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Sample records for human natriuretic peptide

  1. Differential gene expression of the three natriuretic peptides and natriuretic peptide receptor subtypes in human liver.

    PubMed Central

    Vollmar, A M; Paumgartner, G; Gerbes, A L

    1997-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Various effects of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on the liver have been observed. However, there is limited information about the types of receptors for natriuretic peptides expressed by the human liver. AIM: To investigate gene expression of the three NP receptor types (NPR) as well as of the NP in human liver. METHODS: Presence of mRNA coding for all three NPR and for ANP, brain and C-type natriuretic peptide (BNP, CNP) was investigated by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Human liver tissues and hepatocellular carcinoma tissues were examined. RESULTS: Specific PCR products for all three NPR, namely NPR-A, B, and C, could be detected. Moreover, ANP and CNP, but not BNP mRNA was detectable. The concentration of ANP transcripts was up to fivefold higher in hepatocellular carcinoma compared with non-tumorous liver tissue of the same subjects. No difference in the expression of NP receptors relative to GAPDH mRNA of tumorous and non-tumorous tissue was observed except of slightly increased NPR-A transcripts. CONCLUSION: These data show that NPR transcripts are coexpressed with ANP and CNP mRNA in the human liver. This provides evidence for a local NP system in the human liver. Images PMID:9155593

  2. Relationship in humans between atrial natriuretic peptide and arginine vasopressin during dehydration

    SciTech Connect

    Burnett, J.C. Jr.; Wilson, D.M.; Kao, P.C.; Schwab, T.R.; Heublein, D.M.; Heser, D.W.

    1986-03-01

    The present study was designed to define in normal humans (n=6) the relationship between atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and arginine vasopressin (AVP) during thirty-six hours of dehydration. Atrial natriuretic peptide was measured from extracted plasma by radioimmunoassay to alpha-human atrial natriuretic peptide; arginine vasopressin was measured from platelet free plasma by specific radioimmunoassay to AVP. Determinations were obtained of ANP, AVP and plasma osmolality (Posm) prior to and following fluid deprivation for thirty-six hours. The present study demonstrates that dehydration in humans increases plasma osmolality and arginine vasopressin but does not increase atrial natriuretic peptide. These investigations importantly dissociate these two peptide hormonal systems during the physiologic adaptation to fluid deprivation.

  3. Localization of the human B-type natriuretic peptide precursor (NPPB) gene to chromosome 1p36

    SciTech Connect

    Arden, K.C.; Viars, C.S.; Weiss, S.

    1995-03-20

    Cardiac myocytes synthesize and secrete a family of peptide hormones with potent natriuretic, diuretic, and vasodilatory properties. These peptides are derived from precursor molecules that are encoded by two different genes, the atrial natriuretic peptide precursor A (NPPA) and the B-type natriuretic peptide or natriuretic peptide precursor B (NPPB). A human genomic clone for the NPPB gene was used to determine the chromosomal location of the NPPB gene. Analysis of Southern blot hybridization to DNAs from various somatic cell hybrids and fluorescence in situ hybridization allowed assignment of the NPPB locus to human chromosome 1p36. This location coincided with that of the NPPA locus; pulsed-field gel electrophoresis placed NPPA and NPPB within 50 kb of each other. This close chromosomal linkage, together with the conserved primary sequences and structural organization of the two natriuretic peptide precursor genes, suggests that the natriuretic peptide loci may have evolved from a common ancestor gene. 22 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Functional atrial natriuretic peptide receptor in human adrenal tumor

    SciTech Connect

    Shionoiri, H.; Hirawa, N.; Takasaki, I.; Ishikawa, Y.; Oda, H.; Minamisawa, K.; Sugimoto, K.; Matsukawa, T.; Ueda, S.; Miyajima, E.

    1989-01-01

    The effects of synthetic human atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on the release of catecholamines, aldosterone, or cortisol were observed in human adrenal tumors obtained surgically from patients with pheochromocytoma, primary aldosteronism, or Cushing's syndrome, respectively. Each tumor tissue or adjacent normal cortical tissue was sectioned into slices, which were incubated in medium-199 in the presence or absence of adrenocorticotrophin (ACTH) and ANP. The amounts of epinephrine, norepinephrine, aldosterone, or cortisol released into the medium were measured. Existence of ANP receptors on the adrenal tissues was examined by binding assays, affinity labeling, and immunohistochemistry. Release of catecholamines from pheochromocytoma tissues was inhibited by ANP, and the presence of the ANP receptor on pheochromocytoma was further demonstrated by both binding assays and affinity labeling; Scatchard analysis revealed a single class of binding sites for ANP with a Kd of 1.0 nM and a Bmax of 0.4 pmol/mg of protein and the molecular size was estimated as 140 and a 70 kDa under nonreducing and reducing conditions, respectively. The presence of ANP receptors in pheochromocytoma was demonstrated by immunohistochemistry. ANP inhibited both basal and ACTH-stimulated aldosterone secretion in the slices of normal cortex, and localization of ANP receptors in zona glomerulosa cells was also demonstrated. However, ANP did not inhibit basal and ACTH-stimulated aldosterone and cortisol secretion in both tissue slices from aldosteronoma and Cushing's adenoma. Consistent with these observations, the absence of ANP receptors in adenoma tissues was determined by binding assays, affinity labeling, and immunohistochemistry.

  5. Radioimmunoassay and characterization of atrial natriuretic peptide in human plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Yandle, T.G.; Espiner, E.A.; Nicholls, M.G.; Duff, H.

    1986-07-01

    A RIA for alpha-human atrial natriuretic peptide (alpha hANP) in plasma was developed and used to study the immunoreactive components secreted by the heart and circulating in peripheral venous plasma. The assay used (125I)diiodotyrosyl-alpha hANP, purified by high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC), and a C-terminal-specific antiserum purchased from Peninsula Laboratories. Serial dilution curves of coronary sinus plasma samples were parallel with the standard curve, but significant nonparallelism was found in peripheral plasma samples of low immunoreactivity. When plasma was extracted using C-18 Sep-Pak cartridges, serial dilution curves from both coronary sinus and peripheral plasma samples were parallel to the standard curve. Although values for plasma samples assayed before and after extraction agreed closely (r = 0.99; n = 76), immunoreactive ANP in unextracted plasma was consistently greater (70-79 pmol/liter) than in extracts of plasma, suggesting non-specific interference by a component in plasma when assayed without extraction. Mean plasma immunoreactive ANP in 19 normal subjects consuming a normal salt intake was 14 +/- 1 (+/- SE) pmol/liter. In 5 normal men, increasing dietary sodium intake from 10 to 200 mmol sodium/day was associated with a 2-fold increment in ANP levels, and similar changes accompanied acute sodium loading using iv saline. Elevated values were found in patients with congestive heart failure (mean, 58 pmol/liter; range, 0-200; n = 9), chronic renal failure (mean, 118 pmol/liter; range, 30-290; n = 8), and primary aldosteronism (range, 32-90 pmol/liter; n = 3). HPLC and gel chromatographic analysis of the immunoreactive material found in coronary sinus plasma extracts showed that a large amount of the material eluted in the position of alpha hANP.

  6. Human adrenal tumor cell line SW-13 contains a natriuretic peptide receptor system that responds preferentially to ANP among various natriuretic peptides

    SciTech Connect

    Mizuno, T.; Katafuchi, T.; Hagiwara, H.; Ito, T.; Kangawa, K.; Matsuo, H.; Hirose, S. )

    1990-12-31

    A new type of ANP receptor system which clearly distinguishes natriuretic peptides A and B (ANP and BNP) has been identified in the human adrenal tumor cell line SW-13 and characterized. SW-13 cells responded to nanomolar concentrations of ANP with large increases in cGMP levels but in the case of BNP, much higher concentrations were required to produce the same extent of response. This property is unique since the 140-kDa ANP receptors so far characterized do not discriminate between ANP and BNP. For comparison, various natriuretic peptide receptors were also re-characterized using the recently identified CNP.

  7. Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide binds to the natriuretic peptide clearance receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Johns, Douglas G. . E-mail: Douglas.G.Johns@gsk.com; Ao, Zhaohui; Heidrich, Bradley J.; Hunsberger, Gerald E.; Graham, Taylor; Payne, Lisa; Elshourbagy, Nabil; Lu, Quinn; Aiyar, Nambi; Douglas, Stephen A.

    2007-06-22

    Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide (DNP) is a newly-described natriuretic peptide which lowers blood pressure via vasodilation. The natriuretic peptide clearance receptor (NPR-C) removes natriuretic peptides from the circulation, but whether DNP interacts with human NPR-C directly is unknown. The purpose of this study was to test the hypothesis that DNP binds to NPR-C. ANP, BNP, CNP, and the NPR-C ligands AP-811 and cANP(4-23) displaced [{sup 125}I]-ANP from NPR-C with pM-to-nM K {sub i} values. DNP displaced [{sup 125}I]-ANP from NPR-C with nM potency, which represents the first direct demonstration of binding of DNP to human NPR-C. DNP showed high pM affinity for the GC-A receptor and no affinity for GC-B (K {sub i} > 1000 nM). DNP was nearly 10-fold more potent than ANP at stimulating cGMP production in GC-A expressing cells. Blockade of NPR-C might represent a novel therapeutic approach in augmenting the known beneficial actions of DNP in cardiovascular diseases such as hypertension and heart failure.

  8. Pharmacologic Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Reduces Human Leg Capillary Filtration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Vissing, Susanne F.; Lane, Lynda D.; Buckey, Jay C.; Firth, Brian G.; Erdman, William; Hargens, Alan R.; Blomqvist, C. Gunnar

    1995-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is produced and secreted by atrial cells. We measured calf capillary filtration rate with prolonged venous-occlusion plethysmography of supine healthy male subjects during pharmacologic infusion of ANP (48 pmol/kg/min for 15 min; n = 6) and during placebo infusion (n = 7). Results during infusions were compared to prior control measurements. ANP infusion increased plasma (ANP) from 30 +/- 4 to 2,568 +/- 595 pmol/L. Systemic hemoconcentration occurred during ANP infusion: mean hematocrit and plasma colloid osmotic pressure increased 4.6 and 11.3%, respectively, relative to preinfusion baseline values (p less than 0.05). Mean calf filtration, however, was significantly reduced from 0.15 to 0.08 ml/100 ml/min with ANP. Heart rate increased 20% with ANP infusion, whereas blood pressure was unchanged. Calf conductance (blood flow/ arterial pressure) and venous compliance were unaffected by ANP infusion. Placebo infusion had no effect relative to prior baseline control measurements. Although ANP induced systemic capillary filtration, in the calf, filtration was reduced with ANP. Therefore, pharmacologic ANP infusion enhances capillary filtration from the systemic circulation, perhaps at upper body or splanchnic sites or both, while having the opposite effect in the leg.

  9. Pharmacologic Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Reduces Human Leg Capillary Filtration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Vissing, Susanne F.; Lane, Lynda D.; Buckey, Jay C.; Firth, Brian G.; Erdman, William; Hargens, Alan R.; Blomqvist, C. Gunnar

    1995-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is produced and secreted by atrial cells. We measured calf capillary filtration rate with prolonged venous-occlusion plethys-mography of supine health male subjects during pharmacologic infusion of ANP (48 pmol/kg/min for 15 min; n equals 6) and during placebo infusion (n equals 7). Results during infusions were compared to prior control measurements. ANP infusion increased plasma (ANP) from 30 plus or minus 4 to 2,568 plus or minus 595 pmol/L. Systemic hemoconcentration occurred during ANP infusion; mean hematocrit and plasma colloid osmotic pressure increased 4.6 and 11.3 percent respectively, relative to pre-infusion baseline values (p is less than 0.05). Mean calf filtration, however was significantly reduced from 0.15 to 0.08 ml/100 ml/min with ANP. Heart rate increased 20 percent with ANP infusion, wheras blood pressure was unchanged. Calf conductance (blood flow/arterial pressure) and venous compliance were unaffected by ANP infusion. Placebo infusion had no effect relative to prior baseline control measurements. Although ANP induced systemic capillary filtration, in the calf, filtration was reduced with ANP. Therefore, phamacologic ANP infusion enhances capillary filtration from the systemic circulation, perhaps at upper body or splanchic sites or both, while having the opposite effect in the leg.

  10. Pseudomonas aeruginosa Expresses a Functional Human Natriuretic Peptide Receptor Ortholog: Involvement in Biofilm Formation

    PubMed Central

    Rosay, Thibaut; Bazire, Alexis; Diaz, Suraya; Clamens, Thomas; Blier, Anne-Sophie; Mijouin, Lily; Hoffmann, Brice; Sergent, Jacques-Aurélien; Bouffartigues, Emeline; Boireau, Wilfrid; Vieillard, Julien; Hulen, Christian; Dufour, Alain; Harmer, Nicholas J.; Feuilloley, Marc G. J.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Considerable evidence exists that bacteria detect eukaryotic communication molecules and modify their virulence accordingly. In previous studies, it has been demonstrated that the increasingly antibiotic-resistant pathogen Pseudomonas aeruginosa can detect the human hormones brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) at micromolar concentrations. In response, the bacterium modifies its behavior to adapt to the host physiology, increasing its overall virulence. The possibility of identifying the bacterial sensor for these hormones and interfering with this sensing mechanism offers an exciting opportunity to directly affect the infection process. Here, we show that BNP and CNP strongly decrease P. aeruginosa biofilm formation. Isatin, an antagonist of human natriuretic peptide receptors (NPR), prevents this effect. Furthermore, the human NPR-C receptor agonist cANF4-23 mimics the effects of natriuretic peptides on P. aeruginosa, while sANP, the NPR-A receptor agonist, appears to be weakly active. We show in silico that NPR-C, a preferential CNP receptor, and the P. aeruginosa protein AmiC have similar three-dimensional (3D) structures and that both CNP and isatin bind to AmiC. We demonstrate that CNP acts as an AmiC agonist, enhancing the expression of the ami operon in P. aeruginosa. Binding of CNP and NPR-C agonists to AmiC was confirmed by microscale thermophoresis. Finally, using an amiC mutant strain, we demonstrated that AmiC is essential for CNP effects on biofilm formation. In conclusion, the AmiC bacterial sensor possesses structural and pharmacological profiles similar to those of the human NPR-C receptor and appears to be a bacterial receptor for human hormones that enables P. aeruginosa to modulate biofilm expression. PMID:26307165

  11. Localization of corin and atrial natriuretic peptide expression in human renal segments.

    PubMed

    Dong, Liang; Wang, Hao; Dong, Ningzheng; Zhang, Ce; Xue, Boxin; Wu, Qingyu

    2016-09-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP)-mediated natriuretic response is a well-established cardiac endocrine function. Corin is a transmembrane protease that activates ANP in the heart. Corin expression has been detected in non-cardiac tissues including the kidney. Here we examined corin, pro-ANP/ANP and natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A) expression in human renal segments. By immunostaining and in situ hybridization, we found similar corin, pro-ANP/ANP and NPR-A protein and mRNA expression in human renal segments. The expression was most abundant in the proximal convoluted tubules and the medullary connecting ducts. In the proximal tubules, corin protein was present in the apical membrane region underneath the brush border where the ANP-degrading protease neprilysin was abundant. These results suggest that corin-mediated pro-ANP activation may occur in renal segments and that locally produced ANP may act in an autocrine manner to regulate sodium and water reabsorption in situ Our results also point to the proximal convoluted tubules as a major site for local ANP action. Such a renal corin/ANP autocrine mechanism may differ from the cardiac corin/ANP endocrine mechanism in regulating sodium homoeostasis under physiological and pathological conditions. PMID:27343265

  12. Highly sensitive radioimmunoassay of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) in human plasma and urine

    SciTech Connect

    Marumo, F.; Sakamoto, H.; Ando, K.; Ishigami, T.; Kawakami, M.

    1986-05-29

    A highly sensitive radioimmunoassay has been established for measurement of human plasma and urine concentrations of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and requires no extraction or concentration process. An antiserum was prepared from rabbits immunized with ..cap alpha..-human ANP (..cap alpha..-hANP) coupled with bovine-thyroglobulin. The sensitivity of this method was 0.2 pg/tube of synthetic ..cap alpha..-hANP utilized as authentic standard. Recovery of ..cap alpha..-hANP spiked to plasma and urine was 97.7 +/- 15.4% and 97.1 +/- 9.5% (mean +/- SD), respectively. Plasma and urinary ANP concentrations versus assay data showed satisfactory linearity. In 124 health subjects, the plasma ANP concentration was 31.7 +/- 12.0 pg/ml. Two different molecular forms of ANP in plasma and a single form in urine were found by gel permeation chromatography.

  13. Evidence for a novel natriuretic peptide receptor that prefers brain natriuretic peptide over atrial natriuretic peptide.

    PubMed Central

    Goy, M F; Oliver, P M; Purdy, K E; Knowles, J W; Fox, J E; Mohler, P J; Qian, X; Smithies, O; Maeda, N

    2001-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) exert their physiological actions by binding to natriuretic peptide receptor A (NPRA), a receptor guanylate cyclase (rGC) that synthesizes cGMP in response to both ligands. The family of rGCs is rapidly expanding, and it is plausible that there might be additional, as yet undiscovered, rGCs whose function is to provide alternative signalling pathways for one or both of these peptides, particularly given the low affinity of NPRA for BNP. We have investigated this hypothesis, using a genetically modified (knockout) mouse in which the gene encoding NPRA has been disrupted. Enzyme assays and NPRA-specific Western blots performed on tissues from wild-type mice demonstrate that ANP-activated cGMP synthesis provides a good index of NPRA protein expression, which ranges from maximal in adrenal gland, lung, kidney, and testis to minimal in heart and colon. In contrast, immunoreactive NPRA is not detectable in tissues isolated from NPRA knockout animals and ANP- and BNP-stimulatable GC activities are markedly reduced in all mutant tissues. However, testis and adrenal gland retain statistically significant, high-affinity responses to BNP. This residual response to BNP cannot be accounted for by natriuretic peptide receptor B, or any other known mammalian rGC, suggesting the presence of a novel receptor in these tissues that prefers BNP over ANP. PMID:11513736

  14. Atrial natriuretic peptide regulates lipid mobilization and oxygen consumption in human adipocytes by activating AMPK

    SciTech Connect

    Souza, Sandra C.; Chau, Mary D.L.; Yang, Qing; Gauthier, Marie-Soleil; Clairmont, Kevin B.; Wu, Zhidan; Gromada, Jesper; Dole, William P.

    2011-07-08

    Highlights: {yields} Treatment of differentiated human adipocytes with atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) increased lipolysis and oxygen consumption by activating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). {yields} ANP stimulated lipid mobilization by selective activation of the alpha2 subunit of AMPK and increased energy utilization through activation of both the alpha1 and alpha2 subunits of AMPK. {yields} ANP enhanced adipocyte mitochondrial oxidative capacity as evidenced by induction of oxidative mitochondrial genes and increase in oxygen consumption. {yields} Exposure of human adipocytes to fatty acids and (TNF{alpha}) induced insulin resistance and decreased expression of mitochondrial genes which was restored to normal by ANP. -- Abstract: Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) has been shown to regulate lipid and carbohydrate metabolism providing a possible link between cardiovascular function and metabolism by mediating the switch from carbohydrate to lipid mobilization and oxidation. ANP exerts a potent lipolytic effect via cGMP-dependent protein kinase (cGK)-I mediated-stimulation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Activation of the ANP/cGK signaling cascade also promotes muscle mitochondrial biogenesis and fat oxidation. Here we demonstrate that ANP regulates lipid metabolism and oxygen utilization in differentiated human adipocytes by activating the alpha2 subunit of AMPK. ANP treatment increased lipolysis by seven fold and oxygen consumption by two fold, both of which were attenuated by inhibition of AMPK activity. ANP-induced lipolysis was shown to be mediated by the alpha2 subunit of AMPK as introduction of dominant-negative alpha2 subunit of AMPK attenuated ANP effects on lipolysis. ANP-induced activation of AMPK enhanced mitochondrial oxidative capacity as evidenced by a two fold increase in oxygen consumption and induction of mitochondrial genes, including carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1A (CPT1a) by 1.4-fold, cytochrome C (CytC) by 1.3-fold, and

  15. Inhibition of goby posterior intestinal NaCl absorption by natriuretic peptides and by cardiac extracts.

    PubMed

    Loretz, C A

    1996-01-01

    Natriuretic peptides abolish active Na+ and Cl- absorption across the posterior intestine of the euryhaline goby Gillichthys mirabilis. Inhibition by eel and human natriuretic peptides is dose-dependent with the following sequence of potencies based on experimentally determined ID50 values for inhibition of short-circuit current: eel ventricular natriuretic peptide (78 nmol.l-1), eel atrial natriuretic peptide (156 nmol.l-1), human brain natriuretic peptide (326 nmol.l-1), human alpha atrial natriuretic peptide (1.05 mumol.l-1), and eel C-type natriuretic peptide (75 mumol.l-1). Natriuretic peptides also significantly increase transcellular conductance. The observed sequence of natriuretic peptide potencies is suggestive of cellular mediation by GC-A-type NP-R1 receptors in this tissue; as expected for guanylyl-cyclase-coupled NP-R1 receptors, cyclic GMP mimics the action of natriuretic peptides on the goby intestine. Crude aqueous extracts of goby atrium and ventricle inhibited short circuit current and increased tissue conductance in a dose-dependent manner. Ventricular extract was more potent than atrial extract on both a per organ and per milligram basis.

  16. Atrial natriuretic peptide, B-type natriuretic peptide, and serum collagen markers after acute myocardial infarction.

    PubMed

    Magga, Jarkko; Puhakka, Mikko; Hietakorpi, Seppo; Punnonen, Kari; Uusimaa, Paavo; Risteli, Juha; Vuolteenaho, Olli; Ruskoaho, Heikki; Peuhkurinen, Keijo

    2004-04-01

    Experimental data suggest that atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) act locally as antifibrotic factors in heart. We investigated the interrelationships of natriuretic peptides and collagen markers in 93 patients receiving thrombolytic treatment for their first acute myocardial infarction (AMI). Collagen formation following AMI, evaluated as serum levels of amino terminal propeptide of type III procollagen, correlated with NH(2)-terminal proANP (r = 0.45, P < 0.001), BNP (r = 0.55, P < 0.001) and NH(2)-terminal proBNP (r = 0.50, P < 0.01) on day 4 after thrombolysis. Levels of intact amino terminal propeptide of type I procollagen decreased by 34% (P < 0.001), and levels of carboxy terminal cross-linked telopeptide of type I collagen (ICTP) increased by 65% (P < 0.001). ICTP levels correlated with NH(2)-terminal proBNP (r = 0.25, P < 0.05) and BNP (r = 0.28, P < 0.05) on day 4. Our results suggest that ANP and BNP may act as regulators of collagen scar formation and left ventricular remodeling after AMI in humans. Furthermore, degradation of type I collagen is increased after AMI and may be regulated by BNP. PMID:14607848

  17. Receptors for atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and regulation of thyroglobulin secretion by ANP in human thyroid cells

    SciTech Connect

    Sellitti, D.F.; Tseng, Y.C.L.; Wartofsky, L. Walter Reed Army Medical Center, Washington, DC )

    1989-01-01

    Specific binding sites for atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) were identified and characterized in primary cultures of human thyroid cells. Saturation analysis using ({sup 125}I) {alpha} rat (1-28) ANP as the ligand showed a single class of high affinity binding which was inhibited by atriopeptin I and the {alpha} -human form of ANP, but not by a C-terminal fragment (13-28) of the peptide. The number of ANP binding sites in these cultures was not altered by the thyroid hormone concentration of the medium. In a dose-response experiment, thyroglobulin secretion was significantly reduced in the presence of 0.01 nM ANP and was maximally reduced with 10 nM ANP. Cyclic GMP production was increased threefold in the presence of 100 nM ANP, but was unchanged with lower doses of the peptides. The finding of receptors in thyroid follicular cells suggests a hitherto unrecognized role of ANP in the thyroid gland.

  18. NPR-B natriuretic peptide receptors in human corneal epithelium: mRNA, immunohistochemistochemical, protein, and biochemical pharmacology studies

    PubMed Central

    Katoli, Parvaneh; Sule, Anupam; Dimitrijevich, Slobodan D.

    2010-01-01

    Purpose To demonstrate the presence of natriuretic peptide receptors (NPRs) in primary human corneal epithelial cells (p-CEPI), SV40-immortalized CEPI cells (CEPI-17-CL4) and in human corneal epithelium, and to define the pharmacology of natriuretic peptide (NP)-induced cGMP accumulation. Methods NPR presence was shown by RT–PCR, western blot analysis, and indirect immunofluoresence. cGMP accumulation was determined using an enzyme immunoassay. Results p-CEPI and CEPI-17-CL4 cells expressed mRNAs for NPR-A and NPR-B. Proteins for both NPRs were present in these cells and in human corneal epithelium. C-type NP (CNP), atrial NP (ANP) and brain NP (BNP) stimulated the accumulation of cGMP in a concentration-dependent manner in p-CEPI cells (potency; EC50s): CNP (1–53 amino acids) EC50=24±5 nM; CNP fragment (32–53 amino acids) EC50=51±8 nM; ANP (1–28 amino acids) EC50=>10 µM; BNP (32 amino acids) EC50>10 µM (all n=3–4). While the NPs were generally more potent in the CEPI-17-CL4 cells than in p-CEPI cells (n=4–9; p<0.01), the rank order of potency of the peptides was essentially the same in both cell types. Effects of CNP fragment in p-CEPI and CEPI-17-CL4 cells were potently blocked by HS-142–1, an NPR-B receptor subtype-selective antagonist (Ki=0.25±0.05 µM in CEPI-CL4–17; Ki=0.44±0.09 µM in p-CEPIs; n=6–7) but less so by an NPR-A receptor antagonist, isatin (Ki=5.3–7.8 µM, n=3–7). Conclusions Our studies showed the presence of NPR-A and NPR-B (mRNAs and protein) in p-CEPI and CEPI-17-CL4 cells and in human corneal epithelial tissue. However, detailed pharmacological studies revealed NPR-B to be the predominant functionally active receptor in both cell-types whose activation leads to the generation of cGMP. While the physiologic role(s) of the NP system in corneal function remains to be delineated, our multidisciplinary findings pave the way for such future investigations. PMID:20664698

  19. Utility of point-of-care testing of natriuretic peptides (brain natriuretic peptide and n-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide) in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Nayer, Jamshed; Aggarwal, Praveen; Galwankar, Sagar

    2014-07-01

    Rapid and accurate diagnosis of a patient with an acute disease is a challenge for emergency physicians. Natriuretic peptides have emerged as important tools for diagnosis, risk stratification and therapeutic decision making for some categories of emergency patients. Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a member of a four natriuretic peptides family that shares a common 17-peptide ring structure. Atrial natriuretic peptide, C-natriuretic peptide (CNP), and D-type natriuretic peptide are the other natriuretic peptide, which share the same common 17-peptide ring structure. The N-terminal fragment of pro-BNP, N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) consists of 76 amino acids, which is biologically inert, while the active component BNP contains 32 amino acids. BNP and NT-proBNP are secreted in the plasma in equimolar quantities and are frequently used in the diagnosis of congestive heart failure, and distinguishing between patients with dyspnea of cardiac or pulmonary origin. Both natriuretic peptides have also been evaluated for use in the assessment and management of several other conditions including sepsis, cirrhosis of liver and renal failure. However, one should remember that the values of natriuretic peptides are affected by age and weight of the patients, and presence of several comorbidities such as chronic renal failure, type 2 diabetes mellitus, anemia, pulmonary embolism, and acute coronary syndrome. Values of these peptides also vary depending on the type of test used. The performance characteristics of these natriuretic peptides vary depending on the patients on whom they are used. Therefore determination of reference values for these peptides represents a challenge.

  20. An analogue of atrial natriuretic peptide (C-ANP4-23) modulates glucose metabolism in human differentiated adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Ojeda, Francisco Javier; Aguilera, Concepción María; Rupérez, Azahara Iris; Gil, Ángel; Gomez-Llorente, Carolina

    2016-08-15

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the effects of C-atrial natriuretic peptide (C-ANP4-23) in human adipose-derived stem cells differentiated into adipocytes over 10 days (1 μM for 4 h). The intracellular cAMP, cGMP and protein kinase A levels were determined by ELISA and gene and protein expression were determined by qRT-PCR and Western blot, respectively, in the presence or absence of C-ANP4-23. The levels of lipolysis and glucose uptake were also determined. C-ANP4-23 treatment significantly increased the intracellular cAMP levels and the gene expression of glucose transporter type 4 (GLUT4) and protein kinase, AMP-activated, alpha 1 catalytic subunit (AMPK). Western blot showed a significant increase in GLUT4 and phosphor-AMPKα levels. Importantly, the adenylate cyclase inhibitor SQ22536 abolished these effects. Additionally, C-ANP4-23 increased glucose uptake by 2-fold. Our results show that C-ANP4-23 enhances glucose metabolism and might contribute to the development of new peptide-based therapies for metabolic diseases. PMID:27181211

  1. Food intake and body positional change alter the circadian rhythm of atrial natriuretic peptides excretion into human urine.

    PubMed

    Vesely, D L; Giordano, A T

    1991-01-01

    The 98 amino acid (a.a.) N-terminus of the 126 a.a. atrial natriuretic factor prohormone contains two natriuretic and vasodilatory peptides consisting of a.a. 1-30 (proANF 1-30) and a.a. 31-67 (proANF 31-67). The N-terminus and C-terminus (a.a. 99-126, i.e., ANF--also a vasodilatory peptide) circulate normally in humans with a circadian peak at 04:00 h in plasma. To determine if the N-terminus and C-terminus of the ANF prohormone are present in urine and possibly have a circadian variation in urine, six healthy volunteers had urine samples hourly while awake and every 3 h during sleep for five consecutive days obtained for radioimmunoassay. The sleep-awake pattern was varied so that after 2 days of normal sleep (supine)-awake (upright) positions, these volunteers were supine from 15:00 h on the third day until 10:00 h of the fourth day. They were then upright until 19:00 h that day when they became supine again until 02:30 h, and then were upright until 10:00 h of day 5. Three radioimmunoassays that immunologically recognize (a) the whole N-terminus (i.e., amino acids 1-98), (b) the midportion of the N-terminus (amino acids 31-67), and (c) the C-terminus of the ANF prohormone were utilized. ProANF 1-98, proANF 31-67, and the ANF radioimmunoassays each detected their respective peptides in urine. A circadian peak for each of these peptides was detected at 04:00 to 05:00 h whether the person was supine or upright during the night, which were significantly (p less than 0.001) higher than their concentrations in the afternoon of the previous days. Assuming a supine position during the day caused a significant (p less than 0.01) two- to threefold increase in these peptides in the urine. Food intake also increased the concentrations of proANF 1-98, proANF 31-67, and ANF in urine (p less than 0.001). Fluid intake when abstaining from food throughout the day lowered the concentration of these peptides in the urine. It was concluded that there is a circadian rhythm in both

  2. Cardiac natriuretic peptides act via p38 MAPK to induce the brown fat thermogenic program in mouse and human adipocytes

    PubMed Central

    Bordicchia, Marica; Liu, Dianxin; Amri, Ez-Zoubir; Ailhaud, Gerard; Dessì-Fulgheri, Paolo; Zhang, Chaoying; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Sarzani, Riccardo; Collins, Sheila

    2012-01-01

    The ability of mammals to resist body fat accumulation is linked to their ability to expand the number and activity of “brown adipocytes” within white fat depots. Activation of β-adrenergic receptors (β-ARs) can induce a functional “brown-like” adipocyte phenotype. As cardiac natriuretic peptides (NPs) and β-AR agonists are similarly potent at stimulating lipolysis in human adipocytes, we investigated whether NPs could induce human and mouse adipocytes to acquire brown adipocyte features, including a capacity for thermogenic energy expenditure mediated by uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1). In human adipocytes, atrial NP (ANP) and ventricular NP (BNP) activated PPARγ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α) and UCP1 expression, induced mitochondriogenesis, and increased uncoupled and total respiration. At low concentrations, ANP and β-AR agonists additively enhanced expression of brown fat and mitochondrial markers in a p38 MAPK–dependent manner. Mice exposed to cold temperatures had increased levels of circulating NPs as well as higher expression of NP signaling receptor and lower expression of the NP clearance receptor (Nprc) in brown adipose tissue (BAT) and white adipose tissue (WAT). NPR-C–/– mice had markedly smaller WAT and BAT depots but higher expression of thermogenic genes such as Ucp1. Infusion of BNP into mice robustly increased Ucp1 and Pgc-1α expression in WAT and BAT, with corresponding elevation of respiration and energy expenditure. These results suggest that NPs promote “browning” of white adipocytes to increase energy expenditure, defining the heart as a central regulator of adipose tissue biology. PMID:22307324

  3. Hypergravity differentially modulates cGMP efflux in human melanocytic cells stimulated by nitric oxide and natriuretic peptides

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ivanova, K.; Stieber, C.; Lambers, B.; Block, I.; Krieg, R.; Wellmann, A.; Gerzer, R.

    Nitric oxide NO plays a key role in many patho physiologic processes including inflammation and skin cancer The diverse cellular effects of NO are mainly mediated by activation of the soluble guanylyl cyclase sGC isoform that leads to increases in intracellular cGMP levels whereas the membrane-bound isoforms serve as receptors for natriuretic peptides e g ANP In human skin epidermal melanocytes represent the principal cells for skin pigmentation by synthesizing the pigment melanin Melanin acts as a scavenger for free radicals that may arise during metabolic stress as a result of potentially harmful effects of the environment In previous studies we found that long-term exposure to hypergravity stimulated cGMP efflux in normal human melanocytes NHMs and non-metastatic melanoma cells at least partly by an enhanced expression of the multidrug resistance proteins MRP and cGMP transporters MRP4 5 The present study investigated whether hypergravity generated by centrifugal acceleration may modulate the cGMP efflux in NO-stimulated NHMs and melanoma cells MCs with different metastatic potential The NONOates PAPA-NO and DETA-NO were used as direct NO donors for cell stimulation In the presence of 0 1 mM DETA-NO t 1 2 sim 20 h long-term application of hypergravity up to 5 g for 24 h reduced intracellular cGMP levels by stimulating cGMP efflux in NHMs and non-metastatic MCs in comparison to 1 g whereas exposure to 5 g for 6 h in the presence of 0 1 mM PAPA-NO t 1 2 sim 30 min was not effective The hypergravity-stimulated

  4. Protective effect of lyophilized recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide on renal ischemia/reperfusion injury in mice.

    PubMed

    Cao, X; Xia, H Y; Zhang, T; Qi, L C; Zhang, B Y; Cui, R; Chen, X; Zhao, Y R; Li, X Q

    2015-10-27

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) has a protective effect on acute injury of the heart, brain, and lung. However, its role in acute kidney injury (AKI) remains unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate the effect of lyophilized recombinant human BNP (lrh-BNP) on AKI and the underlying molecular mechanisms. An experimental model for AKI was established using an ischemia/reperfusion (I/R) procedure. Healthy adult BALB/c mice were randomized to the sham, I/R, and lrh-BNP-treated post-I/R (BNP + I/R) groups. Post-operatively, the BNP + I/R group was subcutaneously injected with lrh-BNP (0.03 μg·kg(-1)·min(-1)), whereas the other groups received saline at the same dose. Serum creatinine (Scr) and blood urea nitrogen levels were examined; tissue staining was performed to evaluate the degree of I/R injury (IRI). Ki67 positive staining of renal tubular epithelial cells was observed using immunofluorescence confocal laser scanning to assess the effect of BNP on cell proliferation after IRI. Inflammatory factor expression levels were detected to evaluate the effect of BNP on renal inflammation. Compared with the sham group, the I/R group showed increased Scr levels, severe tubular injury of the renal outer medulla, increased Kim-1 mRNA expression, an increased number of infiltrative macrophages in the renal interstitium, and increased TNF-α, IL- 1β, IL-6, MCP-1, and HIF-1α mRNA expression. BNP delivery significantly reduced all pathological changes in the I/R group. The protective role of BNP in murine renal IRI may be associated with its inhibition of renal interstitial inflammation and hypoxia and its promotion of renal tubule repair.

  5. Atrial natriuretic peptide frameshift mutation in familial atrial fibrillation.

    PubMed

    Hodgson-Zingman, Denice M; Karst, Margaret L; Zingman, Leonid V; Heublein, Denise M; Darbar, Dawood; Herron, Kathleen J; Ballew, Jeffrey D; de Andrade, Mariza; Burnett, John C; Olson, Timothy M

    2008-07-10

    Atrial fibrillation is a common arrhythmia that is hereditary in a small subgroup of patients. In a family with 11 clinically affected members, we mapped an atrial fibrillation locus to chromosome 1p36-p35 and identified a heterozygous frameshift mutation in the gene encoding atrial natriuretic peptide. Circulating chimeric atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) was detected in high concentration in subjects with the mutation, and shortened atrial action potentials were seen in an isolated heart model, creating a possible substrate for atrial fibrillation. This report implicates perturbation of the atrial natriuretic peptide-cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) pathway in cardiac electrical instability. PMID:18614783

  6. Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Inhibits Spontaneous Contractile Activity of Lymph Nodes.

    PubMed

    Lobov, G I; Pan'kova, M N

    2016-06-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide dose-dependently inhibited spontaneous phase and tonic activity of smooth muscle strips from the capsule of isolated bovine mesenteric lymph nodes. Pretreatment with L-NAME, diclofenac, and methylene blue had practically no effect on the peptide-induced relaxation responses. In contrast, glibenclamide significantly reduced the inhibitory effect of atrial natriuretic peptide. We suppose that the NO-dependent and cyclooxygenase signaling pathways are not involved in implementation of the inhibitory effects of atrial natriuretic peptide. ATP-sensitive K(+)-channels of the smooth muscle cell membrane are the last component in the signaling pathway leading to relaxation of smooth muscles of the lymph node capsule caused by atrial natriuretic peptide; activation of these channels leads to membrane hyperpolarization and smooth muscle relaxation. PMID:27383173

  7. Clinical utility of natriuretic peptides and troponins in hypertrophic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Kehl, Devin W; Buttan, Anshu; Siegel, Robert J; Rader, Florian

    2016-09-01

    The diagnosis of hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (HCM) is based on clinical, echocardiographic and in some cases genetic findings. However, prognostication remains limited except in the subset of patients with high-risk indicators for sudden cardiac death. Additional methods are needed for risk stratification and to guide clinical management in HCM. We reviewed the available data regarding natriuretic peptides and troponins in HCM. Plasma levels of natriuretic peptides, and to a lesser extent serum levels of troponins, correlate with established disease markers, including left ventricular thickness, symptom status, and left ventricular hemodynamics by Doppler measurements. As a reflection of left ventricular filling pressure, natriuretic peptides may provide an objective measure of the efficacy of a specific therapy. Both natriuretic peptides and troponins predict clinical risk in HCM independently of established risk factors, and their prognostic power is additive. Routine measurement of biomarker levels therefore may be useful in the clinical evaluation and management of patients with HCM.

  8. Atrial natriuretic peptide: water and electrolyte homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Kenyon, C J; Jardine, A G

    1989-08-01

    In the few years since its identification, a clear role for ANP in the regulation of water and electrolyte balance has emerged (Figure 3). The peptide is released in response to blood volume expansion, both acutely and gradually during changes in dietary sodium intake. Similarly, plasma levels are elevated in pathophysiological conditions such as cardiac and renal failure. It has become apparent that ANP has natriuretic, diuretic and vasorelaxant properties. Many of the original studies employed what we now know to be pharmacological doses of the peptide. However, recent reports have confirmed that small, sustained elevations in plasma ANP within or marginally above the 'normal' physiological range produce similar effects. A number of recent studies have tried to specifically address the physiological relevance of ANP. Although undoubtedly release by atrial distension and effective when infused to similar concentrations, atrial distension also has other effects via neural pathways. Thus, the demonstration that excretion of saline is impaired by atrial appendectomy (Benjamin et al, 1988) does not imply that this is only due to the absence of an atrial hormone. Goetz et al (1986) demonstrated that in the denervated heart, although ANP is still released, the excretion of a saline load is impaired. Similarly, in man, Richards et al (1988a) needed to infuse ANP to much higher plasma levels than those achieved by a saline load in order to reproduce the natriuresis. Although these experiments can be criticized, they confirm that ANP is not the sole mechanism for excreting a volume load, or for the natriuresis following atrial distension, but that these effects are likely to reflect the balance between ANP, AVP, the renin-angiotensin and autonomic nervous systems. In rats immunized against ANP (Greenwald et al, 1988), although the ability to excrete an acute saline load was impaired, long-term sodium balance was normal, suggesting that the rats were able to compensate for

  9. Atrial Natriuretic Peptide in Cardiovascular Biology and Disease (NPPA)

    PubMed Central

    Song, Wei; Wang, Hao; Wu, Qingyu

    2015-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is a cardiac hormone that regulates salt-water balance and blood pressure by promoting renal sodium and water excretion and stimulating vasodilation. ANP also has an anti-hypertrophic function in the heart, which is independent of its systemic blood pressure-lowering effect. In mice, ANP deficiency causes salt-sensitive hypertension and cardiac hypertrophy. Recent studies have shown that ANP plays an important role in regulating vascular remodeling and energy metabolism. Variants in the human NPPA gene, encoding the ANP precursor, are associated with hypertension, stroke, coronary artery disease, heart failure (HF) and obesity. ANP and related peptides are used as biomarkers for heart disease. Recombinant proteins and small molecules that enhance the ANP pathway have been developed to treat patients with HF. In this review, we discuss the role of ANP in cardiovascular biology and disease. PMID:26074089

  10. Biochemistry and physiology of the natriuretic peptide receptor guanylyl cyclases.

    PubMed

    Tremblay, Johanne; Desjardins, Richard; Hum, David; Gutkowska, Jolanta; Hamet, Pavel

    2002-01-01

    Guanylyl cyclases (GC) exist as soluble and particulate, membrane-associated enzymes which catalyse the conversion of GTP to cGMP, an intracellular signalling molecule. Several membrane forms of the enzyme have been identified up to now. Some of them serve as receptors for the natriuretic peptides, a family of peptides which includes atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), three peptides known to play important roles in renal and cardiovascular physiology. These are transmembrane proteins composed of a single transmembrane domain, a variable extracellular natriuretic peptide-binding domain, and a more conserved intracellular kinase homology domain (KHD) and catalytic domain. GC-A, the receptor for ANP and BNP, also named natriuretic peptide receptor-A or -1 (NPR-A or NPR- 1), has been studied widely. Its mode of activation by peptide ligands and mechanisms of regulation serve as prototypes for understanding the function of other particulate GC. Activation of this enzyme by its ligand is a complex process requiring oligomerization, ligand binding, KHD phosphorylation and ATP binding. Gene knockout and genetic segregation studies have provided strong evidence for the importance of GC-A in the regulation of blood pressure and heart and renal functions. GC-B is the main receptor for CNP, the latter having a more paracrine role at the vascular and venous levels. The structure and regulation of GC-B is similar to that of GC-A. This chapter reviews the structure and roles of GC-A and GC-B in blood pressure regulation and cardiac and renal pathophysiology. PMID:11952095

  11. Expression and differential regulation of natriuretic peptides in mouse macrophages.

    PubMed Central

    Vollmar, A M; Schulz, R

    1995-01-01

    The coexpression of the natriuretic peptides ANP, BNP and CNP as well as their differential regulation in mouse macrophages was demonstrated by quantitative PCR, HPLC analysis, and specific radioimmunoassays. Exposure of peritoneal- and bone marrow-derived macrophages to various immunomodulators revealed that bacterial LPS strikingly increases (up to 300-fold) the mRNA coding for CNP as does zymosan (up to 15-fold). In this respect, neither the phorbol ester PMA nor the glucocorticoid dexamethasone had any effect. Examination of macrophages for ANP mRNA showed a similar response to LPS and zymosan, though only a three- to sixfold increase, confirming previous data. In contrast, the concentration of mRNA coding for brain natriuretic peptide in these cells was reduced by dexamethasone (up to twofold) as well as LPS (two- to fivefold). No change was observed upon challenge with zymosan or PMA. The findings at the mRNA level are complemented by their corresponding peptide products. Incubation of macrophages with LPS resulted in a two- and fivefold elevation of intracellular ANP and CNP immunoreactivity, respectively. The amount of peptides released from cells under these conditions was found increased for ANP (threefold) and CNP (10-fold). No changes were observed for both intra- and extracellular brain natriuretic peptide. The coexpression of natriuretic peptides in macrophages as well as their different regulations by immunomodulators suggest discrete functions of these peptides within the immune system. Images PMID:7769089

  12. Brain natriuretic peptide: Much more than a biomarker.

    PubMed

    Calzetta, Luigino; Orlandi, Augusto; Page, Clive; Rogliani, Paola; Rinaldi, Barbara; Rosano, Giuseppe; Cazzola, Mario; Matera, Maria Gabriella

    2016-10-15

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) modulates several biological processes by activating the natriuretic peptide receptor A (NPR-A). Atria and ventricles secrete BNP. BNP increases natriuresis, diuresis and vasodilatation, thus resulting in a decreased cardiac workload. BNP and NT-proBNP, which is the biologically inactive N-terminal portion of its pro-hormone, are fast and sensitive biomarkers for diagnosing heart failure. The plasma concentrations of both BNP and NT-proBNP also correlate with left ventricular function in patients with acute exacerbation of COPD, even without history of heart failure. Several studies have been conducted in vitro and in vivo, both in animals and in humans, in order to assess the potential role of the NPR-A activation as a novel therapeutic approach for treating obstructive pulmonary disorders. Unfortunately, these studies have yielded conflicting results. Nevertheless, further recent specific studies, performed in ex vivo models of asthma and COPD, have confirmed the bronchorelaxant effect of BNP and its protective role against bronchial hyperresponsiveness in human airways. These studies have also clarified the intimate mechanism of action of BNP, represented by an autocrine loop elicited by the activation of NPR-A, localized on bronchial epithelium, and the relaxant response of the surrounding ASM, which does not expresses NPR-A. This review explores the teleological activities and paradoxical effects of BNP with regard to chronic obstructive respiratory disorders, and provides an excursus on the main scientific findings that explain why BNP should be considered much more than a biomarker. PMID:27447810

  13. [Diagnostic Ability of Natriuretic Peptides for Heart Failure According to eGFR Level: Comparison between Brain Natriuretic Peptide and Amino-Terminal Probrain Natriuretic Peptide].

    PubMed

    Arakawa, Kimika; Ando, Yukichi; Matsunaga, Sachiko; Nishiura, Akihiko

    2016-03-01

    Although the influence of reduced kidney function on natriuretic peptides (B-type natriuretic peptide [BNP] and amino terminal probrain natriuretic peptide [NT]) is clear, effect of kidney function on the difference of diagnostic ability for heart failure by these peptides is not obvious. The aim of this study was to examine the relationship between natriuretic peptide concentrations and echocardiographic findings according to eGFR level of the patients. In addition, we compared diagnostic ability of BNP with that of NT according to eGFR level. The eGFR levels were classified by based on CKD stage (≥ 60, 45-59, 30-44, 15-29, < 15 and on maintenance HD). Patients who underwent the measurements of BNP, NT and serum creatinine concentrations, as well as echocardiography between March and October in 2011 were enrolled (n = 1,297). The left ventricular mass index was greater in patients with eGFR < 60 than in those with eGFR ≥ 60, but EF (%) was not different among eGFR level (except eGFR30-44). The percentage of patients with heart failure in those with eGFR < 60 (16.0%) was more than eGFR ≥ 60 (5.8%). Median BNP and NT concentrations were elevated in association with decreasing eGFR level. Using receiver-operator characteristic (ROC) analysis, the area under the ROC curve for BNP and NT that stratified subjects with or without heart failure was not different among eGFR level. In conclusion, BNP and NT levels are elevated depend on decreasing eGFR level, BNP and NT are comparable in the accuracy for diagnosing heart failure at every eGFR level. The cut-off value of BNP and NT should be established according to the eGFR level. PMID:27363216

  14. 21 CFR 862.1117 - B-type natriuretic peptide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false B-type natriuretic peptide test system. 862.1117 Section 862.1117 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  15. 21 CFR 862.1117 - B-type natriuretic peptide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false B-type natriuretic peptide test system. 862.1117 Section 862.1117 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  16. 21 CFR 862.1117 - B-type natriuretic peptide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false B-type natriuretic peptide test system. 862.1117 Section 862.1117 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  17. 21 CFR 862.1117 - B-type natriuretic peptide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false B-type natriuretic peptide test system. 862.1117 Section 862.1117 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  18. 21 CFR 862.1117 - B-type natriuretic peptide test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false B-type natriuretic peptide test system. 862.1117 Section 862.1117 Food and Drugs FOOD AND DRUG ADMINISTRATION, DEPARTMENT OF HEALTH AND HUMAN SERVICES (CONTINUED) MEDICAL DEVICES CLINICAL CHEMISTRY AND CLINICAL TOXICOLOGY DEVICES Clinical Chemistry...

  19. B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Deletion Leads to Progressive Hypertension, Associated Organ Damage, and Reduced Survival: Novel Model for Human Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Holditch, Sara J; Schreiber, Claire A; Nini, Ryan; Tonne, Jason M; Peng, Kah-Whye; Geurts, Aron; Jacob, Howard J; Burnett, John C; Cataliotti, Alessandro; Ikeda, Yasuhiro

    2015-07-01

    Altered myocardial structure and function, secondary to chronically elevated blood pressure, are leading causes of heart failure and death. B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), a guanylyl cyclase A agonist, is a cardiac hormone integral to cardiovascular regulation. Studies have demonstrated a causal relationship between reduced production or impaired BNP release and the development of human hypertension. However, the consequences of BNP insufficiency on blood pressure and hypertension-associated complications remain poorly understood. Therefore, the goal of this study was to create and characterize a novel model of BNP deficiency to investigate the effects of BNP absence on cardiac and renal structure, function, and survival. Genetic BNP deletion was generated in Dahl salt-sensitive rats. Compared with age-matched controls, BNP knockout rats demonstrated adult-onset hypertension. Increased left ventricular mass with hypertrophy and substantially augmented hypertrophy signaling pathway genes, developed in young adult knockout rats, which preceded hypertension. Prolonged hypertension led to increased cardiac stiffness, cardiac fibrosis, and thrombi formation. Significant elongation of the QT interval was detected at 9 months in knockout rats. Progressive nephropathy was also noted with proteinuria, fibrosis, and glomerular alterations in BNP knockout rats. End-organ damage contributed to a significant decline in overall survival. Systemic BNP overexpression reversed the phenotype of genetic BNP deletion. Our results demonstrate the critical role of BNP defect in the development of systemic hypertension and associated end-organ damage in adulthood.

  20. [Natriuretic peptides. History of discovery, chemical structure, mechanism of action and the removal routes. Basis of diagnostic and therapeutic use].

    PubMed

    Stryjewski, Piotr J; Nessler, Bohdan; Cubera, Katarzyna; Nessler, Jadwiga

    2013-01-01

    Natriuretic peptides (NP) are the group of proteins synthesized and secreted by the mammalian heart. All the NP are synthesized from prohormones and have 17-amino acid cyclic structures containing two cysteine residues linked by internal disulphide bond. They are characterized by a wide range of actions, mainly through their membrane receptors. The NP regulate the water and electrolyte balance, blood pressure through their diuretic, natriuretic, and relaxating the vascular smooth muscles effects. They also affect the endocrine system and the nervous system. The neurohormonal regulation of blood circulation results are mainly based on antagonism with renin--angiotensin--aldosterone system. The NP representatives are: atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), urodilatine and (DNP) Dendroaspis natriuretic peptide, not found in the human body. According to the guidelines of the European Society of Cardiology determination of NT-proBNP level have found a use in the diagnosis of acute and chronic heart failure, risk stratification in acute coronary syndromes and pulmonary embolism. There are reports found in the literature, that demonstrate the usefulness of NT-proBNP determination in valvular, atrial fibrillation, and syncopes. Recombinant human ANP--Carperitid and BNP--Nesiritid, have already found a use in the adjunctive therapy of dyspnea in acute heart failure. PMID:24167949

  1. Solubilization and molecular characterization of the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) receptor in human platelets: Comparison with ANP receptors in rat tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Schiffrin, E.L.; Carrier, F.; Thibault, G.; Deslongchamps, M. )

    1991-02-01

    We have previously demonstrated the presence of binding sites for atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) in human platelets. These sites have pharmacological characteristics similar to those of rat vascular smooth muscle. They are subject to regulation by circulating levels of ANP in plasma, varying inversely with the latter after high sodium intake, in arterial hypertension and congestive heart failure. We have now solubilized these platelet receptors with the nonionic detergent Triton X-100 (0.6%). The preparations were incubated with (125I)ANP in the presence of increasing concentrations of ANP-(99-126), ANP-(101-126), ANP-(103-126), and ANP-(103-123). The order of potency of these peptides to displace (125I)ANP was similar for the solubilized and particulate receptor. Bound (125I)ANP was covalently cross-linked to the receptor with 5 mM disuccinimidyl suberate. Autoradiography of the sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel showed that (125I)ANP specifically interacts with a 125-kDa membrane component, some of which may be reduced by 2% mercaptoethanol or 10 mmol/L dithiothreitol to a 70-kDa species. A small proportion of a 70-kDa peptide is also found under nonreducing conditions. The concentration of ANP-(99-126) that inhibits binding of (125I)ANP by 50% to both the 125-kDa and the 70-kDa species was 0.1 nM, while that for ANP-(103-123) was 3 nM. The internally ring-deleted analog Des(Gln116,Ser117,Gly118,Leu119,Gly120)ANP -(102-121) or C-ANP displaced with equal potency ANP binding to the high and low mol wt (Mr) bands, as also found in cultured rat vascular smooth muscle cells, but not in the mesemteric arteries these cells are derived from. In the latter, C-ANP displaced only binding from the lower Mr band. These results show that the ANP receptor in human platelets is heterogeneous.

  2. Changes in cardiac aldosterone and its synthase in rats with chronic heart failure: an intervention study of long-term treatment with recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide.

    PubMed

    Zhu, X Q; Hong, H S; Lin, X H; Chen, L L; Li, Y H

    2014-08-01

    The physiological mechanisms involved in isoproterenol (ISO)-induced chronic heart failure (CHF) are not fully understood. In this study, we investigated local changes in cardiac aldosterone and its synthase in rats with ISO-induced CHF, and evaluated the effects of treatment with recombinant human brain natriuretic peptide (rhBNP). Sprague-Dawley rats were divided into 4 different groups. Fifty rats received subcutaneous ISO injections to induce CHF and the control group (n=10) received equal volumes of saline. After establishing the rat model, 9 CHF rats received no further treatment, rats in the low-dose group (n=8) received 22.5 μg/kg rhBNP and those in the high-dose group (n=8) received 45 μg/kg rhBNP daily for 1 month. Cardiac function was assessed by echocardiographic and hemodynamic analysis. Collagen volume fraction (CVF) was determined. Plasma and myocardial aldosterone concentrations were determined using radioimmunoassay. Myocardial aldosterone synthase (CYP11B2) was detected by quantitative real-time PCR. Cardiac function was significantly lower in the CHF group than in the control group (P<0.01), whereas CVF, plasma and myocardial aldosterone, and CYP11B2 transcription were significantly higher than in the control group (P<0.05). Low and high doses of rhBNP significantly improved hemodynamics (P<0.01) and cardiac function (P<0.05) and reduced CVF, plasma and myocardial aldosterone, and CYP11B2 transcription (P<0.05). There were no significant differences between the rhBNP dose groups (P>0.05). Elevated cardiac aldosterone and upregulation of aldosterone synthase expression were detected in rats with ISO-induced CHF. Administration of rhBNP improved hemodynamics and ventricular remodeling and reduced myocardial fibrosis, possibly by downregulating CYP11B2 transcription and reducing myocardial aldosterone synthesis.

  3. Cloning of an unusual natriuretic peptide from the South American coral snake Micrurus corallinus.

    PubMed

    Ho, P L; Soares, M B; Maack, T; Gimenez, I; Puorto, G; Furtado, M F; Raw, I

    1997-11-15

    In the course of cloning abundant cDNAs from the South American coral snake Micrurus corallinus venom gland, we characterized a cDNA coding for a putative natriuretic peptide. All the natural natriuretic peptides described so far, possess a ring structure composed of 17 amino acids formed through an S-S bridge which is extended at the N-terminus by few to several amino acids and may be extended at the C-terminus, usually 4-7 amino acids. In contrast, the M. corallinus natriuretic peptide presents several distinct features: (a) the proform of the deduced natriuretic peptide displays an unusual C-terminus extension. This implies that the mature peptide has a long C-terminal tail or it is further extensively processed to result in the mature natriuretic peptide with the expected 4-7 amino-acid extension. (b) the deduced natriuretic peptide presents an unusual internal Cys within the ring structure. This raises the possibility of natriuretic peptides with a smaller ring structure. (c) the putative natriuretic peptide is flanked by two homologous peptides of unknown function. In addition, an analogous peptide was synthesized and assayed on perfused rat kidney, showing a dose-dependent response in urinary volume and sodium excretion. Moreover, northern-blot studies showed that M. corallinus natriuretic peptide transcripts were highly expressed in venom glands, but they were not detectable in other tissues like heart and brain, suggesting a main role for this M. corallinus natriuretic peptide in the venom gland or in the envenomation by this coral snake's bite.

  4. B-type Natriuretic Peptide circulating forms: Analytical and bioactivity issues.

    PubMed

    Yandle, Tim G; Richards, A Mark

    2015-08-25

    B-type Natriuretic Peptide (BNP), A-type and C-type Natriuretic Peptides (ANP and CNP) comprise a family of peptides that retain a common ring structure and conserved amino acid sequences. All are present in the heart, but only BNP and ANP are regarded as primarily cardiac secretory products. BNP and ANP, acting through a guanylyl cyclase receptor, increase sodium and water excretion by the kidney, induce vasodilation, reduce blood pressure, counteract the bioactivity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and sympathetic nervous systems and possess anti-hypertrophic and anti-fibrotic properties. BNP is synthesised in cardiomyocytes first as the precursor peptide preproBNP. Removal of the signal peptide from preproBNP produces proBNP which is cleaved to produce the biologically active carboxy-terminal BNP peptide and the inactive N-terminal fragment, NT-proBNP. BNP, NT-proBNP, proBNP and the C-terminal portion of the BNP signal peptide have been detected in human plasma as well as multiple sub-forms including truncated forms of BNP and NT-proBNP, as well as variable glycosylation of NT-proBNP and proBNP. The origin of these circulating forms, their potential bioactivity and their detection by current analytical methods are presented in this review. PMID:26160054

  5. Chamber-dependent circadian expression of cardiac natriuretic peptides.

    PubMed

    Goetze, Jens Peter; Georg, Birgitte; Jørgensen, Henrik L; Fahrenkrug, Jan

    2010-02-25

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) have important local functions within the myocardium, where they protect against accelerated fibrosis. As circadian expression of cardiac natriuretic peptides could be of importance in local cardiac protection against disease, we examined the diurnal changes of the mRNAs encoding ANP, BNP, and their common receptor NPR-A in atrial and ventricular myocardium. Forty eight mice were killed at the following ZT times: 4, 8, 12, 16, 20, and 24, where ZT designates Zeitgeber; ZT 0 corresponds to lights ON and ZT 12 corresponds to lights OFF. Eight animals (4 males and 4 females) were included at each time point. Another 48 animals were killed during the second cycle of dark/dark (designated Circadian Time or CT: CT 4, CT 8, CT 12, CT 16, CT 20, and CT 24). The cellular contents of the clock genes Per1 and Bmal1 as well as ANP, BNP, and their common receptor (NPR-A) were determined using RT-PCR. Per1 and Bmal1 mRNA contents oscillated in antiphase in both atrial and ventricular regions, where Bmal1 mRNA peaked 12h out of phase relative to Per1 mRNA. ANP and NPR-A atrial mRNA contents revealed borderline significant diurnal changes, whereas ventricular BNP mRNA contents exhibited pronounced oscillation during constant darkness with nadir at CT 12 (P<0.0001). In conclusion, we report a chamber-dependent circadian profile of cardiac BNP mRNA contents, which is not paralleled by the related ANP gene. Our findings suggest that the BNP mRNA pattern could be associated with increased cardiac susceptibility and response to disease.

  6. 77 FR 4043 - Scientific Information Request on the Use of Natriuretic Peptide Measurement in the Management of...

    Federal Register 2010, 2011, 2012, 2013, 2014

    2012-01-26

    ... Natriuretic Peptide Measurement in the Management of Heart Failure AGENCY: Agency for Healthcare Research and... manufacturers of natriuretic peptide measurement assays. Scientific information is being solicited to inform our Comparative Effectiveness Review of Use of Natriuretic Peptide Measurement in the Management of Heart...

  7. Endothelial C-type natriuretic peptide maintains vascular homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Moyes, Amie J; Khambata, Rayomand S; Villar, Inmaculada; Bubb, Kristen J; Baliga, Reshma S; Lumsden, Natalie G; Xiao, Fang; Gane, Paul J; Rebstock, Anne-Sophie; Worthington, Roberta J; Simone, Michela I; Mota, Filipa; Rivilla, Fernando; Vallejo, Susana; Peiró, Concepción; Sánchez Ferrer, Carlos F; Djordjevic, Snezana; Caulfield, Mark J; MacAllister, Raymond J; Selwood, David L; Ahluwalia, Amrita; Hobbs, Adrian J

    2014-09-01

    The endothelium plays a fundamental role in maintaining vascular homeostasis by releasing factors that regulate local blood flow, systemic blood pressure, and the reactivity of leukocytes and platelets. Accordingly, endothelial dysfunction underpins many cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension, myocardial infarction, and stroke. Herein, we evaluated mice with endothelial-specific deletion of Nppc, which encodes C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), and determined that this mediator is essential for multiple aspects of vascular regulation. Specifically, disruption of CNP leads to endothelial dysfunction, hypertension, atherogenesis, and aneurysm. Moreover, we identified natriuretic peptide receptor-C (NPR-C) as the cognate receptor that primarily underlies CNP-dependent vasoprotective functions and developed small-molecule NPR-C agonists to target this pathway. Administration of NPR-C agonists promotes a vasorelaxation of isolated resistance arteries and a reduction in blood pressure in wild-type animals that is diminished in mice lacking NPR-C. This work provides a mechanistic explanation for genome-wide association studies that have linked the NPR-C (Npr3) locus with hypertension by demonstrating the importance of CNP/NPR-C signaling in preserving vascular homoeostasis. Furthermore, these results suggest that the CNP/NPR-C pathway has potential as a disease-modifying therapeutic target for cardiovascular disorders.

  8. Endothelial C-type natriuretic peptide maintains vascular homeostasis

    PubMed Central

    Moyes, Amie J.; Khambata, Rayomand S.; Villar, Inmaculada; Bubb, Kristen J.; Baliga, Reshma S.; Lumsden, Natalie G.; Xiao, Fang; Gane, Paul J.; Rebstock, Anne-Sophie; Worthington, Roberta J.; Simone, Michela I.; Mota, Filipa; Rivilla, Fernando; Vallejo, Susana; Peiró, Concepción; Sánchez Ferrer, Carlos F.; Djordjevic, Snezana; Caulfield, Mark J.; MacAllister, Raymond J.; Selwood, David L.; Ahluwalia, Amrita; Hobbs, Adrian J.

    2014-01-01

    The endothelium plays a fundamental role in maintaining vascular homeostasis by releasing factors that regulate local blood flow, systemic blood pressure, and the reactivity of leukocytes and platelets. Accordingly, endothelial dysfunction underpins many cardiovascular diseases, including hypertension, myocardial infarction, and stroke. Herein, we evaluated mice with endothelial-specific deletion of Nppc, which encodes C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), and determined that this mediator is essential for multiple aspects of vascular regulation. Specifically, disruption of CNP leads to endothelial dysfunction, hypertension, atherogenesis, and aneurysm. Moreover, we identified natriuretic peptide receptor–C (NPR-C) as the cognate receptor that primarily underlies CNP-dependent vasoprotective functions and developed small-molecule NPR-C agonists to target this pathway. Administration of NPR-C agonists promotes a vasorelaxation of isolated resistance arteries and a reduction in blood pressure in wild-type animals that is diminished in mice lacking NPR-C. This work provides a mechanistic explanation for genome-wide association studies that have linked the NPR-C (Npr3) locus with hypertension by demonstrating the importance of CNP/NPR-C signaling in preserving vascular homoeostasis. Furthermore, these results suggest that the CNP/NPR-C pathway has potential as a disease-modifying therapeutic target for cardiovascular disorders. PMID:25105365

  9. Natriuretic peptides: diagnostic tools and predictors of heart failure outcome.

    PubMed

    Isakson, Susan R; Gardetto, Nancy J; Maisel, Alan S

    2006-11-01

    Congestive heart failure (CHF) is a progressive disease whose outcome largely depends on early, accurate and prompt diagnosis, accompanied by evidence-based treatment. The explosion of uptake of natriuretic peptides (NPs) in clinical practice belies an understanding of how peptides are used. The signal for NP release is the same signal that causes symptoms of CHF, such as increased wall stress. Thus, NPs can reliably add to the information a physician brings to the table as they attempt to diagnose the acutely dyspneic patient with CHF. Additionally, NPs have strong prognostic utility in the emergency room and the hospital. Monitoring of NPs during treatment for acute CHF may help manage the patient. In the future, it is possible that NPs will play a more prominent role in early detection of left ventricular dysfunction as well as guiding chronic CHF treatment. PMID:19804259

  10. Neprilysin and Natriuretic Peptide Regulation in Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Bayes-Genis, Antoni; Morant-Talamante, Nuria; Lupón, Josep

    2016-08-01

    Neprilysin is acknowledged as a key player in neurohormonal regulation, a cornerstone of modern drug therapy in chronic heart failure. In the cardiovascular system, neprilysin cleaves numerous vasoactive peptides, some with mainly vasodilating effects (natriuretic peptides, adrenomedullin, bradykinin) and other with mainly vasoconstrictor effects (angiotensin I and II, endothelin-1). For decades, neprilysin has been an important biotarget. Academia and industry have combined active efforts to search for neprilysin inhibitors (NEPIs) that might be useful in clinical practice. NEPI monotherapy was initially tested with little success due to efficacy issues. Next, combination of NEPI and ACE-inhibiting activity agents were abandoned due to safety concerns. Recently, the combination of NEPI and ARB, also known as ARNI, has shown better than expected results in heart failure with reduced ejection fraction, and multitude of ongoing studies are set to prove its value across the heart failure spectrum. PMID:27260315

  11. Increased transcripts for B-type natriuretic peptide in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Quantitative polymerase chain reaction for atrial and brain natriuretic peptide transcripts.

    PubMed

    Dagnino, L; Lavigne, J P; Nemer, M

    1992-11-01

    The cardiac natriuretic peptide family includes atrial natriuretic factor and brain or B-type natriuretic peptide, also known as iso-atrial natriuretic factor (isoANF). Although these peptides contribute to cardiovascular homeostasis, their respective roles remain unclear. To study regulation of atrial natriuretic factor and isoANF gene expression during progression of hypertension, we developed a quantitative polymerase chain reaction protocol to measure their transcript level in spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) hearts. At the onset of hypertension, atrial natriuretic factor transcripts in 5-week-old SHR were 50% of those of age-matched Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) rats, whereas the level of isoANF transcripts was similar in atria and twofold higher in ventricles. Because atria are the major sites of atrial natriuretic factor gene expression and ventricles contribute predominantly to cardiac isoANF synthesis, total atrial natriuretic factor messenger RNA (mRNA) in the hearts of 5-week-old SHR was about 50% of that in WKY rats, and total isoANF mRNA content was already higher than in control rats. In left ventricles and ventricular septa, progression of hypertension led to a maximal increase of twofold and fourfold in atrial natriuretic factor and isoANF mRNA levels, respectively, with no detectable change in right ventricles. In the atria of older SHR, atrial natriuretic factor and isoANF mRNA levels were comparable to those of age-matched controls. These data indicate that, although increased blood pressure stimulates both atrial natriuretic factor and isoANF gene expression, regulation of the two natriuretic peptide genes is not temporally coordinated in all cardiac compartments. Furthermore, isoANF mRNA is already induced in the ventricles at the onset of the hypertensive stage, and in older SHR, the isoANF gene is hyperresponsive to progression of hypertension compared with atrial natriuretic factor. Thus, isoANF might represent a very sensitive marker of cardiac

  12. Atrial Natriuretic Peptide and Renal Dopaminergic System: A Positive Friendly Relationship?

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Marcelo Roberto; Rukavina Mikusic, Natalia Lucía; Kouyoumdzian, Nicolás Martín; Kravetz, María Cecilia; Fernández, Belisario Enrique

    2014-01-01

    Sodium metabolism by the kidney is accomplished by an intricate interaction between signals from extrarenal and intrarenal sources and between antinatriuretic and natriuretic factors. Renal dopamine plays a central role in this interactive network. The natriuretic hormones, such as the atrial natriuretic peptide, mediate some of their effects by affecting the renal dopaminergic system. Renal dopaminergic tonus can be modulated at different steps of dopamine metabolism (synthesis, uptake, release, catabolism, and receptor sensitization) which can be regulated by the atrial natriuretic peptide. At tubular level, dopamine and atrial natriuretic peptide act together in a concerted manner to promote sodium excretion, especially through the overinhibition of Na+, K+-ATPase activity. In this way, different pathological scenarios where renal sodium excretion is dysregulated, as in nephrotic syndrome or hypertension, are associated with impaired action of renal dopamine and/or atrial natriuretic peptide, or as a result of impaired interaction between these two natriuretic systems. The aim of this review is to update and comment on the most recent evidences demonstrating how the renal dopaminergic system interacts with atrial natriuretic peptide to control renal physiology and blood pressure through different regulatory pathways. PMID:25013796

  13. Influence of resting tension on immunoreactive atrial natriuretic peptide secretion by rat atria superfused in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Schiebinger, R.J.; Linden, J.

    1986-07-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide is a potent diuretic hormone secreted by the atria in response to volume expansion. We examined the effect of resting tension on atrial natriuretic peptide secretion by rat atria superfused in vitro. Left atria were hooked between an electrode and force transducer and superfused with medium 199. The atria were studied at a pacing frequency of 0 or 3 Hz. Atrial natriuretic peptide content of the superfusate was measured by radioimmunoassay. In nonpaced and paced atria, increasing resting tension three- to five-fold caused immunoreactive atrial natriuretic peptide secretion to increase by 35 +/- 5% (mean +/- SEM, n = 6, p less than 0.01) and 30 +/- 3% (n = 4, p less than 0.01), respectively. Lowering resting tension by 50% in nonpaced and paced atria lowered immunoreactive atrial natriuretic peptide secretion by 30 +/- 3% (n = 7, p less than 0.01) and 24 +/- 3% (n = 6, p less than 0.01), respectively. To exclude the possibility that release of norepinephrine or acetylcholine from endogenous nerve endings was mediating this effect, the atria were superfused with the combination of propranolol 0.1 microM, phentolamine 1.0 microM, and atropine 10 microM. These concentrations of the antagonists were 125-fold or higher than their Kd for binding to their respective receptors. The antagonists did not block the rise in immunoreactive atrial natriuretic peptide secretion; neither did they inhibit an established rise in immunoreactive atrial natriuretic peptide secretion induced by increasing the resting tension.

  14. [Hormones and osteoporosis update. Effects of natriuretic peptides on endochondral bone growth].

    PubMed

    Yasoda, Akihiro; Nakao, Kazuwa

    2009-07-01

    We revealed that the C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) and its receptor guanylyl cyclase-B (GC-B) system is a potent and physiological stimulator of endochondral bone growth by using transgenic and knockout mice. In humans, one form of skeletal dysplasias, acromesomelic dysplasia, type Maroteaux, was reported to be caused by loss of function mutations in the GC-B gene. Further studies are needed for clarifying the patho-physiological roles of the CNP/GC-B system on human skeletal dysplasias. Moreover, we will have to translate this effect of the CNP/GC-B system on endochondral bone growth into skeletal dysplasias.

  15. Natriuretic Peptides in Kawasaki Disease: the Myocardial Perspective

    PubMed Central

    Dahdah, Nagib; Fournier, Anne

    2013-01-01

    Making a diagnosis of Kawasaki disease with certainty may be challenging, especially since the recognition of cases with incomplete diagnostic criteria and its consequences. In order to build the diagnostic case in daily practice, clinicians rely on clinical criteria established over four decades ago, aided by non specific laboratory tests, and above all inspired by experience. We have recently studied the diagnostic value of N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide to improve the diagnostic certainty of cases with complete or incomplete clinical criteria. Our working hypothesis was based on the fact that myocarditis is present in nearly all Kawasaki disease patients supported by histology data. In this paper, we review these facts and the myocardial perspective from the diagnostic and the mechanistic standpoints. PMID:26835665

  16. Can Natriuretic Peptides be Used to Guide Therapy?

    PubMed Central

    Lupón, Josep; Jaffe, Allan S.

    2016-01-01

    Over the last 15 years, the hypothesis that intensified treatment directed at reducing natriuretic peptide (NP) concentrations may improve the outcomes of patients with heart failure (HF) has been scrutinized in several prospective clinical trials, with conflicting results. Collectively, however, the data suggest that NP concentrations may be useful in guiding HF management and improving HF-related morbidity and mortality. In this review, we summarize the existing data investigating the use of NPs as targets for outpatient HF therapy. We focus on the information gathered in randomized clinical trials and comprehensive meta-analyses, and also on the recommendations of international guidelines (primarily guidelines from the European Society of Cardiology and the American College of Cardiology/American Heart Association). Although the results for this approach are promising overall, additional well-designed prospective randomized controlled trials (e.g., the GUIDE-IT trial) are necessary to confirm or refute the utility of NP-guided outpatient HF management.

  17. Are endogenous cardenolides controlled by atrial natriuretic peptide.

    PubMed

    Brar, Kanwarjeet S; Gao, Yonglin; El-Mallakh, Rif S

    2016-07-01

    Endogenous cardenolides are digoxin-like substances and ouabain-like substances that have been implicated in the pathogenesis of hypertension and mood disorders in clinical and pre-clinical studies. Regulatory signals for endogenous cardenolides are still unknown. These endogenous compounds are believed to be produced by the adrenal gland in the periphery and the hypothalamus in the central nervous system, and constitute part of an hormonal axis that may regulate the catalytic activity of the α subunit of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase. A review of literature suggests that there is great overlap in physiological environments that are associated with either elevations or reductions in the levels of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and endogenous cardenolides. This suggests that these two factors may share a common regulatory signal or perhaps that ANP may be involved in the regulation of endogenous cardenolides. PMID:27241248

  18. Immunoreactive atrial natriuretic peptide in the guinea pig spleen

    SciTech Connect

    Vollmar, A.M.; Friedrich, A.; Schulz, R. )

    1989-01-01

    The presence of immunoreative ANP precursor-like material in the guinea pig spleen is suggested. This is based on the following experimental evidence: An acidic extract of guinea pig spleen analyzed by Sephadex G-50 gel filtration contained 4.6 pmol/g wet tissue immunoreactive atrial natriuretic peptide (IR-ANP), IR-ANP coeluting with 15 kDa synthetic ANP (2-126). Gel filtrated IR-ANP material was further submitted to reverse phase high performance liquid chromatography and monitored by radioimmunoassay employing two antisera. One antiserum recognizes the C-terminal of ANP (1-126), the second is directed against the N-terminal sequence. Both antisera revealed material eluting with synthetic ANP (2-126). Furthermore, immunohistochemical analysis suggests this ANP-like material to be localized mainly at the periphery of the white pulp of the spleen. These findings link ANP with the immune system.

  19. Natriuretic peptide C receptor signalling in the heart and vasculature.

    PubMed

    Rose, Robert A; Giles, Wayne R

    2008-01-15

    Natriuretic peptides (NPs), including atrial, brain and C-type natriuretic peptides (ANP, BNP and CNP), bind two classes of cell surface receptors: the guanylyl cyclase-linked A and B receptors (NPR-A and NPR-B) and the C receptor (NPR-C). The biological effects of NPs have been mainly attributed to changes in intracellular cGMP following their binding to NPR-A and NPR-B. NPR-C does not include a guanylyl cyclase domain. It has been denoted as a clearance receptor and is thought to bind and internalize NPs for ultimate degradation. However, a substantial body of biochemical work has demonstrated the ability of NPR-C to couple to inhibitory G proteins (Gi) and cause inhibition of adenylyl cyclase and activation of phospholipase-C. Recently, novel physiological effects of NPs, mediated specifically by NPR-C, have been discovered in the heart and vasculature. We have described the ability of CNP, acting via NPR-C, to selectively inhibit L-type calcium currents in atrial and ventricular myocytes, as well as in pacemaker cells (sinoatrial node myocytes). In contrast, our studies of the electrophysiological effects of CNP on cardiac fibroblasts demonstrated an NPR-C-Gi-phospholipase-C-dependent activation of a non-selective cation current mediated by transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. It is also known that CNP and BNP have important anti-proliferative effects in cardiac fibroblasts that appear to involve NPR-C. In the mammalian resistance vessels, including mesenteric and coronary arteries, CNP has been found to function as an NPR-C-dependent endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor that regulates local blood flow and systemic blood pressure by hyperpolarizing smooth muscle cells. In this review we highlight the role of NPR-C in mediating these NP effects in myocytes and fibroblasts from the heart as well as in vascular smooth muscle cells.

  20. Natriuretic peptide C receptor signalling in the heart and vasculature

    PubMed Central

    Rose, Robert A; Giles, Wayne R

    2008-01-01

    Natriuretic peptides (NPs), including atrial, brain and C-type natriuretic peptides (ANP, BNP and CNP), bind two classes of cell surface receptors: the guanylyl cyclase-linked A and B receptors (NPR-A and NPR-B) and the C receptor (NPR-C). The biological effects of NPs have been mainly attributed to changes in intracellular cGMP following their binding to NPR-A and NPR-B. NPR-C does not include a guanylyl cyclase domain. It has been denoted as a clearance receptor and is thought to bind and internalize NPs for ultimate degradation. However, a substantial body of biochemical work has demonstrated the ability of NPR-C to couple to inhibitory G proteins (Gi) and cause inhibition of adenylyl cyclase and activation of phospholipase-C. Recently, novel physiological effects of NPs, mediated specifically by NPR-C, have been discovered in the heart and vasculature. We have described the ability of CNP, acting via NPR-C, to selectively inhibit L-type calcium currents in atrial and ventricular myocytes, as well as in pacemaker cells (sinoatrial node myocytes). In contrast, our studies of the electrophysiological effects of CNP on cardiac fibroblasts demonstrated an NPR-C–Gi–phospholipase-C-dependent activation of a non-selective cation current mediated by transient receptor potential (TRP) channels. It is also known that CNP and BNP have important anti-proliferative effects in cardiac fibroblasts that appear to involve NPR-C. In the mammalian resistance vessels, including mesenteric and coronary arteries, CNP has been found to function as an NPR-C-dependent endothelium-derived hyperpolarizing factor that regulates local blood flow and systemic blood pressure by hyperpolarizing smooth muscle cells. In this review we highlight the role of NPR-C in mediating these NP effects in myocytes and fibroblasts from the heart as well as in vascular smooth muscle cells. PMID:18006579

  1. Consensus document and recommendations on the use of natriuretic peptides in clinical practice.

    PubMed

    Pascual-Figal, D A; Casademont, J; Lobos, J M; Piñera, P; Bayés-Genis, A; Ordóñez-Llanos, J; González-Juanatey, J R

    2016-01-01

    Natriuretic peptides are a useful laboratory tool for the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of patients with heart failure. Natriuretic peptides are used in various healthcare settings (consultations, emergency department, hospitalization, laboratory) and by various primary care and specialised professionals. However, their use in clinical practice is still scare and uneven. Properly using and interpreting natriuretic peptides in clinical practice requires a minimum of prelaboratory (pathophysiology), laboratory (methods) and postlaboratory (interpretation and integration of clinical data) expertise. The objective of this consensus document, developed by several scientific societies, is to update the necessary concepts and expertise on natriuretic peptides that enable its application in the diagnosis, prognosis and treatment of heart failure, in various healthcare environments.

  2. ED 05-4 NATRIURETIC PEPTIDES, METABOLIC SYNDROME AND HYPERTENSION: AN INTEGRATED VIEW.

    PubMed

    Sarzani, Riccardo

    2016-09-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) are the cardiac natriuretic peptides (NP), true "cardiometabolic" hormones well known for their renal, endocrine and cardiovascular activities leading to reduced sodium reabsorption and arterial blood pressure. These effects are mainly mediated by the second messenger cGMP that also stimulates lipolysis, mitochondriogenesis and a thermogenic program with potency similar to catecholamines. Two distinct NP receptors modulate the final response to cardiac NP: the cGMP-signaling receptor NPRA and the clearance receptor NPRC. The cellular and systemic effects of NP largely depend upon the ratio of the clearance receptor NPRC to the signaling receptor NPRA, both abundantly expressed in human adipose tissue and adipocytes. Indeed, most of the available data indicate that the total NPRC expression in the body is the main negative modulator of the circulating NP levels and, at cellular level, NPRC is a main silencer of their biological effects. NP are not only 'cleared' from circulation by NPRC, but they are also degraded very quickly by neutral endopeptidase (NEP) and both are increased in obesity. Starving sharply decreases NPRC expression in white and brown adipose tissue and a low-calorie diet in obese hypertensive patients strongly potentiates the clinical and biological effects of infused ANP. Hypocaloric diet also enhances ANP-induced lipolysis in humans, whereas obesity is associated with lower circulating levels of NP. Many studies have linked the genes of NP and their receprtros to hypertension and many population studies have also linked reduced NP levels to obesity and metabolic syndrome. Insulin/glucose are the main factors in adipocytes hypertrophy in many conditions characterized by insulin resistance such as metabolic syndrome. Insulin attenuate lipolysis in adipocytes by inducing NPRC expression, linking the eating pattern to reduced NP activities both on adipose tissue and likely in the

  3. Preparation and Characterization of Molecularly Imprinted Polymeric Nanoparticles for Atrial Natriuretic Peptide (ANP)

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Chunyan; Howell, Mark; Raulji, Payal; Davis, Yvonne; Mohapatra, Subhra

    2013-01-01

    Natriuretic peptide receptor A (NPRA), the receptor for the cardiac hormone atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), is expressed abundantly on cancer cells and disruption of ANP-NPRA signaling inhibits tumor burden and metastasis. Since antagonists of NPRA signaling have not provided reproducible results, we reasoned that a synthetic neutralizing antibody to ANP, which has high selectivity and affinity for ANP, could be used to regulate ANP levels and attenuate NPRA signaling. In this study, we prepared molecularly imprinted polymer nanoparticles (MIPNPs) for ANP using a short peptide of ANP as the template and determined their binding affinity and selectivity. The MIPNPs were prepared by precipitation polymerization using NH2-SLRRSS-CONH2, which is a short peptide from ANP as template, methacrylic acid (MAA) and N-isopropylacrylamide (NIPAm) as functional monomers, bis-acrylamide (BIS) as crosslinker. The average diameter of MIPNPs and non-imprinted nanoparticles (NIPNPs) in water is 215.8 ±4.6 nm and 197.7±3.1 nm respectively. The binding isotherm analysis showed that MIPNPs have a much higher binding affinity for template peptide and ANP than NIPNPs. Scatchard analysis gave an equilibrium dissociation constant, Kd of 7.3 μM with a binding capacity 106.7 μmol/g for template peptide and Kd of 7.9 μM with a binding capacity of 36.0 μmol/g for ANP. Measurements of binding kinetics revealed that MIPNPs reach protein adsorption equilibrium in 30 min. MIPNPs found to have high specificity for ANP with little affinity for BSA or scrambled ANP peptide. MIPNPs also recognized and adsorbed ANP in cell culture media spiked with ANP and human plasma. Taken together, these results indicate that MIPNPs have high affinity and selectivity for ANP and can be used as a synthetic antibody for modulating ANP-NPRA signaling in cancers. PMID:23459692

  4. Plasma cardiac natriuretic peptide determination as a screening test for the detection of patients with mild left ventricular impairment.

    PubMed Central

    Omland, T.; Aakvaag, A.; Vik-Mo, H.

    1996-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To determine the usefulness of measuring the cardiac natriuretic peptides, atrial natriuretic factor, N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic factor, and brain natriuretic peptide, as screening tests for identifying patients with mild left ventricular impairment. DESIGN: Cross-sectional evaluation of the diagnostic accuracy of the cardiac natriuretic peptides. SETTING: Cardiac catheterisation unit, Norwegian central hospital. PATIENTS: A consecutive series of 254 patients undergoing diagnostic left-sided cardiac catheterisation. One hundred and twenty eight of these patients had a history of previous myocardial infarction. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES: The presence of normal and impaired left ventricular function, as evaluated by logistic regression analysis and estimation of the area under the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve (an index of overall diagnostic accuracy). Ventricular function was assessed by the measurement of left ventricular end diastolic pressure and angiographically determined left ventricular ejection fraction. RESULTS: Logistic regression analysis showed that plasma brain natriuretic peptide was the best predictor of increased left ventricular end diastolic pressure (> or = 15 mm Hg) (P < 0.001), decreased left ventricular ejection fraction (< or = 45%) (P < 0.001), and the combination of left ventricular ejection fraction < or = 45% and left ventricular end diastolic pressure > or = 15 mm Hg (P < 0.001). The areas under the ROC function for the detection of left ventricular dysfunction were 0.789 for brain natriuretic peptide, 0.665 for atrial natriuretic factor, and 0.610 for N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic factor. CONCLUSIONS: Plasma brain natriuretic peptide seemed to be a better indicator of left ventricular function than plasma atrial natriuretic factor or N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic factor. However, the overall diagnostic accuracy of circulating atrial natriuretic factor, N-terminal pro-atrial natriuretic factor, and

  5. A C-type natriuretic peptide from the venom of the platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus): structure and pharmacology.

    PubMed

    de Plater, G M; Martin, R L; Milburn, P J

    1998-07-01

    A peptide which relaxes rat uterine smooth muscle and exhibits homology with the mammalian C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) has previously been identified in platypus (Ornithorhynchus anatinus) venom from its partial N-terminal amino acid sequence. In this study we describe the purification, detailed structure, synthesis and pharmacological characteristics of this peptide, which has been designated ovCNP-39 (Ornithorhynchus venom C-type natriuretic peptide). Elucidation of the 39-residue amino acid sequence confirms the homology with mammalian CNPs. These peptides produce hypotension in vivo and relax smooth muscle in vitro, but are poorly characterised in terms of physiological function. ovCNP-39 is equipotent with human/rat/porcine CNP-22 in eliciting cyclic guanosine 5'-monophosphate (cGMP) elevation in cultured vascular smooth muscle cells, suggesting that, like CNP, it acts through the ANPB natriuretic peptide receptor subtype. The direct elevation of cGMP in vascular smooth muscle by ovCNP-39 may underlie the vasodilatory effects of platypus envenomation. PMID:9827022

  6. SP 04-1 THE ROLE OF NATRIURETIC PEPTIDES IN THE PATHOGENESIS OF CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASES.

    PubMed

    Kobalava, Zhanna

    2016-09-01

    The burden of cardiovascular diseases (CVD) in general and heart failure (HF) in particular continues to increase worldwide. CVD are major contributors to death and morbidity and recognized as important drivers of healthcare expenditure. Chronic overactivity of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system (RAAS) plays a key role in human hypertension and HF pathophysiology. RAAS is fundamental in the overall regulation of cardiovascular homeostasis through the actions of hormones, which regulate vascular tone, and specifically blood pressure through vasoconstriction and renal sodium and water retention. Drugs inhibiting key components of the RAAS have become a cornerstone of contemporary cardiovascular drug therapy. Nowadays there is a high priority for the development of innovative therapeutic agents that better control blood pressure, have a therapeutic potential in HF and enhance current therapies for CVD. The enhancement of the biological activities of the natriuretic peptides (NP) via inhibition of their degradation is one of the novel strategies.Natriuretic peptide system includes primarily three well-characterized peptides with structural similarity: atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP). These three peptides are involved in the maintenance of cardio-renal homeostasis and all have cardio-renal protective properties. Atrial natriuretic peptide and BNP are synthetized mainly by the cardiomyocytes in response to cardiac stretch, whereas CNP is mainly produced by endothelial cells in response to cytokines and endothelium-dependent agonists. B-type natriuretic peptide is also produced by cardiofibroblasts where it elicits its antifibrotic actions in the heart. All NP function via the second messenger cGMP. All three peptides are cleared by the clearance receptor (NPR-C), not linked to a guanylate cyclase. The NP are also cleared from the circulation via enzymatic degradation by neutral endopeptidase

  7. Atrial and brain natriuretic peptides stimulate the production and secretion of C-type natriuretic peptide from bovine aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Nazario, B; Hu, R M; Pedram, A; Prins, B; Levin, E R

    1995-01-01

    C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) is a member of the natriuretic peptide family which is produced in vascular endothelial cells and may play an important paracrine role in the vasaculature. We sought to determine the regulation of CNP production by other vasoactive peptides from cultured aortic endothelial cells. The vasoconstrictors endothelin-1 and angiotensin II had little effect on the basal secretion of CNP. In contrast, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) strongly stimulated the secretion of CNP. BNP caused as much as a 400-fold enhancement above the basal accumulated secretion of CNP over 24 h at a concentration of 1 microM; this was 20 times greater than the stimulatory effect of ANP, BNP and ANP also significantly enhanced the production of new CNP protein (translation) and mRNA expressed in the BAEC. In contrast, C-ANP-4-23, a truncated form of ANP which selectively binds to the natriuretic peptide clearance receptor, did not stimulate CNP secretion. The enhanced production and secretion of CNP, caused by either ANP or BNP, was significantly prevented by LY 83583, an inhibitor of cGMP generation, and was also attenuated by KT 5823, an inhibitor of cGMP-dependent protein kinase. Our results indicate that ANP and BNP can stimulate CNP production through a guanylate cyclase receptor on endothelial cells. BNP is a much more potent stimulator of CNP secretion, compared to ANP. Our findings suggest that the vasodilatory, and anti-mitogenic effects of ANP and BNP in the vasculature could occur in part through CNP production and subsequent action if these interactions occur in vivo. Images PMID:7883964

  8. Atrial natriuretic peptide prevents cancer metastasis through vascular endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Nojiri, Takashi; Hosoda, Hiroshi; Tokudome, Takeshi; Miura, Koichi; Ishikane, Shin; Otani, Kentaro; Kishimoto, Ichiro; Shintani, Yasushi; Inoue, Masayoshi; Kimura, Toru; Sawabata, Noriyoshi; Minami, Masato; Nakagiri, Tomoyuki; Funaki, Soichiro; Takeuchi, Yukiyasu; Maeda, Hajime; Kidoya, Hiroyasu; Kiyonari, Hiroshi; Shioi, Go; Arai, Yuji; Hasegawa, Takeshi; Takakura, Nobuyuki; Hori, Megumi; Ohno, Yuko; Miyazato, Mikiya; Mochizuki, Naoki; Okumura, Meinoshin; Kangawa, Kenji

    2015-01-01

    Most patients suffering from cancer die of metastatic disease. Surgical removal of solid tumors is performed as an initial attempt to cure patients; however, surgery is often accompanied with trauma, which can promote early recurrence by provoking detachment of tumor cells into the blood stream or inducing systemic inflammation or both. We have previously reported that administration of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) during the perioperative period reduces inflammatory response and has a prophylactic effect on postoperative cardiopulmonary complications in lung cancer surgery. Here we demonstrate that cancer recurrence after curative surgery was significantly lower in ANP-treated patients than in control patients (surgery alone). ANP is known to bind specifically to NPR1 [also called guanylyl cyclase-A (GC-A) receptor]. In mouse models, we found that metastasis of GC-A–nonexpressing tumor cells (i.e., B16 mouse melanoma cells) to the lung was increased in vascular endothelium-specific GC-A knockout mice and decreased in vascular endothelium-specific GC-A transgenic mice compared with control mice. We examined the effect of ANP on tumor metastasis in mice treated with lipopolysaccharide, which mimics systemic inflammation induced by surgical stress. ANP inhibited the adhesion of cancer cells to pulmonary arterial and micro-vascular endothelial cells by suppressing the E-selectin expression that is promoted by inflammation. These results suggest that ANP prevents cancer metastasis by inhibiting the adhesion of tumor cells to inflamed endothelial cells. PMID:25775533

  9. Atrial natriuretic peptide increases resistance to venous return in rats

    SciTech Connect

    Chien, Y.W.; Frohlich, E.D.; Trippodo, N.C.

    1987-05-01

    To examine mechanisms by which administration of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) decreases venous return, the authors compared the hemodynamic effects of ANP furosemide (FU), and hexamethonium (HEX) with those of vehicle (VE) in anesthetized rats. Compared with VE, ANP reduced mean arterial pressure, central venous pressure, and cardiac index and increased calculated resistance to venous return. /sup 141/Ce-labeled microspheres were used to determine cardiac output. Mean circulatory filling pressure, distribution of blood flow between splanchnic organs and skeletal muscles, and total peripheral resistance remained unchanged. FU increased urine output similar to that of ANP, yet produced no hemodynamic changes, dissociating diuresis, and decreased cardiac output. HEX lowered arterial pressure through a reduction in total peripheral resistance without altering cardiac output or resistance to venous return. The results confirm previous findings that ANP decreases cardiac output through a reduction in venous return and suggest that this results partly from increased resistance to venous return and not from venodilation or distribution of blood flow.

  10. Analytical Issues with Natriuretic Peptides - has this been Overly Simplified?

    PubMed

    Semenov, Alexander G; Katrukha, Alexey G

    2016-08-01

    Natriuretic peptides (NPs) were first described as cardiac biomarkers more than two decades ago. Since that time, numerous studies have confirmed NPs' diagnostic and prognostic utilities as biomarkers of myocardial function. However, we must now admit that despite the NPs' relatively long period of use in clinical practice, our understanding of the biochemistry and the variety of circulating forms of NPs, as well as of their potential as biomarkers, remains far from being complete and comprehensive. The highly complex nature and wide diversity of circulating forms of NPs make their accurate measurements in plasma far more complex than initially believed. A highly simplistic view of the NPs' use is that elevated values of NPs indicate the severity of heart failure and thus reflect the prognosis. However, as shown by a variety of studies, deep understanding of how the NP system works will be required for correct interpretation of test results in routine practice of cardiovascular disease. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in understanding of the complexity of the NP system and discuss related analytical issues, which open new horizons, as well as challenges for clinical diagnostics. PMID:27683533

  11. Differential response of C-type natriuretic peptide to estrogen and dexamethasone in adult bone.

    PubMed

    Prickett, Timothy C R; Wellby, Martin; Barrell, Graham K; Richards, A Mark; Espiner, Eric A

    2014-09-01

    C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) is crucial in promoting endochondral bone growth in mammals including humans but whether this paracrine hormone participates in maintaining bone integrity in the mature skeleton is unknown. Accordingly we studied changes in plasma and bone tissue CNP in anoestrus adult ewes receiving short term anabolic (estrogen) or catabolic (dexamethasone) treatment for 7days. CNP and the aminoterminal fragment of the CNP prohormone (NTproCNP) were measured in plasma and extracts of cancellous bone excised from vertebral, iliac, tibial and marrow tissues. Concentrations of CNP peptides were much higher in vertebral and iliac extracts than those of tibial or marrow. Both plasma CNP and NTproCNP increased rapidly after estrogen followed by a later rise in bone alkaline phosphatase. Vertebral and iliac (but not tibial or marrow) CNP peptide content were significantly increased by estrogen. Consistent with a skeletal source, plasma NTproCNP was significantly associated with vertebral tissue CNP. In contrast, bone tissue CNP peptide content was unaffected by dexamethasone despite suppression of plasma CNP peptides and bone alkaline phosphatase. We postulate that increases in trabecular bone CNP reflect new endosteal bone formation in these estrogen responsive tissues whereas reduced plasma CNP peptides after dexamethasone, without change in cancellous bone content, reflects reductions in cortical bone turnover.

  12. Regulation of atrial natriuretic peptide receptors in the rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Saavedra, J.M.

    1987-06-01

    We have studied the localization, kinetics, and regulation of receptors for the circulating form of the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP; 99-126) in the rat brain. Quantitative autoradiographic techniques and a /sup 125/I-labeled ligand, /sup 125/I-ANP (99-126), were employed. After in vitro autoradiography, quantification was achieved by computerized microdensitometry followed by comparison with /sup 125/I-standards. ANP receptors were discretely localized in the rat brain, with the highest concentrations in circumventricular organs, the choroid plexus, and selected hypothalamic nuclei involved in the production of the antidiuretic hormone vasopressin and in blood-pressure control. Spontaneously (genetic) hypertensive rats showed much lower numbers of ANP receptors than normotensive controls in the subfornical organ, the area postrema, the nucleus of the solitary tract, and the choroid plexus. These changes are in contrast to those observed for receptors of angiotensin II, another circulating peptide with actions opposite to those of ANP. Under conditions of acute dehydration after water deprivation, as well as under conditions of chronic dehydration such as those present in homozygous Brattleboro rats, there was an up-regulation of ANP receptors in the subfornical organ. Our results indicate that in the brain, circumventricular organs contain ANP receptors which could respond to variations in the concentration of circulating ANP. In addition, brain areas inside the blood-brain barrier contain ANP receptors probably related to the endogenous, central ANP system. The localization of ANP receptors and the alterations in their regulation present in genetically hypertensive rats and after dehydration indicate that brain ANP receptors are probably related to fluid regulation, including the secretion of vasopressin, and to cardiovascular function.

  13. An Emerging Role of Natriuretic Peptides: Igniting the Fat Furnace to Fuel and Warm the Heart.

    PubMed

    Palmer, Biff F; Clegg, Deborah J

    2015-12-01

    Natriuretic peptides are produced in the heart and have been well characterized for their actions in the cardiovascular system to promote diuresis and natriuresis, thereby contributing to maintenance of extracellular fluid volume and vascular tone. For this review, we scanned the literature using PubMed and MEDLINE using the following search terms: beiging, adipose tissue, natriuretic peptides, obesity, and metabolic syndrome. Articles were selected for inclusion if they represented primary data or review articles published from 1980 to 2015 from high-impact journals. With the advent of the newly approved class of drugs that inhibit the breakdown of natriuretic peptides, thereby increasing their circulation, we highlight additional functions for natriuretic peptides that have recently become appreciated, including their ability to drive lipolysis, facilitate beiging of adipose tissues, and promote lipid oxidation and mitochondrial respiration in skeletal muscle. We provide evidence for new roles for natriuretic peptides, emphasizing their ability to participate in body weight regulation and energy homeostasis and discuss how they may lead to novel strategies to treat obesity and the metabolic syndrome.

  14. [Clinical significance of natriuretic peptides in the differential diagnosis of dyspnea].

    PubMed

    Špác, Jiří

    2016-01-01

    Acute dyspnea is one of the most common emergency department symptoms. But early diagnosis and treatment could be e challenging because of multiple potential causes. The gold standard biomarkers in cardiac dyspnea are B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and N-terminal pro-B-type (natriuretic peptide NT-pro BNP), which play an important role in the diagnosis, prognosis, and management of acute decompensated heart failure. The purpose of this review is to analyze diagnostic potential of BNP and NT-pro BNP biomarkers use in patients with acute dyspnea. BNP and NT-proBNP are markers of cardiac stress but are not cardiac-specific. They have comparable clinical utility, and both help in excluding acute cardiac dyspnea but they cannot reliably discriminate systolic from diastolic HF.Key word: acute dyspnea - natriuretic peptide - heart failure. PMID:27627091

  15. Binding sites of atrial natriuretic peptide in tree shrew adrenal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Fuchs, E.; Shigematsu, K.; Saavedra, J.M.

    1986-09-01

    Adrenal gland binding sites for atrial natriuretic peptide-(99-126) (ANP) were quantitated in tree shrew (Tupaia belangeri) by incubation of adrenal sections with (3-(/sup 125/I)-iodotyrosyl28) atrial natriuretic peptide-(99-126), followed by autoradiography with computerized microdensitometry. In the adrenal glands, there are three types of ANP binding sites. One is located in the zona glomerulosa (BMax 84 +/- 6 fmol/mg protein; Kd 122 +/- 9 pM); the second in the zona fasciculata and reticularis (BMax 29 +/- 2 fmol/mg protein; Kd 153 +/- 6 pM) and the third in the adrenal medulla (BMax 179 +/- 1 fmol/mg protein; Kd 70 +/- 2 pM). Besides the influence of ANP on the regulation of adrenocortical mineralcorticoid and glucocorticoid secretion our findings raise the possibility for a local site of action of atrial natriuretic peptide in the regulation of adrenomedullary catecholamines in the tree shrew, primates and man.

  16. Cocaine-associated increase of atrial natriuretic peptides: an early predictor of cardiac complications in cocaine users?

    PubMed Central

    Casartelli, Alessandro; Dacome, Lisa; Tessari, Michela; Pascali, Jennifer; Bortolotti, Federica; Trevisan, Maria Teresa; Bosco, Oliviero; Cristofori, Patrizia; Tagliaro, Franco

    2014-01-01

    Objective Cocaine is known to produce life-threatening cardiovascular complications, and the investigation of the causes of death may be challenging in forensic medicine. The increasing knowledge of the cardiac function biomarkers and the increasing sensitivity of assays provide new tools in monitoring the cardiac life-threatening pathological conditions and in the sudden death investigation in chronic abusers. In this work, cardiac dysfunction was assessed in an animal model by measuring troponin I and natriuretic peptides as biomarkers, and considering other standard endpoints used in preclinical toxicology studies. Methods Lister Hooded rats were treated with cocaine in chronic self-administration studies. Troponin I (cTnI) and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) were evaluated at different time points and heart weight and histopathology were assessed at the end of the treatment period. Furthermore, cocaine and its main metabolites were measured in the rat fur to assess rats’ cocaine exposure. All the procedures and endpoints considered were designed to allow an easy and complete translation from the laboratory animals to human beings, and the same approach was also adopted with a group of 10 healthy cocaine abuse volunteers with no cardiac pathologies. Results Cardiac troponin I values were unaffected, and ANP showed an increasing trend with time in all cocaine-treated animals considered. Similarly, in the healthy volunteers, no changes were observed in troponin serum levels, whereas the N-terminal brain natriuretic pro-peptide (NT proBNP) showed variations comparable with the changes observed in rats. Conclusions In conclusion, natriuretic peptides could represent an early indicator of heart dysfunction liability in chronic cocaine abusers. PMID:27326180

  17. B-type natriuretic peptide modulates ghrelin, hunger, and satiety in healthy men.

    PubMed

    Vila, Greisa; Grimm, Gabriele; Resl, Michael; Heinisch, Birgit; Einwallner, Elisa; Esterbauer, Harald; Dieplinger, Benjamin; Mueller, Thomas; Luger, Anton; Clodi, Martin

    2012-10-01

    Chronic heart failure is accompanied by anorexia and increased release of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) from ventricular cardiomyocytes. The pathophysiological mechanisms linking heart failure and appetite regulation remain unknown. In this study, we investigated the impact of intravenous BNP administration on appetite-regulating hormones and subjective ratings of hunger and satiety in 10 healthy volunteers. Participants received in a randomized, placebo-controlled, crossover, single-blinded study (subject) placebo once and 3.0 pmol/kg/min human BNP-32 once administered as a continuous infusion during 4 h. Circulating concentrations of appetite-regulating peptides were measured hourly. Subjective ratings of hunger and satiety were evaluated by visual analog scales. BNP inhibited the fasting-induced increase in total and acylated ghrelin concentrations over time (P = 0.043 and P = 0.038, respectively). In addition, BNP decreased the subjective rating of hunger (P = 0.009) and increased the feeling of satiety (P = 0.012) when compared with placebo. There were no significant changes in circulating peptide YY, glucagon-like peptide 1, oxyntomodulin, pancreatic polypeptide, leptin, and adiponectin concentrations. In summary, our results demonstrate that BNP exerts anorectic effects and reduces ghrelin concentrations in men. These data, taken together with the known cardiovascular properties of ghrelin, support the existence of a heart-gut-brain axis, which could be therapeutically targeted in patients with heart failure and obesity.

  18. [The role of B type natriuretic peptide in the assessment of post myocardial infarction prognosis].

    PubMed

    Ben Halima, A; Ibn el Hadj, Z; Chrigui, R; Kammoun, I; Lefi, A; Chine, S; Gargouri, S; Keskes, H; Kachboura, S

    2006-10-01

    Recently cardiac peptides have received close attention as cardiovascular markers. Brain (B type) natriuretic peptide is a neurohormone synthesized predominantly in ventricular myocardium. Previous studies have shown that this hormone can provide prognostic information in patients with myocardial infarction. The aim of this review is to evaluate the impact of plasma levels of BNP on prediction of left ventricular ejection fraction and remodelling and major cardiac events after myocardial infarction.

  19. Racial Differences in Circulating Natriuretic Peptide Levels: The Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Deepak K; Claggett, Brian; Wells, Quinn; Cheng, Susan; Li, Man; Maruthur, Nisa; Selvin, Elizabeth; Coresh, Josef; Konety, Suma; Butler, Kenneth R; Mosley, Thomas; Boerwinkle, Eric; Hoogeveen, Ron; Ballantyne, Christie M; Solomon, Scott D

    2015-01-01

    Background Natriuretic peptides promote natriuresis, diuresis, and vasodilation. Experimental deficiency of natriuretic peptides leads to hypertension (HTN) and cardiac hypertrophy, conditions more common among African Americans. Hospital-based studies suggest that African Americans may have reduced circulating natriuretic peptides, as compared to Caucasians, but definitive data from community-based cohorts are lacking. Methods and Results We examined plasma N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (NTproBNP) levels according to race in 9137 Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities (ARIC) Study participants (22% African American) without prevalent cardiovascular disease at visit 4 (1996–1998). Multivariable linear and logistic regression analyses were performed adjusting for clinical covariates. Among African Americans, percent European ancestry was determined from genetic ancestry informative markers and then examined in relation to NTproBNP levels in multivariable linear regression analysis. NTproBNP levels were significantly lower in African Americans (median, 43 pg/mL; interquartile range [IQR], 18, 88) than Caucasians (median, 68 pg/mL; IQR, 36, 124; P<0.0001). In multivariable models, adjusted log NTproBNP levels were 40% lower (95% confidence interval [CI], −43, −36) in African Americans, compared to Caucasians, which was consistent across subgroups of age, gender, HTN, diabetes, insulin resistance, and obesity. African-American race was also significantly associated with having nondetectable NTproBNP (adjusted OR, 5.74; 95% CI, 4.22, 7.80). In multivariable analyses in African Americans, a 10% increase in genetic European ancestry was associated with a 7% (95% CI, 1, 13) increase in adjusted log NTproBNP. Conclusions African Americans have lower levels of plasma NTproBNP than Caucasians, which may be partially owing to genetic variation. Low natriuretic peptide levels in African Americans may contribute to the greater risk for HTN and its sequalae in

  20. Vascular effects and electrolyte homeostasis of the natriuretic peptide isolated from Crotalus oreganus abyssus (North American Grand Canyon rattlesnake) venom.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, S L; Dias-Junior, C A; Baldasso, P A; Damico, D C S; Carvalho, B M A; Garanto, A; Acosta, G; Oliveira, E; Albericio, F; Soares, A M; Marangoni, S; Resende, R R

    2012-08-01

    Crotalus oreganus abyssus is a rattlesnake that is usually found in the Grand Canyon, United States of America. Knowledge regarding the composition of C. o. abyssus venom is scarce. New natriuretic peptides (NPs) have been isolated and characterized from the venoms of members of the Crotalinae family. The NP family comprises three members, ANP (atrial natriuretic peptide), BNP (b-type natriuretic peptide) and CNP (c-type natriuretic peptide), and has an important role in blood pressure regulation and electrolyte homeostasis. The aim of the present study was to characterize a novel natriuretic-like peptide (Coa_NP2), isolated from C. o. abyssus venom. The Coa_NP2 presents an average molecular mass of 3419.88Da (theoretical average molecular mass 3418.94Da, monoisotopic molecular mass 3416.66Da and theoretical PI 7.78) and its amino acid sequence presents the loop region that is characteristic of natriuretic peptides. The peptide has 32 amino acids and its complete sequence is SYGISSGCFGLKLDRIGTMSGLGCWRLLQDSP. Coa_NP2 is a natriuretic peptide of the ANP/BNP-like family, since the carboxyterminal region of CNP has its own NP domain. We demonstrate, herein, that Coa_NP2 produces a dose-dependent decrease in mean arterial pressure in rats, followed by significant increases in concentrations of markers of nitric oxide formation measured in the plasma and vasorelaxation in a thoracic aortic ring bath. The structural and biological aspects confirm Coa_NP2 as a new natriuretic peptide, isolated from snake venom.

  1. Vascular effects and electrolyte homeostasis of the natriuretic peptide isolated from Crotalus oreganus abyssus (North American Grand Canyon rattlesnake) venom.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, S L; Dias-Junior, C A; Baldasso, P A; Damico, D C S; Carvalho, B M A; Garanto, A; Acosta, G; Oliveira, E; Albericio, F; Soares, A M; Marangoni, S; Resende, R R

    2012-08-01

    Crotalus oreganus abyssus is a rattlesnake that is usually found in the Grand Canyon, United States of America. Knowledge regarding the composition of C. o. abyssus venom is scarce. New natriuretic peptides (NPs) have been isolated and characterized from the venoms of members of the Crotalinae family. The NP family comprises three members, ANP (atrial natriuretic peptide), BNP (b-type natriuretic peptide) and CNP (c-type natriuretic peptide), and has an important role in blood pressure regulation and electrolyte homeostasis. The aim of the present study was to characterize a novel natriuretic-like peptide (Coa_NP2), isolated from C. o. abyssus venom. The Coa_NP2 presents an average molecular mass of 3419.88Da (theoretical average molecular mass 3418.94Da, monoisotopic molecular mass 3416.66Da and theoretical PI 7.78) and its amino acid sequence presents the loop region that is characteristic of natriuretic peptides. The peptide has 32 amino acids and its complete sequence is SYGISSGCFGLKLDRIGTMSGLGCWRLLQDSP. Coa_NP2 is a natriuretic peptide of the ANP/BNP-like family, since the carboxyterminal region of CNP has its own NP domain. We demonstrate, herein, that Coa_NP2 produces a dose-dependent decrease in mean arterial pressure in rats, followed by significant increases in concentrations of markers of nitric oxide formation measured in the plasma and vasorelaxation in a thoracic aortic ring bath. The structural and biological aspects confirm Coa_NP2 as a new natriuretic peptide, isolated from snake venom. PMID:22617223

  2. C-type natriuretic peptide inhibits leukocyte recruitment and platelet-leukocyte interactions via suppression of P-selectin expression

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Scotland, Ramona S.; Cohen, Marc; Foster, Paul; Lovell, Matthew; Mathur, Anthony; Ahluwalia, Amrita; Hobbs, Adrian J.

    2005-10-01

    The multifaceted process of immune cell recruitment to sites of tissue injury is key to the development of an inflammatory response and involved in the pathogenesis of numerous cardiovascular disorders. We recently identified C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) as an important endothelium-derived mediator that regulates vascular tone and protects against myocardial ischemia/reperfusion injury. Herein, we investigated whether CNP inhibits leukocyte recruitment and platelet aggregation and thereby exerts a potential antiinflammatory influence on the blood vessel wall. We assessed the effects of CNP on leukocyte-endothelial cell interactions in mouse mesenteric postcapillary venules in vivo in animals with high basal leukocyte activation (endothelial nitric oxide synthase knockout mice, eNOS-/-) or under acute inflammatory conditions (induced by interleukin-1 or histamine). CNP suppressed basal leukocyte rolling in eNOS-/- mice in a rapid, reversible, and concentration-dependent manner. These effects of CNP were mimicked by the selective natriuretic peptide receptor-C agonist cANF4-23. CNP also suppressed leukocyte rolling induced by IL-1 or histamine, inhibited platelet-leukocyte interactions, and prevented thrombin-induced platelet aggregation of human blood. Furthermore, analysis of human umbilical vein endothelial cells, leukocytes, and platelets revealed that CNP selectively attenuates expression of P-selectin. Thus, CNP is a modulator of acute inflammation in the blood vessel wall characterized by leukocyte and platelet activation. These antiinflammatory effects appear to be mediated, at least in part, via suppression of P-selectin expression. These observations suggest that endothelial CNP might maintain an anti-atherogenic influence on the blood vessel wall and represent a target for therapeutic intervention in inflammatory cardiovascular disorders. endothelium | natriuretic peptide receptor type C | atherosclerosis | thrombosis

  3. Increase in plasma concentrations of cardiodilatin (amino terminal pro-atrial natriuretic peptide) in cardiac failure and during recumbency.

    PubMed Central

    Meleagros, L; Gibbs, J S; Ghatei, M A; Bloom, S R

    1988-01-01

    Plasma concentrations of cardiodilatin, the peptide sequence at the amino terminal of the pro-atrial natriuretic peptide, in 17 normal subjects ranged from 59 to 202 (mean 118 (SEM) (9] pmol/l. Recumbency increased the mean (SEM) concentration to 160 (13) pmol/l. The plasma concentration of cardiodilatin in 24 patients with congestive cardiac failure was much higher (964 (175) pmol/l) than in the normal subjects. It was highest in those with heart failure in New York Heart Association functional classes III and IV and the concentration correlated both with atrial natriuretic peptide concentrations and left ventricular ejection fraction. Concentrations rose during induced tachycardia in three patients tested. Chromatography showed a single clean peak of plasma cardiodilatin immunoreactivity. It seems that cardiodilatin is a second circulating cardiac peptide that is jointly released with atrial natriuretic peptide by common stimuli. Other workers have reported that, like atrial natriuretic peptide, three partial cardiodilatin sequences can stimulate renal particulate guanylate cyclase and increase cyclic guanosine monophosphate. The simultaneous release of cardiodilatin in higher circulating concentrations than atrial natriuretic peptide may be relevant to the finding that appropriate concentrations of exogenous atrial natiuretic peptide alone do not produce the full renal effects associated with endogenous peptide release. PMID:2970269

  4. Plasma atrial natriuretic peptide after the Fontan procedure and total cavopulmonary connexion.

    PubMed

    Burch, M; Shinebourne, E A; Rigby, M L; Carter, N; Jeffery, S; Stanley, P; Smith, A

    1990-05-01

    Plasma atrial natriuretic peptide was measured in 10 children undergoing the Fontan procedure and 3 children undergoing total cavopulmonary connexion. There was no significant difference in pre-operative plasma levels, but post-operative levels were significantly higher 48 hours after cardiopulmonary bypass in the Fontan group. There was no significant difference in plasma arginine vasopressin levels either pre- or post-operatively. Post-operative pleural effusions occurred in only 2 of the 10 patients undergoing the Fontan procedure, but were present in all 3 of those undergoing total cavopulmonary connexion. The release of atrial natriuretic peptide is an appropriate homeostatic response to volume loading and the impairment of this response in the early post-operative period may be of clinical importance.

  5. Quantitative proteome changes in Arabidopsis thaliana suspension-cultured cells in response to plant natriuretic peptides.

    PubMed

    Turek, Ilona; Wheeler, Janet I; Gehring, Chris; Irving, Helen R; Marondedze, Claudius

    2015-09-01

    Proteome changes in the Arabidopsis thaliana suspension cells in response to the A. thaliana plant natriuretic peptide (PNP), AtPNP-A (At2g18660) were assessed using quantitative proteomics employing tandem mass tag (TMT) labeling and tandem mass spectrometry (LC-MS/MS). In this study, we characterized temporal responses of suspension-cultured cells to 1 nM and 10 pM AtPNP-A at 0, 10 and 30 min post-treatment. Both concentrations we found to yield a distinct differential proteome signature. The data shown in this article are associated with the article "Plant natriuretic peptides induce a specific set of proteins diagnostic for an adaptive response to abiotic stress" by Turek et al. (Front. Plant Sci. 5 (2014) 661) and have been deposited to the ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001386. PMID:26217812

  6. Cardiac content of brain natriuretic peptide in DOCA-salt hypertensive rats

    SciTech Connect

    Yokota, Naoto; Aburaya, Masahito; Yamamoto, Yoshitaka; Kato, Johji; Kitamura, Kazuo; Kida, Osamu; Eto, Tanenao; Kangawa, Kenji; Tanaka, Kenjiro ); Minamino, Naoto; Matsuo, Hisayuki )

    1991-01-01

    The cardiac content of immunoreactive rat brain natriuretic peptide (ir-rBNP) in deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA)-salt hypertensive rats was measured by radioimmunoassay (RIA). The atrial content of ir-rBNP was significantly lower in the DOCA-salt group than in the control group. However, the ventricular content of ir-rBNP was markedly increased in the DOCA-salt group as compared to the other groups. Ir-rBNP level in the atria was negatively correlated with blood pressure, while that in the ventricle was positively correlated with blood pressure. A significant correlation was observed between tissue levels of ir-rBNP and ir-rat atrial natriuretic peptide (rANP) both in atrium and ventricle. These results raise the possibility that rBNP as well as rANP functions as a cardiac hormone, the production of which probably changes in response to increased of body fluid and blood pressure.

  7. Current and emerging issues with B-type natriuretic peptide. Roundtable discussion.

    PubMed

    Silver, Marc A; Rosendorff, Clive; Berkowitz, Robert; Peacock, W Franklin

    2005-01-01

    A brief panel discussion was held on March 23, 2005, in New York City following a live symposium for primary care physicians discussing the roles of B-type natriuretic peptide in a variety of cardiovascular diseases. The participants were Dr. Marc A. Silver, Advocate Christ Medical Center, Oak Lawn, IL; Dr. Clive Rosendorff, Mount Sinai School of Medicine, New York, NY and VA Medical Center, Bronx, NY; Dr. Robert Berkowitz, Hackensack University Medical Center, Hackensack, NJ; and Dr. W. Franklin Peacock IV, The Cleveland Clinic Department of Emergency Medicine, Cleveland, OH. Dr. Silver moderated the discussion. The panel gathered to review some of the questions that emerged from the symposium and the questions raised by the attendees. These are of interest and importance to all interested in heart failure and B-type natriuretic peptide.

  8. C-type natriuretic peptide plasma levels are reduced in obese adolescents.

    PubMed

    Del Ry, S; Cabiati, M; Bianchi, V; Storti, S; Caselli, C; Prescimone, T; Clerico, A; Saggese, G; Giannessi, D; Federico, G

    2013-12-01

    The high prevalence of obesity in children may increase the magnitude of lifetime risk of cardiovascular disease (CD). At present, explicit data for recommending biomarkers as routine pre-clinical markers of CD in children are lacking. C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) is assuming increasing importance in CD; in adults with heart failure, its plasma levels are related to clinical and functional disease severity. We have previously reported five different reference intervals for blood CNP as a function of age in healthy children; however, data on plasma CNP levels in obese children are still lacking. Aim of this study was to assess CNP levels in obese adolescents and verify whether they differ from healthy subjects. Plasma CNP was measured in 29 obese adolescents (age: 11.8 ± 0.4 years; BMI: 29.8 ± 0.82) by radioimmunoassay and compared with the reference values of healthy subjects. BNP was also measured. Both plasma CNP and BNP levels were significantly lower in the obese adolescents compared to the appropriate reference values (CNP: 3.4 ± 0.2 vs 13.6 ± 2.3 pg/ml, p<0.0001; BNP: 18.8 ± 2.6 vs 36.9 ± 5.5 pg/ml, p=0.003). There was no significant difference between CNP values in males and females. As reported in adults, we observed lower plasma CNP and BNP levels in obese children, suggesting a defective natriuretic peptide system in these patients. An altered regulation of production, clearance and function of natriuretic peptides, already operating in obese adolescents, may possibly contribute to the future development of CD. Thus, the availability of drugs promoting the action of natriuretic peptides may represent an attractive therapeutic option to prevent CD.

  9. Structure, signaling mechanism and regulation of the natriuretic peptide receptor guanylate cyclase.

    SciTech Connect

    Misono, K. S.; Philo, J. S.; Arakawa, T.; Ogata, C. M.; Qiu, Y.; Ogawa, H.; Young, H. S.

    2011-06-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and the homologous B-type natriuretic peptide are cardiac hormones that dilate blood vessels and stimulate natriuresis and diuresis, thereby lowering blood pressure and blood volume. ANP and B-type natriuretic peptide counterbalance the actions of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone and neurohormonal systems, and play a central role in cardiovascular regulation. These activities are mediated by natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPRA), a single transmembrane segment, guanylyl cyclase (GC)-linked receptor that occurs as a homodimer. Here, we present an overview of the structure, possible chloride-mediated regulation and signaling mechanism of NPRA and other receptor GCs. Earlier, we determined the crystal structures of the NPRA extracellular domain with and without bound ANP. Their structural comparison has revealed a novel ANP-induced rotation mechanism occurring in the juxtamembrane region that apparently triggers transmembrane signal transduction. More recently, the crystal structures of the dimerized catalytic domain of green algae GC Cyg12 and that of cyanobacterium GC Cya2 have been reported. These structures closely resemble that of the adenylyl cyclase catalytic domain, consisting of a C1 and C2 subdomain heterodimer. Adenylyl cyclase is activated by binding of G{sub s}{alpha} to C2 and the ensuing 7{sup o} rotation of C1 around an axis parallel to the central cleft, thereby inducing the heterodimer to adopt a catalytically active conformation. We speculate that, in NPRA, the ANP-induced rotation of the juxtamembrane domains, transmitted across the transmembrane helices, may induce a similar rotation in each of the dimerized GC catalytic domains, leading to the stimulation of the GC catalytic activity.

  10. Influence of natriuretic peptide receptor-1 on survival and cardiac hypertrophy during development

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Nicola J.A.; Ellmers, Leigh. J.; Lainchbury, John G.; Maeda, Nobuyo; Smithies, Oliver; Richards, A. Mark; Cameron, Vicky A.

    2010-01-01

    The heart adapts to an increased workload through the activation of a hypertrophic response within the cardiac ventricles. This response is characterized by both an increase in the size of the individual cardiomyocytes and an induction of a panel of genes normally expressed in the embryonic and neonatal ventricle, such as atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP). ANP and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) exert their biological actions through activation of the natriuretic peptide receptor-1 (Npr1). The current study examined mice lacking Npr1 (Npr1−/−) activity and investigated the effects of the absence of Npr1 signaling during cardiac development on embryo viability, cardiac structure and gene and protein expression. Npr1−/−embryos were collected at embryonic day (ED) 12.5, 15.5 and neonatal day 1 (ND 1). Npr1−/−embryos occurred at the expected Mendelian frequency at ED 12.5, but knockout numbers were significantly decreased at ED 15.5 and ND 1. There was no indication of cardiac structural abnormalities in surviving embryos. However, Npr1−/−embryos exhibited cardiac enlargement (without fibrosis) from ED 15.5 as well as significantly increased ANP mRNA and protein expression compared to wild-type (WT) mice, but no concomitant increase in expression of the hypertrophy-related transcription factors, Mef2A, Mef2C, GATA-4, GATA-6 or serum response factor (SRF). However, there was a significant decrease in Connexin-43 (Cx43) gene and protein expression at mid-gestation in Npr1−/−embryos. Our findings suggest that the mechanism by which natriuretic peptide signaling influences cardiac development in Npr1−/− mice is distinct from that seen during the development of pathological cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis. The decreased viability of Npr1−/−embryos may result from a combination of cardiomegaly and dysregulated Cx43 protein affecting cardiac contractility. PMID:19782130

  11. Involvement of insulin-degrading enzyme in insulin- and atrial natriuretic peptide-sensitive internalization of amyloid-β peptide in mouse brain capillary endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shingo; Ohtsuki, Sumio; Murata, Sho; Katsukura, Yuki; Suzuki, Hiroya; Funaki, Miho; Tachikawa, Masanori; Terasaki, Tetsuya

    2014-01-01

    Cerebral clearance of amyloid-β peptide (Aβ), which is implicated in Alzheimer's disease, involves elimination across the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and we previously showed that an insulin-sensitive process is involved in the case of Aβ1-40. The purpose of this study was to clarify the molecular mechanism of the insulin-sensitive Aβ1-40 elimination across mouse BBB. An in vivo cerebral microinjection study demonstrated that [125I]hAβ1-40 elimination from mouse brain was inhibited by human natriuretic peptide (hANP), and [125I]hANP elimination was inhibited by hAβ1-40, suggesting that hAβ1-40 and hANP share a common elimination process. Internalization of [125I]hAβ1-40 into cultured mouse brain capillary endothelial cells (TM-BBB4) was significantly inhibited by either insulin, hANP, other natriuretic peptides or insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) inhibitors, but was not inhibited by phosphoramidon or thiorphan. Although we have reported the involvement of natriuretic peptide receptor C (Npr-C) in hANP internalization, cells stably expressing Npr-C internalized [125I]hANP but not [125I]hAβ1-40, suggesting that there is no direct interaction between Npr-C and hAβ1-40. IDE was detected in plasma membrane of TM-BBB4 cells, and internalization of [125I]hAβ1-40 by TM-BBB4 cells was reduced by IDE-targeted siRNAs. We conclude that elimination of hAβ1-40 from mouse brain across the BBB involves an insulin- and ANP-sensitive process, mediated by IDE expressed in brain capillary endothelial cells.

  12. Evidence that atrial natriuretic peptide tissue extraction is not changed by large increases in its plasma levels induced by pacing in humans.

    PubMed

    Iervasi, G; Clerico, A; Pilo, A; Vitek, F; Berti, S; Palmieri, C; Ravani, M; Sabatino, L; Manfredi, C; Del Chicca, M G; Biagini, A; Donato, L

    1997-03-01

    Atrial natiurectic peptide (ANP) is a cardiac hormone with a very short plasma half-life, which plays an important role in a variety of clinical conditions associated with an increase in pressure and/or volume overload on the heart. The MCR of the hormone is considered to represent a stable parameter, reflecting the uptake and degradation rate of ANP by the periphery, only scarcely affected by rapid oscillations of circulating levels. To evaluate the extent to which MCR is affected by rapid and large variations of circulating levels of the hormone, we measured MCR in five patients with different degrees of myocardial function (from normal to severely impaired), in whom changes in ANP levels were induced by atrial and/or ventricular pacing. Cardiac output was simultaneously measured by thermodilution to calculate whole body extraction of ANP. During constant i.v. infusion of [125I]ANP, the hormone MCR was determined both under basal conditions (at tracer equilibration, 20-30 min after the start of infusion) and during atrial and ventricular pacing. Pacing maneuvers, begun 50 min after the start of infusion, induced a marked and rapid increase in endogenous plasma ANP values in all patients (on the average, 3,7-fold compared to basal values; range, 1.8-5.68), whereas corresponding values of [125I]ANP only minimally changed. The MCR of ANP (3.62 +/- 1.06 L/min, mean +/- SD) slightly decreased (by repeated measures ANOVA, P = 0.0458) during atrial and ventricular pacing procedures (3.35 +/- 1.03 and 3.15 +/- 0.74 L/min, respectively), reaching a mean value of 88.7 +/- 9.0% compared to basal. The small decrease in MCR could be almost completely ascribed to hemodynamic factors; indeed, basal cardiac output (5.76 +/- 1.70 L/min) was found, on the average, to be slightly decreased during atrial and ventricular pacing (5.28 +/- 1.46 and 5.16 +/- 1.33 L/min, respectively), and so whole body extraction of the hormone, measured before pacing (50.0 +/- 12%), remains stable

  13. Immunoreactive prohormone atrial natriuretic peptides 1-30 and 31-67 - Existence of a single circulating amino-terminal peptide

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Yu-Ming; Whitson, Peggy A.; Cintron, Nitza M.

    1990-01-01

    Sep-Pak C18 extraction of human plasma and radioimmunoassay using antibodies which recognize atrial natriuretic peptide (99-128) and the prohormone sequences 1-30 and 31-67 resulted in mean values from 20 normal subjects of 26.2 (+/- 9.2), 362 (+/- 173) and 368 (+/- 160) pg/ml, respectively. A high correlation coefficient between values obtained using antibodies recognizing prohormone sequences 1-30 and 31-67 was observed (R = 0.84). Extracted plasma immunoreactivity of 1-30 and 31-67 both eluted at 46 percent acetonitrile. In contrast, chromatographic elution of synthetic peptides 1-30 and 31-67 was observed at 48 and 39 percent acetonitrile, respectively. Data suggest that the radioimmunoassay of plasma using antibodies recognizing prohormone sequences 1-30 and 31-67 may represent the measurement of a unique larger amino-terminal peptide fragment containing antigenic sites recognized by both antisera.

  14. Diagnostic and prognostic values of B-type natriuretic peptides (BNP) and N-terminal fragment brain natriuretic peptides (NT-pro-BNP).

    PubMed

    Maries, Lorena; Manitiu, Ioan

    2013-08-01

    B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a member of a fournatriuretic peptide family that shares a common 17-peptide ring structure. The N-terminal fragment (NT-pro-BNP) is biologically inert, but both are secreted in the plasma in equimolar quantities and both have been evaluated for use in the management of congestive heart failure. BNP and NT-pro-BNP are frequently used in the diagnosis of congestive heart failure and distinguishing between patients with dyspnoea of cardiac or pulmonary origin. Values of NT-pro-BNP are affected by age or the presence of one or several co-morbidities such as chronic renal failure, type 2 diabetes, and acute coronary syndrome. 'Normal' values of these peptides also vary depending on the type of test used. The performance characteristics of these tests vary depending on the patients on whom they are used and the manufacturer. For this reason, the determination of reference values for this peptide represents such a challenge.

  15. Constitutively active form of natriuretic peptide receptor 2 ameliorates experimental pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Nawa, Nobutoshi; Ishida, Hidekazu; Katsuragi, Shinichi; Baden, Hiroki; Takahashi, Kunihiko; Higeno, Ryota; Torigoe, Fumiko; Mihara, Seiko; Narita, Jun; Miura, Kohji; Nakamura, Kazufumi; Kogaki, Shigetoyo; Ozono, Keiichi

    2016-01-01

    We recently found a constitutively active mutant of natriuretic peptide receptor 2 (caNPR2; V883M), which synthesizes larger amounts of cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) intracellularly without any ligand stimulation than existing drugs. The aim of this study was to investigate the therapeutic effects of gene transduction using caNPR2 for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). In vitro gene transduction into human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells using Sendai virus (SeV) vectors carrying caNPR2 induced 10,000-fold increases in the synthesis of cGMP without ligand stimulation, and the proliferation of caNPR2-expressing cells was significantly attenuated. The PAH model rats generated by hypoxia and the administration of SU5416 were then treated with SeV vectors through a direct injection into the left pulmonary artery. Right ventricular systolic pressure was significantly decreased 2 weeks after the treatment, while systemic blood pressure remained unchanged. Histological analyses revealed that the medial wall thickness and occlusion rate of pulmonary arterioles were significantly improved in caNPR2-treated lungs. Neither the systemic integration of virus vectors nor side effects were observed. The massive stimulation of cGMP synthesis by gene therapy with caNPR2 was safe and effective in a PAH rat model and, thus, has potential as a novel therapy for patients with severe progressive PAH. PMID:27419193

  16. Correlation between heart disorders and concentrations of directly measured atrial natriuretic peptide in plasma.

    PubMed

    Fridrich, L; Szekeres, T; Hartter, E; Schweighofer, F; Gassner, A; Laczkovic, A

    1989-03-01

    We used new commercially available direct radioimmunoassay to measure human atrial natriuretic peptide (h-ANP) in plasma from 48 individuals who were being evaluated for left and right ventricular function. For 13 healthy individuals with normal ventricular function these concentrations ranged up to 54 ng/L. Measurements of h-ANP clearly differentiated between normal subjects, patients with coronary artery disease, and patients who had undergone orthotopic heart transplantation (ANOVA P less than 0.0001, significant differences between all groups)--all showing normal ventricular function at rest. There was a strong negative correlation (r = -0.64, P less than 0.001) between left ventricular ejection fraction and h-ANP concentrations in plasma of patients with proven coronary artery disease, patients with cardiomyopathy, and healthy individuals. Results by the present method and methods involving extraction of the sample correlated well. Evidently the direct assay of h-ANP in plasma yields information that could be used to help evaluate heart disorders and other pathophysiological conditions causing increased h-ANP concentrations in plasma.

  17. Systemic inflammatory response syndrome following burns is mediated by brain natriuretic peptide/natriuretic peptide A receptor-induced shock factor 1 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yang-Cheng; Luo, Cheng-Qun; Li, Xiong

    2016-10-01

    The aim of this study was to determine whether systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) in burn patients is mediated by the brain natriuretic peptide (BNP)/natriuretic peptide A receptor (NPRA)-induced heat shock factor 1 (HSF-1) signalling pathway. Mononuclear cells (MNCs) that were isolated from patients with burn injuries and SIRS mouse models and a RAW264.7 cell line were treated with normal serum or serum obtained from animals with burn injuries. In parallel, small hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) against BNP or NPRA were transfected in both cell types. Western blotting (WB) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were used to detect protein expression and inflammatory factor levels, respectively. We found that interleukin (IL)-12, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, C-reactive protein (CRP), and BNP levels were increased and IL-10 levels were decreased in the plasma and MNCs in vivo in the animal model of SIRS. Additionally, NPRA was upregulated, whereas HSF-1 was downregulated in monocytes in vivo. Treatment of RAW264.7 cells with burn serum or BNP induced IL-12, TNF-α, and CRP secretion as well as HSF-1 expression. Finally, silencing BNP with shRNA interrupted the effect of burn serum on RAW264.7 cells, and silencing NPRA blocked burn serum- and BNP-mediated changes in RAW264.7 cells. These results suggest that the interaction of NPRA with BNP secreted from circulatory MNCs as well as mononuclear macrophages leads to inflammation via HSF-1 during SIRS development following serious burn injury.

  18. Plasma arginine vasopressin, atrial natriuretic peptide and brain natriuretic peptide responses to long-term field training in the heat: effects of fluid ingestion and acclimatization.

    PubMed

    Mudambo, K S; Coutie, W; Rennie, M J

    1997-01-01

    The maintenance of blood volume during exercise, especially in a hot environment, is of major importance for continued performance. In order to investigate the relationships between exercise, type and amount of fluid intake and the degree of acclimatization to heat stress and on responses of arginine vasopressin (AVP), atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), we studied 24 soldiers during and after jogging/walking exercise both before and after acclimatization to field training at [mean (SE)] 40 (0.7) degrees C and 32 (3)% relative humidity. The running exercise was carried out under three conditions, i.e., (1) without any fluid intake, (2) with intake of water or (3) with intake of a dextrose/electrolyte solution. Venous blood samples were drawn before exercise, at the end of exercise and at 15 min and 60 min afterwards. Acclimatization resulted in significant losses of body mass, total body water, plasma volume, ANP and increases in plasma osmolality, packed cell volume and AVP at rest but without any significant changes in BNP. During exercise with no fluid intake, there was a significant rise in plasma osmolality, Na+ and AVP, but no significant alterations in plasma ANP and BNP were observed. When subjects ingested water or dextrose/electrolyte solution during exercise, ANP rose by 234% and 431% respectively and BNP rose by 398% and 583% respectively without any significant increase in AVP. The results suggest that, during acclimatization, the subjects became slightly dehydrated. Alterations in response to changes in body water status appear to be greater for AVP than ANP or BNP at rest. During exercise in the heat ANP and BNP may play complementary roles. PMID:9088840

  19. Sustained increases in plasma C-type natriuretic peptides fail to increase concentrations in cerebrospinal fluid: Evidence from pregnant sheep.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Michele O; Barrell, Graham K; Prickett, Timothy C R; Espiner, Eric A

    2015-07-01

    C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) is a paracrine growth factor with high abundance in CNS tissues and cerebrospinal fluid (CSF). Consistent with findings of CNP transcripts in the cerebral microvasculature and hypothalamus, CNP increases the permeability of the blood-brain barrier and reduces food intake when administered intracerebroventricularly in rodents. Whether high concentrations of CNP in plasma can affect CSF levels is unknown. Accordingly we have studied changes (days 4, 87 and 116) in concurrent plasma and CSF concentrations of CNP peptides in pregnant sheep - a physiologically unique setting in which plasma CNP is elevated for prolonged periods. Preliminary studies in non pregnant sheep showed stable CNP levels in CSF during repetitive sampling. Compared with values in non pregnant controls, plasma concentrations of CNP peptides were markedly raised (30-fold) at days 87 and 116 in pregnant sheep, yet CSF levels in the two groups did not differ. CNP peptides in CSF decreased from day 4 to day 87 in pregnant sheep, possibly reflecting an adaptive response of the cerebral vasculature to increased hemodynamic load. We conclude that sustained high concentrations of CNP - far exceeding levels encountered in human pathophysiology - fail to affect CNP peptide levels in CSF.

  20. Preliminary Development of a DNA Aptamer-Magnetic Bead Capture Electrochemiluminescence Sandwich Assay for Brain Natriuretic Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Bruno, John G.; Richarte, Alicia M.; Phillips, Taylor

    2014-01-01

    Fifty-two candidate DNA aptamer sequences were selected for binding to the cardiovascular biomarker B-type or brain natriuretic peptide (BNP). Candidate aptamers were screened to rank their relative affinities against BNP by an aptamer-based ELISA-like aptamer microplate assay (ELASA). The highest affinity aptamers from ELASA screening were also paired in all possible combinations and screened for electrochemiluminescence (ECL) assay potential in capture aptamer-magnetic bead and ruthenium trisbipyridine (Ru(bpy)32+)-reporter aptamer sandwich formats. The top ECL sandwich combinations utilized the same aptamer pair in either capture or reporting roles with nanogram to low picogram per mL levels of detection even in 50% human serum. ECL assay sensitivity and linearity even in 50% human serum suggest that the aptamer-based assay is at least comparable to other reported immunoassays for BNP. PMID:24764602

  1. Responses of cardiac natriuretic peptides after paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia: ANP surges faster than BNP and CNP.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Jen-Yuan; Wang, An-Mei; Chang, Sheng-Hsiung; Hung, Chung-Lieh; Chen, Chun-Yen; Shih, Bing-Fu; Yeh, Hung-I

    2016-03-15

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) secretion increases after 30 min of paroxysmal supraventricular tachycardia (PSVT). Whether this phenomenon also applies to brain or C-type natriuretic peptides (BNP or CNP) remains unknown. Blood samples of 18 patients (41 ± 11 yr old; 4 men) with symptomatic PSVT and normal left ventricular systolic function (ejection fraction 65 ± 6%) were collected from the coronary sinus (CS) and the femoral artery (FA) before and 30 min after the induction, and 30 min after the termination of PSVT. The results showed that the ANP levels rose steeply after the PSVT and then reduced at 30 min after the termination (baseline vs. post-PSVT vs. posttermination: CS: 34.0 ± 29.6 vs. 74.1 ± 42.3 vs. 46.1 ± 32.9; FA: 5.9 ± 3.24 vs. 28.2 ± 20.7 vs. 10.0 ± 4.6 pg/ml; all P < 0.05). In contrast, compared with ANP, the increases of BNP and CNP in CS after the PSVT were less sharp, but continued to rise after the termination of tachycardia (BNP, 10.2 ± 6.4 vs. 11.3 ± 7.1 vs. 11.8 ± 7.9; CNP, 4.5 ± 1.2 vs. 4.9 ± 1.4 vs. 5.0 ± 1.4 pg/ml; all P < 0.05). The rise of BNP and CNP in FA was similarly less sharp after the PSVT and remained stationary after the termination. PSVT exerted differential effects on cardiac natriuretic peptide levels. ANP increased greater after a 30-min induced PSVT, but dropped faster after termination of PSVT, compared with BNP and CNP.

  2. Atrial Natriuretic Peptide and Type 2 Diabetes Development – Biomarker and Genotype Association Study

    PubMed Central

    Jujić, Amra; Nilsson, Peter M.; Engström, Gunnar; Hedblad, Bo; Melander, Olle; Magnusson, Martin

    2014-01-01

    Background We have recently shown that low plasma levels of mid-regional atrial natriuretic peptide (MR-ANP) predict development of diabetes and glucose progression over time, independently of known risk factors for diabetes development. However, since MR-ANP levels might be influenced by unknown factors causing diabetes, we cannot rule out that such relationship might be confounded. Previous studies have shown an association of a single nucleotide polymorphism rs5068 on the natriuretic peptide precursor A (NPPA) locus gene with higher levels of circulating ANP. Since gene variants are inherited randomly and not subject to confounding, we aimed to investigate whether the variant rs5068 within the NPPA locus is associated with incident type 2 diabetes. Methods We genotyped the variant rs5068 within the NPPA locus in 27,307 individuals without known diabetes from the Malmö Diet Cancer Study. Incident diabetes was retrieved through national and regional registers (median follow-up time of 14 years, 2,823 incident diabetes cases). Results In Cox regression analysis adjusted for age, sex and BMI, we found that the carriers of at least one copy of the G allele of rs5068 had lower likelihood of incident diabetes within 14 years (HR = 0.88, 95% CI 0.78–0.99, p = 0.037). Conclusion Our results indicate a role of the ANP system in the etiology of type 2 diabetes and might help provide insight in the metabolic actions of natriuretic peptides and the pathophysiology of type 2 diabetes. PMID:24586593

  3. Effects of angiotensin, vasopressin and atrial natriuretic peptide on intraocular pressure in anesthetized rats

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Palm, D. E.; Shue, S. G.; Keil, L. C.; Balaban, C. D.; Severs, W. B.

    1995-01-01

    The effects of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), vasopressin (AVP) and angiotensin (ANG) on blood and intraocular pressures of pentobarbital anesthetized rats were evaluated following intravenous, intracerebroventricular or anterior chamber routes of administration. Central injections did not affect intraocular pressure. Equipressor intravenous infusions of ANG raised, whereas AVP decreased, intraocular pressure. Direct infusions of a balanced salt solution (0.175 microliter/min) raised intraocular pressure between 30 and 60 min. Adding ANG or ANP slightly reduced this solvent effect but AVP was markedly inhibitory. An AVP-V1 receptor antagonist reversed the blunting of the solvent-induced rise by the peptide, indicating receptor specificity. Acetazolamide pretreatment lowered intraocular pressure, but the solvent-induced rise in intraocular pressure and inhibition by AVP still occurred without altering the temporal pattern. Thus, these effects appear unrelated to aqueous humor synthesis rate. The data support the possibility of intraocular pressure regulation by peptides acting from the blood and aqueous humor.

  4. Natriuretic Peptides as Predictors of Atrial Fibrillation Recurrences Following Electrical Cardioversion.

    PubMed

    Zografos, Theodoros A; Katritsis, Demosthenes G

    2013-11-01

    Electrical cardioversion (ECV) can be effective in restoring sinus rhythm (SR) in the majority of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Several factors that predispose to AF recurrences, such as age, AF duration and left atrial size have been used to guide a decision for cardioversion, but increasing evidence suggests that they may be rather poor markers of left atrial structural remodeling that determines the long-term success of a rhythm control strategy. In this context, the use of easily obtainable biomarkers, such as the levels of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), to predict AF recurrences may be preferable. Since ANP production is associated with the extent of functional atrial myocardium, and both ANP and BNP reflect atrial pressure and mechanical stretching, these peptides are good candidate biomarkers to assess predisposition to AF recurrences. In this review we focus on the pathophysiological mechanisms and the available clinical evidence regarding the prediction of AF recurrences following successful ECV from pre-procedural ANP and BNP levels.

  5. Natriuretic Peptides as Predictors of Atrial Fibrillation Recurrences Following Electrical Cardioversion

    PubMed Central

    Zografos, Theodoros A; Katritsis, Demosthenes G

    2013-01-01

    Electrical cardioversion (ECV) can be effective in restoring sinus rhythm (SR) in the majority of patients with atrial fibrillation (AF). Several factors that predispose to AF recurrences, such as age, AF duration and left atrial size have been used to guide a decision for cardioversion, but increasing evidence suggests that they may be rather poor markers of left atrial structural remodeling that determines the long-term success of a rhythm control strategy. In this context, the use of easily obtainable biomarkers, such as the levels of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), to predict AF recurrences may be preferable. Since ANP production is associated with the extent of functional atrial myocardium, and both ANP and BNP reflect atrial pressure and mechanical stretching, these peptides are good candidate biomarkers to assess predisposition to AF recurrences. In this review we focus on the pathophysiological mechanisms and the available clinical evidence regarding the prediction of AF recurrences following successful ECV from pre-procedural ANP and BNP levels. PMID:26835050

  6. The response of circulating brain natriuretic peptide to academic stress in college students.

    PubMed

    Amir, Offer; Sagiv, Moran; Eynon, Nir; Yamin, Chen; Rogowski, Ori; Gerzy, Yishay; Amir, Ruthie E

    2010-01-01

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), a cardiac peptide, has been implicated in the regulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) responses to psychological stressors. The influence of academic stress on circulating concentration of the N-terminal fragment of BNP precursor (NT-proBNP), and in relation to the stress hormone (cortisol) response was studied in 170 college students undergoing major examinations. Just prior to the examination, we measured self-estimated stress level, systolic, and diastolic blood pressure (SBP, DBP), heart rate (HR), plasma levels of cortisol, and NT-proBNP. These parameters were compared to the participants' baseline measurements, taken at the same hour of a different 'control day', without a major examination to induce stress. Hemodynamic variables (SBP, DBP, and HR) increased on the examination day compared with baseline values ( p < 0.001). Circulating cortisol concentration increased before examinations (+42%, p < 0.001). The response to stress was marked by a significant decrease in plasma NT-proBNP concentration (-40%, p < 0.001). We found in males a significant interaction between the cortisol elevation with examination stress and the NT-proBNP reduction ( p = 0.02). In response to academic stress, the plasma cortisol elevation was accompanied by a marked reduction in plasma NT-proBNP level. These data may indicate that mental stress entails an interface between the HPA axis and the peripheral natriuretic peptide system, leading to reciprocating changes in circulating levels of the corresponding hormones.

  7. [ATRIAL AND BRAIN NATRIURETIC PEPTIDES OF CARDIAC MUSCLE CELLS IN POSTREPERFUSION PERIOD IN RATS].

    PubMed

    Bugrova, M L

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation and release of atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP) in right atrial cardiac muscle cells has been investigated in rats after 60 minutes and 60 days after the reperfusion start. The total ischemia was simulated by the method of V. G. Korpachev. Immunocytochemical localization of peptides in cardiomyocytes was performed in ultrathin sections using polyclonal antibodies. The intensity of accumulation/excretion of ANP and BNP were analyzed by the method of counting the number of granules (A- and B-types) with immunoreactive labels in 38 x 38 mkm2 visual fields in transmission electron microscope Morgagni 268D (FEI). The results were assessed using Mann-Whitney U-test (p < 0.05). After 60 minutes and 60 days post-reperfusion period, we detected an increase in the synthesis and release of ANP and BNP. The reaction of BNP was more pronounced than ANP. This is due to the fact that ANP is the main hormone of the natriuretic peptide system involved in the regulation of blood pressure in normal conditions, while BNP is the principal regulator of pressure in cardiovascular pathology. PMID:27228659

  8. Natriuretic peptides induce weak VASP phosphorylation at Serine 239 in platelets.

    PubMed

    Borgognone, Alessandra; Lowe, Kate L; Watson, Stephen P; Madhani, Melanie

    2014-01-01

    Cyclic guanosine-3',5'-monophoshate (cGMP) is the common second messenger for the cardiovascular effects of nitric oxide (NO) and natriuretic peptides (NP; e.g. atrial NP [ANP]), which activate soluble and particulate guanylyl cyclases, respectively. The role of NO in regulating cGMP and platelet function is well documented, whereas there is little evidence supporting a role for NPs in regulating platelet reactivity. By studying platelet aggregation and secretion in response to a PAR-1 peptide, collagen and ADP, and phosphorylation of the cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) substrate vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (VASP) at serine 239, we evaluated the effects of NPs in the absence or presence of the non-selective cGMP and cAMP phosphodiesterase (PDE) inhibitor, 3-isobutyl-1-methylxanthine (IBMX). Our results show that NPs, possibly through the clearance receptor (natriuretic peptide receptor-C) expressed on platelet membranes, increase VASP phosphorylation but only following PDE inhibition, indicating a small, localised cGMP synthesis. As platelet aggregation and secretion measured under the same conditions were not affected, we conclude that the magnitude of PKG activation achieved by NPs in platelets per se is not sufficient to exert functional inhibition of platelet involvement in haemostasis. PMID:23469931

  9. Left ventricular dysfunction, natriuretic peptides, and mortality in an urban population

    PubMed Central

    McDonagh, T; Cunningham, A; Morrison, C; McMurray, J; Ford, I; Morton, J; Dargie, H

    2001-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To report the mortality of left ventricular systolic dysfunction (LVD), assessed objectively by echocardiography, and its association with natriuretic peptide hormones in a random sample of 1640 men and women aged 25-74 years from a geographical, urban population.
METHODS—Left ventricular function was measured by echocardiography in 1640 attendees studied in 1992-3. LVD was defined as a left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) ⩽ 30%. Plasma concentrations of N-terminal atrial natriuretic peptide (N-ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) were measured by standard radioimmunoassays. Mortality was documented at four years.
RESULTS—The four year all cause mortality rate in the whole cohort was 4.9% (80 deaths). It was 21% (nine deaths) in those with an LVEF ⩽ 30% and 4% in those whose LVEF was > 30% (p < 0.001). The median (interquartile range) BNP concentration in those who died was 16.9 pg/ml (8.8-27) and 7.8 pg/ml (3.4-13) in survivors (p < 0.0001). Similarly, N-ANP had a median concentration of 2.35 ng/ml (1.32-3.36) in those with a fatal outcome and 1.27 ng/ml (0.9-2.0) in those alive at four years (p < 0.0001). Subjects with an LVEF ⩽ 40% also had a significant mortality rate of 17% if they also had a BNP concentration ⩾ 17.9 pg/ml compared with 6.8% if their BNP was below this concentration (p = 0.013). Multivariate analysis revealed the independent predictors of four year all cause mortality to be increasing age (p < 0.001), a BNP concentration ⩾ 17.9 pg/ml (p = 0.006), the presence of ischaemic heart disease (p = 0.03), and male sex (p = 0.04).
CONCLUSIONS—LVD is associated with a considerable mortality rate in this population. BNP also independently predicts outcome. In addition to its role as a diagnostic aid in chronic heart failure and LVD, it provides prognostic information and clarifies the meaning of a given degree of LVD.


Keywords: epidemiology; left ventricular dysfunction

  10. Localization of atrial natriuretic peptide receptors in the rat tongue and hard palate.

    PubMed

    Park, B K; Cho, E S; Lee, J D; Oh, C; Lee, M S; Kim, S Z; Kim, S H; Cho, K W

    1998-08-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) receptors were characterized in rat oral mucosa using quantitative in vitro autoradiography and activation of particulate guanylyl cyclase (GC) by natriuretic peptides. Competition-binding analysis performed by quantitative in vitro autoradiography demonstrated specific [125I]rANP(1-28) binding sites in the tongue and hard palate. The precise location of this binding was revealed on the basal and parabasal cells of the epithelia by microautoradiography. The dissociation constant (Kd) and maximal binding capacity (Bmax) of these sites were 3.34+/-1.35 nM and 2.71+/-2.21 fmol/mm2 on the epithelium of the tongue, and 4.09+/-1.52 nM and 3.45+/-3.01 fmol/mm2 on the epithelium of the hard palate, respectively. Receptor subtypes were characterized by competition with des [Gln18, Ser19, Gly20, Leu21, Gly22] ANP(4-23) (C-ANP), a specific ligand for the clearance receptor (NPR-C). These binding sites were displaced by C-ANP with inhibition constant (Ki) of 8.96+/-3.18 nM and Bmax of 2.89+/-2.45 fmol/mm2 on the epithelium of the tongue, and Ki of 9.12+/-2.71 nM and Bmax of 3.08+/-2.94 fmol/mm2 on the epithelium of the hard palate, respectively. Production of cyclic GMP by particulate GC in the epithelial membranes of the tongue and hard palate was stimulated by rANP(1-28), porcine brain natriuretic peptide (BNP)(1-26), and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP)(1-22) in a dose-dependent manner. These results indicate that ANP-binding sites in the epithelium of the tongue and hard palate are mainly clearance receptors (NPR-C) but biological receptors (NPR-A and/or NPR-B) with GC activity are also present, and suggest that ANP may have a role in the proliferation of the oral epithelial cells, especially in the tongue and hard palate.

  11. Characterization of atrial natriuretic peptide receptors in brain microvessel endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitson, Peggy A.; Huls, M. H.; Sams, Clarence F.

    1989-01-01

    In view of the suggestions by Chabrier et al. (1987) and Steardo and Nathanson (1987) that atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) may play a role in the fluid homeostasis of the brain, the ANP receptors in primary cultures of bovine brain microvessel endothelian cells were quantitated and characterized. Results of partition binding studies and the effect of cGMP additions indicated the presence of at least two types of ANP receptors, with the majority of the receptors being the nonguanylate cyclase coupled receptors. The presence of at least two ANP receptor types suggests an active role for ANP in regulating brain endothelial cell function.

  12. [Four-week simulated weightlessness increases the expression of atrial natriuretic peptide in the myocardium].

    PubMed

    Zhang, Wen-Cheng; Lu, Yuan-Ming; Yang, Huai-Zhang; Xu, Peng-Tao; Chang, Hui; Yu, Zhi-Bin

    2013-04-25

    One of the major circulatory changes that occur in human during space flight and simulated weightlessness is a cerebral redistribution of body fluids, which is accompanied by an increase of blood volume in the upper body. Therefore, atrial myocardium should increase the secretion of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), but the researches lack common conclusion until now. The present study was to investigate the expression level of ANP in simulated weightlessness rats, and to confirm the changes of ANP by observing the associated proteins of soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptors (SNAREs). The tail-suspended rat model was used to simulate weightlessness. Western blots were carried out to examine the expression levels of ANP and SNARE proteins in atrial and left ventricular myocardium. The results showed that ANP expression in atrial myocardium showed an increase in 4-week tail-suspended rats (SUS) compared with that in the synchronous control rats (CON). We only detected a trace amount of ANP in the left ventricular myocardium of the CON, but found an enhanced expression of ANP in left ventricular myocardium of the SUS. Expression of VAMP-1/2 (vesicle associated SNARE) increased significantly in both atrial and left ventricular myocardium in the SUS compared with that in the CON. There was no difference of the expression of syntaxin-4 (target compartment associated SNARE) between the CON and SUS, but the expression of SNAP-23 showed an increase in atrial myocardium of the SUS compared with that in the CON. Synip and Munc-18c as regulators of SNAREs did not show significant difference between the CON and SUS. These results suggest that the expression of ANP shows an increase in atrial and left ventricular myocardium of 4-week tail-suspended rats. Enhanced expression of VAMP-1/2 associated with ANP vesicles confirms the increased expression of ANP in atrial and left ventricular myocardium.

  13. Atrial natriuretic peptide attenuates agonist-induced pulmonary edema in mice with targeted disruption of the gene for natriuretic peptide receptor-A

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Shu-Whei; Green, Sabrina; Grinnell, Katie L.; Machan, Jason T.; Harrington, Elizabeth O.

    2013-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) inhibits agonist-induced pulmonary edema formation, but the signaling pathway responsible is not well defined. To investigate the role of the particulate guanylate cyclase-linked receptor, natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A), we measured acute lung injury responses in intact mice and pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells (PMVEC) with normal and disrupted expression of NPR-A. NPR-A wild-type (NPR-A+/+), heterozygous (NPR-A+/−), and knockout (NPR-A−/−) mice were anesthetized and treated with thrombin receptor agonist peptide (TRAP) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Lung injury was assessed by lung wet-to-dry (W/D) weight and by protein and cell concentration of bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) fluid. No difference in pulmonary edema formation was seen between NPR-A genotypes under baseline conditions. TRAP and LPS increased lung W/D weight and BAL fluid cell counts more in NPR-A−/− mice than in NPR-A+/− or NPR-A+/+ mice, but no genotype-related differences were seen in TRAP-induced increases in bloodless lung W/D weight or LPS-induced increases in BAL protein concentration. Pretreatment with ANP infusion completely blocked TRAP-induced increases in lung W/D weight and blunted LPS-induced increases in BAL cell counts and protein concentration in both NPR-A−/− and NPR-A+/+ mice. Thrombin decreased transmembrane electrical resistance in monolayers of PMVECs in vitro, and this effect was attenuated by ANP in PMVECs isolated from both genotypes. Administration of the NPR-C-specific ligand, cANF, also blocked TRAP-induced increases in lung W/D weight and LPS-induced increases in BAL cell count and protein concentration in NPR-A+/+ and NPR-A−/− mice. We conclude that ANP is capable of attenuating agonist-induced lung edema in the absence of NPR-A. The protective effect of ANP on agonist-induced lung injury and pulmonary barrier function may be mediated by NPR-C. PMID:23195629

  14. Inefficient constitutive inhibition of P2X3 receptors by brain natriuretic peptide system contributes to sensitization of trigeminal sensory neurons in a genetic mouse model of familial hemiplegic migraine

    PubMed Central

    Marchenkova, Anna; Vilotti, Sandra; Ntamati, Niels; van den Maagdenberg, Arn MJM

    2016-01-01

    Background On trigeminal ganglion neurons, pain-sensing P2X3 receptors are constitutively inhibited by brain natriuretic peptide via its natriuretic peptide receptor-A. This inhibition is associated with increased P2X3 serine phosphorylation and receptor redistribution to non-lipid raft membrane compartments. The natriuretic peptide receptor-A antagonist anantin reverses these effects. We studied whether P2X3 inhibition is dysfunctional in a genetic familial hemiplegic migraine type-1 model produced by introduction of the human pathogenic R192Q missense mutation into the mouse CACNA1A gene (knock-in phenotype). This model faithfully replicates several properties of familial hemiplegic migraine type-1, with gain-of-function of CaV2.1 Ca2+ channels, raised levels of the algogenic peptide calcitonin gene-related peptide, and enhanced activity of P2X3 receptors in trigeminal ganglia. Results In knock-in neurons, anantin did not affect P2X3 receptor activity, membrane distribution, or serine phosphorylation level, implying ineffective inhibition by the constitutive brain natriuretic peptide/natriuretic peptide receptor-A pathway. However, expression and functional properties of this pathway remained intact together with its ability to downregulate TRPV1 channels. Reversing the familial hemiplegic migraine type-1 phenotype with the CaV2.1-specific antagonist, ω-agatoxin IVA restored P2X3 activity to wild-type level and enabled the potentiating effects of anantin again. After blocking calcitonin gene-related peptide receptors, P2X3 receptors exhibited wild-type properties and were again potentiated by anantin. Conclusions P2X3 receptors on mouse trigeminal ganglion neurons are subjected to contrasting modulation by inhibitory brain natriuretic peptide and facilitatory calcitonin gene-related peptide that both operate via complex intracellular signaling. In the familial hemiplegic migraine type-1 migraine model, the action of calcitonin gene-related peptide appears to

  15. Biomarkers Beyond the Natriuretic Peptides for Chronic Heart Failure: Galectin-3 and Soluble ST2

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and NT-proBNP are widely used plasma biomarkers for the diagnosis of acute decompensated heart failure and prognosis for future cardiac disease. The clinical performance of these tests for management of chronic heart failure is somewhat limited by the markers’ high biological variation. Biomarkers such as galectin-3 and soluble ST2 that reflect ongoing remodeling via cardiac fibrosis of the heart may provide complementary information to the natriuretic peptides in the management of chronic heart failure with regards to risk stratification for future adverse cardiac events (death, myocardial infarction, and need for heart transplantation). However, implementation of these biomarkers into routine clinical practice requires documentation that these tests will enable therapeutic decisions that can be made to improve clinical outcomes, and the availability of commercial assays. This report will discuss the need for novel heart failure biomarkers, ideal characteristics of assays, and review and compare the clinical performance of assays for galectin-3 and sST2 for chronic heart failure disease management.

  16. Monitoring B-type natriuretic peptide in patients undergoing therapy with neprilysin inhibitors. An emerging challenge?

    PubMed

    Lippi, Giuseppe; Sanchis-Gomar, Fabian

    2016-09-15

    B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is primarily synthesized by the ventricles of the heart as a 108-amino acid polypeptide precursor (i.e., proBNP), which is then cleaved into a 76-amino acid biologically inert N-terminal fragment (NT-proBNP) and a biologically active 32-amino acid peptide (BNP). The generation of BNP is considerably enhanced in response to high ventricular filling pressures, so that the measurement of either the active hormone or NT-proBNP has become a mainstay in patients with congestive heart failure. Recent evidence was brought that the enzyme neprilysin efficiently degrades circulating BNP in vivo, whereas proBNP and NT-proBNP are virtually resistant to enzymatic cleavage. Increasing emphasis is currently placed on the fact that that measuring BNP in patients taking the novel and promising neprilysin inhibitors such as LCZ696 may not reliably reflect cardiac dysfunction. Since laboratory monitoring in patients with heart failure should be aimed to define the role of BNP in modulating fluid hemostasis and cardiac remodeling, but natriuretic peptides should also serve as reliable biomarkers of cardiac function and treatment response in these patients, the assessment of neither BNP nor NT-proBNP alone provides a comprehensive biological and clinical picture. Therefore, it seems reasonable to suggest both BNP and the neprilysin-resistant peptide NT-proBNP should be concomitantly assessed in patients with heart failure who take neprilysin inhibitors, so allowing to concomitantly monitor the progression of heart failure and to assess the actual cardiorenal potency of circulating BNP. PMID:27317994

  17. Characterization of atrial natriuretic peptide degradation by cell-surface peptidase activity on endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, S. J.; Whitson, P. A.

    1993-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is a fluid-regulating peptide hormone that promotes vasorelaxation, natriuresis, and diuresis. The mechanisms for the release of ANP and for its clearance from the circulation play important roles in modulating its biological effects. Recently, we have reported that the cell surface of an endothelial cell line, CPA47, could degrade 125I-ANP in the presence of EDTA. In this study, we have characterized this degradation of 125I-ANP. The kinetics of ANP degradation by the surface of CPA47 cells were first order, with a Km of 320 +/- 60 nM and Vmax of 35 +/- 14 pmol of ANP degraded/10 min/10(5) cells at pH 7.4. ANP is degraded by the surface of CPA47 cells over a broad pH range from 7.0-8.5. Potato carboxypeptidase inhibitor and bestatin inhibited 125I-ANP degradation, suggesting that this degradative activity on the surface of CPA47 cells has exopeptidase characteristics. The selectivity of CPA47 cell-surface degradation of ANP was demonstrated when 125I-ANP degradation was inhibited in the presence of neuropeptide Y and angiotensin I and II but not bradykinin, bombesin, endothelin-1, or substance P. The C-terminal amino acids phe26 and tyr28 were deduced to be important for ANP interaction with the cell-surface peptidase(s) based on comparison of the IC50 of various ANP analogues and other natriuretic peptides for the inhibition of ANP degradation. These data suggest that a newly characterized divalent cation-independent exopeptidase(s) that selectively recognizes ANP and some other vasoactive peptides exists on the surface of endothelial cells.

  18. Inverse association of long-acting natriuretic peptide with metabolic syndrome in congestive heart failure patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Aims Long-acting natriuretic peptide (LANP) is one of the peptide hormones in atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) pro-hormone. Low levels of natriuretic peptide may lead to reduced lipolysis and excessive weight gain in obese patients. The aim of this study was to investigate the relationship between fasting serum LANP level and the metabolic syndrome (MetS) among congestive heart failure (CHF) patients. Methods Fasting blood samples were obtained from 186 patients with normal renal function in cardiac clinic outpatients. CHF defined by the American College of Cardiology Foundation and the American Heart Association 2005 Guidelines. MetS and its components were defined using diagnostic criteria from the International Diabetes Federation. Results Ninety-eight patients (52.7%) had CHF. There was a tendency of increased fasting LANP levels as the NYHA CHF functional classes increased (p = 0.002). Forty-six of the CHF patients (46.9%) had MetS. Fasting LANP level negatively correlated with MetS among CHF patients (p < 0.001). Univariate linear regression analysis showed that BUN (p = 0.026) positively correlated with fasting serum LANP levels, while body weight (p = 0.009), BMI (p = 0.004), homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR; p = 0.024) and HOMA-β (p = 0.001) negatively correlated with fasting serum LANP levels among the CHF patients. Multivariate forward stepwise linear regression analysis of the significant variables showed that the HOMA-β (R2 change = 0.292, p < 0.001) and HOMA-IR (R2 change = 0.081, p = 0.019) were independent predictors of fasting serum LANP levels in CHF patients. Conclusions LANP level is significantly reduced in CHF patients affected by MetS. HOMA-β and HOMA-IR were independent predictors of serum LANP levels in CHF patients. PMID:23566312

  19. Atrial natriuretic peptide stimulates salt secretion by shark rectal gland by releasing VIP

    SciTech Connect

    Silva, P.; Stoff, J.S.; Solomon, R.J.; Lear, S.; Kniaz, D.; Greger, R.; Epstein, F.H.

    1987-01-01

    Salt secretion by the isolated perfused rectal gland of the spiny dogfish shark, Squalus acanthias, is stimulated by synthetic rat atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP II) as well as extracts of shark heart, but not by 8-bromo-cyclic guanosine 5'-monophosphate. Cardiac peptides have no effect on isolated rectal gland cells or perfused tubules, suggesting that stimulation requires an intact gland. The stimulation of secretion by ANP II is eliminated by maneuvers that block neurotransmitter release. Cardiac peptides stimulate the release of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP), known to be present in rectal glands nerves, into the venous effluent of perfused glands in parallel with their stimulation of salt secretion, but the release of VIP induced by ANP II is prevented by perfusion with procaine. VIP was measured by radioimmunoassay. Cardiac peptides thus appear to regulate rectal gland secretion by releasing VIP from neural stores within the gland. It is possible that other physiological effects of these hormones might be explained by an action to enhanced local release of neurotransmitters.

  20. Correlation between the compact regions predicted by the average distance map (ADM) and the biologically active sites in atrial natriuretic peptide.

    PubMed

    Kikuchi, T

    1992-10-01

    The prediction of the short-range compact regions of human atrial natriuretic peptide (alpha-hANP), one of the biologically active peptides, has been made by means of the Average Distance Map(ADM). We found out that the location of the predicted short-range compact regions is consistent with the structural units determined by the NMR analysis (Kobayashi et al., 1988). Furthermore, the short-range compact regions correspond well to the biologically active areas of atriopeptin (103-125)-amide (which is homologous peptide to alpha-hANP), detected by the glycine substitution technique (Konishi et al., 1987). The results suggest that a predicted short-range compact region can be regarded as a possible active site in a biologically active peptide.

  1. The plant natriuretic peptide receptor is a guanylyl cyclase and enables cGMP-dependent signaling.

    PubMed

    Turek, Ilona; Gehring, Chris

    2016-06-01

    The functional homologues of vertebrate natriuretic peptides (NPs), the plant natriuretic peptides (PNPs), are a novel class of peptidic hormones that signal via guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP) and systemically affect plant salt and water balance and responses to biotrophic plant pathogens. Although there is increasing understanding of the complex roles of PNPs in plant responses at the systems level, little is known about the underlying signaling mechanisms. Here we report isolation and identification of a novel Leucine-Rich Repeat (LRR) protein that directly interacts with A. thaliana PNP, AtPNP-A. In vitro binding studies revealed that the Arabidopsis AtPNP-A binds specifically to the LRR protein, termed AtPNP-R1, and the active region of AtPNP-A is sufficient for the interaction to occur. Importantly, the cytosolic part of the AtPNP-R1, much like in some vertebrate NP receptors, harbors a catalytic center diagnostic for guanylyl cyclases and the recombinant AtPNP-R1 is capable of catalyzing the conversion of guanosine triphosphate to cGMP. In addition, we show that AtPNP-A causes rapid increases of cGMP levels in wild type (WT) leaf tissue while this response is significantly reduced in the atpnp-r1 mutants. AtPNP-A also causes cGMP-dependent net water uptake into WT protoplasts, and hence volume increases, whereas responses of the protoplasts from the receptor mutant are impaired. Taken together, our results suggest that the identified LRR protein is an AtPNP-A receptor essential for the PNP-dependent regulation of ion and water homeostasis in plants and that PNP- and vertebrate NP-receptors and their signaling mechanisms share surprising similarities. PMID:26945740

  2. Natriuretic Peptide-Induced Catecholamine Release from Cardiac Sympathetic Neurons: Inhibition by Histamine H3 and H4 Receptor Activation

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Noel Yan-Ki; Robador, Pablo A.

    2012-01-01

    We reported previously that natriuretic peptides, including brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), promote norepinephrine release from cardiac sympathetic nerves and dopamine release from differentiated pheochromocytoma PC12 cells. These proexocytotic effects are mediated by an increase in intracellular calcium secondary to cAMP/protein kinase A (PKA) activation caused by a protein kinase G (PKG)-mediated inhibition of phosphodiesterase type 3 (PDE3). The purpose of the present study was to search for novel means to prevent the proadrenergic effects of natriuretic peptides. For this, we focused our attention on neuronal inhibitory Gαi/o-coupled histamine H3 and H4 receptors. Our findings show that activation of neuronal H3 and H4 receptors inhibits the release of catecholamines elicited by BNP in cardiac synaptosomes and differentiated PC12 cells. This effect results from a decrease in intracellular Ca2+ due to reduced intracellular cAMP/PKA activity, caused by H3 and H4 receptor-mediated PKG inhibition and consequent PDE3-induced increase in cAMP metabolism. Indeed, selective H3 and H4 receptor agonists each synergized with a PKG inhibitor and a PDE3 activator in attenuating BNP-induced norepinephrine release from cardiac sympathetic nerve endings. This indicates that PKG inhibition and PDE3 stimulation are pivotal for the H3 and H4 receptor-mediated attenuation of BNP-induced catecholamine release. Cardiac sympathetic overstimulation is characteristic of advanced heart failure, which was recently found not to be improved by the administration of recombinant BNP (nesiritide), despite the predicated beneficial effects of natriuretic peptides. Because excessive catecholamine release is likely to offset the desirable effects of natriuretic peptides, our findings suggest novel means to alleviate their adverse effects and improve their therapeutic potential. PMID:22923736

  3. Impact of Modifiable Risk Factors on B-type Natriuretic Peptide and Cardiac Troponin T Concentrations.

    PubMed

    Srivastava, Pratyaksh K; Pradhan, Aruna D; Cook, Nancy R; Ridker, Paul M; Everett, Brendan M

    2016-02-01

    Alcohol use, physical activity, diet, and cigarette smoking are modifiable cardiovascular risk factors that have a substantial impact on the risk of myocardial infarction, stroke, and cardiovascular death. We hypothesized that these behaviors may alter concentrations of cardiac troponin, a marker of myocyte injury, and B-type natriuretic peptide, a marker of myocyte stress. Both markers have shown strong association with adverse cardiovascular outcomes. In 519 women with no evidence of cardiovascular disease, we measured circulating concentrations of cardiac troponin T, using a high-sensitivity assay (hsTnT), and the N-terminal fragment of B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP). We used logistic regression to determine if these behaviors were associated with hsTnT ≥ 3 ng/l or with NT-proBNP in the highest quartile (≥ 127.3 ng/l). The median (Q1 to Q3) NT-proBNP of the cohort was 68.8 ng/l (40.3 to 127.3 ng/l), and 30.8% (160 of 519) of the cohort had circulating hsTnT ≥ 3 ng/l. In adjusted models, women who drank 1 to 6 drinks/week had lower odds of having a hsTnT ≥ 3 ng/l (odds ratio 0.58, 95% confidence interval 0.34 to 0.96) and lower odds of having an elevated NT-proBNP (odds ratio 0.55, 95% confidence interval 0.32 to 0.96). We were subsequently able to validate the results for B-type natriuretic peptide in a large independent cohort. In conclusion, our results suggest that regular alcohol consumption is associated with lower concentrations of hsTnT and NT-proBNP, 2 cardiovascular biomarkers associated with cardiovascular risk, and raise the hypothesis that the beneficial effects of alcohol consumption may be mediated by direct effects on the myocardium. PMID:26739393

  4. The potential value of integrated natriuretic peptide and echo-guided heart failure management.

    PubMed

    Scali, Maria Chiara; Simioniuc, Anca; Dini, Frank Lloyd; Marzilli, Mario

    2014-07-18

    There is increasing interest in guiding Heart Failure (HF) therapy with Brain Natriuretic Peptide (BNP) or N-terminal prohormone of Brain Natriuretic Peptide (NT-proBNP), with the goal of lowering concentrations of these markers (and maintaining their suppression) as part of the therapeutic approach in HF. However, recent European Society of Cardiology (ESC) and American Heart Association/ American College of Cardiology (AHA/ACC) guidelines did not recommend biomarker-guided therapy in the management of HF patients. This has likely to do with the conceptual, methodological, and practical limitations of the Natriuretic Peptides (NP)-based approach, including biological variability, slow time-course, poor specificity, cost and venipuncture, as well as to the lack of conclusive scientific evidence after 15 years of intensive scientific work and industry investment in the field. An increase in NP can be associated with accumulation of extra-vascular lung water, which is a sign of impending acute heart failure. If this is the case, an higher dose of loop diuretics will improve symptoms. However, if no lung congestion is present, diuretics will show no benefit and even harm. It is only a combined clinical, bio-humoral (for instance with evaluation of renal function) and echocardiographic assessment which may unmask the pathophysiological (and possibly therapeutic) heterogeneity underlying the same clinical and NP picture. Increase in B-lines will trigger increase of loop diuretics (or dialysis); the marked increase in mitral insufficiency (at baseline or during exercise) will lead to increase in vasodilators and to consider mitral valve repair; the presence of substantial inotropic reserve during stress will give a substantially higher chance of benefit to beta-blocker or Cardiac Resynchronization Therapy (CRT). To each patient its own therapy, not with a "blind date" with symptoms and NP and carpet bombing with drugs, but with an open-eye targeted approach on the

  5. Identification of Putative Natriuretic Hormones Isolated from Human Urine.

    PubMed

    Kramer, Herbert J

    2015-01-01

    This brief review describes some representative methodological approaches to the isolation of putative endogenous inhibitors of epithelial sodium transport - i.e., as ouabain-like factors (OLF) that inhibit the sodium transport enzyme Na-K-ATPase or inhibit the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC). Gel chromatography and reverse-phase (RP)-high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) of lyophilized and reconstituted 24 h-urine from salt-loaded healthy humans led to two active fractions, a hydrophilic OLF-1 and a lipophilic OLF-2, whose mass (Ms)-spectroscopic data indicate a Mr of 391 (1, 2). Further identification was attempted by Ms-, infrared (IR)-, ultraviolet (UV)-, and (1)H-NMR-spectroscopy. OLF-1 and OLF-2 may be closely related if not identical to (di)ascorbic acid or its salts such as vanadium (V)-V(v)-diascorbate with Mr 403 (3) and V(IV)-diascorbate. OLF-1 and V(v)-diascorbate are about 10-fold stronger inhibitors of Na-K-ATPase than OLF-2 and V(IV)-diascorbate, respectively. In conscious rats, i.v. infusion of OLF-1 and OLF-2 resulted in a strong natriuresis. In a similar study, Cain et al. (4) isolated a sodium transport inhibitor from the urine of uremic patients by gel chromatography and RP-HPLC. In uremic rats, a natriuretic response to the injection of the active material was found. Xanthurenic acid 8-O-β-d-glucoside (Mr 368) and xanthurenic acid 8-O-sulfate (Mr 284) were identified as endogenous inhibitors of sodium transport acting, e.g., by ENaC blockade. No definite relation to blood pressure, body fluid volume, or sodium balance has been reported for any of these above factors, and further studies to identify the natriuretic and/or ouabain-like compound(s) or hormone(s) will be needed. PMID:26052310

  6. Difference in molecular pathology of natriuretic peptides in the myocardium between acute asphyxial and cardiac deaths.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-Hua; Michiue, Tomomi; Ishikawa, Takaki; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2012-07-01

    In investigating death due to mechanical asphyxiation and drowning, a cardiac attack is important for discriminating between possible causes of death and as a contributory factor in death processes; however, general pathologies involving visceral congestion are often similar. The present study compared terminal cardiac dysfunction in these fatalities using the molecular pathology of atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP) in the myocardium as markers of cardiac strain. Both mechanical asphyxiation (n=27) and drowning (n=23) showed significantly lower ANP and BNP mRNA expressions in bilateral ventricular walls than sudden cardiac deaths (n=36). In addition, right atrial wall BNP mRNA expression was lower in asphyxiation; however, immunostaining did not demonstrate any difference among these fatalities. Differences among the subtypes of asphyxiation or between fresh- and saltwater drowning were insignificant. These observations suggest a difference between primary heart failure in sudden cardiac death and terminal cardiac dysfunction secondary to fatal asphyxiation or drowning.

  7. Genetic Decreases in Atrial Natriuretic Peptide and Salt-Sensitive Hypertension

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    John, Simon W. M.; Krege, John H.; Oliver, Paula M.; Hagaman, John R.; Hodgin, Jeffrey B.; Pang, Stephen C.; Flynn, T. Geoffrey; Smithies, Oliver

    1995-02-01

    To determine if defects in the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) system can cause hypertension, mice were generated with a disruption of the proANP gene. Homozygous mutants had no circulating or atrial ANP, and their blood pressures were elevated by 8 to 23 millimeters of mercury when they were fed standard (0.5 percent sodium chloride) and intermediate (2 percent sodium chloride) salt diets. On standard salt diets, heterozygotes had normal amounts of circulating ANP and normal blood pressures. However, on high (8 percent sodium chloride) salt diets they were hypertensive, with blood pressures elevated by 27 millimeters of mercury. These results demonstrate that genetically reduced production of ANP can lead to salt-sensitive hypertension.

  8. Asymmetrical myocardial expression of natriuretic peptides in pacing-induced heart failure.

    PubMed

    Del Ry, Silvia; Cabiati, Manuela; Lionetti, Vincenzo; Simioniuc, Anca; Caselli, Chiara; Prescimone, Tommaso; Emdin, Michele; Giannessi, Daniela

    2009-09-01

    High-frequency pacing of the left ventricle (LV) free wall causes a dyssynchronous pattern of contraction that leads to progressive heart failure (HF) with pronounced differences in regional contractility. Aim of this study was to evaluate possible changes in brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) mRNA expression in the anterior/anterior lateral region (pacing site, PS) as compared to the infero-septal region (opposite site, OS) and to explore possible association between the contractiling pattern and biomarker expression. Cardiac tissue was collected from minipigs with pacing-induced HF (n=8) and without (control, n=6). The samples were selectively harvested from the anterior left ventricular (LV) wall, PS, and from an area remote to the pacing-site, OS. BNP and CNP mRNA expression was evaluated by semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). A significant difference in BNP expression was found in the PS between HF animals and controls (BNP/GAPDH: 0.65+/-0.11 vs. 0.35+/-0.04, p=0.02), but not in the OS (BNP/GAPDH: 0.36+/-0.05, ns vs. controls). CNP expression was not different compared to controls, although higher levels were observed in the PS and in the OS with respect to the controls (CNP/GAPDH: controls 0.089+/-0.036, PS 0.289+/-0.23, OS 0.54+/-0.16). This finding was in tune with an increase of CNP tissue concentration (controls: 0.69+/-0.13; PS=1.56+/-0.19; OS=1.70+/-0.42 pg/mg protein; p=0.039 controls vs. OS). Higher BNP mRNA expression in the PS is consistent with a reduction in contractile function in this region, while higher CNP mRNA expression in the OS suggests the presence of concomitant endothelial dysfunction in the remote region.

  9. Temporal Change in Brain Natriuretic Peptide After Radiotherapy for Thoracic Esophageal Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Jingu, Keiichi Nemoto, Kenji; Kaneta, Tomohiro; Oikawa, Minako; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Ariga, Hisanori; Takeda, Ken; Sakayauchi, Toru; Fujimoto, Keisuke; Narazaki, Kakutaro; Takai, Yoshihiro; Nakata, Eiko; Fukuda, Hiroshi; Takahashi, Shoki; Yamada, Shogo

    2007-12-01

    Purpose: To investigate the relationships of plasma levels of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) with abnormal {sup 18}F-fluorodeoxyglucose (FDG) accumulation in the myocardium corresponding to irradiated fields and temporal changes in BNP, which is used as an index of heart remodeling, after radiotherapy for the mediastinum. Materials and Methods: Brain natriuretic peptide concentrations were measured before and after radiotherapy for thoracic esophageal cancer, and the change in BNP concentration after radiotherapy was investigated. Moreover, FDG accumulation in the myocardium was investigated in patients who had undergone FDG positron emission tomography less than 14 days before or after measurement of BNP concentration, and the Mann-Whitney U test was used to detect significant difference between BNP concentrations in patients with and without abnormal FDG accumulation corresponding to the irradiated field. Results: There was significant difference between the levels of BNP in patients without abnormal FDG accumulation in the irradiated myocardium and in patients with abnormal FDG accumulation (p < 0.001). The levels of BNP in the 9-24 months after radiotherapy group and in the >24 months after radiotherapy group were significantly higher than the levels in the before radiotherapy group, immediately after radiotherapy group, 1-2 months after radiotherapy group, and control group. Conclusions: The level of BNP was significantly increased more than 9 months after the start of radiotherapy and was significantly higher in patients who had high FDG accumulation corresponding to the irradiated field. The results of this study indicate that BNP concentration might be an early indicator of radiation-induced myocardial damage.

  10. Pathophysiology of sudden cardiac death as demonstrated by molecular pathology of natriuretic peptides in the myocardium.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-Hua; Michiue, Tomomi; Ishikawa, Takaki; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2012-11-30

    Various heart diseases present with sudden death; however, it is difficult to interpret the severity of or difference in respective preexisting and terminal cardiac dysfunction based on conventional morphology. The present study investigated the cardiac pathophysiology employing quantitative mRNA measurement of atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP) in the myocardium as markers of cardiac strain, using autopsy materials consisting of acute ischemic heart disease (AIHD, n=40) with/without the pathology of apparent myocardial necrosis (n=19/21), recurrent myocardial infarction (RMI, n=19), chronic congestive heart disease (CHD, n=11) and right ventricular cardiomyopathy (RVC, n=5), as well as hemopericardium (HP, n=11) due to myocardial infarction (n=5) and aortic rupture (n=6), and acute pulmonary thromboembolism (PTE, n=5). Cardiac death groups showed higher ANP and/or BNP mRNA expressions in the left ventricle than acute fatal bleeding (sharp instrumental injury; n=15) and/or mechanical asphyxiation (strangulation; n=10). AIHD and RMI cases had similar ANP and BNP mRNA expressions in bilateral ventricular walls, but their bilateral atrial levels were lower in RMI. RVC showed higher mRNA expressions of posterior left ventricular BNP, and right ventricular and bilateral atrial ANP and BNP. HP cases had lower BNP mRNA expression in the right ventricular wall, but PTE showed lower ANP and BNP mRNA expressions in the left ventricular wall; however, these mRNA expressions at other sites were similar to those of AIHD. CHD presented findings similar to those of AIHD, but the pericardial BNP level was significantly increased. These observations indicate characteristic molecular biological responses of myocardial natriuretic peptides in individual heart diseases and suggest the possible application of molecular pathology to demonstrate cardiac dysfunction even after death.

  11. Diurnal gene expression of lipolytic natriuretic peptide receptors in white adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Smith, Julie; Fahrenkrug, Jan; Jørgensen, Henrik L; Christoffersen, Christina; Goetze, Jens P

    2015-12-01

    Disruption of the circadian rhythm can lead to obesity and cardiovascular disease. In white adipose tissue, activation of the natriuretic peptide receptors (NPRs) stimulates lipolysis. We have previously shown that natriuretic peptides are expressed in a circadian manner in the heart, but the temporal expression profile of their cognate receptors has not been examined in white adipose tissue. We therefore collected peri-renal white adipose tissue and serum from WT mice. Tissue mRNA contents of NPRs - NPR-A and NPR-C, the clock genes Per1 and Bmal1, and transcripts involved in lipid metabolism were quantified at 4-h intervals: in the diurnal study, mice were exposed to a period of 12 h light followed by 12 h darkness (n=52). In the circadian study, mice were kept in darkness for 24 h (n=47). Concomitant serum concentrations of free fatty acids, glycerol, triglycerides (TGs), and insulin were measured. Per1 and Bmal1 mRNA contents showed reciprocal circadian profiles (P<0.0001). NPR-A mRNA contents followed a temporal pattern (P=0.01), peaking in the dark (active) period. In contrast, NPR-C mRNA was expressed in an antiphase manner with nadir in the active period (P=0.007). TG concentrations in serum peaked in the active dark period (P=0.003). In conclusion, NPR-A and NPR-C gene expression is associated with the expression of clock genes in white adipose tissue. The reciprocal expression may thus contribute to regulate lipolysis and energy homeostasis in a diurnal manner.

  12. Physiological levels of A-, B- and C-type natriuretic peptide shed the endothelial glycocalyx and enhance vascular permeability.

    PubMed

    Jacob, Matthias; Saller, Thomas; Chappell, Daniel; Rehm, Markus; Welsch, Ulrich; Becker, Bernhard F

    2013-05-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is a peptide hormone released from the cardiac atria during hypervolemia. Though named for its well-known renal effect, ANP has been demonstrated to acutely increase vascular permeability in vivo. Experimentally, this phenomenon was associated with a marked shedding of the endothelial glycocalyx, at least for supraphysiological intravascular concentrations. This study investigates the impact and mechanism of action of physiological doses of ANP and related peptides on the vascular barrier. In isolated guinea pig hearts, prepared and perfused in a modified Langendorff mode with and without the intravascular presence of the colloid hydroxyethyl starch (HES), we measured functional changes in vascular permeability and glycocalyx shedding related to intracoronary infusion of physiological concentrations of A-, B- and C-type natriuretic peptide (ANP, BNP and CNP). Significant coronary venous washout of glycocalyx constituents (syndecan-1 and heparan sulfate) was observed. As tested for ANP, this effect was positively related to the intracoronary concentration. Intravascular shedding of the glycocalyx was morphologically confirmed by electron microscopy. Also, functional vascular barrier competence decreased, as indicated by significant increases in transudate formation and HES extravasation. Ortho-phenanthroline, a non-specific inhibitor of matrix metalloproteases, was able to reduce ANP-induced glycocalyx shedding. These findings suggest participation of natriuretic peptides in pathophysiological processes like heart failure, inflammation or sepsis. Inhibition of metalloproteases might serve as a basis for future therapeutical options.

  13. C-Type Natriuretic Peptide Induces Anti-contractile Effect Dependent on Nitric Oxide, Oxidative Stress, and NPR-B Activation in Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Pernomian, Laena; Prado, Alejandro F.; Silva, Bruno R.; Azevedo, Aline; Pinheiro, Lucas C.; Tanus-Santos, José E.; Bendhack, Lusiane M.

    2016-01-01

    Aims: To evaluate the role of nitric oxide, reactive oxygen species (ROS), and natriuretic peptide receptor-B activation in C-type natriuretic peptide-anti-contractile effect on Phenylephrine-induced contraction in aorta isolated from septic rats. Methods and Results: Cecal ligation and puncture (CLP) surgery was used to induce sepsis in male rats. Vascular reactivity was conducted in rat aorta and resistance mesenteric artery (RMA). Measurement of survival rate, mean arterial pressure (MAP), plasma nitric oxide, specific protein expression, and localization were evaluated. Septic rats had a survival rate about 37% at 4 h after the surgery, and these rats presented hypotension compared to control-operated (Sham) rats. Phenylephrine-induced contraction was decreased in sepsis. C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) induced anti-contractile effect in aortas. Plasma nitric oxide was increased in sepsis. Nitric oxide-synthase but not natriuretic peptide receptor-B expression was increased in septic rat aortas. C-type natriuretic peptide-anti-contractile effect was dependent on nitric oxide-synthase, ROS, and natriuretic peptide receptor-B activation. Natriuretic peptide receptor-C, protein kinase-Cα mRNA, and basal nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-dependent ROS production were lower in septic rats. Phenylephrine and CNP enhanced ROS production. However, stimulated ROS production was low in sepsis. Conclusion: CNP induced anti-contractile effect on Phenylephrine contraction in aortas from Sham and septic rats that was dependent on nitric oxide-synthase, ROS, and natriuretic peptide receptor-B activation. PMID:27445832

  14. Differential changes in atrial natriuretic peptide and vasopressin receptor bindings in kidney of spontaneously hypertensive rat

    SciTech Connect

    Ogura, T.; Mitsui, T.; Yamamoto, I.; Katayama, E.; Ota, Z.; Ogawa, N.

    1987-01-19

    To elucidate the role of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and vasopressin (VP) in a hypertensive state, ANP and VP receptor bindings in spontaneously hypertensive rat (SHR) kidney were analyzed using the radiolabeled receptor assay (RRA) technique. Systolic blood pressure of SHR aged 12 weeks was statistically higher than that of age-matched Wistar Kyoto (WKY) rats. Maximum binding capacity (Bmax) of (/sup 125/I)-ANP binding to the SHR kidney membrane preparations was statistically lower than that of WKY rats, but dissociation constant (Kd) was not significantly different. On the other hand, Bmax of (/sup 3/H)-VP binding to the SHR kidney membrane preparations was statistically higher than that of WKY rats, but Kd were similar. Since the physiological action of ANP is natriuresis and VP is the most important antidiuretic hormone in mammalia, these opposite changes of ANP and VP receptor bindings in SHR kidney suggested that these peptides may play an important role in the pathophysiology of the hypertensive state, although it has not been confirmed as yet.

  15. Brain Natriuretic Peptide Stimulates Lipid Metabolism through Its Receptor NPR1 and the Glycerolipid Metabolism Pathway in Chicken Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Huang, H Y; Zhao, G P; Liu, R R; Li, Q H; Zheng, M Q; Li, S F; Liang, Z; Zhao, Z H; Wen, J

    2015-11-01

    Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is related to lipid metabolism in mammals, but its effect and the molecular mechanisms underlying it in chickens are incompletely understood. We found that the level of natriuretic peptide precursor B (NPPB, which encodes BNP) mRNA expression in high-abdominal-fat chicken groups was significantly higher than that of low-abdominal-fat groups. Partial correlations indicated that changes in the weight of abdominal fat were positively correlated with NPPB mRNA expression level. In vitro, compared with the control group, preadipocytes with NPPB interference showed reduced levels of proliferation, differentiation, and glycerin in media. Treatments of cells with BNP led to enhanced proliferation and differentiation of cells and glycerin concentration, and mRNA expression of its receptor natriuretic peptide receptor 1 (NPR1) was upregulated significantly. In cells exposed to BNP, 482 differentially expressed genes were identified compared with controls without BNP. Four genes known to be related to lipid metabolism (diacylglycerol kinase; lipase, endothelial; 1-acylglycerol-3-phosphate O-acyltransferase 1; and 1-acylglycerol-3-phosphate O-acyltransferase 2) were enriched in the glycerolipid metabolism pathway and expressed differentially. In conclusion, BNP stimulates the proliferation, differentiation, and lipolysis of preadipocytes through upregulation of the levels of expression of its receptor NPR1 and key genes enriched in the glycerolipid metabolic pathway. PMID:26463554

  16. Characterization of atrial natriuretic peptide receptors in brain microvessel endothelial cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Whitson, P. A.; Huls, M. H.; Sams, C. F.

    1991-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) binding and ANP-induced increases in cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) levels have been observed in brain microvessels (Chabrier et al., 1987; Steardo and Nathanson, 1987), suggesting that this fluid-regulating hormone may play a role in the fluid homeostasis of the brain. This study was initiated to characterize the ANP receptors in primary cultures of brain microvessel endothelial cells (BMECs). The apparent equilibrium dissociation constant, Kd, for ANP increased from 0.25 nM to 2.5 nM, and the number of ANP binding sites as determined by Scatchard analysis increased from 7,100 to 170,000 sites/cell between 2 and 10 days of culture following monolayer formation. Time- and concentration-dependent studies on the stimulation of cGMP levels by ANP indicated that guanylate cyclase-linked ANP receptors were present in BMECs. The relative abilities of ANP, brain natriuretic peptide (BNP), and a truncated analog of ANP containing amino acids 5-27 (ANP 5-27) to modulate the accumulation of cGMP was found to be ANP greater than BNP much greater than ANP 5-27. Affinity cross-linking with disuccinimidyl suberate and radiolabeled ANP followed by gel electrophoresis under reducing conditions demonstrated a single band corresponding to the 60-70 kD receptor, indicating the presence of the nonguanylate cyclase-linked ANP receptor. Radiolabeled ANP binding was examined in the presence of various concentrations of either ANP, BNP, or ANP 5-27 and suggested that a large proportion of the ANP receptors present in blood-brain barrier endothelial cells bind all of these ligands similarly. These data indicate both guanylate cyclase linked and nonguanylate cyclase linked receptors are present on BMECs and that a higher proportion of the nonguanylate cyclase linked receptors is expressed. This in vitro culture system may provide a valuable tool for the examination of ANP receptor expression and function in blood-brain barrier endothelial cells.

  17. Catecholamines, cardiac natriuretic peptides and chromogranin A: evolution and physiopathology of a 'whip-brake' system of the endocrine heart.

    PubMed

    Tota, Bruno; Cerra, Maria Carmela; Gattuso, Alfonsina

    2010-09-15

    In the past 50 years, extensive evidence has shown the ability of vertebrate cardiac non-neuronal cells to synthesize and release catecholamines (CA). This formed the mindset behind the search for the intrinsic endocrine heart properties, culminating in 1981 with the discovery of the natriuretic peptides (NP). CA and NP, co-existing in the endocrine secretion granules and acting as major cardiovascular regulators in health and disease, have become of great biomedical relevance for their potent diagnostic and therapeutic use. The concept of the endocrine heart was later enriched by the identification of a growing number of cardiac hormonal substances involved in organ modulation under normal and stress-induced conditions. Recently, chromogranin A (CgA), a major constituent of the secretory granules, and its derived cardio-suppressive and antiadrenergic peptides, vasostatin-1 and catestatin, were shown as new players in this framework, functioning as cardiac counter-regulators in 'zero steady-state error' homeostasis, particularly under intense excitatory stimuli, e.g. CA-induced myocardial stress. Here, we present evidence for the hypothesis that is gaining support, particularly among human cardiologists. The actions of CA, NP and CgA, we argue, may be viewed as a hallmark of the cardiac capacity to organize 'whip-brake' connection-integration processes in spatio-temporal networks. The involvement of the nitric oxide synthase (NOS)/nitric oxide (NO) system in this configuration is discussed. The use of fish and amphibian paradigms will illustrate the ways that incipient endocrine-humoral agents have evolved as components of cardiac molecular loops and important intermediates during evolutionary transitions, or in a distinct phylogenetic lineage, or under stress challenges. This may help to grasp the old evolutionary roots of these intracardiac endocrine/paracrine networks and how they have evolved from relatively less complicated designs. The latter can also be used

  18. C-type Natriuretic Peptide: a novel biomarker of steroid induced bone toxicity in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL).

    PubMed

    Prickett, Timothy C R; Lyver, Amanda; Wilson, Rachel; Espiner, Eric A; Sullivan, Michael J

    2012-07-01

    Impaired bone growth and mineralization, and osteonecrosis are significant and common long-term sequelae of chemotherapy for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Here we have evaluated the relationship between linear bone growth during chemotherapy for ALL and bone derived C-type Natriuretic Peptide (CNP). CNP is known to be critical to normal endochondral bone growth in both rodents and humans, and plasma concentration of the amino terminal pro CNP (NTproCNP) is strongly correlated with concurrent height velocity in children. Plasma NTproCNP and CNP were measured by radio-immunoassay in 12 children aged 2-9 years during induction and maintenance chemotherapy for children with ALL. Height velocity was calculated from stadiometer readings at intervals of 3-12 months and related to plasma NTproCNP during each growth interval. Plasma NTproCNP was markedly suppressed in all subjects during induction chemotherapy. Brief periods of NTproCNP decline and rapid rebound during maintenance treatment coincided with the use of dexamethasone but not with other chemotherapeutics. Height velocity was markedly reduced during ALL induction but unaffected in maintenance phase, and these changes in growth were strongly correlated with plasma NTproCNP concentration. Plasma NTproCNP has potential use as a biomarker of glucocorticoid-induced bone toxicity.

  19. Atrial natriuretic peptide down-regulates neutrophil recruitment on inflamed endothelium by reducing cell deformability and resistance to detachment force

    PubMed Central

    Morikis, Vasilios A.; Radecke, Chris; Jiang, Yanyan; Heinrich, Volkmar; Curry, Fitz-Roy; Simon, Scott I.

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Recombinant atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is administered in patients with acute heart failure in Japan to improve renal function and hemodynamics, but its anti-inflammatory effect on activated leukocytes may also contribute to its therapeutic efficacy. OBJECTIVE Examine unconventional role of ANP in neutrophil adhesion to inflamed endothelium. METHODS Human neutrophils were perfused over endothelial monolayers in a microfluidic lab-chip assay. Cell rheology was assessed by micropipette aspiration to assess changes in cortical tension and viscosity. Fluorescence microscopy was applied to measure adhesive contact area and β2-integrin focal bond formation. RESULTS ANP inhibited neutrophil rolling and firm adhesion without influencing the upregulation of cellular adhesion molecules on endothelium or the regulation of high affinity CD18 and shedding of L-selectin during neutrophil activation. Exposed to fluid shear, integrin mediated arrest was disrupted with ANP treatment, which elicited formation of long tethers and diminished cell spreading and contact. This correlated with a ~40% increase in neutrophil viscosity and a reduction in the adhesive footprint. CONCLUSIONS A decrease in cell deformation and neutrophil flattening with ANP results in fewer integrin bond clusters, which translates to higher tensile forces and impaired adhesion strengthening and cell detachment. PMID:26639357

  20. B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Levels Predict Ventricular Arrhythmia Post Left Ventricular Assist Device Implantation.

    PubMed

    Hellman, Yaron; Malik, Adnan S; Lin, Hongbo; Shen, Changyu; Wang, I-Wen; Wozniak, Thomas C; Hashmi, Zubair A; Pickrell, Jeanette; Jani, Milena; Caccamo, Marco A; Gradus-Pizlo, Irmina; Hadi, Azam

    2015-12-01

    B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels have been shown to predict ventricular arrhythmia (VA) and sudden death in patients with heart failure. We sought to determine whether BNP levels before left ventricular assist device (LVAD) implantation can predict VA post LVAD implantation in advanced heart failure patients. We conducted a retrospective study consisting of patients who underwent LVAD implantation in our institution during the period of May 2009-March 2013. The study was limited to patients receiving a HeartMate II or HeartWare LVAD. Acute myocardial infarction patients were excluded. We compared between the patients who developed VA within 15 days post LVAD implantation to the patients without VA. A total of 85 patients underwent LVAD implantation during the study period. Eleven patients were excluded (five acute MI, four without BNP measurements, and two discharged earlier than 13 days post LVAD implantation). The incidence of VA was 31%, with 91% ventricular tachycardia (VT) and 9% ventricular fibrillation. BNP remained the single most powerful predictor of VA even after adjustment for other borderline significant factors in a multivariate logistic regression model (P < 0.05). BNP levels are a strong predictor of VA post LVAD implantation, surpassing previously described risk factors such as age and VT in the past. PMID:25864448

  1. Plasma Brain-Type Natriuretic Peptide Level Following Seizure and Syncope: Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Park, Kyung-Il

    2014-01-01

    Background and Purpose: To explore the clinical feasibility of plasma brain-type natriuretic peptide (proBNP) level to differentiate the two major causes of transient unconsciousness, seizure and vasovagal syncope (VVS) in adult patients. Methods: ProBNP levels were evaluated within 24 hours following attack in patients who had experienced a transient episode of unconsciousness. For confirmatory diagnosis, clinical history was reviewed thoroughly and several work-ups including electroencephalography and cerebral imaging and tilt-table test, were performed in cases of putative VVS, as a part of routine clinical approaches. Results: According to various relevant evaluations, 15 patients were diagnosed as seizure (age, 40.3±13.8 years) and 12 patients were VVS (age, 38.1±17.1 years). Plasma concentrations of pro-BNP were not different between two groups (p=0.714). Median level was 34.3 pg/mL (interquartile range: 12.9–91.1) in post-seizure group and 32.3 pg/mL (interquartile range 8.9–77.4) in post-VVS group. Additionally, it was not correlated with the sampling times within 24 hours after the episodes. Conclusions: The plasma level of pro-BNP has a limited clinical value in differentiating seizure and vasovagal syncope in adults. However, the more validated results with a large population should be sought in the future studies to confirm its value. PMID:24977125

  2. Anhedonia and altered cardiac atrial natriuretic peptide following chronic stressor and endotoxin treatment in mice.

    PubMed

    Wann, Boubacar Pasto; Audet, Marie-Claude; Gibb, Julie; Anisman, Hymie

    2010-02-01

    Chronic stressors and inflammatory immune activation may contribute to pathophysiological alterations associated with both major depression and cardiovascular disease. The present study, conducted in mice, assessed whether a chronic stressor of moderate severity that induced an anhedonic effect, when coupled with a bacterial endotoxin, lipopolysaccharide (LPS), additively or interactively provoked circulating and heart atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), a potentially useful diagnostic and prognostic tool in cardiac diseases. As well, given the potential role of inflammatory processes in both depression and cardiovascular disease, we assessed pro-inflammatory mRNA expression in heart in response to the stressor and the LPS treatments. Male CD-1 mice that had been exposed to a chronic, variable stressor over 4 weeks displayed reduced sucrose consumption, possibly reflecting the anhedonic effects of the stressor. Treatment with LPS (10mug) provoked increased circulating corticosterone levels in both chronically stressed and non-stressed mice. Moreover, ANP concentrations in plasma and in the left ventricle were increased by both the stressor and the LPS treatments, as were left atrial and ventricular cytokine (interleukin-1beta; tumor necrosis factor-alpha) mRNA expression. Further, these treatments synergistically influenced the rise of plasma ANP. A link may exist between stressor-provoked depressive features (anhedonia) and immune activation, with elevated levels of ANP, a potential marker of cardiovascular disturbance. These findings are consistent with the view that chronic stressors and inflammatory immune activation may represent a common denominator subserving the frequent comorbidity between these illnesses.

  3. Doxycycline ameliorates aggregation of collagen and atrial natriuretic peptide in murine post-infarction heart.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hongjun; Sun, Xianlin; Wang, Deguo; Hu, Nengwei; Zhang, Yao

    2015-05-01

    Heart failure after myocardial infarction (MI) is associated with the aggregation of collagen and some misfolded proteins. This study was aimed to assess the therapeutic efficacy of doxycycline (Dox) in MI-induced heart failure and elucidate the potential mechanisms involved. A heart failure model of animals was established by ligating the left anterior descending coronary artery of rats. The administration of Dox via drinking water (25mg/kg/day) was initiated after surgery and lasted for two weeks. After cardiac function evaluation by echocardiography, all animals were killed to assess the aggregation of type I collagen, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), and the activities of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs), autophagosomes and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3). Dox treatment significantly improved cardiac function and attenuated cardiac hypertrophy. Histological observation revealed that Dox significantly reduced the expression of collagen and ANP in the heart. Further investigation showed that Dox significantly inhibited the activities of MMP-2 and MMP-9, increased autophagosomes and enhanced LC3-II in post-infarction hearts. This study revealed that Dox treatment could promote autophagy, reduce ANP aggregation in post-infarction hearts, and inhibit MMP-2 and MMP-9 activities. Dox might act as a potential therapeutic drug for preventing proteotoxicity and cardiac dysfunction.

  4. Reduced immunoreactivities of B-type natriuretic peptide in pulmonary arterial hypertension rats after ranolazine treatment.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae Chul; Kim, Kwan Chang; Choe, Soo Young; Hong, Young Mi

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a severe pulmonary vascular disease characterized by sustained increase in the pulmonary arterial pressure and excessive thickening and remodeling of the distal small pulmonary arteries. During disease progression, structural remodeling of the right ventricular (RV) impairs pump function, creates pro-arrhythmic substrates and triggers for arrhythmias. Notably, RV failure and lethal arrhythmias are major contributors to cardiac death in PAH that are not directly addressed by currently available therapies. Ranolazine (RAN) is an anti-anginal, anti-ischemic drug that has cardioprotective effects of heart dysfunction. RAN also has anti-arrhythmic effects due to inhibition of the late sodium current in cardiomyocytes. Therefore, we hypothesized that RAN could reduce the mal-adaptive structural remodeling of the RV, and prevent triggered ventricular arrhythmias in the monocrotaline-induced rat model of PAH. RAN reduced ventricular hypertrophy, reduced levels of B-type natriuretic peptide, and decreased the expression of fibrosis. In addition, RAN prevented cardiovascular death in rat model of PAH. These results support the notion that RAN can improve the functional properties of the RV, highlighting its potential benefits in the setting of heart impairment. PMID:27051563

  5. Arterial Remodeling in B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Knock-Out Females

    PubMed Central

    Holditch, Sara J.; Schreiber, Claire A.; Burnett, John C.; Ikeda, Yasuhiro

    2016-01-01

    Sexual dimorphisms are recognized in cardiovascular conditions such as hypertension, stroke, thrombosis and vasculitis. B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a guanylyl cyclase A (GC-A) agonist. The anti-hypertensive, vasodilatory, anti-fibrotic, and anti-hypertrophic properties of BNP are well established in male animal models. Although circulating BNP levels are higher in women, when compared to age-matched men, the cardiovascular protective propensity of BNP in females is poorly understood. We assessed the cardiovascular consequences of BNP deletion in genetically null (Nppb−/−) female rat lines. Throughout the study, blood pressure (BP) remained uninfluenced by genotype, and cardiorenal consequences of BNP knock out remained minor. Unexpectedly, approximately 60% of Nppb−/− females developed mesenteric polyarteritis-nodosa (PAN)-like vasculitis in their life span, some as early as 4 months of age. Mesenteric lesions involved intense arterial remodeling, progressive inflammation, occluded lumens, and less frequently intestinal necrosis and multiple visceral arterial aneurysms. Cumulative pathologies resulted in a significant decline in survival of the Nppb−/− female. This study highlights BNP’s vasoprotective propensity, bringing to light a possible sex specific difference in the cardiovascular protection provided by BNP. Defects in the BNP/GC-A/cGMP pathway may play a role in arteriopathies in women, while GC-A agonists may provide effective therapy for arteritis. PMID:27162120

  6. B-type natriuretic peptide to predict ductus intervention in infants <28 weeks.

    PubMed

    Czernik, Christoph; Lemmer, Julia; Metze, Boris; Koehne, Petra S; Mueller, Christian; Obladen, Michael

    2008-09-01

    Patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) is frequent in neonates with gestational age of less than 28 wk. Clinical and echocardiographic signs define hemodynamic significance of PDA, but do not reveal the need for PDA intervention in the first days of life. B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) has been proposed as a screening tool for PDA in preterm infants. To determine whether BNP can predict the need for PDA intervention, plasma BNP was measured by chemiluminescence immunoassay in 67 preterm infants <28 wk (median 26) on the second day of life in a prospective blinded study. PDA intervention was based on specified clinical and echocardiographic findings. Twenty-four patients (intervention group) received treatment for PDA and 43 patients (controls) remained without intervention. BNP concentrations were higher in the intervention (median 1069 pg/mL) than in the control group (247 pg/mL, p < 0.001). BNP correlated positively with ductal size (R = 0.46, p < 0.001) and atrial/aortic root ratio (R = 0.54, p < 0.001). In conclusion, plasma BNP proved to be a good predictor for ductus intervention (area under the curve: 0.86) with the best cutoff at 550 pg/mL on the second day of life in ventilated infants less than 28 wk gestation (sensitivity: 83%; specificity: 86%).

  7. Analytical Issues with Natriuretic Peptides – has this been Overly Simplified?

    PubMed Central

    Katrukha, Alexey G.

    2016-01-01

    Natriuretic peptides (NPs) were first described as cardiac biomarkers more than two decades ago. Since that time, numerous studies have confirmed NPs’ diagnostic and prognostic utilities as biomarkers of myocardial function. However, we must now admit that despite the NPs’ relatively long period of use in clinical practice, our understanding of the biochemistry and the variety of circulating forms of NPs, as well as of their potential as biomarkers, remains far from being complete and comprehensive. The highly complex nature and wide diversity of circulating forms of NPs make their accurate measurements in plasma far more complex than initially believed. A highly simplistic view of the NPs’ use is that elevated values of NPs indicate the severity of heart failure and thus reflect the prognosis. However, as shown by a variety of studies, deep understanding of how the NP system works will be required for correct interpretation of test results in routine practice of cardiovascular disease. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in understanding of the complexity of the NP system and discuss related analytical issues, which open new horizons, as well as challenges for clinical diagnostics. PMID:27683533

  8. Genetic Analysis of the Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Gene Polymorphisms among Essential Hypertensive Patients in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Ghodsian, Nooshin; Ismail, Patimah; Ahmadloo, Salma; Eskandarian, Narges; Etemad, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background. Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) considerably influences blood pressure regulation through water and sodium homoeostasis. Several of the studies have utilized anonymous genetic polymorphic markers and made inconsequent claims about the ANP relevant disorders. Thus, we screened Insertion/Deletion (ID) and G191A polymorphisms of ANP to discover sequence variations with potential functional significance and to specify the linkage disequilibrium pattern between polymorphisms. The relationships of detected polymorphisms with EH with or without Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) status were tested subsequently. Method. ANP gene polymorphisms (I/D and A191G) were specified utilizing mutagenically separated Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) in 320 subjects including 163 EH case subjects and 157 controls. Result. This case-control study discovered a significant association between I/D polymorphisms of ANP gene in EH patient without T2DM. However, the study determined no association between G191A polymorphisms of ANP in EH with or without T2DM. In addition, sociodemographic factors in the case and healthy subjects exhibited strong differences (P < 0.05). Conclusion. As a risk factor, ANP gene polymorphisms may affect hypertension. Despite the small sample size in this study, it is the first research assessing the ANP gene polymorphisms in both EH and T2DM patients among Malaysian population. PMID:27413750

  9. Analytical Issues with Natriuretic Peptides – has this been Overly Simplified?

    PubMed Central

    Katrukha, Alexey G.

    2016-01-01

    Natriuretic peptides (NPs) were first described as cardiac biomarkers more than two decades ago. Since that time, numerous studies have confirmed NPs’ diagnostic and prognostic utilities as biomarkers of myocardial function. However, we must now admit that despite the NPs’ relatively long period of use in clinical practice, our understanding of the biochemistry and the variety of circulating forms of NPs, as well as of their potential as biomarkers, remains far from being complete and comprehensive. The highly complex nature and wide diversity of circulating forms of NPs make their accurate measurements in plasma far more complex than initially believed. A highly simplistic view of the NPs’ use is that elevated values of NPs indicate the severity of heart failure and thus reflect the prognosis. However, as shown by a variety of studies, deep understanding of how the NP system works will be required for correct interpretation of test results in routine practice of cardiovascular disease. In this review, we summarize the recent advances in understanding of the complexity of the NP system and discuss related analytical issues, which open new horizons, as well as challenges for clinical diagnostics.

  10. Atrial natriuretic peptide increases microvascular blood flow and macromolecular escape during renin infusion in the hamster

    SciTech Connect

    Boric, M.P.; Albertini, R. )

    1990-02-01

    The effects of Atrial Natriuretic Peptide (ANP) on microvascular hemodynamics and macromolecular permselectivity were studied in the hamster cheek pouch under resting conditions and during intravenous renin infusion. Fluorescent intravital microscopy was used to observe arteriolar diameters and to detect escape of fluorescent dextran of 150 K-Daltons (FITC-Dx-150). Microvascular plasma flow was estimated by clearance of 51Cr-EDTA and net macromolecular transport by clearance of FITC-Dx-150. At rest, topical ANP (2-250 ng/ml) had no effect on arteriolar diameter, 51Cr-EDTA clearance, relative vascular conductance (RVC) or FITC-Dx-150 clearance. Infusion of renin (10 mU/Kg/Hr, iv) elevated systemic arterial pressure by 30% and reduced cheek pouch RVC by 26%. During renin infusion, topical ANP (50 ng/ml) produced transient arteriolar vasodilation, and increased 51Cr-EDTA clearance (+35%), RVC (+58%) and FITC-Dx-150 clearance (+54%), without affecting systemic pressure. ANP did not induce venular leakage sites under any condition, but changes in FITC-Dx-150 clearance were highly correlated with changes in 51Cr-EDTA clearance, suggesting that the larger macromolecular escape was due to increases in microvascular blood flow and capillary/post-capillary hydrostatic pressure.

  11. Atrial natriuretic peptide receptor heterogeneity and effects on cyclic GMP accumulation

    SciTech Connect

    Leitman, D.C.

    1988-01-01

    The effects of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), oxytocin (OT) and vasopressin (AVP) on guanylate cyclase activity and cyclic GMP accumulation were examined, since these hormones appear to be intimately associated with blood pressure and intravascular volume homeostasis. ANP was found to increase cyclic GMP accumulation in ten cell culture systems, which were derived from blood vessels, adrenal cortex, kidney, lung, testes and mammary gland. ANP receptors were characterized in intact cultured cells using {sup 125}I-ANP{sub 8-33}. Specific {sup 125}I-ANP binding was saturable and of high affinity. Scratchard analysis of the binding data for all cell types exhibited a straight line, indicating that these cells possessed a single class of binding sites. Despite the presence of linear Scatchard plots, these studies demonstrated that cultured cells possess two functionally and physically distinct ANP-binding sites. Most of the ANP-binding sites in cultured cells have a molecular size of 66,000 daltons under reducing conditions. The identification of cultured cell types in which hormones (ANP and oxytocin) regulate guanylate cyclase activity and increase cyclic GMP synthesis will provide valuable systems to determine the mechanisms of hormone-receptor coupling to guanylate cyclase and the cellular processes regulated by cyclic GMP.

  12. The role of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) in cold-induced diuresis (CID)

    SciTech Connect

    Agnew, J.W.; Freund, B.J.; DuBose, D.A.; McKay, J.M.; Hashiro, G.M. Tripler Army Medical Center, Honolulu, HI )

    1991-03-11

    The hormonal control of cold-induced diuresis (CID) remains unresolved. This study investigated the role of ANP, plasma vasopressin (AVP), and aldosterone (ALDO) on CID. Four semi-nude men participated in a 210 min exposure to 15C and 29C air, on separate days. These subjects drank 300 mL of water and had an intravenous saline drip throughout both exposures to replace blood and insensible fluid losses. CID was observed in 15C but not in the 29C experiment, as indicated by a greater urine output. In 15C, atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) increased after 90 min by 41% and remained elevated for 2 h relative to 29C. No differences were observed in AVP between 15C and 29C. In the 15C versus the 29C experiment, ALDO was approximately 37% lower at the pre, 15 and 90 min time periods. Mean arterial blood pressure was generally greater but only significant at 60 min during the 15C versus the 29C experiment. Urinary NA{sup +} excretion was elevated in 15C relative to 29C while no difference in K{sup +} excretion was observed. Although pressure effects may contribute, the observed natriuresis in the absence of a kaliuresis in the cold suggests a physiological role of ANP in CID.

  13. Cortical Brain Connectivity and B-Type Natriuretic Peptide in Patients With Congestive Heart Failure.

    PubMed

    Vecchio, Fabrizio; Miraglia, Francesca; Valeriani, Lavinia; Scarpellini, Maria Gabriella; Bramanti, Placido; Mecarelli, Oriano; Rossini, Paolo M

    2015-07-01

    The brain has a high level of complexity and needs continuous oxygen supply. So it is clear that any pathological condition, or physiological (aging) change, in the cardiovascular system affects functioning of the central nervous system. We evaluated linear aspects of the relationship between the slowness of cortical rhythms, as revealed by the modulation of a graph connectivity parameter, and congestive heart failure (CHF), as a reflection of neurodegenerative processes. Eyes-closed resting electroencephalographic (EEG) data of 10 patients with CHF were recorded by 19 electrodes positioned according the international 10-20 system. Graph theory function (normalized characteristic path length λ) was applied to the undirected and weighted networks obtained by lagged linear coherence evaluated by eLORETA software, therefore getting rid of volumetric propagation influences. The EEG frequency bands of interest were: delta (2-4 Hz), theta (4-8 Hz), alpha 1 (8-10.5 Hz), alpha 2 (10.5-13 Hz), beta 1 (13-20 Hz), beta 2 (20-30 Hz), and gamma (30-40 Hz). The analysis between B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) values and λ showed positive correlation in delta, associated with a negative correlation in alpha 2 band. Namely, the higher the severity of the disease (as revealed by the BNP vales), the higher the λ in delta, and lower in alpha 2 band. Results suggest that delta and alpha λ indices are good markers of the severity of CHF.

  14. Involvement of atrial natriuretic peptide in blood pressure reduction induced by estradiol in spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Belo, Najara O; Silva-Barra, Juliana; Carnio, Evelin C; Antunes-Rodrigues, Jose; Gutkowska, Jolanta; Dos Reis, Adelina M

    2004-01-15

    The aim of the present study was to determine the involvement of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) in blood pressure (BP) alterations induced by estradiol treatment. Spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR) and Wistar rats (WR) were ovariectomized and, after 3 weeks, were injected daily for 4 days with estradiol benzoate (E2; 5 microg/100 g/day) or a vehicle. One day after the last injection, the animals were decapitated, blood was collected, and both right and left atrial appendages were quickly removed for determination of ANP by radioimmunoassay (RIA), or used for ANP mRNA determination. Estradiol treatment induced a significant reduction of blood pressure in SHR, but not in WR. This reduction was correlated with the increase of plasma ANP levels that were significantly increased in E2-treated, compared with vehicle-treated, SHR. E2-treated SHR showed significant increases in ANP concentration in the right and left atria compared to the vehicle-treated animals. These observations were confirmed by ANP mRNA. In summary, the present study shows that short-term estradiol treatment reduces the blood pressure of ovariectomized SHR, but not of WR. This reduction was highly correlated with increased plasma estradiol and ANP levels. These results suggest that ANP is involved in mediating the effect of estradiol on blood pressure reduction.

  15. The potential role of natriuretic peptide-guided management for patients hospitalized for heart failure.

    PubMed

    Maisel, Alan; Xue, Yang; Greene, Stephen J; Pang, Peter S; Januzzi, James L; Piña, Ileana L; DeFilippi, Christopher; Butler, Javed

    2015-03-01

    There are >1 million hospitalizations for heart failure (HF) in the United States annually. After discharge, 25% of these patients are rehospitalized within 30 days, and 30% are dead within 1 year. To date, all trials in patients with acute HF (AHF) have failed to improve post-discharge outcomes. There remains a need for an effective objective risk stratification strategy that is capable of reliably identifying patients at heightened risk for readmission and informing discharge decision making. Natriuretic peptide (NP) levels during and after AHF hospitalization can provide valuable information regarding congestion status and chronic remodeling stress. The lack of sensitivity and inter-rater reliability of physical examination, and failure to achieve dry weight in many patients before discharge, renders the use of NP to guide therapy to prevent readmission an attractive option. NP levels can be used across the spectrum of AHF care settings, ranging from the emergency department and inpatient stay to post-discharge follow-up and chronic management. This review summarizes available data and provides an expert opinion on the potential role of NPs to reduce HF readmissions.

  16. Culture on Electrospun Polyurethane Scaffolds Decreases Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Expression by Cardiomyocytes In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Rockwood, Danielle N.; Akins, Robert E.; Parrag, Ian; Woodhouse, Kimberly A.; Rabolt, John F.

    2008-01-01

    The function of the mammalian heart depends on the functional alignment of cardiomyocytes, and controlling cell alignment is an important consideration in biomaterial design for cardiac tissue engineering and research. The physical cues that guide functional cell alignment in vitro and the impact of substrate-imposed alignment on cell phenotype, however, are only partially understood. In this report, primary cardiac ventricular cells were grown on electrospun, biodegradable polyurethane (ES-PU) with either aligned or unaligned microfibers. ES-PU scaffolds supported high-density cultures, and cell subpopulations remained intact over two weeks in culture. ES-PU cultures contained electrically-coupled cardiomyocytes with connexin-43 localized to points of cell:cell contact. Multi-cellular organization correlated with microfiber orientation, and aligned materials yielded highly oriented cardiomyocyte groupings. Atrial natriuretic peptide, a molecular marker that has decreasing expression during ventricular cell maturation, was significantly lower in cultures grown on ES-PU scaffolds than in those grown on tissue culture polystyrene. Cells grown on aligned ES-PU had significantly lower steady state levels of ANP and constitutively released less ANP over time indicating that scaffold-imposed cell organization resulted in a shift in cell phenotype to a more mature state. We conclude that the physical organization of microfibers in ES-PU scaffolds impacts both multi-cellular architecture and cardiac cell phenotype in vitro. PMID:18823659

  17. Role of calcium in effects of atrial natriuretic peptide on aldosterone production in adrenal glomerulosa cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chartier, L.; Schiffrin, E.L.

    1987-04-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) inhibits the stimulation of aldosterone secretion by isolated adrenal glomerulosa cells produced by angiotensin II (ANG II), ACTH, and potassium. The effect of ANP on the dose-response curve of aldosterone stimulated by ANG II, ACTH, and potassium on isolated rat adrenal glomerulosa cells was studied. In the presence of ANP the maximal response of aldosterone output stimulated by ANG II or potassium decreased and the half-maximum (EC/sub 50/) of the response to ACTH was displaced to the right. Because these effects resemble those of calcium-channel blockers, the authors investigated the effect of different concentrations of nifedipine, a dihydropyridine calcium-channel blocker, on the dose-response curve of aldosterone stimulated by ANG II, ACTH, and potassium. Nifedipine produced effects similar to ANP. The maximal response of aldosterone stimulated by ANG II and potassium was decreased and the dose-response curve to ACTH was displaced to the right. ANP decreased the maximal response of aldosterone to the dihydropyridine derivative BAY K8644, a calcium-channel activator, without change in its EC/sub 50/. In contrast, nifedipine displaced the dose-response curve to BAY K8644 to the right as expected of a competitive inhibitor. The effect of ANP and nifedipine on basal and stimulated /sup 45/Ca influx into isolated rat adrenal glomerulosa cells was studied. ANP may act on the rat adrenal glomerulosa cells at least in part by interference with calcium entry.

  18. Urinary C-type natriuretic peptide: an emerging biomarker for heart failure and renal remodeling.

    PubMed

    Zakeri, Rosita; Burnett, John C; Sangaralingham, S Jeson

    2015-03-30

    The public health and economic burden of heart failure (HF) is staggering and the need for relevant pathophysiologic and clinical biomarkers to advance the field and improve HF therapy remains high. Renal dysfunction is common among HF patients and is associated with increased HF hospitalization and mortality. It is widely recognized that mechanisms contributing to HF pathogenesis include a complex bidirectional interaction between the kidney and heart, encompassed by the term cardiorenal syndrome (CRS). Among a new wave of urinary biomarkers germane to CRS, C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) has emerged as an innovative biomarker of renal structural and functional impairment in HF and chronic renal disease states. CNP is a hormone, synthesized in the kidney, and is an important regulator of cell proliferation and organ fibrosis. Hypoxia, cytokines and fibrotic growth factors, which are inherent to both cardiac and renal remodeling processes, are among the recognized stimuli for CNP production and release. In this review we aim to highlight current knowledge regarding the biology and pathophysiological correlates of urinary CNP, and its potential clinical utility as a diagnostic and prognostic biomarker in HF and renal disease states. PMID:25512164

  19. Reduced immunoreactivities of B-type natriuretic peptide in pulmonary arterial hypertension rats after ranolazine treatment

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae Chul; Kim, Kwan Chang

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a severe pulmonary vascular disease characterized by sustained increase in the pulmonary arterial pressure and excessive thickening and remodeling of the distal small pulmonary arteries. During disease progression, structural remodeling of the right ventricular (RV) impairs pump function, creates pro-arrhythmic substrates and triggers for arrhythmias. Notably, RV failure and lethal arrhythmias are major contributors to cardiac death in PAH that are not directly addressed by currently available therapies. Ranolazine (RAN) is an anti-anginal, anti-ischemic drug that has cardioprotective effects of heart dysfunction. RAN also has anti-arrhythmic effects due to inhibition of the late sodium current in cardiomyocytes. Therefore, we hypothesized that RAN could reduce the mal-adaptive structural remodeling of the RV, and prevent triggered ventricular arrhythmias in the monocrotaline-induced rat model of PAH. RAN reduced ventricular hypertrophy, reduced levels of B-type natriuretic peptide, and decreased the expression of fibrosis. In addition, RAN prevented cardiovascular death in rat model of PAH. These results support the notion that RAN can improve the functional properties of the RV, highlighting its potential benefits in the setting of heart impairment. PMID:27051563

  20. Genetic Analysis of the Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Gene Polymorphisms among Essential Hypertensive Patients in Malaysia

    PubMed Central

    Ghodsian, Nooshin; Ismail, Patimah; Ahmadloo, Salma; Eskandarian, Narges; Etemad, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Background. Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) considerably influences blood pressure regulation through water and sodium homoeostasis. Several of the studies have utilized anonymous genetic polymorphic markers and made inconsequent claims about the ANP relevant disorders. Thus, we screened Insertion/Deletion (ID) and G191A polymorphisms of ANP to discover sequence variations with potential functional significance and to specify the linkage disequilibrium pattern between polymorphisms. The relationships of detected polymorphisms with EH with or without Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus (T2DM) status were tested subsequently. Method. ANP gene polymorphisms (I/D and A191G) were specified utilizing mutagenically separated Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) in 320 subjects including 163 EH case subjects and 157 controls. Result. This case-control study discovered a significant association between I/D polymorphisms of ANP gene in EH patient without T2DM. However, the study determined no association between G191A polymorphisms of ANP in EH with or without T2DM. In addition, sociodemographic factors in the case and healthy subjects exhibited strong differences (P < 0.05). Conclusion. As a risk factor, ANP gene polymorphisms may affect hypertension. Despite the small sample size in this study, it is the first research assessing the ANP gene polymorphisms in both EH and T2DM patients among Malaysian population. PMID:27413750

  1. In vivo measurement of atrial natriuretic peptide receptors using nuclear imaging.

    PubMed

    Willenbrock, R; Lambert, R; Tremblay, J; Bavaria, G; Langlois, Y; Léveillé, J; Flanagan, R; Hamet, P

    1992-11-01

    We have successfully visualized atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) receptors in vivo using nuclear imaging. 123I-Labelled ANP, injected in green vervet monkeys, was rapidly bound to ANP receptors in the kidneys and lungs. That the observed uptake was receptor mediated was demonstrated with competition studies using simultaneous injection of unlabelled ANP 99-126. It was possible to distinguish between the ANP receptor subtypes by the use of selective antagonists. Thus coinjection of ANP 102-121-des[Gln, Ser, Gly, Leu, Gly] (C-ANP), an ANP analog that selectively binds to the ANP C-receptor, decreased uptake in the kidneys by 50% but increased relative uptake in the lungs and soft tissues. This method permits for the first time, the dynamic in vivo analysis of ANP receptors and their interaction with endogenous ligand. Differences and changes in local ANP receptor concentrations and occupancy could be detected. Since ANP receptor density and affinity are influenced by various physiological and pathological conditions, clinical and diagnostic applications seem possible.

  2. Role of atrial natriuretic peptide in systemic responses to acute isotonic volume expansion

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Watenpaugh, Donald E.; Yancy, Clyde W.; Buckey, Jay C.; Lane, Lynda D.; Hargens, Alan R.; Blomqvist, C. G.

    1992-01-01

    A hypothesis is proposed that a temporal relationship exists between increases in cardiac filling pressure and plasma artrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) concentration and also between ANP elevation and vasodilation, fluid movement from plasma to interstitium, and increased urine volume (UV). To test the hypothesis, 30 ml/kg isotonic saline were infused in supine male subjects over 24 min and responses were monitored for 3 h postinfusion. Results show that at end infusion, mean arterial pressure (RAP), heart rate and plasma volume exhibited peak increases of 146, 23, and 27 percent, respectively. Mean plasma ANP and UV peaked (45 and 390 percent, respectively) at 30 min postinfusion. Most cardiovascular variables had returned toward control levels by 1 h postinfusion, and net reabsorption of extravascular fluid ensued. It is concluded that since ANP was not significantly increased until 30 min postinfusion, factors other than ANP initiate responses to intravascular fluid loading. These factors include increased vascular pressures, baroreceptor-mediated vasolidation, and hemodilution of plasma proteins. ANP is suggested to mediate, in part, the renal response to saline infusion.

  3. Measurement of the pro-hormone of brain type natriuretic peptide (proBNP): methodological considerations and pathophysiological relevance.

    PubMed

    Clerico, Aldo; Vittorini, Simona; Passino, Claudio

    2011-08-26

    Recent studies demonstrated that large amounts of the pro-hormone peptide of brain natriuretic peptide (proBNP) can be detected in plasma of healthy subjects and in particular of patients with heart failure. As a result, a great part of B-type natriuretic peptides measured in patients with cardio-vascular disease may be devoid of biological activity. These findings stimulated the set up of specific immunoassay methods for the measurement of the intact proBNP peptide. The aim of this review article is to discuss the methodological characteristics and the possible clinical relevance of specific immunoassay methods for the measurement of the proBNP peptide. From an analytical point of view, a fully automated immunoassay of proBNP has some theoretical advantages (e.g., a more stable molecule with higher molecular weight than the derived peptides) compared to the active hormone BNP. Recent studies supported the concept that the precursor proBNP might be actually considered a circulating prohormone, which can be cleaved by specific plasma proteases in BNP, the active hormone, and NT-proBNP, an inactive peptide. The peripheral processing of circulating proBNP could likely be submitted to regulatory rules, which might be impaired in patients with heart failure, opening new perspectives in the treatment of heart failure (e.g., by studying drugs inducing the cleavage of the prohormone into active BNP). Furthermore, as a future perspective, the specific assay in the same plasma sample of the intact precursor proBNP and of the biologically active peptide BNP, could allow a more accurate estimation of the production/secretion of B-type related peptides from cardiomyocytes and of the global cardiac endocrine function.

  4. Plant natriuretic peptides induce proteins diagnostic for an adaptive response to stress

    PubMed Central

    Turek, Ilona; Marondedze, Claudius; Wheeler, Janet I.; Gehring, Chris; Irving, Helen R.

    2014-01-01

    In plants, structural and physiological evidence has suggested the presence of biologically active natriuretic peptides (PNPs). PNPs are secreted into the apoplast, are systemically mobile and elicit a range of responses signaling via cGMP. The PNP-dependent responses include tissue specific modifications of cation transport and changes in stomatal conductance and the photosynthetic rate. PNP also has a critical role in host defense responses. Surprisingly, PNP-homologs are produced by several plant pathogens during host colonization suppressing host defense responses. Here we show that a synthetic peptide representing the biologically active fragment of the Arabidopsis thaliana PNP (AtPNP-A) induces the production of reactive oxygen species in suspension-cultured A. thaliana (Col-0) cells. To identify proteins whose expression changes in an AtPNP-A dependent manner, we undertook a quantitative proteomic approach, employing tandem mass tag (TMT) labeling, to reveal temporal responses of suspension-cultured cells to 1 nM and 10 pM PNP at two different time-points post-treatment. Both concentrations yield a distinct differential proteome signature. Since only the higher (1 nM) concentration induces a ROS response, we conclude that the proteome response at the lower concentration reflects a ROS independent response. Furthermore, treatment with 1 nM PNP results in an over-representation of the gene ontology (GO) terms “oxidation-reduction process,” “translation” and “response to salt stress” and this is consistent with a role of AtPNP-A in the adaptation to environmental stress conditions. PMID:25505478

  5. Permeability and contractile responses of collecting lymphatic vessels elicited by atrial and brain natriuretic peptides.

    PubMed

    Scallan, Joshua P; Davis, Michael J; Huxley, Virginia H

    2013-10-15

    Atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP, respectively) are cardiac hormones released into the bloodstream in response to hypervolaemia or fluid shifts to the central circulation. The actions of both peptides include natriuresis and diuresis, a decrease in systemic blood pressure, and inhibition of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Further, ANP and BNP elicit increases in blood microvessel permeability sufficient to cause protein and fluid extravasation into the interstitium to reduce the vascular volume. Given the importance of the lymphatic vasculature in maintaining fluid balance, we tested the hypothesis that ANP or BNP (100 nM) would likewise elevate lymphatic permeability (Ps) to serum albumin. Using a microfluorometric technique adapted to in vivo lymphatic vessels, we determined that rat mesenteric collecting lymphatic Ps to rat serum albumin increased by 2.0 ± 0.4-fold (P = 0.01, n = 7) and 2.7 ± 0.8-fold (P = 0.07, n = 7) with ANP and BNP, respectively. In addition to measuring Ps responses, we observed changes in spontaneous contraction amplitude and frequency from the albumin flux tracings in vivo. Notably, ANP abolished spontaneous contraction amplitude (P = 0.005) and frequency (P = 0.006), while BNP augmented both parameters by ∼2-fold (P < 0.01 each). These effects of ANP and BNP on contractile function were examined further by using an in vitro assay. In aggregate, these data support the theory that an increase in collecting lymphatic permeability opposes the absorptive function of the lymphatic capillaries, and aids in the retention of protein and fluid in the interstitial space to counteract volume expansion.

  6. The natriuretic peptide/guanylyl cyclase--a system functions as a stress-responsive regulator of angiogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Michaela; Völker, Katharina; Schwarz, Kristine; Carbajo-Lozoya, Javier; Flögel, Ulrich; Jacoby, Christoph; Stypmann, Jörg; van Eickels, Martin; Gambaryan, Stepan; Hartmann, Michael; Werner, Matthias; Wieland, Thomas; Schrader, Jürgen; Baba, Hideo A

    2009-07-01

    Cardiac atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) modulate blood pressure and volume by activation of the receptor guanylyl cyclase-A (GC-A) and subsequent intracellular cGMP formation. Here we report what we believe to be a novel function of these peptides as paracrine regulators of vascular regeneration. In mice with systemic deletion of the GC-A gene, vascular regeneration in response to critical hind limb ischemia was severely impaired. Similar attenuation of ischemic angiogenesis was observed in mice with conditional, endothelial cell-restricted GC-A deletion (here termed EC GC-A KO mice). In contrast, smooth muscle cell-restricted GC-A ablation did not affect ischemic neovascularization. Immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR revealed BNP expression in activated satellite cells within the ischemic muscle, suggesting that local BNP elicits protective endothelial effects. Since within the heart, BNP is mainly induced in cardiomyocytes by mechanical load, we investigated whether the natriuretic peptide/GC-A system also regulates angiogenesis accompanying load-induced cardiac hypertrophy. EC GC-A KO hearts showed diminished angiogenesis, mild fibrosis, and diastolic dysfunction. In vitro BNP/GC-A stimulated proliferation and migration of cultured microvascular endothelia by activating cGMP-dependent protein kinase I and phosphorylating vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein and p38 MAPK. We therefore conclude that BNP, produced by activated satellite cells within ischemic skeletal muscle or by cardiomyocytes in response to pressure load, regulates the regeneration of neighboring endothelia via GC-A. This paracrine communication might be critically involved in coordinating muscle regeneration/hypertrophy and angiogenesis. PMID:19487812

  7. The natriuretic peptide/guanylyl cyclase--a system functions as a stress-responsive regulator of angiogenesis in mice.

    PubMed

    Kuhn, Michaela; Völker, Katharina; Schwarz, Kristine; Carbajo-Lozoya, Javier; Flögel, Ulrich; Jacoby, Christoph; Stypmann, Jörg; van Eickels, Martin; Gambaryan, Stepan; Hartmann, Michael; Werner, Matthias; Wieland, Thomas; Schrader, Jürgen; Baba, Hideo A

    2009-07-01

    Cardiac atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) modulate blood pressure and volume by activation of the receptor guanylyl cyclase-A (GC-A) and subsequent intracellular cGMP formation. Here we report what we believe to be a novel function of these peptides as paracrine regulators of vascular regeneration. In mice with systemic deletion of the GC-A gene, vascular regeneration in response to critical hind limb ischemia was severely impaired. Similar attenuation of ischemic angiogenesis was observed in mice with conditional, endothelial cell-restricted GC-A deletion (here termed EC GC-A KO mice). In contrast, smooth muscle cell-restricted GC-A ablation did not affect ischemic neovascularization. Immunohistochemistry and RT-PCR revealed BNP expression in activated satellite cells within the ischemic muscle, suggesting that local BNP elicits protective endothelial effects. Since within the heart, BNP is mainly induced in cardiomyocytes by mechanical load, we investigated whether the natriuretic peptide/GC-A system also regulates angiogenesis accompanying load-induced cardiac hypertrophy. EC GC-A KO hearts showed diminished angiogenesis, mild fibrosis, and diastolic dysfunction. In vitro BNP/GC-A stimulated proliferation and migration of cultured microvascular endothelia by activating cGMP-dependent protein kinase I and phosphorylating vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein and p38 MAPK. We therefore conclude that BNP, produced by activated satellite cells within ischemic skeletal muscle or by cardiomyocytes in response to pressure load, regulates the regeneration of neighboring endothelia via GC-A. This paracrine communication might be critically involved in coordinating muscle regeneration/hypertrophy and angiogenesis.

  8. Cloning and sequence analysis of an Ophiophagus hannah cDNA encoding a precursor of two natriuretic peptide domains.

    PubMed

    Lei, Weiwei; Zhang, Yong; Yu, Guoyu; Jiang, Ping; He, Yingying; Lee, Wenhui; Zhang, Yun

    2011-04-01

    The king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) is the largest venomous snake. Despite the components are mainly neurotoxins, the venom contains several proteins affecting blood system. Natriuretic peptide (NP), one of the important components of snake venoms, could cause local vasodilatation and a promoted capillary permeability facilitating a rapid diffusion of other toxins into the prey tissues. Due to the low abundance, it is hard to purify the snake venom NPs. The cDNA cloning of the NPs become a useful approach. In this study, a 957 bp natriuretic peptide-encoding cDNA clone was isolated from an O. hannah venom gland cDNA library. The open-reading frame of the cDNA encodes a 210-amino acid residues precursor protein named Oh-NP. Oh-NP has a typical signal peptide sequence of 26 amino acid residues. Surprisingly, Oh-NP has two typical NP domains which consist of the typical sequence of 17-residue loop of CFGXXDRIGC, so it is an unusual NP precursor. These two NP domains share high amino acid sequence identity. In addition, there are two homologous peptides of unknown function within the Oh-NP precursor. To our knowledge, Oh-NP is the first protein precursor containing two NP domains. It might belong to another subclass of snake venom NPs. PMID:21334357

  9. Cloning and sequence analysis of an Ophiophagus hannah cDNA encoding a precursor of two natriuretic peptide domains.

    PubMed

    Lei, Weiwei; Zhang, Yong; Yu, Guoyu; Jiang, Ping; He, Yingying; Lee, Wenhui; Zhang, Yun

    2011-04-01

    The king cobra (Ophiophagus hannah) is the largest venomous snake. Despite the components are mainly neurotoxins, the venom contains several proteins affecting blood system. Natriuretic peptide (NP), one of the important components of snake venoms, could cause local vasodilatation and a promoted capillary permeability facilitating a rapid diffusion of other toxins into the prey tissues. Due to the low abundance, it is hard to purify the snake venom NPs. The cDNA cloning of the NPs become a useful approach. In this study, a 957 bp natriuretic peptide-encoding cDNA clone was isolated from an O. hannah venom gland cDNA library. The open-reading frame of the cDNA encodes a 210-amino acid residues precursor protein named Oh-NP. Oh-NP has a typical signal peptide sequence of 26 amino acid residues. Surprisingly, Oh-NP has two typical NP domains which consist of the typical sequence of 17-residue loop of CFGXXDRIGC, so it is an unusual NP precursor. These two NP domains share high amino acid sequence identity. In addition, there are two homologous peptides of unknown function within the Oh-NP precursor. To our knowledge, Oh-NP is the first protein precursor containing two NP domains. It might belong to another subclass of snake venom NPs.

  10. Increased B-type-natriuretic peptide promotes myocardial cell apoptosis via the B-type-natriuretic peptide/long non-coding RNA LSINCT5/caspase-1/interleukin 1β signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, XIAN; SHA, MINGLEI; YAO, YUTING; DA, JIA; JING, DADAO

    2015-01-01

    Chronic heart failure (CHF) is the final stage of various heart diseases, and is increasingly recognized as a major health problem in the elderly. Previous studies demonstrated that B-type-natriuretic peptide (BNP) is an established biomarker of CHF. Furthermore, BNP also regulates cell proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. Recent evidence has revealed that BNP affects myocardial cell apoptosis during myocardial ischemia-reperfusion injury. Long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) are emerging as novel molecular compounds involved in gene regulation, and have important roles in numerous human diseases. However, the mechanism underlying the BNP and lncRNA-induced regulation of myocardial cell apoptosis remains to be elucidated. The present study reported that lncRNA LSINCT5, upregulated by BNP, is able to regulate myocardial cell apoptosis via the activation of the caspase-1/interleukin (IL)-1β signaling pathway. BNP-induced apoptosis of HCM cells was observed using flow cytometry, and involved caspase-1. In addition, expression profiling using a human lncRNA polymerase chain reaction array revealed that LSINCT5 was highly expressed in BNP-treated myocardial cells, as compared with untreated cells. The role of lncRNA LSINCT5 in HCM cell apoptosis was also investigated. The results of the present study indicated that LSINCT5 silencing by small interfering RNA inhibits caspase-1/IL-1β signaling, and suppresses apoptosis in BNP-treated HCM cells. Therefore, high expression levels of BNP promote the apoptosis of myocardial cells through the lncRNA LSINCT5 mediator, which activates the caspase-1/IL-1β signaling pathway. These findings uncovered a novel pathogenic mechanism, and provided a potential therapeutic target for CHF. PMID:26323562

  11. Correlation between brain natriuretic peptide levels and the prognosis of patients with left ventricular diastolic dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    GONG, HUI; WANG, XIN; SHI, YI-JUN; SHANG, WEN-JING; LING, YI; PAN, LI-JIAN; SHI, HAI-MING

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the association between brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels and the prognosis of patients with left ventricular (LV) diastolic dysfunction. A total of 708 inpatients with cardiovascular disease (mean age, 66 years; 395 males and 313 females) were grouped according to initial BNP and were followed-up for 20–51 months (average, 30.86 months) until endpoint events occurred. Endpoints were defined as mortality or readmission due to cardiovascular disease, or mortality due to any other reason. A total of 67 and 77 events were reported in the BNP ≤80 pg/ml and BNP >80 pg/ml groups, respectively. The occurrence rate of the endpoint was significantly higher in the BNP >80 pg/ml group, as compared with the BNP ≤80 pg/ml group (26.28 vs. 16.14%; relative risk=1.63). Furthermore, the durations of patient survival were significantly shorter in the BNP >80 pg/ml group, as compared with the BNP ≤80 pg/ml group (P=0.0006), and patient survival decreased as BNP levels rose (P=0.0074). Among the 708 patients, 677 underwent echocardiographic detection at the same time. No significant correlation was detected between BNP levels and survival time in 178 patients with normal LV diastolic function [mitral Doppler flow, early diastolic (E)/late diastolic (A)>1] (P=0.2165); whereas a negative correlation was determined in 499 patients with LVD dysfunction (E/A≤1) (Spearman's rho=−0.0899; P=0.0447). The prognoses of patients with elevated BNP levels were correspondingly worse in the present study and these correlations were demonstrated to be significant in patients with LV diastolic dysfunction. Therefore, BNP levels may be used to predict the prognosis of patients with cardiovascular disease. PMID:27313677

  12. Effect of phorbol ester on the release of atrial natriuretic peptide from the hypertrophied rat myocardium.

    PubMed Central

    Kinnunen, P.; Taskinen, T.; Järvinen, M.; Ruskoaho, H.

    1991-01-01

    1. To determine the cellular mechanisms of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) release from ventricular cardiomyocytes, the secretory and the cardiac effects of a phorbol ester, 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA), known to stimulate protein kinase C activity in heart cells, were studied in isolated, perfused heart preparations from 2- and 21-month-old Wistar-Kyoto (WKY) and spontaneously hypertensive (SHR) rats. TPA was added to the perfusion fluid for 30 min at a concentration of 46 nM after removal of atrial tissue. Additionally, atrial and ventricular levels of immunoreactive ANP (IR-ANP) and ANP mRNA, the distribution of ANP within ventricles as well as the relative contribution of atria and ventricles in the release of ANP were studied. 2. Ventricular hypertrophy that gradually developed in hypertensive rats resulted in remarkable augmentation of ANP gene expression, as reflected by elevated levels of immunoreactive ANP and ANP mRNA. The total amount of IR-ANP in the ventricles of the SHR rats increased 41 fold and ANP mRNA levels 12.9 fold from the age of 2 to 21 months. At the age of 21 months, levels of IR-ANP and ANP mRNA in the ventricles of SHR rats were 5.4 fold and 3.7 fold higher, respectively, than in the normotensive WKY rats. Immunohistochemical studies demonstrated ANP granules within the hypertrophic ventricles of the old SHR rats, but not within normal ventricular tissue. 3. In isolated perfused heart preparations, the severely hypertrophied ventricular tissue of SHR rats after atrialectomy secreted more ANP into the perfusate than did the control hearts.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) Images Figure 2 PMID:1826618

  13. Adipose tissue natriuretic peptide receptor expression is related to insulin sensitivity in obesity and diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Kovacova, Zuzana; Tharp, William G.; Liu, Dianxin; Wei, Wan; Xie, Hui

    2016-01-01

    Objective Cardiac natriuretic peptides (NPs) bind to two receptors (NPRA‐mediator of signaling; NPRC‐clearance receptor) whose ratio, NPRR (NPRA/NPRC), determines the NP bioactivity. This study investigated the relationship of NP receptor gene expression in adipose tissue and muscle with obesity and glucose intolerance. Prospectively, the study also assessed whether changes in NP receptor expression and thermogenic gene markers accompanied improvements of insulin sensitivity. Methods A cross‐sectional study of subjects with a wide range of BMI and glucose tolerance (n = 50) was conducted, as well as a randomized 12‐week trial of subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM) treated with pioglitazone (n = 9) or placebo (n = 10). Results NPRR mRNA was significantly lower in adipose tissue of subjects with obesity when compared with lean subjects (P ≤ 0.001). NPRR decreased with progression from normal glucose tolerance to T2DM (P < 0.01) independently of obesity. Treatment of subjects with T2DM with pioglitazone increased NPRR in adipose tissue (P ≤ 0.01) in conjunction with improvements in insulin sensitivity and increases of the thermogenic markers PPARγ coactivator‐1α and uncoupling protein 1 (P ≤ 0.01). Conclusions Decreased adipose tissue NPRR was associated with obesity, glucose intolerance, and insulin resistance. This relationship was not observed for skeletal muscle NPRR. Pharmacological improvement of insulin sensitivity in subjects with T2DM was tied to improvement in NPRR and increased expression of genes involved in thermogenic processes. PMID:26887289

  14. Use of brain natriuretic Peptide and bioimpedance to guide therapy in heart failure patients.

    PubMed

    Valle, Roberto; Aspromonte, Nadia

    2010-01-01

    The key management goals for the stabilization of patients admitted for acutely decompensated heart failure (ADHF) include relief of congestion and restoration of hemodynamic stability. Nevertheless, in spite of clinical improvement, many patients are discharged with hemodynamic congestion. In response to volume expansion, the heart secretes the brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) with a biological action that counter-regulates the activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Since BNP is released by increased volume load and wall stretch, and declines after treatment with drugs of proven efficacy, on the basis of an improvement in filling pressures the level of BNP has been proposed as a 'measure' of congestion. The BNP level of a patient who is admitted with ADHF comprises two components: a baseline, euvolemic 'dry' BNP level and a level induced by volume or pressure overload ('wet' BNP level). So, the prognostic value of BNP during hospitalization depends on the time of measurement: from the lowest on admission when congestion is present (wet BNP) to the highest on clinical and instrumental stability (dry BNP), following the achievement of normohydration, as determined by fluid volume measurement. Euvolemia can be set as the primary goal of treatment for ADHF with dry BNP concentration as a target for discharge other than improvement of symptoms, because high BNP levels predict rehospitalization and death. Discharge criteria utilizing both BNP and hydration status measurement which account for the heterogeneity of the patient population and incorporate different strategies of care should be developed. This could in the next future offer an aid in monitoring heart failure patients or actively guiding optimal titration of therapy. PMID:20428005

  15. Elevated serum brain natriuretic peptide and matrix metalloproteinases 2 and 9 in Wilson's disease.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Nan; Wang, Honghao; Dong, Jianjian; Pan, Suyue; Wang, Xun; Han, Yongsheng; Han, Yongzhu; Yang, Renmin

    2015-08-01

    Wilson's disease (WD) is a disease of copper metabolism characterized by excessive copper deposition in the body. It is reported abnormal copper metabolism has been associated with cardiovascular disease. BNP and MMP2/9 were biomarkers of congestive heart failure (CHF). There is rare study to explore whether serum concentrations of BNP, MMP2, and or MMP9 are altered in patients with WD. In this study we determine whether serum concentrations of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) 2 and 9 are increased in patients with WD. Serum BNP, MMP2 and MMP9 were measured by an ELISA in 34 patients with hepatic WD, in 68 patients with neurological WD, and in 33 healthy controls. We found serum BNP levels were higher in patients with neurological WD than in healthy controls (p = 0.033). Serum MMP2 levels were higher in patients with hepatic (p = 0.009) and neurologic (p = 0.0004) WD than in controls. Serum MMP9 levels were higher in patients with neurologic WD than in patients with hepatic WD (p = 0.002) and controls (p = 0.00005), and were higher in patients with hepatic WD than in controls (p = 0.03). Serum BNP levels were negatively correlated with ceruloplasmin (p = 0.017, r = -0.215), while serum (p = 0.019, r = -0.221) and MMP9 (p = 0.011, r = -0.231) in patients with WD were negatively correlated with ceruloplasmin. BNP, MMP2, and MMP9 may reflect the deposition of copper in the heart.

  16. Bedside Ultrasonography versus Brain Natriuretic Peptide in Detecting Cardiogenic Causes of Acute Dyspnea

    PubMed Central

    Golshani, Keihan; Esmailian, Mehrdad; Valikhany, Aniseh; Zamani, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Acute dyspnea is a common cause of hospitalization in emergency departments (ED).Distinguishing the cardiac causes of acute dyspnea from pulmonary ones is a major challenge for responsible physicians in EDs. This study compares the characteristics of bedside ultrasonography with serum level of blood natriuretic peptide (BNP) in this regard. Methods: This diagnostic accuracy study compares bedside ultrasonography with serum BNP levels in differentiating cardiogenic causes of acute respiratory distress. Echocardiography was considered as the reference test. A checklist including demographic data (age and sex), vital signs, medical history, underlying diseases, serum level of BNP, as well as findings of chest radiography, chest ultrasonography, and echocardiography was filled for all patients with acute onset of dyspnea. Screening characteristics of the two studied methods were calculated and compared using SPSS software, version 20. Results: 48 patients with acute respiratory distress were evaluated (50% female). The mean age of participants was 66.94 ± 16.33 (28-94) years. Based on the results of echocardiography and final diagnosis, the cause of dyspnea was cardiogenic in 20 (41.6%) cases. Bedside ultrasonography revealed the cardiogenic cause of acute dyspnea in 18 cases (0 false positive) and BNP in 44 cases (24 false positives). The area under the ROC curve for bedside ultrasonography and BNP for differentiating the cardiogenic cause of dyspnea were 86.4 (95% CI: 74.6-98.3) and 66.3 (95% CI: 49.8-89.2), respectively (p = 0.0021). Conclusion: It seems that bedside ultrasonography could be considered as a helpful and accurate method in differentiating cardiogenic causes of acute dyspnea in emergency settings. Nevertheless, more study is needed to make a runaway algorithm to evaluate patients with respiratory distress using bedside ultrasonography, which leads to rapid therapeutic decisions in a short time. PMID:27299143

  17. The relation between intraocular pressure change and plasma natriuretic peptide under simulated hypobaric conditions

    PubMed Central

    Karadag, Remzi; Sen, Ahmet; Yildirim, Nilgun; Basmak, Hikmet; Golemez, Haydar; Cakir, Erdinc; Akin, Ahmet

    2010-01-01

    Purpose: To ascertain whether the changes in intraocular pressure (IOP) that occur during hypobaric hypoxic exposure are related to plasma N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels. Materials and Methods: The study group comprised 26 healthy participants (all male, mean age 23.1 years). IOP was measured at local ground level, (792 m above sea level), then while in a chamber providing hypobaric hypoxic conditions (the subjects were exposed to a pressure equivalent to 9144 m for 1-3 min), and again after exit from the chamber. In each condition, the mean of three consecutive measurements of IOP was calculated for each eye. For BNP measurements, blood samples were drawn before the participants entered the chamber and just after they left the chamber. Results: IOP during hypobaric hypoxic exposure (18.00 ± 3.70 mmHg) was significantly greater than that before (15.66 ± 2.10 mmHg, P < 0.001) or after (16.10 ± 2.63 mmHg, P = 0.001) the exposure. IOP levels before and after the exposure were not significantly different (P = 0.136). Plasma BNP levels measured before and after exposure to hypobaric hypoxic conditions were not significantly different (P = 0.462). Conclusion: Plasma BNP levels did not change after short-term hypobaric hypoxic exposure, while the IOP increased. This increase may have been caused by some other systemic factors. As the hypobaric hypoxic conditions were reversed, IOP decreased to normal levels. PMID:20413920

  18. Plasma pro-atrial natriuretic peptide to indicate fluid balance during cystectomy: a prospective observational study

    PubMed Central

    Rasmussen, Kirsten C; Højskov, Michael; Ruhnau, Birgitte; Salling, Lisbeth; Pedersen, Tom; Goetze, Jens P; Secher, Niels H

    2016-01-01

    Objectives During surgery the volume of administered fluid is debated. Pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (proANP) is released by atrial distension, and we evaluated the relationship between changes in proANP associated with perioperative fluid balance. Design Prospective observational study. Setting One university/tertiary centre. Participants The study included patients who underwent radical cystectomy. Plasma for determination of proANP was obtained before surgery, after resection of the bladder, and at the end of surgery for 20 robotic-assisted radical cystectomy (RARC) and 20 open radical cystectomy (ORC) procedures. Results The blood loss was 1871 (95% CI 1267 to 2475) vs 589 mL (378 to 801) in the ORC and RARC groups (p=0.001), respectively, and fluid balance was positive by 1518 mL (1215 to 1821) during ORC, and by 1858 mL (1461 to 2255) during RARC (p=0.163). Yet, at the end of ORC, plasma proANP was reduced by 23% (14% to 32%, p=0.001), while plasma proANP did not change significantly during RARC. Thus, plasma proANP was associated both with the perioperative blood loss (r= −0.475 (0.632 to −0.101), p=0.002), and with fluid balance (r=0.561 (0.302 to 0.740), p=0.001), indicating that a stable plasma proANP required a fluid surplus by 2.4 L (2.0 to 2.7). Conclusions There was a correlation between intraoperative haemorrhage and a decrease in plasma proANP and, taking plasma proANP to indicate filling of the heart, about 2.5 L surplus volume of lactated Ringer's solution appears to maintain cardiac preload during cystectomy. Trial registration number EudraCT (2012-005040-20), Results. PMID:26908528

  19. B-type natriuretic peptide-directed ultrafiltration improves care in acutely hospitalized dialysis patients.

    PubMed

    Tapolyai, Mihály; Uysal, Aşkin; Maeweathers, Gail; Bahta, Elias; Dossabhoy, Neville R

    2009-01-01

    In an observational study in 19 consecutive acutely hospitalized dialysis patients, ultrafiltration (UF) volume was determined by B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels. Patients were ultrafiltrated daily until they achieved a target BNP level <500 pg/mL. The UF volumes ranged from 2 to 5 L per session. All patients were male veterans aged 68+/-11 years (mean +/- SD), 74% were diabetic, 47% were African Americans, 58% underwent prevalent dialysis, and 53% had an arteriovenous fistula. Left ventricular ejection fraction on 2-dimensional echocardiography was 43.8%+/-27.9% (n=16). The admission BNP was 2412+/-1479 pg/mL (range, 561-5000 pg/mL) and BNP at hospital discharge was 1245+/-1173 pg/mL (range, 345-5000 pg/mL) (nonparametric Wilcoxon P=.0013). Admission weight was 88.9+/-27.9 kg and at discharge was 78.1+/-25.6 kg (P=.0002). The number of antihypertensive medications taken was 3.8+/-2.0 at admission and 2.3+/-1.7 at discharge (P=.0005). The number of patients with >2 blood pressure medications decreased from 14 to 6 (Fisher exact test, P=.02). The systolic/diastolic/mean arterial blood pressure decreased from admission to discharge (153.6+/-43.8/80.6+/-21.8/102.4+/-27.3 to 132.1+/-27.9/68.9+/-14.6/89.9+/-16.5 mm Hg; P=.0222/.0139/.0329, respectively). Although all patients were volume-overloaded at admission according to BNP criteria (>500), only 42% were identified as having heart failure. BNP-directed UF is safe because it minimizes symptomatic hypotension, identifies occult congestive heart failure in a large number of patients, and significantly reduces blood pressure in addition to reducing body weight and number of medications used. PMID:19522962

  20. B‐type natriuretic peptide identifies silent myocardial ischaemia in stroke survivors

    PubMed Central

    Wong, K Y K; McSwiggan, S; Kennedy, N S J; MacWalter, R S; Struthers, A D

    2006-01-01

    Objective To test the hypothesis that B‐type natriuretic peptide (BNP) predicts reversible myocardial ischaemia in stroke survivors who do not have chest pain or previous myocardial infarction. Methods 56 stroke survivors (mean (SE) age 68 (8) years) underwent tetrofosmin myocardial perfusion scanning with dipyridamole as the stressor. The degree of ischaemia was assessed by a scoring system (out of 64) by an experienced observer blinded to the results of BNP. Results In the whole cohort, BNP was significantly correlated with the degree of myocardial ischaemia on stress scanning (Spearman's r  =  −0.475, p < 0.001). BNP also correlated with the degree of reversible ischaemia (stress score − rest score; Spearman's r  =  0.28, two tailed p  =  0.049). In the cohort who did not have left ventricular systolic dysfunction (n  =  44), BNP remained higher in patients with relevant myocardial ischaemia (mean (SE) BNP 20.9 pg/ml, 95% confidence interval (CI) 15.2 to 26.5 v 12.2 pg/ml, 95% CI 5.95 to 18.5; p  =  0.046); 33 of the 44 patients had no chest pain or history of myocardial infarction. The relation between resting BNP and both inducible ischaemia and dipyridamole stress score remained significant (Spearman's r  =  0.37 and −0.38, respectively). Conclusions BNP correlates with the degree of reversible myocardial ischaemia in patients who do not have chest pain or a history of myocardial infarction or evidence of left ventricular systolic dysfunction. Stroke survivors with a high BNP deserve further investigations to rule out significant reversible myocardial ischaemia, in order to reduce their risk of cardiac death. PMID:16216865

  1. Natriuretic Peptides as Cardiovascular Safety Biomarkers in Rats: Comparison With Blood Pressure, Heart Rate, and Heart Weight.

    PubMed

    Engle, Steven K; Watson, David E

    2016-02-01

    Cardiovascular (CV) toxicity is an important cause of failure during drug development. Blood-based biomarkers can be used to detect CV toxicity during preclinical development and prioritize compounds at lower risk of causing such toxicities. Evidence of myocardial degeneration can be detected by measuring concentrations of biomarkers such as cardiac troponin I and creatine kinase in blood; however, detection of functional changes in the CV system, such as blood pressure, generally requires studies in animals with surgically implanted pressure transducers. This is a significant limitation because sustained changes in blood pressure are often accompanied by changes in heart rate and together can lead to cardiac hypertrophy and myocardial degeneration in animals, and major adverse cardiovascular events (MACE) in humans. Increased concentrations of NPs in blood correlate with higher risk of cardiac mortality, all-cause mortality, and MACE in humans. Their utility as biomarkers of CV function and toxicity in rodents was investigated by exploring the relationships between plasma concentrations of NTproANP and NTproBNP, blood pressure, heart rate, and heart weight in Sprague Dawley rats administered compounds that caused hypotension or hypertension, including nifedipine, fluprostenol, minoxidil, L-NAME, L-thyroxine, or sunitinib for 1-2 weeks. Changes in NTproANP and/or NTproBNP concentrations were inversely correlated with changes in blood pressure. NTproANP and NTproBNP concentrations were inconsistently correlated with relative heart weights. In addition, increased heart rate was associated with increased heart weights. These studies support the use of natriuretic peptides and heart rate to detect changes in blood pressure and cardiac hypertrophy in short-duration rat studies. PMID:26609138

  2. Clinical Value of Natriuretic Peptides in Predicting Time to Dialysis in Stage 4 and 5 Chronic Kidney Disease Patients

    PubMed Central

    Sundqvist, Sofia; Larson, Thomas; Cauliez, Bruno; Bauer, Fabrice; Dumont, Audrey; Le Roy, Frank; Hanoy, Mélanie; Fréguin-Bouilland, Caroline; Godin, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Background Anticipating the time to renal replacement therapy (RRT) in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients is an important but challenging issue. Natriuretic peptides are biomarkers of ventricular dysfunction related to poor outcome in CKD. We comparatively investigated the value of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) as prognostic markers for the risk of RRT in stage 4 and 5 CKD patients, and in foretelling all-cause mortality and major cardiovascular events within a 5-year follow-up period. Methods Baseline plasma BNP (Triage, Biosite) and NT-proBNP (Elecsys, Roche) were measured at inclusion. Forty-three patients were followed-up during 5 years. Kaplan-Meier analysis, with log-rank testing and hazard ratios (HR), were calculated to evaluate survival without RRT, cardiovascular events or mortality. The independent prognostic value of the biomarkers was estimated in separate Cox multivariate analysis, including estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR), creatininemia and comorbidities. Results During the first 12-month follow-up period, 16 patients started RRT. NT-proBNP concentration was higher in patients who reached endpoint (3221 ng/L vs 777 ng/L, p = 0.02). NT-proBNP concentration > 1345 ng/L proved significant predictive value on survival analysis for cardiovascular events (p = 0.04) and dialysis within 60 months follow-up (p = 0.008). BNP concentration > 140 ng/L was an independent predictor of RRT after 12 months follow-up (p<0.005), and of significant predictive value for initiation of dialysis within 60 months follow-up. Conclusions Our results indicate a prognostic value for BNP and NT-proBNP in predicting RRT in stage 4 and 5 CKD patients, regarding both short- and long-term periods. NT-proBNP also proved a value in predicting cardiovascular events. Natriuretic peptides could be useful predictive biomarkers for therapeutic guidance in CKD. PMID:27548064

  3. Amino-terminal fragment of C-type natriuretic peptide precursor and C-type natriuretic peptide do not correlate in patients with Chagas disease: role for neutral endopeptidase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yong; Moreira, Maria da Consolação V; Heringer-Walther, Silvia; Schultheiss, Heinz-Peter; Siems, Wolf-Eberhard; Wessel, Niels; Walther, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    Atrial and B-type natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP), but not C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP), have been identified to be diagnostic and prognostic markers in Chagas disease (CD). Although ANP and BNP excessively rise in patients with CD, increase in CNP is just minor. Our study aimed to investigate the mechanisms leading to CNP insensitivity to heart failure (HF) stimuli. Amino-terminal fragment of CNP precursor (NT-proCNP) and activity of neutral endopeptidase (NEP) were quantified to monitor CNP generation and degradation, respectively. Blood samples were collected from patients with CD and control healthy subjects. NT-proCNP concentrations were significantly lower in patients with CD without systolic dysfunction compared with healthy subjects. Despite a trend toward increase with rising heart failure clinical severity, it was significantly correlated with left ventricular ejection fraction and other echocardiographic parameters. As shown for CNP before, NT-proCNP could not predict mortality and heart transplant. Importantly, it had no statistical correlation with CNP. Additionally, NEP activity was significantly increased in New York Heart Association III and IV patients with HF but was positively correlated with CNP concentration. Our data demonstrates that generation of CNP is not enhanced under HF condition like CD. Thus, CNP rise by severe HF is caused by its less degradation that is independent of NEP activity.

  4. Natriuretic Peptide Receptor-C is Up-Regulated in the Intima of Advanced Carotid Artery Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Zayed, Mohamed A; Harring, Scott D; Abendschein, Dana R; Vemuri, Chandu; Lu, Dongsi; Detering, Lisa; Liu, Yongjian; Woodard, Pamela K

    2016-01-01

    Objective Natriuretic peptide receptor-C (NPR-C/NPR-3) is a cell surface protein involved in vascular remodelling that is up-regulated in atherosclerosis. NPR-C expression has not been well characterized in human carotid artery occlusive lesions. We hypothesized that NPR-C expression correlates with intimal features of vulnerable atherosclerotic carotid artery plaque. Methods To test this hypothesis, we evaluated NPR-C expression by immunohistochemistry (IHC) in carotid endarterectomy (CEA) specimens isolated from 18 patients. The grade, location, and co-localization of NPR-C in CEA specimens were evaluated using two tissue analysis techniques. Results Relative to minimally diseased CEA specimens, we observed avid NPR-C tissue staining in the intima of maximally diseased CEA specimens (65%; p=0.06). Specifically, maximally diseased CEA specimens demonstrated increased NPR-C expression in the superficial intima (61%, p=0.17), and deep intima (138% increase; p=0.05). In the superficial intima, NPR-C expression significantly co-localized with vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) and macrophages. The intensity of NPR-C expression was also higher in the superficial intima plaque shoulder and cap regions, and significantly correlated with atheroma and fibroatheroma vulnerable plaque regions (β=1.04, 95% CI=0.46, 1.64). Conclusion These findings demonstrate significant NPR-C expression in the intima of advanced carotid artery plaques. Furthermore, NPR-C expression was higher in vulnerable carotid plaque intimal regions, and correlate with features of advanced disease. Our findings suggest that NPR-C may serve as a potential biomarker for carotid plaque vulnerability and progression, in patients with advanced carotid artery occlusive disease. PMID:27547837

  5. New elements in the C-type natriuretic peptide signaling pathway inhibiting swine in vitro oocyte meiotic resumption.

    PubMed

    Santiquet, Nicolas; Papillon-Dion, Emilie; Djender, Nadjib; Guillemette, Christine; Richard, François J

    2014-07-01

    C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) and its cognate receptor, natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR) B, have been shown to promote cGMP production in granulosa/cumulus cells. Once transferred to the oocyte through the gap junctions, the cGMP inhibits oocyte meiotic resumption. CNP has been shown to bind another natriuretic receptor, NPR-C. NPR-C is known to interact with and degrade bound CNP, and has been reported to possess signaling functions. Therefore, NPR-C could participate in the control of oocyte maturation during swine in vitro maturation (IVM). Here, we examine the effect of CNP signaling on meiotic resumption, the amount of cGMP and gap junctional communication (GJC) regulation during swine IVM. The results show an inhibitory effect of CNP in inhibiting oocyte meiotic resumption in follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH)-stimulated IVM. We also found that an NPR-C-specific agonist (cANP([4-23])) is likely to play a role in maintaining meiotic arrest during porcine IVM when in the presence of a suboptimal dose of CNP. Moreover, we show that, even if CNP can increase intracellular concentration of cGMP in cumulus-oocyte complexes, cANP((4-23)) had no impact on cGMP concentration, suggesting a potential cGMP-independent signaling pathway related to NPR-C activation. These data support a potential involvement of cANP((4-23)) through NPR-C in inhibiting oocyte meiotic resumption while in the presence of a suboptimal dose of CNP. The regulation of GJC was not altered by CNP, cANP((4-23)), or the combination of CNP and cANP((4-23)), supporting their potential contribution in sending signals to the oocytes. These findings offer promising insights in to new elements of the signaling pathways that may be involved in inhibiting resumption of meiosis during FSH-stimulated swine IVM.

  6. Influence of doxazosin on biosynthesis of S100A6 and atrial natriuretic factor peptides in the heart of spontaneously hypertensive rats.

    PubMed

    Kasacka, Irena; Piotrowska, Żaneta; Filipek, Anna; Majewski, Mariusz

    2016-02-01

    Hypertension frequently results in severe complications in cardiovascular system and histopathological changes in the heart. To better understand the cellular processes and signaling pathways responsible for the proper functioning of the heart, we decided to check whether doxazosin affects the density of structures containing S100A6 and atrial natriuretic factor in the heart of spontaneously hypertensive rats. The aim of this study is to find differences in the density of the structures containing S100A6 and atrial natriuretic factor in the heart of spontaneously hypertensive rats treated with doxazosin compared to untreated animals. Fragments of heart were collected from five spontaneously hypertensive rats and five spontaneously hypertensive rats receiving doxazosin for six weeks (dose 0.1 mg per 1 kg of body weight). On the paraffin sections S100A6 and atrial natriuretic factor peptides were localized in the heart using immunohistochemistry. Positive immunohistochemical reaction for S100A6 was observed in atrial and ventricular cardiomyocytes and in the coronary vasculature. In the heart of hypertensive rats treated with doxazosin the S100A6 immunoreactivity was significantly lower compared to untreated animals. Immunodetection of atrial natriuretic factor in the heart of rats confirmed presence of peptide in atrial myocardium. Delicate atrial natriuretic factor-immunoreactivity was observed also in few ventricular cardiomyocytes. The atrial natriuretic factor-immunosignal was significantly weaker in hearts of hypertensive rats receiving doxazosin compared to spontaneously hypertensive rats untreated. Since we found that doxazosin reduces the levels of S100A6 and atrial natriuretic factor peptides in the heart of spontaneously hypertensive rats, it can be assumed that cardiovascular disorders that occur in hypertension may be associated with disturbances of cellular processes and signaling pathways.

  7. Influence of doxazosin on biosynthesis of S100A6 and atrial natriuretic factor peptides in the heart of spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Piotrowska, Żaneta; Filipek, Anna; Majewski, Mariusz

    2016-01-01

    Hypertension frequently results in severe complications in cardiovascular system and histopathological changes in the heart. To better understand the cellular processes and signaling pathways responsible for the proper functioning of the heart, we decided to check whether doxazosin affects the density of structures containing S100A6 and atrial natriuretic factor in the heart of spontaneously hypertensive rats. The aim of this study is to find differences in the density of the structures containing S100A6 and atrial natriuretic factor in the heart of spontaneously hypertensive rats treated with doxazosin compared to untreated animals. Fragments of heart were collected from five spontaneously hypertensive rats and five spontaneously hypertensive rats receiving doxazosin for six weeks (dose 0.1 mg per 1 kg of body weight). On the paraffin sections S100A6 and atrial natriuretic factor peptides were localized in the heart using immunohistochemistry. Positive immunohistochemical reaction for S100A6 was observed in atrial and ventricular cardiomyocytes and in the coronary vasculature. In the heart of hypertensive rats treated with doxazosin the S100A6 immunoreactivity was significantly lower compared to untreated animals. Immunodetection of atrial natriuretic factor in the heart of rats confirmed presence of peptide in atrial myocardium. Delicate atrial natriuretic factor-immunoreactivity was observed also in few ventricular cardiomyocytes. The atrial natriuretic factor-immunosignal was significantly weaker in hearts of hypertensive rats receiving doxazosin compared to spontaneously hypertensive rats untreated. Since we found that doxazosin reduces the levels of S100A6 and atrial natriuretic factor peptides in the heart of spontaneously hypertensive rats, it can be assumed that cardiovascular disorders that occur in hypertension may be associated with disturbances of cellular processes and signaling pathways. PMID:26515144

  8. Comparison of treatment effects of bevantolol and metoprolol on cardiac function and natriuretic peptides in patients with dilated cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Hara, Yuji; Hamada, Mareomi; Ohtsuka, Tomoaki; Ogimoto, Akiyoshi; Saeki, Hideyuki; Matsunaka, Tsuyoshi; Suzuki, Jun; Shigematsu, Yuji

    2002-12-01

    This study was designed to compare the efficacy of bevantolol, a beta(1)-selective blocker with alpha-blockade and vasodilating activity, with that of metoprolol, a beta(1)-selective receptor blocker, for the treatment of idiopathic dilated cardiomyopathy (DCM). Forty-one patients with DCM were enrolled to receive either bevantolol or metoprolol in addition to the standard therapy for DCM. They were classified into two groups: 16 patients were treated with bevantolol and 25 were treated with metoprolol. Echocardiographic parameters and atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP, BNP) were measured before treatment and after 6 months of treatment. Left ventricular dimension at end-diastole and end-systole was significantly lower and fractional shortening was significantly higher after treatment than before treatment in both groups. The plasma ANP and BNP levels were significantly decreased in both groups. Changes in all variables, except for systolic blood pressure, showed no significant differences between the two groups. In conclusion, bevantolol showed parallel beneficial effects to those of metoprolol on cardiac function and natriuretic peptides in patients with DCM.

  9. Perioperative application of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide in patients undergoing cardiac surgery

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The purpose of the research was to find out the factors which influence plasma N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) levels, then to assess whether preoperative plasma NT-proBNP levels could predict postoperative outcomes of cardiac surgery. Methods Between November 2008 and February 2010,225 patients who underwent cardiac surgery in our department were included in the study. The mean age was 61.25 ± 12.54 years, and 156 (69.3%) patients were male. NT-proBNP, CK-MB, cTnT and creatinine levels were measured preoperatively and 24 hours after operation. Postoperatively outcomes including ventilation time, length of stay in ICU and hospital, and mortality were closely monitored. The endpoints includes: 1) use of inotropic agents or intra-aortic balloon pump ≥24 h; 2) creatinine level elevated to hemodialysis; 3) cardiac events; 4) ICU stay ≥5d; 5) ventilation dependence ≥ 72 h; 6) deaths within 30 days of surgery. Results NT-proBNP concentrations (median [interquartile range]) increased from 728.4 pg/ml (IQR 213.5 to 2551 pg/ml) preoperatively to 1940.5 pg/ml (IQR 995.9 to 3892 pg/ml) postoperatively (P = 0.015). Preoperative atrial fibrillation, NYHA class III/IV, ejection fraction, pulmonary arterial pressure, left ventricle end-diastolic diameter (LVEDD), preoperative plasma creatinine and cTnT levels were significantly associated with preoperative NT-proBNP levels in univariate analysis. The preoperative NT-proBNP was closely related to ventilation time (P = 0.009), length of stay in ICU (P = 0.004) and length of stay in hospital (P = 0.019). Receiver operating characteristic curves demonstrated a cut-off value above 2773.5 pg/ml was the best cutoff (sensitivity of 63.6% and specificity of 80.8%) to predict the mortality within 30d of surgery. Conclusions Preoperative plasma NT-proBNP level presents a high individual variability in patients undergoing cardiac surgery. NYHA classification, ejection

  10. Evaluation of cardiac functions of cirrhotic children using serum brain natriuretic peptide and tissue Doppler imaging

    PubMed Central

    Fattouh, Aya M; El-Shabrawi, Mortada H; Mahmoud, Enas H; Ahmed, Wafaa O

    2016-01-01

    Background: Cirrhotic cardiomyopathy (CCM) is described as the presence of cardiac dysfunction in cirrhotic patients. In children with chronic liver disease, CCM has been very rarely investigated. The Aim of the Study: Is to evaluate the cardiac function of cirrhotic children to identify those with CCM. Patients and Methods: Fifty-two cirrhotic patients and 53 age and sex matched controls were assessed using serum brain-type natriuretic peptide (BNP), conventional echocardiography, and tissue Doppler imaging. Results: Patients’ mean ages were 7.66 ± 4.16 years (vs. 6.88 ± 3.04 years for the controls). The study included 27 males and 25 females (28 and 25 respectively for the controls). Patients had larger left atrium and right ventricle (RV) (P value 0.05) and increased LV posterior wall thickness than controls (P value 0.04). They had higher late atrial diastolic filling velocity (A) of tricuspid valve (TV) inflow (0.59 ± 0.17 vs. 0.5 ± 0.1 m/s, P < 0.001) and lower ratios between the early diastolic filling velocity (E) and A wave velocity (E/A) of both mitral valve and TV inflow (1.7 ± 0.35 vs. 1.87 ± 0.34 and 1.3 ± 0.3 vs. 1.5 ± 0.3, P < 0.005 and 0.0008, respectively). Patients had significantly longer isovolumic relaxation time of LV (45.5 ± 11.1 vs. 40.5 ± 7.7 ms P 0.008), higher late diastolic peak myocardial velocity (A’) (11.8 ± 3.6 vs. 9.5 ± 2.7 ms, P 0.0003) and systolic velocity (S’) of the RV (14.5 ± 2.7 vs. 13.2 ± 2.9, P 0.01) and significantly higher myocardial performance index of both LV and RV (P 0.001 and 0.01). BNP levels were significantly higher in cases than controls (5.25 ng/l vs. 3.75 ng/l, P < 0.04) and was correlated with the E wave velocity of the TV (r 0.004) and the E/E’ ratio of the RV (r 0.001). None of the clinical or laboratory data were correlated with the BNP level. Conclusion Cirrhotic children have cardiac dysfunction mainly in the form of diastolic dysfunction. There is a need that CCM be more accurately

  11. B-type natriuretic peptide and C-reactive protein in the prediction of atrial fibrillation risk: the CHARGE-AF Consortium of community-based cohort studies

    PubMed Central

    Sinner, Moritz F.; Stepas, Katherine A.; Moser, Carlee B.; Krijthe, Bouwe P.; Aspelund, Thor; Sotoodehnia, Nona; Fontes, João D.; Janssens, A. Cecile J.W.; Kronmal, Richard A.; Magnani, Jared W.; Witteman, Jacqueline C.; Chamberlain, Alanna M.; Lubitz, Steven A.; Schnabel, Renate B.; Vasan, Ramachandran S.; Wang, Thomas J.; Agarwal, Sunil K.; McManus, David D.; Franco, Oscar H.; Yin, Xiaoyan; Larson, Martin G.; Burke, Gregory L.; Launer, Lenore J.; Hofman, Albert; Levy, Daniel; Gottdiener, John S.; Kääb, Stefan; Couper, David; Harris, Tamara B.; Astor, Brad C.; Ballantyne, Christie M.; Hoogeveen, Ron C.; Arai, Andrew E.; Soliman, Elsayed Z.; Ellinor, Patrick T.; Stricker, Bruno H.C.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Heckbert, Susan R.; Pencina, Michael J.; Benjamin, Emelia J.; Alonso, Alvaro

    2014-01-01

    Aims B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and C-reactive protein (CRP) predict atrial fibrillation (AF) risk. However, their risk stratification abilities in the broad community remain uncertain. We sought to improve risk stratification for AF using biomarker information. Methods and results We ascertained AF incidence in 18 556 Whites and African Americans from the Atherosclerosis Risk in Communities Study (ARIC, n=10 675), Cardiovascular Health Study (CHS, n = 5043), and Framingham Heart Study (FHS, n = 2838), followed for 5 years (prediction horizon). We added BNP (ARIC/CHS: N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide; FHS: BNP), CRP, or both to a previously reported AF risk score, and assessed model calibration and predictive ability [C-statistic, integrated discrimination improvement (IDI), and net reclassification improvement (NRI)]. We replicated models in two independent European cohorts: Age, Gene/Environment Susceptibility Reykjavik Study (AGES), n = 4467; Rotterdam Study (RS), n = 3203. B-type natriuretic peptide and CRP were significantly associated with AF incidence (n = 1186): hazard ratio per 1-SD ln-transformed biomarker 1.66 [95% confidence interval (CI), 1.56–1.76], P < 0.0001 and 1.18 (95% CI, 1.11–1.25), P < 0.0001, respectively. Model calibration was sufficient (BNP, χ2 = 17.0; CRP, χ2 = 10.5; BNP and CRP, χ2 = 13.1). B-type natriuretic peptide improved the C-statistic from 0.765 to 0.790, yielded an IDI of 0.027 (95% CI, 0.022–0.032), a relative IDI of 41.5%, and a continuous NRI of 0.389 (95% CI, 0.322–0.455). The predictive ability of CRP was limited (C-statistic increment 0.003). B-type natriuretic peptide consistently improved prediction in AGES and RS. Conclusion B-type natriuretic peptide, not CRP, substantially improved AF risk prediction beyond clinical factors in an independently replicated, heterogeneous population. B-type natriuretic peptide may serve as a benchmark to evaluate novel putative AF risk biomarkers. PMID:25037055

  12. Invasive and noninvasive correlations of B-type natriuretic peptide in patients with heart failure due to Chagas cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Vilas-Boas, Fábio; Feitosa, Gilson Soares; Soares, Milena B P; Pinho-Filho, Joel Alves; Nascimento, Thais; Barojas, Marcos M; Andrade, Marcus V S; Ribeiro-Dos-Santos, Ricardo; Bocchi, Edimar

    2008-01-01

    Heart failure due to Chagas cardiomyopathy (HFCC) differs from failure with other etiologies because of the occurrence of intense inflammatory infiltrate and right ventricle compromise. This article investigates correlations of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels with parameters of severity in HFCC. Twenty-eight patients and 8 normal controls underwent heart catheterization and clinical and laboratory analyses. BNP levels were higher in patients with HFCC (P<.0001) and correlated with New York Heart Association (NYHA) class; right atrial pressure; wedge pressure; cardiac output; levels of serum sodium, hemoglobin, urea, and tumor necrosis factor-alpha; and ejection fraction. Interferon-gamma and transforming growth factor-beta did not correlate with BNP level. The authors conclude that BNP levels are elevated in patients experiencing HFCC, irrespective of NYHA class, and that the occurrence of HFCC correlates with severity of disease.

  13. Diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic relevance of B-type natriuretic hormone and related peptides in children with congenital heart diseases.

    PubMed

    Cantinotti, Massimiliano; Giovannini, Stefania; Murzi, Bruno; Clerico, Aldo

    2011-04-01

    The aim of this article is to review the diagnostic and prognostic relevance of measurement of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) in pediatric patients with congenital cardiac diseases (CHD). A computerized literature search in the National Library of Medicine using the keywords "BNP assay" and "NT-proBNP assay"+neonate/s and newborn/s was performed. Next, we refined the analysis to include only the studies specifically designed to evaluate the clinical usefulness of BNP and NT-proBNP measurements in children with CHD. Several authors suggested that BNP/NT-proBNP is clinically helpful as a diagnostic and prognostic marker for children with suspected CHD. BNP values are age dependent, even in paediatric populations. Unfortunately, accurate reference values for BNP and NT-proBNP for neonatal ages have only recently become available. As a result, the lack of homogenous and accurate decisional levels in the neonatal period greatly limits the clinical impact of the BNP assay, and also contributed to the production of conflicting results. Regardless of age, there is great variability in BNP/NT-proBNP values among CHD characterized by different hemodynamic and clinical conditions. In particular, cardiac defects characterized by left ventricular volume and pressure overload usually show a higher BNP response than CHD which is characterized by right ventricular volume or pressure overload. BNP and NT-proBNP may be considered helpful markers in the integral clinical approach for patients with CHD. Measurement of BNP cannot replace cardiac imaging (including echocardiography, angiography and magnetic resonance), but provide independent, low cost and complementary information for the evaluation of cardiac function and clinical status.

  14. Atrial natriuretic peptide inhibits cell cycle activity of embryonic cardiac progenitor cells via its NPRA receptor signaling axis.

    PubMed

    Hotchkiss, Adam; Feridooni, Tiam; Baguma-Nibasheka, Mark; McNeil, Kathleen; Chinni, Sarita; Pasumarthi, Kishore B S

    2015-04-01

    The biological effects of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) are mediated by natriuretic peptide receptors (NPRs), which can either activate guanylyl cyclase (NPRA and NPRB) or inhibit adenylyl cyclase (NPRC) to modulate intracellular cGMP or cAMP, respectively. During cardiac development, ANP serves as an early maker of differentiating atrial and ventricular chamber myocardium. As development proceeds, expression of ANP persists in the atria but declines in the ventricles. Currently, it is not known whether ANP is secreted or the ANP-NPR signaling system plays any active role in the developing ventricles. Thus the primary aims of this study were to 1) examine biological activity of ANP signaling systems in embryonic ventricular myocardium, and 2) determine whether ANP signaling modulates proliferation/differentiation of undifferentiated cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) and/or cardiomyocytes. Here, we provide evidence that ANP synthesized in embryonic day (E)11.5 ventricular myocytes is actively secreted and processed to its biologically active form. Notably, NPRA and NPRC were detected in E11.5 ventricles and exogenous ANP stimulated production of cGMP in ventricular cell cultures. Furthermore, we showed that exogenous ANP significantly decreased cell number and DNA synthesis of CPCs but not cardiomyocytes and this effect could be reversed by pretreatment with the NPRA receptor-specific inhibitor A71915. ANP treatment also led to a robust increase in nuclear p27 levels in CPCs compared with cardiomyocytes. Collectively, these data provide evidence that in the developing mammalian ventricles ANP plays a local paracrine role in regulating the balance between CPC proliferation and differentiation via NPRA/cGMP-mediated signaling pathways.

  15. B-type Natriuretic Peptide Assay in Differentiating Congestive Heart Failure from Lung Disease in Patients Presenting with Dyspnea.

    PubMed

    Islam, M A; Bari, M S; Islam, M N; Bari, M A; Siddique, S R; Islam, M Z; Begum, M S; Ahammed, S U; Rahman, M A

    2016-07-01

    This cross-sectional analytical study was conducted in Cardiology & Medicine Department of Mymensingh Medical College Hospital. After fulfilling the exclusion & inclusion criteria, B-type natriuretic peptide concentrations were measured in a convenience sample of 100 predominantly male (94%) dyspnic patients who got admitted in Cardiology & Medicine Department of Mymensingh Medical College & Hospital from November 2013 to October 2014. The diagnosis of Congestive Heart Failure (CHF) was based on generally accepted Framingham criteria with corroborative information including hospital course (response to diuretics, vasodilators, inotropes or hemodynamic monitoring) and results of further cardiac testing, including echocardiography. Patients with right heart failure from cor pulmonale were classified as having CHF. Pulmonary disease was confirmed by using the following diagnostic tools: i) A chest X-ray without signs of heart enlargement or pulmonary venous hypertension or a chest X-ray with signs of chronic obstructive lung disease, ii) Normal heart function as seen by echocardiography, iii) Abnormal pulmonary function tests or follow-up results and iv) A positive response to treatment with steroids, nebulizers or antibiotics in hospital. Patients with CHF (n=50) had mean BNP level 1146.72pg/ml (range 103 to 5000pg/ml), which is significantly higher than the group of patients with a final diagnosis of pulmonary disease (n=50) whose BNP was 34pg/ml (range 10 to 90pg/ml) (p<0.05). In conclusion, it was found that B-type natriuretic peptide is an important biomarker for differentiating congestive heart failure from lung disease in patients presenting with dyspnea. PMID:27612893

  16. B-type Natriuretic Peptide Assay in Differentiating Congestive Heart Failure from Lung Disease in Patients Presenting with Dyspnea.

    PubMed

    Islam, M A; Bari, M S; Islam, M N; Bari, M A; Siddique, S R; Islam, M Z; Begum, M S; Ahammed, S U; Rahman, M A

    2016-07-01

    This cross-sectional analytical study was conducted in Cardiology & Medicine Department of Mymensingh Medical College Hospital. After fulfilling the exclusion & inclusion criteria, B-type natriuretic peptide concentrations were measured in a convenience sample of 100 predominantly male (94%) dyspnic patients who got admitted in Cardiology & Medicine Department of Mymensingh Medical College & Hospital from November 2013 to October 2014. The diagnosis of Congestive Heart Failure (CHF) was based on generally accepted Framingham criteria with corroborative information including hospital course (response to diuretics, vasodilators, inotropes or hemodynamic monitoring) and results of further cardiac testing, including echocardiography. Patients with right heart failure from cor pulmonale were classified as having CHF. Pulmonary disease was confirmed by using the following diagnostic tools: i) A chest X-ray without signs of heart enlargement or pulmonary venous hypertension or a chest X-ray with signs of chronic obstructive lung disease, ii) Normal heart function as seen by echocardiography, iii) Abnormal pulmonary function tests or follow-up results and iv) A positive response to treatment with steroids, nebulizers or antibiotics in hospital. Patients with CHF (n=50) had mean BNP level 1146.72pg/ml (range 103 to 5000pg/ml), which is significantly higher than the group of patients with a final diagnosis of pulmonary disease (n=50) whose BNP was 34pg/ml (range 10 to 90pg/ml) (p<0.05). In conclusion, it was found that B-type natriuretic peptide is an important biomarker for differentiating congestive heart failure from lung disease in patients presenting with dyspnea.

  17. Lebetin 2, a Snake Venom-Derived Natriuretic Peptide, Attenuates Acute Myocardial Ischemic Injury through the Modulation of Mitochondrial Permeability Transition Pore at the Time of Reperfusion

    PubMed Central

    Tourki, Bochra; Matéo, Philippe; Morand, Jessica; Elayeb, Mohamed; Godin-Ribuot, Diane; Marrakchi, Naziha; Belaidi, Elise; Messadi, Erij

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac ischemia is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. It is now well established that natriuretic peptides can attenuate the development of irreversible ischemic injury during myocardial infarction. Lebetin 2 (L2) is a new discovered peptide isolated from Macrovipera lebetina venom with structural similarity to B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP). Our objectives were to define the acute cardioprotective actions of L2 in isolated Langendorff-perfused rat hearts after regional or global ischemia-reperfusion (IR). We studied infarct size, left ventricular contractile recovery, survival protein kinases and mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening in injured myocardium. L2 dosage was determined by preliminary experiments at its ability to induce cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) release without changing hemodynamic effects in normoxic hearts. L2 was found to be as effective as BNP in reducing infarct size after the induction of either regional or global IR. Both peptides equally improved contractile recovery after regional IR, but only L2 increased coronary flow and reduced severe contractile dysfunction after global ischemia. Cardioprotection afforded by L2 was abolished after isatin or 5-hydroxydecanote pretreatment suggesting the involvement of natriuretic peptide receptors and mitochondrial KATP (mitoKATP) channels in the L2-induced effects. L2 also increased survival protein expression in the reperfused myocardium as evidenced by phosphorylation of signaling pathways PKCε/ERK/GSK3β and PI3K/Akt/eNOS. IR induced mitochondrial pore opening, but this effect was markedly prevented by L2 treatment. These data show that L2 has strong cardioprotective effect in acute ischemia through stimulation of natriuretic peptide receptors. These beneficial effects are mediated, at least in part, by mitoKATP channel opening and downstream activated survival kinases, thus delaying mPTP opening and improving IR-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID

  18. Lebetin 2, a Snake Venom-Derived Natriuretic Peptide, Attenuates Acute Myocardial Ischemic Injury through the Modulation of Mitochondrial Permeability Transition Pore at the Time of Reperfusion.

    PubMed

    Tourki, Bochra; Matéo, Philippe; Morand, Jessica; Elayeb, Mohamed; Godin-Ribuot, Diane; Marrakchi, Naziha; Belaidi, Elise; Messadi, Erij

    2016-01-01

    Cardiac ischemia is one of the leading causes of death worldwide. It is now well established that natriuretic peptides can attenuate the development of irreversible ischemic injury during myocardial infarction. Lebetin 2 (L2) is a new discovered peptide isolated from Macrovipera lebetina venom with structural similarity to B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP). Our objectives were to define the acute cardioprotective actions of L2 in isolated Langendorff-perfused rat hearts after regional or global ischemia-reperfusion (IR). We studied infarct size, left ventricular contractile recovery, survival protein kinases and mitochondrial permeability transition pore (mPTP) opening in injured myocardium. L2 dosage was determined by preliminary experiments at its ability to induce cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP) release without changing hemodynamic effects in normoxic hearts. L2 was found to be as effective as BNP in reducing infarct size after the induction of either regional or global IR. Both peptides equally improved contractile recovery after regional IR, but only L2 increased coronary flow and reduced severe contractile dysfunction after global ischemia. Cardioprotection afforded by L2 was abolished after isatin or 5-hydroxydecanote pretreatment suggesting the involvement of natriuretic peptide receptors and mitochondrial KATP (mitoKATP) channels in the L2-induced effects. L2 also increased survival protein expression in the reperfused myocardium as evidenced by phosphorylation of signaling pathways PKCε/ERK/GSK3β and PI3K/Akt/eNOS. IR induced mitochondrial pore opening, but this effect was markedly prevented by L2 treatment. These data show that L2 has strong cardioprotective effect in acute ischemia through stimulation of natriuretic peptide receptors. These beneficial effects are mediated, at least in part, by mitoKATP channel opening and downstream activated survival kinases, thus delaying mPTP opening and improving IR-induced mitochondrial dysfunction. PMID

  19. Guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A signaling antagonizes phosphoinositide hydrolysis, Ca2+ release, and activation of protein kinase C

    PubMed Central

    Pandey, Kailash N.

    2014-01-01

    Thus far, three related natriuretic peptides (NPs) and three distinct sub-types of cognate NP receptors have been identified and characterized based on the specific ligand binding affinities, guanylyl cyclase activity, and generation of intracellular cGMP. Atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP) specifically bind and activate guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA), and C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) shows specificity to activate guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-B (GC-B/NPRB). All three NPs bind to natriuretic peptide receptor-C (NPRC), which is also known as clearance or silent receptor. The NPRA is considered the principal biologically active receptor of NP family; however, the molecular signaling mechanisms of NP receptors are not well understood. The activation of NPRA and NPRB produces the intracellular second messenger cGMP, which serves as the major signaling molecule of all three NPs. The activation of NPRB in response to CNP also produces the intracellular cGMP; however, at lower magnitude than that of NPRA, which is activated by ANP and BNP. In addition to enhanced accumulation of intracellular cGMP in response to all three NPs, the levels of cAMP, Ca2+ and inositol triphosphate (IP3) have also been reported to be altered in different cells and tissue types. Interestingly, ANP has been found to lower the concentrations of cAMP, Ca2+, and IP3; however, NPRC has been proposed to increase the levels of these metabolic signaling molecules. The mechanistic studies of decreased and/or increased levels of cAMP, Ca2+, and IP3 in response to NPs and their receptors have not yet been clearly established. This review focuses on the signaling mechanisms of ANP/NPRA and their biological effects involving an increased level of intracellular accumulation of cGMP and a decreased level of cAMP, Ca2+, and IP3 in different cells and tissue systems. PMID:25202235

  20. Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Stimulates Dopamine Tubular Transport by Organic Cation Transporters: A Novel Mechanism to Enhance Renal Sodium Excretion

    PubMed Central

    Kouyoumdzian, Nicolás M.; Rukavina Mikusic, Natalia L.; Kravetz, María C.; Lee, Brenda M.; Carranza, Andrea; Del Mauro, Julieta S.; Pandolfo, Marcela; Gironacci, Mariela M.; Gorzalczany, Susana; Toblli, Jorge E.; Fernández, Belisario E.

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to demonstrate the effects of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on organic cation transporters (OCTs) expression and activity, and its consequences on dopamine urinary levels, Na+, K+-ATPase activity and renal function. Male Sprague Dawley rats were infused with isotonic saline solution during 120 minutes and randomized in nine different groups: control, pargyline plus tolcapone (P+T), ANP, dopamine (DA), D-22, DA+D-22, ANP+D-22, ANP+DA and ANP+DA+D-22. Renal functional parameters were determined and urinary dopamine concentration was quantified by HPLC. Expression of OCTs and D1-receptor in membrane preparations from renal cortex tissues were determined by western blot and Na+, K+-ATPase activity was determined using in vitro enzyme assay. 3H-DA renal uptake was determined in vitro. Compared to P+T group, ANP and dopamine infusion increased diuresis, urinary sodium and dopamine excretion significantly. These effects were more pronounced in ANP+DA group and reversed by OCTs blockade by D-22, demonstrating that OCTs are implied in ANP stimulated-DA uptake and transport in renal tissues. The activity of Na+, K+-ATPase exhibited a similar fashion when it was measured in the same experimental groups. Although OCTs and D1-receptor protein expression were not modified by ANP, OCTs-dependent-dopamine tubular uptake was increased by ANP through activation of NPR-A receptor and protein kinase G as signaling pathway. This effect was reflected by an increase in urinary dopamine excretion, natriuresis, diuresis and decreased Na+, K+-ATPase activity. OCTs represent a novel target that links the activity of ANP and dopamine together in a common mechanism to enhance their natriuretic and diuretic effects. PMID:27392042

  1. Obesity and natriuretic peptides, BNP and NT-proBNP: mechanisms and diagnostic implications for heart failure.

    PubMed

    Madamanchi, Chaitanya; Alhosaini, Hassan; Sumida, Arihiro; Runge, Marschall S

    2014-10-20

    Many advances have been made in the diagnosis and management of heart failure (HF) in recent years. Cardiac biomarkers are an essential tool for clinicians: point of care B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and its N-terminal counterpart (NT-proBNP) levels help distinguish cardiac from non-cardiac causes of dyspnea and are also useful in the prognosis and monitoring of the efficacy of therapy. One of the major limitations of HF biomarkers is in obese patients where the relationship between BNP and NT-proBNP levels and myocardial stiffness is complex. Recent data suggest an inverse relationship between BNP and NT-proBNP levels and body mass index. Given the ever-increasing prevalence of obesity world-wide, it is important to understand the benefits and limitations of HF biomarkers in this population. This review will explore the biology, physiology, and pathophysiology of these peptides and the cardiac endocrine paradox in HF. We also examine the clinical evidence, mechanisms, and plausible biological explanations for the discord between BNP levels and HF in obese patients.

  2. Obesity and Natriuretic Peptides, BNP and NT-proBNP: Mechanisms and Diagnostic Implications for Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Madamanchi, Chaitanya; Alhosaini, Hassan; Sumida, Arihiro; Runge, Marschall S.

    2014-01-01

    Many advances have been made in the diagnosis and management of heart failure (HF) in recent years. Cardiac biomarkers are an essential tool for clinicians: point of care B-Type Natriuretic Peptide (BNP) and its N-terminal counterpart (NT-proBNP) levels help distinguish cardiac from non-cardiac causes of dyspnea and are also useful in the prognosis and monitoring of the efficacy of therapy. One of the major limitations of HF biomarkers is in obese patients where the relationship between BNP and NT-proBNP levels and myocardial stiffness is complex. Recent data suggest an inverse relationship between BNP and NT-proBNP levels and body mass index. Given the ever-increasing prevalence of obesity world-wide, it is important to understand the benefits and limitations of HF biomarkers in this population. This review will explore the biology, physiology, and pathophysiology of these peptides and the cardiac endocrine paradox in HF. We also examine the clinical evidence, mechanisms, and plausible biological explanations for the discord between BNP levels and HF in obese patients. PMID:25156856

  3. Changes of adrenomedullin and natriuretic peptides in patients with adrenal medullary hyperplasia prior to and following pharmacological therapy and adrenalectomy

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Pang-Hu; Shi, Lei; Hu, Wei; Zhang, Xiao-Bin; Wang, Wei; Zhang, Li-Jun

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to investigate the pathophysiological functions of adrenomedullin (ADM), atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP) in patients with adrenal medullary hyperplasia (AMH). Plasma ADM, ANP and BNP concentrations were measured in 20 patients with AMH, 35 patients with essential hypertension (EH), and 40 healthy control subjects. Following effective antihypertensive therapy, the values in AMH and EH patients were measured again and laparoscopic adrenalectomy was performed for AMH patients. At 2 weeks after surgery, the three peptides were measured again. The AMH patients had higher plasma concentrations of ADM, ANP and BNP compared with the EH and control subjects. There were significant differences in the values of ADM, ANP and BNP between adrenal vein and inferior vena cava and between AMH and contralateral adrenal vein. Plasma ADM concentration was correlated with serum epinephrine and norepinephrine and urine vanillylmandelic acid, in addition to systolic and diastolic blood pressure, left ventricular ejection fraction, left ventricular mass index and ANP and BNP values in the AMH group. Following antihypertensive treatment, ADM, ANP and BNP were significantly decreased in EH patients, but remained unchanged in AMH subjects. However, these concentrations significantly decreased following surgery. Therefore, the present results suggest that ADM, ANP and BNP may be involved in regulating adrenal medulla functions. PMID:27446289

  4. Inhibition of dehydration-induced water intake by glucocorticoids is associated with activation of hypothalamic natriuretic peptide receptor-A in rat.

    PubMed

    Liu, Chao; Guan, Jing; Kang, Yunxiao; Xiu, Heming; Chen, Ying; Deng, Bao; Liu, Kunshen

    2010-12-20

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) provides a potent defense mechanism against volume overload in mammals. Its primary receptor, natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A), is localized mostly in the kidney, but also is found in hypothalamic areas involved in body fluid volume regulation. Acute glucocorticoid administration produces potent diuresis and natriuresis, possibly by acting in the renal natriuretic peptide system. However, chronic glucocorticoid administration attenuates renal water and sodium excretion. The precise mechanism underlying this paradoxical phenomenon is unclear. We assume that chronic glucocorticoid administration may activate natriuretic peptide system in hypothalamus, and cause volume depletion by inhibiting dehydration-induced water intake. Volume depletion, in turn, compromises renal water excretion. To test this postulation, we determined the effect of dexamethasone on dehydration-induced water intake and assessed the expression of NPR-A in the hypothalamus. The rats were deprived of water for 24 hours to have dehydrated status. Prior to free access to water, the water-deprived rats were pretreated with dexamethasone or vehicle. Urinary volume and water intake were monitored. We found that dexamethasone pretreatment not only produced potent diuresis, but dramatically inhibited the dehydration-induced water intake. Western blotting analysis showed the expression of NPR-A in the hypothalamus was dramatically upregulated by dexamethasone. Consequently, cyclic guanosine monophosphate (the second messenger for the ANP) content in the hypothalamus was remarkably increased. The inhibitory effect of dexamethasone on water intake presented in a time- and dose-dependent manner, which emerged at least after 18-hour dexamethasone pretreatment. This effect was glucocorticoid receptor (GR) mediated and was abolished by GR antagonist RU486. These results indicated a possible physiologic role for glucocorticoids in the hypothalamic control of water intake

  5. Diabetes-induced loss of gastric ICC accompanied by up-regulation of natriuretic peptide signaling pathways in STZ-induced diabetic mice.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi-Song; Lu, Hong-Li; Huang, Xu; Liu, Dong-Hai; Meng, Xiang-Min; Guo, Xin; Kim, Young-chul; Xu, Wen-Xie

    2013-02-01

    Our previous study demonstrated that natriuretic peptides (NPs) play an inhibitory role in regulation of gastric smooth muscle motility. However, it is not clear whether NPs are involved in diabetics-induced loss of gastric interstitial cell of Cajal (ICC). The present study was designed to investigate the relationship between diabetics-induced loss of gastric ICC and natriuretic peptide signaling pathway in streptozotocin (STZ)-induced diabetic mice. The results showed that the protein expression levels of c-Kit and membrane-bound stem cell factor (mSCF) in gastric smooth muscle layers were decreased in STZ-induced diabetic mice. However, both mRNA and protein expression levels of natriuretic peptide receptor (NPR)-A, B and C were increased in the same place of the diabetic mice. The amplitude of spontaneous contraction in gastric antral smooth muscles was inhibited by C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) dose-dependently and the inhibitory effect was potentiated in diabetic mice. Pretreatment of the cultured gastric smooth muscle cells (GSMCs) with different concentration of CNP can significantly decrease the mSCF expression level. 8-Bromoguanosine-3',5'-cyclomo-nophosphate (8-Br-cGMP), a membrane permeable cGMP analog, mimicked the effect of CNP but not cANF (a specific NPR-C agonist). Methylthiazolyldiphenyl-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay showed that high concentration of cANF (10(-6) mol/L) inhibited cell proliferation in cultured GSMCs. These findings suggest that up-regulation of NPs/NPR-A, B/cGMP and NPs/NPR-C signaling pathways may be involved in diabetes-induced loss of gastric ICC.

  6. Histone Deacetylase Inhibitors Modulate the Transcriptional Regulation of Guanylyl Cyclase/Natriuretic Peptide Receptor-A Gene

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Prerna; Tripathi, Satyabha; Pandey, Kailash N.

    2014-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) binds guanylyl cyclase-A/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA) and produces the intracellular second messenger, cGMP, which regulates cardiovascular homeostasis. We sought to determine the function of histone deacetylases (HDACs) in regulating Npr1 (coding for GC-A/NPRA) gene transcription, using primary mouse mesangial cells treated with class-specific HDAC inhibitors (HDACi). Trichostatin A, a pan inhibitor, and mocetinostat (MGCD0103), a class I HDAC inhibitor, significantly enhanced Npr1 promoter activity (by 8- and 10-fold, respectively), mRNA levels (4- and 5.3-fold, respectively), and NPRA protein (2.7- and 3.5-fold, respectively). However, MC1568 (class II HDAC inhibitor) had no discernible effect. Overexpression of HDAC1 and HDAC2 significantly attenuated Npr1 promoter activity, whereas HDAC3 and HDAC8 had no effect. HDACi-treated cultured cells in vitro and intact animals in vivo showed significantly reduced binding of HDAC1 and -2 and increased accumulation of acetylated H3-K9/14 and H4-K12 at the Npr1 promoter. Deletional analyses of the Npr1 promoter along with ectopic overexpression and inhibition of Sp1 confirmed that HDACi-induced Npr1 gene transcription is accomplished by Sp1 activation. Furthermore, HDACi attenuated the interaction of Sp1 with HDAC1/2 and promoted Sp1 association with p300 and p300/cAMP-binding protein-associated factor; it also promoted the recruitment of p300 and p300/cAMP-binding protein-associated factor to the Npr1 promoter. Our results demonstrate that trichostatin A and MGCD0103 enhanced Npr1 gene expression through inhibition of HDAC1/2 and increased both acetylation of histones (H3-K9/14, H4-K12) and Sp1 by p300, and their recruitment to Npr1 promoter. Our findings define a novel epigenetic regulatory mechanism that governs Npr1 gene transcription. PMID:24451378

  7. Impaired sinoatrial node function and increased susceptibility to atrial fibrillation in mice lacking natriuretic peptide receptor C

    PubMed Central

    Egom, Emmanuel E; Vella, Kimberly; Hua, Rui; Jansen, Hailey J; Moghtadaei, Motahareh; Polina, Iuliia; Bogachev, Oleg; Hurnik, Rhea; Mackasey, Martin; Rafferty, Sara; Ray, Gibanananda; Rose, Robert A

    2015-01-01

    Natriuretic peptides (NPs) are critical regulators of the cardiovascular system that are currently viewed as possible therapeutic targets for the treatment of heart disease. Recent work demonstrates potent NP effects on cardiac electrophysiology, including in the sinoatrial node (SAN) and atria. NPs elicit their effects via three NP receptors (NPR-A, NPR-B and NPR-C). Among these receptors, NPR-C is poorly understood. Accordingly, the goal of this study was to determine the effects of NPR-C ablation on cardiac structure and arrhythmogenesis. Cardiac structure and function were assessed in wild-type (NPR-C+/+) and NPR-C knockout (NPR-C−/−) mice using echocardiography, intracardiac programmed stimulation, patch clamping, high-resolution optical mapping, quantitative polymerase chain reaction and histology. These studies demonstrate that NPR-C−/− mice display SAN dysfunction, as indicated by a prolongation (30%) of corrected SAN recovery time, as well as an increased susceptibility to atrial fibrillation (6% in NPR-C+/+ vs. 47% in NPR-C−/−). There were no differences in SAN or atrial action potential morphology in NPR-C−/− mice; however, increased atrial arrhythmogenesis in NPR-C−/− mice was associated with reductions in SAN (20%) and atrial (15%) conduction velocity, as well as increases in expression and deposition of collagen in the atrial myocardium. No differences were seen in ventricular arrhythmogenesis or fibrosis in NPR-C−/− mice. This study demonstrates that loss of NPR-C results in SAN dysfunction and increased susceptibility to atrial arrhythmias in association with structural remodelling and fibrosis in the atrial myocardium. These findings indicate a critical protective role for NPR-C in the heart. Key points Natriuretic peptides (NPs) elicit their effects via multiple NP receptors (including NPR-A, NPR-B and NPR-C, with NPR-C being relatively poorly understood). We have studied the effects of NPR-C ablation on cardiac structure

  8. Correlation of B-type natriuretic peptide levels and echocardiographic parameters in preterm infants with patent ductus arteriosus

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Hyun Ah; Shin, Jeonghee; Kim, Eunji; Lee, Eun Hee; Son, Chang Sung; Lee, Joo Won

    2016-01-01

    Purpose This study aimed to evaluate the correlation, according to postnatal age, between plasma B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels and echocardiographic parameters for the assessment of patent ductus arteriosus (PDA) in preterm infants with respiratory distress. Methods We enrolled 42 preterm infants with respiratory distress who underwent serial echocardiographic evaluation with simultaneous plasma BNP measurements until ductal closure. The correlations between BNP levels and the following 4 representative echocardiographic parameters were studied: diameter of the ductus arteriosus (DA), ratio of the left atrial diameter to the aortic diameter (LA/Ao), ratio of the PDA diameter to the infant's left pulmonary artery diameter (PDA/LPA), and the antegrade diastolic flow of LPA (DFLPA). Results BNP levels were significantly correlated to the magnitude of the ductal shunt, comprising the DA diameter, PDA/LPA ratio, LA/Ao ratio, and antegrade DFLPA for the overall study period. The earliest significant correlation, starting from postnatal day 2, was observed between the LA/Ao ratio and BNP levels. The PDA/LPA ratio and the antegrade DFLPA showed significant correlations with BNP levels postnatal day 3 onward, and with the DA diameter, postnatal day 5 onward. Conclusion BNP levels and echocardiographic parameters showed a positive correlation, but the significance of the correlations differed according to the postnatal age, especially during the first few days of life. PMID:27186229

  9. [Plasma atrial natriuretic peptide level and urinary fractional sodium excretion (FENa) in patients with chronic renal failure].

    PubMed

    Czekalski, S

    1990-12-01

    The aim of the study was the search for the correlation between the degree of impairment renal function (measured by creatinine clearance) and plasma concentration of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and urinary fractional sodium excretion (FENa) in patients with chronic renal diseases. Forty seven patients were studied: 10 with diminished renal reserve (group I), 10 with renal insufficiency (group II), 27 with renal failure (group III) and 10 chronically haemodialysed before dialysis (group IV). Control group consisted of 27 healthy persons. All patients and controls were on the diet containing 100-120 mmol sodium daily. Plasma ANP levels were significantly higher in all groups of patients (I--16.5 +/- 5.7; II--40.7 +/- 18.6; III--86.2 +/- 49.9; IV--196.1 +/- 51.3 pmol/l, respectively) than in controls (10.8 +/- 6.0 pmol/l). A significant correlation (r = 0.85; p less than 0.01) between plasma ANP concentration and FENa was found when the patients from all groups were pooled together. The results confirm the important role of ANP in the adaptation of reduced kidney mass to the excretion of sodium load.

  10. Pharmacological Therapy in the Heart as an Alternative to Cellular Therapy: A Place for the Brain Natriuretic Peptide?

    PubMed Central

    Rosenblatt-Velin, Nathalie; Badoux, Suzanne; Liaudet, Lucas

    2016-01-01

    The discovery that stem cells isolated from different organs have the ability to differentiate into mature beating cardiomyocytes has fostered considerable interest in developing cellular regenerative therapies to treat cardiac diseases associated with the loss of viable myocardium. Clinical studies evaluating the potential of stem cells (from heart, blood, bone marrow, skeletal muscle, and fat) to regenerate the myocardium and improve its functional status indicated that although the method appeared generally safe, its overall efficacy has remained modest. Several issues raised by these studies were notably related to the nature and number of injected cells, as well as the route and timing of their administration, to cite only a few. Besides the direct administration of cardiac precursor cells, a distinct approach to cardiac regeneration could be based upon the stimulation of the heart's natural ability to regenerate, using pharmacological approaches. Indeed, differentiation and/or proliferation of cardiac precursor cells is controlled by various endogenous mediators, such as growth factors and cytokines, which could thus be used as pharmacological agents to promote regeneration. To illustrate such approach, we present recent results showing that the exogenous administration of the natriuretic peptide BNP triggers “endogenous” cardiac regeneration, following experimental myocardial infarction. PMID:26880973

  11. Molecular pathology of natriuretic peptides in the myocardium with special regard to fatal intoxication, hypothermia, and hyperthermia.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jian-Hua; Michiue, Tomomi; Ishikawa, Takaki; Maeda, Hitoshi

    2012-09-01

    The present study investigated the molecular pathology of atrial and brain natriuretic peptides (ANP and BNP) in the myocardium to evaluate terminal cardiac function in routine forensic casework with particular regard to fatal drug intoxication (n = 18; sedative-hypnotics, n = 10; methamphetamine, n = 8), hypothermia (cold exposure, n = 13), and hyperthermia (heatstroke, n = 10), compared with that in acute ischemic heart disease (AIHD, n = 35) and congestive heart disease (CHD, n = 11) as controls (total n = 87; within 48 h postmortem). Quantitative analyses of myocardial ANP and BNP messenger RNA demonstrated that their expressions in bilateral atrial and ventricular walls were high in methamphetamine intoxication and hypothermia, comparable to those in AIHD and CHD, but were low in sedative-hypnotic intoxication and hyperthermia. In pericardial fluid, both ANP and BNP levels were increased in hypothermia, while CHD cases had an elevated BNP level, and ANP level showed a tendency to increase in hyperthermia; however, immunohistochemistry showed no evident differences in myocardial ANP and BNP among the causes of death. These findings suggest terminal high cardiac strain in methamphetamine intoxication, decreased cardiac strain in sedative-hypnotic intoxication and hyperthermia (heatstroke), and persistent congestion in hypothermia (cold exposure).

  12. Atrial natriuretic peptide degradation by CPA47 cells - Evidence for a divalent cation-independent cell-surface proteolytic activity

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Frost, S. J.; Chen, Y. M.; Whitson, P. A.

    1992-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is rapidly cleared and degraded in vivo. Nonguanylate-cyclase receptors (C-ANPR) and a metalloproteinase, neutral endopeptidase (EC 3.4.24.11) (NEP 24.11), are thought to be responsible for its metabolism. We investigated the mechanisms of ANP degradation by an endothelial-derived cell line, CPA47. CPA47 cells degraded 88 percent of 125I-ANP after 1 h at 37 degrees C as determined by HPLC. Medium preconditioned by these cells degraded 41 percent of the 125I-ANP, and this activity was inhibited by a divalent cation chelator, EDTA. Furthermore, a cell-surface proteolytic activity degraded 125I-ANP in the presence of EDTA when receptor-mediated endocytosis was inhibited either by low temperature (4 degrees C) or by hyperosmolarity at 37 degrees C. The metalloproteinase, NEP 24.11, is unlikely to be the cell-surface peptidase because 125I-ANP is degraded by CPA47 cells at 4 degrees C in the presence of 5 mM EDTA. These data indicate that CPA47 cells can degrade ANP by a novel divalent cation-independent cell-surface proteolytic activity.

  13. Brain natriuretic peptide levels in six basic underwater demolitions/SEAL recruits presenting with swimming induced pulmonary edema (SIPE).

    PubMed

    Shearer, Damon; Mahon, Richard

    2009-01-01

    Swimming induced pulmonary edema (SIPE) is associated with both SCUBA diving and strenuous surface swimming; however, the majority of reported cases and clinically observed cases tend to occur during or after aggressive surface swimming. Capillary stress failure appears to be central to the pathophysiology of this disorder. Regional pulmonary capillaries are exposed to relatively high pressures secondary to increased vascular volume, elevation of pulmonary vascular resistance, and regional differences in perfusion secondary to forces of gravity and high cardiac output. Acute pulmonary edema can be classified as either cardiogenic or noncardiogenic or both. Cardiogenic pulmonary edema occurs when the pulmonary capillary hydrostatic pressure exceeds plasma oncotic pressure. Noncardiogenic pulmonary edema occurs when pulmonary capillary permeability is increased. Given the pathophysiology noted above, SIPE can be described as a cardiogenic pulmonary edema, at least in part, since an increased transalveolar pressure gradient has been implicated in the pathogenesis of SIPE. Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is used in the clinical setting to differentiate cardiac from pulmonary sources of dyspnea, specifically to diagnose cardiogenic pulmonary edema. During clinical management, BNP levels were drawn on six BUD/S recruits simultaneously presenting with pulmonary complaints consistent with SIPE, after an extended surface bay swim. This paper analyzes that data after de-identification and reviews the pathophysiology and clinical management of SIPE.

  14. Volume Assessment in Mechanically Ventilated Critical Care Patients Using Bioimpedance Vectorial Analysis, Brain Natriuretic Peptide, and Central Venous Pressure

    PubMed Central

    House, Andrew A.; Haapio, Mikko; Lentini, Paolo; Bobek, Ilona; de Cal, Massimo; Cruz, Dinna N.; Virzì, Grazia M.; Carraro, Rizzieri; Gallo, Giampiero; Piccinni, Pasquale; Ronco, Claudio

    2011-01-01

    Purpose. Strategies for volume assessment of critically ill patients are limited, yet early goal-directed therapy improves outcomes. Central venous pressure (CVP), Bioimpedance Vectorial Analysis (BIVA), and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) are potentially useful tools. We studied the utility of these measures, alone and in combination, to predict changing oxygenation. Methods. Thirty-four mechanically ventilated patients, 26 of whom had data beyond the first study day, were studied. Relationships were assessed between CVP, BIVA, BNP, and oxygenation index (O2I) in a cross-sectional (baseline) and longitudinal fashion using both univariate and multivariable modeling. Results. At baseline, CVP and O2I were positively correlated (R = 0.39; P = .021), while CVP and BIVA were weakly correlated (R = −0.38; P = .025). The association between slopes of variables over time was negligible, with the exception of BNP, whose slope was correlated with O2I (R = 0.40; P = .044). Comparing tertiles of CVP, BIVA, and BNP slopes with the slope of O2I revealed only modest agreement between BNP and O2I (kappa = 0.25; P = .067). In a regression model, only BNP was significantly associated with O2I; however, this was strengthened by including CVP in the model. Conclusions. BNP seems to be a valuable noninvasive measure of volume status in critical care and should be assessed in a prospective manner. PMID:21151535

  15. Relaxin and atrial natriuretic peptide pathways participate in the anti-fibrotic effect of a melon concentrate in spontaneously hypertensive rats

    PubMed Central

    Carillon, Julie; Gauthier, Audrey; Barial, Sandy; Tournier, Michel; Gayrard, Nathalie; Lajoix, Anne-Dominique; Jover, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    Background In spontaneously hypertensive rats (SHR), a model of human essential hypertension, oxidative stress is involved in the development of cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis associated with hypertension. Dietary supplementation with agents exhibiting antioxidant properties could have a beneficial effect in remodeling of the heart. We previously demonstrated a potent anti-hypertrophic effect of a specific melon (Cucumis melo L.) concentrate with antioxidant properties in spontaneously hypertensive rats. Relaxin and atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) were reported to reduce collagen deposition and fibrosis progression in various experimental models. Objective The aim of the present investigation was to test the hypothesis that, beside reduction in oxidative stress, the melon concentrate may act through relaxin, its receptor (relaxin/insulin-like family peptide receptor 1, RXFP1), and ANP in SHR. Design and results The melon concentrate, given orally during 4 days, reduced cardiomyocyte size (by 25%) and totally reversed cardiac collagen content (Sirius red staining) in SHR but not in their normotensive controls. Treatment with the melon concentrate lowered cardiac nitrotyrosine-stained area (by 45%) and increased by 17–19% the cardiac expression (Western blot) of superoxide dismutase (SOD) and glutathione peroxidase. In addition, plasma relaxin concentration was normalized while cardiac relaxin (Western blot) was lowered in treated SHR. Cardiac relaxin receptor level determined by immunohistochemical analysis increased only in treated SHR. Similarly, the melon concentrate reversed the reduction of plasma ANP concentration and lowered its cardiac expression. Conclusions The present results demonstrate that reversal of cardiac fibrosis by the melon concentrate involves antioxidant defenses, as well as relaxin and ANP pathways restoration. It is suggested that dietary SOD supplementation could be a useful additional strategy against cardiac hypertrophy and fibrosis

  16. Defective stretch-induced release of atrial natriuretic peptide from aging hypertensive rat heart: possible role of phosphatidylinositol pathway.

    PubMed

    Brunner, F; Mouton, R; Lochner, A; Opie, L H

    1995-01-01

    Because the phosphatidylinositol pathway may be part of the signaling system associated with stretch-induced release of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), we tested the hypothesis that formation of the intermediate inositol-1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) is impaired when ANP release is decreased in response to atrial stretch in hearts from aging genetically hypertensive (GH) rats. Immunoreactive ANP release into the coronary effluent and IP3 levels were studied in cardiac tissues of isolated perfused hearts from normotensive control (WAG) or GH rats aged 4, 11, or 16 months. Left atria were repeatedly distended and released with a latex balloon. ANP was measured in coronary effluent, and IP3 was measured in cardiac tissues. In all age groups, stretch and relief of stretch evoked considerably less ANP release in spontaneously beating hearts from GH than from WAG rats. Hearts from GH rats aged 16 months released no ANP, but electrical pacing restored some stretch-induced ANP secretion. With repeated stretch and release of stretch of the left atrium for 2 min, IP3 levels increased in left atrial tissue in WAG but not in GH hearts of all age groups. IP3 levels in (unstretched) left ventricles were much lower than in left atria and were unaltered by atrial stretch. In aging GH rats, the capacity to release ANP on atrial stretch is largely lost, in association with complete suppression of stimulus-induced increase in IP3 levels. These data support a role for IP3 in stretch-mediated atrial ANP secretion and suggest a progressive uncoupling of this signaling pathway in aging hypertensive rats. PMID:7723347

  17. Onset and Regression of Pregnancy-Induced Cardiac Alterations in Gestationally Hypertensive Mice: The Role of the Natriuretic Peptide System.

    PubMed

    Ventura, Nicole M; Li, Terry Y; Tse, M Yat; Andrew, R David; Tayade, Chandrakant; Jin, Albert Y; Pang, Stephen C

    2015-12-01

    Pregnancy induces cardiovascular adaptations in response to increased volume overload. Aside from the hemodynamic changes that occur during pregnancy, the maternal heart also undergoes structural changes. However, cardiac modulation in pregnancies complicated by gestational hypertension is incompletely understood. The objectives of the current investigation were to determine the role of the natriuretic peptide (NP) system in pregnancy and to assess alterations in pregnancy-induced cardiac hypertrophy between gestationally hypertensive and normotensive dams. Previously we have shown that mice lacking the expression of atrial NP (ANP; ANP(-/-)) exhibit a gestational hypertensive phenotype. In the current study, female ANP(+/+) and ANP(-/-) mice were mated with ANP(+/+) males. Changes in cardiac size and weight were evaluated across pregnancy at Gestational Days 15.5 and 17.5 and Postnatal Days 7, 14, and 28. Nonpregnant mice were used as controls. Physical measurement recordings and histological analyses demonstrated peak cardiac hypertrophy occurring at 14 days postpartum in both ANP(+/+) and ANP(-/-) dams with little to no change during pregnancy. Additionally, left ventricular expression of the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and NP system was quantified by real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Up-regulation of Agt and AT(1a) genes was observed late in pregnancy, while Nppa and Nppb genes were significantly up-regulated postpartum. Our data suggest that pregnancy-induced cardiac hypertrophy may be influenced by the RAS throughout gestation and by the NP system postpartum. Further investigations are required to gain a complete understanding of the mechanistic aspects of pregnancy-induced cardiac hypertrophy.

  18. Vascular Relaxation Induced by C-Type Natriuretic Peptide Involves the Ca2+/NO-Synthase/NO Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Andrade, Fernanda A.; Restini, Carolina B. A.; Grando, Marcella D.; Ramalho, Leandra N. Z.; Bendhack, Lusiane M.

    2014-01-01

    Aims C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) and nitric oxide (NO) are endothelium-derived factors that play important roles in the regulation of vascular tone and arterial blood pressure. We hypothesized that NO produced by the endothelial NO-synthase (NOS-3) contributes to the relaxation induced by CNP in isolated rat aorta via activation of endothelial NPR-C receptor. Therefore, the aim of this study was to investigate the putative contribution of NO through NPR-C activation in the CNP induced relaxation in isolated conductance artery. Main Methods Concentration-effect curves for CNP were constructed in aortic rings isolated from rats. Confocal microscopy was used to analyze the cytosolic calcium mobilization induced by CNP. The phosphorylation of the residue Ser1177 of NOS was analyzed by Western blot and the expression and localization of NPR-C receptors was analyzed by immunohistochemistry. Key Findings CNP was less potent in inducing relaxation in denuded endothelium aortic rings than in intact ones. L-NAME attenuated the potency of CNP and similar results were obtained in the presence of hydroxocobalamin, an intracellular NO0 scavenger. CNP did not change the phosphorylation of Ser1177, the activation site of NOS-3, when compared with control. The addition of CNP produced an increase in [Ca2+]c in endothelial cells and a decrease in [Ca2+]c in vascular smooth muscle cells. The NPR-C-receptors are expressed in endothelial and adventitial rat aortas. Significance These results suggest that CNP-induced relaxation in intact aorta isolated from rats involves NO production due to [Ca2+]c increase in endothelial cells possibly through NPR-C activation expressed in these cells. The present study provides a breakthrough in the understanding of the close relationship between the vascular actions of nitric oxide and CNP. PMID:24787693

  19. Impact of Preprocedural B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Levels on the Outcomes After Transcatheter Aortic Valve Implantation.

    PubMed

    Abramowitz, Yigal; Chakravarty, Tarun; Jilaihawi, Hasan; Lee, Chin; Cox, Justin; Sharma, Rahul P; Mangat, Geeteshwar; Cheng, Wen; Makkar, Raj R

    2015-12-15

    There are limited data on the effect of baseline B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) on the outcome after transcatheter aortic valve implantation (TAVI). We investigated the influence of baseline BNP levels on the short-term and midterm clinical outcomes after TAVI. During a 3-year period, 780 patients with severe aortic stenosis underwent TAVI at our institute and had baseline BNP levels. We compared the high, mid, and low tertiles of BNP levels. TAVI end points, device success, and adverse events were considered according to the Valve Academic Research Consortium 2 definitions. Device success was significantly lower for patients with high BNP (98.1% vs 96.2% vs 91.9% for the low, mid, and high BNP tertiles, respectively; p = 0.003). All-cause mortality up to 30 days was 1.2% (3 of 260) versus 2.3% (6 of 260) versus 5% (13 of 260), respectively (p = 0.03). Six-month mortality rate was 4.1% (10 of 241) for the low BNP tertile, 5% (12 of 239) for the mid BNP tertile, and 17.1% (40 of 234) for the high BNP tertile (p <0.001). In the multivariate model, high tertile of baseline BNP was found to be significantly associated with all-cause mortality (hazard ratio 3.3, 95% confidence interval 1.64 to 6.48; p = 0.001). In conclusion, elevated BNP levels are associated with increased short-term and midterm mortality after TAVI. We recommend measurement of baseline BNP as part of risk stratification models for TAVI. PMID:26602075

  20. Clinical value of plasma B-type natriuretic peptide assay in pediatric pneumonia accompanied by heart failure

    PubMed Central

    HU, DAN; LIU, YANG; TAO, HUIXIAN; GAO, JINPING

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have shown that B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is useful in differentiating cardiac from pulmonary causes of dyspnea in adults. To date, international guidelines have recommended measurements of circulating BNP as a biomarker for diagnostic and prognostic purposes, as well as therapeutic monitoring, in adults with cardiac diseases, particularly those suffering from acute and chronic heart failure (HF). The aim of the present study was to investigate the differential diagnostic and therapeutic analysis of BNP levels assayed in pediatric pneumonia accompanied by HF. The clinical data of 80 patients with pneumonia, aged 1–3 years, were analyzed. The patients were divided into two groups: Simple pneumonia (46 cases) and pneumonia accompanied by HF (34 cases). All patients underwent two plasma BNP assays: The first one upon admission to the hospital and the second one prior to discharge. The plasma BNP levels of 20 healthy children were used as the negative control. Plasma BNP levels were measured using the Triage® BNP automated immunoassay systems and reagents. Statistical analysis showed that the plasma BNP levels of the patients upon admission were higher in the pneumonia accompanied by HF group compared with those in the simple pneumonia group (750±120 vs. 135±50 pg/ml; P<0.05). In addition, in the pneumonia accompanied by HF group, the plasma BNP levels of the patients were higher upon admission to the hospital than they were prior to discharge (750±120 vs. 115±45 pg/ml; P<0.05); therefore, plasma BNP may comprise a sensitive diagnostic and therapeutic evaluative marker for pediatric patients with pneumonia accompanied by HF. This finding could prove invaluable in the clinical diagnosis and treatment of the disease. PMID:26668612

  1. Guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A gene disruption causes increased adrenal angiotensin II and aldosterone levels.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Di; Vellaichamy, Elangovan; Somanna, Naveen K; Pandey, Kailash N

    2007-07-01

    Disruption of the guanylyl cyclase-A/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA) gene leads to elevated arterial blood pressure and congestive heart failure in mice lacking NPRA. This study was aimed at determining whether Npr1 (coding for GC-A/NPRA) gene copy number affects adrenal ANG II and aldosterone (Aldo) levels in a gene-dose-dependent manner in Npr1 gene-targeted mice. Adrenal ANG II and Aldo levels increased in 1-copy mice compared with 2-copy mice, but decreased in 3-copy and 4-copy mice. In contrast, renal ANG II levels decreased in 1-copy (25%), 3-copy (38%), and 4-copy (39%) mice compared with 2-copy mice. The low-salt diet stimulated adrenal ANG II and Aldo levels in 1-copy (20 and 2,441%), 2-copy (15 and 2,339%), 3-copy (20 and 424%), and 4-copy (31 and 486%) mice, respectively. The high-salt diet suppressed adrenal ANG II and Aldo levels in 1-copy (46 and 29%) and 2-copy (38 and 17%) mice. On the other hand, the low-salt diet stimulated renal ANG II levels in 1-copy (45%), 2-copy (45%), 3-copy (59%), and 4-copy (48%) mice. However, the high-salt diet suppressed renal ANG II levels in 1-copy (28%) and 2-copy (27%) mice. In conclusion, NPRA signaling antagonizes adrenal ANG II and Aldo levels in a gene-dose dependent manner. Increased adrenal ANG II and Aldo levels may play an important role in elevated arterial blood pressure and progressive hypertension, leading to renal and vascular injury in Npr1 gene-disrupted mice.

  2. How well does B-type natriuretic peptide predict death and cardiac events in patients with heart failure: systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Doust, Jenny A; Pietrzak, Eva; Dobson, Annette; Glasziou, Paul

    2005-01-01

    Objective To assess how well B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) predicts prognosis in patients with heart failure. Design Systematic review of studies assessing BNP for prognosis in patients with heart failure or asymptomatic patients. Data sources Electronic searches of Medline and Embase from January 1994 to March 2004 and reference lists of included studies. Study selection and data extraction We included all studies that estimated the relation between BNP measurement and the risk of death, cardiac death, sudden death, or cardiovascular event in patients with heart failure or asymptomatic patients, including initial values and changes in values in response to treatment. Multivariable models that included both BNP and left ventricular ejection fraction as predictors were used to compare the prognostic value of each variable. Two reviewers independently selected studies and extracted data. Data synthesis 19 studies used BNP to estimate the relative risk of death or cardiovascular events in heart failure patients and five studies in asymptomatic patients. In heart failure patients, each 100 pg/ml increase was associated with a 35% increase in the relative risk of death. BNP was used in 35 multivariable models of prognosis. In nine of the models, it was the only variable to reach significance—that is, other variables contained no prognostic information beyond that of BNP. Even allowing for the scale of the variables, it seems to be a strong indicator of risk. Conclusion Although systematic reviews of prognostic studies have inherent difficulties, including the possibility of publication bias, the results of the studies in this review show that BNP is a strong prognostic indicator for both asymptomatic patients and for patients with heart failure at all stages of disease. PMID:15774989

  3. The Association of Menopausal Age and NT-proBrain Natriuretic Peptide: The Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Ebong, Imo A.; Watson, Karol E.; Goff, David C.; Bluemke, David A.; Srikanthan, Preethi; Horwich, Tamara; Bertoni, Alain G.

    2014-01-01

    Objective Menopausal age could affect the risk of developing cardiovascular disease (CVD). The purpose of this study was to investigate the associations of early menopause (menopause occurring before 45 years of age) and menopausal age with NT-pro brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), a potential risk marker of CVD and heart failure (HF). Methods Our cross-sectional study included 2275 postmenopausal women, aged 45–85 years, without clinical CVD (2000–2002), from the Multi-Ethnic Study of Atherosclerosis. Participants were classified as having or not having early menopause. NT-proBNP was log-transformed. Multivariable linear regression was used for analysis. Results There were 561 women with early menopause. The median NT-proBNP value was 79.0 (41.1–151.6) pg/ml for all participants with values of 83.4 (41.4–164.9) pg/ml and 78.0 (40.8–148.3) pg/ml for women with and without early menopause respectively. The mean (SD) age was 65 (10.1) and 65 (8.9) years for women with and without early menopause respectively. There were no significant interactions between menopausal age and ethnicity. In multivariable analysis, early menopause was associated with a 10.7% increase in NT-proBNP while each year increase in menopausal age was associated with a 0.7% decrease in NT-proBNP. Conclusion Early menopause is associated with greater NT-proBNP levels while each year increase in menopausal age is associated with lower NT-proBNP levels in postmenopausal women. PMID:25290536

  4. Renal Overexpression of Atrial Natriuretic Peptide and Hypoxia Inducible Factor-1α as Adaptive Response to a High Salt Diet

    PubMed Central

    Della Penna, Silvana Lorena; Cao, Gabriel; Carranza, Andrea; Zotta, Elsa; Gorzalczany, Susana; Cerrudo, Carolina Susana; Rukavina Mikusic, Natalia Lucía; Correa, Alicia; Trida, Verónica; Toblli, Jorge Eduardo; Fernández, Belisario Enrique

    2014-01-01

    In the kidney, a high salt intake favors oxidative stress and hypoxia and causes the development of fibrosis. Both atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and hypoxia inducible factor (HIF-1α) exert cytoprotective effects. We tested the hypothesis that renal expression of ANP and HIF-1α is involved in a mechanism responding to the oxidative stress produced in the kidneys of rats chronically fed a high sodium diet. Sprague-Dawley rats were fed with a normal salt (0.4% NaCl) (NS) or a high salt (8% NaCl) (HS) diet for 3 weeks, with or without the administration of tempol (T), an inhibitor of oxidative stress, in the drinking water. We measured the mean arterial pressure (MAP), glomerular filtration rate (GFR), and urinary sodium excretion (UVNa). We evaluated the expression of ANP, HIF-1α, and transforming growth factor (TGF-β1) in renal tissues by western blot and immunohistochemistry. The animals fed a high salt diet showed increased MAP and UVNa levels and enhanced renal immunostaining of ANP, HIF-1α, and TGF-β1. The administration of tempol together with the sodium overload increased the natriuresis further and prevented the elevation of blood pressure and the increased expression of ANP, TGF-β1, and HIF-1α compared to their control. These findings suggest that HIF-1α and ANP, synthesized by the kidney, are involved in an adaptive mechanism in response to a sodium overload to prevent or attenuate the deleterious effects of the oxidative stress and the hypoxia on the development of fibrosis. PMID:24689065

  5. Effect of atrial natriuretic peptide on potassium-stimulated aldosterone secretion: potential relevance to hypoaldosteronism in man.

    PubMed

    Clark, B A; Brown, R S; Epstein, F H

    1992-08-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) has been shown to suppress aldosterone secretion under certain circumstances, although the physiological significance of this is uncertain. We wondered if ANP would suppress potassium-stimulated aldosterone secretion in man and, if so, whether we might find high circulating levels of ANP in patients with the syndrome of acquired hypoaldosteronism. We studied seven healthy young subjects under two conditions: 1) infusion of KCl (0.5 mmol/kg) over 45 min, and 2) KCl infused with ANP (0.01 microgram/kg.min) for 60 min. We also evaluated ANP levels in eight elderly subjects with the syndrome of acquired hypoaldosteronism, as defined by hyperkalemia (mean serum K+, 5.3 +/- 0.1 mmol/L) associated with inappropriately low aldosterone levels (216 +/- 50 pmol/L). In the normal subjects, ANP almost completely suppressed the aldosterone response to KCl infusion (P less than 0.001, by analysis of variance) despite a similar rise in the serum potassium level with KCl alone (0.70 +/- 0.07 mmol/L) and KCl plus ANP (0.75 +/- 0.09 mmol/L). PRA fell slightly during KCl plus ANP treatment, but did not change during the infusion of KCl alone. ANP levels were approximately 800 pmol/L during the ANP infusion studies. Endogenous ANP levels in the hyperkalemic patients with hypoaldosteronism were markedly elevated at 1186 +/- 340 pmol/L (compared to 93 +/- 10 pmol/L in healthy elderly controls), a level that would be capable of suppressing the potassium-mediated aldosterone response. Exogenous infusion of ANP suppressed the aldosterone response to hyperkalemia, and ANP levels were found to be markedly elevated in a group of patients with hyperkalemia and hypoaldosteronism. We suggest that ANP may contribute to clinically significant hypoaldosteronism and hyperkalemia in the syndrome of acquired hypoaldosteronism.

  6. Cocoa flavanols reduce N‐terminal pro‐B‐type natriuretic peptide in patients with chronic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    De Palma, Rodney; Sotto, Imelda; Wood, Elizabeth G.; Khan, Noorafza Q.; Butler, Jane; Johnston, Atholl; Rothman, Martin T.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Aims Poor prognosis in chronic heart failure (HF) is linked to endothelial dysfunction for which there is no specific treatment currently available. Previous studies have shown reproducible improvements in endothelial function with cocoa flavanols, but the clinical benefit of this effect in chronic HF has yet to be determined. Therefore, the aim of this study was to assess the potential therapeutic value of a high dose of cocoa flavanols in patients with chronic HF, by using reductions in N‐terminal pro‐B‐type natriuretic peptide (NT‐proBNP) as an index of improved cardiac function. Methods and results Thirty‐two patients with chronic HF, stable on guideline‐directed medical therapy, were randomized to consume 50 g/day of high‐flavanol dark chocolate (HFDC; 1064 mg of flavanols/day) or low‐flavanol dark chocolate (LFDC; 88 mg of flavanols/day) for 4 weeks and then crossed over to consume the alternative dark chocolate for a further 4 weeks. Twenty‐four patients completed the study. After 4 weeks of HFDC, NT‐proBNP (mean decrease % ± standard deviation) was significantly reduced compared with baseline (−44 ± 69%), LFDC (−33 ± 72%), and follow‐up (−41 ± 77%) values. HFDC also reduced diastolic blood pressure compared with values after LFDC (−6.7 ± 10.1 mmHg). Conclusions Reductions in blood pressure and NT‐proBNP after HFDC indicate decreased vascular resistance resulting in reduced left ventricular afterload. These effects warrant further investigation in patients with chronic HF. PMID:27588209

  7. Predictive Role of Intraoperative Serum Brain Natriuretic Peptide for Early Allograft Dysfunction in Living Donor Liver Transplantation.

    PubMed

    Chae, Min Suk; Koo, Jung Min; Park, Chul Soo

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Early allograft dysfunction (EAD) is considered an important complication in liver transplantation. Serum brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is a marker of cardiac dysfunction related to end-stage liver disease. We investigated the intraoperative change in the serum BNP level and its contribution to EAD after living donor liver transplantation (LDLT). MATERIAL AND METHODS The perioperative data of 104 patients who underwent LDLT were retrospectively reviewed and compared between patients with and without EAD. Serum BNPs were obtained at each phase, and potentially significant factors (P<0.1) were measured by univariate analysis. The intraoperative mean serum BNP level was compared with other predictors using the AUC, and was analyzed for its relationship with EAD by multivariate logistic regression. RESULTS A total of 31 patients (29.8%) developed EAD after LDLT. In all phases, the EAD group showed higher serum BNP levels than the non-EAD group. The serum BNP level at each phase was less accurate than the mean serum BNP level for EAD. The intraoperative mean serum BNP level showed higher predictive accuracy than the Child-Pugh-Turcotte, model for end-stage liver disease (MELD), and D-MELD (donor age × recipient MELD) scores (p<0.05 for all). After multivariate adjustment, intraoperative mean serum BNP level ≥100 pg/mL was identified as an independent risk factor for EAD, along with kidney disease and graft ischemic time. CONCLUSIONS During LDLT, the EAD group showed higher serum BNP levels than the non-EAD group. An intraoperative mean serum BNP level ≥100 pg/mL is independently associated with EAD after LDLT. PMID:27572618

  8. Validation of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide cut-off values for risk stratification of pulmonary embolism.

    PubMed

    Lankeit, Mareike; Jiménez, David; Kostrubiec, Maciej; Dellas, Claudia; Kuhnert, Katherina; Hasenfuß, Gerd; Pruszczyk, Piotr; Konstantinides, Stavros

    2014-06-01

    The optimal N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) cut-off value for risk stratification of pulmonary embolism remains controversial. In this study we validated and compared different proposed NT-proBNP cut-off values in 688 normotensive patients with pulmonary embolism. During the first 30 days, 28 (4.1%) patients reached the primary outcome (pulmonary embolism-related death or complications) and 29 (4.2%) patients died. Receiver operating characteristic analysis yielded an area under the curve of 0.70 (0.60-0.80) for NT-proBNP. A cut-off value of 600 pg·mL(-1) was associated with the best prognostic performance (sensitivity 86% and specificity 50%) and the highest odds ratio (6.04 (95% CI 2.07-17.59), p=0.001) compared to the cut-off values of 1000, 500 or 300 pg·mL(-1). Using multivariable logistic regression analysis, NT-proBNP ≥ 600 pg·mL(-1) had a prognostic impact on top of that of the simplified Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index and right ventricular dysfunction on echocardiography (OR 4.27 (95% CI 1.22-15.01); p=0.024, c-index 0.741). The use of a stepwise approach based on the simplified Pulmonary Embolism Severity Index, NT-proBNP ≥ 600 pg·mL(-1) and echocardiography helped optimise risk assessment. Our findings confirm the prognostic value of NT-proBNP and suggest that a cut-off value of 600 pg·mL(-1) is most appropriate for risk stratification of normotensive patients with pulmonary embolism. NT-proBNP should be used in combination with a clinical score and an imaging procedure for detecting right ventricular dysfunction.

  9. Correlation between B-Type Natriuretic Peptide and Functional/Cognitive Parameters in Discharged Congestive Heart Failure Patients

    PubMed Central

    Leto, Laura; Testa, Marzia; Feola, Mauro

    2015-01-01

    The determination of B-type natriuretic peptides (BNP) may have a role in the diagnosis of heart failure (HF) or guiding HF therapy. This study investigated the role of BNP determination in a cohort of elderly patients admitted to hospital with acute decompensated HF and its correlation with main demographic, clinical, and instrumental data and evaluated possible association with major outcome such as mortality or readmission after a 6-month period of follow-up. Methods. From October 2011 to May 2014 consecutive patients admitted to our unit with symptoms of acute HF or worsening of chronic HF entered the study collecting functional, echocardiographic, and hydration parameters. Correlation between BNP and main parameters was analysed, as well as the mortality/6-month readmission rate. Results. In 951 patients (mean age 71 ys; 37% females) a positive correlation was obtained between BNP and age, creatinine levels, NYHA class at admission and discharge, and levels of hydration; an inverse, negative correlation between BNP and sodium levels, LVEF, distance performed at 6MWT at admission and at discharge, and scores at MMSE at admission and discharge emerged. BNP levels at admission and at discharge were furthermore clearly associated with mortality at 6 months (Chi-square 704.38, p = 0.03) and hospital readmission (Chi-square 741.57, p < 0.01). Conclusion. In an elderly HF population, BNP is related not only with clinical, laboratory, and instrumental data but also with multidimensional scales evaluating global status; higher BNP levels are linked with a worse prognosis in terms of mortality and 6-month readmission. PMID:25977690

  10. The diagnostic performance of mid-regional portion of pro-atrial natriuretic peptide for the detection of left ventricular hypertrophy in Caucasian hypertensive patients.

    PubMed

    Bhandari, S S; Davies, J E; Struck, J; Ng, L L

    2012-12-01

    Left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) is predictive of cardiovascular disease. The vasodilator, natriuretic and diuretic actions of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) support a role in the pathophysiology of hypertension. Measuring the redundant precursor fragment mid-regional portion of pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (MRproANP) overcomes the technical difficulties of quantifying the bioactive ANP. This study sought to investigate the diagnostic and prognostic utility of MRproANP in a hypertensive Caucasian patient population. A total of 194 hypertensive patients (39 patients with LVH, 69±7.82 years of age, 74% female vs 155 patients without LVH, 68±6.51 years of age, 71% female) were derived from a screening study. Plasma MRproANP concentrations were quantified using immunoluminometric assays. Hypertensive patients with LVH had higher MRproANP concentrations than those without LVH (103.04 (50.58) vs 84.11 pmol l(-1) (44.82); P=0.014). Independent predictors of left ventricular mass index were LogMRproANP (P=0.022), male gender (P<0.001), body mass index (P=0.001) and history of angina or myocardial infarction (P=0.009). The receiver operating curve for MRproANP for the detection of LVH was limited, yielding an area under the curve of only 0.628 (confidence interval 0.523-0.733; P=0.014). Therefore, the role of MRproANP may not lie in the diagnosis of LVH but in monitoring the response to therapy. A nonsignificant trend towards greater mortality in patients with above-median MRproANP levels compared with below-median levels (P=0.167) was observed. Larger studies are required to assess its prognostic utility further. PMID:22113442

  11. C-type natriuretic peptide is closely associated to obesity in Caucasian adolescents.

    PubMed

    Del Ry, Silvia; Cabiati, Manuela; Bianchi, Vanessa; Caponi, Laura; Maltinti, Maristella; Caselli, Chiara; Kozakova, Michaela; Palombo, Carlo; Morizzo, Carmela; Marchetti, Sara; Randazzo, Emioli; Clerico, Aldo; Federico, Giovanni

    2016-09-01

    CNP is a natural regulator of adipogenesis playing a role in the development of obesity in childhood. Aim of the study was to evaluate CNP plasma levels in normal-weight (N), overweight (OW) and obese adolescents (O). Eighty two subjects (age:12.8±2.4, years) without cardiac dysfunction were enrolled and CNP plasma levels were measured by RIA. NT-proBNP, MR-proANP, AGEs, reactive hyperemia index (RHI) and standard clinical chemistry parameters were also measured. O and OW adolescents had higher values of BMI and fat mass than N. CNP levels were significantly lower in OW:4.79[3.29-21.15] and O:3.81[1.55-13.4] than in N:13.21[7.6-37.8]; p<0.0001N vs O, p=0.0003N vs OW). LogCNP values correlated significantly and inversely with BMI z-score, FM%, TF% and circulating levels of CRP, insulin, total cholesterol, LDL, and triglycerides, in addition to an inverse relationship with skin AGEs and a direct correlation with RHI. LogCNP was also inversely associated with LogNT-proBNP and LogMR-proANP values. Using ROC analysis the risk of obesity resulted significantly (p≪0.0001) associated with CNP values (AUC=0.9724). These results suggest that CNP may play a more important role than BNP and ANP related peptides, as risk marker of obesity, in addition to its involvement in adipogenesis and endothelial dysfunction. PMID:27376982

  12. A case of marked diuresis by combined dopamine and atrial natriuretic peptide administration without renal injury in acute decompensated heart failure.

    PubMed

    Kamiya, Masataka; Sato, Naoki; Akiya, Mai; Okazaki, Hirotake; Takahashi, Yasuhiro; Mizuno, Kyoichi

    2013-01-01

    Renal injury is an important factor for worsening outcome in acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF). An 81-year-old woman was admitted due to ADHF with dyspnea and mild peripheral edema. The patient was managed with intravenous administration of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) at a dose of 0.0125 μg/kg/minute, which did not control volume overload even at an increased dose of 0.025 μg/kg/minute. After a low dose of dopamine (DA) of 1.0 μg/kg/ minute was added, urine output increased markedly to 120 from 30 mL/hour. Furthermore, her heart rate decreased to 80-100 from 120 bpm and the congestion improved with a reduced brain natriuretic peptide level. Interestingly, the combination of ANP and DA therapy reduced serum creatinine as well as the levels of urinary liver-type fatty acid binding protein, a novel reno-tubular stress marker, by 98.9%, and an oxidative stress marker, urinary 8-hydroxydeoxyguanosine, by 88.2% from baseline levels. Thus, this ADHF patient, a nonresponder to ANP alone, improved without renal injury when administered combination therapy consisting of low doses of ANP and DA, suggesting that this combined therapy might be useful for better management of ADHF in patients without diuretic responses with ANP alone. Further prospective studies are warranted.

  13. Molecular classification of an elasmobranch angiotensin receptor: quantification of angiotensin receptor and natriuretic peptide receptor mRNAs in saltwater and freshwater populations of the Atlantic stingray.

    PubMed

    Evans, Andrew N; Henning, Toni; Gelsleichter, James; Nunez, B Scott

    2010-12-01

    Among the most conserved osmoregulatory hormone systems in vertebrates are the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and the natriuretic peptides (NPs). We examined the RAS and NP system in the euryhaline Atlantic stingray, Dasyatis sabina (Lesueur). To determine the relative sensitivity of target organs to these hormonal systems, we isolated cDNA sequences encoding the D. sabina angiotensin receptor (AT) and natriuretic peptide type-B receptor (NPR-B). We then determined the tissue-specific expression of their mRNAs in saltwater D. sabina from local Texas waters and an isolated freshwater population in Lake Monroe, Florida. AT mRNA was most abundant in interrenal tissue from both populations. NPR-B mRNA was most abundant in rectal gland tissue from both populations, and also highly abundant in the kidney of saltwater D. sabina. This study is the first to report the sequence of an elasmobranch angiotensin receptor, and phylogenetic analysis indicates that the D. sabina receptor is more similar to AT(1) vs. AT(2) proteins. This classification is further supported by molecular analysis of AT(1) and AT(2) proteins demonstrating conservation of AT(1)-specific amino acid residues and motifs in D. sabina AT. Molecular classification of the elasmobranch angiotensin receptor as an AT(1)-like protein provides fundamental insight into the evolution of the vertebrate RAS. PMID:20869458

  14. Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) inhibits DMBA/croton oil induced skin tumor growth by modulating NF-κB, MMPs, and infiltrating mast cells in swiss albino mice.

    PubMed

    Subramanian, Vimala; Vellaichamy, Elangovan

    2014-10-01

    Cardiac hormone atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and its receptor, natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A) are implicated as a vital regulator of cancer cell growth and tumor progression. However, the underlying mechanism by which ANP opposes the cancer growth in in-vivo remains unknown. Herein, we investigated the anti-cancer activity of ANP on 7, 12-dimethyl benzanthracence (DMBA)/Croton oil- induced two-step skin carcinogenic mouse model. Skin tumor incidence and tumor volume were recorded during the experimental period of 16 weeks. ANP (1 μg/kg body weight/alternate days for 4 weeks) was injected subcutaneously from the 13th week of DMBA/Croton oil induction. ANP treatment markedly inhibited the skin tumor growth (P<0.001). A significant reduction in the level of NF-κB activation (P<0.001), infiltrating mast cell count (P<0.01) and MMP-2/-9 (P<0.001, respectively) were noticed in the ANP treated mice skin tissue. Further, ANP treatment revert back the altered levels of serum LDH-4, C-reactive protein (CRP), and enzymatic antioxidants (SOD and CAT activities) to near normal level. Taken together, the results of this study suggest that ANP opposes the skin carcinogenesis by suppressing the inflammatory response and MMPs.

  15. Molecular classification of an elasmobranch angiotensin receptor: quantification of angiotensin receptor and natriuretic peptide receptor mRNAs in saltwater and freshwater populations of the Atlantic stingray.

    PubMed

    Evans, Andrew N; Henning, Toni; Gelsleichter, James; Nunez, B Scott

    2010-12-01

    Among the most conserved osmoregulatory hormone systems in vertebrates are the renin-angiotensin system (RAS) and the natriuretic peptides (NPs). We examined the RAS and NP system in the euryhaline Atlantic stingray, Dasyatis sabina (Lesueur). To determine the relative sensitivity of target organs to these hormonal systems, we isolated cDNA sequences encoding the D. sabina angiotensin receptor (AT) and natriuretic peptide type-B receptor (NPR-B). We then determined the tissue-specific expression of their mRNAs in saltwater D. sabina from local Texas waters and an isolated freshwater population in Lake Monroe, Florida. AT mRNA was most abundant in interrenal tissue from both populations. NPR-B mRNA was most abundant in rectal gland tissue from both populations, and also highly abundant in the kidney of saltwater D. sabina. This study is the first to report the sequence of an elasmobranch angiotensin receptor, and phylogenetic analysis indicates that the D. sabina receptor is more similar to AT(1) vs. AT(2) proteins. This classification is further supported by molecular analysis of AT(1) and AT(2) proteins demonstrating conservation of AT(1)-specific amino acid residues and motifs in D. sabina AT. Molecular classification of the elasmobranch angiotensin receptor as an AT(1)-like protein provides fundamental insight into the evolution of the vertebrate RAS.

  16. Effect of short-term endurance training on exercise capacity, haemodynamics and atrial natriuretic peptide secretion in heart transplant recipients.

    PubMed

    Geny, B; Saini, J; Mettauer, B; Lampert, E; Piquard, F; Follenius, M; Epailly, E; Schnedecker, B; Eisenmann, B; Haberey, P; Lonsdorfer, J

    1996-01-01

    Exercise tolerance of heart transplant patients is often limited. Central and peripheral factors have been proposed to explain such exercise limitation but, to date, the leading factors remain to be determined. We examined how a short-term endurance exercise training programme may improve exercise capacity after heart transplantation, and whether atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) release may contribute to the beneficial effects of exercise training by minimizing ischaemia and/or cardiac and circulatory congestion through its vasodilatation and haemoconcentration properties. Seven heart transplant recipients performed a square-wave endurance exercise test before and after 6 weeks of supervised training, while monitoring haemodynamic parameters, ANP and catecholamine concentrations. After training, the maximal tolerated power and the total mechanical work load increased from 130.4 (SEM 6.5) to 150.0 (SEM 6.0) W (P < 0.05) and from 2.05 (SEM 0.1) to 3.58 (SEM 0.14) kJ.kg-1 (P < 0.001). Resting heart rate decreased from 100.0 (SEM 3.4) to 92.4 (SEM 3.5) beats.min-1 (P < 0.05) but resting and exercise induced increases in cardiac output, stroke volume, right atrial, pulmonary capillary wedge, systemic and pulmonary artery pressures were not significantly changed by training. Exercise-induced decrease of systemic vascular resistance was similar before and after training. After training arterio-venous differences in oxygen content were similar but maximal lactate concentrations decreased from 6.20 (SEM 0.55) to 4.88 (SEM 0.6) mmol.l-1 (P < 0.05) during exercise. Similarly, maximal exercise noradrenaline concentration tended to decrease from 2060 (SEM 327) to 1168 (SEM 227) pg.ml-1. A significant correlation was observed between lactate and catecholamines concentrations. The ANP concentration at rest and the exercise-induced ANP concentration did not change throughout the experiment [104.8 (SEM 13.1) pg.ml-1 vs 116.0 (SEM 13.5) pg.ml-1 and 200.0 (SEM 23.0) pg.ml-1 vs 206

  17. Role of galectin-3 and plasma B type-natriuretic peptide in predicting prognosis in discharged chronic heart failure patients

    PubMed Central

    Feola, Mauro; Testa, Marzia; Leto, Laura; Cardone, Marco; Sola, Mario; Rosso, Gian Luca

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Galectin-3 demonstrated to be a robust independent marker of cardiovascular mid-term (18-month) outcome in heart failure (HF) patients. The objective of this study was to analyze the value of a predischarged determination of plasma galectin-3 alone and with plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) in predicting mid-term outcome in frequent-flyers (FF) HF (≥2 hospitalization for HF/year)/dead patients discharged after an acute decompensated HF (ADHF) episode. All FF chronic HF subjects discharged alive after an ADHF were enrolled. All patients underwent a determination of BNP and galectin-3, a 6-minute walk test, and an echocardiogram within 48 hours upon hospital discharge. Death by any cause, cardiac transplantation, and worsening HF requiring readmission to hospital were considered cardiovascular events. Eighty-three patients (67 males, age 73.2 ± 8.6 years old) were analyzed (mean follow-up 11.6 ± 5.2 months; range 4–22 months). During the follow-up 38 events (45.7%) were scheduled: (13 cardiac deaths, 35 rehospitalizations for ADHF). According to medical history, in 33 patients (39.8%) a definition of FF HF patients was performed (range 2–4 hospitalization/year). HF patients who suffered an event (FF or death) demonstrated more impaired ventricular function (P = 0.037), higher plasma BNP (P = 0.005), and Gal-3 at predischarge evaluation (P = 0.027). Choosing adequate cut-off points (BNP ≥ 500 pg/mL and Gal-3 ≥ 17.6 ng/mL), the Kaplan–Meier curves depicted the powerful stratification using BNP + Gal-3 in predicting clinical course at mid-term follow-up (log rank 5.65; P = 0.017). Adding Gal-3 to BNP, a single predischarge strategy testing seemed to obtain a satisfactorily predictive value in alive HF patients discharged after an ADHF episode. PMID:27368017

  18. Usefulness of natriuretic peptide for the diagnosis of Kawasaki disease: a systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Kuan-Ho; Chang, Shy-Shin; Yu, Chin-Wei; Lin, Shen-Che; Liu, Shu-Chun; Chao, Hsiao-yun; Wu, Jiunn-Yih; Lee, Chien-Chang

    2015-01-01

    Objective To examine the diagnostic value of serum B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) in acute Kawasaki disease (KD). Design Systematic review and meta-analysis. Data sources A systematic literature search strategy was designed and carried out using MEDLINE, EMBASE and the Cochrane Library from inception to December 2013. We also performed manual screening of the bibliographies of primary studies and review articles, and contacted authors for additional data. Study eligibility criteria We included all BNP and NT-pro (N-terminal prohormone) BNP assay studies that compared paediatric patients with KD to patients with febrile illness unrelated to KD. We excluded case reports, case series, review articles, editorials, congress abstracts, clinical guidelines and all studies that compared healthy controls. Primary and secondary outcome measures The performance characteristics of BNP were summarised using forest plots, hierarchical summary receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curves and bivariate random effects models. Results We found six eligible studies including 279 cases of patients with KD and 203 febrile controls. Six studies examined NT-proBNP and one examined BNP. In general, NT-proBNP is a specific and moderately sensitive test for identifying KD. The pooled sensitivity was 0.89 (95% CI 0.78 to 0.95) and the pooled specificity was 0.72 (95% CI 0.58 to 0.82). The area under the summary ROC curve was 0.87 (95% CI 0.83 to 0.89). The positive likelihood ratio (LR+ 3.20, 95% CI 2.10 to 4.80) was sufficiently high to be qualified as a rule-in diagnostic tool in the context of high pre-test probability and compatible clinical symptoms. A high degree of heterogeneity was found using the Cochran Q statistic. Conclusions Current evidence suggests that NT-proBNP may be used as a diagnostic tool for KD. NT-proBNP has high diagnostic value for identifying KD in patients with protracted undifferentiated febrile illness. Prospective large cohort studies are needed to help

  19. All-Trans Retinoic Acid and Sodium Butyrate Enhance Natriuretic Peptide Receptor A Gene Transcription: Role of Histone Modification

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Prerna; Periyasamy, Ramu; Das, Subhankar; Neerukonda, Smitha; Mani, Indra

    2014-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to delineate the mechanisms of GC-A/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA) gene (Npr1) expression in vivo. We used all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) and histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitor, sodium butyrate (NaBu) to examine the expression and function of Npr1 using gene-disrupted heterozygous (1-copy; +/−), wild-type (2-copy; +/+), and gene-duplicated heterozygous (3-copy; ++/+) mice. Npr1+/− mice exhibited increased renal HDAC and reduced histone acetyltransferase (HAT) activity; on the contrary, Npr1++/+ mice showed decreased HDAC and enhanced HAT activity compared with Npr1+/+ mice. ATRA and NaBu promoted global acetylation of histones H3-K9/14 and H4-K12, reduced methylation of H3-K9 and H3-K27, and enriched accumulation of active chromatin marks at the Npr1 promoter. A combination of ATRA-NaBu promoted recruitment of activator-complex containing E26 transformation–specific 1, retinoic acid receptor α, and HATs (p300 and p300/cAMP response element–binding protein-binding protein–associated factor) at the Npr1 promoter, and significantly increased renal NPRA expression, GC activity, and cGMP levels. Untreated 1-copy mice showed significantly increased systolic blood pressure and renal expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) compared with 2- and 3-copy mice. Treatment with ATRA and NaBu synergistically attenuated the expression of α-SMA and PCNA and reduced systolic blood pressure in Npr1+/− mice. Our findings demonstrate that epigenetic upregulation of Npr1 gene transcription by ATRA and NaBu leads to attenuation of renal fibrotic markers and systolic blood pressure in mice with reduced Npr1 gene copy number, which will have important implications in prevention and treatment of hypertension-related renal pathophysiological conditions. PMID:24714214

  20. Brain natriuretic peptide predicts forced vital capacity of the lungs, oxygen pulse and peak oxygen consumption in physiological condition.

    PubMed

    Popovic, Dejana; Ostojic, Miodrag C; Popovic, Bojana; Petrovic, Milan; Vujisic-Tesic, Bosiljka; Kocijancic, Aleksandar; Banovic, Marko; Arandjelovic, Aleksandra; Stojiljkovic, Stanimir; Markovic, Vidan; Damjanovic, Svetozar S

    2013-05-01

    Brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) is used as marker of cardiac and pulmonary diseases. However, the predictive value of circulating NT-pro-BNP for cardiac and pulmonary performance is unclear in physiological conditions. Standard echocardiography, tissue Doppler and forced spirometry at rest were used to assess cardiac parameters and forced vital capacity (FVC) in two groups of athletes (16 elite male wrestlers (W), 21 water polo player (WP)), as different stress adaptation models, and 20 sedentary subjects (C) matched for age. Cardiopulmonary test on treadmill (CPET), as acute stress model, was used to measure peak oxygen consumption (peak VO2), maximal heart rate (HRmax) and peak oxygen pulse (peak VO2/HR). NT-pro-BNP was measured by immunoassey sandwich technique 10min before the test - at rest, at the beginning of the test, at maximal effort, at third minute of recovery. FVC was higher in athletes and the highest in W (WP 5.60±0.29 l; W 6.57±1.00 l; C 5.41±0.29 l; p<0.01). Peak VO2 and peak VO2/HR were higher in athletes and the highest in WP. HRmax was not different among groups. In all groups, NT-pro-BNP decreased from rest to the beginning phase, increased in maximal effort and stayed unchanged in recovery. NT-pro-BNP was higher in C than W in all phases; WP had similar values as W and C. On multiple regression analysis, in all three groups together, ΔNT-pro-BNP from rest to the beginning phase independently predicted both peak VO2 and peak VO2/HR (r=0.38, 0.35; B=37.40, 0.19; p=0.007, 0.000, respectively). NT-pro-BNP at rest predicted HRmax (r=-0.32, B=-0.22, p=0.02). Maximal NT-pro-BNP predicted FVC (r=-0.22, B=-0.07, p=0.02). These results show noticeable predictive value of NT-pro-BNP for both cardiac and pulmonary performance in physiological conditions suggesting that NT-pro-BNP could be a common regulatory factor coordinating adaptation of heart and lungs to stress condition.

  1. N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide level inversely associates with metabolic syndrome in elderly persons

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Aims Serum N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) was lower in the general population with metabolic syndrome (MetS). The aim of this study was to evaluate the relationship between MetS and fasting serum NT-proBNP concentration in elderly persons. Methods Fasting blood samples were obtained from 84 elderly volunteers aged 65 years or older. MetS and its components were defined using diagnostic criteria from the International Diabetes Federation. Results Thirty-eight elderly persons (45.2%) had MetS. Fasting NT-proBNP level was negatively correlated with MetS among elderly patients (p = 0.001). Univariate linear regression analysis showed that age (r = 0.338; p = 0.002) was positively correlated with fasting serum log-NT-proBNP levels, while height (r = -0.253; p = 0.020), body weight (r = -0.238; p = 0.029), waist circumference (r = -0.270; p = 0.013), body fat mass (r = -0.356; p = 0.002) and triglyceride (r = -0.291; p = 0.007) were negatively correlated with fasting serum log-NT-proBNP levels among the elderly persons. Multivariate forward stepwise linear regression analysis of the significant variables showed that age (R 2 change = 0.114, p = 0.011), triglyceride (R 2 change = 0.118, p < 0.001), body fat mass (R 2 change = 0.084, p < 0.001), and height (R 2 change = 0.101, p < 0.001) were the independent predictor of fasting serum log-NT-proBNP levels in elderly persons. Conclusions NT-proBNP level is significantly reduced in elderly persons affected by MetS, and is significantly positively related to age, while negatively related to triglyceride, body fat mass, height in these subjects. PMID:24506889

  2. Expression of natriuretic peptides, nitric oxide synthase, and guanylate cyclase activity in frog mesonephros during the annual cycle.

    PubMed

    Fenoglio, Carla; Visai, Livia; Addario, Concetta; Gerzeli, Giuseppe; Milanesi, Gloria; Vaccarone, Rita; Barni, Sergio

    2004-06-01

    Natriuretic peptides (NPs), a family of structurally related hormones and nitric oxide (NO), generated by nitric oxide synthase (NOS), are believed to be involved in the regulation of fluid balance and sodium homeostasis. Differential expression and regulation of these factors depend on both physiological and pathological conditions. Both NPs and NO act in target organs through the activation of guanylate cyclase (GC) and the generation of guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate (cGMP), which is considered a common messenger for the action of these factors. The present study was designed to investigate--by histochemical methods--the expression of some NPs (proANP and ANP) and isoforms of NOS (neuronal NOS, nNOS, and inducible NOS, iNOS) in the mesonephros of Rana esculenta in different periods of the year including hibernation, to evaluate possible seasonal changes in their expression. We also studied the enzyme activity of NOS-related nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate diaphorase (NADPHd) and of GC. The experiments were performed on pieces of kidney of R. esculenta collected in their natural environment during active and hibernating life. The study was carried out using immunohistochemical techniques to demonstrate proANP, ANP, and some NOS isoforms. Antigen capture by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) was also performed to determine the presence of NPs in the frog kidney extract. Enzyme histochemistry was used to demonstrate the NOS-related NADPHd activity at light microscopy; GC activity was visualized at the electron microscope, using cerium as capture agent. The application of the immunohistochemical techniques demonstrated that frog mesonephros tubules express different patterns of distribution and/or expression of ANP and NOS during the annual cycle. Comparing the results obtained on active and hibernating frogs has provided interesting data; the NOS/NADPHd and GC activities showed some variations as well. Furthermore, the presence of NPs in

  3. Mendelian Randomization Study of B-Type Natriuretic Peptide and Type 2 Diabetes: Evidence of Causal Association from Population Studies

    PubMed Central

    Pfister, Roman; Sharp, Stephen; Luben, Robert; Welsh, Paul; Barroso, Inês; Salomaa, Veikko; Meirhaeghe, Aline; Khaw, Kay-Tee; Sattar, Naveed; Langenberg, Claudia; Wareham, Nicholas J.

    2011-01-01

    Background Genetic and epidemiological evidence suggests an inverse association between B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels in blood and risk of type 2 diabetes (T2D), but the prospective association of BNP with T2D is uncertain, and it is unclear whether the association is confounded. Methods and Findings We analysed the association between levels of the N-terminal fragment of pro-BNP (NT-pro-BNP) in blood and risk of incident T2D in a prospective case-cohort study and genotyped the variant rs198389 within the BNP locus in three T2D case-control studies. We combined our results with existing data in a meta-analysis of 11 case-control studies. Using a Mendelian randomization approach, we compared the observed association between rs198389 and T2D to that expected from the NT-pro-BNP level to T2D association and the NT-pro-BNP difference per C allele of rs198389. In participants of our case-cohort study who were free of T2D and cardiovascular disease at baseline, we observed a 21% (95% CI 3%–36%) decreased risk of incident T2D per one standard deviation (SD) higher log-transformed NT-pro-BNP levels in analysis adjusted for age, sex, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, smoking, family history of T2D, history of hypertension, and levels of triglycerides, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol, and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol. The association between rs198389 and T2D observed in case-control studies (odds ratio = 0.94 per C allele, 95% CI 0.91–0.97) was similar to that expected (0.96, 0.93–0.98) based on the pooled estimate for the log-NT-pro-BNP level to T2D association derived from a meta-analysis of our study and published data (hazard ratio = 0.82 per SD, 0.74–0.90) and the difference in NT-pro-BNP levels (0.22 SD, 0.15–0.29) per C allele of rs198389. No significant associations were observed between the rs198389 genotype and potential confounders. Conclusions Our results provide evidence for a potential causal role of the BNP

  4. N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide as a marker of blunt cardiac contusion in trauma

    PubMed Central

    Dogan, Halil; Sarikaya, Sezgin; Neijmann, Sebnem Tekin; Uysal, Emin; Yucel, Neslihan; Ozucelik, Dogac Niyazi; Okuturlar, Yıldız; Solak, Suleyman; Sever, Nurten; Ayan, Cem

    2015-01-01

    Cardiac contusion is usually caused by blunt chest trauma and, although it is potentially a life-threatening condition, the diagnosis of a myocardial contusion is difficult because of non-specific symptoms and the lack of an ideal test to detect myocardial damage. Cardiac enzymes, such as creatine kinase (CK), creatine kinase MB fraction (CK-MB), cardiac troponin I (cTn-I), and cardiac troponin T (cTn-T) were used in previous studies to demonstrate the blunt cardiac contusion (BCC). Each of these diagnostic tests alone is not effective for diagnosis of BCC. The aim of this study was to investigate the serum heart-type fatty acid binding protein (h-FABP), N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP), CK, CK-MB, and cTn-I levels as a marker of BCC in blunt chest trauma in rats. The eighteen Wistar albino rats were randomly allocated to two groups; group I (control) (n=8) and group II (blunt chest trauma) (n=10). Isolated BCC was induced by the method described by Raghavendran et al. (2005). All rats were observed in their cages and blood samples were collected after five hours of trauma for the analysis of serum h-FABP, NT-pro BNP, CK, CK-MB, and cTn-I levels. The mean serum NT-pro BNP was significantly different between group I and II (10.3±2.10 ng/L versus 15.4±3.68 ng/L, respectively; P=0.0001). NT-pro BNP level >13 ng/ml had a sensitivity of 87.5%, a specificity of 70%, a positive predictive value of 70%, and a negative predictive value of 87.5% for predicting blunt chest trauma (area under curve was 0.794 and P=0.037). There was no significant difference between two groups in serum h-FABP, CK, CK-MB and c Tn-I levels. A relation between NT-Pro BNP and BCC was shown in this study. Serum NT-proBNP levels significantly increased with BCC after 5 hours of the blunt chest trauma. The use of NT-proBNP as an adjunct to other diagnostic tests, such as troponins, electrocardiography (ECG), chest x-ray and echocardiogram may be beneficial for diagnosis of BCC

  5. Brain natriutetic peptide test

    MedlinePlus

    ... medlineplus.gov/ency/article/007509.htm Brain natriuretic peptide test To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) test is a blood test that measures ...

  6. Agonistic induction of a covalent dimer in a mutant of natriuretic peptide receptor-A documents a juxtamembrane interaction that accompanies receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Labrecque, J; Deschênes, J; McNicoll, N; De Léan, A

    2001-03-16

    The natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A) is composed of an extracellular domain with a ligand binding site, a transmembrane-spanning domain, a kinase homology domain, and a guanylyl cyclase domain. In response to agonists (atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide), the kinase homology domain-mediated guanylate cyclase repression is removed, which allows the production of cyclic GMP. Previous work from our laboratory strongly indicated that agonists are exerting their effects through the induction of a juxtamembrane dimeric contact. However, a direct demonstration of this mechanism remains to be provided. As a tool, we are now using the properties of a new mutation, D435C. It introduces a cysteine at a position in NPR-A corresponding to a supplementary cysteine found in NPR-C6, another receptor of this family (a disulfide-linked dimer). Although this D435C mutation only leads to trace levels of NPR-A disulfide-linked dimer at basal state, covalent dimerization can be induced by a treatment with rat ANP or with other agonists. The NPR-A(D435C) mutant has not been subjected to significant structural alterations, since it shares with the wild type receptor a similar dose-response pattern of cellular guanylyl cyclase activation. However, a persistent activation accompanies NPR-A(D435C) dimer formation after the removal of the inducer agonist. On the other hand, a construction where the intracellular domain of NPR-A(D435C) has been truncated (DeltaKC(D435C)) displays a spontaneous and complete covalent dimerization. In addition, the elimination of the intracellular domain in wild type DeltaKC and DeltaKC(D435C) is associated with an increase of agonist binding affinity, this effect being more pronounced with the weak agonist pBNP. Also, a D435C secreted extracellular domain remains unlinked even after incubation with rat ANP. In summary, these results demonstrate, in a dynamic fashion, the agonistic induction of a dimeric contact in the

  7. Agonistic induction of a covalent dimer in a mutant of natriuretic peptide receptor-A documents a juxtamembrane interaction that accompanies receptor activation.

    PubMed

    Labrecque, J; Deschênes, J; McNicoll, N; De Léan, A

    2001-03-16

    The natriuretic peptide receptor-A (NPR-A) is composed of an extracellular domain with a ligand binding site, a transmembrane-spanning domain, a kinase homology domain, and a guanylyl cyclase domain. In response to agonists (atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and brain natriuretic peptide), the kinase homology domain-mediated guanylate cyclase repression is removed, which allows the production of cyclic GMP. Previous work from our laboratory strongly indicated that agonists are exerting their effects through the induction of a juxtamembrane dimeric contact. However, a direct demonstration of this mechanism remains to be provided. As a tool, we are now using the properties of a new mutation, D435C. It introduces a cysteine at a position in NPR-A corresponding to a supplementary cysteine found in NPR-C6, another receptor of this family (a disulfide-linked dimer). Although this D435C mutation only leads to trace levels of NPR-A disulfide-linked dimer at basal state, covalent dimerization can be induced by a treatment with rat ANP or with other agonists. The NPR-A(D435C) mutant has not been subjected to significant structural alterations, since it shares with the wild type receptor a similar dose-response pattern of cellular guanylyl cyclase activation. However, a persistent activation accompanies NPR-A(D435C) dimer formation after the removal of the inducer agonist. On the other hand, a construction where the intracellular domain of NPR-A(D435C) has been truncated (DeltaKC(D435C)) displays a spontaneous and complete covalent dimerization. In addition, the elimination of the intracellular domain in wild type DeltaKC and DeltaKC(D435C) is associated with an increase of agonist binding affinity, this effect being more pronounced with the weak agonist pBNP. Also, a D435C secreted extracellular domain remains unlinked even after incubation with rat ANP. In summary, these results demonstrate, in a dynamic fashion, the agonistic induction of a dimeric contact in the

  8. Prognostic Importance of Exercise Brain Natriuretic Peptide in Asymptomatic Chronic Organic Severe Mitral Regurgitation: An Observational Study

    PubMed Central

    Sinha, Santosh Kumar; Garg, Shalini; Thakur, Ramesh; Krishna, Vinay; Singh, Karandeep; Sachan, Mohit; Goel, Amit; Razi, Mahamdula; Pandey, Umeshwar; Varma, Chandra Mohan

    2016-01-01

    Background The optimal timing of surgery in patients with chronic organic severe mitral regurgitation (MR) continues to be debated, especially for those who are asymptomatic. The aim of the study was to determine independent and additive prognostic value of exercise brain natriuretic peptide (eBNP) in patients with severe asymptomatic MR and normal left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Methods Two hundred twenty-three consecutive patients with severe MR defined by effective regurgitant orifice (ERO) area ≥ 40 mm2 and/or residual volume ≥ 60 mL, LVEF > 60%, and normal LV end-systolic diameter < 40 mm underwent symptom limited exercise treadmill test (TMT). Echocardiography was done immediately after exercise. Data were obtained within 3 minutes of peak exercise. BNP levels were assessed before echo (after 30 minutes of supine rest) and at exercise (i.e., within the 3 minutes of the end of effort). Patients were followed up every 3 months up to 15 months for major adverse cardiac events (MACEs) (cardiovascular death, need for mitral valve surgery and hospitalization for acute pulmonary edema or heart failure). Results Mean age was 31.2 ± 9 years (range: 18 - 40) with majority being male (n = 153; 68%). Etiologies were rheumatic (n = 201; 90%), mitral valve prolapse (n = 17; 7.6%) and hypertrophic cardiomyopathy (n = 5; 2.4%). BNP level significantly increased from rest (65.24 ± 43.92 pg/mL; median: 43.5 pg/mL) to exercise (100.24 ± 98.24 pg/mL; median: 66.5 pg/mL; P < 0.001). Patients were divided into three tertiles according to eBNP levels (T1 = 15 - 44; T2 = 45 - 104; T3 = 105 - 400). There was trend for significantly lower exercise time in T3. During TMT, 66 (29.5%) stopped exercise due to dyspnea. They had similar resting BNP level compared with others but had significantly higher eBNP level (136 ± 109.7 pg/mL vs. 84.88 ± 90.2 pg/mL; P < 0.001). During follow-up (15 months), MACE occurred in 83 patients (37.2%): mitral valve replacement (MVR) in 59

  9. Relationship between glomerular filtration rate and plasma N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide concentrations in dogs with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Miyagawa, Y; Tominaga, Y; Toda, N; Takemura, N

    2013-08-01

    Plasma N-terminal pro B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) concentrations increase in dogs with azotemia. However, the correlation between glomerular filtration rate (GFR) and NT-proBNP concentrations in dogs has not been evaluated. The objective of this study was to evaluate the correlation between GFR and plasma NT-proBNP concentrations in dogs with chronic kidney disease (CKD). In this retrospective cross-sectional study, plasma creatinine (Cre) and NT-proBNP concentrations, plasma iohexol clearance (PCio) values and blood pressure were measured in dogs with CKD. Dogs were classified according to PCio values into D group (dogs with decreased PCio values), and N group (dogs with normal PCio values). Dogs were further categorized on the basis of their systolic blood pressure and PCio values into NT-D group (normotensive dogs with decreased PCio values), NT-N group (normotensive dogs with normal PCio values), HT-D group (hypertensive dogs with decreased PCio values) and HT-N group (hypertensive dogs with normal PCio values). Significant correlations were observed between plasma NT-proBNP and Cre concentrations (r=0.360, P<0.05) and PCio values (r=-0.470, P<0.01). Plasma NT-proBNP concentrations were significantly higher in the D group than in the N group (P<0.001). Plasma NT-proBNP concentrations were significantly higher in the HT-D group than in the other three groups (P ≤ 0.007). No differences in plasma NT-proBNP concentrations were observed between the NT-D and HT-N groups (P=0.28). Plasma NT-proBNP concentrations were significantly lower in the NT-N group than in the other three groups (P ≤ 0.043). Our findings suggest that decreased GFR might be associated with increased plasma NT-proBNP concentrations in dogs, similar to that in humans. In addition, the complication of hypertension in CKD might be associated with further increases in plasma NT-proBNP concentrations. In conclusion, the effects of GFR and blood pressure on the plasma NT

  10. Atrial natriuretic peptide inhibits the expression of tissue factor and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 induced by angiotensin II in cultured rat aortic endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yoshizumi, M; Tsuji, H; Nishimura, H; Kasahara, T; Sugano, T; Masuda, H; Nakagawa, K; Nakahara, Y; Kitamura, H; Yamada, K; Yoneda, M; Sawada, S; Nakagawa, M

    1998-03-01

    The pharmacological characteristics of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP), such as natriuresis, vasodilation, or suppression of smooth muscle cell proliferation, are well investigated. However, this is the first study to report its role on blood coagulation and fibrinolysis mediated by vascular endothelial cells. In this study, the effects of ANP on the enhanced expression of tissue factor (TF) and plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 (PAI-1) by angiotensin II (Ang II) in cultured rat aortic endothelial cells (RAECs) were examined. The expressions of TF and PAI-1 mRNA were detected by northern blotting methods. The activities of TF on the surface of RAECs and PAI-1 in the culture media were measured by chromogenic assay. ANP suppressed mRNA expressions of TF and PAI-1 induced by Ang II in a concentration-dependent manner. This suppression was accompanied by the decreased activities of TF and PAI-1.

  11. Association of restriction fragment length polymorphism at the atrial natriuretic peptide gene locus with aldosterone responsiveness to angiotensin in aldosterone-producing adenoma.

    PubMed

    Tunny, T J; Jonsson, J R; Klemm, S A; Ballantine, D M; Stowasser, M; Gordon, R D

    1994-11-15

    Primary aldosteronism is an important, potentially curable, form of hypertension. We examined the possible association between restriction fragment length polymorphisms in the atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) gene and responsiveness of aldosterone to angiotensin II in 59 patients with primary aldosteronism due to aldosterone-producing adenoma (APA). Significant differences in the allelic frequencies of the BglI, TaqI and XhoI polymorphic sites at the ANP gene locus (chromosome 1; 1p36) between angiotensin II-unresponsive and angiotensin II-responsive tumors were observed. Variation in the ANP gene between the two groups may result in altered expression of ANP within the adrenal gland, and may contribute to the biochemical regulation of aldosterone production of these two subgroups of patients with APA.

  12. MAPK3/1 is conducive to luteinizing hormone-mediated C-type natriuretic peptide decrease in bovine granulosa cells

    PubMed Central

    YANG, Lei; WEI, Qiang; GE, Junbang; ZHAO, Xiaoe; MA, Baohua

    2015-01-01

    C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) plays a role as an oocyte maturation inhibitor (OMI) in many species, including the bovine. However, the effects of luteinizing hormone (LH) on CNP expression and its potential mechanisms have not reported in the bovine. In the present study, we aimed to study the effects of LH on CNP expression and to illuminate the potential molecular mechanism in this process. Our results showed that LH induced epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) phosphorylation, mitogen-activated protein kinase3/1 (MAPK3/1) activation and CNP mRNA decrease in cultured bovine granulosa cells. Further study revealed that LH suppressed CNP expression via the MAPK3/1 signaling pathway, which was activated by the EGFR pathway. In conclusion, our research suggested that MAPK3/1 is involved in LH-mediated decrease of CNP and that this process is related to the EGFR and MAPK3/1 signal pathways. PMID:26655567

  13. Antimicrobial Peptides in Human Sepsis

    PubMed Central

    Martin, Lukas; van Meegern, Anne; Doemming, Sabine; Schuerholz, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    Nearly 100 years ago, antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) were identified as an important part of innate immunity. They exist in species from bacteria to mammals and can be isolated in body fluids and on surfaces constitutively or induced by inflammation. Defensins have anti-bacterial effects against Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria as well as anti-viral and anti-yeast effects. Human neutrophil peptides (HNP) 1–3 and human beta-defensins (HBDs) 1–3 are some of the most important defensins in humans. Recent studies have demonstrated higher levels of HNP 1–3 and HBD-2 in sepsis. The bactericidal/permeability-increasing protein (BPI) attenuates local inflammatory response and decreases systemic toxicity of endotoxins. Moreover, BPI might reflect the severity of organ dysfunction in sepsis. Elevated plasma lactoferrin is detected in patients with organ failure. HNP 1–3, lactoferrin, BPI, and heparin-binding protein are increased in sepsis. Human lactoferrin peptide 1–11 (hLF 1–11) possesses antimicrobial activity and modulates inflammation. The recombinant form of lactoferrin [talactoferrin alpha (TLF)] has been shown to decrease mortality in critically ill patients. A phase II/III study with TLF in sepsis did not confirm this result. The growing number of multiresistant bacteria is an ongoing problem in sepsis therapy. Furthermore, antibiotics are known to promote the liberation of pro-inflammatory cell components and thus augment the severity of sepsis. Compared to antibiotics, AMPs kill bacteria but also neutralize pathogenic factors such as lipopolysaccharide. The obstacle to applying naturally occurring AMPs is their high nephro- and neurotoxicity. Therefore, the challenge is to develop peptides to treat septic patients effectively without causing harm. This overview focuses on natural and synthetic AMPs in human and experimental sepsis and their potential to provide significant improvements in the treatment of critically ill with severe infections

  14. Ranolazine attenuated heightened plasma norepinephrine and B-Type natriuretic peptide-45 in improving cardiac function in rats with chronic ischemic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Feng, Guangqiu; Yang, Yu; Chen, Juan; Wu, Zhiyong; Zheng, Yin; Li, Wei; Dai, Wenxin; Guan, Pin; Zhong, Chunrong

    2016-01-01

    As a new anti-anginal agent, ranolazinehas been shown to play a cardioprotective role in regulating myocardial ischemic injury. Given that plasma norepinephrine (NE) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP, also termed B-type natriuretic peptide-45 in rats) are considered neuron-hormones to indicate heart failure progression. This study aims to examine effects of ranolazine on plasma NE and BNP-45 of rats with chronic ischemic heart failure (CHF). CHF was induced by myocardial infarction following ligation of a left anterior descending artery in adult Sprague-Dawley rats. We hypothesized that ranolazine attenuates the elevated levels of NE and BNP-45 observed in CHF rats thereby leading to improvement of the left ventricular function. Results showed that levels of plasma NE and BNP-45 were increased in CHF rats 6-8 weeks after ligation of the coronary artery. Our data demonstrate for the first time that ranolazine significantly attenuated the augmented NE and BNP-45 induced by CHF (P<0.05 vs. saline control). In addition, a liner relation was observed between NE/BNP-45levels and left ventricular fractional shortening as indication of left ventricular function (r=0.91 and P<0.01 for NE; and r=0.93 and P<0.01 for BNP-45) after administration of ranolazine. In conclusion, CHF increases the expression of NE and BNP-45 in peripheral circulation and these changes are related to the left ventricular function. Ranolazine improves the left ventricular function likely by decreasing heightened NE and BNP-45 induced by CHF. Therefore, our data indicate the role played by ranolazine in improving cardiac function in rats with CHF. PMID:27158417

  15. Ranolazine attenuated heightened plasma norepinephrine and B-Type natriuretic peptide-45 in improving cardiac function in rats with chronic ischemic heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Guangqiu; Yang, Yu; Chen, Juan; Wu, Zhiyong; Zheng, Yin; Li, Wei; Dai, Wenxin; Guan, Pin; Zhong, Chunrong

    2016-01-01

    As a new anti-anginal agent, ranolazinehas been shown to play a cardioprotective role in regulating myocardial ischemic injury. Given that plasma norepinephrine (NE) and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP, also termed B-type natriuretic peptide-45 in rats) are considered neuron-hormones to indicate heart failure progression. This study aims to examine effects of ranolazine on plasma NE and BNP-45 of rats with chronic ischemic heart failure (CHF). CHF was induced by myocardial infarction following ligation of a left anterior descending artery in adult Sprague-Dawley rats. We hypothesized that ranolazine attenuates the elevated levels of NE and BNP-45 observed in CHF rats thereby leading to improvement of the left ventricular function. Results showed that levels of plasma NE and BNP-45 were increased in CHF rats 6-8 weeks after ligation of the coronary artery. Our data demonstrate for the first time that ranolazine significantly attenuated the augmented NE and BNP-45 induced by CHF (P<0.05 vs. saline control). In addition, a liner relation was observed between NE/BNP-45levels and left ventricular fractional shortening as indication of left ventricular function (r=0.91 and P<0.01 for NE; and r=0.93 and P<0.01 for BNP-45) after administration of ranolazine. In conclusion, CHF increases the expression of NE and BNP-45 in peripheral circulation and these changes are related to the left ventricular function. Ranolazine improves the left ventricular function likely by decreasing heightened NE and BNP-45 induced by CHF. Therefore, our data indicate the role played by ranolazine in improving cardiac function in rats with CHF. PMID:27158417

  16. Role of FQQI motif in the internalization, trafficking, and signaling of guanylyl-cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A in cultured murine mesangial cells.

    PubMed

    Mani, Indra; Garg, Renu; Pandey, Kailash N

    2016-01-01

    Binding of the cardiac hormone atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) to transmembrane guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA), produces the intracellular second messenger cGMP in target cells. To delineate the critical role of an endocytic signal in intracellular sorting of the receptor, we have identified a FQQI (Phe(790), Gln(791), Gln(792), and Ile(793)) motif in the carboxyl-terminal region of NPRA. Mouse mesangial cells (MMCs) were transiently transfected with the enhanced green fluorescence protein (eGFP)-tagged wild-type (WT) and mutant constructs of eGFP-NPRA. The mutation FQQI/AAAA, in the eGFP-NPRA cDNA sequence, markedly attenuated the internalization of mutant receptors by almost 49% compared with the WT receptor. Interestingly, we show that the μ1B subunit of adaptor protein-1 binds directly to a phenylalanine-based FQQI motif in the cytoplasmic tail of the receptor. However, subcellular trafficking indicated that immunofluorescence colocalization of the mutated receptor with early endosome antigen-1 (EEA-1), lysosome-associated membrane protein-1 (LAMP-1), and Rab 11 marker was decreased by 57% in early endosomes, 48% in lysosomes, and 42% in recycling endosomes, respectively, compared with the WT receptor in MMCs. The receptor containing the mutated motif (FQQI/AAAA) also produced a significantly decreased level of intracellular cGMP during subcellular trafficking than the WT receptor. The coimmunoprecipitation assay confirmed a decreased level of colocalization of the mutant receptor with subcellular compartments during endocytic processes. The results suggest that the FQQI motif is essential for the internalization and subcellular trafficking of NPRA during the hormone signaling process in intact MMCs.

  17. Human antimicrobial peptides and proteins.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guangshun

    2014-05-13

    As the key components of innate immunity, human host defense antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs) play a critical role in warding off invading microbial pathogens. In addition, AMPs can possess other biological functions such as apoptosis, wound healing, and immune modulation. This article provides an overview on the identification, activity, 3D structure, and mechanism of action of human AMPs selected from the antimicrobial peptide database. Over 100 such peptides have been identified from a variety of tissues and epithelial surfaces, including skin, eyes, ears, mouths, gut, immune, nervous and urinary systems. These peptides vary from 10 to 150 amino acids with a net charge between -3 and +20 and a hydrophobic content below 60%. The sequence diversity enables human AMPs to adopt various 3D structures and to attack pathogens by different mechanisms. While α-defensin HD-6 can self-assemble on the bacterial surface into nanonets to entangle bacteria, both HNP-1 and β-defensin hBD-3 are able to block cell wall biosynthesis by binding to lipid II. Lysozyme is well-characterized to cleave bacterial cell wall polysaccharides but can also kill bacteria by a non-catalytic mechanism. The two hydrophobic domains in the long amphipathic α-helix of human cathelicidin LL-37 lays the basis for binding and disrupting the curved anionic bacterial membrane surfaces by forming pores or via the carpet model. Furthermore, dermcidin may serve as ion channel by forming a long helix-bundle structure. In addition, the C-type lectin RegIIIα can initially recognize bacterial peptidoglycans followed by pore formation in the membrane. Finally, histatin 5 and GAPDH(2-32) can enter microbial cells to exert their effects. It appears that granulysin enters cells and kills intracellular pathogens with the aid of pore-forming perforin. This arsenal of human defense proteins not only keeps us healthy but also inspires the development of a new generation of personalized medicine to combat

  18. Human Antimicrobial Peptides and Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guangshun

    2014-01-01

    As the key components of innate immunity, human host defense antimicrobial peptides and proteins (AMPs) play a critical role in warding off invading microbial pathogens. In addition, AMPs can possess other biological functions such as apoptosis, wound healing, and immune modulation. This article provides an overview on the identification, activity, 3D structure, and mechanism of action of human AMPs selected from the antimicrobial peptide database. Over 100 such peptides have been identified from a variety of tissues and epithelial surfaces, including skin, eyes, ears, mouths, gut, immune, nervous and urinary systems. These peptides vary from 10 to 150 amino acids with a net charge between −3 and +20 and a hydrophobic content below 60%. The sequence diversity enables human AMPs to adopt various 3D structures and to attack pathogens by different mechanisms. While α-defensin HD-6 can self-assemble on the bacterial surface into nanonets to entangle bacteria, both HNP-1 and β-defensin hBD-3 are able to block cell wall biosynthesis by binding to lipid II. Lysozyme is well-characterized to cleave bacterial cell wall polysaccharides but can also kill bacteria by a non-catalytic mechanism. The two hydrophobic domains in the long amphipathic α-helix of human cathelicidin LL-37 lays the basis for binding and disrupting the curved anionic bacterial membrane surfaces by forming pores or via the carpet model. Furthermore, dermcidin may serve as ion channel by forming a long helix-bundle structure. In addition, the C-type lectin RegIIIα can initially recognize bacterial peptidoglycans followed by pore formation in the membrane. Finally, histatin 5 and GAPDH(2-32) can enter microbial cells to exert their effects. It appears that granulysin enters cells and kills intracellular pathogens with the aid of pore-forming perforin. This arsenal of human defense proteins not only keeps us healthy but also inspires the development of a new generation of personalized medicine to

  19. Hormone therapy with tamoxifen reduces plasma levels of NT-B-type natriuretic peptide but does not change ventricular ejection fraction after chemotherapy in women with breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Silva, F B; Romero, W G; Carvalho, A L R; Borgo, M V; Amorim, M H C; Gouvea, S A; Abreu, G R

    2015-02-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of tamoxifen on the plasma concentration of NT-pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) in women undergoing chemotherapy for breast cancer and to correlate changes in NT-proBNP with the left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF). Over a period of 12 months, we followed 60 women with a diagnosis of breast cancer. The patients were separated into a group that received only chemotherapy (n=23), a group that received chemotherapy + tamoxifen (n=21), and a group that received only tamoxifen (n=16). Plasma levels of NT-proBNP were assessed at 0 (T0), 6 (T6), and 12 (T12) months of treatment, and echocardiography data were assessed at T0 and T12. Plasma NT-proBNP levels were increased in the chemotherapy-only group at T6 and T12, whereas elevated NT-proBNP levels were only found at T6 in the chemotherapy + tamoxifen group. At T12, the chemotherapy + tamoxifen group exhibited a significant reduction in the peptide to levels similar to the group that received tamoxifen alone. The chemotherapy-only group exhibited a significant decrease in LVEF at T12, whereas the chemotherapy + tamoxifen and tamoxifen-only groups maintained levels similar to those at the beginning of treatment. Treatment with tamoxifen for 6 months after chemotherapy significantly reduced the plasma levels of NT-proBNP and did not change LVEF in women with breast cancer.

  20. Measurement of cytoplasmic free Ca2+ concentration in rabbit aorta using the photoprotein, aequorin. Effect of atrial natriuretic peptide on agonist-induced Ca2+ signal generation.

    PubMed Central

    Takuwa, Y; Rasmussen, H

    1987-01-01

    Addition of norepinephrine, angiotensin II, or histamine leads to a transient rise in the cytoplasmic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i), as measured with aequorin, in rabbit aortic strips. Each induces a [Ca2+]i transient which peaks in 2 min and then falls either back to baseline (angiotensin II) or to a plateau (norepinephrine and histamine). The [Ca2+]i transient is due to the mobilization of Ca2+ from a caffeine-sensitive, intracellular pool. An elevation of [K+] to 35 mM leads to a monotonic sustained rise in [Ca2+]i which depends entirely on extracellular Ca2+, but an increase to 100 mM leads to a [Ca2+]i transient from the mobilization of intracellular Ca2+. Atrial natriuretic peptide does not alter basal [Ca2+]i nor inhibit the [Ca2+]i transient induced by either histamine or angiotensin II, but blocks that induced by norepinephrine, and blocks the plateau phase induced by either histamine or norepinephrine. The peptide inhibits the contractile response to all three agonists and to K+. PMID:2439545

  1. Sensitive radioimmunoassay of. cap alpha. human atrial natriuretic polypeptide using monoclonal antibody recognizing human form ring structure

    SciTech Connect

    Naomi, S.; Umeda, T.; Iwaoka, T.; Miura, F.; Ohno, M.; Sasaki, M.; Oishi, S.; Sato, T.; Takatsu, K.

    1988-01-01

    A monoclonal antibody (C351) against ..cap alpha.. human atrial natriuretic polypeptide (..cap alpha..hANP) recognizing human form ring structure was established and applied to a radioimmunoassay of plasma ..cap alpha..hANP. The minimum detectable amount in terms of 10 % radioligand displacement relative to zero dose were 0.28 fmol/tube, corresponding to 0.7 fmol/ml in plasma after extraction using Sep-Pak C18 cartridges. When the mean plasma levels at recumbent position in fasted morning were compared in 10 young (<30 years) and 10 elderly (greater than or equal to50 years) healthy subjects taking normal sodium diet, it was slightly higher in the latter. After i.v. infusion of hypertonic saline at a rate of 0.24 ml/kg/min for 20 min in 6 normal subjects (26 to 35 years), it was increased from 4.1 +/- 0.4 to 5.9 +/- 0.7 fmol/ml (p<0.01). In 6 patients with essential hypertension (34 to 57 years), it was elevated with high salt intake. From these results, the radioimmunoassay of plasma IR-..cap alpha..hANP using MAb C351 seems to be quite suitable to detect rather small changes at low plasma concentrations and to investigate a physiological importance of ..cap alpha..hANP in man.

  2. Increased atrial natriuretic peptide (6-33) binding sites in the subfornical organ of water deprived and Brattleboro rats

    SciTech Connect

    Saavedra, J.M.; Israel, A.; Correa, F.M.A.; Kurihara, M.

    1986-09-01

    Binding sites for rat atrial natriuretic eptide (6-33) (ANP) were quantitated in the subfornical organ of chronically dehydrated homozygous Brattleboro rats unable to synthesize vasopressin; heterozygous Brattleboro rats, their controls, Long Evans rats and Long Evans rats after 4 days of water deprivation. Brain sections were incubated in the presence of /sup 125/I-ANP and the results analyzed by autoradiography coupled to computerized microdensitometry and comparison to /sup 125/I-standards. Brattleboro rats and water deprived Long Evans rats presented a higher number of ANP binding sites than their normally hydrated controls. The results suggest a role of ANP binding sites in the subfornical organ in the central regulation of fluid balance and vasopressin secretion.

  3. Association between Obstructive Sleep Apnea and Elevated Levels of Type B Natriuretic Peptide in a Community-Based Sample of Women

    PubMed Central

    Ljunggren, Mirjam; Lindahl, Bertil; Theorell-Haglöw, Jenny; Lindberg, Eva

    2012-01-01

    Study Objectives: Obstructive sleep apnea (OSA) is associated with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease. One contributory factor may be hemodynamic stress due to the negative intrathoracic pressure during each episode of apnea. Type B natriuretic peptide (BNP) is secreted by the cardiac ventricles in response to volume expansion and pressure load and the authors hypothesized that there would be an association between indices of OSA during the night and levels of BNP in the morning. Setting: Community-based in Uppsala, Sweden. Participants: There were 349 women who participated. Measurements and Results: Participants underwent full-night polysomnography and anthropometric measurements, and answered questionnaires about medical conditions and current medication. The morning after the polysomnography, blood samples were drawn for analysis of plasma BNP, C-reactive protein, creatinine, and hemoglobin. There was an increase in mean BNP as the severity of sleep apnea increased, increasing from a mean value of 8.5 ng/L among women with an apnea-hypopnea index (AHI) < 5 to 18.0 ng/L in women with an AHI ≥ 30. Elevated BNP levels (≥ 20 ng/L) were found in 29.8% of the women, whereas 70.2% had normal levels. The odds ratio was 2.2 for elevated BNP levels for women with an AHI of 5–14.9 in relation to women with an AHI < 5, 3.1 for women with an AHI of 15–29.9, and 4.6 for women with an AHI ≥ 30 after adjustment for age, body mass index, systolic blood pressure, antihypertensive drugs, and creatinine. Conclusions: There is a dose-response relationship in women between the severity of sleep apnea during the night and the levels of BNP in the morning. Citation: Ljunggren M; Lindahl B; Theorell-Haglöw J; Lindberg E. Association between obstructive sleep apnea and elevated levels of type B natriuretic peptide in a community-based sample of women. SLEEP 2012;35(11):1521-1527. PMID:23115401

  4. N-Terminal Pro-Brain Natriuretic Peptide Is Associated with a Future Diagnosis of Cancer in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Tarín, Nieves; Cristóbal, Carmen; Lorenzo, Óscar; Blanco-Colio, Luis; Martín-Ventura, José Luis; Huelmos, Ana; Alonso, Joaquín; Aceña, Álvaro; Pello, Ana; Carda, Rocío; Asensio, Dolores; Mahíllo-Fernández, Ignacio; López Bescós, Lorenzo; Egido, Jesús; Farré, Jerónimo

    2015-01-01

    Objective Several papers have reported elevated plasma levels of natriuretic peptides in patients with a previous diagnosis of cancer. We have explored whether N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) plasma levels predict a future diagnosis of cancer in patients with coronary artery disease (CAD). Methods We studied 699 patients with CAD free of cancer. At baseline, NT-proBNP, galectin-3, monocyte chemoattractant protein-1, soluble tumor necrosis factor-like weak inducer of apoptosis, high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, and high-sensitivity cardiac troponin I plasma levels were assessed. The primary outcome was new cancer diagnosis. The secondary outcome was cancer diagnosis, heart failure requiring hospitalization, or death. Results After 2.15±0.98 years of follow-up, 24 patients developed cancer. They were older (68.5 [61.5, 75.8] vs 60.0 [52.0, 72.0] years; p=0.011), had higher NT-proBNP (302.0 [134.8, 919.8] vs 165.5 [87.4, 407.5] pg/ml; p=0.040) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (3.27 [1.33, 5.94] vs 1.92 [0.83, 4.00] mg/L; p=0.030), and lower triglyceride (92.5 [70.5, 132.8] vs 112.0 [82.0, 157.0] mg/dl; p=0.044) plasma levels than those without cancer. NT-proBNP (Hazard Ratio [HR]=1.030; 95% Confidence Interval [CI]=1.008-1.053; p=0.007) and triglyceride levels (HR=0.987; 95%CI=0.975-0.998; p=0.024) were independent predictors of a new cancer diagnosis (multivariate Cox regression analysis). When patients in whom the suspicion of cancer appeared in the first one-hundred days after blood extraction were excluded, NT-proBNP was the only predictor of cancer (HR=1.061; 95%CI=1.034-1.088; p<0.001). NT-proBNP was an independent predictor of cancer, heart failure, or death (HR=1.038; 95%CI=1.023-1.052; p<0.001) along with age, and use of insulin and acenocumarol. Conclusions NT-proBNP is an independent predictor of malignancies in patients with CAD. New studies in large populations are needed to confirm these findings. PMID:26046344

  5. Predictive Values of N-Terminal Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide and Cardiac Troponin I for Myocardial Fibrosis in Hypertrophic Obstructive Cardiomyopathy

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Changlin; Liu, Rong; Yuan, Jiansong; Cui, Jingang; Hu, Fenghuan; Yang, Weixian; Zhang, Yan; Chen, Youzhou; Qiao, Shubin

    2016-01-01

    Background Both high-sensitivity cardiac troponin T and B-type natriuretic peptide are useful in detecting myocardial fibrosis, as determined by late gadolinium enhancement (LGE) cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR), in patients with non-obstructive hypertrophic cardiomyopathy. However, their values to predict myocardial fibrosis in hypertrophic obstructive cardiomyopathy (HOCM) remain unclear. We investigated the role of N-Terminal Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide (NT-proBNP) and cardiac troponin I (cTnI) to identify LGE-CMR in patients with HOCM. Methods Peripheral concentrations of NT-proBNP and cTnI were determined in patients with HOCM (n = 163; age = 47.2 ± 10.8 years; 38.7% females). Contrast-enhanced CMR was performed to identify and quantify myocardial fibrosis. Results LGE was detected in 120 of 163 patients (73.6%). Patients with LGE had significantly higher levels of NT-proBNP and cTnI than those without LGE (1386.2 [904.6–2340.8] vs. 866.6 [707.2–1875.2] pmol/L, P = 0.003; 0.024 [0.010–0.049] vs. 0.010 [0.005–0.021] ng/ml, P <0.001, respectively). The extent of LGE was positively correlated with log cTnI (r = 0.371, P <0.001) and log NT-proBNP (r = 0.211, P = 0.007). On multivariable analysis, both log cTnI and maximum wall thickness (MWT) were independent predictors of the presence of LGE (OR = 3.193, P = 0.033; OR = 1.410, P < 0.001, respectively), whereas log NT-proBNP was not. According to the ROC curve analysis, combined measurements of MWT ≥21 mm and/or cTnI ≥0.025ng/ml indicated good diagnostic performance for the presence of LGE, with specificity of 95% or sensitivity of 88%. Conclusions Serum cTnI is an independent predictor useful for identifying myocardial fibrosis, while plasma NT-proBNP is only associated with myocardial fibrosis on univariate analysis. Combined measurements of serum cTnI with MWT further improve its value in detecting myocardial fibrosis in patients with HOCM. PMID:26765106

  6. Inhibitory effects of C-type natriuretic peptide on the differentiation of cardiac fibroblasts, and secretion of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1.

    PubMed

    Li, Zhi-Qiang; Liu, Ying-Long; Li, Gang; Li, Bin; Liu, Yang; Li, Xiao-Feng; Liu, Ai-Jun

    2015-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the effect of C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) on the function of cardiac fibroblasts (CFs). Western blotting was used to investigate the expression of myofibroblast marker proteins: α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA), extra domain-A fibronectin, collagen I and collagen III, and the activity of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2). Immunofluorescence was used to examine the morphological changes; a transwell assay was used to analyze migration, and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction and ELISA were employed to determine the mRNA expression and protein secretion of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1). The results demonstrated that CNP significantly reduced the protein expression of α-SMA, fibronectin, collagen I and collagen III, and suppressed the migratory ability of CFs. Additionally, the mRNA and protein expression of MCP-1 and PAI-1 was inhibited under the CNP treatment; and this effect was mediated by the inhibition of the ERK1/2 activity. In conclusion, CNP inhibited cardiac fibroblast differentiation and migration, and reduced the secretion of MCP-1 and PAI-1, which demonstrates novel mechanisms to explain the antifibrotic effect of CNP.

  7. Addition of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide levels to electrocardiography criteria for detection of left ventricular hypertrophy: the ARIRANG study.

    PubMed

    Ahn, Min-Soo; Yoo, Byung-Su; Lee, Ji Hyun; Lee, Jun-Won; Youn, Young Jin; Ahn, Sung Gyun; Kim, Jang-Young; Lee, Seung-Hwan; Yoon, Junghan; Park, Jong-Ku; Ahn, Song Vogue; Choi, Eunhee

    2015-04-01

    The utility of electrocardiography (ECG) in screening for left ventricular hypertrophy (LVH) in general populations is limited mainly because its low sensitivity. B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) is released due to the remodeling processes of LVH and could improve the diagnostic accuracy for the ECG criteria for LVH. We hypothesized that addition of BNP levels to ECG criteria could aid LVH detection compared with ECG alone in a general population. We enrolled consecutive 343 subjects from a community-based cohort. LVH was defined as LV mass index > 95 g/m(2) for females and > 115 g/m(2) for males according to echocardiography. The area under the receiver operator characteristic (ROC) curve to detect LVH was 0.55 (95% confidence interval [CI], 0.50-0.61) in Sokolow-Lyon criteria and 0.53 (0.47-0.59) in the Cornell voltage criteria. After addition of N-terminal-proBNP levels to the model, the corresponding areas under the ROC were 0.63 (0.58-0.69) and 0.64 (0.59-0.69), respectively. P values for the comparison in areas under the ROC for models with and without N-terminal-proBNP levels were < 0.001. These data suggest that addition of N-terminal-proBNP levels to ECG criteria could significantly improve the diagnostic accuracy of LVH in general populations.

  8. B-type natriuretic peptide: powerful predictor of end-stage chronic heart failure in individuals with systolic dysfunction of the systemic right ventricle

    PubMed Central

    Hegarova, Marketa; Brotanek, Jaroslav; Kubanek, Milos; Kockova, Radka; Franekova, Janka; Lanska, Vera; Netuka, Ivan; Melenovsky, Vojtech; Malek, Ivan; Kautzner, Josef

    2016-01-01

    Aim To assess whether B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) can serve as a predictor of end-stage chronic heart failure (CHF) in patients with severe systolic dysfunction of the systemic right ventricle (SRV). Methods We performed a retrospective analysis in 28 patients with severe systolic dysfunction of the SRV (ejection fraction 23 ± 6%) who were evaluated as heart transplant (HTx) candidates between May 2007 and October 2014. The primary endpoints of the study (end-stage CHF) were progressive CHF, urgent HTx, and ventricular assist device (VAD) implantation. Plasma BNP levels were measured using a chemiluminescent immunoassay. Results During median follow-up of 29 months (interquartile range, 9-50), 3 patients died of progressive CHF, 5 patients required an urgent HTx, and 6 patients underwent VAD implantation. BNP was a strong predictor of end-stage CHF (hazard ratio per 100 ng/L: 1.079, 95% confidence interval, 1.042-1.117, P˂0.001). The following variables with corresponding areas under the curve (AUC) were identified as the most significant predictors of end-stage CHF: BNP (AUC 1.00), New York Heart Association functional class class III or IV (AUC 0.98), decompensated CHF in the last year (AUC 0.96), and systolic dysfunction of the subpulmonal ventricle (AUC 0.96). Conclusion BNP is a powerful predictor of end-stage CHF in individuals with systolic dysfunction of the SRV. PMID:27586549

  9. Activation of IKK/NF-κB provokes renal inflammatory responses in guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A gene-knockout mice

    PubMed Central

    Das, Subhankar; Periyasamy, Ramu

    2012-01-01

    The present study was aimed at determining the consequences of the disruption of guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA) gene (Npr1) on proinflammatory responses of nuclear factor kappa B, inhibitory kappa B kinase, and inhibitory kappa B alpha (NF-κB, IKK, IκBα) in the kidneys of mutant mice. The results showed that the disruption of Npr1 enhanced the renal NF-κB binding activity by 3.8-fold in 0-copy (−/−) mice compared with 2-copy (+/+) mice. In parallel, IKK activity and IκBα protein phosphorylation were increased by 8- and 11-fold, respectively, in the kidneys of 0-copy mice compared with wild-type mice. Interestingly, IκBα was reduced by 80% and the expression of proinflammatory cytokines and renal fibrosis were significantly enhanced in 0-copy mice than 2-copy mice. Treatment of 0-copy mice with NF-κB inhibitors andrographolide, pyrrolidine dithiocarbamate, and etanercept showed a substantial reduction in renal fibrosis, attenuation of proinflammatory cytokines gene expression, and significantly reduced IKK activity and IkBα phosphorylation. These findings indicate that the systemic disruption of Npr1 activates the renal NF-κB pathways in 0-copy mice, which transactivates the expression of various proinflammatory cytokines to initiate renal remodeling; however, inhibition of NF-κB pathway repairs the abnormal renal pathology in mutant mice. PMID:22318993

  10. Relation of brain natriuretic peptide level to extent of left ventricular scarring in patients with chronic heart failure secondary to ischemic cardiomyopathy.

    PubMed

    Aktas, Mehmet Kemal; Allen, Drew; Jaber, Wael A; Chuang, Hsuan-Hung; Taylor, David O; Yamani, Mohamad H

    2009-01-15

    Multiple factors influence brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) release in patients with heart failure. We hypothesized that extensive myocardial scarring could result in an attenuated BNP response. A total of 115 patients with New York Heart Association class III chronic heart failure and ischemic cardiomyopathy were evaluated for ischemia, hibernation, and myocardial scarring by dipyridamole-rubidium-positron emission tomographic scanning with fluorine-18, 2-fluoro-2-deoxyyglucose. Plasma BNP levels were determined within 2 weeks of the study. Left ventricular dimension and function were evaluated by echocardiography. Patients were categorized as having <33% myocardial scar (n=67) or>or=33% myocardial scar (n=48). BNP measurements were correlated with amount of myocardial scarring. Compared with patients with less scar, those with >or=33% scar had lower BNP levels (mean 317+/-364 vs 635+/-852 pg/ml, median 212 vs 357, p=0.016). Using multiple regression analysis, presence of scarring was associated with decreased BNP response (p=0.022). Further, patients with <33% scar in whom a higher BNP level was noted had more ischemia (51% vs 27%, p=0.01) and greater myocardial hibernation (22+/-14% vs 12+/-7%, p=0.02) compared with patients with >or=33% scar. In conclusion, in patients with chronic heart failure, a decreased BNP response indicated extensive myocardial scarring. PMID:19121444

  11. Early trends in N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide values after left ventricular assist device implantation for chronic heart failure.

    PubMed

    Hasin, Tal; Kushwaha, Sudhir S; Lesnick, Timothy G; Kremers, Walter; Boilson, Barry A; Schirger, John A; Clavell, Alfredo L; Rodeheffer, Richard J; Frantz, Robert P; Edwards, Brooks S; Pereira, Naveen L; Stulak, John M; Joyce, Lyle; Daly, Richard; Park, Soon J; Jaffe, Allan S

    2014-10-15

    Left ventricular assist devices (LVADs) acutely decrease left ventricular wall stress. Thus, early postoperative levels of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) should decrease. This study investigated postoperative changes in NT-proBNP levels, the parameters related to changes, and the possible association with complications by performing a retrospective analysis of changes in daily NT-proBNP (pg/ml) levels from admission to discharge both before and after LVAD implantation in a tertiary referral center. For 72 patients implanted with HeartMate II LVADs, baseline NT-proBNP levels were elevated at 3,943 ng/ml (interquartile range 1,956 to 12,964). Preoperative stabilization led to marked decreases in NT-proBNP. Levels peaked 3 days after surgery and subsequently decreased. Patients with complicated postoperative courses had higher early postoperative elevations. By discharge, NT-proBNP decreased markedly but was still 2.83 (1.60 to 5.76) times the age-based upper limit of normal. The 26% reduction in NT-proBNP between admission and discharge was due mostly to the preoperative reductions and not those induced by the LVAD itself. The decrease was not associated with decreases in LV volume. In conclusion, preoperative treatment reduces NT-proBNP values. The magnitude of early postoperative changes is related to the clinical course. Levels at discharge remain markedly elevated and similar to values after preoperative stabilization despite presumptive acute LV unloading.

  12. Identification of multifunctional peptides from human milk.

    PubMed

    Mandal, Santi M; Bharti, Rashmi; Porto, William F; Gauri, Samiran S; Mandal, Mahitosh; Franco, Octavio L; Ghosh, Ananta K

    2014-06-01

    Pharmaceutical industries have renewed interest in screening multifunctional bioactive peptides as a marketable product in health care applications. In this context, several animal and plant peptides with potential bioactivity have been reported. Milk proteins and peptides have received much attention as a source of health-enhancing components to be incorporated into nutraceuticals and functional foods. By using this source, 24 peptides have been fractionated and purified from human milk using RP-HPLC. Multifunctional roles including antimicrobial, antioxidant and growth stimulating activity have been evaluated in all 24 fractions. Nevertheless, only four fractions show multiple combined activities among them. Using a proteomic approach, two of these four peptides have been identified as lactoferrin derived peptide and kappa casein short chain peptide. Lactoferrin derived peptide (f8) is arginine-rich and kappa casein derived (f12) peptide is proline-rich. Both peptides (f8 and f12) showed antimicrobial activities against both Gram-positive and Gram-negative bacteria. Fraction 8 (f8) exhibits growth stimulating activity in 3T3 cell line and f12 shows higher free radical scavenging activity in comparison to other fractions. Finally, both peptides were in silico evaluated and some insights into their mechanism of action were provided. Thus, results indicate that these identified peptides have multiple biological activities which are valuable for the quick development of the neonate and may be considered as potential biotechnological products for nutraceutical industry.

  13. Alpha-human atrial natriuretic polypeptide (. cap alpha. -hANP) specific binding sites in bovine adrenal gland

    SciTech Connect

    Higuchi, K.; Nawata, H.; Kato, K.I.; Ibayashi, H.; Matsuo, H.

    1986-06-13

    The effects of synthetic ..cap alpha..-human atrial natriuretic polypeptide (..cap alpha..-hANP) on steroidogenesis in bovine adrenocortical cells in primary monolayer culture were investigated. ..cap alpha..-hANP did not inhibit basal aldosterone secretion. ..cap alpha..-hANP induced a significant dose-dependent inhibition of basal levels of cortisol and dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) secretion and also of aCTH (10/sup -8/M)-stimulated increases in aldosterone, cortisol and DHEA secretion. Visualization of (/sup 125/I) ..cap alpha..-hANP binding sites in bovine adrenal gland by an in vitro autoradiographic technique demonstrated that these sites were highly localized in the adrenal cortex, especially the zona glomerulosa. These results suggest that the adrenal cortex may be a target organ for direct receptor-mediated actions of ..cap alpha..-hANP.

  14. The effects of atrial natriuretic peptide and glucagon on proximal glomerulo-tubular balance in anaesthetized rats.

    PubMed

    Harris, P J; Skinner, S L; Zhuo, J

    1988-08-01

    1. The renal actions of ANP (average dose 30 ng kg-1 min-1 and glucagon (50 ng kg-1 min-1) were compared using fractional lithium reabsorption as the index of proximal reabsorption in groups of seven rats. Doses were chosen to cause similar increases in glomerular filtration rate (GFR). Time controls were included. 2. Glucagon raised GFR 32% and absolute proximal reabsorption (APR) 26% producing 81% effective proximal glomerulo-tubular balance (GTB) which was not significantly different from the 100% expected for perfect GTB. ANP raised GFR 33% and APR 10% indicating only 30% effective GTB (P less than 0.01). This was a significantly different effect from glucagon (P less than 0.005). 3. Sodium output increased 10-fold with ANP and 3-fold with glucagon. Filtration fraction increased 33% (P less than 0.04) above the pre-treatment value with ANP but was unchanged with glucagon. Plasma renin concentration was suppressed similarly by each hormone (46 and 36%, P less than 0.05, compared with pre-treatment values). 4. Despite a change in peritubular physical factors favouring reabsorption, there was almost complete attenuation of the increase expected in APR with the ANP-induced increase in GFR. In contrast, a similar change in GFR with glucagon resulted in an almost parallel increase in APR demonstrating maintenance of proximal GTB. 5. It is concluded that in the anaesthetized rat, ANP but not glucagon profoundly inhibits the increase in proximal reabsorption that normally follows an increase in filtered load. Such an action would contribute to the more potent natriuretic activity of ANP compared with glucagon.

  15. Peptide Seems to Boost Human Memory.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chemical and Engineering News, 1981

    1981-01-01

    This article discusses recent studies which have shown that the peptide hormone vasopressin apparently can stimulate memory and learning in healthy human volunteers and in certain mentally disturbed patients. (ECO)

  16. Relationship between N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide and renal function: the effects on predicting early outcome after off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery

    PubMed Central

    Jo, Youn Yi; Kwak, Young Lan; Lee, Jonghoon

    2011-01-01

    Background Plasma levels of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) provide useful prognostic predictors in patients after cardiac surgery. However, predictive accuracy of NT-proBNP levels has varied significantly according to renal dysfunction. The purpose of this study was to assess whether preoperative NT-proBNP levels could be used as predictors of early postoperative outcomes on the basis of renal function in patients undergoing off-pump coronary artery bypass surgery (OPCAB). Methods In 219 patients undergoing elective OPCAB, NT-proBNP and an estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) were assessed preoperatively. All patients were divided into 3 groups according to tertiles of eGFR: the first (eGFR ≥ 90 ml/min/1.73 m2), the second (90 ml/min/1.73 m2 > eGFR ≥ 72 ml/min/1.73 m2) and the third tertile group (eGFR < 72 ml/min/1.73 m2). End point was the composite of early postoperative complications defined as myocardial infarction, new onset atrial fibrillation, ventricular dysfunction, prolonged mechanical ventilator care (> 48 hr), prolonged ICU stay (≥ 3 days), and in hospital mortality. Results There was no difference in early postoperative complications among groups. A preoperative NT-proBNP level of 228 pg/ml and 302 pg/ml (sensitivity 70%, specificity 67%, P < 0.001 and sensitivity 73%, specificity 63%, P = 0.001, respectively) were optimal cut-off values predicting complicated early postoperative course in second and third tertile group, respectively. Conclusions Preoperative NT-proBNP levels seem to be predictive of early postoperative complications in patients with eGFR < 90 ml/min/1.73 m2 undergoing OPCAB. PMID:21860749

  17. [Prognostic value of changes in concentration of brain natriuretic peptide, TNF-alpha factor and Interleukin-6 in chronic cardiac failure].

    PubMed

    Volkova, S Iu

    2008-01-01

    During 6 months therapy initial and final N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide. TNF-alpha, and IL-6 level in blood plasma were determined in 61 ischemic CHI cases with left ventricular ejection fraction below 40%. The patients were followed up for next 24.7 +/- 11.5 months. In period of 6 months following up associated with performed therapy 67.9% of patients showed a positive clinical effect, combined with a decrease of plasma pools of neurohumoral mediators (NM) in 51.4%-71.4% of cases (in dependence on studied NM). There were selected the 4 variants of combinations of clinical efficacy and NM dynamics which failed to coincide in a half of observations for NT-pro BNP and IL-6, and in a third for TNF-alpha. Multivariate analysis of conformities showed, that a decrease of all NM during therapy significantly relates with patient surviving. In a group with a decrease of plasma NT-pro BNP level associated with therapy during consequent following up no lethal outcome was recorded, compared to 16% in a group with a rise in NT-pro BNP (a = 0.2). Lethal outcome was fixed in 4.2% in a group with a decrease in TNF-alpha, compared to 33.3% in a group with elevation in TNF-alpha (a = 0.016); and in 5% in a group with a fall in IL-6, compared to 23.1% in a group with an elevation of IL-6 (a = 0.04).

  18. Increased Epicardial Fat Thickness Correlates with Aortic Stiffness and N-Terminal Pro-Brain Natriuretic Peptide Levels in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients.

    PubMed

    Altun, Ibrahim; Unal, Yasemin; Basaran, Ozcan; Akin, Fatih; Emir, Gulser Karadaban; Kutlu, Gulnihal; Biteker, Murat

    2016-06-01

    Epicardial fat, a metabolically active tissue, has emerged as a risk factor and active player in metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. We investigated epicardial fat thickness in patients who had sustained an acute ischemic stroke, and we evaluated the relationship of epicardial fat thickness with other prognostic factors. We enrolled 61 consecutive patients (age, ≥18 yr) who had sustained a first acute ischemic stroke and had been admitted to our hospital within 24 hours of the onset of stroke symptoms. The control group comprised 82 consecutive sex- and age-matched patients free of past or current stroke who had been admitted to our cardiology clinics. Blood samples were taken for measurement of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) levels at admission. Aortic stiffness indices and epicardial fat thickness were measured by means of transthoracic echocardiography within the first 48 hours. In comparison with the control group, the patients with acute ischemic stroke had significantly higher epicardial fat thickness (4.8 ± 0.9 vs 3.8 ± 0.7 mm; P <0.001), lower aortic distensibility (2.5 ± 0.8 vs 3.4 ± 0.9 cm(2) ·dyn(-1); P <0.001) and lower aortic strain (5.5% ± 1.9% vs 6.4% ± 1.8%; P=0.003). We found a significant association between epicardial fat thickness, NT-proBNP levels, and arterial dysfunction in patients who had sustained acute ischemic stroke. Increased epicardial fat thickness might be a novel risk factor and might enable evaluation of subclinical target-organ damage in these patients.

  19. Increased Epicardial Fat Thickness Correlates with Aortic Stiffness and N-Terminal Pro-Brain Natriuretic Peptide Levels in Acute Ischemic Stroke Patients

    PubMed Central

    Unal, Yasemin; Basaran, Ozcan; Akin, Fatih; Emir, Gulser Karadaban; Kutlu, Gulnihal; Biteker, Murat

    2016-01-01

    Epicardial fat, a metabolically active tissue, has emerged as a risk factor and active player in metabolic and cardiovascular diseases. We investigated epicardial fat thickness in patients who had sustained an acute ischemic stroke, and we evaluated the relationship of epicardial fat thickness with other prognostic factors. We enrolled 61 consecutive patients (age, ≥18 yr) who had sustained a first acute ischemic stroke and had been admitted to our hospital within 24 hours of the onset of stroke symptoms. The control group comprised 82 consecutive sex- and age-matched patients free of past or current stroke who had been admitted to our cardiology clinics. Blood samples were taken for measurement of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) levels at admission. Aortic stiffness indices and epicardial fat thickness were measured by means of transthoracic echocardiography within the first 48 hours. In comparison with the control group, the patients with acute ischemic stroke had significantly higher epicardial fat thickness (4.8 ± 0.9 vs 3.8 ± 0.7 mm; P <0.001), lower aortic distensibility (2.5 ± 0.8 vs 3.4 ± 0.9 cm2·dyn−1; P <0.001) and lower aortic strain (5.5% ± 1.9% vs 6.4% ± 1.8%; P=0.003). We found a significant association between epicardial fat thickness, NT-proBNP levels, and arterial dysfunction in patients who had sustained acute ischemic stroke. Increased epicardial fat thickness might be a novel risk factor and might enable evaluation of subclinical target-organ damage in these patients. PMID:27303237

  20. Sensitive cardiac troponins and N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide in stable coronary artery disease: correlation with left ventricular function as assessed by myocardial strain.

    PubMed

    Smedsrud, Marit Kristine; Gravning, Jørgen; Omland, Torbjørn; Eek, Christian; Mørkrid, Lars; Skulstad, Helge; Aaberge, Lars; Bendz, Bjørn; Kjekshus, John; Edvardsen, Thor

    2015-06-01

    N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and cardiac troponins (cTns) measured with sensitive assays provide strong prognostic information in patients with stable coronary artery disease. However, the relationship between these biomarkers and myocardial contractile function, as well as infarct size, in this patient group, remains to be defined. The study population consisted of 160 patients referred to a follow-up echocardiography scheduled 1 year after coronary revascularization. Concentrations of NT-proBNP, high-sensitive cTnT (hs-cTnT) and sensitive cTnI assays were assessed. Left ventricular function was measured as global peak systolic longitudinal strain by speckle tracking echocardiography and infarct size was assessed by late-enhancement MRI. NT-proBNP and sensitive cTnI levels were significantly associated with left ventricular function by peak systolic strain (R-values 0.243 and 0.228, p = 0.002 and 0.004) as well as infarct size (R-values 0.343 and 0.366, p = 0.014 and p = 0.008). In contrast, hs-cTnT did not correlate with left ventricular function (R = 0.095, p = 0.231) and only marginally with infarct size (R = 0.237, p = 0.094). NT-proBNP and sensitive cTnI levels correlate with left ventricular function and infarct size in patients with stable coronary artery disease after revascularization. As opposed to hs-cTnT, NT-proBNP and cTnI seem to be indicators of incipient myocardial dysfunction and the extent of myocardial necrosis.

  1. Effects of immobilizations stress with or without water immersion on the expression of atrial natriuretic peptide in the hearts of two rat strains.

    PubMed

    Slavikova, Jana; Mistrova, Eliska; Klenerova, Vera; Kruzliak, Peter; Caprnda, Martin; Hynie, Sixtus; Sida, Pavel; Dvorakova, Magdalena Chottova

    2016-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is produced and released by mammalian cardiomyocytes and induces natriuresis, diuresis, and lowering of blood pressure. The present study examined localization of ANP and a possible role of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) activity on the expression of proANP gene in the heart. The Sprague Dawley (SD) and Lewis (LE) rat strains were used. The animals were exposed to the two types of stress: immobilization and immobilization combined with water immersion for 1 hour. Localization of ANP was detected by immunohistochemistry and expression of the proANP mRNA by real-time qPCR in all heart compartments of control and stressed animals after 1 and 3 hours after stress termination (IS1, IS3, ICS1, and ICS3). Relatively high density of ANP-immunoreactivity was observed in both atria of both rat strains. In control rats of both strains, the expression of the proANP mRNA was higher in the atria than in ventricles. In SD rats with the intact HPA axis, an upregulation of ANP gene expression was observed in the right atrium after IS1, in both atria and the left ventricle after IS3 and in the left atrium and the left ventricle after ICS3. In LE rats with a blunted reactivity of the HPA axis, no increase or even a downregulation of the gene expression was observed. Thus, acute stress-induced increase in the expression of the proANP gene is related to the activity of the HPA axis. It may have relevance to ANP-induced protection of the heart.

  2. Effects of immobilizations stress with or without water immersion on the expression of atrial natriuretic peptide in the hearts of two rat strains

    PubMed Central

    Slavikova, Jana; Mistrova, Eliska; Klenerova, Vera; Kruzliak, Peter; Caprnda, Martin; Hynie, Sixtus; Sida, Pavel; Dvorakova, Magdalena Chottova

    2016-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is produced and released by mammalian cardiomyocytes and induces natriuresis, diuresis, and lowering of blood pressure. The present study examined localization of ANP and a possible role of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) activity on the expression of proANP gene in the heart. The Sprague Dawley (SD) and Lewis (LE) rat strains were used. The animals were exposed to the two types of stress: immobilization and immobilization combined with water immersion for 1 hour. Localization of ANP was detected by immunohistochemistry and expression of the proANP mRNA by real-time qPCR in all heart compartments of control and stressed animals after 1 and 3 hours after stress termination (IS1, IS3, ICS1, and ICS3). Relatively high density of ANP-immunoreactivity was observed in both atria of both rat strains. In control rats of both strains, the expression of the proANP mRNA was higher in the atria than in ventricles. In SD rats with the intact HPA axis, an upregulation of ANP gene expression was observed in the right atrium after IS1, in both atria and the left ventricle after IS3 and in the left atrium and the left ventricle after ICS3. In LE rats with a blunted reactivity of the HPA axis, no increase or even a downregulation of the gene expression was observed. Thus, acute stress-induced increase in the expression of the proANP gene is related to the activity of the HPA axis. It may have relevance to ANP-induced protection of the heart. PMID:27508036

  3. Recombinant Atrial Natriuretic Peptide Prevents Aberrant Ca2+ Leakage through the Ryanodine Receptor by Suppressing Mitochondrial Reactive Oxygen Species Production Induced by Isoproterenol in Failing Cardiomyocytes

    PubMed Central

    Susa, Takehisa; Nanno, Takuma; Ishiguchi, Hironori; Myoren, Takeki; Nishimura, Shigehiko; Kato, Takayoshi; Hino, Akihiro; Oda, Tetsuro; Okuda, Shinichi; Yamamoto, Takeshi; Yano, Masafumi

    2016-01-01

    Catecholamines induce intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS), thus enhancing diastolic Ca2+ leakage through the ryanodine receptor during heart failure (HF). However, little is known regarding the effect of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) on ROS generation and Ca2+ handling in failing cardiomyocytes. The aim of the present study was to clarify the mechanism by which an exogenous ANP exerts cardioprotective effects during HF. Cardiomyocytes were isolated from the left ventricles of a canine tachycardia-induced HF model and sham-operated vehicle controls. The degree of mitochondrial oxidized DNA was evaluated by double immunohistochemical (IHC) staining using an anti-VDAC antibody for the mitochondria and an anti-8-hydroxy-2′-deoxyguanosine antibody for oxidized DNA. The effect of ANP on ROS was investigated using 2,7-dichlorofluorescin diacetate, diastolic Ca2+ sparks assessed by confocal microscopy using Fluo 4-AM, and the survival rate of myocytes after 48 h. The double IHC study revealed that isoproterenol (ISO) markedly increased oxidized DNA in the mitochondria in HF and that the ISO-induced DNA damage was markedly inhibited by the co-presence of ANP. ROS production and Ca2+ spark frequency (CaSF) were increased in HF compared to normal controls, and were further increased in the presence of ISO. Notably, ANP significantly suppressed both ISO-induced ROS and CaSF without changing sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca2+ content in HF (p<0.01, respectively). The survival rate after 48 h in HF was significantly decreased in the presence of ISO compared with baseline (p<0.01), whereas it was significantly improved by the co-presence of ANP (p<0.01). Together, our results suggest that ANP strongly suppresses ISO-induced mitochondrial ROS generation, which might correct aberrant diastolic Ca2+ sparks, eventually contributing to the improvement of cardiomyocyte survival in HF. PMID:27657534

  4. Sensitive immunosensor for N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide based on N-(aminobutyl)-N-(ethylisoluminol)-functionalized gold nanodots/multiwalled carbon nanotube electrochemiluminescence nanointerface.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Hongli; Han, Zhili; Wang, Xu; Li, Fang; Cui, Hua; Yang, Di; Bian, Zhiping

    2015-04-15

    A novel electrochemiluminescence (ECL) immunosensor was developed for the determination of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) by using N-(aminobutyl)-N-(ethylisoluminol) (ABEI)-functionalized gold nanodots/chitosan/multiwalled carbon nanotubes (ABEI/GNDs/chitosan/COOH-MWCNTs) hybrid as nanointerface. First, ABEI/GNDs/chitosan/COOH-MWCNTs hybrid nanomaterials were grafted onto the surface of ITO electrode via the film-forming property of hybrid nanomaterials. The anti-NT-proBNP antibody was connected to the surface of modified electrode by virtue of amide reaction via glutaraldehyde. The obtained sensing platform showed strong and stable ECL signal. When NT-proBNP was captured by its antibody immobilized on the sensing platform via immunoreaction, the ECL intensity decreased. Direct ECL signal changes were used for the determination of NT-proBNP. The present ECL immunosensor demonstrated a quite wide linear range of 0.01-100 pg/mL. The achieved low detection limit of 3.86 fg/mL was about 3 orders of magnitude lower than that obtained with electrochemistry method reported previously. Because of the simple and fast analysis, high sensitivity and selectivity, and stable and reliable response, the present immunosensor has been successfully applied to quantify NT-proBNP in practical plasma samples. The success of the sensor in this work also confirms that ABEI/GNDs/chitosan/COOH-MWCNTs hybrid is an ideal nanointerface to fabricate a sensing platform. Furthermore, the proposed strategy could be applied in the detection of other clinically important biomarkers.

  5. N-terminal pro b-type natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) –based score can predict in-hospital mortality in patients with heart failure

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Ya-Ting; Tseng, Yuan-Teng; Chu, Tung-Wei; Chen, John; Lai, Min-Yu; Tang, Woung-Ru; Shiao, Chih-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Serum N-terminal pro b-type natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) testing is recommended in the patients with heart failure (HF). We hypothesized that NT-pro-BNP, in combination with other clinical factors in terms of a novel NT-pro BNP-based score, may provide even better predictive power for in-hospital mortality among patients with HF. A retrospective study enrolled adult patients with hospitalization-requiring HF who fulfilled the predefined criteria during the period from January 2011 to December 2013. We proposed a novel scoring system consisting of several independent predictors including NT-pro-BNP for predicting in-hospital mortality, and then compared the prognosis-predictive power of the novel NT-pro BNP-based score with other prognosis-predictive scores. A total of 269 patients were enrolled in the current study. Factors such as “serum NT-pro-BNP level above 8100 mg/dl,” “age above 79 years,” “without taking angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blocker,” “without taking beta-blocker,” “without taking loop diuretics,” “with mechanical ventilator support,” “with non-invasive ventilator support,” “with vasopressors use,” and “experience of cardio-pulmonary resuscitation” were found as independent predictors. A novel NT-pro BNP-based score composed of these risk factors was proposed with excellent predictability for in-hospital mortality. The proposed novel NT-pro BNP-based score was extremely effective in predicting in-hospital mortality in HF patients. PMID:27411951

  6. Plasma B-type natriuretic peptide levels are poorly related to the occurrence of ischemia or ventricular arrhythmias during symptom-limited exercise in low-risk patients

    PubMed Central

    Porta, Andreu; Candell-Riera, Jaume; Agulló, Luis; Aguadé-Bruix, Santiago; de León, Gustavo; Figueras, Jaume; Garcia-Dorado, David

    2016-01-01

    Introduction The usefulness of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) as a marker of ischemia is controversial. BNP levels have predicted arrhythmias in various settings, but it is unknown whether they are related to exercise-induced ischemic ventricular arrhythmias. Material and methods We analyzed in 63 patients (64 ±14 years, 65% male, 62% with known coronary disease) undergoing exercise stress single-photon emission computed tomography (SPECT) the association between plasma BNP values (before and 15 min after exercise) and the occurrence of ischemia or ventricular arrhythmias during the test. Results Exercise test (8.1 ±2.7 min, 7.4 ±8.1 metabolic equivalents, 82 ±12% of maximal predicted heart rate) induced reversible perfusion defects in 23 (36%) patients. Eight (13%) patients presented significant arrhythmias (≥ 7 ventricular premature complexes/min, couplets, or non-sustained ventricular tachycardia during exercise or in the first minute of recovery). Median baseline BNP levels were 17.5 (12.4–66.4) pg/ml in patients developing scintigraphic ischemia and 45.6 (13.2–107.4) pg/ml in those without ischemia (p = 0.137). The BNP levels increased after exercise (34.4 (15.3–65.4)% increment over baseline, p < 0.001), but the magnitude of this increase was not related to SPECT positivity (35.7 (18.8–65.4)% vs. 27.9 (5.6–64.0)% in patients with and without ischemia, respectively, p = 0.304). No significant association was found between BNP values (at baseline or their change during the test) and ventricular arrhythmias. Conclusions Plasma BNP values – at baseline or after exercise – were not associated with myocardial ischemia or with ventricular arrhythmia during exercise SPECT. These results highlight the limited usefulness of this biomarker to assess acute ischemia. PMID:27186178

  7. Optimizing fluid management in patients with acute decompensated heart failure (ADHF): the emerging role of combined measurement of body hydration status and brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) levels.

    PubMed

    Valle, Roberto; Aspromonte, Nadia; Milani, Loredano; Peacock, Frank W; Maisel, Alan S; Santini, Massimo; Ronco, Claudio

    2011-11-01

    The study tests the hypothesis that in patients admitted with acutely decompensated heart failure (ADHF), achievement of adequate body hydration status with intensive medical therapy, modulated by combined bioelectrical vectorial impedance analysis (BIVA) and B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) measurement, may contribute to optimize the timing of patient's discharge and to improve clinical outcomes. Three hundred patients admitted for ADHF underwent serial BIVA and BNP measurement. Therapy was titrated to reach a BNP value of <250 pg/ml, whenever possible. Patients were categorized as early responders (rapid BNP fall below 250 pg/ml); late responders (slow BNP fall below 250 pg/ml, after aggressive therapy); and non-responders (BNP persistently >250 pg/ml). Worsening of renal function (WRF) was evaluated during hospitalization. Death and rehospitalization were monitored with a 6-month follow-up. BNP value on discharge of ≤250 pg/ml led to a 25% event rate within 6 months (Group A: 17.4%; Group B: 21%, Chi2; n.s.), whereas a value >250 pg/ml (Group C) was associated with a far higher percentage (37%). At discharge, body hydration was 73.8 ± 3.2% in the total population and 73.2 ± 2.1, 73.5 ± 2.8, 74.1 ± 3.6% in the three groups, respectively. WRF was observed in 22.3% of the total. WRF occurred in 22% in Group A, 32% in Group B, and 20% in Group C (P = n.s.). Our study confirms the hypothesis that combined BNP/BIVA sequential measurements help to achieve adequate fluid balance status in patients with ADHF and can be used to drive a "tailored therapy," allowing clinicians to identify high-risk patients and possibly to reduce the incidence of complications secondary to fluid management strategies.

  8. N-terminal pro b-type natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) -based score can predict in-hospital mortality in patients with heart failure.

    PubMed

    Huang, Ya-Ting; Tseng, Yuan-Teng; Chu, Tung-Wei; Chen, John; Lai, Min-Yu; Tang, Woung-Ru; Shiao, Chih-Chung

    2016-01-01

    Serum N-terminal pro b-type natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) testing is recommended in the patients with heart failure (HF). We hypothesized that NT-pro-BNP, in combination with other clinical factors in terms of a novel NT-pro BNP-based score, may provide even better predictive power for in-hospital mortality among patients with HF. A retrospective study enrolled adult patients with hospitalization-requiring HF who fulfilled the predefined criteria during the period from January 2011 to December 2013. We proposed a novel scoring system consisting of several independent predictors including NT-pro-BNP for predicting in-hospital mortality, and then compared the prognosis-predictive power of the novel NT-pro BNP-based score with other prognosis-predictive scores. A total of 269 patients were enrolled in the current study. Factors such as "serum NT-pro-BNP level above 8100 mg/dl," "age above 79 years," "without taking angiotensin converting enzyme inhibitors/angiotensin receptor blocker," "without taking beta-blocker," "without taking loop diuretics," "with mechanical ventilator support," "with non-invasive ventilator support," "with vasopressors use," and "experience of cardio-pulmonary resuscitation" were found as independent predictors. A novel NT-pro BNP-based score composed of these risk factors was proposed with excellent predictability for in-hospital mortality. The proposed novel NT-pro BNP-based score was extremely effective in predicting in-hospital mortality in HF patients. PMID:27411951

  9. Genetically Altered Mutant Mouse Models of Guanylyl Cyclase/Natriuretic Peptide Receptor-A Exhibit the Cardiac Expression of Proinflammatory Mediators in a Gene-Dose-Dependent Manner

    PubMed Central

    Vellaichamy, Elangovan; Das, Subhankar; Subramanian, Umadevi; Maeda, Nobuyo

    2014-01-01

    The objective of this study was to examine whether genetically determined differences in the guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-A gene (Npr1) affect cardiac expression of proinflammatory cytokines, hypertrophic markers, nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), and activating protein-1 (AP-1) in am Npr1 gene-dose–dependent manner. In the present studies, adult male Npr1 gene-disrupted (Npr1−/−), wild-type (Npr1+/+), and gene-duplicated (Npr1++/++) mice were used. The Npr1−/− mice showed 41 mm Hg higher systolic blood pressure and 60% greater heart weight to body weight (HW/BW) ratio; however, Npr1++/++ mice exhibited 15 mm Hg lower systolic blood pressure and 12% reduced HW/BW ratio compared with Npr1+/+ mice. Significant upregulation of gene expression of proinflammatory cytokines and hypertrophic markers along with enhanced NF-κB/AP-1 binding activities were observed in the Npr1−/− mouse hearts. Conversely, hypertrophic markers and proinflammatory cytokines gene expression as well as NF-κB/AP-1 binding activities were markedly decreased in Npr1++/++ mouse hearts compared with wild-type mice. The ventricular guanylyl cyclase activity and cGMP levels were reduced by 96% and 87%, respectively, in Npr1−/− mice; however, these parameters were amplified by 2.8-fold and 3.8-fold, respectively, in Npr1++/++ mice. Echocardiographic analysis revealed significantly increased fractional shortening in Npr1++/++ mice (P < .05) but greatly decreased in Npr1−/− mice (P < .01) hearts compared with Npr1+/+ mice. The present findings suggest that Npr1 represses the expression of cardiac proinflammatory mediators, hypertrophic markers, and NF-κB/AP-1–mediated mechanisms, which seem to be associated in an Npr1 gene-dose–dependent manner. PMID:24424043

  10. Treatment of hypertension with perindopril reduces plasma atrial natriuretic peptide levels, left ventricular mass, and improves echocardiographic parameters of diastolic function

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yalcin, F.; Aksoy, F. G.; Muderrisoglu, H.; Sabah, I.; Garcia, M. J.; Thomas, J. D.

    2000-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Hypertension is a major independent risk factor for cardiac deaths, and diastolic dysfunction is a usual finding during the course of this disease. HYPOTHESIS: This study was designed to investigate the effects of chronic therapy with perindopril on left ventricular (LV) mass, left atrial size, diastolic function, and plasma level of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) in patients with hypertension. METHODS: Twenty four patients who had not been previously taking any antihypertensive medication and without prior history of angina pectoris, myocardial infarction, congestive heart failure, dysrhythmias, valvular heart disease, or systemic illnesses received 4-8 mg/day of perindopril orally. Echocardiographic studies were acquired at baseline and 6 months after the initiation of therapy. RESULTS: Systolic and diastolic blood pressure decreased from 174 +/- 19.7 and 107.5 +/- 7.8 mmHg to 134 +/- 10.6 and 82 +/- 6.7 mmHg, respectively (p < 0.001). Left ventricular mass decreased from 252.4 +/- 8.3 to 205.7 +/- 7.08 g and left atrial volume from 20.4 +/- 5.1 to 17.6 +/- 5.2 ml, respectively (p < 0.001). Transmitral Doppler early and atrial filling velocity ratio (E/A) increased from 0.69 +/- 0.06 to 0.92 +/- 0.05 m/s and plasma ANP level decreased from 71.9 +/- 11.7 to 35.3 +/- 7.8 pg/ml (p < 0.001). Reduction of LV mass correlated positively with a reduction in ANP levels (r = 0.66, p < 0.0005). CONCLUSIONS: Perindopril caused a significant reduction of LV mass, left atrial volume, and plasma ANP levels, as well as improvement in Doppler parameters of LV filling in this group of patients with hypertension.

  11. Effects of immobilizations stress with or without water immersion on the expression of atrial natriuretic peptide in the hearts of two rat strains.

    PubMed

    Slavikova, Jana; Mistrova, Eliska; Klenerova, Vera; Kruzliak, Peter; Caprnda, Martin; Hynie, Sixtus; Sida, Pavel; Dvorakova, Magdalena Chottova

    2016-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) is produced and released by mammalian cardiomyocytes and induces natriuresis, diuresis, and lowering of blood pressure. The present study examined localization of ANP and a possible role of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis (HPA) activity on the expression of proANP gene in the heart. The Sprague Dawley (SD) and Lewis (LE) rat strains were used. The animals were exposed to the two types of stress: immobilization and immobilization combined with water immersion for 1 hour. Localization of ANP was detected by immunohistochemistry and expression of the proANP mRNA by real-time qPCR in all heart compartments of control and stressed animals after 1 and 3 hours after stress termination (IS1, IS3, ICS1, and ICS3). Relatively high density of ANP-immunoreactivity was observed in both atria of both rat strains. In control rats of both strains, the expression of the proANP mRNA was higher in the atria than in ventricles. In SD rats with the intact HPA axis, an upregulation of ANP gene expression was observed in the right atrium after IS1, in both atria and the left ventricle after IS3 and in the left atrium and the left ventricle after ICS3. In LE rats with a blunted reactivity of the HPA axis, no increase or even a downregulation of the gene expression was observed. Thus, acute stress-induced increase in the expression of the proANP gene is related to the activity of the HPA axis. It may have relevance to ANP-induced protection of the heart. PMID:27508036

  12. The inclusion of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide in a sensitive screening strategy for systemic sclerosis-related pulmonary arterial hypertension: a cohort study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a major cause of mortality in systemic sclerosis (SSc). Screening guidelines for PAH recommend multiple investigations, including annual echocardiography, which together have low specificity and may not be cost-effective. We sought to evaluate the predictive accuracy of serum N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) in combination with pulmonary function tests (PFT) (‘proposed’ algorithm) in a screening algorithm for SSc-PAH. Methods We evaluated our proposed algorithm (PFT with NT-proBNP) on 49 consecutive SSc patients with suspected pulmonary hypertension undergoing right heart catherisation (RHC). The predictive accuracy of the proposed algorithm was compared with existing screening recommendations, and is presented as sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV) and negative predictive value (NPV). Results Overall, 27 patients were found to have pulmonary hypertension (PH) at RHC, while 22 had no PH. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of the proposed algorithm for PAH was 94.1%, 54.5%, 61.5% and 92.3%, respectively; current European Society of Cardiology (ESC)/European Respiratory Society (ERS) guidelines achieved a sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV of 94.1%, 31.8%, 51.6% and 87.5%, respectively. In an alternate case scenario analysis, estimating a PAH prevalence of 10%, the proposed algorithm achieved a sensitivity, specificity, PPV and NPV for PAH of 94.1%, 54.5%, 18.7% and 98.8%, respectively. Conclusions The combination of NT-proBNP with PFT is a sensitive, yet simple and non-invasive, screening strategy for SSc-PAH. Patients with a positive screening result can be referred for echocardiography, and further confirmatory testing for PAH. In this way, it may be possible to shift the burden of routine screening away from echocardiography. The findings of this study should be confirmed in larger studies. PMID:24246100

  13. Cost-effectiveness of using N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide to guide the diagnostic assessment and management of dyspneic patients in the emergency department.

    PubMed

    Siebert, Uwe; Januzzi, James L; Beinfeld, Molly T; Cameron, Renee; Gazelle, G Scott

    2006-09-15

    The cost-effectiveness of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) in dyspneic patients in emergency departments (EDs) is unknown. The objective of this study was to assess the cost-effectiveness of NT-pro-BNP testing for the evaluation and initial management of patients with dyspnea in the ED setting. A decision model was developed to evaluate the cost-effectiveness of diagnostic assessment and patient management guided by NT-pro-BNP, compared with standard clinical assessment. The model includes the diagnostic accuracy of the 2 strategies for congestive heart failure and resulting events at 60-day follow-up. Clinical data were obtained from a prospective blinded study of 599 patients presenting to the ED with dyspnea. Costs were based on the Massachusetts General Hospital cost accounting database. The model predicted serious adverse events during follow-up (i.e., urgent care visits, repeat ED presentations, rehospitalizations) and direct medical costs for echocardiograms and hospitalizations. NT-pro-BNP-guided assessment was associated with a 1.6% relative reduction of serious adverse event risk and a 9.4% reduction in costs, translating into savings of $474 per patient, compared with standard clinical assessment. In a sensitivity analysis considering mortality, NT-pro-BNP testing was associated with a 1.0% relative reduction in post-discharge mortality. The optimal use of NT-pro-BNP guidance could reduce the use of echocardiography by up to 58%, prevent 13% of initial hospitalizations, and reduce hospital days by 12%. In conclusion, on the basis of this model, the use of NT-pro-BNP in the diagnostic assessment and subsequent management of patients with dyspnea in the ED setting could lead to improved patient care while providing substantial cost savings to the health care system.

  14. Plasma brain natriuretic peptide level in older outpatients with heart failure is associated with physical frailty, especially with the slowness domain

    PubMed Central

    Nishiguchi, Shu; Nozaki, Yuma; Yamaji, Masayuki; Oya, Kanako; Hikita, Yuki; Aoyama, Tomoki; Mabuchi, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the association between plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) level in patients with heart failure (HF) and physical frailty as well as with each domain of physical frailty. Methods Two hundred and six outpatients of cardiovascular medicine aged 60 years and older who had been hospitalized for HF or had been given a prescription medication for HF were included. Physical frailty was assessed using the following five domains: slowness, weakness, exhaustion, low activity, and shrinking, according to the Cardiovascular Health Study. Patients were divided into nonfrailty and frailty groups according to frailty scores. Plasma BNP level was measured. The 6-min walk test was performed to measure endurance. Results Plasma BNP was significantly different between the two groups (frailty group: 158.0 ± 214.7 pg/mL, nonfrailty group: 65.2 ± 88.0 pg/mL, P < 0.01). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed log-transformed plasma BNP (Log BNP) was significantly associated with physical frailty (OR: 1.68, 95% CI: 1.11–2.56), and Log BNP was significantly associated with the slowness domain (walking speed < 1.0 m/s) of physical frailty (OR: 1.75, 95% CI: 1.15–2.67). Additionally, Log BNP was negatively correlated to the 6-minute walk distance (6MWD) (ρ = −0.37, P < 0.01), while 6MWD was positively correlated to walking speed (ρ = 0.66, P < 0.01). Conclusions Plasma BNP level was related to physical frailty, especially in the slowness domain. Endurance may intervene in the associations between plasma BNP level and walking speed.

  15. Plasma brain natriuretic peptide level in older outpatients with heart failure is associated with physical frailty, especially with the slowness domain

    PubMed Central

    Nishiguchi, Shu; Nozaki, Yuma; Yamaji, Masayuki; Oya, Kanako; Hikita, Yuki; Aoyama, Tomoki; Mabuchi, Hiroshi

    2016-01-01

    Objective To determine the association between plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) level in patients with heart failure (HF) and physical frailty as well as with each domain of physical frailty. Methods Two hundred and six outpatients of cardiovascular medicine aged 60 years and older who had been hospitalized for HF or had been given a prescription medication for HF were included. Physical frailty was assessed using the following five domains: slowness, weakness, exhaustion, low activity, and shrinking, according to the Cardiovascular Health Study. Patients were divided into nonfrailty and frailty groups according to frailty scores. Plasma BNP level was measured. The 6-min walk test was performed to measure endurance. Results Plasma BNP was significantly different between the two groups (frailty group: 158.0 ± 214.7 pg/mL, nonfrailty group: 65.2 ± 88.0 pg/mL, P < 0.01). Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed log-transformed plasma BNP (Log BNP) was significantly associated with physical frailty (OR: 1.68, 95% CI: 1.11–2.56), and Log BNP was significantly associated with the slowness domain (walking speed < 1.0 m/s) of physical frailty (OR: 1.75, 95% CI: 1.15–2.67). Additionally, Log BNP was negatively correlated to the 6-minute walk distance (6MWD) (ρ = −0.37, P < 0.01), while 6MWD was positively correlated to walking speed (ρ = 0.66, P < 0.01). Conclusions Plasma BNP level was related to physical frailty, especially in the slowness domain. Endurance may intervene in the associations between plasma BNP level and walking speed. PMID:27605942

  16. Beta-adrenoceptor blockade potentiates acute exercise-induced release of atrial natriuretic peptide by increasing atrial diameter in normotensive healthy subjects.

    PubMed

    Berlin, I; Lechat, P; Deray, G; Landault, C; Maistre, G; Chermat, V; Brouard, R; Ressayre, C; Puech, A J

    1993-01-01

    The role of atrial distension and/or adrenergic mechanisms in the regulation of atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) secretion, plasma immunoreactive ANP, norepinephrine (NE), epinephrine (E) and left atrial diameter at rest, during and after graded bicycle exercise has been studies in 8 healthy male subjects after single doses of placebo, tertatolol 5 mg (a non-selective beta-adrenoceptor blocker), prazosin 1 mg (an alpha 1-adrenoceptor antagonist) and their combination. Systolic and diastolic left atrial diameters were measured before, during and just after exercise by bidimensional echocardiography. Exercise caused an increase in plasma ANP, which was greater after tertatolol alone, and tertatolol plus prazosin, than after placebo or prazosin alone; the mean area under the plasma ANP concentration curve was increased by 35% after tertatolol alone, by 45% after tertatolol and prazosin compared to placebo, and by 82% and 94%, respectively when compared to prazosin alone. The rise in plasma ANP was more marked during the post-exercise period: 80% after tertatolol alone, 67% after tertatolol and prazosin compared to placebo, and 133% and 115%, respectively, compared to prazosin alone. The rise in plasma ANP was accompanied by an increase in both the systolic and diastolic atrial diameter, which was also significantly greater after tertatolol alone and the combination than placebo, or after prazosin alone. beta-Adrenoceptor blockade alone did not affect the plasma catecholamine concentrations, but the exercise-induced increase in plasma norepinephrine was significantly potentiated by prazosin and by prazosin plus tertatolol, and that of plasma epinephrine by the drug combination.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS)

  17. Combination of Urinary Sodium/Creatinine Ratio and Plasma Brain Natriuretic Peptide Level Predicts Successful Tolvaptan Therapy in Patients With Heart Failure and Volume Overload.

    PubMed

    Sato, Yuichi; Dohi, Kaoru; Watanabe, Kiyotaka; Tanimura, Muneyoshi; Takeuchi, Tetsushiro; Sugiura, Emiyo; Sugimoto, Tadafumi; Kumagai, Naoto; Ogura, Toru; Nakamori, Shiro; Fujimoto, Naoki; Yamada, Norikazu; Ito, Masaaki

    2016-01-01

    To evaluate the short-term clinical and hemodynamic effects of tolvaptan therapy and to identify predictors of the therapeutic outcomes, we retrospectively recruited 60 consecutive hospitalized heart failure (HF) patients (70 ± 11 years) with volume overload. The subjects were divided into two groups on the basis of the changes in HF symptom scores and hemodynamic status assessed by right heart catheterization after tolvaptan therapy (median: 7 days). The majority of patients were successfully treated (group 1). However, 22% of patients (group 2) were unsuccessfully treated, in whom 1) the HF symptom score worsened or 2) there was a stationary HF symptom score ≥ 6 points, and mean PCWP > 18 mmHg and mean RAP > 10 mmHg, after tolvaptan therapy. HF symptom scores, hemodynamic parameters, and plasma brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) level improved in group 1, but all of these parameters remained unchanged in group 2. Lower urine sodium/creatinine ratio (UNa/UCr) and higher BNP level at baseline were independently associated with unsuccessful tolvaptan therapy, and UNa/UCr best predicts unsuccessful tolvaptan therapy with a cut-off value of 46.5 mEq/g·Cr (AUC 0.847, 95% CI: 0.718-0.976, sensitivity 77%, specificity 81%, P < 0.01). Double-positive results of UNa/UCr < 46.5 mEq/g·Cr and plasma BNP level > 778 pg/mL predicted unsuccessful tolvaptan therapy with high diagnostic accuracy (sensitivity 54%, specificity 100%, positive predictive value 100%, negative predictive value 89%, and accuracy 90%). In summary, short-term tolvaptan therapy ameliorated HF symptoms and provided hemodynamic improvement in the majority of patients, and UNa/UCr and BNP level strongly predicted the therapeutic outcomes. PMID:26973271

  18. Immunoreactive atrial natriuretic peptide and dopamine beta-hydroxylase in myocytes and chromaffin cells of the heart of the African lungfish, Protopterus aethiopicus.

    PubMed

    Larsen, T H; Helle, K B; Saetersdal, T

    1994-07-01

    The heart of the African lungfish, Protopterus aethiopicus, was examined for immunoreactive atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) and dopamine beta-hydroxylase (D beta H) as markers for hormone secreting myocytes and chromaffin cells, respectively. Specific antibodies raised against rat alpha-ANP and rat D beta H were used for immunofluorescence microscopy and immunogold electron microscopy. D beta H-immunoreactive cells were restricted to subendocardial areas of the atrium whereas ANP immunoreactivity occurred throughout both the atrial and the ventricular myocardium, showing particularly strong staining intensity in the atrial myocytes. The granular ANP immunostaining in the atrial myocytes was frequently accumulated in the sarcoplasm. In the ventricular myocytes ANP immunoreactivity occurred as scattered granular staining throughout the sarcoplasm. ANP and D beta H immunofluorescence staining coincided with the presence of immunoreactive specific granules and secretory vesicles in the cardiac myocytes and chromaffin cells, respectively, as revealed by electron microscopy. The number of ANP-containing specific granules was generally high in the atrial myocytes, and they were frequently observed in clusters in subsarcolemmal areas. Granular frequency was considerably lower and the mean granular diameter was smaller (0.142 +/- 0.045 micron versus 0.213 +/- 0.049 micron) in the ventricular than in the atrial myocytes. The present results indicate that ANP and D beta H are phylogenetically highly conserved proteins from the dipnoi to the rat. The large amounts of ANP and of specific granules are consistent with an endocrine myocardium in the Protopterus heart. The presence of D beta H and secretory vesicles in the subendocardial chromaffin cells of the atrium suggests a local production of catecholamines from dopamine in the heart of this dipnoan. PMID:7926645

  19. Nitric oxide induces gene expression of Jumonji and retinoblastoma 2 protein while reducing expression of atrial natriuretic peptide precursor type B in cardiomyocytes.

    PubMed

    Klassen, S S; Rabkin, S W

    2008-01-01

    Jumonji (JMJ, Jarid2), a prototypical member of the jumonji domain-containing protein family, plays a major role in embryonic cardiac development, but its role in the developed heart is unclear. Cardiomyocytes from neonatal mouse heart were treated in culture with NO donor SIN-1, 500 microM, for 2, 4, and 20 h. SIN-1 treatment was associated with a significant and 6.9 +/- 2.5 fold increase in jmj gene expression over all time points. The expression of jmj increased markedly and significantly 4.2 +/- 1.1 fold, 16.6 +/- 4.1 fold, and 2.7 +/- 0.3 fold, respectively, at time points 2 h, 4 h, and 20 h after treatment. The ability of the increase in gene expression to translate into an increase in cellular protein expression was ascertained by Western blotting, which showed an increase in the JMJ protein in whole-cell lysates. Because of the relationship of JMJ to Rb and ANP in the heart, gene expression of these proteins was also examined. SIN-1 produced a small but significant increase in Rb2, but not Rb1 or Rb-binding proteins 4, 6, or 7. In contrast, SIN-1 produced a marked and significant reduction in natriuretic peptide precursor type B but not type C to 0.24 +/- 0.09 fold of the control. These data suggest that JMJ may be a critical, previously unrecognized factor that mediates some of the cellular effects of NO, that NO may be able to increase JMJ in diseases associated with reduced JMJ expression.

  20. Hemoglobin and B-type natriuretic peptide preoperative values but not inflammatory markers, are associated with postoperative morbidity in cardiac surgery: a prospective cohort analytic study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Risk stratification in cardiac surgery significantly impacts outcome. This study seeks to define whether there is an independent association between the preoperative serum level of hemoglobin (Hb), leukocyte count (LEUCO), high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP), or B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and postoperative morbidity and mortality in cardiac surgery. Methods Prospective, analytic cohort study, with 554 adult patients undergoing cardiac surgery in a tertiary cardiovascular hospital and followed up for 12 months. The cohort was distributed according to preoperative values of Hb, LEUCO, hsCRP, and BNP in independent quintiles for each of these variables. Results After adjustment for all covariates, a significant association was found between elevated preoperative BNP and the occurrence of low postoperative cardiac output (OR 3.46, 95% CI 1.53–7.80, p = 0.003) or postoperative atrial fibrillation (OR 3.8, 95% CI 1.45–10.38). For the combined outcome (death/acute coronary syndrome/rehospitalization within 12 months), we observed an OR of 1.93 (95% CI 1.00–3.74). An interaction was found between BNP level and the presence or absence of diabetes mellitus. The OR for non-diabetics was 1.26 (95% CI 0.61–2.60) and for diabetics was 18.82 (95% CI 16.2–20.5). Preoperative Hb was also significantly and independently associated with the occurrence of postoperative low cardiac output (OR 0.33, 95% CI 0.13–0.81, p = 0.016). Both Hb and BNP were significantly associated with the lengths of intensive care unit and hospital stays and the number of transfused red blood cells (p < 0.002). Inflammatory markers, although associated with adverse outcomes, lost statistical significance when adjusted for covariates. Conclusions High preoperative BNP or low Hb shows an association of independent risk with postoperative outcomes, and their measurement could help to stratify surgical risk. The ability to predict the onset of atrial fibrillation or

  1. Association between serum N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide levels and characteristics of coronary atherosclerotic plaque detected by coronary computed tomography angiography

    PubMed Central

    Gan, Lu; Feng, Cong; Liu, Chunlei; Tian, Shuping; Song, Xiang; Yang, Li

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to explore the association between the levels of serum N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-pro BNP) and the characteristics of coronary atherosclerotic plaque detected by coronary computed tomography angiography (CCTA), in patients with unstable angina (UA). A total of 202 patients (age range, 47–82 years) were divided into the following three groups: Non-cardiac disease group (57 patients); stable angina pectoris (SAP) group (62 patients); and UA group (83 patients). There were significant differences between the serum NT-pro BNP levels among the three groups (P=0.007). However, in multivariant diagnoses, NT-pro BNP level was not an independent risk factor for UA. The levels of serum NT-pro BNP were observed to be positively correlated with the number of vessels involved (r=0.462; P<0.001), SIS (r=0.475; P<0.001), segment-stenosis score (r=0.453; P<0.001), coronary calcification score (r=0.412; P=0.001), number of obstructive diseases (r=0.346; P<0.001), and the number of segments with non-calcified plaque (r=0.235; P=0.017), mixed plaque (r=0.234; P=0.017) and calcified plaque (r=0.431; P<0.001). The levels of serum NT-pro BNP were significantly higher in patients with UA and left main-left anterior descending (LM-LAD) disease, compared with UA patients without LM-LAD disease (P<0.001). In addition, serum NT-pro BNP was significantly higher in patients with obstructive disease and UA than in those without obstructive disease (P<0.001). The area under the curve of log(NT-pro BNP) was 0.656 (P=0.006; optimal cut-off value, 1.74; sensitivity, 77.6%; specificity, 51.9%). In conclusion, the levels of serum NT-pro BNP are associated with the burden and severity of coronary artery atherosclerotic disease in patients with UA, and may be helpful in risk stratification of patients with UA. PMID:27446259

  2. The interface of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical axis and circulating brain natriuretic peptide in prediction of cardiopulmonary performance during physical stress.

    PubMed

    Popovic, Dejana; Popovic, Bojana; Plecas-Solarovic, Bosiljka; Pešić, Vesna; Markovic, Vidan; Stojiljkovic, Stanimir; Vukcevic, Vladan; Petrovic, Ivana; Banovic, Marko; Petrovic, Milan; Vujisic-Tesic, Bosiljka; Ostojic, Miodrag C; Ristic, Arsen; Damjanovic, Svetozar S

    2013-09-01

    Brain natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) was implicated in the regulation of hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenocortical (HPA) responses to psychological stressors. However, HPA axis activation in different physical stress models and its interface with NT-pro-BNP in the prediction of cardiopulmonary performance is unclear. Cardiopulmonary test on a treadmill was used to assess cardiopulmonary parameters in 16 elite male wrestlers (W), 21 water polo player (WP) and 20 sedentary age-matched subjects (C). Plasma levels of NT-pro-BNP, cortisol and adrenocorticotropic hormone (ACTH) were measured using immunoassay sandwich technique, radioimmunoassay and radioimmunometric techniques, respectively, 10min before test (1), at beginning (2), at maximal effort (3), at 3rdmin of recovery (4). In all groups, NT-pro-BNP decreased between 1 and 2; increased from 2 to 3; and remained unchanged until 4. ACTH increased from 1 to 4, whereas cortisol increased from 1 to 3 and stayed elevated at 4. In all groups together, ΔNT-pro-BNP2/1 predicted peak oxygen consumption (B=37.40, r=0.38, p=0.007); cortisol at 3 predicted heart rate increase between 2 and 3 (r=-0.38,B=-0.06, p=0.005); cortisol at 2 predicted peak carbon-dioxide output (B=2.27, r=0.35, p<0.001); ΔACTH3/2 predicted peak ventilatory equivalent for carbon-dioxide (B=0.03, r=0.33, p=0.003). The relation of cortisol at 1 with NT-pro-BNP at 1 and 3 was demonstrated using logistic function in all the participants together (for 1/cortisol at 1 B=63.40, 58.52; r=0.41, 0.34; p=0.003, 0.013, respectively). ΔNT-pro-BNP2/1 linearly correlated with ΔACTH4/3 in WP and W (r=-0.45, -0.48; p=0.04, 0.04, respectively). These results demonstrate for the first time that HPA axis and NT-pro-BNP interface in physical stress probably contribute to integrative regulation of cardiopulmonary performance.

  3. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide in a novel screening algorithm for pulmonary arterial hypertension in systemic sclerosis: a case-control study

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Pulmonary arterial hypertension is a major cause of mortality in systemic sclerosis. N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) has emerged as a candidate biomarker that may enable the early detection of systemic sclerosis-related pulmonary arterial hypertension (SSc-PAH). The objective of our study was to incorporate NT-proBNP into a screening algorithm for SSc-PAH that could potentially replace transthoracic echocardiography (TTE) as a more convenient and less costly "first tier" test. Methods NT-proBNP levels were measured in patients from four clinical groups: a group with right heart catheter (RHC)-diagnosed SSc-PAH before commencement of therapy for PAH; a group at high risk of SSc-PAH based on TTE; a group with interstitial lung disease; and systemic sclerosis (SSc) controls with no cardiopulmonary complications. NT-proBNP levels were compared by using ANOVA and correlated with other clinical variables by using simple and multiple linear regression. ROC curve analyses were performed to determine the optimal cut point for NT-proBNP and other clinical variables in prediction of PAH. Results NT-proBNP was highest in the PAH group compared with other groups (P < 0.0001), and higher in the risk group compared with controls (P < 0.0001). NT-proBNP was positively correlated with systolic pulmonary artery pressure (PAP) on TTE (P < 0.0001), and mean PAP (P = 0.013), pulmonary vascular resistance (P = 0.005), and mean right atrial pressure (P = 0.006) on RHC. A composite model wherein patients screened positive if NT-proBNP was ≥ 209.8 pg/ml, and/or DLCOcorr was < 70.3% with FVC/DLCOcorr ≥ 1.82, had a sensitivity of 100% and specificity of 77.8% for SSc-PAH. Conclusion We have proposed a screening algorithm for SSc-PAH, incorporating NT-proBNP level and PFTs. This model has high sensitivity and specificity for SSc-PAH and, if positive, should lead to TTE and confirmatory testing for PAH. This screening algorithm must be validated

  4. Plasma Levels of Monocyte Chemoattractant Protein-1, n-Terminal Fragment of Brain Natriuretic Peptide and Calcidiol Are Independently Associated with the Complexity of Coronary Artery Disease

    PubMed Central

    Martín-Reyes, Roberto; Franco-Peláez, Juan Antonio; Lorenzo, Óscar; González-Casaus, María Luisa; Pello, Ana María; Aceña, Álvaro; Carda, Rocío; Martín-Ventura, José Luis; Blanco-Colio, Luis; Martín-Mariscal, María Luisa; Martínez-Milla, Juan; Villa-Bellosta, Ricardo; Piñero, Antonio; Navarro, Felipe; Egido, Jesús; Tuñón, José

    2016-01-01

    Background and Objectives We investigated the relationship of the Syntax Score (SS) and coronary artery calcification (CAC), with plasma levels of biomarkers related to cardiovascular damage and mineral metabolism, as there is sparse information in this field. Methods We studied 270 patients with coronary disease that had an acute coronary syndrome (ACS) six months before. Calcidiol, fibroblast growth factor-23, parathormone, phosphate and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 [MCP-1], high-sensitivity C-reactive protein, galectin-3, and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide [NT-proBNP] levels, among other biomarkers, were determined. CAC was assessed by coronary angiogram as low-grade (0–1) and high-grade (2–3) calcification, measured with a semiquantitative scale ranging from 0 (none) to 3 (severe). For the SS study patients were divided in SS<14 and SS≥14. Multivariate linear and logistic regression analyses were performed. Results MCP-1 predicted independently the SS (RC = 1.73 [95%CI = 0.08–3.39]; p = 0.040), along with NT-proBNP (RC = 0.17 [95%CI = 0.05–0.28]; p = 0.004), male sex (RC = 4.15 [95%CI = 1.47–6.83]; p = 0.003), age (RC = 0.13 [95%CI = 0.02–0.24]; p = 0.020), hypertension (RC = 3.64, [95%CI = 0.77–6.50]; p = 0.013), hyperlipidemia (RC = 2.78, [95%CI = 0.28–5.29]; p = 0.030), and statins (RC = 6.12 [95%CI = 1.28–10.96]; p = 0.013). Low calcidiol predicted high-grade calcification independently (OR = 0.57 [95% CI = 0.36–0.90]; p = 0.013) along with ST-elevation myocardial infarction (OR = 0.38 [95%CI = 0.19–0.78]; p = 0.006), diabetes (OR = 2.35 [95%CI = 1.11–4.98]; p = 0.028) and age (OR = 1.37 [95%CI = 1.18–1.59]; p<0.001). During follow-up (1.79 [0.94–2.86] years), 27 patients developed ACS, stroke, or transient ischemic attack. A combined score using SS and CAC predicted independently the development of the outcome. Conclusions MCP-1 and NT-proBNP are independent predictors of SS, while low calcidiol plasma levels

  5. N-Terminal Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide Plasma Levels as a Potential Biomarker for Cardiac Damage After Radiotherapy in Patients With Left-Sided Breast Cancer

    SciTech Connect

    D'Errico, Maria P.; Grimaldi, Luca; Petruzzelli, Maria F.; Gianicolo, Emilio A.L.; Tramacere, Francesco; Monetti, Antonio; Placella, Roberto; Pili, Giorgio; Andreassi, Maria Grazia; Sicari, Rosa; Picano, Eugenio; Portaluri, Maurizio

    2012-02-01

    Purpose: Adjuvant radiotherapy (RT) after breast-conserving surgery has been associated with increased cardiovascular mortality. Cardiac biomarkers may aid in identifying patients with radiation-mediated cardiac dysfunction. We evaluated the correlation between N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and troponin (TnI) and the dose of radiation to the heart in patients with left-sided breast cancer. Methods and Materials: NT-proBNP and TnI plasma concentrations were measured in 30 left-sided breast cancer patients (median age, 55.0 years) 5 to 22 months after RT (Group I) and in 30 left-sided breast cancer patients (median age, 57.0 years) before RT as control group (Group II). Dosimetric and geometric parameters of heart and left ventricle were determined in all patients of Group I. Seventeen patients underwent complete two-dimensional echocardiography. Results: NT-proBNP levels were significantly higher (p = 0.03) in Group I (median, 90.0 pg/ml; range, 16.7-333.1 pg/ml) than in Group II (median, 63.2 pg/ml; range, 11.0-172.5 pg/ml). TnI levels remained below the cutoff threshold of 0.07 ng/ml in both groups. In patients with NT-proBNP values above the upper limit of 125 pg/ml, there were significant correlations between plasma levels and V{sub 3Gy}(%) (p = 0.001), the ratios D{sub 15cm{sup 3}}(Gy)/D{sub mean}(Gy) (p = 0.01), the ratios D{sub 15cm}{sup 3}/D{sub 50%} (Gy) (p = 0.008) for the heart and correlations between plasma levels and V{sub 2Gy} (%) (p = 0.002), the ratios D{sub 1cm{sup 3}}(Gy)/D{sub mean}(Gy) (p = 0.03), and the ratios D{sub 0.5cm{sup 3}}(Gy)/D{sub 50%}(Gy) (p = 0.05) for the ventricle. Conclusions: Patients with left-sided breast cancer show higher values of NT-pro BNP after RT when compared with non-RT-treated matched patients, increasing in correlation with high doses in small volumes of heart and ventricle. The findings of this study show that the most important parameters are not the mean doses but instead the small

  6. Usefulness of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide and C-reactive protein to predict ICU mortality in unselected medical ICU patients: a prospective, observational study

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction The performance of N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and C-reactive protein (CRP) to predict clinical outcomes in ICU patients is unimpressive. We aimed to assess the prognostic value of NT-proBNP, CRP or the combination of both in unselected medical ICU patients. Methods A total of 576 consecutive patients were screened for eligibility and followed up during the ICU stay. We collected each patient's baseline characteristics including the Acute Physiology and Chronic Health Evaluation II (APACHE-II) score, NT-proBNP and CRP levels. The primary outcome was ICU mortality. Potential predictors were analyzed for possible association with outcomes. We also evaluated the ability of NT-proBNP and CRP additive to APACHE-II score to predict ICU mortality by calculation of C-index, net reclassification improvement (NRI) and integrated discrimination improvement (IDI) indices. Results Multiple regression revealed that CRP, NT-proBNP, APACHE-II score and fasting plasma glucose independently predicted ICU mortality (all P < 0.01). The C-index with respect to prediction of ICU mortality of APACHE II score (0.82 ± 0.02; P < 0.01) was greater than that of NT-proBNP (0.71 ± 0.03; P < 0.01) or CRP (0.65 ± 0.03; P < 0.01) (all P < 0.01). As compared with APACHE-II score (0.82 ± 0.02; P < 0.01), combination of CRP (0.83 ± 0.02; P < 0.01) or NT-proBNP (0.83 ± 0.02; P < 0.01) or both (0.84 ± 0.02; P < 0.01) with APACHE-II score did not significantly increase C-index for predicting ICU mortality (all P > 0.05). However, addition of NT-proBNP to APACHE-II score gave IDI of 6.6% (P = 0.003) and NRI of 16.6% (P = 0.007), addition of CRP to APACHE-II score provided IDI of 5.6% (P = 0.026) and NRI of 12.1% (P = 0.023), and addition of both markers to APACHE-II score yielded IDI of 7.5% (P = 0.002) and NRI of 17.9% (P = 0.002). In the cardiac subgroup (N = 213), NT-proBNP but not CRP independently predicted ICU mortality and addition of NT-proBNP to

  7. How does serum brain natriuretic peptide level change under nasal continuous positive airway pressure in obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome?

    PubMed Central

    Msaad, Sameh; Marrakchi, Rim; Grati, Malek; Gargouri, Rahma; Kammoun, Samy; Jammoussi, Kamel; Yangui, Ilhem

    2016-01-01

    Background Obstructive sleep apnea-hypopnea syndrome (OSAHS) is associated with cardiovascular morbidity and mortality, which can be improved by using continuous positive airway pressure (CPAP) therapy. However, the pathophysiological links between the two kinds of disease and the mechanism of the CPAP effect remain incompletely understood. We aimed to inquire into the myocardial involvement in this relationship. We suggested that serum brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) is sensitive enough to detect myocardial stress caused by OSAHS. Design and methods Sixty-four subjects without cardiovascular disease (21 controls, 24 normotensive OSAHS patients, and 19 hypertensive OSAHS patients) were analyzed for serum BNP at baseline and serially over 6 months. CPAP was applied to 23 patients with severe OSAHS. Results At baseline, the serum BNP levels were significantly higher (p=0.0001) in the OSAHS group (22.3±14.79 pg/ml) than in the control group (9.2±6.75 pg/ml). Increased serum BNP levels were significantly associated with mean transcutaneous oxygen saturation (SpO2) (p<0.0001), minimal SpO2 (p=0.002), oxygen desaturation index (p=0.001), and total sleep time spent with SpO2 lower than 90% (p=0.002). All patients with elevated BNP levels (≥37 pg/ml) had moderate or severe OSAHS (11/43 OSAHS patients). The more severe the OSAHS, the higher the BNP levels were. However, only the difference between severe and mild OSAHS was statistically significant (p=0.029). Hypertensive OSAHS patients had the highest baseline BNP levels (27.7±16.74 pg/ml). They were significantly higher (p=0.001) than in normotensive OSAHS patients (18±11.72 pg/ml) (p=0.039) and the controls (9.2±6.75 pg/ml). As compared with baseline, treatment with CPAP significantly decreased BNP levels in both hypertensive and normotensive OSAHS patients (respectively, from 36±16.10 to 29.7±14.29 pg/ml, p<0.001, and from 20±10.09 to 16±8.98 pg/ml, p<0.001). In contrast, the BNP levels slightly increased in

  8. Mechanism of vasodilation induced by alpha-human atrial natriuretic polypeptide in rabbit and guinea-pig renal arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Fujii, K; Ishimatsu, T; Kuriyama, H

    1986-01-01

    Effects of alpha-human atrial natriuretic polypeptide (alpha-HANP) on electrical and mechanical properties of smooth muscle cells of the guinea-pig and rabbit renal arteries and of the guinea-pig mesenteric artery were investigated. alpha-HANP (up to 10 nM) modified neither the membrane potential nor resistance of smooth muscle cells of the guinea-pig and rabbit renal arteries. In the guinea-pig mesenteric and renal arteries, alpha-HANP (up to 10 nM) had no effect on the amplitude and facilitation (mesenteric artery) or depression (renal artery) of excitatory junction potentials nor on action potentials. In the guinea-pig renal artery, alpha-HANP (up to 10 nM) had no effect on the depolarization induced by noradrenaline (NA) (up to 10 microM) but markedly inhibited NA-induced contraction. alpha-HANP (10 nM) slightly inhibited the K-induced contraction. In the rabbit renal artery, alpha-HANP (10 nM) inhibited the NA-induced contraction and to a lesser extent the K-induced contraction. In the rabbit renal artery, the effects of alpha-HANP on the release of Ca from the cellular storage by two applications of NA, and its re-storage, were investigated in Ca-free solution containing 2 mM-EGTA. When 5 nM-alpha-HANP was applied before and during the first application of 0.5 microM-NA, the contraction was markedly inhibited but the contraction to a second application of 10 microM-NA was potentiated. If the first dose of NA was 10 microM the effect was very small. Under the same experimental procedures, nitroglycerine (10 microM) showed almost the same effects as alpha-HANP on the NA-induced contractions. When both the first (3 mM) and second (10 mM) contractions were evoked by caffeine in Ca-free solution, alpha-HANP (5 nM) and nitroglycerine (10 microM) inhibited both contractions to the same extent. In the rabbit renal artery, applications of alpha-HANP or nitroglycerine increased the amount of guanosine 3',5'-phosphate (cyclic GMP) in a dose-dependent manner. However, a

  9. Histone deacetylase inhibitors modulate the transcriptional regulation of guanylyl cyclase/natriuretic peptide receptor-a gene: interactive roles of modified histones, histone acetyltransferase, p300, AND Sp1.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Prerna; Tripathi, Satyabha; Pandey, Kailash N

    2014-03-01

    Atrial natriuretic peptide (ANP) binds guanylyl cyclase-A/natriuretic peptide receptor-A (GC-A/NPRA) and produces the intracellular second messenger, cGMP, which regulates cardiovascular homeostasis. We sought to determine the function of histone deacetylases (HDACs) in regulating Npr1 (coding for GC-A/NPRA) gene transcription, using primary mouse mesangial cells treated with class-specific HDAC inhibitors (HDACi). Trichostatin A, a pan inhibitor, and mocetinostat (MGCD0103), a class I HDAC inhibitor, significantly enhanced Npr1 promoter activity (by 8- and 10-fold, respectively), mRNA levels (4- and 5.3-fold, respectively), and NPRA protein (2.7- and 3.5-fold, respectively). However, MC1568 (class II HDAC inhibitor) had no discernible effect. Overexpression of HDAC1 and HDAC2 significantly attenuated Npr1 promoter activity, whereas HDAC3 and HDAC8 had no effect. HDACi-treated cultured cells in vitro and intact animals in vivo showed significantly reduced binding of HDAC1 and -2 and increased accumulation of acetylated H3-K9/14 and H4-K12 at the Npr1 promoter. Deletional analyses of the Npr1 promoter along with ectopic overexpression and inhibition of Sp1 confirmed that HDACi-induced Npr1 gene transcription is accomplished by Sp1 activation. Furthermore, HDACi attenuated the interaction of Sp1 with HDAC1/2 and promoted Sp1 association with p300 and p300/cAMP-binding protein-associated factor; it also promoted the recruitment of p300 and p300/cAMP-binding protein-associated factor to the Npr1 promoter. Our results demonstrate that trichostatin A and MGCD0103 enhanced Npr1 gene expression through inhibition of HDAC1/2 and increased both acetylation of histones (H3-K9/14, H4-K12) and Sp1 by p300, and their recruitment to Npr1 promoter. Our findings define a novel epigenetic regulatory mechanism that governs Npr1 gene transcription.

  10. Natural human antibodies to amyloid beta peptide.

    PubMed

    Szabo, Paul; Relkin, Norman; Weksler, Marc E

    2008-06-01

    Properties of human, natural anti-Abeta antibodies and commercially available intravenous immunoglobulin (IVIg) have been examined in light of the beneficial effects of passive immunotherapy with IVIg for patients with mild to moderate Alzheimer's disease (AD). Anti-Abeta antibodies in IVIg recognize conformation-specific epitopes as well as linear epitopes from different regions of the Abeta peptide. Anti-Abeta antibodies in circulation, especially those with high avidity, are often masked by ligands and the avidity of these antibodies increases upon dissociation of the bound ligands from the antibodies. Such natural anti-Abeta antibodies have the capacity to prevent Abeta oligomer-induced neurotoxicity in N2A neuroblastoma cells. This neuro-protective effect may reflect the therapeutic potential of the natural anti-Abeta antibodies found in IVIg for the treatment of patients with AD.

  11. Atrial natriuretic peptide in the locus coeruleus and its possible role in the regulation of arterial blood pressure, fluid and electrolyte homeostasis

    SciTech Connect

    Geiger, H.; Sterzel, R.B. ); Bahner, U.; Heidland, A. ); Palkovits, M. )

    1991-01-01

    Atrial natriuretic factor (ANP) is present in neuronal cells of the locus coeruleus and its vicinity in the pontine tegmentum and moderate amount of ANP is detectable in this area by radioimmunoassay. The ANP is known as a neuropeptide which may influence the body salt and water homeostasis and blood pressure by targeting both central and peripheral regulatory mechanisms. Whether this pontine ANP cell group is involved in any of these regulatory mechanisms, the effect of various types of hypertension and experimental alterations in the salt and water balance on ANP levels was measured by radioimmunoassay in the locus coeruleus of rats. Adrenalectomy, as well as aldosterone and dexamethasone treatments failed to alter ANP levels in the locus coeruleus. Reduced ANP levels were measured in spontaneously hypertensive rats, and in diabetes insipidus rats with vasopressin replacement. In contrast to these situations, elevated ANP levels were found in rats with DOCA-salt or 1-Kidney-1-clip hypertension. These data suggest a link between ANP levels in the locus coeruleus and fluid volume homeostasis. Whether this link is causal and connected with the major activity of locus coeruleus neurons needs further information.

  12. Evaluation of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein relationship with features of metabolic syndrome in high-risk subgroups for cardiovascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Nayak, Bijoor Shivananda; Jagessar, Avinas; Mohammed, Zaryd; Rampersad, Jarryd; Ramkissoon, Solange; Biswah, Shivonne; Mohammed, Amisha; Maraj, Aneela; Rampersad, Christina

    2015-01-01

    Aim: This study evaluating N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) relationship with features of the metabolic syndrome (MS) in high risk subgroups for cardiovascular disease (CVD) in Trinidad. Materials and Methods: The sample population consisted of 160 subjects, 78 of whom were African and 82 East Indian attending medical outpatient clinics of regional health authority hospitals of Trinidad. Results: Systolic blood pressure, triglycerides, glucose and insulin as well as NT-pro-BNP were elevated among the East Indian sub-population, with only systolic blood pressure being significantly elevated among the African sub-population. NT-pro-BNP and hs-CRP demonstrated significant correlations with respect to the majority of independent risk factors inclusive of Adult Treatment Panel III and American Association of Clinical Endocrinologists defined criteria for MS. NT-pro-BNP demonstrated stronger association among the East Indian sub-population as compared to that of the African sub-population. Conclusions: Our study showed that the East Indian subgroup was more at risk for CVD as evidenced by the fulfillment of the criteria for diagnosis of MS and therefore NT-pro-BNP and hs-CRP can be deemed a suitable marker for MS. PMID:26539369

  13. Myocardin-Related Transcription Factor A Is a Common Mediator of Mechanical Stress- and Neurohumoral Stimulation-Induced Cardiac Hypertrophic Signaling Leading to Activation of Brain Natriuretic Peptide Gene Expression▿ †

    PubMed Central

    Kuwahara, Koichiro; Kinoshita, Hideyuki; Kuwabara, Yoshihiro; Nakagawa, Yasuaki; Usami, Satoru; Minami, Takeya; Yamada, Yuko; Fujiwara, Masataka; Nakao, Kazuwa

    2010-01-01

    Subjecting cardiomyocytes to mechanical stress or neurohumoral stimulation causes cardiac hypertrophy characterized in part by reactivation of the fetal cardiac gene program. Here we demonstrate a new common mechanism by which these stimuli are transduced to a signal activating the hypertrophic gene program. Mechanically stretching cardiomyocytes induced nuclear accumulation of myocardin-related transcription factor A (MRTF-A), a coactivator of serum response factor (SRF), in a Rho- and actin dynamics-dependent manner. Expression of brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and other SRF-dependent fetal cardiac genes in response to acute mechanical stress was blunted in mice lacking MRTF-A. Hypertrophic responses to chronic pressure overload were also significantly attenuated in mice lacking MRTF-A. Mutation of a newly identified, conserved and functional SRF-binding site within the BNP promoter, or knockdown of MRTF-A, reduced the responsiveness of the BNP promoter to mechanical stretch. Nuclear translocation of MRTF-A was also involved in endothelin-1- and angiotensin-II-induced activation of the BNP promoter. Moreover, mice lacking MRTF-A showed significantly weaker hypertrophic responses to chronic angiotensin II infusion than wild-type mice. Collectively, these findings point to nuclear translocation of MRTF-A as a novel signaling mechanism mediating both mechanical stretch- and neurohumoral stimulation-induced BNP gene expression and hypertrophic responses in cardiac myocytes. PMID:20606005

  14. An extensive library of surrogate peptides for all human proteins.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, Yassene; Borchers, Christoph H

    2015-11-01

    Selecting the most appropriate surrogate peptides to represent a target protein is a major component of experimental design in Multiple Reaction Monitoring (MRM). Our software PeptidePicker with its v-score remains distinctive in its approach of integrating information about the proteins, their tryptic peptides, and the suitability of these peptides for MRM that is available online in UniProtKB, NCBI's dbSNP, ExPASy, PeptideAtlas, PRIDE, and GPMDB. The scoring algorithm reflects our "best knowledge" for selecting candidate peptides for MRM, based on the uniqueness of the peptide in the targeted proteome, its physiochemical properties, and whether it has previously been observed. Here we present an updated approach where we have already compiled a list of all possible surrogate peptides of the human proteome. Using our stringent selection criteria, the list includes 165k suitable MRM peptides covering 17k proteins of the human reviewed proteins in UniProtKB. Compared to average of 2-4min per protein for retrieving and integrating the information, the precompiled list includes all peptides available instantly. This allows a more cohesive and faster design of a multiplexed MRM experiment and provides insights into evidence for a protein's existence. We will keep this list up-to-date as proteomics data repositories continue to grow. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Computational Proteomics. PMID:26232110

  15. Expression of peptide YY by human blood leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Holler, Julia Pia Natascha; Schmitz, Jessica; Roehrig, Rainer; Wilker, Sigrid; Hecker, Andreas; Padberg, Winfried; Grau, Veronika

    2014-08-01

    Peptide YY is produced by L cells in the mucosa of the distal ileum, colon, and rectum and may have systemic and paracrine functions. We hypothesized that peptide YY is expressed by peripheral blood mononuclear cells. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate the expression of peptide YY mRNA and peptide by peripheral blood mononuclear cells and differentiated THP-1 cells after lipopolysaccharide treatment as an in vitro model of inflammation. Blood was drawn by venipuncture from 18- to 63-year-old healthy male blood donors (n=63); peptide YY mRNA expression levels were detected in peripheral blood mononuclear cells from all healthy male subjects. In 3 subjects, peripheral blood mononuclear cells were cultured for 3 and 24h and peptide YY was detected in the cell culture supernatant. In human monocytic THP-1 cells treated with phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate to induce differentiation to macrophages, treatment with lipopolysaccharide caused down-regulation of peptide YY mRNA levels. In summary, freshly isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells from healthy humans expressed peptide YY. In vitro data suggested that peptide YY expression is down-regulated by differentiation of monocytes to macrophages and proinflammatory stimuli.

  16. Loss of inhibition by brain natriuretic peptide over P2X3 receptors contributes to enhanced spike firing of trigeminal ganglion neurons in a mouse model of familial hemiplegic migraine type-1.

    PubMed

    Marchenkova, Anna; van den Maagdenberg, Arn M J M; Nistri, Andrea

    2016-09-01

    Purinergic P2X3 receptors (P2X3Rs) play an important role in pain pathologies, including migraine. In trigeminal neurons, P2X3Rs are constitutively downregulated by endogenous brain natriuretic peptide (BNP). In a mouse knock-in (KI) model of familial hemiplegic migraine type-1 with upregulated calcium CaV2.1 channel function, trigeminal neurons exhibit hyperexcitability with gain-of-function of P2X3Rs and their deficient BNP-mediated inhibition. We studied whether the absent BNP-induced control over P2X3Rs activity in KI cultures may be functionally expressed in altered firing activity of KI trigeminal neurons. Patch-clamp experiments investigated the excitability of wild-type and KI trigeminal neurons induced by either current or agonists for P2X3Rs or transient receptor potential vanilloid-1 (TRPV1) receptors. Consistent with the constitutive inhibition of P2X3Rs by BNP, sustained pharmacological block of BNP receptors selectively enhanced P2X3R-mediated excitability of wild-type neurons without affecting firing evoked by the other protocols. This effect included increased number of action potentials, lower spike threshold and shift of the firing pattern distribution toward higher spiking activity. Thus, inactivation of BNP signaling transformed the wild-type excitability phenotype into the one typical for KI. BNP receptor block did not influence excitability of KI neurons in accordance with the lack of BNP-induced P2X3R modulation. Our study suggests that, in wild-type trigeminal neurons, negative control over P2X3Rs by the BNP pathway is translated into tonic suppression of P2X3Rs-mediated excitability. Lack of this inhibition in KI cultures results in a hyperexcitability phenotype and might contribute to facilitated trigeminal pain transduction relevant for migraine. PMID:27346147

  17. Combination of lung ultrasound (a comet-tail sign) and N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide in differentiating acute heart failure from chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma as cause of acute dyspnea in prehospital emergency setting

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Introduction We studied the diagnostic accuracy of bedside lung ultrasound (the presence of a comet-tail sign), N-terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) and clinical assessment (according to the modified Boston criteria) in differentiating heart failure (HF)-related acute dyspnea from pulmonary (chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD)/asthma)-related acute dyspnea in the prehospital setting. Methods Our prospective study was performed at the Center for Emergency Medicine, Maribor, Slovenia, between July 2007 and April 2010. Two groups of patients were compared: a HF-related acute dyspnea group (n = 129) and a pulmonary (asthma/COPD)-related acute dyspnea group (n = 89). All patients underwent lung ultrasound examinations, along with basic laboratory testing, rapid NT-proBNP testing and chest X-rays. Results The ultrasound comet-tail sign has 100% sensitivity, 95% specificity, 100% negative predictive value (NPV) and 96% positive predictive value (PPV) for the diagnosis of HF. NT-proBNP (cutoff point 1,000 pg/mL) has 92% sensitivity, 89% specificity, 86% NPV and 90% PPV. The Boston modified criteria have 85% sensitivity, 86% specificity, 80% NPV and 90% PPV. In comparing the three methods, we found significant differences between ultrasound sign and (1) NT-proBNP (P < 0.05) and (2) Boston modified criteria (P < 0.05). The combination of ultrasound sign and NT-proBNP has 100% sensitivity, 100% specificity, 100% NPV and 100% PPV. With the use of ultrasound, we can exclude HF in patients with pulmonary-related dyspnea who have positive NT-proBNP (> 1,000 pg/mL) and a history of HF. Conclusions An ultrasound comet-tail sign alone or in combination with NT-proBNP has high diagnostic accuracy in differentiating acute HF-related from COPD/asthma-related causes of acute dyspnea in the prehospital emergency setting. Trial registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01235182. PMID:21492424

  18. Clinical characteristics of asymptomatic left ventricular diastolic dysfunction and its association with self‐rated health and N‐terminal B‐type natriuretic peptide: a cross‐sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Bennet, Louise; Larsson, Charlotte A.; Andersson, Susanne; Månsson, Jörgen; Lindblad, Ulf

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Aims Left ventricular hypertrophy, obesity, hypertension, and N‐terminal B‐type natriuretic peptide (Nt‐proBNP) predict left ventricular diastolic dysfunction with preserved systolic function (DD‐PSF). Self‐rated health (SRH) is shown to be associated with chronic diseases, but the association of SRH with DD‐PSF is unclear. In light of the clinical implications of DD‐PSF, the following goals are of considerable importance: (1) to determine the role of SRH in patients with DD‐PSF in the general population and (2) to study the association between Nt‐proBNP and DD‐PSF. Methods and results The current study is a cross‐sectional study conducted on a random sampling of a rural population. Individuals 30–75 years of age were consecutively subjected to conventional echocardiography and tissue velocity imaging. Data were collected on 500 (48%) men and 538 (52%) women (n = 1038). DD‐PSF was the main outcome, and SRH and Nt‐proBNP were the primary indicators. Diabetes mellitus, hypertension, and obesity were accounted for as major confounders of the association with SRH. DD‐PSF was identified in 137 individuals, namely, 79 men (15.8%) and 58 women (10.8%). In a multivariate regression model, SRH (OR 2.95; 95% CI 1.02–8.57) and Nt‐proBNP (quartile 4 vs. quartile 1 OR 4.23; 95% CI 1.74–10.26) were both independently associated with DD‐PSF. Conclusions SRH, evaluated based on a descriptive question on general health, should be included in the diagnostic process of DD‐PSF. In agreement with previous studies, our study confirms that Nt‐proBNP is a major indicator of DD‐PSF.

  19. Vitamin D Predicts All-Cause and Cardiac Mortality in Females with Suspected Acute Coronary Syndrome: A Comparison with Brain Natriuretic Peptide and High-Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein

    PubMed Central

    Naesgaard, Patrycja A.; León de la Fuente, Ricardo A.; Nilsen, Stein Tore; Woie, Leik; Aarsland, Torbjoern; Staines, Harry; Nilsen, Dennis W. T.

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin D may not only reflect disease but may also serve as a prognostic indicator. Our aim was to assess the gender-specific utility of vitamin D measured as 25-hydroxy-vitamin D [25(OH)D] to predict all-cause and cardiac death in patients with suspected acute coronary syndrome (ACS) and to compare its prognostic utility to brain natriuretic peptide (BNP) and high-sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP). Blood samples were harvested on admission in 982 patients. Forty percent were women (65.9 ± 12.6 years). Mortality was evaluated in quartiles of 25(OH)D, BNP, and hsCRP, respectively, during a 5-year follow-up, applying univariate and multivariate analyses. One hundred and seventy-three patients died; 78 were women. In 92 patients (37 women), death was defined as cardiac. In women, the univariate hazard ratio (HR) for total death of 25(OH)D in Quartile (Q) 2 versus Q1, Q3 versus Q1, and Q4 versus Q1 was 0.55 (95% CI 0.33–0.93), 0.29 (95% CI 0.15–0.55), and 0.13 (95% CI 0.06–0.32), respectively. In females, it was an independent predictor of total and cardiac death, whereas BNP and hsCRP were less gender-specific. No gender differences in 25(OH)D were noted in a reference material. Accordingly, vitamin D independently predicts mortality in females with suspected ACS. PMID:24349821

  20. The Prognostic Value of Serum Levels of Heart-Type Fatty Acid Binding Protein and High Sensitivity C-Reactive Protein in Patients With Increased Levels of Amino-Terminal Pro-B Type Natriuretic Peptide

    PubMed Central

    Jeong, Ji Hun; Seo, Yiel Hea; Ahn, Jeong Yeal; Kim, Kyung Hee; Seo, Ja Young; Kim, Moon Jin; Lee, Hwan Tae

    2016-01-01

    Background Amino-terminal pro-B type natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) is a well-established prognostic factor in heart failure (HF). However, numerous causes may lead to elevations in NT-proBNP, and thus, an increased NT-proBNP level alone is not sufficient to predict outcome. The aim of this study was to evaluate the utility of two acute response markers, high sensitivity C-reactive protein (hsCRP) and heart-type fatty acid binding protein (H-FABP), in patients with an increased NT-proBNP level. Methods The 278 patients were classified into three groups by etiology: 1) acute coronary syndrome (ACS) (n=62), 2) non-ACS cardiac disease (n=156), and 3) infectious disease (n=60). Survival was determined on day 1, 7, 14, 21, 28, 60, 90, 120, and 150 after enrollment. Results H-FABP (P<0.001), NT-proBNP (P=0.006), hsCRP (P<0.001) levels, and survival (P<0.001) were significantly different in the three disease groups. Patients were divided into three classes by using receiver operating characteristic curves for NT-proBNP, H-FABP, and hsCRP. Patients with elevated NT-proBNP (≥3,856 pg/mL) and H-FABP (≥8.8 ng/mL) levels were associated with higher hazard ratio for mortality (5.15 in NT-proBNP and 3.25 in H-FABP). Area under the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis showed H-FABP was a better predictor of 60-day mortality than NT-proBNP. Conclusions The combined measurement of H-FABP with NT-proBNP provides a highly reliable means of short-term mortality prediction for patients hospitalized for ACS, non-ACS cardiac disease, or infectious disease. PMID:27374706

  1. The prediction of in-hospital mortality by amino terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) levels and other independent variables in acutely ill patients with suspected heart disease.

    PubMed

    Kellett, John

    2005-06-01

    BACKGROUND: Amino terminal pro-brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) measurement can detect and assess heart failure. However, compared with traditional clinical parameters, its value in predicting the in-hospital mortality of patients with suspected heart disease has not been reported. METHODS: We examined the ability of 11 continuous and 21 categorical variables, including NT-proBNP levels measured at the time of admission, to predict in-hospital mortality. The setting was a small Irish rural hospital where 342 consecutive patients with suspected heart disease were admitted as acute medical emergencies. RESULTS: The 31 patients who died while in hospital had significantly higher NT-proBNP levels on admission than patients discharged alive (11,548+/-13,531 vs. 3805+/-6914 pg/mL, p<0.0001). Patients who died in-hospital were older, had significantly higher white cell counts, blood urea and modified early warning (MEW) scores, and lower temperatures, blood pressures and oxygen saturation. Four variables were found to be independent predictors of in-hospital mortality: a systolic blood pressure equal to or below 100 mm Hg, a urea level above 13 mmol/L, a white cell count greater than 13*10(9)/L and a NT-proBNP level greater than or equal to 11,500 pg/mL. The presence of three of these variables was associated with an in-hospital mortality rate of 54%. CONCLUSIONS: Four variables (i.e. hypotension, elevated urea, leukocytosis and elevated NT-proBNP levels) are comparable independent predictors of in-hospital mortality.

  2. Elevated plasma levels of B-type natriuretic Peptide but not C-reactive protein are associated with higher red cell distribution width in patients with coronary artery disease.

    PubMed

    Fukuta, Hidekatsu; Ohte, Nobuyuki; Mukai, Seiji; Saeki, Tomoaki; Asada, Kaoru; Wakami, Kazuaki; Kimura, Genjiro

    2009-05-01

    Although higher red cell distribution width (RDW) has recently been reported to be associated with increased mortality independent of anemia in patients with heart failure and those with coronary artery disease (CAD), the mechanism underlying this association is unknown. We hypothesized that higher RDW may reflect neurohumoral activation and a chronic inflammatory state that each contribute to adverse clinical outcomes in these populations. We measured RDW and plasma levels of B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hs-CRP) in 226 consecutive patients undergoing cardiac catheterization for CAD (age, 67 +/- 8 years; males, 77%; RDW, 45.8 +/- 3.3 fL; hemoglobin, 13.2 +/- 1.4 g/dL; BNP, median [interquartile range], 26.0 [9.0-58.4] pg/mL; hs-CRP, 679 [345-1920] ng/mL). Plasma BNP (r = 0.21, P < 0.01) but not hs-CRP (r = 0.04, P > 0.1) levels correlated with RDW. After adjustment for potential confounders including age, gender, body mass index, glomerular filtration rate, hemoglobin, and known hemodynamic determinants of BNP, including elevated left ventricular end-diastolic pressure and volume and slow left ventricular relaxation, RDW was independently predicted by BNP (r(2) = 0.058, P < 0.001). In conclusion, elevated BNP levels are independently associated with higher RDW in patients with CAD. Neurohumoral activation may be a mechanistic link between increased RDW and adverse clinical outcomes in this population. PMID:19506334

  3. B-type natriuretic peptide and high sensitive C-reactive protein predict 2-year all cause mortality in chest pain patients: a prospective observational study from Salta, Argentina

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Several mechanisms are involved in the pathophysiology of the Acute Coronary Syndrome (ACS). We have addressed whether B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) and high-sensitive C-reactive protein (hsCRP) in admission samples may improve risk stratification in chest pain patients with suspected ACS. Methods We included 982 patients consecutively admitted with chest pain and suspected ACS at nine hospitals in Salta, Northern Argentina. Total and cardiac mortality were recorded during a 2-year follow up period. Patients were divided into quartiles according to BNP and hsCRP levels, respectively, and inter quartile differences in mortality were statistically evaluated applying univariate and multivariate analyses. Results 119 patients died, and the BNP and hsCRP levels were significantly higher among these patients than in survivors. In a multivariable Cox regression model for total death and cardiac death in all patients, the hazard ratio (HR) in the highest quartile (Q4) as compared to the lowest quartile (Q1) of BNP was 2.32 (95% confidence interval (CI), 1.24-4.35), p = 0.009 and 3.34 (95% CI, 1.26-8.85), p = 0.015, respectively. In the TnT positive patients (TnT > 0.01 ng/mL), the HR for total death and cardiac death in Q4 as compared to Q1 was 2.12 (95% CI, 1.07-4.18), p = 0.031 and 3.42 (95% CI, 1.13-10.32), p = 0.029, respectively. The HR for total death for hsCRP in Q4 as compared to Q1 was 1.97 (95% CI, 1.17-3.32), p = 0.011, but this biomarker did not predict cardiac death (p = 0.21). No prognostic impact of these two biomarkers was found in the TnT negative patients. Conclusion BNP and hsCRP may act as clinically useful biomarkers when obtained at admission in a population with suspected ACS. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: NCT01377402. PMID:21958326

  4. Association of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide with contrast-induced nephropathy and long-term outcomes in patients with chronic kidney disease and relative preserved left ventricular function.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yuan-hui; Liu, Yong; Zhou, Ying-ling; Yu, Dan-qing; He, Peng-cheng; Xie, Nian-jin; Li, Hua-long; Wei-Guo; Chen, Ji-yan; Tan, Ning

    2015-04-01

    The aim of the present article was to evaluate the association of N-terminal pro-B-type natriuretic peptide (NT-pro-BNP) with contrast-induced nephropathy (CIN) and long-term outcomes in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD) and relative preserved left ventricular function (LVF) undergoing percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI). We prospectively enrolled 1203 consecutive patients with CKD and preserved LVF undergoing elective PCI. The primary end point was the development of CIN, defined as an absolute increase in serum creatinine (SCr) ≥0.5 mg/dL, from baseline within 48 to 72 hours after contrast medium exposure. CIN incidence varied from 2.2% to 5.2%. Univariate logistic analysis showed that lg-NT-pro-BNP was significantly associated with CIN (odds ratio [OR] = 3.93, 95% confidence interval [CI], 2.22-6.97, P < 0.001). Furthermore, lg-NT-pro-BNP remained a significant predictor of CIN (OR = 3.30, 95% CI, 1.57-6.93, P = 0.002), even after adjusting for potential confounding risk factors. These results were confirmed by using other CIN criteria, which were defined as elevations of the SCr by 25% or 0.5 and 0.3 mg/dL from the baseline. The best cutoff value of lg-NT-pro-BNP for detecting CIN was 2.73 pg/mL (537 pg/mL) with 73.1% sensitivity and 70.0% specificity according to the receiver operating characteristic (ROC) analysis (C statistic = 0.754, 95% CI, 0.67-0.84, P < 0.001). In addition, NT-pro-BNP ≥537 pg/mL (2.73 pg/mL, lg-NT-pro-BNP) was associated with an increased risk of all-cause mortality and composite end points during 2.5 years of follow-up. NT-pro-BNP ≥537 pg/mL is independently associated with an increased risk of CIN with different definitions and poor clinical outcomes in patients with CKD and relative preserved LVF undergoing PCI. PMID:25837748

  5. Evaluation by N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide concentrations and ross scoring of the efficacy of digoxin in the treatment of heart failure secondary to congenital heart disease with left-to-right shunts.

    PubMed

    Elkiran, Ozlem; Sandikkaya, Ayse; Kocak, Gulendam; Karakurt, Cemsit; Taskapan, Cagatay; Yologlu, Saim

    2013-10-01

    This study aimed to evaluate the effectiveness of digoxin in children with heart failure secondary to left-to-right shunt lesions and normal left ventricular systolic function. The study registered 37 such patients (ages 10 days to 24 months, groups 1 and 2) and used 20 healthy children as a control group (group 3). Left ventricular systolic function, as assessed by conventional echocardiography, was normal in all the subjects. Congestive heart failure was diagnosed by clinical evaluation and modified Ross scoring. Plasma N-terminal prohormone of brain natriuretic peptide (NT-proBNP) concentrations and complete blood counts were assessed in all the children. Group 1 was treated with digoxin, enalapril, and furosemide and group 2 with enalapril and furosemide. Approximately 1 month after starting treatment, the patients were reevaluated by physical and echocardiographic examinations, modified Ross scoring, plasma NT-proBNP concentrations, and complete blood counts. The pre- and posttreatment Ross scores of group 1 (p = 0.377) and group 2 (p = 0.616) did not differ significantly. The NT-proBNP values in both groups decreased after treatment (p = 0.0001). The pre- and posttreatment NT-proBNP values did not differ significantly in group 1 (p = 0.094)) and group 2 (p = 0.372). The pretreatment NT-proBNP values in groups 1 and 2 (p = 0.0001) were significantly higher than in the control group (p = 0.003). A smaller difference was observed between posttreatment NT-proBNP values in group 1 and the control group (p = 0.045). We found no significant difference between the posttreatment NT-proBNP values of group 2 and those of the control group (p = 0.271). The study showed that both treatments currently used to treat heart failure secondary to congenital heart disease with left-to-right shunts and preserved left ventricular systolic function are effective and do not differ significantly. Thus, digoxin does not provide any extra benefit in the treatment of such patients.

  6. Peptide secreted by human alveolar macrophages releases neutrophil granule contents

    SciTech Connect

    MacArthur, C.K.; Miller, E.J.; Cohen, A.B.

    1987-11-15

    A monoclonal antibody was developed against an 8000-kDa enzyme-releasing peptide (ERP) released from human alveolar macrophages. ERP was isolated on an immunoaffinity column containing the antibody bound to staphylococcal protein A-Sepharose, and by autoradiography. Release of ERP from the macrophages is not changed by plastic adherence, phagocytosis, calcium ionophore, or phorbol esters. The peptide was not antigenically similar to interferon-..gamma.., tumor necrosis factor, or interleukin l..cap alpha.. or 1..beta... The release of constituents from azurophilic and specific granules was the main identified biologic function of ERP. ERP was a more effective secretagogue in the untreated neutrophils and f-met-leu-phe was more effective in the cytochalasin B-treated neutrophils. Absorption of ERP from macrophage-conditioned medium removed a small amount of the chemotactic activity; however, the immunopurified peptide was not chemotactic or chemokinetic for neutrophils, and at high concentrations, it suppressed base line chemokinesis. Treatment of washed macrophages with trypsin released active ERP of approximately the same m.w. of spontaneously secreted ERP. These studies showed that human alveolar macrophages release a peptide which is a secretagogue for human neutrophils under conditions which may be encountered in the lungs during certain disease states. Proteolytic enzymes which are free in the lungs may release the peptide and lead to the secretion of neutrophil enzymes.

  7. ZAK induces cardiomyocyte hypertrophy and brain natriuretic peptide expression via p38/JNK signaling and GATA4/c-Jun transcriptional factor activation.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, You-Liang; Tsai, Ying-Lan; Shibu, Marthandam Asokan; Su, Chia-Chi; Chung, Li-Chin; Pai, Peiying; Kuo, Chia-Hua; Yeh, Yu-Lan; Viswanadha, Vijaya Padma; Huang, Chih-Yang

    2015-07-01

    Cardiomyocyte hypertrophy is an adaptive response of heart to various stress conditions. During the period of stress accumulation, transition from physiological hypertrophy to pathological hypertrophy results in the promotion of heart failure. Our previous studies found that ZAK, a sterile alpha motif and leucine zipper containing kinase, was highly expressed in infarcted human hearts and demonstrated that overexpression of ZAK induced cardiac hypertrophy. This study evaluates, cellular events associated with the expression of two doxycycline (Dox) inducible Tet-on ZAK expression systems, a Tet-on ZAK WT (wild-type), and a Tet-on ZAK DN (mutant, Dominant-negative form) in H9c2 myoblast cells; Tet-on ZAK WT was found to increase cell size and hypertrophic marker BNP in a dose-dependent manner. To ascertain the mechanism of ZAK-mediated hypertrophy, expression analysis with various inhibitors of the related upstream and downstream proteins was performed. Tet-on ZAK WT expression triggered the p38 and JNK pathway and also activated the expression and nuclear translocation of p-GATA4 and p-c-Jun transcription factors, without the involvement of p-ERK or NFATc3. However, Tet-on ZAK DN showed no effect on the p38 and JNK signaling cascade. The results showed that the inhibitors of JNK1/2 and p38 significantly suppressed ZAK-induced BNP expression. The results show the role of ZAK and/or the ZAK downstream events such as JNK and p38 phosphorylation, c-Jun, and GATA-4 nuclear translocation in cardiac hypertrophy. ZAK and/or the ZAK downstream p38, and JNK pathway could therefore be potential targets to ameliorate cardiac hypertrophy symptoms in ZAK-overexpressed patients. PMID:25869677

  8. DMP1-derived peptides promote remineralization of human dentin.

    PubMed

    Padovano, J D; Ravindran, S; Snee, P T; Ramachandran, A; Bedran-Russo, A K; George, A

    2015-04-01

    Remineralization of dentin during dental caries is of considerable clinical interest. Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is a non-collagenous calcium-binding protein that plays a critical role in biomineralization. In the present study, we tested if peptides derived from DMP1 can be used for dentin remineralization. Peptide pA (pA, MW = 1.726 kDa) and peptide pB (pB, MW = 2.185), containing common collagen-binding domains and unique calcium-binding domains, were synthesized by solid-phase chemistry. An extreme caries lesion scenario was created by collagenase digestion, and the biomineral-nucleating potential of these peptides was ascertained when coated on collagenase-treated dentin matrix and control, native human dentin matrix under physiological levels of calcium and phosphate. Scanning electron microscopy analysis suggests that peptide pB was an effective nucleator when compared with pA. However, a 1:4 ratio of pA to pB was determined to be ideal for dentin remineralization, based on hydroxyapatite (HA) morphology and calcium/phosphorus ratios. Interestingly, HA was nucleated on collagenase-challenged dentin with as little as 20 min of 1:4 peptide incubation. Electron diffraction confirmed the presence of large HA crystals that produced a diffraction pattern indicative of a rod-like crystal structure. These findings suggest that DMP1-derived peptides may be useful to modulate mineral deposition and subsequent formation of HA when exposed to physiological concentrations of calcium and phosphate. PMID:25694469

  9. DMP1-derived Peptides Promote Remineralization of Human Dentin

    PubMed Central

    Padovano, J.D.; Ravindran, S.; Snee, P.T.; Ramachandran, A.; Bedran-Russo, A.K.

    2015-01-01

    Remineralization of dentin during dental caries is of considerable clinical interest. Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is a non-collagenous calcium-binding protein that plays a critical role in biomineralization. In the present study, we tested if peptides derived from DMP1 can be used for dentin remineralization. Peptide pA (pA, MW = 1.726 kDa) and peptide pB (pB, MW = 2.185), containing common collagen-binding domains and unique calcium-binding domains, were synthesized by solid-phase chemistry. An extreme caries lesion scenario was created by collagenase digestion, and the biomineral-nucleating potential of these peptides was ascertained when coated on collagenase-treated dentin matrix and control, native human dentin matrix under physiological levels of calcium and phosphate. Scanning electron microscopy analysis suggests that peptide pB was an effective nucleator when compared with pA. However, a 1:4 ratio of pA to pB was determined to be ideal for dentin remineralization, based on hydroxyapatite (HA) morphology and calcium/phosphorus ratios. Interestingly, HA was nucleated on collagenase-challenged dentin with as little as 20 min of 1:4 peptide incubation. Electron diffraction confirmed the presence of large HA crystals that produced a diffraction pattern indicative of a rod-like crystal structure. These findings suggest that DMP1-derived peptides may be useful to modulate mineral deposition and subsequent formation of HA when exposed to physiological concentrations of calcium and phosphate. PMID:25694469

  10. DMP1-derived peptides promote remineralization of human dentin.

    PubMed

    Padovano, J D; Ravindran, S; Snee, P T; Ramachandran, A; Bedran-Russo, A K; George, A

    2015-04-01

    Remineralization of dentin during dental caries is of considerable clinical interest. Dentin matrix protein 1 (DMP1) is a non-collagenous calcium-binding protein that plays a critical role in biomineralization. In the present study, we tested if peptides derived from DMP1 can be used for dentin remineralization. Peptide pA (pA, MW = 1.726 kDa) and peptide pB (pB, MW = 2.185), containing common collagen-binding domains and unique calcium-binding domains, were synthesized by solid-phase chemistry. An extreme caries lesion scenario was created by collagenase digestion, and the biomineral-nucleating potential of these peptides was ascertained when coated on collagenase-treated dentin matrix and control, native human dentin matrix under physiological levels of calcium and phosphate. Scanning electron microscopy analysis suggests that peptide pB was an effective nucleator when compared with pA. However, a 1:4 ratio of pA to pB was determined to be ideal for dentin remineralization, based on hydroxyapatite (HA) morphology and calcium/phosphorus ratios. Interestingly, HA was nucleated on collagenase-challenged dentin with as little as 20 min of 1:4 peptide incubation. Electron diffraction confirmed the presence of large HA crystals that produced a diffraction pattern indicative of a rod-like crystal structure. These findings suggest that DMP1-derived peptides may be useful to modulate mineral deposition and subsequent formation of HA when exposed to physiological concentrations of calcium and phosphate.

  11. Anti-tumoral activity of human salivary peptides.

    PubMed

    da Costa, João Pinto; Carvalhais, Virginia; Amado, Francisco; Silva, Artur; Nogueira-Ferreira, Rita; Ferreira, Rita; Helguero, Luísa; Vitorino, Rui

    2015-09-01

    Chemotherapy continues to be the standard treatment for advanced or metastasized cancer. However, commonly used chemotherapeutic agents may induce damage in healthy cells and tissues. Thus, in recent years, there has been an increased focus on the development of new, efficient anticancer drugs exhibiting low toxicity and that are not affected by mechanisms of chemoresistance. In the present work, we tested synthetic and naturally obtained human salivary peptides against breast, prostate, colon, osteosarcoma and bladder cancer cell lines (T47-D, PC-3, HT-29, MG63, T-24, respectively). Results have showed that there is a reduced cell population increase that is peptide-, cell- and possibly pathway-specific, with the most potent effect observed in observed in T-47D breast cancer cells. Protein expression and microscopy results further indicate that, in this cell line, the peptide with the sequence GPPPQGGRPQG (GG peptide) interferes with the ability of cell adhesion proteins to stabilize adherens junctions, such as E-cadherin, leading to apoptosis. These promising results encourage future works aimed at disclosing the vast potential of salivary peptides as new therapeutic agents.

  12. Anti-Staphylococcal Biofilm Effects of Human Cathelicidin Peptides.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Biswajit; Golla, Radha M; Lau, Kyle; Lushnikova, Tamara; Wang, Guangshun

    2016-01-14

    Staphylococcus aureus can live together in the form of biofilms to avoid elimination by the host. Thus, a useful strategy to counteract bacterial biofilms is to re-engineer human antimicrobial peptide LL-37 so that it can be used as a remedy for preventing and removing biofilms. This study reports antibiofilm effects of four human cathelicidin LL-37 peptides against community-associated and hospital isolated methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) strains. Although the intact molecule LL-37 inhibited biofilm formation at low concentrations, it did not inhibit bacterial attachment nor disrupt preformed biofilms. However, two 17-residue peptides, GF-17 and 17BIPHE2, inhibited bacterial attachment, biofilm growth, and disrupted established biofilms. An inactive peptide RI-10 was used as a negative control. Our results obtained using the S. aureus mutants in a static biofilm model are consistent with the literature obtained in a flow cell biofilm model. Because 17BIPHE2 is the most effective biofilm disruptor with desired stability to proteases, it is a promising lead for developing new anti-MRSA biofilm agents. PMID:26819677

  13. Evaluation of New Diagnostic Biomarkers in Pediatric Sepsis: Matrix Metalloproteinase-9, Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1, Mid-Regional Pro-Atrial Natriuretic Peptide, and Adipocyte Fatty-Acid Binding Protein

    PubMed Central

    Alqahtani, Mashael F.; Smith, Craig M.; Weiss, Scott L.; Dawson, Susan; Ralay Ranaivo, Hantamalala; Wainwright, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Elevated plasma concentrations of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), mid-regional pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (mrProANP), and adipocyte fatty-acid-binding proteins (A-FaBPs) have been investigated as biomarkers for sepsis or detection of acute neurological injuries in adults, but not children. We carried out a single-center, prospective observational study to determine if these measures could serve as biomarkers to identify children with sepsis. A secondary aim was to determine if these biomarkers could identify children with neurologic complications of sepsis. A total of 90 patients ≤ 18 years-old were included in this study. 30 with severe sepsis or septic shock were compared to 30 age-matched febrile and 30 age-matched healthy controls. Serial measurements of each biomarker were obtained, beginning on day 1 of ICU admission. In septic patients, MMP9-/TIMP-1 ratios (Median, IQR, n) were reduced on day 1 (0.024, 0.004–0.174, 13), day 2 (0.020, 0.002–0.109, 10), and day 3 (0.018, 0.003–0.058, 23) compared with febrile (0.705, 0.187–1.778, 22) and healthy (0.7, 0.4–1.2, 29) (p< 0.05) controls. A-FaBP and mrProANP (Median, IQR ng/mL, n) were elevated in septic patients compared to control groups on first 2 days after admission to the PICU (p <0.05). The area under the curve (AUC) for MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio, mrProANP, and A-FaBP to distinguish septic patients from healthy controls were 0.96, 0.99, and 0.76, respectively. MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio was inversely and mrProANP was directly related to PIM-2, PELOD, and ICU and hospital LOS (p<0.05). A-FaBP level was associated with PELOD, hospital and ICU length of stay (p<0.05). MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio associated with poor Glasgow Outcome Score (p<0.05). A-FaBP levels in septic patients with neurological dysfunction (29.3, 17.2–54.6, 7) were significantly increased compared to septic patients without neurological dysfunction (14.6, 13.3–20.6, 11). MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratios

  14. Evaluation of New Diagnostic Biomarkers in Pediatric Sepsis: Matrix Metalloproteinase-9, Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1, Mid-Regional Pro-Atrial Natriuretic Peptide, and Adipocyte Fatty-Acid Binding Protein.

    PubMed

    Alqahtani, Mashael F; Smith, Craig M; Weiss, Scott L; Dawson, Susan; Ralay Ranaivo, Hantamalala; Wainwright, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    Elevated plasma concentrations of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), mid-regional pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (mrProANP), and adipocyte fatty-acid-binding proteins (A-FaBPs) have been investigated as biomarkers for sepsis or detection of acute neurological injuries in adults, but not children. We carried out a single-center, prospective observational study to determine if these measures could serve as biomarkers to identify children with sepsis. A secondary aim was to determine if these biomarkers could identify children with neurologic complications of sepsis. A total of 90 patients ≤ 18 years-old were included in this study. 30 with severe sepsis or septic shock were compared to 30 age-matched febrile and 30 age-matched healthy controls. Serial measurements of each biomarker were obtained, beginning on day 1 of ICU admission. In septic patients, MMP9-/TIMP-1 ratios (Median, IQR, n) were reduced on day 1 (0.024, 0.004-0.174, 13), day 2 (0.020, 0.002-0.109, 10), and day 3 (0.018, 0.003-0.058, 23) compared with febrile (0.705, 0.187-1.778, 22) and healthy (0.7, 0.4-1.2, 29) (p< 0.05) controls. A-FaBP and mrProANP (Median, IQR ng/mL, n) were elevated in septic patients compared to control groups on first 2 days after admission to the PICU (p <0.05). The area under the curve (AUC) for MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio, mrProANP, and A-FaBP to distinguish septic patients from healthy controls were 0.96, 0.99, and 0.76, respectively. MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio was inversely and mrProANP was directly related to PIM-2, PELOD, and ICU and hospital LOS (p<0.05). A-FaBP level was associated with PELOD, hospital and ICU length of stay (p<0.05). MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio associated with poor Glasgow Outcome Score (p<0.05). A-FaBP levels in septic patients with neurological dysfunction (29.3, 17.2-54.6, 7) were significantly increased compared to septic patients without neurological dysfunction (14.6, 13.3-20.6, 11). MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratios were

  15. Evaluation of New Diagnostic Biomarkers in Pediatric Sepsis: Matrix Metalloproteinase-9, Tissue Inhibitor of Metalloproteinase-1, Mid-Regional Pro-Atrial Natriuretic Peptide, and Adipocyte Fatty-Acid Binding Protein.

    PubMed

    Alqahtani, Mashael F; Smith, Craig M; Weiss, Scott L; Dawson, Susan; Ralay Ranaivo, Hantamalala; Wainwright, Mark S

    2016-01-01

    Elevated plasma concentrations of matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1 (TIMP-1), mid-regional pro-atrial natriuretic peptide (mrProANP), and adipocyte fatty-acid-binding proteins (A-FaBPs) have been investigated as biomarkers for sepsis or detection of acute neurological injuries in adults, but not children. We carried out a single-center, prospective observational study to determine if these measures could serve as biomarkers to identify children with sepsis. A secondary aim was to determine if these biomarkers could identify children with neurologic complications of sepsis. A total of 90 patients ≤ 18 years-old were included in this study. 30 with severe sepsis or septic shock were compared to 30 age-matched febrile and 30 age-matched healthy controls. Serial measurements of each biomarker were obtained, beginning on day 1 of ICU admission. In septic patients, MMP9-/TIMP-1 ratios (Median, IQR, n) were reduced on day 1 (0.024, 0.004-0.174, 13), day 2 (0.020, 0.002-0.109, 10), and day 3 (0.018, 0.003-0.058, 23) compared with febrile (0.705, 0.187-1.778, 22) and healthy (0.7, 0.4-1.2, 29) (p< 0.05) controls. A-FaBP and mrProANP (Median, IQR ng/mL, n) were elevated in septic patients compared to control groups on first 2 days after admission to the PICU (p <0.05). The area under the curve (AUC) for MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio, mrProANP, and A-FaBP to distinguish septic patients from healthy controls were 0.96, 0.99, and 0.76, respectively. MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio was inversely and mrProANP was directly related to PIM-2, PELOD, and ICU and hospital LOS (p<0.05). A-FaBP level was associated with PELOD, hospital and ICU length of stay (p<0.05). MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratio associated with poor Glasgow Outcome Score (p<0.05). A-FaBP levels in septic patients with neurological dysfunction (29.3, 17.2-54.6, 7) were significantly increased compared to septic patients without neurological dysfunction (14.6, 13.3-20.6, 11). MMP-9/TIMP-1 ratios were

  16. Transmembrane Pores Formed by Human Antimicrobial Peptide LL-37

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Shuo

    2011-01-01

    Human LL-37 is a multifunctional cathelicidin peptide that has shown a wide spectrum of antimicrobial activity by permeabilizing microbial membranes similar to other antimicrobial peptides; however, its molecular mechanism has not been clarified. Two independent experiments revealed LL-37 bound to membranes in the {alpha}-helical form with the axis lying in the plane of membrane. This led to the conclusion that membrane permeabilization by LL-37 is a nonpore carpet-like mechanism of action. Here we report the detection of transmembrane pores induced by LL-37. The pore formation coincided with LL-37 helices aligning approximately normal to the plane of the membrane. We observed an unusual phenomenon of LL-37 embedded in stacked membranes, which are commonly used in peptide orientation studies. The membrane-bound LL-37 was found in the normal orientation only when the membrane spacing in the multilayers exceeded its fully hydrated value. This was achieved by swelling the stacked membranes with excessive water to a swollen state. The transmembrane pores were detected and investigated in swollen states by means of oriented circular dichroism, neutron in-plane scattering, and x-ray lamellar diffraction. The results are consistent with the effect of LL-37 on giant unilamellar vesicles. The detected pores had a water channel of radius 2333 {angstrom}. The molecular mechanism of pore formation by LL-37 is consistent with the two-state model exhibited by magainin and other small pore-forming peptides. The discovery that peptide-membrane interactions in swollen states are different from those in less hydrated states may have implications for other large membrane-active peptides and proteins studied in stacked membranes.

  17. Peptide Characterization of Mature Fluorotic and Control Human Enamel.

    PubMed

    Lelis, Isabel Maria Porto; Molina, Gabriela F; Souza, Cláudia; Perez, Walter B; Laure, Helen J; Rosa, José C; Gerlach, Raquel F

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to high fluoride levels during amelogenesis causes enamel fluorosis. This study aimed to determine and compare the amino acid sequences in the enamel of fluorotic and control teeth. This investigation included enamel samples obtained from erupted and non-erupted third molars with either TF grade 4-6 (n=7) fluorosis or no sign of fluorosis (controls, n=7). The samples were kept frozen at -20 °C until protein extraction. Samples were etched and processed with a cocktail of proteinase inhibitors and immediately analyzed. Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Time-Of-Flight/Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF) followed by MASCOT search aided the peptides analysis. The more abundant peptides bore the N-terminal amelogenin sequences WYQSIRPPYP (which is specific for the X-encoded amelogenin) and MPLPPHPGHPGYINF (which does not show sexual dimorphism) were not different in control or fluorotic enamel. There was no missing proteolytic cleavage in the fluorotic samples, which suggested that the increased amount of protein described in fluorotic enamel did not stem from the decreased ability of proteinases to cleave the proteins in humans. This study showed how to successfully obtain peptide from superficial enamel. A relatively low number of teeth was sufficient to provide good data on the actual peptides found in mature enamel. PMID:27007349

  18. Bacteriophage-Fused Peptides for Serodiagnosis of Human Strongyloidiasis

    PubMed Central

    Feliciano, Nágilla Daliane; Ribeiro, Vanessa da Silva; Santos, Fabiana de Almeida Araújo; Fujimura, Patricia Tiemi; Gonzaga, Henrique Tomaz; Goulart, Luiz Ricardo; Costa-Cruz, Julia Maria

    2014-01-01

    Background Strongyloidiasis, a human intestinal infection caused by the nematode Strongyloides stercoralis, is frequently underdiagnosed and although its high prevalence is still a neglected parasitic disease because conventional diagnostic tests based on parasitological examination (presence of Strongyloides larvae in stool) are not sufficiently sensitive due to the low parasitic load and to the irregular larval output. There is an urgent need to improve diagnostic assays, especially for immunocompromised patients with high parasitic load as consequence of self-infection cycle, which can disseminate throughout the body, resulting in a potentially fatal hyperinfection syndrome often accompanied by sepsis or meningitis. Methods/Principal Findings We have performed Phage Display technology to select peptides that mimic S. stercoralis antigens, capable of detecting a humoral response in patients with strongyloidiasis. The peptides reactivity was investigated by Phage-ELISA through different panels of serum samples. We have successfully selected five peptides with significant immunoreactivity to circulating IgG from patients' sera with strongyloidiasis. The phage displayed peptides C9 and C10 presented the highest diagnostic potential (AUC>0.87) with excellent sensitivity (>85%) and good specificity (>77.5%), suggesting that some S. stercoralis antigens trigger systemic immune response. Conclusions/Significance These novel antigens are interesting serum biomarkers for routine strongyloidiasis screenings due to the easy production and simple assay using Phage-ELISA. Such markers may also present a promising application for therapeutic monitoring. PMID:24874206

  19. Peptide Characterization of Mature Fluorotic and Control Human Enamel.

    PubMed

    Lelis, Isabel Maria Porto; Molina, Gabriela F; Souza, Cláudia; Perez, Walter B; Laure, Helen J; Rosa, José C; Gerlach, Raquel F

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to high fluoride levels during amelogenesis causes enamel fluorosis. This study aimed to determine and compare the amino acid sequences in the enamel of fluorotic and control teeth. This investigation included enamel samples obtained from erupted and non-erupted third molars with either TF grade 4-6 (n=7) fluorosis or no sign of fluorosis (controls, n=7). The samples were kept frozen at -20 °C until protein extraction. Samples were etched and processed with a cocktail of proteinase inhibitors and immediately analyzed. Matrix Assisted Laser Desorption/Ionization-Time-Of-Flight/Time-of-Flight Mass Spectrometry (MALDI-TOF/TOF) followed by MASCOT search aided the peptides analysis. The more abundant peptides bore the N-terminal amelogenin sequences WYQSIRPPYP (which is specific for the X-encoded amelogenin) and MPLPPHPGHPGYINF (which does not show sexual dimorphism) were not different in control or fluorotic enamel. There was no missing proteolytic cleavage in the fluorotic samples, which suggested that the increased amount of protein described in fluorotic enamel did not stem from the decreased ability of proteinases to cleave the proteins in humans. This study showed how to successfully obtain peptide from superficial enamel. A relatively low number of teeth was sufficient to provide good data on the actual peptides found in mature enamel.

  20. Human IgA-binding peptides selected from random peptide libraries: affinity maturation and application in IgA purification.

    PubMed

    Hatanaka, Takaaki; Ohzono, Shinji; Park, Mirae; Sakamoto, Kotaro; Tsukamoto, Shogo; Sugita, Ryohei; Ishitobi, Hiroyuki; Mori, Toshiyuki; Ito, Osamu; Sorajo, Koichi; Sugimura, Kazuhisa; Ham, Sihyun; Ito, Yuji

    2012-12-14

    Phage display system is a powerful tool to design specific ligands for target molecules. Here, we used disulfide-constrained random peptide libraries constructed with the T7 phage display system to isolate peptides specific to human IgA. The binding clones (A1-A4) isolated by biopanning exhibited clear specificity to human IgA, but the synthetic peptide derived from the A2 clone exhibited a low specificity/affinity (K(d) = 1.3 μm). Therefore, we tried to improve the peptide using a partial randomized phage display library and mutational studies on the synthetic peptides. The designed Opt-1 peptide exhibited a 39-fold higher affinity (K(d) = 33 nm) than the A2 peptide. An Opt-1 peptide-conjugated column was used to purify IgA from human plasma. However, the recovered IgA fraction was contaminated with other proteins, indicating nonspecific binding. To design a peptide with increased binding specificity, we examined the structural features of Opt-1 and the Opt-1-IgA complex using all-atom molecular dynamics simulations with explicit water. The simulation results revealed that the Opt-1 peptide displayed partial helicity in the N-terminal region and possessed a hydrophobic cluster that played a significant role in tight binding with IgA-Fc. However, these hydrophobic residues of Opt-1 may contribute to nonspecific binding with other proteins. To increase binding specificity, we introduced several mutations in the hydrophobic residues of Opt-1. The resultant Opt-3 peptide exhibited high specificity and high binding affinity for IgA, leading to successful isolation of IgA without contamination.

  1. Vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) inhibits human renal cell carcinoma proliferation.

    PubMed

    Vacas, Eva; Fernández-Martínez, Ana B; Bajo, Ana M; Sánchez-Chapado, Manuel; Schally, Andrew V; Prieto, Juan C; Carmena, María J

    2012-10-01

    Clear renal cell carcinoma (cRCC) is an aggressive and fatal neoplasm. The present work was undertaken to investigate the antiproliferative potential of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) exposure on non-tumoral (HK2) and tumoral (A498, cRCC) human proximal tubular epithelial cell lines. Reverse transcription and semiquantitative PCR was used at the VIP mRNA level whereas enzyme immunoanalysis was performed at the protein level. Both renal cell lines expressed VIP as well as VIP/pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (VPAC) receptors whereas only HK2 cells expressed formyl peptide receptor-like 1 (FPRL-1). Receptors were functional, as shown by VIP stimulation of adenylyl cyclase activity. Treatment with 0.1μM VIP (24h) inhibited proliferation of A498 but not HK2 cells as based on a reduction in the incorporation of [(3)H]-thymidine and BrdU (5'-Br-2'-deoxyuridine), PCNA (proliferating-cell nuclear antigen) expression and STAT3 (signal transducer and activator of transcription 3) expression and activation. VPAC(1)-receptor participation was established using JV-1-53 antagonist and siRNA transfection. Growth-inhibitory response to VIP was related to the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP)/exchange protein directly activated by cAMP (EPAC)/phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3-K) signaling systems as shown by studies on adenylate cyclase stimulation, and using the EPAC-specific compound 8CPT-2Me-cAMP and specific kinase inhibitors such as H89, wortmannin and PD98059. The efficacy of VIP on the prevention of tumor progression was confirmed in vivo using xenografted athymic mouse. These actions support a potential role of this peptide and its agonists in new therapies for cRCC.

  2. Vasoactive intestinal peptide signaling axis in human leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Dorsam, Glenn Paul; Benton, Keith; Failing, Jarrett; Batra, Sandeep

    2011-01-01

    The vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) signaling axis constitutes a master “communication coordinator” between cells of the nervous and immune systems. To date, VIP and its two main receptors expressed in T lymphocytes, vasoactive intestinal peptide receptor (VPAC)1 and VPAC2, mediate critical cellular functions regulating adaptive immunity, including arresting CD4 T cells in G1 of the cell cycle, protection from apoptosis and a potent chemotactic recruiter of T cells to the mucosa associated lymphoid compartment of the gastrointestinal tissues. Since the discovery of VIP in 1970, followed by the cloning of VPAC1 and VPAC2 in the early 1990s, this signaling axis has been associated with common human cancers, including leukemia. This review highlights the present day knowledge of the VIP ligand and its receptor expression profile in T cell leukemia and cell lines. Also, there will be a discussion describing how the anti-leukemic DNA binding transcription factor, Ikaros, regulates VIP receptor expression in primary human CD4 T lymphocytes and T cell lymphoblastic cell lines (e.g. Hut-78). Lastly, future goals will be mentioned that are expected to uncover the role of how the VIP signaling axis contributes to human leukemogenesis, and to establish whether the VIP receptor signature expressed by leukemic blasts can provide therapeutic and/or diagnostic information. PMID:21765981

  3. Binding of Synthetic LKEKK Peptide to Human T-Lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Navolotskaya, E V; Zinchenko, D V; Zolotarev, Y A; Kolobov, A A; Lipkin, V M

    2016-08-01

    The synthetic peptide LKEKK corresponding to sequence 16-20 of human thymosin-α1 and 131-135 of human interferon-α2 was labeled with tritium to specific activity 28 Ci/mol. The [3H]LKEKK bound with high affinity (Kd = 3.7 ± 0.3 nM) to donor blood T-lymphocytes. Treatment of cells with trypsin or proteinase K did not abolish [3H]LKEKK binding, suggesting the non-protein nature of the peptide receptor. The binding was inhibited by thymosin-α1, interferon-α2, and cholera toxin B subunit (Ki = 2.0 ± 0.3, 2.2 ± 0.2, and 3.6 ± 0.3 nM, respectively). Using [3H]LKEKK, we demonstrated the existence of a non-protein receptor common for thymosin-α1, interferon-α2, and cholera toxin B-subunit on donor blood T-lymphocytes. PMID:27677554

  4. Thirty years of the heart as an endocrine organ: physiological role and clinical utility of cardiac natriuretic hormones.

    PubMed

    Clerico, Aldo; Giannoni, Alberto; Vittorini, Simona; Passino, Claudio

    2011-07-01

    Thirty years ago, De Bold et al. (20) reported that atrial extracts contain some biologically active peptides, which promote a rapid and massive diuresis and natriuresis when injected in rats. It is now clear that the heart also exerts an endocrine function and in this way plays a key role in the regulation of cardiovascular and renal systems. The aim of this review is to discuss some recent insights and still-debated findings regarding the cardiac natriuretic hormones (CNHs) produced and secreted by cardiomyocytes (i.e., atrial natriuretic peptide and B-type natriuretic peptide). The functional status of the CNH system depends not only on the production/secretion of CNHs by cardiomyocytes but also on both the peripheral activation of circulating inactive precursor of natriuretic hormones and the transduction of the hormone signal by specific receptors. In this review, we will discuss the data supporting the hypothesis that the production and secretion of CNHs is the result of a complex integration among mechanical, chemical, hemodynamic, humoral, ischemic, and inflammatory inputs. The cross talk among endocrine function, adipose tissue, and sex steroid hormones will be discussed more in detail, considering the clinically relevant relationships linking together cardiovascular risk, sex, and body fat development and distribution. Finally, we will review the pathophysiological role and the clinical relevance of both peripheral maturation of the precursor of B-type natriuretic peptides and hormone signal transduction.

  5. [C-TYPE NATRIURETIC PEP- TIDE: WHAT, WHERE AND WHAT FOR IS THIS?].

    PubMed

    Korostyshevskaya, I M; Maksimov, V F; Rudenko, N S

    2015-05-01

    The up-to-day world-wide data about the structure, distribution, and physiological effects of the most poorly known among the natriuretic peptides--the C-type (CNP)--are summarized in the review. Despite its name, this peptide does not stimulate sodium excretion but shares the prominent vasodilating and antyproliferating effects in different organs and tissues. The special emphasis is attended to CNP functions in central nervous system. The information about the peptide molecular biology, including intracellular processing, blood peptide concentration, specific receptors structure, and signaling pathways in target cells is presented.

  6. Preparation of Tyr-C-peptide from genetically altered human insulin precursor.

    PubMed

    Sun, H; Tang, J; Hu, M

    1995-12-01

    C-peptide radioimmunoassay (C-peptide RIA) is widely used in determination of pancreatic B-cell secretion activity. 125I labeled Tyr-C-peptide is indispensable in C-peptide RIA kit. Herein we discuss a way of obtaining recombinant Tyr-C-peptide. Arg32Tyr human pro-insulin mutant (R32Y-proinsulin) gene was constructed by site-directed mutagenesis and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Purified R32Y-proinsulin was converted to insulin and Tyr-C-peptide by trypsin and carboxypeptidase B codigestion. Tyr-C-peptide was isolated through reverse-phase HPLC (RP-HPLC) and identified by C-peptide RIA and amino acid analysis.

  7. Preparation of Tyr-C-peptide from genetically altered human insulin presursor

    SciTech Connect

    Huaiyu Sun; Jianguo Tang; Meihao Hu

    1995-12-01

    C-peptide radiommunoassay (C-peptide RIA) is widely used in determination of pancreatic B-cell secretion activity. {sup 125}I labeled Tyr-C-peptide is indispensable in C-peptide RIA kit. Herein we discuss a way of obtaining recombinant Tyr-C-peptide. Arg32Tyr human proinsulin mutant (R32Y-proinsulin) gene was constructed by site-directed mutagenesis and overexpressed in Escherichia coli. Purified R32Y-proinsulin was converted to insulin and Tyr-C-peptide by trypsin and carboxypeptidase B codigestion. Tyr-C-peptide was isolated through reverse-phase HPLC (RP-HPLC) and identified by C-peptide RIA and amino acid analysis. 12 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  8. Interaction of synthetic peptide octarphin (TPLVTLFK) with human blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Nekrasova, Yuliia N; Navolotskaya, Elena V

    2013-08-01

    The synthetic peptide octarphin (TPLVTLFK) corresponding to the sequence 12-19 of β-endorphin, a selective agonist of non-opioid β-endorphin receptor, was labeled with tritium to specific activity of 29 Ci/mmol. The analysis of [(3) H]octarphin binding to human T and B lymphocytes separated from normal human blood revealed the existence of one type of high-affinity binding sites (receptors): Kd 3.0 and 3.2 nM, respectively. Besides unlabeled octarphin, unlabeled β-endorphin possessed the ability to inhibit the specific binding of [(3) H]octarphin to Т and B lymphocytes (Ki 1.9 and 2.2 nМ, respectively). Tests of the specificity of the receptors revealed that they are not sensitive to naloxone, α-endorphin, γ-endorphin, [Met(5) ]enkephalin, and [Leu(5) ]enkephalin. Thus, both T and B lymphocytes from normal human blood express non-opioid receptor for β-endorphin. Binding of the hormone to the receptor provides a fragment 12-19. PMID:23794487

  9. Biological activity of Tat (47-58) peptide on human pathogenic fungi

    SciTech Connect

    Jung, Hyun Jun; Park, Yoonkyung; Hahm, Kyung-Soo; Lee, Dong Gun . E-mail: dglee222@knu.ac.kr

    2006-06-23

    Tat (47-58) peptide, a positively charged Arginine-rich peptide derived from HIV-1 regulatory protein Tat, is known for a peptidic delivery factor as a cell-penetrating peptide on mammalian cells. In this study, antifungal effect and its mode of action of Tat peptide were investigated on fungal cells. The results indicate that Tat peptide exhibits antifungal activity against pathogenic fungal cells without hemolytic effect on human erythrocytes. To understand the mechanism(s) of Tat peptide, the cellular distribution of the peptide was investigated. Tat peptide internalized in the fungal cells without any damage to cell membrane when examined using an artificial liposome (PC/cholesterol; 10:1, w/w). Moreover, flow cytometry analysis exhibited the uptake of Tat peptide by energy- and salt-independent pathway, and confocal scanning microscopy displayed that this peptide accumulated in the nucleus of fungal cells rapidly without any impediment by time or temperature, which generally influence on the viral infections. After penetration into the nuclear, the peptide affected the process of cell cycle of Candida albicans through the arrest at G1 phase.

  10. Role of acetylation and charge in antimicrobial peptides based on human beta-defensin-3.

    PubMed

    Papanastasiou, Emilios Andrew; Hua, Quyen; Sandouk, Aline; Son, U Hyon; Christenson, Andrew James; Van Hoek, Monique Louise; Bishop, Barney Michael

    2009-07-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides are an evolutionarily ancient and essential element of innate immunity in higher organisms. The precise mechanism by which these peptides exert their antimicrobial activity on bacteria is not well understood. Decapeptides based on the C-terminus of human beta-defensin-3 were designed and evaluated to study the role of charge in defining the antimicrobial activity and selectivity of these peptides against Escherichia coli. Acetylated derivatives of these peptides were prepared in order to further evaluate how positively charged primary amines contribute to potency in these small antimicrobial peptides. These peptides enabled us to explore the relationship between net charge, charge distribution and antimicrobial activity. While the results indicate that net charge is a major factor in antimicrobial activity in these peptides, the actual relationship between charge and potency appears to be more complex.

  11. Proteolytic fragmentation and peptide mapping of human carboxyamidomethylated tracheobronchial mucin

    SciTech Connect

    Rose, M.C.; Kaufman, B.; Martin, B.M.

    1989-05-15

    Human tracheobronchial mucin was isolated from lung mucosal gel by chromatography on Sepharose 4B in the presence of dissociating and reducing agents, and its thiol residues were carboxyamidomethylated with iodo(1(-14)C)acetamide. The 14C-carboxyamido-methylated mucin was purified by chromatography on Sepharose 2B. No low molecular weight components were detected by molecular sieve chromatography or polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of dissociating and reducing agents or by analytical density centrifugation in CsCl/guanidinium chloride. After digestion of the purified 14C-mucin with trypsin-L-1-tosylamido-2-phenylethyl chloromethyl ketone, three fractions (TR-1, TR-2, and TR-3) were observed by chromatography on Sepharose 4B. TR-1, a 260-kDa mucin glycopeptide fragment, contained all of the neutral hexose and blood group activity and 20% of the radioactivity in the undigested mucin. TR-1 was refractory to a second incubation with trypsin but could be digested by papain or Pronase to a smaller mucin glycopeptide fraction, as judged by the slight decrease in apparent molecular weight on Sepharose CL-4B. These mucin glycopeptides contained approximately 50% of the radioactivity in the TR-1 fraction, indicating that the glycosylated domains of carboxyamidomethylated tracheobronchial mucin contained thiol residues. The remainder of the radioactivity from papain or Pronase digests of TR-1 eluted, like the TR-3 fractions, in the salt fraction on Sepharose CL-4B. Peptide mapping of the nonglycosylated TR-3 fraction by TLC and high voltage electrophoresis yielded six principal and several less intensely stained ninhydrin reactive components, with the radiolabel concentrated in one of the latter peptides.

  12. The human tri-peptide GHK and tissue remodeling.

    PubMed

    Pickart, Loren

    2008-01-01

    Tissue remodeling follows the initial phase of wound healing and stops inflammatory and scar-forming processes, then restores the normal tissue morphology. The human peptide Gly-(L-His)-(L-Lys) or GHK, has a copper 2+ (Cu(2+)) affinity similar to the copper transport site on albumin and forms GHK-Cu, a complex with Cu(2+). These two molecules activate a plethora of remodeling related processes: (1) chemoattraction of repair cells such as macrophages, mast cells, capillary cells; (2) anti-inflammatory actions (suppression of free radicals, thromboxane formation, release of oxidizing iron, transforming growth factor beta-1, tumor necrosis factor alpha and protein glycation while increasing superoxide dismutase, vessel vasodilation, blocking ultraviolet damage to skin keratinocytes and improving fibroblast recovery after X-ray treatments); (3) increases protein synthesis of collagen, elastin, metalloproteinases, anti-proteases, vascular endothelial growth factor, fibroblast growth factor 2, nerve growth factor, neutrotropins 3 and 4, and erythropoietin; (4) increases the proliferation of fibroblasts and keratinocytes; nerve outgrowth, angiogenesis, and hair follicle size. GHK-Cu stimulates wound healing in numerous models and in humans. Controlled studies on aged skin demonstrated that it tightens skin, improves elasticity and firmness, reduces fine lines, wrinkles, photodamage and hyperpigmentation. GHK-Cu also improves hair transplant success, protects hepatic tissue from tetrachloromethane poisoning, blocks stomach ulcer development, and heals intestinal ulcers and bone tissue. These results are beginning to define the complex biochemical processes that regulate tissue remodeling. PMID:18644225

  13. Atrial natriuretic factor: radioimmunoassay and effects on adrenal and pituitary glands

    SciTech Connect

    Gutkowska, J.; Horky, K.; Schiffrin, E.L.; Thibault, G.; Garcia, R.; De Lean, A.; Hamet, P.; Tremblay, J.; Anand-Srivastava, M.B.; Januszewicz, P.

    1986-06-01

    A simple and sensitive radioimmunoassay was developed for measurement of immunoreactive atrial natriuretic factor (IR-ANF) in rat and human plasma and in rat atria. The two atria contain about 20 ..mu..g ANF per rat. The right atrium contained 2.5 times more ANF than did the left. Ether anesthesia and morphine markedly increased IR-ANF in rat plasma. The concentration of IR-ANF in plasma of clinically normal human subjects was 65.3 +/- 2.5 pg/ml. Paroxysmal tachycardia and rapid atrial pacing significantly increased IR-ANF in human plasma. Two- to seven-fold higher concentrations were found in coronary sinus blood than in the peripheral circulation. In the plasma of rats and humans, circulating ANF is probably a small-molecular-weight peptide. ANF acts on the adrenal and the pituitary. ANF inhibits aldosterone secretion from rat zona glomerulosa and steroid secretion by bovine adrenal zona glomerulosa and fasciculata. ANF stimulated the basal secretion of arginine vasopressin (AVP) in vitro and inhibited KCl-stimulated release of AVP.

  14. Regulated Inositol‐Requiring Protein 1‐Dependent Decay as a Mechanism of Corin RNA and Protein Deficiency in Advanced Human Systolic Heart Failure

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Rebecca; Xu, Bin; Rame, J. Eduardo; Felkin, Leanne E.; Barton, Paul; Dries, Daniel L.

    2014-01-01

    the result of IRE1‐mediated corin mRNA degradation. Conclusions These data support the hypothesis that endoplasmic reticulum stress‐mediated, IRE1‐dependent targeted corin mRNA decay is a mechanism leading to corin mRNA resulting in corresponding corin protein deficiency may contribute to the pathophysiology of impaired natriuretic peptide pro‐hormone processing in humans processing in humans with advanced systolic heart failure. PMID:25516437

  15. Meta sequence analysis of human blood peptides and their parent proteins.

    PubMed

    Bowden, Peter; Pendrak, Voitek; Zhu, Peihong; Marshall, John G

    2010-04-18

    Sequence analysis of the blood peptides and their qualities will be key to understanding the mechanisms that contribute to error in LC-ESI-MS/MS. Analysis of peptides and their proteins at the level of sequences is much more direct and informative than the comparison of disparate accession numbers. A portable database of all blood peptide and protein sequences with descriptor fields and gene ontology terms might be useful for designing immunological or MRM assays from human blood. The results of twelve studies of human blood peptides and/or proteins identified by LC-MS/MS and correlated against a disparate array of genetic libraries were parsed and matched to proteins from the human ENSEMBL, SwissProt and RefSeq databases by SQL. The reported peptide and protein sequences were organized into an SQL database with full protein sequences and up to five unique peptides in order of prevalence along with the peptide count for each protein. Structured query language or BLAST was used to acquire descriptive information in current databases. Sampling error at the level of peptides is the largest source of disparity between groups. Chi Square analysis of peptide to protein distributions confirmed the significant agreement between groups on identified proteins.

  16. A peptide hydrogel derived from a fragment of human cardiac troponin C.

    PubMed

    De Leon-Rodriguez, Luis M; Kamalov, Meder; Hemar, Yacine; Mitra, Alok K; Castelletto, Valeria; Hermida-Merino, Daniel; Hamley, Ian W; Brimble, Margaret A

    2016-03-14

    The human cardiac troponin C peptide fragment H-V(9)EQLTEEQKNEFKAAFDIFVLGA(31)-OH, which covers helix-A in the native protein, self-assembles into β-sheet fibrils in solution. These fibrils further entangle to give a hydrogel. This peptide may therefore serve as a template for development of novel biomaterials.

  17. A peptide hydrogel derived from a fragment of human cardiac troponin C.

    PubMed

    De Leon-Rodriguez, Luis M; Kamalov, Meder; Hemar, Yacine; Mitra, Alok K; Castelletto, Valeria; Hermida-Merino, Daniel; Hamley, Ian W; Brimble, Margaret A

    2016-03-14

    The human cardiac troponin C peptide fragment H-V(9)EQLTEEQKNEFKAAFDIFVLGA(31)-OH, which covers helix-A in the native protein, self-assembles into β-sheet fibrils in solution. These fibrils further entangle to give a hydrogel. This peptide may therefore serve as a template for development of novel biomaterials. PMID:26892840

  18. Reactive Oxygen Species, Apoptosis, Antimicrobial Peptides and Human Inflammatory Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Oyinloye, Babatunji Emmanuel; Adenowo, Abiola Fatimah; Kappo, Abidemi Paul

    2015-01-01

    Excessive free radical generation, especially reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to oxidative stress in the biological system, has been implicated in the pathogenesis and pathological conditions associated with diverse human inflammatory diseases (HIDs). Although inflammation which is considered advantageous is a defensive mechanism in response to xenobiotics and foreign pathogen; as a result of cellular damage arising from oxidative stress, if uncontrolled, it may degenerate to chronic inflammation when the ROS levels exceed the antioxidant capacity. Therefore, in the normal resolution of inflammatory reactions, apoptosis is acknowledged to play a crucial role, while on the other hand, dysregulation in the induction of apoptosis by enhanced ROS production could also result in excessive apoptosis identified in the pathogenesis of HIDs. Apparently, a careful balance must be maintained in this complex environment. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been proposed in this review as an excellent candidate capable of playing prominent roles in maintaining this balance. Consequently, in novel drug design for the treatment and management of HIDs, AMPs are promising candidates owing to their size and multidimensional properties as well as their wide spectrum of activities and indications of reduced rate of resistance. PMID:25850012

  19. Reactive oxygen species, apoptosis, antimicrobial peptides and human inflammatory diseases.

    PubMed

    Oyinloye, Babatunji Emmanuel; Adenowo, Abiola Fatimah; Kappo, Abidemi Paul

    2015-01-01

    Excessive free radical generation, especially reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to oxidative stress in the biological system, has been implicated in the pathogenesis and pathological conditions associated with diverse human inflammatory diseases (HIDs). Although inflammation which is considered advantageous is a defensive mechanism in response to xenobiotics and foreign pathogen; as a result of cellular damage arising from oxidative stress, if uncontrolled, it may degenerate to chronic inflammation when the ROS levels exceed the antioxidant capacity. Therefore, in the normal resolution of inflammatory reactions, apoptosis is acknowledged to play a crucial role, while on the other hand, dysregulation in the induction of apoptosis by enhanced ROS production could also result in excessive apoptosis identified in the pathogenesis of HIDs. Apparently, a careful balance must be maintained in this complex environment. Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) have been proposed in this review as an excellent candidate capable of playing prominent roles in maintaining this balance. Consequently, in novel drug design for the treatment and management of HIDs, AMPs are promising candidates owing to their size and multidimensional properties as well as their wide spectrum of activities and indications of reduced rate of resistance. PMID:25850012

  20. Human 20S proteasome activity towards fluorogenic peptides of various chain lengths.

    PubMed

    Rut, Wioletta; Drag, Marcin

    2016-09-01

    The proteasome is a multicatalytic protease responsible for the degradation of misfolded proteins. We have synthesized fluorogenic substrates in which the peptide chain was systematically elongated from two to six amino acids and evaluated the effect of peptide length on all three catalytic activities of human 20S proteasome. In the cases of five- and six-membered peptides, we have also synthesized libraries of fluorogenic substrates. Kinetic analysis revealed that six-amino-acid substrates are significantly better for chymotrypsin-like and caspase-like activity than shorter peptidic substrates. In the case of trypsin-like activity, a five-amino-acid substrate was optimal. PMID:27176742

  1. Human 20S proteasome activity towards fluorogenic peptides of various chain lengths.

    PubMed

    Rut, Wioletta; Drag, Marcin

    2016-09-01

    The proteasome is a multicatalytic protease responsible for the degradation of misfolded proteins. We have synthesized fluorogenic substrates in which the peptide chain was systematically elongated from two to six amino acids and evaluated the effect of peptide length on all three catalytic activities of human 20S proteasome. In the cases of five- and six-membered peptides, we have also synthesized libraries of fluorogenic substrates. Kinetic analysis revealed that six-amino-acid substrates are significantly better for chymotrypsin-like and caspase-like activity than shorter peptidic substrates. In the case of trypsin-like activity, a five-amino-acid substrate was optimal.

  2. Position 156 influences the peptide repertoire and tapasin dependency of human leukocyte antigen B*44 allotypes

    PubMed Central

    Badrinath, Soumya; Saunders, Philippa; Huyton, Trevor; Aufderbeck, Susanne; Hiller, Oliver; Blasczyk, Rainer; Bade-Doeding, Christina

    2012-01-01

    Background Polymorphic differences between donor and recipient human leukocyte antigen class I molecules can result in graft-versus-host disease due to distinct peptide presentation. As part of the peptide-loading complex, tapasin plays an important role in selecting peptides from the pool of potential ligands. Class I polymorphisms can significantly alter the tapasin-mediated interaction with the peptide-loading complex and although most class I allotypes are highly dependent upon tapasin, some are able to load peptides independently of tapasin. Several human leukocyte antigen B*44 allotypes differ exclusively at position 156 (B*44:02156Asp, 44:03156Leu, 44:28156Arg, 44:35156Glu). From these alleles, only the high tapasin-dependency of human leukocyte antigen B*44:02 has been reported. Design and Methods We investigated the influence of position 156 polymorphisms on both the requirement of tapasin for efficient surface expression of each allotype and their peptide features. Genes encoding human leukocyte antigen B*44 variants bearing all possible substitutions at position 156 were lentivirally transduced into human leukocyte antigen class I-negative LCL 721.221 cells and the tapasin-deficient cell line LCL 721.220. Results Exclusively human leukocyte antigen B*44:28156Arg was expressed on the surface of tapasin-deficient cells, suggesting that the remaining B*44/156 variants are highly tapasin-dependent. Our computational analysis suggests that the tapasin-independence of human leukocyte antigen B*44:28156Arg is a result of stabilization of the peptide binding region and generation of a more peptide receptive state. Sequencing of peptides eluted from human leukocyte antigen B*44 molecules by liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-mass spectrometry (LTQ-Orbitrap) demonstrated that both B*44:02 and B*44:28 share the same overall peptide motif and a certain percentage of their individual peptide repertoires in the presence and/or absence of tapasin

  3. Gastrin-releasing peptide, a mammalian analog of bombesin, is present in human neuroendocrine lung tumors.

    PubMed Central

    Bostwick, D. G.; Roth, K. A.; Evans, C. J.; Barchas, J. D.; Bensch, K. G.

    1984-01-01

    Several reports have indicated that the amphibian peptide bombesin is present in oat-cell carcinoma of the human lung. The recent observation that gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP), a 27-amino acid peptide isolated from porcine intestine, may be the mammalian analog of bombesin led the authors to look for this peptide in human pulmonary tumors. Examination of 36 human lung tumors (8 carcinoids, 8 oat-cell carcinomas, and 20 non-oat-cell carcinomas) by immunohistochemistry and radioimmunoassay demonstrated the presence of high, although variable, levels of GRP in neuroendocrine tumors, and not in other histologic types. These findings indicate that bombesin immunoreactivity in human lung tumors should be attributed to GRP or GRP-like molecules and that GRP may be a useful marker of neuroendocrine differentiation. Images Figure 1 PMID:6093543

  4. An Integrated Peptide-Antigen Microarray on Plasmonic Gold Films for Sensitive Human Antibody Profiling

    PubMed Central

    Price, Jordan V.; Tabakman, Scott M.; Li, Yanguang; Gong, Ming; Hong, Guosong; Feng, Ju; Utz, Paul J.; Dai, Hongjie

    2013-01-01

    High-throughput screening for interactions of peptides with a variety of antibody targets could greatly facilitate proteomic analysis for epitope mapping, enzyme profiling, drug discovery and biomarker identification. Peptide microarrays are suited for such undertaking because of their high-throughput capability. However, existing peptide microarrays lack the sensitivity needed for detecting low abundance proteins or low affinity peptide-protein interactions. This work presents a new peptide microarray platform constructed on nanostructured plasmonic gold substrates capable of metal enhanced NIR fluorescence enhancement (NIR-FE) by hundreds of folds for screening peptide-antibody interactions with ultrahigh sensitivity. Further, an integrated histone peptide and whole antigen array is developed on the same plasmonic gold chip for profiling human antibodies in the sera of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) patients, revealing that collectively a panel of biomarkers against unmodified and post-translationally modified histone peptides and several whole antigens allow more accurate differentiation of SLE patients from healthy individuals than profiling biomarkers against peptides or whole antigens alone. PMID:23923050

  5. A Cell-penetrating Peptide Derived from Human Lactoferrin with Conformation-dependent Uptake Efficiency

    PubMed Central

    Duchardt, Falk; Ruttekolk, Ivo R.; Verdurmen, Wouter P. R.; Lortat-Jacob, Hugues; Bürck, Jochen; Hufnagel, Hansjörg; Fischer, Rainer; van den Heuvel, Maaike; Löwik, Dennis W. P. M.; Vuister, Geerten W.; Ulrich, Anne; de Waard, Michel; Brock, Roland

    2009-01-01

    The molecular events that contribute to the cellular uptake of cell-penetrating peptides (CPP) are still a matter of intense research. Here, we report on the identification and characterization of a 22-amino acid CPP derived from the human milk protein, lactoferrin. The peptide exhibits a conformation-dependent uptake efficiency that is correlated with efficient binding to heparan sulfate and lipid-induced conformational changes. The peptide contains a disulfide bridge formed by terminal cysteine residues. At concentrations exceeding 10 μm, this peptide undergoes the same rapid entry into the cytoplasm that was described previously for the arginine-rich CPPs nona-arginine and Tat. Cytoplasmic entry strictly depends on the presence of the disulfide bridge. To better understand this conformation dependence, NMR spectroscopy was performed for the free peptide, and CD measurements were performed for free and lipid-bound peptide. In solution, the peptides showed only slight differences in secondary structure, with a predominantly disordered structure both in the presence and absence of the disulfide bridge. In contrast, in complex with large unilamellar vesicles, the conformation of the oxidized and reduced forms of the peptide clearly differed. Moreover, surface plasmon resonance experiments showed that the oxidized form binds to heparan sulfate with a considerably higher affinity than the reduced form. Consistently, membrane binding and cellular uptake of the peptide were reduced when heparan sulfate chains were removed. PMID:19858187

  6. Peptide-dependent Conformational Fluctuation Determines the Stability of the Human Leukocyte Antigen Class I Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Yanaka, Saeko; Ueno, Takamasa; Shi, Yi; Qi, Jianxun; Gao, George F.; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Sugase, Kenji

    2014-01-01

    In immune-mediated control of pathogens, human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I presents various antigenic peptides to CD8+ T-cells. Long-lived peptide presentation is important for efficient antigen-specific T-cell activation. Presentation time depends on the peptide sequence and the stability of the peptide-HLA complex (pHLA). However, the determinant of peptide-dependent pHLA stability remains elusive. Here, to reveal the pHLA stabilization mechanism, we examined the crystal structures of an HLA class I allomorph in complex with HIV-derived peptides and evaluated site-specific conformational fluctuations using NMR. Although the crystal structures of various pHLAs were almost identical independent of the peptides, fluctuation analyses identified a peptide-dependent minor state that would be more tightly packed toward the peptide. The minor population correlated well with the thermostability and cell surface presentation of pHLA, indicating that this newly identified minor state is important for stabilizing the pHLA and facilitating T-cell recognition. PMID:25028510

  7. LL-37-derived peptides eradicate multidrug-resistant Staphylococcus aureus from thermally wounded human skin equivalents.

    PubMed

    Haisma, Elisabeth M; de Breij, Anna; Chan, Heelam; van Dissel, Jaap T; Drijfhout, Jan W; Hiemstra, Pieter S; El Ghalbzouri, Abdoelwaheb; Nibbering, Peter H

    2014-08-01

    Burn wound infections are often difficult to treat due to the presence of multidrug-resistant bacterial strains and biofilms. Currently, mupirocin is used to eradicate methicillin-resistant Staphylococcus aureus (MRSA) from colonized persons; however, mupirocin resistance is also emerging. Since we consider antimicrobial peptides to be promising candidates for the development of novel anti-infective agents, we studied the antibacterial activities of a set of synthetic peptides against different strains of S. aureus, including mupirocin-resistant MRSA strains. The peptides were derived from P60.4Ac, a peptide based on the human cathelicidin LL-37. The results showed that peptide 10 (P10) was the only peptide more efficient than P60.4Ac, which is better than LL-37, in killing MRSA strain LUH14616. All three peptides displayed good antibiofilm activities. However, both P10 and P60.4Ac were more efficient than LL-37 in eliminating biofilm-associated bacteria. No toxic effects of these three peptides on human epidermal models were detected, as observed morphologically and by staining for mitochondrial activity. In addition, P60.4Ac and P10, but not LL-37, eradicated MRSA LUH14616 and the mupirocin-resistant MRSA strain LUH15051 from thermally wounded human skin equivalents (HSE). Interestingly, P60.4Ac and P10, but not mupirocin, eradicated LUH15051 from the HSEs. None of the peptides affected the excretion of interleukin 8 (IL-8) by thermally wounded HSEs upon MRSA exposure. In conclusion, the synthetic peptides P60.4Ac and P10 appear to be attractive candidates for the development of novel local therapies to treat patients with burn wounds infected with multidrug-resistant bacteria.

  8. Increased synthesis and release of atrial peptide during DOCA escape in conscious dogs

    SciTech Connect

    Metzler, C.H.; Gardner, D.G.; Keil, L.C.; Baxter, J.D.; Ramsay, D.J.

    1987-01-01

    The escape from the sodium-retaining effects of prolonged mineralocorticoid treatment in animals and humans was first noted over 40 yr ago, but despite intense study the mechanisms responsible for the escape phenomenon have not been identified. Putative natriuretic hormones have been proposed to account for the escape phenomenon. To determine whether atrial natriuretic peptides (ANP) could participate in the escape phenomenon, the mineralocorticoid deoxycorticosterone acetate (DOCA) was administered to conscious dogs for 14 days. Escape was accompanied by a doubling of plasma ANP concentration, determined by radioimmunoassay, and four- to sevenfold increases in caridac ANP messenger RNA. There were also significant increases in mean arterial blood pressure during the last 8 days of DOCA treatment. Thus increases in the synthesis and secretion of ANP and increases in atrial pressure may represent mechanisms that contribute to the escape from mineralocorticoid-induced sodium retention.

  9. Host-defense peptides of the skin with therapeutic potential: From hagfish to human.

    PubMed

    Conlon, J Michael

    2015-05-01

    It is now well established that peptides that were first identified on the basis of their ability to inhibit growth of bacteria and fungi are multifunctional and so are more informatively described as host-defense peptides. In some cases, their role in protecting the organism against pathogenic microorganisms, although of importance, may be secondary. A previous article in the journal (Peptides 2014; 57:67-77) assessed the potential of peptides present in the skin secretions of frogs for development into anticancer, antiviral, immunomodulatory and antidiabetic drugs. This review aims to extend the scope of this earlier article by focusing upon therapeutic applications of host-defense peptides present in skin secretions and/or skin extracts of species belonging to other vertebrate classes (Agnatha, Elasmobranchii, Teleostei, Reptilia, and Mammalia as represented by the human) that supplement their potential role as anti-infectives for use against multidrug-resistant microorganisms.

  10. Extensive in vivo human milk peptidomics reveals specific proteolysis yielding protective antimicrobial peptides

    PubMed Central

    Dallas, David C.; Guerrero, Andres; Khaldi, Nora; Castillo, Patricia A.; Martin, William F.; Smilowitz, Jennifer T.; Bevins, Charles L.; Barile, Daniela; German, J. Bruce; Lebrilla, Carlito B.

    2013-01-01

    Milk is traditionally considered an ideal source of the basic elemental nutrients required by infants. More detailed examination is revealing that milk represents a more functional ensemble of components with benefits to both infants and mothers. A comprehensive peptidomics method was developed and used to analyze human milk yielding an extensive array of protein products present in the fluid. Over 300 milk peptides were identified originating from major and many minor protein components of milk. As expected, the majority of peptides derived from β-casein, however no peptide fragments from the major milk proteins lactoferrin, α-lactalbumin and secretory immunoglobulin A were identified. Proteolysis in the mammary gland is selective—released peptides were drawn only from specific proteins and typically from only select parts of the parent sequence. A large number of the peptides showed significant sequence overlap with peptides with known antimicrobial or immunomodulatory functions. Antibacterial assays showed the milk peptide mixtures inhibited the growth of Escherichia coli and Staphylococcus aureus. The pre-digestion of milk proteins and the consequent release antibacterial peptides may provide a selective advantage through evolution by protecting both the mother's mammary gland and her nursing offspring from infection. PMID:23586814

  11. Endogenous Human Milk Peptide Release Is Greater after Preterm Birth than Term Birth123

    PubMed Central

    Dallas, David C; Smink, Christina J; Robinson, Randall C; Tian, Tian; Guerrero, Andres; Parker, Evan A; Smilowitz, Jennifer T; Hettinga, Kasper A; Underwood, Mark A; Lebrilla, Carlito B; German, J Bruce; Barile, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hundreds of naturally occurring milk peptides are present in term human milk. Preterm milk is produced before complete maturation of the mammary gland, which could change milk synthesis and secretion processes within the mammary gland, leading to differences in protein expression and enzymatic activity, thereby resulting in an altered peptide profile. Objective: This study examined differences in peptides present between milk from women delivering at term and women delivering prematurely. Methods: Nano-LC tandem mass spectrometry was employed to identify naturally occurring peptides and compare their abundances between term and preterm human milk samples at multiple time points over lactation. Term milk samples were collected from 8 mothers and preterm milk was collected from 14 mothers. The 28 preterm and 32 term human milk samples were divided into 4 groups based on day of collection (<14, 14–28, 29–41, and 42–58 d). Results: Preterm milk peptide counts, ion abundance, and concentration were significantly higher in preterm milk than term milk. Bioinformatic analysis of the cleavage sites for peptides identified suggested that plasmin was more active in preterm milk than term milk and that cytosol aminopeptidase and carboxypeptidase B2 likely contribute to extensive milk protein breakdown. Many identified milk peptides in both term and preterm milk overlapped with known functional peptides, including antihypertensive, antimicrobial, and immunomodulatory peptides. Conclusion: The high protein degradation by endogenous proteases in preterm milk might attenuate problems because of the preterm infant’s immature digestive system. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01817127. PMID:25540406

  12. Laminin peptide YIGSR induces collagen synthesis in Hs27 human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Yoon, Jong Hyuk; Kim, Jaeyoon; Lee, Hyeongjoo; Kim, So Young; Jang, Hwan-Hee; Ryu, Sung Ho; Kim, Beom Joon; Lee, Taehoon G

    2012-11-23

    The dermal ECM is synthesized from fibroblasts and is primarily compromised of fibrillar collagen and elastic fibers, which support the mechanical strength and resiliency of skin, respectively. Laminin, a major glycoprotein located in the basement membrane, promotes cell adhesion, cell growth, differentiation, and migration. The laminin tyrosine-isoleucine-glycine-serine-arginine (YIGSR) peptide, corresponding to the 929-933 sequence of the β1 chain, is known to be a functional motif with effects on the inhibition of tumor metastasis, the regulation of sensory axonal response and the inhibition of angiogenesis through high affinity to the 67kDa laminin receptor. In this study, we identified a novel function of the YIGSR peptide to enhance collagen synthesis in human dermal fibroblasts. To elucidate this novel function regarding collagen synthesis, we treated human dermal fibroblasts with YIGSR peptide in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. According to subsequent experiments, we found that the YIGSR peptide strongly enhanced collagen type 1 synthesis without changing cell proliferation or cellular MMP-1 level. This YIGSR peptide-mediated collagen type 1 synthesis was modulated by FAK inhibitor and MEK inhibitor. This study clearly reveals that YIGSR peptide plays a novel function on the collagen type 1 synthesis of dermal fibroblasts and also suggests that YIGSR is a strong candidate peptide for the treatment of skin aging and wrinkles.

  13. Enhanced epitopic response to a synthetic human malarial peptide by preimmunization with tetanus toxoid carrier.

    PubMed Central

    Lise, L D; Mazier, D; Jolivet, M; Audibert, F; Chedid, L; Schlesinger, D

    1987-01-01

    Successful human vaccination by synthetic malarial sporozoite peptides may depend on the choice of an appropriate carrier. Tetanus toxoid (TT) has been proposed because of its safe and widespread use in humans. Paradoxically, however, prior exposure to this toxoid vaccine could produce specific epitopic suppression against synthetic malarial peptides conjugated to this same protein as carrier. Indeed, we have previously reported that such a phenomenon can occur in the case of a synthetic vaccine made with a streptococcal peptide conjugated to TT. Our present study shows that similar results can be observed in mice preimmunized with TT 1 month before the administration of a conjugate containing TT and a Plasmodium knowlesi peptide. Analysis of the isotypic pattern of the antipeptide response showed that the immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) subclass and especially the IgG2a and IgG2b subclasses were suppressed. In contrast, when a sporozoite peptide from Plasmodium falciparum was coupled to TT, the total antipeptide antibodies and particularly the IgG1 subclass were enhanced by preimmunization by TT. This increase of antipeptide antibodies was correlated with a greater ability of the sera to neutralize sporozoite infectivity. These results indicate that prior exposure to TT does not systematically impair the antibody response against a peptide administered as a peptide-TT conjugate. PMID:2444539

  14. Bioactive peptides derived from human milk proteins--mechanisms of action.

    PubMed

    Wada, Yasuaki; Lönnerdal, Bo

    2014-05-01

    Human milk contains a multitude of bioactive proteins with very diverse functions, which are beneficial for the rapidly growing neonate. The large variety of bioactivities is accomplished by the combination of bioactive proteins per se and gastrointestinal release of bioactive peptides derived from them. The bioactivities exerted by these peptides include enhancement of mineral absorption, immunomodulation, opioid, antihypertensive and antimicrobial activities. Notably, several of the activities are not attributed to the parental proteins, but exclusively to released bioactive peptides. This article reviews studies on bioactive peptides derived from major human milk proteins, such as caseins, α-lactalbumin and lactoferrin, during gastrointestinal digestion. Studies of bovine milk counterparts are also cited as a comparison.

  15. Structural basis for bifunctional peptide recognition at human δ-opioid receptor

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Fenalti, Gustavo; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Betti, Cecilia; Giguere, Patrick; Han, Gye Won; Ishchenko, Andrii; Liu, Wei; Guillemyn, Karel; Zhang, Haitao; James, Daniel; et al

    2015-02-16

    Bi-functional μ- and δ- opioid receptor (OR) ligands are potential therapeutic alternatives to alkaloid opiate analgesics with diminished side effects. We solved the structure of human δ-OR bound to the bi-functional δ-OR antagonist and μ-OR agonist tetrapeptide H-Dmt-Tic-Phe-Phe-NH2 (DIPP-NH2) by serial femtosecond crystallography, revealing a cis-peptide bond between H-Dmt and Tic. In summary, the observed receptor-peptide interactions are critical to understand the pharmacological profiles of opioid peptides, and to develop improved analgesics.

  16. Structural basis for bifunctional peptide recognition at human δ-opioid receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Fenalti, Gustavo; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Betti, Cecilia; Giguere, Patrick; Han, Gye Won; Ishchenko, Andrii; Liu, Wei; Guillemyn, Karel; Zhang, Haitao; James, Daniel; Wang, Dingjie; Weierstall, Uwe; Spence, John C. H.; Boutet, Sébastien; Messerschmidt, Marc; Williams, Garth J.; Gati, Cornelius; Yefanov, Oleksandr M.; White, Thomas A.; Oberthuer, Dominik; Metz, Markus; Yoon, Chun Hong; Barty, Anton; Chapman, Henry N.; Basu, Shibom; Coe, Jesse; Conrad, Chelsie E.; Fromme, Raimund; Fromme, Petra; Tourwé, Dirk; Schiller, Peter W.; Roth, Bryan L.; Ballet, Steven; Katritch, Vsevolod; Stevens, Raymond C.; Cherezov, Vadim

    2015-02-16

    Bi-functional μ- and δ- opioid receptor (OR) ligands are potential therapeutic alternatives to alkaloid opiate analgesics with diminished side effects. We solved the structure of human δ-OR bound to the bi-functional δ-OR antagonist and μ-OR agonist tetrapeptide H-Dmt-Tic-Phe-Phe-NH2 (DIPP-NH2) by serial femtosecond crystallography, revealing a cis-peptide bond between H-Dmt and Tic. In summary, the observed receptor-peptide interactions are critical to understand the pharmacological profiles of opioid peptides, and to develop improved analgesics.

  17. Structural basis for bifunctional peptide recognition at human δ-Opioid receptor

    PubMed Central

    Fenalti, Gustavo; Zatsepin, Nadia A.; Betti, Cecilia; Giguere, Patrick; Han, Gye Won; Ishchenko, Andrii; Liu, Wei; Guillemyn, Karel; Zhang, Haitao; James, Daniel; Wang, Dingjie; Weierstall, Uwe; Spence, John C.H.; Boutet, Sébastien; Messerschmidt, Marc; Williams, Garth J.; Gati, Cornelius; Yefanov, Oleksandr M.; White, Thomas A.; Oberthuer, Dominik; Metz, Markus; Yoon, Chun Hong; Barty, Anton; Chapman, Henry N.; Basu, Shibom; Coe, Jesse; Conrad, Chelsie E.; Fromme, Raimund; Fromme, Petra; Tourwé, Dirk; Schiller, Peter W.; Roth, Bryan L.; Ballet, Steven; Katritch, Vsevolod; Stevens, Raymond C.; Cherezov, Vadim

    2015-01-01

    Bi-functional μ- and δ- opioid receptor (OR) ligands are potential therapeutic alternatives to alkaloid opiate analgesics with diminished side effects. We solved the structure of human δ-OR bound to the bi-functional δ-OR antagonist and μ-OR agonist tetrapeptide H-Dmt(1)-Tic(2)-Phe(3)-Phe(4)-NH2 (DIPP-NH2) by serial femtosecond crystallography, revealing a cis-peptide bond between H-Dmt(1) and Tic(2). The observed receptor-peptide interactions are critical to understand the pharmacological profiles of opioid peptides, and to develop improved analgesics. PMID:25686086

  18. Structural basis for bifunctional peptide recognition at human δ-opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Fenalti, Gustavo; Zatsepin, Nadia A; Betti, Cecilia; Giguere, Patrick; Han, Gye Won; Ishchenko, Andrii; Liu, Wei; Guillemyn, Karel; Zhang, Haitao; James, Daniel; Wang, Dingjie; Weierstall, Uwe; Spence, John C H; Boutet, Sébastien; Messerschmidt, Marc; Williams, Garth J; Gati, Cornelius; Yefanov, Oleksandr M; White, Thomas A; Oberthuer, Dominik; Metz, Markus; Yoon, Chun Hong; Barty, Anton; Chapman, Henry N; Basu, Shibom; Coe, Jesse; Conrad, Chelsie E; Fromme, Raimund; Fromme, Petra; Tourwé, Dirk; Schiller, Peter W; Roth, Bryan L; Ballet, Steven; Katritch, Vsevolod; Stevens, Raymond C; Cherezov, Vadim

    2015-03-01

    Bifunctional μ- and δ-opioid receptor (OR) ligands are potential therapeutic alternatives, with diminished side effects, to alkaloid opiate analgesics. We solved the structure of human δ-OR bound to the bifunctional δ-OR antagonist and μ-OR agonist tetrapeptide H-Dmt-Tic-Phe-Phe-NH2 (DIPP-NH2) by serial femtosecond crystallography, revealing a cis-peptide bond between H-Dmt and Tic. The observed receptor-peptide interactions are critical for understanding of the pharmacological profiles of opioid peptides and for development of improved analgesics.

  19. Structural basis for bifunctional peptide recognition at human δ-opioid receptor.

    PubMed

    Fenalti, Gustavo; Zatsepin, Nadia A; Betti, Cecilia; Giguere, Patrick; Han, Gye Won; Ishchenko, Andrii; Liu, Wei; Guillemyn, Karel; Zhang, Haitao; James, Daniel; Wang, Dingjie; Weierstall, Uwe; Spence, John C H; Boutet, Sébastien; Messerschmidt, Marc; Williams, Garth J; Gati, Cornelius; Yefanov, Oleksandr M; White, Thomas A; Oberthuer, Dominik; Metz, Markus; Yoon, Chun Hong; Barty, Anton; Chapman, Henry N; Basu, Shibom; Coe, Jesse; Conrad, Chelsie E; Fromme, Raimund; Fromme, Petra; Tourwé, Dirk; Schiller, Peter W; Roth, Bryan L; Ballet, Steven; Katritch, Vsevolod; Stevens, Raymond C; Cherezov, Vadim

    2015-03-01

    Bifunctional μ- and δ-opioid receptor (OR) ligands are potential therapeutic alternatives, with diminished side effects, to alkaloid opiate analgesics. We solved the structure of human δ-OR bound to the bifunctional δ-OR antagonist and μ-OR agonist tetrapeptide H-Dmt-Tic-Phe-Phe-NH2 (DIPP-NH2) by serial femtosecond crystallography, revealing a cis-peptide bond between H-Dmt and Tic. The observed receptor-peptide interactions are critical for understanding of the pharmacological profiles of opioid peptides and for development of improved analgesics. PMID:25686086

  20. The Effects of Super-Flux (High Performance) Dialyzer on Plasma Glycosylated Pro-B-Type Natriuretic Peptide (proBNP) and Glycosylated N-Terminal proBNP in End-Stage Renal Disease Patients on Dialysis

    PubMed Central

    Nakagawa, Yasuaki; Nishikimi, Toshio; Kuwahara, Koichiro; Yasuno, Shinji; Kinoshita, Hideyuki; Kuwabara, Yoshihiro; Nakao, Kazuhiro; Minami, Takeya; Yamada, Chinatsu; Ueshima, Kenji; Ikeda, Yoshihiro; Okamoto, Hiroyuki; Horii, Kazukiyo; Nagata, Kiyoshi; Kangawa, Kenji; Minamino, Naoto; Nakao, Kazuwa

    2014-01-01

    Background Plasma BNP levels are predictive of prognosis in hemodialysis patients. However, recent studies showed that the current BNP immunoassay cross-reacts with glycosylated proBNP, and the NT-proBNP assay underestimates glycosylated NT-proBNP. In addition, the recently developed high performance dialyzer removes medium-sized molecular solutes such as β2-microgloburin. We therefore investigated the effects of high performance dialysis on measured levels of glycosylated proBNP, glycosylated NT-proBNP and other BNP-related peptides in end-stage renal disease (ESRD) patients on hemodialysis. Method The relationships between clinical parameters and BNP-related molecule were also investigated. We used our newly developed immunoassay to measure plasma total BNP and proBNP in 105 normal subjects and 36 ESRD patients before and after hemodialysis. Plasma NT-proBNP was measured using Elecsys II after treatment with or without deglycosylating enzymes. We also measured plasma ANP and cGMP using radioimmunoassays. Results All the measured BNP-related peptides were significantly higher in ESRD patients than healthy subjects. Total BNP (−38.9%), proBNP (−29.7%), glycoNT-proBNP (−45.5%), nonglycoNT-proBNP (−53.4%), ANP (−50.4%) and cGMP (−72.1%) were all significantly reduced after hemodialysis, and the magnitude of the reduction appeared molecular weight- dependent. Both the proBNP/total BNP and glycoNT-proBNP/nonglycoNT-proBNP ratios were increased after hemodialysis. The former correlated positively with hemodialysis vintage and negatively with systolic blood pressure, while the latter correlated positively with parathyroid hormone levels. Conclusion These results suggest that hemodialysis using super-flux dialyzer removes BNP-related peptides in a nearly molecular weight-dependent manner. The ProBNP/total BNP and glycoNT-proBNP/nonglycoNT-proBNP ratios appear to be influenced by hemodialysis-related parameters in ESRD patients on hemodialysis. PMID:24667631

  1. Isolation and characterization of the human parathyroid hormone-like peptide gene

    SciTech Connect

    Mangin, M.; Ikeda, K.; Dreyer, B.E.; Broadus, A.E. )

    1989-04-01

    A parathyroid hormone-like peptide (PTH-LP) has recently been identified in human tumors associated with the syndrome of humoral hypercalcemia of malignancy. The peptide appears to be encoded by a single-copy gene that gives rise to multiple mRNAs that are heterogeneous at both their 5{prime} and their 3{prime} ends. Alternative RNA splicing is responsible for the 3{prime} heterogeneity and results in mRNAs encoding three different peptides, each with a unique C terminus. The authors have isolated and characterized the human PTHLP gene. The gene is a complex transcriptional unit spanning more than 12 kilobases of DNA and containing six exons. Two 5{prime} exons encode distinct 5{prime} untranslated regions and are separated by a putative promoter element, indicating that the gene either has two promoters or is alternatively spliced from a single promoter upstream of the first exon. The middle portion of the PTHLP gene, comprising exons 2-4, has an organizational pattern of introns and exons identical to that of the parathyroid hormone gene, consistent with a common ancestral origin of these two genes. Exon 4 of the PTHLP gene encodes the region common to all three peptides and the C terminus of the shortest peptide, and exons 5 and 6 encode the unique C termini of the other two peptides. Northern analysis of mRNAs from four human tumors of different histological types reveals the preferential use of 3{prime} splicing patterns of individual tumors.

  2. Interaction of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Tat-derived peptides with TAR RNA.

    PubMed

    Long, K S; Crothers, D M

    1995-07-11

    Basic peptides from the carboxy terminus of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) Tat protein bind to the stem-loop region of TAR RNA, spanning a trinucleotide bulge, with high affinity and moderate specificity. Previous studies have demonstrated that TAR RNA contains a specific arginine binding pocket. A series of 24 amino acid Tat-derived peptides with one or two arginines has been evaluated as possible structural models of the wild-type peptide in its interaction with TAR RNA, using gel electrophoretic methods and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopy. Dissociation rate measurements indicate that these peptides form complexes with TAR RNA that are significantly less stable kinetically than the wild-type complex. Through a combination of dissociation and association rate measurements, we estimate that wild-type Tat peptide and TAR RNA interact with a Kd of about 16 pM. Together with competition experiments, these results confirm that band shift gel titration methods significantly underestimate absolute peptide-RNA binding affinities in the subnanomolar range. Through competition experiments with bulge mutants of TAR RNA, we demonstrate that peptides that form longer lived complexes with wild-type TAR RNA also show greater discrimination over TAR RNA bulge mutants. Difference CD spectra show that the Tat-derived peptides do not induce the same changes in TAR RNA as the wild-type peptide. The difference CD spectrum of argininamide bound to TAR RNA is most similar to that of the wild-type peptide-TAR RNA complex, implying that the differences in CD spectra upon complex formation are mostly due to changes in TAR RNA conformation.

  3. Laminin peptide YIGSR induces collagen synthesis in Hs27 human dermal fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Yoon, Jong Hyuk; Kim, Jaeyoon; Lee, Hyeongjoo; Kim, So Young; Jang, Hwan-Hee; Ryu, Sung Ho; Kim, Beom Joon; Lee, Taehoon G.

    2012-11-23

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We identify a function of the YIGSR peptide to enhance collagen synthesis in Hs27. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer YIGSR peptide enhanced collagen type 1 synthesis both of gene and protein levels. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer There were no changes in cell proliferation and MMP-1 level in YIGSR treatment. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The YIGSR effect on collagen synthesis mediated activation of FAK, pyk2 and ERK. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The YIGSR-induced FAK and ERK activation was modulated by FAK and MEK inhibitors. -- Abstract: The dermal ECM is synthesized from fibroblasts and is primarily compromised of fibrillar collagen and elastic fibers, which support the mechanical strength and resiliency of skin, respectively. Laminin, a major glycoprotein located in the basement membrane, promotes cell adhesion, cell growth, differentiation, and migration. The laminin tyrosine-isoleucine-glycine-serine-arginine (YIGSR) peptide, corresponding to the 929-933 sequence of the {beta}1 chain, is known to be a functional motif with effects on the inhibition of tumor metastasis, the regulation of sensory axonal response and the inhibition of angiogenesis through high affinity to the 67 kDa laminin receptor. In this study, we identified a novel function of the YIGSR peptide to enhance collagen synthesis in human dermal fibroblasts. To elucidate this novel function regarding collagen synthesis, we treated human dermal fibroblasts with YIGSR peptide in both a time- and dose-dependent manner. According to subsequent experiments, we found that the YIGSR peptide strongly enhanced collagen type 1 synthesis without changing cell proliferation or cellular MMP-1 level. This YIGSR peptide-mediated collagen type 1 synthesis was modulated by FAK inhibitor and MEK inhibitor. This study clearly reveals that YIGSR peptide plays a novel function on the collagen type 1 synthesis of dermal fibroblasts and also suggests that YIGSR is a strong candidate

  4. Dynamics of Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I Association with the Human Peptide-loading Complex*

    PubMed Central

    Panter, Michaela S.; Jain, Ankur; Leonhardt, Ralf M.; Ha, Taekjip; Cresswell, Peter

    2012-01-01

    Although the human peptide-loading complex (PLC) is required for optimal major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC I) antigen presentation, its composition is still incompletely understood. The ratio of the transporter associated with antigen processing (TAP) and MHC I to tapasin, which is responsible for MHC I recruitment and peptide binding optimization, is particularly critical for modeling of the PLC. Here, we characterized the stoichiometry of the human PLC using both biophysical and biochemical approaches. By means of single-molecule pulldown (SiMPull), we determined a TAP/tapasin ratio of 1:2, consistent with previous studies of insect-cell microsomes, rat-human chimeric cells, and HeLa cells expressing truncated TAP subunits. We also report that the tapasin/MHC I ratio varies, with the PLC population comprising both 2:1 and 2:2 complexes, based on mutational and co-precipitation studies. The MHC I-saturated PLC may be particularly prevalent among peptide-selective alleles, such as HLA-C4. Additionally, MHC I association with the PLC increases when its peptide supply is reduced by inhibiting the proteasome or by blocking TAP-mediated peptide transport using viral inhibitors. Taken together, our results indicate that the composition of the human PLC varies under normal conditions and dynamically adapts to alterations in peptide supply that may arise during viral infection. These findings improve our understanding of the quality control of MHC I peptide loading and may aid the structural and functional modeling of the human PLC. PMID:22829594

  5. Comparison of marmoset and human FSH using synthetic peptides of the β-subunit L2 loop region and anti-peptide antibodies.

    PubMed

    Kutteyil, Susha S; Kulkarni, Bhalchandra J; Mojidra, Rahul; Joseph, Shaini; Pathak, Bhakti R; Mahale, Smita D

    2016-06-01

    Follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) is a glycoprotein hormone required for female and male gametogenesis in vertebrates. Common marmoset (Callithrix jacchus) is a New World primate monkey, used as animal model in biomedical research. Observations like, requirement of extremely high dose of human FSH in marmosets for superovulation compared to other primates and generation of antibodies in marmoset against human FSH after repeated superovulation cycles, point towards the possibility that FSH-FSH receptor (FSHR) interaction in marmosets might be different than in the humans. In this study we attempted to understand some of these structural differences using FSH peptides and anti-peptide antibody approach. Based on sequence alignment, in silico modeling and docking studies, L2 loop of FSH β-subunit (L2β) was found to be different between marmoset and human. Hence, peptides corresponding to region 32-50 of marmoset and human L2β loop were synthesized, purified and characterized. The peptides displayed dissimilarity in terms of molecular mass, predicted isoelectric point, predicted charge and in the ability to inhibit hormone-receptor interaction. Polyclonal antibodies generated against both the peptides were found to exhibit specific binding for the corresponding peptide and parent FSH in ELISA and Western blotting respectively and exhibited negligible reactivity to cross-species peptide and FSH in ELISA. The anti-peptide antibody against marmoset FSH was also able to detect native FSH in marmoset plasma samples and pituitary sections. In summary, the L2β loop of marmoset and human FSH has distinct receptor interaction ability and immunoreactivity indicating possibility of subtle conformational and biochemical differences between the two regions which may affect the FSH-FSHR interaction in these two primates. Copyright © 2016 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:27282136

  6. Effects of Continuous Infusion of Low-dose Human Atrial Natriuretic Peptide (hANP) on the Lungs during Cardiac Surgery

    PubMed Central

    Fukuda, Hirotsugu; Yamada, Yasuyuki; Kuwata, Toshiyuki; Hori, Takayuki; Ogawa, Hironaga; Tsuchiya, Go

    2015-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to determine the effects of a continuous infusion of low-dose hANP on the lungs during cardiac surgery in patients under cardiopulmonary bypass (CPB). Methods: We analyzed 30 consecutive cases of cardiac surgery performed at our hospital from 2007–2008. The patients were divided into a group that received hANP (hANP group) or a group that received saline and no hANP (N-hANP group). We measured various parameters before and after surgery using a PiCCO monitor. Result: There were no differences in the preoperative characteristics between the groups, although urine volume during the operation was significantly greater in the hANP group. After surgery, there were no significant differences between the groups in cardiac output index (CI), global enddiastolic volume index (GEDVI), intrathoracic blood volume index (ITBI), pulmonary blood volume index (PBI), extravascular lung water index (ELWI) and pulmonary vascular permeability index (PVPI), total protein, and creatine. In contrast, interleukin-6 (IL-6) and renin were significantly lower, and albumin was significantly higher in the hANP group. Conclusion: We found that low-dose hANP during open cardiac surgery inhibited the secretion and plasma activity of IL-6 and renin. Although there were no differences in lung circulatory parameters such as the amount of fluid in the pulmonary blood vessels between the two groups, we believe that the strong diuretic effect of hANP reduced third-space fluid retention caused by CPB. PMID:25740453

  7. Approach for Identifying Human Leukocyte Antigen (HLA)-DR Bound Peptides from Scarce Clinical Samples.

    PubMed

    Heyder, Tina; Kohler, Maxie; Tarasova, Nataliya K; Haag, Sabrina; Rutishauser, Dorothea; Rivera, Natalia V; Sandin, Charlotta; Mia, Sohel; Malmström, Vivianne; Wheelock, Åsa M; Wahlström, Jan; Holmdahl, Rikard; Eklund, Anders; Zubarev, Roman A; Grunewald, Johan; Ytterberg, A Jimmy

    2016-09-01

    Immune-mediated diseases strongly associating with human leukocyte antigen (HLA) alleles are likely linked to specific antigens. These antigens are presented to T cells in the form of peptides bound to HLA molecules on antigen presenting cells, e.g. dendritic cells, macrophages or B cells. The identification of HLA-DR-bound peptides presents a valuable tool to investigate the human immunopeptidome. The lung is likely a key player in the activation of potentially auto-aggressive T cells prior to entering target tissues and inducing autoimmune disease. This makes the lung of exceptional interest and presents an ideal paradigm to study the human immunopeptidome and to identify antigenic peptides.Our previous investigation of HLA-DR peptide presentation in the lung required high numbers of cells (800 × 10(6) bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells). Because BAL from healthy nonsmokers typically contains 10-15 × 10(6) cells, there is a need for a highly sensitive approach to study immunopeptides in the lungs of individual patients and controls.In this work, we analyzed the HLA-DR immunopeptidome in the lung by an optimized methodology to identify HLA-DR-bound peptides from low cell numbers. We used an Epstein-Barr Virus (EBV) immortalized B cell line and bronchoalveolar lavage (BAL) cells obtained from patients with sarcoidosis, an inflammatory T cell driven disease mainly occurring in the lung. Specifically, membrane complexes were isolated prior to immunoprecipitation, eluted peptides were identified by nanoLC-MS/MS and processed using the in-house developed ClusterMHCII software. With the optimized procedure we were able to identify peptides from 10 × 10(6) cells, which on average correspond to 10.9 peptides/million cells in EBV-B cells and 9.4 peptides/million cells in BAL cells. This work presents an optimized approach designed to identify HLA-DR-bound peptides from low numbers of cells, enabling the investigation of the BAL immunopeptidome from individual patients

  8. Human antimicrobial peptide histatin 5 is a cell-penetrating peptide targeting mitochondrial ATP synthesis in Leishmania.

    PubMed

    Luque-Ortega, Juan Román; van't Hof, Wim; Veerman, Enno C I; Saugar, José M; Rivas, Luis

    2008-06-01

    Histatin 5 (Hst5) is a human salivary antimicrobial peptide that targets fungal mitochondria. In the human parasitic protozoa Leishmania, the mitochondrial ATP production is essential, as it lacks the bioenergetic switch between glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation described in some yeasts. On these premises, Hst5 activity was assayed on both stages of its life cycle, promastigotes and amastigotes (LC(50)=7.3 and 14.4 microM, respectively). In a further step, its lethal mechanism was studied. The main conclusions drawn were as follows: 1) Hst5 causes limited and temporary damage to the plasma membrane of the parasites, as assessed by electron microscopy, depolarization, and entrance of the vital dye SYTOX Green; 2) Hst5 translocates into the cytoplasm of Leishmania in an achiral receptor-independent manner with accumulation into the mitochondrion, as shown by confocal microscopy; and 3) Hst5 produces a bioenergetic collapse of the parasite, caused essentially by the decrease of mitochondrial ATP synthesis through inhibition of F(1)F(0)-ATPase, with subsequent fast ATP exhaustion. By using the Hst5 enantiomer, it was found that the key steps of its lethal mechanism involved no chiral recognition. Hst5 thus constitutes the first leishmanicidal peptide with a defined nonstereospecific intracellular target. The prospects of its development, by its own or as a carrier molecule for other leishmanicidal molecules, into a novel anti-Leishmania drug with a preferential subcellular accumulation are discussed. PMID:18230684

  9. The effects of shortening lactoferrin derived peptides against tumour cells, bacteria and normal human cells.

    PubMed

    Yang, Nannan; Strøm, Morten B; Mekonnen, Seble M; Svendsen, John S; Rekdal, Oystein

    2004-01-01

    A number of shortened derivatives of the lactoferrin model peptide L12, PAWRKAFRWAKRMLKKAA, were designed in order to elucidate the structural basis for antitumour activity of lactoferrin derivatives. Three tumour cell lines were included in the study and toxicity determined by measuring lysis of human red blood cells and fibroblasts. The results demonstrated a strong correlation between antitumour activity and net positive charge, in which a net charge close to +7 was essential for a high antitumour activity. In order to increase the antitumour activity of the shortest peptide with a net charge less than +7, the hydrophobicity had to be increased by adding a bulky Trp residue. None of the peptides were haemolytic, but toxicity against fibroblasts was observed. However, modifications of the peptides had a higher effect on reducing fibroblast toxicity than antitumour activity and thereby resulted in peptides displaying an almost 7-fold selectivity for tumour cells compared with fibroblasts. The antimicrobial activity against the Gram-negative bacteria Escherichia coil and the Gram-positive bacteria Staphylococcus aureus was also included in order to compare the structural requirements for antitumour activity with those required for a high antimicrobial activity. The results showed that most of the peptides were highly active against both bacterial strains. Less modification by shortening the peptide sequences was tolerated for maintaining a high antitumour activity and selectivity compared with antimicrobial activity. The order of the amino acid residues and thereby the conformation of the peptides was highly essential for antitumour activity, whereas the antimicrobial activity was hardly influenced by changes in this parameter. Thus, in addition to a certain net positive charge and hydrophobicity, the ability to adopt an amphipathic conformation was a more critical structural parameter for antitumour activity than for antimicrobial activity, and implied that a

  10. Integration with the human genome of peptide sequences obtained by high-throughput mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Desiere, Frank; Deutsch, Eric W; Nesvizhskii, Alexey I; Mallick, Parag; King, Nichole L; Eng, Jimmy K; Aderem, Alan; Boyle, Rose; Brunner, Erich; Donohoe, Samuel; Fausto, Nelson; Hafen, Ernst; Hood, Lee; Katze, Michael G; Kennedy, Kathleen A; Kregenow, Floyd; Lee, Hookeun; Lin, Biaoyang; Martin, Dan; Ranish, Jeffrey A; Rawlings, David J; Samelson, Lawrence E; Shiio, Yuzuru; Watts, Julian D; Wollscheid, Bernd; Wright, Michael E; Yan, Wei; Yang, Lihong; Yi, Eugene C; Zhang, Hui; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2005-01-01

    A crucial aim upon the completion of the human genome is the verification and functional annotation of all predicted genes and their protein products. Here we describe the mapping of peptides derived from accurate interpretations of protein tandem mass spectrometry (MS) data to eukaryotic genomes and the generation of an expandable resource for integration of data from many diverse proteomics experiments. Furthermore, we demonstrate that peptide identifications obtained from high-throughput proteomics can be integrated on a large scale with the human genome. This resource could serve as an expandable repository for MS-derived proteome information. PMID:15642101

  11. A GBP 130 derived peptide from Plasmodium falciparum binds to human erythrocytes and inhibits merozoite invasion in vitro.

    PubMed

    Suarez, J E; Urquiza, M; Curtidor, H; Rodriguez, L E; Ocampo, M; Torres, E; Guzman, F; Patarroyo, M E

    2000-01-01

    The malarial GBP 130 protein binds weakly to intact human erythrocytes; the binding sites seem to be located in the repeat region and this region's antibodies block the merozoite invasion. A peptide from this region (residues from 701 to 720) which binds to human erythrocytes was identified. This peptide named 2220 did not bind to sialic acid; the binding site on human erythrocyte was affected by treatment with trypsin but not by chymotrypsin. The peptide was able to inhibit Plasmodium falciparum merozoite invasion of erythrocytes. The residues F701, K703, L705, T706, E713 (FYKILTNTDPNDEVERDNAD) were found to be critical for peptide binding to erythrocytes. PMID:10904405

  12. Major histocompatibility complex peptide ligands as olfactory cues in human body odour assessment.

    PubMed

    Milinski, Manfred; Croy, Ilona; Hummel, Thomas; Boehm, Thomas

    2013-03-22

    In many animal species, social communication and mate choice are influenced by cues encoded by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). The mechanism by which the MHC influences sexual selection is a matter of intense debate. In mice, peptide ligands of MHC molecules activate subsets of vomeronasal and olfactory sensory neurons and influence social memory formation; in sticklebacks, such peptides predictably modify the outcome of mate choice. Here, we examine whether this evolutionarily conserved mechanism of interindividual communication extends to humans. In psychometric tests, volunteers recognized the supplementation of their body odour by MHC peptides and preferred 'self' to 'non-self' ligands when asked to decide whether the modified odour smelled 'like themselves' or 'like their favourite perfume'. Functional magnetic resonance imaging indicated that 'self'-peptides specifically activated a region in the right middle frontal cortex. Our results suggest that despite the absence of a vomeronasal organ, humans have the ability to detect and evaluate MHC peptides in body odour. This may provide a basis for the sensory evaluation of potential partners during human mate choice.

  13. Radioimmunoassay for an inhibin-like peptide from human seminal plasma

    SciTech Connect

    Hammonds, R.G. Jr.; Li, C.H.; Yamashiro, D.; Cabrera, C.M.; Westphal, M.

    1985-01-01

    Antisera raised in rabbits to a synthetic peptide consisting of 31 amino acids with a sequence identical to inhibin-like peptide (ILP) isolated from human seminal plasma afford a highly specific and sensitive radioimmunoassay. Synthetic ILP completely displaces antiserum binding of radioiodinated (Tyr4)-ILP, with half maximal displacement at 36 fmoles ILP/tube. ILP, (Tyr4)-ILP and ILP-(9-31) had essentially equal potency, while ILP-(1-25), ILP-(1-23) and ILP-(1-16) had reduced potency. No cross reactivity was found among a variety of peptide hormones and proteins. Human seminal plasma displaces 50% of (/sup 125/I-Tyr4)-ILP at dilutions equivalent to 50-250 pl/tube, corresponding to immunoreactive ILP concentration of 0.5-2.5 mg/ml.

  14. Impact of peptides on the recognition of HLA class I molecules by human HLA antibodies.

    PubMed

    Mulder, Arend; Eijsink, Chantal; Kester, Michel G D; Franke, Marry E I; Kardol, Marrie J; Heemskerk, Mirjam H M; van Kooten, Cees; Verreck, Frank A; Drijfhout, Jan Wouter; Koning, Frits; Doxiadis, Ilias I N; Claas, Frans H J

    2005-11-01

    MHC class I molecules expressed on cell surfaces are composed of H chain, beta2-microglobulin and any of a vast array of peptides. The role of peptide in the recognition of HLA class I by serum HLA Abs is unknown. In this study, the solid-phase assay of a series (n = 11) of HLA-A2-reactive, pregnancy-induced, human mAbs on a panel (n = 12) of recombinant monomeric HLA-A2 molecules, each containing a single peptide, revealed peptide selectivity of the mAbs. The flow cytometry membrane staining intensities on the HLA-A2-transduced cell line K562, caused by these mAbs, correlated with the number of monomer species detected by the mAbs. Flow cytometry staining on HLA-A2-bearing cell lines of a variety of lineages was indicative of tissue selectivity of these HLA-A2 mAbs. This tissue selectivity suggests that the deleterious effect on allografts is confined to alloantibodies recognizing only HLA class I loaded with peptides that are derived from tissue-specific and household proteins. Since Abs that are only reactive with HLA loaded with irrelevant peptides are expected to be harmless toward allografts, the practice of HLA Ab determination on lymphocyte-derived HLA deserves reconsideration.

  15. Rational Design of Peptide Vaccines Against Multiple Types of Human Papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Dey, Sumanta; De, Antara; Nandy, Ashesh

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) occurs in many types, some of which cause cervical, genital, and other cancers. While vaccination is available against the major cancer-causing HPV types, many others are not covered by these preventive measures. Herein, we present a bioinformatics study for the designing of multivalent peptide vaccines against multiple HPV types as an alternative strategy to the virus-like particle vaccines being used now. Our technique of rational design of peptide vaccines is expected to ensure stability of the vaccine against many cycles of mutational changes, elicit immune response, and negate autoimmune possibilities. Using the L1 capsid protein sequences, we identified several peptides for potential vaccine design for HPV 16, 18, 33, 35, 45, and 11 types. Although there are concerns about the epitope-binding affinities for the peptides identified in this process, the technique indicates possibilities of multivalent, adjuvanted, peptide vaccines against a wider range of HPV types, and tailor-made different combinations of the peptides to address frequency variations of types over different population groups as required for prophylaxis and at lower cost than are in use at the present time.

  16. Rational Design of Peptide Vaccines Against Multiple Types of Human Papillomavirus

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Sumanta; De, Antara; Nandy, Ashesh

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) occurs in many types, some of which cause cervical, genital, and other cancers. While vaccination is available against the major cancer-causing HPV types, many others are not covered by these preventive measures. Herein, we present a bioinformatics study for the designing of multivalent peptide vaccines against multiple HPV types as an alternative strategy to the virus-like particle vaccines being used now. Our technique of rational design of peptide vaccines is expected to ensure stability of the vaccine against many cycles of mutational changes, elicit immune response, and negate autoimmune possibilities. Using the L1 capsid protein sequences, we identified several peptides for potential vaccine design for HPV 16, 18, 33, 35, 45, and 11 types. Although there are concerns about the epitope-binding affinities for the peptides identified in this process, the technique indicates possibilities of multivalent, adjuvanted, peptide vaccines against a wider range of HPV types, and tailor-made different combinations of the peptides to address frequency variations of types over different population groups as required for prophylaxis and at lower cost than are in use at the present time. PMID:27279731

  17. Human neutrophils are activated by a peptide fragment of Clostridium difficile toxin B presumably via formyl peptide receptor.

    PubMed

    Goy, Sebastian D; Olling, Alexandra; Neumann, Detlef; Pich, Andreas; Gerhard, Ralf

    2015-06-01

    Clostridium difficile may induce antibiotic-associated diarrhoea and, in severe cases, pseudomembranous colitis characterized by tremendous neutrophil infiltration. All symptoms are caused by two exotoxins: TcdA and TcdB. We describe here the activation of isolated human blood neutrophils by TcdB and, moreover, by toxin fragments generated by limited proteolytical digestion. Kinetics and profiles of TcdB-induced rise in intracellular-free Ca(2+) and reactive oxygen species production were similar to that induced by fMLF, which activates the formyl peptide receptor (FPR) recognizing formylated bacterial peptide sequences. Transfection assays with the FPR-1 isoform hFPR26 in HEK293 cells, heterologous desensitization experiments and FPR inhibition via cyclosporine H strongly suggest activation of cells via FPR-1. Domain analyses revealed that the N-terminal glucosyltransferase domain of TcdB is a potent activator of FPR pointing towards an additional mechanism that might contribute to pathogenesis. This pro-inflammatory ligand effect can be triggered even by cleaved and, thus, non-cytotoxic toxin. In summary, we report (i) a ligand effect on neutrophils as completely new molecular mode of action, (ii) pathogenic potential of truncated or proteolytically cleaved 'non-cytotoxic' fragments and (iii) an interaction of the N-terminal glucosyltransferase domain instead of the C-terminal receptor binding domain of TcdB with target cells. PMID:25529763

  18. Impaired natriuretic response to high-NaCl diet plus aldosterone infusion in mice overexpressing human CD39, an ectonucleotidase (NTPDase1)

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yue; Robson, Simon C.; Morris, Kaiya L.; Heiney, Kristina M.; Dwyer, Karen M.; Ecelbarger, Carolyn M.

    2015-01-01

    Extracellular nucleotides acting through P2 receptors facilitate natriuresis. To define how purinergic mechanisms are involved in sodium homeostasis, we used transgenic (TG) mice that globally overexpress human CD39 (hCD39, NTPDase1), an ectonucleotidase that hydrolyzes extracellular ATP/ADP to AMP, resulting in an altered extracellular purine profile. On a high-sodium diet (HSD, 3.5% Na+), urine volume and serum sodium were significantly higher in TG mice but sodium excretion was unaltered. Furthermore, TG mice showed an attenuated fall in urine aldosterone with HSD. Western blot analysis revealed significantly lower densities (∼40%) of the β-subunit of the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) in medulla, and the major band (85-kDa) of γ-ENaC in TG mice cortex. To evaluate aldosterone-independent differences, in a second experiment, aldosterone was clamped by osmotic minipump at 20 μg/day, and mice were fed either an HSD or a low-sodium diet (LSD, 0.03% Na+). Here, no differences in urine volume or osmolality, or serum aldosterone were found, but TG mice showed a modest, yet significant impairment in late natriuresis (days 3 and 4). Several major sodium transporters or channel subunits were differentially expressed between the genotypes. HSD caused a downregulation of Na-Cl cotransporter (NCC) in both genotypes; and had higher cortical levels of NCC, Na-K-ATPase (α-1 subunit), and α- and γ-ENaC. The Na-K-2Cl cotransporter (NKCC2) was downregulated by HSD in wild-type mice, but it increased in TG mice. In summary, our data support the concept that extracellular nucleotides facilitate natriuresis; they also reveal an aldosterone-independent downregulation of major renal sodium transporters and channel subunits by purinergic signaling. PMID:25877509

  19. Vaccine for human contraception targeting sperm Izumo protein and YLP12 dodecamer peptide

    PubMed Central

    Naz, Rajesh K

    2014-01-01

    There is an urgent need to develop a better method of contraception which is non-steroidal and reversible to control world population explosion and unintended pregnancies. Contraceptive vaccines (CV), especially targeting sperm-specific proteins, can provide an ideal contraceptive modality. Sperm-specific proteins can induce an immune response in women as well as men, thus can be used for CV development in both sexes. In this article, we will review two sperm-specific proteins, namely Izumo protein and YLP12 dodecamer peptide. Gene-knockout studies indicate that Izumo protein is essential for sperm–egg membrane fusion. Vaccination with Izumo protein or its cDNA causes a significant reduction in fertility of female mice. The antibodies to human Izumo inhibit human sperm penetration assay. Recently, our laboratory found that a significant percentage of infertile women have antibodies to Izumo protein. The second sperm-specific protein is YLP12, a peptide mimetic sequence present on human sperm involved in recognition and binding to the human oocyte zona pellucida. Vaccination with YLP12 or its cDNA causes long-term, reversible contraception, without side effects, in female mice. Infertile, but not fertile, men and women have antibodies to YLP12 peptide. Our laboratory has isolated, cloned, and sequenced cDNA encoding human single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibody from infertile men which reacts with YLP12 peptide. The human YLP12 scFv antibody may provide a novel passive immunocontraceptive, the first of its kind. In conclusion, sperm-specific Izumo protein and YLP12 peptide can provide exciting candidates for antisperm CV development. PMID:24723387

  20. Immunodiagnosis of human neurocysticercosis using a synthetic peptide selected by phage-display.

    PubMed

    Hell, R C R; Amim, P; de Andrade, H M; de Avila, R A M; Felicori, L; Oliveira, A G; Oliveira, C A; Nascimento, E; Tavares, C A P; Granier, C; Chávez-Olórtegui, C

    2009-04-01

    The usefulness of a synthetic peptide in the serodiagnosis of Taenia solium human neurocysticercosis (NC) has been evaluated. Phage-displayed peptides were screened with human antibodies to scolex protein antigen from cysticercus cellulosae (SPACc). One clone was found to interact specifically with anti-SPACc IgGs. The corresponding synthetic peptide was found to be recognized in ELISA by NC patient's sera. The study was carried out with sera from 28 confirmed NC patients, 13 control sera and 73 sera from patients suffering from other infectious diseases. A 93% sensibility and a 94.3% specificity was achieved. Figures of 89% and 31.4% of sensibility and specificity were obtained in a SPACc-based ELISA. Immunoblotting of SPACc with anti-peptide antibodies revealed a single band of approximately 45 kDa in 1D and four 45 kDa isoforms in 2D-gel electrophoresis. A strong and specific immunostaining in the fibers beneath the suckers, at the base of the rostellum, and in the tissue surrounding the scolex of cysticerci was observed by immunomicroscopy. Our results show that a peptide-based immunodiagnostic of neurocisticercosis can be envisioned.

  1. The Human Cathelicidin Antimicrobial Peptide LL-37 as a Potential Treatment for Polymicrobial Infected Wounds.

    PubMed

    Duplantier, Allen J; van Hoek, Monique L

    2013-01-01

    Diabetic patients often have ulcers on their lower-limbs that are infected by multiple biofilm-forming genera of bacteria, and the elimination of the biofilm has proven highly successful in resolving such wounds in patients. To that end, antimicrobial peptides have shown potential as a new anti-biofilm approach. The single human cathelicidin peptide LL-37 has been shown to have antimicrobial and anti-biofilm activity against multiple Gram-positive and Gram-negative human pathogens, and have wound-healing effects on the host. The combination of the anti-biofilm effect and wound-healing properties of LL-37 may make it highly effective in resolving polymicrobially infected wounds when topically applied. Such a peptide or its derivatives could be a platform from which to develop new therapeutic strategies to treat biofilm-mediated infections of wounds. This review summarizes known mechanisms that regulate the endogenous levels of LL-37 and discusses the anti-biofilm, antibacterial, and immunological effects of deficient vs. excessive concentrations of LL-37 within the wound environment. Here, we review recent advances in understanding the therapeutic potential of this peptide and other clinically advanced peptides as a potential topical treatment for polymicrobial infected wounds.

  2. A Selective Cyclic Peptidic Human SIRT5 Inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Liu, Jiajia; Huang, Yajun; Zheng, Weiping

    2016-01-01

    In the current study, we discovered that a side chain-to-side chain cyclic pentapeptide harboring a central N(ε)-carboxyethyl-thiocarbamoyl-lysine residue behaved as a strong and selective (versus human SIRT1/2/3/6) inhibitor against human SIRT5-catalyzed deacylation reaction. This compound was also found to be proteolytically much more stable than its linear counterpart. This compound could be a valuable lead for developing stronger, selective, metabolically stable, and cell permeable human SIRT5 inhibitors. PMID:27626398

  3. Assay for detection of Trypanosoma cruzi antibodies in human sera based on reaction with synthetic peptides.

    PubMed Central

    Vergara, U; Lorca, M; Veloso, C; Gonzalez, A; Engstrom, A; Aslund, L; Pettersson, U; Frasch, A C

    1991-01-01

    Synthetic peptides modelled according to the amino acid sequences derived from the repeated domains of five Trypanosoma cruzi antigens were used in an immunoradiometric assay to detect antibodies appearing after natural human infections. An enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and an indirect immunofluorescence assay performed with a complex antigenic mixture from parasites were used as controls. The results indicate that the synthetic peptides were recognized by a large proportion of serum samples collected from 34 patients with Chagas' disease in Chile and point to their possible use in diagnosis. PMID:1774331

  4. Proteins, peptides, polysaccharides, and nucleotides with inhibitory activity on human immunodeficiency virus and its enzymes.

    PubMed

    Ng, Tzi Bun; Cheung, Randy Chi Fai; Wong, Jack Ho; Chan, Wai Yee

    2015-12-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), the causative agent of acquired immune deficiency syndrome, has claimed innumerable lives in the past. Many biomolecules which suppress HIV replication and also other biomolecules that inhibit enzymes essential to HIV replication have been reported. Proteins including a variety of milk proteins, ribosome-inactivating proteins, ribonucleases, antifungal proteins, and trypsin inhibitors; peptides comprising cathelicidins, defensins, synthetic peptides, and others; polysaccharides and polysaccharopeptides; nucleosides, nucleotides, and ribozymes, demonstrated anti-HIV activity. In many cases, the mechanism of anti-HIV action has been elucidated. Strategies have been devised to augment the anti-HIV potency of these compounds.

  5. Involvement of human peroxisomes in biosynthesis and signaling of steroid and peptide hormones.

    PubMed

    Weinhofer, Isabelle; Kunze, Markus; Forss-Petter, Sonja; Berger, Johannes

    2013-01-01

    Although peroxisomes exert essential biological functions, cell type-specific features of this important organelle are still only superficially characterized. An intriguing new aspect of peroxisomal function was recently uncovered by the observation that the peptide hormones β-lipotropin (β-LPH) and β-endorphin are localized to peroxisomes in various human tissues. This suggests a functional link between peptide hormone metabolism and peroxisomes. In addition, because endocrine manifestations that affect steroid hormones are often found in patients suffering from inherited peroxisomal disorders, the question has been raised whether peroxisomes are also involved in steroidogenesis. With this chapter, we will review several crucial aspects concerning peroxisomes and hormone metabolism. PMID:23821145

  6. Peptide-directed binding of quantum dots to integrins in human fibroblast.

    PubMed

    Shi, Peng; Chen, Hongfeng; Cho, Michael R; Stroscio, Michael A

    2006-03-01

    There is currently a major international effort aimed at integrating semiconductor nanostructures with biological structures. This paper reports the use of peptide sequences with certain motifs like artinine-glycine-aspartic acid (RGD) and leucine-aspartic acid-valine (LDV) to functionalize zinc sulfide (ZnS)-capped cadmiun selenide (CdSe) quantum dots, so that the quantum dot-peptide complexes selectively bind to integrins on HT1080 human fibrosarcoma cells membrane. In this way, an interface between semiconductor nanocrystals and subcellular components was achieved, and the distribution pattern of RGD and LDV receptors on HT1080 cell membranes is revealed. These findings point the way to using a wide class of peptide-functionalized semiconductor quantum dots for the study of cellular processes involving integrins.

  7. Copper-binding peptides from human prion protein and newly designed peroxidative biocatalysts.

    PubMed

    Kagenishi, Tomoko; Yokawa, Ken; Kadono, Takashi; Uezu, Kazuya; Kawano, Tomonori

    2011-01-01

    A previous work suggested that peptides from the histidine-containing copper-binding motifs in human prion protein (PrP) function as peroxidase-like biocatalysts catalyzing the generation of superoxide anion radicals in the presence of neurotransmitters (aromatic monoamines) and phenolics such as tyrosine and tyrosyl residues on proteins. In this study, using various phenolic substrates, the phenol-dependent superoxide-generating activities of PrP-derived peptide sequences were compared. Among the peptides tested, the GGGTH pentapeptide was shown to be the most active catalyst for phenol-dependent reactions. Based on these results, we designed a series of oligoglycyl-histidines as novel peroxidative biocatalysts, and their catalytic performances including kinetics, heat tolerance, and freezing tolerance were analysed. PMID:21630593

  8. Posttranslational processing of endogenous and of baculovirus-expressed human gastrin-releasing peptide precursor.

    PubMed Central

    Lebacq-Verheyden, A M; Kasprzyk, P G; Raum, M G; Van Wyke Coelingh, K; Lebacq, J A; Battey, J F

    1988-01-01

    The 27-amino-acid gastrin-releasing peptide (GRP1-27) is a neuropeptide and growth factor that is synthesized by various neural and neuroendocrine cells. The major pro-GRP hormone (isoform I) contains both GRP1-27 and a novel C-terminal extension peptide termed pro-GRP31-125. In order to define potentially active neuropeptides that could be generated from this novel protein domain, we analyzed the posttranslational processing of endogenous human pro-GRP1-125 in a small-cell lung cancer cell line. Because such studies are much easier in an overexpression system, we investigated at the same time the posttranslational processing of baculovirus-expressed human pro-GRP1-125 in an insect ovary cell line. In the small-cell lung cancer cell line, GRP1-27 was cleaved as expected from the endogenous prohormone at a pair of basic amino acids (29 and 30) and alpha-amidated at its C-terminal methionine; however, a number of novel peptides were generated by additional cleavages in the pro-GRP31-125 domain. In the insect ovary cell line, GRP1-27 was cleaved from the expressed prohormone by a different mechanism, as were a number of other peptides that appeared to be similar in size to those produced by the human neuroendocrine tumor cell line. These data show for the first time that an insect ovary cell line that is widely used to overexpress proteins can process a human neuropeptide precursor. They also reveal the existence of novel pro-GRP-derived peptides that are candidates for biologically active ligands. Images PMID:3211139

  9. Thiol-disulfide exchange in peptides derived from human growth hormone.

    PubMed

    Chandrasekhar, Saradha; Epling, Daniel E; Sophocleous, Andreas M; Topp, Elizabeth M

    2014-04-01

    Disulfide bonds stabilize proteins by cross-linking distant regions into a compact three-dimensional structure. They can also participate in hydrolytic and oxidative pathways to form nonnative disulfide bonds and other reactive species. Such covalent modifications can contribute to protein aggregation. Here, we present experimental data for the mechanism of thiol-disulfide exchange in tryptic peptides derived from human growth hormone in aqueous solution. Reaction kinetics was monitored to investigate the effect of pH (6.0-10.0), temperature (4-50°C), oxidation suppressants [ethylenediaminetetraacetic acid (EDTA) and N2 sparging], and peptide secondary structure (amide cyclized vs. open form). The concentrations of free thiol containing peptides, scrambled disulfides, and native disulfide-linked peptides generated via thiol-disulfide exchange and oxidation reactions were determined using reverse-phase HPLC and liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Concentration versus time data were fitted to a mathematical model using nonlinear least squares regression analysis. At all pH values, the model was able to fit the data with R(2) ≥ 0.95. Excluding oxidation suppressants (EDTA and N2 sparging) resulted in an increase in the formation of scrambled disulfides via oxidative pathways but did not influence the intrinsic rate of thiol-disulfide exchange. In addition, peptide secondary structure was found to influence the rate of thiol-disulfide exchange. PMID:24549831

  10. Efficient Gene Delivery of Primary Human Cells Using Peptide Linked Polyethylenimine Polymer Hybrid

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Devaveena; Inayathullah, Mohammed; Lee, Andrew S; Limiuex, Melbes; Zhang, Xuexiang; Wu, Yi; Nag, Divya; De Almeida, Patricia Eliza; Han, Leng; Rajadas, Jayakumar; Wu, Joseph C

    2011-01-01

    Polyethylenimine (PEI) based polymers are efficient agents for cell transfection. However, their use has been hampered due to high cell death associated with transfection thereby resulting in low efficiency of gene delivery within the cells. To circumvent the problem of cellular toxicity, metal binding peptides were linked to PEI. Eight peptide-PEI derivatives were synthesized to improve cell survival and transfection efficiency. TAT linked PEI was used as a control polymer. Peptides linked with PEI amines formed nano gels as shown by electron microscopy and atomic force microscopic measurements. Polymers were characterized by spectroscopic methods and their ability to form complexes with plasmids was tested using electrophoretic studies. These modifications improved polymer biocompatibility as well as cell survival markedly when compared to PEI alone. A subset of the modified peptide-polymers also showed significantly higher transfection efficiency in primary human cells with respect to the widely used transfection agent, lipofectamine. Study of the underlying mechanism of the observed phenomena revealed lower levels of ‘reactive oxygen species’ (ROS) in presence of the peptide-polymers when compared to PEI alone. This was further corroborated with global gene expression analysis which showed upregulation of multiple genes and pathways involved in regulating intracellular oxidative stress. PMID:21477858

  11. Heparin- and sulfatide-binding peptides from the type I repeats of human thrombospondin promote melanoma cell adhesion.

    PubMed Central

    Guo, N H; Krutzsch, H C; Nègre, E; Vogel, T; Blake, D A; Roberts, D D

    1992-01-01

    Peptides from the three type I repeats of human endothelial cell thrombospondin, containing the consensus sequence-Trp-Ser-Xaa-Trp-, bind to sulfated glycoconjugates including heparin and sulfatide. The peptides are potent inhibitors for the binding of thrombospondin, laminin, or apolipoprotein E to these ligands. The thrombospondin peptides that inhibit heparin binding, but not adjacent peptides from the thrombospondin sequence containing the previously identified adhesive motif Val-Thr-Cys-Gly, promote melanoma cell adhesion when immobilized on plastic. Melanoma cell adhesion to the immobilized peptides is inhibited by soluble recombinant heparin-binding fragment of thrombospondin. The peptides also inhibit heparin-dependent binding of thrombospondin or laminin to human melanoma cells. The active peptides lack any previously identified heparin-binding consensus sequences and most do not contain any basic amino acids. Studies with homologous peptides showed that the tryptophan residues are required for binding. Adjacent basic residues in the second type I repeat enhance binding to heparin but not to sulfatide. Thus the type I peptides of thrombospondin define a distinct class of heparin-binding peptides. Images PMID:1557410

  12. Atrial natriuretic factor mRNA and binding sites in the adrenal gland.

    PubMed Central

    Nunez, D J; Davenport, A P; Brown, M J

    1990-01-01

    The factor inhibiting aldosterone secretion produced by the adrenal medulla may be atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), since the latter abolishes aldosterone release in response to a number of secretagogues, including angiotensin II and K+. In this study we have shown that cells in the adrenal medulla contain ANF mRNA and therefore have the potential to synthesize this peptide. The presence of binding sites for ANF predominantly in the adrenal zona glomerulosa suggests that, if ANF is synthesized in the medulla and transferred to the cortex, it may affect mineralocorticoid status. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. PMID:2146954

  13. Big angiotensin-25: a novel glycosylated angiotensin-related peptide isolated from human urine.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Sayaka; Hatakeyama, Kinta; Asami, Maki; Tokashiki, Mariko; Hibino, Hajime; Nishiuchi, Yuji; Kuwasako, Kenji; Kato, Johji; Asada, Yujiro; Kitamura, Kazuo

    2013-11-29

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS), including angiotensin II (Ang II), plays an important role in the regulation of blood pressure and body fluid balance. Consequently, the RAS has emerged as a key target for treatment of kidney and cardiovascular disease. In a search for bioactive peptides using an antibody against the N-terminal portion of Ang II, we identified and characterized a novel angiotensin-related peptide from human urine as a major molecular form. We named the peptide Big angiotensin-25 (Bang-25) because it consists of 25 amino acids with a glycosyl chain and added cysteine. Bang-25 is rapidly cleaved by chymase to Ang II, but is resistant to cleavage by renin. The peptide is abundant in human urine and is present in a wide range of organs and tissues. In particular, immunostaining of Bang-25 in the kidney is specifically localized to podocytes. Although the physiological function of Bang-25 remains uncertain, our findings suggest it is processed from angiotensinogen and may represent an alternative, renin-independent path for Ang II synthesis in tissue.

  14. Big angiotensin-25: a novel glycosylated angiotensin-related peptide isolated from human urine.

    PubMed

    Nagata, Sayaka; Hatakeyama, Kinta; Asami, Maki; Tokashiki, Mariko; Hibino, Hajime; Nishiuchi, Yuji; Kuwasako, Kenji; Kato, Johji; Asada, Yujiro; Kitamura, Kazuo

    2013-11-29

    The renin-angiotensin system (RAS), including angiotensin II (Ang II), plays an important role in the regulation of blood pressure and body fluid balance. Consequently, the RAS has emerged as a key target for treatment of kidney and cardiovascular disease. In a search for bioactive peptides using an antibody against the N-terminal portion of Ang II, we identified and characterized a novel angiotensin-related peptide from human urine as a major molecular form. We named the peptide Big angiotensin-25 (Bang-25) because it consists of 25 amino acids with a glycosyl chain and added cysteine. Bang-25 is rapidly cleaved by chymase to Ang II, but is resistant to cleavage by renin. The peptide is abundant in human urine and is present in a wide range of organs and tissues. In particular, immunostaining of Bang-25 in the kidney is specifically localized to podocytes. Although the physiological function of Bang-25 remains uncertain, our findings suggest it is processed from angiotensinogen and may represent an alternative, renin-independent path for Ang II synthesis in tissue. PMID:24211583

  15. Granulosa Cell Apoptosis Induced by a Novel FSH Binding Inhibitory Peptide From Human Ovarian Follicular Fluid

    PubMed Central

    Chitnis, Swati S.; Navlakhe, Rajshri M.; Shinde, Gayatri C.; Barve, Sharmila J.; D'Souza, Serena; Mahale, Smita D.; Nandedkar, Tarala D.

    2008-01-01

    Pituitary gonadotropins, follicle-stimulating hormone and luteinizing hormone, are the key regulators of ovarian folliculogenesis; these are known to be directly or indirectly modulated by many intraovarian factors. Our group has identified and studied one such novel peptide from human ovarian follicular fluid. Its partial N-terminal eight amino acid sequence has been deduced, referred to as octapeptide (OP). OP induces follicular atresia in mice and interferes with normal ovarian function in non-human primates, this action being similar to the native peptide. Thus, in this study, an attempt has been made to elucidate the mechanism of action of the synthetic OP by studying the pathway of follicular atresia in mouse ovary. Changes in granulosa cells were studied using various apoptotic markers by flow cytometry and immunohistochemistry. An increase in apoptotic cell population in atretic- and peptide-treated groups was observed compared with normal controls. Interestingly, both these groups exhibited differences in the apoptotic pathway. Results showed that the mitochondrial pathway was predominant in the atretic group, whereas the Fas-FasL pathway was predominant in the peptide-treated groups. The ultrastructural study also showed apoptotic changes in the OP-treated and atretic groups; the pattern of apoptosis differed at the subcellular level. (J Histochem Cytochem 56:961–968, 2008) PMID:18645207

  16. Decreasing brain natriuretic peptide levels after treatment for hyperthyroidism.

    PubMed

    Ertugrul, Derun Taner; Yavuz, Bunyamin; Ata, Naim; Yalcin, Ahmet Arif; Kucukazman, Metin; Algul, Beyza; Dal, Kursad; Akin, Kadir Okhan; Deveci, Onur Sinan; Canbolat, Nihat; Ure, Oznur Sari; Tutal, Emre

    2009-01-01

    BNP are produced in ventricular cardiomyocytes, and secreted in response to volume expansion or pressure overload. The purpose of this study was to assess BNP levels in patients with hyperthyroidism before specific treatment for hyperthyroidism and after euthyroidism was achieved. The study was performed in a prospective design. The study population consisted of 48 consecutive newly diagnosed untreated overt hyper-thyroid patients who had not been treated any anti-thyroid medications before. All subjects underwent transt-horacic echocardiography. Levels of fT3, fT4, TSH and BNP were measured before the onset of the treatment and after euthyroidism was achieved. A significant decrease in BNP (102.5 (6.7-1769) ng/L vs. 5.0 (0.1-87.0) ng/L p< 0.001) levels were observed, after euthyroidism was achieved. The decrease in BNP levels was posi-tively correlated with the decrease in fT3 (r=0.298; p=0.049) and fT4 (r=0.313; p=0.030). There was no cor-relation between BNP levels and TSH levels (p=NS). We conclude that hyperthyroidism may cause high BNP measurements which can lead to misdiagnosis of congestive heart failure. We suggest that thyroid hormones should be checked in patients with high levels of BNP.

  17. A rational approach to select immunogenic peptides that induce IFN-γ response against Toxoplasma gondii in human leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Cardona, Néstor I; Moncada, Diego M; Gómez-Marin, Jorge E

    2015-12-01

    The ideal vaccine to prevent toxoplasmosis in humans would comprise antigens that elicit a protective T cell type 1 response with high IFN-γ production. Here, we report the use of a bioinformatics pipeline to discover peptides based on biochemical characteristics that predict strong IFN-γ response by human leukocytes. We selected peptide sequences that previously were reported to induce IFN-γ to identify the biophysical characteristics that will predict HLA-A*02 high-affinity epitopes. We found that the protein motif pattern FL...L..[VL] was common in previously reported highly immunogenic sequences. We have selected new peptides with a length of 9 residues with affinities from 2 to 21 nM with peptide signal and transmembrane domains and predicted to be cleaved at the proteasome to perform ELISPOT assays with human leukocytes. Within 9 peptides with the highest scores for IFN-γ production, four peptides elicited IFN-γ levels in a range from 252 to 1763 SFC/1e6. Our pipeline uncovered Toxoplasma proteins with peptides that are processed by MHC class 1 in humans. Our results suggest that our rational strategy for the selection of immunogenic epitopes could be used to select peptides as candidates for inclusion in epitope-based vaccines. PMID:26210043

  18. Identification of lactoferrin peptides generated by digestion with human gastrointestinal enzymes.

    PubMed

    Furlund, C B; Ulleberg, E K; Devold, T G; Flengsrud, R; Jacobsen, M; Sekse, C; Holm, H; Vegarud, G E

    2013-01-01

    Lactoferrin (LF) is a protein present in milk and other body fluids that plays important biological roles. As part of a diet, LF must survive gastrointestinal conditions or create bioactive fragments to exert its effects. The degradation of LF and formation of bioactive peptides is highly dependent on individual variation in intraluminal composition. The present study was designed to compare the degradation and peptide formation of bovine LF (bLF) following in vitro digestion under different simulated intraluminal conditions. Human gastrointestinal (GI) juices were used in a 2-step model digestion to mimic degradation in the stomach and duodenum. To account for variation in the buffering capacity of different lactoferrin-containing foods, gastric pH was adjusted either slowly or rapidly to 2.5 or 4.0. The results were compared with in vivo digestion of bLF performed in 2 volunteers. High concentration of GI juices and fast pH reduction to 2.5 resulted in complete degradation in the gastric step. More LF resisted gastric digestion when pH was slowly reduced to 2.5 or 4.0. Several peptides were identified; however, few matched with previously reported peptides from studies using nonhuman enzymes. Surprisingly, no bovine lactoferricin, f(17-41), was identified during in vitro or in vivo digestion under the intraluminal conditions used. The diversity of enzymes in human GI juices seems to affect the hydrolysis of bLF, generating different peptide fragments compared with those obtained when using only one or a few proteases of animal origin. Multiple sequence analysis of the identified peptides indicated a motif consisting of proline and neighboring hydrophobic residues that could restrict proteolytic processing. Further structure analysis showed that almost all proteolytic cutting sites were located on the surface and mainly on the nonglycosylated half of lactoferrin. Digestion of bLF by human enzymes may generate different peptides from those found when lactoferrin is

  19. A new cryptic cationic antimicrobial peptide from human apolipoprotein E with antibacterial activity and immunomodulatory effects on human cells.

    PubMed

    Pane, Katia; Sgambati, Valeria; Zanfardino, Anna; Smaldone, Giovanni; Cafaro, Valeria; Angrisano, Tiziana; Pedone, Emilia; Di Gaetano, Sonia; Capasso, Domenica; Haney, Evan F; Izzo, Viviana; Varcamonti, Mario; Notomista, Eugenio; Hancock, Robert E W; Di Donato, Alberto; Pizzo, Elio

    2016-06-01

    Cationic antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) possess fast and broad-spectrum activity against both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, as well as fungi. It has become increasingly evident that many AMPs, including those that derive from fragments of host proteins, are multifunctional and able to mediate various immunomodulatory functions and angiogenesis. Among these, synthetic apolipoprotein-derived peptides are safe and well tolerated in humans and have emerged as promising candidates in the treatment of various inflammatory conditions. Here, we report the characterization of a new AMP corresponding to residues 133-150 of human apolipoprotein E. Our results show that this peptide, produced either by chemical synthesis or by recombinant techniques in Escherichia coli, possesses a broad-spectrum antibacterial activity. As shown for several other AMPs, ApoE (133-150) is structured in the presence of TFE and of membrane-mimicking agents, like SDS, or bacterial surface lipopolysaccharide (LPS), and an anionic polysaccharide, alginate, which mimics anionic capsular exo-polysaccharides of several pathogenic microorganisms. Noteworthy, ApoE (133-150) is not toxic toward several human cell lines and triggers a significant innate immune response, assessed either as decreased expression levels of proinflammatory cytokines in differentiated THP-1 monocytic cells or by the induction of chemokines released from PBMCs. This novel bioactive AMP also showed a significant anti-inflammatory effect on human keratinocytes, suggesting its potential use as a model for designing new immunomodulatory therapeutics. PMID:27028511

  20. Synergistic effects of C-peptide and insulin on low O2-induced ATP release from human erythrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Stephenson, Alan H.; Ellsworth, Mary L.; Sprague, Randy S.

    2013-01-01

    Erythrocytes participate in the matching of oxygen (O2) delivery with local need in skeletal muscle via the release of O2 and the vasodilator, ATP. It was reported that a concentration of insulin found in humans with insulin resistance inhibits low O2-induced ATP release. However, in vivo, insulin is coreleased with connecting peptide (C-peptide) at equimolar concentrations, but because of the shorter insulin half-life, the peptides circulate at ratios of C-peptide to insulin ranging from 1:1 to 6:1. Here, we investigate the hypothesis that C-peptide and insulin work synergistically to maintain low O2-induced ATP release from human erythrocytes. Using a thin-film tonometer to alter O2 tension, we determined that either C-peptide or insulin alone inhibits low O2-induced ATP release in a concentration-dependent manner; however, coadministration of the peptides at a 1:1 ratio does not (n = 5; P < 0.05). Because this ratio of C-peptide to insulin is not present in vivo for extended periods, we also investigated the effect of additional physiological ratios on ATP release. In the presence of insulin concentrations that would be found in fasting humans (0.05 nM), C-peptide to insulin ratios of 4:1 and 6:1 did not adversely affect low O2-induced ATP release. However, at a concentration of insulin found in the peripheral circulation of humans under postprandial conditions (0.5 nM), a ratio of C-peptide to insulin of 6:1 inhibited low O2-induced ATP release (n = 5). These findings demonstrate a heretofore unrecognized synergism between C-peptide and insulin that could have physiological importance in the regulation of perfusion distribution in skeletal muscle. PMID:24089376

  1. Enhancing Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Specific CD8+ T Cell Responses with Heteroclitic Peptides

    PubMed Central

    Adegoke, Adeolu Oyemade; Grant, Michael David

    2015-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-specific CD8+ T cells play a critical role in containing HIV replication and delaying disease progression. However, HIV-specific CD8+ T cells become progressively more “exhausted” as chronic HIV infection proceeds. Symptoms of T cell exhaustion range from expression of inhibitory receptors and selective loss of cytokine production capacity through reduced proliferative potential, impaired differentiation into effector cells and increased susceptibility to apoptosis. While effective combination antiretroviral therapy (cART) durably reduces HIV viremia to undetectable levels, this alone does not restore the full pluripotency of HIV-specific CD8+ T cells. In a number of studies, a subset of peptide epitope variants categorized as heteroclitic, restimulated more potent cellular immune responses in vitro than did the native, immunizing peptides themselves. This property of heteroclitic peptides has been exploited in experimental cancer and chronic viral infection models to promote clearance of transformed cells and persistent viruses. In this review, we consider the possibility that heteroclitic peptides could improve the efficacy of therapeutic vaccines as part of HIV immunotherapy or eradication strategies. We review literature on heteroclitic peptides and illustrate their potential to beneficially modulate the nature of HIV-specific T cell responses toward those found in the small minority of HIV-infected, aviremic cART-naïve persons termed elite controllers or long-term non-progressors. Our review suggests that the efficacy of HIV vaccines could be improved by identification, testing, and incorporation of heteroclitic variants of native HIV peptide epitopes. PMID:26257743

  2. Tandem mass spectral libraries of peptides in digests of individual proteins: Human Serum Albumin (HSA).

    PubMed

    Dong, Qian; Yan, Xinjian; Kilpatrick, Lisa E; Liang, Yuxue; Mirokhin, Yuri A; Roth, Jeri S; Rudnick, Paul A; Stein, Stephen E

    2014-09-01

    This work presents a method for creating a mass spectral library containing tandem spectra of identifiable peptide ions in the tryptic digestion of a single protein. Human serum albumin (HSA(1)) was selected for this purpose owing to its ubiquity, high level of characterization and availability of digest data. The underlying experimental data consisted of ∼3000 one-dimensional LC-ESI-MS/MS runs with ion-trap fragmentation. In order to generate a wide range of peptides, studies covered a broad set of instrument and digestion conditions using multiple sources of HSA and trypsin. Computer methods were developed to enable the reliable identification and reference spectrum extraction of all peptide ions identifiable by current sequence search methods. This process made use of both MS2 (tandem) spectra and MS1 (electrospray) data. Identified spectra were generated for 2918 different peptide ions, using a variety of manually-validated filters to ensure spectrum quality and identification reliability. The resulting library was composed of 10% conventional tryptic and 29% semitryptic peptide ions, along with 42% tryptic peptide ions with known or unknown modifications, which included both analytical artifacts and post-translational modifications (PTMs) present in the original HSA. The remaining 19% contained unexpected missed-cleavages or were under/over alkylated. The methods described can be extended to create equivalent spectral libraries for any target protein. Such libraries have a number of applications in addition to their known advantages of speed and sensitivity, including the ready re-identification of known PTMs, rejection of artifact spectra and a means of assessing sample and digestion quality.

  3. Immunoactivating peptide p4 augments alveolar macrophage phagocytosis in two diverse human populations.

    PubMed

    Bangert, Mathieu; Wright, Adam K; Rylance, Jamie; Kelly, Matthew J; Wright, Angela D; Carlone, George M; Sampson, Jacquelyn S; Rajam, Gowrisankar; Ades, Edwin W; Kadioglu, Aras; Gordon, Stephen B

    2013-09-01

    New treatment strategies are urgently needed to overcome early mortality in acute bacterial infections. Previous studies have shown that administration of a novel immunoactivating peptide (P4) alongside passive immunotherapy prevents the onset of septicemia and rescues mice from lethal invasive disease models of pneumococcal pneumonia and sepsis. In this study, using two diverse populations of adult volunteers, we determined whether P4 treatment of human alveolar macrophages would upregulate phagocytic killing of Streptococcus pneumoniae ex vivo. We also measured macrophage intracellular oxidation, cytokine secretion, and surface marker expression following stimulation. Peptide treatment showed enhanced bacterial killing in the absence of nonspecific inflammation, consistent with therapeutic potential. This is the first demonstration of P4 efficacy on ex vivo-derived human lung cells.

  4. The use of versatile plant antimicrobial peptides in agribusiness and human health.

    PubMed

    de Souza Cândido, Elizabete; e Silva Cardoso, Marlon Henrique; Sousa, Daniel Amaro; Viana, Juliane Cançado; de Oliveira-Júnior, Nelson Gomes; Miranda, Vívian; Franco, Octávio Luiz

    2014-05-01

    Plant immune responses involve a wide diversity of physiological reactions that are induced by the recognition of pathogens, such as hypersensitive responses, cell wall modifications, and the synthesis of antimicrobial molecules including antimicrobial peptides (AMPs). These proteinaceous molecules have been widely studied, presenting peculiar characteristics such as conserved domains and a conserved disulfide bond pattern. Currently, many AMP classes with diverse modes of action are known, having been isolated from a large number of organisms. Plant AMPs comprise an interesting source of studies nowadays, and among these there are reports of different classes, including defensins, albumins, cyclotides, snakins and several others. These peptides have been widely used in works that pursue human disease control, including nosocomial infections, as well as for agricultural purposes. In this context, this review will focus on the relevance of the structural-function relations of AMPs derived from plants and their proper use in applications for human health and agribusiness.

  5. Modeling of conformational transitions of fibrillogenic peptide, homologous to beta-domain of human alpha-lactalbumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kadochnikov, V. V.; Egorov, V. V.; Shvetsov, A. V.; Kuklin, A. I.; Isaev-Ivanov, V. V.; Lebedev, D. V.

    2016-01-01

    The behavior of the peptide corresponding to beta domain of human alpha-lactalbumin (GYDTQAIVENNESTEYG, WT) has been simulated by the molecular dynamics method. It is shown that, within the model considered, the monomer of this peptide does not tend to form a stable secondary structure; however, simulation of the behavior of several peptide molecules revealed the occurrence of beta structures due to the formation of intermolecular hydrogen bonds. Since the aforementioned interactions involve the terminal portions of peptides, the influence of the tetrapeptide corresponding to the N-terminal portion of WT, TDYG (R), on the secondary structure has been analyzed. The model calculations show that the interaction of this peptide with WT monomer facilitates formation of beta-structures. It is suggested that peptide R may affect the quaternary structure of WT.

  6. Characterization of peptides resulting from digestion of human skin elastin with elastase.

    PubMed

    Getie, M; Schmelzer, C E H; Neubert, R H H

    2005-11-15

    Several pathological disorders are associated with abnormalities in elastic fibers, which are mainly composed of elastin. Understanding the biochemical basis of such disorders requires information about the primary structure of elastin. Since the acquisition of structural information for elastin is hampered by its extreme insolubility in water or any organic solvent, in this study, human skin elastin was digested with elastase to produce water-soluble peptides. Tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) experiments were performed using conventional electrospray ionization (ESI) and nano-ESI techniques coupled with ion trap and quadrupole time-of-flight (qTOF) mass analyzers, respectively. The peptides were identified from the fragment spectra using database searching and/or de novo sequencing. The cleavage sites of the enzyme and, for the first time, the extent and location of proline hydroxylation in human skin elastin were determined. A total of 117 peptides were identified with sequence coverage of 58.8%. It has been observed that 25% of proline residues in the sequenced region are hydroxylated. Elastase cleaves predominantly at the C-terminals of the amino acids Gly, Val, Leu, Ala, and Ile, and to a lesser extent at Phe, Pro, Glu, and Arg. Our results confirm a previous report that human skin elastin lacks amino acid sequences expressed by exon 26A.

  7. Distinct regulation of vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) expression at mRNA and peptide levels in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Agoston, D V; Colburn, S; Krajniak, K G; Waschek, J A

    1992-05-25

    Neuronal differentiation was induced in cultures of the human neuroblastoma cell line subclone SH-SY5Y by 14-day treatment with dibutyryl cAMP (dBcAMP), retinoic acid, and phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA). An approximate 4-fold increase in vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) mRNA concentration was observed after differentiation with retinoic acid, whereas no change in VIP mRNA concentration was observed after differentiation with dBcAMP or PMA. A short-term treatment of cells with PMA did however result in a 5-fold transient increase in VIP mRNA; prior differentiation with retinoic acid or dBcAMP diminished this effect. Observed increases in VIP mRNA were in all cases accompanied by increases in VIP immunoreactivity. Remarkably, however, long-term treatment of cells with dBcAMP, which caused no change in mRNA levels, resulted in a six-fold increase in VIP immunoreactivity. Acute (36-h) treatment with carbachol also caused an increase in VIP immunoreactivity (about 2-fold, and blocked by atropine) without an increase in VIP mRNA level. Thus, a quantitative change in gene transcription or mRNA stability appears not to be a prerequisite for increased VIP expression, indicating that regulation can occur at translational or post-translational steps.

  8. NMR structure and dynamics of the agonist dynorphin peptide bound to the human kappa opioid receptor

    PubMed Central

    O’Connor, Casey; White, Kate L.; Doncescu, Nathalie; Didenko, Tatiana; Roth, Bryan L.; Czaplicki, Georges; Stevens, Raymond C.; Wüthrich, Kurt; Milon, Alain

    2015-01-01

    The structure of the dynorphin (1–13) peptide (dynorphin) bound to the human kappa opioid receptor (KOR) has been determined by liquid-state NMR spectroscopy. 1H and 15N chemical shift variations indicated that free and bound peptide is in fast exchange in solutions containing 1 mM dynorphin and 0.01 mM KOR. Radioligand binding indicated an intermediate-affinity interaction, with a Kd of ∼200 nM. Transferred nuclear Overhauser enhancement spectroscopy was used to determine the structure of bound dynorphin. The N-terminal opioid signature, YGGF, was observed to be flexibly disordered, the central part of the peptide from L5 to R9 to form a helical turn, and the C-terminal segment from P10 to K13 to be flexibly disordered in this intermediate-affinity bound state. Combining molecular modeling with NMR provided an initial framework for understanding multistep activation of a G protein-coupled receptor by its cognate peptide ligand. PMID:26372966

  9. Exquisite specificity and peptide epitope recognition promiscuity, properties shared by antibodies from sharks to humans.

    PubMed

    Marchalonis, J J; Adelman, M K; Robey, I F; Schluter, S F; Edmundson, A B

    2001-01-01

    This review considers definitions of the specificity of antibodies including the development of recent concepts of recognition polyspecificity and epitope promiscuity. Using sets of homologous and unrelated peptides derived from the sequences of immunoglobulin and T cell receptor chains we offer operational definitions of cross-reactivity by investigating correlations of either identities in amino acid sequence, or in hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity profiles with degree of binding in enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Polyreactivity, or polyspecificity, are terms used to denote binding of a monoclonal antibody or purified antibody preparation to large complex molecules that are structurally unrelated, such as thyroglobulin and DNA. As a first approximation, there is a linear correlation between degree of sequence identity or hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity and antigenic cross-binding. However, catastrophic interchanges of amino acids can occur where changing of one amino acid out of 16 in a synthetic peptide essentially eliminates binding to certain antibodies. An operational definition of epitope promiscuity for peptides is the case where two peptides show little or no identity in amino acid sequence but bind strongly to the same antibody as shown by either direct binding or competitive inhibition. Analysis of antibodies of humans and sharks, the two most divergent species in evolution to express antibodies and the combinatorial immune response, indicates that the capacity for both exquisite specificity and epitope recognition promiscuity are essential conserved features of individual vertebrate antibodies.

  10. Structure and Activity of Human Mitochondrial Peptide Deformylase, a Novel Cancer Target

    SciTech Connect

    Escobar-Alvarez, Sindy; Goldgur, Yehuda; Yang, Guangli; Ouerfelli, Ouathek; Li, Yueming; Scheinberg, David A.

    2009-07-21

    Peptide deformylase proteins (PDFs) participate in the N-terminal methionine excision pathway of newly synthesized peptides. We show that the human PDF (HsPDF) can deformylate its putative substrates derived from mitochondrial DNA-encoded proteins. The first structural model of a mammalian PDF (1.7 A), HsPDF, shows a dimer with conserved topology of the catalytic residues and fold as non-mammalian PDFs. The HsPDF C-terminus topology and the presence of a helical loop (H2 and H3), however, shape a characteristic active site entrance. The structure of HsPDF bound to the peptidomimetic inhibitor actinonin (1.7 A) identified the substrate-binding site. A defined S1' pocket, but no S2' or S3' substrate-binding pockets, exists. A conservation of PDF-actinonin interaction across PDFs was observed. Despite the lack of true S2' and S3' binding pockets, confirmed through peptide binding modeling, enzyme kinetics suggest a combined contribution from P2'and P3' positions of a formylated peptide substrate to turnover.

  11. Isolation of a 5-Kilodalton Actin-Sequestering Peptide from Human Blood Platelets

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Safer, Daniel; Golla, Rajasree; Nachmias, Vivianne T.

    1990-04-01

    Resting human platelets contain ≈0.3 mM unpolymerized actin. When freshly drawn and washed platelets are treated with saponin, 85-90% of the unpolymerized actin diffuses out. Analysis by polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis under nondenaturing conditions shows that the bulk of this unpolymerized actin migrates with a higher mobility than does pure G-actin, profilactin, or actin-gelsolin complex. When muscle G-actin is added to fresh or boiled saponin extract, the added muscle actin is shifted to the high-mobility form. The saponin extract contains an acidic peptide having a molecular mass in the range of 5 kDa, which has been purified to homogeneity by reverse-phase HPLC. This peptide also shifts muscle actin to the high-mobility form. Addition of either boiled saponin extract or the purified peptide to muscle G-actin also strongly and stoichiometrically inhibits salt-induced polymerization, as assayed by falling-ball viscometry and by sedimentation. We conclude that this peptide binds to the bulk of the unpolymerized actin in platelets and prevents it from polymerizing.

  12. Changing the peptide specificity of a human T cell receptor by directed evolution

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Sheena N.; Wang, Yuhang; Baylon, Javier L.; Singh, Nishant K.; Baker, Brian M.; Tajkhorshid, Emad; Kranz, David M.

    2014-01-01

    Binding of a T cell receptor (TCR) to a peptide/major histocompatibility complex is the key interaction involved in antigen specificity of T cells. The recognition involves up to six complementarity determining regions (CDR) of the TCR. Efforts to examine the structural basis of these interactions and to exploit them in adoptive T cell therapies has required the isolation of specific T cell clones and their clonotypic TCRs. Here we describe a strategy using in vitro, directed evolution of a single TCR to change its peptide specificity, thereby avoiding the need to isolate T cell clones. The human TCR A6, which recognizes the viral peptide Tax/HLA-A2, was converted to TCR variants that recognized the cancer peptide MART1/HLA-A2. Mutational studies and molecular dynamics simulations identified CDR residues that were predicted to be important in the specificity switch. Thus, in vitro engineering strategies alone can be used to discover TCRs with desired specificities. PMID:25376839

  13. Specific binding of atrial natriuretic factor in brain microvessels

    SciTech Connect

    Chabrier, P.E.; Roubert, P.; Braquet, P.

    1987-04-01

    Cerebral capillaries constitute the blood-brain barrier. Studies of specific receptors (neurotransmitters or hormones) located on this structure can be performed by means of radioligand-binding techniques on isolated brain microvessels. The authors examined on pure bovine cerebral microvessel preparations the binding of atrial natriuretic factor (ANF), using /sup 125/I-labeled ANF. Saturation and competition experiments demonstrated the presence of a single class of ANF-binding sites with high affinity and with a binding capacity of 58 fmol/mg of protein. The binding of /sup 125/I-labeled ANF to brain microvessels is specific, reversible, and time dependent, as is shown by association-dissociation experiments. The demonstration of specific ANF-binding sites on brain microvessels supposes a physiological role of ANF on brain microvasculature. The coexistence of ANF and angiotensin II receptors on this cerebrovascular tissue suggests that the two circulating peptides may act as mutual antagonists in the regulation of brain microcirculation and/or blood-brain barrier function.

  14. A New Peptide Ligand for Targeting Human Carbonic Anhydrase IX, Identified through the Phage Display Technology

    PubMed Central

    Askoxylakis, Vasileios; Garcia-Boy, Regine; Rana, Shoaib; Krämer, Susanne; Hebling, Ulrike; Mier, Walter; Altmann, Annette; Markert, Annette; Debus, Jürgen; Haberkorn, Uwe

    2010-01-01

    Carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) is a transmembrane enzyme found to be overexpressed in various tumors and associated with tumor hypoxia. Ligands binding this target may be used to visualize hypoxia, tumor manifestation or treat tumors by endoradiotherapy. Methods Phage display was performed with a 12 amino acid phage display library by panning against a recombinant extracellular domain of human carbonic anhydrase IX. The identified peptide CaIX-P1 was chemically synthesized and tested in vitro on various cell lines and in vivo in Balb/c nu/nu mice carrying subcutaneously transplanted tumors. Binding, kinetic and competition studies were performed on the CAIX positive human renal cell carcinoma cell line SKRC 52, the CAIX negative human renal cell carcinoma cell line CaKi 2, the human colorectal carcinoma cell line HCT 116 and on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC). Organ distribution studies were carried out in mice, carrying SKRC 52 tumors. RNA expression of CAIX in HCT 116 and HUVEC cells was investigated by quantitative real time PCR. Results In vitro binding experiments of 125I-labeled-CaIX-P1 revealed an increased uptake of the radioligand in the CAIX positive renal cell carcinoma cell line SKRC 52. Binding of the radioligand in the colorectal carcinoma cell line HCT 116 increased with increasing cell density and correlated with the mRNA expression of CAIX. Radioligand uptake was inhibited up to 90% by the unlabeled CaIX-P1 peptide, but not by the negative control peptide octreotide at the same concentration. No binding was demonstrated in CAIX negative CaKi 2 and HUVEC cells. Organ distribution studies revealed a higher accumulation in SKRC 52 tumors than in heart, spleen, liver, muscle, intestinum and brain, but a lower uptake compared to blood and kidney. Conclusions These data indicate that CaIX-P1 is a promising candidate for the development of new ligands targeting human carbonic anhydrase IX. PMID:21209841

  15. Synthesis and characterization of photoactivatable peptide agonists of the human thrombin receptor.

    PubMed

    Bischoff, R; Cordier, Y; Rasmussen, U B; Schlesinger, Y; Gachet, C; Jaquinod, M; Tripet, B; Chong, P C; Pavirani, A

    1994-08-01

    Chemical synthesis and biochemical analysis of modified agonist peptides of the human thrombin receptor derived from the sequence SFLLRNP containing photoactivatable azido groups and biotin for sensitive detection is described. Substitution of leucine in position three with p-azidophenylalanine and extension of the C-terminus with a KGGK spacer containing biotin covalently linked to the side chain of the C-terminal lysine residue resulted in an active receptor agonist as determined by intracellular Ca2+ mobilization in human erythroleukemia (HEL) cells. In contrast, substitution of phenylalanine in position two with p-azidophenylalanine reduced agonist activity significantly. PMID:8050586

  16. Impact of human milk pasteurization on the kinetics of peptide release during in vitro dynamic term newborn digestion.

    PubMed

    Deglaire, Amélie; De Oliveira, Samira C; Jardin, Julien; Briard-Bion, Valérie; Emily, Mathieu; Ménard, Olivia; Bourlieu, Claire; Dupont, Didier

    2016-07-01

    Holder pasteurization (62.5°C, 30 min) ensures sanitary quality of donor's human milk but also denatures beneficial proteins. Understanding whether this further impacts the kinetics of peptide release during gastrointestinal digestion of human milk was the aim of the present paper. Mature raw (RHM) or pasteurized (PHM) human milk were digested (RHM, n = 2; PHM, n = 3) by an in vitro dynamic system (term stage). Label-free quantitative peptidomics was performed on milk and digesta (ten time points). Ascending hierarchical clustering was conducted on "Pasteurization × Digestion time" interaction coefficients. Preproteolysis occurred in human milk (159 unique peptides; RHM: 91, PHM: 151), mostly on β-casein (88% of the endogenous peptides). The predicted cleavage number increased with pasteurization, potentially through plasmin activation (plasmin cleavages: RHM, 53; PHM, 76). During digestion, eight clusters resumed 1054 peptides from RHM and PHM, originating for 49% of them from β-casein. For seven clusters (57% of peptides), the kinetics of peptide release differed between RHM and PHM. The parent protein was significantly linked to the clustering (p-value = 1.4 E-09), with β-casein and lactoferrin associated to clusters in an opposite manner. Pasteurization impacted selectively gastric and intestinal kinetics of peptide release in term newborns, which may have further nutritional consequences.

  17. Angiotensin I-converting enzyme inhibitor peptides derived from the endostatin-containing NC1 fragment of human collagen XVIII.

    PubMed

    Farias, Shirley L; Sabatini, Regiane A; Sampaio, Tatiana C; Hirata, Izaura Y; Cezari, Maria Helena S; Juliano, Maria A; Sturrock, Edward D; Carmona, Adriana K; Juliano, Luiz

    2006-05-01

    Extracellular matrix and soluble plasma proteins generate peptides that regulate biological activities such as cell growth, differentiation and migration. Bradykinin, a peptide released from kininogen by kallikreins, stimulates vasodilatation and endothelial cell proliferation. Various classes of substances can potentiate these biological actions of bradykinin. Among them, the best studied are bradykinin potentiating peptides (BPPs) derived from snake venom, which can also strongly inhibit angiotensin I-converting enzyme (ACE) activity. We identified and synthesized sequences resembling BPPs in the vicinity of potential proteolytic cleavage sites in the collagen XVIII molecule, close to endostatin. These peptides were screened as inhibitors of human recombinant wild-type ACE containing two intact functional domains; two full-length ACE mutants containing only a functional C- or N-domain catalytic site; and human testicular ACE, a natural form of the enzyme that only contains the C-domain. The BPP-like peptides inhibited ACE in the micromolar range and interacted preferentially with the C-domain. The proteolytic activity involved in the release of BPP-like peptides was studied in human serum and human umbilical-vein endothelial cells. The presence of enzymes able to release these peptides in blood led us to speculate on a physiological mechanism for the control of ACE activities.

  18. Modulation of host defense peptide-mediated human mast cell activation by LPS

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Kshitij; Subramanian, Hariharan; Ali, Hydar

    2016-01-01

    Human β-defensin3 (hBD3) and the cathelicidin LL-37 are host defense peptides (HDPs) that directly kill microbes and display immunomodulatory/wound healing properties via the activation of chemokine, formylpeptide and epidermal growth factor receptors on monocytes and epithelial cells. A C-terminal 14 amino acid hBD3 peptide with all Cys residues replaced with Ser (CHRG01) and an LL-37 peptide consisting of residues 17-29 (FK-13) display antimicrobial activity but lack immunomodulatory property. Surprisingly, we found that CHRG01 and FK-13 caused Ca2+ mobilization and degranulation in human mast cells via a novel G protein coupled receptor (GPCR) known as Mas-related gene-X2 (MrgX2). At local sites of bacterial infection, the negatively charged LPS likely interacts with cationic HDPs to inhibit their activity and thus providing a mechanism for pathogens to escape the host defense mechanisms. We found that LPS caused almost complete inhibition of hBD3 and LL-37-induced Ca2+ mobilization and mast cell degranulation. In contrast, it had no effect on CHRG01 and FK-13-induced mast cell responses. These findings suggest that HDP derivatives that kill microbes, harness mast cell’s host defense and wound healing properties via the activation of MrgX2 but are resistant to inhibition by LPS could be utilized for the treatment of antibiotic-resistant microbial infections. PMID:26511058

  19. The Human Cathelicidin Antimicrobial Peptide LL-37 and Mimics are Potential Anticancer Drugs

    PubMed Central

    Kuroda, Kengo; Okumura, Kazuhiko; Isogai, Hiroshi; Isogai, Emiko

    2015-01-01

    Antimicrobial peptides (AMPs) play a critical role in innate host defense against microbial pathogens in many organisms. The human cathelicidin, LL-37, has a net positive charge and is amphiphilic, and can eliminate pathogenic microbes directly via electrostatic attraction toward negatively charged bacterial membranes. A number of studies have shown that LL-37 participates in various host immune systems, such as inflammatory responses and tissue repair, in addition to its antibacterial properties. Moreover, recent evidence suggests that it is also involved in the regulation of cancer. Indeed, previous studies have suggested that human LL-37 is involved in carcinogenesis via multiple reporters, such as FPR2 (FPRL1), epidermal growth factor receptor, and ERBb2, although LL-37 and its fragments and analogs also show anticancer effects in various cancer cell lines. This discrepancy can be attributed to peptide-based factors, host membrane-based factors, and signal regulation. Here, we describe the association between AMPs and cancer with a focus on anticancer peptide functions and selectivity in an effort to understand potential therapeutic implications. PMID:26175965

  20. Osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells promotes mineralization within a biodegradable peptide hydrogel.

    PubMed

    Castillo Diaz, Luis A; Elsawy, Mohamed; Saiani, Alberto; Gough, Julie E; Miller, Aline F

    2016-01-01

    An attractive strategy for the regeneration of tissues has been the use of extracellular matrix analogous biomaterials. Peptide-based fibrillar hydrogels have been shown to mimic the structure of extracellular matrix offering cells a niche to undertake their physiological functions. In this study, the capability of an ionic-complementary peptide FEFEFKFK (F, E, and K are phenylalanine, glutamic acid, and lysine, respectively) hydrogel to host human mesenchymal stem cells in three dimensions and induce their osteogenic differentiation is demonstrated. Assays showed sustained cell viability and proliferation throughout the hydrogel over 12 days of culture and these human mesenchymal stem cells differentiated into osteoblasts simply upon addition of osteogenic stimulation. Differentiated osteoblasts synthesized key bone proteins, including collagen-1 (Col-1), osteocalcin, and alkaline phosphatase. Moreover, mineralization occurred within the hydrogel. The peptide hydrogel is a naturally biodegradable material as shown by oscillatory rheology and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, where both viscoelastic properties and the degradation of the hydrogel were monitored over time, respectively. These findings demonstrate that a biodegradable octapeptide hydrogel can host and induce the differentiation of stem cells and has the potential for the regeneration of hard tissues such as alveolar bone. PMID:27493714

  1. Osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells promotes mineralization within a biodegradable peptide hydrogel

    PubMed Central

    Castillo Diaz, Luis A; Elsawy, Mohamed; Saiani, Alberto; Gough, Julie E; Miller, Aline F

    2016-01-01

    An attractive strategy for the regeneration of tissues has been the use of extracellular matrix analogous biomaterials. Peptide-based fibrillar hydrogels have been shown to mimic the structure of extracellular matrix offering cells a niche to undertake their physiological functions. In this study, the capability of an ionic-complementary peptide FEFEFKFK (F, E, and K are phenylalanine, glutamic acid, and lysine, respectively) hydrogel to host human mesenchymal stem cells in three dimensions and induce their osteogenic differentiation is demonstrated. Assays showed sustained cell viability and proliferation throughout the hydrogel over 12 days of culture and these human mesenchymal stem cells differentiated into osteoblasts simply upon addition of osteogenic stimulation. Differentiated osteoblasts synthesized key bone proteins, including collagen-1 (Col-1), osteocalcin, and alkaline phosphatase. Moreover, mineralization occurred within the hydrogel. The peptide hydrogel is a naturally biodegradable material as shown by oscillatory rheology and reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, where both viscoelastic properties and the degradation of the hydrogel were monitored over time, respectively. These findings demonstrate that a biodegradable octapeptide hydrogel can host and induce the differentiation of stem cells and has the potential for the regeneration of hard tissues such as alveolar bone. PMID:27493714

  2. Atrial natriuretic factor and body water distribution.

    PubMed

    Vidal, N A; Arranz, C T; Mones Sias, M C; Herrmann, A P; Martinez Seeber, A

    1987-11-01

    In the rat, the effects of an atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) (Rat, 8-33 Peninsula Lab) on body water distribution have been evaluated. The ANF administration to nephrectomized animals produced a decrease in plasma volume and a slight increase in haematocrit and in plasma albumin concentration. No modifications were observed in total and intracellular water. The fluid efflux from the capillaries appeared to be located in the interstitial space. These results suggest that ANF could regulate plasma volume and systemic blood pressure, concurrently with its other known effects.

  3. Interactions between the sympathetic nervous system and atrial natriuretic factor in the control of renal functions.

    PubMed

    Genovesi, S; Protasoni, G; Assi, C; Golin, R; Stella, A; Zanchetti, A

    1990-08-01

    We studied neural influences on the renal actions of atrial peptides in anaesthetized cats by comparing the response to atrial natriuretic factor (ANF) infusion in the innervated kidney and in the contralateral surgically denervated kidney. During ANF infusion arterial pressure decrea