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Sample records for human nontransformed rpe-1

  1. The ability to survive mitosis in the presence of microtubule poisons differs significantly between human nontransformed (RPE-1) and cancer (U2OS, HeLa) cells.

    PubMed

    Brito, Daniela A; Rieder, Conly L

    2009-08-01

    We used live cell imaging to compare the fate of human nontransformed (RPE-1) and cancer (HeLa, U2OS) cells as they entered mitosis in nocodazole or taxol. In the same field, and in either drug, a cell in all lines could die in mitosis, exit mitosis and die within 10 h, or exit mitosis and survive > or =10 h. Relative to RPE-1 cells, significantly fewer HeLa or U2OS cells survived mitosis or remained viable after mitosis: in nocodazole concentrations that inhibit spindle microtubule assembly, or in 500 nM taxol, 30% and 27% of RPE-1 cells, respectively, died in or within 10 h of exiting mitosis while 90% and 49% of U2OS and 78% and 81% of HeLa died. This was even true for clinically relevant taxol concentrations (5 nM) which killed 93% and 46%, respectively, of HeLa and U2OS cells in mitosis or within 10 h of escaping mitosis, compared to 1% of RPE-1 cells. Together these data imply that studies using HeLa or U2OS cells, harvested after a prolonged block in mitosis with nocodazole or taxol, are significantly contaminated with dead or dying cells. We also found that the relationship between the duration of mitosis and survival is drug and cell type specific and that lethality is related to the cell type and drug used to prevent satisfaction of the kinetochore attachment checkpoint. Finally, work with a pan-caspase inhibitor suggests that the primary apoptotic pathway triggered by nocodazole during mitosis in RPE-1 cells is not active in U2OS cells. Cell Motil. Cytoskeleton 2008. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  2. The Ability to Survive Mitosis in the Presence of Microtubule Poisons Differs Significantly Between Human Nontransformed (RPE-1) and Cancer (U2OS, HeLa) Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brito, Daniela A.; Rieder, Conly L.

    2008-01-01

    We used live cell imaging to compare the fate of human nontransformed (RPE-1) and cancer (HeLa, U2OS) cells as they entered mitosis in nocodazole or taxol. In the same field, and in either drug, a cell in all lines could die in mitosis, exit mitosis and die within 10 h, or exit mitosis and survive ≥10 h. Relative to RPE-1 cells, significantly fewer HeLa or U2OS cells survived mitosis or remained viable after mitosis: in nocodazole concentrations that inhibit spindle microtubule assembly, or in 500 nM taxol, 30% and 27% of RPE-1 cells, respectively, died in or within 10 h of exiting mitosis while 90% and 49% of U2OS and 78% and 81% of HeLa died. This was even true for clinically relevant taxol concentrations (5 nM) which killed 93% and 46%, respectively, of HeLa and U2OS cells in mitosis or within 10 h of escaping mitosis, compared to 1% of RPE-1 cells. Together these data imply that studies using HeLa or U2OS cells, harvested after a prolonged block in mitosis with nocodazole or taxol, are significantly contaminated with dead or dying cells. We also found that the relationship between the duration of mitosis and survival is drug and cell type specific and that lethality is related to the cell type and drug used to prevent satisfaction of the kinetochore attachment checkpoint. Finally, work with a pancaspase inhibitor suggests that the primary apoptotic pathway triggered by nocodazole during mitosis in RPE-1 cells is not active in U2OS cells. Cell Motil. Cytoskeleton 2008. PMID:18792104

  3. Parabens enable suspension growth of MCF-10A immortalized, non-transformed human breast epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Khanna, Sugandha; Darbre, Philippa D

    2013-05-01

    Parabens (alkyl esters of p-hydroxybenzoic acid) are used extensively as preservatives in consumer products, and intact esters have been measured in several human tissues. Concerns of a potential link between parabens and breast cancer have been raised, but mechanistic studies have centred on their oestrogenic activity and little attention has been paid to any carcinogenic properties. In the present study, we report that parabens can induce anchorage-independent growth of MCF-10A immortalized but non-transformed human breast epithelial cells, a property closely related to transformation and a predictor of tumour growth in vivo. In semi-solid methocel suspension culture, MCF-10A cells produced very few colonies and only of a small size but the addition of 5 × 10(-4) M methylparaben, 10(-5) M n-propylparaben or 10(-5) M n-butylparaben resulted in a greater number of colonies per dish (P < 0.05 in each case) and an increased average colony size (P < 0.001 in each case). Dose-responses showed that concentrations as low as 10(-6) M methylparaben, 10(-7) M n-propylparaben and 10(-7) M n-butylparaben could increase colony numbers (P = 0.016, P = 0.010, P = 0.008, respectively): comparison with a recent measurement of paraben concentrations in human breast tissue samples from 40 mastectomies (Barr et al., 2012) showed that 22/40 of the patients had at least one of the parabens at the site of the primary tumour at or above these concentrations. To our knowledge, this is the first study to report that parabens can induce a transformed phenotype in human breast epithelial cells in vitro, and further investigation is now justified into a potential link between parabens and breast carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2012 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Enhanced neurotrophin synthesis and molecular differentiation in non-transformed human retinal progenitor cells cultured in a rotating bioreactor.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ravindra; Dutt, Kamla

    2006-01-01

    One approach to the treatment of retinal diseases, such as retinitis pigmentosa, is to replace diseased or degenerating cells with healthy cells. Even if all of the problems associated with tissue transplant were to be resolved, the availability of tissue would remain an ongoing problem. We have previously shown that transformed human retinal cells can be grown in a NASA-developed horizontally rotating culture vessel (bioreactor) to form three-dimensional-like structures with the expression of several retinal specific proteins. In this study, we have investigated growth of non-transformed human retinal progenitors (retinal stem cells) in a rotating bioreactor. This rotating culture vessel promotes cell-cell interaction between similar and dissimilar cells. We cultured retinal progenitors (Ret 1-4) alone or as a co-culture with human retinal pigment epithelial cells (RPE, D407) in this system to determine if 3D structures can be generated from non-transformed progenitors. Our second goal was to determine if the formation of 3D structures correlates with the upregulation of neurotrophins, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF), transforming growth factor alpha (TGFalpha), ciliary neurotrophic factor (CNTF), and brain-delivered neurotrophic factor (BDNF). These factors have been implicated in progenitor cell proliferation, commitment, differentiation, and survival. We also investigated the expression of the following retinal specific proteins in this system: neuron specific enolase (NSE); tyrosine hydroxylase (TH); D(2)D(3), D(4) receptors; protein kinase-C alpha (PKCalpha), and calbindin. The 3D structures generated were characterized by phase and scanning transmission electron microscopy. Retinal progenitors, cultured alone or as a co-culture in the rotating bioreactor, formed 3D structures with some degree of differentiation, accompanied by the upregulation of bFGF, CNTF, and TGFalpha. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor, which is expressed in vivo in RPE (D407), was

  5. Evaluation of tellurium toxicity in transformed and non-transformed human colon cells.

    PubMed

    Vij, Puneet; Hardej, Diane

    2012-11-01

    Diphenyl ditelluride (DPDT) and tellurium tetrachloride (TeCl(4)) were evaluated for toxicity in transformed (HT-29, Caco-2) and non-transformed colon cells (CCD-18Co). Significant decreases in viability were observed with DPDT exposure in HT-29 (62.5-1000 μM), Caco-2 (31.25-1000 μM) and CCD-18Co cells (500-1000 μM) and with TeCl(4) in HT-29 (31.25-1000 μM), Caco-2 (31.25-1000 μM) and CCD-18Co cells (500-1000 μM). Light microscopy confirmed viability analysis. Significant increases in caspase 3/7 and 9 activity were observed with DPDT in HT-29 (500-1000 μM) and CCD-18Co cells (1000 μM) indicating apoptosis. No significant increases in caspases were seen with TeCl(4) indicating necrosis. Apoptosis or necrosis was confirmed with fluorescent staining (FITC-Annexin, Hoechst 33342 and Ethidium Homodimer). Significant decreases in GSH/GSSG ratio were observed with DPDT in HT-29 (62.5-1000 μM), and CCD-18Co cells (1000 μM) and with TeCl(4) in HT-29 (62.5-1000 μM) and CCD-18Co cells (250-1000 μM). We concluded that cells treated with DPDT resulted in apoptosis and TeCl(4) treatment in necrosis. GSH/GSSG ratio shifts indicate oxidative mechanisms are involved.

  6. Activation of the Innate Immune Response against DENV in Normal Non-Transformed Human Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Bustos-Arriaga, José; García-Machorro, Jazmín; León-Juárez, Moisés; García-Cordero, Julio; Santos-Argumedo, Leopoldo; Flores-Romo, Leopoldo; Méndez-Cruz, A. René; Juárez-Delgado, Francisco J.; Cedillo-Barrón, Leticia

    2011-01-01

    Background When mosquitoes infected with DENV are feeding, the proboscis must traverse the epidermis several times (“probing”) before reaching a blood vessel in the dermis. During this process, the salivary glands release the virus, which is likely to interact first with cells of the various epidermal and dermal layers, cells which could be physiologically relevant to DENV infection and replication in humans. However, important questions are whether more abundant non-hematopoietic cells such as fibroblasts become infected, and whether they play any role in antiviral innate immunity in the very early stages of infection, or even if they might be used by DENV as primary replication cells. Methodology/Principal Findings Fibroblasts freshly released from healthy skin and infected 12 hours after their isolation show a positive signal for DENV. In addition, when primary skin fibroblast cultures were established and subsequently infected, we showed DENV-2 antigen-positive intracellular signal at 24 hours and 48 hours post-infection. Moreover, the fibroblasts showed productive infection in a conventional plaque assay. The skin fibroblasts infected with DENV-2 underwent potent signaling through both TLR3 and RIG- 1, but not Mda5, triggering up-regulation of IFNβ, TNFα, defensin 5 (HB5) and β defensin 2 (HβD2). In addition, DENV infected fibroblasts showed increased nuclear translocation of interferon (IFN) regulatory factor 3 (IRF3), but not interferon regulatory factor 7 (IRF7), when compared with mock-infected fibroblasts. Conclusions/Significance In this work, we demonstrated the high susceptibility to DENV infection by primary fibroblasts from normal human skin, both in situ and in vitro. Our results suggest that these cells may contribute to the pro-inflammatory and anti-viral microenvironment in the early stages of interaction with DENV-2. Furthermore, the data suggest that fibroblast may also be used as a primary site of DENV replication and provide viral

  7. Exposure to cyclic volatile methylsiloxanes (cVMS) causes anchorage-independent growth and reduction of BRCA1 in non-transformed human breast epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Farasani, Abdullah; Darbre, Philippa D

    2017-04-01

    Dermal absorption of components of personal care products (PCPs) may contribute to breast cancer development. Cyclic volatile methylsiloxanes (cVMS) are used widely in the formulation of PCPs, and their presence has been recently detected in human blood. The objectives of this study were to investigate any genotoxic effects after short- (1 week) or longer-term (30 weeks) exposure to hexamethylcyclotrisiloxane (D3), octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4) or decamethylcyclopentasiloxane (D5) in MCF-10 A and MCF-10F immortalized non-transformed human breast epithelial cells. Genotoxic effects were assessed by an ability of cells to grow in suspension culture, from DNA damage measured by comet assays, and from a reduction in levels of DNA repair proteins measured by RT-PCR and western immunoblotting. Dose-dependent anchorage-independent growth in methocel culture was observed after exposure to D3 (10(-)(13)  M-10(-5)  M) and D4/D5 (10(-)(9)  M-10(-5)  M). DNA damage was measured by the comet assay after 1-h exposure to D3 (10(-)(6)  M-10(-5)  M) and D4 (10(-5)  M). BRCA1 mRNA and BRCA1 protein levels were reduced after 30-week exposure to 10(-5)  M D4 and D5 in both cell lines. Reduced levels of mRNAs for other DNA repair proteins (BRCA2, ATM, ATR, CHK1 and CHK2) were also observed after exposure to 10(-5)  M D5 in both cell lines, and some reductions after exposure to D3 and D4. If cVMS can not only enable anchorage-independent growth of non-transformed breast epithelial cells and damage DNA, but also compromise DNA repair systems, then there is the potential for them to impact on breast carcinogenesis. Further risk assessment now requires information concerning the extent to which cVMS may be present in human breast tissues. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  8. Caspase activity is not required for the mitotic checkpoint or mitotic slippage in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyunghee; Kenny, Alison E.; Rieder, Conly L.

    2011-01-01

     Biochemical studies suggest that caspase activity is required for a functional mitotic checkpoint (MC) and mitotic slippage. To test this directly, we followed nontransformed human telomerase immortalized human retinal pigment epithelia (RPE-1) cells through mitosis after inhibiting or depleting selected caspases. We found that inhibiting caspases individually, in combination, or in toto did not affect the duration or fidelity of mitosis in otherwise untreated cells. When satisfaction of the MC was prevented with 500 nM nocodazole or 2.5 μM dimethylenastron (an Eg5 inhibitor), 92–100% of RPE-1 cells slipped from mitosis in the presence of pan-caspase inhibitors or after simultaneously depleting caspase-3 and -9, and they did so with the same kinetics (∼21–22 h) as after treatment with nocodazole or Eg5 inhibitors alone. Surprisingly, inhibiting or depleting caspase-9 alone doubled the number of nocodazole-treated, but not Eg5-inhibited, cells that died in mitosis. In addition, inhibiting or depleting caspase-9 and -3 together accelerated the rate of slippage ∼40% (to ∼13–15 h). Finally, nocodazole-treated cells that recently slipped through mitosis in the presence or absence of pan-caspase inhibitors contained numerous BubR1 foci in their nuclei. From these data, we conclude that caspase activity is not required for a functional MC or for mitotic slippage. PMID:21613548

  9. Photochemical damage from chronic 458-nm laser exposures in an artificially pigmented hTERT-RPE1 cell line

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Foltz, Michael S.; Whitlock, Norris A.; Estlack, Larry E.; Figueroa, Manuel A.; Thomas, Robert J.; Rockwell, Benjamin A.; Denton, Michael L.

    2006-02-01

    Artificially pigmented hTERT-RPE1 cells were exposed to a mode-locked or continuous wave (CW) laser at 458 nm for one hour in a modified culture incubator. Exposure conditions were selected to give greatest likelihood of damage due to a photochemical mechanism, with interest in possible differences between CW and mode-locked damage thresholds. After post-exposure-recovery (PER) for either 1-hour or 24-hour, cells were concurrently stained with annexin V and 6-CFDA to determine if they had undergone necrosis or apoptosis. Alternatively, cells were stained with Ethidium Homodimer (EthD-1) and Calcein AM to determine if they had undergone necrosis following 1-hour and 24-hours PER. Preliminary results indicate that laser exposure induced some apoptosis following 1-hour PER, with irradiance required for apoptosis being lower than that for necrosis with mode-locked exposure conditions. Probit analysis yielded necrosis thresholds for cell culture following 1-hour PER using data compiled from both dye sets. CW exposures resulted in a lower threshold than mode-locked exposures for necrosis following 1-hour PER. A thermal model provided the predicted temperature rise in cell culture due to laser exposure. The thermal model validates our choice of laser parameters to obtain photochemical damage. Data following 24-hours PER were inconclusive. Considerations of cell migration are included in the interpretation of data and further improvements to methods when using live cell assays are recommended.

  10. PEG-3, a nontransforming cancer progression gene, is a positive regulator of cancer aggressiveness and angiogenesis.

    PubMed

    Su, Z Z; Goldstein, N I; Jiang, H; Wang, M N; Duigou, G J; Young, C S; Fisher, P B

    1999-12-21

    Cancer is a progressive disease culminating in acquisition of metastatic potential by a subset of evolving tumor cells. Generation of an adequate blood supply in tumors by production of new blood vessels, angiogenesis, is a defining element in this process. Although extensively investigated, the precise molecular events underlying tumor development, cancer progression, and angiogenesis remain unclear. Subtraction hybridization identified a genetic element, progression elevated gene-3 (PEG-3), whose expression directly correlates with cancer progression and acquisition of oncogenic potential by transformed rodent cells. We presently demonstrate that forced expression of PEG-3 in tumorigenic rodent cells, and in human cancer cells, increases their oncogenic potential in nude mice as reflected by a shorter tumor latency time and the production of larger tumors with increased vascularization. Moreover, inhibiting endogenous PEG-3 expression in progressed rodent cancer cells by stable expression of an antisense expression vector extinguishes the progressed cancer phenotype. Cancer aggressiveness of PEG-3 expressing rodent cells correlates directly with increased RNA transcription, elevated mRNA levels, and augmented secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF). Furthermore, transient ectopic expression of PEG-3 transcriptionally activates VEGF in transformed rodent and human cancer cells. Taken together these data demonstrate that PEG-3 is a positive regulator of cancer aggressiveness, a process regulated by augmented VEGF production. These studies also support an association between expression of a single nontransforming cancer progression-inducing gene, PEG-3, and the processes of cancer aggressiveness and angiogenesis. In these contexts, PEG-3 may represent an important target molecule for developing cancer therapeutics and inhibitors of angiogenesis.

  11. Discovery of a novel proteasome inhibitor selective for cancer cells over non-transformed cells.

    PubMed

    Kazi, Aslamuzzaman; Lawrence, Harshani; Guida, Wayne C; McLaughlin, Mark L; Springett, Gregory M; Berndt, Norbert; Yip, Richard M L; Sebti, Saïd M

    2009-06-15

    Numerous proteins controlling cell cycle progression, apoptosis and angiogenesis are degraded by the ubiquitin/proteasome system, which has become the subject for intense investigations for cancer therapeutics. Therefore, we used in silico and experimental approaches to screen compounds from the NCI chemical libraries for inhibitors against the chymotrypsin-like (CT-L) activity of the proteasome and discovered PI-083. Molecular docking indicates that PI-083 interacts with the Thr21, Gly47 and Ala49 residues of the beta5 subunit and Asp114 of the beta6 subunit of the proteasome. PI-083 inhibits CT-L activity and cell proliferation and induces apoptosis selectively in cancer cells (ovarian T80-Hras, pancreatic C7-Kras and breast MCF-7) as compared to their normal/immortalized counterparts (T80, C7 and MCF-10A, respectively). In contrast, Bortezomib, the only proteasome inhibitor approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA), did not exhibit this selectivity for cancer over non-transformed cells. In addition, in all cancer cells tested, including Multiple Myeloma (MM), breast, pancreatic, ovarian, lung, prostate cancer cell lines as well as fresh MM cells from patients, PI-083 required less time than Bortezomib to induce its antitumor effects. Furthermore, in nude mouse xenografts in vivo, PI-083, but not Bortezomib, suppressed the growth of human breast and lung tumors. Finally, following in vivo treatment of mice, PI-083 inhibited tumor, but not hepatic liver CT-L activity, whereas Bortezomib inhibited both tumor and liver CT-L activities. These results suggest that PI-083 is more selective for cancer cells and may have broader antitumor activity and therefore warrants further advanced preclinical studies.

  12. Nontransformed, GM-CSF–dependent macrophage lines are a unique model to study tissue macrophage functions

    PubMed Central

    Fejer, György; Wegner, Mareike Dorothee; Györy, Ildiko; Cohen, Idan; Engelhard, Peggy; Voronov, Elena; Manke, Thomas; Ruzsics, Zsolt; Dölken, Lars; Prazeres da Costa, Olivia; Branzk, Nora; Huber, Michael; Prasse, Antje; Schneider, Robert; Apte, Ron N.; Galanos, Chris; Freudenberg, Marina A.

    2013-01-01

    Macrophages are diverse cell types in the first line of antimicrobial defense. Only a limited number of primary mouse models exist to study their function. Bone marrow-derived, macrophage-CSF–induced cells with a limited life span are the most common source. We report here a simple method yielding self-renewing, nontransformed, GM-CSF/signal transducer and activator of transcription 5-dependent macrophages (Max Planck Institute cells) from mouse fetal liver, which reflect the innate immune characteristics of alveolar macrophages. Max Planck Institute cells are exquisitely sensitive to selected microbial agents, including bacterial LPS, lipopeptide, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, cord factor, and adenovirus and mount highly proinflammatory but no anti-inflammatory IL-10 responses. They show a unique pattern of innate responses not yet observed in other mononuclear phagocytes. This includes differential LPS sensing and an unprecedented regulation of IL-1α production upon LPS exposure, which likely plays a key role in lung inflammation in vivo. In conclusion, Max Planck Institute cells offer an useful tool to study macrophage biology and for biomedical science. PMID:23708119

  13. cdc25 is a nuclear protein expressed constitutively throughout the cell cycle in nontransformed mammalian cells

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    A family of proteins homologous to the cdc25 gene product of the fission yeast bear specific protein tyrosine phosphatase activity involved in the activation of the p34cdc2-cyclin B kinase. Using affinity-purified antibodies raised against a synthetic peptide corresponding to the catalytic site of the cdc25 phosphatase, we show that cdc25 protein is constitutively expressed throughout the cell cycle of nontransformed mammalian fibroblasts and does not undergo major changes in protein level. By indirect immunofluorescence, cdc25 protein is found essentially localized in the nucleus throughout interphase and during early prophase. Just before the complete nuclear envelope breakdown at the prophase-prometaphase boundary, cdc25 proteins are redistributed throughout the cytoplasm. During metaphase and anaphase, cdc25 staining remains distributed throughout the cell and excludes the condensed chromosomes. The nuclear locale reappears during telophase. In light of the recent data describing the cytoplasmic localization of cyclin B protein (Pines, J., and T. Hunter. 1991. J. Cell Biol. 115:1-17), the data presented here suggest that separation in two distinct cellular compartments of the cdc25 phosphatase and its substrate p34cdc2-cyclin B may be of importance in the regulation of the cdc2 kinase activity. PMID:1500423

  14. Transformed and nontransformed cells differ in stability and cell cycle regulation of a binding activity to the murine thymidine kinase promoter.

    PubMed Central

    Bradley, D W; Dou, Q P; Fridovich-Keil, J L; Pardee, A B

    1990-01-01

    A DNA binding activity to an upstream region of the murine thymidine kinase gene is regulated differently in a transformed and nontransformed cell line pair. Differences in regulation were observed (i) after serum levels were reduced, (ii) when serum levels were returned to initial high levels, and (iii) while protein synthesis was inhibited. After reduction of serum levels, the binding activity was unstable in nontransformed BALB/c 3T3 clone A31 cells but was significantly more stable in benzo[a]pyrene-transformed BALB/c 3T3 cells. After serum concentration was returned to high levels, the kinetic pattern of the binding activity differed between nontransformed and transformed cells. While protein synthesis was inhibited, the binding activity was unstable in nontransformed cells and stable in transformed cells. Partial inhibition of protein synthesis--a more stringent condition to test instability--prevented the induction of the binding activity in nontransformed cells. Previously, the labile protein hypothesis set forth the criterion that a protein regulating the onset of DNA synthesis should be unstable in nontransformed cells and stable in transformed cells. The DNA binding activity described here satisfies this criterion. Images PMID:2251273

  15. USEPA Environmental Quality Index (EQI) - Air, Water, Land, Built, and Sociodemographic Domains Non-Transformed Variables Dataset as Input for the USEPA EQI, by County for the United States

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The US Environmental Protection Agency's (EPA) National Health and Environmental Effects Research Laboratory (NHEERL) in the Environmental Public Health Division (EPHD) is currently engaged in research aimed at developing a measure that estimates overall environmental quality at the county level for the United States. This work is being conducted as an effort to learn more about how various environmental factors simultaneously contribute to health disparities in low-income and minority populations, and to better estimate the total environmental and social context to which humans are exposed. This dataset contains the finalized non-transformed variables chosen to represent the Air, Water, Land, Built, and Sociodemographic Domains of the total environment. This does not represent the final variables for the EQI. The Transformed dataset was used to create the EQI. This dataset is for information purposes only for those who want to see the original non-transformed variables. Six criteria air pollutants and 81 hazardous air pollutants are included in this dataset. Data sources are the EPA's Air Quality system (http://www.epa.gov/ttn/airs/airsaqs/) and the National-scale Air Toxics Assessment (http://www.epa.gov/nata/). Variables are average pollutant concentrations or emissions for 2000-2005 at the county level for all counties in the United States. Data on water impairment, waste permits, beach closures, domestic water source, deposition for 9 pollutants, drought st

  16. Targeted siRNA Screens Identify ER-to-Mitochondrial Calcium Exchange in Autophagy and Mitophagy Responses in RPE1 Cells.

    PubMed

    MacVicar, Thomas D B; Mannack, Lilith V J C; Lees, Robert M; Lane, Jon D

    2015-06-11

    Autophagy is an important stress response pathway responsible for the removal and recycling of damaged or redundant cytosolic constituents. Mitochondrial damage triggers selective mitochondrial autophagy (mitophagy), mediated by a variety of response factors including the Pink1/Parkin system. Using human retinal pigment epithelial cells stably expressing autophagy and mitophagy reporters, we have conducted parallel screens of regulators of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondrial morphology and function contributing to starvation-induced autophagy and damage-induced mitophagy. These screens identified the ER chaperone and Ca2+ flux modulator, sigma non-opioid intracellular receptor 1 (SIGMAR1), as a regulator of autophagosome expansion during starvation. Screens also identified phosphatidyl ethanolamine methyl transferase (PEMT) and the IP3-receptors (IP3Rs) as mediators of Parkin-induced mitophagy. Further experiments suggested that IP3R-mediated transfer of Ca2+ from the ER lumen to the mitochondrial matrix via the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter (MCU) primes mitochondria for mitophagy. Importantly, recruitment of Parkin to damaged mitochondria did not require IP3R-mediated ER-to-mitochondrial Ca2+ transfer, but mitochondrial clustering downstream of Parkin recruitment was impaired, suggesting involvement of regulators of mitochondrial dynamics and/or transport. Our data suggest that Ca2+ flux between ER and mitochondria at presumed ER/mitochondrial contact sites is needed both for starvation-induced autophagy and for Parkin-mediated mitophagy, further highlighting the importance of inter-organellar communication for effective cellular homeostasis.

  17. Targeted siRNA Screens Identify ER-to-Mitochondrial Calcium Exchange in Autophagy and Mitophagy Responses in RPE1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    MacVicar, Thomas D. B.; Mannack, Lilith V. J. C.; Lees, Robert M.; Lane, Jon D.

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy is an important stress response pathway responsible for the removal and recycling of damaged or redundant cytosolic constituents. Mitochondrial damage triggers selective mitochondrial autophagy (mitophagy), mediated by a variety of response factors including the Pink1/Parkin system. Using human retinal pigment epithelial cells stably expressing autophagy and mitophagy reporters, we have conducted parallel screens of regulators of endoplasmic reticulum (ER) and mitochondrial morphology and function contributing to starvation-induced autophagy and damage-induced mitophagy. These screens identified the ER chaperone and Ca2+ flux modulator, sigma non-opioid intracellular receptor 1 (SIGMAR1), as a regulator of autophagosome expansion during starvation. Screens also identified phosphatidyl ethanolamine methyl transferase (PEMT) and the IP3-receptors (IP3Rs) as mediators of Parkin-induced mitophagy. Further experiments suggested that IP3R-mediated transfer of Ca2+ from the ER lumen to the mitochondrial matrix via the mitochondrial Ca2+ uniporter (MCU) primes mitochondria for mitophagy. Importantly, recruitment of Parkin to damaged mitochondria did not require IP3R-mediated ER-to-mitochondrial Ca2+ transfer, but mitochondrial clustering downstream of Parkin recruitment was impaired, suggesting involvement of regulators of mitochondrial dynamics and/or transport. Our data suggest that Ca2+ flux between ER and mitochondria at presumed ER/mitochondrial contact sites is needed both for starvation-induced autophagy and for Parkin-mediated mitophagy, further highlighting the importance of inter-organellar communication for effective cellular homeostasis. PMID:26110381

  18. Polymethoxyflavone Apigenin-Trimethylether Suppresses LPS-Induced Inflammatory Response in Nontransformed Porcine Intestinal Cell Line IPEC-J2.

    PubMed

    Farkas, Orsolya; Palócz, Orsolya; Pászti-Gere, Erzsébet; Gálfi, Péter

    2015-01-01

    The in vitro anti-inflammatory effect of apigenin and its trimethylated analogue (apigenin-trimethylether) has been investigated in order to evaluate whether these flavonoids could attenuate LPS-induced inflammation in IPEC-J2 non-transformed intestinal epithelial cells. Levels of IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, and COX-2 mRNA were measured as a marker of inflammatory response. The extracellular H2O2 level in IPEC-J2 cells was also monitored by Amplex Red assay. Our data revealed that both compounds had significant lowering effect on the inflammatory response. Apigenin (at 25 μM) significantly decreased gene expression of IL-6 in LPS-treated cells, while apigenin-trimethylether in the same concentration did not influence IL-6 mRNA level. Both apigenin and apigenin-trimethylether reduced IL-8 gene expression significantly. TNF-α mRNA level was decreased by apigenin-trimethylether, which was not influenced by apigenin. Treatment with both flavonoids caused significant reduction in the mRNA level of COX-2, but the anti-inflammatory effect of the methylated analogue was more effective than the unmethylated one. Furthermore, both flavonoids reduced significantly the level of extracellular H2O2 compared to the control cells. In conclusion, the methylated apigenin analogue could avoid LPS-induced intestinal inflammation and it could be applied in the future as an effective anti-inflammatory compound.

  19. Polymethoxyflavone Apigenin-Trimethylether Suppresses LPS-Induced Inflammatory Response in Nontransformed Porcine Intestinal Cell Line IPEC-J2

    PubMed Central

    Farkas, Orsolya; Palócz, Orsolya; Pászti-Gere, Erzsébet; Gálfi, Péter

    2015-01-01

    The in vitro anti-inflammatory effect of apigenin and its trimethylated analogue (apigenin-trimethylether) has been investigated in order to evaluate whether these flavonoids could attenuate LPS-induced inflammation in IPEC-J2 non-transformed intestinal epithelial cells. Levels of IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α, and COX-2 mRNA were measured as a marker of inflammatory response. The extracellular H2O2 level in IPEC-J2 cells was also monitored by Amplex Red assay. Our data revealed that both compounds had significant lowering effect on the inflammatory response. Apigenin (at 25 μM) significantly decreased gene expression of IL-6 in LPS-treated cells, while apigenin-trimethylether in the same concentration did not influence IL-6 mRNA level. Both apigenin and apigenin-trimethylether reduced IL-8 gene expression significantly. TNF-α mRNA level was decreased by apigenin-trimethylether, which was not influenced by apigenin. Treatment with both flavonoids caused significant reduction in the mRNA level of COX-2, but the anti-inflammatory effect of the methylated analogue was more effective than the unmethylated one. Furthermore, both flavonoids reduced significantly the level of extracellular H2O2 compared to the control cells. In conclusion, the methylated apigenin analogue could avoid LPS-induced intestinal inflammation and it could be applied in the future as an effective anti-inflammatory compound. PMID:26180592

  20. Antioxidant potential of Agrobacterium-transformed and non-transformed Physalis ixocarpa plants grown in vitro and ex vitro.

    PubMed

    Bergier, Katarzyna; Kuźniak, Elżbieta; Skłodowska, Maria

    2012-12-07

    Oxidative stress is involved in pathogenesis of a number of chronic diseases hence is an increasing interest in plant-derived natural antioxidants with respect to their potential health benefits. Plants from the genus Physalis are particularly rich in secondary metabolites and show significant antioxidant potential. Recent development in transgenic research has opened new possibilities for enhanced production of secondary metabolites with plant cell and organ cultures. The hairy root-regenerated Physalis ixocarpa plants grown in vitro and ex vitro were compared to the non-transformed plants with respect to their antioxidant potential. The total antioxidant capacity (TAC), the contents of total phenols and ascorbate were evaluated in fruits, flowers, leaves and roots of P. ixocarpa using the ferric reducing antioxidant power assay (FRAP), the Folin-Ciocalteu method and the 2,2'-dipyridyl method, respectively. The antioxidant profiles, in terms of TAC, ascorbate and phenols were organ-specific and depended on the culture conditions. Neither the total phenol content nor the ascorbate level appeared to determine the TAC of the studied plant extracts. The aqueous extracts exhibited lower antioxidant activities than the acetone ones indicating that lipophilic antioxidants made a major contribution to TAC of the plant tissues. Agrobacterium rhizogenes-mediated transformation changed the antioxidant status with respect to TAC, phenols and ascorbate and this effect was observed in the plants grown in vitro and ex vitro.

  1. Effect of a nickel-tolerant ACC deaminase-producing Pseudomonas strain on growth of nontransformed and transgenic canola plants.

    PubMed

    Rodriguez, Hilda; Vessely, Susanne; Shah, Saleh; Glick, Bernard R

    2008-08-01

    Four bacterial strains were isolated from soils at nickel-contaminated sites based on their ability to utilize 1-aminocyclopropane-1-carboxylate (ACC) as a sole source of nitrogen. The four isolates were all identified as Pseudomonas putida Biovar B, and subsequent testing revealed that they all exhibited traits previously associated with plant growth promotion (i.e., indoleacetic acid and siderophore production and ACC deaminase activity). These four strains were also tolerant of nickel concentrations of up to 13.2 mM in the culture medium. The strain, HS-2, selected for further characterization, was used in pot experiments to inoculate both nontransformed and transgenic canola plants (expressing a bacterial ACC deaminase gene in its roots). Plants inoculated with the HS-2 strain produced an increase in plant biomass as well as in nickel (Ni) uptake by shoots and roots. The results suggest that this strain is a potential candidate to be used as an inoculant in both phytoremediation protocols and in plant growth promotion.

  2. Involvement of a non-hormone-binding 90-kilodalton protein in the nontransformed 8S form of the rabbit uterus progesterone receptor

    SciTech Connect

    Renoir, J.M.; Buchou, T.; Baulieu, E.E.

    1986-10-21

    Nontransformed 8S progesterone receptor (8S-PR) was purified by hormone-specific affinity chromatography from rabbit uterine low-salt cytosol containing 20 mM molybdate. In the eluate obtained with radioactive progestin, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) showed the presence of several bands, including three that corresponded to approx.90, approx.120, and approx.85-kDa proteins. None of these three proteins was found in the eluate of the affinity column when the molybdate-containing cytosol was chromatographed in the presence of nonradioactive progesterone (mock purification). Subsequent purification of the affinity eluate by DEAE-Sephacel chromatography gave a single radioactive receptor peak at 0.15 M KCl with a sedimentation coefficient of 8.5 S. Silver staining after SDS-PAGE revealed that this purified 8S-PR fraction contained mainly the 120-, 90-, and 85-kDa proteins. (/sup 3/H)R5020-labeled 8S-PR purified by DEAE-Sephacel column chromatography was UV irradiated, and after SDS-PAGE the 120- and 85-kDa proteins were revealed, but the 90-kDa protein was not. Further evidence for the presence of the 90-kDa non-hormone-binding protein in the purified molybdate-stabilized nontransformed 8S-PR structure was demonstrated. In the course of this work, it was verified that 0.3 M KCl added in cytosol in the absence of molybdate dissociated the 8S-PR complex, and purified 120- and 85-kDa progestin binding proteins were obtained by hormone-specific affinity chromatography of the salt-treated cytosol. In summer, the results demonstrated that, as for the nontransformed avian 8S-PR the nontransformed 8S form of the rabbit uterus PR includes a non-hormone-binding 90-kDa protein.

  3. Lithospheric Structure, Stress, and Magmatism at the Rainbow Non-Transform Offset on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Paulatto, M.; Canales, J. P.; Dunn, R. A.

    2014-12-01

    New oceanic lithosphere is formed at slow-spreading mid-ocean ridges by a combination of eruption and intrusion of magma and by tectonic exhumation and alteration of lower crustal and mantle rocks. We look at the relationship between these two processes and how their relative contributions vary at non-transform ridge-segment offsets (NTOs). Models of mantle upwelling predict magmatic input and heat flux to be relatively low at NTOs, yet many host high-temperature hydrothermal systems, which are difficult to explain without the presence of a crustal magmatic source. We analyzed newly acquired swath bathymetry, gravity and magnetic data from the MARINER experiment together with archived data from the Rainbow NTO (36º10' N) on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge. This NTO is currently experiencing both mantle exhumation and magmatic input as evidenced by the active Rainbow high-temperature hydrothermal field. We calculate mantle Bouguer gravity anomalies and crustal magnetization to constrain the lithospheric structure and tectonic evolution of the NTO during the past ~2 Myr. The swath bathymetry data are used to map faults, extrusive volcanic terrain and tectonized blocks and show that the style of crustal accretion varies along the adjacent ridge segments. Spatial changes in the style of extensional faulting are indicative of variations in the mechanical properties and the state of stress of the lithosphere. We suggest that the availability of magma to drive hydrothermal activity at Rainbow and other similar settings is controlled not only by the thermal regime and the structure of the lithosphere but also by the effect of local stress conditions on magma migration. Models of magma migration and dyking show that changes in the direction of minimum compressive stress affect the propagation of magmatic intrusions. We argue that stress rotation can explain the formation of crustal magma chambers at NTOs despite a reduced magmatic flux. These constraints help determine the role of

  4. A preliminary study of apoptosis induction in glioma cells via alteration of the Bax/Bcl-2-p53 axis by transformed and non-transformed root extracts of Leonurus sibiricus L.

    PubMed

    Sitarek, Przemysław; Skała, Ewa; Toma, Monika; Wielanek, Marzena; Szemraj, Janusz; Nieborowska-Skorska, Malgorzata; Kolasa, Maciej; Skorski, Tomasz; Wysokińska, Halina; Śliwiński, Tomasz

    2016-07-01

    Leonurus sibiricus L. is a traditional medicinal plant which occurs in southern Siberia, China, Korea, Japan, and Vietnam. The plant shows several pharmacological effects, but the most interesting is its anti-cancer activity. The aim of our study was to examine the induction of apoptosis in malignant glioma cells, the most aggressive primary brain tumors of the central nervous system, following treatment with transformed root (TR) or non-transformed root (NR) L. sibiricus extracts. Both the NR and TR extracts were found to have cytotoxic activity in the glioma primary cells. The human glioblastoma cell lines obtained from patients were confirmed to be tumorogenic by the following three markers: D10S1709, D10S1172, and D22S283. HPLC and MS analysis revealed the presence of polyphenolic compounds (chlorogenic acid, ferulic acid, caffeic acid, p-coumaric acid, ellagic acid, and verbascoside) in both sets of root extracts. In summary, our findings demonstrate that treatment of the glioma cells with NR and TR extracts resulted (a) in significant cell growth inhibition, (b) S- and G2/M-phase cell cycle arrest, and (c) apoptosis in a dose-dependent fashion by changing Bax/Bcl-2 ratio (about 4-fold increase) and p53 (5-fold increase) activation. These findings indicate that NR and TR extracts exhibit anti-cancer activity through the regulation of genes involved in apoptosis. This is the first report to demonstrate the cytotoxic effect of polyphenolic extracts from L. sibiricus roots against glioma cells, but further studies are required to understand the complete mechanism of its apoptosic activity.

  5. Helicobacter pylori CagA Suppresses Apoptosis through Activation of AKT in a Nontransformed Epithelial Cell Model of Glandular Acini Formation.

    PubMed

    Vallejo-Flores, Gabriela; Torres, Javier; Sandoval-Montes, Claudia; Arévalo-Romero, Haruki; Meza, Isaura; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Torres-Morales, Julián; Chávez-Rueda, Adriana Karina; Legorreta-Haquet, María Victoria; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M

    2015-01-01

    H. pylori infection is the most important environmental risk to develop gastric cancer, mainly through its virulence factor CagA. In vitro models of CagA function have demonstrated a phosphoprotein activity targeting multiple cellular signaling pathways, while cagA transgenic mice develop carcinomas of the gastrointestinal tract, supporting oncogenic functions. However, it is still not completely clear how CagA alters cellular processes associated with carcinogenic events. In this study, we evaluated the capacity of H. pylori CagA positive and negative strains to alter nontransformed MCF-10A glandular acini formation. We found that CagA positive strains inhibited lumen formation arguing for an evasion of apoptosis activity of central acini cells. In agreement, CagA positive strains induced a cell survival activity that correlated with phosphorylation of AKT and of proapoptotic proteins BIM and BAD. Anoikis is a specific type of apoptosis characterized by AKT and BIM activation and it is the mechanism responsible for lumen formation of MCF-10A acini in vitro and mammary glands in vivo. Anoikis resistance is also a common mechanism of invading tumor cells. Our data support that CagA positive strains signaling function targets the AKT and BIM signaling pathway and this could contribute to its oncogenic activity through anoikis evasion.

  6. Epidermal growth factor receptor transactivation is implicated in IL-6-induced proliferation and ERK1/2 activation in non-transformed prostate epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Poncet, Nadège; Guillaume, Johann; Mouchiroud, Guy

    2011-03-01

    Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGF-R) is a receptor tyrosine kinase that can be activated by molecules other than its cognate ligands. This form of crosstalk called transactivation is frequently observed in both physiological and pathological cellular responses, yet it involves various mechanisms. Using the RWPE-1 cell line as a model of non-transformed prostate epithelial progenitor cells, we observed that interleukin-6 (IL-6) is able to promote cell proliferation and ERK1/2 activation provided that EGF-R kinase activity is not impaired. Treatment with GM6001, a general matrix metalloprotease inhibitor, indicated that IL-6 activates EGF-R through cleavage and release of membrane-anchored EGF-R ligands. Several inhibitors were used to test implication of "a disintegrin and metalloprotease" ADAM10 and ADAM17. GW280264X that targets both ADAM10 and ADAM17 blocked IL-6-induced proliferation and ERK1/2 phosphorylation with same potency as GM6001. However, ADAM10 inhibitor GI254023X and ADAM17 inhibitor TAPI-2 were less efficient in inhibiting response of RWPE-1 cells to IL-6, indicating possible cooperation of ADAM17 with ADAM10 or other metalloproteases. Accordingly, our findings suggest that IL-6 stimulates shedding of EGF-R ligands and transactivation of EGF-R in normal prostate epithelial cells, which may be an important mechanism to promote cell proliferation in inflammatory prostate.

  7. Helicobacter pylori CagA Suppresses Apoptosis through Activation of AKT in a Nontransformed Epithelial Cell Model of Glandular Acini Formation

    PubMed Central

    Vallejo-Flores, Gabriela; Torres, Javier; Sandoval-Montes, Claudia; Arévalo-Romero, Haruki; Meza, Isaura; Camorlinga-Ponce, Margarita; Torres-Morales, Julián; Chávez-Rueda, Adriana Karina; Legorreta-Haquet, María Victoria; Fuentes-Pananá, Ezequiel M.

    2015-01-01

    H. pylori infection is the most important environmental risk to develop gastric cancer, mainly through its virulence factor CagA. In vitro models of CagA function have demonstrated a phosphoprotein activity targeting multiple cellular signaling pathways, while cagA transgenic mice develop carcinomas of the gastrointestinal tract, supporting oncogenic functions. However, it is still not completely clear how CagA alters cellular processes associated with carcinogenic events. In this study, we evaluated the capacity of H. pylori CagA positive and negative strains to alter nontransformed MCF-10A glandular acini formation. We found that CagA positive strains inhibited lumen formation arguing for an evasion of apoptosis activity of central acini cells. In agreement, CagA positive strains induced a cell survival activity that correlated with phosphorylation of AKT and of proapoptotic proteins BIM and BAD. Anoikis is a specific type of apoptosis characterized by AKT and BIM activation and it is the mechanism responsible for lumen formation of MCF-10A acini in vitro and mammary glands in vivo. Anoikis resistance is also a common mechanism of invading tumor cells. Our data support that CagA positive strains signaling function targets the AKT and BIM signaling pathway and this could contribute to its oncogenic activity through anoikis evasion. PMID:26557697

  8. Validation of Reference Genes for Quantitative Real-Time PCR in Bovine PBMCs Transformed and Non-transformed by Theileria annulata.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hongxi; Liu, Junlong; Li, Youquan; Yang, Congshan; Zhao, Shuaiyang; Liu, Juan; Liu, Aihong; Liu, Guangyuan; Yin, Hong; Guan, Guiquan; Luo, Jianxun

    2016-02-01

    Theileria annulata is a tick-borne intracellular protozoan parasite that causes tropical theileriosis, a fatal bovine lymphoproliferative disease. The parasite predominantly invades bovine B lymphocytes and macrophages and induces host cell transformation by a mechanism that is not fully comprehended. Analysis of signaling pathways by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) could be a highly efficient means to understand this transformation mechanism. However, accurate analysis of qPCR data relies on selection of appropriate reference genes for normalization, yet few papers on T. annulata contain evidence of reference gene validation. We therefore used the geNorm and NormFinder programs to evaluate the stability of 5 candidate reference genes; 18S rRNA, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), ACTB (β-actin), PRKG1 (protein kinase cGMP-dependent, type I) and TATA box binding protein (TBP). The results showed that 18S rRNA was the reference gene most stably expressed in bovine PBMCs transformed and non-transformed with T. annulata, followed by GAPDH and TBP. While 18S rRNA and GAPDH were the best combination, these 2 genes were chosen as references to study signaling pathways involved in the transformation mechanism of T. annulata.

  9. Validation of Reference Genes for Quantitative Real-Time PCR in Bovine PBMCs Transformed and Non-transformed by Theileria annulata

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hongxi; Liu, Junlong; Li, Youquan; Yang, Congshan; Zhao, Shuaiyang; Liu, Juan; Liu, Aihong; Liu, Guangyuan; Yin, Hong; Guan, Guiquan; Luo, Jianxun

    2016-01-01

    Theileria annulata is a tick-borne intracellular protozoan parasite that causes tropical theileriosis, a fatal bovine lymphoproliferative disease. The parasite predominantly invades bovine B lymphocytes and macrophages and induces host cell transformation by a mechanism that is not fully comprehended. Analysis of signaling pathways by quantitative real-time PCR (qPCR) could be a highly efficient means to understand this transformation mechanism. However, accurate analysis of qPCR data relies on selection of appropriate reference genes for normalization, yet few papers on T. annulata contain evidence of reference gene validation. We therefore used the geNorm and NormFinder programs to evaluate the stability of 5 candidate reference genes; 18S rRNA, glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDH), ACTB (β-actin), PRKG1 (protein kinase cGMP-dependent, type I) and TATA box binding protein (TBP). The results showed that 18S rRNA was the reference gene most stably expressed in bovine PBMCs transformed and non-transformed with T. annulata, followed by GAPDH and TBP. While 18S rRNA and GAPDH were the best combination, these 2 genes were chosen as references to study signaling pathways involved in the transformation mechanism of T. annulata. PMID:26951977

  10. Helicobacter pylori CagA and IL-1β Promote the Epithelial-to-Mesenchymal Transition in a Nontransformed Epithelial Cell Model

    PubMed Central

    Arévalo-Romero, Haruki; Meza, Isaura; Vallejo-Flores, Gabriela

    2016-01-01

    Gastric cancer is the third cause of cancer death worldwide and infection by Helicobacter pylori (H. pylori) is considered the most important risk factor, mainly by the activity of its virulence factor CagA. H. pylori/CagA-induced chronic inflammation triggers a series of gastric lesions of increased severity, starting with gastritis and ending with cancer. IL-1β has been associated with tumor development and invasiveness in different types of cancer, including gastric cancer. Currently, it is not clear if there is an association between CagA and IL-1β at a cellular level. In this study, we analyzed the effects of IL-1β and CagA on MCF-10A nontransformed cells. We found evidence that both CagA and IL-1β trigger the initiation of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition characterized by β-catenin nuclear translocation, increased expression of Snail1 and ZEB1, downregulation of CDH1, and morphological changes during MCF-10A acini formation. However, only CagA induced MMP9 activity and cell invasion. Our data support that IL-1β and CagA target the β-catenin pathway, with CagA leading to acquisition of a stage related to aggressive tumors. PMID:27525003

  11. Analysis of microearthquakes at the non-transform offset of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge hosting the Rainbow hydrothermal system (36°14'N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horning, G.; Canales, J. P.; Sohn, R. A.; Dunn, R. A.

    2015-12-01

    The Rainbow hydrothermal field is an active, ultramafic-hosted system located on the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (MAR) at 36° 14'N. It is located at a non-transform discontinuity (NTD) of the MAR at the AMAR-AMAR minor segment intersection [German et al., 1996]. Rainbow, in contrast to other ultramafic-hosted systems such as Lost City, is a high-temperature site with fluids up to 365 °C [Douville et al., 2002]. A magmatic heat source must be present to account for the long-lived, high-temperature, heat flux of 1-5 GW [Thurnherr and Richards, 2001], but the nearest, known neovolcanic activity is 15-20 km away on the AMAR segment [German and Parson, 1998]. In 2013, a long-term, ocean bottom seismometer (OBS) microearthquake network of 13 instruments was deployed as part of the MARINER geophysical experiment [Dunn et al., 2013]. Over 40,000 events were detected and located within ~16 km of the active hydrothermal field during the ~200 day deployment. We present hypocenters estimated using P- and S-wave arrival times and a crustal velocity model derived from the active-source tomography component of the MARINER experiment. Moment/magnitude estimates from spectral methods indicate that the majority of events have local magnitudes (ML) of 0-1, with the largest events approaching ML ~2. First arrival polarity data demonstrate that many of the events have non-double couple source mechanisms, and we explore the use of P/S-wave amplitude ratios to constrain these focal mechanisms. The detection of predominantly non-double events indicates processes other than simple fault slip (e.g., serpentinization) are contributing to the observed seismicity and deformation. We use the spatial distribution, magnitudes, rate, and source mechanisms of the seismic events to constrain the coupled processes of hydrothermal circulation and deformation at the Rainbow massif.

  12. The non-transform discontinuity on the Central Indian Ridge at 11°S: The transtensional basin formation and hydrothermal activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pak, S. J.; Kim, H. S.; Son, J.; Kim, J.; Moon, J. W.; Son, S. K.

    2014-12-01

    The bathymetric and magnetic survey, hydrocasting and seabed sampling have been carried out in the middle portion of the Central Indian Ridge (MCIR) between 7°S and 17°S. The MCIR constitutes six first-order segments and seven second-order segments with four non-transform discontinuities (NTDs) and twelve ocean core complexes (OCCs). These segments are characterized by asymmetric accretion that corresponds to about 70% of the surveyed MCIR segment. One of the outstanding NTD in the area is a basin like NTD3-1 at 11°S (50km in length) which strike at 035°, approximately 45° oblique in a clockwise direction to the orientation of two adjoining second-order segments. The hydrothermal activity is recognized at the tips of NTD3-1. No abyssal hills paralleling to basin-shape NTD3-1 are observed. Anomalous depth of the basin, lack of positive magnetic anomaly across the basin and rare seismic activities in the basin floor suggests that extensional tectonism with a sparse volcanism is the dominant process occurring along the NTD3-1. Based on the previous researches that the counterclockwise rotation of ridge is predominant in the area, the region of NTD3-1 largely accommodates shear strain by left-lateral sense motion and consequently forms a transtensional basin, i.e., a pull-apart basin. The strong and frequent hydrothermal plume signals, and highly tectonized rocks in both tips of the NTD3-1 are reflective of the dilation zones or tensional fractures accompanied by the pull-apart basin formation. It is the first identification of a pull-apart basin associated with hydrothermal activity in the Central Indian Ridge.

  13. Numerical modelling of non-transform discontinuity geometry: Implications for ridge structure, volcano-tectonic fabric development and hydrothermal activity at segment ends

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tyler, Stephen; Bull, Jonathan M.; Parson, Lindsay M.; Tuckwell, George W.

    2007-05-01

    Ocean ridge discontinuities partition and offset spreading centres at a range of scales. Large scale discontinuities (10's-100's km) are synonymous with first-order transform faults, which have well defined linear fault zone valleys. In contrast, Non-Transform Discontinuities (NTDs) are diffuse, smaller scale offsets (0 to < 20 km), characterised by central basins or topographic highs. The geometry of NTD offsets can be categorised by the sense of offset, either right-stepping or left-stepping, and by the relative positions of the segment tips. The segment tip configurations include under-lapping, over-lapping or simple across-axis jumps or stepping in the ridge axis. In this study finite difference software is used to model segment geometry at a slow-spreading ridge under a normal tensile-stress within a homogeneous and isotropic medium. Along- and across-axis segment separations were varied incrementally for left- and right-stepping senses. The results show that the ratio of along-axis to across-axis segment tip separation is a dominant control of stress field rotation within an NTD. Features which most clearly show rotation within an NTD include basins and tectonically controlled constructional ridges. The obliquity of these features along with measurements of the surrounding fault fabrics are used as a way of observing and determining stress rotations within NTDs along the Central Indian Ridge (CIR). These rotations were used to obtain segment geometries from models where the central tensor showed an equivalent rotation. The results show that geometry has a profound effect on stress field rotation under which large- and small-scale volcano-tectonic fabrics form. In addition, a shortfall of the predicted model tip relative to interpreted positions, along with morphology and observation of the ridge fabrics at the terminations to some segments, suggests the existence of a zone, broadly analogous to the process zone observed in fracture mechanics, which we call a

  14. Progastrin overexpression imparts tumorigenic/metastatic potential to embryonic epithelial cells: phenotypic differences between transformed and non-transformed stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Shubhashish; Kantara, Carla; Ortiz, Ixiu; Swiercz, Rafal; Kuo, Joyce; Davey, Robert; Escobar, Kenneth; Ullrich, Robert; Singh, Pomila

    2012-01-01

    -cells, unlike non-transformed stem-cells, co-express stem-cell-markers DCLK1 and CD44 with CS-ANXA2. PMID:22532325

  15. Crustal and upper mantle seismic structure beneath the rift mountains and across a nontransform offset at the Mid-Atlantic Ridge (35°N)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Canales, J. Pablo; Detrick, Robert S.; Lin, Jian; Collins, John A.; Toomey, Douglas R.

    2000-02-01

    We present new results on the crustal and upper mantle structure beneath the rift mountains along two segments of the Mid-Atlantic Ridge and across a nontransform offset (NTO). Our results were obtained from a combination of forward modeling and two-dimensional tomographic inversion of wide-angle seismic refraction data and gravity modeling. The study area includes two segments: OH-1 between the Oceanographer fracture zone and the NTO-1 at 34°35'N and OH-2 between NTO-1 and the NTO at 34°10'N. The center of OH-1 is characterized by anomalously thick crust (˜8 km) with a thick Moho transition zone with Vp = 7.2-7.6 km/s. This transition zone, coincident with a gravity low, is probably composed of gabbro sills alternating with dunites, as observed in some ophiolites. OH-1 has larger along-axis crustal thickness variations than OH-2, but average crustal thicknesses are similar (6.0±1.2 km at OH-1, 6.1±0.7 at OH-2). Thus we do not find significant differences in magma supply between these segments, in contrast to what has been inferred from morphological and gravity studies. At both segments the shoaling of the Moho is more rapid at the inside than at the outside corners, consistent with models in which the inside-corner crust is technically modified. The structural differences between inside- and outside-corner crust are more apparent at OH-2, suggesting that the extrusive layer is thinner at the inside corner of OH-2 than at the inside corner of OH-1, probably due to differences in axial morphology and along-axis magma transport. NTO-1 is characterized by a nearly constant velocity gradient within the upper 5 km and low upper mantle velocities (7.4-7.8 km/s). The anomalous structure beneath NTO-1 is interpreted as fractured mafic crust. The P wave velocities and densities required to match the gravity data suggest that serpentinites are common beneath the NTO-1 and possibly beneath the inside corners. Serpentinization could be as much as 40% at ˜3.8 km below

  16. Ki-67 Contributes to Normal Cell Cycle Progression and Inactive X Heterochromatin in p21 Checkpoint-Proficient Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Sun, Xiaoming; Bizhanova, Aizhan; Matheson, Timothy D; Yu, Jun; Zhu, Lihua Julie; Kaufman, Paul D

    2017-09-01

    The Ki-67 protein is widely used as a tumor proliferation marker. However, whether Ki-67 affects cell cycle progression has been controversial. Here we demonstrate that depletion of Ki-67 in human hTERT-RPE1, WI-38, IMR90, and hTERT-BJ cell lines and primary fibroblast cells slowed entry into S phase and coordinately downregulated genes related to DNA replication. Some gene expression changes were partially relieved in Ki-67-depleted hTERT-RPE1 cells by codepletion of the Rb checkpoint protein, but more thorough suppression of the transcriptional and cell cycle defects was observed upon depletion of the cell cycle inhibitor p21. Notably, induction of p21 upon depletion of Ki-67 was a consistent hallmark of cell types in which transcription and cell cycle distribution were sensitive to Ki-67; these responses were absent in cells that did not induce p21. Furthermore, upon Ki-67 depletion, a subset of inactive X (Xi) chromosomes in female hTERT-RPE1 cells displayed several features of compromised heterochromatin maintenance, including decreased H3K27me3 and H4K20me1 labeling. These chromatin alterations were limited to Xi chromosomes localized away from the nuclear lamina and were not observed in checkpoint-deficient 293T cells. Altogether, our results indicate that Ki-67 integrates normal S-phase progression and Xi heterochromatin maintenance in p21 checkpoint-proficient human cells. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  17. The Isolation and Characterization of Human Prostate Cancer Stem Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-05-01

    following significant findings/observations: i) 3D culture of human prostate cancer cells with magnetic nanoparticles is not optimal for tumor initiation...include: magnetic nanoparticles and using a stable (non-transformed) human prostate fibroblast cell line as a feeder layer. The former uses inert magnetic... nanoparticles (3D Biosciences, Inc.) that passively diffuse into live cells that then allow 3D growth in an applied magnetic field1. Such a

  18. 1,25-Dihydroxyvitamin D induces the glutamate transporter SLC1A1 and alters glutamate handling in non-transformed mammary cells

    PubMed Central

    Beaudin, Sarah; Welsh, JoEllen

    2016-01-01

    Genomic profiling of immortalized human mammary epithelial (hTERT-HME1) cells identified several metabolic genes, including the membrane glutamate transporter, SLC1A1, as 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D) regulated. In these studies we have surveyed the effects of 1,25D on known glutamate transporters and evaluated its impact on cellular glutamate handling. We confirm that expression of SLC1A1 and all of its known transcript variants are significantly upregulated in hTERT-HME1 cells following 1,25D treatment. Expression of the full-length cognate protein, EAAT3 is correspondingly increased in 1,25D treated hTERT-HME1 cells. Under the same conditions, the expression of two other glutamate transporters - SLC1A6 (EAAT4) and SLC1A2 (EAAT2 or GLT-1) - is enhanced by 1,25D while that of SLC1A3 (EAAT1 or GLAST) and SLC7A11 (xCT) is decreased. Glutamate is not essential for growth of hTERT-HME1 cells, and supplemental glutamate (up to 0.5 mM) does not abrogate the growth inhibitory effects of 1,25D. These data suggest that extracellular glutamate is not a major contributor to cellular energy metabolism in hTERT-HME1 cells under basal conditions and that the growth inhibitory effects of 1,25D are not secondary to its effects on glutamate handling. Instead, the effects of 1,25D on glutamate transporters translated to a decrease in cellular glutamate concentration and an increase in media glutamate concentration, suggesting that one or more of these transporters functions to export glutamate in response to 1,25D exposure. The reduced cellular glutamate concentration may also reflect its incorporation into the cellular glutathione (GSH) pool, which is increased upon 1,25D treatment. In support of this concept, the expression of GCLC (which codes for the rate-limiting enzyme in GSH synthesis) and genes which generate reducing equivalents in the form of NADPH (ie, G6PD, PGD, IDH2) are elevated in 1,25D treated cells. Taken together, these data identify 1,25D as a physiological

  19. Genetic alterations by human papillomaviruses in oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lazo, P A; Gallego, M I; Ballester, S; Feduchi, E

    1992-03-30

    The integration sites in the cellular genome of human papillomavirus are located in chromosomal regions always associated with oncogenes or other known tumor phenotypes. Two regions, 8q24 and 12q13, are common to several cases of cervical carcinoma and can have integrated more than one type of papillomavirus DNA. These two chromosomal regions contain several genes implicated in oncogenesis. These observations strongly imply that viral integration sites of DNA tumor viruses can be used as the access point to chromosomal regions where genes implicated in the tumor phenotype are located, a situation similar to that of non-transforming retroviruses.

  20. Replication of Human Noroviruses in Stem Cell-Derived Human Enteroids

    PubMed Central

    Ettayebi, Khalil; Crawford, Sue E.; Murakami, Kosuke; Broughman, James R.; Karandikar, Umesh; Tenge, Victoria R.; Neill, Frederick H.; Blutt, Sarah E.; Zeng, Xi-Lei; Qu, Lin; Kou, Baijun; Opekun, Antone R.; Burrin, Douglas; Graham, David Y.; Ramani, Sasirekha; Atmar, Robert L.

    2016-01-01

    The major barrier to research and development of effective interventions for human noroviruses (HuNoVs) has been the lack of a robust and reproducible in vitro cultivation system. HuNoVs are the leading cause of gastroenteritis worldwide. We report successful cultivation of multiple HuNoV strains in enterocytes in stem cell-derived, nontransformed human intestinal enteroid monolayer cultures. Bile, a critical factor of the intestinal milieu, is required for strain-dependent HuNoV replication. Lack of appropriate histoblood group antigen expression in intestinal cells restricts virus replication, and infectivity is abrogated by inactivation (e.g., irradiation, heating) and serum neutralization. This culture system recapitulates the human intestinal epithelium, permits human host-pathogen studies of previously noncultivatable pathogens, and allows the assessment of methods to prevent and treat HuNoV infections. PMID:27562956

  1. In non-transformed cells Bak activates upon loss of anti-apoptotic Bcl-XL and Mcl-1 but in the absence of active BH3-only proteins

    PubMed Central

    Senft, D; Weber, A; Saathoff, F; Berking, C; Heppt, M V; Kammerbauer, C; Rothenfusser, S; Kellner, S; Kurgyis, Z; Besch, R; Häcker, G

    2015-01-01

    Mitochondrial apoptosis is controlled by proteins of the B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) family. Pro-apoptotic members of this family, known as BH3-only proteins, initiate activation of the effectors Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) and Bcl-2 homologous antagonist/killer (Bak), which is counteracted by anti-apoptotic family members. How the interactions of Bcl-2 proteins regulate cell death is still not entirely clear. Here, we show that in the absence of extrinsic apoptotic stimuli Bak activates without detectable contribution from BH3-only proteins, and cell survival depends on anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 molecules. All anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins were targeted via RNA interference alone or in combinations of two in primary human fibroblasts. Simultaneous targeting of B-cell lymphoma-extra large and myeloid cell leukemia sequence 1 led to apoptosis in several cell types. Apoptosis depended on Bak whereas Bax was dispensable. Activator BH3-only proteins were not required for apoptosis induction as apoptosis was unaltered in the absence of all BH3-only proteins known to activate Bax or Bak directly, Bcl-2-interacting mediator of cell death, BH3-interacting domain death agonist and p53-upregulated modulator of apoptosis. These findings argue for auto-activation of Bak in the absence of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 proteins and provide evidence of profound differences in the activation of Bax and Bak. PMID:26610208

  2. Impaired OMA1-dependent cleavage of OPA1 and reduced DRP1 fission activity combine to prevent mitophagy in cells that are dependent on oxidative phosphorylation

    PubMed Central

    MacVicar, Thomas D. B.; Lane, Jon D.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Mitochondrial dynamics play crucial roles in mitophagy-based mitochondrial quality control, but how these pathways are regulated to meet cellular energy demands remains obscure. Using non-transformed human RPE1 cells, we report that upregulation of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation alters mitochondrial dynamics to inhibit Parkin-mediated mitophagy. Despite the basal mitophagy rates remaining stable upon the switch to dependence on oxidative phosphorylation, mitochondria resist fragmentation when RPE1 cells are treated with the protonophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone. Mechanistically, we show that this is because cleavage of the inner membrane fusion factor L-OPA1 is prevented due to the failure to activate the inner membrane protease OMA1 in mitochondria that have a collapsed membrane potential. In parallel, mitochondria that use oxidative phosphorylation are protected from damage-induced fission through the impaired recruitment and activation of mitochondrial DRP1. Using OMA1-deficient MEF cells, we show that the preservation of a stable pool of L-OPA1 at the inner mitochondrial membrane is sufficient to delay mitophagy, even in the presence of Parkin. The capacity of cells that are dependent on oxidative phosphorylation to maintain substantial mitochondrial content in the face of acute damage has important implications for mitochondrial quality control in vivo. PMID:24634514

  3. Impaired OMA1-dependent cleavage of OPA1 and reduced DRP1 fission activity combine to prevent mitophagy in cells that are dependent on oxidative phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    MacVicar, Thomas D B; Lane, Jon D

    2014-05-15

    Mitochondrial dynamics play crucial roles in mitophagy-based mitochondrial quality control, but how these pathways are regulated to meet cellular energy demands remains obscure. Using non-transformed human RPE1 cells, we report that upregulation of mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation alters mitochondrial dynamics to inhibit Parkin-mediated mitophagy. Despite the basal mitophagy rates remaining stable upon the switch to dependence on oxidative phosphorylation, mitochondria resist fragmentation when RPE1 cells are treated with the protonophore carbonyl cyanide m-chlorophenyl hydrazone. Mechanistically, we show that this is because cleavage of the inner membrane fusion factor L-OPA1 is prevented due to the failure to activate the inner membrane protease OMA1 in mitochondria that have a collapsed membrane potential. In parallel, mitochondria that use oxidative phosphorylation are protected from damage-induced fission through the impaired recruitment and activation of mitochondrial DRP1. Using OMA1-deficient MEF cells, we show that the preservation of a stable pool of L-OPA1 at the inner mitochondrial membrane is sufficient to delay mitophagy, even in the presence of Parkin. The capacity of cells that are dependent on oxidative phosphorylation to maintain substantial mitochondrial content in the face of acute damage has important implications for mitochondrial quality control in vivo.

  4. Hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor effects on epithelia. Regulation of intercellular junctions in transformed and nontransformed cell lines, basolateral polarization of c-met receptor in transformed and natural intestinal epithelia, and induction of rapid wound repair in a transformed model epithelium.

    PubMed Central

    Nusrat, A; Parkos, C A; Bacarra, A E; Godowski, P J; Delp-Archer, C; Rosen, E M; Madara, J L

    1994-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells rest on a fibroblast sheath. Thus, factors produced by these fibroblasts may influence epithelial function in a paracrine fashion. We examined modulation of intestinal epithelial function by one such fibroblast product, scatter factor/hepatocyte growth factor (HGF/SF). This effect was studied in vitro by using model T84 intestinal epithelial cells. When applied to confluent T84 monolayers, HGF/SF attenuates transepithelial resistance to passive ion flow in a dose-dependent manner (maximum fall at 300 ng/ml, 28% control monolayer resistance, P < 0.001, ED50 of 1.2 nM), t1/2 of 20 h. This functional effect of HGF/SF and distribution of its receptor, c-met, are polarized to the basolateral membranes of T84 intestinal epithelial cells. HGF/SF effects on resistance are not attributable to altered transcellular resistance (opening of Cl- and/or basolateral K+ channels), cytotoxicity, or enhanced cell proliferation; they therefore represent specific regulation of paracellular tight junction resistance. Analysis with biochemically purified rodent HGF/SF and Madin-Darby canine kidney cells reveals that effects on paracellular tight junctions also occur in other nontransformed epithelia. Binding of HGF/SF to its receptor in T84 intestinal epithelial cells is accompanied by tyrosine phosphorylation of the receptor. Because loosening of intercellular junctions between cells could facilitate separation, spreading, and migration of epithelial cells during physiologic processes such as wound resealing, we determined the effects of HGF/SF on intestinal epithelial wound resealing using our previously published in vitro model (Nusrat, A., C. Delp, and J. L. Madara. 1992. J. Clin. Invest. 89:1501-1511). HGF/SF markedly enhanced wound closure (> 450% increase in rate, P < 0.001) by influencing the migratory and spreading response in not only cells adjoining the wound but also cells many positions removed from the wound. We thus speculate that HGF/SF may

  5. Reliable and versatile immortal muscle cell models from healthy and myotonic dystrophy type 1 primary human myoblasts.

    PubMed

    Pantic, Boris; Borgia, Doriana; Giunco, Silvia; Malena, Adriana; Kiyono, Tohru; Salvatori, Sergio; De Rossi, Anita; Giardina, Emiliano; Sangiuolo, Federica; Pegoraro, Elena; Vergani, Lodovica; Botta, Annalisa

    2016-03-01

    Primary human skeletal muscle cells (hSkMCs) are invaluable tools for deciphering the basic molecular mechanisms of muscle-related biological processes and pathological alterations. Nevertheless, their use is quite restricted due to poor availability, short life span and variable purity of the cells during in vitro culture. Here, we evaluate a recently published method of hSkMCs immortalization, relying on ectopic expression of cyclin D1 (CCND1), cyclin-dependent kinase 4 (CDK4) and telomerase (TERT) in myoblasts from healthy donors (n=3) and myotonic dystrophy type 1 (DM1) patients (n=2). The efficacy to maintain the myogenic and non-transformed phenotype, as well as the main pathogenetic hallmarks of DM1, has been assessed. Combined expression of the three genes i) maintained the CD56(NCAM)-positive myoblast population and differentiation potential; ii) preserved the non-transformed phenotype and iii) maintained the CTG repeat length, amount of nuclear foci and aberrant alternative splicing in immortal muscle cells. Moreover, immortal hSkMCs displayed attractive additional features such as structural maturation of sarcomeres, persistence of Pax7-positive cells during differentiation and complete disappearance of nuclear foci following (CAG)7 antisense oligonucleotide (ASO) treatment. Overall, the CCND1, CDK4 and TERT immortalization yields versatile, reliable and extremely useful human muscle cell models to investigate the basic molecular features of human muscle cell biology, to elucidate the molecular pathogenetic mechanisms and to test new therapeutic approaches for DM1 in vitro.

  6. High-throughput Functional Genomics Identifies Regulators of Primary Human Beta Cell Proliferation.

    PubMed

    Robitaille, Karine; Rourke, Jillian L; McBane, Joanne E; Fu, Accalia; Baird, Stephen; Du, Qiujiang; Kin, Tatsuya; Shapiro, A M James; Screaton, Robert A

    2016-02-26

    The expansion of cells for regenerative therapy will require the genetic dissection of complex regulatory mechanisms governing the proliferation of non-transformed human cells. Here, we report the development of a high-throughput RNAi screening strategy specifically for use in primary cells and demonstrate that silencing the cell cycle-dependent kinase inhibitors CDKN2C/p18 or CDKN1A/p21 facilitates cell cycle entry of quiescent adult human pancreatic beta cells. This work identifies p18 and p21 as novel targets for promoting proliferation of human beta cells and demonstrates the promise of functional genetic screens for dissecting therapeutically relevant state changes in primary human cells. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  7. Identification of Cripto-1 in human milk.

    PubMed

    Bianco, C; Wechselberger, C; Ebert, A; Khan, N I; Sun, Y; Salomon, D S

    2001-03-01

    Cripto-1 (CR-1) is an epidermal growth factor (EGF)-related peptide that plays an important role in normal mammary gland development. CR-1 is expressed in the growing terminal end buds in the virgin mouse mammary gland and its expression increases during pregnancy and lactation. Furthermore, CR-I is involved in the early stages of mouse mammary tumorigenesis and in the pathogenesis of human breast cancer. Since CR-1 is expressed in the mouse mammary gland at high levels during pregnancy and lactation, we have evaluated whether this protein is present in human milk. In the present study we demonstrate that a 28 kDa immunoreactive CR-1 protein is present in 24 human milk samples as assessed by western blot analysis and that by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay the concentration of CR-1 ranges between 62 and 118 ng/ml. In addition, CR-1 that had been purified from human milk is able to stimulate the phosphorylation of mitogen activated protein kinase in nontransformed NMuMG mouse mammary epithelial cells. These results suggest that CR-1 in human milk may be important in regulating mammary gland development during pregnancy and lactation.

  8. Opposing roles of TGF-β and EGF in the regulation of TRAIL-induced apoptosis in human breast epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Cano-González, Ana; López-Rivas, Abelardo

    2016-08-01

    Transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-β) induces the epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT) in breast epithelial cells and plays an important role in mammary morphogenesis and breast cancer. In non-transformed breast epithelial cells TGF-β antagonizes epidermal growth factor (EGF) action and induces growth inhibition. Tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) has been reported to participate in lumen formation during morphogenesis of human breast epithelial cells. Our previous work indicated that sensitivity of human breast epithelial cells to TRAIL can be modulated through the activation of the epidermal growth factor receptor-1 (EGFR). Here, we show that TGF-β opposes EGF-mediated sensitization to TRAIL-induced caspase-8 activation and apoptosis in non-transformed breast epithelial cells. Death-inducing signalling complex (DISC) formation by TRAIL was significantly reduced in cells treated with TGF-β. TGF-β treatment activates cytoprotective autophagy and down-regulates TRAIL-R2 expression at the cell surface by promoting the intracellular accumulation of this receptor. Lastly, we demonstrate that EMT is not involved in the inhibitory effect of TGF-β on apoptosis by TRAIL. Together, the data reveal a fine regulation by EGF and TGF-β of sensitivity of human breast epithelial cells to TRAIL which may be relevant during morphogenesis.

  9. Human Intestinal Enteroids: a New Model To Study Human Rotavirus Infection, Host Restriction, and Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Saxena, Kapil; Blutt, Sarah E.; Ettayebi, Khalil; Zeng, Xi-Lei; Broughman, James R.; Crawford, Sue E.; Karandikar, Umesh C.; Sastri, Narayan P.; Conner, Margaret E.; Opekun, Antone R.; Graham, David Y.; Qureshi, Waqar; Sherman, Vadim; Foulke-Abel, Jennifer; In, Julie; Kovbasnjuk, Olga; Zachos, Nicholas C.; Donowitz, Mark

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human gastrointestinal tract research is limited by the paucity of in vitro intestinal cell models that recapitulate the cellular diversity and complex functions of human physiology and disease pathology. Human intestinal enteroid (HIE) cultures contain multiple intestinal epithelial cell types that comprise the intestinal epithelium (enterocytes and goblet, enteroendocrine, and Paneth cells) and are physiologically active based on responses to agonists. We evaluated these nontransformed, three-dimensional HIE cultures as models for pathogenic infections in the small intestine by examining whether HIEs from different regions of the small intestine from different patients are susceptible to human rotavirus (HRV) infection. Little is known about HRVs, as they generally replicate poorly in transformed cell lines, and host range restriction prevents their replication in many animal models, whereas many animal rotaviruses (ARVs) exhibit a broader host range and replicate in mice. Using HRVs, including the Rotarix RV1 vaccine strain, and ARVs, we evaluated host susceptibility, virus production, and cellular responses of HIEs. HRVs infect at higher rates and grow to higher titers than do ARVs. HRVs infect differentiated enterocytes and enteroendocrine cells, and viroplasms and lipid droplets are induced. Heterogeneity in replication was seen in HIEs from different patients. HRV infection and RV enterotoxin treatment of HIEs caused physiological lumenal expansion detected by time-lapse microscopy, recapitulating one of the hallmarks of rotavirus-induced diarrhea. These results demonstrate that HIEs are a novel pathophysiological model that will allow the study of HRV biology, including host restriction, cell type restriction, and virus-induced fluid secretion. IMPORTANCE Our research establishes HIEs as nontransformed cell culture models to understand human intestinal physiology and pathophysiology and the epithelial response, including host restriction of

  10. Neoplastic transformation of human cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Goth-Goldstein, Regine

    1995-01-01

    The goal of this project was to gain a better understanding of the cellular mechanisms of cancer induction by ionizing radiation as a risk assessment for workers subjected to high LET irradiation such as that found in space. The following ions were used for irradiation: Iron, Argon, Neon, and Lanthanum. Two tests were performed: growth in low serum and growth in agar were used as indicators of cell transformation. The specific aims of this project were to: (1) compare the effectiveness of various ions on degree of transformation of a single dose of the same RBE; (2) determine if successive irradiations with the same ion (Ge 600 MeV/u) increases the degree of transformation; (3) test if clones with the greatest degree of transformation produce tumors in nude mice; and (4) construct a cell hybrid of a transformed and control (non-transformed) clone. The cells used for this work are human mammary epithelial cells with an extended lifespan and selected for growth in MEM + 10% serum.

  11. Comparative transforming potential of different human papillomaviruses associated with non-melanoma skin cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Massimi, Paola; Thomas, Miranda; Bouvard, Veronique; Ruberto, Irene; Campo, M. Saveria; Tommasino, Massimo; Banks, Lawrence

    2008-02-20

    It is well established that high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) that infect mucosal epithelia are the causative agents of cervical cancer. In contrast, the association of cutaneo-tropic HPV types with the development of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is less well defined. In this study, we have analysed the in vitro transforming potential of various cutaneous HPV types. Using oncogene cooperation assays with activated ras, we have shown that diverse cutaneous types, including 12, 14, 15, 24, 36 and 49, have significant transforming potential. Interestingly, most of this activity appears to be encoded by the E6 gene product. In contrast, the common HPV-10 exhibits no significant transforming potential in these assays. This difference may be a reflection of different patterns of cellular localization, with transforming E6s being nuclear and non-transforming being cytoplasmic. These results provide molecular support for a role of these viruses in the development of certain human malignancies.

  12. Human cell toxicogenomic analysis of bromoacetic acid: a regulated drinking water disinfection by-product.

    PubMed

    Muellner, Mark G; Attene-Ramos, Matias S; Hudson, Matthew E; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Plewa, Michael J

    2010-04-01

    The disinfection of drinking water is a major achievement in protecting the public health. However, current disinfection methods also generate disinfection by-products (DBPs). Many DBPs are cytotoxic, genotoxic, teratogenic, and carcinogenic and represent an important class of environmentally hazardous chemicals that may carry long-term human health implications. The objective of this research was to integrate in vitro toxicology with focused toxicogenomic analysis of the regulated DBP, bromoacetic acid (BAA) and to evaluate modulation of gene expression involved in DNA damage/repair and toxic responses, with nontransformed human cells. We generated transcriptome profiles for 168 genes with 30 min and 4 hr exposure times that did not induce acute cytotoxicity. Using qRT-PCR gene arrays, the levels of 25 transcripts were modulated to a statistically significant degree in response to a 30 min treatment with BAA (16 transcripts upregulated and nine downregulated). The largest changes were observed for RAD9A and BRCA1. The majority of the altered transcript profiles are genes involved in DNA repair, especially the repair of double strand DNA breaks, and in cell cycle regulation. With 4 hr of treatment the expression of 28 genes was modulated (12 upregulated and 16 downregulated); the largest fold changes were in HMOX1 and FMO1. This work represents the first nontransformed human cell toxicogenomic study with a regulated drinking water disinfection by-product. These data implicate double strand DNA breaks as a feature of BAA exposure. Future toxicogenomic studies of DBPs will further strengthen our limited knowledge in this growing area of drinking water research.

  13. Radiogenic transformation of human mammary epithelial cells in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T. C.; Georgy, K. A.; Tavakoli, A.; Craise, L. M.; Durante, M.

    1996-01-01

    Cancer induction by space radiations is a major concern for manned space exploration. Accurate assessment of radiation risk at low doses requires basic understanding of mechanism(s) of radiation carcinogenesis. For determining the oncogenic effects of ionizing radiation in human epithelial cells, we transformed a mammary epithelial cell line (185B5), which was immortalized by benzo(a)pyrene, with energetic heavy ions and obtained several transformed clones. These transformed cells showed growth properties on Matrigel similar to human mammary tumor cells. To better understand the mechanisms of radiogenic transformation of human cells, we systematically examined the alterations in chromosomes and cancer genes. Among 16 autosomes examined for translocations, by using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique, chromosomes 3, 12, 13, 15, 16, and 18 appeared to be normal in transformed cells. Chromosomes 1, 4, 6, 8, and 17 in transformed cells, however, showed patterns different from those in nontransformed cells. Southern blot analyses indicated no detectable alterations in myc, ras, Rb, or p53 genes. Further studies of chromosome 17 by using in situ hybridization with unique sequence p53 gene probe and a centromere probe showed no loss of p53 gene in transformed cells. Experimental results from cell fusion studies indicated that the transforming gene(s) is recessive. The role of genomic instability and tumor suppressor gene(s) in radiogenic transformation of human breast cells remains to be identified.

  14. Radiogenic transformation of human mammary epithelial cells in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T. C.; Georgy, K. A.; Tavakoli, A.; Craise, L. M.; Durante, M.

    1996-01-01

    Cancer induction by space radiations is a major concern for manned space exploration. Accurate assessment of radiation risk at low doses requires basic understanding of mechanism(s) of radiation carcinogenesis. For determining the oncogenic effects of ionizing radiation in human epithelial cells, we transformed a mammary epithelial cell line (185B5), which was immortalized by benzo(a)pyrene, with energetic heavy ions and obtained several transformed clones. These transformed cells showed growth properties on Matrigel similar to human mammary tumor cells. To better understand the mechanisms of radiogenic transformation of human cells, we systematically examined the alterations in chromosomes and cancer genes. Among 16 autosomes examined for translocations, by using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) technique, chromosomes 3, 12, 13, 15, 16, and 18 appeared to be normal in transformed cells. Chromosomes 1, 4, 6, 8, and 17 in transformed cells, however, showed patterns different from those in nontransformed cells. Southern blot analyses indicated no detectable alterations in myc, ras, Rb, or p53 genes. Further studies of chromosome 17 by using in situ hybridization with unique sequence p53 gene probe and a centromere probe showed no loss of p53 gene in transformed cells. Experimental results from cell fusion studies indicated that the transforming gene(s) is recessive. The role of genomic instability and tumor suppressor gene(s) in radiogenic transformation of human breast cells remains to be identified.

  15. Human, Humanities, Humanitarian, Humanism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Penman, Kenneth A.; Adams, Samuel H.

    1982-01-01

    Traces the development of secular humanism in education and calls for educators to present their students with a "real" picture of the world, including the values upon which the Unites States was founded. (FL)

  16. Oncolytic Activity of Avian Influenza Virus in Human Pancreatic Ductal Adenocarcinoma Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Pizzuto, Matteo S.; Silic-Benussi, Micol; Pavone, Silvia; Ciminale, Vincenzo; Capua, Ilaria

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is the most lethal form of human cancer, with dismal survival rates due to late-stage diagnoses and a lack of efficacious therapies. Building on the observation that avian influenza A viruses (IAVs) have a tropism for the pancreas in vivo, the present study was aimed at testing the efficacy of IAVs as oncolytic agents for killing human PDA cell lines. Receptor characterization confirmed that human PDA cell lines express the alpha-2,3- and the alpha-2,6-linked glycan receptor for avian and human IAVs, respectively. PDA cell lines were sensitive to infection by human and avian IAV isolates, which is consistent with this finding. Growth kinetic experiments showed preferential virus replication in PDA cells over that in a nontransformed pancreatic ductal cell line. Finally, at early time points posttreatment, infection with IAVs caused higher levels of apoptosis in PDA cells than gemcitabine and cisplatin, which are the cornerstone of current therapies for PDA. In the BxPC-3 PDA cell line, apoptosis resulted from the engagement of the intrinsic mitochondrial pathway. Importantly, IAVs did not induce apoptosis in nontransformed pancreatic ductal HPDE6 cells. Using a model based on the growth of a PDA cell line as a xenograft in SCID mice, we also show that a slightly pathogenic avian IAV significantly inhibited tumor growth following intratumoral injection. Taken together, these results are the first to suggest that IAVs may hold promise as future agents of oncolytic virotherapy against pancreatic ductal adenocarcinomas. IMPORTANCE Despite intensive studies aimed at designing new therapeutic approaches, PDA still retains the most dismal prognosis among human cancers. In the present study, we provide the first evidence indicating that avian IAVs of low pathogenicity display a tropism for human PDA cells, resulting in viral RNA replication and a potent induction of apoptosis in vitro and antitumor effects in vivo. These

  17. P38 Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Activity Is Required during Mitosis for Timely Satisfaction of the Mitotic Checkpoint But Not for the Fidelity of Chromosome Segregation

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Kyunghee; Kenny, Alison E.

    2010-01-01

    Although p38 activity is reported to be required as cells enter mitosis for proper spindle assembly and checkpoint function, its role during the division process remains controversial in lieu of direct data. We therefore conducted live cell studies to determine the effect on mitosis of inhibiting or depleting p38. We found that in the absence of p38 activity the duration of mitosis is prolonged by ∼40% in nontransformed human RPE-1, ∼80% in PtK2 (rat kangaroo), and ∼25% in mouse cells, and this prolongation leads to an elevated mitotic index. However, under this condition chromatid segregation and cytokinesis are normal. Using Mad2/YFP-expressing cells, we show the prolongation of mitosis in the absence of p38 activity is directly due to a delay in satisfying the mitotic checkpoint. Inhibiting p38 did not affect the rate of chromosome motion; however, it did lead to the formation of significantly (10%) longer metaphase spindles. From these data we conclude that normal p38 activity is required for the timely stable attachment of all kinetochores to spindle microtubules, but not for the fidelity of the mitotic process. We speculate that p38 activity promotes timely checkpoint satisfaction by indirectly influencing those motor proteins (e.g., Klp10, Klp67A) involved in regulating the dynamics of kinetochore microtubule ends. PMID:20462950

  18. P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase activity is required during mitosis for timely satisfaction of the mitotic checkpoint but not for the fidelity of chromosome segregation.

    PubMed

    Lee, Kyunghee; Kenny, Alison E; Rieder, Conly L

    2010-07-01

    Although p38 activity is reported to be required as cells enter mitosis for proper spindle assembly and checkpoint function, its role during the division process remains controversial in lieu of direct data. We therefore conducted live cell studies to determine the effect on mitosis of inhibiting or depleting p38. We found that in the absence of p38 activity the duration of mitosis is prolonged by approximately 40% in nontransformed human RPE-1, approximately 80% in PtK2 (rat kangaroo), and approximately 25% in mouse cells, and this prolongation leads to an elevated mitotic index. However, under this condition chromatid segregation and cytokinesis are normal. Using Mad2/YFP-expressing cells, we show the prolongation of mitosis in the absence of p38 activity is directly due to a delay in satisfying the mitotic checkpoint. Inhibiting p38 did not affect the rate of chromosome motion; however, it did lead to the formation of significantly (10%) longer metaphase spindles. From these data we conclude that normal p38 activity is required for the timely stable attachment of all kinetochores to spindle microtubules, but not for the fidelity of the mitotic process. We speculate that p38 activity promotes timely checkpoint satisfaction by indirectly influencing those motor proteins (e.g., Klp10, Klp67A) involved in regulating the dynamics of kinetochore microtubule ends.

  19. 27 T ultra-high static magnetic field changes orientation and morphology of mitotic spindles in human cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Hou, Yubin; Li, Zhiyuan; Ji, Xinmiao; Wang, Ze; Wang, Huizhen; Tian, Xiaofei; Yu, Fazhi; Yang, Zhenye; Pi, Li; Mitchison, Timothy J; Lu, Qingyou; Zhang, Xin

    2017-02-28

    Purified microtubules have been shown to align along the static magnetic field (SMF) in vitro because of their diamagnetic anisotropy. However, whether mitotic spindle in cells can be aligned by magnetic field has not been experimentally proved. In particular, the biological effects of SMF of above 20 T (Tesla) have never been reported. Here we found that in both CNE-2Z and RPE1 human cells spindle orients in 27 T SMF. The direction of spindle alignment depended on the extent to which chromosomes were aligned to form a planar metaphase plate. Our results show that the magnetic torque acts on both microtubules and chromosomes, and the preferred direction of spindle alignment relative to the field depends more on chromosome alignment than microtubules. In addition, spindle morphology was also perturbed by 27 T SMF. This is the first reported study that investigated the cellular responses to ultra-high magnetic field of above 20 T. Our study not only found that ultra-high magnetic field can change the orientation and morphology of mitotic spindles, but also provided a tool to probe the role of spindle orientation and perturbation in developmental and cancer biology.

  20. 27 T ultra-high static magnetic field changes orientation and morphology of mitotic spindles in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lei; Hou, Yubin; Li, Zhiyuan; Ji, Xinmiao; Wang, Ze; Wang, Huizhen; Tian, Xiaofei; Yu, Fazhi; Yang, Zhenye; Pi, Li; Mitchison, Timothy J; Lu, Qingyou; Zhang, Xin

    2017-01-01

    Purified microtubules have been shown to align along the static magnetic field (SMF) in vitro because of their diamagnetic anisotropy. However, whether mitotic spindle in mammalian cells can be aligned by magnetic field has not been experimentally proved. In particular, the biological effects of SMF of above 20 T (Tesla) on mammalian cells have never been reported. Here we found that in both CNE-2Z and RPE1 human cells spindle orients in 27 T SMF. The direction of spindle alignment depended on the extent to which chromosomes were aligned to form a planar metaphase plate. Our results show that the magnetic torque acts on both microtubules and chromosomes, and the preferred direction of spindle alignment relative to the field depends more on chromosome alignment than microtubules. In addition, spindle morphology was also perturbed by 27 T SMF. This is the first reported study that investigated the mammalian cellular responses to ultra-high magnetic field of above 20 T. Our study not only found that ultra-high magnetic field can change the orientation and morphology of mitotic spindles, but also provided a tool to probe the role of spindle orientation and perturbation in developmental and cancer biology. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.22911.001 PMID:28244368

  1. Low calcium culture condition induces mesenchymal cell-like phenotype in normal human epidermal keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Takagi, Ryo; Yamato, Masayuki; Murakami, Daisuke; Sugiyama, Hiroaki; Okano, Teruo

    2011-08-26

    Highlights: {yields} Normal human epidermal keratinocytes serially cultured under low calcium concentration were cytokeratin and vimentin double positive cells. {yields} The human keratinocytes expressed some epithelial stem/progenitor cell makers, mesenchymal cell markers, and markers of epithelial-mesenchymal transition. {yields} Mesenchymal cell-like phenotype in the keratinocytes was suppressed under high-calcium condition. -- Abstract: Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is an important cellular phenomenon in organ developments, cancer invasions, and wound healing, and many types of transformed cell lines are used for investigating for molecular mechanisms of EMT. However, there are few reports for EMT in normal human epithelial cells, which are non-transformed or non-immortalized cells, in vitro. Therefore, normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) serially cultured in low-calcium concentration medium (LCM) were used for investigating relations between differentiation and proliferation and mesenchymal-like phenotype in the present study, since long-term cultivation of NHEK is achieved in LCM. Interestingly, NHEK serially cultured in LCM consisted essentially of cytokeratin-vimentin double positive cells (98%), although the NHEK exhibited differentiation under high-calcium culture condition with 3T3 feeder layer. The vimentin expression was suppressed under high-calcium condition. These results may indicate the importance of mesenchymal-like phenotype for serially cultivation of NHEK in vitro.

  2. Differences in snRNP localization between transformed and nontransformed cells.

    PubMed Central

    Spector, D L; Lark, G; Huang, S

    1992-01-01

    We have examined the localization of snRNPs in a variety of mammalian cells and have observed differences in the organization of these factors in transformed cells, immortal cells, and cells of defined passage number. Cells of defined passage number exhibit a speckled staining pattern after immunolabeling with anti-Sm, anti-B'', or anti-m3G antibodies. Furthermore, 2-3% of the cells, in a given population, exhibit labeling of 1 or 2 round coiled bodies in addition to the speckled-labeling pattern. However, transformed cells exhibited 1-4 intensely stained coiled bodies, in 81-99% of the cells, in addition to the speckled-labeling pattern. Immortal cells exhibited 1-4 intensely stained smaller coiled bodies in 4-40% of the cells, in addition to the speckled-labeling pattern. When immortal cells (REF-52) that had been transformed by adenovirus (REF-52Ad5.4) were examined, these cells exhibited an increase in the percentage of cells containing 1 or 2 intensely stained coiled bodies, in addition to the speckled labeling, from 24 to 99%. On the basis of this study, we conclude that the organization of snRNPs within the mammalian cell nucleus is a reflection of the physiology of the cell that may change upon transformation or immortalization. Images PMID:1535243

  3. Mechanisms of Radiation Toxicity in Transformed and Non-Transformed Cells

    PubMed Central

    Panganiban, Ronald-Allan M.; Snow, Andrew L.; Day, Regina M.

    2013-01-01

    Radiation damage to biological systems is determined by the type of radiation, the total dosage of exposure, the dose rate, and the region of the body exposed. Three modes of cell death—necrosis, apoptosis, and autophagy—as well as accelerated senescence have been demonstrated to occur in vitro and in vivo in response to radiation in cancer cells as well as in normal cells. The basis for cellular selection for each mode depends on various factors including the specific cell type involved, the dose of radiation absorbed by the cell, and whether it is proliferating and/or transformed. Here we review the signaling mechanisms activated by radiation for the induction of toxicity in transformed and normal cells. Understanding the molecular mechanisms of radiation toxicity is critical for the development of radiation countermeasures as well as for the improvement of clinical radiation in cancer treatment. PMID:23912235

  4. Multiple promoter elements govern expression of the human ornithine decarboxylase gene in colon carcinoma cells.

    PubMed Central

    Moshier, J A; Osborne, D L; Skunca, M; Dosescu, J; Gilbert, J D; Fitzgerald, M C; Polidori, G; Wagner, R L; Friezner Degen, S J; Luk, G D

    1992-01-01

    Overexpression of the ornithine decarboxylase (ODC) gene may be important to the development and maintenance of colonic neoplasms, as well as tumors in general. In this study, we examined the promoter elements governing constitutive expression of the human ODC gene in HCT 116 human colon carcinoma cells and, for comparison, K562 human erythro-leukemia cells. It was determined by functional analysis that the promoter elements responsible reside within the 378 bp immediately upstream from the transcription start site. Within this sequence, there are at least three regions that modulate the efficiency of the ODC promoter cooperatively. Both DNA bandshift and footprint assays demonstrated all three regions to be rich in sites that bind to nuclear proteins isolated from HCT 116 and K562 cells; the protein binding pattern of non-transformed, diploid fibroblasts was found to be much less complex. Several of the protein binding sequences have little or no homology to common regulatory elements. We suggest that the constitutive activity of the ODC gene in HCT 116 colon carcinoma cells, and perhaps transformed cells in general, involves a complex interaction of multiple regulatory sequences and their associated nuclear proteins. Finally, the saturation of the promoter in these transformed cell lines suggests that high levels of protein binding in the ODC promoter may contribute to elevated constitutive expression of this gene. Images PMID:1598217

  5. Evaluation of Eye Irritation Potential of Solid Substance with New 3D Reconstructed Human Cornea Model, MCTT HCETM

    PubMed Central

    Jang, Won-hee; Jung, Kyoung-mi; Yang, Hye-ri; Lee, Miri; Jung, Haeng-Sun; Lee, Su-Hyon; Park, Miyoung; Lim, Kyung-Min

    2015-01-01

    The eye irritation potential of drug candidates or pharmaceutical ingredients should be evaluated if there is a possibility of ocular exposure. Traditionally, the ocular irritation has been evaluated by the rabbit Draize test. However, rabbit eyes are more sensitive to irritants than human eyes, therefore substantial level of false positives are unavoidable. To resolve this species difference, several three-dimensional human corneal epithelial (HCE) models have been developed as alternative eye irritation test methods. Recently, we introduced a new HCE model, MCTT HCETM which is reconstructed with non-transformed human corneal cells from limbal tissues. Here, we examined if MCTT HCETM can be employed to evaluate eye irritation potential of solid substances. Through optimization of washing method and exposure time, treatment time was established as 10 min and washing procedure was set up as 4 times of washing with 10 mL of PBS and shaking in 30 mL of PBS in a beaker. With the established eye irritation test protocol, 11 solid substances (5 non-irritants, 6 irritants) were evaluated which demonstrated an excellent predictive capacity (100% accuracy, 100% specificity and 100% sensitivity). We also compared the performance of our test method with rabbit Draize test results and in vitro cytotoxicity test with 2D human corneal epithelial cell lines. PMID:26157556

  6. Evaluation of Eye Irritation Potential of Solid Substance with New 3D Reconstructed Human Cornea Model, MCTT HCE(TM).

    PubMed

    Jang, Won-Hee; Jung, Kyoung-Mi; Yang, Hye-Ri; Lee, Miri; Jung, Haeng-Sun; Lee, Su-Hyon; Park, Miyoung; Lim, Kyung-Min

    2015-07-01

    The eye irritation potential of drug candidates or pharmaceutical ingredients should be evaluated if there is a possibility of ocular exposure. Traditionally, the ocular irritation has been evaluated by the rabbit Draize test. However, rabbit eyes are more sensitive to irritants than human eyes, therefore substantial level of false positives are unavoidable. To resolve this species difference, several three-dimensional human corneal epithelial (HCE) models have been developed as alternative eye irritation test methods. Recently, we introduced a new HCE model, MCTT HCE(TM) which is reconstructed with non-transformed human corneal cells from limbal tissues. Here, we examined if MCTT HCE(TM) can be employed to evaluate eye irritation potential of solid substances. Through optimization of washing method and exposure time, treatment time was established as 10 min and washing procedure was set up as 4 times of washing with 10 mL of PBS and shaking in 30 mL of PBS in a beaker. With the established eye irritation test protocol, 11 solid substances (5 non-irritants, 6 irritants) were evaluated which demonstrated an excellent predictive capacity (100% accuracy, 100% specificity and 100% sensitivity). We also compared the performance of our test method with rabbit Draize test results and in vitro cytotoxicity test with 2D human corneal epithelial cell lines.

  7. Induction by inorganic metal salts of sister chromatid exchanges and chromosome aberrations in human and Syrian hamster cell strains

    SciTech Connect

    Larramendy, M.L.; Popescu, N.C.; DiPaolo, J.A.

    1981-01-01

    Sister chromatid exchange (SCE) and chromosome aberration induction were determined for several inorganic metal salts. Arsenic, nickel, and beryllium salts at concentrations effective in causing transformation of Syrian hamster cells (HEC) induced SCE and chromosome aberrations of HEC and human lymphocytes, whereas sodium tungstate, a non-transforming chemical, neither induced SCE nor chromosome aberrations. Normal human and hamster cells exhibited equal sensitivity to SCE induction; nontoxic concentrations of sodium arsenite, beryllium sulfate, and nickel sulfate caused an increase of 8-10 SCE/cell over control values. Sodium arsenite, a trivalent arsenic, and sodium arsenate, a pentavalent arsenic, produced increases in SCE but the former was effective at lower concentrations. Both arsenic salts were less efficient in inducing SCE in human whole blood than in purified lymphocyte cultures. Sodium arsenite, sodium arsenate, nickel sulfate, and beryllium sulfate also caused damage consisting primarily of chromatid type of aberrations. In HEC, with doses most effective in SCE induction , all four metals produced aberrations in 16-21% of cells. In human lymphocytes, 34 and 30% of the cells had chromosome damage after sodium arsenite and sodium arsenate, respectively, whereas beryllium sulfate or nickel sulfate caused damage in about 10% of the cells. The induction of SCE and chromosomal aberrations by metals reemphasizes the sensitivity of cytological assays and their importance for detecting genetic damage caused by carcinogens.

  8. Melleolides induce rapid cell death in human primary monocytes and cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Bohnert, Markus; Scherer, Olga; Wiechmann, Katja; König, Stefanie; Dahse, Hans-Martin; Hoffmeister, Dirk; Werz, Oliver

    2014-08-01

    The melleolides are structurally unique and bioactive natural products of the basidiomycete genus Armillaria. Here, we report on cytotoxic effects of melleolides from Armillaria mellea towards non-transformed human primary monocytes and human cancer cell lines, respectively. In contrast to staurosporine or pretubulysin that are less cytotoxic for monocytes, the cytotoxic potency of the active melleolides in primary monocytes is comparable to that in cancer cells. The onset of the cytotoxic effects of melleolides was rapid (within <1 h), as compared to the apoptosis inducer staurosporine, the protein biosynthesis inhibitor cycloheximide, and the DNA transcription inhibitor actinomycin D (>5 h, each). Side-by-side comparison with the detergent triton X-100 and staurosporine in microscopic and flow cytometric analysis studies as well as analysis of the viability of mitochondria exclude cell lysis and apoptosis as relevant or primary mechanisms. Our results rather point to necrotic features of cell death mediated by an as yet elusive but rapid mechanism. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. Germ-line variant of human NTH1 DNA glycosylase induces genomic instability and cellular transformation.

    PubMed

    Galick, Heather A; Kathe, Scott; Liu, Minmin; Robey-Bond, Susan; Kidane, Dawit; Wallace, Susan S; Sweasy, Joann B

    2013-08-27

    Base excision repair (BER) removes at least 20,000 DNA lesions per human cell per day and is critical for the maintenance of genomic stability. We hypothesize that aberrant BER, resulting from mutations in BER genes, can lead to genomic instability and cancer. The first step in BER is catalyzed by DNA N-glycosylases. One of these, n(th) endonuclease III-like (NTH1), removes oxidized pyrimidines from DNA, including thymine glycol. The rs3087468 single nucleotide polymorphism of the NTH1 gene is a G-to-T base substitution that results in the NTH1 D239Y variant protein that occurs in ∼6.2% of the global population and is found in Europeans, Asians, and sub-Saharan Africans. In this study, we functionally characterize the effect of the D239Y variant expressed in immortal but nontransformed human and mouse mammary epithelial cells. We demonstrate that expression of the D239Y variant in cells also expressing wild-type NTH1 leads to genomic instability and cellular transformation as assessed by anchorage-independent growth, focus formation, invasion, and chromosomal aberrations. We also show that cells expressing the D239Y variant are sensitive to ionizing radiation and hydrogen peroxide and accumulate double strand breaks after treatment with these agents. The DNA damage response is also activated in D239Y-expressing cells. In combination, our data suggest that individuals possessing the D239Y variant are at risk for genomic instability and cancer.

  10. Selective advantage of trisomic human cells cultured in non-standard conditions

    PubMed Central

    Rutledge, Samuel D.; Douglas, Temple A.; Nicholson, Joshua M.; Vila-Casadesús, Maria; Kantzler, Courtney L.; Wangsa, Darawalee; Barroso-Vilares, Monika; Kale, Shiv D.; Logarinho, Elsa; Cimini, Daniela

    2016-01-01

    An abnormal chromosome number, a condition known as aneuploidy, is a ubiquitous feature of cancer cells. A number of studies have shown that aneuploidy impairs cellular fitness. However, there is also evidence that aneuploidy can arise in response to specific challenges and can confer a selective advantage under certain environmental stresses. Cancer cells are likely exposed to a number of challenging conditions arising within the tumor microenvironment. To investigate whether aneuploidy may confer a selective advantage to cancer cells, we employed a controlled experimental system. We used the diploid, colorectal cancer cell line DLD1 and two DLD1-derived cell lines carrying single-chromosome aneuploidies to assess a number of cancer cell properties. Such properties, which included rates of proliferation and apoptosis, anchorage-independent growth, and invasiveness, were assessed both under standard culture conditions and under conditions of stress (i.e., serum starvation, drug treatment, hypoxia). Similar experiments were performed in diploid vs. aneuploid non-transformed human primary cells. Overall, our data show that aneuploidy can confer selective advantage to human cells cultured under non-standard conditions. These findings indicate that aneuploidy can increase the adaptability of cells, even those, such as cancer cells, that are already characterized by increased proliferative capacity and aggressive tumorigenic phenotypes. PMID:26956415

  11. BRCA1 controls the cell division axis and governs ploidy and phenotype in human mammary cells

    PubMed Central

    Nemirovsky, Oksana; Chen, Helen; Connell, Marisa; Taylor, Brian; Jiang, Jihong; Pilarski, Linda M.; Fleisch, Markus C.; Niederacher, Dieter; Pujana, Miguel Angel; Eaves, Connie J.; Maxwell, Christopher A.

    2017-01-01

    BRCA1 deficiency may perturb the differentiation hierarchy present in the normal mammary gland and is associated with the genesis of breast cancers that are genomically unstable and typically display a basal-like transcriptome. Oriented cell division is a mechanism known to regulate cell fates and to restrict tumor formation. We now show that the cell division axis is altered following shRNA-mediated BRCA1 depletion in immortalized but non-tumorigenic, or freshly isolated normal human mammary cells with graded consequences in progeny cells that include aneuploidy, perturbation of cell polarity in spheroid cultures, and a selective loss of cells with luminal features. BRCA1 depletion stabilizes HMMR abundance and disrupts cortical asymmetry of NUMA-dynein complexes in dividing cells such that polarity cues provided by cell-matrix adhesions were not able to orient division. We also show that immortalized mammary cells carrying a mutant BRCA1 allele (BRCA1 185delAG/+) reproduce many of these effects but in this model, oriented divisions were maintained through cues provided by CDH1+ cell-cell junctions. These findings reveal a previously unknown effect of BRCA1 suppression on mechanisms that regulate the cell division axis in proliferating, non-transformed human mammary epithelial cells and consequent downstream effects on the mitotic integrity and phenotype control of their progeny. PMID:28427147

  12. Comparative human cell toxicogenomic analysis of monohaloacetic acid drinking water disinfection byproducts.

    PubMed

    Attene-Ramos, Matias S; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Plewa, Michael J

    2010-10-01

    The monohaloacetic acids (monoHAAs), iodoacetic, bromoacetic and chloroacetic acids are toxic disinfection byproducts. In vitro toxicological end points were integrated with DNA damage and repair pathway-focused toxicogenomic analyses to evaluate monoHAA-induced alterations of gene expression in normal nontransformed human cells. When compared to concurrent control transcriptome profiles, metabolic pathways involved in the cellular responses to toxic agents were identified and provided insight into the biological mechanisms of toxicity. Using the Database for Annotation, Visualization and Integrated Discovery to analyze the gene array data, the majority of the altered transcriptome profiles were associated with genes responding to DNA damage or those regulating cell cycle or apoptosis. The major pathways involved with altered gene expression were ATM, MAPK, p53, BRCA1, BRCA2, and ATR. These latter pathways highlight the involvement of DNA repair, especially the repair of double strand DNA breaks. All of the resolved pathways are involved in human cell stress response to DNA damage and regulate different stages in cell cycle progression or apoptosis.

  13. AMPK Promotes Aberrant PGC1β Expression To Support Human Colon Tumor Cell Survival

    PubMed Central

    Fisher, Kurt W.; Das, Binita; Kim, Hyun Seok; Clymer, Beth K.; Gehring, Drew; Smith, Deandra R.; Costanzo-Garvey, Diane L.; Fernandez, Mario R.; Brattain, Michael G.; Kelly, David L.; MacMillan, John

    2015-01-01

    A major goal of cancer research is the identification of tumor-specific vulnerabilities that can be exploited for the development of therapies that are selectively toxic to the tumor. We show here that the transcriptional coactivators peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1β (PGC1β) and estrogen-related receptor α (ERRα) are aberrantly expressed in human colon cell lines and tumors. With kinase suppressor of Ras 1 (KSR1) depletion as a reference standard, we used functional signature ontology (FUSION) analysis to identify the γ1 subunit of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) as an essential contributor to PGC1β expression and colon tumor cell survival. Subsequent analysis revealed that a subunit composition of AMPK (α2β2γ1) is preferred for colorectal cancer cell survival, at least in part, by stabilizing the tumor-specific expression of PGC1β. In contrast, PGC1β and ERRα are not detectable in nontransformed human colon epithelial cells, and depletion of the AMPKγ1 subunit has no effect on their viability. These data indicate that Ras oncogenesis relies on the aberrant activation of a PGC1β-dependent transcriptional pathway via a specific AMPK isoform. PMID:26351140

  14. BRCA1 controls the cell division axis and governs ploidy and phenotype in human mammary cells.

    PubMed

    He, Zhengcheng; Kannan, Nagarajan; Nemirovsky, Oksana; Chen, Helen; Connell, Marisa; Taylor, Brian; Jiang, Jihong; Pilarski, Linda M; Fleisch, Markus C; Niederacher, Dieter; Pujana, Miguel Angel; Eaves, Connie J; Maxwell, Christopher A

    2017-05-16

    BRCA1 deficiency may perturb the differentiation hierarchy present in the normal mammary gland and is associated with the genesis of breast cancers that are genomically unstable and typically display a basal-like transcriptome. Oriented cell division is a mechanism known to regulate cell fates and to restrict tumor formation. We now show that the cell division axis is altered following shRNA-mediated BRCA1 depletion in immortalized but non-tumorigenic, or freshly isolated normal human mammary cells with graded consequences in progeny cells that include aneuploidy, perturbation of cell polarity in spheroid cultures, and a selective loss of cells with luminal features. BRCA1 depletion stabilizes HMMR abundance and disrupts cortical asymmetry of NUMA-dynein complexes in dividing cells such that polarity cues provided by cell-matrix adhesions were not able to orient division. We also show that immortalized mammary cells carrying a mutant BRCA1 allele (BRCA1 185delAG/+) reproduce many of these effects but in this model, oriented divisions were maintained through cues provided by CDH1+ cell-cell junctions. These findings reveal a previously unknown effect of BRCA1 suppression on mechanisms that regulate the cell division axis in proliferating, non-transformed human mammary epithelial cells and consequent downstream effects on the mitotic integrity and phenotype control of their progeny.

  15. Sex steroids do not prevent amylin-induced apoptosis in human cells.

    PubMed

    Schwingshackl, A; Blasko, I; Steiner, E; Pozzilli, P; Cavallo, M G; Berger, P; Grubeck-Loebenstein, B

    1998-05-25

    Formation of amylin-containing islet amyloid deposits may contribute to the progressive deterioration of beta cell function in non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. As diabetes mellitus occurs in male, but rarely in female transgenic mice expressing human amylin in their pancreatic beta cells, it is of interest to study the influence of estradiol (E2) and testosterone (T) on amylin-induced cytotoxicity in human cells. The insulinoma cell line CM, thyroid epithelial cells (TEC) in primary culture, and nontransformed fibroblast lines were used. The occurrence of apoptotic cell death was assessed by nuclear labeling with propidium iodide. Amylin was cytotoxic on all cell types tested, but had the most pronounced effect on TEC and the weakest on the CM cell line. Although both E2 and T decreased the proportion of apoptotic cells in cultures kept in the absence of amylin, neither of the two hormones was able to counteract amylin-induced cytotoxicity. beta cell death and hyperglycemia can thus presumably not be prevented by the neutralization of amylin effects by sex steroids.

  16. Multifunctional roles of PKCδ: Opportunities for targeted therapy in human disease.

    PubMed

    Reyland, Mary E; Jones, David N M

    2016-09-01

    The serine-threonine protein kinase, protein kinase C-δ (PKCδ), is emerging as a bi-functional regulator of cell death and proliferation. Studies in PKCδ-/- mice have confirmed a pro-apoptotic role for this kinase in response to DNA damage and a tumor promoter role in some oncogenic contexts. In non-transformed cells, inhibition of PKCδ suppresses the release of cytochrome c and caspase activation, indicating a function upstream of apoptotic pathways. Data from PKCδ-/- mice demonstrate a role for PKCδ in the execution of DNA damage-induced and physiologic apoptosis. This has led to the important finding that inhibitors of PKCδ can be used therapeutically to reduce irradiation and chemotherapy-induced toxicity. By contrast, PKCδ is a tumor promoter in mouse models of mammary gland and lung cancer, and increased PKCδ expression is a negative prognostic indicator in Her2+ and other subtypes of human breast cancer. Understanding how these distinct functions of PKCδ are regulated is critical for the design of therapeutics to target this pathway. This review will discuss what is currently known about biological roles of PKCδ and prospects for targeting PKCδ in human disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  17. Enhanced detection of metastatic prostate cancer cells in human plasma with lipid bodies staining.

    PubMed

    Mitra, Ranjana; Goodman, Oscar B; Le, Thuc T

    2014-02-15

    non-transformed prostate epithelial cells using fluorescent glucose or lipid uptake kinetics. However, metastatic prostate cancer cells in plasma could be clearly distinguished from blood nucleated cells due to the presence of intracellular lipid bodies. Fluorescent labeling of lipid bodies permitted a simple and sensitive means for high throughput detection of metastatic prostate cancer cells in human plasma.

  18. Human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells (HAMLET) kills human glioblastoma cells in brain xenografts by an apoptosis-like mechanism and prolongs survival.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Walter; Gustafsson, Lotta; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Gronli, Janne; Mork, Sverre; Bjerkvig, Rolf; Svanborg, Catharina

    2004-03-15

    Malignant brain tumors present a major therapeutic challenge because no selective or efficient treatment is available. Here, we demonstrate that intratumoral administration of human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells (HAMLET) prolongs survival in a human glioblastoma (GBM) xenograft model, by selective induction of tumor cell apoptosis. HAMLET is a protein-lipid complex that is formed from alpha-lactalbumin when the protein changes its tertiary conformation and binds oleic acid as a cofactor. HAMLET induces apoptosis in a wide range of tumor cells in vitro, but the therapeutic effect in vivo has not been examined. In this study, invasively growing human GBM tumors were established in nude rats (Han:rnu/rnu Rowett, n = 20) by transplantation of human GBM biopsy spheroids. After 7 days, HAMLET was administered by intracerebral convection-enhanced delivery for 24 h into the tumor area; and alpha-lactalbumin, the native, folded variant of the same protein, was used as a control. HAMLET reduced the intracranial tumor volume and delayed the onset of pressure symptoms in the tumor-bearing rats. After 8 weeks, all alpha-lactalbumin-treated rats had developed pressure symptoms, but the HAMLET-treated rats remained asymptomatic. Magnetic resonance imaging scans revealed large differences in tumor volume (456 versus 63 mm(3)). HAMLET caused apoptosis in vivo in the tumor but not in adjacent intact brain tissue or in nontransformed human astrocytes, and no toxic side effects were observed. The results identify HAMLET as a new candidate in cancer therapy and suggest that HAMLET should be additionally explored as a novel approach to controlling GBM progression.

  19. Cytotoxicity evaluation of large cyanobacterial strain set using selected human and murine in vitro cell models.

    PubMed

    Hrouzek, Pavel; Kapuścik, Aleksandra; Vacek, Jan; Voráčová, Kateřina; Paichlová, Jindřiška; Kosina, Pavel; Voloshko, Ludmila; Ventura, Stefano; Kopecký, Jiří

    2016-02-01

    The production of cytotoxic molecules interfering with mammalian cells is extensively reported in cyanobacteria. These compounds may have a use in pharmacological applications; however, their potential toxicity needs to be considered. We performed cytotoxicity tests of crude cyanobacterial extracts in six cell models in order to address the frequency of cyanobacterial cytotoxicity to human cells and the level of specificity to a particular cell line. A set of more than 100 cyanobacterial crude extracts isolated from soil habitats (mainly genera Nostoc and Tolypothrix) was tested by MTT test for in vitro toxicity on the hepatic and non-hepatic human cell lines HepG2 and HeLa, and three cell systems of rodent origin: Yac-1, Sp-2 and Balb/c 3T3 fibroblasts. Furthermore, a subset of the extracts was assessed for cytotoxicity against primary cultures of human hepatocytes as a model for evaluating potential hepatotoxicity. Roughly one third of cyanobacterial extracts caused cytotoxic effects (i.e. viability<75%) on human cell lines. Despite the sensitivity differences, high correlation coefficients among the inhibition values were obtained for particular cell systems. This suggests a prevailing general cytotoxic effect of extracts and their constituents. The non-transformed immortalized fibroblasts (Balb/c 3T3) and hepatic cancer line HepG2 exhibited good correlations with primary cultures of human hepatocytes. The presence of cytotoxic fractions in strongly cytotoxic extracts was confirmed by an activity-guided HPLC fractionation, and it was demonstrated that cyanobacterial cytotoxicity is caused by a mixture of components with similar hydrophobic/hydrophilic properties. The data presented here could be used in further research into in vitro testing based on human models for the toxicological monitoring of complex cyanobacterial samples. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Human phosphatase CDC14A is recruited to the cell leading edge to regulate cell migration and adhesion

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Nan-Peng; Uddin, Borhan; Voit, Renate; Schiebel, Elmar

    2016-01-01

    Cell adhesion and migration are highly dynamic biological processes that play important roles in organ development and cancer metastasis. Their tight regulation by small GTPases and protein phosphorylation make interrogation of these key processes of great importance. We now show that the conserved dual-specificity phosphatase human cell-division cycle 14A (hCDC14A) associates with the actin cytoskeleton of human cells. To understand hCDC14A function at this location, we manipulated native loci to ablate hCDC14A phosphatase activity (hCDC14APD) in untransformed hTERT-RPE1 and colorectal cancer (HCT116) cell lines and expressed the phosphatase in HeLa FRT T-Rex cells. Ectopic expression of hCDC14A induced stress fiber formation, whereas stress fibers were diminished in hCDC14APD cells. hCDC14APD cells displayed faster cell migration and less adhesion than wild-type controls. hCDC14A colocalized with the hCDC14A substrate kidney- and brain-expressed protein (KIBRA) at the cell leading edge and overexpression of KIBRA was able to reverse the phenotypes of hCDC14APD cells. Finally, we show that ablation of hCDC14A activity increased the aggressive nature of cells in an in vitro tumor formation assay. Consistently, hCDC14A is down-regulated in many tumor tissues and reduced hCDC14A expression is correlated with poorer survival of patients with cancer, to suggest that hCDC14A may directly contribute to the metastatic potential of tumors. Thus, we have uncovered an unanticipated role for hCDC14A in cell migration and adhesion that is clearly distinct from the mitotic and cytokinesis functions of Cdc14/Flp1 in budding and fission yeast. PMID:26747605

  1. The Human Ubiquitin Conjugating Enzyme, UBE2E3, Is Required for Proliferation of Retinal Pigment Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Plafker, Kendra S.; Farjo, Krysten M.; Wiechmann, Allan F.; Plafker, Scott M.

    2008-01-01

    Purpose Cell cycle progression is governed by the coordinated activities of kinases, phosphatases, and the ubiquitin system. The entire complement of ubiquitin pathway components that mediate this process in retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells remains to be identified. This study was undertaken to determine whether the human ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, UBE2E3, is essential for RPE cell proliferation. Methods UBE2E3 expression and localization in telomerase-immortalized, human RPE cells was determined with a UBE2E3-specific antibody. The necessity for UBE2E3 in RPE proliferation was determined using small interfering (si)RNA to target the expression of the enzyme. Cell counts and immunolabeling for the proliferation marker Ki-67 and the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27Kip1 were performed to assess the consequences of UBE2E3 depletion. A mouse strain harboring a disrupted allele of UbcM2 (the mouse counterpart of UBE2E3) with the coding sequence for β-galactosidase was used to track the developmental expression of the enzyme in murine RPE cells. Results UBE2E3 localized in the nucleus of the immortalized RPE cells. Depletion of the enzyme by siRNA resulted in a cell-cycle exit accompanied by a loss of Ki-67, an increase in p27Kip1, and a doubling in cell area. Rescue experiments confirmed the specificity of the RNA interference. In vivo, UbcM2 was transcriptionally downregulated during RPE development in the mouse. Conclusions UBE2E3 is essential for the proliferation of RPE-1 cells and is downregulated during RPE layer maturation in the developing mouse eye. These findings indicate that UBE2E3 is a major enzyme in modulating the balance between RPE cell proliferation and differentiation. PMID:18614808

  2. TPR-MET oncogenic rearrangement: Detection by polymerase chain reaction amplification of the transcript and expression in human tumor cells lines

    SciTech Connect

    Soman, N.R.; Wogan, G.N. ); Rhim, J.S. )

    1990-01-01

    Activation of the MET protooncogene by a rearrangement involving the fusion of TPR and MET specific gene sequences has been observed in a human osteosarcoma cell line (HOS) treated in vitro with N-methyl-N{prime}-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG). No information has been available about the possible occurrence of this rearrangement in human tumors. To facilitate rapid screening of human cell lines and tumor samples for this specific gene rearrangement; the authors developed a sensitive detection method based on polymerase chain reaction (PCR) amplification of TPR-MET mRNA. cDNA was generated from cellular transcripts by using one of the PCR primers, which was then used as a template for PCR amplification of a 205-base-pair region carrying the breakpoint. An end-labeled internal probe was hybridized in solution to an aliquot of the PCR product for detecting amplification. Cells could be directly screened by the assay without prior isolation of RNA. A 205-base-pair DNA fragment characteristic of the TRP-MET rearrangement was detected in cell lines previously known to contain this altered sequence. The rearrangement was also detected at very low levels in the parental (nontransformed) cell line, HOS TE-85. A preliminary survey of cell lines derived from a variety of human tumors indicates that TPR-MET rearrangement occurred and was expressed at very low frequencies by cells from 7 of 14 tumors of nonhematopoietic origin.

  3. Reciprocal regulation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 and senescence in human fibroblasts involves oxidant mediated p38 MAPK activation.

    PubMed

    Marmisolle, Inés; Martínez, Jennyfer; Liu, Jie; Mastrogiovanni, Mauricio; Fergusson, María M; Rovira, Ilsa I; Castro, Laura; Trostchansky, Andrés; Moreno, María; Cao, Liu; Finkel, Toren; Quijano, Celia

    2017-01-01

    We sought to explore the fate of the fatty acid synthesis pathway in human fibroblasts exposed to DNA damaging agents capable of inducing senescence, a state of irreversible growth arrest. Induction of premature senescence by doxorubicin or hydrogen peroxide led to a decrease in protein and mRNA levels of acetyl-CoA carboxylase 1 (ACC1), the enzyme that catalyzes the rate-limiting step in fatty-acid biosynthesis. ACC1 decay accompanied the activation of the DNA damage response (DDR), and resulted in decreased lipid synthesis. A reduction in protein and mRNA levels of ACC1 and in lipid synthesis was also observed in human primary fibroblasts that underwent replicative senescence. We also explored the consequences of inhibiting fatty acid synthesis in proliferating non-transformed cells. Using shRNA technology, we knocked down ACC1 in human fibroblasts. Interestingly, this metabolic perturbation was sufficient to arrest proliferation and trigger the appearance of several markers of the DDR and increase senescence associated β-galactosidase activity. Reactive oxygen species and p38 mitogen activated protein kinase phosphorylation participated in the induction of senescence. Similar results were obtained upon silencing of fatty acid synthase (FAS) expression. Together our results point towards a tight coordination of fatty acid synthesis and cell proliferation in human fibroblasts. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Dose-rate effect on proliferation suppression in human cell lines continuously exposed to γ rays.

    PubMed

    Magae, Junji; Furukawa, Chiharu; Ogata, Hiromitsu

    2011-10-01

    Irradiation time and dose rate are important factors in the evaluation of radiation risk for human health. We previously proposed a novel dose-rate effect model, the modified exponential (MOE) model, which predicts that radiation risks decline exponentially as the dose rate decreases. Here we show that, during the early phase of exposure, up to 1000 h, the proliferation of cells continuously exposed to γ rays at a constant dose rate is gradually suppressed, even as the total dose increases. This trend holds for a number of cell lines including tumor cells, nontransformed fibroblasts and leukocytes. The accumulation of total dose by longer exposure times does not increase this suppressive effect even in cells with a defective DNA repair system, suggesting that risk is determined solely by dose rate in the later phase. The dose-rate effect in the early phase follows the MOE model in DNA repair-proficient cell lines, while cells with impaired DNA-PK or ATM show no dose-rate effect. In the later phase, however, a certain dose-rate effect is observed even in mutant cell lines, and suppression of cell proliferation no longer follows the MOE model. Our results suggest that a distinct mechanism that can operate in the absence of intact DNA-PK or ATM influences the dose-rate effect in the later phase of continuous radiation exposure.

  5. FSH-Receptor Isoforms and FSH-dependent Gene Transcription in Human Monocytes and Osteoclasts

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Lisa J; Tourkova, Irina; Wang, Yujuan; Sharrow, Allison C; Landau, Michael S; Yaroslavskiy, Beatrice B; Li, Sun; Zaidi, Mone; Blair, Harry C

    2010-01-01

    Cells of the monocyte series respond to follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) by poorly characterized mechanisms. We studied FSH-receptors (FSH-R) and FSH response in nontransformed human monocytes and in osteoclasts differentiated from these cells. Western blot and PCR confirmed FSH-R expression on monocytes or osteoclasts, although at low levels relative to ovarian controls. Monocyte and osteoclast FSH-Rs differed from FSH-R from ovarian cells, reflecting variable splicing in exons 8–10. Monocytes produced no cAMP, the major signal in ovarian cells, in response to FSH. However, monocytes or osteoclasts transcribed TNFα in response to the FSH. No relation of expression of osteoclast FSH-R to the sex of cell donors or to exposure to sex hormones was apparent. Controls for FSH purity and endotoxin contamination were negative. Unamplified cRNA screening in adherent CD14 cells after 2 hours in 25 ng/ml FSH showed increased transcription of RANKL signalling proteins. Transcription of key proteins that stimulate bone turnover, TNFα and TSG-6, increased 2–3 fold after FSH treatment. Smaller but significant changes occurred in transcripts of selected signalling, adhesion, and cytoskeletal proteins. We conclude that monocyte and osteoclast FSH response diverges from that of ovarian cells, reflecting, at least in part, varying FSH-R isoforms. PMID:20171950

  6. Relocalization of cell adhesion molecules during neoplastic transformation of human fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Belgiovine, Cristina; Chiodi, Ilaria; Mondello, Chiara

    2011-11-01

    Studying neoplastic transformation of telomerase immortalized human fibroblasts (cen3tel), we found that the transition from normal to tumorigenic cells was associated with the loss of growth contact inhibition, the acquisition of an epithelial-like morphology and a change in actin organization, from stress fibers to cortical bundles. We show here that these variations were paralleled by an increase in N-cadherin expression and relocalization of different adhesion molecules, such as N-cadherin, α-catenin, p-120 and β-catenin. These proteins presented a clear membrane localization in tumorigenic cells compared to a more diffuse, cytoplasmic distribution in primary fibroblasts and non-tumorigenic immortalized cells, suggesting that tumorigenic cells could form strong cell-cell contacts and cell contacts did not induce growth inhibition. The epithelial-like appearance of tumorigenic cells did not reflect a mesenchymal-epithelial transition; in fact, cen3tel cells expressed vimentin and did not express cytokeratins at all transformation stages. Moreover, they did not express epithelial proteins such as occluding and claudin-1. In contrast, ZO-1 showed higher levels and a more defined membrane localization in tumorigenic cells compared to non-tumorigenic cells; this confirms its role in adherens junction formation in mesenchymal cells and is in agreement with the strong cell-cell contact formation by neoplastically transformed cells. Finally, we found α-catenin and ZO-1 nuclear localization in non-transformed cells, suggestive of possible additional roles of these proteins besides cell junction formation.

  7. Production, Characterization and Potential Uses of a 3D Tissue-engineered Human Esophageal Mucosal Model.

    PubMed

    Green, Nicola H; Corfe, Bernard M; Bury, Jonathan P; MacNeil, Sheila

    2015-05-18

    The incidence of both esophageal adenocarcinoma and its precursor, Barrett's Metaplasia, are rising rapidly in the western world. Furthermore esophageal adenocarcinoma generally has a poor prognosis, with little improvement in survival rates in recent years. These are difficult conditions to study and there has been a lack of suitable experimental platforms to investigate disorders of the esophageal mucosa. A model of the human esophageal mucosa has been developed in the MacNeil laboratory which, unlike conventional 2D cell culture systems, recapitulates the cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions present in vivo and produces a mature, stratified epithelium similar to that of the normal human esophagus. Briefly, the model utilizes non-transformed normal primary human esophageal fibroblasts and epithelial cells grown within a porcine-derived acellular esophageal scaffold. Immunohistochemical characterization of this model by CK4, CK14, Ki67 and involucrin staining demonstrates appropriate recapitulation of the histology of the normal human esophageal mucosa. This model provides a robust, biologically relevant experimental model of the human esophageal mucosa. It can easily be manipulated to investigate a number of research questions including the effectiveness of pharmacological agents and the impact of exposure to environmental factors such as alcohol, toxins, high temperature or gastro-esophageal refluxate components. The model also facilitates extended culture periods not achievable with conventional 2D cell culture, enabling, inter alia, the study of the impact of repeated exposure of a mature epithelium to the agent of interest for up to 20 days. Furthermore, a variety of cell lines, such as those derived from esophageal tumors or Barrett's Metaplasia, can be incorporated into the model to investigate processes such as tumor invasion and drug responsiveness in a more biologically relevant environment.

  8. Inhibition of Lon protease by triterpenoids alters mitochondria and is associated to cell death in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Gibellini, Lara; Pinti, Marcello; Bartolomeo, Regina; De Biasi, Sara; Cormio, Antonella; Musicco, Clara; Carnevale, Gianluca; Pecorini, Simone; Nasi, Milena; De Pol, Anto; Cossarizza, Andrea

    2015-09-22

    Mitochondrial Lon protease (Lon) regulates several mitochondrial functions, and is inhibited by the anticancer molecule triterpenoid 2-cyano-3, 12-dioxooleana-1,9(11)-dien-28-oic acid (CDDO), or by its C-28 methyl ester derivative (CDDO-Me). To analyze the mechanism of action of triterpenoids, we investigated intramitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS), mitochondrial membrane potential, mitochondrial mass, mitochondrial dynamics and morphology, and Lon proteolytic activity in RKO human colon cancer cells, in HepG2 hepatocarcinoma cells and in MCF7 breast carcinoma cells. We found that CDDO and CDDO-Me are potent stressors for mitochondria in cancer cells, rather than normal non-transformed cells. In particular, they: i) cause depolarization; ii) increase mitochondrial ROS, iii) alter mitochondrial morphology and proteins involved in mitochondrial dynamics; iv) affect the levels of Lon and those of aconitase and human transcription factor A, which are targets of Lon activity; v) increase level of protein carbonyls in mitochondria; vi) lead to intrinsic apoptosis. The overexpression of Lon can rescue cells from cell death, providing an additional evidence on the role of Lon in conditions of excessive stress load.

  9. CD45 phosphatase is crucial for human and murine acute myeloid leukemia maintenance through its localization in lipid rafts

    PubMed Central

    Saint-Paul, Laetitia; Nguyen, Chi-Hung; Buffière, Anne; de Barros, Jean-Paul Pais; Hammann, Arlette; Landras-Guetta, Corinne; Filomenko, Rodolphe; Chrétien, Marie-Lorraine; Johnson, Pauline; Bastie, Jean-Noël; Delva, Laurent; Quéré, Ronan

    2016-01-01

    CD45 is a pan-leukocyte protein with tyrosine phosphatase activity involved in the regulation of signal transduction in hematopoiesis. Exploiting CD45 KO mice and lentiviral shRNA, we prove the crucial role that CD45 plays in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) development and maintenance. We discovered that CD45 does not colocalize with lipid rafts on murine and human non-transformed hematopoietic cells. Using a mouse model, we proved that CD45 positioning within lipid rafts is modified during their oncogenic transformation to AML. CD45 colocalized with lipid rafts on AML cells, which contributes to elevated GM-CSF signal intensity involved in proliferation of leukemic cells. We furthermore proved that the GM-CSF/Lyn/Stat3 pathway that contributes to growth of leukemic cells could be profoundly affected, by using a new plasma membrane disrupting agent, which rapidly delocalized CD45 away from lipid rafts. We provide evidence that this mechanism is also effective on human primary AML samples and xenograft transplantation. In conclusion, this study highlights the emerging evidence of the involvement of lipid rafts in oncogenic development of AML and the targeting of CD45 positioning among lipid rafts as a new strategy in the treatment of AML. PMID:27579617

  10. T Cell Receptor-induced Activation and Apoptosis In Cycling Human T Cells Occur throughout the Cell Cycle

    PubMed Central

    Karas, Michael; Zaks, Tal Z.; JL, Liu; LeRoith, Derek

    1999-01-01

    Previous studies have found conflicting associations between susceptibility to activation-induced cell death and the cell cycle in T cells. However, most of the studies used potentially toxic pharmacological agents for cell cycle synchronization. A panel of human melanoma tumor-reactive T cell lines, a CD8+ HER-2/neu-reactive T cell clone, and the leukemic T cell line Jurkat were separated by centrifugal elutriation. Fractions enriched for the G0–G1, S, and G2–M phases of the cell cycle were assayed for T cell receptor-mediated activation as measured by intracellular Ca2+ flux, cytolytic recognition of tumor targets, and induction of Fas ligand mRNA. Susceptibility to apoptosis induced by recombinant Fas ligand and activation-induced cell death were also studied. None of the parameters studied was specific to a certain phase of the cell cycle, leading us to conclude that in nontransformed human T cells, both activation and apoptosis through T cell receptor activation can occur in all phases of the cell cycle. PMID:10588669

  11. CD45 phosphatase is crucial for human and murine acute myeloid leukemia maintenance through its localization in lipid rafts.

    PubMed

    Saint-Paul, Laetitia; Nguyen, Chi-Hung; Buffière, Anne; Pais de Barros, Jean-Paul; Hammann, Arlette; Landras-Guetta, Corinne; Filomenko, Rodolphe; Chrétien, Marie-Lorraine; Johnson, Pauline; Bastie, Jean-Noël; Delva, Laurent; Quéré, Ronan

    2016-10-04

    CD45 is a pan-leukocyte protein with tyrosine phosphatase activity involved in the regulation of signal transduction in hematopoiesis. Exploiting CD45 KO mice and lentiviral shRNA, we prove the crucial role that CD45 plays in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) development and maintenance. We discovered that CD45 does not colocalize with lipid rafts on murine and human non-transformed hematopoietic cells. Using a mouse model, we proved that CD45 positioning within lipid rafts is modified during their oncogenic transformation to AML. CD45 colocalized with lipid rafts on AML cells, which contributes to elevated GM-CSF signal intensity involved in proliferation of leukemic cells. We furthermore proved that the GM-CSF/Lyn/Stat3 pathway that contributes to growth of leukemic cells could be profoundly affected, by using a new plasma membrane disrupting agent, which rapidly delocalized CD45 away from lipid rafts. We provide evidence that this mechanism is also effective on human primary AML samples and xenograft transplantation. In conclusion, this study highlights the emerging evidence of the involvement of lipid rafts in oncogenic development of AML and the targeting of CD45 positioning among lipid rafts as a new strategy in the treatment of AML.

  12. Hikeshi modulates the proteotoxic stress response in human cells: Implication for the importance of the nuclear function of HSP70s.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Khondoker Md Zulfiker; Mamada, Hiroshi; Takagi, Masatoshi; Kose, Shingo; Imamoto, Naoko

    2017-10-05

    Hikeshi mediates the heat stress-induced nuclear import of heat-shock protein 70 (HSP70s: HSP70/HSC70). Dysfunction of Hikeshi causes some serious effects in humans; however, the cellular function of Hikeshi is largely unknown. Here, we investigated the effects of Hikeshi depletion on the survival of human cells after proteotoxic stress and found opposite effects in HeLa and hTERT-RPE1 (RPE) cells; depletion of Hikeshi reduced the survival of HeLa cells, but increased the survival of RPE cells in response to proteotoxic stress. Hikeshi depletion sustained heat-shock transcription factor 1 (HSF1) activation in HeLa cells after recovery from stress, but introduction of a nuclear localization signal-tagged HSC70 in Hikeshi-depleted HeLa cells down-regulated HSF1 activity. In RPE cells, the HSF1 was efficiently activated, but the activated HSF1 was not sustained after recovery from stress, as in HeLa cells. Additionally, we found that p53 and subsequent up-regulation of p21 were higher in the Hikeshi-depleted RPE cells than in the wild-type cells. Our results indicate that depletion of Hikeshi renders HeLa cells proteotoxic stress-sensitive through the abrogation of the nuclear function of HSP70s required for HSF1 regulation. Moreover, Hikeshi depletion up-regulates p21 in RPE cells, which could be a cause of its proteotoxic stress resistant. © 2017 The Authors. Genes to Cells published by Molecular Biology Society of Japan and John Wiley & Sons Australia, Ltd.

  13. Androgen Receptor (AR) Suppresses Normal Human Prostate Epithelial Cell Proliferation via AR/β-catenin/TCF-4 Complex Inhibition of c-MYC Transcription

    PubMed Central

    Antony, Lizamma; van der Schoor, Freek; Dalrymple, Susan L.; Isaacs, John T.

    2016-01-01

    INTRODUCTION Physiologic testosterone continuously stimulates prostate stromal cell secretion of paracrine growth factors (PGFs), which if unopposed would induce hyperplastic overgrowth of normal prostate epithelial cells (PrECs). METHODS Lentiviral shRNA stable knock down of c-MYC, β-catenin, or TCF-4 completely inhibits normal (i.e., non-transformed) human PrECs growth. c-MYC enhancer driven reporter expression and growth is inhibited by two chemically distinct molecules, which prevent β-catenin signaling either by blocking TCF-4 binding (i.e., toxoflavin) or by stimulating degradation (i.e., AVX939). Recombinant DKK1 protein at a dose, which inhibits activation of canonical Wnt signaling does not inhibit PrEC growth. Nuclear β-catenin translocation and PrEC growth is prevented by both lack of PGFs or Akt inhibitor-I. Growth inhibition induced by lack of PGFs, toxoflavin, or Akt inhibitor-I is overcome by constitutive c-MYC transcription. RESULTS In the presence of continuous PGF signaling, PrEC hyperplasia is prevented by androgen binding to AR suppressing c-MYC transcription, resulting in G0 arrest/terminal differentiation independent of Rb, p21, p27, FoxP3, or down regulation of growth factors receptors and instead involves androgen-induced formation of AR/β-catenin/TCF-4 complexes, which suppress c-MYC transcription. Such suppression does not occur when AR is mutated in its zinc-finger binding domain. DISCUSSION Proliferation of non-transformed human PrECs is dependent upon c-MYC transcription via formation/binding of β-catenin/TCF-4 complexes at both 5′ and 3′ c-MYC enhancers stimulated by Wnt-independent, PGF induced Akt signaling. In the presence of continuous PGF signaling, PrEC hyperplasia is prevented by androgen-induced formation of AR/β-catenin/TCF-4 complexes, which retains binding to 3′ c-MYC enhancer, but now suppresses c-MYC transcription. PMID:24913829

  14. Silencing of the inhibitor of DNA binding protein 4 (ID4) contributes to the pathogenesis of mouse and human CLL

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Shih-Shih; Claus, Rainer; Lucas, David M.; Yu, Lianbo; Qian, Jiang; Ruppert, Amy S.; West, Derek A.; Williams, Katie E.; Johnson, Amy J.; Sablitzky, Fred

    2011-01-01

    Inhibitor of DNA binding protein 4 (ID4) is a member of the dominant-negative basic helix-loop-helix transcription factor family that lacks DNA binding activity and has tumor suppressor function. ID4 promoter methylation has been reported in acute myeloid leukemia and chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), although the expression, function, and clinical relevance of this gene have not been characterized in either disease. We demonstrate that the promoter of ID4 is consistently methylated to various degrees in CLL cells, and increased promoter methylation in a univariable analysis correlates with shortened patient survival. However, ID4 mRNA and protein expression is uniformly silenced in CLL cells irrespective of the degree of promoter methylation. The crossing of ID4+/− mice with Eμ-TCL1 mice triggers a more aggressive murine CLL as measured by lymphocyte count and inferior survival. Hemizygous loss of ID4 in nontransformed TCL1-positive B cells enhances cell proliferation triggered by CpG oligonucleotides and decreases sensitivity to dexamethasone-mediated apoptosis. Collectively, this study confirms the importance of the silencing of ID4 in murine and human CLL pathogenesis. PMID:21098398

  15. Modeling tumor progression by the sequential introduction of genetic alterations into the genome of human normal cells.

    PubMed

    Zecchin, Davide; Arena, Sabrina; Martini, Miriam; Sassi, Francesco; Pisacane, Alberto; Di Nicolantonio, Federica; Bardelli, Alberto

    2013-02-01

    Cancer genomes display a complex blend of genetic lesions affecting oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Multiple modeling approaches indicate that 5-15 driver oncogenic events are required to achieve tumor progression in common epithelial cancers. In vitro, a lower number (2-3) of events is typically sufficient to achieve full transformation. We developed cellular models that closely resemble the occurrence of multiple genetic lesions to understand their role in tumor progression. Homologous recombination and transcriptional downregulation were used to recapitulate the co-occurrence of driver mutations targeting oncogenes and inactivation of tumor suppressor genes in human nontransformed epithelial cells. Knockdown of the tumor suppressor genes PTEN or RB1 was combined with mutagenic activation of individual oncogenes (EGFR, KRAS, BRAF, or PIK3CA), thus generating a combinatorial model. The simultaneous presence of oncogenic and tumor suppressive events resulted in distinct biochemical properties and anchorage-independent growth abilities. Notably, however, we found that even when up to four individual alterations were concomitantly present they were not sufficient to fully transform the target cells. Our results suggest that the close recapitulation of cancer lesions in not-transformed cells is essential to unveil their oncogenic potential and raise questions concerning the minimal requirements for neoplastic transformation of epithelial cells. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Requirement of a dopaminergic neuronal phenotype for toxicity of low concentrations of 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium to human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Schildknecht, Stefan; Poeltl, Dominik; Nagel, Daniel M.; Matt, Florian; Scholz, Diana; Lotharius, Julie; Schmieg, Nathalie; Salvo-Vargas, Alberto; Leist, Marcel

    2009-11-15

    LUHMES cells are conditionally-immortalized non-transformed human fetal cells that can be differentiated to acquire a dopaminergic neuron-like phenotype under appropriate growth conditions. After differentiation by GDNF and cyclic adenosine monophosphate, LUHMES were sensitive to 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium (MPP{sup +}) toxicity at <= 5 muM, but resistant to the parental compound 1-methyl-4-phenyl-1,2,3,6-tetrahydropyridine (MPTP). The high homogeneity and purity of the cultures allowed the detection of metabolic changes during the degeneration. Cellular ATP dropped in two phases after 24 and 48 h; cellular glutathione (GSH) decreased continuously, paralleled by an increase in lipid peroxidation. These events were accompanied by a time-dependent degeneration of neurites. Block of the dopamine transporter by GBR 12909 or mazindol completely abrogated MPP{sup +} toxicity. Inhibition of de novo dopamine synthesis by alpha-methyl-L-tyrosine or 3-iodo-L-tyrosine attenuated toxicity, but did not reduce the initial drop in ATP. Inhibition of mixed lineage kinases by CEP1347 completely prevented the MPP{sup +}-induced loss of viability and intracellular GSH, but failed to attenuate the initial drop of ATP. For the quantitative assessment of neurite degeneration, an automated imaging-based high content screening approach was applied and confirmed the findings made by pharmacological interventions in this study. Our data indicate that inhibition of mitochondrial ATP synthesis is not sufficient to trigger cell death in MPP{sup +}-treated LUHMES.

  17. Human cell toxicogenomic analysis links reactive oxygen species to the toxicity of monohaloacetic acid drinking water disinfection byproducts

    PubMed Central

    Pals, Justin; Attene-Ramos, Matias S.; Xia, Menghang; Wagner, Elizabeth D.; Plewa, Michael J.

    2014-01-01

    Chronic exposure to drinking water disinfection byproducts has been linked to adverse health risks. The monohaloacetic acids (monoHAAs) are generated as byproducts during the disinfection of drinking water and are cytotoxic, genotoxic, mutagenic, and teratogenic. Iodoacetic acid toxicity was mitigated by antioxidants, suggesting the involvement of oxidative stress. Other monoHAAs may share a similar mode of action. Each monoHAA generated a significant concentration-response increase in the expression of a β-lactamase reporter under the control of the Antioxidant Response Element (ARE). The monoHAAs generated oxidative stress with a rank order of IAA > BAA >> CAA; this rank order was observed with other toxicological endpoints. Toxicogenomic analysis was conducted with a non-transformed human intestinal epithelial cell line (FHs 74 Int). Exposure to the monoHAAs altered the transcription levels of multiple oxidative stress responsive genes, indicating that each exposure generated oxidative stress. The transcriptome profiles showed an increase in TXNRD1 and SRXN1, suggesting peroxiredoxin proteins had been oxidized during monoHAA exposures. Three sources of reactive oxygen species were identified, the hypohalous acid generating peroxidase enzymes LPO and MPO, NADPH-dependent oxidase NOX5, and PTGS2 (COX-2) mediated arachidonic acid metabolism. Each monoHAA exposure caused an increase in COX-2 mRNA levels. These data provide a functional association between monoHAA exposure and adverse health outcomes such as oxidative stress, inflammation, and cancer. PMID:24050308

  18. Caveolin-1 expression is maintained in rat and human astroglioma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Patricia L; Liu, Changdan; Smart, Deedee K; Hantus, Stephen T; Fick, James R; Cameron, Richard S

    2002-03-01

    Caveolin-1 is the principal structural and functional component of caveolae, a plasmalemmal compartment that has been proposed to sequester lipid and protein components that participate in transmembrane signal transduction processes. Multiple studies reveal a reduction in the expression level of caveolin-1 mRNA and protein in many carcinomas as well as transformed cells. The human caveolin-1 gene is localized to a suspected tumor suppressor locus (7q31.1). Collectively, these data have been taken to imply that caveolin-1 may function in a tumor suppressor capacity. To determine if a reduction in the expression level of caveolin-1 mRNA and protein accompanied the transformation of astrocytes, we undertook studies of two transformed rat astroglial cell lines, C6 and DI TNC(1), as well as several cell lines derived from human glioblastoma tumors: T98G, U87MG, U118MG, U138MG, and U373MG. Ultrastructural, immunolocalization, immunoblot, and Northern blot analyses demonstrated that caveolin-1 message and protein were expressed in all rat and human glioma cells. The localization pattern, buoyant density, and detergent-insolubility property of caveolin-1 protein were indistinguishable from that determined for nontransformed type 1 astrocytes in culture. Nucleotide sequence analyses of caveolin-1 cDNAs indicate that mutations are not present in the caveolin-1 sequence in any of the glioma cell types. Taken together with previous analyses, these data indicate that, at least for astrocytes, the process of transformation in and of itself is not solely sufficient to reduce the level of caveolin-1 expression, and that caveolin-1 expression in and of itself is not solely sufficient to prevent the acquisition of a transformed phenotype. Copyright 2002 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  19. Functional consequences of anti-sense RNA-mediated inhibition of CD8 surface expression in a human T cell clone

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    An experimental approach for defining the function of CD8 has been developed by linking anti-sense RNA mutagenesis and T cell cloning technologies. We have transfected an anti-sense CD8 episomal expression vector into a CD8+ nontransformed human T cell clone that is specific for the human class I alloantigen HLA-B35. Expression of CD8 on this T cell clone, JH.ARL.1, was selectively and efficiently inhibited. Stimulation of this CD8- variant with specific alloantigen resulted in a marked loss of a number of functional responses, including cytotoxicity, proliferation, IL-2 secretion, and IL-2-R expression. However, these same functional responses could be elicited with stimuli that do not require antigen recognition to activate the T cell (anti- CD3 mAbs, PHA). The results of our study support the hypothesis that CD8 is required for recognition of class I MHC alloantigens that results in activation of T cell functional responses. PMID:2459296

  20. Time-Dependent, HIV-Tat-Induced Perturbation of Human Neurons In Vitro: Towards a Model for the Molecular Pathology of HIV-Associated Neurocognitive Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Gurwitz, Kim T.; Burman, Richard J.; Murugan, Brandon D.; Garnett, Shaun; Ganief, Tariq; Soares, Nelson C.; Raimondo, Joseph V.; Blackburn, Jonathan M.

    2017-01-01

    A significant proportion of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV)-positive individuals are affected by the cognitive, motor and behavioral dysfunction that characterizes HIV-associated neurocognitive disorders (HAND). While the molecular etiology of HAND remains largely uncharacterized, HIV transactivator of transcription (HIV-Tat) is thought to be an important etiological cause. Here we have used mass spectrometry (MS)-based discovery proteomics to identify the quantitative, cell-wide changes that occur when non-transformed, differentiated human neurons are treated with HIV-Tat over time. We identified over 4000 protein groups (false discovery rate <0.01) in this system with 131, 118 and 45 protein groups differentially expressed at 6, 24 and 48 h post treatment, respectively. Alterations in the expression of proteins involved in gene expression and cytoskeletal maintenance were particularly evident. In tandem with proteomic evidence of cytoskeletal dysregulation we observed HIV-Tat induced functional alterations, including a reduction of neuronal intrinsic excitability as assessed by patch-clamp electrophysiology. Our findings may be relevant for understanding in vivo molecular mechanisms in HAND. PMID:28611588

  1. Cross-Analysis of Gene and miRNA Genome-Wide Expression Profiles in Human Fibroblasts at Different Stages of Transformation

    PubMed Central

    Ostano, Paola; Bione, Silvia; Belgiovine, Cristina; Chiodi, Ilaria; Ghimenti, Chiara; Scovassi, A. Ivana; Chiorino, Giovanna

    2012-01-01

    Abstract We have developed a cellular system constituted of human telomerase immortalized fibroblasts that gradually underwent neoplastic transformation during propagation in culture. We exploited this cellular system to investigate gene and miRNA transcriptional programs in cells at different stages of propagation, representing five different phases along the road to transformation, from non-transformed cells up to tumorigenic and metastatic ones. Here we show that gene and miRNA expression profiles were both able to divide cells according to their transformation phase. We identified more than 1,700 genes whose expression was highly modulated in cells at at least one propagation stage and we found that the number of modulated genes progressively increased at successive stages of transformation. These genes identified processes significantly deregulated in tumorigenic cells, such as cell differentiation, cell movement and extracellular matrix remodeling, cell cycle and apoptosis, together with upregulation of several cancer testis antigens. Alterations in cell cycle, apoptosis, and cancer testis antigen expression were particular hallmarks of metastatic cells. A parallel deregulation of a panel of 43 miRNAs strictly connected to the p53 and c-Myc pathways and with oncogenic/oncosuppressive functions was also found. Our results indicate that cen3tel cells can be a useful model for human fibroblast neoplastic transformation, which appears characterized by complex and peculiar alterations involving both genetic and epigenetic reprogramming, whose elucidation could provide useful insights into regulatory networks underlying cancerogenesis. PMID:22321013

  2. Cross-analysis of gene and miRNA genome-wide expression profiles in human fibroblasts at different stages of transformation.

    PubMed

    Ostano, Paola; Bione, Silvia; Belgiovine, Cristina; Chiodi, Ilaria; Ghimenti, Chiara; Scovassi, A Ivana; Chiorino, Giovanna; Mondello, Chiara

    2012-01-01

    We have developed a cellular system constituted of human telomerase immortalized fibroblasts that gradually underwent neoplastic transformation during propagation in culture. We exploited this cellular system to investigate gene and miRNA transcriptional programs in cells at different stages of propagation, representing five different phases along the road to transformation, from non-transformed cells up to tumorigenic and metastatic ones. Here we show that gene and miRNA expression profiles were both able to divide cells according to their transformation phase. We identified more than 1,700 genes whose expression was highly modulated in cells at at least one propagation stage and we found that the number of modulated genes progressively increased at successive stages of transformation. These genes identified processes significantly deregulated in tumorigenic cells, such as cell differentiation, cell movement and extracellular matrix remodeling, cell cycle and apoptosis, together with upregulation of several cancer testis antigens. Alterations in cell cycle, apoptosis, and cancer testis antigen expression were particular hallmarks of metastatic cells. A parallel deregulation of a panel of 43 miRNAs strictly connected to the p53 and c-Myc pathways and with oncogenic/oncosuppressive functions was also found. Our results indicate that cen3tel cells can be a useful model for human fibroblast neoplastic transformation, which appears characterized by complex and peculiar alterations involving both genetic and epigenetic reprogramming, whose elucidation could provide useful insights into regulatory networks underlying cancerogenesis.

  3. Potentiation of epidermal growth factor receptor-mediated oncogenesis by c-Src: implications for the etiology of multiple human cancers.

    PubMed Central

    Maa, M C; Leu, T H; McCarley, D J; Schatzman, R C; Parsons, S J

    1995-01-01

    c-Src is a nontransforming tyrosine kinase that participates in signaling events mediated by a variety of polypeptide growth factor receptors, including the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR). Overexpression and continual ligand stimulation of the EGFR results in morphological transformation of cells in vitro and tumor development in vivo. Elevated levels of c-Src and the EGFR are found in a variety of human malignancies, raising the question of whether c-Src can functionally cooperate with the EGFR during tumorigenesis. To address this issue, we generated c-Src/EGFR double overexpressors and compared their proliferative and biochemical characteristics to those of single overexpressors and control cells. We found that in cells expressing high levels of receptor, c-Src potentiated DNA synthesis, growth in soft agar, and tumor formation in nude mice. Growth potentiation was associated with the formation of a heterocomplex between c-Src and activated EGFR, the appearance of a distinct tyrosyl phosphorylation on the receptor, and an enhancement of receptor substrate phosphorylation. These findings indicate that c-Src is capable of potentiating receptor-mediated tumorigenesis and suggest that synergism between c-Src and the EGFR may contribute to a more aggressive phenotype in multiple human tumors. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:7542783

  4. Initial slope of radiation survival curves is characteristic of the origin of primary and established cultures of human tumor cells and fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Malaise, E.P.; Fertil, B.; Deschavanne, P.J.; Chavaudra, N.; Brock, W.A.

    1987-08-01

    The published survival curves of 110 human tumor cell lines and 147 nontransformed human fibroblast strains have been reanalyzed using three different statistical methods: the single hit multitarget model, the linear-quadratic model, and the mean inactivation dose. The 110 tumor cell lines were classified in two ways: (a) into three categories defined by clinical radiocurability criteria, and (b) into seven categories based on histopathology. The 147 fibroblast strains were divided into eight genetic groups. Differences in the radiosensitivities of both the tumor cell and fibroblast groups could be demonstrated only by parameters that describe the slopes of the initial part of the survival curves. The capacity of the survival level to identify significant differences between groups was dose dependent over the range 1 to 6 Gy. This relationship showed a bell-shaped curve with a maximum at 1.5 Gy for the tumor cell lines and 3 Gy for the fibroblasts. Values for intrinsic radiosensitivity for a number of groups of tumors have also been obtained by primary culture of tumor cells. These values are strictly comparable to those obtained by clonogenic methods. This confirms that intrinsic radiosensitivity is a determinant of the response of tumor cells to radiotherapy and suggests that tissue culture methods may be used as a predictive assay.

  5. Vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein- and Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus-derived glycoprotein-pseudotyped lentivirus vectors differentially transduce corneal endothelium, trabecular meshwork, and human photoreceptors.

    PubMed

    Lipinski, Daniel M; Barnard, Alun R; Charbel Issa, Peter; Singh, Mandeep S; De Silva, Samantha R; Trabalza, Antonio; Eleftheriadou, Ioanna; Ellison, Stuart M; Mazarakis, Nicholas D; MacLaren, Robert E

    2014-01-01

    The ability to deliver a large transgene efficiently to photoreceptors using viral vectors remains problematic and yet is critical for the future therapy of inherited retinal diseases such as Stargardt's and Usher's 1B. Herein, we examine the ocular tropism of a HIV-1-based lentivirus vector pseudotyped with Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus-derived glycoprotein (VEEV-G) after intraocular delivery to the posterior and anterior chambers of C57BL/6 wild-type mice. Reporter gene (EGFP) expression was evaluated using in vivo fluorescence imaging followed by postmortem immunohistochemistry and retinal function assessed by electroretinography. Intracameral administration of VEEV-G and vesicular stomatitis virus glycoprotein (VSV-G)-pseudotyped vectors resulted in robust transgene expression in the corneal endothelium and trabecular meshwork. After subretinal administration, onset of transgene expression was observed in the retinal pigment epithelium (RPE) 1 day postinjection with both VEEV-G and control VSV-G pseudotypes, but no significant photoreceptor transduction was apparent. Substantial degeneration of the outer nuclear layer was observed with VEEV-G-pseudotyped vector, which corresponded to ablation of retinal function. Subretinal administration of VSV-G was observed to result in significant suppression of electrophysiological function compared with buffer-injected and uninjected control eyes. Suppression of the c-wave amplitude, in addition to reduced RPE65 expression, indicated potential RPE dysfunction. Ex vivo tropism of VSV-G was assessed using organotypic culture of explanted retina harvested from wild-type mice and human patients undergoing retinal detachment surgery to examine the prevention of transduction by physical barriers and species differences in tropism.

  6. Human See, Human Do.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tomasello, Michael

    1997-01-01

    A human demonstrator showed human children and captive chimpanzees how to drag food or toys closer using a rakelike tool. One side of the rake was less efficient than the other for dragging. Chimps tried to reproduce results rather than methods while children imitated and used the more efficient rake side. Concludes that imitation leads to…

  7. The ETS Transcription Factor ESE-1 Transforms MCF-12A Human Mammary Epithelial Cells via a Novel Cytoplasmic Mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Prescott, Jason D.; Koto, Karen S. N.; Singh, Meenakshi; Gutierrez-Hartmann, Arthur

    2004-01-01

    Several different transcription factors, including estrogen receptor, progesterone receptor, and ETS family members, have been implicated in human breast cancer, indicating that transcription factor-induced alterations in gene expression underlie mammary cell transformation. ESE-1 is an epithelium-specific ETS transcription factor that contains two distinguishing domains, a serine- and aspartic acid-rich (SAR) domain and an AT hook domain. ESE-1 is abundantly expressed in human breast cancer and trans-activates epithelium-specific gene promoters in transient transfection assays. While it has been presumed that ETS factors transform mammary epithelial cells via their nuclear transcriptional functions, here we show (i) that ESE-1 protein is cytoplasmic in human breast cancer cells; (ii) that stably expressed green fluorescent protein-ESE-1 transforms MCF-12A human mammary epithelial cells; and (iii) that the ESE-1 SAR domain, acting in the cytoplasm, is necessary and sufficient to mediate this transformation. Deletion of transcriptional regulatory or nuclear localization domains does not impair ESE-1-mediated transformation, whereas fusing the simian virus 40 T-antigen nuclear localization signal to various ESE-1 constructs, including the SAR domain alone, inhibits their transforming capacity. Finally, we show that the nuclear localization of ESE-1 protein induces apoptosis in nontransformed mammary epithelial cells via a transcription-dependent mechanism. Together, our studies reveal two distinct ESE-1 functions, apoptosis and transformation, where the ESE-1 transcription activation domain contributes to apoptosis and the SAR domain mediates transformation via a novel nonnuclear, nontranscriptional mechanism. These studies not only describe a unique ETS factor transformation mechanism but also establish a new paradigm for cell transformation in general. PMID:15169914

  8. The single IgG IL-1-related receptor controls TLR responses in differentiated human intestinal epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Khan, Mohammed A; Steiner, Theodore S; Sham, Ho Pan; Bergstrom, Kirk S; Huang, Jingtian T; Assi, Kiran; Salh, Bill; Tai, Isabella T; Li, Xiaoxia; Vallance, Bruce A

    2010-03-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells (IECs) are constantly exposed to enteric microbes. Although IECs express TLRs that recognize bacterial products, the activation of these TLRs is strictly controlled through poorly understood mechanisms, producing a state of hyporesponsiveness and preventing unwanted inflammation. The single IgG IL-1-related receptor (Sigirr) is a negative regulator of TLRs that is expressed by IECs and was recently shown to inhibit experimental colitis. However, the importance of Sigirr in IEC hyporesponsiveness and its distribution within the human colon is unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of Sigirr in regulating epithelial-specific TLR responses and characterized its expression in colonic biopsy specimens. Transformed and nontransformed human IECs were cultured as monolayers. Transient gene silencing and stable overexpression of Sigirr was performed to assess innate IEC responses. Sigirr expression in human colonic biopsy specimens was examined by immunohistochemistry. Bacterial infection of IECs and exposure to flagellin transiently decreased Sigirr protein expression, concurrent with secretion of the neutrophil chemokine IL-8. Sigirr gene silencing augmented chemokine responses to bacterial flagellin, Pam3Cys, and the cytokine IL-1beta. Conversely, stable overexpression of Sigirr diminished NF-kappaB-mediated IL-8 responses to TLR ligands. We also found that Sigirr expression increased as IECs differentiated in culture. This observation was confirmed in biopsy sections, in which Sigirr expression within colonic crypts was prominent in IECs at the apex and diminished at the base. Our findings show that Sigirr broadly regulates innate responses in differentiated human IECs; therefore, it may modulate epithelial involvement in infectious and inflammatory bowel diseases.

  9. Barriers to Infection of Human Cells by Feline Leukemia Virus: Insights into Resistance to Zoonosis

    PubMed Central

    Terry, Anne; Kilbey, Anna; Naseer, Asif; Levy, Laura S.; Ahmad, Shamim; Watts, Ciorsdaidh; Mackay, Nancy; Cameron, Ewan; Wilson, Sam

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human genome displays a rich fossil record of past gammaretrovirus infections, yet no current epidemic is evident, despite environmental exposure to viruses that infect human cells in vitro. Feline leukemia viruses (FeLVs) rank high on this list, but neither domestic nor workplace exposure has been associated with detectable serological responses. Nonspecific inactivation of gammaretroviruses by serum factors appears insufficient to explain these observations. To investigate further, we explored the susceptibilities of primary and established human cell lines to FeLV-B, the most likely zoonotic variant. Fully permissive infection was common in cancer-derived cell lines but was also a feature of nontransformed keratinocytes and lung fibroblasts. Cells of hematopoietic origin were generally less permissive and formed discrete groups on the basis of high or low intracellular protein expression and virion release. Potent repression was observed in primary human blood mononuclear cells and a subset of leukemia cell lines. However, the early steps of reverse transcription and integration appear to be unimpaired in nonpermissive cells. FeLV-B was subject to G→A hypermutation with a predominant APOBEC3G signature in partially permissive cells but was not mutated in permissive cells or in nonpermissive cells that block secondary viral spread. Distinct cellular barriers that protect primary human blood cells are likely to be important in protection against zoonotic infection with FeLV. IMPORTANCE Domestic exposure to gammaretroviruses such as feline leukemia viruses (FeLVs) occurs worldwide, but the basis of human resistance to infection remains incompletely understood. The potential threat is evident from the human genome sequence, which reveals many past epidemics of gammaretrovirus infection, and from recent cross-species jumps of gammaretroviruses from rodents to primates and marsupials. This study examined resistance to infection at the cellular level

  10. Barriers to Infection of Human Cells by Feline Leukemia Virus: Insights into Resistance to Zoonosis.

    PubMed

    Terry, Anne; Kilbey, Anna; Naseer, Asif; Levy, Laura S; Ahmad, Shamim; Watts, Ciorsdaidh; Mackay, Nancy; Cameron, Ewan; Wilson, Sam; Neil, James C

    2017-03-01

    The human genome displays a rich fossil record of past gammaretrovirus infections, yet no current epidemic is evident, despite environmental exposure to viruses that infect human cells in vitro Feline leukemia viruses (FeLVs) rank high on this list, but neither domestic nor workplace exposure has been associated with detectable serological responses. Nonspecific inactivation of gammaretroviruses by serum factors appears insufficient to explain these observations. To investigate further, we explored the susceptibilities of primary and established human cell lines to FeLV-B, the most likely zoonotic variant. Fully permissive infection was common in cancer-derived cell lines but was also a feature of nontransformed keratinocytes and lung fibroblasts. Cells of hematopoietic origin were generally less permissive and formed discrete groups on the basis of high or low intracellular protein expression and virion release. Potent repression was observed in primary human blood mononuclear cells and a subset of leukemia cell lines. However, the early steps of reverse transcription and integration appear to be unimpaired in nonpermissive cells. FeLV-B was subject to G→A hypermutation with a predominant APOBEC3G signature in partially permissive cells but was not mutated in permissive cells or in nonpermissive cells that block secondary viral spread. Distinct cellular barriers that protect primary human blood cells are likely to be important in protection against zoonotic infection with FeLV.IMPORTANCE Domestic exposure to gammaretroviruses such as feline leukemia viruses (FeLVs) occurs worldwide, but the basis of human resistance to infection remains incompletely understood. The potential threat is evident from the human genome sequence, which reveals many past epidemics of gammaretrovirus infection, and from recent cross-species jumps of gammaretroviruses from rodents to primates and marsupials. This study examined resistance to infection at the cellular level with the most

  11. More Human than Human.

    PubMed

    Lawrence, David

    2017-07-01

    Within the literature surrounding nonhuman animals on the one hand and cognitively disabled humans on the other, there is much discussion of where beings that do not satisfy the criteria for personhood fit in our moral deliberations. In the future, we may face a different but related problem: that we might create (or cause the creation of) beings that not only satisfy but exceed these criteria. The question becomes whether these are minimal criteria, or hierarchical, such that those who fulfill them to greater degree should be afforded greater consideration. This article questions the validity and necessity of drawing divisions among beings that satisfy the minimum requirements for personhood; considering how future beings-intelligent androids, synthezoids, even alternate-substrate sentiences-might fit alongside the "baseline" human. I ask whether these alternate beings ought to be considered different to us, and why this may or may not matter in terms of a notion of "human community." The film Blade Runner, concerned in large part with humanity and its key synthezoid antagonist Roy Batty, forms a framing touchstone for my discussion. Batty is stronger, faster, more resilient, and more intelligent than Homo sapiens. His exploits, far beyond the capability of normal humans, are contrasted with his frailty and transient lifespan, his aesthetic appreciation of the sights he has seen, and his burgeoning empathy. Not for nothing does his creator within the mythos term him "more human than human."

  12. Correlation between PLD repair capacity and the survival curve of human fibroblasts in exponential growth phase: analysis in terms of several parameters

    SciTech Connect

    Fertil, B.; Deschavanne, P.J.; Debieu, D.; Malaise, E.P.

    1988-10-01

    Published data on the in vitro radiosensitivity of 46 nontransformed fibroblasts of different genetic origins studied in plateau phase with immediate or delayed plating were used to investigate to what extent potentially lethal damage repair capacity is related to intrinsic radiosensitivity (i.e., irradiated in exponential growth phase). While most of the survival curve analysis is conducted in terms of D0, Dq, and the mean inactivation dose D, some of the data are also discussed in terms of the linear-quadratic model parameter alpha. Using D it is shown that: (i) the radiosensitivity of human fibroblasts in exponential growth phase does not significantly differ from that of plateau-phase fibroblasts with immediate plating; (ii) the radiosensitivity of plateau-phase cells with delayed plating is correlated to the radiosensitivity of cells with immediate plating: the more radioresistant the cell strain in exponential growth phase, the higher its repair capacity; (iii) the repair capacity of the cell strains is related to their genetic origin. In conclusion, we suggest that the survival curve of growing cells depends on the repair capacity of the cells.

  13. Proteasome-Dependent Degradation of Daxx by the Viral E1B-55K Protein in Human Adenovirus-Infected Cells ▿

    PubMed Central

    Schreiner, Sabrina; Wimmer, Peter; Sirma, Hüseyin; Everett, Roger D.; Blanchette, Paola; Groitl, Peter; Dobner, Thomas

    2010-01-01

    The death-associated protein Daxx found in PML (promyelocytic leukemia protein) nuclear bodies (PML-NBs) is involved in transcriptional regulation and cellular intrinsic antiviral resistence against incoming viruses. We found that knockdown of Daxx in a nontransformed human hepatocyte cell line using RNA interference (RNAi) techniques results in significantly increased adenoviral (Ad) replication, including enhanced viral mRNA synthesis and viral protein expression. This Daxx restriction imposed upon adenovirus growth is counteracted by early protein E1B-55K (early region 1B 55-kDa protein), a multifunctional regulator of cell-cycle-independent Ad5 replication. The viral protein binds to Daxx and induces its degradation through a proteasome-dependent pathway. We show that this process is independent of Ad E4orf6 (early region 4 open reading frame 6), known to promote the proteasomal degradation of cellular p53, Mre11, DNA ligase IV, and integrin α3 in combination with E1B-55K. These results illustrate the importance of the PML-NB-associated factor Daxx in virus growth restriction and suggest that E1B-55K antagonizes innate antiviral activities of Daxx and PML-NBs to stimulate viral replication at a posttranslational level. PMID:20484509

  14. Low cytotoxicity of inorganic nanotubes and fullerene-like nanostructures in human bronchial epithelial cells: relation to inflammatory gene induction and antioxidant response.

    PubMed

    Pardo, Michal; Shuster-Meiseles, Timor; Levin-Zaidman, Smadar; Rudich, Assaf; Rudich, Yinon

    2014-03-18

    The cytotoxicity of tungsten disulfide nano tubes (INT-WS2) and inorganic fullerene-like molybdenum disulfide (IF-MoS2) nanoparticles (NPs) used in industrial and medical applications was evaluated in comparison to standard environmental particulate matter. The IF-MoS2 and INT-WS2 reside in vesicles/inclusion bodies, suggestive of endocytic vesicles. In cells representing the respiratory, immune and metabolic systems, both IF-MoS2 and INT-WS2 NPs remained nontoxic compared to equivalent concentrations (up to 100 μg/mL in the medium) of silica dioxide (SiO2), diesel engine-derived and carbon black NPs, which induced cell death. Associating with this biocompatibility of IF-MoS2\\INT-WS2, we demonstrate in nontransformed human bronchial cells (NL-20) relative low induction of the pro-inflammatory cytokines IL-1β, IL-6, IL-8, and TNF-α. Moreover, IF-MoS2 and INT-WS2 activated antioxidant response as measured by the antioxidant response element (ARE) using a luciferase reporter, and induced Nrf2-mediated Phase II detoxification genes. Collectively, our findings suggest that the lower cytotoxicity of IF-MoS2 and INT-WS2 NPs does not reflect general biological inertness. Rather, compared to other NP's, it likely results from decreased pro-inflammatory activation, but a comparable significant capacity to induce protective antioxidant/detoxification defense mechanisms.

  15. A high-affinity and specific carrier-mediated mechanism for uptake of thiamine pyrophosphate by human colonic epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Nabokina, Svetlana M; Said, Hamid M

    2012-08-01

    All mammals require exogenous sources of thiamine (vitamin B1), as they lack the ability to synthesize the vitamin. These sources are dietary and bacterial (the latter is in reference to the vitamin, which is synthesized by the normal microflora of the large intestine). Bacterially generated thiamine exists in the free, as well as the pyrophosphorylated [thiamine pyrophosphate (TPP)], form. With no (or very little) phosphatase activity in the colon, we hypothesized that the bacterially generated TPP can also be taken up by colonocytes. To test this hypothesis, we examined [(3)H]TPP uptake in the human-derived, nontransformed colonic epithelial NCM460 cells and purified apical membrane vesicles isolated from the colon of human organ donors. Uptake of TPP by NCM460 cells occurred without metabolic alterations in the transported substrate and 1) was pH- and Na(+)-independent, but energy-dependent, 2) was saturable as a function of concentration (apparent K(m) = 0.157 ± 0.028 μM), 3) was highly specific for TPP and not affected by free thiamine (or its analogs) or by thiamine monophosphate and unrelated folate derivatives, 4) was adaptively regulated by extracellular substrate (TPP) level via what appears to be a transcriptionally mediated mechanism(s), and 5) appeared to be influenced by an intracellular Ca(2+)/calmodulin-mediated regulatory pathway. These findings suggest the involvement of a carrier-mediated mechanism for TPP uptake by colonic NCM460 cells, which was further confirmed by results from studies of native human colonic apical membrane vesicles. The results also suggest that the bacterially synthesized TPP in the large intestine is bioavailable and may contribute to overall body homeostasis of vitamin B1 and, especially, to the cellular nutrition of the local colonocytes.

  16. Human Development, Human Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smillie, David

    One of the truly remarkable events in human evolution is the unprecedented increase in the size of the brain of "Homo" over a brief span of 2 million years. It would appear that some significant selective pressure or opportunity presented itself to this branch of the hominid line and caused a rapid increase in the brain, introducing a…

  17. Human Development, Human Evolution.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Smillie, David

    One of the truly remarkable events in human evolution is the unprecedented increase in the size of the brain of "Homo" over a brief span of 2 million years. It would appear that some significant selective pressure or opportunity presented itself to this branch of the hominid line and caused a rapid increase in the brain, introducing a…

  18. Humanizing the Humanities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Peters, Dennis

    1983-01-01

    Reviews some of the steps taken at Shoreline Community College to develop cooperative programs involving vocational and academic faculty, including the creation of a Humanities Advisory Council. Briefly describes some of the cooperative programs, e.g., symposia on critical issues in higher education, guest lectures, and high school outreach. (AYC)

  19. CHR-2797: an antiproliferative aminopeptidase inhibitor that leads to amino acid deprivation in human leukemic cells.

    PubMed

    Krige, David; Needham, Lindsey A; Bawden, Lindsay J; Flores, Nicolas; Farmer, Hannah; Miles, Lauren E C; Stone, Erica; Callaghan, Juliana; Chandler, Stephen; Clark, Vanessa L; Kirwin-Jones, Patricia; Legris, Valérie; Owen, Jo; Patel, Thakor; Wood, Steve; Box, Gary; Laber, David; Odedra, Rajesh; Wright, Annette; Wood, L Michael; Eccles, Suzanne A; Bone, Elisabeth A; Ayscough, Andrew; Drummond, Alan H

    2008-08-15

    CHR-2797 is a novel metalloenzyme inhibitor that is converted into a pharmacologically active acid product (CHR-79888) inside cells. CHR-79888 is a potent inhibitor of a number of intracellular aminopeptidases, including leucine aminopeptidase. CHR-2797 exerts antiproliferative effects against a range of tumor cell lines in vitro and in vivo and shows selectivity for transformed over nontransformed cells. Its antiproliferative effects are at least 300 times more potent than the prototypical aminopeptidase inhibitor, bestatin. However, the mechanism by which inhibition of these enzymes leads to proliferative changes is not understood. Gene expression microarrays were used to profile changes in mRNA expression levels in the human promyelocytic leukemia cell line HL-60 treated with CHR-2797. This analysis showed that CHR-2797 treatment induced a transcriptional response indicative of amino acid depletion, the amino acid deprivation response, which involves up-regulation of amino acid synthetic genes, transporters, and tRNA synthetases. These changes were confirmed in other leukemic cell lines sensitive to the antiproliferative effects of CHR-2797. Furthermore, CHR-2797 treatment inhibited phosphorylation of mTOR substrates and reduced protein synthesis in HL-60 cells, both also indicative of amino acid depletion. Treatment with CHR-2797 led to an increase in the concentration of intracellular small peptides, the substrates of aminopeptidases. It is suggested that aminopeptidase inhibitors, such as CHR-2797 and bestatin, deplete sensitive tumor cells of amino acids by blocking protein recycling, and this generates an antiproliferative effect. CHR-2797 is orally bioavailable and currently undergoing phase II clinical investigation in the treatment of myeloid leukemia.

  20. Humanity and human DNA.

    PubMed

    Mattei, Jean-François

    2012-10-01

    Genetics has marked the second half of the 20th century by addressing such formidable problems as the identification of our genes and their role, their interaction with the environment, and even their therapeutic uses. The identification of genes raises questions about differences between humans and non-humans, as well as about the evolution towards trans-humanism and post-humanism. In practise, however, the main question concerns the limits of prenatal genetic diagnosis, not only on account of the seriousness of the affections involved but also because of the choice to be made between following-up the medical indication and engaging in a systematic public health strategy aimed at eliminating children with certain handicaps. History reminds us that genetic science has already been misused by political forces influenced by the ideas of eugenics, particularly in the Nazi period. We may wonder whether it is reasonable to formulate a judgement on the life of a child yet to be born, merely on the basis of a DNA analysis. My experience as a practising geneticist and my involvement in French politics forces me to stress the dangers of a new eugenics hiding behind a medical mask. As demonstrated by epigenetics, human beings cannot be reduced to their DNA alone. In our society, one of the problems concerns individuals whose lives may be considered by some as simply not worth living. Another problem is the place and the social significance of the handicapped amongst us. Fortunately, recent progresses in gene therapy, biotherapy, and even pharmacology, appear to be opening up promising therapeutic perspectives. We should bear in mind that the chief vocation of medical genetics, which fully belongs to the art of medicine, is to heal and to cure. This is precisely where genetics should concentrate its efforts software.

  1. The Single IgG IL-1 related receptor (Sigirr) controls Toll-like receptor responses in differentiated human intestinal epithelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Mohammed A.; Sham, Ho Pan; Bergstrom, Kirk; Huang, Jingtian T.; Steiner, Theodore S.; Assi, Kiran; Salh, Bill; Tai, Isabella T.; Li, Xiaoxia; Vallance, Bruce A.

    2013-01-01

    Intestinal epithelial cells (IEC) are constantly exposed to enteric microbes. Although IECs express TLRs that recognize bacterial products, activation of these TLRs is strictly controlled through poorly understood mechanisms, producing a state of hypo-responsiveness and preventing unwanted inflammation. The Single IgG IL-1 related receptor (Sigirr) is a negative regulator of TLRs that is expressed by IEC and recently shown to inhibit experimental colitis. However, the importance of Sigirr in IEC hyporesponsiveness and its distribution within the human colon is unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of Sigirr in regulating epithelial specific TLR responses and characterize its expression in colonic biopsies. Transformed and non-transformed human IEC were cultured as monolayers. Transient gene silencing and stable over-expression of Sigirr was performed to assess innate IEC responses. Sigirr expression in human colonic biopsies was examined by immunohistochemistry. Bacterial infection of IEC and exposure to flagellin transiently decreased Sigirr protein expression, concurrent with secretion of the neutrophil chemokine IL-8. Sigirr gene silencing augmented chemokine responses to bacterial flagellin, Pam3Cys and the cytokine IL-1β. Conversely, stable over-expression of Sigirr diminished NF-κB mediated IL-8 responses to TLR ligands. We also found that Sigirr expression increased as IECs differentiated in culture. This observation was confirmed in biopsy sections, where Sigirr expression within colonic crypts was prominent in IECs at the apex and diminished at the base. Our findings show that Sigirr broadly regulates innate responses in differentiated human IEC, and may therefore modulate epithelial involvement in infectious and inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:20130217

  2. PCR phenotyping of cytokines, growth factors and their receptors and bone matrix proteins in human osteoblast-like cell lines.

    PubMed

    Bilbe, G; Roberts, E; Birch, M; Evans, D B

    1996-11-01

    the analysis of the molecular mechanisms, whereby the target gene of interest is modulated in a model cell line. In addition, this study indicates that at least based on the transcript expression profile of the factors analyzed, human osteosarcoma-derived osteoblast-like cells are useful as models for their nontransformed counterparts.

  3. Utility of Nicotiana tabacum cell suspension cultures expressing human CYP1A1, CYP1A2 and CYP3A4 to study the oxidative metabolism of the herbicide 14C-fluometuron.

    PubMed

    Breuer, Maren Anne; Schmidt, Burkhard; Schuphan, Ingolf

    2009-01-01

    The metabolism and biotransformation of the (14)C-labeled phenylurea herbicide fluometuron was examined using tobacco cell suspension cultures transformed separately with human cyp1a1, cyp1a2 and cyp3a4, and corresponding non-transformed cultures in order to screen and predict metabolic patterns. Experimental parameters modified were concentration of (14)C-fluometuron, incubation period, and additional application of inhibitor carbaryl. Media and cell extracts were analyzed by radio-TLC and radio-HPLC, isolated metabolites by LC-MS, and non-extractable residues by combustion. During 48 hours, the CYP1A1 expressing cultures metabolized 90.0 % of applied fluometuron, while the non-transgenic controls transformed 67.0 %. The CYP1A2 expressing cultures exhibited highest rates (95.1 %), CYP3A4 expressing cultures lowest rates (43.0 %). The primary metabolites identified were mono-demethyl (main metabolite in controls) and di-demethyl fluometuron (mainly in CYP1A2 cultures), besides a non-identified primary product (mainly in CYP1A1 cultures); metabolic profiles differed distinctly among cultures. After addition of carbaryl, rates of fluometuron decreased noticeably in controls and not in CYP3A4 expressing cultures. This may indicate inhibition of endogenous tobacco P450s involved in fluometuron metabolism but not of CYP3A4. Additionally, the P450-transgenic cultures proved to be valuable tools to produce large amounts of metabolites for thorough identification.

  4. Discoidin Domain Receptor 2 Mediates Collagen-Induced Activation of Membrane-Type 1 Matrix Metalloproteinase in Human Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Majkowska, Iwona; Shitomi, Yasuyuki; Ito, Noriko; Gray, Nathanael S; Itoh, Yoshifumi

    2017-03-07

    Membrane-Type 1 Matrix Metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP) is a membrane-bound MMP that is highly expressed in cells with invading capacity including fibroblasts and invasive cancer cell. A potential physiological stimulus for MT1-MMP expression is fibrillar collagen, and it has been shown that it upregulates both MT1-MMP gene and functions in various cell types. However, the mechanisms of collagen-mediated MT1-MMP activation is not clearly understood. In this study we identified discoidin domain receptor 2 (DDR2) as a crucial receptor that mediates this process in human fibroblasts. Knocking down DDR2, but not β1 integrin subunit, a common subunit for all collagen-binding integrins, inhibited collagen-induced activation of proMMP-2 and upregulation of MT1-MMP at the gene and protein level. Interestingly DDR2 knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of DDR2 also inhibited MT1-MMP-dependent cellular degradation of collagen film, suggesting that cell surface collagen degradation by MT1-MMP involves DDR2-mediated collagen signalling. This DDR2-mediated mechanism is only present in non-transformed mesenchymal cells, as collagen-induced MT1-MMP activation in HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells and MT1-MMP function in MDA-MB231 breast cancer cells were not affected by DDR kinase inhibition. DDR2 activation was found to be noticeably more effective when cells were stimulated by collagen without non-helical telopeptides region compared to intact collagen fibrils. Those data suggest that DDR2 is a microenvironmental sensor that regulates fibroblasts migration in collagen-rich environment.

  5. A tumor-promoting mechanism mediated by retrotransposon-encoded reverse transcriptase is active in human transformed cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Sciamanna, Ilaria; Gualtieri, Alberto; Cossetti, Cristina; Osimo, Emanuele Felice; Ferracin, Manuela; Macchia, Gianfranco; Aricò, Eleonora; Prosseda, Gianni; Vitullo, Patrizia; Misteli, Tom; Spadafora, Corrado

    2013-01-01

    LINE-1 elements make up the most abundant retrotransposon family in the human genome. Full-length LINE-1 elements encode a reverse transcriptase (RT) activity required for their own retrotranpsosition as well as that of non-autonomous Alu elements. LINE-1 are poorly expressed in normal cells and abundantly in cancer cells. Decreasing RT activity in cancer cells, by either LINE-1-specific RNA interference, or by RT inhibitory drugs, was previously found to reduce proliferation and promote differentiation and to antagonize tumor growth in animal models. Here we have investigated how RT exerts these global regulatory functions. We report that the RT inhibitor efavirenz (EFV) selectively downregulates proliferation of transformed cell lines, while exerting only mild effects on non-transformed cells; this differential sensitivity matches a differential RT abundance, which is high in the former and undetectable in the latter. Using CsCl density gradients, we selectively identify Alu and LINE-1 containing DNA:RNA hybrid molecules in cancer but not in normal cells. Remarkably, hybrid molecules fail to form in tumor cells treated with EFV under the same conditions that repress proliferation and induce the reprogramming of expression profiles of coding genes, microRNAs (miRNAs) and ultraconserved regions (UCRs). The RT-sensitive miRNAs and UCRs are significantly associated with Alu sequences. The results suggest that LINE-1-encoded RT governs the balance between single-stranded and double-stranded RNA production. In cancer cells the abundant RT reverse-transcribes retroelement-derived mRNAs forming RNA:DNA hybrids. We propose that this impairs the formation of double-stranded RNAs and the ensuing production of small regulatory RNAs, with a direct impact on gene expression. RT inhibition restores the ‘normal’ small RNA profile and the regulatory networks that depend on them. Thus, the retrotransposon-encoded RT drives a previously unrecognized mechanism crucial to the

  6. Expression of 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase enzymes in human osteosarcoma: potential role in pathogenesis and as targets for treatments.

    PubMed

    Patel, Pushpa; Hardy, Rowan; Sumathi, Vaiyapuri; Bartle, Gillian; Kindblom, Lars-Gunnar; Grimer, Robert; Bujalska, Iwona; Stewart, Paul M; Rabbitt, Elizabeth; Gittoes, Neil J L; Cooper, Mark S

    2012-08-01

    Osteosarcoma (OS) is a primary malignant tumour of bone occurring predominantly in children and young adults. Despite chemotherapy, relapse is common and mortality remains high. Non-transformed osteoblasts are highly sensitive to glucocorticoids, which reduce proliferation and induce apoptosis. Previously, we observed that OS cells, but not normal osteoblasts, express 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 2 (11β-HSD2). This enzyme inactivates cortisol (active) to cortisone (inactive) and expression of 11β-HSD2 renders OS cells resistant to glucocorticoids. By contrast, the related enzyme 11β-HSD1 converts cortisone to cortisol and reduces OS cell proliferation in vitro. Some synthetic glucocorticoids (e.g. dehydrodexamethasone (DHD), inactive counterpart of dexamethasone (DEX)) have been reported to be activated by 11β-HSD2. We therefore investigated expression and enzymatic activity of 11β-HSD isozymes in human OS tissue, determined whether 11β-HSD expression has prognostic value in the response to therapy, and evaluated the potential use of synthetic glucocorticoids to selectively target OS cells. OS samples expressed both 11β-HSD1 and 11β-HSD2. 11β-HSD1 expression in pretreatment biopsy specimens positively correlated with primary tumour size. Expression and activity of 11β-HSD1 in post-treatment biopsies were unrelated to the degree of tumour necrosis following chemotherapy. However, high 11β-HSD2 expression in post-treatment biopsies correlated with a poor response to therapy. OS cells that expressed 11β-HSD2 inactivated endogenous glucocorticoids; but these cells were also able to generate DEX from DHD. These results suggest that OS treatment response is related to 11β-HSD2 enzyme expression. Furthermore, OS cells expressing this enzyme could be targeted by treatment with synthetic glucocorticoids that are selectively reactivated by the enzyme.

  7. Human cell toxicogenomic analysis linking reactive oxygen species to the toxicity of monohaloacetic acid drinking water disinfection byproducts.

    PubMed

    Pals, Justin; Attene-Ramos, Matias S; Xia, Menghang; Wagner, Elizabeth D; Plewa, Michael J

    2013-01-01

    Chronic exposure to drinking water disinfection byproducts has been linked to adverse health risks. The monohaloacetic acids (monoHAAs) are generated as byproducts during the disinfection of drinking water and are cytotoxic, genotoxic, mutagenic, and teratogenic. Iodoacetic acid toxicity was mitigated by antioxidants, suggesting the involvement of oxidative stress. Other monoHAAs may share a similar mode of action. Each monoHAA generated a significant concentration-response increase in the expression of a β-lactamase reporter under the control of the antioxidant response element (ARE). The monoHAAs generated oxidative stress with a rank order of iodoacetic acid (IAA) > bromoacetic acid (BAA) ≫ chloroacetic acid (CAA); this rank order was observed with other toxicological end points. Toxicogenomic analysis was conducted with a nontransformed human intestinal epithelial cell line (FHs 74 Int). Exposure to the monoHAAs altered the transcription levels of multiple oxidative stress responsive genes, indicating that each exposure generated oxidative stress. The transcriptome profiles showed an increase in thioredoxin reductase 1 (TXNRD1) and sulfiredoxin (SRXN1), suggesting peroxiredoxin proteins had been oxidized during monoHAA exposures. Three possible sources of reactive oxygen species were identified, the hypohalous acid generating peroxidase enzymes lactoperoxidase (LPO) and myeloperoxidase (MPO), nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate (NADPH)-dependent oxidase 5 (NOX5), and PTGS2 (COX-2) mediated arachidonic acid metabolism. Each monoHAA exposure caused an increase in COX-2 mRNA levels. These data provide a functional association between monoHAA exposure and adverse health outcomes such as oxidative stress, inflammation, and cancer.

  8. Identification of WEE1 as a potential molecular target in cancer cells by RNAi screening of the human tyrosine kinome

    PubMed Central

    Murrow, Lyndsay M.; Garimella, Sireesha V.; Jones, Tamara L.; Caplen, Natasha J.; Lipkowitz, Stanley

    2012-01-01

    Breast cancers can be classified into those that express the estrogen (ER) and progesterone (PR) receptors, those with ERBB2 (HER-2/Neu) amplification, and those without expression of ER, PR, or amplification of ERBB2 (referred to as triple-negative or basal-like breast cancer). In order to identify potential molecular targets in breast cancer, we performed a synthetic siRNA-mediated RNAi screen of the human tyrosine kinome. A primary RNAi screen conducted in the triple-negative/basal-like breast cancer cell line MDA-MB231 followed by secondary RNAi screens and further studies in this cell line and two additional triple-negative/basal-like breast cancer cell lines, BT20 and HCC1937, identified the G2/M checkpoint protein, WEE1, as a potential therapeutic target. Similar sensitivity to WEE1 inhibition was observed in cell lines from all subtypes of breast cancer. RNAi-mediated silencing or small compound inhibition of WEE1 in breast cancer cell lines resulted in an increase in γH2AX levels, arrest in the S-phase of the cell cycle, and a significant decrease in cell proliferation. WEE1-inhibited cells underwent apoptosis as demonstrated by positive Annexin V staining, increased sub-G1 DNA content, apoptotic morphology, caspase activation, and rescue by the pan-caspase inhibitor, Z-VAD-FMK. In contrast, the non-transformed mammary epithelial cell line, MCF10A, did not exhibit any of these downstream effects following WEE1 silencing or inhibition. These results identify WEE1 as a potential molecular target in breast cancer. PMID:19821025

  9. A tumor-promoting mechanism mediated by retrotransposon-encoded reverse transcriptase is active in human transformed cell lines.

    PubMed

    Sciamanna, Ilaria; Gualtieri, Alberto; Cossetti, Cristina; Osimo, Emanuele Felice; Ferracin, Manuela; Macchia, Gianfranco; Aricò, Eleonora; Prosseda, Gianni; Vitullo, Patrizia; Misteli, Tom; Spadafora, Corrado

    2013-12-01

    LINE-1 elements make up the most abundant retrotransposon family in the human genome. Full-length LINE-1 elements encode a reverse transcriptase (RT) activity required for their own retrotranpsosition as well as that of non-autonomous Alu elements. LINE-1 are poorly expressed in normal cells and abundantly in cancer cells. Decreasing RT activity in cancer cells, by either LINE-1-specific RNA interference, or by RT inhibitory drugs, was previously found to reduce proliferation and promote differentiation and to antagonize tumor growth in animal models. Here we have investigated how RT exerts these global regulatory functions. We report that the RT inhibitor efavirenz (EFV) selectively downregulates proliferation of transformed cell lines, while exerting only mild effects on non-transformed cells; this differential sensitivity matches a differential RT abundance, which is high in the former and undetectable in the latter. Using CsCl density gradients, we selectively identify Alu and LINE-1 containing DNA:RNA hybrid molecules in cancer but not in normal cells. Remarkably, hybrid molecules fail to form in tumor cells treated with EFV under the same conditions that repress proliferation and induce the reprogramming of expression profiles of coding genes, microRNAs (miRNAs) and ultraconserved regions (UCRs). The RT-sensitive miRNAs and UCRs are significantly associated with Alu sequences. The results suggest that LINE-1-encoded RT governs the balance between single-stranded and double-stranded RNA production. In cancer cells the abundant RT reverse-transcribes retroelement-derived mRNAs forming RNA:DNA hybrids. We propose that this impairs the formation of double-stranded RNAs and the ensuing production of small regulatory RNAs, with a direct impact on gene expression. RT inhibition restores the 'normal' small RNA profile and the regulatory networks that depend on them. Thus, the retrotransposon-encoded RT drives a previously unrecognized mechanism crucial to the

  10. The effect of neighboring cells on the stiffness of cancerous and non-cancerous human mammary epithelial cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guo, Xinyi; Bonin, Keith; Scarpinato, Karin; Guthold, Martin

    2014-10-01

    Using an Atomic Force Microscope (AFM) with a 5.3 μm diameter spherical probe, we determined mechanical properties of individual human mammary epithelial cells. The cells were derived from a pair of cell lines that mimic cell progression through four phases of neoplastic transformation: normal (non-transformed), immortal, tumorigenic, and metastatic. Measurements on cells in all four phases were taken over both the cytoplasmic and nuclear regions. Moreover, the measurements were made for cells in different microenvironments as related to cell-cell contacts: isolated cells; cells residing on the periphery of a contiguous cell monolayer; and cells on the inside of a contiguous cell monolayer. By fitting the AFM force versus indentation curves to a Hertz model, we determined the pseudo-elastic Young’s modulus, E. Combining all data for the cellular subregions (over nucleus and cytoplasm) and the different cell microenvironments, we obtained stiffness values for normal, immortal, tumorigenic, and metastatic cells of 870 Pa, 870 Pa, 490 Pa, and 580 Pa, respectively. That is, cells become softer as they advance to the tumorigenic phase and then stiffen somewhat in the final step to metastatic cells. We also found a distinct contrast in the influence of a cell’s microenvironment on cell stiffness. Normal mammary epithelial cells inside a monolayer are stiffer than peripheral cells, which are stiffer than isolated cells. However, the microenvironment had a slight, opposite effect on tumorigenic and little effect on immortal and metastatic cell stiffness. Thus, the stiffness of cancer cells is less sensitive to the microenvironment than normal cells. Our results show that the mechanical properties of a cell can depend on cancer progression and microenvironment (cell-cell interactions).

  11. Human Augmentics: augmenting human evolution.

    PubMed

    Kenyon, Robert V; Leigh, Jason

    2011-01-01

    Human Augmentics (HA) refers to technologies for expanding the capabilities, and characteristics of humans. One can think of Human Augmentics as the driving force in the non-biological evolution of humans. HA devices will provide technology to compensate for human biological limitations either natural or acquired. The strengths of HA lie in its applicability to all humans. Its interoperability enables the formation of ecosystems whereby augmented humans can draw from other realms such as "the Cloud" and other augmented humans for strength. The exponential growth in new technologies portends such a system but must be designed for interaction through the use of open-standards and open-APIs for system development. We discuss the conditions needed for HA to flourish with an emphasis on devices that provide non-biological rehabilitation.

  12. Human Parvoviruses.

    PubMed

    Qiu, Jianming; Söderlund-Venermo, Maria; Young, Neal S

    2017-01-01

    Parvovirus B19 (B19V) and human bocavirus 1 (HBoV1), members of the large Parvoviridae family, are human pathogens responsible for a variety of diseases. For B19V in particular, host features determine disease manifestations. These viruses are prevalent worldwide and are culturable in vitro, and serological and molecular assays are available but require careful interpretation of results. Additional human parvoviruses, including HBoV2 to -4, human parvovirus 4 (PARV4), and human bufavirus (BuV) are also reviewed. The full spectrum of parvovirus disease in humans has yet to be established. Candidate recombinant B19V vaccines have been developed but may not be commercially feasible. We review relevant features of the molecular and cellular biology of these viruses, and the human immune response that they elicit, which have allowed a deep understanding of pathophysiology. Copyright © 2016 American Society for Microbiology.

  13. Human Rights/Human Needs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Canning, Cynthia

    1978-01-01

    The faculty of Holy Names High School developed an interdisciplinary human rights program with school-wide activities focusing on three selected themes: the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights, in conjunction with Human Rights Week; Food; and Women. This article outlines major program activities. (SJL)

  14. Up-regulation of early growth response gene 1 (EGR-1) via ERK1/2 signals attenuates sulindac sulfide-mediated cytotoxicity in the human intestinal epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Moon, Yuseok Yang, Hyun; Kim, Yung Bu

    2007-09-01

    Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs) are used to relieve pain and inflammation and have also received considerable attention because of their preventive effects against human cancer. However, the drug application is sometimes limited by the severe gastrointestinal ulcers and mucosal complications. In the present study, NSAID sulindac sulfide was investigated for the cytotoxic injury in the intestinal epithelial cells in association with an immediate inducible factor, early growth response gene 1 (EGR-1). Previously we reported that sulindac sulfide can suppress tumor cell invasion by inducing EGR-1. Extending the previous study, EGR-1 induction by sulindac sulfide was observed both in the non-transformed and transformed human intestinal epithelial cell lines. In terms of signaling pathway, ERK1/2 MAP kinases and its substrate Elk-1 transcription factor were involved in the sulindac sulfide-induced EGR-1 gene expression. Moreover, sulindac sulfide stimulated the nuclear translocation of the transcription factor EGR-1, which was also mediated by ERK1/2 signaling pathway. The roles of EGR-1 signals in the apoptotic cell death were assessed in the intestinal epithelial cells. Suppression of EGR-1 expression retarded cellular growth and colony forming activity in the intestinal epithelial cells. Moreover, induced EGR-1 ameliorated sulindac sulfide-mediated apoptotic cell death and enhanced the cellular survival. Taken all together, sulindac sulfide activated ERK1/2 MAP kinases which then mediated EGR-1 induction and nuclear translocation, all of which played important roles in the cellular survival from NSAID-mediated cytotoxicity in the human intestinal epithelial cells, implicating the protective roles of EGR-1 in the NSAID-mediated mucosal injuries.

  15. Teaching humanism.

    PubMed

    Stern, David T; Cohen, Jordan J; Bruder, Ann; Packer, Barbara; Sole, Allison

    2008-01-01

    As the "passion that animates authentic professionalism," humanism must be infused into medical education and clinical care as a central feature of medicine's professionalism movement. In this article, we discuss a current definition of humanism in medicine. We will also provide detailed descriptions of educational programs intended to promote humanism at a number of medical schools in the United States (and beyond) and identify the key factors that make these programs effective. Common elements of programs that effectively teach humanism include: (1) opportunities for students to gain perspective in the lives of patients; (2) structured time for reflection on those experiences; and (3) focused mentoring to ensure that these events convert to positive, formative learning experiences. By describing educational experiences that both promote and sustain humanism in doctors, we hope to stimulate the thinking of other medical educators and to disseminate the impact of these innovative educational programs to help the profession meet its obligation to provide the public with humanistic physicians.

  16. Human cloning and human dignity.

    PubMed

    Birnbacher, Dieter

    2005-03-01

    Judging from the official documents dealing with the moral and legal aspects of human reproductive cloning there seems to be a nearly worldwide consensus that reproductive cloning is incompatible with human dignity. The certainty of this judgement is, however, not matched by corresponding arguments. Is the incompatibility of reproductive with human dignity an ultimate moral intuition closed to further argument? The paper considers several ways by which the intuition might be connected with more familiar applications of the concept of human dignity, and argues that there is no such connection. It concludes that the central objections to human reproductive cloning are not objections relating to dignity but objections relating to risk, especially the risks imposed on children born in the course of testing the method's safety.

  17. Human rights

    PubMed Central

    Powell, J Enoch

    1977-01-01

    What are human rights? In this article Enoch Powell, MP (a former Conservative Minister of Health), approaches this question through a critical discussion of Article 25 (I) of the United Nations Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Professor R S Downie in his accompanying commentary analyses Mr Powell's statements and takes up in particular Mr Powell's argument that claiming rights for one person entails compulsion on another person. In Professor Downie's view there is nothing in Article 25 (I) that cannot embody acceptable moral rights, the commonly accepted interpretation of that Article of the UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights which many people think is wholly acceptable. PMID:604483

  18. Human Cytochrome P450 2W1 Is Not Expressed in Adrenal Cortex and Is Only Rarely Expressed in Adrenocortical Carcinomas

    PubMed Central

    Nolé, Paola; Duijndam, Britt; Stenman, Adam; Juhlin, C. Christofer; Kozyra, Mikael; Larsson, Catharina; Ingelman-Sundberg, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Human cytochome P450 2W1 (CYP2W1) enzyme is expressed in fetal colon and in colon tumors. The level of expression is higher in colon metastases than in the parent tumors and the enzyme is a possible drug target for treatment of colorectal cancer, as demonstrated in mouse xenograft studies. A previous study published in this journal reported that CYP2W1 is highly expressed in normal and transformed adrenal tissue. However, adrenal expression of CYP2W1 protein was not seen in previous studies in our research group. To clarify this inconsistency, we have used qRT-PCR and Western blotting with CYP2W1-specific antibodies to probe a panel of 27 adrenocortical carcinomas and 35 normal adrenal cortex samples. CYP2W1 mRNA expression is seen in all samples. However, significant CYP2W1 protein expression was found in only one tumor sample (a testosterone-producing adrenocortical carcinoma) and not in any normal tissue. Differences in the specificity of the CYP2W1 antibodies used in the two studies may explain the apparent discrepancy. We conclude that normal adrenal tissue lacks P450 2W1 enzyme expression; also, adrenocortical carcinomas generally do not express the enzyme. This information thus underline the colon cancer specificity of CYP2W1 enzyme expression and has implications for the development of anti-colon cancer therapies based on CYP2W1 as a drug target, since 2W1-dependent bioactivation of prodrugs for CYP2W1 will not take place in normal adrenal tissue or other non-transformed tissues. PMID:27598485

  19. Overcoming Humanism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Guiliano, Louis; Davis, Robert Leonard

    1979-01-01

    Humanism cheats students because it gives them false ideas about their abilities and encourages them to aspire to unrealistic levels of achievement. It also reduces the level of performance that should be expected of teachers and paraprofessionals. (Author/IRT)

  20. Human expunction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klee, Robert

    2017-10-01

    Thomas Nagel in `The Absurd' (Nagel 1971) mentions the future expunction of the human species as a `metaphor' for our ability to see our lives from the outside, which he claims is one source of our sense of life's absurdity. I argue that the future expunction (not to be confused with extinction) of everything human - indeed of everything biological in a terran sense - is not a mere metaphor but a physical certainty under the laws of nature. The causal processes by which human expunction will take place are presented in some empirical detail, so that philosophers cannot dismiss it as merely speculative. I also argue that appeals to anthropic principles or to forms of mystical cosmology are of no plausible avail in the face of human expunction under the laws of physics.

  1. Human otoacariasis.

    PubMed

    Somayaji, K S Gangadhara; Rajeshwari, A

    2007-09-01

    Accidental entry of foreign bodies into the ear canal is very common. Animate foreign bodies constitute upto 14% of cases, majority being the cockroaches. Not many cases of ticks entering into human ears are found in the scientific literature. Even the available reports are from South Africa, Nepal, Malaysia, Chile and Srilanka. This Indian study discusses the occurence, clinical features, the methods adopted in the removal and the complications of tick infestation of human ear. A total of 144 cases of ticks entering the human ears were studied over a period of two years from Jan 2004 to Dec 2005. This report represents one of the largest recorded series of human otoacariasis available in the Indian literature.

  2. Human babesiosis.

    PubMed

    Rożej-Bielicka, Wioletta; Stypułkowska-Misiurewicz, Hanna; Gołąb, Elżbieta

    2015-01-01

    Babesiosis is an emerging parasitic, anthropo-zoonotic tick-borne disease, seldom diagnosed in humans. Caused by Protozoa, Babesia (also called Piroplasma) intraerytrocytic piriform microorganism. Infection of vertebrates is transmitted by ticks. Out of more than 100 Babesia species/genotypes described so far, only some were diagnosed in infected humans, mostly B. microti, B. divergens and B. venatorum (Babesia sp. EU1). Infection in humans is often asymptomatic or mild but is of a particular risk for asplenic individuals, those with congenital or acquired immunodeficiencies, and elderly. Infections transmitted with blood and blood products raise concerns in hemotherapy. Epidemiological situation of babesiosis varies around the world. In Europe, no increase in the number of cases was reported, but in the USA its prevalence is increasing and extension of endemic areas is observed. The aim of this publication is to describe the problems connected with the current epidemiological situation, diagnosis and treatment of human babesiosis with regard to clinical status of patients.

  3. Human Cloning

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-07-20

    not believe that noncoital, asexual reproduction , such as cloning, would be considered a fundamental right by the Supreme Court. A ban on human...society by “crossing the boundary from sexual to asexual reproduction , thus approving in principle the genetic manipulation and control of nascent human... reproductive cloning and, by a vote of 10 to 7, a four-year moratorium on cloning for medical research purposes. The ethical issues surrounding reproductive

  4. Human Endomucin

    PubMed Central

    Samulowitz, Ulrike; Kuhn, Annegret; Brachtendorf, Gertrud; Nawroth, Roman; Braun, Attila; Bankfalvi, Agnes; Böcker, Werner; Vestweber, Dietmar

    2002-01-01

    Endomucin is a typical sialomucin that we recently identified on the surface of mouse endothelial cells and on putative hematopoetic clusters of the dorsal aorta in the embryo. We have generated a panel of monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against the extracellular part of human endomucin and polyclonal antibodies against the cytoplasmic part. Using immunohistochemistry endomucin was specifically detected on endothelial cells of blood and lymphatic vessels of all analyzed human tissues. In addition, the polyclonal antibodies stained the epithelium of the epidermis as well as epithelial and myoepithelial cells of the eccrine and apocrine glands in the skin. This nonendothelial staining could only be seen with a subset of mAbs if the staining procedure was amplified. Although high endothelial venules (HEVs) were not significantly stained with mAbs against endomucin, the polyclonal antibodies clearly detected endomucin on HEVs in lymphatic organs of the mouse and human, suggesting HEV-specific glycosylation affecting recognition by the mAbs. Indeed, endomucin isolated from human and mouse lymphoid organs carried the MECA-79 epitope that defines a set of L-selectin ligands on HEVs called peripheral node addressins. We conclude that human and mouse endomucin are endothelial sialomucins with the potential to function as L-selectin ligands. PMID:12000719

  5. Human monkeypox.

    PubMed

    McCollum, Andrea M; Damon, Inger K

    2014-01-01

    Human monkeypox is a zoonotic Orthopoxvirus with a presentation similar to smallpox. Clinical differentiation of the disease from smallpox and varicella is difficult. Laboratory diagnostics are principal components to identification and surveillance of disease, and new tests are needed for a more precise and rapid diagnosis. The majority of human infections occur in Central Africa, where surveillance in rural areas with poor infrastructure is difficult but can be accomplished with evidence-guided tools and educational materials to inform public health workers of important principles. Contemporary epidemiological studies are needed now that populations do not receive routine smallpox vaccination. New therapeutics and vaccines offer hope for the treatment and prevention of monkeypox; however, more research must be done before they are ready to be deployed in an endemic setting. There is a need for more research in the epidemiology, ecology, and biology of the virus in endemic areas to better understand and prevent human infections.

  6. [Humanized childbirth].

    PubMed

    Kuo, Su-Chen

    2005-06-01

    Childbirth is a major event in a family. The expectant parent's perception of the childbirth experience influences his or her development as a parent. Making childbirth a positive and satisfying experience for women is the responsibility of health care providers. Women want to have physical and emotional privacy during labor and delivery, and to experience both in a friendly, comfortable environment. For women expected to undergo normal deliveries, humanized childbirth is one accessible approach. This article explores the definition and evolution of humanized childbirth and the care practice that it involves. It also explores birth plans and birth experiences, and the improvements necessary to routine labor practices to enable women to participate in decision making about their childbirth experiences. The author emphasizes that when health-care providers recognize the value of humanized childbirth and make changes accordingly, the dignity of women's childbirth experiences will be enhanced.

  7. Human Interface to Netcentricity

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-06-01

    to human communication involves communications initiated by applications or devices for human consumption. Examples include intelligent agents...AKO) are all examples of human to machine communication. • Human to Human: Human to human communication in a net-centric environment can be...the discussion will center on providing options for improving human to human communication . It is our position that an emphasis on human to human

  8. Human Trafficking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David McKay

    2011-01-01

    The shadowy, criminal nature of human trafficking makes evaluating its nature and scope difficult. The U.S. State Department and anti-trafficking groups estimate that worldwide some 27 million people are caught in a form of forced servitude today. Public awareness of modern-day slavery is gaining momentum thanks to new abolitionist efforts. Among…

  9. Humanizing Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cirillo, Michelle

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author explores the history and the mathematics used by Newton and Leibniz in their invention of calculus. The exploration of this topic is intended to show students that mathematics is a human invention. Suggestions are made to help teachers incorporate the mathematics and the history into their own lessons. (Contains 3…

  10. Classical Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Goodwin, Donn; And Others

    1975-01-01

    This article reports on a pilot course in humanities team-taught by three teachers, two from a senior high-school and one from a junior high-school, in Brookfield, Wisconsin. The specific subject matter is Greek and Roman culture. The curriculum is outlined and the basic reading list is included. (CLK)

  11. Nothing Human

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wharram, C. C.

    2014-01-01

    In this essay C. C. Wharram argues that Terence's concept of translation as a form of "contamination" anticipates recent developments in philosophy, ecology, and translation studies. Placing these divergent fields of inquiry into dialogue enables us read Terence's well-known statement "I am a human being--I deem nothing…

  12. Humanizing Shakespeare.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bernstein, Abraham

    The task of humanizing Shakespeare for high school seniors is not simple but may be done in a variety of ways, all intended to arouse student interest, curiosity, respect, and fondness for the Bard. Gimmicks such as bulletin board signs, pictures, maps, charts, and writings attract attention, as do letters to local newspapers reporting informally…

  13. Human Trafficking

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wilson, David McKay

    2011-01-01

    The shadowy, criminal nature of human trafficking makes evaluating its nature and scope difficult. The U.S. State Department and anti-trafficking groups estimate that worldwide some 27 million people are caught in a form of forced servitude today. Public awareness of modern-day slavery is gaining momentum thanks to new abolitionist efforts. Among…

  14. Humanizing Calculus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cirillo, Michelle

    2007-01-01

    In this article, the author explores the history and the mathematics used by Newton and Leibniz in their invention of calculus. The exploration of this topic is intended to show students that mathematics is a human invention. Suggestions are made to help teachers incorporate the mathematics and the history into their own lessons. (Contains 3…

  15. Nothing Human

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Wharram, C. C.

    2014-01-01

    In this essay C. C. Wharram argues that Terence's concept of translation as a form of "contamination" anticipates recent developments in philosophy, ecology, and translation studies. Placing these divergent fields of inquiry into dialogue enables us read Terence's well-known statement "I am a human being--I deem nothing…

  16. Human Rights in the Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harpham, Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    Human rights are rapidly entering the academic curriculum, with programs appearing all over the country--including at Duke, Harvard, Northeastern, and Stanford Universities; the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; the Universities of Chicago, of Connecticut, of California at Berkeley, and of Minnesota; and Trinity College. Most of these…

  17. Human Mind in Human Society.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Furth, Hans G.

    1996-01-01

    Claims that mind and mental objects form a societal mental structure enabling children to assimilate the society and become co-constructing members. Cites evidence that competence to create mental objects, symbols, and meanings separated from action is the evolutionary evolved human capacity for society and culture. Vygotsky's "natural"…

  18. Human Rights in the Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harpham, Geoffrey

    2012-01-01

    Human rights are rapidly entering the academic curriculum, with programs appearing all over the country--including at Duke, Harvard, Northeastern, and Stanford Universities; the Massachusetts Institute of Technology; the Universities of Chicago, of Connecticut, of California at Berkeley, and of Minnesota; and Trinity College. Most of these…

  19. Humane reproduction.

    PubMed

    1974-03-01

    Discusses social, economic, and humane considerations in population control. Mental health aspects of controlled fertility are considered in relation to the family's psychosocial and material resources, the effects of reproduction on the individual the family, and community, and the advantages and disadvantages of controlled reproduction. A distinction between family planning and population control is outlined. It is suggested that there is hardly a single more effective tool for preventing psychological disorders than the prevention of unwanted pregnancies. Analyses of educational and medical services and methods of birth control are presented. A comprehensive neighborhood health station, which would consolidate these services, is suggested. It is concluded that humane programs of reproduction would lead to a reconciliation of biological drives with a responsible concern for the quality of life.

  20. Human Locomotion

    PubMed Central

    Inman, Verne T.

    1966-01-01

    The development of bipedal plantigrade progression is a purely human, and apparently learned, accomplishment. Experimental findings confirm the hypothesis that the human body will integrate the motion of various segments of the body and control the activity of muscles to minimize energy expenditure. Movements which are integrated for this purpose include vertical displacement of the body, horizontal rotation of the pelvis, mediolateral pelvic tilt, flexion of the knee, plantar flexion of the ankle and foot, lateral displacement of the torso and rotation of the shoulder girdle. Raising and lowering the body results in gains and losses of potential energy, and acceleration and deceleration result in gains and losses of kinetic energy. The motions are so co-ordinated that a transfer of energy back and forth from kinetic to potential occurs during walking, which tends to minimize total energy expenditure as well as muscle work. ImagesFig. 1 PMID:5942660

  1. Human genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Carlson, E.A.

    1984-01-01

    This text provides full and balanced coverage of the concepts requisite for a thorough understanding of human genetics. Applications to both the individual and society are integrated throughout the lively and personal narrative, and the essential principles of heredity are clearly presented to prepare students for informed participation in public controversies. High-interest, controversial topics, including recombinant DNA technology, oncogenes, embryo transfer, environmental mutagens and carcinogens, IQ testing, and eugenics encourage understanding of important social issues.

  2. Human evolution.

    PubMed

    Wood, B

    1996-12-01

    The common ancestor of modern humans and the great apes is estimated to have lived between 5 and 8 Myrs ago, but the earliest evidence in the human, or hominid, fossil record is Ardipithecus ramidus, from a 4.5 Myr Ethiopian site. This genus was succeeded by Australopithecus, within which four species are presently recognised. All combine a relatively primitive postcranial skeleton, a dentition with expanded chewing teeth and a small brain. The most primitive species in our own genus, Homo habilis and Homo rudolfensis, are little advanced over the australopithecines and with hindsight their inclusion in Homo may not be appropriate. The first species to share a substantial number of features with later Homo is Homo ergaster, or 'early African Homo erectus', which appears in the fossil record around 2.0 Myr. Outside Africa, fossil hominids appear as Homo erectus-like hominids, in mainland Asia and in Indonesia close to 2 Myr ago; the earliest good evidence of 'archaic Homo' in Europe is dated at between 600-700 Kyr before the present. Anatomically modern human, or Homo sapiens, fossils are seen first in the fossil record in Africa around 150 Kyr ago. Taken together with molecular evidence on the extent of DNA variation, this suggests that the transition from 'archaic' to 'modern' Homo may have taken place in Africa.

  3. Human suffering.

    PubMed

    1992-12-01

    10 measures of quality of life are used to rank 141 countries in the International Human Suffering Index (HSI). The Index differentiates between extreme, high, moderate, and minimal levels of human suffering. Social welfare is the sum of 10 measures: life expectancy, daily caloric intake, clean drinking water, infant immunization, secondary school enrollment, gross national product per capita, the rate of inflation, communication technology (i.e., telephones), political freedom, and civil rights. Each measure is ranked between 0 and 10. The highest score indicates the greatest country stress, with the worst possible score being 100. About 1 billion people live in desperate poverty. Living conditions are the worst in Mozambique (93), followed by Somalia, Afghanistan, Haiti, and Sudan. Most of these countries also have high population growth. The most comfortable countries are Denmark (1), the Netherlands, Belgium, Switzerland, and Canada, which have low population growth. Total scores of 75 or greater (extreme human suffering) occur in 27 countries (20 in Africa, 16 in Asia, and Haiti) with 8% of the world's population (432 million people). High human suffering scores range between 50 and 74 and include 56 countries (24 in Africa, 16 in Asia, 15 in the Western Hemisphere, and 1 in Oceania) with 3.5 billion people. The number of countries in this grouping increased from 44 countries with 58% of world population in 1987. Moderate suffering scores range from 25-49. Countries with moderate suffering number 34 countries (9 in Europe, 13 in Asia, 8 in the Western Hemisphere, and 2 in Oceania and 2 in Africa) with 11.8% of world population (636 million). Over the preceding 5-year period the number of countries increased from 29 countries with 10% of world population. Minimal human suffering occurs in 24 countries (17 in Europe, Israel and Japan in Asia; Canada, the US, and Barbados in the Western Hemisphere; and Australia and New Zealand in Oceania) with 14.8% of world

  4. Human Capital, (Human) Capabilities and Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Grange, L.

    2011-01-01

    In this article I initiate a debate into the (de)merits of human capital theory and human capability theory and discuss implications of the debate for higher education. Human capital theory holds that economic growth depends on investment in education and that economic growth is the basis for improving the quality of human life. Human capable…

  5. Human Capital, (Human) Capabilities and Higher Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Le Grange, L.

    2011-01-01

    In this article I initiate a debate into the (de)merits of human capital theory and human capability theory and discuss implications of the debate for higher education. Human capital theory holds that economic growth depends on investment in education and that economic growth is the basis for improving the quality of human life. Human capable…

  6. Human Heredity: Genetic Mechanisms in Humans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blank, C. E.

    1988-01-01

    Discussed are some of the uncertainties in human genetic mechanisms that are often presented as dogma in Biology textbooks. Presented is a brief historical background and illustrations involving chromosome abnormality in humans and linkage studies in humans. (CW)

  7. Human Heredity: Genetic Mechanisms in Humans.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Blank, C. E.

    1988-01-01

    Discussed are some of the uncertainties in human genetic mechanisms that are often presented as dogma in Biology textbooks. Presented is a brief historical background and illustrations involving chromosome abnormality in humans and linkage studies in humans. (CW)

  8. Influence of chronic low-dose/dose-rate high-LET irradiation from radium-226 in a human colorectal carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Vo, Nguyen T K; Sokeechand, Bibi S H; Seymour, Colin B; Mothersill, Carmel E

    2017-07-01

    To evaluate potential damages of chronic environmentally relevant low-dose/dose-rate high-LET irradiation from a naturally occurring alpha-emitting radionuclide (radium-226, (226)Ra) on a human colorectal carcinoma HCT116 p53(+/+) cell line. Clonogenic survival assays and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) measurement with a sensitive fluorescent MMP probe JC-1 were performed in HCT116 p53(+/+) cells chronically exposure to low doses/dose rates of (226)Ra with high-LET. Comparisons were made with the human non-transformed keratinocyte HaCaT cell line and acute low-dose direct low-LET gamma radiation. The chronic low-dose/dose-rate alpha radiation (CLD/DRAR) did not reduce the clonogenic survival of HCT116 p53(+/+) cells over the period of 70 days of exposure. Only one significant reduction in the HCT116 p53(+/+) cells' clonogenic survival was when cells were grown with 10,000mBq/mL (226)Ra for 40 days and progeny cells were clonogenically assessed in the presence of 10,000mBq/mL (226)Ra. The cumulative doses that cells received during this period ranged from 0.05 to 46.2mGy. The mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) dropped initially in both HCT116 p53(+/+) and HaCaT cells in response to CLD/DRAR. The MMP in HCT116 p53(+/+) cells recovered more quickly at all dose points than and that in HaCaT cells until the end of the exposure period. The highest dose rate of 0.66mGy/day depolarized the HaCaT's mitochondria more consistently during the exposure period. The faster recovery status of the MMP in HCT116 p53(+/+) cells than that in HaCaT cells was also observed after exposure to acute low-dose gamma rays. Overall, it was found that CLD/DRAR had little impact on the MMP of human colorectal cancer and keratinocyte cell lines. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Human schistosomiasis

    PubMed Central

    Colley, Daniel G; Bustinduy, Amaya L; Secor, W Evan; King, Charles H

    2015-01-01

    Human schistosomiasis—or bilharzia—is a parasitic disease caused by trematode flukes of the genus Schistosoma. By conservative estimates, at least 230 million people worldwide are infected with Schistosoma spp. Adult schistosome worms colonise human blood vessels for years, successfully evading the immune system while excreting hundreds to thousands of eggs daily, which must either leave the body in excreta or become trapped in nearby tissues. Trapped eggs induce a distinct immune-mediated granulomatous response that causes local and systemic pathological effects ranging from anaemia, growth stunting, impaired cognition, and decreased physical fitness, to organ-specific effects such as severe hepatosplenism, periportal fibrosis with portal hypertension, and urogenital inflammation and scarring. At present, preventive public health measures in endemic regions consist of treatment once every 1 or 2 years with the isoquinolinone drug, praziquantel, to suppress morbidity. In some locations, elimination of transmission is now the goal; however, more sensitive diagnostics are needed in both the field and clinics, and integrated environmental and health-care management will be needed to ensure elimination. PMID:24698483

  10. Human schistosomiasis.

    PubMed

    Colley, Daniel G; Bustinduy, Amaya L; Secor, W Evan; King, Charles H

    2014-06-28

    Human schistosomiasis--or bilharzia--is a parasitic disease caused by trematode flukes of the genus Schistosoma. By conservative estimates, at least 230 million people worldwide are infected with Schistosoma spp. Adult schistosome worms colonise human blood vessels for years, successfully evading the immune system while excreting hundreds to thousands of eggs daily, which must either leave the body in excreta or become trapped in nearby tissues. Trapped eggs induce a distinct immune-mediated granulomatous response that causes local and systemic pathological effects ranging from anaemia, growth stunting, impaired cognition, and decreased physical fitness, to organ-specific effects such as severe hepatosplenism, periportal fibrosis with portal hypertension, and urogenital inflammation and scarring. At present, preventive public health measures in endemic regions consist of treatment once every 1 or 2 years with the isoquinolinone drug, praziquantel, to suppress morbidity. In some locations, elimination of transmission is now the goal; however, more sensitive diagnostics are needed in both the field and clinics, and integrated environmental and health-care management will be needed to ensure elimination.

  11. Human Astroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Pintó, Rosa M.; Guix, Susana

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Human astroviruses (HAtVs) are positive-sense single-stranded RNA viruses that were discovered in 1975. Astroviruses infecting other species, particularly mammalian and avian, were identified and classified into the genera Mamastrovirus and Avastrovirus. Through next-generation sequencing, many new astroviruses infecting different species, including humans, have been described, and the Astroviridae family shows a high diversity and zoonotic potential. Three divergent groups of HAstVs are recognized: the classic (MAstV 1), HAstV-MLB (MAstV 6), and HAstV-VA/HMO (MAstV 8 and MAstV 9) groups. Classic HAstVs contain 8 serotypes and account for 2 to 9% of all acute nonbacterial gastroenteritis in children worldwide. Infections are usually self-limiting but can also spread systemically and cause severe infections in immunocompromised patients. The other groups have also been identified in children with gastroenteritis, but extraintestinal pathologies have been suggested for them as well. Classic HAstVs may be grown in cells, allowing the study of their cell cycle, which is similar to that of caliciviruses. The continuous emergence of new astroviruses with a potential zoonotic transmission highlights the need to gain insights on their biology in order to prevent future health threats. This review focuses on the basic virology, pathogenesis, host response, epidemiology, diagnostic assays, and prevention strategies for HAstVs. PMID:25278582

  12. NATO Human View Architecture and Human Networks

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Handley, Holly A. H.; Houston, Nancy P.

    2010-01-01

    The NATO Human View is a system architectural viewpoint that focuses on the human as part of a system. Its purpose is to capture the human requirements and to inform on how the human impacts the system design. The viewpoint contains seven static models that include different aspects of the human element, such as roles, tasks, constraints, training and metrics. It also includes a Human Dynamics component to perform simulations of the human system under design. One of the static models, termed Human Networks, focuses on the human-to-human communication patterns that occur as a result of ad hoc or deliberate team formation, especially teams distributed across space and time. Parameters of human teams that effect system performance can be captured in this model. Human centered aspects of networks, such as differences in operational tempo (sense of urgency), priorities (common goal), and team history (knowledge of the other team members), can be incorporated. The information captured in the Human Network static model can then be included in the Human Dynamics component so that the impact of distributed teams is represented in the simulation. As the NATO militaries transform to a more networked force, the Human View architecture is an important tool that can be used to make recommendations on the proper mix of technological innovations and human interactions.

  13. The Digital Humanities as a Humanities Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svensson, Patrik

    2012-01-01

    This article argues that the digital humanities can be seen as a humanities project in a time of significant change in the academy. The background is a number of scholarly, educational and technical challenges, the multiple epistemic traditions linked to the digital humanities, the potential reach of the field across and outside the humanities,…

  14. The Digital Humanities as a Humanities Project

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Svensson, Patrik

    2012-01-01

    This article argues that the digital humanities can be seen as a humanities project in a time of significant change in the academy. The background is a number of scholarly, educational and technical challenges, the multiple epistemic traditions linked to the digital humanities, the potential reach of the field across and outside the humanities,…

  15. Building artificial humans to understand humans.

    PubMed

    Ishiguro, Hiroshi; Nishio, Shuichi

    2007-01-01

    If we could build an android as a very humanlike robot, how would we humans distinguish a real human from an android? The answer to this question is not so easy. In human-android interaction, we cannot see the internal mechanism of the android, and thus we may simply believe that it is a human. This means that a human can be defined from two perspectives: one by organic mechanism and the other by appearance. Further, the current rapid progress in artificial organs makes this distinction confusing. The approach discussed in this article is to create artificial humans with humanlike appearances. The developed artificial humans, an android and a geminoid, can be used to improve understanding of humans through psychological and cognitive tests conducted using the artificial humans. We call this new approach to understanding humans android science.

  16. Human Rhinoviruses

    PubMed Central

    Lamson, Daryl M.; St. George, Kirsten; Walsh, Thomas J.

    2013-01-01

    Human rhinoviruses (HRVs), first discovered in the 1950s, are responsible for more than one-half of cold-like illnesses and cost billions of dollars annually in medical visits and missed days of work. Advances in molecular methods have enhanced our understanding of the genomic structure of HRV and have led to the characterization of three genetically distinct HRV groups, designated groups A, B, and C, within the genus Enterovirus and the family Picornaviridae. HRVs are traditionally associated with upper respiratory tract infection, otitis media, and sinusitis. In recent years, the increasing implementation of PCR assays for respiratory virus detection in clinical laboratories has facilitated the recognition of HRV as a lower respiratory tract pathogen, particularly in patients with asthma, infants, elderly patients, and immunocompromised hosts. Cultured isolates of HRV remain important for studies of viral characteristics and disease pathogenesis. Indeed, whether the clinical manifestations of HRV are related directly to viral pathogenicity or secondary to the host immune response is the subject of ongoing research. There are currently no approved antiviral therapies for HRVs, and treatment remains primarily supportive. This review provides a comprehensive, up-to-date assessment of the basic virology, pathogenesis, clinical epidemiology, and laboratory features of and treatment and prevention strategies for HRVs. PMID:23297263

  17. [Human papillomaviruses].

    PubMed

    Gross, G

    2003-10-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) infect exclusively the basal cells of the skin and of mucosal epithelia adjacent to the skin such as the mouth, the upper respiratory tract, the lower genital tract and the anal canal. HPV does not lead to a viremia. Basically there are three different types of HPV infection: Clinically visible lesions, subclinical HPV infections and latent HPV infections. Distinct HPV types induce morphologically and prognostically different clinical pictures. The most common HPV associated benign tumor of the skin is the common wart. Infections of the urogenitoanal tract with specific HPV-types are recognised as the most frequent sexually transmitted viral infections. So-called "high-risk" HPV-types (HPV16, 18 and others) are regarded by the world health organisation as important risk-factors for the development of genital cancer (mainly cervical cancer), anal cancer and upper respiratory tract cancer in both genders. Antiviral substances with a specific anti-HPV effect are so far unknown. Conventional therapies of benign skin warts and of mucosal warts are mainly nonspecific. They comprise tissue-destroying therapies such as electrocautery, cryotherapy and laser. In addition cytotoxic substances such as podophyllotoxin and systemic therapy with retinoids are in use. Systemically and topically administered immunotherapies represent a new approach for treatment. Both interferons and particularly the recently developed imiquimod, an interferon-alpha and cytokine-inductor lead to better results and are better tolerated then conventional therapies. HPV-specific vaccines have been developed in the last 5 years and will be used in future for prevention and treatment of benign and malignant HPV-associated tumors of the genitoanal tract in both sexes.

  18. Human Factors in Human-Systems Integration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fitts, David J.; Sandor, Aniko; Litaker, Harry L., Jr.; Tillman, Barry

    2008-01-01

    Any large organization whose mission is to design and develop systems for humans, and train humans needs a well-developed integration and process plan to deal with the challenges that arise from managing multiple subsystems. Human capabilities, skills, and needs must be considered early in the design and development process, and must be continuously considered throughout the development lifecycle. This integration of human needs within system design is typically formalized through a Human-Systems Integration (HSI) program. By having an HSI program, an institution or organization can reduce lifecycle costs and increase the efficiency, usability, and quality of its products because human needs have been considered from the beginning.

  19. Humane Education: An Overview.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Whitlock, Eileen S.; Westerlund, Stuart R.

    This booklet traces the historical development of human education as it has been instilled into the young people of America from colonial times to the present and provides a future prognosis of humaneness in the schools. Humane education promotes humane behavior and is an important part of the humane movement in the United States, although until…

  20. Human Research Risk Management

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Crew health and performance is critical to successful human exploration beyond low Earth orbit. The Human Research Program (HRP) investigates and mitigates the highest risks to human health and per...

  1. Engineered human vaccines

    SciTech Connect

    Sandhu, J.S. . Div. of Immunology and Neurobiology)

    1994-01-01

    The limitations of human vaccines in use at present and the design requirements for a new generation of human vaccines are discussed. The progress in engineering of human vaccines for bacteria, viruses, parasites, and cancer is reviewed, and the data from human studies with the engineered vaccines are discussed, especially for cancer and AIDS vaccines. The final section of the review deals with the possible future developments in the field of engineered human vaccines and the requirement for effective new human adjuvants.

  2. Human-machine interactions

    DOEpatents

    Forsythe, J. Chris; Xavier, Patrick G.; Abbott, Robert G.; Brannon, Nathan G.; Bernard, Michael L.; Speed, Ann E.

    2009-04-28

    Digital technology utilizing a cognitive model based on human naturalistic decision-making processes, including pattern recognition and episodic memory, can reduce the dependency of human-machine interactions on the abilities of a human user and can enable a machine to more closely emulate human-like responses. Such a cognitive model can enable digital technology to use cognitive capacities fundamental to human-like communication and cooperation to interact with humans.

  3. Visualizing Humans by Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnenat-Thalmann, Nadia

    1992-01-01

    Presents an overview of the problems and techniques involved in visualizing humans in a three-dimensional scene. Topics discussed include human shape modeling, including shape creation and deformation; human motion control, including facial animation and interaction with synthetic actors; and human rendering and clothing, including textures and…

  4. Special Section: Human Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frydenlund, Knut; And Others

    1978-01-01

    Eleven articles examine human rights in Europe. Topics include unemployment, human rights legislation, role of the Council of Europe in promoting human rights, labor unions, migrant workers, human dignity in industralized societies, and international violence. Journal available from Council of Europe, Directorate of Press and Information, 67006…

  5. Cooperation in human teaching.

    PubMed

    Kruger, Ann Cale

    2015-01-01

    Kline's evolutionary analysis of teaching provides welcome reframing for cross-species comparisons. However, theory based on competition cannot explain the transmission of human cultural elements that were collectively created. Humans evolved in a cultural niche and teaching-learning coevolved to transmit culture. To study human cultural variation in teaching, we need a more articulated theory of this distinctively human engagement.

  6. The Humanities: Interconnections.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Salomone, Ronald E., Ed.

    1985-01-01

    Focusing on a wide range of interdisciplinary themes and ideas for humanities instruction, the 17 articles in this journal issue discuss the following topics: (1) literature, humanities, and the adult learner; (2) the role of the humanities in educating for a democracy; (3) humanities in the marketplace; (4) literature versus "great books" in high…

  7. What Are the Humanities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Broderick, Francis

    A working definition of the humanities and characteristics of a liberally educated person are specified. The humanities embrace areas of human knowledge that possess these elements: central concern for human beings rather than for the processes of nature or the structures of society; primary focus on the individual rather than on the group;…

  8. Visualizing Humans by Computer.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Magnenat-Thalmann, Nadia

    1992-01-01

    Presents an overview of the problems and techniques involved in visualizing humans in a three-dimensional scene. Topics discussed include human shape modeling, including shape creation and deformation; human motion control, including facial animation and interaction with synthetic actors; and human rendering and clothing, including textures and…

  9. Human Research Program Opportunities

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kundrot, Craig E.

    2014-01-01

    The goal of HRP is to provide human health and performance countermeasures, knowledge, technologies, and tools to enable safe, reliable, and productive human space exploration. The Human Research Program was designed to meet the needs of human space exploration, and understand and reduce the risk to crew health and performance in exploration missions.

  10. ISS Payload Human Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ellenberger, Richard; Duvall, Laura; Dory, Jonathan

    2016-01-01

    The ISS Payload Human Factors Implementation Team (HFIT) is the Payload Developer's resource for Human Factors. HFIT is the interface between Payload Developers and ISS Payload Human Factors requirements in SSP 57000. ? HFIT provides recommendations on how to meet the Human Factors requirements and guidelines early in the design process. HFIT coordinates with the Payload Developer and Astronaut Office to find low cost solutions to Human Factors challenges for hardware operability issues.

  11. Preference for human eyes in human infants.

    PubMed

    Dupierrix, Eve; de Boisferon, Anne Hillairet; Méary, David; Lee, Kang; Quinn, Paul C; Di Giorgio, Elisa; Simion, Francesca; Tomonaga, Masaki; Pascalis, Olivier

    2014-07-01

    Despite evidence supporting an early attraction to human faces, the nature of the face representation in neonates and its development during the first year after birth remain poorly understood. One suggestion is that an early preference for human faces reflects an attraction toward human eyes because human eyes are distinctive compared with other animals. In accord with this proposal, prior empirical studies have demonstrated the importance of the eye region in face processing in adults and infants. However, an attraction for the human eye has never been shown directly in infants. The current study aimed to investigate whether an attraction for human eyes would be present in newborns and older infants. With the use of a preferential looking time paradigm, newborns and 3-, 6-, 9-, and 12-month-olds were simultaneously presented with a pair of nonhuman primate faces (chimpanzees and Barbary macaques) that differed only by the eyes, thereby pairing a face with original nonhuman primate eyes with the same face in which the eyes were replaced by human eyes. Our results revealed that no preference was observed in newborns, but a preference for nonhuman primate faces with human eyes emerged from 3months of age and remained stable thereafter. The findings are discussed in terms of how a preference for human eyes may emerge during the first few months after birth.

  12. Training Humans for the Human Domain

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2015-11-01

    TRAINING HUMANS FOR THE HUMAN DOMAIN Dr. Steve Tatham Mr. Keir Giles U.S. ARMY WAR COLLEGE ~~~ ~O.L STRATEGIC STUDIES INSTITUTE Report...REPORT TYPE 3. DATES COVERED 00-00-2015 to 00-00-2015 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Training Humans for the Human Domain 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT...NUMBER 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER 5e. TASK NUMBER 5f. WORK UNIT NUMBER 7. PERFORMING ORGANIZATION NAME(S) AND

  13. Economics of human trafficking.

    PubMed

    Wheaton, Elizabeth M; Schauer, Edward J; Galli, Thomas V

    2010-01-01

    Because freedom of choice and economic gain are at the heart of productivity, human trafficking impedes national and international economic growth. Within the next 10 years, crime experts expect human trafficking to surpass drug and arms trafficking in its incidence, cost to human well-being, and profitability to criminals (Schauer and Wheaton, 2006: 164-165). The loss of agency from human trafficking as well as from modern slavery is the result of human vulnerability (Bales, 2000: 15). As people become vulnerable to exploitation and businesses continually seek the lowest-cost labour sources, trafficking human beings generates profit and a market for human trafficking is created. This paper presents an economic model of human trafficking that encompasses all known economic factors that affect human trafficking both across and within national borders. We envision human trafficking as a monopolistically competitive industry in which traffickers act as intermediaries between vulnerable individuals and employers by supplying differentiated products to employers. In the human trafficking market, the consumers are employers of trafficked labour and the products are human beings. Using a rational-choice framework of human trafficking we explain the social situations that shape relocation and working decisions of vulnerable populations leading to human trafficking, the impetus for being a trafficker, and the decisions by employers of trafficked individuals. The goal of this paper is to provide a common ground upon which policymakers and researchers can collaborate to decrease the incidence of trafficking in humans.

  14. Differential expression of collagenase by human fibroblasts and bone marrow stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, G W; Moran, D; Andrews, D F; Singer, J W

    1994-02-01

    The bone marrow stroma, represented in long-term marrow culture by cells of the adherent layer, is composed of a heterogenous mixture of macrophages and mesenchymal cells, including fibroblasts, endothelial cells and adipocytes, in association with a proteoglycan matrix. This matrix, which is synthesized by the stroma, is capable of binding hematopoietic growth factors, and likely plays a major role in hematopoietic regulation. Clonally-derived non-transformed bone marrow stromal cells, propagated in the presence of basic fibroblast growth factor, were studied for expression of collagenase, an enzyme whose substrate, collagen, is a major component of the extracellular matrix. Expression of steady-state collagenase mRNA was undetectable in both unstimulated dermal fibroblasts and non-transformed marrow stromal cells. However, stimulation with interleukin 1 alpha (10 U/ml) for 24 h resulted in marked accumulation of collagenase mRNA in dermal fibroblast cells, yet failed to elicit a similar response in bone marrow stromal cells. Both marrow stromal cells and dermal fibroblasts constitutively expressed transcripts of collagen I, and rhIL-1 alpha upregulated transcripts of interleukin 6 in both these cells as well. Although similar in morphology, these data indicate that bone marrow stromal cells differ from fibroblasts in their response to IL-1. In the marrow microenvironment, where IL-1 may be secreted by a variety of cell types, such suppression of collagenase expression may serve to prevent unwanted mobilization of collagen from the glycoprotein matrix by marrow stromal cells.

  15. Mice with human livers.

    PubMed

    Grompe, Markus; Strom, Stephen

    2013-12-01

    Animal models are used to study many aspects of human disease and to test therapeutic interventions. However, some very important features of human biology cannot be replicated in animals, even in nonhuman primates or transgenic rodents engineered with human genes. Most human microbial pathogens do not infect animals and the metabolism of many xenobiotics is different between human beings and animals. The advent of transgenic immune-deficient mice has made it possible to generate chimeric animals harboring human tissues and cells, including hepatocytes. The liver plays a central role in many human-specific biological processes and mice with humanized livers can be used to model human metabolism, liver injury, gene regulation, drug toxicity, and hepatotropic infections.

  16. Human dignity, bioethics, and human rights.

    PubMed

    Häyry, Matti; Takala, Tuija

    2005-09-01

    The authors analyse and assess the Universal Draft Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights published by UNESCO. They argue that the Draft has two main weaknesses. It unnecessarily confines the scope of bioethics to life sciences and their practical applications. And it fails to spell out the intended role of human dignity in international ethical regulation.

  17. Values for Human-to-Human Reference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gorman, Michael

    2001-01-01

    Defines "values" and lists the eight values (stewardship, service, intellectual freedom, rationalism, literacy and learning, equity of access, privacy, democracy) derived by the author in an earlier work. Gives a brief history of the evolution of human-to-human reference service and discusses its future. Relates each of the author's eight values…

  18. Indicators: Human Disturbance

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Human disturbance is a measure of the vulnerability of aquatic resources to a variety of harmful human activities such as tree removal, road building, construction near shorelines/streambanks, and artificial hardening of lakeshores with retaining walls.

  19. Telling the Human Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Miles

    1987-01-01

    Proposes that one of the fundamental human attributes is telling stories. Explores the debate on whether Neanderthals possessed language ability. Discusses the role of the "human story" in teaching anthropology. (DH)

  20. The Growing Human Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keyfitz, Nathan

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the issue of human population. Illustrates the projections of the growing human population in terms of developed and less developed countries. Describes the family planning programs in several countries. Lists three references for further reading. (YP)

  1. Human assisted robotic exploration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Files, B. T.; Canady, J.; Warnell, G.; Stump, E.; Nothwang, W. D.; Marathe, A. R.

    2016-05-01

    In support of achieving better performance on autonomous mapping and exploration tasks by incorporating human input, we seek here to first characterize humans' ability to recognize locations from limited visual information. Such a characterization is critical to the design of a human-in-the-loop system faced with deciding whether and when human input is useful. In this work, we develop a novel and practical place-recognition task that presents humans with video clips captured by a navigating ground robot. Using this task, we find experimentally that human performance does not seem to depend on factors such as clip length or familiarity with the scene and also that there is significant variability across subjects. Moreover, we find that humans significantly outperform a state-of-the-art computational solution to this problem, suggesting the utility of incorporating human input in autonomous mapping and exploration techniques.

  2. Human genomic variation

    PubMed Central

    Disotell, Todd R

    2000-01-01

    The recent completion and assembly of the first draft of the human genome, which combines samples from several ethnically diverse males and females, provides preliminary data on the extent of human genetic variation. PMID:11178257

  3. Human bites (image)

    MedlinePlus

    Human bites present a high risk of infection. Besides the bacteria which can cause infection, there is ... the wound extends below the skin. Anytime a human bite has broken the skin, seek medical attention.

  4. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    Why get vaccinated?HPV vaccine prevents infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) types that are associated with cause ... at http://www.cdc.gov/hpv. HPV Vaccine (Human Papillomavirus) Information Statement. U.S. Department of Health and ...

  5. Human Melioidosis, Malawi, 2011

    PubMed Central

    Katangwe, Thembi; Purcell, Janet; Bar-Zeev, Naor; Denis, Brigitte; Montgomery, Jacqui; Alaerts, Maaike; Heyderman, Robert Simon; Dance, David A.B.; Kennedy, Neil; Feasey, Nicholas

    2013-01-01

    A case of human melioidosis caused by a novel sequence type of Burkholderia pseudomallei occurred in a child in Malawi, southern Africa. A literature review showed that human cases reported from the continent have been increasing. PMID:23735189

  6. Telling the Human Story.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richardson, Miles

    1987-01-01

    Proposes that one of the fundamental human attributes is telling stories. Explores the debate on whether Neanderthals possessed language ability. Discusses the role of the "human story" in teaching anthropology. (DH)

  7. Mining human antibody repertoires

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) have become drugs of choice for the management of an increasing number of human diseases. Human antibody repertoires provide a rich source for human mAbs. Here we review the characteristics of natural and non-natural human antibody repertoires and their mining with non-combinatorial and combinatorial strategies. In particular, we discuss the selection of human mAbs from naïve, immune, transgenic and synthetic human antibody repertoires using methods based on hybridoma technology, clonal expansion of peripheral B cells, single-cell PCR, phage display, yeast display and mammalian cell display. Our reliance on different strategies is shifting as we gain experience and refine methods to the efficient generation of human mAbs with superior pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. PMID:20505349

  8. HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

    MedlinePlus

    ... For Consumers Consumer Information by Audience For Women HPV (human papillomavirus) Share Tweet Linkedin Pin it More ... outside of the body. To Learn More About HPV Human Papillomavirus Vaccine More in For Women Medication ...

  9. The Growing Human Population.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Keyfitz, Nathan

    1989-01-01

    Discusses the issue of human population. Illustrates the projections of the growing human population in terms of developed and less developed countries. Describes the family planning programs in several countries. Lists three references for further reading. (YP)

  10. Pathfinder: Humans in space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Anderson, John L.

    1988-01-01

    Viewgraphs are presented on the Pathfinder program. Information is given on human exploration of the solar system, technical requirements interfaces, program objectives, space suits, human performance, man-machine systems, space habitats, life support systems, and artificial gravity

  11. Human productivity program definition

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cramer, D. B.

    1985-01-01

    The optimization of human productivity on the space station within the existing resources and operational constraints is the aim of the Human Productivity Program. The conceptual objectives of the program are as follows: (1) to identify long lead technology; (2) to identify responsibility for work elements; (3) to coordinate the development of crew facilities and activities; and (4) to lay the foundation for a cost effective approach to improving human productivity. Human productivity work elements are also described and examples are presented.

  12. Human papillomavirus molecular biology.

    PubMed

    Harden, Mallory E; Munger, Karl

    Human papillomaviruses are small DNA viruses with a tropism for squamous epithelia. A unique aspect of human papillomavirus molecular biology involves dependence on the differentiation status of the host epithelial cell to complete the viral lifecycle. A small group of these viruses are the etiologic agents of several types of human cancers, including oral and anogenital tract carcinomas. This review focuses on the basic molecular biology of human papillomaviruses. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Humanities in the Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vendler, Helen

    1982-01-01

    In order that the humanities survive in America and that they find a place in the American community, learning should begin with arts. It is by the natural reciprocity between the arts and the humanities that the humanities can be made most accessible in the community. (MLW)

  14. Human Machine Learning Symbiosis

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Walsh, Kenneth R.; Hoque, Md Tamjidul; Williams, Kim H.

    2017-01-01

    Human Machine Learning Symbiosis is a cooperative system where both the human learner and the machine learner learn from each other to create an effective and efficient learning environment adapted to the needs of the human learner. Such a system can be used in online learning modules so that the modules adapt to each learner's learning state both…

  15. Humanities in the Community.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Vendler, Helen

    1982-01-01

    In order that the humanities survive in America and that they find a place in the American community, learning should begin with arts. It is by the natural reciprocity between the arts and the humanities that the humanities can be made most accessible in the community. (MLW)

  16. Monogenic human obesity.

    PubMed

    Farooqi, I Sadaf

    2008-01-01

    We and others have identified several single gene defects that disrupt the molecules in the leptinmelanocortin pathway causing severe obesity in humans. In this review, we consider these human monogenic obesity syndromes and discuss how far the characterisation of these patients has informed our understanding of the physiological role of leptin and the melanocortins in the regulation of human body weight and neuroendocrine function.

  17. Expanding Human Intelligence.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Galyean, Beverly-Colleene

    1983-01-01

    The human brain is capable of mastering skills far beyond those it is now used for. Three questions about the further evolution of human intelligence are raised: What will be the next step in human intelligence? How is the next step manifesting itself? How can we prepare for those changes? (IS)

  18. Whose Human Rights?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rendel, Margherita

    During the last 50 years, principles, institutions, and policies of human rights have been developed worldwide. This book brings together European and international conventions on human rights, the rights of women, and the users and uses of education, and places them in their wider context. It examines issues in how human rights work, the ways in…

  19. [Eugenics and human cloning].

    PubMed

    Boloz, W

    2001-01-01

    Because of legislative bans there are still no reports of human cloning. However eager public debate is currently running, concerning medical, legal, social and ethical aspects of human cloning. Arguments for and against human cloning are presented. An important argument against cloning is the danger of eugenic tendencies connected with cloning, which could lead to genetic discrimination.

  20. A Human Rights Glossary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flowers, Nancy

    1998-01-01

    Presents a human rights glossary that includes definitions of basic terms, treaties, charters, and groups/organizations that have been featured in previous articles in this edition of "Update on Law-Related Education"; the human rights terms have been compiled as part of the celebration of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights…

  1. Whose Human Rights?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rendel, Margherita

    During the last 50 years, principles, institutions, and policies of human rights have been developed worldwide. This book brings together European and international conventions on human rights, the rights of women, and the users and uses of education, and places them in their wider context. It examines issues in how human rights work, the ways in…

  2. Production Of Human Antibodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammons, David W.; Neil, Garry A.

    1993-01-01

    Process for making human monoclonal antibodies based on combination of techniques. Antibodies made active against specific antigen. Process involves in vivo immunization of human B lymphocyte cells in mice. B cells of interest enriched in vitro before fusion. Method potentially applicable to any antigen. Does not rely on use of Epstein-Barr virus at any step. Human lymphocytes taken from any source.

  3. A Human Rights Glossary.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Flowers, Nancy

    1998-01-01

    Presents a human rights glossary that includes definitions of basic terms, treaties, charters, and groups/organizations that have been featured in previous articles in this edition of "Update on Law-Related Education"; the human rights terms have been compiled as part of the celebration of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights…

  4. Production Of Human Antibodies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sammons, David W.; Neil, Garry A.

    1993-01-01

    Process for making human monoclonal antibodies based on combination of techniques. Antibodies made active against specific antigen. Process involves in vivo immunization of human B lymphocyte cells in mice. B cells of interest enriched in vitro before fusion. Method potentially applicable to any antigen. Does not rely on use of Epstein-Barr virus at any step. Human lymphocytes taken from any source.

  5. Robotics of human movements.

    PubMed

    van der Smagt, Patrick; Grebenstein, Markus; Urbanek, Holger; Fligge, Nadine; Strohmayr, Michael; Stillfried, Georg; Parrish, Jonathon; Gustus, Agneta

    2009-01-01

    The construction of robotic systems that can move the way humans do, with respect to agility, stability and precision, is a necessary prerequisite for the successful integration of robotic systems in human environments. We explain human-centered views on robotics, based on the three basic ingredients (1) actuation; (2) sensing; and (3) control, and formulate detailed examples thereof.

  6. Esprit: A Humanities Magazine.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Parker, Donald G.; Capella, Barry John

    In March 1984, the first issue of "Esprit," a semi-annual humanities magazine for the 56 two-year colleges in New York State, was published. The magazine seeks to confront the apparent decline of student interest in the humanities, community doubts about the relevance of the humanities, and the seeming indifference to the special truths…

  7. Human Rights Resource Catalogue.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Zambrano, Elias, Comp.

    This document provides information about 25 programs/brochures which focus on human rights topics. Specific topics include: (1) counselor preparation; (2) multicultural awareness; (3) abuse and neglect; (4) Acquired Immune Deficiency Syndrome; (5) self-awareness; (6) human rights awareness and human rights of students; (7) cultural diversity; (8)…

  8. The Virtual Physiological Human

    PubMed Central

    Coveney, Peter V.; Diaz, Vanessa; Hunter, Peter; Kohl, Peter; Viceconti, Marco

    2011-01-01

    The Virtual Physiological Human is synonymous with a programme in computational biomedicine that aims to develop a framework of methods and technologies to investigate the human body as a whole. It is predicated on the transformational character of information technology, brought to bear on that most crucial of human concerns, our own health and well-being.

  9. Human Systems Roadmap Review

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2016-02-09

    Performance Human Aspects of Operations in Military Environments Dr. Ray Perez (Navy) Dr. Todd Nelson (AF) Dr. Mike LaFiandra (Army) Dr. Liz Bowman...Interfaces and Cognitive Processes Human Aspects of Operations in Military Environments Protection, Sustainment, and Warfighter Performance Right Person...mission command and tactical intelligence human - agent teaming  Personalized, integrated assessments and training to improve performance

  10. Rethinking medical humanities.

    PubMed

    Chiapperino, Luca; Boniolo, Giovanni

    2014-12-01

    This paper questions different conceptions of Medical Humanities in order to provide a clearer understanding of what they are and why they matter. Building upon former attempts, we defend a conception of Medical Humanities as a humanistic problem-based approach to medicine aiming at influencing its nature and practice. In particular, we discuss three main conceptual issues regarding the overall nature of this discipline: (i) a problem-driven approach to Medical Humanities; (ii) the need for an integration of Medical Humanities into medicine; (iii) the methodological requirements that could render Medical Humanities an effective framework for medical decision-making.

  11. Human Mitochondrial Protein Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 131 Human Mitochondrial Protein Database (Web, free access)   The Human Mitochondrial Protein Database (HMPDb) provides comprehensive data on mitochondrial and human nuclear encoded proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and function. This database consolidates information from SwissProt, LocusLink, Protein Data Bank (PDB), GenBank, Genome Database (GDB), Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), Human Mitochondrial Genome Database (mtDB), MITOMAP, Neuromuscular Disease Center and Human 2-D PAGE Databases. This database is intended as a tool not only to aid in studying the mitochondrion but in studying the associated diseases.

  12. Humanism in emergency medicine.

    PubMed

    Rosenzweig, S

    1993-09-01

    Emergency medicine has not yet appropriated "humanism" as a term of its own. Medical humanism needs to be interpreted in a way that is consistent with the practical goals of emergency medicine. In this essay, humanism in emergency medicine is defined by identifying the dehumanizing aspects of sudden illness and exploring of ways for sustaining the humanity of emergency department patients. Excerpts from Dr Oliver Sacks' autobiographical work A Leg to Stand On give voice to the human needs created by sudden illness and its treatment.

  13. Biological Races in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Templeton, Alan R.

    2013-01-01

    Races may exist in humans in a cultural sense, but biological concepts of race are needed to access their reality in a non-species-specific manner and to see if cultural categories correspond to biological categories within humans. Modern biological concepts of race can be implemented objectively with molecular genetic data through hypothesis-testing. Genetic data sets are used to see if biological races exist in humans and in our closest evolutionary relative, the chimpanzee. Using the two most commonly used biological concepts of race, chimpanzees are indeed subdivided into races but humans are not. Adaptive traits, such as skin color, have frequently been used to define races in humans, but such adaptive traits reflect the underlying environmental factor to which they are adaptive and not overall genetic differentiation, and different adaptive traits define discordant groups. There are no objective criteria for choosing one adaptive trait over another to define race. As a consequence, adaptive traits do not define races in humans. Much of the recent scientific literature on human evolution portrays human populations as separate branches on an evolutionary tree. A tree-like structure among humans has been falsified whenever tested, so this practice is scientifically indefensible. It is also socially irresponsible as these pictorial representations of human evolution have more impact on the general public than nuanced phrases in the text of a scientific paper. Humans have much genetic diversity, but the vast majority of this diversity reflects individual uniqueness and not race. PMID:23684745

  14. Human rights and bioethics.

    PubMed

    Barilan, Y M; Brusa, M

    2008-05-01

    In the first part of this article we survey the concept of human rights from a philosophical perspective and especially in relation to the "right to healthcare". It is argued that regardless of meta-ethical debates on the nature of rights, the ethos and language of moral deliberation associated with human rights is indispensable to any ethics that places the victim and the sufferer in its centre. In the second part we discuss the rise of the "right to privacy", particularly in the USA, as an attempt to make the element of personal free will dominate over the element of basic human interest within the structure of rights and when different rights seem to conflict. We conclude by discussing the relationship of human rights with moral values beyond the realm of rights, mainly human dignity, free will, human rationality and response to basic human needs.

  15. Human Milk Banking.

    PubMed

    Haiden, Nadja; Ziegler, Ekhard E

    2016-01-01

    Human milk banks play an essential role by providing human milk to infants who would otherwise not be able to receive human milk. The largest group of recipients are premature infants who derive very substantial benefits from it. Human milk protects premature infants from necrotizing enterocolitis and from sepsis, two devastating medical conditions. Milk banks collect, screen, store, process, and distribute human milk. Donating women usually nurse their own infants and have a milk supply that exceeds their own infants' needs. Donor women are carefully selected and are screened for HIV-1, HIV-2, human T-cell leukemia virus 1 and 2, hepatitis B, hepatitis C, and syphilis. In the milk bank, handling, storing, processing, pooling, and bacterial screening follow standardized algorithms. Heat treatment of human milk diminishes anti-infective properties, cellular components, growth factors, and nutrients. However, the beneficial effects of donor milk remain significant and donor milk is still highly preferable in comparison to formula.

  16. Human research subjects as human research workers.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Holly Fernandez

    2014-01-01

    Biomedical research involving human subjects has traditionally been treated as a unique endeavor, presenting special risks and demanding special protections. But in several ways, the regulatory scheme governing human subjects research is counter-intuitively less protective than the labor and employment laws applicable to many workers. This Article relies on analogical and legal reasoning to demonstrate that this should not be the case; in a number of ways, human research subjects ought to be fundamentally recast as human research workers. Like other workers protected under worklaw, biomedical research subjects often have interests that diverge from those in positions of control but little bargaining power for change. Bearing these important similarities in mind, the question becomes whether there is any good reason to treat subjects and protected workers differently as a matter of law. With regard to unrestricted payment, eligibility for a minimum wage, compensation for injury, and rights to engage in concerted activity, the answer is no and human subjects regulations ought to be revised accordingly.

  17. Integrated Environmental Modelling: human decisions, human challenges

    USGS Publications Warehouse

    Glynn, Pierre D.

    2015-01-01

    Integrated Environmental Modelling (IEM) is an invaluable tool for understanding the complex, dynamic ecosystems that house our natural resources and control our environments. Human behaviour affects the ways in which the science of IEM is assembled and used for meaningful societal applications. In particular, human biases and heuristics reflect adaptation and experiential learning to issues with frequent, sharply distinguished, feedbacks. Unfortunately, human behaviour is not adapted to the more diffusely experienced problems that IEM typically seeks to address. Twelve biases are identified that affect IEM (and science in general). These biases are supported by personal observations and by the findings of behavioural scientists. A process for critical analysis is proposed that addresses some human challenges of IEM and solicits explicit description of (1) represented processes and information, (2) unrepresented processes and information, and (3) accounting for, and cognizance of, potential human biases. Several other suggestions are also made that generally complement maintaining attitudes of watchful humility, open-mindedness, honesty and transparent accountability. These suggestions include (1) creating a new area of study in the behavioural biogeosciences, (2) using structured processes for engaging the modelling and stakeholder communities in IEM, and (3) using ‘red teams’ to increase resilience of IEM constructs and use.

  18. [The embryo, the human and the humanized].

    PubMed

    Roa, A

    1992-03-01

    Since the moment of fecundation the human embryo is endowed with the properties of unity and uniqueness and its existence is therefore inviolable. Disputing arguments against this thesis are analyzed. Recent views of some biologists negate the human character to the embryo since the essence of a human being would be its cultural nature and ability to communicate. However, the embryo contains all the genetic information that will allow him to develop the ability to communicate. Any attempt to separate the 3 moments of time, past present and future is a definitive violation of ethics. A basic foundation of ethics is that present and future are implicit in the past and vice-versa. Finally, the idea that the unwanted child is not a cultural being should be discarded.

  19. Chimeras and human dignity.

    PubMed

    de Melo-Martín, Inmaculada

    2008-12-01

    Discussions about whether new biomedical technologies threaten or violate human dignity are now common. Indeed, appeals to human dignity have played a central role in national and international debates about whether to allow particular kinds of biomedical investigations. The focus of this paper is on chimera research. I argue here that both those who claim that particular types of human-nonhuman chimera research threaten human dignity and those who argue that such threat does not exist fail to make their case. I first introduce some of the arguments that have been offered supporting the claim that the creation of certain sorts of chimeras threatens or violates human dignity. I next present opponents' assessments of such arguments. Finally I critically analyze both the critics' and the supporters' claims about whether chimera research threatens human dignity.

  20. Human Performance in Space

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jones, Patricia M.; Fiedler, Edna

    2010-01-01

    Human factors is a critical discipline for human spaceflight. Nearly every human factors research area is relevant to space exploration -- from the ergonomics of hand tools used by astronauts, to the displays and controls of a spacecraft cockpit or mission control workstation, to levels of automation designed into rovers on Mars, to organizational issues of communication between crew and ground. This chapter focuses more on the ways in which the space environment (especially altered gravity and the isolated and confined nature of long-duration spaceflight) affects crew performance, and thus has specific novel implications for human factors research and practice. We focus on four aspects of human performance: neurovestibular integration, motor control and musculo-skeletal effects, cognitive effects, and behavioral health. We also provide a sampler of recent human factors studies from NASA.

  1. Human Systems Integration Requirements

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-09-01

    HUMAN SYSTEMS INTEGRATION OFFICE HUMAN SYSTEMS INTEGRATION REQUIREMENTS POCKET GUIDE SEPTEMBER 2009 Report Documentation Page Form ApprovedOMB No...collection of information if it does not display a currently valid OMB control number. 1. REPORT DATE SEP 2009 2. REPORT TYPE Pocket Guide 3. DATES...COVERED 00-09-2009 to 00-12-2011 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Human Systems Integration Requirements Pocket Guide 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER 5b. GRANT NUMBER

  2. Human hemoglobin genetics

    SciTech Connect

    Honig, G.R.; Adams, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    This book contains the following 10 chapters: Introduction; The Human Hemoglobins; The Human Globin Genes; Hemoglobin Synthesis and Globin Gene Expression; The Globin Gene Mutations - A. Mechanisms and Classification; The Globin Gene Mutations - B. Their Phenotypes and Clinical Expression; The Genetics of the Human Globin Gene Loci: Formal Genetics and Gene Linkage; The Geographic Distribution of Globin Gene Variation; Labortory Identification, Screening, Education, and Counseling for Abnormal Hemoglobins and Thalassemias; and Approaches to the Treatment of the Hemoglobin Disorders.

  3. Artificial human vision camera

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goudou, J.-F.; Maggio, S.; Fagno, M.

    2014-10-01

    In this paper we present a real-time vision system modeling the human vision system. Our purpose is to inspire from human vision bio-mechanics to improve robotic capabilities for tasks such as objects detection and tracking. This work describes first the bio-mechanical discrepancies between human vision and classic cameras and the retinal processing stage that takes place in the eye, before the optic nerve. The second part describes our implementation of these principles on a 3-camera optical, mechanical and software model of the human eyes and associated bio-inspired attention model.

  4. The psychology of humanness.

    PubMed

    Haslam, Nick; Loughnan, Steve; Holland, Elise

    2013-01-01

    This chapter explores the ways in which the concept of "humanness" illuminates a wide and fascinating variety of psychological phenomena. After introducing the concept--everyday understandings of what it is to be human--we present a model of the diverse ways in which humanness can be denied to people. According to this model people may be perceived as lacking uniquely human characteristics, and thus likened to animals, or as lacking human nature, and thus likened to inanimate objects. Both of these forms of dehumanization occur with varying degrees of subtlety, from the explicit uses of derogatory animal metaphors, to stereotypes that ascribe lesser humanness or simpler minds to particular groups, to nonconscious associations between certain humans and nonhumans. After reviewing research on dehumanization through the lens of our model we examine additional topics that the psychology of humanness clarifies, notably the perception of nonhuman animals and the objectification of women. Humanness emerges as a concept that runs an integrating thread through a variety of research literatures.

  5. Human target acquisition performance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Teaney, Brian P.; Du Bosq, Todd W.; Reynolds, Joseph P.; Thompson, Roger; Aghera, Sameer; Moyer, Steven K.; Flug, Eric; Espinola, Richard; Hixson, Jonathan

    2012-06-01

    The battlefield has shifted from armored vehicles to armed insurgents. Target acquisition (identification, recognition, and detection) range performance involving humans as targets is vital for modern warfare. The acquisition and neutralization of armed insurgents while at the same time minimizing fratricide and civilian casualties is a mounting concern. U.S. Army RDECOM CERDEC NVESD has conducted many experiments involving human targets for infrared and reflective band sensors. The target sets include human activities, hand-held objects, uniforms & armament, and other tactically relevant targets. This paper will define a set of standard task difficulty values for identification and recognition associated with human target acquisition performance.

  6. Robotics for Human Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Fong, Terrence; Deans, Mathew; Bualat, Maria

    2013-01-01

    Robots can do a variety of work to increase the productivity of human explorers. Robots can perform tasks that are tedious, highly repetitive or long-duration. Robots can perform precursor tasks, such as reconnaissance, which help prepare for future human activity. Robots can work in support of astronauts, assisting or performing tasks in parallel. Robots can also perform "follow-up" work, completing tasks designated or started by humans. In this paper, we summarize the development and testing of robots designed to improve future human exploration of space.

  7. [Human physiology: kidney].

    PubMed

    Natochin, Iu V

    2010-01-01

    The content of human physiology as an independent part of current physiology is discussed. Substantiated is the point that subjects of human physiology are not only special sections of physiology where functions are inherent only in human (physiology of intellectual activity, speech, labor, sport), but also in peculiarities of functions, specificity of regulation of each of physiological systems. By the example of physiology of kidney and water-salt balance there are shown borders of norm, peculiarities of regulation in human, new chapters of renal physiology which have appeared in connection with achievements of molecular physiology.

  8. Competent human research personnel.

    PubMed

    Arford, Patricia H; Knowles, Marilyn B; Sneed, Nancee V

    2008-12-01

    The process of conducting human research is highly regulated, rigorous, detailed oriented, potentially harmful, and, hopefully, beneficial. Health professionals learn how to critique, design, analyze, and apply human research but have minimal education in how to conduct human research. Successful completion of a 24-hour course was mandated for research support personnel to enhance the protection of human subjects, improve the integrity of data collected, and ensure cost-effective results. Routine audits demonstrated that the course substantially improved the documentation of the informed consent process, source documentation, protocol adherence, and regulatory compliance.

  9. Developing Human Resources through Actualizing Human Potential

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Clarken, Rodney H.

    2012-01-01

    The key to human resource development is in actualizing individual and collective thinking, feeling and choosing potentials related to our minds, hearts and wills respectively. These capacities and faculties must be balanced and regulated according to the standards of truth, love and justice for individual, community and institutional development,…

  10. IMMUNOASSAY HUMAN EXPOSURE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Human Exposure Research Branch has developed several enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods to support human exposure assessment studies. Immunoassays to detect low levels (<10 ng/mL) of chlorpyrifos in food, track-in dirt and house dust have been applied to sam...

  11. Human Mind Maps

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glass, Tom

    2016-01-01

    When students generate mind maps, or concept maps, the maps are usually on paper, computer screens, or a blackboard. Human Mind Maps require few resources and little preparation. The main requirements are space where students can move around and a little creativity and imagination. Mind maps can be used for a variety of purposes, and Human Mind…

  12. [Human science and medicine].

    PubMed

    Caporale, Maria

    2005-01-01

    Objective of Human Science teaching is to develop Knowledge and ability for rational analysis of bio-medical problems. The relationship between doctor and patient must be founded on dialogue, cooperation, understanding, on respect of human rights: life, health, physical integrity, privacy, autonomy, freedom and liability to guide ethical choices in clinical experience and rediscover anthropological significance of Medicine.

  13. Portraits of Human Greatness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saint Anselm's Coll., Manchester, NH.

    Examined is the Humanities Program at St. Anselm College, a two-year program of readings and lectures ordered chronologically from ancient to contemporary times--from the age of Classical Greek thought and the Old Testament to the twentieth century. The first year of the Humanities Program is organized in eight units on general modes of…

  14. Human vaccines & immunotherapeutics: news.

    PubMed

    Riedmann, Eva M

    2013-10-01

    Infant rotavirus vaccination provides for herd immunity Nonreplicating sporozoite vaccine protects humans against malaria Personalized brain cancer vaccine enters phase 2 trial Novel implantable therapeutic cancer vaccine to be tested in humans Clostridium difficile vaccine candidate successful in phase 1 CDC reports strong uptake of HPV vaccine in boys Whooping cough outbreak in Texas.

  15. Manage "Human Capital" Strategically

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odden, Allan

    2011-01-01

    To strategically manage human capital in education means restructuring the entire human resource system so that schools not only recruit and retain smart and capable individuals, but also manage them in ways that support the strategic directions of the organization. These management practices must be aligned with a district's education improvement…

  16. Human Powered Centrifuge

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mulenburg, Gerald M. (Inventor); Vernikos, Joan (Inventor)

    1997-01-01

    A human powered centrifuge has independently established turntable angular velocity and human power input. A control system allows excess input power to be stored as electric energy in a battery or dissipated as heat through a resistors. In a mechanical embodiment, the excess power is dissipated in a friction brake.

  17. Human gene therapy.

    PubMed

    Sandhu, J S; Keating, A; Hozumi, N

    1997-01-01

    Human gene therapy and its application for the treatment of human genetic disorders, such as cystic fibrosis, cancer, and other diseases, are discussed. Gene therapy is a technique in which a functioning gene is inserted into a human cell to correct a genetic error or to introduce a new function to the cell. Many methods, including retroviral vectors and non-viral vectors, have been developed for both ex vivo and in vivo gene transfer into cells. Vectors need to be developed that efficiently transfer genes to target cells, and promoter systems are required that regulate gene expression according to physiologic needs of the host cell. There are several safety and ethical issues related to manipulating the human genome that need to be resolved. Current gene therapy efforts focus on gene insertion into somatic cells only. Gene therapy has potential for the effective treatment of genetic disorders, and gene transfer techniques are being used for basic research, for example, in cancer, to examine the underlying mechanism of disease. There are still many technical obstacles to be overcome before human gene therapy can become a routine procedure. The current human genome project provides the sequences of a vast number of human genes, leading to the identification, characterization, and understanding of genes that are responsible for many human diseases.

  18. Fungi that Infect Humans.

    PubMed

    Köhler, Julia R; Hube, Bernhard; Puccia, Rosana; Casadevall, Arturo; Perfect, John R

    2017-06-01

    Fungi must meet four criteria to infect humans: growth at human body temperatures, circumvention or penetration of surface barriers, lysis and absorption of tissue, and resistance to immune defenses, including elevated body temperatures. Morphogenesis between small round, detachable cells and long, connected cells is the mechanism by which fungi solve problems of locomotion around or through host barriers. Secretion of lytic enzymes, and uptake systems for the released nutrients, are necessary if a fungus is to nutritionally utilize human tissue. Last, the potent human immune system evolved in the interaction with potential fungal pathogens, so few fungi meet all four conditions for a healthy human host. Paradoxically, the advances of modern medicine have made millions of people newly susceptible to fungal infections by disrupting immune defenses. This article explores how different members of four fungal phyla use different strategies to fulfill the four criteria to infect humans: the Entomophthorales, the Mucorales, the Ascomycota, and the Basidiomycota. Unique traits confer human pathogenic potential on various important members of these phyla: pathogenic Onygenales comprising thermal dimorphs such as Histoplasma and Coccidioides; the Cryptococcus spp. that infect immunocompromised as well as healthy humans; and important pathogens of immunocompromised patients-Candida, Pneumocystis, and Aspergillus spp. Also discussed are agents of neglected tropical diseases important in global health such as mycetoma and paracoccidiomycosis and common pathogens rarely implicated in serious illness such as dermatophytes. Commensalism is considered, as well as parasitism, in shaping genomes and physiological systems of hosts and fungi during evolution.

  19. The great human expansion.

    PubMed

    Henn, Brenna M; Cavalli-Sforza, L L; Feldman, Marcus W

    2012-10-30

    Genetic and paleoanthropological evidence is in accord that today's human population is the result of a great demic (demographic and geographic) expansion that began approximately 45,000 to 60,000 y ago in Africa and rapidly resulted in human occupation of almost all of the Earth's habitable regions. Genomic data from contemporary humans suggest that this expansion was accompanied by a continuous loss of genetic diversity, a result of what is called the "serial founder effect." In addition to genomic data, the serial founder effect model is now supported by the genetics of human parasites, morphology, and linguistics. This particular population history gave rise to the two defining features of genetic variation in humans: genomes from the substructured populations of Africa retain an exceptional number of unique variants, and there is a dramatic reduction in genetic diversity within populations living outside of Africa. These two patterns are relevant for medical genetic studies mapping genotypes to phenotypes and for inferring the power of natural selection in human history. It should be appreciated that the initial expansion and subsequent serial founder effect were determined by demographic and sociocultural factors associated with hunter-gatherer populations. How do we reconcile this major demic expansion with the population stability that followed for thousands years until the inventions of agriculture? We review advances in understanding the genetic diversity within Africa and the great human expansion out of Africa and offer hypotheses that can help to establish a more synthetic view of modern human evolution.

  20. Humane Education Projects Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Junior League of Ogden, UT.

    This handbook was developed to promote interest in humane education and to encourage the adoption of humane education projects. Although specifically designed to assist Junior Leagues in developing such projects, the content should prove valuable to animal welfare organizations, zoos, aquariums, nature centers, and other project-oriented groups…

  1. Investigating the Human Experience

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ducote, Richard L.; Peterson, Robert E.

    1975-01-01

    A project entitled "Investigating the Human Experience," which was funded by the National Endowment for the Humanities, enables the College of DuPage to conduct a series of free films in various off-campus facilities. Documentaries and recent TV specials are shown, followed by a group discussion moderated by an instructor from the…

  2. Manage "Human Capital" Strategically

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Odden, Allan

    2011-01-01

    To strategically manage human capital in education means restructuring the entire human resource system so that schools not only recruit and retain smart and capable individuals, but also manage them in ways that support the strategic directions of the organization. These management practices must be aligned with a district's education improvement…

  3. Environment and the Humanities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Rodney F., Ed.; And Others

    As a conference report, the booklet is primarily devoted to abstracts of papers presented at a Conference on Environment and Humanities held in Tallahassee, Florida, April 25-27, 1976. Dr. Huston Smith of Syracuse University, the main speaker, addressed the issue of "Humanities and Environmental Awareness." Other topics discussed…

  4. Evaluating the Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, Howard

    2013-01-01

    How can one measure the value of teaching the humanities? The problem of assessment and accountability is prominent today, of course, in secondary and higher education. It is perhaps even more acute for those who teach the humanities in nontraditional settings, such as medical and other professional schools. The public assumes that academes can…

  5. Quantification of human responses

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Steinlage, R. C.; Gantner, T. E.; Lim, P. Y. W.

    1992-01-01

    Human perception is a complex phenomenon which is difficult to quantify with instruments. For this reason, large panels of people are often used to elicit and aggregate subjective judgments. Print quality, taste, smell, sound quality of a stereo system, softness, and grading Olympic divers and skaters are some examples of situations where subjective measurements or judgments are paramount. We usually express what is in our mind through language as a medium but languages are limited in available choices of vocabularies, and as a result, our verbalizations are only approximate expressions of what we really have in mind. For lack of better methods to quantify subjective judgments, it is customary to set up a numerical scale such as 1, 2, 3, 4, 5 or 1, 2, 3, ..., 9, 10 for characterizing human responses and subjective judgments with no valid justification except that these scales are easy to understand and convenient to use. But these numerical scales are arbitrary simplifications of the complex human mind; the human mind is not restricted to such simple numerical variations. In fact, human responses and subjective judgments are psychophysical phenomena that are fuzzy entities and therefore difficult to handle by conventional mathematics and probability theory. The fuzzy mathematical approach provides a more realistic insight into understanding and quantifying human responses. This paper presents a method for quantifying human responses and subjective judgments without assuming a pattern of linear or numerical variation for human responses. In particular, quantification and evaluation of linguistic judgments was investigated.

  6. HUMAN HEALTH RESEARCH STRATEGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mission of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is to protect public health and safeguard the environment. Risk assessment is an integral part of this mission in that it identifies and characterizes environmentally related human health problems. The Human Health Re...

  7. Being Human in Sport.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Dorothy J.; Fahey, Brian W.

    The structure of humanness as the unique and essential being of the individual, constantly emerging through experience and the actualization of human potential within the sports environment, is the central theme of this book. Sport is defined broadly to include all forms of physical activity experiences. Each chapter represents an inquiry unique…

  8. Methods in human cytogenetics

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 4, discusses the various techniques used in the study human cytogenetics. The methods are discussed in historical order, from direct methods to tissue culture techniques, prenatal studies, meiotic studies, sex chromatin techniques, banding techniques, prophase banding and replication studies. Nomenclature of human chromosomes and quantitative methods are also mentioned. 60 refs., 3 figs.

  9. The Humanities' Value

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harpham, Geoffrey Galt

    2009-01-01

    Why should society support the humanities when so many people are suffering from the effects of the economic crisis? What claim do the humanities, or scholarship generally, have on increasingly limited resources? Shouldn't such pursuits be considered luxuries at a time when people should be focusing on essentials? The alleviation of human…

  10. The human genome project

    SciTech Connect

    Yager, T.D.; Zewert, T.E.; Hood, L.E. )

    1994-04-01

    The Human Genome Project (HGP) is a coordinated worldwide effort to precisely map the human genome and the genomes of selected model organisms. The first explicit proposal for this project dates from 1985 although its foundations (both conceptual and technological) can be traced back many years in genetics, molecular biology, and biotechnology. The HGP has matured rapidly and is producing results of great significance.

  11. IMMUNOASSAY HUMAN EXPOSURE STUDIES

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Human Exposure Research Branch has developed several enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods to support human exposure assessment studies. Immunoassays to detect low levels (<10 ng/mL) of chlorpyrifos in food, track-in dirt and house dust have been applied to sam...

  12. Quantifying Human Performance Reliability.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Askren, William B.; Regulinski, Thaddeus L.

    Human performance reliability for tasks in the time-space continuous domain is defined and a general mathematical model presented. The human performance measurement terms time-to-error and time-to-error-correction are defined. The model and measurement terms are tested using laboratory vigilance and manual control tasks. Error and error-correction…

  13. Annotated Humanities Programs.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Adler, Richard R.; Applebee, Arthur

    The humanities programs offered in 1968 by 227 United States secondary schools are listed alphabetically by state, including almost 100 new programs not annotated in the 1967 listing (see TE 000 224). Each annotation presents a brief description of the approach to study used in the particular humanities course (e.g., American Studies, Culture…

  14. Humane Education Projects Handbook.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Junior League of Ogden, UT.

    This handbook was developed to promote interest in humane education and to encourage the adoption of humane education projects. Although specifically designed to assist Junior Leagues in developing such projects, the content should prove valuable to animal welfare organizations, zoos, aquariums, nature centers, and other project-oriented groups…

  15. Humanism within Globalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Jennifer E.

    2014-01-01

    The complexity of adult learning connects it to almost all other facets of human endeavor. Consequently, the future of adult education depends, to a large extent on who participates and the quality of such participation. Quality participation, when teamed with environments committed to a concern for humanity, launches opportunities for varied…

  16. Human Dignity Through History.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Satterlie, Arthur L.

    A major educational need, as assessed by a committee of teachers, students, and community members, is to recognize acceptance of human dignity as the ultimate value in decision making. This concept provides a basis for the elementary and secondary social studies program. Although the concept of human dignity was promoted with the signing of the…

  17. Human Simulated Diving Experiments.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bruce, David S.; Speck, Dexter F.

    1979-01-01

    This report details several simulated divinq experiments on the human. These are suitable for undergraduate or graduate laboratories in human or environmental physiology. The experiment demonstrates that a diving reflex is precipitated by both facial cooling and apnea. (Author/RE)

  18. Introduction to human factors

    SciTech Connect

    Winters, J.M.

    1988-03-01

    Some background is given on the field of human factors. The nature of problems with current human/computer interfaces is discussed, some costs are identified, ideal attributes of graceful system interfaces are outlined, and some reasons are indicated why it's not easy to fix the problems. (LEW)

  19. Environment and the Humanities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Allen, Rodney F., Ed.; And Others

    As a conference report, the booklet is primarily devoted to abstracts of papers presented at a Conference on Environment and Humanities held in Tallahassee, Florida, April 25-27, 1976. Dr. Huston Smith of Syracuse University, the main speaker, addressed the issue of "Humanities and Environmental Awareness." Other topics discussed…

  20. Humanism within Globalization

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Weber, Jennifer E.

    2014-01-01

    The complexity of adult learning connects it to almost all other facets of human endeavor. Consequently, the future of adult education depends, to a large extent on who participates and the quality of such participation. Quality participation, when teamed with environments committed to a concern for humanity, launches opportunities for varied…

  1. Human-System Technology

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-11-10

    Computing, this multidisciplinary field exploits advances in cognitive research together with those in computer science and related areas to optimize the...deep understanding of human cognition, perception, and/or locomotion; the relevant areas of computer science ; and the nature of the human activity to be

  2. Evaluating the Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brody, Howard

    2013-01-01

    How can one measure the value of teaching the humanities? The problem of assessment and accountability is prominent today, of course, in secondary and higher education. It is perhaps even more acute for those who teach the humanities in nontraditional settings, such as medical and other professional schools. The public assumes that academes can…

  3. HUMAN HEALTH RESEARCH STRATEGY

    EPA Science Inventory

    The mission of the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency (EPA) is to protect public health and safeguard the environment. Risk assessment is an integral part of this mission in that it identifies and characterizes environmentally related human health problems. The Human Health Re...

  4. The Humanities' Value

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harpham, Geoffrey Galt

    2009-01-01

    Why should society support the humanities when so many people are suffering from the effects of the economic crisis? What claim do the humanities, or scholarship generally, have on increasingly limited resources? Shouldn't such pursuits be considered luxuries at a time when people should be focusing on essentials? The alleviation of human…

  5. Assessment of Human Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Mount, Frances; Foley, Tico

    1999-01-01

    Human Factors Engineering, often referred to as Ergonomics, is a science that applies a detailed understanding of human characteristics, capabilities, and limitations to the design, evaluation, and operation of environments, tools, and systems for work and daily living. Human Factors is the investigation, design, and evaluation of equipment, techniques, procedures, facilities, and human interfaces, and encompasses all aspects of human activity from manual labor to mental processing and leisure time enjoyments. In spaceflight applications, human factors engineering seeks to: (1) ensure that a task can be accomplished, (2) maintain productivity during spaceflight, and (3) ensure the habitability of the pressurized living areas. DSO 904 served as a vehicle for the verification and elucidation of human factors principles and tools in the microgravity environment. Over six flights, twelve topics were investigated. This study documented the strengths and limitations of human operators in a complex, multifaceted, and unique environment. By focusing on the man-machine interface in space flight activities, it was determined which designs allow astronauts to be optimally productive during valuable and costly space flights. Among the most promising areas of inquiry were procedures, tools, habitat, environmental conditions, tasking, work load, flexibility, and individual control over work.

  6. Vaccination against human papillomavirus

    PubMed Central

    Mello, Claudia Figueiredo

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human papillomavirus infection is common and causes different manifestations. This infection is a public health concern because it has been associated with genital tract malignant diseases among men and women. Currently two vaccines are available to prevent the human papillomavirus infection and its associated diseases. PMID:24488402

  7. Portraits of Human Greatness.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Saint Anselm's Coll., Manchester, NH.

    Examined is the Humanities Program at St. Anselm College, a two-year program of readings and lectures ordered chronologically from ancient to contemporary times--from the age of Classical Greek thought and the Old Testament to the twentieth century. The first year of the Humanities Program is organized in eight units on general modes of…

  8. Incorporating Human Interindividual Biotransformation ...

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The protection of sensitive individuals within a population dictates that measures other than central tendencies be employed to estimate risk. The refinement of human health risk assessments for chemicals metabolized by the liver to reflect data on human variability can be accomplished through (1) the characterization of enzyme expression in large banks of human liver samples, (2) the employment of appropriate techniques for the quantification and extrapolation of metabolic rates derived in vitro, and (3) the judicious application of physiologically based pharmacokinetic (PBPK) modeling. While in vitro measurements of specific biochemical reactions from multiple human samples can yield qualitatively valuable data on human variance, such measures must be put into the perspective of the intact human to yield the most valuable predictions of metabolic differences among humans. For quantitative metabolism data to be the most valuable in risk assessment, they must be tied to human anatomy and physiology, and the impact of their variance evaluated under real exposure scenarios. For chemicals metabolized in the liver, the concentration of parent chemical in the liver represents the substrate concentration in the MichaelisMenten description of metabolism. Metabolic constants derived in vitro may be extrapolated to the intact liver, when appropriate conditions are met. Metabolic capacity Vmax; the maximal rate of the reaction) can be scaled directly to the concentration

  9. Mars Human Exploration Objectives

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Briggs, Geoff

    1998-01-01

    This paper reviews the objectives and other considerations of Human exploration of Mars. The objectives of human exploration of Mars are: (1) to learn how Mars is similar to, and different from, Earth; (2) to explore possible life, past and present; (3) to discover what Mars is like now from the perspective of Geoscience and geologic history; and (4) how did Mars form and how did its formation differ from Earth. Considerations of human Martian exploration involve: (1) having a capable base laboratory; (2) having long range transportation; (3) having operational autonomy of the crew, and the requirement of the crew to possess a range of new cognitive processes along with easy communications with terrestrial colleagues; and finally (4) creating the human habitat along with human factors which involve more than just survivability.

  10. Human Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Woolford, Barbara; Mount, Frances

    2004-01-01

    The first human space flight, in the early 1960s, was aimed primarily at determining whether humans could indeed survive and function in micro-gravity. Would eating and sleeping be possible? What mental and physical tasks could be performed? Subsequent programs increased the complexity of the tasks the crew performed. Table 1 summarizes the history of U.S. space flight, showing the projects, their dates, crew sizes, and mission durations. With over forty years of experience with human space flight, the emphasis now is on how to design space vehicles, habitats, and missions to produce the greatest returns to human knowledge. What are the roles of the humans in space flight in low earth orbit, on the moon, and in exploring Mars?

  11. Implications for human health.

    PubMed Central

    Golberg, L

    1979-01-01

    To analyze the implications for human health, the toxicologist requires four sets of data: the results of toxicity and other studies in animals; quantitative data on actual or potential human exposure; whatever information is available on effects of exposure in man; and the statistical extrapolations from the dose-response relationships in animals to the (usually) much lower levels of human exposure. Professional expertise in toxicology is essential to assess the nature and severity of the toxic effects observed in animals, including such characteristics as potential for progression, irreversibility and production of incapacity. Given sufficient data, an estimate can be arrived at of the likelihood that such effects will be elicited in human populations of differing susceptibilities. The criteria by which the overall implications for human health can be judged comprise both the direct effects on man, as well as the indirect consequences stemming from environmental impacts. PMID:540600

  12. Beliefs about Human Extinction

    SciTech Connect

    Tonn, Bruce Edward

    2009-11-01

    This paper presents the results of a web-based survey about futures issues. Among many questions, respondents were asked whether they believe humans will become extinct. Forty-five percent of the almost 600 respondents believe that humans will become extinct. Many of those holding this believe felt that humans could become extinct within 500-1000 years. Others estimated extinction 5000 or more years into the future. A logistic regression model was estimated to explore the bases for this belief. It was found that people who describe themselves a secular are more likely to hold this belief than people who describe themselves as being Protestant. Older respondents and those who believe that humans have little control over their future also hold this belief. In addition, people who are more apt to think about the future and are better able to imagine potential futures tend to also believe that humans will become extinct.

  13. Dogs catch human yawns.

    PubMed

    Joly-Mascheroni, Ramiro M; Senju, Atsushi; Shepherd, Alex J

    2008-10-23

    This study is the first to demonstrate that human yawns are possibly contagious to domestic dogs (Canis familiaris). Twenty-nine dogs observed a human yawning or making control mouth movements. Twenty-one dogs yawned when they observed a human yawning, but control mouth movements did not elicit yawning from any of them. The presence of contagious yawning in dogs suggests that this phenomenon is not specific to primate species and may indicate that dogs possess the capacity for a rudimentary form of empathy. Since yawning is known to modulate the levels of arousal, yawn contagion may help coordinate dog-human interaction and communication. Understanding the mechanism as well as the function of contagious yawning between humans and dogs requires more detailed investigation.

  14. Archaea on human skin.

    PubMed

    Probst, Alexander J; Auerbach, Anna K; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The recent era of exploring the human microbiome has provided valuable information on microbial inhabitants, beneficials and pathogens. Screening efforts based on DNA sequencing identified thousands of bacterial lineages associated with human skin but provided only incomplete and crude information on Archaea. Here, we report for the first time the quantification and visualization of Archaea from human skin. Based on 16 S rRNA gene copies Archaea comprised up to 4.2% of the prokaryotic skin microbiome. Most of the gene signatures analyzed belonged to the Thaumarchaeota, a group of Archaea we also found in hospitals and clean room facilities. The metabolic potential for ammonia oxidation of the skin-associated Archaea was supported by the successful detection of thaumarchaeal amoA genes in human skin samples. However, the activity and possible interaction with human epithelial cells of these associated Archaea remains an open question. Nevertheless, in this study we provide evidence that Archaea are part of the human skin microbiome and discuss their potential for ammonia turnover on human skin.

  15. Human Space Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jeevarajan, Antony

    2014-01-01

    The Mars probe, launched by India a few months ago, is on its way to Mars. At this juncture, it is appropriate to talk about the opportunities presented to us for the Human Exploration of Mars. I am planning to highlight some of the challenges to take humans to Mars, descend, land, stay, ascend and return home safely. The logistics of carrying the necessary accessories to stay at Mars will be delivered in multiple stages using robotic missions. The primary ingredients for human survival is air, water, food and shelter and the necessity to recycle the primary ingredients will be articulated. Humans have to travel beyond the van Allen radiation belt under microgravity condition during this inter-planetary travel for about 6 months minimum one way. The deconditioning of human system under microgravity conditions and protection of humans from Galactic cosmic radiation during the travel should be taken into consideration. The multi-disciplinary effort to keep the humans safe and functional during this journey will be addressed.

  16. Human fetal thyroid function.

    PubMed

    Polak, Michel

    2014-01-01

    The early steps of thyroid development that lead to its function in the human fetus and subsequently the further maturation that allows the human fetus to secrete thyroxine (T4) in a significant amount are reviewed here. We underline the importance of the transfer of T4 from the pregnant woman to her fetus, which contributes at all stages of the pregnancy to fetal thyroid function and development. In the first trimester of pregnancy, the temporal and structural correlation of thyroid hormone synthesis with folliculogenesis supported the concept that structural and functional maturations are closely related. Human thyroid terminal differentiation follows a precisely timed gene expression program. The crucial role of the sodium/iodine symporter for the onset of thyroid function in the human fetus is shown. Fetal T4 is detected by the eleventh week of gestation and progressively increases throughout. The pattern of thyroid hormones and thyroid-stimulating hormone levels in the course of pregnancy is given from fetal blood sampling data, and the mechanisms governing this maturation in the human fetus are discussed. Finally an example of primary human fetal thyroid dysfunction, such as in Down syndrome, is given. The understanding of the physiology of the human fetal thyroid function is the basis for fetal medicine in the field of thyroidology.

  17. Archaea on Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Probst, Alexander J.; Auerbach, Anna K.; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The recent era of exploring the human microbiome has provided valuable information on microbial inhabitants, beneficials and pathogens. Screening efforts based on DNA sequencing identified thousands of bacterial lineages associated with human skin but provided only incomplete and crude information on Archaea. Here, we report for the first time the quantification and visualization of Archaea from human skin. Based on 16 S rRNA gene copies Archaea comprised up to 4.2% of the prokaryotic skin microbiome. Most of the gene signatures analyzed belonged to the Thaumarchaeota, a group of Archaea we also found in hospitals and clean room facilities. The metabolic potential for ammonia oxidation of the skin-associated Archaea was supported by the successful detection of thaumarchaeal amoA genes in human skin samples. However, the activity and possible interaction with human epithelial cells of these associated Archaea remains an open question. Nevertheless, in this study we provide evidence that Archaea are part of the human skin microbiome and discuss their potential for ammonia turnover on human skin. PMID:23776475

  18. Propelling medical humanities in China.

    PubMed

    Tang, Wei

    2017-05-23

    Advances in the study of the medical humanities and medical humanities education have been made over the past few decades. Many influential journals have published articles examining the role of medical humanities and medical humanities education, the development and evaluation of medical humanities, and the design of a curriculum for medical humanities education in Western countries. However, most articles related to medical humanities in China were published in Chinese, moreover, researchers have worked in relative isolation and published in disparate journals, so their work has not been systematically presented to and evaluated by international readers. The six companion articles featured in this issue describe the current status and challenge of medical humanities and medical humanities education in China in the hope of providing international readers with a novel and meaningful glimpse into medical humanities in China. This Journal is calling for greater publication of research on medical humanities and medical humanities education to propel medical humanities in China.

  19. Human Plasma Protein C

    PubMed Central

    Kisiel, Walter

    1979-01-01

    Protein C is a vitamin K-dependent protein, which exists in bovine plasma as a precursor of a serine protease. In this study, protein C was isolated to homogeneity from human plasma by barium citrate adsorption and elution, ammonium sulfate fractionation, DEAE-Sephadex chromatography, dextran sulfate agarose chromatography, and preparative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Human protein C (Mr = 62,000) contains 23% carbohydrate and is composed of a light chain (Mr = 21,000) and a heavy chain (Mr = 41,000) held together by a disulfide bond(s). The light chain has an amino-terminal sequence of Ala-Asn-Ser-Phe-Leu- and the heavy chain has an aminoterminal sequence of Asp-Pro-Glu-Asp-Gln. The residues that are identical to bovine protein C are underlined. Incubation of human protein C with human α-thrombin at an enzyme to substrate weight ratio of 1:50 resulted in the formation of activated protein C, an enzyme with serine amidase activity. In the activation reaction, the apparent molecular weight of the heavy chain decreased from 41,000 to 40,000 as determined by gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate. No apparent change in the molecular weight of the light chain was observed in the activation process. The heavy chain of human activated protein C also contains the active-site serine residue as evidenced by its ability to react with radiolabeled diisopropyl fluorophosphate. Human activated protein C markedly prolongs the kaolin-cephalin clotting time of human plasma, but not that of bovine plasma. The amidolytic and anticoagulant activities of human activated protein C were completely obviated by prior incubation of the enzyme with diisopropyl fluorophosphate. These results indicate that human protein C, like its bovine counterpart, exists in plasma as a zymogen and is converted to a serine protease by limited proteolysis with attendant anticoagulant activity. Images PMID:468991

  20. Genetics of human hydrocephalus

    PubMed Central

    Williams, Michael A.; Rigamonti, Daniele

    2006-01-01

    Human hydrocephalus is a common medical condition that is characterized by abnormalities in the flow or resorption of cerebrospinal fluid (CSF), resulting in ventricular dilatation. Human hydrocephalus can be classified into two clinical forms, congenital and acquired. Hydrocephalus is one of the complex and multifactorial neurological disorders. A growing body of evidence indicates that genetic factors play a major role in the pathogenesis of hydrocephalus. An understanding of the genetic components and mechanism of this complex disorder may offer us significant insights into the molecular etiology of impaired brain development and an accumulation of the cerebrospinal fluid in cerebral compartments during the pathogenesis of hydrocephalus. Genetic studies in animal models have started to open the way for understanding the underlying pathology of hydrocephalus. At least 43 mutants/loci linked to hereditary hydrocephalus have been identified in animal models and humans. Up to date, 9 genes associated with hydrocephalus have been identified in animal models. In contrast, only one such gene has been identified in humans. Most of known hydrocephalus gene products are the important cytokines, growth factors or related molecules in the cellular signal pathways during early brain development. The current molecular genetic evidence from animal models indicate that in the early development stage, impaired and abnormal brain development caused by abnormal cellular signaling and functioning, all these cellular and developmental events would eventually lead to the congenital hydrocephalus. Owing to our very primitive knowledge of the genetics and molecular pathogenesis of human hydrocephalus, it is difficult to evaluate whether data gained from animal models can be extrapolated to humans. Initiation of a large population genetics study in humans will certainly provide invaluable information about the molecular and cellular etiology and the developmental mechanisms of human

  1. Human Resource Accounting.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1984-12-01

    I AD-RI54 787 HUMAN RESOURCE ACCOUNTING (U) NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL 1/2 F MONTEREY CR J C MARTINS DEC 84 1UNCLASSIFIED /G 5/9 NL -~~ .. 2. . L...Monterey, California JUN1im THESISG HUMAN RESOURCE ACCOUNTING by Joaquim C. Martins LLJ.. December 1984 Thesis Advisor: R.A. McGonigal Approved for...REPORT & PECRI00 COVERED Master’s Thesis; Human Resource Accounting Dcme 94- ’ 6. PERFORMING ORG. REPORT NUMBER 7. AUTOR(*) . CONTRACT OR GRANT NUMBER

  2. Human Computer Interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhagwani, Akhilesh; Sengar, Chitransh; Talwaniper, Jyotsna; Sharma, Shaan

    2012-08-01

    The paper basically deals with the study of HCI (Human computer interaction) or BCI(Brain-Computer-Interfaces) Technology that can be used for capturing brain signals and translating them into commands that allow humans to control (just by thinking) devices such as computers, robots, rehabilitation technology and virtual reality environments. The HCI is based as a direct communication pathway between the brain and an external device. BCIs are often aimed at assisting, augmenting, or repairing human cognitive or sensory-motor functions.The paper also deals with many advantages of BCI Technology along with some of its applications and some major drawbacks.

  3. Human exposure to aluminium.

    PubMed

    Exley, Christopher

    2013-10-01

    Human activities have circumvented the efficient geochemical cycling of aluminium within the lithosphere and therewith opened a door, which was previously only ajar, onto the biotic cycle to instigate and promote the accumulation of aluminium in biota and especially humans. Neither these relatively recent activities nor the entry of aluminium into the living cycle are showing any signs of abating and it is thus now imperative that we understand as fully as possible how humans are exposed to aluminium and the future consequences of a burgeoning exposure and body burden. The aluminium age is upon us and there is now an urgent need to understand how to live safely and effectively with aluminium.

  4. Aluminium in human sweat.

    PubMed

    Minshall, Clare; Nadal, Jodie; Exley, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    It is of burgeoning importance that the human body burden of aluminium is understood and is measured. There are surprisingly few data to describe human excretion of systemic aluminium and almost no reliable data which relate to aluminium in sweat. We have measured the aluminium content of sweat in 20 healthy volunteers following mild exercise. The concentration of aluminium ranged from 329 to 5329μg/L. These data equate to a daily excretion of between 234 and 7192μg aluminium and they strongly suggest that perspiration is the major route of excretion of systemic aluminium in humans. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier GmbH. All rights reserved.

  5. Human Use Index (Future)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    Human land uses may have major impacts on ecosystems, affecting biodiversity, habitat, air and water quality. The human use index (also known as U-index) is the percentage of human land use in an area, including agriculture, urban and suburban development, and mining. Low values indicate little disturbance of natural land cover. More information about these resources, including the variables used in this study, may be found here: https://edg.epa.gov/data/Public/ORD/NERL/ReVA/ReVA_Data.zip.

  6. Introduction to human factors.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Eric

    2012-03-01

    This paper provides an introduction to "human factors engineering," an applied science that seeks to optimize usability and safety of systems. Human factors engineering pursues this goal by aligning system design with the perceptual, cognitive, and physical capabilities of users. Human factors issues loom large in the diabetes management domain because patients and health care professionals interact with a complex variety of systems, including medical device hardware and software, which are themselves embedded within larger systems of institutions, people, and processes. Usability considerations must be addressed in these systems and devices to ensure safe and effective diabetes management.

  7. Human pancreas development.

    PubMed

    Jennings, Rachel E; Berry, Andrew A; Strutt, James P; Gerrard, David T; Hanley, Neil A

    2015-09-15

    A wealth of data and comprehensive reviews exist on pancreas development in mammals, primarily mice, and other vertebrates. By contrast, human pancreatic development has been less comprehensively reviewed. Here, we draw together those studies conducted directly in human embryonic and fetal tissue to provide an overview of what is known about human pancreatic development. We discuss the relevance of this work to manufacturing insulin-secreting β-cells from pluripotent stem cells and to different aspects of diabetes, especially permanent neonatal diabetes, and its underlying causes.

  8. Human Genome Project

    SciTech Connect

    Block, S.; Cornwall, J.; Dally, W.; Dyson, F.; Fortson, N.; Joyce, G.; Kimble, H. J.; Lewis, N.; Max, C.; Prince, T.; Schwitters, R.; Weinberger, P.; Woodin, W. H.

    1998-01-04

    The study reviews Department of Energy supported aspects of the United States Human Genome Project, the joint National Institutes of Health/Department of Energy program to characterize all human genetic material, to discover the set of human genes, and to render them accessible for further biological study. The study concentrates on issues of technology, quality assurance/control, and informatics relevant to current effort on the genome project and needs beyond it. Recommendations are presented on areas of the genome program that are of particular interest to and supported by the Department of Energy.

  9. Oncogenic human papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    McBride, Alison A

    2017-10-19

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are an ancient group of viruses with small, double-stranded DNA circular genomes. They are species-specific and have a strict tropism for mucosal and cutaneous stratified squamous epithelial surfaces of the host. A subset of these viruses has been demonstrated to be the causative agent of several human cancers. Here, we review the biology, natural history, evolution and cancer association of the oncogenic HPVs.This article is part of the themed issue 'Human oncogenic viruses'. © 2017 The Authors.

  10. Oncogenic human papillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are an ancient group of viruses with small, double-stranded DNA circular genomes. They are species-specific and have a strict tropism for mucosal and cutaneous stratified squamous epithelial surfaces of the host. A subset of these viruses has been demonstrated to be the causative agent of several human cancers. Here, we review the biology, natural history, evolution and cancer association of the oncogenic HPVs. This article is part of the themed issue ‘Human oncogenic viruses’. PMID:28893940

  11. Sulfatases and human disease.

    PubMed

    Diez-Roux, Graciana; Ballabio, Andrea

    2005-01-01

    Sulfatases are a highly conserved family of proteins that cleave sulfate esters from a wide range of substrates. The importance of sulfatases in human metabolism is underscored by the presence of at least eight human monogenic diseases caused by the deficiency of individual sulfatases. Sulfatase activity requires a unique posttranslational modification, which is impaired in patients with multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD) due to a mutation of the sulfatase modifying factor 1 (SUMF1). Here we review current knowledge and future perspectives on the evolution of the sulfatase gene family, on the role of these enzymes in human metabolism, and on new developments in the therapy of sulfatase deficiencies.

  12. Mitotic entry: Non-genetic heterogeneity exposes the requirement for Plk1.

    PubMed

    Aspinall, Claire F; Zheleva, Daniella; Tighe, Anthony; Taylor, Stephen S

    2015-11-03

    The quest to develop novel antimitotic chemotherapy agents has led to the generation of several small molecule inhibitors targeting Plk1, a protein kinase required for multiple aspects of cell division. Previous studies have shown that upon exposure to Plk1 inhibitors, cells enter mitosis, delay briefly in prophase and then arrest in mitosis due to an inability to undergo centrosome separation. Here, we show that four different classes of Plk1 inhibitor block mitotic entry in several cancer cell lines and non-transformed RPE-1 cells. The proportion of cells that arrest in G2 is cell line and concentration dependent, and is subject to non-genetic heterogeneity. Following inhibitor washout, the G2 block is alleviated and cells enter mitosis but then fail to complete cell division indicating that most Plk1 inhibitors are not fully reversible. An exception is CYC140844; in contrast to five other inhibitors examined here, this novel Plk1 inhibitor is fully reversible. We discuss the implications for developing Plk1 inhibitors as chemotherapy agents and research tools.

  13. Shugoshin-1 balances Aurora B kinase activity via PP2A to promote chromosome bi-orientation.

    PubMed

    Meppelink, Amanda; Kabeche, Lilian; Vromans, Martijn J M; Compton, Duane A; Lens, Susanne M A

    2015-04-28

    Correction of faulty kinetochore-microtubule attachments is essential for faithful chromosome segregation and dictated by the opposing activities of Aurora B kinase and PP1 and PP2A phosphatases. How kinase and phosphatase activities are appropriately balanced is less clear. Here, we show that a centromeric pool of PP2A-B56 counteracts Aurora B T-loop phosphorylation and is recruited to centromeres through Shugoshin-1 (Sgo1). In non-transformed RPE-1 cells, Aurora B, Sgo1, and PP2A-B56 are enriched on centromeres and levels diminish as chromosomes establish bi-oriented attachments. Elevating Sgo1 levels at centromeres recruits excess PP2A-B56, and this counteracts Aurora B kinase activity, undermining efficient correction of kinetochore-microtubule attachment errors. Conversely, Sgo1-depleted cells display reduced centromeric localization of Aurora B, whereas the remaining kinase is hyperactive due to concomitant reduction of centromeric PP2A-B56. Our data suggest that Sgo1 can tune the stability of kinetochore-microtubule attachments through recruitment of PP2A-B56 that balances Aurora B activity at the centromere. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Aerospace Human Factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jordan, Kevin

    1999-01-01

    The following contains the final report on the activities related to the Cooperative Agreement between the human factors research group at NASA Ames Research Center and the Psychology Department at San Jose State University. The participating NASA Ames division has been, as the organization has changed, the Aerospace Human Factors Research Division (ASHFRD and Code FL), the Flight Management and Human Factors Research Division (Code AF), and the Human Factors Research and Technology Division (Code IH). The inclusive dates for the report are November 1, 1984 to January 31, 1999. Throughout the years, approximately 170 persons worked on the cooperative agreements in one capacity or another. The Cooperative Agreement provided for research personnel to collaborate with senior scientists in ongoing NASA ARC research. Finally, many post-MA/MS and post-doctoral personnel contributed to the projects. It is worth noting that 10 former cooperative agreement personnel were hired into civil service positions directly from the agreements.

  15. Human Reliability Program Overview

    SciTech Connect

    Bodin, Michael

    2012-09-25

    This presentation covers the high points of the Human Reliability Program, including certification/decertification, critical positions, due process, organizational structure, program components, personnel security, an overview of the US DOE reliability program, retirees and academia, and security program integration.

  16. Creativity: The Human Resource.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Richard W.

    1979-01-01

    The author discusses an exhibition entitled "Creativity--The Human Resource." The exhibition examines the work of 15 Americans, such as designer Buckminster Fuller and artist Judy Chicago, who have contributed in special ways to the arts and sciences. (PHR)

  17. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Other Funding Find NCI funding for small business innovation, technology transfer, and contracts Training Cancer Training at ... of Cancer, 1975-2009, featuring the burden and trends in human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated cancers and HPV ...

  18. Human Resource Planning

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hoffman, W. H.; Wyatt, L. L.

    1977-01-01

    By using the total resource approach, we have focused attention on the need to integrate human resource planning with other business plans and highlighted the importance of a productivity strategy. (Author)

  19. Retroviruses and human pathology

    SciTech Connect

    Gallo, R.C.; Stehelin, D.; Varnier, O.E.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains four sections, each consisting of several papers. The section headings are: Retroviruses and the Murine Model System;Retroviruses and the Vertebrate Model System;Retroviruses and Human Pathology;and Retroviruses and Oncogenes.

  20. Finland and the Humanities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fromm, Hans

    1986-01-01

    Reviews the status of the humanities in Finland, beginning with the post World War II era. Comments on state-supported programs and the successes achieved in such areas as linguistics, philology, literature, and historical research. (JDH)

  1. Teaching about Human Geography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlene, Vickie J.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a sampling of items from the ERIC database concerning the teaching of human geography. Includes documents dealing with Africa, Asia, the United States, Canada, Antarctica, and geographic concepts. Explains how to obtain ERIC documents. (SG)

  2. Pesticides and Human Health

    MedlinePlus

    ... Control a pest Integrated Pest Management What are pesticides? Herbicides Disinfectants Fungicides Insecticides Natural and Biological Pesticides ... Rodenticides Other types of pesticides Disponible en español Pesticides and Human Health Pesticides have a specific purpose ...

  3. Human Biomass Consumption

    NASA Image and Video Library

    Humans are using an increasing amount of Earth’s annual production of plants. Research shows that, from 1995 to 2005, consumption rose from 20 to 25 percent of the planet's annual production. Wha...

  4. Spaceflight Versus Human Spaceflight

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Barr, Stephanie

    2013-09-01

    Spaceflight is challenging. Human spaceflight is far more challenging,.Those familiar with spaceflight recognize that human spaceflight is more than tacking an environmental control system on an existing spacecraft, that there are a number of serious technical challenges involved in sending people out into space and bringing them back home safely.The return trip, bringing the crew back to the surface of the earth safely, is more than just an additional task, it's the new imperative. Differences between manned and unmanned spaceflight are more than technical. The human element forces a change in philosophy, a mindset that will likely touch every aspect of flight from launch through mission and return. Seasoned space professionals used to the paradigms and priorities of unmanned flight need to be cognizant of these differences and some of the implications, perhaps most especially because mission success and human safety priorities are sometimes contradictory.

  5. Will Technology Humanize Us?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Snider, Robert C.

    1972-01-01

    The author considers the question of whether technology will cause humanization or dehumanization in the schools. He concludes that we can not stop tecchnology; we can only give it direction and purpose. (Author/MS)

  6. Teaching about Human Geography.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schlene, Vickie J.

    1991-01-01

    Presents a sampling of items from the ERIC database concerning the teaching of human geography. Includes documents dealing with Africa, Asia, the United States, Canada, Antarctica, and geographic concepts. Explains how to obtain ERIC documents. (SG)

  7. Approaches to Human Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Budd, Richard W., Ed.; Ruben, Brent D., Ed.

    This anthology of essays approaches human communication from the points of view of: anthropology, art biology, economics, encounter groups, semantics, general system theory, history, information theory, international behavior, journalism, linguistics, mass media, neurophysiology, nonverbal behavior, organizational behavior, philosophy, political…

  8. Human Computers 1947

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1947-01-01

    Langley's human computers at work in 1947. The female presence at Langley, who performed mathematical computations for male staff. Photograph published in Winds of Change, 75th Anniversary NASA publication (page 48), by James Schultz.

  9. Uniquely human social cognition.

    PubMed

    Saxe, Rebecca

    2006-04-01

    Recent data identify distinct components of social cognition associated with five brain regions. In posterior temporal cortex, the extrastriate body area is associated with perceiving the form of other human bodies. A nearby region in the posterior superior temporal sulcus is involved in interpreting the motions of a human body in terms of goals. A distinct region at the temporo-parietal junction supports the uniquely human ability to reason about the contents of mental states. Medial prefrontal cortex is divided into at least two subregions. Ventral medial prefrontal cortex is implicated in emotional empathy, whereas dorsal medial prefrontal cortex is implicated in the uniquely human representation of triadic relations between two minds and an object, supporting shared attention and collaborative goals.

  10. Human Spaceflight Safety Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-02

    Reitred astronaut Lt. Gen. Thomas Stafford testifies during a hearing before the House Subcommitte on Space and Aeronautics regarding Safety of Human Spaceflight on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, Dec. 2, 2009, in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  11. Human Spaceflight Safety Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-02

    Dr. Joseph R. Fragola, Vice President, Valador, Inc., testifies during a hearing before the House Subcommitte on Space and Aeronautics regarding Safety of Human Spaceflight on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, Dec. 2, 2009, in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  12. Human Spaceflight Safety Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-02

    Jeff Hanley, Constellation Program Manager at NASA, testifies before a hearing before the House Subcommitte on Space and Aeronautics regarding Safety of Human Spaceflight on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, Dec. 2, 2009, in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  13. Human Spaceflight Safety Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-02

    Bretton Alexander, President of the Commercial Spaceflight Federation, testifies during a hearing before the House Subcommitte on Space and Aeronautics regarding Safety of Human Spaceflight on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, Dec. 2, 2009, in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  14. Human Spaceflight Safety Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-02

    Constellation Program Manager Jeff Hanley testifies during a hearing before the House Subcommitte on Space and Aeronautics regarding Safety of Human Spaceflight on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, Dec. 2, 2009, in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  15. Statement on Human Cloning

    MedlinePlus

    ... form Search American Association for the Advancement of Science Statement on Human Cloning Tweet The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) recognizes the intense debates within our society ...

  16. Creativity: The Human Resource.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lewis, Richard W.

    1979-01-01

    The author discusses an exhibition entitled "Creativity--The Human Resource." The exhibition examines the work of 15 Americans, such as designer Buckminster Fuller and artist Judy Chicago, who have contributed in special ways to the arts and sciences. (PHR)

  17. Human X chromosome

    SciTech Connect

    1993-12-31

    Chapter 21, describes in detail the human X chromosome. X chromatin (or Barr body) formation, inactivation and reactivation of the X chromosome, X;Y translocations, and sex reversal are discussed. 30 refs., 3 figs.

  18. Statement on Human Cloning

    MedlinePlus

    ... form Search American Association for the Advancement of Science Statement on Human Cloning Tweet The American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) recognizes the intense debates within our society ...

  19. Human Systems Integration Introduction

    NASA Image and Video Library

    This lecture provides an overview of Human Systems Integration (HSI), its implementation cost and return on investment, HSI domains, how HSI fits into the NASA organization structure, HSI roles and...

  20. The Human Hazard.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Tickell, Crispin

    1995-01-01

    Examines the plight of environmental refugees and the adequacy of political responses to the situation. Discusses the consequences of accelerated environmental change, particularly the impact of global warming on human migration. (LZ)

  1. Bridging Humanism and Behaviorism.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Chu, Lily

    1980-01-01

    Humanistic behaviorism may provide the necessary bridge between behaviorism and humanism. Perhaps the most humanistic approach to teaching is to learn how certain changes will help students and how these changes can be accomplished. (Author/MLF)

  2. Humanism vs. Behaviorism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Madeline

    1977-01-01

    Author argues that humanism and behaviorism are not necessarily exclusive of one another, and that principles of behaviorism, when thoughtfully applied, can lead to the achievement of humanistic goals. (RW)

  3. Viruses and human cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Gallo, R.C.; Haseltine, W.; Klein, G.; Zur Hausen, H.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains papers on the following topics: Immunology and Epidemiology, Biology and Pathogenesis, Models of Pathogenesis and Treatment, Simian and Bovine Retroviruses, Human Papilloma Viruses, EBV and Herpesvirus, and Hepatitis B Virus.

  4. Science and Human Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cassin, Rene

    1972-01-01

    Practices and products of scientific research have been threatening human privacy. Strong guidelines should be enforced by world organizations to prevent this. Practicing professionals should also resist temptations for infringing upon other's rights. (PS)

  5. Habitability and Human Factors Contributions to Human Space Flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sumaya, Jennifer Boyer

    2011-01-01

    This slide presentation reviews the work of the Habitability and Human Factors Branch in support of human space flight in two main areas: Applied support to major space programs, and Space research. The field of Human Factors applies knowledge of human characteristics for the design of safer, more effective, and more efficient systems. This work is in several areas of the human space program: (1) Human-System Integration (HSI), (2) Orion Crew Exploration Vehicle, (3) Extravehicular Activity (EVA), (4) Lunar Surface Systems, (5) International Space Station (ISS), and (6) Human Research Program (HRP). After detailing the work done in these areas, the facilities that are available for human factors work are shown.

  6. Pushing Human Frontiers

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Zubrin, Robert

    2005-01-01

    With human colonization of Mars, I think you will see a higher standard of civilization, just as America set a higher standard of civilization which then promulgated back into Europe. I think that if you want to maximize human potential, you need a higher standard of civilization, and that becomes an example that benefits everyone. Without an open frontier, closed world ideologies, such as the Malthus Theory, tend to come to the forefront. It is that there are limited resources; therefore, we are all in deadly competition with each other for the limited pot. The result is tyrannical and potentially genocidal regimes, and we've already seen this in the twentieth century. There s no truth in the Malthus Theory, because human beings are the creators of their resources. With every mouth comes a pair of hands and a brain. But if it seems to be true, you have a vector in this direction, and it is extremely unfortunate. It is only in a universe of infinite resources that all humans can be brothers and sisters. The fundamental question which affects humanity s sense of itself is whether the world is changeable or fixed. Are we the makers of our world or just its inhabitants? Some people have a view that they re living at the end of history within a world that s already defined, and there is no fundamental purpose to human life because there is nothing humans can do that matters. On the other hand, if humans understand their own role as the creators of their world, that s a much more healthy point of view. It raises the dignity of humans. Indeed, if we do establish a new branch of human civilization on Mars that grows in time and potency to the point where it cannot really settle Mars, but transforms Mars, and brings life to Mars, we will prove to everyone and for all time the precious and positive nature of the human species and every member of it.

  7. Human Assisted Assembly Processes

    SciTech Connect

    CALTON,TERRI L.; PETERS,RALPH R.

    2000-01-01

    Automatic assembly sequencing and visualization tools are valuable in determining the best assembly sequences, but without Human Factors and Figure Models (HFFMs) it is difficult to evaluate or visualize human interaction. In industry, accelerating technological advances and shorter market windows have forced companies to turn to an agile manufacturing paradigm. This trend has promoted computerized automation of product design and manufacturing processes, such as automated assembly planning. However, all automated assembly planning software tools assume that the individual components fly into their assembled configuration and generate what appear to be a perfectly valid operations, but in reality the operations cannot physically be carried out by a human. Similarly, human figure modeling algorithms may indicate that assembly operations are not feasible and consequently force design modifications; however, if they had the capability to quickly generate alternative assembly sequences, they might have identified a feasible solution. To solve this problem HFFMs must be integrated with automated assembly planning to allow engineers to verify that assembly operations are possible and to see ways to make the designs even better. Factories will very likely put humans and robots together in cooperative environments to meet the demands for customized products, for purposes including robotic and automated assembly. For robots to work harmoniously within an integrated environment with humans the robots must have cooperative operational skills. For example, in a human only environment, humans may tolerate collisions with one another if they did not cause much pain. This level of tolerance may or may not apply to robot-human environments. Humans expect that robots will be able to operate and navigate in their environments without collisions or interference. The ability to accomplish this is linked to the sensing capabilities available. Current work in the field of cooperative

  8. Human Exploration of Mars

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2016-10-22

    The scientific knowledge and technologies needed to make human exploration of Mars happen are within our reach. NASA 360 joins Dr. Jim Green, Director of NASA’s Planetary Science Division, as he discusses how NASA is preparing for human exploration of the Red Planet. This video was created from a live recording at the Viking 40th Anniversary Symposium in July 2016. To watch the original talk please visit: http://bit.ly/2bk1PGk

  9. The Human Relations School.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fox, Robert S.; Lippitt, Ronald

    As an expansion of ED 026 320, the model for a Human Relations School sketched in this document is an attempt to answer these questions: What would it be like if a school were to see itself as a laboratory for living and learning in which the test that is known about human interaction were utilized? How would it be organized? What would be its…

  10. The great human expansion

    PubMed Central

    Henn, Brenna M.; Cavalli-Sforza, L. L.; Feldman, Marcus W.

    2012-01-01

    Genetic and paleoanthropological evidence is in accord that today’s human population is the result of a great demic (demographic and geographic) expansion that began approximately 45,000 to 60,000 y ago in Africa and rapidly resulted in human occupation of almost all of the Earth’s habitable regions. Genomic data from contemporary humans suggest that this expansion was accompanied by a continuous loss of genetic diversity, a result of what is called the “serial founder effect.” In addition to genomic data, the serial founder effect model is now supported by the genetics of human parasites, morphology, and linguistics. This particular population history gave rise to the two defining features of genetic variation in humans: genomes from the substructured populations of Africa retain an exceptional number of unique variants, and there is a dramatic reduction in genetic diversity within populations living outside of Africa. These two patterns are relevant for medical genetic studies mapping genotypes to phenotypes and for inferring the power of natural selection in human history. It should be appreciated that the initial expansion and subsequent serial founder effect were determined by demographic and sociocultural factors associated with hunter-gatherer populations. How do we reconcile this major demic expansion with the population stability that followed for thousands years until the inventions of agriculture? We review advances in understanding the genetic diversity within Africa and the great human expansion out of Africa and offer hypotheses that can help to establish a more synthetic view of modern human evolution. PMID:23077256

  11. Human Germline Genome Editing.

    PubMed

    Ormond, Kelly E; Mortlock, Douglas P; Scholes, Derek T; Bombard, Yvonne; Brody, Lawrence C; Faucett, W Andrew; Garrison, Nanibaa' A; Hercher, Laura; Isasi, Rosario; Middleton, Anna; Musunuru, Kiran; Shriner, Daniel; Virani, Alice; Young, Caroline E

    2017-08-03

    With CRISPR/Cas9 and other genome-editing technologies, successful somatic and germline genome editing are becoming feasible. To respond, an American Society of Human Genetics (ASHG) workgroup developed this position statement, which was approved by the ASHG Board in March 2017. The workgroup included representatives from the UK Association of Genetic Nurses and Counsellors, Canadian Association of Genetic Counsellors, International Genetic Epidemiology Society, and US National Society of Genetic Counselors. These groups, as well as the American Society for Reproductive Medicine, Asia Pacific Society of Human Genetics, British Society for Genetic Medicine, Human Genetics Society of Australasia, Professional Society of Genetic Counselors in Asia, and Southern African Society for Human Genetics, endorsed the final statement. The statement includes the following positions. (1) At this time, given the nature and number of unanswered scientific, ethical, and policy questions, it is inappropriate to perform germline gene editing that culminates in human pregnancy. (2) Currently, there is no reason to prohibit in vitro germline genome editing on human embryos and gametes, with appropriate oversight and consent from donors, to facilitate research on the possible future clinical applications of gene editing. There should be no prohibition on making public funds available to support this research. (3) Future clinical application of human germline genome editing should not proceed unless, at a minimum, there is (a) a compelling medical rationale, (b) an evidence base that supports its clinical use, (c) an ethical justification, and (d) a transparent public process to solicit and incorporate stakeholder input. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. All rights reserved.

  12. Human exploration mission studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cataldo, Robert L.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes several case studies of human space exploration, considered by the NASA's Office of Exploration in 1988. Special attention is given to the mission scenarios, the critical technology required in these expeditions, and the extraterrestrial power requirements of significant system elements. The cases examined include a manned expedition to Phobos, the inner Martian moon; a human expedition to Mars; the Lunar Observatory; and a lunar outpost to early Mars evolution.

  13. [Synthesizing a human genome?

    PubMed

    Jordan, Bertrand

    2016-10-01

    The recently proposed « HGP-write » project aims to synthetize a full human genome and to introduce it into cells. This ambitious endeavour is fraught with financial and technical uncertainties and, if successful, would make « synthetic humans » a definite possibility even though this is not part of its announced goals. Accordingly, it has not been received with enthusiasm. © 2016 médecine/sciences – Inserm.

  14. Alcohol in human history.

    PubMed

    Vallee, B L

    1994-01-01

    The role of ethanol in the history of human development is here summarized under seven topics: I. Alcohol: the substitute for water as the major human beverage; II. Alcohol as a component of the diet and source of calories; III. Alcohol, concentration by distillation; IV. The Reformation, Temperance and Prohibition; V. Potable nonalcoholic beverages: Boiled water (coffee, tea); VI. Purification and sanitation of water; VII. The present and future.

  15. Meeting human needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicogossian, Arnauld E.

    1992-01-01

    The degree of autonomy of future long duration manned missions will emphasize interactions between human operators and automated systems aimed at the most effective allocations of tasks between humans and machines. Knowledge of crewmembers' physical status, encompassing both capabilities and limitations, will also be critical during EVA and planetary roving missions; psychological evaluation and support, with a view to both individual health and group cohesion and productivity, may become a critical consideration. Attention is here given to crewmembers' medical and psychological vulnerabilities.

  16. Meeting human needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicogossian, Arnauld E.

    1992-01-01

    The degree of autonomy of future long duration manned missions will emphasize interactions between human operators and automated systems aimed at the most effective allocations of tasks between humans and machines. Knowledge of crewmembers' physical status, encompassing both capabilities and limitations, will also be critical during EVA and planetary roving missions; psychological evaluation and support, with a view to both individual health and group cohesion and productivity, may become a critical consideration. Attention is here given to crewmembers' medical and psychological vulnerabilities.

  17. Humans in space.

    PubMed

    White, R J; Averner, M

    2001-02-22

    Many successful space missions over the past 40 years have highlighted the advantages and necessity of humans in the exploration of space. But as space travel becomes ever more feasible in the twenty-first century, the health and safety of future space explorers will be paramount. In particular, understanding the risks posed by exposure to radiation and extended weightlessness will be crucial if humans are to travel far from Earth.

  18. Evolution and human sexuality.

    PubMed

    Gray, Peter B

    2013-12-01

    The aim of this review is to put core features of human sexuality in an evolutionary light. Toward that end, I address five topics concerning the evolution of human sexuality. First, I address theoretical foundations, including recent critiques and developments. While much traces back to Darwin and his view of sexual selection, more recent work helps refine the theoretical bases to sex differences and life history allocations to mating effort. Second, I consider central models attempting to specify the phylogenetic details regarding how hominin sexuality might have changed, with most of those models honing in on transitions from a possible chimpanzee-like ancestor to the slightly polygynous and long-term bonded sociosexual partnerships observed among most recently studied hunter-gatherers. Third, I address recent genetic and physiological data contributing to a refined understanding of human sexuality. As examples, the availability of rapidly increasing genomic information aids comparative approaches to discern signals of selection in sexuality-related phenotypes, and neuroendocrine studies of human responses to sexual stimuli provide insight into homologous and derived mechanisms. Fourth, I consider some of the most recent, large, and rigorous studies of human sexuality. These provide insights into sexual behavior across other national samples and on the Internet. Fifth, I discuss the relevance of a life course perspective to understanding the evolution of human sexuality. Most research on the evolution of human sexuality focuses on young adults. Yet humans are sexual beings from gestation to death, albeit in different ways across the life course, and in ways that can be theoretically couched within life history theory. Copyright © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. The human oncogenic viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Luderer, A.A.; Weetall, H.H

    1986-01-01

    This book contains eight selections. The titles are: Cytogenetics of the Leukemias and Lymphomas; Cytogenetics of Solid Tumors: Renal Cell Carcinoma, Malignant Melanoma, Retinoblastoma, and Wilms' Tumor; Elucidation of a Normal Function for a Human Proto-Oncogene; Detection of HSV-2 Genes and Gene Products in Cervical Neoplasia; Papillomaviruses in Anogennital Neoplasms; Human Epstein-Barr Virus and Cancer; Hepatitis B Virus and Hepatocellular Carcinoma; and Kaposi's Sarcoma: Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and Associated Viruses.

  20. Mapping the human genome

    SciTech Connect

    Annas, G.C.; Elias, S.

    1992-01-01

    This article is a review of the book Mapping the Human Genome: Using Law and Ethics as Guides, edited by George C. Annas and Sherman Elias. The book is a collection of essays on the subject of using ethics and laws as guides to justify human gene mapping. It addresses specific issues such problems related to eugenics, patents, insurance as well as broad issues such as the societal definitions of normality.

  1. Human ocular anatomy.

    PubMed

    Kels, Barry D; Grzybowski, Andrzej; Grant-Kels, Jane M

    2015-01-01

    We review the normal anatomy of the human globe, eyelids, and lacrimal system. This contribution explores both the form and function of numerous anatomic features of the human ocular system, which are vital to a comprehensive understanding of the pathophysiology of many oculocutaneous diseases. The review concludes with a reference glossary of selective ophthalmologic terms that are relevant to a thorough understanding of many oculocutaneous disease processes.

  2. Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    MedlinePlus

    ... education Fact Sheet PFS005: Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus AUGUST 2015 • Reasons for Getting Tested • Who Should ... For More Information • Glossary Testing for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) is the virus that ...

  3. Human Exposure Database System (HEDS)

    EPA Pesticide Factsheets

    The Human Exposure Database System (HEDS) provides public access to data sets, documents, and metadata from EPA on human exposure. It is primarily intended for scientists involved in human exposure studies or work requiring such data.

  4. Proteomics of human mitochondria.

    PubMed

    Palmfeldt, Johan; Bross, Peter

    2017-03-01

    Proteomics have passed through a tremendous development in the recent years by the development of ever more sensitive, fast and precise mass spectrometry methods. The dramatically increased research in the biology of mitochondria and their prominent involvement in all kinds of diseases and ageing has benefitted from mitochondrial proteomics. We here review substantial findings and progress of proteomic analyses of human cells and tissues in the recent past. One challenge for investigations of human samples is the ethically and medically founded limited access to human material. The increased sensitivity of mass spectrometry technology aids in lowering this hurdle and new approaches like generation of induced pluripotent cells from somatic cells allow to produce patient-specific cellular disease models with great potential. We describe which human sample types are accessible, review the status of the catalog of human mitochondrial proteins and discuss proteins with dual localization in mitochondria and other cellular compartments. We describe the status and developments of pertinent mass spectrometric strategies, and the use of databases and bioinformatics. Using selected illustrative examples, we draw a picture of the role of proteomic analyses for the many disease contexts from inherited disorders caused by mutation in mitochondrial proteins to complex diseases like cancer, type 2 diabetes and neurodegenerative diseases. Finally, we speculate on the future role of proteomics in research on human mitochondria and pinpoint fields where the evolving technologies will be exploited. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  5. Glycobiology of human milk.

    PubMed

    Newburg, D S

    2013-07-01

    Glycans are characteristic components of milk, and each species has unique patterns of specific carbohydrates. Human milk is unusually rich in glycans, with the major components being lactose and oligosaccharides, representing approximately 6.8 and 1% of the milk, respectively. Other sources of glycans in human milk include monosaccharides, mucins, glycosaminoglycans, glycoproteins, glycopeptides, and glycolipids. In human milk, the presence and patterns of these glycans vary depending upon the stage of lactation and the maternal genes and their genetic polymorphisms that control glycosyl transferases. The synthesis of milk glycans utilizes a significant portion of the metabolic energy that the mother expends when producing her milk, but other than lactose, these glycans contribute little to the nutritional needs of the infant. The data herein support several functions. 1) Many human milk glycans inhibit pathogens from binding to the intestinal mucosa. 2) Human milk glycans attenuate inflammation. 3) Glycans also directly stimulate the growth of beneficial (mutualist) bacteria of the microbiota (formerly considered commensal microflora of the intestine); these mutualists and their fermentation products can, in turn, (a) inhibit pathogens, (b) modulate signaling and inflammation, and (c) the fermentation products can be absorbed and utilized as a source of dietary calories. These functions can help direct and support intestinal postnatal growth, development, and ontogeny of colonization. The many functions of the milk glycans may synergistically protect infants from disease. Hence, human milk glycans and their homologs may serve as novel prophylactic or therapeutic agents for a diverse range of deleterious conditions.

  6. Human immunoglobulin allotypes

    PubMed Central

    Lefranc, Marie-Paule

    2009-01-01

    More than twenty recombinant monoclonal antibodies are approved as therapeutics. Almost all of these are based on the whole IgG isotype format, but vary in the origin of the variable regions between mouse (chimeric), humanized mouse and fully human sequences; all of those with whole IgG format employ human constant region sequences. Currently, the opposing merits of the four IgG subclasses are considered with respect to the in vivo biological activities considered to be appropriate to the disease indication being treated. Human heavy chain genes also exhibit extensive structural polymorphism(s) and, being closely linked, are inherited as a haplotype. Polymorphisms (allotypes) within the IgG isotype were originally discovered and described using serological reagents derived from humans; demonstrating that allotypic variants can be immunogenic and provoke antibody responses as a result of allo-immunization. The serologically defined allotypes differ widely within and between population groups; therefore, a mAb of a given allotype will, inevitably, be delivered to a cohort of patients homozygous for the alternative allotype. This publication reviews the serologically defined human IgG allotypes and considers the potential for allotype differences to contribute to or potentiate immunogenicity. PMID:20073133

  7. Potentiality and human embryos.

    PubMed

    Lizza, John P

    2007-09-01

    Consideration of the potentiality of human embryos to develop characteristics of personhood, such as intellect and will, has figured prominently in arguments against abortion and the use of human embryos for research. In particular, such consideration was the basis for the call of the US President's Council on Bioethics for a moratorium on stem cell research on human embryos. In this paper, I critique the concept of potentiality invoked by the Council and offer an alternative account. In contrast to the Council's view that an embryo's potentiality is determined by definition and is not affected by external conditions that may prevent certain possibilities from ever being realized, I propose an empirically grounded account of potentiality that involves an assessment of the physical and decisional conditions that may restrict an embryo's possibilities. In my view, some human embryos lack the potentiality to become a person that other human embryos have. Assuming for the sake of argument that the potential to become a person gives a being special moral status, it follows that some human embryos lack this status. This argument is then used to support Gene Outka's suggestion that it is morally permissible to experiment on 'spare' frozen embryos that are destined to be destroyed.

  8. Human Factors Review Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Paramore, B.; Peterson, L.R.

    1985-12-01

    ''Human Factors'' is concerned with the incorporation of human user considerations into a system in order to maximize human reliability and reduce errors. This Review Plan is intended to assist in the assessment of human factors conditions in existing DOE facilities. In addition to specifying assessment methodologies, the plan describes techniques for improving conditions which are found to not adequately support reliable human performance. The following topics are addressed: (1) selection of areas for review describes techniques for needs assessment to assist in selecting and prioritizing areas for review; (2) human factors engineering review is concerned with optimizing the interfaces between people and equipment and people and their work environment; (3) procedures review evaluates completeness and accuracy of procedures, as well as their usability and management; (4) organizational interface review is concerned with communication and coordination between all levels of an organization; and (5) training review evaluates training program criteria such as those involving: trainee selection, qualification of training staff, content and conduct of training, requalification training, and program management.

  9. Human behavior and human performance: Psychomotor demands

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1992-01-01

    The results of several experiments are presented in abstract form. These studies are critical for the interpretation and acceptance of flight based science to be conducted by the Behavior and Performance project. Some representative titles are as follow: External audio for IBM/PC compatible computers; A comparative assessment of psychomotor performance (target prediction by humans and macaques); Response path (a dependent measure for computer maze solving and other tasks); Behavioral asymmetries of psychomotor performance in Rhesus monkey (a dissociation between hand preference and skill); Testing primates with joystick based automated apparatus; and Environmental enrichment and performance assessment for ground or flight based research with primates;

  10. Microtubule organization during human parthenogenesis.

    PubMed

    Terada, Yukihiro; Hasegawa, Hisataka; Ugajin, Tomohisa; Murakami, Takashi; Yaegashi, Nobuo; Okamura, Kunihiro

    2009-04-01

    In human fertilization, the sperm centrosome plays a crucial role as a microtubule organizing center (MTOC). We studied microtubule organization during human parthenogenesis, which occurs when a human egg undergoes cleavage without a sperm centrosome. Multiple cytoplasmic asters were organized in the human oocyte after parthenogenetic activation, indicating that multiple MTOC are present in the human oocyte cytoplasm and function like a human sperm centrosome during parthenogenesis.

  11. Developing Human Performance Measures

    SciTech Connect

    Jeffrey Joe; Bruce Hallbert; Larry Blackwood; Donald Dudehoeffer; Kent Hansen

    2006-05-01

    Through the reactor oversight process (ROP), the U.S. Nuclear Regulatory Commission (NRC) monitors the performance of utilities licensed to operate nuclear power plants. The process is designed to assure public health and safety by providing reasonable assurance that licensees are meeting the cornerstones of safety and designated crosscutting elements. The reactor inspection program, together with performance indicators (PIs), and enforcement activities form the basis for the NRC’s risk-informed, performance based regulatory framework. While human performance is a key component in the safe operation of nuclear power plants and is a designated cross-cutting element of the ROP, there is currently no direct inspection or performance indicator for assessing human performance. Rather, when human performance is identified as a substantive cross cutting element in any 1 of 3 categories (resources, organizational or personnel), it is then evaluated for common themes to determine if follow-up actions are warranted. However, variability in human performance occurs from day to day, across activities that vary in complexity, and workgroups, contributing to the uncertainty in the outcomes of performance. While some variability in human performance may be random, much of the variability may be attributed to factors that are not currently assessed. There is a need to identify and assess aspects of human performance that relate to plant safety and to develop measures that can be used to successfully assure licensee performance and indicate when additional investigation may be required. This paper presents research that establishes a technical basis for developing human performance measures. In particular, we discuss: 1) how historical data already gives some indication of connection between human performance and overall plant performance, 2) how industry led efforts to measure and model human performance and organizational factors could serve as a data source and basis for a

  12. Human Milk Fortification.

    PubMed

    Simmer, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Human milk is the feed of choice for preterm infants. However, human milk does not provide enough nutrition, especially protein, for preterm infants to achieve target growth rates similar to those in utero (15-20 g/kg per day). Fortifiers for human milk, manufactured from bovine milk, are commercially available and routinely used for patients born <32 weeks' gestation prior to discharge home. Recent recommended dietary intakes (RDI) have been revised. Up to 4.2 g of protein and 135 kcal/kg per day is recommended for infants born very preterm. Additional supplements are needed to current commercial fortifiers to achieve these RDI and reduce the incidence of ex-uterine growth failure. A human milk fortifier that is manufactured from donor human milk is available in some developed countries and may confer some clinical benefits, including a reduction in necrotizing enterocolitis. Fortification can be added in a standardized protocol as per manufacturers' instructions. Human milk composition can be analyzed and fortification individualized to take into account the large variation from mother to mother. Alternatively, fortification can be increased in a stepwise manner based on assumed composition while monitoring blood urea levels for safety. The current aim is to prevent preterm infants dropping percentiles and falling below the 10th percentile at 36 weeks' corrected gestational age or discharge home. More data are required on how best to fortify human milk for preterm infants to achieve optimal growth, development and health outcomes in the long term. There is an urgent need for well-designed and informed randomized clinical trials in this vulnerable preterm population.

  13. Spaceflight Human System Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holubec, Keith; Tillman, Barry; Connolly, Jan

    2009-01-01

    NASA created a new approach for human system integration and human performance standards. NASA created two documents a standard and a reference handbook. The standard is titled NASA Space Flight Human-System Standard (SFHSS) and consists of two-volumes: Volume 1- Crew Health This volume covers standards needed to support astronaut health (medical care, nutrition, sleep, exercise, etc.) Volume 2 Human Factors, Habitability and Environmental Health This volume covers the standards for system design that will maintain astronaut performance (ie., environmental factors, design of facilities, layout of workstations, and lighting requirements). It includes classic human factors requirements. The new standards document is written in terms so that it is applicable to a broad range of present and future NASA systems. The document states that all new programs prepare system-specific requirements that will meet the general standards. For example, the new standard does not specify a design should accommodate specific percentiles of a defined population. Rather, NASA-STD-3001, Volume 2 states that all programs shall prepare program-specific requirements that define the user population and their size ranges. The design shall then accommodate the full size range of those users. The companion reference handbook, Human Integration Design Handbook (HIDH), was developed to capture the design consideration information from NASA-STD-3000, and adds spaceflight lessons learned, gaps in knowledge, example solutions, and suggests research to further mature specific disciplines. The HIDH serves two major purposes: HIDH is the reference document for writing human factors requirements for specific systems. HIDH contains design guidance information that helps insure that designers create systems which safely and effectively accommodate the capabilities and limitations of space flight crews.

  14. Spaceflight Human System Standards

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Holubec, Keith; Tillman, Barry; Connolly, Jan

    2009-01-01

    NASA created a new approach for human system integration and human performance standards. NASA created two documents a standard and a reference handbook. The standard is titled NASA Space Flight Human-System Standard (SFHSS) and consists of two-volumes: Volume 1- Crew Health This volume covers standards needed to support astronaut health (medical care, nutrition, sleep, exercise, etc.) Volume 2 Human Factors, Habitability and Environmental Health This volume covers the standards for system design that will maintain astronaut performance (ie., environmental factors, design of facilities, layout of workstations, and lighting requirements). It includes classic human factors requirements. The new standards document is written in terms so that it is applicable to a broad range of present and future NASA systems. The document states that all new programs prepare system-specific requirements that will meet the general standards. For example, the new standard does not specify a design should accommodate specific percentiles of a defined population. Rather, NASA-STD-3001, Volume 2 states that all programs shall prepare program-specific requirements that define the user population and their size ranges. The design shall then accommodate the full size range of those users. The companion reference handbook, Human Integration Design Handbook (HIDH), was developed to capture the design consideration information from NASA-STD-3000, and adds spaceflight lessons learned, gaps in knowledge, example solutions, and suggests research to further mature specific disciplines. The HIDH serves two major purposes: HIDH is the reference document for writing human factors requirements for specific systems. HIDH contains design guidance information that helps insure that designers create systems which safely and effectively accommodate the capabilities and limitations of space flight crews.

  15. Meeting human needs

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Nicogossian, Arnauld E.

    1992-01-01

    Manned space flight can be viewed as an interaction of three general elements: the human crewmember, spacecraft systems, and the environment. While the human crewmember is a crucial element in the system, certain physiological, psychological, environ- mental and spacecraft systems factors can compromise human performance in space. These factors include atmospheric pressure, physiology, uncertainties associated with space radiation, the potential for exposure to toxic materials in the closed environment, and spacecraft habitability. Health protection in space, for current and future missions, relies on a philosophy of risk reduction, which in the space program is achieved in four ways-through health maintenance, health care, design criteria, an selection and training. Emphasis is place upon prevention, through selection criteria and careful screening. Spacecraft health care systems must be absolutely reliable, and they will be automated and computerized to the maximum extent possible, but still designed with the human crewmember's capabilities in mind. The autonomy and technological sophistication of future missions will require a greater emphasis on high-level interaction between the human operator and automated systems, with effective allocation of tasks between humans and machines. Performance in space will include complex tasks during extravehicular activity (EVA) and on planetary surfaces, and knowledge of crewmembers' capability and limitations during such operations will be critical to mission success. Psychological support will become increasingly important on space missions, as crews spend long periods in remote and potentially hazardous environments. The success of future missions will depend on both individual psychological health and group cohesion and productivity, particularly as crew profiles become more heterogeneous. Thus, further human factors are needed in the area of small-group dynamics and performance.

  16. Infants' Responses to Real Humans and Representations of Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heron, Michelle; Slaughter, Virginia

    2010-01-01

    Infants' responses to typical and scrambled human body shapes were assessed in relation to the realism of the human body stimuli presented. In four separate experiments, infants were familiarized to typical human bodies and then shown a series of scrambled human bodies on the test. Looking behaviour was assessed in response to a range of different…

  17. Infants' Responses to Real Humans and Representations of Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Heron, Michelle; Slaughter, Virginia

    2010-01-01

    Infants' responses to typical and scrambled human body shapes were assessed in relation to the realism of the human body stimuli presented. In four separate experiments, infants were familiarized to typical human bodies and then shown a series of scrambled human bodies on the test. Looking behaviour was assessed in response to a range of different…

  18. Why Geo-Humanities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Graells, Robert Casals i.; Sibilla, Anna; Bohle, Martin

    2016-04-01

    Anthropogenic global change is a composite process. It consists of societal processes (in the 'noosphere') and natural processes (in the 'bio-geosphere'). The 'noosphere' is the ensemble of social, cultural or political insights ('shared subjective mental concepts') of people. Understanding the composite of societal and natural processes ('human geo-biosphere intersections'), which shapes the features of anthropogenic global change, would benefit from a description that draws equally on natural sciences, social sciences and humanities. To that end it is suggested to develop a concept of 'geo-humanities': This essay presents some aspects of its scope, discussing "knowledge that is to manage", "intentions that are to shape", "choices that are to justify" and "complexity that is to handle". Managing knowledge: That people understand anthropogenic global change requires their insights into how 'human geosphere intersections' function. Insights are formed ('processed') in the noosphere by means of interactions between people. Understanding how 'human geosphere intersections' functions combines scientific, engineering and economic studies with studies of the dynamics of the noosphere. Shaping intentions: During the last century anthropogenic global change developed as the collateral outcome of humankind's accumulated actions. It is caused by the number of people, the patterns of their consumption of resources, and the alterations of their environments. Nowadays, anthropogenic global chance is either an intentional negligence or a conscious act. Justifying choices: Humanity has alternatives how to alter Earth at planetary scale consciously. For example, there is a choice to alter the geo-biosphere or to adjust the noosphere. Whatever the choice, it will depend on people's world-views, cultures and preferences. Thus beyond issues whether science and technology are 'sound' overarching societal issues are to tackle, such as: (i) how to appropriate and distribute natural

  19. Inhaled human insulin.

    PubMed

    Strack, Thomas R

    2006-04-01

    The benefit of subcutaneous insulin therapy in patients with diabetes is frequently limited due to difficulty in convincing patients of the importance of multiple daily insulin injections to cope effectively with meal-associated glycemic changes. Thus, the aim of achieving tight glycemic control, which is critical for reducing the risk of long-term diabetes-related complications, frequently remains elusive. The successful development of an inhalable insulin as a noninvasive alternative promises to change the management of diabetes. The first product to become available to patients is inhaled human insulin, a dry-powder formulation packaged into discrete blisters containing 1 or 3 mg of dry-powder human insulin and administered via a unique pulmonary inhaler device. It has recently been approved in both the United States and the European Union for the control of hyperglycemia in adult patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes. The pharmacokinetic profile of inhaled human insulin closely mimics the natural pattern of insulin secretion, and resembles that of rapid-acting subcutaneous analogs. Similarly to rapid-acting subcutaneous analogs, inhaled human insulin has a more rapid onset of glucose-lowering activity compared to subcutaneous regular insulin, allowing it to be administered shortly before meals. It has a duration of glucose-lowering activity comparable to subcutaneous regular insulin and longer than rapid-acting insulin analogs. Inhaled human insulin effectively controls postprandial glucose concentrations in patients with type 1 or type 2 diabetes without increasing the risk of hypoglycemia, and even improves fasting glucose levels compared to subcutaneous insulin. Inhaled human insulin has an overall favorable safety profile. There are small reductions in lung function (1-1.5% of total lung forced expiratory volume in the first second [FEV1] capacity) after onset of treatment that are reversible in most patients if treatment is discontinued. Inhaled human

  20. Human HOX gene disorders.

    PubMed

    Quinonez, Shane C; Innis, Jeffrey W

    2014-01-01

    The Hox genes are an evolutionarily conserved family of genes, which encode a class of important transcription factors that function in numerous developmental processes. Following their initial discovery, a substantial amount of information has been gained regarding the roles Hox genes play in various physiologic and pathologic processes. These processes range from a central role in anterior-posterior patterning of the developing embryo to roles in oncogenesis that are yet to be fully elucidated. In vertebrates there are a total of 39 Hox genes divided into 4 separate clusters. Of these, mutations in 10 Hox genes have been found to cause human disorders with significant variation in their inheritance patterns, penetrance, expressivity and mechanism of pathogenesis. This review aims to describe the various phenotypes caused by germline mutation in these 10 Hox genes that cause a human phenotype, with specific emphasis paid to the genotypic and phenotypic differences between allelic disorders. As clinical whole exome and genome sequencing is increasingly utilized in the future, we predict that additional Hox gene mutations will likely be identified to cause distinct human phenotypes. As the known human phenotypes closely resemble gene-specific murine models, we also review the homozygous loss-of-function mouse phenotypes for the 29 Hox genes without a known human disease. This review will aid clinicians in identifying and caring for patients affected with a known Hox gene disorder and help recognize the potential for novel mutations in patients with phenotypes informed by mouse knockout studies.

  1. Human hybrid hybridoma

    SciTech Connect

    Tiebout, R.F.; van Boxtel-Oosterhof, F.; Stricker, E.A.M.; Zeijlemaker, W.P.

    1987-11-15

    Hybrid hybridomas are obtained by fusion of two cells, each producing its own antibody. Several authors have reported the construction of murine hybrid hybridomas with the aim to obtain bispecific monoclonal antibodies. The authors have investigated, in a model system, the feasibility of constructing a human hybrid hybridoma. They fused two monoclonal cell lines: an ouabain-sensitive and azaserine/hypoxanthine-resistant Epstein-Barr virus-transformed human cell line that produces an IgG1kappa antibody directed against tetanus toxiod and an azaserine/hypoxanthine-sensitive and ouabain-resistant human-mouse xenohybrid cell line that produces a human IgG1lambda antibody directed against hepatitis-B surface antigen. Hybrid hybridoma cells were selected in culture medium containing azaserine/hypoxanthine and ouabain. The hybrid nature of the secreted antibodies was analyzed by means of two antigen-specific immunoassay. The results show that it is possible, with the combined use of transformation and xenohybridization techniques, to construct human hybrid hybridomas that produce bispecific antibodies. Bispecific antibodies activity was measured by means of two radioimmunoassays.

  2. Human occupancy detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brown, David A.

    1994-10-01

    In the area of security and surveillance technologies, the problem of the arrival in Canada of illegal and undesirable ship and truck cargo loads is steadily increasing. As the volumes of cargo arrivals increase so do the Immigration and Customs problems related to the determination of the validity of those cargo contents. Of special concern to Immigration Control Authorities around the world is the emerging and increasing trend of illegal smuggling of human beings hidden inside of shipping containers. Beginning in 1992, Immigration Control Authorities in Canada observed an escalation of alien people smuggling through the use of cargo shipping containers arriving in the Port of Montreal. This paper will present to the audience the recently completed Immigration Canada Human Occupancy Detection project by explaining the design, development and testing of human occupancy detectors. The devices are designed to electronically detect the presence of persons hiding inside of shipping containers, without the requirement of opening the container doors. The human occupancy detection concepts are based upon the presence of carbon dioxide or other human waste characteristics commonly found inside of shipping containers.

  3. Healthy human gut phageome

    PubMed Central

    Manrique, Pilar; Bolduc, Benjamin; Walk, Seth T.; van der Oost, John; de Vos, Willem M.; Young, Mark J.

    2016-01-01

    The role of bacteriophages in influencing the structure and function of the healthy human gut microbiome is unknown. With few exceptions, previous studies have found a high level of heterogeneity in bacteriophages from healthy individuals. To better estimate and identify the shared phageome of humans, we analyzed a deep DNA sequence dataset of active bacteriophages and available metagenomic datasets of the gut bacteriophage community from healthy individuals. We found 23 shared bacteriophages in more than one-half of 64 healthy individuals from around the world. These shared bacteriophages were found in a significantly smaller percentage of individuals with gastrointestinal/irritable bowel disease. A network analysis identified 44 bacteriophage groups of which 9 (20%) were shared in more than one-half of all 64 individuals. These results provide strong evidence of a healthy gut phageome (HGP) in humans. The bacteriophage community in the human gut is a mixture of three classes: a set of core bacteriophages shared among more than one-half of all people, a common set of bacteriophages found in 20–50% of individuals, and a set of bacteriophages that are either rarely shared or unique to a person. We propose that the core and common bacteriophage communities are globally distributed and comprise the HGP, which plays an important role in maintaining gut microbiome structure/function and thereby contributes significantly to human health. PMID:27573828

  4. Human milk banking guidelines.

    PubMed

    Bharadva, Ketan; Tiwari, Satish; Mishra, Sudhir; Mukhopadhyay, Kanya; Yadav, Balraj; Agarwal, R K; Kumar, Vishesh

    2014-06-01

    WHO and UNICEF state that the use of human milk from other sources should be the first alternative when it is not possible for the mother to breastfeed. Human milk banks should be made available in appropriate situations. The IYCF Chapter is actively concerned about the compelling use of formula feeds in the infants because of the non availability of human breast milk banks. A National Consultative Meet for framing guidelines was summoned by the IYCF Chapter and the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India on 30th June, 2013, with representations from various stakeholders. The guidelines were drafted after an extensive literature review and discussions. Though these guidelines are based on the experiences and guidelines from other countries, changes have been made to suit the Indian setup, culture and needs, without compromising scientific evidence. To ensure quality of donated breast milk as a safe end product. Human Milk Banking Association should be constituted, and human milk banks should be established across the country. National coordination mechanism should be developed with a secretariat and technical support to follow-up on action in States. Budgetary provisions should be made available for the activities.

  5. [Human cloning or cannibalism].

    PubMed

    Sokolowski, L M

    2001-01-01

    In this article I develop the idea presented in my previous work that human cloning would be of little practical use since almost any aim that one would like to attain by multiple cloning of a concrete man or a group of people, are unattainable or it might be achieved by easier, cheaper and more efficient traditional methods. For this reason cloning of a man is unlikely to occur on a larger scale and only few people will decide to clone themselves. In this sense no social effects of human cloning will be disastrous for the human population. Yet investigations in human genetics are very important since they may provide medical applications far more important than human cloning. It is argued that the main trend of modern medicine: organ transplantation from an alien donor, will become socially dangerous in near future since the number of donors will be drastically smaller than the number of potential patients waiting for transplantations. This in turn may cause social conflicts and a form of medical cannibalism may arise. These problems and conflicts will be avoided if organ transplantation from an alien donor is replaced by organ cloning, i.e. by transplanting an organ developed from the patient.

  6. Human herpesvirus 6.

    PubMed Central

    Braun, D K; Dominguez, G; Pellett, P E

    1997-01-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 variant A (HHV-6A) and human herpesvirus 6 variant B (HHV-6B) are two closely related yet distinct viruses. These visuses belong to the Roseolovirus genus of the betaherpesvirus subfamily; they are most closely related to human herpesvirus 7 and then to human cytomegalovirus. Over 95% of people older than 2 years of age are seropositive for either or both HHV-6 variants, and current serologic methods are incapable of discriminating infection with one variant from infection with the other. HHV-6A has not been etiologically linked to any human disease, but such an association will probably be found soon. HHV-6B is the etiologic agent of the common childhood illness exanthem subitum (roseola infantum or sixth disease) and related febrile illnesses. These viruses are frequently active and associated with illness in immunocompromised patients and may play a role in the etiology of Hodgkin's disease and other malignancies. HHV-6 is a commensal inhabitant of brains; various neurologic manifestations, including convulsions and encephalitis, can occur during primary HHV-6 infection or in immunocompromised patients. HHV-6 and distribution in the central nervous system are altered in patients with multiple sclerosis; the significance of this is under investigation. PMID:9227865

  7. The Human Genome Program

    SciTech Connect

    Bell, G.I.

    1989-01-01

    Early in 1986, Charles DeLisi, then head of the Office of Health and Environmental Research at the Department of Energy (DOE) requested the Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL) to organize a workshop charged with inquiring whether the state of technology and potential payoffs in biological knowledge and medical practice were such as to justify an organized program to map and sequence the human genome. The DOE's interest arose from its mission to assess the effects of radiation and other products of energy generation on human health in general and genetic material in particular. The workshop concluded that the technology was ripe, the benefits would be great, and a national program should be promptly initiated. Later committees, reporting to DOE, to the NIH, to the Office of Technology Assessment of the US Congress, and to the National Academy of Science have reviewed these issues more deliberately and come to the same conclusion. As a consequence, there has been established in the United States, a Human Genome Program, with funding largely from the NIH and the DOE, as indicated in Table 1. Moreover, the Program has attracted international interest, and Great Britain, France, Italy, and the Soviet Union, among other countries, have been reported to be starting human genome initiatives. Coordination of these programs, clearly in the interests of each, remains to be worked out, although an international Human Genome Organization (HUGO) is considering such coordination. 5 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  8. The Human Serum Metabolome

    PubMed Central

    Psychogios, Nikolaos; Hau, David D.; Peng, Jun; Guo, An Chi; Mandal, Rupasri; Bouatra, Souhaila; Sinelnikov, Igor; Krishnamurthy, Ramanarayan; Eisner, Roman; Gautam, Bijaya; Young, Nelson; Xia, Jianguo; Knox, Craig; Dong, Edison; Huang, Paul; Hollander, Zsuzsanna; Pedersen, Theresa L.; Smith, Steven R.; Bamforth, Fiona; Greiner, Russ; McManus, Bruce; Newman, John W.; Goodfriend, Theodore; Wishart, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Continuing improvements in analytical technology along with an increased interest in performing comprehensive, quantitative metabolic profiling, is leading to increased interest pressures within the metabolomics community to develop centralized metabolite reference resources for certain clinically important biofluids, such as cerebrospinal fluid, urine and blood. As part of an ongoing effort to systematically characterize the human metabolome through the Human Metabolome Project, we have undertaken the task of characterizing the human serum metabolome. In doing so, we have combined targeted and non-targeted NMR, GC-MS and LC-MS methods with computer-aided literature mining to identify and quantify a comprehensive, if not absolutely complete, set of metabolites commonly detected and quantified (with today's technology) in the human serum metabolome. Our use of multiple metabolomics platforms and technologies allowed us to substantially enhance the level of metabolome coverage while critically assessing the relative strengths and weaknesses of these platforms or technologies. Tables containing the complete set of 4229 confirmed and highly probable human serum compounds, their concentrations, related literature references and links to their known disease associations are freely available at http://www.serummetabolome.ca. PMID:21359215

  9. The Exploration of Mars by Humans: Why Mars? Why Humans?

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Levine, Joel S.

    2011-01-01

    As we commemorate the 50th anniversary of Yuri Gagarin's historic flight in 1961, the first flight of a human in space, plans are underway for another historic human mission. Plans are being developed for a human mission to Mars. Once we reach Mars, the human species will become the first two-planet species. Both the Bush Administration (in 2004) and the Obama Administration (in 2010) proposed a human mission to Mars as a national goal of the United States.

  10. Human Modeling For Ground Processing Human Factors Engineering Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tran, Donald; Stambolian, Damon; Henderson, Gena; Barth, Tim

    2011-01-01

    There have been many advancements and accomplishments over that last few years using human modeling for human factors engineering analysis for design of spacecraft and launch vehicles. The key methods used for this are motion capture and computer generated human models. The focus of this paper is to explain the different types of human modeling used currently and in the past at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) currently, and to explain the future plans for human modeling for future spacecraft designs.

  11. Human-human reliance in the context of automation.

    PubMed

    Lyons, Joseph B; Stokes, Charlene K

    2012-02-01

    The current study examined human-human reliance during a computer-based scenario where participants interacted with a human aid and an automated tool simultaneously. Reliance on others is complex, and few studies have examined human-human reliance in the context of automation. Past research found that humans are biased in their perceived utility of automated tools such that they view them as more accurate than humans. Prior reviews have postulated differences in human-human versus human-machine reliance, yet few studies have examined such reliance when individuals are presented with divergent information from different sources. Participants (N = 40) engaged in the Convoy Leader experiment.They selected a convoy route based on explicit guidance from a human aid and information from an automated map. Subjective and behavioral human-human reliance indices were assessed. Perceptions of risk were manipulated by creating three scenarios (low, moderate, and high) that varied in the amount of vulnerability (i.e., potential for attack) associated with the convoy routes. Results indicated that participants reduced their behavioral reliance on the human aid when faced with higher risk decisions (suggesting increased reliance on the automation); however, there were no reported differences in intentions to rely on the human aid relative to the automation. The current study demonstrated that when individuals are provided information from both a human aid and automation,their reliance on the human aid decreased during high-risk decisions. This study adds to a growing understanding of the biases and preferences that exist during complex human-human and human-machine interactions.

  12. Human Modeling for Ground Processing Human Factors Engineering Analysis

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stambolian, Damon B.; Lawrence, Brad A.; Stelges, Katrine S.; Steady, Marie-Jeanne O.; Ridgwell, Lora C.; Mills, Robert E.; Henderson, Gena; Tran, Donald; Barth, Tim

    2011-01-01

    There have been many advancements and accomplishments over the last few years using human modeling for human factors engineering analysis for design of spacecraft. The key methods used for this are motion capture and computer generated human models. The focus of this paper is to explain the human modeling currently used at Kennedy Space Center (KSC), and to explain the future plans for human modeling for future spacecraft designs

  13. Teleoperator Human Factors Study

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    An investigation of the spectrum of space teleoperation activities likely in the 1985 to 1995 decade focused on the resolution of critical human engineering issues and characterization of the technology effect on performance of remote human operators. The study began with the identification and documentation of a set of representative reference teleoperator tasks. For each task, technology, development, and design options, issues, and alternatives that bear on human operator performance were defined and categorized. A literature survey identified existing studies of man/machine issues. For each teleoperations category, an assessment was made of the state of knowledge on a scale from adequate to void. The tests, experiments, and analyses necessary to provide the missing elements of knowledge were then defined. A limited set of tests were actually performed, including operator selection, baseline task definition, control mode study, lighting study, camera study, and preliminary time delay study.

  14. Helicopter human factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Sandra G.

    1988-01-01

    The state-of-the-art helicopter and its pilot are examined using the tools of human-factors analysis. The significant role of human error in helicopter accidents is discussed; the history of human-factors research on helicopters is briefly traced; the typical flight tasks are described; and the noise, vibration, and temperature conditions typical of modern military helicopters are characterized. Also considered are helicopter controls, cockpit instruments and displays, and the impact of cockpit design on pilot workload. Particular attention is given to possible advanced-technology improvements, such as control stabilization and augmentation, FBW and fly-by-light systems, multifunction displays, night-vision goggles, pilot night-vision systems, night-vision displays with superimposed symbols, target acquisition and designation systems, and aural displays. Diagrams, drawings, and photographs are provided.

  15. Human factors in aviation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiener, Earl L. (Editor); Nagel, David C. (Editor)

    1988-01-01

    The fundamental principles of human-factors (HF) analysis for aviation applications are examined in a collection of reviews by leading experts, with an emphasis on recent developments. The aim is to provide information and guidance to the aviation community outside the HF field itself. Topics addressed include the systems approach to HF, system safety considerations, the human senses in flight, information processing, aviation workloads, group interaction and crew performance, flight training and simulation, human error in aviation operations, and aircrew fatigue and circadian rhythms. Also discussed are pilot control; aviation displays; cockpit automation; HF aspects of software interfaces; the design and integration of cockpit-crew systems; and HF issues for airline pilots, general aviation, helicopters, and ATC.

  16. Whither medical humanities?

    PubMed

    Singh, Navjeevan

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the medical humanities (MH) and their role in medical education is in its infancy in India. Students are initiated into professional (medical) education too early in life, usually at the expense of a basic grounding in the humanities, resulting in warped intellectual growth. The author, arguing against the wholesale import of foreign systems, advocates free inquiry by medical educators to evolve a humanities programme for medical students derived from our own cultural context. This essay describes the early experiences of efforts to make a beginning at the University College of Medical Sciences, Delhi. The author reviews the various strategies used and the challenges of introducing the subject to the current generation of medical students.

  17. Medical humanities ... almost.

    PubMed

    Dangayach, Neha

    2012-01-01

    Brought up in the traditional education system in a large teaching hospital in Mumbai, India, I moved on to do specialisation in neurology in the United States of America. The Indian system of pre-medical education mandates early choices between the humanities and the sciences and thus precludes a more well-rounded development of a student. Though medical humanities is not taught as a subject as part of the medical curriculum in India, listening to inspiring and learned teachers and the daily interaction with scores of patients who are willing to submit themselves to examination "in the cause of medical education" is a humbling experience to a sensitive student. I see similar willingness in patients in the United States. However, a formal course in the medical humanities, including arts, literature, and philosophy will surely enrich the experience of a larger number of undergraduates and postgraduates learning the core subjects and help in moulding a more rounded physician.

  18. Highlights of human toxocariasis

    PubMed Central

    Glickman, Lawrence T.; Dorchies, Philippe; Morassin, Bruno

    2001-01-01

    Human toxocariasis is a helminthozoonosis due to the migration of Toxocara species larvae through human organism. Humans become infected by ingesting either embryonated eggs from soil (geophagia, pica), dirty hands or raw vegetables, or larvae from undercooked giblets. The diagnosis relies upon sensitive immunological methods (ELISA or western-blot) which use Toxocara excretory-secretory antigens. Seroprevalence is high in developed countries, especially in rural areas, and also in some tropical islands. The clinical spectrum of the disease comprises four syndromes, namely visceral larva migrans, ocular larva migrans, and the more recently recognized "common" (in adults) and "covert" (in children) pictures. Therapy of ocular toxocariasis is primarily based upon corticosteroids use, when visceral larva migrans and few cases of common or covert toxocariasis can be treated by anthelmintics whose the most efficient appeared to be diethylcarbamazine. When diagnosed, all of these syndromes require thorough prevention of recontamination (especially by deworming pets) and sanitary education. PMID:11301585

  19. Monogenic human obesity syndromes.

    PubMed

    Farooqi, I S; O'Rahilly, S

    2004-01-01

    Over the past decade, we have witnessed a major increase in the scale of scientific activity devoted to the study of energy balance and obesity. This explosion of interest has, to a large extent, been driven by the identification of genes responsible for murine obesity syndromes and the novel physiological pathways revealed by those genetic discoveries. We and others recently have identified several single-gene defects causing severe human obesity. Many of these defects have occurred in molecules identical or similar to those identified as a cause of obesity in rodents. This chapter will consider the human monogenic obesity syndromes that have been characterized to date and discuss how far such observations support the physiological role of these molecules in the regulation of human body weight and neuroendocrine function.

  20. Monogenic obesity in humans.

    PubMed

    Farooqi, I Sadaf; O'Rahilly, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    Until relatively recently, the small number of identifiable inherited human diseases associated with marked obesity were complex, pleiotropic developmental disorders, the molecular basis for which were entirely obscure. The molecular basis for many of these complex syndromes, such as Bardet Beidl syndrome, has been revealed, providing novel insights into processes essential for human hypothalamic function and energy balance. In addition to these discoveries, which were the fruits of positional cloning, the molecular constituents of the signaling pathways responsible for the control of mammalian energy homeostasis have been identified, largely through the study of natural or artificial mutations in mice. We discuss the increasing number of human disorders that result from genetic disruption of the leptin-melanocortin pathways that have been identified. Practical implications of these findings for genetic counseling, prognostication, and even therapy have already emerged.

  1. Monogenic human obesity syndromes.

    PubMed

    Farooqi, I S

    2006-01-01

    Over the past decade we have witnessed a major increase in the scale of scientific activity devoted to the study of energy balance and obesity. This explosion of interest has, to a large extent, been driven by the identification of genes responsible for murine obesity syndromes, and the novel physiological pathways revealed by those genetic discoveries. Others and we have also recently identified several single gene defects causing severe human obesity. Many of these defects have been in molecules identical or similar to those identified as a cause of obesity in rodents. I will review the human monogenic obesity syndromes that have been characterised to date and discuss how far such observations support the physiological role of these molecules in the regulation of human body weight and neuroendocrine function.

  2. [Human rights and procreation].

    PubMed

    Leroy, F

    1990-04-01

    The impact of procreation on freedom, health and welfare of human beings, is considerable. This relationship, however, is not mirrored in texts devoted to Human Rights. This omission obviously implies a neglect of women's and children's rights. The history of anticonceptive methods exemplifies the struggle for these rights. This conquest, which has lasted two hundred years, is far from completed. Because of the demographic outbreak in Third World countries, an ideological conflict has appeared between first generation Human Rights concerned with individual freedom ("rights of") and those of second generation aiming at social fairness ("rights to"). Adequate political and economic adjustment between North and South is a prerequisite to any balanced compromise that would resolve this conflict through democratic, albeit intensive, birth control.

  3. Human-Robot Interaction

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rochlis-Zumbado, Jennifer; Sandor, Aniko; Ezer, Neta

    2012-01-01

    Risk of Inadequate Design of Human and Automation/Robotic Integration (HARI) is a new Human Research Program (HRP) risk. HRI is a research area that seeks to understand the complex relationship among variables that affect the way humans and robots work together to accomplish goals. The DRP addresses three major HRI study areas that will provide appropriate information for navigation guidance to a teleoperator of a robot system, and contribute to the closure of currently identified HRP gaps: (1) Overlays -- Use of overlays for teleoperation to augment the information available on the video feed (2) Camera views -- Type and arrangement of camera views for better task performance and awareness of surroundings (3) Command modalities -- Development of gesture and voice command vocabularies

  4. Preparing for Human Exploration

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Drake, Bret G.; Joosten, B. Kent

    1998-01-01

    NASA's Human Exploration and Development of Space (HEDS) Enterprise is defining architectures and requirements for human exploration that radically reduce the costs of such missions through the use of advanced technologies, commercial partnerships and innovative systems strategies. In addition, the HEDS Enterprise is collaborating with the Space Science Enterprise to acquire needed early knowledge about Mars and to demonstrate critical technologies via robotic missions. This paper provides an overview of the technological challenges facing NASA as it prepares for human exploration. Emphasis is placed on identifying the key technologies including those which will provide the most return in terms of reducing total mission cost and/or reducing potential risk to the mission crew. Top-level requirements are provided for those critical enabling technology options currently under consideration.

  5. Human nutrition: evolutionary perspectives.

    PubMed

    Barnicot, N A

    2005-01-01

    In recent decades, much new evidence relating to the ape forerunners of modern humans has come to hand and diet appears to be an important factor. At some stage, there must have been a transition from a largely vegetarian ape diet to a modern human hunting economy providing significant amounts of meat. On an even longer evolutionary time scale the change was more complex. The mechanisms of evolutionary change are now better understood than they were in Darwin's time, thanks largely to great advances in genetics, both experimental and theoretical. It is virtually certain that diet, as a major component of the human environment, must have exerted evolutionary effects, but researchers still have little good evidence.

  6. The Human Toxome Project

    PubMed Central

    Bouhifd, Mounir; Andersen, Melvin E.; Baghdikian, Christina; Boekelheide, Kim; Crofton, Kevin M.; Fornace, Albert J.; Kleensang, Andre; Li, Henghong; Livi, Carolina; Maertens, Alexandra; McMullen, Patrick D.; Rosenberg, Michael; Thomas, Russell; Vantangoli, Marguerite; Yager, James D.; Zhao, Liang; Hartung, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    Summary The Human Toxome Project, funded as an NIH Transformative Research grant 2011–2016, is focused on developing the concepts and the means for deducing, validating and sharing molecular pathways of toxicity (PoT). Using the test case of estrogenic endocrine disruption, the responses of MCF-7 human breast cancer cells are being phenotyped by transcriptomics and mass-spectrometry-based metabolomics. The bioinformatics tools for PoT deduction represent a core deliverable. A number of challenges for quality and standardization of cell systems, omics technologies and bioinformatics are being addressed. In parallel, concepts for annotation, validation and sharing of PoT information, as well as their link to adverse outcomes, are being developed. A reasonably comprehensive public database of PoT, the Human Toxome Knowledge-base, could become a point of reference for toxicological research and regulatory test strategies. PMID:25742299

  7. Uncovering the Human Methyltransferasome*

    PubMed Central

    Petrossian, Tanya C.; Clarke, Steven G.

    2011-01-01

    We present a comprehensive analysis of the human methyltransferasome. Primary sequences, predicted secondary structures, and solved crystal structures of known methyltransferases were analyzed by hidden Markov models, Fisher-based statistical matrices, and fold recognition prediction-based threading algorithms to create a model, or profile, of each methyltransferase superfamily. These profiles were used to scan the human proteome database and detect novel methyltransferases. 208 proteins in the human genome are now identified as known or putative methyltransferases, including 38 proteins that were not annotated previously. To date, 30% of these proteins have been linked to disease states. Possible substrates of methylation for all of the SET domain and SPOUT methyltransferases as well as 100 of the 131 seven-β-strand methyltransferases were surmised from sequence similarity clusters based on alignments of the substrate-specific domains. PMID:20930037

  8. Possible human endogenous cryogens.

    PubMed

    Shido, Osamu; Sugimoto, Naotoshi

    2011-06-01

    Anapyrexia, which is a regulated fall in core temperature, is beneficial for animals and humans when the oxygen supply is limited, e.g., hypoxic, ischemic, or histotoxic hypoxia, since at low body temperature the tissues require less oxygen due to Q(10). Besides hypoxia, anapyrexia can be induced various exogenous and endogenous substances, named cryogens. However, there are only a few reports investigating endogenous cryogens in mammals. We have experienced one patient who suffered from severe hypothermia. The patient seemed to be excessively producing endogenous peptidergic cryogenic substances the molecular weight of which may be greater than 30 kDa. In animal studies, the patient's cryogen appeared to affect metabolic functions, including thermogenic threshold temperatures, and then to produce hypothermia. Since endogenous cryogenic substances may be regarded as useful tool in human activities, e.g., during brain hypothermia therapy or staying in a space station or spaceship, further studies may be needed to identify human endogenous cryogens.

  9. Helicopter human factors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hart, Sandra G.

    1988-01-01

    The state-of-the-art helicopter and its pilot are examined using the tools of human-factors analysis. The significant role of human error in helicopter accidents is discussed; the history of human-factors research on helicopters is briefly traced; the typical flight tasks are described; and the noise, vibration, and temperature conditions typical of modern military helicopters are characterized. Also considered are helicopter controls, cockpit instruments and displays, and the impact of cockpit design on pilot workload. Particular attention is given to possible advanced-technology improvements, such as control stabilization and augmentation, FBW and fly-by-light systems, multifunction displays, night-vision goggles, pilot night-vision systems, night-vision displays with superimposed symbols, target acquisition and designation systems, and aural displays. Diagrams, drawings, and photographs are provided.

  10. Human immune system variation

    PubMed Central

    Brodin, Petter; Davis, Mark M.

    2017-01-01

    The human immune system is highly variable between individuals but relatively stable over time within a given person. Recent conceptual and technological advances have enabled systems immunology analyses, which reveal the composition of immune cells and proteins in populations of healthy individuals. The range of variation and some specific influences that shape an individual’s immune system is now becoming clearer. Human immune systems vary as a consequence of heritable and non-heritable influences, but symbiotic and pathogenic microbes and other non-heritable influences explain most of this variation. Understanding when and how such influences shape the human immune system is key for defining metrics of immunological health and understanding the risk of immune-mediated and infectious diseases. PMID:27916977

  11. Abortion and human rights.

    PubMed

    Shaw, Dorothy

    2010-10-01

    Abortion has been a reality in women's lives since the beginning of recorded history, typically with a high risk of fatal consequences, until the last century when evolutions in the field of medicine, including techniques of safe abortion and effective methods of family planning, could have ended the need to seek unsafe abortion. The context of women's lives globally is an important but often ignored variable, increasingly recognised in evolving human rights especially related to gender and reproduction. International and regional human rights instruments are being invoked where national laws result in violations of human rights such as health and life. The individual right to conscientious objection must be respected and better understood, and is not absolute. Health professional organisations have a role to play in clarifying responsibilities consistent with national laws and respecting reproductive rights. Seeking common ground using evidence rather than polarised opinion can assist the future focus.

  12. Reflections on humanizing biomedicine.

    PubMed

    Marcum, James A

    2008-01-01

    Although biomedicine is responsible for the "miracles" of modern medicine, paradoxically it has also led to a quality-of-care crisis in which many patients feel disenfranchised from the health-care industry. To address this crisis, several medical commentators make an appeal for humanizing biomedicine, which has led to shifts in the philosophical boundaries of medical knowledge and practice. In this paper, the metaphysical, epistemological, and ethical boundaries of biomedicine and its humanized versions are investigated and compared to one another. Biomedicine is founded on a metaphysical position of mechanistic monism, an epistemology of objective knowing, and an ethic of emotionally detached concern. In humanizing modern medicine, these boundaries are often shifted to a metaphysical position of dualism/holism, an epistemology of subject knowing, and an ethic of empathic care. In a concluding section, the question is discussed whether these shifts in the philosophical boundaries are adequate to resolve the quality-of-care crisis.

  13. Cardiovascular Deconditioning in Humans: Human Studies Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Gordon

    1999-01-01

    Major cardiovascular problems, secondary to cardiovascular deconditioning, may occur on extended space missions. While it is generally assumed that the microgravity state is the primary cause of cardiovascular deconditioning, sleep deprivation and disruption of diurnal rhythms may also play an important role. Factors that could be modified by either or both of these perturbations include: autonomic function and short-term cardiovascular reflexes, vasoreactivity, circadian rhythm of cardiovascular hormones (specifically the renin-angiotensin system) and renal sodium handling and hormonal influences on that process, venous compliance, cardiac mass, and cardiac conduction processes. The purpose of the Human Studies Core is to provide the infrastructure to conduct human experiments which will allow for the assessment of the likely role of such factors in the space travel associated cardiovascular deconditioning process and to develop appropriate countermeasures. The Core takes advantage of a newly-created Intensive Physiologic Monitoring (IPM) Unit at the Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, to perform these studies. The Core includes two general experimental protocols. The first protocol involves a head down tilt bed-rest study to simulate microgravity. The second protocol includes the addition of a disruption of circadian rhythms to the simulated microgravity environment. Before and after each of these environmental manipulations, the subjects will undergo acute stressors simulating changes in volume and/or stress, which could occur in space and on return to Earth. The subjects are maintained in a rigidly controlled environment with fixed light/dark cycles, activity pattern, and dietary intake of nutrients, fluids, ions and calories.

  14. Cardiovascular Deconditioning in Humans: Human Studies Core

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Williams, Gordon

    1999-01-01

    Major cardiovascular problems, secondary to cardiovascular deconditioning, may occur on extended space missions. While it is generally assumed that the microgravity state is the primary cause of cardiovascular deconditioning, sleep deprivation and disruption of diurnal rhythms may also play an important role. Factors that could be modified by either or both of these perturbations include: autonomic function and short-term cardiovascular reflexes, vasoreactivity, circadian rhythm of cardiovascular hormones (specifically the renin-angiotensin system) and renal sodium handling and hormonal influences on that process, venous compliance, cardiac mass, and cardiac conduction processes. The purpose of the Human Studies Core is to provide the infrastructure to conduct human experiments which will allow for the assessment of the likely role of such factors in the space travel associated cardiovascular deconditioning process and to develop appropriate countermeasures. The Core takes advantage of a newly-created Intensive Physiologic Monitoring (IPM) Unit at the Brigham and Women's Hospital, Boston, MA, to perform these studies. The Core includes two general experimental protocols. The first protocol involves a head down tilt bed-rest study to simulate microgravity. The second protocol includes the addition of a disruption of circadian rhythms to the simulated microgravity environment. Before and after each of these environmental manipulations, the subjects will undergo acute stressors simulating changes in volume and/or stress, which could occur in space and on return to Earth. The subjects are maintained in a rigidly controlled environment with fixed light/dark cycles, activity pattern, and dietary intake of nutrients, fluids, ions and calories.

  15. The Human Centrifuge

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    van Loon, Jack J. W. A.

    2009-01-01

    Life on Earth has developed at unit gravity, 9.81 m/s2, which was a major factor especially when vertebrates emerged from water onto land in the late Devonian, some 375 million years ago. But how would nature have evolved on a larger planet? We are able to address this question simply in experiments using centrifuges. Based on these studies we have gained valuable insights in the physiological process in plants and animals. They adapt to a new steady state suitable for the high-g environments applied. Information on mammalian adaptations to hyper-g is interesting or may be even vital for human space exploration programs. It has been shown in long duration animal hypergravity studies, ranging from snails, rats to primates, that various structures like muscles, bones, neuro-vestibular, or the cardio-vascular system are affected. However, humans have never been exposed to a hyper-g environment for long durations. Centrifuge studies involving humans are mostly in the order of hours. The current work on human centrifuges are all focused on short arm systems to apply short periods of artificial gravity in support of long duration space missions in ISS or to Mars. In this paper we will address the possible usefulness of a large human centrifuge on Earth. In such a centrifuge a group of humans can be exposed to hypergravity for, in principle, an unlimited period of time like living on a larger planet. The input from a survey under scientists working in the field of gravitational physiology, but also other disciplines, will be discussed.

  16. Human dignity and human tissue: a meaningful ethical relationship?

    PubMed

    Kirchhoffer, David G; Dierickx, Kris

    2011-09-01

    Human dignity has long been used as a foundational principle in policy documents and ethical guidelines intended to govern various forms of biomedical research. Despite the vast amount of literature concerning human dignity and embryonic tissues, the majority of biomedical research uses non-embryonic human tissue. Therefore, this contribution addresses a notable lacuna in the literature: the relationship, if any, between human dignity and human tissue. This paper first elaborates a multidimensional understanding of human dignity that overcomes many of the shortcomings associated with the use of human dignity in other ethical debates. Second, it discusses the relationship between such an understanding of human dignity and 'non-embryonic' human tissue. Finally, it considers the implications of this relationship for biomedical research and practice involving human tissue. The contribution demonstrates that while human tissue cannot be said to have human dignity, human dignity is nevertheless implicated by human tissue, making what is done with human tissue and how it is done worthy of moral consideration.

  17. Human Challenges in Exploration Missions

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lloyd, Charles W.

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presents an overview using pictures some of the history of human exploration of the new frontiers of Earth and then examines some of the challenges to human exploration of space. Particular attention is given to the environmental factors and to the social and human factors that effect humans in space environments.

  18. Human Rights: The Essential Reference.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Devine, Carol; Hansen, Carol Rae; Wilde, Ralph; Bronkhorst, Daan; Moritz, Frederic A.; Rolle, Baptiste; Sherman, Rebecca; Southard, Jo Lynn; Wilkinson, Robert; Poole, Hilary, Ed.

    This reference work documents the history of human rights theory, explains each article of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, explores the contemporary human rights movement, and examines the major human rights issues facing the world today. This book is the first to combine historical and contemporary perspectives on these critical…

  19. Sacred Sounds in the Humanities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kelly, Robert A.

    To see literature as a sign and a symbol simply reasserts the view of the humanities as the embodiment of the highest aspirations of human nature. Human beings are sign givers and symbol makers as they look for the sacred meaning in their lives. Through a college humanities course, some of the symbols that artists employ in fiction, poetry, drama,…

  20. Making IBM's Computer, Watson, Human

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rachlin, Howard

    2012-01-01

    This essay uses the recent victory of an IBM computer (Watson) in the TV game, "Jeopardy," to speculate on the abilities Watson would need, in addition to those it has, to be human. The essay's basic premise is that to be human is to behave as humans behave and to function in society as humans function. Alternatives to this premise are considered…

  1. Making IBM's Computer, Watson, Human

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rachlin, Howard

    2012-01-01

    This essay uses the recent victory of an IBM computer (Watson) in the TV game, "Jeopardy," to speculate on the abilities Watson would need, in addition to those it has, to be human. The essay's basic premise is that to be human is to behave as humans behave and to function in society as humans function. Alternatives to this premise are considered…

  2. Human MSH2 protein

    DOEpatents

    de la Chapelle, Albert; Vogelstein, Bert; Kinzler, Kenneth W.

    1997-01-01

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error.sup.+ (RER.sup.+) tumor cells.

  3. Human MSH2 protein

    DOEpatents

    Chapelle, A. de la; Vogelstein, B.; Kinzler, K.W.

    1997-01-07

    The human MSH2 gene, responsible for hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer, was identified by virtue of its homology to the MutS class of genes, which are involved in DNA mismatch repair. The sequence of cDNA clones of the human gene are provided, and the sequence of the gene can be used to demonstrate the existence of germ line mutations in hereditary non-polyposis colorectal cancer (HNPCC) kindreds, as well as in replication error{sup +} (RER{sup +}) tumor cells. 19 figs.

  4. Human Factors Model

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1993-01-01

    Jack is an advanced human factors software package that provides a three dimensional model for predicting how a human will interact with a given system or environment. It can be used for a broad range of computer-aided design applications. Jack was developed by the computer Graphics Research Laboratory of the University of Pennsylvania with assistance from NASA's Johnson Space Center, Ames Research Center and the Army. It is the University's first commercial product. Jack is still used for academic purposes at the University of Pennsylvania. Commercial rights were given to Transom Technologies, Inc.

  5. On human health.

    PubMed

    van Spijk, Piet

    2015-05-01

    If it is true that health is a priority objective of medicine, then medical practice can only be successful if the meaning of the term "health" is known. Various attempts have been made over the years to define health. This paper proposes a new definition. In addition to current health concepts, it also takes into account the distinction between specifically human (great) health and health as the absence of disease and illness-i.e. small health. The feeling of leading a life that makes sense plays a key role in determining specifically human great health.

  6. Ayahuasca and human destiny.

    PubMed

    McKenna, Dennis J

    2005-06-01

    In this essay, the author shares his personal reflections gleaned from a lifetime of research with ayahuasca, and speculates on the societal, political, planetary, and evolutionary implications of humanity's aeons-old symbiosis with this shamanic plant. The thesis is developed that at this critical historical juncture, ayahuasca has developed a strategy to broadcast its message to a wider world--a reflection of the urgent need to avert global ecological catastrophe. While ayahuasca has much to teach us, the critical question is, will humanity hear it, and heed it, in time?

  7. Defining the Human Microbiome

    PubMed Central

    Ursell, Luke K; Metcalf, Jessica L; Parfrey, Laura Wegener; Knight, Rob

    2012-01-01

    Rapidly developing sequencing methods and analytical techniques are enhancing our ability to understand the human microbiome, and, indeed, how we define the microbiome and its constituents. In this review we highlight recent research that expands our ability to understand the human microbiome on different spatial and temporal scales, including daily timeseries datasets spanning months. Furthermore, we discuss emerging concepts related to defining operational taxonomic units, diversity indices, core versus transient microbiomes and the possibility of enterotypes. Additional advances in sequencing technology and in our understanding of the microbiome will provide exciting prospects for exploiting the microbiota for personalized medicine. PMID:22861806

  8. Biodemography of human ageing

    PubMed Central

    Vaupel, James W.

    2014-01-01

    Human senescence has been delayed by a decade. This finding, documented in 1994 and bolstered since, is a fundamental discovery about the biology of human ageing, and one with profound implications for individuals, society and the economy. Remarkably, the rate of deterioration with age seems to be constant across individuals and over time: it seems that death is being delayed because people are reaching old age in better health. Research by demographers, epidemiologists and other biomedical researchers suggests that further progress is likely to be made in advancing the frontier of survival — and healthy survival — to even greater ages. PMID:20336136

  9. We Are Human Beings.

    PubMed

    McGee, Andrew

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, I examine Jeff McMahan's arguments for his claim that we are not human organisms, and the arguments of Derek Parfit to the same effect in a recent paper. McMahan uses these arguments to derive conclusions concerning the moral status of embryos and permanent vegetative state (PVS) patients. My claim will be that neither thinker has successfully shown that we are not human beings, and therefore these arguments do not establish the ethical conclusions that McMahan has sought to draw from the arguments in respect of the moral status of embryos and PVS patients.

  10. Human exploration mission studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cataldo, Robert L.

    1989-01-01

    The nation's efforts to expand human presence and activity beyond Earth orbit into the solar system was given renewed emphasis in January of 1988 when the Presidential Directive on National Space Policy was signed into effect. The expansion of human presence into the solar system has particular significance, in that it defines long-range goals for NASA's future missions. To embark and achieve such ambitious ventures is a significant undertaking, particularly compared to past space activities. Missions to Mars, the Moon, and Phobos, as well as an observatory based on the dark side of the Moon are discussed.

  11. Human vitreous transplantation.

    PubMed Central

    Shafer, D. M.

    1976-01-01

    This lecture presents the experience in 200 implantations of human eye-bank vitreous through the pars plana of eyes with complicated retinal detachments. Though the success rate was modest, it shows that a large-bore instrument can be passed into the vitreous cavity of the eye with relative impunity and sets the stage for the present popular machine vitrectomy. In addition, the paper presents the author's experience with human vitreous transplantation by the 'open sky' transcorneal technique for otherwise hopeless vitreous opacities. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 PMID:769647

  12. We Are Human Beings

    PubMed Central

    McGee, Andrew

    2016-01-01

    In this paper, I examine Jeff McMahan’s arguments for his claim that we are not human organisms, and the arguments of Derek Parfit to the same effect in a recent paper. McMahan uses these arguments to derive conclusions concerning the moral status of embryos and permanent vegetative state (PVS) patients. My claim will be that neither thinker has successfully shown that we are not human beings, and therefore these arguments do not establish the ethical conclusions that McMahan has sought to draw from the arguments in respect of the moral status of embryos and PVS patients. PMID:26810918

  13. Mapping Human Epigenomes

    PubMed Central

    Rivera, Chloe M.; Ren, Bing

    2013-01-01

    As the second dimension to the genome, the epigenome contains key information specific to every type of cells. Thousands of human epigenome maps have been produced in recent years thanks to rapid development of high throughput epigenome mapping technologies. In this review, we discuss the current epigenome mapping toolkit and utilities of epigenome maps. We focus particularly on mapping of DNA methylation, chromatin modification state and chromatin structures, and emphasize the use of epigenome maps to delineate human gene regulatory sequences and developmental programs. We also provide a perspective on the progress of the epigenomics field and challenges ahead. PMID:24074860

  14. Disorders of Human Hemoglobin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bank, Arthur; Mears, J. Gregory; Ramirez, Francesco

    1980-02-01

    Studies of the human hemoglobin system have provided new insights into the regulation of expression of a group of linked human genes, the γ -δ -β globin gene complex in man. In particular, the thalassemia syndromes and related disorders of man are inherited anemias that provide mutations for the study of the regulation of globin gene expression. New methods, including restriction enzyme analysis and cloning of cellular DNA, have made it feasible to define more precisely the structure and organization of the globin genes in cellular DNA. Deletions of specific globin gene fragments have already been found in certain of these disorders and have been applied in prenatal diagnosis.

  15. Human nature, human culture: the case of cultural evolution.

    PubMed

    Lewens, Tim

    2017-10-06

    In recent years, far from arguing that evolutionary approaches to our own species permit us to describe the fundamental character of human nature, a prominent group of cultural evolutionary theorists has instead argued that the very idea of 'human nature' is one we should reject. It makes no sense, they argue, to speak of human nature in opposition to human culture. The very same sceptical arguments have also led some thinkers-usually from social anthropology-to dismiss the intimately related idea that we can talk of human culture in opposition to human nature. How, then, are we supposed to understand the cultural evolutionary project itself, whose proponents seem to deny the distinction between human nature and human culture, while simultaneously relying on a closely allied distinction between 'genetic' (or sometimes 'organic') evolution and 'cultural' evolution? This paper defends the cultural evolutionary project against the charge that, in refusing to endorse the concept of human nature, it has inadvertently sabotaged itself.

  16. Occupying the Digital Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rice, Jeff

    2013-01-01

    This essay questions the digital humanities' dependence on interpretation and critique as strategies for reading and responding to texts. Instead, the essay proposes suggestion as a digital rhetorical practice, one that does not replace hermeneutics, but instead offers alternative ways to respond to texts. The essay uses the Occupy movement as an…

  17. ANTHROPOMETRY AND HUMAN ENGINEERING.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    de l’armee de l’air francaise; Sheldon types and success in flight performance; Adapting the aeroplane to the pilot; Instrument dials, instrument...establishment of a longitudinal study of the medical and psychological aspects of the U.S. naval aviator; Somatotyping ; Human factors in aircraft design.

  18. Human Influenza Virus Infections.

    PubMed

    Peteranderl, Christin; Herold, Susanne; Schmoldt, Carole

    2016-08-01

    Seasonal and pandemic influenza are the two faces of respiratory infections caused by influenza viruses in humans. As seasonal influenza occurs on an annual basis, the circulating virus strains are closely monitored and a yearly updated vaccination is provided, especially to identified risk populations. Nonetheless, influenza virus infection may result in pneumonia and acute respiratory failure, frequently complicated by bacterial coinfection. Pandemics are, in contrary, unexpected rare events related to the emergence of a reassorted human-pathogenic influenza A virus (IAV) strains that often causes increased morbidity and spreads extremely rapidly in the immunologically naive human population, with huge clinical and economic impact. Accordingly, particular efforts are made to advance our knowledge on the disease biology and pathology and recent studies have brought new insights into IAV adaptation mechanisms to the human host, as well as into the key players in disease pathogenesis on the host side. Current antiviral strategies are only efficient at the early stages of the disease and are challenged by the genomic instability of the virus, highlighting the need for novel antiviral therapies targeting the pulmonary host response to improve viral clearance, reduce the risk of bacterial coinfection, and prevent or attenuate acute lung injury. This review article summarizes our current knowledge on the molecular basis of influenza infection and disease progression, the key players in pathogenesis driving severe disease and progression to lung failure, as well as available and envisioned prevention and treatment strategies against influenza virus infection. Thieme Medical Publishers 333 Seventh Avenue, New York, NY 10001, USA.

  19. Marketing Human Resource Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, Eric, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    Describes three human resource development activities: training, education, and development. Explains marketing from the practitioners's viewpoint in terms of customer orientation; external and internal marketing; and market analysis, research, strategy, and mix. Shows how to design, develop, and implement strategic marketing plans and identify…

  20. Tackling Human Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLester, Susan

    2005-01-01

    In 2003, four high school students from the Tashkent International School in the capital city confronted the issue of their nation's human rights problems head on by researching the topic and publishing their findings on the Web. The site, "Uzbekistan: Opaque Reality," was created as an entry for the non-profit Global SchoolNet's Doors…

  1. The Human Toxome Project

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Human Toxome project, funded as an NIH Transformative Research grant 2011--‐ 2016, is focused on developing the concepts and the means for deducing, validating, and sharing molecular Pathways of Toxicity (PoT). Using the test case of estrogenic endocrine disruption, the respo...

  2. Fighting for the Humanities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nelson, Cary

    2012-01-01

    The question, "Who will bankroll poetry?", succinctly embodies what is now a widespread recognition that the humanities may have more to lose in the current budget wars than either the sciences or a number of technical fields. The only budget war that can unite individuals, rather than divide them, is one arguing that too much is being…

  3. Tackling Human Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McLester, Susan

    2005-01-01

    In 2003, four high school students from the Tashkent International School in the capital city confronted the issue of their nation's human rights problems head on by researching the topic and publishing their findings on the Web. The site, "Uzbekistan: Opaque Reality," was created as an entry for the non-profit Global SchoolNet's Doors…

  4. Designers of Human Settlements

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cliff, Ursula

    1976-01-01

    Reviewed herein are the ideas of nine men who have addressed themselves to the problems of human settlements in this century. The ideas reviewed include those of Arnold Toynbee, Lewis Mumford, Hassan Fathy, Buckminster Fuller, Constantinos Doxiadis, Charles Correa, Paul Mwaluko, Robert McNamara and John F. C. Turner. (BT)

  5. Medicine and the Humanities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pabst, Diana

    1992-01-01

    Discusses a Pennsylvania State University seminar program designed to help medical professionals explore aspects of medical treatment through readings in the humanities. Argues that the program is broader in vision and scope that other medical ethics courses. Suggests that the effort can refresh and deepen doctors' work with patients. (SG)

  6. Human Biology: Experimental.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    New York City Board of Education, Brooklyn, NY. Bureau of Curriculum Development.

    Education is a process of adapting to change, and the rate of change is especially rapid in science today. This curriculum in human biology is an alternative to the New York State courses in general and Regents biology, and it has been designed to focus on change from the standpoint of the urban student. It is designed to provide students with…

  7. Humane Treatment of Animals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Joan Smithey

    This booklet is designed to give teachers resource information about the humane treatment of and care for animals. The topics are presented as springboards for discussion and class activity. Topics include the care of dogs, cats, birds, horses, and fish; wildlife and ecological relationships; and careers with animals. Illustrations on some pages…

  8. Human perspiration measurement.

    PubMed

    Ohhashi, T; Sakaguchi, M; Tsuda, T

    1998-11-01

    We review various methods developed for human perspiration measurement and their physiological applications, with special reference to the performance and application of a new home-made ratemeter and instrumentation with a microscope. Many kinds of humidity sensor based on humidity-sensitive electrical properties have been investigated and placed on the market. Recently a capacitive thin-film humidity sensor was constructed and confirmed to be one of the best humidity sensors for accurately and quickly detecting changes in the relative humidity of gas-flow perfused through a ventilated chamber for human perspiration measurement. In this paper we also introduce a new home-made ratemeter with a capacitive humidity sensor, the electrical output of which is not disturbed by changes in ambient temperature, and new instrumentation for directly observing drops of sweat secreted from eccrine glands in human skin and simultaneously measuring the change in amount of perspiration at the same area of skin. Finally, we review physiological applications of the methods for measuring human palmar perspiration including emotional sweating.

  9. Human Sexuality Education Program.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Claremont Univ. Center, CA.

    This program provides information to students about human sexual biology, behavior and attitudes. The primary intent of the workshops described is to provide fuller information and opportunity for self awareness to encourage participants to be more responsible as sexual beings, and to restructure their attitudes. The program presents the…

  10. The Humanization of Science.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Larson, James H.

    1986-01-01

    Describes an exercise which focuses on the ethical and human aspects of science. Outlines the approach and components of a writing assignment based on a literary and humanistic analysis of "The Double Helix" by James Watson. Provides sample questions and examples of integrative literary works. (ML)

  11. Human health and groundwater

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The high quality of most groundwaters, consequent upon the self-purification capacity of subsurface strata, has long been a key factor in human health and wellbeing. More than 50% of the world’s population now rely on groundwater for their supply of drinking water – and in most circumstances a prope...

  12. Human performance measuring device

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Michael, J.; Scow, J.

    1970-01-01

    Complex coordinator, consisting of operator control console, recorder, subject display panel, and limb controls, measures human performance by testing perceptual and motor skills. Device measures psychophysiological functions in drug and environmental studies, and is applicable to early detection of psychophysiological body changes.

  13. Humane Treatment of Animals.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dawson, Joan Smithey

    This booklet is designed to give teachers resource information about the humane treatment of and care for animals. The topics are presented as springboards for discussion and class activity. Topics include the care of dogs, cats, birds, horses, and fish; wildlife and ecological relationships; and careers with animals. Illustrations on some pages…

  14. Human Social Genomics

    PubMed Central

    Cole, Steven W.

    2014-01-01

    A growing literature in human social genomics has begun to analyze how everyday life circumstances influence human gene expression. Social-environmental conditions such as urbanity, low socioeconomic status, social isolation, social threat, and low or unstable social status have been found to associate with differential expression of hundreds of gene transcripts in leukocytes and diseased tissues such as metastatic cancers. In leukocytes, diverse types of social adversity evoke a common conserved transcriptional response to adversity (CTRA) characterized by increased expression of proinflammatory genes and decreased expression of genes involved in innate antiviral responses and antibody synthesis. Mechanistic analyses have mapped the neural “social signal transduction” pathways that stimulate CTRA gene expression in response to social threat and may contribute to social gradients in health. Research has also begun to analyze the functional genomics of optimal health and thriving. Two emerging opportunities now stand to revolutionize our understanding of the everyday life of the human genome: network genomics analyses examining how systems-level capabilities emerge from groups of individual socially sensitive genomes and near-real-time transcriptional biofeedback to empirically optimize individual well-being in the context of the unique genetic, geographic, historical, developmental, and social contexts that jointly shape the transcriptional realization of our innate human genomic potential for thriving. PMID:25166010

  15. The Humanities and Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, John W.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Five individuals discuss the relationship of the humanities and leadership in different contexts: the liberal arts (John W. Gardner); the sculpting of a statue of James Madison (Walker Hancock); the Kennedy years (Thomas R. West), our civic culture (Bruce Adams); and liberal education (Gregory S. Prince, Jr.). (MSE)

  16. Animal and Human Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rummel, Lynda

    Several misconceptions regarding the status of human communication systems relative to the systems of other animals are discussed in this paper. Arguments are offered supporting the expansion of the communication discipline to include the study of the communication systems of other species. The "communicative continuity" view which ranks…

  17. The Human Connection

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Holliday, Christina O.

    2005-01-01

    Without effective classroom management, teaching and learning cannot take place. The responsibility for a teacher's success in the classroom lies as much in the human connection between administrator and teacher as between teacher and student. In fact, it lies with all who work with schools: universities, school boards, administrators, and…

  18. Biotechnologies and Human Dignity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, William; Masciulli, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors review some contemporary cases where biotechnologies have been employed, where they have had global implications, and where there has been considerable debate. The authors argue that the concept of dignity, which lies at the center of such documents as the 2005 Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights, the…

  19. Human Learning and Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, David A.

    2012-01-01

    This innovative textbook is the first to integrate learning and memory, behaviour, and cognition. It focuses on fascinating human research in both memory and learning (while also bringing in important animal studies) and brings the reader up to date with the latest developments in the subject. Students are encouraged to think critically: key…

  20. Human Memory: The Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Michael E.

    2010-01-01

    The human mind has two types of memory: short-term and long-term. In all types of learning, it is best to use that structure rather than to fight against it. One way to do that is to ensure that learners can fit new information into patterns that can be stored in and more easily retrieved from long-term memory.

  1. Futures of Human Communication.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Harms, L. S.

    There are several research areas basic to the long-range future of human communications. Telecommunication and transportation offer the possiblity of two worldwide communications networks whose interrelationships need to be explored in terms of the needs of the individual, the community, and the world at large. Expanding possibilities of…

  2. Human chromosome 8.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, S

    1988-01-01

    The role of human chromosome 8 in genetic disease together with the current status of the genetic linkage map for this chromosome is reviewed. Both hereditary genetic disease attributed to mutant alleles at gene loci on chromosome 8 and neoplastic disease owing to somatic mutation, particularly chromosomal translocations, are discussed. PMID:3070042

  3. Food Affects Human Behavior.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Kolata, Gina

    1982-01-01

    A conference on whether food and nutrients affect human behavior was held on November 9, 1982 at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology. Various research studies on this topic are reviewed, including the effects of food on brain biochemistry (particularly sleep) and effects of tryptophane as a pain reducer. (JN)

  4. Human Development Student Modules.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    South Carolina State Dept. of Education, Columbia. Office of Vocational Education.

    This set of 61 student learning modules deals with various topics pertaining to human development. The modules, which are designed for use in performance-based vocational education programs, each contain the following components: an introduction for the student, a performance objective, a variety of learning activities, content information, a…

  5. Learning to Be Human

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macmurray, John

    2012-01-01

    This article presents "Learning to be Human", which John Macmurray delivered on 5 May 1958 as the annual public lecture at Moray House College of Education, now part of Edinburgh University. The key themes of the paper are ones to which Macmurray returned again and again in both his educational and his philosophical writing for over 40 years and…

  6. Humanizing science education

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Donnelly, James F.

    2004-09-01

    This paper argues that the diverse curriculum reform agendas associated with science education are strongly and critically associated with the educational characteristics of the humanities. The article begins with a survey of interpretations of the distinctive contribution which the humanities make to educational purposes. From this survey four general characteristics of the humanities are identified: an appeal to an autonomous self with the right and capacity to make independent judgements and interpretations; indeterminacy in the subject matter of these judgements and interpretations; a focus on meaning, in the context of human responses, actions, and relationships, and especially on the ethical, aesthetic, and purposive; and finally, the possibility of commonality in standards of judgement and interpretation, under conditions of indeterminacy. Inquiry and science technology and society (STS) orientated curriculum development agendas within science education are explored in the light of this analysis. It is argued that the four characteristics identified are central to the educational purposes of these and other less prominent modes of curriculum development in science, though not unproblematically so. In the light of this discussion the prognosis and challenges for science curriculum development are explored.

  7. Humans as Lie Detectors.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    DePaulo, Bella; And Others

    1980-01-01

    Discusses several studies of whether and how well humans can detect lies. Examines the accuracy of such persons as well as the process of how they actually detect lies, how they think they detect lies, and whether the actual and perceived processes of lie detection correspond to one another. (JMF)

  8. The Humanities Today.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Aiex, Nola Kortner

    This paper discusses several of the many books and articles which have appeared during the past decade which chronicle the supposedly precarious state of the humanities in higher education. The paper focuses on the first book, the surprise best seller, "The Closing of the American Mind," written by Allan Bloom in 1987 and especially on a…

  9. Human perspectives in horticulture

    Treesearch

    Charles A. Lewis

    1977-01-01

    Gardening produces not only vegetables and flowers, but also social and behavioral benefits. In low-income housing sites in New York, Philadelphia, and Chicago, gardening programs have resulted in reduced vandalism, new neighborliness, cleaned and painted buildings and streets, and other improvements. The human response to plants, and the qualities of plants that...

  10. Parasites and human evolution.

    PubMed

    Perry, George H

    2014-01-01

    Our understanding of human evolutionary and population history can be advanced by ecological and evolutionary studies of our parasites. Many parasites flourish only in the presence of very specific human behaviors and in specific habitats, are wholly dependent on us, and have evolved with us for thousands or millions of years. Therefore, by asking when and how we first acquired those parasites, under which environmental and cultural conditions we are the most susceptible, and how the parasites have evolved and adapted to us and we in response to them, we can gain considerable insight into our own evolutionary history. As examples, the tapeworm life cycle is dependent on our consumption of meat, the divergence of body and head lice may have been subsequent to the development of clothing, and malaria hyperendemicity may be associated with agriculture. Thus, the evolutionary and population histories of these parasites are likely intertwined with critical aspects of human biology and culture. Here I review the mechanics of these and multiple other parasite proxies for human evolutionary history and discuss how they currently complement our fossil, archeological, molecular, linguistic, historical, and ethnographic records. I also highlight potential future applications of this promising model for the field of evolutionary anthropology.

  11. Biotechnologies and Human Dignity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sweet, William; Masciulli, Joseph

    2011-01-01

    In this article, the authors review some contemporary cases where biotechnologies have been employed, where they have had global implications, and where there has been considerable debate. The authors argue that the concept of dignity, which lies at the center of such documents as the 2005 Universal Declaration on Bioethics and Human Rights, the…

  12. Human Memory: The Basics

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Martinez, Michael E.

    2010-01-01

    The human mind has two types of memory: short-term and long-term. In all types of learning, it is best to use that structure rather than to fight against it. One way to do that is to ensure that learners can fit new information into patterns that can be stored in and more easily retrieved from long-term memory.

  13. Human Learning and Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lieberman, David A.

    2012-01-01

    This innovative textbook is the first to integrate learning and memory, behaviour, and cognition. It focuses on fascinating human research in both memory and learning (while also bringing in important animal studies) and brings the reader up to date with the latest developments in the subject. Students are encouraged to think critically: key…

  14. Recombinant human milk proteins.

    PubMed

    Lönnerdal, Bo

    2006-01-01

    Human milk provides proteins that benefit newborn infants. They not only provide amino acids, but also facilitate the absorption of nutrients, stimulate growth and development of the intestine, modulate immune function, and aid in the digestion of other nutrients. Breastfed infants have a lower prevalence of infections than formula-fed infants. Since many women in industrialized countries choose not to breastfeed, and an increasing proportion of women in developing countries are advised not to breastfeed because of the risk of HIV transmission, incorporation of recombinant human milk proteins into infant foods is likely to be beneficial. We are expressing human milk proteins known to have anti-infective activity in rice. Since rice is a normal constituent of the diet of infants and children, limited purification of the proteins is required. Lactoferrin has antimicrobial and iron-binding activities. Lysozyme is an enzyme that is bactericidal and also acts synergistically with lactoferrin. These recombinant proteins have biological activities identical to their native counterparts. They are equally resistant to heat processing, which is necessary for food applications, and to acid and proteolytic enzymes which are needed to maintain their biological activity in the gastrointestinal tract of infants. These recombinant human milk proteins may be incorporated into infant formulas, baby foods and complementary foods, and used with the goal to reduce infectious diseases.

  15. Antihumanism in the Humanities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Schwartz, Joel

    1990-01-01

    Analyzes the antihumanistic elements of Jacques Derrida's theory of deconstruction. Argues that the modern French intellectuals, including Foucault, Derrida, and Lacan, have had an antihumanistic effect on the American social sciences and humanities by rejecting the existence of truth, morality, and rationality. (FMW)

  16. The Humanities and Leadership.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gardner, John W.; And Others

    1985-01-01

    Five individuals discuss the relationship of the humanities and leadership in different contexts: the liberal arts (John W. Gardner); the sculpting of a statue of James Madison (Walker Hancock); the Kennedy years (Thomas R. West), our civic culture (Bruce Adams); and liberal education (Gregory S. Prince, Jr.). (MSE)

  17. Humanizing the Workplace.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fairfield, Roy P., Ed.

    A series of essays discussing ideas about humanizing work are presented in the document. Three major sections divide the essays, and each includes a preface with comments suggesting the central focus and questions with which the authors are concerned. The first section deals with the history, philosophy, and issues related to work and contains…

  18. The Humanization of Education.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nechaev, N.; Usov, V.

    1991-01-01

    Warns against a tendency to command Soviet educational reform from above without thought of practical results. Criticizes proceeding before priorities have been set or put into practice, and ignoring the need for a vehicle of reform, material, and labor resources. Urges the humanization of architectural education through study of art, the…

  19. Medicine and the Humanities.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Pabst, Diana

    1992-01-01

    Discusses a Pennsylvania State University seminar program designed to help medical professionals explore aspects of medical treatment through readings in the humanities. Argues that the program is broader in vision and scope that other medical ethics courses. Suggests that the effort can refresh and deepen doctors' work with patients. (SG)

  20. Towards International Humanism

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Huxley, Julian

    1971-01-01

    The basic task before the educational profession today is to study and understand the evolutionary-humanist revolution, to follow up its educational implications; and to enable as many as possible of the world's growing minds to be illuminated by its new vision of human destiny. (Author/JB)

  1. Radar: Human Safety Net

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritz, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Radar is a technology that can be used to detect distant objects not visible to the human eye. A predecessor of radar, called the telemobiloscope, was first used to detect ships in the fog in 1904 off the German coast. Many scientists have worked on the development and refinement of radar (Hertz with electromagnetic waves; Popov with determining…

  2. Negative Human Interaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brannan, John M.

    1972-01-01

    This study is an effort to examine man's most negative experiences as he perceives them. The results indicated that teachers were involved more often than any other person in the most negative experience reported. Improved human relations skills are clearly indicated for those in higher education as well as in public schools. (Author)

  3. Human Balance System

    MedlinePlus

    ... and vision problems, and difficulty with concentration and memory. What is balance? Balance is the ability to maintain the body’s center of mass over its base of support. 1 A properly functioning balance system allows humans to see clearly while moving, identify orientation with ...

  4. Human Ecology: Curriculum Review.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bybee, Rodger W.

    1984-01-01

    Describes nine commercially available programs which represent one aspect or a portion of the human ecology theme. Other information supplied for each program includes: program objectives; methods of instruction; specific subjects, grade, and ability levels; materials produced and purchasable; program implementation; teacher preparation; program…

  5. Lessons in Human Relations.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Glenn, Joanne Lozar

    2003-01-01

    Explores the importance of relationship literacy--the ability to create good relationships with others--in the next economy and offers perspectives on how business education instructors can help students develop and improve their human relations skills for business success. (Author/JOW)

  6. Radar: Human Safety Net

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ritz, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Radar is a technology that can be used to detect distant objects not visible to the human eye. A predecessor of radar, called the telemobiloscope, was first used to detect ships in the fog in 1904 off the German coast. Many scientists have worked on the development and refinement of radar (Hertz with electromagnetic waves; Popov with determining…

  7. Learning to Be Human

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Macmurray, John

    2012-01-01

    This article presents "Learning to be Human", which John Macmurray delivered on 5 May 1958 as the annual public lecture at Moray House College of Education, now part of Edinburgh University. The key themes of the paper are ones to which Macmurray returned again and again in both his educational and his philosophical writing for over 40 years and…

  8. Predictors of human rotation.

    PubMed

    Stochl, Jan; Croudace, Tim

    2013-01-01

    Why some humans prefer to rotate clockwise rather than anticlockwise is not well understood. This study aims to identify the predictors of the preferred rotation direction in humans. The variables hypothesised to influence rotation preference include handedness, footedness, sex, brain hemisphere lateralisation, and the Coriolis effect (which results from geospatial location on the Earth). An online questionnaire allowed us to analyse data from 1526 respondents in 97 countries. Factor analysis showed that the direction of rotation should be studied separately for local and global movements. Handedness, footedness, and the item hypothesised to measure brain hemisphere lateralisation are predictors of rotation direction for both global and local movements. Sex is a predictor of the direction of global rotation movements but not local ones, and both sexes tend to rotate clockwise. Geospatial location does not predict the preferred direction of rotation. Our study confirms previous findings concerning the influence of handedness, footedness, and sex on human rotation; our study also provides new insight into the underlying structure of human rotation movements and excludes the Coriolis effect as a predictor of rotation.

  9. Fighting for Human Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ong, Bao

    2011-01-01

    Speak Truth To Power consists of 17 teacher-developed lessons based on the stories of rights advocates from all over the world. The lessons were created for sixth-through 12th-grade students, and have come to New York schools thanks to the Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice and Human Rights and the New York State United Teachers union. Speak…

  10. Who Hung the Humanities?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lambert, David

    2013-01-01

    This paper is partly based on a lecture given at the AGTA conference in Perth in January 2013. It argues for a progressive subject based curriculum in which geography plays an essential part. This is based on an analysis of why and how subjects like geography, as part of the humanities, have been undermined and diminished in recent times. In a way…

  11. Marketing Human Resource Development.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Frank, Eric, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    Describes three human resource development activities: training, education, and development. Explains marketing from the practitioners's viewpoint in terms of customer orientation; external and internal marketing; and market analysis, research, strategy, and mix. Shows how to design, develop, and implement strategic marketing plans and identify…

  12. Human Babesiosis, Bolivia, 2013

    PubMed Central

    Gabrielli, Simona; Totino, Valentina; Macchioni, Fabio; Zuñiga, Freddy; Rojas, Patricia; Lara, Yuni; Roselli, Mimmo; Cancrini, Gabriella

    2016-01-01

    To investigate human babesiosis in the Bolivian Chaco, in 2013 we tested blood samples from 271 healthy persons living in 2 rural communities in this region. Microscopy and PCR indicated that 3.3% of persons were positive for Babesia microti parasites (US lineage); seroprevalence was 45.7%. Appropriate screening should mitigate the risk for transfusion-associated babesiosis. PMID:27434696

  13. The Human Toxome Project

    EPA Science Inventory

    The Human Toxome project, funded as an NIH Transformative Research grant 2011--‐ 2016, is focused on developing the concepts and the means for deducing, validating, and sharing molecular Pathways of Toxicity (PoT). Using the test case of estrogenic endocrine disruption, the respo...

  14. Humanized Youth Work

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Brokenleg, Martin

    2012-01-01

    The author reflects on the history of the Circle of Courage model in creating resilient children in a world where virtually all young people can be considered to be at risk. The author stresses that those people in the Reclaiming Youth movement are in the business of humanizing youth work and childcare. They continue to call adults back to the…

  15. Fighting for Human Rights

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Ong, Bao

    2011-01-01

    Speak Truth To Power consists of 17 teacher-developed lessons based on the stories of rights advocates from all over the world. The lessons were created for sixth-through 12th-grade students, and have come to New York schools thanks to the Robert F. Kennedy Center for Justice and Human Rights and the New York State United Teachers union. Speak…

  16. Human Spaceflight Safety Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-02

    Bryan O'Connor, Chief of Safety and Mission Assurance at NASA, testifies before a hearing before the House Subcommitte on Space and Aeronautics regarding Safety of Human Spaceflight on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, Dec. 2, 2009, in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  17. Human Spaceflight Safety Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-02

    U.S. Rep. Pete Olson, R-Texas, speaks during a hearing before the House Subcommitte on Space and Aeronautics regarding Safety of Human Spaceflight on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, Dec. 2, 2009, in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  18. Human Spaceflight Safety Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-02

    Bryan O'Connor, Chief of Safety and Mission Assurance at NASA, testifies during a hearing before the House Subcommitte on Space and Aeronautics regarding Safety of Human Spaceflight on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, Dec. 2, 2009, in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  19. Human Spaceflight Safety Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-02

    U.S. Rep. Gabrielle Giffords, D-Ariz., left, speaks with reitred astronaut Lt. Gen. Thomas Stafford prior to the start of a hearing before the House Subcommitte on Space and Aeronautics regarding Safety of Human Spaceflight on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, Dec. 2, 2009, in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)

  20. Human Spaceflight Safety Hearing

    NASA Image and Video Library

    2009-12-02

    John Marshall, a member of the NASA Aerospace Safety Advisory Panel (ASAP), testifies during a hearing before the House Subcommitte on Space and Aeronautics regarding Safety of Human Spaceflight on Capitol Hill, Wednesday, Dec. 2, 2009, in Washington. Photo Credit: (NASA/Bill Ingalls)