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  1. Altered autophagy in human adipose tissues in obesity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Context: Autophagy is a housekeeping mechanism, involved in metabolic regulation and stress response, shown recently to regulate lipid droplets biogenesis/breakdown and adipose tissue phenotype. Objective: We hypothesized that in human obesity autophagy may be altered in adipose tissue in a fat d...

  2. Brown adipose tissue in humans: therapeutic potential to combat obesity.

    PubMed

    Carey, Andrew L; Kingwell, Bronwyn A

    2013-10-01

    Harnessing the considerable capacity of brown adipose tissue (BAT) to consume energy was first proposed as a potential target to control obesity nearly 40years ago. The plausibility of this approach was, however, questioned due to the prevailing view that BAT was either not present or not functional in adult humans. Recent definitive identification of functional BAT in adult humans as well as a number of important advances in the understanding of BAT biology has reignited interest in BAT as an anti-obesity target. Proof-of-concept evidence demonstrating drug-induced BAT activation provides an important foundation for development of targeted pharmacological approaches with clinical application. This review considers evidence from both human and relevant animal studies to determine whether harnessing BAT for the treatment of obesity via pharmacological intervention is a realistic goal. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Brown adipose tissue as a therapeutic target for human obesity.

    PubMed

    Saito, Masayuki

    2013-12-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is the major site of sympathetically activated adaptive thermogenesis during cold exposure and after spontaneous hyperphagia, thereby controlling whole-body energy expenditure and body fat. Recent radionuclide studies have demonstrated the existence of metabolically active BAT in healthy adult humans. Human BAT is activated by acute cold exposure, being positively correlated to cold-induced increases in energy expenditure. The metabolic activity of BAT is lower in older and obese individuals. The inverse relationship between the BAT activity and body fatness suggests that BAT, because of its energy dissipating activity, is protective against body fat accumulation. In fact, either repeated cold exposure or daily ingestion of some food ingredients acting on transient receptor potential channels recruited BAT in association with increased energy expenditure and decreased body fat even in individuals with low BAT activities before the treatment. Thus, BAT is a promising therapeutic target for combating human obesity and related metabolic disorders.

  4. Human brown adipose tissue: regulation and anti-obesity potential.

    PubMed

    Saito, Masayuki

    2014-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is the site of sympathetically activated adaptive thermognenesis during cold exposure and after hyperphagia, thereby controlling whole-body energy expenditure (EE) and body fat. Radionuclide imaging studies have demonstrated that adult humans have metabolically active BAT composed of mainly beige/brite adipocytes, recently identified brown-like adipocytes. The inverse relationship between the BAT activity and body fatness suggests that BAT is, because of its energy dissipating activity, protective against body fat accumulation in humans as it is in small rodents. In fact, either repeated cold exposure or daily ingestion of some food ingredients acting on transient receptor potential channels recruits BAT in parallel with increased EE and decreased body fat. In addition to the sympathetic nervous system, several endocrine factors are also shown to recruit BAT. Thus, BAT is a promising therapeutic target for combating human obesity and related metabolic disorders.

  5. Brown adipose tissue as an anti-obesity tissue in humans.

    PubMed

    Chechi, K; Nedergaard, J; Richard, D

    2014-02-01

    During the 11th Stock Conference held in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, world-leading experts came together to present and discuss recent developments made in the field of brown adipose tissue biology. Owing to the vast capacity of brown adipose tissue for burning food energy in the process of thermogenesis, and due to demonstrations of its presence in adult humans, there is tremendous interest in targeting brown adipose tissue as an anti-obesity tissue in humans. However, the future of such therapeutic approaches relies on our understanding of the origin, development, recruitment, activation and regulation of brown adipose tissue in humans. As reviewed here, the 11th Stock Conference was organized around these themes to discuss the recent progress made in each aspect, to identify gaps in our current understanding and to further provide a common groundwork that could support collaborative efforts aimed at a future therapy for obesity, based on brown adipose tissue thermogenesis.

  6. The evolution of human adiposity and obesity: where did it all go wrong?

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Jonathan C. K.

    2012-01-01

    Because obesity is associated with diverse chronic diseases, little attention has been directed to the multiple beneficial functions of adipose tissue. Adipose tissue not only provides energy for growth, reproduction and immune function, but also secretes and receives diverse signaling molecules that coordinate energy allocation between these functions in response to ecological conditions. Importantly, many relevant ecological cues act on growth and physique, with adiposity responding as a counterbalancing risk management strategy. The large number of individual alleles associated with adipose tissue illustrates its integration with diverse metabolic pathways. However, phenotypic variation in age, sex, ethnicity and social status is further associated with different strategies for storing and using energy. Adiposity therefore represents a key means of phenotypic flexibility within and across generations, enabling a coherent life-history strategy in the face of ecological stochasticity. The sensitivity of numerous metabolic pathways to ecological cues makes our species vulnerable to manipulative globalized economic forces. The aim of this article is to understand how human adipose tissue biology interacts with modern environmental pressures to generate excess weight gain and obesity. The disease component of obesity might lie not in adipose tissue itself, but in its perturbation by our modern industrialized niche. Efforts to combat obesity could be more effective if they prioritized ‘external’ environmental change rather than attempting to manipulate ‘internal’ biology through pharmaceutical or behavioral means. PMID:22915021

  7. Adipose tissue glycogen accumulation is associated with obesity-linked inflammation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Ceperuelo-Mallafré, Victòria; Ejarque, Miriam; Serena, Carolina; Duran, Xavier; Montori-Grau, Marta; Rodríguez, Miguel Angel; Yanes, Oscar; Núñez-Roa, Catalina; Roche, Kelly; Puthanveetil, Prasanth; Garrido-Sánchez, Lourdes; Saez, Enrique; Tinahones, Francisco J.; Garcia-Roves, Pablo M.; Gómez-Foix, Anna Ma; Saltiel, Alan R.; Vendrell, Joan; Fernández-Veledo, Sonia

    2015-01-01

    Objective Glycogen metabolism has emerged as a mediator in the control of energy homeostasis and studies in murine models reveal that adipose tissue might contain glycogen stores. Here we investigated the physio(patho)logical role of glycogen in human adipose tissue in the context of obesity and insulin resistance. Methods We studied glucose metabolic flux of hypoxic human adipoctyes by nuclear magnetic resonance and mass spectrometry-based metabolic approaches. Glycogen synthesis and glycogen content in response to hypoxia was analyzed in human adipocytes and macrophages. To explore the metabolic effects of enforced glycogen deposition in adipocytes and macrophages, we overexpressed PTG, the only glycogen-associated regulatory subunit (PP1-GTS) reported in murine adipocytes. Adipose tissue gene expression analysis was performed on wild type and homozygous PTG KO male mice. Finally, glycogen metabolism gene expression and glycogen accumulation was analyzed in adipose tissue, mature adipocytes and resident macrophages from lean and obese subjects with different degrees of insulin resistance in 2 independent cohorts. Results We show that hypoxia modulates glucose metabolic flux in human adipocytes and macrophages and promotes glycogenesis. Enforced glycogen deposition by overexpression of PTG re-orients adipocyte secretion to a pro-inflammatory response linked to insulin resistance and monocyte/lymphocyte migration. Furthermore, glycogen accumulation is associated with inhibition of mTORC1 signaling and increased basal autophagy flux, correlating with greater leptin release in glycogen-loaded adipocytes. PTG-KO mice have reduced expression of key inflammatory genes in adipose tissue and PTG overexpression in M0 macrophages induces a pro-inflammatory and glycolytic M1 phenotype. Increased glycogen synthase expression correlates with glycogen deposition in subcutaneous adipose tissue of obese patients. Glycogen content in subcutaneous mature adipocytes is associated

  8. Depot-specific regulation of autotaxin with obesity in human adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Rancoule, Chloé; Dusaulcy, Rodolphe; Tréguer, Karine; Grès, Sandra; Guigné, Charlotte; Quilliot, Didier; Valet, Philippe; Saulnier-Blache, Jean Sébastien

    2012-12-01

    Autotaxin (ATX) is a lysophospholipase D involved in synthesis of a bioactive mediator: lysophosphatidic. ATX is abundantly produced by adipocytes and exerts a negative action on adipose tissue expansion. In both mice and humans, ATX expression increases with obesity in association with insulin resistance. In the present study, fat depot-specific regulation of ATX was explored in human. ATX mRNA expression was quantified in visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue in obese (BMI > 40 kg/m(2); n = 27) and non-obese patients (BMI < 25 kg/m(2); n = 10). Whatever the weight status of the patients is, ATX expression was always higher (1.3- to 6-fold) in subcutaneous than in visceral fat. Nevertheless, visceral fat ATX was significantly higher (42 %) in obese than in non-obese patients, whereas subcutaneous fat ATX remained unchanged. In obese patients, visceral fat ATX expression was positively correlated with diastolic arterial blood pressure (r = 0.67; P = 0.001). This correlation was not observed with subcutaneous fat ATX. Visceral fat ATX was mainly correlated with leptin (r = 0.60; P = 0.001), inducible nitric oxide synthase (r = 0.58; P = 0,007), and apelin receptor (r = 0.50; P = 0.007). These correlations were not observed with subcutaneous fat ATX. These results reveal that obesity-associated upregulation of human adipose tissue ATX is specific to the visceral fat depot.

  9. Uncovering Suitable Reference Proteins for Expression Studies in Human Adipose Tissue with Relevance to Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Pérez-Pérez, Rafael; López, Juan A.; García-Santos, Eva; Camafeita, Emilio; Gómez-Serrano, María; Ortega-Delgado, Francisco J.; Ricart, Wifredo; Fernández-Real, José M.; Peral, Belén

    2012-01-01

    Background Protein expression studies based on the two major intra-abdominal human fat depots, the subcutaneous and the omental fat, can shed light into the mechanisms involved in obesity and its co-morbidities. Here we address, for the first time, the identification and validation of reference proteins for data standardization, which are essential for accurate comparison of protein levels in expression studies based on fat from obese and non-obese individuals. Methodology and Findings To uncover adipose tissue proteins equally expressed either in omental and subcutaneous fat depots (study 1) or in omental fat from non-obese and obese individuals (study 2), we have reanalyzed our previously published data based on two-dimensional fluorescence difference gel electrophoresis. Twenty-four proteins (12 in study 1 and 12 in study 2) with similar expression levels in all conditions tested were selected and identified by mass spectrometry. Immunoblotting analysis was used to confirm in adipose tissue the expression pattern of the potential reference proteins and three proteins were validated: PARK7, ENOA and FAA. Western Blot analysis was also used to test customary loading control proteins. ENOA, PARK7 and the customary loading control protein Beta-actin showed steady expression profiles in fat from non-obese and obese individuals, whilst FAA maintained steady expression levels across paired omental and subcutaneous fat samples. Conclusions ENOA, PARK7 and Beta-actin are proper reference standards in obesity studies based on omental fat, whilst FAA is the best loading control for the comparative analysis of omental and subcutaneous adipose tissues either in obese and non-obese subjects. Neither customary loading control proteins GAPDH and TBB5 nor CALX are adequate standards in differential expression studies on adipose tissue. The use of the proposed reference proteins will facilitate the adequate analysis of proteins differentially expressed in the context of obesity

  10. Differential coexpression analysis of obesity-associated networks in human subcutaneous adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Walley, A J; Jacobson, P; Falchi, M; Bottolo, L; Andersson, J C; Petretto, E; Bonnefond, A; Vaillant, E; Lecoeur, C; Vatin, V; Jernas, M; Balding, D; Petteni, M; Park, Y S; Aitman, T; Richardson, S; Sjostrom, L; Carlsson, L M S; Froguel, P

    2012-01-01

    To use a unique obesity-discordant sib-pair study design to combine differential expression analysis, expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) mapping and a coexpression regulatory network approach in subcutaneous human adipose tissue to identify genes relevant to the obese state. Genome-wide transcript expression in subcutaneous human adipose tissue was measured using Affymetrix U133 Plus 2.0 microarrays (Affymetrix, Santa Clara, CA, USA), and genome-wide genotyping data was obtained using an Applied Biosystems (Applied Biosystems; Life Technologies, Carlsbad, CA, USA) SNPlex linkage panel. A total of 154 Swedish families ascertained through an obese proband (body mass index (BMI) >30 kg m(-2)) with a discordant sibling (BMI>10 kg m(-2) less than proband). Approximately one-third of the transcripts were differentially expressed between lean and obese siblings. The cellular adhesion molecules (CAMs) KEGG grouping contained the largest number of differentially expressed genes under cis-acting genetic control. By using a novel approach to contrast CAMs coexpression networks between lean and obese siblings, a subset of differentially regulated genes was identified, with the previously GWAS obesity-associated neuronal growth regulator 1 (NEGR1) as a central hub. Independent analysis using mouse data demonstrated that this finding of NEGR1 is conserved across species. Our data suggest that in addition to its reported role in the brain, NEGR1 is also expressed in subcutaneous adipose tissue and acts as a central 'hub' in an obesity-related transcript network.

  11. Obesity Determines the Immunophenotypic Profile and Functional Characteristics of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells From Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Pachón-Peña, Gisela; Serena, Carolina; Ejarque, Miriam; Petriz, Jordi; Duran, Xevi; Oliva-Olivera, W.; Simó, Rafael; Tinahones, Francisco J.

    2016-01-01

    Adipose tissue is a major source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which possess a variety of properties that make them ideal candidates for regenerative and immunomodulatory therapies. Here, we compared the immunophenotypic profile of human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) from lean and obese individuals, and explored its relationship with the apparent altered plasticity of hASCs. We also hypothesized that persistent hypoxia treatment of cultured hASCs may be necessary but not sufficient to drive significant changes in mature adipocytes. hASCs were obtained from subcutaneous adipose tissue of healthy, adult, female donors undergoing abdominal plastic surgery: lean (n = 8; body mass index [BMI]: 23 ± 1 kg/m2) and obese (n = 8; BMI: 35 ± 5 kg/m2). Cell surface marker expression, proliferation and migration capacity, and adipogenic differentiation potential of cultured hASCs at two different oxygen conditions were studied. Compared with lean-derived hASCs, obese-derived hASCs demonstrated increased proliferation and migration capacity but decreased lipid droplet accumulation, correlating with a higher expression of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-II and cluster of differentiation (CD) 106 and lower expression of CD29. Of interest, adipogenic differentiation modified CD106, CD49b, HLA-ABC surface protein expression, which was dependent on the donor’s BMI. Additionally, low oxygen tension increased proliferation and migration of lean but not obese hASCs, which correlated with an altered CD36 and CD49b immunophenotypic profile. In summary, the differences observed in proliferation, migration, and differentiation capacity in obese hASCs occurred in parallel with changes in cell surface markers, both under basal conditions and during differentiation. Therefore, obesity is an important determinant of stem cell function independent of oxygen tension. Significance The obesity-related hypoxic environment may have latent effects on human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal

  12. Obesity Determines the Immunophenotypic Profile and Functional Characteristics of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells From Adipose Tissue.

    PubMed

    Pachón-Peña, Gisela; Serena, Carolina; Ejarque, Miriam; Petriz, Jordi; Duran, Xevi; Oliva-Olivera, W; Simó, Rafael; Tinahones, Francisco J; Fernández-Veledo, Sonia; Vendrell, Joan

    2016-04-01

    Adipose tissue is a major source of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which possess a variety of properties that make them ideal candidates for regenerative and immunomodulatory therapies. Here, we compared the immunophenotypic profile of human adipose-derived stem cells (hASCs) from lean and obese individuals, and explored its relationship with the apparent altered plasticity of hASCs. We also hypothesized that persistent hypoxia treatment of cultured hASCs may be necessary but not sufficient to drive significant changes in mature adipocytes. hASCs were obtained from subcutaneous adipose tissue of healthy, adult, female donors undergoing abdominal plastic surgery: lean (n=8; body mass index [BMI]: 23±1 kg/m2) and obese (n=8; BMI: 35±5 kg/m2). Cell surface marker expression, proliferation and migration capacity, and adipogenic differentiation potential of cultured hASCs at two different oxygen conditions were studied. Compared with lean-derived hASCs, obese-derived hASCs demonstrated increased proliferation and migration capacity but decreased lipid droplet accumulation, correlating with a higher expression of human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-II and cluster of differentiation (CD) 106 and lower expression of CD29. Of interest, adipogenic differentiation modified CD106, CD49b, HLA-ABC surface protein expression, which was dependent on the donor's BMI. Additionally, low oxygen tension increased proliferation and migration of lean but not obese hASCs, which correlated with an altered CD36 and CD49b immunophenotypic profile. In summary, the differences observed in proliferation, migration, and differentiation capacity in obese hASCs occurred in parallel with changes in cell surface markers, both under basal conditions and during differentiation. Therefore, obesity is an important determinant of stem cell function independent of oxygen tension. The obesity-related hypoxic environment may have latent effects on human adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hASCs) with

  13. Obesity and prostate cancer: gene expression signature of human periprostatic adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Ribeiro, Ricardo; Monteiro, Cátia; Catalán, Victoria; Hu, Pingzhao; Cunha, Virgínia; Rodríguez, Amaia; Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier; Fraga, Avelino; Príncipe, Paulo; Lobato, Carlos; Lobo, Francisco; Morais, António; Silva, Vitor; Sanches-Magalhães, José; Oliveira, Jorge; Pina, Francisco; Lopes, Carlos; Medeiros, Rui; Frühbeck, Gema

    2012-09-25

    Periprostatic (PP) adipose tissue surrounds the prostate, an organ with a high predisposition to become malignant. Frequently, growing prostatic tumor cells extend beyond the prostatic organ towards this fat depot. This study aimed to determine the genome-wide expression of genes in PP adipose tissue in obesity/overweight (OB/OW) and prostate cancer patients. Differentially expressed genes in human PP adipose tissue were identified using microarrays. Analyses were conducted according to the donors' body mass index characteristics (OB/OW versus lean) and prostate disease (extra prostatic cancer versus organ confined prostate cancer versus benign prostatic hyperplasia). Selected genes with altered expression were validated by real-time PCR. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) was used to investigate gene ontology, canonical pathways and functional networks. In the PP adipose tissue of OB/OW subjects, we found altered expression of genes encoding molecules involved in adipogenic/anti-lipolytic, proliferative/anti-apoptotic, and mild immunoinflammatory processes (for example, FADS1, down-regulated, and LEP and ANGPT1, both up-regulated). Conversely, in the PP adipose tissue of subjects with prostate cancer, altered genes were related to adipose tissue cellular activity (increased cell proliferation/differentiation, cell cycle activation and anti-apoptosis), whereas a downward impact on immunity and inflammation was also observed, mostly related to the complement (down-regulation of CFH). Interestingly, we found that the microRNA MIRLET7A2 was overexpressed in the PP adipose tissue of prostate cancer patients. Obesity and excess adiposity modified the expression of PP adipose tissue genes to ultimately foster fat mass growth. In patients with prostate cancer the expression profile of PP adipose tissue accounted for hypercellularity and reduced immunosurveillance. Both findings may be liable to promote a favorable environment for prostate cancer progression.

  14. Obesity and prostate cancer: gene expression signature of human periprostatic adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Periprostatic (PP) adipose tissue surrounds the prostate, an organ with a high predisposition to become malignant. Frequently, growing prostatic tumor cells extend beyond the prostatic organ towards this fat depot. This study aimed to determine the genome-wide expression of genes in PP adipose tissue in obesity/overweight (OB/OW) and prostate cancer patients. Methods Differentially expressed genes in human PP adipose tissue were identified using microarrays. Analyses were conducted according to the donors' body mass index characteristics (OB/OW versus lean) and prostate disease (extra prostatic cancer versus organ confined prostate cancer versus benign prostatic hyperplasia). Selected genes with altered expression were validated by real-time PCR. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis (IPA) was used to investigate gene ontology, canonical pathways and functional networks. Results In the PP adipose tissue of OB/OW subjects, we found altered expression of genes encoding molecules involved in adipogenic/anti-lipolytic, proliferative/anti-apoptotic, and mild immunoinflammatory processes (for example, FADS1, down-regulated, and LEP and ANGPT1, both up-regulated). Conversely, in the PP adipose tissue of subjects with prostate cancer, altered genes were related to adipose tissue cellular activity (increased cell proliferation/differentiation, cell cycle activation and anti-apoptosis), whereas a downward impact on immunity and inflammation was also observed, mostly related to the complement (down-regulation of CFH). Interestingly, we found that the microRNA MIRLET7A2 was overexpressed in the PP adipose tissue of prostate cancer patients. Conclusions Obesity and excess adiposity modified the expression of PP adipose tissue genes to ultimately foster fat mass growth. In patients with prostate cancer the expression profile of PP adipose tissue accounted for hypercellularity and reduced immunosurveillance. Both findings may be liable to promote a favorable environment for

  15. Genetics of Adiposity in Large Animal Models for Human Obesity-Studies on Pigs and Dogs.

    PubMed

    Stachowiak, M; Szczerbal, I; Switonski, M

    2016-01-01

    The role of domestic mammals in the development of human biomedical sciences has been widely documented. Among these model species the pig and dog are of special importance. Both are useful for studies on the etiology of human obesity. Genome sequences of both species are known and advanced genetic tools [eg, microarray SNP for genome wide association studies (GWAS), next generation sequencing (NGS), etc.] are commonly used in such studies. In the domestic pig the accumulation of adipose tissue is an important trait, which influences meat quality and fattening efficiency. Numerous quantitative trait loci (QTLs) for pig fatness traits were identified, while gene polymorphisms associated with these traits were also described. The situation is different in dog population. Generally, excessive accumulation of adipose tissue is considered, similar to humans, as a complex disease. However, research on the genetic background of canine obesity is still in its infancy. Between-breed differences in terms of adipose tissue accumulation are well known in both animal species. In this review we show recent advances of studies on adipose tissue accumulation in pigs and dogs, and their potential importance for studies on human obesity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Important mitochondrial proteins in human omental adipose tissue show reduced expression in obesity

    PubMed Central

    Lindinger, Peter W.; Christe, Martine; Eberle, Alex N.; Kern, Beatrice; Peterli, Ralph; Peters, Thomas; Jayawardene, Kamburapola J.I.; Fearnley, Ian M.; Walker, John E.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is associated with impaired mitochondrial function. This study compares mitochondrial protein expression in omental fat in obese and non-obese humans. Omental adipose tissue was obtained by surgical biopsy, adipocytes were purified and mitochondria isolated. Using anion-exchange chromatography, SDS-PAGE and mass-spectrometry, 128 proteins with potentially different abundances in patient groups were identified, 62 of the 128 proteins are mainly localized in the mitochondria. Further quantification of 12 of these 62 proteins by immune dot blot analysis revealed four proteins citrate synthase, HADHA, LETM1 and mitofilin being inversely associated with BMI, and mitofilin being inversely correlated with gender. PMID:26217759

  17. Genome-wide DNA promoter methylation and transcriptome analysis in human adipose tissue unravels novel candidate genes for obesity.

    PubMed

    Keller, Maria; Hopp, Lydia; Liu, Xuanshi; Wohland, Tobias; Rohde, Kerstin; Cancello, Raffaella; Klös, Matthias; Bacos, Karl; Kern, Matthias; Eichelmann, Fabian; Dietrich, Arne; Schön, Michael R; Gärtner, Daniel; Lohmann, Tobias; Dreßler, Miriam; Stumvoll, Michael; Kovacs, Peter; DiBlasio, Anna-Maria; Ling, Charlotte; Binder, Hans; Blüher, Matthias; Böttcher, Yvonne

    2017-01-01

    DNA methylation plays an important role in obesity and related metabolic complications. We examined genome-wide DNA promoter methylation along with mRNA profiles in paired samples of human subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and omental visceral adipose tissue (OVAT) from non-obese vs. obese individuals. We identified negatively correlated methylation and expression of several obesity-associated genes in our discovery dataset and in silico replicated ETV6 in two independent cohorts. Further, we identified six adipose tissue depot-specific genes (HAND2, HOXC6, PPARG, SORBS2, CD36, and CLDN1). The effects were further supported in additional independent cohorts. Our top hits might play a role in adipogenesis and differentiation, obesity, lipid metabolism, and adipose tissue expandability. Finally, we show that in vitro methylation of SORBS2 directly represses gene expression. Taken together, our data show distinct tissue specific epigenetic alterations which associate with obesity.

  18. Adipose Tissue–Specific Regulation of Angiotensinogen in Obese Humans and Mice: Impact of Nutritional Status and Adipocyte Hypertrophy

    PubMed Central

    Yasue, Shintaro; Masuzaki, Hiroaki; Okada, Sadanori; Ishii, Takako; Kozuka, Chisayo; Tanaka, Tomohiro; Fujikura, Junji; Ebihara, Ken; Hosoda, Kiminori; Katsurada, Akemi; Ohashi, Naro; Urushihara, Maki; Kobori, Hiroyuki; Morimoto, Naoki; Kawazoe, Takeshi; Naitoh, Motoko; Okada, Mitsuru; Sakaue, Hiroshi; Suzuki, Shigehiko; Nakao, Kazuwa

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND The adipose tissue renin–angiotensin system (RAS) has been implicated in the pathophysiology of obesity and dysfunction of adipose tissue. However, neither regulation of angiotensinogen (AGT) expression in adipose tissue nor secretion of adipose tissue–derived AGT has been fully elucidated in humans. METHODS Human subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue (SAT) biopsies were performed for 46 subjects with a wide range of body mass index (BMI). Considering the mRNA level of AGT and indices of body fat mass, the amount of adipose tissue–derived AGT secretion (A-AGT-S) was estimated. Using a mouse model of obesity and weight reduction, plasma AGT levels were measured with a newly developed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), and the contribution of A-AGT-S to plasma AGT levels was assessed. RESULTS A-AGT-S was substantially increased in obese humans and the value was correlated with the plasma AGT level in mice. A-AGT-S and plasma AGT were higher in obese mice, whereas lower in mice with weight reduction. However, the AGT mRNA levels in the liver, kidney, and aorta were not altered in the mouse models. In both humans and mice, the AGT mRNA levels in mature adipocytes (MAs) were comparable to those in stromal-vascular cells. Coulter Multisizer analyses revealed that AGT mRNA levels in the MAs were inversely correlated with the average size of mature adipocytes. CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrates that adipose tissue–derived AGT is substantially augmented in obese humans, which may contribute considerably to elevated levels of circulating AGT. Adipose tissue–specific regulation of AGT provides a novel insight into the clinical implications of adipose tissue RAS in human obesity. PMID:20057360

  19. Blunted metabolic responses to cold and insulin stimulation in brown adipose tissue of obese humans.

    PubMed

    Orava, Janne; Nuutila, Pirjo; Noponen, Tommi; Parkkola, Riitta; Viljanen, Tapio; Enerbäck, Sven; Rissanen, Aila; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H; Virtanen, Kirsi A

    2013-11-01

    Inactive brown adipose tissue (BAT) may predispose to weight gain. This study was designed to measure metabolism in the BAT of obese humans, and to compare it to that in lean subjects. The impact of weight loss on BAT and the association of detectable BAT with various metabolic characteristics were also assessed. Using positron emission tomography (PET), cold- and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and blood flow in the BAT of obese and lean humans were quantified. Further, cold-induced glucose uptake was measured in obese subjects before and after a 5-month conventional weight loss. Mean responses in BAT glucose uptake rate to both cold and insulin stimulation were twice as large in lean as in obese subjects. Blood flow in BAT was also lower in obese subjects under cold conditions. The increase in cold-induced BAT glucose uptake rate after weight loss was not statistically significant. Subjects with cold-activated detectable BAT were leaner and had higher whole-body insulin sensitivity than BAT-negative subjects, irrespective of age and gender. The effects of cold and insulin on BAT activity are severely blunted in obesity, and the presence of detectable BAT may contribute to a metabolically healthy status. Copyright © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  20. [Human brown adipose tissue].

    PubMed

    Virtanen, Kirsi A; Nuutila, Pirjo

    2015-01-01

    Adult humans have heat-producing and energy-consuming brown adipose tissue in the clavicular region of the neck. There are two types of brown adipose cells, the so-called classic and beige adipose cells. Brown adipose cells produce heat by means of uncoupler protein 1 (UCP1) from fatty acids and sugar. By applying positron emission tomography (PET) measuring the utilization of sugar, the metabolism of brown fat has been shown to multiply in the cold, presumably influencing energy consumption. Active brown fat is most likely present in young adults, persons of normal weight and women, least likely in obese persons.

  1. Characterization of stromal vascular fraction and adipose stem cells from subcutaneous, preperitoneal and visceral morbidly obese human adipose tissue depots

    PubMed Central

    Silva, Karina Ribeiro; Côrtes, Isis; Liechocki, Sally; Carneiro, João Regis Ivar; Souza, Antônio Augusto Peixoto; Borojevic, Radovan; Maya-Monteiro, Clarissa Menezes

    2017-01-01

    Background/Objectives The pathological condition of obesity is accompanied by a dysfunctional adipose tissue. We postulate that subcutaneous, preperitoneal and visceral obese abdominal white adipose tissue depots could have stromal vascular fractions (SVF) with distinct composition and adipose stem cells (ASC) that would differentially account for the pathogenesis of obesity. Methods In order to evaluate the distribution of SVF subpopulations, samples of subcutaneous, preperitoneal and visceral adipose tissues from morbidly obese women (n = 12, BMI: 46.2±5.1 kg/m2) were collected during bariatric surgery, enzymatically digested and analyzed by flow cytometry (n = 12). ASC from all depots were evaluated for morphology, surface expression, ability to accumulate lipid after induction and cytokine secretion (n = 3). Results A high content of preadipocytes was found in the SVF of subcutaneous depot (p = 0.0178). ASC from the three depots had similar fibroblastoid morphology with a homogeneous expression of CD34, CD146, CD105, CD73 and CD90. ASC from the visceral depot secreted the highest levels of IL-6, MCP-1 and G-CSF (p = 0.0278). Interestingly, preperitoneal ASC under lipid accumulation stimulus showed the lowest levels of all the secreted cytokines, except for adiponectin that was enhanced (p = 0.0278). Conclusions ASC from preperitoneal adipose tissue revealed the less pro-inflammatory properties, although it is an internal adipose depot. Conversely, ASC from visceral adipose tissue are the most pro-inflammatory. Therefore, ASC from subcutaneous, visceral and preperitoneal adipose depots could differentially contribute to the chronic inflammatory scenario of obesity. PMID:28323901

  2. EGFL6 is increasingly expressed in human obesity and promotes proliferation of adipose tissue-derived stromal vascular cells.

    PubMed

    Oberauer, Rupert; Rist, Wolfgang; Lenter, Martin C; Hamilton, Bradford S; Neubauer, Heike

    2010-10-01

    With increasing rates of obesity driving the incidence of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases to epidemic levels, understanding of the biology of adipose tissue expansion is a focus of current research. Identification and characterization of secreted proteins of the adipose tissue could provide further insights into the function of adipose tissue and might help to therapeutically influence the development of obesity and associated metabolic disorders. In the present study, we identified human epidermal growth factor-like domain multiple-6 (EGFL6) as an adipose tissue-secreted protein. EGFL6 expression in human subcutaneous adipose tissue significantly increased with obesity and decreased after weight loss. Further, expression and secretion of EGFL6 increased with in vitro differentiation of human preadipocytes, suggesting that mature adipocytes are the main source of EGFL6. Containing epidermal growth factor (EGF)-like repeats, an Arg-Gly-Asp (RGD) integrin binding motif and a mephrin, A5 protein and receptor protein-tyrosine phosphatase mu (MAM) domain, EGFL6 was suggested to be an extra-cellular matrix protein. Recombinant human EGFL6 protein mediated cell adhesion of human adipose tissue-derived stromal vascular cells (AD-SVC) in an RGD-dependent manner. FACS analyses revealed specific binding of the protein to the cell surface of AD-SVC with the binding being predominantly mediated by the EGF-like repeats. Recombinant EGFL6 enhanced proliferation of human AD-SVC as measured by MTS assay and [(14)C]-thymidine incorporation. These results indicate that human EGFL6 is a paracrine/autocrine growth factor of adipose tissue up-regulated in obesity and potentially involved in the process of adipose tissue expansion and the development of obesity.

  3. Disruption of GIP/GIPR axis in human adipose tissue is linked to obesity and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Ceperuelo-Mallafré, Victòria; Duran, Xavier; Pachón, Gisela; Roche, Kelly; Garrido-Sánchez, Lourdes; Vilarrasa, Nuria; Tinahones, Francisco J; Vicente, Vicente; Pujol, Jordi; Vendrell, Joan; Fernández-Veledo, Sonia

    2014-05-01

    Glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) has a central role in glucose homeostasis through its amplification of insulin secretion; however, its physiological role in adipose tissue is unclear. Our objective was to define the function of GIP in human adipose tissue in relation to obesity and insulin resistance. GIP receptor (GIPR) expression was analyzed in human sc adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose (VAT) from lean and obese subjects in 3 independent cohorts. GIPR expression was associated with anthropometric and biochemical variables. GIP responsiveness on insulin sensitivity was analyzed in human adipocyte cell lines in normoxic and hypoxic environments as well as in adipose-derived stem cells obtained from lean and obese patients. GIPR expression was downregulated in SAT from obese patients and correlated negatively with body mass index, waist circumference, systolic blood pressure, and glucose and triglyceride levels. Furthermore, homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance, glucose, and G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) emerged as variables strongly associated with GIPR expression in SAT. Glucose uptake studies and insulin signaling in human adipocytes revealed GIP as an insulin-sensitizer incretin. Immunoprecipitation experiments suggested that GIP promotes the interaction of GRK2 with GIPR and decreases the association of GRK2 to insulin receptor substrate 1. These effects of GIP observed under normoxia were lost in human fat cells cultured in hypoxia. In support of this, GIP increased insulin sensitivity in human adipose-derived stem cells from lean patients. GIP also induced GIPR expression, which was concomitant with a downregulation of the incretin-degrading enzyme dipeptidyl peptidase 4. None of the physiological effects of GIP were detected in human fat cells obtained from an obese environment with reduced levels of GIPR. GIP/GIPR signaling is disrupted in insulin-resistant states, such as obesity, and normalizing this

  4. IL-15 concentrations in skeletal muscle and subcutaneous adipose tissue in lean and obese humans: local effects of IL-15 on adipose tissue lipolysis.

    PubMed

    Pierce, Joseph R; Maples, Jill M; Hickner, Robert C

    2015-06-15

    Animal/cell investigations indicate that there is a decreased adipose tissue mass resulting from skeletal muscle (SkM) IL-15 secretion (e.g., SkM-blood-adipose tissue axis). IL-15 could regulate fat mass accumulation in obesity via lipolysis, although this has not been investigated in humans. Therefore, the purpose was to examine whether SkM and/or subcutaneous adipose tissue (SCAT) IL-15 concentrations were correlated with SCAT lipolysis in lean and obese humans and determine whether IL-15 perfusion could induce lipolysis in human SCAT. Local SkM and abdominal SCAT IL-15 (microdialysis) and circulating IL-15 (blood) were sampled in lean (BMI: 23.1 ± 1.9 kg/m(2); n = 10) and obese (BMI: 34.7 ± 3.5 kg/m(2); n = 10) subjects at rest/during 1-h cycling exercise. Lipolysis (SCAT interstitial glycerol concentration) was compared against local/systemic IL-15. An additional probe in SCAT was perfused with IL-15 to assess direct lipolytic responses. SkM IL-15 was not different between lean and obese subjects (P = 0.45), whereas SCAT IL-15 was higher in obese vs. lean subjects (P = 0.02) and was correlated with SCAT lipolysis (r = 0.45, P = 0.05). Exercise increased SCAT lipolysis in lean and obese (P < 0.01), but exercise-induced SCAT lipolysis changes were not correlated with exercise-induced SCAT IL-15 changes. Microdialysis perfusion resulting in physiological IL-15 concentrations in the adipose tissue interstitium increased lipolysis in lean (P = 0.04) but suppressed lipolysis in obese (P < 0.01). Although we found no support for a human IL-15 SkM-blood-adipose tissue axis, IL-15 may be produced in/act on the abdominal SCAT depot. The extent to which this autocrine/paracrine IL-15 action regulates human body composition remains unknown.

  5. Dysregulation of the peripheral and adipose tissue endocannabinoid system in human abdominal obesity.

    PubMed

    Blüher, Matthias; Engeli, Stefan; Klöting, Nora; Berndt, Janin; Fasshauer, Mathias; Bátkai, Sándor; Pacher, Pál; Schön, Michael R; Jordan, Jens; Stumvoll, Michael

    2006-11-01

    The endocannabinoid system has been suspected to contribute to the association of visceral fat accumulation with metabolic diseases. We determined whether circulating endocannabinoids are related to visceral adipose tissue mass in lean, subcutaneous obese, and visceral obese subjects (10 men and 10 women in each group). We further measured expression of the cannabinoid type 1 (CB(1)) receptor and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) genes in paired samples of subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue in all 60 subjects. Circulating 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG) was significantly correlated with body fat (r = 0.45, P = 0.03), visceral fat mass (r = 0.44, P = 0.003), and fasting plasma insulin concentrations (r = 0.41, P = 0.001) but negatively correlated to glucose infusion rate during clamp (r = 0.39, P = 0.009). In visceral adipose tissue, CB(1) mRNA expression was negatively correlated with visceral fat mass (r = 0.32, P = 0.01), fasting insulin (r = 0.48, P < 0.001), and circulating 2-AG (r = 0.5, P < 0.001), whereas FAAH gene expression was negatively correlated with visceral fat mass (r = 0.39, P = 0.01) and circulating 2-AG (r = 0.77, P < 0.001). Our findings suggest that abdominal fat accumulation is a critical correlate of the dysregulation of the peripheral endocannabinoid system in human obesity. Thus, the endocannabinoid system may represent a primary target for the treatment of abdominal obesity and associated metabolic changes.

  6. Decreased RB1 mRNA, Protein, and Activity Reflect Obesity-Induced Altered Adipogenic Capacity in Human Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Moreno-Navarrete, José María; Petrov, Petar; Serrano, Marta; Ortega, Francisco; García-Ruiz, Estefanía; Oliver, Paula; Ribot, Joan; Ricart, Wifredo; Palou, Andreu; Bonet, Mª Luisa; Fernández-Real, José Manuel

    2013-01-01

    Retinoblastoma (Rb1) has been described as an essential player in white adipocyte differentiation in mice. No studies have been reported thus far in human adipose tissue or human adipocytes. We aimed to investigate the possible role and regulation of RB1 in adipose tissue in obesity using human samples and animal and cell models. Adipose RB1 (mRNA, protein, and activity) was negatively associated with BMI and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) while positively associated with the expression of adipogenic genes (PPARγ and IRS1) in both visceral and subcutaneous human adipose tissue. BMI increase was the main contributor to adipose RB1 downregulation. In rats, adipose Rb1 gene expression and activity decreased in parallel to dietary-induced weight gain and returned to baseline with weight loss. RB1 gene and protein expression and activity increased significantly during human adipocyte differentiation. In fully differentiated adipocytes, transient knockdown of Rb1 led to loss of the adipogenic phenotype. In conclusion, Rb1 seems to play a permissive role for human adipose tissue function, being downregulated in obesity and increased during differentiation of human adipocytes. Rb1 knockdown findings further implicate Rb1 as necessary for maintenance of adipogenic characteristics in fully differentiated adipocytes. PMID:23315497

  7. Decreased RB1 mRNA, protein, and activity reflect obesity-induced altered adipogenic capacity in human adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Navarrete, José María; Petrov, Petar; Serrano, Marta; Ortega, Francisco; García-Ruiz, Estefanía; Oliver, Paula; Ribot, Joan; Ricart, Wifredo; Palou, Andreu; Bonet, M Luisa; Fernández-Real, José Manuel

    2013-06-01

    Retinoblastoma (Rb1) has been described as an essential player in white adipocyte differentiation in mice. No studies have been reported thus far in human adipose tissue or human adipocytes. We aimed to investigate the possible role and regulation of RB1 in adipose tissue in obesity using human samples and animal and cell models. Adipose RB1 (mRNA, protein, and activity) was negatively associated with BMI and insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) while positively associated with the expression of adipogenic genes (PPARγ and IRS1) in both visceral and subcutaneous human adipose tissue. BMI increase was the main contributor to adipose RB1 downregulation. In rats, adipose Rb1 gene expression and activity decreased in parallel to dietary-induced weight gain and returned to baseline with weight loss. RB1 gene and protein expression and activity increased significantly during human adipocyte differentiation. In fully differentiated adipocytes, transient knockdown of Rb1 led to loss of the adipogenic phenotype. In conclusion, Rb1 seems to play a permissive role for human adipose tissue function, being downregulated in obesity and increased during differentiation of human adipocytes. Rb1 knockdown findings further implicate Rb1 as necessary for maintenance of adipogenic characteristics in fully differentiated adipocytes.

  8. Translational issues in targeting brown adipose tissue thermogenesis for human obesity management.

    PubMed

    Dulloo, Abdul G

    2013-10-01

    The recent advancements in unraveling novel mechanisms that control the induction, (trans)differentiation, proliferation, and thermogenic activity and capacity of brown adipose tissue (BAT), together with the application of imaging techniques for human BAT visualization, have generated optimism that these advances will provide novel strategies for targeting BAT thermogenesis, leading to efficacious and safe obesity therapies. This paper first provides an overview of landmark events of the past few decades that have been driving the search for pharmaceutical and nutraceutical compounds that would increase BAT thermogenesis for obesity management. It then addresses issues about what could be expected from an ideal thermogenic antiobesity approach, in particular to what extent daily energy expenditure will need to increase in order to achieve long-term weight loss currently achievable only through bariatric surgery, and whether the human body will have enough thermogenic capacity to reach this target weight loss by future therapies focused on BAT.

  9. WDTC1, an ortholog of Drosphilia adipose gene, associates with human obesity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Obesity, a major characteristic of metabolic syndrome, is associated with increased risk of type 2 diabetes and coronary heart disease, and is a major healthcare burden worldwide. The prevalence of obesity has reached epidemic proportions. Adipose (adp) is an obesity gene in Drosophila and plays a ...

  10. Molecular and morphologic characterization of superficial- and deep-subcutaneous adipose tissue subdivisions in human obesity.

    PubMed

    Cancello, Raffaella; Zulian, Alessandra; Gentilini, Davide; Maestrini, Sabrina; Della Barba, Alberto; Invitti, Cecilia; Corà, Davide; Caselle, Michele; Liuzzi, Antonio; Di Blasio, Anna Maria

    2013-12-01

    Human abdominal subcutaneous white adipose tissue (SAT) is composed of two different subcompartments: a "superficial" SAT (SSAT), located between the skin and a fibrous-fascia plane; and a deeper SAT, located under this fibrous fascia plane, indicated as "deep" SAT (DSAT). In order to investigate whether SSAT and DSAT have different molecular and morphological features, paired SSAT/DSAT biopsies were collected from 10 female obese patients and used for microarray and morphologic analysis. The stroma-vascular fraction cells were also isolated from both depots and cultured in vitro to assess the lipid accumulation rate. SSAT and DSAT displayed different patterns of gene expression, mainly for metabolic and inflammatory genes, respectively. Detailed gene expression analysis indicated that several metabolic genes, including adiponectin, are preferentially expressed in SSAT, whereas inflammatory genes are over-expressed in DSAT. Despite a similar lipid accumulation rate in vitro, in vivo SSAT showed a significant adipocyte hypertrophy together with a significantly lower inflammatory infiltration and vascular vessel lumen mean size, when compared to DSAT. These data show that, SSAT and DSAT are functionally and morphologically different and emphasize the importance of considering independent these two adipose depots when investigating SAT biology and obesity complications. Copyright © 2013 The Obesity Society.

  11. Adipose tissue transcriptomic signature highlights the pathological relevance of extracellular matrix in human obesity

    PubMed Central

    Henegar, Corneliu; Tordjman, Joan; Achard, Vincent; Lacasa, Danièle; Cremer, Isabelle; Guerre-Millo, Michèle; Poitou, Christine; Basdevant, Arnaud; Stich, Vladimir; Viguerie, Nathalie; Langin, Dominique; Bedossa, Pierre; Zucker, Jean-Daniel; Clement, Karine

    2008-01-01

    Background Investigations performed in mice and humans have acknowledged obesity as a low-grade inflammatory disease. Several molecular mechanisms have been convincingly shown to be involved in activating inflammatory processes and altering cell composition in white adipose tissue (WAT). However, the overall importance of these alterations, and their long-term impact on the metabolic functions of the WAT and on its morphology, remain unclear. Results Here, we analyzed the transcriptomic signature of the subcutaneous WAT in obese human subjects, in stable weight conditions and after weight loss following bariatric surgery. An original integrative functional genomics approach was applied to quantify relations between relevant structural and functional themes annotating differentially expressed genes in order to construct a comprehensive map of transcriptional interactions defining the obese WAT. These analyses highlighted a significant up-regulation of genes and biological themes related to extracellular matrix (ECM) constituents, including members of the integrin family, and suggested that these elements could play a major mediating role in a chain of interactions that connect local inflammatory phenomena to the alteration of WAT metabolic functions in obese subjects. Tissue and cellular investigations, driven by the analysis of transcriptional interactions, revealed an increased amount of interstitial fibrosis in obese WAT, associated with an infiltration of different types of inflammatory cells, and suggest that phenotypic alterations of human pre-adipocytes, induced by a pro-inflammatory environment, may lead to an excessive synthesis of ECM components. Conclusion This study opens new perspectives in understanding the biology of human WAT and its pathologic changes indicative of tissue deterioration associated with the development of obesity. PMID:18208606

  12. Brown adipose tissue: research milestones of a potential player in human energy balance and obesity.

    PubMed

    Zafrir, B

    2013-10-01

    Obesity and diabetes mellitus are worldwide epidemics driven by the disruption in energy balance. In recent years, it was discovered that functional brown adipose tissue (BAT), once thought to exist mainly in infants, is present in adults, and can be detected during cold stimulation, and is associated with decreased adiposity. Brown fat pads were shown to be highly vascularized and metabolically active and on stimulation, they caused enhanced energy expenditure and increased glucose and fatty acid uptake. These observations drew attention to the possibility that nonshivering thermogenesis mediated by activation of BAT might be important in human energy balance and a potential tool to counter obesity. Recent investigations have revealed significant advances in the understanding of the role of BAT-mediated thermogenesis, uncovering essential knowledge on the origin, differentiation, activation, and regulation of BAT in both murine models and humans. In addition to classic BAT depots, transformation of white adipocytes into brown-like adipocytes, and the development of "beige" cells from distinct precursors, were demonstrated in different animal models and resulted in increased thermogenic activity. Several transcription factors, activating proteins, and hormones are increasingly identified as regulating the development and function of both brown-like adipocytes and classic brown fat pads. This review will summarize the evolution of research on BAT in humans, in light of the renewed scientific interest and growing body of evidence showing that recruitment and activation of BAT and browning of white adipose tissue can affect energy expenditure and may be a future feasible target in the treatment of metabolic diseases. © Georg Thieme Verlag KG Stuttgart · New York.

  13. Parathyroid Hormone-Related Protein, Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells Adipogenic Capacity and Healthy Obesity.

    PubMed

    Roca-Rodríguez, María Mar; El Bekay, Rajaa; Garrido-Sanchez, Lourdes; Gómez-Serrano, María; Coin-Aragüez, Leticia; Oliva-Olivera, Wilfredo; Lhamyani, Said; Clemente-Postigo, Mercedes; García-Santos, Eva; de Luna Diaz, Resi; Yubero-Serrano, Elena M; Fernández Real, José M; Peral, Belén; Tinahones, Francisco J

    2015-06-01

    This study aimed to define the potential role of PTHrP on adipogenic regulation and to analyze its relationship with obesity and insulin resistance. This was a cross-sectional study in which visceral (VAT) and subcutaneous (SAT) adipose tissue were extracted from 19 morbidly obese, 10 obese, and 10 lean subjects. PTHrP mRNA levels were measured in VAT and SAT. VAT mesenchymal stem cells and 3T3-L1 cells were differentiated into adipocytes in presence or absence of PTHrP siRNA. PTHrP mRNA and protein levels as well as adipogenic markers were evaluated by Western blotting or qPCR. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence procedures were used for PTHrP intracellular localization. Both human VAT and SAT express PTHrP protein mainly in the nucleolar compartment of stromal vascular fraction cells. The highest levels of PTHrP mRNA and protein expression were detected in undifferentiated mesenchymal cells and progressively decreased during adipogenesis. Remarkably, adipogenic differentiation in human mesenchymal stem cells (A-hMSC) was significantly impaired in a pthrp knockdown. PTHrP seems to be related to obesity-associated insulin resistance (IR), given that we found that PTHrP mRNA expression was higher in VAT from morbidly obese with a low IR degree (MO-L-IR) subjects than those from morbidly obese with a high IR degree (MO-H-IR) and lean subjects, and correlated positively with body mass index and hip circumference. We also found that A-hMSC from MO-L-IRs displayed higher adipogenic capacity than those from both MO-H-IRs and leans. In addition, adipogenesis was impaired in VAT from MO-H-IRs, given that mRNA expression levels of key adipogenic regulators were lower than those from MO-L-IR subjects. PTHrP could be a potential new therapeutic target for the reprograming of adipogenesis and adipose tissue expansion, thus possibly ameliorating the metabolic syndrome in obese subjects.

  14. Adipose tissue dysfunction in obesity.

    PubMed

    Blüher, M

    2009-06-01

    The incidence of obesity has increased dramatically during recent decades. Obesity will cause a decline in life expectancy for the first time in recent history due to numerous co-morbid disorders. Adipocyte and adipose tissue dysfunction belong to the primary defects in obesity and may link obesity to several health problems including increased risk of insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes, fatty liver disease, hypertension, dyslipidemia, atherosclerosis, dementia, airway disease and some cancers. However, not all obese individuals develop obesity related metabolic or cardiovascular disorders potentially due to a preserved normal adipose tissue architecture and function. The majority of patients with obesity have an impaired adipose tissue function caused by the interaction of genetic and environmental factors which lead to adipocyte hypertrophy, hypoxia, a variety of stresses and inflammatory processes within adipose tissue. Ectopic fat accumulation including visceral obesity may be considered as a consequence of adipose tissue dysfunction, which is further characterized by changes in the cellular composition, increased lipid storage and impaired insulin sensitivity in adipocytes, and secretion of a proinflammatory, atherogenic, and diabetogenic adipokine pattern. This review focuses on the discussion of mechanisms causing or maintaining impaired adipose tissue function in obesity and potentially linking obesity to its associated disorders. A model is proposed how different pathogenic factors and mechanisms may cause dysfunction of adipose tissue.

  15. The Circulatory and Metabolic Responses to Hypoxia in Humans – With Special Reference to Adipose Tissue Physiology and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Heinonen, Ilkka H. A.; Boushel, Robert; Kalliokoski, Kari K.

    2016-01-01

    Adipose tissue metabolism and circulation play an important role in human health. It is well-known that adipose tissue mass is increased in response to excess caloric intake leading to obesity and further to local hypoxia and inflammatory signaling. Acute exercise increases blood supply to adipose tissue and mobilization of fat stores for energy. However, acute exercise during systemic hypoxia reduces subcutaneous blood flow in healthy young subjects, but the response in overweight or obese subjects remains to be investigated. Emerging evidence also indicates that exercise training during hypoxic exposure may provide additive benefits with respect to many traditional cardiovascular risk factors as compared to exercise performed in normoxia, but unfavorable effects of hypoxia have also been documented. These topics will be covered in this brief review dealing with hypoxia and adipose tissue physiology. PMID:27621722

  16. Human adipose triglyceride lipase (PNPLA2) is not regulated by obesity and exhibits low in vitro triglyceride hydrolase activity.

    PubMed

    Mairal, A; Langin, D; Arner, P; Hoffstedt, J

    2006-07-01

    The recent identification of murine adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL, now known as patatin-like phospholipase domain containing 2 [PNPLA2]), gene product of Pnpla2, has questioned the unique role of hormone sensitive lipase (HSL, now known as LIPE), gene product of Lipe, in fat cell lipolysis. Here, we investigated human ATGL and HSL adipose tissue gene expression and in vitro lipase activity. Levels of mRNA in adipose tissue from healthy obese and non-obese subjects were measured and lipase activity and adipocyte lipolytic capacity determined. HSL and ATGL cDNAs were transfected into Cos-7 cells and the relative tri- and diglyceride hydrolase activities were measured. Obesity was associated with a decreased subcutaneous and increased omental adipose tissue level of HSL mRNA. Subcutaneous HSL mRNA content was normalised upon weight reduction. In contrast, ATGL mRNA levels were unaffected by obesity and weight reduction. A high adipose tissue lipase activity was associated with increased maximal lipolysis and increased HSL, but not with ATGL mRNA levels. The in vitro triglyceride hydrolase activity of HSL was markedly higher than that of ATGL and contrary to HSL, ATGL was devoid of diglyceride hydrolase activity. The use of a selective HSL-inhibitor resulted in complete inhibition of HSL-mediated tri- and diglyceride hydrolase activity. The pH profile of human white adipose tissue triolein hydrolase activity was identical to that of HSL but differed from the ATGL profile. HSL, but not ATGL gene expression shows a regulation according to obesity status and is associated with increased adipose tissue lipase activity. Moreover, HSL has a higher capacity than ATGL to hydrolyse triglycerides in vitro.

  17. Mapping of human brown adipose tissue in lean and obese young men

    PubMed Central

    Leitner, Brooks P.; Huang, Shan; Brychta, Robert J.; Duckworth, Courtney J.; Baskin, Alison S.; McGehee, Suzanne; Tal, Ilan; Dieckmann, William; Gupta, Garima; Kolodny, Gerald M.; Pacak, Karel; Herscovitch, Peter

    2017-01-01

    Human brown adipose tissue (BAT) can be activated to increase glucose uptake and energy expenditure, making it a potential target for treating obesity and metabolic disease. Data on the functional and anatomic characteristics of BAT are limited, however. In 20 healthy young men [12 lean, mean body mass index (BMI) 23.2 ± 1.9 kg/m2; 8 obese, BMI 34.8 ± 3.3 kg/m2] after 5 h of tolerable cold exposure, we measured BAT volume and activity by 18F-labeled fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography/computerized tomography (PET/CT). Obese men had less activated BAT than lean men (mean, 130 vs. 334 mL) but more fat in BAT-containing depots (mean, 1,646 vs. 855 mL) with a wide range (0.1–71%) in the ratio of activated BAT to inactive fat between individuals. Six anatomic regions had activated BAT—cervical, supraclavicular, axillary, mediastinal, paraspinal, and abdominal—with 67 ± 20% of all activated BAT concentrated in a continuous fascial layer comprising the first three depots in the upper torso. These nonsubcutaneous fat depots amounted to 1.5% of total body mass (4.3% of total fat mass), and up to 90% of each depot could be activated BAT. The amount and activity of BAT was significantly influenced by region of interest selection methods, PET threshold criteria, and PET resolutions. The present study suggests that active BAT can be found in specific adipose depots in adult humans, but less than one-half of the fat in these depots is stimulated by acute cold exposure, demonstrating a previously underappreciated thermogenic potential. PMID:28739898

  18. Fibronectin gene expression in human adipose tissue and its associations with obesity-related genes and metabolic parameters.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seoung Hee; Park, Hye Soon; Lee, Jung Ah; Song, Young Sook; Jang, Yeon Jin; Kim, Jong-Hyeok; Lee, Yeon Ji; Heo, Yoonseok

    2013-04-01

    Limited data are available on the in vivo expression of fibronectin, one of the main extracellular matrix components. We investigated the expression of fibronectin in abdominal visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and the associations of leptin, adiponectin, and vaspin gene expression with metabolic parameters in obese women. We recruited female subjects undergoing bariatric surgery for obesity (n = 24) and patients undergoing benign gynecological surgery as the control group (n = 23). We measured anthropometric variables, abdominal fat distribution, metabolic parameters, serum concentrations of leptin, adiponectin, and vaspin, and depot-specific mRNA expression of fibronectin, leptin, adiponectin, and vaspin. Fibronectin expression in both VAT and SAT was significantly lower in the obese group than in the control group. Fibronectin expression in both VAT and SAT were negatively correlated with body mass index or waist circumference, with higher prominence in VAT. In multiple regression analysis, fibronectin expression in both VAT and SAT was negatively correlated with serum leptin concentration. Fibronectin expression in VAT was negatively correlated with leptin expression in VAT. Additionally, fibronectin expression in SAT was negatively correlated with leptin expression in SAT and positively correlated with adiponectin expression in VAT and SAT. We found significant negative associations between depot-specific fibronectin expression in human adipose tissue and obesity indices and obesity-related biomarkers. Our results suggest that fibronectin expression may contribute to obesity and metabolic dysregulation in humans.

  19. IL-15 concentrations in skeletal muscle and subcutaneous adipose tissue in lean and obese humans: local effects of IL-15 on adipose tissue lipolysis

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Joseph R.; Maples, Jill M.

    2015-01-01

    Animal/cell investigations indicate that there is a decreased adipose tissue mass resulting from skeletal muscle (SkM) IL-15 secretion (e.g., SkM-blood-adipose tissue axis). IL-15 could regulate fat mass accumulation in obesity via lipolysis, although this has not been investigated in humans. Therefore, the purpose was to examine whether SkM and/or subcutaneous adipose tissue (SCAT) IL-15 concentrations were correlated with SCAT lipolysis in lean and obese humans and determine whether IL-15 perfusion could induce lipolysis in human SCAT. Local SkM and abdominal SCAT IL-15 (microdialysis) and circulating IL-15 (blood) were sampled in lean (BMI: 23.1 ± 1.9 kg/m2; n = 10) and obese (BMI: 34.7 ± 3.5 kg/m2; n = 10) subjects at rest/during 1-h cycling exercise. Lipolysis (SCAT interstitial glycerol concentration) was compared against local/systemic IL-15. An additional probe in SCAT was perfused with IL-15 to assess direct lipolytic responses. SkM IL-15 was not different between lean and obese subjects (P = 0.45), whereas SCAT IL-15 was higher in obese vs. lean subjects (P = 0.02) and was correlated with SCAT lipolysis (r = 0.45, P = 0.05). Exercise increased SCAT lipolysis in lean and obese (P < 0.01), but exercise-induced SCAT lipolysis changes were not correlated with exercise-induced SCAT IL-15 changes. Microdialysis perfusion resulting in physiological IL-15 concentrations in the adipose tissue interstitium increased lipolysis in lean (P = 0.04) but suppressed lipolysis in obese (P < 0.01). Although we found no support for a human IL-15 SkM-blood-adipose tissue axis, IL-15 may be produced in/act on the abdominal SCAT depot. The extent to which this autocrine/paracrine IL-15 action regulates human body composition remains unknown. PMID:25921578

  20. Intra-adipose sex steroid metabolism and body fat distribution in idiopathic human obesity.

    PubMed

    Wake, Deborah J; Strand, Magnus; Rask, Eva; Westerbacka, Jukka; Livingstone, Dawn E W; Soderberg, Stefan; Andrew, Ruth; Yki-Jarvinen, Hannele; Olsson, Tommy; Walker, Brian R

    2007-03-01

    Causes of visceral fat accumulation include glucocorticoid excess or decreased oestrogen/androgen ratio either in plasma or within adipose tissue. In obese subjects, the intra-adipose cortisol-generating enzyme 11beta-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11beta-HSD1) is increased, but information on sex steroid signalling is sparse. We aimed to test associations between body fat or fat distribution and mRNA transcript levels for androgen and oestrogen receptors and for enzymes metabolizing sex steroids in adipose tissue. A cross-sectional study. Forty-five healthy men and women with body mass index (BMI) 21-36 kg/m(2). In subcutaneous adipose biopsies we measured mRNAs for enzymes metabolizing local oestrogens (aromatase) and androgens [5alpha-reductase type 1; AKR1C2 (3alpha-HSD3); AKR1C3 (17beta-HSD5, 3alpha-HSD2)] and for sex steroid receptors [oestrogen receptor (ER)-alpha and androgen receptor (AR)]. We related these to body fat mass and distribution. Generalized obesity (BMI) was associated with increased aromatase mRNA (r = 0.35, P < 0.05). Central obesity (waist : hip ratio) was associated with mRNA for AKR1C2 (r = 0.28, P < 0.05) and AKR1C3 (r = 0.38, P < 0.01) but not aromatase (r = 0.06). 5alpha-Reductase type 1, ER and AR mRNA levels did not predict fat amount or its distribution. These data on transcript levels suggest that, in idiopathic obesity, increased intra-adipose oestrogen generation by aromatase predicts peripheral fat distribution, while androgen metabolism by AKR1C isoforms predicts central fat distribution, supporting the hypothesis that intra-adipose sex steroid metabolism is a determinant of gynoid vs. android patterns of body fat.

  1. Pro-Inflammatory CD11c+CD206+ Adipose Tissue Macrophages Are Associated With Insulin Resistance in Human Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Wentworth, John M.; Naselli, Gaetano; Brown, Wendy A.; Doyle, Lisa; Phipson, Belinda; Smyth, Gordon K.; Wabitsch, Martin; O'Brien, Paul E.; Harrison, Leonard C.

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Insulin resistance and other features of the metabolic syndrome have been causally linked to adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) in mice with diet-induced obesity. We aimed to characterize macrophage phenotype and function in human subcutaneous and omental adipose tissue in relation to insulin resistance in obesity. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Adipose tissue was obtained from lean and obese women undergoing bariatric surgery. Metabolic markers were measured in fasting serum and ATMs characterized by immunohistology, flow cytometry, and tissue culture studies. RESULTS ATMs comprised CD11c+CD206+ cells in “crown” aggregates and solitary CD11c−CD206+ cells at adipocyte junctions. In obese women, CD11c+ ATM density was greater in subcutaneous than omental adipose tissue and correlated with markers of insulin resistance. CD11c+ ATMs were distinguished by high expression of integrins and antigen presentation molecules; interleukin (IL)-1β, -6, -8, and -10; tumor necrosis factor-α; and CC chemokine ligand-3, indicative of an activated, proinflammatory state. In addition, CD11c+ ATMs were enriched for mitochondria and for RNA transcripts encoding mitochondrial, proteasomal, and lysosomal proteins, fatty acid metabolism enzymes, and T-cell chemoattractants, whereas CD11c− ATMs were enriched for transcripts involved in tissue maintenance and repair. Tissue culture medium conditioned by CD11c+ ATMs, but not CD11c− ATMs or other stromovascular cells, impaired insulin-stimulated glucose uptake by human adipocytes. CONCLUSIONS These findings identify proinflammatory CD11c+ ATMs as markers of insulin resistance in human obesity. In addition, the machinery of CD11c+ ATMs indicates they metabolize lipid and may initiate adaptive immune responses. PMID:20357360

  2. Carotenoids in Adipose Tissue Biology and Obesity.

    PubMed

    Bonet, M Luisa; Canas, Jose A; Ribot, Joan; Palou, Andreu

    2016-01-01

    Cell, animal and human studies dealing with carotenoids and carotenoid derivatives as nutritional regulators of adipose tissue biology with implications for the etiology and management of obesity and obesity-related metabolic diseases are reviewed. Most studied carotenoids in this context are β-carotene, cryptoxanthin, astaxanthin and fucoxanthin, together with β-carotene-derived retinoids and some other apocarotenoids. Studies indicate an impact of these compounds on essential aspects of adipose tissue biology including the control of adipocyte differentiation (adipogenesis), adipocyte metabolism, oxidative stress and the production of adipose tissue-derived regulatory signals and inflammatory mediators. Specific carotenoids and carotenoid derivatives restrain adipogenesis and adipocyte hypertrophy while enhancing fat oxidation and energy dissipation in brown and white adipocytes, and counteract obesity in animal models. Intake, blood levels and adipocyte content of carotenoids are reduced in human obesity. Specifically designed human intervention studies in the field, though still sparse, indicate a beneficial effect of carotenoid supplementation in the accrual of abdominal adiposity. In summary, studies support a role of specific carotenoids and carotenoid derivatives in the prevention of excess adiposity, and suggest that carotenoid requirements may be dependent on body composition.

  3. Pathways commonly dysregulated in mouse and human obese adipose tissue: FAT/CD36 modulates differentiation and lipogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Berger, E; Héraud, S; Mojallal, A; Lequeux, C; Weiss-Gayet, M; Damour, O; Géloën, A

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is linked to adipose tissue hypertrophy (increased adipocyte cell size) and hyperplasia (increased cell number). Comparative analyses of gene datasets allowed us to identify 1426 genes which may represent common adipose phenotype in humans and mice. Among them we identified several adipocyte-specific genes dysregulated in obese adipose tissue, involved in either fatty acid storage (acyl CoA synthase ACSL1, hormone-sensitive lipase LIPE, aquaporin 7 AQP7, perilipin PLIN) or cell adhesion (fibronectin FN1, collagens COL1A1, COL1A3, metalloprotein MMP9, or both (scavenger receptor FAT/CD36). Using real-time analysis of cell surface occupancy on xCELLigence system we developed a new method to study lipid uptake and differentiation of mouse 3T3L1 fibroblasts and human adipose stem cells. Both processes are regulated by insulin and fatty acids such as oleic acid. We showed that fatty acid addition to culture media increased the differentiation rate and was required for full differentiation into unilocular adipocytes. Significant activation of lipogenesis, i.e. lipid accumulation, by either insulin or oleic acid was monitored in times ranging from 1 to 24 h, depending on differentiation state, whereas significant effects on adipogenesis, i.e., surperimposed lipid accumulation and gene transcriptional regulations were measured after 3 to 4 d. Combination of selected times for analysis of lipid contents, cell counts, size fractionations, and gene transcriptional regulations showed that FAT/CD36 specific inhibitor AP5258 significantly increased cell survival of oleic acid-treated mouse and human adipocytes, and partially restored the transcriptional response to oleic acid in the presence of insulin through JNK pathway. Taken together, these data open new perspectives to study the molecular mechanisms commonly dysregulated in mouse and human obesity at the level of lipogenesis linked to hypertrophy and adipogenesis linked to hyperplasia. PMID:26257990

  4. An analysis of DNA methylation in human adipose tissue reveals differential modification of obesity genes before and after gastric bypass and weight loss.

    PubMed

    Benton, Miles C; Johnstone, Alice; Eccles, David; Harmon, Brennan; Hayes, Mark T; Lea, Rod A; Griffiths, Lyn; Hoffman, Eric P; Stubbs, Richard S; Macartney-Coxson, Donia

    2015-01-22

    Environmental factors can influence obesity by epigenetic mechanisms. Adipose tissue plays a key role in obesity-related metabolic dysfunction, and gastric bypass provides a model to investigate obesity and weight loss in humans. Here, we investigate DNA methylation in adipose tissue from obese women before and after gastric bypass and significant weight loss. In total, 485,577 CpG sites were profiled in matched, before and after weight loss, subcutaneous and omental adipose tissue. A paired analysis revealed significant differential methylation in omental and subcutaneous adipose tissue. A greater proportion of CpGs are hypermethylated before weight loss and increased methylation is observed in the 3' untranslated region and gene bodies relative to promoter regions. Differential methylation is found within genes associated with obesity, epigenetic regulation and development, such as CETP, FOXP2, HDAC4, DNMT3B, KCNQ1 and HOX clusters. We identify robust correlations between changes in methylation and clinical trait, including associations between fasting glucose and HDAC4, SLC37A3 and DENND1C in subcutaneous adipose. Genes investigated with differential promoter methylation all show significantly different levels of mRNA before and after gastric bypass. This is the first study reporting global DNA methylation profiling of adipose tissue before and after gastric bypass and associated weight loss. It provides a strong basis for future work and offers additional evidence for the role of DNA methylation of adipose tissue in obesity.

  5. Insulin differentially modulates the peripheral endocannabinoid system in human subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue from lean and obese individuals.

    PubMed

    Murdolo, G; Kempf, K; Hammarstedt, A; Herder, C; Smith, U; Jansson, P-A

    2007-09-01

    Human obesity has been associated with a dysregulation of the peripheral and adipose tissue (AT) endocannabinoid system (ES). The aim of this study was to elucidate the acute in vivo effects of insulin on gene expression of the cannabinoid type 1 (CB-1) and type 2 (CB-2) receptors, as well as of the fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) in the sc abdominal adipose tissue (SCAAT). Nine lean (L) and 9 obese (OB), but otherwise healthy males were studied in the fasting state and during a euglycemic hyperinsulinemic clamp (40 mU/m2 * min(-1)). SCAAT biopsies were obtained at baseline and after 270 min of i.v. maintained hyperinsulinemia. The basal SCAAT gene expression pattern revealed an upregulation of the FAAH in the OB (p=0.03 vs L), whereas similar CB-1 and CB-2 mRNA levels were seen. Following hyperinsulinemia, the FAAH mRNA levels significantly increased approximately 2-fold in the L (p=0.01 vs baseline) but not in the OB. In contrast, insulin failed to significantly change both the adipose CB-1 and CB-2 gene expression. Finally, the FAAH gene expression positively correlated with the fasting serum insulin concentration (r 0.66; p=0.01), whereas an inverse association with the whole-body glucose disposal (r -0.58; p<0.05) was seen. Taken together, these first time observations demonstrate that the ES-related genes in the SCAAT differentially respond to hyperinsulinemia in lean/insulin-sensitive and in obese/insulin-resistant individuals. We suggest that insulin may play a key role in the obesity-linked dysregulation of the adipose ES at the gene level.

  6. Depot Dependent Effects of Dexamethasone on Gene Expression in Human Omental and Abdominal Subcutaneous Adipose Tissues from Obese Women

    PubMed Central

    Karastergiou, Kalypso; Gower, Adam; Fried, Susan K.

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids promote fat accumulation in visceral compared to subcutaneous depots, but the molecular mechanisms involved remain poorly understood. To identify long-term changes in gene expression that are differentially sensitive or responsive to glucocorticoids in these depots, paired samples of human omental (Om) and abdominal subcutaneous (Abdsc) adipose tissues obtained from obese women during elective surgery were cultured with the glucocorticoid receptor agonist dexamethasone (Dex, 0, 1, 10, 25 and 1000 nM) for 7 days. Dex regulated 32% of the 19,741 genes on the array, while 53% differed by Depot and 2.5% exhibited a Depot*Dex concentration interaction. Gene set enrichment analysis showed Dex regulation of the expected metabolic and inflammatory pathways in both depots. Cluster analysis of the 460 transcripts that exhibited an interaction of Depot and Dex concentration revealed sets of mRNAs for which the responses to Dex differed in magnitude, sensitivity or direction between the two depots as well as mRNAs that responded to Dex only in one depot. These transcripts were also clearly depot different in fresh adipose tissue and are implicated in processes that could affect adipose tissue distribution or functions (e.g. adipogenesis, triacylglycerol synthesis and storage, insulin action). Elucidation of the mechanisms underlying the depot differences in the effect of Dex on the expression of specific genes and pathways that regulate adipose function may offer novel insights into understanding the biology of visceral adipose tissues and their links to metabolic health. PMID:28005982

  7. Depot Dependent Effects of Dexamethasone on Gene Expression in Human Omental and Abdominal Subcutaneous Adipose Tissues from Obese Women.

    PubMed

    Pickering, R Taylor; Lee, Mi-Jeong; Karastergiou, Kalypso; Gower, Adam; Fried, Susan K

    2016-01-01

    Glucocorticoids promote fat accumulation in visceral compared to subcutaneous depots, but the molecular mechanisms involved remain poorly understood. To identify long-term changes in gene expression that are differentially sensitive or responsive to glucocorticoids in these depots, paired samples of human omental (Om) and abdominal subcutaneous (Abdsc) adipose tissues obtained from obese women during elective surgery were cultured with the glucocorticoid receptor agonist dexamethasone (Dex, 0, 1, 10, 25 and 1000 nM) for 7 days. Dex regulated 32% of the 19,741 genes on the array, while 53% differed by Depot and 2.5% exhibited a Depot*Dex concentration interaction. Gene set enrichment analysis showed Dex regulation of the expected metabolic and inflammatory pathways in both depots. Cluster analysis of the 460 transcripts that exhibited an interaction of Depot and Dex concentration revealed sets of mRNAs for which the responses to Dex differed in magnitude, sensitivity or direction between the two depots as well as mRNAs that responded to Dex only in one depot. These transcripts were also clearly depot different in fresh adipose tissue and are implicated in processes that could affect adipose tissue distribution or functions (e.g. adipogenesis, triacylglycerol synthesis and storage, insulin action). Elucidation of the mechanisms underlying the depot differences in the effect of Dex on the expression of specific genes and pathways that regulate adipose function may offer novel insights into understanding the biology of visceral adipose tissues and their links to metabolic health.

  8. Persistent organic pollutant levels in human visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue in obese individuals—Depot differences and dysmetabolism implications

    SciTech Connect

    Pestana, Diogo; Faria, Gil; Sá, Carla; Fernandes, Virgínia C.; Teixeira, Diana; Norberto, Sónia; Faria, Ana; and others

    2014-08-15

    Background: The role of persistent organic pollutants (POPs) with endocrine disrupting activity in the aetiology of obesity and other metabolic dysfunctions has been recently highlighted. Adipose tissue (AT) is a common site of POPs accumulation where they can induce adverse effects on human health. Objectives: To evaluate the presence of POPs in human visceral (vAT) and subcutaneous (scAT) adipose tissue in a sample of Portuguese obese patients that underwent bariatric surgery, and assess their putative association with metabolic disruption preoperatively, as well as with subsequent body mass index (BMI) reduction. Methods: AT samples (n=189) from obese patients (BMI ≥35) were collected and the levels of 13 POPs were determined by gas chromatography with electron-capture detection (GC-ECD). Anthropometric and biochemical data were collected at the time of surgery. BMI variation was evaluated after 12 months and adipocyte size was measured in AT samples. Results: Our data confirm that POPs are pervasive in this obese population (96.3% of detection on both tissues), their abundance increasing with age (R{sub S}=0.310, p<0.01) and duration of obesity (R{sub S}=0.170, p<0.05). We observed a difference in AT depot POPs storage capability, with higher levels of ΣPOPs in vAT (213.9±204.2 compared to 155.1±147.4 ng/g of fat, p<0.001), extremely relevant when evaluating their metabolic impact. Furthermore, there was a positive correlation between POP levels and the presence of metabolic syndrome components, namely dysglycaemia and hypertension, and more importantly with cardiovascular risk (R{sub S}=0.277, p<0.01), with relevance for vAT (R{sub S}=0.315, p<0.01). Finally, we observed an interesting relation of higher POP levels with lower weight loss in older patients. Conclusion: Our sample of obese subjects allowed us to highlight the importance of POPs stored in AT on the development of metabolic dysfunction in a context of obesity, shifting the focus to their

  9. Fatty acid binding protein expression in different human adipose tissue depots in relation to rates of lipolysis and insulin concentration in obese individuals.

    PubMed

    Fisher, R M; Thörne, A; Hamsten, A; Arner, P

    2002-10-01

    Two fatty acid binding proteins (FABPs) are expressed in adipose tissue, adipocyte lipid binding protein (ALBP) and keratinocyte lipid binding protein (KLBP). This study investigated FABP expression in visceral and subcutaneous human adipose tissue depots and associations with lipolytic differences between the depots and circulating insulin concentrations. ALBP and KLBP (protein and RNA) were quantified in subcutaneous and omental adipose tissue from obese individuals and expressed relative to actin. ALBP RNA and protein expression was significantly higher in subcutaneous compared to omental adipose tissue (both p < 0.05), whereas KLBP RNA and protein expression was no different between the two sites. There were significant inverse correlations between serum insulin concentrations and the ALBP/KLBP RNA ratio in both subcutaneous and omental adipose tissue (both p < 0.02). Basal rates of glycerol and fatty acid release measured in adipocytes isolated from subcutaneous and omental adipose tissue were significantly higher in the former (p < or = 0.02). Therefore the relative ALBP/KLBP content of human adipose tissue is different in different adipose tissue depots and at the RNA level is related to the circulating insulin concentration, at least in obese subjects. The higher rates of basal lipolysis in adipocytes isolated from subcutaneous compared to omental adipose tissue might be related to the increased ALBP content of the former. Therefore adipose tissue FABPs are interesting candidates for investigation to further our understanding of the insulin resistance syndrome and regulation of lipolysis.

  10. Visceral Adipose MicroRNA 223 Is Upregulated in Human and Murine Obesity and Modulates the Inflammatory Phenotype of Macrophages

    PubMed Central

    Syed, Rafay; Duggineni, Dheeraj; Rutsky, Jessica; Rengasamy, Palanivel; Zhang, Jie; Huang, Kun; Needleman, Bradley; Mikami, Dean; Perry, Kyle; Hazey, Jeffrey; Rajagopalan, Sanjay

    2016-01-01

    Obesity in humans and mice is typified by an activated macrophage phenotype in the visceral adipose tissue (VAT) leading to increased macrophage-mediated inflammation. microRNAs (miRNAs) play an important role in regulating inflammatory pathways in macrophages, and in this study we compared miRNA expression in the VAT of insulin resistant morbidly obese humans to a non-obese cohort with normal glucose tolerance. miR-223-3p was found to be significantly upregulated in the whole omental tissue RNA of 12 human subjects, as were 8 additional miRNAs. We then confirmed that miR-223 upregulation was specific to the stromal vascular cells of human VAT, and found that miR-223 levels were unchanged in adipocytes and circulating monocytes of the non-obese and obese. miR-223 ablation increased basal / unstimulated TLR4 and STAT3 expression and LPS-stimulated TLR4, STAT3, and NOS2 expression in primary macrophages. Conversely, miR-223 mimics decreased TLR4 expression in primary macrophage, at the same time it negatively regulated FBXW7 expression, a well described suppressor of Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling. We concluded that the abundance of miR-223 in macrophages significantly modulates macrophage phenotype / activation state and response to stimuli via effects on the TLR4/FBXW7 axis. PMID:27812198

  11. MAP3K8 (TPL2/COT) affects obesity-induced adipose tissue inflammation without systemic effects in humans and in mice.

    PubMed

    Ballak, Dov B; van Essen, Peter; van Diepen, Janna A; Jansen, Henry; Hijmans, Anneke; Matsuguchi, Tetsuya; Sparrer, Helmut; Tack, Cees J; Netea, Mihai G; Joosten, Leo A B; Stienstra, Rinke

    2014-01-01

    Chronic low-grade inflammation in adipose tissue often accompanies obesity, leading to insulin resistance and increasing the risk for metabolic diseases. MAP3K8 (TPL2/COT) is an important signal transductor and activator of pro-inflammatory pathways that has been linked to obesity-induced adipose tissue inflammation. We used human adipose tissue biopsies to study the relationship of MAP3K8 expression with markers of obesity and expression of pro-inflammatory cytokines (IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8). Moreover, we evaluated obesity-induced adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance in mice lacking MAP3K8 and WT mice on a high-fat diet (HFD) for 16 weeks. Individuals with a BMI >30 displayed a higher mRNA expression of MAP3K8 in adipose tissue compared to individuals with a normal BMI. Additionally, high mRNA expression levels of IL-1β, IL-6 and IL-8, but not TNF -α, in human adipose tissue were associated with higher expression of MAP3K8. Moreover, high plasma SAA and CRP did not associate with increased MAP3K8 expression in adipose tissue. Similarly, no association was found for MAP3K8 expression with plasma insulin or glucose levels. Mice lacking MAP3K8 had similar bodyweight gain as WT mice, yet displayed lower mRNA expression levels of IL-1β, IL-6 and CXCL1 in adipose tissue in response to the HFD as compared to WT animals. However, MAP3K8 deficient mice were not protected against HFD-induced adipose tissue macrophage infiltration or the development of insulin resistance. Together, the data in both human and mouse show that MAP3K8 is involved in local adipose tissue inflammation, specifically for IL-1β and its responsive cytokines IL-6 and IL-8, but does not seem to have systemic effects on insulin resistance.

  12. Regulation of adipose branched-chain amino acid catabolism enzyme expression and cross-adipose amino acid flux in human obesity.

    PubMed

    Lackey, Denise E; Lynch, Christopher J; Olson, Kristine C; Mostaedi, Rouzbeh; Ali, Mohamed; Smith, William H; Karpe, Fredrik; Humphreys, Sandy; Bedinger, Daniel H; Dunn, Tamara N; Thomas, Anthony P; Oort, Pieter J; Kieffer, Dorothy A; Amin, Rajesh; Bettaieb, Ahmed; Haj, Fawaz G; Permana, Paska; Anthony, Tracy G; Adams, Sean H

    2013-06-01

    Elevated blood branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) are often associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, which might result from a reduced cellular utilization and/or incomplete BCAA oxidation. White adipose tissue (WAT) has become appreciated as a potential player in whole body BCAA metabolism. We tested if expression of the mitochondrial BCAA oxidation checkpoint, branched-chain α-ketoacid dehydrogenase (BCKD) complex, is reduced in obese WAT and regulated by metabolic signals. WAT BCKD protein (E1α subunit) was significantly reduced by 35-50% in various obesity models (fa/fa rats, db/db mice, diet-induced obese mice), and BCKD component transcripts significantly lower in subcutaneous (SC) adipocytes from obese vs. lean Pima Indians. Treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes or mice with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ agonists increased WAT BCAA catabolism enzyme mRNAs, whereas the nonmetabolizable glucose analog 2-deoxy-d-glucose had the opposite effect. The results support the hypothesis that suboptimal insulin action and/or perturbed metabolic signals in WAT, as would be seen with insulin resistance/type 2 diabetes, could impair WAT BCAA utilization. However, cross-tissue flux studies comparing lean vs. insulin-sensitive or insulin-resistant obese subjects revealed an unexpected negligible uptake of BCAA from human abdominal SC WAT. This suggests that SC WAT may not be an important contributor to blood BCAA phenotypes associated with insulin resistance in the overnight-fasted state. mRNA abundances for BCAA catabolic enzymes were markedly reduced in omental (but not SC) WAT of obese persons with metabolic syndrome compared with weight-matched healthy obese subjects, raising the possibility that visceral WAT contributes to the BCAA metabolic phenotype of metabolically compromised individuals.

  13. Regulation of adipose branched-chain amino acid catabolism enzyme expression and cross-adipose amino acid flux in human obesity

    PubMed Central

    Lackey, Denise E.; Lynch, Christopher J.; Olson, Kristine C.; Mostaedi, Rouzbeh; Ali, Mohamed; Smith, William H.; Karpe, Fredrik; Humphreys, Sandy; Bedinger, Daniel H.; Dunn, Tamara N.; Thomas, Anthony P.; Oort, Pieter J.; Kieffer, Dorothy A.; Amin, Rajesh; Bettaieb, Ahmed; Haj, Fawaz G.; Permana, Paska; Anthony, Tracy G.

    2013-01-01

    Elevated blood branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) are often associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes, which might result from a reduced cellular utilization and/or incomplete BCAA oxidation. White adipose tissue (WAT) has become appreciated as a potential player in whole body BCAA metabolism. We tested if expression of the mitochondrial BCAA oxidation checkpoint, branched-chain α-ketoacid dehydrogenase (BCKD) complex, is reduced in obese WAT and regulated by metabolic signals. WAT BCKD protein (E1α subunit) was significantly reduced by 35–50% in various obesity models (fa/fa rats, db/db mice, diet-induced obese mice), and BCKD component transcripts significantly lower in subcutaneous (SC) adipocytes from obese vs. lean Pima Indians. Treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes or mice with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ agonists increased WAT BCAA catabolism enzyme mRNAs, whereas the nonmetabolizable glucose analog 2-deoxy-d-glucose had the opposite effect. The results support the hypothesis that suboptimal insulin action and/or perturbed metabolic signals in WAT, as would be seen with insulin resistance/type 2 diabetes, could impair WAT BCAA utilization. However, cross-tissue flux studies comparing lean vs. insulin-sensitive or insulin-resistant obese subjects revealed an unexpected negligible uptake of BCAA from human abdominal SC WAT. This suggests that SC WAT may not be an important contributor to blood BCAA phenotypes associated with insulin resistance in the overnight-fasted state. mRNA abundances for BCAA catabolic enzymes were markedly reduced in omental (but not SC) WAT of obese persons with metabolic syndrome compared with weight-matched healthy obese subjects, raising the possibility that visceral WAT contributes to the BCAA metabolic phenotype of metabolically compromised individuals. PMID:23512805

  14. Reduced oxygenation in human obese adipose tissue is associated with impaired insulin suppression of lipolysis.

    PubMed

    Pasarica, Magdalena; Rood, Jennifer; Ravussin, Eric; Schwarz, Jean-Marc; Smith, Steven R; Redman, Leanne M

    2010-08-01

    Adipose tissue in obese individuals is characterized by reduced capillary density and reduced oxygenation. Our objective was to test whether hypoxia is associated with reduced antilipolytic effect of insulin. Twenty-one lean and obese individuals participated in this cross-sectional study at a university-based clinical research center. In all subjects, in situ adipose tissue (AT) oxygenation [AT oxygen partial pressure (ATpO2)] was measured with a Clark electrode, insulin sensitivity as well as basal and insulin-suppressed lipolysis (continuous infusion of (2H5)glycerol) were measured during a euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamp, and abdominal sc AT biopsies were collected to assess fat cell size (Coulter counting of osmium-fixed cells), capillary density (by staining of histological sections), and gene expression (by quantitative RT-PCR). In situ ATpO2 was evaluated. The ability of insulin to suppress lipolysis (percent) was positively correlated with insulin sensitivity (r=0.43; P<0.05), ATpO2 (r=0.44; P<0.05), vascular endothelial growth factor mRNA (r=0.73; P<0.01), and capillary density (r=0.75; P<0.01). These results indicate that low capillary density and ATpO2 in AT are potentially upstream causes of AT dysfunction.

  15. Increased infiltration of macrophages in omental adipose tissue is associated with marked hepatic lesions in morbid human obesity.

    PubMed

    Cancello, Raffaella; Tordjman, Joan; Poitou, Christine; Guilhem, Gaël; Bouillot, Jean Luc; Hugol, Danielle; Coussieu, Christiane; Basdevant, Arnaud; Bar Hen, Avner; Bedossa, Pierre; Guerre-Millo, Michèle; Clément, Karine

    2006-06-01

    In human obesity, white adipose tissue (WAT) is enriched in macrophages. How macrophage infiltration in WAT contributes to the complications of obesity is unknown. This study tested the hypothesis that recruitment of macrophages in omental WAT is associated with hepatic damage in obese patients. Paired biopsies of subcutaneous and omental WAT and a liver biopsy were collected during gastric surgery in 46 obese women and 9 obese men (BMI 47.9 +/- 0.93 kg/m(2)). The number of HAM56+ macrophages in WAT was quantified microscopically, and correlations with clinical and biological parameters and histological liver pathology were investigated. There were twice as many macrophages in omental as in subcutaneous WAT (P<0.0001). After adjustment for age, omental WAT macrophage infiltration was correlated to fasting glucose and insulin, quantitative insulin sensitivity check index, triglycerides, aspartate aminotransferase (AST), and gamma-glutamyltranspeptidase. We propose an easy equation to estimate the amount of macrophages in omental WAT. Increased macrophage accumulation specifically in omental WAT was associated with hepatic fibroinflammatory lesions (P=0.01). The best predictive model for the severity of hepatic damage includes adiponectinemia, AST, and omental WAT macrophages. These data suggest that the presence of macrophages in omental WAT participates in the cellular mechanisms favoring hepatic fibroinflammatory lesions in obese patients.

  16. Obesity and inflammation: reduced cytokine expression due to resveratrol in a human in vitro model of inflamed adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Zagotta, Ivana; Dimova, Elitsa Y.; Debatin, Klaus-Michael; Wabitsch, Martin; Kietzmann, Thomas; Fischer-Posovszky, Pamela

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is associated with an inflammatory status and linked with a number of pathophysiological complications among them cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes mellitus, or the metabolic syndrome. Resveratrol was proposed to improve obesity-related inflammatory problems, but the effect of resveratrol on cytokine expression in obesity is not completely understood. In this study, we used an in vitro model of human adipose tissue inflammation to examine the effects of resveratrol on the production of the inflammatory cytokines interleukin 6 (IL-6), IL-8, and monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1). We found that resveratrol reduced IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1 levels in a concentration-dependent manner in adipocytes under inflammatory conditions. Further experiments showed that the action of resveratrol was mainly due to its NFκB inhibitory potential. Thus, our data support the concept that resveratrol can alleviate obesity-induced up-regulation of inflammatory cytokines providing a new insight toward novel treatment options in obesity. PMID:25926797

  17. Brown adipose tissue thermogenesis: β3-adrenoreceptors as a potential target for the treatment of obesity in humans.

    PubMed

    Mund, Ross A; Frishman, William H

    2013-01-01

    It has been shown in rodents and newborn babies that brown adipose tissue (BAT) plays an important role in the generation of heat for maintenance of core body temperature. BAT is responsible for the process of adaptive thermogenesis, which involves heat generation in response to a drop in the environment's temperature or to high energy intake from diet. In rodents, the process of BAT thermogenesis is controlled by activation of the β3-adrenergic receptor (β3-AR), which has a protective effect against development of obesity. Previously, it was generally thought that in humans, BAT dissipated after childhood and adopted an insignificant role in human physiology. However, over the past few years, it has been discovered that adult humans still possess fully functional BAT. Through imaging with F-fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography-computed tomography scans, it has been determined that not only does human BAT exist, but also it is still responsive to stimuli, such as a drop in the environment's temperature. Although some evidence exists for β3-AR control of BAT thermogenesis in humans, this fact remains unclear due to a lack of highly selective β3-AR agonists and antagonists which have an effect on the human body. With further investigation on thermogenesis receptor control and effect of BAT metabolism on whole body energy expenditure, BAT may serve as a potential target for the treatment and prevention of obesity and other metabolic conditions in humans.

  18. Changes in markers of oxidative stress and DNA damage in human visceral adipose tissue from subjects with obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Jones, D A; Prior, S L; Barry, J D; Caplin, S; Baxter, J N; Stephens, J W

    2014-12-01

    In the past 30 years, prevalence of obesity has almost trebled resulting in an increased incidence of type 2 diabetes mellitus and other co-morbidities. Visceral adipose tissue is believed to play a vital role, but underlying mechanisms remain unclear. Our aim was to investigate changes in markers of oxidative damage in human visceral adipose tissue to determine levels of oxidative burden that may be attributed to obesity and/or diabetes. Visceral adipose tissue samples from 61 subjects undergoing abdominal surgery grouped as lean, obese and obese with type 2 diabetes mellitus, were examined using 3 different markers of oxidative stress. Malondialdehyde (MDA) concentration was measured as a marker of lipid peroxidation, telomere length and Comet assay as markers of oxidative DNA damage. No significant difference in MDA concentration, telomere length and DNA damage was observed between groups, although longer telomere lengths were seen in the obese with diabetes group compared to the obese group (P<0.05). Lower MDA concentration and longer telomere length were seen in subjects with diabetes compared to those without (P<0.05). DNA damage, analysed via Comet assay, was significantly lower in subjects with diabetes compared to those without (P<0.05). A paradoxical decrease in oxidative stress and DNA damage was observed in samples from subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus. Further work is required to investigate this further, however this phenomenon may be due to an up regulation of antioxidant defences in adipose tissue. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Regulation of adipose branched chain amino acid catabolism enzyme expression and cross-adipose amino acid flux in human obesity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Elevated blood branched chain amino acids (BCAA) are often associated with insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. One possibility is that under these conditions there is a reduced cellular utilization and/or lower complete oxidation of BCAAs. White adipose tissue (WAT) has become appreciated as a...

  20. Altered Metabolic and Stemness Capacity of Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells from Obese Mouse and Human

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Laura M.; Bernal, Aurora; de Lucas, Beatriz; San Martin, Nuria; Mastrangelo, Annalaura; García, Antonia; Barbas, Coral; Gálvez, Beatriz G.

    2015-01-01

    Adipose stem cells (ASCs) are an appealing source of cells for therapeutic intervention; however, the environment from which ASCs are isolated may impact their usefulness. Using a range of functional assays, we have evaluated whether ASCs isolated from an obese environment are comparable to cells from non-obese adipose tissue. Results showed that ASCs isolated from obese tissue have a reduced proliferative ability and a loss of viability together with changes in telomerase activity and DNA telomere length, suggesting a decreased self-renewal capacity. Metabolic analysis demonstrated that mitochondrial content and function was impaired in obese-derived ASCs resulting in changes in favored oxidative substrates. These findings highlight the impact of obesity on adult stem properties. Hence, caution should be exercised when considering the source of ASCs for cellular therapies since their therapeutic potential may be impaired. PMID:25875023

  1. Altered metabolic and stemness capacity of adipose tissue-derived stem cells from obese mouse and human.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Laura M; Bernal, Aurora; de Lucas, Beatriz; San Martin, Nuria; Mastrangelo, Annalaura; García, Antonia; Barbas, Coral; Gálvez, Beatriz G

    2015-01-01

    Adipose stem cells (ASCs) are an appealing source of cells for therapeutic intervention; however, the environment from which ASCs are isolated may impact their usefulness. Using a range of functional assays, we have evaluated whether ASCs isolated from an obese environment are comparable to cells from non-obese adipose tissue. Results showed that ASCs isolated from obese tissue have a reduced proliferative ability and a loss of viability together with changes in telomerase activity and DNA telomere length, suggesting a decreased self-renewal capacity. Metabolic analysis demonstrated that mitochondrial content and function was impaired in obese-derived ASCs resulting in changes in favored oxidative substrates. These findings highlight the impact of obesity on adult stem properties. Hence, caution should be exercised when considering the source of ASCs for cellular therapies since their therapeutic potential may be impaired.

  2. Anatomical locations of human brown adipose tissue: functional relevance and implications in obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sacks, Harold; Symonds, Michael E

    2013-06-01

    We will review information about and present hypotheses as to the anatomy of brown adipose tissue (BAT). Why is it located where it is in humans? Its anatomical distribution is likely to confer survival value by protecting critical organs from hypothermia by adaptive thermogenesis. Ultimately, the location and function will be important when considering therapeutic strategies for preventing and treating obesity and type 2 diabetes, in which case successful interventions will need to have a significant effect on BAT function in subjects living in a thermoneutral environment. In view of the diverse locations and potential differences in responsiveness between BAT depots, it is likely that BAT will be shown to have much more subtle and thus previously overlooked functions and regulatory control mechanisms.

  3. Differences in the redox status of human visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissues--relationships to obesity and metabolic risk.

    PubMed

    Jankovic, Aleksandra; Korac, Aleksandra; Srdic-Galic, Biljana; Buzadzic, Biljana; Otasevic, Vesna; Stancic, Ana; Vucetic, Milica; Markelic, Milica; Velickovic, Ksenija; Golic, Igor; Korac, Bato

    2014-05-01

    Metabolic homeostasis depends on adipocyte metabolic responses/processes, most of which are redox-regulated. Besides, visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissues (VAT and SAT, respectively) differ metabolically and in their contribution to metabolic complications, but their redox characteristics in humans are still unknown. To understand the molecular mechanisms of metabolic syndrome development, we analysed the redox characteristics of VAT and SAT in groups with various body weights and metabolic risks. Fifty premenopausal women were classified according to body mass index into normal-weight and obese groups, and these groups were further sub-classified into metabolically healthy and metabolically obese ("at risk") based on the homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR) index and the triglyceride, total-, LDL- and HDL-cholesterol levels. Antioxidant components, NADPH oxidase protein and 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE) levels were analysed in VAT and SAT. Compared with the SAT, the VAT showed a higher basal level of glutathione (GSH) and GSH-dependent enzyme activities. Compared with the metabolically healthy normal-weight controls, the obese groups of women showed lower GSH levels in both depots. However, in these groups, additional prooxidative changes (increased NADPH oxidase and 4-HNE and decreased levels of SOD and/or CAT) were observed only in VAT. Because of the critical role of thiol-redox homeostasis in lipogenesis, interdepot-differences in the GSH-dependent antioxidant part may be connected to the higher metabolic activity found in VAT. Analogously, the lower GSH levels that occur during obesity and the corresponding additional redox imbalance may be signs of VAT metabolic dysfunction that underlie the subsequent metabolic impairment. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Adipose tissue macrophages: the inflammatory link between obesity and cancer?

    PubMed

    Wagner, Marek; Samdal Steinskog, Eli Sihn; Wiig, Helge

    2015-04-01

    Obesity has increased dramatically over the last three decades. Thus, epidemiological evidence linking obesity and cancer has ignited our interest in the relationship between adipose tissue mass and cancer development. Obesity is defined as an excess of adipose tissue that is typified by a chronic, low-grade inflammatory response instigated by macrophage infiltration. Therefore, in this review, we will discuss the putative causal relationship between obesity-induced chronic inflammation and cancer with particular focus on adipose tissue macrophages. Chronic, low-grade inflammation has long been associated with cancer initiation, promotion and progression. Therefore, signals derived from adipose tissue macrophages may play a significant role in carcinogenesis. In this review we will discuss the molecular mechanisms of cancer development in obesity and highlight possible therapeutic strategies aiming at adipose tissue macrophages. The strong correlation between tumor-associated macrophage infiltration and tumor growth and progression emphasizes the value of macrophages as an effective therapeutic target. It remains to be deciphered to what extent adipose tissue macrophages contribute to these processes, especially in tumors growing within or adjacent to adipose tissue. More effort should also be placed on elucidating macrophage differences between humans and mice that may lead to the development of more effective diagnostic and therapeutic strategies.

  5. Prostaglandin E2 Exerts Multiple Regulatory Actions on Human Obese Adipose Tissue Remodeling, Inflammation, Adaptive Thermogenesis and Lipolysis

    PubMed Central

    García-Alonso, Verónica; Titos, Esther; Alcaraz-Quiles, Jose; Rius, Bibiana; Lopategi, Aritz; López-Vicario, Cristina; Jakobsson, Per-Johan; Delgado, Salvadora; Lozano, Juanjo; Clària, Joan

    2016-01-01

    Obesity induces white adipose tissue (WAT) dysfunction characterized by unremitting inflammation and fibrosis, impaired adaptive thermogenesis and increased lipolysis. Prostaglandins (PGs) are powerful lipid mediators that influence the homeostasis of several organs and tissues. The aim of the current study was to explore the regulatory actions of PGs in human omental WAT collected from obese patients undergoing laparoscopic bariatric surgery. In addition to adipocyte hypertrophy, obese WAT showed remarkable inflammation and total and pericellular fibrosis. In this tissue, a unique molecular signature characterized by altered expression of genes involved in inflammation, fibrosis and WAT browning was identified by microarray analysis. Targeted LC-MS/MS lipidomic analysis identified increased PGE2 levels in obese fat in the context of a remarkable COX-2 induction and in the absence of changes in the expression of terminal prostaglandin E synthases (i.e. mPGES-1, mPGES-2 and cPGES). IPA analysis established PGE2 as a common top regulator of the fibrogenic/inflammatory process present in this tissue. Exogenous addition of PGE2 significantly reduced the expression of fibrogenic genes in human WAT explants and significantly down-regulated Col1α1, Col1α2 and αSMA in differentiated 3T3 adipocytes exposed to TGF-β. In addition, PGE2 inhibited the expression of inflammatory genes (i.e. IL-6 and MCP-1) in WAT explants as well as in adipocytes challenged with LPS. PGE2 anti-inflammatory actions were confirmed by microarray analysis of human pre-adipocytes incubated with this prostanoid. Moreover, PGE2 induced expression of brown markers (UCP1 and PRDM16) in WAT and adipocytes, but not in pre-adipocytes, suggesting that PGE2 might induce the trans-differentiation of adipocytes towards beige/brite cells. Finally, PGE2 inhibited isoproterenol-induced adipocyte lipolysis. Taken together, these findings identify PGE2 as a regulator of the complex network of interactions

  6. Obesity-Associated Inflammatory Cytokines and Prostaglandin E2 Stimulate Glucose Transporter mRNA Expression and Glucose Uptake in Primary Human Adipose Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Docanto, Maria M; Ham, Seungmin; Corbould, Anne; Brown, Kristy A

    2015-08-01

    Obesity is associated with chronic low-grade inflammation. This occurs largely as a result of the infiltration of immune cells within the obese adipose, which produce a number of inflammatory factors, including interleukin-6 (IL-6), IL-1β, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα), and prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2)). These factors have previously been shown to affect insulin-mediated glucose uptake in differentiated adipocytes. However, the insulin-independent effect of inflammation on adipocyte precursors, the adipose stromal cells, has not been explored. This study therefore aimed to examine the effect of obesity-associated inflammatory factors on the expression of insulin-independent glucose transporters (GLUT1 and GLUT3) and on the uptake of glucose within adipose stromal cells. Primary human subcutaneous adipose stromal cells were isolated from abdominoplasty, and the effect of inflammatory cytokines (IL-6, IL-1β, and TNFα) and PGE(2) on GLUT mRNA expression and glucose transport was assessed using real-time polymerase chain reaction and radiolabeled deoxyglucose uptake assays, respectively. Results demonstrate that all four inflammatory mediators caused a dose-dependent increase in GLUT1 mRNA expression and glucose uptake. GLUT3 mRNA expression was also upregulated by IL-6 (0.5 ng/mL), TNFα (0.1 and 10 ng/mL), and PGE(2) (0.1 μM). Overall, these results demonstrate that obesity-associated inflammation increases insulin-independent glucose transporter expression and glucose uptake in undifferentiated adipose stromal cells.

  7. A Systems Genetics Approach Identified GPD1L and its Molecular Mechanism for Obesity in Human Adipose Tissue.

    PubMed

    He, Hao; Sun, Dianjianyi; Zeng, Yong; Wang, Ruifeng; Zhu, Wei; Cao, Shaolong; Bray, George A; Chen, Wei; Shen, Hui; Sacks, Frank M; Qi, Lu; Deng, Hong-Wen

    2017-05-11

    To explore novel molecular mechanisms underlying obesity, we applied a systems genetics framework to integrate risk genetic loci from the largest body mass index (BMI) genome-wide association studies (GWAS) meta-analysis with mRNA and microRNA profiling in adipose tissue from 200 subjects. One module was identified to be most significantly associated with obesity and other metabolic traits. We identified eight hub genes which likely play important roles in obesity metabolism and identified microRNAs that significantly negatively correlated with hub genes. This module was preserved in other three test gene expression datasets, and all hub genes were consistently downregulated in obese subjects through the meta-analysis. Gene GPD1L had the highest connectivity and was identified a key causal regulator in the module. Gene GPD1L was significantly negatively correlated with the expression of miR-210, which was experimentally validated that miR-210 regulated GPD1L protein level through direct interaction with its mRNA three prime untranslated region (3'-UTR). GPD1L was found to be upregulated during weight loss and weight maintenance induced by low calorie diet (LCD), while downregulated during weight gain induced by high-fat diet (HFD). The results indicated that increased GPD1L in adipose tissue may have a significant therapeutic potential in reducing obesity and insulin resistance.

  8. Hypercholesterolemia induces adipose dysfunction in conditions of obesity and nonobesity.

    PubMed

    Aguilar, David; Fernandez, Maria Luz

    2014-09-01

    It is well known that hypercholesterolemia can lead to atherosclerosis and coronary heart disease. Adipose tissue represents an active endocrine and metabolic site, which might be involved in the development of chronic disease. Because adipose tissue is a key site for cholesterol metabolism and the presence of hypercholesterolemia has been shown to induce adipocyte cholesterol overload, it is critical to investigate the role of hypercholesterolemia on normal adipose function. Studies in preadipocytes revealed that cholesterol accumulation can impair adipocyte differentiation and maturation by affecting multiple transcription factors. Hypercholesterolemia has been observed to cause adipocyte hypertrophy, adipose tissue inflammation, and disruption of endocrine function in animal studies. Moreover, these effects can also be observed in obesity-independent conditions as confirmed by clinical trials. In humans, hypercholesterolemia disrupts adipose hormone secretion of visfatin, leptin, and adiponectin, adipokines that play a central role in numerous metabolic pathways and regulate basic physiologic responses such as appetite and satiety. Remarkably, treatment with cholesterol-lowering drugs has been shown to restore adipose tissue endocrine function. In this review the role of hypercholesterolemia on adipose tissue differentiation and maturation, as well as on hormone secretion and physiologic outcomes, in obesity and non–obesity conditions is presented.

  9. Reduced flow-and acetylcholine-induced dilations in visceral compared to subcutaneous adipose arterioles in human morbid obesity

    PubMed Central

    Grizelj, I.; Cavka, A.; Bian, J.T.; Szczurek, M.; Robinson, A.; Shinde, S.; Nguyen, V.; Braunschweig, C.; Wang, E.; Drenjancevic, I.; Phillips, S.A.

    2014-01-01

    Background and aims The hypothesis of this study was that microvascular flow-induced dilation (FID) and acetylcholine-induced dilation (AChID) is impaired in visceral (VAT) compared to subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) arterioles in morbidly obese women. Additional aim was to determine the mechanisms contributing to FID and AChID in VAT and SAT arterioles. Methods and results Arterioles were obtained from SAT and VAT biopsies from women (BMI>35 kg/m2) undergoing bariatric surgery. Microvessels were cannulated for reactivity measurements in response to flow (pressure gradients of 10–100 cmH2O) and to acetylcholine (ACh;10−9–10−4 M) with and without Nω-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME), indomethacin (INDO), and PEG-catalase. Nitric oxide (NO)and hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) generation were detected in arterioles by fluorescence microscopy. FID and AChID of arterioles from VAT were reduced compared to SAT arterioles. In SAT arterioles, L-NAME, INDO, and PEG-catalase significantly reduced FID and AChID but had no effect individually on VAT arterioles’ vasodilator reactivity. INDO+L-NAME reduced FID in VAT arterioles. NO-fluorescence was greater in arterioles from SAT compared to VAT arterioles. Vascular H2O2 generation during flow was similar in both VAT and SAT. Conclusion Our results suggest that VAT arterioles display reduced vasodilator reactivity to flow and ACh compared to SAT arterioles, mediated by different regulatory mechanisms in human obesity. PMID:25155427

  10. Effects of Moderate and Subsequent Progressive Weight Loss on Metabolic Function and Adipose Tissue Biology in Humans with Obesity.

    PubMed

    Magkos, Faidon; Fraterrigo, Gemma; Yoshino, Jun; Luecking, Courtney; Kirbach, Kyleigh; Kelly, Shannon C; de Las Fuentes, Lisa; He, Songbing; Okunade, Adewole L; Patterson, Bruce W; Klein, Samuel

    2016-04-12

    Although 5%-10% weight loss is routinely recommended for people with obesity, the precise effects of 5% and further weight loss on metabolic health are unclear. We conducted a randomized controlled trial that evaluated the effects of 5.1% ± 0.9% (n = 19), 10.8% ± 1.3% (n = 9), and 16.4% ± 2.1% (n = 9) weight loss and weight maintenance (n = 14) on metabolic outcomes. 5% weight loss improved adipose tissue, liver and muscle insulin sensitivity, and β cell function, without a concomitant change in systemic or subcutaneous adipose tissue markers of inflammation. Additional weight loss further improved β cell function and insulin sensitivity in muscle and caused stepwise changes in adipose tissue mass, intrahepatic triglyceride content, and adipose tissue expression of genes involved in cholesterol flux, lipid synthesis, extracellular matrix remodeling, and oxidative stress. These results demonstrate that moderate 5% weight loss improves metabolic function in multiple organs simultaneously, and progressive weight loss causes dose-dependent alterations in key adipose tissue biological pathways. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Adipose Dipeptidyl Peptidase-4 and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Sell, Henrike; Blüher, Matthias; Klöting, Nora; Schlich, Raphaela; Willems, Miriam; Ruppe, Florian; Knoefel, Wolfram Trudo; Dietrich, Arne; Fielding, Barbara A.; Arner, Peter; Frayn, Keith N.; Eckel, Jürgen

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To study expression of the recently identified adipokine dipeptidyl peptidase-4 (DPP4) in subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) of patients with various BMIs and insulin sensitivities, as well as to assess circulating DPP4 in relation to obesity and insulin sensitivity. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS DPP4 expression was measured in SAT and VAT from 196 subjects with a wide range of BMIs and insulin sensitivities. DPP4 release was measured ex vivo in paired biopsies from SAT and VAT as well as in vivo from SAT of lean and obese patients. Circulating DPP4 was measured in insulin-sensitive and insulin-resistant BMI-matched obese patients. RESULTS DPP4 expression was positively correlated with BMI in both SAT and VAT, with VAT consistently displaying higher expression than SAT. Ex vivo release of DPP4 from adipose tissue explants was higher in VAT than in SAT in both lean and obese patients, with obese patients displaying higher DPP4 release than lean controls. Net release of DPP4 from adipose tissue was also demonstrated in vivo with greater release in obese subjects than in lean subjects and in women than in men. Insulin-sensitive obese patients had significantly lower circulating DPP4 than did obesity-matched insulin-resistant patients. In this experiment, DPP4 positively correlated with the amount of VAT, adipocyte size, and adipose tissue inflammation. CONCLUSIONS DPP4, a novel adipokine, has a higher release from VAT that is particularly pronounced in obese and insulin-resistant patients. Our data suggest that DPP4 may be a marker for visceral obesity, insulin resistance, and the metabolic syndrome. PMID:24130353

  12. Sirtuins 1-7 expression in human adipose-derived stem cells from subcutaneous and visceral fat depots: influence of obesity and hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Mariani, Stefania; Di Rocco, Giuliana; Toietta, Gabriele; Russo, Matteo A; Petrangeli, Elisa; Salvatori, Luisa

    2016-11-14

    The sirtuin family comprises seven NAD(+)-dependent deacetylases which control the overall health of organisms through the regulation of pleiotropic metabolic pathways. Sirtuins are important modulators of adipose tissue metabolism and their expression is higher in lean than obese subjects. At present, the role of sirtuins in adipose-derived stem cells has not been investigated yet. Therefore, in this study, we evaluated the expression of the complete panel of sirtuins in adipose-derived stem cells isolated from both subcutaneous and visceral fat of non-obese and obese subjects. We aimed at investigating the influence of obesity on sirtuins' levels, their role in obesity-associated inflammation, and the relationship with the peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta, which also plays functions in adipose tissue metabolism. The mRNA levels in the four types of adipose-derived stem cells were evaluated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction, in untreated cells and also after 8 h of hypoxia exposure. Correlations among sirtuins' expression and clinical and molecular parameters were also analyzed. We found that sirtuin1-6 exhibited significant higher mRNA expression in visceral adipose-derived stem cells compared to subcutaneous adipose-derived stem cells of non-obese subjects. Sirtuin1-6 levels were markedly reduced in visceral adipose-derived stem cells of obese patients. Sirtuins' expression in visceral adipose-derived stem cells correlated negatively with body mass index and C-reactive protein and positively with peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor delta. Finally, only in the visceral adipose-derived stem cells of obese patients hypoxia-induced mRNA expression of all of the sirtuins. Our results highlight that sirtuins' levels in adipose-derived stem cells are consistent with protective effects against visceral obesity and inflammation, and suggest a transcriptional mechanism through which acute hypoxia up-regulates sirtuins in the visceral

  13. [White adipose tissue dysfunction observed in obesity].

    PubMed

    Lewandowska, Ewa; Zieliński, Andrzej

    2016-05-01

    Obesity is a disease with continuingly increasing prevalence. It occurs worldwide independently of age group, material status or country of origin. At these times the most common reasons for obesity are bad eating habits and dramatic reduction of physical activity, which cause the energy imbalance of organism. Fundamental alteration observed in obese subjects is white adipose tissue overgrowth, which is linked to increased incidence of obesity-related comorbidities, such as: cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes or digestive tract diseases. What is more, obesity is also a risk factor for some cancers. Special risk for diseases linked to excessive weight is associated with overgrowth of visceral type of adipose tissue. Adipose tissue, which is the main energy storehouse in body and acts also as an endocrine organ, undergoes both the morphological and the functional changes in obesity, having a negative impact on whole body function. In this article we summarize the most important alterations in morphology and function of white adipose tissue, observed in obese subjects.

  14. Reduced adipose tissue oxygenation in human obesity: evidence for rarefaction, macrophage chemotaxis, and inflammation without an angiogenic response.

    PubMed

    Pasarica, Magdalena; Sereda, Olga R; Redman, Leanne M; Albarado, Diana C; Hymel, David T; Roan, Laura E; Rood, Jennifer C; Burk, David H; Smith, Steven R

    2009-03-01

    Based on rodent studies, we examined the hypothesis that increased adipose tissue (AT) mass in obesity without an adequate support of vascularization might lead to hypoxia, macrophage infiltration, and inflammation. Oxygen partial pressure (AT pO2) and AT temperature in abdominal AT (9 lean and 12 overweight/obese men and women) was measured by direct insertion of a polarographic Clark electrode. Body composition was measured by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry, and insulin sensitivity was measured by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. Abdominal subcutaneous tissue was used for staining, quantitative RT-PCR, and chemokine secretion assay. AT pO2 was lower in overweight/obese subjects than lean subjects (47 +/- 10.6 vs. 55 +/- 9.1 mmHg); however, this level of pO2 did not activate the classic hypoxia targets (pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase and vascular endothelial growth factor [VEGF]). AT pO2 was negatively correlated with percent body fat (R = -0.50, P < 0.05). Compared with lean subjects, overweight/obese subjects had 44% lower capillary density and 58% lower VEGF, suggesting AT rarefaction (capillary drop out). This might be due to lower peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma1 and higher collagen VI mRNA expression, which correlated with AT pO2 (P < 0.05). Of clinical importance, AT pO2 negatively correlated with CD68 mRNA and macrophage inflammatory protein 1alpha secretion (R = -0.58, R = -0.79, P < 0.05), suggesting that lower AT pO2 could drive AT inflammation in obesity. Adipose tissue rarefaction might lie upstream of both low AT pO2 and inflammation in obesity. These results suggest novel approaches to treat the dysfunctional AT found in obesity.

  15. A multicompartmental model of in vivo adipose tissue glycerol kinetics and capillary permeability in lean and obese humans.

    PubMed

    Coppack, Simon W; Chinkes, David L; Miles, John M; Patterson, Bruce W; Klein, Samuel

    2005-07-01

    Lipolysis of adipose tissue triglycerides releases glycerol. Twenty-four volunteers, of whom 6 were obese and 13 were women, received a primed-constant infusion of 2H5-glycerol for 120 min during postabsorptive steady-state conditions. Arterial, abdominal venous, and interstitial (microdialysis) samples were taken, and a four-compartment model was applied to assess subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue glycerol kinetics. Adipose tissue blood flow was measured using 133Xe washout. Venous glycerol concentrations (median 230 micromol/l [interquartile range 210-268]) were consistently greater than those of arterial blood (69.1 micromol/l [56.5-85.5]), while glycerol isotopic enrichments (tracer-to-tracee ratio) were greater in arterial blood (8.34% [7.44-10.1]) than venous blood (2.34% [1.71-2.69], P < 0.01). Microdialysate glycerol enrichment was 1.44% (1.11-1.79), indicating incomplete permeability of glycerol between capillary blood and interstitium. Calculated interstitial glycerol concentrations were between 270 micromol/l (256-350) and 332 micromol/l (281-371) (examining different boundary conditions). The calculated capillary diffusion capacity (ps) was between 2.21 ml . 100 g tissue(-1) . min(-1) (1.31-3.13) and 3.09 ml . 100 g tissue(-1) . min(-1) (1.52-4.90) and correlated inversely with adiposity (Rs< or = -0.45, P < 0.05). Our results support previous estimates of interstitial glycerol concentration within adipose tissue and reveal capillary diffusion capacity is reduced in obesity.

  16. Association between subcutaneous white adipose tissue and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D in overweight and obese adults

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Background: Cholecalciferol is known to be deposited in human adipose tissue, but the distribution of 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) in adipose tissue is not known. Objectives: To determine whether 25(OH)D is detectable in subcutaneous white adipose tissue (SWAT) in overweight and obese persons an...

  17. Purinergic signaling modulates human visceral adipose inflammatory responses: implications in metabolically unhealthy obesity.

    PubMed

    Pandolfi, J; Ferraro, A; Lerner, M; Serrano, J R; Dueck, A; Fainboim, L; Arruvito, L

    2015-05-01

    Obesity is accompanied by chronic inflammation of VAT, which promotes metabolic changes, and purinergic signaling has a key role in a wide range of inflammatory diseases. Therefore, we addressed whether fat inflammation could be differentially modulated by this signaling pathway in the MUO and in individuals who remain MHO. Our results show that the necrotized VAT of both groups released greater levels of ATP compared with lean donors. Interestingly, MUO tissue SVCs showed up-regulation and engagement of the purinergic P2X7R. The extracellular ATP concentration is regulated by an enzymatic process, in which CD39 converts ATP and ADP into AMP, and CD73 converts AMP into adenosine. In VAT, the CD73 ectoenzyme was widely distributed in immune and nonimmune cells, whereas CD39 expression was restricted to immune CD45PAN(+) SVCs. Although the MUO group expressed the highest levels of both ectoenzymes, no difference in ATP hydrolysis capacity was found between the groups. As expected, MUO exhibited the highest NLRP3 inflammasome expression and IL-1β production. MUO SVCs also displayed up-regulation of the A2AR, allowing extracellular adenosine to increase IL-1β local secretion. Additionally, we demonstrate that metabolic parameters and BMI are positively correlated with purinergic components in VAT. These findings indicate that purinergic signaling is a novel mechanism involved in the chronic inflammation of VAT underlying the metabolic changes in obesity. Finally, our study reveals a proinflammatory role for adenosine in sustaining IL-1β production in this tissue.

  18. Human adipose dynamics and metabolic health.

    PubMed

    Feng, Bin; Zhang, Tracy; Xu, Haiyan

    2013-04-01

    The two types of adipose tissue in humans, white and brown, have distinct developmental origins and functions. Human white adipose tissue plays a pivotal role in maintaining whole-body energy homeostasis by storing triglycerides when energy is in surplus, releasing free fatty acids as a fuel during energy shortage, and secreting adipokines that are important for regulating lipid and glucose metabolism. The size of white adipose mass needs to be kept at a proper set point. Dramatic expansion of white fat mass causes obesity--now become a global epidemic disease--and increases the risk for the development of many life-threatening diseases. The absence of white adipose tissue or abnormal white adipose tissue redistribution leads to lipodystrophy, a condition often associated with metabolic disorders. Brown adipose tissue is a thermogenic organ whose mass is inversely correlated with body mass index and age. Therapeutic approaches targeting adipose tissue have been proven to be effective in improving obesity-related metabolic disorders, and promising new therapies could be developed in the near future. © 2013 New York Academy of Sciences.

  19. Human adipose tissue stem cells: relevance in the pathophysiology of obesity and metabolic diseases and therapeutic applications.

    PubMed

    Cignarelli, Angelo; Perrini, Sebastio; Ficarella, Romina; Peschechera, Alessandro; Nigro, Pasquale; Giorgino, Francesco

    2012-12-10

    Stem cells are unique cells exhibiting self-renewing properties and the potential to differentiate into multiple specialised cell types. Totipotent or pluripotent stem cells are generally abundant in embryonic or fetal tissues, but the use of discarded embryos as sources of these cells raises challenging ethical problems. Adult stem cells can also differentiate into a wide variety of cell types. In particular, adult adipose tissue contains a pool of abundant and accessible multipotent stem cells, designated as adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs), that are able to replicate as undifferentiated cells, to develop as mature adipocytes and to differentiate into multiple other cell types along the mesenchymal lineage, including chondrocytes, myocytes and osteocytes, and also into cells of endodermal and neuroectodermal origin, including beta-cells and neurons, respectively. An impairment in the differentiation potential and biological functions of ASCs may contribute to the development of obesity and related comorbidities. In this review, we summarise different aspects of the ASCs with special reference to the isolation and characterisation of these cell populations, their relation to the biochemical features of the adipose tissue depot of origin and to the metabolic characteristics of the donor subject and discuss some prospective therapeutic applications.

  20. Modulation of natriuretic peptide receptors in human adipose tissue: molecular mechanisms behind the "natriuretic handicap" in morbidly obese patients.

    PubMed

    Gentili, Alessandra; Frangione, Maria Rosaria; Albini, Elisa; Vacca, Carmine; Ricci, Maria Anastasia; De Vuono, Stefano; Boni, Marcello; Rondelli, Fabio; Rotelli, Luciana; Lupattelli, Graziana; Orabona, Ciriana

    2017-08-01

    The B-type natriuretic peptide (BNP) hormone plays a crucial role in the regulation of cardiovascular and energy homeostasis. Obesity is associated with low circulating levels of BNP, a condition known as "natriuretic handicap." Recent evidences suggest an altered expression of BNP receptors-both the signaling natriuretic peptide receptors (NPR)-A and the clearance NPR-C receptor-in adipose tissue (AT) as one of the putative causes of natriuretic handicap. The current study aims at clarifying the molecular mechanisms behind the natriuretic handicap, focusing on NPR modulation in the AT of obese and control subjects. The study enrolled 34 obese and 20 control subjects undergoing bariatric or abdominal surgery, respectively. The main clinical and biochemical parameters, including circulating BNP, were assessed. In visceral (VAT) and subcutaneous AT (SAT) samples, collected during surgery, the adipocytes and stromal vascular fraction (SVF) expression of NPR-A and NPR-C and the SVF secretion of interleukin 6 (IL-6) were determined. Both VAT and SAT from obese patients expressed a lower NPR-A/NPR-C ratio in adipocytes and the SVF secreted a higher level of IL-6, compared with the controls. Moreover, NPR-A/NPR-C ratio expressed by VAT and SAT adipocytes negatively correlated with body mass index, insulin, the Homeostasis Model Assessment of Insulin resistance, and IL-6 secreted by SVF, and the expression of the clearance receptor NPR-C, in both the VAT and SAT adipocytes, showed a negative correlation with circulating BNP. Overall, insulin resistance/hyperinsulinemia and AT inflammation (ie, high level of IL-6) are the major determinants of the lower NPR-A/NPR-C ratio in adipocytes, thus contributing to the natriuretic handicap in obese subjects. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Rare adipose disorders (RADs) masquerading as obesity.

    PubMed

    Herbst, Karen L

    2012-02-01

    Rare adipose disorders (RADs) including multiple symmetric lipomatosis (MSL), lipedema and Dercum's disease (DD) may be misdiagnosed as obesity. Lifestyle changes, such as reduced caloric intake and increased physical activity are standard care for obesity. Although lifestyle changes and bariatric surgery work effectively for the obesity component of RADs, these treatments do not routinely reduce the abnormal subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) of RADs. RAD SAT likely results from the growth of a brown stem cell population with secondary lymphatic dysfunction in MSL, or by primary vascular and lymphatic dysfunction in lipedema and DD. People with RADs do not lose SAT from caloric limitation and increased energy expenditure alone. In order to improve recognition of RADs apart from obesity, the diagnostic criteria, histology and pathophysiology of RADs are presented and contrasted to familial partial lipodystrophies, acquired partial lipodystrophies and obesity with which they may be confused. Treatment recommendations focus on evidence-based data and include lymphatic decongestive therapy, medications and supplements that support loss of RAD SAT. Associated RAD conditions including depression, anxiety and pain will improve as healthcare providers learn to identify and adopt alternative treatment regimens for the abnormal SAT component of RADs. Effective dietary and exercise regimens are needed in RAD populations to improve quality of life and construct advanced treatment regimens for future generations.

  2. Rare adipose disorders (RADs) masquerading as obesity

    PubMed Central

    Herbst, Karen L

    2012-01-01

    Rare adipose disorders (RADs) including multiple symmetric lipomatosis (MSL), lipedema and Dercum's disease (DD) may be misdiagnosed as obesity. Lifestyle changes, such as reduced caloric intake and increased physical activity are standard care for obesity. Although lifestyle changes and bariatric surgery work effectively for the obesity component of RADs, these treatments do not routinely reduce the abnormal subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) of RADs. RAD SAT likely results from the growth of a brown stem cell population with secondary lymphatic dysfunction in MSL, or by primary vascular and lymphatic dysfunction in lipedema and DD. People with RADs do not lose SAT from caloric limitation and increased energy expenditure alone. In order to improve recognition of RADs apart from obesity, the diagnostic criteria, histology and pathophysiology of RADs are presented and contrasted to familial partial lipodystrophies, acquired partial lipodystrophies and obesity with which they may be confused. Treatment recommendations focus on evidence-based data and include lymphatic decongestive therapy, medications and supplements that support loss of RAD SAT. Associated RAD conditions including depression, anxiety and pain will improve as healthcare providers learn to identify and adopt alternative treatment regimens for the abnormal SAT component of RADs. Effective dietary and exercise regimens are needed in RAD populations to improve quality of life and construct advanced treatment regimens for future generations. PMID:22301856

  3. Consuming fructose-sweetened, not glucose-sweetened, beverages increases visceral adiposity and lipids and decreases insulin sensitivity in overweight/obese humans

    PubMed Central

    Stanhope, Kimber L.; Schwarz, Jean Marc; Keim, Nancy L.; Griffen, Steven C.; Bremer, Andrew A.; Graham, James L.; Hatcher, Bonnie; Cox, Chad L.; Dyachenko, Artem; Zhang, Wei; McGahan, John P.; Seibert, Anthony; Krauss, Ronald M.; Chiu, Sally; Schaefer, Ernst J.; Ai, Masumi; Otokozawa, Seiko; Nakajima, Katsuyuki; Nakano, Takamitsu; Beysen, Carine; Hellerstein, Marc K.; Berglund, Lars; Havel, Peter J.

    2009-01-01

    Studies in animals have documented that, compared with glucose, dietary fructose induces dyslipidemia and insulin resistance. To assess the relative effects of these dietary sugars during sustained consumption in humans, overweight and obese subjects consumed glucose- or fructose-sweetened beverages providing 25% of energy requirements for 10 weeks. Although both groups exhibited similar weight gain during the intervention, visceral adipose volume was significantly increased only in subjects consuming fructose. Fasting plasma triglyceride concentrations increased by approximately 10% during 10 weeks of glucose consumption but not after fructose consumption. In contrast, hepatic de novo lipogenesis (DNL) and the 23-hour postprandial triglyceride AUC were increased specifically during fructose consumption. Similarly, markers of altered lipid metabolism and lipoprotein remodeling, including fasting apoB, LDL, small dense LDL, oxidized LDL, and postprandial concentrations of remnant-like particle–triglyceride and –cholesterol significantly increased during fructose but not glucose consumption. In addition, fasting plasma glucose and insulin levels increased and insulin sensitivity decreased in subjects consuming fructose but not in those consuming glucose. These data suggest that dietary fructose specifically increases DNL, promotes dyslipidemia, decreases insulin sensitivity, and increases visceral adiposity in overweight/obese adults. PMID:19381015

  4. Ceruloplasmin is a novel adipokine which is overexpressed in adipose tissue of obese subjects and in obesity-associated cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Arner, Erik; Forrest, Alistair R R; Ehrlund, Anna; Mejhert, Niklas; Itoh, Masayoshi; Kawaji, Hideya; Lassmann, Timo; Laurencikiene, Jurga; Rydén, Mikael; Arner, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Obesity confers an increased risk of developing specific cancer forms. Although the mechanisms are unclear, increased fat cell secretion of specific proteins (adipokines) may promote/facilitate development of malignant tumors in obesity via cross-talk between adipose tissue(s) and the tissues prone to develop cancer among obese. We searched for novel adipokines that were overexpressed in adipose tissue of obese subjects as well as in tumor cells derived from cancers commonly associated with obesity. For this purpose expression data from human adipose tissue of obese and non-obese as well as from a large panel of human cancer cell lines and corresponding primary cells and tissues were explored. We found expression of ceruloplasmin to be the most enriched in obesity-associated cancer cells. This gene was also significantly up-regulated in adipose tissue of obese subjects. Ceruloplasmin is the body's main copper carrier and is involved in angiogenesis. We demonstrate that ceruloplasmin is a novel adipokine, which is produced and secreted at increased rates in obesity. In the obese state, adipose tissue contributed markedly (up to 22%) to the total circulating protein level. In summary, we have through bioinformatic screening identified ceruloplasmin as a novel adipokine with increased expression in adipose tissue of obese subjects as well as in cells from obesity-associated cancers. Whether there is a causal relationship between adipose overexpression of ceruloplasmin and cancer development in obesity cannot be answered by these cross-sectional comparisons.

  5. Targeting adipose tissue in the treatment of obesity-associated diabetes.

    PubMed

    Kusminski, Christine M; Bickel, Perry E; Scherer, Philipp E

    2016-09-01

    Adipose tissue regulates numerous physiological processes, and its dysfunction in obese humans is associated with disrupted metabolic homeostasis, insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM). Although several US-approved treatments for obesity and T2DM exist, these are limited by adverse effects and a lack of effective long-term glucose control. In this Review, we provide an overview of the role of adipose tissue in metabolic homeostasis and assess emerging novel therapeutic strategies targeting adipose tissue, including adipokine-based strategies, promotion of white adipose tissue beiging as well as reduction of inflammation and fibrosis.

  6. Accumulation of CD11c+CD163+ Adipose Tissue Macrophages through Upregulation of Intracellular 11β-HSD1 in Human Obesity.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Shotaro; Koh, Vivien; Kua, Ley-Fang; So, Jimmy; Davide, Lomanto; Lim, Kee Siang; Petersen, Sven Hans; Yong, Wei-Peng; Shabbir, Asim; Kono, Koji

    2016-11-01

    Adipose tissue (AT) macrophages (ATMs) are key players for regulation of AT homeostasis and obesity-related metabolic disorders. However, the phenotypes of human ATMs and regulatory mechanisms of their polarization have not been clearly described. In this study, we investigated human ATMs in both abdominal visceral AT and s.c. AT and proposed an 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-HSD1)-glucocorticoid receptor regulatory axis that might dictate M1/M2 polarization in ATMs. The accumulation of CD11c(+)CD163(+) ATMs in both visceral AT and s.c. AT of obese individuals was confirmed at the cellular level and was found to be clearly correlated with body mass index and production of reactive oxygen species. Using our in vitro system where human peripheral blood monocytes (hPBMs) were cocultured with Simpson-Golabi-Behmel syndrome adipocytes, M1/M2 polarization was found to be dependent on 11β-HSD1, an intracellular glucocorticoid reactivating enzyme. Exposure of hPBMs to cortisol-induced expression of CD163 and RU-486, a glucocorticoid receptor antagonist, significantly abrogated CD163 expression through coculture of mature adipocytes with hPBMs. Moreover, 11β-HSD1 was expressed in crown ATMs in obese AT. Importantly, conditioned medium from coculture of adipocytes with hPBMs enhanced proliferation of human breast cancer MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells. In summary, the phenotypic switch of ATMs from M2 to mixed M1/M2 phenotype occurred through differentiation of adipocytes in obese individuals, and upregulation of intracellular 11β-HSD1 might play a role in the process. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  7. Effects of obesity, diabetes and exercise on Fndc5 gene expression and irisin release in human skeletal muscle and adipose tissue: in vivo and in vitro studies

    PubMed Central

    Kurdiova, Timea; Balaz, Miroslav; Vician, Marek; Maderova, Denisa; Vlcek, Miroslav; Valkovic, Ladislav; Srbecky, Miroslav; Imrich, Richard; Kyselovicova, Olga; Belan, Vitazoslav; Jelok, Ivan; Wolfrum, Christian; Klimes, Iwar; Krssak, Martin; Zemkova, Erika; Gasperikova, Daniela; Ukropec, Jozef; Ukropcova, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Irisin was identified as a myokine secreted by contracting skeletal muscle, possibly mediating some exercise health benefits via ‘browning’ of white adipose tissue. However, a controversy exists concerning irisin origin, regulation and function in humans. Thus, we have explored Fndc5 gene and irisin protein in two clinical studies: (i) a cross-sectional study (effects of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in drug-naive men) and (ii) an intervention study (exercise effects in sedentary, overweight/obese individuals). Glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity were assessed. Maximal aerobic capacity and muscle strength were measured before and after training. Body composition (magnetic resonance imaging), muscle and liver fat content (1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS)) and in vivo muscle metabolism (32P-MRS) were determined. Skeletal muscle and subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue samples were taken in the fasted state and during euglycaemic hyperinsulinaemia (adipose tissue) and before/after exercise training (muscle). We found that muscle Fndc5 mRNA was increased in prediabetes but not T2D. Fndc5 in adipose tissue and irisin in plasma were reduced in T2D by 40% and 50%, respectively. In contrast, T2D-derived myotubes expressed/secreted the highest levels of Fndc5/irisin. Neither hyperinsulinaemia (adipose tissue/plasma) nor exercise (muscle/plasma) affected Fndc5/irisin in vivo. Circulating irisin was positively associated with muscle mass, strength and metabolism and negatively with fasting glycaemia. Glucose and palmitate decreased Fndc5 mRNA in myotubes in vitro. We conclude that distinct patterns of Fndc5/irisin in muscle, adipose tissue and circulation, and concordant in vivo down-regulation in T2D, indicate that irisin might distinguish metabolic health and disease. Moreover, Fndc5/irisin was discordantly regulated in diabetic muscle and myotubes in vitro, suggesting that whole body factors, such as glucose and fatty acids, might be important for irisin

  8. Effects of obesity, diabetes and exercise on Fndc5 gene expression and irisin release in human skeletal muscle and adipose tissue: in vivo and in vitro studies.

    PubMed

    Kurdiova, Timea; Balaz, Miroslav; Vician, Marek; Maderova, Denisa; Vlcek, Miroslav; Valkovic, Ladislav; Srbecky, Miroslav; Imrich, Richard; Kyselovicova, Olga; Belan, Vitazoslav; Jelok, Ivan; Wolfrum, Christian; Klimes, Iwar; Krssak, Martin; Zemkova, Erika; Gasperikova, Daniela; Ukropec, Jozef; Ukropcova, Barbara

    2014-03-01

    Irisin was identified as a myokine secreted by contracting skeletal muscle, possibly mediating some exercise health benefits via 'browning' of white adipose tissue. However, a controversy exists concerning irisin origin, regulation and function in humans. Thus, we have explored Fndc5 gene and irisin protein in two clinical studies: (i) a cross-sectional study (effects of type 2 diabetes (T2D) in drug-naive men) and (ii) an intervention study (exercise effects in sedentary, overweight/obese individuals). Glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity were assessed. Maximal aerobic capacity and muscle strength were measured before and after training. Body composition (magnetic resonance imaging), muscle and liver fat content (1H-magnetic resonance spectroscopy (MRS)) and in vivo muscle metabolism (32P-MRS) were determined. Skeletal muscle and subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue samples were taken in the fasted state and during euglycaemic hyperinsulinaemia (adipose tissue) and before/after exercise training (muscle). We found that muscle Fndc5 mRNA was increased in prediabetes but not T2D. Fndc5 in adipose tissue and irisin in plasma were reduced in T2D by 40% and 50%, respectively. In contrast, T2D-derived myotubes expressed/secreted the highest levels of Fndc5/irisin. Neither hyperinsulinaemia (adipose tissue/plasma) nor exercise (muscle/plasma) affected Fndc5/irisin in vivo. Circulating irisin was positively associated with muscle mass, strength and metabolism and negatively with fasting glycaemia. Glucose and palmitate decreased Fndc5 mRNA in myotubes in vitro. We conclude that distinct patterns of Fndc5/irisin in muscle, adipose tissue and circulation, and concordant in vivo down-regulation in T2D, indicate that irisin might distinguish metabolic health and disease. Moreover, Fndc5/irisin was discordantly regulated in diabetic muscle and myotubes in vitro, suggesting that whole body factors, such as glucose and fatty acids, might be important for irisin regulation

  9. Human Adipose Stromal/Stem Cells from Obese Donors Show Reduced Efficacy in Halting Disease Progression in the Experimental Autoimmune Encephalomyelitis Model of Multiple Sclerosis.

    PubMed

    Strong, Amy L; Bowles, Annie C; Wise, Rachel M; Morand, Joseph P; Dutreil, Maria F; Gimble, Jeffrey M; Bunnell, Bruce A

    2016-03-01

    Multiple sclerosis is an autoimmune disease that affects the white matter of the central nervous system and involves inflammation and demyelination. The recent advances in our understanding of adipose-derived stromal/stem cells (ASCs) and the utilization of these cells in clinical settings to treat diseases have made it essential to identify the most effective ASCs for therapy. Studies have not yet investigated the impact of obesity on the therapeutic efficacy of ASCs. Obesity is characterized by adipocyte hyperplasia and hypertrophy and can extend to metabolic and endocrine dysfunction. Investigating the impact obesity has on ASC biology will determine whether these cells are suitable for use in regenerative medicine. The therapeutic efficacy of ASCs isolated from lean subjects (body mass index [BMI] < 25; lnASCs) and obese subjects (BMI > 30; obASCs) were determined in murine experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), a model of multiple sclerosis. Compared with the EAE disease-modifying effects of lnASCs, obASCs consistently failed to alleviate clinical symptoms or inhibit inflammation in the central nervous system. When activated, obASCs expressed higher mRNA levels of several pro-inflammatory cytokines compared with lnASCs. Additionally, conditioned media (CM) collected from the obASCs markedly enhanced the proliferation and differentiation of T cells; whereas, CM from lnASC did not. These results indicate that obesity reduces, or eliminates, the anti-inflammatory effects of human ASCs such that they may not be a suitable cell source for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. The data suggest that donor demographics may be particularly important when identifying suitable stem cells for treatment. © 2016 AlphaMed Press.

  10. Comparison of Markers and Functional Attributes of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells and Dedifferentiated Adipocyte Cells from Subcutaneous Fat of an Obese Diabetic Donor.

    PubMed

    Watson, James E; Patel, Niketa A; Carter, Gay; Moor, Andrea; Patel, Rekha; Ghansah, Tomar; Mathur, Abhishek; Murr, Michel M; Bickford, Paula; Gould, Lisa J; Cooper, Denise R

    2014-03-01

    Objective: Adipose tissue is a robust source of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) that may be able to provide secreted factors that promote the ability of wounded tissue to heal. However, adipocytes also have the potential to dedifferentiate in culture to cells with stem cell-like properties that may improve their behavior and functionality for certain applications. Approach: ADSCs are adult mesenchymal stem cells that are cultured from the stromal vascular fraction of adipose tissue. However, adipocytes are capable of dedifferentiating into cells with stem cell properties. In this case study, we compare ADSC and dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells from the same patient and fat depot for mesenchymal cell markers, embryonic stem cell markers, ability to differentiate to adipocytes and osteoblasts, senescence and telomerase levels, and ability of conditioned media (CM) to stimulate migration of human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs). Innovation and Conclusions: ADSCs and DFAT cells displayed identical levels of CD90, CD44, CD105, and were CD34- and CD45-negative. They also expressed similar levels of Oct4, BMI1, KLF4, and SALL4. DFAT cells, however, showed higher efficiency in adipogenic and osteogenic capacity. Telomerase levels of DFAT cells were double those of ADSCs, and senescence declined in DFAT cells. CM from both cell types altered the migration of fibroblasts. Despite reports of ADSCs from a number of human depots, there have been no comparisons of the ability of dedifferentiated DFAT cells from the same donor and depot to differentiate or modulate migration of HDFs. Since ADSCs were from an obese diabetic donor, reprogramming of DFAT cells may help improve a patient's cells for regenerative medicine applications.

  11. Comparison of Markers and Functional Attributes of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells and Dedifferentiated Adipocyte Cells from Subcutaneous Fat of an Obese Diabetic Donor

    PubMed Central

    Watson, James E.; Patel, Niketa A.; Carter, Gay; Moor, Andrea; Patel, Rekha; Ghansah, Tomar; Mathur, Abhishek; Murr, Michel M.; Bickford, Paula; Gould, Lisa J.; Cooper, Denise R.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Adipose tissue is a robust source of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) that may be able to provide secreted factors that promote the ability of wounded tissue to heal. However, adipocytes also have the potential to dedifferentiate in culture to cells with stem cell-like properties that may improve their behavior and functionality for certain applications. Approach: ADSCs are adult mesenchymal stem cells that are cultured from the stromal vascular fraction of adipose tissue. However, adipocytes are capable of dedifferentiating into cells with stem cell properties. In this case study, we compare ADSC and dedifferentiated fat (DFAT) cells from the same patient and fat depot for mesenchymal cell markers, embryonic stem cell markers, ability to differentiate to adipocytes and osteoblasts, senescence and telomerase levels, and ability of conditioned media (CM) to stimulate migration of human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs). Innovation and Conclusions: ADSCs and DFAT cells displayed identical levels of CD90, CD44, CD105, and were CD34- and CD45-negative. They also expressed similar levels of Oct4, BMI1, KLF4, and SALL4. DFAT cells, however, showed higher efficiency in adipogenic and osteogenic capacity. Telomerase levels of DFAT cells were double those of ADSCs, and senescence declined in DFAT cells. CM from both cell types altered the migration of fibroblasts. Despite reports of ADSCs from a number of human depots, there have been no comparisons of the ability of dedifferentiated DFAT cells from the same donor and depot to differentiate or modulate migration of HDFs. Since ADSCs were from an obese diabetic donor, reprogramming of DFAT cells may help improve a patient's cells for regenerative medicine applications. PMID:24669358

  12. BFIT, a unique acyl-CoA thioesterase induced in thermogenic brown adipose tissue: cloning, organization of the human gene and assessment of a potential link to obesity.

    PubMed Central

    Adams, S H; Chui, C; Schilbach, S L; Yu, X X; Goddard, A D; Grimaldi, J C; Lee, J; Dowd, P; Colman, S; Lewin, D A

    2001-01-01

    We hypothesized that certain proteins encoded by temperature-responsive genes in brown adipose tissue (BAT) contribute to the remarkable metabolic shifts observed in this tissue, thus prompting a differential mRNA expression analysis to identify candidates involved in this process in mouse BAT. An mRNA species corresponding to a novel partial-length gene was found to be induced 2-3-fold above the control following cold exposure (4 degrees C), and repressed approximately 70% by warm acclimation (33 degrees C, 3 weeks) compared with controls (22 degrees C). The gene displayed robust BAT expression (i.e. approximately 7-100-fold higher than other tissues in controls). The full-length murine gene encodes a 594 amino acid ( approximately 67 kDa) open reading frame with significant homology to the human hypothetical acyl-CoA thioesterase KIAA0707. Based on cold-inducibility of the gene and the presence of two acyl-CoA thioesterase domains, we termed the protein brown-fat-inducible thioesterase (BFIT). Subsequent analyses and cloning efforts revealed the presence of a novel splice variant in humans (termed hBFIT2), encoding the orthologue to the murine BAT gene. BFIT was mapped to syntenic regions of chromosomes 1 (human) and 4 (mouse) associated with body fatness and diet-induced obesity, potentially linking a deficit of BFIT activity with exacerbation of these traits. Consistent with this notion, BFIT mRNA was significantly higher ( approximately 1.6-2-fold) in the BAT of obesity-resistant compared with obesity-prone mice fed a high-fat diet, and was 2.5-fold higher in controls compared with ob/ob mice. Its strong, cold-inducible BAT expression in mice suggests that BFIT supports the transition of this tissue towards increased metabolic activity, probably through alteration of intracellular fatty acyl-CoA concentration. PMID:11696000

  13. Expression of S6K1 in human visceral adipose tissue is upregulated in obesity and related to insulin resistance and inflammation.

    PubMed

    Catalán, Victoria; Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier; Rodríguez, Amaia; Ramírez, Beatriz; Andrada, Patricia; Rotellar, Fernando; Valentí, Víctor; Moncada, Rafael; Martí, Pablo; Silva, Camilo; Salvador, Javier; Frühbeck, Gema

    2015-04-01

    The ribosomal protein S6 kinase 1 (S6K1) is a component of the insulin signalling pathway that has been proposed as a key molecular factor in insulin resistance development under conditions of nutrient overload. The aim was to evaluate the involvement of S6K1 in obesity as well as to explore their association with visceral adipose tissue (VAT) inflammation. Samples obtained from 40 subjects were used. Gene expression levels of RPS6KB1 and key inflammatory markers were analysed in VAT. The effect of insulin on transcript levels of RPS6KB1 in human differentiated adipocytes was also explored. RPS6KB1 mRNA levels in VAT were increased (P < 0.05) in obese patients. Insulin treatment significantly enhanced (P < 0.01) gene expression levels of RPS6KB1 and a positive association (P < 0.05) of RPS6KB1 expression with different markers of insulin resistance was observed. Moreover, RPS6KB1 gene expression levels were positively correlated with VAT gene expression levels of the inflammatory markers CCL2, CD68, MMP2, MMP9, VEGFA and CHI3L1 as well as with mRNA levels of MTOR and MAPK8, representative players involved in signalling pathways related to S6K1. The increased levels of S6K1 in obesity and its positive association with insulin resistance and inflammation suggest a role for this protein in the changes that take place in VAT in obesity establishing a link between inflammation and a higher risk for the development of metabolic diseases.

  14. Regulation of adipose branched-chain amin acid catabolism enzyme expression and cross-adipose amino acid flux in human obesity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Elevated blood branched-chain amin acids (BCAA)are often assoicated with insulin resistance and type2 diabetes, which might result from a reduced cellular utilization and/or incomplete BCAA oxidation. White adipose tissue (WAT) has become appreciated as a potential player in whole body BCAA metaboli...

  15. CCR7 Maintains Nonresolving Lymph Node and Adipose Inflammation in Obesity.

    PubMed

    Hellmann, Jason; Sansbury, Brian E; Holden, Candice R; Tang, Yunan; Wong, Blenda; Wysoczynski, Marcin; Rodriguez, Jorge; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Hill, Bradford G; Spite, Matthew

    2016-08-01

    Accumulation of immune cells in adipose tissue promotes insulin resistance in obesity. Although innate and adaptive immune cells contribute to adipose inflammation, the processes that sustain these interactions are incompletely understood. Here we show that obesity promotes the accumulation of CD11c(+) adipose tissue immune cells that express C-C chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7) in mice and humans, and that CCR7 contributes to chronic inflammation and insulin resistance. We identified that CCR7(+) macrophages and dendritic cells accumulate in adipose tissue in close proximity to lymph nodes (LNs) (i.e., perinodal) and visceral adipose. Consistent with the role of CCR7 in regulating the migration of immune cells to LNs, obesity promoted the accumulation of CD11c(+) cells in LNs, which was prevented by global or hematopoietic deficiency of Ccr7 Obese Ccr7(-/-) mice had reduced accumulation of CD8(+) T cells, B cells, and macrophages in adipose tissue, which was associated with reduced inflammatory signaling. This reduction in maladaptive inflammation translated to increased insulin signaling and improved glucose tolerance in obesity. Therapeutic administration of an anti-CCR7 antibody phenocopied the effects of genetic Ccr7 deficiency in mice with established obesity. These results suggest that CCR7 plays a causal role in maintaining innate and adaptive immunity in obesity.

  16. CCR7 Maintains Nonresolving Lymph Node and Adipose Inflammation in Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Hellmann, Jason; Sansbury, Brian E.; Holden, Candice R.; Tang, Yunan; Wong, Blenda; Wysoczynski, Marcin; Rodriguez, Jorge; Bhatnagar, Aruni; Hill, Bradford G.

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of immune cells in adipose tissue promotes insulin resistance in obesity. Although innate and adaptive immune cells contribute to adipose inflammation, the processes that sustain these interactions are incompletely understood. Here we show that obesity promotes the accumulation of CD11c+ adipose tissue immune cells that express C-C chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7) in mice and humans, and that CCR7 contributes to chronic inflammation and insulin resistance. We identified that CCR7+ macrophages and dendritic cells accumulate in adipose tissue in close proximity to lymph nodes (LNs) (i.e., perinodal) and visceral adipose. Consistent with the role of CCR7 in regulating the migration of immune cells to LNs, obesity promoted the accumulation of CD11c+ cells in LNs, which was prevented by global or hematopoietic deficiency of Ccr7. Obese Ccr7−/− mice had reduced accumulation of CD8+ T cells, B cells, and macrophages in adipose tissue, which was associated with reduced inflammatory signaling. This reduction in maladaptive inflammation translated to increased insulin signaling and improved glucose tolerance in obesity. Therapeutic administration of an anti-CCR7 antibody phenocopied the effects of genetic Ccr7 deficiency in mice with established obesity. These results suggest that CCR7 plays a causal role in maintaining innate and adaptive immunity in obesity. PMID:27207557

  17. Adipose extracellular matrix remodelling in obesity and insulin resistance☆

    PubMed Central

    Lin, De; Chun, Tae-Hwa; Kang, Li

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of adipose tissues undergoes constant remodelling to allow adipocytes and their precursor cells to change cell shape and function in adaptation to nutritional cues. Abnormal accumulation of ECM components and their modifiers in adipose tissues has been recently demonstrated to cause obesity-associated insulin resistance, a hallmark of type 2 diabetes. Integrins and other ECM receptors (e.g. CD44) that are expressed in adipose tissues have been shown to regulate insulin sensitivity. It is well understood that a hypoxic response is observed in adipose tissue expansion during obesity progression and that hypoxic response accelerates fibrosis and inflammation in white adipose tissues. The expansion of adipose tissues should require angiogenesis; however, the excess deposition of ECM limits the angiogenic response of white adipose tissues in obesity. While recent studies have focused on the metabolic consequences and the mechanisms of adipose tissue expansion and remodelling, little attention has been paid to the role played by the interaction between peri-adipocyte ECM and their cognate cell surface receptors. This review will address what is currently known about the roles played by adipose ECM, their modifiers, and ECM receptors in obesity and insulin resistance. Understanding how excess ECM deposition in the adipose tissue deteriorates insulin sensitivity would provide us hints to develop a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. PMID:27179976

  18. Adipose extracellular matrix remodelling in obesity and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Lin, De; Chun, Tae-Hwa; Kang, Li

    2016-11-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) of adipose tissues undergoes constant remodelling to allow adipocytes and their precursor cells to change cell shape and function in adaptation to nutritional cues. Abnormal accumulation of ECM components and their modifiers in adipose tissues has been recently demonstrated to cause obesity-associated insulin resistance, a hallmark of type 2 diabetes. Integrins and other ECM receptors (e.g. CD44) that are expressed in adipose tissues have been shown to regulate insulin sensitivity. It is well understood that a hypoxic response is observed in adipose tissue expansion during obesity progression and that hypoxic response accelerates fibrosis and inflammation in white adipose tissues. The expansion of adipose tissues should require angiogenesis; however, the excess deposition of ECM limits the angiogenic response of white adipose tissues in obesity. While recent studies have focused on the metabolic consequences and the mechanisms of adipose tissue expansion and remodelling, little attention has been paid to the role played by the interaction between peri-adipocyte ECM and their cognate cell surface receptors. This review will address what is currently known about the roles played by adipose ECM, their modifiers, and ECM receptors in obesity and insulin resistance. Understanding how excess ECM deposition in the adipose tissue deteriorates insulin sensitivity would provide us hints to develop a new therapeutic strategy for the treatment of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Adipose tissue inflammation: a cause or consequence of obesity-related insulin resistance?

    PubMed

    Blüher, Matthias

    2016-09-01

    The worldwide obesity epidemic has become a major health concern, because it contributes to higher mortality due to an increased risk for noncommunicable diseases including cardiovascular diseases, type 2 diabetes, musculoskeletal disorders and some cancers. Insulin resistance may link accumulation of adipose tissue in obesity to metabolic diseases, although the underlying mechanisms are not completely understood. In the past decades, data from human studies and transgenic animal models strongly suggested correlative, but also causative associations between activation of proinflammatory pathways and insulin resistance. Particularly chronic inflammation in adipose tissue seems to play an important role in the development of obesity-related insulin resistance. On the other hand, adipose tissue inflammation has been shown to be essential for healthy adipose tissue expansion and remodelling. However, whether adipose tissue inflammation represents a consequence or a cause of impaired insulin sensitivity remains an open question. A better understanding of the molecular pathways linking excess adipose tissue storage to chronic inflammation and insulin resistance may provide the basis for the future development of anti-inflammatory treatment strategies to improve adverse metabolic consequences of obesity. In this review, potential mechanisms of adipose tissue inflammation and how adipose tissue inflammation may cause insulin resistance are discussed. © 2016 The Author(s). published by Portland Press Limited on behalf of the Biochemical Society.

  20. Reduced flow-and acetylcholine-induced dilations in visceral compared to subcutaneous adipose arterioles in human morbid obesity.

    PubMed

    Grizelj, Ivana; Cavka, Ana; Bian, Jing-Tan; Szczurek, Mary; Robinson, Austin; Shinde, Shruti; Nguyen, Van; Braunschweig, Carol; Wang, Edward; Drenjancevic, Ines; Phillips, Shane A

    2015-01-01

    The hypothesis of this study was that microvascular FID and AChID is impaired in visceral (VAT) compared to SAT arterioles in morbidly obese women. An Additional aim was to determine the mechanisms contributing to FID and AChID in VAT and SAT arterioles. Arterioles were obtained from SAT and VAT biopsies from women (BMI > 35 kg/m(2) ) undergoing bariatric surgery. Microvessels were cannulated for reactivity measurements in response to flow (pressure gradients of 10-100 cmH2 O) and to ACh (10(-9) -10(-4 ) M) with and without l-NAME, INDO, and PEG-catalase. NO and H2 O2 generation were detected in arterioles by fluorescence microscopy. FID and AChID of arterioles from VAT were reduced compared to SAT arterioles. In SAT arterioles, l-NAME, INDO, and PEG-catalase significantly reduced FID and AChID but had no effect individually on VAT arterioles' vasodilator reactivity. INDO +l-NAME reduced FID in VAT arterioles. NO-fluorescence was greater in arterioles from SAT compared to VAT arterioles. Vascular H2 O2 generation during flow was similar in both VAT and SAT. Our results suggest that VAT arterioles display reduced vasodilator reactivity to flow and ACh compared to SAT arterioles, mediated by different regulatory mechanisms in human obesity. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  1. Adiposity and human regional body temperature.

    PubMed

    Savastano, David M; Gorbach, Alexander M; Eden, Henry S; Brady, Sheila M; Reynolds, James C; Yanovski, Jack A

    2009-11-01

    Human obesity is associated with increased heat production; however, subcutaneous adipose tissue provides an insulating layer that impedes heat loss. To maintain normothermia, therefore, obese individuals must increase their heat dissipation. The objective was to test the hypothesis that temperature in a heat-dissipating region of the hand is elevated in obese adults. Obese [body mass index (in kg/m(2)) > or = 30] and normal-weight (NW; body mass index = 18-25) adults were studied under thermoneutral conditions at rest. Core body temperature was measured by using ingested telemetric capsules. The temperatures of the third fingernail bed of the right hand and of abdominal skin from an area 1.5 cm inferior to the umbilicus were determined by using infrared thermography. Abdominal skin temperatures were also measured via adhesive thermistors that were placed over a prominent skin-surface blood vessel and over an adjacent nonvessel location. The groups were compared by analysis of covariance with age, sex, race, and room temperature as covariates. Core temperature did not differ significantly between the 23 obese and 13 NW participants (P = 0.74). However, infrared thermography-measured fingernail-bed temperature was significantly higher in obese subjects than in NW subjects (33.9 +/- 0.7 degrees C compared with 28.6 +/- 0.9 degrees C; P < 0.001). Conversely, infrared thermography-measured abdominal skin temperature was significantly lower in obese subjects than in NW subjects (31.8 +/- 0.2 degrees C compared with 32.8 +/- 0.3 degrees C; P = 0.02). Nonvessel abdominal skin temperatures measured by thermistors were also lower in obese subjects (P = 0.04). Greater subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue in obese adults may provide a significant insulating layer that blunts abdominal heat transfer. Augmented heat release from the hands may offset heat retention in areas of the body with greater adiposity, thereby helping to maintain normothermia in obesity. This trial was

  2. Adiposity and human regional body temperature123

    PubMed Central

    Savastano, David M; Gorbach, Alexander M; Eden, Henry S; Brady, Sheila M; Reynolds, James C

    2009-01-01

    Background: Human obesity is associated with increased heat production; however, subcutaneous adipose tissue provides an insulating layer that impedes heat loss. To maintain normothermia, therefore, obese individuals must increase their heat dissipation. Objective: The objective was to test the hypothesis that temperature in a heat-dissipating region of the hand is elevated in obese adults. Design: Obese [body mass index (in kg/m2) ≥ 30] and normal-weight (NW; body mass index = 18–25) adults were studied under thermoneutral conditions at rest. Core body temperature was measured by using ingested telemetric capsules. The temperatures of the third fingernail bed of the right hand and of abdominal skin from an area 1.5 cm inferior to the umbilicus were determined by using infrared thermography. Abdominal skin temperatures were also measured via adhesive thermistors that were placed over a prominent skin-surface blood vessel and over an adjacent nonvessel location. The groups were compared by analysis of covariance with age, sex, race, and room temperature as covariates. Results: Core temperature did not differ significantly between the 23 obese and 13 NW participants (P = 0.74). However, infrared thermography–measured fingernail-bed temperature was significantly higher in obese subjects than in NW subjects (33.9 ± 0.7°C compared with 28.6 ± 0.9°C; P < 0.001). Conversely, infrared thermography–measured abdominal skin temperature was significantly lower in obese subjects than in NW subjects (31.8 ± 0.2°C compared with 32.8 ± 0.3°C; P = 0.02). Nonvessel abdominal skin temperatures measured by thermistors were also lower in obese subjects (P = 0.04). Conclusions: Greater subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue in obese adults may provide a significant insulating layer that blunts abdominal heat transfer. Augmented heat release from the hands may offset heat retention in areas of the body with greater adiposity, thereby helping to maintain normothermia in

  3. Examination of carnitine palmitoyl transferase 1 abundance in white adipose tissue: implications in obesity research.

    PubMed

    Warfel, Jaycob D; Vandanmagsar, Bolormaa; Dubuisson, Olga S; Hodgeson, Sydney M; Elks, Carrie M; Ravussin, Eric; Mynatt, Randall L

    2017-03-22

    Carnitine Palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1) is essential for the transport of long chain fatty acids into the mitochondria for oxidation. Recently, it was reported that decreased CPT1b mRNA in adipose tissue was a contributing factor for obesity in rats. We therefore closely examined the expression level of Cpt1 in adipose tissue from mice, rats, and humans. Cpt1a is the predominate isoform in adipose tissue from all three species. Rat white adipose tissue has a moderate amount of Cpt1b mRNA, but it is very minor compared to Cpt1b expression in muscle. Total CPT1 activity in adipose tissue is also minor relative to other tissues. Both Cpt1a and Cpt1b mRNA were increased in gonadal fat but not inguinal fat by diet-induced obesity in mice. We also measured CPT1a and CPT1b expression in subcutaneous adipose tissue from human subjects with a wide range of BMI. Interestingly, CPT1a expression positively correlated with BMI (R=0.46), but there was no correlation with CPT1b (R=0.04). Our findings indicate that white adipose tissue fatty acid oxidation capacity is minor compared to metabolically active tissues. Further, given the already low abundance of Cpt1b in white adipose tissue, it is unlikely that decreases in its expression can quantitatively decrease whole body energy expenditure enough to contribute to an obese phenotype.

  4. Gender and Obesity Specific MicroRNA Expression in Adipose Tissue from Lean and Obese Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Mentzel, Caroline M. Junker; Anthon, Christian; Jacobsen, Mette J.; Karlskov-Mortensen, Peter; Bruun, Camilla S.; Jørgensen, Claus B.; Gorodkin, Jan; Cirera, Susanna; Fredholm, Merete

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is a complex condition that increases the risk of life threatening diseases such as cardiovascular disease and diabetes. Studying the gene regulation of obesity is important for understanding the molecular mechanisms behind the obesity derived diseases and may lead to better intervention and treatment plans. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are short non-coding RNAs regulating target mRNA by binding to their 3’UTR. They are involved in numerous biological processes and diseases, including obesity. In this study we use a mixed breed pig model designed for obesity studies to investigate differentially expressed miRNAs in subcutaneous adipose tissue by RNA sequencing (RNAseq). Both male and female pigs are included to explore gender differences. The RNAseq study shows that the most highly expressed miRNAs are in accordance with comparable studies in pigs and humans. A total of six miRNAs are differentially expressed in subcutaneous adipose tissue between the lean and obese group of pigs, and in addition gender specific significant differential expression is observed for a number of miRNAs. The differentially expressed miRNAs have been verified using qPCR. The results of these studies in general confirm the trends found by RNAseq. Mir-9 and mir-124a are significantly differentially expressed with large fold changes in subcutaneous adipose tissue between lean and obese pigs. Mir-9 is more highly expressed in the obese pigs with a fold change of 10 and a p-value < 0.001. Mir-124a is more highly expressed in the obese pigs with a fold change of 114 and a p-value < 0.001. In addition, mir-124a is significantly higher expressed in abdominal adipose tissue in male pigs with a fold change of 119 and a p-value < 0.05. Both miRNAs are also significantly higher expressed in the liver of obese male pigs where mir-124a has a fold change of 12 and mir-9 has a fold change of 1.6, both with p-values < 0.05. PMID:26222688

  5. Nutritional regulation of lipid metabolism in human adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Coppack, S W; Patel, J N; Lawrence, V J

    2001-01-01

    Pfeiffer and colleagues years ago pointed out that different distributions and amounts of adipose tissue are associated with abnormalities of lipolysis and lipoprotein metabolism. Adipose tissue has several crucial roles including (i) mobilization from stores of fatty acids as an energy source, (ii) catabolism of lipoproteins such as very-low-density lipoprotein and (iii) synthesis and release of hormonal signals such as leptin and interleukin-6. These adipose tissue actions are crucially regulated by nutrition. The review considers the existence of metabolic pathways and modes of regulation within adipose tissue, and how such metabolic activity can be quantitated in humans. Nutrition can influence adipose tissue at several 'levels'. Firstly the level of obesity or malnutrition has important effects on many aspects of adipose tissue metabolism. Secondly short-term overfeeding, underfeeding and exercise have major impacts on adipose tissue behaviour. Lastly, specific nutrients are capable of regulating adipose tissue metabolism. Recently there have been considerable advances in understanding adipose tissue metabolism and in particular its regulation. This review discusses the behaviour of adipose tissue under various nutritional conditions. There is then a review of recent work examining the ways in which nutritional influences act via intra-cellular mechanisms, insulin and the sympathetic innervation of adipose tissue.

  6. Adipose Tissue Dendritic Cells Are Independent Contributors to Obesity-Induced Inflammation and Insulin Resistance.

    PubMed

    Cho, Kae Won; Zamarron, Brian F; Muir, Lindsey A; Singer, Kanakadurga; Porsche, Cara E; DelProposto, Jennifer B; Geletka, Lynn; Meyer, Kevin A; O'Rourke, Robert W; Lumeng, Carey N

    2016-11-01

    Dynamic changes of adipose tissue leukocytes, including adipose tissue macrophage (ATM) and adipose tissue dendritic cells (ATDCs), contribute to obesity-induced inflammation and metabolic disease. However, clear discrimination between ATDC and ATM in adipose tissue has limited progress in the field of immunometabolism. In this study, we use CD64 to distinguish ATM and ATDC, and investigated the temporal and functional changes in these myeloid populations during obesity. Flow cytometry and immunostaining demonstrated that the definition of ATM as F4/80(+)CD11b(+) cells overlaps with other leukocytes and that CD45(+)CD64(+) is specific for ATM. The expression of core dendritic cell genes was enriched in CD11c(+)CD64(-) cells (ATDC), whereas core macrophage genes were enriched in CD45(+)CD64(+) cells (ATM). CD11c(+)CD64(-) ATDCs expressed MHC class II and costimulatory receptors, and had similar capacity to stimulate CD4(+) T cell proliferation as ATMs. ATDCs were predominantly CD11b(+) conventional dendritic cells and made up the bulk of CD11c(+) cells in adipose tissue with moderate high-fat diet exposure. Mixed chimeric experiments with Ccr2(-/-) mice demonstrated that high-fat diet-induced ATM accumulation from monocytes was dependent on CCR2, whereas ATDC accumulation was less CCR2 dependent. ATDC accumulation during obesity was attenuated in Ccr7(-/-) mice and was associated with decreased adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance. CD45(+)CD64(+) ATM and CD45(+)CD64(-)CD11c(+) ATDCs were identified in human obese adipose tissue and ATDCs were increased in s.c. adipose tissue compared with omental adipose tissue. These results support a revised strategy for unambiguous delineation of ATM and ATDC, and suggest that ATDCs are independent contributors to adipose tissue inflammation during obesity. Copyright © 2016 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  7. Reduced adipose tissue lymphatic drainage of macromolecules in obese subjects: a possible link between obesity and local tissue inflammation?

    PubMed

    Arngrim, N; Simonsen, L; Holst, J J; Bülow, J

    2013-05-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate subcutaneous adipose tissue lymphatic drainage (ATLD) of macromolecules in lean and obese subjects and, furthermore, to evaluate whether ATLD may change in parallel with adipose tissue blood flow. Lean and obese male subjects were studied before and after an oral glucose load. Adipose-tissue blood flow was measured in the anterior subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue by the (133)Xe-washout technique. ATLD was measured as the disappearance rate of (99m)Tc-labelled nanoaggregated human albumin, during fasting and after an oral glucose load. A significant increase in ATLD was seen after the glucose load in the lean subjects. In the obese subjects, ATLD remained constant throughout the study and was significantly lower compared to the lean subjects. These results indicate a reduced ability to remove macromolecules from the interstitial space through the lymphatic system in obese subjects. Furthermore, they suggest that postprandial changes in ATLD taking place in lean subjects are not observed in obese subjects. This may have a role in the development of obesity-related inflammation in hypertrophic adipose tissue.

  8. Sortilin 1 knockout alters basal adipose glucose metabolism but not diet-induced obesity in mice.

    PubMed

    Li, Jibiao; Matye, David J; Wang, Yifeng; Li, Tiangang

    2017-04-01

    Sortilin 1 (Sort1) is a trafficking receptor that has been implicated in the regulation of plasma cholesterol in humans and mice. Here, we use metabolomics and hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp approaches to obtain further understanding of the in vivo effects of Sort1 deletion on diet-induced obesity as well as on adipose lipid and glucose metabolism. Results show that Sort1 knockout (KO) does not affect Western diet-induced obesity nor adipose fatty acid and ceramide concentrations. Under the basal fasting state, chow-fed Sort1 KO mice have decreased adipose glycolytic metabolites, but Sort1 deletion does not affect insulin-stimulated tissue glucose uptake during the insulin clamp. These results suggest that Sort1 loss-of-function in vivo does not affect obesity development, but differentially modulates adipose glucose metabolism under fasting and insulin-stimulated states. © 2017 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  9. DNA methylation map in circulating leukocytes mirrors subcutaneous adipose tissue methylation pattern: a genome-wide analysis from non-obese and obese patients

    PubMed Central

    Crujeiras, A. B.; Diaz-Lagares, A.; Sandoval, J.; Milagro, F. I.; Navas-Carretero, S.; Carreira, M. C.; Gomez, A.; Hervas, D.; Monteiro, M. P.; Casanueva, F. F.; Esteller, M.; Martinez, J. A.

    2017-01-01

    The characterization of the epigenetic changes within the obesity-related adipose tissue will provide new insights to understand this metabolic disorder, but adipose tissue is not easy to sample in population-based studies. We aimed to evaluate the capacity of circulating leukocytes to reflect the adipose tissue-specific DNA methylation status of obesity susceptibility. DNA samples isolated from subcutaneous adipose tissue and circulating leukocytes were hybridized in the Infinium HumanMethylation 450 BeadChip. Data were compared between samples from obese (n = 45) and non-obese (n = 8–10) patients by Wilcoxon-rank test, unadjusted for cell type distributions. A global hypomethylation of the differentially methylated CpG sites (DMCpGs) was observed in the obese subcutaneous adipose tissue and leukocytes. The overlap analysis yielded a number of genes mapped by the common DMCpGs that were identified to reflect the obesity state in the leukocytes. Specifically, the methylation levels of FGFRL1, NCAPH2, PNKD and SMAD3 exhibited excellent and statistically significant efficiencies in the discrimination of obesity from non-obesity status (AUC > 0.80; p < 0.05) and a great correlation between both tissues. Therefore, the current study provided new and valuable DNA methylation biomarkers of obesity-related adipose tissue pathogenesis through peripheral blood analysis, an easily accessible and minimally invasive biological material instead of adipose tissue. PMID:28211912

  10. Vitamin D modulates adipose tissue biology: possible consequences for obesity?

    PubMed

    Landrier, Jean-François; Karkeni, Esma; Marcotorchino, Julie; Bonnet, Lauriane; Tourniaire, Franck

    2016-02-01

    Cross-sectional studies depict an inverse relationship between vitamin D (VD) status reflected by plasma 25-hydroxy-vitamin D and obesity. Furthermore, recent studies in vitro and in animal models tend to demonstrate an impact of VD and VD receptor on adipose tissue and adipocyte biology, pointing to at least a part-causal role of VD insufficiency in obesity and associated physiopathological disorders such as adipose tissue inflammation and subsequent insulin resistance. However, clinical and genetic studies are far less convincing, with highly contrasted results ruling out solid conclusions for the moment. Nevertheless, prospective studies provide interesting data supporting the hypothesis of a preventive role of VD in onset of obesity. The aim of this review is to summarise the available data on relationships between VD, adipose tissue/adipocyte physiology, and obesity in order to reveal the next key points that need to be addressed before we can gain deeper insight into the controversial VD-obesity relationship.

  11. Accumulation of adiponectin in inflamed adipose tissues of obese mice.

    PubMed

    Nakatsuji, Hideaki; Kishida, Ken; Sekimoto, Ryohei; Komura, Noriyuki; Kihara, Shinji; Funahashi, Tohru; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2014-04-01

    Adipose tissue inflammation plays an important role in the pathogenesis of obesity-associated complications, such as atherosclerosis. Adiponectin secreted from adipocytes has various beneficial effects including anti-inflammatory effect. Obesity often presents with hypoadiponectinemia. However, the mechanism and adiponectin movement in obesity remain uncharacterized. Here we investigated tissue distribution of adiponectin protein in lean and obese mice. Adiponectin protein levels were evaluated by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and western blotting. Adipose tissues were fractionated into mature adipocyte fraction (MAF) and stromal vascular fraction (SVF). Adiponectin protein was detected not only in MAF but also in SVF, which lacks adiponectin mRNA expression, of adipose tissue remarkably. SVF adiponectin protein level was higher in obese mice than in lean mice. The mechanism of adiponectin accumulation was investigated in adiponectin-deficient (APN-KO) mice after injection of plasma from wild-type mice. These mice showed accumulation of exogenous adiponectin, which derived from wild type mice, in adipose tissues, and the adiponectin was more observed in SVF of diet induced obese APN-KO mice than lean APN-KO mice. Among the adiponectin binding proteins, T-cadherin mRNA and protein levels in SVF of obese mice were remarkably higher than in lean mice. Oxidative stress levels were also significantly higher in SVF of obese mice than lean mice. Mechanistically, H2O2 up-regulated T-cadherin mRNA level in murine macrophages. The results demonstrated adiponectin targets to adipose SVF of obese mice. These findings should shed a new light on the pathology of adipose tissue inflammation and hypoadiponectinemia of obesity. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Splanchnic lipolysis in human obesity

    PubMed Central

    Nielsen, Soren; Guo, ZengKui; Johnson, C. Michael; Hensrud, Donald D.; Jensen, Michael D.

    2004-01-01

    Elevated FFA concentrations have been shown to reproduce some of the metabolic abnormalities of obesity. It has been hypothesized that visceral adipose tissue lipolysis releases excess FFAs into the portal vein, exposing the liver to higher FFA concentrations. We used isotope dilution/hepatic vein catheterization techniques to examine whether intra-abdominal fat contributes a greater portion of hepatic FFA delivery in visceral obesity. Obese women (n = 24) and men (n = 20) with a range of obesity phenotypes, taken together with healthy, lean women (n = 12) and men (n = 12), were studied. Systemic, splanchnic, and leg FFA kinetics were measured. The results showed that plasma FFA concentrations were approximately 20% greater in obese men and obese women. The contribution of splanchnic lipolysis to hepatic FFA delivery ranged from less than 10% to almost 50% and increased as a function of visceral fat in women (r = 0.49, P = 0.002) and in men (r = 0.52, P = 0.002); the slope of the relationship was greater in women than in men (P < 0.05). Leg and splanchnic tissues contributed a greater portion of systemic FFA release in obese men and women than in lean men and women. We conclude that the contribution of visceral adipose tissue lipolysis to hepatic FFA delivery increases with increasing visceral fat in humans and that this effect is greater in women than in men. PMID:15173884

  13. CD11c expression in adipose tissue and blood and its role in diet-induced obesity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    To examine CD11c, a beta(2)-integrin, on adipose tissue (AT) leukocytes, and blood monocytes and its role in diet-induced obesity. High-fat diet-induced obese C57BL/6 mice, CD11c-deficient mice, and obese humans were studied. CD11c, leukocytes, and chemokines/cytokines were examined in AT and/or blo...

  14. Adipose tissue, obesity and adipokines: role in cancer promotion.

    PubMed

    Booth, Andrea; Magnuson, Aaron; Fouts, Josephine; Foster, Michelle

    2015-01-01

    Adipose tissue is a complex organ with endocrine, metabolic and immune regulatory roles. Adipose depots have been characterized to release several adipocytokines that work locally in an autocrine and paracrine fashion or peripherally in an endocrine fashion. Adipocyte hypertrophy and excessive adipose tissue accumulation, as occurs during obesity, dysregulates the microenvironment within adipose depots and systemically alters peripheral tissue metabolism. The term "adiposopathy" is used to describe this promotion of pathogenic adipocytes and associated adipose - elated disorders. Numerous epidemiological studies confirm an association between obesity and various cancer forms. Proposed mechanisms that link obesity/adiposity to high cancer risk and mortality include, but are not limited to, obesity-related insulin resistance, hyperinsulinemia, sustained hyperglycemia, glucose intolerance, oxidative stress, inflammation and/or adipocktokine production. Several epidemiological studies have demonstrated a relationship between specific circulating adipocytokines and cancer risk. The aim of this review is to define the function, in normal weight and obesity states, of well-characterized and novel adipokines including leptin, adiponectin, apelin, visfatin, resistin, chemerin, omentin, nesfatin and vaspin and summarize the data that relates their dysfunction, whether associated or direct effects, to specific cancer outcomes. Overall research suggests most adipokines promote cancer cell progression via enhancement of cell proliferation and migration, inflammation and anti-apoptosis pathways, which subsequently can prompt cancer metastasis. Further research and longitudinal studies are needed to define the specific independent and additive roles of adipokines in cancer progression and reoccurrence.

  15. Prolactin Promotes Adipose Tissue Fitness and Insulin Sensitivity in Obese Males.

    PubMed

    Ruiz-Herrera, Xarubet; de Los Ríos, Ericka A; Díaz, Juan M; Lerma-Alvarado, Ricardo M; Martínez de la Escalera, Lucía; López-Barrera, Fernando; Lemini, María; Arnold, Edith; Martínez de la Escalera, Gonzalo; Clapp, Carmen; Macotela, Yazmín

    2017-01-01

    Excessive accumulation of body fat triggers insulin resistance and features of the metabolic syndrome. Recently, evidence has accumulated that obesity, type 2 diabetes, and metabolic syndrome are associated with reduced levels of serum prolactin (PRL) in humans and rodents, raising the question of whether low PRL levels contribute to metabolic dysfunction. Here, we have addressed this question by investigating the role of PRL in insulin sensitivity and adipose tissue fitness in obese rodents and humans. In diet-induced obese rats, treatment with PRL delivered via osmotic mini-pumps, improved insulin sensitivity, prevented adipocyte hypertrophy, and reduced inflammatory cytokine expression in visceral fat. PRL also induced increased expression of Pparg and Xbp1s in visceral adipose tissue and elevated circulating adiponectin levels. Conversely, PRL receptor null mice challenged with a high-fat diet developed greater insulin resistance, glucose intolerance, and increased adipocyte hypertrophy compared with wild-type mice. In humans, serum PRL values correlated positively with systemic adiponectin levels and were reduced in insulin-resistant patients. Furthermore, PRL circulating levels and PRL produced by adipose tissue correlated directly with the expression of PPARG, ADIPOQ, and GLUT4 in human visceral and sc adipose tissue. Thus, PRL, acting through its cognate receptors, promotes healthy adipose tissue function and systemic insulin sensitivity. Increasing the levels of PRL in the circulation may have therapeutic potential against obesity-induced metabolic diseases. Copyright © 2017 by the Endocrine Society.

  16. Insulin sensitive and resistant obesity in humans: AMPK activity, oxidative stress, and depot-specific changes in gene expression in adipose tissue[S

    PubMed Central

    Xu, X. Julia; Gauthier, Marie-Soleil; Hess, Donald T.; Apovian, Caroline M.; Cacicedo, Jose M.; Gokce, Noyan; Farb, Melissa; Valentine, Rudy J.; Ruderman, Neil B.

    2012-01-01

    We previously reported that adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activity is lower in adipose tissue of morbidly obese individuals who are insulin resistant than in comparably obese people who are insulin sensitive. However, the number of patients and parameters studied were small. Here, we compared abdominal subcutaneous, epiploic, and omental fat from 16 morbidly obese individuals classified as insulin sensitive or insulin resistant based on the homeostatic model assessment of insulin resistance. We confirmed that AMPK activity is diminished in the insulin resistant group. A custom PCR array revealed increases in mRNA levels of a wide variety of genes associated with inflammation and decreases in PGC-1α and Nampt in omental fat of the insulin resistant group. In contrast, subcutaneous abdominal fat of the same patients showed increases in PTP-1b, VEGFa, IFNγ, PAI-1, and NOS-2 not observed in omental fat. Only angiotensinogen and CD4+ mRNA levels were increased in both depots. Surprisingly, TNFα was only increased in epiploic fat, which otherwise showed very few changes. Protein carbonyl levels, a measure of oxidative stress, were increased in all depots. Thus, adipose tissues of markedly obese insulin resistant individuals uniformly show decreased AMPK activity and increased oxidative stress compared with insulin sensitive patients. However, most changes in gene expression appear to be depot-specific. PMID:22323564

  17. Genetic modification of human mesenchymal stem cells helps to reduce adiposity and improve glucose tolerance in an obese diabetic mouse model.

    PubMed

    Sen, Sabyasachi; Domingues, Cleyton C; Rouphael, Carol; Chou, Cyril; Kim, Chul; Yadava, Nagendra

    2015-12-09

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells that can differentiate into fat, muscle, bone and cartilage cells. Exposure of subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue derived AD-MSCs to high glucose (HG) leads to superoxide accumulation and up-regulation of inflammatory molecules. Our aim was to inquire how HG exposure affects MSCs differentiation and whether the mechanism is reversible. We exposed human adipose tissue derived MSCs to HG (25 mM) and compared it to normal glucose (NG, 5.5 mM) exposed cells at 7, 10 and 14 days. We examined mitochondrial superoxide accumulation (Mitosox-Red), cellular oxygen consumption rate (OCR, Seahorse) and gene expression. HG increased reactive superoxide (ROS) accumulation noted by day 7 both in cytosol and mitochondria. The OCR between the NG and HG exposed groups however did not change until 10 days at which point OCR of HG exposed cells were reduced significantly. We noted that HG exposure upregulated mRNA expression of adipogenic (PPARG, FABP-4, CREBP alpha and beta), inflammatory (IL-6 and TNF alpha) and antioxidant (SOD2 and Catalase) genes. Next, we used AdSOD2 to upregulate SOD2 prior to HG exposure and thereby noted reduction in superoxide generation. SOD2 upregulation helped reduce mRNA over-expression of PPARG, FABP-4, IL-6 and TNFα. In a series of separate experiments, we delivered the eGFP and SOD2 upregulated MSCs (5 days post ex-vivo transduction) and saline intra-peritoneally (IP) to obese diabetic (db/db) mice. We confirmed homing-in of eGFP labeled MSCs, delivered IP, to different inflamed fat pockets, particularly omental fat. Mice receiving SOD2-MSCs showed progressive reduction in body weight and improved glucose tolerance (GTT) at 4 weeks, post MSCs transplantation compared to the GFP-MSC group (control). High glucose evokes superoxide generation, OCR reduction and adipogenic differentiation. Mitochondrial superoxide dismutase upregulation quenches excess superoxide and reduces adipocyte

  18. Enhanced biglycan gene expression in the adipose tissues of obese women and its association with obesity-related genes and metabolic parameters

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jimin; Lee, Seul Ki; Shin, Ji-min; Jeoun, Un-woo; Jang, Yeon Jin; Park, Hye Soon; Kim, Jong-Hyeok; Gong, Gyung-Yub; Lee, Taik Jong; Hong, Joon Pio; Lee, Yeon Ji; Heo, Yoon-Suk

    2016-01-01

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling dynamically occurs to accommodate adipose tissue expansion during obesity. One non-fibrillar component of ECM, biglycan, is released from the matrix in response to tissue stress; the soluble form of biglycan binds to toll-like receptor 2/4 on macrophages, causing proinflammatory cytokine secretion. To investigate the pattern and regulatory properties of biglycan expression in human adipose tissues in the context of obesity and its related diseases, we recruited 21 non-diabetic obese women, 11 type 2 diabetic obese women, and 59 normal-weight women. Regardless of the presence of diabetes, obese patients had significantly higher biglycan mRNA in both visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue. Biglycan mRNA was noticeably higher in non-adipocytes than adipocytes and significantly decreased during adipogenesis. Adipose tissue biglycan mRNA positively correlated with adiposity indices and insulin resistance parameters; however, this relationship disappeared after adjusting for BMI. In both fat depots, biglycan mRNA strongly correlated with the expression of genes related to inflammation and endoplasmic reticulum stress. In addition, culture of human preadipocytes and differentiated adipocytes under conditions mimicking the local microenvironments of obese adipose tissues significantly increased biglycan mRNA expression. Our data indicate that biglycan gene expression is increased in obese adipose tissues by altered local conditions. PMID:27465988

  19. Prostaglandin E2 inhibits p53 in human breast adipose stromal cells: a novel mechanism for the regulation of aromatase in obesity and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuyi; Docanto, Maria M; Sasano, Hironobu; Lo, Camden; Simpson, Evan R; Brown, Kristy A

    2015-02-15

    Obesity is a risk factor for postmenopausal breast cancer and the majority of these cancers are estrogen dependent. Aromatase converts androgens into estrogens and its increased expression in breast adipose stromal cells (ASC) is a major driver of estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. In particular, obesity-associated and tumor-derived factors, such as prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), have been shown to drive the expression of aromatase by stimulating the activity of the proximal promoter II (PII). The tumor-suppressor p53 is a key regulator of cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis and is frequently mutated in breast cancer. Mutations in p53 are rare in tumor-associated ASCs. Therefore, it was hypothesized that p53 is regulated by PGE2 and involved in the PGE2-mediated regulation of aromatase. Results demonstrate that PGE2 causes a significant decrease in p53 transcript and nuclear protein expression, as well as phosphorylation at Ser15 in primary human breast ASCs. Stabilization of p53 with RITA leads to a significant decrease in the PGE2-stimulated aromatase mRNA expression and activity, and PII activity. Interaction of p53 with PII was demonstrated and this interaction is decreased in the presence of PGE2. Moreover, mutation of the identified p53 response element leads to an increase in the basal activity of the promoter. Immunofluorescence on clinical samples demonstrates that p53 is decreased in tumor-associated ASCs compared with ASCs from normal breast tissue, and that there is a positive association between perinuclear (inactive) p53 and aromatase expression in these cells. Furthermore, aromatase expression is increased in breast ASCs from Li-Fraumeni patients (germline TP53 mutations) compared with non-Li-Fraumeni breast tissue. Overall, our results demonstrate that p53 is a negative regulator of aromatase in the breast and its inhibition by PGE2 provides a novel mechanism for aromatase regulation in obesity and breast cancer. ©2015 American Association for Cancer

  20. ENPP2 contributes to adipose tissue expansion and insulin resistance in diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Nishimura, Satoshi; Nagasaki, Mika; Okudaira, Shinichi; Aoki, Junken; Ohmori, Tsukasa; Ohkawa, Ryunosuke; Nakamura, Kazuhiro; Igarashi, Koji; Yamashita, Hiroshi; Eto, Koji; Uno, Kansei; Hayashi, Naoto; Kadowaki, Takashi; Komuro, Issei; Yatomi, Yutaka; Nagai, Ryozo

    2014-12-01

    Body weight is tightly regulated by food intake and energy dissipation, and obesity is related to decreased energy expenditure (EE). Herein, we show that nucleotide pyrophosphatase/phosphodiesterase 2 (ENPP2, autotaxin) is an adipose-derived, secreted enzyme that controls adipose expansion, brown adipose tissue (BAT) function, and EE. In mice, Enpp2 was highly expressed in visceral white adipose tissue and BAT and is downregulated in hypertrophied adipocytes/adipose tissue. Enpp2(+/-) mice and adipocyte-specific Enpp2 knockout mice fed a high-fat diet showed smaller body weight gains and less insulin resistance than control mice fed the same diet. BAT was functionally more active and EE was increased in Enpp2-deficient mice. In humans, ENPP2 expression in subcutaneous fat and ENPP2 levels in serum were reduced in obese subjects. Taken together, our results establish ENPP2 as an adipose-derived, secreted enzyme that regulates adipose obesity and systemic metabolism. They also suggest ENPP2 could be a useful therapeutic target for the treatment of metabolic disease. © 2014 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  1. Visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue express and secrete functional alpha2hsglycoprotein (fetuin a) especially in obesity.

    PubMed

    Pérez-Sotelo, Diego; Roca-Rivada, Arturo; Larrosa-García, María; Castelao, Cecilia; Baamonde, Iván; Baltar, Javier; Crujeiras, Ana Belen; Seoane, Luisa María; Casanueva, Felipe F; Pardo, María

    2017-02-01

    The secretion of the hepatokine alpha-2-Heremans-Schmid glycoprotein/Fetuin A, implicated in pathological processes including systemic insulin resistance, by adipose tissue has been recently described. Thus, we have recently identified its presence in white adipose tissue secretomes by mass spectrometry. However, the secretion pattern and function of adipose-derived alpha-2-Heremans-Schmid glycoprotein are poorly understood. The aim of this study is to evaluate the expression and secretion of total and active phosphorylated alpha-2-Heremans-Schmid glycoprotein by adipose tissue from visceral and subcutaneous localizations in animals at different physiological and nutritional status including anorexia and obesity. Alpha-2-Heremans-Schmid glycoprotein expression and secretion in visceral adipose tissue and subcutaneous adipose tissue explants from animals under fasting and exercise training, at pathological situations such as anorexia and obesity, and from human obese individuals were assayed by immunoblotting, quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. We reveal that visceral adipose tissue expresses and secretes more alpha-2-Heremans-Schmid glycoprotein than subcutaneous adipose tissue, and that this secretion is diminished after fasting and exercise training. Visceral adipose tissue from anorectic animals showed reduced alpha-2-Heremans-Schmid glycoprotein secretion; on the contrary, alpha-2-Heremans-Schmid glycoprotein is over-secreted by visceral adipose tissue in the occurrence of obesity. While secretion of active-PhophoSer321α2HSG by visceral adipose tissue is independent of body mass index, we found that the fraction of active-alpha-2-Heremans-Schmid glycoprotein secreted by subcutaneous adipose tissue increments significantly in situations of obesity. Functional studies show that the inhibition of adipose-derived alpha-2-Heremans-Schmid glycoprotein increases insulin sensitivity in differentiated adipocytes. In

  2. Obesity and the human microbiome.

    PubMed

    Ley, Ruth E

    2010-01-01

    Obesity was once rare, but the last few decades have seen a rapid expansion of the proportion of obese individuals worldwide. Recent work has shown obesity to be associated with a shift in the representation of the dominant phyla of bacteria in the gut, both in humans and animal models. This review summarizes the latest research into the association between microbial ecology and host adiposity, and the mechanisms by which microbes in the gut may mediate host metabolism in the context of obesity. Studies of the effect of excess body fat on the abundances of different bacteria taxa in the gut generally show alterations in the gastrointestinal microbiota, and changes during weight loss. The gastrointestinal microbiota have been shown to impact insulin resistance, inflammation, and adiposity via interactions with epithelial and endocrine cells. Large-scale alterations of the gut microbiota and its microbiome (gene content) are associated with obesity and are responsive to weight loss. Gut microbes can impact host metabolism via signaling pathways in the gut, with effects on inflammation, insulin resistance, and deposition of energy in fat stores. Restoration of the gut microbiota to a healthy state may ameliorate the conditions associated with obesity and help maintain a healthy weight.

  3. Preventing diet-induced obesity in mice by adipose tissue transformation and angiogenesis using targeted nanoparticles

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Yuan; Xu, Xiaoyang; Zhang, Xue-Qing; Farokhzad, Omid C.; Langer, Robert

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of obesity, which is recognized by the American Medical Association as a disease, has nearly doubled since 1980, and obesity-related comorbidities have become a major threat to human health. Given that adipose tissue expansion and transformation require active growth of new blood vasculature, angiogenesis offers a potential target for the treatment of obesity-associated disorders. Here we construct two peptide-functionalized nanoparticle (NP) platforms to deliver either Peroxisome Proliferator-Activated Receptor gamma (PPARgamma) activator rosiglitazone (Rosi) or prostaglandin E2 analog (16,16-dimethyl PGE2) to adipose tissue vasculature. These NPs were engineered through self-assembly of a biodegradable triblock polymer composed of end-to-end linkages between poly(lactic-coglycolic acid)-b-poly(ethylene glycol) (PLGA-b-PEG) and an endothelial-targeted peptide. In this system, released Rosi promotes both transformation of white adipose tissue (WAT) into brown-like adipose tissue and angiogenesis, which facilitates the homing of targeted NPs to adipose angiogenic vessels, thereby amplifying their delivery. We show that i.v. administration of these NPs can target WAT vasculature, stimulate the angiogenesis that is required for the transformation of adipose tissue, and transform WAT into brown-like adipose tissue, by the up-regulation of angiogenesis and brown adipose tissue markers. In a diet-induced obese mouse model, these angiogenesis-targeted NPs have inhibited body weight gain and modulated several serological markers including cholesterol, triglyceride, and insulin, compared with the control group. These findings suggest that angiogenesis-targeting moieties with angiogenic stimulator-loaded NPs could be incorporated into effective therapeutic regimens for clinical treatment of obesity and other metabolic diseases. PMID:27140638

  4. Proteomics in the characterization of adipose dysfunction in obesity

    PubMed Central

    Brockman, David; Chen, Xiaoli

    2012-01-01

    Adipose tissue plays a central role in body weight homeostasis, inflammation, and insulin resistance via serving as a fat-buffering system, regulating lipid storage and mobilization and releasing a large range of adipokines and cytokines. Adipose tissue is also the major inflammation-initiated site in obesity. Adipose-derived adipokines and cytokines are known to be involved in the modulation of a wide range of important physiological processes, particularly immune response, glucose and lipid homeostasis and insulin resistance. Adipose tissue dysfunction, characterized by an imbalanced secretion of pro- and anti-inflammatory adipokines and cytokines, decreased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake, dysregulation of lipid storage and release and mitochondrial dysfunction, has been linked to obesity and its associated metabolic disorders. Proteomic technology has been a powerful tool for identifying key components of the adipose proteome, which may contribute to the pathogenesis of adipose tissue dysfunction in obesity. In this review, we summarized the recent advances in the proteomic characterization of adipose tissue and discussed the identified proteins that potentially play important roles in insulin resistance and lipid homeostasis. PMID:23700508

  5. Adipose Tissue Oxygenation in Obesity: A Matter of Cardiovascular Risk?

    PubMed

    Landini, Linda; Honka, Miikka-Juhani; Ferrannini, Ele; Nuutila, Pirjo

    2016-01-01

    Obesity, a chronic low-grade inflammation disorder characterized by an expansion in adipose tissue mass, is rapidly expanding worldwide leading to an increase in the incidence of comorbidities such as insulin resistance, type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. This has led to a renewed interest in the adipose tissue function, historically considered as a passive fat storage. It is now well established that adipose tissue is an organ with an active role in production and release of a variety of molecules called adipocytokines. Dysregulated production of adipocytokines seems to be responsible for the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes; however, the mechanisms are still unclear. Hypoxia, that occurs when adipocytes expand in obesity, has been proposed as a possible cause of adipose tissue inflammation. On the other hand, recent studies have shown that adipose tissue oxygen tension was actually higher (hyperoxia) than normal and associated with insulin resistance in obesity, despite a reduction in blood flow. This might be explained by the role of mitochondrial oxygen consumption. Hence, further studies are needed to understand the role of adipose tissue oxygenation and perfusion in obesity to assess pathophysiology and novel opportunities for treating the diseases.

  6. Hypoxia and adipose tissue function and dysfunction in obesity.

    PubMed

    Trayhurn, Paul

    2013-01-01

    The rise in the incidence of obesity has led to a major interest in the biology of white adipose tissue. The tissue is a major endocrine and signaling organ, with adipocytes, the characteristic cell type, secreting a multiplicity of protein factors, the adipokines. Increases in the secretion of a number of adipokines occur in obesity, underpinning inflammation in white adipose tissue and the development of obesity-associated diseases. There is substantial evidence, particularly from animal studies, that hypoxia develops in adipose tissue as the tissue mass expands, and the reduction in Po(2) is considered to underlie the inflammatory response. Exposure of white adipocytes to hypoxic conditions in culture induces changes in the expression of >1,000 genes. The secretion of a number of inflammation-related adipokines is upregulated by hypoxia, and there is a switch from oxidative metabolism to anaerobic glycolysis. Glucose utilization is increased in hypoxic adipocytes with corresponding increases in lactate production. Importantly, hypoxia induces insulin resistance in fat cells and leads to the development of adipose tissue fibrosis. Many of the responses of adipocytes to hypoxia are initiated at Po(2) levels above the normal physiological range for adipose tissue. The other cell types within the tissue also respond to hypoxia, with the differentiation of preadipocytes to adipocytes being inhibited and preadipocytes being transformed into leptin-secreting cells. Overall, hypoxia has pervasive effects on the function of adipocytes and appears to be a key factor in adipose tissue dysfunction in obesity.

  7. Investigations of the endocannabinoid system in adipose tissue: effects of obesity/ weight loss and treatment options.

    PubMed

    Bennetzen, Marianne Faurholt

    2011-04-01

    Obesity is a world wide epidemic; it is becoming more usual to be overweight or obese than to be normal weight. Obesity increases the risk of an extensive range of diseases such as cardiovascular disease, diabetes mellitus type 2, hypertension, depression and some types of cancer. Adipose tissue is more than a storage organ for surplus energy - it is also a setting for complex metabolic processes and adipose tissue releases substances that interact with other parts of the body to influence several systems including food intake and energy metabolism. The endocannabinoid system (ECS) is one of the signalling systems that control feeding behaviour. The ECS is implicated in many functions, such as pain, memory, addiction, inflammation, and feeding, and could be considered a stress recovery system. It also seems to integrate nutrient intake, metabolism and storage maintaining homeostatic balance. The ECS is a recently discovered system, and research indicates hyperactivity in obesity. The aim of this thesis is to elaborate on the relationships of this widespread system and its elements in adipose tissue in obesity. Study I is a 4 weeks rat intervention study to investigate whether weight independent effect of Rimonabant treatment exists. We found that food intake-tolerance development could be circumvented by cyclic administration of Rimonabant and implications of weight independent effects of treatment. Study II is a cross-sectional study to establish the expression of cannabinoid receptor 1 from various adipose tissue depots of lean and obese persons. In this study we conclude, that the subcutaneous adipose tissue express more CBR1 than the visceral depot in lean, but comparable levels in obese. Study III is a 10 weeks human intervention study to asses the effects on the ECS of 10% weight loss. We found reduction in the ECS in obesity that normalised with weight loss. Our results clearly show the presence of all the components of the ECS in human adipose tissue, and

  8. Epicardial Adiposity in Children with Obesity and Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Eren, Erdal; Koca, Bulent; Ture, Mehmet; Guzel, Bulent

    2014-01-01

    Objective: Obesity increases cardiac diseases by increasing tendency to atherosclerosis. Our aim was to define epicardial adipose tissue thickness, and its related factors in obese children. Methods: Total of 94 patients were divided into obesity with metabolic syndrome (MS) (n=30), obesity without MS (n=33), and control (n=31) groups. Auxological values with fasting glucose, fasting insulin, alanine transaminase, serum lipid levels, and high sensitive C-reactive protein levels were evaluated. Epicardial adipose tissue thickness, interventricular septum thickness and left ventricular mass were measured by echocardiography. Findings: Weight, body mass index, waist circumference, insulin, alanine transaminase, and high sensitive C-reactive protein values were markedly higher in obesity group when compared with controls (P<0.001). Epicardial adipose tissue thickness was 0.64±0.23 cm in obesity with MS; 0.60±0.20 cm in obesity without MS, and 0.27±0.12 cm in control group (P<0.001). Interventricular septum thickness and left ventricular mass values were markedly high in obesity without MS group (P<0.001 and P=0.002). Conclusion: Our study has indicated that obesity has unfavorable effects on heart starting in the adolescence. PMID:25755863

  9. Salt-inducible kinase 2 and -3 are downregulated in adipose tissue from obese or insulin-resistant individuals: implications for insulin signalling and glucose uptake in human adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Säll, Johanna; Pettersson, Annie M L; Björk, Christel; Henriksson, Emma; Wasserstrom, Sebastian; Linder, Wilhelm; Zhou, Yuedan; Hansson, Ola; Andersson, Daniel P; Ekelund, Mikael; Degerman, Eva; Stenkula, Karin G; Laurencikiene, Jurga; Göransson, Olga

    2017-02-01

    Salt-inducible kinases (SIKs) are related to the metabolic regulator AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). SIK2 is abundant in adipose tissue. The aims of this study were to investigate the expression of SIKs in relation to human obesity and insulin resistance, and to evaluate whether changes in the expression of SIKs might play a causal role in the development of disturbed glucose uptake in human adipocytes. SIK mRNA and protein was determined in human adipose tissue or adipocytes, and correlated to clinical variables. SIK2 and SIK3 expression and phosphorylation were analysed in adipocytes treated with TNF-α. Glucose uptake, GLUT protein levels and localisation, phosphorylation of protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) and the SIK substrate histone deacetylase 4 (HDAC4) were analysed after the SIKs had been silenced using small interfering RNA (siRNA) or inhibited using a pan-SIK-inhibitor (HG-9-91-01). We demonstrate that SIK2 and SIK3 mRNA are downregulated in adipose tissue from obese individuals and that the expression is regulated by weight change. SIK2 is also negatively associated with in vivo insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), independently of BMI and age. Moreover, SIK2 protein levels and specific kinase activity display a negative correlation to BMI in human adipocytes. Furthermore, SIK2 and SIK3 are downregulated by TNF-α in adipocytes. Silencing or inhibiting SIK1-3 in adipocytes results in reduced phosphorylation of HDAC4 and PKB/Akt, less GLUT4 at the plasma membrane, and lower basal and insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in adipocytes. This is the first study to describe the expression and function of SIKs in human adipocytes. Our data suggest that SIKs might be protective in the development of obesity-induced insulin resistance, with implications for future treatment strategies.

  10. Worsening of obesity and metabolic status yields similar molecular adaptations in human subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue: decreased metabolism and increased immune response.

    PubMed

    Klimcáková, Eva; Roussel, Balbine; Márquez-Quiñones, Adriana; Kovácová, Zuzana; Kováciková, Michaela; Combes, Marion; Siklová-Vítková, Michaela; Hejnová, Jindra; Srámková, Petra; Bouloumié, Anne; Viguerie, Nathalie; Stich, Vladimir; Langin, Dominique

    2011-01-01

    It is not known whether biological differences reported between sc adipose tissue (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) depots underlie the pathogenicity of visceral fat. We compared SAT and VAT gene expression according to obesity, visceral fat accumulation, insulin resistance, and presence of the metabolic syndrome. Subjects were assigned into four groups (lean, overweight, obese, and obese with metabolic syndrome). Subjects were recruited at a university hospital. Thirty-two women were included. Anthropometric measurements, euglycemic-hyperinsulinemic clamps, blood analyses, and computed tomography scans were performed, and paired samples of SAT and VAT were obtained for DNA microarray-based gene expression profiling. Considering the two fat depots together, 1125 genes were more and 1025 genes were less expressed in lean compared with metabolic syndrome subjects. Functional annotation clustering showed, from lean to metabolic syndrome subjects, progressive down-regulation of metabolic pathways including branched-chain amino acid, fatty acid, carbohydrate, and mitochondrial energy metabolism and up-regulation of immune response genes involved in toll-like receptor, TNF, nuclear factor-κB, and apoptosis pathways. Metabolism and immune response genes showed an opposite correlation with fat mass, fat distribution, or insulin resistance indices. These associations were similar in SAT and VAT, although about 1000 genes showed differential expression between SAT and VAT. The increase in adiposity and the worsening of metabolic status are associated with a coordinated down-regulation of metabolism-related and up-regulation of immune response-related gene expression. Molecular adaptations in SAT prove as discriminating as those in VAT.

  11. Signals from the Adipose Microenvironment and the Obesity-Cancer Link-A Systematic Review.

    PubMed

    Himbert, Caroline; Delphan, Mahmoud; Scherer, Dominique; Bowers, Laura W; Hursting, Stephen; Ulrich, Cornelia M

    2017-09-01

    Obesity and its associated metabolic dysregulation are established risk factors for many cancers. However, the biologic mechanisms underlying this relationship remain incompletely understood. Given the rising rates of both obesity and cancer worldwide, and the challenges for many people to lose excess adipose tissue, a systematic approach to identify potential molecular and metabolic targets is needed to develop effective mechanism-based strategies for the prevention and control of obesity-driven cancer. Epidemiologic, clinical, and preclinical data suggest that within the growth-promoting, proinflammatory microenvironment accompanying obesity, crosstalk between adipose tissue (comprised of adipocytes, macrophages and other cells) and cancer-prone cells may occur via obesity-associated hormones, cytokines, and other mediators that have been linked to increased cancer risk and/or progression. We report here a systematic review on the direct "crosstalk" between adipose tissue and carcinomas in humans. We identified 4,641 articles with n = 20 human clinical studies, which are summarized as: (i) breast (n = 7); (ii) colorectal (n = 4); (iii) esophageal (n = 2); (iv) esophageal/colorectal (n = 1); (v) endometrial (n = 1); (vi) prostate (n = 4); and (vii) ear-nose-throat (ENT) cancer (n = 1). Findings from these clinical studies reinforce preclinical data and suggest organ-dependent crosstalk between adipose tissue and carcinomas via VEGF, IL6, TNFα, and other mechanisms. Moreover, visceral white adipose tissue plays a more central role, as it is more bioenergetically active and is associated with a more procancer secretome than subcutaneous adipose tissue. Efforts to eavesdrop and ultimately interfere with this cancer-enhancing crosstalk may lead to new targets and strategies for decreasing the burden of obesity-related cancers. Cancer Prev Res; 10(9); 494-506. ©2017 AACR. ©2017 American Association for Cancer Research.

  12. CD40 promotes MHC class II expression on adipose tissue macrophages and regulates adipose tissue CD4+ T cells with obesity.

    PubMed

    Morris, David L; Oatmen, Kelsie E; Mergian, Taleen A; Cho, Kae Won; DelProposto, Jennifer L; Singer, Kanakadurga; Evans-Molina, Carmella; O'Rourke, Robert W; Lumeng, Carey N

    2016-06-01

    Obesity activates both innate and adaptive immune responses in adipose tissue, but the mechanisms critical for regulating these responses remain unknown. CD40/CD40L signaling provides bidirectional costimulatory signals between antigen-presenting cells and CD4(+) T cells, and CD40L expression is increased in obese humans. Therefore, we examined the contribution of CD40 to the progression of obesity-induced inflammation in mice. CD40 was highly expressed on adipose tissue macrophages in mice, and CD40/CD40L signaling promoted the expression of antigen-presenting cell markers in adipose tissue macrophages. When fed a high fat diet, Cd40-deficient mice had reduced accumulation of conventional CD4(+) T cells (Tconv: CD3(+)CD4(+)Foxp3(-)) in visceral fat compared with wild-type mice. By contrast, the number of regulatory CD4(+) T cells (Treg: CD3(+)CD4(+)Foxp3(+)) in lean and obese fat was similar between wild-type and knockout mice. Adipose tissue macrophage content and inflammatory gene expression in fat did not differ between obese wild-type and knockout mice; however, major histocompatibility complex class II and CD86 expression on adipose tissue macrophages was reduced in visceral fat from knockout mice. Similar results were observed in chimeric mice with hematopoietic Cd40-deficiency. Nonetheless, neither whole body nor hematopoietic disruption of CD40 ameliorated obesity-induced insulin resistance in mice. In human adipose tissue, CD40 expression was positively correlated with CD80 and CD86 expression in obese patients with type 2 diabetes. These findings indicate that CD40 signaling in adipose tissue macrophages regulates major histocompatibility complex class II and CD86 expression to control the expansion of CD4(+) T cells; however, this is largely dispensable for the development of obesity-induced inflammation and insulin resistance in mice. © Society for Leukocyte Biology.

  13. Relationships between Rodent White Adipose Fat Pads and Human White Adipose Fat Depots

    PubMed Central

    Chusyd, Daniella E.; Wang, Donghai; Huffman, Derek M.; Nagy, Tim R.

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this review was to compare and contrast the physiological and metabolic profiles of rodent white adipose fat pads with white adipose fat depots in humans. Human fat distribution and its metabolic consequences have received extensive attention, but much of what has been tested in translational research has relied heavily on rodents. Unfortunately, the validity of using rodent fat pads as a model of human adiposity has received less attention. There is a surprisingly lack of studies demonstrating an analogous relationship between rodent and human adiposity on obesity-related comorbidities. Therefore, we aimed to compare known similarities and disparities in terms of white adipose tissue (WAT) development and distribution, sexual dimorphism, weight loss, adipokine secretion, and aging. While the literature supports the notion that many similarities exist between rodents and humans, notable differences emerge related to fat deposition and function of WAT. Thus, further research is warranted to more carefully define the strengths and limitations of rodent WAT as a model for humans, with a particular emphasis on comparable fat depots, such as mesenteric fat. PMID:27148535

  14. Adipose Natural Killer Cells Regulate Adipose Tissue Macrophages to Promote Insulin Resistance in Obesity.

    PubMed

    Lee, Byung-Cheol; Kim, Myung-Sunny; Pae, Munkyong; Yamamoto, Yasuhiko; Eberlé, Delphine; Shimada, Takeshi; Kamei, Nozomu; Park, Hee-Sook; Sasorith, Souphatta; Woo, Ju Rang; You, Jia; Mosher, William; Brady, Hugh J M; Shoelson, Steven E; Lee, Jongsoon

    2016-04-12

    Obesity-induced inflammation mediated by immune cells in adipose tissue appears to participate in the pathogenesis of insulin resistance. We show that natural killer (NK) cells in adipose tissue play an important role. High-fat diet (HFD) increases NK cell numbers and the production of proinflammatory cytokines, notably TNFα, in epididymal, but not subcutaneous, fat depots. When NK cells were depleted either with neutralizing antibodies or genetic ablation in E4bp4(+/-) mice, obesity-induced insulin resistance improved in parallel with decreases in both adipose tissue macrophage (ATM) numbers, and ATM and adipose tissue inflammation. Conversely, expansion of NK cells following IL-15 administration or reconstitution of NK cells into E4bp4(-/-) mice increased both ATM numbers and adipose tissue inflammation and exacerbated HFD-induced insulin resistance. These results indicate that adipose NK cells control ATMs as an upstream regulator potentially by producing proinflammatory mediators, including TNFα, and thereby contribute to the development of obesity-induced insulin resistance. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  15. Differential Role of Adipose Tissues in Obesity and Related Metabolic and Vascular Complications

    PubMed Central

    Beneit, Nuria; Díaz-Castroverde, Sabela

    2016-01-01

    This review focuses on the contribution of white, brown, and perivascular adipose tissues to the pathophysiology of obesity and its associated metabolic and vascular complications. Weight gain in obesity generates excess of fat, usually visceral fat, and activates the inflammatory response in the adipocytes and then in other tissues such as liver. Therefore, low systemic inflammation responsible for insulin resistance contributes to atherosclerotic process. Furthermore, an inverse relationship between body mass index and brown adipose tissue activity has been described. For these reasons, in recent years, in order to combat obesity and its related complications, as a complement to conventional treatments, a new insight is focusing on the role of the thermogenic function of brown and perivascular adipose tissues as a promising therapy in humans. These lines of knowledge are focused on the design of new drugs, or other approaches, in order to increase the mass and/or activity of brown adipose tissue or the browning process of beige cells from white adipose tissue. These new treatments may contribute not only to reduce obesity but also to prevent highly prevalent complications such as type 2 diabetes and other vascular alterations, such as hypertension or atherosclerosis. PMID:27766104

  16. Adipose Genes Down-Regulated During Experimental Endotoxemia Are Also Suppressed in Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Hinkle, Christine C.; Haris, Lalarukh; Shah, Rhia; Mehta, Nehal N.; Putt, Mary E.; Reilly, Muredach P.

    2012-01-01

    Context: Adipose inflammation is a crucial link between obesity and its metabolic complications. Human experimental endotoxemia is a controlled model for the study of inflammatory cardiometabolic responses in vivo. Objective: We hypothesized that adipose genes down-regulated during endotoxemia would approximate changes observed with obesity-related inflammation and reveal novel candidates in cardiometabolic disease. Design, Subjects, and Intervention: Healthy volunteers (n = 14) underwent a 3 ng/kg endotoxin challenge; adipose biopsies were taken at 0, 4, 12, and 24 h for mRNA microarray. A priority list of highly down-regulated and biologically relevant genes was validated by RT-PCR in an independent sample of adipose from healthy subjects (n = 7) undergoing a subclinical 0.6 ng/kg endotoxemia protocol. Expression of validated genes was screened in adipose of lean and severely obese individuals (n = 11 per group), and cellular source was probed in cultured adipocytes and macrophages. Results: Endotoxemia (3 ng/kg) suppressed expression of 353 genes (to <67% of baseline; P < 1 × 10−5) of which 68 candidates were prioritized for validation. In low-dose (0.6 ng/kg) endotoxin validation, 22 (32%) of these 68 genes were confirmed. Functional classification revealed that many of these genes are involved in cell development and differentiation. Of validated genes, 59% (13 of 22) were down-regulated more than 1.5-fold in primary human adipocytes after treatment with endotoxin. In human macrophages, 59% (13 of 22) were up-regulated during differentiation to inflammatory M1 macrophages whereas 64% (14 of 22) were down-regulated during transition to homeostatic M2 macrophages. Finally, in obese vs. lean adipose, 91% (20 of 22) tended to have reduced expression (χ2 = 10.72, P < 0.01) with 50% (11 of 22) reaching P < 0.05 (χ2 = 9.28, P < 0.01). Conclusions: Exploration of down-regulated mRNA in adipose during human endotoxemia revealed suppression of genes involved in

  17. Obesity induces a phenotypic switch in adipose tissue macrophage polarization.

    PubMed

    Lumeng, Carey N; Bodzin, Jennifer L; Saltiel, Alan R

    2007-01-01

    Adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) infiltrate adipose tissue during obesity and contribute to insulin resistance. We hypothesized that macrophages migrating to adipose tissue upon high-fat feeding may differ from those that reside there under normal diet conditions. To this end, we found a novel F4/80(+)CD11c(+) population of ATMs in adipose tissue of obese mice that was not seen in lean mice. ATMs from lean mice expressed many genes characteristic of M2 or "alternatively activated" macrophages, including Ym1, arginase 1, and Il10. Diet-induced obesity decreased expression of these genes in ATMs while increasing expression of genes such as those encoding TNF-alpha and iNOS that are characteristic of M1 or "classically activated" macrophages. Interestingly, ATMs from obese C-C motif chemokine receptor 2-KO (Ccr2-KO) mice express M2 markers at levels similar to those from lean mice. The antiinflammatory cytokine IL-10, which was overexpressed in ATMs from lean mice, protected adipocytes from TNF-alpha-induced insulin resistance. Thus, diet-induced obesity leads to a shift in the activation state of ATMs from an M2-polarized state in lean animals that may protect adipocytes from inflammation to an M1 proinflammatory state that contributes to insulin resistance.

  18. Obesity induces a phenotypic switch in adipose tissue macrophage polarization

    PubMed Central

    Lumeng, Carey N.; Bodzin, Jennifer L.; Saltiel, Alan R.

    2007-01-01

    Adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) infiltrate adipose tissue during obesity and contribute to insulin resistance. We hypothesized that macrophages migrating to adipose tissue upon high-fat feeding may differ from those that reside there under normal diet conditions. To this end, we found a novel F4/80+CD11c+ population of ATMs in adipose tissue of obese mice that was not seen in lean mice. ATMs from lean mice expressed many genes characteristic of M2 or “alternatively activated” macrophages, including Ym1, arginase 1, and Il10. Diet-induced obesity decreased expression of these genes in ATMs while increasing expression of genes such as those encoding TNF-α and iNOS that are characteristic of M1 or “classically activated” macrophages. Interestingly, ATMs from obese C-C motif chemokine receptor 2–KO (Ccr2-KO) mice express M2 markers at levels similar to those from lean mice. The antiinflammatory cytokine IL-10, which was overexpressed in ATMs from lean mice, protected adipocytes from TNF-α–induced insulin resistance. Thus, diet-induced obesity leads to a shift in the activation state of ATMs from an M2-polarized state in lean animals that may protect adipocytes from inflammation to an M1 proinflammatory state that contributes to insulin resistance. PMID:17200717

  19. Human omental and subcutaneous adipose tissue exhibit specific lipidomic signatures.

    PubMed

    Jové, Mariona; Moreno-Navarrete, José María; Pamplona, Reinald; Ricart, Wifredo; Portero-Otín, Manuel; Fernández-Real, José Manuel

    2014-03-01

    Despite their differential effects on human metabolic pathophysiology, the differences in omental and subcutaneous lipidomes are largely unknown. To explore this field, liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry was used for lipidome analyses of adipose tissue samples (visceral and subcutaneous) selected from a group of obese subjects (n=38). Transcriptomics and in vitro studies in adipocytes were used to confirm the pathways affected by location. The analyses revealed the existence of obesity-related specific lipidome signatures in each of these locations, attributed to selective enrichment of specific triglycerides, glycerophospholipids, and sphingolipids, because these were not observed in adipose tissues from nonobese individuals. The changes were compatible with subcutaneous enrichment in pathways involved in adipogenesis, triacylglyceride synthesis, and lipid droplet formation, as well as increased α-oxidation. Marked differences between omental and subcutaneous depots in obese individuals were seen in the association of lipid species with metabolic traits (body mass index and insulin sensitivity). Targeted studies also revealed increased cholesterol (Δ56%) and cholesterol epoxide (Δ34%) concentrations in omental adipose tissue. In view of the effects of cholesterol epoxide, which induced enhanced expression of adipocyte differentiation and α-oxidation genes in human omental adipocytes, a novel role for cholesterol epoxide as a signaling molecule for differentiation is proposed. In summary, in obesity, adipose tissue exhibits a location-specific differential lipid profile that may contribute to explaining part of its distinct pathogenic role.

  20. The Roles of Adipokines, Proinflammatory Cytokines, and Adipose Tissue Macrophages in Obesity-Associated Insulin Resistance in Modest Obesity and Early Metabolic Dysfunction

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Ji Min; Joung, Kyong Hye; Lee, Ju Hee; You, Bo Ram; Choi, Min Jeong; Ryu, Min Jeong; Ko, Young Bok; Lee, Min A.; Lee, Junguee; Ku, Bon Jeong; Shong, Minho; Lee, Ki Hwan; Kim, Hyun Jin

    2016-01-01

    The roles of adipokines, proinflammatory cytokines, and adipose tissue macrophages in obesity-associated insulin resistance have been explored in both animal and human studies. However, our current understanding of obesity-associated insulin resistance relies on studies of artificial metabolic extremes. The purpose of this study was to explore the roles of adipokines, proinflammatory cytokines, and adipose tissue macrophages in human patients with modest obesity and early metabolic dysfunction. We obtained omental adipose tissue and fasting blood samples from 51 females undergoing gynecologic surgery. We investigated serum concentrations of proinflammatory cytokines and adipokines as well as the mRNA expression of proinflammatory and macrophage phenotype markers in visceral adipose tissue using ELISA and quantitative RT-PCR. We measured adipose tissue inflammation and macrophage infiltration using immunohistochemical analysis. Serum levels of adiponectin and leptin were significantly correlated with HOMA-IR and body mass index. The levels of expression of MCP-1 and TNF-α in visceral adipose tissue were also higher in the obese group (body mass index ≥ 25). The expression of mRNA MCP-1 in visceral adipose tissue was positively correlated with body mass index (r = 0.428, p = 0.037) but not with HOMA-IR, whereas TNF-α in visceral adipose tissue was correlated with HOMA-IR (r = 0.462, p = 0.035) but not with body mass index. There was no obvious change in macrophage phenotype or macrophage infiltration in patients with modest obesity or early metabolic dysfunction. Expression of mRNA CD163/CD68 was significantly related to mitochondrial-associated genes and serum inflammatory cytokine levels of resistin and leptin. These results suggest that changes in the production of inflammatory biomolecules precede increased immune cell infiltration and induction of a macrophage phenotype switch in visceral adipose tissue. Furthermore, serum resistin and leptin have specific

  1. Quantitative CT imaging for adipose tissue analysis in mouse model of obesity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Marchadier, A.; Vidal, C.; Tafani, J.-P.; Ordureau, S.; Lédée, R.; Léger, C.

    2011-03-01

    In obese humans CT imaging is a validated method for follow up studies of adipose tissue distribution and quantification of visceral and subcutaneous fat. Equivalent methods in murine models of obesity are still lacking. Current small animal micro-CT involves long-term X-ray exposure precluding longitudinal studies. We have overcome this limitation by using a human medical CT which allows very fast 3D imaging (2 sec) and minimal radiation exposure. This work presents novel methods fitted to in vivo investigations of mice model of obesity, allowing (i) automated detection of adipose tissue in abdominal regions of interest, (ii) quantification of visceral and subcutaneous fat. For each mouse, 1000 slices (100μm thickness, 160 μm resolution) were acquired in 2 sec using a Toshiba medical CT (135 kV, 400mAs). A Gaussian mixture model of the Hounsfield curve of 2D slices was computed with the Expectation Maximization algorithm. Identification of each Gaussian part allowed the automatic classification of adipose tissue voxels. The abdominal region of interest (umbilical) was automatically detected as the slice showing the highest ratio of the Gaussian proportion between adipose and lean tissues. Segmentation of visceral and subcutaneous fat compartments was achieved with 2D 1/2 level set methods. Our results show that the application of human clinical CT to mice is a promising approach for the study of obesity, allowing valuable comparison between species using the same imaging materials and software analysis.

  2. Identification of Adipose Tissue Dendritic Cells Correlated With Obesity-Associated Insulin-Resistance and Inducing Th17 Responses in Mice and Patients

    PubMed Central

    Bertola, Adeline; Ciucci, Thomas; Rousseau, Déborah; Bourlier, Virginie; Duffaut, Carine; Bonnafous, Stéphanie; Blin-Wakkach, Claudine; Anty, Rodolphe; Iannelli, Antonio; Gugenheim, Jean; Tran, Albert; Bouloumié, Anne; Gual, Philippe; Wakkach, Abdelilah

    2012-01-01

    T-cell regulation in adipose tissue provides a link between inflammation and insulin resistance. Because of alterations in adipose tissue T-cell composition in obesity, we aimed to identify the antigen-presenting cells in adipose tissue of obese mice and patients with insulin resistance. Dendritic cells (DCs) and T cells were studied in mice and in two cohorts of obese patients. In lean mice, only CD11c+ DCs were detected in adipose tissue. Adoptive transfer of naive CD4+ T cells in Rag1−/− mice led to a predominant Th1 response in adipose tissue. In contrast, during obesity DCs (human CD11c+CD1c+ and mouse CD11chighF4/80low) accumulated in adipose tissue. CD11chighF4/80low DCs from obese mice induced Th17 differentiation. In patients, the presence of CD11c+CD1c+ DCs correlated with the BMI and with an elevation in Th17 cells. In addition, these DCs led to ex vivo Th17 differentiation. CD1c gene expression further correlated with homeostatic model assessment-insulin resistance in the subcutaneous adipose tissue of obese patients. We show for the first time the presence and accumulation of specific DCs in adipose tissue in mouse and human obesity. These DCs were functional and could be important regulators of adipose tissue inflammation by regulating the switch toward Th17 cell responses in obesity-associated insulin resistance. PMID:22596049

  3. The physiological and pathophysiological roles of taurine in adipose tissue in relation to obesity.

    PubMed

    Murakami, Shigeru

    2017-10-01

    Obesity is caused by an imbalance between energy intake and energy expenditure. It is established that obesity is a state of low-grade chronic inflammation, which is characterized by enlarged hypertrophied adipocytes, increased infiltration by macrophages and marked changes in the secretion of adipokines and free fatty acids. The effects of taurine on the pathogenesis of obesity have been reported in animals and humans. Although the mechanisms underlying the anti-obesity action of taurine remain to be defined, taurine seems to ameliorate obesity through stimulation of energy expenditure, modulation of lipid metabolism, anorexic effect, anti-inflammatory and anti-oxidative effects. Recent studies revealed that taurine supplementation reduces the infiltration of macrophages and modulates the polarization of adipose tissue macrophages in high-fat diet-induced obese mice. In addition, taurine downregulates the production of pro-inflammatory cytokines by adipocytes, suggesting that taurine plays an anti-inflammatory role in adipose tissue. This article reviews the effects and mechanisms of taurine on the development of obesity, focusing on the role of taurine in white adipose tissue. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Adipose-derived stem cells from lean and obese humans show depot specific differences in their stem cell markers, exosome contents and senescence: role of protein kinase C delta (PKCδ) in adipose stem cell niche

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Rekha S.; Carter, Gay; El Bassit, Ghattas; Patel, Achintya A.; Cooper, Denise R.; Murr, Michel

    2016-01-01

    Background Adipose-derived stem cells (ASC) and its exosomes are gaining utmost importance in the field of regenerative medicine. The ASCs tested for their potential in wound healing are predominantly derived from the subcutaneous depot of lean donors. However, it is important to characterize the ASC derived from different adipose depots as these depots have clinically distinct roles. Methods We characterized the ASC derived from subcutaneous and omental depots from a lean donor (sc-ASCn and om-ASCn) and compared it to the ASC derived from an obese donor (sc-ASCo and om-ASCo) using flow cytometry and real time qPCR. Results We show that stem cell markers Oct4, Sal4, Sox15, KLF4 and BMI1 have distinct expression patterns in each ASC. We evaluated the secretome of the ASC and characterized their secreted exosomes. We show long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) are secreted by ASC and their expression varied between the ASC’s derived from different depots. Protein kinase C delta (PKCδ) regulates the mitogenic signals in stem cells. We evaluated the effect of silencing PKCδ in sc-ASCn, om-ASCn, sc-ASCo and om-ASCo. Using β-galactosidase staining, we evaluated the percentage of senescent cells in sc-ASCn, om-ASCn, sc-ASCo and om-ASCo. Our results also indicated that silencing PKCδ increases the percentage of senescent cells. Conclusions Our case-specific study demonstrates a role of PKCδ in maintaining the adipose stem cell niche and importantly demonstrates depot-specific differences in adipose stem cells and their exosome content. PMID:27358894

  5. Carotenoids and their conversion products in the control of adipocyte function, adiposity and obesity.

    PubMed

    Bonet, M Luisa; Canas, Jose A; Ribot, Joan; Palou, Andreu

    2015-04-15

    A novel perspective of the function of carotenoids and carotenoid-derived products - including, but not restricted to, the retinoids - is emerging in recent years which connects these compounds to the control of adipocyte biology and body fat accumulation, with implications for the management of obesity, diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Cell and animal studies indicate that carotenoids and carotenoids derivatives can reduce adiposity and impact key aspects of adipose tissue biology including adipocyte differentiation, hypertrophy, capacity for fatty acid oxidation and thermogenesis (including browning of white adipose tissue) and secretory function. Epidemiological studies in humans associate higher dietary intakes and serum levels of carotenoids with decreased adiposity. Specifically designed human intervention studies, though still sparse, indicate a beneficial effect of carotenoid supplementation in the accrual of abdominal adiposity. The objective of this review is to summarize recent findings in this area, place them in physiological contexts, and provide likely regulatory schemes whenever possible. The focus will be on the effects of carotenoids as nutritional regulators of adipose tissue biology and both animal and human studies, which support a role of carotenoids and retinoids in the prevention of abdominal adiposity. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Adipose tissue macrophages: phenotypic plasticity and diversity in lean and obese states

    PubMed Central

    Morris, David L.; Singer, Kanakadurga; Lumeng, Carey N.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose of review Proinflammatory adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) contribute to obesity-associated disease morbidity. We will provide an update of the current state of knowledge regarding the phenotypic and functional diversity of ATMs in lean and obese mice and humans. Recent findings The phenotypic diversity of ATMs is now known to include more than two types requiring an expansion of the simple concept of an M2 to M1 shift with obesity. Potential functions for ATMs now include the regulation of fibrosis and response to acute lipolysis in states of caloric restriction. Novel pathways that can potentiate ATM action have been identified, which include inflammasome activation and the response to lipodystrophic adipose tissue. Studies provide a new appreciation for the ability of ATMs to respond dynamically to the adipose tissue microenvironment. Summary ATMs play a key role in shaping the inflammatory milieu within adipose tissue, and it is now apparent that ATM heterogeneity is acutely shaped by the adipose tissue environment. To account for the new findings, we propose a new nomenclature for ATM subtypes that takes into account their diversity. PMID:21587064

  7. Oncostatin m is produced in adipose tissue and is regulated in conditions of obesity and type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Sanchez-Infantes, David; White, Ursula A; Elks, Carrie M; Morrison, Ron F; Gimble, Jeffrey M; Considine, Robert V; Ferrante, Anthony W; Ravussin, Eric; Stephens, Jacqueline M

    2014-02-01

    Adipose tissue is a highly active endocrine organ that secretes many factors that affect other tissues and whole-body metabolism. Adipocytes are responsive to several glycoprotein 130 (gp130) cytokines, some of which have been targeted as potential antiobesity therapeutics. Oncostatin M (OSM) is a gp130 family member known to inhibit adipocyte differentiation in vitro, but its effects on other adipocyte properties are not characterized. The expression of OSM in white adipose tissue (WAT) has not been evaluated in the context of obesity. Thus, our objective was to examine the expression of adipose tissue OSM in obese animals and humans. OSM expression was examined in adipose tissues from mice with diet-induced and genetic obesity and in obese humans as well as in fractionated adipose tissue from mice. Murine adipocytes were used to examine OSM receptor expression and the effects of OSM on adipocytes, including the secretion of factors such as plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 and IL-6, which are implicated in metabolic diseases. OSM expression is increased in rodent and human obesity/type 2 diabetes mellitus. In humans, OSM levels correlate with body weight and insulin and are inversely correlated with glucose disposal rate as measured by hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp. OSM is not produced from the adipocytes in WAT but derives from cells in the stromovascular fraction, including F4/80(+) macrophages. The specific receptor of OSM, OSM receptor-β, is expressed in adipocytes and adipose tissue and increased in both rodent models of obesity examined. OSM acts on adipocytes to induce the expression and secretion of plasminogen activator inhibitor 1 and IL-6. These data indicate that WAT macrophages are a source of OSM and that OSM levels are significantly induced in murine and human obesity/type 2 diabetes mellitus. These studies suggest that OSM produced from immune cells in WAT acts in a paracrine manner on adipocytes to promote a proinflammatory phenotype in

  8. Transcriptomic Identification of ADH1B as a Novel Candidate Gene for Obesity and Insulin Resistance in Human Adipose Tissue in Mexican Americans from the Veterans Administration Genetic Epidemiology Study (VAGES)

    PubMed Central

    Winnier, Deidre A.; Fourcaudot, Marcel; Norton, Luke; Abdul-Ghani, Muhammad A.; Hu, Shirley L.; Farook, Vidya S.; Coletta, Dawn K.; Kumar, Satish; Puppala, Sobha; Chittoor, Geetha; Dyer, Thomas D.; Arya, Rector; Carless, Melanie; Lehman, Donna M.; Curran, Joanne E.; Cromack, Douglas T.; Tripathy, Devjit; Blangero, John; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Göring, Harald H. H.; DeFronzo, Ralph A.; Jenkinson, Christopher P.

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a complex metabolic disease that is more prevalent in ethnic groups such as Mexican Americans, and is strongly associated with the risk factors obesity and insulin resistance. The goal of this study was to perform whole genome gene expression profiling in adipose tissue to detect common patterns of gene regulation associated with obesity and insulin resistance. We used phenotypic and genotypic data from 308 Mexican American participants from the Veterans Administration Genetic Epidemiology Study (VAGES). Basal fasting RNA was extracted from adipose tissue biopsies from a subset of 75 unrelated individuals, and gene expression data generated on the Illumina BeadArray platform. The number of gene probes with significant expression above baseline was approximately 31,000. We performed multiple regression analysis of all probes with 15 metabolic traits. Adipose tissue had 3,012 genes significantly associated with the traits of interest (false discovery rate, FDR ≤ 0.05). The significance of gene expression changes was used to select 52 genes with significant (FDR ≤ 10-4) gene expression changes across multiple traits. Gene sets/Pathways analysis identified one gene, alcohol dehydrogenase 1B (ADH1B) that was significantly enriched (P < 10-60) as a prime candidate for involvement in multiple relevant metabolic pathways. Illumina BeadChip derived ADH1B expression data was consistent with quantitative real time PCR data. We observed significant inverse correlations with waist circumference (2.8 x 10-9), BMI (5.4 x 10-6), and fasting plasma insulin (P < 0.001). These findings are consistent with a central role for ADH1B in obesity and insulin resistance and provide evidence for a novel genetic regulatory mechanism for human metabolic diseases related to these traits. PMID:25830378

  9. Transcriptomic identification of ADH1B as a novel candidate gene for obesity and insulin resistance in human adipose tissue in Mexican Americans from the Veterans Administration Genetic Epidemiology Study (VAGES).

    PubMed

    Winnier, Deidre A; Fourcaudot, Marcel; Norton, Luke; Abdul-Ghani, Muhammad A; Hu, Shirley L; Farook, Vidya S; Coletta, Dawn K; Kumar, Satish; Puppala, Sobha; Chittoor, Geetha; Dyer, Thomas D; Arya, Rector; Carless, Melanie; Lehman, Donna M; Curran, Joanne E; Cromack, Douglas T; Tripathy, Devjit; Blangero, John; Duggirala, Ravindranath; Göring, Harald H H; DeFronzo, Ralph A; Jenkinson, Christopher P

    2015-01-01

    Type 2 diabetes (T2D) is a complex metabolic disease that is more prevalent in ethnic groups such as Mexican Americans, and is strongly associated with the risk factors obesity and insulin resistance. The goal of this study was to perform whole genome gene expression profiling in adipose tissue to detect common patterns of gene regulation associated with obesity and insulin resistance. We used phenotypic and genotypic data from 308 Mexican American participants from the Veterans Administration Genetic Epidemiology Study (VAGES). Basal fasting RNA was extracted from adipose tissue biopsies from a subset of 75 unrelated individuals, and gene expression data generated on the Illumina BeadArray platform. The number of gene probes with significant expression above baseline was approximately 31,000. We performed multiple regression analysis of all probes with 15 metabolic traits. Adipose tissue had 3,012 genes significantly associated with the traits of interest (false discovery rate, FDR ≤ 0.05). The significance of gene expression changes was used to select 52 genes with significant (FDR ≤ 10(-4)) gene expression changes across multiple traits. Gene sets/Pathways analysis identified one gene, alcohol dehydrogenase 1B (ADH1B) that was significantly enriched (P < 10(-60)) as a prime candidate for involvement in multiple relevant metabolic pathways. Illumina BeadChip derived ADH1B expression data was consistent with quantitative real time PCR data. We observed significant inverse correlations with waist circumference (2.8 x 10(-9)), BMI (5.4 x 10(-6)), and fasting plasma insulin (P < 0.001). These findings are consistent with a central role for ADH1B in obesity and insulin resistance and provide evidence for a novel genetic regulatory mechanism for human metabolic diseases related to these traits.

  10. Gooey Stuff, Intra-Activity, and Differential Obesities: Foregrounding Agential Adiposity within Childhood Obesity Stories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Land, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    In Canada, forces such as the media, medical discourse, and public policy work to position childhood obesity as increased body fat content or excess adiposity due to various personal, social, and economic factors. Drawing on Barad's "agential realist ontology", this article aims to inhabit-with obesity in an effort to disrupt dominant…

  11. Gooey Stuff, Intra-Activity, and Differential Obesities: Foregrounding Agential Adiposity within Childhood Obesity Stories

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Land, Nicole

    2015-01-01

    In Canada, forces such as the media, medical discourse, and public policy work to position childhood obesity as increased body fat content or excess adiposity due to various personal, social, and economic factors. Drawing on Barad's "agential realist ontology", this article aims to inhabit-with obesity in an effort to disrupt dominant…

  12. [Thyroid hormones, obesity and brown adipose tissue thermogenesis].

    PubMed

    Zaninovich, A A

    2001-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is the main site for hormone-dependent (non-shivering) thermogenesis in response to cold in lower mammals. The hypothalamus controls the cold-induced BAT activation by stimulating the sympathetic nerves and the secretion of norepinephrine (NE) in BAT. Mediated by beta-3 noradrenergic receptor and in the presence of triiodothyronine (T3), NE promotes the synthesis of the uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1). UCP1 is a 32 kDa protein located in the inner membrane of BAT mitochondria, where it dissipates the proton gradient created by oxidations in the mitochondria. UCP1 functions as a proton translocator, substituting for another translocator, the ATP synthetase. The uncoupling of oxidations and phosphorylations and the inhibition of ATP synthesis lead to dissipation as heat of all energy produced in the respiratory chain. The supply of adequate amounts of T3 is ensured by the cold-induced enhancement of the enzyme 5'-deiodinase type II activity, which deiodinates thyroxine (T4) to T3. The absence of T3 blocks UCP1 synthesis, leading to hypothermia. BAT has a limited significance in humans, except in the newborn, where it serves for a rapid acclimation to ambient temperature. The study of BAT physiology will provide more insight into the mechanisms regulating energy balance and body weight in humans, thus contributing to prevent and treat human obesity.

  13. Increased carotid intima-media thickness and reduced distensibility in human class III obesity: independent and differential influences of adiposity and blood pressure on the vasculature.

    PubMed

    Moore, Xiao L; Michell, Danielle; Lee, Sabrina; Skilton, Michael R; Nair, Rajesh; Dixon, John B; Dart, Anthony M; Chin-Dusting, Jaye

    2013-01-01

    Carotid intima-media-thickness (cIMT) and carotid distensibility (distensibility), structural and functional properties of carotid arteries respectively, are early markers, as well as strong predictors of cardiovascular disease (CVD). The characteristic of these two parameters in individuals with BMI>40.0 kg/m(2) (Class III obesity), however, are largely unknown. The present study was designed to document cIMT and distensibility in this population and to relate these to other factors with established association with CVD in obesity. The study included 96 subjects (65 with BMI>40.0 kg/m(2) and 31, age- and gender-matched, with BMI of 18.5 to 30.0 kg/m(2)). cIMT and distensibility were measured by non-invasive high resolution ultrasonography, circulatory CD133(+)/KDR(+) angiogenic cells and endothelial microparticles (EMP) by flow cytometry, and plasma levels of adipokines, growth factors and cytokines by Luminex immunoassay kits. The study results demonstrated increased cIMT (0.62±0.11 mm vs. 0.54±0.08 mm, P = 0.0002) and reduced distensibility (22.52±10.79 10(-3)kpa(-1)vs. 29.91±12.37 10(-3)kpa(-1), P<0.05) in individuals with BMI>40.0 kg/m(2). Both cIMT and distensibility were significantly associated with traditional CVD risk factors, adiposity/adipokines and inflammatory markers but had no association with circulating angiogenic cells. We also demonstrated, for the first time, elevated plasma EMP levels in individuals with BMI>40.0 kg/m(2). In conclusion, cIMT is increased and distensibility reduced in Class III obesity with the changes predominantly related to conventional CVD risk factors present in this condition, demonstrating that both cIMT and distensibility remain as CVD markers in Class III obesity.

  14. Combined effects of insulin treatment and adipose tissue-specific agouti expression on the development of obesity.

    PubMed

    Mynatt, R L; Miltenberger, R J; Klebig, M L; Zemel, M B; Wilkinson, J E; Wilkinson, W O; Woychik, R P

    1997-02-04

    The agouti gene product is a secreted protein that acts in a paracrine manner to regulate coat color in mammals. Several dominant mutations at the agouti locus in mice cause the ectopic, ubiquitous expression of agouti, resulting in a condition similar to adult-onset obesity and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus. The human agouti protein is 85% homologous to mouse agouti; however, unlike the mouse agouti gene, human agouti is normally expressed in adipose tissue. To address whether expression of agouti in human adipose tissue is physiologically relevant, transgenic mice were generated that express agouti in adipose tissue. Similar to most humans, these mice do not become obese or diabetic. However, we found that daily insulin injections significantly increased weight gain in the transgenic lines expressing agouti in adipose tissue, but not in nontransgenic mice. These results suggest that insulin triggers the onset of obesity and that agouti expression in adipose tissue potentiates this effect. Accordingly, the investigation of agouti's role in obesity and non-insulin-dependent diabetes mellitus in mice holds significant promise for understanding the pathophysiology of human obesity.

  15. GM3 ganglioside and phosphatidylethanolamine-containing lipids are adipose tissue markers of insulin resistance in obese women.

    PubMed

    Wentworth, J M; Naselli, G; Ngui, K; Smyth, G K; Liu, R; O'Brien, P E; Bruce, C; Weir, J; Cinel, M; Meikle, P J; Harrison, L C

    2016-04-01

    The association between central obesity and insulin resistance reflects the properties of visceral adipose tissue. Our aim was to gain further insight into this association by analysing the lipid composition of subcutaneous and omental adipose tissue in obese women with and without insulin resistance. Subcutaneous and omental adipose tissue and serum were obtained from 29 obese non-diabetic women, 13 of whom were hyperinsulinemic. Histology, lipid and gene profiling were performed. In omental adipose tissue of obese, insulin-resistant women, adipocyte hypertrophy and macrophage infiltration were accompanied by an increase in GM3 ganglioside and its synthesis enzyme ST3GAL5; in addition, phosphatidylethanolamine (PE) lipids were increased and their degradation enzyme, phosphatidylethanolamine methyl transferase (PEMT), decreased. ST3GAL5 was expressed predominantly in adipose stromovascular cells and PEMT in adipocytes. Insulin resistance was also associated with an increase in PE lipids in serum. The relevance of these findings to insulin resistance in humans is supported by published mouse studies, in which adipocyte GM3 ganglioside, increased by the inflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor-α, impaired insulin action and PEMT was required for adipocyte lipid storage. Thus in visceral adipose tissue of obese humans, an increase in GM3 ganglioside secondary to inflammation may contribute to insulin resistance and a decrease in PEMT may be a compensatory response to adipocyte hypertrophy.

  16. Calcium Sensing Receptor (CaSR) activation elevates proinflammatory factor expression in human adipose cells and adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Cifuentes, Mariana; Fuentes, Cecilia; Acevedo, Ingrid; Villalobos, Elisa; Hugo, Eric; Ben Jonathan, Nira; Reyes, Marcela

    2013-01-01

    We have previously established that human adipose cells and the human adipose cell line LS14 express the calcium sensing receptor (CaSR) and that its expression is elevated upon exposure to inflammatory cytokines that are typically elevated in obese humans. Research in recent years has established that an important part of the adverse metabolic and cardiovascular consequences of obesity derive from a dysfunction of the tissue, one of the mechanisms being a disordered secretion pattern leading to an excess of proinflammatory cytokines and chemokines. Given the reported association of the CaSR to inflammatory processes in other tissues, we sought to evaluate its role elevating the adipose expression of inflammatory factors. We exposed adipose tissue and in-vitro cultured LS14 preadipocytes and differentiated adipocytes to the calcimimetic cinacalcet and evaluated the expression or production of the proinflammatory cytokines IL6, IL1β and TNFα as well as the chemoattractant factor CCL2. CaSR activation elicited an elevation in the expression of the inflammatory factors, which was in part reverted by SN50, an inhibitor of the inflammatory mediator NFκB. Our observations suggest that CaSR activation elevates cytokine and chemokine production through a signaling pathway involving activation of NFκB nuclear translocation. These findings confirm the relevance of the CaSR in the pathophysiology of obesity-induced adipose tissue dysfunction, with an interesting potential for pharmacological manipulation in the fight against obesity- associated diseases. PMID:22449852

  17. The "Big Bang" in obese fat: Events initiating obesity-induced adipose tissue inflammation.

    PubMed

    Wensveen, Felix M; Valentić, Sonja; Šestan, Marko; Turk Wensveen, Tamara; Polić, Bojan

    2015-09-01

    Obesity is associated with the accumulation of pro-inflammatory cells in visceral adipose tissue (VAT), which is an important underlying cause of insulin resistance and progression to diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM2). Although the role of pro-inflammatory cytokines in disease development is established, the initiating events leading to immune cell activation remain elusive. Lean adipose tissue is predominantly populated with regulatory cells, such as eosinophils and type 2 innate lymphocytes. These cells maintain tissue homeostasis through the excretion of type 2 cytokines, such as IL-4, IL-5, and IL-13, which keep adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) in an anti-inflammatory, M2-like state. Diet-induced obesity is associated with the loss of tissue homeostasis and development of type 1 inflammatory responses in VAT, characterized by IFN-γ. A key event is a shift of ATMs toward an M1 phenotype. Recent studies show that obesity-induced adipocyte hypertrophy results in upregulated surface expression of stress markers. Adipose stress is detected by local sentinels, such as NK cells and CD8(+) T cells, which produce IFN-γ, driving M1 ATM polarization. A rapid accumulation of pro-inflammatory cells in VAT follows, leading to inflammation. In this review, we provide an overview of events leading to adipose tissue inflammation, with a special focus on adipose homeostasis and the obesity-induced loss of homeostasis which marks the initiation of VAT inflammation. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  18. The Pathogenesis of Obesity-Associated Adipose Tissue Inflammation.

    PubMed

    Engin, Atilla

    2017-01-01

    Obesity is characterized by a state of chronic, low-grade inflammation. However, excessive fatty acid release may worsen adipose tissue inflammation and contributes to insulin resistance. In this case, several novel and highly active molecules are released abundantly by adipocytes like leptin, resistin, adiponectin or visfatin, as well as some more classical cytokines. Most likely cytokines that are released by inflammatory cells infiltrating obese adipose tissue are such as tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-alpha), interleukin 6 (IL-6), monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1) (CCL-2) and IL-1. All of those molecules may act on immune cells leading to local and generalized inflammation. In this process, toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4)/phosphatidylinositol-3'-kinase (PI3K)/Protein kinase B (Akt) signaling pathway, the unfolded protein response (UPR) due to endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress through hyperactivation of c-Jun N-terminal Kinase (JNK) -Activator Protein 1 (AP1) and inhibitor of nuclear factor kappa-B kinase beta (IKKbeta)-nuclear factor kappa B (NF-kappaB) pathways play an important role, and may also affect vascular endothelial function by modulating vascular nitric oxide and superoxide release. Additionally, systemic oxidative stress, macrophage recruitment, increase in the expression of NOD-like receptor (NLR) family protein (NLRP3) inflammasone and adipocyte death are predominant determinants in the pathogenesis of obesity-associated adipose tissue inflammation. In this chapter potential involvement of these factors that contribute to the adverse effects of obesity are reviewed.

  19. Monogenic human obesity.

    PubMed

    Farooqi, I Sadaf

    2008-01-01

    We and others have identified several single gene defects that disrupt the molecules in the leptinmelanocortin pathway causing severe obesity in humans. In this review, we consider these human monogenic obesity syndromes and discuss how far the characterisation of these patients has informed our understanding of the physiological role of leptin and the melanocortins in the regulation of human body weight and neuroendocrine function.

  20. Obesity and respiratory infections: does excess adiposity weigh down host defense?

    PubMed

    Mancuso, Peter

    2013-08-01

    The number of overweight and obese individuals has dramatically increased in the US and other developed nations during the past 30 years. While type II diabetes and cardiovascular disease are well recognized co-morbid conditions associated with obesity, recent reports have demonstrated a greater severity of illness in obese patients due to influenza during the 2009 H1N1 pandemic. Consistent with these reports, diet-induced obesity has been shown to impair anti-viral host defense in murine models of influenza infection. However, the impact of obesity on the risk of community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia in human patients is not clear. Relatively few studies have evaluated the influence of diet-induced obesity in murine models of bacterial infections of the respiratory tract. Obese leptin deficient humans and leptin and leptin-receptor deficient mice exhibit greater susceptibility to respiratory infections suggesting a requirement for leptin in the pulmonary innate and adaptive immune response to infection. In contrast to these studies, we have observed that obese leptin receptor signaling mutant mice are resistant to pneumococcal pneumonia highlighting the complex interaction between leptin receptor signaling and immune function. Given the increased prevalence of obesity and poor responsiveness of obese individuals to vaccination against influenza, the development of novel immunization strategies for this population is warranted. Additional clinical and animal studies are needed to clarify the relationship between increased adiposity and susceptibility to community-acquired and nosocomial pneumonia.

  1. Munc18c in adipose tissue is downregulated in obesity and is associated with insulin.

    PubMed

    Garrido-Sanchez, Lourdes; Escote, Xavier; Coin-Aragüez, Leticia; Fernandez-Garcia, Jose Carlos; El Bekay, Rajaa; Vendrell, Joan; Garcia-Fuentes, Eduardo; Tinahones, Francisco J

    2013-01-01

    Munc18c is associated with glucose metabolism and could play a relevant role in obesity. However, little is known about the regulation of Munc18c expression. We analyzed Munc18c gene expression in human visceral (VAT) and subcutaneous (SAT) adipose tissue and its relationship with obesity and insulin. We evaluated 70 subjects distributed in 12 non-obese lean subjects, 23 overweight subjects, 12 obese subjects and 23 nondiabetic morbidly obese patients (11 with low insulin resistance and 12 with high insulin resistance). The lean, overweight and obese persons had a greater Munc18c gene expression in adipose tissue than the morbidly obese patients (p<0.001). VAT Munc18c gene expression was predicted by the body mass index (B = -0.001, p = 0.009). In SAT, no associations were found by different multiple regression analysis models. SAT Munc18c gene expression was the main determinant of the improvement in the HOMA-IR index 15 days after bariatric surgery (B = -2148.4, p = 0.038). SAT explant cultures showed that insulin produced a significant down-regulation of Munc18c gene expression (p = 0.048). This decrease was also obtained when explants were incubated with liver X receptor alpha (LXRα) agonist, either without (p = 0.038) or with insulin (p = 0.050). However, Munc18c gene expression was not affected when explants were incubated with insulin plus a sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) inhibitor (p = 0.504). Munc18c gene expression in human adipose tissue is down-regulated in morbid obesity. Insulin may have an effect on the Munc18c expression, probably through LXRα and SREBP-1c.

  2. Munc18c in Adipose Tissue Is Downregulated in Obesity and Is Associated with Insulin

    PubMed Central

    Escote, Xavier; Coin-Aragüez, Leticia; Fernandez-Garcia, Jose Carlos; El Bekay, Rajaa; Vendrell, Joan

    2013-01-01

    Objective Munc18c is associated with glucose metabolism and could play a relevant role in obesity. However, little is known about the regulation of Munc18c expression. We analyzed Munc18c gene expression in human visceral (VAT) and subcutaneous (SAT) adipose tissue and its relationship with obesity and insulin. Materials and Methods We evaluated 70 subjects distributed in 12 non-obese lean subjects, 23 overweight subjects, 12 obese subjects and 23 nondiabetic morbidly obese patients (11 with low insulin resistance and 12 with high insulin resistance). Results The lean, overweight and obese persons had a greater Munc18c gene expression in adipose tissue than the morbidly obese patients (p<0.001). VAT Munc18c gene expression was predicted by the body mass index (B = −0.001, p = 0.009). In SAT, no associations were found by different multiple regression analysis models. SAT Munc18c gene expression was the main determinant of the improvement in the HOMA-IR index 15 days after bariatric surgery (B = −2148.4, p = 0.038). SAT explant cultures showed that insulin produced a significant down-regulation of Munc18c gene expression (p = 0.048). This decrease was also obtained when explants were incubated with liver X receptor alpha (LXRα) agonist, either without (p = 0.038) or with insulin (p = 0.050). However, Munc18c gene expression was not affected when explants were incubated with insulin plus a sterol regulatory element-binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) inhibitor (p = 0.504). Conclusions Munc18c gene expression in human adipose tissue is down-regulated in morbid obesity. Insulin may have an effect on the Munc18c expression, probably through LXRα and SREBP-1c. PMID:23700440

  3. Downregulation of de Novo Fatty Acid Synthesis in Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue of Moderately Obese Women

    PubMed Central

    Guiu-Jurado, Esther; Auguet, Teresa; Berlanga, Alba; Aragonès, Gemma; Aguilar, Carmen; Sabench, Fàtima; Armengol, Sandra; Porras, José Antonio; Martí, Andreu; Jorba, Rosa; Hernández, Mercè; del Castillo, Daniel; Richart, Cristóbal

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the expression of fatty acid metabolism-related genes in human adipose tissue from moderately obese women. We used qRT-PCR and Western Blot to analyze visceral (VAT) and subcutaneous (SAT) adipose tissue mRNA expression involved in de novo fatty acid synthesis (ACC1, FAS), fatty acid oxidation (PPARα, PPARδ) and inflammation (IL6, TNFα), in normal weight control women (BMI < 25 kg/m2, n = 35) and moderately obese women (BMI 30–38 kg/m2, n = 55). In SAT, ACC1, FAS and PPARα mRNA expression were significantly decreased in moderately obese women compared to controls. The downregulation reported in SAT was more pronounced when BMI increased. In VAT, lipogenic-related genes and PPARα were similar in both groups. Only PPARδ gene expression was significantly increased in moderately obese women. As far as inflammation is concerned, TNFα and IL6 were significantly increased in moderate obesity in both tissues. Our results indicate that there is a progressive downregulation in lipogenesis in SAT as BMI increases, which suggests that SAT decreases the synthesis of fatty acid de novo during the development of obesity, whereas in VAT lipogenesis remains active regardless of the degree of obesity. PMID:26694359

  4. Downregulation of de Novo Fatty Acid Synthesis in Subcutaneous Adipose Tissue of Moderately Obese Women.

    PubMed

    Guiu-Jurado, Esther; Auguet, Teresa; Berlanga, Alba; Aragonès, Gemma; Aguilar, Carmen; Sabench, Fàtima; Armengol, Sandra; Porras, José Antonio; Martí, Andreu; Jorba, Rosa; Hernández, Mercè; del Castillo, Daniel; Richart, Cristóbal

    2015-12-16

    The purpose of this work was to evaluate the expression of fatty acid metabolism-related genes in human adipose tissue from moderately obese women. We used qRT-PCR and Western Blot to analyze visceral (VAT) and subcutaneous (SAT) adipose tissue mRNA expression involved in de novo fatty acid synthesis (ACC1, FAS), fatty acid oxidation (PPARα, PPARδ) and inflammation (IL6, TNFα), in normal weight control women (BMI < 25 kg/m², n = 35) and moderately obese women (BMI 30-38 kg/m², n = 55). In SAT, ACC1, FAS and PPARα mRNA expression were significantly decreased in moderately obese women compared to controls. The downregulation reported in SAT was more pronounced when BMI increased. In VAT, lipogenic-related genes and PPARα were similar in both groups. Only PPARδ gene expression was significantly increased in moderately obese women. As far as inflammation is concerned, TNFα and IL6 were significantly increased in moderate obesity in both tissues. Our results indicate that there is a progressive downregulation in lipogenesis in SAT as BMI increases, which suggests that SAT decreases the synthesis of fatty acid de novo during the development of obesity, whereas in VAT lipogenesis remains active regardless of the degree of obesity.

  5. Metabolic remodeling of white adipose tissue in obesity

    PubMed Central

    Cummins, Timothy D.; Holden, Candice R.; Sansbury, Brian E.; Gibb, Andrew A.; Shah, Jasmit; Zafar, Nagma; Tang, Yunan; Hellmann, Jason; Rai, Shesh N.; Spite, Matthew; Bhatnagar, Aruni

    2014-01-01

    Adipose tissue metabolism is a critical regulator of adiposity and whole body energy expenditure; however, metabolic changes that occur in white adipose tissue (WAT) with obesity remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to understand the metabolic and bioenergetic changes occurring in WAT with obesity. Wild-type (C57BL/6J) mice fed a high-fat diet (HFD) showed significant increases in whole body adiposity, had significantly lower V̇o2, V̇co2, and respiratory exchange ratios, and demonstrated worsened glucose and insulin tolerance compared with low-fat-fed mice. Metabolomic analysis of WAT showed marked changes in lipid, amino acid, carbohydrate, nucleotide, and energy metabolism. Tissue levels of succinate and malate were elevated, and metabolites that could enter the Krebs cycle via anaplerosis were mostly diminished in high-fat-fed mice, suggesting altered mitochondrial metabolism. Despite no change in basal oxygen consumption or mitochondrial DNA abundance, citrate synthase activity was decreased by more than 50%, and responses to FCCP were increased in WAT from mice fed a high-fat diet. Moreover, Pgc1a was downregulated and Cox7a1 upregulated after 6 wk of HFD. After 12 wk of high-fat diet, the abundance of several proteins in the mitochondrial respiratory chain or matrix was diminished. These changes were accompanied by increased Parkin and Pink1, decreased p62 and LC3-I, and ultrastructural changes suggestive of autophagy and mitochondrial remodeling. These studies demonstrate coordinated restructuring of metabolism and autophagy that could contribute to the hypertrophy and whitening of adipose tissue in obesity. PMID:24918202

  6. Reduced adipose tissue H2S in obesity.

    PubMed

    Katsouda, Antonia; Szabo, Csaba; Papapetropoulos, Andreas

    2017-10-02

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenously produced signaling molecule synthesized by cystathionine γ-lyase (CSE), cystathionine β-synthase (CBS) and 3-mercaptopyruvate sulfurtransferase (3-MST). Given that H2S exerts significant effects on bioenergetics and metabolism, the goal of the current study was to determine the expression of H2S-producing enzymes in adipose tissues in models of obesity and metabolic disruption. Mice fed a western diet expressed lower mRNA levels of all three enzymes in epididymal fat (EWAT), while only CSE and 3-MST were reduced in brown adipose tissue (BAT). At the protein level 3-MST was reduced in all fat depots studied. Using db/db mice, a genetic model of obesity, we found that CSE, CBS and 3-MST mRNA were reduced in white fat, while only CSE was reduced in BAT. CBS and CSE protein levels were suppressed in all three fat depots. In a model of age-related weight gain, no reduction in the mRNA of any of the enzymes was noted. Smaller amounts of 3-MST protein were found in EWAT, while both CSE and 3-MST were reduced in BAT. Tissue levels of H2S were lower in WAT in HFD mice; both WAT and BAT contained lower H2S amounts in db/db animals. Taken together, our data suggest that obesity is associated with a decreased expression of H2S-synthesizing enzymes and reduced H2S levels in adipose tissues of mice. We propose that the reduction in H2S may contribute to the metabolic response associated with obesity. Further work is needed to determine whether restoring H2S levels during obesity may have a beneficial effect on obesity-associated metabolic alterations. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Adipose tissue fatty acid chain length and mono-unsaturation increases with obesity and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Yew Tan, Chong; Virtue, Samuel; Murfitt, Steven; Roberts, Lee D; Robert, Lee D; Phua, Yi Hui; Dale, Martin; Griffin, Julian L; Tinahones, Francisco; Scherer, Philipp E; Vidal-Puig, Antonio

    2015-12-17

    The non-essential fatty acids, C18:1n9, C16:0, C16:1n7, C18:0 and C18:1n7 account for over 75% of fatty acids in white adipose (WAT) triacylglycerol (TAG). The relative composition of these fatty acids (FA) is influenced by the desaturases, SCD1-4 and the elongase, ELOVL6. In knock-out models, loss of SCD1 or ELOVL6 results in reduced Δ9 desaturated and reduced 18-carbon non-essential FA respectively. Both Elovl6 KO and SCD1 KO mice exhibit improved insulin sensitivity. Here we describe the relationship between WAT TAG composition in obese mouse models and obese humans stratified for insulin resistance. In mouse models with increasing obesity and insulin resistance, there was an increase in scWAT Δ9 desaturated FAs (SCD ratio) and FAs with 18-carbons (Elovl6 ratio) in mice. Data from mouse models discordant for obesity and insulin resistance (AKT2 KO, Adiponectin aP2-transgenic), suggested that scWAT TAG Elovl6 ratio was associated with insulin sensitivity, whereas SCD1 ratio was associated with fat mass. In humans, a greater SCD1 and Elovl6 ratio was found in metabolically more harmful visceral adipose tissue when compared to subcutaneous adipose tissue.

  8. Adiposity in childhood cancer survivors: insights into obesity physiopathology.

    PubMed

    Siviero-Miachon, Adriana Aparecida; Spinola-Castro, Angela Maria; Guerra-Junior, Gil

    2009-03-01

    As childhood cancer treatment has become more effective, survival rates have improved, and a number of complications have been described while many of these patients reach adulthood. Obesity is a well-recognized late effect, and its metabolic effects may lead to cardiovascular disease. Currently, studies concerning overweight have focused on acute lymphocytic leukemia and brain tumors, since they are at risk for hypothalamic-pituitary axis damage secondary to cancer therapies (cranial irradiation, chemotherapy, and brain surgery) or to primary tumor location. Obesity and cancer have metabolic syndrome features in common. Thus, it remains controversial if overweight is a cause or consequence of cancer, and to date additional mechanisms involving adipose tissue and hypothalamic derangements have been considered, comprising premature adiposity rebound, hyperinsulinemia, leptin regulation, and the role of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma. Overall, further research is still necessary to better understand the relationship between adipogenesis and hypothalamic control deregulation following cancer therapy.

  9. Genomic and epigenomic regulation of adipose tissue inflammation in obesity.

    PubMed

    Toubal, Amine; Treuter, Eckardt; Clément, Karine; Venteclef, Nicolas

    2013-12-01

    Chronic inflammation of adipose tissue is viewed as a hallmark of obesity and contributes to the development of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. According to current models, nutrient excess causes metabolic and structural changes in adipocytes, which initiate transcriptional programs leading to the expression of inflammatory molecules and the subsequent recruitment of immune cells. Recent advances in deciphering the underlying mechanisms revealed that key regulatory events occur at the genomic and epigenomic levels. Here we review these advances because they offer a better understanding of the mechanisms behind the complex obesogenic program in adipose tissue, and because they may help in defining new therapeutic strategies that prevent, restrict, and resolve inflammation in the context of obesity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Persistent organic pollutants meet adipose tissue hypoxia: does cross-talk contribute to inflammation during obesity?

    PubMed

    Myre, M; Imbeault, P

    2014-01-01

    Lipophilic persistent organic pollutants (POPs) accumulate in lipid-rich tissues such as human adipose tissue. This is particularly problematic in individuals with excess adiposity, a physiological state that may be additionally characterized by local adipose tissue hypoxia. Hypoxic patches occur when oxygen diffusion is insufficient to reach all hypertrophic adipocytes. POPs and hypoxia independently contribute to the development of adipose tissue-specific and systemic inflammation often associated with obesity. Inflammation is induced by increased proinflammatory mediators such as tumour necrosis factor-alpha, interleukin-6, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1, as well as reduced adiponectin release, an anti-inflammatory and insulin-sensitizing adipokine. The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) mediates the cellular response to some pollutants, while hypoxia responses occur through the oxygen-sensitive transcription factor hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF)-1. There is some overlap between the two signalling pathways since both require a common subunit called the AhR nuclear translocator. As such, it is unclear how adipocytes respond to simultaneous POP and hypoxia exposure. This brief review explores the independent contribution of POPs and adipose tissue hypoxia as factors underlying the inflammatory response from adipocytes during obesity. It also highlights that the combined effect of POPs and hypoxia through the AhR and HIF-1 signalling pathways remains to be tested.

  11. Transcriptome profiling of visceral adipose tissue in a novel obese rat model, WNIN/Ob & its comparison with other animal models.

    PubMed

    Sakamuri, Siva Sankara Vara Prasad; Putcha, Uday Kumar; Veettil, Giridharan Nappan; Ayyalasomayajula, Vajreswari

    2016-09-01

    Adipose tissue dysfunction in obesity is linked to the development of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. We studied the differential gene expression in retroperitoneal adipose tissue of a novel obese rat model, WNIN/Ob, to understand the possible underlying transcriptional changes involved in the development of obesity and associatedcomorbidities in this model. Four month old, male WNIN/Ob lean and obese rats were taken, blood was collected and tissues were dissected. Body composition analysis and adipose tissue histology were performed. Global gene expression in retroperitoneal adipose tissue of lean and obese rats was studied by microarray using Affymetrix GeneChips. One thousand and seventeen probe sets were downregulated and 963 probe sets were upregulated (more than two-fold) in adipose tissue of WNIN/Ob obese rats when compared to that of lean rats. Small nucleolar RNA (SnoRNA) made most of the underexpressed probe sets, whereas immune system-related genes werethe most overexpressed in the adipose tissues of obese rats. Genes coding for cytoskeletal proteinswere downregulated, whereas genes related to lipid biosynthesis were elevated in the adipose tissue of obese rats. Majority of the altered genes and pathways in adipose tissue of WNIN/Ob obese rats were similar to the observations in other obese animal models and human obesity. Based on these observations, it is proposed that WNIN/Ob obese rat model may be a good model to study the mechanisms involved in the development of obesity and its comorbidities. Downregulation of SnoRNA appears to be a novel feature in this obese rat model.

  12. Transcriptome profiling of visceral adipose tissue in a novel obese rat model, WNIN/Ob & its comparison with other animal models

    PubMed Central

    Sakamuri, Siva Sankara Vara Prasad; Putcha, Uday Kumar; Veettil, Giridharan Nappan; Ayyalasomayajula, Vajreswari

    2016-01-01

    Background & objectives: Adipose tissue dysfunction in obesity is linked to the development of type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases. We studied the differential gene expression in retroperitoneal adipose tissue of a novel obese rat model, WNIN/Ob, to understand the possible underlying transcriptional changes involved in the development of obesity and associatedcomorbidities in this model. Methods: Four month old, male WNIN/Ob lean and obese rats were taken, blood was collected and tissues were dissected. Body composition analysis and adipose tissue histology were performed. Global gene expression in retroperitoneal adipose tissue of lean and obese rats was studied by microarray using Affymetrix GeneChips. Results: One thousand and seventeen probe sets were downregulated and 963 probe sets were upregulated (more than two-fold) in adipose tissue of WNIN/Ob obese rats when compared to that of lean rats. Small nucleolar RNA (SnoRNA) made most of the underexpressed probe sets, whereas immune system-related genes werethe most overexpressed in the adipose tissues of obese rats. Genes coding for cytoskeletal proteinswere downregulated, whereas genes related to lipid biosynthesis were elevated in the adipose tissue of obese rats. Interpretation & conclusions: Majority of the altered genes and pathways in adipose tissue of WNIN/Ob obese rats were similar to the observations in other obese animal models and human obesity. Based on these observations, it is proposed that WNIN/Ob obese rat model may be a good model to study the mechanisms involved in the development of obesity and its comorbidities. Downregulation of SnoRNA appears to be a novel feature in this obese rat model. PMID:28139540

  13. Adipose HIF-1α causes obesity by suppressing brown adipose tissue thermogenesis.

    PubMed

    Jun, Jonathan C; Devera, Ronald; Unnikrishnan, Dileep; Shin, Mi-Kyung; Bevans-Fonti, Shannon; Yao, Qiaoling; Rathore, Aman; Younas, Haris; Halberg, Nils; Scherer, Philipp E; Polotsky, Vsevolod Y

    2017-03-01

    Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) in adipose tissue is known to promote obesity. We hypothesized that HIF-1α interferes with brown fat thermogenesis, thus decreasing energy expenditure. To test this hypothesis, we compared transgenic mice constitutively expressing HIF-1α in adipose tissues (HIF-1α++) at usual temperature (22 °C), where brown fat is somewhat active, or at thermoneutrality (30 °C), where brown fat is minimally active. HIF-1α++ mice or control litter mates were separated into room temperature (22 °C) or thermoneutrality (30 °C) groups. We assessed weight gain, food intake, calorimetry, activity, and oxygen consumption and transcriptional changes in isolated white and brown adipocytes. At 22 °C, HIF-1α++ mice exhibited accelerated weight gain, cold and glucose intolerance, hyperglycemia, and decreased energy expenditure without changes in food intake or activity. These changes were absent or minimal at thermoneutrality. In brown adipocytes of HIF-1α++ mice, oxygen consumption decreased ~50 % in association with reduced mitochondrial content, uncoupling protein 2, and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma coactivator 1 (PGC-1α). In conclusion, adipose HIF-1α overexpression inhibits thermogenesis and cellular respiration in brown adipose tissue, promoting obesity in the setting of reduced ambient temperature.

  14. Deficiency in adipocyte chemokine receptor CXCR4 exacerbates obesity and compromises thermoregulatory responses of brown adipose tissue in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity

    PubMed Central

    Yao, Longbiao; Heuser-Baker, Janet; Herlea-Pana, Oana; Zhang, Nan; Szweda, Luke I.; Griffin, Timothy M.; Barlic-Dicen, Jana

    2014-01-01

    The chemokine receptor CXCR4 is expressed on adipocytes and macrophages in adipose tissue, but its role in this tissue remains unknown. We evaluated whether deficiency in either adipocyte or myeloid leukocyte CXCR4 affects body weight (BW) and adiposity in a mouse model of high-fat-diet (HFD)-induced obesity. We found that ablation of adipocyte, but not myeloid leukocyte, CXCR4 exacerbated obesity. The HFD-fed adipocyte-specific CXCR4-knockout (AdCXCR4ko) mice, compared to wild-type C57BL/6 control mice, had increased BW (average: 52.0 g vs. 35.5 g), adiposity (average: 49.3 vs. 21.0% of total BW), and inflammatory leukocyte content in white adipose tissue (WAT), despite comparable food intake. As previously reported, HFD feeding increased uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1) expression (fold increase: 3.5) in brown adipose tissue (BAT) of the C57BL/6 control mice. However, no HFD-induced increase in UCP1 expression was observed in the AdCXCR4ko mice, which were cold sensitive. Thus, our study suggests that adipocyte CXCR4 limits development of obesity by preventing excessive inflammatory cell recruitment into WAT and by supporting thermogenic activity of BAT. Since CXCR4 is conserved between mouse and human, the newfound role of CXCR4 in mouse adipose tissue may parallel the role of this chemokine receptor in human adipose tissue.—Yao, L., Heuser-Baker, J., Herlea-Pana, O., Zhang, N., Szweda, L. I., Griffin, T. M., Barlic-Dicen, J. Deficiency in adipocyte chemokine receptor CXCR4 exacerbates obesity and compromises thermoregulatory responses of brown adipose tissue in a mouse model of diet-induced obesity. PMID:25016030

  15. Adiponectin: a biomarker of obesity-induced insulin resistance in adipose tissue and beyond.

    PubMed

    Lu, Jin-Ying; Huang, Kuo-Chin; Chang, Lin-Chau; Huang, Ying-Shing; Chi, Yu-Chiao; Su, Ta-Chan; Chen, Chi-Ling; Yang, Wei-Shiung

    2008-09-01

    Adiponectin is one of the most thoroughly studied adipocytokines. Low plasma levels of adiponectin are found to associate with obesity, metabolic syndrome, diabetes and many other human diseases. From animal experiments and human studies, adiponectin has been shown to be a key regulator of insulin sensitivity. In this article, we review the evidence and propose that hypo-adiponectinemia is not a major cause of obesity. Instead, it is the result of obesity-induced insulin resistance in the adipose tissue. Hypo-adiponectinemia then mediates the metabolic effects of obesity on the other peripheral tissues, such as liver and skeletal muscle and may also exert some direct effects on end-organ damage. We propose that deciphering the molecular details governing the adiponectin gene expression and protein secretion will lead us to more comprehensive understanding of the mechanisms of insulin resistance in the adipose tissue and provide us new avenues for the therapeutic intervention of obesity and insulin resistance-related human disorders.

  16. Common dysregulated pathways in obese adipose tissue and atherosclerosis.

    PubMed

    Moreno-Viedma, V; Amor, M; Sarabi, A; Bilban, M; Staffler, G; Zeyda, M; Stulnig, T M

    2016-08-26

    The metabolic syndrome is becoming increasingly prevalent in the general population that is at simultaneous risk for both type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. The critical pathogenic mechanisms underlying these diseases are obesity-driven insulin resistance and atherosclerosis, respectively. To obtain a better understanding of molecular mechanisms involved in pathogenesis of the metabolic syndrome as a basis for future treatment strategies, studies considering both inherent risks, namely metabolic and cardiovascular, are needed. Hence, the aim of this study was to identify pathways commonly dysregulated in obese adipose tissue and atherosclerotic plaques. We carried out a gene set enrichment analysis utilizing data from two microarray experiments with obese white adipose tissue and atherosclerotic aortae as well as respective controls using a combined insulin resistance-atherosclerosis mouse model. We identified 22 dysregulated pathways common to both tissues with p values below 0.05, and selected inflammatory response and oxidative phosphorylation pathways from the Hallmark gene set to conduct a deeper evaluation at the single gene level. This analysis provided evidence of a vast overlap in gene expression alterations in obese adipose tissue and atherosclerosis with Il7r, C3ar1, Tlr1, Rgs1 and Semad4d being the highest ranked genes for the inflammatory response pathway and Maob, Bckdha, Aldh6a1, Echs1 and Cox8a for the oxidative phosphorylation pathway. In conclusion, this study provides extensive evidence for common pathogenic pathways underlying obesity-driven insulin resistance and atherogenesis which could provide a basis for the development of novel strategies to simultaneously prevent type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease in patients with metabolic syndrome.

  17. Obesity-induced DNA released from adipocytes stimulates chronic adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Nishimoto, Sachiko; Fukuda, Daiju; Higashikuni, Yasutomi; Tanaka, Kimie; Hirata, Yoichiro; Murata, Chie; Kim-Kaneyama, Joo-ri; Sato, Fukiko; Bando, Masahiro; Yagi, Shusuke; Soeki, Takeshi; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Imoto, Issei; Sakaue, Hiroshi; Shimabukuro, Michio; Sata, Masataka

    2016-01-01

    Obesity stimulates chronic inflammation in adipose tissue, which is associated with insulin resistance, although the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. Here we showed that obesity-related adipocyte degeneration causes release of cell-free DNA (cfDNA), which promotes macrophage accumulation in adipose tissue via Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9), originally known as a sensor of exogenous DNA fragments. Fat-fed obese wild-type mice showed increased release of cfDNA, as determined by the concentrations of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) in plasma. cfDNA released from degenerated adipocytes promoted monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) expression in wild-type macrophages, but not in TLR9-deficient (Tlr9−/−) macrophages. Fat-fed Tlr9−/− mice demonstrated reduced macrophage accumulation and inflammation in adipose tissue and better insulin sensitivity compared with wild-type mice, whereas bone marrow reconstitution with wild-type bone marrow restored the attenuation of insulin resistance observed in fat-fed Tlr9−/− mice. Administration of a TLR9 inhibitory oligonucleotide to fat-fed wild-type mice reduced the accumulation of macrophages in adipose tissue and improved insulin resistance. Furthermore, in humans, plasma ssDNA level was significantly higher in patients with computed tomography–determined visceral obesity and was associated with homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), which is the index of insulin resistance. Our study may provide a novel mechanism for the development of sterile inflammation in adipose tissue and a potential therapeutic target for insulin resistance. PMID:27051864

  18. Obesity-induced DNA released from adipocytes stimulates chronic adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Nishimoto, Sachiko; Fukuda, Daiju; Higashikuni, Yasutomi; Tanaka, Kimie; Hirata, Yoichiro; Murata, Chie; Kim-Kaneyama, Joo-Ri; Sato, Fukiko; Bando, Masahiro; Yagi, Shusuke; Soeki, Takeshi; Hayashi, Tetsuya; Imoto, Issei; Sakaue, Hiroshi; Shimabukuro, Michio; Sata, Masataka

    2016-03-01

    Obesity stimulates chronic inflammation in adipose tissue, which is associated with insulin resistance, although the underlying mechanism remains largely unknown. Here we showed that obesity-related adipocyte degeneration causes release of cell-free DNA (cfDNA), which promotes macrophage accumulation in adipose tissue via Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9), originally known as a sensor of exogenous DNA fragments. Fat-fed obese wild-type mice showed increased release of cfDNA, as determined by the concentrations of single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) in plasma. cfDNA released from degenerated adipocytes promoted monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) expression in wild-type macrophages, but not in TLR9-deficient (Tlr9 (-/-) ) macrophages. Fat-fed Tlr9 (-/-) mice demonstrated reduced macrophage accumulation and inflammation in adipose tissue and better insulin sensitivity compared with wild-type mice, whereas bone marrow reconstitution with wild-type bone marrow restored the attenuation of insulin resistance observed in fat-fed Tlr9 (-/-) mice. Administration of a TLR9 inhibitory oligonucleotide to fat-fed wild-type mice reduced the accumulation of macrophages in adipose tissue and improved insulin resistance. Furthermore, in humans, plasma ssDNA level was significantly higher in patients with computed tomography-determined visceral obesity and was associated with homeostasis model assessment of insulin resistance (HOMA-IR), which is the index of insulin resistance. Our study may provide a novel mechanism for the development of sterile inflammation in adipose tissue and a potential therapeutic target for insulin resistance.

  19. Cafeteria diet-induced obesity causes oxidative damage in white adipose.

    PubMed

    Johnson, Amy R; Wilkerson, Matthew D; Sampey, Brante P; Troester, Melissa A; Hayes, D Neil; Makowski, Liza

    2016-04-29

    Obesity continues to be one of the most prominent public health dilemmas in the world. The complex interaction among the varied causes of obesity makes it a particularly challenging problem to address. While typical high-fat purified diets successfully induce weight gain in rodents, we have described a more robust model of diet-induced obesity based on feeding rats a diet consisting of highly palatable, energy-dense human junk foods - the "cafeteria" diet (CAF, 45-53% kcal from fat). We previously reported that CAF-fed rats became hyperphagic, gained more weight, and developed more severe hyperinsulinemia, hyperglycemia, and glucose intolerance compared to the lard-based 45% kcal from fat high fat diet-fed group. In addition, the CAF diet-fed group displayed a higher degree of inflammation in adipose and liver, mitochondrial dysfunction, and an increased concentration of lipid-derived, pro-inflammatory mediators. Building upon our previous findings, we aimed to determine mechanisms that underlie physiologic findings in the CAF diet. We investigated the effect of CAF diet-induced obesity on adipose tissue specifically using expression arrays and immunohistochemistry. Genomic evidence indicated the CAF diet induced alterations in the white adipose gene transcriptome, with notable suppression of glutathione-related genes and pathways involved in mitigating oxidative stress. Immunohistochemical analysis indicated a doubling in adipose lipid peroxidation marker 4-HNE levels compared to rats that remained lean on control standard chow diet. Our data indicates that the CAF diet drives an increase in oxidative damage in white adipose tissue that may affect tissue homeostasis. Oxidative stress drives activation of inflammatory kinases that can perturb insulin signaling leading to glucose intolerance and diabetes. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Molecular pathways linking non-shivering thermogenesis and obesity: focusing on brown adipose tissue development.

    PubMed

    Valente, Angelica; Jamurtas, Athanasios Z; Koutedakis, Yiannis; Flouris, Andreas D

    2015-02-01

    An increase in energy intake and/or a decrease in energy expenditure lead to fat storage, causing overweight and obesity phenotypes. The objective of this review was to analyse, for the first time using a systematic approach, all published evidence from the past 8 years regarding the molecular pathways linking non-shivering thermogenesis and obesity in mammals, focusing on mechanisms involved in brown adipose tissue development. Two major databases were scanned from 2006 to 2013 using 'brown adipose tissue' AND 'uncoupling protein-1' AND 'mammalian thermoregulation' AND 'obesity' as key words. A total of 61 articles were retrieved using the search criteria. The available research used knockout methodologies, various substances, molecules and agonist treatments, or different temperature and diet conditions, to assess the molecular pathways linking non-shivering thermogenesis and obesity. By integrating the results of the evaluated animal and human studies, our analysis identified specific molecules that enhance non-shivering thermogenesis and metabolism by: (i) stimulating 'brite' (brown-like) cell development in white adipose tissue; (ii) increasing uncoupling protein-1 expression in brite adipocytes; and (iii) augmenting brown and/or brite adipose tissue mass. The latter can be also increased through low temperature, hibernation and/or molecules involved in brown adipocyte differentiation. Cold stimuli and/or certain molecules activate uncoupling protein-1 in the existing brown adipocytes, thus increasing total energy expenditure by a magnitude proportional to the number of available brown adipocytes. Future research should address the interplay between body mass, brown adipose tissue mass, as well as the main molecules involved in brite cell development.

  1. Metabolic Rescue of Obese Adipose-Derived Stem Cells by Lin28/Let7 Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Pérez, Laura M.; Bernal, Aurora; San Martín, Nuria; Lorenzo, Margarita; Fernández-Veledo, Sonia; Gálvez, Beatriz G.

    2013-01-01

    Adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs) are promising candidates for autologous cell-based regeneration therapies by virtue of their multilineage differentiation potential and immunogenicity; however, relatively little is known about their role in adipose tissue physiology and dysfunction. Here we evaluated whether ASCs isolated from nonobese and obese tissue differed in their metabolic characteristics and differentiation potential. During differentiation to mature adipocytes, mouse and human ASCs derived from nonobese tissues both increased their insulin sensitivity and inhibition of lipolysis, whereas obese-derived ASCs were insulin-resistant, showing impaired insulin-stimulated glucose uptake and resistance to the antilipolytic effect of insulin. Furthermore, obese-derived ASCs showed enhanced release of proinflammatory cytokines and impaired production of adiponectin. Interestingly, the delivery of cytosol from control ASCs into obese-derived ASCs using a lipid-based, protein-capture methodology restored insulin sensitivity on glucose and lipid metabolism and reversed the proinflammatory cytokine profile, in part due to the restoration of Lin28 protein levels. In conclusion, glucose and lipid metabolism as well as maturation of ASCs is truncated in an obese environment. The reversal of the altered pathways in obese cells by delivery of normal subcellular fractions offers a potential new tool for cell therapy. PMID:23423565

  2. Brown adipose tissue: a potential target in the fight against obesity and the metabolic syndrome.

    PubMed

    Poekes, Laurence; Lanthier, Nicolas; Leclercq, Isabelle A

    2015-12-01

    BAT (brown adipose tissue) is the main site of thermogenesis in mammals. It is essential to ensure thermoregulation in newborns. It is also found in (some) adult humans. Its capacity to oxidize fatty acids and glucose without ATP production contributes to energy expenditure and glucose homoeostasis. Brown fat activation has thus emerged as an attractive therapeutic target for the treatment of obesity and the metabolic syndrome. In the present review, we integrate the recent advances on the metabolic role of BAT and its relation with other tissues as well as its potential contribution to fighting obesity and the metabolic syndrome.

  3. Group 2 innate lymphoid cells promote beiging of adipose and limit obesity

    PubMed Central

    Brestoff, Jonathan R.; Kim, Brian S.; Saenz, Steven A.; Stine, Rachel R.; Monticelli, Laurel A.; Sonnenberg, Gregory F.; Thome, Joseph J.; Farber, Donna L.; Lutfy, Kabirullah; Seale, Patrick; Artis, David

    2015-01-01

    Obesity is an increasingly prevalent disease regulated by genetic and environmental factors. Emerging studies indicate that immune cells, including monocytes, granulocytes and lymphocytes, regulate metabolic homeostasis and are dysregulated in obesity1,2. Group 2 innate lymphoid cells (ILC2s) can regulate adaptive immunity3,4 and eosinophil and alternatively-activated macrophage responses5, and were recently identified in murine white adipose tissue (WAT)5 where they may act to limit the development of obesity6. However, ILC2s have not been identified in human adipose tissue, and the mechanisms by which ILC2s regulate metabolic homeostasis remain unknown. Here, we identify ILC2s in human WAT and demonstrate that decreased ILC2 responses in WAT are a conserved characteristic of obesity in humans and mice. Interleukin (IL)-33 was found to be critical for the maintenance of ILC2s in WAT and in limiting adiposity in mice by increasing caloric expenditure. This was associated with recruitment of uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1)+ beige adipocytes in WAT, a process known as beiging or browning that regulates caloric expenditure7–9. IL-33-induced beiging was dependent on ILC2s, and IL-33 treatment or transfer of IL-33-elicited ILC2s was sufficient to drive beiging independently of the adaptive immune system, eosinophils or IL-4 receptor signaling. We found that ILC2s produce methionine-enkephalin peptides that can act directly on adipocytes to upregulate Ucp1 expression in vitro and that promote beiging in vivo. Collectively, these studies indicate that in addition to responding to infection or tissue damage, ILC2s can regulate adipose function and metabolic homeostasis in part via production of enkephalin peptides that elicit beiging. PMID:25533952

  4. Monogenic human obesity syndromes.

    PubMed

    Farooqi, I S; O'Rahilly, S

    2004-01-01

    Over the past decade, we have witnessed a major increase in the scale of scientific activity devoted to the study of energy balance and obesity. This explosion of interest has, to a large extent, been driven by the identification of genes responsible for murine obesity syndromes and the novel physiological pathways revealed by those genetic discoveries. We and others recently have identified several single-gene defects causing severe human obesity. Many of these defects have occurred in molecules identical or similar to those identified as a cause of obesity in rodents. This chapter will consider the human monogenic obesity syndromes that have been characterized to date and discuss how far such observations support the physiological role of these molecules in the regulation of human body weight and neuroendocrine function.

  5. Monogenic human obesity syndromes.

    PubMed

    Farooqi, I S

    2006-01-01

    Over the past decade we have witnessed a major increase in the scale of scientific activity devoted to the study of energy balance and obesity. This explosion of interest has, to a large extent, been driven by the identification of genes responsible for murine obesity syndromes, and the novel physiological pathways revealed by those genetic discoveries. Others and we have also recently identified several single gene defects causing severe human obesity. Many of these defects have been in molecules identical or similar to those identified as a cause of obesity in rodents. I will review the human monogenic obesity syndromes that have been characterised to date and discuss how far such observations support the physiological role of these molecules in the regulation of human body weight and neuroendocrine function.

  6. Metabolic Response of Visceral White Adipose Tissue of Obese Mice Exposed for 5 Days to Human Room Temperature Compared to Mouse Thermoneutrality

    PubMed Central

    van der Stelt, Inge; Hoevenaars, Femke; Široká, Jitka; de Ronde, Lidwien; Friedecký, David; Keijer, Jaap; van Schothorst, Evert

    2017-01-01

    Housing of laboratory mice at room temperature (22°C) might be considered a constant cold stress, which induces a thermogenic program in brown adipose tissue (BAT). However, the early adaptive response of white adipose tissue (WAT), the fat storage organ of the body, to a change from thermoneutrality to room temperature is not known. This was investigated here for various WAT depots, focusing on epididymal WAT (eWAT), widely used as reference depot. Male adult diet-induced obese (DIO) C57BL/6JOlaHsd mice housed at thermoneutrality (29°C), were for 5 days either switched to room temperature (22°C) or remained at thermoneutrality. Energy metabolism was continuously measured using indirect calorimetry. At the end of the study, serum metabolomics and WAT transcriptomics were performed. We confirmed activation of the thermogenic program in 22°C housed mice. Body weight and total fat mass were reduced. Whole body energy expenditure (EE) was increased, with a higher fatty acid to carbohydrate oxidation ratio and increased serum acylcarnitine levels, while energy intake was not significantly different between the two groups. Transcriptome analysis of eWAT identified tissue remodeling and inflammation as the most affected processes. Expression of pro-inflammatory M1 macrophage-related genes, and M1 over M2 macrophage ratio were decreased, which might be linked to an increased insulin sensitivity. Markers of thermogenesis were not altered in eWAT. Decreased expression of tryptophan hydroxylase 2 (Tph2) and cholecystokinin (Cck) might represent altered neuroendocrine signaling. eWAT itself does not show increased fatty acid oxidation. The three measured WATs, epididymal, mesenteric, and retroperitoneal, showed mainly similar responses; reduced inflammation (s100a8), decreased carbohydrate oxidation, and no or small differences in fatty acid oxidation. However, Ucp1 was only expressed and increased in rWAT in 22°C housed mice. Cck expression was decreased in the three

  7. Impaired Mitochondrial Biogenesis in Adipose Tissue in Acquired Obesity.

    PubMed

    Heinonen, Sini; Buzkova, Jana; Muniandy, Maheswary; Kaksonen, Risto; Ollikainen, Miina; Ismail, Khadeeja; Hakkarainen, Antti; Lundbom, Jesse; Lundbom, Nina; Vuolteenaho, Katriina; Moilanen, Eeva; Kaprio, Jaakko; Rissanen, Aila; Suomalainen, Anu; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H

    2015-09-01

    Low mitochondrial number and activity have been suggested as underlying factors in obesity, type 2 diabetes, and metabolic syndrome. However, the stage at which mitochondrial dysfunction manifests in adipose tissue after the onset of obesity remains unknown. Here we examined subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) samples from healthy monozygotic twin pairs, 22.8-36.2 years of age, who were discordant (ΔBMI >3 kg/m(2), mean length of discordance 6.3 ± 0.3 years, n = 26) and concordant (ΔBMI <3 kg/m(2), n = 14) for body weight, and assessed their detailed mitochondrial metabolic characteristics: mitochondrial-related transcriptomes with dysregulated pathways, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) amount, mtDNA-encoded transcripts, and mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS) protein levels. We report global expressional downregulation of mitochondrial oxidative pathways with concomitant downregulation of mtDNA amount, mtDNA-dependent translation system, and protein levels of the OXPHOS machinery in the obese compared with the lean co-twins. Pathway analysis indicated downshifting of fatty acid oxidation, ketone body production and breakdown, and the tricarboxylic acid cycle, which inversely correlated with adiposity, insulin resistance, and inflammatory cytokines. Our results suggest that mitochondrial biogenesis, oxidative metabolic pathways, and OXPHOS proteins in SAT are downregulated in acquired obesity, and are associated with metabolic disturbances already at the preclinical stage. © 2015 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  8. Growth hormone signaling in muscle and adipose tissue of obese human subjects: associations with measures of body composition and interaction with resveratrol treatment.

    PubMed

    Clasen, Berthil F; Poulsen, Morten M; Escande, Carlos; Pedersen, Steen B; Møller, Niels; Chini, Eduardo N; Jessen, Niels; Jørgensen, Jens O L

    2014-12-01

    Growth hormone (GH) secretion is reduced in obesity, despite normal serum insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-1) levels, but the association between obesity and the GH signaling is unknown. Furthermore, SIRT1, an nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide-dependent protein deacetylase, reduces hepatic IGF-1 production in mice via blunting of GH-induced STAT5 signaling. To study GH signaling in muscle and fat in obese subjects and the interaction with concomitant administration of the putative SIRT1 activator resveratrol, and to assess the effects of inhibiting or knocking down SIRT1 on GH regulated genes in vitro. Twenty-four obese males were examined in a randomized, double blinded, parallel-group study with resveratrol or placebo treatment for 5 weeks followed by a GH bolus. Muscle and fat biopsies were collected before and after GH. Body composition was assessed by DEXA and MRI. (1) Effect of body composition and age on GH-stimulated STAT5b phosphorylation and IGF-1, SOCS2, and CISH mRNA in muscle and fat. (2) The impact of resveratrol treatment on GH activity. (3) Impact of inhibiting or knocking down SIRT1 on effects of GH in vitro. Significant GH-induced STAT5b phosphorylation in muscle and fat in obese subjects was recorded together with increased CISH and SOCS2 mRNA. GH-induced STAT5b phosphorylation in muscle correlated positively with age [r = 0.53, p < 0.01], but not with body composition. Resveratrol administration had no impact on body composition, serum IGF-1, or GH signaling in vivo, and SIRT1 knock down or inhibition did not affect GH signaling in vitro. (1) GH induced STAT5b phosphorylation is detectable in muscle and fat in adult males with simple obesity, but is not determined by body composition. (2) Resveratrol supplementation does not impact circulating IGF-1 levels or GH signaling in human muscle and fat. (3) Our data speak against a major impact of SIRT1on GH action in human subjects.

  9. Early adiposity rebound and obesity in children with congenital hypothyroidism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Shou-Yen; Lin, Shio-Jean; Lin, Sheng-Hsiang; Chou, Yen-Yin

    2013-04-01

    Earlier adiposity rebound (AR) is correlated with obesity. Our goal is to examine rates of obesity and AR in congenital hypothyroidism (CHT) and analyze the risk factors of obesity. We retrospectively reviewed the cases with abnormal newborn screens of thyroid-stimulating hormone (TSH) from 1990 to 2005 and enrolled permanent CHT patients who continued to receive treatment after the 3(rd) year of life. We determined subgroups of obesity/being overweight and normal body mass index (BMI) by the latest BMI at 6-7 years of age. BMI at each age and the age of AR were compared with the general population in Taiwan. The statistical correlation of obesity with the age and BMI at both AR and first peak, and thyroid function was calculated. A total of 90 cases of CHT were enrolled. The prevalence of obesity/being overweight was 32.2%. The age of AR was 4.94 ± 1.81 and 4.58 ± 1.86 years old in boys and girls, respectively. The age of AR in the girls with CHT was earlier than in girls in general, but no statistical significance was found in boys with CHT compared to the general population. Obesity was correlated with earlier age of AR, higher BMI at first peak and AR, and lower T4 after treatment, but not with the age of first peak of BMI, T4/TSH at diagnosis and AR, and TSH after treatment. Children with CHT have a higher risk of obesity due to earlier age of AR. We recommend that supervision and intervention on weight control should be provided to prevent the occurrence of obesity later. Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  10. Differential expression of aquaporin 7 in adipose tissue of lean and obese high fat consumers.

    PubMed

    Marrades, M Pilar; Milagro, Fermin I; Martínez, J Alfredo; Moreno-Aliaga, Maria J

    2006-01-20

    Aquaporin 7 (AQP7) is an aquaglyceroprotein responsible for the secretion and uptake of glycerol from the adipocyte. The modulation of the expression of this membrane transport protein might play an important role in the susceptibility to the development of obesity. The aim of the present study was to compare the AQP7 gene expression in subcutaneous abdominal fat in lean vs. obese high fat intakers with a similar daily physical activity pattern. Twelve young men, 6 lean (BMI=23.2+/-0.4kg/m(2)) and 6 obese (35.0+/-1.1kg/m(2)) with a similar habitual dietary intake of fat (45.5+/-2.5 vs. 43.5+/-1.7% daily energy from fat for lean and obese, respectively) and physical activity (16.0+/-5.7 vs. 17.2+/-5.1 METsh/week for lean and obese, respectively), were recruited. Subcutaneous abdominal fat biopsies were obtained and total RNA was extracted and purified. Pools of RNA from lean and obese individuals were probed into Affymetrix GeneChip Human U133A. The microarray analysis revealed that AQP7 gene was down-regulated in obese compared to lean subjects. The results of the microarray analysis were confirmed by real-time PCR studies. In summary, our data show that the AQP7 gene is differentially expressed in adipose tissue of lean and obese individuals. The down-regulation of the AQP7 gene could be implicated in the susceptibility to obesity by reducing glycerol release and promoting the accumulation of lipids in the adipose tissue.

  11. Mitochondrial respiration in subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue from patients with morbid obesity.

    PubMed

    Kraunsøe, Regitze; Boushel, Robert; Hansen, Christina Neigaard; Schjerling, Peter; Qvortrup, Klaus; Støckel, Mikael; Mikines, Kári J; Dela, Flemming

    2010-06-15

    Adipose tissue exerts important endocrine and metabolic functions in health and disease. Yet the bioenergetics of this tissue is not characterized in humans and possible regional differences are not elucidated. Using high resolution respirometry, mitochondrial respiration was quantified in human abdominal subcutaneous and intra-abdominal visceral (omentum majus) adipose tissue from biopsies obtained in 20 obese patients undergoing bariatric surgery. Mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) and genomic DNA (gDNA) were determined by the PCR technique for estimation of mitochondrial density. Adipose tissue samples were permeabilized and respirometric measurements were performed in duplicate at 37 degrees C. Substrates (glutamate (G) + malate (M) + octanoyl carnitine (O) + succinate (S)) were added sequentially to provide electrons to complex I + II. ADP ((D)) for state 3 respiration was added after GM. Uncoupled respiration was measured after addition of FCCP. Visceral fat contained more mitochondria per milligram of tissue than subcutaneous fat, but the cells were smaller. Robust, stable oxygen fluxes were found in both tissues, and coupled state 3 (GMOS(D)) and uncoupled respiration were significantly (P < 0.05) higher in visceral (0.95 +/- 0.05 and 1.15 +/- 0.06 pmol O(2) s(1) mg(1), respectively) compared with subcutaneous (0.76 +/- 0.04 and 0.98 +/- 0.05 pmol O(2) s(1) mg(1), respectively) adipose tissue. Expressed per mtDNA, visceral adipose tissue had significantly (P < 0.05) lower mitochondrial respiration. Substrate control ratios were higher and uncoupling control ratio lower (P < 0.05) in visceral compared with subcutaneous adipose tissue. We conclude that visceral fat is bioenergetically more active and more sensitive to mitochondrial substrate supply than subcutaneous fat. Oxidative phosphorylation has a higher relative activity in visceral compared with subcutaneous adipose tissue.

  12. Improvement in adiposity with oligofructose is modified by antibiotics in obese rats.

    PubMed

    Bomhof, Marc R; Paul, Heather A; Geuking, Markus B; Eller, Lindsay K; Reimer, Raylene A

    2016-08-01

    Given the intimate link between gut microbiota and host physiology, there is growing interest in understanding the mechanisms by which diet influences gut microbiota and affects human metabolic health. Using antibiotics and the prebiotic oligofructose, which has been shown to counteract excess fat mass, we explored the gut microbiota-dependent effects of oligofructose on body composition and host metabolism. Diet-induced obese male Sprague Dawley rats, fed a background high-fat/sucrose diet, were randomized to one of the following diets for 6 wk: 1) high-energy control; 2) 10% oligofructose; 3) ampicillin; 4) ampicillin + 10% oligofructose; 5) ampicillin/neomycin; or 6) ampicillin/neomycin + 10% oligofructose. Combining oligofructose with ampicillin treatment blunted the decrease in adiposity seen with oligofructose. Although ampicillin did not affect total bacteria, ampicillin impeded oligofructose-induced increases in Bifidobacterium and Lactobacillus In contrast, the combination of ampicillin and neomycin reduced total bacteria but did not abrogate the oligofructose-induced decrease in adiposity. Oligofructose-mediated effects on host adiposity and metabolic health appear to be in part dependent on the presence of specific microbial species within the gut.-Bomhof, M. R., Paul, H. A., Geuking, M. B., Eller, L. K., Reimer, R. A. Improvement in adiposity with oligofructose is modified by antibiotics in obese rats.

  13. CILAIR-Based Secretome Analysis of Obese Visceral and Subcutaneous Adipose Tissues Reveals Distinctive ECM Remodeling and Inflammation Mediators

    PubMed Central

    Roca-Rivada, Arturo; Belen Bravo, Susana; Pérez-Sotelo, Diego; Alonso, Jana; Isabel Castro, Ana; Baamonde, Iván; Baltar, Javier; Casanueva, Felipe F.; Pardo, María

    2015-01-01

    In the context of obesity, strong evidences support a distinctive pathological contribution of adipose tissue depending on its anatomical site of accumulation. Therefore, subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) has been lately considered metabolically benign compared to visceral fat (VAT), whose location is associated to the risk of developing cardiovascular disease, insulin resistance, and other associated comorbidities. Under the above situation, the chronic local inflammation that characterizes obese adipose tissue, has acquired a major role on the pathogenesis of obesity. In this work, we have analyzed for the first time human obese VAT and SAT secretomes using an improved quantitative proteomic approach for the study of tissue secretomes, Comparison of Isotope-Labeled Amino acid Incorporation Rates (CILAIR). The use of double isotope-labeling-CILAIR approach to analyze VAT and SAT secretomes allowed the identification of location-specific secreted proteins and its differential secretion. Additionally to the very high percentage of identified proteins previously implicated in obesity or in its comorbidities, this approach was revealed as a useful tool for the study of the obese adipose tissue microenvironment including extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling and inflammatory status. The results herein presented reinforce the fact that VAT and SAT depots have distinct features and contribute differentially to metabolic disease. PMID:26198096

  14. Central nervous system lipocalin-type prostaglandin D2-synthase is correlated with orexigenic neuropeptides, visceral adiposity and markers of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis in obese humans.

    PubMed

    Elias, E; Benrick, A; Behre, C J; Ekman, R; Zetterberg, H; Stenlöf, K; Wallenius, V

    2011-06-01

    Lipocalin-type prostaglandin D2-synthase (L-PGDS) is the main producer of prostaglandin D2 (PGD2) in the central nervous system (CNS). Animal data suggest effects of central nervous L-PGDS in the regulation of food intake and obesity. No human data are available. We hypothesised that a role for CNS L-PGDS in metabolic function in humans would be reflected by correlations with known orexigenic neuropeptides. Cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and serum samples were retrieved from 26 subjects in a weight loss study, comprising a 3-week dietary lead-in followed by 12-weeks of leptin or placebo treatment. At baseline, CSF L-PGDS was positively correlated with neuropeptide Y (NPY) (ρ = 0.695, P < 0.001, n = 26) and galanin (ρ = 0.651, P < 0.001) as well as visceral adipose tissue (ρ = 0.415, P = 0.035). Furthermore, CSF L-PGDS was inversely correlated with CSF leptin (ρ = -0.529, P = 0.005) and tended to correlate inversely with s.c. adipose tissue (ρ = -0.346, P = 0.084). As reported earlier, leptin treatment had no effect on weight loss and did not affect CSF L-PGDS or NPY levels compared to placebo. After weight loss, the change of CSF L-PGDS was significantly correlated with the change of CSF NPY levels (ρ = 0.604, P = 0.004, n = 21). Because of the correlation between baseline CSF L-PGDS levels and visceral adipose tissue, we examined associations with hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal (HPA) axis components. Baseline CSF L-PGDS was correlated with corticotrophin-releasing hormone (ρ = 0.764, P < 0.001) and β-endorphin (ρ = 0.491, P < 0.001). By contrast, serum L-PGDS was not correlated with any of the measured variables either at baseline or after treatment. In summary, CSF L-PGDS was correlated with orexigenic neuropeptides, visceral fat distribution and central HPA axis mediators. The importance of these findings is unclear but could suggest a role for CSF L-PGDS in the regulation of visceral

  15. Mechanisms of Chronic State of Inflammation as Mediators That Link Obese Adipose Tissue and Metabolic Syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Fuentes, Eduardo; Fuentes, Francisco; Badimon, Lina; Palomo, Iván

    2013-01-01

    The metabolic syndrome is a cluster of cardiometabolic alterations that include the presence of arterial hypertension, insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and abdominal obesity. Obesity is associated with a chronic inflammatory response, characterized by abnormal adipokine production, and the activation of proinflammatory signalling pathways resulting in the induction of several biological markers of inflammation. Macrophage and lymphocyte infiltration in adipose tissue may contribute to the pathogenesis of obesity-mediated metabolic disorders. Adiponectin can either act directly on macrophages to shift polarization and/or prime human monocytes into alternative M2-macrophages with anti-inflammatory properties. Meanwhile, the chronic inflammation in adipose tissue is regulated by a series of transcription factors, mainly PPARs and C/EBPs, that in conjunction regulate the expression of hundreds of proteins that participate in the metabolism and storage of lipids and, as such, the secretion by adipocytes. Therefore, the management of the metabolic syndrome requires the development of new therapeutic strategies aimed to alter the main genetic pathways involved in the regulation of adipose tissue metabolism. PMID:23843680

  16. Possible Involvement of Opa-Interacting Protein 5 in Adipose Proliferation and Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Kana; Maeda, Norikazu; Mori, Takuya; Sekimoto, Ryohei; Tsushima, Yu; Matsuda, Keisuke; Yamaoka, Masaya; Suganami, Takayoshi; Nishizawa, Hitoshi; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Funahashi, Tohru; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is an epidemic matter increasing risk for cardiovascular diseases and metabolic disorders such as type 2 diabetes. We recently examined the association between visceral fat adiposity and gene expression profile of peripheral blood cells in human subjects. In a series of studies, Opa (Neisseria gonorrhoeae opacity-associated)-interacting protein 5 (OIP5) was nominated as a molecule of unknown function in adipocytes and thus the present study was performed to investigate the role of OIP5 in obesity. Adenovirus overexpressing Oip5 (Ad-Oip5) was generated and infected to 3T3-L1 cells stably expressing Coxsackie-Adenovirus Receptor (CAR-3T3-L1) and to mouse subcutaneous fat. For a knockdown experiment, siRNA against Oip5 (Oip5-siRNA) was introduced into 3T3-L1 cells. Proliferation of adipose cells was measured by BrdU uptake, EdU-staining, and cell count. Significant increase of Oip5 mRNA level was observed in obese white adipose tissues and such increase was detected in both mature adipocytes fraction and stromal vascular cell fraction. Ad-Oip5-infected CAR-3T3-L1 preadipocytes and adipocytes proliferated rapidly, while a significant reduction of proliferation was observed in Oip5-siRNA-introduced 3T3-L1 preadipocytes. Fat weight and number of adipocytes were significantly increased in Ad-Oip5-administered fat tissues. Oip5 promotes proliferation of pre- and mature-adipocytes and contributes adipose hyperplasia. Increase of Oip5 may associate with development of obesity. PMID:24516558

  17. Genetic & epigenetic approach to human obesity.

    PubMed

    Rao, K Rajender; Lal, Nirupama; Giridharan, N V

    2014-11-01

    Obesity is an important clinical and public health challenge, epitomized by excess adipose tissue accumulation resulting from an imbalance in energy intake and energy expenditure. It is a forerunner for a variety of other diseases such as type-2-diabetes (T2D), cardiovascular diseases, some types of cancer, stroke, hyperlipidaemia and can be fatal leading to premature death. Obesity is highly heritable and arises from the interplay of multiple genes and environmental factors. Recent advancements in Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have shown important steps towards identifying genetic risks and identification of genetic markers for lifestyle diseases, especially for a metabolic disorder like obesity. According to the 12th Update of Human Obesity Gene Map there are 253 quantity trait loci (QTL) for obesity related phenotypes from 61 genome wide scan studies. Contribution of genetic propensity of individual ethnic and racial variations in obesity is an active area of research. Further, understanding its complexity as to how these variations could influence ones susceptibility to become or remain obese will lead us to a greater understanding of how obesity occurs and hopefully, how to prevent and treat this condition. In this review, various strategies adapted for such an analysis based on the recent advances in genome wide and functional variations in human obesity are discussed.

  18. Genetic & epigenetic approach to human obesity

    PubMed Central

    Rao, K. Rajender; Lal, Nirupama; Giridharan, N.V.

    2014-01-01

    Obesity is an important clinical and public health challenge, epitomized by excess adipose tissue accumulation resulting from an imbalance in energy intake and energy expenditure. It is a forerunner for a variety of other diseases such as type-2-diabetes (T2D), cardiovascular diseases, some types of cancer, stroke, hyperlipidaemia and can be fatal leading to premature death. Obesity is highly heritable and arises from the interplay of multiple genes and environmental factors. Recent advancements in Genome-wide association studies (GWAS) have shown important steps towards identifying genetic risks and identification of genetic markers for lifestyle diseases, especially for a metabolic disorder like obesity. According to the 12th Update of Human Obesity Gene Map there are 253 quantity trait loci (QTL) for obesity related phenotypes from 61 genome wide scan studies. Contribution of genetic propensity of individual ethnic and racial variations in obesity is an active area of research. Further, understanding its complexity as to how these variations could influence ones susceptibility to become or remain obese will lead us to a greater understanding of how obesity occurs and hopefully, how to prevent and treat this condition. In this review, various strategies adapted for such an analysis based on the recent advances in genome wide and functional variations in human obesity are discussed. PMID:25579139

  19. Television viewing, computer use, obesity, and adiposity in US preschool children

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    There is limited evidence in preschool children linking media use, such as television/video viewing and computer use, to obesity and adiposity. We tested three hypotheses in preschool children: 1) that watching > 2 hours of TV/videos daily is associated with obesity and adiposity, 2) that computer u...

  20. URB is abundantly expressed in adipose tissue and dysregulated in obesity.

    PubMed

    Okada, Takuya; Nishizawa, Hitoshi; Kurata, Akifumi; Tamba, Sachiko; Sonoda, Mina; Yasui, Atsutaka; Kuroda, Yohei; Hibuse, Toshiyuki; Maeda, Norikazu; Kihara, Shinji; Hadama, Tohru; Tobita, Kazuki; Akamatsu, Suguru; Maeda, Kazuhisa; Shimomura, Iichiro; Funahashi, Tohru

    2008-03-07

    Dysregulated production of adipocytokines in obesity is involved in the development of metabolic syndrome. URB/DRO1 contains N-terminal signal sequence and is thought to play a role in apoptosis of tumor cells. In the present study, we investigated the expression pattern of URB mRNA in adipose tissue and secretion from cultured adipocytes. In human and mouse, URB mRNA was predominantly expressed in adipose tissue and was downregulated in obese mouse models, such as ob/ob, KKAy, and diet-induced obese mice. In 3T3L1 adipocytes, insulin, TNF-alpha, H(2)O(2) and hypoxia decreased URB mRNA level. This regulation was similar to that for adiponectin and opposite to MCP-1. URB protein was secreted in media of URB cDNA-stably transfected cells and endogenous URB was detected in media of cultured human adipocytes. In conclusion, the expression pattern of URB suggests its role in obesity and the results suggest that URB is secreted, at least in part, from adipocytes.

  1. Effects of glucose and insulin on secretion of amyloid-β by human adipose tissue cells.

    PubMed

    Tharp, William G; Gupta, Dhananjay; Smith, Joshua; Jones, Karen P; Jones, Amanda M; Pratley, Richard E

    2016-07-01

    Obesity and type 2 diabetes mellitus are risk factors for developing Alzheimer disease. Overlapping patterns of metabolic dysfunction may be common molecular links between these complex diseases. Amyloid-β (Aβ) precursor protein and associated β- and γ-secretases are expressed in adipose tissue. Aβ precursor protein is up-regulated with obesity and correlated to insulin resistance. Aβ may be secreted by adipose tissue, its production may be regulated through metabolic pathways, and Aβ may exert effects on adipose tissue insulin receptor signaling. Human stromal-vascular cells and differentiated adipocytes were cultured with different combinations of glucose and insulin and then assayed for Aβ in conditioned media. Aβ was measured in vivo using adipose tissue microdialysis. Aβ secretion was increased by glucose and insulin in vitro. Adipose tissue microdialysates contained Aβ. Adipocytes treated with Aβ had decreased expression of insulin receptor substrate-2 and reduced Akt-1 phosphorylation. Aβ was made by adipose tissue cells in vitro at concentrations similar to in vivo measurements. Regulation of Aβ production by glucose and insulin and effects of Aβ on the insulin receptor pathway suggest similar cellular mechanisms may exist between neuronal dysfunction in Alzheimer disease and adipose dysfunction in type 2 diabetes. © 2016 The Authors Obesity published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of The Obesity Society (TOS).

  2. [Monogenic obesity in human].

    PubMed

    Onigata, Kazumichi

    2013-02-01

    Obesity is a heterogeneous pathologic condition that is driven by interactions between multiple genetic and environmental factors. The discovery of leptin has provided the useful clue to the molecular dissection of central pathways involved in the regulation of food intake and body weight. Monogenic obesity in human has been documented. Several obesity causing genes within the leptin-POMC-melanocortin axis have been identified: Leptin, leptin receptor, proopiomelanocortin (POMC), prohormone convertase 1 (PC1), and melanocortin receptor-4 (MC4-R) genes. The patients who have a mutation of such genes developed early onset of obesity and distinct metabolic abnormalities. Also, several gene mutations have been identified in some syndromes presenting hereditary symptomatic obesity.

  3. Gene expression profiling in subcutaneous, visceral, and epigastric adipose tissues of patients with extreme obesity

    PubMed Central

    Gerhard, Glenn S.; Styer, Amanda M.; Strodel, William E.; Roesch, Stephen L.; Yavorek, Abby; Carey, David J.; Wood, G. Craig; Petrick, Anthony T.; Gabrielsen, Jon; Ibele, Anna; Benotti, Peter; Rolston, David D.; Still, Christopher D.; Argyropoulos, George

    2013-01-01

    Objective The goal of the present study was to identify differences in gene expression between SAT, VAT, and EAT depots in Class III severely obese individuals. Design Human subcutaneous (SAT) and visceral (VAT) adipose tissues exhibit differential gene expression profiles. There is little information, however, about the other proximal white adipose tissue, epigastric (EAT) in terms of its function and contribution to metabolism. Subjects and Methods Using RNA from adipose biospecimens obtained from Class III severely obese patients undergoing open Roux-en-Y gastric bypass surgery, we compared gene expression profiles between SAT, VAT, and EAT, using microarrays validated by real time quantitative PCR. Results The three depots were found to share 1,907 genes. VAT had the greatest number of genes [66] expressed exclusively in this depot, followed by SAT [23], and then EAT [14]. Moreover, VAT shared more genes with EAT [65] than with SAT [38]. Further analyses using ratios of SAT/EAT, VAT/EAT, and SAT/VAT, identified specific as well as overlapping networks and pathways of genes representing dermatological diseases, inflammation, cell cycle and growth, cancer, and development. Targeted analysis of genes playing a role in adipose tissue development and function, revealed that Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor Gamma Coactivator 1-alpha (PGC1-α) that regulates the precursor of the hormone Irisin (FNCD5), were abundantly expressed in all three fat depots, along with fibroblast growth factors (FGF) FGF1, FGF7, and FGF10, whereas, FGF19 and FGF21 were undetectable. Conclusions These data indicate that EAT has more in common with VAT suggesting similar metabolic potential. The human epigastric adipose depot could play a significant functional role in metabolic diseases and should be further investigated. PMID:23949615

  4. Adipose tissue gene expression and metabolic health of obese adults

    PubMed Central

    Das, Swapan Kumar; Ma, Lijun; Sharma, Neeraj

    2014-01-01

    Obese subjects with a similar body mass index (BMI) exhibit substantial heterogeneity in gluco- and cardio-metabolic heath phenotypes. However, defining genes that underlie the heterogeneity of metabolic features among obese individuals and determining metabolically healthy and unhealthy phenotypes remain challenging. We conducted unsupervised hierarchical clustering analysis of subcutaneous adipose tissue transcripts from 30 obese men and women ≥40 years old. Despite similar BMIs in all subjects, we found two distinct subgroups, one metabolically healthy (Group 1) and one metabolically unhealthy (Group 2). Subjects in Group 2 showed significantly higher total cholesterol (p=0.005), LDL cholesterol (p=0.006), 2h-Insulin during OGTT (p=0.015) and lower insulin sensitivity (SI, p=0.029) compared to Group 1. We identified significant up-regulation of 141 genes (e.g. MMP9 and SPP1) and down-regulation of 17 genes (e.g. NDRG4 and GINS3) in group 2 subjects. Intriguingly, these differentially expressed transcripts were enriched for genes involved in cardiovascular disease-related processes (p=2.81×10−11–3.74×10−02) and pathways involved in immune and inflammatory response (p=8.32×10−5–0.04). Two down-regulated genes, NDRG4 and GINS3, have been located in a genomic interval associated with cardiac repolarization in published GWASs and zebra fish knockout models. Our study provides evidence that perturbations in the adipose tissue gene expression network are important in defining metabolic health in obese subjects. PMID:25520251

  5. Lipocalin 2 produces insulin resistance and can be upregulated by glucocorticoids in human adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Kamble, Prasad G; Pereira, Maria J; Sidibeh, Cherno O; Amini, Sam; Sundbom, Magnus; Börjesson, Joey Lau; Eriksson, Jan W

    2016-05-15

    The adipokine lipocalin 2 is linked to obesity and metabolic disorders. However, its role in human adipose tissue glucose and lipid metabolism is not explored. Here we show that the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone dose-dependently increased lipocalin 2 gene expression in subcutaneous and omental adipose tissue from pre-menopausal females, while it had no effect in post-menopausal females or in males. Subcutaneous adipose tissue from both genders treated with recombinant human lipocalin 2 showed a reduction in protein levels of GLUT1 and GLUT4 and in glucose uptake in isolated adipocytes. In subcutaneous adipose tissue, lipocalin 2 increased IL-6 gene expression whereas expression of PPARγ and adiponectin was reduced. Our findings suggest that lipocalin 2 can contribute to insulin resistance in human adipose tissue. In pre-menopausal females, it may partly mediate adverse metabolic effects exerted by glucocorticoid excess. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. The renin-angiotensin system in adipose tissue and its metabolic consequences during obesity.

    PubMed

    Frigolet, Maria E; Torres, Nimbe; Tovar, Armando R

    2013-12-01

    Obesity is a worldwide disease that is accompanied by several metabolic abnormalities such as hypertension, hyperglycemia and dyslipidemia. The accelerated adipose tissue growth and fat cell hypertrophy during the onset of obesity precedes adipocyte dysfunction. One of the features of adipocyte dysfunction is dysregulated adipokine secretion, which leads to an imbalance of pro-inflammatory, pro-atherogenic versus anti-inflammatory, insulin-sensitizing adipokines. The production of renin-angiotensin system (RAS) components by adipocytes is exacerbated during obesity, contributing to the systemic RAS and its consequences. Increased adipose tissue RAS has been described in various models of diet-induced obesity (DIO) including fructose and high-fat feeding. Up-regulation of the adipose RAS by DIO promotes inflammation, lipogenesis and reactive oxygen species generation and impairs insulin signaling, all of which worsen the adipose environment. Consequently, the increase of circulating RAS, for which adipose tissue is partially responsible, represents a link between hypertension, insulin resistance in diabetes and inflammation during obesity. However, other nutrients and food components such as soy protein attenuate adipose RAS, decrease adiposity, and improve adipocyte functionality. Here, we review the molecular mechanisms by which adipose RAS modulates systemic RAS and how it is enhanced in obesity, which will explain the simultaneous development of metabolic syndrome alterations. Finally, dietary interventions that prevent obesity and adipocyte dysfunction will maintain normal RAS concentrations and effects, thus preventing metabolic diseases that are associated with RAS enhancement. © 2013.

  7. CXCL5 is an adipose tissue derived factor that links obesity to insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Chavey, Carine; Lazennec, Gwendal; Lagarrigue, Sylviane; Clapé, Cyrielle; Iankova, Irena; Teyssier, Jacques; Annicotte, Jean-Sébastien; Schmidt, Julien; Mataki, Chikage; Yamamoto, Hiroyasu; Sanches, Rosario; Guma, Anna; Stich, Vladimir; Vitkova, Michaela; Jardin-Watelet, Bénédicte; Renard, Eric; Strieter, Robert; Tuthill, Antoinette; Hotamisligil, Gôkhan S.; Vidal-Puig, Toni; Zorzano, Antonio; Langin, Dominique; Fajas, Lluis

    2009-01-01

    We show here high levels of expression and secretion of the chemokine CXCL5 in the macrophage fraction of white adipose tissue (WAT). Moreover, we find that CXCL5 is dramatically increased in serum of human obese compared to lean subjects. Conversely, CXCL5 concentration is decreased in obese subjects after a weight reduction program, or in obese non-insulin resistant, compared to insulin resistant obese subjects. Most importantly we demonstrate that treatment with recombinant CXCL5 blocks insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in muscle in mice. CXCL5 blocks insulin signaling by activating the Jak2/STAT5/SOCS2 pathway. Finally, by treating obese, insulin resistant mice with either anti-CXCL5 neutralizing antibodies or antagonists of CXCR2, which is the CXCL5 receptor we demonstrate that CXCL5 mediates insulin resistance. Furthermore CXCR2−/− mice are protected against obesity-induced insulin resistance. Taken together, these results show that secretion of CXCL5 by WAT resident macrophages represents a link between obesity, inflammation, and insulin resistance. PMID:19356715

  8. Adipose tissue macrophages impair preadipocyte differentiation in humans

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li Fen; Craig, Colleen M.; Tolentino, Lorna L.; Choi, Okmi; Morton, John; Rivas, Homero; Cushman, Samuel W.; Engleman, Edgar G.; McLaughlin, Tracey

    2017-01-01

    Aim The physiologic mechanisms underlying the relationship between obesity and insulin resistance are not fully understood. Impaired adipocyte differentiation and localized inflammation characterize adipose tissue from obese, insulin-resistant humans. The directionality of this relationship is not known, however. The aim of the current study was to investigate whether adipose tissue inflammation is causally-related to impaired adipocyte differentiation. Methods Abdominal subcutaneous(SAT) and visceral(VAT) adipose tissue was obtained from 20 human participants undergoing bariatric surgery. Preadipocytes were isolated, and cultured in the presence or absence of CD14+ macrophages obtained from the same adipose tissue sample. Adipocyte differentiation was quantified after 14 days via immunofluorescence, Oil-Red O, and adipogenic gene expression. Cytokine secretion by mature adipocytes cultured with or without CD14+macrophages was quantified. Results Adipocyte differentiation was significantly lower in VAT than SAT by all measures (p<0.001). With macrophage removal, SAT preadipocyte differentiation increased significantly as measured by immunofluorescence and gene expression, whereas VAT preadipocyte differentiation was unchanged. Adipocyte-secreted proinflammatory cytokines were higher and adiponectin lower in media from VAT vs SAT: macrophage removal reduced inflammatory cytokine and increased adiponectin secretion from both SAT and VAT adipocytes. Differentiation of preadipocytes from SAT but not VAT correlated inversely with systemic insulin resistance. Conclusions The current results reveal that proinflammatory immune cells in human SAT are causally-related to impaired preadipocyte differentiation, which in turn is associated with systemic insulin resistance. In VAT, preadipocyte differentiation is poor even in the absence of tissue macrophages, pointing to inherent differences in fat storage potential between the two depots. PMID:28151993

  9. Obesity accelerates T cell senescence in murine visceral adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Shirakawa, Kohsuke; Yan, Xiaoxiang; Shinmura, Ken; Endo, Jin; Kataoka, Masaharu; Katsumata, Yoshinori; Yamamoto, Tsunehisa; Anzai, Atsushi; Isobe, Sarasa; Yoshida, Naohiro; Itoh, Hiroshi; Manabe, Ichiro; Sekai, Miho; Hamazaki, Yoko; Fukuda, Keiichi; Minato, Nagahiro; Sano, Motoaki

    2016-12-01

    Chronic inflammation in visceral adipose tissue (VAT) precipitates the development of cardiometabolic disorders. Although changes in T cell function associated with visceral obesity are thought to affect chronic VAT inflammation, the specific features of these changes remain elusive. Here, we have determined that a high-fat diet (HFD) caused a preferential increase and accumulation of CD44hiCD62LloCD4+ T cells that constitutively express PD-1 and CD153 in a B cell-dependent manner in VAT. These cells possessed characteristics of cellular senescence and showed a strong activation of Spp1 (encoding osteopontin [OPN]) in VAT. Upon T cell receptor stimulation, these T cells also produced large amounts of OPN in a PD-1-resistant manner in vitro. The features of CD153+PD-1+CD44hiCD4+ T cells were highly reminiscent of senescence-associated CD4+ T cells that normally increase with age. Adoptive transfer of CD153+PD-1+CD44hiCD4+ T cells from HFD-fed WT, but not Spp1-deficient, mice into the VAT of lean mice fed a normal diet recapitulated the essential features of VAT inflammation and insulin resistance. Our results demonstrate that a distinct CD153+PD-1+CD44hiCD4+ T cell population that accumulates in the VAT of HFD-fed obese mice causes VAT inflammation by producing large amounts of OPN. This finding suggests a link between visceral adiposity and immune aging.

  10. Adiposity and hand osteoarthritis: the Netherlands Epidemiology of Obesity study

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Obesity, usually characterized by the body mass index (BMI), is a risk factor for hand osteoarthritis (OA). We investigated whether adipose tissue and abdominal fat distribution are associated with hand OA. Methods The Netherlands Epidemiology of Obesity (NEO) study is a population-based cohort aged 45 to 65 years, including 5315 participants (53% women, median BMI 29.9 kg/m2). Fat percentage and fat mass (FM) (kg) were estimated using bioelectrical impedance analysis. The waist-to-hip ratio (WHR) was calculated. In 1721 participants, visceral adipose tissue (VAT) and subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) (cm2) were assessed using abdominal MR imaging. Hand OA was defined according to the ACR criteria. Odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were calculated for the association of fat percentage, FM, WHR, VAT and SAT with hand OA using logistic regression analyses per standard deviation, stratified by sex and adjusted for age. Results Hand OA was present in 8% of men and 20% of women. Fat percentage was associated with hand OA in men (OR 1.34 (95% CI 1.11 to 1.61)) and women (OR 1.26 (1.05 to 1.51)), as was FM. WHR was associated with hand OA in men (OR 1.45 (1.13 to 1.85)), and to a lesser extent in women (OR 1.17 (1.00 to 1.36)). Subgroup analysis revealed that VAT was associated with hand OA in men (OR1.33 (1.01 to 1.75)). This association increased after additional adjustment for FM (OR 1.51 (1.13 to 2.03)). Conclusions Fat percentage, FM and WHR were associated with hand OA. VAT was associated with hand OA in men, suggesting involvement of visceral fat in hand OA. PMID:24447395

  11. Obesity and the role of gut and adipose hormones in female reproduction.

    PubMed

    Gosman, Gabriella G; Katcher, Heather I; Legro, Richard S

    2006-01-01

    Reproductive function declines at both extremes of human energy balance. The relationship between obesity and reproductive function is complex and incompletely understood. The literature has established the negative impact of excess energy stores on ovulatory function and investigated the mechanisms whereby this occurs. Furthermore, weight loss in obese anovulatory women increases ovulation and conception. Obesity and anti-obesity therapy effects on the endometrium, implantation and early fetal development have received less attention. The discovery of adipokines and enterokines greatly expands the ability to investigate the relationship between obesity, therapies to produce weight loss and reproductive function. In this review, we discuss select adipose and enteric signals. We focus on in vitro, animal and human data that lend biological plausibility to adipokines and enterokines as mediators of obesity and reproduction. Very little published work exists that directly addresses adipocyte and enteric signals in this specific role; therefore, much of this review is on the basis of a synthesis of the literature in three areas: (i) in vitro and in vivo evidence regarding the reproductive effects of these signals; (ii) adipokine and enterokine changes that occur with weight-loss therapies, focusing on hypocaloric diets, bariatric surgery and drugs that target adipocyte or enteric signals and (iii) reproductive changes produced by these weight-loss therapies.

  12. Secreted human adipose leptin decreases mitochondrial respiration in HCT116 colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Yehuda-Shnaidman, Einav; Nimri, Lili; Tarnovscki, Tanya; Kirshtein, Boris; Rudich, Assaf; Schwartz, Betty

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a key risk factor for the development of colon cancer; however, the endocrine/paracrine/metabolic networks mediating this connection are poorly understood. Here we hypothesize that obesity results in secreted products from adipose tissue that induce malignancy-related metabolic alterations in colon cancer cells. Human HCT116 colon cancer cells, were exposed to conditioned media from cultured human adipose tissue fragments of obese vs. non-obese subjects. Oxygen consumption rate (OCR, mostly mitochondrial respiration) and extracellular acidification rate (ECAR, mostly lactate production via glycolysis) were examined vis-à-vis cell viability and expression of related genes and proteins. Our results show that conditioned media from obese (vs. non-obese) subjects decreased basal (40%, p<0.05) and maximal (50%, p<0.05) OCR and gene expression of mitochondrial proteins and Bax without affecting cell viability or expression of glycolytic enzymes. Similar changes could be recapitulated by incubating cells with leptin, whereas, leptin-receptor specific antagonist inhibited the reduced OCR induced by conditioned media from obese subjects. We conclude that secreted products from the adipose tissue of obese subjects inhibit mitochondrial respiration and function in HCT116 colon cancer cells, an effect that is at least partly mediated by leptin. These results highlight a putative novel mechanism for obesity-associated risk of gastrointestinal malignancies, and suggest potential new therapeutic avenues.

  13. Secreted Human Adipose Leptin Decreases Mitochondrial Respiration in HCT116 Colon Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yehuda-Shnaidman, Einav; Nimri, Lili; Tarnovscki, Tanya; Kirshtein, Boris; Rudich, Assaf; Schwartz, Betty

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is a key risk factor for the development of colon cancer; however, the endocrine/paracrine/metabolic networks mediating this connection are poorly understood. Here we hypothesize that obesity results in secreted products from adipose tissue that induce malignancy-related metabolic alterations in colon cancer cells. Human HCT116 colon cancer cells, were exposed to conditioned media from cultured human adipose tissue fragments of obese vs. non-obese subjects. Oxygen consumption rate (OCR, mostly mitochondrial respiration) and extracellular acidification rate (ECAR, mostly lactate production via glycolysis) were examined vis-à-vis cell viability and expression of related genes and proteins. Our results show that conditioned media from obese (vs. non-obese) subjects decreased basal (40%, p<0.05) and maximal (50%, p<0.05) OCR and gene expression of mitochondrial proteins and Bax without affecting cell viability or expression of glycolytic enzymes. Similar changes could be recapitulated by incubating cells with leptin, whereas, leptin-receptor specific antagonist inhibited the reduced OCR induced by conditioned media from obese subjects. We conclude that secreted products from the adipose tissue of obese subjects inhibit mitochondrial respiration and function in HCT116 colon cancer cells, an effect that is at least partly mediated by leptin. These results highlight a putative novel mechanism for obesity-associated risk of gastrointestinal malignancies, and suggest potential new therapeutic avenues. PMID:24073224

  14. A chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) protocol for use in whole human adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Haim, Yulia; Tarnovscki, Tanya; Bashari, Dana; Rudich, Assaf

    2013-11-01

    Chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) has become a central method when studying in vivo protein-DNA interactions, with the major challenge being the hope to capture "authentic" interactions. While ChIP protocols have been optimized for use with specific cell types and tissues including adipose tissue-derived cells, a working ChIP protocol addressing the challenges imposed by fresh whole human adipose tissue has not been described. Utilizing human paired omental and subcutaneous adipose tissue obtained during elective abdominal surgeries, we have carefully identified and optimized individual steps in the ChIP protocol employed directly on fresh tissue fragments. We describe a complete working protocol for using ChIP on whole adipose tissue fragments. Specific steps required adaptation of the ChIP protocol to human whole adipose tissue. In particular, a cross-linking step was performed directly on fresh small tissue fragments. Nuclei were isolated before releasing chromatin, allowing better management of fat content; a sonication protocol to obtain fragmented chromatin was optimized. We also demonstrate the high sensitivity of immunoprecipitated chromatin from adipose tissue to freezing. In conclusion, we describe the development of a ChIP protocol optimized for use in studying whole human adipose tissue, providing solutions for the unique challenges imposed by this tissue. Unraveling protein-DNA interaction in whole human adipose tissue will likely contribute to elucidating molecular pathways contributing to common human diseases such as obesity and type 2 diabetes.

  15. Secreted factors derived from obese visceral adipose tissue regulate the expression of breast malignant transformation genes.

    PubMed

    Crujeiras, A B; Cabia, B; Carreira, M C; Amil, M; Cueva, J; Andrade, S; Seoane, L M; Pardo, M; Sueiro, A; Baltar, J; Morais, T; Monteiro, M P; Lopez-Lopez, R; Casanueva, F F

    2016-03-01

    Obese adipose tissue, especially the visceral depot, exhibits altered production of several molecules that could have a role on the initiation/promotion of breast cancer development. The aim of this work was to evaluate the effect of excess adipose tissue and its secreted factors on the expression of genes involved in the early steps of tumor promotion on the mammary gland. Carcinogenesis-related gene expression was evaluated in mammary gland tissue from female diet-induced obese (DIO) Sprague-Dawley rats and circulating leukocytes isolated from a group of breast cancer diagnosed and non-diagnosed obese women and compared with their normal weight counterparts. In addition, the human non-tumoral mammary epithelial cell line MCF10A was treated in vitro with the visceral (retroperitoneal adipose tissue (RPAT)) or subcutaneous adipose tissue (SAT) secretome and with rising concentrations of the lipid peroxidation by-product 4-hydroxynonenal (4-HNE). DIO rats were classified as susceptible to DIO (DIO-S) or partially resistant to DIO (DIO-R) according to the maximum fat mass gain of the lean group as a cut-off. As compared with lean and DIO-R, the DIO-S group showed a higher fat mass and lower lean mass. The anatomical characteristic of DIO-S was correlated with differential expression of cellular proliferation (ALDH3A1 and MYC) and antioxidant and DNA protection (GSTM2, SIRT1), and tumor suppression (TP53, PTEN, TGFB1) genes. Remarkably, this carcinogenesis-related gene expression pattern was reproduced in MCF10A treated with the RPAT secretome from DIO-S rats and with the lipid peroxidation by-product 4-HNE. Moreover, this pattern was also detected in leukocytes from obese women compared with normal weight women without evidence of breast cancer. Lipid peroxides secreted by the obese visceral adipose tissue could be among the relevant factors that promote changes involved in the early steps of tumor development in mammary gland. These changes can be detected even

  16. Obesity and weight loss could alter the properties of adipose stem cells?

    PubMed Central

    Baptista, Leandra S; Silva, Karina R; Borojevic, Radovan

    2015-01-01

    The discovery that adipose tissue represents an interesting source of multipotent stem cells has led to many studies exploring the clinical potential of these cells in cell-based therapies. Recent advances in understanding the secretory capacity of adipose tissue and the role of adipokines in the development of obesity and associated disorders have added a new dimension to the study of adipose tissue biology in normal and diseased states. Subcutaneous adipose tissue forms the interface between the clinical application of regenerative medicine and the establishment of the pathological condition of obesity. These two facets of adipose tissue should be understood as potentially related phenomena. Because of the functional characteristics of adipose stem cells, these cells represent a fundamental tool for understanding how these two facets are interconnected and could be important for therapeutic applications. In fact, adipose tissue stem cells have multiple functions in obesity related to adipogenic, angiogenic and secretory capacities. In addition, we have also previously described a predominance of larger blood vessels and an adipogenic memory in the subcutaneous adipose tissue after massive weight loss subsequent to bariatric surgery (ex-obese patients). Understanding the reversibility of the behavior of adipose stem cells in obeses and in weight loss is relevant to both physiological studies and the potential use of these cells in regenerative medicine. PMID:25621116

  17. Concise review: The obesity cancer paradigm: exploration of the interactions and crosstalk with adipose stem cells.

    PubMed

    Strong, Amy L; Burow, Matthew E; Gimble, Jeffrey M; Bunnell, Bruce A

    2015-02-01

    With the recognition of obesity as a global health crisis, researchers have devoted greater effort to defining and understanding the pathophysiological molecular pathways regulating the biology of adipose tissue and obesity. Obesity, the excessive accumulation of adipose tissue due to hyperplasia and hypertrophy, has been linked to an increased incidence and aggressiveness of colon, hematological, prostate, and postmenopausal breast cancers. The increased morbidity and mortality of obesity-associated cancers have been attributed to higher levels of hormones, adipokines, and cytokines secreted by the adipose tissue. The increased amount of adipose tissue also results in higher numbers of adipose stromal/stem cells (ASCs). These ASCs have been shown to impact cancer progression directly through several mechanisms, including the increased recruitment of ASCs to the tumor site and increased production of cytokines and growth factors by ASCs and other cells within the tumor stroma. Emerging evidence indicates that obesity induces alterations in the biologic properties of ASCs, subsequently leading to enhanced tumorigenesis and metastasis of cancer cells. This review will discuss the links between obesity and cancer tumor progression, including obesity-associated changes in adipose tissue, inflammation, adipokines, and chemokines. Novel topics will include a discussion of the contribution of ASCs to this complex system with an emphasis on their role in the tumor stroma. The reciprocal and circular feedback loop between obesity and ASCs as well as the mechanisms by which ASCs from obese patients alter the biology of cancer cells and enhance tumorigenesis will be discussed. © 2014 AlphaMed Press.

  18. Role of NKG2D in obesity-induced adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Chung, Jun-Jae; Markiewicz, Mary A; Polić, Bojan; Shaw, Andrey S

    2014-01-01

    The early events that initiate inflammation in the adipose tissue during obesity are not well defined. It is unclear whether the recruitment of CD8 T cells to the adipose tissue during onset of obesity occurs through antigen-dependent or -independent processes. We have previously shown that interaction between NKG2D (natural-killer group 2, member D) and its ligand Rae-1ε is sufficient to recruit cytotoxic T lymphocytes to the pancreas and induce insulitis. Here, we tested whether NKG2D-NKG2D ligand interaction is also involved in obesity-induced adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance. We observed a significant induction of NKG2D ligand expression in the adipose tissue of obese mice, especially during the early stages of obesity. However, mice lacking NKG2D developed similar levels of insulin resistance and adipose tissue inflammation compared to control mice when placed on a high-fat diet. Moreover, overexpression of Rae-1ε in the adipose tissue did not increase immune cell infiltration to the adipose tissue either in the setting of a normal or high-fat diet. These results indicate that, unlike in the pancreas, NKG2D-NKG2D ligand interaction does not play a critical role in obesity-induced inflammation in the adipose tissue.

  19. Role of NKG2D in Obesity-Induced Adipose Tissue Inflammation and Insulin Resistance

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Jun-Jae; Markiewicz, Mary A.; Polić, Bojan; Shaw, Andrey S.

    2014-01-01

    The early events that initiate inflammation in the adipose tissue during obesity are not well defined. It is unclear whether the recruitment of CD8 T cells to the adipose tissue during onset of obesity occurs through antigen-dependent or -independent processes. We have previously shown that interaction between NKG2D (natural-killer group 2, member D) and its ligand Rae-1ε is sufficient to recruit cytotoxic T lymphocytes to the pancreas and induce insulitis. Here, we tested whether NKG2D–NKG2D ligand interaction is also involved in obesity-induced adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance. We observed a significant induction of NKG2D ligand expression in the adipose tissue of obese mice, especially during the early stages of obesity. However, mice lacking NKG2D developed similar levels of insulin resistance and adipose tissue inflammation compared to control mice when placed on a high-fat diet. Moreover, overexpression of Rae-1ε in the adipose tissue did not increase immune cell infiltration to the adipose tissue either in the setting of a normal or high-fat diet. These results indicate that, unlike in the pancreas, NKG2D–NKG2D ligand interaction does not play a critical role in obesity-induced inflammation in the adipose tissue. PMID:25333972

  20. Deficiency of Interleukin-15 Confers Resistance to Obesity by Diminishing Inflammation and Enhancing the Thermogenic Function of Adipose Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Lacraz, Gregory; Rakotoarivelo, Volatiana; Labbé, Sebastien M.; Vernier, Mathieu; Noll, Christophe; Mayhue, Marian; Stankova, Jana; Schwertani, Adel; Grenier, Guillaume; Carpentier, André; Richard, Denis; Ferbeyre, Gerardo; Fradette, Julie; Rola-Pleszczynski, Marek; Menendez, Alfredo; Langlois, Marie-France; Ilangumaran, Subburaj; Ramanathan, Sheela

    2016-01-01

    Objective IL-15 is an inflammatory cytokine secreted by many cell types. IL-15 is also produced during physical exercise by skeletal muscle and has been reported to reduce weight gain in mice. Contrarily, our findings on IL-15 knockout (KO) mice indicate that IL-15 promotes obesity. The aim of this study is to investigate the mechanisms underlying the pro-obesity role of IL-15 in adipose tissues. Methods Control and IL-15 KO mice were maintained on high fat diet (HFD) or normal control diet. After 16 weeks, body weight, adipose tissue and skeletal mass, serum lipid levels and gene/protein expression in the adipose tissues were evaluated. The effect of IL-15 on thermogenesis and oxygen consumption was also studied in primary cultures of adipocytes differentiated from mouse preadipocyte and human stem cells. Results Our results show that IL-15 deficiency prevents diet-induced weight gain and accumulation of lipids in visceral and subcutaneous white and brown adipose tissues. Gene expression analysis also revealed elevated expression of genes associated with adaptive thermogenesis in the brown and subcutaneous adipose tissues of IL-15 KO mice. Accordingly, oxygen consumption was increased in the brown adipocytes from IL-15 KO mice. In addition, IL-15 KO mice showed decreased expression of pro-inflammatory mediators in their adipose tissues. Conclusions Absence of IL-15 results in decreased accumulation of fat in the white adipose tissues and increased lipid utilization via adaptive thermogenesis. IL-15 also promotes inflammation in adipose tissues that could sustain chronic inflammation leading to obesity-associated metabolic syndrome. PMID:27684068

  1. Quantification of adipose tissue in a rodent model of obesity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Johnson, David H.; Flask, Chris; Wan, Dinah; Ernsberger, Paul; Wilson, David L.

    2006-03-01

    Obesity is a global epidemic and a comorbidity for many diseases. We are using MRI to characterize obesity in rodents, especially with regard to visceral fat. Rats were scanned on a 1.5T clinical scanner, and a T1W, water-spoiled image (fat only) was divided by a matched T1W image (fat + water) to yield a ratio image related to the lipid content in each voxel. The ratio eliminated coil sensitivity inhomogeneity and gave flat values across a fat pad, except for outlier voxels (> 1.0) due to motion. Following sacrifice, fat pad volumes were dissected and measured by displacement in canola oil. In our study of 6 lean (SHR), 6 dietary obese (SHR-DO), and 9 genetically obese rats (SHROB), significant differences in visceral fat volume was observed with an average of 29+/-16 ml increase due to diet and 84+/-44 ml increase due to genetics relative to lean control with a volume of 11+/-4 ml. Subcutaneous fat increased 14+/-8 ml due to diet and 198+/-105 ml due to genetics relative to the lean control with 7+/-3 ml. Visceral fat strongly correlated between MRI and dissection (R2 = 0.94), but MRI detected over five times the subcutaneous fat found with error-prone dissection. Using a semi-automated images segmentation method on the ratio images, intra-subject variation was very low. Fat pad composition as estimated from ratio images consistently differentiated the strains with SHROB having a greater lipid concentration in adipose tissues. Future work will include in vivo studies of diet versus genetics, identification of new phenotypes, and corrective measures for obesity; technical efforts will focus on correction for motion and automation in quantification.

  2. Involvement of lysosomal dysfunction in autophagosome accumulation and early pathologies in adipose tissue of obese mice

    PubMed Central

    Mizunoe, Yuhei; Sudo, Yuka; Okita, Naoyuki; Hiraoka, Hidenori; Mikami, Kentaro; Narahara, Tomohiro; Negishi, Arisa; Yoshida, Miki; Higashibata, Rikako; Watanabe, Shukoh; Kaneko, Hiroki; Natori, Daiki; Furuichi, Takuma; Yasukawa, Hiromine; Kobayashi, Masaki; Higami, Yoshikazu

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Whether obesity accelerates or suppresses autophagy in adipose tissue is still debatable. To clarify dysregulation of autophagy and its role in pathologies of obese adipose tissue, we focused on lysosomal function, protease maturation and activity, both in vivo and in vitro. First, we showed that autophagosome formation was accelerated, but autophagic clearance was impaired in obese adipose tissue. We also found protein and activity levels of CTSL (cathepsin L) were suppressed in obese adipose tissue, while the activity of CTSB (cathepsin B) was significantly enhanced. Moreover, cellular senescence and inflammasomes were activated in obese adipose tissue. In 3T3L1 adipocytes, downregulation of CTSL deteriorated autophagic clearance, upregulated expression of CTSB, promoted cellular senescence and activated inflammasomes. Upregulation of CTSB promoted additional activation of inflammasomes. Therefore, we suggest lysosomal dysfunction observed in obese adipose tissue leads to lower autophagic clearance, resulting in autophagosome accumulation. Simultaneously, lysosomal abnormalities, including deteriorated CTSL function and compensatory activation of CTSB, caused cellular senescence and inflammasome activation. Our findings strongly suggest lysosomal dysfunction is involved in early pathologies of obese adipose tissue. PMID:28121218

  3. Obesity-associated insulin resistance is correlated to adipose tissue vascular endothelial growth factors and metalloproteinase levels.

    PubMed

    Tinahones, Francisco José; Coín-Aragüez, Leticia; Mayas, Maria Dolores; Garcia-Fuentes, Eduardo; Hurtado-Del-Pozo, Carmen; Vendrell, Joan; Cardona, Fernando; Calvo, Rosa-Maria; Obregon, Maria-Jesus; El Bekay, Rajaa

    2012-04-02

    The expansion of adipose tissue is linked to the development of its vasculature, which appears to have the potential to regulate the onset of obesity. However, at present, there are no studies highlighting the relationship between human adipose tissue angiogenesis and obesity-associated insulin resistance (IR). Our aim was to analyze and compare angiogenic factor expression levels in both subcutaneous (SC) and omentum (OM) adipose tissues from morbidly obese patients (n = 26) with low (OB/L-IR) (healthy obese) and high (OB/H-IR) degrees of IR, and lean controls (n = 17). Another objective was to examine angiogenic factor correlations with obesity and IR.Here we found that VEGF-A was the isoform with higher expression in both OM and SC adipose tissues, and was up-regulated 3-fold, together with MMP9 in OB/L-IR as compared to leans. This up-regulation decreased by 23% in OB/-H-IR compared to OB/L-IR. On the contrary, VEGF-B, VEGF-C and VEGF-D, together with MMP15 was down-regulated in both OB/H-IR and OB/L-IR compared to lean patients. Moreover, MMP9 correlated positively and VEGF-C, VEGF-D and MMP15 correlated negatively with HOMA-IR, in both SC and OM. We hereby propose that the alteration in MMP15, VEGF-B, VEGF-C and VEGF-D gene expression may be caused by one of the relevant adipose tissue processes related to the development of IR, and the up-regulation of VEGF-A in adipose tissue could have a relationship with the prevention of this pathology.

  4. Obesity-associated insulin resistance is correlated to adipose tissue vascular endothelial growth factors and metalloproteinase levels

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The expansion of adipose tissue is linked to the development of its vasculature, which appears to have the potential to regulate the onset of obesity. However, at present, there are no studies highlighting the relationship between human adipose tissue angiogenesis and obesity-associated insulin resistance (IR). Results Our aim was to analyze and compare angiogenic factor expression levels in both subcutaneous (SC) and omentum (OM) adipose tissues from morbidly obese patients (n = 26) with low (OB/L-IR) (healthy obese) and high (OB/H-IR) degrees of IR, and lean controls (n = 17). Another objective was to examine angiogenic factor correlations with obesity and IR. Here we found that VEGF-A was the isoform with higher expression in both OM and SC adipose tissues, and was up-regulated 3-fold, together with MMP9 in OB/L-IR as compared to leans. This up-regulation decreased by 23% in OB/-H-IR compared to OB/L-IR. On the contrary, VEGF-B, VEGF-C and VEGF-D, together with MMP15 was down-regulated in both OB/H-IR and OB/L-IR compared to lean patients. Moreover, MMP9 correlated positively and VEGF-C, VEGF-D and MMP15 correlated negatively with HOMA-IR, in both SC and OM. Conclusion We hereby propose that the alteration in MMP15, VEGF-B, VEGF-C and VEGF-D gene expression may be caused by one of the relevant adipose tissue processes related to the development of IR, and the up-regulation of VEGF-A in adipose tissue could have a relationship with the prevention of this pathology. PMID:22471305

  5. Early adiposity rebound and the risk of adult obesity.

    PubMed

    Whitaker, R C; Pepe, M S; Wright, J A; Seidel, K D; Dietz, W H

    1998-03-01

    At 5 to 6 years of age, body fatness normally declines to a minimum, a point called adiposity rebound (AR), before increasing again into adulthood. We determined whether a younger age at AR was associated with an increased risk of adult obesity and whether this risk was independent of fatness at AR and parent obesity. A retrospective cohort study using lifelong height and weight measurements recorded in outpatient medical records. Group Health Cooperative of Puget Sound (GHC), a health maintenance organization based in Seattle, Washington. All 390 GHC members (and their parents) born at GHC between January 1, 1965, and January 1, 1971, who had at least one recorded adult height and weight measurement plus two visits with recorded height and weight measurements in each of three age intervals: 1.5 to 4, 4 to 8, and 8 to 16 years. We calculated the mean body mass index (BMI) of each subject during young adulthood (age 21 to 29 years) and the BMI of the parents when each subject was 1.5 years of age. Adult obesity was defined as a BMI >/=27.8 for males and >/=27. 3 for females. Curves were fit to each subject's BMI values between ages 1.5 and 16 years, and the age and BMI at AR were calculated from these curves. Subjects were divided into tertiles of age at AR (early, middle, and late), BMI at AR, and parent BMI (heavy, medium, and lean). The mean age at AR was 5.5 years, and 15% of the cohort was obese in young adulthood. Adult obesity rates were higher in those with early versus late AR (25% vs 5%), those who were heavy versus lean at AR (24% vs 4%), those with heavy versus lean mothers (25% vs 5%), and those with heavy versus lean fathers (21% vs 5%). After adjusting for parent BMI and BMI at AR, the odds ratio for adult obesity associated with early versus late AR was 6.0 (95% CI, 1.3-26.6). An early AR is associated with an increased risk of adult obesity independent of parent obesity and the BMI at AR. Future research should examine the biological and behavioral

  6. Endogenous ways to stimulate brown adipose tissue in humans.

    PubMed

    Broeders, Evie; Bouvy, Nicole D; van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D

    2015-03-01

    Obesity is the result of disequilibrium between energy intake and energy expenditure (EE). Successful long-term weight loss is difficult to achieve with current strategies for the correction of this caloric imbalance. Non-shivering thermogenesis (NST) in brown adipose tissue (BAT) is a possible therapeutic target for the prevention and treatment of obesity and associated metabolic diseases. In recent years, more knowledge about the function and stimulation of bat has been obtained. The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) is currently seen as the main effector for brown fat function. Also, interplay between the thyroid axis and SNS plays an important role in BAT thermogenesis. Almost daily new pathways for the induction of BAT thermogenesis and 'browning' of white adipose tissue (WAT) are identified. Especially the activation of BAT via endogenous pathways has received strong scientific attention. Here we will discuss the relevance of several pathways in activating BAT and their implications for the treatment of obesity. In this review we will focus on the discussion of the most promising endocrine and paracrine pathways to stimulate BAT, by factors and pathways that naturally occur in the human body.

  7. Human Brown Fat and Obesity: Methodological Aspects

    PubMed Central

    van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter

    2011-01-01

    Much is known about brown adipose tissue (BAT) in rodents. Its function is to generate heat in response to low environmental temperatures and to diet or overfeeding. The knowledge about BAT in humans is still rather limited despite the recent rediscovery of its functionality in adults. This review highlights the information available on the contribution of BAT in increasing human energy expenditure in relation to obesity. Besides that methodological aspects will be discussed that need special attention in order to unravel the heat producing capacity of human BAT, the recruitment of the tissue, and its functionality. PMID:22654813

  8. MRI characterization of brown adipose tissue in obese and normal-weight children.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jie; Schoeneman, Samantha E; Zhang, Huiyuan; Kwon, Soyang; Rigsby, Cynthia K; Shore, Richard M; Josefson, Jami L

    2015-10-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is identified in mammals as an adaptive thermogenic organ for modulation of energy expenditure and heat generation. Human BAT may be primarily composed of brown-in-white (BRITE) adipocytes and stimulation of BRITE may serve as a potential target for obesity interventions. Current imaging studies of BAT detection and characterization have been mainly limited to PET/CT. MRI is an emerging application for BAT characterization in healthy children. To exploit Dixon and diffusion-weighted MRI methods to characterize cervical-supraclavicular BAT/BRITE properties in normal-weight and obese children while accounting for pubertal status. Twenty-eight healthy children (9-15 years old) with a normal or obese body mass index participated. MRI exams were performed to characterize supraclavicular adipose tissues by measuring tissue fat percentage, T2*, tissue water mobility, and microvasculature properties. We used multivariate linear regression models to compare tissue properties between normal-weight and obese groups while accounting for pubertal status. MRI measurements of BAT/BRITE tissues in obese children showed higher fat percentage (P < 0.0001), higher T2* (P < 0.0001), and lower diffusion coefficient (P = 0.015) compared with normal-weight children. Pubertal status was a significant covariate for the T2* measurement, with higher T2* (P = 0.0087) in pubertal children compared to prepubertal children. Perfusion measurements varied by pubertal status. Compared to normal-weight children, obese prepubertal children had lower perfusion fraction (P = 0.003) and pseudo-perfusion coefficient (P = 0.048); however, obese pubertal children had higher perfusion fraction (P = 0.02) and pseudo-perfusion coefficient (P = 0.028). This study utilized chemical-shift Dixon MRI and diffusion-weighted MRI methods to characterize supraclavicular BAT/BRITE tissue properties. The multi-parametric evaluation revealed evidence of

  9. Breast cancer 1 (BrCa1) may be behind decreased lipogenesis in adipose tissue from obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Francisco J; Moreno-Navarrete, José M; Mayas, Dolores; García-Santos, Eva; Gómez-Serrano, María; Rodriguez-Hermosa, José I; Ruiz, Bartomeu; Ricart, Wifredo; Tinahones, Francisco J; Frühbeck, Gema; Peral, Belen; Fernández-Real, José M

    2012-01-01

    Expression and activity of the main lipogenic enzymes is paradoxically decreased in obesity, but the mechanisms behind these findings are poorly known. Breast Cancer 1 (BrCa1) interacts with acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) reducing the rate of fatty acid biosynthesis. In this study, we aimed to evaluate BrCa1 in human adipose tissue according to obesity and insulin resistance, and in vitro cultured adipocytes. BrCa1 gene expression, total and phosphorylated (P-) BrCa1, and ACC were analyzed in adipose tissue samples obtained from a total sample of 133 subjects. BrCa1 expression was also evaluated during in vitro differentiation of human adipocytes and 3T3-L1 cells. BrCa1 gene expression was significantly up-regulated in both omental (OM; 1.36-fold, p = 0.002) and subcutaneous (SC; 1.49-fold, p = 0.001) adipose tissue from obese subjects. In parallel with increased BrCa1 mRNA, P-ACC was also up-regulated in SC (p = 0.007) as well as in OM (p = 0.010) fat from obese subjects. Consistent with its role limiting fatty acid biosynthesis, both BrCa1 mRNA (3.5-fold, p<0.0001) and protein (1.2-fold, p = 0.001) were increased in pre-adipocytes, and decreased during in vitro adipogenesis, while P-ACC decreased during differentiation of human adipocytes (p = 0.005) allowing lipid biosynthesis. Interestingly, BrCa1 gene expression in mature adipocytes was restored by inflammatory stimuli (macrophage conditioned medium), whereas lipogenic genes significantly decreased. The specular findings of BrCa1 and lipogenic enzymes in adipose tissue and adipocytes reported here suggest that BrCa1 might help to control fatty acid biosynthesis in adipocytes and adipose tissue from obese subjects.

  10. Timing of adiposity rebound: a step toward preventing obesity.

    PubMed

    Boonpleng, Wannaporn; Park, Chang Gi; Gallo, Agatha M

    2012-01-01

    Adiposity rebound (AR) is used as an indicator to predict obesity in adults. Previous studies about AR in the U.S. were based on local data; therefore, the generalizability of study results is limited. The purpose of this study was to identify the timing of AR for U.S. children using a national survey data set, the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES). Combined data of NHANES 1999-2008 were used to estimate the national level of this critical period for U.S. children developing obesity. Data of 8813 children 2 to 10 years of age were analyzed. Mean body mass index was estimated using the survey sample analysis method. Visual inspection method was employed to examine the timing of AR. Gender and race/ethnicity differences in AR were identified at an early age. AR occurred earlier in girls and in Non-Hispanic African-American children than in Non-Hispanic Caucasian children. Differences in timing for AR by gender and race/ethnicity should be considered in planning early and timely intervention efforts to prevent childhood obesity.

  11. Hemodynamic overload and intra-abdominal adiposity in obese children: Relationships with cardiovascular structure and function.

    PubMed

    Kozakova, M; Morizzo, C; Bianchi, V; Marchetti, S; Federico, G; Palombo, C

    2016-01-01

    Childhood obesity promotes adverse changes in cardiovascular structure and function. This study evaluated whether these changes are related to intra-abdominal adiposity and associated cardiometabolic risk or to body-size induced hemodynamic overload. 55 obese children/adolescents and 35 healthy-weight controls underwent carotid, cardiac and abdominal ultrasound to assess carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT), diameter, distension and stiffness, left ventricular (LV) dimension, mass and function and extent of intra-abdominal adiposity. As compared to controls with healthy BMI, obese children had higher systolic blood pressure (BP), stroke volume and lower total peripheral resistance (P < 0.001-0.0001), higher plasma triglycerides, glycated hemoglobin, insulin and HOMA-IR index (P = 0.01-<0.0001), higher carotid IMT, diameter and distension (P < 0.005-0.0005), higher LV diameter, wall thickness and mass (P < 0.001-0.0001), and impaired LV diastolic function assessed by myocardial longitudinal performance (P < 0.005). In entire population, independent determinants of carotid diameter, LV diameter, wall thickness and mass were fat-free mass (or stroke volume, respectively) and BP. Carotid distension was determined by carotid diameter and BP, and carotid IMT by carotid diameter, BP, HDL-cholesterol and glycated hemoglobin. LV diastolic performance was inversely related to preperitoneal fat thickness and plasma insulin levels. Obese youths present signs of impaired lipid and glucose metabolism, hyperdynamic circulation and cardiovascular changes. Increase in LV dimensions and mass and in carotid diameter and distension seems to reflect adaptation to body-size induced increase in hemodynamic load, changes in LV diastolic performance a negative impact of intra-abdominal adiposity and associated metabolic risk, and increase in IMT both adaptive remodeling and metabolic risk. Copyright © 2015 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of

  12. A major role of insulin in promoting obesity-associated adipose tissue inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Pedersen, David J.; Guilherme, Adilson; Danai, Laura V.; Heyda, Lauren; Matevossian, Anouch; Cohen, Jessica; Nicoloro, Sarah M.; Straubhaar, Juerg; Noh, Hye Lim; Jung, DaeYoung; Kim, Jason K.; Czech, Michael P.

    2015-01-01

    Objective Adipose tissue (AT) inflammation is associated with systemic insulin resistance and hyperinsulinemia in obese rodents and humans. A longstanding concept is that hyperinsulinemia may promote systemic insulin resistance through downregulation of its receptor on target tissues. Here we tested the novel hypothesis that insulin also impairs systemic insulin sensitivity by specifically enhancing adipose inflammation. Methods Circulating insulin levels were reduced by about 50% in diet-induced and genetically obese mice by treatments with diazoxide or streptozotocin, respectively. We then examined AT crown-like structures, macrophage markers and pro-inflammatory cytokine expression in AT. AT lipogenesis and systemic insulin sensitivity was also monitored. Conversely, insulin was infused into lean mice to determine its affects on the above parameters. Results Lowering circulating insulin levels in obese mice by streptozotocin treatment decreased macrophage content in AT, enhancing insulin stimulated Akt phosphorylation and de novo lipogenesis (DNL). Moreover, responsiveness of blood glucose levels to injected insulin was improved by streptozotocin and diazoxide treatments of obese mice without changes in body weight. Remarkably, even in lean mice, infusion of insulin under constant euglycemic conditions stimulated expression of cytokines in AT. Consistent with these findings, insulin treatment of 3T3-L1 adipocytes caused a 10-fold increase in CCL2 mRNA levels within 6 h, which was blocked by the ERK inhibitor PD98059. Conclusion Taken together, these results indicate that obesity-associated hyperinsulinemia unexpectedly drives AT inflammation in obese mice, which in turn contributes to factors that suppress insulin-stimulated adipocyte DNL and systemic insulin sensitivity. PMID:26137438

  13. Contribution of daily and seasonal biorhythms to obesity in humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanikowska, Dominika; Sato, Maki; Witowski, Janusz

    2015-04-01

    While the significance of obesity as a serious health problem is well recognized, little is known about whether and how biometerological factors and biorhythms causally contribute to obesity. Obesity is often associated with altered seasonal and daily rhythmicity in food intake, metabolism and adipose tissue function. Environmental stimuli affect both seasonal and daily rhythms, and the latter are under additional control of internal molecular oscillators, or body clocks. Modifications of clock genes in animals and changes to normal daily rhythms in humans (as in shift work and sleep deprivation) result in metabolic dysregulation that favours weight gain. Here, we briefly review the potential links between biorhythms and obesity in humans.

  14. [Brown adipose tissue: the body's own weapon against obesity?].

    PubMed

    Boon, Mariëtte R; Bakker, Leontine E H; Meinders, A Edo; van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter; Rensen, Patrick C N; Jazet, Ingrid M

    2013-01-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) dissipates energy stored in triglycerides as heat via the uncoupling protein UCP1. It has recently been discovered that BAT is present and active in adults. BAT is situated predominantly around the aorta and in the supraclavicular area. BAT volume and activity are lower in individuals who are obese. This suggests that BAT significantly contributes to total energy expenditure. Several pathological conditions that are accompanied by activation of BAT, such as hyperthyroidism and phaeochromocytoma, result in the increased expenditure of energy and in weight loss. Various ways in which BAT can be manipulated to increase the expenditure of energy have been identified, e.g. exposure to cold, the use of so-called uncoupling agents or the administration of the hormone irisin. The activation of BAT could potentially be used to induce weight loss.

  15. ACE2/Ang 1-7 axis: A critical regulator of epicardial adipose tissue inflammation and cardiac dysfunction in obesity

    PubMed Central

    Patel, Vaibhav B.; Basu, Ratnadeep; Oudit, Gavin Y.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Obesity is characterized by an excessive fat accumulation in adipose tissues leading to weight gain and is increasing in prevalence and is strongly associated with metabolic and cardiovascular disorders. The renin-angiotensin system (RAS) has emerged as a key pathogenic mechanism for these disorders; activated RAS and angiotensin (Ang) II production results in worsening of cardiovascular diseases and angiotensin converting enzyme 2 (ACE2) negatively regulates RAS by metabolizing Ang II into Ang 1-7. ACE2 is expressed in the adipocytes and its expression is upregulated in response to high fat diet induced obesity in mice. Loss of ACE2 results in heart failure with preserved ejection fraction which is mediated in part by epicardial adipose tissue inflammation. Angiotensin 1-7 reduces the obesity associated cardiac dysfunction predominantly via its role in adiponectin expression and attenuation of epicardial adipose tissue inflammation. Human heart disease is also linked with inflammed epicardial adipose tissue. Here, we discuss the important interpretation of the novel of ACE2/Ang 1-7 pathway in obesity associated cardiac dysfunction. PMID:27617176

  16. Obesity accelerates T cell senescence in murine visceral adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    Shirakawa, Kohsuke; Yan, Xiaoxiang; Shinmura, Ken; Endo, Jin; Kataoka, Masaharu; Katsumata, Yoshinori; Yamamoto, Tsunehisa; Anzai, Atsushi; Isobe, Sarasa; Yoshida, Naohiro; Itoh, Hiroshi; Manabe, Ichiro; Sekai, Miho; Hamazaki, Yoko; Fukuda, Keiichi; Minato, Nagahiro

    2016-01-01

    Chronic inflammation in visceral adipose tissue (VAT) precipitates the development of cardiometabolic disorders. Although changes in T cell function associated with visceral obesity are thought to affect chronic VAT inflammation, the specific features of these changes remain elusive. Here, we have determined that a high-fat diet (HFD) caused a preferential increase and accumulation of CD44hiCD62LloCD4+ T cells that constitutively express PD-1 and CD153 in a B cell–dependent manner in VAT. These cells possessed characteristics of cellular senescence and showed a strong activation of Spp1 (encoding osteopontin [OPN]) in VAT. Upon T cell receptor stimulation, these T cells also produced large amounts of OPN in a PD-1–resistant manner in vitro. The features of CD153+PD-1+CD44hiCD4+ T cells were highly reminiscent of senescence-associated CD4+ T cells that normally increase with age. Adoptive transfer of CD153+PD-1+CD44hiCD4+ T cells from HFD-fed WT, but not Spp1-deficient, mice into the VAT of lean mice fed a normal diet recapitulated the essential features of VAT inflammation and insulin resistance. Our results demonstrate that a distinct CD153+PD-1+CD44hiCD4+ T cell population that accumulates in the VAT of HFD-fed obese mice causes VAT inflammation by producing large amounts of OPN. This finding suggests a link between visceral adiposity and immune aging. PMID:27820698

  17. C1q/TNF-related protein 6 (CTRP6) links obesity to adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Lei, Xia; Seldin, Marcus M; Little, Hannah C; Choy, Nicholas; Klonisch, Thomas; Wong, G William

    2017-09-08

    Obesity is associated with chronic low-grade inflammation, and metabolic regulators linking obesity to inflammation have therefore received much attention. Secreted C1q/TNF-related proteins (CTRPs) are one such group of regulators that regulate glucose and fat metabolism in peripheral tissues and modulate inflammation in adipose tissue. We have previously shown that expression of CTRP6 is up-regulated in leptin-deficient mice and, conversely, down-regulated by the anti-diabetic drug rosiglitazone. Here, we provide evidence for a novel role of CTRP6 in modulating both inflammation and insulin sensitivity. We found that in obese and diabetic humans and mouse models, CTRP6 expression was markedly up-regulated in adipose tissue and that stromal vascular cells, such as macrophages, are a major CTRP6 source. Overexpressing mouse or human CTRP6 impaired glucose disposal in peripheral tissues in response to glucose and insulin challenge in wild-type mice. Conversely, Ctrp6 gene deletion improved insulin action and increased metabolic rate and energy expenditure in diet-induced obese mice. Mechanistically, CTRP6 regulates local inflammation and glucose metabolism by targeting macrophages and adipocytes, respectively. In cultured macrophages, recombinant CTRP6 dose-dependently up-regulated the expression and production of TNF-α. Conversely, CTRP6 deficiency reduced circulating inflammatory cytokines and pro-inflammatory macrophages in adipose tissue. CTRP6-overexpressing mice or CTRP6-treated adipocytes had reduced insulin-stimulated Akt phosphorylation and glucose uptake. In contrast, loss of CTRP6 enhanced insulin-stimulated Akt activation in adipose tissue. Together, these results establish CTRP6 as a novel metabolic/immune regulator linking obesity to adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance. © 2017 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Sexual Dimorphism in Clock Genes Expression in Human Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Abellán, P.; Madrid, J. A.; Luján, J. A.; Frutos, M. D.; González, R.; Martínez-Augustín, O.; de Medina, F. Sánchez; Ordovás, J. M.; Garaulet, M.

    2015-01-01

    Background This study was carried out to investigate whether sex-related differences exist in the adipocyte expression of clock genes from subcutaneous abdominal and visceral fat depots in severely obese patients. Methods We investigated 16 morbidly obese patients, eight men and eight women (mean age 45±20 years; mean BMI 46±6 kg/m2), undergoing laparoscopic gastric bypass surgery. Biopsies were taken as paired samples [subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue (AT)] at the beginning of the surgical process at 11:00 h in the morning. Metabolic syndrome features such as waist circumference, plasma glucose, triglycerides, total cholesterol, high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) were also studied. The expression of clock genes (PER2, BMAL1, and CRY1) was measured by quantitative real-time PCR, Western blot, and immunohistochemical analysis. Results Gene expression was significantly higher in women than in men for the three genes studied in both ATs (P<0.05). In visceral fat, these differences were more marked. (P<0.001). Western blot analysis partially confirmed these results since statistical differences were observed for PER2 in both ATs and for CRY1 in subcutaneous adipose tissue. There were no differences in BMAL1 protein expression. Interestingly, clock gene expression level was correlated with LDL-C and HDL-C (P<0.05). Moreover, we found significant associations with body fat mass in women and with age in men. Conclusions Clock genes expression is sex dependent in human adipose tissue from morbidly obese subjects and correlates to a decreased in metabolic syndrome-related traits. These preliminary results make necessary to go deep into the knowledge of the molecular basis of the sexual dimorphism in chronobiology. PMID:22081238

  19. Sex differences in metabolic and adipose tissue responses to juvenile-onset obesity in sheep.

    PubMed

    Bloor, Ian D; Sébert, Sylvain P; Saroha, Vivek; Gardner, David S; Keisler, Duane H; Budge, Helen; Symonds, Michael E; Mahajan, Ravi P

    2013-10-01

    Sex is a major factor determining adipose tissue distribution and the subsequent adverse effects of obesity-related disease including type 2 diabetes. The role of gender on juvenile obesity and the accompanying metabolic and inflammatory responses is not well established. Using an ovine model of juvenile onset obesity induced by reduced physical activity, we examined the effect of gender on metabolic, circulatory, and related inflammatory and energy-sensing profiles of the major adipose tissue depots. Despite a similar increase in fat mass with obesity between genders, males demonstrated a higher storage capacity of lipids within perirenal-abdominal adipocytes and exhibited raised insulin. In contrast, obese females became hypercortisolemic, a response that was positively correlated with central fat mass. Analysis of gene expression in perirenal-abdominal adipose tissue demonstrated the stimulation of inflammatory markers in males, but not females, with obesity. Obese females displayed increased expression of genes involved in the glucocorticoid axis and energy sensing in perirenal-abdominal, but not omental, adipose tissue, indicating a depot-specific mechanism that may be protective from the adverse effects of metabolic dysfunction and inflammation. In conclusion, young males are at a greater risk than females to the onset of comorbidities associated with juvenile-onset obesity. These sex-specific differences in cortisol and adipose tissue could explain the earlier onset of the metabolic-related diseases in males compared with females after obesity.

  20. Retention of sedentary obese visceral white adipose tissue phenotype with intermittent physical activity despite reduced adiposity.

    PubMed

    Wainright, Katherine S; Fleming, Nicholas J; Rowles, Joe L; Welly, Rebecca J; Zidon, Terese M; Park, Young-Min; Gaines, T'Keaya L; Scroggins, Rebecca J; Anderson-Baucum, Emily K; Hasty, Alyssa H; Vieira-Potter, Victoria J; Padilla, Jaume

    2015-09-01

    Regular physical activity is effective in reducing visceral white adipose tissue (AT) inflammation and oxidative stress, and these changes are commonly associated with reduced adiposity. However, the impact of multiple periods of physical activity, intercalated by periods of inactivity, i.e., intermittent physical activity, on markers of AT inflammation and oxidative stress is unknown. In the present study, 5-wk-old male C57BL/6 mice were randomized into three groups (n = 10/group): sedentary, regular physical activity, and intermittent physical activity, for 24 wk. All animals were singly housed and fed a diet containing 45% kcal from fat. Regularly active mice had access to voluntary running wheels throughout the study period, whereas intermittently active mice had access to running wheels for 3-wk intervals (i.e., 3 wk on/3 wk off) throughout the study. At death, regular and intermittent physical activity was associated with similar reductions in visceral AT mass (approximately -24%, P < 0.05) relative to sedentary. However, regularly, but not intermittently, active mice exhibited decreased expression of visceral AT genes related to inflammation (e.g., monocyte chemoattractant protein 1), immune cell infiltration (e.g., CD68, CD11c, F4/80, CD11b/CD18), oxidative stress (e.g., p47 phagocyte oxidase), and endoplasmic reticulum stress (e.g., CCAAT enhancer-binding protein homologous protein; all P < 0.05). Furthermore, regular, but not intermittent, physical activity was associated with a trend toward improvement in glucose tolerance (P = 0.059). Collectively, these findings suggest that intermittent physical activity over a prolonged period of time may lead to a reduction in adiposity but with retention of a sedentary obese white AT and metabolic phenotype.

  1. Automated segmentation of abdominal subcutaneous adipose tissue and visceral adipose tissue in obese adolescent in MRI.

    PubMed

    Hui, Steve C N; Zhang, Teng; Shi, Lin; Wang, Defeng; Ip, Chei-Bing; Chu, Winnie C W

    2017-10-07

    To develop a reliable and reproducible automatic technique to segment and measure SAT and VAT based on MRI. Chemical-shift water-fat MRI were taken on twelve obese adolescents (mean age: 16.1±0.6, BMI: 31.3±2.3) recruited under the health monitoring program. The segmentation applied a spoke template created using Midpoint Circle algorithm followed by Bresenham's Line algorithm to detect narrow connecting regions between subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissues. Upon satisfaction of given constrains, a cut was performed to separate SAT and VAT. Bone marrow was consisted in pelvis and femur. By using the intensity difference in T2*, a mask was created to extract bone marrow adipose tissue (MAT) from VAT. Validation was performed using a semi-automatic method. Pearson coefficient, Bland-Altman plot and intra-class coefficient (ICC) were applied to measure accuracy and reproducibility. Pearson coefficient indicated that results from the proposed method achieved high correlation with the semi-automatic method. Bland-Altman plot and ICC showed good agreement between the two methods. Lowest ICC was obtained in VAT segmentation at lower regions of the abdomen while the rests were all above 0.80. ICC (0.98-0.99) also indicated the proposed method performed good reproducibility. No user interaction was required during execution of the algorithm and the segmented images and volume results were given as output. This technique utilized the feature in the regions connecting subcutaneous and visceral fat and T2* intensity difference in bone marrow to achieve volumetric measurement of various types of adipose tissue in abdominal site. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  2. Brown Adipose Tissue and Browning Agents: Irisin and FGF21 in the Development of Obesity in Children and Adolescents.

    PubMed

    Pyrżak, B; Demkow, U; Kucharska, A M

    2015-01-01

    In the pediatric population, especially in early infancy, the activity of brown adipose tissue (BAT) is the highest. Further in life BAT is more active in individuals with a lower body mass index and one can expect that BAT is protective against childhood obesity. The development of BAT throughout the whole life can be regulated by genetic, endocrine, and environmental factors. Three distinct adipose depots have been identified: white, brown, and beige adipocytes. The process by which BAT can become beige is still unclear and is an area of intensive research. The "browning agents" increase energy expenditure through the production of heat. Numerous factors known as "browning agents" have currently been described. In humans, recent studies justify a notion of a role of novel myokines: irisin and fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) in the metabolism and development of obesity. This review describes a possible role of irisin and FGF21 in the pathogenesis of obesity in children.

  3. Adipose tissue extracellular matrix and vascular abnormalities in obesity and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Spencer, Michael; Unal, Resat; Zhu, Beibei; Rasouli, Neda; McGehee, Robert E; Peterson, Charlotte A; Kern, Philip A

    2011-12-01

    Insulin resistance is associated with inflammation, fibrosis, and hypoxia in adipose tissue. This study was intended to better characterize the extracellular matrix (ECM) and vascularity of insulin-resistant adipose tissue. Adipose expression of collagens, elastin, and angiogenic factors was assessed using real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry (IHC) in abdominal sc adipose tissue. Adipocyte-macrophage coculture experiments examined the effects of polarized macrophages on adipose ECM gene expression, and the effects of collagens were measured in an angiogenesis assay. A total of 74 nondiabetic subjects participated at a University Clinical Research Center. Interventions included baseline adipose biopsy and measurement of insulin sensitivity. Outcome measures included characterization of vascularity and ECM in adipose tissue. CD31 (an endothelial marker) mRNA showed no significant correlation with body mass index or insulin sensitivity. In a subgroup of 17 subjects (nine obese, eight lean), CD31-positive capillary number in obese was decreased by 58%, whereas larger vessels were increased by 70%, accounting for the lack of change in CD31 expression with obesity. Using IHC, obese (compared with lean) subjects had decreased elastin and increased collagen V expression, and adipocytes cocultured with M2 macrophages had reduced elastin and increased collagen V expression. In obese subjects, collagen V was colocalized with large blood vessels, and the addition of collagen V to an angiogenesis assay inhibited endothelial budding. The adipose tissue from obese/insulin-resistant subjects has fewer capillaries and more large vessels as compared with lean subjects. The ECM of adipose tissue may play an important role in regulating the expandability as well as angiogenesis of adipose tissue.

  4. Serum Resistin Levels Are Associated with Adiposity and Insulin Sensitivity in Obese Hispanic Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Nieva-Vazquez, Adriana; Torres-Rasgado, Enrique; López-López, José G.; Romero, Jose R.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Background and Aims: Resistin is involved in the development of obesity and insulin resistance (IR) in mice and may play a similar role in humans through mechanisms that remain unresolved. The objective of this study was to characterize the relationship between resistin levels in obese subjects with and without IR among Hispanic subjects. Material and Methods: A cross-sectional study was performed on 117 nondiabetic Hispanic subjects of both genders that were allocated into three study groups: A control group (n=47) of otherwise healthy individuals in metabolic balance, a group with obesity (OB) (n=36), and a group with obesity and IR (OB-IR) (n=34). Anthropometric and clinical characterization was carried out, and resistin levels were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Results: We found that resistin levels were higher in OB and OB-IR groups when compared to the control group (1331.79±142.15 pg/mL, 1266.28±165.97 pg/mL vs. 959.21±171.43 pg/mL; P<0.05), an effect that was not confounded by age (control, 34.04±10.00 years; OB, 37.30±10.78 years; and OB-IR, 35.67±10.15 years). In addition, we observed a significant correlation (P<0.001) between resistin levels and higher adiposity and insulin sensitivity (IS) in our cohort. Conclusions: Our results suggest that higher resistin levels are associated with higher adiposity and lower IS among obese Hispanic subjects. PMID:24266722

  5. The lung innate immune gene surfactant protein-D is expressed in adipose tissue and linked to obesity status.

    PubMed

    Ortega, F J; Pueyo, N; Moreno-Navarrete, J M; Sabater, M; Rodriguez-Hermosa, J I; Ricart, W; Tinahones, F J; Fernández-Real, J M

    2013-12-01

    Surfactant protein-D (SFTPD) is a component of the lung innate immunity that enhances clearance of pathogens and modulates inflammatory responses. An inverse association of putative, lung-derived circulating SFTPD with obesity has been reported but no information is available concerning possible SFTPD gene expression in human adipose tissue. SFTPD gene expression was analyzed in human omental (OM; n=156) and subcutaneous (SC; n=106) adipose tissue, and in isolated fat cells (n=12) in association with measures of obesity and glucose tolerance. SFTPD gene was expressed in human adipose tissue and adipocytes. This expression was decreased in OM and SC adipose tissue from obese subjects with (-47%, P<0.0001; and -37%, P=0.048) and without (-34%, P=0.001; and -22%, P=0.08; respectively) type 2 diabetes when compared with the control group. Indeed, OM SFTPD was inversely associated with body mass index (r=-0.33, P<0.0001), percent fat mass (r=-0.36, P<0.0001), waist perimeter (r=-0.26, P=0.002), diastolic blood pressure (r=-0.21, P=0.018) and fasting glucose (r=-0.21, P=0.012); and positively linked to the expression of insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS1; r=0.25, P=0.004), perilipin A (PLIN; r=0.38, P=0.007) and fatty acid synthase (FASN; r=0.36, P<0.0001). Accordingly, increased SFTPD (4.5-fold, P=0.02) was detected in isolated adipocytes when compared with the stromal-vascular cell fraction, in parallel to IRS1, FASN and PLIN. Both OM and SC adipose tissue (mainly mature adipocytes) express SFTPD. This expression decreases with obesity and impaired glucose tolerance.

  6. Contributions of adipose tissue architectural and tensile properties toward defining healthy and unhealthy obesity

    PubMed Central

    Lackey, Denise E.; Burk, David H.; Ali, Mohamed R.; Mostaedi, Rouzbeh; Smith, William H.; Park, Jiyoung; Scherer, Philipp E.; Seay, Shundra A.; McCoin, Colin S.; Bonaldo, Paolo

    2013-01-01

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) plays an important role in the maintenance of white adipose tissue (WAT) architecture and function, and proper ECM remodeling is critical to support WAT malleability to accomodate changes in energy storage needs. Obesity and adipocyte hypertrophy place a strain on the ECM remodeling machinery, which may promote disordered ECM and altered tissue integrity and could promote proinflammatory and cell stress signals. To explore these questions, new methods were developed to quantify omental and subcutaneous WAT tensile strength and WAT collagen content by three-dimensional confocal imaging, using collagen VI knockout mice as a methods validation tool. These methods, combined with comprehensive measurement of WAT ECM proteolytic enzymes, transcript, and blood analyte analyses, were used to identify unique pathophenotypes of metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes mellitus in obese women, using multivariate statistical modeling and univariate comparisons with weight-matched healthy obese individuals. In addition to the expected differences in inflammation and glycemic control, approximately 20 ECM-related factors, including omental tensile strength, collagen, and enzyme transcripts, helped discriminate metabolically compromised obesity. This is consistent with the hypothesis that WAT ECM physiology is intimately linked to metabolic health in obese humans, and the studies provide new tools to explore this relationship. PMID:24302007

  7. Adiposity rebound in children: a simple indicator for predicting obesity.

    PubMed

    Rolland-Cachera, M F; Deheeger, M; Bellisle, F; Sempé, M; Guilloud-Bataille, M; Patois, E

    1984-01-01

    To follow and predict the evolution of adiposity during growth, individual adiposity curves, assessed by the weight/height2 index, were drawn for 151 children from the age of 1 month to 16 yr. Adiposity increases during the 1st yr and then decreases. A renewed rise, termed here the adiposity rebound, occurs at about 6 yr. Individual weight/height2 curves may differ regarding their percentile range level and age at adiposity rebound. The present study shows a relationship between the age at adiposity rebound and final adiposity. An early rebound (before 5.5 yr) is followed by a significantly higher adiposity level than a later rebound (after 7 yr). This phenomenon is observed whatever the subject's adiposity at 1 yr. The present observations might be connected with the cellularity of adipose tissue.

  8. CTRP7 deletion attenuates obesity-linked glucose intolerance, adipose tissue inflammation, and hepatic stress.

    PubMed

    Petersen, Pia S; Lei, Xia; Wolf, Risa M; Rodriguez, Susana; Tan, Stefanie Y; Little, Hannah C; Schweitzer, Michael A; Magnuson, Thomas H; Steele, Kimberley E; Wong, G William

    2017-04-01

    Chronic low-grade inflammation and cellular stress are important contributors to obesity-linked metabolic dysfunction. Here, we uncover an immune-metabolic role for C1q/TNF-related protein 7 (CTRP7), a secretory protein of the C1q family with previously unknown function. In obese humans, circulating CTRP7 levels were markedly elevated and positively correlated with body mass index, glucose, insulin, insulin resistance index, hemoglobin A1c, and triglyceride levels. Expression of CTRP7 in liver was also significantly upregulated in obese humans and positively correlated with gluconeogenic genes. In mice, Ctrp7 expression was differentially modulated in various tissues by fasting and refeeding and by diet-induced obesity. A genetic loss-of-function mouse model was used to determine the requirement of CTRP7 for metabolic homeostasis. When fed a control low-fat diet, male or female mice lacking CTRP7 were indistinguishable from wild-type littermates. In obese male mice consuming a high-fat diet, however, CTRP7 deficiency attenuated insulin resistance and enhanced glucose tolerance, effects that were independent of body weight, metabolic rate, and physical activity level. Improved glucose metabolism in CTRP7-deficient mice was associated with reduced adipose tissue inflammation, as well as decreased liver fibrosis and cellular oxidative and endoplasmic reticulum stress. These results provide a link between elevated CTRP7 levels and impaired glucose metabolism, frequently associated with obesity. Inhibiting CTRP7 action may confer beneficial metabolic outcomes in the setting of obesity and diabetes. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Modulations of calcium in adipose tissue by TRPC1: a key player in obesity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The disruption of metabolic homeostasis, the regulation of energy the body extracts, stores and uses, leads to excess adipose tissue accumulation and the onset of obesity. White adipose tissue (WAT) is a metabolically dynamic endocrine organ responsible for maintaining metabolic homeostasis through ...

  10. AMPK Activation by Metformin Suppresses Abnormal Extracellular Matrix Remodeling in Adipose Tissue and Ameliorates Insulin Resistance in Obesity.

    PubMed

    Luo, Ting; Nocon, Allison; Fry, Jessica; Sherban, Alex; Rui, Xianliang; Jiang, Bingbing; Xu, X Julia; Han, Jingyan; Yan, Yun; Yang, Qin; Li, Qifu; Zang, Mengwei

    2016-08-01

    Fibrosis is emerging as a hallmark of metabolically dysregulated white adipose tissue (WAT) in obesity. Although adipose tissue fibrosis impairs adipocyte plasticity, little is known about how aberrant extracellular matrix (ECM) remodeling of WAT is initiated during the development of obesity. Here we show that treatment with the antidiabetic drug metformin inhibits excessive ECM deposition in WAT of ob/ob mice and mice with diet-induced obesity, as evidenced by decreased collagen deposition surrounding adipocytes and expression of fibrotic genes including the collagen cross-linking regulator LOX Inhibition of interstitial fibrosis by metformin is likely attributable to the activation of AMPK and the suppression of transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1)/Smad3 signaling, leading to enhanced systemic insulin sensitivity. The ability of metformin to repress TGF-β1-induced fibrogenesis is abolished by the dominant negative AMPK in primary cells from the stromal vascular fraction. TGF-β1-induced insulin resistance is suppressed by AMPK agonists and the constitutively active AMPK in 3T3L1 adipocytes. In omental fat depots of obese humans, interstitial fibrosis is also associated with AMPK inactivation, TGF-β1/Smad3 induction, aberrant ECM production, myofibroblast activation, and adipocyte apoptosis. Collectively, integrated AMPK activation and TGF-β1/Smad3 inhibition may provide a potential therapeutic approach to maintain ECM flexibility and combat chronically uncontrolled adipose tissue expansion in obesity.

  11. Adipose tissue R2* signal is increased in subjects with obesity: A preliminary MRI study.

    PubMed

    Fernández-Real, José Manuel; Blasco, Gerard; Puig, Josep; Moreno, Maria; Xifra, Gemma; Sánchez-Gonzalez, Javier; Maria Alustiza, Jose; Pedraza, Salvador; Ricart, Wifredo; María Moreno-Navarrete, José

    2016-02-01

    Circulating and adipose tissue markers of iron overload are increased in subjects with obesity. The aim is to study iron signals in adipose tissue. Adipose tissue R2* values and hepatic iron concentration (HIC) were evaluated using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) in 23 middle-aged subjects with obesity and 20 subjects without obesity. Subcutaneous (SAT) and visceral adipose tissue (VAT) R2* were increased in subjects with obesity (P = 0.004 and P = 0.008) and correlated significantly and positively with HIC in all subjects. Strikingly, most of the associations of liver iron with metabolic parameters were replicated with SAT and VAT R2*. BMI, waist circumference, fat mass, HOMA value, and C-reactive protein positively correlated with HIC and SAT and VAT R2*. BMI or percent fat mass (but not insulin resistance) contributed independently to 26.8-34.8% of the variance in sex- and age-adjusted SAT or VAT R2* (β > 0.40, P < 0.005). Within subjects with obesity, total cholesterol independently contributed to 14.8% of sex- and age-adjusted VAT iron variance (β = 0.50, P = 0.025). Increased R2* in adipose tissue, which might indicate iron content, runs in parallel to liver iron stores of subjects with obesity. VAT iron seems also associated with serum cholesterol within subjects with obesity. © 2015 The Obesity Society.

  12. Activation of Adipose Tissue Macrophages in Obese Mice does not Require Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Behan, JW; Ehsanipour, EA; Sheng, X; Pramanik, R; Wang, Xingchao; Hsieh, Yao-Te; Kim, Yong-Mi; Mittelman, Steven D.

    2012-01-01

    Macrophages which infiltrate adipose tissue and secrete pro-inflammatory cytokines may be responsible for obesity-induced insulin resistance. However, why macrophages migrate into adipose tissue and become activated remains unknown, though some studies suggest this may be regulated by T and B lymphocytes. In the present study, we test whether T and B lymphocytes and NK cells are necessary for the obesity-induced activation of macrophages in adipose tissue. NOD/SCID/IL2-receptor gamma-chain knockout (NSG) mice, which lack mature T and B lymphocytes and NK cells, were made obese by selectively reducing litters and weaning onto a high-fat diet. Mice were then maintained on the diet for 10-11 weeks. Adipose tissue from obese NSG mice had more activated macrophages than non-obese mice. These macrophages were found in “crown like structures” surrounding adipocytes, and expressed higher levels of the inflammatory cytokine TNFα. However, obesity did not impair glucose tolerance in the NSG mice. These studies demonstrate that T and B lymphocytes and NK cells are not necessary for adipose tissue macrophage activation in obese mice. T and B lymphocytes and/or NK cells may be necessary for the development of obesity-induced impaired glucose tolerance. PMID:23754826

  13. Increased adipocyte S-nitrosylation targets anti-lipolytic action of insulin: relevance to adipose tissue dysfunction in obesity.

    PubMed

    Ovadia, Hilla; Haim, Yulia; Nov, Ori; Almog, Orna; Kovsan, Julia; Bashan, Nava; Benhar, Moran; Rudich, Assaf

    2011-09-02

    Protein S-nitrosylation is a reversible protein modification implicated in both physiological and pathophysiological regulation of protein function. In obesity, skeletal muscle insulin resistance is associated with increased S-nitrosylation of insulin-signaling proteins. However, whether adipose tissue is similarly affected in obesity and, if so, what are the causes and functional consequences of increased S-nitrosylation in this tissue are unknown. Total protein S-nitrosylation was increased in intra-abdominal adipose tissue of obese humans and in high fat-fed or leptin-deficient ob/ob mice. Both the insulin receptor β-subunit and Akt were S-nitrosylated, correlating with body weight. Elevated protein and mRNA expression of inducible NO synthase and decreased protein levels of thioredoxin reductase were associated with increased adipose tissue S-nitrosylation. Cultured differentiated pre-adipocyte cell lines exposed to the NO donors S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) or S-nitroso-N-acetylpenicillamine exhibited diminished insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt but not of GSK3 nor of insulin-stimulated glucose uptake. Yet the anti-lipolytic action of insulin was markedly impaired in both cultured adipocytes and in mice injected with GSNO prior to administration of insulin. In cells, impaired ability of insulin to diminish phosphorylated PKA substrates in response to isoproterenol suggested impaired insulin-induced activation of PDE3B. Consistently, increased S-nitrosylation of PDE3B was detected in adipose tissue of high fat-fed obese mice. Site-directed mutagenesis revealed that Cys-768 and Cys-1040, two putative sites for S-nitrosylation adjacent to the substrate-binding site of PDE3B, accounted for ∼50% of its GSNO-induced S-nitrosylation. Collectively, PDE3B and the anti-lipolytic action of insulin may constitute novel targets for increased S-nitrosylation of adipose tissue in obesity.

  14. Circadian expression of adiponectin and its receptors in human adipose tissue

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Adiponectin is one of the most clinically relevant cytokines associated with obesity. However, circadian rhythmicity of adiponectin in human adipose tissue (AT) has not been analyzed. To assess whether the mRNA levels of adiponectin and its receptors (ADIPOR1 and ADIPOR2) might show daily circadian ...

  15. Differential protein expression in white adipose tissue from obesity-prone and obesity-resistant mice in response to high fat diet and anti-obesity herbal medicines.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sang Woo; Park, Tae-Jun; Choi, Jae Heon; Aseer, Kanikkai Raja; Choi, Ji-Young; Kim, Ye Jin; Choi, Myung-Sook; Yun, Jong Won

    2015-01-01

    One of the most interesting issues in obesity research is why certain humans are obesity-prone (OP) while others are obesity-resistant (OR) upon exposure to a high-calorie diet. However, the pathways responsible for these phenotypic differences are still largely unknown. In order to discover marker molecules determining susceptibility and/or resistance to obesity in response to high fat diet (HFD) or anti-obesity herbal medicine (TH), we conducted comparative proteomic analysis of white adipose tissue (WAT) from OP, OR, as well as TH-treated mice. OP mice fed HFD gained approximately 33% more body weight than OR mice, and TH significantly reduced body weight gain in HFD-fed mice by 30%. These mice were further subjected to proteomic analysis using two-dimensional electrophoresis (2-DE) combined with matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization-time of flight mass spectrometry (MALDI-TOF-MS). Proteomic data revealed 59 spots that were differentially regulated from a total of 1,045 matched spots, and 57 spots of these were identified as altered WAT proteins between OP and OR mice by peptide mass finger printing. Interestingly, 45 proteins were similarly regulated in OR mice in response to TH treatment. Of these, 10 proteins have already been recognized in the context of obesity; however, other proteins involved in obesity susceptibility or resistance were identified for the first time in the present study. Our results suggest that TH actively contributed to body weight reduction in HFD-fed obese mice by altering protein regulation in WAT, and it was also found that TH-responsive proteins can be used as potent molecules for obesity treatment. © 2015 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  16. Thrombospondin-1 regulates adiposity and metabolic dysfunction in diet-induced obesity enhancing adipose inflammation and stimulating adipocyte proliferation

    PubMed Central

    Kong, Ping; Gonzalez-Quesada, Carlos; Li, Na; Cavalera, Michele; Lee, Dong-Wook

    2013-01-01

    As a typical matricellular protein, thrombospondin (TSP)-1, binds to the structural matrix and regulates cellular behavior by modulating growth factor and cytokine signaling. Obesity and diabetes are associated with marked upregulation of TSP-1 in adipose tissue. We hypothesized that endogenous TSP-1 may play an important role in the pathogenesis of diet-induced obesity and metabolic dysfunction. Accordingly, we examined the effects of TSP-1 gene disruption on weight gain, adiposity, and adipose tissue inflammation in mice receiving a high-fat diet (HFD: 60% fat, 20% carbohydrate) or a high-carbohydrate low-fat diet (HCLFD: 10% fat, 70% carbohydrate). HFD mice had significantly higher TSP-1 expression in perigonadal adipose tissue; TSP-1 was predominantly localized in the adipose interstitium. TSP-1 loss attenuated weight gain and fat accumulation in HFD and HCLFD groups. Compared with corresponding wild-type animals, TSP-1-null mice had decreased insulin levels but exhibited elevated free fatty acid and triglyceride levels, suggesting impaired fatty acid uptake. TSP-1 loss did not affect adipocyte size and had no effect on adipose vascular density. However, TSP-1-null mice exhibited attenuated tumor necrosis factor-α mRNA expression and reduced macrophage infiltration, suggesting a role for TSP-1 in mediating obesity-associated inflammation. In vitro, TSP-1 enhanced proliferation of 3T3-L1 preadipocytes but did not modulate inflammatory cytokine and chemokine synthesis. In conclusion, TSP-1 upregulation contributes to weight gain, adipose growth, and the pathogenesis of metabolic dysfunction. The effects of TSP-1 may involve stimulation of adipocyte proliferation, activation of inflammatory signaling, and facilitated fatty acid uptake by adipocytes. PMID:23757408

  17. Uric Acid Secretion from Adipose Tissue and Its Increase in Obesity*

    PubMed Central

    Tsushima, Yu; Nishizawa, Hitoshi; Tochino, Yoshihiro; Nakatsuji, Hideaki; Sekimoto, Ryohei; Nagao, Hirofumi; Shirakura, Takashi; Kato, Kenta; Imaizumi, Keiichiro; Takahashi, Hiroyuki; Tamura, Mizuho; Maeda, Norikazu; Funahashi, Tohru; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is often accompanied by hyperuricemia. However, purine metabolism in various tissues, especially regarding uric acid production, has not been fully elucidated. Here we report, using mouse models, that adipose tissue could produce and secrete uric acid through xanthine oxidoreductase (XOR) and that the production was enhanced in obesity. Plasma uric acid was elevated in obese mice and attenuated by administration of the XOR inhibitor febuxostat. Adipose tissue was one of major organs that had abundant expression and activities of XOR, and adipose tissues in obese mice had higher XOR activities than those in control mice. 3T3-L1 and mouse primary mature adipocytes produced and secreted uric acid into culture medium. The secretion was inhibited by febuxostat in a dose-dependent manner or by gene knockdown of XOR. Surgical ischemia in adipose tissue increased local uric acid production and secretion via XOR, with a subsequent increase in circulating uric acid levels. Uric acid secretion from whole adipose tissue was increased in obese mice, and uric acid secretion from 3T3-L1 adipocytes was increased under hypoxia. Our results suggest that purine catabolism in adipose tissue could be enhanced in obesity. PMID:23913681

  18. Activation of the peripheral endocannabinoid system in human obesity.

    PubMed

    Engeli, Stefan; Böhnke, Jana; Feldpausch, Mareike; Gorzelniak, Kerstin; Janke, Jürgen; Bátkai, Sándor; Pacher, Pál; Harvey-White, Judy; Luft, Friedrich C; Sharma, Arya M; Jordan, Jens

    2005-10-01

    Obesity is the main risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes. Activation of the central endocannabinoid system increases food intake and promotes weight gain. Blockade of the cannabinoid type 1 (CB-1) receptor reduces body weight in animals by central and peripheral actions; the role of the peripheral endocannabinoid system in human obesity is now being extensively investigated. We measured circulating endocannabinoid concentrations and studied the expression of CB-1 and the main degrading enzyme, fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), in adipose tissue of lean (n = 20) and obese (n = 20) women and after a 5% weight loss in a second group of women (n = 17). Circulating levels of anandamide and 1/2-arachidonoylglycerol were increased by 35 and 52% in obese compared with lean women (P < 0.05). Adipose tissue mRNA levels were reduced by -34% for CB-1 and -59% for FAAH in obese subjects (P < 0.05). A strong negative correlation was found between FAAH expression in adipose tissue and circulating endocannabinoids. Circulating endocannabinoids and CB-1 or FAAH expression were not affected by 5% weight loss. The expression of CB-1 and FAAH was increased in mature human adipocytes compared with in preadipocytes and was found in several human tissues. Our findings support the presence of a peripheral endocannabinoid system that is upregulated in human obesity.

  19. Infrared thermography for indirect assessment of activation of brown adipose tissue in lean and obese male subjects.

    PubMed

    El Hadi, Hamza; Frascati, Andrea; Granzotto, Marnie; Silvestrin, Valentina; Ferlini, Elisabetta; Vettor, Roberto; Rossato, Marco

    2016-12-01

    Brown adipose tissue (BAT) plays a key role in adaptive thermogenesis in mammals, and it has recently been considered as an attractive therapeutic target for tackling human obesity by increasing energy expenditure. Thermal imaging using infrared thermography (IRT) has emerged as a potential safe, rapid and inexpensive technique for detecting BAT in humans. However, little attention has been given to the reliability of this method in obese subjects. To this end, we evaluated the capacity of IRT to detect activated supraclavicular (SCV) BAT in 14 lean and 16 mildly obese young adults after acute cold exposure. Using IRT we measured the temperature of the skin overlying the SCV and sternal areas at baseline and after acute cold stimulation. Additionally, energy expenditure was measured by indirect calorimetry and body composition was estimated using bioelectrical impedance analysis. Energy expenditure and SCV skin temperature significantly increased in lean subjects upon cold exposure, while no significant changes were detected in the obese group. Furthermore, cold-induced variations in SCV skin temperature of obese subjects showed a negative correlation with body mass index. This study suggests that in lean individuals BAT is a rapidly activated thermogenic tissue possibly involved in the regulation of energy balance, and can be indirectly assessed using IRT. In obese subjects, BAT seems less prone to be activated by cold exposure, with the degree of adiposity representing a limiting factor for the indirect detection of BAT activation by measuring the skin temperature overlying BAT.

  20. Adipose tissue supports normalization of macrophage and liver lipid handling in obesity reversal.

    PubMed

    Vatarescu, Maayan; Bechor, Sapir; Haim, Yulia; Pecht, Tal; Tarnovscki, Tanya; Slutsky, Noa; Nov, Ori; Shapiro, Hagit; Shemesh, Avishai; Porgador, Angel; Bashan, Nava; Rudich, Assaf

    2017-06-01

    Adipose tissue inflammation and dysfunction are considered central in the pathogenesis of obesity-related dysmetabolism, but their role in the rapid metabolic recovery upon obesity reversal is less well defined. We hypothesized that changes in adipose tissue endocrine and paracrine mechanisms may support the rapid improvement of obesity-induced impairment in cellular lipid handling. C57Bl-6J mice were fed ad libitum either normal chow (NC) or high-fat diet (HFF) for 10 weeks. A dietary obesity reversal group was fed HFF for 8 weeks and then switched to NC for 2 weeks (HFF→NC). Whole-body glucose homeostasis rapidly nearly normalized in the HFF→NC mice (fasting glucose and insulin fully normalized, glucose and insulin tolerance tests reversed 82% to the NC group levels). During 2 weeks of the dietary reversal, the liver was significantly cleared from ectopic fat, and functionally, glucose production from pyruvate, alanine or fructose was normalized. In contrast, adipose tissue inflammation (macrophage infiltration and polarization) largely remained as in HFF, though obesity-induced adipose tissue macrophage lipid accumulation decreased by ~50%, and adipose tissue MAP kinase hyperactivation was reversed. Ex vivo, mild changes in adipose tissue adipocytokine secretion profile were noted. These corresponded to partial or full reversal of the excess cellular lipid droplet accumulation induced by HFF adipose tissue conditioned media in hepatoma or macrophage cells, respectively. We propose that early after initiating reversal of nutritional obesity, rapid metabolic normalization largely precedes resolution of adipose tissue inflammation. Nevertheless, we demonstrate a hitherto unrecognized contribution of adipose tissue to the rapid improvement in lipid handling by the liver and by macrophages. © 2017 The authors.

  1. CD40 deficiency in mice exacerbates obesity-induced adipose tissue inflammation, hepatic steatosis, and insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Chang-An; Kogan, Sophia; Amano, Shinya U.; Wang, Mengxi; Dagdeviren, Sezin; Friedline, Randall H.; Aouadi, Myriam; Kim, Jason K.

    2013-01-01

    The pathophysiology of obesity and type 2 diabetes in rodents and humans is characterized by low-grade inflammation in adipose tissue and liver. The CD40 receptor and its ligand CD40L initiate immune cell signaling promoting inflammation, but conflicting data on CD40L-null mice confound its role in obesity-associated insulin resistance. Here, we demonstrate that CD40 receptor-deficient mice on a high-fat diet display the expected decrease in hepatic cytokine levels but paradoxically exhibit liver steatosis, insulin resistance, and glucose intolerance compared with their age-matched wild-type controls. Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp studies also demonstrated insulin resistance in glucose utilization by the CD40-null mice compared with wild-type mice. In contrast to liver, adipose tissue in CD40-deficient animals harbors elevated cytokine levels and infiltration of inflammatory cells, particularly macrophages and CD8+ effector T cells. In addition, ex vivo explants of epididymal adipose tissue from CD40−/− mice display elevated basal and isoproterenol-stimulated lipolysis, suggesting a potential increase of lipid efflux from visceral fat to the liver. These findings reveal that 1) CD40-null mice represent an unusual model of hepatic steatosis with reduced hepatic inflammation, and 2) CD40 unexpectedly functions in adipose tissue to attenuate its inflammation in obesity, thereby protecting against hepatic steatosis. PMID:23482447

  2. A macrophage NBR1-MEKK3 complex triggers JNK-mediated adipose-tissue inflammation in obesity

    PubMed Central

    Hernandez, Eloy D.; Lee, Sang Jun; Kim, Ji Young; Duran, Angeles; Linares, Juan F.; Yajima, Tomoko; Müller, Timo D.; Tschöp, Matthias H.; Smith, Steven R.; Diaz-Meco, Maria T.; Moscat, Jorge

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY The c-Jun NH(2)-terminal kinase (JNK) is a critical determinant of obesity-associated inflammation and glucose intolerance. The upstream mechanisms controlling this pathway are still unknown. Here we report that the levels of the PB1 domain-containing adapter NBR1 correlated with the expression of pro-inflammatory molecules in adipose tissue from human patients with metabolic syndrome, suggesting that NBR1 plays a key role in adipose-tissue inflammation. We also show that NBR1 inactivation in the myeloid compartment impairs the function, M1 polarization and chemotactic activity of macrophages, prevents inflammation of adipose tissue, and improves glucose tolerance in obese mice. Furthermore, we demonstrate that an interaction between the PB1 domains of NBR1 and the mitogen-activated kinase kinase 3 (MEKK3) enables the formation of a signaling complex required for the activation of JNK. Together these discoveries identify an NBR1-MEKK3 complex as a key regulator of JNK signaling and adipose-tissue inflammation in obesity. PMID:25043814

  3. ADCY5 Gene Expression in Adipose Tissue Is Related to Obesity in Men and Mice

    PubMed Central

    Knigge, Anja; Klöting, Nora; Schön, Michael R.; Dietrich, Arne; Fasshauer, Mathias; Gärtner, Daniel; Lohmann, Tobias; Dreßler, Miriam; Stumvoll, Michael; Kovacs, Peter; Blüher, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Genome wide association studies revealed an association of the single nucleotide polymorphism rs11708067 within the ADCY5 gene—encoding adenylate cyclase 5—with increased type 2 diabetes (T2D) risk and higher fasting glucose. However, it remains unclear whether the association between ADCY5 variants and glycemic traits may involve adipose tissue (AT) related mechanisms. We therefore tested the hypothesis that ADCY5 mRNA expression in human and mouse AT is related to obesity, fat distribution, T2D in humans and high fat diet (HFD) in mice. We measured ADCY5 mRNA expression in paired samples of visceral and subcutaneous adipose tissue from 244 individuals with a wide range of body weight and parameters of hyperglycemia, which have been genotyped for rs11708067. In addition, AT ADCY5 mRNA was assessed in C57BL/6NTac which underwent a 10 weeks standard chow (n = 6) or high fat diet (HFD, n = 6). In humans, visceral ADCY5 expression is significantly higher in obese compared to lean individuals. ADCY5 expression correlates with BMI, body fat mass, circulating leptin, fat distribution, waist and hip circumference, but not with fasting plasma glucose and HbA1c. Adcy5 expression in mouse AT is significantly higher after a HFD compared to chow (p<0.05). Importantly, rs11708067 is not associated with ADCY5 mRNA expression levels in either fat depot in any of the genetic models tested. Our results suggest that changes in AT ADCY5 expression are related to obesity and fat distribution, but not with impaired glucose metabolism and T2D. However, altered ADCY5 expression in AT does not seem to be the mechanism underlying the association between rs11708067 and increased T2D risk. PMID:25793868

  4. Adrenomedullin 2 Improves Early Obesity-Induced Adipose Insulin Resistance by Inhibiting the Class II MHC in Adipocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Song-Yang; Lv, Ying; Zhang, Heng; Gao, Song; Wang, Ting; Feng, Juan; Wang, Yuhui; Liu, George; Xu, Ming-Jiang; Wang, Xian; Jiang, Changtao

    2016-08-01

    MHC class II (MHCII) antigen presentation in adipocytes was reported to trigger early adipose inflammation and insulin resistance. However, the benefits of MHCII inhibition in adipocytes remain largely unknown. Here, we showed that human plasma polypeptide adrenomedullin 2 (ADM2) levels were negatively correlated with HOMA of insulin resistance in obese human. Adipose-specific human ADM2 transgenic (aADM2-tg) mice were generated. The aADM2-tg mice displayed improvements in high-fat diet-induced early adipose insulin resistance. This was associated with increased insulin signaling and decreased systemic inflammation. ADM2 dose-dependently inhibited CIITA-induced MHCII expression by increasing Blimp1 expression in a CRLR/RAMP1-cAMP-dependent manner in cultured adipocytes. Furthermore, ADM2 treatment restored the high-fat diet-induced early insulin resistance in adipose tissue, mainly via inhibition of adipocyte MHCII antigen presentation and CD4(+) T-cell activation. This study demonstrates that ADM2 is a promising candidate for the treatment of early obesity-induced insulin resistance. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  5. Agouti expression in human adipose tissue: functional consequences and increased expression in type 2 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Smith, Steven R; Gawronska-Kozak, Barbara; Janderová, Lenka; Nguyen, Taylor; Murrell, Angela; Stephens, Jacqueline M; Mynatt, Randall L

    2003-12-01

    It is well recognized that the agouti/melanocortin system is an important regulator of body weight homeostasis. Given that agouti is expressed in human adipose tissue and that the ectopic expression of agouti in adipose tissue results in moderately obese mice, the link between agouti expression in human adipose tissue and obesity/type 2 diabetes was investigated. Although there was no apparent relationship between agouti mRNA levels and BMI, agouti mRNA levels were significantly elevated in subjects with type 2 diabetes. The regulation of agouti in cultured human adipocytes revealed that insulin did not regulate agouti mRNA, whereas dexamethasone treatment potently increased the levels of agouti mRNA. Experiments with cultured human preadipocytes and with cells obtained from transgenic mice that overexpress agouti demonstrated that melanocortin receptor (MCR) signaling in adipose tissue can regulate both preadipocyte proliferation and differentiation. Taken together, these results reveal that agouti can regulate adipogenesis at several levels and suggest that there are functional consequences of elevated agouti levels in human adipose tissue. The influence of MCR signaling on adipogenesis combined with the well-established role of MCR signaling in the hypothalamus suggest that adipogenesis is coordinately regulated with food intake and energy expenditure.

  6. Early adiposity rebound: review of papers linking this to subsequent obesity in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Taylor, Rachael W; Grant, Andrea M; Goulding, Ailsa; Williams, Sheila M

    2005-11-01

    Improving our understanding of factors driving fat gain in young children should increase our ability to manage the rising problem of obesity. Accordingly, studies associating timing of adiposity rebound with later obesity are reviewed. Investigations in many countries have confirmed that early adiposity rebound increases risk of high blood pressure and obesity in young adults. The magnitude of the effect can be substantial (>3 body mass index units at 18-21 years) for those undergoing early (<5 years of age) compared with late (>7 years of age) rebound. Early rebound is also associated with impaired glucose tolerance and diabetes in adulthood. Because adiposity rebound is determined using serial measurements of body mass index, the actual changes in body composition occurring during this time are obscured. Recent data show that changing body mass index during adiposity rebound is due to higher than average deposition of weight rather than slowing of the rate of height gain. Moreover, this increased weight gain occurs because of rapid deposition of fat rather than lean tissue, with early rebounders gaining fat mass at almost three times the rate of late rebounders. Future work is needed to identify reasons for early adiposity rebound. Because high physical activity and low inactivity are associated with lower body fat during the period of adiposity rebound, studies should be undertaken to see whether stepping up activity can slow fat gain, delay the onset of adiposity rebound and lower adult obesity.

  7. Adipose tissue monomethyl branched chain fatty acids and insulin sensitivity: effects of obesity and weight loss

    PubMed Central

    Su, Xiong; Magkos, Faidon; Zhou, Dequan; Eagon, J. Christopher; Fabbrini, Elisa; Okunade, Adewole L.; Klein, Samuel

    2014-01-01

    Objective An increase in circulating branched-chain amino acids (BCAA) is associated with insulin resistance. Adipose tissue is a potentially important site for BCAA metabolism. We evaluated whether monomethyl branched chain fatty acids (mmBCFA) in adipose tissue, which are likely derived from BCAA catabolism, are associated with insulin sensitivity. Design and Methods Insulin-stimulated glucose disposal was determined by using the hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp procedure with stable isotope glucose tracer infusion, in 9 lean and 9 obese subjects, and in a separate group of 9 obese subjects before and 1 year after Roux-en-Y gastric bypass (RYGB) surgery (38% weight loss). Adipose tissue mmBCFA content was measured in tissue biopsies taken in the basal state. Results Total adipose tissue mmBCFA content was ~30% lower in obese than lean subjects (P = 0.02), and increased by ~65% after weight loss in the RYGB group (P = 0.01). Adipose tissue mmBCFA content correlated positively with skeletal muscle insulin sensitivity (R2 = 35%, P = 0.01, n = 18). Conclusions These results demonstrate a novel association between adipose tissue mmBCFA content and obesity-related insulin resistance. Additional studies are needed to determine whether the association between adipose tissue mmBCFA and muscle insulin sensitivity is causal or a simple association. PMID:25328153

  8. Functional Plasticity of Adipose-Derived Stromal Cells During Development of Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Xiang-Yang; Ma, Shuangtao; Eirin, Alfonso; Woollard, John R.; Hickson, LaTonya J.; Sun, Dong; Lerman, Amir

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is a major risk factor for a number of chronic diseases, including diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, and cancer. Expansion of the adipose mass requires adipocyte precursor cells that originate from multipotent adipose-derived stromal cells (ASCs), which in turn also participate in repair activities. ASC function might decline in a disease milieu, but it remains unclear whether ASC function varies during the development of obesity. We tested the hypothesis that microenvironmental inflammatory changes during development of metabolic disorders in obesity affect ASC function. Domestic pigs were fed with an atherogenic (n = 7) or normal (n = 7) diet for 16 weeks. Abdominal adipose tissue biopsies were collected after 8, 12, and 16 weeks of diet for ASC isolation and immunohistochemistry of in situ ASCs and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). Longitudinal changes in proliferation, differentiation, and anti-inflammatory functions of ASCs were assessed. At 16 weeks, upregulated TNF-α expression in adipose tissue from obese pigs was accompanied by increased numbers of adipocyte progenitors (CD24+/CD34+) in adipose tissue and enlarged adipocyte size. In vitro, ASCs from obese pigs showed enhanced adipogenic and osteogenic propensity, which was abolished by anti-TNF-α treatment, whereas lean ASCs treated with TNF-α showed enhanced adipogenesis. Furthermore, obese ASCs showed increased senescence compared with lean ASCs, whereas their immunomodulatory capacity was preserved. Adipose tissue inflammation promotes an increase in resident adipocyte progenitors and upregulated TNF-α enhances ASC adipogenesis. Thus, adipose tissue anti-inflammatory strategies might be a novel target to attenuate obesity and its complications. Significance Adipose-derived stromal cell (ASC) function might decline in a disease milieu, but it remains unclear whether ASC function varies during the development of obesity. This study tested the hypothesis that microenvironmental inflammatory

  9. Obesity-induced Changes in Adipose Tissue Microenvironment and Their Impact on Cardiovascular Disease

    PubMed Central

    Fuster, Jose J.; Ouchi, Noriyuki; Gokce, Noyan; Walsh, Kenneth

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is causally linked with the development of cardiovascular disorders. Accumulating evidence indicates that cardiovascular disease is the “collateral damage” of obesity-driven adipose tissue dysfunction that promotes a chronic inflammatory state within the organism. Adipose tissues secrete bioactive substances, referred to as adipokines, which largely function as modulators of inflammation. The microenvironment of adipose tissue will affect the adipokine secretome, having actions on remote tissues. Obesity typically leads to the upregulation of pro-inflammatory adipokines and the downregulation of anti-inflammatory adipokines, thereby contributing to the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. In this review, we focus on the microenvironment of adipose tissue and how it influences cardiovascular disorders, including atherosclerosis and ischemic heart diseases, through the systemic actions of adipokines. PMID:27230642

  10. The Ubiquitin Ligase Siah2 Regulates Obesity-induced Adipose Tissue Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Kilroy, Gail; Carter, Lauren E.; Newman, Susan; Burk, David H.; Manuel, Justin; Möller, Andreas; Bowtell, David D.; Mynatt, Randall L.; Ghosh, Sujoy; Floyd, Z. Elizabeth

    2015-01-01

    Objective Chronic, low-grade adipose tissue inflammation associated with adipocyte hypertrophy is an important link in the relationship between obesity and insulin resistance. Although ubiquitin ligases regulate inflammatory processes, the role of these enzymes in metabolically driven adipose tissue inflammation is relatively unexplored. Herein, we examined the effect of the ubiquitin ligase Siah2 on obesity-related adipose tissue inflammation. Methods Wild-type and Siah2KO mice were fed a low or high fat diet for 16 weeks. Indirect calorimetry, body composition, glucose and insulin tolerance were assayed along with glucose and insulin levels. Gene and protein expression, immunohistochemistry, adipocyte size distribution and lipolysis were also analyzed. Results Enlarged adipocytes in obese Siah2KO mice are not associated with obesity-induced insulin resistance. Proinflammatory gene expression, stress kinase signaling, fibrosis and crown-like structures are reduced in the Siah2KO adipose tissue and Siah2KO adipocytes are more responsive to insulin-dependent inhibition of lipolysis. Loss of Siah2 increases expression of PPARγ target genes involved in lipid metabolism and decreases expression of proinflammatory adipokines regulated by PPARγ. Conclusions Siah2 links adipocyte hypertrophy with adipocyte dysfunction and recruitment of proinflammatory immune cells to adipose tissue. Selective regulation of PPARγ activity is a Siah2-mediated mechanism contributing to obesity-induced adipose tissue inflammation. PMID:26380945

  11. Maternal Obesity in Pregnancy Developmentally Programs Adipose Tissue Inflammation in Young, Lean Male Mice Offspring

    PubMed Central

    Alfaradhi, Maria Z.; Fernandez-Twinn, Denise S.; Pantaleão, Lucas C.; Carr, Sarah K.; Ferland-McCollough, David; Yeo, Giles S. H.; Bushell, Martin; Ozanne, Susan E.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity during pregnancy has a long-term effect on the health of the offspring including risk of developing the metabolic syndrome. Using a mouse model of maternal diet-induced obesity, we employed a genome-wide approach to investigate the microRNA (miRNA) and miRNA transcription profile in adipose tissue to understand mechanisms through which this occurs. Male offspring of diet-induced obese mothers, fed a control diet from weaning, showed no differences in body weight or adiposity at 8 weeks of age. However, offspring from the obese dams had up-regulated cytokine (Tnfα; P < .05) and chemokine (Ccl2 and Ccl7; P < .05) signaling in their adipose tissue. This was accompanied by reduced expression of miR-706, which we showed can directly regulate translation of the inflammatory proteins IL-33 (41% up-regulated; P < .05) and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase 1D (30% up-regulated; P < .01). We conclude that exposure to obesity during development primes an inflammatory environment in adipose tissue that is independent of offspring adiposity. Programming of adipose tissue miRNAs that regulate expression of inflammatory signaling molecules may be a contributing mechanism. PMID:27583789

  12. Human obesity and endothelium-dependent responsiveness

    PubMed Central

    Campia, Umberto; Tesauro, Manfredi; Cardillo, Carmine

    2012-01-01

    Obesity is an ongoing worldwide epidemic. Besides being a medical condition in itself, obesity dramatically increases the risk of development of metabolic and cardiovascular disease. This risk appears to stem from multiple abnormalities in adipose tissue function leading to a chronic inflammatory state and to dysregulation of the endocrine and paracrine actions of adipocyte-derived factors. These, in turn, disrupt vascular homeostasis by causing an imbalance between the NO pathway and the endothelin 1 system, with impaired insulin-stimulated endothelium-dependent vasodilation. Importantly, emerging evidence suggests that the vascular dysfunction of obesity is not just limited to the endothelium, but also involves the other layers of the vessel wall. In particular, obesity-related changes in medial smooth muscle cells seem to disrupt the physiological facilitatory action of insulin on the responsiveness to vasodilator stimuli, whereas the adventitia and perivascular fat appear to be a source of pro-inflammatory and vasoactive factors that may contribute to endothelial and smooth muscle cell dysfunction, and to the pathogenesis of vascular disease. While obesity-induced vascular dysfunction appears to be reversible, at least in part, with weight control strategies, these have not proved sufficient to prevent the metabolic and cardiovascular complication of obesity on a large scale. While a number of currently available drugs have shown potentially beneficial vascular effects in patients with obesity and the metabolic syndrome, elucidation of the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying vascular damage in obese patients is necessary to identify additional pharmacologic targets to prevent the cardiovascular complications of obesity, and their human and economic costs. LINKED ARTICLES This article is part of a themed section on Fat and Vascular Responsiveness. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2012.165.issue-3 PMID:21895631

  13. Human obesity and endothelium-dependent responsiveness.

    PubMed

    Campia, Umberto; Tesauro, Manfredi; Cardillo, Carmine

    2012-02-01

    Obesity is an ongoing worldwide epidemic. Besides being a medical condition in itself, obesity dramatically increases the risk of development of metabolic and cardiovascular disease. This risk appears to stem from multiple abnormalities in adipose tissue function leading to a chronic inflammatory state and to dysregulation of the endocrine and paracrine actions of adipocyte-derived factors. These, in turn, disrupt vascular homeostasis by causing an imbalance between the NO pathway and the endothelin 1 system, with impaired insulin-stimulated endothelium-dependent vasodilation. Importantly, emerging evidence suggests that the vascular dysfunction of obesity is not just limited to the endothelium, but also involves the other layers of the vessel wall. In particular, obesity-related changes in medial smooth muscle cells seem to disrupt the physiological facilitatory action of insulin on the responsiveness to vasodilator stimuli, whereas the adventitia and perivascular fat appear to be a source of pro-inflammatory and vasoactive factors that may contribute to endothelial and smooth muscle cell dysfunction, and to the pathogenesis of vascular disease. While obesity-induced vascular dysfunction appears to be reversible, at least in part, with weight control strategies, these have not proved sufficient to prevent the metabolic and cardiovascular complication of obesity on a large scale. While a number of currently available drugs have shown potentially beneficial vascular effects in patients with obesity and the metabolic syndrome, elucidation of the pathophysiological mechanisms underlying vascular damage in obese patients is necessary to identify additional pharmacologic targets to prevent the cardiovascular complications of obesity, and their human and economic costs. This article is part of a themed section on Fat and Vascular Responsiveness. To view the other articles in this section visit http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/bph.2012.165.issue-3. © 2011 The Authors. British

  14. Intermittent Fasting Promotes White Adipose Browning and Decreases Obesity by Shaping the Gut Microbiota.

    PubMed

    Li, Guolin; Xie, Cen; Lu, Siyu; Nichols, Robert G; Tian, Yuan; Li, Licen; Patel, Daxeshkumar; Ma, Yinyan; Brocker, Chad N; Yan, Tingting; Krausz, Kristopher W; Xiang, Rong; Gavrilova, Oksana; Patterson, Andrew D; Gonzalez, Frank J

    2017-10-03

    While activation of beige thermogenesis is a promising approach for treatment of obesity-associated diseases, there are currently no known pharmacological means of inducing beiging in humans. Intermittent fasting is an effective and natural strategy for weight control, but the mechanism for its efficacy is poorly understood. Here, we show that an every-other-day fasting (EODF) regimen selectively stimulates beige fat development within white adipose tissue and dramatically ameliorates obesity, insulin resistance, and hepatic steatosis. EODF treatment results in a shift in the gut microbiota composition leading to elevation of the fermentation products acetate and lactate and to the selective upregulation of monocarboxylate transporter 1 expression in beige cells. Microbiota-depleted mice are resistance to EODF-induced beiging, while transplantation of the microbiota from EODF-treated mice to microbiota-depleted mice activates beiging and improves metabolic homeostasis. These findings provide a new gut-microbiota-driven mechanism for activating adipose tissue browning and treating metabolic diseases. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  15. Differential methylation in visceral adipose tissue of obese men discordant for metabolic disturbances.

    PubMed

    Guénard, Frédéric; Tchernof, André; Deshaies, Yves; Pérusse, Louis; Biron, Simon; Lescelleur, Odette; Biertho, Laurent; Marceau, Simon; Vohl, Marie-Claude

    2014-03-15

    Obesity is associated with an increased risk of Type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular diseases (CVD). The severely obese population is heterogeneous regarding CVD risk profile. Our objective was to identify metabolic pathways potentially associated with development of metabolic syndrome (MetS) through an analysis of overrepresented pathways from differentially methylated genes between severely obese men with (MetS+) and without (MetS-) the MetS. Genome-wide quantitative DNA methylation analysis in VAT of severely obese men was carried out using the Infinium HumanMethylation450 BeadChip. Differences in methylation levels between MetS+ (n = 7) and MetS- (n = 7) groups were tested. Overrepresented pathways from the list of differentially methylated genes were identified and visualized with the Ingenuity Pathway Analysis system. Differential methylation analysis between MetS+ and MetS- groups identified 8,578 methylation probes (3,258 annotated genes) with significant differences in methylation levels (false discovery rate-corrected DiffScore ≥ |13| ∼ P ≤ 0.05). Pathway analysis from differentially methylated genes identified 41 overrepresented (P ≤ 0.05) pathways. The most overrepresented pathways were related to structural components of the cell membrane, inflammation and immunity and cell cycle regulation. This study provides potential targets associated with adipose tissue dysfunction and development of the MetS.

  16. Early adiposity rebound: causes and consequences for obesity in children and adults.

    PubMed

    Rolland-Cachera, M F; Deheeger, M; Maillot, M; Bellisle, F

    2006-12-01

    the latter decreasing the energy density of the diet and then reducing energy intake. The high-fat, low-protein content of human milk may contribute to its beneficial effects on growth processes. Early (pre- and postnatal) life is a critical period during which environmental factors may programme adaptive mechanisms that will persist in adulthood. Under-nutrition in fetal life or during the first years after birth may programme a thrifty metabolism that will exert adverse effects later in life, especially if the growing child is exposed to overnutrition. These observations stress the importance of an adequate nutritional status in childhood and the necessity to provide nutritional intakes adapted to nutritional needs at various stages of growth. Because the AR reflects particular BMI patterns, it is a useful tool for the paediatrician to monitor the child's adiposity development and for researchers to investigate the different developmental patterns leading to overweight. It contributes to the understanding of chronic disease programming and suggests new approaches to obesity prevention.

  17. Unique transcriptomic signature of omental adipose tissue in Ossabaw swine: a model of childhood obesity

    PubMed Central

    Toedebusch, Ryan G.; Roberts, Michael D.; Wells, Kevin D.; Company, Joseph M.; Kanosky, Kayla M.; Padilla, Jaume; Jenkins, Nathan T.; Perfield, James W.; Ibdah, Jamal A.; Booth, Frank W.

    2014-01-01

    To better understand the impact of childhood obesity on intra-abdominal adipose tissue phenotype, a complete transcriptomic analysis using deep RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) was performed on omental adipose tissue (OMAT) obtained from lean and Western diet-induced obese juvenile Ossabaw swine. Obese animals had 88% greater body mass, 49% greater body fat content, and a 60% increase in OMAT adipocyte area (all P < 0.05) compared with lean pigs. RNA-seq revealed a 37% increase in the total transcript number in the OMAT of obese pigs. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis showed transcripts in obese OMAT were primarily enriched in the following categories: 1) development, 2) cellular function and maintenance, and 3) connective tissue development and function, while transcripts associated with RNA posttranslational modification, lipid metabolism, and small molecule biochemistry were reduced. DAVID and Gene Ontology analyses showed that many of the classically recognized gene pathways associated with adipose tissue dysfunction in obese adults including hypoxia, inflammation, angiogenesis were not altered in OMAT in our model. The current study indicates that obesity in juvenile Ossabaw swine is characterized by increases in overall OMAT transcript number and provides novel data describing early transcriptomic alterations that occur in response to excess caloric intake in visceral adipose tissue in a pig model of childhood obesity. PMID:24642759

  18. Obesity, proinflammatory mediators, adipose tissue progenitors, and breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Bertolini, Francesco; Orecchioni, Stefania; Petit, Jean-Yves; Kolonin, Mikhail G

    2014-11-01

    There is emerging evidence that obesity is associated with an increase in the incidence, severity, and mortality from different types of cancer, including postmenopausal breast cancer. Here, we discuss the role of white adipose tissue (WAT) cells and of related soluble factors in the local and metastatic growth of this neoplastic disease. Moreover, we discuss the recent increase in the use of WAT-derived progenitor cells in breast cancer patients to enhance the quality of breast reconstruction and the related risks. In several murine models, WAT cells and progenitors were found to have cooperative roles in promoting local breast cancer. Moreover, they were found to contribute to adipocytes and pericytes supporting the cancer vasculature, and stimulated the metastatic progression of breast cancer. There are some clinically retrospective data showing a significant increase in the frequency of intraepithelial neoplasia in patients who received a lipofilling procedure for breast reconstruction compared with controls. Preclinical models and clinical studies are urgently needed to investigate how to inhibit the tumor-promoting activity of WAT cells and progenitors. The risks associated with the use of WAT cells for breast reconstructions should be better investigated retrospectively and prospectively.

  19. Adipose tissue macrophages in the Development of Obesity-induced Inflammation, Insulin Resistance and Type 2 Diabetes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jongsoon

    2014-01-01

    It has been increasingly accepted that chronic subacute inflammation plays an important role in the development of insulin resistance and Type 2 Diabetes in animals and humans. Particularly supporting this is that suppression of systemic inflammation in Type 2 Diabetes improves glycemic control; this also points to a new potential therapeutic target for the treatment of Type 2 Diabetes. Recent studies strongly suggest that obesity-induced inflammation is mainly mediated by tissue resident immune cells, with particular attention being focused on adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs). This review delineates the current progress made in understanding obesity-induced inflammation and the roles ATMs play in this process. PMID:23397293

  20. Sleep and birthweight predict visceral adiposity in overweight/obese children.

    PubMed

    Sokolovic, N; Kuriyan, R; Kurpad, A V; Thomas, T

    2013-06-01

    Visceral adiposity poses significant consequences for long-term health and it is important to identify methods that can be used to prevent fat deposition in visceral adipose tissue. To identify the factors contributing to differential fat distribution in overweight/obese children. Demographic, dietary and lifestyle factors potentially associated with increased visceral adipose tissue in overweight and obese South-Indian children aged 3 to 16 years. The diagnosis of visceral obesity was based on the waist-to-height ratio (WHtR) cut-off value of 0.5. Exposure variables with statistically different distributions in the two WHtR categories, when examined by Mann-Whitney and chi-square tests, were used to develop a binary logistic regression model of visceral adiposity. Increased birthweight and higher sleep duration were significant predictors of having a healthy WHtR, with odds ratios of 1.30 and 1.26 respectively. Early programming effects associated with low birthweight and current sleep deprivation could promote the storage of excess fat as visceral adipose tissue in overweight and obese children. © 2013 The Authors. Pediatric Obesity © 2013 International Association for the Study of Obesity.

  1. CD40L deficiency ameliorates adipose tissue inflammation and metabolic manifestations of obesity in mice.

    PubMed

    Poggi, Marjorie; Engel, David; Christ, Anette; Beckers, Linda; Wijnands, Erwin; Boon, Louis; Driessen, Ann; Cleutjens, Jack; Weber, Christian; Gerdes, Norbert; Lutgens, Esther

    2011-10-01

    Obese adipose tissue shows hallmarks of chronic inflammation, which promotes the development of metabolic disorders. The mechanisms by which immune cells interact with each other or with metabolism-associated cell types, and the players involved, are still unclear. The CD40-CD40L costimulatory dyad plays a pivotal role in immune responses and in diseases such as atherosclerosis and may therefore be a mediator of obesity. Here we investigated whether CD40L is involved in adipose tissue inflammation and its associated metabolic changes. To assess a putative role of CD40L in obesity in vivo, we evaluated metabolic and inflammatory consequences of 18 weeks of high-fat feeding in CD40L(+/+) and CD40L(-/-) mice. In addition, C57Bl6 mice were injected with neutralizing anti-CD40L (αCD40L) antibody for 12 weeks while being fed a high-fat diet. Genetic deficiency of CD40L attenuated the development of diet-induced obesity, hepatic steatosis, and increased systemic insulin sensitivity. In adipose tissue, it impaired obesity-induced immune cell infiltration and the associated deterioration of glucose and lipid metabolism. Accordingly, αCD40L treatment improved systemic insulin sensitivity, glucose tolerance, and CD4(+) T-cell infiltration in adipose tissue with limited effects on adipose tissue weight. CD40L plays a crucial role in the development of obesity-induced inflammation and metabolic complications.

  2. Monogenic obesity in humans.

    PubMed

    Farooqi, I Sadaf; O'Rahilly, Stephen

    2005-01-01

    Until relatively recently, the small number of identifiable inherited human diseases associated with marked obesity were complex, pleiotropic developmental disorders, the molecular basis for which were entirely obscure. The molecular basis for many of these complex syndromes, such as Bardet Beidl syndrome, has been revealed, providing novel insights into processes essential for human hypothalamic function and energy balance. In addition to these discoveries, which were the fruits of positional cloning, the molecular constituents of the signaling pathways responsible for the control of mammalian energy homeostasis have been identified, largely through the study of natural or artificial mutations in mice. We discuss the increasing number of human disorders that result from genetic disruption of the leptin-melanocortin pathways that have been identified. Practical implications of these findings for genetic counseling, prognostication, and even therapy have already emerged.

  3. NK cells link obesity-induced adipose stress to inflammation and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Wensveen, Felix M; Jelenčić, Vedrana; Valentić, Sonja; Šestan, Marko; Wensveen, Tamara Turk; Theurich, Sebastian; Glasner, Ariella; Mendrila, Davor; Štimac, Davor; Wunderlich, F Thomas; Brüning, Jens C; Mandelboim, Ofer; Polić, Bojan

    2015-04-01

    An important cause of obesity-induced insulin resistance is chronic systemic inflammation originating in visceral adipose tissue (VAT). VAT inflammation is associated with the accumulation of proinflammatory macrophages in adipose tissue, but the immunological signals that trigger their accumulation remain unknown. We found that a phenotypically distinct population of tissue-resident natural killer (NK) cells represented a crucial link between obesity-induced adipose stress and VAT inflammation. Obesity drove the upregulation of ligands of the NK cell-activating receptor NCR1 on adipocytes; this stimulated NK cell proliferation and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) production, which in turn triggered the differentiation of proinflammatory macrophages and promoted insulin resistance. Deficiency of NK cells, NCR1 or IFN-γ prevented the accumulation of proinflammatory macrophages in VAT and greatly ameliorated insulin sensitivity. Thus NK cells are key regulators of macrophage polarization and insulin resistance in response to obesity-induced adipocyte stress.

  4. Adipose tissue and serum CCDC80 in obesity and its association with related metabolic disease.

    PubMed

    Osorio-Conles, O; Guitart, M; Moreno-Navarrete, J M; Escoté, X; Duran, X; Fernandez-Real, J M; Gomez-Foix, A M; Fernández-Veledo, S; Vendrell, J

    2017-08-23

    Coiled-coil domain-containing 80 (CCDC80) is an adipocyte-secreted protein that modulates glucose homeostasis in response to diet-induced obesity in mice. The objective of this study is to analyze the link between human CCDC80 and obesity. CCDC80 protein expression was assessed in paired visceral (VAT) and subcutaneous (SAT) adipose tissue from 10 subjects (BMI range 22.4-38.8 kg/m(2)). Circulating CCDC80 levels were quantified in serum samples from two independent cross-sectional cohorts comprising 33 lean and 15 obese (cohort 1) and 32 morbid obese (cohort 2) male subjects. Insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion and blood neutrophil count were quantified in serum samples from both cohorts. Additionally, circulating free IGF-1 levels and oral glucose tolerance tests (OGTT) were assessed in cohort 1 whereas C-reactive protein levels and degree of atherosclerosis and hepatic steatosis were studied in cohort 2. In lean subjects, total CCDC80 protein content assessed by immunoblotting was lower in VAT than in SAT. In obese patients, CCDC80 was increased in VAT (P<0.05), but equivalent in SAT compared with lean counterparts. In cohort 1, serum CCDC80 correlated negatively with the acute insulin response to glucose and IGF1 levels, and positively with blood neutrophil count, independently of BMI, but not with insulin sensitivity. In cohort 2, serum CCDC80 was positively linked to the inflammatory biomarker C-reactive protein (r=0.46; P=0.009), atherosclerosis (carotid intima-media thickness, r=0.62; P<0.001) and hepatic steatosis (ANOVA P=0.025). Overall, these results suggest for the first time that CCDC80 may be a component of the obesity-altered secretome in VAT and could act as an adipokine whose circulant levels are linked to glucose tolerance derangements and related to inflammation-associated chronic complications.

  5. Effects of resveratrol on obesity-related inflammation markers in adipose tissue of genetically obese rats.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Zorita, Saioa; Fernández-Quintela, Alfredo; Lasa, Arrate; Hijona, Elizabeth; Bujanda, Luis; Portillo, María P

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to examine whether resveratrol might represent a promising therapeutic tool with which to combat adipose tissue chronic inflammation in a model of genetic obesity and to link its anti-inflammatory activity with its effect on body fat reduction. Twenty 6-wk-old male Zucker (fa/fa) rats were randomly distributed into two experimental groups. Resveratrol (RSV) was given orally (15 mg/kg body weight/d in RSV group) by means of an orogastric catheter for 6 wk. Enzyme activities were measured spectrophotometrically or fluorimetrically. Gene and protein expressions were analyzed by reverse transcriptase polymerase chain reaction and Western blot respectively. Cytokine concentrations and the activity of nuclear factor κ-light-chain-enhancer of activated β cells (NF-κB) were measured by using commercial kits. RSV reduced the weight of internal adipose tissues. In epididymal depot glucose-6P-dehydrogenase, acetyl-CoA carboxylase activities, as well as lipoprotein lipase expression and activity were reduced by RSV. The expression of hormone-sensitive lipase was increased, and that of the cluster of differentiation 36 was reduced. Serum concentrations of tumor necrosis factor-α, monocyte chemoattractant protein 1, and C-reactive protein were lower in the RSV-treated group than in the control group. Protein expression of interleukin-6 and the activity of NF-κB, were decreased by RSV. The present results provide evidence that fatty acid uptake and lipolysis are metabolic pathways involved in the response of adipose tissue to RSV. This polyphenol modulates plasma cytokine levels partially by reducing macrophage infiltration in adipose tissue and inhibiting NF-κB activity. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. The TMAO-Producing Enzyme Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase 3 Regulates Obesity and the Beiging of White Adipose Tissue.

    PubMed

    Schugar, Rebecca C; Shih, Diana M; Warrier, Manya; Helsley, Robert N; Burrows, Amy; Ferguson, Daniel; Brown, Amanda L; Gromovsky, Anthony D; Heine, Markus; Chatterjee, Arunachal; Li, Lin; Li, Xinmin S; Wang, Zeneng; Willard, Belinda; Meng, YongHong; Kim, Hanjun; Che, Nam; Pan, Calvin; Lee, Richard G; Crooke, Rosanne M; Graham, Mark J; Morton, Richard E; Langefeld, Carl D; Das, Swapan K; Rudel, Lawrence L; Zein, Nizar; McCullough, Arthur J; Dasarathy, Srinivasan; Tang, W H Wilson; Erokwu, Bernadette O; Flask, Chris A; Laakso, Markku; Civelek, Mete; Naga Prasad, Sathyamangla V; Heeren, Joerg; Lusis, Aldons J; Hazen, Stanley L; Brown, J Mark

    2017-06-20

    Emerging evidence suggests that microbes resident in the human intestine represent a key environmental factor contributing to obesity-associated disorders. Here, we demonstrate that the gut microbiota-initiated trimethylamine N-oxide (TMAO)-generating pathway is linked to obesity and energy metabolism. In multiple clinical cohorts, systemic levels of TMAO were observed to strongly associate with type 2 diabetes. In addition, circulating TMAO levels were associated with obesity traits in the different inbred strains represented in the Hybrid Mouse Diversity Panel. Further, antisense oligonucleotide-mediated knockdown or genetic deletion of the TMAO-producing enzyme flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (FMO3) conferred protection against obesity in mice. Complimentary mouse and human studies indicate a negative regulatory role for FMO3 in the beiging of white adipose tissue. Collectively, our studies reveal a link between the TMAO-producing enzyme FMO3 and obesity and the beiging of white adipose tissue. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. The inflammatory C-reactive protein is increased in both liver and adipose tissue in severely obese patients independently from metabolic syndrome, Type 2 diabetes, and NASH.

    PubMed

    Anty, Rodolphe; Bekri, Soumeya; Luciani, Nathalie; Saint-Paul, Marie-Christine; Dahman, Moncef; Iannelli, Antonio; Amor, Imed Ben; Staccini-Myx, Aline; Huet, Pierre-Michel; Gugenheim, Jean; Sadoul, Jean-Louis; Le Marchand-Brustel, Yannick; Tran, Albert; Gual, Philippe

    2006-08-01

    C-Reactive Protein (CRP), a nonspecific marker of inflammation that is moderately elevated in obesity, metabolic syndrome (MS), and type 2 diabetes, has been proposed as a surrogate marker of nonalcoholic steatohepatitis (NASH). Its clinical usefulness in the diagnosis of NASH was evaluated in severely obese patients without or with MS, diabetes, and NASH and the potential roles of the liver and of the adipose tissue in CRP production were characterized. Severely obese patients without NASH (without MS [N = 13], with MS [N = 11], or with MS and diabetes [N = 7]) and with NASH (without [N = 8] or with [N = 7] MS) were studied. For each patient, liver and adipose tissue biopsies were collected during a bariatric surgery and were used to determine the CRP gene expression by real-time PCR. The role of interleukin-6 (IL6) and lipopolysaccharide in CRP expression was also evaluated in subcutaneous adipose tissue obtained during cosmetic abdominoplasty. Plasma CRP levels were elevated in severely obese patients independently from the presence or absence of MS, diabetes, or NASH. CRP gene expression was not only increased in livers but also in adipose tissues of obese patients compared with controls subjects. In human adipose tissue, CRP mRNA levels were positively correlated with those of IL-6 and the CRP expression was enhanced in vitro by IL-6 and lipopolysaccharide. Plasma CRP levels are not predictive of the diagnosis of NASH in severely obese patients. The liver but also the adipose tissue can produce CRP, a process which could be dependent on IL6. Therefore, both tissues might contribute to the elevated plasma CRP levels found in obesity. In addition, the large amount of body fat may well produce an important part of the circulating CRP, further limiting its clinical usefulness in the evaluation of NASH in severely obese patients.

  8. Visceral adipose tissue is an independent correlate of glucose disposal in older obese postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Brochu, M; Starling, R D; Tchernof, A; Matthews, D E; Garcia-Rubi, E; Poehlman, E T

    2000-07-01

    Older obese postmenopausal women have an increased risk for type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease. Increased abdominal obesity may contribute to these comorbidities. There is considerable controversy, however, regarding the effects of visceral adipose tissue as a singular predictor of insulin resistance compared to the other constituents of adiposity. To address this issue, we examined the independent association of regional adiposity and total fat mass with glucose disposal in obese older postmenopausal women. A secondary objective examined the association between glucose disposal with markers of skeletal muscle fat content (muscle attenuation) and physical activity levels. We studied 44 healthy obese postmenopausal women between 50 and 71 yr of age (mean +/- SD, 56.5 +/- 5.3 yr). The rate of glucose disposal was measured using the euglycemic/hyperinsulinemic clamp technique. Visceral and sc adipose tissue areas and midthigh muscle attenuation were measured from computed tomography. Fat mass and lean body mass were estimated from dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. Peak VO2 was measured from a treadmill test to volitional fatigue. Physical activity energy expenditure was measured from indirect calorimetry and doubly labeled water. Pearson correlations indicated that glucose disposal was inversely related to visceral adipose tissue area (r = -0.40; P < 0.01), but not to sc adipose tissue area (r = 0.17), total fat mass (r = 0.05), midthigh muscle attenuation (r = 0.01), peak VO2 (r = -0.22), or physical activity energy expenditure (r = -0.01). The significant association persisted after adjusting visceral adipose tissue for fat mass and abdominal sc adipose tissue levels (r = -0.45; P < 0.005; in both cases). Additional analyses matched two groups of women for fat mass, but with different visceral adipose tissue levels. Results showed that obese women with high visceral adipose tissue levels (283 +/- 59 vs. 137 +/- 24 cm2; P < 0.0001) had a lower glucose

  9. Two types of brown adipose tissue in humans

    PubMed Central

    Lidell, Martin E; Betz, Matthias J; Enerbäck, Sven

    2014-01-01

    During the last years the existence of metabolically active brown adipose tissue in adult humans has been widely accepted by the research community. Its unique ability to dissipate chemical energy stored in triglycerides as heat makes it an attractive target for new drugs against obesity and its related diseases. Hence the tissue is now subject to intense research, the hypothesis being that an expansion and/or activation of the tissue is associated with a healthy metabolic phenotype. Animal studies provide evidence for the existence of at least two types of brown adipocytes. Apart from the classical brown adipocyte that is found primarily in the interscapular region where it constitutes a thermogenic organ, a second type of brown adipocyte, the so-called beige adipocyte, can appear within white adipose tissue depots. The fact that the two cell types develop from different precursors suggests that they might be recruited and stimulated by different cues and therefore represent two distinct targets for therapeutic intervention. The aim of this commentary is to discuss recent work addressing the question whether also humans possess two types of brown adipocytes and to highlight some issues when looking for molecular markers for such cells. PMID:24575372

  10. Role of cannabinoid receptor 1 in human adipose tissue for lipolysis regulation and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Sidibeh, Cherno O; Pereira, Maria J; Lau Börjesson, Joey; Kamble, Prasad G; Skrtic, Stanko; Katsogiannos, Petros; Sundbom, Magnus; Svensson, Maria K; Eriksson, Jan W

    2017-03-01

    We recently showed that the peripheral cannabinoid receptor type 1 (CNR1) gene is upregulated by the synthetic glucocorticoid dexamethasone. CNR1 is highly expressed in the central nervous system and has been a drug target for the treatment of obesity. Here we explore the role of peripheral CNR1 in states of insulin resistance in human adipose tissue. Subcutaneous adipose tissue was obtained from well-controlled type 2 diabetes subjects and controls. Subcutaneous adipose tissue gene expression levels of CNR1 and endocannabinoid synthesizing and degrading enzymes were assessed. Furthermore, paired human subcutaneous adipose tissue and omental adipose tissue from non-diabetic volunteers undergoing kidney donation or bariatric surgery, was incubated with or without dexamethasone. Subcutaneous adipose tissue obtained from volunteers through needle biopsy was incubated with or without dexamethasone and in the presence or absence of the CNR1-specific antagonist AM281. CNR1 gene and protein expression, lipolysis and glucose uptake were evaluated. Subcutaneous adipose tissue CNR1 gene expression levels were 2-fold elevated in type 2 diabetes subjects compared with control subjects. Additionally, gene expression levels of CNR1 and endocannabinoid-regulating enzymes from both groups correlated with markers of insulin resistance. Dexamethasone increased CNR1 expression dose-dependently in subcutaneous adipose tissue and omental adipose tissue by up to 25-fold. Dexamethasone pre-treatment of subcutaneous adipose tissue increased lipolysis rate and reduced glucose uptake. Co-incubation with the CNR1 antagonist AM281 prevented the stimulatory effect on lipolysis, but had no effect on glucose uptake. CNR1 is upregulated in states of type 2 diabetes and insulin resistance. Furthermore, CNR1 is involved in glucocorticoid-regulated lipolysis. Peripheral CNR1 could be an interesting drug target in type 2 diabetes and dyslipidemia.

  11. [Adaptation of adipose tissue to weight-reduction energy-restricted diet in obese individuals].

    PubMed

    Štich, Vladimír

    2016-01-01

    Obesity is associated with a number of metabolic disorders that lead to the development of type 2 diabetes, hyperlipidemia and ultimately cardiovascular diseases. An important role in the pathogenesis of metabolic disorders accompanying obesity is probably played by the alterations of adipose tissue characteristics: metabolic, endocrine and immune functions. The key component of obesity treatment, the weight-reduction energy-restricted diet, leads not only to the reduction of weight (specifically fat mass), but also to correction of obesity accompanying metabolic disorders. The mechanisms which mediate the metabolic effect of the weight-reduction energy-restricted diet, are unclear. It can be assumed that the weight-reduction diet "corrects" the impaired functions of the obese individuals adipose tissue and, subsequently, of the resulting metabolic disorders. The following text presents an overview of the changes of morphological and functional characteristics of adipose tissue that are induced by weight-reduction energy-restricted diets in obese individuals: the energy-restricted diet and the associated weight reduction cause a change in the size and differentiation of adipocytes, a change of metabolic functions, primarily of the regulation of adipose tissue lipolysis and lipogenesis, change in the regulation of endocrine functions and, finally, they lead to the change in the immune function indicators, i.e. adipose tissue infiltration with immune cells and secretion of a spectrum of cytokines. The knowledge about the mechanisms of favourable metabolic effects of energy-restricted diets may lead to an advancement in non-pharmacological procedures of therapy for obesity and its complications, and, in the longer, term to the development of new therapeutic pharmacological procedures.Key words: energy-restricted diet - obesity - weight reduction - adipose tissue.

  12. CD11c expression in adipose tissue and blood and its role in diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Wu, Huaizhu; Perrard, Xiaoyuan Dai; Wang, Qun; Perrard, Jerry L; Polsani, Venkateshwar R; Jones, Peter H; Smith, C Wayne; Ballantyne, Christie M

    2010-02-01

    To examine CD11c, a beta(2)-integrin, on adipose tissue (AT) leukocytes and blood monocytes and its role in diet-induced obesity. High-fat diet-induced obese C57BL/6 mice, CD11c-deficient mice, and obese humans were studied. CD11c, leukocytes, and chemokines/cytokines were examined in AT and/or blood by flow cytometry, RNase protection assay, quantitative polymerase chain reaction, or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Obese C57BL/6 mice had increased CD11c in AT and blood compared with lean controls. CD11c messenger RNA positively correlated with monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 in human visceral AT. Obese humans with metabolic syndrome had a higher CD11c level on blood monocytes compared with lean humans. Low-fat diet-induced weight loss reduced blood monocyte CD11c in obese mice and humans. Mouse and human monocyte CD11c levels and mouse AT CD11c messenger RNA correlated with insulin resistance. CD11c deficiency in mice did not alter weight gain but decreased inflammation, evidenced by a lower T-cell number and reduced levels of major histocompatibility complex class II, C-C chemokine ligand 2 (CCL5), CCL4, and interferon gamma in AT, and ameliorated insulin resistance and glucose intolerance associated with diet-induced obesity. Diet-induced obesity increased CD11c in both AT and blood in mice and humans. CD11c plays an important role in T-cell accumulation and activation in AT, and contributes to insulin resistance associated with obesity.

  13. Obesity-related hypertension: epidemiology, pathophysiology, treatments, and the contribution of perivascular adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Aghamohammadzadeh, Reza; Heagerty, Anthony M

    2012-06-01

    The advent of the obesity epidemic has highlighted the need to re-assess more closely the pathophysiology of obesity-related hypertension with the aim of identifying new therapies. In this article, we review the role of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system, sympathetic nervous system, and inflammation in relation to the pathophysiology of this condition. We also discuss the potential role of the perivascular adipose tissue in the context of obesity-related hypertension.

  14. Adipose Hypothermia in Obesity and Its Association with Period Homolog 1, Insulin Sensitivity, and Inflammation in Fat

    PubMed Central

    Yamaoka, Masaya; Maeda, Norikazu; Takayama, Yasunori; Sekimoto, Ryohei; Tsushima, Yu; Matsuda, Keisuke; Mori, Takuya; Inoue, Kana; Nishizawa, Hitoshi; Tominaga, Makoto; Funahashi, Tohru; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2014-01-01

    Visceral fat adiposity plays an important role in the development of metabolic syndrome. We reported previously the impact of human visceral fat adiposity on gene expression profile of peripheral blood cells. Genes related to circadian rhythm were highly associated with visceral fat area and period homolog 1 (PER1) showed the most significant negative correlation with visceral fat area. However, regulation of adipose Per1 remains poorly understood. The present study was designed to understand the regulation of Per1 in adipose tissues. Adipose Per1 mRNA levels of ob/ob mice were markedly low at 25 and 35 weeks of age. The levels of other core clock genes of white adipose tissues were also low in ob/ob mice at 25 and 35 weeks of age. Per1 mRNA was mainly expressed in the mature adipocyte fraction (MAF) and it was significantly low in MAF of ob/ob mice. To examine the possible mechanisms, 3T3-L1 adipocytes were treated with H2O2, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), S100A8, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). However, no significant changes in Per1 mRNA level were observed by these agents. Exposure of cultured 3T3-L1 adipocytes to low temperature (33°C) decreased Per1 and catalase, and increased monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (Mcp-1) mRNA levels. Hypothermia also worsened insulin-mediated Akt phosphorylation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Finally, telemetric analysis showed low temperature of adipose tissues in ob/ob mice. In obesity, adipose hypothermia seems to accelerate adipocyte dysfunction. PMID:25397888

  15. Adipose hypothermia in obesity and its association with period homolog 1, insulin sensitivity, and inflammation in fat.

    PubMed

    Yamaoka, Masaya; Maeda, Norikazu; Takayama, Yasunori; Sekimoto, Ryohei; Tsushima, Yu; Matsuda, Keisuke; Mori, Takuya; Inoue, Kana; Nishizawa, Hitoshi; Tominaga, Makoto; Funahashi, Tohru; Shimomura, Iichiro

    2014-01-01

    Visceral fat adiposity plays an important role in the development of metabolic syndrome. We reported previously the impact of human visceral fat adiposity on gene expression profile of peripheral blood cells. Genes related to circadian rhythm were highly associated with visceral fat area and period homolog 1 (PER1) showed the most significant negative correlation with visceral fat area. However, regulation of adipose Per1 remains poorly understood. The present study was designed to understand the regulation of Per1 in adipose tissues. Adipose Per1 mRNA levels of ob/ob mice were markedly low at 25 and 35 weeks of age. The levels of other core clock genes of white adipose tissues were also low in ob/ob mice at 25 and 35 weeks of age. Per1 mRNA was mainly expressed in the mature adipocyte fraction (MAF) and it was significantly low in MAF of ob/ob mice. To examine the possible mechanisms, 3T3-L1 adipocytes were treated with H2O2, tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), S100A8, and lipopolysaccharide (LPS). However, no significant changes in Per1 mRNA level were observed by these agents. Exposure of cultured 3T3-L1 adipocytes to low temperature (33°C) decreased Per1 and catalase, and increased monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (Mcp-1) mRNA levels. Hypothermia also worsened insulin-mediated Akt phosphorylation in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Finally, telemetric analysis showed low temperature of adipose tissues in ob/ob mice. In obesity, adipose hypothermia seems to accelerate adipocyte dysfunction.

  16. Extracellular Vesicles from Adipose Tissue-A Potential Role in Obesity and Type 2 Diabetes?

    PubMed

    Gao, Xuan; Salomon, Carlos; Freeman, Dilys J

    2017-01-01

    Adipose tissue plays a key role in the development of insulin resistance and its pathological sequelae, such as type 2 diabetes and non-alcoholic fatty liver disease. Dysfunction in the adipose tissue response to storing excess fatty acids as triglyceride can lead to adipose tissue inflammation and spillover of fatty acids from this tissue and accumulation of fatty acids as lipid droplets in ectopic sites, such as liver and muscle. Extracellular vesicles (EVs) are released from adipocytes and have been proposed to be involved in adipocyte/macrophage cross talk and to affect insulin signaling and transforming growth factor β expression in liver cells leading to metabolic disease. Furthermore EV produced by adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ADSC) can promote angiogenesis and cancer cell migration and have neuroprotective and neuroregenerative properties. ADSC EVs have therapeutic potential in vascular and neurodegenerative disease and may also be used to target specific functional miRNAs to cells. Obesity is associated with an increase in adipose-derived EV which may be related to the metabolic complications of obesity. In this review, we discuss our current knowledge of EV produced by adipose tissue and the potential impact of adipose tissue-derived EV on metabolic diseases associated with obesity.

  17. Immune-mediated activation of the endocannabinoid system in visceral adipose tissue in obesity.

    PubMed

    Kempf, K; Hector, J; Strate, T; Schwarzloh, B; Rose, B; Herder, C; Martin, S; Algenstaedt, P

    2007-08-01

    The aim of the study was to investigate if the endocannabinoid system (ECS) is activated in visceral adipose tissue and if adipose tissue inflammation affects the ECS activation state. Therefore, expression of fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), cannabinoid receptor 1 (Cb1), adiponectin, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-alpha was compared in visceral adipose tissue from 10 normal-weight (BMI 24.4+/-1.1 kg/m2) and 11 obese subjects (BMI 37.6+/-13.6 kg/m2) using quantitative RT-PCR, and gene expression changes were analyzed after in vitro stimulation of visceral adipose tissue with TNF-alpha. The data demonstrate that the ECS is activated in obese visceral adipose tissue as shown by decreased FAAH, Cb1, and adiponectin expression. Obesity-related ECS activation is accompanied by elevated expression of the pro-inflammatory cytokine TNF-alpha, which in turn stimulates ECS activation in vitro. Our data show a strong association between adipose tissue inflammation and ECS activation in obesity, and indicate that a pro-inflammatory state may directly activate the ECS.

  18. The Epigenomic Analysis of Human Obesity.

    PubMed

    Bell, Christopher G

    2017-09-01

    Analysis of the epigenome-the chemical modifications and packaging of the genome that can influence or indicate its activity-enables molecular insight into cell type-specific machinery. It can, therefore, reveal the pathophysiological mechanisms at work in disease. Detected changes can also represent physiological responses to adverse environmental exposures, thus enabling the epigenetic mark of DNA methylation to act as an epidemiological biomarker, even in surrogate tissue. This makes epigenomic analysis an attractive prospect to further understand the pathobiology and epidemiological aspects of obesity. Furthermore, integrating epigenomic data with known obesity-associated common genetic variation can aid in deciphering their molecular mechanisms. This review primarily examines epidemiological or population-based studies of epigenetic modifications in relation to adiposity traits, as opposed to animal or cell models. It discusses recent work exploring the epigenome with respect to human obesity, which to date has predominately consisted of array-based studies of DNA methylation in peripheral blood. It is of note that highly replicated BMI DNA methylation associations are not causal, but strongly driven by coassociations for more precisely measured intertwined outcomes and factors, such as hyperlipidemia, hyperglycemia, and inflammation. Finally, the potential for the future exploration of the epigenome in obesity and related disorders is considered. © 2017 The Obesity Society.

  19. Effect of pre-existing maternal obesity, gestational diabetes and adipokines on the expression of genes involved in lipid metabolism in adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Lappas, Martha

    2014-02-01

    To determine the effect of maternal obesity, gestational diabetes mellitus (GDM) and adipokines on the expression of genes involved in fatty acid uptake, transport, synthesis and metabolism. Human subcutaneous and omental adipose tissues were obtained from lean, overweight and obese normal glucose tolerant (NGT) women and women with GDM. Quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR) was performed to determine the level of expression. Adipose tissue explants were performed to determine the effect of the adipokines TNFα, IL-1β and leptin on adipose tissue gene expression. Pre-existing maternal obesity and GDM are associated with decreased expression in genes involved in fatty acid uptake and intracellular transport (LPL, FATP2, FATP6, FABPpm and ASCL1), triacylglyceride (TAG) biosynthesis (MGAT1,7 MGAT2 and DGAT1), lipogenesis (FASN) and lipolysis (PNPLA2, HSL and MGLL). Decreased gene expression was also observed for the transcription factors involved in lipid metabolism (LXRα, PPARα, PPARδ, PPARγ, RXRα and SREBP1c). On the other hand, the gene expression of the adipokines TNFα, IL-1β and or leptin was increased in adipose tissue from obese and GDM women. Functional in vitro studies revealed that these adipokines decreased the gene expression of LPL, FATP2, FATP6, ASCL1, PNPLA2, PPARδ, PPARγ and RXRα. Pregnancies complicated by pre-existing maternal obesity and GDM are associated with abnormal adipose tissue lipid metabolism, which may play a role in the pathogenesis of these diseases. © 2014.

  20. Crosstalk between adipocytes and immune cells in adipose tissue inflammation and metabolic dysregulation in obesity.

    PubMed

    Huh, Jin Young; Park, Yoon Jeong; Ham, Mira; Kim, Jae Bum

    2014-05-01

    Recent findings, notably on adipokines and adipose tissue inflammation, have revised the concept of adipose tissues being a mere storage depot for body energy. Instead, adipose tissues are emerging as endocrine and immunologically active organs with multiple effects on the regulation of systemic energy homeostasis. Notably, compared with other metabolic organs such as liver and muscle, various inflammatory responses are dynamically regulated in adipose tissues and most of the immune cells in adipose tissues are involved in obesity-mediated metabolic complications, including insulin resistance. Here, we summarize recent findings on the key roles of innate (neutrophils, macrophages, mast cells, eosinophils) and adaptive (regulatory T cells, type 1 helper T cells, CD8 T cells, B cells) immune cells in adipose tissue inflammation and metabolic dysregulation in obesity. In particular, the roles of natural killer T cells, one type of innate lymphocyte, in adipose tissue inflammation will be discussed. Finally, a new role of adipocytes as antigen presenting cells to modulate T cell activity and subsequent adipose tissue inflammation will be proposed.

  1. Brown adipose tissue activity as a target for the treatment of obesity/insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Poher, Anne-Laure; Altirriba, Jordi; Veyrat-Durebex, Christelle; Rohner-Jeanrenaud, Françoise

    2015-01-01

    Presence of brown adipose tissue (BAT), characterized by the expression of the thermogenic uncoupling protein 1 (UCP1), has recently been described in adult humans. UCP1 is expressed in classical brown adipocytes, as well as in "beige cells" in white adipose tissue (WAT). The thermogenic activity of BAT is mainly controlled by the sympathetic nervous system. Endocrine factors, such as fibroblast growth factor 21 (FGF21) and bone morphogenic protein factor-9 (BMP-9), predominantly produced in the liver, were shown to lead to activation of BAT thermogenesis, as well as to "browning" of WAT. This was also observed in response to irisin, a hormone secreted by skeletal muscles. Different approaches were used to delineate the impact of UCP1 on insulin sensitivity. When studied under thermoneutral conditions, UCP1 knockout mice exhibited markedly increased metabolic efficiency due to impaired thermogenesis. The impact of UCP1 deletion on insulin sensitivity in these mice was not reported. Conversely, several studies in both rodents and humans have shown that BAT activation (by cold exposure, β3-agonist treatment, transplantation and others) improves glucose tolerance and insulin sensitivity. Interestingly, similar results were obtained by adipose tissue-specific overexpression of PR-domain-containing 16 (PRDM16) or BMP4 in mice. The mediators of such beneficial effects seem to include FGF21, interleukin-6, BMP8B and prostaglandin D2 synthase. Interestingly, some of these molecules can be secreted by BAT itself, indicating the occurrence of autocrine effects. Stimulation of BAT activity and/or recruitment of UCP1-positive cells are therefore relevant targets for the treatment of obesity/type 2 diabetes in humans.

  2. Adipose-Tissue and Intestinal Inflammation – Visceral Obesity and Creeping Fat

    PubMed Central

    Kredel, Lea I.; Siegmund, Britta

    2014-01-01

    Obesity has become one of the main threats to health worldwide and therefore gained increasing clinical and economic significance as well as scientific attention. General adipose-tissue accumulation in obesity is associated with systemically increased pro-inflammatory mediators and humoral and cellular changes within this compartment. These adipose-tissue changes and their systemic consequences led to the concept of obesity as a chronic inflammatory state. A pathognomonic feature of Crohn’s disease (CD) is creeping fat (CF), a locally restricted hyperplasia of the mesenteric fat adjacent to the inflamed segments of the intestine. The precise role of this adipose-tissue and its mediators remains controversial, and ongoing work will have to define whether this compartment is protecting from or contributing to disease activity. This review aims to outline specific cellular changes within the adipose-tissue, occurring in either obesity or CF. Hence the potential impact of adipocytes and resident immune cells from the innate and adaptive immune system will be discussed for both diseases. The second part focuses on the impact of generalized adipose-tissue accumulation in obesity, respectively on the locally restricted form in CD, on intestinal inflammation and on the closely related integrity of the mucosal barrier. PMID:25309544

  3. Adipose-tissue and intestinal inflammation - visceral obesity and creeping fat.

    PubMed

    Kredel, Lea I; Siegmund, Britta

    2014-01-01

    Obesity has become one of the main threats to health worldwide and therefore gained increasing clinical and economic significance as well as scientific attention. General adipose-tissue accumulation in obesity is associated with systemically increased pro-inflammatory mediators and humoral and cellular changes within this compartment. These adipose-tissue changes and their systemic consequences led to the concept of obesity as a chronic inflammatory state. A pathognomonic feature of Crohn's disease (CD) is creeping fat (CF), a locally restricted hyperplasia of the mesenteric fat adjacent to the inflamed segments of the intestine. The precise role of this adipose-tissue and its mediators remains controversial, and ongoing work will have to define whether this compartment is protecting from or contributing to disease activity. This review aims to outline specific cellular changes within the adipose-tissue, occurring in either obesity or CF. Hence the potential impact of adipocytes and resident immune cells from the innate and adaptive immune system will be discussed for both diseases. The second part focuses on the impact of generalized adipose-tissue accumulation in obesity, respectively on the locally restricted form in CD, on intestinal inflammation and on the closely related integrity of the mucosal barrier.

  4. Native human adipose stromal cells: localization, morphology and phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Maumus, M; Peyrafitte, J-A; D'Angelo, R; Fournier-Wirth, C; Bouloumié, A; Casteilla, L; Sengenès, C; Bourin, P

    2011-01-01

    Objectives: Beside having roles in energy homeostasis and endocrine modulation, adipose tissue (AT) is now considered a promising source of mesenchymal stromal cells (adipose-derived stromal cells or ASCs) for regenerative medicine. Despite numerous studies on cultured ASCs, native human ASCs are rarely investigated. Indeed, the phenotype of ASCs in their native state, their localization within AT and comparison with bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BM-MSCs) has been poorly investigated. Design: To address these issues, the stroma vascular fraction (SVF) of human AT was extracted and native cell subtypes were isolated by immunoselection to study their clonogenic potential in culture. Immunohistology on samples of human AT in combination with reconstruction of confocal sections were performed in order to localize ASCs. Results: Compared with BM-MNCs, all native ASCs were found in the CD34+ cell fraction of the AT-SVF. Native ASCs expressed classical mesenchymal markers described for BM-MSCs. Interestingly, CD34 expression decreased during ASC cell culture and was negatively correlated with cell proliferation rate. Immunohistological analysis revealed that native ASCs exhibited specific morphological features with protrusions. They were found scattered in AT stroma and did not express in vivo pericytic markers such as NG2, CD140b or alpha-smooth muscle actin, which appeared during the culture process. Finally, ASCs spontaneous commitment to adipocytic lineage was enhanced in AT from obese humans. Conclusions: The use of complementary methodological approaches to study native human ASCs revealed their immunophenotype, their specific morphology, their location within AT and their stemness. Furthermore, our data strongly suggest that human ASCs participate in adipogenesis during AT development. PMID:21266947

  5. Adipose tissue, metabolic and inflammatory responses to stroke are altered in obese mice.

    PubMed

    Haley, Michael J; Mullard, Graham; Hollywood, Katherine A; Cooper, Garth J; Dunn, Warwick B; Lawrence, Catherine B

    2017-08-10

    Obesity is an independent risk factor for stroke, though several clinical studies have reported that obesity improves stroke outcome. Obesity is hypothesised to aid recovery by protecting against post-stroke catabolism. We therefore assessed whether obese mice had an altered metabolic and inflammatory response to stroke. Obese ob/ob mice underwent 20 min middle cerebral artery occlusion and 24 h reperfusion. Lipid metabolism and expression of inflammatory cytokines were assessed in the plasma, liver and adipose tissue. The obese-specific metabolic response to stroke was assessed in plasma using non-targeted UPLC-MS metabolomics coupled with univariate and multivariate analysis. Obesity had no effect on the extent of weight loss 24 h after stroke but affected the metabolic and inflammatory responses to stroke, predominantly affecting lipid metabolism. Specifically, obese mice had increases in plasma free fatty acids and expression of adipose lipolytic enzymes. Metabolomics identified several classes of metabolites affected by stroke in obese mice, including fatty acids and membrane lipids (glycerophospholipids, lysophospholipids and sphingolipids). Obesity also featured increases in inflammatory cytokines in the plasma and adipose tissue. Overall these results demonstrate that obesity affected the acute metabolic and inflammatory response to stroke and suggest a potential role for adipose tissue in this effect. These findings could have implications for longer-term recovery and also further highlight the importance of considering comorbidities in preclinical stroke research, especially when identifying biomarkers for stroke. However, further work is required to assess whether these changes translate into long-term effects on recovery. © 2017. Published by The Company of Biologists Ltd.

  6. Effects of Korean red ginseng (Panax ginseng) on obesity and adipose inflammation in ovariectomized mice.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hyunghee; Choi, Jeonghyun; Shin, Soon Shik; Yoon, Michung

    2016-02-03

    Korean red ginseng (ginseng, Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer) is a famous traditional drug used in Korea for the treatment and prevention of obesity, type 2 diabetes, cancer, and liver and cardiovascular diseases. Menopause is strongly associated with many of the aforementioned metabolic diseases and increased visceral obesity. The aims of this study were to investigate whether ginseng inhibits obesity and related disorders in ovariectomized (OVX) C57BL/6J mice, which is a mouse model of postmenopausal women, and to determine the mechanism of action involved in this process. After OVX mice were treated with 5% (w/w) ginseng for 15 weeks, we determined the effects of ginseng on obesity and adipose inflammation, angiogenesis, metalloproteinase (MMP) activity and metabolic parameters. OVX mice had higher body weight, adipose tissue mass and adipocyte size when fed a high fat diet (HFD) compared with HFD-fed sham-operated mice. All of these parameters were significantly reduced in OVX mice fed a HFD supplemented with ginseng. Ginseng treatment also decreased blood vessel density, MMP activity, and mRNA levels of angiogenic factors (e.g., VEGF-A and FGF-2) and MMPs (e.g., MMP-2 and MMP-9) in adipose tissues of OVX mice. Infiltrating inflammatory cells and expression of inflammatory cytokines (e.g., CD68, TNFα and MCP-1) in adipose tissue were reduced by ginseng. Ginseng not only reduced the circulating levels of free fatty acids and triglycerides, but also normalized hyperinsulinemia and hyperglycemia in OVX mice. Hepatic lipid droplets were almost completely abolished by ginseng. These results suggest that ginseng inhibited ovariectomy-induced obesity, adiposity, and adipocyte hypertrophy by modulating angiogenesis and MMP activity. Ginseng also suppressed adipose inflammation, insulin resistance, and hepatic steatosis in OVX mice. Thus, it is likely that ginseng may be a promising drug for the prevention and treatment of obesity and related disorders in obese postmenopausal

  7. B56alpha/protein phosphatase 2A inhibits adipose lipolysis in high-fat diet-induced obese mice.

    PubMed

    Kinney, Brice P; Qiao, Liping; Levaugh, Justin M; Shao, Jianhua

    2010-08-01

    Lipolysis and lipogenesis are two opposite processes that control lipid storage in adipocytes. Impaired adipose lipolysis has been observed in both obese human subjects and animal models. This study investigated the mechanisms underlying impaired adipose lipolysis in a high-fat diet-induced obese (DIO) mouse model. DIO models were created using male C57BL/6 mice. Our results show that beta3 adrenergic receptor-specific agonist BRL37344 induced adipose lipolysis was significantly blunted in DIO mice. The levels of Ser660 phosphorylation of hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL) were significantly decreased in the epididymal fat of DIO mice. However, protein levels of HSL, adipose triglyceride lipase and its coactivator comparative gene identification-58 were similar between DIO and control mice. It is known that upon lipolytic hormone stimulation, protein kinase A phosphorylates HSL Ser660 and activates HSL, whereas protein phosphatase 2A (PP2A) dephosphorylates and inactivates HSL. Interestingly, our study shows that high-fat feeding did not alter epididymal fat cAMP and protein kinase A protein levels but significantly increased the expression of the alpha-isoform of PP2A regulatory subunit B' (B56alpha). To study the role of B56alpha in obesity-associated lipolytic defect, B56alpha was overexpressed or knocked down by adenovirus-mediated gene transduction in cultured 3T3-L1CARDelta1 adipocytes. Overexpression of B56alpha significantly decreased HSL Ser660 phosphorylation. In contrast, knocking down B56alpha increased hormone-stimulated HSL activation and lipolysis in mature 3T3-L1CARDelta1 adipocytes. These results strongly suggest that elevated B56alpha/PP2A inhibits HSL and lipolysis in white adipose tissue of DIO mice.

  8. Genetics of human body size and shape: pleiotropic and independent genetic determinants of adiposity.

    PubMed

    Livshits, G; Yakovenko, K; Ginsburg, E; Kobyliansky, E

    1998-01-01

    The present study utilized pedigree data from three ethnically different populations of Kirghizstan, Turkmenia and Chuvasha. Principal component analysis was performed on a matrix of genetic correlations between 22 measures of adiposity, including skinfolds, circumferences and indices. Findings are summarized as follows: (1) All three genetic matrices were not positive definite and the first four factors retained even after exclusion RG > or = 1.0, explained from 88% to 97% of the total additive genetic variation in the 22 trials studied. This clearly emphasizes the massive involvement of pleiotropic gene effects in the variability of adiposity traits. (2) Despite the quite natural differences in pairwise correlations between the adiposity traits in the three ethnically different samples under study, factor analysis revealed a common basic pattern of covariability for the adiposity traits. In each of the three samples, four genetic factors were retained, namely, the amount of subcutaneous fat, the total body obesity, the pattern of distribution of subcutaneous fat and the central adiposity distribution. (3) Genetic correlations between the retained four factors were virtually non-existent, suggesting that several independent genetic sources may be governing the variation of adiposity traits. (4) Variance decomposition analysis on the obtained genetic factors leaves no doubt regarding the substantial familial and (most probably genetic) effects on variation of each factor in each studied population. The similarity of results in the three different samples indicates that the findings may be deemed valid and reliable descriptions of the genetic variation and covariation pattern of adiposity traits in the human species.

  9. Local proliferation of macrophages contributes to obesity-associated adipose tissue inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Vangala, Pranitha; Tencerova, Michaela; Nicoloro, Sarah M.; Yawe, Joseph C.; Shen, Yuefei; Czech, Michael P.; Aouadi, Myriam

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Adipose tissue (AT) of obese mice and humans accumulates immune cells, which secrete cytokines that can promote insulin resistance. AT macrophages (ATMs) are thought to originate from bone marrow-derived monocytes, which infiltrate the tissue from the circulation. Here we show that a major fraction of macrophages unexpectedly undergo cell division locally within AT, as detected by Ki67 expression and 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine incorporation. Macrophages within the visceral AT (VAT), but not those in other tissues, including liver and spleen, displayed increased proliferation in obesity. Importantly, depletion of blood monocytes had no impact on ATM content, while their proliferation in situ continued. Treatment with monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) induced macrophage cell division in AT explants, while MCP-1 deficiency in vivo decreased ATM proliferation. These results reveal that proliferation in situ driven by MCP-1 is an important process by which macrophages accumulate in the VAT in obesity, in addition to blood monocyte recruitment. PMID:24374218

  10. Adipose Tissue Lipolysis Is Upregulated in Lean and Obese Men During Acute Resistance Exercise

    PubMed Central

    Chatzinikolaou, Athanasios; Fatouros, Ioannis; Petridou, Anatoli; Jamurtas, Athanasios; Avloniti, Alexandra; Douroudos, Ioannis; Mastorakos, George; Lazaropoulou, Christina; Papassotiriou, Ioannis; Tournis, Symeon; Mitrakou, Asimina; Mougios, Vassilis

    2008-01-01

    OBJECTIVE—To investigate the effect of acute resistance exercise on adipose tissue triacylglycerol lipase activity (TGLA) in lean and obese men. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS—Nine lean and eight obese men performed 30 min of circuit resistance exercise. Adipose tissue and blood were sampled during exercise for TGLA, metabolite, and hormone determinations. Respiratory exchange ratio (RER) was measured throughout exercise. RESULTS—Energy expenditure of exercise relative to body mass was higher in the lean and RER was higher in the obese men, suggesting lower fat oxidation. TGLA increased 18-fold at 5 min of exercise in the lean men and 16-fold at 10 min of exercise in the obese men. The delayed lipolytic activation in the obese men was reflected in serum nonesterified fatty acid and glycerol concentrations. Plasma insulin increased in the obese but did not change in the lean men. CONCLUSIONS—Resistance exercise upregulated adipose tissue lipolysis and enhanced energy expenditure in lean and obese men, with a delayed lipolytic activation in the obese men. PMID:18375413

  11. Obesity and cancer: the role of adipose tissue and adipo-cytokines-induced chronic inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Divella, Rosa; De Luca, Raffaele; Abbate, Ines; Naglieri, Emanuele; Daniele, Antonella

    2016-01-01

    Adipose tissue in addition to its ability to keep lipids is now recognized as a real organ with both metabolic and endocrine functions. Recent studies demonstrated that in obese animals is established a status of adipocyte hypoxia and in this hypoxic state interaction between adipocytes and stromal vascular cells contribute to tumor development and progression. In several tumors such as breast, colon, liver and prostate, obesity represents a poor predictor of clinical outcomes. Dysfunctional adipose tissue in obesity releases a disturbed profile of adipokines with elevated levels of pro-inflammatory factors and a consequent alteration of key signaling mediators which may be an active local player in establishing the peritumoral environment promoting tumor growth and progression. Therefore, adipose tissue hypoxia might contribute to cancer risk in the obese population. To date the precise mechanisms behind this obesity-cancer link is not yet fully understood. In the light of information provided in this review that aims to identify the key mechanisms underlying the link between obesity and cancer we support that inflammatory state specific of obesity may be important in obesity-cancer link. PMID:27994674

  12. Green tea extract activates AMPK and ameliorates white adipose tissue metabolic dysfunction induced by obesity.

    PubMed

    Rocha, Andréa; Bolin, Anaysa Paola; Cardoso, Claudia Andrea Lima; Otton, Rosemari

    2016-10-01

    Beneficial effects of green tea (GT) polyphenols against obesity have been reported. However, until this moment the molecular mechanisms of how green tea can modulate obesity and regulates fat metabolism, particularly in adipose tissue, remain poorly understood. The aim of this study was to evaluate the role of GT extract in the adipose tissue of obese animals and its effect on weight gain, metabolism and function (de novo lipogenesis and lipolysis), and the involvement of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Male Wistar rats were treated with GT by gavage (12 weeks/5 days/week; 500 mg/kg of body weight), and obesity was induced by cafeteria diet (8 weeks). Here, we show that obese rats treated with GT showed a significant reduction in indicators of obesity such as hyperlipidemia, fat synthesis, body weight, and fat depots as compared to those treated with standard control diet. AMPK was induced in adipose tissue in rats that were treated with GT and likely restored insulin sensitivity, increased mRNA expression of GLUT4, reducing the concentrations of plasma and liver lipid content, also stimulating fatty acid oxidation in the same tissue. Importantly, repression of de novo lipogenesis in the adipose tissue, reduced lipid droplets in the liver, and the development of insulin resistance in diet-induced obese rats were accompanied by AMPK activation. Our study identified that metabolic changes caused by GT intake induced AMPK activation and modulate the expression of genes involved in metabolism, particularly in adipose tissue, thus offering a therapeutic strategy to combat insulin resistance, dyslipidemia, and obesity in rats.

  13. Macrophage infiltration into obese adipose tissues suppresses the induction of UCP1 level in mice.

    PubMed

    Sakamoto, Tomoya; Nitta, Takahiro; Maruno, Koji; Yeh, Yu-Sheng; Kuwata, Hidetoshi; Tomita, Koichi; Goto, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Kawada, Teruo

    2016-04-15

    Emergence of thermogenic adipocytes such as brown and beige adipocytes is critical for whole body energy metabolism. Promoting the emergence of these adipocytes, which increase energy expenditure, could be a viable strategy in treating obesity and its related diseases. However, little is known regarding the mechanisms that regulate the emergence of these adipocytes in obese adipose tissue. Here, we demonstrated that classically activated macrophages (M1 Mϕ) suppress the induction of thermogenic adipocytes in obese adipose tissues of mice. Cold exposure significantly induced the expression levels of uncoupling protein-1 (UCP1), which is a mitochondrial protein unique in thermogenic adipocytes, in C57BL/6 mice fed a normal diet. However, UCP1 induction was significantly suppressed in adipose tissues of C57BL/6 mice fed a high-fat diet, into which M1 Mϕ infiltrated. Depletion of M1 Mϕ using clodronate liposomes eliminated the suppressive effect and markedly reduced the mRNA level of tumor necrosis factor-α (TNFα) in the adipose tissues. Importantly, consistent with the observed changes in the expression levels of marker genes for thermogenic adipocytes, combination treatment of clodronate liposome and cold exposure resulted in metabolic benefits such as lowered body weight and blood glucose level in obese mice. Moreover, intraperitoneal injection of recombinant TNFα protein suppressed UCP1 induction in lean adipose tissues of mice. Collectively, our data indicate that infiltrated M1 Mϕ suppress the induction of thermogenic adipocytes in obese adipose tissues via TNFα. This report suggests that inflammation induced by infiltrated Mϕ could cause not only insulin resistance but also reduction of energy expenditure in adipose tissues. Copyright © 2016 the American Physiological Society.

  14. Targeting obesity-related adipose tissue dysfunction to prevent cancer development and progression

    PubMed Central

    Gucalp, Ayca; Iyengar, Neil M.; Hudis, Clifford A.; Dannenberg, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    The incidence of obesity, a leading modifiable risk factor for common solid tumors, is increasing. Effective interventions are needed to minimize the public health implications of obesity. Although the mechanisms linking increased adiposity to malignancy are incompletely understood, growing evidence points to complex interactions among multiple systemic and tissue-specific pathways including inflamed white adipose tissue. The metabolic and inflammatory consequences of white adipose tissue dysfunction collectively provide a plausible explanation for the link between overweight/obesity and carcinogenesis. Gaining a better understanding of these underlying molecular pathways and developing risk assessment tools that identify at-risk populations will be critical in implementing effective and novel cancer prevention and management strategies. PMID:26970134

  15. Targeting obesity-related adipose tissue dysfunction to prevent cancer development and progression.

    PubMed

    Gucalp, Ayca; Iyengar, Neil M; Hudis, Clifford A; Dannenberg, Andrew J

    2016-02-01

    The incidence of obesity, a leading modifiable risk factor for common solid tumors, is increasing. Effective interventions are needed to minimize the public health implications of obesity. Although the mechanisms linking increased adiposity to malignancy are incompletely understood, growing evidence points to complex interactions among multiple systemic and tissue-specific pathways including inflamed white adipose tissue. The metabolic and inflammatory consequences of white adipose tissue dysfunction collectively provide a plausible explanation for the link between overweight/obesity and carcinogenesis. Gaining a better understanding of these underlying molecular pathways and developing risk assessment tools that identify at-risk populations will be critical in implementing effective and novel cancer prevention and management strategies. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Breast Cancer 1 (BrCa1) May Be behind Decreased Lipogenesis in Adipose Tissue from Obese Subjects

    PubMed Central

    Ortega, Francisco J.; Moreno-Navarrete, José M.; Mayas, Dolores; García-Santos, Eva; Gómez-Serrano, María; Rodriguez-Hermosa, José I.; Ruiz, Bartomeu; Ricart, Wifredo; Tinahones, Francisco J.; Frühbeck, Gema; Peral, Belen; Fernández-Real, José M.

    2012-01-01

    Context Expression and activity of the main lipogenic enzymes is paradoxically decreased in obesity, but the mechanisms behind these findings are poorly known. Breast Cancer 1 (BrCa1) interacts with acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC) reducing the rate of fatty acid biosynthesis. In this study, we aimed to evaluate BrCa1 in human adipose tissue according to obesity and insulin resistance, and in vitro cultured adipocytes. Research Design and Methods BrCa1 gene expression, total and phosphorylated (P-) BrCa1, and ACC were analyzed in adipose tissue samples obtained from a total sample of 133 subjects. BrCa1 expression was also evaluated during in vitro differentiation of human adipocytes and 3T3-L1 cells. Results BrCa1 gene expression was significantly up-regulated in both omental (OM; 1.36-fold, p = 0.002) and subcutaneous (SC; 1.49-fold, p = 0.001) adipose tissue from obese subjects. In parallel with increased BrCa1 mRNA, P-ACC was also up-regulated in SC (p = 0.007) as well as in OM (p = 0.010) fat from obese subjects. Consistent with its role limiting fatty acid biosynthesis, both BrCa1 mRNA (3.5-fold, p<0.0001) and protein (1.2-fold, p = 0.001) were increased in pre-adipocytes, and decreased during in vitro adipogenesis, while P-ACC decreased during differentiation of human adipocytes (p = 0.005) allowing lipid biosynthesis. Interestingly, BrCa1 gene expression in mature adipocytes was restored by inflammatory stimuli (macrophage conditioned medium), whereas lipogenic genes significantly decreased. Conclusions The specular findings of BrCa1 and lipogenic enzymes in adipose tissue and adipocytes reported here suggest that BrCa1 might help to control fatty acid biosynthesis in adipocytes and adipose tissue from obese subjects. PMID:22666314

  17. Updated survey of the steroid-converting enzymes in human adipose tissues.

    PubMed

    Tchernof, André; Mansour, Mohamed Fouad; Pelletier, Mélissa; Boulet, Marie-Michèle; Nadeau, Mélanie; Luu-The, Van

    2015-03-01

    Over the past decade, adipose tissues have been increasingly known for their endocrine properties, that is, their ability to secrete a number of adipocytokines that may exert local and/or systemic effects. In addition, adipose tissues have long been recognized as significant sites for steroid hormone transformation and action. We hereby provide an updated survey of the many steroid-converting enzymes that may be detected in human adipose tissues, their activities and potential roles. In addition to the now well-established role of aromatase and 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase (HSD) type 1, many enzymes have been reported in adipocyte cell lines, isolated mature cells and/or preadipocytes. These include 11β-HSD type 2, 17β-HSDs, 3β-HSD, 5α-reductases, sulfatases and glucuronosyltransferases. Some of these enzymes are postulated to bear relevance for adipose tissue physiology and perhaps for the pathophysiology of obesity. This elaborate set of steroid-converting enzymes in the cell types of adipose tissue deserves further scientific attention. Our work on 20α-HSD (AKR1C1), 3α-HSD type 3 (AKR1C2) and 17β-HSD type 5 (AKR1C3) allowed us to clarify the relevance of these enzymes for some aspects of adipose tissue function. For example, down-regulation of AKR1C2 expression in preadipocytes seems to potentiate the inhibitory action of dihydrotestosterone on adipogenesis in this model. Many additional studies are warranted to assess the impact of intra-adipose steroid hormone conversions on adipose tissue functions and chronic conditions such as obesity, diabetes and cancer. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Central Adiposity is Negatively Associated with Hippocampal-Dependent Relational Memory among Overweight and Obese Children

    PubMed Central

    Khan, Naiman A.; Baym, Carol L.; Monti, Jim M.; Raine, Lauren B.; Drollette, Eric S.; Scudder, Mark R.; Moore, R. Davis; Kramer, Arthur F.; Hillman, Charles H.; Cohen, Neal J.

    2014-01-01

    Objective To assess associations between adiposity and hippocampal-dependent and hippocampal-independent memory forms among prepubertal children. Study design Prepubertal children (7–9-year-olds, n = 126), classified as non-overweight (<85th %tile BMI-for-age [n = 73]) or overweight/obese (≥85th %tile BMI-for-age [n = 53]), completed relational (hippocampal-dependent) and item (hippocampal-independent) memory tasks, and performance was assessed with both direct (behavioral accuracy) and indirect (preferential disproportionate viewing [PDV]) measures. Adiposity (%whole body fat mass, subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue, visceral adipose tissue, and total abdominal adipose tissue) was assessed using DXA. Backward regressions identified significant (P <0.05) predictive models of memory performance. Covariates included age, sex, pubertal timing, socioeconomic status, IQ, oxygen consumption (VO2max), and body mass index (BMI) z-score. Results Among overweight/obese children, total abdominal adipose tissue was a significant negative predictor of relational memory behavioral accuracy, and pubertal timing together with socioeconomic status jointly predicted the PDV measure of relational memory. In contrast, among non-overweight children, male sex predicted item memory behavioral accuracy, and a model consisting of socioeconomic status and BMI z-score jointly predicted the PDV measure of relational memory. Conclusions Regional, and not whole body, fat deposition was selectively and negatively associated with hippocampal-dependent relational memory among overweight/obese prepubertal children. PMID:25454939

  19. Central adiposity is negatively associated with hippocampal-dependent relational memory among overweight and obese children.

    PubMed

    Khan, Naiman A; Baym, Carol L; Monti, Jim M; Raine, Lauren B; Drollette, Eric S; Scudder, Mark R; Moore, R Davis; Kramer, Arthur F; Hillman, Charles H; Cohen, Neal J

    2015-02-01

    To assess associations between adiposity and hippocampal-dependent and hippocampal-independent memory forms among prepubertal children. Prepubertal children (age 7-9 years; n = 126), classified as non-overweight (<85th percentile body mass index [BMI]-for-age [n = 73]) or overweight/obese (≥85th percentile BMI-for-age [n = 53]), completed relational (hippocampal-dependent) and item (hippocampal-independent) memory tasks. Performance was assessed with both direct (behavioral accuracy) and indirect (preferential disproportionate viewing [PDV]) measures. Adiposity (ie, percent whole-body fat mass, subcutaneous abdominal adipose tissue, visceral adipose tissue, and total abdominal adipose tissue) was assessed by dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry. Backward regression identified significant (P < .05) predictive models of memory performance. Covariates included age, sex, pubertal timing, socioeconomic status (SES), IQ, oxygen consumption, and BMI z-score. Among overweight/obese children, total abdominal adipose tissue was a significant negative predictor of relational memory behavioral accuracy, and pubertal timing together with SES jointly predicted the PDV measure of relational memory. In contrast, among non-overweight children, male sex predicted item memory behavioral accuracy, and a model consisting of SES and BMI z-score jointly predicted the PDV measure of relational memory. Regional, but not whole-body, fat deposition was selectively and negatively associated with hippocampal-dependent relational memory among overweight/obese prepubertal children. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Soya protein attenuates abnormalities of the renin-angiotensin system in adipose tissue from obese rats.

    PubMed

    Frigolet, María E; Torres, Nimbe; Tovar, Armando R

    2012-01-01

    Several metabolic disturbances during obesity are associated with adipose tissue-altered functions. Adipocytes contain the renin-angiotensin system (RAS), which regulates signalling pathways that control angiogenesis via Akt in an autocrine fashion. Soya protein (Soy) consumption modifies the gene expression pattern in adipose tissue, resulting in an improved adipocyte function. Therefore, the aim of the present work is to study whether dietary Soy regulates the expression of RAS and angiogenesis-related genes and its association with the phosphorylated state of Akt in the adipose tissue of obese rats. Animals were fed a 30 % Soy or casein (Cas) diet containing 5 or 25 % fat for 160 d. mRNA abundance was studied in the adipose tissue, and Akt phosphorylation and hormone release were measured in the primary adipocyte culture. The present results show that Soy treatment in comparison with Cas consumption induces lower angiotensin release and increased insulin-stimulated Akt activation in adipocytes. Furthermore, Soy consumption varies the expression of RAS and angiogenesis-related genes, which maintain cell size and vascularity in the adipose tissue of rats fed a high-fat diet. Thus, adipocyte hypertrophy and impaired angiogenesis, which are frequently observed in dysfunctional adipose tissue, were avoided by consuming dietary Soy. Taken together, these findings suggest that Soy can be used as a dietary strategy to preserve adipocyte functionality and to prevent obesity abnormalities.

  1. Role of adipose tissue renin-angiotensin system in metabolic and inflammatory diseases associated with obesity.

    PubMed

    Yvan-Charvet, Laurent; Quignard-Boulangé, Annie

    2011-01-01

    Obesity is a leading cause of death worldwide because of its associated inflammatory disorders such as hypertension, cardiovascular and kidney diseases, dyslipidemia, glucose intolerance, and certain types of cancer. Adipose tissue expresses all components of the renin-angiotensin system necessary to generate angiotensin (Ang) peptides for local function. The angiotensin type 1 (AT1) and type 2 (AT2) receptors mediate the effect of Ang II and recent studies have shown that both receptors may modulate fat mass expansion through upregulation of adipose tissue lipogenesis (AT2) and downregulation of lipolysis (AT1). Thus, both receptors may have synergistic and additive effects to promote the storage of lipid in adipose tissue in response to the nutrient environment. The production of angiotensinogen (AGT) by adipose tissue in rodents also contributes to one third of the circulating AGT levels. Increased adipose tissue AGT production in the obese state may be responsible in part for the metabolic and inflammatory disorders associated with obesity. This supports the notion that besides the traditional role of Ang II produced by the liver in the control of blood pressure, Ang II produced by the adipose tissue may more accurately reflect the role of this hormone in the regulation of fat mass and associated disorders.

  2. Adipose tissue in obesity-related inflammation and insulin resistance: cells, cytokines, and chemokines.

    PubMed

    Makki, Kassem; Froguel, Philippe; Wolowczuk, Isabelle

    2013-12-22

    Adipose tissue is a complex organ that comprises a wide range of cell types with diverse energy storage, metabolic regulation, and neuroendocrine and immune functions. Because it contains various immune cells, either adaptive (B and T lymphocytes; such as regulatory T cells) or innate (mostly macrophages and, more recently identified, myeloid-derived suppressor cells), the adipose tissue is now considered as a bona fide immune organ, at the cross-road between metabolism and immunity. Adipose tissue disorders, such as those encountered in obesity and lipodystrophy, cause alterations to adipose tissue distribution and function with broad effects on cytokine, chemokine, and hormone expression, on lipid storage, and on the composition of adipose-resident immune cell populations. The resulting changes appear to induce profound consequences for basal systemic inflammation and insulin sensitivity. The purpose of this review is to synthesize the current literature on adipose cell composition remodeling in obesity, which shows how adipose-resident immune cells regulate inflammation and insulin resistance-notably through cytokine and chemokine secretion-and highlights major research questions in the field.

  3. Association of proton density fat fraction in adipose tissue with imaging-based and anthropometric obesity markers in adults.

    PubMed

    Franz, D; Weidlich, D; Freitag, F; Holzapfel, C; Drabsch, T; Baum, T; Eggers, H; Witte, A; Rummeny, E J; Hauner, H; Karampinos, D C

    2017-08-14

    The purpose of this study was to examine the relationship of the proton density fat fraction (PDFF), measured by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), of supraclavicular and gluteal adipose tissue with subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue (SAT and VAT) volumes, liver fat fraction and anthropometric obesity markers. The supraclavicular fossa was selected as a typical location where brown adipocytes may be present in humans and the gluteal region was selected as a typical location enclosing primarily white adipocytes. In this cross-sectional study, 61 adults (44 women, median age 29.3 years, range 21-68 years) underwent an MRI examination of the neck and the abdomen/pelvis (3T, Ingenia, Philips Healthcare). PDFF maps of the supraclavicular and gluteal adipose tissue and the liver were generated. Volumes of SAT and VAT were calculated and supraclavicular and subcutaneous fat were segmented using custom-built post-processing algorithms. Body mass index (BMI), waist circumference and waist-to-height ratio were recorded. Statistical analysis was conducted using the Student's t-test and Pearson correlation analysis. Mean supraclavicular PDFF was 75.3±4.7% (range 65.4-83.8%) and mean gluteal PDFF was 89.7±2.9% (range 82.2-94%), resulting in a significant difference (P<0.0001). Supraclavicular PDFF was positively correlated with VAT (r=0.76, P<0.0001), SAT (r=0.73, P<0.0001), liver PDFF (r=0.42, P=0.0008) and all measured anthropometric obesity markers. Gluteal subcutaneous PDFF also correlated with VAT (r=0.59, P<0.0001), SAT (r=0.63, P<0.0001), liver PDFF (r=0.3, P=0.02) and anthropometric obesity markers. The positive correlations between adipose tissue PDFF and imaging, as well as anthropometric obesity markers suggest that adipose tissue PDFF may be useful as a biomarker for improving the characterization of the obese phenotype, for risk stratification and for selection of appropriate treatment strategies.International Journal of Obesity advance online publication

  4. Adipose Expression of Tumor Necrosis Factor-α: Direct Role in Obesity-Linked Insulin Resistance

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hotamisligil, Gokhan S.; Shargill, Narinder S.; Spiegelman, Bruce M.

    1993-01-01

    Tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) has been shown to have certain catabolic effects on fat cells and whole animals. An induction of TNF-α messenger RNA expression was observed in adipose tissue from four different rodent models of obesity and diabetes. TNF-α protein was also elevated locally and systemically. Neutralization of TNF-α in obese fa/fa rats caused a significant increase in the peripheral uptake of glucose in response to insulin. These results indicate a role for TNF-α in obesity and particularly in the insulin resistance and diabetes that often accompany obesity.

  5. Association between subcutaneous white adipose tissue and serum 25-hydroxyvitamin D in overweight and obese adults.

    PubMed

    Piccolo, Brian D; Dolnikowski, Gregory; Seyoum, Elias; Thomas, Anthony P; Gertz, Erik R; Souza, Elaine C; Woodhouse, Leslie R; Newman, John W; Keim, Nancy L; Adams, Sean H; Van Loan, Marta D

    2013-08-26

    Cholecalciferol is known to be deposited in human adipose tissue, but it is not known whether 25-hydroxyvitamin D (25(OH)D) is found in detectable concentrations. Therefore, our objective was to determine whether 25(OH)D is detectable in subcutaneous white adipose tissue (SWAT) in overweight and obese persons enrolled in a twelve week energy restricted diet. Baseline and post-intervention gluteal SWAT biopsies were collected from 20 subjects participating in a larger clinical weight loss intervention. LC-MS/MS was utilized to determine SWAT 25(OH)D concentrations. Serum 25(OH)D and 1,25(OH)2D were measured by RIA. Body composition was assessed by dual energy x-ray absorptiometry. SWAT 25(OH)D concentrations were 5.8 ± 2.6 nmol/kg tissue and 6.2 ± 2.7 nmol/kg tissue pre- and post-intervention SWAT, respectively. There was a significant positive association between SWAT 25(OH)D concentration and serum 25(OH)D concentration (r = 0.52, P < 0.01). Both SWAT and serum 25(OH)D concentrations did not significantly change after a twelve-week period of energy restriction with approximately 5 kg of fat loss. In conclusion, we have demonstrated our LC-MS/MS method can detect 25(OH)D3 in human subcutaneous fat tissue from overweight and obese individuals and is consistent with previously reported concentrations in swine. Additionally, our findings of no significant changes in SWAT 25(OH)D3 or serum 25(OH)D after a 6% loss of total body weight and 13% reduction in total fat provides the first human evidence that adipose 25(OH)D does not likely contribute to serum 25(OH)D with moderate weight loss; whether this is also the case with larger amounts of weight loss is unknown. Weight loss alone is not sufficient to increase serum 25(OH)D and increases in dietary or dermal biosynthesis of vitamin D appear to be the most critical contributors to in vitamin D status.

  6. Caspase Induction and BCL2 Inhibition in Human Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Tinahones, Francisco José; Coín Aragüez, Leticia; Murri, Mora; Oliva Olivera, Wilfredo; Mayas Torres, María Dolores; Barbarroja, Nuria; Gomez Huelgas, Ricardo; Malagón, Maria M.; El Bekay, Rajaa

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Cell death determines the onset of obesity and associated insulin resistance. Here, we analyze the relationship among obesity, adipose tissue apoptosis, and insulin signaling. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS The expression levels of initiator (CASP8/9) and effector (CASP3/7) caspases as well as antiapoptotic B-cell lymphoma (BCL)2 and inflammatory markers were assessed in visceral (VAT) and subcutaneous (SAT) adipose tissue from patients with different degrees of obesity and without insulin resistance or diabetes. Adipose tissue explants from lean subjects were cultured with TNF-α or IL-6, and the expression of apoptotic and insulin signaling components was analyzed and compared with basal expression levels in morbidly obese subjects. RESULTS SAT and VAT exhibited increased CASP3/7 and CASP8/9 expression levels and decreased BCL2 expression with BMI increase. These changes were accompanied by increased inflammatory cytokine mRNA levels and macrophage infiltration markers. In obese subjects, CASP3/7 activation and BCL2 downregulation correlated with the IRS-1/2–expression levels. Expression levels of caspases, BCL2, p21, p53, IRS-1/2, GLUT4, protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B, and leukocyte antigen-related phosphatase in TNF-α– or IL-6–treated explants from lean subjects were comparable with those found in adipose tissue samples from morbidly obese subjects. These insulin component expression levels were reverted with CASP3/7 inhibition in these TNF-α– or IL-6–treated explants. CONCLUSIONS Body fat mass increase is associated with CASP3/7 and BCL2 expression in adipose tissue. Moreover, this proapoptotic state correlated with insulin signaling, suggesting its potential contribution to the development of insulin resistance. PMID:23193206

  7. Associations of Dispositional Mindfulness with Obesity and Central Adiposity: the New England Family Study

    PubMed Central

    Britton, Willoughby B.; Howe, Chanelle J.; Gutman, Roee; Gilman, Stephen E.; Brewer, Judson; Eaton, Charles B.; Buka, Stephen L.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To evaluate whether dispositional mindfulness (defined as the ability to attend nonjudgmentally to one’s own physical and mental processes) is associated with obesity and central adiposity. Methods Study participants (n=394) were from the New England Family Study, a prospective birth cohort, with median age 47 years. Dispositional mindfulness was assessed using the Mindful Attention Awareness Scale (MAAS). Central adiposity was assessed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans with primary outcomes android fat mass and android/gynoid ratio. Obesity was defined as body mass index ≥30 kg/m2. Results Multivariable-adjusted regression analyses demonstrated that participants with low vs. high MAAS scores were more likely to be obese (prevalence ratio for obesity= 1.34 (95 % confidence limit (CL): 1.02, 1.77)), adjusted for age, gender, race/ethnicity, birth weight, childhood socioeconomic status, and childhood intelligence. Furthermore, participants with low vs. high MAAS level had a 448 (95 % CL 39, 857) g higher android fat mass and a 0.056 (95 % CL 0.003, 0.110) greater android/gynoid fat mass ratio. Prospective analyses demonstrated that participants who were not obese in childhood and became obese in adulthood (n=154) had −0.21 (95 % CL −0.41, −0.01; p=0.04) lower MAAS scores than participants who were not obese in childhood or adulthood (n=203). Conclusions Dispositional mindfulness may be inversely associated with obesity and adiposity. Replication studies are needed to adequately establish whether low dispositional mindfulness is a risk factor for obesity and adiposity. PMID:26481650

  8. Evidence for activation of inflammatory lipoxygenase pathways in visceral adipose tissue of obese Zucker rats

    PubMed Central

    Chakrabarti, Swarup K.; Wen, Yeshao; Dobrian, Anca D.; Cole, Banumathi K.; Ma, Qian; Pei, Hong; Williams, Michael D.; Bevard, Melissa H.; Vandenhoff, George E.; Keller, Susanna R.; Gu, Jiali

    2011-01-01

    Central obesity is associated with low-grade inflammation that promotes type 2 diabetes and cardiovascular disease in obese individuals. The 12- and 5-lipoxygenase (12-LO and 5-LO) enzymes have been linked to inflammatory changes, leading to the development of atherosclerosis. 12-LO has also been linked recently to inflammation and insulin resistance in adipocytes. We analyzed the expression of LO and proinflammatory cytokines in adipose tissue and adipocytes in obese Zucker rats, a widely studied genetic model of obesity, insulin resistance, and the metabolic syndrome. mRNA expression of 12-LO, 5-LO, and 5-LO-activating protein (FLAP) was upregulated in adipocytes and adipose tissue from obese Zucker rats compared with those from lean rats. Concomitant with increased LO gene expression, the 12-LO product 12-HETE and the 5-LO products 5-HETE and leukotriene B4 (LTB4) were also increased in adipocytes. Furthermore, upregulation of key proinflammatory markers interleukin (IL)-6, TNFα, and monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 were observed in adipocytes isolated from obese Zucker rats. Immunohistochemistry indicated that the positive 12-LO staining in adipose tissue represents cells in addition to adipocytes. This was confirmed by Western blotting in stromal vascular fractions. These changes were in part reversed by the novel anti-inflammatory drug lisofylline (LSF). LSF also reduced p-STAT4 in visceral adipose tissue from obese Zucker rats and improved the metabolic profile, reducing fasting plasma glucose and increasing insulin sensitivity in obese Zucker rats. In 3T3-L1 adipocytes, LSF abrogated the inflammatory response induced by LO products. Thus, therapeutic agents reducing LO or STAT4 activation may provide novel tools to reduce obesity-induced inflammation. PMID:20978234

  9. Blocking CXCR7-mediated adipose tissue macrophages chemotaxis attenuates insulin resistance and inflammation in obesity.

    PubMed

    Peng, Hongxia; Zhang, Hu; Zhu, Honglei

    2016-10-28

    Adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) have been considered to have a pivotal role in the chronic inflammation development during obesity. Although chemokine-chemokine receptor interaction has been studied in ATMs infiltration, most chemokine receptors remain incompletely understood and little is known about their mechanism of actions that lead to ATMs chemotaxis and pathogenesis of insulin resistance during obesity. In this study, we reported that CXCR7 expression is upregulated in adipose tissue, and specifically in ATMs during obesity. In addition, CXCL11 or CXCL12-induced ATMs chemotaxis is mediated by CXCR7 in obesity but not leanness, whereas CXCR3 and CXCR4 are not involved. Additional mechanism study shows that NF-κB activation is essential in ATMs chemotaxis, and manipulates chemotaxis of ATMs via CXCR7 expression regulation in obesity. Most importantly, CXCR7 neutralizing therapy dose dependently leads to less infiltration of macrophages into adipose tissue and thus reduces inflammation and improves insulin sensitivity in obesity. In conclusion, these findings demonstrated that blocking CXCR7-mediated ATMs chemotaxis ameliorates insulin resistance and inflammation in obesity. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Gene expression profiling of white adipose tissue reveals paternal transmission of proneness to obesity.

    PubMed

    Morita, Sumiyo; Nakabayashi, Kazuhiko; Kawai, Tomoko; Hayashi, Keiko; Horii, Takuro; Kimura, Mika; Kamei, Yasutomi; Ogawa, Yoshihiro; Hata, Kenichiro; Hatada, Izuho

    2016-02-12

    Previously, we found that C57BL/6J (B6) mice are more prone to develop obesity than PWK mice. In addition, we analyzed reciprocal crosses between these mice and found that (PWK × B6) F1 mice, which have B6 fathers, are more likely to develop dietary obesity than (B6 × PWK) F1 mice, which have B6 mothers. These results suggested that diet-induced obesity is paternally transmitted. In this study, we performed transcriptome analysis of adipose tissues of B6, PWK, (PWK × B6) F1, and (B6 × PWK) F1 mice using next-generation sequencing. We found that paternal transmission of diet-induced obesity was correlated with genes involved in adipose tissue inflammation, metal ion transport, and cilia. Furthermore, we analyzed the imprinted genes expressed in white adipose tissue (WAT) and obesity. Expression of paternally expressed imprinted genes (PEGs) was negatively correlated with body weight, whereas expression of maternally expressed imprinted genes (MEGs) was positively correlated. In the obesity-prone B6 mice, expression of PEGs was down-regulated by a high-fat diet, suggesting that abnormally low expression of PEGs contributes to high-fat diet-induced obesity in B6 mice. In addition, using single-nucleotide polymorphisms that differ between B6 and PWK, we identified candidate imprinted genes in WAT.

  11. Taurine improves obesity-induced inflammatory responses and modulates the unbalanced phenotype of adipose tissue macrophages.

    PubMed

    Lin, Shan; Hirai, Shizuka; Yamaguchi, Yuko; Goto, Tsuyoshi; Takahashi, Nobuyuki; Tani, Fumito; Mutoh, Chikako; Sakurai, Takanobu; Murakami, Shigeru; Yu, Rina; Kawada, Teruo

    2013-12-01

    It is increasingly accepted that chronic inflammation is a feature of obesity. Obesity-induced inflammation triggers enhanced recruitment of macrophages into the adipose tissue. Depending on their phenotype, macrophages can be designated either as pro-inflammatory M1 macrophages or anti-inflammatory M2 macrophages. We have therefore investigated the effects of taurine, a sulfated amino acid that is abundant in seafood, on obesity-related inflammation. In high-fat diet fed C57BL/6J mice, taurine treatment reduced the infiltration of macrophages and promoted an M2-like phenotype of macrophages in adipose tissues. In addition, taurine decreased the production of inflammatory cytokines, and suppressed the development of hyperglycemia in diet-induced obese mice. Moreover, in vitro experiments that involved bone marrow derived macrophages indicated that taurine treatment induced alternative M2 macrophage activation, and its chloride, taurine chloramines, inhibited classical M1 macrophage activation. Our findings indicate that taurine treatment attenuates the infiltration of adipose tissue by macrophages and modulates the phenotype of macrophages, which suggest that taurine is a valuable food constituent with a potential to attenuate chronic inflammation in adipose tissue and improve obesity-related insulin resistance. © 2013 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  12. TEAVIGO (epigallocatechin gallate) supplementation prevents obesity in rodents by reducing adipose tissue mass.

    PubMed

    Wolfram, Swen; Raederstorff, Daniel; Wang, Ying; Teixeira, Sandra R; Elste, Volker; Weber, Peter

    2005-01-01

    This study investigated the antiobesity effects of TEAVIGO, a product providing the most abundant green tea catechin, epigallocatechin gallate (EGCG), in a pure form. Two models of diet-induced obesity and an in vitro adipocyte differentiation assay were employed. Prevention and regression of diet-induced obesity by dietary supplementation with EGCG was studied in C57BL/6J mice and Sprague-Dawley rats, respectively. Expression of genes regulating lipid metabolism was assessed in adipose tissue. The effects of EGCG on adipocyte differentiation were investigated in vitro. In C57BL/6J mice, EGCG supplementation prevented diet-induced increases in body weight and in fed state plasma levels of glucose, triglycerides, and leptin. EGCG decreased subcutaneous and epididymal adipose tissue weights. Supplementation of EGCG reversed the established obesity in Sprague-Dawley rats. Fatty acid synthase and acetyl-CoA carboxylase-1 mRNA levels were markedly decreased in adipose tissue of EGCG-supplemented mice. EGCG dose dependently inhibited adipocyte differentiation in vitro. This study shows for the first time that supplementation with the most abundant green tea polyphenol, EGCG, abolishes diet-induced obesity. This effect is at least partly mediated via a direct influence on adipose tissue. Thus, dietary supplementation with EGCG should be considered as a valuable natural treatment option for obesity. Copyright 2005 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  13. Origins of metabolic complications in obesity: adipose tissue and free fatty acid trafficking

    PubMed Central

    Mittendorfer, Bettina

    2013-01-01

    Purpose of review Obesity is associated with a number of serious medical complications that are risk factors for cardiovascular disease (e.g., insulin resistance, dyslipidemia and liver fat accumulation). Alterations in fatty acid trafficking, both between tissues and within cells, represent a key feature in the pathophysiology of the metabolic complications in obese subjects. The ways by which fatty acid “re-routing” may affect metabolic function are summarized in this article. Recent findings Ectopic fat accumulation (i.e., fat accumulation in non-adipose tissues) appears to be a key feature distinguishing metabolically healthy from metabolically abnormal subjects. This observation has led to the believe that an imbalance in fatty acid trafficking away from adipose tissue towards non-adipose tissues is a primary cause for the development of metabolic alterations in obese subjects. More recently, however, it has become apparent that fatty acid trafficking with within non-adipose tissues cells (i.e., towards storage - in the form of triglycerides - and oxidation) may be equally important in determining risk for development of metabolic disease. Summary The pathophysiology of the metabolic alterations associated with obesity is probably multifactorial within a complex network of coordinated physiological responses. Only through the integration of multiple concepts will it be possible to further our understanding in this area and to help prevent the metabolic alterations associated with obesity. PMID:21849896

  14. Direct effects of sex steroid hormones on adipose tissues and obesity.

    PubMed

    Mayes, J S; Watson, G H

    2004-11-01

    Sex steroid hormones are involved in the metabolism, accumulation and distribution of adipose tissues. It is now known that oestrogen receptor, progesterone receptor and androgen receptor exist in adipose tissues, so their actions could be direct. Sex steroid hormones carry out their function in adipose tissues by both genomic and nongenomic mechanisms. In the genomic mechanism, the sex steroid hormone binds to its receptor and the steroid-receptor complex regulates the transcription of given genes. Leptin and lipoprotein lipase are two key proteins in adipose tissues that are regulated by transcriptional control with sex steroid hormones. In the nongenomic mechanism, the sex steroid hormone binds to its receptor in the plasma membrane, and second messengers are formed. This involves both the cAMP cascade and the phosphoinositide cascade. Activation of the cAMP cascade by sex steroid hormones would activate hormone-sensitive lipase leading to lipolysis in adipose tissues. In the phosphoinositide cascade, diacylglycerol and inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate are formed as second messengers ultimately causing the activation of protein kinase C. Their activation appears to be involved in the control of preadipocyte proliferation and differentiation. In the presence of sex steroid hormones, a normal distribution of body fat exists, but with a decrease in sex steroid hormones, as occurs with ageing or gonadectomy, there is a tendency to increase central obesity, a major risk for cardiovascular disease, type 2 diabetes and certain cancers. Because sex steroid hormones regulate the amount and distribution of adipose tissues, they or adipose tissue-specific selective receptor modulators might be used to ameliorate obesity. In fact, hormone replacement therapy in postmenopausal women and testosterone replacement therapy in older men appear to reduce the degree of central obesity. However, these therapies have numerous side effects limiting their use, and selective receptor

  15. Systems pharmacology of adiposity reveals inhibition of EP300 as a common therapeutic mechanism of caloric restriction and resveratrol for obesity

    PubMed Central

    Nishimura, Yuhei; Sasagawa, Shota; Ariyoshi, Michiko; Ichikawa, Sayuri; Shimada, Yasuhito; Kawaguchi, Koki; Kawase, Reiko; Yamamoto, Reiko; Uehara, Takuma; Yanai, Takaaki; Takata, Ryoji; Tanaka, Toshio

    2015-01-01

    Both caloric restriction (CR) and resveratrol (RSV) have beneficial effects on obesity. However, the biochemical pathways that mediate these beneficial effects might be complex and interconnected and have not been fully elucidated. To reveal the common therapeutic mechanism of CR and RSV, we performed a comparative transcriptome analysis of adipose tissues from diet-induced obese (DIO) zebrafish and obese humans. We identified nine genes in DIO zebrafish and seven genes in obese humans whose expressions were regulated by CR and RSV. Although the gene lists did not overlap except for one gene, the gene ontologies enriched in the gene lists were highly overlapped, and included genes involved in adipocyte differentiation, lipid storage and lipid metabolism. Bioinformatic analysis of cis-regulatory sequences of these genes revealed that their transcriptional regulators also overlapped, including EP300, HDAC2, CEBPB, CEBPD, FOXA1, and FOXA2. We also identified 15 and 46 genes that were dysregulated in the adipose tissue of DIO zebrafish and obese humans, respectively. Bioinformatics analysis identified EP300, HDAC2, and CEBPB as common transcriptional regulators for these genes. EP300 is a histone and lysyl acetyltransferase that modulates the function of histone and various proteins including CEBPB, CEBPD, FOXA1, and FOXA2. We demonstrated that adiposity in larval zebrafish was significantly reduced by C646, an inhibitor of EP300 that antagonizes acetyl-CoA. The reduction of adiposity by C646 was not significantly different from that induced by RSV or co-treatment of C646 and RSV. These results indicate that the inhibition of EP300 might be a common therapeutic mechanism between CR and RSV in adipose tissues of obese individuals. PMID:26441656

  16. Human adipose tissue expresses intrinsic circadian rhythm in insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Carrasco-Benso, Maria P; Rivero-Gutierrez, Belen; Lopez-Minguez, Jesus; Anzola, Andrea; Diez-Noguera, Antoni; Madrid, Juan A; Lujan, Juan A; Martínez-Augustin, Olga; Scheer, Frank A J L; Garaulet, Marta

    2016-09-01

    In humans, insulin sensitivity varies according to time of day, with decreased values in the evening and at night. Mechanisms responsible for the diurnal variation in insulin sensitivity are unclear. We investigated whether human adipose tissue (AT) expresses intrinsic circadian rhythms in insulin sensitivity that could contribute to this phenomenon. Subcutaneous and visceral AT biopsies were obtained from extremely obese participants (body mass index, 41.8 ± 6.3 kg/m(2); 46 ± 11 y) during gastric-bypass surgery. To assess the rhythm in insulin signaling, AKT phosphorylation was determined every 4 h over 24 h in vitro in response to different insulin concentrations (0, 1, 10, and 100 nM). Data revealed that subcutaneous AT exhibited robust circadian rhythms in insulin signaling (P < 0.00001). Insulin sensitivity reached its maximum (acrophase) around noon, being 54% higher than during midnight (P = 0.009). The amplitude of the rhythm was positively correlated with in vivo sleep duration (r = 0.53; P = 0.023) and negatively correlated with in vivo bedtime (r = -0.54; P = 0.020). No circadian rhythms were detected in visceral AT (P = 0.643). Here, we demonstrate the relevance of the time of the day for how sensitive AT is to the effects of insulin. Subcutaneous AT shows an endogenous circadian rhythm in insulin sensitivity that could provide an underlying mechanism for the daily rhythm in systemic insulin sensitivity.-Carrasco-Benso, M. P., Rivero-Gutierrez, B., Lopez-Minguez, J., Anzola, A., Diez-Noguera, A., Madrid, J. A., Lujan, J. A., Martínez-Augustin, O., Scheer, F. A. J. L., Garaulet, M. Human adipose tissue expresses intrinsic circadian rhythm in insulin sensitivity.

  17. Vascular targeting of adipose tissue as an anti-obesity approach.

    PubMed

    Daquinag, Alexes C; Zhang, Yan; Kolonin, Mikhail G

    2011-05-01

    Development of obesity is characterized by hypertrophy and hyperplasia of adipocytes in white adipose tissue (WAT). This process relies on concomitant angiogenesis. Results from experimental inhibition or depletion of cells comprising the vasculature in animal models have contributed to the understanding of the mechanisms governing expansion of WAT. Disruption of neovascularization might be potentially useful for obesity prevention. In addition, approaches in which the mature WAT vasculature is disrupted have been sought with the aim of combating obesity after its onset. Other cell types in WAT, including adipose stromal cells, which support angiogenesis, could represent alternative targets for combinatorial WAT treatment. This review discusses recent advances in WAT vascular targeting and implications for the development of new anti-obesity therapeutics. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Aromatase overexpression in dysfunctional adipose tissue links obesity to postmenopausal breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xuyi; Simpson, Evan R; Brown, Kristy A

    2015-09-01

    The number of breast cancer cases has increased in the last a few decades and this is believed to be associated with the increased prevalence of obesity worldwide. The risk of breast cancer increases with age beyond menopause and the relationship between obesity and the risk of breast cancer in postmenopausal women is well established. The majority of postmenopausal breast cancers are estrogen receptor (ER) positive and estrogens produced in the adipose tissue promotes tumor formation. Obesity results in the secretion of inflammatory factors that stimulate the expression of the aromatase enzyme, which converts androgens into estrogens in the adipose tissue. Evidence demonstrating a link between obesity and breast cancer has led to the investigation of metabolic pathways as novel regulators of estrogen production, including pathways that can be targeted to inhibit aromatase specifically within the breast. This review aims to present some of the key findings in this regard. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Arginase inhibition ameliorates adipose tissue inflammation in mice with diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Hu, Huan; Moon, Jiyoung; Chung, Ji Hyung; Kim, Oh Yoen; Yu, Rina; Shin, Min-Jeong

    2015-08-28

    This study examined whether oral administration of an arginase inhibitor regulates adipose tissue macrophage infiltration and inflammation in mice with high fat diet (HFD)-induced obesity. Male C57BL/6 mice (n = 30) were randomly assigned to control (CTL, n = 10), HFD only (n = 10), and HFD with arginase inhibitor N(ω)-hydroxy-nor-l-arginine (HFD with nor-NOHA, n = 10) groups. Plasma and mRNA levels of cytokines in epididymal adipose tissues (EAT), macrophage infiltration into EAT, and macrophage phenotype polarization were measured in the animals after 12 weeks. Additionally, the effects of nor-NOHA on adipose tissue macrophage infiltration and mRNA expression of cytokines were measured in co-cultured 3T3-L1 adipocytes and RAW 264.7 macrophages. Macrophage infiltration into the adipocytes was significantly suppressed by nor-NOHA treatment in adipocyte/macrophage co-culture system and mice with HFD-induced obesity. Pro-inflammatory cytokines, including monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), and interleukin-6 (IL-6), were significantly downregulated, and the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-10 was significantly upregulated in nor-NOHA-treated co-cultured cells. In the mice with HFD-induced obesity, plasma and mRNA levels of MCP-1 significantly reduced after supplementation with nor-NOHA. In addition, oral supplement of nor-NOHA modified M1/M2 phenotype ratio in the EAT. Oral supplementation of an arginase inhibitor, nor-NOHA, altered M1/M2 macrophage phenotype and macrophage infiltration into HFD-induced obese adipose tissue, thereby improved adipose tissue inflammatory response. These results may indicate that arginase inhibition ameliorates obesity-induced adipose tissue inflammation.

  20. Pomegranate vinegar attenuates adiposity in obese rats through coordinated control of AMPK signaling in the liver and adipose tissue

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The effect of pomegranate vinegar (PV) on adiposity was investigated in high-fat diet (HF)-induced obese rats. Methods The rats were divided into 5 groups and treated with HF with PV or acetic acid (0, 6.5 or 13% w/w) for 16 weeks. Statistical analyses were performed by the Statistical Analysis Systems package, version 9.2. Results Compared to control, PV supplementation increased phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), leading to changes in mRNA expressions: increases for hormone sensitive lipase and mitochondrial uncoupling protein 2 and decreases for sterol regulatory element binding protein-1c (SREBP-1c) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptorγ (PPARγ) in adipose tissue; increases for PPARα and carnitinepalmitoyltransferase-1a (CPT-1a) and decrease for SREBP-1c in the liver. Concomitantly, PV reduced increases of body weight (p = 0.048), fat mass (p = 0.033), hepatic triglycerides (p = 0.005), and plasma triglycerides (p = 0.001). Conclusions These results suggest that PV attenuates adiposity through the coordinated control of AMPK, which leads to promotion of lipolysis in adipose tissue and stimulation of fatty acid oxidation in the liver. PMID:24180378

  1. A comparison of inflammatory and oxidative stress markers in adipose tissue from weight-matched obese male and female mice.

    PubMed

    Nickelson, Karen J; Stromsdorfer, Kelly L; Pickering, R Taylor; Liu, Tzu-Wen; Ortinau, Laura C; Keating, Aileen F; Perfield, James W

    2012-01-01

    Expansion of intra-abdominal adipose tissue and the accompanying inflammatory response has been put forward as a unifying link between obesity and the development of chronic diseases. However, an apparent sexual dimorphism exists between obesity and chronic disease risk due to differences in the distribution and abundance of adipose tissue. A range of experimental protocols have been employed to demonstrate the role of estrogen in regulating health benefits; however, most studies are confounded by significant differences in body weight and adiposity. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to compare weight-matched obese male and female mice to determine if the sex-dependent health benefits remain when body weight is similar. The development of obesity in female mice receiving a high-fat diet was delayed; however, subsequent comparisons of weight-matched obese mice revealed greater adiposity in obese female mice. Despite excess adiposity and enlarged adipocyte size, obese females remained more glucose tolerant than weight-matched male mice, and this benefit was associated with increased expression of adiponectin and reductions in immune cell infiltration and oxidative stress in adipose tissue. Therefore, the protective benefits of estrogen persist in the obese state and appear to improve the metabolic phenotype of adipose tissue and the individual.

  2. Epigenetics and human obesity.

    PubMed

    van Dijk, S J; Molloy, P L; Varinli, H; Morrison, J L; Muhlhausler, B S

    2015-01-01

    Recent technological advances in epigenome profiling have led to an increasing number of studies investigating the role of the epigenome in obesity. There is also evidence that environmental exposures during early life can induce persistent alterations in the epigenome, which may lead to an increased risk of obesity later in life. This paper provides a systematic review of studies investigating the association between obesity and either global, site-specific or genome-wide methylation of DNA. Studies on the impact of pre- and postnatal interventions on methylation and obesity are also reviewed. We discuss outstanding questions, and introduce EpiSCOPE, a multidisciplinary research program aimed at increasing the understanding of epigenetic changes in emergence of obesity. An electronic search for relevant articles, published between September 2008 and September 2013 was performed. From the 319 articles identified, 46 studies were included and reviewed. The studies provided no consistent evidence for a relationship between global methylation and obesity. The studies did identify multiple obesity-associated differentially methylated sites, mainly in blood cells. Extensive, but small, alterations in methylation at specific sites were observed in weight loss intervention studies, and several associations between methylation marks at birth and later life obesity were found. Overall, significant progress has been made in the field of epigenetics and obesity and the first potential epigenetic markers for obesity that could be detected at birth have been identified. Eventually this may help in predicting an individual's obesity risk at a young age and opens possibilities for introducing targeted prevention strategies. It has also become clear that several epigenetic marks are modifiable, by changing the exposure in utero, but also by lifestyle changes in adult life, which implies that there is the potential for interventions to be introduced in postnatal life to modify

  3. Associations of Dispositional Mindfulness with Obesity and Central Adiposity: the New England Family Study.

    PubMed

    Loucks, Eric B; Britton, Willoughby B; Howe, Chanelle J; Gutman, Roee; Gilman, Stephen E; Brewer, Judson; Eaton, Charles B; Buka, Stephen L

    2016-04-01

    To evaluate whether dispositional mindfulness (defined as the ability to attend nonjudgmentally to one's own physical and mental processes) is associated with obesity and central adiposity. Study participants (n = 394) were from the New England Family Study, a prospective birth cohort, with median age 47 years. Dispositional mindfulness was assessed using the Mindful Attention Awareness Scale (MAAS). Central adiposity was assessed using dual-energy X-ray absorptiometry (DXA) scans with primary outcomes android fat mass and android/gynoid ratio. Obesity was defined as body mass index ≥30 kg/m(2). Multivariable-adjusted regression analyses demonstrated that participants with low vs. high MAAS scores were more likely to be obese (prevalence ratio for obesity = 1.34 (95 % confidence limit (CL): 1.02, 1.77)), adjusted for age, gender, race/ethnicity, birth weight, childhood socioeconomic status, and childhood intelligence. Furthermore, participants with low vs. high MAAS level had a 448 (95 % CL 39, 857) g higher android fat mass and a 0.056 (95 % CL 0.003, 0.110) greater android/gynoid fat mass ratio. Prospective analyses demonstrated that participants who were not obese in childhood and became obese in adulthood (n = 154) had -0.21 (95 % CL -0.41, -0.01; p = 0.04) lower MAAS scores than participants who were not obese in childhood or adulthood (n = 203). Dispositional mindfulness may be inversely associated with obesity and adiposity. Replication studies are needed to adequately establish whether low dispositional mindfulness is a risk factor for obesity and adiposity.

  4. Obesity reduces methionine sulfoxide reductase activity in visceral adipose tissue

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Visceral obesity is linked to the development of comorbidities including insulin resistance and cardiovascular disease. Elevated levels of oxidative stress are observed in obese individuals and in animal models of obesity, pointing to a mechanistic role of oxidative stress. A recent genetic study in...

  5. Regulation of alternative splicing in human obesity loci.

    PubMed

    Kaminska, Dorota; Käkelä, Pirjo; Nikkola, Elina; Venesmaa, Sari; Ilves, Imre; Herzig, Karl-Heinz; Kolehmainen, Marjukka; Karhunen, Leila; Kuusisto, Johanna; Gylling, Helena; Pajukanta, Päivi; Laakso, Markku; Pihlajamäki, Jussi

    2016-10-01

    Multiple obesity susceptibility loci have been identified by genome-wide association studies, yet the mechanisms by which these loci influence obesity remain unclear. Alternative splicing could contribute to obesity by regulating the transcriptomic and proteomic diversity of genes in these loci. Based on a database search, 72 of the 136 genes at the 13 obesity loci encoded multiple protein isoforms. Thus, alternative splicing of these genes in adipose tissue samples was analyzed from the Metabolic Syndrome in Men population-based study and from two weight loss intervention studies (surgical and very low calorie diet). Alternative splicing was confirmed in 11 genes with PCR capillary electrophoresis in human subcutaneous adipose tissue. Interestingly, differential splicing of TRA2B, BAG6, and MSH5 was observed between lean individuals with normoglycemia and overweight individuals with type 2 diabetes. Of these genes, we detected fat depot-dependent splicing of TRA2B and BAG6 and weight loss-induced regulation of MSH5 splicing in the intervention studies. Finally, body mass index was a major determinant of TRA2B, BAG6, and MSH5 splicing in the combined data. This study provides evidence for alternative splicing in obesity loci, suggesting that alternative splicing at least in part mediates the obesity-associated risk in these loci. © 2016 The Obesity Society.

  6. Depot- and sex-specific effects of maternal obesity in offspring's adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Lecoutre, Simon; Deracinois, Barbara; Laborie, Christine; Eberlé, Delphine; Guinez, Céline; Panchenko, Polina E; Lesage, Jean; Vieau, Didier; Junien, Claudine; Gabory, Anne; Breton, Christophe

    2016-07-01

    According to the Developmental Origin of Health and Disease (DOHaD) concept, alterations of nutrient supply in the fetus or neonate result in long-term programming of individual body weight (BW) setpoint. In particular, maternal obesity, excessive nutrition, and accelerated growth in neonates have been shown to sensitize offspring to obesity. The white adipose tissue may represent a prime target of metabolic programming induced by maternal obesity. In order to unravel the underlying mechanisms, we have developed a rat model of maternal obesity using a high-fat (HF) diet (containing 60% lipids) before and during gestation and lactation. At birth, newborns from obese dams (called HF) were normotrophs. However, HF neonates exhibited a rapid weight gain during lactation, a key period of adipose tissue development in rodents. In males, increased BW at weaning (+30%) persists until 3months of age. Nine-month-old HF male offspring was normoglycemic but showed mild glucose intolerance, hyperinsulinemia, and hypercorticosteronemia. Despite no difference in BW and energy intake, HF adult male offspring was predisposed to fat accumulation showing increased visceral (gonadal and perirenal) depots weights and hyperleptinemia. However, only perirenal adipose tissue depot exhibited marked adipocyte hypertrophy and hyperplasia with elevated lipogenic (i.e. sterol-regulated element binding protein 1 (Srebp1), fatty acid synthase (Fas), and leptin) and diminished adipogenic (i.e. peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (Pparγ), 11β-hydroxysteroid dehydrogenase type 1 (11β-Hds1)) mRNA levels. By contrast, very few metabolic variations were observed in HF female offspring. Thus, maternal obesity and accelerated growth during lactation program offspring for higher adiposity via transcriptional alterations of visceral adipose tissue in a depot- and sex-specific manner.

  7. Neuropeptide Y Is Produced by Adipose Tissue Macrophages and Regulates Obesity-Induced Inflammation

    PubMed Central

    Singer, Kanakadurga; Morris, David L.; Oatmen, Kelsie E.; Wang, Tianyi; DelProposto, Jennifer; Mergian, Taleen; Cho, Kae Won; Lumeng, Carey N.

    2013-01-01

    Neuropeptide Y (NPY) is induced in peripheral tissues such as adipose tissue with obesity. The mechanism and function of NPY induction in fat are unclear. Given the evidence that NPY can modulate inflammation, we examined the hypothesis that NPY regulates the function of adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) in response to dietary obesity in mice. NPY was induced by dietary obesity in the stromal vascular cells of visceral fat depots from mice. Surprisingly, the induction of Npy was limited to purified ATMs from obese mice. Significant basal production of NPY was observed in cultured bone marrow derived macrophage and dendritic cells (DCs) and was increased with LPS stimulation. In vitro, addition of NPY to myeloid cells had minimal effects on their activation profiles. NPY receptor inhibition promoted DC maturation and the production of IL-6 and TNFα suggesting an anti-inflammatory function for NPY signaling in DCs. Consistent with this, NPY injection into lean mice decreased the quantity of M1-like CD11c+ ATMs and suppressed Ly6chi monocytes. BM chimeras generated from Npy−/− donors demonstrated that hematopoietic NPY contributes to the obesity-induced induction of Npy in fat. In addition, loss of Npy expression from hematopoietic cells led to an increase in CD11c+ ATMs in visceral fat with high fat diet feeding. Overall, our studies suggest that NPY is produced by a range of myeloid cells and that obesity activates the production of NPY in adipose tissue macrophages with autocrine and paracrine effects. PMID:23472120

  8. Esophageal adenocarcinoma and obesity: peritumoral adipose tissue plays a role in lymph node invasion.

    PubMed

    Trevellin, Elisabetta; Scarpa, Marco; Carraro, Amedeo; Lunardi, Francesca; Kotsafti, Andromachi; Porzionato, Andrea; Saadeh, Luca; Cagol, Matteo; Alfieri, Rita; Tedeschi, Umberto; Calabrese, Fiorella; Castoro, Carlo; Vettor, Roberto

    2015-05-10

    Obesity is associated with cancer risk in esophageal adenocarcinoma (EAC). Adipose tissue directly stimulates tumor progression independently from body mass index (BMI), but the mechanisms are not fully understood. We studied the morphological, histological and molecular characteristics of peritumoral and distal adipose tissue of 60 patients with EAC, to investigate whether depot-specific differences affect tumor behavior. We observed that increased adipocyte size (a hallmark of obesity) was directly associated with leptin expression, angiogenesis (CD31) and lymphangiogenesis (podoplanin); however, these parameters were associated with nodal metastasis only in peritumoral but not distal adipose tissue of patients. We treated OE33 cells with conditioned media (CM) collected from cultured biopsies of adipose tissue and we observed increased mRNA levels of leptin and adiponectin receptors, as well as two key regulator genes of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT): alpha-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and E-cadherin. This effect was greater in cells treated with CM from peritumoral adipose tissue of patients with nodal metastasis and was partially blunted by a leptin antagonist. Therefore, peritumoral adipose tissue may exert a direct effect on the progression of EAC by secreting depot-specific paracrine factors, and leptin is a key player in this crosstalk.

  9. Does inorganic nitrate say NO to obesity by browning white adipose tissue?

    PubMed Central

    Roberts, Lee D

    2015-01-01

    The dietary constituent inorganic nitrate, found in large concentrations in green leafy vegetables, has beneficial effects on cardiometabolic health. Contemporary studies employing nitrate have demonstrated that the anion has anti-obesity and anti-diabetic properties; however the nitrate-mediated mechanisms for improving metabolic health remain unclear. Recently, we employed a combined histological, metabolomics, and transcriptional and protein analysis approach to establish that nitrate promoted the “browning” of white adipose tissue via the xanthine oxidoreductase catalyzed reductive nitrate-nitrite-nitric oxide pathway. Interestingly, it was observed that nitrate-stimulated brown adipose-associated gene expression in white adipose tissue was augmented in hypoxia. These findings not only suggest that protection from metabolic disease offered by vegetable consumption may, in part, be mediated through the effects of nitrate on white adipose tissue, but also, since hypoxia is a serious co-morbidity affecting adipose tissue in obese individuals, that nitrate may be effective in promoting the browning of adipose tissue to improve metabolic fitness. PMID:26451288

  10. The gene expression of the main lipogenic enzymes is downregulated in visceral adipose tissue of obese subjects.

    PubMed

    Ortega, Francisco J; Mayas, Dolores; Moreno-Navarrete, José M; Catalán, Victoria; Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier; Esteve, Eduardo; Rodriguez-Hermosa, Jose I; Ruiz, Bartomeu; Ricart, Wifredo; Peral, Belen; Fruhbeck, Gema; Tinahones, Francisco J; Fernández-Real, José M

    2010-01-01

    Contradictory findings regarding the gene expression of the main lipogenic enzymes in human adipose tissue depots have been reported. In this cross-sectional study, we aimed to evaluate the mRNA expression of fatty acid synthase (FAS) and acetyl-CoA carboxilase (ACC) in omental and subcutaneous (SC) fat depots from subjects who varied widely in terms of body fat mass. FAS and ACC gene expression were evaluated by real time-PCR in 188 samples of visceral adipose tissue which were obtained during elective surgical procedures in 119 women and 69 men. Decreased sex-adjusted FAS (-59%) and ACC (-49%) mRNA were found in visceral adipose tissue from obese subjects, with and without diabetes mellitus type 2 (DM-2), compared with lean subjects (both P < 0.0001). FAS mRNA was also decreased (-40%) in fat depots from overweight subjects (P < 0.05). Indeed, FAS mRNA was significantly and positively associated with ACC gene expression (r = 0.316, P < 0.0001) and negatively with BMI (r = -0.274), waist circumference (r = -0.437), systolic blood pressure (r = -0.310), serum glucose (r = -0.277), and fasting triglycerides (r = -0.226), among others (all P < 0.0001). Similar associations were observed for ACC gene expression levels. In a representative subgroup of nonobese (n = 4) and obese women (n = 6), relative FAS gene expression levels significantly correlated (r = 0.657, P = 0.034; n = 10) with FAS protein values. FAS protein levels were also inversely correlated with blood glucose (r = -0.640, P = 0.046) and fasting triglycerides (r = -0.832, P = 0.010). In conclusion, the gene expression of the main lipogenic enzymes is downregulated in visceral adipose tissue from obese subjects.

  11. Epicatechin downregulates adipose tissue CCL19 expression and thereby ameliorates diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Sano, T; Nagayasu, S; Suzuki, S; Iwashita, M; Yamashita, A; Shinjo, T; Sanui, T; Kushiyama, A; Kanematsu, T; Asano, T; Nishimura, F

    2017-03-01

    Epicatechin (EC) intake has been suggested to be beneficial for the prevention of cardiovascular disorders, and it is well known that adipose tissue inflammation is one of the major risk factors for coronary heart diseases. The purpose of the present study was to determine the in vitro and in vivo effects of EC on adipose tissue inflammation and obesity. DNA microarray analysis was performed to evaluate the effects of EC on gene expression in adipocytes co-cultured with bacterial endotoxin-stimulated macrophages. To determine the in vivo effects of the catechin, C57BL/6 mice were fed either a high-fat diet (HFD) or HFD combined with EC, and metabolic changes were observed EC suppressed the expression of many inflammatory genes in the adipocytes co-cultured with endotoxin-stimulated macrophages. Specifically, EC markedly suppressed chemokine (CC motif) ligand 19 (CCL19) expression. The target cell of EC appeared to macrophages. The in vivo study indicated that mice fed the EC-supplemented HFD were protected from diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance. Accordingly, the expression levels of genes associated with inflammation in adipose tissue and in the liver were downregulated in this group of mice. EC exerts beneficial effects for the prevention of adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance. Since we previously reported that mice deficient in the CCL19 receptor were protected from diet-induced obesity and insulin resistance, it can be concluded that the beneficial effects of EC could be mediated, at least in part, by marked suppression of CCL19 expression. Copyright © 2016 The Italian Society of Diabetology, the Italian Society for the Study of Atherosclerosis, the Italian Society of Human Nutrition, and the Department of Clinical Medicine and Surgery, Federico II University. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Survivin, a key player in cancer progression, increases in obesity and protects adipose tissue stem cells from apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Ejarque, Miriam; Ceperuelo-Mallafré, Victòria; Serena, Carolina; Pachón, Gisela; Núñez-Álvarez, Yaiza; Terrón-Puig, Margarida; Calvo, Enrique; Núñez-Roa, Catalina; Oliva-Olivera, Wilfredo; Tinahones, Francisco J; Peinado, Miguel Angel; Vendrell, Joan; Fernández-Veledo, Sonia

    2017-05-18

    Adipose tissue (AT) has a central role in obesity-related metabolic imbalance through the dysregulated production of cytokines and adipokines. In addition to its known risk for cardiovascular disease and diabetes, obesity is also a major risk for cancer. We investigated the impact of obesity for the expression of survivin, an antiapoptotic protein upregulated by adipokines and a diagnostic biomarker of tumor onset and recurrence. In a cross-sectional study of 111 subjects classified by body mass index, circulating levels of survivin and gene expression in subcutaneous AT were significantly higher in obese patients and positively correlated with leptin. Within AT, survivin was primarily detected in human adipocyte-derived stem cells (hASCs), the adipocyte precursors that determine AT expansion. Remarkably, survivin expression was significantly higher in hASCs isolated from obese patients that from lean controls and was increased by proinflammatory M1 macrophage soluble factors including IL-1β. Analysis of survivin expression in hASCs revealed a complex regulation including epigenetic modifications and protein stability. Surprisingly, obese hASCs showed survivin promoter hypermethylation that correlated with a significant decrease in its mRNA levels. Nonetheless, a lower level of mir-203, which inhibits survivin protein translation, and higher protein stability, was found in obese hASCs compared with their lean counterparts. We discovered that survivin levels determine the susceptibility of hASCs to apoptotic stimuli (including leptin and hypoxia). Accordingly, hASCs from an obese setting were protected from apoptosis. Collectively, these data shed new light on the molecular mechanisms governing AT expansion in obesity through promotion of hASCs that are resistant to apoptosis, and point to survivin as a potential new molecular player in the communication between AT and tumor cells. Thus, inhibition of apoptosis targeting survivin might represent an effective

  13. Forkhead box O-1 modulation improves endothelial insulin resistance in human obesity.

    PubMed

    Karki, Shakun; Farb, Melissa G; Ngo, Doan T M; Myers, Samantha; Puri, Vishwajeet; Hamburg, Naomi M; Carmine, Brian; Hess, Donald T; Gokce, Noyan

    2015-06-01

    Increased visceral adiposity has been closely linked to insulin resistance, endothelial dysfunction, and cardiometabolic disease in obesity, but pathophysiological mechanisms are poorly understood. We sought to investigate mechanisms of vascular insulin resistance by characterizing depot-specific insulin responses and gain evidence that altered functionality of transcription factor forkhead box O-1 (FOXO-1) may play an important role in obesity-related endothelial dysfunction. We intraoperatively collected paired subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue samples from 56 severely obese (body mass index, 43 ± 7 kg/m(2)) and 14 nonobese subjects during planned surgical operations, and characterized depot-specific insulin-mediated responses using Western blot and quantitative immunofluorescence techniques. Insulin signaling via phosphorylation of FOXO-1 and consequent endothelial nitric oxide synthase stimulation was selectively impaired in the visceral compared with subcutaneous adipose tissue and endothelial cells of obese subjects. In contrast, tissue actions of insulin were preserved in nonobese individuals. Pharmacological antagonism with AS1842856 and biological silencing using small interfering RNA-mediated FOXO-1 knockdown reversed insulin resistance and restored endothelial nitric oxide synthase activation in the obese. We observed profound endothelial insulin resistance in the visceral adipose tissue of obese humans which improved with FOXO-1 inhibition. FOXO-1 modulation may represent a novel therapeutic target to diminish vascular insulin resistance. In addition, characterization of endothelial insulin resistance in the adipose microenvironment may provide clues to mechanisms of systemic disease in human obesity. © 2015 American Heart Association, Inc.

  14. Increased Interleukin-32 Levels in Obesity Promote Adipose Tissue Inflammation and Extracellular Matrix Remodeling: Effect of Weight Loss.

    PubMed

    Catalán, Victoria; Gómez-Ambrosi, Javier; Rodríguez, Amaia; Ramírez, Beatriz; Valentí, Víctor; Moncada, Rafael; Landecho, Manuel F; Silva, Camilo; Salvador, Javier; Frühbeck, Gema

    2016-12-01

    Interleukin (IL)-32 is a recently described cytokine involved in the regulation of inflammation. We aimed to explore whether IL-32 could function as an inflammatory and angiogenic factor in human obesity and obesity-associated type 2 diabetes. Samples obtained from 90 subjects were used in the study. Obese patients exhibited higher expression levels of IL-32 in visceral adipose tissue (AT) as well as in subcutaneous AT and peripheral blood mononuclear cells. IL32 was mainly expressed by stromovascular fraction cells, and its expression was significantly enhanced by inflammatory stimuli and hypoxia, whereas no changes were found after the incubation with anti-inflammatory cytokines. The addition of exogenous IL-32 induced the expression of inflammation and extracellular matrix-related genes in human adipocyte cultures, and IL32-silenced adipocytes showed a downregulation of inflammatory genes. Furthermore, adipocyte-conditioned media obtained from obese patients increased IL32 gene expression in human monocyte cultures, whereas the adipocyte-conditioned media from lean volunteers had no effect on IL32 mRNA levels. These findings provide evidence, for the first time, about the inflammatory and remodeling properties of IL-32 in AT, implicating this cytokine in obesity-associated comorbidities. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association.

  15. Contributions of adipose tissue architectural and tensile properties toward defining healthy and unhealthy obesity

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The extracellular matrix (ECM) plays an important role in maintenance of white adipose tissue (WAT) architecture and function, and proper ECM remodeling is critical to support WAT malleability to accomodate changes in energy storage needs. Obesity and adipocyte hypertrophy places a strain on the EC...

  16. Television Viewing, Computer Use, Obesity, And Adiposity In US Preschool Children

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    We tested whether three sedentary activities were associated with obesity and adiposity in U.S. preschool children: 1) watching >2 hours/day of TV/videos, 2) computer use, and 3) >2 hours/day of media use (TV/videos and computer use). We conducted a cross-sectional study using nationally representat...

  17. Novel genes of visceral adiposity: identification of mouse and human mesenteric estrogen-dependent adipose (MEDA)-4 gene and its adipogenic function.

    PubMed

    Zhang, H; Chen, X; Sairam, M R

    2012-06-01

    Visceral adiposity represents a high risk factor for type 2 diabetes, metabolic syndrome, and cardiovascular disease as well as various cancers. While studying sex hormone imbalance-induced early obesity and late onset of insulin resistance in FSH receptor knock out female mice, we identified a novel mesenteric estrogen-dependent adipose gene (MEDA-4) selectively up-regulated in a depot-specific manner in mesenteric adipose tissue. Meda-4 cloned from both mouse and human adipose tissue codes for a 34-kDa cytosolic protein with 91% homology. Mouse Meda-4 mRNA is expressed highest in visceral adipose tissue and localizes predominantly in the adipocyte fraction. Human MEDA-4 is also more abundant in omental fat than sc depot in obese patients. In 3T3-L1 cells endogenous Meda-4 expression increases early during differentiation, and its overexpression promotes differentiation of preadipocytes into adipocytes and enhances glucose uptake. Conversely, short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown of Meda-4 reduces both adipogenic and glucose uptake potential. In promoting adipogenesis, Meda-4 up-regulates transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ2. Meda-4 promotes lipid accumulation in adipocytes, regulating adipocyte fatty acid-binding protein 2, CD36, lipoprotein lipase, hormone-sensitive lipase, acyl-Coenzyme A oxidase-1, perilipin-1, and fatty acid synthase expression. 17β-Estradiol reduced Meda-4 expression in mesenteric adipose tissue of ovariectomized mice and in 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Thus our study identifies Meda-4 as a novel adipogenic gene, capable of promoting differentiation of preadipocytes into adipocytes, increasing lipid content and glucose uptake in adipocytes. Therefore it might play an important role in adipose tissue expansion in normal and aberrant hormonal conditions and pathophysiological states.

  18. A role for novel adipose tissue-secreted factors in obesity-related carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Cabia, B; Andrade, S; Carreira, M C; Casanueva, F F; Crujeiras, A B

    2016-04-01

    Obesity, a pandemic disease, is caused by an excessive accumulation of fat that can have detrimental effects on health. Adipose tissue plays a very important endocrine role, secreting different molecules that affect body physiology. In obesity, this function is altered, leading to a dysfunctional production of several factors, known as adipocytokines. This process has been linked to various comorbidities associated with obesity, such as carcinogenesis. In fact, several classical adipocytokines with increased levels in obesity have been demonstrated to exert a pro-carcinogenic role, including leptin, TNF-α, IL-6 and resistin, whereas others like adiponectin, with decreased levels in obesity, might have an anti-carcinogenic function. In this expanding field, new proteomic techniques and approaches have allowed the identification of novel adipocytokines, a number of which exhibit an altered production in obesity and type 2 diabetes and thus are related to adiposity. Many of these novel adipocytokines have also been identified in various tumour types, such as that of the breast, liver or endometrium, thereby increasing the list of potential contributors to carcinogenesis. This review is focused on the regulation of these novel adipocytokines by obesity, including apelin, endotrophin, FABP4, lipocalin 2, omentin-1, visfatin, chemerin, ANGPTL2 or osteopontin, emphasizing its involvement in tumorigenesis. © 2016 World Obesity.

  19. Children grow and horses race: is the adiposity rebound a critical period for later obesity?

    PubMed

    Cole, T J

    2004-03-12

    The adiposity rebound is the second rise in body mass index that occurs between 3 and 7 years. An early age at adiposity rebound is known to be a risk factor for later obesity. The aim here is to clarify the connection between the age at rebound and the corresponding pattern of body mass index change, in centile terms, so as to better understand its ability to predict later fatness. Longitudinal changes in body mass index during adiposity rebound, measured both in original (kg/m2) and standard deviation (SD) score units, are studied in five hypothetical subjects. Two aspects of the body mass index curve, the body mass index centile and the rate of body mass index centile crossing, determine a child's age at rebound. A high centile and upward centile crossing are both associated separately with an early rebound, while a low centile and/or downward centile crossing correspond to a late rebound. Early adiposity rebound is a risk factor for later fatness because it identifies children whose body mass index centile is high and/or crossing upwards. Such children are likely to have a raised body mass index later in childhood and adulthood. This is an example of Peto's "horse racing effect". The association of centile crossing with later obesity is statistical not physiological, and it applies at all ages not just at rebound, so adiposity rebound cannot be considered a critical period for future obesity. Body mass index centile crossing is a more direct indicator of the underlying drive to fatness. An early age at adiposity rebound predicts later fatness because it identifies children whose body mass index centile is high and/or crossing upwards. Such children are likely to have a raised body mass index later. Body mass index centile crossing is more direct than the timing of adiposity rebound for predicting later fatness.

  20. Children grow and horses race: is the adiposity rebound a critical period for later obesity?

    PubMed Central

    Cole, TJ

    2004-01-01

    Background The adiposity rebound is the second rise in body mass index that occurs between 3 and 7 years. An early age at adiposity rebound is known to be a risk factor for later obesity. The aim here is to clarify the connection between the age at rebound and the corresponding pattern of body mass index change, in centile terms, so as to better understand its ability to predict later fatness. Discussion Longitudinal changes in body mass index during adiposity rebound, measured both in original (kg/m2) and standard deviation (SD) score units, are studied in five hypothetical subjects. Two aspects of the body mass index curve, the body mass index centile and the rate of body mass index centile crossing, determine a child's age at rebound. A high centile and upward centile crossing are both associated separately with an early rebound, while a low centile and/or downward centile crossing correspond to a late rebound. Early adiposity rebound is a risk factor for later fatness because it identifies children whose body mass index centile is high and/or crossing upwards. Such children are likely to have a raised body mass index later in childhood and adulthood. This is an example of Peto's "horse racing effect". The association of centile crossing with later obesity is statistical not physiological, and it applies at all ages not just at rebound, so adiposity rebound cannot be considered a critical period for future obesity. Body mass index centile crossing is a more direct indicator of the underlying drive to fatness. Summary An early age at adiposity rebound predicts later fatness because it identifies children whose body mass index centile is high and/or crossing upwards. Such children are likely to have a raised body mass index later. Body mass index centile crossing is more direct than the timing of adiposity rebound for predicting later fatness. PMID:15113440

  1. Reduced Socs3 expression in adipose tissue protects female mice against obesity-induced insulin resistance

    PubMed Central

    Palanivel, R.; Fullerton, M. D.; Galic, S.; Honeyman, J.; Hewitt, K. A.; Jorgensen, S. B.; Steinberg, G. R.

    2017-01-01

    Aims/hypothesis Inflammation in obesity increases the levels of the suppressor of cytokine signalling-3 (SOCS3) protein in adipose tissue, but the physiological importance of this protein in regulating whole-body insulin sensitivity in obesity is not known. Methods We generated Socs3 floxed (wild-type, WT) and Socs3 aP2 (also known as Fabp4)-Cre null (Socs3 AKO) mice. Mice were maintained on either a regular chow or a high-fat diet (HFD) for 16 weeks during which time body mass, adiposity, glucose homeostasis and insulin sensitivity were assessed. Results The HFD increased SOCS3 levels in adipose tissue of WT but not Socs3 AKO mice. WT and Socs3 AKO mice had similar body mass and adiposity, assessed using computed tomography (CT) imaging, irrespective of diet or sex. On a control chow diet there were no differences in insulin sensitivity or glucose tolerance. When fed a HFD, female but not male Socs3 AKO mice had improved glucose tolerance as well as lower fasting glucose and insulin levels compared with WT littermates. Hyperinsulinaemic–euglycaemic clamps and positron emission tomography (PET) imaging demonstrated that improved insulin sensitivity was due to elevated adipose tissue glucose uptake. Increased insulin-stimulated glucose uptake in adipose tissue was associated with enhanced levels and activating phosphorylation of insulin receptor substrate-1 (IRS1). Conclusions/interpretation These data demonstrate that inhibiting SOCS3 production in adipose tissue of female mice is effective for improving whole-body insulin sensitivity in obesity. PMID:22872213

  2. Brown Adipose Tissue and Seasonal Variation in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Au-Yong, Iain T.H.; Thorn, Natasha; Ganatra, Rakesh; Perkins, Alan C.; Symonds, Michael E.

    2009-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Brown adipose tissue (BAT) is present in adult humans where it may be important in the prevention of obesity, although the main factors regulating its abundance are not well established. BAT demonstrates seasonal variation relating to ambient temperature and photoperiod in mammals. The objective of our study was therefore to determine whether seasonal variation in BAT activity in humans was more closely related to the prevailing photoperiod or temperature. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS We studied 3,614 consecutive patients who underwent positron emission tomography followed by computed tomography scans. The presence and location of BAT depots were documented and correlated with monthly changes in photoperiod and ambient temperature. RESULTS BAT activity was demonstrated in 167 (4.6%) scans. BAT was demonstrated in 52/724 scans (7.2%) in winter compared with 27/1,067 (2.5%) in summer months (P < 0.00001, χ2 test). Monthly changes in the occurrence of BAT were more closely related to differences in photoperiod (r2 = 0.876) rather than ambient temperature (r2 = 0.696). Individuals with serial scans also demonstrated strong seasonal variation in BAT activity (average standardized uptake value [SUVmax] 1.5 in July and 9.4 in January). BAT was also more common in female patients (female: n = 107, 7.2%; male: n = 60, 2.8%; P < 0.00001, χ2 test). CONCLUSIONS Our study demonstrates a very strong seasonal variation in the presence of BAT. This effect is more closely associated with photoperiod than ambient temperature, suggesting a previously undescribed mechanism for mediating BAT function in humans that could now potentially be recruited for the prevention or reversal of obesity. PMID:19696186

  3. Long-acting glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide ameliorates obesity-induced adipose tissue inflammation.

    PubMed

    Varol, Chen; Zvibel, Isabel; Spektor, Lior; Mantelmacher, Fernanda Dana; Vugman, Milena; Thurm, Tamar; Khatib, Marian; Elmaliah, Elinor; Halpern, Zamir; Fishman, Sigal

    2014-10-15

    Obesity induces low-grade chronic inflammation, manifested by proinflammatory polarization of adipose tissue innate and adaptive resident and recruited immune cells that contribute to insulin resistance (IR). The glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) is an incretin hormone that mediates postprandial insulin secretion and has anabolic effects on the adipose tissue. Importantly, recent evidence suggested that GIP is a potential suppressor of inflammation in several metabolic models. In this study, we aimed to investigate the immunoregulatory role of GIP in a murine model of diet-induced obesity (DIO) using the long-acting GIP analog [d-Ala(2)]GIP. Administration of [d-Ala(2)]GIP resulted in adipocytes of increased size, increased levels of adipose tissue lipid droplet proteins, indicating better lipid storage capacity, and reduced adipose tissue inflammation. Flow cytometry analysis revealed reduced numbers of inflammatory Ly6C(hi) monocytes and F4/80(hi)CD11c(+) macrophages, associated with IR. In addition, [d-Ala(2)]GIP reduced adipose tissue infiltration of IFN-γ-producing CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells. Furthermore, [d-Ala(2)]GIP treatment induced a favorable adipose tissue adipokine profile, manifested by a prominent reduction in key inflammatory cytokines (TNF-α, IL-1β, IFN-γ) and chemokines (CCL2, CCL8, and CCL5) and an increase in adiponectin. Notably, [d-Ala(2)]GIP also reduced the numbers of circulating neutrophils and proinflammatory Ly6C(hi) monocytes in mice fed regular chow or a high-fat diet. Finally, the beneficial immune-associated effects were accompanied by amelioration of IR and improved insulin signaling in liver and adipose tissue. Collectively, our results describe key beneficial immunoregulatory properties for GIP in DIO and reveal that its augmentation ameliorates adipose tissue inflammation and improves IR. Copyright © 2014 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  4. Overweight, obesity, central adiposity and associated chronic diseases in cuban adults.

    PubMed

    Díaz, María Elena; Jiménez, Santa; García, René Guillermo; Bonet, Mariano; Wong, Iraida

    2009-10-01

    Introduction Prevalence of overweight and obesity is increasing worldwide in parallel with the growing burden of noncommunicable chronic diseases. According to the World Health Organization, in 2005 approximately 1.6 billion individuals aged ≥15 years were overweight and at least 400 million were obese; by 2015 these figures will almost double. Central distribution of adiposity has also been associated with higher rates of cardiovascular diseases and other conditions. Objective Determine the prevalence of overweight, obesity and central adiposity, and their association with noncommunicable chronic diseases and related lifestyle risk factors in Cuban adults. Methods The Second National Survey on Risk Factors and Chronic Diseases (ENFRENT II), conducted in 2000-2001, surveyed a representative sample of males and females aged ≥15 years using a stratified, multi-stage cluster sampling design. Data from a sub-sample of 19,519 individuals aged ≥20 years were analyzed and prevalence calculated for diabetes, hypertension, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, and for each of these variables in association with overweight, obesity and central distribution of adiposity, and with the presence of sedentary lifestyle, smoking, alcohol consumption, eating regular daily meals and daily breakfast. Results Estimated prevalence of overweight and obesity in the adult population was 30.8% (CI: 30.1-31.5) and 11.8% (CI: 11.2-12.4), respectively. Obesity prevalence was twice as high in women (15.4%; CI: 14.5-16.3) as in men (7.9%; CI: 7.3-8.6). Obesity was significantly more frequent in diabetics, hypertensives and people with heart disease, while central adiposity was significantly associated with a higher prevalence of diabetes mellitus, cardiovascular and cerebrovascular diseases, hypertension, obesity and overweight. Smoking and alcohol consumption were low among overweight and obese subjects, who exhibited a higher prevalence of irregular and inadequate eating patterns

  5. Glucose-6-Phosphate Dehydrogenase Deficiency Improves Insulin Resistance With Reduced Adipose Tissue Inflammation in Obesity.

    PubMed

    Ham, Mira; Choe, Sung Sik; Shin, Kyung Cheul; Choi, Goun; Kim, Ji-Won; Noh, Jung-Ran; Kim, Yong-Hoon; Ryu, Je-Won; Yoon, Kun-Ho; Lee, Chul-Ho; Kim, Jae Bum

    2016-09-01

    Glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), a rate-limiting enzyme of the pentose phosphate pathway, plays important roles in redox regulation and de novo lipogenesis. It was recently demonstrated that aberrant upregulation of G6PD in obese adipose tissue mediates insulin resistance as a result of imbalanced energy metabolism and oxidative stress. It remains elusive, however, whether inhibition of G6PD in vivo may relieve obesity-induced insulin resistance. In this study we showed that a hematopoietic G6PD defect alleviates insulin resistance in obesity, accompanied by reduced adipose tissue inflammation. Compared with wild-type littermates, G6PD-deficient mutant (G6PD(mut)) mice were glucose tolerant upon high-fat-diet (HFD) feeding. Intriguingly, the expression of NADPH oxidase genes to produce reactive oxygen species was alleviated, whereas that of antioxidant genes was enhanced in the adipose tissue of HFD-fed G6PD(mut) mice. In diet-induced obesity (DIO), the adipose tissue of G6PD(mut) mice decreased the expression of inflammatory cytokines, accompanied by downregulated proinflammatory macrophages. Accordingly, macrophages from G6PD(mut) mice greatly suppressed lipopolysaccharide-induced proinflammatory signaling cascades, leading to enhanced insulin sensitivity in adipocytes and hepatocytes. Furthermore, adoptive transfer of G6PD(mut) bone marrow to wild-type mice attenuated adipose tissue inflammation and improved glucose tolerance in DIO. Collectively, these data suggest that inhibition of macrophage G6PD would ameliorate insulin resistance in obesity through suppression of proinflammatory responses. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association.

  6. Targeting adipose tissue inflammation to treat the underlying basis of the metabolic complications of obesity.

    PubMed

    Goran, Michael I; Alderete, Tanya L

    2012-01-01

    The prevalence of obesity has increased throughout the last three decades due to genetic, metabolic, behavioral, and environmental factors [1]. Obesity in turn increases risk for a number of metabolic diseases including type 2 diabetes, cardiovascular disease, fatty liver disease and some forms of cancer [1]. Despite the well-known link between obesity and increased morbidity, the mechanism of this remains elusive. Thus, the question 'why does increased body fat cause increased metabolic comorbidities' remains unanswered. By understanding the underlying basis of obesity-associated metabolic diseases, different therapies could be designed to target relevant pathways. Although we lack a full understanding of the underlying mechanisms that result in disease, several putative explanations exist for why fat affects metabolic health. One such theory is based on the anatomic location of fat deposition and ectopic fat accumulation [2]. Specifically, current literature suggests that visceral, liver and skeletal fat accumulation affects organ function and contributes to the development of insulin resistance, fatty liver, and the metabolic syndrome [3]. However, even in individuals matched for body fat and fat distribution, significant differences can exist in metabolic outcomes, and the phenomenon of metabolically healthy obese has been well described [4]. More recent data suggest the alternative hypothesis relating excess adipose tissue to disease risk based on the metabolic function and morphological properties of adipose tissue. In this scenario, excess adipose tissue is hypothesized to contribute to a state of chronic inflammation which promotes development of insulin resistance as well as other metabolic complications by stimulating nuclear factor-ĸB and Jun N-terminal kinase pathways in adipocytes and the liver [5]. In this paper, we will review the hypothesis linking excess adipose tissue to increased disease risk through adipose tissue inflammation. Copyright

  7. Total DDT and dieldrin content of human adipose tissue

    SciTech Connect

    Ahmad, N.; Harsas, W.; Marolt, R.S.; Morton, M.; Pollack, J.K.

    1988-12-01

    As far as the authors could ascertain only 4 well-documented analytical studies have been carried out in Australia determining the total DDT and dieldrin content of human adipose tissue. The latest of these studies was published over 16 years ago. Therefore it is timely and important to re-examine the total DDT and dieldrin concentration within the adipose tissue of the Australian population. The present investigation has analyzed 290 samples of human adipose tissue obtained from Westmead Hospital situated in an outer suburb of Sydney, New South Wales for their content of total DDT and dieldrin.

  8. Molecular cloning of feline resistin and the expression of resistin, leptin and adiponectin in the adipose tissue of normal and obese cats.

    PubMed

    Takashima, Satoshi; Nishii, Naohito; Kato, Akiko; Matsubara, Tatsuya; Shibata, Sanae; Kitagawa, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    Resistin, one of the adipokines that has a cycteine-rich C-terminus, is considered to relate to the development of insulin resistance in rats. However, in cats, there is little knowledge regarding resistin. In this study, we cloned the feline resistin cDNA from adipose tissue by RT-PCR. The feline resistin clone contained an entire open reading frame encoding 107 amino acids that had 72.8%, 75.4%, 50.9% and 51.8% homology with bovine, human, mouse and rat homologues, respectively. In both subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissues, the transcription levels of feline resistin mRNA were significantly higher in obese cats than normal cats, and those of feline adiponectin mRNA were significantly lower in obese cats than normal cats. However, there was no difference in the expression of feline leptin between normal and obese cats. On the other hand, in both normal and obese cats, there were no significant differences in resistin, leptin and adiponectin mRNA levels between subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissues. In cats, the altered expression of resistin and adiponectin mRNA with obesity may contribute to the pathogenesis of insulin resistance and subsequent diabetes mellitus. In addition to feline adiponectin, the feline resistin cDNA clone obtained in this study will be useful for further investigation of the pathogenesis of obesity in cats.

  9. Plasma PTX3 protein levels inversely correlate with insulin secretion and obesity, whereas visceral adipose tissue PTX3 gene expression is increased in obesity.

    PubMed

    Osorio-Conles, O; Guitart, M; Chacón, M R; Maymo-Masip, E; Moreno-Navarrete, J M; Montori-Grau, M; Näf, S; Fernandez-Real, J M; Vendrell, J; Gómez-Foix, A M

    2011-12-01

    Plasma acutephase protein pentraxin 3 (PTX3) concentration is dysregulated in human obesity and metabolic syndrome. Here, we explore its relationship with insulin secretion and sensitivity, obesity markers, and adipose tissue PTX3 gene expression. Plasma PTX3 protein levels were analyzed in a cohort composed of 27 lean [body mass index (BMI) ≤ 25 kg/m(2)] and 48 overweight (BMI 25-30 kg/m(2)) men (cohort 1). In this cohort, plasma PTX3 was negatively correlated with fasting triglyceride levels and insulin secretion after intravenous and oral glucose administration. Plasma PTX3 protein and PTX3 gene expression in visceral (VAT) and subcutaneous (SAT) whole adipose tissue and adipocyte and stromovascular fractions were analyzed in cohort 2, which was composed of 19 lean, 28 overweight, and 15 obese subjects (BMI >30 kg/m(2)). An inverse association with body weight and waist/hip ratio was observed in cohort 2. In VAT depots, PTX3 mRNA levels were higher in subjects with BMI >25 kg/m(2) than in lean subjects, positively correlated with IL-1β mRNA levels, and higher in the adipocyte than stromovascular fraction. Human preadipocyte SGBS cell line was used to study PTX3 production in response to factors that obesity entails. In SGBS adipocytes, PTX3 gene expression was enhanced by IL-1β and TNFα but not IL-6 or insulin. In conclusion, the negative correlation between PTX3 and glucose-stimulated insulin secretion suggests a role for PTX3 in metabolic control. PTX3 gene expression is upregulated in VAT depots in obesity, despite lower plasma PTX3 protein, and by some proinflammatory cytokines in cultured adipocytes.

  10. The role of glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase in adipose tissue inflammation in obesity.

    PubMed

    Park, Yoon Jeong; Choe, Sung Sik; Sohn, Jee Hyung; Kim, Jae Bum

    2017-04-03

    Obesity is closely associated with metabolic diseases including type 2 diabetes. One hallmark characteristics of obesity is chronic inflammation that is coordinately controlled by complex signaling networks in adipose tissues. Compelling evidence indicates that reactive oxygen species (ROS) and its related signaling pathways play crucial roles in the progression of chronic inflammation in obesity. The pentose phosphate pathway (PPP) is an anabolic pathway that utilizes the glucoses to generate molecular building blocks and reducing equivalents in the form of NADPH. In particular, NADPH acts as one of the key modulators in the control of ROS through providing an electron for both ROS generation and scavenging. Recently, we have reported that glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase (G6PD), a rate-limiting enzyme of the PPP, is implicated in adipose tissue inflammation and systemic insulin resistance in obesity. Mechanistically, G6PD potentiates generation of ROS that augments pro-inflammatory responses in adipose tissue macrophages, leading to systemic insulin resistance. Here, we provide an overview of cell type- specific roles of G6PD in the regulation of ROS balance as well as additional details on the significance of G6PD that contributes to pro-oxidant NADPH generation in obesity-related chronic inflammation and insulin resistance.

  11. Maternal obesity enhances white adipose tissue differentiation and alters genome-scale DNA methylation in male rat offspring

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    The risk of obesity in adulthood is strongly influenced by maternal body composition. Here we examined the hypothesis that maternal obesity influences white adipose tissue (WAT) transcriptome and increases propensity for adipogenesis in the offspring, prior to the development of obesity, using an es...

  12. Dynamics of human adipose lipid turnover in health and metabolic disease.

    PubMed

    Arner, Peter; Bernard, Samuel; Salehpour, Mehran; Possnert, Göran; Liebl, Jakob; Steier, Peter; Buchholz, Bruce A; Eriksson, Mats; Arner, Erik; Hauner, Hans; Skurk, Thomas; Rydén, Mikael; Frayn, Keith N; Spalding, Kirsty L

    2011-09-25

    Adipose tissue mass is determined by the storage and removal of triglycerides in adipocytes. Little is known, however, about adipose lipid turnover in humans in health and pathology. To study this in vivo, here we determined lipid age by measuring (14)C derived from above ground nuclear bomb tests in adipocyte lipids. We report that during the average ten-year lifespan of human adipocytes, triglycerides are renewed six times. Lipid age is independent of adipocyte size, is very stable across a wide range of adult ages and does not differ between genders. Adipocyte lipid turnover, however, is strongly related to conditions with disturbed lipid metabolism. In obesity, triglyceride removal rate (lipolysis followed by oxidation) is decreased and the amount of triglycerides stored each year is increased. In contrast, both lipid removal and storage rates are decreased in non-obese patients diagnosed with the most common hereditary form of dyslipidaemia, familial combined hyperlipidaemia. Lipid removal rate is positively correlated with the capacity of adipocytes to break down triglycerides, as assessed through lipolysis, and is inversely related to insulin resistance. Our data support a mechanism in which adipocyte lipid storage and removal have different roles in health and pathology. High storage but low triglyceride removal promotes fat tissue accumulation and obesity. Reduction of both triglyceride storage and removal decreases lipid shunting through adipose tissue and thus promotes dyslipidaemia. We identify adipocyte lipid turnover as a novel target for prevention and treatment of metabolic disease.

  13. Inflammatory Role of Toll-Like Receptors in Human and Murine Adipose Tissue

    PubMed Central

    Poulain-Godefroy, Odile; Le Bacquer, Olivier; Plancq, Pauline; Lecœur, Cécile; Pattou, François; Frühbeck, Gema; Froguel, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    It was recently demonstrated that TLR4 activation via dietary lipids triggers inflammatory pathway and alters insulin responsiveness in the fat tissue during obesity. Here, we question whether other TLR family members could participate in the TLR-mediated inflammatory processes occurring in the obese adipose tissue. We thus studied the expression of TLR1, TLR2, TLR4, and TLR6 in adipose tissue. These receptors are expressed in omental and subcutaneous human fat tissue, the expression being higher in the omental tissue, independently of the metabolic status of the subject. We demonstrated a correlation of TLRs expression within and between each depot suggesting a coregulation. Murine 3T3-L1 preadipocyte cells stimulated with Pam3CSK4 induced the expression of some proinflammatory markers. Therefore, beside TLR4, other toll-like receptors are differentially expressed in human fat tissue, and functional in an adipocyte cell line, suggesting that they might participate omental adipose tissue-related inflammation that occurs in obesity. PMID:20339530

  14. A Stratified Transcriptomics Analysis of Polygenic Fat and Lean Mouse Adipose Tissues Identifies Novel Candidate Obesity Genes

    PubMed Central

    Morton, Nicholas M.; Nelson, Yvonne B.; Michailidou, Zoi; Di Rollo, Emma M.; Ramage, Lynne; Hadoke, Patrick W. F.; Seckl, Jonathan R.; Bunger, Lutz; Horvat, Simon; Kenyon, Christopher J.; Dunbar, Donald R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Obesity and metabolic syndrome results from a complex interaction between genetic and environmental factors. In addition to brain-regulated processes, recent genome wide association studies have indicated that genes highly expressed in adipose tissue affect the distribution and function of fat and thus contribute to obesity. Using a stratified transcriptome gene enrichment approach we attempted to identify adipose tissue-specific obesity genes in the unique polygenic Fat (F) mouse strain generated by selective breeding over 60 generations for divergent adiposity from a comparator Lean (L) strain. Results To enrich for adipose tissue obesity genes a ‘snap-shot’ pooled-sample transcriptome comparison of key fat depots and non adipose tissues (muscle, liver, kidney) was performed. Known obesity quantitative trait loci (QTL) information for the model allowed us to further filter genes for increased likelihood of being causal or secondary for obesity. This successfully identified several genes previously linked to obesity (C1qr1, and Np3r) as positional QTL candidate genes elevated specifically in F line adipose tissue. A number of novel obesity candidate genes were also identified (Thbs1, Ppp1r3d, Tmepai, Trp53inp2, Ttc7b, Tuba1a, Fgf13, Fmr) that have inferred roles in fat cell function. Quantitative microarray analysis was then applied to the most phenotypically divergent adipose depot after exaggerating F and L strain differences with chronic high fat feeding which revealed a distinct gene expression profile of line, fat depot and diet-responsive inflammatory, angiogenic and metabolic pathways. Selected candidate genes Npr3 and Thbs1, as well as Gys2, a non-QTL gene that otherwise passed our enrichment criteria were characterised, revealing novel functional effects consistent with a contribution to obesity. Conclusions A focussed candidate gene enrichment strategy in the unique F and L model has identified novel adipose tissue-enriched genes

  15. Obesity, Oxidative Stress, Adipose Tissue Dysfunction, and the Associated Health Risks: Causes and Therapeutic Strategies.

    PubMed

    Manna, Prasenjit; Jain, Sushil K

    2015-12-01

    Obesity is gaining acceptance as a serious primary health burden that impairs the quality of life because of its associated complications, including diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, cancer, asthma, sleep disorders, hepatic dysfunction, renal dysfunction, and infertility. It is a complex metabolic disorder with a multifactorial origin. Growing evidence suggests that oxidative stress plays a role as the critical factor linking obesity with its associated complications. Obesity per se can induce systemic oxidative stress through various biochemical mechanisms, such as superoxide generation from NADPH oxidases, oxidative phosphorylation, glyceraldehyde auto-oxidation, protein kinase C activation, and polyol and hexosamine pathways. Other factors that also contribute to oxidative stress in obesity include hyperleptinemia, low antioxidant defense, chronic inflammation, and postprandial reactive oxygen species generation. In addition, recent studies suggest that adipose tissue plays a critical role in regulating the pathophysiological mechanisms of obesity and its related co-morbidities. To establish an adequate platform for the prevention of obesity and its associated health risks, understanding the factors that contribute to the cause of obesity is necessary. The most current list of obesity determinants includes genetic factors, dietary intake, physical activity, environmental and socioeconomic factors, eating disorders, and societal influences. On the basis of the currently identified predominant determinants of obesity, a broad range of strategies have been recommended to reduce the prevalence of obesity, such as regular physical activity, ad libitum food intake limiting to certain micronutrients, increased dietary intake of fruits and vegetables, and meal replacements. This review aims to highlight recent findings regarding the role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of obesity and its associated risk factors, the role of dysfunctional adipose tissue in

  16. Obesity, Oxidative Stress, Adipose Tissue Dysfunction, and the Associated Health Risks: Causes and Therapeutic Strategies

    PubMed Central

    Manna, Prasenjit

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Obesity is gaining acceptance as a serious primary health burden that impairs the quality of life because of its associated complications, including diabetes, cardiovascular diseases, cancer, asthma, sleep disorders, hepatic dysfunction, renal dysfunction, and infertility. It is a complex metabolic disorder with a multifactorial origin. Growing evidence suggests that oxidative stress plays a role as the critical factor linking obesity with its associated complications. Obesity per se can induce systemic oxidative stress through various biochemical mechanisms, such as superoxide generation from NADPH oxidases, oxidative phosphorylation, glyceraldehyde auto-oxidation, protein kinase C activation, and polyol and hexosamine pathways. Other factors that also contribute to oxidative stress in obesity include hyperleptinemia, low antioxidant defense, chronic inflammation, and postprandial reactive oxygen species generation. In addition, recent studies suggest that adipose tissue plays a critical role in regulating the pathophysiological mechanisms of obesity and its related co-morbidities. To establish an adequate platform for the prevention of obesity and its associated health risks, understanding the factors that contribute to the cause of obesity is necessary. The most current list of obesity determinants includes genetic factors, dietary intake, physical activity, environmental and socioeconomic factors, eating disorders, and societal influences. On the basis of the currently identified predominant determinants of obesity, a broad range of strategies have been recommended to reduce the prevalence of obesity, such as regular physical activity, ad libitum food intake limiting to certain micronutrients, increased dietary intake of fruits and vegetables, and meal replacements. This review aims to highlight recent findings regarding the role of oxidative stress in the pathogenesis of obesity and its associated risk factors, the role of dysfunctional adipose tissue

  17. Stromal Cells Derived from Visceral and Obese Adipose Tissue Promote Growth of Ovarian Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yan; Nowicka, Aleksandra; Solley, Travis N.; Wei, Caimiao; Parikh, Aaroh; Court, Laurence; Burks, Jared K.; Andreeff, Michael; Woodward, Wendy A.; Dadbin, Ali; Kolonin, Mikhail G.; Lu, Karen H.; Klopp, Ann H.

    2015-01-01

    Obesity, and in particular visceral obesity, has been associated with an increased risk of developing cancers as well as higher rates of mortality following diagnosis. The impact of obesity on adipose-derived stromal cells (ASC), which contribute to the formation of tumor stroma, is unknown. Here we hypothesized that visceral source and diet-induced obesity (DIO) changes the ASC phenotype, contributing to the tumor promoting effects of obesity. We found that ASC isolated from subcutaneous (SC-ASC) and visceral (V-ASC) white adipose tissue(WAT) of lean(Le) and obese(Ob) mice exhibited similar mesenchymal cell surface markers expression, and had comparable effects on ovarian cancer cell proliferation and migration. Obese and visceral derived ASC proliferated slower and exhibited impaired differentiation into adipocytes and osteocytes in vitro as compared to ASC derived from subcutaneous WAT of lean mice. Intraperitoneal co-injection of ovarian cancer cells with obese or visceral derived ASC, but not lean SC-ASC, increased growth of intraperitoneal ID8 tumors as compared to controls. Obese and V-ASC increased stromal infiltration of inflammatory cells, including CD3+ T cells and F4/80+ macrophages. Obese and visceral derived ASC, but not lean SC-ASC, increased expression of chemotactic factors IL-6, MIP-2, and MCP-1 when cultured with tumor cells. Overall, these results demonstrate that obese and V-ASC have a unique phenotype, with more limited proliferation and differentiation capacity but enhanced expression of chemotactic factors in response to malignant cells which support infiltration of inflammatory cells and support tumor growth and dissemination. PMID:26317219

  18. Molecular Pathways: Adipose Inflammation as a Mediator of Obesity-Associated Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Howe, Louise R.; Subbaramaiah, Kotha; Hudis, Clifford A.; Dannenberg, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    The increasing rate of obesity worldwide is predicted to be associated with a surge in diseases. Notably, obesity has been linked to approximately 20% of cancer cases in the United States; obesity is associated with both increased risk and worse outcomes after diagnosis. Altered levels of circulating factors are strongly implicated including insulin, insulin-like growth factor 1, leptin, adiponectin and interleukin-6 (IL-6). Additionally, increasing attention has focused on the consequences of local adipose inflammation. Inflammatory foci characterized by crown-like structures consisting of dead adipocytes encircled by macrophages occur in white adipose depots, including the breast tissue, of most overweight and obese women. Saturated fatty acids, released as a consequence of obesity-associated lipolysis, induce macrophage activation via Toll-like receptor 4, thereby stimulating NFκB signaling. This, in turn, activates transcription of proinflammatory genes including cyclooxygenase-2, IL-6, IL-1β, and tumor necrosis factor α. Elevated levels of proinflammatory mediators cause both local and systemic effects. Of particular relevance with regard to breast cancer is increased transcription of the CYP19 gene encoding aromatase, the rate-limiting enzyme for estrogen synthesis. Notably, this obesity-inflammation-aromatase axis provides a plausible explanation for increased rates of post-menopausal, hormone receptor-positive breast cancer associated with obesity and hence may offer targets for interventions to attenuate risk or improve prognosis. Potential approaches include weight reduction, exercise, and suppression of obesity-driven signaling pathways using pharmaceutical or dietary agents. A key future goal is to identify biomarkers that accurately report adipose inflammation, both for identification of at-risk individuals and to assess the efficacy of interventions. PMID:23958744

  19. Molecular pathways: adipose inflammation as a mediator of obesity-associated cancer.

    PubMed

    Howe, Louise R; Subbaramaiah, Kotha; Hudis, Clifford A; Dannenberg, Andrew J

    2013-11-15

    The increasing rate of obesity worldwide is predicted to be associated with a surge in diseases. Notably, obesity has been linked to approximately 20% of cancer cases in the United States; obesity is associated with both increased risk and worse outcomes after diagnosis. Altered levels of circulating factors are strongly implicated, including insulin, insulin-like growth factor 1, leptin, adiponectin, and interleukin-6 (IL-6). In addition, increasing attention has focused on the consequences of local adipose inflammation. Inflammatory foci characterized by crown-like structures consisting of dead adipocytes encircled by macrophages occur in white adipose depots, including the breast tissue, of most overweight and obese women. Saturated fatty acids, released as a consequence of obesity-associated lipolysis, induce macrophage activation via Toll-like receptor 4, thereby stimulating NF-κB signaling. This, in turn, activates transcription of proinflammatory genes including COX-2, IL-6, IL-1β, and TNFα. Elevated levels of proinflammatory mediators cause both local and systemic effects. Of particular relevance with regard to breast cancer is increased transcription of the CYP19 gene encoding aromatase, the rate-limiting enzyme for estrogen synthesis. Notably, this obesity-inflammation-aromatase axis provides a plausible explanation for increased rates of postmenopausal, hormone receptor-positive breast cancer associated with obesity and hence may offer targets for interventions to attenuate risk or improve prognosis. Potential approaches include weight reduction, exercise, and suppression of obesity-driven signaling pathways using pharmaceutical or dietary agents. A key future goal is to identify biomarkers that accurately report adipose inflammation, both for identification of at-risk individuals and to assess the efficacy of interventions. Clin Cancer Res; 19(22); 6074-83. ©2013 AACR.

  20. Adipose triglyceride lipase expression and fasting regulation are differently affected by cold exposure in adipose tissues of lean and obese Zucker rats.

    PubMed

    Caimari, Antoni; Oliver, Paula; Palou, Andreu

    2012-09-01

    Adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL) hydrolyzes triacylglycerols to diacylglycerols in the first step of lipolysis, providing substrates for hormone-sensitive lipase (HSL). Here we studied whether ATGL messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein levels were affected by 24-h cold exposure in different white adipose tissue depots and in interscapular brown adipose tissue of lean and obese Zucker rats submitted to feeding and 14-h fasting conditions. HSL mRNA expression was also studied in selected depots. In both lean and obese rats, as a general trend, cold exposure increased ATGL mRNA and protein levels in the different adipose depots, except in the brown adipose tissue of lean animals, where a decrease was observed. In lean rats, cold exposure strongly improved fasting up-regulation of ATGL expression in all the adipose depots. Moreover, in response to fasting, in cold-exposed lean rats, there was a stronger positive correlation between circulating nonesterified fatty acids (NEFA) and ATGL mRNA levels in the adipose depots and a higher percentage increase of circulating NEFA in comparison with control animals not exposed to cold. In obese rats, fasting-induced up-regulation of ATGL was impaired and was not improved by cold. The effects of obesity and cold exposure on HSL mRNA expression were similar to those observed for ATGL, suggesting common regulatory mechanisms for both proteins. Thus, cold exposure increases ATGL expression and improves its fasting-up-regulation in adipose tissue of lean rats. In obese rats, cold exposure also increases ATGL expression but fails to improve its regulation by fasting, which could contribute to the increased difficulty for mobilizing lipids in these animals. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. Alteration of local adipose tissue trace element homeostasis as a possible mechanism of obesity-related insulin resistance.

    PubMed

    Tinkov, Alexey A; Sinitskii, Anton I; Popova, Elizaveta V; Nemereshina, Olga N; Gatiatulina, Evgenia R; Skalnaya, Margarita G; Skalny, Anatoly V; Nikonorov, Alexandr A

    2015-09-01

    The mechanisms of association between obesity and the related metabolic disturbances in general and insulin resistance in particular are extensively studied. Taking into account a key role of adipose tissue insulin resistance in the development of systemic obesity-related insulin resistance, the estimation of mechanisms linking increased adiposity and impaired insulin signaling in adipocytes will allow to develop novel prophylactic and therapeutic approaches to treatment of these states. A number of trace elements like chromium, zinc, and vanadium have been shown to take part in insulin signaling via various mechanisms. Taking into account a key role of adipocyte in systemic carbohydrate homeostasis it can be asked if trace element homeostasis in adipose tissue may influence regulatory mechanisms of glucose metabolism. We hypothesize that caloric excess through currently unknown mechanisms results in decreased chromium, vanadium, and zinc content in adipocytes. Decreased content of trace elements in the adipose tissue causes impairment of intra-adipocyte insulin signaling subsequently leading to adipose tissue insulin resistance. The latter significantly contributes to systemic insulin resistance and further metabolic disruption in obesity. It is also possible that decreased adipose tissue trace element content is associated with dysregulation of insulin-sensitizing and proinflammatory adipokines also leading to insulin resistance. We hypothesize that insulin resistance and adipokine dysbalance increase the severity of obesity subsequently aggravating alteration of adipose tissue trace element balance. Single indications of high relative adipose tissue trace element content, decreased Cr, V, and Zn content in obese adipose tissue, and tight association between fat tissue chromium, vanadium, and zinc levels and metabolic parameters in obesity may be useful for hypothesis validation. If our hypothesis will be confirmed by later studies, adipose tissue chromium

  2. A new perspective on adiposity in a naturally obese mammal

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Ortiz, R. M.; Noren, D. P.; Litz, B.; Ortiz, C. L.

    2001-01-01

    Many mammals seasonally reduce body fat due to inherent periods of fasting, which is associated with decreased leptin concentrations. However, no data exist on the correlation between fat mass (FM) and circulating leptin in marine mammals, which have evolved large fat stores as part of their adaptation to periods of prolonged fasting. Therefore, FM was estimated (by tritiated water dilution), and serum leptin and cortisol were measured in 40 northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris) pups early (<1 wk postweaning) and late (6-8 wk postweaning) during their natural, postweaning fast. Body mass (BM) and FM were reduced late; however, percent FM (early: 43.9 +/- 0.5, late: 45.5 +/- 0.5%) and leptin [early: 2.9 +/- 0.1 ng/ml human equivalents (HE), late: 3.0 +/- 0.1 ng/ml HE] did not change. Cortisol increased between early (9.2 +/- 0.5 microg/dl) and late (16.3 +/- 0.9 microg/dl) periods and was significantly and negatively correlated with BM (r = 0.426; P < 0.0001) and FM (r = 0.328; P = 0.003). FM and percent FM were not correlated (P > 0.10) with leptin at either period. The present study suggests that these naturally obese mammals appear to possess a novel cascade for regulating body fat that includes cortisol. The lack of a correlation between leptin and FM may reflect the different functions of fat between terrestrial and marine mammals.

  3. A new perspective on adiposity in a naturally obese mammal.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, R M; Noren, D P; Litz, B; Ortiz, C L

    2001-12-01

    Many mammals seasonally reduce body fat due to inherent periods of fasting, which is associated with decreased leptin concentrations. However, no data exist on the correlation between fat mass (FM) and circulating leptin in marine mammals, which have evolved large fat stores as part of their adaptation to periods of prolonged fasting. Therefore, FM was estimated (by tritiated water dilution), and serum leptin and cortisol were measured in 40 northern elephant seal (Mirounga angustirostris) pups early (<1 wk postweaning) and late (6-8 wk postweaning) during their natural, postweaning fast. Body mass (BM) and FM were reduced late; however, percent FM (early: 43.9 +/- 0.5, late: 45.5 +/- 0.5%) and leptin [early: 2.9 +/- 0.1 ng/ml human equivalents (HE), late: 3.0 +/- 0.1 ng/ml HE] did not change. Cortisol increased between early (9.2 +/- 0.5 microg/dl) and late (16.3 +/- 0.9 microg/dl) periods and was significantly and negatively correlated with BM (r = 0.426; P < 0.0001) and FM (r = 0.328; P = 0.003). FM and percent FM were not correlated (P > 0.10) with leptin at either period. The present study suggests that these naturally obese mammals appear to possess a novel cascade for regulating body fat that includes cortisol. The lack of a correlation between leptin and FM may reflect the different functions of fat between terrestrial and marine mammals.

  4. Adipose Cell Size and Regional Fat Deposition as Predictors of Metabolic Response to Overfeeding in Insulin-Resistant and Insulin-Sensitive Humans.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin, Tracey; Craig, Colleen; Liu, Li-Fen; Perelman, Dalia; Allister, Candice; Spielman, Daniel; Cushman, Samuel W

    2016-05-01

    Obesity is associated with insulin resistance, but significant variability exists between similarly obese individuals, pointing to qualitative characteristics of body fat as potential mediators. To test the hypothesis that obese, insulin-sensitive (IS) individuals possess adaptive adipose cell/tissue responses, we measured subcutaneous adipose cell size, insulin suppression of lipolysis, and regional fat responses to short-term overfeeding in BMI-matched overweight/obese individuals classified as IS or insulin resistant (IR). At baseline, IR subjects exhibited significantly greater visceral adipose tissue (VAT), intrahepatic lipid (IHL), plasma free fatty acids, adipose cell diameter, and percentage of small adipose cells. With weight gain (3.1 ± 1.4 kg), IR subjects demonstrated no significant change in adipose cell size, VAT, or insulin suppression of lipolysis and only 8% worsening of insulin-mediated glucose uptake (IMGU). Alternatively, IS subjects demonstrated significant adipose cell enlargement; decrease in the percentage of small adipose cells; increase in VAT, IHL, and lipolysis; 45% worsening of IMGU; and decreased expression of lipid metabolism genes. Smaller baseline adipose cell size and greater enlargement with weight gain predicted decline in IMGU, as did increase in IHL and VAT and decrease in insulin suppression of lipolysis. Weight gain in IS humans causes maladaptive changes in adipose cells, regional fat distribution, and insulin resistance. The correlation between development of insulin resistance and changes in adipose cell size, VAT, IHL, and insulin suppression of lipolysis highlight these factors as potential mediators between obesity and insulin resistance. © 2016 by the American Diabetes Association. Readers may use this article as long as the work is properly cited, the use is educational and not for profit, and the work is not altered.

  5. Genetics of obesity in humans.

    PubMed

    Farooqi, Sadaf; O'Rahilly, Stephen

    2006-12-01

    Considerable attention has focused on deciphering the hypothalamic pathways that mediate the behavioral and metabolic effects of leptin. We and others have identified several single gene defects that disrupt the molecules in the leptin-melanocortin pathway causing severe obesity in humans. In this review, we consider these human monogenic obesity syndromes and discuss how far the characterization of these patients has informed our understanding of the physiological role of leptin and the melanocortins in the regulation of human body weight and neuroendocrine function.

  6. Insulin action in morbid obesity: a focus on muscle and adipose tissue.

    PubMed

    Mitrou, Panayota; Raptis, Sotirios A; Dimitriadis, George

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this review is to summarize the mechanisms underlying insulin resistance in morbid obesity. Glucose regulation by insulin depends on the suppression of endogenous glucose production and stimulation of glucose disposal. In morbid obesity, glucose production by the liver is increased. Moreover, the sensitivity of glucose metabolism to insulin is impaired both in muscle (due to defects in insulin-stimulated glucose utilization and decreased blood flow) and in adipose tissue (due to decreased blood flow). However, recent studies suggest that expanded total fat mass becomes a major consumer of glucose providing a sink for glucose and compensating for insulin resistance. Metabolism and immunity are closely linked. Bearing in mind the crosstalk between inflammatory pathways and the insulin signaling cascade, adipose tissue derived cytokines may represent a link between inflammation and metabolic signals and mediate, at least in part, insulin resistance. Adipose tissue plays a crucial role by buffering daily influx of dietary fat, suppressing the release of non-esterified fatty acids into the circulation and increasing triacylglycerol clearance. However, in morbid obesity there is an impairment of the normal ability of adipose tissue to buffer fatty acids, despite hyperinsulinemia. Lipotoxicity gradually impairs insulin action in the liver and muscle, aggravating insulin resistance.

  7. Balanced caloric macronutrient composition downregulates immunological gene expression in human blood cells-adipose tissue diverges.

    PubMed

    Brattbakk, Hans-Richard; Arbo, Ingerid; Aagaard, Siv; Lindseth, Inge; de Soysa, Ann Kristin Hjelle; Langaas, Mette; Kulseng, Bård; Lindberg, Fedon; Johansen, Berit

    2013-01-01

    Cardiovascular disease, obesity, and type 2 diabetes are conditions characterized by low-grade systemic inflammation, strongly influenced by lifestyle, but the mechanisms that link these characteristics are poorly understood. Our first objective was to investigate if a normocaloric diet with a calorically balanced macronutrient composition influenced immunological gene expression. Findings regarding the suitability of blood as biological material in nutrigenomics and gene expression profiling have been inconclusive. Our second objective was to compare blood and adipose tissue sample quality in terms of adequacy for DNA-microarray analyses, and to determine tissue-specific gene expression patterns. Blood and adipose tissue samples were collected for gene expression profiling from three obese men before, during, and after a 28-day normocaloric diet intervention where each meal contained an approximately equal caloric load of macronutrients. Time series analyses of blood gene expression revealed a cluster of downregulated genes involved in immunological processes. Blood RNA quality and yield were satisfactory, and DNA-microarray analysis reproducibility was similar in blood and adipose tissue. Gene expression correlation between blood and adipose tissue varied according to gene function, and was especially low for genes involved in immunological and metabolic processes. This suggests that diet composition is of importance in inflammatory processes in blood cells. The findings also suggest that a systems biology approach, in which tissues are studied in parallel, should be employed to fully understand the impact of dietary challenges on the human body.

  8. No evidence for a role of adipose tissue-derived serum amyloid a in the development of insulin resistance or obesity-related inflammation in hSAA1(+/-) transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Ahlin, Sofie; Olsson, Maja; Olsson, Bob; Svensson, Per-Arne; Sjöholm, Kajsa

    2013-01-01

    Obesity is associated with a low-grade inflammation including moderately increased serum levels of the acute phase protein serum amyloid A (SAA). In obesity, SAA is mainly produced from adipose tissue and serum levels of SAA are associated with insulin resistance. SAA has been described as a chemoattractant for inflammatory cells and adipose tissue from obese individuals contains increased numbers of macrophages. However, whether adipose tissue-derived SAA can have a direct impact on macrophage infiltration in adipose tissue or the development of insulin resistance is unknown. The aim of this study was to investigate the effects of adipose tissue-derived SAA1 on the development of insulin resistance and obesity-related inflammation. We have previously established a transgenic mouse model expressing human SAA1 in the adipose tissue. For this report, hSAA1(+/-) transgenic mice and wild type mice were fed with a high fat diet or normal chow. Effects of hSAA1 on glucose metabolism were assessed using an oral glucose tolerance test. Real-time PCR was used to measure the mRNA levels of macrophage markers and genes related to insulin sensitivity in adipose tissue. Cytokines during inflammation were analyzed using a Proinflammatory 7-plex Assay. We found similar insulin and glucose levels in hSAA1 mice and wt controls during an oral glucose tolerance test and no decrease in mRNA levels of genes related to insulin sensitivity in adipose tissue in neither male nor female hSAA1 animals. Furthermore, serum levels of proinflammatory cytokines and mRNA levels of macrophage markers in adipose tissue were not increased in hSAA1 mice. Hence, in this model we find no evidence that adipose tissue-derived hSAA1 influences the development of insulin resistance or obesity-related inflammation.

  9. Lipopolysaccharide-binding protein is a negative regulator of adipose tissue browning in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Gavaldà-Navarro, Aleix; Moreno-Navarrete, José M; Quesada-López, Tania; Cairó, Montserrat; Giralt, Marta; Fernández-Real, José M; Villarroya, Francesc

    2016-10-01

    Adipocyte lipopolysaccharide-binding protein (LBP) biosynthesis is associated with obesity-induced adipose tissue dysfunction. Our purpose was to study the role of LBP in regulating the browning of adipose tissue. Adult mice were maintained at 4°C for 3 weeks or treated with the β3-adrenergic agonist, CL316,243, for 1 week to induce the browning of white fat. Precursor cells from brown and white adipose tissues were cultured under differentiation-inducing conditions to yield brown and beige/brite adipocytes, respectively. In vitro, Lbp was knocked down in 3T3-L1 adipocytes, and cells were treated with recombinant LBP or co-cultured in transwells with control 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Wild-type and Lbp-null mice, fed a standard or high fat diet (HFD) for 15 weeks, were also used in investigations. In humans, subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue samples were obtained from a cohort of morbidly obese participants. The induction of white fat browning by exposure of mice to cold or CL316,243 treatment was strongly associated with decreased Lbp mRNA expression in white adipose tissue. The acquisition of the beige/brite phenotype in cultured cells was associated with downregulation of Lbp. Moreover, silencing of Lbp induced the expression of brown fat-related genes in adipocytes, whereas LBP treatment reversed this effect. Lbp-null mice exhibited the spontaneous induction of subcutaneous adipose tissue browning, as evidenced by a remarkable increase in Ucp1 and Dio2 gene expression and the appearance of multivacuolar adipocyte clusters. The amount of brown adipose tissue, and brown adipose tissue activity were also increased in Lbp-null mice. These changes were associated with decreased weight gain in Lbp-null mice and protection against HFD-induced inflammatory responses, as shown by reduced IL-6 levels. However, rather than improving glucose homeostasis, these effects led to glucose intolerance and insulin resistance. LBP is identified as a negative regulator of the

  10. The Neuropathology of Obesity: Insights from Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Edward B.; Mattson, Mark P.

    2013-01-01

    Obesity, a pathologic state defined by excess adipose tissue, is a significant public health problem as it affects a large proportion of individuals and is linked with increased risk for numerous chronic diseases. Obesity is the result of fundamental changes associated with modern society including overnutrition and sedentary lifestyles. Proper energy homeostasis is dependent on normal brain function as the master metabolic regulator which integrates peripheral signals, modulates autonomic outflow and controls feeding behavior. Therefore, many human brain diseases are associated with obesity. This review explores the neuropathology of obesity by examining brain diseases which either cause or are influenced by obesity. First, several genetic and acquired brain diseases are discussed as a means to understand the central regulation of peripheral metabolism. These diseases range from monogenetic causes of obesity (leptin deficiency, MC4R deficiency, Bardet-Biedl syndrome and others) to complex neurodevelopmental disorders (Prader-Willi syndrome and Sim1 deficiency) and neurodegenerative conditions (frontotemporal dementia and Gourmand’s syndrome) and serve to highlight the central regulatory mechanisms which have evolved to maintain energy homeostasis. Next, to examine the effect of obesity on the brain, chronic neuropathologic conditions (epilepsy, multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer’s disease) are discussed as examples of obesity leading to maladaptive processes which exacerbate chronic disease. Thus obesity is associated with multiple pathways including abnormal metabolism, altered hormonal signaling and increased inflammation which act in concert to promote downstream neuropathology. Finally, the effect of anti-obesity interventions is discussed in terms of brain structure and function. Together, understanding human diseases and anti-obesity interventions leads to insights into the bidirectional interaction between peripheral metabolism and central brain function

  11. The neuropathology of obesity: insights from human disease.

    PubMed

    Lee, Edward B; Mattson, Mark P

    2014-01-01

    Obesity, a pathologic state defined by excess adipose tissue, is a significant public health problem as it affects a large proportion of individuals and is linked with increased risk for numerous chronic diseases. Obesity is the result of fundamental changes associated with modern society including overnutrition and sedentary lifestyles. Proper energy homeostasis is dependent on normal brain function as the master metabolic regulator, which integrates peripheral signals, modulates autonomic outflow and controls feeding behavior. Therefore, many human brain diseases are associated with obesity. This review explores the neuropathology of obesity by examining brain diseases which either cause or are influenced by obesity. First, several genetic and acquired brain diseases are discussed as a means to understand the central regulation of peripheral metabolism. These diseases range from monogenetic causes of obesity (leptin deficiency, MC4R deficiency, Bardet-Biedl syndrome and others) to complex neurodevelopmental disorders (Prader-Willi syndrome and Sim1 deficiency) and neurodegenerative conditions (frontotemporal dementia and Gourmand's syndrome) and serve to highlight the central regulatory mechanisms which have evolved to maintain energy homeostasis. Next, to examine the effect of obesity on the brain, chronic neuropathologic conditions (epilepsy, multiple sclerosis and Alzheimer's disease) are discussed as examples of obesity leading to maladaptive processes which exacerbate chronic disease. Thus, obesity is associated with multiple pathways including abnormal metabolism, altered hormonal signaling and increased inflammation which act in concert to promote downstream neuropathology. Finally, the effect of anti-obesity interventions is discussed in terms of brain structure and function. Together, understanding human diseases and anti-obesity interventions leads to insights into the bidirectional interaction between peripheral metabolism and central brain function

  12. Microparticles derived from obese adipose tissue elicit a pro-inflammatory phenotype of CD16(+), CCR5(+) and TLR8(+) monocytes.

    PubMed

    Renovato-Martins, Mariana; Matheus, Maria Eline; de Andrade, Isadora Ramos; Moraes, João Alfredo; da Silva, Simone Vargas; Citelli Dos Reis, Marta; de Souza, Antônio Augusto Peixoto; da Silva, César Cláudio; Bouskela, Eliete; Barja-Fidalgo, Christina

    2017-01-01

    Macrophage infiltration into adipose tissue (AT) is a hallmark of the chronic inflammatory response in obesity and is supported by an intense monocyte migration towards AT. Although it has been detected an increased proportion of circulating CD16(+) monocyte subsets in obese subjects, the mechanisms underlying this effect and the contribution of these cells to the inflamed profile of obese AT are still poorly understood. We investigated whether factors secreted by human obese omental AT could polarize monocytes to CD16(+) enriched phenotype, and how these changes could modify their migratory capacity towards adipose tissue itself. We show that explants of human obese omental AT, obtained during bariatric surgery, released higher levels of MIP1-α, TNFα, leptin and also VEGF, together with increasing amounts of microparticles (MP), when compared to explants of lean subcutaneous AT. A higher content of circulating MP derived from preadipocytes and leukocytes was also detected in plasma of obese subjects. Conditioned media or MP released from obese omental AT increased CD16 and CCR5 expression on CD14(+)CD16(-) monocytes and augmented their migratory capacity towards the conditioned media from obese omental AT, itself. This effect was inhibited when MIP1-α was neutralized. Additionally, we demonstrate that MP derived from obese omental AT carry and transfer TLR8 to monocytes, thus triggering an increase in CD16 expression in those cells. Our data shows a positive feedback loop between blood monocytes and obese omental AT, which releases chemotactic mediators and TLR8-enriched MP, thus inducing an up-regulation of CD16(+) monocytes, favoring leukocyte infiltration in the obese omental AT.

  13. Effect of feed restriction on adipose tissue transcript concentrations in genetically lean and obese pigs.

    PubMed

    McNeel, R L; Ding, S T; Smith, E O; Mersmann, H J

    2000-04-01

    To determine possible genetic influences on the steady-state concentrations of several key transcription factor transcripts and the transcript concentrations for adipocyte-characteristic proteins, young, genetically obese and lean pigs were given ad libitum access or feed or were restrictively fed at 50% of ad libitum intake for 5 wk. Obese pigs were smaller and fatter than lean pigs, whether intake was ad libitum or restrictive. Plasma protein, albumin, and cholesterol concentrations were greater in obese than in lean pigs. Plasma NEFA, blood urea nitrogen, triacylglycerols, and postprandial glucose and insulin concentrations were less (P < .02) in pigs fed restrictively than in pigs with ad libitum access to feed, regardless of genetic group. The adipose tissue glucose transporter 4, fatty acid synthase, and leptin transcript concentrations were greater (P < .05) in obese than in lean pigs. The CCAAT/enhancer binding proteins beta and alpha, adipocyte fatty acid binding protein, hormone-sensitive lipase, and the beta1-adrenergic receptor transcript concentrations tended (P < . 10) to be greater in adipose tissue from obese than in that from lean pigs. Several other transcripts were numerically greater in obese than in lean pigs. The data collectively suggest that messenger RNA concentration for several adipose tissue proteins is a contributing factor to the excess fat deposition in these obese pigs. Restricted feeding did not change the concentration of any transcript except that for adipocyte fatty acid binding protein, which was reduced. The accretion of fat was markedly reduced in the restrictively fed pigs, but this diminution does not seem to be regulated by modulation of messenger RNA concentration.

  14. Increased inflammatory properties of adipose tissue macrophages recruited during diet-induced obesity.

    PubMed

    Lumeng, Carey N; Deyoung, Stephanie M; Bodzin, Jennifer L; Saltiel, Alan R

    2007-01-01

    Although recent studies show that adipose tissue macrophages (ATMs) participate in the inflammatory changes in obesity and contribute to insulin resistance, the properties of these cells are not well understood. We hypothesized that ATMs recruited to adipose tissue during a high-fat diet have unique inflammatory properties compared with resident tissue ATMs. Using a dye (PKH26) to pulse label ATMs in vivo, we purified macrophages recruited to white adipose tissue during a high-fat diet. Comparison of gene expression in recruited and resident ATMs using real-time RT-PCR and cDNA microarrays showed that recruited ATMs overexpress genes important in macrophage migration and phagocytosis, including interleukin-6 (IL-6), inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and C-C chemokine receptor 2 (CCR2). Many of these genes were not induced in ATMs from high-fat diet-fed CCR2 knockout mice, supporting the importance of CCR2 in regulating recruitment of inflammatory ATMs during obesity. Additionally, expression of Apoe was decreased, whereas genes important in lipid metabolism, such as Pparg, Adfp, Srepf1, and Apob48r, were increased in the recruited macrophages. In agreement with this, ATMs from obese mice had increased lipid content compared with those from lean mice. These studies demonstrate that recruited ATMs in obese animals represent a subclass of macrophages with unique properties.

  15. Hypovitaminosis D and adipose tissue - cause and effect relationships in obesity.

    PubMed

    Pelczyńska, Marta; Grzelak, Teresa; Walczak, Marcelina; Czyżewska, Krystyna

    2016-09-01

    In recent years, attention has been focused on pleiotropic directions of effects exerted by vitamin D. Epidemiological data indicate that deficiency of vitamin D in various population groups represents an increasingly widespread phenomenon, while a decreased serum concentration of calcitriol correlates with manifestation of civilization-linked diseases, including visceral obesity. This study aims at a review and synthesis of data linked to relationships between lowered vitamin D concentrations in blood and manifestation of obesity, and potential mechanisms which affect the concentration of the vitamin in conditions of an excessive accumulation of adipose tissue. Several variables are distinguished which can affect the status of vitamin D in obesity, but the key role in this respect is ascribed to the metabolic activity of visceral adipose tissue. Among others, the activity favours sequestration and modulation of calcitriol turnover. On the other hand, the effects of vitamin D on the process of adipogenesis and its involvement in remodelling of adipose tissue are pointed out. Also, several factors of an environmental nature (e.g. time of year/day, dietetic supply of vitamin D), genetic nature (e.g. genetic polymorphisms) and other conditioning (e.g. coexisting diseases, age, content of melanin in skin) cannot be bypassed as they may affect the concentration of vitamin D. Nevertheless, it still remains unresolved to what extent hypovitaminosis D represents the cause and to which it is the effect of obesity.

  16. Obesity and coronary microvascular disease - implications for adipose tissue-mediated remote inflammatory response.

    PubMed

    Bagi, Zsolt; Broskova, Zuzana; Feher, Attila

    2014-05-01

    It is believed that obesity has detrimental effects on the coronary circulation. These include immediate changes in coronary arterial vasomotor responsiveness and the development of occlusive large coronary artery disease. Despite its critical role in regulating myocardial perfusion, the altered behavior of coronary resistance arteries, which gives rise to coronary microvascular disease (CMD) is poorly understood in obesity. A chronic, low-grade vascular inflammation has been long considered as one of the main underlying pathology behind CMD. The expanded adipose tissue and the infiltrating macrophages are the major sources of pro-inflammatory mediators that have been implicated in causing inadequate myocardial perfusion and, in a long term, development of heart failure in obese patients. Much less is known the mechanisms regulating the release of these cytokines into the circulation that enable them to exert their remote effects in the coronary microcirculation. This mini review aims to examine recent studies describing alterations in the vasomotor function of coronary resistance arteries and the role of adipose tissue-derived pro-inflammatory cytokines and adipokines in contributing to CMD in obesity. We provide examples of regulatory mechanisms by which adipokines are released from adipose tissue to exert their remote inflammatory effects on coronary microvessels. We identify some of the important challenges and opportunities going forward.

  17. Molecular cloning and characterization of the anti-obesity gene adipose in pig.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yanling; Long, Qinqiang; Feng, Bin; Zhu, Xiaoyue; Zheng, Zifeng; Gao, Sumin; Gao, Mingju; Gan, Li; Zhou, Lei; Yang, Zaiqing

    2012-11-01

    Obesity has become an epidemic health problem characterized by aberrant energy metabolism. As the major player in energy homeostasis, adipose tissue has a decisive role in the development of obesity. Many genes involved in adipogenesis are also correlated with obesity. Adipose (Adp) has been established as an anti-obesity gene to repress adipogenesis and fat accumulation in mice, which inhibits the transcriptional activity of PPARγ by forming a chromatin remodeling complex with histones and HDAC3. Here, we reported the cloning and characterization of the pig Adp gene. Pig Adp cDNA had an ORF of 2034 nucleotides and was highly conserved among various species. Genomic sequence analysis indicated that pig Adp gene contains 16 exons and 15 introns, spanning more than 60kb on chromosome 6q21-24. The expression of pig Adp was high in testis, lung, kidney and adipose tissues, and relatively low in skeletal muscle. Bioinformatic analysis of 5'-flanking region of Adp has identified several potential binding sites for pivotal transcriptional factors related to both adipocyte differentiation and inflammation, highlighting the significance of Adp in energy metabolism. We have confirmed that KLF6, a positive regulator of adipogenesis, can enhance the promoter activity of Adp and up-regulate its mRNA expression. Taken together, our results would be helpful for further study of Adp regulation in the process of fat accumulation. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Interferon tau alleviates obesity-induced adipose tissue inflammation and insulin resistance by regulating macrophage polarization.

    PubMed

    Ying, Wei; Kanameni, Srikanth; Chang, Cheng-An; Nair, Vijayalekshmi; Safe, Stephen; Bazer, Fuller W; Zhou, Beiyan

    2014-01-01

    Chronic adipose tissue inflammation is a hallmark of obesity-induced insulin resistance and anti-inflammatory agents can benefit patients with obesity-associated syndromes. Currently available type I interferons for therapeutic immunomodulation are accompanied by high cytotoxicity and therefore in this study we have examined anti-inflammatory effects of interferon tau (IFNT), a member of the type I interferon family with low cellular toxicity even at high doses. Using a diet-induced obesity mouse model, we observed enhanced insulin sensitivity in obese mice administered IFNT compared to control mice, which was accompanied by a significant decrease in secretion of proinflammatory cytokines and elevated anti-inflammatory macrophages (M2) in adipose tissue. Further investigations revealed that IFNT is a potent regulator of macrophage activation that favors anti-inflammatory responses as evidenced by activation of associated surface antigens, production of anti-inflammatory cytokines, and activation of selective cell signaling pathways. Thus, our study demonstrates, for the first time, that IFNT can significantly mitigate obesity-associated systemic insulin resistance and tissue inflammation by controlling macrophage polarization, and thus IFNT can be a novel bio-therapeutic agent for treating obesity-associated syndromes and type 2 diabetes.

  19. Vitamin E reduces adipose tissue fibrosis, inflammation, and oxidative stress and improves metabolic profile in obesity.