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Sample records for human papillomavirus l2

  1. Human Papillomavirus L2 facilitates viral escape from late endosomes via Sorting Nexin 17

    PubMed Central

    Marušič, Martina Bergant; Ozbun, Michelle A; Campos, Samuel K; Myers, Michael P; Banks, Lawrence

    2011-01-01

    The Human Papillomavirus (HPV) L2 capsid protein plays an essential role during the early stages of viral infection, but the molecular mechanisms underlying its mode of action remain obscure. Using a proteomic approach we have identified the adaptor protein, Sorting Nexin 17 (SNX17) as a strong interacting partner of HPV L2. This interaction occurs through a highly conserved SNX17 consensus binding motif, which is present in the majority of HPV L2 proteins analysed. Using mutants of L2 defective for SNX17 interaction, or siRNA ablation of SNX17 expression we demonstrate that the interaction between L2 and SNX17 is essential for viral infection. Furthermore, loss of the L2-SNX17 interaction results in enhanced turnover of the L2 protein and decreased stability of the viral capsids, and concomitantly there is a dramatic decrease in the efficiency with which viral genomes transit to the nucleus. Indeed, using a range of endosomal and lysosomal markers we show that capsids defective in their capacity to bind SNX17 transit much more rapidly to the lysosomal compartment. These results demonstrate that the L2-SNX17 interaction is essential for viral infection and facilitates the escape of the L2-DNA complex from the late endosomal/lysosomal compartments. PMID:22151726

  2. Topography of the Human Papillomavirus Minor Capsid Protein L2 during Vesicular Trafficking of Infectious Entry

    PubMed Central

    DiGiuseppe, Stephen; Keiffer, Timothy R.; Bienkowska-Haba, Malgorzata; Luszczek, Wioleta; Guion, Lucile G. M.; Müller, Martin

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human papillomavirus (HPV) capsid is composed of the major capsid protein L1 and the minor capsid protein L2. During entry, the HPV capsid undergoes numerous conformational changes that result in endosomal uptake and subsequent trafficking of the L2 protein in complex with the viral DNA to the trans-Golgi network. To facilitate this transport, the L2 protein harbors a number of putative motifs that, if capable of direct interaction, would interact with cytosolic host cell factors. These data imply that a portion of L2 becomes cytosolic during infection. Using a low concentration of digitonin to selectively permeabilize the plasma membrane of infected cells, we mapped the topography of the L2 protein during infection. We observed that epitopes within amino acid residues 64 to 81 and 163 to 170 and a C-terminal tag of HPV16 L2 are exposed on the cytosolic side of intracellular membranes, whereas an epitope within residues 20 to 38, which are upstream of a putative transmembrane region, is luminal. Corroborating these findings, we also found that L2 protein is sensitive to trypsin digestion during infection. These data demonstrate that the majority of the L2 protein becomes accessible on the cytosolic side of intracellular membranes in order to interact with cytosolic factors to facilitate vesicular trafficking. IMPORTANCE In order to complete infectious entry, nonenveloped viruses have to pass cellular membranes. This is often achieved through the viral capsid protein associating with or integrating into intracellular membrane. Here, we determine the topography of HPV L2 protein in the endocytic vesicular compartment, suggesting that L2 becomes a transmembrane protein with a short luminal portion and with the majority facing the cytosolic side for interaction with host cell transport factors. PMID:26246568

  3. Factors influencing subcellular localization of the human papillomavirus L2 minor structural protein

    SciTech Connect

    Kieback, Elisa; Mueller, Martin . E-mail: Martin.Mueller@dkfz.de

    2006-02-05

    Two structural proteins form the capsids of papillomaviruses. The major structural protein L1 is the structural determinant of the capsids and is present in 360 copies arranged in 72 pentamers. The minor structural protein L2 is estimated to be present in twelve copies per capsid. Possible roles for L2 in interaction with cell surface receptors and in virion uptake have been suggested. As previously reported, L2 localizes in subnuclear domains identified as nuclear domain 10 (ND10). As it was demonstrated that L2 is able to recruit viral and cellular proteins to ND10, a possible role for L2 as a mediator in viral assembly has been proposed. In this study, we determined factors influencing the localization of L2 at ND10. Under conditions of moderate L2 expression level and in the absence of heterologous viral components, we observed that, in contrast to previous reports, L2 is mainly distributed homogeneously throughout the nucleus. L2, however, is recruited to ND10 at a higher expression level or in the presence of viral components derived from vaccinia virus or from Semliki Forest virus. We observed that translocation of L2 to ND10 is not a concentration-dependent accumulation but rather seems to be triggered by yet unidentified cellular factors. In contrast to HPV 11 and 16 L2, the HPV 18 L2 protein seems to require L1 for efficient nuclear accumulation.

  4. Chimeric L1-L2 virus-like particles as potential broad-spectrum human papillomavirus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Schellenbacher, Christina; Roden, Richard; Kirnbauer, Reinhard

    2009-10-01

    The amino (N) terminus of the human papillomavirus (HPV) minor capsid protein L2 can induce low-titer, cross-neutralizing antibodies. The aim of this study was to improve immunogenicity of L2 peptides by surface display on highly ordered, self-assembled virus-like particles (VLP) of major capsid protein L1, and to more completely characterize neutralization epitopes of L2. Overlapping peptides comprising amino acids (aa) 2 to 22 (hereafter, chimera or peptide 2-22), 13 to 107, 18 to 31, 17 to 36, 35 to 75, 75 to 112, 115 to 154, 149 to 175, and 172 to 200 of HPV type 16 (HPV16) L2 were genetically engineered into the DE surface loop of bovine papillomavirus type 1 L1 VLP. Except for chimeras 35-75 and 13-107, recombinant fusion proteins assembled into VLP. Vaccination of rabbits with Freund's adjuvanted native VLP induced higher L2-specific antibody titers than vaccination with corresponding sodium dodecyl sulfate-denatured proteins. Immune sera to epitopes within residues 13 to 154 neutralized HPV16 in pseudovirion neutralization assays, whereas chimera 17-36 induced additional cross-neutralization to divergent high-risk HPV18, -31, -45, -52, and -58; low-risk HPV11; and beta-type HPV5 (titers of 50 to 10,000). Aluminum hydroxide-monophosphoryl lipid A (Alum-MPL)-adjuvanted VLP induced similar patterns of neutralization in both rabbits and mice, albeit with 100-fold-lower titers than Freund's adjuvant. Importantly, Alum-MPL-adjuvanted immunization with chimeric HPV16L1-HPV16L2 (peptide 17-36) VLP induced neutralization or cross-neutralization of HPV16, -18, -31, -45, -52, and -58; HPV6 and -11; and HPV5 (titers of 50 to 100,000). Immunization with HPV16 L1-HPV16 L2 (chimera 17-36) VLP in adjuvant applicable for human use induces broad-spectrum neutralizing antibodies against HPV types evolutionarily divergent to HPV16 and thus may protect against infection with mucosal high-risk, low-risk, and beta HPV types and associated disease. PMID:19640991

  5. Impact of Inhibitors and L2 Antibodies upon the Infectivity of Diverse Alpha and Beta Human Papillomavirus Types

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Kihyuck; Jiang, Rosie; Wang, Joshua W.; Jagu, Subhashini; Kirnbauer, Reinhard; Roden, Richard B. S.

    2014-01-01

    The licensed human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines elicit type-restricted immunity but do not target cutaneous HPV types of the beta genus that are associated with non-melanoma skin cancer in immune-compromised patients, and it is unclear if these diverse types share a common mechanism of infection. Residues 11-88 of minor capsid protein L2 contain cross-protective epitopes, and vaccination with concatamers of this region derived from as many as eight alpha HPV (L2 α11-88x8) is being developed as an alternative prophylactic vaccine with potentially broader efficacy. There is also interest in developing broadly protective topical microbicides, such as carrageenan or heparin that block HPV receptor interactions, or small molecule inhibitors of infection. Here we have examined several inhibitors of HPV infection and antisera to L2 α11-88x8 for their breadth of activity against infection by 34 HPV types from within both the alpha and beta families using pseudovirions (PsV) carrying a luciferase reporter as surrogates for native virus. We observed that both heparin and carrageenan prevented infection by mucosatropic HPV types, but surprisingly PsV of several epidermotropic alpha4 and beta HPV types exhibited increased infectivity especially at low inhibitor concentrations. Furin and γ-secretase inhibitors and L2 α11-88x8 antiserum blocked infection by all HPV PsV types tested. These findings suggest that the distinct tropism of mucosal and cutaneous HPV may reflect distinct cell surface receptor interactions, but a common uptake mechanism dependent upon furin and γ-secretase proteolytic activities. Carrageenan, which is being tested as a vaginal microbicide, broadly inhibited infection by the high-risk mucosatropic HPV PsV, but not most skin tropic alpha and beta HPV. Vaccination with an L2 multimer derived exclusively from alpha papillomavirus sequences induced antibodies that broadly neutralized PsV of all 34 HPVs from within both the alpha and beta families

  6. Alpha-Defensin HD5 Inhibits Furin Cleavage of Human Papillomavirus 16 L2 To Block Infection

    PubMed Central

    Wiens, Mayim E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a significant oncogenic virus, but the innate immune response to HPV is poorly understood. Human α-defensin 5 (HD5) is an innate immune effector peptide secreted by epithelial cells in the genitourinary tract. HD5 is broadly antimicrobial, exhibiting potent antiviral activity against HPV at physiologic concentrations; however, the specific mechanism of HD5-mediated inhibition against HPV is unknown. During infection, the HPV capsid undergoes several critical cell-mediated viral protein processing steps, including unfolding and cleavage of the minor capsid protein L2 by host cyclophilin B and furin. Using HPV16 pseudovirus, we show that HD5 interacts directly with the virus and inhibits the furin-mediated cleavage of L2 at the cell surface during infection at a step downstream of the cyclophilin B-mediated unfolding of L2. Importantly, HD5 does not affect the enzymatic activity of furin directly. Thus, our data support a model in which HD5 prevents furin from accessing L2 by occluding the furin cleavage site via direct binding to the viral capsid. IMPORTANCE Our study elucidates a new antiviral action for α-defensins against nonenveloped viruses in which HD5 directly interferes with a critical host-mediated viral processing step, furin cleavage of L2, at the cell surface. Blocking this key event has deleterious effects on the intracellular steps of virus infection. Thus, in addition to informing the antiviral mechanisms of α-defensins, our studies highlight the critical role of furin cleavage in HPV entry. Innate immune control, mediated in part by α-defensins expressed in the genital mucosa, may influence susceptibility to HPV infections that lead to cervical cancer. Moreover, understanding the mechanism of these natural antivirals may inform the design of therapeutics to limit HPV infection. PMID:25540379

  7. Immunization with a consensus epitope from Human Papillomavirus L2 induces antibodies that are broadly neutralizing

    PubMed Central

    Tyler, Mitchell; Tumban, Ebenezer; Dziduszko, Agnieszka; Ozbun, Michelle A.; Peabody, David S.; Chackerian, Bryce

    2014-01-01

    Vaccines targeting conserved epitopes in the HPV minor capsid protein, L2, can elicit antibodies that can protect against a broad spectrum of HPV types that are associated with cervical cancer and other HPV malignancies. Thus, L2 vaccines have been explored as alternatives to the current HPV vaccines, which are largely type-specific. In this study we assessed the immunogenicity of peptides spanning the N-terminal domain of L2 linked to the surface of a highly immunogenic bacteriophage virus-like particle (VLP) platform. Although all of the HPV16 L2 peptide-displaying VLPs elicited high-titer anti-peptide antibody responses, only a subset of the immunogens elicited antibody responses that were strongly protective from HPV16 pseudovirus (PsV) infection in a mouse genital challenge model. One of these peptides, mapping to HPV16 L2 amino acids 65–85, strongly neutralized HPV16 PsV but showed little ability to cross-neutralize other high-risk HPV types. In an attempt to broaden the protection generated through vaccination with this peptide, we immunized mice with VLPs displaying a peptide that represented a consensus sequence from high-risk and other HPV types. Vaccinated mice produced antibodies with broad, high-titer neutralizing activity against all of the HPV types that we tested. Therefore, immunization with virus-like particles displaying a consensus HPV sequence is an effective method to broaden neutralizing antibody responses against a type-specific epitope. PMID:24962748

  8. Cyclophilins Facilitate Dissociation of the Human Papillomavirus Type 16 Capsid Protein L1 from the L2/DNA Complex following Virus Entry

    PubMed Central

    Bienkowska-Haba, Malgorzata; Williams, Carlyn; Kim, Seong Man; Garcea, Robert L.

    2012-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are composed of the major and minor capsid proteins, L1 and L2, that encapsidate a chromatinized, circular double-stranded DNA genome. At the outset of infection, the interaction of HPV type 16 (HPV16) (pseudo)virions with heparan sulfate proteoglycans triggers a conformational change in L2 that is facilitated by the host cell chaperone cyclophilin B (CyPB). This conformational change results in exposure of the L2 N terminus, which is required for infectious internalization. Following internalization, L2 facilitates egress of the viral genome from acidified endosomes, and the L2/DNA complex accumulates at PML nuclear bodies. We recently described a mutant virus that bypasses the requirement for cell surface CyPB but remains sensitive to cyclosporine for infection, indicating an additional role for CyP following endocytic uptake of virions. We now report that the L1 protein dissociates from the L2/DNA complex following infectious internalization. Inhibition and small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of CyPs blocked dissociation of L1 from the L2/DNA complex. In vitro, purified CyPs facilitated the dissociation of L1 pentamers from recombinant HPV11 L1/L2 complexes in a pH-dependent manner. Furthermore, CyPs released L1 capsomeres from partially disassembled HPV16 pseudovirions at slightly acidic pH. Taken together, these data suggest that CyPs mediate the dissociation of HPV L1 and L2 capsid proteins following acidification of endocytic vesicles. PMID:22761365

  9. L2, the minor capsid protein of papillomavirus

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Joshua W.; Roden, Richard B.S.

    2013-10-15

    The capsid protein L2 plays major roles in both papillomavirus assembly and the infectious process. While L1 forms the majority of the capsid and can self-assemble into empty virus-like particles (VLPs), L2 is a minor capsid component and lacks the capacity to form VLPs. However, L2 co-assembles with L1 into VLPs, enhancing their assembly. L2 also facilitates encapsidation of the ∼8 kbp circular and nucleosome-bound viral genome during assembly of the non-enveloped T=7d virions in the nucleus of terminally differentiated epithelial cells, although, like L1, L2 is not detectably expressed in infected basal cells. With respect to infection, L2 is not required for particles to bind to and enter cells. However L2 must be cleaved by furin for endosome escape. L2 then travels with the viral genome to the nucleus, wherein it accumulates at ND-10 domains. Here, we provide an overview of the biology of L2. - Highlights: • L2 is the minor antigen of the non-enveloped T=7d icosahedral Papillomavirus capsid. • L2 is a nuclear protein that can traffic to ND-10 and facilitate genome encapsidation. • L2 is critical for infection and must be cleaved by furin. • L2 is a broadly protective vaccine antigen recognized by neutralizing antibodies.

  10. Durable immunity to oncogenic human papillomaviruses elicited by adjuvanted recombinant Adeno-associated virus-like particle immunogen displaying L2 17-36 epitopes.

    PubMed

    Jagu, Subhashini; Karanam, Balusubramanyam; Wang, Joshua W; Zayed, Hatem; Weghofer, Margit; Brendle, Sarah A; Balogh, Karla K; Tossi, Kerstin Pino; Roden, Richard B S; Christensen, Neil D

    2015-10-13

    Vaccination with the minor capsid protein L2, notably the 17-36 neutralizing epitope, induces broadly protective antibodies, although the neutralizing titers attained in serum are substantially lower than for the licensed L1 VLP vaccines. Here we examine the impact of other less reactogenic adjuvants upon the induction of durable neutralizing serum antibody responses and protective immunity after vaccination with HPV16 and HPV31 L2 amino acids 17-36 inserted at positions 587 and 453 of VP3, respectively, for surface display on Adeno-Associated Virus 2-like particles [AAVLP (HPV16/31L2)]. Mice were vaccinated three times subcutaneously with AAVLP (HPV16/31L2) at two week intervals at several doses either alone or formulated with alum, alum and MPL, RIBI adjuvant or Cervarix. The use of adjuvant with AAVLP (HPV16/31L2) was necessary in mice for the induction of L2-specific neutralizing antibody and protection against vaginal challenge with HPV16. While use of alum was sufficient to elicit durable protection (>3 months after the final immunization), antibody titers were increased by addition of MPL and RIBI adjuvants. To determine the breadth of immunity, rabbits were immunized three times with AAVLP (HPV16/31L2) either alone, formulated with alum±MPL, or RIBI adjuvants, and after serum collection, the animals were concurrently challenged with HPV16/31/35/39/45/58/59 quasivirions or cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV) at 6 or 12 months post-immunization. Strong protection against all HPV types was observed at both 6 and 12 months post-immunization, including robust protection in rabbits receiving the vaccine without adjuvant. In summary, vaccination with AAVLP presenting HPV L2 17-36 epitopes at two sites on their surface induced cross-neutralizing serum antibody, immunity against HPV16 in the genital tract, and long-term protection against skin challenge with the 7 most common oncogenic HPV types when using a clinically relevant adjuvant.

  11. Durable immunity to oncogenic human papillomaviruses elicited by adjuvanted recombinant Adeno-associated virus-like particle immunogen displaying L2 17-36 epitopes.

    PubMed

    Jagu, Subhashini; Karanam, Balusubramanyam; Wang, Joshua W; Zayed, Hatem; Weghofer, Margit; Brendle, Sarah A; Balogh, Karla K; Tossi, Kerstin Pino; Roden, Richard B S; Christensen, Neil D

    2015-10-13

    Vaccination with the minor capsid protein L2, notably the 17-36 neutralizing epitope, induces broadly protective antibodies, although the neutralizing titers attained in serum are substantially lower than for the licensed L1 VLP vaccines. Here we examine the impact of other less reactogenic adjuvants upon the induction of durable neutralizing serum antibody responses and protective immunity after vaccination with HPV16 and HPV31 L2 amino acids 17-36 inserted at positions 587 and 453 of VP3, respectively, for surface display on Adeno-Associated Virus 2-like particles [AAVLP (HPV16/31L2)]. Mice were vaccinated three times subcutaneously with AAVLP (HPV16/31L2) at two week intervals at several doses either alone or formulated with alum, alum and MPL, RIBI adjuvant or Cervarix. The use of adjuvant with AAVLP (HPV16/31L2) was necessary in mice for the induction of L2-specific neutralizing antibody and protection against vaginal challenge with HPV16. While use of alum was sufficient to elicit durable protection (>3 months after the final immunization), antibody titers were increased by addition of MPL and RIBI adjuvants. To determine the breadth of immunity, rabbits were immunized three times with AAVLP (HPV16/31L2) either alone, formulated with alum±MPL, or RIBI adjuvants, and after serum collection, the animals were concurrently challenged with HPV16/31/35/39/45/58/59 quasivirions or cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV) at 6 or 12 months post-immunization. Strong protection against all HPV types was observed at both 6 and 12 months post-immunization, including robust protection in rabbits receiving the vaccine without adjuvant. In summary, vaccination with AAVLP presenting HPV L2 17-36 epitopes at two sites on their surface induced cross-neutralizing serum antibody, immunity against HPV16 in the genital tract, and long-term protection against skin challenge with the 7 most common oncogenic HPV types when using a clinically relevant adjuvant. PMID:26382603

  12. Durable immunity to oncogenic human papillomaviruses elicited by adjuvanted recombinant Adeno-associated virus-like particle immunogen displaying L2 17–36 epitopes

    PubMed Central

    Jagu, Subhashini; Karanam, Balusubramanyam; Wang, Joshua W.; Zayed, Hatem; Weghofer, Margit; Brendle, Sarah A.; Balogh, Karla K.; Tossi, Kerstin Pino; Roden, Richard B.S.; Christensen, Neil D.

    2016-01-01

    Vaccination with the minor capsid protein L2, notably the 17–36 neutralizing epitope, induces broadly protective antibodies, although the neutralizing titers attained in serum are substantially lower than for the licensed L1 VLP vaccines. Here we examine the impact of other less reactogenic adjuvants upon the induction of durable neutralizing serum antibody responses and protective immunity after vaccination with HPV16 and HPV31 L2 amino acids 17–36 inserted at positions 587 and 453 of VP3, respectively, for surface display on Adeno-Associated Virus 2-like particles [AAVLP (HPV16/31L2)]. Mice were vaccinated three times subcutaneously with AAVLP (HPV16/31L2) at two week intervals at several doses either alone or formulated with alum, alum and MPL, RIBI adjuvant or Cervarix. The use of adjuvant with AAVLP (HPV16/31L2) was necessary in mice for the induction of L2-specific neutralizing antibody and protection against vaginal challenge with HPV16. While use of alum was sufficient to elicit durable protection (>3 months after the final immunization), antibody titers were increased by addition of MPL and RIBI adjuvants. To determine the breadth of immunity, rabbits were immunized three times with AAVLP (HPV16/31L2) either alone, formulated with alum ± MPL, or RIBI adjuvants, and after serum collection, the animals were concurrently challenged with HPV16/31/35/39/45/58/59 quasivirions or cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV) at 6 or 12 months post-immunization. Strong protection against all HPV types was observed at both 6 and 12 months post-immunization, including robust protection in rabbits receiving the vaccine without adjuvant. In summary, vaccination with AAVLP presenting HPV L2 17–36 epitopes at two sites on their surface induced cross-neutralizing serum antibody, immunity against HPV16 in the genital tract, and long-term protection against skin challenge with the 7 most common oncogenic HPV types when using a clinically relevant adjuvant. PMID:26382603

  13. HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Health Topics Mammography Women and Diabetes HPV, HIV, Birth Control Heart Health for Women Pregnancy Menopause More Women's Health Topics Resources for You Human Papillomavirus Vaccine HPV Information in Other Languages Women ...

  14. Papillomaviruses and human disease

    SciTech Connect

    Syrjanen, K.; Gissman, L.; Koss, L.G.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 17 selections. Some of the titles are: Papillomaviruses: particles, genome organization and proteins; Physical state of papillomavirus DNA in tumors; Transforming and regulatory functions of bovine papillomavirus Type 1; and Transcription of papillomavirus genomes.

  15. [Network Research on Human Papillomavirus].

    PubMed

    Almeida-Gutiérrez, Eduardo; Paniagua, Ramón; Furuya, María ElenaYuriko

    2015-01-01

    In order to increase the research in important health questions at a national and institutional levels, the Human Papillomavirus Research Network of the Health Research Coordination of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social offers this supplement with the purpose of assisting patients that daily look for attention due to the human papillomavirus or to cervical cancer.

  16. Nongenital human papillomavirus disease.

    PubMed

    Mayeaux, E J; Khan, Michelle J

    2013-06-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common viral cause of cancer, and is responsible for 5% of cancers worldwide. Following demonstration of the causative link between HPV and cervical cancer, HPV has been shown to be associated with several anogenital malignancies and with oral pharyngeal cancers. HPV-related anal and oral pharyngeal disease is rising in incidence and includes anal warts and neoplasia, recurrent respiratory papillomatosis, and oral pharyngeal neoplasia. This article presents an overview of the epidemiology, clinical manifestations, diagnosis, and treatment of nongenital HPV-related disease.

  17. A Multimeric L2 Vaccine for Prevention of Animal Papillomavirus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Jagu, Subhashini; Malandro, Nicole; Kwak, Kihyuck; Yuan, Hang; Schlegel, Richard; Palmer, Kenneth E; Huh, Warner K; Campo, M Saveria; Roden, Richard BS

    2011-01-01

    It is unclear what level of neutralizing antibody is sufficient to protect cattle from experimental bovine papillomavirus type 4 (BPV4) challenge. Markedly lower, and often undetected, serum neutralizing antibody titers were associated with protection in cattle vaccinated with BPV4 L2 as compared to L1 VLP. We hypothesized that vaccination with concatemers of the N-terminal protective epitopes of L2 derived from multiple animal papillomavirus types would enhance the breadth and strength of immunity. Therefore we generated a multimeric L2 antigen derived from three bovine and three canine papillomavirus types with divergent phenotypes and purified it from bacteria. Mice vaccinated three times with this six type L2 vaccine formulated in alum or RIBI adjuvant generated robust serum neutralizing antibody titers against BPV1, BPV4 and canine oral papillomavirus (COPV). Furthermore, vaccination with this six type L2 vaccine formulated in alum, like BPV1 L1 VLP, protected the mice from experimental challenge with BPV1 pseudovirus. PMID:21920572

  18. A multimeric L2 vaccine for prevention of animal papillomavirus infections.

    PubMed

    Jagu, Subhashini; Malandro, Nicole; Kwak, Kihyuck; Yuan, Hang; Schlegel, Richard; Palmer, Kenneth E; Huh, Warner K; Campo, M Saveria; Roden, Richard B S

    2011-11-10

    It is unclear what level of neutralizing antibody is sufficient to protect cattle from experimental bovine papillomavirus type 4 (BPV4) challenge. Markedly lower, and often undetected, serum neutralizing antibody titers were associated with protection in cattle vaccinated with BPV4 L2 as compared to L1 VLP. We hypothesized that vaccination with concatemers of the N-terminal protective epitopes of L2 derived from multiple animal papillomavirus types would enhance the breadth and strength of immunity. Therefore we generated a multimeric L2 antigen derived from three bovine and three canine papillomavirus types with divergent phenotypes and purified it from bacteria. Mice vaccinated three times with this six type L2 vaccine formulated in alum or RIBI adjuvant generated robust serum neutralizing antibody titers against BPV1, BPV4 and canine oral papillomavirus (COPV). Furthermore, vaccination with this six type L2 vaccine formulated in adjuvant, like BPV1 L1 VLP, protected the mice from experimental challenge with BPV1 pseudovirus. PMID:21920572

  19. Developing vaccines against minor capsid antigen L2 to prevent papillomavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Karanam, Balasubramanyam; Jagu, Subhashini; Huh, Warner K.; Roden, Richard B.S.

    2011-01-01

    A subset of human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes is responsible for ~5% of all cancer deaths globally, and uterine cervical carcinoma accounts for the majority of these cases. Their impact is greatest for women who do not have access to effective secondary preventive measures, and consequently over 80% of cervical cancer deaths worldwide occur in Developing nations. The understanding that persistent infection by this ‘oncogenic’ subset of HPV genotypes is necessary for the development of cervical carcinoma has driven the development of preventive vaccines. Two preventive vaccines comprising recombinant HPV L1 virus-like particles (VLPs) have been licensed. However, the current cost of these vaccines precludes global delivery, and they target only two of the ~15 known oncogenic HPV types, although ~70% of cervical cancer cases are attributed to these two types and there is evidence for some degree of cross-protection against other closely related types. A possible approach to broader immunity at lower cost is to consider vaccination against L2. L2 vaccines can be produced inexpensively and they also have the promise of conferring much broader cross-type protective immunity than observed with L1 VLP immunization. However, L2 vaccine development lags behind L1 VLP vaccines and several technical hurdles remain. PMID:19421199

  20. Human papillomaviruses and cancer.

    PubMed

    Haedicke, Juliane; Iftner, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are small oncogenic DNA viruses of which more than 200 types have been identified to date. A small subset of these is etiologically linked to the development of anogenital malignancies such as cervical cancer. In addition, recent studies established a causative relationship between these high-risk HPV types and tonsillar and oropharyngeal cancer. Clinical management of cervical cancer and head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) is largely standardized and involves surgical removal of the tumor tissue as well as adjuvant chemoradiation therapy. Notably, the response to therapeutic intervention of HPV-positive HNSCCs has been found to be better as compared to HPV-negative tumors. Although the existing HPV vaccine is solely licensed for the prevention of cervical cancer, it might also have prophylactic potential for the development of high-risk HPV-associated HNSCCs. Another group of viruses, which belongs to the beta-HPV subgroup, has been implicated in nonmelanoma skin cancer, however, the etiology remains to be established. Treatment of HPV-induced nonmelanoma skin cancer is based on local excision. However, topically applied immune-modulating substances represent non-surgical alternatives for the management of smaller cutaneous tumors. In this review we present the current knowledge of the role of HPV in cancer development and discuss clinical management options as well as targets for the development of future intervention therapies.

  1. The biology of human papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Harrison P; Ramírez-Fort, Marigdalia K; Rady, Peter L

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are small, double-stranded DNA viruses that cause lesions in cutaneous and mucosal tissue and are responsible for carcinomas of the cervix, vagina, vulva and penis. HPVs sort into 5 genera with a total of approximately 150 species that have been sequenced. Its genome is comprised of an early (E) region encoding the viral regulatory proteins, a late (L) region encoding the viral structural proteins and a noncoding region that is essential to the viral life cycle. For infection to occur, the virus must access the basal epidermal layer where, following endocytosis and viral capsid disassembly, the L2 protein mediates viral genome transfer to the nuclei of mitotic keratinocytes. The viral genome is maintained in episomal form during the normal life cycle and replicates in synchrony with the host cell DNA under the mediation of E1, E2, E4 and E5 viral proteins. In most high-grade cervical neoplasms, however, the viral DNA is integrated into the host genome through the disruption of the E2 open reading frame. The oncoproteins E6 and E7, which were previously suppressed by E2, are then free to inhibit the Rb and p53 tumor suppressor pathways. The viral life cycle concludes with the packaging of the viral genome and virus release, which entails the E2-mediated recruitment of L2 to regions of replication, the expression of L1 and the assembly of the icosahedral capsid in the nucleus. Overall, the complex biology of HPV continues to be an important area of research with substantial implications for public health.

  2. Oral Human Papillomavirus Infection in Children.

    PubMed

    Ilea, Aranka; Boşca, Bianca; Miclăuş, Viorel; Rus, Vasile; Băbţan, Anida Maria; Mesaros, Anca; Crişan, Bogdan; Câmpian, Radu Septimiu

    2016-02-01

    Oral human papillomavirus infection is rare in children, but the presence of a villous lesion with slow but continuous growth concerns parents, who need information and therapeutic solutions from the physician. All these aspects are discussed based on a case report of a 9-year-old child with an oral human papillomavirus infection.

  3. Vaccines and immunization against human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Christensen, Neil D; Budgeon, Lynn R

    2014-01-01

    Prophylactic and therapeutic immunization strategies are an effective method to control human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated diseases and cancers. Current protective virus-like particle and capsid-based vaccines are highly protective against vaccine-matched HPV types, and continued improvements in second-generation vaccines will lead to broader protection and cross-protection against the cancer-associated types. Increasing the effectiveness of broadly cross-protective L2-based immunogens will require adjuvants that activate innate immunity to thus enhance adaptive immunity. Therapeutic immunization strategies are needed to control and cure clinical disease and HPV-associated cancers. Significant advances in strategies to improve induction of cell-mediated immunity to HPV early (and capsid) proteins have been pretested in preclinical animal papillomavirus models. Several of these effective protocols have translated into successful therapeutic immune-mediated clearance of clinical lesions. Nevertheless, there are significant challenges in activating immunity to cancer-associated lesions due to various immune downregulatory events that are triggered by persistent HPV infections. A better understanding of immune responses to HPV lesions in situ is needed to optimize immune effector T cells that efficiently locate to sites of infection and which should lead to an effective immunotherapeutic management of this important human viral pathogen. The most effective immunization strategy may well require combination antiviral and immunotherapeutic treatments to achieve complete clearance of HPV infections and associated cancers. PMID:24643192

  4. Epigenetics of human papillomaviruses

    SciTech Connect

    Johannsen, Eric; Lambert, Paul F.

    2013-10-15

    Human papilllomaviruses (HPVs) are common human pathogens that infect cutaneous or mucosal epithelia in which they cause warts, self-contained benign lesions that commonly regress. The HPV life cycle is intricately tied to the differentiation of the host epithelium it infects. Mucosotropic HPVs are the most common sexually transmitted pathogen known to mankind. A subset of the mucosotropic HPVs, so-called high risk HPVs, is etiologically associated with numerous cancers of the anogenital tract, most notably the cervix, as well as a growing fraction of head and neck cancers. In these cancers, the HPV genome, which normally exists an a double stranded, circular, nuclear plasmid, is commonly found integrated into the host genome and expresses two viral oncogenes, E6 and E7, that are implicated in the development and maintainance of the cancers caused by these high risk HPVs. Numerous studies, primarily on the high risk HPV16, have documented that the methylation status of the viral genome changes not only in the context of the viral life cycle but also in the context of the progressive neoplastic disease that culminates in cancer. In this article, we summarize the knowledge gained from those studies. We also provide the first analysis of available ChIP-seq data on the occupancy of both epigentically modified histones as well as transcription factors on the high risk HPV18 genome in the context of HeLa cells, a cervical cancer-derived cell line that has been the subject of extensive analyses using this technique. - Highlights: • Methylation status of HPV genomes is dynamic. • Changes are seen in both the viral life cycle and neoplasia. • Histone modification status at LCR is predictive of transcription factor occupancy. • Novel transcription factor binding noted by ChIP-seq.

  5. Anorectal human papillomavirus: current concepts.

    PubMed

    Assi, Roland; Reddy, Vikram; Einarsdottir, Hulda; Longo, Walter E

    2014-12-01

    Increased anorectal human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is related to the recent trends in sexual behavior in both homosexual and heterosexual groups and prevalence of infection with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Clinical presentation and natural history depend on the serotype involved. HPV 6 and 11 are found in the benign wart. Local control can be achieved with a wide selection of surgical and topical techniques. HPV 16, 18, and 31 are found in dysplastic lesions and have the potential to progress to invasive anal squamous cell carcinoma. Recognition and early management of dysplastic lesions is crucial to prevent the morbidity and mortality associated with anal cancer. While low-grade lesions can be closely observed, high-grade lesions should be eradicated. Different strategies can be used to eradicate the disease while preserving anorectal function. Studies on the efficacy of vaccination on anorectal HPV showed promising results in select population groups and led to the recent expansion of current vaccination recommendations.

  6. [Apoptosis modulation by human papillomavirus].

    PubMed

    Jave-Suárez, Luis Felipe; Ratkovich-González, Sarah; Olimón-Andalón, Vicente; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important processes to keep the homeostasis in organisms is the apoptosis, also called programmed cell death. This mechanism works through two pathways: The intrinsic or mitochondrial, which responds to DNA damage and extern agents like UV radiation; and the extrinsic or receptor-mediated, which binds to their ligands to initiate the apoptotic trail. The evasion of apoptosis is one of the main causes of cellular transformation to malignity. Many viruses had shown capacity to modify the apoptotic process; among them is the human papillomavirus, which, by means of its oncoproteins, interferes in pathways, reacting with the receptors and molecules and participating in the death mechanism. This creates ideal conditions for cancer development.

  7. Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Quadrivalent Vaccine

    Cancer.gov

    This page contains brief information about recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) quadrivalent vaccine and a collection of links to more information about the use of this vaccine, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  8. Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Bivalent Vaccine

    Cancer.gov

    This page contains brief information about recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) bivalent vaccine and a collection of links to more information about the use of this vaccine, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  9. Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Nonavalent Vaccine

    Cancer.gov

    This page contains brief information about recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) nonavalent vaccine and a collection of links to more information about the use of this vaccine, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  10. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine (Gardasil-9)

    MedlinePlus

    ... vaccinated?Gardasil-9 prevents many cancers caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infections, including:cervical cancer in females vaginal and ... Gardasil-9 can prevent most of these cancers. HPV infection usually comes from sexual contact, and most ...

  11. Human papillomaviruses-related cancers

    PubMed Central

    Al Moustafa, Ala-Eddin; Al-Awadhi, Rana; Missaoui, Nabiha; Adam, Ishag; Durusoy, Raika; Ghabreau, Lina; Akil, Nizar; Ahmed, Hussain Gadelkarim; Yasmeen, Amber; Alsbeih, Ghazi

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are estimated to be the most common sexually transmitted infections worldwide. Meanwhile, it is well established that infection by high-risk HPVs is considered the major cause of cervical cancer since more than 96% of these cancers are positive for high-risk HPVs, especially types 16 and 18. Moreover, during the last 2 decades, numerous studies pointed-out the possible involvement of high-risk HPV in several human carcinomas including head and neck, colorectal and breast cancers. The association between high-risk HPVs and cervical cancer and potentially other human malignancies would necessitate the introduction of vaccines which were generated against the 2 most frequent high-risk HPVs (types 16 and 18) worldwide, including the Middle East (ME) as well as North African countries. The presence of high-risk HPVs in the pathogenesis of human cancers in the ME, which is essential in order to evaluate the importance of vaccination against HPVs, has not been fully investigated yet. In this review, we present an overview of the existing epidemiological evidence regarding the presence of HPV in human cancers in the ME and the potential impact of vaccination against HPV infections and its outcome on human health in this region. PMID:25424787

  12. Bovine and human papillomaviruses: a comparative review.

    PubMed

    Munday, J S

    2014-11-01

    Fifty years ago, inoculation with bovine papillomavirus (BPV) was found to cause mesenchymal tumors of the skin in cattle and horses, as well as tumors of the bladder in cattle. Subsequent to these studies of BPVs, human papillomaviruses (HPVs) were found to cause cervical cancer resulting in intense research into papillomaviruses. During the past 50 years, the ways that HPVs and BPVs cause disease have been investigated, and both HPVs and BPVs have been associated with an increasingly diverse range of diseases. Herein, the biology, oncogenic mechanisms, and diseases associated with BPVs are compared with those of HPVs. As reviewed, there are currently significant differences between BPVs and HPVs. However, research 50 years ago into BPVs formed a prologue for the recognition that papillomaviruses have a significant role in human disease, and it is possible that future research may similarly reveal that BPVs are less different from HPVs than is currently recognized.

  13. Next generation prophylactic human papillomavirus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Schiller, John T; Müller, Martin

    2015-05-01

    The two licensed bivalent and quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) L1 (the major papillomavirus virion protein) virus-like particle (VLP) vaccines are regarded as safe, effective, and well established prophylactic vaccines. However, they have some inherent limitations, including a fairly high production and delivery cost, virus-type restricted protection, and no reported therapeutic activity, which might be addressed with the development of alternative dosing schedules and vaccine products. A change from a three-dose to a two-dose protocol for the licensed HPV vaccines, especially in younger adolescents (aged 9-13 years), is underway in several countries and is likely to become the future norm. Preliminary evidence suggests that recipients of HPV vaccines might derive prophylactic benefits from one dose of the bivalent vaccine. Substantial interest exists in both the academic and industrial sectors in the development of second-generation L1 VLP vaccines in terms of cost reduction-eg, by production in Escherichia coli or alternative types of yeast. However, Merck's nonavalent vaccine, produced via the Saccharomyces cerevisiae production system that is also used for their quadrivalent vaccine, is the first second-generation HPV VLP vaccine to be available on the market. By contrast, other pharmaceutical companies are developing microbial vectors that deliver L1 genes. These two approaches would add an HPV component to existing live attenuated vaccines for measles and typhoid fever. Prophylactic vaccines that are based on induction of broadly cross-neutralising antibodies to L2, the minor HPV capsid protein, are also being developed both as simple monomeric fusion proteins and as virus-like display vaccines. The strong interest in developing the next generation of vaccines, particularly by manufacturers in middle-to-high income countries, increases the likelihood that vaccine production will become decentralised with the hope that effective HPV vaccines will be

  14. Next generation prophylactic human papillomavirus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Schiller, John T; Müller, Martin

    2015-05-01

    The two licensed bivalent and quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) L1 (the major papillomavirus virion protein) virus-like particle (VLP) vaccines are regarded as safe, effective, and well established prophylactic vaccines. However, they have some inherent limitations, including a fairly high production and delivery cost, virus-type restricted protection, and no reported therapeutic activity, which might be addressed with the development of alternative dosing schedules and vaccine products. A change from a three-dose to a two-dose protocol for the licensed HPV vaccines, especially in younger adolescents (aged 9-13 years), is underway in several countries and is likely to become the future norm. Preliminary evidence suggests that recipients of HPV vaccines might derive prophylactic benefits from one dose of the bivalent vaccine. Substantial interest exists in both the academic and industrial sectors in the development of second-generation L1 VLP vaccines in terms of cost reduction-eg, by production in Escherichia coli or alternative types of yeast. However, Merck's nonavalent vaccine, produced via the Saccharomyces cerevisiae production system that is also used for their quadrivalent vaccine, is the first second-generation HPV VLP vaccine to be available on the market. By contrast, other pharmaceutical companies are developing microbial vectors that deliver L1 genes. These two approaches would add an HPV component to existing live attenuated vaccines for measles and typhoid fever. Prophylactic vaccines that are based on induction of broadly cross-neutralising antibodies to L2, the minor HPV capsid protein, are also being developed both as simple monomeric fusion proteins and as virus-like display vaccines. The strong interest in developing the next generation of vaccines, particularly by manufacturers in middle-to-high income countries, increases the likelihood that vaccine production will become decentralised with the hope that effective HPV vaccines will be

  15. Adolescent Male Human Papillomavirus Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Nanagas, Vivian C.; Stolfi, Adrienne; Nanagas, Maria T.; Eberhart, Gregory M.; Alter, Sherman J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To determine male vaccination rates with quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV4) before and after the October 2011 national recommendation to routinely immunize adolescent males. Methods. We reviewed HPV4 dose 1 (HPV4-1) uptake in 292 adolescent males in our urban clinic prior to national recommendations and followed-up for HPV4 series completion rates. After national recommendation, 248 urban clinic and 247 suburban clinic males were reviewed for HPV4-1 uptake. Factors associated with HPV4-1 refusal were determined with multiple logistic regression. Results. Of the initial 292 males, 78% received HPV4-1 and 38% received the 3-dose series. After recommendation, HPV4-1 uptake was 59% and 7% in urban and suburban clinics, respectively. Variables associated with HPV4-1 uptake/refusal included time period, race, type of insurance, and receipt of concurrent vaccines. Conclusions. HPV4-1 vaccination rates in our urban clinic were high before and after routine HPV vaccine recommendations for adolescent males. Our vaccination rates were much higher than in a suburban practice. PMID:27336012

  16. Human papillomaviruses and skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Smola, Sigrun

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) infect squamous epithelia and can induce hyperproliferative lesions. More than 120 different HPV types have been characterized and classified into five different genera. While mucosal high-risk HPVs have a well-established causal role in anogenital carcinogenesis, the biology of cutaneous HPVs is less well understood. The clinical relevance of genus beta-PV infection has clearly been demonstrated in patients suffering from epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV), a rare inherited disease associated with ahigh rate of skin cancer. In the normal population genus beta-PV are suspected to have an etiologic role in skin carcinogenesis as well but this is still controversially discussed. Their oncogenic potency has been investigated in mouse models and in vitro. In 2009, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classified the genus beta HPV types 5 and 8 as "possible carcinogenic" biological agents (group 2B) in EV disease. This chapter will give an overview on the knowns and unknowns of infections with genus beta-PV and discuss their potential impact on skin carcinogenesis in the general population.

  17. [Genetic regulation of human genital papillomaviruses].

    PubMed

    Alvarez-Salas, L M; López-Bayghen, E

    1995-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) specifically infect stratified epithelial cells, causing benign and malignant neoplasia. Several elements directing this virus' genetic expression are present in a non-coding region called LCR. HPV infection starts in the basal cells of stratified epithelia, where a particular combination of cellular factors interacting with the LCR starts the transcription of the viral E6 and E7 oncogenes. The E6 and E7 genes alter the cell cycle because they interact and inactivate tumor suppressor proteins: E6 binds and degrades protein p53 and E7 associates with p105RB. E1 and E2 are the next synthesized proteins. E2 blocks the early transcription and permits E1 specific binding to the viral origin of replication located within the LCR, initiating the viral genome replication. Following the course of viral infection, the E2-induced E6 and E7 down-regulation releases p53 and p105RB proteins, and the differentiation process can continue. Then, a putative late promoter can activate the capsid genes L1 and L2. At this step, mature virions can be detected in the upper layers of the epithelium. Disruption in E2 gene transcription is usually associated to genital malignant neoplasia. In the absence of E2, E6 and E7 remain constitutively expressed, sustaining the immortality of the infected cell and blocking the epithelial differentiation program.

  18. Global challenges of implementing human papillomavirus vaccines

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus vaccines are widely hailed as a sweeping pharmaceutical innovation for the universal benefit of all women. The implementation of the vaccines, however, is far from universal or equitable. Socio-economically marginalized women in emerging and developing, and many advanced economies alike, suffer a disproportionately large burden of cervical cancer. Despite the marketing of Human Papillomavirus vaccines as the solution to cervical cancer, the market authorization (licensing) of the vaccines has not translated into universal equitable access. Vaccine implementation for vulnerable girls and women faces multiple barriers that include high vaccine costs, inadequate delivery infrastructure, and lack of community engagement to generate awareness about cervical cancer and early screening tools. For Human Papillomavirus vaccines to work as a public health solution, the quality-assured delivery of cheaper vaccines must be integrated with strengthened capacity for community-based health education and screening. PMID:21718495

  19. Genetic alterations by human papillomaviruses in oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lazo, P A; Gallego, M I; Ballester, S; Feduchi, E

    1992-03-30

    The integration sites in the cellular genome of human papillomavirus are located in chromosomal regions always associated with oncogenes or other known tumor phenotypes. Two regions, 8q24 and 12q13, are common to several cases of cervical carcinoma and can have integrated more than one type of papillomavirus DNA. These two chromosomal regions contain several genes implicated in oncogenesis. These observations strongly imply that viral integration sites of DNA tumor viruses can be used as the access point to chromosomal regions where genes implicated in the tumor phenotype are located, a situation similar to that of non-transforming retroviruses.

  20. Human papillomavirus type 13 infecting the conjunctiva.

    PubMed

    Benevides dos Santos, Paulo José; Borborema dos Santos, Cristina Maria; Rufino Mendonça, Rosângela; Vieira do Carmo, Maria Auxiliadora; Astofi-Filho, Spartaco

    2005-09-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH) is a rare infection caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) types 13 or 32 believed to infect exclusively oral mucosa. This report illustrates a case of multiple conjunctival papillomas similar to oral FEH caused by HPV-13, consisting in the first description of its infection outside the oral mucosa in a healthy patient.

  1. Four historic legends in human papillomaviruses research.

    PubMed

    Mammas, Ioannis N; Spandidos, Demetrios A

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) infection and HPVs-associated lesions, including skin warts in children and adults and cervical neoplasia in women, have been excessively studied since ancient years. In our article, we present briefly four major researchers from the HPVs pre-vaccination historic period: Hippokrates the Asclepiad, Domenico Antonio Rigoni-Stern, George N. Papanicolaou and Harald zur Hausen.

  2. Human Papillomavirus: A Catalyst to a Killer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richman, Alice

    2005-01-01

    Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most prevalent and widespread sexually transmitted disease and is responsible for almost all cases of cervical cancer worldwide. However, HPV has received little public health attention, is not a reportable STD, and often is absent from the repertoire of STDs. In addition, there is pervasive misinformation…

  3. Capsomer Vaccines Protect Mice from Vaginal Challenge with Human Papillomavirus

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wai-Hong; Gersch, Elizabeth; Kwak, Kihyuck; Jagu, Subhashini; Karanam, Balasubramanyam; Huh, Warner K.; Garcea, Robert L.; Roden, Richard B. S.

    2011-01-01

    Capsomers were produced in bacteria as glutathione-S-transferase (GST) fusion proteins with human papillomavirus type 16 L1 lacking the first nine and final 29 residues (GST-HPV16L1Δ) alone or linked with residues 13–47 of HPV18, HPV31 and HPV45 L2 in tandem (GST-HPV16L1Δ-L2x3). Subcutaneous immunization of mice with GST-HPV16L1Δ or GST-HPV16L1Δ-L2x3 in alum and monophosphoryl lipid A induced similarly high titers of HPV16 neutralizing antibodies. GST-HPV16L1Δ-L2x3 also elicited moderate L2-specific antibody titers. Intravaginal challenge studies showed that immunization of mice with GST-HPV16 L1Δ or GST-HPV16L1Δ-L2x3 capsomers, like Cervarix®, provided complete protection against HPV16. Conversely, vaccination with GST-HPV16 L1Δ capsomers failed to protect against HPV18 challenge, whereas mice immunized with either GST-HPV16L1Δ-L2x3 capsomers or Cervarix® were each completely protected. Thus, while the L2-specific response was moderate, it did not interfere with immunity to L1 in the context of GST-HPV16L1Δ-L2x3 and is sufficient to mediate L2-dependent protection against an experimental vaginal challenge with HPV18. PMID:22069498

  4. Production of Furin-cleaved Papillomavirus Pseudovirions and their use for in vitro neutralization assays of L1 or L2-specific antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Joshua W; Matsui, Ken; Pan, Yuanji; Kwak, Kihyuck; Peng, Shiwen; Kemp, Troy; Pinto, Ligia; Roden, Richard B.S

    2015-01-01

    Immunization with Human Papillomavirus (HPV) L1 virus-like particles or L2 capsid protein elicits neutralizing antibodies that mediate protection. A high throughput and sensitive in vitro neutralization assay is therefore valuable for prophylactic HPV vaccine studies. Over several hours during infection of the genital tract, virions take on a distinct intermediate conformation, including a required furin cleavage of L2 at its N-terminus. This intermediate is an important target for neutralization by L2-specific antibody, but it is very transiently exposed during in vitro infection of most cell lines resulting in insensitive measurement for L2, but not L1-specific neutralizing antibodies. To model this intermediate, we describe a protocol to generate furin-cleaved HPV pseudovirions (fc-PsV) which deliver an encapsidated reporter plasmid to facilitate infectivity measurements. We also describe a protocol for use of fc-PsV in a high throughput in vitro neutralization assay for the sensitive measurement of both L1 and L2-specific neutralizing antibodies. PMID:26237105

  5. Production of Furin-Cleaved Papillomavirus Pseudovirions and Their Use for In Vitro Neutralization Assays of L1- or L2-Specific Antibodies.

    PubMed

    Wang, Joshua W; Matsui, Ken; Pan, Yuanji; Kwak, Kihyuck; Peng, Shiwen; Kemp, Troy; Pinto, Ligia; Roden, Richard B S

    2015-08-03

    Immunization with Human Papillomavirus (HPV) L1 virus-like particles or L2 capsid protein elicits neutralizing antibodies that mediate protection. A high-throughput and sensitive in vitro neutralization assay is therefore valuable for prophylactic HPV vaccine studies. Over several hours during infection of the genital tract, virions take on a distinct intermediate conformation, including a required furin cleavage of L2 at its N-terminus. This intermediate is an important target for neutralization by L2-specific antibody, but it is very transiently exposed during in vitro infection of most cell lines resulting in insensitive measurement for L2, but not L1-specific neutralizing antibodies. To model this intermediate, we describe a protocol to generate furin-cleaved HPV pseudovirions (fc-PsV), which deliver an encapsidated reporter plasmid to facilitate infectivity measurements. We also describe a protocol for use of fc-PsV in a high-throughput in vitro neutralization assay for the sensitive measurement of both L1 and L2-specific neutralizing antibodies.

  6. Human alpha and beta papillomaviruses use different synonymous codon profiles.

    PubMed

    Cladel, Nancy M; Bertotto, Alex; Christensen, Neil D

    2010-06-01

    Human papillomaviruses use rare codons relative to their hosts. It has been theorized that this is a mechanism to allow the virus to escape immune surveillance. In the present study, we examined the codings of four major genes of 21 human alpha (mucosatropic) viruses and 16 human beta (cutaneous-tropic) viruses. We compared the codon usage of different genes from a given papillomavirus and also the same genes from different papillomaviruses. Our data showed that codon usage was not always uniform between two genes of a given papillomavirus or between the same genes of papillomaviruses from different genera. We speculate as to why this might be and conclude that codon usage in the papillomaviruses may not only play a role in facilitating escape from immune surveillance but may also underlie some of the unanswered questions in the papillomavirus field.

  7. Target Cell Cyclophilins Facilitate Human Papillomavirus Type 16 Infection

    PubMed Central

    Sapp, Martin

    2009-01-01

    Following attachment to primary receptor heparan sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG), human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) particles undergo conformational changes affecting the major and minor capsid proteins, L1 and L2, respectively. This results in exposure of the L2 N-terminus, transfer to uptake receptors, and infectious internalization. Here, we report that target cell cyclophilins, peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerases, are required for efficient HPV16 infection. Cell surface cyclophilin B (CyPB) facilitates conformational changes in capsid proteins, resulting in exposure of the L2 N-terminus. Inhibition of CyPB blocked HPV16 infection by inducing noninfectious internalization. Mutation of a putative CyP binding site present in HPV16 L2 yielded exposed L2 N-terminus in the absence of active CyP and bypassed the need for cell surface CyPB. However, this mutant was still sensitive to CyP inhibition and required CyP for completion of infection, probably after internalization. Taken together, these data suggest that CyP is required during two distinct steps of HPV16 infection. Identification of cell surface CyPB will facilitate the study of the complex events preceding internalization and adds a putative drug target for prevention of HPV–induced diseases. PMID:19629175

  8. Just implementation of human papillomavirus vaccination.

    PubMed

    Malmqvist, Erik; Natunen, Kari; Lehtinen, Matti; Helgesson, Gert

    2012-04-01

    Many countries are now implementing human papillomavirus vaccination. There is disagreement about who should receive the vaccine. Some propose vaccinating both boys and girls in order to achieve the largest possible public health impact. Others regard this approach as too costly and claim that only girls should be vaccinated. We question the assumption that decisions about human papillomavirus vaccination policy should rely solely on estimates of overall benefits and costs. There are important social justice aspects that also need to be considered. Policy makers should consider how to best protect individuals who will remain unvaccinated through no fault of their own. This is especially important if these individuals are already disadvantaged in other ways and if vaccinating other people increases their risk of infection.

  9. Animal papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Rector, Annabel; Van Ranst, Marc

    2013-10-01

    We provide an overview of the host range, taxonomic classification and genomic diversity of animal papillomaviruses. The complete genomes of 112 non-human papillomavirus types, recovered from 54 different host species, are currently available in GenBank. The recent characterizations of reptilian papillomaviruses extend the host range of the Papillomaviridae to include all amniotes. Although the genetically diverse papillomaviruses have a highly conserved genomic lay-out, deviations from this prototypic genome organization are observed in several animal papillomaviruses, and only the core ORFs E1, E2, L2 and L1 are present in all characterized papillomavirus genomes. The discovery of papilloma-polyoma hybrids BPCV1 and BPCV2, containing a papillomaviral late region but an early region encoding typical polyomaviral nonstructural proteins, and the detection of recombination breakpoints between the early and late coding regions of cetacean papillomaviruses, could indicate that early and late gene cassettes of papillomaviruses are relatively independent entities that can be interchanged by recombination.

  10. Human papillomavirus type 13 and pygmy chimpanzee papillomavirus type 1: comparison of the genome organizations.

    PubMed

    Van Ranst, M; Fuse, A; Fiten, P; Beuken, E; Pfister, H; Burk, R D; Opdenakker, G

    1992-10-01

    Human papillomavirus type 13(HPV-13) is associated with oral focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH) in humans. A recent epidemic of a FEH-like disease in a pygmy chimpanzee (Pan paniscus) colony allowed us to clone a novel papillomavirus genome. To assess the homology between HPV-13 and the pygmy chimpanzee papillomavirus type 1 (PCPV-1), the complete nucleotide sequences of both FEH-related viruses were determined. In both viruses, all eight major open reading frames were located on one strand and the genomic organization was similar to that of other mucosal papillomaviruses. The genomes of PCPV-1 and HPV-13 showed extensive overall sequence homology (85%). They could be classified, using phylogenetic analysis, together with HPV types 6, 11, 43, and 44 in a group associated with benign orogenital lesions. These data indicate that two phylogenetically related papillomaviruses can elicit similar pathology in different primate host species, reflecting viral genomic similarities.

  11. HPV vaccine (human papillomavirus) Cervarix - what you need to know

    MedlinePlus

    ... taken in its entirety from the CDC HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Cervarix® Vaccine Information Statement: www.cdc.gov/vaccines/ ... What is HPV? Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most ... in the United States. More than half of sexually active men and ...

  12. HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Gardasil Vaccine - What You Need to Know

    MedlinePlus

    ... taken in its entirety from the CDC HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Vaccine - Gardasil® Vaccine Information Statement (VIS): www.cdc. ... WHAT IS HPV? Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most ... in the United States. More than half of sexually active men and ...

  13. Association of human immunodeficiency virus-induced immunosuppression with human papillomavirus infection and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Henry, M J; Stanley, M W; Cruikshank, S; Carson, L

    1989-02-01

    Human papillomavirus infection plays an important causal role in cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and carcinoma. The rate of infection with human papillomavirus as well as the incidence of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and carcinoma are increased in immunosuppressed patients. We report a possible association between infection with human immunodeficiency virus and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia with human papillomavirus infection.

  14. Global Delivery of Human Papillomavirus Vaccines.

    PubMed

    Wigle, Jannah; Fontenot, Holly B; Zimet, Gregory D

    2016-02-01

    Worldwide, cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer among women. Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination, if broadly implemented, has the potential to significantly reduce global rates of morbidity and mortality associated with cervical and other HPV-related cancers. More than 100 countries around the world have licensed HPV vaccines. As of February, 2015, there were an estimated 80 national HPV immunization programs and 37 pilot programs. This article discusses global implementation of HPV vaccination programs and issues such as vaccine financing and different approaches to HPV vaccine delivery.

  15. [Infection therapeutic modalities in human papillomavirus].

    PubMed

    Carrillo Pacheco, Adia; Hernández Valencia, Marcelino; Hernández Quijano, Tomás; Zárate, Arturo

    2012-11-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) genital it can infect any mucous of the body and to cause cancer of the uterine cervix. Until recently specific treatments did not exist on this infection, for what had to destroy or to remove the injured tissue by diverse procedures, what could have obstetric repercussions in young women. Recently some surgical modalities and topical drugs have arisen, as well as of systemic employment that allow to arrive to the lesions difficult to approach, and have demonstrated good effectiveness to cure the infection for HPV, for what an analysis of the medical treatment of this infection type is made. PMID:23427640

  16. The human papillomavirus E7 oncoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin-Drubin, Margaret E. Muenger, Karl

    2009-02-20

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) E7 oncoprotein shares functional similarities with such proteins as adenovirus E1A and SV40 large tumor antigen. As one of only two viral proteins always expressed in HPV-associated cancers, E7 plays a central role in both the viral life cycle and carcinogenic transformation. In the HPV viral life cycle, E7 disrupts the intimate association between cellular differentiation and proliferation in normal epithelium, allowing for viral replication in cells that would no longer be in the dividing population. This function is directly reflected in the transforming activities of E7, including tumor initiation and induction of genomic instability.

  17. Clinical significance of human papillomavirus genotyping.

    PubMed

    Choi, Youn Jin; Park, Jong Sup

    2016-03-01

    Cervical cancer is the fourth most common cancer in women worldwide, and the human papillomavirus (HPV) is the main causative agent for its development. HPV is a heterogeneous virus, and a persistent infection with a high-risk HPV contributes to the development of cancer. In recent decades, great advances have been made in understanding the molecular biology of HPV, and HPV's significance in cervical cancer prevention and management has received increased attention. In this review, we discuss the role of HPV genotyping in cervical cancer by addressing: clinically important issues in HPV virology; the current application of HPV genotyping in clinical medicine; and potential future uses for HPV genotyping.

  18. Human papillomavirus-related basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder associated with genital tract human papillomavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Ginori, Alessandro; Barone, Aurora; Santopietro, Rosa; Barbanti, Gabriele; Cecconi, Filippo; Tripodi, Sergio Antonio

    2015-02-01

    Basaloid squamous cell carcinoma is a biologically aggressive neoplasm mainly found in the head and neck region. Recently, four cases of basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder have been reported, and three of them occurred in patients with neurogenic bladder, repeated catheterizations and human papillomavirus infection of the urinary tract. To the best of our knowledge, none of the patients affected by basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder described in the literature had documented genital involvement by human papillomavirus. Herein, we describe the case of a woman with neurogenic bladder affected by basaloid squamous cell carcinoma of the bladder and by a concomitant genital tract human papillomavirus infection.

  19. Cervical Human Papillomavirus Screening among Older Women

    PubMed Central

    Grainge, Matthew J.; Seth, Rashmi; Guo, Li; Neal, Keith R.; Coupland, Carol; Vryenhoef, Paul; Johnson, Jane; Jenkins, David

    2005-01-01

    Rates of acquisition and clearance of cervical human papillomavirus (HPV) during a 3-year period in women 51 years of age were compared with rates in younger women to provide data on cervical screening for women >50 years of age. Paired, cytologically negative, archived cervical smears taken 3 years apart from 710 women in Nottingham, United Kingdom, were retrieved and tested for HPV infection with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with GP5+/6+ primers. Seventy-one (21.3%) of 333 women 51 years of age who were HPV negative at baseline were positive 3 years later. This percentage was higher than the corresponding acquisition rates among women 21 (15.2%), 31 (14.1%), and 41 (13.3%) years of age, although these differences were not significant. This retrospective study shows that HPV-negative women >50 years of age can acquire HPV and, therefore, require cervical screening. PMID:16318718

  20. Oral contraceptives, human papillomavirus and cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    La Vecchia, Carlo; Boccia, Stefania

    2014-03-01

    Oncogenic human papillomavirus is the key determinant of cervical cancer, but other risk factors interact with it to define individual risk. Among these, there is oral contraceptive (OC) use. A quantitative review of the link between OCs and cervical cancer was performed. Long-term (>5 year) current or recent OC use has been related to an about two-fold excess risk of cervical cancer. Such an excess risk, however, levels off after stopping use, and approaches unity 10 or more years after stopping. The public health implications of OC use for cervical cancer are limited. In any case, such implications are greater in middle-income and low-income countries, as well as in central and eastern Europe and Latin America, where cervical cancer screening and control remain inadequate.

  1. New treatments for human papillomavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Santos, C; Pigem, R; Alsina, M

    2013-12-01

    Human papillomavirus infection is very common. In this article, we review the latest developments in the treatment of lesions caused by this virus, with a particular focus on anogenital warts. Sinecatechins and new imiquimod formulations are among the most significant new developments. Others include photodynamic therapy and intralesional immunotherapy, but there is insufficient evidence to recommend their routine use. Finally, while therapeutic vaccines and inhibitory molecules appear to hold great promise, they are still in the early phases of investigation. More studies are needed, and these should have similar designs, larger samples, and sufficiently long follow-up periods to enable the direct comparison of the short-term and long-term effectiveness of different treatment options.

  2. Human papillomavirus and gastrointestinal cancer: A review.

    PubMed

    Bucchi, Dania; Stracci, Fabrizio; Buonora, Nicola; Masanotti, Giuseppe

    2016-09-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections worldwide. Exposure to HPV is very common, and an estimated 65%-100% of sexually active adults are exposed to HPV in their lifetime. The majority of HPV infections are asymptomatic, but there is a 10% chance that individuals will develop a persistent infection and have an increased risk of developing a carcinoma. The International Agency for Research on Cancer has found that the following cancer sites have a strong causal relationship with HPV: cervix uteri, penis, vulva, vagina, anus and oropharynx, including the base of the tongue and the tonsils. However, studies of the aetiological role of HPV in colorectal and esophageal malignancies have conflicting results. The aim of this review was to organize recent evidence and issues about the association between HPV infection and gastrointestinal tumours with a focus on esophageal, colorectal and anal cancers. The ultimate goal was to highlight possible implications for prognosis and prevention. PMID:27672265

  3. Human papillomavirus and gastrointestinal cancer: A review

    PubMed Central

    Bucchi, Dania; Stracci, Fabrizio; Buonora, Nicola; Masanotti, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections worldwide. Exposure to HPV is very common, and an estimated 65%-100% of sexually active adults are exposed to HPV in their lifetime. The majority of HPV infections are asymptomatic, but there is a 10% chance that individuals will develop a persistent infection and have an increased risk of developing a carcinoma. The International Agency for Research on Cancer has found that the following cancer sites have a strong causal relationship with HPV: cervix uteri, penis, vulva, vagina, anus and oropharynx, including the base of the tongue and the tonsils. However, studies of the aetiological role of HPV in colorectal and esophageal malignancies have conflicting results. The aim of this review was to organize recent evidence and issues about the association between HPV infection and gastrointestinal tumours with a focus on esophageal, colorectal and anal cancers. The ultimate goal was to highlight possible implications for prognosis and prevention.

  4. Modulation of therapeutic sensitivity by human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Swick, Adam D; Chatterjee, Anirban; De Costa, Anna-Maria A; Kimple, Randall J

    2015-09-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are small double-stranded DNA viruses that pose significant public health concerns as the causative agent of approximately 5% of worldwide cancers. The HPV oncogenes E6 and E7 play key roles in carcinogenesis. In the last 15years there has been a significant increase in the incidence of HPV-related head and neck cancers arising primarily in the oropharynx. Patients with HPV-positive head and neck cancers (HNCs) have a significantly improved prognosis compared to those with HPV-negative disease. In this review we will discuss data suggesting how HPV oncogenes modulate both the intrinsic radiation sensitivity of HNCs and also have important effects upon the tumor microenvironment. Together, these findings contribute to the improved outcomes seen in patients with HPV-positive HNC. PMID:26364887

  5. Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection: a Mozambique overview.

    PubMed

    Pizzol, Damiano; Putoto, Giovanni; Chhaganlal, Kajal D

    2016-06-01

    Human Papillomavirus is agent of the most common sexually transmitted disease which is able to infect mucosal and cutaneous membranes of the anogenital region, upper aerodigestive tract, and other head and neck mucosal regions. Although mainly HPV infection can be asymptomatic and transient, it may persist and give rise to various lesions such as warts, condyloma dysplasia and cancers depending on low or high risk type of HPV infection. Moreover, growing recent evidence suggests a role of this virus in male and female fertility. To date no effective prevention, test, treatment and control strategies are provided for people in developing countries despite the reported high incidence of HPV both in women and men. This paper reviews the more recent literature about HPV infection highlighting epidemiology, related pathologies and possible fertility effects of HPV in male and female with particular attention to the Mozambique context.

  6. Human papillomavirus oncoproteins and apoptosis (Review)

    PubMed Central

    JIANG, PEIYUE; YUE, YING

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review the literature and identify the association between human papillomavirus (HPV) oncoproteins and apoptosis. HPV-associated apoptosis may be primarily blocked by a number of oncoproteins, including E5, E6 and E7. E5 protein protects cells from tumor necrosis factor-associated apoptosis; the oncoprotein E6 predominantly inhibits apoptosis through the p53 pathway; and oncoprotein E7 is involved in apoptosis activation and inhibition. In addition, HPV oncoproteins are involved in activating or repressing the transcription of E6/E7. In conclusion, HPV oncoproteins, including E5, E6 and E7 protein, may interfere with apoptosis via certain regulatory principles. PMID:24348754

  7. The role of human papillomaviruses in oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Mighty, Kristen K; Laimins, Laimonis A

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are the causative agents of cervical and other anogenital as well as oral cancers. Approximately fifty percent of virally induced cancers in the USA are associated with HPV infections. HPVs infect stratified epithelia and link productive replication with differentiation. The viral oncoproteins, E6, E7, and E5, play important roles in regulating viral functions during the viral life cycle and also contribute to the development of cancers. p53 and Rb are two major targets of the E6 and E7 oncoproteins, but additional cellular proteins also play important roles. E5 plays an auxiliary role in contributing to the development of cancers. This review will discuss the various targets of these viral proteins and what roles they play in viral pathogenesis.

  8. Human papillomavirus and gastrointestinal cancer: A review

    PubMed Central

    Bucchi, Dania; Stracci, Fabrizio; Buonora, Nicola; Masanotti, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections worldwide. Exposure to HPV is very common, and an estimated 65%-100% of sexually active adults are exposed to HPV in their lifetime. The majority of HPV infections are asymptomatic, but there is a 10% chance that individuals will develop a persistent infection and have an increased risk of developing a carcinoma. The International Agency for Research on Cancer has found that the following cancer sites have a strong causal relationship with HPV: cervix uteri, penis, vulva, vagina, anus and oropharynx, including the base of the tongue and the tonsils. However, studies of the aetiological role of HPV in colorectal and esophageal malignancies have conflicting results. The aim of this review was to organize recent evidence and issues about the association between HPV infection and gastrointestinal tumours with a focus on esophageal, colorectal and anal cancers. The ultimate goal was to highlight possible implications for prognosis and prevention. PMID:27672265

  9. Human papillomavirus types and recurrent cervical warts

    SciTech Connect

    Nuovo, G.J. ); Pedemonte, B.M. )

    1990-03-02

    The authors analyzed cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CINs) detected after cryotherapy to determine if recurrence is associated with the same human papillomavirus (HPV) type found in the original lesion. Eight women had detectable HPV DNA in CINs that occurred after ablation of another CIN, and for each patient the HPV type in the pretreatment lesion was different from that in the CIN that appeared after cryotherapy. This compares with 12 women who had HPV detected in two or more CINs present at the same time, 11 of whom had the same HPv type noted. they concluded that although multiple, simultaneous CINs in a woman often contain the same HPV type, recurrent CINs that occur after cryotherapy contain an HPV type different from that present in the pretreatment lesion.

  10. Human papillomavirus molecular biology and disease association

    PubMed Central

    Egawa, Nagayasu; Griffin, Heather; Kranjec, Christian; Murakami, Isao

    2015-01-01

    Summary Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) have evolved over millions of years to propagate themselves in a range of different animal species including humans. Viruses that have co‐evolved slowly in this way typically cause chronic inapparent infections, with virion production in the absence of apparent disease. This is the case for many Beta and Gamma HPV types. The Alpha papillomavirus types have however evolved immunoevasion strategies that allow them to cause persistent visible papillomas. These viruses activate the cell cycle as the infected epithelial cell differentiates in order to create a replication competent environment that allows viral genome amplification and packaging into infectious particles. This is mediated by the viral E6, E7, and E5 proteins. High‐risk E6 and E7 proteins differ from their low‐risk counterparts however in being able to drive cell cycle entry in the upper epithelial layers and also to stimulate cell proliferation in the basal and parabasal layers. Deregulated expression of these cell cycle regulators underlies neoplasia and the eventual progression to cancer in individuals who cannot resolve high‐risk HPV infection. Most work to date has focused on the study of high‐risk HPV types such as HPV 16 and 18, which has led to an understanding of the molecular pathways subverted by these viruses. Such approaches will lead to the development of better strategies for disease treatment, including targeted antivirals and immunotherapeutics. Priorities are now focused toward understanding HPV neoplasias at sites other than the cervix (e.g. tonsils, other transformation zones) and toward understanding the mechanisms by which low‐risk HPV types can sometimes give rise to papillomatosis and under certain situations even cancers. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25752814

  11. Human papillomavirus molecular biology and disease association.

    PubMed

    Doorbar, John; Egawa, Nagayasu; Griffin, Heather; Kranjec, Christian; Murakami, Isao

    2015-03-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) have evolved over millions of years to propagate themselves in a range of different animal species including humans. Viruses that have co-evolved slowly in this way typically cause chronic inapparent infections, with virion production in the absence of apparent disease. This is the case for many Beta and Gamma HPV types. The Alpha papillomavirus types have however evolved immunoevasion strategies that allow them to cause persistent visible papillomas. These viruses activate the cell cycle as the infected epithelial cell differentiates in order to create a replication competent environment that allows viral genome amplification and packaging into infectious particles. This is mediated by the viral E6, E7, and E5 proteins. High-risk E6 and E7 proteins differ from their low-risk counterparts however in being able to drive cell cycle entry in the upper epithelial layers and also to stimulate cell proliferation in the basal and parabasal layers. Deregulated expression of these cell cycle regulators underlies neoplasia and the eventual progression to cancer in individuals who cannot resolve high-risk HPV infection. Most work to date has focused on the study of high-risk HPV types such as HPV 16 and 18, which has led to an understanding of the molecular pathways subverted by these viruses. Such approaches will lead to the development of better strategies for disease treatment, including targeted antivirals and immunotherapeutics. Priorities are now focused toward understanding HPV neoplasias at sites other than the cervix (e.g. tonsils, other transformation zones) and toward understanding the mechanisms by which low-risk HPV types can sometimes give rise to papillomatosis and under certain situations even cancers.

  12. Human Papillomavirus Vaccine: State of the Art and Future Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Panatto, Donatella; Amicizia, Daniela; Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; Rizzitelli, Emanuela; Tramalloni, Daniela; Valle, Ivana; Gasparini, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is a widely distributed and common virus, that causes benign lesions (such as warts and papillomas) but, if not cleared, can lead to malignant lesions as well, such as intraepithelial lesions and neoplasia. An extensive body of researches has demonstrated that E1 and E2 are involved in viral transcription and replication, E5, E6, and E7 act as oncoproteins, whilst L1 and L2 contribute to the formation of the capsid. However, this view has been recently challenged, since also E2 could play a role in HPV-induced carcinogenesis. Therefore, a complex picture is emerging, opening new ways and perspectives. The present article provides an overview of the biology of HPV, paying particular attention to its structural details and molecular mechanisms. The article also shows how this knowledge has been exploited for developing effective vaccines, both prophilactic/preventive and therapeutic ones. L1-based prophylactic vaccines, like Gardasil, Cervarix, and Gardasil 9, have been already licensed, whilst L2-based second generation preventive vaccines are still under clinical trials. New, highly immunogenic and effective vaccines can be further developed thanks to computer-aided design and bioinformatics/computational biology. The optimization of combinational therapies is another promising opportunity. PMID:26572981

  13. Human Papillomavirus Vaccine: State of the Art and Future Perspectives.

    PubMed

    Panatto, Donatella; Amicizia, Daniela; Bragazzi, Nicola Luigi; Rizzitelli, Emanuela; Tramalloni, Daniela; Valle, Ivana; Gasparini, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is a widely distributed and common virus, that causes benign lesions (such as warts and papillomas) but, if not cleared, can lead to malignant lesions as well, such as intraepithelial lesions and neoplasia. An extensive body of researches has demonstrated that E1 and E2 are involved in viral transcription and replication, E5, E6, and E7 act as oncoproteins, whilst L1 and L2 contribute to the formation of the capsid. However, this view has been recently challenged, since also E2 could play a role in HPV-induced carcinogenesis. Therefore, a complex picture is emerging, opening new ways and perspectives. The present article provides an overview of the biology of HPV, paying particular attention to its structural details and molecular mechanisms. The article also shows how this knowledge has been exploited for developing effective vaccines, both prophilactic/preventive and therapeutic ones. L1-based prophylactic vaccines, like Gardasil, Cervarix, and Gardasil 9, have been already licensed, whilst L2-based second generation preventive vaccines are still under clinical trials. New, highly immunogenic and effective vaccines can be further developed thanks to computer-aided design and bioinformatics/computational biology. The optimization of combinational therapies is another promising opportunity.

  14. Human papillomavirus, current vaccines, and cervical cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Teitelman, Anne M; Stringer, Marilyn; Averbuch, Tali; Witkoski, Amy

    2009-01-01

    Human papillomavirus infection, the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States, is associated with the development of cervical cancer. The new human papillomavirus vaccine advances cervical cancer prevention; however, provider-recommended screening with Papanicolaou tests and lifestyle modifications are still needed. Widespread implementation of the vaccine and delivering cervical cancer screening to underserved populations remain a challenge. Nurses are ideally suited to address these needs by providing education to patients and families. PMID:19208050

  15. Negative emotions and stigma associated with a human papillomavirus test result: A comparison between human papillomavirus-positive men and women.

    PubMed

    Daley, Ellen M; Vamos, Cheryl A; Wheldon, Christopher W; Kolar, Stephanie K; Baker, Elizabeth A

    2015-08-01

    Human papillomavirus has largely been framed as a women's health issue, and the psychosocial impact of human papillomavirus among men remains unclear. In this study, we found that women infected with human papillomavirus (n = 154) experienced a greater degree of negative emotions and stigma than human papillomavirus-infected men (n = 190). Among women, younger age and less education were associated with greater expression of negative emotions and stigma. Conversely, being single was significantly associated with a greater degree of negative emotions and stigma beliefs among men. These findings suggest the need to re-frame messages that both men and women receive regarding human papillomavirus.

  16. [General aspects of structure, classification and replication of human papillomavirus].

    PubMed

    Santos-López, Gerardo; Márquez-Domínguez, Luis; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Vallejo-Ruiz, Verónica

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) refers to a group of viruses which belongs to a larger group, commonly referred to as papillomaviruses. These viruses are taxonomically located in the Papillomaviridae family. Papillomaviruses are small, non-enveloped with a genome of double-stranded DNA and they have affinity for epithelial tissue. Many of them are associated with human infection; they induce benign lesions of the skin (warts) and mucous membranes (condylomas), but they are also associated with some epithelial malignancies, such as cervical cancer and other tumors of the urogenital tract. Papillomaviridae contains 16 genera, which are named with a Greek letter prefix and the termination papillomavirus, e.g., Alphapapillomavirus, Betapapillomavirus, etcetera. From the clinical point of view, human papillomaviruses infecting the genital tract (which are located in the genus Alphapapilomavirus) have been divided into two groups: those of low risk, associated with benign genital warts, and those of high risk, with oncogenic potential, which are the etiological agents of cervical cancer. In this paper we review some relevant aspects of the structure, replication cycle and classification of human papillomaviruses.

  17. [General aspects of structure, classification and replication of human papillomavirus].

    PubMed

    Santos-López, Gerardo; Márquez-Domínguez, Luis; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Vallejo-Ruiz, Verónica

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) refers to a group of viruses which belongs to a larger group, commonly referred to as papillomaviruses. These viruses are taxonomically located in the Papillomaviridae family. Papillomaviruses are small, non-enveloped with a genome of double-stranded DNA and they have affinity for epithelial tissue. Many of them are associated with human infection; they induce benign lesions of the skin (warts) and mucous membranes (condylomas), but they are also associated with some epithelial malignancies, such as cervical cancer and other tumors of the urogenital tract. Papillomaviridae contains 16 genera, which are named with a Greek letter prefix and the termination papillomavirus, e.g., Alphapapillomavirus, Betapapillomavirus, etcetera. From the clinical point of view, human papillomaviruses infecting the genital tract (which are located in the genus Alphapapilomavirus) have been divided into two groups: those of low risk, associated with benign genital warts, and those of high risk, with oncogenic potential, which are the etiological agents of cervical cancer. In this paper we review some relevant aspects of the structure, replication cycle and classification of human papillomaviruses. PMID:26462512

  18. Immunoprevention of human papillomavirus-associated malignancies

    PubMed Central

    Wang1, Joshua W.; Hung, Chein-fu; Huh, Warner K.; Trimble, Cornelia L.; Roden, Richard B.S.

    2014-01-01

    Persistent infection by one of fifteen high risk human papillomavirus (hrHPV) types is a necessary but not sufficient cause of 5% of all human cancers. This provides a remarkable opportunity for cancer prevention via immunization. Since Harald zur Hausen’s pioneering identification of hrHPV types 16 and 18, found in ~50% and ~20% of cervical cancers respectively, two prophylactic HPV vaccines containing virus-like particles (VLP) of each genotype have been widely licensed. These vaccines are beginning to impact infection and HPV-associated neoplasia rates after immunization campaigns in adolescents. Here we review recent progress and opportunities to better prevent HPV-associated cancers, including: broadening immune-protection to cover all hrHPV types, reducing the cost of HPV vaccines especially for developing countries that have the highest rates of cervical cancer, and immune-based treatment of established HPV infections. Screening based upon George Papanicolaou’s cervical cytology testing, and more recently detection of hrHPV DNA/RNA, followed by ablative treatment of high grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN2/3) have substantially reduced cervical cancer rates, and we examine their interplay with immune-based modalities for the prevention and eventual elimination of cervical cancer and other HPV-related malignancies. PMID:25488410

  19. Role of human papillomaviruses in carcinogenesis.

    PubMed

    Ghittoni, Raffaella; Accardi, Rosita; Chiocca, Susanna; Tommasino, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) family comprises more than 170 different types that preferentially infect the mucosa of the genitals, upper-respiratory tract, or the skin. The 'high-risk HPV type', a sub-group of mucosal HPVs, is the cause of approximately 5% of all human cancers, which corresponds to one-third of all virus-induced tumours. Within the high-risk group, HPV16 is the most oncogenic type, being responsible for approximatively 50% of all worldwide cervical cancers. Many studies suggest that, in addition to the high-risk mucosal HPV types, certain cutaneous HPVs also have a role in the development of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC). Functional studies on the HPV early gene products showed that E6 and E7 play a key role in carcinogenesis. These two proteins use multiple mechanisms to evade host immune surveillance, allowing viral persistence, and to deregulate cell cycle and apoptosis control, thus facilitating the accumulation of DNA damage and ultimately cellular transformation. The demonstration that high-risk HPV types are the etiological agents of cervical cancer allowed the implementation in the clinical routine of novel screening strategies for cervical lesions, as well as the development of a very efficient prophylactic vaccine. Because of these remarkable achievements, there is no doubt that in the coming decades we will witness a dramatic reduction of cervical cancer incidence worldwide.

  20. HPV (Human Papillomavirus) vaccine - what you need to know [Gardasil®-9

    MedlinePlus

    ... taken in its entirety from the CDC HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Gardasil-9 Vaccine Information Statement (VIS): www.cdc. ... WHY GET VACCINATED? Gardasil-9 prevents human papillomavirus (HPV) ... and vulvar cancers in females, and Anal cancer in females ...

  1. Safety of human papillomavirus vaccines: a review

    PubMed Central

    Stillo, Michela; Carrillo Santisteve, Paloma; Lopalco, Pier Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Between 2006 and 2009, two different human papillomavirus virus (HPV) vaccines were licensed for use: a quadrivalent (qHPVv) and a bivalent (bHPVv) vaccine. Since 2008, HPV vaccination programmes have been implemented in the majority of the industrialized countries. Since 2013, HPV vaccination has been part of the national programs of 66 countries including almost all countries in North America and Western Europe. Despite all the efforts made by individual countries, coverage rates are lower than expected. Vaccine safety represents one of the main concerns associated with the lack of acceptance of HPV vaccination both in the European Union/European Economic Area and elsewhere. Areas covered: Safety data published on bivalent and quadrivalent HPV vaccines, both in pre-licensure and post-licensure phase, are reviewed. Expert opinion: Based on the latest scientific evidence, both HPV vaccines seem to be safe. Nevertheless, public concern and rumors about adverse events (AE) represent an important barrier to overcome in order to increase vaccine coverage. Passive surveillance of AEs is an important tool for detecting safety signals, but it should be complemented by activities aimed at assessing the real cause of all suspect AEs. Improved vaccine safety surveillance is the first step for effective communication based on scientific evidence. PMID:25689872

  2. Human papillomavirus DNA in oral mucosal lesions.

    PubMed

    Giovannelli, Lucia; Campisi, Giuseppina; Lama, Anna; Giambalvo, Ornella; Osborn, John; Margiotta, Valerio; Ammatuna, Pietro

    2002-03-15

    This study determined the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA in oral mucosa cells from 121 patients with different types of oral mucosal lesions (13 squamous cell carcinomas, 59 potentially malignant lesions, 49 benign erosive ulcerative lesions) and from 90 control subjects. HPV DNA was detected by nested polymerase chain reaction, and genotype was determined by DNA sequencing. HPV prevalence was 61.5% in carcinomas, 27.1% in potentially malignant lesions, 26.5% in erosive ulcerative lesions, and 5.5% in control subjects. The risk of malignant or potentially malignant lesions was associated with HPV and was statistically significant. HPV-18 was found in 86.5% of HPV-positive lesions but was not associated with a particular type of lesion and was found in 80% of the HPV-positive control subjects. HPV infection was related to older age but not to sex, smoking, or alcohol use; the presence of lesions in the oral cavity increased the risk of HPV infection.

  3. Human papillomavirus vaccination among adolescents in Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Underwood, Natasha L; Weiss, Paul; Gargano, Lisa M; Seib, Katherine; Rask, Kimberly J; Morfaw, Christopher; Murray, Dennis; DiClemente, Ralph J; Hughes, James M; Sales, Jessica M

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination coverage for adolescent females and males remains low in the United States. We conducted a 3-arm randomized controlled trial (RCT) conducted in middle and high schools in eastern Georgia from 2011–2013 to determine the effect of 2 educational interventions used to increase adolescent vaccination coverage for the 4 recommended adolescent vaccines: Tdap, MCV4, HPV and influenza. As part of this RCT, this article focuses on: 1) describing initiation and completion of HPV vaccine series among a diverse population of male and female adolescents; 2) assessing parental attitudes toward HPV vaccine; and 3) examining correlates of HPV vaccine series initiation and completion. Parental attitude score was the strongest predictor of HPV vaccine initiation among adolescents (adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 2.08; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.80, 2.39). Other correlates that significantly predicted HPV series initiation were gender, study year, and intervention arm. Parental attitudes remained a significant predictor of receipt of 3 doses of HPV vaccine along with gender, race, school type and insurance type. This study demonstrates that positive parental attitudes are important predictors of HPV vaccination and critical to increasing coverage rates. Our findings suggest that more research is needed to understand how parental attitudes are developed and evolve over time. PMID:25912372

  4. [Human papillomavirus vaccine. Efficacy and safety].

    PubMed

    Bruni, Laia; Serrano, Beatriz; Bosch, Xavier; Castellsagué, Xavier

    2015-05-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) related disease remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Prophylactic vaccines have been recognized as the most effective intervention to control for HPV-related diseases. This article reviews the major phaseii/iii trials of the bivalent (HPVs16/18), quadrivalent (HPVs6/11/16/18), and the recently approved 9-valent vaccine (HPVs6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58). Large trials have been conducted showing the safety, immunogenicity and high efficacy of the bivalent and quadrivalent vaccines in the prevention of pre-invasive lesions and infection, especially when administered at young ages before exposure to HPV. Trials of the 9-valent vaccine have also demonstrated the safety, immunogenicity and efficacy of the vaccine in the prevention of infection and disease associated with the vaccine types, and its potential to substantially increase the overall prevention of HPV-related diseases. Post-licensure country reports have shown the recent and early impact of these vaccines at population level after the implementation of established HPV vaccination programs, including decreases in the prevalence of vaccine HPV types, the incidence of genital warts, and the incidence of high-grade cervical abnormalities. If widely implemented, current HPV vaccines may drastically reduce the incidence of cervical cancer and other HPV-related cancers and diseases.

  5. [Human papillomavirus detection in cervical cancer prevention].

    PubMed

    Picconi, María Alejandra

    2013-01-01

    Cervical cancer (CC), which is strongly associated to high-risk human papillomavirus (hr-HPV) infection, continues being a significant health problem in Latin America. The use of conventional cytology to detect precancerous cervical lesions has had no major impact on reducing CC incidence and mortality rates, which are still high in the region. New screening tools to detect precancerous lesions became available, which provide great opportunities for CC prevention, as do highly efficacious HPV vaccines able to prevent nearly all lesions associated with HPV-16 and -18 when applied before viral exposure. Currently, hr-HPV testing represents an invaluable component of clinical guidelines for screening, management and treatment of CC and their precursor lesions. Many testing strategies have been developed that can detect a broad spectrum of hr-HPV types in a single assay; however, only a small subset of them has documented clinical performance for any of the standard HPV testing indications. HPV tests that have not been validated and lack proof of reliability, reproducibility and accuracy should not be used in clinical management. Once incorporated into the lab, it is essential to submit the whole procedure of HPV testing to continuous and rigorous quality assurance to avoid sub-optimal, potentially harmful practices. Recent progress and current status of these methods are discussed in this article.

  6. Therapeutic Vaccine Strategies against Human Papillomavirus

    PubMed Central

    Khallouf, Hadeel; Grabowska, Agnieszka K.; Riemer, Angelika B.

    2014-01-01

    High-risk types of human papillomavirus (HPV) cause over 500,000 cervical, anogenital and oropharyngeal cancer cases per year. The transforming potential of HPVs is mediated by viral oncoproteins. These are essential for the induction and maintenance of the malignant phenotype. Thus, HPV-mediated malignancies pose the unique opportunity in cancer vaccination to target immunologically foreign epitopes. Therapeutic HPV vaccination is therefore an ideal scenario for proof-of-concept studies of cancer immunotherapy. This is reflected by the fact that a multitude of approaches has been utilized in therapeutic HPV vaccination design: protein and peptide vaccination, DNA vaccination, nanoparticle- and cell-based vaccines, and live viral and bacterial vectors. This review provides a comprehensive overview of completed and ongoing clinical trials in therapeutic HPV vaccination (summarized in tables), and also highlights selected promising preclinical studies. Special emphasis is given to adjuvant science and the potential impact of novel developments in vaccinology research, such as combination therapies to overcome tumor immune suppression, the use of novel materials and mouse models, as well as systems vaccinology and immunogenetics approaches. PMID:26344626

  7. Human papillomavirus infections and oral tumors.

    PubMed

    Syrjänen, Stina

    2003-08-01

    In the past 20 years, there has been an increasing interest in human papillomaviruses (HPV) because of their potential role in the pathogenesis of malignant tumors. In 1983, we published the first evidence that HPV might be involved in oral squamous cell carcinomas. The identification of morphological similarities between oral and cervical mucosa lead us to this original proposal. In a recent meta-analysis, HPV was indeed confirmed as an independent risk factor for oral carcinoma. To date, totally more than 100 types of HPV have been identified. As in anogenital cancers, HPV type 16 is the most prevalent type in oral carcinomas. The benign oral lesions, associated with HPV infection, include squamous cell papilloma, condyloma acuminatum, verrucca vulgaris and focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH). Papillomas and condylomas are mostly caused by HPV type 6 or 11, while oral verrucas are associated with the skin types 2 or 4. A family history of FEH has been suggested. The FEH lesions are caused by HPV types 13 and 32, only detected in oral epithelium. In immunocompromised patients, benign HPV-induced lesions are characterized by atypical morphology and the simultaneous detection of multiple HPV types. Oral benign HPV lesions are mostly asymptomatic, and may persist or regress spontaneously.

  8. Human papillomavirus infection of the oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Garlick, J A; Taichman, L B

    1991-08-01

    This article reviews the lesions of oral mucosa that contain human papillomavirus (HPV). These HPV-associated lesions can be classified into two broad types on the basis of their biologic behavior, benign lesions and premalignant malignant or malignant lesions. Benign oral lesions include squamous cell papilloma (SCP), verruca vulgaris (VV), condyloma acuminatum (CA), and focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH). Of these entities, VV, CA, and FEH demonstrate characteristic HPV-induced cytopathic effects, whereas SCP infrequently shows such changes. All of these lesions show a clear association with HPV. Premalignant and malignant oral lesions include leukoplakia and squamous cell carcinoma. The etiologic role of HPV in these lesions is still unclear. Koilocytosis is the most common cytopathic effect seen in both groups of lesions. Even though it is sometimes difficult to distinguish between hyperplastic lesions such as SCP, VV, and CA, clinical and certain histologic features can facilitate the diagnosis. Although exceptions do exist, each of the two classes of lesions is most commonly associated with particular HPV types. The benign oral lesions are associated with HPV 2, 4, 6, 11, 13, and 32; the malignant oral lesions are associated with HPV 16 and 18. No preferential association has been demonstrated between specific HPV types and a particular oral lesion.

  9. Human papillomavirus vaccination among adolescents in Georgia.

    PubMed

    Underwood, Natasha L; Weiss, Paul; Gargano, Lisa M; Seib, Katherine; Rask, Kimberly J; Morfaw, Christopher; Murray, Dennis; DiClemente, Ralph J; Hughes, James M; Sales, Jessica M

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination coverage for adolescent females and males remains low in the United States. We conducted a 3-arm randomized controlled trial (RCT) conducted in middle and high schools in eastern Georgia from 2011-2013 to determine the effect of 2 educational interventions used to increase adolescent vaccination coverage for the 4 recommended adolescent vaccines: Tdap, MCV4, HPV and influenza. As part of this RCT, this article focuses on: 1) describing initiation and completion of HPV vaccine series among a diverse population of male and female adolescents; 2) assessing parental attitudes toward HPV vaccine; and 3) examining correlates of HPV vaccine series initiation and completion. Parental attitude score was the strongest predictor of HPV vaccine initiation among adolescents (adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 2.08; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.80, 2.39). Other correlates that significantly predicted HPV series initiation were gender, study year, and intervention arm. Parental attitudes remained a significant predictor of receipt of 3 doses of HPV vaccine along with gender, race, school type and insurance type. This study demonstrates that positive parental attitudes are important predictors of HPV vaccination and critical to increasing coverage rates. Our findings suggest that more research is needed to understand how parental attitudes are developed and evolve over time. PMID:25912372

  10. Human Papillomavirus Laboratory Testing: the Changing Paradigm.

    PubMed

    Burd, Eileen M

    2016-04-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) cause essentially all cervical cancers, most anal and oropharyngeal cancers, and some vaginal, vulvar, and penile cancers. Improved understanding of the pathogenesis of infection and the availability of newer tests are changing the approach to screening and diagnosis. Molecular tests to detect DNA from the most common high-risk HPVs are FDA approved for use in conjunction with cytology in cervical cancer screening programs. More-specific tests that detect RNA from high-risk HPV types are now also available. The use of molecular tests as the primary screening tests is being adopted in some areas. Genotyping to identify HPV16 and -18 has a recommended role in triaging patients for colposcopy who are high-risk HPV positive but have normal cytology. There are currently no recommended screening methods for anal, vulvar, vaginal, penile, or oropharyngeal HPV infections. HPV testing has limited utility in patients at high risk for anal cancer, but p16 immunohistochemistry is recommended to clarify lesions in tissue biopsy specimens that show moderate dysplasia or precancer mimics. HPV testing is recommended for oropharyngeal squamous cell tumors as a prognostic indicator. Ongoing research will help to improve the content of future guidelines for screening and diagnostic testing. PMID:26912568

  11. Knowledge about human papillomavirus and the human papillomavirus vaccine in Belgian students

    PubMed Central

    Deriemaeker, Hanne; Reichman, Gina; Devroey, Dirk; Cammu, Hendrik

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The aim of this study was to examine the knowledge of Belgian university students about the human papillomavirus (HPV) and HPV–vaccination. Material and methods During a period of two months we administered an online questionnaire, which contained 29 questions, to 3332 students of the Free University of Brussels. Of the 433 completed questionnaires, 346 were included by age (18–30 years) and completeness of responded questionnaires. These formed the study group. Results Of the 346 included questionnaires (76% female), 48% were completed by medical students. The majority (65%) knew that both genders could be infected with HPV. Ninety–five percent of all medical students were aware of the existence of HPV, while 92% knew of the possibility to be vaccinated against the virus. Ninety percent of them were aware of the causal relationship between HPV infection and cervical cancer. 46% of the medical students were aware that HPV can cause anogenital cancers, and only 28% knew that HPV–vaccination could protect them against genital warts. Sixty percent of all female students were fully vaccinated against HPV, without any difference between medical and non–medical students. A very small part of all students (3%) believed that vaccination against HPV could enhance a promiscuous lifestyle. Conclusions Almost 80% of respondents were aware of the existence of the human papillomavirus, its morbid potential and the HPV–vaccination. PMID:25667765

  12. Papillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Félez-Sánchez, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Papillomaviruses (PVs) are a numerous family of small dsDNA viruses infecting virtually all mammals. PVs cause infections without triggering a strong immune response, and natural infection provides only limited protection against reinfection. Most PVs are part and parcel of the skin microbiota. In some cases, infections by certain PVs take diverse clinical presentations from highly productive self-limited warts to invasive cancers. We propose PVs as an excellent model system to study the evolutionary interactions between the immune system and pathogens causing chronic infections: genotypically, PVs are very diverse, with hundreds of different genotypes infecting skin and mucosa; phenotypically, they display extremely broad gradients and trade-offs between key phenotypic traits, namely productivity, immunogenicity, prevalence, oncogenicity and clinical presentation. Public health interventions have been launched to decrease the burden of PV-associated cancers, including massive vaccination against the most oncogenic human PVs, as well as systematic screening for PV chronic anogenital infections. Anti-PVs vaccines elicit protection against infection, induce cross-protection against closely related viruses and result in herd immunity. However, our knowledge on the ecological and intrapatient dynamics of PV infections remains fragmentary. We still need to understand how the novel anthropogenic selection pressures posed by vaccination and screening will affect viral circulation and epidemiology. We present here an overview of PV evolution and the connection between PV genotypes and the phenotypic, clinical manifestations of the diseases they cause. This differential link between viral evolution and the gradient cancer-warts-asymptomatic infections makes PVs a privileged playground for evolutionary medicine research. PMID:25634317

  13. Canine oral papillomavirus genomic sequence: a unique 1.5-kb intervening sequence between the E2 and L2 open reading frames.

    PubMed

    Delius, H; Van Ranst, M A; Jenson, A B; zur Hausen, H; Sundberg, J P

    1994-10-01

    The canine oral papillomavirus (COPV) is associated with oropharyngeal papillomatosis in dogs, coyotes, and wolves. We have determined the complete nucleotide sequence of COPV, the largest of all known PV genomes (8607 bp). The genomic architecture of the COPV genome is similar to that of other PVs except for a unique and large noncoding region of 1.5 kb between the end of the early region (E2) and the beginning of the late region (L2) and a small (345 bp) upstream regulatory region between the end of L1 and the beginning of E6. Although COPV displays a primarily mucosal tropism, the COPV nucleotide sequence showed the highest overall similarity to cutaneous papillomaviruses such as HPV-1, HPV-63, CRPV (cottontail rabbit PV), FdPV (Felis domesticus PV), and MnPV (Mastomys natalensis PV). PMID:8091677

  14. Epidermodysplasia verruciformis-associated human papillomavirus 8: genomic sequence and comparative analysis.

    PubMed Central

    Fuchs, P G; Iftner, T; Weninger, J; Pfister, H

    1986-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) 8 induces skin tumors which are at high risk for malignant conversion. The nucleotide sequence of HPV8 has been determined and compared to sequences of papillomaviruses with different oncogenic potential. The general organization of the HPV8 genome is similar to that of other types. Highly conserved, genus-specific sequences were found in open reading frames (ORFs) E1, E2, and L1. In ORFs E6, E7, and L2, HPV8 is more distantly related, but it was possible to differentiate subgenera in which HPV8 belonged to the HPV1-cottontail rabbit papillomavirus group. Sequences within ORF E4 and part of ORF L2 are rather type specific. HPV8 stands out by several unique features: the considerably reduced size of the noncoding region (397 base pairs), with a seemingly low potential for forming complex secondary structures; a cluster of putative promoter elements in the 3' half of ORF E1; an RNA polymerase III promoter-like sequence close to the C terminus of ORF E2; and of particular interest, the homology between the putative protein encoded by ORF E4 and the Epstein-Barr virus nuclear antigen 2 protein, which may reflect similar mechanisms in virus-mediated transformation. PMID:3009874

  15. New Approaches to Prophylactic Human Papillomavirus Vaccines for Cervical Cancer Prevention

    PubMed Central

    Gersch, Elizabeth D.; Gissmann, Lutz; Garcea, Robert L.

    2013-01-01

    The currently licensed human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines are safe and highly effective at preventing HPV infection for a select number of papillomavirus types, thus decreasing the incidence of precursors to cervical cancer. It is expected that vaccination will also ultimately reduce the incidence of this cancer. However, the licensed HPV vaccines are type-restricted and expensive, and also require refrigeration, multiple doses, and intramuscular injection. Second generation vaccines are currently being developed to address these shortcomings. New expression systems, viral and bacterial vectors for HPV L1 capsid protein delivery, and use of the HPV L2 capsid protein will hopefully aid in decreasing cost and increasing ease of use and breadth of protection. These second generation vaccines also could allow affordable immunization of women in developing countries, where the incidence of cervical cancer is high. PMID:22293302

  16. New approaches to prophylactic human papillomavirus vaccines for cervical cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Gersch, Elizabeth D; Gissmann, Lutz; Garcea, Robert L

    2012-01-01

    The currently licensed human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines are safe and highly effective at preventing HPV infection for a select number of papillomavirus types, thus decreasing the incidence of precursors to cervical cancer. It is expected that vaccination will also ultimately reduce the incidence of this cancer. The licensed HPV vaccines are, however, type restricted and expensive, and also require refrigeration, multiple doses and intramuscular injection. Second-generation vaccines are currently being developed to address these shortcomings. New expression systems, viral and bacterial vectors for HPV L1 capsid protein delivery, and use of the HPV L2 capsid protein will hopefully aid in decreasing cost and increasing ease of use and breadth of protection. These second-generation vaccines could also allow affordable immunization of women in developing countries, where the incidence of cervical cancer is high.

  17. Global proficiency study of human papillomavirus genotyping.

    PubMed

    Eklund, Carina; Zhou, Tiequn; Dillner, Joakim

    2010-11-01

    Internationally comparable quality assurance of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) DNA detection and typing methods is essential for evaluation of HPV vaccines and effective monitoring and implementation of HPV vaccination programs. Therefore, the World Health Organization (WHO) HPV Laboratory Network (LabNet) designed an international proficiency study. Following announcement at the WHO website, the responding laboratories performed HPV typing using one or more of their usual assays on 43 coded samples composed of titration series of purified plasmids of 16 HPV types (HPV6, -11, -16, -18, -31, -33, -35, -39, -45, -51, -52, -56, -58, -59, -66, and -68). Detection of at least 50 IU of HPV16 or HPV18 DNA and of 500 genome equivalents (GE) of the other 14 HPV types (in samples with single and multiple HPV types) was considered proficient. Fifty-four laboratories worldwide submitted a total of 84 data sets. More than 21 HPV-genotyping assays were used. Commonly used methods were Linear Array, Lineblot, InnoLiPa, Clinical Array, type-specific real-time PCR, PCR-Luminex and microarray assays. The major oncogenic HPV types (HPV16 and -18) were detected in 89.7% (70/78) and 92.2% (71/77) of the data sets, respectively. HPV types 56, 59, and 68 were the least commonly detected types (in less than 80% of the data sets). Twenty-eight data sets reported multiple false-positive results and were considered nonproficient. In conclusion, we found that international proficiency studies, traceable to international standards, allow standardized quality assurance for different HPV-typing assays and enable the comparison of data generated from different laboratories worldwide.

  18. Felis domesticus papillomavirus, isolated from a skin lesion, is related to canine oral papillomavirus and contains a 1.3 kb non-coding region between the E2 and L2 open reading frames.

    PubMed

    Terai, Masanori; Burk, Robert D

    2002-09-01

    We have characterized the complete genome (8300 bp) of an isolate of Felis domesticus papillomavirus (FdPV) from a domestic cat with cutaneous papillomatosis. A BLAST homology search using the nucleotide sequence of the L1 open reading frame demonstrated that the FdPV genome was most closely related to canine oral papillomavirus (COPV). A 384 bp non-coding region (NCR) was found between the end of L1 and the beginning of E6, and a 1.3 kbp NCR was located between the end of E2 and the beginning of L2. Phylogenetic analysis placed FdPV in the E3 clade with COPV. Both viruses contain the atypical second NCR, which has no homology with sequences in existing databases. PMID:12185286

  19. Evidence of recombination within human alpha-papillomavirus

    PubMed Central

    Angulo, Manuel; Carvajal-Rodríguez, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) has a causal role in cervical cancer with almost half a million new cases occurring each year. Presence of the carcinogenic HPV is necessary for the development of the invasive carcinoma of the genital tract. Therefore, persistent infection with carcinogenic HPV causes virtually all cervical cancers. Some aspects of the molecular evolution of this virus, as the putative importance of recombination in its evolutionary history, are an opened current question. In addition, recombination could also be a significant issue nowadays since the frequency of co-infection with more than one HPV type is not a rare event and, thus, new recombinant types could be currently being generated. Results We have used human alpha-PV sequences from the public database at Los Alamos National Laboratory to report evidence that recombination may exist in this virus. A model-based population genetic approach was used to infer the recombination signal from the HPV DNA sequences grouped attending to phylogenetic and epidemiological information, as well as to clinical manifestations. Our results agree with recently published ones that use a different methodology to detect recombination associated to the gene L2. In addition, we have detected significant recombination signal in the genes E6, E7, L2 and L1 at different groups, and importantly within the high-risk type HPV16. The method used has recently been shown to be one of the most powerful and reliable procedures to detect the recombination signal. Conclusion We provide new support to the recent evidence of recombination in HPV. Additionally, we performed the recombination estimation assuming the best-fit model of nucleotide substitution and rate variation among sites, of the HPV DNA sequence sets. We found that the gene with recombination in most of the groups is L2 but the highest values were detected in L1 and E6. Gene E7 was recombinant only within the HPV16 type. The topic deserves further study

  20. The role of human papillomavirus in squamous carcinoma of the head and neck.

    PubMed

    Li, Guojun; Sturgis, Erich M

    2006-03-01

    Human papillomavirus type-16 infection is associated with a significant portion of squamous carcinoma of the head and neck, particularly for the oropharynx and for those lacking the other risk factors of tobacco and alcohol. The link between human papillomavirus type-16 and carcinoma of the oropharynx is based on the identification of human papillomavirus type-16 in oropharyngeal tumors and the association of human papillomavirus type-16 with the risk of oropharyngeal cancer estimated in case-control epidemiologic studies. This review highlights the molecular mechanism of human papillomavirus carcinogenesis and the association of human papillomavirus type-16 as a risk factor for squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx as well as recent research efforts utilizing human papillomavirus as a biomarker of clinical outcomes.

  1. Model systems of human papillomavirus-associated disease.

    PubMed

    Doorbar, John

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) cause a range of serious diseases, including the vast majority of cervical cancers, most anal cancers and around half of head and neck cancers. They are also responsible for troublesome benign epithelial lesions, including genital warts and laryngeal papillomas, and in some individuals HPVs lead to recurrent respiratory papillomatosis and other difficult-to-manage diseases. As a result, there is a great need for model systems that accurately mimic papillomavirus infections in humans. This is complicated by the diverse variety of HPVs, which now number over 200 types, and the different strategies they have evolved to persist in the population. The most well-developed models involve the culture of HPV-containing keratinocytes in organotypic raft culture, an approach which appears to accurately mimic the life cycle of several of the high-risk cancer-associated HPV types. Included amongst these are HPV16 and 18, which cause the majority of cervical cancers. The low-risk HPV types persist less well in tissue-culture models, and our ability to study the productive life cycle of these viruses is more limited. Although ongoing research is likely to improve this situation, animal models of papillomavirus disease can provide considerable basic information as to how lesions form, regress and can be controlled by the immune system. The best studied are cottontail rabbit papillomavirus, rabbit oral papillomavirus and, more recently, mouse papillomavirus (MmuPV), the last of which is providing exciting new insights into viral tropisms and immune control. In addition, transgenic models of disease have helped us to understand the consequences of persistent viral gene expression and the importance of co-factors such as hormones and UV irradiation in the development of neoplasia and cancer. It is hoped that such disease models will eventually lead us to better understanding and better treatments for human disease. PMID:26456009

  2. Model systems of human papillomavirus-associated disease.

    PubMed

    Doorbar, John

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) cause a range of serious diseases, including the vast majority of cervical cancers, most anal cancers and around half of head and neck cancers. They are also responsible for troublesome benign epithelial lesions, including genital warts and laryngeal papillomas, and in some individuals HPVs lead to recurrent respiratory papillomatosis and other difficult-to-manage diseases. As a result, there is a great need for model systems that accurately mimic papillomavirus infections in humans. This is complicated by the diverse variety of HPVs, which now number over 200 types, and the different strategies they have evolved to persist in the population. The most well-developed models involve the culture of HPV-containing keratinocytes in organotypic raft culture, an approach which appears to accurately mimic the life cycle of several of the high-risk cancer-associated HPV types. Included amongst these are HPV16 and 18, which cause the majority of cervical cancers. The low-risk HPV types persist less well in tissue-culture models, and our ability to study the productive life cycle of these viruses is more limited. Although ongoing research is likely to improve this situation, animal models of papillomavirus disease can provide considerable basic information as to how lesions form, regress and can be controlled by the immune system. The best studied are cottontail rabbit papillomavirus, rabbit oral papillomavirus and, more recently, mouse papillomavirus (MmuPV), the last of which is providing exciting new insights into viral tropisms and immune control. In addition, transgenic models of disease have helped us to understand the consequences of persistent viral gene expression and the importance of co-factors such as hormones and UV irradiation in the development of neoplasia and cancer. It is hoped that such disease models will eventually lead us to better understanding and better treatments for human disease.

  3. Intention of College Students to Receive the Human Papillomavirus Vaccine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to better understand what influences the intentions of college students to receive the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the USA and cancers related to HPV are on the rise. Design/Methodology/Approach: A 2×2 experimental design was used to predict the…

  4. Development of a Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Intervention for Australian Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Spring C.; Davies, Cristyn; McBride, Kate; Blades, Joanna; Stoney, Tanya; Marshall, Helen; Skinner, S. Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Australia has implemented a nation-wide programme providing a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine to girls and boys through school-based programmes. Previous research has identified three distinct areas for attention: (1) lack of understanding about HPV and HPV vaccination, (2) young people's desire for involvement in decision-making…

  5. Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Intent and Uptake among Female College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, Divya A.; Zochowski, Melissa; Peterman, Stephanie; Dempsey, Amanda F.; Ernst, Susan; Dalton, Vanessa K.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine intent and the effect of an educational intervention on vaccine uptake among female college students. Participants: Females aged 18 to 26 attending a university health service gynecology clinic (n = 256). Methods: Participants were randomized to receive either HPV-specific education with a…

  6. Human papillomavirus-associated cancers: A growing global problem

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Anshuma; Singh, Mini P; Rai, Bhavana

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is linked with several cancers such as cancer cervix, vagina, vulva, head and neck, anal, and penile carcinomas. Although there is a proven association of HPV with these cancers, questions regarding HPV testing, vaccination, and treatment of HPV-related cancers continue to remain unanswered. The present article provides an overview of the HPV-associated cancers. PMID:27127735

  7. Maternal acceptance of human papillomavirus vaccine in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Sam, I-Ching; Wong, Li-Ping; Rampal, Sanjay; Leong, Yin-Hui; Pang, Chan-Fu; Tai, Yong-Ting; Tee, Hwee-Ching; Kahar-Bador, Maria

    2009-06-01

    Acceptability rates of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination by 362 Malaysian mothers were 65.7% and 55.8% for daughters and sons, respectively. Younger mothers, and those who knew someone with cancer, were more willing to vaccinate their daughters. If the vaccine was routine and cost free, acceptability rate was 97.8%. PMID:19465327

  8. The causal relation between human papillomavirus and cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, F X; Lorincz, A; Muñoz, N; Meijer, C J L M; Shah, K V

    2002-01-01

    The causal role of human papillomavirus infections in cervical cancer has been documented beyond reasonable doubt. The association is present in virtually all cervical cancer cases worldwide. It is the right time for medical societies and public health regulators to consider this evidence and to define its preventive and clinical implications. A comprehensive review of key studies and results is presented. PMID:11919208

  9. Identification and Validation of Human Papillomavirus Encoded microRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Rönty, Mikko; Michon, Frederic; Frilander, Mikko J.; Ritari, Jarmo; Tarkkanen, Jussi; Paulín, Lars; Auvinen, Petri; Auvinen, Eeva

    2013-01-01

    We report here identification and validation of the first papillomavirus encoded microRNAs expressed in human cervical lesions and cell lines. We established small RNA libraries from ten human papillomavirus associated cervical lesions including cancer and two human papillomavirus harboring cell lines. These libraries were sequenced using SOLiD 4 technology. We used the sequencing data to predict putative viral microRNAs and discovered nine putative papillomavirus encoded microRNAs. Validation was performed for five candidates, four of which were successfully validated by qPCR from cervical tissue samples and cell lines: two were encoded by HPV 16, one by HPV 38 and one by HPV 68. The expression of HPV 16 microRNAs was further confirmed by in situ hybridization, and colocalization with p16INK4A was established. Prediction of cellular target genes of HPV 16 encoded microRNAs suggests that they may play a role in cell cycle, immune functions, cell adhesion and migration, development, and cancer. Two putative viral target sites for the two validated HPV 16 miRNAs were mapped to the E5 gene, one in the E1 gene, two in the L1 gene and one in the LCR region. This is the first report to show that papillomaviruses encode their own microRNA species. Importantly, microRNAs were found in libraries established from human cervical disease and carcinoma cell lines, and their expression was confirmed in additional tissue samples. To our knowledge, this is also the first paper to use in situ hybridization to show the expression of a viral microRNA in human tissue. PMID:23936163

  10. Identification and validation of human papillomavirus encoded microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Qian, Kui; Pietilä, Tuuli; Rönty, Mikko; Michon, Frederic; Frilander, Mikko J; Ritari, Jarmo; Tarkkanen, Jussi; Paulín, Lars; Auvinen, Petri; Auvinen, Eeva

    2013-01-01

    We report here identification and validation of the first papillomavirus encoded microRNAs expressed in human cervical lesions and cell lines. We established small RNA libraries from ten human papillomavirus associated cervical lesions including cancer and two human papillomavirus harboring cell lines. These libraries were sequenced using SOLiD 4 technology. We used the sequencing data to predict putative viral microRNAs and discovered nine putative papillomavirus encoded microRNAs. Validation was performed for five candidates, four of which were successfully validated by qPCR from cervical tissue samples and cell lines: two were encoded by HPV 16, one by HPV 38 and one by HPV 68. The expression of HPV 16 microRNAs was further confirmed by in situ hybridization, and colocalization with p16INK4A was established. Prediction of cellular target genes of HPV 16 encoded microRNAs suggests that they may play a role in cell cycle, immune functions, cell adhesion and migration, development, and cancer. Two putative viral target sites for the two validated HPV 16 miRNAs were mapped to the E5 gene, one in the E1 gene, two in the L1 gene and one in the LCR region. This is the first report to show that papillomaviruses encode their own microRNA species. Importantly, microRNAs were found in libraries established from human cervical disease and carcinoma cell lines, and their expression was confirmed in additional tissue samples. To our knowledge, this is also the first paper to use in situ hybridization to show the expression of a viral microRNA in human tissue.

  11. University Students' Knowledge and Attitudes Regarding Cervical Cancer, Human Papillomavirus, and Human Papillomavirus Vaccines in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koç, Zeliha

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The current descriptive study aimed to determine university students' knowledge and attitudes regarding cervical cancer, human papillomavirus (HPV), and HPV vaccines in Turkey. Participants: A total of 800 students participated. Methods: This study was carried out between September 1, 2012, and October 30, 2012, in 8 female…

  12. Maturation of the Human Papillomavirus 16 Capsid

    PubMed Central

    Cardone, Giovanni; Moyer, Adam L.; Cheng, Naiqian; Thompson, Cynthia D.; Dvoretzky, Israel; Lowy, Douglas R.; Schiller, John T.; Steven, Alasdair C.; Buck, Christopher B.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Papillomaviruses are a family of nonenveloped DNA viruses that infect the skin or mucosa of their vertebrate hosts. The viral life cycle is closely tied to the differentiation of infected keratinocytes. Papillomavirus virions are released into the environment through a process known as desquamation, in which keratinocytes lose structural integrity prior to being shed from the surface of the skin. During this process, virions are exposed to an increasingly oxidative environment, leading to their stabilization through the formation of disulfide cross-links between neighboring molecules of the major capsid protein, L1. We used time-lapse cryo-electron microscopy and image analysis to study the maturation of HPV16 capsids assembled in mammalian cells and exposed to an oxidizing environment after cell lysis. Initially, the virion is a loosely connected procapsid that, under in vitro conditions, condenses over several hours into the more familiar 60-nm-diameter papillomavirus capsid. In this process, the procapsid shrinks by ~5% in diameter, its pentameric capsomers change in structure (most markedly in the axial region), and the interaction surfaces between adjacent capsomers are consolidated. A C175S mutant that cannot achieve normal inter-L1 disulfide cross-links shows maturation-related shrinkage but does not achieve the fully condensed 60-nm form. Pseudoatomic modeling based on a 9-Å resolution reconstruction of fully mature capsids revealed C-terminal disulfide-stabilized “suspended bridges” that form intercapsomeric cross-links. The data suggest a model in which procapsids exist in a range of dynamic intermediates that can be locked into increasingly mature configurations by disulfide cross-linking, possibly through a Brownian ratchet mechanism. PMID:25096873

  13. Life Cycle Heterogeneity in Animal Models of Human Papillomavirus-Associated Disease

    PubMed Central

    Peh, Woei Ling; Middleton, Kate; Christensen, Neil; Nicholls, Philip; Egawa, Kiyofumi; Sotlar, Karl; Brandsma, Janet; Percival, Alan; Lewis, Jon; Liu, Wen Jun; Doorbar, John

    2002-01-01

    Animal papillomaviruses are widely used as models to study papillomavirus infection in humans despite differences in genome organization and tissue tropism. Here, we have investigated the extent to which animal models of papillomavirus infection resemble human disease by comparing the life cycles of 10 different papillomavirus types. Three phases in the life cycles of all viruses were apparent using antibodies that distinguish between early events, the onset of viral genome amplification, and the expression of capsid proteins. The initiation of these phases follows a highly ordered pattern that appears important for the production of virus particles. The viruses examined included canine oral papillomavirus, rabbit oral papillomavirus (ROPV), cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV), bovine papillomavirus type 1, and human papillomavirus types 1, 2, 11, and 16. Each papillomavirus type showed a distinctive gene expression pattern that could be explained in part by differences in tissue tropism, transmission route, and persistence. As the timing of life cycle events affects the accessibility of viral antigens to the immune system, the ideal model system should resemble human mucosal infection if vaccine design is to be effective. Of the model systems examined here, only ROPV had a tissue tropism and a life cycle organization that resembled those of the human mucosal types. ROPV appears most appropriate for studies of the life cycles of mucosal papillomavirus types and for the development of prophylactic vaccines. The persistence of abortive infections caused by CRPV offers advantages for the development of therapeutic vaccines. PMID:12239317

  14. Analysis of cis-elements that facilitate extrachromosomal persistence of human papillomavirus genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Pittayakhajonwut, Daraporn; Angeletti, Peter C.

    2008-05-10

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are maintained latently in dividing epithelial cells as nuclear plasmids. Two virally encoded proteins, E1, a helicase, and E2, a transcription factor, are important players in replication and stable plasmid maintenance in host cells. Recent experiments in yeast have demonstrated that viral genomes retain replication and maintenance function independently of E1 and E2 [Angeletti, P.C., Kim, K., Fernandes, F.J., and Lambert, P.F. (2002). Stable replication of papillomavirus genomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. J. Virol. 76(7), 3350-8; Kim, K., Angeletti, P.C., Hassebroek, E.C., and Lambert, P.F. (2005). Identification of cis-acting elements that mediate the replication and maintenance of human papillomavirus type 16 genomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. J. Virol. 79(10), 5933-42]. Flow cytometry studies of EGFP-reporter vectors containing subgenomic HPV fragments with or without a human ARS (hARS), revealed that six fragments located in E6-E7, E1-E2, L1, and L2 regions showed a capacity for plasmid stabilization in the absence of E1 and E2 proteins. Interestingly, four fragments within E7, the 3' end of L2, and the 5' end of L1 exhibited stability in plasmids that lacked an hARS, indicating that they possess both replication and maintenance functions. Two fragments lying in E1-E2 and the 3' region of L1 were stable only in the presence of hARS, that they contained only maintenance function. Mutational analyses of HPV16-GFP reporter constructs provided evidence that genomes lacking E1 and E2 could replicate to an extent similar to wild type HPV16. Together these results support the concept that cellular factors influence HPV replication and maintenance, independently, and perhaps in conjunction with E1 and E2, suggesting a role in the persistent phase of the viral lifecycle.

  15. The association of human papillomavirus vaccination with sexual behaviours and human papillomavirus knowledge: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Coles, Victoria A H; Patel, Ajay S; Allen, Felicity L; Keeping, Sam T; Carroll, Stuart M

    2015-10-01

    Since the 2008 introduction of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination programme for adolescent girls in the UK, parents and other groups have expressed fears that immunisation condones sexual activity, promotes promiscuity and encourages risky sexual behaviour. This study aimed to explore whether HPV vaccination programmes have increased knowledge surrounding HPV and associated disease and whether uptake has influenced sexual behaviour. MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Library and PsycINFO electronic databases were interrogated. Studies of behaviour, attitudes and knowledge associated with HPV vaccination (or vaccination intent) in subjects of any age and gender in programmes reflective of UK practice were included in the review (n = 58). The evidence regarding the association of HPV vaccination with high-risk sexual behaviour was varied, primarily due to the heterogeneous nature of the included studies. Young females typically exhibited better knowledge than males, and vaccinated respondents (or those with vaccination intent) had higher levels of knowledge than the unvaccinated. However, knowledge surrounding HPV and genital warts was generally poor. This review highlights the need to provide effective education regarding the HPV vaccine and HPV-associated disease to adolescents of vaccination age, nurses, teachers, parents and guardians to ultimately allow informed decisions to be made regarding receipt of the HPV vaccine.

  16. Identification of TRAPPC8 as a Host Factor Required for Human Papillomavirus Cell Entry

    PubMed Central

    Ishii, Yoshiyuki; Nakahara, Tomomi; Kataoka, Michiyo; Kusumoto-Matsuo, Rika; Mori, Seiichiro; Takeuchi, Takamasa; Kukimoto, Iwao

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a non-enveloped virus composed of a circular DNA genome and two capsid proteins, L1 and L2. Multiple interactions between its capsid proteins and host cellular proteins are required for infectious HPV entry, including cell attachment and internalization, intracellular trafficking and viral genome transfer into the nucleus. Using two variants of HPV type 51, the Ma and Nu strains, we have previously reported that MaL2 is required for efficient pseudovirus (PsV) transduction. However, the cellular factors that confer this L2 dependency have not yet been identified. Here we report that the transport protein particle complex subunit 8 (TRAPPC8) specifically interacts with MaL2. TRAPPC8 knockdown in HeLa cells yielded reduced levels of reporter gene expression when inoculated with HPV51Ma, HPV16, and HPV31 PsVs. TRAPPC8 knockdown in HaCaT cells also showed reduced susceptibility to infection with authentic HPV31 virions, indicating that TRAPPC8 plays a crucial role in native HPV infection. Immunofluorescence microscopy revealed that the central region of TRAPPC8 was exposed on the cell surface and colocalized with inoculated PsVs. The entry of Ma, Nu, and L2-lacking PsVs into cells was equally impaired in TRAPPC8 knockdown HeLa cells, suggesting that TRAPPC8-dependent endocytosis plays an important role in HPV entry that is independent of L2 interaction. Finally, expression of GFP-fused L2 that can also interact with TRAPPC8 induced dispersal of the Golgi stack structure in HeLa cells, a phenotype also observed by TRAPPC8 knockdown. These results suggest that during viral intracellular trafficking, binding of L2 to TRAPPC8 inhibits its function resulting in Golgi destabilization, a process that may assist HPV genome escape from the trans-Golgi network. PMID:24244674

  17. Investigation of human papillomavirus DNA in colorectal carcinomas and adenomas.

    PubMed

    Yavuzer, Dilek; Karadayi, Nimet; Salepci, Taflan; Baloglu, Huseyin; Dabak, Resat; Bayramicli, Oya Uygur

    2011-03-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been considered to be an etiological agent for anogenital cancers, such as cervical cancer and possibly a subset of cancers of the aerodigestive tract. The aim of the study was to evaluate the presence of human papillomavirus DNA in colorectal carcinomas and adenomas. Formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded archival tissue samples were used for DNA extraction. One hundred and six colorectal carcinomas and 62 adenomas were screened by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for HPV DNA with a control group of 49 cervical tissues with invasive cervical carcinoma and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN). In the study group, we did not find HPV DNA positivity in any of all the colorectal carcinomas and adenomas. In the control group with cervical lesions, 34 out of 49 (69.4%) samples were positive for the HPV DNA. These results indicated that there was no correlation between HPV infection and colorectal carcinomas and adenomas. PMID:20082157

  18. Recurrent laryngeal papillomatosis: successful treatment with human papillomavirus vaccination.

    PubMed

    Mudry, Peter; Vavrina, Martin; Mazanek, Pavel; Machalova, Michaela; Litzman, Jiri; Sterba, Jaroslav

    2011-05-01

    The authors describe the case of a 5-year-old girl with recurrent laryngeal papillomatosis (RLP) due to human papillomavirus (HPV) type 11, who required frequent surgical treatment. Complete recovery occurred after HPV vaccination (Gardasil). Confirmed remission of RLP has continued during the 17 months of follow-up since vaccination. The authors conclude that HPV vaccination may represent a new therapeutic option in this situation.

  19. Papillomaviruses: Molecular and clinical aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Howley, P.M.; Broker, T.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains nine sections, each consisting of several papers. The section headings are : Papillomaviruses and Human Genital Tract Diseases;Papillomaviruses and Human Cutaneous Diseases, Papillomaviruses and Human Oral and Laryngeal Diseases;Therapeutic Approaches to Papillomavirus Infections;Animal Papillomaviruses;Molecular Biology;Transcription, Replication, and Genome Organization;Epithelial Cell Culture;Papillomavirus Transformation;and Viral Vectors.

  20. Healthy Skin of Many Animal Species Harbors Papillomaviruses Which Are Closely Related to Their Human Counterparts

    PubMed Central

    Antonsson, Annika; Hansson, Bengt Göran

    2002-01-01

    Papillomaviruses associated with clinical symptoms have been found in many vertebrate species. In this study, we have used an L1 gene consensus PCR test designed to detect a broad spectrum of human skin papillomaviruses to analyze swab samples from healthy skin of 111 animals belonging to 19 vertebrate species. In eight of the species, papillomavirus DNA was found with the following prevalences: chimpanzees, 9 of 11 samples positive; gorillas, 3 of 4; long-tailed macaques, 14 of 16; spider monkeys, 2 of 2; ruffed lemurs, 1 of 2; cows, 6 of 10; European elks, 4 of 4; aurochs, 1 of 1. In total, 53 new putative animal papillomavirus types were found. The results show that skin papillomaviruses can be detected in healthy skin from many different animal species and are sufficiently related genetically to their human counterparts to be identified by a human skin papillomavirus primer set (FAP59 and FAP64). PMID:12438579

  1. Management of cutaneous human papillomavirus infection in immunocompromised patients.

    PubMed

    Varada, Sowmya; Posnick, Mark; Alessa, Dana; Ramírez-Fort, Marigdalia K

    2014-01-01

    Individuals with inherited immunodeficiencies, autoimmune disorders, organ or bone marrow transplantation and with human immunodeficiency virus are particularly susceptible to developing severe, persistent and extensive manifestations of cutaneous human papillomavirus (HPV) disease. These complex cases require a unique and often multimodal approach to management. In this chapter, we discuss several states of immune compromise with increased susceptibility to HPV disease and review the literature on available management strategies including acitretin, cidofovir, Candida antigen, cimetidine, imiquimod, isotretinoin, fluorouracil, selenium, podophyllotoxin, photodynamic therapy, mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitors and the quadrivalent HPV vaccine.

  2. DETECTION OF HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS IN THE ORAL CAVITIES OF PERSONS WITH FANCONI ANEMIA

    PubMed Central

    Winer, Rachel L.; Huang, Claire E.; Cherne, Stephen; Stern, Joshua E.; Butsch Kovacic, Melinda S.; Mehta, Parinda A.; Sauter, Sharon L.; Galloway, Denise A.; Katzenellenbogen, Rachel A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective We conducted a cross-sectional study to describe the prevalence and correlates of type-specific human papillomavirus DNA in the oral cavities of persons with Fanconi Anemia. Materials and Methods Oral swabs were collected from 67 participants with Fanconi Anemia and tested for 27 human papillomavirus genotypes using polymerase chain reaction-based methods. Results Participants were a mean of 18.6 (standard deviation, 10.0) years of age (range 4 to 47 years). The prevalence of oral human papillomavirus infection was 7.5%, and the prevalence of high-risk human papillomavirus infection was 6.0%. Human papillomavirus type 16 was not detected in any samples. Prevalence was higher in adults than in children (13.3% versus 2.7% in those ≥18 versus <18 years of age). Among adults, prevalence was higher in males than in females (25.0% versus 9.1% respectively). Conclusions Prevalence of oral human papillomavirus infection in persons with Fanconi Anemia was comparable to estimates from other studies in the general population. However, in contrast to previous studies, we did not identify human papillomavirus type 16 (the type found in most human papillomavirus-related head and neck cancers) in any participants. PMID:25158861

  3. Human papillomavirus type 16 sequence variation in concurrent vulvar and penile carcinoma in a married couple.

    PubMed

    Mitamura, Takashi; Watari, Hidemichi; Yamashiro, Katsushige; Kato, Tatsuya; Hosaka, Masayoshi; Shimada, Chisa; Fukumoto, Shun; Noshiro, Kiwamu; Sasaki, Takayuki; Sakuragi, Noriaki

    2015-06-01

    We encountered an elderly married couple with concurrent vulvar and penile carcinoma with an Asian variant of human papillomavirus type 16. Asian variants might have an elevated risk of concurrent external genital carcinomas of a male and a female, and analysis of human papillomavirus variants might be important to understand the mechanism of carcinogenesis. PMID:25970313

  4. Disclosure of genital human papillomavirus infection to female sex partners by young men.

    PubMed

    Arima, Yuzo; Winer, Rachel L; Kurth, Ann E; Martin, Diane P; Hughes, James P; Stern, Michael E; Feng, Qinghua; Kiviat, Nancy B; Koutsky, Laura A

    2012-08-01

    A survey was administered to male university students who tested positive for high-risk human papillomavirus. Disclosure was more likely in men with fewer partners, in main partnerships, and in longer partnerships. Disclosure was associated with discussing the Pap test/human papillomavirus vaccine with female partners and not associated with a worsening relationship. PMID:22797688

  5. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) and Genital Warts

    MedlinePlus

    ... page. Skip Navigation U.S. Department of Health and Human Services • National Institutes of Health Temas de Salud ... RELATED GOVERNMENT SITES U.S. Department of Health and Human Services National Institutes of Health USA.gov

  6. Kallikrein-8 Proteolytically Processes Human Papillomaviruses in the Extracellular Space To Facilitate Entry into Host Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cerqueira, Carla; Samperio Ventayol, Pilar; Vogeley, Christian

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The entry of human papillomaviruses into host cells is a complex process. It involves conformational changes at the cell surface, receptor switching, internalization by a novel endocytic mechanism, uncoating in endosomes, trafficking of a subviral complex to the Golgi complex, and nuclear entry during mitosis. Here, we addressed how the stabilizing contacts in the capsid of human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) may be reversed to allow uncoating of the viral genome. Using biochemical and cell-biological analyses, we determined that the major capsid protein L1 underwent proteolytic cleavage during entry. In addition to a dispensable cathepsin-mediated proteolysis that occurred likely after removal of capsomers from the subviral complex in endosomes, at least two further proteolytic cleavages of L1 were observed, one of which was independent of the low-pH environment of endosomes. This cleavage occurred extracellularly. Further analysis showed that the responsible protease was the secreted trypsin-like serine protease kallikrein-8 (KLK8) involved in epidermal homeostasis and wound healing. Required for infection, the cleavage was facilitated by prior interaction of viral particles with heparan sulfate proteoglycans. KLK8-mediated cleavage was crucial for further conformational changes exposing an important epitope of the minor capsid protein L2. Occurring independently of cyclophilins and of furin that mediate L2 exposure, KLK8-mediated cleavage of L1 likely facilitated access to L2, located in the capsid lumen, and potentially uncoating. Since HPV6 and HPV18 also required KLK8 for entry, we propose that the KLK8-dependent entry step is conserved. IMPORTANCE Our analysis of the proteolytic processing of incoming HPV16, an etiological agent of cervical cancer, demonstrated that the capsid is cleaved extracellularly by a serine protease active during wound healing and that this cleavage was crucial for infection. The cleavage of L1 is one of at least four structural

  7. [Melanoma and Human Papillomaviruses: Is There an Outlook for Study?].

    PubMed

    Volgareva, G M; Mikhaylova, I N; Golovina, D A

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is one of the most aggressive human malignant tumors. Its incidence and mortality are growing steadily. Ultraviolet irradiation is the main risk factor for melanoma involved in melanomagenesis. The probability of viral etiology of melanoma has been discussed. Human papillomaviruses (HPV) have been mentioned among candidates for its etiologic agents because some HPV types are the powerful carcinogens causing cervical cancer and other cancers. The review analyses the literature data on the association of melanoma with HPV Several groupsfound HPVin skin melanomas as well as in mucosa; viruses of high oncogenic risk were detected in some cases. For some organs the etiological role of high-risk HPV as inducers of invasive carcinomas is confirmed. These organs require special mention: cervix uteri, vulva, vagina, penis, anal region, and oral cavity. However in the majority of the studies in which viral DNA-positive melanomas were found, testing for viral genome expression was not done while this is the fact of primary importance. HPVare found in normal skin and mucous membranes thus creating justifiable threat of tumor specimen contamination with viral DNA in vivo. There are limited data on aggravation of the disease prognosis in papillomavirus-positive melanomas. However, any systematic observation of a sizeable patient group distinguished by that tumor type has not been performed yet. Viral E6 and E7 oncogenes of high-risk papillomaviruses were shown to be able to transform normal human melanocytes in vitro experiments. Thus, we can assume the presence of the association of melanoma with oncogenic HPV. The clinical significance of this problem is indisputable under the conditions of the steady increase in melanoma incidence and mortality rates in Russia and abroad. The problem requires further study. PMID:27522713

  8. [Melanoma and Human Papillomaviruses: Is There an Outlook for Study?].

    PubMed

    Volgareva, G M; Mikhaylova, I N; Golovina, D A

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is one of the most aggressive human malignant tumors. Its incidence and mortality are growing steadily. Ultraviolet irradiation is the main risk factor for melanoma involved in melanomagenesis. The probability of viral etiology of melanoma has been discussed. Human papillomaviruses (HPV) have been mentioned among candidates for its etiologic agents because some HPV types are the powerful carcinogens causing cervical cancer and other cancers. The review analyses the literature data on the association of melanoma with HPV Several groupsfound HPVin skin melanomas as well as in mucosa; viruses of high oncogenic risk were detected in some cases. For some organs the etiological role of high-risk HPV as inducers of invasive carcinomas is confirmed. These organs require special mention: cervix uteri, vulva, vagina, penis, anal region, and oral cavity. However in the majority of the studies in which viral DNA-positive melanomas were found, testing for viral genome expression was not done while this is the fact of primary importance. HPVare found in normal skin and mucous membranes thus creating justifiable threat of tumor specimen contamination with viral DNA in vivo. There are limited data on aggravation of the disease prognosis in papillomavirus-positive melanomas. However, any systematic observation of a sizeable patient group distinguished by that tumor type has not been performed yet. Viral E6 and E7 oncogenes of high-risk papillomaviruses were shown to be able to transform normal human melanocytes in vitro experiments. Thus, we can assume the presence of the association of melanoma with oncogenic HPV. The clinical significance of this problem is indisputable under the conditions of the steady increase in melanoma incidence and mortality rates in Russia and abroad. The problem requires further study.

  9. The moral justification for a compulsory human papillomavirus vaccination program.

    PubMed

    Balog, Joseph E

    2009-04-01

    Compulsory human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination of young girls has been proposed as a public health intervention to reduce the threat of the disease. Such a program would entail a symbiotic relationship between scientific interests in reducing mortality and morbidity and philosophical interests in promoting morality. This proposal raises the issue of whether government should use its police powers to restrict liberty and parental autonomy for the purpose of preventing harm to young people. I reviewed the scientific literature that questions the value of a HPV vaccination. Applying a principle-based approach to moral reasoning, I concluded that compulsory HPV vaccinations can be justified on moral, scientific, and public health grounds.

  10. The Moral Justification for a Compulsory Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Program

    PubMed Central

    2009-01-01

    Compulsory human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination of young girls has been proposed as a public health intervention to reduce the threat of the disease. Such a program would entail a symbiotic relationship between scientific interests in reducing mortality and morbidity and philosophical interests in promoting morality. This proposal raises the issue of whether government should use its police powers to restrict liberty and parental autonomy for the purpose of preventing harm to young people. I reviewed the scientific literature that questions the value of a HPV vaccination. Applying a principle-based approach to moral reasoning, I concluded that compulsory HPV vaccinations can be justified on moral, scientific, and public health grounds. PMID:19197085

  11. Development and psychometric evaluation of the Thai Human Papillomavirus Beliefs Scale.

    PubMed

    Juntasopeepun, Phanida; Davidson, Patricia M; Chang, Sungwon; Suwan, Natthawan; Phianmongkhol, Yupin; Srisomboon, Jatupol

    2011-12-01

    In this study, we developed and evaluated the psychometric properties of the Thai Human Papillomavirus Beliefs Scale. The Scale was tested on 386 young women aged 18-24 years in Chiang Mai, Thailand. Content validity of the Scale was evaluated by a panel of experts, construct validity was determined using exploratory factor analysis, and reliability was assessed for stability and internal consistency. Factor analysis provided empirical support for the existence of four factors, which accounted for 67.7% of the total variance: perceived susceptibility, perceived seriousness, perceived benefits, and perceived barriers. Cronbach's α reliability coefficients for the four subscales ranged from 0.59 to 0.86. Factors predicting intention to receive the papillomavirus vaccine were perceived susceptibility, perceived benefits, and perceived barriers. The Thai Human Papillomavirus Beliefs Scale demonstrated promising psychometric properties, indicating that it might be a useful instrument for assessing young women's human papillomavirus and cervical cancer-associated beliefs, and for predicting human papillomavirus vaccination intention.

  12. Mucosal and cutaneous human papillomaviruses detected in raw sewages.

    PubMed

    La Rosa, Giuseppina; Fratini, Marta; Accardi, Luisa; D'Oro, Graziana; Della Libera, Simonetta; Muscillo, Michele; Di Bonito, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Epitheliotropic viruses can find their way into sewage. The aim of the present study was to investigate the occurrence, distribution, and genetic diversity of Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs) in urban wastewaters. Sewage samples were collected from treatment plants distributed throughout Italy. The DNA extracted from these samples was analyzed by PCR using five PV-specific sets of primers targeting the L1 (GP5/GP6, MY09/MY11, FAP59/64, SKF/SKR) and E1 regions (PM-A/PM-B), according to the protocols previously validated for the detection of mucosal and cutaneous HPV genotypes. PCR products underwent sequencing analysis and the sequences were aligned to reference genomes from the Papillomavirus Episteme database. Phylogenetic analysis was then performed to assess the genetic relationships among the different sequences and between the sequences of the samples and those of the prototype strains. A broad spectrum of sequences related to mucosal and cutaneous HPV types was detected in 81% of the sewage samples analyzed. Surprisingly, sequences related to the anogenital HPV6 and 11 were detected in 19% of the samples, and sequences related to the "high risk" oncogenic HPV16 were identified in two samples. Sequences related to HPV9, HPV20, HPV25, HPV76, HPV80, HPV104, HPV110, HPV111, HPV120 and HPV145 beta Papillomaviruses were detected in 76% of the samples. In addition, similarity searches and phylogenetic analysis of some sequences suggest that they could belong to putative new genotypes of the beta genus. In this study, for the first time, the presence of HPV viruses strongly related to human cancer is reported in sewage samples. Our data increases the knowledge of HPV genomic diversity and suggests that virological analysis of urban sewage can provide key information useful in supporting epidemiological studies.

  13. Human papillomavirus DNA and mRNA prevalence and association with cervical cytological abnormalities in the Irish HIV population.

    PubMed

    Loy, Aisling; McInerney, Jamie; Pilkington, Loretto; Keegan, Helen; Delamere, Sandra; Martin, Cara M; Sheils, Orla; O'Leary, John J; Mulcahy, Fiona

    2015-10-01

    The complex interplay between HIV and human papillomavirus and its link to cervical dysplasia is poorly understood. This is the first study to assess the prevalence of oncogenic human papillomavirus mRNA in HIV-positive women, its relationship to HIV and its potential use in the triage of cervical cancer screening in HIV-positive women. In this cross-sectional study, we included 321 HIV-positive women. In all, 28.7% had abnormal cervical cytology, 51.1% were human papillomavirus DNA-positive and 21.8% tested positive for human papillomavirus mRNA. Women with a CD4 count of <200 × 10(6)/L were more likely to test positive for human papillomavirus DNA and mRNA. Virally suppressed women were less likely to be human papillomavirus DNA-positive; however, the same did not hold true for human papillomavirus mRNA. We found the human papillomavirus mRNA screening to be more specific when screening for low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion than human papillomavirus DNA at 84.53% compared to 57.36%. However, the sensitivity was less at 51.59% versus 91.07% for human papillomavirus DNA. It may be possible in the future to use human papillomavirus mRNA/DNA testing within a triage algorithm for the screening and management of cervical cancer in the HIV-positive patient.

  14. Human Papillomavirus 45 Genetic Variation and Cervical Cancer Risk Worldwide

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Alyce A.; Heideman, Daniëlle A. M.; Boon, Debby; Gheit, Tarik; Snijders, Peter J. F.; Tommasino, Massimo; Franceschi, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human papillomavirus 45 (HPV45) is a member of the HPV18-related alpha-7 species and accounts for approximately 5% of all cervical cancer cases worldwide. This study evaluated the genetic diversity of HPV45 and the association of HPV45 variants with the risk of cervical cancer by sequencing the entire E6 and E7 open reading frames of 300 HPV45-positive cervical samples from 36 countries. A total of 43 HPV45 sequence variants were identified that formed 5 phylogenetic sublineages, A1, A2, A3, B1, and B2, the distribution of which varied by geographical region. Among 192 cases of cervical cancer and 101 controls, the B2 sublineage was significantly overrepresented in cervical cancer, both overall and in Africa and Europe separately. We show that the sequence analysis of E6 and E7 allows the classification of HPV45 variants and that the risk of cervical cancer may differ by HPV45 variant sublineage. IMPORTANCE This work describes the largest study to date of human papillomavirus 45 (HPV45)-positive cervical samples and provides a comprehensive reference for phylogenetic classification for use in epidemiological studies of the carcinogenicity of HPV45 genetic variants, particularly as our findings suggest that the B2 sublineage of HPV45 is associated with a higher risk of cervical cancer. PMID:24501412

  15. Economic evaluation of human papillomavirus vaccination in the United Kingdom

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Yoon Hong; Edmunds, W John

    2008-01-01

    Objective To assess the cost effectiveness of routine vaccination of 12 year old schoolgirls against human papillomavirus infection in the United Kingdom. Design Economic evaluation. Setting UK. Population Schoolgirls aged 12 or older. Main outcome measures Costs, quality adjusted life years (QALYs), and incremental cost effectiveness ratios for a range of vaccination options. Results Vaccinating 12 year old schoolgirls with a quadrivalent vaccine at 80% coverage is likely to be cost effective at a willingness to pay threshold of £30 000 (€37 700; $59 163) per QALY gained, if the average duration of protection from the vaccine is more than 10 years. Implementing a catch-up campaign of girls up to age 18 is likely to be cost effective. Vaccination of boys is unlikely to be cost effective. A bivalent vaccine with the same efficacy against human papillomavirus types 16 and 18 costing £13-£21 less per dose (depending on the duration of vaccine protection) may be as cost effective as the quadrivalent vaccine although less effective as it does not prevent anogenital warts. Conclusions Routine vaccination of 12 year old schoolgirls combined with an initial catch-up campaign up to age 18 is likely to be cost effective in the UK. The results are robust to uncertainty in many parameters and processes. A key influential variable is the duration of vaccine protection. PMID:18640957

  16. Role of human papillomavirus in the development of urothelial carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Yavuzer, Dilek; Karadayi, Nimet; Salepci, Taflan; Baloglu, Huseyin; Bilici, Ahmet; Sakirahmet, Dilek

    2011-09-01

    It has been estimated that almost 10% of the worldwide cancer burden is linked to human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Although the association between HPV and bladder carcinoma has been extensively investigated, data on the role of HPV in bladder carcinogenesis are controversial. The aim of the study was to assess the possible role of human papillomavirus in the development of urothelial bladder carcinomas. Formalin-fixed and paraffin-embedded archival tissue samples were used for DNA extraction. Seventy urothelial bladder carcinoma tissues were screened by nested-polymerase chain reaction (PCR) for HPV DNA with a control group of total 18 cervical tissues with invasive cervical carcinoma and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia III (CIN III). In the study group, we did not find HPV DNA positivity in any of the urothelial carcinomas. In the control group, 15 out of 18 (83.3%) samples were positive for the HPV DNA. These results indicated that there was no association between HPV infection and urothelial carcinomas. PMID:20428971

  17. Strategies against human papillomavirus infection and cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Jung, Woon-Won; Chun, Taehoon; Sul, Donggeun; Hwang, Kwang Woo; Kang, Hyung-Sik; Lee, Duck Joo; Han, In-Kwon

    2004-12-01

    Papillomaviruses infect a wide variety of animals, including humans. The human papillomavirus (HPV), in particular, is one of the most common causes of sexually transmitted disease. More than 200 types of HPV have been identified by DNA sequence data, and 85 HPV genotypes have been well characterized to date. HPV can infect the basal epithelial cells of the skin or inner tissue linings, and are, accordingly, categorized as either cutaneous or mucosal type. HPV is associated with a panoply of clinical conditions, ranging from innocuous lesions to cervical cancer. In the early 1980s, studies first reported a link between cervical cancer and genital HPV infection. Genital HPV infections are now recognized to be a major risk factor in at least 95% of cervical cancers. 30 different HPV genotypes have been identified as causative of sexually transmitted diseases, most of which induce lesions in the cervix, vagina, vulva, penis, and anus, as the result of sexual contact. There is also direct evidence demonstrating that at least four of these genotypes are prerequisite factors in cervical cancer. The main aim of this review was to evaluate the current literature regarding the pathovirology, diagnostics, vaccines, therapy, risk groups, and further therapeutic directions for HPV infections. In addition, we reviewed the current status of HPV infections in South Korean women, as evidenced by our data.

  18. Prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) in oral cavity and oropharynx.

    PubMed

    Castro, Therezita Peixoto Patury Galvão; Bussoloti Filho, Ivo

    2006-01-01

    The prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) in the oral cavity and oropharynx has not yet been as well studied as its infection of the vaginal tract. However, new study are emerge after the development of molecular biology techniques. The objective of this study is to show the prevalence of HPV in the oral cavity and the oropharynx. An ample bibliographic review was done showing a prevalence of HPV 6, 11 in a normal oral mucous membrane (latent infection). In oral benign lesions associated with HPV, a prevalence of HPV 6 and 11 was observed in squamous cell papilloma (SCP) and condylomas acuminatum, while HPV 2 and 57 were more prevalent in verruca vulgaris lesions. As for focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH) and oral cancer, especially squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), the prevalence was of HPV 13 and 32, and HPV 16, respectively. The last findings are, nonetheless, controversial. The last findings are, nonetheless, controversial. Showed also discrepancy result the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) in normal oral mucous (latent infection) and in oral cancer, however evidenced confirmatory result in oral benign lesions associated with virus.

  19. hpvPDB: An Online Proteome Reserve for Human Papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Satish; Jena, Lingaraja; Daf, Sangeeta; Mohod, Kanchan; Goyal, Peyush; Varma, Ashok K

    2013-12-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the leading cause of cancer mortality among women worldwide. The molecular understanding of HPV proteins has significant connotation for understanding their intrusion in the host and designing novel protein vaccines and anti-viral agents, etc. Genomic, proteomic, structural, and disease-related information on HPV is available on the web; yet, with trivial annotations and more so, it is not well customized for data analysis, host-pathogen interaction, strain-disease association, drug designing, and sequence analysis, etc. We attempted to design an online reserve with comprehensive information on HPV for the end users desiring the same. The Human Papillomavirus Proteome Database (hpvPDB) domiciles proteomic and genomic information on 150 HPV strains sequenced to date. Simultaneous easy expandability and retrieval of the strain-specific data, with a provision for sequence analysis and exploration potential of predicted structures, and easy access for curation and annotation through a range of search options at one platform are a few of its important features. Affluent information in this reserve could be of help for researchers involved in structural virology, cancer research, drug discovery, and vaccine design.

  20. hpvPDB: An Online Proteome Reserve for Human Papillomavirus

    PubMed Central

    Jena, Lingaraja; Daf, Sangeeta; Mohod, Kanchan; Goyal, Peyush; Varma, Ashok K.

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the leading cause of cancer mortality among women worldwide. The molecular understanding of HPV proteins has significant connotation for understanding their intrusion in the host and designing novel protein vaccines and anti-viral agents, etc. Genomic, proteomic, structural, and disease-related information on HPV is available on the web; yet, with trivial annotations and more so, it is not well customized for data analysis, host-pathogen interaction, strain-disease association, drug designing, and sequence analysis, etc. We attempted to design an online reserve with comprehensive information on HPV for the end users desiring the same. The Human Papillomavirus Proteome Database (hpvPDB) domiciles proteomic and genomic information on 150 HPV strains sequenced to date. Simultaneous easy expandability and retrieval of the strain-specific data, with a provision for sequence analysis and exploration potential of predicted structures, and easy access for curation and annotation through a range of search options at one platform are a few of its important features. Affluent information in this reserve could be of help for researchers involved in structural virology, cancer research, drug discovery, and vaccine design. PMID:24465243

  1. Understanding and overcoming barriers to human papillomavirus vaccine acceptance.

    PubMed

    Zimet, Gregory D

    2006-02-01

    New vaccines designed to prevent human papillomavirus (HPV) infection have the potential to reduce the incidence of serious illness and death worldwide among women, substantially reduce the emotional suffering associated with abnormal Papanicolaou (Pap) test results and the diagnosis of cervical cancer, and save significant health care dollars. However, these benefits may not be fully realized until the vaccine is accepted by patients, parents, and health care practitioners. Furthermore, there may be unique issues related to the acceptance of a vaccine designed to prevent a sexually transmitted infection that is poorly understood by many women. Among the acceptance issues are: individual comfort with a sexually transmitted infection (STI) vaccine; parental comfort with vaccination of their preadolescent/early adolescent daughters; physician comfort with recommending a human papillomavirus vaccine to women and parents of preadolescents; and physician communication skills related to talking with women and parents about the vaccine. Potentially difficult as it might be to implement a vaccination program, vaccination and prevention of HPV-associated disease are still infinitely preferable to observation and treatment. This article will review some of the potential barriers to HPV Vaccine acceptance, with a particular focus on factors relevant to female patients, parents, and health care providers.

  2. Human papillomavirus: current status and issues of vaccination.

    PubMed

    Malik, Heena; Khan, Fahim H; Ahsan, Haseeb

    2014-02-01

    An association between human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and the development of cervical cancer was initially suggested over 30 years ago, and today there is clear evidence that certain subtypes of HPV are the causative agents of such malignancies. Papillomaviruses make up a vast family that comprises hundreds of different viruses. These viruses infect epithelia in humans and animals and cause benign hyperproliferative lesions, commonly called warts or papillomas, which can occasionally progress to squamous cell cancer. HPV infections are considered the most common among sexually transmitted diseases. One of the most prevalent cancer types induced by HPV (mostly types 16 and 18) is cervical cancer. Vaccination is the most effective means of preventing this infectious disease. These prophylactic vaccines, based on virus-like particles (VLPs), are extremely effective in providing protection from infection in almost 100 % of cases. VLP vaccines of HPV are subunit vaccines consisting only of the major viral capsid protein of HPV. There are two types of vaccine available: bivalent vaccine (against HPV-16/18) and quadrivalent vaccine (against HPV-6/11/16/18). Second-generation prophylactic HPV vaccines, currently in clinical trials, may hold several merits over the current bivalent and quadrivalent vaccines, such as protection against additional oncogenic HPV types, less dependence on cold-chain storage and distribution, and non-invasive methods of delivery.

  3. [Human papillomavirus infection in male genitalia].

    PubMed

    Cano Garfias, R; Villarreal Peral, C; Juárez Azpilcueta, A

    1995-10-01

    A prospective and transversal study in 100 patients since January to December of 1994, was done, to know the human papiloma virus infection prevalence in male genitals. The patients were studied by a clinical history, genital area colposcopic revision after acetic acid 5% application, biopsy of the lesion and histopathology study. The patients age was among 16 to 71 years old, with a media of 38.8 years old. The sexual activity beginning was from 12 to 27 years old, with an average of 18 years old. Forty one percent of the patients have had sexual relations with prostitutes, 26% have had sexually transmitted diseases, 9% of the patients referred only 1 sexual mate and 82% had human papiloma virus infection.

  4. The Expanded Impact of Human Papillomavirus Vaccine.

    PubMed

    Pahud, Barbara A; Ault, Kevin A

    2015-12-01

    Human papilloma virus (HPV) infection is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the United States. Some infections will result in anogenital warts and anogenital or oropharyngeal cancers. Preventing HPV infection is a public health priority to reduce cancer and HPV-associated complications. Prevention through vaccination is the most cost-effective and lifesaving intervention to decrease the burden of HPV-related cancers and other HPV-associated diseases. It is critical for pediatricians to make a strong recommendation for early and timely vaccination and completion of the 3-dose series. The goal of early vaccination is to immunize before first exposure to HPV virus.

  5. Human Papillomavirus (HPV)-associated Oral Cancers and Treatment Strategies.

    PubMed

    Sathish, N; Wang, X; Yuan, Y

    2014-07-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is known to be associated with several types of human cancer, including cervical, vulvar, vaginal, penile, anal, and head-and-neck cancers. Among these cancers, HPV-associated head-and-neck cancers, inclusive of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and oral cavity squamous cell carcinomas (OCSCC), have recently risen dramatically in men under 50 years old. Within 20 years, the percentage of HPV-positive OSCC in total OSCC went from less than 20% to more than 70% in the United States and some European countries. This article reviews the incidence trend and pathogenesis of HPV-associated head-and-neck cancers as well as current treatment modalities for the disease.

  6. Roles of Human Papillomaviruses and p16 in Oral Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sritippho, Thanun; Chotjumlong, Pareena; Iamaroon, Anak

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck cancer, including oral cancer, is the sixth most common cancer in humans worldwide. More than 90% of oral cancers are of squamous cell carcinoma type. Recent studies have shown a strong relationship between human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and head and neck cancer, especially oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) and oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). Moreover, the incidence of HPV-related OSCC appears to be on the rise while HPV-unrelated OSCC tends to have stabilized in the past decades. p16, a tumor suppressor gene, normally functions as a regulator of the cell cycle. Upon infection with high-risk types of HPV (HR-HPV), particularly types 16, 18, 31, 33, 34, 35, 39, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59, 66, 68, and 70, the expression of p16 is aberrantly overexpressed. Therefore, the expression of p16 is widely used as a surrogate marker for HPV infection in head and neck cancer.

  7. Human papillomavirus in cervical and head-and-neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Psyrri, Amanda; DiMaio, Daniel

    2008-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a major cause of cancer mortality in women worldwide and is initiated by infection with high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs). High-risk HPVs, especially HPV-16, are associated with other anogenital cancers and a subgroup of head-and-neck cancers. Indeed, HPV infection could account for the development of head-and-neck cancer in certain individuals that lack the classical risk factors for this disease (tobacco and alcohol abuse). This Review summarizes the main events of the HPV life cycle, the functions of the viral proteins, and the implications of HPV infection on their hosts, with an emphasis on carcinogenic mechanisms and disease outcomes in head-and-neck cancer. The demonstration that HPVs have a role in human carcinogenesis has allowed the development of preventive and therapeutic strategies aimed at reducing the incidence and mortality of HPV-associated cancers.

  8. Novel Functions of the Human Papillomavirus E6 Oncoproteins.

    PubMed

    Wallace, Nicholas A; Galloway, Denise A

    2015-11-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) infect the epidermis as well as mucous membranes of humans. They are the causative agents of anogenital tract and some oropharyngeal cancers. Infections begin in the basal epithelia, where the viral genome replicates slowly along with its host cell. As infected cells begin to differentiate and progress toward the periphery, the virus drives proliferation in cells that would otherwise be quiescent. To uncouple differentiation from continued cellular propagation, HPVs express two oncoproteins, HPV E6 and E7. This review focuses on high-risk α-HPV E6, which in addition to supporting viral replication has transforming properties. HPV E6 promotes p53 degradation and activates telomerase, but the multifaceted oncoprotein has numerous other functions that are highlighted here. PMID:26958922

  9. A DNA methylation classifier of cervical precancer based on human papillomavirus and human genes.

    PubMed

    Brentnall, Adam R; Vasiljević, Nataša; Scibior-Bentkowska, Dorota; Cadman, Louise; Austin, Janet; Szarewski, Anne; Cuzick, Jack; Lorincz, Attila T

    2014-09-15

    Testing for high-risk (hr) types of human papillomavirus (HPV) is highly sensitive as a screening test of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplastic (CIN2/3) disease, the precursor of cervical cancer. However, it has a relatively low specificity. Our objective was to develop a prediction rule with a higher specificity, using combinations of human and HPV DNA methylation. Exfoliated cervical specimens from colposcopy-referral cohorts in London were analyzed for DNA methylation levels by pyrosequencing in the L1 and L2 regions of HPV16, HPV18, HPV31 and human genes EPB41L3, DPYS and MAL. Samples from 1,493 hrHPV-positive women were assessed and of these 556 were found to have CIN2/3 at biopsy; 556 tested positive for HPV16 (323 CIN2/3), 201 for HPV18 (73 CIN2/3) and 202 for HPV31 (98 CIN2/3). The prediction rule included EPB41L3 and HPV and had area under curve 0.80 (95% CI 0.78-0.82). For 90% sensitivity, specificity was 36% (33-40) and positive predictive value (PPV) was 46% (43-48). By HPV type, 90% sensitivity corresponded to the following specificities and PPV, respectively: HPV16, 38% (32-45) and 67% (63-71); HPV18, 53% (45-62) and 52% (45-59); HPV31, 39% (31-49) and 58% (51-65); HPV16, 18 or 31, 44% (40-49) and 62% (59-65) and other hrHPV 17% (14-21) and 21% (18-24). We conclude that a methylation assay in hrHPV-positive women might improve PPV with minimal sensitivity loss.

  10. Prevention of cancer by prophylactic human papillomavirus vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Kwak, Kihyuck; Yemelyanova, Anna; Roden, Richard B.S.

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY OF RECENT ADVANCES Oncogenic human papillomaviruses (HPV) are exclusively mucosal pathogens that are non-cytopathic and the basal epithelial cells harboring and maintaining an infection do not produce either capsid antigen or virus. The efficacy of the licensed L1 virus-like particle (VLP) vaccines has encouraged development of several second generation vaccines aimed at expanding the coverage to all oncogenic HPV types and reducing barriers to global implementation. Currently there is no defined immune correlate of protection that can be used to determine if an individual patient is protected and for the evaluation of these second generation vaccines. Surprisingly, passive transfer of neutralizing serum antibody is protective in animal models. Recent studies suggest how neutralizing antibody mediates immunity against mucosal HPV and the possible impact of memory B cells. PMID:21185706

  11. Overview: Detection of Human Papillomavirus in Clinical Samples.

    PubMed

    Prakrankamanant, Preeda; Wongsena, Metee

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually-transmitted virus and it is known that persistent infection by high-risk HPV is a necessary factor for cervical carcinogenesis. Although cytological screening has decreased the incidence of cervical cancer, the sensitivity and specificity of testing is limited. To date, HPV-driven molecular techniques have provided a number of potential biomarkers for both diagnostic and prognostic use in clinical management. In addition, they can provide insights into the biology of HPV-induced cancers leading to non-surgical therapy. This review summarizes current knowledge of detection methods for HPV and related biomarkers that can be used to discriminate lesions with a high risk of progression of cervical cancer. PMID:26817243

  12. Human papillomavirus reporting: impact on Bethesda cytology reports.

    PubMed

    Raab, Stephen S

    2003-08-01

    In 2001, the Bethesda Committee revised the terminology for reporting Papanicolaou tests. One of the 2001 Bethesda forum groups addressed the use of ancillary tests, and the most commonly used ancillary test is for human papillomavirus (HPV). The Bethesda Ancillary Testing Forum presented terminology related to HPV testing. The Ancillary Testing Forum recommended that the specific HPV test method be presented and the results reported as positive or negative for HPV of a certain type or class. The Papanicolaou test and the HPV test should be reported together or should refer to each other if possible. A number of reporting schema currently are used to report HPV results; these schema include probabilistic reporting, integrated reporting, reporting as a result, and reporting with clinical management recommendations. Few data currently are available to support an optimal reporting method. PMID:12873168

  13. International standardization and classification of human papillomavirus types.

    PubMed

    Bzhalava, Davit; Eklund, Carina; Dillner, Joakim

    2015-02-01

    Established Human Papillomavirus (HPV) types, up to HPV202, belong to 49 species in five genera. International standardization in classification and quality standards for HPV type designation and detection is ensured by the International HPV Reference Center. The center i) receives clones of potentially novel HPV types, re-clones and re-sequences them. If confirmed, an HPV type number is assigned and posted on www.hpvcenter.se. ii) distributes reference clone samples, for academic research, under Material Transfer Agreements agreed with the originator. iii) provides preliminary checking of whether new sequences represent novel types iv) issues international proficiency panels for HPV genotyping. The rate of HPV type discovery is increasing, probably because of metagenomic sequencing. γ-genus today contains 79HPV types and 27 species, surpassing ∝ and β genera with 65 and 51HPV types, respectively. Regular issuing of proficiency panels based on HPV reference clones has resulted in global improvement of HPV genotyping services.

  14. Young Hispanic Men and Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Choices.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Tami L; Stephens, Dionne P; Johnson-Mallard, Versie; Higgins, Melinda

    2016-03-01

    This exploratory descriptive study examined perceived vulnerabilities to human papillomavirus (HPV) and the correlation to factors influencing vaccine beliefs and vaccine decision making in young Hispanic males attending a large public urban university. Only 24% of participants believed that the HPV vaccine could prevent future problems, and 53% said they would not be vaccinated. The best predictors of HPV vaccination in young Hispanic men were agreement with doctor recommendations and belief in the vaccine's efficacy. Machismo cultural norms influence young Hispanic men's HPV-related decision making, their perceptions of the vaccine, and how they attitudinally act on what little HPV information they have access to. This study provides culturally relevant information for the development of targeted health education strategies aimed at increasing HPV vaccination in young Hispanic men.

  15. Another Look at the Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Experience in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Deber, Raisa B.; Guttmann, Astrid; McGeer, Allison; Krahn, Murray

    2011-01-01

    Policy debates about immunization frequently focus on classic trade-offs between individual versus collective well-being. Publicly funded immunization programs are usually justified on the basis of widespread public benefit with minimal individual risk. We discuss the example of the policy process surrounding the adoption of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine in Canada to consider whether public good arguments continue to dominate immunization policymaking. Specifically, we show how a range of stakeholders framed HPV vaccination as a personal—rather than a public—matter, despite the absence of a controversy over mandatory immunization as was the case in the United States. Our findings suggest an erosion of the persuasiveness of public good arguments around collective immunization programs in the policy discourse. PMID:21852642

  16. The Spanish human papillomavirus vaccine consensus group: a working model.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Bordoy, Javier; Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2010-08-01

    Successful implementation of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine in each country can only be achieved from a complementary and synergistic perspective, integrating all the different points of view of the diverse related professionals. It is this context where the Spanish HPV Vaccine Consensus Group (Grupo Español de Consenso sobre la Vacuna VPH, GEC-VPH) was created. GEC-VPH philosophy, objectives and experience are reported in this article, with particular attention to the management of negative publicity and anti-vaccine groups. Initiatives as GEC-VPH--adapted to each country's particular idiosyncrasies--might help to overcome the existing barriers and to achieve wide and early implementation of HPV vaccination. PMID:20484987

  17. Detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA in focal epithelial hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Garlick, J A; Calderon, S; Buchner, A; Mitrani-Rosenbaum, S

    1989-03-01

    Five focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH) specimens from four patients were examined by Southern blot hybridization analysis to determine the specific human papillomavirus (HPV) types present. The histomorphologic features of these specimens were also evaluated and a broad variety of changes including koilocytes, mitosoid cells, ballooning cells and cells showing individual cell keratinization were noted. FEH lesions from the three patients sharing a familial relationship demonstrated HPV DNA sequences that were either the prototype HPV-13 or a very closely related HPV-13 subtype. These patients also showed similar clinical features. Lesional tissue from the other patient was found to harbor HPV DNA sequences similar to HPV-32. In view of these findings it is suggested that these specific HPV types are associated with the characteristic FEH histomorphology described.

  18. Preventive and Therapeutic Vaccines against Human Papillomaviruses Associated Cervical Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Nayereh, Khadem Ghaebi; Khadem, Ghaeb

    2012-01-01

    Cervical cancer is, globally known to be, one of the most common cancers among women especially in developing countries. More than 90% of cervical cancers are associated with high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) particularly HPV types 16 and 18. Two major strategies have been developed for prevention and treatment of cervical cancer and other HPV-associated malignancies; the first one is based on HPV virus-like particles (VLPs) containing HPV structural proteins. VLP based vaccines can induce genotype specific virus neutralizing antibodies for preventing HPV infections. The other strategy is based on HPV early genes especially E6 and E7 for eliminating the established HPV infections; therefore they are classified as HPV therapeutic vaccines. This article reviews the preventive and therapeutic vaccines against HPV infections and cervical cancer. PMID:23493151

  19. Human papillomavirus as a target for management, prevention and therapy.

    PubMed

    Crosbie, Emma J; Kitchener, Henry C

    2012-01-01

    The discovery that human papillomavirus (HPV) is the necessary causal factor in cervical carcinogenesis has made it a target for prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines, as well as a diagnostic tool in cervical screening. Whilst prophylactic vaccination has proven very effective in terms of preventing cervical cancer precursor lesions, therapeutic strategies have presented far greater challenges. HPV testing has shown itself to be extremely valuable in the triage of low grade cytological abnormalities, test of cure following treatment of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), and will, over the next 10 years, gradually replace cytology as the mainstay of primary cervical screening. In this review, the latest evidence supporting HPV as both a biomarker of risk for cervical cancer and a target for prophylactic and therapeutic vaccination is presented. PMID:22690976

  20. Human papillomaviruses: shared and distinct pathways for pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Galloway, Denise A; Laimins, Laimonis A

    2015-10-01

    Over 200 types of human papillomaviruses (HPV) have been identified that infect epithelial cells at different anatomic locations. HPVs are grouped into five genera with the alpha and beta viruses being the most commonly studied. Members of the alpha HPV genus infect genital epithelia and are the causative agents of many anogenital cancers. Beta HPVs infect cutaneous epithelia and have been suggested as co-factors in the development of non-melanoma skin cancers. Recent studies have shown that activation of DNA damage pathways is important for the productive life cycle of the alpha HPVs while the beta viruses suppress their activation. These differences likely contribute to the varying types of lesions and malignancies that are associated with these viruses.

  1. Overview: Detection of Human Papillomavirus in Clinical Samples.

    PubMed

    Prakrankamanant, Preeda; Wongsena, Metee

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually-transmitted virus and it is known that persistent infection by high-risk HPV is a necessary factor for cervical carcinogenesis. Although cytological screening has decreased the incidence of cervical cancer, the sensitivity and specificity of testing is limited. To date, HPV-driven molecular techniques have provided a number of potential biomarkers for both diagnostic and prognostic use in clinical management. In addition, they can provide insights into the biology of HPV-induced cancers leading to non-surgical therapy. This review summarizes current knowledge of detection methods for HPV and related biomarkers that can be used to discriminate lesions with a high risk of progression of cervical cancer.

  2. Human papillomavirus infection: etiopathogenesis, molecular biology and clinical manifestations.

    PubMed

    Leto, Maria das Graças Pereira; Santos Júnior, Gildo Francisco Dos; Porro, Adriana Maria; Tomimori, Jane

    2011-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a DNA virus that presents tropism for epithelial cells, causing infections of the skin and mucous membranes. Replication of HPV occurs in the nuclei of squamous cells and its life cycle is directly related to the differentiation program of the host cell. To date, nearly 100 different types of HPV have been characterized and there is a large number of other types that have not been sequenced yet. Besides being responsible for benign lesions of the skin and mucous membranes, HPV is also involved in the development of various mucocutaneous tumors: Bowen's disease, non-melanoma skin cancers and genital carcinomas. This review discusses the characteristics of HPV, malignant and benign mucous and skin manifestations caused by HPV, besides the main methods of detection and typing of the virus.

  3. Home-Based or Clinic-Based Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Screening

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2016-01-28

    Atypical Squamous Cell of Undetermined Significance; Cervical Carcinoma; Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Grade 2/3; Health Status Unknown; Human Papillomavirus Infection; Low Grade Cervical Squamous Intraepithelial Neoplasia; Stage 0 Cervical Cancer

  4. Structural basis for acyl-group discrimination by human Gcn5L2

    PubMed Central

    Ringel, Alison E.; Wolberger, Cynthia

    2016-01-01

    Gcn5 is a conserved acetyltransferase that regulates transcription by acetylating the N-terminal tails of histones. Motivated by recent studies identifying a chemically diverse array of lysine acyl modifications in vivo, the acyl-chain specificity of the acetyltransferase human Gcn5 (Gcn5L2) was examined. Whereas Gcn5L2 robustly catalyzes lysine acetylation, the acyltransferase activity of Gcn5L2 becomes progressively weaker with increasing acyl-chain length. To understand how Gcn5 discriminates between different acyl-CoA molecules, structures of the catalytic domain of human Gcn5L2 bound to propionyl-CoA and butyryl-CoA were determined. Although the active site of Gcn5L2 can accommodate propionyl-CoA and butyryl-CoA without major structural rearrangements, butyryl-CoA adopts a conformation incompatible with catalysis that obstructs the path of the incoming lysine residue and acts as a competitive inhibitor of Gcn5L2 versus acetyl-CoA. These structures demonstrate how Gcn5L2 discriminates between acyl-chain donors and explain why Gcn5L2 has weak activity for acyl moieties that are larger than an acetyl group. PMID:27377381

  5. Biphenotypic human papillomavirus-associated head and neck squamous cell carcinoma: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Pitiyage, Gayani; Lei, Mary; Guererro Urbano, Teresa; Odell, Edward; Thavaraj, Selvam

    2015-07-11

    Human papillomavirus-associated oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma is now recognised as a subtype of head and neck cancer with distinct clinical, molecular and histological characteristics. The majority of these carcinomas are of non-keratinising squamous type but there is a growing number of histomorphologic variants of this disease. Here we describe the clinical, histomorphologic and immunophenotypic features of two cases of human papillomavirus-associated oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma demonstrating a clearly delineated biphasic differentiated and undifferentiated phenotype.

  6. Laboratory production in vivo of infectious human papillomavirus type 11

    SciTech Connect

    Kreider, J.W.; Howett, M.K.; Leure-Dupree, A.E.; Zaino, R.J.; Weber, J.A.

    1987-02-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) induce among patients natural lesions which produce small amounts of virus. Infection of human cell cultures does not lead to the multiplication of virus, which also does not replicate in experimental animals. The authors have developed a unique system for the laboratory production of HPV type 11 (HPV-11). Fragments of human neonatal foreskin were infected with an extract of naturally occurring human vulvar condylomata and grafted beneath the renal capsule of athymic mice. Later (3 to 5 months), condylomatous cysts developed from those grafts. Nuclei of koilocytotic cells contained large amounts of capsid antigen and intranuclear virions. The experimentally induced condylomata were homogenized, and the virions were extracted and used to infect another generation of human foreskin grafts in athymic mice. The HPV-11 DNA content and infectivity of the natural and experimental condylomata were similar. Extracts of experimental condylomata were subjected to differential ultracentrifugation and sedimentation in CsCl density gradients. A single, opalescent band was visible at a density of 1.34 g/ml. It contained HPV virions with HPV-11 DNA. This report is the first demonstration of the laboratory production of an HPV.

  7. Cloning of monomeric human papillomavirus type 16 DNA integrated within cell DNA from a cervical carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Matsukura, T.; Kanda, T.; Furuno, A.; Yoshikawa, H.; Kawana, T.; Yoshiike, K.

    1986-06-01

    The authors have molecularly cloned and characterized monomeric human papillomavirus type 16 DNA with flanking cell DNA sequences from a cervical carcinoma. Determination of nucleotide sequence around the junctions of human papillomavirus and cell DNAs revealed that at the site of integration within cell DNA the cloned viral DNA had a deletion between nucleotides 1284 and 4471 (numbering system from K. Seedorf, G. Kraemmer, M. Duerst, S. Suhai, and W.G. Roewkamp), which includes the greater part of E1 gene and the entire E2 gene. In the remaining part of the E1 gene, three guanines were found at the location where two guanines at nucleotides 1137 and 1138 have been recorded. This additional guanine shifted the reading frame and erased an interruption in the E1 gene. The data strongly suggest that, like other papillomaviruses, human papillomavirus type 16 has an uninterrupted E1 gene.

  8. Human papillomavirus genotyping and integration in ovarian cancer Saudi patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with different malignancies but its role in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer is controversial. This study investigated the prevalence, genotyping and physical state of HPV in ovarian cancer Saudi patients. Methods Hundred formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) ovarian carcinoma tissues and their normal adjacent tissues (NAT) were included in the study. HPV was detected by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using degenerated HPVL1 consensus primer pairs MY09/MY11 and GP5+/GP6 + to amplify a broad spectrum of HPV genotypes in a single reaction. The HPV positive samples were further genotyped using DNA sequencing. The physical state of the virus was identified using Amplification of Papillomavirus Oncogene Transcripts (APOT) assay in the samples positive for HPV16 and/or HPV18. Results High percentage of HPV (42%) was observed in ovarian carcinoma compared to 8% in the NAT. The high-risk HPV types 16, 18 and 45 were highly associated with the advanced stages of tumor, while low-risk types 6 and 11 were present in NAT. In malignant tissues, HPV-16 was the most predominant genotype followed by HPV-18 and -45. The percentage of viral integration into the host genome was significantly high (61.1%) compared to 38.9% episomal in HPV positive tumors tissues. In HPV18 genotype the percentage of viral integration was 54.5% compared to 45.5% episomal. Conclusion The high risk HPV genotypes in ovarian cancer may indicate its role in ovarian carcinogenesis. The HPV vaccination is highly recommended to reduce this type of cancer. PMID:24252426

  9. Cancerl cells 5. Papillomaviruses

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, B.M.; Brandsma, J.L. ); Taichman, L.B. )

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 30 selections. Some of the titles are: Elements that Control the Transcription of Genital Human Papillomavirus Type 18; Human Paillomavirus Gene Expression; RNA Probes to Analyze Human Papillomavirus Gene Expression in Squamous Papilloma of the Respiratory Tract; Expression of Human Papillomavirus Type-1 E4 Gene Products in Warts; and Underreplication of Human Papillomavirus Type-1 DNA in Cultures of Foreskin Keratinocytes.

  10. The Epidemiology of Human Papillomavirus Infection and Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, F. Xavier; de Sanjosé, Silvia

    2007-01-01

    Cervical cancer has been recognized as a rare outcome of a common Sexually Transmitted Infection (STI). The etiologic association is restricted to a limited number of viral types of the family of the Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs). The association is causal in nature and under optimal testing systems, HPV DNA can be identified in all specimens of invasive cervical cancer. As a consequence, it has been claimed that HPV infection is a necessary cause of cervical cancer. The evidence is consistent worldwide and implies both the Squamous Cell Carcinomas (SCC), the adenocarcinomas and the vast majority (i.e. > 95%) of the immediate precursors, namely High Grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesions (HSIL)/Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia 3 (CIN3)/Carcinoma in situ. Co-factors that modify the risk among HPV DNA positive women include the use of oral contraceptives (OC) for five or more years, smoking, high parity (five or more full term pregnancies) and previous exposure to other sexually transmitted diseases such as Chlamydia Trachomatis (CT) and Herpes Simplex Virus type 2 (HSV-2). Women exposed to the Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) are at high risk for HPV infection, HPV DNA persistency and progression of HPV lesions to cervical cancer. PMID:17627057

  11. Sequence determination of human papillomavirus type 6a and assembly of virus-like particles in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, K J; Cook, J C; Joyce, J G; Brown, D R; Schultz, L D; George, H A; Rosolowsky, M; Fife, K H; Jansen, K U

    1995-06-01

    Human papillomavirus 6a (HPV6a), the most abundant HPV6 subtype, was detected in a vulvar condyloma acuminatum. The complete genome of HPV6a was cloned, and its DNA sequence was shown to be over 97% identical to the HPV6b sequence. Of the eight open reading frames (ORFs) of HPV6a, only the imputed amino acid sequence of the major capsid protein L1 was identical to the corresponding HPV6b sequence; all other HPV6a ORFs showed amino acid changes compared to the HPV6b ORFs. The HPV6a L1 or the L1 + L2 ORFs were expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Self-assembly of the L1 capsid protein into virus-like particles (VLPs) was demonstrated both in the L1 as well as L1 + L2 coexpressing yeast strains. Copurification of the L1 and L2 proteins showed complex formation of the L1 and L2 proteins in the yeast-derived VLPs of coexpressing strains. PMID:7778283

  12. Human Papillomavirus Infections in Nonsexually Active Perinatally HIV Infected Children

    PubMed Central

    Puga, Ana; Farhat, Sepideh; Ma, Yifei

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Although human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are common in HIV-infected adults, little is known about children. Our objective was to examine the prevalence of and risks for HPV of the oral mucosal and external genital areas in nonsexually active (NSA) perinatally (P) HIV+ children and compare with HIV-exposed but uninfected (HEU) children. A convenience sample attending a pediatric clinic were enrolled. Samples for HPV were obtained from the oral and anogenital areas and tested for one of 37 HPV types. The mean age of the 48 PHIV+ children was 14.3±3.9 years vs. 6.2±4.8 for the 52 HEU (p<0.001). Of the 23 PHIV+ girls, 30.4% had anogenital and 17% had oral HPV, and of the 27 HEU girls, 2 (7.4%) anogenital and 0 had oral HPV. Of the boys, 4/23 (17.4%) and 1/25 (4%) PHIV+ had anogenital and oral HPV, respectively, and 3/24 (12.5%) and 1/25 (4%) HEU had anogenital and oral HPV, respectively. Rates of HPV did not differ by age among the PHIV+, whereas older HEU were more likely to have HPV than younger HEU (p=0.07). This large age gap precluded statistical comparison by HIV status. The presence of HPV in NSA PHIV+ children may have implications regarding HPV vaccination efficacy. PMID:24460009

  13. Current studies on human papillomavirus in Saudi Arabia.

    PubMed

    Alhamlan, Fatimah Saeed; Al-Qahtani, Ahmed A; Al-Ahdal, Mohammed N

    2015-07-04

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a significant etiological factor and an important prognosticator in cervical cancer. Indeed, researchers worldwide have confirmed these roles for high-risk HVPs in over 70% of cervical cancer cases. According to the World Health Organization, approximately 561,200 new cancer cases (5.2% of all new cancers) are attributed to HPV infection. Over 120 types of HPV are classified further as either low-risk HPV (LR-HPV) or high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) based on their oncological potential of transforming cells. The LR-HPV types cause benign hyperproliferative lesions (i.e. genital warts) while the HR-HPV types are strongly associated with premalignant and malignant cervical lesions. Data on the prevalence of HPV, survival of infected patients, and mortality rate are scarce in Saudi Arabia. The unsubstantiated assumption of a low prevalence of HPV in Saudi Arabia has contributed to limiting HPV research in this conservative country. Therefore, the goal of this review is to shed light on the current HPV research being conducted and the prevalence of HPV in Saudi Arabia.

  14. Development of a highly thermostable, adjuvanted human papillomavirus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Hassett, Kimberly J; Meinerz, Natalie M; Semmelmann, Florian; Cousins, Megan C; Garcea, Robert L; Randolph, Theodore W

    2015-08-01

    A major impediment to economical, worldwide vaccine distribution is the requirement for a "cold chain" to preserve antigenicity. We addressed this problem using a model human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine stabilized by immobilizing HPV16 L1 capsomeres, i.e., pentameric subunits of the virus capsid, within organic glasses formed by lyophilization. Lyophilized glass and liquid vaccine formulations were incubated at 50°C for 12weeks, and then analyzed for retention of capsomere conformational integrity and the ability to elicit neutralizing antibody responses after immunization of BALB/c mice. Capsomeres in glassy-state vaccines retained tertiary and quaternary structure, and critical conformational epitopes. Moreover, glassy formulations adjuvanted with aluminum hydroxide or aluminum hydroxide and glycopyranoside lipid A were not only as immunogenic as the commercially available HPV vaccine Cervarix®, but also retained complete neutralizing immunogenicity after high-temperature storage. The thermal stability of such adjuvanted vaccine powder preparations may thus eliminate the need for the cold chain. PMID:25998700

  15. Human Papillomavirus in Brazilian women with and without cervical lesions

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Human Papillomavirus (HPV) high-risk (HR) types are the causal factor for cervical cancer and premalignant dysplasia. Data on frequency of HPV types provide a basis to design and evaluate HPV prevention programs. Taking into account the heterogeneity of HPV types across and within populations this study aims to access the HPV frequency in Brazilian women. Results We identified 24 different types of HPV, including a Betapapillomavirus and a likely new type, previously reported, from 132 women positive for the virus analysed by Hybrid Capture II assay. These women were infected by a single or multiple HPV types and 142 HPV strains were identified. HR types were found in 75% of women and HPV types 16, 18, 45, 58, and 66 had the highest frequency. Significant differences in frequency of HR HPV types were found for presence of cervical lesions, and for different HPV species and women age. Conclusions Compared with previous studies in Brazil, our data indicated differences in frequency and HPV type diversity, a significant association of other HR-types but HPV16 and 18 and cervical lesions, and a trend for distinct distribution of HPV types by age. PMID:21208414

  16. Human papillomavirus detection in paraffin-embedded colorectal cancer tissues.

    PubMed

    Tanzi, Elisabetta; Bianchi, Silvia; Frati, Elena R; Amicizia, Daniela; Martinelli, Marianna; Bragazzi, Nicola L; Brisigotti, Maria Pia; Colzani, Daniela; Fasoli, Ester; Zehender, Gianguglielmo; Panatto, Donatella; Gasparini, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has a well-recognized aetiological role in the development of cervical cancer and other anogenital tumours. Recently, an association between colorectal cancer and HPV infection has been suggested, although this is still controversial. This study aimed at detecting and characterizing HPV infection in 57 paired biopsies from colorectal cancers and adjacent intact tissues using a degenerate PCR approach. All amplified fragments were genotyped by means of sequencing. Overall, HPV prevalence was 12.3 %. In particular, 15.8 % of tumour tissues and 8.8 % of non-cancerous tissue samples were HPV DNA-positive. Of these samples, 85.7 % were genotyped successfully, with 41.7 % of sequences identifying four genotypes of the HR (high oncogenic risk) clade Group 1; the remaining 58.3 % of HPV-genotyped specimens had an unclassified β-HPV. Examining additional cases and analysing whole genomes will help to outline the significance of these findings.

  17. Human Beta-papillomavirus infection and keratinocyte carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Quint, Koen D; Genders, Roel E; de Koning, Maurits N C; Borgogna, Cinzia; Gariglio, Marisa; Bouwes Bavinck, Jan Nico; Doorbar, John; Feltkamp, Mariet C

    2015-01-01

    Although the role of oncogenic human Alpha-papillomaviruses (HPVs) in the development of mucosal carcinomas at different body sites (eg cervix, anus, oropharynx) is fully recognized, a role for HPV in keratinocyte carcinomas (KCs; basal and squamous cell carcinomas) of the skin is not yet clear. KCs are the most common cancers in Caucasians, with the major risk factor being ultraviolet (UV) light exposure. A possible role for Beta-HPV types (BetaPV) in the development of KC was suggested several decades ago, supported by a number of epidemiological studies. Our current review summarizes the recent molecular and histopathological evidence in support of a causal association between BetaPV and the development of KC, and outlines the suspected synergistic effect of viral gene expression with UV radiation and immune suppression. Further insights into the molecular pathways and protein interactions used by BetaPV and the host cell is likely to extend our understanding of the role of BetaPV in KC. PMID:25131163

  18. Prevalence of human papillomavirus infection in Italian and immigrant women.

    PubMed

    Paba, P; Morosetti, G; Criscuolo, A A; Chiusuri, V; Marcuccilli, F; Sesti, F; Piccione, E; Perno, C F; Ciotti, M

    2012-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted agent worldwide. Prevalence varies according to the geographic regions, and is highest in developing countries. Geographic differences exist also in the detection rate of oncogenic types in malignant cervical lesions. In this study, the prevalence of HPV infection as well as the spectrum of HPV types was evaluated in Italian and immigrant women of the urban area of Rome. Several risk factors (age at first intercourse, number of partners, smoking, pregnancy, age at first pregnancy, contraception, education, and menarche) were taken into consideration. Overall, there was a high prevalence of HPV infection in the two groups studied. No significant differences were observed in the spectrum of HPV types detected. HPV 16 and 18 were the types detected more frequently in both groups. Interestingly, HPV 54 and 70 were found only in the immigrants. Whether this finding reflects a recent introduction of these HPV types in the population studied remains to be established. Monitoring of HPV types in the population is advisable, especially in countries like Italy which is a destination and a gateway for immigrants directed towards north and central Europe. The introduction of high risk HPV variants may have a clinical impact and affect the diagnostic procedures.

  19. Variants of human papillomavirus type 16 predispose toward persistent infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Liao, Hong; Yang, Binlie; Geffre, Christopher P; Zhang, Ai; Zhou, Aizhi; Cao, Huimin; Wang, Jieru; Zhang, Zhenbo; Zheng, Wenxin

    2015-01-01

    A cohort study of 292 Chinese women was conducted to determine the relationship between human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 variants and persistent viral infection. Enrolled patients were HPV16 positive and had both normal cytology and histology. Flow-through hybridization and gene chip technology was used to identify the HPV type. A PCR sequencing assay was performed to find HPV16 E2, E6 and E7 gene variants. The associations between these variants and HPV16 persistent infection was analyzed by Fisher's exact test. It was found that the variants T178G, T350G and A442C in the E6 gene, as well as C3158A and G3248A variants in the E2 gene were associated with persistent HPV16 infection. No link was observed between E7 variants and persistent viral infection. Our findings suggest that detection of specific HPV variants would help identify patients who are at high risk for viral persistence and development of cervical neoplasia.

  20. Human Papillomavirus Vaccination: A Case Study in Translational Science

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Allyson K.; Harris, Antoneicka L.; Jacobson, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Each year 610,000 cases of anogenital and oropharyngeal cancers caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) occur worldwide. HPV vaccination represents a promising opportunity to prevent cancer on a global scale. The vaccine’s story dates back to discoveries in chickens at the beginning of the 20th century with evidence that a cell-free filtrate could transmit the propensity to grow cancers. Later, studies with similarly derived filtrates from mammalian tumors showed that hosts could develop immunity to subsequent exposures. Epidemiologic studies linked cervical cancer to members of a family of viruses that cause papillomatosis and common warts. This led to work with DNA hybridization demonstrating a causal relationship. The formation of virus-like particles (VLPs) from viral capsid proteins led to the development of models for safe and effective vaccines. While much work remains with the acceptance of universal vaccination, the HPV vaccines Gardasil® and Cervarix® thus represent a century of successful translational research. PMID:24841923

  1. Human papillomavirus and breast cancer in Iran: a meta- analysis

    PubMed Central

    Haghshenas, Mohammad Reza; Mousavi, Tahoora; Moosazadeh, Mahmood; Afshari, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Objective(s): This study aims to investigate the relationship between human papillomavirus (HPV) and breast cancer using meta- analysis. Materials and Methods: Relevant studies were identified reviewing the national and international databases. We also increased the search sensitivity by investigating the references as well as interview with research centers and experts. Finally, quality assessment and implementation of inclusion/exclusion criteria determined the eligible articles for meta-analysis. Based on the heterogeneity observed among the results of the primary studies, random effects model was used to estimate the pooled prevalence of HPV infection and also pooled odds ratio between HPV and developing breast cancer using Stata SE V. 11 software. Results: This meta- analysis included 11 primary studies investigating the HPV infection prevalence among 1539 Iranian women. Pooled prevalence (95% confidence interval) of HPV infection among Iranian women with breast cancer was estimated as of 23.6% (6.7- 40.5), while, the odds ratio (95% confidence interval) between HPV infection and developing breast cancer was estimated as of 5.7% (0.7- 46.8). Conclusion: This meta- analysis showed a high prevalence of HPV infection among women with breast cancer. We also found that the odds of developing breast cancer among women with breast cancer was more than that of women without breast cancer. PMID:27114791

  2. The association between human papillomavirus infection and female lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Frank Cheau-Feng; Huang, Jing-Yang; Tsai, Stella Ching-Shao; Nfor, Oswald Ndi; Chou, Ming-Chih; Wu, Ming-Fang; Lee, Chun-Te; Jan, Cheng-Feng; Liaw, Yung-Po

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer deaths among Taiwanese women. Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been detected in lung cancer tissues. The aim of this study was to investigate the association between HPV infection and lung cancer among the Taiwanese women. The analytical data were collected from the longitudinal health insurance databases (LHID 2005 and 2010) of the National Health Insurance Research Database (NHIRD). The study participants were 30 years and older and included 24,162 individuals who were identified with HPV infection from 2001 to 2004 and 1,026,986 uninfected individuals. Lung cancer incidence among infected and uninfected individuals was compared using the univariate and multivariate regression models. Among the total participants, 24,162 individuals were diagnosed with HPV. After adjusting for age, gender, low income, residential area, and comorbidity, the risk of lung cancer was higher in women (hazard ratio [HR] 1.263, 95% CI 1.015–1.571), while all cancer risks were high in both men and women with corresponding hazard ratios (HR) of 1.161 (95% CI 1.083–1.245) and HR 1.240 (95% CI 1.154–1.331), respectively. This study showed a significant increase in lung cancer risk among Taiwanese women who were exposed to HPV infection. PMID:27281096

  3. Human papillomavirus testing in the prevention of cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Schiffman, Mark; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Wacholder, Sholom; Kinney, Walter; Gage, Julia C; Castle, Philip E

    2011-03-01

    Strong evidence now supports the adoption of cervical cancer prevention strategies that explicitly focus on persistent infection with the causal agent, human papillomavirus (HPV). To inform an evidence-based transition to a new public health approach for cervical cancer screening, we summarize the natural history and cervical carcinogenicity of HPV and discuss the promise and uncertainties of currently available screening methods. New HPV infections acquired at any age are virtually always benign, but persistent infections with one of approximately 12 carcinogenic HPV types explain virtually all cases of cervical cancer. In the absence of an overtly persistent HPV infection, the risk of cervical cancer is extremely low. Thus, HPV test results predict the risk of cervical cancer and its precursors (cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3) better and longer than cytological or colposcopic abnormalities, which are signs of HPV infection. The logical and inevitable move to HPV-based cervical cancer prevention strategies will require longer screening intervals that will disrupt current gynecologic and cytology laboratory practices built on frequent screening. A major challenge will be implementing programs that do not overtreat HPV-positive women who do not have obvious long-term persistence of HPV or treatable lesions at the time of initial evaluation. The greatest potential for reduction in cervical cancer rates from HPV screening is in low-resource regions that can implement infrequent rounds of low-cost HPV testing and treatment.

  4. A review of methods for detect human Papillomavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted virus. Worldwide, the most common high-risk (HR)-HPV are -16/18, and approximately 70% of cervical cancers (CC) are due to infection by these genotypes. Persistent infection by HR-HPV is a necessary but not sufficient cause of this cancer, which develops over a long period through precursor lesions, which can be detected by cytological screening. Although this screening has decreased the incidence of CC, HPV-related cervical disease, including premalignant and malignant lesions, continues to be a major burden on health-care systems. Although not completely elucidated, the HPV-driven molecular mechanisms underlying the development of cervical lesions have provided a number of potential biomarkers for both diagnostic and prognostic use in the clinical management of women with HPV-related cervical disease, and these biomarkers can also be used to increase the positive predictive value of current screening methods. In addition, they can provide insights into the biology of HPV-induced cancer and thus lead to the development of nonsurgical therapies. Considering the importance of detecting HPV and related biomarkers, a variety of methods are being developed for these purposes. This review summarizes current knowledge of detection methods for HPV, and related biomarkers that can be used to discriminate lesions with a high risk of progression to CC. PMID:23131123

  5. Resequencing Microarray Technology for Genotyping Human Papillomavirus in Cervical Smears

    PubMed Central

    Berthet, Nicolas; Falguières, Michael; Filippone, Claudia; Bertolus, Chloé; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Brisse, Sylvain; Gessain, Antoine; Heard, Isabelle; Favre, Michel

    2014-01-01

    There are more than 40 human papillomaviruses (HPVs) belonging to the alpha genus that cause sexually transmitted infections; these infections are among the most frequent and can lead to condylomas and anogenital intra-epithelial neoplasia. At least 18 of these viruses are causative agents of anogenital carcinomas. We evaluated the performance of a resequencing microarray for the detection and genotyping of alpha HPV of clinical significance using cloned HPV DNA. To reduce the number of HPV genotypes tiled on microarray, we used reconstructed ancestral sequences (RASs) as they are more closely related to the various genotypes than the current genotypes are among themselves. The performance of this approach was tested by genotyping with a set of 40 cervical smears already genotyped using the commercial PapilloCheck kit. The results of the two tests were concordant for 70% (28/40) of the samples and compatible for 30% (12/40). Our findings indicate that RASs were able to detect and identify one or several HPV in clinical samples. Associating RASs with homonym sequences improved the genotyping of HPV present in cases of multiple infection. In conclusion, we demonstrate the diagnostic potential of resequencing technology for genotyping of HPV, and illustrate its value both for epidemiological studies and for monitoring the distribution of HPV in the post-vaccination era. PMID:25383888

  6. Is Human Papillomavirus Associated with Prostate Cancer Survival?

    PubMed Central

    Barbazza, Renzo; Marongiu, Barbara; Bonin, Serena; Stanta, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    The role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in prostate carcinogenesis is highly controversial: some studies suggest a positive association between HPV infection and an increased risk of prostate cancer (PCa), whereas others do not reveal any correlation. In this study, we investigated the prognostic impact of HPV infection on survival in 150 primary PCa patients. One hundred twelve (74.67%) patients had positive expression of HPV E7 protein, which was evaluated in tumour tissue by immunohistochemistry. DNA analysis on a subset of cases confirmed HPV infection and revealed the presence of genotype 16. In Kaplan-Meier analysis, HPV-positive cancer patients showed worse overall survival (OS) (median 4.59 years) compared to HPV-negative (median 8.24 years, P = 0.0381). In multivariate analysis age (P < 0.001), Gleason score (P < 0.001), nuclear grading (P = 0.002), and HPV status (P = 0.034) were independent prognostic factors for OS. In our cohort, we observed high prevalence of HPV nuclear E7 oncoprotein and an association between HPV infection and PCa survival. In the debate about the oncogenic activity of HPV in PCa, our results further confirm the need for additional studies to clarify the possible role of HPV in prostate carcinogenesis. PMID:24288430

  7. Therapeutic Vaccines Against Human Papillomavirus and Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Cid-Arregui, Angel

    2009-01-01

    Cervical cancer and its precursor intra-epithelial lesions are linked to infection by a subset of so-called “highrisk” human papillomavirus types, which are estimated to infect nearly four hundred million women worldwide. Two prophylactic vaccines have been commercialized recently targeting HPV16 and 18, the most prevalent viral types found in cervical cancer, which operate through induction of capsid-specific neutralizing antibodies. However, in patients with persistent infection these vaccines have not been found to protect against progression to neoplasia. Attempts are being made to develop therapeutic vaccines targeting nonstructural early viral proteins. Among these, E6 and E7 are the preferred targets, since they are essential for induction and maintenance of the malignant phenotype and are constitutively expressed by the transformed epithelial cells. Here are reviewed the most relevant potential vaccines based on HPV early antigens that have shown efficacy in preclinical models and that are being tested in clinical studies, which should determine their therapeutic capacity for eradicating HPV-induced premalignant and malignant lesions and cure cervical cancer. PMID:19915722

  8. Human Papillomavirus Infection, Infertility, and Assisted Reproductive Outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Pereira, Nigel; Kucharczyk, Katherine M.; Estes, Jaclyn L.; Gerber, Rachel S.; Lekovich, Jovana P.; Elias, Rony T.; Spandorfer, Steven D.

    2015-01-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) is a sexually transmitted infection common among men and women across all geographic and socioeconomic subgroups worldwide. Recent evidence suggests that HPV infection may affect fertility and alter the efficacy of assisted reproductive technologies. In men, HPV infection can affect sperm parameters, specifically motility. HPV-infected sperm can transmit viral DNA to oocytes, which may be expressed in the developing blastocyst. HPV can increase trophoblastic apoptosis and reduce the endometrial implantation of trophoblastic cells, thus increasing the theoretical risk of miscarriage. Vertical transmission of HPV during pregnancy may be involved in the pathophysiology of preterm rupture of membranes and spontaneous preterm birth. In patients undergoing intrauterine insemination for idiopathic infertility, HPV infection confers a lower pregnancy rate. In contrast, the evidence regarding any detrimental impact of HPV infection on IVF outcomes is inconclusive. It has been suggested that vaccination could potentially counter HPV-related sperm impairment, trophoblastic apoptosis, and spontaneous miscarriages; however, these conclusions are based on in vitro studies rather than large-scale epidemiological studies. Improvement in the understanding of HPV sperm infection mechanisms and HPV transmission into the oocyte and developing blastocyst may help explain idiopathic causes of infertility and miscarriage. PMID:26609434

  9. Human papillomavirus vaccination guideline update: American Cancer Society guideline endorsement.

    PubMed

    Saslow, Debbie; Andrews, Kimberly S; Manassaram-Baptiste, Deana; Loomer, Lacey; Lam, Kristina E; Fisher-Borne, Marcie; Smith, Robert A; Fontham, Elizabeth T H

    2016-09-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE The American Cancer Society (ACS) reviewed and updated its guideline on human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination based on a methodologic and content review of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) HPV vaccination recommendations. A literature review was performed to supplement the evidence considered by the ACIP and to address new vaccine formulations and recommendations as well as new data on population outcomes since publication of the 2007 ACS guideline. The ACS Guideline Development Group determined that the evidence supports ACS endorsement of the ACIP recommendations, with one qualifying statement related to late vaccination. The ACS recommends vaccination of all children at ages 11 and 12 years to protect against HPV infections that lead to several cancers and precancers. Late vaccination for those not vaccinated at the recommended ages should be completed as soon as possible, and individuals should be informed that vaccination may not be effective at older ages. CA Cancer J Clin 2016;66:375-385. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  10. Lack of association between human papillomavirus infection and colorectal cancer

    PubMed Central

    Taherian, Hanieh; Fard, Zahra Tahmasebi; Abdirad, Afshin

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Colorectal cancer is the third leading cause of cancer-related deaths worldwide, with nearly one million new cases identified annually. Different factors might cause colorectal cancer, one of the most prevalent cancers among both men and women. Viral aetiology in cancerous malignancies is a very important issue and so far a number of viral strains have been identified as tumour oncogene viruses. Viral infections, such as human papillomavirus (HPV), have recently been suggested as a risk factor for colorectal cancer. However, the aetiology of the disease is still unknown. Aim To assessed the association between HPV infection and colorectal cancer. Material and methods In this study, 50 cancer tissue samples and 50 samples without colon cancer were studied in order to identify HPV through polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Of 42 adenocarcinomas, 10 were well differentiated, 30 moderated differentiated, and 2 were poorly differentiated. DNA extraction was verified by beta globin gene amplification; specific PCR was carried out based on HPV L1 consensus primers MY09/MY11. Results HPV DNA was not identified in any of the normal, adenocarcinoma, or adenoma samples. Conclusions In contrast with previous studies, the current research failed to establish a relationship between HPV infection and the incidence of colon cancer. Considering the existing inconsistencies, it is recommended that further studies be conducted with larger sample size. PMID:25396002

  11. Adolescent Premature Ovarian Insufficiency Following Human Papillomavirus Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Harvey Rodrick Grenville

    2014-01-01

    Three young women who developed premature ovarian insufficiency following quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination presented to a general practitioner in rural New South Wales, Australia. The unrelated girls were aged 16, 16, and 18 years at diagnosis. Each had received HPV vaccinations prior to the onset of ovarian decline. Vaccinations had been administered in different regions of the state of New South Wales and the 3 girls lived in different towns in that state. Each had been prescribed the oral contraceptive pill to treat menstrual cycle abnormalities prior to investigation and diagnosis. Vaccine research does not present an ovary histology report of tested rats but does present a testicular histology report. Enduring ovarian capacity and duration of function following vaccination is unresearched in preclinical studies, clinical and postlicensure studies. Postmarketing surveillance does not accurately represent diagnoses in adverse event notifications and can neither represent unnotified cases nor compare incident statistics with vaccine course administration rates. The potential significance of a case series of adolescents with idiopathic premature ovarian insufficiency following HPV vaccination presenting to a general practice warrants further research. Preservation of reproductive health is a primary concern in the recipient target group. Since this group includes all prepubertal and pubertal young women, demonstration of ongoing, uncompromised safety for the ovary is urgently required. This matter needs to be resolved for the purposes of population health and public vaccine confidence. PMID:26425627

  12. Therapeutic vaccines against human papillomavirus and cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Cid-Arregui, Angel

    2009-01-01

    Cervical cancer and its precursor intra-epithelial lesions are linked to infection by a subset of so-called "highrisk" human papillomavirus types, which are estimated to infect nearly four hundred million women worldwide. Two prophylactic vaccines have been commercialized recently targeting HPV16 and 18, the most prevalent viral types found in cervical cancer, which operate through induction of capsid-specific neutralizing antibodies. However, in patients with persistent infection these vaccines have not been found to protect against progression to neoplasia. Attempts are being made to develop therapeutic vaccines targeting nonstructural early viral proteins. Among these, E6 and E7 are the preferred targets, since they are essential for induction and maintenance of the malignant phenotype and are constitutively expressed by the transformed epithelial cells. Here are reviewed the most relevant potential vaccines based on HPV early antigens that have shown efficacy in preclinical models and that are being tested in clinical studies, which should determine their therapeutic capacity for eradicating HPV-induced premalignant and malignant lesions and cure cervical cancer. PMID:19915722

  13. Human papillomaviruses and non-melanoma skin cancer.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin-Drubin, Margaret E

    2015-04-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) infect the squamous epithelium and can induce benign and malignant lesions. To date, more than 200 different HPV types have been identified and classified into five genera, α, β, γ, μ, and ν. While high-risk α mucosal HPVs have a well-established role in cervical carcinoma and a significant percentage of other anogenital tract and oral carcinomas, the biology of the cutaneous β HPVs and their contribution to non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) has been less studied. Although the association of β HPV infection with NMSC in patients with a rare, genetically determined condition, epidermodysplasia verruciformis has been well established, the role of β HPV infection with NMSC in the normal population remains controversial. In stark contrast to α HPV-associated cancers, the presence of the β HPV genome does not appear to be mandatory for the maintenance of the malignant phenotype. Moreover, the mechanism of action of the β HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins differs from the β HPV oncoproteins.

  14. Pathogenesis of human papillomavirus-associated mucosal disease.

    PubMed

    Groves, Ian J; Coleman, Nicholas

    2015-03-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are a necessary cause of carcinoma of the cervix and other mucosal epithelia. Key events in high-risk HPV (HRHPV)-associated neoplastic progression include persistent infection, deregulated expression of virus early genes in basal epithelial cells and genomic instability causing secondary host genomic imbalances. There are multiple mechanisms by which deregulated virus early gene expression may be achieved. Integration of virus DNA into host chromosomes is observed in the majority of cervical squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs), although in ∼15% of cases the virus remains extrachromosomal (episomal). Interestingly, not all integration events provide a growth advantage to basal cervical epithelial cells or lead to increased levels of the virus oncogenes E6 and E7, when compared with episome-containing basal cells. The factors that provide a competitive advantage to some integrants, but not others, are complex and include virus and host contributions. Gene expression from integrated and episomal HRHPV is regulated through host epigenetic mechanisms affecting the virus long control region (LCR), which appear to be of functional importance. New approaches to treating HRHPV-associated mucosal neoplasia include knockout of integrated HRHPV DNA, depletion of virus transcripts and inhibition of virus early gene transcription through targeting or use of epigenetic modifiers. Copyright © 2014 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  15. Human papillomavirus type 16 DNA in periungual squamous cell carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Moy, R.L.; Eliezri, Y.D.; Bennett, R.G. ); Nuovo, G.J.; Siverstein, S. Columbia Univ., New York, NY ); Zitelli, J.A. )

    1989-05-12

    Ten squamous cell carcinomas (in situ or invasive) of the fingernail region were analyzed for the presence of DNA sequences homologous to human papilloma-virus (HPV) by dot blot hybridization. In most patients, the lesions were verrucae of long-term duration that were refractory to conventional treatment methods. Eight of the lesions contained HPV DNA sequences, and in six of these the sequences were related to HPV 16 as deduced from low-stringency nucleic acid hybridization followed by low- and high-stringency washes. Furthermore, the restriction endonuclease digestion pattern of DNA isolated from four of these lesions was diagnostic of episomal HPV 16. The high-frequency association of HPV 16 with periungual squamous cell carcinoma is similar to that reported for HPV 16 with squamous cell carcinomas on mucous membranes at other sites, notably the genital tract. The findings suggest that HPV 16 may play an important role in the development of squamous cell carcinomas of the finger, most notably those lesions that are chronic and located in the periungual area.

  16. Could the human papillomavirus vaccines drive virulence evolution?

    PubMed

    Murall, Carmen Lía; Bauch, Chris T; Day, Troy

    2015-01-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines hold great promise for preventing several cancers caused by HPV infections. Yet little attention has been given to whether HPV could respond evolutionarily to the new selection pressures imposed on it by the novel immunity response created by the vaccine. Here, we present and theoretically validate a mechanism by which the vaccine alters the transmission-recovery trade-off that constrains HPV's virulence such that higher oncogene expression is favoured. With a high oncogene expression strategy, the virus is able to increase its viral load and infected cell population before clearance by the vaccine, thus improving its chances of transmission. This new rapid cell-proliferation strategy is able to circulate between hosts with medium to high turnover rates of sexual partners. We also discuss the importance of better quantifying the duration of challenge infections and the degree to which a vaccinated host can shed virus. The generality of the models presented here suggests a wider applicability of this mechanism, and thus highlights the need to investigate viral oncogenicity from an evolutionary perspective.

  17. Gnathic and peripheral ameloblastomas lack human papillomavirus DNA.

    PubMed

    Verduin, Lindsey; Bishop, Justin; Mills, Stacey E

    2015-10-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been associated with a variety of head and neck neoplasms, including squamous cell carcinomas and Schneiderian papillomas. Ameloblastomas can arise from either the gnathic bones or peripheral soft tissues. Peripheral sinonasal ameloblastomas share clinical features with Schneiderian papillomas. A small number of reports have described detection of HPV DNA within ameloblastomas. However, Most of these cases was reported in the 1990s, used the polymerase chain reaction technique, and only examined gnathic tumors. The current study was designed to determine whether low- or high-risk HPV DNA could be detected in gnathic or peripheral ameloblastomas using in situ hybridization. Twenty-nine examples of gnathic osseous and peripheral head and neck ameloblastomas were obtained from the authors' archives (University of Virginia and the Johns Hopkins Hospital). High-risk HPV DNA was not detected in any of the 29 tumors analyzed. Low-risk HPV DNA was identified in only 1 tumor, which was peripheral in origin, and from an immunocompromised patient. We believe that the HPV in this case represents a background "passenger" infection. This study demonstrates that HPV of either high- or low-risk subtypes is unlikely to play a role in the pathogenesis of sinonasal ameloblastomas.

  18. Human Papillomavirus Vaccination at a Time of Changing Sexual Behavior.

    PubMed

    Baussano, Iacopo; Lazzarato, Fulvio; Brisson, Marc; Franceschi, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence varies widely worldwide. We used a transmission model to show links between age-specific sexual patterns and HPV vaccination effectiveness. We considered rural India and the United States as examples of 2 heterosexual populations with traditional age-specific sexual behavior and gender-similar age-specific sexual behavior, respectively. We simulated these populations by using age-specific rates of sexual activity and age differences between sexual partners and found that transitions from traditional to gender-similar sexual behavior in women <35 years of age can result in increased (2.6-fold in our study) HPV16 prevalence. Our model shows that reductions in HPV16 prevalence are larger if vaccination occurs in populations before transitions in sexual behavior and that increased risk for HPV infection attributable to transition is preventable by early vaccination. Our study highlights the importance of using time-limited opportunities to introduce HPV vaccination in traditional populations before changes in age-specific sexual patterns occur.

  19. A review of methods for detect human Papillomavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Abreu, André L P; Souza, Raquel P; Gimenes, Fabrícia; Consolaro, Marcia E L

    2012-11-06

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted virus. Worldwide, the most common high-risk (HR)-HPV are -16/18, and approximately 70% of cervical cancers (CC) are due to infection by these genotypes. Persistent infection by HR-HPV is a necessary but not sufficient cause of this cancer, which develops over a long period through precursor lesions, which can be detected by cytological screening. Although this screening has decreased the incidence of CC, HPV-related cervical disease, including premalignant and malignant lesions, continues to be a major burden on health-care systems. Although not completely elucidated, the HPV-driven molecular mechanisms underlying the development of cervical lesions have provided a number of potential biomarkers for both diagnostic and prognostic use in the clinical management of women with HPV-related cervical disease, and these biomarkers can also be used to increase the positive predictive value of current screening methods. In addition, they can provide insights into the biology of HPV-induced cancer and thus lead to the development of nonsurgical therapies. Considering the importance of detecting HPV and related biomarkers, a variety of methods are being developed for these purposes. This review summarizes current knowledge of detection methods for HPV, and related biomarkers that can be used to discriminate lesions with a high risk of progression to CC.

  20. Human papillomavirus genotypes distribution in cervical samples from Uruguayan women.

    PubMed

    Ramas, Viviana; Mirazo, Santiago; Bonilla, Sylvia; Mendoza, Laura; Lago, Olga; Basiletti, Jorge; González, Joaquin; Picconi, Maria Alejandra; Arbiza, Juan

    2013-05-01

    Persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) causes cervical preneoplasic lesions and invasive cervical cancer. This study evaluated the prevalence and distribution of HPV genotypes in cervical exfoliated cells from Uruguayan women. Five hundred sixty-eight cervical specimens were examined by PCR using MY09/11 primer set, and were genotyped by restriction enzyme digestion (RFLP). Some of the samples which remained undetermined were reanalyzed by PGMY PCR combined with reverse line blot hybridization. Overall, about 42% of samples were positive for HPV; 96% in high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion, 66% in low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion, 15% in atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance, and 19% in samples negative for intraepithelial lesion or malignancy. HPV 16 was the most commonly found genotype, followed by HPV 68 and 58. Within low risk-HPV genotypes 6, 61, and 11 were the most frequent. This is the first cross-sectional study, accounting for prevalence and genotype distribution of HPV in Uruguayan women.

  1. Immune therapy for human papillomaviruses-related cancers

    PubMed Central

    Rosales, Ricardo; Rosales, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are a large family of double strand DNA viruses comprising more than 180 types. Infection with HPV is very common and it is associated with benign and malignant proliferation of skin and squamous mucosae. Many HPVs, considered low-risk such as HPV 6 and 11, produce warts; while high-risk viruses, such as HPVs 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, and 58, induce tumors. About 5% of all cancers in men and women are associated with HPV infection. Because there are not antiviral drugs for HPV infection, current therapies for low-risk HPV infections involve physical removal of the lesion by cryotherapy, trichloracetic acid, laser, or surgical removal. Surgical procedures are effective in the treatment of pre-cancerous lesions, however after these procedures, many recurrences appear due to new re-infections, or to failure of the procedure to eliminate the HPV. In addition, HPV can inhibit recognition of malignant cells by the immune system, leading to the development of cancer lesions. When this occurs, radiotherapy and chemotherapy are then used. Unfortunately, about 50% of the HPV-cancer patients still die. In the past decade, a better knowledge of the natural history of the virus-host interaction and of the immune response against this viral infection has brought new therapeutic strategies geared to modulate the immune system to generate an efficient virus-specific cytotoxic response. Novel HPV protein-expressing vaccines have shown some significant clinical efficacy and systemic HPV-specific cytotoxic T cell responses. This review will describe the current status of the several therapeutic strategies used to treat HPV-induced lesions, and discuss the various new therapies now being tested. PMID:25493236

  2. The complex relationship between human papillomavirus and cervical adenocarcinoma.

    PubMed

    Molijn, Anco; Jenkins, David; Chen, Wen; Zhang, Xun; Pirog, Edyta; Enqi, Wu; Liu, Bin; Schmidt, Johannes; Cui, Jiangfeng; Qiao, Youlin; Quint, Wim

    2016-01-15

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is reported in 60-100% of cervical adenocarcinoma (CADC) globally. We investigated this relationship in a hospital-based survey in China. 718 CADC samples from nine Chinese regions were analysed. Expert pathologists reviewed cases with p16 and progesterone receptor immunostaining. Cases were tested for HPV using whole-tissue sections (WTS) and laser-capture microdissection. All cases were HPV-tested by L1 based broad-spectrum SPF10 -DEIA-LiPA25 PCR. Negative cases were tested for DNA adequacy and with E6 oncogene, type-specific HPV PCRs. Using WTS-PCR CADC showed overall 75% HPV-positivity (33-100% for different histological types). LCM-PCR showed that none of minimal deviation or serous CADC, and <10% of all clear cell and endometrioid CADC were HPV-positive in tumour cells. Usual and adenosquamous CADC showed a single HPV genotype in 60 and 78% cases. In some cases, HPV was found in adjacent cervix but not in tumour. HPV 16, 18 and 45 accounted for 90% of HPV in tumour cells. Patients with HPV-positive tumours were on average 6 years younger and presented at a lower clinicopathological stage as compared to patients with HPV-negative cancers. CADC is diverse pathologically and in HPV status. Special histopathological tumor subtypes may develop through different cellular and molecular pathways. Between 20 and 40% usual and adenosquamous types, in particular these diagnosed in older women and at advanced FIGO stages, are not driven by oncogenic HPV. In these cases HPV may not be involved in carcinogenisis or maybe lost during tumour progression.

  3. Association between human papillomavirus DNA and temporal arteritis

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background To examine the relationship between human papillomavirus (HPV) and giant cell arteritis (GCA) of the temporal artery. Methods The study group consisted of 22 cases of histologically positive/biopsy confirmed GCA. The control groups consisted of 21 histologically negative temporal artery biopsies and fifteen cases of vascular margins of nephrectomies. For detection of the presence of HPV, two methods were used: 1) polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with INNO-LiPA HPV Genotyping Extra, 2) Cervista™ HPV HR. All cases were from the files of the Barnes-Jewish Hospital and Washington University in St. Louis. Results HPV DNA was detected by PCR and genotyping in 16 of 22 (73%) histologically positive cases of GCA and in only five of 21 (24%) histologically negative temporal artery biopsies. Among the vascular margin controls, only three of 15 (20%) were positive for HPV DNA. The second, independent method (CervistaTM) confirmed the aforesaid results with 100% concordance with the exception of three cases which had low genomic DNA for which it was not possible to perform the test. The differences in HPV positivity between the histologically positive and negative temporal artery biopsies and between the histologically positive temporal artery biopsies and controls were both statistically significant (p = 0.001 and 0.002, respectively). Conclusions The results of our study revealed a statistically significant association between HPV positivity and biopsy confirmed temporal giant cell arteritis GCA (p = 0.001). Further studies are necessary to elucidate the pathophysiology underlying this association. PMID:22831396

  4. Epithelial Cell Responses to Infection with Human Papillomavirus

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Summary: Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection of the genital tract is common in young sexually active individuals, the majority of whom clear the infection without overt clinical disease. Most of those who do develop benign lesions eventually mount an effective cell-mediated immune (CMI) response, and the lesions regress. Regression of anogenital warts is accompanied histologically by a CD4+ T cell-dominated Th1 response; animal models support this and provide evidence that the response is modulated by antigen-specific CD4+ T cell-dependent mechanisms. Failure to develop an effective CMI response to clear or control infection results in persistent infection and, in the case of the oncogenic HPVs, an increased probability of progression to high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive carcinoma. Effective evasion of innate immune recognition seems to be the hallmark of HPV infections. The viral infectious cycle is exclusively intraepithelial: there is no viremia and no virus-induced cytolysis or cell death, and viral replication and release are not associated with inflammation. HPV globally downregulates the innate immune signaling pathways in the infected keratinocyte. Proinflammatory cytokines, particularly the type I interferons, are not released, and the signals for Langerhans cell (LC) activation and migration, together with recruitment of stromal dendritic cells and macrophages, are either not present or inadequate. This immune ignorance results in chronic infections that persist over weeks and months. Progression to high-grade intraepithelial neoplasia with concomitant upregulation of the E6 and E7 oncoproteins is associated with further deregulation of immunologically relevant molecules, particularly chemotactic chemokines and their receptors, on keratinocytes and endothelial cells of the underlying microvasculature, limiting or preventing the ingress of cytotoxic effectors into the lesions. Recent evidence suggests that HPV infection of basal

  5. Barriers to human papillomavirus vaccine acceptability in Israel.

    PubMed

    Fisher, William A; Laniado, Hila; Shoval, Hila; Hakim, Marwan; Bornstein, Jacob

    2013-11-22

    Barriers to human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine acceptability in Israel include Israel's relatively low incidence of cervical cancer; the religiously-based 80% circumcision rate in Israel, which is regarded as contributing to the lower incidence of HPV infection in the country; the fact that HPV vaccine provides immunity against only few virus types; the vaccine's high cost; and the perception that HPV transmission is associated with unacceptable sexual relations. A recent survey has demonstrated that, following media two campaigns, Israeli's level of awareness of the vaccine increased but the actual vaccination rate remained low, at approximately 10%. Survey findings also indicated that an enduring barrier to HPV vaccination is the vaccine's high cost. Recent research on a convenience sample of Israeli undergraduate women 21 to 24 years of age showed that intentions to receive HPV vaccination in the coming year were a function of women's attitudes towards getting vaccinated and their perceptions of social support for doing so. Undergraduate women who intended to be vaccinated perceived the prevention of cervical cancer, avoidance of personal health threat, and avoidance of HPV infection per se to be the advantages of undergoing HPV vaccination. Disadvantages of getting vaccinated included fear of vaccine side effects, cost of the vaccine, and newness of the vaccine, doubts about vaccines, time required to undergo multiple vaccinations, and dislike of injections. Friends', mothers' and physicians' recommendations influenced women's intentions to be vaccinated in the coming year as well. This article forms part of a regional report entitled "Comprehensive Control of HPV Infections and Related Diseases in Israel" Vaccine Volume 31, Supplement 8, 2013. Updates of the progress in the field are presented in a separate monograph entitled "Comprehensive Control of HPV Infections and Related Diseases" Vaccine Volume 30, Supplement 5, 2012.

  6. Human papillomavirus detection in moroccan patients with nasopharyngeal carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC) is a malignant tumor which arises in surface epithelium of the posterior wall of the nasopharynx. There's is evidence that Epstein Barr virus (EBV) is associated to NPC development. However, many epidemiologic studies point to a connection between viral infections by the human papillomavirus (HPV) and NPC. Method Seventy Moroccan patients with NPC were screened for EBV and HPV. EBV detection was performed by PCR amplification of BZLF1 gene, encoding the ZEBRA (Z Epstein-Barr Virus Replication Activator) protein, and HPV infection was screened by PCR amplification with subsequent typing by hybridization with specific oligonucleotides for HPV types 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 45 and 59. Results The age distribution of our patients revealed a bimodal pattern. Sixty two cases (88.9%) were classified as type 3 (undifferentiated carcinoma), 6 (8.6%) as type 2 (non keratinizing NPC) and only 2 (2.9%) cases were classified as type 1 (keratinizing NPC). EBV was detected in all NPC tumors, whereas HPV DNA was revealed in 34% of cases (24/70). Molecular analysis showed that 20.8% (5/24) were infected with HPV31, and the remaining were infected with other oncogenic types (i.e., HPV59, 16, 18, 33, 35 and 45). In addition, statistical analysis showed that there's no association between sex or age and HPV infection (P > 0.1). Conclusion Our data indicated that EBV is commonly associated with NPC in Moroccan patients and show for the first time that NPC tumours from Moroccan patients harbour high risk HPV genotypes. PMID:21352537

  7. Prevalence of High-Risk Human Papillomavirus Among Older Women

    PubMed Central

    Lindau, Stacy Tessler; Drum, Melinda L.; Gaumer, Elyzabeth; Surawska, Hanna; Jordan, Jeanne A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To estimate the prevalence, genotypes, and individual-level correlates of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) among women aged 57–85. Methods Community-residing women (n=1550), aged 57–85, were drawn from a nationally-representative probability sample. In-home interviews and biomeasures, including a self-collected vaginal specimen, were obtained between 2005 and 2006. Specimens were analyzed for high-risk HPV DNA using probe hybridization and signal amplification (hc2); of 1,028 specimens provided, 1,010 were adequate for analysis. All samples testing positive were analyzed for HPV DNA by L1 consensus polymerase chain reaction followed by type-specific hybridization. Results The overall population-based weighted estimate of high-risk HPV prevalence by hc2 was 6.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 4.5 to 7.9). Current marital and smoking status, frequency of sexual activity, history of cancer, and hysterectomy were associated with high-risk HPV positivity. Among high-risk HPV+ women, 63% had multiple type infections. HPV 16 or 18 was present in 17.4% of all high-risk HPV+ women. The most common high-risk genotypes among high-risk HPV+ women were HPV 61 (19.1%), 31 (13.1%), 52 (12.9%), 58 (12.5%), 83 (12.3%), 66(12.0%), 51 (11.7%), 45 (11.2%), 56 (10.3%), 53 (10.2%), 16 (9.7%), and 62 (9.2%). Being married and having an intact uterus were independently associated with lower prevalence of high-risk HPV. Among unmarried women, current sexual activity and smoking were independently and positively associated with high-risk HPV infection. Conclusions In this nationally representative population, nearly 1 in 16 women aged 57–85 were found to have high-risk HPV and prevalence was stable across older age groups. PMID:18978096

  8. Oncogenic association of specific human papillomavirus types with cervical neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Lorincz, A T; Temple, G F; Kurman, R J; Jenson, A B; Lancaster, W D

    1987-10-01

    Molecular hybridization analysis of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA from 190 cervical biopsy specimens from women in the United States, Brazil, and Peru revealed viral sequences in 2 (9%) of 23 biopsy specimens of normal mature squamous epithelium, 7 (44%) of 16 biopsy specimens of metaplastic squamous epithelia, 60 (77%) of 78 cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), 57 (89%) of 64 invasive squamous carcinomas, and 8 (89%) of 9 endocervical adenocarcinomas. HPV typing by DNA hybridization revealed HPV 6 and HPV 11 sequences in metaplastic squamous epithelia, CIN I, and CIN II, but not in CIN III lesions or invasive carcinomas. HPV 16 was detected in metaplastic epithelium and in nearly half of the invasive squamous carcinomas and adenocarcinomas. It was present in 31% of CIN lesions, increasing in frequency with the severity of CIN from 20% of CIN I to 50% of CIN III. HPV 16 showed a striking difference in geographic distribution, being detected in 36% of the carcinomas from the United States compared to 64% of the carcinomas from Brazil and Peru. HPV 18 was found in metaplastic epithelia and in 17% of carcinomas but in only 1% of CIN lesions. HPV 31 was not found in metaplastic epithelium but was present in 6% of carcinomas and in 18% of CIN lesions. In addition, a group of uncharacterized HPVs, not corresponding to any of the probes used, was found in 5% of normal and metaplastic epithelia and in 18% of CIN and 19% of invasive cancers. These results suggest that individual HPV types that infect the cervix have varying degrees of oncogenic association. HPV 6 and HPV 11 appear to have very little oncogenic association, HPV 31 has low oncogenic association, and HPV 16 and HPV 18 have high oncogenic association. PMID:2821311

  9. Prevalence of human papillomavirus in esophageal carcinoma in Tangshan, China

    PubMed Central

    Mehryar, Mohammadreza Mohammadzad; Li, Shu-Ying; Liu, Hong-Wei; Li, Fan; Zhang, Fang; Zhou, Yu-Bai; Zeng, Yi; Li, Jin-Tao

    2015-01-01

    AIM: To study the prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) in esophageal carcinoma in Tangshan, China, a high-incidence area. METHODS: Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue specimens from 198 patients who were pathologically diagnosed with esophageal squamous cell carcinoma from 2011 to 2013 were obtained from a pathology department in Tangshan. DNA was extracted from all 198 specimens to detect HPV by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). β-globin PCR was performed to check the quality of the DNA extraction procedure. PCR was performed to detect a wide range of HPV types, and type-specific PCR was performed to detect HPV types 16 and 18. Negative and positive controls were used for HPV 16 and 18 detection. RESULTS: The DNA extraction method in this study appeared to be more effective than other previously reported methods. After DNA extraction, more than 98% of the tissue specimens had an acceptable result in the DNA qualification test (β-globin PCR). The overall prevalence of HPV in tumor tissues by GP6+/GP5+ PCR was 79.79%, and the prevalence of HPV types 16 and 18 was 40.40% and 47.47%, respectively. PCR demonstrated the presence of HPV, and direct sequencing confirmed the HPV genotypes. All HPV-positive PCR products were checked by DNA sequence analysis using DNAman and compared with the known HPV sequences listed in the Basic Local Alignment Search Tool database to evaluate the HPV types. This analysis confirmed the presence of HPV types 16 and 18. CONCLUSION: DNA of high-risk HPV types 16 and 18 is present in esophageal tumors, implicating HPV as a possible etiologic factor for esophageal squamous cell carcinoma. PMID:25780287

  10. Human papillomavirus in lung carcinomas among three Latin American countries.

    PubMed

    Castillo, Andres; Aguayo, Francisco; Koriyama, Chihaya; Shuyama, Karem; Akiba, Suminori; Herrera-Goepfert, Roberto; Carrascal, Edwin; Klinge, German; Sánchez, Juvenal; Eizuru, Yoshito

    2006-04-01

    The presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) genome in lung carcinomas has been reported worldwide but its frequency varies from country to country. We examined HPV genome in 36 lung carcinomas, consisting of 14 squamous cell carcinomas, 13 adenocarcinomas, and 9 small cell carcinomas, collected from Colombia, Mexico and Peru. PCR analysis using GP5+/GP6+ primers, combined with Southern blot hybridization, found the presence of HPV genome in 10 (28%) of 36 cases. This percentage is similar to the value of 22% reported by Syrjänen, who conducted a meta-analysis of nearly 2500 lung carcinomas examined to date. Genotype analysis revealed that the most predominant genotype was HPV-16 (7 cases), followed by HPV-18 (2 cases) and HPV-33 (1 case). HPV-16 was more frequently found among female than male cases (P=0.008) but was not detected in any adenocarcinoma cases. On the other hand, HPV-18 and HPV-33 were detected only among male cases. These HPV genotypes were detected only in adenocarcinomas, and all the HPV genotypes detected in this histological type were HPV-18 or HPV-33. The frequency of HPV-16 positive cases among all the HPV positive cases differed in the sexes (P=0.033) and differed in the three histological types (P=0.017). The presence of HPV tended to be more frequent in well-differentiated tumors when squamous cell carcinomas and adenocarcinomas were combined. However, it was not statistically significant (P=0.093). Neither p16 nor p53 expression in carcinoma cells was related to the proportion of HPV-positive cases. In conclusion, high-risk HPV DNA was detected in 28% of lung carcinomas. The predisposition of HPV-16 to female cases and to non-adenomatous carcinomas warrants further investigation. PMID:16525675

  11. Geospatial patterns of human papillomavirus vaccine uptake in Minnesota

    PubMed Central

    Nelson, Erik J; Hughes, John; Oakes, J Michael; Pankow, James S; Kulasingam, Shalini L

    2015-01-01

    Objectives To identify factors associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination and to determine the geographic distribution of vaccine uptake while accounting for spatial autocorrelation. Design This study is cross-sectional in design using data collected via the Internet from the Survey of Minnesotans About Screening and HPV study. Setting and participants The sample consists of 760 individuals aged 18–30 years nested within 99 ZIP codes surrounding the downtown area of Minneapolis, Minnesota. Results In all, 46.2% of participants had received≥1 dose of HPV vaccine (67.7% of women and 13.0% of men). Prevalence of HPV vaccination was found to exhibit strong spatial dependence () across ZIP codes. Accounting for spatial dependence, age (OR=0.76, 95% CI 0.70 to 0.83) and male gender (OR=0.04, 95% CI 0.03 to 0.07) were negatively associated with vaccination, while liberal political preferences (OR=4.31, 95% CI 2.32 to 8.01), and college education (OR=2.58, 95% CI 1.14 to 5.83) were found to be positively associated with HPV vaccination. Conclusions Strong spatial dependence and heterogeneity of HPV vaccination prevalence were found across ZIP codes, indicating that spatial statistical models are needed to accurately identify and estimate factors associated with vaccine uptake across geographic units. This study also underscores the need for more detailed data collected at local levels (eg, ZIP code), as patterns of HPV vaccine receipt were found to differ significantly from aggregated state and national patterns. Future work is needed to further pinpoint areas with the greatest disparities in HPV vaccination and how to then access these populations to improve vaccine uptake. PMID:26316652

  12. Human Papillomavirus Genotype Distribution in Invasive Cervical Cancer in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Loya, Asif; Serrano, Beatriz; Rasheed, Farah; Tous, Sara; Hassan, Mariam; Clavero, Omar; Raza, Muhammad; De Sanjosé, Silvia; Bosch, F. Xavier; Alemany, Laia

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have assessed the burden of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in Pakistan. We aim to provide specific information on HPV-type distribution in invasive cervical cancer (ICC) in the country. A total of 280 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue blocks were consecutively selected from Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Centre (Lahore, Pakistan). HPV-DNA was detected by SPF10 broad-spectrum PCR followed by DNA enzyme immunoassay and genotyping by LiPA25. HPV-DNA prevalence was 87.5% (95%CI: 83.0–91.1), with 96.1% of cases histologically classified as squamous cell carcinoma. Most of the HPV-DNA positive cases presented single infections (95.9%). HPV16 was the most common type followed by HPV18 and 45. Among HPV-DNA positive, a significantly higher contribution of HPV16/18 was detected in Pakistan (78.4%; 72.7–83.3), compared to Asia (71.6%; 69.9–73.4) and worldwide (70.8%; 69.9–71.8) and a lower contribution of HPVs31/33/45/52/58 (11.1%; 7.9–15.7 vs. 19.8%; 18.3–21.3 and 18.5%; 17.7–19.3). HPV18 or HPV45 positive ICC cases were significantly younger than cases infected by HPV16 (mean age: 43.3, 44.4, 50.5 years, respectively). A routine cervical cancer screening and HPV vaccination program does not yet exist in Pakistan; however, the country could benefit from national integrated efforts for cervical cancer prevention and control. Calculated estimations based on our results show that current HPV vaccine could potentially prevent new ICC cases. PMID:27483322

  13. Human Papillomavirus-Associated Cancers - United States, 2008-2012.

    PubMed

    Viens, Laura J; Henley, S Jane; Watson, Meg; Markowitz, Lauri E; Thomas, Cheryll C; Thompson, Trevor D; Razzaghi, Hilda; Saraiya, Mona

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a known cause of cervical cancers, as well as some vulvar, vaginal, penile, oropharyngeal, anal, and rectal cancers (1,2). Although most HPV infections are asymptomatic and clear spontaneously, persistent infections with one of 13 oncogenic HPV types can progress to precancer or cancer. To assess the incidence of HPV-associated cancers, CDC analyzed 2008-2012 high-quality data from the CDC's National Program of Cancer Registries and the National Cancer Institute's Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results program. During 2008-2012, an average of 38,793 HPV-associated cancers were diagnosed annually, including 23,000 (59%) among females and 15,793 (41%) among males. By multiplying these counts by the percentages attributable to HPV (3), CDC estimated that approximately 30,700 new cancers were attributable to HPV, including 19,200 among females and 11,600 among males. Cervical precancers can be detected through screening, and treatment can prevent progression to cancer; HPV vaccination can prevent infection with HPV types that cause cancer at cervical and other sites (3). Vaccines are available for HPV types 16 and 18, which cause 63% of all HPV-associated cancers in the United States, and for HPV types 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58, which cause an additional 10% (3). Among the oncogenic HPV types, HPV 16 is the most likely to both persist and to progress to cancer (3). The impact of these primary and secondary prevention interventions can be monitored using surveillance data from population-based cancer registries. PMID:27387669

  14. Barriers to human papillomavirus vaccine acceptability in Israel.

    PubMed

    Fisher, William A; Laniado, Hila; Shoval, Hila; Hakim, Marwan; Bornstein, Jacob

    2013-11-22

    Barriers to human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine acceptability in Israel include Israel's relatively low incidence of cervical cancer; the religiously-based 80% circumcision rate in Israel, which is regarded as contributing to the lower incidence of HPV infection in the country; the fact that HPV vaccine provides immunity against only few virus types; the vaccine's high cost; and the perception that HPV transmission is associated with unacceptable sexual relations. A recent survey has demonstrated that, following media two campaigns, Israeli's level of awareness of the vaccine increased but the actual vaccination rate remained low, at approximately 10%. Survey findings also indicated that an enduring barrier to HPV vaccination is the vaccine's high cost. Recent research on a convenience sample of Israeli undergraduate women 21 to 24 years of age showed that intentions to receive HPV vaccination in the coming year were a function of women's attitudes towards getting vaccinated and their perceptions of social support for doing so. Undergraduate women who intended to be vaccinated perceived the prevention of cervical cancer, avoidance of personal health threat, and avoidance of HPV infection per se to be the advantages of undergoing HPV vaccination. Disadvantages of getting vaccinated included fear of vaccine side effects, cost of the vaccine, and newness of the vaccine, doubts about vaccines, time required to undergo multiple vaccinations, and dislike of injections. Friends', mothers' and physicians' recommendations influenced women's intentions to be vaccinated in the coming year as well. This article forms part of a regional report entitled "Comprehensive Control of HPV Infections and Related Diseases in Israel" Vaccine Volume 31, Supplement 8, 2013. Updates of the progress in the field are presented in a separate monograph entitled "Comprehensive Control of HPV Infections and Related Diseases" Vaccine Volume 30, Supplement 5, 2012. PMID:24229720

  15. Can clinical tests help monitor human papillomavirus vaccine impact?

    PubMed

    Meites, Elissa; Lin, Carol; Unger, Elizabeth R; Steinau, Martin; Patel, Sonya; Markowitz, Lauri E; Hariri, Susan

    2013-09-01

    As immunization programs for human papillomavirus (HPV) are implemented more widely around the world, interest is increasing in measuring their impact. One early measurable impact of HPV vaccine is on the prevalence of specific HPV types in a population. In low-resource settings, a potentially attractive strategy would be to monitor HPV prevalence using clinical cervical cancer screening test results to triage specimens for HPV typing. We assessed this approach in a nationally representative population of U.S. females aged 14-59 years. Using self-collected cervico-vaginal swab specimens from 4,150 women participating in the National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey during 2003-2006, we evaluated type-specific HPV prevalence detected by the Roche linear array (LA) research test on all specimens, compared with type-specific HPV prevalence detected by LA conducted only on specimens positive by the digene hybrid capture 2 (HC-2) clinical test. We calculated weighted prevalence estimates and their 95% confidence intervals (CIs), and examined relative type-specific HPV prevalence according to the two testing approaches. The population prevalence of oncogenic HPV vaccine types 16/18 was 6.2% (CI:5.4-7.1) by LA if all specimens were tested, and 2.4% (CI:1.9-3.0) if restricted to positive HC-2. Relative prevalence of individual HPV types was similar for both approaches. Compared with typing all specimens, a triage approach would require testing fewer specimens, but a greater reduction in HPV prevalence or a larger group of specimens would be needed to detect vaccine impact. Further investigation is warranted to inform type-specific HPV monitoring approaches around the world.

  16. Human Papillomavirus Infection in Women from Tlaxcala, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Velázquez-Márquez, Noé; Jaime Jiménez-Aranda, Lucio; Sánchez-Alonso, Patricia; Santos-López, Gerardo; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Vallejo-Ruiz, Verónica

    2010-01-01

    Cervical cancer is an important health problem in women living in developing countries. Infection with some genotypes of human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most important risk factor associated with cervical cancer. Little information exists about HPV genotype distribution in rural and suburban regions of Mexico. Thus, we determined the prevalence of HPV genotypes in women from Tlaxcala, one of the poorest states in central Mexico, and we evaluated age infection prevalence and risk factors associated with cervical neoplasm. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 236 women seeking gynecological care at the Mexican Institute for Social Security in Tlaxcala, Mexico. Cervical scrapings were diagnosed as normal, low-grade, and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LGSIL, HGSIL). Parallel samples were used to detect HPV genotypes by PCR assays using type-specific primers for HPV 6, 11, 16, 18, and 31. An epidemiological questionnaire was applied. Prevalence of HPV infection was 31.3%. From the infected samples, prevalence of HPV 16 was 45.9%; HPV 18, 31.1%; HPV 31, 16.2%; HPV 6, 10.8%; HPV 11, 6.7%. With regard to age, the highest HPV prevalence (43.5%) was found in the 18- to 24-year-old group and the lowest (19%) in the 45- to 54-year-old group. None of the risk factors showed association with cervical neoplasia grade. HPV 16 was the most common in cervical lesions. HPV was present in 22% of normal samples and, of these, 82.6% represented high-risk HPVs. Tlaxcala showed HPV prevalence comparable to that of the largest cities in Mexico, with higher prevalence for HPV 31. PMID:24031552

  17. Oral human papillomavirus is common in individuals with Fanconi anemia

    PubMed Central

    Sauter, Sharon L.; Wells, Susanne I.; Zhang, Xue; Hoskins, Elizabeth E.; Davies, Stella M.; Myers, Kasiani C.; Mueller, Robin; Panicker, Gitika; Unger, Elizabeth R.; Sivaprasad, Umasundari; Brown, Darron R.; Mehta, Parinda A.; Butsch Kovacic, Melinda

    2015-01-01

    Background Fanconi Anemia (FA) is a rare genetic disorder resulting in a loss of function of the FA-related DNA repair pathway. Individuals with FA are predisposed to some cancers including oropharyngeal and gynecological cancers with known associations with human papillomavirus (HPV) in the general population. Since individuals with FA respond poorly to chemotherapy and radiation, prevention of cancer is critical. Methods To determine if individuals with FA are particularly susceptible to oral HPV infection, we analyzed survey-based risk factor data and tested DNA isolated from oral rinses from 126 individuals with FA and 162 unaffected first-degree family members for 37 HPV types. Results Fourteen individuals (11.1%) with FA tested positive, significantly more (p=0.003) than family members (2.5%). While HPV prevalence was even higher for sexually active individuals with FA (17.7% vs. 2.4% in family; p=0.003), HPV positivity also tended to be higher in the sexually inactive (8.7% in FA vs. 2.9% in siblings). Indeed, having FA increased HPV positivity 4.9 fold (95%CI: 1.6–15.4) considering age and sexual experience, but did not differ by other potential risk factors. Conclusion Our studies suggest that oral HPV is more common in individuals with FA. It will be essential to continue to explore associations between risk factors and immune dysfunction on HPV incidence and persistence over time. Impact HPV vaccination should be emphasized in those with FA as a first step to prevent oropharyngeal cancers, although additional studies are needed to determine if the level of protection it offers in this population is adequate. PMID:25809863

  18. Prevalence of human papillomavirus in oropharyngeal cancer: a systematic review

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Andrew P.; Saha, Sandeep; Kraninger, Jennifer L.; Swick, Adam D.; Yu, Menggang; Lambertg, Paul F.; Kimple, Randall

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The global incidence of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) has been increasing, and it has been proposed that a rising rate of human papillomavirus (HPV) associated cancers is driving the observed changes in OPSCC incidence. We carried out this systematic review to further examine the prevalence of HPV in OPSCC over time worldwide. Methods A systematic literature search was performed to identify all articles through January 31, 2014 that reported on the prevalence of HPV in OPSCC. Articles that met inclusion criteria were divided into four time frames (pre-1995, 1995—1999, 2000—2004, and 2005—present) based on the median year of the study's sample collection period. Employing a weighted analysis of variance (ANOVA) model, we examined the trends of HPV-positivity over time worldwide, in North America, and in Europe. Results Our literature search identified 699 unique articles. 175 underwent review of the entire study and 105 met inclusion criteria. These 105 articles reported on the HPV prevalence in 9541 OPSCC specimens across 23 nations. We demonstrated significant increases in the percentage change of HPV-positive OPSCCs from pre-1995 to present: 20.6% worldwide (p-value for trend: p<0.001), 21.6% in North America (p=0.013) and 21.5% in Europe (p=0.033). Discussion Interestingly, while in Europe there was a steady increase in HPV prevalence across all time frames, reaching nearly 50% most recently, in North America HPV prevalence appears to have plateaued over the past decade at about 65%. These findings may have important implications regarding predictions for the future incidence of OPSCC. PMID:26049691

  19. Human papillomavirus infection among women in South and North Vietnam.

    PubMed

    Pham, Thi Hoang Anh; Nguyen, Trong Hieu; Herrero, Rolando; Vaccarella, Salvatore; Smith, Jennifer S; Nguyen Thuy, Thi Thuy; Nguyen, Hoai Nga; Nguyen, Ba Duc; Ashley, Rhoda; Snijders, Peter J F; Meijer, Chris J L M; Muñoz, Nubia; Parkin, D Max; Franceschi, Silvia

    2003-03-20

    The incidence rate of invasive cervical carcinoma (ICC) is 4-fold higher in Ho Chi Minh City, in the South of Vietnam, than in Hanoi, in the North. Thus, we explored the prevalence of and the risk factors for human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in these 2 areas. A population-based random sample of married women aged 15-69 years were interviewed and had a gynaecological examination in the urban district of Ho Chi Minh City and in a peri-urban district in Hanoi. HPV DNA detection was performed using a GP5+/6+ primer-mediated PCR enzyme immunoassay. A total of 922 women from Ho Chi Minh and 994 from Hanoi, for whom a Pap smear and HPV-status were available, were evaluated. HPV DNA was detected among 10.9% of women in Ho Chi Minh City and 2.0% in Hanoi (age standardized prevalence, world standard population: 10.6% and 2.3%, respectively). In the 2 areas combined, 30 different HPV types were found, the most common being HPV 16 (in 14 single and 18 multiple infections), followed by HPV 58, 18 and 56. A peak of HPV DNA detection in women younger than age 25 was found in Ho Chi Minh City (22.3%) but not in Hanoi. Major risk factors for HPV DNA detection were indicators of sexual habits, most notably the presence of HSV-2 antibodies, nulliparity and the current use of oral contraceptives. Women in Hanoi showed the lowest HPV prevalence ever reported so far, suggesting that HPV has not spread widely in this population. As expected, HPV prevalence in a population seemed to be closely correlated with ICC incidence rates. PMID:12569577

  20. Human Papillomavirus 18 Genetic Variation and Cervical Cancer Risk Worldwide

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Alyce A.; Gheit, Tarik; Franceschi, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human papillomavirus 18 (HPV18) is the second most carcinogenic HPV type, after HPV16, and it accounts for approximately 12% of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) as well as 37% of adenocarcinoma (ADC) of the cervix worldwide. We aimed to evaluate the worldwide diversity and carcinogenicity of HPV18 genetic variants by sequencing the entire long control region (LCR) and the E6 open reading frame of 711 HPV18-positive cervical samples from 39 countries, taking advantage of the International Agency for Research on Cancer biobank. A total of 209 unique HPV18 sequence variants were identified that formed three phylogenetic lineages (A, B, and C). A and B lineages each divided into four sublineages, including a newly identified candidate B4 sublineage. The distribution of lineages varied by geographical region, with B and C lineages found principally in Africa. HPV18 (sub)lineages were compared between 453 cancer cases and 236 controls, as well as between 81 ADC and 160 matched SCC cases. In region-stratified analyses, there were no significant differences in the distribution of HPV18 variant lineages between cervical cancer cases and controls or between ADC and SCC. In conclusion, our findings do not support the role of HPV18 (sub)lineages for discriminating cancer risk or explaining why HPV18 is more strongly linked with ADC than SCC. IMPORTANCE This is the largest and most geographically/ethnically diverse study of the genetic variation of HPV18 to date, providing a comprehensive reference for phylogenetic classification of HPV18 sublineages for epidemiological and biological studies. PMID:26269181

  1. Epigenetic pathogenesis of human papillomavirus in upper aerodigestive tract cancers.

    PubMed

    Talukdar, Fazlur Rahman; Ghosh, Sankar Kumar; Laskar, Ruhina Shirin; Kannan, Ravi; Choudhury, Biswadeep; Bhowmik, Arup

    2015-11-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been recently associated with squamous cell carcinoma of upper aerodigestive tract (SCC of UADT), but its possible role in promoting aberrant methylation in these tumors has largely remained unexplored. Herein, we investigated the association of HPV with aberrant methylation in tumor-related genes/loci consisting of the classical CpG Island Methylator Phenotype (CIMP) panel markers (p16, MLH1, MINT1, MINT2, and MINT31) and other frequently methylated cancer-related genes (DAPK1, GSTP1, BRCA1, ECAD, and RASSF1) and survival of UDAT cancers. The study includes 219 SCC of UADT patients from different hospitals of Northeast India. Detection of HPV and aberrant promoter methylation was performed by PCR and Methylation Specific PCR respectively. Association study was conducted by Logistic regression analysis and overall survival analysis was done by Kaplan-Meier plot. HPV was detected in 37% of cases, with HPV-18 as the major high-risk sub-type. Although HPV presence did not seem to affect survival in overall UADT cancers, but was associated with a favourable prognosis in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Hierarchical clustering revealed three distinct clusters with different methylation profile and HPV presence. Among these, the CIMP-high subgroup exhibited the highest HPV positive cases (66%). Furthermore, multivariate analysis revealed a strong synergistic association of HPV and tobacco towards modulating promoter hypermethylation in UADT cancer (OR = 27.50 [95% CI = 11.51-88.03] for CIMP-high vs. CIMP-low). The present study proposes a potential role of HPV in impelling aberrant methylation in specific tumor related loci, which might contribute in the initiation and progression of SCC of UADT. PMID:25213493

  2. The Cell Cycle Timing of Human Papillomavirus DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Reinson, Tormi; Henno, Liisi; Toots, Mart; Ustav, Mart; Ustav, Mart

    2015-01-01

    Viruses manipulate the cell cycle of the host cell to optimize conditions for more efficient viral genome replication. One strategy utilized by DNA viruses is to replicate their genomes non-concurrently with the host genome; in this case, the viral genome is amplified outside S phase. This phenomenon has also been described for human papillomavirus (HPV) vegetative genome replication, which occurs in G2-arrested cells; however, the precise timing of viral DNA replication during initial and stable replication phases has not been studied. We developed a new method to quantitate newly synthesized DNA levels and used this method in combination with cell cycle synchronization to show that viral DNA replication is initiated during S phase and is extended to G2 during initial amplification but follows the replication pattern of cellular DNA during S phase in the stable maintenance phase. E1 and E2 protein overexpression changes the replication time from S only to both the S and G2 phases in cells that stably maintain viral episomes. These data demonstrate that the active synthesis and replication of the HPV genome are extended into the G2 phase to amplify its copy number and the duration of HPV genome replication is controlled by the level of the viral replication proteins E1 and E2. Using the G2 phase for genome amplification may be an important adaptation that allows exploitation of changing cellular conditions during cell cycle progression. We also describe a new method to quantify newly synthesized viral DNA levels and discuss its benefits for HPV research. PMID:26132923

  3. Predictors of Human Papillomavirus Awareness and Knowledge in 2013

    PubMed Central

    Blake, Kelly D.; Ottenbacher, Allison J.; Rutten, Lila J. Finney; Grady, Meredith A.; Kobrin, Sarah C.; Jacobson, Robert M.; Hesse, Bradford W.

    2014-01-01

    Background Nearly 80 million people in the U.S. are currently infected with at least one of two strains of human papillomavirus (HPV), which is associated with 70% of cervical cancers. Greater cervical cancer mortality has been observed among women of lower SES and those living in rural, versus urban, areas. African American and Hispanic women are significantly more likely to die from cervical cancer than non-Hispanic white women. Purpose To assess current population awareness of and knowledge about HPV and the HPV vaccine, as well as the contribution of sociodemographic characteristics to disparities in HPV awareness and knowledge. Methods Cross-sectional data were obtained from the National Cancer Institute’s 2013 Health Information National Trends Survey (HINTS; N=3,185). Multivariable logistic regression was employed to identify gaps in awareness and knowledge by sex, education, income, race/ethnicity, geographic area, and other important sociodemographic characteristics. Analyses were conducted in 2014. Results Sixty-eight percent of Americans had heard of HPV and the HPV vaccine. Consistent with the Knowledge Gap Hypothesis, awareness and knowledge were patterned by sex, age, education, and other important sociodemographic factors. Those in rural areas were less likely than those in urban areas to know that HPV causes cervical cancer. Less than 5% of Americans were aware that HPV often clears on its own without treatment. Conclusions Although awareness and knowledge of HPV is increasing, there are opportunities to target communication with populations for whom knowledge gaps currently exist, in order to promote dialogue about the vaccine among patients and their providers. PMID:25700651

  4. Immune therapy for human papillomaviruses-related cancers.

    PubMed

    Rosales, Ricardo; Rosales, Carlos

    2014-12-10

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are a large family of double strand DNA viruses comprising more than 180 types. Infection with HPV is very common and it is associated with benign and malignant proliferation of skin and squamous mucosae. Many HPVs, considered low-risk such as HPV 6 and 11, produce warts; while high-risk viruses, such as HPVs 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, and 58, induce tumors. About 5% of all cancers in men and women are associated with HPV infection. Because there are not antiviral drugs for HPV infection, current therapies for low-risk HPV infections involve physical removal of the lesion by cryotherapy, trichloracetic acid, laser, or surgical removal. Surgical procedures are effective in the treatment of pre-cancerous lesions, however after these procedures, many recurrences appear due to new re-infections, or to failure of the procedure to eliminate the HPV. In addition, HPV can inhibit recognition of malignant cells by the immune system, leading to the development of cancer lesions. When this occurs, radiotherapy and chemotherapy are then used. Unfortunately, about 50% of the HPV-cancer patients still die. In the past decade, a better knowledge of the natural history of the virus-host interaction and of the immune response against this viral infection has brought new therapeutic strategies geared to modulate the immune system to generate an efficient virus-specific cytotoxic response. Novel HPV protein-expressing vaccines have shown some significant clinical efficacy and systemic HPV-specific cytotoxic T cell responses. This review will describe the current status of the several therapeutic strategies used to treat HPV-induced lesions, and discuss the various new therapies now being tested.

  5. Commercially available molecular tests for human papillomaviruses (HPV): 2015 update.

    PubMed

    Poljak, Mario; Kocjan, Boštjan J; Oštrbenk, Anja; Seme, Katja

    2016-03-01

    Commercial molecular tests for human papillomaviruses (HPV) are invaluable diagnostic tools in cervical carcinoma screening and management of women with cervical precancerous lesions as well as important research tools for epidemiological studies, vaccine development, and implementation and monitoring of vaccination programs. In this third inventory of commercial HPV tests, we identified 193 distinct commercial HPV tests and at least 127 test variants available on the market in 2015, which represents a 54% and 79% increase in the number of distinct HPV tests and variants, respectively, in comparison to our last inventory performed in 2012. Identified HPV tests were provisionally divided into eight main groups and several subgroups. Among the 193 commercial HPV tests, all but two target alpha-HPV types only. Although the number of commercial HPV tests with at least one published study in peer-reviewed literature has increased significantly in the last three years, several published performance evaluations are still not in line with agreed-upon standards in the HPV community. Manufacturers should invest greater effort into evaluating their products and publishing validation/evaluation results in peer-reviewed journals. To achieve this, more clinically oriented external quality-control panels and initiatives are required. For evaluating the analytical performance of the entire range of HPV tests currently on the market, more diverse and reliable external quality-control programs based on international standards for all important HPV types are indispensable. The performance of a wider range of HPV tests must be promptly evaluated on a variety of alternative clinical specimens. In addition, more complete HPV assays containing validated sample-extraction protocols and appropriate internal controls are urgently needed. Provision of a broader range of automated systems allowing large-scale HPV testing as well as the development of reliable, rapid, and affordable molecular

  6. Mutational analysis of human papillomavirus type 16 E7 functions.

    PubMed Central

    Watanabe, S; Kanda, T; Sato, H; Furuno, A; Yoshiike, K

    1990-01-01

    The human papillomavirus type 16 E7 gene encodes a nuclear oncoprotein (98 amino acids [AAs] long) consisting of three regions: regions 1 (AAs 1 to 20) and 2 (AAs 21 to 40), which show high homology to the sequences of conserved domains 1 and 2, respectively, of adenovirus E1A; and region 3 (AAs 41 to 98) containing two metal-binding motifs Cys-X-X-Cys (AAs 58 and 91 to 94). We constructed AA deletion (substitution) mutants and single-AA substitution mutants of E7 placed under the control of the simian virus 40 promoter and examined their biological functions. Stable expression of E7 protein in monkey COS-1 cells required almost the entire length of E7 and was markedly lowered by the mutations in region 3. Transactivation of the adenovirus E2 promoter in monkey CV-1 cells was lowered by the mutations. It was abolished by changing Cys-24 to Gly and markedly decreased by a mutation at His-2 or at the metal-binding motifs in region 3. Focal transformation of rat 3Y1 cells by E7 was eliminated by changing His-2 to Asp or Cys-24 to Gly and was greatly impaired by changing Cys-61 or Cys-94 to Gly. The transforming function survived mutations at Leu-13 and Cys-68 and deletion of Asp-Ser-Ser (AAs 30 to 32). The data suggest that regions 1 to 3 are required for its functions and that the meta-binding motifs in region 3 are required to maintain a stable or functional structure of the E7 protein. Images PMID:2152813

  7. Barriers to Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Among US Adolescents

    PubMed Central

    Holman, Dawn M.; Benard, Vicki; Roland, Katherine B.; Watson, Meg; Liddon, Nicole; Stokley, Shannon

    2015-01-01

    IMPORTANCE Since licensure of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine in 2006, HPV vaccine coverage among US adolescents has increased but remains low compared with other recommended vaccines. OBJECTIVE To systematically review the literature on barriers to HPV vaccination among US adolescents to inform future efforts to increase HPV vaccine coverage. EVIDENCE REVIEW We searched PubMed and previous review articles to identify original research articles describing barriers to HPV vaccine initiation and completion among US adolescents. Only articles reporting data collected in 2009 or later were included. Findings from 55 relevant articles were summarized by target populations: health care professionals, parents, underserved and disadvantaged populations, and males. FINDINGS Health care professionals cited financial concerns and parental attitudes and concerns as barriers to providing the HPV vaccine to patients. Parents often reported needing more information before vaccinating their children. Concerns about the vaccine’s effect on sexual behavior, low perceived risk of HPV infection, social influences, irregular preventive care, and vaccine cost were also identified as potential barriers among parents. Some parents of sons reported not vaccinating their sons because of the perceived lack of direct benefit. Parents consistently cited health care professional recommendations as one of the most important factors in their decision to vaccinate their children. CONCLUSIONS AND RELEVANCE Continued efforts are needed to ensure that health care professionals and parents understand the importance of vaccinating adolescents before they become sexually active. Health care professionals may benefit from guidance on communicating HPV recommendations to patients and parents. Further efforts are also needed to reduce missed opportunities for HPV vaccination when adolescents interface with the health care system. Efforts to increase uptake should take into account the specific

  8. Epigenetic pathogenesis of human papillomavirus in upper aerodigestive tract cancers.

    PubMed

    Talukdar, Fazlur Rahman; Ghosh, Sankar Kumar; Laskar, Ruhina Shirin; Kannan, Ravi; Choudhury, Biswadeep; Bhowmik, Arup

    2015-11-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been recently associated with squamous cell carcinoma of upper aerodigestive tract (SCC of UADT), but its possible role in promoting aberrant methylation in these tumors has largely remained unexplored. Herein, we investigated the association of HPV with aberrant methylation in tumor-related genes/loci consisting of the classical CpG Island Methylator Phenotype (CIMP) panel markers (p16, MLH1, MINT1, MINT2, and MINT31) and other frequently methylated cancer-related genes (DAPK1, GSTP1, BRCA1, ECAD, and RASSF1) and survival of UDAT cancers. The study includes 219 SCC of UADT patients from different hospitals of Northeast India. Detection of HPV and aberrant promoter methylation was performed by PCR and Methylation Specific PCR respectively. Association study was conducted by Logistic regression analysis and overall survival analysis was done by Kaplan-Meier plot. HPV was detected in 37% of cases, with HPV-18 as the major high-risk sub-type. Although HPV presence did not seem to affect survival in overall UADT cancers, but was associated with a favourable prognosis in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma. Hierarchical clustering revealed three distinct clusters with different methylation profile and HPV presence. Among these, the CIMP-high subgroup exhibited the highest HPV positive cases (66%). Furthermore, multivariate analysis revealed a strong synergistic association of HPV and tobacco towards modulating promoter hypermethylation in UADT cancer (OR = 27.50 [95% CI = 11.51-88.03] for CIMP-high vs. CIMP-low). The present study proposes a potential role of HPV in impelling aberrant methylation in specific tumor related loci, which might contribute in the initiation and progression of SCC of UADT.

  9. Human papillomavirus infection in women in four regions of Senegal.

    PubMed

    Mbaye, El Hadji Seydou; Gheit, Tarik; Dem, Ahmadou; McKay-Chopin, Sandrine; Toure-Kane, Ndeye Coumba; Mboup, Souleymane; Tommasino, Massimo; Sylla, Bakary S; Boye, Cheikh Saad Bouh

    2014-02-01

    Cervical cancer is the most frequent cancer among women in Senegal. However, there are few data concerning the human papillomavirus (HPV) types inducing neoplasia and cervical cancers and their prevalence in the general population of Senegal. The aim of this study is to determine the prevalence of HPV infection in Senegalese women aged 18 years and older in Dakar Region and three other regions. Cervical samples were collected from 498 women aged 18-80 years (mean, 42.1 years) in Dakar Region. Also, 438 samples were collected from three other regions: Thiès, Saint-Louis, and Louga. The samples were screened for 21 HPV genotypes using an HPV type-specific E7 PCR bead-based multiplex genotyping assay (TS-MPG). The prevalence of high risk (HR)-HPV in Dakar Region was 17.4%. HPV 52 (3.2%) was the most prevalent HPV type, followed by HPV 31 (3.0%) and HPV 16, 45, and 53 (all 2.8%). In the Thiès, Saint-Louis, and Louga Regions, the prevalence of HR-HPV was 23.2%, 13.1%, and 19.4%, respectively. The study revealed the specificity of HPV prevalence in Dakar Region and other regions of Senegal. The observed patterns show some differences compared with other regions of the world. These findings raise the possibility that, in addition to HPV 16 and HPV 18, other HPV types should be considered for a vaccination program in Senegal. However, additional studies to determine the HPV type distribution in cervical cancer specimens in Senegal are required to further corroborate this hypothesis.

  10. Oral Human Papillomavirus in Youth From the Pediatric HIV/AIDS Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Farhat, Sepideh; Yao, Tzy-Jyun; Ryder, Mark I; Russell, Jonathan S; Van Dyke, Russell B; Hazra, Rohan; Shiboski, Caroline H

    2016-08-01

    In contrast to high rates of oral human papillomavirus (HPV) found in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected adults, only 2% of 209 perinatally HIV-infected youth had oral HPV. This rate was similar in HIV-exposed but uninfected youth. No association was found with sexual activity; however, low CD4 counts were associated with oral HPV. PMID:27414680

  11. Lifelong widespread warts associated with human papillomavirus type 70/85: a new diagnostic entity?

    PubMed

    Giuliodori, Katia; Campanati, Anna; Liberati, Giulia; Ganzetti, Giulia; Giangiacomi, Mirella; Marinelli, Katia; Cataldi, Ivana; Marconi, Barbara; Offidani, Annamaria

    2016-01-01

    We present a patient with HPV 70/85-positive widespread cutaneous warts characterized by clinical and histological features atypical for classic generalized verrucosis or epidermodysplasia verruciformis. The cutaneous HPV infection is characterized by verrucous papules or plaques variable in size, number, and distribution depending on the genotype of HPV involved and the immune status of the patient. Human papillomaviruses comprise five genera (alpha, beta, gamma, mu, and nu papillomavirus) with different life-cycle characteristics, epithelial tropisms, and disease associations. Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) is a rare, lifelong, autosomal recessive skin disease characterized by persistent cutaneous human papillomavirus infection not necessarily associated with immune system defects. The disease results from an unusual genetic susceptibility to infections with various types of HPVs (especially β-HPV), some of which cause malignant transformation. Conversely, generalized verrucosis has been more typically associated with generalized warts, which are associated with immunocompromised conditions. PMID:27014773

  12. Human papillomavirus detection in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Vietía, Dayahindara; Liuzzi, Juan; Ávila, Maira; De Guglielmo, Zoraya; Prado, Yrneh; Correnti, María

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Human Papillomavirus (HPV) has been associated with benign and malignant lesions in different epitheliums. The relationship between specific genotypes of high-risk HPV and some human cancers is well established. The aim of this work was to detect the HPV genotypes present in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods We evaluated 71 samples of patients with histopathological diagnosis of HNSCC. The DNA extraction was conducted with the QIAGEN commercial kit. HPV detection and genotyping were performed by reverse hybridisation (INNO-LiPA) following the commercial specifications. Results The mean age of the patients evaluated was 60.7 ± 13.11 years. The distribution of the lesions included 25 (35.20%) cases of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral cavity, 23 (32.39%) of larynx, 16 (22.50%) of the oropharynx, 4 (5.63%) of paranasal sinus, and 2 (2. 80%) cases of SCC of the nostril. Of the patients, 78.9% were males, and of these 76% were tobacco users and 67.6% were alcohol consumers. The viral DNA was detected in 67.6% of the samples. The oral cavity and the larynx were the highest HPV-positivity sites with 35.40% and 29.10% respectively. The most frequent genotype was 16 as single infection (18.70%), or in combination with another HPV types. In the oral cavity and larynx the genotypes 16 or the combination 6 and 51 were present in 11.76% and 14.28%, respectively; and in the oropharynx the most frequent genotype was 16 in 22.50% of the cases, and in the paranasal sinus 50% presented infection with HPV-6. We observed that tumours with most advanced size and stage presented greater HPV positivity. Conclusions This study shows a high percentage of HPV positivity in SCC is mainly associated with high-risk HPV. It is important to highlight that viral infection, especially HPV-16, could be a risk factor in HNSCC progression. PMID:25374623

  13. In vivo transformation of human skin with human papillomavirus type 11 from condylomatot acuminata

    SciTech Connect

    Kreider, J.W.; Howett, M.K.; Lill, N.L.; Bartlett, G.L.; Zaino, R.J.; Sedlacek, T.V.; Mortel, R.

    1986-08-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) have been implicated in the development of a number of human malignancies, but direct tests of their involvement have not been possible. The authors describe a system in which human skin from various skin from various sites was infected with HPV type 11 (HPV-11) extracted from vulvar condylomata and was grafted beneath the renal capsule of athymic mice. Most of the skin grafts so treated underwent morphological transformation, resulting in the development of condylomata identical to those which occur spontaneously in patients. Foreskins responded with the most vigorous proliferative response to HPV-11. The lesions produced the characteristic intranuclear group-specific antigen of papillomaviruses. Both dot blot and Southern blot analysis of DNA from the lesions revealed the presence of HPV-11 DNA in the transformed grafts. These results demonstrate the first laboratory system for the study of the interaction of human skin with an HPV. The method may be useful in understanding the mechanisms of HPV transformation and replication and is free of the ethical restraints which have impeded study. This system will allow the direct study of factors which permit neoplastic progression of HPV-induced cutaneous lesions in human tissues.

  14. Does human papillomavirus cause cervical cancer? The state of the epidemiological evidence.

    PubMed Central

    Muñoz, N.; Bosch, X.; Kaldor, J. M.

    1988-01-01

    The human papillomavirus has emerged over the past decade as the leading candidate to be the sexually transmitted aetiological factor in cervical cancer. Although it appears that papillomavirus types 16 and 18 are associated with a higher risk of advanced cervical neoplasia, most of the evidence comes from studies which do not satisfy basic epidemiological requirements, and are therefore difficult to interpret. The most significant problems are the small sample size, potentially biased selection of study subjects, the difficulties in cytologically distinguishing precancerous lesions from papilloma infection of the cervix, the unknown specificity and sensitivity of the various hybridisation methods for determining papillomavirus infection status, and the statistical analyses and presentation of results. On the basis of the existing studies, one is forced to conclude that, while experimental data suggest an oncogenic potential for HPV, the epidemiological evidence implicating it as a cause of cervical neoplasia is still rather limited. PMID:2831924

  15. Characterization of human papillomavirus type 13 from focal epithelial hyperplasia Heck lesions.

    PubMed

    Pfister, H; Hettich, I; Runne, U; Gissmann, L; Chilf, G N

    1983-08-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia Heck lesions of a Turkish patient were shown to contain papillomavirus-specific DNA, which was molecularly cloned into bacteriophage lambda. It proved to be related to human papillomavirus (HPV) type 6 DNA and HPV type 11 DNA. Reassociation kinetics revealed a cross-hybridization of 4 and 3%, respectively. There was no cross-reactivity with HPV type 1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 8, or 10. This papillomavirus type will be referred to as HPV type 13. The DNA was characterized by cleavage with several restriction enzymes, and the cleavage sites were physically mapped. Papules from two additional cases of Morbus Heck contained HPV type 13 DNA as shown by Southern blot hybridization and by the characteristic cleavage patterns. This may indicate that HPV type 13 is more frequently associated with focal epithelial hyperplasia Heck than are other HPV types. PMID:6312071

  16. Human papillomavirus-32-associated focal epithelial hyperplasia accompanying HPV-16-positive papilloma-like lesions in oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Liu, Na; Wang, Jiayi; Lei, Lei; Li, Yanzhong; Zhou, Min; Dan, Hongxia; Zeng, Xin; Chen, Qianming

    2013-05-01

    Human papillomavirus infection can cause a variety of benign or malignant oral lesions, and the various genotypes can cause distinct types of lesions. To our best knowledge, there has been no report of 2 different human papillomavirus-related oral lesions in different oral sites in the same patient before. This paper reported a patient with 2 different oral lesions which were clinically and histologically in accord with focal epithelial hyperplasia and oral papilloma, respectively. Using DNA extracted from these 2 different lesions, tissue blocks were tested for presence of human papillomavirus followed by specific polymerase chain reaction testing for 6, 11, 13, 16, 18, and 32 subtypes in order to confirm the clinical diagnosis. Finally, human papillomavirus-32-positive focal epithelial hyperplasia accompanying human papillomavirus-16-positive oral papilloma-like lesions were detected in different sites of the oral mucosa. Nucleotide sequence sequencing further confirmed the results. So in our clinical work, if the simultaneous occurrences of different human papillomavirus associated lesions are suspected, the multiple biopsies from different lesions and detection of human papillomavirus genotype are needed to confirm the diagnosis.

  17. Comprehensive control of human papillomavirus infections and related diseases.

    PubMed

    Bosch, F Xavier; Broker, Thomas R; Forman, David; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Gillison, Maura L; Doorbar, John; Stern, Peter L; Stanley, Margaret; Arbyn, Marc; Poljak, Mario; Cuzick, Jack; Castle, Philip E; Schiller, John T; Markowitz, Lauri E; Fisher, William A; Canfell, Karen; Denny, Lynette A; Franco, Eduardo L; Steben, Marc; Kane, Mark A; Schiffman, Mark; Meijer, Chris J L M; Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy; Castellsagué, Xavier; Kim, Jane J; Brotons, Maria; Alemany, Laia; Albero, Ginesa; Diaz, Mireia; de Sanjosé, Silvia

    2013-12-31

    Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is recognized as one of the major causes of infection-related cancer worldwide, as well as the causal factor in other diseases. Strong evidence for a causal etiology with HPV has been stated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer for cancers of the cervix uteri, penis, vulva, vagina, anus and oropharynx (including base of the tongue and tonsils). Of the estimated 12.7 million new cancers occurring in 2008 worldwide, 4.8% were attributable to HPV infection, with substantially higher incidence and mortality rates seen in developing versus developed countries. In recent years, we have gained tremendous knowledge about HPVs and their interactions with host cells, tissues and the immune system; have validated and implemented strategies for safe and efficacious prophylactic vaccination against HPV infections; have developed increasingly sensitive and specific molecular diagnostic tools for HPV detection for use in cervical cancer screening; and have substantially increased global awareness of HPV and its many associated diseases in women, men, and children. While these achievements exemplify the success of biomedical research in generating important public health interventions, they also generate new and daunting challenges: costs of HPV prevention and medical care, the implementation of what is technically possible, socio-political resistance to prevention opportunities, and the very wide ranges of national economic capabilities and health care systems. Gains and challenges faced in the quest for comprehensive control of HPV infection and HPV-related cancers and other disease are summarized in this review. The information presented may be viewed in terms of a reframed paradigm of prevention of cervical cancer and other HPV-related diseases that will include strategic combinations of at least four major components: 1) routine introduction of HPV vaccines to women in all countries, 2) extension and simplification of

  18. Comprehensive control of human papillomavirus infections and related diseases.

    PubMed

    Bosch, F Xavier; Broker, Thomas R; Forman, David; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Gillison, Maura L; Doorbar, John; Stern, Peter L; Stanley, Margaret; Arbyn, Marc; Poljak, Mario; Cuzick, Jack; Castle, Philip E; Schiller, John T; Markowitz, Lauri E; Fisher, William A; Canfell, Karen; Denny, Lynette A; Franco, Eduardo L; Steben, Marc; Kane, Mark A; Schiffman, Mark; Meijer, Chris J L M; Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy; Castellsagué, Xavier; Kim, Jane J; Brotons, Maria; Alemany, Laia; Albero, Ginesa; Diaz, Mireia; de Sanjosé, Silvia

    2013-11-22

    Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is recognized as one of the major causes of infection-related cancer worldwide, as well as the causal factor in other diseases. Strong evidence for a causal etiology with HPV has been stated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer for cancers of the cervix uteri, penis, vulva, vagina, anus and oropharynx (including base of the tongue and tonsils). Of the estimated 12.7 million new cancers occurring in 2008 worldwide, 4.8% were attributable to HPV infection, with substantially higher incidence and mortality rates seen in developing versus developed countries. In recent years, we have gained tremendous knowledge about HPVs and their interactions with host cells, tissues and the immune system; have validated and implemented strategies for safe and efficacious prophylactic vaccination against HPV infections; have developed increasingly sensitive and specific molecular diagnostic tools for HPV detection for use in cervical cancer screening; and have substantially increased global awareness of HPV and its many associated diseases in women, men, and children. While these achievements exemplify the success of biomedical research in generating important public health interventions, they also generate new and daunting challenges: costs of HPV prevention and medical care, the implementation of what is technically possible, socio-political resistance to prevention opportunities, and the very wide ranges of national economic capabilities and health care systems. Gains and challenges faced in the quest for comprehensive control of HPV infection and HPV-related cancers and other disease are summarized in this review. The information presented may be viewed in terms of a reframed paradigm of prevention of cervical cancer and other HPV-related diseases that will include strategic combinations of at least four major components: 1) routine introduction of HPV vaccines to women in all countries, 2) extension and simplification of

  19. Comprehensive control of human papillomavirus infections and related diseases.

    PubMed

    Bosch, F Xavier; Broker, Thomas R; Forman, David; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Gillison, Maura L; Doorbar, John; Stern, Peter L; Stanley, Margaret; Arbyn, Marc; Poljak, Mario; Cuzick, Jack; Castle, Philip E; Schiller, John T; Markowitz, Lauri E; Fisher, William A; Canfell, Karen; Denny, Lynette A; Franco, Eduardo L; Steben, Marc; Kane, Mark A; Schiffman, Mark; Meijer, Chris J L M; Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy; Castellsagué, Xavier; Kim, Jane J; Brotons, Maria; Alemany, Laia; Albero, Ginesa; Diaz, Mireia; de Sanjosé, Silvia

    2013-12-30

    Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is recognized as one of the major causes of infection-related cancer worldwide, as well as the causal factor in other diseases. Strong evidence for a causal etiology with HPV has been stated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer for cancers of the cervix uteri, penis, vulva, vagina, anus and oropharynx (including base of the tongue and tonsils). Of the estimated 12.7 million new cancers occurring in 2008 worldwide, 4.8% were attributable to HPV infection, with substantially higher incidence and mortality rates seen in developing versus developed countries. In recent years, we have gained tremendous knowledge about HPVs and their interactions with host cells, tissues and the immune system; have validated and implemented strategies for safe and efficacious prophylactic vaccination against HPV infections; have developed increasingly sensitive and specific molecular diagnostic tools for HPV detection for use in cervical cancer screening; and have substantially increased global awareness of HPV and its many associated diseases in women, men, and children. While these achievements exemplify the success of biomedical research in generating important public health interventions, they also generate new and daunting challenges: costs of HPV prevention and medical care, the implementation of what is technically possible, socio-political resistance to prevention opportunities, and the very wide ranges of national economic capabilities and health care systems. Gains and challenges faced in the quest for comprehensive control of HPV infection and HPV-related cancers and other disease are summarized in this review. The information presented may be viewed in terms of a reframed paradigm of prevention of cervical cancer and other HPV-related diseases that will include strategic combinations of at least four major components: 1) routine introduction of HPV vaccines to women in all countries, 2) extension and simplification of

  20. Implementation of human papillomavirus immunization in the developing world.

    PubMed

    Kane, Mark A; Serrano, Beatriz; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Wittet, Scott

    2012-11-20

    Cervical cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in women in less developed regions of the world and the leading cause of cancer deaths in GAVI-eligible countries, where 54% of worldwide cervical cancer deaths occur. If prevention is not implemented in these countries, population growth alone will lead to a 63% increase in deaths by 2025. Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines are routinely used in the National Immunization Programs in most industrial countries, and the decision by the GAVI Alliance to accept applications from eligible developing countries for HPV vaccine support is the single most important opportunity for children in these countries to be protected against HPV-related diseases. As it has done for other vaccines, such as Haemophilus influenzae type b, rotavirus and pneumococcal conjugate vaccines, GAVI should strongly consider developing and funding a group dedicated to working on all aspects of HPV vaccine introduction in the developing world. Immunization in middle-income developing countries not eligible for GAVI support will depend on "tiered" pricing policies or regional procurement schemes to make vaccine available at prices significantly lower than those in industrial countries. Immunization coverage of infants has reached high levels in many of the poorest developing countries where complementary strategies for HPV control, such as adult screening and treatment, are poorly developed. Immunizing young adolescents will require expansion of immunization infrastructure to reach cohorts that currently are largely unreached, but the success of school-based strategies in industrial countries and developing country demonstration projects provides hope that relatively high coverage may be achieved in many countries. Communication and advocacy strategies for HPV control need to carefully consider local cultural attitudes toward HPV-related issues. Current strategies supported by health economic analyses call for female only immunization, but

  1. Comprehensive control of human papillomavirus infections and related diseases.

    PubMed

    Bosch, F Xavier; Broker, Thomas R; Forman, David; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Gillison, Maura L; Doorbar, John; Stern, Peter L; Stanley, Margaret; Arbyn, Marc; Poljak, Mario; Cuzick, Jack; Castle, Philip E; Schiller, John T; Markowitz, Lauri E; Fisher, William A; Canfell, Karen; Denny, Lynette A; Franco, Eduardo L; Steben, Marc; Kane, Mark A; Schiffman, Mark; Meijer, Chris J L M; Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy; Castellsagué, Xavier; Kim, Jane J; Brotons, Maria; Alemany, Laia; Albero, Ginesa; Diaz, Mireia; de Sanjosé, Silvia

    2013-12-29

    Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is recognized as one of the major causes of infection-related cancer worldwide, as well as the causal factor in other diseases. Strong evidence for a causal etiology with HPV has been stated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer for cancers of the cervix uteri, penis, vulva, vagina, anus and oropharynx (including base of the tongue and tonsils). Of the estimated 12.7 million new cancers occurring in 2008 worldwide, 4.8% were attributable to HPV infection, with substantially higher incidence and mortality rates seen in developing versus developed countries. In recent years, we have gained tremendous knowledge about HPVs and their interactions with host cells, tissues and the immune system; have validated and implemented strategies for safe and efficacious prophylactic vaccination against HPV infections; have developed increasingly sensitive and specific molecular diagnostic tools for HPV detection for use in cervical cancer screening; and have substantially increased global awareness of HPV and its many associated diseases in women, men, and children. While these achievements exemplify the success of biomedical research in generating important public health interventions, they also generate new and daunting challenges: costs of HPV prevention and medical care, the implementation of what is technically possible, socio-political resistance to prevention opportunities, and the very wide ranges of national economic capabilities and health care systems. Gains and challenges faced in the quest for comprehensive control of HPV infection and HPV-related cancers and other disease are summarized in this review. The information presented may be viewed in terms of a reframed paradigm of prevention of cervical cancer and other HPV-related diseases that will include strategic combinations of at least four major components: 1) routine introduction of HPV vaccines to women in all countries, 2) extension and simplification of

  2. Human papillomavirus vaccine introduction--the first five years.

    PubMed

    Markowitz, Lauri E; Tsu, Vivien; Deeks, Shelley L; Cubie, Heather; Wang, Susan A; Vicari, Andrea S; Brotherton, Julia M L

    2012-11-20

    The availability of prophylactic human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines has provided powerful tools for primary prevention of cervical cancer and other HPV-associated diseases. Since 2006, the quadrivalent and bivalent vaccines have each been licensed in over 100 countries. By the beginning of 2012, HPV vaccine had been introduced into national immunization programs in at least 40 countries. Australia, the United Kingdom, the United States, and Canada were among the first countries to introduce HPV vaccination. In Europe, the number of countries having introduced vaccine increased from 3 in 2007 to 22 at the beginning of 2012. While all country programs target young adolescent girls, specific target age groups vary as do catch-up recommendations. Different health care systems and infrastructure have resulted in varied implementation strategies, with some countries delivering vaccine in schools and others through health centers or primary care providers. Within the first 5 years after vaccines became available, few low- or middle-income countries had introduced HPV vaccine. The main reason was budgetary constraints due to the high vaccine cost. Bhutan and Rwanda implemented national immunization after receiving vaccine through donation programs in 2010 and 2011, respectively. The GAVI Alliance decision in 2011 to support HPV vaccination should increase implementation in low-income countries. Evaluation of vaccination programs includes monitoring of coverage, safety, and impact. Vaccine safety monitoring is part of routine activities in many countries. Safety evaluations are important and communication about vaccine safety is critical, as events temporally associated with vaccination can be falsely attributed to vaccination. Anti-vaccination efforts, in part related to concerns about safety, have been mounted in several countries. In the 5 years since HPV vaccines were licensed, there have been successes as well as challenges with vaccine introduction and implementation

  3. Human papillomavirus-related carcinomas of the sinonasal tract.

    PubMed

    Bishop, Justin A; Guo, Theresa W; Smith, David F; Wang, Hao; Ogawa, Takenori; Pai, Sara I; Westra, William H

    2013-02-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is an established cause of head and neck carcinomas arising in the oropharynx. The presence of HPV has also been reported in some carcinomas arising in the sinonasal tract, but little is known about their overall incidence or their clinicopathologic profile. The surgical pathology archives of The Johns Hopkins Hospital were searched for all carcinomas arising in the sinonasal tract from 1995 to 2011, and tissue microarrays were constructed. p16 immunohistochemical analysis and DNA in situ hybridization for high-risk types of HPV were performed. Demographic and clinical outcome data were extracted from patient medical records. Of 161 sinonasal carcinomas, 34 (21%) were positive for high-risk HPV DNA, including type 16 (82%), type 31/33 (12%), and type 18 (6%). HPV-positive carcinomas consisted of 28 squamous cell carcinomas and variants (15 nonkeratinizing or partially keratinizing, 4 papillary, 5 adenosquamous, 4 basaloid), 1 small cell carcinoma, 1 sinonasal undifferentiated carcinoma, and 4 carcinomas that were difficult to classify but exhibited adenoid cystic carcinoma-like features. Immunohistochemistry for p16 was positive in 59/161 (37%) cases, and p16 expression strongly correlated with the presence of HPV DNA: 33 of 34 (97%) HPV-positive tumors exhibited high p16 expression, whereas only 26 of 127 (20%) HPV-negative tumors were p16 positive (P<0.0001). The HPV-related carcinomas occurred in 19 men and 15 women ranging in age from 33 to 87 years (mean, 54 y). A trend toward improved survival was observed in the HPV-positive group (hazard ratio=0.58, 95% confidence interval [0.26, 1.28]). The presence of high-risk HPV in 21% of sinonasal carcinomas confirms HPV as an important oncologic agent of carcinomas arising in the sinonasal tract. Although nonkeratinizing squamous cell carcinoma is the most common histologic type, there is a wide morphologic spectrum of HPV-related disease that includes a variant that resembles

  4. Comprehensive Control of Human Papillomavirus Infections and Related Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, F. Xavier; Broker, Thomas R.; Forman, David; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Gillison, Maura L.; Doorbar, John; Stern, Peter L.; Stanley, Margaret; Arbyn, Marc; Poljak, Mario; Cuzick, Jack; Castle, Philip E.; Schiller, John T.; Markowitz, Lauri E.; Fisher, William A.; Canfell, Karen; Denny, Lynette A.; Franco, Eduardo L.; Steben, Marc; Kane, Mark A.; Schiffman, Mark; Meijer, Chris J.L.M.; Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy; Castellsagué, Xavier; Kim, Jane J.; Brotons, Maria; Alemany, Laia; Albero, Ginesa; Diaz, Mireia; de Sanjosé, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is recognized as one of the major causes of infection-related cancer worldwide, as well as the causal factor in other diseases. Strong evidence for a causal etiology with HPV has been stated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer for cancers of the cervix uteri, penis, vulva, vagina, anus and oropharynx (including base of the tongue and tonsils). Of the estimated 12.7 million new cancers occurring in 2008 worldwide, 4.8% were attributable to HPV infection, with substantially higher incidence and mortality rates seen in developing versus developed countries. In recent years, we have gained tremendous knowledge about HPVs and their interactions with host cells, tissues and the immune system; have validated and implemented strategies for safe and efficacious prophylactic vaccination against HPV infections; have developed increasingly sensitive and specific molecular diagnostic tools for HPV detection for use in cervical cancer screening; and have substantially increased global awareness of HPV and its many associated diseases in women, men, and children. While these achievements exemplify the success of biomedical research in generating important public health interventions, they also generate new and daunting challenges: costs of HPV prevention and medical care, the implementation of what is technically possible, socio-political resistance to prevention opportunities, and the very wide ranges of national economic capabilities and health care systems. Gains and challenges faced in the quest for comprehensive control of HPV infection and HPV-related cancers and other disease are summarized in this review. The information presented may be viewed in terms of a reframed paradigm of prevention of cervical cancer and other HPV-related diseases that will include strategic combinations of at least four major components: 1) routine introduction of HPV vaccines to women in all countries, 2) extension and simplification of

  5. Detection of the human papillomavirus 58 physical state using the amplification of papillomavirus oncogene transcripts assay.

    PubMed

    Chaiwongkot, Arkom; Pientong, Chamsai; Ekalaksananan, Tipaya; Vinokurova, Svetlana; Kongyingyoes, Bunkerd; Chumworathayi, Bandit; Patarapadungkit, Natcha; Siriaunkgul, Sumalee; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus

    2013-05-01

    HPV 58 is detected commonly in cervical cancer in East Asian countries. To evaluate the HPV 58 physical state, the amplification of papillomavirus oncogene transcripts (APOT) and hybridisation assays were established. Episome- and integrate-derived transcripts were confirmed by direct sequencing. Twenty-nine HPV 58 positive samples from various cervical lesions were used. The results showed that the episome-derived transcripts were recognised as two major specific amplified products (1040 and 714 bp). Two splice donor sites were mapped to the 5' splice site of the E1 gene on SD898 and SD899 and spliced to the 3' acceptor site of the E4 gene on SA3353, SA3356 and SA3365. The episome-derived transcripts were found 100% in normal cervical epithelia and low-grade lesions (9/9 cases) while the integrate-derived transcripts were detected in 13.3% of high-grade lesions (2/15 cases) and in 20% of carcinomas (1/5 cases). HPV 58 integration sites were found on chromosomes 4q21, 12q24 and 18q12. Using the established APOT assay, the results revealed not only novel information on the HPV 58 transcription patterns of episomal transcripts, but also integration site. The APOT assay is a reliable and useful tool for the detection of the HPV 58 physical state and its oncogene expression.

  6. Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Intention among College Men: What's Oral Sex Got to Do with It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosby, Richard A.; DiClemente, Ralph J.; Salazar, Laura F.; Nash, Rachel; Younge, Sinead; Head, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify associations between engaging in oral sex and perceived risk of oral cancer among college men. Also, to identify associations, and their moderating factors, between oral sex and human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine acceptance. Methods: Young men were recruited from 2 university campuses in the South (N = 150). Men completed an…

  7. Investigating Stakeholder Attitudes and Opinions on School-Based Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nodulman, Jessica A.; Starling, Randall; Kong, Alberta S.; Buller, David B.; Wheeler, Cosette M.; Woodall, W. Gill

    2015-01-01

    Background: In several countries worldwide, school-based human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination programs have been successful; however, little research has explored US stakeholders' acceptance toward school-based HPV vaccination programs. Methods: A total of 13 focus groups and 12 key informant interviews (N?=?117; 85% females; 66% racial/ethnic…

  8. The Acceptability of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccination among Women with Physical Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yen, Chia-Feng; Chen, Si-Fan; Lin, Lan-Ping; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Chang, Mao-Jung; Wu, Chia-Ling; Lin, Jin-Ding

    2011-01-01

    The present paper aims to explore awareness and acceptability of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination and to identify factors influencing HPV acceptability among women with physical disabilities in Taiwan. The study participants were 438 adult women with physical disabilities, aged 18-69 years. The participants were all officially registered as…

  9. Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Stages of Change among Male and Female University Students: Ready or Not?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, Divya A.; Grunzweig, Katherine A.; Zochowski, Melissa K.; Dempsey, Amanda F.; Carlos, Ruth C.; Dalton, Vanessa K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine gender differences in human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine stages of change following the recommendations for permissive use of HPV vaccine in males. Participants: Students aged 18-26 attending a large, public, Midwest university in April 2010. Methods: Participants completed a self-administered, online questionnaire. HPV…

  10. Beliefs and Knowledge about the Human Papillomavirus Vaccine among Undergraduate Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Theresa; Weinstein, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to assess male undergraduate students' human papillomavirus (HPV) knowledge and intentions to receive the HPV vaccination. Design: Cross-sectional survey. Method: A sample of 116 male undergraduate students from a university in the Midwestern USA completed a survey questionnaire assessing various aspects…

  11. Receipt of the Human Papillomavirus Vaccine among Female College Students in the United States, 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindley, Lisa L.; Elkind, Julia S.; Landi, Suzanne N.; Brandt, Heather M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine receipt of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine among female college students by demographic/descriptive characteristics and sexual behaviors. Methods: A secondary analysis of the Spring 2009 National College Health Assessment-II was conducted with 40,610 female college students (aged 18 to 24 years) attending 4-year…

  12. Evolution and classification of oncogenic human papillomavirus types and variants associated with cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zigui; de Freitas, Luciana Bueno; Burk, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    The nomenclature of human papillomavirus (HPV) is established by the International Committee on Taxonomy of Virus (ICTV). However, the ICTV does not set standards for HPV below species levels. This chapter describes detailed genotyping methods for determining and classifying HPV variants. PMID:25348294

  13. [Vaccination perspective against human papillomavirus and consequences for the screening of uterine cervical neoplasm].

    PubMed

    Delvenne, Ph

    2007-01-01

    The link between cervical cancer and some types of human papillomavirus (HPV) has generated, in recent years, a great interest for the development of anti-HPV vaccines. The purpose of this article is to review the current perspectives for anti-HPV prophylactic vaccination and to describe the potential implications for the cervical cytology screening programs.

  14. Safety of human papillomavirus 6, 11, 16 and 18 (recombinant): systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Pedro Luiz Spinelli; Calestini, Gustavo Lacerda da Silva; Alvo, Fernando Salgueiro; Freitas, Jefferson Michel de Moura; Castro, Paula Marcela Vilela; Konstantyner, Tulio

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify and quantify the adverse effects associated with the recombinant human papillomavirus (types 6, 11, 16 and 18) vaccine in adolescents. Data source: Systematic review of randomized clinical trials from PubMed, SciELO and Lilacs databases. Articles investigating the safety of the vaccine in subjects under 18 years and comparing the recombinant human papillomavirus types 6, 11, 16 and 18 vaccine with a control group were included. Meta-analyses were performed for the outcomes of pain, erythema, swelling and fever, using clinical trials with maximum Jadad score. Data synthesis: Fourteen studies were included. The most common adverse effects related to the human papillomavirus vaccine were effects with no severity (pain, erythema, edema, and fever). Five studies were used for the meta-analyses: pain-risk difference (RD)=11% (p<0.001); edema-RD=8% (p<0.001); erythema-RD=5% (p<0.001); fever-RD=2% (p<0.003). Conclusions: The recombinant human papillomavirus types 6, 11, 16 and 18 vaccine was safe and well tolerated. The main adverse effects related to vaccination were pain, erythema, edema and fever. The low frequency of severe adverse effects encourages the administration of the vaccine in the population at risk. PMID:26376359

  15. Focal epithelial hyperplasia: human-papillomavirus-induced disease with a genetic predisposition in a Venezuelan family.

    PubMed

    Premoli-De-Percoco, G; Cisternas, J P; Ramírez, J L; Galindo, I

    1993-05-01

    A study on the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA sequences and focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH) in a family of Venezuelan ancestry has revealed that FEH is an HPV-induced disease presenting familial aggregation. The genealogical evidence indicates a genetic predisposition to the disease.

  16. Opportunities for Increasing Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Provision in School Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Jennifer L.; Feld, Ashley L.; O'Malley, Brittany; Entzel, Pamela; Smith, Jennifer S.; Gilkey, Melissa B.; Brewer, Noel T.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Uptake of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine remains low among adolescents in the United States. We sought to assess barriers to HPV vaccine provision in school health centers to inform subsequent interventions. Methods: We conducted structured interviews in the fall of 2010 with staff from all 33 school health centers in North…

  17. Print News Coverage of School-Based Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Mandates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casciotti, Dana M.; Smith, Katherine C.; Andon, Lindsay; Vernick, Jon; Tsui, Amy; Klassen, Ann C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In 2007, legislation was proposed in 24 states and the District of Columbia for school-based human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine mandates, and mandates were enacted in Texas, Virginia, and the District of Columbia. Media coverage of these events was extensive, and media messages both reflected and contributed to controversy surrounding…

  18. Knowledge, Beliefs, and Behaviors: Examining Human Papillomavirus-Related Gender Differences among African American College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bynum, Shalanda A.; Brandt, Heather M.; Friedman, Daniela B.; Annang, Lucy; Tanner, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Given recent approval for administration of a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine to men, it is important to assess the HPV-related perspectives of men and women. The purpose of this study was to examine gender differences in HPV knowledge, beliefs, and vaccine acceptance among college students attending 3 historically black…

  19. Men's Perceptions and Knowledge of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Infection and Cervical Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPartland, Tara S.; Weaver, Bethany A.; Lee, Shu-Kuang; Koutsky, Laura A.

    2005-01-01

    The authors assessed young men's knowledge and perceptions of genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection to identify factors that predict intention to make positive behavioral changes. Male university students aged 18 to 25 years completed a self-report instrument to assess knowledge and perceptions of genital HPV infection. If diagnosed with…

  20. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Informational Behaviors of College Students in Regard to the Human Papillomavirus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandfort, Jessica R.; Pleasant, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To assess students' human papillomavirus (HPV) knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. Participants/ Methods: Students (N = 1,282) at a large, public university in the Northeast United States completed a questionnaire during February 2008 assessing HPV knowledge, prevalence, transmission, cervical cancer risk and stigma; sexual behavior,…

  1. The EVER Proteins as a Natural Barrier against Papillomaviruses: a New Insight into the Pathogenesis of Human Papillomavirus Infections

    PubMed Central

    Lazarczyk, Maciej; Cassonnet, Patricia; Pons, Christian; Jacob, Yves; Favre, Michel

    2009-01-01

    Summary: Infections by human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are the most frequently occurring sexually transmitted diseases. The crucial role of genital oncogenic HPV in cervical carcinoma development is now well established. In contrast, the role of cutaneous HPV in skin cancer development remains a matter of debate. Cutaneous beta-HPV strains show an amazing ubiquity. The fact that a few oncogenic genotypes cause cancers in patients suffering from epidermodysplasia verruciformis is in sharp contrast to the unapparent course of infection in the general population. Our recent investigations revealed that a natural barrier exists in humans, which protects them against infection with these papillomaviruses. A central role in the function of this HPV-specific barrier is played by a complex of the zinc-transporting proteins EVER1, EVER2, and ZnT-1, which maintain cellular zinc homeostasis. Apparently, the deregulation of the cellular zinc balance emerges as an important step in the life cycles not only of cutaneous but also of genital HPVs, although the latter viruses have developed a mechanism by which they can break the barrier and impose a zinc imbalance. Herein, we present a previously unpublished list of the cellular partners of EVER proteins, which points to future directions concerning investigations of the mechanisms of action of the EVER/ZnT-1 complex. We also present a general overview of the pathogenesis of HPV infections, taking into account the latest discoveries regarding the role of cellular zinc homeostasis in the HPV life cycle. We propose a potential model for the mechanism of function of the anti-HPV barrier. PMID:19487731

  2. Restoration of telomeres in human papillomavirus-immortalized human anogenital epithelial cells.

    PubMed Central

    Klingelhutz, A J; Barber, S A; Smith, P P; Dyer, K; McDougall, J K

    1994-01-01

    Loss of telomeres has been hypothesized to be important in cellular senescence and may play a role in carcinogenesis. In this study, we have measured telomere length in association with the immortalization and transformation of human cervical and foreskin epithelial cells by the human papillomavirus type 16 or 18 E6 and E7 open reading frames. By using a telomeric TTAGGG repeat probe, it was shown that the telomeres of precrisis normal and E6-, E7-, and E6/E7-expressing cells gradually shortened with passaging (30 to 100 bp per population doubling). Cells that expressed both E6 and E7 went through a crisis period and gave rise to immortalized lines. In contrast to precrisis cells, E6/E7-immortalized cells generally showed an increase in telomere length as they were passaged in culture, with some later passage lines having telomeres that were similar to or longer than the earliest-passage precrisis cells examined. No consistent association could be made between telomere length and tumorigenicity of cells in nude mice. However, of the three cell lines that grew in vivo, two had long telomeres, thus arguing against the hypothesis that cancer cells favor shortened telomeres. Our results indicate that arrest of telomere shortening may be important in human papillomavirus-associated immortalization and that restoration of telomere length may be advantageous to cells with regard to their ability to proliferate. Images PMID:8289836

  3. Restoration of telomeres in human papillomavirus-immortalized human anogenital epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Klingelhutz, A.J.; Barber, S.A.; Smith, P.P.

    1994-02-01

    Loss of telomeres has been hypothesized to be important in cellular senescence and may play a role in carcinogenesis. In this study, we have measured telomere length in association with the immortalization and transformation of human cervical and foreskin epithelial cells by the human papillomavirus type 16 or 18 E6 and E7 open reading frames. By using a telomeric TTAGGG repeat probe, it was shown that the telomeres of precrisis normal and E6-, E7-, and E6/E7-expressing cells gradually shortened with passaging (30 to 100 bp per population doubling). Cells that expressed both E6 and E7 went through a crisis period and gave rise to immortalized lines. In contrast to precrisis cells, E6/E7-immortalized cells generally showed an increase in telomere length as they were passaged in culture, with some later passage lines having telomeres that were similar to or longer than the earliest-passage precrisis cells examined. No consistent association could be made between telomere length and tumorigenicity of cells in nude mice. However, of the three cell lines that grew in vivo, two had long telomeres, thus arguing against the hypothesis that cancer cells favor shortened telomeres. Our results indicate that arrest of telomere shortening may be important in human papillomavirus-associated immortalization and that restoration of telomere length may be advantageous to cells with regard to their ability to proliferate. 55 refs., 7 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Impact of human papillomavirus on head and neck squamous cell cancers in Gabon.

    PubMed

    Ingrid, Labouba; Chloé, Bertolus; Hervé, Koumakpayi Ismail; Ernest, Belembaogo; Jérôme, Miloundja; Nicolas, Berthet

    2015-01-01

    Head and neck squamous cell cancers are among the most aggressive. Their incidence and mortality rates are relatively lower in Middle Africa than worldwide, but in Gabon, these rates tend to be 2-3 fold higher than in neighboring countries. The main risk factors are alcohol and tobacco consumption. However, in the last decades, there was cumulated evidence that human papillomaviruses were a significant risk factor, particularly for oropharyngeal squamous cell cancer. In Gabon, as elsewhere in Africa, assessment of these 3 risk factors need to be improved to determine their respective role in the development of head and neck squamous cell cancers. The potential differences in alcohol/tobacco consumption habits as well as in infectious ecology between developing and developed countries can make it difficult to transpose current data on this issue. Determining the respective role of alcohol/tobacco consumption and human papillomaviruses in the development of head and neck squamous cell cancers is crucial for the management of these cancers that could become a serious public health issue in Gabon. Human papillomaviruses are not only a risk factor but also a biomarker with promising clinical potential for the follow-up of head and neck squamous cell cancers potentially able to select an adequate treatment. Then, assessing the epidemiological impact of human papillomaviruses in Gabon and in all of Africa would prove useful for the clinical follow-up of head and neck squamous cell cancers, and would also provide essential data to plan a global prevention strategy against head and neck squamous cell cancers due to human papillomaviruses. PMID:26557156

  5. Deep sequencing extends the diversity of human papillomaviruses in human skin.

    PubMed

    Bzhalava, Davit; Mühr, Laila Sara Arroyo; Lagheden, Camilla; Ekström, Johanna; Forslund, Ola; Dillner, Joakim; Hultin, Emilie

    2014-07-24

    Most viruses in human skin are known to be human papillomaviruses (HPVs). Previous sequencing of skin samples has identified 273 different cutaneous HPV types, including 47 previously unknown types. In the present study, we wished to extend prior studies using deeper sequencing. This deeper sequencing without prior PCR of a pool of 142 whole genome amplified skin lesions identified 23 known HPV types, 3 novel putative HPV types and 4 non-HPV viruses. The complete sequence was obtained for one of the known putative types and almost the complete sequence was obtained for one of the novel putative types. In addition, sequencing of amplimers from HPV consensus PCR of 326 skin lesions detected 385 different HPV types, including 226 previously unknown putative types. In conclusion, metagenomic deep sequencing of human skin samples identified no less than 396 different HPV types in human skin, out of which 229 putative HPV types were previously unknown.

  6. A Cell-Free Assembly System for Generating Infectious Human Papillomavirus 16 Capsids Implicates a Size Discrimination Mechanism for Preferential Viral Genome Packaging

    PubMed Central

    Cerqueira, Carla; Pang, Yuk-Ying S.; Day, Patricia M.; Thompson, Cynthia D.; Buck, Christopher B.; Lowy, Douglas R.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT We have established a cell-free in vitro system to study human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) assembly, a poorly understood process. L1/L2 capsomers, obtained from the disassembly of virus-like particles (VLPs), were incubated with nuclear extracts to provide access to the range of cellular proteins that would be available during assembly within the host cell. Incorporation of a reporter plasmid “pseudogenome” was dependent on the presence of both nuclear extract and ATP. Unexpectedly, L1/L2 VLPs that were not disassembled prior to incubation with a reassembly mixture containing nuclear extract also encapsidated a reporter plasmid. As with HPV pseudoviruses (PsV) generated intracellularly, infection by cell-free particles assembled in vitro required the presence of L2 and was susceptible to the same biochemical inhibitors, implying the cell-free assembled particles use the infectious pathway previously described for HPV16 produced in cell culture. Using biochemical and electron microscopy analyses, we observed that, in the presence of nuclear extract, intact VLPs partially disassemble, providing a mechanistic explanation to how the exogenous plasmid was packaged by these particles. Further, we provide evidence that capsids containing an <8-kb pseudogenome are resistant to the disassembly/reassembly reaction. Our results suggest a novel size discrimination mechanism for papillomavirus genome packaging in which particles undergo iterative rounds of disassembly/reassembly, seemingly sampling DNA until a suitably sized DNA is encountered, resulting in the formation of a stable virion structure. IMPORTANCE Little is known about papillomavirus assembly biology due to the difficulties in propagating virus in vitro. The cell-free assembly method established in this paper reveals a new mechanism for viral genome packaging and will provide a tractable system for further dissecting papillomavirus assembly. The knowledge gained will increase our understanding of

  7. Delineation of Interfaces on Human Alpha-Defensins Critical for Human Adenovirus and Human Papillomavirus Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Wiens, Mayim E.; Lu, Wuyuan; Smith, Jason G.

    2014-01-01

    Human α-defensins are potent anti-microbial peptides with the ability to neutralize bacterial and viral targets. Single alanine mutagenesis has been used to identify determinants of anti-bacterial activity and binding to bacterial proteins such as anthrax lethal factor. Similar analyses of α-defensin interactions with non-enveloped viruses are limited. We used a comprehensive set of human α-defensin 5 (HD5) and human neutrophil peptide 1 (HNP1) alanine scan mutants in a combination of binding and neutralization assays with human adenovirus (AdV) and human papillomavirus (HPV). We have identified a core of critical hydrophobic residues that are common determinants for all of the virus-defensin interactions that were analyzed, while specificity in viral recognition is conferred by specific surface-exposed charged residues. The hydrophobic residues serve multiple roles in maintaining the tertiary and quaternary structure of the defensins as well as forming an interface for virus binding. Many of the important solvent-exposed residues of HD5 group together to form a critical surface. However, a single discrete binding face was not identified for HNP1. In lieu of whole AdV, we used a recombinant capsid subunit comprised of penton base and fiber in quantitative binding studies and determined that the anti-viral potency of HD5 was a function of stoichiometry rather than affinity. Our studies support a mechanism in which α-defensins depend on hydrophobic and charge-charge interactions to bind at high copy number to these non-enveloped viruses to neutralize infection and provide insight into properties that guide α-defensin anti-viral activity. PMID:25188351

  8. Delineation of interfaces on human alpha-defensins critical for human adenovirus and human papillomavirus inhibition.

    PubMed

    Tenge, Victoria R; Gounder, Anshu P; Wiens, Mayim E; Lu, Wuyuan; Smith, Jason G

    2014-09-01

    Human α-defensins are potent anti-microbial peptides with the ability to neutralize bacterial and viral targets. Single alanine mutagenesis has been used to identify determinants of anti-bacterial activity and binding to bacterial proteins such as anthrax lethal factor. Similar analyses of α-defensin interactions with non-enveloped viruses are limited. We used a comprehensive set of human α-defensin 5 (HD5) and human neutrophil peptide 1 (HNP1) alanine scan mutants in a combination of binding and neutralization assays with human adenovirus (AdV) and human papillomavirus (HPV). We have identified a core of critical hydrophobic residues that are common determinants for all of the virus-defensin interactions that were analyzed, while specificity in viral recognition is conferred by specific surface-exposed charged residues. The hydrophobic residues serve multiple roles in maintaining the tertiary and quaternary structure of the defensins as well as forming an interface for virus binding. Many of the important solvent-exposed residues of HD5 group together to form a critical surface. However, a single discrete binding face was not identified for HNP1. In lieu of whole AdV, we used a recombinant capsid subunit comprised of penton base and fiber in quantitative binding studies and determined that the anti-viral potency of HD5 was a function of stoichiometry rather than affinity. Our studies support a mechanism in which α-defensins depend on hydrophobic and charge-charge interactions to bind at high copy number to these non-enveloped viruses to neutralize infection and provide insight into properties that guide α-defensin anti-viral activity.

  9. Methylation of Cervical Neoplastic Cells Infected With Human Papillomavirus 16

    PubMed Central

    Ki, Eun Young; Lee, Keun Ho; Hur, Soo Young; Rhee, Jee Eun; Kee, Mee Kyung; Kang, Chung; Park, Jong Sup

    2016-01-01

    Objective This study was conducted to evaluate the role of methylation of adenylate cyclase activating peptide 1 (ADCYAP1), paired box gene 1 (PAX1), cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1), and T-lymphocyte maturation–associated protein (MAL) during carcinogenesis. Methods We evaluated the methylation of 4 genes by using the cervical carcinoma cell lines (CaSki, SiHa, HeLa, and C33A) and cervical neoplastic cells from 56 subjects with human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16)–infected low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSILs), 50 subjects with HPV16-infected high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSILs), and 24 subjects with HPV16-infected invasive cervical cancer who attended Seoul St. Mary’s Hospital. Methylation of the 4 genes was evaluated using quantitative bisulfate pyrosequencing. Results The ADCYAP1 promoter was hypermethylated in the 4 cell lines (CaSki, 97.40 ± 1.39; SiHa, 82.04 ± 17.02; HeLa, 96.14 ± 2.08; and C33A, 78 ± 10.18). PAX1 and CADM1 were hypermethylated in the HPV16/18-infected cell lines CaSki (PAX1, 91.18 ± 9.91; CADM1, 93.5 ± 7.33), SiHa (PAX1, 96.14 ± 2.08; CADM1, 93.15 ± 8.81), and HeLa (PAX1, 82.04 ± 17.02; CADM1, 92.43 ± 9.95). MAL was hypermethylated in the CaSki cell line (96.04 ± 4.74). Among human cervical neoplastic cells, the methylation indices of ADCYAP1 were 7.8 (95% confidence interval [95% CI], 7.0–8.6) in subjects with LSILs and 39.8 (95% CI, 29.0–54.7) in those with cervical cancer (P < 0.001); for PAX1, 7.2 (95% CI, 6.1–8.5) and 37.8 (95% CI, 27.1–52.7), respectively; for CADM1, 3.5 (95% CI, 3.0–4.0) and 17.7 (95% CI, 10.8–29.1), respectively; for MAL, 2.7 (95% CI, 2.5–3.0) and 13.0 (95% CI, 7.6–22.0), respectively (P < 0.001 for each). Immunohistochemical staining results were positive in the cytoplasm of subjects with low methylation of the 4 gene promoters; however, they were negative in the cytoplasm of those with hypermethylation of the 4 gene promoters. Conclusions The results of this

  10. Distinct Human Papillomavirus Type 16 Methylomes in Cervical Cells at Different Stages of Premalignancy

    PubMed Central

    Brandsma, Janet L.; Sun, Ying; Lizardi, Paul M.; Tuck, David P.; Zelterman, Daniel; Haines, G. Kenneth; Martel, Maritza; Harigopal, Malini; Schofield, Kevin; Neapolitano, Matthew

    2009-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) gene expression is dramatically altered during cervical carcinogenesis. Because dysregulated genes frequently show abnormal patterns of DNA methylation, we hypothesized that comprehensive mapping of the HPV methylomes in cervical samples at different stages of progression would reveal patterns of clinical significance. To test this hypothesis, thirteen HPV16-positive samples were obtained from women undergoing routine cervical cancer screening. Complete methylation data were obtained for 98.7% of the HPV16 CpGs in all samples by bisulfite-sequencing. Most HPV16 CpGs were unmethylated or methylated in only one sample. The other CpGs were methylated at levels ranging from 11% to 100% of the HPV16 copies per sample. The results showed three major patterns and two variants of one pattern. The patterns showed minimal or no methylation (A), low level methylation in the E1 and E6 genes (B), and high level methylation at many CpGs in the E5/L2/L1 region (C). Generally, pattern A was associated with negative cytology, pattern B with low-grade lesions, and pattern C with high-grade lesions. The severity of the cervical lesions was then ranked by the HPV16 DNA methylation patterns and, independently, by the pathologic diagnoses. Statistical analysis of the two rating methods showed highly significant agreement. In conclusion, analysis of the HPV16 DNA methylomes in clinical samples of cervical cells led to the identification of distinct methylation patterns which, after validation in larger studies, could have potential utility as biomarkers of neoplastic cervical progression. PMID:19443004

  11. Human Papillomaviruses; Epithelial Tropisms, and the Development of Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Egawa, Nagayasu; Egawa, Kiyofumi; Griffin, Heather; Doorbar, John

    2015-07-16

    Papillomaviruses have evolved over many millions of years to propagate themselves at specific epithelial niches in a range of different host species. This has led to the great diversity of papillomaviruses that now exist, and to the appearance of distinct strategies for epithelial persistence. Many papillomaviruses minimise the risk of immune clearance by causing chronic asymptomatic infections, accompanied by long-term virion-production with only limited viral gene expression. Such lesions are typical of those caused by Beta HPV types in the general population, with viral activity being suppressed by host immunity. A second strategy requires the evolution of sophisticated immune evasion mechanisms, and allows some HPV types to cause prominent and persistent papillomas, even in immune competent individuals. Some Alphapapillomavirus types have evolved this strategy, including those that cause genital warts in young adults or common warts in children. These strategies reflect broad differences in virus protein function as well as differences in patterns of viral gene expression, with genotype-specific associations underlying the recent introduction of DNA testing, and also the introduction of vaccines to protect against cervical cancer. Interestingly, it appears that cellular environment and the site of infection affect viral pathogenicity by modulating viral gene expression. With the high-risk HPV gene products, changes in E6 and E7 expression are thought to account for the development of neoplasias at the endocervix, the anal and cervical transformation zones, and the tonsilar crypts and other oropharyngeal sites. A detailed analysis of site-specific patterns of gene expression and gene function is now prompted.

  12. Global Genomic Diversity of Human Papillomavirus 6 Based on 724 Isolates and 190 Complete Genome Sequences

    PubMed Central

    Jelen, Mateja M.; Chen, Zigui; Kocjan, Boštjan J.; Burt, Felicity J.; Chan, Paul K. S.; Chouhy, Diego; Combrinck, Catharina E.; Coutlée, François; Estrade, Christine; Ferenczy, Alex; Fiander, Alison; Franco, Eduardo L.; Garland, Suzanne M.; Giri, Adriana A.; González, Joaquín Víctor; Gröning, Arndt; Heidrich, Kerstin; Hibbitts, Sam; Hošnjak, Lea; Luk, Tommy N. M.; Marinic, Karina; Matsukura, Toshihiko; Neumann, Anna; Oštrbenk, Anja; Picconi, Maria Alejandra; Richardson, Harriet; Sagadin, Martin; Sahli, Roland; Seedat, Riaz Y.; Seme, Katja; Severini, Alberto; Sinchi, Jessica L.; Smahelova, Jana; Tabrizi, Sepehr N.; Tachezy, Ruth; Tohme, Sarah; Uloza, Virgilijus; Vitkauskiene, Astra; Wong, Yong Wee; Židovec Lepej, Snježana; Burk, Robert D.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human papillomavirus type 6 (HPV6) is the major etiological agent of anogenital warts and laryngeal papillomas and has been included in both the quadrivalent and nonavalent prophylactic HPV vaccines. This study investigated the global genomic diversity of HPV6, using 724 isolates and 190 complete genomes from six continents, and the association of HPV6 genomic variants with geographical location, anatomical site of infection/disease, and gender. Initially, a 2,800-bp E5a-E5b-L1-LCR fragment was sequenced from 492/530 (92.8%) HPV6-positive samples collected for this study. Among them, 130 exhibited at least one single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP), indel, or amino acid change in the E5a-E5b-L1-LCR fragment and were sequenced in full. A global alignment and maximum likelihood tree of 190 complete HPV6 genomes (130 fully sequenced in this study and 60 obtained from sequence repositories) revealed two variant lineages, A and B, and five B sublineages: B1, B2, B3, B4, and B5. HPV6 (sub)lineage-specific SNPs and a 960-bp representative region for whole-genome-based phylogenetic clustering within the L2 open reading frame were identified. Multivariate logistic regression analysis revealed that lineage B predominated globally. Sublineage B3 was more common in Africa and North and South America, and lineage A was more common in Asia. Sublineages B1 and B3 were associated with anogenital infections, indicating a potential lesion-specific predilection of some HPV6 sublineages. Females had higher odds for infection with sublineage B3 than males. In conclusion, a global HPV6 phylogenetic analysis revealed the existence of two variant lineages and five sublineages, showing some degree of ethnogeographic, gender, and/or disease predilection in their distribution. IMPORTANCE This study established the largest database of globally circulating HPV6 genomic variants and contributed a total of 130 new, complete HPV6 genome sequences to available sequence repositories. Two HPV

  13. Production of Human papillomavirus pseudovirions in plants and their use in pseudovirion-based neutralisation assays in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Lamprecht, Renate L; Kennedy, Paul; Huddy, Suzanne M; Bethke, Susanne; Hendrikse, Megan; Hitzeroth, Inga I; Rybicki, Edward P

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) cause cervical cancer and have recently also been implicated in mouth, laryngeal and anogenital cancers. There are three commercially available prophylactic vaccines that show good efficacy; however, efforts to develop second-generation vaccines that are more affordable, stable and elicit a wider spectrum of cross-neutralising immunity are still ongoing. Testing antisera elicited by current and candidate HPV vaccines for neutralizing antibodies is done using a HPV pseudovirion (PsV)-based neutralisation assay (PBNA). PsVs are produced by transfection of mammalian cell cultures with plasmids expressing L1 and L2 capsid proteins, and a reporter gene plasmid, a highly expensive process. We investigated making HPV-16 PsVs in plants, in order to develop a cheaper alternative. The secreted embryonic alkaline phosphatase (SEAP) reporter gene and promoter were cloned into a geminivirus-derived plant expression vector, in order to produce circular dsDNA replicons. This was co-introduced into Nicotiana benthamiana plants with vectors expressing L1 and L2 via agroinfiltration, and presumptive PsVs were purified. The PsVs contained DNA, and could be successfully used for PBNA with anti-HPV antibodies. This is the first demonstration of the production of mammalian pseudovirions in plants, and the first demonstration of the potential of plants to make DNA vaccines. PMID:26853456

  14. Using organotypic (raft) epithelial tissue cultures for the biosynthesis and isolation of infectious human papillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Ozbun, Michelle A.; Patterson, Nicole A.

    2014-01-01

    Papillomaviruses have a strict tropism for epithelial cells and they are fully reliant on cellular differentiation for completion of their life cycles, resulting in the production of progeny virions. Thus, a permissive environment for full viral replication in vitro wherein virion morphogenesis occurs under cooperative viral and cellular cues requires the cultivation of epithelium. Presented in the first section of this unit is a protocol for growing differentiating epithelial tissues, whose structure and function mimics many important morphological and biochemical aspects of normal skin. The technique, pioneered by Asslineau and Pruniéras (Asselineau and Prunieras 1984) and modified by Kopan et al. (Kopan et al. 1987), involves growing epidermal cells atop a dermal equivalent consisting of live fibroblasts and a collagen lattice. Epithelial stratification and differentiation ensues when the keratinocyte-dermal equivalent is placed at the air-liquid interface. The apparent floating nature of the cell-matrix in this method led to the nickname “raft” cultures. The general technique can be applied to normal low passage keratinocytes, to cells stably transfected with papillomavirus genes or genomes, as well as keratinocytes established from neoplastic lesions. However, infectious papillomavirus particles have only been isolated from organotypic epithelial cultures initiated with cells that maintain oncogenic human papillomavirus genomes in an extrachomosomal replicative form. The second section of this unit is dedicated to a virion isolation method that minimizes aerosol and skin exposure to these human carcinogens. Although the focus of the protocols is on the growth of tissues that yields infectious papillomavirus progeny, this culture system facilitates the investigation of these fastidious viruses during their complex replicative cycles, and raft tissues can be manipulated and harvested at any point during the process. Importantly, a single step virus growth

  15. Using organotypic (raft) epithelial tissue cultures for the biosynthesis and isolation of infectious human papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Ozbun, Michelle A; Patterson, Nicole A

    2014-08-01

    Papillomaviruses have a strict tropism for epithelial cells, and they are fully reliant on cellular differentiation for completion of their life cycles, resulting in the production of progeny virions. Thus, a permissive environment for full viral replication in vitro-wherein virion morphogenesis occurs under cooperative viral and cellular cues-requires the cultivation of epithelium. Presented in the first section of this unit is a protocol to grow differentiating epithelial tissues that mimic many important morphological and biochemical aspects of normal skin. The technique involves growing epidermal cells atop a dermal equivalent consisting of live fibroblasts and a collagen lattice. Epithelial stratification and differentiation ensues when the keratinocyte-dermal equivalent is placed at the air-liquid interface. The apparent floating nature of the cell-matrix in this method led to the nickname "raft" cultures. The general technique can be applied to normal low passage keratinocytes, to cells stably transfected with papillomavirus genes or genomes, or keratinocytes established from neoplastic lesions. However, infectious papillomavirus particles have only been isolated from organotypic epithelial cultures initiated with cells that maintain oncogenic human papillomavirus genomes in an extrachomosomal replicative form. The second section of this unit is dedicated to a virion isolation method that minimizes aerosol and skin exposure to these human carcinogens. Although the focus of the protocols is on the growth of tissues that yields infectious papillomavirus progeny, this culture system facilitates the investigation of these fastidious viruses during their complex replicative cycles, and raft tissues can be manipulated and harvested at any point during the process. Importantly, a single-step virus growth cycle is achieved in this process, as it is unlikely that progeny virions are released to initiate subsequent rounds of infection.

  16. Branchiogenic carcinoma with high-risk-type human papillomavirus infection: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Hiroyuki; Deng, Zeyi; Ikegami, Taro; Matayoshi, Sen; Agena, Shinya; Kiyuna, Asanori; Yamashita, Yukashi; Uehara, Takayuki; Ganaha, Akira; Suzuki, Mikio

    2016-01-01

    Branchiogenic carcinoma (BC) usually appears as a mass lesion with a predominant cystic component. Since lymph node metastasis from oropharyngeal carcinoma (OPC) has a cystic appearance, it is occasionally difficult to distinguish between BC and nodal metastases from clinically silent OPC. Factors associated with the malignant transformation process in BC remain obscure. The present study reports the case of a 56-year-old man with a right cystic cervical mass that was diagnosed as squamous cell carcinoma based on examination by fine-needle aspiration biopsy. The primary tumor could not be detected despite several imaging examinations, a pan-endoscopy of the head and neck, esophagus and stomach, biopsies of the head and neck regions, and bilateral tonsillectomies. The pathological findings of the surgical specimens from a radical neck dissection were consistent with the histological characteristics of BC, with evidence of transition from dysplasia through intraepithelial carcinoma to invasive carcinoma. Normal squamous epithelium and dysplastic and cancerous portions in the BC showed strong p16INK4a immunoreactivity. The expression of p16INK4a was also observed in all 9 nodal metastases in the neck dissection specimens. The cystic formation observed in the BC was not observed in the nodal metastases. As the presence of human papillomavirus-16 in the tumor was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction, quantitative polymerase chain reaction was employed for the measurement of human papillomavirus-16 viral load and integration. The results showed that the viral load of human papillomavirus-16 was 3.01×107/50 ng genomic DNA, and the E2/E6 ratio was 0.13, so the integration state was judged to be the mixed type. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of BC associated with high-risk-type human papillomavirus infection. The study indicates that a human papillomavirus-positive neck mass may not necessarily be OPC, but that it could be BC with a poor prognosis

  17. Branchiogenic carcinoma with high-risk-type human papillomavirus infection: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Hiroyuki; Deng, Zeyi; Ikegami, Taro; Matayoshi, Sen; Agena, Shinya; Kiyuna, Asanori; Yamashita, Yukashi; Uehara, Takayuki; Ganaha, Akira; Suzuki, Mikio

    2016-01-01

    Branchiogenic carcinoma (BC) usually appears as a mass lesion with a predominant cystic component. Since lymph node metastasis from oropharyngeal carcinoma (OPC) has a cystic appearance, it is occasionally difficult to distinguish between BC and nodal metastases from clinically silent OPC. Factors associated with the malignant transformation process in BC remain obscure. The present study reports the case of a 56-year-old man with a right cystic cervical mass that was diagnosed as squamous cell carcinoma based on examination by fine-needle aspiration biopsy. The primary tumor could not be detected despite several imaging examinations, a pan-endoscopy of the head and neck, esophagus and stomach, biopsies of the head and neck regions, and bilateral tonsillectomies. The pathological findings of the surgical specimens from a radical neck dissection were consistent with the histological characteristics of BC, with evidence of transition from dysplasia through intraepithelial carcinoma to invasive carcinoma. Normal squamous epithelium and dysplastic and cancerous portions in the BC showed strong p16INK4a immunoreactivity. The expression of p16INK4a was also observed in all 9 nodal metastases in the neck dissection specimens. The cystic formation observed in the BC was not observed in the nodal metastases. As the presence of human papillomavirus-16 in the tumor was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction, quantitative polymerase chain reaction was employed for the measurement of human papillomavirus-16 viral load and integration. The results showed that the viral load of human papillomavirus-16 was 3.01×107/50 ng genomic DNA, and the E2/E6 ratio was 0.13, so the integration state was judged to be the mixed type. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of BC associated with high-risk-type human papillomavirus infection. The study indicates that a human papillomavirus-positive neck mass may not necessarily be OPC, but that it could be BC with a poor prognosis

  18. Association of infections with human immunodeficiency virus and human papillomavirus in Honduras.

    PubMed

    Ferrera, A; Melchers, W J; Velema, J P; Figueroa, M

    1997-08-01

    The etiologic role of the oncogenic types of human papillomavirus (HPV) in the development of cervical cancer has been widely proven. Since this cancer occurs more frequently in immunosuppressed individuals, we sought to evaluate the prevalence of HPV infection among human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected and HIV-noninfected prostitutes in Tegucigalpa, Honduras. Cervical scrapes were collected from 23 HIV-seropositive and 28 HIV-seronegative prostitutes for HPV DNA detection by the polymerase chain reaction. Fifty-six percent of the HIV-seropositive women and only 18% of the seronegative women were HPV DNA positive (odds ratio = 6.0). In addition, there was a significant association between seropositivity for HIV with a history of sexually transmitted diseases (P < 0.01). Our data confirm the association between infections with HIV and HPV.

  19. Role of papillomavirus oncogenes in human cervical cancer: Transgenic animal studies

    SciTech Connect

    Griep, A.E.; Lambert, P.F.

    1994-05-01

    Human papillomaviruses are believed to be etiologic agents for the majority of human cervical carcinoma, a common cancer that is a leading cause of death by cancer among women worldwide. In cervical carcinoma, a subset of papillomaviral genes, namely E6 and E7, are expressed. In vitro tissue culture studies indicate that HPV E6 and E7 are oncogenes, and that their oncogenicity is due in part to their capacity to inactivate cellular tumor suppressor genes. The behavior of E6 and E7 in vitro and the genetic evidence from analysis of human cancers suggest that the E6 and E7 genes play a significant role in the development of cervical cancer. This hypothesis is now being tested using animal models. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge of the oncogenicity of papillomavirus genes that has been generated through their study in transgenic mice. 82 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Mucosal Human Papillomaviruses Encode Four Different E5 Proteins Whose Chemistry and Phylogeny Correlate with Malignant or Benign Growth

    PubMed Central

    Bravo, Ignacio G.; Alonso, Ángel

    2004-01-01

    We performed a phylogenetic study of the E2-L2 region of human mucosal papillomaviruses (PVs) and of the proteins therein encoded. Hitherto, proteins codified in this region were known as E5 proteins. We show that many of these proteins could be spurious translations, according to phylogenetic and chemical coherence criteria between similar protein sequences. We show that there are four separate families of E5 proteins, with different characteristics of phylogeny, chemistry, and rate of evolution. For the sake of clarity, we propose a change in the present nomenclature. E5α is present in groups A5, A6, A7, A9, and A11, PVs highly associated with malignant carcinomas of the cervix and penis. E5β is present in groups A2, A3, A4, and A12, i.e., viruses associated with certain warts. E5γ is present in group A10, and E5δ is encoded in groups A1, A8, and A10, which are associated with benign transformations. The phylogenetic relationships between mucosal human PVs are the same when considering the oncoproteins E6 and E7 and the E5 proteins and differ from the phylogeny estimated for the structural proteins L1 and L2. Besides, the protein divergence rate is higher in early proteins than in late proteins, increasing in the order L1 < L2 < E6 ≈ E7 < E5. Moreover, the same proteins have diverged more rapidly in viruses associated with malignant transformations than in viruses associated with benign transformations. The E5 proteins display, therefore, evolutionary characteristics similar to those of the E6 and E7 oncoproteins. This could reflect a differential involvement of the E5 types in the transformation processes. PMID:15564472

  1. An Association of Human Papillomaviruses Low Risk and High Risk Subtypes with Skin Tag

    PubMed Central

    Pezeshkpoor, Fakhrozaman; Jafarian, Amir Hossein; Ghazvini, Kiarash; Yazdanpanah, Mohammad Javad; Sadeghian, Ali; Esmaili, Habiballah; Karrabi, Maryam; Rohani, Fatemeh; Joushan, Bahareh

    2012-01-01

    Objective(s) Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are related to the genesis of various benign lesions and some malignant tumors, but no clear relationship has been identified so far between the subtypes of HPV and skin tag. Materials and Methods The present case-control study was designed to detect the existence of low risk and high risk HPV types in lesions of 50 patients with skin tag (case group) and normal skin around the melanocytic nevus of 30 patients (control group), using PCR. Results All of the samples were negative for HPV subtypes, except two samples in control group which were positive for high risk HPV. There was no significant relationship between the HPV subtypes and skin tag. Conclusion There is no association between skin tag and low risk and high risk human papillomaviruses. PMID:23493098

  2. Genomic instability of the host cell induced by the human papillomavirus replication machinery.

    PubMed

    Kadaja, Meelis; Sumerina, Alina; Verst, Tatjana; Ojarand, Mari; Ustav, Ene; Ustav, Mart

    2007-04-18

    Development of invasive cervical cancer upon infection by 'high-risk' human papillomavirus (HPV) in humans is a stepwise process in which some of the initially episomal 'high-risk' type of HPVs (HR-HPVs) integrate randomly into the host cell genome. We show that HPV replication proteins E1 and E2 are capable of inducing overamplification of the genomic locus where HPV origin has been integrated. Clonal analysis of the cells in which the replication from integrated HPV origin was induced showed excision, rearrangement and de novo integration of the HPV containing and flanking cellular sequences. These data suggest that papillomavirus replication machinery is capable of inducing genomic changes of the host cell that may facilitate the formation of the HPV-dependent cancer cell. PMID:17396148

  3. Cost-effectiveness of human papillomavirus vaccination in low and middle income countries: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Fesenfeld, Michaela; Hutubessy, Raymond; Jit, Mark

    2013-08-20

    The World Health Organization recommends establishing that human papillomavirus vaccination is cost-effective before vaccine introduction. We searched Pubmed, Embase and the Cochrane Library to 1 April 2012 for economic evaluations of human papillomavirus vaccination in low and middle income countries. We found 25 articles, but almost all low income countries and many middle income countries lacked country-specific studies. Methods, assumptions and consequently results varied widely, even for studies conducted for the same country. Despite the heterogeneity, most studies conclude that vaccination is likely to be cost-effective and possibly even cost saving, particularly in settings without organized cervical screening programmes. However, study uncertainty could be reduced by clarity about vaccine prices and vaccine delivery costs. The review supports extending vaccination to low income settings where vaccine prices are competitive, donor funding is available, cervical cancer burden is high and screening options are limited.

  4. The most effective and promising population health strategies to advance human papillomavirus vaccination.

    PubMed

    Jacobson, Robert M; Agunwamba, Amenah A; St Sauver, Jennifer L; Finney Rutten, Lila J

    2016-01-01

    The US is failing to make substantive progress toward improving rates of human papillomavirus vaccine uptake. While the Healthy People 2020 goal for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination is 80%, the three-dose completion rate in the US in 2014 for 13- to 17-year-old females is less than 40%, and the rate for males is just above 20%. Experts point to a number of reasons for the poor HPV vaccination rates including parental concerns about safety, necessity, and timing. However, the evidence refuting these concerns is substantial. Efforts focusing on education and communication have not shown promise, but several population health strategies have reminder/recall systems; practice-focused strategies targeting staff, clinicians, and parents; assessment and feedback activities; and school-based HPV vaccination programs. PMID:26559567

  5. Cytological screening for cervical cancer and human papillomavirus in general practice.

    PubMed Central

    Hiscock, E.; Reece, G.

    1988-01-01

    In a retrospective study of cervical screening in a general practice in Birmingham 156 out of 1913 smears taken over three years showed some abnormality. Smears from 65 women showed severe non-specific inflammation, and 91 women had various grades of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, of whom 53 were aged under 30 and 13 over 40. Of 35 women with clinical evidence of human papillomavirus, 21 had normal results on cervical testing and 14 abnormal results. The incidence of genital warts among sexually active young people is growing, but the association of human papillomavirus with abnormal cervical smears is not clear. The efficacy of screening in the United Kingdom must be improved by actively encouraging younger patients to attend for regular screening. PMID:2852515

  6. Characterization of human papillomavirus type 66 from an invasive carcinoma of the uterine cervix.

    PubMed Central

    Tawheed, A R; Beaudenon, S; Favre, M; Orth, G

    1991-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA sequences coexisting with HPV16 and HPV45 were cloned from an invasive cervical carcinoma. The cloned HPV was shown to be a novel type, named HPV66, and is related to HPV56 (an HPV detected in cervical cancer). After screening 160 anogenital biopsies, four specimens exhibited histological features of intraepithelial neoplasia and contained HPV66 sequences. Of these, three were found to be associated with another HPV type. Images PMID:1663515

  7. [Human papillomavirus and cervical cancer in México: a constant struggle].

    PubMed

    Torres-Poveda, Kirvis; Madrid-Marina, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Given that human papillomavirus and cervical cancer are a health problem in México, since they affect women of reproductive age and have a negative impact on our society, it is crucial to prevent those diseases and to raise awareness among physicians who deal with their clinical and therapeutic management. That is the reason why we show three Original contributions and 13 Current themes in this supplement of the Revista Médica del Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social.

  8. Focal epithelial hyperplasia (Heck's disease): report of two cases with PCR detection of human papillomavirus DNA.

    PubMed

    Jayasooriya, P R; Abeyratne, S; Ranasinghe, A W; Tilakaratne, W M

    2004-07-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH) (Heck's disease) is essentially a benign oral infection produced by the human papillomavirus (HPV). Although this condition is known to exist in numerous populations and ethnic groups, it is relatively rare in South-East Asia. The following report is based on two cases of adult FEH with histopathological features in favour of the disease. In addition, polymerase chain reaction was performed to detect the presence of HPV DNA in the lesions in order to confirm the histopathological diagnosis.

  9. Human papillomavirus DNA from warts for typing by endonuclease restriction patterns: purification by alkaline plasmid methods.

    PubMed

    Chinami, M; Tanikawa, E; Hachisuka, H; Sasai, Y; Shingu, M

    1990-01-01

    The alkaline plasmid DNA extraction method of Birnboim and Doly was applied for the isolation of human papillomavirus (HPV) from warts. Tissue from common and plantar warts was digested with proteinase K, and the extrachromosomal circular covalently-closed form of HPV-DNA was rapidly extracted by alkaline sodium dodecyl sulphate and phenol-chloroform treatment. Recovery of HPV-DNA from the tissue was sufficient for determination of endonuclease restriction patterns by agarose gel electrophoresis.

  10. Pain in adolescent girls receiving human papillomavirus vaccine with concomitantly administered vaccines.

    PubMed

    Walter, Emmanuel B; Kemper, Alex R; Dolor, Rowena J; Dunne, Eileen F

    2015-02-01

    Using the Faces Pain Scale - Revised, we assessed injection site pain 10 minutes after vaccination in young females randomized to receive either quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine (HPV4) before or after concomitantly administered vaccines. Although pain was modestly more after HPV4 injection than after other vaccines, the pain intensity after HPV4 injection was significantly less in those who received HPV4 before receiving other concomitant vaccines.

  11. Human papillomavirus type-specific prevalence in women with cervical intraepithelial neoplasm in Western China.

    PubMed

    Li, Jinke; Mei, Jie; Wang, Xuedong; Hu, Lina; Lin, Yong; Yang, Pei

    2012-03-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) type-specific prevalence was studied in 600 cases of cervical intraepithelial neoplasm in western China by GenoArray test. HPV-16 and -58 were the most prevalent types, with prevalences of 37.8% and 21.8%, respectively. HPV-18 and -45 were uncommon types. The results show different type distributions from that of other regions, which is important evidence for the selection of future genotypes in HPV vaccines in western China.

  12. Cloning and genomic characterization of Felis domesticus papillomavirus type 1.

    PubMed

    Tachezy, Ruth; Duson, Griet; Rector, Annabel; Jenson, A Bennett; Sundberg, John P; Van Ranst, Marc

    2002-09-30

    A novel papillomavirus was cloned from hyperkeratotic cutaneous lesions of a Persian domestic cat. The Felis domesticus papillomavirus (FdPV-1) genome counts 8300 bp and has a typical genome structure with an early region (E1, E2, E4, E6, E7), a late region (L1, L2), and a noncoding upstream regulatory region (URR or NCR1) between the end of L1 and the beginning of E6. The FdPV-1 also shows an unusual second noncoding region (NCR2) of 1.3 kb, situated between the end of E2 and the beginning of L2. This NCR2 is uniquely related to a similar region in the canine oral papillomavirus (COPV). Phylogenetic analysis places FdPV-1 together with COPV, the cottontail rabbit papillomavirus, human papillomavirus type 1 (HPV-1), and HPV-63 in the group of the benign cutaneous papillomaviruses. The position of FdPV-1 in the phylogenetic tree allows us to hypothesize that already in an early phase of the papillomavirus molecular evolution, a split occurred into viruses with a dual tropism primarily for cutaneous epithelia but also secondarily for mucosal surfaces, and viruses with a specific monotropism for mucosal surfaces. The close relationship between FdPV-1 and COPV, and between their Canidae and Felidae hosts, supports the hypothesis that papillomaviruses have speciated and coevolved together with their hosts throughout vertebrate evolution. A papillomavirus mutation rate of 0.73 to 0.96 x 10(-8) nucleotide substitutions per base per year was calculated. PMID:12359433

  13. Human papillomavirus infection in Beijing, People's Republic of China: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, R; Zhang, W Y; Wu, M H; Zhang, S W; Pan, J; Zhu, L; Zhang, Y P; Li, H; Gu, Y S; Liu, X Z

    2009-01-01

    Background: No recent data exist on human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in Beijing, People's Republic of China. Materials and method We interviewed and examined a representative, randomly selected sample of 5552 sexually active women aged 25–54 years. Cervical cell samples were analysed for HPV DNA by a MY09/11-based PCR assay. Results: Human papillomavirus prevalence was 6.7% overall and 4.8% among women without cervical abnormalities. Of the 21 subtypes identified, HPV16 was the commonest type (2.6% overall; 39.1% of HPV-positive women), followed by HPV 58 (1.0%), 33 (0.8%), 43 (0.7%) and 56 (0.7%). High-risk HPV types predominated in all age groups. Human papillomavirus prevalence was highest in young to middle-aged women. Marital status, number of husband's sexual partners, age at sexual debut and nulligravidity were all associated with being HPV positive. Conclusions: In our survey, HPV 16, HPV 58 and HPV 33 were the most prevalent HPV types in Beijing, indicating the potential for the prophylactic HPV 16/18 vaccine in China. PMID:19862002

  14. Rearrangement of both alleles of human chromosome 8 in cells, one of them as a result of papillomavirus DNA integration

    SciTech Connect

    Lazo, P.A.

    1988-01-05

    Integration of papillomavirus in the genome of the host cell has been found associated with malignant cases of cervical carcinoma. To determine what role viral integration plays as part of the pathogenic mechanism resulting in a cancer cell, the structure of integrated papillomavirus DNA (human papillomavirus DNA 18) segments and its cellular flanking sequences in HeLa cells as well as the corresponding normal human allele have been characterized. All integrated viral DNA segments have the same human DNA sequences in their 5' flank. The use of human sequence flanking the viral DNA as a probe detected the presence of four different forms of this human DNA region based on restriction fragment length polymorphism. Three of these forms can be linked to integrated viral DNA from human papillomavirus 18. The remaining form could not be linked to viral DNA and did not have a germline pattern in its 5'-end suggesting that it was also structurally altered. None of the forms of the human sequence present in HeLa cells has the complete structure of the germline normal allele characterized in DNA from placenta and human fibroblasts IMR-90. This observation suggests that HeLa cells carry a structural alteration in both alleles of the same locus, one of which was caused by integration of papillomavirus DNA. This locus is located on a chromosome fragile site. These rearrangements will result in a homozygous situation which is interpreted as affecting a recessive phenotype which might be involved in some aspect of tumorigenesis.

  15. Chromatin-like structures obtained after alkaline disruption of bovine and human papillomaviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Favre, M; Breitburd, F; Croissant, O; Orth, G

    1977-01-01

    Four low-molecular-weight polypeptides migrating like H2a, H2b, H3, and H4 calf liver histones were detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate-acrylamide gel electrophoresis of highly purified preparations of bovine papillomavirus (BPV) and human papillomavirus (HPV). Complexes of these polypeptides and viral DNA were isolated by agarose-gel filtration of the alkaline disruption products of both viruses. When observed under the electron microscope, these complexes appeared as circular structures composed of nucleosomes with a diameter of about 8.0 nm interconnected by a naked DNA filament. The maximal frequency of nucleosomes per molecule was 30 for both viruses, corresponding to a condensation ratio of the viral DNA of 2.5. Images PMID:191643

  16. Human papillomavirus type 16 DNA-induced malignant transformation of NIH 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yasumoto, S.; Burkhardt, A.L.; Doniger, J.; DiPaolo, J.A.

    1986-02-01

    A biological function for human papillomavirus 16 (HPV 16) DNA was demonstrated by transformation of NIH 3T3 cells. HPV 16 DNA has been found frequently in genital cancer and has been classified as a papillomavirus on the basis of DNA homology. A recombinant HPV 16 DNA (pSHPV16d), which contains a head-to-tail dimer of the full-length HPV 16 genome, induced morphologic transformation; the transformed cells were tumorigenic in nude mice. Expression of transforming activity was unique because of the long latency period (more than 4 weeks) required for induction of morphologic transformation and because the transfected DNA existed primarily in a multimeric form with some rearrangement. Furthermore, virus-specific RNAs were expressed in the transformants. The transformation of NIH 3T3 cells provides a model for analyzing the functions of HPV 16, which is associated with cervical carcinomas.

  17. Pre-clinical immunogenicity of human papillomavirus alpha-7 and alpha-9 major capsid proteins.

    PubMed

    Bissett, Sara L; Mattiuzzo, Giada; Draper, Eve; Godi, Anna; Wilkinson, Dianna E; Minor, Philip; Page, Mark; Beddows, Simon

    2014-11-12

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines confer protection against the oncogenic genotypes HPV16 and HPV18 through the generation of type-specific neutralizing antibodies raised against the constituent virus-like particles (VLP) based upon the major capsid proteins (L1) of these genotypes. The vaccines also confer a degree of cross-protection against some genetically related types from the Alpha-9 (HPV16-like: HPV31, HPV33, HPV35, HPV52, HPV58) and Alpha-7 (HPV18-like: HPV39, HPV45, HPV59, HPV68) species groups. The mechanism of cross-protection is unclear but may involve antibodies capable of recognizing shared inter-genotype epitopes. The relationship(s) between the genetic and antigenic diversity of the L1 protein, particularly for non-vaccine genotypes, is poorly understood. We carried out a comprehensive evaluation of the immunogenicity of L1 VLP derived from genotypes within the Alpha-7 and Alpha-9 species groups in New Zealand White rabbits and used L1L2 pseudoviruses as the target antigens in neutralization assays. The majority antibody response against L1 VLP was type-specific, as expected, but several instances of robust cross-neutralization were nevertheless observed including between HPV33 and HPV58 within the Alpha-9 species and between HPV39, HPV59 and HPV68 in the Alpha-7 species. Immunization with an experimental tetravalent preparation comprising VLP based upon HPV16, HPV18, HPV39 and HPV58 was capable of generating neutralizing antibodies against all the Alpha-7 and Alpha-9 genotypes. Competition of HPV31 and HPV33 cross-neutralizing antibodies in the tetravalent sera confirmed that these antibodies originated from HPV16 and HPV58 VLP, respectively, and suggested that they represent minority specificities within the antibody repertoire generated by the immunizing antigen. These data improve our understanding of the antigenic diversity of the L1 protein per se and may inform the rational design of a next generation vaccine formulation based upon

  18. Pre-clinical immunogenicity of human papillomavirus alpha-7 and alpha-9 major capsid proteins

    PubMed Central

    Bissett, Sara L.; Mattiuzzo, Giada; Draper, Eve; Godi, Anna; Wilkinson, Dianna E.; Minor, Philip; Page, Mark; Beddows, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines confer protection against the oncogenic genotypes HPV16 and HPV18 through the generation of type-specific neutralizing antibodies raised against the constituent virus-like particles (VLP) based upon the major capsid proteins (L1) of these genotypes. The vaccines also confer a degree of cross-protection against some genetically related types from the Alpha-9 (HPV16-like: HPV31, HPV33, HPV35, HPV52, HPV58) and Alpha-7 (HPV18-like: HPV39, HPV45, HPV59, HPV68) species groups. The mechanism of cross-protection is unclear but may involve antibodies capable of recognizing shared inter-genotype epitopes. The relationship(s) between the genetic and antigenic diversity of the L1 protein, particularly for non-vaccine genotypes, is poorly understood. We carried out a comprehensive evaluation of the immunogenicity of L1 VLP derived from genotypes within the Alpha-7 and Alpha-9 species groups in New Zealand White rabbits and used L1L2 pseudoviruses as the target antigens in neutralization assays. The majority antibody response against L1 VLP was type-specific, as expected, but several instances of robust cross-neutralization were nevertheless observed including between HPV33 and HPV58 within the Alpha-9 species and between HPV39, HPV59 and HPV68 in the Alpha-7 species. Immunization with an experimental tetravalent preparation comprising VLP based upon HPV16, HPV18, HPV39 and HPV58 was capable of generating neutralizing antibodies against all the Alpha-7 and Alpha-9 genotypes. Competition of HPV31 and HPV33 cross-neutralizing antibodies in the tetravalent sera confirmed that these antibodies originated from HPV16 and HPV58 VLP, respectively, and suggested that they represent minority specificities within the antibody repertoire generated by the immunizing antigen. These data improve our understanding of the antigenic diversity of the L1 protein per se and may inform the rational design of a next generation vaccine formulation based upon

  19. Gallic acid induces apoptosis in human cervical epithelial cells containing human papillomavirus type 16 episomes.

    PubMed

    Shi, Lin; Lei, Yanjun; Srivastava, Ranjana; Qin, Weihua; Chen, Jason J

    2016-01-01

    The high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPV) that infect the anogenital tract are strongly associated with the development of cervical carcinoma, which is the second most common cancer in women worldwide. Therapeutic drugs specifically targeting HPV are not available. Polyphenolic compounds have gained considerable attention because of their cytotoxic effects against a variety of cancers and certain viruses. In this study, we examined the effects of several polyphenols on cellular proliferation and death of the human cervical cancer cells and human cervical epithelial cells containing stable HPV type 16 episomes (HPVep). Our results show that three polyphenols inhibited proliferation of HeLa cells dose-dependently. Furthermore, one of the examined polyphenols, gallic acid (GA), also inhibited the proliferation of HPVep cells and exhibited significant specificity towards HPV-positive cells. The anti-proliferative effect of GA on HPVep and HeLa cells was associated with apoptosis and upregulation of p53. These results suggest that GA can be a potential candidate for the development of anti-HPV agents.

  20. First Detection of Human Papillomaviruses and Human Polyomaviruses in River Waters in Italy.

    PubMed

    Iaconelli, M; Petricca, S; Libera, S Della; Di Bonito, P; La Rosa, G

    2015-12-01

    Waterborne exposure to human viruses is possible through contact with contaminated water environments and can result in infections associated with a wide range of illnesses, including gastrointestinal, respiratory, ear, ocular, and skin infections. Recently, the occurrence in water environments of two groups of human viruses-both known with oncogenic potential, human polyomaviruses (HPyVs) and papillomaviruses (HPVs)-has been reported worldwide. These viruses, responsible for highly prevalent infections worldwide, have recently been proposed as potentially emerging waterborne pathogens. The objective of the present study was to examine the occurrence of HPyVs and HPVs in surface waters, by monitoring two rivers in Northwestern Italy, by nested PCR assays and sequencing. HPyVs (JC, BK, and Merkel cell polyomavirus) were detected in 10/25 (40%) samples. HPVs (HPV8, 17, 21, 25, 32, 80, 99, 105, and putative new HPVs) were identified in 14/25 (56%) river samples. The number of HPV DNA copies in waters was measured by quantitative real-time PCR. To our knowledge, this is the first detection and quantification of HPVs in surface waters. The possibility that HPyVs and HPVs can be transmitted by the waterborne route deserves to be explored in future studies. PMID:26049729

  1. First Detection of Human Papillomaviruses and Human Polyomaviruses in River Waters in Italy.

    PubMed

    Iaconelli, M; Petricca, S; Libera, S Della; Di Bonito, P; La Rosa, G

    2015-12-01

    Waterborne exposure to human viruses is possible through contact with contaminated water environments and can result in infections associated with a wide range of illnesses, including gastrointestinal, respiratory, ear, ocular, and skin infections. Recently, the occurrence in water environments of two groups of human viruses-both known with oncogenic potential, human polyomaviruses (HPyVs) and papillomaviruses (HPVs)-has been reported worldwide. These viruses, responsible for highly prevalent infections worldwide, have recently been proposed as potentially emerging waterborne pathogens. The objective of the present study was to examine the occurrence of HPyVs and HPVs in surface waters, by monitoring two rivers in Northwestern Italy, by nested PCR assays and sequencing. HPyVs (JC, BK, and Merkel cell polyomavirus) were detected in 10/25 (40%) samples. HPVs (HPV8, 17, 21, 25, 32, 80, 99, 105, and putative new HPVs) were identified in 14/25 (56%) river samples. The number of HPV DNA copies in waters was measured by quantitative real-time PCR. To our knowledge, this is the first detection and quantification of HPVs in surface waters. The possibility that HPyVs and HPVs can be transmitted by the waterborne route deserves to be explored in future studies.

  2. Characterization of primary human keratinocytes transformed by human papillomavirus type 18

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, P.; McDougall, J.K. )

    1988-06-01

    Primary human epithelial cells were cotransfected with pHPV-18 and pSV2neo, and cell strains were generated by selecting in G418. Southern blot analysis revealed the presence of at least one intact, integrated viral genome in these cells. FE-A cells showed altered growth properties, characterized by a change in morphology, and clonal density. Differentiation markers analyzed by Western blotting (immunoblotting), such as cytokeratins and involucrin, indicated that the cells resembled a partially differentiated epithelial population. Increased expression of the 40-kilodalton cytokeratin was observed in FE-A cells, similar to that observed in simian virus 40-immortalized human keratinocytes. Calcium and 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate treatment induced normal epithelial cells to differentiate, whereas the human papillomavirus 18 (HPV-18)-containing keratinocytes were resistant to these signals, indicating their partially transformed nature. These cells were not able to induce tumors in nude mice over a period of up to 8 months. A second cell strain, FE-H18L, also generated by transfecting HPV-18, also exhibited an extended life span and similar alterations in morphology. Viral RNA transcribed from the early region of HPV-18 was detected in both cell strains by Northern (RNA) blot analysis. These cell strains should provide a useful model for determining the role of HPV in carcinogenesis.

  3. A large spectrum of alpha and beta papillomaviruses are detected in human stool samples.

    PubMed

    Di Bonito, Paola; Della Libera, Simonetta; Petricca, Sabrina; Iaconelli, Marcello; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Graffeo, Rosalia; Accardi, Luisa; La Rosa, Giuseppina

    2015-03-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) have been detected in urban wastewaters, demonstrating that epitheliotropic viruses can find their way into sewage through the washing of skin and mucous membranes. Papillomavirus shedding through faeces is still an unexplored issue. The objective of the present study was to investigate the presence of HPVs in stool samples. We analysed 103 faecal specimens collected from hospitalized patients with diarrhoea using validated primers able to detect α, β and γ HPVs. PCR products underwent sequencing analysis and sequences were aligned to reference genomes from the Papillomavirus Episteme database. A total of 15 sequences were characterized from the faecal samples. Thirteen samples (12.6 %) were positive for nine genotypes belonging to the α and β genera: HPV32 (LR, α1), HPV39 (HR, α7), HPV44 (LR, α10), HPV8 (β1), HPV9, HPV23, HPV37, HPV38 and HPV120 (β2). Two putative novel genotypes of the β genus, species 1 and 2, were also detected. The tissue(s) of origin is unknown, since faeces can collect HPVs originating from or passing through the entire digestive system. To our knowledge, this is the first investigation on the occurrence and diversity of HPVs in faecal samples. Results from this study demonstrate that HPVs can find their way into sewage as a consequence of shedding in the faeces. This highlights the need for further studies aimed at understanding the prevalence of HPV in different water environments and the potential for waterborne transmission.

  4. Regression of Human Papillomavirus Intraepithelial Lesions Is Induced by MVA E2 Therapeutic Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    López-Contreras, Mario; Rosales, Carlos; Magallanes-Molina, Jose-Roberto; Gonzalez-Vergara, Roberto; Arroyo-Cazarez, Jose Martin; Ricardez-Arenas, Antonio; del Follo-Valencia, Armando; Padilla-Arriaga, Santiago; Guerrero, Miriam Veronica; Pirez, Miguel Angel; Arellano-Fiore, Claudia; Villarreal, Freddy

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Human papilloma viruses can induce warts, condylomas, and other intraepithelial cervical lesions that can progress to cancer. Cervical cancer is a serious problem in developing countries because early detection is difficult, and thus proper early treatment is many times missing. In this phase III clinical trial, we evaluated the potential use of MVA E2 recombinant vaccinia virus to treat intraepithelial lesions associated with papillomavirus infection. A total of 1176 female and 180 male patients with intraepithelial lesions were studied. They were injected with 107 MVA E2 virus particles directly into their uterus, urethra, vulva, or anus. Patients were monitored by colposcopy and cytology. Immune response was determined by measuring the antibody titer against MVA E2 virus and by analyzing the cytotoxic activity against cancer cells bearing papillomavirus DNA. Papillomavirus was determined by the Hybrid Capture method or by polymerase chain reaction analysis. By histology, 1051 (89.3%) female patients showed complete elimination of lesions after treatment with MVA E2. In 28 (2.4%) female patients, the lesion was reduced to CIN 1. Another 97 (8.3%) female patients presented isolated koilocytes after treatment. In men, all lesions were completely eliminated. All MVA E2–treated patients developed antibodies against the MVA E2 vaccine and generated a specific cytotoxic response against papilloma-transformed cells. Papillomavirus DNA was not detected after treatment in 83% of total patients treated. MVA E2 did not generate any apparent side effects. These data suggest that therapeutic vaccination with MVA E2 vaccine is an excellent candidate to stimulate the immune system and generate regression in intraepithelial lesions when applied locally. PMID:25275724

  5. Papillomavirus Prophylactic Vaccines: Established Successes, New Approaches▿

    PubMed Central

    Campo, M. Saveria; Roden, Richard B. S.

    2010-01-01

    Vaccines against the human papillomaviruses (HPVs) most frequently associated with cancer of the cervix are now available. These prophylactic vaccines, based on virus-like particles (VLPs), are extremely effective, providing protection from infection in almost 100% of cases. However, the vaccines present some limitations: they are effective primarily against the HPV type present in the vaccine, are expensive to produce, and need a cold chain. Vaccines based on the minor capsid protein L2 have been very successful in animal models and have been shown to provide a good level of protection against different papillomavirus types. The potential of L2-based vaccines to protect against many types of HPVs is discussed. PMID:19906917

  6. Identification of a Novel Human Papillomavirus, Type HPV199, Isolated from a Nasopharynx and Anal Canal, and Complete Genomic Characterization of Papillomavirus Species Gamma-12

    PubMed Central

    Oštrbenk, Anja; Kocjan, Boštjan J.; Hošnjak, Lea; Li, Jingjing; Deng, Qiuju; Šterbenc, Anja; Poljak, Mario

    2015-01-01

    The novel human papillomavirus type 199 (HPV199) was initially identified in a nasopharyngeal swab sample obtained from a 25 year-old immunocompetent male. The complete genome of HPV199 is 7,184 bp in length with a GC content of 36.5%. Comparative genomic characterization of HPV199 and its closest relatives showed the classical genomic organization of Gammapapillomaviruses (Gamma-PVs). HPV199 has seven major open reading frames (ORFs), encoding five early (E1, E2, E4, E6, and E7) and two late (L1 and L2) proteins, while lacking the E5 ORF. The long control region (LCR) of 513 bp is located between the L1 and E6 ORFs. Phylogenetic analysis additionally confirmed that HPV-199 clusters into the Gamma-PV genus, species Gamma-12, additionally containing HPV127, HV132, HPV148, HPV165, and three putative HPV types: KC5, CG2 and CG3. HPV199 is most closely related to HPV127 (nucleotide identity 77%). The complete viral genome sequence of additional HPV199 isolate was determined from anal canal swab sample. Two HPV199 complete viral sequences exhibit 99.4% nucleotide identity. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first member of Gamma-PV with complete nucleotide sequences determined from two independent clinical samples. To evaluate the tissue tropism of the novel HPV type, 916 clinical samples were tested using HPV199 type-specific real-time PCR: HPV199 was detected in 2/76 tissue samples of histologically confirmed common warts, 2/108 samples of eyebrow hair follicles, 2/137 anal canal swabs obtained from individuals with clinically evident anal pathology, 4/184 nasopharyngeal swabs and 3/411 cervical swabs obtained from women with normal cervical cytology. Although HPV199 was found in 1.4% of cutaneous and mucosal samples only, it exhibits dual tissue tropism. According to the results of our study and literature data, dual tropism of all Gamma-12 members is highly possible. PMID:26375679

  7. Phylogenetically related, clinically different: human papillomaviruses 6 and 11 variants distribution in genital warts and in laryngeal papillomatosis.

    PubMed

    Godínez, J M; Nicolás-Párraga, S; Pimenoff, V N; Mengual-Chuliá, B; Muñoz, N; Bosch, F X; Sánchez, G I; McCloskey, J; Bravo, I G

    2014-06-01

    Genital warts (GWs) and laryngeal papillomatosis (LP) are two usually benign pathologies related to infection with human papillomaviruses (HPVs), mainly HPV6 and HPV11. The aim of this work was to describe the genetic diversity of HPV6 and HPV11 isolates found in GWs and LPs, and to analyse the differential involvement of viral variants in either lesion. A total of 231 samples diagnosed as GWs (n = 198) or LP (n = 33) and caused by HPV6 or HPV11 monoinfections were analysed. The phylogenetic relationships of the retrieved viral sequences were explored. We have identified the long control region and the intergenic E2-L2 region as the two most variable regions in both HPV6 and HPV11 genomes. We have generated new HPV6 (n = 166) or HPV11 (n = 65) partial sequences from GWs and LPs lesions spanning both regions and studied them in the context of all available sequences of both types (final n = 412). Our results show a significant (p <0.01) differential presence of HPV6 variants among both pathologies, with HPV6 B variants being preferentially found in GW versus LP samples. No differential involvement of HPV11 variants was observed. Our findings suggest that different HPV6 variants may either show differential tropism or have different potential to induce lesions in different epithelia.

  8. Regulation of human genome expression and RNA splicing by human papillomavirus 16 E2 protein.

    PubMed

    Gauson, Elaine J; Windle, Brad; Donaldson, Mary M; Caffarel, Maria M; Dornan, Edward S; Coleman, Nicholas; Herzyk, Pawel; Henderson, Scott C; Wang, Xu; Morgan, Iain M

    2014-11-01

    Human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) is causative in human cancer. The E2 protein regulates transcription from and replication of the viral genome; the role of E2 in regulating the host genome has been less well studied. We have expressed HPV16 E2 (E2) stably in U2OS cells; these cells tolerate E2 expression well and gene expression analysis identified 74 genes showing differential expression specific to E2. Analysis of published gene expression data sets during cervical cancer progression identified 20 of the genes as being altered in a similar direction as the E2 specific genes. In addition, E2 altered the splicing of many genes implicated in cancer and cell motility. The E2 expressing cells showed no alteration in cell growth but were altered in cell motility, consistent with the E2 induced altered splicing predicted to affect this cellular function. The results present a model system for investigating E2 regulation of the host genome.

  9. The Interaction between Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Human Papillomaviruses in Heterosexuals in Africa.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2015-04-02

    Sub-Saharan Africa has the highest incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical cancer in the world, which is further aggravated by the burden of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) disease with invasive cervical cancer being an AIDS-defining cancer. The prevalence of HPV infection and associated disease is very high in HIV-infected people and continues to be a problem even after anti-retroviral therapy. In the genital tract, the interaction between HPV and HIV is complex, with infection with multiple HPV types reported to make both women and men more susceptible to HIV infection. Besides the national programmes to vaccinate girls against HPV and screen women for cervical cancer, there should be targeted cervical cancer screening, treatment and prevention programmes introduced into HIV treatment centres. There is evidence that in high HIV prevalence areas, HIV-positive women could cause increases in the prevalence of genital HPV infection in HIV-negative men and so increase the HPV circulating in the community. Condom use and circumcision reduce the acquisition of HIV-1, and also to some extent of HPV. This review will highlight what is known about the interaction of HIV and HPV, with an emphasis on research in Africa.

  10. The Interaction between Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Human Papillomaviruses in Heterosexuals in Africa

    PubMed Central

    Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2015-01-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa has the highest incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical cancer in the world, which is further aggravated by the burden of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) disease with invasive cervical cancer being an AIDS-defining cancer. The prevalence of HPV infection and associated disease is very high in HIV-infected people and continues to be a problem even after anti-retroviral therapy. In the genital tract, the interaction between HPV and HIV is complex, with infection with multiple HPV types reported to make both women and men more susceptible to HIV infection. Besides the national programmes to vaccinate girls against HPV and screen women for cervical cancer, there should be targeted cervical cancer screening, treatment and prevention programmes introduced into HIV treatment centres. There is evidence that in high HIV prevalence areas, HIV-positive women could cause increases in the prevalence of genital HPV infection in HIV-negative men and so increase the HPV circulating in the community. Condom use and circumcision reduce the acquisition of HIV-1, and also to some extent of HPV. This review will highlight what is known about the interaction of HIV and HPV, with an emphasis on research in Africa. PMID:26239348

  11. The Interaction between Human Immunodeficiency Virus and Human Papillomaviruses in Heterosexuals in Africa.

    PubMed

    Williamson, Anna-Lise

    2015-01-01

    Sub-Saharan Africa has the highest incidence of human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical cancer in the world, which is further aggravated by the burden of human immunodeficiency virus/acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (HIV/AIDS) disease with invasive cervical cancer being an AIDS-defining cancer. The prevalence of HPV infection and associated disease is very high in HIV-infected people and continues to be a problem even after anti-retroviral therapy. In the genital tract, the interaction between HPV and HIV is complex, with infection with multiple HPV types reported to make both women and men more susceptible to HIV infection. Besides the national programmes to vaccinate girls against HPV and screen women for cervical cancer, there should be targeted cervical cancer screening, treatment and prevention programmes introduced into HIV treatment centres. There is evidence that in high HIV prevalence areas, HIV-positive women could cause increases in the prevalence of genital HPV infection in HIV-negative men and so increase the HPV circulating in the community. Condom use and circumcision reduce the acquisition of HIV-1, and also to some extent of HPV. This review will highlight what is known about the interaction of HIV and HPV, with an emphasis on research in Africa. PMID:26239348

  12. Reported changes in sexual behaviour and human papillomavirus knowledge in Peruvian female sex workers following participation in a human papillomavirus vaccine trial.

    PubMed

    Brown, B; Blas, M M; Heidari, O; Carcamo, C; Halsey, N A

    2013-07-01

    Limited data exist on the effect of clinical trial participation on sexual behavioural change. Two hundred female sex workers working in Lima, Peru received human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine in either the standard (0, 2, 6 months) or modified (0, 3, 6 months) schedule. Participants received comprehensive screening and treatment for sexually transmitted infections (STIs), counselling on safe sex practices, education about HPV and the HPV vaccine, contraceptives (oral and condoms) and family planning at each visit. We assessed vaccine completion rates, change in sexual practices, and changes in HPV knowledge before and after participation in the vaccine trial. There were high rates of vaccine completion, 91% overall. The estimated number of reported new and total clients over a 30-day period decreased significantly (P < 0.001). Knowledge about HPV and HPV-related disease increased among all participants. In addition, all participants listed at least one preventive strategy during the month 7 follow-up survey. PMID:23970767

  13. Integrative approach to diagnosis of genital human papillomaviruses (HPV) infection of female.

    PubMed

    Dunjic, Momir; Stanisic, Slavisa; Krstic, Dejan; Stanisic, Miodrag; Ignjatic, Z Jovanovic; Dunjic, Marija

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a virus from the papillomavirus family that is capable of infecting humans. Some types of HPVs cause warts, while others can lead to cancers of the cervix, vulva, vagina, penis, oropharynx and anus. High-risk human papillomavirus (hr HPV) has been detected in almost all cervical squamous cell carcinomas and adenocarcinomas. All patients examined by colposcopy. Cervical swab is routinely done and patients are screened with both HPV DNA by Real Time Polimerase Chain Reaction (RT PCR) testing and Pap testing. Pictures obtained by colposcopy were examined by indirect Bi-Digital O-Ring Test (BDORT) by using reference control substance (RCS): HPV 16, HPV 18, and Integrin α5 β1. BDORT was developed by Prof. Omura Y. of New York and received U.S. patent in 1993. For detection of HPV DNA we used RT PCR and standard Qiagen method which detect 18 types (16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, 58, 59, 68, 6, 11, 42, 43, 44) of HPV from smear. From 63 patients where is BDORT indicated presence of HPV, in 49 patients (77.8%) RT PCR confirmed presence of HPV. From 63 patients in 54 patients (85.7%), we detected, by colposcopic exam, some kind of lesions associated with HPV infection. Results obtained by RT PCR: one type (1/18) of DNA HPV in 25 patients (51.02%), 2 types (2/18) in 15 patients (30.61%) and 3 types (3/18) in 9 patients (18.37%). Although BDORT results usually have higher sensitivity and detection rate is much higher, it can be used together with RT PCR in detection of HPV and cervical lesions associated with HPV infection. PMID:25693306

  14. The impact of glucocorticoids and anti-cd20 therapy on cervical human papillomavirus infection risk in women with systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Pinto, Claudia; Garcia-Carrasco, Mario; Vallejo-Ruiz, Veronica; Taboada-Cole, Alejandro; Muñoz-Guarneros, Margarita; Solis-Poblano, Juan Carlos; Pezzat-Said, Elias; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; Jave-Suarez, Luis Felipe; de Lara, Luis Vazquez; Ramos-Alvarez, Gloria; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Lopez-Colombo, Aurelio

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify the prevalence and factors associated with cervical human papillomavirus infection in women with systemic lupus erythematosus METHODS: This cross-sectional study collected traditional and systemic lupus erythematosus-related disease risk factors, including conventional and biologic therapies. A gynecological evaluation and cervical cytology screen were performed. Human papillomavirus detection and genotyping were undertaken by PCR and linear array assay. RESULTS: A total of 148 patients were included, with a mean age and disease duration of 42.5±11.8 years and 9.7±5.3 years, respectively. The prevalence of squamous intraepithelial lesions was 6.8%. The prevalence of human papillomavirus infection was 29%, with human papillomavirus subtype 59 being the most frequent. Patients with human papillomavirus were younger than those without the infection (38.2±11.2 vs. 44.2±11.5 years, respectively; p = 0.05), and patients with the virus had higher daily prednisone doses (12.8±6.8 vs. 9.7±6.7 mg, respectively; p = 0.01) and cumulative glucocorticoid doses (14.2±9.8 vs. 9.7±7.3 g, respectively; p = 0.005) compared with patients without. Patients with human papillomavirus infection more frequently received rituximab than those without (20.9% vs. 8.5%, respectively; p = 0.03). In the multivariate analysis, only the cumulative glucocorticoid dose was associated with human papillomavirus infection. CONCLUSIONS: The cumulative glucocorticoid dose may increase the risk of human papillomavirus infection. Although rituximab administration was more frequent in patients with human papillomavirus infection, no association was found. Screening for human papillomavirus infection is recommended in women with systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:24473503

  15. Human papillomaviruses in cervical cancer I. HPV-16 and 18 predominate in the Greek population.

    PubMed

    Vassilandonopoulou, G; Panotopoulou, E; Fotiou, S; Tserkezoglou, A; Machera, E; Kottaridis, S

    1997-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) and their role in carcinogenesis have been the subject of extensive investigation Specific types of HPV have been associated with cervical carcinoma HPV 16 and 18 are mainly associated with malignant progression and considered "high risk" viruses Using Southern blot analysis and in situ hybridization we investigated the presence of papilloma viruses in cervical carcinoma patients as well as appropriate controls. The results presented here support the aetiological role of HPV 16 and 18 in cervical carcinoma and demonstrate the prevalence of these viruses in Greek women. The role of viruses in carcinogenesis in well established in almost all species from fishes, to birds, to mammals. Although not well circumstantiated, viruses probably play as-great a role in human cancer as in other species. The role of human papillomaviruses (HPV) not only in benign proliferations, but also in a number of malignancies has long been postulated (1,2). Presently over 20 HPV types have been identified and there is evidence now associating specific types with certain human anogenital cancers, notably cervical cancer (3,4). Advance neoplasias such as squamous cell carcinomas are associated with types, 16,18 and 31, with type 16 prevailing in these lesions (5,6). In this paper we shall present evidence which extends and confirms that previously reported on the prevalence of HPV 16 and 18 in Greek women. PMID:9066640

  16. Human papillomavirus causes an angiogenic switch in keratinocytes which is sufficient to alter endothelial cell behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W.; Li, F.; Mead, L.; White, H.; Walker, J.; Ingram, D.A.; Roman, A.

    2007-10-10

    One of the requirements for tumor growth is the ability to recruit a blood supply, a process known as angiogenesis. Angiogenesis begins early in the progression of cervical disease from mild to severe dysplasia and on to invasive cancer. We have previously reported that expression of human papillomavirus type 16 E6 and E7 (HPV16 E6E7) proteins in primary foreskin keratinocytes (HFKs) decreases expression of two inhibitors and increases expression of two angiogenic inducers [Toussaint-Smith, E., Donner, D.B., Roman, A., 2004. Expression of human papillomavirus type 16 E6 and E7 oncoproteins in primary foreskin keratinocytes is sufficient to alter the expression of angiogenic factors. Oncogene 23, 2988-2995]. Here we report that HPV-induced early changes in the keratinocyte phenotype are sufficient to alter endothelial cell behavior both in vitro and in vivo. Conditioned media from HPV16 E6E7 expressing HFKs as well as from human cervical keratinocytes containing the intact HPV16 were able to stimulate proliferation and migration of human microvascular endothelial cells. In addition, introduction of the conditioned media into immunocompetent mice using a Matrigel plug model resulted in a clear angiogenic response. These novel data support the hypothesis that HPV proteins contribute not only to the uncontrolled keratinocyte growth seen following HPV infection but also to the angiogenic response needed for tumor formation.

  17. Infection of human papillomaviruses in cancers of different human organ sites.

    PubMed

    Shukla, Shirish; Bharti, Alok C; Mahata, Sutapa; Hussain, Showket; Kumar, Rakesh; Hedau, Suresh; Das, Bhudev C

    2009-09-01

    Clinico-epidemiological and molecular studies have established the casual link between Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection and cervical cancer as also association of HPV infection with several other cancers. In India, cervical cancer is a leading cancer among women and almost all cases of cervical cancer show prevalence of High Risk (HR)-HPV infection. HPV has been also detected in a significant proportion of oral, esophageal, anal, vaginal, vulvar, and penile cancer and in a small percentage of lung, laryngeal, and stomach cancer in India. Due to lack of organized HPV screening program, insufficient infrastructure and trained manpower and inadequacy in cancer registries, there are not much data available on the countrywide HPV prevalence and its type distribution in different cancers in India. Forthcoming introduction of recently developed HPV vaccines in India given a new urgency to know the prevalence and distribution of various HPV types in different organ sites for the management and monitoring of vaccination program and its impact on prevalence of other cancers. This review, summarizes studies on the prevalence of HPV infection in cancers of different organ sites in India.

  18. Testing for human papillomavirus: basic pathobiology of infection, methodologies, and implications for clinical use.

    PubMed Central

    Wilbur, D. C.; Stoler, M. H.

    1991-01-01

    New molecular biological evidence has recently emerged, strongly implicating the human papillomavirus (HPV) as playing an etiologic role in the development of neoplasias of the genital tract. As technologies advance, the ability to test for the presence of HPV has become simpler, more reliable, and less expensive. A great deal of controversy has arisen regarding the effective and proper utilization of these new tests in the management of HPV infections. This review will detail the new evidence implicating the putative role of HPV in neoplasia and the current methodologies available for assessing the presence of HPV in clinical samples and will describe the current controversy surrounding their utilization. PMID:1661053

  19. Human Papillomavirus Antibody Reference Reagents for Use in Postvaccination Surveillance Serology

    PubMed Central

    Bissett, Sara L.; Wilkinson, Dianna; Tettmar, Kate I.; Jones, Nicky; Stanford, Elaine; Panicker, Gitika; Faust, Helena; Borrow, Ray; Soldan, Kate; Unger, Elizabeth R.; Dillner, Joakim; Minor, Philip

    2012-01-01

    Suitably controlled serosurveillance surveys are essential for evaluating human papillomavirus (HPV) immunization programs. A panel of plasma samples from 18-year-old females was assembled, the majority of the samples being from recipients of the bivalent HPV vaccine. Antibody specificities were evaluated by three independent laboratories, and 3 pools that displayed no antibodies to any HPV type tested or intermediate or high levels of antibody to HPV16, HPV18, HPV31, and HPV45 were created. These pools will be useful as control reagents for HPV serology. PMID:22278326

  20. Human papillomavirus infection in men who have sex with men in Lima, Peru.

    PubMed

    Quinn, Roswell; Salvatierra, Javier; Solari, Vicky; Calderon, Martha; Ton, Thanh G N; Zunt, Joseph R

    2012-12-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection among men who have sex with men (MSM) is the primary risk factor for anal cancer. Of 105 Peruvian MSM examined, 77.1% were infected with HPV; of these 79.0% were coinfected with two or more types and 47.3% were infected by a carcinogenic type. HPV types 53, 6, 16, and 58 were the most frequent HPV infections detected. High-risk HPV type infection was associated with sex work, HIV status, and having rectal chlamydial or gonorrheal infection. These findings support broadening HPV vaccine coverage and increasing surveillance for the development of cancer in MSM infected with HPV. PMID:22519744

  1. Human papillomavirus status in head and neck cancer: the ethics of disclosure.

    PubMed

    Shuman, Andrew G; Wolf, Gregory T

    2010-09-15

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is an emerging causative factor for squamous carcinoma of the oropharynx and perhaps other head and neck cancers. There is a great deal of uncertainty regarding the clinical significance and implications of HPV status in this patient population. As a result, there is no established protocol for informing patients of the potential link between viral infection and their cancer. This paper discusses some of the ethical issues involved with informing head and neck cancer patients of their HPV status, recognizing the dilemma posed by unresolved clinical questions and the need to respect the autonomy of patients by disclosing relevant information.

  2. Linking cervical cancer to the human papillomavirus: findings from a qualitative study with Mexican women.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Sandra G; Becker, Davida; Tatum, Carrie; Aldrich, Tess; Fernández-C, Araceli

    2007-02-01

    Cervical cancer is an important cause of mortality for women in developing countries. Researchers have established a link between cervical cancer and the human papillomavirus (HPV). We explored Mexican women's beliefs about cervical cancer and sexually transmitted infections (STIs), including HPV, to better understand the social implications of this linkage. We conducted eight focus groups with middle-aged and young women in Mexico City. Cervical cancer elicited different social and emotional responses than STIs; participants generally attached less culpability to it and saw it as more life threatening. Information campaigns should take into account differences in lay conceptions of these illnesses.

  3. [Human papillomavirus E7 oncoprotein and its role in the cell transformation].

    PubMed

    Vallejo-Ruiz, Verónica; Velázquez-Márquez, Noé; Sánchez-Alonso, Patricia; Santos-López, Gerardo; Reyes-Leyva, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) genome codifies proteins with oncogenic activity, such as E7. Due to its structural characteristics, the E7 protein may interact with a great variety of cellular proteins. Some of these proteins act as cell-cycle regulators and other proteins function as transcription factors. These interactions play an important role in the induction of mitogenic pathways, in G1/S progression, and the inhibition of cellular differentiation, which increases chromosomal instability. The aim of this study is to describe the interactions of HPV E7 protein with different cellular proteins, and their contribution in the development of cervical cancer.

  4. Vaccinations and secondary immune thrombocytopenia with antiphospholipid antibodies by human papillomavirus vaccine.

    PubMed

    Bizjak, Mojca; Bruck, Or; Kanduc, Darja; Praprotnik, Sonja; Shoenfeld, Yehuda

    2016-04-01

    A 13-year-old girl developed immune thrombocytopenic purpura (ITP) and concomitant positive antiphospholipid antibodies (aPL) following vaccination with a quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. During the course of a disease, she developed clinical manifestation with bleeding and she was treated with intravenous immunoglobulins. Consequently, the number of her platelets remained critically low and she was put on corticosteroids and rituximab. Since then, her platelet count remain within the normal range, but her aPL are still present. PMID:27312165

  5. When do sexual partnerships need to be accounted for in transmission models of human papillomavirus?

    PubMed

    Muller, Heidi; Bauch, Chris

    2010-02-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is often transmitted through sexual partnerships. However, many previous HPV transmission models ignore the existence of partnerships by implicitly assuming that each new sexual contact is made with a different person. Here, we develop a simplified pair model--based on the example of HPV--that explicitly includes sexual partnership formation and dissolution. We show that not including partnerships can potentially result in biased projections of HPV prevalence. However, if transmission rates are calibrated to match empirical pre-vaccine HPV prevalence, the projected prevalence under a vaccination program does not vary significantly, regardless of whether partnerships are included. PMID:20616995

  6. Human papillomavirus-associated neoplasms of the sinonasal tract and nasopharynx.

    PubMed

    Thavaraj, Selvam

    2016-03-01

    It is now well established that human papillomavirus (HPV) is an important causative factor in a subgroup of head and neck cancer. In the head and neck, while HPV is strongly associated with squamous cell carcinoma arising in the oropharynx, there is a growing interest in HPV-associated neoplasms of non-oropharyngeal origin including those which arise within sinonasal and nasopharyngeal mucosa. This article reviews current literature on the association of HPV with Scheiderian papillomas, sinonasal squamous cell carcinoma, sinonasal undifferentiated carcinoma, carcinoma with adenoid cystic-like features, and nasopharyngeal carcinoma. Several clinical implications of HPV detection in sinonasal and nasopharyngeal carcinomas are briefly discussed.

  7. Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and genotype frequency in the oral mucosa of newborns in Milan, Italy.

    PubMed

    Martinelli, M; Zappa, A; Bianchi, S; Frati, E; Colzani, D; Amendola, A; Tanzi, E

    2012-06-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) causes cutaneous and mucosal infections in both adults and children. In order to evaluate HPV prevalence and the spectrum of genotypes in the oral cavity of paediatric subjects, a retrospective study was carried out on oral-pharyngeal swabs collected from 177 newborns aged 0-6 months. HPV-DNA was detected by a nested-PCR; the viral typing was made through DNA sequencing. HPV infection was identified in 25 subjects (14.1%) and the sequence analysis showed eight distinct genotypes. These data confirm HPV detection in newborn oral mucosa. Further investigations are needed to clarify the methods of HPV acquisition.

  8. Human papillomaviruses activate and recruit SMC1 cohesin proteins for the differentiation-dependent life cycle through association with CTCF insulators.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Kavi; Gunasekharan, Vignesh; Satsuka, Ayano; Laimins, Laimonis A

    2015-04-01

    Human papillomaviruses infect stratified epithelia and link their productive life cycle to the differentiation state of the host cell. Productive viral replication or amplification is restricted to highly differentiated suprabasal cells and is dependent on the activation of the ATM DNA damage pathway. The ATM pathway has three arms that can act independently of one another. One arm is centered on p53, another on CHK2 and a third on SMC1/NBS1 proteins. A role for CHK2 in HPV genome amplification has been demonstrated but it was unclear what other factors provided important activities. The cohesin protein, SMC1, is necessary for sister chromatid association prior to mitosis. In addition the phosphorylated form of SMC1 plays a critical role together with NBS1 in the ATM DNA damage response. In normal cells, SMC1 becomes phosphorylated in response to radiation, however, in HPV positive cells our studies demonstrate that it is constitutively activated. Furthermore, pSMC1 is found localized in distinct nuclear foci in complexes with γ-H2AX, and CHK2 and bound to HPV DNA. Importantly, knockdown of SMC1 blocks differentiation-dependent genome amplification. pSMC1 forms complexes with the insulator transcription factor CTCF and our studies show that these factors bind to conserved sequence motifs in the L2 late region of HPV 31. Similar motifs are found in most HPV types. Knockdown of CTCF with shRNAs blocks genome amplification and mutation of the CTCF binding motifs in the L2 open reading frame inhibits stable maintenance of viral episomes in undifferentiated cells as well as amplification of genomes upon differentiation. These findings suggest a model in which SMC1 factors are constitutively activated in HPV positive cells and recruited to viral genomes through complex formation with CTCF to facilitate genome amplification. Our findings identify both SMC1 and CTCF as critical regulators of the differentiation-dependent life cycle of high-risk human papillomaviruses.

  9. [Pap test used for detection of cellular changes associated with human papillomavirus].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Valencia, Marcelino; Carrillo-Pacheco, Adia; Hernández-Quijano, Tomás; Zárate, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    Human papilloma virus can infect any mucous of the body and can cause cancer of the uterine cervix. This suggests recommending the Papanicolaou smear combined with a test for detection of human papillomavirus with a frequency interval of 3 years, since it grants greater information and fidelity to the result. The detection studies should begin at the age of 21 years and should stop at 65 years age. Until recently specific treatments did not exist to treat human papilloma virus, but recently some drugs that have demonstrated good effectiveness in curing the infection of human papilloma virus. One example is glycirrhicinic acid, which has demonstrated fewer adverse effects, as well as the possibility that its systemic employment allows treatment of lesions that are difficult to approach. The medical recommendations should be in constant revision, since a clinical trial can modify the interpretation of what is necessary to individualize each patient's treatment.

  10. Human papillomavirus detection from human immunodeficiency virus-infected Colombian women's paired urine and cervical samples.

    PubMed

    Munoz, Marina; Camargo, Milena; Soto-De Leon, Sara C; Sanchez, Ricardo; Parra, Diana; Pineda, Andrea C; Sussmann, Otto; Perez-Prados, Antonio; Patarroyo, Manuel E; Patarroyo, Manuel A

    2013-01-01

    Infection, coinfection and type-specific human papillomavirus (HPV) distribution was evaluated in human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive women from paired cervical and urine samples. Paired cervical and urine samples (n = 204) were taken from HIV-positive women for identifying HPV-DNA presence by using polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with three generic primer sets (GP5+/6+, MY09/11 and pU1M/2R). HPV-positive samples were typed for six high-risk HPV (HR-HPV) (HPV-16, -18, -31, -33, -45 and -58) and two low-risk (LR-HPV) (HPV-6/11) types. Agreement between paired sample results and diagnostic performance was evaluated. HPV infection prevalence was 70.6% in cervical and 63.2% in urine samples. HPV-16 was the most prevalent HPV type in both types of sample (66.7% in cervical samples and 62.0% in urine) followed by HPV-31(47.2%) in cervical samples and HPV-58 (35.7%) in urine samples. There was 55.4% coinfection (infection by more than one type of HPV) in cervical samples and 40.2% in urine samples. Abnormal Papanicolau smears were observed in 25.3% of the women, presenting significant association with HPV-DNA being identified in urine samples. There was poor agreement of cervical and urine sample results in generic and type-specific detection of HPV. Urine samples provided the best diagnosis when taking cytological findings as reference. In conclusion including urine samples could be a good strategy for ensuring adherence to screening programs aimed at reducing the impact of cervical cancer, since this sample is easy to obtain and showed good diagnostic performance.

  11. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) types 101 and 103 Isolated from Cervicovaginal Cells Lack an E6 Open Reading Frame (ORF) and are Related to Gamma-Papillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zigui; Schiffman, Mark; Herrero, Rolando; DeSalle, Rob; Burk, Robert D.

    2007-01-01

    Complete genomes of HPV101 and HPV103 were PCR amplified and cloned from cervicovaginal cells of a 34-year-old female with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 (CIN 3) and a 30-year-old female with a normal Pap test, respectively. HPV101 and HPV103 contain 4 early genes (E7, E1, E2 and E4) and 2 late genes (L2 and L1), but both lack the canonical E6 ORF. Pairwise alignment similarity of the L1 ORF nucleotide sequences of HPV101 and HPV103 indicated that they are at least 30 % dissimilar to each other and all known PVs. However, similarities of the other ORFs (E7, E1, E2, and L2) indicated that HPV101 and HPV103 are most related to each other. Phylogenetic analyses revealed that these two types form a monophyletic clade, clustering together with the gamma- and pi-PV groups. These data demonstrated that HPV genomes closely related to papillomaviruses identified from cutaneous epithelia can be isolated from the genital mucosal region. Moreover, this is the first report of HPVs lacking an E6 ORF and phylogenetic evidence suggests this occurred subsequent to their emergence from the gamma-/pi-PVs. PMID:17125811

  12. Molecular Characterization of High-Risk Human Papillomavirus in Women in Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Faso.

    PubMed

    Traore, Ina Marie Angèle; Zohoncon, Théodora Mahoukèdè; Dembele, Adama; Djigma, Florencia W; Obiri-Yeboah, Dorcas; Traore, Germain; Bambara, Moussa; Ouedraogo, Charlemagne; Traore, Yves; Simpore, Jacques

    2016-01-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is found in over 99% of cervical cancers. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of HPV in a population of women in Bobo-Dioulasso and to identify the high-risk types present in these women. From May to June, 2015, 181 women who came for consultation at the Souro Sanou University Hospital of Bobo-Dioulasso have been included in this study. Uterine endocervical swabs have been taken in these women. DNA obtained by extraction from the samples thus collected was used to determine the prevalence of high-risk human papillomavirus genotypes through real-time PCR. The age of the women ranged from 20 to 56 years with a mean of 35.3 ± 8.1 years. The prevalence of infection by high-risk HPV types was 25.4% (46/181). The most common high-risk HPV genotypes were HPV 39 (18.5%), HPV 52 (16.7%), HPV 18 (14.8%), and HPV 35 (13.0%). HPV 16 which is included in the HPV vaccines was not found in the population studied. This type of study which is the first one in Bobo-Dioulasso has showed a high prevalence of genotypes HPV 39, HPV 52, and HPV 35 which are not yet covered by a vaccine. PMID:27525275

  13. Molecular Characterization of High-Risk Human Papillomavirus in Women in Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Traore, Ina Marie Angèle; Dembele, Adama; Obiri-Yeboah, Dorcas; Traore, Germain; Bambara, Moussa; Ouedraogo, Charlemagne; Traore, Yves

    2016-01-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is found in over 99% of cervical cancers. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of HPV in a population of women in Bobo-Dioulasso and to identify the high-risk types present in these women. From May to June, 2015, 181 women who came for consultation at the Souro Sanou University Hospital of Bobo-Dioulasso have been included in this study. Uterine endocervical swabs have been taken in these women. DNA obtained by extraction from the samples thus collected was used to determine the prevalence of high-risk human papillomavirus genotypes through real-time PCR. The age of the women ranged from 20 to 56 years with a mean of 35.3 ± 8.1 years. The prevalence of infection by high-risk HPV types was 25.4% (46/181). The most common high-risk HPV genotypes were HPV 39 (18.5%), HPV 52 (16.7%), HPV 18 (14.8%), and HPV 35 (13.0%). HPV 16 which is included in the HPV vaccines was not found in the population studied. This type of study which is the first one in Bobo-Dioulasso has showed a high prevalence of genotypes HPV 39, HPV 52, and HPV 35 which are not yet covered by a vaccine. PMID:27525275

  14. A new type of human papillomavirus associated with oral focal epithelial hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Beaudenon, S; Praetorius, F; Kremsdorf, D; Lutzner, M; Worsaae, N; Pehau-Arnaudet, G; Orth, G

    1987-02-01

    Lesions from 10 patients suffering from focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH) of the oral mucosa, including those of 4 Greenlandic Eskimos, were investigated for the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA sequences by blot hybridization experiments. Two distinct HPVs were detected in the DNA extracted from these lesions, and their genomes were molecularly cloned and characterized. One of these HPVs, detected in 4 patients, was found to be identical with HPV13, whose association with FEH was already known. The other one, detected in 6 patients, was only weakly related to HPV13 and to the other HPVs associated with lesions of the mucous membranes, and constituted a new HPV type, tentatively named HPV32. Lesions from other types of oral papillomas, obtained from 14 additional patients, were also analyzed. Human papillomavirus DNA sequences were detected in the DNA preparations extracted from 5 specimens: HPV6 DNA in a condyloma and in a papilloma, 2 as yet uncharacterized HPV DNAs in 2 papillomas, and HPV32 DNA in a papilloma which showed histologic similarities to FEH. Thus, it seems likely that FEH of the oral mucosa is a disease associated with 2 specific HPVs--HPV13 and HPV32.

  15. Fish oil constituent docosahexa-enoic acid selectively inhibits growth of human papillomavirus immortalized keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Chen, D; Auborn, K

    1999-02-01

    The omega-3-fatty acids inhibit proliferation of breast cancer cells whereas omega-6-fatty acids stimulate growth. In this study, we examined effects of these fatty acids on human pre-cancerous cells. Cervical keratinocytes, immortalized with the oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16, were treated with linoleic acid, an omega-6-fatty acid, and the omega-3-fatty acids, eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids. Using both cell counts and bromodeoxyuridine incorporation, docosahexaenoic acid inhibited growth of these cells to a greater extent than eicosapenta-enoic acid. Linoleic acid had no effect. The effect of docosahexaenoic acid was dose dependent and caused growth arrest. Docosahexaenoic acid inhibited growth of HPV16 immortalized foreskin keratinocytes and laryngeal keratinocytes grown from explants of benign tumors caused by papillomavirus, but had no effect on normal foreskin and laryngeal keratinocytes. Docosahexaenoic acid inhibited growth in the presence of estradiol, a growth stimulator for these cells. Indomethacin, a cyclooxygenase inhibitor like docosahexaenoic acid, had only minimal effect on growth. Alpha-tocopherol, a peroxidation inhibitor, abrogated effects of docosahexaenoic acid implying that inhibitory effects were via lipid peroxidation. PMID:10069461

  16. Detection of High-Risk Human Papillomaviruses in the Prevention of Cervical Cancer in India.

    PubMed

    Baskaran, Krishnan; Kumar, P Kranthi; Karunanithi, Santha; Sethupathy, Subramanian; Thamaraiselvi, B; Swaruparani, S

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are small, non-enveloped, double-stranded DNA viruses that infect epithelial tissues. Specific genotypes of human papillomavirus are the single most common etiological agents of cervical intraepithelial lesions and cervical cancer. Cervical cancer usually arises at squamous metaplastic epithelium of transformation zone (TZ) of the cervix featuring infection with one or more oncogenic or high-risk HPV (HR- HPV) types. A hospital- based study in a rural set up was carried out to understand the association of HR-HPV with squamous intraepithelial lesions (SILs) and cervical cancer. In the present study, HR-HPV was detected in 65.7% of low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSILs), 84.6% of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSILs) and 94% of cervical cancer as compared to 10.7% of controls. The association of HPV infection with SIL and cervical cancer was analyzed with Chi square test (p<0.001). The significant association found confirmed that detection of HR-HPV is a suitable candidate for early identification of cervical precancerous lesions and in the prevention of cervical cancer in India.

  17. Human papillomavirus prevalence in paired urine and cervical samples in women invited for cervical cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Burroni, Elena; Bonanni, Paolo; Sani, Cristina; Lastrucci, Vieri; Carozzi, Francesca; Iossa, Anna; Andersson, Karin Louise; Brandigi, Livia; Di Pierro, Carmelina; Confortini, Massimo; Levi, Miriam; Boccalini, Sara; Indiani, Laura; Sala, Antonino; Tanini, Tommaso; Bechini, Angela; Azzari, Chiara

    2015-03-01

    With the introduction of Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination in young girls in 2007, it is important to monitor HPV infections and epidemiological changes in this target population. The present study has evaluated the detection of human papillomavirus DNA in paired cervical and urine samples to understand if HPV testing in urine could be used as non-invasive method to monitor HPV status in young women. The study enrolled 216 twenty five-year-old women, resident in Florence and invited for the first time to the cervical cancer Screening Program within a project evaluating the impact of HPV vaccination. HPV genotyping was performed on 216 paired urine and cervical samples. The overall concordance between cervix and urine samples, investigated by HPV genotyping (INNO-LiPA HPV Genotyping Extra), was: 85.6% (184/215), 84.6% (182/215), 80% (172/215) when the same HPV, at least the same HR HPV and all HR HPV, respectively, were detected. HPV type specific concordance in paired urine and cervical samples was observed in 85.8% (175/204) of women with normal cytology and in seven out of nine women with abnormal cytology. Urine seems to be a suitable and reliable biological material for HPV DNA detection as evidenced by the high concordance with HPV detected in cervical samples. These results suggest that urine could be a good noninvasive tool to monitor HPV infection in vaccinated women.

  18. Bead-based multiplex genotyping of 58 cutaneous human papillomavirus types.

    PubMed

    Michael, K M; Forslund, O; Bacevskij, O; Waterboer, T; Bravo, I G; Pawlita, M; Schmitt, M

    2011-10-01

    Cutaneous human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are a heterogeneous, nonmonophyletic assembly, comprising about 50 characterized types and at least 133 isolates putatively representing new types. Their natural history of infection and potential association with nonmelanoma skin cancer are not well understood. Several PCR systems have been developed that amplify a broad spectrum of cutaneous HPVs. However, amplicon genotyping by sequencing or reverse line blot assays are complex and not well suited for high-throughput analyses. We developed a novel multiplex cutaneous papillomavirus genotyping (McPG) assay for 38 defined and 20 putative cutaneous HPVs of the beta, gamma, mu, and nu genera. Viral DNA was amplified by the use of a modified single-tube nested "hanging-droplet" FAP PCR. The amplifiable papillomavirus (PV) spectrum was enlarged by the use of 9 outer and 13 inner primers. Biotinylated PCR products were hybridized to type-specific oligonucleotide probes coupled to fluorescence-labeled polystyrene beads and analyzed using Luminex technology. Analytical sensitivity was analyzed for 38 defined HPVs and was ≤100 genome copies for all types. Integrated β-globin primers allow for simultaneous DNA quality control. McPG is characterized by high reproducibility (κ= 0.84, 95% confidence interval = 0.79 to 0.88), good concordance with the original nested FAP PCR, followed by sequencing (70.2% complete or partial agreement) when 322 skin biopsy DNA samples were analyzed, and improved ability to detect multiple infections (on average 2.5 HPV types per HPV-positive sample compared to 1.7 HPV types with nested FAP-PCR). In conclusion, McPG is a powerful tool for genotyping multiple cutaneous HPVs in a high-throughput format and is thus suitable for large-scale epidemiological studies.

  19. Differential effects of human papillomavirus type 6, 16, and 18 DNAs on immortalization and transformation of human cervical epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pecoraro, G.; Morgan, D.; Defendi, V. )

    1989-01-01

    The human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are associated with specific benign and malignant lesions of the skin and mucosal epithelia. Cloned viral DNAs from HPV types 6b, 16, and 18 associated with different pathological manifestations of genital neoplasia in vivo were introduced into primary human cervical epithelial cells by electroporation. Cells transfected with HPV16 or HPV18 DNA acquired indefinite lifespans, distinct morphological alterations, and anchorage-independent growth (HPV18), and contain integrated transcriptionally active viral genomes. HPV6b or plasmid electroporated cells senesced at low passage. The alterations in growth and differentiation of the cells appear to reflect the progressive oncogenic processes that result in cervical carcinoma in vivo.

  20. Phylogenetic analysis of beta-papillomaviruses as inferred from nucleotide and amino acid sequence data.

    PubMed

    Gottschling, Marc; Köhler, Anja; Stockfleth, Eggert; Nindl, Ingo

    2007-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) of the beta-group seem to be involved in the pathogenesis of non-melanoma skin cancer. Papillomaviruses are host specific and are considered closely co-evolving with their hosts. Evolutionary incongruence between early genes and late genes has been reported among oncogenic genital alpha-papillomaviruses and considerably challenge phylogenetic reconstructions. We investigated the relationships of 29 beta-HPV (25 types plus four putative new types, subtypes, or variants) as inferred from codon aligned and amino acid sequence data of the genes E1, E2, E6, E7, L1, and L2 using likelihood, distance, and parsimony approaches. An analysis of a L1 fragment included additional nucleotide and amino acid sequences from seven non-human beta-papillomaviruses. Early genes and late genes evolution did not conflict significantly in beta-papillomaviruses based on partition homogeneity tests (p > or = 0.001). As inferred from the complete genome analyses, beta-papillomaviruses were monophyletic and segregated into four highly supported monophyletic assemblages corresponding to the species 1, 2, 3, and fused 4/5. They basically split into the species 1 and the remainder of beta-papillomaviruses, whose species 3, 4, and 5 constituted the sistergroup of species 2. beta-Papillomaviruses have been isolated from humans, apes, and monkeys, and phylogenetic analyses of the L1 fragment showed non-human papillomaviruses highly polyphyletic nesting within the HPV species. Thus, host and virus phylogenies were not congruent in beta-papillomaviruses, and multiple invasions across species borders may contribute (additionally to host-linked evolution) to their diversification.

  1. Human papillomavirus knowledge, vaccine acceptance, and vaccine series completion among female entertainment and sex workers in Phnom Penh, Cambodia: the Young Women's Health Study.

    PubMed

    Wadhera, Priya; Evans, Jennifer L; Stein, Ellen; Gandhi, Monica; Couture, Marie-Claude; Sansothy, Neth; Sichan, Keo; Maher, Lisa; Kaldor, John; Page, Kimberly; Kien

    2015-10-01

    Human papillomavirus is a common sexually transmitted infection and the causative agent for cervical cancer, a frequently occurring malignant disease among women in developing countries. We assessed human papillomavirus awareness prior to the delivery of a brief information and education intervention, and human papillomavirus vaccine provision to female entertainment and sex workers (N = 220). At baseline, only 23.6% of women had heard of human papillomavirus. Following the educational intervention, 90% answered all the human papillomavirus knowledge questions correctly. Of 192 participants attending the first quarterly cohort visit where vaccine was offered, 149 (78%) were eligible for vaccination; HIV-positive (n = 32) and pregnant (n = 11) women were excluded. Acceptance of vaccine among eligible women was universal, and 79.2% completed the three-dose vaccination series. Women who reported use of amphetamine-type stimulants had significantly and independently lower odds of vaccine completion (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.24; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.08, 0.69). New pregnancies also had an impact on vaccine completion: 5.4% (8/149 5.4%) who started the series had to stop due to new pregnancy. Results demonstrate the effectiveness of a simple education intervention designed to increase human papillomavirus knowledge and the feasibility of successful human papillomavirus vaccine in a population that is often difficult to engage in preventive health care.

  2. High-risk human papillomavirus infection involving multiple anatomic sites of the female lower genital tract: a multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction-based study.

    PubMed

    Hui, Yiang; Manna, Pradip; Ou, Joyce J; Kerley, Spencer; Zhang, Cunxian; Sung, C James; Lawrence, W Dwayne; Quddus, M Ruhul

    2015-09-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus infection usually is seen at one anatomic site in an individual. Rarely, infection at multiple anatomic sites of the female lower genital tract in the same individual is encountered either simultaneously and/or at a later date. The current study identifies the various subtypes of high-risk human papillomavirus infection in these scenarios and analyzes the potential significance of these findings. High-risk human papillomavirus infection involving 22 anatomic sites from 7 individuals was identified after institutional review board approval. Residual paraffin-embedded tissue samples were retrieved, and all 15 high-risk human papillomavirus were identified and viral load quantified using multiplex real-time polymerase chain reaction-based method. Multiple high-risk human papillomavirus subtypes were identified in 32% of the samples and as many as 5 different subtypes of high-risk human papillomavirus infection in a single anatomic site. In general, each anatomic site has unique combination of viral subtypes, although one individual showed overlapping subtypes in the vagina, cervix, and vulvar samples. Higher viral load and rare subtypes are more frequent in younger patients and in dysplasia compared with carcinoma. Follow-up ranging from 3 to 84 months revealed persistent high-risk human papillomavirus infection in 60% of cases.

  3. Treatment of human papillomavirus infection with interferon alpha and ribavirin in a patient with acquired aplastic anemia.

    PubMed

    Mosa, Clara; Trizzino, Antonino; Trizzino, Angela; Di Marco, Floriana; D'Angelo, Paolo; Farruggia, Piero

    2014-06-01

    Genital warts caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) are the most frequent sexually transmitted infection. We describe a case of severe perianal and genital HPV infection in a patient with acquired aplastic anemia, unresponsive to traditional therapies and treated effectively with a combination of interferon and ribavirin. PMID:24661930

  4. Deconstructing Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Knowledge: Objective and Perceived Knowledge in Males' Intentions to Receive the HPV Vaccine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krawczyk, Andrea; Stephenson, Ellen; Perez, Samara; Lau, Elsa; Rosberger, Zeev

    2013-01-01

    Background: The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine was recently approved for men. To effectively tailor HPV education efforts toward men, it is important to understand what men know about HPV and how this knowledge relates to their decision to receive the vaccine. This study examines how objective HPV knowledge, objective HPV vaccine knowledge,…

  5. Does Mother Know Best? An Actor-Partner Model of College-Age Women's Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krieger, Janice L.; Kam, Jennifer A.; Katz, Mira L.; Roberto, Anthony J.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the associations of perceived threat, perceived efficacy, and parent-child communication with the extent to which college-age women received the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. Daughters and their mothers completed a survey about the HPV vaccine (N = 182 dyads). The results showed that mothers' perceived self-efficacy to…

  6. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Risk Factors, Vaccination Patterns, and Vaccine Perceptions among a Sample of Male College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fontenot, Holly B.; Collins Fantasia, Heidi; Charyk, Anna; Sutherland, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination rates, including initiation and completion of the vaccine series, and barriers to vaccination in a sample of male college students. Participants: Male students between the ages of 18 and 25 who reported being currently or previously sexually active (N = 735). Methods: A cross-sectional…

  7. Disparities in Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Literacy and Vaccine Completion among Asian American Pacific Islander Undergraduates: Implications for Cancer Health Equity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Hee Yun; Kwon, Melissa; Vang, Suzanne; DeWolfe, Jessica; Kim, Nam Keol; Lee, Do Kyung; Yeung, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Low rates of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination among young Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) women need to be addressed, particularly given the high incidence of cervical cancer in this population. The current study aims to investigate predictors of HPV vaccination in young AAPI and non-Latina white (NLW) women. Methods: A…

  8. How to Inform: Comparing Written and Video Education Interventions to Increase Human Papillomavirus Knowledge and Vaccination Intentions in Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krawczyk, Andrea; Lau, Elsa; Perez, Samara; Delisle, Vanessa; Amsel, Rhonda; Rosberger, Zeev

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy of 2 human papillomavirus (HPV) educational interventions on increasing HPV knowledge and vaccination intentions in college students. Participants: Male (n = 60) and female (n = 140) undergraduates (M[subscript age] = 20.4, SD = 2.3) recruited from a university in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, from October 2009 to…

  9. The Role of Human Papillomavirus (HPV)-Related Stigma on HPV Vaccine Decision-Making among College Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Georden; Perez, Samara; Huta, Veronika; Rosberger, Zeev; Lebel, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The goals of the present study are (1) to identify sociodemographic and psychosocial predictors of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related stigma and (2) to examine the relationship between HPV-related stigma in predicting HPV vaccine decision-making among college males. Participants: Six hundred and eighty college males aged 18--26 from 3…

  10. Correlates to Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Status and Willingness to Vaccinate in Low-Income Philadelphia High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bass, Sarah B.; Leader, Amy; Shwarz, Michelle; Greener, Judith; Patterson, Freda

    2015-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the correlates of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination or willingness to be vaccinated in urban, minority adolescents. Methods: Using responses to the 2013 Youth Risk Behavior Survey in Philadelphia, a random sample of high schools provided weighted data representing 20,941 9th to 12th graders. Stratified by…

  11. Relative Persuasiveness of Gain- versus Loss-Framed Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Messages for the Present- and Future-Minded

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nan, Xiaoli

    2012-01-01

    This research examines how young adults' attitudes toward human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination and their intentions to get the vaccine are influenced by the framing of health messages (gain vs. loss) and time orientation (i.e., the extent to which people value immediate vs. distant consequences of their decisions). Results of an experiment…

  12. A prospective study of the relationship between prediagnostic human papillomavirus seropositivity and HPV DNA in subsequent cervical carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Sigstad, E; Lie, A K; Luostarinen, T; Dillner, J; Jellum, E; Lehtinen, M; Thoresen, S; Abeler, V

    2002-07-15

    Several prospective studies with invasive carcinoma as endpoint have supported Human Papillomavirus as a cause of cervical carcinoma. However, the largest study used seroepidemiology and did not analyse presence of Human Papillomavirus DNA in the subsequent tumour. Linkage of serum bank registries and cancer registries had identified 196 women with a registered cervical carcinoma after donation of a serum sample. For the present study, biopsies for 127 cases could be located, verified to contain invasive carcinoma and be amplified by PCR. Three control women who had remained alive and without cervical carcinoma during an equal length of follow-up had been matched to each of the case women and tested for HPV antibodies. Presence of Human Papillomavirus DNA in the tumours was analysed by general primer and type specific PCR. HPV16-seropositive women had a relative risk of 4.4 (95% CI: 2.2-8.8) to develop cervical carcinoma carrying HPV16 DNA. By contrast, there was no excess risk for Human Papillomavirus 16-seropositive women to develop cervical carcinoma devoid of HPV16 DNA. Prediagnostic HPV16 seropositivity was strongly correlated with later HPV16 DNA positivity of the tumour (P<0.001) and prediagnostic HPV18 seropositivity correlated with HPV18 DNA in the tumour (P<0.03). The link between prediagnostic seropositivity and type of viral DNA in the cancer implies that the carcinogenic effect of infection with these viruses is dependent on persistent presence of type-specific viral DNA.

  13. A Randomized Intervention Study to Evaluate Whether Electronic Messaging Can Increase Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Completion and Knowledge among College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richman, Alice R.; Maddy, LaDonna; Torres, Essie; Goldberg, Ellen J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate an intervention aimed at increasing human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine completion of the 3-dose series and knowledge. Participants: Two hundred sixty-four male and female US college students 18-26 years old who were receiving HPV vaccine dose 1. Methods: Students were randomly assigned to the intervention or control group.…

  14. Predicting Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Intentions of College-Aged Males: An Examination of Parents' and Son's Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Mira L.; Kam, Jennifer A.; Krieger, Janice L.; Roberto, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine male students' and their parents' human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine communication in relation to males' willingness to discuss the vaccine with their health care provider and the likelihood of being vaccinated. Participants: Dyads (n = 111) of students and parents. Methods: Participants completed a HPV vaccine survey based…

  15. The Uptake of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine among Adolescent Females in the United States: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, Jacqueline A.; Peterson, Jane Anthony

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive review of literature was conducted to identify the barriers and facilitators, from the parents'/guardians' and primary care providers' (PCPs) perspective, that are associated with the uptake of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine among adolescent females. Findings from 14 peer-reviewed articles indicate that 37% of adolescent…

  16. College Students' Perceptions of and Experiences with Human Papillomavirus and Herpes: Implications for College Sexual Health Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirschler, Christopher; Hope, Andrea; Myers, Jaime L.

    2015-01-01

    Sexually transmitted infections spread through skin-to-skin contact represent unique prevention challenges. This study examines how college students perceive safer sex practices with respect to human papillomavirus (HPV) and herpes. Qualitative and quantitative data (n = 275) were collected using an online questionnaire. College students'…

  17. Knowledge of Human Papillomavirus and Perceived Barriers to Vaccination in a Sample of US Female College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillard, James Price; Spear, Margaret E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess knowledge of human papillomavirus (HPV) and perceived barriers to being vaccinated against the virus. Participants: Three hundred ninety-six undergraduate women enrolled at Penn State University in Fall 2008. Methods: A random sample of students were invited to participate in a Web-based survey. Results: Awareness of HPV and…

  18. Understanding Human Papillomavirus: An Internet Survey of Knowledge, Risk, and Experience among Female and Male College Students in Hawaii

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertram, Cathy C.; Niederhauser, Victoria P.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Persistent Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is an etiologic agent in the development of cervical cancer. Despite the increasingly high prevalence of HPV, people at risk of exposure lack knowledge about the virus, its relationship to cervical cancer, and a realistic perspective regarding HPV consequences. Purpose: To describe knowledge about…

  19. Immunogenicity of Bivalent Human Papillomavirus DNA Vaccine Using Human Endogenous Retrovirus Envelope-Coated Baculoviral Vectors in Mice and Pigs

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Hee-Jung; Hur, Yoon-Ki; Cho, Youn-Dong; Kim, Mi-Gyeong; Lee, Hoon-Taek; Oh, Yu-Kyoung; Kim, Young Bong

    2012-01-01

    Human papillomavirus is known to be the major pathogen of cervical cancer. Here, we report the efficacy of a bivalent human papillomavirus type 16 and 18 DNA vaccine system following repeated dosing in mice and pigs using a recombinant baculovirus bearing human endogenous retrovirus envelope protein (AcHERV) as a vector. The intramuscular administration of AcHERV-based HPV16L1 and HPV18L1 DNA vaccines induced antigen-specific serum IgG, vaginal IgA, and neutralizing antibodies to levels comparable to those achieved using the commercially marketed vaccine Cervarix. Similar to Cervarix, AcHERV-based bivalent vaccinations completely blocked subsequent vaginal challenge with HPV type-specific pseudovirions. However, AcHERV-based bivalent vaccinations induced significantly higher cell-mediated immune responses than Cervarix, promoting 4.5- (HPV16L1) and 3.9-(HPV18L1) fold higher interferon-γ production in splenocytes upon stimulation with antigen type-specific pseudovirions. Repeated dosing did not affect the immunogenicity of AcHERV DNA vaccines. Three sequential immunizations with AcHERV-HP18L1 DNA vaccine followed by three repeated dosing with AcHERV-HP16L1 over 11 weeks induced an initial production of anti-HPV18L1 antibody followed by subsequent induction of anti-HPV16L1 antibody. Finally, AcHERV-based bivalent DNA vaccination induced antigen-specific serum IgG immune responses in pigs. These results support the further development of AcHERV as a bivalent human papillomavirus DNA vaccine system for use in preventing the viral infection as well as treating the infected women by inducing both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. Moreover, the possibility of repeated dosing indicates the utility of AcHERV system for reusable vectors of other viral pathogen vaccines. PMID:23209698

  20. Mechanisms of carcinogenesis in human skin against the background of papillomavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Reva, I V; Reva, G V; Yamamoto, T; Tolmachyov, V E

    2014-09-01

    The cells in the skin tumor developing under conditions of persisting papillomavirus infection are morphologically identical to blast cells in a blood smear from a leukemia patient. The cells filling the lesion focus are morphologically and immunohistochemically related to blood stem cells. A mechanism of epithelial layer modification under conditions of papillomavirus infection leading to carcinogenesis is proposed. The dynamics of structural changes in the skin is characterized by disturbed interactions between the epithelium and adjacent connective tissue, destruction of the basal membrane, disorders in the cambial keratinocyte differentiation, and absence of the spinous and granular layers. We conclude that detection of blast leukocytes in the human skin lesion can be explained by disorders in the cell-cell interactions in the epithelium-mesenchymal tissue system. High proliferative activity followed by death of cambial keratinocytes, migration of effector antigen-presenting CD68 cells to the adjacent connective tissue are the factors inducing migration of blast leukocytic forms to the focus. Not only keratinocyte restitution capacity, but also epithelium-dependent differentiation of young leukocytes disappeared. Undifferentiated cells are migrated from the blood to the epithelium alteration zone, but not in the reverse direction. The insufficiency or the absence of blood blast cell differentiation of the in the focus of epidermal injury and adjacent tissue triggers carcinogenesis. The authors suggest their model of carcinogenesis. The conclusions offer a new concept of cancer pathogenesis and suggest a new strategy in the search for methods for early diagnosis of carcinogenesis.

  1. Using Organotypic Epithelial Tissue Culture to Study the Human Papillomavirus Life Cycle.

    PubMed

    Lee, Denis; Norby, Kathryn; Hayes, Mitchell; Chiu, Ya-Fang; Sugden, Bill; Lambert, Paul F

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are small double-stranded DNA viruses that are associated with greater than 95% of cervical cancers and 20% of head and neck cancers. These cancers arise from persistent infections in which there is continued expression of the HPV E6 and E7 oncogenes, often as a consequence of integration of HPV DNA into the host genome. Such cancers represent "dead ends" for the virus as integration disrupts the viral genome and because the cancers are defective in normal epithelial differentiation, which is required for production of progeny papillomavirus. In order to study the full viral life cycle, from the establishment to maintenance to productive stages, our lab makes use of the organotypic epithelial tissue culture system. This system allows us to mimic the three-dimensional structure of epithelia whose differentiation is tightly linked to the completion of the HPV viral life cycle. In this chapter we describe how various aspects of the HPV life cycle are monitored in raft cultures making use of an immortalized keratinocyte cell line. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. PMID:27153383

  2. The Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus in Cervical Cancer in Iran.

    PubMed

    Mortazavi, SH; Zali, MR; Raoufi, M; Nadji, M; Kowsarian, P; Nowroozi, A

    2002-01-01

    Background: The human papiloma virus (HPV), which is sexually transmitted, and most commonly causes genital warts, has been linked to cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and invasive carcinoma. Of ninety plus types of HPV, HPV-16 is the most prevalent in cervical cancer, followed by HPV-18, and HPV-33. As HPV's implication has not been assessed in the Middle East the main focus of this retrospective study was to determine the prevalence of HPV -16,18, and 33 in cases of cervical cancer from Iran. Material and Methods: This retrospective study covered 100 patients with uterine cervical carcinomas who were referred to two referral centers for cancer in Tehran-Iran. Pathological blocks were collected for these cases and initial review of the blocks showed poor specimens in 18 cases, which left 82 cases for the study. These samples were histologically examined to verify the presence and the type of carcinoma. The next step was in situ hybridzation for the detection of HPV common DNA. In Situ hybridization was preformed on all samples. Finally, Polymerase Chain Reaction (PCR) was preformed for the HPV types 16, 18, and 33. PCR amplification of exon 5 of the p53 gene was used as an internal control for the integrity of DNA. Takara PCR Human papilloma Detection method was used which includes primer for HPV 16, 18, and 33. Three primers were used alone, or in combination, in order to increase the sensitivity of the detection. Results: The majority of tumors were squamous cell carcinomas (87%). The rest were adenosquamous carcinoma and adenocarcinomas. None of the 82 different cervical carcinoma tissue samples were found to be positive by in situ hybridization. In the PCR samples, amplification of DNA was observed for 69 tumor specimens. In the remainning13 cases, the DNA in fixed tissue was degraded, as verified by the absence of an internal control band (p53). Out of the total 69 tumors (85.5%) with adequate DNA contained HPV band on PCR. The majority (73.9%) of HPV

  3. Is routine human papillomavirus vaccination an option for ghana?

    PubMed

    Edwin, A K

    2010-06-01

    Cervical cancer remains an important public health problem in developing countries where over 80% of the global burden occurs annually but screening has been ineffective. In a polygamous country like Ghana with a high incidence of cervical cancer but no national screening program, the Human Papilloma Virus (HPV) vaccine presents a unique opportunity to reduce the burden of HPV infection and cervical cancer in Ghanaian women. The evidence so far indicates that the vaccines are safe and efficacious. Although routine HPV vaccination of girls raises several religious, political, socioeconomic and ethical challenges, the emphasis of this paper will be on addressing the ethical challenges using the principles of autonomy, beneficence, non-maleficence and justice as a framework. Parental autonomy can be preserved with judicious exemptions for those who decline the vaccine on religious and philosophical grounds. This promotes public health without trampling parental authority. Routine HPV vaccination confers several benefits to individuals and society by preventing HPV infection. Instead of causing harm; it reduces harm by preventing the development of about 70% of cervical cancers and removing the negative physical and psychological impact of a cervical cancer diagnosis. It also has the potential to reduce the disparities in cervical cancer rates and its cost effectiveness will ensure considerable cost savings in terms of the money spent on diagnosis and treatment. Consequently, the HPV vaccine is an important public health landmark and achievement in women's health that must be heralded, especially in developing countries where the bulk of the disease and death occur.

  4. Oncogenic potential diverge among human papillomavirus type 16 natural variants

    SciTech Connect

    Sichero, Laura; Simao Sobrinho, Joao; Lina Villa, Luisa

    2012-10-10

    We compared E6/E7 protein properties of three different HPV-16 variants: AA, E-P and E-350G. Primary human foreskin keratinocytes (PHFK) were transduced with HPV-16 E6 and E7 and evaluated for proliferation and ability to grow in soft agar. E-P infected keratinocytes presented the lowest efficiency in colony formation. AA and E-350G keratinocytes attained higher capacity for in vitro transformation. We observed similar degradation of TP53 among HPV-16 variants. Furthermore, we accessed the expression profile in early (p5) and late passage (p30) transduced cells of 84 genes commonly involved in carcinogenesis. Most differences could be attributed to HPV-16 E6/E7 expression. In particular, we detected different expression of ITGA2 and CHEK2 in keratinocytes infected with AA and AA/E-350G late passage cells, respectively, and higher expression of MAP2K1 in E-350G transduced keratinocytes. Our results indicate differences among HPV-16 variants that could explain, at least in part, differences in oncogenic potential attributed to these variants.

  5. Genomic diversity of human papillomaviruses (HPV) and clinical implications: an overview in adulthood and childhood.

    PubMed

    Mammas, Ioannis N; Spandidos, Demetrios A; Sourvinos, George

    2014-01-01

    During the last years, several researchers have highlighted the importance of characterizing more than one genomic region in order to detect recombination and classify variants of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) properly. HPVs variants differ in their biological, molecular and chemical properties. Therefore, this genomic diversity can present differences in the natural history and pathogenicity of HPVs. Different 'high-risk' HPVs variants of the genotypes HPV 16 and 18 can confer varied risks of viral persistence in the human cervix and influence HPVs progression to cervical cancer. Moreover, different 'low-risk' HPVs variants of the genotypes HPV 6 and 11 can play a unique role in the development of anogenital and cutaneous warts, recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) and ophthalmic pterygium. In future, the precise impact of genomic HPVs diversity to the clinical course of HPVs-associated diseases as well as to the efficacy of the current HPVs vaccines remains to be elucidated.

  6. Human papillomavirus in the HIV-infected host: epidemiology and pathogenesis in the antiretroviral era.

    PubMed

    Brickman, Cristina; Palefsky, Joel M

    2015-03-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is associated with essentially all cervical cancers, 80-90 % of anal cancers, and a high proportion of oropharyngeal, vaginal, penile, and vulvar cancers. Malignancy is preceded by the development of precancerous lesions termed high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL). Men and women with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection are at high risk of HPV-related malignancies. The incidence of anal cancer in particular has markedly risen during the antiretroviral era due to the increased longevity of patients with HIV and the absence of anal malignancy screening programs. HIV infection may facilitate initial HPV infection by disrupting epithelial cell tight junctions. Once infection is established, HIV may promote HSIL development via the up-regulation of HPV oncogene expression and impairment of the immune response needed to clear the lesion. HIV-infected women should be screened for cervical HSIL and cancer, and HIV-infected men and women should be considered for anal screening programs.

  7. Comparative transforming potential of different human papillomaviruses associated with non-melanoma skin cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Massimi, Paola; Thomas, Miranda; Bouvard, Veronique; Ruberto, Irene; Campo, M. Saveria; Tommasino, Massimo; Banks, Lawrence

    2008-02-20

    It is well established that high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) that infect mucosal epithelia are the causative agents of cervical cancer. In contrast, the association of cutaneo-tropic HPV types with the development of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is less well defined. In this study, we have analysed the in vitro transforming potential of various cutaneous HPV types. Using oncogene cooperation assays with activated ras, we have shown that diverse cutaneous types, including 12, 14, 15, 24, 36 and 49, have significant transforming potential. Interestingly, most of this activity appears to be encoded by the E6 gene product. In contrast, the common HPV-10 exhibits no significant transforming potential in these assays. This difference may be a reflection of different patterns of cellular localization, with transforming E6s being nuclear and non-transforming being cytoplasmic. These results provide molecular support for a role of these viruses in the development of certain human malignancies.

  8. Human papillomavirus promotes Epstein-Barr virus maintenance and lytic reactivation in immortalized oral keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Makielski, Kathleen R; Lee, Denis; Lorenz, Laurel D; Nawandar, Dhananjay M; Chiu, Ya-Fang; Kenney, Shannon C; Lambert, Paul F

    2016-08-01

    Epstein-Barr virus and human papillomaviruses are human tumor viruses that infect and replicate in upper aerodigestive tract epithelia and cause head and neck cancers. The productive phases of both viruses are tied to stratified epithelia highlighting the possibility that these viruses may affect each other's life cycles. Our lab has established an in vitro model system to test the effects of EBV and HPV co-infection in stratified squamous oral epithelial cells. Our results indicate that HPV increases maintenance of the EBV genome in the co-infected cells and promotes lytic reactivation of EBV in upper layers of stratified epithelium. Expression of the HPV oncogenes E6 and E7 were found to be necessary and sufficient to account for HPV-mediated lytic reactivation of EBV. Our findings indicate that HPV increases the capacity of epithelial cells to support the EBV life cycle, which could in turn increase EBV-mediated pathogenesis in the oral cavity. PMID:27179345

  9. Human papillomavirus promotes Epstein-Barr virus maintenance and lytic reactivation in immortalized oral keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Makielski, Kathleen R; Lee, Denis; Lorenz, Laurel D; Nawandar, Dhananjay M; Chiu, Ya-Fang; Kenney, Shannon C; Lambert, Paul F

    2016-08-01

    Epstein-Barr virus and human papillomaviruses are human tumor viruses that infect and replicate in upper aerodigestive tract epithelia and cause head and neck cancers. The productive phases of both viruses are tied to stratified epithelia highlighting the possibility that these viruses may affect each other's life cycles. Our lab has established an in vitro model system to test the effects of EBV and HPV co-infection in stratified squamous oral epithelial cells. Our results indicate that HPV increases maintenance of the EBV genome in the co-infected cells and promotes lytic reactivation of EBV in upper layers of stratified epithelium. Expression of the HPV oncogenes E6 and E7 were found to be necessary and sufficient to account for HPV-mediated lytic reactivation of EBV. Our findings indicate that HPV increases the capacity of epithelial cells to support the EBV life cycle, which could in turn increase EBV-mediated pathogenesis in the oral cavity.

  10. Molecular analysis of human papillomavirus virus-like particle activated Langerhans cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Woodham, Andrew W; Raff, Adam B; Da Silva, Diane M; Kast, W Martin

    2015-01-01

    Langerhans cells (LC) are the resident antigen-presenting cells in human epithelium, and are therefore responsible for initiating immune responses against human papillomaviruses (HPV) entering the epithelial and mucosal layers in vivo. Upon proper pathogenic stimulation, LC become activated causing an internal signaling cascade that results in the up-regulation of co-stimulatory molecules and the release of inflammatory cytokines. Activated LC then migrate to lymph nodes where they interact with antigen-specific T cells and initiate an adaptive T-cell response. However, HPV manipulates LC in a suppressive manner that alters these normal maturation responses. Here, in vitro LC activation assays for the detection of phosphorylated signaling intermediates, the up-regulation of activation-associated surface markers, and the release of inflammatory cytokines in response to HPV particles are described.

  11. Economic Burden of Human Papillomavirus-Related Diseases in Italy

    PubMed Central

    Baio, Gianluca; Capone, Alessandro; Marcellusi, Andrea; Mennini, Francesco Saverio; Favato, Giampiero

    2012-01-01

    Introduction Human papilloma virus (HPV) genotypes 6, 11, 16, and 18 impose a substantial burden of direct costs on the Italian National Health Service that has never been quantified fully. The main objective of the present study was to address this gap: (1) by estimating the total direct medical costs associated with nine major HPV-related diseases, namely invasive cervical cancer, cervical dysplasia, cancer of the vulva, vagina, anus, penis, and head and neck, anogenital warts, and recurrent respiratory papillomatosis, and (2) by providing an aggregate measure of the total economic burden attributable to HPV 6, 11, 16, and 18 infection. Methods For each of the nine conditions, we used available Italian secondary data to estimate the lifetime cost per case, the number of incident cases of each disease, the total economic burden, and the relative prevalence of HPV types 6, 11, 16, and 18, in order to estimate the aggregate fraction of the total economic burden attributable to HPV infection. Results The total direct costs (expressed in 2011 Euro) associated with the annual incident cases of the nine HPV-related conditions included in the analysis were estimated to be €528.6 million, with a plausible range of €480.1–686.2 million. The fraction attributable to HPV 6, 11, 16, and 18 was €291.0 (range €274.5–315.7 million), accounting for approximately 55% of the total annual burden of HPV-related disease in Italy. Conclusions The results provided a plausible estimate of the significant economic burden imposed by the most prevalent HPV-related diseases on the Italian welfare system. The fraction of the total direct lifetime costs attributable to HPV 6, 11, 16, and 18 infections, and the economic burden of noncervical HPV-related diseases carried by men, were found to be cost drivers relevant to the making of informed decisions about future investments in programmes of HPV prevention. PMID:23185412

  12. DNA Copy Number Aberrations, and Human Papillomavirus Status in Penile Carcinoma. Clinico-Pathological Correlations and Potential Driver Genes

    PubMed Central

    Lambros, Maryou; Stankiewicz, Elzbieta; Ng, Charlotte K. Y.; Weigelt, Britta; Rajab, Ramzi; Tinwell, Brendan; Corbishley, Cathy; Watkin, Nick; Berney, Dan; Reis-Filho, Jorge S.

    2016-01-01

    Penile squamous cell carcinoma is a rare disease, in which somatic genetic aberrations have yet to be characterized. We hypothesized that gene copy aberrations might correlate with human papillomavirus status and clinico-pathological features. We sought to determine the spectrum of gene copy number aberrations in a large series of PSCCs and to define their correlations with human papillomavirus, histopathological subtype, and tumor grade, stage and lymph node status. Seventy formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded penile squamous cell carcinomas were centrally reviewed by expert uropathologists. DNA was extracted from micro-dissected samples, subjected to PCR-based human papillomavirus assessment and genotyping (INNO-LiPA human papillomavirus Genotyping Extra Assay) and microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization using a 32K Bacterial Artificial Chromosome array platform. Sixty-four samples yielded interpretable results. Recurrent gains were observed in chromosomes 1p13.3-q44 (88%), 3p12.3-q29 (86%), 5p15.33-p11 (67%) and 8p12-q24.3 (84%). Amplifications of 5p15.33-p11 and 11p14.1-p12 were found in seven (11%) and four (6%) cases, respectively. Losses were observed in chromosomes 2q33-q37.3 (86%), 3p26.3-q11.1 (83%) and 11q12.2-q25 (81%). Although many losses and gains were similar throughout the cohort, there were small significant differences observed at specific loci, between human papillomavirus positive and negative tumors, between tumor types, and tumor grade and nodal status. These results demonstrate that despite the diversity of genetic aberrations in penile squamous cell carcinomas, there are significant correlations between the clinico-pathological data and the genetic changes that may play a role in disease natural history and progression and highlight potential driver genes, which may feature in molecular pathways for existing therapeutic agents. PMID:26901676

  13. Progressive squamous epithelial neoplasia in K14-human papillomavirus type 16 transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Arbeit, J M; Münger, K; Howley, P M; Hanahan, D

    1994-01-01

    To model human papillomavirus-induced neoplastic progression, expression of the early region of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) was targeted to the basal cells of the squamous epithelium in transgenic mice, using a human keratin 14 (K14) enhancer/promoter. Twenty-one transgenic founder mice were produced, and eight lines carrying either wild-type or mutant HPV16 early regions that did not express the E1 or E2 genes were established. As is characteristic of human cancers, the E6 and E7 genes remained intact in these mutants. The absence of E1 or E2 function did not influence the severity of the phenotype that eventually developed in the transgenic mice. Hyperplasia, papillomatosis, and dysplasia appeared at multiple epidermal and squamous mucosal sites, including ear and truncal skin, face, snout and eyelids, and anus. The ears were the most consistently affected site, with pathology being present in all lines with 100% penetrance. This phenotype also progressed through discernible stages. An initial mild hyperplasia was followed by hyperplasia, which further progressed to dysplasia and papillomatosis. During histopathological progression, there was an incremental increase in cellular DNA synthesis, determined by 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation, and a profound perturbation in keratinocyte terminal differentiation, as revealed by immunohistochemistry to K5, K14, and K10 and filaggrin. These K14-HPV16 transgenic mice present an opportunity to study the role of the HPV16 oncogenes in the neoplastic progression of squamous epithelium and provide a model with which to identify genetic and epigenetic factors necessary for carcinogenesis. Images PMID:7515971

  14. Are 20 human papillomavirus types causing cervical cancer?

    PubMed

    Arbyn, Marc; Tommasino, Massimo; Depuydt, Christophe; Dillner, Joakim

    2014-12-01

    In 2012, the International Agency for Research on Cancer concluded that there was consistent and sufficient epidemiological, experimental and mechanistic evidence of carcinogenicity to humans for 12 HPV types (HPV16, HPV18, HPV31, HPV33, HPV35, HPV39, HPV45, HPV51, HPV52, HPV56, HPV58 and HPV59) for cervical cancer. Therefore, these types were considered as 1A carcinogens. They all belong to the family of the α-Papillomaviridae, in particular to the species α5 (HPV51), α6 (HPV56), α7 (HPV18, HPV39, HPV45, HPV59) and α9 (HPV16, HPV31, HPV33, HPV35, HPV52, HPV58). Less evidence is available for a thirteenth type (HPV68, α7), which is classified as a 2A carcinogen (probably carcinogenic). Moreover, seven other phylogenetically related types (HPV26, HPV53, HPV66, HPV67, HPV68, HPV70 and HPV73) were identified as single HPV infections in certain rare cases of cervical cancer and were considered possibly carcinogenic (2B carcinogens). Recently, Halec et al [7] demonstrated that the molecular signature of HPV-induced carcinogenesis (presence of type-specific spliced E6*| mRNA; increased expression of p16; and decreased expression of cyclin D1, p53 and Rb) was similar in cervical cancers containing single infections with one of the eight afore-mentioned 2A or 2B carcinogens to those in cancers with single infections with group 1 carcinogens. Ninety six percent of cervical cancers are attributable to one of the 13 most common HPV types (groups 1 and 2A). Including the additional seven HPV types (group 2B) added 2.6%, to reach a total of 98.7% of all HPV-positive cervical cancers. From recently updated meta-analyses, it was shown that HPV68, HPV26, HPV66, HPV67, HPV73 and HPV82 were significantly more common in cancer cases than in women with normal cervical cytology, suggesting that for these HPV types, an upgrading of the carcinogen classification could be considered. However, there is no need to include them in HPV screening tests or vaccines, given their rarity in

  15. Oral sex practices, oral human papillomavirus and correlations between oral and cervical human papillomavirus prevalence among female sex workers in Lima, Peru.

    PubMed

    Brown, B; Blas, M M; Cabral, A; Carcamo, C; Gravitt, P E; Halsey, N

    2011-11-01

    Few data exist on oral human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence in female sex workers (FSWs). Information regarding oral sex practices of 185 Peruvian FSWs, 18-26 years of age, was obtained via survey and compared with HPV testing results of oral rinse samples. Oral HPV prevalence was 14/185 (7.6%); four (28.9%) HPV genotypes were carcinogenic. One hundred and eighty-two participants reported having had oral sex; 95% reported condom use during oral sex with clients and 9.5% with partners. Women who had oral sex more than three times with their partners in the past month were more likely to have oral HPV than women who had oral sex three times or less (P = 0.06). Ten (71.4%) women with oral HPV were HPV-positive at the cervix; conversely 8.3% of women with cervical HPV were HPV-positive in the oral cavity. The prevalence of oral HPV was relatively low, considering the high rates of oral sex practiced by these women. PMID:22096051

  16. Detection of human papillomavirus DNA by in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction in human papillomavirus equivocal and dysplastic cervical biopsies.

    PubMed

    Shroyer, K R; Lovelace, G S; Abarca, M L; Fennell, R H; Corkill, M E; Woodard, W D; Davilla, G H

    1993-09-01

    One hundred twenty-one paraffin-embedded cervical biopsy specimens were tested for the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA by in situ hybridization and polymerase chain reaction. By in situ hybridization using probes for HPV types 6/11, 16/18, 31/33/35, 42/43/44, 51/52, and 45/56, HPV DNA was found in none of 20 normal/squamous metaplasia biopsy specimens, in one of 76 HPV equivocal biopsy specimens, in seven of 12 condyloma/mild dysplasia biopsy specimens, and in 12 of 13 moderate/severe dysplasia biopsy specimens. Polymerase chain reaction using HPV L1 consensus sequence primers followed by filter hybridization of the amplification products was positive for HPV DNA in two of 20 normal/squamous metaplasia biopsy specimens, in 23 of 76 HPV equivocal biopsy specimens, in eight of 12 condyloma/mild dysplasia biopsy specimens, and in 12 of 13 moderate/severe dysplasia biopsy specimens. Among biopsies that tested positive by polymerase chain reaction but that were negative by in situ hybridization, the most commonly identified HPV was type 16. We conclude that although HPV equivocal biopsy specimens contain HPV DNA more frequently than histologically normal tissue, the majority of biopsy specimens in this category test negative for HPV DNA. The clinical significance of a positive test for HPV, in the absence of unequivocal histologic changes, remains to be determined.

  17. Human papillomavirus genotypes in human immunodeficiency virus-positive patients with anal pathology in Madrid, Spain

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background We studied anal specimens to determine the distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes and co-infection occurrence. This information will contribute to the knowledge of HPV genotype distributions and provide an estimate of the prevalence of different oncogenic HPV genotypes found in patients in Madrid (Spain). Methods We studied a total of 82 anal biopsies from the Hospital General Universitario Gregorio Marañón of Madrid. These included 4 specimens with benign lesions, 52 specimens with low-grade anal squamous intraepithelial lesion, 24 specimens with high-grade anal squamous intraepithelial lesions and 2 specimens with invasive anal carcinoma. HPV genotyping was performed with PCR amplification and reverse dot blot hybridization. Results We detected 33 different HPV genotypes, including 16 HPVs associated with a high risk of carcinogenesis, 3 HPVs associated with a highly likely risk of carcinogenesis and 14 HPVs associated with a low-risk of carcinogenesis. In two specimens, an uncharacterized HPV genotype was detected. The most frequent HPV genotypes found were HPV-16 (10.3%; 95% CI: 6.6%-15.1%), HPV-52 (8.5%; 95% CI: 5.2%-13%) and HPV-43/44 (7.6%; 95% CI: 4.5%-11.9%). HPV-18 was only detected in 0.9% (95% CI: 0.1%-3.2%) of the total viruses detected in all lesions. HPV co-infections were found in 83.9% of all types of lesions. The majority of cases (90.2%) were concomitantly infected with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV). Conclusion The prevalence of high-risk carcinogenic genotypes in anal pathological samples was remarkable. Therefore, further studies that include a greater number of samples, particularly invasive carcinoma cases are needed to evaluate the potential influence of these HPV genotypes in the appearance of anal carcinomas. Also, the influence of other accompanying infections should be evaluated clarify the appearance of this type of carcinoma. Virtual slides The virtual slide(s) for this article can be found here

  18. The U4 Antibody Epitope on Human Papillomavirus 16 Identified by Cryo-electron Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Guan, Jian; Bywaters, Stephanie M.; Brendle, Sarah A.; Lee, Hyunwook; Ashley, Robert E.; Christensen, Neil D.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human papillomavirus (HPV) major structural protein L1 composes capsomers that are linked together through interactions mediated by the L1 C terminus to constitute a T=7 icosahedral capsid. H16.U4 is a type-specific monoclonal antibody recognizing a conformation-dependent neutralizing epitope of HPV thought to include the L1 protein C terminus. The structure of human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) complexed with H16.U4 fragments of antibody (Fab) was solved by cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) image reconstruction. Atomic structures of virus and Fab were fitted into the corresponding cryo-EM densities to identify the antigenic epitope. The antibody footprint mapped predominately to the L1 C-terminal arm with an additional contact point on the side of the capsomer. This footprint describes an epitope that is presented capsid-wide. However, although the H16.U4 epitope suggests the presence of 360 potential binding sites exposed in the capsid valley between each capsomer, H16.U4 Fab bound only to epitopes located around the icosahedral five-fold vertex of the capsid. Thus, the binding characteristics of H16.U4 defined in this study showed a distinctive selectivity for local conformation-dependent interactions with specific L1 invading arms between five-fold related capsomers. IMPORTANCE Human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) is the most prevalent oncogenic genotype in HPV-associated anogenital and oral cancers. Here we use cryo-EM reconstruction techniques to solve the structures of the HPV16 capsid complexes using H16.U4 fragment of antibody (Fab). Different from most other antibodies directed against surface loops, H16.U4 monoclonal antibody is unique in targeting the C-terminal arm of the L1 protein. This monoclonal antibody (MAb) is used throughout the HPV research community in HPV serological and vaccine development and to define mechanisms of HPV uptake. The unique binding mode of H16.U4 defined here shows important conformation-dependent interactions within

  19. Sequence duplication and internal deletion in the integrated human papillomavirus type 16 genome cloned from a cervical carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Choo, Kongbung; Lee, Hsienhsiung; Pan, Chaochih; Wu, Sheuemei; Liew, Lipnyin; Cheung, Wingfai; Han, Shouhwa )

    1988-05-01

    Integrated human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) sequences were cloned from a cervical carcinoma and analyzed by restriction mapping and nucleotide sequencing. The viral integration sites were mapped within the E1 and E2 open reading frames (ORFs). The E4 and E5 ORFs were entirely deleted. An internal deletion of 376 base pairs (bp) was found disrupting the L1 and L2 ORFs. Sequencing analysis showed that an AGATGT/ACATCT inverted repeat marked the deletion junction with two flanking direct repeats 14 and 8 bp in length. A 1,330-bp sequence duplication containing the long control region (LCR) and the E6 and E7 ORFs was also found. The duplication junction was formed by two 24-bp direct repeats with 79% (19 of 24) homology located within the LCR and the E2 ORF of the prototype viral genome, respectively. This observation leads us to propose that the initial viral integration involved an HPV16 dimer in which the direct repeats in tandem units recombined, resulting in reiteration of only a portion of the original duplication. A guanosine insertion between nucleotides 1,137 and 1,138 created a continuous E1 ORF which was previously shown to be disrupted. Results from this study indicate that sequence reiteration and internal deletion in the integrated, and possibly in the episomal, HPV16 genome are influenced by specific nucleotide sequences in the viral genome. Moreover, reiteration of the LCR/E6/E7 sequences further supports the hypothesis that the E6/E7 ORFs may code for oncogenic proteins and that regulatory signals in the LCR may play a role in cellular transformation.

  20. Human neuronal encoding of English syntactic violations as revealed by both L1 and L2 speakers.

    PubMed

    Kubota, Mikio; Ferrari, Paul; Roberts, Timothy P L

    2004-09-23

    Our previous study [M. Kubota, P. Ferrari, T.P.L. Roberts, Magnetoencephalography detection of early syntactic processes in humans: comparison between L1 speakers and L2 learners, Neurosci. Lett. 353 (2003) 107-110] showed that an early syntactic response was elicited in first language (L1) speakers for within-phrase, but not across-phrase violations, implying that there may exist a continuum of neuronal error gravity. Such an early component was not elicited by second-language (L2) learners. The current auditory study investigated whether two types of different syntactic violations regarding noun-phrase raising (NP-raising) and case-filter constructions would elicit a prominent early syntactic component in each hemisphere for both L1 and advanced L2 speakers of English. Neuromagnetic fields were recorded, using a dual 37-channel gradiometer system. A prominent component, peaking at approximately 150 ms post-onset, was observed in both hemispheres of two groups in response to NP-raising induced violations, but not case-filter violations. The findings imply that L1 and L2 speakers have similar neuronal mechanisms subserving syntactic processing of such violations.

  1. p53 codon 72 polymorphism and human papillomavirus associated skin cancer

    PubMed Central

    O'Connor, D; Kay, E; Leader, M; Atkins, G; Murphy, G; Mabruk, M

    2001-01-01

    Background/Aims—Non-melanoma skin cancers frequently harbour multiple human papillomavirus (HPV) types. A recent report suggests that a polymorphism of the p53 tumour suppressor gene that results in the substitution of a proline residue with an arginine residue at position 72 of the p53 protein might act as a risk factor in HPV associated malignancies. This study aimed to determine the following: (1) the relation between HPV infection and the development of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), and (2) whether there is a correlation between p53 codon 72 polymorphism and the development of SCC. Methods—Blood samples were taken from 55 patients with skin cancer (both renal transplant recipients and immunocompetent patients with skin cancer) and 115 ethnically matched volunteers. A polymerase chain reaction based assay was used to determine p53 codon 72 genotypes. In addition, 49 benign and malignant lesions from 34 of the patients with skin cancer and 20 normal human skin samples from 20 of the control volunteers were examined for HPV. Results—The proportions of p53 codon 72 genotypes found were 78% arginine homozygous, 2% proline homozygous, and 20% heterozygous among patients with skin cancer and 79% arginine homozygous, 3.5% proline homozygous, and 17.5% heterozygous among the control population. Statistical analysis showed no significant differences in the distribution of the two p53 isoforms between the patients with skin cancer and the control population. The predominant viral types detected in both the patients and the control group were EV associated HPVs, although the incidence was lower in normal skin samples than in malignant lesions or viral warts. Conclusions—These results suggest that in a Celtic population there is no correlation between the presence of HPV, the p53 codon 72 arginine polymorphism, and the development of skin cancer. Key Words: p53 codon 72 polymorphism • human papillomavirus • skin cancer PMID:11429426

  2. Suppression of Langerhans cell activation is conserved amongst human papillomavirus α and β genotypes, but not a µ genotype.

    PubMed

    Da Silva, Diane M; Movius, Carly A; Raff, Adam B; Brand, Heike E; Skeate, Joseph G; Wong, Michael K; Kast, W Martin

    2014-03-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has evolved mechanisms that allow it to evade the human immune system. Studies have shown HPV-mediated suppression of activation of Langerhans cells (LC) is a key mechanism through which HPV16 evades initial immune surveillance. However, it has not been established whether high- and low-risk mucosal and cutaneous HPV genotypes share a common mechanism of immune suppression. Here, we demonstrate that LC exposed to capsids of HPV types 18, 31, 45, 11, (alpha-papillomaviruses) and HPV5 (beta-papillomavirus) similarly suppress LC activation, including lack of costimulatory molecule expression, lack of cytokine and chemokine secretion, lack of migration, and deregulated cellular signaling. In contrast, HPV1 (mu-papillomavirus) induced costimulatory molecule and cytokine upregulation, but LC migration and cellular signaling was suppressed. These results suggest that alpha and beta HPV genotypes, and partially a mu genotype, share a conserved mechanism of immune escape that enables these viruses to remain undetected in the absence of other inflammatory events.

  3. Primary human cervical carcinoma cells require human papillomavirus E6 and E7 expression for ongoing proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Magaldi, Thomas G.; Almstead, Laura L.; Bellone, Stefania; Prevatt, Edward G.; Santin, Alessandro D.; DiMaio, Daniel

    2012-01-05

    Repression of human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 and E7 oncogenes in established cervical carcinoma cell lines causes senescence due to reactivation of cellular tumor suppressor pathways. Here, we determined whether ongoing expression of HPV16 or HPV18 oncogenes is required for the proliferation of primary human cervical carcinoma cells in serum-free conditions at low passage number after isolation from patients. We used an SV40 viral vector expressing the bovine papillomavirus E2 protein to repress E6 and E7 in these cells. To enable efficient SV40 infection and E2 gene delivery, we first incubated the primary cervical cancer cells with the ganglioside GM1, a cell-surface receptor for SV40 that is limiting in these cells. Repression of HPV in primary cervical carcinoma cells caused them to undergo senescence, but the E2 protein had little effect on HPV-negative primary cells. These data suggest that E6 and E7 dependence is an inherent property of human cervical cancer cells.

  4. Human papillomavirus detection in women with and without human immunodeficiency virus infection in Colombia

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background HIV infection leads to a decreasing immune response, thereby facilitating the appearance of other infections, one of the most important ones being HPV. However, studies are needed for determining associations between immunodeficiency caused by HIV and/or the presence of HPV during the course of cervical lesions and their degree of malignancy. This study describes the cytological findings revealed by the Papanicolaou test, laboratory characteristics and HPV molecular profile in women with and without HIV infection. Methods A total of 216 HIV-positive and 1,159 HIV-negative women were invited to participate in the study; PCR was used for the molecular detection of HPV in cervical samples. Statistical analysis (such as percentages, Chi-square test and Fisher’s exact test when applicable) determined human papillomavirus (HPV) infection frequency (single and multiple) and the distribution of six types of high-risk-HPV in women with and without HIV infection. Likewise, a logistic regression model was run to evaluate the relationship between HIV-HPV infection and different risk factors. Results An association was found between the frequency of HPV infection and infection involving 2 or more HPV types (also known as multiple HPV infection) in HIV-positive women (69.0% and 54.2%, respectively); such frequency was greater than that found in HIV-negative women (44.3% and 22.7%, respectively). Statistically significant differences were observed between both groups (p = 0.001) regarding HPV presence (both in infection and multiple HPV infection). HPV-16 was the most prevalent type in the population being studied (p = 0.001); other viral types had variable distribution in both groups (HIV-positive and HIV-negative). HPV detection was associated with <500 cell/mm3 CD4-count (p = 0.004) and higher HIV-viral-load (p = 0.001). HPV-DNA detection, <200 cell/mm3 CD4-count (p = 0.001), and higher HIV-viral-load (p = 0.001) were associated with

  5. Human papillomavirus and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma: what the clinician should know.

    PubMed

    Genden, Eric M; Sambur, Ian M; de Almeida, John R; Posner, Marshall; Rinaldo, Alessandra; Rodrigo, Juan P; Strojan, Primož; Takes, Robert P; Ferlito, Alfio

    2013-02-01

    The incidence of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) is rising in contrast to the decreasing incidence of carcinomas arising in other subsites of the head and neck. The human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has played an increasing role in these epidemiological changes and as the etiology for a significant fraction of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas, OPSCC in particular. Most importantly, many retrospective studies have shown that the prognosis differs significantly between patients with HPV-associated tumors and non-HPV associated tumors. Thus, questions arise on the choices of treatment for patients based on HPV status and the consequences of therapy. Given the recognized relevance of HPV status in OPSCC, many new questions concerning the biology, treatment, and prevention of HPV infection arise. This review is intended to highlight some of the major issues and frequently asked questions relevant for the clinician dealing with patients with OPSCC. PMID:22752642

  6. Association of Genital Infections Other Than Human Papillomavirus with Pre-Invasive and Invasive Cervical Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Ishita; Mandal, Ranajit; Kundu, Pratip; Biswas, Jaydip

    2016-02-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a well-established causative agent of malignancy of the female genital tract and a common Sexually Transmitted Infection. The probable co-factors that prevent spontaneous clearance of HPV and progression to neoplasia are genital tract infections from organisms like Chlamydia, Trichomonas vaginalis etc, smoking, nutritional deficiencies and multiparity. Inflammatory conditions can lead to pre-neoplastic manifestations in the cervical epithelium; however their specific role in cervical carcinogenesis is not yet established. Therefore it is imperative to study the likely association between HPV and co-infection with various common pathogens in the genital tract of women having cervical precancer or cancer. A "Pubmed" search was made for articles in Literature on this topic using the words: Cervical neoplasia, HPV, co-infections, Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN), Trichomonas vaginalis, Candida, Chlamydia and the relevant information obtained was used to draft the review. PMID:27042571

  7. Environmental Scanning as a Public Health Tool: Kentucky’s Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Project

    PubMed Central

    Wilburn, Amanda; Knight, Jennifer R.

    2016-01-01

    Borrowing from business, quality improvement programs, and strategic planning principles, environmental scanning is gaining popularity in public health practice and research and is advocated as an assessment and data collection tool by federal funding agencies and other health-related organizations. Applicable to a range of current and emerging health topics, environmental scans — through various methods — assess multiple facets of an issue by engaging stakeholders who can ask or answer research questions, exploring related policy, critiquing published and gray literature, collecting and analyzing qualitative and quantitative data in both primary and secondary forms, disseminating findings to internal and external stakeholders, and informing subsequent planning and decision making. To illustrate the environmental scanning process in a public health setting and showcase its value to practitioners in the field, we describe a federally funded environmental scan for a human papillomavirus vaccination project in Kentucky. PMID:27536901

  8. Environmental Scanning as a Public Health Tool: Kentucky's Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Project.

    PubMed

    Wilburn, Amanda; Vanderpool, Robin C; Knight, Jennifer R

    2016-01-01

    Borrowing from business, quality improvement programs, and strategic planning principles, environmental scanning is gaining popularity in public health practice and research and is advocated as an assessment and data collection tool by federal funding agencies and other health-related organizations. Applicable to a range of current and emerging health topics, environmental scans - through various methods - assess multiple facets of an issue by engaging stakeholders who can ask or answer research questions, exploring related policy, critiquing published and gray literature, collecting and analyzing qualitative and quantitative data in both primary and secondary forms, disseminating findings to internal and external stakeholders, and informing subsequent planning and decision making. To illustrate the environmental scanning process in a public health setting and showcase its value to practitioners in the field, we describe a federally funded environmental scan for a human papillomavirus vaccination project in Kentucky. PMID:27536901

  9. Antibodies to human papillomavirus and to other genital infectious agents and invasive cervical cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Jha, P K; Beral, V; Peto, J; Hack, S; Hermon, C; Deacon, J; Mant, D; Chilvers, C; Vessey, M P; Pike, M C

    1993-05-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) play an important part in the development of cervical cancer, but the role of other infectious agents, such as herpes simplex virus (HSV), is not clear. We assayed serum samples collected from 219 women with cervical cancer and from 387 controls for antibody to infectious agents. HPV 16-E7 and/or HPV 18-E7 antibodies were significantly related to cervical cancer risk (RR 1.9, 95% CI 1.2-3.2). Antibodies to HSV types 1 and 2, Chlamydia trachomatis, and to multiple infectious agents were associated with cervical cancer when seroprevalence rates in all cases and controls were compared, but when HPV-seropositive cases and controls were compared these associations were weaker and non-significant. This finding suggests that past infections with sexually transmitted infections other than HPV may be surrogate markers of exposure to HPV, and of no separate aetiological significance.

  10. Human Papillomavirus Prevalence and Herd Immunity after Introduction of Vaccination Program, Scotland, 2009-2013.

    PubMed

    Cameron, Ross L; Kavanagh, Kimberley; Pan, Jiafeng; Love, John; Cuschieri, Kate; Robertson, Chris; Ahmed, Syed; Palmer, Timothy; Pollock, Kevin G J

    2016-01-01

    In 2008, a national human papillomavirus (HPV) immunization program using a bivalent vaccine against HPV types 16 and 18 was implemented in Scotland along with a national surveillance program designed to determine the longitudinal effects of vaccination on HPV infection at the population level. Each year during 2009-2013, the surveillance program conducted HPV testing on a proportion of liquid-based cytology samples from women undergoing their first cervical screening test for precancerous cervical disease. By linking vaccination, cervical screening, and HPV testing data, over the study period we found a decline in HPV types 16 and 18, significant decreases in HPV types 31, 33, and 45 (suggesting cross-protection), and a nonsignificant increase in HPV 51. In addition, among nonvaccinated women, HPV types 16 and 18 infections were significantly lower in 2013 than in 2009. Our results preliminarily indicate herd immunity and sustained effectiveness of the bivalent vaccine on virologic outcomes at the population level.

  11. Incremental impact of adding boys to current human papillomavirus vaccination programs: role of herd immunity.

    PubMed

    Brisson, Marc; van de Velde, Nicolas; Franco, Eduardo L; Drolet, Mélanie; Boily, Marie-Claude

    2011-08-01

    Our aim was to examine the potential incremental impact of vaccinating boys against human papillomavirus (HPV) on vaccine-type infection in females and males, using an individual-based HPV transmission-dynamic model. Under base assumptions (vaccine efficacy = 99%, duration of protection = 20 years, coverage = 70%), vaccinating 12-year-old boys, in addition to girls, resulted in an incremental reduction in HPV-16/18 (HPV-6/11) incidence over 70 years of 16% (3%) in females and 23% (4%) in males. The benefit of vaccinating boys decreased with improved vaccination coverage in girls. Given the important predicted herd immunity impact of vaccinating girls under moderate to high vaccine coverage, the potential incremental gains of vaccinating boys are limited.

  12. Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Requirements in US Schools: Recommendations for Moving Forward.

    PubMed

    North, Anna L; Niccolai, Linda M

    2016-10-01

    Safe and effective human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines have been available and recommended for adolescents for a decade in the United States, yet vaccination rates remain suboptimal. School entry requirements have increased uptake of other vaccines for adolescents and made coverage more equitable. However, only 3 jurisdictions require HPV vaccine for school. We summarize the current status of HPV vaccine requirements and discuss the rationales for and against these policies. The rationales for requirements include HPV vaccine efficacy and safety, effectiveness of requirements for increasing vaccine uptake and making it more equitable, and use of requirements as "safety nets" and to achieve herd immunity. The rationales against requirements include low parental acceptance of HPV vaccine, the financial burden on educational systems and health departments, and the possibility for alternatives to increase vaccine uptake. Many challenges to HPV vaccine requirements are addressable, and we conclude with recommendations on how to approach these challenges. PMID:27552264

  13. Immunological studies of cerebrospinal fluid from patients with CNS symptoms after human papillomavirus vaccination.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Yukitoshi; Matsudaira, Takashi; Nakano, Hitoshi; Nasu, Hirosato; Ikeda, Hitoshi; Nakaoka, Kentaro; Takayama, Rumiko; Oota, Masayasu

    2016-09-15

    In 32 patients with prolonged central nervous system symptoms after human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination, we measured conventional and immunological markers in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and compared with the levels in disease controls. Our studies revealed significantly decreased chloride and neuron-specific enolase (NSE) levels in CSF of patients with CNS symptoms after HPV vaccination compared to disease controls. IL-4, IL-13, and CD4(+) T cells increased significantly in patients, and IL-17 increased significantly from 12 to 24months after symptom onset. Chemokines (IL-8 and MCP-1) were also elevated, but CD8(+) T cells, PDGF-bb and IL-12 were reduced. Antibodies to GluN2B-NT2, GluN2B-CT and GluN1-NT increased significantly. These results suggest biological, mainly immunological, changes in the CSF of patients after HPV vaccination. PMID:27609278

  14. Human papillomavirus and anorectal carcinoma knowledge in men who have sex with men.

    PubMed

    Blackwell, Christopher W; Eden, Candace

    2011-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a precursor to the development of anorectal carcinoma. Studies have indicated that men who have sex with men (MSM) have significantly higher rates of HPV and HIV than their heterosexual counterparts and are at greater risk for anorectal carcinoma. This article presents findings from a descriptive study to assess knowledge of HPV, anorectal carcinoma, and anorectal screening in a sample of MSM in Orlando, FL. The 89 participants demonstrated knowledge deficits. The average score on knowledge items was only 38% correct. Of the 49 participants who had heard of anal Papanicolau (Pap) smears, only 5 (10.2%) discussed screening with a physician, while 8 (16.3%) had discussed it with a nurse, and 16 (32.7%) with another health care professional. Findings support the need for community outreach efforts to promote knowledge and the need for discussion with providers regarding HPV and anorectal carcinoma in this vulnerable population.

  15. Association of Genital Infections Other Than Human Papillomavirus with Pre-Invasive and Invasive Cervical Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Ranajit; Kundu, Pratip; Biswas, Jaydip

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a well-established causative agent of malignancy of the female genital tract and a common Sexually Transmitted Infection. The probable co-factors that prevent spontaneous clearance of HPV and progression to neoplasia are genital tract infections from organisms like Chlamydia, Trichomonas vaginalis etc, smoking, nutritional deficiencies and multiparity. Inflammatory conditions can lead to pre-neoplastic manifestations in the cervical epithelium; however their specific role in cervical carcinogenesis is not yet established. Therefore it is imperative to study the likely association between HPV and co-infection with various common pathogens in the genital tract of women having cervical precancer or cancer. A “Pubmed” search was made for articles in Literature on this topic using the words: Cervical neoplasia, HPV, co-infections, Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN), Trichomonas vaginalis, Candida, Chlamydia and the relevant information obtained was used to draft the review. PMID:27042571

  16. Human papillomavirus and cervical cancer: issues for biobehavioral and psychosocial research.

    PubMed

    Waller, Jo; McCaffery, Kirsten J; Forrest, Sue; Wardle, Jane

    2004-02-01

    There is now overwhelming evidence that high-risk, sexually transmitted types of human papillomavirus (HPV) are the main causal agent in cervical cancer. Biobehavioral and psychosocial research is uniquely capable of addressing many of the issues raised by HPV and its link with cervical cancer. In this article we review current findings in this area and identify issues for future research. The first of the three sections explores issues associated with the introduction of HPV testing for the detection and management of cervical abnormalities and the impact of growing public awareness of the sexually transmitted nature of cervical cancer. The implications for public understanding of cervical cancer, psychosocial issues associated with screening, and the potential impact on screening uptake are discussed. The second section addresses the role of biobehavioral factors in the persistence and progression of HPV infection as well as possible interventions to minimize the risk of persistence. Finally, primary prevention of HPV is discussed.

  17. Aluminum granuloma after administration of the quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine. Report of a case.

    PubMed

    Marsee, Derek K; Williams, John M; Velazquez, Elsa F

    2008-12-01

    We report the case of a young woman who developed a subcutaneous granulomatous response after administration of the quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine. The inciting agent was most likely an aluminum adjuvant, which previously has been reported to be associated with a granulomatous response after administration of other vaccines. Histologically, the lesion consisted of a necrotic/necrobiotic center surrounded by palisading epithelioid histiocytes closely resembling deep granuloma annulare or rheumatoid nodule. The histiocytes contained abundant intracytoplasmic violaceous/gray granular material. An ammonium aurintricarboxylate (Aluminon) stain demonstrated the presence of aluminum in the granular material. Aluminum granulomas should be included in the differential diagnosis of deep granulomatous reaction in young women, due to the high frequency of vaccination in this population.

  18. Telogen effluvium following bivalent human papillomavirus vaccine administration: a report of two cases.

    PubMed

    Tuccori, Marco; Pisani, Chiara; Bachini, Laura; Pardini, Milena; Mantarro, Stefania; Antonioli, Luca; Fornai, Matteo; Rubinelli, Marinella; Cirinei, Carlo; Blandizzi, Corrado

    2012-01-01

    We describe two cases of telogen effluvium occurring in two 11-year-old children following bivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine administration. The two children began to lose their hair following the second HPV vaccine dose. Alopecia worsened following the third vaccine dose and then resolved spontaneously within a few months. In both cases, laboratory analysis and psychiatric evaluation excluded causes other than anti-HPV vaccine. Social discomfort and isolation were associated with alopecia in the two children. The clinical presentation was consistent with a pattern of telogen effluvium. The identification of specific vaccine components responsible for triggering the adverse event remains difficult. In similar cases, suspension of immunization is not recommended, as it provides health benefits that overcome the possible adverse effect of transient telogen effluvium. Caregivers should ensure psychiatric support to their patients to manage the social and emotional distress that might be associated with hair loss.

  19. Acceptability of the human papillomavirus vaccine among diverse Hispanic mothers and grandmothers.

    PubMed

    Ramírez, Michelle; Jessop, Amy B; Leader, Amy; Crespo, Carlos Juan

    2014-01-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine has the potential to reduce rates of cervical cancer and other HPV-related morbidity among Hispanic women who are disproportionately affected by this disease. Understanding the barriers faced by this population is an important public health goal. In this qualitative pilot study, 17 mothers and grandmothers of adolescent girls from diverse Hispanic backgrounds in a large northeastern city in the United States were interviewed to examine attitudes regarding vaccine acceptability. The findings reveal that negative media, concerns about sexuality, side effects, and efficacy may impact vaccine uptake and completion. Of the 4 participants whose daughters had received the vaccine, only 1 had completed the full series, which may speak to the trend of lower series completion among Hispanics. This pilot data could inform important considerations when designing longitudinal research that may provide some necessary insights into the factors that facilitate or impede HPV vaccine completion among U.S. Hispanics. PMID:24865437

  20. Synthesis of infectious human papillomavirus type 18 in differentiating epithelium transfected with viral DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Meyers, C; Mayer, T J; Ozbun, M A

    1997-01-01

    The lack of a permissive system for the propagation of viral stocks containing abundant human papillomavirus (HPV) particles has hindered the study of infectivity and the early stages of HPV replication. The organotypic (raft) culture system has permitted the study of a number of the differentiation-specific aspects of HPV, including amplification of viral DNA, expression of late genes, and viral morphogenesis. However, these investigations have been limited to a single virus type, namely, HPV type 31 (HPV31). We have artificially introduced linearized HPV18 genomic DNA into primary keratinocytes by electroporation, followed by clonal expansion and induction of epithelial stratification and differentiation in organotypic culture. We report the synthesis of infectious HPV18 virions. Virus particles approximately 50 nm in diameter were observed by electron microscopy. HPV18 virions purified by isopycnic gradient were capable of infecting keratinocytes in vitro, as shown by the expression of multiple HPV18-specific, spliced transcripts. PMID:9311816

  1. Oncogenic potential of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) and its relation with cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common cause of cervical cancer. Cervical cancer being the second most common cancer after lung cancer, affecting women of different age groups; has a prevalence of about 20% in young sexually active women. Among different types of HPV, HPV16 the major strain causing this cancer and is sexually transmitted had been unnoticed for decades. Keeping in mind the multiple risk factors related with cervical cancer such as early age sexual activities, teenage pregnancies, smoking, use of oral contraceptives, having multiple sex partners, hormone replacement therapies and various other unknown factors lead to the onset of the disease. Awareness for various diagnostic procedures such as Pap smears screening prove to be an effective way in eradicating the oncogenic potential of HPV. PMID:21635792

  2. American Society of Clinical Oncology Statement: Human Papillomavirus Vaccination for Cancer Prevention.

    PubMed

    Bailey, Howard H; Chuang, Linus T; duPont, Nefertiti C; Eng, Cathy; Foxhall, Lewis E; Merrill, Janette K; Wollins, Dana S; Blanke, Charles D

    2016-05-20

    American Society of Clinical Oncology (ASCO), the leading medical professional oncology society, is committed to lessening the burden of cancer and as such will promote underused interventions that have the potential to save millions of lives through cancer prevention. As the main providers of cancer care worldwide, our patients, their families, and our communities look to us for guidance regarding all things cancer related, including cancer prevention. Through this statement and accompanying recommendations, ASCO hopes to increase awareness of the tremendous global impact of human papillomavirus (HPV) -caused cancers, refocus the discussion of HPV vaccination on its likely ability to prevent millions of cancer deaths, and increase HPV vaccination uptake via greater involvement of oncology professionals in ensuring accurate public discourse about HPV vaccination and calling for the implementation of concrete strategies to address barriers to vaccine access and acceptance.

  3. Cost-effectiveness of Human Papillomavirus Vaccination in the United States

    PubMed Central

    Ekwueme, Donatus U.; Saraiya, Mona; Markowitz, Lauri E.

    2008-01-01

    We describe a simplified model, based on the current economic and health effects of human papillomavirus (HPV), to estimate the cost-effectiveness of HPV vaccination of 12-year-old girls in the United States. Under base-case parameter values, the estimated cost per quality-adjusted life year gained by vaccination in the context of current cervical cancer screening practices in the United States ranged from $3,906 to $14,723 (2005 US dollars), depending on factors such as whether herd immunity effects were assumed; the types of HPV targeted by the vaccine; and whether the benefits of preventing anal, vaginal, vulvar, and oropharyngeal cancers were included. The results of our simplified model were consistent with published studies based on more complex models when key assumptions were similar. This consistency is reassuring because models of varying complexity will be essential tools for policy makers in the development of optimal HPV vaccination strategies. PMID:18258117

  4. Low frequency of human papillomavirus infection in conjunctival squamous cell carcinoma of Mexican patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The relationship between Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection and conjunctiva cancer is controversial. HPV detection will provide more information about the role of this infectious agent in the biology of conjunctiva cancer. In the present study, DNA extracted and purified from 36 Conjunctival Squamous Cell Carcinomas (CSCC) was evaluated by PCR for HPV DNA sequences. The results were correlated with the clinical and histopathological variables. Results The results showed that HPV DNA was present in 8 CSCC samples (22%); HPV16 was the sole type detected. Significant association was found between HPV detection and the limbus tumor subtype (p = 0.03). All the samples were non-metastatic squamous cell carcinoma. Conclusions The HPV presence in CSCC from Mexican patients is not a common event. PMID:22099431

  5. The Combined Influence of Oral Contraceptives and Human Papillomavirus Virus on Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Efird, Jimmy T.; Toland, Amanda E.; Lea, C. Suzanne; Phillips, Christopher J.

    2011-01-01

    The vast majority of cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (CSCC) will occur in those with fair complexion, tendency to burn, and high ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure. Organ transplant recipients also are an important population at great risk for CSCC. An association has been reported between oral contraceptive (OC) use, human papillomavirus virus (HPV) and cervical cancer, and there could be a similar association for CSCC. The cutaneous HPV β-E6 protein, a close cousin of the transformative E6 protein underlying anogenital cancers, has been shown to inhibit apoptosis in response to UVR damage and stimulate morphologic transformation in rodent fibroblast cell lines. Furthermore, OC use has been shown to enhance HPV transcription and may contribute to CSCC risk through this pathway. PMID:21499554

  6. Concurrent Human Papillomavirus-Positive Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx in a Married Couple.

    PubMed

    Brobst, Tyler D; García, Joaquín J; Price, Katharine A; Gao, Ge; Smith, David I; Price, Daniel L

    2016-01-01

    Background. Although alcohol and tobacco use are known risk factors for development of squamous cell carcinoma in the head and neck, human papillomavirus (HPV) has been increasingly associated with this group of cancers. We describe the case of a married couple who presented with HPV-positive oropharynx squamous cell carcinoma within two months of each other. Methods. Tumor biopsies were positive for p16 and high-risk HPV in both patients. Sanger sequencing showed a nearly identical HPV16 strain in both patients. Both patients received chemoradiation, and one patient also underwent transoral robotic tongue base resection with bilateral neck dissection. Results. Both patients showed no evidence of recurrent disease on follow-up PET imaging. Conclusions. New head and neck symptoms should be promptly evaluated in the partner of a patient with known HPV-positive oropharynx cancer. This case expands the limited current literature on concurrent presentation of HPV-positive oropharynx squamous cell carcinoma in couples. PMID:27418994

  7. Oral focal epithelial hyperplasia: report of 3 cases with human papillomavirus DNA sequencing analysis.

    PubMed

    Gültekin, S E; Tokman Yildirim, Benay; Sarisoy, S

    2011-01-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH), or Heck's disease, is a benign proliferative viral infection of the oral mucosa that is related to Human Papil-lomavirus (HPV), mainly subtypes 13 and 32. Although this condition is known to exist in numerous populations and ethnic groups, the reported cases among Caucasians are relatively rare. It presents as asymptomatic papules or nodules on the oral mucosa, gingiva, tongue, and lips. Histopathologically, it is characterized by parakeratosis, epithelial hyperplasia, focal acanthosis, fusion, and horizontal outgrowth of epithelial ridges and the cells named mitozoids. The purpose of this case report was to present 3 cases of focal epithelial hyperplasia in a pediatric age group. Histopathological and clinical features of cases are discussed and DNA sequencing analysis is reported in which HPV 13, HPV 32, and HPV 11 genomes are detected.

  8. The use of the polymerase chain reaction for the detection of human papillomavirus type 13.

    PubMed

    Williamson, A L; Dennis, S J

    1991-01-01

    Human papillomavirus type 13 (HPV-13) is associated with oral focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH). The purpose of this study was to establish conditions for the application of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to the specific detection and amplification of HPV-13 DNA. To design primers for HPV-13 a part of the HPV-13 genome was sequenced first: the smallest BamHI fragment (597 bp) of HPV-13 was subcloned and sequenced. The sequence was found to be part of a large open reading frame and had significant homology with the L1 gene of other HPVs. HPV-13 specific primers were designed to amplify a 240 bp fragment from the L1 gene by PCR. Conditions for PCR were standardized for this set of primers.

  9. Human Papillomavirus E2 Protein: Linking Replication, Transcription, and RNA Processing.

    PubMed

    Graham, Sheila V

    2016-10-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) life cycle is tightly linked to differentiation of the infected epithelium. This means that viral proteins must exert control over epithelial gene expression in order to optimize viral production. The HPV E2 protein controls replication, transcription, and viral genome partitioning during the viral infectious life cycle. It consists of a nucleic acid-binding domain and a protein-protein interaction domain separated by a flexible serine and arginine-rich hinge region. Over the last few years, mounting evidence has uncovered an important new role for E2 in viral and cellular RNA processing. This Gem discusses the role of E2 in controlling the epithelial cellular environment and how E2 might act to coordinate late events in the viral replication cycle.

  10. The effect of human papillomavirus on DNA repair in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Low, Garren M; Thylur, David S; N Yamamoto, Vicky; Sinha, Uttam K

    2016-10-01

    Much of the current literature regarding the molecular pathophysiology of human papillomavirus (HPV) in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has focused on the virus's effect on cell cycle modulation and cell proliferation. A second mechanism of pathogenicity employed by HPV, dysregulation of cellular DNA repair processes, has been more sparsely studied. The purpose of this review is to describe current understanding about the effect of HPV on DNA repair in HNSCC, taking cues from cervical cancer literature. HPV affects DNA-damage response pathways by interacting with many proteins, including ATM, ATR, MRN, γ-H2AX, Chk1, Chk2, p53, BRCA1, BRCA2, RAD51, Rb-related proteins 107 and 130, Tip60, and p16INK4A. Further elucidation of these pathways could lead to development of targeted therapies and improvement of current treatment protocols.

  11. The effect of human papillomavirus on DNA repair in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Low, Garren M; Thylur, David S; N Yamamoto, Vicky; Sinha, Uttam K

    2016-10-01

    Much of the current literature regarding the molecular pathophysiology of human papillomavirus (HPV) in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) has focused on the virus's effect on cell cycle modulation and cell proliferation. A second mechanism of pathogenicity employed by HPV, dysregulation of cellular DNA repair processes, has been more sparsely studied. The purpose of this review is to describe current understanding about the effect of HPV on DNA repair in HNSCC, taking cues from cervical cancer literature. HPV affects DNA-damage response pathways by interacting with many proteins, including ATM, ATR, MRN, γ-H2AX, Chk1, Chk2, p53, BRCA1, BRCA2, RAD51, Rb-related proteins 107 and 130, Tip60, and p16INK4A. Further elucidation of these pathways could lead to development of targeted therapies and improvement of current treatment protocols. PMID:27688101

  12. Social Cognitive Theory Predictors of Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Intentions of College Men at a Southeastern University.

    PubMed

    Priest, Hannah M; Knowlden, Adam P; Sharma, Manoj

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use social cognitive theory to predict human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination intentions of college men attending a large, southeastern university. Data collection comprised two phases. Phase I established face and content validity of the instrument by a panel of six experts. Phase II assessed internal consistency reliability using Cronbach's alpha and predicted behavioral intentions applying multiple linear regression. HPV knowledge, expectations, self-efficacy to get HPV vaccine, situational perception, self-efficacy in overcoming barriers to get HPV vaccine, and self-control to get HPV vaccine were regressed on behavioral intentions. Situational perception and self-control to get HPV vaccine were significant predictors, accounting for 22% of variance in behavioral intentions to get vaccinated within the next 6 months. Overall, college men reported low behavioral intentions to getting vaccinated. Future interventions should target situational perception and self-control to increase HPV vaccination intentions.

  13. Current issues facing the introduction of human papillomavirus vaccine in malaysia.

    PubMed

    Wong, Lp; Sam, Ic

    2007-01-01

    Certain human papillomavirus (HPV) types are strongly associated with cervical cancer. Recently-described effective vaccines against these HPV types represent a great medical breakthrough in preventing cervical cancer. In Malaysia, the vaccine has just received regulatory approval. We are likely to face similar barriers to implementing HPV vaccination as reported by countries where vaccination has been introduced. Most women have poor understanding of HPV and its link to cervical cancer. Physicians who will be recommending HPV vaccines may not have extensive knowledge or experience with HPV-related disease. Furthermore, a vaccine against a sexually-transmitted infection may elicit negative reactions from potential recipients or their carers, particularly in a conservative society. Given the high cost of the vaccine, reaching the most vulnerable women is a concern. To foster broad acceptance of HPV vaccine, education must be provided to health care providers, parents and young women about the risks of HPV infection and the benefits of vaccination.

  14. Is human papillomavirus vaccination likely to be a useful strategy in India?

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sudeep; Kerkar, Rajendra A.; Dikshit, Rajesh; Badwe, Rajendra A.

    2013-01-01

    Two vaccines that protect against infection by some of the oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) subtypes have recently been licensed for use in population-based vaccination strategies in many countries. However, these products are being promoted as ‘cervical cancer vaccines’ based on inadequate data. Specifically, there remain several concerns about the duration of immunogenicity, length of follow-up of trial subjects, endpoints chosen in vaccine trials, applicability of trial results to real populations, the safety of these products, and their cost-effectiveness as public health interventions. Furthermore, it is unlikely that vaccination will obviate the need for setting up robust and cost-effective screening programs in countries like India. This article will discuss various aspects of HPV vaccination from a public health perspective, especially from the point of view of its relevance to India and other South Asian countries. PMID:24455622

  15. Productive Lifecycle of Human Papillomaviruses that Depends Upon Squamous Epithelial Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Kajitani, Naoko; Satsuka, Ayano; Kawate, Akifumi; Sakai, Hiroyuki

    2012-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) target the stratified epidermis, and can causes diseases ranging from benign condylomas to malignant tumors. Infections of HPVs in the genital tract are among the most common sexually transmitted diseases, and a major risk factor for cervical cancer. The virus targets epithelial cells in the basal layer of the epithelium, while progeny virions egress from terminally differentiated cells in the cornified layer, the surface layer of the epithelium. In infected basal cells, the virus maintains its genomic DNA at low-copy numbers, at which the viral productive lifecycle cannot proceed. Progression of the productive lifecycle requires differentiation of the host cell, indicating that there is tight crosstalk between viral replication and host differentiation programs. In this review, we discuss the regulation of the HPV lifecycle controlled by the differentiation program of the host cells. PMID:22536200

  16. Social Cognitive Theory Predictors of Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Intentions of College Men at a Southeastern University.

    PubMed

    Priest, Hannah M; Knowlden, Adam P; Sharma, Manoj

    2015-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to use social cognitive theory to predict human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination intentions of college men attending a large, southeastern university. Data collection comprised two phases. Phase I established face and content validity of the instrument by a panel of six experts. Phase II assessed internal consistency reliability using Cronbach's alpha and predicted behavioral intentions applying multiple linear regression. HPV knowledge, expectations, self-efficacy to get HPV vaccine, situational perception, self-efficacy in overcoming barriers to get HPV vaccine, and self-control to get HPV vaccine were regressed on behavioral intentions. Situational perception and self-control to get HPV vaccine were significant predictors, accounting for 22% of variance in behavioral intentions to get vaccinated within the next 6 months. Overall, college men reported low behavioral intentions to getting vaccinated. Future interventions should target situational perception and self-control to increase HPV vaccination intentions. PMID:26470399

  17. Human Papillomavirus and Vaccination Of Males: Knowledge and Attitudes Of Registered Nurses.

    PubMed

    White, Leah; Waldrop, Julee; Waldrop, Cabe

    2016-01-01

    The American Academy of Pediatrics recommends the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine for all 11 to 12-year olds as part of the adolescent immunization platform. However, this vaccine has not been universally accepted by health care providers, parents, or the public, and has lower vaccination coverage rates than other recommended vaccines for the same age group. The purpose of this study was to determine registered nurses' knowledge and attitudes about HPV and associated HPV vaccine for males. One hundred eleven (111) RNs participated in a descriptive exploratory study using a survey method. Nurses were knowledgeable about specific HPV information but were less knowledgeable about the extent of HPV infection seen in males or the availability or indications of HPV vaccine for males. This study demonstrates that nurses need more education about HPV and HPV vaccine. PMID:27019938

  18. Concurrent Human Papillomavirus-Positive Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Oropharynx in a Married Couple

    PubMed Central

    García, Joaquín J.; Price, Katharine A.; Gao, Ge; Smith, David I.

    2016-01-01

    Background. Although alcohol and tobacco use are known risk factors for development of squamous cell carcinoma in the head and neck, human papillomavirus (HPV) has been increasingly associated with this group of cancers. We describe the case of a married couple who presented with HPV-positive oropharynx squamous cell carcinoma within two months of each other. Methods. Tumor biopsies were positive for p16 and high-risk HPV in both patients. Sanger sequencing showed a nearly identical HPV16 strain in both patients. Both patients received chemoradiation, and one patient also underwent transoral robotic tongue base resection with bilateral neck dissection. Results. Both patients showed no evidence of recurrent disease on follow-up PET imaging. Conclusions. New head and neck symptoms should be promptly evaluated in the partner of a patient with known HPV-positive oropharynx cancer. This case expands the limited current literature on concurrent presentation of HPV-positive oropharynx squamous cell carcinoma in couples. PMID:27418994

  19. Tampons: a novel patient-administered method for the assessment of genital human papillomavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Fairley, C K; Chen, S; Tabrizi, S N; Quinn, M A; McNeil, J J; Garland, S M

    1992-06-01

    Assessment of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection usually requires a speculum examination to collect genital specimens. A technique using tampons as a patient-administered method for the collection of specimens was studied by dot blot hybridization (HPV types 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, and 33) and polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Tampons and cervical scrapes were collected from 48 consecutive women attending a dysplasia clinic. Tampons provided a significantly larger pellet volume (P less than .002) and more DNA (P less than .01) than scrapes. There was a close correlation when samples were analyzed for the presence of HPV DNA. Using dot blot hybridization, 8 cervical scrapes (17%) and 9 tampons (19%) were positive for HPV DNA (90% correlation). By PCR, 35 cervical scrapes (73%) and 33 tampons (69%) were positive for HPV DNA (88% correlation). Thus, tampon specimens are an easy method for assessment of genital HPV infection.

  20. [News items on human papillomavirus and its vaccine in the Valencian press (2006-2011)].

    PubMed

    Tuells, José; Duro Torrijos, José Luis; Chilet Rosell, Elisa; Pastor Villalba, Eliseo; Portero Alonso, Antonio; Navarro Ortiz, Carmen; Galiana de la Villa, Eva María

    2013-01-01

    The process of introducing the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine aimed at teenage girls has not been entirely without controversy in Spain. This vaccine was originally hyped as a preventive measure in the fight against cervical cancer but the resulting euphoria was tempered by a message calling for evidence. During administration of the second dose of the vaccine in February 2009, an unexpected turn of events attracted vast media coverage when two teenagers experienced adverse effects after immunization in Valencia (Spain). This study analyzes the scope and content of news items on HPV, immunization and cervical cancer published between 2006 and 2011 in two widely disseminated regional newspapers in Valencia. We also discuss the extent to which the messages transmitted may have influenced acceptability of the vaccine.

  1. Human papillomavirus infection in couples with female low-grade intraepithelial cervical lesion.

    PubMed

    Simon, Philippe; Roumeguere, Thierry; Christophe Noël, Jean

    2010-11-01

    Low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) are frequently found during cervical cancer screening. Usually they are associated with a human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Does the high-transmission rate of HPV infection to the male partner represent a clinical risk for him? Are preventive measures to be taken to prevent the occurrence of male diseases? More than 80% of all LSIL are associated with HPV infections. The prevalence of HPV infection in males can range up to 40%, with 60% of the male partners of LSIL female patients presenting with penile flat lesions. The spontaneous cure rate for male infections is very high (90% at 5 years) but negative consequences in females (cervical high-grade lesion and cervical cancer) are frequent. Their male counterparts are far rarer but in some patients can require deleterious treatment. Transmission prevention by the use of condoms and circumcision is discussed. The effectiveness of HPV vaccination in this situation has not been validated. PMID:20646823

  2. [Research progress in roles of high-risk human papillomavirus E2 protein].

    PubMed

    Wu, En-Qi; Tang, Yuan-Yu

    2014-03-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is the principal cause of various cancers including cervical cancer, anal cancer, vulvar cancer, and some head and neck cancers. In the viral life cycle, by interacting with both viral and host DNA and proteins, the HPV E2 protein plays a pivotal role in viral transcriptional regulation and DNA replication, and it is also associated with modification of various cellular processes, including host gene transcription, RNA processing, apoptosis, ubiquitination, and intracellular trafficking, to create a convenient environment for a replicative cycle of the virus and contribute to the HPV pathogenesis. Elucidating the roles of E2 protein throughout the viral life cycle will improve our understanding of the viral life cycle and pathogenesis and help us identify novel antiviral agents with therapeutic potential. This article reviews the research progress in the structure, roles, and activity of high-risk HPV E2 protein, particularly that of HPV-16.

  3. Do high-risk human papillomaviruses cause oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma?

    PubMed

    Mirghani, H; Amen, F; Moreau, F; Lacau St Guily, J

    2015-03-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPV) are an established etiologic factor for a growing number of oropharyngeal cancers. However, their potential role in other upper aerodigestive tract locations is still a matter of debate, particularly in the oral cavity. This is of paramount importance as in the future diagnosis, treatment and follow up in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma may vary according to HPV status. This article reviews the recent published data and highlights some of the pitfalls that have hampered the accurate assessment of HR-HPV oncological role outside the oropharynx. We demonstrate that, in contrast to the oropharynx, only a small fraction of cancers located in the oral cavity seem to be HPV-related even in young non-smoking non-drinking patients. We emphasize several relevant factors to consider in assumed HPV-induced oral cavity cancers and discuss the current theories that explain why HPV-induced cancers arise preferentially in the oropharynx.

  4. Prediction of high-risk types of human papillomaviruses using statistical model of protein "sequence space".

    PubMed

    Wang, Cong; Hai, Yabing; Liu, Xiaoqing; Liu, Nanfang; Yao, Yuhua; He, Pingan; Dai, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Discrimination of high-risk types of human papillomaviruses plays an important role in the diagnosis and remedy of cervical cancer. Recently, several computational methods have been proposed based on protein sequence-based and structure-based information, but the information of their related proteins has not been used until now. In this paper, we proposed using protein "sequence space" to explore this information and used it to predict high-risk types of HPVs. The proposed method was tested on 68 samples with known HPV types and 4 samples without HPV types and further compared with the available approaches. The results show that the proposed method achieved the best performance among all the evaluated methods with accuracy 95.59% and F1-score 90.91%, which indicates that protein "sequence space" could potentially be used to improve prediction of high-risk types of HPVs.

  5. Transcriptional differences of the human papillomavirus type 16 genome between precancerous lesions and invasive carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Shirasawa, Hiroshi; Tomita, Yoshimi; Kubota, Koichi; Kasai, Tokuzo; Sekiya, Souei; Takamizawa, Hiroyoshi; Simizu, Bunsiti )

    1988-03-01

    Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) genome DNA and its transcripts in biopsied cervical neoplasias were analyzed by simultaneous extraction of DNA and RNA from one biopsied sample. Southern blot analysis revealed that 5 of 20 cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CINs) contained HPV16 DNAs existing primarily as episomes and two of seven invasive carcinomas harbored HPV16 genome sequences integrated into the host DNA. Northern (RNA) blot analysis showed that the HPV16 genome sequences were transcriptionally active in the five CINs, as well as in the two invasive carcinomas. The pattern of HPV16-specific transcripts in the CINs was uniform, and the major transcripts were 4.2, 2.2, 1.6, and 1.4 kilobases in size. However, the pattern of HPV16-specific transcripts in the invasive carcinomas was variable and different from that in CINs, suggesting that the alteration of transcriptional pattern might play a key role in the development of malignancy.

  6. Recurrent optic neuritis and neuromyelitis optica-IgG following first and second human papillomavirus vaccinations.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hyeyeon; Lee, Hye Lim; Yeo, Minju; Kim, Ji Seon; Shin, Dong-Ick; Lee, Sang-Soo; Lee, Sung-Hyun

    2016-05-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is widely used to prevent cervical cancer caused by certain types of HPV in girls and young women. Demyelinating disorders within months following HPV innoculation have been reported, but the causal link between HPV vaccination and the onset of demyelinating disorders have not been certain. We report a case of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) that was noteworthy because optic neuritis (ON) occurred in a very close temporal association with both the first and second HPV vaccinations, which might suggest an association between HPV vaccination and the development of NMO-IgG and recurrent ON. This emphasizes the necessity for continuing surveillance for adverse events after HPV vaccination. PMID:27046292

  7. Cumulative Impact of HIV and Multiple Concurrent Human Papillomavirus Infections on the Risk of Cervical Dysplasia.

    PubMed

    Adler, David H; Wallace, Melissa; Bennie, Thola; Abar, Beau; Meiring, Tracy L; Williamson, Anna-Lise; Bekker, Linda-Gail

    2016-01-01

    Infection with HIV is known to increase the risk of cervical cancer. In addition, evidence suggests that concurrent infection with multiple human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes increases the risk of cervical dysplasia more than infection with a single HPV genotype. However, the impact of the combination of HIV coinfection and presence of multiple concurrent HPV infections on the risk of cervical dysplasia is uncertain. We compared the results of HPV testing and Pap smears between HIV-infected and HIV-uninfected young women to assess the cumulative impact of these two conditions. We found that both HIV and the presence of multiple concurrent HPV infections are associated with increased risk of associated Pap smear abnormality and that the impact of these two risk factors may be additive. PMID:26997954

  8. [Research progress regarding the clinical evaluation on recombinant human papillomavirus vaccines].

    PubMed

    He, W G; Zhao, J; Huang, S J; Wu, T

    2016-06-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the main cause for cervical cancer, anogenital cancers and genital warts. Three HPV vaccines have been licensed abroad. Data from clinical trials showed high efficacy of the HPV vaccines in young women with 90%-100% vaccine-related HPV diseases prevented. Though efficacy of the vaccine appears lower in older women, this population can still benefit from vaccination. Immunobriging trials show that the two-dose schedule in 9-14 years old girls elicits non-inferior immune response than the three-dose one in young adults. In addition, HPV vaccines can reduce the recurrent rates in CIN2+ patients after therapeutic surgery and the vaccines have cross-protection aganist diseases caused by non-vaccine type HPV. Safety data on HPV vaccines are assuring. Thus HPV vaccine should be widely used in adolescent girls and women of appropriate age groups. PMID:27346126

  9. A PCR-based microwell-plate hybrid capture assay for high-risk human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yumei; Liu, Yan; Ding, Yaping; Sun, Nan; Gong, Yafang; Gao, Shangxian

    2014-12-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with cervical cancer. In this study, we developed a high-throughput microwell-plate hybrid capture (MPHC) method for epidemiological studies of high-risk HPV (HRHPV). The results with 1238 cervical specimens from female outpatients showed a concordance rate of 94.3 % between the MPHC and Hybrid Capture II assay. The MPHC assay showed an average HRHPV rate of 29.3 % for high-risk populations in populous cities of China. The established MPHC assay could sensitively and specifically detect 13 types of HRHPV and is suitable for large-scale screening, especially in areas where real-time PCR or fluorescence equipment is unavailable.

  10. Geographical distribution and risk association of human papillomavirus genotype 52-variant lineages.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Chuqing; Park, Jong-Sup; Grce, Magdalena; Hibbitts, Samantha; Palefsky, Joel M; Konno, Ryo; Smith-McCune, Karen K; Giovannelli, Lucia; Chu, Tang-Yuan; Picconi, María Alejandra; Piña-Sánchez, Patricia; Settheetham-Ishida, Wannapa; Coutlée, Francois; De Marco, Federico; Woo, Yin-Ling; Ho, Wendy C S; Wong, Martin C S; Chirenje, Mike Z; Magure, Tsitsi; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Sabol, Ivan; Fiander, Alison N; Chen, Zigui; Chan, Martin C W; Cheung, Tak-Hong; Burk, Robert D; Chan, Paul K S

    2014-11-15

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) genotype 52 is commonly found in Asian cases of cervical cancer but is rare elsewhere. Analysis of 611 isolates collected worldwide revealed a remarkable geographical distribution, with lineage B predominating in Asia (89.0% vs 0%-5.5%; P(corrected) < .001), whereas lineage A predominated in Africa, the Americas, and Europe. We propose that the name "Asian lineage" be used to denote lineage B, to signify this feature. Preliminary analysis suggested a higher disease risk for lineage B, although ethnogeographical confounders could not be excluded. Further studies are warranted to verify whether the reported high attribution of disease to HPV52 in Asia is due to the high prevalence of lineage B.

  11. Epidemiology, clinical manifestations, and recent advances in vaccination against human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Broomall, Eileen M; Reynolds, Sonya M; Jacobson, Robert M

    2010-03-01

    In October 2009, the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) approved a newly licensed vaccine, Cervarix, directed against human papillomavirus (HPV) to prevent cervical cancer. The ACIP also expanded its recommendations against HPV by giving permission to physicians to vaccinate males aged 9 to 26 years with the previously licensed vaccine, Gardasil, to prevent genital warts, in addition to its previous recommendation for females aged 9 to 26 years to prevent cervical cancer and genital warts. The marketing, expense, safety, and reactivity of Gardasil continue to be the subject of controversy. Of the >100 types of HPVs, approximately 40 are sexually transmitted, and HPV is the most common sexually transmitted disease. By age 50 years, 80% of women will have contracted a sexually transmitted HPV infection. While most individuals are clear of infection by 2 years, some types of HPV carry a high risk for progressing to cancer, and HPV is identified in >99% of patients with cervical cancer. Each year in the United States approximately 12,000 women develop cervical cancer and nearly 4000 die of it. Human papillomavirus is also associated with genital warts and other anogenital cancers. The United States has now licensed 2 vaccines against HPV, Gardasil and Cervarix. Gardasil has been shown to be safe and effective in preventing HPV infections by types 6, 11, 16, and 18; types 16 and 18 are associated with 2 high-risk types of cervical cancer and are associated with 70% of all cervical cancers. Types 6 and 11 are associated with 90% of anogenital warts. Cervarix has also been shown to be safe and effective in preventing HPV infections by types 16 and 18, but offers no known protection against anogenital warts. PMID:20203463

  12. Structural optimization of a retrograde trafficking inhibitor that protects cells from infections by human polyoma- and papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Carney, Daniel W; Nelson, Christian D S; Ferris, Bennett D; Stevens, Julia P; Lipovsky, Alex; Kazakov, Teymur; DiMaio, Daniel; Atwood, Walter J; Sello, Jason K

    2014-09-01

    Human polyoma- and papillomaviruses are non-enveloped DNA viruses that cause severe pathologies and mortalities. Under circumstances of immunosuppression, JC polyomavirus causes a fatal demyelinating disease called progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML) and the BK polyomavirus is the etiological agent of polyomavirus-induced nephropathy and hemorrhagic cystitis. Human papillomavirus type 16, another non-enveloped DNA virus, is associated with the development of cancers in tissues like the uterine cervix and oropharynx. Currently, there are no approved drugs or vaccines to treat or prevent polyomavirus infections. We recently discovered that the small molecule Retro-2(cycl), an inhibitor of host retrograde trafficking, blocked infection by several human and monkey polyomaviruses. Here, we report diversity-oriented syntheses of Retro-2(cycl) and evaluation of the resulting analogs using an assay of human cell infections by JC polyomavirus. We defined structure-activity relationships and also discovered analogs with significantly improved potency as suppressors of human polyoma- and papillomavirus infection in vitro. Our findings represent an advance in the development of drug candidates that can broadly protect humans from non-enveloped DNA viruses and toxins that exploit retrograde trafficking as a means for cell entry.

  13. HMGB1 binds to the rs7903146 locus in TCF7L2 in human pancreatic islets.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Yuedan; Oskolkov, Nikolay; Shcherbina, Liliya; Ratti, Joyce; Kock, Kian-Hong; Su, Jing; Martin, Brian; Oskolkova, Malin Zackrisson; Göransson, Olga; Bacon, Julie; Li, Weimin; Bucciarelli, Saskia; Cilio, Corrado; Brazma, Alvis; Thatcher, Bradley; Rung, Johan; Wierup, Nils; Renström, Erik; Groop, Leif; Hansson, Ola

    2016-07-15

    The intronic SNP rs7903146 in the T-cell factor 7-like 2 gene (TCF7L2) is the common genetic variant most highly associated with Type 2 diabetes known to date. The risk T-allele is located in an open chromatin region specific to human pancreatic islets of Langerhans, thereby accessible for binding of regulatory proteins. The risk T-allele locus exhibits stronger enhancer activity compared to the non-risk C-allele. The aim of this study was to identify transcriptional regulators that bind the open chromatin region in the rs7903146 locus and thereby potentially regulate TCF7L2 expression and activity. Using affinity chromatography followed by Edman sequencing, we identified one candidate regulatory protein, i.e. high-mobility group protein B1 (HMGB1). The binding of HMGB1 to the rs7903146 locus was confirmed in pancreatic islets from human deceased donors, in HCT116 and in HEK293 cell lines using: (i) protein purification on affinity columns followed by Western blot, (ii) chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by qPCR and (iii) electrophoretic mobility shift assay. The results also suggested that HMGB1 might have higher binding affinity to the C-allele of rs7903146 compared to the T-allele, which was supported in vitro using Dynamic Light Scattering, possibly in a tissue-specific manner. The functional consequence of HMGB1 depletion in HCT116 and INS1 cells was reduced insulin and TCF7L2 mRNA expression, TCF7L2 transcriptional activity and glucose stimulated insulin secretion. These findings suggest that the rs7903146 locus might exert its enhancer function by interacting with HMGB1 in an allele dependent manner. PMID:26845344

  14. HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS ASSOCIATION WITH HEAD AND NECK CANCERS: UNDERSTANDING VIRUS BIOLOGY AND USING IT IN THE DEVELOPMENT OF CANCER DIAGNOSTICS.

    PubMed

    Strati, Katerina; Lambert, Paul F

    2008-01-01

    The link between human papillomaviruses and human cervical cancers has long been established. However, human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are now being detected in another type of cancer, not previously associated with this virus, head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). This review will focus on experimental data supporting the view that HPVs contribute to the etiology of a subset of HNSCC. We further put forth the argument that HPV-associated HNSCC deserves to be recognized as a distinct disease in the clinic and as such needs to be appropriately diagnosed. We offer an overview of studies that have helped dissect the role of HPVs in HNSCC and that may be helpful in the development of new diagnostic tools for discriminating this type of HNSCC.

  15. The clearance of oral high-risk human papillomavirus infection is impaired by long-term persistence of cervical human papillomavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Louvanto, K; Rautava, J; Syrjänen, K; Grénman, S; Syrjänen, S

    2014-11-01

    Persistence of high-risk (HR-) human papillomavirus (HPV) infection of the uterine cervix increases the risk of cervical cancer. Oral HPV infections are among potential covariates of long-term genotype-specific persistent cervical HR-HPV infections. It is not known whether this persistence reflects inability of the host to reject HPV infections in general. A case-control setting was designed to estimate the covariates of long-term persistent cervical HR-HPV infections using multivariate generalized estimating equation (GEE) models. HPV was detected with PCR using GP05+/GP06+-primers and genotyped for 24 HPVs with a Multimetrix-kit. The cases (n=43) included women who had genotype-specific persistent cervical HR-HPV infection for at least 24 months (24M+) and controls were women who tested repeatedly HPV-negative in their cervical samples (n=52). These women represent a sub-cohort of the Finnish Family HPV Study. The cases differed significantly from the HPV-negative controls in several aspects: they were younger, had a longer mean time to incident oral HPV infection (40.7 versus 23.6 months), longer duration of oral HPV persistence (38.4 versus 14.1 months), and longer time to clearance of their oral HPV infection (50.0 versus 28.2 months). In multivariate GEE analysis, the second pregnancy during the follow up was the only independent predictor with significant protective effect against 24M+ persistent cervical HR-HPV infections, OR of 0.15 (95% CI 0.07-0.34). To conclude, long-term persistent cervical HR-HPV infections are associated with a prolonged clearance of oral HR-HPV infections while new pregnancy protects against persistent cervical HR-HPV infections.

  16. Human papillomavirus (HPV) and Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) in non small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Joh, Joongho; Jenson, A Bennett; Moore, Grace D; Rezazedeh, Arash; Slone, Stephen P; Ghim, Shin-je; Kloecker, Goetz H

    2010-12-01

    Certain types of human papillomavirus (HPV) induce cancers, especially cervical cancers in women. A meta-analysis of the literature suggests that HPV is also associated with 20%-25% of non small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Merkel cell Polyomavirus (MCPyV) causes most Merkel cell carcinomas in immunocompromised hosts, and is associated with some squamous carcinomas of skin in immunocompetent individuals. Since both oncogenic viruses appear to involve the tonsils and, therefore, have clear access to the lungs, we examined that the possible association of HPV and MCPyV infections with lung cancers, especially, NSCLC. DNAs were extracted from 51 frozen tissues from 30 lung cancer patients, and examined for the presence of HPV and MCPyV by PCR and DNA sequencing analysis. Clinical data was correlated with the viral status. HPVs were only detected in 5 adenocarcinomas (16.7% of all lung cancers examined). Three were positive for HPV-16, 1 for HPV-11 and 1 had an unknown HPV type DNA. None was identified in benign tissue. MCPyV DNA was detected in 5 NSCLCs (16.7%). Three of the 5 were identified in squamous carcinomas, 1 in adenocarcinoma, and 1 in an unspecified NSCLC. Two additional samples were positive for MCPyV DNA within benign adjacent lung tissue only. In one adenocarcinoma, HPV-11 was identified in an adenocarcinoma, and MCPyV DNA was detected in the adjacent "benign" tissue. HPV and MCPyV were directly associated with 33.3% of NSCLC. Further studies are necessary to determine if polyomavirus and papillomavirus are necessary risk factors for some cases of NSCLC.

  17. Human papillomavirus (HPV) genome status & cervical cancer outcome - A retrospective study

    PubMed Central

    Das, Poulami; Thomas, Asha; Kannan, Sadhana; Deodhar, Kedar; Shrivastava, Shyam K.; Mahantshetty, Umesh; Mulherkar, Rita

    2015-01-01

    Background & objectives: Persistent infections with high-risk (HR) human papillomaviruses such as HPV 16, 18, 31, 33 and 45 have been identified as the major aetiological factor for cervical cancer. The clinical outcome of the disease is often determined by viral factors such as viral load, physical status and oncogene expression. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the impact of such factors on clinical outcome in HPV16 positive, locally advanced cervical cancer cases. Methods: One hundred and thirty two pretreatment cervical tumour biopsies were selected from patients undergoing radiotherapy alone (n=63) or concomitant chemo-radiation (n=69). All the samples were positive for HPV 16. Quantitative real time-PCR was carried out to determine viral load and oncogene expression. Physical status of the virus was determined for all the samples by the ratio of E2copies/E7copies; while in 73 cases, the status was reanalyzed by more sensitive APOT (amplification of papillomavirus oncogene transcripts) assay. Univariate analysis of recurrence free survival was carried out using Kaplan-Meier method and for multivariate analysis the Cox proportional hazard model was used. Results: The median viral load was 19.4 (IQR, 1.9- 69.3), with viral integration observed in 86 per cent cases by combination of the two methodologies. Both univariate and multivariate analyses identified viral physical status as a good predictor of clinical outcome following radiation treatment, with episomal form being associated with increased recurrence free survival. Interpretation & conclusions: The present study results showed that viral physical status might act as an important prognostic factor in cervical cancer. PMID:26658585

  18. Ras Modifies Proliferation and Invasiveness of Cells Expressing Human Papillomavirus Oncoproteins▿

    PubMed Central

    Yoshida, Satoshi; Kajitani, Naoko; Satsuka, Ayano; Nakamura, Hiroyasu; Sakai, Hiroyuki

    2008-01-01

    Infection by human papillomavirus (HPV) is a major risk factor for human cervical carcinoma. However, the HPV infection alone is not sufficient for cancer formation. Cervical carcinogenesis is considered a multistep process accompanied by genetic alterations of the cell. Ras is activated in approximately 20% of human cancers, and it is related to the metastatic conversion of tumor cells. We investigated how Ras activation was involved in the malignant conversion of HPV-infected lesions. The active form of H-ras was introduced into human primary keratinocytes expressing the HPV type 18 (HPV18) oncoproteins E6 and/or E7. We analyzed the keratinocytes’ growth potentials and found that the activation of the Ras pathway induced senescence-like growth arrest. Senescence could be eliminated by high-risk E7 expression, suggesting that the pRb pathway was important for Ras-induced senescence. Then we analyzed the effect of Ras activation on epidermis development by using an organotypic “raft” culture and found that the E7 and H-ras coexpressions conferred invasive potential on the epidermis. This invasiveness resulted from the upregulation of MT1-MMP and MMP9 by H-ras and E7, respectively, in which the activation of the MEK/extracellular signal-regulated kinase pathway was involved. These results indicated that the activation of Ras or the related signal pathways promoted the malignant conversion of HPV-infected cells. PMID:18579583

  19. Improving the Understanding of Pathogenesis of Human Papillomavirus 16 via Mapping Protein-Protein Interaction Network

    PubMed Central

    Dong, Yongcheng; Kuang, Qifan; Dai, Xu; Li, Rong; Wu, Yiming; Leng, Weijia; Li, Yizhou; Li, Menglong

    2015-01-01

    The human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) has high risk to lead various cancers and afflictions, especially, the cervical cancer. Therefore, investigating the pathogenesis of HPV16 is very important for public health. Protein-protein interaction (PPI) network between HPV16 and human was used as a measure to improve our understanding of its pathogenesis. By adopting sequence and topological features, a support vector machine (SVM) model was built to predict new interactions between HPV16 and human proteins. All interactions were comprehensively investigated and analyzed. The analysis indicated that HPV16 enlarged its scope of influence by interacting with human proteins as much as possible. These interactions alter a broad array of cell cycle progression. Furthermore, not only was HPV16 highly prone to interact with hub proteins and bottleneck proteins, but also it could effectively affect a breadth of signaling pathways. In addition, we found that the HPV16 evolved into high carcinogenicity on the condition that its own reproduction had been ensured. Meanwhile, this work will contribute to providing potential new targets for antiviral therapeutics and help experimental research in the future. PMID:25961044

  20. Immortalization of human foreskin keratinocytes by various human papillomavirus DNAs corresponds to their association with cervical carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Woodworth, C.D.; Doniger, J.; DiPaolo, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Normal human foreskin keratinocytes cotransfected with the neomycin resistance gene and recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) DNAs (types 16, 18, 31, and 33) that have a high or moderate association with cervical malignancy acquired immortality and contained integrated and transcriptionally active viral genomes. Only transcripts from the intact E6 and E7 genes were detected in at least one cell line, suggesting that one or both of these genes are responsible for immortalization. Recombinant HPV DNAs with low or no oncogenic potential for cervical cancer (HPV1a, -5, -6b, and -11) induced small G418-resistant colonies that senesced as did the nontransfected cells. These colonies contained only episomal virus DNA; therefore, integration of HPV sequences is important for immortalization of keratinocytes. This study suggests that the virus-encoded immortalization function contributes to the pathogenesis of cervical carcinoma.

  1. Feasibility and implementation of a literature information management system for human papillomavirus in head and neck cancers with imaging.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dee H; Matthiesen, Chance L; Alleman, Anthony M; Fournier, Aaron L; Gunter, Tyler C

    2014-01-01

    This work examines the feasibility and implementation of information service-orientated architecture (ISOA) on an emergent literature domain of human papillomavirus, head and neck cancer, and imaging. From this work, we examine the impact of cancer informatics and generate a full set of summarizing clinical pearls. Additionally, we describe how such an ISOA creates potential benefits in informatics education, enhancing utility for creating enduring digital content in this clinical domain.

  2. Purification and DNA-binding properties of human papillomavirus type 16 E6 protein expressed in Escherichia coli.

    PubMed

    Imai, Y; Tsunokawa, Y; Sugimura, T; Terada, M

    1989-11-15

    Unfused human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV 16) E6 protein was expressed in Escherichia coli using a lambda PL promoter system. The protein was isolated from the cells as inclusion bodies, extracted by 6 M guanidine-HCl, and purified by chromatography. The purified protein had high affinity to DNA and was demonstrated for the first time to bind to a specific sequence within the long control region of HPV 16. PMID:2556128

  3. Feasibility and implementation of a literature information management system for human papillomavirus in head and neck cancers with imaging.

    PubMed

    Wu, Dee H; Matthiesen, Chance L; Alleman, Anthony M; Fournier, Aaron L; Gunter, Tyler C

    2014-01-01

    This work examines the feasibility and implementation of information service-orientated architecture (ISOA) on an emergent literature domain of human papillomavirus, head and neck cancer, and imaging. From this work, we examine the impact of cancer informatics and generate a full set of summarizing clinical pearls. Additionally, we describe how such an ISOA creates potential benefits in informatics education, enhancing utility for creating enduring digital content in this clinical domain. PMID:25392683

  4. Feasibility and Implementation of a Literature Information Management System for Human Papillomavirus in Head and Neck Cancers with Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Dee H; Matthiesen, Chance L; Alleman, Anthony M; Fournier, Aaron L; Gunter, Tyler C

    2014-01-01

    This work examines the feasibility and implementation of information service-orientated architecture (ISOA) on an emergent literature domain of human papillomavirus, head and neck cancer, and imaging. From this work, we examine the impact of cancer informatics and generate a full set of summarizing clinical pearls. Additionally, we describe how such an ISOA creates potential benefits in informatics education, enhancing utility for creating enduring digital content in this clinical domain. PMID:25392683

  5. American Cancer Society Guideline for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine use to prevent cervical cancer and its precursors.

    PubMed

    Saslow, Debbie; Castle, Philip E; Cox, J Thomas; Davey, Diane D; Einstein, Mark H; Ferris, Daron G; Goldie, Sue J; Harper, Diane M; Kinney, Walter; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Noller, Kenneth L; Wheeler, Cosette M; Ades, Terri; Andrews, Kimberly S; Doroshenk, Mary K; Kahn, Kelly Green; Schmidt, Christy; Shafey, Omar; Smith, Robert A; Partridge, Edward E; Garcia, Francisco

    2007-01-01

    The American Cancer Society (ACS) has developed guidelines for the use of the prophylactic human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine for the prevention of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and cervical cancer. These recommendations are based on a formal review of the available evidence. They address the use of prophylactic HPV vaccines, including who should be vaccinated and at what age, as well as a summary of policy and implementation issues. Implications for screening are also discussed.

  6. High-risk human papillomavirus in non-melanoma skin lesions from renal allograft recipients and immunocompetent patients

    PubMed Central

    Reuschenbach, M; Tran, T; Faulstich, F; Hartschuh, W; Vinokurova, S; Kloor, M; Krautkrämer, E; Zeier, M; von Knebel Doeberitz, M; Sommerer, C

    2011-01-01

    Background: High-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPVs) can be detected in a proportion of non-melanoma skin cancers. Data on prevalence are inconclusive, but are essential to estimate the relevance of HR-HPV, particularly with regard to prophylactic HPV vaccines for skin cancer prevention. Methods: High-risk human papillomavirus DNA was investigated in 140 non-melanoma skin lesions from 54 immunocompetent patients and 33 immunosuppressed renal allograft recipients. Expression of p16INK4a, a marker for HR-HPV oncogene expression in the uterine cervix, and of p53 and pRB was evaluated immunohistochemically. Results: The highest prevalence of HR-HPV was found in squamous cell cancer (SCC) (46.2% (6 out of 13) in immunosuppressed and 23.5% (4 out of 17) in immunocompetent patients). High-risk human papillomavirus positivity was accompanied by diffuse p16INK4a expression in most SCC (P<0.001) and basal cell cancers (P=0.02), while almost all SCC in situ were p16INK4a positive irrespective of HR-HPV presence (P=0.66). Diffuse p16INK4a expression was associated with lack of pRB expression (P=0.001). p53 was strongly expressed in 40.0% (56 out of 140) of the lesions irrespective of HR-HPV presence. Conclusion: High-risk human papillomavirus can be detected in lesions of keratinised squamous epithelia. The association of HR-HPV with diffuse p16INK4a expression might indicate HR-HPV oncogene expression in a proportion of lesions. Overexpression of p53 suggests p53 pathway alterations in HR-HPV-positive and -negative lesions. PMID:21427726

  7. Suppression of Antitumor Immune Responses by Human Papillomavirus through Epigenetic Downregulation of CXCL14

    PubMed Central

    Cicchini, Louis; Westrich, Joseph A.; Xu, Tao; Vermeer, Daniel W.; Berger, Jennifer N.; Clambey, Eric T.; Lee, Denis; Song, John I.; Lambert, Paul F.; Greer, Robert O.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are causally associated with multiple human cancers. Previous studies have shown that the HPV oncoprotein E7 induces immune suppression; however, the underlying mechanisms remain unknown. To understand the mechanisms by which HPV deregulates host immune responses in the tumor microenvironment, we analyzed gene expression changes of all known chemokines and their receptors using our global gene expression data sets from human HPV-positive and -negative head/neck cancer and cervical tissue specimens in different disease stages. We report that, while many proinflammatory chemokines increase expression throughout cancer progression, CXCL14 is dramatically downregulated in HPV-positive cancers. HPV suppression of CXCL14 is dependent on E7 and associated with DNA hypermethylation in the CXCL14 promoter. Using in vivo mouse models, we revealed that restoration of Cxcl14 expression in HPV-positive mouse oropharyngeal carcinoma cells clears tumors in immunocompetent syngeneic mice, but not in Rag1-deficient mice. Further, Cxcl14 reexpression significantly increases natural killer (NK), CD4+ T, and CD8+ T cell infiltration into the tumor-draining lymph nodes in vivo. In vitro transwell migration assays show that Cxcl14 reexpression induces chemotaxis of NK, CD4+ T, and CD8+ T cells. These results suggest that CXCL14 downregulation by HPV plays an important role in suppression of antitumor immune responses. Our findings provide a new mechanistic understanding of virus-induced immune evasion that contributes to cancer progression. PMID:27143385

  8. [Detection of microRNAs seed sequences within human papillomavirus genomes].

    PubMed

    Pineda-Gómez, David; Garrido, Efraín; Chávez, Pedro; Salcedo, Mauricio

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we are reporting for the first time the presence of seed sequences of human and viral microRNAs embedded within both high and low risk human papillomavirus (HPV) genomes. These seed sequences have high oncogenic potential. They were found using an in silico analysis based on the microRNA sequences added to Sanger's database. Among these sequences, it was observed a potential fingerprint harbouring several repeated sequences of microRNA 297 (miR-297) within the LCR region of HPV types 16, 18, 33, 45 and 52. Further analyses were performed for low risk HPV types 6 and 11 and we observed that the probable fingerprint was absent in HPV11, even when we detected other repeated sequences of miR-363. According to these findings, besides the fact that we detected the presence of microRNA sequences within HPV genomes, we suggest a common putative viral mechanism of gene expression regulation shared among human virus.

  9. Cancer, Warts, or Asymptomatic Infections: Clinical Presentation Matches Codon Usage Preferences in Human Papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Félez-Sánchez, Marta; Trösemeier, Jan-Hendrik; Bedhomme, Stéphanie; González-Bravo, Maria Isabel; Kamp, Christel; Bravo, Ignacio G

    2015-07-01

    Viruses rely completely on the hosts' machinery for translation of viral transcripts. However, for most viruses infecting humans, codon usage preferences (CUPrefs) do not match those of the host. Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are a showcase to tackle this paradox: they present a large genotypic diversity and a broad range of phenotypic presentations, from asymptomatic infections to productive lesions and cancer. By applying phylogenetic inference and dimensionality reduction methods, we demonstrate first that genes in HPVs are poorly adapted to the average human CUPrefs, the only exception being capsid genes in viruses causing productive lesions. Phylogenetic relationships between HPVs explained only a small proportion of CUPrefs variation. Instead, the most important explanatory factor for viral CUPrefs was infection phenotype, as orthologous genes in viruses with similar clinical presentation displayed similar CUPrefs. Moreover, viral genes with similar spatiotemporal expression patterns also showed similar CUPrefs. Our results suggest that CUPrefs in HPVs reflect either variations in the mutation bias or differential selection pressures depending on the clinical presentation and expression timing. We propose that poor viral CUPrefs may be central to a trade-off between strong viral gene expression and the potential for eliciting protective immune response.

  10. Class Manual for Information Resources in the Humanities (LIS 382L.2).

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Roy, Loriene

    Basic course information and worksheets are presented in this textbook/workbook for "Information Resources in the Humanities," a course offered by the Graduate School of Library and Information Science at the University of Texas at Austin. The guide is divided into eight sections. The first presents the syllabus, lists assignments (e.g., online…

  11. Human Papillomaviruses Activate and Recruit SMC1 Cohesin Proteins for the Differentiation-Dependent Life Cycle through Association with CTCF Insulators

    PubMed Central

    Satsuka, Ayano; Laimins, Laimonis A.

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses infect stratified epithelia and link their productive life cycle to the differentiation state of the host cell. Productive viral replication or amplification is restricted to highly differentiated suprabasal cells and is dependent on the activation of the ATM DNA damage pathway. The ATM pathway has three arms that can act independently of one another. One arm is centered on p53, another on CHK2 and a third on SMC1/NBS1 proteins. A role for CHK2 in HPV genome amplification has been demonstrated but it was unclear what other factors provided important activities. The cohesin protein, SMC1, is necessary for sister chromatid association prior to mitosis. In addition the phosphorylated form of SMC1 plays a critical role together with NBS1 in the ATM DNA damage response. In normal cells, SMC1 becomes phosphorylated in response to radiation, however, in HPV positive cells our studies demonstrate that it is constitutively activated. Furthermore, pSMC1 is found localized in distinct nuclear foci in complexes with γ-H2AX, and CHK2 and bound to HPV DNA. Importantly, knockdown of SMC1 blocks differentiation-dependent genome amplification. pSMC1 forms complexes with the insulator transcription factor CTCF and our studies show that these factors bind to conserved sequence motifs in the L2 late region of HPV 31. Similar motifs are found in most HPV types. Knockdown of CTCF with shRNAs blocks genome amplification and mutation of the CTCF binding motifs in the L2 open reading frame inhibits stable maintenance of viral episomes in undifferentiated cells as well as amplification of genomes upon differentiation. These findings suggest a model in which SMC1 factors are constitutively activated in HPV positive cells and recruited to viral genomes through complex formation with CTCF to facilitate genome amplification. Our findings identify both SMC1 and CTCF as critical regulators of the differentiation-dependent life cycle of high-risk human papillomaviruses

  12. Acquired immune response to oncogenic human papillomavirus associated with prophylactic cervical cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Einstein, Mark H

    2008-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a common infection among women and a necessary cause of cervical cancer. Oncogenic HPV types infecting the anogenital tract have the potential to induce natural immunity, but at present we do not clearly understand the natural history of infection in humans and the mechanisms by which the virus can evade the host immune response. Natural acquired immune responses against HPV may be involved in the clearance of infection, but persistent infection with oncogenic virus types leads to the development of precancerous lesions and cancer. B cell responses are important for viral neutralization, but antibody responses in patients with cervical cancer are poor. Prophylactic vaccines targeting oncogenic virus types associated with cervical cancer have the potential to prevent up to 80% of cervical cancers by targeting HPV types 16 and 18. Clinical data show that prophylactic vaccines are effective in inducing antibody responses and in preventing persistent infection with HPV, as well as the subsequent development of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. This article reviews the known data regarding natural immune responses to HPV and those developed by prophylactic vaccination.

  13. Oncogenic Human Papillomaviruses Activate the Tumor-Associated Lens Epithelial-Derived Growth Factor (LEDGF) Gene

    PubMed Central

    Leitz, Jenny; Reuschenbach, Miriam; Lohrey, Claudia; Honegger, Anja; Accardi, Rosita; Tommasino, Massimo; Llano, Manuel; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Hoppe-Seyler, Karin; Hoppe-Seyler, Felix

    2014-01-01

    The expression of the human papillomavirus (HPV) E6/E7 oncogenes is crucial for HPV-induced malignant cell transformation. The identification of cellular targets attacked by the HPV oncogenes is critical for our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of HPV-associated carcinogenesis and may open novel therapeutic opportunities. Here, we identify the Lens Epithelial-Derived Growth Factor (LEDGF) gene as a novel cellular target gene for the HPV oncogenes. Elevated LEDGF expression has been recently linked to human carcinogenesis and can protect tumor cells towards different forms of cellular stress. We show that intracellular LEDGF mRNA and protein levels in HPV-positive cancer cells are critically dependent on the maintenance of viral oncogene expression. Ectopic E6/E7 expression stimulates LEDGF transcription in primary keratinocytes, at least in part via activation of the LEDGF promoter. Repression of endogenous LEDGF expression by RNA interference results in an increased sensitivity of HPV-positive cancer cells towards genotoxic agents. Immunohistochemical analyses of cervical tissue specimens reveal a highly significant increase of LEDGF protein levels in HPV-positive lesions compared to histologically normal cervical epithelium. Taken together, these results indicate that the E6/E7-dependent maintenance of intracellular LEDGF expression is critical for protecting HPV-positive cancer cells against various forms of cellular stress, including DNA damage. This could support tumor cell survival and contribute to the therapeutic resistance of cervical cancers towards genotoxic treatment strategies in the clinic. PMID:24604027

  14. The E5 oncoprotein of human papillomavirus type 16 enhances endothelin-1-induced keratinocyte growth.

    PubMed

    Venuti, A; Salani, D; Poggiali, F; Manni, V; Bagnato, A

    1998-08-15

    Human keratinocytes express ETA receptors and produce endothelin-1 (ET-1), which stimulates growth response. Previously, we reported that a twofold increase in ETA receptors is present in human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) immortalized keratinocytes and that ET-1 induces enhanced proliferative response in these cell lines compared to normal cells. The present studies examine whether the E5 gene of HPV16 is responsible for the enhanced activity of ET-1 in HPV-transfected keratinocytes. The presence of the E5 gene in growth factor-starved keratinocytes induced the DNA synthesis and enhanced the mitogenic activity of ET-1 or epidermal growth factor. The selection of primary keratinocytes in growth factor-free medium with the addition of ET-1 as a growth factor showed that E5-transfected keratinocytes were able to grow and to form a higher number of larger colonies with respect to untransfected cells. This effect seems to be related to the interaction of E5 with the mitogenic signaling pathway of ET-1 rather than to an increase in the expression of the receptors for ET-1. In conclusion, our data demonstrate that E5 enhances ligand signaling in keratinocytes outside the EGF pathway by the amplification of the proliferative effect of ET-1/ETA receptor signaling.

  15. The Transcription Map of Human Papillomavirus Type 18 during Genome Replication in U2OS Cells

    PubMed Central

    Toots, Mart; Männik, Andres; Kivi, Gaily; Ustav, Mart; Ustav, Ene; Ustav, Mart

    2014-01-01

    The human osteosarcoma cell line U2OS is useful for studying genome replication of human papillomavirus (HPVs) subtypes that belong to different phylogenetic genera. In this study, we defined the HPV18 transcription map in U2OS cells during transient replication, stable maintenance and vegetative amplification by identifying viral promoter regions, transcription polyadenylation and splicing sites during HPV18 genome replication. Mapping of the HPV18 transcription start sites in U2OS cells revealed five distinct promoter regions (P102, P520, P811, P1193 and P3000). With the exception of P3000, all of these regions have been previously identified during productive HPV18 infection. Collectively, the data suggest that U2OS cells are suitable for studying the replication and transcription properties of HPVs and to serve as a platform for conducting high-throughput drug screens to identify HPV replication inhibitors. In addition, we have identified mRNA species that are initiated from the promoter region P3000, which can encode two E2C regulator proteins that contain only the C-terminal hinge and DNA-binding and dimerization domains of E2. We show that these proteins regulate the initial amplification of HPV18 by modulating viral transcription. Moreover, we show that one of these proteins can act as a transcriptional activator of promoter P102. PMID:25548925

  16. Deregulation of the miRNAs Expression in Cervical Cancer: Human Papillomavirus Implications

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Gómez, Yazmín; Organista-Nava, Jorge; Gariglio, Patricio

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non coding RNAs of 18–25 nucleotides in length. The temporal or short-lived expression of the miRNAs modulates gene expression post transcriptionally. Studies have revealed that miRNAs deregulation correlates and is involved with the initiation and progression of human tumors. Cervical cancer (CC) displays notably increased or decreased expression of a large number of cellular oncogenic or tumor suppressive miRNAs, respectively. However, understanding the potential role of miRNAs in CC is still limited. In CC, the high-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPVs) infection can affect the miRNAs expression through oncoprotein E6 and E7 that contribute to viral pathogenesis, although other viral proteins might also be involved. This deregulation in the miRNAs expression has an important role in the hallmarks of CC. Interestingly, the miRNA expression profile in CC can discriminate between normal and tumor tissue and the extraordinary stability of miRNAs makes it suitable to serve as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers of cancer. In this review, we will summarize the role of the HR-HPVs in miRNA expression, the role of miRNAs in the hallmarks of CC, and the use of miRNAs as potential prognostic biomarkers in CC. PMID:24490161

  17. Rat embryo fibroblast cells expressing human papillomavirus 1a genes exhibit altered growth properties and tumorigenicity.

    PubMed Central

    Green, M; Brackmann, K H; Loewenstein, P M

    1986-01-01

    Human papillomavirus 1a (HPV1a) induces benign tumors (papillomas or warts) in humans under natural conditions of infection but has not been found to replicate significantly in cell culture or in experimental animals. To establish model systems to study the oncogenic properties and expression of HPV genes, we established cell lines by cotransfecting the 3Y1 rat fibroblast cell line with HPV1a DNA constructs containing an intact early gene region and the Tn5 neomycin resistance gene. Most cell lines selected for expression of the neomycin resistance gene by treatment with the antibiotic G-418 contained viral DNA in a high-molecular-weight form. The growth characteristics of several cell lines containing high copy numbers of HPV1a DNA were studied further. They were shown to differ from the parental cell line and from G-418-resistant cell lines that did not incorporate viral DNA in the following properties: morphological alteration, increased cell density at confluence, growth in 0.5% serum, efficient anchorage-independent growth in soft agar, and rapid formation of tumors in nude mice. Those cell lines that possessed altered growth properties and tumorigenicity were found to express abundant quantities of polyadenylated virus-specific RNA species in the cytoplasm. Images PMID:3023676

  18. HLA Immunogenotype Determines Persistent Human Papillomavirus Virus Infection in HIV-Infected Patients Receiving Antiretroviral Treatment.

    PubMed

    Meys, Rhonda; Purdie, Karin J; de Koning, Maurits N C; Quint, Koen D; Little, Ann-Margaret; Baker, Finnuala; Francis, Nick; Asboe, David; Hawkins, David; Marsh, Steven G E; Harwood, Catherine A; Gotch, Frances M; Bunker, Christopher B

    2016-06-01

    A proportion of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-infected patients develop persistent, stigmatizing human papillomavirus (HPV)-related cutaneous and genital warts and anogenital (pre)cancer. This is the first study to investigate immunogenetic variations that might account for HPV susceptibility and the largest to date to categorize the HPV types associated with cutaneous warts in HIV-positive patients. The HLA class I and II allele distribution was analyzed in 49 antiretroviral (ART)-treated HIV-positive patients with persistent warts, 42 noninfected controls, and 46 HIV-positive controls. The allele HLA-B*44 was more frequently identified in HIV-positive patients with warts (P = .004); a susceptible haplotype (HLA-B*44, HLA-C*05; P = .001) and protective genes (HLA-DQB1*06; P = .03) may also contribute. Cutaneous wart biopsy specimens from HIV-positive patients harbored common wart types HPV27/57, the unusual wart type HPV7, and an excess of Betapapillomavirus types (P = .002), compared with wart specimens from noninfected controls. These findings suggest that HLA testing might assist in stratifying those patients in whom vaccination should be recommended. PMID:26908737

  19. Prevalence and risk factors of human papillomavirus infection by penile site in uncircumcised Kenyan men.

    PubMed

    Smith, Jennifer S; Backes, Danielle M; Hudgens, Michael G; Bailey, Robert C; Veronesi, Giovanni; Bogaarts, Martijn; Agot, Kawango; Ndinya-Achola, J O; Maclean, Ian; Agingu, Walter; Meijer, Chris J L M; Moses, Stephen; Snijders, Peter J F

    2010-01-15

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence was estimated from 2,705 sexually active, uncircumcised, human immunodeficiency virus seronegative men aged 17-28 years in Kisumu, Kenya. HPV prevalence was 51.1% (95% confidence interval: 49.2-53.0%) in penile cells from the glans/coronal sulcus and/or shaft. HPV prevalence varied by anatomical site, with 46.5% positivity in the glans/coronal sulcus compared with 19.1% in the shaft (p < 0.0001). High-risk HPV was detected in 31.2% of glans and 12.3% of shaft samples (p < 0.0001). HPV16 was the most common type and 29.2% of men were infected with more than one HPV type. Risk factors for HPV infection included presence of C. trachomatis, N. gonorrhea, self-reported sexually transmitted infections, and less frequent bathing. Lifetime number of sexual partners and herpes simplex virus type-2 seropositivity were also marginally associated with HPV infection. PMID:19626601

  20. Clinical cancer chemoprevention: From the hepatitis B virus (HBV) vaccine to the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Horng-Jyh

    2015-04-01

    Approximately 2 million new cancer cases are attributed to infectious agents each year worldwide. Vaccines for the hepatitis B virus (HBV), a risk factor of hepatocellular cancer, and human papillomavirus (HPV), a risk factor of cervical cancer, are considered major successes in clinical chemoprevention of cancer. In Taiwan, the first evidence of cancer prevention through vaccinations was provided by HBV vaccination data in infants. The Taiwanese HBV vaccination program has since become a model immunization schedule for newborns worldwide. Persistent infection with high-risk HPV is generally accepted as prerequisite for cervical cancer diagnosis; however, cervical cancer is a rare complication of HPV infections. This is due to the fact that such infections tend to be transient. The safety and efficacy of both available HPV quadrivalent vaccine and bivalent vaccine are not in doubt at the present time. Until a human cytomegalovirus (CMV) vaccine becomes available, simple hygienic practices, such as hand washing, can prevent CMV infection both before and during pregnancy. Each country should establish her official guidelines regarding which vaccines should be used to treat various conditions, the target population (i.e., universal or limited to a selected population), and the immunization schedules. After a vaccine is recommended, decisions regarding reimbursement by the public health care fund are evaluated. The guidelines become part of the immunization schedule, which is updated annually and published in the official bulletin. In conclusion, both HBV and HPV vaccines are considered major successes in the chemoprevention of cancer.

  1. Prevalence of human papillomavirus in oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma in the United States across time.

    PubMed

    Stein, Andrew P; Saha, Sandeep; Yu, Menggang; Kimple, Randall J; Lambert, Paul F

    2014-04-21

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are involved in approximately 5% of all human cancer. Although initially recognized for causing nearly all cases of cervical carcinoma, much data has now emerged implicating HPVs as a causal factor in other anogenital cancers as well as a subset of head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs), most commonly oropharyngeal cancers. Numerous clinical trials have demonstrated that patients with HPV+ oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC) have improved survival compared to patients with HPV- cancers. Furthermore, epidemiological evidence shows the incidence of OPSCC has been steadily rising over time in the United States. It has been proposed that an increase in HPV-related OPSCCs is the driving force behind the increasing rate of OPSCC. Although some studies have revealed an increase in HPV+ head and neck malignancies over time in specific regions of the United States, there has not been a comprehensive study validating this trend across the entire country. Therefore, we undertook this meta-analysis to assess all literature through August 2013 that reported on the prevalence of HPV in OPSCC for patient populations within the United States. The results show an increase in the prevalence of HPV+ OPSCC from 20.9% in the pre-1990 time period to 51.4% in 1990-1999 and finally to 65.4% for 2000-present. In this manner, our study provides further evidence to support the hypothesis that HPV-associated OPSCCs are driving the increasing incidence of OPSCC over time in the United States.

  2. Deregulation of the miRNAs expression in cervical cancer: human papillomavirus implications.

    PubMed

    Gómez-Gómez, Yazmín; Organista-Nava, Jorge; Gariglio, Patricio

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non coding RNAs of 18-25 nucleotides in length. The temporal or short-lived expression of the miRNAs modulates gene expression post transcriptionally. Studies have revealed that miRNAs deregulation correlates and is involved with the initiation and progression of human tumors. Cervical cancer (CC) displays notably increased or decreased expression of a large number of cellular oncogenic or tumor suppressive miRNAs, respectively. However, understanding the potential role of miRNAs in CC is still limited. In CC, the high-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPVs) infection can affect the miRNAs expression through oncoprotein E6 and E7 that contribute to viral pathogenesis, although other viral proteins might also be involved. This deregulation in the miRNAs expression has an important role in the hallmarks of CC. Interestingly, the miRNA expression profile in CC can discriminate between normal and tumor tissue and the extraordinary stability of miRNAs makes it suitable to serve as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers of cancer. In this review, we will summarize the role of the HR-HPVs in miRNA expression, the role of miRNAs in the hallmarks of CC, and the use of miRNAs as potential prognostic biomarkers in CC.

  3. Requirement for Estrogen Receptor Alpha in a Mouse Model for Human Papillomavirus-Associated Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Sang-Hyuk; Wiedmeyer, Kerri; Shai, Anny; Korach, Kenneth S.; Lambert, Paul F.

    2008-01-01

    The majority of human cervical cancers are associated with the high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs), which encode the potent E6 and E7 oncogenes. Upon prolonged treatment with physiological levels of exogenous estrogen, K14E7 transgenic mice expressing HPV-16 E7 oncoprotein in their squamous epithelia succumb to uterine cervical cancer. Furthermore, prolonged withdrawal of exogenous estrogen results in complete or partial regression of tumors in this mouse model. In the current study we investigated whether estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is required for the development of cervical cancer in K14E7 transgenic mice. We demonstrate that exogenous estrogen fails to promote either dysplasia or cervical cancer in K14E7/ERα−/− mice despite the continued presence of the presumed cervical cancer precursor cell type, reserve cells, and evidence for E7 expression therein. We also observed that cervical cancers in our mouse models are strictly associated with atypical squamous metaplasia (ASM), which is believed to be the precursor for cervical cancer in women. Consistently, E7 and exogenous estrogen failed to promote ASM in the absence of ERα. We conclude that ERα plays a crucial role at an early stage of cervical carcinogenesis in this mouse model. PMID:19047174

  4. Primary prevention of human papillomavirus-dependent neoplasia: no condom, no sex.

    PubMed

    Epstein, Richard J

    2005-11-01

    Cervix cancer is one of several neoplastic disorders that arise following transfer of human papillomavirus (HPV) during unprotected sexual intercourse, and like most other sexually transmitted diseases (STDs), is largely preventable by consistent condom use. This primary prevention strategy has received little support, however, when compared with massive secondary prevention initiatives involving cervical screening. The reasons for this anomalous situation are complex, and include: (i) the asymptomatic nature of most primary HPV infections; (ii) widespread ignorance concerning the venereal aetiology of HPV-related cancers; (iii) the common but incorrect belief that condom use does not reduce HPV transmission; (iv) the perceived irrelevance of safe sex campaigns based on reducing transmission of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in high-HPV but low-HIV countries such as the Philippines; (v) the promotion of oral contraception by the medical and pharmaceutical sectors as the sexual prophylaxis of choice; and (vi) the assumption that HPV vaccines will solve the problem. Here it is proposed that the high prevalence of non-HIV STDs, including distressing disorders such as genital warts and herpes simplex, can be exploited with greater efficacy as a public health deterrent to unsafe sex and HPV transmission. Targeting a "mutually assured infection" campaign at vulnerable subgroups such as teenagers and oral contraceptive users could help reverse the global expansion of HPV-related cancers. PMID:16223580

  5. Human papillomavirus 16 E5 induces bi-nucleated cell formation by cell-cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Lulin; Plafker, Kendra; Vorozhko, Valeriya; Zuna, Rosemary E.; Hanigan, Marie H.; Gorbsky, Gary J.; Plafker, Scott M.; Angeletti, Peter C.; Ceresa, Brian P.

    2009-02-05

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) 16 is a DNA virus encoding three oncogenes - E5, E6, and E7. The E6 and E7 proteins have well-established roles as inhibitors of tumor suppression, but the contribution of E5 to malignant transformation is controversial. Using spontaneously immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells), we demonstrate that expression of HPV16 E5 is necessary and sufficient for the formation of bi-nucleated cells, a common characteristic of precancerous cervical lesions. Expression of E5 from non-carcinogenic HPV6b does not produce bi-nucleate cells. Video microscopy and biochemical analyses reveal that bi-nucleates arise through cell-cell fusion. Although most E5-induced bi-nucleates fail to propagate, co-expression of HPV16 E6/E7 enhances the proliferation of these cells. Expression of HPV16 E6/E7 also increases bi-nucleated cell colony formation. These findings identify a new role for HPV16 E5 and support a model in which complementary roles of the HPV16 oncogenes lead to the induction of carcinogenesis.

  6. Oncogenic human papillomaviruses activate the tumor-associated lens epithelial-derived growth factor (LEDGF) gene.

    PubMed

    Leitz, Jenny; Reuschenbach, Miriam; Lohrey, Claudia; Honegger, Anja; Accardi, Rosita; Tommasino, Massimo; Llano, Manuel; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Hoppe-Seyler, Karin; Hoppe-Seyler, Felix

    2014-03-01

    The expression of the human papillomavirus (HPV) E6/E7 oncogenes is crucial for HPV-induced malignant cell transformation. The identification of cellular targets attacked by the HPV oncogenes is critical for our understanding of the molecular mechanisms of HPV-associated carcinogenesis and may open novel therapeutic opportunities. Here, we identify the Lens Epithelial-Derived Growth Factor (LEDGF) gene as a novel cellular target gene for the HPV oncogenes. Elevated LEDGF expression has been recently linked to human carcinogenesis and can protect tumor cells towards different forms of cellular stress. We show that intracellular LEDGF mRNA and protein levels in HPV-positive cancer cells are critically dependent on the maintenance of viral oncogene expression. Ectopic E6/E7 expression stimulates LEDGF transcription in primary keratinocytes, at least in part via activation of the LEDGF promoter. Repression of endogenous LEDGF expression by RNA interference results in an increased sensitivity of HPV-positive cancer cells towards genotoxic agents. Immunohistochemical analyses of cervical tissue specimens reveal a highly significant increase of LEDGF protein levels in HPV-positive lesions compared to histologically normal cervical epithelium. Taken together, these results indicate that the E6/E7-dependent maintenance of intracellular LEDGF expression is critical for protecting HPV-positive cancer cells against various forms of cellular stress, including DNA damage. This could support tumor cell survival and contribute to the therapeutic resistance of cervical cancers towards genotoxic treatment strategies in the clinic.

  7. Increases in Human Papillomavirus Detection During Early HIV Infection Among Women in Zimbabwe

    PubMed Central

    Nowak, Rebecca G.; Morrison, Charles S.; Gange, Stephen J.; Kwok, Cynthia; Oliver, Amy E.; Howard, Roslyn; Van Der Pol, Barbara; Salata, Robert A.; Padian, Nancy S.; Chipato, Tsungai; Munjoma, Marshall; Celentano, David D.

    2011-01-01

    Background. Individuals who acquire human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) may experience an immediate disruption of genital tract immunity, altering the ability to mount a local and effective immune response. This study examined the impact of early HIV infection on new detection of human papillomavirus (HPV). Methods. One hundred fifty-five Zimbabwean women with observation periods before and after HIV acquisition and 486 HIV-uninfected women were selected from a cohort study evaluating hormonal contraceptive use and risk of HIV acquisition. Study visits occurred at 3-month intervals. Cervical swab samples available from up to 6 months before, at, and up to 6 months after the visit when HIV was first detected were typed for 37 HPV genotypes or subtypes. Results. We observed ∼5-fold higher odds of multiple (≥2) new HPV detections only after HIV acquisition, relative to HIV-negative women after adjusting for sexual behavior and concurrent genital tract infections. We also observed ∼2.5-fold higher odds of single new HPV detections at visits before and after HIV acquisition, relative to HIV-uninfected women in multivariable models. Conclusions. These findings suggest that HIV infection has an immediate impact on genital tract immunity, as evidenced by the high risk of multiple new HPV detections immediately after HIV acquisition. PMID:21451006

  8. Recurrent Loss of NFE2L2 Exon 2 Is a Mechanism for Nrf2 Pathway Activation in Human Cancers.

    PubMed

    Goldstein, Leonard D; Lee, James; Gnad, Florian; Klijn, Christiaan; Schaub, Annalisa; Reeder, Jens; Daemen, Anneleen; Bakalarski, Corey E; Holcomb, Thomas; Shames, David S; Hartmaier, Ryan J; Chmielecki, Juliann; Seshagiri, Somasekar; Gentleman, Robert; Stokoe, David

    2016-09-01

    The Nrf2 pathway is frequently activated in human cancers through mutations in Nrf2 or its negative regulator KEAP1. Using a cell-line-derived gene signature for Nrf2 pathway activation, we found that some tumors show high Nrf2 activity in the absence of known mutations in the pathway. An analysis of splice variants in oncogenes revealed that such tumors express abnormal transcript variants from the NFE2L2 gene (encoding Nrf2) that lack exon 2, or exons 2 and 3, and encode Nrf2 protein isoforms missing the KEAP1 interaction domain. The Nrf2 alterations result in the loss of interaction with KEAP1, Nrf2 stabilization, induction of a Nrf2 transcriptional response, and Nrf2 pathway dependence. In all analyzed cases, transcript variants were the result of heterozygous genomic microdeletions. Thus, we identify an alternative mechanism for Nrf2 pathway activation in human tumors and elucidate its functional consequences. PMID:27568559

  9. Molecular cloning and characterization of the DNAs of human papillomaviruses 19, 20, and 25 from a patient with epidermodysplasia verruciformis.

    PubMed

    Gassenmaier, A; Lammel, M; Pfister, H

    1984-12-01

    Five human papillomavirus (HPV) DNAs from lesions of an epidermodysplasia verruciformis patient were cloned in lambda L 47: DNA of HPV 5, which predominated in the carcinoma; DNA of a variant type of HPV 8, which was not detected in the carcinoma DNA by Southern blot hybridization but only by cloning; and DNAs of three papillomaviruses that were isolated from warts. Southern blot and liquid phase DNA-DNA hybridization under stringent conditions showed that the three viruses from warts were new types, which we named HPVs 19, 20, and 25. These viruses cross-hybridized between 3 and 29% among themselves and with HPVs 5 and 8. After physical mapping with several restriction enzymes, the colinear genomes were aligned with HPV 8 DNA to define early and late regions. HPVs 8, 19, and 25 shared homology in different parts of their genomes. PMID:6092702

  10. Replicative Intermediates of Human Papillomavirus Type 11 in Laryngeal Papillomas: Site of Replication Initiation and Direction of Replication

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Auborn, K. J.; Little, R. D.; Platt, T. H. K.; Vaccariello, M. A.; Schildkraut, C. L.

    1994-07-01

    We have examined the structures of replication intermediates from the human papillomavirus type 11 genome in DNA extracted from papilloma lesions (laryngeal papillomas). The sites of replication initiation and termination utilized in vivo were mapped by using neutral/neutral and neutral/alkaline two-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis methods. Initiation of replication was detected in or very close to the upstream regulatory region (URR; the noncoding, regulatory sequences upstream of the open reading frames in the papillomavirus genome). We also show that replication forks proceed bidirectionally from the origin and converge 180circ opposite the URR. These results demonstrate the feasibility of analysis of replication of viral genomes directly from infected tissue.

  11. Herpes simplex virus downregulation of secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor enhances human papillomavirus type 16 infection.

    PubMed

    Skeate, Joseph G; Porras, Tania B; Woodham, Andrew W; Jang, Julie K; Taylor, Julia R; Brand, Heike E; Kelly, Thomas J; Jung, Jae U; Da Silva, Diane M; Yuan, Weiming; Kast, W Martin

    2016-02-01

    Herpes simplex virus (HSV) was originally implicated in the aetiology of cervical cancer, and although high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is now the accepted causative agent, the epidemiological link between HSV and HPV-associated cancers persists. The annexin A2 heterotetramer (A2t) has been shown to mediate infectious HPV type 16 (HPV16) uptake by human keratinocytes, and secretory leukocyte protease inhibitor (SLPI), an endogenous A2t ligand, inhibits HPV16 uptake and infection. Interestingly, HSV infection induces a sustained downregulation of SLPI in epithelial cells, which we hypothesized promotes HPV16 infection through A2t. Here, we show that in vitro infection of human keratinocytes with HSV-1 or HSV-2, but not with an HSV-1 ICP4 deletion mutant that does not downregulate SLPI, leads to a >70% reduction of SLPI mRNA and a >60% decrease in secreted SLPI protein. Consequently, we observed a significant increase in the uptake of HPV16 virus-like particles and gene transduction by HPV16 pseudovirions (two- and 2.5-fold, respectively) in HSV-1- and HSV-2-infected human keratinocyte cell cultures compared with uninfected cells, whereas exogenously added SLPI reversed this effect. Using a SiMPull (single-molecule pulldown) assay, we demonstrated that endogenously secreted SLPI interacts with A2t on epithelial cells in an autocrine/paracrine manner. These results suggested that ongoing HSV infection and resultant downregulation of local levels of SLPI may impart a greater susceptibility for keratinocytes to HPV16 infection through the host cell receptor A2t, providing a mechanism that may, in part, provide an explanation for the aetiological link between HSV and HPV-associated cancers.

  12. The papillomavirus life cycle.

    PubMed

    Doorbar, John

    2005-03-01

    Papillomaviruses infect epithelial cells, and depend on epithelial differentiation for completion of their life cycle. The expression of viral gene products is closely regulated as the infected basal cell migrates towards the epithelial surface. Expression of E6 and E7 in the lower epithelial layers drives cells into S-phase, which creates an environment that is conducive for viral genome replication and cell proliferation. Genome amplification, which is necessary for the production of infectious virions, is prevented until the levels of viral replication proteins rise, and depends on the co-expression of several viral proteins. Virus capsid proteins are expressed in cells that also express E4 as the infected cell enters the upper epithelial layers. The timing of these events varies depending on the infecting papillomavirus, and in the case of the high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs), on the severity of neoplasia. Viruses that are evolutionarily related, such as HPV1 and canine oral papillomavirus (COPV), generally organize their productive cycle in a similar way, despite infecting different hosts and epithelial sites. In some instances, such as following HPV16 infection of the cervix or cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV) infection of domestic rabbits, papillomaviruses can undergo abortive infections in which the productive cycle of the virus is not completed. As with other DNA tumour viruses, such abortive infections can predispose to cancer. PMID:15753007

  13. Easy and fast detection and genotyping of high-risk human papillomavirus by dedicated DNA microarrays.

    PubMed

    Albrecht, Valérie; Chevallier, Anne; Magnone, Virginie; Barbry, Pascal; Vandenbos, Fanny; Bongain, André; Lefebvre, Jean-Claude; Giordanengo, Valérie

    2006-11-01

    Persistent cervical high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is correlated with an increased risk of developing a high-grade cervical intraepithelial lesion. A two-step method was developed for detection and genotyping of high-risk HPV. DNA was firstly amplified by asymmetrical PCR in the presence of Cy3-labelled primers and dUTP. Labelled DNA was then genotyped using DNA microarray hybridization. The current study evaluated the technical efficacy of laboratory-designed HPV DNA microarrays for high-risk HPV genotyping on 57 malignant and non-malignant cervical smears. The approach was evaluated for a broad range of cytological samples: high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL), low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL) and atypical squamous cells of high-grade (ASC-H). High-risk HPV was also detected in six atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US) samples; among them only one cervical specimen was found uninfected, associated with no histological lesion. The HPV oligonucleotide DNA microarray genotyping detected 36 infections with a single high-risk HPV type and 5 multiple infections with several high-risk types. Taken together, these results demonstrate the sensitivity and specificity of the HPV DNA microarray approach. This approach could improve clinical management of patients with cervical cytological abnormalities. PMID:16879879

  14. Reassurance Against Future Risk of Precancer and Cancer Conferred by a Negative Human Papillomavirus Test

    PubMed Central

    Schiffman, Mark; Katki, Hormuzd A.; Castle, Philip E.; Fetterman, Barbara; Wentzensen, Nicolas; Poitras, Nancy E.; Lorey, Thomas; Cheung, Li C.; Kinney, Walter K.

    2014-01-01

    Primary human papillomavirus (HPV) testing (without concurrent Pap tests) every 3 years is under consideration in the United States as an alternative to the two recommended cervical cancer screening strategies: primary Pap testing every 3 years, or concurrent Pap and HPV testing (“cotesting”) every 5 years. Using logistic regression and Weibull survival models, we estimated and compared risks of cancer and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 or worse (CIN3+) for the three strategies among 1011092 women aged 30 to 64 years testing HPV-negative and/or Pap-negative in routine screening at Kaiser Permanente Northern California since 2003. All statistical tests were two sided. Three-year risks following an HPV-negative result were lower than 3-year risks following a Pap-negative result (CIN3+ = 0.069% vs 0.19%, P < .0001; Cancer = 0.011% vs 0.020%, P < .0001) and 5-year risks following an HPV-negative/Pap-negative cotest (CIN3+ = 0.069% vs 0.11%, P < .0001; Cancer = 0.011% vs 0.014%, P = .21). These findings suggest that primary HPV testing merits consideration as another alternative for cervical screening. PMID:25038467

  15. Human papillomavirus infection in the oromaxillofacial area: Clinical anatomy and histological considerations.

    PubMed

    Ilea, Aranka; Boşca, Bianca; MiclĂuş, Viorel; Rus, Vasile; BĂbţan, Anida Maria; CÂmpian, Radu Septimiu

    2015-11-01

    Clinical manifestations of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in the head and neck can range from benign lesions, which are the most frequent, to malignant lesions. The prevalence of head and neck cancer is increasing, despite currently decreasing trends in known risk factors such as smoking and alcohol use. A new patient profile has appeared in recent practice: most frequently a middle-aged male patient who does not smoke or drink alcohol, is sexually active (possibly having multiple partners), and presents with oral or cervicofacial lesions requiring diagnosis and treatment. Another risk factor that should be considered in these patients is HPV infection. The association of oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMD) with HPV is a challenge for the medical practitioner. The gold standard for diagnosis is histopathological examination, which can also yield evidence suggesting HPV infection. Determination of the viral genotype provides additional data for assessing the oncological risk of an HPV infection. Treatment of these patients is aimed at removing the lesions, in association or not with antiviral treatment and recurrence control.

  16. Episodic detection of human papillomavirus within a longitudinal cohort of young women.

    PubMed

    Shew, Marcia L; Ermel, Aaron C; Tong, Yan; Tu, Wanzhu; Qadadri, Brahim; Brown, Darron R

    2015-12-01

    Redetection of a type-specific human papillomavirus (HPV) infection may represent reinfection. However, a growing body of literature suggests that reactivation of HPV is common and that episodic detection of a HPV infection may represent reactivation of a persistent virus. A cohort of prospectively followed adolescent women (N = 150), ages 14-17, was observed on average 6.4 years. The authors describe the redetection of 37 HPV types and associated factors of redetection of high-risk (HR) and low-risk (LR) types using Cox proportional hazard models. Of 1,248 HPV type-specific infections, 286 (22.9%) were associated with redetection after apparent clearance. Chlamydia infections (HR = 1.99 [95%CI, 1.15-3.49]) and non-condom use (HR = 1.1 [95%CI, 1.04-1.99]) were associated with increased redetection of HR-HPV infections. Oral contraceptive pills (HR = 2.73 [95%CI, 1.52-4.90]) and number of sexual partners (HR = 1.44 [95%CI, 1.04-1.99]) were associated with increased redetection of LR-HPV infections. Episodic detection of HPV is common for HR- and LR-HPV types. This finding and identified factors or redetection have clinical implications and enhances the understanding of HPV natural history.

  17. Prevalence of human papillomavirus types in cervical cancerous and precancerous lesions of Ecuadorian women.

    PubMed

    Mejía, Lorena; Muñoz, Diana; Trueba, Gabriel; Tinoco, Leopoldo; Zapata, Sonia

    2016-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection worldwide and it is responsible for most cases of uterine cancer. In Ecuador there is limited information about HPV types (and variants) in cancerous lesions; however, identifying the type-specific HPV prevalence in cervical lesions of women living in Ecuador is important to better predict the impact of HPV prophylactic vaccination in this country. We studied the prevalence of HPV types in cervical cancerous or precancerous lesions from 164 Ecuadorian women and found that 86.0% were HPV positive. The most common types were HPV16 (41.8%) and HPV58 (30.5%). Interestingly, HPV18 was detected only in 2.8% of the HPV-positive samples. Fifteen DNA sequences (genes E6 and L1) from 16 samples positive for HPV16 belonged to the European lineage, considered one of the least carcinogenic lineages, and 1 (6.25%) to the Asian-American lineage. Similar analysis in 12 HPV58 positive samples showed that 10 (83.3%) sequences grouped in sublineage A2, which belongs to the oldest HPV58 lineage, 1 belonged to A3 and 1 to lineage C. This study suggests that the currently used HPV vaccines (bivalent and tetravalent) may have lower effectiveness in Ecuador than in other geographic locations where HPV18 is more prevalent.

  18. Human papillomavirus 33 worldwide genetic variation and associated risk of cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Alyce A.; Heideman, Daniëlle A.M.; Boon, Debby; Chen, Zigui; Burk, Robert D.; De Vuyst, Hugo; Gheit, Tarik; Snijders, Peter J.F.; Tommasino, Massimo; Franceschi, Silvia; Clifford, Gary M.

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) 33, a member of the HPV16-related alpha-9 species group, is found in approximately 5% of cervical cancers worldwide. The current study aimed to characterize the genetic diversity of HPV33 and to explore the association of HPV33 variants with the risk for cervical cancer. Taking advantage of the International Agency for Research on Cancer biobank, we sequenced the entire E6 and E7 open reading frames of 213 HPV33-positive cervical samples from 30 countries. We identified 28 HPV33 variants that formed 5 phylogenetic groups: the previously identified A1, A2, and B (sub) lineages and the novel A3 and C (sub)lineages. The A1 sublineage was strongly over-represented in cervical cases compared to controls in both Africa and Europe. In conclusion, we provide a classification system for HPV33 variants based on the sequence of E6 and E7 and suggest that the association of HPV33 with cervical cancer may differ by variant (sub)lineage. PMID:24314666

  19. Hyperthermia Selectively Targets Human Papillomavirus in Cervical Tumors via p53-Dependent Apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Oei, Arlene L; van Leeuwen, Caspar M; ten Cate, Rosemarie; Rodermond, Hans M; Buist, Marrije R; Stalpers, Lukas J A; Crezee, Johannes; Kok, H Petra; Medema, Jan Paul; Franken, Nicolaas A P

    2015-12-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with cervical cancer, the third most common cancer in women. The high-risk HPV types 16 and 18 are found in over 70% of cervical cancers and produce the oncoprotein, early protein 6 (E6), which binds to p53 and mediates its ubiquitination and degradation. Targeting E6 has been shown to be a promising treatment option to eliminate HPV-positive tumor cells. In addition, combined hyperthermia with radiation is a very effective treatment strategy for cervical cancer. In this study, we examined the effect of hyperthermia on HPV-positive cells using cervical cancer cell lines infected with HPV 16 and 18, in vivo tumor models, and ex vivo-treated patient biopsies. Strikingly, we demonstrate that a clinically relevant hyperthermia temperature of 42 °C for 1 hour resulted in E6 degradation, thereby preventing the formation of the E6-p53 complex and enabling p53-dependent apoptosis and G2-phase arrest. Moreover, hyperthermia combined with p53 depletion restored both the cell-cycle distribution and apoptosis to control levels. Collectively, our findings provide new insights into the treatment of HPV-positive cervical cancer and suggest that hyperthermia therapy could improve patient outcomes.

  20. Enhanced human papillomavirus type 8 oncogene expression levels are crucial for skin tumorigenesis in transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hufbauer, M.; Lazic, D.; Akguel, B.; Brandsma, J.L.; Pfister, H.; Weissenborn, S.J.

    2010-08-01

    Human papillomavirus 8 (HPV8) is involved in skin cancer development in epidermodysplasia verruciformis patients. Transgenic mice expressing HPV8 early genes (HPV8-CER) developed papillomas, dysplasias and squamous cell carcinomas. UVA/B-irradiation and mechanical wounding of HPV8-CER mouse skin led to prompt papilloma induction in about 3 weeks. The aim of this study was to analyze the kinetics and level of transgene expression in response to skin irritations. Transgene expression was already enhanced 1 to 2 days after UVA/B-irradiation or tape-stripping and maintained during papilloma development. The enhanced transgene expression could be assigned to UVB and not to UVA. Papilloma development was thus always paralleled by an increased transgene expression irrespective of the type of skin irritation. A knock-down of E6 mRNA by tattooing HPV8-E6-specific siRNA led to a delay and a lower incidence of papilloma development. This indicates that the early increase of viral oncogene expression is crucial for induction of papillomatosis.

  1. Human Papillomavirus Infection as a Possible Cause of Spontaneous Abortion and Spontaneous Preterm Delivery.

    PubMed

    Ambühl, Lea Maria Margareta; Baandrup, Ulrik; Dybkær, Karen; Blaakær, Jan; Uldbjerg, Niels; Sørensen, Suzette

    2016-01-01

    Based on the current literature, we aimed to provide an overview on Human Papillomavirus prevalence in normal pregnancies and pregnancies with adverse outcome. We conducted a systematic literature search in PubMed and Embase. Data extracted from the articles and used for analysis included HPV prevalence, pregnancy outcome, geographical location, investigated tissue types, and HPV detection methods. The overall HPV prevalence in normal full-term pregnancies was found to be 17.5% (95% CI; 17.3-17.7) for cervix, 8.3% (95% CI; 7.6-9.1) for placental tissue, 5.7% (95% CI; 5.1-6.3) for amniotic fluid, and 10.9% (95% CI; 10.1-11.7) for umbilical cord blood. Summary estimates for HPV prevalence of spontaneous abortions and spontaneous preterm deliveries, in cervix (spontaneous abortions: 24.5%, and preterm deliveries: 47%, resp.) and placenta (spontaneous abortions: 24.9%, and preterm deliveries: 50%, resp.), were identified to be higher compared to normal full-term pregnancies (P < 0.05 and P < 0.0001). Great variation in HPV prevalence was observed between study populations of different geographical locations. This review demonstrates an association between spontaneous abortion, spontaneous preterm delivery, and the presence of HPV in both the cervix and the placenta. However, a reliable conclusion is difficult to draw due to the limited number of studies conducted on material from pregnancies with adverse outcome and the risk of residual confounding. PMID:27110088

  2. Detection and genotyping of human papillomavirus in breast cancer tissues from Iraqi patients.

    PubMed

    Ali, S H M; Al-Alwan, N A S; Al-Alwany, S H M

    2014-06-18

    Studies have suggested a possible link between breast cancer pathogenesis and human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. This study in Iraq used in situ hybridization to detect the frequency and genotyping of HPV in tissue specimens from 129 patients diagnosed with malignant breast cancer, 24 with benign breast tumours and 20 healthy controls. In the breast cancer group, cocktail HPV genotypes were detected in 60 (46.5%) archived tissue blocks. Of these, genotypes 16 (55.5%), 18 (58.4%), 31 (65.0%) and 33 (26.6%) were detected. Mixed HPV genotypes 16 + 18, 16 + 18 + 31, 16 + 18 + 33, 18 + 33, 16 + 31 and 18 + 31 were found in 5.0%, 25.0%, 8.3%, 7.7%, 10.0% and 13.3% of cancer cases respectively. Only 3 benign breast tumour tissues (12.5%) and none of the healthy breast tissue specimens were HPV-DNA-positive. The detection of high-oncogenic HPV genotypes in patients with breast cancer supports the hypothesis of an etiologic role for the virus in breast cancer development.

  3. Ubiquitination and proteasome degradation of the E6 proteins of human papillomavirus types 11 and 18.

    PubMed

    Stewart, Deborah; Kazemi, Shirin; Li, Suiyang; Massimi, Paola; Banks, Lawrence; Koromilas, Antonis E; Matlashewski, Greg

    2004-06-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are aetiological agents for genital warts and cervical cancer, the different pathologies of which are dependent on the type of HPV infection. Oncogenic HPV types associated with cancer are carcinogens by virtue of their oncogene products, which target key regulators of cell proliferation and apoptosis. The viral E6 protein from oncogenic HPV types plays a central role in carcinogenesis by exploiting the cellular proteasome degradation pathway in order to mediate the degradation of cellular proteins, most notably the prototype tumour suppressor protein p53. Much less is known about the cellular targets of E6 from the non-oncogenic HPV types associated with genital warts. It is also unclear what factors influence the level and stability of the viral E6 proteins in cells. This report demonstrates that both oncogenic and non-oncogenic HPV E6 proteins (from types 18 and 11, respectively) are ubiquitinated and targeted for degradation by the 26S proteasome. E6 domains required for the induction of p53 or DLG degradation, or E6AP binding, are not involved in proteasome-mediated degradation of HPV-18 E6. These results provide insight into the cellular modulation of E6 protein levels from both high-risk and low-risk HPV types. PMID:15166424

  4. Structural comparison of four different antibodies interacting with human papillomavirus 16 and mechanisms of neutralization

    SciTech Connect

    Guan, Jian; Bywaters, Stephanie M.; Brendle, Sarah A.; Lee, Hyunwook; Ashley, Robert E.; Makhov, Alexander M.; Conway, James F.; Christensen, Neil D.; Hafenstein, Susan

    2015-09-15

    Cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM) was used to solve the structures of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) complexed with fragments of antibody (Fab) from three different neutralizing monoclonals (mAbs): H16.1A, H16.14J, and H263.A2. The structure-function analysis revealed predominantly monovalent binding of each Fab with capsid interactions that involved multiple loops from symmetry related copies of the major capsid protein. The residues identified in each Fab-virus interface map to a conformational groove on the surface of the capsomer. In addition to the known involvement of the FG and HI loops, the DE loop was also found to constitute the core of each epitope. Surprisingly, the epitope mapping also identified minor contributions by EF and BC loops. Complementary immunological assays included mAb and Fab neutralization. The specific binding characteristics of mAbs correlated with different neutralizing behaviors in pre- and post-attachment neutralization assays. - Highlights: • We present HPV16-Fab complexes from neutralizing mAbs: H16.1A, H16.14J, and H263.A2. • The structure-function analysis revealed predominantly monovalent binding of each mAb. • Capsid–Fab interactions involved multiple loops from symmetry related L1 proteins. • Besides the known FG and HI loops, epitope mapping also identified DE, EF, and BC loops. • Neutralizing assays complement the structures to show multiple neutralization mechanisms.

  5. Human papillomavirus-related Diseases: Oropharynx Cancers and Potential Implications for Adolescent HPV Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Gillison, Maura L.

    2008-01-01

    Molecular and epidemiological data now support an etiologic role for oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) in oral cancers in women and men. Recent studies have demonstrated an increase in the incidence of HPV-associated oral cancers in the United States (US). Moreover, the incidence rates for these cancers are higher in men than women. Oral HPV infections acquired through oral sex appear to be the principal risk factor for HPV-associated oral cancers. Despite reports in the popular press that the prevalence of oral sexual behaviors is increasing in the adolescent population, trends in these behaviors over time are largely unavailable. However, data indicate that oral-genital contact is frequently practiced among adolescents; adolescents do not typically consider this a risky behavior. The majority of oral cancers (approximately 90%) caused by HPV are identified as HPV 16 positive. Therefore, HPV-associated oral cancers could be prevented by a prophylactic vaccine if the vaccine were demonstrated to be capable of preventing oral HPV 16 infection. These findings have created new potential opportunities for the primary prevention of oral cancers. PMID:18809146

  6. Lack of detection of human papillomavirus DNA in prostate carcinomas in patients from northeastern Brazil.

    PubMed

    Araujo-Neto, Ari P; Ferreira-Fernandes, Hygor; Amaral, Carolina M M; Santos, Lina G; Freitas, Antônio C; Silva-Neto, Jacinto C; Rey, Juan A; Burbano, Rommel R; Silva, Benedito B da; Yoshioka, France K N; Pinto, Giovanny R

    2016-03-01

    Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer among men in western populations, and despite its high mortality, its etiology remains unknown. Inflammatory processes are related to the etiology of various types of tumors, and prostate inflammation, in particular, has been associated with prostate cancer carcinogenesis and progression. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with benign and malignant lesions in the anogenital tract of both females and males. The possible role of HPV in prostate carcinogenesis is a subject of great controversy. In this study, we aimed to examine the prevalence of HPV infections in prostate carcinomas of patients from northeastern Brazil. This study included 104 tissue samples from primary prostate carcinoma cases. HPV DNA was purified and then amplified using MY09/11 and GP5+/GP6+ degenerate primer sets that detect a wide range of HPV types, and with specific PCR primers sets for E6 and E7 HPV regions to detect HPV 16. None of the samples showed amplification products of HPV DNA for primer sets MY09/11 and GP5+/GP6+, or the specific primer set for the E6 and E7 HPV regions. HPV infection, thus, does not seem to be one of the causes of prostate cancer in the population studied.

  7. Lack of detection of human papillomavirus DNA in prostate carcinomas in patients from northeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Araujo-Neto, Ari P.; Ferreira-Fernandes, Hygor; Amaral, Carolina M.M.; Santos, Lina G.; Freitas, Antônio C.; Silva-Neto, Jacinto C.; Rey, Juan A.; Burbano, Rommel R.; da Silva, Benedito B.; Yoshioka, France K.N.; Pinto, Giovanny R.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Prostate cancer is the second most common cancer among men in western populations, and despite its high mortality, its etiology remains unknown. Inflammatory processes are related to the etiology of various types of tumors, and prostate inflammation, in particular, has been associated with prostate cancer carcinogenesis and progression. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with benign and malignant lesions in the anogenital tract of both females and males. The possible role of HPV in prostate carcinogenesis is a subject of great controversy. In this study, we aimed to examine the prevalence of HPV infections in prostate carcinomas of patients from northeastern Brazil. This study included 104 tissue samples from primary prostate carcinoma cases. HPV DNA was purified and then amplified using MY09/11 and GP5+/GP6+ degenerate primer sets that detect a wide range of HPV types, and with specific PCR primers sets for E6 and E7 HPV regions to detect HPV 16. None of the samples showed amplification products of HPV DNA for primer sets MY09/11 and GP5+/GP6+, or the specific primer set for the E6 and E7 HPV regions. HPV infection, thus, does not seem to be one of the causes of prostate cancer in the population studied. PMID:27007894

  8. Coverage of human papillomavirus vaccination during the first year of its introduction in Spain.

    PubMed

    Limia, A; Pachón, I

    2011-01-01

    The decision to introduce human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination into the national immunisation programme in Spain was made in October 2007, recommending vaccination of girls aged between 11 and 14 years with three doses of HPV vaccine. All 19 regions of the country (17 Autonomous Communities and two Autonomous Cities) introduced HPV vaccination gradually into their immunisation programmes between November 2007 and the last school term of 2008. Eight regions administered the vaccine in healthcare centres and 11 in schools. In the first year of the introduction of HPV vaccination, coverage of the first and third doses was assessed, to determine the proportion of girls who did not complete the vaccination. On the basis of the available data, the Ministry of Health estimated that coverage for the first dose was 87.2% (range: 73.9–98.9%; 95% CI: 71.8 to 100) and 77.3% (range: 62.2–97.4%; 95% CI: 57.9 to 96.7) for the third dose. Higher uptake was observed when the vaccination was carried out in schools compared with healthcare centres, but the difference was not statistically significant. Negative messages in the media during implementation of the HPV vaccination programme may have had some influence on the attitudes of adolescent girls and/or their parents towards HPV vaccination and may be partly responsible for the observed vaccination dropout rate. PMID:21632017

  9. How to best measure the effectiveness of male human papillomavirus vaccine programmes?

    PubMed

    Garland, S M; Molesworth, E G; Machalek, D A; Cornall, A M; Tabrizi, Sepehr N

    2015-09-01

    In many countries now, vaccination of young adolescent girls with prophylactic human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines has been rolled out as a public health programme. In countries where coverage has been high, this has led to dramatic reductions in cervical high-grade precancerous lesions, as well as genital warts. A reduction in circulating vaccine-related HPV types has also been demonstrated. With the introduction of gender-neutral approaches incorporating universal vaccination of pre-adolescent boys in some countries, implementation of post-vaccine monitoring will be critical to evaluate the incremental impact of male vaccination. In contrast to cervical screening programmes, population-wide screening for HPV infection or related disease in males is not recommended; hence real-time monitoring of HPV vaccine effectiveness in males will require dedicated surveillance strategies. Monitoring the prevalence of circulating genital HPV types using a sentinel surveillance model could offer a good surrogate marker of early vaccine effectiveness in males. However, such an approach requires careful consideration of the most appropriate anatomical sites from which to collect specimens, the best sampling methods and the most sensitive assays to use. Additionally, in assessing an accurate measure of the impact of HPV vaccination in the male population, the effect of herd protection will need to be assessed, as most male programmes will commence in the setting of established female programmes. This poses an interesting epidemiological challenge. PMID:26055415

  10. Transcriptome signature of irreversible senescence in human papillomavirus-positive cervical cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Wells, Susanne I.; Aronow, Bruce J.; Wise, Trisha M.; Williams, Sarah S.; Couget, Jennifer A.; Howley, Peter M.

    2003-01-01

    A frequent characteristic of human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive cervical cancers is the loss of viral E2 gene expression in HPV-infected cervical epithelial cells as a consequence of viral DNA integration into the cellular genome. The expression of E2 in HPV-positive cancer cells results in the repression of the viral E6/E7 oncogenes, activation of the p53 and pRB pathways, and a G1 cell cycle arrest, followed by induction of cellular senescence. The transcriptional consequences of E2-mediated cell cycle arrest that lead to senescence currently are unknown. Using conditional senescence induction in HeLa cells and microarray analysis, we describe here the expression profile of cells irreversibly committed to senescence. Our results provide insight into the molecular anatomy of senescence pathways and its regulation by HPV on-coproteins. These include the induction of the RAB vesicular transport machinery and a general down-regulation of chromatin regulatory molecules. The repression of tumor-specific G antigens during E2 senescence supports a reversal of the tumorigenic phenotype by E2 and the potential approach of tumor-specific G antigen-specific immunotherapy for cervical cancer. PMID:12756294

  11. High Prevalence of Human Papillomavirus in Colorectal Cancer in Hispanics: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Bernabe-Dones, Raul D.; Gonzalez-Pons, Maria; Villar-Prados, Alejandro; Lacourt-Ventura, Mercedes; Rodríguez-Arroyo, Heriberto; Fonseca-Williams, Sharon; Velazquez, Francisco E.; Diaz-Algorri, Yaritza; Lopez-Diaz, Sofia M.; Rodríguez, Nayra; Yamamura, Yasuhiro; Cruz-Correa, Marcia

    2016-01-01

    The role of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) in colorectal carcinogenesis remains elusive. Based on the high incidence of HPV-associated malignancies among Puerto Rican Hispanics, this study aimed to assess the prevalence of HPV infection and viral integration in colorectal tissues in order to evaluate its putative role in colorectal cancer (CRC). In this case-control study, the prevalence of HPV infection in CRC (cases n = 45) and normal colon mucosa from cancer-free subjects (controls n = 36) was assessed by a nested PCR strategy. HPV-16 genotyping was performed in HPV-positive tissues and the physical status of the HPV-16 genome was determined by E2 detection. HPV was detected in 19 of 45 (42.2%) CRC cases (mean age 61.1 ± 10.7 years, 24 males) and in 1 of 36 (2.8%) controls (mean age 60.9 ± 9.6 years, 24 males) with an OR = 25.58 (95% CI 3.21 to 203.49). HPV-16 was detected in 63.2% of the HPV-positive colorectal tumors; genome integration was observed in all HPV-16 positive cases. This is the first report showing the high prevalence of HPV infections in Caribbean Hispanic colorectal tumors. Despite evidence of HPV integration into the host genome, further mechanistic analysis examining HPV oncoprotein expression and the putative role of these oncoproteins in colorectal carcinogenesis is warranted. PMID:26904111

  12. Numerical simulation of a two-sex human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Suryani, I.; Adi-Kusumo, F.

    2014-02-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is a major cause of cervical cancer, precancerous lesions, cancer and other disease. HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection. Although HPV virus primarily affects woman but it can also affects man because it cause of cancer of the anus, vulva, vagina, penis and some other cancers. HPV vaccines now used to prevent cervical cancer and genital warts because the vaccine protect against four types of HPV that most commonly cause disease are types 6, 11, 16, and 18. This paper is sequel work of Elbasha (2008). Difference with Elbasha (2008) are give alternative proof global stability, numerical simulation and interpretation. Global stability of the equilibrium on the model of a two-sex HPV vaccination were explored by using Lyapunov. Although we use the same lyapunov function, we use the largest invariant set to proof the global stability. The result show that the global stability of the equilibrium depends on the effective reproduction number (R). If R < 1 then the infection-free equilibrium is asymptotically stable globally. If R > 1 then endemic equilibrium have globally asymptotically stable properties. Then equilibrium proceed with the interpretation of numerical simulation.

  13. Human papillomavirus infection in the oromaxillofacial area: Clinical anatomy and histological considerations.

    PubMed

    Ilea, Aranka; Boşca, Bianca; MiclĂuş, Viorel; Rus, Vasile; BĂbţan, Anida Maria; CÂmpian, Radu Septimiu

    2015-11-01

    Clinical manifestations of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in the head and neck can range from benign lesions, which are the most frequent, to malignant lesions. The prevalence of head and neck cancer is increasing, despite currently decreasing trends in known risk factors such as smoking and alcohol use. A new patient profile has appeared in recent practice: most frequently a middle-aged male patient who does not smoke or drink alcohol, is sexually active (possibly having multiple partners), and presents with oral or cervicofacial lesions requiring diagnosis and treatment. Another risk factor that should be considered in these patients is HPV infection. The association of oral potentially malignant disorders (OPMD) with HPV is a challenge for the medical practitioner. The gold standard for diagnosis is histopathological examination, which can also yield evidence suggesting HPV infection. Determination of the viral genotype provides additional data for assessing the oncological risk of an HPV infection. Treatment of these patients is aimed at removing the lesions, in association or not with antiviral treatment and recurrence control. PMID:26331491

  14. Predictors of the Sexual Well-being of Individuals Diagnosed with Herpes and Human Papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Foster, Lyndsay R; Byers, E Sandra

    2016-02-01

    Research suggests that having a sexually transmitted infection (STI) such as genital herpes and human papillomavirus (HPV) can negatively affect sexual well-being. However, there is little research examining factors associated with poorer sexual well-being among individuals with a STI. This study investigated the extent to which stigma experiences, individual characteristics, and STI characteristics were associated with multiple aspects of sexual well-being among individuals diagnosed with herpes and/or HPV. Participants were an average of 36 years old (SD = 11.58) and included 188 individuals with herpes and/or HPV who completed measures of sexual activity, sexual problems, and sexual cognitive-affective factors. The results showed that experiences of stigmatization were the most important predictors of sexual well-being. Participants who perceived were stigmatized by others as well as those who internalized negative social attitudes to a greater extent reported poorer sexual well-being across all dimensions, over and above individual and STI characteristics. The implications of these findings for sexual health professionals are discussed. PMID:25408498

  15. Cervical Cancer Screening after Perimenopause: How Is Human Papillomavirus Test Performed?

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the third most prevalent cancer in women around the world. Recently in Korea, the incidence of cervical cancer has decreased, but in all stages of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN), CIN has shown a 91% increase from 1999 to 2008. Persistent human papillomavirus (HPV) infection has been found to be the main cause of cervical cancer. HPV types 16 and 18 have been found in 70% of cervical cancer patients around the world. Cervical cancer screening such as cytology has limitations in terms of sensitivity and specificity. A discussion about the need for the HPV test is becoming active in order to compensate for the limitation of cytology. After the role of HPV in cervical cancer was identified, the importance of HPV detection test as a screening was emphasized. Several tests have been developed and each test has its own advantages and disadvantages, and new test method to overcome the disadvantages is still being developed. Today's guidelines and tests are those you would choose from among the large number of cervical cancer screening guidelines and tests, based on the consideration that the selected guidelines and the test are effective. PMID:27617239

  16. Production and characterisation of a monoclonal antibody to human papillomavirus type 16 using recombinant vaccinia virus.

    PubMed

    McLean, C S; Churcher, M J; Meinke, J; Smith, G L; Higgins, G; Stanley, M; Minson, A C

    1990-06-01

    A monoclonal antibody was raised against the major capsid protein L1 of human papillomavirus type 16, using a recombinant vaccinia virus that expresses the L1 protein, as a target for screening. This antibody, designated CAMVIR-1, reacted with a 56 kilodalton protein in cells infected with L1-vaccinia virus, and the protein was present in a predominantly nuclear location. The antibody also detects the HPV-16 L1 antigen in formalin fixed, paraffin wax embedded biopsy specimens and on routine cervical smears. The antibody reacts strongly and consistently with biopsy specimens containing HPV-16 or HPV-33, but very weak reactions were occasionally observed with biopsy specimens or smears containing HPV-6 or HPV-11. The potential advantages of using a vaccinia recombinant are (i) the target protein is synthesised in a eukoryotic cell so that its "processing" and location are normal; (ii) cells infected with vaccinia recombinants can be subjected to various fixing procedures similar to those used for routine clinical material. This greatly increases the probability that an identified antibody will be useful in a clinical setting.

  17. Knowledge and acceptability of human papillomavirus vaccination and cervical cancer screening among women in Karnataka, India.

    PubMed

    Montgomery, Martha P; Dune, Tanaka; Shetty, Prasanna K; Shetty, Avinash K

    2015-03-01

    Cervical cancer is the leading cause of cancer-related mortality among women in India; however, participation in prevention and screening is low and the reasons for this are not well understood. In a cross-sectional survey in August 2008, 202 healthy women in Karnataka, India completed a questionnaire regarding knowledge, attitudes, and practices related to human papillomavirus (HPV) and cervical cancer. Factors associated with vaccination and Papanicolau (Pap) smear screening acceptance were explored. Thirty-six percent of women had heard of HPV while 15% had heard of cervical cancer. Five percent of women reported ever having a Pap smear, and 4% of women felt at risk of HPV infection. Forty-six percent of women were accepting of vaccination, but fewer (21%) were willing to have a Pap smear. Overall, knowledge related to HPV and cervical cancer topics was low. Women with negative attitudes toward HPV infection were 5.3 (95% confidence interval (CI) 2.8-10) times more likely to accept vaccination but were not significantly more likely to accept Pap smear (odds ratio 1.5, 95% CI 0.7-3.0). Cost and a low level of perceived risk were the most frequent factors cited as potential barriers. Improving awareness of HPV and cervical cancer through health care providers in addition to increasing access to vaccination and screening through government-sponsored programs may be feasible and effective methods to reduce cervical cancer burden in India.

  18. Human papillomavirus prevalence, cervical abnormalities and risk factors among female sex workers in Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Brown, B; Blas, M M; Cabral, A; Byraiah, G; Guerra-Giraldez, C; Sarabia-Vega, V; Carcamo, C; Gravitt, P E; Halsey, N A

    2015-01-01

    Summary Female sex workers (FSWs) are at high risk of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Questionnaires were administered to 200 FSWs aged 18–26 years in Lima, Peru, to gather risk behaviours, and cervical swab samples were collected for Pap smears and HPV DNA testing as part of a longitudinal study. Participants reported a median of 120 clients in the past month, and 99.2% reported using condoms with clients. The prevalence of any HPV in cervical samples was 66.8%; 34 (17.1%) participants had prevalent HPV 16 or 18, and 92 (46.2%) had one or more oncogenic types. Fifteen women had abnormal Pap smears, 13 of which were HPV DNA positive. Fewer years since first sex was associated with oncogenic HPV prevalence in a model adjusted for previous sexually transmitted infection (STI) status and condom use with partners (prevalence ratio = 0.77, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.60–0.97). Our data confirm the high rates of HPV transmission among FSWs in Peru, highlighting the need for early and effective strategies to prevent cervical cancer. PMID:22581946

  19. [Esophageal papilloma: case report, molecular identification of human papillomavirus and literature review].

    PubMed

    Barbaglia, Yanina; Jiménez, Félix; Tedeschi, Fabián; Zalazar, Fabián

    2013-09-01

    sophageal squamous papilloma is an uncommon, usually asymptomatic, benign tumor of the squamous epithelium consisting of a raised, sessile, small and round (smooth or rough) lesion. The prevalence is between 0.01 and 0.45% of cases, with a male/female ratio of 3:1. The etiology and pathogenesis appear to be a mechanical or chemical irritation of the mucosa in addition to the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV), important agent in the evolution to a squamous carcinoma, especially HPV types 16 and 18. In this paper, we describe a case of esophageal papilloma whose diagnosis involved endoscopic images, pathological studies and detection of viral DNA by polymerase chain reaction. By using molecular techniques (PCR-RFLP) a profile consistent with HPV type 16 has been obtained. The patient underwent polypectomy and currently, after 3 years of diagnosis, he remains asymptomatic. This work is one of the first national reports of a patient with esophageal papilloma in which one of the most frequently HPV genotypes associated with esophageal carcinoma (HPV 16) has been detected.

  20. Immunotherapy for human papillomavirus-associated disease and cervical cancer: review of clinical and translational research.

    PubMed

    Lee, Sung Jong; Yang, Andrew; Wu, T C; Hung, Chien Fu

    2016-09-01

    Cervical cancer is the fourth most lethal women's cancer worldwide. Current treatments against cervical cancer include surgery, radiotherapy, chemotherapy, and anti-angiogenic agents. However, despite the various treatments utilized for the treatment of cervical cancer, its disease burden remains a global issue. Persistent infection of human papillomavirus (HPV) has been identified as an essential step of pathogenesis of cervical cancer and many other cancers, and nation-wide HPV screening as well as preventative HPV vaccination program have been introduced globally. However, even though the commercially available prophylactic HPV vaccines, Gardasil (Merck) and Cervarix (GlaxoSmithKline), are effective in blocking the entry of HPV into the epithelium of cervix through generation of HPV-specific neutralizing antibodies, they cannot eliminate the pre-existing HPV infection. For these reason, other immunotherapeutic options against HPV-associated diseases, including therapeutic vaccines, have been continuously explored. Therapeutic HPV vaccines enhance cell-mediated immunity targeting HPV E6 and E7 antigens by modulating primarily dendritic cells and cytotoxic T lymphocyte. Our review will cover various therapeutic vaccines in development for the treatment of HPV-associated lesions and cancers. Furthermore, we will discuss the potential of immune checkpoint inhibitors that have recently been adopted and tested for their treatment efficacy against HPV-induced cervical cancer.