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Sample records for human papillomavirus oncogene

  1. Role of papillomavirus oncogenes in human cervical cancer: Transgenic animal studies

    SciTech Connect

    Griep, A.E.; Lambert, P.F.

    1994-05-01

    Human papillomaviruses are believed to be etiologic agents for the majority of human cervical carcinoma, a common cancer that is a leading cause of death by cancer among women worldwide. In cervical carcinoma, a subset of papillomaviral genes, namely E6 and E7, are expressed. In vitro tissue culture studies indicate that HPV E6 and E7 are oncogenes, and that their oncogenicity is due in part to their capacity to inactivate cellular tumor suppressor genes. The behavior of E6 and E7 in vitro and the genetic evidence from analysis of human cancers suggest that the E6 and E7 genes play a significant role in the development of cervical cancer. This hypothesis is now being tested using animal models. In this review, we summarize our current knowledge of the oncogenicity of papillomavirus genes that has been generated through their study in transgenic mice. 82 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Transmission between Archaic and Modern Human Ancestors during the Evolution of the Oncogenic Human Papillomavirus 16.

    PubMed

    Pimenoff, Ville N; de Oliveira, Cristina Mendes; Bravo, Ignacio G

    2017-01-01

    Every human suffers through life a number of papillomaviruses (PVs) infections, most of them asymptomatic. A notable exception are persistent infections by Human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16), the most oncogenic infectious agent for humans and responsible for most infection-driven anogenital cancers. Oncogenic potential is not homogeneous among HPV16 lineages, and genetic variation within HPV16 exhibits some geographic structure. However, an in-depth analysis of the HPV16 evolutionary history was still wanting. We have analyzed extant HPV16 diversity and compared the evolutionary and phylogeographical patterns of humans and of HPV16. We show that codivergence with modern humans explains at most 30% of the present viral geographical distribution. The most explanatory scenario suggests that ancestral HPV16 already infected ancestral human populations and that viral lineages co-diverged with the hosts in parallel with the split between archaic Neanderthal-Denisovans and ancestral modern human populations, generating the ancestral HPV16A and HPV16BCD viral lineages, respectively. We propose that after out-of-Africa migration of modern human ancestors, sexual transmission between human populations introduced HPV16A into modern human ancestor populations. We hypothesize that differential coevolution of HPV16 lineages with different but closely related ancestral human populations and subsequent host-switch events in parallel with introgression of archaic alleles into the genomes of modern human ancestors may be largely responsible for the present-day differential prevalence and association with cancers for HPV16 variants.

  3. Oncogenic potential diverge among human papillomavirus type 16 natural variants

    SciTech Connect

    Sichero, Laura; Simao Sobrinho, Joao; Lina Villa, Luisa

    2012-10-10

    We compared E6/E7 protein properties of three different HPV-16 variants: AA, E-P and E-350G. Primary human foreskin keratinocytes (PHFK) were transduced with HPV-16 E6 and E7 and evaluated for proliferation and ability to grow in soft agar. E-P infected keratinocytes presented the lowest efficiency in colony formation. AA and E-350G keratinocytes attained higher capacity for in vitro transformation. We observed similar degradation of TP53 among HPV-16 variants. Furthermore, we accessed the expression profile in early (p5) and late passage (p30) transduced cells of 84 genes commonly involved in carcinogenesis. Most differences could be attributed to HPV-16 E6/E7 expression. In particular, we detected different expression of ITGA2 and CHEK2 in keratinocytes infected with AA and AA/E-350G late passage cells, respectively, and higher expression of MAP2K1 in E-350G transduced keratinocytes. Our results indicate differences among HPV-16 variants that could explain, at least in part, differences in oncogenic potential attributed to these variants.

  4. [Oncogenic potential of papillomaviruses].

    PubMed

    Váňová, B; Golais, F

    2013-01-01

    Papillomaviruses belong to a group of viruses with double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). These viruses are believed to induce benign as well as malignant tumour growth. Thanks to professor zur Hausen, the connection between the infection by human papillomaviruses (HPV) and cervix cancer was described in detail a few years ago. However, there exist certain types of HPV viruses, in which no association with malignancies was ever demonstrated. Hence, we can divide HPV into "high-risk" (HR) and "low-risk" (LR) group. Our work describes the life cycle of HPV, molecular mechanisms of oncogenesis and aims to compare HR HPV and LR HPV within these terms.

  5. Human papillomavirus DNA and oncogene alterations in colorectal tumors.

    PubMed

    Pérez, Luis Orlando; Barbisan, Gisela; Ottino, Anabel; Pianzola, Horacio; Golijow, Carlos Daniel

    2010-09-01

    The aim of the present study is to determine the presence and molecular integrity of high-risk HPV types in colorectal adenocarcinomas and to assess whether viral DNA is related to common proto-oncogene alterations, such as k-ras mutations and c-myc gene amplification, in colorectal cancer. Seventy-five colorectal adenocarcinomas were screened for HPV infection using nested-PCR (MY09/11-GP5+/6+). HPV typing was performed by type-specific PCR for HPV 16 and HPV 18 DNA. Unidentified samples were subsequently sequenced to determine the viral genotype. The physical status of HPV was determined by a nested PCR approach for type-specific E2 sequences. C-myc amplification was assessed by co-amplification with β-globin as control locus, and mutation in k-ras codons 12 and 13 by ARMS-PCR. Overall, HPV was detected in thirty-three colorectal specimens (44%). HPV 16 was the prevalent type (16/75), followed by HPV 18 (15/75), HPV 31 (1/75) and HPV 66 (1/75). E2 disruption was detected in 56.3% of HPV 16 and in 40% of HPV 18 positive tumors. C-myc amplification was detected in 29.4% of cases, while k-ras mutations in 30.7%. There was no significant trend for HPV infection in tumors harboring either k-ras or c-myc alterations. This study demonstrates HPV DNA and viral integration in colorectal tumors, suggesting a potential role of this virus in colorectal carcinogenesis. There was no concurrence, however, of k-ras and c-myc activation with viral infection.

  6. Acquired immune response to oncogenic human papillomavirus associated with prophylactic cervical cancer vaccines.

    PubMed

    Einstein, Mark H

    2008-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a common infection among women and a necessary cause of cervical cancer. Oncogenic HPV types infecting the anogenital tract have the potential to induce natural immunity, but at present we do not clearly understand the natural history of infection in humans and the mechanisms by which the virus can evade the host immune response. Natural acquired immune responses against HPV may be involved in the clearance of infection, but persistent infection with oncogenic virus types leads to the development of precancerous lesions and cancer. B cell responses are important for viral neutralization, but antibody responses in patients with cervical cancer are poor. Prophylactic vaccines targeting oncogenic virus types associated with cervical cancer have the potential to prevent up to 80% of cervical cancers by targeting HPV types 16 and 18. Clinical data show that prophylactic vaccines are effective in inducing antibody responses and in preventing persistent infection with HPV, as well as the subsequent development of high-grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. This article reviews the known data regarding natural immune responses to HPV and those developed by prophylactic vaccination.

  7. Determination of Oncogenic Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Genotypes in Anogenital Cancers in Myanmar.

    PubMed

    Mu Mu Shwe; Hlaing Myat Thu; Khin Saw Aye; Aye Aye Myint; Mya Thida; Khin Shwe Mar; Khin Khin Oo; Khin Sandar Aye; Okada, Shigeru; Kyaw Zin Thant

    2016-01-01

    Molecular and epidemiologic investigations suggest a causal role for human papillomavirus (HPV) in anogenital cancers. This study identified oncogenic HPV genotypes in anogenital cancers among men and women in a 2013 cross-sectional descriptive study in Myanmar. In total, 100 biopsy tissues of histologically confirmed anogenital cancers collected in 2008-2012 were studied, including 30 penile and 9 anal cancers from Yangon General Hospital and 61 vulvar cancers from Central Women's Hospital, Yangon. HPV-DNA testing and genotyping were performed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. Overall, 34% of anogenital cancers were HPV-positive. HPV was found in 44.4% of anal (4/9), 36.1% of vulvar (22/61), and 26.7% of penile (8/30) cancers. The most frequent genotypes in anal cancers were HPV 16 (75% ) and 18 (25% ). In vulvar cancers, HPV 33 was most common (40.9% ), followed by 16 (31.8% ), 31 (22.7% ), and 18 (4.6% ). In penile cancers, HPV 16 (62.5% ) was most common, followed by 33 (25% ) and 18 (12.5% ). This is the first report of evidencebased oncogenic HPV genotypes in anogenital cancers among men and women in Myanmar. This research provides valuable information for understanding the burden of HPV-associated cancers of the anus, penis, and vulva and considering the effectiveness of prophylactic HPV vaccination.

  8. Arsenic trioxide inhibits cell proliferation and human papillomavirus oncogene expression in cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Hongtao; Gao, Peng; Zheng, Jie

    2014-09-05

    Arsenic trioxide (As2O3) has shown therapeutic effects in some leukemias and solid cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms of its anticancer efficacy have not been clearly elucidated, particularly in solid cancers. Our previous data showed that As2O3 induced apoptosis of human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 DNA-immortalized human cervical epithelial cells and cervical cancer cells and inhibited the expression of HPV oncogenes in these cells. In the present study, we systemically examined the effects of As2O3 on five human cervical cancer cell lines and explored the possible molecular mechanisms. MTT assay showed that HPV-negative C33A cells were more sensitive to growth inhibition induced by As2O3 than HPV-positive cervical cancer cells, and HPV 18-positive HeLa and C4-I cells were more sensitive to As2O3 than HPV 16-positive CaSki and SiHa cells. After As2O3 treatment, both mRNA and protein levels of HPV E6 and E7 obviously decreased in all HPV positive cell lines. In contrast, p53 and Rb protein levels increased in all tested cell lines. Transcription factor AP-1 protein expression decreased significantly in HeLa, CaSki and C33A cells with ELISA method. These results suggest that As2O3 is a potential anticancer drug for cervical cancer.

  9. Arsenic trioxide inhibits cell proliferation and human papillomavirus oncogene expression in cervical cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hongtao; Gao, Peng; Zheng, Jie

    2014-09-05

    Highlights: • As{sub 2}O{sub 3} inhibits growth of cervical cancer cells and expression of HPV oncogenes in these cells. • HPV-negative cervical cancer cells are more sensitive to As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV-positive cervical cancer cells. • HPV-18 positive cervical cancer cells are more sensitive to As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV-16 positive cancer cells. • Down-regulation of HPV oncogenes by As{sub 2}O{sub 3} is partially due to the diminished AP-1 binding. - Abstract: Arsenic trioxide (As{sub 2}O{sub 3}) has shown therapeutic effects in some leukemias and solid cancers. However, the molecular mechanisms of its anticancer efficacy have not been clearly elucidated, particularly in solid cancers. Our previous data showed that As{sub 2}O{sub 3} induced apoptosis of human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 DNA-immortalized human cervical epithelial cells and cervical cancer cells and inhibited the expression of HPV oncogenes in these cells. In the present study, we systemically examined the effects of As{sub 2}O{sub 3} on five human cervical cancer cell lines and explored the possible molecular mechanisms. MTT assay showed that HPV-negative C33A cells were more sensitive to growth inhibition induced by As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV-positive cervical cancer cells, and HPV 18-positive HeLa and C4-I cells were more sensitive to As{sub 2}O{sub 3} than HPV 16-positive CaSki and SiHa cells. After As{sub 2}O{sub 3} treatment, both mRNA and protein levels of HPV E6 and E7 obviously decreased in all HPV positive cell lines. In contrast, p53 and Rb protein levels increased in all tested cell lines. Transcription factor AP-1 protein expression decreased significantly in HeLa, CaSki and C33A cells with ELISA method. These results suggest that As{sub 2}O{sub 3} is a potential anticancer drug for cervical cancer.

  10. Enhanced human papillomavirus type 8 oncogene expression levels are crucial for skin tumorigenesis in transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Hufbauer, M.; Lazic, D.; Akguel, B.; Brandsma, J.L.; Pfister, H.; Weissenborn, S.J.

    2010-08-01

    Human papillomavirus 8 (HPV8) is involved in skin cancer development in epidermodysplasia verruciformis patients. Transgenic mice expressing HPV8 early genes (HPV8-CER) developed papillomas, dysplasias and squamous cell carcinomas. UVA/B-irradiation and mechanical wounding of HPV8-CER mouse skin led to prompt papilloma induction in about 3 weeks. The aim of this study was to analyze the kinetics and level of transgene expression in response to skin irritations. Transgene expression was already enhanced 1 to 2 days after UVA/B-irradiation or tape-stripping and maintained during papilloma development. The enhanced transgene expression could be assigned to UVB and not to UVA. Papilloma development was thus always paralleled by an increased transgene expression irrespective of the type of skin irritation. A knock-down of E6 mRNA by tattooing HPV8-E6-specific siRNA led to a delay and a lower incidence of papilloma development. This indicates that the early increase of viral oncogene expression is crucial for induction of papillomatosis.

  11. Evolution and classification of oncogenic human papillomavirus types and variants associated with cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zigui; de Freitas, Luciana Bueno; Burk, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    The nomenclature of human papillomavirus (HPV) is established by the International Committee on Taxonomy of Virus (ICTV). However, the ICTV does not set standards for HPV below species levels. This chapter describes detailed genotyping methods for determining and classifying HPV variants. PMID:25348294

  12. Enhanced transcriptional activation by E2 proteins from the oncogenic human papillomaviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Kovelman, R; Bilter, G K; Glezer, E; Tsou, A Y; Barbosa, M S

    1996-01-01

    A systematic comparison of transcriptional activation by papillomavirus E2 proteins revealed that the E2 proteins from high-risk human papillomaviruses (human papillomavirus type 16 [HPV-16] and HPV-18) are much more active than are the E2 proteins from low-risk HPVs (HPV-6b and HPV-11). Despite the tropism of HPVs for particular epithelial cell types, this difference in transcriptional activation was observed in a number of different epithelial and nonepithelial cells. The enhanced activities of the E2 proteins from high-risk HPVs did not result from higher steady-state levels of protein in vivo, and in vitro DNA-binding assays revealed similar binding properties for these two classes of E2 proteins. These results demonstrate that the E2 proteins from high-risk HPVs have an intrinsically enhanced potential to activate transcription from promoters with E2-responsive elements. We found that there are also substantial differences between the activation properties of the bovine papillomavirus type 1 E2 protein and those of either of the two classes of HPV E2 proteins, especially with regard to requirements for particular configurations of E2 binding sites in the target promoter. Our results indicate that there are at least three distinct functional classes of E2 proteins and that these classes of E2 proteins may perform different roles during the respective viral life cycles. PMID:8892874

  13. The human oncogenic viruses

    SciTech Connect

    Luderer, A.A.; Weetall, H.H

    1986-01-01

    This book contains eight selections. The titles are: Cytogenetics of the Leukemias and Lymphomas; Cytogenetics of Solid Tumors: Renal Cell Carcinoma, Malignant Melanoma, Retinoblastoma, and Wilms' Tumor; Elucidation of a Normal Function for a Human Proto-Oncogene; Detection of HSV-2 Genes and Gene Products in Cervical Neoplasia; Papillomaviruses in Anogennital Neoplasms; Human Epstein-Barr Virus and Cancer; Hepatitis B Virus and Hepatocellular Carcinoma; and Kaposi's Sarcoma: Acquired Immunodeficiency Syndrome (AIDS) and Associated Viruses.

  14. Seroprevalence of 8 Oncogenic Human Papillomavirus Genotypes and Acquired Immunity Against Reinfection

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Lauren; Pawlita, Michael; Castle, Phillip E.; Waterboer, Tim; Sahasrabuddhe, Vikrant; Gravitt, Patti E.; Schiffman, Mark; Wentzensen, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    Background. Natural human papillomavirus (HPV) antibody titers have shown protection against subsequent HPV infection, but previous studies were restricted to few HPV genotypes. We examined the association of naturally occurring antibodies against 8 carcinogenic HPV types with subsequent infections. Methods. A total of 2302 women enrolled in the Atypical Squamous Cells of Undetermined Significance/Low-Grade Squamous Intraepithelial Lesion Triage Study provided blood samples at baseline. Serum samples were tested for antibodies against 8 carcinogenic HPV genotypes (16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 45, 52, and 58) using a multiplex serology assay. We analyzed the relationship between HPV antibodies and HPV infection during 2 years of follow-up among women negative for the specific HPV type at baseline. Results. Baseline seroprevalence for HPV16 L1 was associated with decreased risk of DNA positivity for HPV16 (odds ratio, 0.39 [95% confidence interval, .18–.86]) at ≥2 follow-up visits. We observed similar but nonsignificant decreased risks for HPV18 and 31. These findings were restricted to women reporting a new sex partner during follow-up. There was no association between baseline seroprevalence and detection of precancer during follow-up. Conclusions. Seroprevalence conferred protection against subsequent HPV infection for HPV16 and indicated possible protection for 2 other genotypes, suggesting that this effect is common to several HPV genotypes. PMID:24569064

  15. The CD63-Syntenin-1 Complex Controls Post-Endocytic Trafficking of Oncogenic Human Papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Gräßel, Linda; Fast, Laura Aline; Scheffer, Konstanze D; Boukhallouk, Fatima; Spoden, Gilles A; Tenzer, Stefan; Boller, Klaus; Bago, Ruzica; Rajesh, Sundaresan; Overduin, Michael; Berditchevski, Fedor; Florin, Luise

    2016-08-31

    Human papillomaviruses enter host cells via a clathrin-independent endocytic pathway involving tetraspanin proteins. However, post-endocytic trafficking required for virus capsid disassembly remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that the early trafficking pathway of internalised HPV particles involves tetraspanin CD63, syntenin-1 and ESCRT-associated adaptor protein ALIX. Following internalisation, viral particles are found in CD63-positive endosomes recruiting syntenin-1, a CD63-interacting adaptor protein. Electron microscopy and immunofluorescence experiments indicate that the CD63-syntenin-1 complex controls delivery of internalised viral particles to multivesicular endosomes. Accordingly, infectivity of high-risk HPV types 16, 18 and 31 as well as disassembly and post-uncoating processing of viral particles was markedly suppressed in CD63 or syntenin-1 depleted cells. Our analyses also present the syntenin-1 interacting protein ALIX as critical for HPV infection and CD63-syntenin-1-ALIX complex formation as a prerequisite for intracellular transport enabling viral capsid disassembly. Thus, our results identify the CD63-syntenin-1-ALIX complex as a key regulatory component in post-endocytic HPV trafficking.

  16. Male foreskin and oncogenic human papillomavirus infection in men and their female partners.

    PubMed

    Tobian, Aaron A R; Gray, Ronald H

    2011-07-01

    Persistent high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infection causes cervical cancer, the third leading cause of cancer mortality in women worldwide. High rates of HR-HPV and cervical cancer occur in sub-Saharan Africa and are exacerbated by the HIV epidemic, making prevention of HR-HPV and HIV priorities. Male circumcision reduces HIV acquisition in men. As presented in this article, randomized controlled trial data also demonstrate that male circumcision reduces penile HR-HPV infection in both HIV-negative and -positive men. Male circumcision of HIV-negative men also reduces the prevalence and incidence of HR-HPV infections in their female partners. However, male circumcision of HIV-positive men has no effect on HR-HPV infection in their female partners. These data demonstrate that male circumcision is most effective prior to sexual debut, and the presence of the male foreskin facilitates HIV and HR-HPV infection in men and their female partners. Additional studies that utilize the foreskin mucosa obtained at the time of male circumcision are needed to assess the mucosal microenvironment in HIV and HR-HPV coinfections to develop additional preventive and therapeutic approaches.

  17. The CD63-Syntenin-1 Complex Controls Post-Endocytic Trafficking of Oncogenic Human Papillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Gräßel, Linda; Fast, Laura Aline; Scheffer, Konstanze D.; Boukhallouk, Fatima; Spoden, Gilles A.; Tenzer, Stefan; Boller, Klaus; Bago, Ruzica; Rajesh, Sundaresan; Overduin, Michael; Berditchevski, Fedor; Florin, Luise

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses enter host cells via a clathrin-independent endocytic pathway involving tetraspanin proteins. However, post-endocytic trafficking required for virus capsid disassembly remains unclear. Here we demonstrate that the early trafficking pathway of internalised HPV particles involves tetraspanin CD63, syntenin-1 and ESCRT-associated adaptor protein ALIX. Following internalisation, viral particles are found in CD63-positive endosomes recruiting syntenin-1, a CD63-interacting adaptor protein. Electron microscopy and immunofluorescence experiments indicate that the CD63-syntenin-1 complex controls delivery of internalised viral particles to multivesicular endosomes. Accordingly, infectivity of high-risk HPV types 16, 18 and 31 as well as disassembly and post-uncoating processing of viral particles was markedly suppressed in CD63 or syntenin-1 depleted cells. Our analyses also present the syntenin-1 interacting protein ALIX as critical for HPV infection and CD63-syntenin-1-ALIX complex formation as a prerequisite for intracellular transport enabling viral capsid disassembly. Thus, our results identify the CD63-syntenin-1-ALIX complex as a key regulatory component in post-endocytic HPV trafficking. PMID:27578500

  18. Lineages of Oncogenic Human Papillomavirus Types Other Than Type 16 and 18 and Risk for Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Schiffman, Mark; Koutsky, Laura A.; Hughes, James P.; Winer, Rachel L.; Mao, Constance; Hulbert, Ayaka; Lee, Shu-Kuang; Shen, Zhenping; Kiviat, Nancy B.

    2014-01-01

    Background Data on clinical outcomes of infection with variants of oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) types other than HPV16 and HPV18 are rare. We investigated intratypic variations in non-HPV16/18 oncogenic types and their corresponding relationships with cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grades 2–3 (CIN2/3). Methods Study subjects were women who were positive for one or more of 11 non-HPV16/18 oncogenic types. Subjects were followed every six months for two years for detection of HPV and cervical lesions. Variant lineages were defined by sequencing the 3’ part of the long control region and the entire E6/E7 region of HPV genome. Lineage-associated risk of CIN2/3 was assessed using logistic regression with generalized estimating equations. Results A total of 4591 type-specific HPV infections among 2667 women were included in the analysis. The increase in risk of CIN2/3 was statistically significant for women with HPV31 A or B compared with C variants, HPV33 A1 compared with B variants, HPV45 A3 or B2 compared with B1 variants, HPV56 B compared with A2 variants, and HPV58 A1 or A3 compared with C variants. For these five types, the adjusted odds ratio associated with CIN2/3 was 2.0 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.5 to 2.6) for infections with single-type high-risk (HR) variants, 1.7 (95% CI = 1.0 to 2.7) for infections with two or more types but only one HR variant, and 5.3 (95% CI = 3.1 to 8.4) for infections with HR variants of two or more types as compared with those with single-type non-HR variants. The likelihood of CIN2/3 was similar for women with HPV16 infection and for those with HPV58 A1 variant infection. Conclusions These findings suggest that for a given HPV type, intratypic nucleotide changes may alter phenotypic traits that affect the probability of neoplasia. PMID:25217779

  19. ONCOGENIC HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS (HPV) INFECTIONS IN 18 TO 24 YEAR OLD FEMALE ONLINE DATERS

    PubMed Central

    Barrere, Alexis; Stern, Joshua E.; Feng, Qinghua; Hughes, James P.; Winer, Rachel L.

    2015-01-01

    Background While risk factors for HPV infections in young women are well-defined, the risk associated with meeting male sex partners via the internet is unclear. Methods We analyzed cross-sectional data from 282 18-24-year old women who reported using Internet dating websites in the past year. Women were mailed vaginal self-sampling kits for PCR-based HPV genotyping (including 19 oncogenic types) and sexual behavior and health history questionnaires. Generalized linear models were used to evaluate risk factors for prevalent oncogenic HPV infections. Results 35% of women reported having met a male sex partner via the Internet in the past 6 months, and 42% reported a history of HPV vaccination. The prevalence of oncogenic HPV infection was 37%, and 9% of women tested positive for HPV-16 or HPV-18. Having met a male sex partner via the Internet in the past 6 months was not significantly associated with oncogenic HPV infection. In multivariate analyses, variables associated with an increased likelihood of oncogenic HPV infection included male partners in the past 6 months who were reported to have ≥1 concurrent partnership (adjusted prevalence ratio [aPR]=1.51,95%CI:1.11-2.06) and not always using condoms with male partners in the past 6 months (aPR=1.86,95%CI:1.05-3.30). Self-reporting a history of receiving ≥1 dose of HPV vaccine was inversely associated with testing positive for HPV-16 or HPV-18 (aPR=0.39,95%CI:0.16–0.97). Conclusions While measures of recent sexual behavior were associated with prevalent oncogenic HPV infection, male partners met online were not associated with an increased likelihood of infection in this cohort of young women. PMID:26267875

  20. The human papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Orth, G; Jablonska, S; Breitburd, F; Favre, M; Croissant, O

    1978-01-01

    Recent biochemical and serological studies have shown the existence of at least four distinct types of human papillomaviruses (HPVs) causing benign skin lesions. These viruses show hardly no antigenic relationships; their DNAs differ by their sensitivity to restriction endonucleases, and show little, if any, sequence homology, as detected by molecular hybridization using complementary RNAs transcribed in vitro. Data on the pathogenicity of HPVs are still incomplete but indicate that some types of benign skin lesions (plantar warts, common warts, flat warts) may be preferentially associated with some types of HPV. Most interesting is that epidermodysplasia verruciformis has been found associated with two types of virus, and that malignant conversion of some lesions has been observed in all the patients infected with one of them. This suggests that at least a HPV may have a higher oncogenic potential, as do rabbit (Shope) papillomavirus and bovine alimentary tract papillomavirus. Much remains to be known on human papilloma-viruses and further studies may lead to the characterization of additional types of HPVs, especially in genital condylomata acuminata and laryngeal papillomas whose malignant conversion, although rare, may be observed. Progress in this field has been and remains hampered by the lack of cell culture systems allowing replication of these highly host and tissue specific viruses, and by the widely variable virus content of the different human lesions known to be associated with a papillomavirus. Further studies are warranted by the possible role of these widespread and epitheliotropic viruses in the origin of some carcinomas in man.

  1. Loss of Dependence on Continued Expression of the Human Papillomavirus 16 E7 Oncogene in Cervical Cancers and Precancerous Lesions Arising in Fanconi Anemia Pathway-Deficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Park, Soyeong; Park, Jung Wook; Pitot, Henry C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT   Fanconi anemia (FA) is a rare genetic disorder caused by defects in DNA damage repair. FA patients often develop squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) at sites where high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are known to cause cancer, including the cervix. However, SCCs found in human FA patients are often HPV negative, even though the majority of female FA patients with anogenital cancers had preexisting HPV-positive dysplasia. We hypothesize that HPVs contribute to the development of SCCs in FA patients but that the continued expression of HPV oncogenes is not required for the maintenance of the cancer state because FA deficiency leads to an accumulation of mutations in cellular genes that render the cancer no longer dependent upon viral oncogenes. We tested this hypothesis, making use of Bi-L E7 transgenic mice in which we temporally controlled expression of HPV16 E7, the dominant viral oncogene in HPV-associated cancers. As seen before, the persistence of cervical neoplastic disease was highly dependent upon the continued expression of HPV16 E7 in FA-sufficient mice. However, in mice with FA deficiency, cervical cancers persisted in a large fraction of the mice after HPV16 E7 expression was turned off, indicating that these cancers had escaped from their dependency on E7. Furthermore, the severity of precancerous lesions also failed to be reduced significantly in the mice with FA deficiency upon turning off expression of E7. These findings confirm our hypothesis and may explain the fact that, while FA patients have a high frequency of infections by HPVs and HPV-induced precancerous lesions, the cancers are frequently HPV negative. Importance   Fanconi anemia (FA) patients are at high risk for developing squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) at sites where high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) frequently cause cancer. Yet these SCCs are often HPV negative. FA patients have a genetic defect in their capacity to repair damaged DNA. HPV oncogenes cause an

  2. Induction of promyelocytic leukemia (PML) oncogenic domains (PODs) by papillomavirus

    SciTech Connect

    Nakahara, Tomomi; Lambert, Paul F.

    2007-09-30

    Promyelocytic leukemia oncogenic domains (PODs), also called nuclear domain 10 (ND10), are subnuclear structures that have been implicated in a variety of cellular processes as well as the life cycle of DNA viruses including papillomaviruses. In order to investigate the interplay between papillomaviruses and PODs, we analyzed the status of PODs in organotypic raft cultures of human keratinocytes harboring HPV genome that support the differentiation-dependent HPV life cycle. The number of PODs per nucleus was increased in the presence of HPV genomes selectively within the poorly differentiated layers but was absent in the terminally differentiated layers of the stratified epithelium. This increase in PODs was correlated with an increase in abundance of post-translationally modified PML protein. Neither the E2-dependent transcription nor viral DNA replication was reliant upon the presence of PML. Implications of these findings in terms of HPV's interaction with its host are discussed.

  3. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccines

    MedlinePlus

    ... Directory Cancer Prevention Overview Research Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccines On This Page What are human papillomaviruses? Which ... infections? Can HPV infections be prevented? What HPV vaccines are available? Who should get the HPV vaccines? ...

  4. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine

    MedlinePlus

    Why get vaccinated?HPV vaccine prevents infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) types that are associated with cause ... at http://www.cdc.gov/hpv. HPV Vaccine (Human Papillomavirus) Information Statement. U.S. Department of Health and ...

  5. Oncogenic Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Type Distribution and HPV Type 16 E6 Variants in Two Spanish Population Groups with Different Levels of HPV Infection Risk

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, M.; Torres, M.; Muñoz, L.; Fernández-García, E.; Canals, J.; Cabornero, A. I.; Aguilar, E.; Ballesteros, J.; del Amo, J.; García-Sáiz, A.

    2006-01-01

    The aim of this study is to determine oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) types and HPV type 16 (HPV16) variant distribution in two Spanish population groups, commercial sex workers and imprisoned women (CSW/IPW) and the general population. A multicenter cross-sectional study of 1,889 women from five clinical settings in two Spanish cities was conducted from May to November 2004. Oncogenic HPV infection was tested by an Hybrid Capture II (HC2) test, and positive samples were genotyped by direct sequencing using three different primer sets in L1 (MY09/11 and GP5+/GP6+) and E6/E7. HPV16 variants were identified by sequencing the E6, E2, and L1 regions. Four hundred twenty-five samples were positive for the HC2 test, 31.5% from CSW/IPW and 10.7% from the general population. HPV16 was the most frequent type. Distinct profiles of oncogenic HPV type prevalence were observed across the two populations. In order of decreasing frequency, HPV types 16, 31, 58, 66, 56, and 18 were most frequent in CSW/IPW women, and types 16, 31, 52, 68, 51, and 53 were most frequent in the general population. We analyzed HPV16 intratype variants, and a large majority (78.7%) belonged to the European lineage. AA variants were detected in 16.0% of cases. African variants belonging to classes Af1 (4.0%) and Af2 (1.3%) were detected. Different HPV types and HPV16 intratype variants are involved in oncogenic HPV infections in our population. These results suggest that HPV type distribution differs in CSW/IPW women and in the general population, although further analysis is necessary. PMID:16597872

  6. Oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) type distribution and HPV type 16 E6 variants in two Spanish population groups with different levels of HPV infection risk.

    PubMed

    Ortiz, M; Torres, M; Muñoz, L; Fernández-García, E; Canals, J; Cabornero, A I; Aguilar, E; Ballesteros, J; Del Amo, J; García-Sáiz, A

    2006-04-01

    The aim of this study is to determine oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) types and HPV type 16 (HPV16) variant distribution in two Spanish population groups, commercial sex workers and imprisoned women (CSW/IPW) and the general population. A multicenter cross-sectional study of 1,889 women from five clinical settings in two Spanish cities was conducted from May to November 2004. Oncogenic HPV infection was tested by an Hybrid Capture II (HC2) test, and positive samples were genotyped by direct sequencing using three different primer sets in L1 (MY09/11 and GP5+/GP6+) and E6/E7. HPV16 variants were identified by sequencing the E6, E2, and L1 regions. Four hundred twenty-five samples were positive for the HC2 test, 31.5% from CSW/IPW and 10.7% from the general population. HPV16 was the most frequent type. Distinct profiles of oncogenic HPV type prevalence were observed across the two populations. In order of decreasing frequency, HPV types 16, 31, 58, 66, 56, and 18 were most frequent in CSW/IPW women, and types 16, 31, 52, 68, 51, and 53 were most frequent in the general population. We analyzed HPV16 intratype variants, and a large majority (78.7%) belonged to the European lineage. AA variants were detected in 16.0% of cases. African variants belonging to classes Af1 (4.0%) and Af2 (1.3%) were detected. Different HPV types and HPV16 intratype variants are involved in oncogenic HPV infections in our population. These results suggest that HPV type distribution differs in CSW/IPW women and in the general population, although further analysis is necessary.

  7. Characterization of a cluster of oncogenic mutations in E6 of a human papillomavirus 83 variant isolated from a high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion.

    PubMed

    Cannavo, Isabelle; Benchetrit, Maxime; Loubatier, Céline; Michel, Gregory; Lemichez, Emmanuel; Giordanengo, Valérie

    2011-10-01

    We previously isolated human papillomavirus 83 (HPV83m) from a cervical smear. Sequence analysis of E6 and E7 proteins highlighted five mutations located in the second putative zinc-finger region of E6 (E6m), an important domain for protein-protein or protein-DNA interactions. Here, we show that E6m of HPV83m can trigger human primary cell proliferation and anchorage-independent growth properties, similarly to E6 of HPV16, a high-risk HPV (HR-HPV). Interestingly, we demonstrate that, in contrast to E6 of HPV16, E6m corrupts neither p53 stability nor telomerase activity, but acts as a specific modulator of the transcriptional machinery. By studying E6m reversion mutants, we confirmed the importance of the second zinc-finger domain in triggering the observed upregulation of cell growth and of the transcriptional machinery. Reversion of these mutations in E6m (to yield strain E6r) fully abolished the oncogenic potential of E6m, transforming the phenotype of E6 from a high-risk to a low-risk phenotype. Importantly, our data define the importance of a cluster of mutations in the second zinc finger of E6m in increasing the oncogenic potential of HPV83.

  8. Comparing human papillomavirus prevalences in women with normal cytology or invasive cervical cancer to rank genotypes according to their oncogenic potential: a meta-analysis of observational studies

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Mucosal human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a necessary cause of cervical cancer. Vaccine and non-vaccine genotype prevalences may change after vaccine introduction. Therefore, it appears essential to rank HPV genotypes according to their oncogenic potential for invasive cervical cancer, independently of their respective prevalences. Methods We performed meta-analyses of published observational studies and estimated pooled odds ratios with random-effects models for 32 HPV genotypes, using HPV-16 as the reference. Results Twenty-seven studies yielded 9,252 HPV-infected women: 2,902 diagnosed with invasive cervical cancer and 6,350 with normal cytology. Expressed as (odds ratio [95% confidence interval]), HPV-18 (0.63 [0.51, 0.78]) ranked closest to HPV-16, while other genotypes showed continuously decreasing relative oncogenic potentials: HPV-45 (0.35 [0.22, 0.55]), HPV-69 (0.28 [0.09, 0.92]), HPV-58 (0.24 [0.15, 0.38]), HPV-31 (0.22 [0.14, 0.35]), HPV-33 (0.22 [0.12, 0.38]), HPV-34 (0.21 [0.06, 0.80]), HPV-67 (0.21 [0.06, 0.67]), HPV-39 (0.17 [0.09, 0.30]), HPV-59 (0.17 [0.09, 0.31]), HPV-73 (0.16 [0.06, 0.41]), and HPV-52 (0.16 [0.11, 0.23]). Conclusions Our results support the markedly higher oncogenic potentials of HPV-16 and -18, followed by HPV-31, -33, -39, -45, -52, -58 and -59, and highlight the need for further investigation of HPV-34, -67, -69 and -73. Overall, these findings could have important implications for the prevention of cervical cancer. PMID:23941096

  9. O-linked N-acetylglucosamine transferase promotes cervical cancer tumorigenesis through human papillomaviruses E6 and E7 oncogenes

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Min Young; Park, Jeongsook; Lee, Dong Hoon; Roh, Gu Seob; Kim, Hyun Joon; Kang, Sang Soo; Cho, Gyeong Jae; Park, Ji Kwon; Cho, Jin Won; Shin, Jeong Kyu; Choi, Wan Sung

    2016-01-01

    O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) transferase (OGT) increases O-GlcNAc modification (O-GlcNAcylation), and transcriptional co-regulator host cell factor 1 (HCF-1) is one of OGT targets. High-risk Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs) encode E6 and E7 oncoproteins, which promote cervical cancer. Here, we tested whether O-GlcNAc modification of HCF-1 affects HPV E6 and E7 expressions and tumorigenesis of cervical cancer. We found that depleting OGT with OGT-specific shRNA significantly decreased levels of E6 and E7 oncoproteins, and cervical cancer tumorigenesis, while OGT overexpression greatly increased levels of E6 and E7 oncoproteins. Notably, OGT overexpression caused dose-dependent increases in the transcriptional activity of E6 and E7, and this activity was decreased when HCF-1 was depleted with HCF-1-specific siRNA. Moreover, OGT depletion reduced proliferation, invasion, and metastasis in cervical cancer cells. Further, high glucose enhanced the interaction between OGT and HCF-1, paralleling increased levels of E6 and E7 in cervical cancer cells. Most importantly, we found that reducing OGT in HeLa cells caused decreased tumor growth in vivo. These findings identify OGT as a novel cellular factor involved in E6 and E7 expressions and cervical cancer tumorigenesis, suggesting that targeting OGT in cervical cancer may have potential therapeutic benefit. PMID:27331873

  10. O-linked N-acetylglucosamine transferase promotes cervical cancer tumorigenesis through human papillomaviruses E6 and E7 oncogenes.

    PubMed

    Kim, Minjun; Kim, Yoon Sook; Kim, Hwajin; Kang, Min Young; Park, Jeongsook; Lee, Dong Hoon; Roh, Gu Seob; Kim, Hyun Joon; Kang, Sang Soo; Cho, Gyeong Jae; Park, Ji Kwon; Cho, Jin Won; Shin, Jeong Kyu; Choi, Wan Sung

    2016-07-12

    O-linked N-acetylglucosamine (O-GlcNAc) transferase (OGT) increases O-GlcNAc modification (O-GlcNAcylation), and transcriptional co-regulator host cell factor 1 (HCF-1) is one of OGT targets. High-risk Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs) encode E6 and E7 oncoproteins, which promote cervical cancer. Here, we tested whether O-GlcNAc modification of HCF-1 affects HPV E6 and E7 expressions and tumorigenesis of cervical cancer. We found that depleting OGT with OGT-specific shRNA significantly decreased levels of E6 and E7 oncoproteins, and cervical cancer tumorigenesis, while OGT overexpression greatly increased levels of E6 and E7 oncoproteins. Notably, OGT overexpression caused dose-dependent increases in the transcriptional activity of E6 and E7, and this activity was decreased when HCF-1 was depleted with HCF-1-specific siRNA. Moreover, OGT depletion reduced proliferation, invasion, and metastasis in cervical cancer cells. Further, high glucose enhanced the interaction between OGT and HCF-1, paralleling increased levels of E6 and E7 in cervical cancer cells. Most importantly, we found that reducing OGT in HeLa cells caused decreased tumor growth in vivo. These findings identify OGT as a novel cellular factor involved in E6 and E7 expressions and cervical cancer tumorigenesis, suggesting that targeting OGT in cervical cancer may have potential therapeutic benefit.

  11. Vaccination against human papillomavirus

    PubMed Central

    Mello, Claudia Figueiredo

    2013-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human papillomavirus infection is common and causes different manifestations. This infection is a public health concern because it has been associated with genital tract malignant diseases among men and women. Currently two vaccines are available to prevent the human papillomavirus infection and its associated diseases. PMID:24488402

  12. Papillomavirus sequences integrate near cellular oncogenes in some cervical carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Duerst, M.; Croce, C.M.; Gissmann, L.; Schwarz, E.; Huebner, K.

    1987-02-01

    The chromosomal locations of cellular sequences flanking integrated papillomavirus DNA in four cervical cell lines and a primary cervical carcinoma have been determined. The two human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 flanking sequences derived from the tumor were localized to chromosomes regions 20pter..-->..20q13 and 3p25..-->..3qter, regions that also contain the protooncogenes c-src-1 and c-raf-1, respectively. The HPV 16 integration site in the SiHa cervical carcinoma-derived cell line is in chromosome region 13q14..-->..13q32. The HPV 18 integration site in SW756 cervical carcinoma cells is in chromosome 12 but is not closely linked to the Ki-ras2 gene. Finally, in two cervical carcinoma cell lines, HeLa and C4-I, HPV 18 DNA is integrated in chromosome 8, 5' of the c-myc gene. The HeLaHPV 18 integration site is within 40 kilobases 5' of the c-myc gene, inside the HL60 amplification unit surrounding and including the c-myc gene. Additionally, steady-state levels of c-myc mRNA are elevated in HeLa and C4-I cells relative to other cervical carcinoma cell lines. Thus, in at least some genital tumors, cis-activation of cellular oncogenes by HPV may be involved in malignant transformation of cervical cells.

  13. Geographical distribution and oncogenic risk association of human papillomavirus type 58 E6 and E7 sequence variations

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Paul K.S.; Zhang, Chuqing; Park, Jong-Sup; Smith-McCune, Karen K.; Palefsky, Joel M.; Giovannelli, Lucia; Coutlée, Francois; Hibbitts, Samantha; Konno, Ryo; Settheetham-Ishida, Wannapa; Chu, Tang-Yuan; Ferrera, Annabelle; Picconi, María Alejandra; De Marco, Federico; Woo, Yin-Ling; Raiol, Tainá; Piña-Sánchez, Patricia; Bae, Jeong-Hoon; Wong, Martin C.S.; Chirenje, Mike Z.; Magure, Tsitsi; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Fiander, Alison N.; Capra, Giuseppina; Ki, Eun Young; Tan, Yi; Chen, Zigui; Burk, Robert D.; Chan, Martin C.W.; Cheung, Tak-Hong; Pim, David; Banks, Lawrence

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) 58 accounts for a notable proportion of cervical cancers in East Asia and parts of Latin America, but it is uncommon elsewhere. The reason for such ethnogeographical predilection is unknown. In our study, nucleotide sequences of E6 and E7 genes of 401 HPV58 isolates collected from 15 countries/cities across four continents were examined. Phylogenetic relationship, geographical distribution and risk association of nucleotide sequence variations were analyzed. We found that the E6 genes of HPV58 variants were more conserved than E7. Thus, E6 is a more appropriate target for type-specific detection, whereas E7 is more appropriate for strain differentiation. The frequency of sequence variation varied geographically. Africa had significantly more isolates with E6-367A (D86E) but significantly less isolates with E6-203G, -245G, -367C (prototype-like) than other regions (p ≤ 0.003). E7-632T, -760A (T20I, G63S) was more frequently found in Asia, and E7-793G (T74A) was more frequent in Africa (p < 0.001). Variants with T20I and G63S substitutions at E7 conferred a significantly higher risk for cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade III and invasive cervical cancer compared to other HPV58 variants (odds ratio = 4.44, p = 0.007). In conclusion, T20I and/or G63S substitution(s) at E7 of HPV58 is/are associated with a higher risk for cervical neoplasia. These substitutions are more commonly found in Asia and the Americas, which may account for the higher disease attribution of HPV58 in these areas. PMID:23136059

  14. Activation of human papillomavirus type 18 E6-E7 oncogene expression by transcription factor Sp1.

    PubMed Central

    Hoppe-Seyler, F; Butz, K

    1992-01-01

    The human papillomavirus 18 (HPV18) E6 and E7 proteins are considered to be primarily responsive for the transforming activity of the virus. In order to analyse the molecular mechanisms resulting in viral oncoprotein expression, it is necessary to identify the factors involved in the transcriptional regulation of the E6/E7 genes. Here we define by gel retardation experiments a sequence aberrant Sp1 binding site present in the promoter proximal part of the viral transcriptional control region (Upstream Regulatory Region, URR). Functional analyses employing transient reporter assays reveal that this Sp1 element is required for an efficient stimulation of the HPV18 E6/E7-promoter. Mutation of the Sp1 element in the natural context of the HPV18 URR leads to a strong decrease in the activity of the E6/E7-promoter in several cell lines. The magnitude of reduction varies between different cell types and is higher in cell lines of epithelial origin when compared with nonepithelial cells. Cotransfection assays using Sp1 expression vector systems further define the promoter proximal HPV18 Sp1 binding motif as a functional Sp1 element in vivo and show that its integrity is essential for the stimulation of the E6/E7-promoter by augmented levels of Sp1. These results indicate, that the cellular transcription factor Sp1 plays an important role for the stimulation of the E6/E7-promoter by the viral URR and represents a major determinant for the expression of HPV18 transforming genes E6 and E7. Images PMID:1336181

  15. Silencing of human papillomavirus (HPV) E6/E7 oncogene expression affects both the contents and the amounts of extracellular microvesicles released from HPV-positive cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Honegger, Anja; Leitz, Jenny; Bulkescher, Julia; Hoppe-Seyler, Karin; Hoppe-Seyler, Felix

    2013-10-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) E6/E7 oncogenes play a crucial role in the HPV-induced carcinogenesis. In this study, the authors investigated whether silencing of endogenous HPV E6/E7 expression may influence the contents or amounts of extracellular microvesicles (eMVs) released from HPV-positive cancer cells. It was found that eMVs secreted from HeLa cells are enriched for Survivin protein. RNA interference studies revealed that maintenance of both intracellular and microvesicular Survivin amounts was strongly dependent on continuous E6/E7 expression. This indicates that intracellular HPV activities are translated into visible alterations of protein contents in eMVs. Besides Survivin, eMVs from HeLa cells contain additional members of the inhibitor of apoptosis protein (IAP) family (XIAP, c-IAP1 and Livin). In contrast, no evidence for the presence of the HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins in eMVs was obtained. Moreover, it was found that silencing of HPV E6/E7 expression led to a significant increase of exosomes-representing eMVs of endocytic origin-released from HeLa cells. This effect was associated with the reinduction of p53, stimulation of the p53 target genes TSAP6 and CHMP4C that can enhance exosome production and induction of senescence. Taken together, these results show that silencing of HPV E6/E7 oncogene expression profoundly affects both the composition and amounts of eMVs secreted by HPV-positive cancer cells. This indicates that HPVs can induce molecular signatures in eMVs that may affect intercellular communication and could be explored for diagnostic purposes.

  16. Detection of oncogenic genital human papillomavirus (HPV) among HPV negative older and younger women after 7 years of follow-up.

    PubMed

    Brogaard, Kim Agerholm; Munk, Christian; Iftner, Thomas; Frederiksen, Kirsten; Kjaer, Susanne K

    2014-06-01

    The knowledge on risk factors of being human papillomavirus (HPV)-positive among older women is sparse. The aim was to determine the frequency of oncogenic HPV appearance after 7 years among initially HPV-negative women and to examine potential risk factors that influence the occurrence of HPV in older women using multiple logistic regression. For comparison, a younger cohort of women examined under identical study settings was included. This prospective cohort study comprised 1,577 older women (age 40-50 at enrolment) and 2,920 women aged 22-32. Participants were interviewed and underwent a gynecological examination at two time points (7 years apart). Cervical samples were tested for HPV using Hybrid Capture 2 (HC2) and only women who tested HC2-negative at baseline were included. The HPV prevalence among older and younger women was 6.4% and 10.7%, respectively, and there was no "second peak" observed among older women. Recent sexual partners were a strong determinant of HPV appearance irrespective of age. Lifetime number of sexual partners was a significant risk factor for HPV appearance among older women, even after adjustment for recent sexual behavior. In addition, menopause was associated with a non-significantly increased risk of HPV appearance at follow-up. In conclusion, appearance of HPV in previously HPV-negative older women may be due to both recent sexual behavior and previous exposure that is, reactivation of a latent HPV infection.

  17. Epitomics: IgG-epitome decoding of E6, E7 and L1 proteins from oncogenic human papillomavirus type 58

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Wan-Xiang; Wang, Jian; Tang, Hai-Ping; He, Ya-Ping; Zhu, Qian-Xi; Gupta, Satish K.; Gu, Shao-Hua; Huang, Qiang; Ji, Chao-Neng; Liu, Ling-Feng; Li, Gui-Ling; Xu, Cong-Jian; Xie, Yi

    2016-01-01

    To enable rational multi-epitope vaccine and diagnostic antigen design, it is imperative to delineate complete IgG-epitome of the protein. Here, we describe results of IgG-epitome decoding of three proteins from high-risk (HR-) oncogenic human papillomavirus type 58 (HPV58). To reveal their entire epitomes, employing peptide biosynthetic approach, 30 precise linear B-cell epitopes (BCEs) were mapped on E6, E7 and L1 proteins using rabbits antisera to the respective recombinant proteins. Using sequence alignment based on BCE minimal motif, the specificity and conservativeness of each mapped BCE were delineated mainly among known HR-HPVs, including finding 3 broadly antibody cross-reactive BCEs of L1 that each covers almost all HR-HPVs. Western blots revealed that 13 of the 18 BCEs within L1-epitome were recognized by murine antisera to HPV58 virus-like particles, suggesting that these are antibody accessible BCEs. Also, a highly conserved epitope (YGD/XTL) of E6 was found to exist only in known common HR-HPVs, which could be used as the first peptide reference marker for judging HR-HPVs. Altogether, this study provides systemic and exhaustive information on linear BCEs of HR-HPV58 that will facilitate development of novel multi-epitope diagnostic reagents/chips for testing viral antibodies and ‘universal’ preventive HPV peptide vaccine based on L1 conserved BCEs. PMID:27708433

  18. Type-dependent association between risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia and viral load of oncogenic human papillomavirus types other than types 16 and 18.

    PubMed

    Fu Xi, Long; Schiffman, Mark; Ke, Yang; Hughes, James P; Galloway, Denise A; He, Zhonghu; Hulbert, Ayaka; Winer, Rachel L; Koutsky, Laura A; Kiviat, Nancy B

    2017-04-15

    Studies of the clinical relevance of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA load have focused mainly on HPV16 and HPV18. Data on other oncogenic types are rare. Study subjects were women enrolled in the atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASC-US) and low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (LSIL) triage study who had ≥1 of 11 non-HPV16/18 oncogenic types detected during a 2-year follow-up at 6-month intervals. Viral load measurements were performed on the first type-specific HPV-positive specimens. The association of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grades 2-3 (CIN2/3) with type-specific HPV DNA load was assessed with discrete-time Cox regression. Overall, the increase in the cumulative risk of CIN2/3 per 1 unit increase in log10 -transformed viral load was statistically significant for four types within species 9 including HPV31 (adjusted hazard ratio [HR adjusted ] = 1.32: 95% confidence interval [CI], 1.14-1.52), HPV35 (HR adjusted  = 1.47; 95% CI, 1.23-1.76), HPV52 (HR adjusted  = 1.14; 95% CI, 1.01-1.30) and HPV58 (HR adjusted  = 1.49; 95% CI, 1.23-1.82). The association was marginally significant for HPV33 (species 9) and HPV45 (species 7) and was not appreciable for other types. The per 1 log10 -unit increase in viral load of a group of species 9 non-HPV16 oncogenic types was statistically significantly associated with risk of CIN2/3 for women with a cytologic diagnosis of within normal limits, ASC-US, or LSIL at the first HPV-positive visit but not for those with high-grade SIL. Findings suggest that the viral load-associated risk of CIN2/3 is type-dependent, and mainly restricted to the species of HPV types related to HPV16, which shares this association.

  19. Human papillomaviruses and cancer.

    PubMed

    Haedicke, Juliane; Iftner, Thomas

    2013-09-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are small oncogenic DNA viruses of which more than 200 types have been identified to date. A small subset of these is etiologically linked to the development of anogenital malignancies such as cervical cancer. In addition, recent studies established a causative relationship between these high-risk HPV types and tonsillar and oropharyngeal cancer. Clinical management of cervical cancer and head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCCs) is largely standardized and involves surgical removal of the tumor tissue as well as adjuvant chemoradiation therapy. Notably, the response to therapeutic intervention of HPV-positive HNSCCs has been found to be better as compared to HPV-negative tumors. Although the existing HPV vaccine is solely licensed for the prevention of cervical cancer, it might also have prophylactic potential for the development of high-risk HPV-associated HNSCCs. Another group of viruses, which belongs to the beta-HPV subgroup, has been implicated in nonmelanoma skin cancer, however, the etiology remains to be established. Treatment of HPV-induced nonmelanoma skin cancer is based on local excision. However, topically applied immune-modulating substances represent non-surgical alternatives for the management of smaller cutaneous tumors. In this review we present the current knowledge of the role of HPV in cancer development and discuss clinical management options as well as targets for the development of future intervention therapies.

  20. HPV (Human Papillomavirus)

    MedlinePlus

    ... Ask your doctor if you should get the HPV Vaccine. What else can I do to lower my ... the body. To Learn More About HPV Human Papillomavirus Vaccine More in For Women Medication Safety for Women ¡ ...

  1. A chimeric 18L1-45RG1 virus-like particle vaccine cross-protects against oncogenic alpha-7 human papillomavirus types.

    PubMed

    Huber, Bettina; Schellenbacher, Christina; Jindra, Christoph; Fink, Dieter; Shafti-Keramat, Saeed; Kirnbauer, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Persistent infection with oncogenic human papillomaviruses (HPV) types causes all cervical and a subset of other anogenital and oropharyngeal carcinomas. Four high-risk (hr) mucosal types HPV16, 18, 45, or 59 cause almost all cervical adenocarcinomas (AC), a subset of cervical cancer (CxC). Although the incidence of cervical squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) has dramatically decreased following introduction of Papanicolaou (PAP) screening, the proportion of AC has relatively increased. Cervical SCC arise mainly from the ectocervix, whereas AC originate primarily from the endocervical canal, which is less accessible to obtain viable PAP smears. Licensed (bivalent and quadrivalent) HPV vaccines comprise virus-like particles (VLP) of the most important hr HPV16 and 18, self-assembled from the major capsid protein L1. Due to mainly type-restricted efficacy, both vaccines do not target 13 additional hr mucosal types causing 30% of CxC. The papillomavirus genus alpha species 7 (α7) includes a group of hr types of which HPV18, 45, 59 are proportionally overrepresented in cervical AC and only partially (HPV18) targeted by current vaccines. To target these types, we generated a chimeric vaccine antigen that consists of a cross-neutralizing epitope (homologue of HPV16 RG1) of the L2 minor capsid protein of HPV45 genetically inserted into a surface loop of HPV18 L1 VLP (18L1-45RG1). Vaccination of NZW rabbits with 18L1-45RG1 VLP plus alum-MPL adjuvant induced high-titer neutralizing antibodies against homologous HPV18, that cross-neutralized non-cognate hr α7 types HPV39, 45, 68, but not HPV59, and low risk HPV70 in vitro, and induced a robust L1-specific cellular immune response. Passive immunization protected mice against experimental vaginal challenge with pseudovirions of HPV18, 39, 45 and 68, but not HPV59 or the distantly related α9 type HPV16. 18L1-45RG1 VLP might be combined with our previously described 16L1-16RG1 VLP to develop a second generation bivalent vaccine

  2. The High-Risk Human Papillomavirus E6 Oncogene Exacerbates the Negative Effect of Tryptophan Starvation on the Development of Chlamydia trachomatis

    PubMed Central

    Sherchand, Shardulendra P.; Ibana, Joyce A.; Zea, Arnold H.; Quayle, Alison J.; Aiyar, Ashok

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia trachomatis is an obligate intracellular pathogen that requires specific essential nutrients from the host cell, one of which is the amino acid tryptophan. In this context interferon gamma (IFNγ) is the major host protective cytokine against chlamydial infections because it induces the expression of the host enzyme, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase 1, that degrades tryptophan, thereby restricting bacterial replication. The mechanism by which IFNγ acts has been dissected in vitro using epithelial cell-lines such as HeLa, HEp-2, or the primary-like endocervical cell-line A2EN. All these cell-lines express the high-risk human papillomavirus oncogenes E6 & E7. While screening cell-lines to identify those suitable for C. trachomatis co-infections with other genital pathogens, we unexpectedly found that tryptophan starvation did not completely block chlamydial development in cell-lines that were HR-HPV negative, such as C33A and 293. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that HR-HPV oncogenes modulate the effect of tryptophan starvation on chlamydial development by comparing chlamydial development in HeLa and C33A cell-lines that were both derived from cervical carcinomas. Our results indicate that during tryptophan depletion, unlike HeLa, C33A cells generate sufficient intracellular tryptophan via proteasomal activity to permit C. trachomatis replication. By generating stable derivatives of C33A that expressed HPV16 E6, E7 or E6 & E7, we found that E6 expression alone was sufficient to convert C33A cells to behave like HeLa during tryptophan starvation. The reduced tryptophan levels in HeLa cells have a biological consequence; akin to the previously described effect of IFNγ, tryptophan starvation protects C. trachomatis from clearance by doxycycline in HeLa but not C33A cells. Curiously, when compared to the known Homo sapiens proteome, the representation of tryptophan in the HR-HPV E6 & E6AP degradome is substantially lower, possibly providing a mechanism that

  3. Bovine and human papillomaviruses: a comparative review.

    PubMed

    Munday, J S

    2014-11-01

    Fifty years ago, inoculation with bovine papillomavirus (BPV) was found to cause mesenchymal tumors of the skin in cattle and horses, as well as tumors of the bladder in cattle. Subsequent to these studies of BPVs, human papillomaviruses (HPVs) were found to cause cervical cancer resulting in intense research into papillomaviruses. During the past 50 years, the ways that HPVs and BPVs cause disease have been investigated, and both HPVs and BPVs have been associated with an increasingly diverse range of diseases. Herein, the biology, oncogenic mechanisms, and diseases associated with BPVs are compared with those of HPVs. As reviewed, there are currently significant differences between BPVs and HPVs. However, research 50 years ago into BPVs formed a prologue for the recognition that papillomaviruses have a significant role in human disease, and it is possible that future research may similarly reveal that BPVs are less different from HPVs than is currently recognized.

  4. Papillomaviruses and human disease

    SciTech Connect

    Syrjanen, K.; Gissman, L.; Koss, L.G.

    1987-01-01

    This book contains 17 selections. Some of the titles are: Papillomaviruses: particles, genome organization and proteins; Physical state of papillomavirus DNA in tumors; Transforming and regulatory functions of bovine papillomavirus Type 1; and Transcription of papillomavirus genomes.

  5. Genetic alterations by human papillomaviruses in oncogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lazo, P A; Gallego, M I; Ballester, S; Feduchi, E

    1992-03-30

    The integration sites in the cellular genome of human papillomavirus are located in chromosomal regions always associated with oncogenes or other known tumor phenotypes. Two regions, 8q24 and 12q13, are common to several cases of cervical carcinoma and can have integrated more than one type of papillomavirus DNA. These two chromosomal regions contain several genes implicated in oncogenesis. These observations strongly imply that viral integration sites of DNA tumor viruses can be used as the access point to chromosomal regions where genes implicated in the tumor phenotype are located, a situation similar to that of non-transforming retroviruses.

  6. Human papillomavirus oncogenic E6 protein regulates human β-defensin 3 (hBD3) expression via the tumor suppressor protein p53

    PubMed Central

    Yue, Hong; Wang, Liming; Jin, Jessica; Ghosh, Santosh K.; Kawsar, Hameem I.; Zender, Chad; Androphy, Elliot J.; Weinberg, Aaron; McCormick, Thomas S.; Jin, Ge

    2016-01-01

    Human β-defensin-3 (hBD3) is an epithelial cell-derived innate immune regulatory molecule overexpressed in oral dysplastic lesions and fosters a tumor-promoting microenvironment. Expression of hBD3 is induced by the epidermal growth factor receptor signaling pathway. Here we describe a novel pathway through which the high-risk human papillomavirus type-16 (HPV-16) oncoprotein E6 induces hBD3 expression in mucosal keratinocytes. Ablation of E6 by siRNA induces the tumor suppressor p53 and diminishes hBD3 in HPV-16 positive CaSki cervical cancer cells and UM-SCC-104 head and neck cancer cells. Malignant cells in HPV-16-associated oropharyngeal cancer overexpress hBD3. HPV-16 E6 induces hBD3 mRNA expression, peptide production and gene promoter activity in mucosal keratinocytes. Reduction of cellular levels of p53 stimulates hBD3 expression, while activation of p53 by doxorubicin inhibits its expression in primary oral keratinocytes and CaSki cells, suggesting that p53 represses hBD3 expression. A p53 binding site in the hBD3 gene promoter has been identified by using electrophoretic mobility shift assays and chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP). In addition, the p63 protein isoform ΔNp63α, but not TAp63, stimulated transactivation of the hBD3 gene and was co-expressed with hBD3 in head and neck cancer specimens. Therefore, high-risk HPV E6 oncoproteins may stimulate hBD3 expression in tumor cells to facilitate tumorigenesis of HPV-associated head and neck cancer. PMID:27034006

  7. Human telomerase reverse transcriptase regulates vascular endothelial growth factor expression via human papillomavirus oncogene E7 in HPV-18-positive cervical cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Fang; Cui, Jinquan

    2015-07-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection induces chronic and precancerous lesions and results in invasive cervical cancer. Human telomerase as well as inflammatory and angiogenic factors such as telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) or vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) could play a role in regulating HPV-induced cervical cancer. This study investigated underlying molecular events in HPV-induced HPV-positive cervical cancer through hTERT and VEGF in vitro. Expressions of hTERT, a rate-limiting subunit of telomerase, and VEGF mRNA and proteins were, respectively, assessed by qRT-PCR, ELISA, and TRAP-ELISA in HPV-positive tissue samples and cervical cancer cell lines. To assess hTERT and VEGF secretion, hTERT overexpression and knockdown were conducted in HPV-18-positive Hela cells by hTERT cDNA and shRNA transfection, respectively. Then, the effect of HPV E6 and E7 on VEGF expressions was assessed in HPV-negative cervical cancer cells. Data have shown that VEGF expression levels are associated with hTERT expressions and telomerase activity in HPV-positive cervical cancer tissues and cells. Knockdown of hTERT expression down-regulated VEGF expressions, whereas overexpression of hTERT up-regulated VEGF expressions in HPV-18-positive Hela cells. Furthermore, HPV E7 oncoprotein was necessary for hTERT to up-regulate VEGF expressions in HPV-negative cervical cancer cells. Data from this current study indicate that HPV oncoproteins up-regulated hTERT and telomerase activity and in turn promoted VEGF expressions, which could be a key mechanism for HPV-induced cervical cancer development and progression.

  8. [Network Research on Human Papillomavirus].

    PubMed

    Almeida-Gutiérrez, Eduardo; Paniagua, Ramón; Furuya, María ElenaYuriko

    2015-01-01

    In order to increase the research in important health questions at a national and institutional levels, the Human Papillomavirus Research Network of the Health Research Coordination of the Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social offers this supplement with the purpose of assisting patients that daily look for attention due to the human papillomavirus or to cervical cancer.

  9. Human papillomavirus and cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Crosbie, Emma J; Einstein, Mark H; Franceschi, Silvia; Kitchener, Henry C

    2013-09-07

    Cervical cancer is caused by human papillomavirus infection. Most human papillomavirus infection is harmless and clears spontaneously but persistent infection with high-risk human papillomavirus (especially type 16) can cause cancer of the cervix, vulva, vagina, anus, penis, and oropharynx. The virus exclusively infects epithelium and produces new viral particles only in fully mature epithelial cells. Human papillomavirus disrupts normal cell-cycle control, promoting uncontrolled cell division and the accumulation of genetic damage. Two effective prophylactic vaccines composed of human papillomavirus type 16 and 18, and human papillomavirus type 16, 18, 6, and 11 virus-like particles have been introduced in many developed countries as a primary prevention strategy. Human papillomavirus testing is clinically valuable for secondary prevention in triaging low-grade cytology and as a test of cure after treatment. More sensitive than cytology, primary screening by human papillomavirus testing could enable screening intervals to be extended. If these prevention strategies can be implemented in developing countries, many thousands of lives could be saved.

  10. [Papillomaviruses and human tumors].

    PubMed

    Vonka, V; Hamsíková, E; Sobotková, E; Smahel, M; Kitasato, H; Sainerová, H; Ludvíková, V; Zák, R; Kanka, J; Kolár, Z; Kovarík, J

    2000-12-01

    The report summarizes the main results obtained in the course of our research project. The results of immunological and epidemiological studies provide further proofs that human papillomaviruses (HPV) are the etiological agents in cervical neoplasia. In addition, they raise hopes that immunological methods may be utilized in diagnostics of cervical cancer and for monitoring the clinical course of this disease in the near future. Since the etiological relationship between HPV and cervical carcinoma seems to be proven beyond reasonable doubt, the development of prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines has become the dominant of the contemporary HPV reseach. For studying immune reactions against HPV-induced tumours we developed a model of HPV16-transformed rodent cells.

  11. Human papillomavirus E6/E7 oncogenes promote mouse ear regeneration by increasing the rate of wound re-epithelization and epidermal growth.

    PubMed

    Valencia, Concepción; Bonilla-Delgado, José; Oktaba, Katarzyna; Ocádiz-Delgado, Rodolfo; Gariglio, Patricio; Covarrubias, Luis

    2008-12-01

    Mammals have limited regeneration capacity. We report here that, in transgenic mice (Tg(bK6-E6/E7)), the expression of the E6/E7 oncogenes of human papilloma virus type 16 (HPV16) under the control of the bovine keratin 6 promoter markedly improves the mouse's capacity to repair portions of the ear after being wounded. Increased repair capacity correlates with an increased number of epidermal proliferating cells. In concordance with the expected effects of the E6 and E7 oncogenes, levels of p53 decreased and those of p16 in epidermal cells increased. In addition, we observed that wound re-epithelization proceeded faster in transgenic than in wild-type animals. After the initial re-epithelization, epidermal cell migration from the intact surrounding tissue appears to be a major contributor to the growing epidermis, especially in the repairing tissue of transgenic mice. We also found that there is a significantly higher number of putative epidermal stem cells in Tg(bK6-E6/E7) than in wild-type mice. Remarkably, hair follicles and cartilage regenerated within the repaired ear tissue, without evidence of tumor formation. We propose that the ability to regenerate ear portions is limited by the capacity of the epidermis to repair itself and grow.

  12. Human Papillomavirus and Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Burd, Eileen M.

    2003-01-01

    Of the many types of human papillomavirus (HPV), more than 30 infect the genital tract. The association between certain oncogenic (high-risk) strains of HPV and cervical cancer is well established. Although HPV is essential to the transformation of cervical epithelial cells, it is not sufficient, and a variety of cofactors and molecular events influence whether cervical cancer will develop. Early detection and treatment of precancerous lesions can prevent progression to cervical cancer. Identification of precancerous lesions has been primarily by cytologic screening of cervical cells. Cellular abnormalities, however, may be missed or may not be sufficiently distinct, and a portion of patients with borderline or mildly dyskaryotic cytomorphology will have higher-grade disease identified by subsequent colposcopy and biopsy. Sensitive and specific molecular techniques that detect HPV DNA and distinguish high-risk HPV types from low-risk HPV types have been introduced as an adjunct to cytology. Earlier detection of high-risk HPV types may improve triage, treatment, and follow-up in infected patients. Currently, the clearest role for HPV DNA testing is to improve diagnostic accuracy and limit unnecessary colposcopy in patients with borderline or mildly abnormal cytologic test results. PMID:12525422

  13. Human papillomaviruses and skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Smola, Sigrun

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) infect squamous epithelia and can induce hyperproliferative lesions. More than 120 different HPV types have been characterized and classified into five different genera. While mucosal high-risk HPVs have a well-established causal role in anogenital carcinogenesis, the biology of cutaneous HPVs is less well understood. The clinical relevance of genus beta-PV infection has clearly been demonstrated in patients suffering from epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV), a rare inherited disease associated with ahigh rate of skin cancer. In the normal population genus beta-PV are suspected to have an etiologic role in skin carcinogenesis as well but this is still controversially discussed. Their oncogenic potency has been investigated in mouse models and in vitro. In 2009, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classified the genus beta HPV types 5 and 8 as "possible carcinogenic" biological agents (group 2B) in EV disease. This chapter will give an overview on the knowns and unknowns of infections with genus beta-PV and discuss their potential impact on skin carcinogenesis in the general population.

  14. Abrogation of a mitotic checkpoint by E2 proteins from oncogenic human papillomaviruses correlates with increased turnover of the p53 tumor suppressor protein.

    PubMed Central

    Frattini, M G; Hurst, S D; Lim, H B; Swaminathan, S; Laimins, L A

    1997-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) E2 and E1 proteins are required for the replication of viral genomes in vivo. We have examined the effects of increasing the level of E2 on viral and cellular replication using recombinant adenoviruses. Infection of cells which maintain HPV 31 DNA episomally with E2 recombinant adenoviruses resulted in a 5-fold increase in genome copy number as well as an S phase arrest allowing for the continued replication of cellular DNA. Similar effects on cell cycle progression were seen following infection of normal human foreskin keratinocytes, the natural host cell. The DNA content of these cells increased beyond 4N indicating that multiple rounds of replication had occurred without an intervening mitotic event. In addition, increased cyclin A and E associated kinase activity was observed, while no change was detected in cyclin B associated kinase activity or in the activation state of cdc2 kinase. Interestingly, the levels of the p53 tumor suppresser protein were dramatically reduced through a post-transcriptional mechanism following infection. These data suggest a role for E2 in regulating viral and cellular replication by abrogation of a mitotic checkpoint, which is, at least in part, controlled by p53. PMID:9029152

  15. Oncogenic human papillomavirus imposes an instructive pattern of DNA methylation changes which parallel the natural history of cervical HPV infection in young women.

    PubMed

    Leonard, Sarah M; Wei, Wenbin; Collins, Stuart I; Pereira, Merlin; Diyaf, Afaf; Constandinou-Williams, Christothea; Young, Lawrence S; Roberts, Sally; Woodman, Ciarán B

    2012-07-01

    The contribution of early virus-induced epigenetic changes to human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated carcinogenesis is poorly understood. Using genome-wide methylation array profiling and a cell-based model, which supports replication of HPV episomes, we found that transfection of primary human foreskin keratinocytes with episomal forms of high-risk HPV types was followed by upregulation of the DNA methyltransferases, DNMT1 and DNMT3B, and changes in the methylation status of cellular genes many of which are reported to be differentially methylated in cervical neoplasia. HPV16- and HPV18-associated changes were not randomly distributed across the genome, but clustered at specific chromosomal locations which mapped on to known HPV integration sites and to chromosomal regions lost and gained in high-grade cervical neoplasia. Methylation changes were directed in part by the same cis-acting factors that appear to direct methylation changes in cancer, the presence of a bivalent chromatin mark in human embryonic stem cells and promoter CpG content; these associations explain much of the ontological profile of genes found to have increased methylation following HPV16 transfection. We were also able to show, using sequential samples from a cohort of young women with incident HPV16 infections, that the detection in cervical samples of methylated forms of the tumour suppressor gene, RARB, often parallels the natural history of cervical HPV infection. Our findings suggest that further investigation of the distribution and determinants of early virus-induced epigenetic reprogramming will provide important insights into the pathogenesis of virus-associated malignancy.

  16. Comparison of the immunogenicity of Cervarix® and Gardasil® human papillomavirus vaccines for oncogenic non-vaccine serotypes HPV-31, HPV-33, and HPV-45 in HIV-infected adults.

    PubMed

    Toft, Lars; Tolstrup, Martin; Müller, Martin; Sehr, Peter; Bonde, Jesper; Storgaard, Merete; Østergaard, Lars; Søgaard, Ole S

    2014-01-01

    Individuals infected with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have excess risk of developing human papillomavirus (HPV)-related disease. A substantial fraction of HPV-associated cancers is caused by HPV serotypes not included in the currently available vaccines. Among healthy women, both Cervarix(®) (HPV-16/18, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, GSK) and Gardasil(®) (HPV-6/11/16/18, Merck) have demonstrated partial cross-protection against certain oncogenic non-vaccine HPV-types. Currently, there are no available data on vaccine-induced cross-protection in men and little is known about cross-reactive immunity after HPV-vaccination of HIV-infected individuals. In an investigator-initiated trial, we randomized 91 HIV-positive men and women to receive vaccination with Cervarix(®) or Gardasil(®). The HPV-DNA status of the participants was determined with pcr before and after immunization. Cross-reactive antibody responses against HPV-31, HPV-33, and HPV-45 were evaluated for up to 12 months using a pseudovirion-based neutralization assay (PBNA). Geometric mean antibody titers (GMTs) were compared among vaccine groups and genders at 7 and 12 months.: Both vaccines induced anti-HPV-31, -33, and -45 neutralizing antibodies in participants who were seronegative and HPV-DNA negative for those types at study entry. Geometric mean antibody titers were comparable between vaccine groups. Interestingly, anti-HPV-31 and -33 antibody titers were higher among women compared with men at 7 and 12 months.: In conclusion, both licensed HPV-vaccines induced cross-neutralizing antibodies against frequent oncogenic non-vaccine serotypes HPV-31, HPV-33, and HPV-45 in HIV-infected adults, and women had greater serological responses against HPV-31 and -33 compared with men.

  17. Carcinogenic human papillomavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Schiffman, Mark; Doorbar, John; Wentzensen, Nicolas; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Fakhry, Carole; Monk, Bradley J; Stanley, Margaret A; Franceschi, Silvia

    2016-12-01

    Infections with human papillomavirus (HPV) are common and transmitted by direct contact. Although the great majority of infections resolve within 2 years, 13 phylogenetically related, sexually transmitted HPV genotypes, notably HPV16, cause - if not controlled immunologically or by screening - virtually all cervical cancers worldwide, a large fraction of other anogenital cancers and an increasing proportion of oropharyngeal cancers. The carcinogenicity of these HPV types results primarily from the activity of the oncoproteins E6 and E7, which impair growth regulatory pathways. Persistent high-risk HPVs can transition from a productive (virion-producing) to an abortive or transforming infection, after which cancer can result after typically slow accumulation of host genetic mutations. However, which precancerous lesions progress and which do not is unclear; the majority of screening-detected precancers are treated, leading to overtreatment. The discovery of HPV as a carcinogen led to the development of effective preventive vaccines and sensitive HPV DNA and RNA tests. Together, vaccination programmes (the ultimate long-term preventive strategy) and screening using HPV tests could dramatically alter the landscape of HPV-related cancers. HPV testing will probably replace cytology-based cervical screening owing to greater reassurance when the test is negative. However, the effective implementation of HPV vaccination and screening globally remains a challenge.

  18. Genital human papillomavirus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Lowy, D R; Kirnbauer, R; Schiller, J T

    1994-01-01

    Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a common sexually transmitted disease that at the present time is not effectively controlled or treated. Many infections are inapparent and transient. However, some HPV infections result in persistent lesions that in some cases undergo carcinogenic progression. A subset of genital HPVs, designated high-risk types, are preferentially associated with high-grade dysplasias and carcinomas. About 90% of cervical cancers contain high-risk HPV DNA, most often HPV16. Development of a subunit vaccine against high-risk genital HPVs is a desirable and, it appears, an increasingly feasible long-term goal. The viral E6 and E7 oncoproteins are selectively maintained and expressed in progressed HPV tumors and could potentially be targets for therapeutic vaccines. The L1 major virion structural proteins have recently been shown to self-assemble into virus-like particles when expressed in insect cells. These particles might serve as the basis for a prophylactic vaccine to prevent genital HPV infection. Images PMID:8146136

  19. Emerging human papillomavirus vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Barbara; Maraj, Bharat; Tran, Nam Phuong; Knoff, Jayne; Chen, Alexander; Alvarez, Ronald D; Hung, Chien-Fu; Wu, T.-C.

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Identification of human papillomavirus (HPV) as the etiologic factor of cervical, anogenital, and a subset of head and neck cancers has stimulated the development of preventive and therapeutic HPV vaccines to control HPV-associated malignancies. Excitement has been generated by the commercialization of two preventive L1-based vaccines, which use HPV virus-like particles (VLPs) to generate capsid-specific neutralizing antibodies. However, factors such as high cost and requirement for cold chain have prevented widespread implementation where they are needed most. Areas covered Next generation preventive HPV vaccine candidates have focused on cost-effective stable alternatives and generating broader protection via targeting multivalent L1 VLPs, L2 capsid protein, and chimeric L1/L2 VLPs. Therapeutic HPV vaccine candidates have focused on enhancing T cell-mediated killing of HPV-transformed tumor cells, which constitutively express HPV-encoded proteins, E6 and E7. Several therapeutic HPV vaccines are in clinical trials. Expert opinion Although progress is being made, cost remains an issue inhibiting the use of preventive HPV vaccines in countries that carry the majority of the cervical cancer burden. In addition, progression of therapeutic HPV vaccines through clinical trials may require combination strategies employing different therapeutic modalities. As research in the development of HPV vaccines continues, we may generate effective strategies to control HPV-associated malignancies. PMID:23163511

  20. [Human papillomavirus prophylactic vaccine].

    PubMed

    Kawana, Kei

    2012-06-01

    Human papillomavirus causes viral-dependent cancers, including cervical, anal, vulvar, penile, vaginal, and oropharyngeal, and condyloma acuminata. In the last decade, HPV prophylactic vaccine has been developed and spread worldwide after many large-scale clinical studies. These studies demonstrate significant clinical efficacy for prevention of HPV16/18/6/11-related diseases. In particular, prevention of cervical cancer should be the most important role in the world. In Japan, incidence of cervical cancer does not increase, but the peak of age of the patients at 2005 is 25-45 years old and became 20 years younger than that at 1985. The current two HPV vaccines can prevent the infection of HPV16/18 among high-risk HPVs and will provide a significant impact especially on young-age onset cervical cancer. Furthermore, quadrivalent HPV vaccine, Gardasil, has shown population impact that is decrease of patients with condyloma acuminate in several countries. The clinical efficacy seems to be convincing. Here HPV vaccine will be reviewed based on the literatures.

  1. Pathogenesis of infection by human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Brendle, Sarah A; Bywaters, Stephanie M; Christensen, Neil D

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are associated with benign lesions known as warts and several cancer types including cancer of the cervix, penis, anus and oral cavity. HPVs are classified by their oncogenic potential and are divided into high-risk oncogenic HPVs and low-risk HPVs. Tissue tropism is used as another means of classifying the virus, and HPVs are divided into types that infect mucosal or cutaneous tissues. Several risk factors have been identified that elevate an individual's likelihood of becoming infected with HPV including cigarette smoking, a large number of lifetime sexual partners and immunosuppression. Most HPV infections are cleared naturally, although persistent infection with oncogenic HPV types can lead to the cancers mentioned above. HPV has employed several mechanisms to avoid detection by the host immune system. Virus is released along with shedding skin cells in a nonlytic manner, and the virus has an altered codon usage leading to reduced expression of viral proteins. Infections from high-risk oncogenic HPV types that progress cause neoplasias that are defined as CIN1-CIN3 depending on the amount of abnormal cell growth and the level of cellular differentiation.

  2. Effects of 17beta-estradiol and progesterone on transcription of human papillomavirus 16 E6/E7 oncogenes in CaSki and SiHa cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ruutu, M; Wahlroos, N; Syrjänen, K; Johansson, B; Syrjänen, S

    2006-01-01

    Several in vitro studies have addressed the interactions between estrogen/progesterone and human papillomavirus (HPV), but the results are controversial. We evaluated the effects of estrogen and progesterone and their antagonists on messenger RNA expression of HPV16 E6/E7 in HPV16-positive cell lines CaSki and SiHa with real-time reverse-transciptase polymerase chain reaction method. Colorimetric assay with tetrazolium salt (WST-1) and flow cytometry were used for testing proliferation and apoptosis. No statistically significant changes were found after hormone treatment in the expression of HPV16 E6/E7 or hormone receptors in CaSki and SiHa cell lines. Progesterone increased cell proliferation in both the cells, while estrogen increased proliferation of SiHa cells only. Estrogen seemed to protect the CaSki cells from apoptosis, and tamoxifen did not abrogate this effect. Progesterone slightly increased apoptosis of CaSki cells, and this effect was neutralized with RU486. In this study, estrogen and progesterone did not change either the transcription levels of HPV16 E6/E7 or estrogen receptor or progesterone receptor levels. Hormone receptor antagonists had no effect on transcription. Both hormones might have a permissive effect for the growth of cervical cancer, by promoting cell proliferation and making the cells vulnerable to mutations. In addition, estrogen acts as an antiapoptotic agent allowing growth advance of the cells infected with oncogenic HPV.

  3. Human Papillomavirus Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    Savas, Lara S.; Fernández, Maria E.; Jobe, David; Carmack, Chakema C.

    2012-01-01

    Background Research is needed to understand parental factors influencing human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination, particularly in groups with a higher burden of cervical cancer. Purpose To determine correlates of HPV vaccination among a sample of low-income parents of age-eligible daughters (aged 9–17 years) who called the 2-1-1 Helpline. Secondary analyses describe potential differences in HPV vaccination correlates by Hispanic and black parent groups, specifically. Methods This 2009 cross-sectional feasibility survey of cancer prevention needs was conducted in Houston at the 2-1-1 Texas/United Way Helpline. In 2012, to examine the association between parental psychosocial, cognitive, and decisional factors and HPV vaccination uptake (one or two doses), bivariate and multivariable logistic regression analyses were conducted for minority parents and for Hispanic and black parent groups, separately. Results Lower rates of HPV vaccination uptake were reported among minority daughters of 2-1-1 callers (29% overall) compared with national and Texas rates. In final adjusted analysis, factors positively associated with HPV vaccination uptake included being offered the vaccination by a doctor or nurse, belief that the vaccine would prevent cervical cancer, and Hispanic ethnicity. Secondary analyses detected differences in factors associated with vaccination in Hispanic and black groups. Conclusions Findings indicate low levels of vaccination among 2-1-1 callers. Increased understanding of determinants of HPV vaccination in low-income minority groups can guide interventions to increase coverage. Because 2-1-1 informational and referral services networks reach populations considered medically underserved, 2-1-1 can serve as a community hub for informing development of and implementing approaches aimed at hard-to-reach groups. PMID:23157770

  4. MassARRAY Spectrometry Is More Sensitive than PreTect HPV-Proofer and Consensus PCR for Type-Specific Detection of High-Risk Oncogenic Human Papillomavirus Genotypes in Cervical Cancer▿

    PubMed Central

    Basu, Partha; Chandna, Puneet; Bamezai, R. N. K.; Siddiqi, Maqsood; Saranath, Dhananjaya; Lear, Adrian; Ratnam, Sam

    2011-01-01

    Type-specific detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) is indicated for better risk stratification and clinical management of women testing positive for HPV and for epidemiologic surveillance. MassARRAY spectrometry (MassARRAY; Sequenom) is a novel method for type-specific detection of 15 high-risk oncogenic HPV types: HPV-16, -18, -31, -33, -35, -39, -45, -51, -52, -56, -58, -59, -66, -68, and -73. PreTect HPV-Proofer (Proofer; Norchip) is a type-specific assay that detects E6/E7 mRNA from five high-risk oncogenic HPV types: HPV-16, -18, -31, -33, and -45. The performance of these tests for type-specific identification of HPV was assessed with cervical specimens from 192 cases of cervical cancer in comparison with consensus MY09/MY11 PCR followed by nucleotide sequencing (consensus PCR). The overall HPV detection rates were 94.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 91.7, 97.9), 83.3% (95% CI, 78.1, 88.5), and 86.5% (95% CI, 81.7, 91.3) for MassARRAY, Proofer, and consensus PCR, respectively. All tests were negative in six (3.1%) of the 192 cases. Considering only the specimens that contained at least one of the five types targeted by Proofer, the detection rates were 96.6%, 91.4%, and 86.9% for MassARRAY, Proofer, and consensus PCR, respectively. MassARRAY detected multiple infections in 14.1%, Proofer detected multiple infections in 3.6%, and consensus PCR failed to detect any multiple infections. The agreement was highest at 86.0% (kappa = 0.76) between MassARRAY and Proofer and lowest at 81.8% (kappa = 0.69) between Proofer and consensus PCR. In conclusion, MassARRAY is a highly sensitive and accurate method for type-specific detection of oncogenic HPV in cervical cancer, with Proofer showing impressive performance. PMID:21813716

  5. MassARRAY spectrometry is more sensitive than PreTect HPV-Proofer and consensus PCR for type-specific detection of high-risk oncogenic human papillomavirus genotypes in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Basu, Partha; Chandna, Puneet; Bamezai, R N K; Siddiqi, Maqsood; Saranath, Dhananjaya; Lear, Adrian; Ratnam, Sam

    2011-10-01

    Type-specific detection of human papillomavirus (HPV) is indicated for better risk stratification and clinical management of women testing positive for HPV and for epidemiologic surveillance. MassARRAY spectrometry (MassARRAY; Sequenom) is a novel method for type-specific detection of 15 high-risk oncogenic HPV types: HPV-16, -18, -31, -33, -35, -39, -45, -51, -52, -56, -58, -59, -66, -68, and -73. PreTect HPV-Proofer (Proofer; Norchip) is a type-specific assay that detects E6/E7 mRNA from five high-risk oncogenic HPV types: HPV-16, -18, -31, -33, and -45. The performance of these tests for type-specific identification of HPV was assessed with cervical specimens from 192 cases of cervical cancer in comparison with consensus MY09/MY11 PCR followed by nucleotide sequencing (consensus PCR). The overall HPV detection rates were 94.8% (95% confidence interval [CI], 91.7, 97.9), 83.3% (95% CI, 78.1, 88.5), and 86.5% (95% CI, 81.7, 91.3) for MassARRAY, Proofer, and consensus PCR, respectively. All tests were negative in six (3.1%) of the 192 cases. Considering only the specimens that contained at least one of the five types targeted by Proofer, the detection rates were 96.6%, 91.4%, and 86.9% for MassARRAY, Proofer, and consensus PCR, respectively. MassARRAY detected multiple infections in 14.1%, Proofer detected multiple infections in 3.6%, and consensus PCR failed to detect any multiple infections. The agreement was highest at 86.0% (kappa = 0.76) between MassARRAY and Proofer and lowest at 81.8% (kappa = 0.69) between Proofer and consensus PCR. In conclusion, MassARRAY is a highly sensitive and accurate method for type-specific detection of oncogenic HPV in cervical cancer, with Proofer showing impressive performance.

  6. Cigarette smoking and human papillomavirus in patients with reported cervical cytological abnormality.

    PubMed Central

    Burger, M P; Hollema, H; Gouw, A S; Pieters, W J; Quint, W G

    1993-01-01

    OBJECTIVE--To assess the relation between two risk factors for cervical neoplasia: smoking and infection with oncogenic human papillomavirus. It has been suggested that smoking causes a local immunological defect, which could facilitate the infection and persistence of human papillomavirus. DESIGN--Cross sectional epidemiological study. Completion of a structured questionnaire by the patients, analysis of cervical scrapes for human papillomavirus, and morphological examination of biopsy specimens. SETTING--Outpatient gynaecological clinic. SUBJECTS--181 women with a report of cervical cytological abnormality. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURES--Prevalence of infection with oncogenic human papillomavirus and smoking habits. RESULTS--Oncogenic human papillomavirus was found in the cervix of 26 (41%) of the 63 women who did not smoke, 22 (58%) of the 38 who smoked 1-10 cigarettes a day, 28 (61%) of the 46 who smoked 11-20 cigarettes a day, and 26 (76%) of the 34 who smoked > or = 21 cigarettes a day. The prevalence of the virus thus increased in accordance with the number of cigarettes smoked (p = 0.001). This relation remained after adjustment for age at first intercourse and lifetime number of sexual partners. Of the 63 non-smokers, 23 had previously smoked at least 10 cigarettes a day at some time. Of these 23 women, 14 (61%) had oncogenic human papillomavirus in their cervix. Of the 40 women who had never smoked at least 10 cigarettes a day, 12 (30%) had the virus. The prevalence of oncogenic human papillomavirus in non-smokers therefore depended on previous smoking habits (p = 0.03). CONCLUSION--The dose dependent effect of cigarette smoking on the occurrence of oncogenic human papillomavirus favours a causal relation between these risk factors for cervical neoplasia. PMID:8387842

  7. [General aspects of structure, classification and replication of human papillomavirus].

    PubMed

    Santos-López, Gerardo; Márquez-Domínguez, Luis; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Vallejo-Ruiz, Verónica

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) refers to a group of viruses which belongs to a larger group, commonly referred to as papillomaviruses. These viruses are taxonomically located in the Papillomaviridae family. Papillomaviruses are small, non-enveloped with a genome of double-stranded DNA and they have affinity for epithelial tissue. Many of them are associated with human infection; they induce benign lesions of the skin (warts) and mucous membranes (condylomas), but they are also associated with some epithelial malignancies, such as cervical cancer and other tumors of the urogenital tract. Papillomaviridae contains 16 genera, which are named with a Greek letter prefix and the termination papillomavirus, e.g., Alphapapillomavirus, Betapapillomavirus, etcetera. From the clinical point of view, human papillomaviruses infecting the genital tract (which are located in the genus Alphapapilomavirus) have been divided into two groups: those of low risk, associated with benign genital warts, and those of high risk, with oncogenic potential, which are the etiological agents of cervical cancer. In this paper we review some relevant aspects of the structure, replication cycle and classification of human papillomaviruses.

  8. Epigenetics of human papillomaviruses

    SciTech Connect

    Johannsen, Eric; Lambert, Paul F.

    2013-10-15

    Human papilllomaviruses (HPVs) are common human pathogens that infect cutaneous or mucosal epithelia in which they cause warts, self-contained benign lesions that commonly regress. The HPV life cycle is intricately tied to the differentiation of the host epithelium it infects. Mucosotropic HPVs are the most common sexually transmitted pathogen known to mankind. A subset of the mucosotropic HPVs, so-called high risk HPVs, is etiologically associated with numerous cancers of the anogenital tract, most notably the cervix, as well as a growing fraction of head and neck cancers. In these cancers, the HPV genome, which normally exists an a double stranded, circular, nuclear plasmid, is commonly found integrated into the host genome and expresses two viral oncogenes, E6 and E7, that are implicated in the development and maintainance of the cancers caused by these high risk HPVs. Numerous studies, primarily on the high risk HPV16, have documented that the methylation status of the viral genome changes not only in the context of the viral life cycle but also in the context of the progressive neoplastic disease that culminates in cancer. In this article, we summarize the knowledge gained from those studies. We also provide the first analysis of available ChIP-seq data on the occupancy of both epigentically modified histones as well as transcription factors on the high risk HPV18 genome in the context of HeLa cells, a cervical cancer-derived cell line that has been the subject of extensive analyses using this technique. - Highlights: • Methylation status of HPV genomes is dynamic. • Changes are seen in both the viral life cycle and neoplasia. • Histone modification status at LCR is predictive of transcription factor occupancy. • Novel transcription factor binding noted by ChIP-seq.

  9. Oncogenic Papillomavirus and Polyomavirus in Water Environments: Is There a Potential for Waterborne Transmission?

    PubMed

    Fratini, M; Di Bonito, P; La Rosa, G

    2014-03-01

    Waterborne exposure to human viruses through contact with sewage-contaminated water environments can result in infections associated with a wide range of illnesses. Gastrointestinal symptoms are the most commonly encountered manifestations of waterborne viral illness. Respiratory diseases, neurological diseases and paralysis can also occur. Whether viral infections resulting in health outcomes like cancer might also be transmitted by the waterborne route is unknown. Recently, viruses belonging to two oncogenic groups-Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs) and Human Polyomaviruses (HPyVs)-have been detected in urban sewages worldwide. The latter have also been identified in other water environments. HPVs are epitheliotropic viruses responsible for several diseases of skin and mucosae, from common warts to squamous intraepithelial lesions that can either heal or progress to invasive carcinoma of the cervix, vulva, vagina, penis, anus or oropharynx. Human PyVs infect different tissues and organs, causing infections that are usually subclinical in immunocompetent individuals but can be serious in immunocompromised hosts. These pathogens belong to a family of DNA tumour viruses. Merkel cell polyomavirus, a HPyV identified in recent years, has attracted much attention due to its link with a rare and aggressive form of human cancer. Merkel cell carcinoma, the incidence of which has tripled over the past two decades. JC polyomavirus and BK polyomavirus are also potentially oncogenic. The observed abundance and wide dissemination of HPVs and HPyVs in water environments strongly suggest the need to shed light on the fate of these viruses in water environments and to elucidate their potential for waterborne transmission. Such information is essential for the improvement of wastewater management programs in terms of both sewage treatment and water quality surveillance.

  10. Therapy of cutaneous human Papillomavirus infections.

    PubMed

    Rivera, Allison; Tyring, Stephen K

    2004-01-01

    Human Papillomaviruses (HPV) are double-stranded DNA viruses, which result in a variety of clinical manifestations according to type. The most common cutaneous lesions include warts located on the skin and genitalia. Because there is currently no cure for HPV infection, treatment focuses on the alleviation of signs and symptoms. Unfortunately, therapy has not been proved to affect transmissibility. Traditional treatment modalities have focused on the destruction of infected tissue through a variety of techniques. These include podophyllin resin, podophyllotoxin, salicylic acid, trichloroacetic acid, bichloroacetic acid, cryotherapy, laser, and surgical techniques. None of these modalities have been proved to be superior. More recently, immunomodulatory compounds with antiviral properties have demonstrated superior efficacy with clearance rates up to 77% and low recurrence rates. Most importantly, clinical trials of vaccines to prevent acquisition of oncogenic HPV are demonstrating marked safety and efficacy.

  11. Molecular genetic characterization of p53 mutated oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma cells transformed with human papillomavirus E6 and E7 oncogenes.

    PubMed

    Oh, Ji-Eun; Kim, Jeong-Oh; Shin, Jung-Young; Zhang, Xiang-Hua; Won, Hye-Sung; Chun, Sang-Hoon; Jung, Chan-Kwon; Park, Won-Sang; Nam, Suk-Woo; Eun, Jung-Woo; Kang, Jin-Hyoung

    2013-08-01

    Patients with HPV-positive oropharyngeal cancer show better tumor response to radiation or chemotherapy than patients with HPV-negative cancer. HPV oncoprotein E6 binds and degrades a typically wild-type p53 protein product. However, HPV16 infection and p53 mutation infrequently coexist in a subset of HNSCCs. The purpose of this study was to investigate the mechanisms through which tumor biology and molecular genetic mechanisms change when two HPV-negative, p53-mutated oropharyngeal cell lines (YD8, non-disruptive p53 mutation; YD10B, disruptive p53 mutation) derived from patients with a history of heavy smoking are transfected with HPV E6 and E7 oncogenes in vitro. Transfection with HPV E6 and E7 oncogenes in YD8, reduced the abundance of proteins encoded by tumor suppressor genes, such as p-p53 and p-Rb. Cell proliferative activity was increased in the cells transfected with E6E7 compared to cells transfected with vector alone (P=0.09), whereas the invasiveness of E6E7-transfected cells was significantly reduced (P=0.02). cDNA microarray of the transfected cells with E6E7 showed significant changes in mRNA expression in several signaling pathways, including focal adhesion, JAK-STAT signaling pathway, cell cycle and p53 signaling pathway. Regarding the qPCR array for the p53 signaling pathway, the mRNA expression of STAT1 was remarkably upregulated by 6.47-fold (P<0.05); in contrast, IGF-1R was significantly downregulated by 2.40-fold in the YD8-vector compared toYD8-E6E7 (P<0.01). Finally, data collected from these two array experiments enabled us to select two genes, STAT1 and IGF-1R, for further study. In immunohistochemical study, nuclear STAT1 expression was slightly higher in HPV-positive compared to HPV-negative oropharyngeal tumors (P=0.18); however, cytoplasmic STAT1 was significantly lower in HPV-positive cases (P=0.03). IGF-1R expression levels were remarkably lower in HPV-positive compared to HPV-negative cases (P=0.01). Our data suggest that

  12. Oncogenes and RNA splicing of human tumor viruses.

    PubMed

    Ajiro, Masahiko; Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2014-09-01

    Approximately 10.8% of human cancers are associated with infection by an oncogenic virus. These viruses include human papillomavirus (HPV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCV), human T-cell leukemia virus 1 (HTLV-1), Kaposi's sarcoma-associated herpesvirus (KSHV), hepatitis C virus (HCV) and hepatitis B virus (HBV). These oncogenic viruses, with the exception of HCV, require the host RNA splicing machinery in order to exercise their oncogenic activities, a strategy that allows the viruses to efficiently export and stabilize viral RNA and to produce spliced RNA isoforms from a bicistronic or polycistronic RNA transcript for efficient protein translation. Infection with a tumor virus affects the expression of host genes, including host RNA splicing factors, which play a key role in regulating viral RNA splicing of oncogene transcripts. A current prospective focus is to explore how alternative RNA splicing and the expression of viral oncogenes take place in a cell- or tissue-specific manner in virus-induced human carcinogenesis.

  13. Papillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Félez-Sánchez, Marta

    2015-01-01

    Papillomaviruses (PVs) are a numerous family of small dsDNA viruses infecting virtually all mammals. PVs cause infections without triggering a strong immune response, and natural infection provides only limited protection against reinfection. Most PVs are part and parcel of the skin microbiota. In some cases, infections by certain PVs take diverse clinical presentations from highly productive self-limited warts to invasive cancers. We propose PVs as an excellent model system to study the evolutionary interactions between the immune system and pathogens causing chronic infections: genotypically, PVs are very diverse, with hundreds of different genotypes infecting skin and mucosa; phenotypically, they display extremely broad gradients and trade-offs between key phenotypic traits, namely productivity, immunogenicity, prevalence, oncogenicity and clinical presentation. Public health interventions have been launched to decrease the burden of PV-associated cancers, including massive vaccination against the most oncogenic human PVs, as well as systematic screening for PV chronic anogenital infections. Anti-PVs vaccines elicit protection against infection, induce cross-protection against closely related viruses and result in herd immunity. However, our knowledge on the ecological and intrapatient dynamics of PV infections remains fragmentary. We still need to understand how the novel anthropogenic selection pressures posed by vaccination and screening will affect viral circulation and epidemiology. We present here an overview of PV evolution and the connection between PV genotypes and the phenotypic, clinical manifestations of the diseases they cause. This differential link between viral evolution and the gradient cancer-warts-asymptomatic infections makes PVs a privileged playground for evolutionary medicine research. PMID:25634317

  14. Role of human papillomaviruses in carcinogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Ghittoni, Raffaella; Accardi, Rosita; Chiocca, Susanna; Tommasino, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) family comprises more than 170 different types that preferentially infect the mucosa of the genitals, upper-respiratory tract, or the skin. The ‘high-risk HPV type’, a sub-group of mucosal HPVs, is the cause of approximately 5% of all human cancers, which corresponds to one-third of all virus-induced tumours. Within the high-risk group, HPV16 is the most oncogenic type, being responsible for approximatively 50% of all worldwide cervical cancers. Many studies suggest that, in addition to the high-risk mucosal HPV types, certain cutaneous HPVs also have a role in the development of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC). Functional studies on the HPV early gene products showed that E6 and E7 play a key role in carcinogenesis. These two proteins use multiple mechanisms to evade host immune surveillance, allowing viral persistence, and to deregulate cell cycle and apoptosis control, thus facilitating the accumulation of DNA damage and ultimately cellular transformation. The demonstration that high-risk HPV types are the etiological agents of cervical cancer allowed the implementation in the clinical routine of novel screening strategies for cervical lesions, as well as the development of a very efficient prophylactic vaccine. Because of these remarkable achievements, there is no doubt that in the coming decades we will witness a dramatic reduction of cervical cancer incidence worldwide. PMID:25987895

  15. [Melanoma and Human Papillomaviruses: Is There an Outlook for Study?].

    PubMed

    Volgareva, G M; Mikhaylova, I N; Golovina, D A

    2016-01-01

    Melanoma is one of the most aggressive human malignant tumors. Its incidence and mortality are growing steadily. Ultraviolet irradiation is the main risk factor for melanoma involved in melanomagenesis. The probability of viral etiology of melanoma has been discussed. Human papillomaviruses (HPV) have been mentioned among candidates for its etiologic agents because some HPV types are the powerful carcinogens causing cervical cancer and other cancers. The review analyses the literature data on the association of melanoma with HPV Several groupsfound HPVin skin melanomas as well as in mucosa; viruses of high oncogenic risk were detected in some cases. For some organs the etiological role of high-risk HPV as inducers of invasive carcinomas is confirmed. These organs require special mention: cervix uteri, vulva, vagina, penis, anal region, and oral cavity. However in the majority of the studies in which viral DNA-positive melanomas were found, testing for viral genome expression was not done while this is the fact of primary importance. HPVare found in normal skin and mucous membranes thus creating justifiable threat of tumor specimen contamination with viral DNA in vivo. There are limited data on aggravation of the disease prognosis in papillomavirus-positive melanomas. However, any systematic observation of a sizeable patient group distinguished by that tumor type has not been performed yet. Viral E6 and E7 oncogenes of high-risk papillomaviruses were shown to be able to transform normal human melanocytes in vitro experiments. Thus, we can assume the presence of the association of melanoma with oncogenic HPV. The clinical significance of this problem is indisputable under the conditions of the steady increase in melanoma incidence and mortality rates in Russia and abroad. The problem requires further study.

  16. [Apoptosis modulation by human papillomavirus].

    PubMed

    Jave-Suárez, Luis Felipe; Ratkovich-González, Sarah; Olimón-Andalón, Vicente; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important processes to keep the homeostasis in organisms is the apoptosis, also called programmed cell death. This mechanism works through two pathways: The intrinsic or mitochondrial, which responds to DNA damage and extern agents like UV radiation; and the extrinsic or receptor-mediated, which binds to their ligands to initiate the apoptotic trail. The evasion of apoptosis is one of the main causes of cellular transformation to malignity. Many viruses had shown capacity to modify the apoptotic process; among them is the human papillomavirus, which, by means of its oncoproteins, interferes in pathways, reacting with the receptors and molecules and participating in the death mechanism. This creates ideal conditions for cancer development.

  17. Anti-human papillomavirus therapeutics: facts & future.

    PubMed

    Bharti, Alok C; Shukla, Shirish; Mahata, Sutapa; Hedau, Suresh; Das, Bhudev C

    2009-09-01

    Even after 25 years of establishing Human Papillomavirus (HPV) as the causative agent for cervical cancer, effective treatment of HPV infection still unavailable. Comprehensive efforts especially for targeting HPV infection have been made only in recent years. Conventional physical ablation of HPV-induced lesions such as cryo-therapy, photo-therapy, LEEP, laser cone-biopsy and localized radiotherapy are shown to be effective to some extent in treating localized lesions where the removal of diseased tissue is associated with removal of transforming keratinocytes harboring HPV. Apart from currently available prophylactic vaccines which prevent the viral entry and should be given prior to viral exposure, several attempts are being made to develop therapeutic vaccines that could treat prevailing HPV infection. In addition, immunomodulators like interferons and imiquimod that have been shown to elicit cytokine milieu to enhance host immune response against HPV infection. Also, antiviral approaches such as RNA interference (RNAi) nucleotide analogs, antioxidants and herbal derivatives have shown effective therapeutic potential against HPV infection. These leads are being tested in pre-clinical and clinical studies. Present article provides a brief overview of conventional therapies for HPV-associated diseases. Potential of non-ablative anti-HPV treatment modalities that could prove useful for either elimination of HPV in early stages of infection when the virus is not integrated into the host cell genome or suppression of the expression of viral oncogenes that dys-regulate the host cell cycle following transformation is discussed.

  18. Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Quadrivalent Vaccine

    Cancer.gov

    This page contains brief information about recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) quadrivalent vaccine and a collection of links to more information about the use of this vaccine, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  19. Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Bivalent Vaccine

    Cancer.gov

    This page contains brief information about recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) bivalent vaccine and a collection of links to more information about the use of this vaccine, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  20. Recombinant Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Nonavalent Vaccine

    Cancer.gov

    This page contains brief information about recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) nonavalent vaccine and a collection of links to more information about the use of this vaccine, research results, and ongoing clinical trials.

  1. Evidence and Impact of Human Papillomavirus Latency

    PubMed Central

    Gravitt, Patti E

    2012-01-01

    At present, there is no consensus in the scientific community regarding the ability for human papillomavirus (HPV) infections to establish latency. Based on animal studies, a model of papillomavirus latency has been proposed in which papillomaviruses can be retained in the basal epithelial stem cell pool as latent infections and periodically induced to reactivate when the stem cell divides and one daughter cell is committed to terminal differentiation and induction of the viral life cycle. Tissue resident memory T-cells are hypothesized to control these periodic reactivation episodes and thus limit their duration. In this paper, evidence from human studies consistent with this model of papillomavirus latency is reviewed. Given the strong circumstantial evidence supporting a natural history of HPV infection which includes a immunologically controlled latent state, the longer term implications of HPV latency on a highly infected and aging population may warrant a more serious evaluation. PMID:23341855

  2. Expression of Cellular Oncogenes in Human Malignancies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Slamon, Dennis J.; Dekernion, Jean B.; Verma, Inder M.; Cline, Martin J.

    1984-04-01

    Cellular oncogenes have been implicated in the induction of malignant transformation in some model systems in vitro and may be related to malignancies in vivo in some vertebrate species. This article describes a study of the expression of 15 cellular oncogenes in fresh human tumors from 54 patients, representing 20 different tumor types. More than one cellular oncogene was transcriptionally active in all of the tumors examined. In 14 patients it was possible to study normal and malignant tissue from the same organ. In many of these patients, the transcriptional activity of certain oncogenes was greater in the malignant than the normal tissue. The cellular fes (feline sarcoma) oncogene, not previously known to be transcribed in mammalian tissue, was found to be active in lung and hematopoietic malignancies.

  3. Post hoc analysis of the PATRICIA randomized trial of the efficacy of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16)/HPV-18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine against incident and persistent infection with nonvaccine oncogenic HPV types using an alternative multiplex type-specific PCR assay for HPV DNA.

    PubMed

    Struyf, Frank; Colau, Brigitte; Wheeler, Cosette M; Naud, Paulo; Garland, Suzanne; Quint, Wim; Chow, Song-Nan; Salmerón, Jorge; Lehtinen, Matti; Del Rosario-Raymundo, M Rowena; Paavonen, Jorma; Teixeira, Júlio C; Germar, Maria Julieta; Peters, Klaus; Skinner, S Rachel; Limson, Genara; Castellsagué, Xavier; Poppe, Willy A J; Ramjattan, Brian; Klein, Terry D; Schwarz, Tino F; Chatterjee, Archana; Tjalma, Wiebren A A; Diaz-Mitoma, Francisco; Lewis, David J M; Harper, Diane M; Molijn, Anco; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; David, Marie-Pierre; Dubin, Gary

    2015-02-01

    The efficacy of the human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16)/HPV-18 AS04-adjuvanted vaccine against cervical infections with HPV in the Papilloma Trial against Cancer in Young Adults (PATRICIA) was evaluated using a combination of the broad-spectrum L1-based SPF10 PCR-DNA enzyme immunoassay (DEIA)/line probe assay (LiPA25) system with type-specific PCRs for HPV-16 and -18. Broad-spectrum PCR assays may underestimate the presence of HPV genotypes present at relatively low concentrations in multiple infections, due to competition between genotypes. Therefore, samples were retrospectively reanalyzed using a testing algorithm incorporating the SPF10 PCR-DEIA/LiPA25 plus a novel E6-based multiplex type-specific PCR and reverse hybridization assay (MPTS12 RHA), which permits detection of a panel of nine oncogenic HPV genotypes (types 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 45, 52, 58, and 59). For the vaccine against HPV types 16 and 18, there was no major impact on estimates of vaccine efficacy (VE) for incident or 6-month or 12-month persistent infections when the MPTS12 RHA was included in the testing algorithm versus estimates with the protocol-specified algorithm. However, the alternative testing algorithm showed greater sensitivity than the protocol-specified algorithm for detection of some nonvaccine oncogenic HPV types. More cases were gained in the control group than in the vaccine group, leading to higher point estimates of VE for 6-month and 12-month persistent infections for the nonvaccine oncogenic types included in the MPTS12 RHA assay (types 31, 33, 35, 45, 52, 58, and 59). This post hoc analysis indicates that the per-protocol testing algorithm used in PATRICIA underestimated the VE against some nonvaccine oncogenic HPV types and that the choice of the HPV DNA testing methodology is important for the evaluation of VE in clinical trials. (This study has been registered at ClinicalTrials.gov under registration no. NCT00122681.).

  4. HPV (Human Papillomavirus) vaccine - what you need to know

    MedlinePlus

    ... is taken in its entirety from the CDC HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Vaccine Information Statement (VIS): www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/hpv.html . CDC review information for HPV (Human Papillomavirus) ...

  5. Human papillomavirus in oral lesions.

    PubMed

    González, Joaquín V; Gutiérrez, Rafael A; Keszler, Alicia; Colacino, Maria del Carmen; Alonio, Lidia V; Teyssie, Angelica R; Picconi, Maria Alejandra

    2007-01-01

    Growing evidence suggests a role for human papillomavirus (HPV) in oral cancer; however its involvement is still controversial. This study evaluates the frequency of HPV DNA in a variety of oral lesions in patients from Argentina. A total of 77 oral tissue samples from 66 patients were selected (cases); the clinical-histopathological diagnoses corresponded to: 11 HPV- associated benign lesions, 8 non-HPV associated benign lesions, 33 premalignant lesions and 25 cancers. Sixty exfoliated cell samples from normal oral mucosa were used as controls. HPV detection and typing were performed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using primers MY09, 11, combined with RFLP or alternatively PCR using primers GP5+, 6+ combined with dot blot hybridization. HPV was detected in 91.0% of HPV- associated benign lesions, 14.3% of non-HPV associated benign lesions, 51.5% of preneoplasias and 60.0% of cancers. No control sample tested HPV positive. In benign HPV- associated lesions, 30.0% of HPV positive samples harbored high-risk types, while in preneoplastic lesions the value rose to 59.9%. In cancer lesions, HPV detection in verrucous carcinoma was 88.9% and in squamous cell carcinoma 43.8%, with high-risk type rates of 75.5% and 85.6%, respectively. The high HPV frequency detected in preneoplastic and neoplastic lesions supports an HPV etiological role in at least a subset of oral cancers.

  6. Global challenges of implementing human papillomavirus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Graham, Janice E; Mishra, Amrita

    2011-06-30

    Human Papillomavirus vaccines are widely hailed as a sweeping pharmaceutical innovation for the universal benefit of all women. The implementation of the vaccines, however, is far from universal or equitable. Socio-economically marginalized women in emerging and developing, and many advanced economies alike, suffer a disproportionately large burden of cervical cancer. Despite the marketing of Human Papillomavirus vaccines as the solution to cervical cancer, the market authorization (licensing) of the vaccines has not translated into universal equitable access. Vaccine implementation for vulnerable girls and women faces multiple barriers that include high vaccine costs, inadequate delivery infrastructure, and lack of community engagement to generate awareness about cervical cancer and early screening tools. For Human Papillomavirus vaccines to work as a public health solution, the quality-assured delivery of cheaper vaccines must be integrated with strengthened capacity for community-based health education and screening.

  7. Global challenges of implementing human papillomavirus vaccines

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus vaccines are widely hailed as a sweeping pharmaceutical innovation for the universal benefit of all women. The implementation of the vaccines, however, is far from universal or equitable. Socio-economically marginalized women in emerging and developing, and many advanced economies alike, suffer a disproportionately large burden of cervical cancer. Despite the marketing of Human Papillomavirus vaccines as the solution to cervical cancer, the market authorization (licensing) of the vaccines has not translated into universal equitable access. Vaccine implementation for vulnerable girls and women faces multiple barriers that include high vaccine costs, inadequate delivery infrastructure, and lack of community engagement to generate awareness about cervical cancer and early screening tools. For Human Papillomavirus vaccines to work as a public health solution, the quality-assured delivery of cheaper vaccines must be integrated with strengthened capacity for community-based health education and screening. PMID:21718495

  8. The fanconi anemia pathway limits human papillomavirus replication.

    PubMed

    Hoskins, Elizabeth E; Morreale, Richard J; Werner, Stephen P; Higginbotham, Jennifer M; Laimins, Laimonis A; Lambert, Paul F; Brown, Darron R; Gillison, Maura L; Nuovo, Gerard J; Witte, David P; Kim, Mi-Ok; Davies, Stella M; Mehta, Parinda A; Butsch Kovacic, Melinda; Wikenheiser-Brokamp, Kathryn A; Wells, Susanne I

    2012-08-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) deregulate epidermal differentiation and cause anogenital and head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs). The E7 gene is considered the predominant viral oncogene and drives proliferation and genome instability. While the implementation of routine screens has greatly reduced the incidence of cervical cancers which are almost exclusively HPV positive, the proportion of HPV-positive head and neck SCCs is on the rise. High levels of HPV oncogene expression and genome load are linked to disease progression, but genetic risk factors that regulate oncogene abundance and/or genome amplification remain poorly understood. Fanconi anemia (FA) is a genome instability syndrome characterized at least in part by extreme susceptibility to SCCs. FA results from mutations in one of 15 genes in the FA pathway, whose protein products assemble in the nucleus and play important roles in DNA damage repair. We report here that loss of FA pathway components FANCA and FANCD2 stimulates E7 protein accumulation in human keratinocytes and causes increased epithelial proliferation and basal cell layer expansion in the HPV-positive epidermis. Additionally, FANCD2 loss stimulates HPV genome amplification in differentiating cells, demonstrating that the intact FA pathway functions to restrict the HPV life cycle. These findings raise the possibility that FA genes suppress HPV infection and disease and suggest possible mechanism(s) for reported associations of HPV with an FA cohort in Brazil and for allelic variation of FA genes with HPV persistence in the general population.

  9. Lichenoid drug eruption after human papillomavirus vaccination.

    PubMed

    Laschinger, Mary E; Schleichert, Rachel A; Green, Brian

    2015-01-01

    Lichenoid drug reactions have been linked to a long and growing list of medications, most of which are used mainly in adults, making these reactions exceedingly rare in children. To the best of our knowledge, this case report is the first of a lichenoid drug eruption in a child after human papillomavirus vaccination.

  10. Four historic legends in human papillomaviruses research.

    PubMed

    Mammas, Ioannis N; Spandidos, Demetrios A

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) infection and HPVs-associated lesions, including skin warts in children and adults and cervical neoplasia in women, have been excessively studied since ancient years. In our article, we present briefly four major researchers from the HPVs pre-vaccination historic period: Hippokrates the Asclepiad, Domenico Antonio Rigoni-Stern, George N. Papanicolaou and Harald zur Hausen.

  11. Human Papillomavirus: A Catalyst to a Killer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richman, Alice

    2005-01-01

    Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most prevalent and widespread sexually transmitted disease and is responsible for almost all cases of cervical cancer worldwide. However, HPV has received little public health attention, is not a reportable STD, and often is absent from the repertoire of STDs. In addition, there is pervasive misinformation…

  12. Could the human papillomavirus vaccines drive virulence evolution?

    PubMed

    Murall, Carmen Lía; Bauch, Chris T; Day, Troy

    2015-01-07

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines hold great promise for preventing several cancers caused by HPV infections. Yet little attention has been given to whether HPV could respond evolutionarily to the new selection pressures imposed on it by the novel immunity response created by the vaccine. Here, we present and theoretically validate a mechanism by which the vaccine alters the transmission-recovery trade-off that constrains HPV's virulence such that higher oncogene expression is favoured. With a high oncogene expression strategy, the virus is able to increase its viral load and infected cell population before clearance by the vaccine, thus improving its chances of transmission. This new rapid cell-proliferation strategy is able to circulate between hosts with medium to high turnover rates of sexual partners. We also discuss the importance of better quantifying the duration of challenge infections and the degree to which a vaccinated host can shed virus. The generality of the models presented here suggests a wider applicability of this mechanism, and thus highlights the need to investigate viral oncogenicity from an evolutionary perspective.

  13. The Interaction Between Human Papillomaviruses and the Stromal Microenvironment.

    PubMed

    Woodby, B; Scott, M; Bodily, J

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are small, double-stranded DNA viruses that replicate in stratified squamous epithelia and cause a variety of malignancies. Current efforts in HPV biology are focused on understanding the virus-host interactions that enable HPV to persist for years or decades in the tissue. The importance of interactions between tumor cells and the stromal microenvironment has become increasingly apparent in recent years, but how stromal interactions impact the normal, benign life cycle of HPVs, or progression of lesions to cancer is less understood. Furthermore, how productively replicating HPV impacts cells in the stromal environment is also unclear. Here we bring together some of the relevant literature on keratinocyte-stromal interactions and their impacts on HPV biology, focusing on stromal fibroblasts, immune cells, and endothelial cells. We discuss how HPV oncogenes in infected cells manipulate other cells in their environment, and, conversely, how neighboring cells may impact the efficiency or course of HPV infection.

  14. Human alpha and beta papillomaviruses use different synonymous codon profiles.

    PubMed

    Cladel, Nancy M; Bertotto, Alex; Christensen, Neil D

    2010-06-01

    Human papillomaviruses use rare codons relative to their hosts. It has been theorized that this is a mechanism to allow the virus to escape immune surveillance. In the present study, we examined the codings of four major genes of 21 human alpha (mucosatropic) viruses and 16 human beta (cutaneous-tropic) viruses. We compared the codon usage of different genes from a given papillomavirus and also the same genes from different papillomaviruses. Our data showed that codon usage was not always uniform between two genes of a given papillomavirus or between the same genes of papillomaviruses from different genera. We speculate as to why this might be and conclude that codon usage in the papillomaviruses may not only play a role in facilitating escape from immune surveillance but may also underlie some of the unanswered questions in the papillomavirus field.

  15. Human Papillomaviruses As Therapeutic Targets in Human Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hellner, Karin; Münger, Karl

    2011-01-01

    Cervical carcinomas are almost universally associated with high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infections, and are a leading cause of cancer death in women worldwide. HPV oncoproteins contribute to cancer initiation and progression and their expression is necessary for the maintenance of the transformed state. The fact that the initiating oncogenic insult, infection with a high-risk HPV and viral oncoprotein expression, is common to almost all cervical cancers offers unique opportunities for prevention, early detection, and therapy. The potential for prevention has been realized by introduction of prophylactic vaccines that are to prevent transmission of specific high-risk HPVs. Given, however, that these vaccines have no therapeutic efficacy and HPV-associated cervical cancers arise years if not decades after the initial infection, it has been estimated that there will be no measurable decline of HPV-associated tumors before 2040. Cervical cancer alone will be diagnosed in more than 375,000 US women between now and 2040. Other HPV-associated anogenital and head and neck cancers are predicted to afflict another 700,000 men and women over this time period. Hence, therapeutic efforts to combat high-risk HPV-associated disease remain of critical importance. PMID:21220591

  16. Abrogation of the Brd4-Positive Transcription Elongation Factor b Complex by Papillomavirus E2 Protein Contributes to Viral Oncogene Repression▿

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Junpeng; Li, Qing; Lievens, Sam; Tavernier, Jan; You, Jianxin

    2010-01-01

    The cellular bromodomain protein Brd4 is a major interacting partner of the papillomavirus (PV) E2 protein. Interaction of E2 with Brd4 contributes to viral episome maintenance. The E2-Brd4 interaction also plays an important role in repressing viral oncogene expression from the integrated viral genome in human PV (HPV)-positive cancer cells. However, the underlying mechanism is not clearly understood. In host cells, Brd4 recruits positive transcription elongation factor b (P-TEFb) to stimulate RNA polymerase II phosphorylation during cellular and viral gene expression. P-TEFb associates with the C terminus of Brd4, which largely overlaps with the E2 binding site on Brd4. In this study, we demonstrate that E2 binding to Brd4 inhibits the interaction of endogenous Brd4 and P-TEFb. P-TEFb is essential for viral oncogene E6/E7 transcription in both HeLa and CaSki cells that contain integrated HPV genomes. E2 binding to Brd4 abrogates the recruitment of P-TEFb to the integrated viral chromatin template, leading to inactivation of P-TEFb and repression of the viral oncogene E6/E7. Furthermore, dissociation of the Brd4-P-TEFb complex from the integrated viral chromatin template using a Brd4 bromodomain dominant-negative inhibitor also hampers HPV E6/E7 oncogene expression. Our data support that Brd4 recruitment of P-TEFb to the viral chromatin template is essential for viral oncogene expression. Abrogation of the interaction between P-TEFb and Brd4 thus provides a mechanism for E2-mediated repression of the viral oncogenes from the integrated viral genomes in cancer cells. PMID:19846528

  17. Mucosal and cutaneous human papillomaviruses detected in raw sewages.

    PubMed

    La Rosa, Giuseppina; Fratini, Marta; Accardi, Luisa; D'Oro, Graziana; Della Libera, Simonetta; Muscillo, Michele; Di Bonito, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Epitheliotropic viruses can find their way into sewage. The aim of the present study was to investigate the occurrence, distribution, and genetic diversity of Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs) in urban wastewaters. Sewage samples were collected from treatment plants distributed throughout Italy. The DNA extracted from these samples was analyzed by PCR using five PV-specific sets of primers targeting the L1 (GP5/GP6, MY09/MY11, FAP59/64, SKF/SKR) and E1 regions (PM-A/PM-B), according to the protocols previously validated for the detection of mucosal and cutaneous HPV genotypes. PCR products underwent sequencing analysis and the sequences were aligned to reference genomes from the Papillomavirus Episteme database. Phylogenetic analysis was then performed to assess the genetic relationships among the different sequences and between the sequences of the samples and those of the prototype strains. A broad spectrum of sequences related to mucosal and cutaneous HPV types was detected in 81% of the sewage samples analyzed. Surprisingly, sequences related to the anogenital HPV6 and 11 were detected in 19% of the samples, and sequences related to the "high risk" oncogenic HPV16 were identified in two samples. Sequences related to HPV9, HPV20, HPV25, HPV76, HPV80, HPV104, HPV110, HPV111, HPV120 and HPV145 beta Papillomaviruses were detected in 76% of the samples. In addition, similarity searches and phylogenetic analysis of some sequences suggest that they could belong to putative new genotypes of the beta genus. In this study, for the first time, the presence of HPV viruses strongly related to human cancer is reported in sewage samples. Our data increases the knowledge of HPV genomic diversity and suggests that virological analysis of urban sewage can provide key information useful in supporting epidemiological studies.

  18. Mucosal and Cutaneous Human Papillomaviruses Detected in Raw Sewages

    PubMed Central

    La Rosa, Giuseppina; Fratini, Marta; Accardi, Luisa; D'Oro, Graziana; Della Libera, Simonetta; Muscillo, Michele; Di Bonito, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Epitheliotropic viruses can find their way into sewage. The aim of the present study was to investigate the occurrence, distribution, and genetic diversity of Human Papillomaviruses (HPVs) in urban wastewaters. Sewage samples were collected from treatment plants distributed throughout Italy. The DNA extracted from these samples was analyzed by PCR using five PV-specific sets of primers targeting the L1 (GP5/GP6, MY09/MY11, FAP59/64, SKF/SKR) and E1 regions (PM-A/PM-B), according to the protocols previously validated for the detection of mucosal and cutaneous HPV genotypes. PCR products underwent sequencing analysis and the sequences were aligned to reference genomes from the Papillomavirus Episteme database. Phylogenetic analysis was then performed to assess the genetic relationships among the different sequences and between the sequences of the samples and those of the prototype strains. A broad spectrum of sequences related to mucosal and cutaneous HPV types was detected in 81% of the sewage samples analyzed. Surprisingly, sequences related to the anogenital HPV6 and 11 were detected in 19% of the samples, and sequences related to the “high risk” oncogenic HPV16 were identified in two samples. Sequences related to HPV9, HPV20, HPV25, HPV76, HPV80, HPV104, HPV110, HPV111, HPV120 and HPV145 beta Papillomaviruses were detected in 76% of the samples. In addition, similarity searches and phylogenetic analysis of some sequences suggest that they could belong to putative new genotypes of the beta genus. In this study, for the first time, the presence of HPV viruses strongly related to human cancer is reported in sewage samples. Our data increases the knowledge of HPV genomic diversity and suggests that virological analysis of urban sewage can provide key information useful in supporting epidemiological studies. PMID:23341898

  19. Comparison of the immunogenicity of the human papillomavirus (HPV)-16/18 vaccine and the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine for oncogenic non-vaccine types HPV-31 and HPV-45 in healthy women aged 18-45 years.

    PubMed

    Einstein, Mark H; Baron, Mira; Levin, Myron J; Chatterjee, Archana; Fox, Bradley; Scholar, Sofia; Rosen, Jeffrey; Chakhtoura, Nahida; Lebacq, Marie; van der Most, Robbert; Moris, Philippe; Giannini, Sandra L; Schuind, Anne; Datta, Sanjoy K; Descamps, Dominique

    2011-12-01

    Protection against oncogenic non-vaccine types (cross-protection) offered by human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines may provide a significant medical benefit. Available clinical efficacy data suggest the two licensed vaccines (HPV-16/18 vaccine, GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals (GSK), and HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine, Merck & Co., Inc.) differ in terms of protection against oncogenic non-vaccine HPV types -31/45. The immune responses induced by the two vaccines against these two non-vaccine HPV types (cross-reactivity) was compared in an observer-blind study up to Month 24 (18 mo post-vaccination), in women HPV DNA-negative and seronegative prior to vaccination for the HPV type analyzed (HPV-010 [NCT00423046]). Geometric mean antibody titers (GMTs) measured by pseudovirion-based neutralization assay (PBNA) and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) were similar between vaccines for HPV-31/45. Seropositivity rates for HPV-31 were also similar between vaccines; however, there was a trend for higher seropositivity with the HPV-16/18 vaccine (13.0-16.7%) versus the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine (0.0-5.0%) for HPV-45 with PBNA, but not ELISA. HPV-31/45 cross-reactive memory B-cell responses were comparable between vaccines. Circulating antigen-specific CD4+ T-cell frequencies were higher for the HPV-16/18 vaccine than the HPV-6/11/16/18 vaccine (HPV-31 [geometric mean ratio [GMR] =2.0; p=0.0002] and HPV-45 [GMR=2.6; p=0.0092]), as were the proportion of T-cell responders (HPV-31, p=0.0009; HPV-45, p=0.0793). In conclusion, immune response to oncogenic non-vaccine HPV types -31/45 was generally similar for both vaccines with the exception of T-cell response which was higher with the HPV-16/18 vaccine. Considering the differences in cross-protective efficacy between the two vaccines, the results might provide insights into the underlying mechanism(s) of protection.

  20. Host defenses against human papillomaviruses: lessons from epidermodysplasia verruciformis.

    PubMed

    Orth, G

    2008-01-01

    Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) is a rare, autosomal recessive genodermatosis associated with a high risk of skin carcinoma (MIM 226400). EV is characterized by the abnormal susceptibility of otherwise healthy patients to infection by specific, weakly virulent human papillomaviruses (HPVs), including the potentially oncogenic HPV-5. Inactivating mutations in either of the related EVER1/TMC6 and EVER2/TMC8 genes cause most EV cases. New insights in EV pathogenesis have been gained from the following recent observations: (1) EV-specific HPVs (betapapillomaviruses) are defective for an important growth-promoting function encoded by an E5/E8 gene present in other HPVs, and inactivation of EVER proteins may compensate for the missing viral function; (2) the transmembrane viral E5/E8 and cellular EVER proteins interact both with the zinc transporter ZnT1, and are likely to modulate zinc homeostasis. EV may thus represent a primary deficiency in intrinsic, constitutive immunity to betapapillomaviruses, or constitute a primary deficiency in innate immunity (or both). Keratinocytes, the home cells of HPVs, are likely to play a central role in both cases. An important issue is to establish which cellular genes involved in intrinsic and innate antiviral responses play a part in the outcome of infections with other HPV types, such as genital oncogenic HPVs.

  1. University Students' Knowledge and Attitudes Regarding Cervical Cancer, Human Papillomavirus, and Human Papillomavirus Vaccines in Turkey

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Koç, Zeliha

    2015-01-01

    Objectives: The current descriptive study aimed to determine university students' knowledge and attitudes regarding cervical cancer, human papillomavirus (HPV), and HPV vaccines in Turkey. Participants: A total of 800 students participated. Methods: This study was carried out between September 1, 2012, and October 30, 2012, in 8 female…

  2. CDC25 phosphatases as potential human oncogenes.

    PubMed

    Galaktionov, K; Lee, A K; Eckstein, J; Draetta, G; Meckler, J; Loda, M; Beach, D

    1995-09-15

    Cyclin-dependent kinases (CDKs) are activated by CDC25 phosphatases, which remove inhibitory phosphate from tyrosine and threonine residues. In human cells, CDC25 proteins are encoded by a multigene family, consisting of CDC25A, CDC25B, and CDC25C. In rodent cells, human CDC25A or CDC25B but not CDC25C phosphatases cooperate with either Ha-RASG12V or loss of RB1 in oncogenic focus formation. Such transformants were highly aneuploid, grew in soft agar, and formed high-grade tumors in nude mice. Overexpression of CDC25B was detected in 32 percent of human primary breast cancers tested. The CDC25 phosphatases may contribute to the development of human cancer.

  3. Viral Oncogenes, Noncoding RNAs, and RNA Splicing in Human Tumor Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Zheng, Zhi-Ming

    2010-01-01

    Viral oncogenes are responsible for oncogenesis resulting from persistent virus infection. Although different human tumor viruses express different viral oncogenes and induce different tumors, their oncoproteins often target similar sets of cellular tumor suppressors or signal pathways to immortalize and/or transform infected cells. Expression of the viral E6 and E7 oncogenes in papillomavirus, E1A and E1B oncogenes in adenovirus, large T and small t antigen in polyomavirus, and Tax oncogene in HTLV-1 are regulated by alternative RNA splicing. However, this regulation is only partially understood. DNA tumor viruses also encode noncoding RNAs, including viral microRNAs, that disturb normal cell functions. Among the determined viral microRNA precursors, EBV encodes 25 from two major clusters (BART and BHRF1), KSHV encodes 12 from a latent region, human polyomavirus MCV produce only one microRNA from the late region antisense to early transcripts, but HPVs appears to produce no viral microRNAs. PMID:21152115

  4. The human papillomavirus E7 oncoprotein

    SciTech Connect

    McLaughlin-Drubin, Margaret E. Muenger, Karl

    2009-02-20

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) E7 oncoprotein shares functional similarities with such proteins as adenovirus E1A and SV40 large tumor antigen. As one of only two viral proteins always expressed in HPV-associated cancers, E7 plays a central role in both the viral life cycle and carcinogenic transformation. In the HPV viral life cycle, E7 disrupts the intimate association between cellular differentiation and proliferation in normal epithelium, allowing for viral replication in cells that would no longer be in the dividing population. This function is directly reflected in the transforming activities of E7, including tumor initiation and induction of genomic instability.

  5. Human Papillomavirus: What Every Provider Should Know

    PubMed Central

    Erickson, Britt K.; Alvarez, Ronald D.; Huh, Warner K.

    2012-01-01

    Persistence of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection is necessary for the development of cervical cancer. Additionally, infection with HPV is implicated in the majority of cases of other genital tract malignancies including vulvar, penile, and vaginal cancer. HPV testing and vaccination are a routine part of OB/GYN clinical practice. With an enhanced public awareness of HPV infections, many patients turn to their OB/GYN with questions about transmission, testing and prevention. In this review, we will discuss the biology of HPV, epidemiology of disease, methods and indications for testing, and vaccination strategies. PMID:23021131

  6. Human papillomavirus genotyping and integration in ovarian cancer Saudi patients

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) is associated with different malignancies but its role in the pathogenesis of ovarian cancer is controversial. This study investigated the prevalence, genotyping and physical state of HPV in ovarian cancer Saudi patients. Methods Hundred formalin fixed paraffin embedded (FFPE) ovarian carcinoma tissues and their normal adjacent tissues (NAT) were included in the study. HPV was detected by nested polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using degenerated HPVL1 consensus primer pairs MY09/MY11 and GP5+/GP6 + to amplify a broad spectrum of HPV genotypes in a single reaction. The HPV positive samples were further genotyped using DNA sequencing. The physical state of the virus was identified using Amplification of Papillomavirus Oncogene Transcripts (APOT) assay in the samples positive for HPV16 and/or HPV18. Results High percentage of HPV (42%) was observed in ovarian carcinoma compared to 8% in the NAT. The high-risk HPV types 16, 18 and 45 were highly associated with the advanced stages of tumor, while low-risk types 6 and 11 were present in NAT. In malignant tissues, HPV-16 was the most predominant genotype followed by HPV-18 and -45. The percentage of viral integration into the host genome was significantly high (61.1%) compared to 38.9% episomal in HPV positive tumors tissues. In HPV18 genotype the percentage of viral integration was 54.5% compared to 45.5% episomal. Conclusion The high risk HPV genotypes in ovarian cancer may indicate its role in ovarian carcinogenesis. The HPV vaccination is highly recommended to reduce this type of cancer. PMID:24252426

  7. [Genetics and susceptibility to human papillomaviruses: epidermodysplasia verruciformis, a disease model].

    PubMed

    Orth, Gérard

    2010-06-01

    The outcomes of infection by human papillomaviruses (HPV), both oncogenic and non oncogenic, show major interindividual variability The underlying genetic factors and mechanisms are poorly known, but their complexity is illustrated by epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV), a rare autosomal recessive genodermatosis associated with a high risk of non melanoma skin cancer. This model disease is characterized by abnormal susceptibility to widespread betapapillomaviruses, including HPV-5, a virus associated with EV cancers. Most cases of EV are caused by a mutation that inactivates either of two related genes, EVER1 and EVER2. This inactivation likely compensates for the absence of a viral gene (E5 or E8) essential for HPV pathogenicity. Proteins E5 and E8 interfere with the interaction between EVER proteins and ZnT1, a zinc transporter EV is thus likely to represent a primary defect of intrinsic (constitutive) immunity or innate immunity to betapapillomaviruses, involving modulation of zinc homeostasis upon keratinocyte infection. It remains to be established which cellular genes are involved in intrinsic, innate or acquired immune responses to other human papillomaviruses, including oncogenic genital types.

  8. Duty to Advocate: Human Papillomavirus Vaccination.

    PubMed

    Nichols, Kristen; Girotto, Jennifer; Steele, Amy Mitchell-Van; Stoffella, Sylvia

    2017-01-01

    Despite the excellent benefit-to-risk ratio for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination and recommendations for its routine use from the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), significant controversy surrounding HPV vaccination continues to exist. In light of this controversy and continued low rates of vaccination among U.S. adolescents, the Pediatric Pharmacy Advocacy Group (PPAG) endorses the safety and efficacy of HPV vaccination and agrees with ACIP recommendations for protection of the U.S. population against the potentially severe consequences of HPV. The PPAG recommends that all eligible individuals undergo vaccination. We further recommend that pediatric pharmacists participate in the education of patients and their families and serve as advocates for HPV vaccination. This document serves as an update to the 2008 PPAG position statement.1.

  9. Human papillomavirus and gastrointestinal cancer: A review

    PubMed Central

    Bucchi, Dania; Stracci, Fabrizio; Buonora, Nicola; Masanotti, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections worldwide. Exposure to HPV is very common, and an estimated 65%-100% of sexually active adults are exposed to HPV in their lifetime. The majority of HPV infections are asymptomatic, but there is a 10% chance that individuals will develop a persistent infection and have an increased risk of developing a carcinoma. The International Agency for Research on Cancer has found that the following cancer sites have a strong causal relationship with HPV: cervix uteri, penis, vulva, vagina, anus and oropharynx, including the base of the tongue and the tonsils. However, studies of the aetiological role of HPV in colorectal and esophageal malignancies have conflicting results. The aim of this review was to organize recent evidence and issues about the association between HPV infection and gastrointestinal tumours with a focus on esophageal, colorectal and anal cancers. The ultimate goal was to highlight possible implications for prognosis and prevention. PMID:27672265

  10. Human papillomavirus oncoproteins and apoptosis (Review)

    PubMed Central

    JIANG, PEIYUE; YUE, YING

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to review the literature and identify the association between human papillomavirus (HPV) oncoproteins and apoptosis. HPV-associated apoptosis may be primarily blocked by a number of oncoproteins, including E5, E6 and E7. E5 protein protects cells from tumor necrosis factor-associated apoptosis; the oncoprotein E6 predominantly inhibits apoptosis through the p53 pathway; and oncoprotein E7 is involved in apoptosis activation and inhibition. In addition, HPV oncoproteins are involved in activating or repressing the transcription of E6/E7. In conclusion, HPV oncoproteins, including E5, E6 and E7 protein, may interfere with apoptosis via certain regulatory principles. PMID:24348754

  11. Human papillomavirus types and recurrent cervical warts

    SciTech Connect

    Nuovo, G.J. ); Pedemonte, B.M. )

    1990-03-02

    The authors analyzed cervical intraepithelial neoplasias (CINs) detected after cryotherapy to determine if recurrence is associated with the same human papillomavirus (HPV) type found in the original lesion. Eight women had detectable HPV DNA in CINs that occurred after ablation of another CIN, and for each patient the HPV type in the pretreatment lesion was different from that in the CIN that appeared after cryotherapy. This compares with 12 women who had HPV detected in two or more CINs present at the same time, 11 of whom had the same HPv type noted. they concluded that although multiple, simultaneous CINs in a woman often contain the same HPV type, recurrent CINs that occur after cryotherapy contain an HPV type different from that present in the pretreatment lesion.

  12. Duty to Advocate: Human Papillomavirus Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Nichols, Kristen; Girotto, Jennifer; Steele, Amy Mitchell-Van; Stoffella, Sylvia

    2017-01-01

    Despite the excellent benefit-to-risk ratio for human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination and recommendations for its routine use from the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP), significant controversy surrounding HPV vaccination continues to exist. In light of this controversy and continued low rates of vaccination among U.S. adolescents, the Pediatric Pharmacy Advocacy Group (PPAG) endorses the safety and efficacy of HPV vaccination and agrees with ACIP recommendations for protection of the U.S. population against the potentially severe consequences of HPV. The PPAG recommends that all eligible individuals undergo vaccination. We further recommend that pediatric pharmacists participate in the education of patients and their families and serve as advocates for HPV vaccination. This document serves as an update to the 2008 PPAG position statement.1 PMID:28337085

  13. New treatments for human papillomavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Muñoz-Santos, C; Pigem, R; Alsina, M

    2013-12-01

    Human papillomavirus infection is very common. In this article, we review the latest developments in the treatment of lesions caused by this virus, with a particular focus on anogenital warts. Sinecatechins and new imiquimod formulations are among the most significant new developments. Others include photodynamic therapy and intralesional immunotherapy, but there is insufficient evidence to recommend their routine use. Finally, while therapeutic vaccines and inhibitory molecules appear to hold great promise, they are still in the early phases of investigation. More studies are needed, and these should have similar designs, larger samples, and sufficiently long follow-up periods to enable the direct comparison of the short-term and long-term effectiveness of different treatment options.

  14. Systematic review of human papillomavirus vaccine coadministration.

    PubMed

    Noronha, Alinea S; Markowitz, Lauri E; Dunne, Eileen F

    2014-05-13

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination is recommended in early adolescence, at an age when other vaccines are also recommended. Administration of multiple vaccines during one visit is an opportunity to improve uptake of adolescent vaccines. We conducted a systematic review of safety and immunogenicity of HPV vaccines coadministered with other vaccines. Our review included 9 studies, 4 of quadrivalent HPV vaccine and 5 of bivalent HPV vaccine; coadministered vaccines included: meningococcal conjugate, hepatitis A, hepatitis B, combined hepatitis A and B, tetanus, diphtheria, acellular pertussis, and inactivated poliovirus vaccines. Studies varied in methods of data collection and measurement of immunogenicity and safety. Noninferiority of immune response and an acceptable safety profile were demonstrated when HPV vaccine was coadministered with other vaccines.

  15. Human Beta-papillomavirus infection and keratinocyte carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Quint, Koen D; Genders, Roel E; de Koning, Maurits N C; Borgogna, Cinzia; Gariglio, Marisa; Bouwes Bavinck, Jan Nico; Doorbar, John; Feltkamp, Mariet C

    2015-01-01

    Although the role of oncogenic human Alpha-papillomaviruses (HPVs) in the development of mucosal carcinomas at different body sites (eg cervix, anus, oropharynx) is fully recognized, a role for HPV in keratinocyte carcinomas (KCs; basal and squamous cell carcinomas) of the skin is not yet clear. KCs are the most common cancers in Caucasians, with the major risk factor being ultraviolet (UV) light exposure. A possible role for Beta-HPV types (BetaPV) in the development of KC was suggested several decades ago, supported by a number of epidemiological studies. Our current review summarizes the recent molecular and histopathological evidence in support of a causal association between BetaPV and the development of KC, and outlines the suspected synergistic effect of viral gene expression with UV radiation and immune suppression. Further insights into the molecular pathways and protein interactions used by BetaPV and the host cell is likely to extend our understanding of the role of BetaPV in KC.

  16. Is Human Papillomavirus Associated with Prostate Cancer Survival?

    PubMed Central

    Barbazza, Renzo; Marongiu, Barbara; Bonin, Serena; Stanta, Giorgio

    2013-01-01

    The role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in prostate carcinogenesis is highly controversial: some studies suggest a positive association between HPV infection and an increased risk of prostate cancer (PCa), whereas others do not reveal any correlation. In this study, we investigated the prognostic impact of HPV infection on survival in 150 primary PCa patients. One hundred twelve (74.67%) patients had positive expression of HPV E7 protein, which was evaluated in tumour tissue by immunohistochemistry. DNA analysis on a subset of cases confirmed HPV infection and revealed the presence of genotype 16. In Kaplan-Meier analysis, HPV-positive cancer patients showed worse overall survival (OS) (median 4.59 years) compared to HPV-negative (median 8.24 years, P = 0.0381). In multivariate analysis age (P < 0.001), Gleason score (P < 0.001), nuclear grading (P = 0.002), and HPV status (P = 0.034) were independent prognostic factors for OS. In our cohort, we observed high prevalence of HPV nuclear E7 oncoprotein and an association between HPV infection and PCa survival. In the debate about the oncogenic activity of HPV in PCa, our results further confirm the need for additional studies to clarify the possible role of HPV in prostate carcinogenesis. PMID:24288430

  17. Evaluating knowledge about human papillomavirus infection among Brazilian health professionals.

    PubMed

    Villar, Livia Melo; Rabello, Aline Dutra; de Paula, Vanessa Salete

    2011-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is one of the most common sexually transmitted diseases worldwide. Although two safe and clinically effective vaccines against HPV have been developed, they are not available to the public health network in Brazil. This study was performed to assess knowledge about HPV among seventy-nine professionals who completed a questionnaire about diagnosis, transmission, symptoms, prevention and general information. General knowledge about HPV was high, as most of them recognized that HPV is transmitted sexually (98.7%), the disease can be asymptomatic (82.3%) or warts can be present on the genitals (84.8 ) and the Pap smear is the screening method to identify cellular changes on the cervix (88.6%). However, many professionals did not know that there are now vaccines available for many HPV variants (38.0%) and that not all of them are oncogenic (44.3%). These data show that further educational programs, especially about HPV prevention, are needed in Brazil.

  18. Prevalence of human papillomavirus infection in Italian and immigrant women.

    PubMed

    Paba, P; Morosetti, G; Criscuolo, A A; Chiusuri, V; Marcuccilli, F; Sesti, F; Piccione, E; Perno, C F; Ciotti, M

    2012-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted agent worldwide. Prevalence varies according to the geographic regions, and is highest in developing countries. Geographic differences exist also in the detection rate of oncogenic types in malignant cervical lesions. In this study, the prevalence of HPV infection as well as the spectrum of HPV types was evaluated in Italian and immigrant women of the urban area of Rome. Several risk factors (age at first intercourse, number of partners, smoking, pregnancy, age at first pregnancy, contraception, education, and menarche) were taken into consideration. Overall, there was a high prevalence of HPV infection in the two groups studied. No significant differences were observed in the spectrum of HPV types detected. HPV 16 and 18 were the types detected more frequently in both groups. Interestingly, HPV 54 and 70 were found only in the immigrants. Whether this finding reflects a recent introduction of these HPV types in the population studied remains to be established. Monitoring of HPV types in the population is advisable, especially in countries like Italy which is a destination and a gateway for immigrants directed towards north and central Europe. The introduction of high risk HPV variants may have a clinical impact and affect the diagnostic procedures.

  19. Human papillomavirus detection in paraffin-embedded colorectal cancer tissues.

    PubMed

    Tanzi, Elisabetta; Bianchi, Silvia; Frati, Elena R; Amicizia, Daniela; Martinelli, Marianna; Bragazzi, Nicola L; Brisigotti, Maria Pia; Colzani, Daniela; Fasoli, Ester; Zehender, Gianguglielmo; Panatto, Donatella; Gasparini, Roberto

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has a well-recognized aetiological role in the development of cervical cancer and other anogenital tumours. Recently, an association between colorectal cancer and HPV infection has been suggested, although this is still controversial. This study aimed at detecting and characterizing HPV infection in 57 paired biopsies from colorectal cancers and adjacent intact tissues using a degenerate PCR approach. All amplified fragments were genotyped by means of sequencing. Overall, HPV prevalence was 12.3 %. In particular, 15.8 % of tumour tissues and 8.8 % of non-cancerous tissue samples were HPV DNA-positive. Of these samples, 85.7 % were genotyped successfully, with 41.7 % of sequences identifying four genotypes of the HR (high oncogenic risk) clade Group 1; the remaining 58.3 % of HPV-genotyped specimens had an unclassified β-HPV. Examining additional cases and analysing whole genomes will help to outline the significance of these findings.

  20. Human papillomavirus molecular biology and disease association

    PubMed Central

    Egawa, Nagayasu; Griffin, Heather; Kranjec, Christian; Murakami, Isao

    2015-01-01

    Summary Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) have evolved over millions of years to propagate themselves in a range of different animal species including humans. Viruses that have co‐evolved slowly in this way typically cause chronic inapparent infections, with virion production in the absence of apparent disease. This is the case for many Beta and Gamma HPV types. The Alpha papillomavirus types have however evolved immunoevasion strategies that allow them to cause persistent visible papillomas. These viruses activate the cell cycle as the infected epithelial cell differentiates in order to create a replication competent environment that allows viral genome amplification and packaging into infectious particles. This is mediated by the viral E6, E7, and E5 proteins. High‐risk E6 and E7 proteins differ from their low‐risk counterparts however in being able to drive cell cycle entry in the upper epithelial layers and also to stimulate cell proliferation in the basal and parabasal layers. Deregulated expression of these cell cycle regulators underlies neoplasia and the eventual progression to cancer in individuals who cannot resolve high‐risk HPV infection. Most work to date has focused on the study of high‐risk HPV types such as HPV 16 and 18, which has led to an understanding of the molecular pathways subverted by these viruses. Such approaches will lead to the development of better strategies for disease treatment, including targeted antivirals and immunotherapeutics. Priorities are now focused toward understanding HPV neoplasias at sites other than the cervix (e.g. tonsils, other transformation zones) and toward understanding the mechanisms by which low‐risk HPV types can sometimes give rise to papillomatosis and under certain situations even cancers. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:25752814

  1. [Human papillomavirus E7 oncoprotein and its role in the cell transformation].

    PubMed

    Vallejo-Ruiz, Verónica; Velázquez-Márquez, Noé; Sánchez-Alonso, Patricia; Santos-López, Gerardo; Reyes-Leyva, Julio

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) genome codifies proteins with oncogenic activity, such as E7. Due to its structural characteristics, the E7 protein may interact with a great variety of cellular proteins. Some of these proteins act as cell-cycle regulators and other proteins function as transcription factors. These interactions play an important role in the induction of mitogenic pathways, in G1/S progression, and the inhibition of cellular differentiation, which increases chromosomal instability. The aim of this study is to describe the interactions of HPV E7 protein with different cellular proteins, and their contribution in the development of cervical cancer.

  2. Differential effects of human papillomavirus type 6, 16, and 18 DNAs on immortalization and transformation of human cervical epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pecoraro, G.; Morgan, D.; Defendi, V. )

    1989-01-01

    The human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are associated with specific benign and malignant lesions of the skin and mucosal epithelia. Cloned viral DNAs from HPV types 6b, 16, and 18 associated with different pathological manifestations of genital neoplasia in vivo were introduced into primary human cervical epithelial cells by electroporation. Cells transfected with HPV16 or HPV18 DNA acquired indefinite lifespans, distinct morphological alterations, and anchorage-independent growth (HPV18), and contain integrated transcriptionally active viral genomes. HPV6b or plasmid electroporated cells senesced at low passage. The alterations in growth and differentiation of the cells appear to reflect the progressive oncogenic processes that result in cervical carcinoma in vivo.

  3. Using organotypic (raft) epithelial tissue cultures for the biosynthesis and isolation of infectious human papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Ozbun, Michelle A; Patterson, Nicole A

    2014-08-01

    Papillomaviruses have a strict tropism for epithelial cells, and they are fully reliant on cellular differentiation for completion of their life cycles, resulting in the production of progeny virions. Thus, a permissive environment for full viral replication in vitro-wherein virion morphogenesis occurs under cooperative viral and cellular cues-requires the cultivation of epithelium. Presented in the first section of this unit is a protocol to grow differentiating epithelial tissues that mimic many important morphological and biochemical aspects of normal skin. The technique involves growing epidermal cells atop a dermal equivalent consisting of live fibroblasts and a collagen lattice. Epithelial stratification and differentiation ensues when the keratinocyte-dermal equivalent is placed at the air-liquid interface. The apparent floating nature of the cell-matrix in this method led to the nickname "raft" cultures. The general technique can be applied to normal low passage keratinocytes, to cells stably transfected with papillomavirus genes or genomes, or keratinocytes established from neoplastic lesions. However, infectious papillomavirus particles have only been isolated from organotypic epithelial cultures initiated with cells that maintain oncogenic human papillomavirus genomes in an extrachomosomal replicative form. The second section of this unit is dedicated to a virion isolation method that minimizes aerosol and skin exposure to these human carcinogens. Although the focus of the protocols is on the growth of tissues that yields infectious papillomavirus progeny, this culture system facilitates the investigation of these fastidious viruses during their complex replicative cycles, and raft tissues can be manipulated and harvested at any point during the process. Importantly, a single-step virus growth cycle is achieved in this process, as it is unlikely that progeny virions are released to initiate subsequent rounds of infection.

  4. Using organotypic (raft) epithelial tissue cultures for the biosynthesis and isolation of infectious human papillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Ozbun, Michelle A.; Patterson, Nicole A.

    2014-01-01

    Papillomaviruses have a strict tropism for epithelial cells and they are fully reliant on cellular differentiation for completion of their life cycles, resulting in the production of progeny virions. Thus, a permissive environment for full viral replication in vitro wherein virion morphogenesis occurs under cooperative viral and cellular cues requires the cultivation of epithelium. Presented in the first section of this unit is a protocol for growing differentiating epithelial tissues, whose structure and function mimics many important morphological and biochemical aspects of normal skin. The technique, pioneered by Asslineau and Pruniéras (Asselineau and Prunieras 1984) and modified by Kopan et al. (Kopan et al. 1987), involves growing epidermal cells atop a dermal equivalent consisting of live fibroblasts and a collagen lattice. Epithelial stratification and differentiation ensues when the keratinocyte-dermal equivalent is placed at the air-liquid interface. The apparent floating nature of the cell-matrix in this method led to the nickname “raft” cultures. The general technique can be applied to normal low passage keratinocytes, to cells stably transfected with papillomavirus genes or genomes, as well as keratinocytes established from neoplastic lesions. However, infectious papillomavirus particles have only been isolated from organotypic epithelial cultures initiated with cells that maintain oncogenic human papillomavirus genomes in an extrachomosomal replicative form. The second section of this unit is dedicated to a virion isolation method that minimizes aerosol and skin exposure to these human carcinogens. Although the focus of the protocols is on the growth of tissues that yields infectious papillomavirus progeny, this culture system facilitates the investigation of these fastidious viruses during their complex replicative cycles, and raft tissues can be manipulated and harvested at any point during the process. Importantly, a single step virus growth

  5. An update on oral human papillomavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Bharti, Ankit H.; Chotaliya, Kiran; Marfatia, Y. S.

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) constitutes the majority of newly acquired sexually transmitted infections (STIs) in United States as per the centers for disease control factsheet 2013. Genital HPV is the most common STI with incidence of about 5.5 million world-wide, nearly 75% of sexually active men and women have been exposed to HPV at some point in their lives. Oral Sexual behavior is an important contributor to infection of HPV in the oral mucosa especially in cases known to practice high risk behavior and initiating the same at an early age. HPV infection of the oral mucosa currents is believed to affect 1-50% of the general population, depending on the method used for diagnosis. The immune system clears most HPV naturally within 2 years (about 90%), but the ones that persist can cause serious diseases. HPV is an essential carcinogen being implicated increasingly in association with cancers occurring at numerous sites in the body. Though there does not occur any specific treatment for the HPV infection, the diseases it causes are treatable such as genital warts, cervical and other cancers. PMID:24339456

  6. The paediatric story of human papillomavirus (Review)

    PubMed Central

    MAMMAS, IOANNIS N.; SOURVINOS, GEORGE; SPANDIDOS, DEMETRIOS A.

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is composed of a particularly heterogeneous family of DNA viruses, which has gained much attention in recent years due to the discoveries of Professor Harald zur Hausen, who first identified a connection between HPV and cervical cancer. Professor Harald zur Hausen, the ‘Father of HPV Virology’, was the recipient of the 2008 Nobel Prize. HPV can be transmitted through physical contact via autoinoculation or fomites, sexual contact, as well as vertically from the HPV-positive mother to her newborn, causing subclinical or clinical infections. In infancy and childhood, HPV-associated clinical infections include skin warts, genital warts and juvenile recurrent respiratory papillomatosis, while cervical squamous intraepithelial lesions have also been reported among adolescent girls. To date, several research teams, worldwide, have extensively investigated HPV from the paediatric point of view. This primitive effort has been performed before the recent great expansion of paediatric HPV research due to the vaccination programmes against HPV, which were introduced into clinical practice in 2006. In this review article, we present a brief overview of paediatric HPV research after the first report in 1978 involving children in the research of HPV until the time point of this great expansion. In the future, it is expected that further unresolved issues will be addressed and clarified, as the paediatric story of HPV remains a challenging research target. PMID:25013461

  7. Human papillomavirus DNA in oral mucosal lesions.

    PubMed

    Giovannelli, Lucia; Campisi, Giuseppina; Lama, Anna; Giambalvo, Ornella; Osborn, John; Margiotta, Valerio; Ammatuna, Pietro

    2002-03-15

    This study determined the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA in oral mucosa cells from 121 patients with different types of oral mucosal lesions (13 squamous cell carcinomas, 59 potentially malignant lesions, 49 benign erosive ulcerative lesions) and from 90 control subjects. HPV DNA was detected by nested polymerase chain reaction, and genotype was determined by DNA sequencing. HPV prevalence was 61.5% in carcinomas, 27.1% in potentially malignant lesions, 26.5% in erosive ulcerative lesions, and 5.5% in control subjects. The risk of malignant or potentially malignant lesions was associated with HPV and was statistically significant. HPV-18 was found in 86.5% of HPV-positive lesions but was not associated with a particular type of lesion and was found in 80% of the HPV-positive control subjects. HPV infection was related to older age but not to sex, smoking, or alcohol use; the presence of lesions in the oral cavity increased the risk of HPV infection.

  8. Requiring human papillomavirus vaccine for immigrant women.

    PubMed

    Hachey, Krista J; Allen, Rebecca H; Nothnagle, Melissa; Boardman, Lori A

    2009-11-01

    The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommends human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination of 11- to 12-year-old girls, with catch-up vaccination for girls and women aged 13 to 26 years. Although compulsory HPV vaccination is not currently mandated for any U.S. population, immigrant women aged 11-26 years are now required to receive the first injection of the vaccine (the full series consists of three doses) as a result of the 1996 Illegal Immigration Reform and Immigrant Responsibility Act. According to this law, immigrants applying for visas to enter the United States or to adjust their immigration status must receive the inoculations that the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices recommends for U.S. residents. In the case of HPV, this law represents not only an undue burden on immigrant women, but also raises scientific and ethical questions regarding the benefit of vaccination in this population. Given these issues, immigrant women should not be required to provide documentation of HPV vaccination at the time of visa application or adjustment of immigration status.

  9. [Human papillomavirus vaccine. Efficacy and safety].

    PubMed

    Bruni, Laia; Serrano, Beatriz; Bosch, Xavier; Castellsagué, Xavier

    2015-05-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) related disease remains a major cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Prophylactic vaccines have been recognized as the most effective intervention to control for HPV-related diseases. This article reviews the major phaseii/iii trials of the bivalent (HPVs16/18), quadrivalent (HPVs6/11/16/18), and the recently approved 9-valent vaccine (HPVs6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58). Large trials have been conducted showing the safety, immunogenicity and high efficacy of the bivalent and quadrivalent vaccines in the prevention of pre-invasive lesions and infection, especially when administered at young ages before exposure to HPV. Trials of the 9-valent vaccine have also demonstrated the safety, immunogenicity and efficacy of the vaccine in the prevention of infection and disease associated with the vaccine types, and its potential to substantially increase the overall prevention of HPV-related diseases. Post-licensure country reports have shown the recent and early impact of these vaccines at population level after the implementation of established HPV vaccination programs, including decreases in the prevalence of vaccine HPV types, the incidence of genital warts, and the incidence of high-grade cervical abnormalities. If widely implemented, current HPV vaccines may drastically reduce the incidence of cervical cancer and other HPV-related cancers and diseases.

  10. Current status of human papillomavirus vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Yi, Seokjae

    2014-01-01

    Cervical cancer is a malignant neoplasm arising from cells that originate in the cervix uteri. It is the second most prevalent cancer among women. It can have several causes; an infection with some type of human papillomavirus (HPV) is the greatest risk factor for cervical cancer. Over 100 types of HPVs have been identified, and more than 40 types of HPVs are typically transmitted through sexual contact and infect the anogenital region. Among these, a number of HPVs types, containing types 16 and 18, are classified as "high-risk" HPVs that can cause cervical cancer. The HPVs vaccine prevents infection with certain species of HPVs associated with the development of cervical cancer, genital warts, and some less common cancers. Two HPVs vaccines are currently on the global market: quadrivalent HPVs vaccine and bivalent HPV vaccine that use virus-like particles as a vaccine antigen. This review discusses the current status of HPVs vaccines on the global market, clinical trials, and the future of HPVs vaccine development. PMID:25003090

  11. [Human papillomavirus detection in cervical cancer prevention].

    PubMed

    Picconi, María Alejandra

    2013-01-01

    Cervical cancer (CC), which is strongly associated to high-risk human papillomavirus (hr-HPV) infection, continues being a significant health problem in Latin America. The use of conventional cytology to detect precancerous cervical lesions has had no major impact on reducing CC incidence and mortality rates, which are still high in the region. New screening tools to detect precancerous lesions became available, which provide great opportunities for CC prevention, as do highly efficacious HPV vaccines able to prevent nearly all lesions associated with HPV-16 and -18 when applied before viral exposure. Currently, hr-HPV testing represents an invaluable component of clinical guidelines for screening, management and treatment of CC and their precursor lesions. Many testing strategies have been developed that can detect a broad spectrum of hr-HPV types in a single assay; however, only a small subset of them has documented clinical performance for any of the standard HPV testing indications. HPV tests that have not been validated and lack proof of reliability, reproducibility and accuracy should not be used in clinical management. Once incorporated into the lab, it is essential to submit the whole procedure of HPV testing to continuous and rigorous quality assurance to avoid sub-optimal, potentially harmful practices. Recent progress and current status of these methods are discussed in this article.

  12. Safety of human papillomavirus vaccines: a review

    PubMed Central

    Stillo, Michela; Carrillo Santisteve, Paloma; Lopalco, Pier Luigi

    2015-01-01

    Introduction: Between 2006 and 2009, two different human papillomavirus virus (HPV) vaccines were licensed for use: a quadrivalent (qHPVv) and a bivalent (bHPVv) vaccine. Since 2008, HPV vaccination programmes have been implemented in the majority of the industrialized countries. Since 2013, HPV vaccination has been part of the national programs of 66 countries including almost all countries in North America and Western Europe. Despite all the efforts made by individual countries, coverage rates are lower than expected. Vaccine safety represents one of the main concerns associated with the lack of acceptance of HPV vaccination both in the European Union/European Economic Area and elsewhere. Areas covered: Safety data published on bivalent and quadrivalent HPV vaccines, both in pre-licensure and post-licensure phase, are reviewed. Expert opinion: Based on the latest scientific evidence, both HPV vaccines seem to be safe. Nevertheless, public concern and rumors about adverse events (AE) represent an important barrier to overcome in order to increase vaccine coverage. Passive surveillance of AEs is an important tool for detecting safety signals, but it should be complemented by activities aimed at assessing the real cause of all suspect AEs. Improved vaccine safety surveillance is the first step for effective communication based on scientific evidence. PMID:25689872

  13. Human papillomavirus-related esophageal cancer survival

    PubMed Central

    Guo, Lanwei; Liu, Shuzheng; Zhang, Shaokai; Chen, Qiong; Zhang, Meng; Quan, Peiliang; Sun, Xi-Bin

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Background: Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been identified to be related to progression of esophageal cancer. However, the results remain controversial. A meta-analysis of epidemiologic studies was therefore conducted to address this issue. Methods: The electronic databases of MEDLINE and Excerpta Medica database were searched till April 30, 2016. Study-specific risk estimates were pooled using a random-effects model. Results: Ten studies involving a total of 1184 esophageal cancer cases were included in this meta-analysis. The pooled hazard ratio comparing HPV-positive to HPV-negative esophageal cancers was 1.03 (95% confidence interval 0.78–1.37), which was not significantly correlated with improved survival. However, HPV-16-positive patients might have a significantly favorable survival (hazard ratio 0.73, 95% confidence interval 0.44–1.21). Conclusion: The meta-analysis indicated that HPV infection may not be of prognostic utility in the evaluation of factors contributing to esophageal cancer. Further large prospective studies are encouraged to stratify survival analysis by HPV type. PMID:27861358

  14. Human papillomavirus related diseases in Malaysians.

    PubMed

    Cheah, P L

    1994-06-01

    The surge of information on the aetiological association of the human papillomavirus (HPV) with some epithelial tumours emanating from various centres has prompted the initiation of a large-scale retrospective study at the Department of Pathology, University Hospital Kuala Lumpur to determine the prevalence and importance of this virus in some epithelial tumours of Malaysian patients. A retrospective analysis of 100 cases of large cell non-keratinising carcinoma of the uterine cervix by in-situ hybridisation on archival formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded tissue has revealed the presence of HPV type 16 in 47% and type 18 in 41% of cases. This gives an overall detection rate of 88% of the two HPV types most commonly encountered in cervical carcinomas. Except for the unusually high frequency of HPV 18 detected in the cases, the overall prevalence is comparable to that reported in studies from most other centres. Although this higher frequency of HPV 18 may be due to geographical variation, the selection of the large cell non-keratinising type of squamous cell cervical carcinoma for study remains a possible reason for this phenomenon. In comparison to cervical carcinomas, HPV appears to be uncommon in penile carcinomas and HPV 6 was detected in only 1 of 23 cases studied.

  15. Introducing human papillomavirus vaccines - questions remain.

    PubMed

    Paavonen, Jorma; Lehtinen, Matti

    2008-01-01

    Genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection and HPV-associated cervical and other anogenital cancers are significant public health problems. HPV 16 and HPV 18 are responsible for approximately 70% of all invasive cervical cancers worldwide. The first prophylactic HPV virus-like particle (VLP) vaccine against HPV types 6/11/16/18 was licensed in 2006 for girls and women aged 9-26 years. The second prophylactic HPV vaccine against HPV types 16 and 18 has been licensed this year. These vaccines are almost 100% effective in preventing infection and high-grade precancer associated with the HPV types included in the vaccine. The vaccines are well tolerated, safe, and highly immunogenic when given in three doses within 6 months. Efficacy of the vaccine against external vulvar and HPV-related vaginal lesions is also high. Even though the vaccine is highly effective against high-grade cervical, vaginal, or vulvar precancers, this only applies to women unexposed to these HPV types and only to high-grade intraepithelial lesions caused by these HPV types. Therefore, it is important to understand that the population impact of the vaccines will be much lower than vaccinating naive populations. Implementing HPV vaccine is a great opportunity but also a great challenge. However, mandatory HPV vaccination may raise many questions, and more answers are needed.

  16. Human Papillomavirus Laboratory Testing: the Changing Paradigm

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    SUMMARY High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) cause essentially all cervical cancers, most anal and oropharyngeal cancers, and some vaginal, vulvar, and penile cancers. Improved understanding of the pathogenesis of infection and the availability of newer tests are changing the approach to screening and diagnosis. Molecular tests to detect DNA from the most common high-risk HPVs are FDA approved for use in conjunction with cytology in cervical cancer screening programs. More-specific tests that detect RNA from high-risk HPV types are now also available. The use of molecular tests as the primary screening tests is being adopted in some areas. Genotyping to identify HPV16 and -18 has a recommended role in triaging patients for colposcopy who are high-risk HPV positive but have normal cytology. There are currently no recommended screening methods for anal, vulvar, vaginal, penile, or oropharyngeal HPV infections. HPV testing has limited utility in patients at high risk for anal cancer, but p16 immunohistochemistry is recommended to clarify lesions in tissue biopsy specimens that show moderate dysplasia or precancer mimics. HPV testing is recommended for oropharyngeal squamous cell tumors as a prognostic indicator. Ongoing research will help to improve the content of future guidelines for screening and diagnostic testing. PMID:26912568

  17. Molecular detection methods of human papillomavirus (HPV).

    PubMed

    Zaravinos, Apostolos; Mammas, Ioannis N; Sourvinos, George; Spandidos, Demetrios A

    2009-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) testing can identify women at risk of cervical cancer. Currently, molecular detection methods are the gold standard for identification of HPV. The three categories of molecular assays that are available are based on the detection of HPV DNA and include (1) non-amplified hybridization assays, such as Southern transfer hybridization (STH), dot blot hybridization (DB) and in situ hybridization (ISH); (2) signal amplified hybridization assays, such as hybrid capture assays (HC2); (3) target amplification assays, such as polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and in situ PCR. STH requires large amounts of DNA, is laborious and not reproducible, while ISH has only moderate sensitivity for HPV. The sensitivity of the HC2 assay is similar to that of PCR-based assays, with high sensitivity being achieved by signal rather than target amplification. PCR-based detection is both highly sensitive and specific. Since PCR can be performed on very small amounts of DNA, it is ideal for use on specimens with low DNA content. In the future, with the advance of technology, viral DNA extraction and amplification systems will become more rapid, more sensitive, and more automated.

  18. Human papillomaviruses. Applications, caveats and prevention.

    PubMed

    Crum, Christopher P; Berkowitz, Ross S

    2002-07-01

    Unlike cervical cytology, human papillomavirus (HPV) testing provides an objective assessment of neoplasia risk. The major advantages of this technology are the potential for "reflex testing" (when used with liquid-based cytology); efficient exclusion of HPV-negative women, who can be triaged to yearly follow-up; and identification of HPV-positive women, who require colposcopic triage. However, practitioners should be aware that highly sensitive HPV tests will also identify many women with little or no immediate risk of significant neoplasia, may impose a psychosocial burden on the patient and may be used or interpreted inappropriately by both practitioners and patients. However, these caveats are similar to those inherent in any screening program involving a sexually transmitted disease, and the disadvantages of HPV testing will be minimized by attention to patient concerns and a keen awareness of the limitations of this technology. Ultimately, control of cervical cancer and its precursors rests with active prevention via vaccination programs targeting HPV. If successful, such programs could radically alter the number of women requiring triage for preinvasive disease and initiate a progressive decline in cervical cancer incidence.

  19. Human papillomavirus vaccination among adolescents in Georgia

    PubMed Central

    Underwood, Natasha L; Weiss, Paul; Gargano, Lisa M; Seib, Katherine; Rask, Kimberly J; Morfaw, Christopher; Murray, Dennis; DiClemente, Ralph J; Hughes, James M; Sales, Jessica M

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination coverage for adolescent females and males remains low in the United States. We conducted a 3-arm randomized controlled trial (RCT) conducted in middle and high schools in eastern Georgia from 2011–2013 to determine the effect of 2 educational interventions used to increase adolescent vaccination coverage for the 4 recommended adolescent vaccines: Tdap, MCV4, HPV and influenza. As part of this RCT, this article focuses on: 1) describing initiation and completion of HPV vaccine series among a diverse population of male and female adolescents; 2) assessing parental attitudes toward HPV vaccine; and 3) examining correlates of HPV vaccine series initiation and completion. Parental attitude score was the strongest predictor of HPV vaccine initiation among adolescents (adjusted odds ratio (aOR): 2.08; 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.80, 2.39). Other correlates that significantly predicted HPV series initiation were gender, study year, and intervention arm. Parental attitudes remained a significant predictor of receipt of 3 doses of HPV vaccine along with gender, race, school type and insurance type. This study demonstrates that positive parental attitudes are important predictors of HPV vaccination and critical to increasing coverage rates. Our findings suggest that more research is needed to understand how parental attitudes are developed and evolve over time. PMID:25912372

  20. The biology of beta human papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Tommasino, Massimo

    2017-03-02

    The beta genus comprises more than 50 beta human papillomavirus (HPV) types that are suspected to be involved, together with ultraviolet (UV) irradiation, in the development of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC), the most common form of human cancer. Two members of the genus beta, HPV5 and HPV8, were first identified in patients with a genetic disorder, epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV), that confers high susceptibility to beta HPV infection and NMSC development. The fact that organ transplant recipients (OTRs) with an impaired immune system have an elevated risk of NMSC raised the hypothesis that beta HPV types may also be involved in skin carcinogenesis in non-EV patients. Epidemiological studies have shown that serological and viral DNA markers are weakly, but significantly, associated with history of NMSC in OTRs and the general population. Functional studies on mucosal high-risk (HR) HPV types have clearly demonstrated that the products of two early genes, E6 and E7, are the main viral oncoproteins, which are able to deregulate events closely linked to transformation, such as cell cycle progression and apoptosis. Studies on a small number of beta HPV types have shown that their E6 and E7 oncoproteins also have the ability to interfere with the regulation of key pathways/events associated with cellular transformation. However, the initial functional data indicate that the molecular mechanisms leading to cellular transformation are different from those of mucosal HR HPV types. Beta HPV types may act only at early stages of carcinogenesis, by potentiating the deleterious effects of other carcinogens, such as UV radiation.

  1. Human papillomavirus-associated cancers - United States, 2004-2008.

    PubMed

    2012-04-20

    Oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) has a causal role in nearly all cervical cancers and in many vulvar, vaginal, penile, anal, and oropharyngeal cancers. Most HPV infections clear within 1-2 years, but those that persist can progress to precancer or cancer. In the United States, public health prevention of cervical cancer includes both secondary prevention through cervical cancer screening and primary prevention through HPV vaccination. Transmission of HPV also can be reduced through condom use and limiting the number of sexual partners. Two vaccines (bivalent and quadrivalent) are available to protect against HPV types 16 and 18, which are responsible for 70% of cervical cancers. HPV 16 also is the most common HPV type found in the other five cancers often associated with HPV. To assess the incidence of HPV-associated cancers (i.e., cancers at specific anatomic sites and with specific cell types in which HPV DNA frequently is found), CDC analyzed 2004-2008 data from the National Program of Cancer Registries (NPCR) and the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) program. During 2004-2008, an average of 33,369 HPV-associated cancers were diagnosed annually (rate: 10.8 per 100,000 population), including 12,080 among males (8.1 per 100,000) and 21,290 among females (13.2). Multiplying the counts for HPV-associated cancers by percentages attributable to HPV, CDC estimated that approximately 26,000 new cancers attributable to HPV occurred each year, including 18,000 among females and 8,000 among males. Population-based cancer registries are important surveillance tools to measure the impact on cancer rates of public health interventions such as vaccination and screening.

  2. A rapid DNA extraction method suitable for human papillomavirus detection.

    PubMed

    Brestovac, Brian; Wong, Michelle E; Costantino, Paul S; Groth, David

    2014-04-01

    Infection with oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes is necessary for the development of cervical cancer. Testing for HPV DNA from liquid based cervical samples can be used as an adjunct to traditional cytological screening. In addition there are ongoing viral load, genotyping, and prevalence studies. Therefore, a sensitive DNA extraction method is needed to maximize the efficiency of HPV DNA detection. The XytXtract Tissue kit is a DNA extraction kit that is rapid and so could be useful for HPV testing, particularly in screening protocols. This study was undertaken to determine the suitability of this method for HPV detection. DNA extraction from HeLa and Caski cell lines containing HPV 18 and 16 respectively together with DNA from five liquid based cervical samples were used in a HPV PCR assay. DNA was also extracted using the QIAamp DNA mini kit (Qiagen, Hilden, Germany) as a comparison. DNA extracts were serially diluted and assayed. HPV DNA was successfully detected in cell lines and cervical samples using the XytXtract Tissue kit. In addition, the XytXtract method was found to be more sensitive than the QIAmp method as determined by a dilution series of the extracted DNA. While the XytXtract method is a closed, the QIAamp method uses a spin column with possible loss of DNA through DNA binding competition of the matrix, which could impact on the final extraction efficiency. The XytXtract is a cheap, rapid and efficient method for extracting HPV DNA from both cell lines and liquid based cervical samples.

  3. Present status of human papillomavirus vaccine development and implementation.

    PubMed

    Herrero, Rolando; González, Paula; Markowitz, Lauri E

    2015-05-01

    Oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the cause of nearly all cervical cancers and a proportion of other anogenital and oropharyngeal cancers. A bivalent vaccine containing HPV 16 and 18 and a quadrivalent vaccine containing HPV 6, 11, 16, and 18 antigens are in use in vaccination programmes around the world. In clinical trials, three vaccine doses provided 90-100% protection against cervical infection and pre-cancer related to HPV 16 and 18 in women aged 15-26 years who were not infected at vaccination. Partial cross-protection against other HPV types has been reported but its duration is unknown. The vaccines were also efficacious at the prevention of HPV 16 and 18 infections at other anatomical sites in both sexes. Immunobridging studies allowed licensing of the vaccines for use starting at age 9 years for both sexes. Two-dose schedules elicit high antibody concentrations, leading to the recommendation of two-dose schedules for girls aged 9-14 years. Pre-licensure and post-licensure studies have provided data supporting vaccine safety. In 2014, a nonavalent vaccine containing HPV 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58 antigens was licensed by the US Food and Drug Administration. HPV vaccination was first introduced in high-income countries owing to vaccine cost, logistic challenges, and competing health priorities. Since 2011, vaccine prices have lowered, allowing the introduction of the vaccine in some middle-income countries. Funding of the vaccine by the GAVI Alliance in 2012 led to demonstration projects in some low-income countries. By 2014, more than 57 countries had included the HPV vaccine in their national health programmes. Data from several countries have shown the effect of vaccination on HPV infection and associated disease, and provided evidence of herd immunity. Expansion of programmes to countries with the highest burden of disease is beginning, but further efforts are needed to realise the potential of HPV vaccines.

  4. Primary human cervical carcinoma cells require human papillomavirus E6 and E7 expression for ongoing proliferation

    SciTech Connect

    Magaldi, Thomas G.; Almstead, Laura L.; Bellone, Stefania; Prevatt, Edward G.; Santin, Alessandro D.; DiMaio, Daniel

    2012-01-05

    Repression of human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 and E7 oncogenes in established cervical carcinoma cell lines causes senescence due to reactivation of cellular tumor suppressor pathways. Here, we determined whether ongoing expression of HPV16 or HPV18 oncogenes is required for the proliferation of primary human cervical carcinoma cells in serum-free conditions at low passage number after isolation from patients. We used an SV40 viral vector expressing the bovine papillomavirus E2 protein to repress E6 and E7 in these cells. To enable efficient SV40 infection and E2 gene delivery, we first incubated the primary cervical cancer cells with the ganglioside GM1, a cell-surface receptor for SV40 that is limiting in these cells. Repression of HPV in primary cervical carcinoma cells caused them to undergo senescence, but the E2 protein had little effect on HPV-negative primary cells. These data suggest that E6 and E7 dependence is an inherent property of human cervical cancer cells.

  5. Human papillomaviruses genotyping in plantar warts.

    PubMed

    de Planell-Mas, Elena; Martínez-Garriga, Blanca; Zalacain, Antonio Jesús; Vinuesa, Teresa; Viñas, Miguel

    2017-05-01

    Plantar warts are caused by human papillomaviruses (HPVs) and have been associated with several HPV genotypes. However, there are few studies focused exclusively on plantar warts. In this work, we aim to identify the HPV genotypes of plantar warts and explore their relation to demographic and clinical characteristics of patients. A total of 72 patients diagnosed with plantar warts were recruited at the Laser unit at Podiatric Hospital, University of Barcelona, Spain. Inner hyperkeratosis laminar sections of warts were collected and DNA of samples were extracted. Amplification of a conserved region of the HPV L1 gene was performed with the SK-Polymerase chain reaction method. DNA amplicons were sequenced and HPV types identified. The most prevalent genotypes detected among the 105 analyzed plantar warts were HPV-57 (37.1%), HPV-27 (23.8%), HPV-1a (20.9%), HPV-2 (15.2%), and HPV-65 (2.8%). The majority of patients (78%) presented one single plantar wart, whereas multiple warts were detected in 22.2% of patients. One patient with multiple warts presented HPV types from two different genera, suggesting the spread of warts by self-inoculation as well as by de novo infection. No significant differences between the number of warts in toes, midfoot and heel were found. The most prevalent HPV types detected in all areas belonged to the alpha genus. This work provides new insight on plantar warts and their associated HPV genotypes, and evidences the usefulness and reliability of both the sample collection procedure and the PCR method used for HPV detection and typing. J. Med. Virol. 89:902-907, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Human papillomavirus causes an angiogenic switch in keratinocytes which is sufficient to alter endothelial cell behavior

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, W.; Li, F.; Mead, L.; White, H.; Walker, J.; Ingram, D.A.; Roman, A.

    2007-10-10

    One of the requirements for tumor growth is the ability to recruit a blood supply, a process known as angiogenesis. Angiogenesis begins early in the progression of cervical disease from mild to severe dysplasia and on to invasive cancer. We have previously reported that expression of human papillomavirus type 16 E6 and E7 (HPV16 E6E7) proteins in primary foreskin keratinocytes (HFKs) decreases expression of two inhibitors and increases expression of two angiogenic inducers [Toussaint-Smith, E., Donner, D.B., Roman, A., 2004. Expression of human papillomavirus type 16 E6 and E7 oncoproteins in primary foreskin keratinocytes is sufficient to alter the expression of angiogenic factors. Oncogene 23, 2988-2995]. Here we report that HPV-induced early changes in the keratinocyte phenotype are sufficient to alter endothelial cell behavior both in vitro and in vivo. Conditioned media from HPV16 E6E7 expressing HFKs as well as from human cervical keratinocytes containing the intact HPV16 were able to stimulate proliferation and migration of human microvascular endothelial cells. In addition, introduction of the conditioned media into immunocompetent mice using a Matrigel plug model resulted in a clear angiogenic response. These novel data support the hypothesis that HPV proteins contribute not only to the uncontrolled keratinocyte growth seen following HPV infection but also to the angiogenic response needed for tumor formation.

  7. Development of a Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Intervention for Australian Adolescents

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Cooper, Spring C.; Davies, Cristyn; McBride, Kate; Blades, Joanna; Stoney, Tanya; Marshall, Helen; Skinner, S. Rachel

    2016-01-01

    Objective: Australia has implemented a nation-wide programme providing a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine to girls and boys through school-based programmes. Previous research has identified three distinct areas for attention: (1) lack of understanding about HPV and HPV vaccination, (2) young people's desire for involvement in decision-making…

  8. Intention of College Students to Receive the Human Papillomavirus Vaccine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richards, Keith

    2016-01-01

    Purpose: The purpose of this paper is to better understand what influences the intentions of college students to receive the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. HPV is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the USA and cancers related to HPV are on the rise. Design/Methodology/Approach: A 2×2 experimental design was used to predict the…

  9. Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Intent and Uptake among Female College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, Divya A.; Zochowski, Melissa; Peterman, Stephanie; Dempsey, Amanda F.; Ernst, Susan; Dalton, Vanessa K.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine intent and the effect of an educational intervention on vaccine uptake among female college students. Participants: Females aged 18 to 26 attending a university health service gynecology clinic (n = 256). Methods: Participants were randomized to receive either HPV-specific education with a…

  10. Focal epithelial hyperplasia caused by human papillomavirus 13.

    PubMed

    Saunders, Natasha R; Scolnik, Dennis; Rebbapragada, Anuradha; Koelink, Eric; Craw, Lindsey; Roth, Sherryn; Aronson, Leya; Perusini, Stephen; Silverman, Michael S

    2010-06-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia is a benign, papulo-nodular disease of the oral cavity. It is rare, affecting primarily Native American populations during childhood. It is closely associated with human papillomavirus 13 and 32. This report describes the diagnosis of 2 cases of focal epithelial hyperplasia in children from southern Guyana. The diagnosis was made using clinical criteria, polymerase chain reaction, and DNA sequencing.

  11. [Pathogenesis of human papillomavirus infection in patients with epidermodysplasia verruciformis].

    PubMed

    Liang, Si; Zuo, Ya-Gang; Wang, Bao-Xi

    2009-02-01

    Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV), a rare inherited disease, is believed to be associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. EVER1/2 genes, dendritic cells, T lymphocytes, and the biological characteristics of HPV itself may play roles in the pathogenesis of HPV infection.

  12. Human papillomavirus-associated cancers: A growing global problem

    PubMed Central

    Bansal, Anshuma; Singh, Mini P; Rai, Bhavana

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is linked with several cancers such as cancer cervix, vagina, vulva, head and neck, anal, and penile carcinomas. Although there is a proven association of HPV with these cancers, questions regarding HPV testing, vaccination, and treatment of HPV-related cancers continue to remain unanswered. The present article provides an overview of the HPV-associated cancers. PMID:27127735

  13. Human papillomavirus in the HIV-infected host: epidemiology and pathogenesis in the antiretroviral era.

    PubMed

    Brickman, Cristina; Palefsky, Joel M

    2015-03-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is associated with essentially all cervical cancers, 80-90 % of anal cancers, and a high proportion of oropharyngeal, vaginal, penile, and vulvar cancers. Malignancy is preceded by the development of precancerous lesions termed high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL). Men and women with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) infection are at high risk of HPV-related malignancies. The incidence of anal cancer in particular has markedly risen during the antiretroviral era due to the increased longevity of patients with HIV and the absence of anal malignancy screening programs. HIV infection may facilitate initial HPV infection by disrupting epithelial cell tight junctions. Once infection is established, HIV may promote HSIL development via the up-regulation of HPV oncogene expression and impairment of the immune response needed to clear the lesion. HIV-infected women should be screened for cervical HSIL and cancer, and HIV-infected men and women should be considered for anal screening programs.

  14. Comparative transforming potential of different human papillomaviruses associated with non-melanoma skin cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Massimi, Paola; Thomas, Miranda; Bouvard, Veronique; Ruberto, Irene; Campo, M. Saveria; Tommasino, Massimo; Banks, Lawrence

    2008-02-20

    It is well established that high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) that infect mucosal epithelia are the causative agents of cervical cancer. In contrast, the association of cutaneo-tropic HPV types with the development of non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) is less well defined. In this study, we have analysed the in vitro transforming potential of various cutaneous HPV types. Using oncogene cooperation assays with activated ras, we have shown that diverse cutaneous types, including 12, 14, 15, 24, 36 and 49, have significant transforming potential. Interestingly, most of this activity appears to be encoded by the E6 gene product. In contrast, the common HPV-10 exhibits no significant transforming potential in these assays. This difference may be a reflection of different patterns of cellular localization, with transforming E6s being nuclear and non-transforming being cytoplasmic. These results provide molecular support for a role of these viruses in the development of certain human malignancies.

  15. First Detection of Human Papillomaviruses and Human Polyomaviruses in River Waters in Italy.

    PubMed

    Iaconelli, M; Petricca, S; Libera, S Della; Di Bonito, P; La Rosa, G

    2015-12-01

    Waterborne exposure to human viruses is possible through contact with contaminated water environments and can result in infections associated with a wide range of illnesses, including gastrointestinal, respiratory, ear, ocular, and skin infections. Recently, the occurrence in water environments of two groups of human viruses-both known with oncogenic potential, human polyomaviruses (HPyVs) and papillomaviruses (HPVs)-has been reported worldwide. These viruses, responsible for highly prevalent infections worldwide, have recently been proposed as potentially emerging waterborne pathogens. The objective of the present study was to examine the occurrence of HPyVs and HPVs in surface waters, by monitoring two rivers in Northwestern Italy, by nested PCR assays and sequencing. HPyVs (JC, BK, and Merkel cell polyomavirus) were detected in 10/25 (40%) samples. HPVs (HPV8, 17, 21, 25, 32, 80, 99, 105, and putative new HPVs) were identified in 14/25 (56%) river samples. The number of HPV DNA copies in waters was measured by quantitative real-time PCR. To our knowledge, this is the first detection and quantification of HPVs in surface waters. The possibility that HPyVs and HPVs can be transmitted by the waterborne route deserves to be explored in future studies.

  16. Genital human papillomavirus infection in women from the Zagreb region.

    PubMed

    Marijan, Tatjana; Vranes, Jasmina; Mlinarić-Dzepina, Ana; Leskovar, Vladimira; Knezević, Jasna; Kvaternik, Matea

    2007-04-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the most common sexually transmitted infection, especially among young, sexually active individuals. As persistent infection with oncogenic types may lead to cervical cancer, HPV testing is a useful tool to screen for women at risk for subsequent development of cervical cancer. The aim of the study was to determine the prevalence of high-risk HPV (hrHPV) infection in different age groups of cytologically selected women from the Zagreb region, and to evaluate the frequency and results of repeat hrHPV testing. During a one-year study period (November 2005 to November 2006), a total of 3,440 cervical samples from women attending gynecological services of public and private health care systems were received. They were tested for 13 hrHPV genotypes by the polymerase chain reaction based AMPLICOR HPV test (Roche Molecular Systems). The overall prevalence of hrHPV was 34.6%. Most samples were obtained from women aged 21-30 years (44.2%), followed by the 31-40 (27.6%), 41-50 (15.7%), 51-60 (5.3%) and 261 (2.4%) age groups. Out of 3,227 cervical samples obtained from women of known age, 4.9% were obtained from the group of girls younger than 21, in which the highest prevalence of hrHPV (49.4%) was found. A similar prevalence was observed in women aged 21-30 (45.1%). The prevalence gradually decreased with age. During the study period, repeat hrHPV testing was performed in samples from 66 women at different intervals. Out of 28 women that were hrHPV negative on initial testing, only five women turned positive on repeat testing. Out of 38 women that were positive on initial testing, in one-third hrHPV could not be detected on repeat testing. As expected, hrHPV infection was highly prevalent in female adolescents and young women. Further investigation on repeat hrHPV testing is needed to assess virus clearance and rate of newly acquired infection.

  17. Oral squamous papilloma and condyloma acuminatum as manifestations of buccal-genital infection by human papillomavirus

    PubMed Central

    dos Reis, Helena Lucia B.; Rabelo, Priscila C.; de Santana, Maria Rúbia F.; Ferreira, Dennis Carvalho; Filho, Antônio C.

    2009-01-01

    Genital infection by human papillomavirus (HPV), a sexually transmitted disease (STD), has increased considerably due to the changes in sexual behaviour and an increase in the practice of oral sex. HPV, in a parallel manner, has been closely studied due to its oncogenic potential. We present the case of a 27-year-old patient, with a multi-partner sexual history and frequent practice of oral sex, who suffered from warts lesions on the genitalia and tongue. Squamous papilloma was diagnosed from a tongue biopsy. The treatment of the oral lesion was by way of surgery, without relapse in the first two years. Our discussion in this report is regarding the HPV infection in the oral cavity. PMID:21938114

  18. Progress toward implementation of human papillomavirus vaccination--the Americas, 2006-2010.

    PubMed

    2011-10-14

    Cervical cancer is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in the Americas, where an estimated 80,574 new cases and 36,058 deaths were reported in 2008, with 85% of this burden occurring in Latin America and the Caribbean. Two oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) types (16 and 18) cause approximately 70% of cervical cancers and a substantial proportion of other HPV-related cancers. HPV vaccination provides an opportunity to greatly reduce cervical cancer burden through primary prevention of HPV infection. This report summarizes the progress toward HPV vaccine introduction in the Americas, focusing on countries that have introduced the vaccine in national or regional immunization programs. As of January 2011, four countries in the Americas had introduced HPV vaccine. Overcoming issues related to financing and delivery of HPV vaccine remains a key public health challenge to more widespread implementation of HPV vaccination in the Americas.

  19. Is human papillomavirus vaccination likely to be a useful strategy in India?

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, Sudeep; Kerkar, Rajendra A.; Dikshit, Rajesh; Badwe, Rajendra A.

    2013-01-01

    Two vaccines that protect against infection by some of the oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) subtypes have recently been licensed for use in population-based vaccination strategies in many countries. However, these products are being promoted as ‘cervical cancer vaccines’ based on inadequate data. Specifically, there remain several concerns about the duration of immunogenicity, length of follow-up of trial subjects, endpoints chosen in vaccine trials, applicability of trial results to real populations, the safety of these products, and their cost-effectiveness as public health interventions. Furthermore, it is unlikely that vaccination will obviate the need for setting up robust and cost-effective screening programs in countries like India. This article will discuss various aspects of HPV vaccination from a public health perspective, especially from the point of view of its relevance to India and other South Asian countries. PMID:24455622

  20. Evaluation of human papillomavirus elimination from cervix uteri by infrared laser exposure.

    PubMed

    Dymkovets, V P; Ezhov, V V; Manykin, A A; Belov, S V; Danileiko, Yu K; Osiko, V V; Salyuk, V A

    2011-12-01

    Elimination of types 16 and 18 human papilloma virus from the surface of cervix uteri for secondary prevention of cervical cancer was evaluated. The method is protected by patent of invention of the Russian Federation. Infrared laser therapy of cervix uteri was carried out in patients with precancer diseases of cervix uteri at Department of Gynecology of Municipal Clinical Hospital No. 52 (Moscow). Papillomavirus infection was eliminated using a Russian diode laser (lambda=1.06 μ, radiation power 10 W) with a collimating headpiece using carbon die at a distance of 10-12 cm from the exposed surface. The treatment resulted in a high percentage of elimination of types 16 and 18 oncogenic virus 4-6 weeks and during delayed periods after exposure.

  1. Detection of High-Risk Human Papillomaviruses in the Prevention of Cervical Cancer in India.

    PubMed

    Baskaran, Krishnan; Kumar, P Kranthi; Karunanithi, Santha; Sethupathy, Subramanian; Thamaraiselvi, B; Swaruparani, S

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are small, non-enveloped, double-stranded DNA viruses that infect epithelial tissues. Specific genotypes of human papillomavirus are the single most common etiological agents of cervical intraepithelial lesions and cervical cancer. Cervical cancer usually arises at squamous metaplastic epithelium of transformation zone (TZ) of the cervix featuring infection with one or more oncogenic or high-risk HPV (HR- HPV) types. A hospital- based study in a rural set up was carried out to understand the association of HR-HPV with squamous intraepithelial lesions (SILs) and cervical cancer. In the present study, HR-HPV was detected in 65.7% of low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSILs), 84.6% of high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSILs) and 94% of cervical cancer as compared to 10.7% of controls. The association of HPV infection with SIL and cervical cancer was analyzed with Chi square test (p<0.001). The significant association found confirmed that detection of HR-HPV is a suitable candidate for early identification of cervical precancerous lesions and in the prevention of cervical cancer in India.

  2. Structure-function analysis of the human papillomavirus type 16 E7 oncoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Phelps, W C; Münger, K; Yee, C L; Barnes, J A; Howley, P M

    1992-01-01

    The E7 gene of human papillomavirus type 16 encodes a multifunctional nuclear phosphoprotein that is functionally and structurally similar to the adenovirus (Ad) E1A proteins and the T antigens of other papovaviruses. E7 can cooperate with an activated ras oncogene to transform primary rodent cells, trans activate the Ad E2 promoter, and abrogate transforming growth factor beta-mediated repression of c-myc. Recent studies suggest that these functions may in part be a consequence of the ability of E7 to associate with the product of the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor gene (pRB). In this study, a series of site-specific mutations of the human papillomavirus type 16 E7 gene product were constructed and assessed for their effects on intracellular protein stability, ras cooperativity, transcriptional trans activation, pRB association, and phosphorylation. The results of these studies indicate that the transforming and trans-activating domains extensively overlap within a region of the protein analogous to conserved region 2 of Ad E1A, suggesting that pRB binding is necessary for both activities. Deletion of sequences in conserved region 1 abrogates cellular transformation but has only a marginal effect on trans activation. These data suggest that E7 trans activation and cellular transformation are interrelated but separable functions. Images PMID:1312637

  3. Papilloma formation in human foreskin xenografts after inoculation of human papillomavirus type 16 DNA.

    PubMed Central

    Brandsma, J L; Brownstein, D G; Xiao, W; Longley, B J

    1995-01-01

    A mouse model of high-risk human papillomavirus infection was developed in which human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 DNA was inoculated into human foreskin grafted to the skin of severe combined immunodeficient (scid) mice. Grafted skin contained human epidermis and dermis and, like normal human skin, expressed involucrin in differentiating keratinocytes. HPV type 16 DNA, attached to gold particles, was delivered directly into human epidermal cells and induced exophytic papilloma with histologic features of papillomavirus infection, including koilocytosis and expression of papillomavirus capsid antigen. This model should be useful for determining in vivo the functions of viral genes and for developing strategies to prevent and treat HPV-associated disease. It may also be of value in developing animal models of other human skin diseases. PMID:7884930

  4. Human papillomavirus prevalence and associated factors in women and men in south China: a population-based study

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Feixue; Yin, Kai; Wu, Xin; Lan, Jian; Huang, Shoujie; Sheng, Wei; Zhao, Jun; Su, Yingying; Wang, Ying; Li, Yanping; Li, Rongcheng; Zhang, Jun; Li, Mingqiang; Wu, Ting; Xia, Ningshao

    2016-01-01

    Oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is a cause of many anogenital cancers in women and men; however, there is little research on HPV prevalence and risk factors that includes both women and men from the same population. A total of 4687 participants, including 2378 women and 2309 men aged 18–55 years old from the same community, were enrolled in the study in Liuzhou, China. Exfoliated cells were collected from the participants from different anatomic sites and were tested for 13 oncogenic and 3 non-oncogenic HPV types. The prevalence of any oncogenic HPV type was higher in women than in men (18.7% vs 9.4%, P<0.001), whereas the prevalence of HPV 6 and 11 infection was similar (1.4% vs 1.2%, P=0.6832). HPV 52, 58, 16, 39 and 18 were the five most prevalent types in both sexes. Sexual and hygienic behaviors were associated with HPV infection in both women and men. We found that oncogenic HPV DNA detection is more prevalent in women than in men in China, whereas the prevalence of HPV 6 and 11 is similar in both sexes. The data indicate that the interaction of host and virus might be different among high- and low-risk HPV types. PMID:27876782

  5. The association of human papillomavirus vaccination with sexual behaviours and human papillomavirus knowledge: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Coles, Victoria A H; Patel, Ajay S; Allen, Felicity L; Keeping, Sam T; Carroll, Stuart M

    2015-10-01

    Since the 2008 introduction of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination programme for adolescent girls in the UK, parents and other groups have expressed fears that immunisation condones sexual activity, promotes promiscuity and encourages risky sexual behaviour. This study aimed to explore whether HPV vaccination programmes have increased knowledge surrounding HPV and associated disease and whether uptake has influenced sexual behaviour. MEDLINE, Embase, Cochrane Library and PsycINFO electronic databases were interrogated. Studies of behaviour, attitudes and knowledge associated with HPV vaccination (or vaccination intent) in subjects of any age and gender in programmes reflective of UK practice were included in the review (n = 58). The evidence regarding the association of HPV vaccination with high-risk sexual behaviour was varied, primarily due to the heterogeneous nature of the included studies. Young females typically exhibited better knowledge than males, and vaccinated respondents (or those with vaccination intent) had higher levels of knowledge than the unvaccinated. However, knowledge surrounding HPV and genital warts was generally poor. This review highlights the need to provide effective education regarding the HPV vaccine and HPV-associated disease to adolescents of vaccination age, nurses, teachers, parents and guardians to ultimately allow informed decisions to be made regarding receipt of the HPV vaccine.

  6. Immortalization of human foreskin keratinocytes by various human papillomavirus DNAs corresponds to their association with cervical carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Woodworth, C.D.; Doniger, J.; DiPaolo, J.A.

    1989-01-01

    Normal human foreskin keratinocytes cotransfected with the neomycin resistance gene and recombinant human papillomavirus (HPV) DNAs (types 16, 18, 31, and 33) that have a high or moderate association with cervical malignancy acquired immortality and contained integrated and transcriptionally active viral genomes. Only transcripts from the intact E6 and E7 genes were detected in at least one cell line, suggesting that one or both of these genes are responsible for immortalization. Recombinant HPV DNAs with low or no oncogenic potential for cervical cancer (HPV1a, -5, -6b, and -11) induced small G418-resistant colonies that senesced as did the nontransfected cells. These colonies contained only episomal virus DNA; therefore, integration of HPV sequences is important for immortalization of keratinocytes. This study suggests that the virus-encoded immortalization function contributes to the pathogenesis of cervical carcinoma.

  7. Using Organotypic Epithelial Tissue Culture to Study the Human Papillomavirus Life Cycle.

    PubMed

    Lee, Denis; Norby, Kathryn; Hayes, Mitchell; Chiu, Ya-Fang; Sugden, Bill; Lambert, Paul F

    2016-05-06

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are small double-stranded DNA viruses that are associated with greater than 95% of cervical cancers and 20% of head and neck cancers. These cancers arise from persistent infections in which there is continued expression of the HPV E6 and E7 oncogenes, often as a consequence of integration of HPV DNA into the host genome. Such cancers represent "dead ends" for the virus as integration disrupts the viral genome and because the cancers are defective in normal epithelial differentiation, which is required for production of progeny papillomavirus. In order to study the full viral life cycle, from the establishment to maintenance to productive stages, our lab makes use of the organotypic epithelial tissue culture system. This system allows us to mimic the three-dimensional structure of epithelia whose differentiation is tightly linked to the completion of the HPV viral life cycle. In this chapter we describe how various aspects of the HPV life cycle are monitored in raft cultures making use of an immortalized keratinocyte cell line. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  8. Chronic estrogen-induced cervical and vaginal squamous carcinogenesis in human papillomavirus type 16 transgenic mice.

    PubMed

    Arbeit, J M; Howley, P M; Hanahan, D

    1996-04-02

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs), including type 16, have been identified as factors in cervical carcinogenesis. However, the presence and expression of the virus per se appear to be insufficient for carcinogenesis. Rather, cofactors most likely are necessary in addition to viral gene expression to initiate neoplasia. One candidate cofactor is prolonged exposure to sex hormones. To examine the possible effects of estrogen on HPV-associated neoplasia, we treated transgenic mice expressing the oncogenes of HPV16 under control of the human keratin-14 promoter (K14-HPV16 transgenic mice) and nontransgenic control mice with slow release pellets of 17beta-estradiol. Squamous carcinomas developed in a multistage pathway exclusively in the vagina and cervix of K14-HPV16 transgenic mice. Estrogen-induced carcinogenesis was accompanied by an incremental increase in the incidence and distribution of proliferating cells solely within the cervical and vaginal squamous epithelium of K14-HPV16 mice. Expression of the HPV transgenes in untreated transgenic mice was detectable only during estrus; estrogen treatment resulted in transgene expression that was persistent but not further upregulated, remaining at low levels at all stages of carcinogenesis. The data demonstrate a novel mechanism of synergistic cooperation between chronic estrogen exposure and the oncogenes of HPV16 that coordinates squamous carcinogenesis in the female reproductive tract of K14-HPV16 transgenic mice.

  9. Human papillomavirus 16 E5 induces bi-nucleated cell formation by cell-cell fusion

    SciTech Connect

    Hu Lulin; Plafker, Kendra; Vorozhko, Valeriya; Zuna, Rosemary E.; Hanigan, Marie H.; Gorbsky, Gary J.; Plafker, Scott M.; Angeletti, Peter C.; Ceresa, Brian P.

    2009-02-05

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) 16 is a DNA virus encoding three oncogenes - E5, E6, and E7. The E6 and E7 proteins have well-established roles as inhibitors of tumor suppression, but the contribution of E5 to malignant transformation is controversial. Using spontaneously immortalized human keratinocytes (HaCaT cells), we demonstrate that expression of HPV16 E5 is necessary and sufficient for the formation of bi-nucleated cells, a common characteristic of precancerous cervical lesions. Expression of E5 from non-carcinogenic HPV6b does not produce bi-nucleate cells. Video microscopy and biochemical analyses reveal that bi-nucleates arise through cell-cell fusion. Although most E5-induced bi-nucleates fail to propagate, co-expression of HPV16 E6/E7 enhances the proliferation of these cells. Expression of HPV16 E6/E7 also increases bi-nucleated cell colony formation. These findings identify a new role for HPV16 E5 and support a model in which complementary roles of the HPV16 oncogenes lead to the induction of carcinogenesis.

  10. Papillomaviruses: Molecular and clinical aspects

    SciTech Connect

    Howley, P.M.; Broker, T.R.

    1985-01-01

    This book contains nine sections, each consisting of several papers. The section headings are : Papillomaviruses and Human Genital Tract Diseases;Papillomaviruses and Human Cutaneous Diseases, Papillomaviruses and Human Oral and Laryngeal Diseases;Therapeutic Approaches to Papillomavirus Infections;Animal Papillomaviruses;Molecular Biology;Transcription, Replication, and Genome Organization;Epithelial Cell Culture;Papillomavirus Transformation;and Viral Vectors.

  11. Metastatic MHC class I-negative mouse cells derived by transformation with human papillomavirus type 16

    PubMed Central

    Šmahel, M; Sobotková, E; Bubeník, J; Šímová, J; Žák, R; Ludvíková, V; Hájková, R; Kovařík, J; Jelínek, F; Povýšil, C; Marinov, J; Vonka, V

    2001-01-01

    In the endeavour to develop a model for studying gene therapy of cancers associated with human papillomaviruses (HPVs), mouse cells were transformed with the HPV type 16 (HPV16) and activated H-ras oncogenes. This was done by contransfection of plasmid p16HHMo, carrying the HPV16 E6/E7 oncogenes, and plasmid pEJ6.6, carrying the gene coding for human H-ras oncoprotein activated by G12V mutation, into secondary C57BL/6 mouse kidney cells. An oncogenic cell line, designated MK16/1/IIIABC, was derived. The epithelial origin of the cells was confirmed by their expression of cytokeratins. No MHC class I and class II molecules were detected on the surface of MK16/1/IIIABC cells. Spontaneous metastases were observed in lymphatic nodes and lungs after prolonged growth of MK16/1/IIIABC-induced subcutaneous tumours. Lethally irradiated MK16/1/IIIABC cells induced protection against challenge with 105homologous cells, but not against a higher cell dose (5 × 105). Plasmids p16HHMo and pEJ6.6 were also used for preventive immunization of mice. In comparison with a control group injected with pBR322, they exhibited moderate protection, in terms of prolonged survival, against MK16/1/IIIABC challenge (P< 0.03). These data suggest that MK16/1/IIIABC cells may serve as a model for studying immune reactions against HPV16-associated human tumours. © 2001 Cancer Research Campaign http://www.bjcancer.com PMID:11225590

  12. High prevalence of human papillomavirus infection in American Indian women of the Northern Plains

    PubMed Central

    Bell, Maria C.; Schmidt-Grimminger, Delf; Patrick, Sarah; Ryschon, Tim; Linz, Laurie; Chauhan, Subhash C.

    2008-01-01

    Objectives Cervical cancer is the leading gynecological malignancy worldwide, and the incidence of this disease is very high in American Indian women. Infection with the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is responsible for more than 95% of cervical squamous carcinomas. Therefore, the main objective of this study was to analyze oncogenic HPV infections in American Indian women residing in the Northern Plains. Methods Cervical samples were collected from 287 women attending a Northern Plains American Indian reservation outpatient clinic. DNA was extracted from the cervical samples and HPV specific DNA were amplified by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) using the L1 consensus primer sets. The PCR products were hybridized with the Roche HPV Line Blot assay for HPV genotyping to detect 27 different low and high-risk HPV genotypes. The chi-square test was performed for statistical analysis of the HPV infection and cytology diagnosis data. Results Of the total 287 patients, 61 women (21.25%) tested positive for HPV infection. Among all HPV-positive women, 41 (67.2%) were infected with high-risk HPV types. Of the HPV infected women, 41% presented with multiple HPV genotypes. Additionally, of the women infected with oncogenic HPV types, 20 (48.7%) were infected with HPV 16 and 18 and the remaining 21 (51.3%) were infected with other oncogenic types (i.e., HPV59, 39, 73). Women infected with oncogenic HPV types had significantly higher (p=0.001) abnormal Papanicolaou smear tests (Pap test) compared to women who were either HPV negative or positive for non-oncogenic HPV types. The incidence of HPV infection was inversely correlated (p<0.05) with the age of the patients, but there was no correlation (p=0.33) with seasonal variation. Conclusions In this study, we observed a high prevalence of HPV infection in American Indian women residing on Northern Plains Reservations. In addition, a significant proportion of the oncogenic HPV infections were other than HPV16 and 18. PMID:17659767

  13. Human Papillomavirus: Current and Future RNAi Therapeutic Strategies for Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Hun Soon; Rajasekaran, Nirmal; Ju, Woong; Shin, Young Kee

    2015-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are small DNA viruses; some oncogenic ones can cause different types of cancer, in particular cervical cancer. HPV-associated carcinogenesis provides a classical model system for RNA interference (RNAi) based cancer therapies, because the viral oncogenes E6 and E7 that cause cervical cancer are expressed only in cancerous cells. Previous studies on the development of therapeutic RNAi facilitated the advancement of therapeutic siRNAs and demonstrated its versatility by siRNA-mediated depletion of single or multiple cellular/viral targets. Sequence-specific gene silencing using RNAi shows promise as a novel therapeutic approach for the treatment of a variety of diseases that currently lack effective treatments. However, siRNA-based targeting requires further validation of its efficacy in vitro and in vivo, for its potential off-target effects, and of the design of conventional therapies to be used in combination with siRNAs and their drug delivery vehicles. In this review we discuss what is currently known about HPV-associated carcinogenesis and the potential for combining siRNA with other treatment strategies for the development of future therapies. Finally, we present our assessment of the most promising path to the development of RNAi therapeutic strategies for clinical settings. PMID:26239469

  14. A review of prophylactic human papillomavirus vaccines: recommendations and monitoring in the US.

    PubMed

    Dunne, Eileen F; Datta, S Deblina; E Markowitz, Lauri

    2008-11-15

    It has been estimated that genital human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most common sexually transmitted infection in the US. Nononcogenic types, such as HPV type 6 (HPV-6) and HPV-11, can cause benign or low-grade cervical cell changes, genital warts, and recurrent respiratory papillomatosis. Oncogenic types can cause cervical and other anogenital cancers; oncogenic HPV types are detected in 99% of cervical cancers worldwide. A quadrivalent HPV vaccine to prevent HPV-6, HPV-11, HPV-16, and HPV-18 was licensed for use in the US in June 2006 and an application for Food and Drug Administration licensure was submitted for a bivalent HPV vaccine to prevent HPV-16 and HPV-18 in March 2007. Currently in the US, the quadrivalent HPV vaccine is recommended for routine immunization of girls aged 11 and 12 years, and catch-up immunization is recommended through age 26 years. Monitoring the impact of prophylactic HPV vaccines will be useful for understanding the population level impact of vaccination. In this report, the authors provide a brief review of the epidemiology of HPV infection and an overview of prophylactic HPV vaccines and postvaccine licensure monitoring.

  15. Human papillomavirus prevalence, cervical abnormalities and risk factors among female sex workers in Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Brown, B; Blas, M M; Cabral, A; Byraiah, G; Guerra-Giraldez, C; Sarabia-Vega, V; Carcamo, C; Gravitt, P E; Halsey, N A

    2015-01-01

    Summary Female sex workers (FSWs) are at high risk of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Questionnaires were administered to 200 FSWs aged 18–26 years in Lima, Peru, to gather risk behaviours, and cervical swab samples were collected for Pap smears and HPV DNA testing as part of a longitudinal study. Participants reported a median of 120 clients in the past month, and 99.2% reported using condoms with clients. The prevalence of any HPV in cervical samples was 66.8%; 34 (17.1%) participants had prevalent HPV 16 or 18, and 92 (46.2%) had one or more oncogenic types. Fifteen women had abnormal Pap smears, 13 of which were HPV DNA positive. Fewer years since first sex was associated with oncogenic HPV prevalence in a model adjusted for previous sexually transmitted infection (STI) status and condom use with partners (prevalence ratio = 0.77, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.60–0.97). Our data confirm the high rates of HPV transmission among FSWs in Peru, highlighting the need for early and effective strategies to prevent cervical cancer. PMID:22581946

  16. Human papillomavirus prevalence, cervical abnormalities and risk factors among female sex workers in Lima, Peru.

    PubMed

    Brown, B; Blas, M M; Cabral, A; Byraiah, G; Guerra-Giraldez, C; Sarabia-Vega, V; Carcamo, C; Gravitt, P E; Halsey, N A

    2012-04-01

    Female sex workers (FSWs) are at high risk of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Questionnaires were administered to 200 FSWs aged 18-26 years in Lima, Peru, to gather risk behaviours, and cervical swab samples were collected for Pap smears and HPV DNA testing as part of a longitudinal study. Participants reported a median of 120 clients in the past month, and 99.2% reported using condoms with clients. The prevalence of any HPV in cervical samples was 66.8%; 34 (17.1%) participants had prevalent HPV 16 or 18, and 92 (46.2%) had one or more oncogenic types. Fifteen women had abnormal Pap smears, 13 of which were HPV DNA positive. Fewer years since first sex was associated with oncogenic HPV prevalence in a model adjusted for previous sexually transmitted infection (STI) status and condom use with partners (prevalence ratio = 0.77, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 0.60-0.97). Our data confirm the high rates of HPV transmission among FSWs in Peru, highlighting the need for early and effective strategies to prevent cervical cancer.

  17. Vaccines against human papillomavirus infections: protection against cancer, genital warts or both?

    PubMed

    Joura, E A; Pils, S

    2016-12-01

    Since 2006, three vaccines against infections and disease caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) became available in Europe-in 2006 a quadrivalent HPV 6/11/16/18 vaccine, in 2007 a bivalent HPV 16/18 vaccine and in 2015 a nonavalent HPV 6/11/16/18/31/33/45/52/58 vaccine. HPV 16 and 18 are the most oncogenic HPV strains, causing about 70% of cervical and other HPV-related cancers, HPV 6 and 11 cause 85% of all genital warts. The additional types of the polyvalent vaccine account for about 20% of invasive cervical cancer and >35% of pre-cancer. The potential differences between these vaccines caused some debate. All three vaccines give a robust and long-lasting protection against the strains in the various vaccines. The promise of cross-protection against other types (i.e. HPV 31/33/45) and hence a broader cancer protection was not fulfilled because these observations were confounded by the vaccine efficacy against the vaccine types. Furthermore, cross-protection was not consistent over various studies, not durable and not consistently seen in the real world experience. The protection against disease caused by oncogenic HPV strains was not compromised by the protection against low-risk types causing genital warts. The most effective cancer protection to date can be expected by the nonavalent vaccine, data indicate a 97% efficacy against cervical and vulvovaginal pre-cancer caused by these nine HPV types.

  18. Healthy Skin of Many Animal Species Harbors Papillomaviruses Which Are Closely Related to Their Human Counterparts

    PubMed Central

    Antonsson, Annika; Hansson, Bengt Göran

    2002-01-01

    Papillomaviruses associated with clinical symptoms have been found in many vertebrate species. In this study, we have used an L1 gene consensus PCR test designed to detect a broad spectrum of human skin papillomaviruses to analyze swab samples from healthy skin of 111 animals belonging to 19 vertebrate species. In eight of the species, papillomavirus DNA was found with the following prevalences: chimpanzees, 9 of 11 samples positive; gorillas, 3 of 4; long-tailed macaques, 14 of 16; spider monkeys, 2 of 2; ruffed lemurs, 1 of 2; cows, 6 of 10; European elks, 4 of 4; aurochs, 1 of 1. In total, 53 new putative animal papillomavirus types were found. The results show that skin papillomaviruses can be detected in healthy skin from many different animal species and are sufficiently related genetically to their human counterparts to be identified by a human skin papillomavirus primer set (FAP59 and FAP64). PMID:12438579

  19. Incidence of cervical human papillomavirus infection in systemic lupus erythematosus women.

    PubMed

    Mendoza-Pinto, C; García-Carrasco, M; Vallejo-Ruiz, V; Méndez-Martínez, S; Taboada-Cole, A; Etchegaray-Morales, I; Muñóz-Guarneros, M; Reyes-Leyva, J; López-Colombo, A

    2017-01-01

    Objectives Our objective was to study the incidence, persistence and clearance of human papillomavirus infection in systemic lupus erythematosus women and assess risk factors for persistence of human papillomavirus infection. Methods We carried out a prospective, observational cohort study of 127 systemic lupus erythematosus women. Patients were evaluated at baseline and at three years. Traditional and systemic lupus erythematosus women-related disease risk factors were collected. Gynaecological evaluations and cervical cytology screening were made. Human papillomavirus detection and genotyping were made by polymerase chain reaction and linear array. Results The cumulative prevalence of human papillomavirus infection increased from 22.8% at baseline to 33.8% at three years; p = < 0.001: 20.1% of patients experienced 43 incident infections. The risk of any human papillomavirus infection was 10.1 per 1000 patient-months. At three years, 47 (88.6%) prevalent infections were cleared. Independent risk factors associated with incident human papillomavirus infection included more lifetime sexual partners (odds ratio = 1.8, 95% confidence interval = 1.11-3.0) and cumulative cyclophosphamide dose (odds ratio = 3.9, 95% confidence interval = 1.2-12.8). Conclusions In systemic lupus erythematosus women, the cumulative prevalence of human papillomavirus infection, including high risk-human papillomavirus and multiple human papillomavirus infections, may increase over time. Most persistent infections were low risk-human papillomavirus. The number of lifetime sexual partners and the cumulative cyclophosphamide dose were independently associated with incident human papillomavirus infection.

  20. Progressive squamous epithelial neoplasia in K14-human papillomavirus type 16 transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Arbeit, J M; Münger, K; Howley, P M; Hanahan, D

    1994-01-01

    To model human papillomavirus-induced neoplastic progression, expression of the early region of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) was targeted to the basal cells of the squamous epithelium in transgenic mice, using a human keratin 14 (K14) enhancer/promoter. Twenty-one transgenic founder mice were produced, and eight lines carrying either wild-type or mutant HPV16 early regions that did not express the E1 or E2 genes were established. As is characteristic of human cancers, the E6 and E7 genes remained intact in these mutants. The absence of E1 or E2 function did not influence the severity of the phenotype that eventually developed in the transgenic mice. Hyperplasia, papillomatosis, and dysplasia appeared at multiple epidermal and squamous mucosal sites, including ear and truncal skin, face, snout and eyelids, and anus. The ears were the most consistently affected site, with pathology being present in all lines with 100% penetrance. This phenotype also progressed through discernible stages. An initial mild hyperplasia was followed by hyperplasia, which further progressed to dysplasia and papillomatosis. During histopathological progression, there was an incremental increase in cellular DNA synthesis, determined by 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine incorporation, and a profound perturbation in keratinocyte terminal differentiation, as revealed by immunohistochemistry to K5, K14, and K10 and filaggrin. These K14-HPV16 transgenic mice present an opportunity to study the role of the HPV16 oncogenes in the neoplastic progression of squamous epithelium and provide a model with which to identify genetic and epigenetic factors necessary for carcinogenesis. Images PMID:7515971

  1. Association between epidermodysplasia verruciformis-associated human papillomavirus DNA in plucked eyebrow hair and solar keratoses.

    PubMed

    Boxman, I L; Russell, A; Mulder, L H; Bavinck, J N; ter Schegget, J; Green, A

    2001-11-01

    Epidermodysplasia-verruciformis-associated human papillomavirus DNA has been demonstrated in squamous cell carcinomas and plucked hair from immunocompetent patients and renal transplant recipients. This study investigated the association between infection with epidermodysplasia-verruciformis-associated human papillomavirus, identified by the detection of viral DNA in plucked eyebrow hairs, and solar keratoses. These lesions are strongly predictive of squamous cell carcinoma. In a cross-sectional study 518 individuals were enrolled from a randomly selected sample of a subtropical Australian community. Epidermodysplasia-verruciformis-associated human papillomavirus DNA in eyebrow hair was detected using a nested polymerase chain reaction specific for epidermodysplasia-verruciformis-associated human papillomavirus types. Epidermo dysplasia-verruciformis-associated human papillomavirus DNA was present in 121 (49%) of 245 men and 116 (44%) of 262 women. There was a strongly significant increase in epidermodysplasia-verruciformis-associated human papillomavirus infection with age (p < 0.00001), with prevalences of 29% in the 25-39 y age group, 42% at 40-59 y and 65% in the 60-79 y age group. Among men there was a strong association between epidermodysplasia-verruciformis-associated human papillomavirus and solar keratoses with an odds ratio, adjusted for age, skin color, and occupational sun exposure, of 3.40 (95% confidence interval, 1.77-6.53). No such association was found among women [odds ratio 1.03 (95% confidence interval 0.59-1.77, after adjustment for the same factors)]. Differences in occupational sun exposure and smoking histories could not explain these apparently different associations between epidermodysplasia-verruciformis-associated human papillomavirus infection and solar keratoses in men and women. In conclusion, epidermodysplasia-verruciformis-associated human papillomavirus infection is associated with solar keratoses in men suggesting that

  2. Focal epithelial hyperplasia: a multifocal oral human papillomavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Flaitz, C M

    2000-01-01

    Widespread, slightly elevated and confluent nodules are observed throughout the oral mucosa in a young Hispanic girl. Repeated irritation of the soft tissues from a compromised occlusion is an aggravating factor for the spread of these lesions. A diagnosis of focal epithelial hyperplasia, a human papillomavirus infection, is made following histopathologic diagnosis and viral typing. Recognition of this specific type of warts is important in order to avoid the mistaken identification of condyloma acuminata, which may have significant repercussions in the life of a young child.

  3. [Human papillomavirus vaccines: a new challenge for pediatricians].

    PubMed

    Martinón-Torres, F; Bernaola Iturbe, E; Giménez Sánchez, F; Baca Cots, M; De Juan Martín, F; Díez Domingo, J; Garcés Sánchez, M; Gómez Campderá, J A; Picazo, J J; Pineda Solas, V

    2006-11-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are the most common sexually transmitted infections in the world. This infection is a necessary cause of cervical cancer, has been related to other forms of anogenital, airway and digestive cancers, and also causes anogenital warts. The recent advances in HPV prophylactic vaccines and their imminent commercial availability will post a new challenge to pediatricians: the indication and administration of these vaccines for the prevention of HPV infection, and consequently, of cervical cancer and other HPV-related diseases. The present article reviews the essentials of HPV infection, its relationship with cervical cancer, the advances in prophylactic HPV vaccines, and the role of the pediatrician in this context.

  4. Vaccines for human papillomavirus infection: a critical analysis.

    PubMed

    Nath, Amiya Kumar; Thappa, Devinder Mohan

    2009-01-01

    This article takes a critical look at the pros and cons of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines. There is enough evidence to suggest that the prophylactic vaccines are efficacious in preventing various benign and malignant conditions (including cervical cancers) caused by HPV. Even though the vaccine is costly, hypothetical analysis has shown that HPV vaccination will be cost effective in the long run. Therapeutic HPV vaccines used to treat established disease are still undergoing evaluation in clinical studies, and results seem to be encouraging. Although several countries have started mandatory vaccination programs with the prophylactic HPV vaccines, conservatives have voiced concerns regarding the moral impact of such vaccination programs.

  5. Development and psychometric evaluation of the Thai Human Papillomavirus Beliefs Scale.

    PubMed

    Juntasopeepun, Phanida; Davidson, Patricia M; Chang, Sungwon; Suwan, Natthawan; Phianmongkhol, Yupin; Srisomboon, Jatupol

    2011-12-01

    In this study, we developed and evaluated the psychometric properties of the Thai Human Papillomavirus Beliefs Scale. The Scale was tested on 386 young women aged 18-24 years in Chiang Mai, Thailand. Content validity of the Scale was evaluated by a panel of experts, construct validity was determined using exploratory factor analysis, and reliability was assessed for stability and internal consistency. Factor analysis provided empirical support for the existence of four factors, which accounted for 67.7% of the total variance: perceived susceptibility, perceived seriousness, perceived benefits, and perceived barriers. Cronbach's α reliability coefficients for the four subscales ranged from 0.59 to 0.86. Factors predicting intention to receive the papillomavirus vaccine were perceived susceptibility, perceived benefits, and perceived barriers. The Thai Human Papillomavirus Beliefs Scale demonstrated promising psychometric properties, indicating that it might be a useful instrument for assessing young women's human papillomavirus and cervical cancer-associated beliefs, and for predicting human papillomavirus vaccination intention.

  6. [Detection of microRNAs seed sequences within human papillomavirus genomes].

    PubMed

    Pineda-Gómez, David; Garrido, Efraín; Chávez, Pedro; Salcedo, Mauricio

    2015-01-01

    In this paper we are reporting for the first time the presence of seed sequences of human and viral microRNAs embedded within both high and low risk human papillomavirus (HPV) genomes. These seed sequences have high oncogenic potential. They were found using an in silico analysis based on the microRNA sequences added to Sanger's database. Among these sequences, it was observed a potential fingerprint harbouring several repeated sequences of microRNA 297 (miR-297) within the LCR region of HPV types 16, 18, 33, 45 and 52. Further analyses were performed for low risk HPV types 6 and 11 and we observed that the probable fingerprint was absent in HPV11, even when we detected other repeated sequences of miR-363. According to these findings, besides the fact that we detected the presence of microRNA sequences within HPV genomes, we suggest a common putative viral mechanism of gene expression regulation shared among human virus.

  7. hpvPDB: An Online Proteome Reserve for Human Papillomavirus

    PubMed Central

    Jena, Lingaraja; Daf, Sangeeta; Mohod, Kanchan; Goyal, Peyush; Varma, Ashok K.

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is the leading cause of cancer mortality among women worldwide. The molecular understanding of HPV proteins has significant connotation for understanding their intrusion in the host and designing novel protein vaccines and anti-viral agents, etc. Genomic, proteomic, structural, and disease-related information on HPV is available on the web; yet, with trivial annotations and more so, it is not well customized for data analysis, host-pathogen interaction, strain-disease association, drug designing, and sequence analysis, etc. We attempted to design an online reserve with comprehensive information on HPV for the end users desiring the same. The Human Papillomavirus Proteome Database (hpvPDB) domiciles proteomic and genomic information on 150 HPV strains sequenced to date. Simultaneous easy expandability and retrieval of the strain-specific data, with a provision for sequence analysis and exploration potential of predicted structures, and easy access for curation and annotation through a range of search options at one platform are a few of its important features. Affluent information in this reserve could be of help for researchers involved in structural virology, cancer research, drug discovery, and vaccine design. PMID:24465243

  8. Modulation of microRNA-mRNA Target Pairs by Human Papillomavirus 16 Oncoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Harden, Mallory E.; Prasad, Nripesh; Griffiths, Anthony

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT The E6 and E7 proteins are the major oncogenic drivers encoded by high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs). While many aspects of the transforming activities of these proteins have been extensively studied, there are fewer studies that have investigated how HPV E6/E7 expression affects the expression of cellular noncoding RNAs. The goal of our study was to investigate HPV16 E6/E7 modulation of cellular microRNA (miR) levels and to determine the potential consequences for cellular gene expression. We performed deep sequencing of small and large cellular RNAs in primary undifferentiated cultures of human foreskin keratinocytes (HFKs) with stable expression of HPV16 E6/E7 or a control vector. After integration of the two data sets, we identified 51 differentially expressed cellular miRs associated with the modulation of 1,456 potential target mRNAs in HPV16 E6/E7-expressing HFKs. We discovered that the degree of differential miR expression in HFKs expressing HPV16 E6/E7 was not necessarily predictive of the number of corresponding mRNA targets or the potential impact on gene expression. Additional analyses of the identified miR-mRNA pairs suggest modulation of specific biological activities and biochemical pathways. Overall, our study supports the model that perturbation of cellular miR expression by HPV16 E6/E7 importantly contributes to the rewiring of cellular regulatory circuits by the high-risk HPV E6 and E7 proteins that contribute to oncogenic transformation. PMID:28049151

  9. Preclinical Model To Test Human Papillomavirus Virus (HPV) Capsid Vaccines In Vivo Using Infectious HPV/Cottontail Rabbit Papillomavirus Chimeric Papillomavirus Particles▿

    PubMed Central

    Mejia, Andres F.; Culp, Timothy D.; Cladel, Nancy M.; Balogh, Karla K.; Budgeon, Lynn R.; Buck, Christopher B.; Christensen, Neil D.

    2006-01-01

    A human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine consisting of virus-like particles (VLPs) was recently approved for human use. It is generally assumed that VLP vaccines protect by inducing type-specific neutralizing antibodies. Preclinical animal models cannot be used to test for protection against HPV infections due to species restriction. We developed a model using chimeric HPV capsid/cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV) genome particles to permit the direct testing of HPV VLP vaccines in rabbits. Animals vaccinated with CRPV, HPV type 16 (HPV-16), or HPV-11 VLPs were challenged with both homologous (CRPV capsid) and chimeric (HPV-16 capsid) particles. Strong type-specific protection was observed, demonstrating the potential application of this approach. PMID:17005666

  10. Evasion of host immune defenses by human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Westrich, Joseph A; Warren, Cody J; Pyeon, Dohun

    2017-03-02

    A majority of human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are asymptomatic and self-resolving in the absence of medical interventions. Various innate and adaptive immune responses, as well as physical barriers, have been implicated in controlling early HPV infections. However, if HPV overcomes these host immune defenses and establishes persistence in basal keratinocytes, it becomes very difficult for the host to eliminate the infection. The HPV oncoproteins E5, E6, and E7 are important in regulating host immune responses. These oncoproteins dysregulate gene expression, protein-protein interactions, posttranslational modifications, and cellular trafficking of critical host immune modulators. In addition to the HPV oncoproteins, sequence variation and dinucleotide depletion in papillomavirus genomes has been suggested as an alternative strategy for evasion of host immune defenses. Since anti-HPV host immune responses are also considered to be important for antitumor immunity, immune dysregulation by HPV during virus persistence may contribute to immune suppression essential for HPV-associated cancer progression. Here, we discuss cellular pathways dysregulated by HPV that allow the virus to evade various host immune defenses.

  11. A prospective analysis of smoking and human papillomavirus infection among men in the HPV in Men Study.

    PubMed

    Schabath, Matthew B; Villa, Luisa L; Lin, Hui-Yi; Fulp, William J; Lazcano-Ponce, Eduardo; Salmerón, Jorge; Abrahamsen, Martha E; Papenfuss, Mary R; Quiterio, Manuel; Giuliano, Anna R

    2014-05-15

    At present it is unknown whether the higher prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection among smokers in men is attributed to a higher probability of acquiring an infection or because of longer infection persistence. Thus, we investigated the role of smoking on the incidence (acquisition) and clearance (persistence) of genital HPV infections among 4,026 men in the HPV in Men (HIM) Study, a multinational prospective study of the natural history of genital HPV infection in men. Genital HPV infections were grouped by any, oncogenic and nononcogenic HPV infections and smoking status was categorized as current, former and never smokers. The incidence of any, oncogenic and nononcogenic HPV infections was significantly higher among current smokers compared to former and never smokers (p < 0.01). In multivariable analyses adjusting for sexual behavior and potential confounders, when compared to never smokers, current smokers exhibited significantly higher probability of acquiring any [hazard ratio (HR) = 1.23; 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.02-1.50] and nononcogenic (HR = 1.21; 95% CI 1.00-1.45) infections and a borderline significant probability for oncogenic infections (HR = 1.18; 95% CI 0.98-1.41). Although the median duration of HPV infection was generally longer among current smokers, we found no statistically significant associations in the multivariable analyses. Overall, these results demonstrated that current smoking exhibited the highest incidence and highest probability of acquiring genital HPV infections.

  12. Human papillomavirus vaccine: A boon or curse

    PubMed Central

    Chawla, Sumit; Singh, Inderjeet; Jain, Rambilas; Mehta, Bharti; Kumari, Sneh; Sahoo, Soumya Swaroop

    2015-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most common cancer among women worldwide, with about 493,000 new cases diagnosed annually. Of 274,000 deaths due to cervical cancer each year, more than 80% occur in developing countries, and this proportion is expected to increase to 90% by 2020. Up to 70% of sexually active women will become infected with human papilloma virus (HPV) during their lifetime. Even though screening reduces the risk of cervical cancer, it does not prevent HPV infection or development of precancerous lesions which need careful follow-up and often need excision. It was observed in a study, pre-adolescent vaccination alone reduced cancer incidence by 44% and was more effective than screening alone. A combined approach of pre-adolescent vaccination and screening of adult women was more effective than either alone. The high probability of acquiring HPV infection once, one has become sexually active raises the question of whether the vaccine will be effective if given to girls who have already been infected with HPV type 16 or 18. In April 2010, The Indian parliament's Standing Committee on Health, began probing the use of HPV vaccines in 2 states after the reported deaths of 7 girls, and concluded that “safety and rights of children were highly compromised and violated.” Though the question of immunization of older girls and women deserves attention, from a public health perspective, the first priority in resource-poor settings would be to vaccinate young adolescent girls. PMID:25668662

  13. Requirement for Estrogen Receptor Alpha in a Mouse Model for Human Papillomavirus-Associated Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chung, Sang-Hyuk; Wiedmeyer, Kerri; Shai, Anny; Korach, Kenneth S.; Lambert, Paul F.

    2008-01-01

    The majority of human cervical cancers are associated with the high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs), which encode the potent E6 and E7 oncogenes. Upon prolonged treatment with physiological levels of exogenous estrogen, K14E7 transgenic mice expressing HPV-16 E7 oncoprotein in their squamous epithelia succumb to uterine cervical cancer. Furthermore, prolonged withdrawal of exogenous estrogen results in complete or partial regression of tumors in this mouse model. In the current study we investigated whether estrogen receptor alpha (ERα) is required for the development of cervical cancer in K14E7 transgenic mice. We demonstrate that exogenous estrogen fails to promote either dysplasia or cervical cancer in K14E7/ERα−/− mice despite the continued presence of the presumed cervical cancer precursor cell type, reserve cells, and evidence for E7 expression therein. We also observed that cervical cancers in our mouse models are strictly associated with atypical squamous metaplasia (ASM), which is believed to be the precursor for cervical cancer in women. Consistently, E7 and exogenous estrogen failed to promote ASM in the absence of ERα. We conclude that ERα plays a crucial role at an early stage of cervical carcinogenesis in this mouse model. PMID:19047174

  14. Rat embryo fibroblast cells expressing human papillomavirus 1a genes exhibit altered growth properties and tumorigenicity.

    PubMed Central

    Green, M; Brackmann, K H; Loewenstein, P M

    1986-01-01

    Human papillomavirus 1a (HPV1a) induces benign tumors (papillomas or warts) in humans under natural conditions of infection but has not been found to replicate significantly in cell culture or in experimental animals. To establish model systems to study the oncogenic properties and expression of HPV genes, we established cell lines by cotransfecting the 3Y1 rat fibroblast cell line with HPV1a DNA constructs containing an intact early gene region and the Tn5 neomycin resistance gene. Most cell lines selected for expression of the neomycin resistance gene by treatment with the antibiotic G-418 contained viral DNA in a high-molecular-weight form. The growth characteristics of several cell lines containing high copy numbers of HPV1a DNA were studied further. They were shown to differ from the parental cell line and from G-418-resistant cell lines that did not incorporate viral DNA in the following properties: morphological alteration, increased cell density at confluence, growth in 0.5% serum, efficient anchorage-independent growth in soft agar, and rapid formation of tumors in nude mice. Those cell lines that possessed altered growth properties and tumorigenicity were found to express abundant quantities of polyadenylated virus-specific RNA species in the cytoplasm. Images PMID:3023676

  15. Deregulation of the miRNAs Expression in Cervical Cancer: Human Papillomavirus Implications

    PubMed Central

    Gómez-Gómez, Yazmín; Organista-Nava, Jorge; Gariglio, Patricio

    2013-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are a class of small non coding RNAs of 18–25 nucleotides in length. The temporal or short-lived expression of the miRNAs modulates gene expression post transcriptionally. Studies have revealed that miRNAs deregulation correlates and is involved with the initiation and progression of human tumors. Cervical cancer (CC) displays notably increased or decreased expression of a large number of cellular oncogenic or tumor suppressive miRNAs, respectively. However, understanding the potential role of miRNAs in CC is still limited. In CC, the high-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPVs) infection can affect the miRNAs expression through oncoprotein E6 and E7 that contribute to viral pathogenesis, although other viral proteins might also be involved. This deregulation in the miRNAs expression has an important role in the hallmarks of CC. Interestingly, the miRNA expression profile in CC can discriminate between normal and tumor tissue and the extraordinary stability of miRNAs makes it suitable to serve as diagnostic and prognostic biomarkers of cancer. In this review, we will summarize the role of the HR-HPVs in miRNA expression, the role of miRNAs in the hallmarks of CC, and the use of miRNAs as potential prognostic biomarkers in CC. PMID:24490161

  16. Secreted primary human malignant mesothelioma exosome signature reflects oncogenic cargo

    PubMed Central

    Greening, David W.; Ji, Hong; Chen, Maoshan; Robinson, Bruce W. S.; Dick, Ian M.; Creaney, Jenette; Simpson, Richard J.

    2016-01-01

    Malignant mesothelioma (MM) is a highly-aggressive heterogeneous malignancy, typically diagnosed at advanced stage. An important area of mesothelioma biology and progression is understanding intercellular communication and the contribution of the secretome. Exosomes are secreted extracellular vesicles shown to shuttle cellular cargo and direct intercellular communication in the tumour microenvironment, facilitate immunoregulation and metastasis. In this study, quantitative proteomics was used to investigate MM-derived exosomes from distinct human models and identify select cargo protein networks associated with angiogenesis, metastasis, and immunoregulation. Utilising bioinformatics pathway/network analyses, and correlation with previous studies on tumour exosomes, we defined a select mesothelioma exosomal signature (mEXOS, 570 proteins) enriched in tumour antigens and various cancer-specific signalling (HPGD/ENO1/OSMR) and secreted modulators (FN1/ITLN1/MAMDC2/PDGFD/GBP1). Notably, such circulating cargo offers unique insights into mesothelioma progression and tumour microenvironment reprogramming. Functionally, we demonstrate that oncogenic exosomes facilitate the migratory capacity of fibroblast/endothelial cells, supporting the systematic model of MM progression associated with vascular remodelling and angiogenesis. We provide biophysical and proteomic characterisation of exosomes, define a unique oncogenic signature (mEXOS), and demonstrate the regulatory capacity of exosomes in cell migration/tube formation assays. These findings contribute to understanding tumour-stromal crosstalk in the context of MM, and potential new diagnostic and therapeutic extracellular targets. PMID:27605433

  17. Human Papillomavirus (HPV)-associated Oral Cancers and Treatment Strategies.

    PubMed

    Sathish, N; Wang, X; Yuan, Y

    2014-07-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is known to be associated with several types of human cancer, including cervical, vulvar, vaginal, penile, anal, and head-and-neck cancers. Among these cancers, HPV-associated head-and-neck cancers, inclusive of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) and oral cavity squamous cell carcinomas (OCSCC), have recently risen dramatically in men under 50 years old. Within 20 years, the percentage of HPV-positive OSCC in total OSCC went from less than 20% to more than 70% in the United States and some European countries. This article reviews the incidence trend and pathogenesis of HPV-associated head-and-neck cancers as well as current treatment modalities for the disease.

  18. Manipulation of the innate immune response by human papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Hong, Shiyuan; Laimins, Laimonis A

    2017-03-02

    The innate immune response constitutes the first line of defense against infections by pathogens. Successful pathogens such as human papillomaviruses (HPVs) have evolved mechanisms that target several points in these pathways including sensing of viral genomes, blocking the synthesis of interferons and inhibiting the action of JAK/STAT transcription factors. Disruption of these inhibitory mechanisms contributes to the ability of HPVs to establish persistent infections, which is the major etiological factor in the development of anogenital cancers. Interestingly, HPVs also positively activate several members of these pathways such as STAT-5 that are important for their differentiation-dependent life cycle. STAT-5 activation induces the ATM and ATR DNA damage response pathways that play critical roles in HPV genome amplification. Targeting of these pathways by pharmaceuticals can provide novel opportunities to inhibit infections by these important human pathogens.

  19. Papillomavirus E6 proteins

    SciTech Connect

    Howie, Heather L.; Katzenellenbogen, Rachel A.; Galloway, Denise A.

    2009-02-20

    The papillomaviruses are small DNA viruses that encode approximately eight genes, and require the host cell DNA replication machinery for their viral DNA replication. Thus papillomaviruses have evolved strategies to induce host cell DNA synthesis balanced with strategies to protect the cell from unscheduled replication. While the papillomavirus E1 and E2 genes are directly involved in viral replication by binding to and unwinding the origin of replication, the E6 and E7 proteins have auxillary functions that promote proliferation. As a consequence of disrupting the normal checkpoints that regulate cell cycle entry and progression, the E6 and E7 proteins play a key role in the oncogenic properties of human papillomaviruses with a high risk of causing anogenital cancers (HR HPVs). As a consequence, E6 and E7 of HR HPVs are invariably expressed in cervical cancers. This article will focus on the E6 protein and its numerous activities including inactivating p53, blocking apoptosis, activating telomerase, disrupting cell adhesion, polarity and epithelial differentiation, altering transcription and reducing immune recognition.

  20. Papillomavirus E6 proteins

    PubMed Central

    Howie, Heather L; Katzenellenbogen, Rachel A; Galloway, Denise A

    2009-01-01

    The papillomaviruses are small DNA viruses that encode approximately eight genes, and require the host cell DNA replication machinery for their viral DNA replication. Thus papillomaviruses have evolved strategies to induce host cell DNA synthesis balanced with strategies to protect the cell from unscheduled replication. While the papillomavirus E1 and E2 genes are directly involved in viral replication by binding to and unwinding the origin of replication, the E6 and E7 proteins have auxillary functions that promote proliferation. As a consequence of disrupting the normal checkpoints that regulate cell cycle entry and progression, the E6 and E7 proteins play a key role in the oncogenic properties of human papillomaviruses with a high risk of causing anogenital cancers (HR HPVs). As a consequence, E6 and E7 of HR HPVs are invariably expressed in cervical cancers. This article will focus on the E6 protein and its numerous activities including inactivating p53, blocking apoptosis, activating telomerase, disrupting cell adhesion, polarity and epithelial differentiation, altering transcription and reducing immune recognition. PMID:19081593

  1. Human papillomavirus and head and neck carcinomas: focus on evidence in the babel of published data.

    PubMed

    Morbini, P; Benazzo, M

    2016-08-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV)-associated squamous cell carcinoma of the oropharynx is a well-defined entity mostly affecting young to middle-aged male non-smokers. It is generally associated with a favourable outcome, and for this reason a less intensive therapeutic approach has been proposed for this subset of patients. The incidence of HPV-associated oropharyngeal cancers is rapidly increasing in most Western countries, but detailed epidemiological data are not available for the Italian population. Furthermore, among other head and neck regions, a smaller proportion of oral high-grade dysplasia and cancers seems to depend on HPV infection, whereas its role in laryngeal cancer is recognised as less relevant. HPV-dependent neoplastic transformation depends on the expression of viral oncogenes in the infected host cell that can only be directly documented through viral oncogene mRNA identification. The consensus on how to classify these patients from clinical and laboratory diagnostic points of view is still limited, with different approaches based on one or more diagnostic techniques including p16 immunostaining, in situ hybridisation and polymerase chain reation (PCR) amplification of viral DNA. The possibility of early diagnosis relying on the identification of HPV infection in oral and oropharyngeal exfoliated cells has so far provided unsatisfactory results, although viral persistence after treatment has been associated with risk of recurrence. Presently, sufficient data are not available to document the natural history and progression from tonsillar HPV infection to oropharyngeal cancer development, and to clearly define the modality of transmission and risk exposure, among which sexual behaviours appear to play a relevant role. The diffusion of HPV vaccination and its administration to both genders will undoubtedly dramatically modify the epidemiology of HPV-related head and neck cancers in the coming years.

  2. International standardization and classification of human papillomavirus types.

    PubMed

    Bzhalava, Davit; Eklund, Carina; Dillner, Joakim

    2015-02-01

    Established Human Papillomavirus (HPV) types, up to HPV202, belong to 49 species in five genera. International standardization in classification and quality standards for HPV type designation and detection is ensured by the International HPV Reference Center. The center i) receives clones of potentially novel HPV types, re-clones and re-sequences them. If confirmed, an HPV type number is assigned and posted on www.hpvcenter.se. ii) distributes reference clone samples, for academic research, under Material Transfer Agreements agreed with the originator. iii) provides preliminary checking of whether new sequences represent novel types iv) issues international proficiency panels for HPV genotyping. The rate of HPV type discovery is increasing, probably because of metagenomic sequencing. γ-genus today contains 79HPV types and 27 species, surpassing ∝ and β genera with 65 and 51HPV types, respectively. Regular issuing of proficiency panels based on HPV reference clones has resulted in global improvement of HPV genotyping services.

  3. Another Look at the Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Experience in Canada

    PubMed Central

    Deber, Raisa B.; Guttmann, Astrid; McGeer, Allison; Krahn, Murray

    2011-01-01

    Policy debates about immunization frequently focus on classic trade-offs between individual versus collective well-being. Publicly funded immunization programs are usually justified on the basis of widespread public benefit with minimal individual risk. We discuss the example of the policy process surrounding the adoption of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine in Canada to consider whether public good arguments continue to dominate immunization policymaking. Specifically, we show how a range of stakeholders framed HPV vaccination as a personal—rather than a public—matter, despite the absence of a controversy over mandatory immunization as was the case in the United States. Our findings suggest an erosion of the persuasiveness of public good arguments around collective immunization programs in the policy discourse. PMID:21852642

  4. Nursing care and treatment of the patient with human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Peate, Ian

    Human papillomavirus is a common and highly contagious virus that causes genital warts, which are not only unsightly, but the treatment may also be complex and the results of such treatment variable. For the patient this may result in physical and psychological trauma. Over 100 genotypes of the virus have been identified and a number of these can result in benign tumours of the skin and mucosa. Others however, are associated with intraepithelial neoplaisa of the vulva, cervix, penis and anus and squamous cell carcinoma. The nurse can provide the patient with the physical and psychological support the patient needs only if he/she has insight and understanding regarding the infection, its natural history, the diagnosis and subsequent management. Care should be provided in a non-judgmental manner, with respect and empathy.

  5. Human papillomaviruses: shared and distinct pathways for pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Galloway, Denise A.; Laimins, Laimonis A.

    2015-01-01

    Over 200 types of human papillomaviruses (HPV) have been identified that infect epithelial cells at different anatomic locations. HPVs are grouped into five genra with the alpha and beta viruses being the most commonly studied. Members of the alpha HPV genus infect genital epithelia and are the causative agents of many anogenital cancers. Beta HPVs infect cutaneous epithelia and have been suggested as co-factors in the development of non-melanoma skin cancers. Recent studies have shown that activation of DNA damage pathways is important for the productive life cycle of the alpha HPVs while the beta viruses suppress their activation. These differences likely contribute to the varying types of lesions and malignancies that are associated with these viruses. PMID:26398222

  6. Young Hispanic Men and Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Choices.

    PubMed

    Thomas, Tami L; Stephens, Dionne P; Johnson-Mallard, Versie; Higgins, Melinda

    2016-03-01

    This exploratory descriptive study examined perceived vulnerabilities to human papillomavirus (HPV) and the correlation to factors influencing vaccine beliefs and vaccine decision making in young Hispanic males attending a large public urban university. Only 24% of participants believed that the HPV vaccine could prevent future problems, and 53% said they would not be vaccinated. The best predictors of HPV vaccination in young Hispanic men were agreement with doctor recommendations and belief in the vaccine's efficacy. Machismo cultural norms influence young Hispanic men's HPV-related decision making, their perceptions of the vaccine, and how they attitudinally act on what little HPV information they have access to. This study provides culturally relevant information for the development of targeted health education strategies aimed at increasing HPV vaccination in young Hispanic men.

  7. The Spanish human papillomavirus vaccine consensus group: a working model.

    PubMed

    Cortés-Bordoy, Javier; Martinón-Torres, Federico

    2010-08-01

    Successful implementation of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine in each country can only be achieved from a complementary and synergistic perspective, integrating all the different points of view of the diverse related professionals. It is this context where the Spanish HPV Vaccine Consensus Group (Grupo Español de Consenso sobre la Vacuna VPH, GEC-VPH) was created. GEC-VPH philosophy, objectives and experience are reported in this article, with particular attention to the management of negative publicity and anti-vaccine groups. Initiatives as GEC-VPH--adapted to each country's particular idiosyncrasies--might help to overcome the existing barriers and to achieve wide and early implementation of HPV vaccination.

  8. Human papillomaviruses: shared and distinct pathways for pathogenesis.

    PubMed

    Galloway, Denise A; Laimins, Laimonis A

    2015-10-01

    Over 200 types of human papillomaviruses (HPV) have been identified that infect epithelial cells at different anatomic locations. HPVs are grouped into five genera with the alpha and beta viruses being the most commonly studied. Members of the alpha HPV genus infect genital epithelia and are the causative agents of many anogenital cancers. Beta HPVs infect cutaneous epithelia and have been suggested as co-factors in the development of non-melanoma skin cancers. Recent studies have shown that activation of DNA damage pathways is important for the productive life cycle of the alpha HPVs while the beta viruses suppress their activation. These differences likely contribute to the varying types of lesions and malignancies that are associated with these viruses.

  9. Human papillomaviruses: research priorities for the next decade.

    PubMed

    Langsfeld, Erika; Laimins, Laimonis A

    2016-05-01

    Human papillomaviruses are the causative agents of cervical, anal as well as many oropharyngeal cancers. While prophylactic vaccines have been developed, uptake is low in the US and other Western countries, and access is limited in less developed countries. A number of areas are emerging as critical for future study. These include investigation of the mechanisms regulating infection and progression to cancer at both cervical and oropharyngeal sites as these appear to be distinct. HPV-induced cancers also may be susceptible to immune therapy, revealing opportunities for treating advanced cervical disease and reducing the morbidity of treatments for oropharyngeal cancers. We believe these areas are critical focal points for HPV cancer research in the next decade.

  10. Patient-provider communication and human papillomavirus vaccine acceptance.

    PubMed

    Rand, Cynthia M; Schaffer, Stanley J; Humiston, Sharon G; Albertin, Christina S; Shone, Laura P; Heintz, Eric V; Blumkin, Aaron K; Stokley, Shannon; Szilagyi, Peter G

    2011-02-01

    The authors performed telephone interviews of parents of adolescents (n = 430) and their older adolescents (n = 208) in Monroe County, New York to measure parent and adolescent acceptance of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, its association with ratings of provider communication, and vaccine-related topics discussed with the adolescent's provider. More than half of adolescent girls had already received an HPV vaccination, with fewer than one quarter refusing. Parent and teen ratings of provider communication was high, and not related to HPV vaccine refusal. Parents were more likely to refuse if they were Hispanic (odds ratio [OR] = 5.88, P = .05) or did not consider vaccines "very safe" (OR = 2.76, P = .04). Most parents of boys (85%) believed males should be given HPV vaccine if recommended. Few parents and teens recalled discussing that vaccination does not preclude future Pap smear testing. Providers should address cultural and vaccine safety concerns in discussions about HPV vaccine.

  11. Malakoplakia of the esophagus caused by human papillomavirus infection.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ya-Li; Xie, Yu-Cheng; Li, Xiao-Ling; Guo, Jing; Sun, Tao; Tang, Jing

    2012-12-07

    Malakoplakia is a rare granulomatous disease probably caused by infection and characterized histologically by Michaelis-Gutmann bodies. We report a more rarely seen case esophageal malakoplakia in a 54-year-old woman. She presented with coughing while eating and drinking. Gastroscopy showed yellow nodules in the esophagus, and endoscopic ultrasonography showed a space-occupying lesion in the substratum of the esophageal mucosa. All findings highly resembled esophageal cancer. Histopathological examination finally indentified this space-occupying lesion as malakoplakia and not cancer. Immunohistochemistry showed that she had human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in the esophagus, which indicates that infection was responsible for the malakoplakia. This is believed to be the first case of malakoplakia in the esophagus, and more importantly, we established that HPV infection was the initiator of esophageal malakoplakia.

  12. The case for vaccinating boys against human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Hull, Sarah C; Caplan, Arthur L

    2009-01-01

    Vaccination policy in the case of human papillomavirus (HPV) has remained a constant source of controversy ever since Gardasil, Merck's vaccine against HPV, received US Food and Drug Administration approval in the summer of 2006. This controversy has centered on the risks and benefits of vaccinating girls and women in rich and poor nations alike. However, despite all of the attention created by this important policy question, relatively little has been focused on another key public health question: should boys be vaccinated against HPV as well? If herd immunity against the most carcinogenic strains of HPV could be more rapidly and efficiently achieved by vaccinating everyone at risk for being a carrier, it logically follows that vaccine policy should expand to include boys and men.

  13. Model systems to study the life cycle of human papillomaviruses and HPV-associated cancers.

    PubMed

    Chow, Louise T

    2015-04-01

    The prevalent human papillomaviruses (HPVs) infect either cutaneous or mucosal epithelium. Active Infections lead to epithelial hyperprolifeation and are usually cleared in healthy individuals within a year. Persistent infections in the anogenital tracts by certain high-risk genotypes such as HPV-16, HPV-18 and closely related types, can progress to high grade dysplasias and carcinomas in women and men, including cervical, vulva, penile and anal cancers. A significant fraction of the head and neck cancers are also caused by HPV-16. The viral oncogenes responsible for neoplastic conversion are E6 and E7 that disrupt the pathways controlled by the two major tumor suppressor genes, p53 and members of pRB family. Because HPV cannot be propagated in conventional submerged monolayer cell cultures, organotypic epithelial raft cultures that generate a stratified and differentiated epithelium have been used to study the viral life cycle. This article describes several systems to examine aspects of the viral productive phase, along with the advantages and limitations. Animal model systems of HPV carcinogenesis are also briefly described.

  14. Ensembled support vector machines for human papillomavirus risk type prediction from protein secondary structures.

    PubMed

    Kim, Sun; Kim, Jeongmi; Zhang, Byoung-Tak

    2009-02-01

    Infection by the human papillomavirus (HPV) is regarded as the major risk factor in the development of cervical cancer. Detection of high-risk HPV is important for understanding its oncogenic mechanisms and for developing novel clinical tools for its diagnosis, treatment, and prevention. Several methods are available to predict the risk types for HPV protein sequences. Nevertheless, no tools can achieve a universally good performance for all domains, including HPV and nor do they provide confidence levels for their decisions. Here, we describe ensembled support vector machines (SVMs) to classify HPV risk types, which assign given proteins into high-, possibly high-, or low-risk type based on their confidence level. Our approach uses protein secondary structures to obtain the differential contribution of subsequences for the risk type, and SVM classifiers are combined with a simple but efficient string kernel to handle HPV protein sequences. In the experiments, we compare our approach with previous methods in accuracy and F1-score, and present the predictions for unknown HPV types, which provides promising results.

  15. Association of human papillomavirus type 16 and its genetic variants with cervical lesion in Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong Su; Shin, Sue; Kim, Eui-Chong; Kim, Ji Eun; Kim, Yong Beom; Oh, Sohee; Roh, Eun Youn; Yoon, Jong Hyun

    2016-11-01

    Persistent human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) is the major risk factor for cervical cancer. HPV16 intratypic variants differ in their geographical distribution and oncogenic potential. This study aimed to analyze the distribution of HPV16 variants and their association with cervical lesion histopathology in Korean women. In total, 133 HPV16-positive cervical samples from women admitted to Seoul National University Boramae Hospital were analyzed by sequencing E6, E7, and L1 genes and the long control region (LCR), and the variant distribution according to cervical lesion grade was determined. Isolates were grouped into a phylogenetic lineage, and A1-3, A4, C, and D sublineages were detected in 54.1, 37.8, 0.7, and 7.4% of samples, respectively. The most commonly observed LCR variations were 7521G>A (91.5%), 7730A>C (59.6%), and 7842G>A (59.6%). Furthermore, A4 or D sublineage-positive women had a higher risk for cervical cancer than women who were positive for A1-3. Among HPV phylogenetic clusters, A1-3 was the predominant sublineage, and within A1-3, the 350G polymorphism was highly frequent. These results differed from those of previous studies in Korea and other Asian countries. The findings suggest that cervical neoplasia incidence in HPV16-infected patients could be affected by the distribution of HPV16 variants in the population.

  16. Analysis of Sequence Variation and Risk Association of Human Papillomavirus 52 Variants Circulating in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Youn Jin; Ki, Eun Young; Zhang, Chuqing; Ho, Wendy C. S.; Lee, Sung-Jong; Jeong, Min Jin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Human papillomavirus (HPV) 52 is a carcinogenic, high-risk genotype frequently detected in cervical cancer cases from East Asia, including Korea. Materials and Methods Sequences of HPV52 detected in 91 cervical samples collected from women attending Seoul St. Mary’s Hospital were analyzed. HPV52 genomic sequences were obtained by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based sequencing and analyzed using Seq-Scape software, and phylogenetic trees were constructed using MEGA6 software. Results Of the 91 cervical samples, 40 were normal, 22 were low-grade lesions, 21 were high-grade lesions and 7 were squamous cell carcinomas. Four HPV52 variant lineages (A, B, C and D) were identified. Lineage B was the most frequently detected lineage, followed by lineage C. By analyzing the two most frequently detected lineages (B and C), we found that distinct variations existed in each lineage. We also found that a lineage B-specific mutation K93R (A379G) was associated with an increased risk of cervical neoplasia. Conclusions To our knowledge, we are the first to reveal the predominance of the HPV52 lineages, B and C, in Korea. We also found these lineages harbored distinct genetic alterations that may affect oncogenicity. Our findings increase our understanding on the heterogeneity of HPV52 variants, and may be useful for the development of new diagnostic assays and therapeutic vaccines. PMID:27977741

  17. Knowledge, attitude and practice of malaysian medical and pharmacy students towards human papillomavirus vaccination.

    PubMed

    Rashwan, Hesham H; Saat, Nur Zakiah N Mohd; Abd Manan, Dahlia Nadira

    2012-01-01

    Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection is one of the most common sexually transmitted infections and oncogenic HPV is the main cause of cervical cancer. However, HPV vaccination is already available as the primary preventive method against cervical cancer. The objective of this study was to determine the level of knowledge, attitude and practice of HPV vaccination among Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia (UKM) and Universiti Malaya (UM) students. This study was conducted from March until August 2009. Pre-tested and validated questionnaires were filled by the third year UKM (n=156) and UM (n=149) students from medical, dentistry and pharmacy faculties. The results showed that the overall level of knowledge on HPV infection, cervical cancer and its prevention among respondents was high and the majority of them had positive attitude towards HPV vaccination. Medical students had the highest level of knowledge (p<0.05). Very few students (3.6%) had already taken the vaccine with no significant difference between the two Universities (p=0.399). In conclusion, the knowledge and attitude of the respondents were high and positive, respectively. Only few students took HPV vaccination. Thus, more awareness campaigns and HPV vaccination services should be provided at universities' campuses with the price of the HPV vaccine reduced for the students.

  18. A low density microarray method for the identification of human papillomavirus type 18 variants.

    PubMed

    Meza-Menchaca, Thuluz; Williams, John; Rodríguez-Estrada, Rocío B; García-Bravo, Aracely; Ramos-Ligonio, Ángel; López-Monteon, Aracely; Zepeda, Rossana C

    2013-09-26

    We describe a novel microarray based-method for the screening of oncogenic human papillomavirus 18 (HPV-18) molecular variants. Due to the fact that sequencing methodology may underestimate samples containing more than one variant we designed a specific and sensitive stacking DNA hybridization assay. This technology can be used to discriminate between three possible phylogenetic branches of HPV-18. Probes were attached covalently on glass slides and hybridized with single-stranded DNA targets. Prior to hybridization with the probes, the target strands were pre-annealed with the three auxiliary contiguous oligonucleotides flanking the target sequences. Screening HPV-18 positive cell lines and cervical samples were used to evaluate the performance of this HPV DNA microarray. Our results demonstrate that the HPV-18's variants hybridized specifically to probes, with no detection of unspecific signals. Specific probes successfully reveal detectable point mutations in these variants. The present DNA oligoarray system can be used as a reliable, sensitive and specific method for HPV-18 variant screening. Furthermore, this simple assay allows the use of inexpensive equipment, making it accessible in resource-poor settings.

  19. A Low Density Microarray Method for the Identification of Human Papillomavirus Type 18 Variants

    PubMed Central

    Meza-Menchaca, Thuluz; Williams, John; Rodríguez-Estrada, Rocío B.; García-Bravo, Aracely; Ramos-Ligonio, Ángel; López-Monteon, Aracely; Zepeda, Rossana C.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a novel microarray based-method for the screening of oncogenic human papillomavirus 18 (HPV-18) molecular variants. Due to the fact that sequencing methodology may underestimate samples containing more than one variant we designed a specific and sensitive stacking DNA hybridization assay. This technology can be used to discriminate between three possible phylogenetic branches of HPV-18. Probes were attached covalently on glass slides and hybridized with single-stranded DNA targets. Prior to hybridization with the probes, the target strands were pre-annealed with the three auxiliary contiguous oligonucleotides flanking the target sequences. Screening HPV-18 positive cell lines and cervical samples were used to evaluate the performance of this HPV DNA microarray. Our results demonstrate that the HPV-18's variants hybridized specifically to probes, with no detection of unspecific signals. Specific probes successfully reveal detectable point mutations in these variants. The present DNA oligoarray system can be used as a reliable, sensitive and specific method for HPV-18 variant screening. Furthermore, this simple assay allows the use of inexpensive equipment, making it accessible in resource-poor settings. PMID:24077317

  20. Translational Mini-Review Series on Vaccines: Monitoring of human papillomavirus vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Dillner, J; Arbyn, M; Dillner, L

    2007-01-01

    ARTICLES PUBLISHED IN THIS MINI-REVIEW SERIES ON VACCINES Peptide vaccines for myeloid leukaemias. Clin Exp Immunol 2007; 148: doi:10.1111/j.1365-2249.2007.03383.x The Edward Jenner Museum and the history of vaccination. Clin Exp Immunol 2007; 147: doi:10.1111/j.1365-2249.2007.03304.x Dendritic cell-based vaccines in renal cancer. Clin Exp Immunol 2007; 147: doi:10.1111/j.1365-2249.2007.03305.xDevelopment and evaluation of improved vaccines against tuberculosis. Clin Exp Immunol 2007; 147: doi:10.1111/j.1365-2249.2007.03306.x Persistent infection with oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) is a necessary cause of cervical cancer. Moreover, HPV type 16 (and to a lesser degree HPV type 18) is linked with more rare cancers, namely cancer of the vulva, vagina, penis, anus, oropharynx and larynx. Effective prophylactic vaccines have been developed. In this review, we briefly address immunological aspects of HPV infection and the results of HPV vaccination trials. Internationally standardized monitoring and evaluation of prophylactic HPV vaccination programmes will be essential for arriving at the most (cost-)effective strategies for cancer control. PMID:17437418

  1. Activation of miR-9 by human papillomavirus in cervical cancer.

    PubMed

    Liu, Weijun; Gao, Ge; Hu, Xiaoxia; Wang, Yuhui; Schwarz, Julie K; Chen, Jason J; Grigsby, Perry W; Wang, Xiaowei

    2014-11-30

    Cervical cancer is the third most common cancer in women worldwide, leading to about 300,000 deaths each year. Most cervical cancers are caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. However, persistent transcriptional activity of HPV oncogenes, which indicates active roles of HPV in cervical cancer maintenance and progression, has not been well characterized. Using our recently developed assays for comprehensive profiling of HPV E6/E7 transcripts, we have detected transcriptional activities of 10 high-risk HPV strains from 87 of the 101 cervical tumors included in the analysis. These HPV-positive patients had significantly better survival outcome compared with HPV-negative patients, indicating HPV transcriptional activity as a favorable prognostic marker for cervical cancer. Furthermore, we have determined microRNA (miRNA) expression changes that were correlated with tumor HPV status. Our profiling and functional analyses identified miR-9 as the most activated miRNA by HPV E6 in a p53-independent manner. Further target validation and functional studies showed that HPV-induced miR-9 activation led to significantly increased cell motility by downregulating multiple gene targets involved in cell migration. Thus, our work helps to understand the molecular mechanisms as well as identify potential therapeutic targets for cervical cancer and other HPV-induced cancers.

  2. HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Gardasil® Vaccine - what you need to know

    MedlinePlus

    ... is taken in its entirety from the CDC HPV (Human Papillomavirus) Vaccine - Gardasil® Vaccine Information Statement (VIS): www.cdc.gov/vaccines/hcp/vis/vis-statements/hpv-gardasil.html . CDC review information for HPV Gardasil® ...

  3. Home-Based or Clinic-Based Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Screening

    ClinicalTrials.gov

    2017-01-23

    Atypical Squamous Cell of Undetermined Significance; Cervical Carcinoma; Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia Grade 2/3; Health Status Unknown; Human Papillomavirus Infection; Low Grade Cervical Squamous Intraepithelial Neoplasia; Stage 0 Cervical Cancer

  4. Detection of Human Papillomavirus in Korean Breast Cancer Patients by Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction and Meta-Analysis of Human Papillomavirus and Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Jinhyuk; Kim, Chungyeul; Lee, Hye Seung; Choi, Yoo Jin; Kim, Ha Yeon; Lee, Jinhwan; Chang, Hyeyoon; Kim, Aeree

    2016-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a well-established oncogenic virus of cervical, anogenital, and oropharyngeal cancer. Various subtypes of HPV have been detected in 0% to 60% of breast cancers. The roles of HPV in the carcinogenesis of breast cancer remain controversial. This study was performed to determine the prevalence of HPV-positive breast cancer in Korean patients and to evaluate the possibility of carcinogenic effect of HPV on breast. Methods Meta-analysis was performed in 22 case-control studies for HPV infection in breast cancer. A total of 123 breast cancers, nine intraductal papillomas and 13 nipple tissues of patients with proven cervical HPV infection were tested by real-time polymerase chain reaction to detect 28 subtypes of HPV. Breast cancers were composed of 106 formalin-fixed and paraffin embedded (FFPE) breast cancer samples and 17 touch imprint cytology samples of breast cancers. Results The overall odds ratio between breast cancer and HPV infection was 5.43 (95% confidence interval, 3.24 to 9.12) with I2 = 34.5% in meta-analysis of published studies with case-control setting and it was statistically significant. HPV was detected in 22 cases of breast cancers (17.9%) and two cases of intaductal papillomas (22.2%). However, these cases had weak positivity. Conclusions These results failed to serve as significant evidence to support the relationship between HPV and breast cancer. Further study with larger epidemiologic population is merited to determine the relationship between HPV and breast cancer. PMID:27725620

  5. A comparison of clinically utilized human papillomavirus detection methods in head and neck cancer

    PubMed Central

    Schlecht, Nicolas F.; Brandwein-Gensler, Margaret; Nuovo, Gerard J.; Li, Maomi; Dunne, Anne; Kawachi, Nicole; Smith, Richard V.; Burk, Robert D.; Prystowsky, Michael B.

    2011-01-01

    Detection of human papillomavirus in head and neck cancer has therapeutic implications. In-situ hybridization and immuno-histochemistry for p16 are used by surgical pathologists. We compared the sensitivity and specificity of three popular commercial tests for human papillomavirus detection in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas to a “gold standard” human papillomavirus PCR assay. One hundred-and-ten prospectively collected, formalin fixed tumor specimens were compiled onto tissue microarrays and tested for human papillomavirus DNA by in-situ hybridization with two probe sets: a biotinylated probe for high-risk human papillomavirus types 16/18 (Dako, CA), and a probe cocktail for 16/18 plus 10 additional high-risk types (Ventana, AZ). P16INK4 expression was also assessed using a Pharmingen immuno-histochemistry antibody (BD Biosciences, CA). Tissue microarrays were stained and scored at expert laboratories. Human papillomavirus DNA was detected by MY09/11-PCR using Gold AmpliTaq and dot-blot hybridization on matched fresh frozen specimens in a research laboratory. Human papillomavirus 16 E6 and E7-RNA expression was also measured using RT-PCR. Test performance was assessed by receiver operating characteristic analysis. High-risk human papillomavirus DNA types 16, 18 and 35 were detected by MY-PCR in 28% of tumors, with the majority (97%) testing positive for type 16. Compared to MY-PCR, the sensitivity and specificity for high-risk human papillomavirus DNA detection with Dako in-situ hybridization was 21% (95%CI:7–42) and 100% (95%CI:93–100), respectively. Corresponding test results by Ventana in-situ hybridization were 59% (95%CI:39–78) and 58% (95%CI:45–71), respectively. P16 immuno-histochemistry performed better overall than Dako (p=0.042) and Ventana (p=0.055), with a sensitivity of 52% (95%CI:32–71) and specificity of 93% (95%CI:84–98). Compared to a gold standard human papillomavirus PCR assays, HPV detection by in-situ hybridization was

  6. A multimodal approach to improving human papillomavirus vaccination in a community pharmacy setting

    PubMed Central

    Hohmeier, Kenneth C; Randolph, Donna D; Smith, Cindy Taliaferro; Hagemann, Tracy M

    2016-01-01

    Background: Community pharmacy has become a major access point for several types of vaccinations. Despite the success of vaccination programs like influenza, pneumococcal, and herpes zoster, the rates of human papillomavirus vaccination continue to lag. Objectives: The primary objective is to describe and report on the impact of a multimodal series of pharmacist-led educational interventions on human papillomavirus vaccination rates in a community pharmacy setting. The primary outcome of this study was change in pharmacist-delivered human papillomavirus vaccination throughout a corresponding 8-week period in 2014 and 2015. Methods: A single-center, quasi-experimental interrupted time series mixed-methods pilot study was used to investigate a pharmacist-led, multimodal educational intervention approach to improve human papillomavirus vaccination rates in the community. Results: During the 2014 control period, there were no human papillomavirus vaccines dispensed or administered according to the internal prescription dispensing software. In 2015, a total of 10 patients indicated that they were vaccinated, with 9 patients receiving their first dose and 1 patient receiving his or her second dose at the pharmacy. Pharmacist recommendation was the most reported education method for increasing patient awareness of the human papillomavirus vaccine (n = 10). Conclusion: This study demonstrates pharmacist designed, educational interventions may impact human papillomavirus vaccination rates in the community. Further community-based research with larger sample sizes is warranted to verify these results. Due to the unique barriers to human papillomavirus vaccination, a multimodal and inter-professional approach such as the one presented here is warranted. PMID:28348735

  7. Laboratory production in vivo of infectious human papillomavirus type 11

    SciTech Connect

    Kreider, J.W.; Howett, M.K.; Leure-Dupree, A.E.; Zaino, R.J.; Weber, J.A.

    1987-02-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) induce among patients natural lesions which produce small amounts of virus. Infection of human cell cultures does not lead to the multiplication of virus, which also does not replicate in experimental animals. The authors have developed a unique system for the laboratory production of HPV type 11 (HPV-11). Fragments of human neonatal foreskin were infected with an extract of naturally occurring human vulvar condylomata and grafted beneath the renal capsule of athymic mice. Later (3 to 5 months), condylomatous cysts developed from those grafts. Nuclei of koilocytotic cells contained large amounts of capsid antigen and intranuclear virions. The experimentally induced condylomata were homogenized, and the virions were extracted and used to infect another generation of human foreskin grafts in athymic mice. The HPV-11 DNA content and infectivity of the natural and experimental condylomata were similar. Extracts of experimental condylomata were subjected to differential ultracentrifugation and sedimentation in CsCl density gradients. A single, opalescent band was visible at a density of 1.34 g/ml. It contained HPV virions with HPV-11 DNA. This report is the first demonstration of the laboratory production of an HPV.

  8. Tumorigenic transformation of murine keratinocytes by the E5 genes of bovine papillomavirus type 1 and human papillomavirus type 16.

    PubMed Central

    Leptak, C; Ramon y Cajal, S; Kulke, R; Horwitz, B H; Riese, D J; Dotto, G P; DiMaio, D

    1991-01-01

    To examine the biological properties of the bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV) and human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) E5 genes, each was cloned separately into a retroviral expression vector and helper-free recombinant viruses were generated in packaging cell lines. The BPV E5 retroviruses efficiently caused morphologic and tumorigenic transformation of cultured lines of murine fibroblasts, whereas the HPV16 E5 viruses were inactive in these assays. In contrast, infection of the p117 established line of murine epidermal keratinocytes with either the BPV or the HPV16 E5 retrovirus resulted in the generation of tumorigenic cells. Pam212 murine keratinocytes were also transformed to tumorigenicity by the HPV16 E5 gene but not by the gene carrying a frameshift mutation. These results establish that the HPV16 E5 gene is a transforming gene in cells related to its normal host epithelial cells. Images PMID:1658398

  9. Transforming properties of Felis catus papillomavirus type 2 E6 and E7 putative oncogenes in vitro and their transcriptional activity in feline squamous cell carcinoma in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Altamura, Gennaro; Corteggio, Annunziata; Pacini, Laura; Conte, Andrea; Pierantoni, Giovanna Maria; Tommasino, Massimo; Accardi, Rosita; Borzacchiello, Giuseppe

    2016-09-15

    Felis catus papillomavirus type 2 (FcaPV2) DNA is found in feline cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs); however, its biological properties are still uncharacterized. In this study, we successfully expressed FcaPV2 E6 and E7 putative oncogenes in feline epithelial cells and demonstrated that FcaPV2 E6 binds to p53, impairing its protein level. In addition, E6 and E7 inhibited ultraviolet B (UVB)-triggered accumulation of p53, p21 and pro-apoptotic markers such as Cleaved Caspase3, Bax and Bak, suggesting a synergistic action of the virus with UV exposure in tumour pathogenesis. Furthermore, FcaPV2 E7 bound to feline pRb and impaired pRb levels, resulting in upregulation of the downstream pro-proliferative genes Cyclin A and Cdc2. Importantly, we demonstrated mRNA expression of FcaPV2 E2, E6 and E7 in feline SCC samples, strengthening the hypothesis of a causative role in the development of feline SCC. - Highlights: • FcaPV2 E6 binds to and deregulates feline p53 protein. • FcaPV2 E7 binds to and deregulates feline pRb protein. • FcaPV2 oncogenes inhibit UVB-induced apoptosis. • FcaPV2 E6E7 and E7 increase the lifespan of primary cells. • FcaPV2 E2, E6 and E7 are expressed at the mRNA level in feline SCC in vivo.

  10. Cloning of monomeric human papillomavirus type 16 DNA integrated within cell DNA from a cervical carcinoma

    SciTech Connect

    Matsukura, T.; Kanda, T.; Furuno, A.; Yoshikawa, H.; Kawana, T.; Yoshiike, K.

    1986-06-01

    The authors have molecularly cloned and characterized monomeric human papillomavirus type 16 DNA with flanking cell DNA sequences from a cervical carcinoma. Determination of nucleotide sequence around the junctions of human papillomavirus and cell DNAs revealed that at the site of integration within cell DNA the cloned viral DNA had a deletion between nucleotides 1284 and 4471 (numbering system from K. Seedorf, G. Kraemmer, M. Duerst, S. Suhai, and W.G. Roewkamp), which includes the greater part of E1 gene and the entire E2 gene. In the remaining part of the E1 gene, three guanines were found at the location where two guanines at nucleotides 1137 and 1138 have been recorded. This additional guanine shifted the reading frame and erased an interruption in the E1 gene. The data strongly suggest that, like other papillomaviruses, human papillomavirus type 16 has an uninterrupted E1 gene.

  11. Involvement of human papillomavirus infections in prostate cancer progression.

    PubMed

    Al Moustafa, Ala-Eddin

    2008-08-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are sexually transmitted and have been associated with several human carcinomas especially cervical and colorectal. On the other hand, a small number of studies have examined the presence of high-risk HPV in human prostate cancer tissues. Currently, the presence and role of high-risk HPV infections in prostate carcinogenesis remain unclear because of the limited number of investigations. This raises the question whether high-risk HPV infections play any role in human prostate cancer development. However, other investigators and our group were able to immortalize normal and cancer prostate epithelial cells in vitro by E6/E7 of HPV type 16. In this paper, we propose the hypothesis that normal and cancer prostate epithelial cells are susceptible to persistent HPV infections; therefore, high-risk HPV infections play an important role in the progression of prostate cancer. We believe that an international collaboration of epidemiological studies and more molecular biology investigations are necessary to answer these important questions.

  12. Human papillomavirus alters microRNA profiles in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Wald, Abigail I.; Hoskins, Elizabeth E.; Wells, Susanne I.; Ferris, Robert L.; Khan, Saleem A.

    2010-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) positive cases of squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck (SCCHN) have a much better disease outcome compared to SCCHN cases lacking HPVs. Differences in microRNA (miRNA) expression may affect their clinical outcomes. Methods miRNA expression was studied using microarrays and quantitative RT-PCR in HPV-16 positive and HPV-negative SCCHN cell lines. The role of HPV-16 E6 and E7 oncogenes in altering miRNA expression was investigated using human foreskin keratinocytes (HFKs). Results MiRNAs miR-363, miR-33 and miR-497 were upregulated while miR-155, miR-181a, miR-181b, miR-29a, miR-218, miR-222, miR-221 and miR-142-5p were downregulated in HPV-positive cells compared to both HPV-negative SCCHN and normal oral keratinocytes. HPV-16 E6 oncogene altered miRNA expression in HFKs and in an HPV-16 positive cell line with E6 knockdown using siRNA. Conclusions MiRNAs differentially expressed in the presence of HPV-16 may provide biomarkers for SCCHN and identify cellular pathways targeted by this virus. PMID:20652977

  13. Cancerl cells 5. Papillomaviruses

    SciTech Connect

    Steinberg, B.M.; Brandsma, J.L. ); Taichman, L.B. )

    1987-01-01

    This book contains over 30 selections. Some of the titles are: Elements that Control the Transcription of Genital Human Papillomavirus Type 18; Human Paillomavirus Gene Expression; RNA Probes to Analyze Human Papillomavirus Gene Expression in Squamous Papilloma of the Respiratory Tract; Expression of Human Papillomavirus Type-1 E4 Gene Products in Warts; and Underreplication of Human Papillomavirus Type-1 DNA in Cultures of Foreskin Keratinocytes.

  14. Human papillomavirus capsids preferentially bind and infect tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Kines, Rhonda C.; Cerio, Rebecca J.; Roberts, Jeffrey N.; Thompson, Cynthia D.; de Los Pinos, Elisabet; Lowy, Douglas R.; Schiller, John T.

    2015-01-01

    We previously determined that human papillomavirus (HPV) virus-like particles (VLPs) and pseudovirions (PsV) did not, respectively, bind to or infect intact epithelium of the cervicovaginal tract. However, they strongly bound heparin sulfate proteoglycans (HSPG) on the basement membrane of disrupted epithelium and infected the keratinocytes that subsequently entered the disrupted site. We here report that HPV capsids (VLP and PsV) have the same restricted tropism for a wide variety of disrupted epithelial and mesothelial tissues, whereas intact tissues remain resistant to binding. However, the HPV capsids directly bind and infect most tumor-derived cell lines in vitro and have analogous tumor-specific properties in vivo, after local or intravenous injection, using orthotopic models for human ovarian and lung cancer, respectively. The pseudovirions also specifically infected implanted primary human ovarian tumors. Heparin and ι-carrageenan blocked binding and infection of all tumor lines tested, implying that tumor cell binding is HSPG-dependent. A survey using a panel of modified heparins indicate that N-sulfation and, to a lesser degree O-6 sulfation of the surface HSPG on the tumors are important for HPV binding. Therefore, it appears that tumor cells consistently evolve HSPG modification patterns that mimic the pattern normally found on the basement membrane but not on the apical surfaces of normal epithelial or mesothelial cells. Consequently, appropriately modified HPV VLPs and/or PsV could be useful reagents to detect and potentially treat a remarkably broad spectrum of cancers. PMID:26317490

  15. The interaction between human papillomavirus and other viruses.

    PubMed

    Guidry, J T; Scott, R S

    2017-03-02

    The etiological role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in anogenital tract and head and neck cancers is well established. However, only a low percentage of HPV-positive women develop cancer, indicating that HPV is necessary but not sufficient in carcinogenesis. Several biological and environmental cofactors have been implicated in the development of HPV-associated carcinoma that include immune status, hormonal changes, parity, dietary habits, tobacco usage, and co-infection with other sexually transmissible agents. Such cofactors likely contribute to HPV persistent infection through diverse mechanisms related to immune control, efficiency of HPV infection, and influences on tumor initiation and progression. Conversely, HPV co-infection with other factors may also harbor anti-tumor effects. Here, we review epidemiological and experimental studies investigating human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), herpes simplex virus (HSV) 1 and 2, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), BK virus (BKV), JC virus (JCV), and adeno-associated virus (AAV) as viral cofactors in or therapeutic factors against the development of genital and oral HPV-associated carcinomas.

  16. The interrelation of HIV, cervical human papillomavirus, and neoplasia among antenatal clinic attenders in Tanzania

    PubMed Central

    Mayaud, P.; Gill, D.; Weiss, H.; Uledi, E.; Kopwe, L.; Todd, J.; ka-Gina, G.; Grosskurth, H.; Hayes, R.; Mabey, D. C.; Lacey, C.

    2001-01-01

    * Died April 2000 Objectives: To determine the prevalence and interrelation of cervical human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes, squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL), HIV, and other reproductive tract infections (RTIs) among urban antenatal clinic attenders in Mwanza, Tanzania. Methods: Genital swabs were collected from 660 pregnant women and tested for a range of RTIs and for cervical cytology. Cervical HPV-DNA was detected by PCR and genotyped. HIV and syphilis serologies were performed. Results: HPV prevalence was 34% (209/612 women). Of the 144 typeable samples, 83% were high risk (HR-HPV) oncogenic strains (56% HPV 16 related types). SIL was detected in 43 women (7%), with high grade SIL in 3%. There was a high prevalence of HIV (15%), and of any RTI (83%). Genital warts were detected in 20 women (3%). HPV infection was associated with some behavioural factors (short duration of relationship, single status, not using condoms) and gonorrhoea. There was no overall association between HPV and HIV (OR=1.02, 95% CI 0.6–1.6), but a non-significant trend towards a stronger association with HR-HPV in women aged 15–19 (OR=2.79, 95% CI 0.8–9.5) and women aged ≥30 (OR=3.20, 95% CI 0.7–15). SIL was associated with HPV (OR=3.66, 95% CI 1.9–7.0), but not significantly with HIV (OR=1.54, 95% CI 0.7–3.4). Prevalence of SIL was higher among women dually positive for HPV/HIV compared to HPV infection only (21% v 12%), although this difference was not statistically significant (p=0.17). Conclusions: HPV infection was highly prevalent in this young antenatal population. The association of HIV with HR-HPV types in older women may suggest that the principal HIV/HPV interaction in this population is for HIV to upregulate HPV persistence, leading to subsequent development of SIL. Key Words: human papillomavirus; squamous intraepithelial lesion; HIV/AIDS; Africa PMID:11463923

  17. Integration of human papillomavirus 18 DNA in esophageal carcinoma 109 cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Ke; Li, Jin-Tao; Li, Shu-Ying; Zhu, Li-Hua; Zhou, Ling; Zeng, Yi

    2011-01-01

    AIM: To detect human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA in esophageal carcinoma (EC) 109 cells and investigate the relationship between HPV and EC. METHODS: Genomic DNA and total RNA from EC109 cells were isolated. HPV DNA was detected by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) with the general primer sets of My09/11 and GP5 +/6 + for the HPV L1 gene and type-specific primer sets for HPV18 E6 and HPV18 E6-E7. Reverse transcription (RT) of mRNA isolated from EC109 cells was performed to produce a cDNA. And then a PCR-based protocol for the amplification of papillomavirus oncogene transcripts was used to analyze HPV18 DNA and integrated transcripts of HPV18 in the chromosomes of EC109 cells. The final nested PCR products were cloned into a pMD-18T vector and sequenced to analyze the chromosomal location of HPV integration. RESULTS: HPV18 DNA was detected in EC109 cells by PCR using the general primer sets of My09/11 and GP5 +/6 + for HPV L1 and the type-specific primer sets for HPV18 E6 and E6-E7 to generate products of 450 bp, 150 bp, 335 bp and 944 bp, respectively. Approximately 600 bp of integrated HPV18-specific transcript was identified. The final nested PCR product of integrated HPV18 DNA was cloned into a pMD-18T vector and sequenced to analyze the chromosomal location of HPV integration. Sequence alignment showed that the HPV18 sequence from EC109 cells was identical to that of the encoded early protein E7-E1 of the standard HPV18 strain X05015, and another partial gene sequence was identical to a partial sequence of human chromosome 8. CONCLUSION: Integration of the HPV genome into the host cell chromosome suggests that persistent HPV infection is vital for malignant cell transformation and carcinogenesis. PMID:22072858

  18. The role of human papillomavirus infection in prostate carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Aghakhani, Arezoo; Hamkar, Rasool; Parvin, Mahmoud; Ghavami, Nastaran; Nadri, Mahsa; Pakfetrat, Attesa; Banifazl, Mohammad; Eslamifar, Ali; Izadi, Nabiollah; Jam, Sara; Ramezani, Amitis

    2011-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are associated with benign and malignant lesions of the female and male anogenital tract. Currently the possible role of HPV infections in prostate carcinogenesis is a subject of great controversy. In this study we aimed to investigate the role of HPV infection in prostate carcinoma (PCa). The study included formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue samples of 104 primary prostate adenocarcinoma cases and 104 control tissues of benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH). HPV-DNA was purified and amplified through MY09/MY11 and GP5(+)/GP6(+) primers and subsequently subjected to sequencing. HPV-DNA was found in 13 of 104 (12.5%) PCa and 8 of 104 (7.7%) BPH samples. High-risk HPVs were detected in 10 of 13 (76.9%) PCa and 5 of 8 (62.5%) BPH samples with positive HPV-DNA. Low-risk HPVs were detected in 3 of 13 (23.1%) PCa and 3 of 8 (37.5%) BPH specimens with positive HPV-DNA. There was no significant difference between PCa and BPH specimens regarding HPV-DNA presence or the detection of high-risk and low-risk types of HPV. Our data do not support the role of HPV infection in prostate carcinoma. Further studies are required to elucidate the role of HPV infection in human prostate carcinogenesis.

  19. [Human papillomavirus: a vaccine against cervical carcinoma uterine].

    PubMed

    Franceschi, Silvia

    2002-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been identified in fewer than 20 years as the central cause of cervical carcinoma and one of the most powerful known human carcinogens. At least 20 different types of HPV have been associated with relative risks of approximately 100 for both squamous-cell carcinoma and the rarer adenocarcinoma of the cervix uteri. Cytologic screening programs have contributed to the decline of cervical cancer mortality in Europe and the United States. Long-term screening programs remain, however, outside the reach of the poorest countries, where 80% of deaths for cervical carcinoma occurs. More than 20 different types of prophylactic and/or therapeutic vaccines against HPV are being evaluated in clinical or preclinical studies. One such type, a prophylactic vaccine based on the marked immunogenicity and safety of the empty viral capsid, will start being evaluated in 2002 in 3 phase-III randomized studies, mostly in the United States and Latin America. The International Agency for Research on Cancer and World Health Organization are planning, in parallel with the studies above, a double blind randomized phase IV study of approximately 40,000 adolescent and young women in Asia. Such study, which should include a cluster randomization (by village of birth); a comparison with another vaccine (rather than with placebo); and, possibly, the inclusion of adolescents and young adults of male sex. Such trial may accelerate by many years the availability of an anti-HPV vaccine among populations at highest risk for cervical carcinoma.

  20. Prevalence of human papillomavirus in university young women

    PubMed Central

    MONTALVO, MARIA T.; LOBATO, ISMELDA; VILLANUEVA, HILDA; BORQUEZ, CELIA; NAVARRETE, DANIELA; ABARCA, JUAN; CALAF, GLORIA M.

    2011-01-01

    Cervical cancer is the second most prevalent female cancer worldwide. The majority of cases appear between the age of 30 and 50. Human papillomavirus (HPV) plays a central role in cervical cancer with 99.7% of HPV DNA identified in invasive cervical carcinomas. The prevalence of the HPV infection varies substantially among countries and according to age and lifestyle. HPV is a common sexually transmitted infection among males and females with a 70% higher incidence in sexually active females. This study aimed to determine the prevalence of human papillomavirus in young university women by analyzing the correlation between Papanicolaou (PAP)-stained cervical tests and HPV detection by genotyping, as well as other risk factors. A total of 200 women aged between 18 and 25 years were enrolled in this study, which took place between September 2008 and May 2009 at the Universidad de Tarapacá, Arica, Chile. Results of the PAP smears showed that 97.5% of cells had normal characteristics, although an inflammatory pattern was noted. The prevalence of generic HPV infection was 3.5% when testing for HPV DNA using the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method. An analysis of the genotype of infected female individuals indicated that high-risk HPV types, such as HPV 16 and 31 were present in 42.84 and 14.29% of females, respectively, and low-risk types such as HPV 6, in 14.29%. Only one sample with differentiated non-HPV (14.29%) was found. A 95% correlation between PAP-stained cervical tests and the method of testing for HPV was observed. Using the PCR method, it was found that of the 195 negative PAP smears, 5 were positive for HPV and two of the samples that were positive for ASC-US were also positive. A significantly increased (P<0.05) HPV infection risk was observed in the 18–21 age group with a higher prevalence (71.40%) when compared to the 22–25 age group (28.6%). A significant (P<0.042) difference was found between smoking and HPV infection. In conclusion, a

  1. Animal papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Rector, Annabel; Van Ranst, Marc

    2013-10-01

    We provide an overview of the host range, taxonomic classification and genomic diversity of animal papillomaviruses. The complete genomes of 112 non-human papillomavirus types, recovered from 54 different host species, are currently available in GenBank. The recent characterizations of reptilian papillomaviruses extend the host range of the Papillomaviridae to include all amniotes. Although the genetically diverse papillomaviruses have a highly conserved genomic lay-out, deviations from this prototypic genome organization are observed in several animal papillomaviruses, and only the core ORFs E1, E2, L2 and L1 are present in all characterized papillomavirus genomes. The discovery of papilloma-polyoma hybrids BPCV1 and BPCV2, containing a papillomaviral late region but an early region encoding typical polyomaviral nonstructural proteins, and the detection of recombination breakpoints between the early and late coding regions of cetacean papillomaviruses, could indicate that early and late gene cassettes of papillomaviruses are relatively independent entities that can be interchanged by recombination.

  2. Evidence of association of human papillomavirus with prognosis worsening in glioblastoma multiforme

    PubMed Central

    Vidone, Michele; Alessandrini, Federica; Marucci, Gianluca; Farnedi, Anna; de Biase, Dario; Ricceri, Fulvio; Calabrese, Claudia; Kurelac, Ivana; Porcelli, Anna Maria; Cricca, Monica; Gasparre, Giuseppe

    2014-01-01

    Background Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) is the most malignant brain tumor in adults, but its etiology still remains unknown. Recently, a role of viruses such as cytomegalovirus and JC virus in gliomagenesis has been suggested. Since human papillomavirus (HPV) is considered the most common oncogenic virus in humans, we evaluated its occurrence in GBM samples. Material and Methods Fifty-two formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded primary glioblastoma specimens were retrospectively analyzed. The presence of HPV genome on tumor DNA was assessed by MY/GP nested PCR. Confirmation of HPV detection was obtained by chromogenic in situ hybridization (CISH) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) with an antibody directed against the L1 capsidic protein. Finally, univariate and multivariate proportional-hazards models were used to compare the risk of death among HPV-positive and HPV-negative patients. Results Strikingly, viral DNA was detected after PCR in 12 cases (23%). HPV16 genome was present in 25% infected samples, whereas the remaining samples tested positive for HPV6. CISH confirmed positivity in all infected samples for which enough material was available. Moreover, IHC positivity suggested that production of viral proteins from HPV genome is an ongoing process in GBM cancer cells. Finally an association between HPV infection and a worse prognosis was found in patients upon age stratification with a univariate analysis (HR, 2.10; 95% CI, 1.00–4.44; log-rank P = .045). Conclusions HPV infection status may be considered an independent prognostic factor in GBM patients and suggests that prevention may be considered, should HPV be recognized as a causative agent in gliomagenesis. PMID:24285549

  3. Trials and projects on cervical cancer and human papillomavirus prevention in sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Adefuye, Peter O; Broutet, Nathalie J; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Denny, Lynette A

    2013-12-29

    Cervical cancer is the leading cause of cancer morbidity and mortality in women in sub-Saharan Africa (SSA), accounting for about 50,000 deaths annually. Until recently, cytology was the gold standard for screening and prevention of cervical cancer. This method of screening has not been successful in SSA due to a lack of human, financial and material resources and poor health care infrastructure. It is estimated that less than 5% of at risk women have ever being screened. In the past two decades alternative approaches to cytology for cervical cancer screening have been evaluated in low- and medium-income countries. Visual inspection with acetic acid (VIA) and/or Lugol's iodine (VILI) have been shown to have adequate sensitivity, although low specificity, in a number of cross-sectional research and demonstration projects. Visual inspection methods require minimal resources, are technologically accessible, and are feasible for screening for precancerous lesions. Linking screening with VIA/VILI to treatment with cryotherapy may enable screening and treatment to take place in one visit, but this is likely to result in large numbers of women being subjected to unnecessary treatment. A number of studies have shown that cryotherapy is not associated with significant side effects or complications and is well tolerated. Creating the infrastructure for screening of older women is considered desirable, despite the limitations of visual inspection methods as screening tests. Understanding the role of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in the etiology of cervical cancer and the discovery of HPV rapid test kits, as well as the development of vaccines against the HPV oncogenic types, have created new opportunities for prevention of cervical cancer. Trials and projects have established (and are still ongoing) the feasibility of using these molecular tests for screening. The ultimate in prevention method is primary prevention, offered by the advent of prophylactic vaccines

  4. Different Modes of Human Papillomavirus DNA Replication during Maintenance

    PubMed Central

    Hoffmann, Ralf; Hirt, Bernhard; Bechtold, Viviane; Beard, Peter; Raj, Kenneth

    2006-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) begins its life cycle by infecting the basal cells of the epithelium. Within these proliferating cells, the viral genomes are replicated, maintained, and passed on to the daughter cells. Using HPV episome-containing cell lines that were derived from naturally infected cervical tissues, we investigated the mode by which the viral DNAs replicate in these cells. We observed that, whereas HPV16 DNA replicated in an ordered once-per-S-phase manner in W12 cells, HPV31 DNA replicated via a random-choice mechanism in CIN612 cells. However, when HPV16 and HPV31 DNAs were separately introduced into an alternate keratinocyte cell line NIKS, they both replicated randomly. This indicates that HPV DNA is inherently capable of replicating by either random-choice or once-per-S-phase mechanisms and that the mode of HPV DNA replication is dependent on the cells that harbor the viral episome. High expression of the viral replication protein E1 in W12 cells converted HPV16 DNA replication to random-choice replication and, as such, it appears that the mode of HPV DNA replication in proliferating cells is dependent on the presence or the increased level of this protein in the host cell. The implications of these observations on maintenance, latency, and persistence are discussed. PMID:16611903

  5. [Cervical infection epidemiology of human papillomavirus in Ushuaia, Argentina].

    PubMed

    Sijvarger, C C; González, J V; Prieto, A; Messmer, A G; Mallimaci, M C; Alonio, V L; Teyssié, A R; Picconi, M A

    2006-01-01

    Genital infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is decisive in the causation of cervical cancer. In order to evaluate the epidemiology of HPV infection in Ushuaia, Province of Tierra del Fuego, Argentina, 132 endocervical cytobrushes from preneoplastic and neoplastic cases and controls were studied. Detection and typing of the viral genome was performed by polymerase chain reaction, combined with a restriction fragment length polymorphism assay or hybridization. The overall prevalence of HPV infection was 41% in the population examined, with a frequency of 26% in the controls and 71% in the cases under study. The 14-24 age group showed the highest HPV prevalence. The most common viral types in the infected population were HPV 16 (23%), HPV 18 (11%), HPV 33 (8%) and HPV 35 (8%), while high risk viral types were detected in 30% of the samples, 16% of the controls and 60% of the cases. This study provides the first data on the predominant viral types in Ushuaia. Our results show lower levels of infection than in regions with a high incidence of cervical cancer, HPV 16 being the most prevalent viral type. This research may be useful for selecting a specific vaccine targeting the population examined.

  6. Human Papillomavirus Infectious Entry and Trafficking Is a Rapid Process

    PubMed Central

    Broniarczyk, Justyna; Massimi, Paola; Bergant, Martina

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Previous studies have indicated that human papillomavirus (HPV) infectious entry is slow, requiring many hours after initial infection for the virus to gain entry into the nucleus. However, intracellular transport pathways typically are very rapid, and in the context of a natural HPV infection in a wounded epithelium, such slow intracellular transport would seem to be at odds with a normal viral infection. Using synchronized cell populations, we show that HPV trafficking can be a rapid process. In cells that are infected in the late S-early G2/M phase of the cell cycle, HPV16 pseudovirion (PsV) reporter DNA gene expression is detectable by 8 h postinfection. Likewise, reporter DNA can be visualized within the nucleus in conjunction with PML nuclear bodies 1 h to 2 h postinfection in cells that are infected with PsVs just prior to mitotic entry. This demonstrates that endosomal trafficking of HPV is rapid, with mitosis being the main restriction on nuclear entry. IMPORTANCE HPV infectious entry appears to be slow and requires mitosis to occur before the incoming viral DNA can access the nucleus. In this study, we show that HPV trafficking in the cell actually is very rapid. This demonstrates that in the context of a normal virus infection, the cell cycle state will have a major influence on the time it takes for an incoming virus to enter the nucleus and initiate viral gene expression. PMID:26063434

  7. Human papillomavirus vaccination induces neutralising antibodies in oral mucosal fluids

    PubMed Central

    Handisurya, A; Schellenbacher, C; Haitel, A; Senger, T; Kirnbauer, R

    2016-01-01

    Background: Mucosal human papillomaviruses (HPV) are a major cause of cancers and papillomas of the anogenital and oropharyngeal tract. HPV-vaccination elicits neutralising antibodies in sera and cervicovaginal secretions and protects uninfected individuals from persistent anogenital infection and associated diseases caused by the vaccine-targeted HPV types. Whether immunisation can prevent oropharyngeal infection and diseases and whether neutralising antibodies represent the correlate of protection, is still unclear. Methods: We determined IgG and neutralising antibodies against low-risk HPV6 and high-risk HPV16/18 in sera and oral fluids from healthy females (n=20) before and after quadrivalent HPV-vaccination and compared the results with non-vaccinated controls. Results: HPV-vaccination induced type-specific antibodies in sera and oral fluids of the vaccinees. Importantly, the antibodies in oral fluids were capable of neutralising HPV pseudovirions in vitro, indicating protection from infection. The increased neutralising antibody levels against HPV16/18 in sera and oral fluids post-vaccination correlated significantly within an individual. Conclusions: We provide experimental proof that HPV-vaccination elicits neutralising antibodies to the vaccine-targeted types in oral fluids. Hence, immunisation may confer direct protection against type-specific HPV infection and associated diseases of the oropharyngeal tract. Measurement of antibodies in oral fluids represents a suitable tool to assess vaccine-induced protection within the mucosal milieu of the orophayrynx. PMID:26867163

  8. Laboratory and clinical aspects of human papillomavirus testing

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Paul K.S.; Picconi, María Alejandra; Cheung, Tak Hong; Giovannelli, Lucia; Park, Jong Sup

    2012-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is associated with a wide spectrum of disease that ranges from self-limited skin warts to life-threatening cancers. Since HPV plays a necessary etiological role in cervical cancer, it is logical to use HPV as a marker for early detection of cervical cancer and precancer. Recent advances in technology enable the development of high-throughput HPV assays of different formats, including DNA-based, mRNA-based, high-risk group-specific and type-specific methods. The ultimate goal of these assays is to improve the accuracy and cost-effiectiveness of cervical screening programs. HPV testing has several potential advantages compared to cytology-based screening. However, since the cancer to transient infection ratio is always low in the general population, HPV test results are bound to have a low positive predictive value that may subject women to unnecessary follow-up investigations. The wide-spread administration of prophylactic HPV vaccine will substantially decrease the incidence of cancer and precancer. This poses a number of challenges to cytology-based screening, and the role of HPV testing is expected to increase. Finally, apart from technical and cost-effiectiveness considerations, one should also keep in mind the psycho-social impact of using sexually-transmitted agents as a marker for cancer screening. PMID:22913405

  9. Human papillomavirus (HPV) genotyping of cutaneous warts in Greek children.

    PubMed

    Giannaki, Maria; Kakourou, Talia; Theodoridou, Maria; Syriopoulou, Vassiliki; Kabouris, Marios; Louizou, Eirini; Chrousos, George

    2013-01-01

    The human papillomavirus (HPV) infects the squamous epithelium of the skin and produces common warts, plantar warts, and flat warts, which occur commonly on the hands, face, and feet. The objective of this study was to determine the presence of HPV in warts in children in order to associate the virus with the disease. Sixty-eight children with clinically diagnosed cutaneous warts were recruited. Skin biopsy samples were examined and DNA was extracted using a commercially available kit. To distinguish between the HPV types, we used a specific pair of primers to amplify the HPV DNA. Polymerase chain reaction amplification of the L1 region was followed by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis and Luminex xMAP technology. HPV 57 was the predominant type in our study, although the detection of the high-risk HPV type 16 in 33% of our positive samples indicates the presence of mucosal high-risk HPV types in the skin of children. It seems that the newly introduced Luminex assay maximized the discrimination of genotypes even in the case of multiple HPV infections. Or findings also suggest the presence of high-risk HPV types in cutaneous warts.

  10. Prospects and prejudices of human papillomavirus vaccines in India.

    PubMed

    Das, Bhudev C; Hussain, Showket; Nasare, Vilas; Bharadwaj, Mausumi

    2008-05-23

    Cervical cancer is the most common cancer and a leading cause of cancer deaths among women in developing countries. The disease is caused due to persistent infection of one or more of about 15 high-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPVs), most commonly by HPV types 16/18. In India, over 98% of cervical cancer cases harbor HPV infection and HPV 16 is the type exclusively (80-90%) prevalent. Unlike the West, HPV infection is most common in women in their third decade (26-35 years) of sexual activity and invasive cancer also arises much later with a peak at about 45-55 years of age. Recently, two successful prophylactic HPV vaccines, a quadrivalent (HPV16/18/6/11) 'Gardasil' by Merck and a bivalent (HPV16/18) 'Cervarix' by GSK have been developed. Several other approaches including plant-based edible, pentameric capsomere-based intranasal and DNA-based vaccines have also been employed to develop prophylactic vaccines. Also, several therapeutic vaccines either protein/peptide based or DNA based are in clinical trials but are yet to establish their efficacy. Though there are several issues regarding implementation of the already developed vaccines in resource limited countries, efforts are being made to develop cost-effective second-generation vaccines. If cost minimized, HPV related new technologies involved in screening tests and vaccines are expected to reduce incidence of cervical cancer and deaths it causes in women from developing countries.

  11. Human papillomavirus genotypes and cervical cancer in northeast Thailand.

    PubMed

    Natphopsuk, Sitakan; Settheetham-Ishida, Wannapa; Pientong, Chamsai; Sinawat, Supat; Yuenyao, Pissamai; Ishida, Takafumi; Settheetham, Dariwan

    2013-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a major cause of cervical cancer. More than 100 HPV genotypes have been identified; however the distribution varies geographically and according to ethnicity. The purpose of this study was to investigate the prevalence and distribution of HPV subtypes among Northeast Thai women. Subjects included 198 cases of SCCA and 198 age-matched, healthy controls. HPV-DNA was amplified by PCR using the consensus primers GP5+/6+ system followed by reverse line blot hybridization genotyping. The prevalence of high-risk HPV infection was 21 (10.1%) and 152 (76.8%) in the controls and in the cases, respectively. High-risk HPV significantly increased the risk for cervical cancer with an OR of 42.4 (95%CI: 22.4-81.4, p<0.001) and an adjusted OR of 40.7-fold (95%CI: 21.5-76.8, p <0.001). HPV-16 was the most prevalent HPV type in the SCCA (56.2%) followed by HPV-58 (17.8%) and HPV-18 (13.6%); whereas HPV-58 (46.4%) was a prominent genotype in the controls followed by HPV-16 (39.3%) and unidentified HPV types (25.0%). These findings indicate that HPV infection remains a critical risk factor for SCCA; particularly, HPV-16, HPV-58 and HPV-18. In order to eradicate cervical cancer, sustained health education, promoted use of prophylactics and a HPV-58 vaccine should be introduced in this region.

  12. Human papillomaviruses and non-melanoma skin cancer.

    PubMed

    McLaughlin-Drubin, Margaret E

    2015-04-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) infect the squamous epithelium and can induce benign and malignant lesions. To date, more than 200 different HPV types have been identified and classified into five genera, α, β, γ, μ, and ν. While high-risk α mucosal HPVs have a well-established role in cervical carcinoma and a significant percentage of other anogenital tract and oral carcinomas, the biology of the cutaneous β HPVs and their contribution to non-melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) has been less studied. Although the association of β HPV infection with NMSC in patients with a rare, genetically determined condition, epidermodysplasia verruciformis has been well established, the role of β HPV infection with NMSC in the normal population remains controversial. In stark contrast to α HPV-associated cancers, the presence of the β HPV genome does not appear to be mandatory for the maintenance of the malignant phenotype. Moreover, the mechanism of action of the β HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins differs from the β HPV oncoproteins.

  13. Human Papillomavirus Vaccination: A Case Study in Translational Science

    PubMed Central

    Palmer, Allyson K.; Harris, Antoneicka L.; Jacobson, Robert M.

    2014-01-01

    Each year 610,000 cases of anogenital and oropharyngeal cancers caused by human papillomavirus (HPV) occur worldwide. HPV vaccination represents a promising opportunity to prevent cancer on a global scale. The vaccine’s story dates back to discoveries in chickens at the beginning of the 20th century with evidence that a cell-free filtrate could transmit the propensity to grow cancers. Later, studies with similarly derived filtrates from mammalian tumors showed that hosts could develop immunity to subsequent exposures. Epidemiologic studies linked cervical cancer to members of a family of viruses that cause papillomatosis and common warts. This led to work with DNA hybridization demonstrating a causal relationship. The formation of virus-like particles (VLPs) from viral capsid proteins led to the development of models for safe and effective vaccines. While much work remains with the acceptance of universal vaccination, the HPV vaccines Gardasil® and Cervarix® thus represent a century of successful translational research. PMID:24841923

  14. Human papillomavirus infections in nonsexually active perinatally HIV infected children.

    PubMed

    Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Puga, Ana; Farhat, Sepideh; Ma, Yifei

    2014-02-01

    Although human papillomavirus (HPV) infections are common in HIV-infected adults, little is known about children. Our objective was to examine the prevalence of and risks for HPV of the oral mucosal and external genital areas in nonsexually active (NSA) perinatally (P) HIV+ children and compare with HIV-exposed but uninfected (HEU) children. A convenience sample attending a pediatric clinic were enrolled. Samples for HPV were obtained from the oral and anogenital areas and tested for one of 37 HPV types. The mean age of the 48 PHIV+ children was 14.3±3.9 years vs. 6.2±4.8 for the 52 HEU (p<0.001). Of the 23 PHIV+ girls, 30.4% had anogenital and 17% had oral HPV, and of the 27 HEU girls, 2 (7.4%) anogenital and 0 had oral HPV. Of the boys, 4/23 (17.4%) and 1/25 (4%) PHIV+ had anogenital and oral HPV, respectively, and 3/24 (12.5%) and 1/25 (4%) HEU had anogenital and oral HPV, respectively. Rates of HPV did not differ by age among the PHIV+, whereas older HEU were more likely to have HPV than younger HEU (p=0.07). This large age gap precluded statistical comparison by HIV status. The presence of HPV in NSA PHIV+ children may have implications regarding HPV vaccination efficacy.

  15. Human papillomavirus DNA in plasma of patients with cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pornthanakasem, Wichai; Shotelersuk, Kanjana; Termrungruanglert, Wichai; Voravud, Narin; Niruthisard, Somchai; Mutirangura, Apiwat

    2001-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a crucial etiological factor for cervical cancer (CC) development. From a diagnostic view-point, the consistent presence of HPV in CC allows the viral DNA to be used as a genetic marker. The aims of this study were to evaluate the presence, physical status and clinical significant of HPV DNA in circulation of CC patients. Results Whereas 6 out of 50 (12%) HPV positive CC patients revealed plasma HPV DNA, it was detected in none of 20 normal controls or 13 HPV negative CC cases. The plasma DNA exhibited an HPV type identical to the HPV in the primary tumors and the DNA from both sources was integrated into host genome. Interestingly, several findings suggested an association between plasma HPV DNA and metastasis. First, three of the HPV DNA positive cases were CC patients with clinical stage IVB or recurrence with distance metastases (P = 0.001, RR = 15.67). Second, the amount of plasma HPV DNA from metastatic patients to be three times more than three other patients without metastases. Finally, the later cases had tendency to develop recurrence distant metastases within one year after complete treatment when compared with other HPV associated CC patients with the same stage but without the present of plasma HPV DNA. Conclusions The plasma HPV DNA originated from the CC, was associated with metastasis and could be used as a marker representing the circulating free CC DNA. PMID:11244579

  16. Human Papillomavirus Vaccination at a Time of Changing Sexual Behavior.

    PubMed

    Baussano, Iacopo; Lazzarato, Fulvio; Brisson, Marc; Franceschi, Silvia

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence varies widely worldwide. We used a transmission model to show links between age-specific sexual patterns and HPV vaccination effectiveness. We considered rural India and the United States as examples of 2 heterosexual populations with traditional age-specific sexual behavior and gender-similar age-specific sexual behavior, respectively. We simulated these populations by using age-specific rates of sexual activity and age differences between sexual partners and found that transitions from traditional to gender-similar sexual behavior in women <35 years of age can result in increased (2.6-fold in our study) HPV16 prevalence. Our model shows that reductions in HPV16 prevalence are larger if vaccination occurs in populations before transitions in sexual behavior and that increased risk for HPV infection attributable to transition is preventable by early vaccination. Our study highlights the importance of using time-limited opportunities to introduce HPV vaccination in traditional populations before changes in age-specific sexual patterns occur.

  17. Human papillomavirus vaccination in the United Kingdom: what about boys?

    PubMed

    Kubba, Tamara

    2008-11-01

    In September 2008 the UK Department of Health initiated a human papillomavirus (HPV) immunisation programme for girls aged 12-13 for prevention of cervical cancer, which is most often caused by two HPV types. An important question, yet to be addressed, is whether boys should also be vaccinated. Men also get HPV and transmit it sexually, not just women. Certain HPV types are associated with genital warts, which have significant morbidity, and with difficult to treat non-cervical malignancies, including vulval, penile, anal and oro-pharyngeal cancer, which are best prevented through vaccination. Moreover, increased persistence of HPV infection is associated with HIV infection. A review of the literature and evidence from modelling suggest that vaccinating boys would increase vaccination impact and may be necessary to achieve herd immunity targets. Excluding boys sends the wrong message that girls and women alone are responsible for sexual health. Although protective efficacy of the vaccine in men has not yet been fully established, the rationale for vaccinating boys as well as girls at an early age is strong, assuming efficacy is established. Meanwhile, provision of the quadrivalent vaccine should become UK policy, in order to include protection against genital warts, the argument for which is strengthened if boys are also vaccinated.

  18. Human papillomavirus type 16 DNA in periungual squamous cell carcinomas

    SciTech Connect

    Moy, R.L.; Eliezri, Y.D.; Bennett, R.G. ); Nuovo, G.J.; Siverstein, S. Columbia Univ., New York, NY ); Zitelli, J.A. )

    1989-05-12

    Ten squamous cell carcinomas (in situ or invasive) of the fingernail region were analyzed for the presence of DNA sequences homologous to human papilloma-virus (HPV) by dot blot hybridization. In most patients, the lesions were verrucae of long-term duration that were refractory to conventional treatment methods. Eight of the lesions contained HPV DNA sequences, and in six of these the sequences were related to HPV 16 as deduced from low-stringency nucleic acid hybridization followed by low- and high-stringency washes. Furthermore, the restriction endonuclease digestion pattern of DNA isolated from four of these lesions was diagnostic of episomal HPV 16. The high-frequency association of HPV 16 with periungual squamous cell carcinoma is similar to that reported for HPV 16 with squamous cell carcinomas on mucous membranes at other sites, notably the genital tract. The findings suggest that HPV 16 may play an important role in the development of squamous cell carcinomas of the finger, most notably those lesions that are chronic and located in the periungual area.

  19. Human Papillomavirus and the Development of Different Cancers.

    PubMed

    Gao, Ge; Smith, David I

    2017-03-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) are responsible for the development of almost all cervical cancers. HPV is also found in 85% of anal cancer and in 50% of penile, vulvar, and vaginal cancers, and they are increasingly found in a subset of head and neck cancers, i.e., oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinomas (OPSCC). The model for how HPV causes cancer is derived from several decades of study on cervical cancer, and it is just presumed that this model is not only completely valid for cervical cancer but for all other HPV-driven cancers as well. Next-generation sequencing (NGS) has now provided the necessary tools to characterize genomic alterations in cancer cells and can precisely determine the physical status of HPV in those cells as well. We discuss recent discoveries from different applications of NGS in both cervical cancer and OPSCCs, including whole-genome sequencing and mate-pair NGS. We also discuss what NGS studies have revealed about the different ways that HPV can be involved in cancer formation, specifically comparing cervical cancer and OPSCC.

  20. Adolescent Premature Ovarian Insufficiency Following Human Papillomavirus Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Ward, Harvey Rodrick Grenville

    2014-01-01

    Three young women who developed premature ovarian insufficiency following quadrivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination presented to a general practitioner in rural New South Wales, Australia. The unrelated girls were aged 16, 16, and 18 years at diagnosis. Each had received HPV vaccinations prior to the onset of ovarian decline. Vaccinations had been administered in different regions of the state of New South Wales and the 3 girls lived in different towns in that state. Each had been prescribed the oral contraceptive pill to treat menstrual cycle abnormalities prior to investigation and diagnosis. Vaccine research does not present an ovary histology report of tested rats but does present a testicular histology report. Enduring ovarian capacity and duration of function following vaccination is unresearched in preclinical studies, clinical and postlicensure studies. Postmarketing surveillance does not accurately represent diagnoses in adverse event notifications and can neither represent unnotified cases nor compare incident statistics with vaccine course administration rates. The potential significance of a case series of adolescents with idiopathic premature ovarian insufficiency following HPV vaccination presenting to a general practice warrants further research. Preservation of reproductive health is a primary concern in the recipient target group. Since this group includes all prepubertal and pubertal young women, demonstration of ongoing, uncompromised safety for the ovary is urgently required. This matter needs to be resolved for the purposes of population health and public vaccine confidence. PMID:26425627

  1. Human papillomavirus (HPV): making the case for 'Immunisation for All'.

    PubMed

    Prue, G; Lawler, M; Baker, P; Warnakulasuriya, S

    2016-08-05

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) contributes to the most common sexually transmitted infections, with repeated and persistent infection with particular types causing disease in both men and women. Infection with low-risk HPV types can lead to genital warts and benign lesions of the oral cavity, while high-risk types can cause various HPV-related malignancies. The incidence of head and neck cancers has been rising in the past number of decades mostly due to oropharyngeal cancer linked to HPV infection. HPV vaccination has been shown to be effective for cervical and other anogenital HPV-related cancers, and there is significant potential for HPV vaccination to prevent oropharyngeal cancers, given that the HPV types implicated in this disease can be protected against by the HPV vaccine. Few countries have implemented a universal HPV vaccination programme for males and females, with many countries arguing that female-only vaccination programmes protect males via herd immunity and that men who have sex with men will be protected via targeted vaccination programmes. We argue these may be limited in their effectiveness. We propose that the most effective, practical, ethical and potentially cost-effective solution is universal HPV vaccination that might lead to control of HPV-related diseases in men and women alike.

  2. Maternal Support for Human Papillomavirus Vaccination in Honduras

    PubMed Central

    Langrish, Sarah M.; Cotton, Deborah J.; Simon, Carol J.

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Cervical cancer is a leading cause of cancer death for women in Latin America, and vaccinating against human papillomavirus (HPV) has the potential to limit this disease. We sought to determine Honduran women's awareness of HPV vaccination and interest in vaccinating their daughters against HPV. Methods We interviewed mothers aged ≥17 at primary care clinics in Honduras. First, we collected demographic information and assessed knowledge related to cervical cancer prevention and awareness of HPV and HPV vaccination. Because most participants were not familiar with HPV, education about the relationships among HPV, sexual activity, and cervical cancer was provided before we asked participants if they would accept HPV vaccination for a 9-year-old daughter. We used multivariable logistic regression to determine predictors of vaccine acceptance. Results We interviewed 632 mothers. Only 13% had heard of HPV vaccination before the interview. After education, 91% would accept HPV vaccination for a 9-year-old daughter. Mothers who intended to vaccinate knew more at baseline about cervical cancer prevention than did those who did not endorse vaccination. Demographic characteristics did not predict vaccine acceptance. Conclusions Few Honduran mothers were aware of HPV or HPV vaccination. However, most Honduran mothers would accept HPV vaccination for their daughters after receiving education about the relationship between HPV infection and cervical cancer. Baseline cervical cancer knowledge was associated with vaccine acceptance. PMID:21091226

  3. Identification of human papillomavirus in esophageal squamous papillomas

    PubMed Central

    Bohn, Olga L; Navarro, Leticia; Saldivar, Jesus; Sanchez-Sosa, Sergio

    2008-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the presence of human papillomavirus (HPV) in esophageal squamous papilloma (ESP) and determine p16, p53 and Ki67 expression in a Mexican cohort. METHODS: Nineteen cases diagnosed as ESP, corresponding to 18 patients were reviewed; nineteen cases of normal esophageal mucosa were used as negative controls. HPV detection was performed by amplified chromogenic in situ hybridization (ACISH) using a wide spectrum-cocktail probe and PCR. RESULTS: The average age at presentation was 46.3 years (range 28-72 years). Patients included four (22.22%) males and 14 (77.77%) females. The most frequent location was upper third (11 cases), followed by middle third (3 cases) and unknown site (5 cases). Immunohistochemistry (IHC) revealed basal and focal p53 expression in 17 cases (89%); p16 was expressed in eight cases (42.10%) and the Ki67 index ranged from 10% to 30%. HPV was detected in 14 out of 16 cases (87.5%) by ACISH: Twelve showed diffuse nuclear patterns and two showed granular patterns. HPV DNA was identified by PCR in 12 out of 14 cases (85.7%). Low-risk HPV types were detected in the most of the cases. CONCLUSION: This study provides identification of HPV infection in almost 80% of ESP using either ACISH or PCR; overall, all of these lesions show low expression of cell-cycle markers. We suggest ACISH as an alternative diagnostic tool for HPV detection in ESP. PMID:19084918

  4. Human papillomavirus vaccination guideline update: American Cancer Society guideline endorsement.

    PubMed

    Saslow, Debbie; Andrews, Kimberly S; Manassaram-Baptiste, Deana; Loomer, Lacey; Lam, Kristina E; Fisher-Borne, Marcie; Smith, Robert A; Fontham, Elizabeth T H

    2016-09-01

    Answer questions and earn CME/CNE The American Cancer Society (ACS) reviewed and updated its guideline on human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination based on a methodologic and content review of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) HPV vaccination recommendations. A literature review was performed to supplement the evidence considered by the ACIP and to address new vaccine formulations and recommendations as well as new data on population outcomes since publication of the 2007 ACS guideline. The ACS Guideline Development Group determined that the evidence supports ACS endorsement of the ACIP recommendations, with one qualifying statement related to late vaccination. The ACS recommends vaccination of all children at ages 11 and 12 years to protect against HPV infections that lead to several cancers and precancers. Late vaccination for those not vaccinated at the recommended ages should be completed as soon as possible, and individuals should be informed that vaccination may not be effective at older ages. CA Cancer J Clin 2016;66:375-385. © 2016 American Cancer Society.

  5. High-Risk Human Papillomavirus Targets Crossroads in Immune Signaling

    PubMed Central

    Tummers, Bart; Van Der Burg, Sjoerd H.

    2015-01-01

    Persistent infections with a high-risk type human papillomavirus (hrHPV) can progress to cancer. High-risk HPVs infect keratinocytes (KCs) and successfully suppress host immunity for up to two years despite the fact that KCs are well equipped to detect and initiate immune responses to invading pathogens. Viral persistence is achieved by active interference with KCs innate and adaptive immune mechanisms. To this end hrHPV utilizes proteins encoded by its viral genome, as well as exploits cellular proteins to interfere with signaling of innate and adaptive immune pathways. This results in impairment of interferon and pro-inflammatory cytokine production and subsequent immune cell attraction, as well as resistance to incoming signals from the immune system. Furthermore, hrHPV avoids the killing of infected cells by interfering with antigen presentation to antigen-specific cytotoxic T lymphocytes. Thus, hrHPV has evolved multiple mechanisms to avoid detection and clearance by both the innate and adaptive immune system, the molecular mechanisms of which will be dealt with in detail in this review. PMID:26008697

  6. The Relationship between Cocaine Use and Human Papillomavirus Infections in HIV-Seropositive and HIV-Seronegative Women

    PubMed Central

    Minkoff, Howard; Zhong, Ye; Strickler, Howard D.; Watts, D. Heather; Palefsky, Joel M.; Levine, Alexandra M.; D'Souza, Gypsyamber; Howard, Andrea A.; Plankey, Michael; Massad, L. Stewart; Burk, Robert

    2008-01-01

    Objective. Animal data suggest that cocaine has an immunosuppressive effect, but no human studies have been conducted to assess the relation of cocaine use with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, the viral cause of cervical cancer. Since both cocaine use and HPV infection are common among HIV-positive women, we sought to determine whether use of cocaine and/or crack influences the natural history of HPV among women with or at high risk of HIV. Methods. Women enrolled in the Women's Interagency HIV Study (2278 HIV-seropositive and 826 high-risk seronegative women) were examined every six months for up to 9.5 years with Pap smear, collection of cervicovaginal lavage (CVL) samples, and detailed questionnaires regarding health and behavior, including use of crack and cocaine (crack/cocaine). CVLs were tested for HPV DNA by PCR, with genotyping for over forty HPV types. Results. In multivariate logistic regression models, censoring women treated for cervical neoplasia, crack/cocaine use within the last six months was associated with prevalent detection of oncogenic HPV DNA (odds ratio [OR] = 1.30 (1.09–1.55)), and with oncogenic HPV-positive squamous intraepithelial lesions (SIL) (OR = 1.70 (1.27–2.27)), following adjustment for age, race, HIV-serostatus, and CD4+ T-cell count, the number of sexual partners in the past six months, and smoking. In multivariate Cox models crack/cocaine use was also associated with a trend that approached significance in regard to incident detection of oncogenic HPV-positive SIL (HR = 1.51, 95% CI 0.99–2.30), and while the rate of oncogenic HPV clearance was not related to cocaine use, the clearance of any SIL was significantly lower in those with versus those without recent crack/cocaine use (HR = 0.57, 95% CI 0.34–0.97). Conclusions. Cocaine use is associated with an increased risk of detection of both prevalent and incident oncogenic HPV infection, as well as an increased risk of HPV-positive SIL over time. PMID:18437233

  7. Establishment of Human Papillomavirus Infection Requires Cell Cycle Progression

    PubMed Central

    Pyeon, Dohun; Pearce, Shane M.; Lank, Simon M.; Ahlquist, Paul; Lambert, Paul F.

    2009-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are DNA viruses associated with major human cancers. As such there is a strong interest in developing new means, such as vaccines and microbicides, to prevent HPV infections. Developing the latter requires a better understanding of the infectious life cycle of HPVs. The HPV infectious life cycle is closely linked to the differentiation state of the stratified epithelium it infects, with progeny virus only made in the terminally differentiating suprabasal compartment. It has long been recognized that HPV must first establish its infection within the basal layer of stratified epithelium, but why this is the case has not been understood. In part this restriction might reflect specificity of expression of entry receptors. However, this hypothesis could not fully explain the differentiation restriction of HPV infection, since many cell types can be infected with HPVs in monolayer cell culture. Here, we used chemical biology approaches to reveal that cell cycle progression through mitosis is critical for HPV infection. Using infectious HPV16 particles containing the intact viral genome, G1-synchronized human keratinocytes as hosts, and early viral gene expression as a readout for infection, we learned that the recipient cell must enter M phase (mitosis) for HPV infection to take place. Late M phase inhibitors had no effect on infection, whereas G1, S, G2, and early M phase cell cycle inhibitors efficiently prevented infection. We conclude that host cells need to pass through early prophase for successful onset of transcription of the HPV encapsidated genes. These findings provide one reason why HPVs initially establish infections in the basal compartment of stratified epithelia. Only this compartment of the epithelium contains cells progressing through the cell cycle, and therefore it is only in these cells that HPVs can establish their infection. By defining a major condition for cell susceptibility to HPV infection, these results also have

  8. Multiplexed Serologic Assay for Nine Anogenital Human Papillomavirus Types▿

    PubMed Central

    Opalka, David; Matys, Katie; Bojczuk, Paul; Green, Tina; Gesser, Richard; Saah, Alfred; Haupt, Richard; Dutko, Frank; Esser, Mark T.

    2010-01-01

    A multiplexed human papillomavirus (HPV) immunoassay has been developed for the detection of human IgG antibodies to HPV type 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58 virus-like particle (VLP) types in serum following natural infection or immunization with VLP-based vaccines. The VLP antigens were covalently conjugated to carboxyl Luminex microspheres (MS) using a carbodiimide chemistry. Antibody (Ab) titers were determined in a direct binding format, in which an IgG1- to -4-specific, phycoerythrin (PE)-labeled monoclonal antibody (MAb) (HP6043) binds to human serum IgG antibodies. Pooled serum samples from rhesus macaques immunized with a 9-valent VLP-based vaccine served as the reference standard. The overall specificity of the assay was >99%, and the linearity (parallelism) of the assay was <7% per 10-fold dilution. Total assay precision was <19% across 3 different VLP-microsphere lots, 2 secondary antibody lots, and 2 different operators over a period of 3 weeks. Three different methods were used to evaluate serostatus cutoffs (SCO): (i) a clinical sensitivity/specificity analysis based on “likely negative” and “likely positive” samples from nonvaccinees, (ii) stringent upper tolerance limits on samples from “likely negatives,” and (iii) stringent upper tolerance limits from the same “likely negative” sample set after VLP adsorption. Depending on the method to set the serostatus cutoff, the percentage of seropositive samples at the month 48 time point following vaccination with the HPV 6/11/16/18 quadrivalent vaccine ranged from 70% to 100%. This assay has proven useful for measuring the levels of serum antibody to the nine HPV VLPs following natural infection or administration of VLP-based vaccines. PMID:20237197

  9. Multiplexed serologic assay for nine anogenital human papillomavirus types.

    PubMed

    Opalka, David; Matys, Katie; Bojczuk, Paul; Green, Tina; Gesser, Richard; Saah, Alfred; Haupt, Richard; Dutko, Frank; Esser, Mark T

    2010-05-01

    A multiplexed human papillomavirus (HPV) immunoassay has been developed for the detection of human IgG antibodies to HPV type 6, 11, 16, 18, 31, 33, 45, 52, and 58 virus-like particle (VLP) types in serum following natural infection or immunization with VLP-based vaccines. The VLP antigens were covalently conjugated to carboxyl Luminex microspheres (MS) using a carbodiimide chemistry. Antibody (Ab) titers were determined in a direct binding format, in which an IgG1- to -4-specific, phycoerythrin (PE)-labeled monoclonal antibody (MAb) (HP6043) binds to human serum IgG antibodies. Pooled serum samples from rhesus macaques immunized with a 9-valent VLP-based vaccine served as the reference standard. The overall specificity of the assay was >99%, and the linearity (parallelism) of the assay was <7% per 10-fold dilution. Total assay precision was <19% across 3 different VLP-microsphere lots, 2 secondary antibody lots, and 2 different operators over a period of 3 weeks. Three different methods were used to evaluate serostatus cutoffs (SCO): (i) a clinical sensitivity/specificity analysis based on "likely negative" and "likely positive" samples from nonvaccinees, (ii) stringent upper tolerance limits on samples from "likely negatives," and (iii) stringent upper tolerance limits from the same "likely negative" sample set after VLP adsorption. Depending on the method to set the serostatus cutoff, the percentage of seropositive samples at the month 48 time point following vaccination with the HPV 6/11/16/18 quadrivalent vaccine ranged from 70% to 100%. This assay has proven useful for measuring the levels of serum antibody to the nine HPV VLPs following natural infection or administration of VLP-based vaccines.

  10. Skp2 is oncogenic and overexpressed in human cancers.

    PubMed

    Gstaiger, M; Jordan, R; Lim, M; Catzavelos, C; Mestan, J; Slingerland, J; Krek, W

    2001-04-24

    Skp2 is a member of the F-box family of substrate-recognition subunits of SCF ubiquitin-protein ligase complexes that has been implicated in the ubiquitin-mediated degradation of several key regulators of mammalian G(1) progression, including the cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor p27, a dosage-dependent tumor suppressor protein. In this study, we examined Skp2 and p27 protein expression by immunohistochemistry in normal oral epithelium and in different stages of malignant oral cancer progression, including dysplasia and oral squamous cell carcinoma. We found that increased levels of Skp2 protein are associated with reduced p27 in a subset of oral epithelial dysplasias and carcinomas compared with normal epithelial controls. Tumors with high Skp2 (>20% positive cells) expression invariably showed reduced or absent p27 and tumors with high p27 (>20% positive cells) expression rarely showed Skp2 positivity. Increased Skp2 protein levels were not always correlated with increased cell proliferation (assayed by Ki-67 staining), suggesting that alterations of Skp2 may contribute to the malignant phenotype without affecting proliferation. Skp2 protein overexpression may lead to accelerated p27 proteolysis and contribute to malignant progression from dysplasia to oral epithelial carcinoma. Moreover, we also demonstrate that Skp2 has oncogenic potential by showing that Skp2 cooperates with H-Ras(G12V) to malignantly transform primary rodent fibroblasts as scored by colony formation in soft agar and tumor formation in nude mice. The observations that Skp2 can mediate transformation and is up-regulated during oral epithelial carcinogenesis support a role for Skp2 as a protooncogene in human tumors.

  11. In vitro and in vivo growth suppression of human papillomavirus 16-positive cervical cancer cells by CRISPR/Cas9

    SciTech Connect

    Zhen, Shuai; Hua, Ling; Takahashi, Y.; Narita, S.; Liu, Yun-Hui; Li, Yan

    2014-08-08

    Highlights: • Established CRISPR/Cas9 targeting promoter of HPV 16 and targeting E6, E7 transcript. • CRISPR/Cas9 resulted in accumulation of p53 and p21, reduced the proliferation of cervical cancer cells. • Finding inhibited tumorigenesis and growth of mice incubated by cells with CRISPR/Cas9. • CRISPR/Cas9 will be a new treatment strategy, in cervical and other HPV-associated cancer therapy. - Abstract: Deregulated expression of high-risk human papillomavirus oncogenes (E6 and E7) is a pivotal event for pathogenesis and progression in cervical cancer. Both viral oncogenes are therefore regarded as ideal therapeutic targets. In the hope of developing a gene-specific therapy for HPV-related cancer, we established CRISPR/Cas9 targeting promoter of HPV 16 E6/E7 and targeting E6, E7 transcript, transduced the CRISPR/Cas9 into cervical HPV-16-positive cell line SiHa. The results showed that CRISPR/Cas9 targeting promoter, as well as targeting E6 and E7 resulted in accumulation of p53 and p21 protein, and consequently remarkably reduced the abilities of proliferation of cervical cancer cells in vitro. Then we inoculated subcutaneously cells into nude mice to establish the transplanted tumor animal models, and found dramatically inhibited tumorigenesis and growth of mice incubated by cells with CRISPR/Cas9 targeting (promoter+E6+E7)-transcript. Our results may provide evidence for application of CRISPR/Cas9 targeting HR-HPV key oncogenes, as a new treatment strategy, in cervical and other HPV-associated cancer therapy.

  12. Human papillomavirus and squamous cell cancer of the skin--epidermodysplasia verruciformis-associated human papillomavirus revisited.

    PubMed

    Arnold, Andreas W; Hofbauer, Günther F L

    2012-01-01

    As squamous cell cancer (SCC) is the most common malignancy in organ transplant recipients, a viral etiology has been proposed. Human papillomavirus (HPV) is found more often in organ transplant recipients than in the general population, but its role in cancer development has been debated for years. As a model of susceptibility of HPV the inherited disease epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) has been investigated intensively. EV is an autosomal-recessive skin disease leading to multiple flat warts and pityriasis versicolor-like macules in early youth. EV patients are at great risk of developing skin cancer due to a lack of defense against beta HPV. Beta HPV are causally involved in the formation of skin cancer in patients afflicted with EV. Beta HPV has frequently been detected in SCC and its early lesions such as actinic keratoses. Depending on the methods used, a prevalence of 30-90% has been reported for beta HPV for SCC in organ transplant recipients, while this prevalence in the general population is lower, but still considerable at 50%. Epidemiologic studies in the general population seem to suggest that beta HPV plays a role in the formation of SCC, both for invasive and in situ lesions.

  13. Multicenter Study of Human Papillomavirus and the Human Papillomavirus Vaccine: Knowledge and Attitudes among People of African Descent

    PubMed Central

    Thurman, Natalie; Halliday, Darron; Butler, Raleigh; Francis, Dorita; Joseph, Madeline; Thompson, Jahzreel; Andraos-Selim, Cecile; Taioli, Emanuela; Hagan, Kourtney L.; Jones, Erin A.; Jones, Jade; Moss, Cierra M.; Smith, Ar'Lena C.; Ashing, Kimlin Tam; Ragin, Camille C.

    2013-01-01

    Objective. To compare knowledge and attitudes of human papillomavirus (HPV) and the vaccine between different cultures of African descent. Methods. A cross-sectional survey of 555 African-Americans and Afro-Caribbeans residing in the US and the Bahamas (BHM) was conducted. Results. General knowledge about HPV and the HPV vaccine differed between the two countries significantly. Bahamian respondents were less likely to have higher numbers of correct knowledge answers when compared to Americans (Adjusted Odds Ratio [Adj. OR] 0.47, 95% Confidence Interval [CI] 0.30–0.75). Older age, regardless of location, was also associated with answering fewer questions correctly (Adj. OR 0.61, 95% CI 0.40–0.92). Attitudes related to HPV vaccination were similar between the US and BHM, but nearly 80% of BHM respondents felt that children should not be able to receive the vaccine without parental consent compared to 57% of American respondents. Conclusions. Grave lack of knowledge, safety and cost concerns, and influence of parental restrictions may negatively impact vaccine uptake among African-American and Afro-Caribbean persons. Interventions to increase the vaccine uptake in the Caribbean must include medical provider and parental involvement. Effective strategies for education and increasing vaccine uptake in BHM are crucial for decreasing cervical cancer burden in the Caribbean. PMID:23956612

  14. Human Papillomavirus Typing in HIV-Positive Women

    PubMed Central

    Hameed, Meera; Fernandes, Helen; Skurnick, Joan; Moore, Dorothy; Kloser, Patricia

    2001-01-01

    Objective: Human papillomavirus (HPV) is the major cause of cervical carcinoma and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia worldwide. Certain HPV types have a strong association with and probably a causative role in the pathogenesis of premalignant cervical lesions. Epidemiologic studies in women infected by the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) have shown an increased incidence of squamous intraepithelial lesions (SILs), whichwere predominantly high-grade. Six to 30 per cent of women diagnosed with atypical squamous cells of undetermined significance (ASCUS) on a Papanicolaou (Pap) smear harbor SIL in normal screening populations. This study was undertaken to determine the presence of low- and high-risk HPV types in women infected by HIV and to correlate the results to those of the Pap smear. Study design: HPV DNA typing (low- and high-risk) by Digene™ (Digene Corporation, Gathesburg, MD) hybrid capture methodology was performed on cervical swabs from 209 HIV-positive women. The results of HPV typing were correlated with those of the Pap smear in a retrospective analysis. Results: One hundred and one women (48%) tested positive for HPV subtypes by DNA typing by the hybrid capture method. Of these, 64 patients (63%) had Pap smears whichwere read as being normal, having benign cellular changes, or having ASCUS (favor reactive process). Of these, 19 patients tested positive for both high-risk and low-risk subtypes, 32 patients tested positive only for high-risk subtypes, and 13 patients tested positive only for low-risk subtypes. Conclusion: HPV subtyping identifies a significant group of HIV-positive women who are at risk for developing cervical intraepithelial neoplasia, although they may not show significant abnormalities on their Pap smears. PMID:11495559

  15. Human papillomavirus type 59 immortalized keratinocytes express late viral proteins and infectious virus after calcium stimulation.

    PubMed

    Lehr, Elizabeth E; Qadadri, Brahim; Brown, Calla R; Brown, Darron R

    2003-09-30

    Human papillomavirus type 59 (HPV 59) is an oncogenic type related to HPV 18. HPV 59 was recently propagated in the athymic mouse xenograft system. A continuous keratinocyte cell line infected with HPV 59 was created from a foreskin xenograft grown in an athymic mouse. Cells were cultured beyond passage 50. The cells were highly pleomorphic, containing numerous abnormally shaped nuclei and mitotic figures. HPV 59 sequences were detected in the cells by DNA in situ hybridization in a diffuse nuclear distribution. Southern blots were consistent with an episomal state of HPV 59 DNA at approximately 50 copies per cell. Analysis of the cells using a PCR/reverse blot strip assay, which amplifies a portion of the L1 open reading frame, was strongly positive. Differentiation of cells in monolayers was induced by growth in F medium containing 2 mM calcium chloride for 10 days. Cells were harvested as a single tissue-like sheet, and histologic analysis revealed a four-to-six cell-thick layer. Transcripts encoding involucrin, a cornified envelope protein, and the E1/E4 and E1/E4/L1 viral transcripts were detected after several days of growth in F medium containing 2 mM calcium chloride. The E1/E4 and L1 proteins were detected by immunohistochemical analysis, and virus particles were seen in electron micrographs in a subset of differentiated cells. An extract of differentiated cells was prepared by vigorous sonication and was used to infect foreskin fragments. These fragments were implanted into athymic mice. HPV 59 was detected in the foreskin xenografts removed 4 months later by DNA in situ hybridization and PCR/reverse blot assay. Thus, the complete viral growth cycle, including production on infectious virus, was demonstrated in the HPV 59 immortalized cells grown in a simple culture system.

  16. Epidemiologic Evaluation of Human Papillomavirus Type Competition and the Potential for Type Replacement Post-Vaccination

    PubMed Central

    Tota, Joseph E.; Jiang, Mengzhu; Ramanakumar, Agnihotram V.; Walter, Stephen D.; Kaufman, Jay S.; Coutlée, François; Richardson, Harriet; Burchell, Ann N.; Koushik, Anita; Mayrand, Marie Hélène; Villa, Luisa L.; Franco, Eduardo L.

    2016-01-01

    Background Millions of women have been vaccinated with one of two first-generation human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines. Both vaccines remain in use and target two oncogenic types (HPVs 16 and 18); however, if these types naturally compete with others that are not targeted, type replacement may occur following reductions in the circulating prevalence of targeted types. To explore the potential for type replacement, we evaluated natural HPV type competition in unvaccinated females. Methods Valid HPV DNA typing information was available from five epidemiological studies conducted in Canada and Brazil (n = 14,685; enrollment across studies took place between1993 and 2010), which used similar consensus-primer PCR assays, capable of detecting up to 40 HPV types. A total of 38,088 cervicovaginal specimens were available for inclusion in our analyses evaluating HPV type-type interactions involving vaccine-targeted types (6, 11, 16, and 18), and infection with each of the other HPV types. Results Across the studies, the average age of participants ranged from 21.0 to 43.7 years. HPV16 was the most common type (prevalence range: 1.0% to 13.8%), and in general HPV types were more likely to be detected as part of a multiple infection than as single infections. In our analyses focusing on each of the vaccine-targeted HPV types separately, many significant positive associations were observed (particularly involving HPV16); however, we did not observe any statistically significant negative associations. Conclusions Our findings suggest that natural HPV type competition does not exist, and that type replacement is unlikely to occur in vaccinated populations. PMID:28005904

  17. Link between chronic inflammation and human papillomavirus-induced carcinogenesis (Review)

    PubMed Central

    FERNANDES, JOSÉ VERÍSSIMO; DE MEDEIROS FERNANDES, THALES ALLYRIO ARAÚJO; DE AZEVEDO, JENNER CHRYSTIAN VERÍSSIMO; COBUCCI, RICARDO NEY OLIVEIRA; DE CARVALHO, MARIA GORETTI FREIRE; ANDRADE, VANIA SOUSA; DE ARAÚJO, JOSÉLIO MARIA GALVÃO

    2015-01-01

    Inflammation is a defense strategy against invading agents and harmful molecules that is activated immediately following a stimulus, and involves the release of cytokines and chemokines, which activate the innate immune response. These mediators act together to increase blood flow and vascular permeability, facilitating recruitment of effector cells to the site of injury. Following resolution of the injury and removal of the stimulus, inflammation is disabled, but if the stimulus persists, inflammation becomes chronic and is strongly associated with cancer. This is likely to be due to the fact that the inflammation leads to a wound that does not heal, requiring a constant renewal of cells, which increases the risk of neoplastic transformation. Debris from phagocytosis, including the reactive species of oxygen and nitrogen that cause damage to DNA already damaged by the leukotrienes and prostaglandins, has an impact on inflammation and various carcinogenic routes. There is an association between chronic inflammation, persistent infection and cancer, where oncogenic action is mediated by autocrine and paracrine signals, causing changes in somatic cells under the influence of the microbial genome or of epigenetic factors. Among the infectious agents associated with cancer, certain genotypes of human papillomavirus (HPV) stand out. HPV is responsible for virtually all cases of cervical cancer and a lower proportion of cancers of the vagina, vulva, anus, penis and a number of extragenital cancers. In the present review, recent advances in the mechanisms involved in the inflammatory response are presented with their participation in the process of carcinogenesis, emphasizing the role of chronic inflammation in the development of HPV-induced cervical cancer. PMID:25663851

  18. Effect of Different Human Papillomavirus Serological and DNA Criteria on Vaccine Efficacy Estimates

    PubMed Central

    Lang Kuhs, Krystle A.; Porras, Carolina; Schiller, John T.; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Schiffman, Mark; Gonzalez, Paula; Wacholder, Sholom; Ghosh, Arpita; Li, Yan; Lowy, Douglas R.; Kreimer, Aimée R.; Poncelet, Sylviane; Schussler, John; Quint, Wim; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Sherman, Mark E.; Sidawy, Mary; Herrero, Rolando; Hildesheim, Allan; Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Lang Kuhs, Krystle A.; Schiller, John T.; Schiffman, Mark; Wacholder, Sholom; Lowy, Douglas R.; Kreimer, Aimée R.; Sherman, Mark E.; Hildesheim, Allan; Safaeian, Mahboobeh; Porras, Carolina; Rodriguez, Ana Cecilia; Gonzalez, Paula; Herrero, Rolando; Gonzalez, Paula; Herrero, Rolando; Ghosh, Arpita; Li, Yan; Poncelet, Sylviane; Schussler, John; Quint, Wim; van Doorn, Leen-Jan; Sidawy, Mary; Self, Steve; Benavides, Adriana; Calzada, Luis Diego; Karron, Ruth; Nayar, Ritu; Roach, Nancy; Cain, Joanna; Davey, Diane; DeMets, David; Fuster, Francisco; Gershon, Ann; Holly, Elizabeth; Raventós, Henriette; Rida, Wasima; Rosero-Bixby, Luis; Suthers, Kristen; Lara, Silvia; Thomas, Sarah; Alfaro, Mario; Barrantes, Manuel; Concepción Bratti, M.; Cárdenas, Fernando; Cortés, Bernal; Espinoza, Albert; Estrada, Yenory; González, Paula; Guillén, Diego; Herrero, Roland; Jiménez, Silvia E.; Morales, Jorge; Villegas, Luis; Morera, Lidia Ana; Pérez, Elmer; Porras, Carolina; Rodríguez, Ana Cecilia; Rivas, Libia; Freer, Enrique; Bonilla, José; García-Piñeres, Alfanso; Silva, Sandra; Atmella, Ivannia; Ramírez, Margarita; Hildesheim, Allan; Kreimer, Aimée R.; Lowy, Douglas R.; Macklin, Nora; Schiffman, Mark; Schiller, John T.; Sherman, Mark; Solomon, Diane; Wacholder, Sholom; Pinto, Ligia; Kemp, Troy; Eklund, Claire; Hutchinson, Martha; Sidawy, Mary; Quint, Wim; van Doorn, Leen-Jan

    2014-01-01

    Two trials of clinically approved human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines, Females United to Unilaterally Reduce Endo/Ectocervical Disease (FUTURE I/II) and the Papilloma Trial Against Cancer in Young Adults (PATRICIA), reported a 22% difference in vaccine efficacy (VE) against cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or worse in HPV-naïve subcohorts; however, serological testing methods and the HPV DNA criteria used to define HPV-unexposed women differed between the studies. We applied previously described methods to simulate these HPV-naïve subcohorts within the Costa Rica HPV16/18 Vaccine Trial and assessed how these criteria affect the estimation of VE. We applied 2 enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) thresholds for HPV16 and HPV18 seropositivity (8 and 7 ELISA units/mL, respectively, for PATRICIA; 54 and 65 ELISA units/mL, respectively, for FUTURE I/II (to approximate the competitive Luminex immunoassay)) and 2 criteria for HPV DNA positivity (12 oncogenic HPV types, plus HPV66 and 68/73 for PATRICIA; or plus HPV6 and 11 for FUTURE I/II). VE was computed in the 2 naïve subcohorts. Using the FUTURE I/II and PATRICIA criteria, VE estimates against cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2 or worse, regardless of HPV type, were 69.0% (95% confidence interval: 40.3%, 84.9%) and 80.8% (95% confidence interval: 52.6%, 93.5%), respectively (P = 0.1). Although the application of FUTURE I/II criteria to our cohort resulted in the inclusion of more sexually experienced women, methodological differences did not fully explain the VE differences. PMID:25139208

  19. Evaluation of the FTA Carrier Device for Human Papillomavirus Testing in Developing Countries

    PubMed Central

    Cortes, Bernal; Quint, Wim; Kreimer, Aimée R.; Porras, Carolina; Rodríguez, Ana Cecilia; Jimenez, Silvia; Herrero, Rolando; Struijk, Linda; Hildesheim, Allan; Melchers, Willem

    2012-01-01

    Liquid-based methods for the collection, transportation, and storage of cervical cells are cumbersome and expensive and involve laborious DNA extraction. An FTA cartridge is a solid carrier device, easier to handle and allowing simple DNA elution for human papillomavirus (HPV) testing. HPV-DNA results from cervical specimens collected in PreservCyt medium (Hologic, Inc.) and the indicating FTA elute cartridge were compared in an area where transportation and storage may affect the performance of the test. Cervical cells from 319 young adult women enrolled in the Costa Rica Vaccine Trial were collected by a nurse using a Cervex brush (Roberts), which was placed on the FTA cartridge and subsequently rinsed in 20 ml of PreservCyt medium. Two 0.5-ml PreservCyt aliquots were frozen for HPV-PCR testing; the FTA cartridges were kept at room temperature. HPV-DNA detection and typing was performed using SPF10 PCR/DEIA (DNA enzyme immunoassay detection of amplimers)/LiPA25 system. The percent agreement, agreement among positives, and kappas were estimated. Positivity was higher for FTA compared to PreservCyt specimens (54.5% versus 45.8%, P < 0.001). For oncogenic types, the overall agreement was 0.92, the agreement between positives was 0.74, and the kappa was 0.79. For individual HPV types, the overall agreement ranged from 0.97 to 1.00. We did not observe reduced cytology adequacy when specimen collection for cytology was preceded by FTA collection for HPV testing. HPV-DNA detection from FTA cartridges is broadly comparable to detection from PC medium. The higher HPV detection observed for FTA-collected specimens should be explored further. FTA cartridges could provide a simpler and more cost-effective method for cervical cell collection, storage, and transportation for HPV-DNA detection in research settings in developing countries. PMID:22993174

  20. Type-specific prevalence of human papillomavirus by cervical cytology among women in Brasov, Romania.

    PubMed

    Moga, Marius Alexandru; Irimie, Marius; Oanta, Alexandru; Pascu, Alina; Burtea, Victoria

    2014-01-01

    The oncogenic role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in triggering cervical cancer, the second most common cancer in women worldwide, is well established. Romania ranks in first place in Europe in terms of the incidence of cervical cancer. Geographical widespread data on HPV type-distribution are essential for estimating the impact of HPV vaccines and cervical cancer screening programmes. In this study we aimed to identify the prevalence of HPV genotypes and to establish correlations with abnormal cervical cytology among the female population of Brasov County, Romania. A total of 1,000 women aged 17.3-57 years, attending routine cervical examination in the Obstetrics and Gynecology Hospital of Brasov, Romania, and undergoing both cytological examination and HPV genotyping were screened. Infection with 35 different HPV genotypes was detected in 39.6% of cytological specimens. Overall HPV infections were highest in young women under 25 years (p<0.0001), in which cervical cytological abnormalities also reached the highest prevalence. Patients infected by HPV-16 or HPV-18 showed the highest prevalence of cervical cytological abnormalities. Some 48.2% of women with abnormal cytology were infected with high-risk HPV types whereas less than 3% of them were infected only with low-risk HPV types. Our study showed that the prevalence of high-risk HPV infection among Romanian women is higher compared to other studies in other geographic areas. Thus, we consider that in areas where there is an increased prevalence of high-risk HPV infections, HPV genotyping should be performed in all women aged between 18 and 45 years, and Pap test should be performed every 6 months in women with high-risk HPV infection, even those with previous normal cervical cytology.

  1. COMBINED P16 AND HUMAN PAPILLOMAVIRUS TESTING PREDICTS HEAD AND NECK CANCER SURVIVAL

    PubMed Central

    Salazar, C. R.; Anayannis, N.; Smith, R. V.; Wang, Y.; Haigentz, M.; Garg, M.; Schiff, B. A.; Kawachi, N.; Elman, J.; Belbin, T. J.; Prystowsky, M. B.; Burk, R. D.; Schlecht, N. F.

    2014-01-01

    While its prognostic significance remains unclear, p16INK4a protein expression is increasingly being used as a surrogate marker for oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in head and neck squamous cell carcinomas (HNSCC). To evaluate the prognostic utility of p16 expression in HNSCC, we prospectively collected 163 primary tumor specimens from histologically confirmed HNSCC patients who were followed for up to 9.4 years. Formalin fixed tumor specimens were tested for p16 protein expression by immunohistochemistry. HPV type-16 DNA and RNA was detected by MY09/11-PCR and E6/E7 RT-PCR on matched frozen tissue, respectively. P16 protein expression was detected more often in oropharyngeal tumors (53%) as compared with laryngeal (24%), hypopharyngeal (8%), or oral cavity tumors (4%; P<0.0001). With respect to prognosis, p16-positive oropharyngeal tumors exhibited significantly better overall survival than p16-negative tumors (log-rank test p=0.04), whereas no survival benefit was observed for non-oropharyngeal tumors. However, when both p16 and HPV DNA test results were considered, concordantly positive non-oropharyngeal tumors had significantly better disease-specific survival than concordantly negative non-oropharyngeal tumors after controlling for sex, nodal stage, tumor size, tumor subsite, primary tumor site number, smoking, and drinking (adjusted hazard ratio [HR]=0.04, 0.01–0.54). Compared with concordantly negative non-oropharyngeal HNSCC, p16(+)/HPV16(-) non-oropharyngeal HNSCC (n=13, 7%) demonstrated no significant improvement in disease-specific survival when HPV16 was detected by RNA (adjusted HR=0.83, 0.22–3.17). Our findings show that p16 immunohistochemistry alone has potential as a prognostic test for oropharyngeal cancer survival, but combined p16/HPV testing is necessary to identify HPV-associated non-oropharyngeal HNSCC with better prognosis. PMID:24706381

  2. Human papillomavirus vaccination: recommendations of the Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP).

    PubMed

    Markowitz, Lauri E; Dunne, Eileen F; Saraiya, Mona; Chesson, Harrell W; Curtis, C Robinette; Gee, Julianne; Bocchini, Joseph A; Unger, Elizabeth R

    2014-08-29

    This report summarizes the epidemiology of human papillomavirus (HPV) and associated diseases, describes the licensed HPV vaccines, provides updated data from clinical trials and postlicensure safety studies, and compiles recommendations from CDC's Advisory Committee on Immunization Practices (ACIP) for use of HPV vaccines. Persistent infection with oncogenic HPV types can cause cervical cancer in women as well as other anogenital and oropharyngeal cancers in women and men. HPV also causes genital warts. Two HPV vaccines are licensed in the United States. Both are composed of type-specific HPV L1 protein, the major capsid protein of HPV. Expression of the L1 protein using recombinant DNA technology produces noninfectious virus-like particles (VLPs). Quadrivalent HPV vaccine (HPV4) contains four HPV type-specific VLPs prepared from the L1 proteins of HPV 6, 11, 16, and 18. Bivalent HPV vaccine (HPV2) contains two HPV type-specific VLPs prepared from the L1 proteins of HPV 16 and 18. Both vaccines are administered in a 3-dose series. ACIP recommends routine vaccination with HPV4 or HPV2 for females aged 11 or 12 years and with HPV4 for males aged 11 or 12 years. Vaccination also is recommended for females aged 13 through 26 years and for males aged 13 through 21 years who were not vaccinated previously. Males aged 22 through 26 years may be vaccinated. ACIP recommends vaccination of men who have sex with men and immunocompromised persons (including those with HIV infection) through age 26 years if not previously vaccinated. As a compendium of all current recommendations for use of HPV vaccines, information in this report is intended for use by clinicians, vaccination providers, public health officials, and immunization program personnel as a resource. ACIP recommendations are reviewed periodically and are revised as indicated when new information and data become available.

  3. High prevalence of human papillomavirus DNA detected in cervical swabs from women in southern Selangor, Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Chong, P P; Asyikin, N; Rusinahayati, M; Halimatun, S; Rozita, R; Ng, C K; Hamilton, W H Wan; Tan, B C; Noraihan, N; Rohani, A; Faezah, H; Latiffah, L; Maha, A; Sabariah, A R

    2010-01-01

    Persistent high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is known to play an important role in the genesis of cervical cancer. Since new screening and prevention strategies, namely improved HPV testing and HPV vaccination have been aggressively promoted recently, it is crucial to investigate the HPV distribution in Malaysia in order to maximize their cost-effectiveness. This study was therefore conducted to assess the HPV type distribution in the most populous region, the state of Selangor. A total of 200 cervical swab samples were collected in two health-screening campaigns, and also from women attending obstetrics and gynecology clinics in several hospitals in Selangor. DNA extraction was performed and HPV DNA was detected via nested PCR using MY09/MY11 as outer primers and GP5+/GP6+ as inner primers which target the L1 gene of the viral genome. The purified PCR products were subjected to automated DNA sequencing to determine the HPV genotype. Out of 180 β-globin positive samples, 84 (46.7%) were positive for HPV DNA. The most common HPV type found was high-risk oncogenic type 16 (40%), followed by HPV type 18 (3.3%), HPV 33 (1.7%), HPV 31 (0.6%), and low-risk HPV 87 (0.6%). Our study confirmed that nested PCR method is highly sensitive in detecting HPV DNA even in low risk patients. Since a relatively high prevalence rate of HPV infection was found in this population, prompt healthcare policy changes to bring about implementation of early HPV vaccination program is desirable to prevent a high incidence of cervical cancer.

  4. Human Papillomavirus and Epstein-Barr virus co-infection in Cervical Carcinoma in Algerian women

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Despite the fact that the implication of human papillomavirus (HPV) in the carcinogenesis and prognosis of cervical cancer is well established, the impact of a co-infection with high risk HPV (HR-HPV) and Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is still not fully understood. Methods Fifty eight randomly selected cases of squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) of the uterine cervix, 14 normal cervices specimens, 21 CIN-2/3 and 16 CIN-1 cases were examined for EBV and HPV infections. Detection of HR-HPV specific sequences was carried out by PCR amplification using consensus primers of Manos and by Digene Hybrid Capture. The presence of EBV was revealed by amplifying a 660 bp specific EBV sequence of BALF1. mRNA expression of LMP-1 in one hand and protein levels of BARF-1, LMP-1 and EBNA-1 in the other hand were assessed by RT-PCR and immunoblotting and/or immunohischemistry respectively. Results HR-HPV infection was found in patients with SCC (88%), low-grade (75%) and high grade (95%) lesions compared to only 14% of normal cervix cases. However, 69%, 12.5%, 38.1%, and 14% of SCC, CIN-1, CIN-2/3 and normal cervix tissues, respectively, were EBV infected. The highest co-infection (HR-HPV and EBV) was found in squamous cell carcinoma cases (67%). The latter cases showed 27% and 29% expression of EBV BARF-1 and LMP-1 oncogenes respectively. Conclusion The high rate of HR-HPV and EBV co-infection in SCC suggests that EBV infection is incriminated in cervical cancer progression. This could be taken into account as bad prognosis in this type of cancer. However, the mode of action in dual infection in cervical oncogenesis needs further investigation. PMID:24252325

  5. Analysis of CpG methylation sites and CGI among human papillomavirus DNA genomes

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The Human Papillomavirus (HPV) genome is divided into early and late coding sequences, including 8 open reading frames (ORFs) and a regulatory region (LCR). Viral gene expression may be regulated through epigenetic mechanisms, including cytosine methylation at CpG dinucleotides. We have analyzed the distribution of CpG sites and CpG islands/clusters (CGI) among 92 different HPV genomes grouped in function of their preferential tropism: cutaneous or mucosal. We calculated the proportion of CpG sites (PCS) for each ORF and calculated the expected CpG values for each viral type. Results CpGs are underrepresented in viral genomes. We found a positive correlation between CpG observed and expected values, with mucosal high-risk (HR) virus types showing the smallest O/E ratios. The ranges of the PCS were similar for most genomic regions except E4, where the majority of CpGs are found within islands/clusters. At least one CGI belongs to each E2/E4 region. We found positive correlations between PCS for each viral ORF when compared with the others, except for the LCR against four ORFs and E6 against three other ORFs. The distribution of CpG islands/clusters among HPV groups is heterogeneous and mucosal HR-HPV types exhibit both lower number and shorter island sizes compared to cutaneous and mucosal Low-risk (LR) HPVs (all of them significantly different). Conclusions There is a difference between viral and cellular CpG underrepresentation. There are significant correlations between complete genome PCS and a lack of correlations between several genomic region pairs, especially those involving LCR and E6. L2 and L1 ORF behavior is opposite to that of oncogenes E6 and E7. The first pair possesses relatively low numbers of CpG sites clustered in CGIs while the oncogenes possess a relatively high number of CpG sites not associated to CGIs. In all HPVs, E2/E4 is the only region with at least one CGI and shows a higher content of CpG sites in every HPV type with an

  6. Meta-analysis of human papillomavirus infection concordance

    PubMed Central

    Reiter, Paul L.; Pendergraft, William F.; Brewer, Noel T.

    2010-01-01

    Background Estimates of human papillomavirus (HPV) concordance among sexual partners are important for various public health activities, from counseling individual patients to predicting the impact of HPV vaccination. Methods We systematically searched PubMed and EMBASE for studies of HPV concordance among heterosexual couples published through 2008 in English. Two coders independently abstracted data using standardized forms. We integrated concordance data using random-effects meta-analysis. Results Thirty studies (33 study populations) that met inclusion criteria reported concordance data for 2,972 couples. Most studies were cross-sectional, cohort studies conducted in Europe or Asia that used DNA hybridization to test for HPV, sometimes in conjunction with polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Overall, 25.5% (95% CI: 17.2%-36.1%) of couples were infected with 1 or more of the same HPV types. Among couples with both members HPV-positive, 63.2% (95% CI: 49.1%-75.3%) were infected with 1 or more of the same viral types. Positive concordance was higher for female partners of men with HPV infections than for male partners of women with HPV infections. Positive concordance was also higher for studies using PCR and for the few studies that recruited men with HPV-related disease. Conclusions Sexual partners of HPV-infected individuals had high rates of HPV infection, suggesting a need for increased attention to this group. Impact Our refined estimates of HPV concordance can inform clinical encounters and public health planning. Future HPV concordance studies should use more rigorous research designs, characterize their participants in greater detail, and study more meaningful populations. PMID:20833971

  7. Quadrivalent Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Effectiveness: A Swedish National Cohort Study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Incidence of condyloma, or genital warts (GW), is the earliest possible disease outcome to measure when assessing the effectiveness of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination strategies. Efficacy trials that follow prespecified inclusion and exclusion criteria may not be fully generalizable to real-life HPV vaccination programs, which target a broader segment of the population. We assessed GW incidence after on-demand vaccination with quadrivalent HPV vaccine using individual-level data from the entire Swedish population. Methods An open cohort of girls and women aged 10 to 44 years living in Sweden between 2006 and 2010 (N > 2.2 million) was linked to multiple population registers to identify incident GW in relation to HPV vaccination. For vaccine effectiveness, incidence rate ratios of GW were estimated using time-to-event analyses with adjustment for attained age and parental education level, stratifying on age at first vaccination. Results A total of 124 000 girls and women were vaccinated between 2006 and 2010. Girls and women with at least one university-educated parent were 15 times more likely to be vaccinated before age 20 years than girls and women whose parents did not complete high school (relative risk ratio = 15.45, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 14.65 to 16.30). Among those aged older than 20 years, GW rates declined among the unvaccinated, suggesting that HPV vaccines were preferentially used by women at high risk of GW. Vaccination effectiveness was 76% (95% CI = 73% to 79%) among those who received three doses of the vaccine with their first dose before age 20 years. Vaccine effectiveness was highest in girls vaccinated before age 14 years (effectiveness = 93%, 95% CI = 73% to 98%). Conclusions Young age at first vaccination is imperative for maximizing quadrivalent HPV vaccine effectiveness. PMID:23486550

  8. Human Papillomavirus Infection in Women from Tlaxcala, Mexico

    PubMed Central

    Velázquez-Márquez, Noé; Jaime Jiménez-Aranda, Lucio; Sánchez-Alonso, Patricia; Santos-López, Gerardo; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Vallejo-Ruiz, Verónica

    2010-01-01

    Cervical cancer is an important health problem in women living in developing countries. Infection with some genotypes of human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most important risk factor associated with cervical cancer. Little information exists about HPV genotype distribution in rural and suburban regions of Mexico. Thus, we determined the prevalence of HPV genotypes in women from Tlaxcala, one of the poorest states in central Mexico, and we evaluated age infection prevalence and risk factors associated with cervical neoplasm. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 236 women seeking gynecological care at the Mexican Institute for Social Security in Tlaxcala, Mexico. Cervical scrapings were diagnosed as normal, low-grade, and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LGSIL, HGSIL). Parallel samples were used to detect HPV genotypes by PCR assays using type-specific primers for HPV 6, 11, 16, 18, and 31. An epidemiological questionnaire was applied. Prevalence of HPV infection was 31.3%. From the infected samples, prevalence of HPV 16 was 45.9%; HPV 18, 31.1%; HPV 31, 16.2%; HPV 6, 10.8%; HPV 11, 6.7%. With regard to age, the highest HPV prevalence (43.5%) was found in the 18- to 24-year-old group and the lowest (19%) in the 45- to 54-year-old group. None of the risk factors showed association with cervical neoplasia grade. HPV 16 was the most common in cervical lesions. HPV was present in 22% of normal samples and, of these, 82.6% represented high-risk HPVs. Tlaxcala showed HPV prevalence comparable to that of the largest cities in Mexico, with higher prevalence for HPV 31. PMID:24031552

  9. Prevalence of cervical human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in Vanuatu.

    PubMed

    Aruhuri, Bernadette; Tarivonda, Len; Tenet, Vanessa; Sinha, Rohit; Snijders, Peter J F; Clifford, Gary; Pang, James; McAdam, Margaret; Meijer, Chris J L M; Frazer, Ian H; Franceschi, Silvia

    2012-05-01

    To provide information on human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence and the distribution of individual HPV types in Pacific Islands, we conducted a population-based survey in Vanuatu, South Pacific. Nine hundred and eighty-seven women between 18 and 64 years of age were included. GP5(+)/6(+)-mediated PCR assay was used for HPV testing. The prevalence of 44 HPV types was 28.4% corresponding to an age (world)-standardized prevalence of 25.0% [95% confidence interval (CI), 21.9%-28.0%]. The prevalence of high-risk (HR) HPV types was 21.7% (age-standardized prevalence of 19.2%; 95% CI, 16.4%-22.0%). Among 840 women with adequate cytologic results, 13.6% showed cervical abnormalities, including 3.6% with high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL) and 0.8% with invasive cervical carcinoma. HPV prevalence declined from 46.1% in women aged ≤21 to 15.3% in those ≥45 years. Being single was significantly associated with HPV positivity. HR HPV findings by PCR assay and hybrid capture 2 (HC2; conducted in Vanuatu) were moderately correlated (κ test = 0.59). The positive predictive values of HR HPV positivity for HSIL or worse were 27.6% for PCR and 35.2% for HC2 among women aged ≥30. Nearly half of screening-positive women could not be reevaluated mainly on account of the difficulty to trace back women. The availability of a rapid HPV testing method that allows see-and-treat approaches at the same visit would be, therefore, essential. On account of their high cumulative burden of cervical lesions, also women older than 40 years should be included in at least the first screening round in unscreened populations.

  10. Human papillomavirus infection in women from tlaxcala, Mexico.

    PubMed

    Velázquez-Márquez, Noé; Jaime Jiménez-Aranda, Lucio; Sánchez-Alonso, Patricia; Santos-López, Gerardo; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Vallejo-Ruiz, Verónica

    2010-07-01

    Cervical cancer is an important health problem in women living in developing countries. Infection with some genotypes of human papillomavirus (HPV) is the most important risk factor associated with cervical cancer. Little information exists about HPV genotype distribution in rural and suburban regions of Mexico. Thus, we determined the prevalence of HPV genotypes in women from Tlaxcala, one of the poorest states in central Mexico, and we evaluated age infection prevalence and risk factors associated with cervical neoplasm. A cross-sectional study was conducted in 236 women seeking gynecological care at the Mexican Institute for Social Security in Tlaxcala, Mexico. Cervical scrapings were diagnosed as normal, low-grade, and high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LGSIL, HGSIL). Parallel samples were used to detect HPV genotypes by PCR assays using type-specific primers for HPV 6, 11, 16, 18, and 31. An epidemiological questionnaire was applied. Prevalence of HPV infection was 31.3%. From the infected samples, prevalence of HPV 16 was 45.9%; HPV 18, 31.1%; HPV 31, 16.2%; HPV 6, 10.8%; HPV 11, 6.7%. With regard to age, the highest HPV prevalence (43.5%) was found in the 18- to 24-year-old group and the lowest (19%) in the 45- to 54-year-old group. None of the risk factors showed association with cervical neoplasia grade. HPV 16 was the most common in cervical lesions. HPV was present in 22% of normal samples and, of these, 82.6% represented high-risk HPVs. Tlaxcala showed HPV prevalence comparable to that of the largest cities in Mexico, with higher prevalence for HPV 31.

  11. Human papillomavirus (HPV) and oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Dalianis, Tina

    2014-12-01

    Numerous reports in recent decades have shown that, in addition to smoking and alcohol, human papillomavirus (HPV) is also associated with the development of oropharyngeal squamous cell carcinoma (OPSCC), predominantly in the tonsils and base of the tongue. In 2007, the International Agency on Research against Cancer (IARC) therefore declared HPV to be a risk factor for OPSCC and noted that 80% of those affected are men. In addition, patients with HPV-positive OPSCC, in particular never-smokers, have a much better clinical response to therapy than patients with HPV-negative OPSCC and other head and neck cancers. Most patients with HPV-positive OPSCC may thus not need the increasingly intensive chemo-radiotherapy currently administered today to most patients with head neck cancers and associated with many adverse effects. Furthermore, an increase in the incidence of OPSCC has been observed in many western countries, accompanied by a rise in the proportion of HPV-positive tumors. Patients with HPV-positive OPSCC, like those with cervical cancer, more often have an earlier sexual debut and have more sexual partners. It has therefore been proposed that the increased incidence of OPSCC observed might be due to an epidemic of sexually transmitted HPV. The important issues today regarding this growing cohort of patients with HPV-positive OPSCC are therefore individualized treatment and prevention. More specifically, selected HPV-positive OPSCC patients with biomarkers of good prognosis might be included in randomized trials with less intensive treatment. HPV vaccination should also be considered for boys, in addition to the current recommendations for immunization of girls.

  12. Commercially available molecular tests for human papillomaviruses (HPV): 2015 update.

    PubMed

    Poljak, Mario; Kocjan, Boštjan J; Oštrbenk, Anja; Seme, Katja

    2016-03-01

    Commercial molecular tests for human papillomaviruses (HPV) are invaluable diagnostic tools in cervical carcinoma screening and management of women with cervical precancerous lesions as well as important research tools for epidemiological studies, vaccine development, and implementation and monitoring of vaccination programs. In this third inventory of commercial HPV tests, we identified 193 distinct commercial HPV tests and at least 127 test variants available on the market in 2015, which represents a 54% and 79% increase in the number of distinct HPV tests and variants, respectively, in comparison to our last inventory performed in 2012. Identified HPV tests were provisionally divided into eight main groups and several subgroups. Among the 193 commercial HPV tests, all but two target alpha-HPV types only. Although the number of commercial HPV tests with at least one published study in peer-reviewed literature has increased significantly in the last three years, several published performance evaluations are still not in line with agreed-upon standards in the HPV community. Manufacturers should invest greater effort into evaluating their products and publishing validation/evaluation results in peer-reviewed journals. To achieve this, more clinically oriented external quality-control panels and initiatives are required. For evaluating the analytical performance of the entire range of HPV tests currently on the market, more diverse and reliable external quality-control programs based on international standards for all important HPV types are indispensable. The performance of a wider range of HPV tests must be promptly evaluated on a variety of alternative clinical specimens. In addition, more complete HPV assays containing validated sample-extraction protocols and appropriate internal controls are urgently needed. Provision of a broader range of automated systems allowing large-scale HPV testing as well as the development of reliable, rapid, and affordable molecular

  13. Immune therapy for human papillomaviruses-related cancers.

    PubMed

    Rosales, Ricardo; Rosales, Carlos

    2014-12-10

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are a large family of double strand DNA viruses comprising more than 180 types. Infection with HPV is very common and it is associated with benign and malignant proliferation of skin and squamous mucosae. Many HPVs, considered low-risk such as HPV 6 and 11, produce warts; while high-risk viruses, such as HPVs 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, and 58, induce tumors. About 5% of all cancers in men and women are associated with HPV infection. Because there are not antiviral drugs for HPV infection, current therapies for low-risk HPV infections involve physical removal of the lesion by cryotherapy, trichloracetic acid, laser, or surgical removal. Surgical procedures are effective in the treatment of pre-cancerous lesions, however after these procedures, many recurrences appear due to new re-infections, or to failure of the procedure to eliminate the HPV. In addition, HPV can inhibit recognition of malignant cells by the immune system, leading to the development of cancer lesions. When this occurs, radiotherapy and chemotherapy are then used. Unfortunately, about 50% of the HPV-cancer patients still die. In the past decade, a better knowledge of the natural history of the virus-host interaction and of the immune response against this viral infection has brought new therapeutic strategies geared to modulate the immune system to generate an efficient virus-specific cytotoxic response. Novel HPV protein-expressing vaccines have shown some significant clinical efficacy and systemic HPV-specific cytotoxic T cell responses. This review will describe the current status of the several therapeutic strategies used to treat HPV-induced lesions, and discuss the various new therapies now being tested.

  14. Immune therapy for human papillomaviruses-related cancers

    PubMed Central

    Rosales, Ricardo; Rosales, Carlos

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are a large family of double strand DNA viruses comprising more than 180 types. Infection with HPV is very common and it is associated with benign and malignant proliferation of skin and squamous mucosae. Many HPVs, considered low-risk such as HPV 6 and 11, produce warts; while high-risk viruses, such as HPVs 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 39, 45, 51, 52, 56, and 58, induce tumors. About 5% of all cancers in men and women are associated with HPV infection. Because there are not antiviral drugs for HPV infection, current therapies for low-risk HPV infections involve physical removal of the lesion by cryotherapy, trichloracetic acid, laser, or surgical removal. Surgical procedures are effective in the treatment of pre-cancerous lesions, however after these procedures, many recurrences appear due to new re-infections, or to failure of the procedure to eliminate the HPV. In addition, HPV can inhibit recognition of malignant cells by the immune system, leading to the development of cancer lesions. When this occurs, radiotherapy and chemotherapy are then used. Unfortunately, about 50% of the HPV-cancer patients still die. In the past decade, a better knowledge of the natural history of the virus-host interaction and of the immune response against this viral infection has brought new therapeutic strategies geared to modulate the immune system to generate an efficient virus-specific cytotoxic response. Novel HPV protein-expressing vaccines have shown some significant clinical efficacy and systemic HPV-specific cytotoxic T cell responses. This review will describe the current status of the several therapeutic strategies used to treat HPV-induced lesions, and discuss the various new therapies now being tested. PMID:25493236

  15. Human Papillomavirus Genotype Distribution in Invasive Cervical Cancer in Pakistan

    PubMed Central

    Loya, Asif; Serrano, Beatriz; Rasheed, Farah; Tous, Sara; Hassan, Mariam; Clavero, Omar; Raza, Muhammad; De Sanjosé, Silvia; Bosch, F. Xavier; Alemany, Laia

    2016-01-01

    Few studies have assessed the burden of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in Pakistan. We aim to provide specific information on HPV-type distribution in invasive cervical cancer (ICC) in the country. A total of 280 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue blocks were consecutively selected from Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Centre (Lahore, Pakistan). HPV-DNA was detected by SPF10 broad-spectrum PCR followed by DNA enzyme immunoassay and genotyping by LiPA25. HPV-DNA prevalence was 87.5% (95%CI: 83.0–91.1), with 96.1% of cases histologically classified as squamous cell carcinoma. Most of the HPV-DNA positive cases presented single infections (95.9%). HPV16 was the most common type followed by HPV18 and 45. Among HPV-DNA positive, a significantly higher contribution of HPV16/18 was detected in Pakistan (78.4%; 72.7–83.3), compared to Asia (71.6%; 69.9–73.4) and worldwide (70.8%; 69.9–71.8) and a lower contribution of HPVs31/33/45/52/58 (11.1%; 7.9–15.7 vs. 19.8%; 18.3–21.3 and 18.5%; 17.7–19.3). HPV18 or HPV45 positive ICC cases were significantly younger than cases infected by HPV16 (mean age: 43.3, 44.4, 50.5 years, respectively). A routine cervical cancer screening and HPV vaccination program does not yet exist in Pakistan; however, the country could benefit from national integrated efforts for cervical cancer prevention and control. Calculated estimations based on our results show that current HPV vaccine could potentially prevent new ICC cases. PMID:27483322

  16. Human Papillomavirus 18 Genetic Variation and Cervical Cancer Risk Worldwide

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Alyce A.; Gheit, Tarik; Franceschi, Silvia

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human papillomavirus 18 (HPV18) is the second most carcinogenic HPV type, after HPV16, and it accounts for approximately 12% of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) as well as 37% of adenocarcinoma (ADC) of the cervix worldwide. We aimed to evaluate the worldwide diversity and carcinogenicity of HPV18 genetic variants by sequencing the entire long control region (LCR) and the E6 open reading frame of 711 HPV18-positive cervical samples from 39 countries, taking advantage of the International Agency for Research on Cancer biobank. A total of 209 unique HPV18 sequence variants were identified that formed three phylogenetic lineages (A, B, and C). A and B lineages each divided into four sublineages, including a newly identified candidate B4 sublineage. The distribution of lineages varied by geographical region, with B and C lineages found principally in Africa. HPV18 (sub)lineages were compared between 453 cancer cases and 236 controls, as well as between 81 ADC and 160 matched SCC cases. In region-stratified analyses, there were no significant differences in the distribution of HPV18 variant lineages between cervical cancer cases and controls or between ADC and SCC. In conclusion, our findings do not support the role of HPV18 (sub)lineages for discriminating cancer risk or explaining why HPV18 is more strongly linked with ADC than SCC. IMPORTANCE This is the largest and most geographically/ethnically diverse study of the genetic variation of HPV18 to date, providing a comprehensive reference for phylogenetic classification of HPV18 sublineages for epidemiological and biological studies. PMID:26269181

  17. Prevalence of High-Risk Human Papillomavirus Among Older Women

    PubMed Central

    Lindau, Stacy Tessler; Drum, Melinda L.; Gaumer, Elyzabeth; Surawska, Hanna; Jordan, Jeanne A.

    2009-01-01

    Objective To estimate the prevalence, genotypes, and individual-level correlates of high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) among women aged 57–85. Methods Community-residing women (n=1550), aged 57–85, were drawn from a nationally-representative probability sample. In-home interviews and biomeasures, including a self-collected vaginal specimen, were obtained between 2005 and 2006. Specimens were analyzed for high-risk HPV DNA using probe hybridization and signal amplification (hc2); of 1,028 specimens provided, 1,010 were adequate for analysis. All samples testing positive were analyzed for HPV DNA by L1 consensus polymerase chain reaction followed by type-specific hybridization. Results The overall population-based weighted estimate of high-risk HPV prevalence by hc2 was 6.0% (95% confidence interval [CI] = 4.5 to 7.9). Current marital and smoking status, frequency of sexual activity, history of cancer, and hysterectomy were associated with high-risk HPV positivity. Among high-risk HPV+ women, 63% had multiple type infections. HPV 16 or 18 was present in 17.4% of all high-risk HPV+ women. The most common high-risk genotypes among high-risk HPV+ women were HPV 61 (19.1%), 31 (13.1%), 52 (12.9%), 58 (12.5%), 83 (12.3%), 66(12.0%), 51 (11.7%), 45 (11.2%), 56 (10.3%), 53 (10.2%), 16 (9.7%), and 62 (9.2%). Being married and having an intact uterus were independently associated with lower prevalence of high-risk HPV. Among unmarried women, current sexual activity and smoking were independently and positively associated with high-risk HPV infection. Conclusions In this nationally representative population, nearly 1 in 16 women aged 57–85 were found to have high-risk HPV and prevalence was stable across older age groups. PMID:18978096

  18. Nucleic acid tests for the detection of alpha human papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Poljak, Mario; Cuzick, Jack; Kocjan, Boštjan J; Iftner, Thomas; Dillner, Joakim; Arbyn, Marc

    2012-11-20

    Testing for high-risk types of alpha human papillomaviruses (HPV) is an invaluable part of clinical guidelines for cervical carcinoma screening, management and treatment. In this comprehensive inventory of commercial tests for detection of alpha-HPV, we identified at least 125 distinct HPV tests and at least 84 variants of the original tests. However, only a small subset of HPV tests has documented clinical performance for any of the standard HPV testing indications. For more than 75% of HPV tests currently on the market, no single publication in peer-reviewed literature can be identified. HPV tests that have not been validated and lack proof of reliability, reproducibility and accuracy should not be used in clinical management. Once incorporated in the lab, it is essential that the whole procedure of HPV testing is subject to continuous and rigorous quality assurance to avoid sub-optimal, potentially harmful practices. Manufacturers of HPV tests are urged to put more effort into evaluating their current and future products analytically, using international standards, and for clinical applications, using clinically validated endpoints. To assist with analytical validation, the World Health Organization is developing international standards for HPV types other than HPV16 and HPV18 and is planning development of external quality control panels specifically designed to be used for performance evaluation of current and future HPV tests. There is a need for more competitively priced HPV tests, especially for resource-poor countries, and uniform test validation criteria based on international standards should enable issuing more competitive and fair tender notices for purchasing. Automation systems allowing large-scale testing, as well as further increases in clinical performance, are the main needs in the further improvement of HPV tests. This article forms part of a special supplement entitled "Comprehensive Control of HPV Infections and Related Diseases" Vaccine

  19. The Cell Cycle Timing of Human Papillomavirus DNA Replication.

    PubMed

    Reinson, Tormi; Henno, Liisi; Toots, Mart; Ustav, Mart; Ustav, Mart

    2015-01-01

    Viruses manipulate the cell cycle of the host cell to optimize conditions for more efficient viral genome replication. One strategy utilized by DNA viruses is to replicate their genomes non-concurrently with the host genome; in this case, the viral genome is amplified outside S phase. This phenomenon has also been described for human papillomavirus (HPV) vegetative genome replication, which occurs in G2-arrested cells; however, the precise timing of viral DNA replication during initial and stable replication phases has not been studied. We developed a new method to quantitate newly synthesized DNA levels and used this method in combination with cell cycle synchronization to show that viral DNA replication is initiated during S phase and is extended to G2 during initial amplification but follows the replication pattern of cellular DNA during S phase in the stable maintenance phase. E1 and E2 protein overexpression changes the replication time from S only to both the S and G2 phases in cells that stably maintain viral episomes. These data demonstrate that the active synthesis and replication of the HPV genome are extended into the G2 phase to amplify its copy number and the duration of HPV genome replication is controlled by the level of the viral replication proteins E1 and E2. Using the G2 phase for genome amplification may be an important adaptation that allows exploitation of changing cellular conditions during cell cycle progression. We also describe a new method to quantify newly synthesized viral DNA levels and discuss its benefits for HPV research.

  20. Barriers to human papillomavirus vaccine acceptability in Israel.

    PubMed

    Fisher, William A; Laniado, Hila; Shoval, Hila; Hakim, Marwan; Bornstein, Jacob

    2013-11-22

    Barriers to human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine acceptability in Israel include Israel's relatively low incidence of cervical cancer; the religiously-based 80% circumcision rate in Israel, which is regarded as contributing to the lower incidence of HPV infection in the country; the fact that HPV vaccine provides immunity against only few virus types; the vaccine's high cost; and the perception that HPV transmission is associated with unacceptable sexual relations. A recent survey has demonstrated that, following media two campaigns, Israeli's level of awareness of the vaccine increased but the actual vaccination rate remained low, at approximately 10%. Survey findings also indicated that an enduring barrier to HPV vaccination is the vaccine's high cost. Recent research on a convenience sample of Israeli undergraduate women 21 to 24 years of age showed that intentions to receive HPV vaccination in the coming year were a function of women's attitudes towards getting vaccinated and their perceptions of social support for doing so. Undergraduate women who intended to be vaccinated perceived the prevention of cervical cancer, avoidance of personal health threat, and avoidance of HPV infection per se to be the advantages of undergoing HPV vaccination. Disadvantages of getting vaccinated included fear of vaccine side effects, cost of the vaccine, and newness of the vaccine, doubts about vaccines, time required to undergo multiple vaccinations, and dislike of injections. Friends', mothers' and physicians' recommendations influenced women's intentions to be vaccinated in the coming year as well. This article forms part of a regional report entitled "Comprehensive Control of HPV Infections and Related Diseases in Israel" Vaccine Volume 31, Supplement 8, 2013. Updates of the progress in the field are presented in a separate monograph entitled "Comprehensive Control of HPV Infections and Related Diseases" Vaccine Volume 30, Supplement 5, 2012.

  1. Human Papillomavirus Genotype Distribution in Invasive Cervical Cancer in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Loya, Asif; Serrano, Beatriz; Rasheed, Farah; Tous, Sara; Hassan, Mariam; Clavero, Omar; Raza, Muhammad; De Sanjosé, Silvia; Bosch, F Xavier; Alemany, Laia

    2016-07-30

    Few studies have assessed the burden of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in Pakistan. We aim to provide specific information on HPV-type distribution in invasive cervical cancer (ICC) in the country. A total of 280 formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue blocks were consecutively selected from Shaukat Khanum Memorial Cancer Hospital and Research Centre (Lahore, Pakistan). HPV-DNA was detected by SPF10 broad-spectrum PCR followed by DNA enzyme immunoassay and genotyping by LiPA25. HPV-DNA prevalence was 87.5% (95%CI: 83.0-91.1), with 96.1% of cases histologically classified as squamous cell carcinoma. Most of the HPV-DNA positive cases presented single infections (95.9%). HPV16 was the most common type followed by HPV18 and 45. Among HPV-DNA positive, a significantly higher contribution of HPV16/18 was detected in Pakistan (78.4%; 72.7-83.3), compared to Asia (71.6%; 69.9-73.4) and worldwide (70.8%; 69.9-71.8) and a lower contribution of HPVs31/33/45/52/58 (11.1%; 7.9-15.7 vs. 19.8%; 18.3-21.3 and 18.5%; 17.7-19.3). HPV18 or HPV45 positive ICC cases were significantly younger than cases infected by HPV16 (mean age: 43.3, 44.4, 50.5 years, respectively). A routine cervical cancer screening and HPV vaccination program does not yet exist in Pakistan; however, the country could benefit from national integrated efforts for cervical cancer prevention and control. Calculated estimations based on our results show that current HPV vaccine could potentially prevent new ICC cases.

  2. The role of the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signalling pathway in human cancers induced by infection with human papillomaviruses.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lifang; Wu, Jianhong; Ling, Ming Tat; Zhao, Liang; Zhao, Kong-Nan

    2015-04-17

    Infection with Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) leads to the development of a wide-range of cancers, accounting for 5% of all human cancers. A prominent example is cervical cancer, one of the leading causes of cancer death in women worldwide. It has been well established that tumor development and progression induced by HPV infection is driven by the sustained expression of two oncogenes E6 and E7. The expression of E6 and E7 not only inhibits the tumor suppressors p53 and Rb, but also alters additional signalling pathways that may be equally important for transformation. Among these pathways, the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) signalling cascade plays a very important role in HPV-induced carcinogenesis by acting through multiple cellular and molecular events. In this review, we summarize the frequent amplification of PI3K/Akt/mTOR signals in HPV-induced cancers and discuss how HPV oncogenes E6/E7/E5 activate the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signalling pathway to modulate tumor initiation and progression and affect patient outcome. Improvement of our understanding of the mechanism by which the PI3K/Akt/mTOR signalling pathway contributes to the immortalization and carcinogenesis of HPV-transduced cells will assist in devising novel strategies for preventing and treating HPV-induced cancers.

  3. Gay and bisexual men's human papillomavirus vaccine intentions: a theory-based structural equation analysis.

    PubMed

    Wheldon, Christopher W; Buhi, Eric R; Daley, Ellen M

    2013-09-01

    In this study, we examined the structural relationships among constructs from the Health Belief Model as they relate to human papillomavirus vaccine intentions in young gay and bisexual men in the United States (N = 183). A model was identified that fit the data well and accounted for 56% of the variance in vaccine intentions. Perceived benefits and barriers were the most proximate predictors of intentions, whereas knowledge and perceived threat exerted only indirect influence. Clarifying the propositional structures within the Health Belief Model can help to advance our understanding of human papillomavirus-related cognitions and behaviors and inform vaccine promotion programs.

  4. Multiple oncogenic mutations and clonal relationship in spatially distinct benign human epidermal tumors

    PubMed Central

    Hafner, Christian; Toll, Agustí; Fernández-Casado, Alejandro; Earl, Julie; Marqués, Miriam; Acquadro, Francesco; Méndez-Pertuz, Marinela; Urioste, Miguel; Malats, Núria; Burns, Julie E.; Knowles, Margaret A.; Cigudosa, Juan C.; Hartmann, Arndt; Vogt, Thomas; Landthaler, Michael; Pujol, Ramón M.; Real, Francisco X.

    2010-01-01

    Malignant tumors result from the accumulation of genetic alterations in oncogenes and tumor suppressor genes. Much less is known about the genetic changes in benign tumors. Seborrheic keratoses (SK) are very frequent benign human epidermal tumors without malignant potential. We performed a comprehensive mutational screen of genes in the FGFR3-RAS-MAPK and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-AKT pathways from 175 SK, including multiple lesions from each patient. SK commonly harbored multiple bona fide oncogenic mutations in FGFR3, PIK3CA, KRAS, HRAS, EGFR, and AKT1 oncogenes but not in tumor suppressor genes TSC1 and PTEN. Despite the occurrence of oncogenic mutations and the evidence for downstream ERK/MAPK and PI3K pathway signaling, we did not find induction of senescence or a DNA damage response. Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) analysis revealed that SK are genetically stable. The pattern of oncogenic mutations and X chromosome inactivation departs significantly from randomness and indicates that spatially independent lesions from a given patient share a clonal relationship. Our findings show that multiple oncogenic mutations in the major signaling pathways involved in cancer are not sufficient to drive malignant tumor progression. Furthermore, our data provide clues on the origin and spread of oncogenic mutations in tissues, suggesting that apparently independent (multicentric) adult benign tumors may have a clonal origin. PMID:21078999

  5. Cervical human papillomavirus and HIV infection in women of child-bearing age in Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire, 2010

    PubMed Central

    Jaquet, A; Horo, A; Charbonneau, V; Ekouevi, D K; Roncin, L; Toure, B; Coffie, P; Minga, A; Sasco, A J; Garrigue, I; Fleury, H; Dabis, F

    2012-01-01

    Background: We sought to document the association of Human immunodeficiency Virus (HIV) infection and immunodeficiency with oncogenic Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection in women with no cervical neoplastic lesions identified through a cervical cancer screening programme in Côte d'Ivoire. Methods: A consecutive sample of women stratified on their HIV status and attending the national blood donor clinic or the closest HIV clinic was recruited during a cervical cancer screening programme based on the visual inspection. Diagnosis of HPV infection and genotype identification were based on the Linear Array; HPV test. Results: A total of 445 (254 HIV-positive and 191 HIV-negative) women were included. The prevalence of oncogenic HPV infection was 53.9% (95% confidence interval (CI) 47.9–59.9) in HIV-positive women and 33.7% (95% CI 27.1–40.3) in HIV-negative women (odds ratio (OR)=2.3 (95% CI 1.5–3.3)). In multivariate analysis, HIV-positive women with a CD4 count <200 cells mm3 or between 200 and 499 cells mm3 were more likely to harbour an oncogenic HPV compared with women with a CD4 count ⩾500 cells mm3 with OR of 2.8 (95% CI 1.1–8.1) and 1.7 (95% CI 1.0–2.9), respectively. Conclusion: A high prevalence of oncogenic HPV was found in women with no cervical neoplastic lesions, especially in HIV-positive women. Despite antiretroviral use, immunodeficiency was a main determinant of the presence of oncogenic HPV. PMID:22782349

  6. High risk human papillomavirus and Epstein Barr virus in human breast milk

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Multiple viruses, including human immunodeficiency virus, Epstein Barr virus (EBV) and mouse mammary tumour virus have been identified in human milk. High risk human papillomavirus (HPV) sequences have been identified in breast cancer. The aim of this study is to determine if viral sequences are present in human milk from normal lactating women. Findings Standard (liquid) and in situ polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques were used to identify HPV and EBV in human milk samples from normal lactating Australian women who had no history of breast cancer. High risk human papillomavirus was identified in milk samples of 6 of 40 (15%) from normal lactating women - sequencing on four samples showed three were HPV 16 and one was HPV 18. Epstein Barr virus was identified in fourteen samples (33%). Conclusion The presence of high risk HPV and EBV in human milk suggests the possibility of milk transmission of these viruses. However, given the rarity of viral associated malignancies in young people, it is possible but unlikely, that such transmission is associated with breast or other cancers. PMID:22937830

  7. Malignant transformation of diploid human fibroblasts by transfection of oncogenes

    SciTech Connect

    McCormick, J.J.

    1992-01-01

    This document consist of brief reports prepared by postdoctoral students supported by the project, each describing his accomplishments under the grant. Topics include (1) Malignant Transformation of MSU-1. 1 Cells by Gamma Radiation, (2) Correlation between Levels of ras Expression and Presence of Transformed Phenotypes Including Tumorigenicity, Using a Modulatable Promoter, (3) Relation between Specific rad Oncogene Expression, (4) Correlation of Genetic Changes in Fibroblastic Tumors with Malignancies, (5)Transformation of MSU-1.1 Cells by sis Oncogene, (6) Malignant Transformation of MSU-1.0 Cells, (7) Correlation of Urokinase Plasminogen Activation (mu-PA) with Malignant Phenotype, (8)Two Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis Studies of the Proteins of the Major Cell Strains of the MSU-1 Family of Cells, and (9) Correlation between Proteinase Activity Levels and Malignancy.

  8. Reduced expression of autophagy markers correlates with high-risk human papillomavirus infection in human cervical squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    WANG, HUA-YI; YANG, GUI-FANG; HUANG, YAN-HUA; HUANG, QI-WEN; GAO, JUN; ZHAO, XIAN-DA; HUANG, LI-MING; CHEN, HONG-LEI

    2014-01-01

    Infection by an oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV), in particular HPV16 and 18, is a high risk factor for developing cervical cancer; however, viral infection alone is not sufficient for cancer progression. Autophagy is hypothesized to be an important process during carcinogenesis. The aim of the present study was to investigate the association between autophagy and high-risk HPV (hrHPV) infection in human cervical squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs), and to analyze the clinical significance of this association. Quantum dot (QD)-based immunofluorescence histochemistry was used to detect the expression of autophagy markers, Beclin-1 and microtubule-associated proteins 1A/1B light chain 3B (LC3B) proteins, in 104 cases of cervical cancer (including 80 SCCs and 24 adenocarcinomas) and 20 normal cervical tissues. hrHPV (HPV16/18) infection was detected by QDs based fluorescence in situ hybridization in cervical cancers. The results revealed that the expression levels of Beclin-1 and LC3B were significantly lower in cervical cancer cells when compared with those of normal cervical squamous epithelial cells, and were found to negatively correlate with hrHPV infection. The expression levels of Beclin-1 and LC3B were not associated with age, tumor grade, tumor stage, tumor node metastasis stage or lymph node metastasis. However, a positive correlation was identified between Beclin-1 and LC3B protein expression. In addition, the absence of autophagy in combination with hrHPV infection may accelerate the progression of cervical SCC. In conclusion, decreased expression of Beclin-1 and LC3B may be important in cervical carcinogenesis. The hrHPV-host cell interaction may inhibit autophagy, which may aid virus duplication and infection, as well as cervical cancer development. PMID:25202355

  9. Evidence of recombination within human alpha-papillomavirus

    PubMed Central

    Angulo, Manuel; Carvajal-Rodríguez, Antonio

    2007-01-01

    Background Human papillomavirus (HPV) has a causal role in cervical cancer with almost half a million new cases occurring each year. Presence of the carcinogenic HPV is necessary for the development of the invasive carcinoma of the genital tract. Therefore, persistent infection with carcinogenic HPV causes virtually all cervical cancers. Some aspects of the molecular evolution of this virus, as the putative importance of recombination in its evolutionary history, are an opened current question. In addition, recombination could also be a significant issue nowadays since the frequency of co-infection with more than one HPV type is not a rare event and, thus, new recombinant types could be currently being generated. Results We have used human alpha-PV sequences from the public database at Los Alamos National Laboratory to report evidence that recombination may exist in this virus. A model-based population genetic approach was used to infer the recombination signal from the HPV DNA sequences grouped attending to phylogenetic and epidemiological information, as well as to clinical manifestations. Our results agree with recently published ones that use a different methodology to detect recombination associated to the gene L2. In addition, we have detected significant recombination signal in the genes E6, E7, L2 and L1 at different groups, and importantly within the high-risk type HPV16. The method used has recently been shown to be one of the most powerful and reliable procedures to detect the recombination signal. Conclusion We provide new support to the recent evidence of recombination in HPV. Additionally, we performed the recombination estimation assuming the best-fit model of nucleotide substitution and rate variation among sites, of the HPV DNA sequence sets. We found that the gene with recombination in most of the groups is L2 but the highest values were detected in L1 and E6. Gene E7 was recombinant only within the HPV16 type. The topic deserves further study

  10. Human papillomavirus detection in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Vietía, Dayahindara; Liuzzi, Juan; Ávila, Maira; De Guglielmo, Zoraya; Prado, Yrneh; Correnti, María

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Human Papillomavirus (HPV) has been associated with benign and malignant lesions in different epitheliums. The relationship between specific genotypes of high-risk HPV and some human cancers is well established. The aim of this work was to detect the HPV genotypes present in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). Methods We evaluated 71 samples of patients with histopathological diagnosis of HNSCC. The DNA extraction was conducted with the QIAGEN commercial kit. HPV detection and genotyping were performed by reverse hybridisation (INNO-LiPA) following the commercial specifications. Results The mean age of the patients evaluated was 60.7 ± 13.11 years. The distribution of the lesions included 25 (35.20%) cases of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the oral cavity, 23 (32.39%) of larynx, 16 (22.50%) of the oropharynx, 4 (5.63%) of paranasal sinus, and 2 (2. 80%) cases of SCC of the nostril. Of the patients, 78.9% were males, and of these 76% were tobacco users and 67.6% were alcohol consumers. The viral DNA was detected in 67.6% of the samples. The oral cavity and the larynx were the highest HPV-positivity sites with 35.40% and 29.10% respectively. The most frequent genotype was 16 as single infection (18.70%), or in combination with another HPV types. In the oral cavity and larynx the genotypes 16 or the combination 6 and 51 were present in 11.76% and 14.28%, respectively; and in the oropharynx the most frequent genotype was 16 in 22.50% of the cases, and in the paranasal sinus 50% presented infection with HPV-6. We observed that tumours with most advanced size and stage presented greater HPV positivity. Conclusions This study shows a high percentage of HPV positivity in SCC is mainly associated with high-risk HPV. It is important to highlight that viral infection, especially HPV-16, could be a risk factor in HNSCC progression. PMID:25374623

  11. Widespread flat warts associated with human papillomavirus type 5: a cutaneous manifestation of human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Prose, N S; von Knebel-Doeberitz, C; Miller, S; Milburn, P B; Heilman, E

    1990-11-01

    Numerous flat and tinea versicolor-like warts developed on the face, trunk, and upper extremities of a 10-year-old boy with human immunodeficiency virus infection. Nucleic acid analysis of involved skin revealed human papillomavirus type 5, which has sometimes been associated with epidermodysplasia verruciformis. This human papillomavirus type has also been described in patients with common variable immunodeficiency and dyskeratosis congenita and in renal allograft recipients. Human immunodeficiency virus infection should be added to the list of immune-related disorders that predispose to widespread flat warts.

  12. In vivo transformation of human skin with human papillomavirus type 11 from condylomatot acuminata

    SciTech Connect

    Kreider, J.W.; Howett, M.K.; Lill, N.L.; Bartlett, G.L.; Zaino, R.J.; Sedlacek, T.V.; Mortel, R.

    1986-08-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) have been implicated in the development of a number of human malignancies, but direct tests of their involvement have not been possible. The authors describe a system in which human skin from various skin from various sites was infected with HPV type 11 (HPV-11) extracted from vulvar condylomata and was grafted beneath the renal capsule of athymic mice. Most of the skin grafts so treated underwent morphological transformation, resulting in the development of condylomata identical to those which occur spontaneously in patients. Foreskins responded with the most vigorous proliferative response to HPV-11. The lesions produced the characteristic intranuclear group-specific antigen of papillomaviruses. Both dot blot and Southern blot analysis of DNA from the lesions revealed the presence of HPV-11 DNA in the transformed grafts. These results demonstrate the first laboratory system for the study of the interaction of human skin with an HPV. The method may be useful in understanding the mechanisms of HPV transformation and replication and is free of the ethical restraints which have impeded study. This system will allow the direct study of factors which permit neoplastic progression of HPV-induced cutaneous lesions in human tissues.

  13. Human papillomavirus-32-associated focal epithelial hyperplasia accompanying HPV-16-positive papilloma-like lesions in oral mucosa.

    PubMed

    Liu, Na; Wang, Jiayi; Lei, Lei; Li, Yanzhong; Zhou, Min; Dan, Hongxia; Zeng, Xin; Chen, Qianming

    2013-05-01

    Human papillomavirus infection can cause a variety of benign or malignant oral lesions, and the various genotypes can cause distinct types of lesions. To our best knowledge, there has been no report of 2 different human papillomavirus-related oral lesions in different oral sites in the same patient before. This paper reported a patient with 2 different oral lesions which were clinically and histologically in accord with focal epithelial hyperplasia and oral papilloma, respectively. Using DNA extracted from these 2 different lesions, tissue blocks were tested for presence of human papillomavirus followed by specific polymerase chain reaction testing for 6, 11, 13, 16, 18, and 32 subtypes in order to confirm the clinical diagnosis. Finally, human papillomavirus-32-positive focal epithelial hyperplasia accompanying human papillomavirus-16-positive oral papilloma-like lesions were detected in different sites of the oral mucosa. Nucleotide sequence sequencing further confirmed the results. So in our clinical work, if the simultaneous occurrences of different human papillomavirus associated lesions are suspected, the multiple biopsies from different lesions and detection of human papillomavirus genotype are needed to confirm the diagnosis.

  14. Human papillomavirus infection, vaccination, and cervical cancer communication: the protection dilemma faced by women in southern Appalachia.

    PubMed

    Hutson, Sadie P; Dorgan, Kelly A; Duvall, Kathryn L; Garrett, Linda H

    2011-11-30

    Human papillomavirus is the most frequently occurring sexually transmitted infection and has been recognized as the necessary cause of cervical cancer. Understanding the shift in public awareness caused by recent changes to cervical prevention is critical to addressing cervical cancer disparities in Appalachia. Since the human papillomavirus vaccine was approved for prevention, little data have been collected regarding human papillomavirus risk assessment and vaccine perceptions among Appalachian women. The purpose of the authors in this study was to investigate communication and cultural issues via a social scripting framework that could influence human papillomavirus vaccine uptake among southern Appalachian women; and explore participants' perceptions of human papillomavirus, cervical cancer, and the vaccine. A qualitative, descriptive design was employed to examine these issues in eight counties in northeast Tennessee and southwest Virginia. Thirty-nine women aged 18-49 years participated in a single individual interview or focus group session from October 2007 through August 2008. Interview and focus group data were audio-taped and transcribed verbatim. Two major themes emerged from the data: the human papillomavirus vaccine protection dilemma and spheres of silence surrounding the human papillomavirus vaccine protection dilemma. Study findings suggested areas for future research and may assist healthcare professionals in approaching southern Appalachian women as they make decisions regarding cervical cancer prevention.

  15. Implementation of human papillomavirus immunization in the developing world.

    PubMed

    Kane, Mark A; Serrano, Beatriz; de Sanjosé, Silvia; Wittet, Scott

    2012-11-20

    Cervical cancer is the second leading cause of cancer death in women in less developed regions of the world and the leading cause of cancer deaths in GAVI-eligible countries, where 54% of worldwide cervical cancer deaths occur. If prevention is not implemented in these countries, population growth alone will lead to a 63% increase in deaths by 2025. Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines are routinely used in the National Immunization Programs in most industrial countries, and the decision by the GAVI Alliance to accept applications from eligible developing countries for HPV vaccine support is the single most important opportunity for children in these countries to be protected against HPV-related diseases. As it has done for other vaccines, such as Haemophilus influenzae type b, rotavirus and pneumococcal conjugate vaccines, GAVI should strongly consider developing and funding a group dedicated to working on all aspects of HPV vaccine introduction in the developing world. Immunization in middle-income developing countries not eligible for GAVI support will depend on "tiered" pricing policies or regional procurement schemes to make vaccine available at prices significantly lower than those in industrial countries. Immunization coverage of infants has reached high levels in many of the poorest developing countries where complementary strategies for HPV control, such as adult screening and treatment, are poorly developed. Immunizing young adolescents will require expansion of immunization infrastructure to reach cohorts that currently are largely unreached, but the success of school-based strategies in industrial countries and developing country demonstration projects provides hope that relatively high coverage may be achieved in many countries. Communication and advocacy strategies for HPV control need to carefully consider local cultural attitudes toward HPV-related issues. Current strategies supported by health economic analyses call for female only immunization, but

  16. Comprehensive control of human papillomavirus infections and related diseases.

    PubMed

    Bosch, F Xavier; Broker, Thomas R; Forman, David; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Gillison, Maura L; Doorbar, John; Stern, Peter L; Stanley, Margaret; Arbyn, Marc; Poljak, Mario; Cuzick, Jack; Castle, Philip E; Schiller, John T; Markowitz, Lauri E; Fisher, William A; Canfell, Karen; Denny, Lynette A; Franco, Eduardo L; Steben, Marc; Kane, Mark A; Schiffman, Mark; Meijer, Chris J L M; Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy; Castellsagué, Xavier; Kim, Jane J; Brotons, Maria; Alemany, Laia; Albero, Ginesa; Diaz, Mireia; de Sanjosé, Silvia

    2013-12-29

    Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is recognized as one of the major causes of infection-related cancer worldwide, as well as the causal factor in other diseases. Strong evidence for a causal etiology with HPV has been stated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer for cancers of the cervix uteri, penis, vulva, vagina, anus and oropharynx (including base of the tongue and tonsils). Of the estimated 12.7 million new cancers occurring in 2008 worldwide, 4.8% were attributable to HPV infection, with substantially higher incidence and mortality rates seen in developing versus developed countries. In recent years, we have gained tremendous knowledge about HPVs and their interactions with host cells, tissues and the immune system; have validated and implemented strategies for safe and efficacious prophylactic vaccination against HPV infections; have developed increasingly sensitive and specific molecular diagnostic tools for HPV detection for use in cervical cancer screening; and have substantially increased global awareness of HPV and its many associated diseases in women, men, and children. While these achievements exemplify the success of biomedical research in generating important public health interventions, they also generate new and daunting challenges: costs of HPV prevention and medical care, the implementation of what is technically possible, socio-political resistance to prevention opportunities, and the very wide ranges of national economic capabilities and health care systems. Gains and challenges faced in the quest for comprehensive control of HPV infection and HPV-related cancers and other disease are summarized in this review. The information presented may be viewed in terms of a reframed paradigm of prevention of cervical cancer and other HPV-related diseases that will include strategic combinations of at least four major components: 1) routine introduction of HPV vaccines to women in all countries, 2) extension and simplification of

  17. Biological relevance of human papillomaviruses in vulvar cancer.

    PubMed

    Halec, Gordana; Alemany, Laia; Quiros, Beatriz; Clavero, Omar; Höfler, Daniela; Alejo, Maria; Quint, Wim; Pawlita, Michael; Bosch, Francesc X; de Sanjose, Silvia

    2017-04-01

    The carcinogenic role of high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) types in the increasing subset of vulvar intraepithelial neoplasia and vulvar cancer in young women has been established. However, the actual number of vulvar cancer cases attributed to HPV is still imprecisely defined. In an attempt to provide a more precise definition of HPV-driven vulvar cancer, we performed HPV-type-specific E6*I mRNA analyses available for 20 HR-/possible HR (pHR)-HPV types, on tissue samples from 447 cases of vulvar cancer. HPV DNA genotyping was performed using SPF10-LiPA25 assay due to its high sensitivity in formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissues. Data on p16(INK4a) expression was available for comparative analysis via kappa statistics. The use of highly sensitive assays covering the detection of HPV mRNA in a broad spectrum of mucosal HPV types resulted in the detection of viral transcripts in 87% of HPV DNA+ vulvar cancers. Overall concordance between HPV mRNA+ and p16(INK4a) upregulation (strong, diffuse immunostaining in >25% of tumor cells) was 92% (K=0.625, 95% confidence interval (CI)=0.531-0.719). Among these cases, 83% were concordant pairs of HPV mRNA+ and p16(INK4a)+ and 9% were concordant pairs of HPV mRNA- and p16(INK4a)-. Our data confirm the biological role of HR-/pHR-HPV types in the great majority of HPV DNA+ vulvar cancers, resulting in an HPV-attributable fraction of at least 21% worldwide. Most HPV DNA+ vulvar cancers were associated with HPV16 (85%), but a causative role for other, less frequently occurring mucosal HPV types (HPV26, 66, 67, 68, 70 and 73) was also confirmed at the mRNA level for the first time. These findings should be taken into consideration for future screening options as HPV-associated vulvar preneoplastic lesions have increased in incidence in younger women and require different treatment than vulvar lesions that develop from rare autoimmune-related mechanisms in older women.

  18. High prevalence of human papillomaviruses in Ghanaian pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Schulze, Marco H; Völker, Fabian M; Lugert, Raimond; Cooper, Paul; Hasenclever, Kai; Groß, Uwe; Pfister, Herbert; Silling, Steffi

    2016-12-01

    Data about the prevalence of human papillomaviruses (HPV) in African women with normal and abnormal cervical cytology are still scarce. Current HPV vaccines contain HPV types, which mainly represent the HPV epidemiology of industrial countries. As further developments of HPV vaccines are going on, it is necessary to regard regional differences in HPV type prevalence to ensure optimal protection by the vaccine. Vaginal swabs of Ghanaian pregnant women, routinely collected before delivery to rule out bacterial infections causing early onset sepsis, were screened for 12 high-risk (HR), 13 probably/possibly (pHR), and 18 low-risk (LR) HPV types. Most pregnant women come for delivery to the hospital. This was considered as appropriate possibility to have an unselected group of women. HPV DNA were detected in 55/165 women (33.3, 95 % CI 26.3-41.1 %). Thirty-four out of fifty-five (61.8, 95 % CI 47.7-74.3 %) of HPV-positive women were infected with HR and/or pHR HPV types. The five most prevalent HR or pHR HPV types were HPV-52 and HPV-67 (7 women each, 4.2, 95 % CI 1.9-8.9 %), HPV-53 (six women, 3.6, 95 % CI 1.5-8.1 %), HPV-45 (five women, 3.0, 95 % CI 1.1-7.3 %), and HPV-18 (four women, 2.4, 95 % CI 0.8-6.5 %), respectively. HPV-16 was found in two women only (1.2, 95 % CI 0.2-4.8 %). Future HPV vaccine research may devote special interest to HPV-67 and HPV-53 provided further studies confirm their high prevalence in the general population of Sub-Saharan African countries. The true carcinogenic potential of HPV-67, which is a member of species alpha9 including HPV-16, and so far categorized as pHR, should be clarified.

  19. Distribution of human papillomavirus genotypes in cervical lesions

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Li; Cong, Xiao; Shi, Mai; Wang, Xiu-Hong; Liu, Hai-Yan; Bian, Mei-Lu

    2017-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to investigate the distribution of human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes in cervical lesions, and the association between different HPV genotypes and cervical lesions. Between January 2013 and June 2014, the HPV type determinations of nucleic acid by use of fluorescence polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method of 15,192 outpatients in China-Japan Friendship Hospital were performed and the infection status was analyzed. The results showed that: i) 2,366 Cases were HPV positive and 12,826 cases were HPV negative, the overall infection rate was 15.57% (2,366/15,192), in which a single genotype of HPV infection rate was 11.63% (1,767/15,192), and multiple genotypes of HPV infection rate was 3.94% (599/15,192); ii) HPV16, HPV52 and HPV58 infections were the most common HPV genotypes, the infection rates were 3.95% (600/15,192), 2.86% (435/15,192) and 2.67% (406/15,192), respectively; and iii) According to the gold standard of histopathological analysis via hematoxylin-eosin staining, HPV16, HPV52 and HPV58 accounted for 58.80% (154/267) of all CIN2 or above squamous epithelial lesions. Furthermore, three cases with pathological changes of the cervical severe glandular epithelium were all HPV18 infection. The difference was statistically significant (χ2=60.74, P<0.001). Single HPV subtype infection was primarily associated with HPV16, HPV52 and HPV58. In conclusion, HPV type detection had a may be important in screening of cervical lesions as a difference in pathogenic ability was noted among different HPV genotypes. As cervical cancer is an infectious disease, HPV testing may help detect more precancerous lesions, thus reducing the morbidity and mortality of cervical cancer. HPV16, HPV52 and HPV58 were associated with severe cervical squamous epithelial lesions; HPV18 was associated with cervical severe glandular cell pathological changes, although it was not the most common HPV genotype in China. When positive, a clinical cervical

  20. Comprehensive control of human papillomavirus infections and related diseases.

    PubMed

    Bosch, F Xavier; Broker, Thomas R; Forman, David; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Gillison, Maura L; Doorbar, John; Stern, Peter L; Stanley, Margaret; Arbyn, Marc; Poljak, Mario; Cuzick, Jack; Castle, Philip E; Schiller, John T; Markowitz, Lauri E; Fisher, William A; Canfell, Karen; Denny, Lynette A; Franco, Eduardo L; Steben, Marc; Kane, Mark A; Schiffman, Mark; Meijer, Chris J L M; Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy; Castellsagué, Xavier; Kim, Jane J; Brotons, Maria; Alemany, Laia; Albero, Ginesa; Diaz, Mireia; de Sanjosé, Silvia

    2013-12-31

    Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is recognized as one of the major causes of infection-related cancer worldwide, as well as the causal factor in other diseases. Strong evidence for a causal etiology with HPV has been stated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer for cancers of the cervix uteri, penis, vulva, vagina, anus and oropharynx (including base of the tongue and tonsils). Of the estimated 12.7 million new cancers occurring in 2008 worldwide, 4.8% were attributable to HPV infection, with substantially higher incidence and mortality rates seen in developing versus developed countries. In recent years, we have gained tremendous knowledge about HPVs and their interactions with host cells, tissues and the immune system; have validated and implemented strategies for safe and efficacious prophylactic vaccination against HPV infections; have developed increasingly sensitive and specific molecular diagnostic tools for HPV detection for use in cervical cancer screening; and have substantially increased global awareness of HPV and its many associated diseases in women, men, and children. While these achievements exemplify the success of biomedical research in generating important public health interventions, they also generate new and daunting challenges: costs of HPV prevention and medical care, the implementation of what is technically possible, socio-political resistance to prevention opportunities, and the very wide ranges of national economic capabilities and health care systems. Gains and challenges faced in the quest for comprehensive control of HPV infection and HPV-related cancers and other disease are summarized in this review. The information presented may be viewed in terms of a reframed paradigm of prevention of cervical cancer and other HPV-related diseases that will include strategic combinations of at least four major components: 1) routine introduction of HPV vaccines to women in all countries, 2) extension and simplification of

  1. Comprehensive control of human papillomavirus infections and related diseases.

    PubMed

    Bosch, F Xavier; Broker, Thomas R; Forman, David; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Gillison, Maura L; Doorbar, John; Stern, Peter L; Stanley, Margaret; Arbyn, Marc; Poljak, Mario; Cuzick, Jack; Castle, Philip E; Schiller, John T; Markowitz, Lauri E; Fisher, William A; Canfell, Karen; Denny, Lynette A; Franco, Eduardo L; Steben, Marc; Kane, Mark A; Schiffman, Mark; Meijer, Chris J L M; Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy; Castellsagué, Xavier; Kim, Jane J; Brotons, Maria; Alemany, Laia; Albero, Ginesa; Diaz, Mireia; de Sanjosé, Silvia

    2013-12-30

    Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is recognized as one of the major causes of infection-related cancer worldwide, as well as the causal factor in other diseases. Strong evidence for a causal etiology with HPV has been stated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer for cancers of the cervix uteri, penis, vulva, vagina, anus and oropharynx (including base of the tongue and tonsils). Of the estimated 12.7 million new cancers occurring in 2008 worldwide, 4.8% were attributable to HPV infection, with substantially higher incidence and mortality rates seen in developing versus developed countries. In recent years, we have gained tremendous knowledge about HPVs and their interactions with host cells, tissues and the immune system; have validated and implemented strategies for safe and efficacious prophylactic vaccination against HPV infections; have developed increasingly sensitive and specific molecular diagnostic tools for HPV detection for use in cervical cancer screening; and have substantially increased global awareness of HPV and its many associated diseases in women, men, and children. While these achievements exemplify the success of biomedical research in generating important public health interventions, they also generate new and daunting challenges: costs of HPV prevention and medical care, the implementation of what is technically possible, socio-political resistance to prevention opportunities, and the very wide ranges of national economic capabilities and health care systems. Gains and challenges faced in the quest for comprehensive control of HPV infection and HPV-related cancers and other disease are summarized in this review. The information presented may be viewed in terms of a reframed paradigm of prevention of cervical cancer and other HPV-related diseases that will include strategic combinations of at least four major components: 1) routine introduction of HPV vaccines to women in all countries, 2) extension and simplification of

  2. Comprehensive control of human papillomavirus infections and related diseases.

    PubMed

    Bosch, F Xavier; Broker, Thomas R; Forman, David; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Gillison, Maura L; Doorbar, John; Stern, Peter L; Stanley, Margaret; Arbyn, Marc; Poljak, Mario; Cuzick, Jack; Castle, Philip E; Schiller, John T; Markowitz, Lauri E; Fisher, William A; Canfell, Karen; Denny, Lynette A; Franco, Eduardo L; Steben, Marc; Kane, Mark A; Schiffman, Mark; Meijer, Chris J L M; Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy; Castellsagué, Xavier; Kim, Jane J; Brotons, Maria; Alemany, Laia; Albero, Ginesa; Diaz, Mireia; de Sanjosé, Silvia

    2013-11-22

    Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is recognized as one of the major causes of infection-related cancer worldwide, as well as the causal factor in other diseases. Strong evidence for a causal etiology with HPV has been stated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer for cancers of the cervix uteri, penis, vulva, vagina, anus and oropharynx (including base of the tongue and tonsils). Of the estimated 12.7 million new cancers occurring in 2008 worldwide, 4.8% were attributable to HPV infection, with substantially higher incidence and mortality rates seen in developing versus developed countries. In recent years, we have gained tremendous knowledge about HPVs and their interactions with host cells, tissues and the immune system; have validated and implemented strategies for safe and efficacious prophylactic vaccination against HPV infections; have developed increasingly sensitive and specific molecular diagnostic tools for HPV detection for use in cervical cancer screening; and have substantially increased global awareness of HPV and its many associated diseases in women, men, and children. While these achievements exemplify the success of biomedical research in generating important public health interventions, they also generate new and daunting challenges: costs of HPV prevention and medical care, the implementation of what is technically possible, socio-political resistance to prevention opportunities, and the very wide ranges of national economic capabilities and health care systems. Gains and challenges faced in the quest for comprehensive control of HPV infection and HPV-related cancers and other disease are summarized in this review. The information presented may be viewed in terms of a reframed paradigm of prevention of cervical cancer and other HPV-related diseases that will include strategic combinations of at least four major components: 1) routine introduction of HPV vaccines to women in all countries, 2) extension and simplification of

  3. Comprehensive Control of Human Papillomavirus Infections and Related Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Bosch, F. Xavier; Broker, Thomas R.; Forman, David; Moscicki, Anna-Barbara; Gillison, Maura L.; Doorbar, John; Stern, Peter L.; Stanley, Margaret; Arbyn, Marc; Poljak, Mario; Cuzick, Jack; Castle, Philip E.; Schiller, John T.; Markowitz, Lauri E.; Fisher, William A.; Canfell, Karen; Denny, Lynette A.; Franco, Eduardo L.; Steben, Marc; Kane, Mark A.; Schiffman, Mark; Meijer, Chris J.L.M.; Sankaranarayanan, Rengaswamy; Castellsagué, Xavier; Kim, Jane J.; Brotons, Maria; Alemany, Laia; Albero, Ginesa; Diaz, Mireia; de Sanjosé, Silvia

    2014-01-01

    Infection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is recognized as one of the major causes of infection-related cancer worldwide, as well as the causal factor in other diseases. Strong evidence for a causal etiology with HPV has been stated by the International Agency for Research on Cancer for cancers of the cervix uteri, penis, vulva, vagina, anus and oropharynx (including base of the tongue and tonsils). Of the estimated 12.7 million new cancers occurring in 2008 worldwide, 4.8% were attributable to HPV infection, with substantially higher incidence and mortality rates seen in developing versus developed countries. In recent years, we have gained tremendous knowledge about HPVs and their interactions with host cells, tissues and the immune system; have validated and implemented strategies for safe and efficacious prophylactic vaccination against HPV infections; have developed increasingly sensitive and specific molecular diagnostic tools for HPV detection for use in cervical cancer screening; and have substantially increased global awareness of HPV and its many associated diseases in women, men, and children. While these achievements exemplify the success of biomedical research in generating important public health interventions, they also generate new and daunting challenges: costs of HPV prevention and medical care, the implementation of what is technically possible, socio-political resistance to prevention opportunities, and the very wide ranges of national economic capabilities and health care systems. Gains and challenges faced in the quest for comprehensive control of HPV infection and HPV-related cancers and other disease are summarized in this review. The information presented may be viewed in terms of a reframed paradigm of prevention of cervical cancer and other HPV-related diseases that will include strategic combinations of at least four major components: 1) routine introduction of HPV vaccines to women in all countries, 2) extension and simplification of

  4. Human papillomavirus: burden of illness and treatment cost considerations.

    PubMed

    Fox, Paul A; Tung, Mun-Yee

    2005-01-01

    The monetary and personal costs to society of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection are enormous. In order to make a comparison of different treatment methods we reviewed the entire literature on HPV treatment from January 1966 to December 2003 using MEDLINE, with particular reference to published meta-analyses, randomized controlled and comparative studies. Patient-applied therapies offer patients the possibility of convenient and, on the whole, pain-free treatment. Podofilox (podophyllotoxin) and salicylic acid for genital and extragenital warts, respectively, have the additional advantage of being the most cost-effective treatments and, on this basis, they are to be commended as appropriate first-line agents. The second-line treatment of choice for common warts is cryotherapy. For recalcitrant common warts possible options include inosine pranobex with cryotherapy or electrosurgery, imiquimod with paring and occlusion, intralesional bleomycin, or diphencyprone. Alternative first-line and second-line treatments for genital warts would be either some form of surgical removal or imiquimod. The first option may be the cheapest but this has to be balanced against a degree of post-operative morbidity. Limited data from comparative studies do not show any clear difference in efficacy between cryotherapy, trichloroacetic acid, scissor excision, electrosurgery, and laser surgery in the treatment of genital warts, and the cost effectiveness of these therapies is probably similar to that of imiquimod. Cryotherapy and trichloroacetic acid are relatively expensive and inconvenient for patients and should be reserved as third-line treatments with certain exceptions, such as cryotherapy for meatal warts. The duration of treatment is significantly related to the number of warts present, the area covered by the warts, and the length of time the warts have been present. For recalcitrant anogenital warts third-line treatment options that show promise include surgery in combination

  5. A Review of Clinical Trials of Human Papillomavirus Prophylactic Vaccines

    PubMed Central

    Schiller, John T.; Castellsagué, Xavier; Garland, Suzanne M.

    2015-01-01

    End of study analyses of the phase III trials of prophylactic human papillomavirus (HPV) virus-like particle (VLP) vaccines in young women are now largely completed. Two distinct vaccines were evaluated, Gardasil® (Merck & Co., Whitehouse Station, NJ USA) a quadrivalent vaccine containing VLPs of types 6, 11, 16 and 18 and Cervarix® (GlaxoSmithKline Biologicals, Rixensart, Belgium), a bivalent vaccine containing VLPs of types 16 and 18. Both vaccines exhibited excellent safety and immunogenicity profiles. The vaccines also demonstrated remarkably high and similar efficacy against the vaccine-targeted types for a range of cervical endpoints from persistent infection to cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 3 (CIN3) in women naïve to the corresponding type at the time of vaccination. However, protection from incident infection or disease from non-vaccine types was restricted, and the vaccines had no effect on prevalent infection or disease. Gardasil® also demonstrated strong protection against genital warts and vulvar/vaginal neoplasia associated with the vaccine types. In other trials, Gardasil® protected mid-adult women from incident infection and CIN caused by the vaccine types and protected men for incident infection, genital warts and anal intraepithelial neoplasia by the vaccine types. Cervarix® protected against vaccine-targeted anal infections in women in an end of study evaluation. For practical reasons, efficacy studies have not been conducted in the primary target populations of current vaccination programs, adolescent girls and boys. However, immunogenicity bridging studies demonstrating excellent safety and strong immune responses in adolescence, coupled with the documentation of durable antibody responses and protection in young adults, leads to an optimistic projection of the effectiveness of the vaccines in adolescent vaccination programs. Taken together, the excellent clinical trial results strongly support the potential of the vaccines as

  6. Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Stages of Change among Male and Female University Students: Ready or Not?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Patel, Divya A.; Grunzweig, Katherine A.; Zochowski, Melissa K.; Dempsey, Amanda F.; Carlos, Ruth C.; Dalton, Vanessa K.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To examine gender differences in human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine stages of change following the recommendations for permissive use of HPV vaccine in males. Participants: Students aged 18-26 attending a large, public, Midwest university in April 2010. Methods: Participants completed a self-administered, online questionnaire. HPV…

  7. Knowledge, Beliefs, and Behaviors: Examining Human Papillomavirus-Related Gender Differences among African American College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bynum, Shalanda A.; Brandt, Heather M.; Friedman, Daniela B.; Annang, Lucy; Tanner, Andrea

    2011-01-01

    Objective: Given recent approval for administration of a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine to men, it is important to assess the HPV-related perspectives of men and women. The purpose of this study was to examine gender differences in HPV knowledge, beliefs, and vaccine acceptance among college students attending 3 historically black…

  8. Print News Coverage of School-Based Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Mandates

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Casciotti, Dana M.; Smith, Katherine C.; Andon, Lindsay; Vernick, Jon; Tsui, Amy; Klassen, Ann C.

    2014-01-01

    Background: In 2007, legislation was proposed in 24 states and the District of Columbia for school-based human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine mandates, and mandates were enacted in Texas, Virginia, and the District of Columbia. Media coverage of these events was extensive, and media messages both reflected and contributed to controversy surrounding…

  9. Receipt of the Human Papillomavirus Vaccine among Female College Students in the United States, 2009

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lindley, Lisa L.; Elkind, Julia S.; Landi, Suzanne N.; Brandt, Heather M.

    2013-01-01

    Objective: To determine receipt of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine among female college students by demographic/descriptive characteristics and sexual behaviors. Methods: A secondary analysis of the Spring 2009 National College Health Assessment-II was conducted with 40,610 female college students (aged 18 to 24 years) attending 4-year…

  10. Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Intention among College Men: What's Oral Sex Got to Do with It?

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Crosby, Richard A.; DiClemente, Ralph J.; Salazar, Laura F.; Nash, Rachel; Younge, Sinead; Head, Sara

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To identify associations between engaging in oral sex and perceived risk of oral cancer among college men. Also, to identify associations, and their moderating factors, between oral sex and human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine acceptance. Methods: Young men were recruited from 2 university campuses in the South (N = 150). Men completed an…

  11. The Acceptability of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccination among Women with Physical Disabilities

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Yen, Chia-Feng; Chen, Si-Fan; Lin, Lan-Ping; Hsu, Shang-Wei; Chang, Mao-Jung; Wu, Chia-Ling; Lin, Jin-Ding

    2011-01-01

    The present paper aims to explore awareness and acceptability of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination and to identify factors influencing HPV acceptability among women with physical disabilities in Taiwan. The study participants were 438 adult women with physical disabilities, aged 18-69 years. The participants were all officially registered as…

  12. Opportunities for Increasing Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Provision in School Health Centers

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Moss, Jennifer L.; Feld, Ashley L.; O'Malley, Brittany; Entzel, Pamela; Smith, Jennifer S.; Gilkey, Melissa B.; Brewer, Noel T.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Uptake of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine remains low among adolescents in the United States. We sought to assess barriers to HPV vaccine provision in school health centers to inform subsequent interventions. Methods: We conducted structured interviews in the fall of 2010 with staff from all 33 school health centers in North…

  13. Beliefs and Knowledge about the Human Papillomavirus Vaccine among Undergraduate Men

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hunter, Theresa; Weinstein, Melissa

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The objective of this study was to assess male undergraduate students' human papillomavirus (HPV) knowledge and intentions to receive the HPV vaccination. Design: Cross-sectional survey. Method: A sample of 116 male undergraduate students from a university in the Midwestern USA completed a survey questionnaire assessing various aspects…

  14. Resolution of novel human papillomavirus-induced warts after HPV vaccination.

    PubMed

    Silling, Steffi; Wieland, Ulrike; Werner, Marko; Pfister, Herbert; Potthoff, Anja; Kreuter, Alexander

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) XS2 was isolated from warts on an immunosuppressed patient. After HPV vaccination, the warts resolved. HPVXS2 was also found in warts and normal skin of HIV-positive patients and rarely in HIV-negative controls. Further studies should elucidate the mechanisms that lead to wart clearance.

  15. Investigating Stakeholder Attitudes and Opinions on School-Based Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Programs

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nodulman, Jessica A.; Starling, Randall; Kong, Alberta S.; Buller, David B.; Wheeler, Cosette M.; Woodall, W. Gill

    2015-01-01

    Background: In several countries worldwide, school-based human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination programs have been successful; however, little research has explored US stakeholders' acceptance toward school-based HPV vaccination programs. Methods: A total of 13 focus groups and 12 key informant interviews (N?=?117; 85% females; 66% racial/ethnic…

  16. Knowledge, Attitudes, and Informational Behaviors of College Students in Regard to the Human Papillomavirus

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sandfort, Jessica R.; Pleasant, Andrew

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To assess students' human papillomavirus (HPV) knowledge, attitudes, and behaviors. Participants/ Methods: Students (N = 1,282) at a large, public university in the Northeast United States completed a questionnaire during February 2008 assessing HPV knowledge, prevalence, transmission, cervical cancer risk and stigma; sexual behavior,…

  17. Men's Perceptions and Knowledge of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Infection and Cervical Cancer

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    McPartland, Tara S.; Weaver, Bethany A.; Lee, Shu-Kuang; Koutsky, Laura A.

    2005-01-01

    The authors assessed young men's knowledge and perceptions of genital human papillomavirus (HPV) infection to identify factors that predict intention to make positive behavioral changes. Male university students aged 18 to 25 years completed a self-report instrument to assess knowledge and perceptions of genital HPV infection. If diagnosed with…

  18. Safety of human papillomavirus 6, 11, 16 and 18 (recombinant): systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Coelho, Pedro Luiz Spinelli; Calestini, Gustavo Lacerda da Silva; Alvo, Fernando Salgueiro; Freitas, Jefferson Michel de Moura; Castro, Paula Marcela Vilela; Konstantyner, Tulio

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To identify and quantify the adverse effects associated with the recombinant human papillomavirus (types 6, 11, 16 and 18) vaccine in adolescents. Data source: Systematic review of randomized clinical trials from PubMed, SciELO and Lilacs databases. Articles investigating the safety of the vaccine in subjects under 18 years and comparing the recombinant human papillomavirus types 6, 11, 16 and 18 vaccine with a control group were included. Meta-analyses were performed for the outcomes of pain, erythema, swelling and fever, using clinical trials with maximum Jadad score. Data synthesis: Fourteen studies were included. The most common adverse effects related to the human papillomavirus vaccine were effects with no severity (pain, erythema, edema, and fever). Five studies were used for the meta-analyses: pain-risk difference (RD)=11% (p<0.001); edema-RD=8% (p<0.001); erythema-RD=5% (p<0.001); fever-RD=2% (p<0.003). Conclusions: The recombinant human papillomavirus types 6, 11, 16 and 18 vaccine was safe and well tolerated. The main adverse effects related to vaccination were pain, erythema, edema and fever. The low frequency of severe adverse effects encourages the administration of the vaccine in the population at risk. PMID:26376359

  19. Risk factors for human papillomavirus exposure and co-factors for cervical cancer in Latin America and the Caribbean.

    PubMed

    Almonte, Maribel; Albero, Ginesa; Molano, Mónica; Carcamo, César; García, Patricia J; Pérez, Gonzalo

    2008-08-19

    The incidence of cervical cancer in Latin America and the Caribbean (LAC) is among the highest in the world. Because there are major demographic shifts happening in LAC countries (population growth, urbanization and ageing) cervical cancer incidence and mortality will likely continue to be a significant public health problem. Overall human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence in the LAC general population has been found to be 2-fold higher than the average worldwide prevalence. The large HPV and cancer burden may be explained by the highly prevalent HPV variants of HPV types -16 and 18, which have an increased oncogenic potential. Given the major mode of transmission of genital HPV is sexual, certain, patterns of sexual behaviour (early age at first sexual intercourse, number of sexual partners and sexual behaviour of the partner) are associated with an increased risk of HPV genital acquisition. Although HPV infection is necessary for carcinogenesis, certain co-factors (high parity, long term use of oral contraceptives, smoking and co-infection with the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)) help in the progression from infection to cancer. Many studies that have contributed to this evidence have been carried out in LAC and are reviewed and summarised in this article. Since HPV vaccines will likely take years to implement, and many more years to show impact on disease, cervical cancer screening programmes remain as the key intervention to control disease in LAC in the years to come.

  20. Targeting the function of the HER2 oncogene in human cancer therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Moasser, Mark M.

    2011-01-01

    The year 2007 marks exactly two decades since HER2 was functionally implicated in the pathogenesis of human breast cancer (Slamon et al. 1987). This finding established the HER2 oncogene hypothesis for the development of some human cancers. An abundance of experimental evidence compiled over the past two decades now solidly supports the HER2 oncogene hypothesis. A direct consequence of this hypothesis was the promise that inhibitors of oncogenic HER2 would be highly effective treatments for HER2-driven cancers. This treatment hypothesis has led to the development and widespread use of anti-HER2 antibodies (trastuzumab) in clinical management resulting in significantly improved clinical anti-tumor efficacies that have transformed the clinical practice of oncology. In the shadows of this irrefutable clinical success, scientific studies have not yet been able to mechanistically validate that trastuzumab inhibits oncogenic HER2 function and it remains possible that the current clinical advances are a consequence of the oncogene hypothesis but not a translation of it. These looming scientific uncertainties suggest that the full promise of the treatment hypothesis may not yet have been realized. The coming decade will see a second generation of HER2 targeting agents brought into clinical testing and a renewed attempt to treat HER2-driven cancers through the inactivation HER2. Here I review the development of treatments that target HER2 in the context of the HER2 oncogene hypothesis, and where we stand with regards to the clinical translation of the HER2 oncogene hypothesis. PMID:17486079

  1. Isolation and Propagation of Human Papillomavirus Type 16 in Human Xenografts Implanted in the Severe Combined Immunodeficiency Mouse

    PubMed Central

    Bonnez, William; DaRin, Carrie; Borkhuis, Christine; de Mesy Jensen, Karen; Reichman, Richard C.; Rose, Robert C.

    1998-01-01

    We report the isolation and propagation of human papillomavirus type 16, the main agent of cervical cancer, using human foreskin fragments implanted in severe combined immunodeficiency mice. The infection produced viral particles, and with each passage of the virus it caused lesions identical to intraepithelial neoplasia, the precursor to carcinoma. PMID:9573300

  2. Cross-talk between Human Papillomavirus Oncoproteins and Hedgehog Signaling Synergistically Promotes Stemness in Cervical Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Vishnoi, Kanchan; Mahata, Sutapa; Tyagi, Abhishek; Pandey, Arvind; Verma, Gaurav; Jadli, Mohit; Singh, Tejveer; Singh, Sukh Mahendra; Bharti, Alok C.

    2016-01-01

    Viral oncoproteins E6/E7 play key oncogenic role in human papillomavirus (HPV)-mediated cervical carcinogenesis in conjunction with aberrant activation of cellular signaling events. GLI-signaling has been implicated in metastasis and tumor recurrence of cervical cancer. However, the interaction of GLI-signaling with HPV oncogenes is unknown. We examined this relationship in established HPV-positive and HPV-negative cervical cancer cell lines using specific GLI inhibitor, cyclopamine and HPVE6/E7 siRNAs. Cervical cancer cell lines showed variable expression of GLI-signaling components. HPV16-positive SiHa cells, overexpressed GLI1, Smo and Patch. Inhibition by cyclopamine resulted in dose-dependent reduction of Smo and GLI1 and loss of cell viability with a higher magnitude in HPV-positive cells. Cyclopamine selectively downregulated HPVE6 expression and resulted in p53 accumulation, whereas HPVE7 and pRb level remained unaffected. siRNA-mediated silencing of HPV16E6 demonstrated reduced GLI1 transcripts in SiHa cells. Cervical cancer stem-like cells isolated by side population analysis, displayed retention of E6 and GLI1 expression. Fraction of SP cells was reduced in cyclopamine-treated cultures. When combined with E6-silencing cyclopamine resulted in loss of SP cell’s sphere-forming ability. Co-inhibition of GLI1 and E6 in cervical cancer cells showed additive anti-cancer effects. Overall, our data show existence of a cooperative interaction between GLI signaling and HPVE6. PMID:27678330

  3. Cross-talk between Human Papillomavirus Oncoproteins and Hedgehog Signaling Synergistically Promotes Stemness in Cervical Cancer Cells.

    PubMed

    Vishnoi, Kanchan; Mahata, Sutapa; Tyagi, Abhishek; Pandey, Arvind; Verma, Gaurav; Jadli, Mohit; Singh, Tejveer; Singh, Sukh Mahendra; Bharti, Alok C

    2016-09-28

    Viral oncoproteins E6/E7 play key oncogenic role in human papillomavirus (HPV)-mediated cervical carcinogenesis in conjunction with aberrant activation of cellular signaling events. GLI-signaling has been implicated in metastasis and tumor recurrence of cervical cancer. However, the interaction of GLI-signaling with HPV oncogenes is unknown. We examined this relationship in established HPV-positive and HPV-negative cervical cancer cell lines using specific GLI inhibitor, cyclopamine and HPVE6/E7 siRNAs. Cervical cancer cell lines showed variable expression of GLI-signaling components. HPV16-positive SiHa cells, overexpressed GLI1, Smo and Patch. Inhibition by cyclopamine resulted in dose-dependent reduction of Smo and GLI1 and loss of cell viability with a higher magnitude in HPV-positive cells. Cyclopamine selectively downregulated HPVE6 expression and resulted in p53 accumulation, whereas HPVE7 and pRb level remained unaffected. siRNA-mediated silencing of HPV16E6 demonstrated reduced GLI1 transcripts in SiHa cells. Cervical cancer stem-like cells isolated by side population analysis, displayed retention of E6 and GLI1 expression. Fraction of SP cells was reduced in cyclopamine-treated cultures. When combined with E6-silencing cyclopamine resulted in loss of SP cell's sphere-forming ability. Co-inhibition of GLI1 and E6 in cervical cancer cells showed additive anti-cancer effects. Overall, our data show existence of a cooperative interaction between GLI signaling and HPVE6.

  4. [Prostate cancer: papillomaviruses as a possible cause].

    PubMed

    Volgareva, G M

    2015-01-01

    Prostate cancer (PC) incidence and mortality are steadily increasing. Causation of PC is not clearly understood; in particular, role of human papillomaviruses (HPV) is still disputable. The review contains analysis of literature data on possible participation of HPV powerful biological carcinogens, in PC genesis. PC incidence increase in persons with immunodeficiency indicates involvement of some infectious agent in the disease etiology. Several research groups communicated HPV DNA finding including that of oncogenic types in PC specimens (transrectal biopsies). There are limited data on the occurrence of oncogenic HPV 16 oncoprotein E7 in such specimens and on its unfavorable effect on disease prognosis. The successful attempt is known to transfect normal human prostate cells with oncogenic HPVDNA in vitro. Epidemiological data on associations of PC with HPV are controversial. It may result from the considered in the present review certain technical peculiarities of these studies. Controlfor serum antibodies to HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins recognized to indicate HPV-positive tumor growth in an organism has not been performed yet in PC patients. DNA of oncogenic HPV is rather commonly found in organs adjacent to prostate--urethra, rectum, urinary bladder. In the study held in Russia on a group of healthy men examined for sexually transmitted diseases genitourinary HPVinfection was found in every second person; 42% of them harbored oncogenic HPV. Possible participation of oncogenic HPV in PC genesis deserves close attention and further study.

  5. Human Papillomaviruses; Epithelial Tropisms, and the Development of Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Egawa, Nagayasu; Egawa, Kiyofumi; Griffin, Heather; Doorbar, John

    2015-01-01

    Papillomaviruses have evolved over many millions of years to propagate themselves at specific epithelial niches in a range of different host species. This has led to the great diversity of papillomaviruses that now exist, and to the appearance of distinct strategies for epithelial persistence. Many papillomaviruses minimise the risk of immune clearance by causing chronic asymptomatic infections, accompanied by long-term virion-production with only limited viral gene expression. Such lesions are typical of those caused by Beta HPV types in the general population, with viral activity being suppressed by host immunity. A second strategy requires the evolution of sophisticated immune evasion mechanisms, and allows some HPV types to cause prominent and persistent papillomas, even in immune competent individuals. Some Alphapapillomavirus types have evolved this strategy, including those that cause genital warts in young adults or common warts in children. These strategies reflect broad differences in virus protein function as well as differences in patterns of viral gene expression, with genotype-specific associations underlying the recent introduction of DNA testing, and also the introduction of vaccines to protect against cervical cancer. Interestingly, it appears that cellular environment and the site of infection affect viral pathogenicity by modulating viral gene expression. With the high-risk HPV gene products, changes in E6 and E7 expression are thought to account for the development of neoplasias at the endocervix, the anal and cervical transformation zones, and the tonsilar crypts and other oropharyngeal sites. A detailed analysis of site-specific patterns of gene expression and gene function is now prompted. PMID:26193301

  6. Human Papillomaviruses; Epithelial Tropisms, and the Development of Neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Egawa, Nagayasu; Egawa, Kiyofumi; Griffin, Heather; Doorbar, John

    2015-07-16

    Papillomaviruses have evolved over many millions of years to propagate themselves at specific epithelial niches in a range of different host species. This has led to the great diversity of papillomaviruses that now exist, and to the appearance of distinct strategies for epithelial persistence. Many papillomaviruses minimise the risk of immune clearance by causing chronic asymptomatic infections, accompanied by long-term virion-production with only limited viral gene expression. Such lesions are typical of those caused by Beta HPV types in the general population, with viral activity being suppressed by host immunity. A second strategy requires the evolution of sophisticated immune evasion mechanisms, and allows some HPV types to cause prominent and persistent papillomas, even in immune competent individuals. Some Alphapapillomavirus types have evolved this strategy, including those that cause genital warts in young adults or common warts in children. These strategies reflect broad differences in virus protein function as well as differences in patterns of viral gene expression, with genotype-specific associations underlying the recent introduction of DNA testing, and also the introduction of vaccines to protect against cervical cancer. Interestingly, it appears that cellular environment and the site of infection affect viral pathogenicity by modulating viral gene expression. With the high-risk HPV gene products, changes in E6 and E7 expression are thought to account for the development of neoplasias at the endocervix, the anal and cervical transformation zones, and the tonsilar crypts and other oropharyngeal sites. A detailed analysis of site-specific patterns of gene expression and gene function is now prompted.

  7. Protection of rabbits against challenge with rabbit papillomaviruses by immunization with the N terminus of human papillomavirus type 16 minor capsid antigen L2.

    PubMed

    Gambhira, Ratish; Jagu, Subhashini; Karanam, Balasubramanyam; Gravitt, Patti E; Culp, Timothy D; Christensen, Neil D; Roden, Richard B S

    2007-11-01

    Current L1 virus-like particle (VLP) vaccines provide type-restricted protection against a small subset of the human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes associated with cervical cancer, necessitating continued cytologic screening of vaccinees. Cervical cancer is most problematic in countries that lack the resources for screening or highly multivalent HPV VLP vaccines, suggesting the need for a low-cost, broadly protective vaccinogen. Here, N-terminal L2 polypeptides comprising residues 1 to 88 or 11 to 200 derived from HPV16, bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV1), or cottontail rabbit papillomavirus (CRPV) were produced in bacteria. Rabbits were immunized with these N-terminal L2 polypeptides and concurrently challenged with CRPV and rabbit oral papillomavirus (ROPV). Vaccination with either N-terminal L2 polypeptides of CRPV effectively protected rabbits from CRPV challenge but not from papillomas induced by cutaneous challenge with CRPV genomic DNA. Furthermore, papillomas induced by CRPV genomic DNA deficient for L2 expression grew at the same rate as those induced by wild-type CRPV genomic DNA, further suggesting that the L2 polypeptide vaccines lack therapeutic activity. Neutralizing serum antibody titers of >15 correlated with protection (P < 0.001), a finding consistent with neutralizing antibody-mediated protection. Surprisingly, a remarkable degree of protection against heterologous papillomavirus types was observed after vaccination with N-terminal L2 polypeptides. Notably, vaccination with HPV16 L2 11-200 protected against cutaneous and mucosal challenge with CRPV and ROPV, respectively, papillomaviruses that are evolutionarily divergent from HPV16. Further, vaccination with HPV16 L2 11-200 generates broadly cross-neutralizing serum antibody, suggesting the potential of L2 as a second-generation preventive HPV vaccine antigen.

  8. The oncogene HER2; Its signaling and transforming functions and its role in human cancer pathogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Moasser, Mark M.

    2011-01-01

    The year 2007 marks exactly two decades since HER2 was functionally implicated in the pathogenesis of human breast cancer (Slamon et al. 1987). This finding established the HER2 oncogene hypothesis for the development of some human cancers. The subsequent two decades have brought about an explosion of information about the biology of HER2 and the Human Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor (HER) family. An abundance of experimental evidence now solidly supports the HER2 oncogene hypothesis and etiologically links amplification of the HER2 gene locus with human cancer pathogenesis. The molecular mechanisms underlying HER2 tumorigenesis appear to be complex and a unified mechanistic model of HER2 induced transformation has not emerged. Numerous hypotheses implicating diverse transforming pathways have been proposed and are individually supported by experimental models and HER2 may indeed induce cell transformation through multiple mechanisms. Here I review the evidence supporting the oncogenic function of HER2, the mechanisms that are felt to mediate its oncogenic functions, and the evidence that links the experimental evidence with human cancer pathogenesis. PMID:17471238

  9. Prognostic implication of human papillomavirus types and species in cervical cancer patients undergoing primary treatment.

    PubMed

    Lau, Yat Ming; Cheung, Tak Hong; Yeo, Winnie; Mo, Frankie; Yu, Mei Yung; Lee, Kun Min; Ho, Wendy C S; Yeung, Apple C M; Law, Priscilla T Y; Chan, Paul K S

    2015-01-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) types are associated with cervical cancer. It is well established that individual HPV types vary in oncogenicity, but current data on their prognostic implication remain controversial. We examined the association between HPV types/species and the survival of 236 Chinese women aged 26-87 (mean 54.4) years after receiving primary treatment for cervical cancer. Overall, 45.8% were of FIGO stage I, 41.9% stage II, and 12.3% stage III. The four most prevalent types found were HPV-16 (60.2%), HPV-18 (21.6%), HPV-52 (11.9%), and HPV-58 (9.3%). Overall, 19.5% of patients had multiple-type infections, 78.4% harboured one or more alpha-9 species, and 28.8% harboured one or more alpha-7 species. After a median follow-up of 8.0 years, 156 (66.1%) patients survived. The 3-year overall survival rate was 75.5%. Factors independently associated with a poorer 3-year overall survival were age >60 years, tumour size >4 cm, lymph node involvement and treatment with radiotherapy+/-chemotherapy. Univariate analysis showed HPV-16 single-type infection was associated with a marginally poorer disease-specific survival (71.6% vs. 87.0%, HR: 1.71, 95% CI = 1.01-2.90), whereas non-HPV-16 alpha-9 species was associated with a better disease-specific survival (90.0% vs. 76.2%, HR: 0.36, 95% CI = 0.16-0.79). However, on multivariate analysis, HPV infection status irrespective of different grouping methods, including individual types, species, single-type or co-infection, did not carry any significant prognostic significance. In conclusion, we did not observe any association between infection with a particular HPV type/species and survival. An HPV type-based stratification in treatment and follow-up plan could not be recommended.

  10. Prevalence of risk factors associated with human papillomavirus infection in women living with HIV

    PubMed Central

    Hankins, C; Coutlée, F; Lapointe, N; Simard, P; Tran, T; Samson, J; Hum, L

    1999-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Concurrent infection with HIV and human papillomavirus (HPV) in women is associated with increased rates of cervical dysplasia and shorter survival following the development of cervical cancer. The authors examined risk factors for HPV infection at study entry in HIV-positive women enrolled in the Canadian Women's HIV Study, a prospective open cohort study. METHODS: Subjects eligible for this analysis included the 375 HIV-positive women in the Canadian Women's HIV Study for whom HPV test results were available. Questionnaires on behavioural and clinical information, Pap smears, cervicovaginal lavage specimens and vaginal tampon specimens for HPV detection and typing by polymerase chain reaction were obtained at study entry. RESULTS: Overall, 67.2% (252/375) of the women were HPV-positive; the global prevalence of intermediate- and high-risk oncogenic HPV types was 49.1% (184/375). Women with squamous cell dysplasia (32/294) were more likely to have HPV infection than those without dysplasia (90.6% v. 62.6%; p = 0.002). Multivariate logistic regression analysis, with adjustment for number of lifetime partners and history of STD, revealed that the following risk factors were independently associated with HPV infection: CD4 count of less than 0.20 x 10(9)/L (adjusted odds ratio [OR] 1.99 [95% confidence interval (Cl) 1.17-3.37 (p = 0.011)]), non-white race (adjusted OR 2.00 [95% Cl 1.17-3.42 (p = 0.011)]), inconsistent condom use in the 6 months before study entry (adjusted OR 2.02 [95% Cl 1.16-3.50 (p = 0.013)]), and lower age, with women age 30-39 years (adjusted OR 0.51 [95% Cl 0.30-0.87 (p = 0.013)]) and age 40 years or older (adjusted OR 0.52 [95% Cl 0.26-1.01 (p = 0.052)]) compared with women less than 30 years of age. INTERPRETATION: Close monitoring for HPV-related effects is warranted in all HIV-positive women, particularly younger, non-white women who do not always use condoms. Counselling for women living with HIV, particularly younger women

  11. Human papillomavirus DNA positivity and seropositivity in rural Chinese men and women: a population-based cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fangfang; Deng, Qiuju; Zhang, Chanyuan; Pan, Yaqi; Liu, Ying; He, Zhonghu; Sun, Min; Liu, Mengfei; Li, Jingjing; Li, Xiang; Zhang, Chaoting; Hang, Dong; Ning, Tao; Guo, Chuanhai; Liang, Yongmei; Xu, Ruiping; Zhang, Lixin; Cai, Hong; Ke, Yang

    2016-01-01

    Data on simultaneous analysis of human papillomavirus (HPV) DNA and serology and the correlations within a single general population are limited. Among 1603 men and 2187 women enrolled from rural China, serum antibodies against bacterially derived GST-L1 fusion proteins of HPV were assessed with multiplexed serology and HPV DNA was evaluated with PCR-based sequencing. Few subjects were dually positive to HPV DNA and serum antibodies for any HPV (6.6% of men and 3.1% of women). The proportion of men ever having been infected with any HPV (DNA and/or antibody positive) was higher than that of women (71.0% vs. 65.2%, P < 0.001). Type-specific association was observed for genital HPV infection and HPV seropositivity among women but not among men. A positive correlation between the number of lifetime sexual partners and positivity for oncogenic HPV DNA and/or antibodies was found in men but was absent in women. Among 762 couples, the presence of HPV DNA and/or antibodies in one partner was positively associated with the identical HPV type in the other partner. These findings may reflect a site-specific natural course of HPV infection and further understanding of the epidemiology of HPV. PMID:27211017

  12. The Asian-American E6 variant protein of human papillomavirus 16 alone is sufficient to promote immortalization, transformation, and migration of primary human foreskin keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Niccoli, Sarah; Abraham, Suraj; Richard, Christina; Zehbe, Ingeborg

    2012-11-01

    We examined how well the human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 oncogene can function in the absence of the E7 oncogene during the carcinogenic process in human keratinocytes using a common HPV variant strongly associated with cervical cancer: the Asian-American E6 variant (AAE6). This E6 variant is 20 times more frequently detected in cervical cancer than the prototype European E6 variant, as evidenced by independent epidemiological data. Using cell culture and cell-based functional assays, we assessed how this variant can perform crucial carcinogenesis steps compared to the prototype E6 variant. The ability to immortalize and transform primary human foreskin keratinocytes (PHFKs) to acquire resilient phenotypes and the ability to promote cell migration were evaluated. The immortalization capability was assayed based on population doublings, number of passages, surpassing mortality stages 1 and 2, human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) expression, and the ability to overcome G(1) arrest via p53 degradation. Transformation and migration efficiency were analyzed using a combination of functional cell-based assays. We observed that either AAE6 or prototype E6 proteins alone were sufficient to immortalize PHFKs, although AAE6 was more potent in doing so. The AAE6 variant protein alone pushed PHFKs through transformation and significantly increased their migration ability over that of the E6 prototype. Our findings are in line with epidemiological data that the AA variant of HPV16 confers an increased risk over the European prototype for cervical cancer, as evidenced by a superior immortalization, transformation, and metastatic potential.

  13. Detection of high-risk human papillomavirus type 16/18 in cutaneous warts in immunocompetent patients, using polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Payal, R; Gupta, S; Aggarwal, R; Handa, S; Radotra, B D; Arora, S K

    2006-10-31

    Cutaneous warts are caused by human papillomavirus (HPV). Prevalence studies of the types of HPV present in cutaneous warts have been carried out more frequently in immunosuppressed patients. The present study was designed to study the association of high-risk HPV in cutaneous warts of immunocompetent patients. A total of 45 cases of cutaneous warts from various sites in immunocompetent subjects were analyzed for HPV. Samples included both archival material i.e., paraffin embedded and fresh tissue. Highly sensitive and comprehensive polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methodology for detection of HPV of high oncogenic potential, HPV 16/18, was employed. Human papillomavirus 16 was detected in 3 (6.6%) patients. None of the lesions demonstrated HPV 18. None of the cutaneous warts demonstrated histopathological features associated with dysplasia or neoplasia. The identification of HPV 16 in cutaneous warts, which are benign proliferations of the skin, further expands the spectrum of HPV-linked lesions. It remains of critical interest to determine whether these types are specifically associated with the development of malignant lesions analogous to those seen in anogenital cancer.

  14. Branchiogenic carcinoma with high-risk-type human papillomavirus infection: A case report

    PubMed Central

    Maeda, Hiroyuki; Deng, Zeyi; Ikegami, Taro; Matayoshi, Sen; Agena, Shinya; Kiyuna, Asanori; Yamashita, Yukashi; Uehara, Takayuki; Ganaha, Akira; Suzuki, Mikio

    2016-01-01

    Branchiogenic carcinoma (BC) usually appears as a mass lesion with a predominant cystic component. Since lymph node metastasis from oropharyngeal carcinoma (OPC) has a cystic appearance, it is occasionally difficult to distinguish between BC and nodal metastases from clinically silent OPC. Factors associated with the malignant transformation process in BC remain obscure. The present study reports the case of a 56-year-old man with a right cystic cervical mass that was diagnosed as squamous cell carcinoma based on examination by fine-needle aspiration biopsy. The primary tumor could not be detected despite several imaging examinations, a pan-endoscopy of the head and neck, esophagus and stomach, biopsies of the head and neck regions, and bilateral tonsillectomies. The pathological findings of the surgical specimens from a radical neck dissection were consistent with the histological characteristics of BC, with evidence of transition from dysplasia through intraepithelial carcinoma to invasive carcinoma. Normal squamous epithelium and dysplastic and cancerous portions in the BC showed strong p16INK4a immunoreactivity. The expression of p16INK4a was also observed in all 9 nodal metastases in the neck dissection specimens. The cystic formation observed in the BC was not observed in the nodal metastases. As the presence of human papillomavirus-16 in the tumor was confirmed by polymerase chain reaction, quantitative polymerase chain reaction was employed for the measurement of human papillomavirus-16 viral load and integration. The results showed that the viral load of human papillomavirus-16 was 3.01×107/50 ng genomic DNA, and the E2/E6 ratio was 0.13, so the integration state was judged to be the mixed type. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of BC associated with high-risk-type human papillomavirus infection. The study indicates that a human papillomavirus-positive neck mass may not necessarily be OPC, but that it could be BC with a poor prognosis

  15. In vitro generation and type-specific neutralization of a human papillomavirus type 16 virion pseudotype.

    PubMed Central

    Roden, R B; Greenstone, H L; Kirnbauer, R; Booy, F P; Jessie, J; Lowy, D R; Schiller, J T

    1996-01-01

    We report a system for generating infectious papillomaviruses in vitro that facilitates the analysis of papillomavirus assembly, infectivity, and serologic relatedness. Cultured hamster BPHE-1 cells harboring autonomously replicating bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV1) genomes were infected with recombinant Semliki Forest viruses that express the structural proteins of BPV1. When plated on C127 cells, extracts from cells expressing L1 and L2 together induced numerous transformed foci that could be specifically prevented by BPV neutralizing antibodies, demonstrating that BPV infection was responsible for the focal transformation. Extracts from BPHE-1 cells expressing L1 or L2 separately were not infectious. Although Semliki Forest virus-expressed L1 self-assembled into virus-like particles (VLPs), viral DNA was detected in particles only when L2 was coexpressed with L1, indicating that genome encapsidation requires L2. Expression of human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) L1 and L2 together in BPHE-1 cells also yielded infectious virus. These pseudotyped virions were neutralized by antiserum to HPV16 VLPs derived from European (114/K) or African (Z-1194) HPV16 variants but not by antisera to BPV VLPs, to a poorly assembling mutant HPV16 L1 protein, or to VLPs of closely related genital HPV types. Extracts from BPHE-1 cells coexpressing BPV L1 and HPV16 L2 or HPV16 L1 and BPV L2 were not infectious. We conclude that (i) mouse C127 cells express the cell surface receptor for HPV16 and are able to uncoat HPV16 capsids; (ii) if a papillomavirus DNA packaging signal exists, then it is conserved between the BPV and HPV16 genomes; (iii) functional L1-L2 interaction exhibits type specificity; and (iv) protection by HPV virus-like particle vaccines is likely to be type specific. PMID:8709207

  16. The potential of plants for the production and delivery of human papillomavirus vaccines.

    PubMed

    Rosales-Mendoza, Sergio; Govea-Alonso, Dania O

    2015-07-01

    The available vaccines against human papillomavirus have some limitations such as low coverage due to their high cost, reduced immune coverage and the lack of therapeutic effects. Recombinant vaccines produced in plants (genetically engineered using stable or transient expression systems) offer the possibility to obtain low cost, efficacious and easy to administer vaccines. The status on the development of plant-based vaccines against human papillomavirus is analyzed and placed in perspective in this review. Some candidates have been characterized at a preclinical level with interesting outcomes. However, there is a need to perform the immunological characterization of several vaccine prototypes, especially through the oral administration route, as well as develop new candidates based on new chimeric designs intended to provide broader immunoprotection and therapeutic activity.

  17. Cost-effectiveness of human papillomavirus vaccination in low and middle income countries: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Fesenfeld, Michaela; Hutubessy, Raymond; Jit, Mark

    2013-08-20

    The World Health Organization recommends establishing that human papillomavirus vaccination is cost-effective before vaccine introduction. We searched Pubmed, Embase and the Cochrane Library to 1 April 2012 for economic evaluations of human papillomavirus vaccination in low and middle income countries. We found 25 articles, but almost all low income countries and many middle income countries lacked country-specific studies. Methods, assumptions and consequently results varied widely, even for studies conducted for the same country. Despite the heterogeneity, most studies conclude that vaccination is likely to be cost-effective and possibly even cost saving, particularly in settings without organized cervical screening programmes. However, study uncertainty could be reduced by clarity about vaccine prices and vaccine delivery costs. The review supports extending vaccination to low income settings where vaccine prices are competitive, donor funding is available, cervical cancer burden is high and screening options are limited.

  18. Vaccination against the Human Papillomavirus: the lessons we have not learned.

    PubMed

    Hoffner, Brianna

    2009-04-06

    Recent conversations regarding the vaccine against the Human Papillomavirus have focused on scientific concerns of effectiveness and scope of prevention as well as social, political and economic concerns including who should be eligible to receive the vaccine and why. However, discussions to date have not reflected on comparable historical perspectives including lessons learned in the development and marketing of the Hepatitis B vaccine. These two vaccines have remarkably similar public health implications in the prevention of specific cancers as well as generating alike social, political and financial concerns. The present paper examines these similarities with the intention of providing perspective on the current Human Papillomavirus vaccine debate and advocating for more expedient and expansive vaccine availability.

  19. BCL3 exerts an oncogenic function by regulating STAT3 in human cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Hu; Wang, Wuliang; Zhao, Qinghe; Hu, Guiming; Deng, Kehong; Liu, Yuling

    2016-01-01

    Aberrant expression of oncogenes and/or tumor suppressors play a fundamental effect on the pathogenesis and tumorigenicity of cervical cancer (CC). B-cell CLL/lymphoma 3 (BCL3) was previously found to be a putative proto-oncogene in human cancers and regulated signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), a critical oncogene, in CC cell line. However, its expression status, clinical significance and biological functions in CC remain largely unclear. The expressions of BCL3 and STAT3 in CC specimens were determined by immunohistochemistry. MTT, colony formation assays and flow cytometry analysis were carried out to test proliferation and cell cycle of CC cells. Here, the levels of BCL3 were overexpressed in CC compared to adjacent cervical tissues. Furthermore, high levels of BCL3 protein were confirmed by immunoblotting in CC cells as compared with normal cervical epithelial cells. The positive expression of BCL3 was correlated with adverse prognostic features and reduced survival rate. In addition, BCL3 regulated STAT3 abundance in CC cells. STAT3 was found to be upregulated and positively correlated with BCL3 expression in CC specimens. BCL3 overexpression resulted in prominent increased proliferation and cell cycle progression in Hela cells. By contrast, inhibition of BCL3 in CaSki cells remarkably suppressed proliferative ability and cell cycle progression. In vivo studies showed that knockdown of BCL3 inhibited tumor growth of CC in mice xenograft model. Notably, we confirmed that STAT3 mediated the oncogenic roles of BCL3 in CC. In conclusion, we suggest that BCL3 serves as an oncogene in CC by modulating proliferation and cell cycle progression, and its oncogenic effect is mediated by its downstream target gene, STAT3. PMID:27822067

  20. The levels of epithelial anchor proteins β-catenin and zona occludens-1 are altered by E7 of human papillomaviruses 5 and 8.

    PubMed

    Heuser, Sandra; Hufbauer, Martin; Marx, Benjamin; Tok, Ali; Majewski, Slawomir; Pfister, Herbert; Akgül, Baki

    2016-02-01

    Infection with viruses of the genus Betapapillomavirus, β-human papillomaviruses (β-HPV), is implicated in the development of non-melanoma skin cancer. This was first evidenced for HPV5 and HPV8 in patients with the skin disease epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV). The relocalization of the junctional bridging proteins β-catenin and zona occludens-1 (ZO-1) from the adherens and tight junctions are common processes of the epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) associated with tumour invasion. Here, we report that β-catenin and ZO-1 are strongly upregulated by the E7 oncoproteins of HPV5 and HPV8 in keratinocytes grown in organotypic skin cultures. Although the membrane-tethered form of β-catenin was elevated, no signs of β-catenin activity within the canonical Wnt signalling pathway could be detected. The upregulation of β-catenin and ZO-1 could also be confirmed in the skin of HPV8 transgenic mice as well as in cutaneous squamous cell carcinomas of EV patients. These data provide the first evidence that β-catenin and ZO-1 are direct targets of E7 of the oncogenic β-HPV types 5 and 8. The ability to deregulate these epithelial junction proteins may contribute to the oncogenic potential of these viruses in human skin.

  1. Association between Human Papillomavirus and Human T-Lymphotropic Virus in Indigenous Women from the Peruvian Amazon

    PubMed Central

    Garcia, Patricia J.; Carcamo, Cesar; Montano, Silvia M.; Muñante, Ricardo; Zunt, Joseph R.

    2012-01-01

    Background No association between the Human T-cell lymphotropic virus (HTLV), an oncogenic virus that alters host immunity, and the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) has previously been reported. Examining the association between these two viruses may permit the identification of a population at increased risk for developing cervical cancer. Methods and Findings Between July 2010 and February 2011, we conducted a cross-sectional study among indigenous Amazonian Peruvian women from the Shipibo-Konibo ethnic group, a group with endemic HTLV infection. We recruited women between 15 and 39 years of age who were living in the cities of Lima and Ucayali. Our objectives were to determine the association between HTLV and: (i) HPV infection of any type, and (ii) high-risk HPV type infection. Sexually active Shipibo-Konibo women were screened for HTLV-1 and HTLV-2 infections. All HTLV-1 or -2 positive women, along with two community-matched HTLV negative sexually active Shipibo-Konibo controls were later tested for the presence of HPV DNA, conventional cytology, and HIV. We screened 1,253 Shipibo-Konibo women, observing a prevalence of 5.9% (n = 74) for HTLV-1 and 3.8% (n = 47) for HTLV-2 infections. We enrolled 62 (60.8%) HTLV-1 positive women, 40 (39.2%) HTLV-2 positive women, and 205 community-matched HTLV negative controls. HTLV-1 infection was strongly associated with HPV infection of any type (43.6% vs. 29.3%; Prevalence Ratio (PR): 2.10, 95% CI: 1.53–2.87), and with high-risk HPV infection (32.3% vs. 22.4%; PR: 1.93, 95% CI: 1.04–3.59). HTLV-2 was not significantly associated with either of these HPV infections. Conclusions HTLV-1 infection was associated with HPV infection of any type and with high-risk HPV infection. Future longitudinal studies are needed to evaluate the incidence of high-risk HPV infection as well as the incidence of cervical neoplasia among HTLV-1 positive women. PMID:22952937

  2. The mysterious human epidermal cell cycle, or an oncogene-induced differentiation checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Gandarillas, Alberto

    2012-01-01

    Fifteen years ago, we reported that proto-oncogene MYC promoted differentiation of human epidermal stem cells, a finding that was surprising to the MYC and the skin research communities. MYC was one of the first human oncogenes identified, and it had been strongly associated with proliferation. However, it was later shown that MYC could induce apoptosis under low survival conditions. Currently, the notion that MYC promotes epidermal differentiation is widely accepted, but the cell cycle mechanisms that elicit this function remain unresolved. We have recently reported that keratinocytes respond to cell cycle deregulation and DNA damage by triggering terminal differentiation. This mechanism might constitute a homeostatic protection face to cell cycle insults. Here, I discuss recent and not-so-recent evidence suggesting the existence of a largely unexplored oncogene-induced differentiation response (OID) analogous to oncogene-induced apoptosis (OIA) or senescence (OIS). In addition, I propose a model for the role of the cell cycle in skin homeostasis maintenance and for the dual role of MYC in differentiation. PMID:23114621

  3. [Focal epithelial hyperplasia of the oral mucosa. A unique manifestation of human papillomavirus].

    PubMed

    van der Voort, E A M; Arani, S Fallah; Hegt, V Noordhoek; van Praag, M C G

    2009-03-01

    A 34-year old Creole woman appeared at the dermatology department with white-pink spots on the oral mucosa, which had been there for some time. Histology showed lesions characteristic of focal epithelial hyperplasia. The patient was treated with a CO2 laser. Focal epithelial hyperplasia is a rare benign lesion and is caused by human papillomavirus subtypes 13 or 32; it only appears on the oral mucosa.

  4. Focal epithelial hyperplasia (Heck's disease): report of two cases with PCR detection of human papillomavirus DNA.

    PubMed

    Jayasooriya, P R; Abeyratne, S; Ranasinghe, A W; Tilakaratne, W M

    2004-07-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH) (Heck's disease) is essentially a benign oral infection produced by the human papillomavirus (HPV). Although this condition is known to exist in numerous populations and ethnic groups, it is relatively rare in South-East Asia. The following report is based on two cases of adult FEH with histopathological features in favour of the disease. In addition, polymerase chain reaction was performed to detect the presence of HPV DNA in the lesions in order to confirm the histopathological diagnosis.

  5. [Human papillomavirus and cervical cancer in México: a constant struggle].

    PubMed

    Torres-Poveda, Kirvis; Madrid-Marina, Vicente

    2015-01-01

    Given that human papillomavirus and cervical cancer are a health problem in México, since they affect women of reproductive age and have a negative impact on our society, it is crucial to prevent those diseases and to raise awareness among physicians who deal with their clinical and therapeutic management. That is the reason why we show three Original contributions and 13 Current themes in this supplement of the Revista Médica del Instituto Mexicano del Seguro Social.

  6. Activation of proto-oncogenes in human and mouse lung tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Reynolds, S.H.; Anderson, M.W. )

    1991-06-01

    Lung cancer is a leading cause of cancer-related deaths in several nations. Epidemiological studies have indicated that 85% of all lung cancer deaths and 30% of all cancer deaths in the US are associated with tobacco smoking. Various chemicals in tobacco smoke are thought to react with DNA and to ultimately yield heritable mutations. In an effort to understand the molecular mechanisms involved in lung tumorigenesis, the authors have analyzed proto-oncogene activation in a series of human lung tumors from smokers and spontaneously occurring and chemically induced lung tumors in mice. Approximately 86% of the human lung tumors and > 90% of the mouse lung tumors were found to contain activated oncogenes. ras Oncogenes activated by point mutations were detected in many of the human lung adenocarcinomas and virtually all of the mouse lung adenomas and adenocarcinomas. The mutation profiles of the activated K-ras genes detected in the chemically induced mouse lung tumors suggest that the observed mutations result from genotoxic effects of the chemicals. Comparison of the K-ras mutations observed in the human lung adenocarcinomas with mutation profiles observed in the mouse lung tumors suggest that bulky hydrophobic DNA adducts may be responsible for the majority of the mutations observed in the activated human K-ras genes. Other data indicate that approximately 20% of human lung tumors contain potentially novel transforming genes that may also be targets for mutagens in cigarette smoke.

  7. Vaccinating HIV patients: focus on human papillomavirus and herpes zoster vaccines.

    PubMed

    Koenig, Helen C; Garland, Joseph M; Weissman, Drew; Mounzer, Karam

    2013-01-01

    Vaccination has been one of our most powerful tools to decrease morbidity and mortality from infectious diseases in the last century. It is critical to understand the evolving safety and efficacy data for vaccines in HIV-infected individuals as the number of people living with HIV in the United States and globally continues to increase. The quadrivalent human papillomavirus vaccine and the herpes zoster vaccine are newly licensed in the general population, and several studies have recently been published on the safety and efficacy of these vaccines in HIV populations. This manuscript reviews recent data for the vaccines most commonly administered in HIV patients and incorporates these data into our body of knowledge about the safety and efficacy of vaccines in this population. In addition, patient factors that predict response for each vaccine are discussed. Given the great burden of human papillomavirus and herpes zoster in HIV patients, we discuss the benefits and the challenges of vaccinating HIV patients with the human papillomavirus and herpes zoster vaccines. This review provides information that clinicians need to make real-time decisions in the absence of large-scale trials in the HIV population.

  8. Activation of H-ras oncogene in 3-methylcholanthrene-transformed human cell line.

    PubMed

    Rhim, J S; Fujita, J; Park, J B

    1987-08-01

    DNA prepared from the 3-methylcholanthrene (3MC)-transformed human 312H cell line induced foci on NIH/3T3 cells, whereas DNAs prepared from 7,12-dimethylbenz[a]-anthracene-transformed and the dimethylsulfoxide control 312H cell lines failed to induce foci. The transformed gene from the 3MC-transformed 312H cells was identified as an activated form of the human cellular transforming H-ras oncogene. Analysis of the ras oncogene p21 product in this transformant by immunoprecipitation and gel electrophoresis suggested that this gene was activated by mutation in the 61st codon. These findings demonstrate that activation of a member of the ras gene family can occur in a chemically transformed human cell line.

  9. Initiation of oncogenic transformation in human mammary epithelial cells by charged particles

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yang, T. C.; Georgy, K. A.; Craise, L. M.; Durante, M.

    1997-01-01

    Experimental studies have shown that high linear-energy transfer (LET) charged particles can be more effective than x-rays and gamma-rays in inducing oncogenic transformation in cultured cells and tumors in animals. Based on these results, experiments were designed and performed with an immortal human mammary epithelial cell line (H184B5), and several clones transformed by heavy ions were obtained. Cell fusion experiments were subsequently done, and results indicate that the transforming gene(s) is recessive. Chromosome analysis with fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) techniques also showed additional translocations in transformed human mammary epithelial cells. In addition, studies with these cell lines indicate that heavy ions can effectively induce deletion, break, and dicentrics. Deletion of tumor suppressor gene(s) and/or formation of translocation through DNA double strand breaks is a likely mechanism for the initiation of oncogenic transformation in human mammary epithelial cells.

  10. Peptide interactions stabilize and restructure human papillomavirus type 16 E6 to interact with p53.

    PubMed

    Ansari, Tina; Brimer, Nicole; Vande Pol, Scott B

    2012-10-01

    Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) E6 (16E6) binds the E3 ubiquitin ligase E6AP and p53, thereby targeting degradation of p53 (M. Scheffner, B. A. Werness, J. M. Huibregtse, A. J. Levine, and P. M. Howley, Cell 63:1129-1136, 1990). Here we show that minimal 16E6-binding LXXLL peptides reshape 16E6 to confer p53 interaction and stabilize 16E6 in vivo but that degradation of p53 by 16E6 requires E6AP expression. These experiments establish a general mechanism for how papillomavirus E6 binding to LXXLL peptides reshapes E6 to then act as an adapter molecule.

  11. Peptide Interactions Stabilize and Restructure Human Papillomavirus Type 16 E6 To Interact with p53

    PubMed Central

    Ansari, Tina; Brimer, Nicole

    2012-01-01

    Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) E6 (16E6) binds the E3 ubiquitin ligase E6AP and p53, thereby targeting degradation of p53 (M. Scheffner, B. A. Werness, J. M. Huibregtse, A. J. Levine, and P. M. Howley, Cell 63:1129–1136, 1990). Here we show that minimal 16E6-binding LXXLL peptides reshape 16E6 to confer p53 interaction and stabilize 16E6 in vivo but that degradation of p53 by 16E6 requires E6AP expression. These experiments establish a general mechanism for how papillomavirus E6 binding to LXXLL peptides reshapes E6 to then act as an adapter molecule. PMID:22896608

  12. Development of aggressive squamous cell carcinoma in epidermodysplasia verruciformis associated with human papillomavirus type 22b.

    PubMed

    Kim, Taegyun; Park, Jae Chan; Roh, Mi Ryung; Park, Jin Mo; Kim, Se Heon; Cho, Nam Hoon; Lee, Min-Geol

    2010-01-01

    Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) is a rare genetic disease characterized by abnormal susceptibility to infection with EV-related human papillomavirus (HPV), now known as the beta-papillomavirus (beta-PV). Clinically specific beta-PV-type-associated EV, especially HPV-5 and -8, shows a high rate of progression to squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). In this report, we describe a 39-year-old Korean man with HPV-22b-associated EV who developed a rapidly progressing SCC. The patient presented with a huge destructive mass on the nose. Histopathological evaluation of the mass was compatible with well-differentiated SCC. HPV typing results from both EV and SCC specimens demonstrated HPV-22b which has not been considered to be associated with SCC in EV patients so far. The patient underwent surgical excision and postoperative radiotherapy for locoregional control. This is the first report presenting the association of an SCC arising from previous EV with HPV-22b infection only.

  13. Human papillomavirus type 16 DNA-induced malignant transformation of NIH 3T3 cells

    SciTech Connect

    Yasumoto, S.; Burkhardt, A.L.; Doniger, J.; DiPaolo, J.A.

    1986-02-01

    A biological function for human papillomavirus 16 (HPV 16) DNA was demonstrated by transformation of NIH 3T3 cells. HPV 16 DNA has been found frequently in genital cancer and has been classified as a papillomavirus on the basis of DNA homology. A recombinant HPV 16 DNA (pSHPV16d), which contains a head-to-tail dimer of the full-length HPV 16 genome, induced morphologic transformation; the transformed cells were tumorigenic in nude mice. Expression of transforming activity was unique because of the long latency period (more than 4 weeks) required for induction of morphologic transformation and because the transfected DNA existed primarily in a multimeric form with some rearrangement. Furthermore, virus-specific RNAs were expressed in the transformants. The transformation of NIH 3T3 cells provides a model for analyzing the functions of HPV 16, which is associated with cervical carcinomas.

  14. Chromatin-like structures obtained after alkaline disruption of bovine and human papillomaviruses.

    PubMed Central

    Favre, M; Breitburd, F; Croissant, O; Orth, G

    1977-01-01

    Four low-molecular-weight polypeptides migrating like H2a, H2b, H3, and H4 calf liver histones were detected by sodium dodecyl sulfate-acrylamide gel electrophoresis of highly purified preparations of bovine papillomavirus (BPV) and human papillomavirus (HPV). Complexes of these polypeptides and viral DNA were isolated by agarose-gel filtration of the alkaline disruption products of both viruses. When observed under the electron microscope, these complexes appeared as circular structures composed of nucleosomes with a diameter of about 8.0 nm interconnected by a naked DNA filament. The maximal frequency of nucleosomes per molecule was 30 for both viruses, corresponding to a condensation ratio of the viral DNA of 2.5. Images PMID:191643

  15. Will vaccination against human papillomavirus prevent eye disease? A review of the evidence.

    PubMed

    Hughes, D S; Powell, N; Fiander, A N

    2008-04-01

    The role of human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in eye disease is controversial. However, a recent case illustrates the possible role of HPV in conjunctival squamous carcinoma and the potentially devastating effects of this disease. The development of two vaccines to prevent infection with HPV types most commonly associated with anogenital cancers has led to debate about the pros and cons of a national immunisation programme to prevent cervical cancer. The introduction of such a vaccination programme may have an additional beneficial effect on the occurrence of some head and neck, including ocular, cancers. This review discusses the nature of papillomaviruses, mechanisms of infection and carcinogenesis, the possible role of HPV in eye disease, and finally the likely impact of the new prophylactic vaccines.

  16. Phylogenetic analysis of beta-papillomaviruses as inferred from nucleotide and amino acid sequence data.

    PubMed

    Gottschling, Marc; Köhler, Anja; Stockfleth, Eggert; Nindl, Ingo

    2007-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPV) of the beta-group seem to be involved in the pathogenesis of non-melanoma skin cancer. Papillomaviruses are host specific and are considered closely co-evolving with their hosts. Evolutionary incongruence between early genes and late genes has been reported among oncogenic genital alpha-papillomaviruses and considerably challenge phylogenetic reconstructions. We investigated the relationships of 29 beta-HPV (25 types plus four putative new types, subtypes, or variants) as inferred from codon aligned and amino acid sequence data of the genes E1, E2, E6, E7, L1, and L2 using likelihood, distance, and parsimony approaches. An analysis of a L1 fragment included additional nucleotide and amino acid sequences from seven non-human beta-papillomaviruses. Early genes and late genes evolution did not conflict significantly in beta-papillomaviruses based on partition homogeneity tests (p > or = 0.001). As inferred from the complete genome analyses, beta-papillomaviruses were monophyletic and segregated into four highly supported monophyletic assemblages corresponding to the species 1, 2, 3, and fused 4/5. They basically split into the species 1 and the remainder of beta-papillomaviruses, whose species 3, 4, and 5 constituted the sistergroup of species 2. beta-Papillomaviruses have been isolated from humans, apes, and monkeys, and phylogenetic analyses of the L1 fragment showed non-human papillomaviruses highly polyphyletic nesting within the HPV species. Thus, host and virus phylogenies were not congruent in beta-papillomaviruses, and multiple invasions across species borders may contribute (additionally to host-linked evolution) to their diversification.

  17. Prevalence of human papillomavirus infection, distribution of viral types and risk factors in cervical samples from human immunodeficiency virus-positive women attending three human immunodeficiency virus-acquired immune deficiency syndrome reference centres in northeastern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    Martins, Albert Eduardo Silva; Lucena-Silva, Norma; Garcia, Renan Gomes; Welkovic, Stefan; Barboza, Aureliana; Menezes, Maria Luiza Bezerra; Maruza, Magda; Tenório, Terezinha; Ximenes, Ricardo AA

    2014-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patients have a greater prevalence of coinfection with human papillomavirus (HPV) is of high oncogenic risk. Indeed, the presence of the virus favours intraepithelial squamous cell lesion progression and may induce cancer. The aim of this study was to evaluate the prevalence of HPV infection, distribution of HPV types and risk factors among HIV-positive patients. Cervical samples from 450 HIV-positive patients were analysed with regard to oncotic cytology, colposcopy and HPV presence and type by means of polymerase chain reaction and sequencing. The results were analysed by comparing demographic data and data relating to HPV and HIV infection. The prevalence of HPV was 47.5%. Among the HPV-positive samples, 59% included viral types of high oncogenic risk. Multivariate analysis showed an association between HPV infection and the presence of cytological alterations (p = 0.003), age greater than or equal to 35 years (p = 0.002), number of partners greater than three (p = 0.002), CD4+ lymphocyte count < 200/mm3 (p = 0.041) and alcohol abuse (p = 0.004). Although high-risk HPV was present in the majority of the lesions studied, the low frequency of HPV 16 (3.3%), low occurrence of cervical lesions and preserved immunological state in most of the HIV-positive patients were factors that may explain the low occurrence of precancerous cervical lesions in this population. PMID:25317701

  18. Vulnerability of Normal Human Mammary Epithelial Cells to Oncogenic Transformation

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2012-04-01

    diverse transformed HMEC lines with defined genetic alterations may aid the identification of potential therapeutic treatments , including...human model systems to test potential therapeutics, could facilitate individualized treatment and possibly prevention. The main variables thought to...epithelial cells. Middle, corresponding cell culture models used in this study. Red, treatment or genetic manipulation used. Cell models are described in

  19. p53 Degradation Activity, Expression, and Subcellular Localization of E6 Proteins from 29 Human Papillomavirus Genotypes

    PubMed Central

    Mesplède, Thibault; Gagnon, David; Bergeron-Labrecque, Fanny; Azar, Ibrahim; Sénéchal, Hélène; Coutlée, François

    2012-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are the etiological agents of cervical cancer and other human malignancies. HPVs are classified into high- and low-risk genotypes according to their association with cancer. Host cell transformation by high-risk HPVs relies in part on the ability of the viral E6 protein to induce the degradation of p53. We report the development of a cellular assay that accurately quantifies the p53 degradation activity of E6 in vivo, based on the fusion of p53 to Renilla luciferase (RLuc-p53). This assay was used to measure the p53 degradation activities of E6 proteins from 29 prevalent HPV types and variants of HPV type 16 (HPV16) and HPV33 by determining the amount of E6 expression vector required to reduce by half the levels of RLuc-p53 (50% effective concentration [EC50]). These studies revealed an unexpected variability in the p53 degradation activities of different E6 proteins, even among active types whose EC50s span more than 2 log units. Differences in activity were greater between types than between variants and did not correlate with differences in the intracellular localization of E6, with most being predominantly nuclear. Protein and mRNA expression of the 29 E6 proteins was also examined. For 16 high-risk types, spliced transcripts that encode shorter E6*I proteins of variable sizes and abundances were detected. Mutation of the splice donor site in five different E6 proteins increased their p53 degradation activity, suggesting that mRNA splicing can limit the activity of some high-risk E6 types. The quantification of p53 degradation in vivo represents a novel tool to systematically compare the oncogenic potentials of E6 proteins from different HPV types and variants. PMID:22013048

  20. A human cellular sequence implicated in trk oncogene activation is DNA damage inducible

    SciTech Connect

    Ben-Ishai, R.; Scharf, R.; Sharon, R.; Kapten, I. )

    1990-08-01

    Xeroderma pigmentosum cells, which are deficient in the repair of UV light-induced DNA damage, have been used to clone DNA-damage-inducible transcripts in human cells. The cDNA clone designated pC-5 hybridizes on RNA gel blots to a 1-kilobase transcript, which is moderately abundant in nontreated cells and whose synthesis is enhanced in human cells following UV irradiation or treatment with several other DNA-damaging agents. UV-enhanced transcription of C-5 RNA is transient and occurs at lower fluences and to a greater extent in DNA-repair-deficient than in DNA-repair-proficient cells. Southern blot analysis indicates that the C-5 gene belongs to a multigene family. A cDNA clone containing the complete coding sequence of C-5 was isolated. Sequence analysis revealed that it is homologous to a human cellular sequence encoding the amino-terminal activating sequence of the trk-2h chimeric oncogene. The presence of DNA-damage-responsive sequences at the 5' end of a chimeric oncogene could result in enhanced expression of the oncogene in response to carcinogens.

  1. Human PIF1 helicase supports DNA replication and cell growth under oncogenic-stress

    PubMed Central

    Gagou, Mary E.; Ganesh, Anil; Phear, Geraldine; Robinson, Darren; Petermann, Eva; Cox, Angela; Meuth, Mark

    2014-01-01

    Unwinding duplex DNA is a critical processing step during replication, repair and transcription. Pif1 are highly conserved non-processive 5′->3′ DNA helicases with well-established roles in maintenance of yeast genome stability. However, the function of the sole member of Pif1 family in humans remains unclear. Human PIF1 is essential for tumour cell viability, particularly during replication stress, but is dispensable in non-cancerous cells and Pif1 deficient mice. Here we report that suppression of PIF1 function slows replication fork rates and increases arrested forks during normal cycling conditions. Importantly, PIF1-dependent replication impediments impair S-phase progression and reduce proliferation rates of RAS oncogene-transformed fibroblasts, where replication fork slowing is exacerbated, but not parental, non-cancerous cells. Disrupted fork movement upon PIF1-depletion does not enhance double-stranded break formation or DNA damage responses but affects resumption of DNA synthesis after prolonged replication inhibitor exposure, accompanied by diminished new origin firing and mainly S-phase entry. Taken together, we characterised a functional role for human PIF1 in DNA replication that becomes important for cell growth under oncogenic stress. Given that oncogenes induce high levels of replication stress during the early stages of tumorigenesis, this function of PIF1 could become critical during cancer development. PMID:25359767

  2. Phosphorylation regulates binding of the human papillomavirus type 8 E2 protein to host chromosomes.

    PubMed

    Sekhar, Vandana; McBride, Alison A

    2012-09-01

    The papillomavirus E2 proteins are indispensable for the viral life cycle, and their functions are subject to tight regulation. The E2 proteins undergo posttranslational modifications that regulate their properties and roles in viral transcription, replication, and genome maintenance. During persistent infection, the E2 proteins from many papillomaviruses act as molecular bridges that tether the viral genomes to host chromosomes to retain them within the host nucleus and to partition them to daughter cells. The betapapillomavirus E2 proteins bind to pericentromeric regions of host mitotic chromosomes, including the ribosomal DNA loci. We recently reported that two residues (arginine 250 and serine 253) within the chromosome binding region of the human papillomavirus type 8 (HPV8) E2 protein are required for this binding. In this study, we show that serine 253 is phosphorylated, most likely by protein kinase A, and this modulates the interaction of the E2 protein with cellular chromatin. Furthermore, we show that this phosphorylation occurs in S phase, increases the half-life of the E2 protein, and promotes chromatin binding from S phase through mitosis.

  3. A large spectrum of alpha and beta papillomaviruses are detected in human stool samples.

    PubMed

    Di Bonito, Paola; Della Libera, Simonetta; Petricca, Sabrina; Iaconelli, Marcello; Sanguinetti, Maurizio; Graffeo, Rosalia; Accardi, Luisa; La Rosa, Giuseppina

    2015-03-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) have been detected in urban wastewaters, demonstrating that epitheliotropic viruses can find their way into sewage through the washing of skin and mucous membranes. Papillomavirus shedding through faeces is still an unexplored issue. The objective of the present study was to investigate the presence of HPVs in stool samples. We analysed 103 faecal specimens collected from hospitalized patients with diarrhoea using validated primers able to detect α, β and γ HPVs. PCR products underwent sequencing analysis and sequences were aligned to reference genomes from the Papillomavirus Episteme database. A total of 15 sequences were characterized from the faecal samples. Thirteen samples (12.6 %) were positive for nine genotypes belonging to the α and β genera: HPV32 (LR, α1), HPV39 (HR, α7), HPV44 (LR, α10), HPV8 (β1), HPV9, HPV23, HPV37, HPV38 and HPV120 (β2). Two putative novel genotypes of the β genus, species 1 and 2, were also detected. The tissue(s) of origin is unknown, since faeces can collect HPVs originating from or passing through the entire digestive system. To our knowledge, this is the first investigation on the occurrence and diversity of HPVs in faecal samples. Results from this study demonstrate that HPVs can find their way into sewage as a consequence of shedding in the faeces. This highlights the need for further studies aimed at understanding the prevalence of HPV in different water environments and the potential for waterborne transmission.

  4. Human papillomavirus detection in cervical scrapes from women attended in the Family Health Program1

    PubMed Central

    Augusto, Everton Faccini; dos Santos, Larissa Silva; Oliveira, Ledy do Horto dos Santos

    2014-01-01

    Objectives to survey the prevalence of human papillomavirus, associated risk factors and genotype distribution in women who were referred to cervical cancer screening when attended in a Family Health Program. Method we conducted a cross-sectional survey, investigating 351 women. Polymerase chain reaction for DNA amplification and restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis were used to detect and typify the papillomavirus. Results virus infection was detected in 8.8% of the samples. Among the 21 different genotypes identified in this study, 14 were high risk for cervical cancer, and the type 16 was the most prevalent type. The infection was associated with women who had non-stable sexual partners. Low risk types were associated with younger women, while the high risk group was linked to altered cytology. Conclusion in this sample attended a Family Health Program, we found a low rate of papillomavirus infection. Virus frequency was associated to sexual behavior. However, the broad range of genotypes detected deserves attention regarding the vaccine coverage, which includes only HPV prevalent types. PMID:24553709

  5. Aurora-A Oncogene in Human Ovarian Cancer

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-11-01

    in Human Ovarian Cancer 5b. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-05-1-0021 5c. PROGRAM ELEMENT NUMBER 6. AUTHOR(S) 5d. PROJECT NUMBER Jin Q. Cheng, M.D...this project : 1) examine the clinicalpathological significance and the mechanism of Aurora-A overexpression/activation in ovarian cancer; 2) determine...kinase is required to localize D-TACC to centro- somes and to regulate astral microtubules. J Cell Biol 2002;156:437–51. 33. Castro A, Mandart E, Lorca T

  6. Regression of Human Papillomavirus Intraepithelial Lesions Is Induced by MVA E2 Therapeutic Vaccine

    PubMed Central

    López-Contreras, Mario; Rosales, Carlos; Magallanes-Molina, Jose-Roberto; Gonzalez-Vergara, Roberto; Arroyo-Cazarez, Jose Martin; Ricardez-Arenas, Antonio; del Follo-Valencia, Armando; Padilla-Arriaga, Santiago; Guerrero, Miriam Veronica; Pirez, Miguel Angel; Arellano-Fiore, Claudia; Villarreal, Freddy

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Human papilloma viruses can induce warts, condylomas, and other intraepithelial cervical lesions that can progress to cancer. Cervical cancer is a serious problem in developing countries because early detection is difficult, and thus proper early treatment is many times missing. In this phase III clinical trial, we evaluated the potential use of MVA E2 recombinant vaccinia virus to treat intraepithelial lesions associated with papillomavirus infection. A total of 1176 female and 180 male patients with intraepithelial lesions were studied. They were injected with 107 MVA E2 virus particles directly into their uterus, urethra, vulva, or anus. Patients were monitored by colposcopy and cytology. Immune response was determined by measuring the antibody titer against MVA E2 virus and by analyzing the cytotoxic activity against cancer cells bearing papillomavirus DNA. Papillomavirus was determined by the Hybrid Capture method or by polymerase chain reaction analysis. By histology, 1051 (89.3%) female patients showed complete elimination of lesions after treatment with MVA E2. In 28 (2.4%) female patients, the lesion was reduced to CIN 1. Another 97 (8.3%) female patients presented isolated koilocytes after treatment. In men, all lesions were completely eliminated. All MVA E2–treated patients developed antibodies against the MVA E2 vaccine and generated a specific cytotoxic response against papilloma-transformed cells. Papillomavirus DNA was not detected after treatment in 83% of total patients treated. MVA E2 did not generate any apparent side effects. These data suggest that therapeutic vaccination with MVA E2 vaccine is an excellent candidate to stimulate the immune system and generate regression in intraepithelial lesions when applied locally. PMID:25275724

  7. Characterization of primary human keratinocytes transformed by human papillomavirus type 18

    SciTech Connect

    Kaur, P.; McDougall, J.K. )

    1988-06-01

    Primary human epithelial cells were cotransfected with pHPV-18 and pSV2neo, and cell strains were generated by selecting in G418. Southern blot analysis revealed the presence of at least one intact, integrated viral genome in these cells. FE-A cells showed altered growth properties, characterized by a change in morphology, and clonal density. Differentiation markers analyzed by Western blotting (immunoblotting), such as cytokeratins and involucrin, indicated that the cells resembled a partially differentiated epithelial population. Increased expression of the 40-kilodalton cytokeratin was observed in FE-A cells, similar to that observed in simian virus 40-immortalized human keratinocytes. Calcium and 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate treatment induced normal epithelial cells to differentiate, whereas the human papillomavirus 18 (HPV-18)-containing keratinocytes were resistant to these signals, indicating their partially transformed nature. These cells were not able to induce tumors in nude mice over a period of up to 8 months. A second cell strain, FE-H18L, also generated by transfecting HPV-18, also exhibited an extended life span and similar alterations in morphology. Viral RNA transcribed from the early region of HPV-18 was detected in both cell strains by Northern (RNA) blot analysis. These cell strains should provide a useful model for determining the role of HPV in carcinogenesis.

  8. Human papillomavirus infection and immunohistochemical p16(INK4a) expression as predictors of outcome in penile squamous cell carcinomas.

    PubMed

    Bezerra, Stephania M; Chaux, Alcides; Ball, Mark W; Faraj, Sheila F; Munari, Enrico; Gonzalez-Roibon, Nilda; Sharma, Rajni; Bivalacqua, Trinity J; Burnett, Arthur L; Netto, George J

    2015-04-01

    Approximately 50% of penile squamous cell carcinomas (SCC) are associated with high-risk human papillomavirus (HR-HPV) infection. We evaluated the correlation of p16(INK4a) expression and HR-HPV with clinicopathological features and outcome in a cohort of patients with penile SCC. Two tissue microarrays were constructed from 53 invasive penile SCC at our hospital. p16(INK4a) expression was assessed by immunohistochemistry (CINtec Kit). High-risk human papillomavirus status was assessed by in situ hybridization (INFORM HPV III family 16 probe B cocktail). High-risk human papillomavirus was detected in 8 cases (15%), and p16(INK4a) overexpression was found in 23 cases (44%). Both markers showed a significant association with histologic subtype (P = .017 and P = .01, respectively) and lymphovascular invasion (P = .015 and P = .015, respectively). Regarding outcome analyses, neither HPV infection nor p16(INK4a) overexpression significantly predicted overall survival or cancer-specific survival using Cox proportional hazards regression model. High-risk human papillomavirus positivity and p16(INK4a) overexpression were significantly associated with histologic subtype and presence of lymphovascular invasion. Human papillomavirus status was not predictive of outcome in our cohort.

  9. Genomic Instability and Cancer: Lessons Learned from Human Papillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Korzeniewski, Nina; Spardy, Nicole; Duensing, Anette; Duensing, Stefan

    2010-01-01

    High-risk HPV E6 and E7 oncoproteins cooperate to subvert critical host cell cycle checkpoint control mechanisms in order to promote viral genome replication. This results not only in aberrant proliferation but also in host cellular changes that can promote genomic instability. The HPV-16 E7 oncoprotein was found to induce centrosome abnormalities thereby disrupting mitotic fidelity and increasing the risk for chromosome missegregation and aneuploidy. In addition, expression of the high-risk HPV E7 oncoprotein stimulates DNA replication stress as a potential source of DNA breakage and structural chromosomal instability. Proliferation of genomically unstable cells is sustained by several mechanisms including the accelerated degradation of claspin by HPV-16 E7 and the degradation of p53 by the high-risk HPV E6 oncoprotein. These results highlight the oncogenic potential of aberrant proliferation and opens new avenues for prevention of malignant progression, not only in HPV-associated cervical cancer but also in non-virally associated malignancies with disrupted cell cycle checkpoint control mechanisms. PMID:21075512

  10. Utilising proteomic approaches to understand oncogenic human herpesviruses (Review)

    PubMed Central

    OWEN, CHRISTOPHER B.; HUGHES, DAVID J.; BAQUERO-PEREZ, BELINDA; BERNDT, ANJA; SCHUMANN, SOPHIE; JACKSON, BRIAN R.; WHITEHOUSE, ADRIAN

    2014-01-01

    The γ-herpesviruses Epstein-Barr virus and Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus are successful pathogens, each infecting a large proportion of the human population. These viruses persist for the life of the host and may each contribute to a number of malignancies, for which there are currently no cures. Large-scale proteomic-based approaches provide an excellent means of increasing the collective understanding of the proteomes of these complex viruses and elucidating their numerous interactions within the infected host cell. These large-scale studies are important for the identification of the intricacies of viral infection and the development of novel therapeutics against these two important pathogens. PMID:25279171

  11. CPI-17 drives oncogenic Ras signaling in human melanomas via Ezrin-Radixin-Moesin family proteins

    PubMed Central

    Riecken, Lars Björn; Zoch, Ansgar; Wiehl, Ulrike; Reichert, Sabine; Scholl, Ingmar; Cui, Yan; Ziemer, Mirjana; Anderegg, Ulf; Hagel, Christian; Morrison, Helen

    2016-01-01

    Hyperactive Ras signaling has strong oncogenic effects causing several different forms of cancer. Hyperactivity is frequently induced by mutations within Ras itself, which account for up to 30% of all human cancers. In addition, hyperactive Ras signaling can also be triggered independent of Ras by either mutation or by misexpression of various upstream regulators and immediate downstream effectors. We have previously reported that C-kinase potentiated protein phosphatase-1 inhibitor of 17 kDa (CPI-17) can drive Ras activity and promote tumorigenic transformation by inhibition of the tumor suppressor Merlin. We now describe an additional element of this oncogenic mechanism in the form of the ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) protein family, which exhibits opposing roles in Ras activity control. Thus, CPI-17 drives Ras activity and tumorigenesis in a two-fold way; inactivation of the tumor suppressor merlin and activation of the growth promoting ERM family. The in vivo significance of this oncogenic switch is highlighted by demonstrating CPI-17's involvement in human melanoma pathogenesis. PMID:27793041

  12. Cervical Cancer Prevention in Malaysia: Knowledge and Attitude of Undergraduate Pharmacy Students Towards Human Papillomavirus Infection, Screening and Vaccination in Malaysia.

    PubMed

    Maharajan, Mari Kannan; Rajiah, Kingston; Sze Fang, Kelly Num; Lui, Lai Yun

    2017-03-01

    This study was conducted to evaluate knowledge of undergraduate pharmacy students about human papillomavirus infection and their attitude towards its prevention. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in 270 undergraduate pharmacy students using a validated questionnaire to assess knowledge about human papillomavirus infection and cervical cancer and their attitudes towards human papillomavirus vaccines. Eighty-one percent of the respondents knew that human papillomavirus is a cause of cervical cancer, and 87.8 % knew that this infection is preventable. The gender of the respondents showed the strongest correlations with human papillomavirus knowledge. There were no significant correlations between the ethnic group of the respondents and their human papillomavirus-related knowledge. Higher perceptions of risk were associated with relationship status, and respondents who were in a relationship showed greater interest in vaccinating themselves; relationship status emerged as a unique predictor. The results indicated a moderately high level of knowledge and positive attitude towards human papillomavirus vaccination with few disagreements. The results of this study will help to develop and plan appropriate education campaigns for pharmacy students that aim to reduce human papillomavirus infection and, consequently, the incidence of and mortality caused by cervical cancer in Malaysia.

  13. Effects of high mobility group protein box 1 and toll like receptor 4 pathway on warts caused by human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Weng, Hui; Liu, Hongbo; Deng, Yunhua; Xie, Yuyan; Shen, Guanxin

    2014-10-01

    Accumulative evidence has demonstrated that inflammation has an important role in human papillomavirus (HPV) oncogenicity. However, the effects of high mobility group protein box 1 (HMGB1)-toll like receptor 4 (TLR4) signaling pathway associated inflammation on epidermal warts caused by HPV remain unclear. The present study investigated the HMGB1, TLR4 and nuclear factor-κB p65 expression in condyloma acuminatum (CA) and verruca vulgaris (VV). Immunohistochemistry and western blot analysis revealed that p65 expression in epithelial nuclei in VV and CA was significantly higher than in normal skin (NS) (P<0.01), and p65 in CA was higher than in VV but this difference was not significant. The level of extracellular HMGB1 increased significantly and progressively from NS to VV to CA (P<0.05). The level of TLR4 on the surface of epithelial membranes in the CA samples was significantly higher than in NS (P<0.01), and TLR4 in VV samples was significantly lower than in NS (P<0.01). There was a positive correlation between p65 expression in the epithelial nuclei and HMGB1 in the epithelial intercellular spaces (r=0.5199, P<0.01). These findings indicate that inflammation is intensified in warts caused by HPV. HMGB1-TLR4 pathway-associated inflammation may therefore have a pivotal role in CA. HMGB1, rather than TLR4, may be a vital mediator of inflammation in VV. Therapies targeting HMGB1 may be a potential strategy for the treatment of HPV-associated warts.

  14. Human papillomavirus types distribution in eastern Sicilian females with cervical lesions. A correlation with colposcopic and histological findings.

    PubMed

    Le Donne, Maria; Giuffrè, Giuseppe; Caruso, Carmela; Nicotina, Piero Antonio; Alibrandi, Angela; Scalisi, Rosalba; Simone, Angela; Chiofalo, Benito; Triolo, Onofrio

    2013-07-01

    To determine human papillomavirus (HPV) types distribution in cervical lesions in a Southern Italian female population in Messina and their relationship between HPV type and grade of colposcopic and histopathological abnormality, a total of 253 women aged 17-68 years, with previous cytological abnormalities, were included in this study. HPV-DNA testing, colposcopy and biopsy were performed. For each sample, cervical cells were collected by centrifugation and DNA was extracted, followed by a PCR-based HPV-DNA assay and reverse dot blot genotyping. HPV-16 was found the most common type (46.6 %) followed by HPV-31 (26.9 %), -6 (18.6 %), -58 (8.8 %), -18 (6.7 %), -66 (5.7 %), -52 and -53 (4.7 %). Out of 62 women with abnormal transformation zone (ATZ) area compatible with squamous intraepithelial lesion (SIL) or cervical cancer (CC), 64.5 % was found high risk (HR) HPV-positive. Moreover the severity of the colposcopic diagnosis was positively correlated with the higher HPV oncogenicity risk (HPV-16 P = 0.023; and HPV-53 P = 0.047). The HPV-16 was found the most prevalent type within each histological category: 66.7 %, 31.2 %, 44 % and 37.2 % of CC, high grade (H)SIL, low grade (L)SIL and chronic cervicitis respectively; followed by HPV-31 present in 25 %, 8 %, and 13.3 % of HSIL, LSIL and chronic cervicitis respectively. A higher HPV incidence than the rest of Italy was found, in agreement with that detected by other authors for the South of the country. These data provide further information about the types prevalence in women with cervical lesions living in Eastern Sicily, suggesting the introduction of new targeted vaccines against a wider spectrum of HPV.

  15. Anal human papillomavirus and HIV: An exploratory study among men who have sex with men in Moscow, Russia

    PubMed Central

    Wirtz, AL; Zelaya, CE; Peryshkina, A; McGowan, I; Cranston, RD; Latkin, C; D’Souza, G; Galai, N; Mogilniy, V; Dzhigun, P; Kostetskaya, I; Beyrer, C

    2016-01-01

    Anal human papillomavirus (HPV) is prevalent among men who have sex with men (MSM), but has not been studied in the Russian Federation. HIV seropositive (N=58) and seronegative MSM (N=65) were enrolled in a cross-sectional study in Moscow, Russia, surveyed, and underwent anal cytology and anal HPV genotyping. Multivariable logistic regression was performed to identify correlates of infection with oncogenic HPV genotypes 16 and/or 18 (HPV 16/18). Some 39.5% of all MSM were infected with at least one anal HPV genotype, 31.7% with HPV16/18, and 11.7% had high grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (HSIL). HPV 16/18 was more prevalent among HIV seropositive than seronegative men (41.4% vs. 23.1%; p=0.03). In the final multivariable model, HIV infection was independently associated with HPV 16/18 (AOR:5.08; 95%CI:1.49–17.34), as were migration to/within Russia (AOR:3.18; 95%CI:1.00–10.09) and having 2–4 steady male sex partners in the last year (vs. ≤1 partner; AOR:6.99; 95%CI:1.94–25.24). History of jail/prison and use of incompatible lubricants were marginally associated with HPV 16/18 (p<0.10). Anal HPV 16/18 was prevalent among this sample of Moscow-based MSM and strongly associated with HIV infection. Correlations with mobility and detention in prison/jail, likely reflect behavioural risk and low healthcare access among marginalized populations that limits access to HIV/STI prevention options. Comprehensive prevention options are needed for MSM in Russia and may benefit from inclusion of young men in piloted HPV vaccination programs. PMID:25953132

  16. Phylogenetic and functional analysis of sequence variation of human papillomavirus type 31 E6 and E7 oncoproteins.

    PubMed

    Ferenczi, Annamária; Gyöngyösi, Eszter; Szalmás, Anita; László, Brigitta; Kónya, József; Veress, György

    2016-09-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPV) are the causative agents of cervical and other anogenital cancers as well as a subset of head and neck cancers. The E6 and E7 oncoproteins of HPV contribute to oncogenesis by associating with the tumour suppressor protein p53 and pRb, respectively. For HPV types 16 and 18, intratypic sequence variation was shown to have biological and clinical significance. The functional significance of sequence variation among HPV 31 variants was studied less intensively. HPV 31 variants belonging to different variant lineages were found to have differences in persistence and in the ability to cause high grade cervical intraepithelial neoplasia. In the present study, we started to explore the functional effects of natural sequence variation of HPV 31 E6 and E7 oncoproteins. The E6 variants were tested for their effects on p53 protein stability and transcriptional activity, while the E7 variants were tested for their effects on pRb protein level and also on the transcriptional activity of E2F transcription factors. HPV 31 E7 variants displayed uniform effects on pRb stability and also on the activity of E2F transcription factors. HPV 31 E6 variants had remarkable differences in the ability to inhibit the trans-activation function of p53 but not in the ability to induce the in vivo degradation of p53. Our results indicate that natural sequence variation of the HPV 31 E6 protein may be involved in the observed differences in the oncogenic potential between HPV 31 variants.

  17. Involvement of Nuclear Export in Human Papillomavirus Type 18 E6-Mediated Ubiquitination and Degradation of p53

    PubMed Central

    Stewart, Deborah; Ghosh, Anirban; Matlashewski, Greg

    2005-01-01

    The E6 protein from high-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs) targets the p53 tumor suppressor for degradation by the proteasome pathway. This ability contributes to the oncogenic potential of these viruses. However, several aspects concerning the mechanism of E6-mediated p53 degradation at the cellular level remain to be clarified. This study therefore examined the role of cell localization and ubiquitination in the E6-mediated degradation of p53. As demonstrated within, following coexpression both p53 and high-risk HPV type 18 (HPV-18) E6 (18E6) shuttle from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. Mutation of the C-terminal nuclear export signal (NES) of p53 or treatment with leptomycin B inhibited the 18E6-mediated nuclear export of p53. Impairment of nuclear export resulted in only a partial reduction in 18E6-mediated degradation, suggesting that both nuclear and cytoplasmic proteasomes can target p53 for degradation. This was also consistent with the observation that 18E6 mediated the accumulation of polyubiquitinated p53 in the nucleus. In comparison, a p53 isoform that localizes predominantly to the cytoplasm was not targeted for degradation by 18E6 in vivo but could be degraded in vitro, arguing that nuclear p53 is the target for E6-mediated degradation. This study supports a model in which (i) E6 mediates the accumulation of polyubiquitinated p53 in the nucleus, (ii) E6 is coexported with p53 from the nucleus to the cytoplasm via a CRM1 nuclear export mechanism involving the C-terminal NES of p53, and (iii) E6-mediated p53 degradation can be mediated by both nuclear and cytoplasmic proteasomes. PMID:15994771

  18. Prevalence, concordance and determinants of human papillomavirus infection among heterosexual partners in a rural region in central Mexico

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Although human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in heterosexual couples has been sparsely studied, it is relevant to understand disease burden and transmission mechanisms. The present study determined the prevalence and concordance of type-specific HPV infection as well as the determinants of infection in heterosexual couples in a rural area of Mexico. Methods A cross-sectional study was conducted in 504 clinically healthy heterosexual couples from four municipalities in the State of Mexico, Mexico. HPV testing was performed using biotinylated L1 consensus primers and reverse line blot in cervical samples from women and in genital samples from men. Thirty-seven HPV types were detected, including high-risk oncogenic types and low-risk types. Multivariate logistic regression models were utilized to evaluate factors associated with HPV. Results The prevalence of HPV infection was 20.5% in external male genitals and 13.7% in cervical samples. In 504 sexual couples participating in the study, concordance of HPV status was 79%; 34 partners (6.7%) were concurrently infected, and 21 out of 34 partners where both were HPV positive (61.8%) showed concordance for one or more HPV types. The principal risk factor associated with HPV DNA detection in men as well as women was the presence of HPV DNA in the respective regular sexual partner (OR = 5.15, 95%CI 3.01-8.82). In men, having a history of 10 or more sexual partners over their lifetime (OR 2.5, 95%CI 1.3 - 4.8) and having had sexual relations with prostitutes (OR 1.7, 95%CI 1.01 - 2.8) increased the likelihood of detecting HPV DNA. Conclusions In heterosexual couples in rural regions in Mexico, the prevalence of HPV infection and type-specific concordance is high. High-risk sexual behaviors are strong determinants of HPV infection in men. PMID:20667085

  19. Anal human papillomavirus infection among HIV-infected and uninfected men who have sex with men in Beijing, China

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Yifei; Qian, Han-Zhu; Sun, Jiangping; Gao, Lei; Yin, Lu; Li, Xiangwei; Xiao, Dong; Li, Dongliang; Sun, Xiaoyun; Ruan, Yuhua; Milam, Douglas F.; Pan, Stephen W.; Shao, Yiming; Vermund, Sten H.

    2013-01-01

    To determine prevalence, genotypes and predictors of anal human papillomavirus (HPV) among HIV-infected and uninfected men who have sex with men (MSM) in Beijing, China. In 2010–2011, we recruited MSM (age range 18–61; median 28 years) through peer volunteers, and collected demographic/behavioral information via interviewer-administrated questionnaires. Trained health workers collected anal swabs for HPV genotyping by PCR and blood samples for HIV/syphilis serologies . We obtained anal specimens from 212 HIV-infected and 459 HIV-uninfected participants. Among HIV-infected MSM, 82.1% were HPV-infected vs. 57.5% in HIV-uninfected (p<0.01). HIV-infected men had the greatest likelihood of multiple types: 17.9% uninfected; 36.3% with one type; 36.8% with 2–3; 9.0% with >4. Oncogenic HPV prevalence was higher among HIV- infected (61.3%) than uninfected participants (39.7%; p<0.01). HIV-uninfected MSM reporting always using condoms during insertive anal intercourse (past 6 months) were less likely to be HPV-infected (OR=0.49, 95%CI: 0.31–0.77). Among HIV-uninfected MSM, HPV infection was associated with unprotected receptive anal intercourse (past 6 months; OR=1.92, 95%CI: 1.19–3.11) and being forced to have sex (previous year; OR=3.32, 95%CI: 1.10–10.0). Multivariable logistic analysis among HIV infected MSM suggested that unprotected oral intercourse (past 6 months) was associated with HPV (adjusted OR=2.12, 95%CI: 1.00–4.48). Syphilis occurred in 55.8% of HIV-infected/HPV-infected, 50.0% of HIV-infected/HPV-uninfected, 19.6% of HIV-uninfected/HPV-infected, and 13.0% of HIV-uninfected/HPV-uninfected MSM. HPV anal infections were more common among HIV-infected than uninfected MSM in China, including oncogenic and multiple types. Unprotected oral and receptive anal sex were significant HPV risk factors. Promotion of safer sex and HPV vaccination is strongly recommended among MSM. PMID:23732908

  20. [Biomarkers of cervical carcinogenesis associated with genital human papillomavirus infection].

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Ana; Delgado, Candida; Verdasca, Nuno; Pista, Angela

    2013-01-01

    Introdução/Objetivos: A infeção persistente pelo Vírus do Papiloma Humano de alto risco (HPVar) é considerada como a causa necessária, embora não suficiente, para o desenvolvimento do cancro do colo do útero, sugerindo que outros fatores estarão envolvidos no processo de carcinogénese. Este estudo pretendeu avaliar indicadores de prognóstico da persistência da infeção por HPV, nomeadamente o estado físico e a carga viral dos HPV 16 e 18 e a superexpressão dos transcritos do RNAm dos HPV 16, 18, 31, 33 e 45, num grupo de mulheres com ou sem sintomatologia clínica e citopatológica. Material e Métodos: Foram estudadas 378 alíquotas de células epiteliais congeladas pertencentes a utentes dos centros de saúde do Serviço Nacional de Saúde e de clínicas privadas, referenciadas para teste HPV, entre Janeiro de 2007 e Dezembro de 2010. De acordo com o diagnóstico citopatológico, foram definidos cinco grupos: normal, ASCUS, LSIL, HSIL e carcinoma invasivo do colo do útero. Para a determinação do estado físico do DNA e da carga viral dos HPV 16 e 18 foi utilizada metodologia de PCR em tempo real, e para a superexpressão dos transcritos dos oncogenes E6 e E7 o sistema comercial NucliSENS EasyQ HPV®. Os indicadores foram analisados em associação com os tipos de lesão do colo do útero. Para a análise estatística foi utilizado o o programa informático SPSS versão 16.0 e o teste de Chi-Quadrado. Resultados: Os resultados mostraram ausência de associação estatisticamente significativa entre a gravidade da lesão e o estado físico do DNA dos HPV 16 e 18. A superexpressão dos transcritos do RNAm E6/E7 e a carga viral dos HPV 16 e 18 aumentaram significativamente em função do grau da lesão. Conclusões: Os resultados obtidos sugerem que a determinação do estado físico do DNA dos HPV 16 e 18, isoladamente, não constitui um indicador de prognóstico para o desenvolvimento e progressão das lesões. A superexpressão dos transcritos

  1. Regulation of human genome expression and RNA splicing by human papillomavirus 16 E2 protein.

    PubMed

    Gauson, Elaine J; Windle, Brad; Donaldson, Mary M; Caffarel, Maria M; Dornan, Edward S; Coleman, Nicholas; Herzyk, Pawel; Henderson, Scott C; Wang, Xu; Morgan, Iain M

    2014-11-01

    Human papillomavirus 16 (HPV16) is causative in human cancer. The E2 protein regulates transcription from and replication of the viral genome; the role of E2 in regulating the host genome has been less well studied. We have expressed HPV16 E2 (E2) stably in U2OS cells; these cells tolerate E2 expression well and gene expression analysis identified 74 genes showing differential expression specific to E2. Analysis of published gene expression data sets during cervical cancer progression identified 20 of the genes as being altered in a similar direction as the E2 specific genes. In addition, E2 altered the splicing of many genes implicated in cancer and cell motility. The E2 expressing cells showed no alteration in cell growth but were altered in cell motility, consistent with the E2 induced altered splicing predicted to affect this cellular function. The results present a model system for investigating E2 regulation of the host genome.

  2. Characterization of human antibody-reactive epitopes encoded by human papillomavirus types 16 and 18.

    PubMed Central

    Jenison, S A; Yu, X P; Valentine, J M; Galloway, D A

    1991-01-01

    We have previously reported that the most common human serum immunoglobulin G antibody reactivities to human papillomavirus type 16 and type 18 (HPV16 and HPV18)-encoded proteins are directed against the minor capsid proteins (HPV16 L2 and HPV18 L2) and to the E7 protein of HPV16 (S. A. Jenison, X.-P. Yu, J. M. Valentine, L. A. Koutsky, A. E. Christiansen, A. M. Beckmann, and D. A. Galloway, J. Infect. Dis. 162:60-69, 1990). In this study, the antibody-reactive segments of the HPV16 E7, HPV16 L2, and HPV18 L2 polypeptides were mapped by using nested sets of deleted recombinant proteins. A single major immunoreactive region was identified in the HPV16 E7 polypeptide between amino acids (aa) 21 and 34 (DLYCYE-QLNDSSEE). In contrast, three distinct immunoreactive regions of the HPV16 L2 polypeptide were present in the segment between aa149 and aa204, and three distinct immunoreactive regions of the HPV18 L2 polypeptide were present in the segment between aa110 and aa211. With the exception of one serum sample, serum immunoglobulin G antibodies which reacted with HPV16 L2 polypeptides or with HPV18 L2 polypeptides were not cross-reactive. Images PMID:1704924

  3. Reported changes in sexual behaviour and human papillomavirus knowledge in Peruvian female sex workers following participation in a human papillomavirus vaccine trial.

    PubMed

    Brown, B; Blas, M M; Heidari, O; Carcamo, C; Halsey, N A

    2013-07-01

    Limited data exist on the effect of clinical trial participation on sexual behavioural change. Two hundred female sex workers working in Lima, Peru received human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine in either the standard (0, 2, 6 months) or modified (0, 3, 6 months) schedule. Participants received comprehensive screening and treatment for sexually transmitted infections (STIs), counselling on safe sex practices, education about HPV and the HPV vaccine, contraceptives (oral and condoms) and family planning at each visit. We assessed vaccine completion rates, change in sexual practices, and changes in HPV knowledge before and after participation in the vaccine trial. There were high rates of vaccine completion, 91% overall. The estimated number of reported new and total clients over a 30-day period decreased significantly (P < 0.001). Knowledge about HPV and HPV-related disease increased among all participants. In addition, all participants listed at least one preventive strategy during the month 7 follow-up survey.

  4. AHNS series: Do you know your guidelines? Management of head and neck cancer in the era of human papillomavirus: Educating our patients on human papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Guo, Theresa; Goldenberg, David; Fakhry, Carole

    2017-03-06

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has changed the face of head and neck cancer over the past 2 decades. No longer is this solely a disease of older patients with a history of heavy tobacco and alcohol use. Patients with HPV-related head and neck cancers tend to be younger, healthier, and have an improved prognosis, compared with those with HPV-negative tumors. As more patients are diagnosed with HPV-related head and neck cancer, physicians have important topics to consider. These include prevalence, transmission, and natural history of HPV, the role of screening, vaccines, and HPV testing in head and neck cancer. This article continues a series developed by the American Head and Neck Society's Education Committee entitled "Do you know your guidelines?" and is intended to provide guidance for navigating common questions and concerns patients may have about HPV infection and HPV-related head and neck cancer. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. Head Neck, 2017.

  5. The DNA Binding Domain of a Papillomavirus E2 Protein Programs a Chimeric Nuclease To Cleave Integrated Human Papillomavirus DNA in HeLa Cervical Carcinoma Cells▿

    PubMed Central

    Horner, Stacy M.; DiMaio, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Viral DNA binding proteins that direct nucleases or other protein domains to viral DNA in lytically or latently infected cells may provide a novel approach to modulate viral gene expression or replication. Cervical carcinogenesis is initiated by high-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) infection, and viral DNA persists in the cancer cells. To test whether a DNA binding domain of a papillomavirus protein can direct a nuclease domain to cleave HPV DNA in cervical cancer cells, we fused the DNA binding domain of the bovine papillomavirus type 1 (BPV1) E2 protein to the catalytic domain of the FokI restriction endonuclease, generating a BPV1 E2-FokI chimeric nuclease (BEF). BEF introduced DNA double-strand breaks on both sides of an E2 binding site in vitro, whereas DNA binding or catalytic mutants of BEF did not. After expression of BEF in HeLa cervical carcinoma cells, we detected cleavage at E2 binding sites in the integrated HPV18 DNA in these cells and also at an E2 binding site in cellular DNA. BEF-expressing cells underwent senescence, which required the DNA binding activity of BEF, but not its nuclease activity. These results demonstrate that DNA binding domains of viral proteins can target effector molecules to cognate binding sites in virally infected cells. PMID:17392356

  6. Downregulation of Toll-Like Receptor 9 Expression by Beta Human Papillomavirus 38 and Implications for Cell Cycle Control

    PubMed Central

    Pacini, Laura; Savini, Claudia; Ghittoni, Raffaella; Saidj, Djamel; Lamartine, Jerome; Hasan, Uzma A.; Accardi, Rosita

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Innate immunity is the first line of host defense against infections. Many oncogenic viruses can deregulate several immune-related pathways to guarantee the persistence of the infection. Here, we show that the cutaneous human papillomavirus 38 (HPV38) E6 and E7 oncoproteins suppress the expression of the double-stranded DNA sensor Toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) in human foreskin keratinocytes (HFK), a key mediator of the antiviral innate immune host response. In particular, HPV38 E7 induces TLR9 mRNA downregulation by promoting accumulation of ΔNp73α, an antagonist of p53 and p73. Inhibition of ΔNp73α expression by antisense oligonucleotide in HPV38 E6/E7 HFK strongly rescues mRNA levels of TLR9, highlighting a key role of ΔNp73α in this event. Chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments showed that ΔNp73α is part of a negative transcriptional regulatory complex with IκB kinase beta (IKKβ) that binds to a NF-κB responsive element within the TLR9 promoter. In addition, the Polycomb protein enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2), responsible for gene expression silencing, is also recruited into the complex, leading to histone 3 trimethylation at lysine 27 (H3K27me3) in the same region of the TLR9 promoter. Ectopic expression of TLR9 in HPV38 E6/E7 cells resulted in an accumulation of the cell cycle inhibitors p21WAF1 and p27Kip1, decreased CDK2-associated kinase activity, and inhibition of cellular proliferation. In summary, our data show that HPV38, similarly to other viruses with well-known oncogenic activity, can downregulate TLR9 expression. In addition, they highlight a new role for TLR9 in cell cycle regulation. IMPORTANCE The mucosal high-risk HPV types have been clearly associated with human carcinogenesis. Emerging lines of evidence suggest the involvement of certain cutaneous HPV types in development of skin squamous cell carcinoma, although this association is still under debate. Oncogenic viruses have evolved different strategies to hijack the

  7. Liquid biopsy for detection of actionable oncogenic mutations in human cancers and electric field induced release and measurement liquid biopsy (eLB).

    PubMed

    Tu, Michael; Chia, David; Wei, Fang; Wong, David

    2016-01-21

    Oncogenic activations by mutations in key cancer genes such as EGFR and KRAS are frequently associated with human cancers. Molecular targeting of specific oncogenic mutations in human cancer is a major therapeutic inroad for anti-cancer drug therapy. In addition, progressive developments of oncogene mutations lead to drug resistance. Therefore, the ability to detect and continuously monitor key actionable oncogenic mutations is important to guide the use of targeted molecular therapies to improve long-term clinical outcomes in cancer patients. Current oncogenic mutation detection is based on direct sampling of cancer tissue by surgical resection or biopsy. Oncogenic mutations were recently shown to be detectable in circulating bodily fluids of cancer patients. This field of investigation, termed liquid biopsy, permits a less invasive means of assessing the oncogenic mutation profile of a patient. This paper will review the analytical strategies used to assess oncogenic mutations from biofluid samples. Clinical applications will also be discussed.

  8. Liquid Biopsy for Detection of Actionable Oncogenic Mutations in Human Cancers and Electric Field Induced Release and Measurement Liquid Biopsy (eLB)

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Michael; Chia, David; Wei, Fang; Wong, David

    2015-01-01

    Oncogenic activations by mutations in key cancer genes such as EGFR and KRAS are frequently associated with human cancers. Molecular targeting of specific oncogenic mutations in human cancer is a major therapeutic inroad for anti-cancer drug therapy. In addition, progressive developments of oncogene mutations lead to drug resistance. Therefore, the ability to detect and continuously monitor key actionable oncogenic mutations is important to guide the use of targeted molecular therapies to improve long-term clinical outcomes in cancer patients. Current oncogenic mutation detection is based on direct sampling of cancer tissue by surgical resection or biopsy. Oncogenic mutations were recently shown to be detectable in circulating bodily fluids of cancer patients. This field of investigation, termed liquid biopsy, permits a less invasive means of assessing the oncogenic mutation profile of a patient. This paper will review the analytical strategies used to assess oncogenic mutations from biofluid samples. Clinical applications will also be discussed. PMID:26645892

  9. Human gene control by vital oncogenes: revisiting a theoretical model and its implications for targeted cancer therapy.

    PubMed

    Willis, Rudolph E

    2012-01-01

    An important assumption of our current understanding of the mechanisms of carcinogenesis has been the belief that clarification of the cancer process would inevitably reveal some of the crucial mechanisms of normal human gene regulation. Since the momentous work of Bishop and Varmus, both the molecular and the biochemical processes underlying the events in the development of cancer have become increasingly clear. The identification of cellular signaling pathways and the role of protein kinases in the events leading to gene activation have been critical to our understanding not only of normal cellular gene control mechanisms, but also have clarified some of the important molecular and biochemical events occurring within a cancer cell. We now know that oncogenes are dysfunctional proto-oncogenes and that dysfunctional tumor suppressor genes contribute to the cancer process. Furthermore, Weinstein and others have hypothesized the phenomenon of oncogene addiction as a distinct characteristic of the malignant cell. It can be assumed that cancer cells, indeed, become dependent on such vital oncogenes. The products of these vital oncogenes, such as c-myc, may well be the Achilles heel by which targeted molecular therapy may lead to truly personalized cancer therapy. The remaining problem is the need to introduce relevant molecular diagnostic tests such as genome microarray analysis and proteomic methods, especially protein kinase identification arrays, for each individual patient. Genome wide association studies on cancers with gene analysis of single nucleotide and other mutations in functional proto-oncogenes will, hopefully, identify dysfunctional proto-oncogenes and allow the development of more specific targeted drugs directed against the protein products of these vital oncogenes. In 1984 Willis proposed a molecular and biochemical model for eukaryotic gene regulation suggesting how proto-oncogenes might function within the normal cell. That model predicted the

  10. Analysis of cis-elements that facilitate extrachromosomal persistence of human papillomavirus genomes

    SciTech Connect

    Pittayakhajonwut, Daraporn; Angeletti, Peter C.

    2008-05-10

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are maintained latently in dividing epithelial cells as nuclear plasmids. Two virally encoded proteins, E1, a helicase, and E2, a transcription factor, are important players in replication and stable plasmid maintenance in host cells. Recent experiments in yeast have demonstrated that viral genomes retain replication and maintenance function independently of E1 and E2 [Angeletti, P.C., Kim, K., Fernandes, F.J., and Lambert, P.F. (2002). Stable replication of papillomavirus genomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. J. Virol. 76(7), 3350-8; Kim, K., Angeletti, P.C., Hassebroek, E.C., and Lambert, P.F. (2005). Identification of cis-acting elements that mediate the replication and maintenance of human papillomavirus type 16 genomes in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. J. Virol. 79(10), 5933-42]. Flow cytometry studies of EGFP-reporter vectors containing subgenomic HPV fragments with or without a human ARS (hARS), revealed that six fragments located in E6-E7, E1-E2, L1, and L2 regions showed a capacity for plasmid stabilization in the absence of E1 and E2 proteins. Interestingly, four fragments within E7, the 3' end of L2, and the 5' end of L1 exhibited stability in plasmids that lacked an hARS, indicating that they possess both replication and maintenance functions. Two fragments lying in E1-E2 and the 3' region of L1 were stable only in the presence of hARS, that they contained only maintenance function. Mutational analyses of HPV16-GFP reporter constructs provided evidence that genomes lacking E1 and E2 could replicate to an extent similar to wild type HPV16. Together these results support the concept that cellular factors influence HPV replication and maintenance, independently, and perhaps in conjunction with E1 and E2, suggesting a role in the persistent phase of the viral lifecycle.

  11. The impact of glucocorticoids and anti-cd20 therapy on cervical human papillomavirus infection risk in women with systemic lupus erythematosus

    PubMed Central

    Mendoza-Pinto, Claudia; Garcia-Carrasco, Mario; Vallejo-Ruiz, Veronica; Taboada-Cole, Alejandro; Muñoz-Guarneros, Margarita; Solis-Poblano, Juan Carlos; Pezzat-Said, Elias; Aguilar-Lemarroy, Adriana; Jave-Suarez, Luis Felipe; de Lara, Luis Vazquez; Ramos-Alvarez, Gloria; Reyes-Leyva, Julio; Lopez-Colombo, Aurelio

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To identify the prevalence and factors associated with cervical human papillomavirus infection in women with systemic lupus erythematosus METHODS: This cross-sectional study collected traditional and systemic lupus erythematosus-related disease risk factors, including conventional and biologic therapies. A gynecological evaluation and cervical cytology screen were performed. Human papillomavirus detection and genotyping were undertaken by PCR and linear array assay. RESULTS: A total of 148 patients were included, with a mean age and disease duration of 42.5±11.8 years and 9.7±5.3 years, respectively. The prevalence of squamous intraepithelial lesions was 6.8%. The prevalence of human papillomavirus infection was 29%, with human papillomavirus subtype 59 being the most frequent. Patients with human papillomavirus were younger than those without the infection (38.2±11.2 vs. 44.2±11.5 years, respectively; p = 0.05), and patients with the virus had higher daily prednisone doses (12.8±6.8 vs. 9.7±6.7 mg, respectively; p = 0.01) and cumulative glucocorticoid doses (14.2±9.8 vs. 9.7±7.3 g, respectively; p = 0.005) compared with patients without. Patients with human papillomavirus infection more frequently received rituximab than those without (20.9% vs. 8.5%, respectively; p = 0.03). In the multivariate analysis, only the cumulative glucocorticoid dose was associated with human papillomavirus infection. CONCLUSIONS: The cumulative glucocorticoid dose may increase the risk of human papillomavirus infection. Although rituximab administration was more frequent in patients with human papillomavirus infection, no association was found. Screening for human papillomavirus infection is recommended in women with systemic lupus erythematosus. PMID:24473503

  12. Recurrent optic neuritis and neuromyelitis optica-IgG following first and second human papillomavirus vaccinations.

    PubMed

    Chang, Hyeyeon; Lee, Hye Lim; Yeo, Minju; Kim, Ji Seon; Shin, Dong-Ick; Lee, Sang-Soo; Lee, Sung-Hyun

    2016-05-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine is widely used to prevent cervical cancer caused by certain types of HPV in girls and young women. Demyelinating disorders within months following HPV innoculation have been reported, but the causal link between HPV vaccination and the onset of demyelinating disorders have not been certain. We report a case of neuromyelitis optica spectrum disorder (NMOSD) that was noteworthy because optic neuritis (ON) occurred in a very close temporal association with both the first and second HPV vaccinations, which might suggest an association between HPV vaccination and the development of NMO-IgG and recurrent ON. This emphasizes the necessity for continuing surveillance for adverse events after HPV vaccination.

  13. Human papillomavirus-induced carcinogenesis and the ubiquitin-proteasome system.

    PubMed

    Scheffner, Martin; Whitaker, Noel J

    2003-02-01

    Certain types of human papillomaviruses have been etiologically associated with malignant lesions, most notably with cervical cancer. The major oncoproteins of these cancer-associated viruses are encoded by the viral E6 and E7 genes. Thorough characterization of these oncoproteins and their interaction with cellular proteins has shown that both E6 and E7 exploit the ubiquitin-proteasome system to degrade and, thus, to functionally inactivate negative cell-regulatory proteins including members of the p110(RB) family and p53. This act of piracy is assumed to contribute to both the efficient propagation of HPVs and HPV-induced carcinogenesis.

  14. Absence of human papillomavirus sequences in epithelial breast cancer in a Mexican female population.

    PubMed

    Herrera-Romano, Lisbeth; Fernández-Tamayo, Nora; Gómez-Conde, Eduardo; Reyes-Cardoso, Juan M; Ortiz-Gutierrez, Felipe; Ceballos, Guillermo; Valdivia, Alejandra; Piña, Patricia; Salcedo, Mauricio

    2012-09-01

    The role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in breast cancer is controversial. We evaluated 118 breast carcinomas and two paraffin-embedded tissues of lesions of the nipple of Mexican patients for HPV sequences. No carcinoma sample exhibited koilocytosis, in contrast to lesions of the nipple. We subjected purified DNAs to PCR employing two HPV16/E6 or GP5/6 primer set oligonucleotides. Results showed that HPV DNA sequences were absent in the breast tissues. Absence of HPV in breast carcinoma failed to support an association between HPV infection and this carcinoma.

  15. Detection and Genotyping of Human Papillomaviruses from Archival Formalin-Fixed Tissue Samples.

    PubMed

    Van Doorslaer, Koenraad; Chen, Zigui; McBride, Alison A

    2016-11-18

    Pathology departments routinely process and store formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded (FFPE) tissue samples for clinical diagnosis. These collections often contain decades' worth of samples and represent a treasure trove of specimens that can be analyzed for retrospective epidemiological studies, diagnostics, and pathogen discovery. Accurate amplification and sequencing of DNA from these samples is critical for the usability of these FFPE samples. Here we present a collection of protocols that describe extraction of DNA from FFPE tissues, PCR amplification of human papillomavirus DNA, and subsequent genotyping of the infecting virus. © 2016 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  16. [Human papillomavirus and carcinoma of the cervix vaccines against the human papillomavirus-promise of an efficacious prevention].

    PubMed

    Kohl, Igor

    2006-06-01

    The persistent infection with high-risk (oncogenic) HPV types is the necessary cause of cervical cancer. HPV types 16 and 18 are the most important of the high-risk types all around the world. The low risk HPV types, include type 6, 11 and next, cause either benign genital warts or low-grade intraepithelial lesions. Cervical cancer is the third most important cause of cancer deaths in women worldwide, after, first, breast cancer and, second, lung cancer, and the leading cause of cancer deaths in women in the developing world. Every year, half a million women around the world are diagnosed as new cases, and more than 270,000 die from this disease. The majority of deaths, around 80 %, occur in developing countries (in Latin America and Sub-Saharan Africa). The main reason for these variations in incidence is probably the availability of screening programmes in many developed countries but not in poorer developing countries. Pap smear testing forms the basis of cervical cancer screening programmes round the world. A well-implemented screening programme can reduce the incidence of cervical cancer in a country by approximately 80 %. Although useful is fully implemented, a cytology-based screening programme does have limitations. It cannot prevent infection with high-risk HPV or the subsequent development of pre-cancerous lesions. It is also a very expensive and demanding system to set up and maintain. Knowledge that cervical cancer is caused by viral infection provided the exceptional way to use a vaccination as the next tool of cervical cancer prevention. There are the only two realistic approaches for the prevention of cervical cancer--cervical screening and vaccination. Vaccination of a healthy individual to protect them against a disease is an excellent example of primary prevention. Two pharmaceutical companies--GlaxoSmithKline (GSK) and Merck--developed a prophylactic vaccines which are already in the pre-licence phase. The results published up to now showed a

  17. [Pap test used for detection of cellular changes associated with human papillomavirus].

    PubMed

    Hernández-Valencia, Marcelino; Carrillo-Pacheco, Adia; Hernández-Quijano, Tomás; Zárate, Arturo

    2013-01-01

    Human papilloma virus can infect any mucous of the body and can cause cancer of the uterine cervix. This suggests recommending the Papanicolaou smear combined with a test for detection of human papillomavirus with a frequency interval of 3 years, since it grants greater information and fidelity to the result. The detection studies should begin at the age of 21 years and should stop at 65 years age. Until recently specific treatments did not exist to treat human papilloma virus, but recently some drugs that have demonstrated good effectiveness in curing the infection of human papilloma virus. One example is glycirrhicinic acid, which has demonstrated fewer adverse effects, as well as the possibility that its systemic employment allows treatment of lesions that are difficult to approach. The medical recommendations should be in constant revision, since a clinical trial can modify the interpretation of what is necessary to individualize each patient's treatment.

  18. MUC1 Functions as an Oncogene by Targeting the Nucleus of Human Breast Cancer Cells

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    Donald Kufe, M.D. CONTRACTING ORGANIZATION: Dana-Farber Cancer Institute Boston, MA 02115 REPORT DATE: September 2005 TYPE OF REPORT: Annual PREPARED...TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER MUCI Functions as an Oncogene by Targeting the Nucleus of Human Breast Cancer Cells 5b. GRANT NUMBER DAMD17-03-1...5. MUC1 increases ERa occupancy of EREs and ERa-mediated transactivation. A. MCF-7/CsiRNA and MCF-7/ MUCl siRNA-A cells were treated with 100 nM E2 for

  19. Human papillomavirus and human immunodeficiency virus infections: relation with cervical dysplasia-neoplasia in African women.

    PubMed

    La Ruche, G; You, B; Mensah-Ado, I; Bergeron, C; Montcho, C; Ramon, R; Touré-Coulibaly, K; Welffens-Ekra, C; Dabis, F; Orth, G

    1998-05-18

    Our study assessed the factors associated with cervical squamous intra-epithelial lesions (SILs) and invasive cervical cancer, with special attention to human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) and human papillomavirus (HPV) infections. Women from 3 outpatient gynecology clinics of Abidjan, Côte d'Ivoire, were screened for cervical abnormalities: 151 women with low-grade SILs and 151 controls, 60 with high-grade SILs and 240 controls, and 13 with invasive cancer and 65 controls were enrolled in 3 case-control studies. Controls were chosen at random among the women without lesions, with a frequency matching for age and center. We used the PCR method for the detection of cervical HPV DNA and the restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis for HPV typing. HIV antibody testing and CD4 cell count were performed. In multivariate analyses, factors associated with cervical lesions were: for low-grade SILs, HPV positivity, HIV-1 seropositivity and parity >3; for high-grade SILs, HPV positivity, chewing tobacco, HIV-1 seropositivity and illiteracy, and for invasive cancer, HPV positivity only. We found a diversity of HPV types associated with SILs. In HIV-1-infected women, SILs occurred at an early stage of HIV disease. Women infected with both HIV-1 and HPV were at much higher risk of SILs than women infected with each of these 2 viruses separately. Invasive cancer was linked to HIV-2 infection in univariate analysis only. Our results suggest that the relation of SILs with HIV-1 infection is mainly explained by HPV infection and that HIV-1-infected African women may not often reach the invasive stage of cervical cancer.

  20. Molecular Characterization of High-Risk Human Papillomavirus in Women in Bobo-Dioulasso, Burkina Faso

    PubMed Central

    Traore, Ina Marie Angèle; Dembele, Adama; Obiri-Yeboah, Dorcas; Traore, Germain; Bambara, Moussa; Ouedraogo, Charlemagne; Traore, Yves

    2016-01-01

    High-risk human papillomavirus (HPV) is found in over 99% of cervical cancers. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of HPV in a population of women in Bobo-Dioulasso and to identify the high-risk types present in these women. From May to June, 2015, 181 women who came for consultation at the Souro Sanou University Hospital of Bobo-Dioulasso have been included in this study. Uterine endocervical swabs have been taken in these women. DNA obtained by extraction from the samples thus collected was used to determine the prevalence of high-risk human papillomavirus genotypes through real-time PCR. The age of the women ranged from 20 to 56 years with a mean of 35.3 ± 8.1 years. The prevalence of infection by high-risk HPV types was 25.4% (46/181). The most common high-risk HPV genotypes were HPV 39 (18.5%), HPV 52 (16.7%), HPV 18 (14.8%), and HPV 35 (13.0%). HPV 16 which is included in the HPV vaccines was not found in the population studied. This type of study which is the first one in Bobo-Dioulasso has showed a high prevalence of genotypes HPV 39, HPV 52, and HPV 35 which are not yet covered by a vaccine. PMID:27525275

  1. Human papillomavirus prevalence in paired urine and cervical samples in women invited for cervical cancer screening.

    PubMed

    Burroni, Elena; Bonanni, Paolo; Sani, Cristina; Lastrucci, Vieri; Carozzi, Francesca; Iossa, Anna; Andersson, Karin Louise; Brandigi, Livia; Di Pierro, Carmelina; Confortini, Massimo; Levi, Miriam; Boccalini, Sara; Indiani, Laura; Sala, Antonino; Tanini, Tommaso; Bechini, Angela; Azzari, Chiara

    2015-03-01

    With the introduction of Human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination in young girls in 2007, it is important to monitor HPV infections and epidemiological changes in this target population. The present study has evaluated the detection of human papillomavirus DNA in paired cervical and urine samples to understand if HPV testing in urine could be used as non-invasive method to monitor HPV status in young women. The study enrolled 216 twenty five-year-old women, resident in Florence and invited for the first time to the cervical cancer Screening Program within a project evaluating the impact of HPV vaccination. HPV genotyping was performed on 216 paired urine and cervical samples. The overall concordance between cervix and urine samples, investigated by HPV genotyping (INNO-LiPA HPV Genotyping Extra), was: 85.6% (184/215), 84.6% (182/215), 80% (172/215) when the same HPV, at least the same HR HPV and all HR HPV, respectively, were detected. HPV type specific concordance in paired urine and cervical samples was observed in 85.8% (175/204) of women with normal cytology and in seven out of nine women with abnormal cytology. Urine seems to be a suitable and reliable biological material for HPV DNA detection as evidenced by the high concordance with HPV detected in cervical samples. These results suggest that urine could be a good noninvasive tool to monitor HPV infection in vaccinated women.

  2. Inactivation of the human papillomavirus E6 or E7 gene in cervical carcinoma cells by using a bacterial CRISPR/Cas RNA-guided endonuclease.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, Edward M; Kornepati, Anand V R; Goldstein, Michael; Bogerd, Hal P; Poling, Brigid C; Whisnant, Adam W; Kastan, Michael B; Cullen, Bryan R

    2014-10-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HPVs), including HPV-16 and HPV-18, are the causative agents of cervical carcinomas and are linked to several other tumors of the anogenital and oropharyngeal regions. The majority of HPV-induced tumors contain integrated copies of the normally episomal HPV genome that invariably retain intact forms of the two HPV oncogenes E6 and E7. E6 induces degradation of the cellular tumor suppressor p53, while E7 destabilizes the retinoblastoma (Rb) protein. Previous work has shown that loss of E6 function in cervical cancer cells induces p53 expression as well as downstream effectors that induce apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Similarly, loss of E7 allows increased Rb expression, leading to cell cycle arrest and senescence. Here, we demonstrate that expression of a bacterial Cas9 RNA-guided endonuclease, together with single guide RNAs (sgRNAs) specific for E6 or E7, is able to induce cleavage of the HPV genome, resulting in the introduction of inactivating deletion and insertion mutations into the E6 or E7 gene. This results in the induction of p53 or Rb, leading to cell cycle arrest and eventual cell death. Both HPV-16- and HPV-18-transformed cells were found to be responsive to targeted HPV genome-specific DNA cleavage. These data provide a proof of principle for the idea that vector-delivered Cas9/sgRNA combinations could represent effective treatment modalities for HPV-induced cancers. Importance: Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) are the causative agents of almost all cervical carcinomas and many other tumors, including many head and neck cancers. In these cancer cells, the HPV DNA genome is integrated into the cellular genome, where it expresses high levels of two viral oncogenes, called E6 and E7, that are required for cancer cell growth and viability. Here, we demonstrate that the recently described bacterial CRISPR/Cas RNA-guided endonuclease can be reprogrammed to target and destroy the E6 or E7 gene in cervical carcinoma cells

  3. Optimization of a human papillomavirus-specific enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay.

    PubMed

    Karem, Kevin L; Poon, Alysia C; Bierl, Cynthia; Nisenbaum, Rosane; Unger, Elizabeth

    2002-05-01

    A strategy was developed for the control, standardization, and critical evaluation of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of human papillomavirus-specific immunoglobulin G in human sera. Control human sera, polyclonal animal sera, and monoclonal antibodies were used to establish optimal assay parameters, including antigen coating, serum dilutions, and criteria for daily reproducibility, monitoring, and rejection of assays. Three evaluation techniques were used in parallel to define an optimal cutoff absorbance value that yields greater than 93% sensitivity and 98.5% specificity in the assay's ability to discriminate positive and negative control sera. This strategy provides an optimal method by which to determine cutoff absorbance values for ELISA.

  4. Optimization of a Human Papillomavirus-Specific Enzyme-Linked Immunosorbent Assay

    PubMed Central

    Karem, Kevin L.; Poon, Alysia C.; Bierl, Cynthia; Nisenbaum, Rosane; Unger, Elizabeth

    2002-01-01

    A strategy was developed for the control, standardization, and critical evaluation of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) for the detection of human papillomavirus-specific immunoglobulin G in human sera. Control human sera, polyclonal animal sera, and monoclonal antibodies were used to establish optimal assay parameters, including antigen coating, serum dilutions, and criteria for daily reproducibility, monitoring, and rejection of assays. Three evaluation techniques were used in parallel to define an optimal cutoff absorbance value that yields greater than 93% sensitivity and 98.5% specificity in the assay's ability to discriminate positive and negative control sera. This strategy provides an optimal method by which to determine cutoff absorbance values for ELISA. PMID:11986263

  5. Impact of viral E2-gene status on outcome after radiotherapy for patients with human papillomavirus 16-positive cancer of the uterine cervix

    SciTech Connect

    Lindel, Katja . E-mail: Katja_Lindel@med.uni-heidelberg.de; Villiers, Ethel-Michele de; Burri, Philipp; Studer, Ueli; Altermatt, Hans J.; Greiner, Richard H.; Gruber, Guenther

    2006-07-01

    Purpose: Integration of high-risk papillomavirus DNA has been considered an important step in oncogenic progression to cervical carcinoma. Disruption of the human papillomavirus (HPV) genome within the E2 gene is frequently a consequence. This study investigated the influence of episomal viral DNA on outcome in patients with advanced cervical cancer treated with primary radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Paraffin-embedded biopsies of 82 women with locally advanced cervical cancer could be analyzed for HPV infection by multiplex polymerase chain reaction (PCR) by use of SPF1/2 primers. E2-gene intactness of HPV-16-positive samples was analyzed in 3 separate amplification reactions by use of the E2A, E2B, E2C primers. Statistical analyses (Kaplan-Meier method; log-rank test) were performed for overall survival (OS), disease-free survival (DFS), local progression-free survival (LPFS), and distant metastases-free survival (DMFS). Results: Sixty-one (75%) of 82 carcinomas were HPV positive, 44 of them for HPV-16 (72%). Seventeen of the 44 HPV-16-positive tumors (39%) had an intact E2 gene. Patients with a HPV-16-positive tumor and an intact E2 gene showed a trend for a better DFS (58% vs. 38%, p = 0.06) compared with those with a disrupted E2 gene. A nonsignificant difference occurred regarding OS (87% vs. 66%, p = 0.16) and DMFS (57% vs. 48%, p = 0.15). Conclusion: E2-gene status may be a promising new target, but more studies are required to elucidate the effect of the viral E2 gene on outcome after radiotherapy in HPV-positive tumors.

  6. Human papillomavirus knowledge, vaccine acceptance, and vaccine series completion among female entertainment and sex workers in Phnom Penh, Cambodia: the Young Women's Health Study.

    PubMed

    Wadhera, Priya; Evans, Jennifer L; Stein, Ellen; Gandhi, Monica; Couture, Marie-Claude; Sansothy, Neth; Sichan, Keo; Maher, Lisa; Kaldor, John; Page, Kimberly; Kien

    2015-10-01

    Human papillomavirus is a common sexually transmitted infection and the causative agent for cervical cancer, a frequently occurring malignant disease among women in developing countries. We assessed human papillomavirus awareness prior to the delivery of a brief information and education intervention, and human papillomavirus vaccine provision to female entertainment and sex workers (N = 220). At baseline, only 23.6% of women had heard of human papillomavirus. Following the educational intervention, 90% answered all the human papillomavirus knowledge questions correctly. Of 192 participants attending the first quarterly cohort visit where vaccine was offered, 149 (78%) were eligible for vaccination; HIV-positive (n = 32) and pregnant (n = 11) women were excluded. Acceptance of vaccine among eligible women was universal, and 79.2% completed the three-dose vaccination series. Women who reported use of amphetamine-type stimulants had significantly and independently lower odds of vaccine completion (adjusted odds ratio [AOR] 0.24; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.08, 0.69). New pregnancies also had an impact on vaccine completion: 5.4% (8/149 5.4%) who started the series had to stop due to new pregnancy. Results demonstrate the effectiveness of a simple education intervention designed to increase human papillomavirus knowledge and the feasibility of successful human papillomavirus vaccine in a population that is often difficult to engage in preventive health care.

  7. Deconstructing Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Knowledge: Objective and Perceived Knowledge in Males' Intentions to Receive the HPV Vaccine

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krawczyk, Andrea; Stephenson, Ellen; Perez, Samara; Lau, Elsa; Rosberger, Zeev

    2013-01-01

    Background: The human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine was recently approved for men. To effectively tailor HPV education efforts toward men, it is important to understand what men know about HPV and how this knowledge relates to their decision to receive the vaccine. This study examines how objective HPV knowledge, objective HPV vaccine knowledge,…

  8. The Uptake of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine among Adolescent Females in the United States: A Review of the Literature

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bartlett, Jacqueline A.; Peterson, Jane Anthony

    2011-01-01

    A comprehensive review of literature was conducted to identify the barriers and facilitators, from the parents'/guardians' and primary care providers' (PCPs) perspective, that are associated with the uptake of Human Papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine among adolescent females. Findings from 14 peer-reviewed articles indicate that 37% of adolescent…

  9. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Risk Factors, Vaccination Patterns, and Vaccine Perceptions among a Sample of Male College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fontenot, Holly B.; Collins Fantasia, Heidi; Charyk, Anna; Sutherland, Melissa A.

    2014-01-01

    Objective: To examine human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination rates, including initiation and completion of the vaccine series, and barriers to vaccination in a sample of male college students. Participants: Male students between the ages of 18 and 25 who reported being currently or previously sexually active (N = 735). Methods: A cross-sectional…

  10. A Randomized Intervention Study to Evaluate Whether Electronic Messaging Can Increase Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Completion and Knowledge among College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Richman, Alice R.; Maddy, LaDonna; Torres, Essie; Goldberg, Ellen J.

    2016-01-01

    Objective: To evaluate an intervention aimed at increasing human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine completion of the 3-dose series and knowledge. Participants: Two hundred sixty-four male and female US college students 18-26 years old who were receiving HPV vaccine dose 1. Methods: Students were randomly assigned to the intervention or control group.…

  11. Correlates to Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Status and Willingness to Vaccinate in Low-Income Philadelphia High School Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bass, Sarah B.; Leader, Amy; Shwarz, Michelle; Greener, Judith; Patterson, Freda

    2015-01-01

    Background: Little is known about the correlates of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination or willingness to be vaccinated in urban, minority adolescents. Methods: Using responses to the 2013 Youth Risk Behavior Survey in Philadelphia, a random sample of high schools provided weighted data representing 20,941 9th to 12th graders. Stratified by…

  12. Relative Persuasiveness of Gain- versus Loss-Framed Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Messages for the Present- and Future-Minded

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Nan, Xiaoli

    2012-01-01

    This research examines how young adults' attitudes toward human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination and their intentions to get the vaccine are influenced by the framing of health messages (gain vs. loss) and time orientation (i.e., the extent to which people value immediate vs. distant consequences of their decisions). Results of an experiment…

  13. Disparities in Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Literacy and Vaccine Completion among Asian American Pacific Islander Undergraduates: Implications for Cancer Health Equity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lee, Hee Yun; Kwon, Melissa; Vang, Suzanne; DeWolfe, Jessica; Kim, Nam Keol; Lee, Do Kyung; Yeung, Miriam

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: Low rates of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination among young Asian American and Pacific Islander (AAPI) women need to be addressed, particularly given the high incidence of cervical cancer in this population. The current study aims to investigate predictors of HPV vaccination in young AAPI and non-Latina white (NLW) women. Methods: A…

  14. Predicting Human Papillomavirus Vaccine Intentions of College-Aged Males: An Examination of Parents' and Son's Perceptions

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Katz, Mira L.; Kam, Jennifer A.; Krieger, Janice L.; Roberto, Anthony J.

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To examine male students' and their parents' human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine communication in relation to males' willingness to discuss the vaccine with their health care provider and the likelihood of being vaccinated. Participants: Dyads (n = 111) of students and parents. Methods: Participants completed a HPV vaccine survey based…

  15. The Role of Human Papillomavirus (HPV)-Related Stigma on HPV Vaccine Decision-Making among College Males

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Jones, Georden; Perez, Samara; Huta, Veronika; Rosberger, Zeev; Lebel, Sophie

    2016-01-01

    Objective: The goals of the present study are (1) to identify sociodemographic and psychosocial predictors of human papillomavirus (HPV)-related stigma and (2) to examine the relationship between HPV-related stigma in predicting HPV vaccine decision-making among college males. Participants: Six hundred and eighty college males aged 18--26 from 3…

  16. Does Mother Know Best? An Actor-Partner Model of College-Age Women's Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Behavior

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krieger, Janice L.; Kam, Jennifer A.; Katz, Mira L.; Roberto, Anthony J.

    2011-01-01

    This study examined the associations of perceived threat, perceived efficacy, and parent-child communication with the extent to which college-age women received the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine. Daughters and their mothers completed a survey about the HPV vaccine (N = 182 dyads). The results showed that mothers' perceived self-efficacy to…

  17. College Students' Perceptions of and Experiences with Human Papillomavirus and Herpes: Implications for College Sexual Health Education

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Hirschler, Christopher; Hope, Andrea; Myers, Jaime L.

    2015-01-01

    Sexually transmitted infections spread through skin-to-skin contact represent unique prevention challenges. This study examines how college students perceive safer sex practices with respect to human papillomavirus (HPV) and herpes. Qualitative and quantitative data (n = 275) were collected using an online questionnaire. College students'…

  18. How to Inform: Comparing Written and Video Education Interventions to Increase Human Papillomavirus Knowledge and Vaccination Intentions in Young Adults

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Krawczyk, Andrea; Lau, Elsa; Perez, Samara; Delisle, Vanessa; Amsel, Rhonda; Rosberger, Zeev

    2012-01-01

    Objective: To compare the efficacy of 2 human papillomavirus (HPV) educational interventions on increasing HPV knowledge and vaccination intentions in college students. Participants: Male (n = 60) and female (n = 140) undergraduates (M[subscript age] = 20.4, SD = 2.3) recruited from a university in Montreal, Quebec, Canada, from October 2009 to…

  19. Knowledge of Human Papillomavirus and Perceived Barriers to Vaccination in a Sample of US Female College Students

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Dillard, James Price; Spear, Margaret E.

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To assess knowledge of human papillomavirus (HPV) and perceived barriers to being vaccinated against the virus. Participants: Three hundred ninety-six undergraduate women enrolled at Penn State University in Fall 2008. Methods: A random sample of students were invited to participate in a Web-based survey. Results: Awareness of HPV and…

  20. Understanding Human Papillomavirus: An Internet Survey of Knowledge, Risk, and Experience among Female and Male College Students in Hawaii

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Bertram, Cathy C.; Niederhauser, Victoria P.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Persistent Human Papillomavirus (HPV) is an etiologic agent in the development of cervical cancer. Despite the increasingly high prevalence of HPV, people at risk of exposure lack knowledge about the virus, its relationship to cervical cancer, and a realistic perspective regarding HPV consequences. Purpose: To describe knowledge about…

  1. PPM1D exerts its oncogenic properties in human pancreatic cancer through multiple mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Wu, Bo; Guo, Bo-Min; Kang, Jie; Deng, Xian-Zhao; Fan, You-Ben; Zhang, Xiao-Ping; Ai, Kai-Xing

    2016-03-01

    Protein phosphatase, Mg(2+)/Mn(2+) dependent, 1D (PPM1D) is emerging as an oncogene by virtue of its negative control on several tumor suppressor pathways. However, the clinical significance of PPM1D in pancreatic cancer (PC) has not been defined. In this study, we determined PPM1D expression in human PC tissues and cell lines and their irrespective noncancerous controls. We subsequently investigated the functional role of PPM1D in the migration, invasion, and apoptosis of MIA PaCa-2 and PANC-1 PC cells in vitro and explored the signaling pathways involved. Furthermore, we examined the role of PPM1D in PC tumorigenesis in vivo. Our results showed that PPM1D is overexpressed in human PC tissues and cell lines and significantly correlated with tumor growth and metastasis. PPM1D promotes PC cell migration and invasion via potentiation of the Wnt/β-catenin pathway through downregulation of apoptosis-stimulating of p53 protein 2 (ASPP2). In contrast to PPM1D, our results showed that ASPP2 is downregulated in PC tissues. Additionally, PPM1D suppresses PC cell apoptosis via inhibition of the p38 MAPK/p53 pathway through both dephosphorylation of p38 MAPK and downregulation of ASPP2. Furthermore, PPM1D promotes PC tumor growth in vivo. Our results demonstrated that PPM1D is an oncogene in PC.

  2. Seroreactivity of 38 human papillomavirus types in epidermodysplasia verruciformis patients, relatives, and controls.

    PubMed

    Michael, Kristina M; Waterboer, Tim; Pfister, Herbert; Gariglio, Marisa; Majewski, Slawomir; Favre, Michel; Pawlita, Michael

    2010-03-01

    Epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV) is a rare recessive genodermatosis characterized by high susceptibility to infections with human papillomaviruses (HPVs) of genus beta. Knowledge about seroreactivity against HPV in these patients and their first-degree relatives is scarce. Using multiplex serology, we analyzed antibodies to 38 HPV types from five genera in 32 EV patients, 22 first-degree relatives, and 64 and 44 age- and sex-matched, non-related, healthy controls, respectively. EV patients showed higher seroprevalences than non-related controls with statistically significant odds ratios (ORs) for 5 of 10 investigated alpha (OR range 6.9-21.3), all 16 beta (OR range 12.3-61.3), 3 of 9 gamma (OR range 6.4-11.7), and 1 of 2 micro HPVs (OR 5.8). In comparison to their relatives, antibodies in EV patients were significantly more prevalent for 4 of 16 beta HPVs (OR range 12.5-25.6), but for none of the other genera. A significantly increased seroprevalence in relatives compared with their controls was only seen for HPV 5 (OR 22.1). The considerably elevated HPV seroprevalence in EV patients, especially for beta papillomaviruses (PVs), reflects the high viral load described for these individuals. Whether the observed differences between relatives and healthy controls depend on heterozygosity for EV-associated alleles requires further investigation.

  3. Characterization of Human Papillomavirus Type 154 and Tissue Tropism of Gammapapillomaviruses

    PubMed Central

    Ure, Agustín Enrique; Forslund, Ola

    2014-01-01

    The novel human papillomavirus type 154 (HPV154) was characterized from a wart on the crena ani of a three-year-old boy. It was previously designated as the putative HPV type FADI3 by sequencing of a subgenomic FAP amplicon. We obtained the complete genome by combined methods including rolling circle amplification (RCA), genome walking through an adapted method for detection of integrated papillomavirus sequences by ligation-mediated PCR (DIPS-PCR), long-range PCR, and finally by cloning of four overlapping amplicons. Phylogenetically, the HPV154 genome clustered together with members of the proposed species Gammapapillomavirus 11, and demonstrated the highest identity in L1 to HPV136 (68.6%). The HPV154 was detected in 3% (2/62) of forehead skin swabs from healthy children. In addition, the different detection sites of 62 gammapapillomaviruses were summarized in order to analyze their tissue tropism. Several of these HPV types have been detected from multiple sources such as skin, oral, nasal, and genital sites, suggesting that the gammapapillomaviruses are generalists with a broader tissue tropism than previously appreciated. The study expands current knowledge concerning genetic diversity and tropism among HPV types in the rapidly growing gammapapillomavirus genus. PMID:24551244

  4. New method for automatic identification identification and typing of single and multiple superimposed human papillomavirus sequences.

    PubMed

    Feoli-Fonseca, J C; Oligny, L L; Yotov, W V

    1999-12-01

    This study of specimens of human papillomaviruses (HPV) through HPV-specific polymerase chain reaction (PCR), followed by direct sequencing, resulted in 11% (38/354) superimposed HPV sequences, signifying coinfection with more than one HPV type. To address the diagnostic problem that these superimposed ("degenerated," overlapping) sequences pose, the authors created a papillomavirus database in Microsoft Excel (Microsoft Corporation, Redmond, WA, U.S.A.) and Corel Quattro Pro 9 (Corel Corporation, Ottawa, Ontario, Canada) formats, retrievable from http://www2.crosswinds.net/ -crosswindswatson/index.html. This sequence database is simultaneously a search and comparison tool for quick (several seconds) typing of HPV from regular and "degenerated" sequencing results. Some of the advantages of the method are as follows: (1) superimposed HPV sequences that differ in length could be readily identified from a single input; (2) the search is restricted to the currently known 127 PV types, which speeds up the typing; (3) the most common HPV sequencing artifacts are included for quick detection; (4) there is no proprietary code and the database could be easily improved; (5) HPV sequence identification does not require internet connection; and (6) new HPV types could be easily detected. This method allowed resolution of all but 1 of 354 HPV-positive specimens. From 38 superimposed HPV sequences, this method identified one known HPV type (3 specimens), two HPV types (30 specimens) and three HPV types (4 specimens).

  5. Human Papillomavirus DNA Replication Compartments in a Transient DNA Replication System

    PubMed Central

    Swindle, C. Scott; Zou, Nianxiang; Van Tine, Brian A.; Shaw, George M.; Engler, Jeffrey A.; Chow, Louise T.

    1999-01-01

    Many DNA viruses replicate their genomes at nuclear foci in infected cells. Using indirect immunofluorescence in combination with fluorescence in situ hybridization, we colocalized the human papillomavirus (HPV) replicating proteins E1 and E2 and the replicating origin-containing plasmid to nuclear foci in transiently transfected cells. The host replication protein A (RP-A) was also colocalized to these foci. These nuclear structures were identified as active sites of viral DNA synthesis by bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) pulse-labeling. Unexpectedly, the great majority of RP-A and BrdU incorporation was found in these HPV replication domains. Furthermore, E1, E2, and RP-A were also colocalized to nuclear foci in the absence of an origin-containing plasmid. These observations suggest a spatial reorganization of the host DNA replication machinery upon HPV DNA replication or E1 and E2 expression. Alternatively, viral DNA replication might be targeted to host nuclear domains that are active during the late S phase, when such domains are limited in number. In a fraction of cells expressing E1 and E2, the promyelocytic leukemia protein, a component of nuclear domain 10 (ND10), was either partially or completely colocalized with E1 and E2. Since ND10 structures were recently hypothesized to be sites of bovine papillomavirus virion assembly, our observation suggests that HPV DNA amplification might be partially coupled to virion assembly. PMID:9882301

  6. Analysis of molecular biology techniques for the diagnosis of human papillomavirus infection and cervical cancer prevention.

    PubMed

    Carestiato, Fernanda Nahoum; Silva, Kátia Cristina da; Balthazar, Daniela Signorelli; Silva, Licínio; Marinho, Marisa; Oliveira, Ledy Horto Dos Santos; Cavalcanti, Silvia Maria Baeta

    2006-01-01

    The objective of the present study was to evaluate the usefulness of molecular methodologies to access human papillomavirus genome in the genital tract. Samples from 136 women aged 17 to 52 years old obtained from the Dr. Sérgio Franco Laboratories between 2000 and 2001, were analyzed by the hybrid capture assay and amplified by PCR with generic primers MY09/MY11 and specific primers for types 16, 18, 31, 33, 35, 58. Viral genome was detected in 71.3% of the samples by hybrid capture and 75% by amplification. When cytopathology was used as a reference method for screening lesions, hybrid capture (p=0) and amplification (p=0.002) presented positive association. The 3 methods showed absolute agreement when cytopathology confirmed papillomavirus infection and high grade intraepithelial lesion. Disagreements occurred for 10 cases: seven inflammatory cases positive by PCR and negative for hybrid capture and 3 low squamous intraepithelial lesions positive for hybrid capture but negative for amplification. In conclusion, hybrid capture was shown to be sensitive and specific enough for use in clinical routines. Moreover, the evaluation of viral load values obtained by this method were shown to be related to the severity of the lesion and merit further studies to analyze the possible association with risk of progression to malignancy.

  7. Economic evaluation of human papillomavirus screening in Germany.

    PubMed

    Mittendorf, T; Petry, K U; Iftner, T; Greiner, W; von der Schulenburg, J M

    2003-09-01

    Cytology-based screening programs for cervical cancer have been effective in reducing cancer incidence and preventing premature deaths worldwide. However, there is concern about the relatively low sensitivity of current screening procedures. Although the causal association between infection with certain high-risk types of human papilloma virus (HPV) and the development of cervical cancer has been clearly established, testing for the major risk factor is not part of current screening practice. We created a tree decision model over time to evaluate different policy choices for implementing a population-based screening program. Results of the economic analysis indicate that testing with any implemented HPV DNA testing (stand alone or in combination with the Papanicolaou smear) is superior to cytology and measures presently in use. Additional costs per life-years gained cannot be reported because the HPV branches had fewer discounted overall costs (euro 222 million vs. euro 82 and euro 76 million, respectively), and they saved more life years (19,599 vs. 19,163 and 903, respectively) then the smear alternative. Any HPV DNA testing is preferable over the current state of the art performed in Germany. This is true not only for economic reasons but also for life-years gained. Therefore HPV DNA testing must become an essential component to back up the relatively weak sensitivity of the standard procedure.

  8. Detection of human papillomavirus types 45 and 51 by type-specific polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Weyn, Christine; Boulenouar, Selma; Mathys, Vanessa; Vanhoolandt, Julie; Bernis, Aurore; Fontaine, Véronique

    2007-12-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) types 45 and 51 are both considered as high risk types for the development of human cervical cancer. To optimize the detection of these two types in clinical samples, HPV-45 and HPV-51 specific primers were designed to amplify respectively a 141bp and a 266bp fragment from the L1 gene by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The sensitivity and the specificity of these two PCR reactions were determined using varying amounts of HPV DNA containing plasmids and negative and positive controls. Overall, the sensitivity for the HPV-45 plasmid DNA is 10fg, while for HPV-51 the sensitivity is 1fg. This is equivalent to approximately 100 and 10 HPV genome copies per PCR reaction, respectively.

  9. Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Genotyping: Automation and Application in Routine Laboratory Testing

    PubMed Central

    Torres, M; Fraile, L; Echevarria, JM; Hernandez Novoa, B; Ortiz, M

    2012-01-01

    A large number of assays designed for genotyping human papillomaviruses (HPV) have been developed in the last years. They perform within a wide range of analytical sensitivity and specificity values for the different viral types, and are used either for diagnosis, epidemiological studies, evaluation of vaccines and implementing and monitoring of vaccination programs. Methods for specific genotyping of HPV-16 and HPV-18 are also useful for the prevention of cervical cancer in screening programs. Some commercial tests are, in addition, fully or partially automated. Automation of HPV genotyping presents advantages such as the simplicity of the testing procedure for the operator, the ability to process a large number of samples in a short time, and the reduction of human errors from manual operations, allowing a better quality assurance and a reduction of cost. The present review collects information about the current HPV genotyping tests, with special attention to practical aspects influencing their use in clinical laboratories. PMID:23248734

  10. Androgen responsive adult human prostatic epithelial cell lines immortalized by human papillomavirus 18.

    PubMed

    Bello, D; Webber, M M; Kleinman, H K; Wartinger, D D; Rhim, J S

    1997-06-01

    Prostate cancer and benign tumors of the prostate are the two most common neoplastic diseases in men in the United States, however, research on their causes and treatment has been slow because of the difficulty in obtaining fresh samples of human tissue and a lack of well characterized cell lines which exhibit growth and differentiation characteristics of normal prostatic epithelium. Non-neoplastic adult human prostatic epithelial cells from a white male donor were immortalized with human papillomavirus 18 which resulted in the establishment of the RWPE-1 cell line. Cells from the RWPE-1 cell line were further transformed by v-Ki-ras to establish the RWPE-2 cell line. The objectives of this study were to: (1) establish the prostatic epithelial origin and androgen responsiveness of RWPE-1 and RWPE-2 cell lines; (2) examine their response to growth factors; and (3) establish the malignant characteristics of the RWPE-2 cell line. Immunoperoxidase staining showed that both RWPE-1 and RWPE-2 cells express cytokeratins 8 and 18, which are characteristic of luminal prostatic epithelial cells, but they also coexpress basal cell cytokeratins. These cell lines show growth stimulation and prostate specific antigen (PSA) and androgen receptor (AR) expression in response to the synthetic androgen mibolerone, which establishes their prostatic epithelial origin. Both cell lines also show a dose-dependent growth stimulation by EGF and bFGF and growth inhibition when exposed to TGF-beta, however, the transformed RWPE-2 cells are less responsive. RWPE-1 cells neither grow in agar nor form tumors when injected into nude mice with or without Matrigel. However, RWPE-2 cells form colonies in agar and tumors in nude mice. In the in vitro invasion assay, RWPE-1 cells are not invasive whereas RWPE-2 cells are invasive. Nuclear expression of p53 and Rb proteins was heterogeneous but detectable by immunostaining in both cell lines. The RWPE-1 cells, which show many normal cell

  11. DNA Copy Number Aberrations, and Human Papillomavirus Status in Penile Carcinoma. Clinico-Pathological Correlations and Potential Driver Genes

    PubMed Central

    Lambros, Maryou; Stankiewicz, Elzbieta; Ng, Charlotte K. Y.; Weigelt, Britta; Rajab, Ramzi; Tinwell, Brendan; Corbishley, Cathy; Watkin, Nick; Berney, Dan; Reis-Filho, Jorge S.

    2016-01-01

    Penile squamous cell carcinoma is a rare disease, in which somatic genetic aberrations have yet to be characterized. We hypothesized that gene copy aberrations might correlate with human papillomavirus status and clinico-pathological features. We sought to determine the spectrum of gene copy number aberrations in a large series of PSCCs and to define their correlations with human papillomavirus, histopathological subtype, and tumor grade, stage and lymph node status. Seventy formalin-fixed, paraffin embedded penile squamous cell carcinomas were centrally reviewed by expert uropathologists. DNA was extracted from micro-dissected samples, subjected to PCR-based human papillomavirus assessment and genotyping (INNO-LiPA human papillomavirus Genotyping Extra Assay) and microarray-based comparative genomic hybridization using a 32K Bacterial Artificial Chromosome array platform. Sixty-four samples yielded interpretable results. Recurrent gains were observed in chromosomes 1p13.3-q44 (88%), 3p12.3-q29 (86%), 5p15.33-p11 (67%) and 8p12-q24.3 (84%). Amplifications of 5p15.33-p11 and 11p14.1-p12 were found in seven (11%) and four (6%) cases, respectively. Losses were observed in chromosomes 2q33-q37.3 (86%), 3p26.3-q11.1 (83%) and 11q12.2-q25 (81%). Although many losses and gains were similar throughout the cohort, there were small significant differences observed at specific loci, between human papillomavirus positive and negative tumors, between tumor types, and tumor grade and nodal status. These results demonstrate that despite the diversity of genetic aberrations in penile squamous cell carcinomas, there are significant correlations between the clinico-pathological data and the genetic changes that may play a role in disease natural history and progression and highlight potential driver genes, which may feature in molecular pathways for existing therapeutic agents. PMID:26901676

  12. Search for NTRK1 proto-oncogene rearrangements in human thyroid tumours originated after therapeutic radiation

    PubMed Central

    Bounacer, A; Schlumberger, M; Wicker, R; Du-Villard, J A; Caillou, B; Sarasin, A; Suárez, H G

    2000-01-01

    Rearrangements of NTRK1 proto-oncogene were detected in ‘spontaneous’ papillary thyroid carcinomas with a frequency varying from 5 to 25% in different studies. These rearrangements result in the formation of chimaeric genes composed of the tyrosine kinase domain of NTRK1 fused to 5′ sequences of different genes. To investigate if the NTRK1 gene plays a role in radiation-induced thyroid carcinogenesis, we looked for the presence of NTRK1 -activating rearrangements in 32 human thyroid tumours (16 follicular adenomas, 14 papillary carcinomas and two lymph-node metastases of papillary thyroid carcinomas) from patients who had received external radiation, using the reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction, Southern blot and direct sequencing techniques. These data were compared with those obtained in a series of 28 ‘spontaneous’ benign and malignant thyroid tumours, collected from patients without a history of radiation exposure and four in vitro culture cell lines derived from ‘spontaneous’ thyroid cancers. Our results concerning the radiation-associated tumours showed that only rearrangements between NTRK1 and TPM3 genes (TRK oncogene) were detected in 2/14 papillary carcinomas and in one lymph-node metastasis of one of these papillary thyroid carcinomas. All the radiation-associated adenomas were negative. In the ‘spontaneous’ tumours, only one of the 14 papillary carcinomas and one of the four in vitro culture cell lines, derived from a papillary carcinoma, presented a NTRK1 rearrangement also with the TPM3 gene. Twenty-five of this series of radiation-associated tumours were previously studied for the ras and RET/PTC oncogenes. In conclusion, our data: (a) show that the overall frequency of NTRK1 rearrangements is similar between radiation-associated (2/31: 6%) and ‘spontaneous’ epithelial thyroid tumours (2/32: 6%). The frequency, if we consider exclusively the papillary carcinomas, is in both cases 12%; (b) show that the TRK oncogene

  13. Human Papillomavirus Vaccine as an Anticancer Vaccine: Collaborative Efforts to Promote Human Papillomavirus Vaccine in the National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Julie S; Steele, C Brooke; Hayes, Nikki; Bhatt, Achal; Moore, Angela R

    2017-03-01

    Widespread use of the human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine has the potential to reduce incidence from HPV-associated cancers. However, vaccine uptake among adolescents remains well below the Healthy People 2020 targets. The Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (CDC) National Comprehensive Cancer Control Program (NCCCP) awardees are well positioned to work with immunization programs to increase vaccine uptake. The CDC chronic disease management information system was queried for objectives and activities associated with HPV vaccine that were reported by NCCCP awardees from 2013 to 2016 as part of program reporting requirements. A content analysis was conducted on the query results to categorize interventions according to strategies outlined in The Guide to Community Preventive Services and the 2014 President's Cancer Panel report. Sixty-two percent of NCCCP awardees had planned or implemented at least one activity since 2013 to address low HPV vaccination coverage in their jurisdictions. Most NCCCP awardees (86%) reported community education activities, while 65% reported activities associated with provider education. Systems-based strategies such as client reminders or provider assessment and feedback were each reported by less than 25% of NCCCP awardees. Many NCCCP awardees report planning or implementing activities to address low HPV vaccination coverage, often in conjunction with state immunization programs. NCCCP awardees can play a role in increasing HPV vaccination coverage through their cancer prevention and control expertise and access to partners in the healthcare community.

  14. Oral sex practices, oral human papillomavirus and correlations between oral and cervical human papillomavirus prevalence among female sex workers in Lima, Peru

    PubMed Central

    Brown, B; Blas, M M; Cabral, A; Carcamo, C; Gravitt, P E; Halsey, N

    2015-01-01

    Summary Few data exist on oral human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence in female sex workers (FSWs). Information regarding oral sex practices of 185 Peruvian FSWs, 18–26 years of age, was obtained via survey and compared with HPV testing results of oral rinse samples. Oral HPV prevalence was 14/185 (7.6%); four (28.9%) HPV genotypes were carcinogenic. One hundred and eighty-two participants reported having had oral sex; 95% reported condom use during oral sex with clients and 9.5% with partners. Women who had oral sex more than three times with their partners in the past month were more likely to have oral HPV than women who had oral sex three times or less (P = 0.06). Ten (71.4%) women with oral HPV were HPV-positive at the cervix; conversely 8.3% of women with cervical HPV were HPV-positive in the oral cavity. The prevalence of oral HPV was relatively low, considering the high rates of oral sex practiced by these women. PMID:22096051

  15. Oral sex practices, oral human papillomavirus and correlations between oral and cervical human papillomavirus prevalence among female sex workers in Lima, Peru.

    PubMed

    Brown, B; Blas, M M; Cabral, A; Carcamo, C; Gravitt, P E; Halsey, N

    2011-11-01

    Few data exist on oral human papillomavirus (HPV) prevalence in female sex workers (FSWs). Information regarding oral sex practices of 185 Peruvian FSWs, 18-26 years of age, was obtained via survey and compared with HPV testing results of oral rinse samples. Oral HPV prevalence was 14/185 (7.6%); four (28.9%) HPV genotypes were carcinogenic. One hundred and eighty-two participants reported having had oral sex; 95% reported condom use during oral sex with clients and 9.5% with partners. Women who had oral sex more than three times with their partners in the past month were more likely to have oral HPV than women who had oral sex three times or less (P = 0.06). Ten (71.4%) women with oral HPV were HPV-positive at the cervix; conversely 8.3% of women with cervical HPV were HPV-positive in the oral cavity. The prevalence of oral HPV was relatively low, considering the high rates of oral sex practiced by these women.

  16. Mutation analysis of the c-mos proto-oncogene in human ovarian teratomas.

    PubMed Central

    de Foy, K. A.; Gayther, S. A.; Colledge, W. H.; Crockett, S.; Scott, I. V.; Evans, M. J.; Ponder, B. A.

    1998-01-01

    Female transgenic mice lacking a functional c-mos proto-oncogene develop ovarian teratomas, indicating that c-mos may behave as a tumour-suppressor gene for this type of tumour. We have analysed the entire coding region of the c-MOS gene in a series of human ovarian teratomas to determine whether there are any cancer-causing alterations. DNA from twenty teratomas was analysed by single-strand conformational analysis (SSCA) and heteroduplex analysis (HA) to screen for somatic and germline mutations. In nine of these tumours the entire gene was also sequenced. A previously reported polymorphism and a single new sequence variant were identified, neither of which we would predict to be disease-causing alterations. These results suggest that mutations in the coding region of the c-MOS gene do not play a significant role in the genesis of human ovarian teratomas. Images Figure 1 PMID:9635841

  17. Transfection of normal human bronchial epithelial cells with the bcl-2 oncogene

    SciTech Connect

    Kennedy, C.H.; Kenyon, K.D.; Tesfaigzi, J.

    1995-12-01

    In vitro, studies examining the transformation of virus-immortalized human bronchial epithelial (HBE) cells after exposure to chemical and physical carcinogens have contributed to our understanding of the mechanisms that underlie the development of lung cancer. Virus-immortalized HBE cells have been used because of both the limited life span of normal human bronchial epithelial (NHBE) cells in culture (approximately 30-35 population doublins) and their resistance to in vitro malignant transformation. For example, human papillomavirus (HPV)-immortalized HBE cells have been used to study the genetic changes that occur after exposure to {alpha}-particles in vitro. Although this model may prove to be useful for studying the 18% or less of bronchogenic carcinomas found to contain HPV sequences, it is not an appropriate model for studying the majority of lung epithelial malignancies in which HPV DNA is not detected. This view is supported by the fact that HPV-immortalized cell lines commonly exhibit aneuploidy. This results of this study suggest that: (1) NHBE cells can be transiently transfected with the pCMV{Beta} vector; and (2) the antibiotic hygromycin-resistant transfected cells.

  18. Difference in prevalence of human papillomavirus genotypes in cytomorphologically normal cervical smears is associated with a history of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Van Den Brule, A J; Walboomers, J M; Du Maine, M; Kenemans, P; Meijer, C J

    1991-05-30

    The prevalence of human papillomavirus (HPV) genotypes was investigated by the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) method in cytologically normal and abnormal cervical scrapes obtained from asymptomatic women (n = 1,346), participating in a triennial screening program for cervical cancer, and from a gynecological outpatient population (n = 593). In the symptom-free population oncogenic HPV types 16, 18, 31 and 33 were present in 1.5% of cytologically normal scrapes, while the overall HPV prevalence rate was 3.5%. Significantly, higher HPV prevalence rates of 7% (oncogenic HPV; p less than 0.01) and 14% (all HPV; p less than 0.01), respectively, were found in cytologically normal scrapes of the gynecologic outpatient population. It appeared that in this outpatient group 78% of the smears containing HPV 16 and 18 were associated with a history of cervical pathology, i.e. cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade I to III. In smears with mild and severe dysplasia and smears suspected of carcinoma in situ from both populations, the overall HPV prevalence was 70%, 84% and 100%, respectively. In all squamous-cell carcinomas of the cervix (n = 50) HPV was detected. Frequencies of HPV 16 and 18 increased from 41% in mild dysplasia to 94% in cervical carcinomas. Since a low prevalence of HPV was found in cytomorphologically normal cervices of women without a clinicopathological history, the findings in this study suggest that HPV detection in population-based screening programs for cervical neoplasia can be an important tool in identifying women who are at risk of developing dysplasia and cervical cancer.

  19. Variant-specific persistence of infections with human papillomavirus Types 31, 33, 45, 56 and 58 and risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Xi, Long Fu; Schiffman, Mark; Koutsky, Laura A; Hughes, James P; Hulbert, Ayaka; Shen, Zhenping; Galloway, Denise A; Kiviat, Nancy B

    2016-09-01

    In our previous study of the etiologic role of oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) types other than HPV16 and 18, we observed a significantly higher risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia Grades 2-3 (CIN2/3) associated with certain lineages of HPV types 31/33/45/56/58 [called high-risk (HR) variants] compared with non-HR variants. This study was to examine whether these intra-type variants differ in persistence of the infection and persistence-associated risk of CIN2/3. Study subjects were women who had any of HPV types 31/33/45/56/58 newly detected during a 2-year follow-up with 6-month intervals. For each type, the first positive sample was used for variant characterization. The association of reverting-to-negativity with group of the variants and CIN2/3 with length of positivity was assessed using discrete Cox regression and logistic regression, respectively. Of the 598 newly detected, type-specific HPV infections, 312 became undetectable during follow-up. Infections with HR, compared with non-HR, variants were marginally more likely to become negative [adjusted hazard ratio = 1.3; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.9-1.8]. The adjusted odds ratio associating with the development of CIN2/3 was 3.0 (95% CI, 1.2-7.4) for persistent infections with HR variants for 6 months and 10.0 (95% CI, 3.8-38.0) for persistent infections with HR variants for 12-18 months as compared with the first positive detection of HR variants. Among women with non-HR variants, there were no appreciable differences in risk of CIN2/3 by length of positivity. Findings suggest that the lineage-associated risk of CIN2/3 was not mediated through a prolonged persistent infection, but oncogenic heterogeneity of the variants.

  20. Enhancer-promoter activity of human papillomavirus type 16 long control regions isolated from cell lines SiHa and CaSki and cervical cancer biopsies.

    PubMed

    Kozuka, T; Aoki, Y; Nakagawa, K; Ohtomo, K; Yoshikawa, H; Matsumoto, K; Yoshiike, K; Kanda, T

    2000-03-01

    Expression of human papillomavirus 16 (HPV-16) oncogenes is markedly higher in cervical cancer cells than in precancerous cells, and the elevated expression is believed to be required for the malignant phenotypes. We compared cancer cell lines CaSki (with 200 to 400 copies of HPV-16 DNA per cell) and SiHa (with one to two copies of HPV-16 DNA per cell) for the E7 expression in cells and the enhancer-promoter activity of the isolated viral long control region (LCR). Although these parameters per cell were 10-fold higher in CaSki than in SiHa, the levels of the E7 mRNA and protein per HPV DNA copy were 10- to 20-fold higher in SiHa than in CaSki. Characterization of the isolated LCRs showed that, whereas the LCR from CaSki resembled the prototype in structure and activity, the LCR from SiHa, with a deletion of 38 base pairs, enhanced transcription from P97 as assayed by using a plasmid capable of expressing luciferase. The upregulation appeared to be due to removal of one of the silencer YY1-binding sites. Furthermore, we isolated and characterized LCRs from 51 cervical cancer patients' biopsies. Among them, one with a deletion including YY1-binding sites and the other with a substitution in a YY1-motif were found to enhance the transcription. These findings suggest that mutation affecting YY1-motifs in the LCR is one of the mechanisms enhancing the viral oncogene expression in the course of progression of cancer cells.

  1. Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection in a case-control study of oral squamous cell carcinoma and its increasing trend in northeastern Thailand.

    PubMed

    Phusingha, Pensiri; Ekalaksananan, Tipaya; Vatanasapt, Patravoot; Loyha, Kulchaya; Promthet, Supannee; Kongyingyoes, Bunkerd; Patarapadungkit, Natcha; Chuerduangphui, Jureeporn; Pientong, Chamsai

    2016-12-09

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is an independent risk factor for development of oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC). This study aimed to investigate the role of HPV infection and the trend in percentage of HPV-associated OSCC over a 5-year period in northeastern Thailand. In this case-control study, 91 exfoliated oral cell samples and 80 lesion cell samples from OSCC cases and exfoliated oral cells from 100 age/gender-matched controls were collected. HPV infection was investigated by PCR using GP5+/GP6+ primers followed by HPV genotyping using reverse line blot hybridization. Quantitative RT-PCR was used to evaluate HPV oncogene transcription. Temporal trends of HPV infection were evaluated in archived formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded (FFPE) OSCC tissues using in situ hybridization. HPV DNA was found in 17.5% (14/80) of lesion samples from OSCC cases and 29.7% (27/91) of exfoliated oral cell samples from the same cases. These values were significantly higher than in exfoliated oral cell samples from controls (13%, 13/100). HPV-16 was the genotype most frequently found in OSCC cases (92.8%, 13/14 infected cases). Interestingly, HPV oncogene mRNA expression was detected and correlated with OSCC cases (P < 0.005). Of 146 archived FFPE OSCC samples, 82 (56.2%) were positive for high-risk HPV DNA and 64 (43.8%) cases were positive for HPV E6/E7 mRNA expression. There was a trend of increasing percentage of HPV-associated OSCC from 2005 to 2010. This was especially so for females with well-differentiated tumors in specific tongue sub-sites. We suggest that HPV infection plays an important role in oral carcinogenesis in northeastern Thailand.

  2. Atypical Protein Kinase Cι as a human oncogene and therapeutic target

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Peter J.; Justilien, Verline; Riou, Philippe; Linch, Mark; Fields, Alan P.

    2014-01-01

    Protein kinase inhibitors represent a major class of targeted therapeutics that has made a positive impact on treatment of cancer and other disease indications. Among the promising kinase targets for further therapeutic development are members of the Protein Kinase C (PKC) family.The PKCs are central components of many signaling pathways that regulate diverse cellular functions including proliferation, cell cycle, differentiation, survival, cell migration, and polarity. Genetic manipulation of individual PKC isozymes has demonstrated that they often fulfill distinct, nonredundant cellular functions.11 Participation of PKC members in different intracellular signaling pathways reflects responses to varying extracellular stimuli, intracellular localization, tissue distribution, phosphorylation status, and intermolecular interactions. PKC activity, localization, phosphorylation, and/or expression are often altered in human tumors, and PKC isozymes have been implicated in various aspects of transformation, including uncontrolled proliferation, migration, invasion, metastasis, angiogenesis, and resistance to apoptosis. Despite the strong relationship between PKC isozymes and cancer, to date only atypical PKCiota has been shown to function as a bona fide oncogene, and as such is a particularly attractive therapeutic target for cancer treatment. In this review, we discuss the role of PKCiota in transformation and describe mechanism-based approaches to therapeutically target oncogenic PKCiota signaling in cancer. PMID:24231509

  3. Expression of membrane type 1 matrix metalloproteinase in papillomavirus-positive cells: role of the human papillomavirus (HPV) 16 and HPV8 E7 gene products.

    PubMed

    Smola-Hess, Sigrun; Pahne, Jenny; Mauch, Cornelia; Zigrino, Paola; Smola, Hans; Pfister, Herbert J

    2005-05-01

    Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) degrade extracellular matrix. They are involved in cellular proliferation, migration, angiogenesis, invasion and metastasis. MT-1 MMP, a membrane-bound MMP, is expressed in carcinomas of the uterine cervix in vivo. This type of cancer is associated with human papillomavirus (HPV) infection. Here it was shown that keratinocytes transformed with HPV16 or HPV18 in vitro, and HPV-positive cervical carcinoma cell lines, constitutively expressed MT-1 MMP. Expression of the E7 protein from the mucosal and cutaneous high-risk types HPV16 and HPV8, but not from the cutaneous low-risk type HPV1, was sufficient to induce MT-1 MMP expression in primary human keratinocytes and HaCaT cells. As a consequence, MMP-2 was activated. MT-1 MMP expression might play a role in the HPV life cycle by promoting proliferation of host cells and might contribute to their invasive phenotype during malignant progression.

  4. E1-Mediated Recruitment of a UAF1-USP Deubiquitinase Complex Facilitates Human Papillomavirus DNA Replication

    PubMed Central

    Lehoux, Michaël; Gagnon, David

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The human papillomavirus (HPV) E1 helicase promotes viral DNA replication through its DNA unwinding activity and association with host factors. The E1 proteins from anogenital HPV types interact with the cellular WD repeat-containing factor UAF1 (formerly known as p80). Specific amino acid substitutions in E1 that impair this interaction inhibit maintenance of the viral episome in immortalized keratinocytes and reduce viral DNA replication by up to 70% in transient assays. In this study, we determined by affinity purification of UAF1 that it interacts with three deubiquitinating enzymes in C33A cervical carcinoma cells: USP1, a nuclear protein, and the two cytoplasmic enzymes USP12 and USP46. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments indicated that E1 assembles into a ternary complex with UAF1 and any one of these three USPs. Moreover, expression of E1 leads to a redistribution of USP12 and USP46 from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. Chromatin immunoprecipitation studies further revealed that E1 recruits these threes USPs to the viral origin in association with UAF1. The function of USP1, USP12, and USP46 in viral DNA replication was investigated by overproduction of catalytically inactive versions of these enzymes in transient assays. All three dominant negative USPs reduced HPV31 DNA replication by up to 60%, an effect that was specific, as it was not observed in assays performed with a truncated E1 lacking the UAF1-binding domain or with bovine papillomavirus 1 E1, which does not bind UAF1. These results highlight the importance of the USP1, USP12, and USP46 deubiquitinating enzymes in anogenital HPV DNA replication. IMPORTANCE Human papillomaviruses are small DNA tumor viruses that induce benign and malignant lesions of the skin and mucosa. HPV types that infect the anogenital tract are the etiological agents of cervical cancer, the majority of anal cancers, and a growing proportion of head-and-neck cancers. Replication of the HPV genome requires the viral

  5. Annual disease burden due to human papillomavirus 16 and 18 infections in Finland.

    PubMed

    Syrjänen, Kari J

    2009-01-01

    Apart from cancers of the lower female genital tract, human papillomaviruses (HPV) are associated with a large number of benign, premalignant and malignant lesions at different anatomic sites in both genders. Malignant tumours and their precursors are usually attributed to the oncogenic (high-risk, HR) HPV types, whereas benign lesions (mostly papillomas) are ascribed to the low-risk (LR) HPV types, most notably HPV6 and HPV11. To date, the main interest has been focused on HR-HPV types and their associated pathology, and much less attention has been paid to the lesions caused by the LR-HPV types. The recent licensing of an effective prophylactic vaccine against the 2 most important LR-HPV types (HPV6 and HPV11) has resulted in considerably increased interest in these LR-HPV types as well. This author recently conducted a systematic survey of the annual disease burden due to HPV6/11 infections in Finland. As a rational continuation, the present survey was conducted to estimate the annual disease burden due to HPV16 and HPV18 infections in our country. Together, these 2 documents form the foundation for calculations of the annual costs needed to treat the diseases caused by these 2 most common LR and HR HPV types. Similar to HPV6/11, accurate estimates of disease burden are also mandatory for all modelling of the cost-effectiveness of prophylactic HPV16/18 vaccines. In the first step, the published HPV literature was used to create a list of benign, premalignant and malignant lesions associated with this virus at different anatomic sites. The GLOBOCAN 2004 (IARC; International Agency for Research on Cancer) database was used to derive the global numbers of incident cases for each of these malignancies in 2002, and the Finnish Cancer Registry (FCR) website was used to obtain these numbers for Finland (y 2005). The evidence linking HPV to each individual tumour category was classified as: (1) established, (2) emerging, and (3) controversial. All published evidence was

  6. Human Papillomavirus Vaccination Requirements in US Schools: Recommendations for Moving Forward.

    PubMed

    North, Anna L; Niccolai, Linda M

    2016-10-01

    Safe and effective human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccines have been available and recommended for adolescents for a decade in the United States, yet vaccination rates remain suboptimal. School entry requirements have increased uptake of other vaccines for adolescents and made coverage more equitable. However, only 3 jurisdictions require HPV vaccine for school. We summarize the current status of HPV vaccine requirements and discuss the rationales for and against these policies. The rationales for requirements include HPV vaccine efficacy and safety, effectiveness of requirements for increasing vaccine uptake and making it more equitable, and use of requirements as "safety nets" and to achieve herd immunity. The rationales against requirements include low parental acceptance of HPV vaccine, the financial burden on educational systems and health departments, and the possibility for alternatives to increase vaccine uptake. Many challenges to HPV vaccine requirements are addressable, and we conclude with recommendations on how to approach these challenges.

  7. [The application of the polymerase chain reaction technic for the detection of human papillomavirus sequences].

    PubMed

    Soto, Y; Muné, M; Goicolea, A; Morales, E; Santoyo, J M; Valdés, O; Ramírez, R; Pimentel, T

    1998-01-01

    The polymerase chain reaction technique was applied to detect sequences of human Papillomavirus (HPV) by controls of cellular lines of cervical cancer and of tissues obtained through biopsy with a HPV-positive clinical diagnosis. A set of consensus oligonucleotides, which are complementary to a highly conserved region within the open reading frame E1 of the viral genome of HPV affecting the cervical mucosa, was used. With these primers it was possible to amplify DNA sequences corresponding to HPV 6 and 11, considered in the low risk group, and to HPV 16, 18, 31 and 33, included in the high risk group. The study of the sensitivity of the amplification technique showed a level of detection of 3,5 viral particles per each cellular diploid genome.

  8. Anal human papillomavirus infection: prevalence, diagnosis and treatment of related lesions.

    PubMed

    Benevolo, Maria; Donà, Maria Gabriella; Ravenda, Paola Simona; Chiocca, Susanna

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) infection is mostly asymptomatic, but may also have many diverse clinical signs encompassing benign ano-genital lesions, and carcinomas. Recently, interest has also particularly focused on anal cancer since, over the last decades, its incidence has been greatly increasing in developed countries, both in women and men and is drastically higher in specific risk groups, such as men who have sex with men (MSM) and HIV-1 infected individuals. Approximately 88% of anal cancer cases worldwide are associated with HPV infection. This review summarizes our current understanding of anal HPV infection, discussing its epidemiology and risk factors in various populations, and the state of the art in the detection of anal HPV infection and its related lesions through both cytology and histology. Finally, we discuss the clinical management and therapy for these lesions.

  9. Association of Genital Infections Other Than Human Papillomavirus with Pre-Invasive and Invasive Cervical Neoplasia

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Ranajit; Kundu, Pratip; Biswas, Jaydip

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a well-established causative agent of malignancy of the female genital tract and a common Sexually Transmitted Infection. The probable co-factors that prevent spontaneous clearance of HPV and progression to neoplasia are genital tract infections from organisms like Chlamydia, Trichomonas vaginalis etc, smoking, nutritional deficiencies and multiparity. Inflammatory conditions can lead to pre-neoplastic manifestations in the cervical epithelium; however their specific role in cervical carcinogenesis is not yet established. Therefore it is imperative to study the likely association between HPV and co-infection with various common pathogens in the genital tract of women having cervical precancer or cancer. A “Pubmed” search was made for articles in Literature on this topic using the words: Cervical neoplasia, HPV, co-infections, Cervical Intraepithelial Neoplasia (CIN), Trichomonas vaginalis, Candida, Chlamydia and the relevant information obtained was used to draft the review. PMID:27042571

  10. Single-organ vasculitis of the cervix accompanying human papillomavirus infection

    PubMed Central

    Gözüküçük, Murat; Gürsoy, Aslı Yarcı; Kankaya, Duygu; Atabekoglu, Cem

    2016-01-01

    Single-organ vasculitis (SOV) has rarely been reported to involve the female genital tract but mostly the uterine cervix. A 39-year-old woman was diagnosed to have a high-grade cervical intraepithelial lesion and was treated by large loop excision of the transformation zone. Histopathological evaluation of the excised specimen confirmed the diagnosis of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade III accompanied by human papillomavirus infection. The excised second specimen showed the evidence of vasculitis of medium-sized vessels of the cervix, which is a quite rare form of SOV. It seems to be important to be aware of the localized form of polyarteritis nodosa limited to the female genital tract to prevent unnecessary immunosuppressive therapies. PMID:28386466

  11. A Case Report of Focal Epithelial Hyperplasia (Heck's disease) with PCR Detection of Human Papillomavirus.

    PubMed

    Ozden, Bora; Gunduz, Kaan; Gunhan, Omer; Ozden, Feyza Otan

    2011-12-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia or Heck's disease, is a rare viral infection of the oral mucosa caused by human papillomavirus. The frequency of this disease varies widely from one geographic region to another. In Caucasians there have been only few cases reported. This paper reports a case of focal epithelial hyperplasia and demonstrates the association with HPV subtype 32 through polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and sequencing of PCR products. A 7-year-old Caucasian girl was admitted to our clinic for investigation of multiple oral mucosal lesions in the mouth. Lesion was excised under local anesthesia without any complication. The lesion was diagnosed as focal epithelial hyperplasia according to both clinical and histopathological features. Dental staff should be aware of these kind of lesions and histopathological examination together with a careful clinical observation should be carried out for a definitive diagnosis.

  12. Oral focal epithelial hyperplasia: report of 3 cases with human papillomavirus DNA sequencing analysis.

    PubMed

    Gültekin, S E; Tokman Yildirim, Benay; Sarisoy, S

    2011-01-01

    Focal epithelial hyperplasia (FEH), or Heck's disease, is a benign proliferative viral infection of the oral mucosa that is related to Human Papil-lomavirus (HPV), mainly subtypes 13 and 32. Although this condition is known to exist in numerous populations and ethnic groups, the reported cases among Caucasians are relatively rare. It presents as asymptomatic papules or nodules on the oral mucosa, gingiva, tongue, and lips. Histopathologically, it is characterized by parakeratosis, epithelial hyperplasia, focal acanthosis, fusion, and horizontal outgrowth of epithelial ridges and the cells named mitozoids. The purpose of this case report was to present 3 cases of focal epithelial hyperplasia in a pediatric age group. Histopathological and clinical features of cases are discussed and DNA sequencing analysis is reported in which HPV 13, HPV 32, and HPV 11 genomes are detected.

  13. Characterization of human papillomavirus in airway papillomas by histologic and biochemical analysis.

    PubMed

    Glynn, M; Sanford, T; Hoover, L; Kinsey, W; Dobbs, L; Bruegger, D

    1999-11-01

    The role of human papillomavirus (HPV) in airway papillomas has been well defined in recent literature. The chronicity and recurrence of papillomas has been postulated to be a result of residual viral genome in tissue treated with standard laser techniques. Thirteen patients with airway papillomas were selected for study with polymerase chain reaction (PCR) methods to detect viral DNA. Specimens taken prior to laser therapy and specimens taken at laser margins were consistently positive for HPV DNA by PCR. The HPV DNA is apparently present in tissues after macroscopic disease has been ablated by laser techniques. Histologic analysis of laser biopsies demonstrated fragments of squamous epithelium with cytologic features of HPV infection. Laser treatment is ineffective in eradicating HPV-infected tissues from airway papillomas, and this finding supports the notion that recurrence is a product of HPV incorporated into tissue not ablated by laser irradiation. Specific methods, results, and clinical correlation will be discussed.

  14. Extensive human papillomavirus type 7-associated orofacial warts in an immunocompetent patient.

    PubMed

    Ritzkowsky, A; Weissenborn, S; Krieg, T; Pfister, H; Wieland, U

    2001-05-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) type 7 is frequently found in butchers' warts and has been demonstrated in oral and facial warts of HIV-infected patients. The reservoirs of HPV7 and the route of transmission are still unclear. Here we describe an HIV-negative, otherwise healthy patient with extensive, recurrent orofacial papillomatosis whose immune status proved to be normal and who had no history of meat handling. HPV7 L1 gene DNA that differed in 3 point mutations from the HPV7 prototype could be detected in 2 morphologically distinct, perioral lesions by different PCR protocols. In situ hybridization confirmed the presence of HPV7 DNA in the nuclei of vacuolated cells of the granular layer. Our data show that HPV7 can lead to perioral, spiky warts and brownish plaques in immunocompetent patients who had never been working as a meat or fish handler.

  15. Journey of the Human Papillomavirus (HPV) in a Developing Country over 5 Years (2010 - 2015).

    PubMed

    Danial, M; Sivasangari, S; Arulappen, Al; Ong, Lm

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) is a prevalent sexually transmitted infection with serious medical, sexual, and relationship consequences. HPV vaccine protection is available globally but unfortunately vaccine uptake is inconsistent everywhere. From this study, it was observed that the awareness of cervical cancer, HPV virus and HPV vaccination in Malaysia is high, at 83.1%, 73.9% and 73.3% of respondents, respectively. However, a considerably low percentage had undergone HPV vaccination (8.6%) compared to those who had experienced a Pap smear (32.9%). Awareness between cervical cancer and HPV virus and vaccination was low. Health care providers and the governing bodies have to play a vital role in disseminating holistic information on the vaccine and the importance of getting vaccinated to the public more vigorously in Malaysia.

  16. Do high-risk human papillomaviruses cause oral cavity squamous cell carcinoma?

    PubMed

    Mirghani, H; Amen, F; Moreau, F; Lacau St Guily, J

    2015-03-01

    High-risk human papillomaviruses (HR-HPV) are an established etiologic factor for a growing number of oropharyngeal cancers. However, their potential role in other upper aerodigestive tract locations is still a matter of debate, particularly in the oral cavity. This is of paramount importance as in the future diagnosis, treatment and follow up in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma may vary according to HPV status. This article reviews the recent published data and highlights some of the pitfalls that have hampered the accurate assessment of HR-HPV oncological role outside the oropharynx. We demonstrate that, in contrast to the oropharynx, only a small fraction of cancers located in the oral cavity seem to be HPV-related even in young non-smoking non-drinking patients. We emphasize several relevant factors to consider in assumed HPV-induced oral cavity cancers and discuss the current theories that explain why HPV-induced cancers arise preferentially in the oropharynx.

  17. Splicing and Polyadenylation of Human Papillomavirus Type 16 mRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Chengjun; Kajitani, Naoko; Schwartz, Stefan

    2017-01-01

    The human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) life cycle can be divided into an early stage in which the HPV16 genomic DNA is replicated, and a late stage in which the HPV16 structural proteins are synthesized and virions are produced. A strong coupling between the viral life cycle and the differentiation state of the infected cell is highly characteristic of all HPVs. The switch from the HPV16 early gene expression program to the late requires a promoter switch, a polyadenylation signal switch and a shift in alternative splicing. A number of cis-acting RNA elements on the HPV16 mRNAs and cellular and viral factors interacting with these elements are involved in the control of HPV16 gene expression. This review summarizes our knowledge of HPV16 cis-acting RNA elements and cellular and viral trans-acting factors that regulate HPV16 gene expression at the level of splicing and polyadenylation. PMID:28208770

  18. Prediction of high-risk types of human papillomaviruses using statistical model of protein "sequence space".

    PubMed

    Wang, Cong; Hai, Yabing; Liu, Xiaoqing; Liu, Nanfang; Yao, Yuhua; He, Pingan; Dai, Qi

    2015-01-01

    Discrimination of high-risk types of human papillomaviruses plays an important role in the diagnosis and remedy of cervical cancer. Recently, several computational methods have been proposed based on protein sequence-based and structure-based information, but the information of their related proteins has not been used until now. In this paper, we proposed using protein "sequence space" to explore this information and used it to predict high-risk types of HPVs. The proposed method was tested on 68 samples with known HPV types and 4 samples without HPV types and further compared with the available approaches. The results show that the proposed method achieved the best performance among all the evaluated methods with accuracy 95.59% and F1-score 90.91%, which indicates that protein "sequence space" could potentially be used to improve prediction of high-risk types of HPVs.

  19. Low frequency of human papillomavirus infection in conjunctival squamous cell carcinoma of Mexican patients

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background The relationship between Human Papillomavirus (HPV) infection and conjunctiva cancer is controversial. HPV detection will provide more information about the role of this infectious agent in the biology of conjunctiva cancer. In the present study, DNA extracted and purified from 36 Conjunctival Squamous Cell Carcinomas (CSCC) was evaluated by PCR for HPV DNA sequences. The results were correlated with the clinical and histopathological variables. Results The results showed that HPV DNA was present in 8 CSCC samples (22%); HPV16 was the sole type detected. Significant association was found between HPV detection and the limbus tumor subtype (p = 0.03). All the samples were non-metastatic squamous cell carcinoma. Conclusions The HPV presence in CSCC from Mexican patients is not a common event. PMID:22099431

  20. Pap testing, awareness, and acceptability of a human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine among Chinese American women.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Giang T; Chen, Bei; Chan, Melvin

    2012-10-01

    Little is known about the knowledge and opinions of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine among Chinese immigrants, nor the impact of framing HPV as a sexually transmitted infection in this population. A cross-sectional survey was conducted focusing on knowledge and experience with HPV, HPV vaccine, cervical cancer and Pap testing, and attitudes toward HPV vaccine in response to different message frames. Chinese American women were recruited in a community setting (n = 162). Only 19 % had heard of HPV and 38 % had had a Pap test in the last 3 years. Multivariate logistic regression showed that English proficiency was associated with vaccination acceptance and insurance status was associated with HPV awareness; there was no observed correlation with message framing. Chinese American women with limited English proficiency have low HPV awareness. Community-based, culturally appropriate education about cervical cancer and HPV vaccine should be directed toward limited-English proficient Chinese American women.

  1. Sources of information for assessing human papillomavirus vaccination history among young women.

    PubMed

    Niccolai, Linda M; McBride, Vanessa; Julian, Pamela R

    2014-05-23

    Assessing history of human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccination is important for monitoring vaccine uptake, impact, and effectiveness. Based on data collected from 1720 women with high-grade cervical lesions reported to a statewide surveillance system in Connecticut, we found that available medical records did not contain HPV vaccination information for 34% of women, and 43% of women could not be reached for interview. When both were used for data collection, concordance of vaccination history (83%) and sensitivity of self-report (96%) were both high. Reviewing medical records based on self-reported information about vaccine providers increased confirmation of vaccination histories in this sample by 18%. The vaccine registry in Connecticut is not currently utilized for HPV vaccinations, but efforts to increase use for adolescent vaccines could be useful in the future to overcome limitations of other sources.