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Sample records for human peripheral benzodiazepine

  1. The expression of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors in human skin: the relationship with epidermal cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Stoebner, P E; Carayon, P; Penarier, G; Fréchin, N; Barnéon, G; Casellas, P; Cano, J P; Meynadier, J; Meunier, L

    1999-06-01

    The peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) is a protein of mitochondrial outer membranes utilizing porphyrins as endogenous ligands. PBR is part of a heteromeric receptor complex involved in the formation of mitochondrial permeability transition pores and in the early events of apoptosis. PBR may function as an oxygen-dependent signal generator; recent data indicate that these receptors may preserve the mitochondria of haematopoietic cell lines from damage caused by oxygen radicals. To identify PBRs in human skin, we used a specific monoclonal antibody directed against the C-terminus fragment of the human receptor. PBR immunoreactivity was found in keratinocytes, Langerhans cells, hair follicles and dermal vascular endothelial cells. Interestingly, confocal microscopic examination of skin sections revealed that PBR expression was strongly upregulated in the superficial differentiated layers of the epidermis. Ultrastructurally, PBRs were distributed throughout the cytoplasm but were selectively expressed on the mitochondrial membranes of epidermal cells. The elevated level of PBRs in the spinous layer was not associated with an increased number of mitochondria nor with an increased amount of mRNA as assessed by in situ hybridization on microautoradiographed skin sections. The present work provides, for the first time, evidence of PBR immunoreactivity in human skin. This mitochondrial receptor may modulate apoptosis in the epidermis; its increased expression in differentiated epidermal layers may represent a novel mechanism of natural skin protection against free radical damage generated by ultraviolet exposure. PMID:10354064

  2. Imaging of a glioma using peripheral benzodiazepine receptor ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Starosta-Rubinstein, S.; Ciliax, B.J.; Penney, J.B.; McKeever, P.; Young, A.B.

    1987-02-01

    Two types of benzodiazepine receptors have been demonstrated in mammalian tissues, one which is localized on neuronal elements in brain and the other, on glial cells and in peripheral tissues such as kidney. In vivo administration of /sup 3/H-labeled PK 11195 (1-(2-chlorophenyl-N-methyl-N-(1-methylpropyl)-3-isoquinoline carboxamide) or (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam with 5 mg of clonazepam per kg to rats with intracranial C6 gliomas resulted in high levels of tritiated-drug binding to the tumor as shown by quantitative autoradiography. Pharmacological studies indicated that the bound drugs labeled the peripheral benzodiazepine binding site. Binding to the peripheral benzodiazepine site was confirmed primarily to malignant cells with little binding to adjacent normal brain tissue or to necrotic tissue. Tumor cell binding was completely inhibited by preadministration of the peripheral benzodiazepine blocking agent PK 11195 at 5 mg/kg. The centrally selective benzodiazepine ligand clonazepam had no effect on PK 11195 binding to the tumor cells. When binding to other tumor cell lines grown in nude mice and nude athymic rats was evaluated, little or no peripheral benzodiazepine binding was detected on human pheochromocytoma (RN1) and neuroblastoma (SK-N-MC, SK-N-SH) tumor cells, respectively. However, high densities of peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites were observed on tumors derived from a human glioma cell line (ATCC HTB 14, U-87 MG). The presence of high concentrations of specific peripheral benzodiazepine receptors on glial tumors suggests that human primary central nervous system tumors could be imaged and diagnosed using peripheral benzodiazepine ligands labeled with positron- or gamma-emitting isotopes.

  3. Imaging of a glioma using peripheral benzodiazepine receptor ligands.

    PubMed Central

    Starosta-Rubinstein, S; Ciliax, B J; Penney, J B; McKeever, P; Young, A B

    1987-01-01

    Two types of benzodiazepine receptors have been demonstrated in mammalian tissues, one which is localized on neuronal elements in brain and the other, on glial cells and in peripheral tissues such as kidney. In vivo administration of 3H-labeled PK 11195 [1-(2-chlorophenyl-N-methyl-N-(1-methylpropyl)-3-isoquinoline carboxamide] or [3H]flunitrazepam with 5 mg of clonazepam per kg to rats with intracranial C6 gliomas resulted in high levels of tritiated-drug binding to the tumor as shown by quantitative autoradiography. Pharmacological studies indicated that the bound drugs labeled the peripheral benzodiazepine binding site. Binding to the peripheral benzodiazepine site was confirmed primarily to malignant cells with little binding to adjacent normal brain tissue or to necrotic tissue. Tumor cell binding was completely inhibited by preadministration of the peripheral benzodiazepine blocking agent PK 11195 at 5 mg/kg. The centrally selective benzodiazepine ligand clonazepam had no effect on PK 11195 binding to the tumor cells. When binding to other tumor cell lines grown in nude mice and nude athymic rats was evaluated, little or no peripheral benzodiazepine binding was detected on human pheochromocytoma (RN1) and neuroblastoma (SK-N-MC, SK-N-SH) tumor cells, respectively. However, high densities of peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites were observed on tumors derived from a human glioma cell line (ATCC HTB 14, U-87 MG). The presence of high concentrations of specific peripheral benzodiazepine receptors on glial tumors suggests that human primary central nervous system tumors could be imaged and diagnosed using peripheral benzodiazepine ligands labeled with positron- or gamma-emitting isotopes. Images PMID:3027710

  4. Expression of peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) in human tumors: relationship to breast, colorectal, and prostate tumor progression.

    PubMed

    Han, Zeqiu; Slack, Rebecca S; Li, Wenping; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2003-01-01

    High levels of peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR), the alternative-binding site for diazepam, are part of the aggressive human breast cancer cell phenotype in vitro. We examined PBR levels and distribution in normal tissue and tumors from multiple cancer types by immunohistochemistry. Among normal breast tissues, fibroadenomas, primary and metastatic adenocarcinomas, there is a progressive increase in PBR levels parallel to the invasive and metastatic ability of the tumor (p < 0.0001). In colorectal and prostate carcinomas, PBR levels were also higher in tumor than in the corresponding non-tumoral tissues and benign lesions (p < 0.0001). In contrast, PBR was highly concentrated in normal adrenal cortical cells and hepatocytes, whereas in adrenocortical tumors and hepatomas PBR levels were decreased. Moreover, malignant skin tumors showed decreased PBR expression compared with normal skin. These results indicate that elevated PBR expression is not a common feature of aggressive tumors, but rather may be limited to certain cancers, such as those of breast, colon-rectum and prostate tissues, where elevated PBR expression is associated with tumor progression. Thus, we propose that PBR overexpression could serve as a novel prognostic indicator of an aggressive phenotype in breast, colorectal and prostate cancers.

  5. Platelet peripheral benzodiazepine receptors in repeated stress

    SciTech Connect

    Dar, D.E.; Bidder, M.; Gavish, M. ); Weizman, A.; Karp, L.; Tyano, S. ); Grinshpoon, A.; Bleich, A.

    1991-01-01

    ({sup 3}H)PK 11195 binding to platelet membranes and plasma stress hormones were studied in soldiers at the beginning of a parachute training course, following 6 days of preparatory exercises, and after the fourth actual parachute jump. A slight reduction (15%; NS) in the number of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBR) was detected at the end of the exercise period, prior to the first jump. Reduced density of PBR was observed immediately after the repeated actual jumps. Equilibrium dissociation constants were not affected by the stressful situation. Plasma cortisol and prolactin levels remained unaltered during the entire study period.

  6. The bovine peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor: A receptor with low affinity for benzodiazepines

    SciTech Connect

    Parola, A.L.; Laird, H.E. II )

    1991-01-01

    The density of bovine peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors (PBR) in four tissues was highest in adrenal cortex. The adrenal cortex PBR cofractionated with a mitochondrial membrane marker enzyme and could be solubilized with intact ligand binding properties using digitonin. The membrane bound and soluble mitochondrial receptors were pharmacologically characterized and showed the rank order of potency to inhibit ({sup 3}H)PK 11195 binding was PK 11195 > protoporphyrin IX > benzodiazepines. ({sup 3}H)PK 11195 binding to bovine adrenal mitochondria was unaffected by diethylpyrocarbonate, a histidine residue modifying reagent that decreased binding to rat liver mitochondria by 70%. ({sup 3}H)PK 14105 photolabeled the bovine PBR and the Mr was estimated under nondenaturing and denaturing conditions. These results demonstrate the bovine peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor is pharmacologically and biochemically distinct from the rat receptor, but the receptor component photolabeled by an isoquinoline ligand has a similar molecular weight.

  7. Platelet peripheral benzodiazepine receptors are decreased in Parkinson's disease

    SciTech Connect

    Bonuccelli, U.; Nuti, A.; Del Dotto, P.; Piccini, P.; Martini, C.; Giannacccini, G.; Lucacchini, A.; Muratorio, A. )

    1991-01-01

    Peripheral benzodiazepine (BDZ) receptors are located in a variety of tissues, including platelets, in the nuclear and/or mitochondrial membranes. The authors studied the density of peripheral BDZ receptors in platelets of 10 de novo Parkinson's disease (PD) patients, 18 PD patients treated with a levodopa/carbidopa combination, and in 15 healthy subjects matched for sex and age. The binding assay was conducted using ({sup 3}H)PK 11195, a specific ligand for peripheral BDZ receptors. A significant decrease in the density of ({sup 3}H)PK 11195 binding sites has been observed in PD patients with respect to controls but not between de novo and treated PD patients. No correlation has been found between the decrease in density of ({sup 3}H)PK 11195 binding sites in platelets and either the duration or severity of PD. Peripheral BDZ receptors are implicated in the regulation of mitochondrial respiratory function. Thus, their decrease in PD might parallel the abnormalities in mitochondrial function recently found in this neurologic disease.

  8. PET study of carbon-11-PK 11195 binding to peripheral type benzodiazepine sites in glioblastoma: A case report

    SciTech Connect

    Pappata, S.; Cornu, P.; Samson, Y.; Prenant, C.; Benavides, J.; Scatton, B.; Crouzel, C.; Hauw, J.J.; Syrota, A. )

    1991-08-01

    The utility of the peripheral type benzodiazepine site ligand 11C-PK 11195, for imaging human glioma in conjunction with Positron Emission Tomography, relies on a high specific binding of the tracer to tumoral peripheral type benzodiazepines sites. In a patient with glioblastoma, the authors found that 11C-PK 11195 binding was two-fold higher in the tumor than in normal gray matter and that 30% of tumoral binding could be displaced by a large excess of unlabeled drug. These findings suggest that tumoral retention of the ligand is due, in part, to specific binding.

  9. Benzodiazepines

    MedlinePlus

    ... with amnesia, hostility, irritability, and vivid or disturbing dreams. Affect on body Benzodiazepines slow down the central nervous system and may cause sleepiness. Drugs causing similar effects Alcohol, barbiturates, sleeping pills, and GHB Overdose effects Effects of overdose ...

  10. Benzodiazepines

    PubMed Central

    Greenblatt, D. J.; Shader, R. I.; Divoll, M.; Harmatz, J. S.

    1981-01-01

    1 The onset and duration of action of benzodiazepines after single oral doses depend largely on absorption rate and the rate and extent of distribution, respectively. 2 The rate and extent of accumulation during multiple dosage depend on elimination half-life and clearance. A framework is proposed for classification of benzodiazepines according to elimination half-life. 3 Long-acting benzodiazepines have half-life values usually exceeding 24 hours. Drugs in this category have long-acting pharmacologically active metabolites (often desmethyldiazepam), accumulate extensively during multiple dosage, and may have impaired clearance in the elderly and those with liver disease. 4 Intermediate and short-acting benzodiazepines have half-life values from 5-24 hours. Active metabolites are uncommon. Accumulation during multiple dosage is less extensive than with the long-acting group, and diminishes as the half-life becomes shorter. Age and liver disease have a small influence on metabolic clearance. 5 The half-life of ultrashort acting benzodiazepines is less than 5 hours. These drugs are essentially non-accumulating. 6 Pharmacokinetic classification may assist in understanding of differences among benzodiazepines, but does not explain all of their clinical actions. PMID:6133528

  11. Benzodiazepines - Effects on Human Performance and Behavior.

    PubMed

    Drummer, O H

    2002-02-01

    There exist a large number of drugs belonging to the benzodiazepine family. These include the 1,4-benzodiazepines such as diazepam, temazepam and oxazepam, the often more potent diazolo- and triazolo-groups represented by alprazolam, midazolam, triazolam etc. These drugs represent a large range of potencies from submilligram doses to over 100 mg and a range of polarities. Consequently, blood or plasma concentrations associated with prescribed use range from sub-nanogram per mL to near-microgram per mL. Their medical use varies, but they are predominantly used as hypnotics and sedatives. Some members are also used in the treatment of post-traumatic stress and obsessive-compulsive disorders, alcohol withdrawal, muscle spasm, and seizures. Recreationally, drug users favor these drugs to reduce the symptoms of withdrawal and unpleasant effects of heroin and cocaine. They are also commonly used as "date-rape" drugs to render a victim incapable of resisting an attack. Benzodiazepines elicit a large number of physiological and psychological responses in humans that often can lead to significant behavioral changes and adverse effects on skills required for safe driving. These include reduced lane control, increased reaction times, reduced hand-eye coordination and cognitive impairment. Impairment can exceed that seen with 0.05 g% ethanol. In high doses benzodiazepines can cause persons to exhibit classical features of CNS-depressant drugs such as nystagmus, ataxia, slurred speech, and impaired divided attention skills. As one would expect with hypnotics and sedatives, any sleep deprivation, or situations involving monotonous driving can lead to a reduced ability to concentrate and maintain vigilance. Adverse effects on REM and NREM sleep patterns will exacerbate fatigue-related components to driving. Persons with sleep abnormalities, e.g., sleep apnea, may be more likely to be affected by benzodiazepines than those with normal sleep patterns. Ethanol and narcotic

  12. Regulation of renal peripheral benzodiazepine receptors by anion transport inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Basile, A.S.; Lueddens, W.M.; Skolnick, P.

    1988-01-01

    The in vitro and in vivo regulation of (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 binding to peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBR) by ion transport/exchange inhibitors was studied in the kidney. The potencies of 9-anthroic acid, furosemide, bumetanide, hydrochlorothiazide and SITS as inhibitors of (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 binding to renal membranes were consistent with their actions as anion transport inhibitors (Ki approx. = 30 - 130 ..mu..M). In contrast, spironolactone, amiloride, acetazolamide, and ouabain were less potent (Ki=100-1000 ..mu..M). Administration of furosemide to rats for five days resulted in a profound diuresis accompanied by a significant increase in PBR density (43%) that was apparent by the fifth day of treatment. Administration of hydrochlorothiazide or Ro 5-4864 for five days also caused diuresis and increased renal PBR density. Both the diuresis and increased density of PBR produced by Ro 5-4864 were blocked by coadministration of PK 11195, which alone had no effect on either PBR density or urine volume. The equilibrium binding constants of (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 to cardiac membranes were unaffected by administration of any of these drugs. These findings suggest that renal PBR may be selectively modulated in vivo and in vitro by administration of ion transport/exchange inhibitors. 36 references, 4 tables.

  13. Peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) ligand cytotoxicity unrelated to PBR expression.

    PubMed

    Hans, Gregory; Wislet-Gendebien, Sabine; Lallemend, François; Robe, Pierre; Rogister, Bernard; Belachew, Shibeshih; Nguyen, Laurent; Malgrange, Brigitte; Moonen, Gustave; Rigo, Jean-Michel

    2005-03-01

    Some synthetic ligands of the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR), an 18 kDa protein of the outer mitochondrial membrane, are cytotoxic for several tumor cell lines and arise as promising chemotherapeutic candidates. However, conflicting results were reported regarding the actual effect of these drugs on cellular survival ranging from protection to toxicity. Moreover, the concentrations needed to observe such a toxicity were usually high, far above the affinity range for their receptor, hence questioning its specificity. In the present study, we have shown that micromolar concentrations of FGIN-1-27 and Ro 5-4864, two chemically unrelated PBR ligands are toxic for both PBR-expressing SK-N-BE neuroblastoma cells and PBR-deficient Jurkat lymphoma cells. We have thereby demonstrated that the cytotoxicity of these drugs is unrelated to their PBR-binding activity. Moreover, Ro 5-4864-induced cell death differed strikingly between both cell types, being apoptotic in Jurkat cells while necrotic in SK-N-BE cells. Again, this did not seem to be related to PBR expression since Ro 5-4864-induced death of PBR-transfected Jurkat cells remained apoptotic. Taken together, our results show that PBR is unlikely to mediate all the effects of these PBR ligands. They however confirm that some of these ligands are very effective cytotoxic drugs towards various cancer cells, even for reputed chemoresistant tumors such as neuroblastoma, and, surprisingly, also for PBR-lacking tumor cells.

  14. A comparative autoradiography study in post mortem whole hemisphere human brain slices taken from Alzheimer patients and age-matched controls using two radiolabelled DAA1106 analogues with high affinity to the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) system.

    PubMed

    Gulyás, Balázs; Makkai, Boglárka; Kása, Péter; Gulya, Károly; Bakota, Lidia; Várszegi, Szilvia; Beliczai, Zsuzsa; Andersson, Jan; Csiba, László; Thiele, Andrea; Dyrks, Thomas; Suhara, Tetsua; Suzuki, Kazutoshi; Higuchi, Makato; Halldin, Christer

    2009-01-01

    The binding of two radiolabelled analogues (N-(5-[125I]Iodo-2-phenoxyphenyl)-N-(2,5-dimethoxybenzyl)acetamide ([125I]desfluoro-DAA1106) and N-(5-[125I]Fluoro-2-phenoxyphenyl)-N-(2-[125I]Iodo-5-methoxybenzyl)acetamide ([125I]desmethoxy-DAA1106) of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) (or TSPO, 18kDa translocator protein) ligand DAA1106 was examined by in vitro autoradiography on human post mortem whole hemisphere brain slices obtained from Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and age-matched controls. Both [(125)I]desfluoro-IDAA1106 and [(125)I]desmethoxy-IDAA1106 were effectively binding to various brain structures. The binding could be blocked by the unlabelled ligand as well as by other PBR specific ligands. With both radiolabelled compounds, the binding showed regional inhomogeneity and the specific binding values proved to be the highest in the hippocampus, temporal and parietal cortex, the basal ganglia and thalamus in the AD brains. Compared with age-matched control brains, specific binding in several brain structures (temporal and parietal lobes, thalamus and white matter) in Alzheimer brains was significantly higher, indicating that the radioligands can effectively label-activated microglia and the up-regulated PBR/TSPO system in AD. Complementary immunohistochemical studies demonstrated reactive microglia activation in the AD brain tissue and indicated that increased ligand binding coincides with increased regional microglia activation due to neuroinflammation. These investigations yield further support to the PBR/TSPO binding capacity of DAA1106 in human brain tissue, demonstrate the effective usefulness of its radio-iodinated analogues as imaging biomarkers in post mortem human studies, and indicate that its radiolabelled analogues, labelled with short half-time bioisotopes, can serve as prospective in vivo imaging biomarkers of activated microglia and the up-regulated PBR/TSPO system in the human brain.

  15. A comparative autoradiography study in post mortem whole hemisphere human brain slices taken from Alzheimer patients and age-matched controls using two radiolabelled DAA1106 analogues with high affinity to the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) system.

    PubMed

    Gulyás, Balázs; Makkai, Boglárka; Kása, Péter; Gulya, Károly; Bakota, Lidia; Várszegi, Szilvia; Beliczai, Zsuzsa; Andersson, Jan; Csiba, László; Thiele, Andrea; Dyrks, Thomas; Suhara, Tetsua; Suzuki, Kazutoshi; Higuchi, Makato; Halldin, Christer

    2009-01-01

    The binding of two radiolabelled analogues (N-(5-[125I]Iodo-2-phenoxyphenyl)-N-(2,5-dimethoxybenzyl)acetamide ([125I]desfluoro-DAA1106) and N-(5-[125I]Fluoro-2-phenoxyphenyl)-N-(2-[125I]Iodo-5-methoxybenzyl)acetamide ([125I]desmethoxy-DAA1106) of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) (or TSPO, 18kDa translocator protein) ligand DAA1106 was examined by in vitro autoradiography on human post mortem whole hemisphere brain slices obtained from Alzheimer's disease (AD) patients and age-matched controls. Both [(125)I]desfluoro-IDAA1106 and [(125)I]desmethoxy-IDAA1106 were effectively binding to various brain structures. The binding could be blocked by the unlabelled ligand as well as by other PBR specific ligands. With both radiolabelled compounds, the binding showed regional inhomogeneity and the specific binding values proved to be the highest in the hippocampus, temporal and parietal cortex, the basal ganglia and thalamus in the AD brains. Compared with age-matched control brains, specific binding in several brain structures (temporal and parietal lobes, thalamus and white matter) in Alzheimer brains was significantly higher, indicating that the radioligands can effectively label-activated microglia and the up-regulated PBR/TSPO system in AD. Complementary immunohistochemical studies demonstrated reactive microglia activation in the AD brain tissue and indicated that increased ligand binding coincides with increased regional microglia activation due to neuroinflammation. These investigations yield further support to the PBR/TSPO binding capacity of DAA1106 in human brain tissue, demonstrate the effective usefulness of its radio-iodinated analogues as imaging biomarkers in post mortem human studies, and indicate that its radiolabelled analogues, labelled with short half-time bioisotopes, can serve as prospective in vivo imaging biomarkers of activated microglia and the up-regulated PBR/TSPO system in the human brain. PMID:18984021

  16. Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor: a protein of mitochondrial outer membranes utilizing porphyrins as endogenous ligands

    SciTech Connect

    Snyder, S.H.; Verma, A.; Trifiletti, R.R.

    1987-10-01

    The peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor is a site identified by its nanomolar affinity for (/sup 3/H)diazepam, similar to the affinity of diazepam for the central-type benzodiazepine receptor in the brain. The peripheral type benzodiazepine receptor occurs in many peripheral tissues but has discrete localizations as indicated by autoradiographic studies showing uniquely high densities of the receptors in the adrenal cortex and in Leydig cells of the testes. Subcellular localization studies reveal a selective association of the receptors with the outer membrane of mitochondria. Photoaffinity labeling of the mitochondrial receptor with (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam reveals two discrete labeled protein bands of 30 and 35 kDa, respectively. The 35-kDa band appears to be identical with the voltage-dependent anion channel protein porin. Fractionation of numerous peripheral tissues reveals a single principal endogenous ligand for the receptor, consisting of porphyrins, which display nanomolar affinity. Interactions of porphyrins with the mitochondrial receptor may clarify its physiological role and account for many pharmacological actions of benzodiazepines.

  17. Increase of peripheral type benzodiazepine binding sites in kidney and olfactory bulb in acutely stressed rats.

    PubMed

    Novas, M L; Medina, J H; Calvo, D; De Robertis, E

    1987-03-17

    Fifteen minutes after the initiation of swimming stress in the rat we observed a 50% increase in the number of [3H]RO 5-4864 binding sites in kidney and a 37% increase in the olfactory bulb, without change in affinity. The binding in heart and cerebral cortex remained unchanged after the stress. These results are discussed in relation to previous work on both the action of an acute stress in central benzodiazepine receptors and the possible modulation of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors of the kidney by adrenocortical hormones.

  18. Aldosterone-reversible decrease in the density of renal peripheral benzodiazepine receptors in the rat after adrenalectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Basile, A.S.; Ostrowski, N.L.; Skolnick, P.

    1987-03-01

    A statistically significant decrease in the density of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors was observed in renal membranes of rats beginning 2 weeks after adrenalectomy when compared with sham-operated controls. This decrease in peripheral benzodiazepine receptor density was manifest as a decrease in the maximum binding of two ligands, (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 and (/sup 3/H)PK 11195, without accompanying changes in their Kd for this site. Similar changes were not seen in another aldosterone-sensitive organ, the submandibular salivary gland. The decrease in peripheral benzodiazepine receptor density observed in adrenalectomized rat renal membranes was restored to control levels after 1 week of aldosterone administration using a dose (12.5 micrograms/kg/day) that had no effect on peripheral benzodiazepine receptor density in sham-operated animals. In contrast, dexamethasone administration (50 micrograms/kg/day, 1 week) had no effect on renal peripheral benzodiazepine receptor density when administered to either adrenalectomized or sham-operated rats. Further, adrenal demedullation had no effect on renal peripheral benzodiazepine receptor density or affinity. The decrease in peripheral benzodiazepine receptor density was localized to the renal cortex and the outer stripe of the medulla by gross dissection of renal slices and renal tissue section autoradiography. The specific effect of adrenalectomy on renal peripheral benzodiazepine receptor density, the lack of direct effect of aldosterone on (/sup 3/H) Ro 5-4864 binding and the localization of the change in peripheral benzodiazepine receptor density to the renal cortex and outer stripe suggest that these changes may reflect an adaptation of the renal nephron (possibly the distal convoluted tubule, intermediate tubule and/or the collecting duct) to the loss of mineralocorticoid hormones.

  19. Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) in human breast cancer: correlation of breast cancer cell aggressive phenotype with PBR expression, nuclear localization, and PBR-mediated cell proliferation and nuclear transport of cholesterol.

    PubMed

    Hardwick, M; Fertikh, D; Culty, M; Li, H; Vidic, B; Papadopoulos, V

    1999-02-15

    Aberrant cell proliferation and increased invasive and metastatic behavior are hallmarks of the advancement of breast cancer. Numerous studies implicate a role for cholesterol in the mechanisms underlying cell proliferation and cancer progression. The peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) is an Mr 18,000 protein primarily localized to the mitochondria. PBR mediates cholesterol transport across the mitochondrial membranes in steroidogenic cells. A role for PBR in the regulation of tumor cell proliferation has also been shown. In this study, we examined the expression, characteristics, localization, and function of PBR in a battery of human breast cancer cell lines differing in their invasive and chemotactic potential as well as in several human tissue biopsies. Expression of PBR ligand binding and mRNA was dramatically increased in the highly aggressive cell lines, such as MDA-231, relative to nonaggressive cell lines, such as MCF-7. PBR was also found to be expressed at high levels in aggressive metastatic human breast tumor biopsies compared with normal breast tissues. Subcellular localization with both antibodies and a fluorescent PBR drug ligand revealed that PBR from the MDA-231 cell line as well as from aggressive metastatic human breast tumor biopsies localized primarily in and around the nucleus. This localization is in direct contrast to the largely cytoplasmic localization seen in MCF-7 cells, normal breast tissue, and to the typical mitochondrial localization seen in mouse tumor Leydig cells. Pharmacological characterization of the receptor and partial nucleotide sequencing of PBR cDNA revealed that the MDA-231 PBR is similar, although not identical, to previously described PBR. Addition of high affinity PBR drug ligands to MDA-231 cells increased the incorporation of bromodeoxyuridine into the cells in a dose-dependent manner, suggesting a role for PBR in the regulation of MDA-231 cell proliferation. Cholesterol uptake into isolated MDA-231

  20. Comparison of (/sup 14/C)-deoxyglucose metabolism and peripheral benzodiazepine receptor binding in rat C6 glioma

    SciTech Connect

    Richfield, E.K.; Ciliax, B.J.; Starosta-Rubinstein, S.R.; McKeever, P.E.; Penney, J.B.; Young, A.B.

    1988-08-01

    A rat C6 glioma tumor model has demonstrated that C6 tumor cells express a high density of peripheral benzodiazepine (BDZ) receptors. We report a poor correlation between the density of peripheral BDZ receptors and tumor metabolism using (/sup 14/C)-deoxyglucose in this C6 glioma model. We also compared the abilities of in vivo and in vitro BDZ receptor binding and tumor metabolism to measure the tumor area. All imaging methods were capable of estimating both the gross and total tumor area and had similar specificities and sensitivities. Because of a high signal-to-noise ratio, in vivo peripheral BDZ receptor binding may be a useful method for determining tumor size in human tumors expressing the receptor using PET.

  1. Peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) new insight in cell proliferation and cell differentiation review.

    PubMed

    Corsi, Lorenzo; Geminiani, Elisa; Baraldi, Mario

    2008-01-01

    The peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR), is an 18 kDa protein of the mammalian mitochondrial membrane and is a highly conserved protein among the mammalian. PBR is involved in numerous biological functions, including steroid biosynthesis, mitochondrial oxidative phosporylation and cell proliferation. The presence of PBR at the nuclear subcellular level has been demonstrated in aggressive breast cancer cell line and human glioma cells, where it seems to be involved in cell proliferation. In our previous studies we investigated the presence of nuclear PBR in different hepatic tumour cell lines with regard to binding to [3H] PK 11,195 and protein analysis. The results obtained by saturation binding experiments and Scatchard analysis of nuclear PBR density in parallel with the results on the growth curves of the cell lines tested, indicate that the nuclear PBR density correlates inversely with cell doubling time. Moreover, the cell line with high nuclear PBR proliferates in response to PBR ligands, whereas that with low nuclear PBR does not. All these findings support the idea that PBR could play a pivotal role in cell proliferation and this receptor protein could be potentially important either in early diagnosis or chemopreventive strategies against degenerative disease.

  2. Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) gene amplification in MDA-MB-231 aggressive breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hardwick, Matthew; Cavalli, Luciane R; Barlow, Keith D; Haddad, Bassem R; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2002-11-01

    Recent studies using human breast cancer cell lines, animal models, and human tissue biopsies have suggested a close correlation between the expression of the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) and the progression of breast cancer. This study investigates the genetic status of the PBR gene in two human breast cancer cell lines: MDA-MB-231 cells, which are an aggressive breast cancer cell line that contains high levels of PBR, and MCF-7 cells, which are a nonaggressive cell line that contains low levels of PBR. Both DNA (Southern) blot and fluorescence in situ hybridization analyses indicate that the PBR gene is amplified in MDA-MB-231 relative to MCF-7 cells. These data suggest that PBR gene amplification may be an important indicator of breast cancer progression.

  3. Long-lasting effect of early handling on the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor.

    PubMed

    Weizman, R; Lehmann, J; Leschiner, S; Allmann, I; Stoehr, T; Heidbreder, C; Domeney, A; Feldon, J; Gavish, M

    1999-12-01

    The present study determined the impact of early handling (EH) in rats on behavioral response to environmental stress and on peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) binding characteristics (Bmax and Kd) in various organs. The behavioral consequences of EH in rats were expressed as increased exploratory activity in an open-field paradigm, when compared with nonhandled control rats. These findings are interpreted in terms of decreased emotionality. The biochemical consequences of EH, in both male and female rats, were expressed as the upregulation of PBR in the adrenal and kidney and the downregulation of gonadal (testis and ovary) PBR. It is possible that the long-lasting adrenal and renal changes in PBR expression in EH rats may enable better regulation of the hypothalamic-pituitary-adrenal axis, renin-angiotensin system, and autonomic nervous system responses to stress in adulthood. The significance of the EH-induced reduction in gonadal PBR for gonadal activity in adulthood is as yet unclear.

  4. Preservation of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors: differential effects of freezing on (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 and (3H)PK 11195 binding

    SciTech Connect

    Basile, A.S.; Ostrowski, N.L.; Skolnick, P.

    1987-04-01

    A statistically significant decrease in the density of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors was observed in renal membranes of rats beginning 2 weeks after adrenalectomy when compared with sham-operated controls. This decrease in peripheral benzodiazepine receptor density was manifest as a decrease in the Bmax of two ligands (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 and (/sup 3/H)PK 11195, without accompanying changes in their apparent affinity (Kd) for this site. Similar changes were not seen in another aldosterone-sensitive organ, the submandibular salivary gland. The decrease in peripheral benzodiazepine receptor density in observed in adrenalectomized rat renal membranes was restored to control levels after 1 week of aldosterone administration using a dose (12.5 micrograms/kg/day) that had no effect on peripheral benzodiazepine receptor density in sham-operated animals. In contrast, dexamethasone administration (50 micrograms/kg/day, 1 week) had no effect on renal peripheral benzodiazepine receptor density when administered to either adrenalectomized or sham-operated rats. Further, adrenal demedullation had no effect on renal peripheral benzodiazepine receptor density or affinity. The decrease in peripheral benzodiazepine receptor density was localized to the renal cortex and the outer stripe of the medulla by gross dissection of renal slices and renal tissue section autoradiography. The specific effect of adrenalectomy on renal peripheral benzodiazepine receptor density, the lack of direct effect of aldosterone on (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 binding, and the localization of the change in peripheral benzodiazepine receptor density to the renal cortex and outer stripe suggests that these changes may reflect an adaptation of the renal nephron (possibly the distal convoluted tubule, intermediate tubule and/or the collecting duct) to the loss of mineralocorticoid hormones.

  5. Tissue specific regulation of peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor density after chemical sympathectomy

    SciTech Connect

    Basile, A.S.; Skolnick, P.

    1988-01-01

    The characteristics of (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 binding to peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBR) in the central nervous system and peripheral tissues were examined after chemical sympathectomy with 6-hydroxydopamine (6-OHDA). One week after the intracisternal administration of 6-OHDA, the number of (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 binding sites (Bmax) in the hypothalamus and striatum increased 41 and 50% respectively, concurrent with significant reductions in catecholamine content. An increase (34%) in the Bmax of (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 to cardiac ventricle was observed one week after parenteral 6-OHDA administration. In contrast, the B/sub max/ of (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4684 to pineal gland decreased 48% after 6-OHDA induced reduction in norepinephrine content. The Bmax values for (/sup 3/H)Ro 5-4864 binding to other tissues (including lung, kidney, spleen, cerebral cortex, cerebellum, hippocampus and olfactory bulbs) were unaffected by 6-OHDA administration. The density of pineal, but not cardiac PBR was also reduced after reserpine treatment, an effect reversed by isoproterenol administration. These findings demonstrate that alterations in sympathetic input may regulate the density of PBR in both the central nervous system and periphery in a tissue specific fashion. 33 references, 4 tables.

  6. Micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography of benzodiazepines in human urine.

    PubMed

    Schafroth, M; Thormann, W; Allemann, D

    1994-01-01

    The determination of the major urinary compounds of eight common benzodiazepines, flunitrazepam, diazepam, midazolam, clonazepam, bromazepam, temazepam, oxazepam, and lorazepam, by micellar electrokinetic capillary chromatography (MECC) is shown to be a simple and attractive approach for confirmation testing of these drugs in human urine. After enzymatic hydrolysis and extraction using mixed-mode solid-phase cartridges and a two-step elution protocol, fractions were analyzed in a phosphate/borate buffer (pH 9.3) containing 75 mM sodium dodecyl sulfate and small amounts of isopropanol, methanol and/or acetonitrile using an instrument with on- column multi-wavelength detection. The presence of these compounds could unambiguously be confirmed in patient urines which tested positive for benzodiazepines using a commercial enzyme multiplied immunoassay screening technique (EMIT). The sensitivity of the MECC assay is demonstrated to be better than that of EMIT. MECC analysis of one patient urine which tested negatively employing EMIT revealed the presence of lorazepam, this demonstrating that false-negative results from the initial immunological screening process can be recognized using MECC. For one example, 7-aminoflunitrazepam, the MECC data are shown to agree well with those obtained by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry.

  7. Identification of des-(Gly-Ile)-endozepine as an effector of corticotropin-dependent adrenal steroidogenesis: stimulation of cholesterol delivery is mediated by the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor.

    PubMed Central

    Besman, M J; Yanagibashi, K; Lee, T D; Kawamura, M; Hall, P F; Shively, J E

    1989-01-01

    Delivery of cholesterol to inner mitochondrial membranes is rate-limiting for steroidogenesis in the zona fasciculata of adrenal cortex. A protein that stimulates this process was isolated to homogeneity from bovine adrenal tissue. This protein's primary structure has been determined in its entirety by a combination of automated Edman microsequencing, fast-atom bombardment mass spectrometry (FAB-MS). The sequence was identical to that previously reported for bovine brain endozepine, except that it lacks the last two residues, -Gly-Ile, at the C terminus. To our knowledge, isolation of an endozepine-related protein from a tissue other than brain has not been reported previously. Endozepine competes with benzodiazepines for saturable binding sites in synaptosomes and in mitochondria of specific peripheral tissues. Previous reports have localized the adrenal benzodiazepine receptor to the outer mitochondrial membrane. In this report, we show that the prototypic benzodiazepine, diazepam, effects a stimulation of adrenal mitochondrial cholesterol delivery similar to that observed for endozepine. The effective diazepam concentration was consistent with that previously shown to displace a high-affinity ligand of the mitochondrial benzodiazepine receptor. The action of diazepam in adrenal mitochondria suggests that the mediation of corticotropin-induced steroidogenesis may be the physiological function of the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor. These studies provide new insights into the previously unknown function of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors and should allow new investigations into the stimulation of steroidogenesis by endozepines and benzodiazepines in the brain and in certain peripheral tissues. PMID:2544879

  8. In vivo studies on the role of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) in steroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Papadopoulos, V; Widmaier, E P; Amri, H; Zilz, A; Li, H; Culty, M; Castello, R; Philip, G H; Sridaran, R; Drieu, K

    1998-01-01

    In various steroidogenic cell models, mitochondrial preparations and submitochondrial fractions, the expression of the mitochondrial 18 kDa peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) protein confers the ability to take up and release, upon ligand activation, cholesterol. Thus, cholesterol becomes available to P450scc on the inner mitochondrial membrane. These in vitro studies were validated by in vivo experiments. Treatment of rats with ginkgolide B (GKB), specifically reduced the ligand binding capacity, protein, and mRNA expression of the adrenocortical PBR and circulating glucocorticoid levels. Treatment with GKB also resulted in inhibition of PBR protein synthesis and corticosterone production by isolated adrenocortical cells in response to ACTH. The ontogeny of both PBR binding capacity and protein directly paralleled that of ACTH-inducible steroidogenesis in rat adrenal cells and in rats injected with ACTH. In addition, the previously described suppression of luteal progesterone synthesis in the pregnant rat by continuous in vivo administration of a gonadotropin-releasing hormone agonist may be due to decreased luteal PBR ligand binding and mRNA. These results suggest that (i) PBR is an absolute prerequisite for adrenocortical and luteal steroidogenesis, (ii) regulation of adrenal PBR expression may be used as a tool to control circulating glucocorticoid levels and (iii) the stress hypo-responsive period of neonatal rats may result from decreased adrenal cortical PBR expression.

  9. Evidence that variation in the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) gene influences susceptibility to panic disorder.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Kazuhiko; Yamada, Kazuo; Iwayama, Yoshimi; Toyota, Tomoko; Furukawa, Aizou; Takimoto, Takahiro; Terayama, Hayato; Iwahashi, Kazuhiko; Takei, Nori; Minabe, Yoshio; Sekine, Yoshimoto; Suzuki, Katsuaki; Iwata, Yasuhide; Pillai, Anitha; Nakamoto, Yurie; Ikeda, Kazutaka; Yoshii, Mitsunobu; Fukunishi, Isao; Yoshikawa, Takeo; Mori, Norio

    2006-04-01

    Panic disorder (PD) is the repeated sudden occurrence of panic attacks, episodes characterized by psychological symptoms. Peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) is closely associated with personality traits for anxiety tolerance, and that it holds promise as a biological marker of stressful conditions. We have performed association analyses using the polymorphism to determine the PBR in PD. We screened the subjects for sequence variations within the 5' region, the coding region (exons 2-4), and the 3' noncoding region. One novel missense variant in exon 4, derived from the nucleotide transition in codon 162 (CGT --> CAT:485G > A) resulting in an arginine-to-histidine (Arg --> His) change, was detected in these subjects. The 485G > polymorphism of the PBR gene was analyzed in 91 PD patients and 178 controls. The genotypic and allelic analyses of the 485G > A revealed significant differences between the panic patients and the comparison subjects (P = 0.021 and 0.014, respectively). The present study provides new and important evidence that variation in the PBR gene influences susceptibility to PD.

  10. Interactions of pyrethroid insecticides with GABA sub A and peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Devaud, L.L.

    1988-01-01

    Pyrethroid insecticides are potent proconvulsants in the rat. All pyrethroids evincing proconvulsant activity elicited a similar 25-30% maximal reduction of seizure threshold. The Type II pyrethroids were the most potent proconvulsants with 1R{alpha}S, cis cypermethrin having an ED{sub 50} value of 6.3 nmol/kg. The proconvulsant activity of both Type I and Type II pyrenthroids was blocked by pretreatment with PK 11195, the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PTBR) antagonist. In contrast, phenytoin did not antagonize the proconvulsant activity of either deltamethrin or permethrin. Pyrethroids displaced the specific binding of ({sup 3}H)Ro5-4864 to rat brain membranes with a significant correlation between the log EC{sub 50} values for their activities as proconvulsants and the log IC{sub 50} values for their inhibition of ({sup 3}H)Ro5-4864 binding. Both Ro5-4864 and pyrethroid insecticides were found to influence specific ({sup 35}S)TBPS binding in a GABA-dependent manner. PK 11195 and the Type II pyrethroid, deltamethrin antagonized the Ro5-4864-induced modulation of ({sup 35}S)TBPS binding. Pyrethroid insecticides, Ro5-4864 and veratridine influenced GABA-gated {sup 36}Chloride influx. Moreover, the Type II pyrethroids elicited an increase in {sup 36}chloride influx in the absence of GABA-stimulation. Both of these actions were antagonized by PK 11195 and tetrodotoxin.

  11. Selective pharmacological modulation of renal peripheral-type benzodiazepine binding by treatment with diuretic drugs

    SciTech Connect

    Lukeman, D.S.; Vaughn, D.A.; Fanestil, D.D.

    1988-01-01

    The authors have assessed the effects of in vivo administration of different classes of diuretic drugs on the expression of the peripheral-type benzodiazepine binding site (PBBS) in crude membranes derived from the cortex and outer medulla of rat kidney by saturation analysis with the PBBS-selective ligands (/sup 3/H)RO5-4864 and (/sup 3/H)PH 11195 in cortex and (/sup 3/H)RO5-4864 in outer medulla. Administration for 14-15 days of furosemide, a drug that blocks NaCl-KCl coupled transport in the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle, produced a significant doubling in the PBBS density (B/sub max/) in outer medulla, a region of the kidney rich in thick ascending limbs, and produced a lesser but significant increase in PBBS density in the cortex. Conversely, administration for 14-15 days of the carbonic anhydrase inhibitor acetazolamide, which acts predominantly in the proximal tubule, and hydrochlorothiazide, which acts predominantly in the early distal tubule, elicited statistically significant increases in PBBS density in renal cortex but not in renal outer medulla. Furthermore, all drug treatments were without effect on the equilibrium dissociation constants (K/sub d/s) of (/sup 3/H)RO5-4864 and (/sup 3/H)PK 11195 binding to cortical and outer medullary membrane preparations. These findings demonstrate that the PBBS can be selectively up-regulated in different regions of the kidney by diuretic drugs with different modes/sites of action. 50 references, 1 table.

  12. TLN-4601 peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR/TSPO) binding properties do not mediate apoptosis but confer tumor-specific accumulation.

    PubMed

    Bertomeu, T; Zvereff, V; Ibrahim, A; Zehntner, S P; Aliaga, A; Rosa-Neto, P; Bedell, B J; Falardeau, P; Gourdeau, H

    2010-11-15

    TLN-4601 is a farnesylated dibenzodiazepinone isolated from Micromonospora sp. with an antiproliferative effect on several human cancer cell lines. Although the mechanism of action of TLN-4601 is unknown, our earlier work indicated that TLN-4601 binds the PBR (peripheral benzodiazepine receptor; more recently known as the translocator protein or TSPO), an 18 kDa protein associated with the mitochondrial permeability transition (mPT) pore. While the exact function of the PBR remains a matter of debate, it has been implicated in heme and steroid synthesis, cellular growth and differentiation, oxygen consumption and apoptosis. Using the Jurkat immortalized T-lymphocyte cell line, documented to have negligible PBR expression, and Jurkat cells stably transfected with a human PBR cDNA, the present study demonstrates that TLN-4601 induces apoptosis independently of PBR expression. As PBRs are overexpressed in brain tumors compared to normal brain, we examined if TLN-4601 would preferentially accumulate in tumors using an intra-cerebral tumor model. Our results demonstrate the ability of TLN-4601 to effectively bind the PBR in vivo as determined by competitive binding assay and receptor occupancy. Analysis of TLN-4601 tissue and plasma indicated that TLN-4601 preferentially accumulates in the tumor. Indeed, drug levels were 200-fold higher in the tumor compared to the normal brain. TLN-4601 accumulation in the tumor (176 μg/g) was also significant compared to liver (24.8 μg/g; 7-fold) and plasma (16.2 μg/mL; 11-fold). Taken together our data indicate that while PBR binding does not mediate cell growth inhibition and apoptosis, PBR binding may allow for the specific accumulation of TLN-4601 in PBR positive tumors.

  13. Synthesis of new molecular probes for investigation of steroid biosynthesis induced by selective interaction with peripheral type benzodiazepine receptors (PBR).

    PubMed

    Campiani, Giuseppe; Ramunno, Anna; Fiorini, Isabella; Nacci, Vito; Morelli, Elena; Novellino, Ettore; Goegan, Mara; Mennini, Tiziana; Sullivan, Stephen; Zisterer, Daniela M; Williams, Clive D

    2002-09-12

    In the present study, we have synthesized and tested novel pyridopyrrolo- and pyrrolobenzoxazepine derivatives, as novel and selective peripheral type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) ligands, and their ability to modulate steroid biosynthesis has been investigated. A subset of new ligands bind the PBR (rat brain and testis) with picomolar affinity, representing the most potent ligands that have been identified to date, and elicited effects on endogenous rate of steroidogenesis in MA10 Leydig cells, having similar potency and effect as PK11195. Several compounds, differently substituted at C-7, were used as molecular yardsticks to probe the spatial dimension of the lipophilic pocket L4 in the receptor binding site.

  14. Increased expression of peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) in dimethylbenz[a]anthracene-induced mammary tumors in rats.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, Sutapa; Mukherjee, Shyamali; Das, Salil K

    2006-05-01

    Expression of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBR) has been found in every tissue examined; however, it is most abundant in steroid-producing tissues. Although the primary function of PBR is the regulation of steroidogenesis, its existence in nonsteroidogenic tissues as well as in other cellular compartments including the nucleus suggests that there may be other roles for PBR. Our laboratory reported earlier a significant increase of PBR density in the nucleus of DMBA-induced malignant submandibular glands of rats, suggesting a role of PBR in nuclear events of peripheral tissues. Since then numerous studies have demonstrated the abundance of PBR in tumors. Numerous studies implicate a role for cholesterol in the mechanisms underlying cell proliferation and cancer progression. Based on studies with a battery of human breast cancer cell lines and several human tissue biopsies, Hardwick et al. suggested that PBR expression, nuclear localization, and PBR-mediated cholesterol transport into the nucleus are involved in human breast cancer cell proliferation and aggressive phenotype expression. The purpose of the present study is to confirm this hypothesis by developing an animal breast cancer model and correlating the above events with the breast cancer. Weanling rats were maintained on a diet containing animal protein (casein) for 30 days and then a single dose of DMBA in sesame oil (80 mg/kg) was administered by gavage to the animals. Control animals received the vehicle only. After 122 days of DMBA administration, the animals were sacrificed. All tumors were detected by palpation. B(max) of PBRs was 52.6% and 128.4% higher in the non-aggressive and aggressive cancer tissues, respectively, than that in normal tissues. Cholesterol uptake into isolated nuclei was found to be higher in both non-aggressive and aggressive tumor breast tissue than that in control tissue. There was also corresponding increase in B(max) of PBRs in the nucleus of cancer tissues

  15. Peripheral benzodiazepine receptor/translocator protein global knock-out mice are viable with no effects on steroid hormone biosynthesis.

    PubMed

    Tu, Lan N; Morohaku, Kanako; Manna, Pulak R; Pelton, Susanne H; Butler, W Ronald; Stocco, Douglas M; Selvaraj, Vimal

    2014-10-01

    Translocator protein (TSPO), previously known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, is a mitochondrial outer membrane protein implicated as essential for cholesterol import to the inner mitochondrial membrane, the rate-limiting step in steroid hormone biosynthesis. Previous research on TSPO was based entirely on in vitro experiments, and its critical role was reinforced by an early report that claimed TSPO knock-out mice were embryonic lethal. In a previous publication, we examined Leydig cell-specific TSPO conditional knock-out mice that suggested TSPO was not required for testosterone production in vivo. This raised controversy and several questions regarding TSPO function. To examine the definitive role of TSPO in steroidogenesis and embryo development, we generated global TSPO null (Tspo(-/-)) mice. Contrary to the early report, Tspo(-/-) mice survived with no apparent phenotypic abnormalities and were fertile. Examination of adrenal and gonadal steroidogenesis showed no defects in Tspo(-/-) mice. Adrenal transcriptome comparison of gene expression profiles showed that genes involved in steroid hormone biosynthesis (Star, Cyp11a1, and Hsd3b1) were unchanged in Tspo(-/-) mice. Adrenocortical ultrastructure illustrated no morphological alterations in Tspo(-/-) mice. In an attempt to correlate our in vivo findings to previously used in vitro models, we also determined that siRNA knockdown or the absence of TSPO in different mouse and human steroidogenic cell lines had no effect on steroidogenesis. These findings directly refute the dogma that TSPO is indispensable for steroid hormone biosynthesis and viability. By amending the current model, this study advances our understanding of steroidogenesis with broad implications in biology and medicine.

  16. Gender differences in brain peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) expression and seizures produced by heptachlor during development.

    PubMed

    Garcia, Eric F; Woolley, Dorothy E

    2008-01-01

    Heptachlor has been widely used as an insecticide. It is a GABA-A antagonist and causes seizures. It also increases peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBRs) in brain. PBRs are found on the outer mitochondrial membrane in glia, rather than in neurons, and are necessary for steroidogenesis in brain. We compared the effects of acute oral administration of heptachlor (60 mg/ml oil/kg body wt) at 10 ages from postnatal day (PND) 0 to 60 on brain PBR expression and seizure severity in both male and female rats at 1 and 2 hr after administration. From PND 10 through 60, brain PBR expression was increased about 175-225% of controls at both 1 and 2 hr after heptachlor in females. In males however, PBRs were only increased at 30-60 days at 1 hr but not at any age at 2 hr. At 2 hr after heptachlor at 30-60 days in males, PBRs were significantly lower than at 1 hr and even tended to be lower than control levels. By contrast, seizure intensity was greater in males than in females from 10 through 20 days of age at 1 hr and was even greater at 2 hr from 16 through 30 days of age, reflecting the lower PBR levels at 2 hr than at 1 hr in males. Thus, the gender difference in PBR expression was the opposite of the gender difference in seizure intensity. PBRs in brain synthesize several neurosteroids, including allopregnanolone, which is a potent anticonvulsant agent. We hypothesize that the gender differences in seizure intensity after heptachlor were due to the action of heptachlor in greatly increasing PBR expression in females but not in males. Thus the greater expression of PBRs in females would result in more synthesis of allopregnanolone than in males. Therefore, because of allopregnanolone's anticonvulsant effects, seizure intensity was less in females than in males. By comparison, maximal electroshock (MES) caused seizures and increased PBRs in brain in both male and female developing rats with no gender differences at 10-20 days of age.

  17. Regulation of the mitochondrial permeability transition pore by the outer membrane does not involve the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (Translocator Protein of 18 kDa (TSPO)).

    PubMed

    Šileikytė, Justina; Blachly-Dyson, Elizabeth; Sewell, Randall; Carpi, Andrea; Menabò, Roberta; Di Lisa, Fabio; Ricchelli, Fernanda; Bernardi, Paolo; Forte, Michael

    2014-05-16

    Translocator protein of 18 kDa (TSPO) is a highly conserved, ubiquitous protein localized in the outer mitochondrial membrane, where it is thought to play a key role in the mitochondrial transport of cholesterol, a key step in the generation of steroid hormones. However, it was first characterized as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor because it appears to be responsible for high affinity binding of a number of benzodiazepines to non-neuronal tissues. Ensuing studies have employed natural and synthetic ligands to assess the role of TSPO function in a number of natural and pathological circumstances. Largely through the use of these compounds and biochemical associations, TSPO has been proposed to play a role in the mitochondrial permeability transition pore (PTP), which has been associated with cell death in many human pathological conditions. Here, we critically assess the role of TSPO in the function of the PTP through the generation of mice in which the Tspo gene has been conditionally eliminated. Our results show that 1) TSPO plays no role in the regulation or structure of the PTP, 2) endogenous and synthetic ligands of TSPO do not regulate PTP activity through TSPO, 3) outer mitochondrial membrane regulation of PTP activity occurs though a mechanism that does not require TSPO, and 4) hearts lacking TSPO are as sensitive to ischemia-reperfusion injury as hearts from control mice. These results call into question a wide variety of studies implicating TSPO in a number of pathological processes through its actions on the PTP.

  18. Downregulation of (3H)Ro5-4864 binding sites after exposure to peripheral-type benzodiazepines in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, M.D.; Wang, J.K.; Morgan, J.I.; Spector, S.

    1986-09-01

    Peripheral-type benzodiazepine (BZD) binding sites undergo a rapid and pronounced downregulation after exposure to these compounds in vitro. Friend erythroleukemia cells were incubated with micromolar concentrations of BZD after which they were washed thoroughly and the binding of the specific peripheral-type BZD radioligand (/sup 3/H)Ro5-4864 was determined. Exposure to the peripheral-type BZD Ro7-3351 decreased the number of (/sup 3/H)Ro5-4864 binding sites from 324 to 41 fmol/10(6) cells with no change in affinity. Downregulation appears to require active cellular processes because it is blocked when exposure to BZD is at 4/sup 0/C rather than at 37/sup 0/C. Furthermore, whereas (/sup 3/H)Ro5-4864 binding is decreased substantially in membrane preparations made from downregulated cells, it is not altered when membrane preparations from control cells are exposed to BZD. The time course of downregulation is quite rapid, as it occurs within minutes. In contrast, the return of sites requires days and there is a close relationship between return of sites and growth of new cells. The ability of BZDs to downregulate correlates more closely with affinity for the peripheral-type site than with biological activity. The ability to undergo downregulation is characteristic of receptors and its occurrence suggests that peripheral-type BZD binding sites are functional receptors.

  19. The effects of prostaglandin F2alpha treatment on peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors in the ovary and uterus during pseudopregnancy of rats.

    PubMed

    Bar-Ami, Shalom; Bendel, Nachum; Leschiner, Svetlana; Levin, Evgeny; Veenman, Leo; Gavish, Moshe

    2006-02-14

    A previous study by us indicated that peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) density may be increased in the ovaries and uterus of pregnant rats (Weizman R, Dagan E, Snyder SH, Gavish M. Impact of pregnancy and lactation on GABAA receptor and central-type and peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors. Brain Res 1997;752:7-14). In the present study, the effects of prostaglandin F2alpha (PGF2alpha) on PBR density in the ovary and uterus of pseudopregnant rats were assayed. Pseudopregnancy was induced on day 29 post-partum (PP) by s.c. injection of 50IU pregnant mare serum gonadotropin (PMSG) and 3 days later by s.c. injection of 20IU human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG). PBR ligand binding density was assayed with the specific PBR ligand [3H]PK 11195. A two-fold increase in ovarian PBR density was observed 2 days after hCG administration compared with vehicle control rats and this effect was maintained for 3 weeks. In the uterus, a three-fold increase in PBR density was observed and this increase was maintained for 1 week after hCG administration. Pseudopregnancy did not appear to affect renal PBR density or affinity. Treatment with PGF2alpha, which causes luteolysis, resulted in an approximately 50% reduction of PBR density in the ovaries of pseudopregnant rats at day 53 PP compared to pseudopregnant control rats. Treatment with indomethacin, which prevents the formation of PGF2alpha, caused the PBR density in the uterus of pseudopregnant rats at day 53 PP to be twice as high as in pseudopregnant control rats. All the above treatments did not affect the affinity of [3H]PK 11195 to ovarian and uterine PBR. These data suggest that PBR density in corpora lutea and uterus during pseudopregnancy is regulated by PGF2alpha.

  20. Peripheral benzodiazepine receptor regulates vascular endothelial activations via suppression of the voltage-dependent anion channel-1.

    PubMed

    Joo, Hee Kyoung; Lee, Yu Ran; Lim, Sun Young; Lee, Eun Ji; Choi, Sunga; Cho, Eun Jung; Park, Myoung Soo; Ryoo, Sungwoo; Park, Jin Bong; Jeon, Byeong Hwa

    2012-05-01

    Peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) is a multifunctional protein mainly found on the outer mitochondrial membrane. PBR expression is increased by tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in endothelial cells. Adenoviral overexpression of PBR inhibits monocyte adhesion, VCAM-1, and ICAM-1 expression in TNF-α-activated endothelial cells. Rotenone, cyclosporine A, and bongkrekic acid suppress TNF-α-induced VCAM-1 expression. Overexpression of PBR inhibits voltage-dependent anion channel-1 (VDAC-1) expression and the silencing of PBR increases VDAC-1 expression in endothelial cells. Moreover, TNF-α-induced VCAM-1 expression is suppressed by VDAC-1 gene silencing. PBR overexpression significantly decreases TNF-α-induced mitochondrial reactive oxygen species and MnSOD expression. These results suggest that PBR can inhibit endothelial activation and this action is related to the inhibition of mitochondrial ROS and/or VDAC-1 expression in endothelial cells.

  1. Early ontogeny of the central benzodiazepine receptor in human embryos and fetuses

    SciTech Connect

    Hebebrand, J.; Hofmann, D.; Reichelt, R.; Schnarr, S.; Knapp, M.; Propping, P.; Foedisch, H.J.

    1988-01-01

    The early ontogeny of the central benzodiazepine receptor (BZR) was investigated in human embryos and fetuses between 7 and 26 weeks of gestation. Brain tissue was gained from terminated pregnancies or spontaneous abortions. Binding studies, which were performed with /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam (FNZ), revealed that specific benzodiazepine binding is already detectable at an embryonal age of 7 weeks post conception. Binding at this early stage can be displaced potently by clonazepam and the inverse agonist ..beta..-CCE. Additionally, /sup 3/H-FNZ binding is enhanced by GABA. Thus, benzodiazepine binding is of the central type. Receptor density increases steeply in whole brain between weeks 8 and 11 of gestation. In frontal cortex receptor density increases gradually between weeks 12 and 26 of gestation. No specific fetal disease entity (including trisomy 21) was consistently associated with exceptionally high or low B/sub max/-values.

  2. The radiosynthesis of [18F]PK 14105 as an alternative radioligand for peripheral type benzodiazepine binding sites.

    PubMed

    Pascali, C; Luthra, S K; Pike, V W; Price, G W; Ahier, R G; Hume, S P; Myers, R; Manjil, L; Cremer, J E

    1990-01-01

    A method has been developed for labelling PK 14105 [N-methyl-N-(1-methyl-propyl)-1(2-fluoro-5-nitrophenyl)isoquinoline-3- carboxamide], a ligand that has high affinity and selectivity for peripheral type benzodiazepine binding sites (PBBS), with NCA fluorine-18 (t1/2 = 109.8 min, beta + = 96.9%). The method involves treating the 2-chloro-analogue with cyclotron-produced NCA [18F]fluoride in dimethyl sulphoxide, with rubidium carbonate as base, at 140 degrees C for 20 min. Purification is achieved by separation on a reverse phase Sep-Pak followed by PHLC on a silica gel column, to give chemically and radiochemically pure product with a specific activity of ca 7.4 GBq/mumol (200 mCi/mumol), decay-corrected to the end of radionuclide production (EOB). The radiosynthesis requires 210 min. giving a radiochemical yield of 10-20%, decay-corrected to EOB. [18F]PK 14105 was found to bind avidly to sites associated with kainic acid-induced unilateral lesions of rat striata. Such binding was blocked by pre-dosing the rat with PK 11195, so providing evidence for specific binding to PBBS. These results suggest that [18F]PK 14105 has potential for studying phenomena associated with PBBS in man by PET. PMID:2166014

  3. Single-step High-yield Radiosynthesis and Evaluation of a Sensitive 18F-Labeled Ligand for Imaging Brain Peripheral Benzodiazepine Receptors with PET

    PubMed Central

    Briard, Emmanuelle; Zoghbi, Sami S.; Siméon, Fabrice G.; Imaizumi, Masao; Gourley, Jonathan P.; Shetty, H. Umesha; Lu, Shuiyu; Fujita, Masahiro; Innis, Robert B.; Pike, Victor W.

    2009-01-01

    Elevated levels of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBR) are associated with activated microglia in their response to inflammation. Hence, PBR imaging in vivo is valuable for investigating brain inflammatory conditions. Sensitive, easily prepared and readily available radioligands for imaging with positron emission tomography (PET) are desirable for this purpose. We describe a new 18F-labeled PBR radioligand, namely [18F]N-fluoroacetyl-N-(2,5-dimethoxybenzyl)-2-phenoxyaniline ([18F]9). [18F]9 was produced easily through a single and highly efficient step, the reaction of [18F]fluoride ion with the corresponding bromo precursor, 8. Ligand 9 exhibited high affinity for PBR in vitro. PET showed that [18F]9 was avidly taken into monkey brain and gave a high ratio of PBR-specific to nonspecific binding. [18F]9 was devoid of defluorination in rat and monkey and gave predominantly polar radiometabolite(s). In rat, a low level radiometabolite of intermediate lipophilicity was identified as [18F]2-fluoro-N-(2-phenoxyphenyl)acetamide ([18F]11). [18F]9 is a promising radioligand for future imaging of PBR in living human brain. PMID:19119848

  4. Nuclear location-dependent role of peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) in hepatic tumoral cell lines proliferation.

    PubMed

    Corsi, L; Geminiani, E; Avallone, R; Baraldi, M

    2005-04-15

    PBR is involved in numerous biological functions, including steroid biosynthesis, mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation and cell proliferation. The presence of PBR at the perinuclear/nuclear subcellular level has been demonstrated in aggressive breast cancer cell lines and human glioma cells where it seems to be involved in cell proliferation. In our study we investigated the presence of perinuclear/nuclear PBR in different hepatic tumor cell lines with regard to binding to [3H] PK 11195 and protein analysis. The results obtained by saturation binding experiments and scatchard analysis of perinuclear/nuclear PBR density in parallel with the results on the growth curves of the cell lines tested, indicate that the perinuclear/nuclear PBR density correlates inversely with cell doubling time. Moreover, the cell line with high perinuclear/nuclear PBR proliferated in response to PBR ligand, whereas that with low perinuclear/nuclear PBR did not. Our results reinforce the idea that the subcellular localisation of PBR defines its function and that this receptor could be a possible target for new strategies against cancer.

  5. Biodistribution and dosimetry of [123I]iodo-PK 11195: a potential agent for SPET imaging of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor.

    PubMed

    Versijpt, J; Dumont, F; Thierens, H; Jansen, H; De Vos, F; Slegers, G; Santens, P; Dierckx, R A; Korf, J

    2000-09-01

    The highest concentrations of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) are found in the kidneys and heart. In addition, the PBR has been reported to reflect neuro-inflammatory damage by co-localisation with activated microglia. PK 11195 is a high-affinity ligand for the PBR. The aim of this study was to investigate in humans the biodistribution and dosimetry of [123I]iodoPK 11195, a potential single-photon emission tomography tracer for the PBR. Five healthy volunteers were injected with 112 MBq of [123I]iodo-PK 11195. Sequential whole-body scans were performed up to 72 h post injection. Multiple blood samples were taken, and urine was collected to measure the fraction voided by the renal system. Decay-corrected regions of interest of the whole-body images were analysed, and geometric mean count rates were used to determine organ activity. Organ absorbed doses and effective dose were calculated using the MIRD method. [123I]iodo-PK 11195 was rapidly cleared from the blood, mainly by the hepatobiliary system. Approximately 22% was voided in urine after 48 h. Average organ residence times were 0.74, 0.44 and 0.29 h for the liver, upper large intestine and lower large intestine, respectively. The testes received the highest dose, 109.4 microGy/MBq. All other organs investigated received doses of less than 50 microGy/MBq. The effective dose was 40.3 microSv/MBq. In conclusion, [123I]iodo-PK 11195 is a suitable agent for the visualisation of the PBR and indirectly for the imaging of neuro-inflammatory lesions. Taking into account the radiation burden of 7.46 mSv following an administration of 185 MBq, a [123I]iodo-PK 11195 investigation has to be considered an ICRP risk category IIb investigation. PMID:11007514

  6. Peripheral Benzodiazepine Receptor/Translocator Protein Global Knock-out Mice Are Viable with No Effects on Steroid Hormone Biosynthesis*♦

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Lan N.; Morohaku, Kanako; Manna, Pulak R.; Pelton, Susanne H.; Butler, W. Ronald; Stocco, Douglas M.; Selvaraj, Vimal

    2014-01-01

    Translocator protein (TSPO), previously known as the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor, is a mitochondrial outer membrane protein implicated as essential for cholesterol import to the inner mitochondrial membrane, the rate-limiting step in steroid hormone biosynthesis. Previous research on TSPO was based entirely on in vitro experiments, and its critical role was reinforced by an early report that claimed TSPO knock-out mice were embryonic lethal. In a previous publication, we examined Leydig cell-specific TSPO conditional knock-out mice that suggested TSPO was not required for testosterone production in vivo. This raised controversy and several questions regarding TSPO function. To examine the definitive role of TSPO in steroidogenesis and embryo development, we generated global TSPO null (Tspo−/−) mice. Contrary to the early report, Tspo−/− mice survived with no apparent phenotypic abnormalities and were fertile. Examination of adrenal and gonadal steroidogenesis showed no defects in Tspo−/− mice. Adrenal transcriptome comparison of gene expression profiles showed that genes involved in steroid hormone biosynthesis (Star, Cyp11a1, and Hsd3b1) were unchanged in Tspo−/− mice. Adrenocortical ultrastructure illustrated no morphological alterations in Tspo−/− mice. In an attempt to correlate our in vivo findings to previously used in vitro models, we also determined that siRNA knockdown or the absence of TSPO in different mouse and human steroidogenic cell lines had no effect on steroidogenesis. These findings directly refute the dogma that TSPO is indispensable for steroid hormone biosynthesis and viability. By amending the current model, this study advances our understanding of steroidogenesis with broad implications in biology and medicine. PMID:24936060

  7. Stimulus-sensitive myoclonus of the baboon Papio papio: pharmacological studies reveal interactions between benzodiazepines and the central cholinergic system.

    PubMed

    Rektor, I; Bryere, P; Silva-Barrat, C; Menini, C

    1986-01-01

    The baboon Papio papio develops a nonepileptic myoclonus 20 to 30 min after i.m. benzodiazepine injection. It is characterized by bilateral jerks involving mainly the neck and the trunk, by the absence of any correlative EEG paroxysmal discharge, and by its facilitation during movement or agitation. This myoclonus resembles the intention myoclonus of human patients as seen, for example, after anoxia. We found in experiments on 10 adolescent baboons that atropine alone induced the myoclonus for several hours, that physostigmine completely antagonized the benzodiazepine-induced as well as the atropine-induced myoclonus, and that the peripherally acting cholinergic antagonist, methyl-QNB, and agonist prostigmine had no action on the myoclonus, suggesting that the benzodiazepine-induced myoclonus in this species depends on a strong depression of the central cholinergic system by benzodiazepine. The benzodiazepine-induced myoclonus was mediated by benzodiazepine receptors as it was blocked by the specific benzodiazepine receptor antagonist, Ro 15-1788, which did not block atropine-induced myoclonus; latency to myoclonus after benzodiazepine was longer than after atropine. These facts suggest that benzodiazepines, by an as yet unknown mechanism, induce a depression of the cholinergic system which in turn leads to the development of myoclonus. Finally, the benzodiazepine-induced myoclonus of the baboon can be considered as a good model for testing drugs that act on the muscarinic cholinergic system and also for testing benzodiazepine-acetylcholine interactions.

  8. A Case of Stiff Person Syndrome: Immunomodulatory Effect of Benzodiazepines

    PubMed Central

    Zdziarski, Przemyslaw

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Stiff person syndrome (SPS) is a rare autoimmune disease. Most patients have high-titer antibodies against glutamate decarboxylase (GADAb), which is without practical value in disease monitoring. Benzodiazepines are the first line drugs, but long-term use is not well characterized. This report demonstrates ineffective benzodiazepine therapy of SPS that prompts tachyphylaxis, loss of responsiveness, and finally benzodiazepine withdrawal syndrome. Convulsion and anxiety correlate with high level of creatine phosphokinase (CK). Although tonus and spasm attacks were successfully controlled by tizanidine, glutamate release inhibitor, the immune response, and autoimmune diabetes development require the plasmapheresis, mycophenolat mofetil, and rituximab therapy that results in a significant decrease of GADAb, impaired glucose tolerance (IGT), lactate dehydrogenase (LDH), and CK normalization. Unfortunately, reintroduction of benzodiazepine was a source of rapid and high increase of CK, LDH, GADAb titer (up to 1:15,000), IGT, and SPS relapse. Contrary to previous publications, we observed IGT that correlated with high anti-GAD level, but without high immunogenetic susceptibility to haplotype human leukocyte antigens-DR3, DQw2. This preliminary observation and the last finding of immunomodulatory properties of peripheral benzodiazepine receptor suggest that increased antigenic stimulation during benzodiazepine therapy and glutamatergic hyperactivity could account for convulsions observed in SPS. Benzodiazepine withdrawal prompted alternative muscle relaxant therapy (tizanidine). Muscular and brain abnormalities observed in SPS indicate that noncardiac CK level may be a useful tool in SPS therapy monitoring. PMID:26061327

  9. Imaging brain inflammation with [(11)C]PK11195 by PET and induction of the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor after transient focal ischemia in rats.

    PubMed

    Rojas, Santiago; Martín, Abraham; Arranz, Maria J; Pareto, Deborah; Purroy, Jesús; Verdaguer, Esther; Llop, Jordi; Gómez, Vanessa; Gispert, Joan D; Millán, Olga; Chamorro, Angel; Planas, Anna M

    2007-12-01

    [(11)C]PK11195 is used in positron emission tomography (PET) studies for imaging brain inflammation in vivo as it binds to the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) expressed by reactive glia and macrophages. However, features of the cellular reaction required to induce a positive [(11)C]PK11195 signal are not well characterized. We performed [(11)C]PK11195 PET and autoradiography in rats after transient focal cerebral ischemia. We determined [(3)H]PK11195 binding and PBR expression in brain tissue and examined the lesion with several markers. [(11)C]PK11195 standard uptake value increased at day 4 and grew further at day 7 within the ischemic core. Accordingly, ex vivo [(3)H]PK11195 binding increased at day 4, and increases further at day 7. The PET signal also augmented in peripheral regions, but to a lesser extent than in the core. Binding in the region surrounding infarction was supported by [(11)C]PK11195 autoradiography at day 7 showing that the radioactive signal extended beyond the infarcted core. Enhanced binding was preceded by increases in PBR mRNA expression in the ipsilateral hemisphere, and a 18-kDa band corresponding to PBR protein was detected. Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor immunohistochemistry showed subsets of ameboid microglia/macrophages within the infarcted core showing a distinctive strong PBR expression from day 4. These cells were often located surrounding microhemorrhages. Reactive astrocytes forming a rim surrounding infarction at day 7 also showed some PBR immunostaining. These results show cellular heterogeneity in the level of PBR expression, supporting that PBR is not a simple marker of inflammation, and that the extent of [(11)C]PK11195 binding depends on intrinsic features of the inflammatory cells.

  10. [18F]FMDAA1106 and [18F]FEDAA1106: two positron-emitter labeled ligands for peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR).

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ming Rong; Maeda, Jun; Furutsuka, Kenji; Yoshida, Yuichiro; Ogawa, Masanao; Suhara, Tetsuya; Suzuki, Kazutoshi

    2003-01-20

    We synthesized and evaluated N-(5-fluoro-2-phenoxyphenyl)-N-(2-[(18)F]fluoromethyl-5-methoxybenzyl)acetamide ([(18)F]-FMDAA1106) and N-(5-fluoro-2-phenoxyphenyl)-N-(2-[(18)F]fluoroethyl-5-methoxybenzyl)acetamide ([(18)F]FEDAA1106) as two potent radioligands for peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBR). [(18)F]FMDAA1106 and [(18)F]FEDAA1106 were respectively synthesized by fluoroalkylation of the desmethyl precursor DAA1123 with [(18)F]FCH(2)I and [(18)F]FCH(2)CH(2)Br. Ex vivo autoradiograms of [(18)F]FMDAA1106 and [(18)F]FEDAA1106 binding sites in the rat brains revealed that a high radioactivity was present in the olfactory bulb, the highest PBR density region in the brain.

  11. Regulation of the expression of peripheral benzodiazepine receptors and their endogenous ligands during rat sciatic nerve degeneration and regeneration: a role for PBR in neurosteroidogenesis.

    PubMed

    Lacor, P; Gandolfo, P; Tonon, M C; Brault, E; Dalibert, I; Schumacher, M; Benavides, J; Ferzaz, B

    1999-01-01

    Peripheral benzodiazepine receptors (PBR) and their endogenous ligands, the diazepam-binding inhibitor derived-peptides, are present in Schwann cells in the peripheral nervous system. The aim of this study was to determine the influence of reversible (freeze-injury) and permanent (transection and ligature) nerve lesion on PBR density and on the levels of their endogenous ligands, by autoradiography (using [3H]PK11195) and radioimmunoassay (using antisera directed against the octadecaneuropeptide (ODN), a diazepam-binding inhibitor fragment). The potential role of PBR on peripheral nerve steroidogenesis, was studied by investigating the effect of specific PBR agonists and antagonists on pregnenolone levels in the sciatic nerve. Sixteen to 30 days after nerve lesion, PBR density and ODN-LI level were highly increased. Their expression returned to normal level when regeneration was completed 60 days after freeze-injury, but remained elevated when regeneration did not occur in transected distal stumps. Reverse-phase HPLC analysis of ODN-LI showed that in control nerve extracts, the major immunoreactive peak co-elutes with triakontatetraneuropeptide (TTN). After freeze-injury, intermediate molecular forms eluting between ODN and TTN were predominant and remained elevated at day 60. The greater accumulation of intermediate forms when regeneration is allowed to occur may indicate a particular role of these forms in axonal elongation and myelination. Ro5-4864, a high affinity PBR agonist increased pregnenolone concentration in the sciatic nerve. This effect was antagonised by PK11195, a high affinity PBR antagonist, which had no effect on pregnenolone basal level, indicating a specific action of PBR in neurosteroid production. These results suggest a role for PBR and their endogenous ligands in peripheral nerve regeneration. A trophic effect could be exerted via stimulation of steroid synthesis.

  12. Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) and PBR drug ligands in fibroblast and fibrosarcoma cell proliferation: role of ERK, c-Jun and ligand-activated PBR-independent pathways.

    PubMed

    Kletsas, Dimitris; Li, Wenping; Han, Zeqiu; Papadopoulos, Vassilios

    2004-05-15

    Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) is a 18-kDa high-affinity drug and cholesterol binding protein, that has been implicated in several physiological processes, such as cholesterol transport and mitochondrial respiration. Specific PBR ligands regulate cell proliferation, although their action is controversial and probably cell-type specific. The aim of the present study was to examine the expression of PBR in cells of mesenchymal origin, i.e. human fibroblasts and fibrosarcoma cells, as well as its role in the regulation of their proliferation. Both mesenchymal cell types express high levels of PBR, localized exclusively in mitochondria. PBR-specific drug ligands, the isoquinoline carboxamide PK 11195 and the benzodiazepine Ro5-4864, at relative high concentrations (10(-4)M), exert a strong inhibitory effect on cell proliferation by arresting the cells at the G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle, while no apoptotic cell death was observed. In normal fibroblasts, this inhibition was correlated with a decrease in the activation of the cell cycle markers ERK and c-Jun. PBR knockdown by RNA inhibition did not affect the proliferation of either cell type and did not influence the inhibitory effect of PK 11195 and Ro5-4864 on cell growth. These data suggest that in fibroblasts and fibrosarcoma cells PBR drug ligands inhibit cell proliferation in a PBR-independent manner. These results are in contrast to data reported on cells of epithelial origin, suggesting that the origin of the cells is crucial in defining the role of PBR in their proliferation, and raise caution in the commonly made assumption that PBR mediates cell functions affected by PBR drug ligands.

  13. Enhanced expression of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) and its endogenous ligand octadecaneuropeptide (ODN) in the regenerating adult rat sciatic nerve.

    PubMed

    Lacor, P; Benavides, J; Ferzaz, B

    1996-12-01

    In this study we have investigated the expression of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) and its endogenous ligand octadecaneuropeptide (ODN) in the sciatic nerve of the adult rat by immunohistochemistry. We have also determined the effect of nerve freezing lesion or chronic denervation on PBR and ODN expression. In the sciatic nerve of control rats PBR- and ODN-immunoreactivities (IR) were associated to Schwann cells. Ten days after nerve injury, PBR- and ODN-IR increased significantly in the distal stump. PBR-IR was associated to Schwann cells and macrophages, whereas ODN-IR was only detected in Schwann cells. Immunoreactivities returned to normal levels when axons were allowed to regenerate for 2 months after nerve freezing-injury. Under chronic denervation conditions, PBR- and ODN-IR remained elevated in the distal stump, at least for this period of time. These results suggest that PBR and ODN are regulated by signals from regenerating axons and that PBR and its endogenous ligand may play a role in peripheral nerve regeneration.

  14. PK 11195 attenuates kainic acid-induced seizures and alterations in peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) protein components in the rat brain.

    PubMed

    Veenman, L; Leschiner, S; Spanier, I; Weisinger, G; Weizman, A; Gavish, M

    2002-03-01

    Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptors (PBR) are located in glial cells in the brain and in peripheral tissues. Mitochondria form the primary location for PBR. Functional PBR appear to require at least three components: an isoquinoline binding protein, a voltage-dependent anion channel, and an adenine nucleotide carrier. In the present study, rats received intraperitoneal kainic acid injections, which are known to cause seizures, neurodegeneration, hyperactivity, gliosis, and a fivefold increase in PBR ligand binding density in the hippocampus. In the forebrain of control rats, hippocampal voltage-dependent anion channel and adenine nucleotide carrier abundance was relatively low, while isoquinoline binding protein abundance did not differ between hippocampus and the rest of the forebrain. One week after kainic acid injection, isoquinoline binding protein abundance was increased more than 20-fold in the hippocampal mitochondrial fraction. No significant changes were detected regarding hippocampal voltage-dependent anion channel and adenine nucleotide carrier abundance. Pre-treatment with the isoquinoline PK11195, a specific PBR ligand, attenuated the occurrence of seizures, hyperactivity, and increases in isoquinoline binding protein levels in the hippocampus, which usually follow kainic acid application. These data suggest that isoquinoline binding protein may be involved in these effects of kainic acid injections.

  15. Administration of the inverse benzodiazepine agonist MRK-016 rescues acquisition and memory consolidation following peripheral administration of bacterial endotoxin.

    PubMed

    Eimerbrink, M J; White, J D; Pendry, R J; Hodges, S L; Sadler, L N; Wiles, J D; Weintraub, M K; Chumley, M J; Boehm, G W

    2015-07-15

    Recent evidence suggests that inflammation-induced decrements in cognitive function can be mitigated via manipulation of excitatory or inhibitory transmission. We tested the ability of the inverse benzodiazepine agonist, MRK-016 (MRK) to protect against LPS-induced deficits in memory acquisition and consolidation, using a contextual fear conditioning (CFC) paradigm. In Experiment One, mice received lipopolysaccharide (LPS) and/or MRK injections prior to CFC training, and were then tested 24h after training. In Experiment Two, animals received similar treatment injections immediately after training, and were tested 24h later. Additionally, hippocampal samples were collected 4h after LPS injections and immediately after testing, to evaluate brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) and insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1) mRNA expression. Results indicate that MRK can protect against LPS-induced learning/memory decrements in both paradigms. We also found, in both paradigms, that animals treated with LPS/Saline expressed significantly less BDNF mRNA when compared to Saline/Saline-treated animals 4h after LPS administration, but that MRK did not restore BDNF expression levels. Further, treatment administrations had no effect on IGF-1 mRNA expression at any collection time-point. In summary, MRK-016 can protect against LPS-induced deficits in memory acquisition and consolidation, in this hippocampus-dependent paradigm, though this protection occurs independently of recovery of BDNF expression. PMID:25823763

  16. Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor binding 4{prime}-IODO-PK11195: A new radioiodinated ligand for detecting lesioned brain areas

    SciTech Connect

    Saji, H.; Iida, Y.; Nakatsuka, I.

    1995-05-01

    An increase in the peripheral-type benzodiazepine binding sites (PBBS) has recently been reported in excitotoxic and ischaemic lesions in the brain. Thus, PBBS visualization has been of greater interest due to the possibility of imaging the lesioned area as positive image. In this study, our interest is focussed in the development of a radioiodinated compound for the SPECT study of PBBS function. Taking account of the environment of binding sites and the stability in vivo, we selected the 4{prime}position of C-1 phenyl moiety of the isoqunoline derivative PK11195 as the best exploitable site for the iodination. The no-carrier-added I-125 labeled 4{prime}-iodo-PK11195 (IPK) was synthesized by the bromine-iodine exchange reaction in 60% radiochemical yield and > 98% radiochemical purity. In vitro competitive binding studies with H-3-PI11195 using rat kidney membranes shows that IPK has high affinity for PBBS as much as PK11195. The in vivo biodistribution in mice showed high uptake of I-125-IPK in the kidney, lung, heart and adrenal, organs reported as containing high PBBS, which were reduced by the treatment with cold PK11195. Furthermore, autoradiographic studies in transient middle cerebral arteries occlusion in rats showed high accumulation of I-125-IPK in lesioned sites, in contrast to the decease of radioactivity of Tc-99m-HM-PAO. Gathered data indicated that the newly designed IPK holds to great potential for detecting the lesioned brain areas as positive image.

  17. Modulation of constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR) by 6-arylpyrrolo[2,1-d][1,5]benzothiazepine derivatives, ligands of peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR).

    PubMed

    Anderson, Linnea E; Dring, Ann M; Hamel, Laura D; Stoner, Matthew A

    2011-04-25

    Constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and pregnane X receptor (PXR) regulate xenobiotic sensing and metabolism through interactions with multiple exogenous and endogenous chemicals. Compounds that activate CAR are often ligands of PXR; attention is therefore given to discovery of new, receptor-specific chemical entities that may be exploited for therapeutic and basic research purposes. Recently, ligands of the peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR), PK11195 and FGIN-1-27, were shown to modulate both CAR and PXR. PBR is a mitochondrial transport protein responsible for multiple regulatory functions, including heme biosynthesis, a major component in cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes. To investigate possible new roles for PBR involvement in metabolic regulation, expression of the CAR and PXR target genes, CYP2B6 and CYP3A4, was measured in human hepatocytes following treatment with a targeted PBR ligand set. Luciferase reporter assays with transiently expressed wild-type CAR (CAR1), splice variant CAR3, or PXR in HuH-7 cells were used to further study activation of these receptors. Four structurally related PBR ligands (benzothiazepines) differentially modulate CAR1, CAR3 and PXR activity. Benzothiazepine NF49 is an agonist ligand of CAR3, a partial agonist of PXR, exhibits greater inverse agonist activity on CAR1 than does PK11195, and is a new tool for studying these closely related nuclear receptors.

  18. The peroxisome proliferator perfluorodecanoic acid inhibits the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) expression and hormone-stimulated mitochondrial cholesterol transport and steroid formation in Leydig cells.

    PubMed

    Boujrad, N; Vidic, B; Gazouli, M; Culty, M; Papadopoulos, V

    2000-09-01

    The peroxisome proliferator perfluordecanoic acid (PFDA) has been shown to exert an antiandrogenic effect in vivo by acting directly on the interstitial Leydig cells of the testis. The objective of this study was to examine the in vitro effects of PFDA and identify its site of action in steroidogenesis using as model systems the mouse tumor MA-10 and isolated rat Leydig cells. PFDA inhibited in a time- and dose-dependent manner the hCG-stimulated Leydig cell steroidogenesis. This effect was localized at the level of cholesterol transport into the mitochondria. PFDA did not affect either the total cell protein synthesis or the mitochondrial integrity. Moreover, it did not induce any DNA damage. Morphological studies indicated that PFDA induced lipid accumulation in the cells, probably due to the fact that cholesterol mobilized by hCG did not enter the mitochondria to be used for steroidogenesis. In search of the target of PFDA, we examined its effect on key regulatory mechanisms of steroidogenesis. PFDA did not affect the hCG-induced steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) levels. However, it was found to inhibit the mitochondrial peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) ligand binding capacity, 18-kDa protein, and messenger RNA (mRNA) levels. Further studies indicated that PFDA did not affect PBR transcription, but it rather accelerated PBR mRNA decay. Taken together, these data suggest that PFDA inhibits the Leydig cell steroidogenesis by affecting PBR mRNA stability, thus inhibiting PBR expression, cholesterol transport into the mitochondria, and the subsequent steroid formation. Moreover, this action of PFDA on PBR mRNA stability indicates a new mechanism of action of peroxisome proliferators distinct from the classic transcription-mediated regulation of target genes.

  19. Imaging of peripheral benzodiazepine receptor expression as biomarkers of detrimental versus beneficial glial responses in mouse models of Alzheimer's and other CNS pathologies.

    PubMed

    Ji, Bin; Maeda, Jun; Sawada, Makoto; Ono, Maiko; Okauchi, Takashi; Inaji, Motoki; Zhang, Ming-Rong; Suzuki, Kazutoshi; Ando, Kiyoshi; Staufenbiel, Matthias; Trojanowski, John Q; Lee, Virginia M Y; Higuchi, Makoto; Suhara, Tetsuya

    2008-11-19

    We demonstrate the significance of peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) imaging in living mouse models of Alzheimer's disease (AD) as biomarkers and functional signatures of glial activation. By radiochemically and immunohistochemically analyzing murine models of the two pathological hallmarks of AD, we found that AD-like Abeta deposition is concurrent with astrocyte-dominant PBR expression, in striking contrast with nonastroglial PBR upregulation in accumulations of AD-like phosphorylated tau. Because tau-induced massive neuronal loss was distinct from the marginal neurodegeneration associated with Abeta plaques in these models, cellular localization of PBR reflected deleterious and beneficial glial reactions to tau versus Abeta pathologies, respectively. This notion was subsequently examined in models of various non-AD neuropathologies, revealing the following reactive glial dynamics underlying differential PBR upregulation: (1) PBR(-) astrogliosis uncoupled with microgliosis or coupled with PBR(+) microgliosis associated with irreversible neuronal insults; and (2) PBR(+) astrogliosis coupled with PBR(- or +/-) microgliosis associated with minimal or reversible neuronal toxicity. Intracranial transplantation of microglia also indicated that nontoxic microglia drives astroglial PBR expression. Moreover, levels of glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor (GDNF) in astrocytes were correlated with astroglial PBR, except for increased GDNF in PBR(-) astrocytes in the model of AD-like tau pathology, thereby suggesting that PBR upregulation in astrocytes is an indicator of neurotrophic support. Together, PBR expressions in astrocytes and microglia reflect beneficial and deleterious glial reactions, respectively, in diverse neurodegenerative disorders including AD, pointing to new applications of PBR imaging for monitoring the impact of gliosis on the pathogenesis and treatment of AD.

  20. Omega 3 (peripheral type benzodiazepine binding) site distribution in the rat immune system: an autoradiographic study with the photoaffinity ligand (/sup 3/H)PK 14105

    SciTech Connect

    Benavides, J.; Dubois, A.; Dennis, T.; Hamel, E.; Scatton, B.

    1989-04-01

    The anatomical distribution of omega 3 (peripheral type benzodiazepine binding) sites in the immune system organs of the rat has been studied autoradiographically at both macroscopic and microscopic levels of resolution using either reversible or irreversible (UV irradiation) labeling with (/sup 3/H)PK 14105. In thymus sections, (/sup 3/H)PK 14105 labeled with high affinity (Kd, derived from saturation experiments = 10.8 nM) a single population of sites which possessed the pharmacological characteristics of omega 3 sites. In the thymus gland, higher omega 3 site densities were detected in the cortex than in the medulla; in these subregions, silver grains were associated to small (10-18 microns diameter) cells. In the spleen, omega 3 sites were more abundant in the white than in the red pulp. In the white pulp, silver grains were denser in the marginal zone than in the vicinity of the central artery and labeling was, as in the thymus, associated to small cytoplasm-poor cells. In the red pulp, omega 3 site associated silver grains were observed mainly in the Bilroth cords. In the lymph nodes, the medullary region showed a higher labeling than the surrounding follicles and paracortex. A significant accumulation of silver grains was observed in the lymph node medullary cords. In the intestine, Peyer patches were particularly enriched in omega 3 sites (especially in the periphery of the follicles). The distribution of omega 3 sites in the immune system organs suggests a preferential labeling of cells of T and monocytic lineages. This is consistent with the proposed immunoregulatory properties of some omega 3 site ligands.

  1. Mitochondrial benzodiazepine receptors regulate steroid biosynthesis

    SciTech Connect

    Mukhin, A.G.; Papadopoulos, V.; Costa, E.; Krueger, K.E. )

    1989-12-01

    Recent observations on the steroid synthetic capability within the brain open the possibility that benzodiazepines may influence steroid synthesis in nervous tissue through interactions with peripheral-type benzodiazepine recognition sites, which are highly expressed in steroidogenic cells and associated with the outer mitochondrial membrane. To examine this possibility nine molecules that exhibit a greater than 10,000-fold difference in their affinities for peripheral-type benzodiazepine binding sites were tested for their effects on a well-established steroidogenic model system, the Y-1 mouse adrenal tumor cell line. 4{prime}-Chlorodiazepam, PK 11195, and PK 14067 stimulated steroid production by 2-fold in Y-1 cells, whereas diazepam, flunitrazepam, zolpidem, and PK 14068 displayed a lower (1.2- to 1.5-fold) maximal stimulation. In contrast, clonazepam and flumazenil did not stimulate steroid synthesis. The potencies of these compounds to inhibit {sup 3}H-labeled PK 11195 binding to peripheral-type benzodiazepine recognition sites correlated with their potencies to stimulate steroid production. Similar findings were observed in bovine and rat adrenocortical cell preparations. These results suggest that ligands of the peripheral-type benzodiazepine recognition site acting on this mitochondrial receptor can enhance steroid production. This action may contribute specificity to the pharmacological profile of drugs preferentially acting on the benzodiazepine recognition site associated with the outer membrane of certain mitochondrial populations.

  2. The peripheral clock regulates human pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Hardman, Jonathan A; Tobin, Desmond J; Haslam, Iain S; Farjo, Nilofer; Farjo, Bessam; Al-Nuaimi, Yusur; Grimaldi, Benedetto; Paus, Ralf

    2015-04-01

    Although the regulation of pigmentation is well characterized, it remains unclear whether cell-autonomous controls regulate the cyclic on-off switching of pigmentation in the hair follicle (HF). As human HFs and epidermal melanocytes express clock genes and proteins, and given that core clock genes (PER1, BMAL1) modulate human HF cycling, we investigated whether peripheral clock activity influences human HF pigmentation. We found that silencing BMAL1 or PER1 in human HFs increased HF melanin content. Furthermore, tyrosinase expression and activity, as well as TYRP1 and TYRP2 mRNA levels, gp100 protein expression, melanocyte dendricity, and the number gp100+ HF melanocytes, were all significantly increased in BMAL1 and/or PER1-silenced HFs. BMAL1 or PER1 silencing also increased epidermal melanin content, gp100 protein expression, and tyrosinase activity in human skin. These effects reflect direct modulation of melanocytes, as BMAL1 and/or PER1 silencing in isolated melanocytes increased tyrosinase activity and TYRP1/2 expression. Mechanistically, BMAL1 knockdown reduces PER1 transcription, and PER1 silencing induces phosphorylation of the master regulator of melanogenesis, microphthalmia-associated transcription factor, thus stimulating human melanogenesis and melanocyte activity in situ and in vitro. Therefore, the molecular clock operates as a cell-autonomous modulator of human pigmentation and may be targeted for future therapeutic strategies. PMID:25310406

  3. The peripheral clock regulates human pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Hardman, Jonathan A; Tobin, Desmond J; Haslam, Iain S; Farjo, Nilofer; Farjo, Bessam; Al-Nuaimi, Yusur; Grimaldi, Benedetto; Paus, Ralf

    2015-04-01

    Although the regulation of pigmentation is well characterized, it remains unclear whether cell-autonomous controls regulate the cyclic on-off switching of pigmentation in the hair follicle (HF). As human HFs and epidermal melanocytes express clock genes and proteins, and given that core clock genes (PER1, BMAL1) modulate human HF cycling, we investigated whether peripheral clock activity influences human HF pigmentation. We found that silencing BMAL1 or PER1 in human HFs increased HF melanin content. Furthermore, tyrosinase expression and activity, as well as TYRP1 and TYRP2 mRNA levels, gp100 protein expression, melanocyte dendricity, and the number gp100+ HF melanocytes, were all significantly increased in BMAL1 and/or PER1-silenced HFs. BMAL1 or PER1 silencing also increased epidermal melanin content, gp100 protein expression, and tyrosinase activity in human skin. These effects reflect direct modulation of melanocytes, as BMAL1 and/or PER1 silencing in isolated melanocytes increased tyrosinase activity and TYRP1/2 expression. Mechanistically, BMAL1 knockdown reduces PER1 transcription, and PER1 silencing induces phosphorylation of the master regulator of melanogenesis, microphthalmia-associated transcription factor, thus stimulating human melanogenesis and melanocyte activity in situ and in vitro. Therefore, the molecular clock operates as a cell-autonomous modulator of human pigmentation and may be targeted for future therapeutic strategies.

  4. Preferential affinity of /sup 3/H-2-oxo-quazepam for type I benzodiazepine recognition sites in the human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Corda, M.G.; Giorgi, O.; Longoni, B.; Ongini, E.; Montaldo, S.; Biggio, G.

    1988-01-01

    The hypnotic drug quazepam and its active metabolite 2-oxo-quazepam (2-oxo-quaz) are two benzodiazepines (BZ) containing a trifluoroethyl moiety on the ring nitrogen at position 1, characterized by their preferential affinity for Type I BZ recognition sites. In the present study we characterized the binding of /sup 3/H-2-oxo-quaz in discrete areas of the human brain. Saturation analysis demonstrated specific and saturable binding of /sup 3/H-2-oxo-quaz to membrane preparations from human cerebellum. Hill plot analysis of displacement curves of /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam binding by 2-oxo-quaz yielded Hill coefficients of approximately 1 in the cerebellum and significantly less than 1 in the cerebral cortex, hippocampus, caudate nucleus, thalamus and pons. Self and cross displacement curves for /sup 3/H-FNT and /sup 3/H-2-oxo-quaz binding in these brain areas indicated that 2-oxo-quaz binds with different affinities to two populations of binding sites. High affinity binding sites were more abundant in the cerebellum, cerebral cortex, hippocampus and thalamus, whereas low affinity sites were predominant in the caudate nucleus and pons. Competition studies of /sup 3/H-2-oxo-quaz and /sup 3/H-FNT using unlabelled ligands indicated that compounds which preferentially bind to Type I sites are more potent at displacing /sup 3/H-2-oxo-quaz than /sup 3/H-FNT from cerebral cortex membrane preparations. 26 references, 2 figures, 3 tables.

  5. Benzodiazepines: Uses and Abuses

    PubMed Central

    Hoffman, Brain F.; Shugar, Gerald

    1982-01-01

    Anxiety is ubiquitous in our society. Although non-drug treatments should always be used, benzodiazepines are the drugs of choice when drugs are indicated. In double blind studies the benzodiazepines are superior to placebo in controlling acute anxiety and autonomic over-activity in psychosomatic disorders. They are also useful in a variety of other conditions such as the treatment or prevention of muscle spasms and pain, status epilepticus, drug withdrawal, stage 4 sleep disorders and akathisia. However, benzodiazepines have many side effects, produce tolerance, dependence and withdrawal syndromes and should be used cautiously. There is no evidence that benzodiazepines are useful in chronic anxiety. The short-acting drugs are safer with elderly patients and those with hepatic disease or hypoalbuminemia. Small amounts of prescription benzodiazepines should be used for the shortest possible period. Educational programs concerning the proper use of benzodiazepines should be increased. PMID:21286524

  6. Glucocorticoids entrain molecular clock components in human peripheral cells.

    PubMed

    Cuesta, Marc; Cermakian, Nicolas; Boivin, Diane B

    2015-04-01

    In humans, shift work induces a desynchronization between the circadian system and the outside world, which contributes to shift work-associated medical disorders. Using a simulated night shift experiment, we previously showed that 3 d of bright light at night fully synchronize the central clock to the inverted sleep schedule, whereas the peripheral clocks located in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) took longer to reset. This underlines the need for testing the effects of synchronizers on both the central and peripheral clocks. Glucocorticoids display circadian rhythms controlled by the central clock and are thought to act as synchronizers of rodent peripheral clocks. In the present study, we tested whether the human central and peripheral clocks were sensitive to exogenous glucocorticoids (Cortef) administered in the late afternoon. We showed that 20 mg Cortef taken orally acutely increased PER1 expression in PBMC peripheral clocks. After 6 d of Cortef administration, the phases of central markers were not affected, whereas those of PER2-3 and BMAL1 expression in PBMCs were shifted by ∼ 9.5-11.5 h. These results demonstrate, for the first time, that human peripheral clocks are entrained by glucocorticoids. Importantly, they suggest innovative interventions for shift workers and jet-lag travelers, combining synchronizing agents for the central and peripheral clocks.

  7. Cellular Reprogramming of Human Peripheral Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Xiao-Bing

    2013-01-01

    Breakthroughs in cell fate conversion have made it possible to generate large quantities of patient-specific cells for regenerative medicine. Due to multiple advantages of peripheral blood cells over fibroblasts from skin biopsy, the use of blood mononuclear cells (MNCs) instead of skin fibroblasts will expedite reprogramming research and broaden the application of reprogramming technology. This review discusses current progress and challenges of generating induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) from peripheral blood MNCs and of in vitro and in vivo conversion of blood cells into cells of therapeutic value, such as mesenchymal stem cells, neural cells and hepatocytes. An optimized design of lentiviral vectors is necessary to achieve high reprogramming efficiency of peripheral blood cells. More recently, non-integrating vectors such as Sendai virus and episomal vectors have been successfully employed in generating integration-free iPSCs and somatic stem cells. PMID:24060839

  8. Benzodiazepines: Sedation and Agitation.

    PubMed

    Gallagher, Catherine

    2016-01-01

    Dental anxiety is common and frequently poses a barrier to necessary dental treatment. The increasing availability of conscious sedation in dental practice has made treatment much more accessible for anxious patients. At present, benzodiazepines are the most commonly used drugs in sedation practice and provide a pleasant experience for most, but not all, patients. An understanding of the mechanism of action of benzodiazepines should inform our practice and deepen our understanding of why and how sedation may fail. CPD/CLINICAL RELEVANCE: As an increasing number of dentists provide sedation for their patients an update on benzodiazepines is timely.

  9. PK11195, a peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (pBR) ligand, broadly blocks drug efflux to chemosensitize leukemia and myeloma cells by a pBR-independent, direct transporter-modulating mechanism.

    PubMed

    Walter, Roland B; Pirga, Jason L; Cronk, Michelle R; Mayer, Sasha; Appelbaum, Frederick R; Banker, Deborah E

    2005-11-15

    The peripheral benzodiazepine receptor (pBR) ligand, PK11195, promotes mitochondrial apoptosis and blocks P-glycoprotein (Pgp)-mediated drug efflux to chemosensitize cancer cells at least as well or better than the Pgp modulator, cyclosporine A (CSA). We now show that PK11195 broadly inhibits adenosine triphosphate (ATP)-binding cassette (ABC) transporters in hematologic cancer cell lines and primary leukemia-cell samples, including multidrug resistance protein (MRP), breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP), and/or Pgp. Ectopic expression models confirmed that pBR can directly mediate chemosensitizing by PK11195, presumably via mitochondrial activities, but showed that pBR expression is unnecessary to PK11195-mediated efflux inhibition. PK11195 binds plasma-membrane sites in Pgp-expressing cells, stimulates Pgp-associated adenosine triphosphatase (ATPase) activity, and causes conformational changes in Pgp, suggesting that PK11195 modulates Pgp-mediated efflux by direct transporter interaction(s). PK11195 and CSA bind noncompetitively in Pgp-expressing cells, indicating that PK11195 interacts with Pgp at sites that are distinct from CSA-binding sites. Importantly, PK11195 concentrations that were effective in these in vitro assays can be safely achieved in patients. Because PK11195 promotes chemotherapy-induced apoptosis by a pBR-dependent mitochondrial mechanism and broadly blocks drug efflux by an apparently pBR-independent, ABC transporter-dependent mechanism, PK11195 may be a useful clinical chemosensitizer in cancer patients.

  10. Peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) aggregation and absence of steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR)/PBR association in the mitochondrial membrane as determined by bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET).

    PubMed

    Bogan, Randy L; Davis, Tracy L; Niswender, Gordon D

    2007-04-01

    The steroidogenic acute regulatory protein (StAR) is responsible for acute control of cholesterol transport across the mitochondrial membrane, however the mechanism of StAR-associated cholesterol transport is unknown and may involve the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR)/endozepine system. Several molecules of PBR may associate to form a channel through which cholesterol passes to the inner mitochondrial membrane, and endozepine is the natural ligand for PBR. Bioluminescence resonance energy transfer (BRET) was used to test StAR/PBR/endozepine interactions, PBR aggregation, and the effect of second messengers on interactions. There was no evidence of StAR/PBR, StAR/endozepine, or PBR/endozepine interactions. The StAR and PBR fusion proteins were trafficking to the mitochondria as expected, but the endozepine fusion protein was not localized to the mitochondria indicating that it was not biologically active. Data were obtained indicating that PBR forms aggregates in the mitochondrial membrane. Energy transfer between PBR fusion proteins was dose and time dependent, but there was no effect induced by PK11195 ligand binding or pharmacologic activation of PKA or PKC second messenger pathways. It appears that PBR aggregates in the mitochondrial membrane, however there was no evidence that PBR aggregation is regulated in the acute control of steroidogenesis, or that PBR and StAR interact.

  11. Glucocorticoid receptors, in human alveolar macrophages and peripheral blood cells.

    PubMed Central

    Ozaki, T; Yasuoka, S; Nakayama, T; Tsubura, E

    1982-01-01

    The numbers of glucocorticoid receptors in human alveolar macrophages and peripheral blood cells were measured with 3H-prednisolone. Alveolar macrophages, which constituted 89.0 +/- 5.9% of broncho-alveolar cells, obtained by broncho-alveolar lavage from normal volunteers had much larger numbers of specific glucocorticoid receptors than peripheral blood cells. The numbers of glucocorticoid receptors in peripheral polymorphonuclear leucocytes, lymphocytes and lymphocyte subpopulations (B cells, T cells, TG cells and TnonG cells) were nearly equal. In patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis, in whom alveolar macrophages amounted to over 85% of the broncho-alveolar cells, the number of glucocorticoid receptors in alveolar macrophages was significantly decreased, but the numbers in their peripheral blood cells were normal. This finding suggests that the number of glucocorticoid receptors in alveolar macrophages may change specifically during disorders of the lung. PMID:7075033

  12. The regulation of central and peripheral circadian clocks in humans.

    PubMed

    Cermakian, N; Boivin, D B

    2009-11-01

    Many circadian rhythms are controlled by the central clock of the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, as well as clocks located in other brain regions and most peripheral tissues. These central and peripheral clocks are based on clock genes and their protein products. In recent years, the expression of clock genes has started to be investigated in human samples, primarily white blood cells, but also skin, oral mucosa, colon cells, adipose tissue as well as post-mortem brain tissue. The expression of clock genes in those peripheral tissues offers a way to monitor human peripheral clocks and to compare their function and regulation with those of the central clock, which is followed by markers such as melatonin, cortisol and core body temperature. We have recently used such an approach to compare central and peripheral rhythms in subjects under different lighting conditions. In particular, we have monitored the entrainment of the clock of blood cells in subjects undergoing a simulated night shift protocol with bright light treatment, known to efficiently reset the central clock. This line of research will be helpful for learning more about the human circadian system and to find ways to alleviate health problems of shift workers, and other populations experiencing altered circadian rhythms. PMID:19849799

  13. Gamma-aminobutyric acid-modulated benzodiazepine binding sites in bacteria

    SciTech Connect

    Lummis, S.C.R.; Johnston, G.A.R. ); Nicoletti, G. ); Holan, G. )

    1991-01-01

    Benzodiazepine binding sites, which were once considered to exist only in higher vertebrates, are here demonstrated in the bacteria E. coli. The bacterial ({sup 3}H)diazepam binding sites are modulated by GABA; the modulation is dose dependent and is reduced at high concentrations. The most potent competitors of E.Coli ({sup 3}H)diazepam binding are those that are active in displacing ({sup 3}H)benzodiazepines from vertebrate peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites. These vertebrate sites are not modulated by GABA, in contrast to vertebrate neuronal benzodiazepine binding sites. The E.coli benzodiazepine binding sites therefore differ from both classes of vertebrate benzodiazepine binding sites; however the ligand spectrum and GABA-modulatory properties of the E.coli sites are similar to those found in insects. This intermediate type of receptor in lower species suggests a precursor for at least one class of vertebrate benzodiazepine binding sites may have existed.

  14. Simultaneous determination of fifteen low-dosed benzodiazepines in human urine by solid-phase extraction and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Borrey, D; Meyer, E; Lambert, W; Van Peteghem, C; De Leenheer, A P

    2001-12-25

    A gas chromatographic-mass spectrometric method was developed for the simultaneous analysis of 15 low-dosed benzodiazepines, both parent compounds and their corresponding metabolites, in human urine. The target compounds are alprazolam, alpha-hydroxyalprazolam, 4-hydroxyalprazolam, flunitrazepam, 7-aminoflunitrazepam, desmethylflunitrazepam, flurazepam, hydroxyethylflurazepam, nitrogen-desalkylflurazepam, ketazolam, oxazepam, lormetazepam, lorazepam, triazolam and alpha-hydroxytriazolam. Nitrogen-methylclonazepam is used as the internal standard. The urine sample preparation involves enzymatic hydrolysis of the conjugated metabolites with Helix pomatia beta-glucuronidase for 1 h at 56 degrees C followed by solid-phase extraction on a phenyl-type column. The extracted benzodiazepines are subsequently analyzed on a polydimethylsiloxane column using on-column injection to enhance sensitivity. The extraction efficiency exceeded 80% for all compounds except for oxazepam, lorazepam and 4-hydroxyalprazolam which had recoveries of about 60%. The LODs ranged from 13 to 30 ng/ml in the scan mode and from 1.0 to 1.7 ng/ml in the selected ion monitoring (SIM) mode. Linear calibration curves were obtained in the concentration ranges from 50 to 1000 ng/ml in the scan mode and from 5 to 100 ng/ml in the SIM mode. The within-day and day-to-day relative standard deviations at three different concentrations never exceeded 15%.

  15. Chronic use of benzodiazepines among older adults

    PubMed Central

    Alvarenga, Jussara Mendonça; Giacomin, Karla Cristina; de Loyola, Antônio Ignácio; Uchoa, Elizabeth; Firmo, Josélia Oliveira Araújo

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the perception of and motivation for the chronic use of benzodiazepine among older adults. METHODS A qualitative study was conducted on 22 older adults living in Bambuí, MG, Southeastern Brazil, who were taking benzodiazepines and had the clinical and cognitive ability to respond to interview questions. The collected data were analyzed on the basis of the “signs, meanings, and actions” model. RESULTS The main reasons pointed out for the use of benzodiazepines were “nervousness”, “sleep problems”, and “worry” due to family and financial problems, everyday problems, and existential difficulties. None of the interviewees said that they used benzodiazepines in a dose higher than that recommended or had been warned by health professionals about any risks of their continuous use. Different strategies were used to obtain the prescription for the medication, and any physician would prescribe it, indicating that a bond was established with the drug and not with the health professional or healthcare service. Obtaining and consuming the medication turned into a crucial issue because benzodiazepine assumes the status of an essential food, which leads users to not think but sleep. It causes a feeling of relief from their problems such as awareness of human finitude and fragility, existential difficulties, and family problems. CONCLUSIONS Benzodiazepine assumes the characteristics of polyvalence among older adults, which extrapolate specific clinical indications, and of essentiality to deal with life’s problems in old age. Although it relieves the “nerves”, the chronic use of benzodiazepines buffers suffering and prevents older adults from going through the suffering. This shows important difficulties in the organization and planning of strategies that are necessary for minimizing the chronic use in this population. PMID:26039388

  16. Chronic use of benzodiazepines among older adults.

    PubMed

    Alvarenga, Jussara Mendonça; Giacomin, Karla Cristina; Loyola Filho, Antônio Ignácio de; Uchoa, Elizabeth; Firmo, Josélia Oliveira Araújo

    2014-12-01

    OBJECTIVE To analyze the perception of and motivation for the chronic use of benzodiazepine among older adults. METHODS A qualitative study was conducted on 22 older adults living in Bambuí, MG, Southeastern Brazil, who were taking benzodiazepines and had the clinical and cognitive ability to respond to interview questions. The collected data were analyzed on the basis of the "signs, meanings, and actions" model. RESULTS The main reasons pointed out for the use of benzodiazepines were "nervousness", "sleep problems", and "worry" due to family and financial problems, everyday problems, and existential difficulties. None of the interviewees said that they used benzodiazepines in a dose higher than that recommended or had been warned by health professionals about any risks of their continuous use. Different strategies were used to obtain the prescription for the medication, and any physician would prescribe it, indicating that a bond was established with the drug and not with the health professional or healthcare service. Obtaining and consuming the medication turned into a crucial issue because benzodiazepine assumes the status of an essential food, which leads users to not think but sleep. It causes a feeling of relief from their problems such as awareness of human finitude and fragility, existential difficulties, and family problems. CONCLUSIONS Benzodiazepine assumes the characteristics of polyvalence among older adults, which extrapolate specific clinical indications, and of essentiality to deal with life's problems in old age. Although it relieves the "nerves", the chronic use of benzodiazepines buffers suffering and prevents older adults from going through the suffering. This shows important difficulties in the organization and planning of strategies that are necessary for minimizing the chronic use in this population.

  17. Gnathic and peripheral ameloblastomas lack human papillomavirus DNA.

    PubMed

    Verduin, Lindsey; Bishop, Justin; Mills, Stacey E

    2015-10-01

    Human papillomavirus (HPV) has been associated with a variety of head and neck neoplasms, including squamous cell carcinomas and Schneiderian papillomas. Ameloblastomas can arise from either the gnathic bones or peripheral soft tissues. Peripheral sinonasal ameloblastomas share clinical features with Schneiderian papillomas. A small number of reports have described detection of HPV DNA within ameloblastomas. However, Most of these cases was reported in the 1990s, used the polymerase chain reaction technique, and only examined gnathic tumors. The current study was designed to determine whether low- or high-risk HPV DNA could be detected in gnathic or peripheral ameloblastomas using in situ hybridization. Twenty-nine examples of gnathic osseous and peripheral head and neck ameloblastomas were obtained from the authors' archives (University of Virginia and the Johns Hopkins Hospital). High-risk HPV DNA was not detected in any of the 29 tumors analyzed. Low-risk HPV DNA was identified in only 1 tumor, which was peripheral in origin, and from an immunocompromised patient. We believe that the HPV in this case represents a background "passenger" infection. This study demonstrates that HPV of either high- or low-risk subtypes is unlikely to play a role in the pathogenesis of sinonasal ameloblastomas.

  18. Cardiovascular characterization of pyrrolo[2,1-d][1,5]benzothiazepine derivatives binding selectively to the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR): from dual PBR affinity and calcium antagonist activity to novel and selective calcium entry blockers.

    PubMed

    Campiani, G; Fiorini, I; De Filippis, M P; Ciani, S M; Garofalo, A; Nacci, V; Giorgi, G; Sega, A; Botta, M; Chiarini, A; Budriesi, R; Bruni, G; Romeo, M R; Manzoni, C; Mennini, T

    1996-07-19

    The synthesis and cardiovascular characterization of a series of novel pyrrolo[2,1-d][1,5]-benzothiazepine derivatives (54-68) are described. Selective peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor (PBR) ligands, such as PK 11195 and Ro 5-4864, have recently been found to possess low but significant inhibitory activity of L-type calcium channels, and this property is implicated in the cardiovascular effects observed with these compounds. In functional studies both PK 11195 (1-(2-chlorophenyl)-N-methyl-N-(1-methylpropyl)-3-isoquinolinecarboxa mide) and Ro 5-4864 (4'-chlorodiazepam) did not display selectivity between cardiac and vascular tissue. Therefore, several 7-(acyloxy)-6-arylpyrrolo[2,1-d][1,5]benzothiazepines, potent and selective peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor ligands recently developed by us (3, 7-20), were subjected to calcium channel receptor binding assay. Some of these compounds showed an unexpected potency in displacing the binding of [3H]nitrendipine from L-type calcium channels, much higher than that reported for PK 11195 and Ro 5-4864 and equal to or higher than that of reference calcium antagonists such as verapamil and (+)-cis-diltiazem. Specifically, in rat cortex homogenate, our prototypic PBR ligand 7-acetoxy-6-(p-methoxyphenyl)pyrrolo[2,1-d][1,5]benzothiazepine (3) showed an IC50 equal to 0.13 nM for inhibition of [3H]nitrendipine binding. Furthermore, in functional studies this compound displayed a clear-cut selectivity for cardiac over vascular tissue. Comparison of calcium antagonist activity on guinea pig aorta strips with the negative inotropic activity, determined by using isolated guinea pig left atria, revealed that 3 displayed higher selectivity than the reference (+)-cis-diltiazem. Thus, the pyrrolobenzothiazepine 3 might represent a new tool for characterizing the relationship between the PBR and cardiac function. Furthermore, we have also investigated the structural dependence of binding to PBR and L-type calcium channels, and

  19. Photoacoustic tomography of small-animal and human peripheral joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Xueding; Chamberland, David L.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Carson, Paul L.; Jamadar, David A.

    2008-02-01

    As an emerging imaging technology that combines the merits of both light and ultrasound, photoacoustic tomography (PAT) holds promise for screening and diagnosis of inflammatory joint diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis. In this study, the feasibility of PAT in imaging small-animal joints and human peripheral joints in a noninvasive manner was explored. Ex vivo rat tail and fresh cadaveric human finger joints were imaged. Based on the intrinsic optical contrast, intra- and extra-articular tissue structures in the joints were visualized successfully. Using light in the near-infrared region, the imaging depth of PAT is sufficient for cross-sectional imaging of a human peripheral joint as a whole organ. PAT, as a novel imaging modality with unique advantages, may contribute significantly to the early diagnosis of inflammatory joint disorders and accurate monitoring of disease progression and response to therapy.

  20. [Benzodiazepine and nonbenzodiazepine hypnotics].

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Masaki; Inoue, Yuichi

    2015-06-01

    The prevalence of insomnia shows an age-associated increase. Especially, persons with age over 60 years frequently suffer from arousal during sleep and early-morning awakening. The reason of this phenomenon can be explained by age-related change in sleepwake regulation, comorbid diseases and psycho-social status. Benzodiazepine derivatives and benzodiazepine agonists have been widely used for treatment of insomnia. These GABA-A receptor agonist hypnotics have sedative effect, possibly causing various adverse events, i.e. falls and hip fracture, anterograde amnesia, next morning hangover especially in the elderly. When making a choice of treatment drugs for the elderly, low dose benzodiazepine hypnotics with relatively high Ω1-selectivity, and newer hypnotics including melatonic receptor agonist or orexin receptor antagonist can become important candidates considering their comorbid diseases or drug interaction with other medications.

  1. Activation of the Peripheral Endocannabinoid System in Human Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Engeli, Stefan; Böhnke, Jana; Feldpausch, Mareike; Gorzelniak, Kerstin; Janke, Jürgen; Bátkai, Sándor; Pacher, Pál; Harvey-White, Judy; Luft, Friedrich C.; Sharma, Arya M.; Jordan, Jens

    2008-01-01

    Obesity is the main risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes. Activation of the central endocannabinoid system increases food intake and promotes weight gain. Blockade of the cannabinoid type 1 (CB-1) receptor reduces body weight in animals by central and peripheral actions; the role of the peripheral endocannabinoid system in human obesity is now being extensively investigated. We measured circulating endocannabinoid concentrations and studied the expression of CB-1 and the main degrading enzyme, fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), in adipose tissue of lean (n = 20) and obese (n = 20) women and after a 5% weight loss in a second group of women (n = 17). Circulating levels of anandamide and 1/2-arachidonoylglycerol were increased by 35 and 52% in obese compared with lean women (P < 0.05). Adipose tissue mRNA levels were reduced by −34% for CB-1 and −59% for FAAH in obese subjects (P < 0.05). A strong negative correlation was found between FAAH expression in adipose tissue and circulating endocannabinoids. Circulating endocannabinoids and CB-1 or FAAH expression were not affected by 5% weight loss. The expression of CB-1 and FAAH was increased in mature human adipocytes compared with in preadipocytes and was found in several human tissues. Our findings support the presence of a peripheral endocannabinoid system that is upregulated in human obesity. PMID:16186383

  2. Activation of the peripheral endocannabinoid system in human obesity.

    PubMed

    Engeli, Stefan; Böhnke, Jana; Feldpausch, Mareike; Gorzelniak, Kerstin; Janke, Jürgen; Bátkai, Sándor; Pacher, Pál; Harvey-White, Judy; Luft, Friedrich C; Sharma, Arya M; Jordan, Jens

    2005-10-01

    Obesity is the main risk factor for the development of type 2 diabetes. Activation of the central endocannabinoid system increases food intake and promotes weight gain. Blockade of the cannabinoid type 1 (CB-1) receptor reduces body weight in animals by central and peripheral actions; the role of the peripheral endocannabinoid system in human obesity is now being extensively investigated. We measured circulating endocannabinoid concentrations and studied the expression of CB-1 and the main degrading enzyme, fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH), in adipose tissue of lean (n = 20) and obese (n = 20) women and after a 5% weight loss in a second group of women (n = 17). Circulating levels of anandamide and 1/2-arachidonoylglycerol were increased by 35 and 52% in obese compared with lean women (P < 0.05). Adipose tissue mRNA levels were reduced by -34% for CB-1 and -59% for FAAH in obese subjects (P < 0.05). A strong negative correlation was found between FAAH expression in adipose tissue and circulating endocannabinoids. Circulating endocannabinoids and CB-1 or FAAH expression were not affected by 5% weight loss. The expression of CB-1 and FAAH was increased in mature human adipocytes compared with in preadipocytes and was found in several human tissues. Our findings support the presence of a peripheral endocannabinoid system that is upregulated in human obesity. PMID:16186383

  3. Are Human Peripheral Nerves Sensitive to X-Ray Imaging?

    PubMed Central

    Scopel, Jonas Francisco; de Souza Queiroz, Luciano; O’Dowd, Francis Pierce; Júnior, Marcondes Cavalcante França; Nucci, Anamarli; Hönnicke, Marcelo Gonçalves

    2015-01-01

    Diagnostic imaging techniques play an important role in assessing the exact location, cause, and extent of a nerve lesion, thus allowing clinicians to diagnose and manage more effectively a variety of pathological conditions, such as entrapment syndromes, traumatic injuries, and space-occupying lesions. Ultrasound and nuclear magnetic resonance imaging are becoming useful methods for this purpose, but they still lack spatial resolution. In this regard, recent phase contrast x-ray imaging experiments of peripheral nerve allowed the visualization of each nerve fiber surrounded by its myelin sheath as clearly as optical microscopy. In the present study, we attempted to produce high-resolution x-ray phase contrast images of a human sciatic nerve by using synchrotron radiation propagation-based imaging. The images showed high contrast and high spatial resolution, allowing clear identification of each fascicle structure and surrounding connective tissue. The outstanding result is the detection of such structures by phase contrast x-ray tomography of a thick human sciatic nerve section. This may further enable the identification of diverse pathological patterns, such as Wallerian degeneration, hypertrophic neuropathy, inflammatory infiltration, leprosy neuropathy and amyloid deposits. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first successful phase contrast x-ray imaging experiment of a human peripheral nerve sample. Our long-term goal is to develop peripheral nerve imaging methods that could supersede biopsy procedures. PMID:25757086

  4. [The benzodiazepines use disorder].

    PubMed

    Kawano, Takaaki; Inada, Ken

    2015-09-01

    Benzodiazepines are widely used as anti-anxiety drugs and sleeping drugs. On the other hand, it is also true that use disorders such as abuse or dependence is often a problem. Including the distinctive usual dose depends on the BZ drugs use disorders, I outlined the actual situation, diagnostic criteria, and the treatment.

  5. Human Peripheral Lung Tumours: Light and Electron Microscopic Correlation

    PubMed Central

    Mollo, Franco; Canese, Maria G.; Campobasso, Onofrio

    1973-01-01

    Thirteen human peripheral lung tumours have been studied in both light and electron microscopy. They were classified as epidermoid carcinoma, mucus-secreting cell adenocarcinoma, and alveolar cell adenocarcinoma, the latter made up of granular pneumocytes. Alveolar cell cancer, as defined by ultrastructural features, could assume different gross histological patterns in light microscopy, and therefore electron microscopy is required for its identification. Since neither squamous nor mucous metaplasia was observed in any alveolar cell tumour, it is tentatively suggested that all peripheral lung tumours which lack these features may be derived from granular pneumocytes, irrespective of whether they appear to be adenocarcinomata or large cell carcinomata when examined by light microscopy. ImagesFig. 1Fig. 2Fig. 3Fig. 4Fig. 5Fig. 6Fig. 7Fig. 8Fig. 9Fig. 10Fig. 11Fig. 12Fig. 13Fig. 14 PMID:4348471

  6. New tetrahydroimidazo[4,5,1-jk][1,4]-benzodiazepin-2(1H)-one and -thione derivatives are potent inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 replication and are synergistic with 2',3'-dideoxynucleoside analogs.

    PubMed Central

    Pauwels, R; Andries, K; Debyser, Z; Kukla, M J; Schols, D; Breslin, H J; Woestenborghs, R; Desmyter, J; Janssen, M A; De Clercq, E

    1994-01-01

    Tetrahydro-imidazo[4,5,1-jk][1,4]-benzodiazepin-2(1H)-one and -thione (TIBO) derivatives were shown to specifically block human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) replication through a unique interaction with the HIV-1 reverse transcriptase (RT). Through further modification of the lead compounds and structure-activity relationship analysis several new TIBO derivatives that show high potency, selectivity, and specificity against HIV-1 have been obtained. A new TIBO derivative, R86183, inhibits the replication of HIV-1, but not HIV-2, in a variety of CD4+ T-cell lines and peripheral blood lymphocytes, at a concentration of 0.3 to 30 nM, which is at least 4 orders of magnitude lower than the 50% cytotoxic concentration. Whereas an HIV-1 strain containing the Leu-100-->Ile mutation in the RT gene is about 400-fold less susceptible, R86183 still inhibits the replication of an HIV-1 strain containing the Tyr-181-->Cys RT mutation by 50% at a concentration of 130 nM. R86183 inhibits the poly(C).oligo(dG)12-18-directed HIV-1 RT reaction by 50% at a concentration of 57 nM. The antiviral activity of 22 TIBO derivatives in cell culture correlated well with their activity against HIV-1 RT. No such correlation was found for their cytotoxicity. The combination of R86183 with either zidovudine or didanosine resulted in a synergistic inhibition of HIV-1 (strain IIIB) replication. Combination of R86183 with the protease inhibitor Ro31-8959 was found to be additive. Also described is a dilution protocol circumventing overestimation and underestimation of antiviral activity due to adherence to plastic surfaces. Images PMID:7535037

  7. Drugs of abuse and benzodiazepines in the Madrid Region (Central Spain): seasonal variation in river waters, occurrence in tap water and potential environmental and human risk.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, A; Rodríguez-Gil, J L; González-Alonso, S; Mastroianni, N; López de Alda, M; Barceló, D; Valcárcel, Y

    2014-09-01

    This work analyzes the seasonal variation (winter and summer) of ten drugs of abuse, six metabolites and three benzodiazepines in surface waters from the Jarama and Manzanares Rivers in the Madrid Region, the most densely populated area in Spain. The occurrence of these compounds in tap water in this region is also investigated and a preliminary human health risk characterization performed for those substances found in tap water. Finally, a screening level risk assessment that combines the measured environmental concentrations (MECs) with dose-response data to estimate Hazard Quotients (HQs) for the compounds studied is also presented. The results of this study show the presence of fourteen out of the nineteen compounds analyzed in winter and twelve of them in summer. The most ubiquitous compounds, with a frequency of detection of 100% in both seasons, were the cocaine metabolite benzoylecgonine (BE), the amphetamine-type stimulant (ATS) ephedrine (EPH), the opioid methadone (METH), the METH metabolite 2-ethylene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP), and the three benzodiazepines investigated, namely alprazolam (ALP), diazepam (DIA) and lorazepam (LOR). The highest concentrations observed corresponded to EPH (1020ngL(-1) in winter and 250ngL(-1) in summer). The only compounds not detected in both seasons were heroin (HER) and its metabolite 6-acetylmorphine (6ACM), lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and its metabolite 2-oxo-3-hydroxy-LSD (O-H-LSD), and Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). In terms of overall concentration, all sampling points presented higher concentrations in winter than in summer. Statistical analyses performed to gather evidence concerning occasional seasonal differences in the concentrations of individual substances between summer and winter showed statistically significantly higher concentrations (p<0.05) of BE, EPH and the opioid morphine (MOR) in winter than in summer. Two out of the nineteen compounds studied, namely cocaine (CO) and EPH

  8. Inorganic arsenite alters macrophage generation from human peripheral blood monocytes.

    PubMed

    Sakurai, Teruaki; Ohta, Takami; Fujiwara, Kitao

    2005-03-01

    Inorganic arsenite has caused severe inflammatory chronic poisoning in humans through the consumption of contaminated well water. In this study, we examined the effects of arsenite at nanomolar concentrations on the in vitro differentiation of human macrophages from peripheral blood monocytes. While arsenite was found to induce cell death in a culture system containing macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), macrophages induced by granulocyte-macrophage CSF (GM-CSF) survived the treatment, but were morphologically, phenotypically, and functionally altered. In particular, arsenite-induced cells expressed higher levels of a major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II antigen, HLA-DR, and CD14. They were more effective at inducing allogeneic or autologous T cell responses and responded more strongly to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) by inflammatory cytokine release as compared to cells induced by GM-CSF alone. On the other hand, arsenite-induced cells expressed lower levels of CD11b and CD54 and phagocytosed latex beads or zymosan particles less efficiently. We also demonstrated that the optimum amount of cellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) induced by nM arsenite might play an important role in this abnormal monocyte differentiation. This work may have implications in chronic arsenic poisoning because the total peripheral blood arsenic concentrations of these patients are at nM levels.

  9. Myeloperoxidase in human peripheral blood lymphocytes: Production and subcellular localization.

    PubMed

    Okada, Sabrina Sayori; de Oliveira, Edson Mendes; de Araújo, Tomaz Henrique; Rodrigues, Maria Rita; Albuquerque, Renata Chaves; Mortara, Renato Arruda; Taniwaki, Noemi Nosomi; Nakaya, Helder Imoto; Campa, Ana; Moreno, Ana Carolina Ramos

    2016-02-01

    Myeloperoxidase (MPO) is an important enzyme in the front-line protection against microorganisms. In peripheral blood, it is accepted that MPO is only produced by myeloid-lineage cells. Thus, MPO presence is unexpected in lymphocytes. We showed recently that B1-lymphocytes from mice have MPO. Here, we showed that subsets of human peripheral B, CD4(+) and CD8(+) T lymphocytes express MPO. The content of MPO in lymphocytes was very low compared to neutrophils/monocytes with a preferential distribution in the nucleus and perinuclear region. Also, we performed a MPO mRNA expression analysis from human blood cells derived from microarray raw data publicly available, showing that MPO is modulated in infectious disease. MPO was increased in CD4(+) T lymphocytes from HIV chronic infection and in CD8(+) T lymphocytes from HCV-positive patients. Our study points out MPO as a multifunctional protein due to its subcellular localization and expression modulation in lymphocytes indicating alternative unknown functions for MPO in lymphocytes. PMID:26632272

  10. Development of the MAE/UHPLC-MS-TOF method for determination of benzodiazepines in human bio-fluids for toxicological analysis.

    PubMed

    Woźniakiewicz, Aneta; Wietecha-Posłuszny, Renata; Woźniakiewicz, Michał; Nowak, Julia; Kościelniak, Paweł

    2015-04-10

    A rapid method of microwave-assisted extraction (MAE) followed by ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography with mass spectrometry with time of flight detection (UHPLC-MS-TOF) was optimized and validated for the purpose of determination of five benzodiazepines in human serum and blood samples. Extraction parameters and conditions of the UHPLC-MS-TOF method were defined. Validation of the developed method was performed at three concentration levels: 10, 100 and 250 ng/mL of each drug for both serum and blood samples. For serum and blood the limit of detection was found in the ranges 0.46-2.58 ng/mL and 0.43-1.87 ng/mL, precision (RSD): 0.3-6.7% and 0.9-8.4%, accuracy of the assay (RE): -5.3 to +2.4% and -5.7 to +7.6%, recovery: 80.5-104.3% and 79.9-106.9%, matrix effects: 95.9-110.5% and 97.5-114.2%, respectively. Moreover, the optimized and validated MAE/UHPLC-MS-TOF method was applied to analysis of blood samples.

  11. Peripheral and central control of swallowing initiation in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Aida, Seiya; Takeishi, Ryosuke; Magara, Jin; Watanabe, Masahiro; Ito, Kayoko; Nakamura, Yuki; Tsujimura, Takanori; Hayashi, Hirokazu; Inoue, Makoto

    2015-11-01

    We investigated (1) how peripheral inputs might assist central inputs in the control of voluntary evoked swallowing, (2) inter-individual variation in involuntary and voluntary swallowing initiation, and (3) whether natural chewing behavior affects the initiation of involuntary swallowing in healthy humans. Eleven participants completed a repetitive saliva swallowing test (RSST), chewing test (CHEW), and rest period (REST). In RSST, participants repetitively swallowed as quickly as possible. In CHEW, subjects chewed gum freely. We delivered pharyngeal electrical stimulation (PEStim) to the laryngopharynx and compared the number of swallows that occurred with and without PEStim. PEStim significantly increased the number of voluntary evoked swallows in RSST, as well as the number of swallows in CHEW and REST trials, although this facilitatory effect was larger in REST trials. We found a positive correlation between the number of swallows at RSST without PEStim and that at REST with PEStim within individuals. Additionally, we found a significant positive correlation between the number of swallows at RSST with PEStim and the sum of that at RSST without PEStim and at REST with PES. Based on the current results, we suggest that (1) peripheral inputs within a certain range appear to facilitate the central inputs that control voluntary swallowing, (2) inter-individual variations in swallowing initiation may arise from differences in the excitability of the common neural network in the lower brainstem, and (3) during chewing, food reduction in the oral cavity is prioritized, such that the neural network associated with chewing may regulate swallowing initiation.

  12. Induction of tissue transglutaminase in human peripheral blood monocytes

    PubMed Central

    1984-01-01

    The levels and activity of tissue transglutaminase were studied in human peripheral blood monocytes during differentiation into macrophages in vitro. The enzyme was present at low levels in freshly isolated monocytes (less than 20 ng/mg cell protein) but increased 50- fold during 10 d of adherent culture in autologous serum, reaching levels of 0.1% of total cellular protein. The rate of appearance of tissue transglutaminase in monocytes was accelerated by low levels of lipopolysaccharide. The half-life of disappearance of transglutaminase from human monocytes was 11 and 7 h in 2-d-old and 10-d-old cells, respectively. Treatment of 1-day-old monocytes with actinomycin D for 24 h blocked the increase in transglutaminase levels. These results indicated that the induction of gene transcription and protein synthesis was responsible for the increased transglutaminase levels and activity observed with cultured human monocytes. The induction of tissue transglutaminase may be a component in the in vivo differentiation of human monocytes into macrophages. PMID:6141210

  13. Piperine inhibits cytokine production by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Chuchawankul, S; Khorana, N; Poovorawan, Y

    2012-01-01

    Piperine, an amide isolated from Piper species (Piperaceae), has been reported to exhibit central nervous system depression, anti-pyretic and anti-inflammatory activity. Immunomodulatory and anti-tumor activity of piperine has been demonstrated in mouse carcinomas. However, there is little information available concerning the effect of piperine on humans. We evaluated the immunopharmacological activity of this compound in human immune cells. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were exposed to piperine, and cell proliferation was determined by the MTS assay. Piperine significantly inhibited phytohemagglutinin-stimulated human PBMC proliferation after exposure for 72 h. This compound inhibited PBMC activity, with an IC(50) of 100.73 ± 11.16 μg/mL. Production of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and interferon-γ (IFN-γ) was measured using an ELISA assay and RT-PCR. Piperine inhibited IL-2 and IFN-γ production in the PBMCs. RT-PCR data indicated that IL-2 and IFN-γ mRNA expression in PBMCs is suppressed by piperine. This compound significantly inhibited the production of these two cytokines by activated PBMCs in a dose-dependent manner. In conclusion, piperine appears to have potential as an immunomodulatory agent for immune system suppression. PMID:22535397

  14. Prescribing benzodiazepines for noninstitutionalized elderly.

    PubMed Central

    Thomson, M.; Smith, W. A.

    1995-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To describe benzodiazepine prescribing for elderly people living in the community in British Columbia, and to compare such prescribing with an indicator of current guidelines. DESIGN: Descriptive analysis of pharmacy billing data. SETTING: Province of British Columbia. PARTICIPANTS: All elderly persons (age 65 and older) dispensed benzodiazepines by community pharmacies in British Columbia during 1990. MAIN OUTCOME MEASURE: Potentially inappropriate prescriptions were defined by a maximum 2-month limit of 20 diazepam equivalents daily, as determined by the BC Drug Usage Review Program in consultation with experts in the field. Physicians' rates of potentially inappropriate prescribing were determined per 100 benzodiazepine prescriptions written. RESULTS: Almost 24% of elderly people in British Columbia were prescribed benzodiazepines at least once during 1990. Of these, 17.1% were given potentially inappropriate prescriptions. Physicians who prescribed benzodiazepines most frequently had the highest rates of potentially inappropriate prescriptions. CONCLUSION: Prescribing practice does not correspond with our indicator of current guidelines. PMID:7756916

  15. Prokineticins in central and peripheral control of human reproduction.

    PubMed

    Traboulsi, Wael; Brouillet, Sophie; Sergent, Frederic; Boufettal, Houssine; Samouh, Naima; Aboussaouira, Touria; Hoffmann, Pascale; Feige, Jean Jacques; Benharouga, Mohamed; Alfaidy, Nadia

    2015-11-01

    Prokineticin 1 (PROK1) and (PROK2), are two closely related proteins that were identified as the mammalian homologs of their two amphibian homologs, mamba intestinal toxin (MIT-1) and Bv8. PROKs activate two G-protein linked receptors (prokineticin receptor 1 and 2, PROKR1 and PROKR2). Both PROK1 and PROK2 have been found to regulate a stunning array of biological functions. In particular, PROKs stimulate gastrointestinal motility, thus accounting for their family name "prokineticins". PROK1 acts as a potent angiogenic mitogen, thus earning its other name, endocrine gland-derived vascular endothelial factor. In contrast, PROK2 signaling pathway has been shown to be a critical regulator of olfactory bulb morphogenesis and sexual maturation. During the last decade, strong evidences established the key roles of prokineticins in the control of human central and peripheral reproductive processes. PROKs act as main regulators of the physiological functions of the ovary, uterus, placenta, and testis, with marked dysfunctions in various pathological conditions such as recurrent pregnancy loss, and preeclampsia. PROKs have also been associated to the tumor development of some of these organs. In the central system, prokineticins control the migration of GnRH neurons, a key process that controls reproductive functions. Importantly, mutations in PROK2 and PROKR2 are associated to the development of Kallmann syndrome, with direct consequences on the reproductive system. This review describes the finely tuned actions of prokineticins in the control of the central and peripheral reproductive processes. Also, it discusses future research directions for the use of these cytokines as diagnostic markers for several reproductive diseases.

  16. Drugs of abuse and benzodiazepines in the Madrid Region (Central Spain): seasonal variation in river waters, occurrence in tap water and potential environmental and human risk.

    PubMed

    Mendoza, A; Rodríguez-Gil, J L; González-Alonso, S; Mastroianni, N; López de Alda, M; Barceló, D; Valcárcel, Y

    2014-09-01

    This work analyzes the seasonal variation (winter and summer) of ten drugs of abuse, six metabolites and three benzodiazepines in surface waters from the Jarama and Manzanares Rivers in the Madrid Region, the most densely populated area in Spain. The occurrence of these compounds in tap water in this region is also investigated and a preliminary human health risk characterization performed for those substances found in tap water. Finally, a screening level risk assessment that combines the measured environmental concentrations (MECs) with dose-response data to estimate Hazard Quotients (HQs) for the compounds studied is also presented. The results of this study show the presence of fourteen out of the nineteen compounds analyzed in winter and twelve of them in summer. The most ubiquitous compounds, with a frequency of detection of 100% in both seasons, were the cocaine metabolite benzoylecgonine (BE), the amphetamine-type stimulant (ATS) ephedrine (EPH), the opioid methadone (METH), the METH metabolite 2-ethylene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP), and the three benzodiazepines investigated, namely alprazolam (ALP), diazepam (DIA) and lorazepam (LOR). The highest concentrations observed corresponded to EPH (1020ngL(-1) in winter and 250ngL(-1) in summer). The only compounds not detected in both seasons were heroin (HER) and its metabolite 6-acetylmorphine (6ACM), lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and its metabolite 2-oxo-3-hydroxy-LSD (O-H-LSD), and Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). In terms of overall concentration, all sampling points presented higher concentrations in winter than in summer. Statistical analyses performed to gather evidence concerning occasional seasonal differences in the concentrations of individual substances between summer and winter showed statistically significantly higher concentrations (p<0.05) of BE, EPH and the opioid morphine (MOR) in winter than in summer. Two out of the nineteen compounds studied, namely cocaine (CO) and EPH

  17. Distribution and Development of Peripheral Glial Cells in the Human Fetal Cochlea

    PubMed Central

    Locher, Heiko; de Groot, John C. M. J.; van Iperen, Liesbeth; Huisman, Margriet A.; Frijns, Johan H. M.; Chuva de Sousa Lopes, Susana M.

    2014-01-01

    The adult human cochlea contains various types of peripheral glial cells that envelop or myelinate the three different domains of the spiral ganglion neurons: the central processes in the cochlear nerve, the cell bodies in the spiral ganglia, and the peripheral processes in the osseous spiral lamina. Little is known about the distribution, lineage separation and maturation of these peripheral glial cells in the human fetal cochlea. In the current study, we observed peripheral glial cells expressing SOX10, SOX9 and S100B as early as 9 weeks of gestation (W9) in all three neuronal domains. We propose that these cells are the common precursor to both mature Schwann cells and satellite glial cells. Additionally, the peripheral glial cells located along the peripheral processes expressed NGFR, indicating a phenotype distinct from the peripheral glial cells located along the central processes. From W12, the spiral ganglion was gradually populated by satellite glial cells in a spatiotemporal gradient. In the cochlear nerve, radial sorting was accomplished by W22 and myelination started prior to myelination of the peripheral processes. The developmental dynamics of the peripheral glial cells in the human fetal cochlea is in support of a neural crest origin. Our study provides the first overview of the distribution and maturation of peripheral glial cells in the human fetal cochlea from W9 to W22. PMID:24498246

  18. Biologically active low density lipoprotein in human peripheral lymph.

    PubMed Central

    Reichl, D; Myant, N B; Brown, M S; Goldstein, J L

    1978-01-01

    We have compared the ability of human serum and peripheral lymph to suppress the activity of 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-coenzyme A reductase (HMG-CoA reductase), to activate cholesteryl ester synthesis, and to compete with 125I-labeled low density lipoprotein (LDL) for binding to LDL receptors in cultured human fibroblasts. Whole lymph was active in all three tests and the activity per unit volume in lymph was approximately equal to 1/10th that in serum. All three biologic activities in lymph were confined to the d less than 1.063 g/ml fraction. Whole lymph had no significant effect on HMG-CoA reductase activity in fibroblasts from a patient with homozygous familial hypercholesterolemia, whose cells lack LDL receptors. The LDL-like biologic activity per unit mass of immunologically active apoprotein B was approximately the same in lymph as in serum. The current data indicate that functionally active LDL is present in lymph and that the concentration of this lipoprotein is approximately equal to 1/10th that in serum. PMID:201669

  19. Pharmacodynamics of benzodiazepines.

    PubMed

    Stahmer, S D

    1985-10-26

    Twenty benzodiazepines (BDZs) are at present registered in the RSA. They are anxiolytic, sedative, hypnotic, anticonvulsant and possibly muscle relaxant. Structure-activity relationships are important in modelling BDZ molecules for optimum binding to receptors. Electrophysiological, behavioural and neurochemical effects of BDZs are good indicators of therapeutic potential, and help to elucidate mechanism(s) of action. Specific BDZ receptors on neurons (gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-receptor-associated) and on astrocytes (not associated with GABA receptors) exist in the mammalian central nervous system. BDZs enhance GABA neurotransmission. Selective BDZ antagonists (e.g. Ro 15-1788) are important as research tools, and potentially as diagnostic aids and therapeutic agents. Other possible mechanisms for BDZ action include the roles of adenosine and serotonin. Endogenous BDZ-receptor ligands (e.g. inosine, hypoxanthine, nicotinamide) may be important, but the physiological role of BDZ receptors remains speculative. PMID:2865820

  20. Bioenergetic analysis of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Jones, N; Piasecka, J; Bryant, A H; Jones, R H; Skibinski, D O F; Francis, Nigel J; Thornton, C A

    2015-10-01

    Leucocytes respond rapidly to pathogenic and other insults, with responses ranging from cytokine production to migration and phagocytosis. These are bioenergetically expensive, and increased glycolytic flux provides adenosine triphosphate (ATP) rapidly to support these essential functions. However, much of this work is from animal studies. To understand more clearly the relative role of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation in human leucocytes, especially their utility in a translational research setting, we undertook a study of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MNCs) bioenergetics. Glycolysis was essential during lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α production, as 2-deoxy-D-glucose decreased significantly the output of all three cytokines. After optimizing cell numbers and the concentrations of all activators and inhibitors, oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis profiles of fresh and cryopreserved/resuscitated MNCs were determined to explore the utility of MNCs for determining the bioenergetics health profile in multiple clinical settings. While the LPS-induced cytokine response did not differ significantly between fresh and resuscitated cells from the same donors, cryopreservation/resuscitation significantly affected mainly some measures of oxidative phosphorylation, but also glycolysis. Bioenergetics analysis of human MNCs provides a quick, effective means to measure the bioenergetics health index of many individuals, but cryopreserved cells are not suitable for such an analysis. The translational utility of this approach was tested by comparing MNCs of pregnant and non-pregnant women to reveal increased bioenergetics health index with pregnancy but significantly reduced basal glycolysis and glycolytic capacity. More detailed analysis of discrete leucocyte populations would be required to understand the relative roles of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation during inflammation and

  1. Bioenergetic analysis of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    Jones, N; Piasecka, J; Bryant, A H; Jones, R H; Skibinski, D O F; Francis, Nigel J; Thornton, C A

    2015-01-01

    Leucocytes respond rapidly to pathogenic and other insults, with responses ranging from cytokine production to migration and phagocytosis. These are bioenergetically expensive, and increased glycolytic flux provides adenosine triphosphate (ATP) rapidly to support these essential functions. However, much of this work is from animal studies. To understand more clearly the relative role of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation in human leucocytes, especially their utility in a translational research setting, we undertook a study of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (MNCs) bioenergetics. Glycolysis was essential during lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-mediated interleukin (IL)−1β, IL-6 and tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α production, as 2-deoxy-D-glucose decreased significantly the output of all three cytokines. After optimizing cell numbers and the concentrations of all activators and inhibitors, oxidative phosphorylation and glycolysis profiles of fresh and cryopreserved/resuscitated MNCs were determined to explore the utility of MNCs for determining the bioenergetics health profile in multiple clinical settings. While the LPS-induced cytokine response did not differ significantly between fresh and resuscitated cells from the same donors, cryopreservation/resuscitation significantly affected mainly some measures of oxidative phosphorylation, but also glycolysis. Bioenergetics analysis of human MNCs provides a quick, effective means to measure the bioenergetics health index of many individuals, but cryopreserved cells are not suitable for such an analysis. The translational utility of this approach was tested by comparing MNCs of pregnant and non-pregnant women to reveal increased bioenergetics health index with pregnancy but significantly reduced basal glycolysis and glycolytic capacity. More detailed analysis of discrete leucocyte populations would be required to understand the relative roles of glycolysis and oxidative phosphorylation during inflammation and

  2. Distribution of lead-203 in human peripheral blood in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Ong, C N; Lee, W R

    1980-01-01

    In-vitro experiments using 203Pb were performed to identify the lead binding components in human peripheral blood. The distribution of lead in plasma, in the red cell membrane, and within the red cell was also investigated. Studies of the distribution of 203Pb in whole blood showed that at a lead concentration of 2.45 mumol/l (50 micrograms/100 ml) about 94% of lead had been incorporated by the erythrocytes and 6% remained in the plasma. After extraction of lipid by a methanol/chloroform mixture, about 75% of the lead was found to be associated with the protein fraction. The lipid contained about 21% of the 203Pb, the remainder being in the aqueous plasma. SDS polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of blood plasma showed that almost 90% of the 203Pb was present in the albumin fraction; the remainder was likely to be associated with high molecular weight globulins. Several binding sites were identified on the erythrocyte membrane. The high molecular weight component, about 130 000-230 000, was the most important 203Pb binding site. Chemical modification of membrane proteins suggested that the carboxyl groups are the major ligand responsible for most of the lead binding. SH groups of the membrane may have a minor role, but amino groups did not appear to affect the lead binding. The binding of lead to erythrocytes was not confined to membranes, over 80% of lead in blood penetrates into erythrocytes and binds to intracellular components. Gel chromatography of the haemolysate showed that over 90% of the 203Pb was attached to the haemoglobin molecule. PMID:7370196

  3. Radioiodinated benzodiazepines: agents for mapping glial tumors

    SciTech Connect

    Van Dort, M.E.; Ciliax, B.J.; Gildersleeve, D.L.; Sherman, P.S.; Rosenspire, K.C.; Young, A.B.; Junck, L.; Wieland, D.M.

    1988-11-01

    Two isomeric iodinated analogues of the peripheral benzodiazepine binding site (PBS) ligand Ro5-4864 have been synthesized and labeled in high specific activity with iodine-125. Competitive binding assays conducted with the unlabeled analogues indicate high affinity for PBS. Tissue biodistribution studies in rats with these /sup 125/I-labeled ligands indicate high uptake of radioactivity in the adrenals, heart, and kidney--tissues known to have high concentrations of PBS. Preadministration of the potent PBS antagonist PK 11195 blocked in vivo uptake in adrenal tissue by over 75%, but to a lesser degree in other normal tissues. In vivo binding autoradiography in brain conducted in C6 glioma bearing rats showed dense, PBS-mediated accumulation of radioactivity in the tumor. Ligand 6 labeled with /sup 123/I may have potential for scintigraphic localization of intracranial glioma.

  4. The use of benzodiazepines in clinical practice

    PubMed Central

    Shader, R. I.; Greenblatt, D. J.

    1981-01-01

    1 The pharmacokinetic characteristics of the six benzodiazepine anxiolytic drugs available in the United States are reviewed. 2 Concern over the abuse potential of the benzodiazepine class of drugs is discussed. PMID:6133535

  5. Generation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Using Sendai Virus.

    PubMed

    Soares, Filipa A C; Pedersen, Roger A; Vallier, Ludovic

    2016-01-01

    This protocol describes the efficient isolation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells from circulating blood via density gradient centrifugation and subsequent generation of integration-free human induced pluripotent stem cells. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells are cultured for 9 days to allow expansion of the erythroblast population. The erythroblasts are then used to derive human induced pluripotent stem cells using Sendai viral vectors, each expressing one of the four reprogramming factors Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc.

  6. Use and abuse of benzodiazepines*

    PubMed Central

    1983-01-01

    Benzodiazepines are widely used for the treatment of anxiety, insomnia, and certain neuromuscular and convulsive disorders. However, their widespread availability has given rise to fears that they are over-prescribed. The problem is compounded by the fact that there is no universal agreement among medical practitioners as to the clinical indications warranting the use of these drugs. Although most industrialized countries exercise control over the sale and manufacture of benzodiazepines, many developing countries do not have sufficient control of these drugs. As a result, information on drug utilization and associated problems is difficult to obtain and there is a lack of comparative data on drug consumption in different countries. The present article describes the current knowledge on the pharmacological, clinical, and epidemiological characteristics of benzodiazepines, and the problems associated with their use, and indicates areas where more research is needed. Recommendations are made for future work. PMID:6605211

  7. [239Pu and chromosomal aberrations in human peripheral blood lymphocytes].

    PubMed

    Okladnikova, N D; Osovets, S V; Kudriavtseva, T I

    2009-01-01

    The genome status in somatic cells was assessed using the chromosomal aberration (CA) test in peripheral blood lymphocytes from 194 plutonium workers exposed to occupational radiation mainly from low-transportable compounds of airborne 230Pu. Pu body burden at the time of cytogenetic study varied from values close to the method sensitivity to values multiply exceeding the permissible level. Standard (routine) methods of peripheral blood lymphocytes cultivation were applied. Chromatid- and chromosomal-type structural changes were estimated. Aberrations were estimated per 100 examined metaphase cells. The quantitative relationship between the CA frequency and Pu body burden and the absorbed dose to the lung was found. Mathematical processing of results was carried out based on the phenomenological model. The results were shown as theoretical and experimental curves. The threshold of the CA yield was 0.43 +/- 0.03 kBq (Pu body burden) and 6.12 +/- 1.20 cGy (absorbed dose to the lung).

  8. Interactions of benzodiazepines on psychomotor skills

    PubMed Central

    Mattila, M. J.

    1984-01-01

    1 Interactions of centrally active drugs are difficult to analyse in man due to methodological and ethical problems. 2 Alcoholic and methylxanthine beverages are the most common centrally active agents that might modify the effects of benzodiazepines on performance. In sufficiently large doses ethanol enhances the effects of benzodiazepines, even those that are not metabolized by mixed function oxidases sensitive to blockade by ethanol. Consequently, the combined effect of ethanol and benzodiazepines may occur at the receptor level and/or result from altered binding of benzodiazepines to plasma proteins. 3 Newer benzodiazepines may differ from the older in their interactions. Caffeine and theophylline counteract benzodiazepine effects on performance, resulting perhaps from the blockade of adenosine receptors which could be linked with the GABA-benzodiazepine receptor system. 4 Central stimulants of the amphetamine type also counteract benzodiazepine effects in a somewhat selective way. New stimulant antidepressants rather counteract than increase benzodiazepine effects. Central antimuscarinics in combination with benzodiazepines are detrimental for memory. Specific benzodiazepine antagonists are effective also in man but without known clinical applications. PMID:6151848

  9. The induction of human peripheral blood lymphoid colonies by conditioned media from human tumour cell lines.

    PubMed Central

    Vesole, D H; Moore, G E

    1980-01-01

    Conditioned medium (CM) from 29 human tumour cell lines and 3 malignant pleural fluids were tested for their ability to stimulate lymphoid colony formation in semi-solid agar; 9 of 14 malignant melanomas, 3 of 6 colonic carcinomas, 2 of 5 ovarian carcinomas, 3 of 4 breast carcinomas and 1 of 3 pleural fluids from breast cancer patients contained colony-stimulating activity (CSA) for human peripheral blood lymphoid cells (PBL) in semi-solid agar. Conditioned media also stimulated PBL proliferation in liquid medium; these effects were dose dependent. With the exception of one pleural fluid, extensive dialysis of CM did not significantly increase colony formation; CM from two tumour cell lines demonstrated a significant decrease in the induction of colony formation after dialysis. PMID:6970165

  10. The effect of background variables on human peripheral lymphocyte micronuclei.

    PubMed

    Yager, J W

    1990-01-01

    Application of biological methods for assessment of occupational and environmental exposure to single agents or complex mixtures is optimized by determination of the possible influence of background factors on the biological endpoint of interest. Analysis of micronuclei in peripheral blood lymphocytes using the cytokinesis-block method was performed on healthy volunteers up to three times for each individual at intervals of approximately four months. Questionnaires were administered to ascertain recent health history and lifestyle factors such as smoking and drinking habits. Results to date indicate that age (r = 0.45, p = 0.001) and estimated number of diagnostic X-rays during the past year (r = 0.35, p = 0.01) contribute significantly to increased frequency of micronuclei. Information on the potential influence of background factors is critical for appropriate statistical analysis of data from occupational and population monitoring studies that utilize the cytokinesis block lymphocyte micronucleus assay to assess exposure to genotoxic agents.

  11. Immunotoxicity Assessment of Rice-Derived Recombinant Human Serum Albumin Using Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Fu, Kai; Cheng, Qin; Liu, Zhenwei; Chen, Zhen; Wang, Yan; Ruan, Honggang; Zhou, Lu; Xiong, Jie; Xiao, Ruijing; Liu, Shengwu; Zhang, Qiuping; Yang, Daichang

    2014-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is extensively used in clinics to treat a variety of diseases, such as hypoproteinemia, hemorrhagic shock, serious burn injuries, cirrhotic ascites and fetal erythroblastosis. To address supply shortages and high safety risks from limited human donors, we recently developed recombinant technology to produce HSA from rice endosperm. To assess the risk potential of HSA derived from Oryza sativa (OsrHSA) before a First-in-human (FIH) trial, we compared OsrHSA and plasma-derived HSA (pHSA), evaluating the potential for an immune reaction and toxicity using human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The results indicated that neither OsrHSA nor pHSA stimulated T cell proliferation at 1x and 5x dosages. We also found no significant differences in the profiles of the CD4+ and CD8+ T cell subsets between OsrHSA- and pHSA-treated cells. Furthermore, the results showed that there were no significant differences between OsrHSA and pHSA in the production of cytokines such as interferon-gamma (IFN-γ), tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNF-α), interleukin (IL)-10 and IL-4. Our results demonstrated that OsrHSA has equivalent immunotoxicity to pHSA when using the PBMC model. Moreover, this ex vivo system could provide an alternative approach to predict potential risks in novel biopharmaceutical development. PMID:25099245

  12. Do benzodiazepines contribute to respiratory problems?

    PubMed

    Vozoris, Nicholas T

    2014-12-01

    Non-selective benzodiazepines are a class of sedative and anxiolytic medication that are commonly prescribed. Physiology studies and animal studies suggest that non-selective benzodiazepines may adversely impact respiration through a variety of mechanisms. Several recent, well-designed, population-based observational studies confirm that benzodiazepine-related negative respiratory outcomes are a concern. In this article, the mechanisms and clinical evidence for non-selective benzodiazepine-related adverse respiratory outcomes, as well as the methodological issues relating to the evaluation of adverse drug effects are reviewed.

  13. New method to differentiate human peripheral blood monocytes into insulin producing cells: Human hematosphere culture.

    PubMed

    Hur, Jin; Yang, Ji Min; Choi, Jae-Il; Yun, Ji-Yeon; Jang, Jae Hee; Kim, Joonoh; Kim, Ju-Young; Oh, Il-Young; Yoon, Chang-Hwan; Cho, Hyun-Jai; Park, Young-Bae; Kim, Hyo-Soo

    2012-02-24

    Strategy to differentiate stem cells into insulin producing cells (IPCs) in vitro has been a promising one to get cell source of β-cell replacement therapy for diabetes. It has been suggested that islets and neurons share features and nestin-positive cells could differentiate into IPCs. We have recently developed a three-dimensional culture system using human peripheral blood cells named as blood-born hematosphere (BBHS). Here we showed that most of BBHS were composed of nestin-positive cells. Under the four-stage differentiation protocol for IPCs, we plated nestin-positive BBHS onto fibronectin-coated dish. These cells form islet-like clusters and most of them expressed insulin. Pancreatic specific genes were turned on, such as transcription factors (Pdx-1, Ngn3 and Nkx6.1), genes related to endocrine function (Glut-2 and PC2) or β cell function (Kir6.2, SUR1). Furthermore islet differentiation was confirmed by dithizone (DTZ) staining to detect zinc ion which binds insulin protein within the cells. Finally, IPCs derived from BBHS showed capability to secrete insulin in response to glucose stimulation. Taken together, our novel protocol successfully induced islet-like human insulin producing cells out of BBHS. This strategy of ex vivo expansion of IPCs using BBHS provides an autologous therapeutic cell source for the treatment of diabetes. PMID:22310720

  14. Benzodiazepine receptor ligand influences on acquisition: suggestion of an endogenous modulatory mechanism mediated by benzodiazepine receptors.

    PubMed

    Izquierdo, I; Pereira, M E; Medina, J H

    1990-07-01

    In rats, pretraining ip administration of the central benzodiazepine receptor antagonist, flumazenil (5.0 mg/kg), or of the inverse agonist, n-butyl-beta-carboline-3-carboxylate (BCCB) (0.2 or 0.5 mg/kg), facilitated retention of a step-down inhibitory avoidance task; the central agonists, clonazepam and diazepam (0.4 or 1.0 mg/kg), had an opposite effect, and the peripheral agonist, 4'-chlordiazepam (1.25 or 6.25 mg/kg), was without effect. Pre- but not post-training flumazenil (2.0 mg/kg) blocked the effect of BCCB (0.5 mg/kg), clonazepam (1.0 mg/kg), or diazepam (1.0 mg/kg) given also pretraining. The post-training administration of all of these drugs had no effect on retention of the avoidance task. Flumazenil (5.0 mg/kg) and BCCB (0.5 mg/kg), given before training, enhanced retention test performance of habituation to a buzzer but not of habituation to an open field. In the three tasks studied, none of the drugs used had any appreciable effect on training session parameters. These results suggest that there is an endogenous mechanism mediated by benzodiazepine agonists, sensitive to inverse agonists, that normally down-regulates acquisition of certain behaviors; this mechanism becomes activated only when the tasks involve or occur with a certain degree of stress or anxiety (i.e., inhibitory avoidance or habituation to the buzzer) and not in less stressful or anxiogenic tasks (i.e., habituation to an open field).

  15. Genotoxicity test of self-renovated ceramics in primary human peripheral lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Hua, Nan; Zhu, Huifang; Zhuang, Jing; Chen, Liping

    2014-12-01

    Zirconia-based ceramics is widely used in dentistry. Different compositions of ceramics have different features. Our self-renovated ceramics become more machinable without scarifying its dental restoration properties after adjusting ratio of lanthanum phosphate (LaPO4)/yttrium oxide (Y2O3). In order to evaluate its safety, here, we tested its genotoxicity in primary human peripheral lymphocytes. The human lymphocytes cultured on three groups of different ratios of LaPO4/Y2O3 diphase ceramics for 6 days showed little effect of growth inhibition and similar effect of growth trend to the negative control. Furthermore, single-cell gel electrophoresis (comet assay) indicated that there was no significant difference of the value of tail moment between the tested ceramics and negative control, the IPS Empress II (P > 0.05). Our findings implicate that our self-renovated ceramics do not induce DNA damages in human peripheral lymphocytes and support their future clinic application.

  16. Structure and localization of the gene encoding human peripheral myelin protein 2 (PMP2)

    SciTech Connect

    Hayasaka, Kiyoshi; Himoro, Masato; Takada, Goro ); Takahashi, Ei-Ichi ); Minoshima, Shinsei; Shimizu, Nobuyoshi )

    1993-11-01

    Peripheral myelin protein 2 (PMP2) is a small, basic, and cytoplasmic lipid-binding protein of peripheral myelin. In this paper, the authors describe the cloning, characterization, and chromosomal mapping of the human PMP2 gene. The gene is about 8 kb long and consists of four exons. All exon-intron junction sequences conform to the GT/AG rule. The 5[prime]-flanking region of the gene has a TA-rich element (TATA-like box) and a single defined transcription initiation site detected by the primer extension method. The gene for human PMP2 was assigned to chromosome 8q21.3-q22.1 by spot hybridization of flow-sorted human chromosomes and fluorescence in situ hybridization. 29 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  17. Thyroxine differentially modulates the peripheral clock: lessons from the human hair follicle.

    PubMed

    Hardman, Jonathan A; Haslam, Iain S; Farjo, Nilofer; Farjo, Bessam; Paus, Ralf

    2015-01-01

    The human hair follicle (HF) exhibits peripheral clock activity, with knock-down of clock genes (BMAL1 and PER1) prolonging active hair growth (anagen) and increasing pigmentation. Similarly, thyroid hormones prolong anagen and stimulate pigmentation in cultured human HFs. In addition they are recognized as key regulators of the central clock that controls circadian rhythmicity. Therefore, we asked whether thyroxine (T4) also influences peripheral clock activity in the human HF. Over 24 hours we found a significant reduction in protein levels of BMAL1 and PER1, with their transcript levels also decreasing significantly. Furthermore, while all clock genes maintained their rhythmicity in both the control and T4 treated HFs, there was a significant reduction in the amplitude of BMAL1 and PER1 in T4 (100 nM) treated HFs. Accompanying this, cell-cycle progression marker Cyclin D1 was also assessed appearing to show an induced circadian rhythmicity by T4 however, this was not significant. Contrary to short term cultures, after 6 days, transcript and/or protein levels of all core clock genes (BMAL1, PER1, clock, CRY1, CRY2) were up-regulated in T4 treated HFs. BMAL1 and PER1 mRNA was also up-regulated in the HF bulge, the location of HF epithelial stem cells. Together this provides the first direct evidence that T4 modulates the expression of the peripheral molecular clock. Thus, patients with thyroid dysfunction may also show a disordered peripheral clock, which raises the possibility that short term, pulsatile treatment with T4 might permit one to modulate circadian activity in peripheral tissues as a target to treat clock-related disease.

  18. Regulation of human peripheral blood monocyte DR antigen expression in vitro by lymphokines and recombinant interferons.

    PubMed Central

    Sztein, M B; Steeg, P S; Johnson, H M; Oppenheim, J J

    1984-01-01

    The in vitro regulation of adult human monocyte DR antigen expression was studied. Normally about 75% of freshly obtained human peripheral blood monocytes express DR antigens as determined by anti-DR and complement-mediated cytotoxicity assays. DR expression on monocytes in unfractionated peripheral blood mononuclear cell cultures persisted to variable degrees for up to 5 d of incubation. However, when the mononuclear cells were thoroughly depleted of nonadherent cells, cultured monocytes consistently exhibited progressively decreased DR expression over 2-5 d of incubation. Readdition of nonadherent cells to the adherent cell population prevented or delayed this decrease in monocyte DR antigen expression. Thus, monocyte DR expression diminished markedly during in vitro incubation; however, the presence of nonadherent cells somehow interfered with this process. In other experiments, peripheral adherent monocytes, which had been cultured for 2-3 d to reduce their DR expression, could be induced to reexpress DR antigens after 2 d of incubation with unpurified lymphokine-containing culture supernatants, recombinant human interferon-alpha, or recombinant human gamma interferon (IFN-gamma). The reinduction of DR expression on human monocytes by lymphokines was abrogated by an antiserum produced to the synthetic N-terminal amino acids of human IFN-gamma, indicating that IFN-gamma is the active mediator in the lymphokine-containing preparations. Monocytes cultured with lymphokines or recombinant interferons also could initiate a significantly greater mixed lymphocyte response than control monocytes. Thus, IFN-gamma-containing lymphokines and recombinant interferons are required to induce human monocyte DR expression and accessory cell capacity in vitro, since in their absence monocytes become DR antigen-deficient. Finally, incubation of unfractionated human mononuclear cells with anti-human IFN-gamma also promoted the loss of monocyte DR expression. These findings suggest

  19. Ectopic lymphokine gene expression in human peripheral blood lymphocytes in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Chambers, C.A.; Kang, Joonsoo; Hozumi, Nobumichi Mount Sinai Hospital, Toronto, Ontario )

    1992-02-01

    An animal model to study the effects of ectopic expression of cytokines involved in cell growth and differentiation has been established. Retrovirus vectors containing the human interleukin 6 cDNA were used to produce high titer virus-producing lines. Human peripheral blood lymphocytes (hPBLs) were successfully infected with the retrovirus and engrafted into severe combined immunodeficient mice. The majority of the animals were engrafted with hPBLs, as determined by the presence of human glucose phosphate isomerase. Furthermore, six of seven mice engrafted with hPBLs infected with high titer virus and detectable hPBLs present in the spleen expressed the retroviral human interleukin 6 gene. Importantly, human interleukin 6 protein was expressed at physiologically significant levels in these mice. These results demonstrate that models for human disease and immunotherapy involving retrovirus-mediated gene transfer into human cells can be developed in mice.

  20. 21 CFR 862.3170 - Benzodiazepine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Benzodiazepine test system. 862.3170 Section 862....3170 Benzodiazepine test system. (a) Identification. A benzodiazepine test system is a device intended to measure any of the benzodiazepine compounds, sedative and hypnotic drugs, in blood, plasma,...

  1. 21 CFR 862.3170 - Benzodiazepine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Benzodiazepine test system. 862.3170 Section 862....3170 Benzodiazepine test system. (a) Identification. A benzodiazepine test system is a device intended to measure any of the benzodiazepine compounds, sedative and hypnotic drugs, in blood, plasma,...

  2. 21 CFR 862.3170 - Benzodiazepine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Benzodiazepine test system. 862.3170 Section 862....3170 Benzodiazepine test system. (a) Identification. A benzodiazepine test system is a device intended to measure any of the benzodiazepine compounds, sedative and hypnotic drugs, in blood, plasma,...

  3. 21 CFR 862.3170 - Benzodiazepine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Benzodiazepine test system. 862.3170 Section 862....3170 Benzodiazepine test system. (a) Identification. A benzodiazepine test system is a device intended to measure any of the benzodiazepine compounds, sedative and hypnotic drugs, in blood, plasma,...

  4. 21 CFR 862.3170 - Benzodiazepine test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Benzodiazepine test system. 862.3170 Section 862....3170 Benzodiazepine test system. (a) Identification. A benzodiazepine test system is a device intended to measure any of the benzodiazepine compounds, sedative and hypnotic drugs, in blood, plasma,...

  5. An antiviral target on reverse transcriptase of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 revealed by tetrahydroimidazo-[4,5,1-jk] [1,4]benzodiazepin-2 (1H)-one and -thione derivatives.

    PubMed Central

    Debyser, Z; Pauwels, R; Andries, K; Desmyter, J; Kukla, M; Janssen, P A; De Clercq, E

    1991-01-01

    Screening of pharmacologically acceptable prototype compounds has recently led to the discovery of a series of ultraselective inhibitors of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-1 replication, the tetrahydroimidazo[4,5,1-jk] [1,4]-benzodiazepin-2(1H)-one and -thione (TIBO) derivatives. The TIBO compounds completely suppress the formation of proviral DNA in acutely infected cells, as revealed by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) analysis. TIBO derivatives are inhibitory to the reverse transcriptase (RT) of HIV-1 but not that of HIV-2 or other retroviruses. The inhibition is most effective with poly(C)-oligo(dG) as the template/primer, and it is selectively directed against the RNA-dependent DNA polymerase activity and not the accompanying DNA-dependent DNA polymerase and ribonuclease H activity of HIV-1 RT. Kinetic studies point to an uncompetitive inhibition with regard to the template/primer. TIBO compounds are active against HIV-1 replication through a unique interaction with HIV-1 RT. The experimental data indicate the existence of a target on HIV-1 RT that is responsible for the inhibition of replication and a mode of action unrelated to that of previously studied RT inhibitors. Images PMID:1705038

  6. Long-Term Use of Benzodiazepines

    PubMed Central

    Potts, Nicholas L.S.; Krishnan, K. Ranga R.

    1992-01-01

    Problems associated with physical dependence and abuse of benzodiazepines by a small percentage of patients have reduced their popularity from the most commonly prescribed psychoactive drug in the 1970s to being prescribed for mainly short periods. Patients who benefit from long-term benzodiazepine use are nearly ignored by the medical community as a whole. This article details what patient population can improve from long-term benzodiazepine therapy, the risks and benefits of treatment, and how to select appropriate candidates. PMID:21229127

  7. Benzodiazepines consumption: does dependence vary with age?

    PubMed

    Gérardin, Marie; Victorri-Vigneau, Caroline; Guerlais, Marylène; Guillou-Landreat, Morgane; Grall-Bronnec, Marie; Jolliet, Pascale

    2014-09-01

    We have compared two groups of chronic benzodiazepines (or zolpidem/zopiclone) users: "Seniors," aged 65 years or more, and "Adults," aged less than 65 years. The study took place in the Pays de Loire region. The questionnaire assesses dependence based on items from the DSM-IV. The analysis was based on 176 Senior questionnaires and 212 Adult questionnaires. Whereas Senior patients take benzodiazepines routinely with little negative consequences, Adults suffer from underlying psychological trouble, mention a higher consumption than planned, which causes negative consequences. 35.2% of Seniors are dependent on benzodiazepines versus 49.8% of Adults. PMID:24810390

  8. Benzodiazepines consumption: does dependence vary with age?

    PubMed

    Gérardin, Marie; Victorri-Vigneau, Caroline; Guerlais, Marylène; Guillou-Landreat, Morgane; Grall-Bronnec, Marie; Jolliet, Pascale

    2014-09-01

    We have compared two groups of chronic benzodiazepines (or zolpidem/zopiclone) users: "Seniors," aged 65 years or more, and "Adults," aged less than 65 years. The study took place in the Pays de Loire region. The questionnaire assesses dependence based on items from the DSM-IV. The analysis was based on 176 Senior questionnaires and 212 Adult questionnaires. Whereas Senior patients take benzodiazepines routinely with little negative consequences, Adults suffer from underlying psychological trouble, mention a higher consumption than planned, which causes negative consequences. 35.2% of Seniors are dependent on benzodiazepines versus 49.8% of Adults.

  9. Identification, characterization, and purification of a 65,000 dalton protein in rat brain is photolabeled by nitro-containing benzodiazepines

    SciTech Connect

    Bowling, A.C.

    1988-01-01

    Benzodiazepines bind to two well-characterized classes of nanomolar-affinity binding sites, the central and the peripheral types. Although these sites appear to mediate many of the effects of these compounds, they cannot account for all of the biochemical and physiologic effects of the benzodiazepines. In this investigation, a protein that is photolabeled by NO{sub 2}-containing benzodiazepines was identified and characterized in rat brain by performing photaffinity labeling experiments with ({sup 3}H)-clonazepam and ({sup 3}H)-flunitrazepam. These experiments demonstrate that this photolabeled protein has a molecular weight of 65,000 daltons. Photolabeling of the protein was saturable, inhibited in a stereoselective manner by benzodiazepine enantiomers, inhibited by therapeutically-relevant concentrations of many different NO{sub 2}-containing benzodiazepines, and was not inhibited by more than 70 non-benzodiazepine compounds. The photolabeled protein is distinct from the central and peripheral sites on the basis of molecular weight, benzodiazepine inhibitory potencies, subcellular localization, and tissue distribution.

  10. Effects of benzodiazepines on sleep and wakefulness

    PubMed Central

    Roth, T.; Zorick, F.; Sicklesteel, Jeanne; Stepanski, E.

    1981-01-01

    The differential effects of short and long acting benzodiazepines on sleeping and waking behaviour are discussed, with particular reference to hypnotic efficacy, and their effects on the structure of sleep and daytime function. PMID:6133532

  11. Rapid flow cytometric measurement of cytokine-induced phosphorylation pathways [CIPP] in human peripheral blood leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Montag, David T; Lotze, Michael T

    2006-11-01

    Current strategies designed to assess cells in the peripheral blood are limited to evaluation of phenotype or delayed measurement [>6 h] of function, usually quantifying cytokine production, cytolytic activity, or response to antigens. We reasoned that measurable abnormalities in signaling pathways could reflect pathological environs that cells experience in the setting of inflammatory states/cancer and could be represented in the peripheral blood. Two major pathways regulating the immune response are the JAK/STAT and MAPK/ERK pathways. These pathways are initiated by ligand-receptor binding and are rapidly propagated by subsequent protein phosphorylation cascades. We evaluated the brief application of cytokines in vitro to interrogate the early phosphorylation events of these signaling pathways in normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Individual cytokine doses and time intervals of treatment were assessed to identify conditions useful in a clinical laboratory and as an initial goal to induce maximal phosphorylation. Surprisingly, all of the STAT proteins assessed and ERK1/2 are maximally phosphorylated within 15 min in human PBMC simply following addition of cytokines without preactivation of the cells. At 2 h, cells typically return to their basal phosphorylation states. For most of the cytokines tested, increased phosphorylation directly correlated with increased concentrations of the individual cytokines. These strategies will enable robust development of simple blood analyses to identify normal levels as well as impairments in STAT and MAPK/ERK signaling pathways associated with various human disease states including acute and chronic inflammatory conditions throughout clinical immunology.

  12. Receptor expression and responsiveness of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells to a human cytomegalovirus encoded CC chemokine.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Qi; Xu, Jun; Gao, Huihui; Tao, Ran; Li, Wei; Shang, Shiqiang; Gu, Weizhong

    2015-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus is a ubiquitous pathogen that infects the majority of the world's population. After long period of time co-evolving with human being, this pathogen has developed several strategies to evade host immune surveillance. One of the major trick is encoding homologous to those of the host organism or stealing host cellular genes that have significant functions in immune system. To date, we have found several viral immune analogous which include G protein coupled receptor, class I major histocompatibility complex and chemokine. Chemokine is a small group of molecules which is defined by the presence of four cysteines in highly conserved region. The four kinds of chemokines (C, CC, CXC, and CX3C) are classified based on the arrangement of 1 or 2 N-terminal cysteine residues. UL128 protein is one of the analogous that encoded by human cytomegalovirus that has similar amino acid sequences to the human CC chemokine. It has been proved to be one of the essential particles that involved in human cytomegalovirus entry into epithelial/endothelial cells as well as macrophages. It is also the target of potent neutralizing antibodies in human cytomegalovirus-seropositive individuals. We had demonstrated the chemotactic trait of UL128 protein in our previous study. Recombinant UL128 in vitro has the ability to attract monocytes to the infection region and enhances peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation by activating the MAPK/ERK signaling pathway. However, the way that this viral encoded chemokine interacting with peripheral blood mononuclear cells and the detailed mechanism that involving the virus entry into host cells keeps unknown. Here we performed in vitro investigation into the effects of UL128 protein on peripheral blood mononuclear cell's activation and receptor binding, which may help us further understand the immunomodulatory function of UL128 protein as well as human cytomegalovirus diffusion mechanism.

  13. Design, synthesis and biological evaluation of sulfamide and triazole benzodiazepines as novel p53-MDM2 inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Yu, Zhiliang; Zhuang, Chunlin; Wu, Yuelin; Guo, Zizhao; Li, Jin; Dong, Guoqiang; Yao, Jianzhong; Sheng, Chunquan; Miao, Zhenyuan; Zhang, Wannian

    2014-01-01

    A series of sulfamide and triazole benzodiazepines were obtained with the principle of bioisosterism. The p53-murine double minute 2 (MDM2) inhibitory activity and in vitro antitumor activity were evaluated. Most of the novel benzodiazepines exhibited moderate protein binding inhibitory activity. Particularly, triazole benzodiazepines showed good inhibitory activity and antitumor potency. Compound 16 had promising antitumor activity against the U-2 OS human osteosarcoma cell line with an IC50 value of 4.17 μM, which was much better than that of nutlin-3. The molecular docking model also successfully predicted that this class of compounds mimicked the three critical residues of p53 binding to MDM2.

  14. Quantification of Collagen Organization in the Peripheral Human Cornea at Micron-Scale Resolution

    PubMed Central

    Boote, Craig; Kamma-Lorger, Christina S.; Hayes, Sally; Harris, Jonathan; Burghammer, Manfred; Hiller, Jennifer; Terrill, Nicholas J.; Meek, Keith M.

    2011-01-01

    The collagen microstructure of the peripheral cornea is important in stabilizing corneal curvature and refractive status. However, the manner in which the predominantly orthogonal collagen fibrils of the central cornea integrate with the circumferential limbal collagen is unknown. We used microfocus wide-angle x-ray scattering to quantify the relative proportion and orientation of collagen fibrils over the human corneolimbal interface at intervals of 50 μm. Orthogonal fibrils changed direction 1–1.5 mm before the limbus to integrate with the circumferential limbal fibrils. Outside the central 6 mm, additional preferentially aligned collagen was found to reinforce the cornea and limbus. The manner of integration and degree of reinforcement varied significantly depending on the direction along which the limbus was approached. We also employed small-angle x-ray scattering to measure the average collagen fibril diameter from central cornea to limbus at 0.5 mm intervals. Fibril diameter was constant across the central 6 mm. More peripherally, fibril diameter increased, indicative of a merging of corneal and scleral collagen. The point of increase varied with direction, consistent with a scheme in which the oblique corneal periphery is reinforced by chords of scleral collagen. The results have implications for the cornea's biomechanical response to ocular surgeries involving peripheral incision. PMID:21723812

  15. Sleep Deprivation Impairs the Human Central and Peripheral Nervous System Discrimination of Social Threat.

    PubMed

    Goldstein-Piekarski, Andrea N; Greer, Stephanie M; Saletin, Jared M; Walker, Matthew P

    2015-07-15

    Facial expressions represent one of the most salient cues in our environment. They communicate the affective state and intent of an individual and, if interpreted correctly, adaptively influence the behavior of others in return. Processing of such affective stimuli is known to require reciprocal signaling between central viscerosensory brain regions and peripheral-autonomic body systems, culminating in accurate emotion discrimination. Despite emerging links between sleep and affective regulation, the impact of sleep loss on the discrimination of complex social emotions within and between the CNS and PNS remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate in humans that sleep deprivation impairs both viscerosensory brain (anterior insula, anterior cingulate cortex, amygdala) and autonomic-cardiac discrimination of threatening from affiliative facial cues. Moreover, sleep deprivation significantly degrades the normally reciprocal associations between these central and peripheral emotion-signaling systems, most prominent at the level of cardiac-amygdala coupling. In addition, REM sleep physiology across the sleep-rested night significantly predicts the next-day success of emotional discrimination within this viscerosensory network across individuals, suggesting a role for REM sleep in affective brain recalibration. Together, these findings establish that sleep deprivation compromises the faithful signaling of, and the "embodied" reciprocity between, viscerosensory brain and peripheral autonomic body processing of complex social signals. Such impairments hold ecological relevance in professional contexts in which the need for accurate interpretation of social cues is paramount yet insufficient sleep is pervasive. PMID:26180190

  16. Sleep Deprivation Impairs the Human Central and Peripheral Nervous System Discrimination of Social Threat

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein-Piekarski, Andrea N.; Greer, Stephanie M.; Saletin, Jared M.

    2015-01-01

    Facial expressions represent one of the most salient cues in our environment. They communicate the affective state and intent of an individual and, if interpreted correctly, adaptively influence the behavior of others in return. Processing of such affective stimuli is known to require reciprocal signaling between central viscerosensory brain regions and peripheral-autonomic body systems, culminating in accurate emotion discrimination. Despite emerging links between sleep and affective regulation, the impact of sleep loss on the discrimination of complex social emotions within and between the CNS and PNS remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate in humans that sleep deprivation impairs both viscerosensory brain (anterior insula, anterior cingulate cortex, amygdala) and autonomic-cardiac discrimination of threatening from affiliative facial cues. Moreover, sleep deprivation significantly degrades the normally reciprocal associations between these central and peripheral emotion-signaling systems, most prominent at the level of cardiac-amygdala coupling. In addition, REM sleep physiology across the sleep-rested night significantly predicts the next-day success of emotional discrimination within this viscerosensory network across individuals, suggesting a role for REM sleep in affective brain recalibration. Together, these findings establish that sleep deprivation compromises the faithful signaling of, and the “embodied” reciprocity between, viscerosensory brain and peripheral autonomic body processing of complex social signals. Such impairments hold ecological relevance in professional contexts in which the need for accurate interpretation of social cues is paramount yet insufficient sleep is pervasive. PMID:26180190

  17. Characterization of Endoneurial Fibroblast-like Cells from Human and Rat Peripheral Nerves

    PubMed Central

    Richard, Laurence; Védrenne, Nicolas; Vallat, Jean-Michel

    2014-01-01

    Endoneurial fibroblast-like cells (EFLCs) are one of the cell populations present in the peripheral nervous system. The role and immunophenotypic characteristics of EFLCs are not well known and led us to perform a histological and cytological study of EFLCs in normal human and rat peripheral nerves. We found that all EFLCs express CD34, neural/glial antigen 2 (NG2), and prolyl-4-hydrolase-beta. In addition, half of the EFLCs in normal peripheral nerves express platelet-derived growth factor receptor-β (PDGFR-β) and some also express the intermediate filament nestin in vivo (at a lower level than Schwann cells, which express high levels of nestin). Using cell cultures of purified EFLCs, we characterized subpopulations of EFLCs expressing PDGFR-β alone or PDGFR-β and nestin. Experimental nerve lesions in rat resulted in an increase in nestin-positive EFLCs, which returned to normal levels after 8 days. This suggests that some EFLCs could have a different proliferative and/or regenerative potential than others, and these EFLCs may play a role in the initial phase of nerve repair. These “activated” EFLCs share some immunophenotypic similarities with pericytes and Interstitial cells of Cajal, which have progenitor cell potentials. This raises the questions as to whether a proportion of EFLCs have a possible role as endoneurial progenitor cells. PMID:24670794

  18. Sleep Deprivation Impairs the Human Central and Peripheral Nervous System Discrimination of Social Threat.

    PubMed

    Goldstein-Piekarski, Andrea N; Greer, Stephanie M; Saletin, Jared M; Walker, Matthew P

    2015-07-15

    Facial expressions represent one of the most salient cues in our environment. They communicate the affective state and intent of an individual and, if interpreted correctly, adaptively influence the behavior of others in return. Processing of such affective stimuli is known to require reciprocal signaling between central viscerosensory brain regions and peripheral-autonomic body systems, culminating in accurate emotion discrimination. Despite emerging links between sleep and affective regulation, the impact of sleep loss on the discrimination of complex social emotions within and between the CNS and PNS remains unknown. Here, we demonstrate in humans that sleep deprivation impairs both viscerosensory brain (anterior insula, anterior cingulate cortex, amygdala) and autonomic-cardiac discrimination of threatening from affiliative facial cues. Moreover, sleep deprivation significantly degrades the normally reciprocal associations between these central and peripheral emotion-signaling systems, most prominent at the level of cardiac-amygdala coupling. In addition, REM sleep physiology across the sleep-rested night significantly predicts the next-day success of emotional discrimination within this viscerosensory network across individuals, suggesting a role for REM sleep in affective brain recalibration. Together, these findings establish that sleep deprivation compromises the faithful signaling of, and the "embodied" reciprocity between, viscerosensory brain and peripheral autonomic body processing of complex social signals. Such impairments hold ecological relevance in professional contexts in which the need for accurate interpretation of social cues is paramount yet insufficient sleep is pervasive.

  19. Alcohol Withdrawal Syndrome: Benzodiazepines and Beyond

    PubMed Central

    Sachdeva, Ankur; Chandra, Mina

    2015-01-01

    Alcohol dependence is an increasing and pervasive problem. Alcohol withdrawal symptoms are a part of alcohol dependence syndrome and are commonly encountered in general hospital settings, in most of the departments. Alcohol withdrawal syndrome ranges from mild to severe. The severe complicated alcohol withdrawal may present with hallucinations, seizures or delirium tremens. Benzodiazepines have the largest and the best evidence base in the treatment of alcohol withdrawal, and are considered the gold standard. Others, such as anticonvulsants, barbiturates, adrenergic drugs, and GABA agonists have been tried and have evidence. Supportive care and use of vitamins is essential in the management. Symptom triggered regime is favoured over fixed tapering dose regime, although monitoring through scales is cumbersome. This article aims to review the evidence base for appropriate clinical management of the alcohol withdrawal syndrome. We searched Pubmed for articles published in English on ‘Alcohol withdrawal syndrome’ in humans during the last 10 years. A total of 1182 articles came up. Articles not relevant to clinical utility and management were excluded based on the titles and abstract available. Full text articles, meta-analyses, systematic reviews and randomized controlled trials were obtained from this list and were considered for review. PMID:26500991

  20. The Presence of Select Tau Species in Human Peripheral Tissues and Their Relation to Alzheimer's Disease.

    PubMed

    Dugger, Brittany N; Whiteside, Charisse M; Maarouf, Chera L; Walker, Douglas G; Beach, Thomas G; Sue, Lucia I; Garcia, Angelica; Dunckley, Travis; Meechoovet, Bessie; Reiman, Eric M; Roher, Alex E

    2016-01-01

    Tau becomes excessively phosphorylated in Alzheimer's disease (AD) and is widely studied within the brain. Further examination of the extent and types of tau present in peripheral tissues and their relation to AD is warranted given recent publications on pathologic spreading. Cases were selected based on the presence of pathological tau spinal cord deposits (n = 18). Tissue samples from sigmoid colon, scalp, abdominal skin, liver, and submandibular gland were analyzed by western blot and enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs) for certain tau species; frontal cortex gray matter was used for comparison. ELISAs revealed brain to have the highest total tau levels, followed by submandibular gland, sigmoid colon, liver, scalp, and abdominal skin. Western blots with antibodies recognizing tau phosphorylated at threonine 231(pT231), serine 396 and 404 (PHF-1), and an unmodified total human tau between residues 159 and 163 (HT7) revealed multiple banding patterns, some of which predominated in peripheral tissues. As submandibular gland had the highest levels of peripheral tau, a second set of submandibular gland samples were analyzed (n = 36; 19 AD, 17 non-demented controls). ELISAs revealed significantly lower levels of pS396 (p = 0.009) and pT231 (p = 0.005) in AD cases but not total tau (p = 0.18). Furthermore, pT231 levels in submandibular gland inversely correlated with Braak neurofibrillary tangle stage (p = 0.04), after adjusting for age at death, gender, and postmortem interval. These results provide evidence that certain tau species are present in peripheral tissues. Of potential importance, submandibular gland pT231 is progressively less abundant with increasing Braak neurofibrillary tangle stage. PMID:26890756

  1. Glycoantigens Induce Human Peripheral Tr1 Cell Differentiation with Gut-homing Specialization*

    PubMed Central

    Kreisman, Lori S. C.; Cobb, Brian A.

    2011-01-01

    The carbohydrate antigen (glycoantigen) PSA from an intestinal commensal bacteria is able to down-regulate inflammatory bowel disease in model mice, suggesting that stimulation with PSA results in regulatory T cell (Treg) generation. However, mechanisms of how peripheral human T cells respond and home in response to commensal antigens are still not understood. Here, we demonstrate that a single exposure to PSA induces differentiation of human peripheral CD4+ T cells into type-Tr1 Tregs. This is in contrast to mouse models where PSA induced the production of Foxp3+ iTregs. The human PSA-induced Tr1 cells are profoundly anergic and exhibit nonspecific bystander suppression mediated by IL-10 secretion. Most surprisingly, glycoantigen exposure provoked expression of gut homing receptors on their surface. These findings reveal a mechanism for immune homeostasis in the gut whereby exposure to commensal glycoantigens provides the requisite information to responding T cells for proper tissue localization (gut) and function (anti-inflammatory/regulatory). PMID:21228275

  2. The effect of stress on core and peripheral body temperature in humans.

    PubMed

    Vinkers, Christiaan H; Penning, Renske; Hellhammer, Juliane; Verster, Joris C; Klaessens, John H G M; Olivier, Berend; Kalkman, Cor J

    2013-09-01

    Even though there are indications that stress influences body temperature in humans, no study has systematically investigated the effects of stress on core and peripheral body temperature. The present study therefore aimed to investigate the effects of acute psychosocial stress on body temperature using different readout measurements. In two independent studies, male and female participants were exposed to a standardized laboratory stress task (the Trier Social Stress Test, TSST) or a non-stressful control task. Core temperature (intestinal and temporal artery) and peripheral temperature (facial and body skin temperature) were measured. Compared to the control condition, stress exposure decreased intestinal temperature but did not affect temporal artery temperature. Stress exposure resulted in changes in skin temperature that followed a gradient-like pattern, with decreases at distal skin locations such as the fingertip and finger base and unchanged skin temperature at proximal regions such as the infra-clavicular area. Stress-induced effects on facial temperature displayed a sex-specific pattern, with decreased nasal skin temperature in females and increased cheek temperature in males. In conclusion, the amplitude and direction of stress-induced temperature changes depend on the site of temperature measurement in humans. This precludes a direct translation of the preclinical stress-induced hyperthermia paradigm, in which core temperature uniformly rises in response to stress to the human situation. Nevertheless, the effects of stress result in consistent temperature changes. Therefore, the present study supports the inclusion of body temperature as a physiological readout parameter of stress in future studies.

  3. Productive Infection of Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells by Feline Immunodeficiency Virus: Implications for Vector Development

    PubMed Central

    Johnston, James; Power, Christopher

    1999-01-01

    Feline immunodeficiency virus (FIV) is a lentivirus causing immune suppression and neurological disease in cats. Like primate lentiviruses, FIV utilizes the chemokine receptor CXCR4 for infection. In addition, FIV gene expression has been demonstrated in immortalized human cell lines. To investigate the extent and mechanism by which FIV infected primary and immortalized human cell lines, we compared the infectivity of two FIV strains, V1CSF and Petaluma, after cell-free infection. FIV genome was detected in infected human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and macrophages at 21 and 14 days postinfection, respectively. Flow cytometry analysis of FIV-infected human PBMC indicated that antibodies to FIV p24 recognized 12% of the cells. Antibodies binding the CCR3 chemokine receptor maximally inhibited infection of human PBMC by both FIV strains compared to antibodies to CXCR4 or CCR5. Reverse transcriptase levels increased in FIV-infected human PBMC, with detection of viral titers of 101.3 to 102.1 50% tissue culture infective doses/106 cells depending on the FIV strain examined. Cell death in human PBMC infected with either FIV strain was significantly elevated relative to uninfected control cultures. These findings indicate that FIV can productively infect primary human cell lines and that viral strain specificity should be considered in the development of an FIV vector for gene therapy. PMID:9971834

  4. Photoacoustic and ultrasound dual-modality imaging of human peripheral joints

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xu, Guan; Rajian, Justin R.; Girish, Gandikota; Kaplan, Mariana J.; Fowlkes, J. Brian; Carson, Paul L.; Wang, Xueding

    2013-01-01

    A photoacoustic (PA) and ultrasound (US) dual modality system, for imaging human peripheral joints, is introduced. The system utilizes a commercial US unit for both US control imaging and PA signal acquisition. Preliminary in vivo evaluation of the system, on normal volunteers, revealed that this system can recover both the structural and functional information of intra- and extra-articular tissues. Confirmed by the control US images, the system, on the PA mode, can differentiate tendon from surrounding soft tissue based on the endogenous optical contrast. Presenting both morphological and pathological information in joint, this system holds promise for diagnosis and characterization of inflammatory joint diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis.

  5. Expression of extracellular calcium (Ca2+o)-sensing receptor in human peripheral blood monocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Yamaguchi, T.; Olozak, I.; Chattopadhyay, N.; Butters, R. R.; Kifor, O.; Scadden, D. T.; Brown, E. M.; O'Malley, B. W. (Principal Investigator)

    1998-01-01

    The calcium-sensing receptor (CaR) is a G protein-coupled receptor playing key roles in extracellular calcium ion (Ca2+o) homeostasis in parathyroid gland and kidney. Macrophage-like mononuclear cells appear at sites of osteoclastic bone resorption during bone turnover and may play a role in the "reversal" phase of skeletal remodeling that follows osteoclastic resorption and precedes osteoblastic bone formation. Bone resorption produces substantial local increases in Ca2+o that could provide a signal for such mononuclear cells present locally within the bone marrow microenvironment. Indeed, previous studies by other investigators have shown that raising Ca2+o either in vivo or in vitro stimulated the release of interleukin-6 (IL-6) from human peripheral blood monocytes, suggesting that these cells express a Ca2+o-sensing mechanism. In these earlier studies, however, the use of reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) failed to detect transcripts for the CaR previously cloned from parathyroid and kidney in peripheral blood monocytes. Since we recently found that non-specific esterase-positive, putative monocytes isolated from murine bone marrow express the CaR, we reevaluated the expression of this receptor in human peripheral blood monocytes. Immunocytochemistry, flow cytometry, and Western blot analysis, performed using a polyclonal antiserum specific for the CaR, detected CaR protein in human monocytes. In addition, the use of RT-PCR with CaR-specific primers, followed by nucleotide sequencing of the amplified products, identified CaR transcripts in the cells. Therefore, taken together, our data show that human peripheral blood monocytes possess both CaR protein and mRNA very similar if not identical to those expressed in parathyroid and kidney that could mediate the previously described, direct effects of Ca2+o on these cells. Furthermore, since mononuclear cells isolated from bone marrow also express the CaR, the latter might play some role in

  6. The effects of lipid A on gamma-irradiated human peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dubničková, M.; Kuzmina, E. A.; Chausov, V. N.; Ravnachka, I.; Boreyko, A. V.; Krasavin, E. A.

    2016-03-01

    The modulatory effects of lipid A (diphosphoryl lipid A (DLA) and monophosphoryl lipid A (MLA)) on apoptosis induction and DNA structure damage (single and double-strand breaks (SSBs and DSBs, respectively)) in peripheral human blood lymphocytes are studied for 60Co gamma-irradiation. It is shown that in the presence of these agents the amount of apoptotic cells increases compared with the irradiated control samples. The effect is most strongly pronounced for DLA. In its presence, a significant increase is observed in the number of radiation-induced DNA SSBs and DSBs. Possible mechanisms are discussed of the modifying influence of the used agents on radiation-induced cell reactions

  7. Norwalk Virus Does Not Replicate in Human Macrophages or Dendritic Cells Derived from the Peripheral Blood of Susceptible Humans

    PubMed Central

    Lay, Margarita K.; Atmar, Robert L.; Guix, Susana; Bharadwaj, Uddalak; He, Hong; Neill, Frederick H.; Sastry, Jagannadha K.; Yao, Qizhi; Estes, Mary K.

    2010-01-01

    Human noroviruses are difficult to study due to the lack of an efficient in vitro cell culture system or small animal model. Murine norovirus replicates in murine macrophages (MΦ) and dendritic cells (DCs), raising the possibility that human NoVs might replicate in such human cell types. To test this hypothesis, we evaluated DCs and MΦ derived from monocyte subsets and CD11c+ DCs isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells of individuals susceptible to Norwalk virus (NV) infection. These cells were exposed to NV and replication was evaluated by immunofluorescence and by quantitative RT-PCR. A few PBMC-derived DCs expressed NV proteins. However, NV RNA did not increase in any of the cells tested. These results demonstrate that NV does not replicate in human CD11c+ DCs, monocyte-derived DCs and MΦ, but abortive infection may occur in a few DCs. These results suggest that NV tropism is distinct from that of murine noroviruses. PMID:20667573

  8. Disseminated human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) infection in SCID- hu mice after peripheral inoculation with HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    A small animal model that could be infected with human immunodeficiency virus 1 (HIV-1) after peripheral inoculation would greatly facilitate the study of the pathophysiology of acute HIV-1 infection. The utility of SCID mice implanted with human fetal thymus and liver (SCID-hu mice) for studying peripheral HIV-1 infection in vivo has been hampered by the requirement for direct intraimplant injection of HIV-1 and the continued restriction of the resultant HIV-1 infection to the human thymus and liver (hu-thy/liv) implant. This may have been due to the very low numbers of human T cells present in the SCID-hu mouse peripheral lymphoid compartment. Since the degree of the peripheral reconstitution of SCID-hu mice with human T cells may be a function of the hu-thy/liv implant size, we increased the quantity of hu-thy/liv tissue implanted under the renal capsule and implanted hu-thy/liv tissue under the capsules of both kidneys. This resulted in SCID-hu mice in which significant numbers of human T cells were detected in the peripheral blood, spleens, and lymph nodes. After intraimplant injection of HIV-1 into these modified SCID-hu mice, significant HIV-1 infection was detected by quantitative coculture not only in the hu- thy/liv implant, but also in the spleen and peripheral blood. This indicated that HIV-1 infection can spread from the thymus to the peripheral lymphoid compartment. More importantly, a similar degree of infection of the hu-thy/liv implant and peripheral lymphoid compartment occurred after peripheral intraperitoneal inoculation with HIV-1. Active viral replication was indicated by the detection of HIV-1 gag DNA, HIV-1 gag RNA, and spliced tat/rev RNA in the hu-thy/liv implants, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC), spleens, and lymph nodes of these HIV-1-infected SCID-hu mice. As a first step in using our modified SCID-hu mouse model to investigate the pathophysiological consequences of HIV-1 infection, the effect of HIV-1 infection on the

  9. Role of HO/CO in the Control of Peripheral Circulation in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Sacerdoti, David; Mania, Despina; Pesce, Paola; Gaiani, Silvia; Gatta, Angelo; Bolognesi, Massimo

    2012-01-01

    Experimental studies show that the heme oxygenase/carbon monoxide system (HO/CO) plays an important role in the homeostasis of circulation and in the pathophysiology of hypertension. No data are available on its role in the control of peripheral circulation in humans. We evaluated the effects of inhibition of HO with stannous mesoporphyrin IX (SnMP) (200 μM) locally administered by iontophoresis, on human skin blood flow, evaluated by laser-Doppler flowmetry, in the presence and absence of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) inhibition with L-NG-Nitroarginine methyl ester (L-NAME) (100 μM). We also evaluated the effect of HO inhibition on vasodilatation induced by acetylcholine (ACh) and vasoconstriction caused by noradrenaline (NA). SnMP and L-NAME caused a similar 20–25% decrease in skin flow. After nitric oxide (NO) inhibition with L-NAME, HO inhibition with SnMP caused a further 20% decrease in skin perfusion. SnMP decreased vasodilatation induced by ACh by about 70%, while it did not affect vasoconstriction to NA. In conclusion, HO/CO participates in the control of peripheral circulation, independently from NO, and is involved in vasodilatation to ACh. PMID:22500215

  10. Cytogenetic response to coffee in Chinese hamster ovary AUXB1 cells and human peripheral lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Tucker, J D; Taylor, R T; Christensen, M L; Strout, C L; Hanna, M L

    1989-09-01

    We have investigated the genotoxic effects of three different brands and three types of coffee (freshly brewed regular, instant regular and freshly brewed decaffeinated) in two mammalian systems: the Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) AUXB1 cell line and human peripheral lymphocytes. Sister-chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and endoreduplicated cells (ERCs) were used as the endpoints. Coffee was prepared according to the manufacturer's suggestions, and after cooling, administered to cultured cells at dilutions ranging up to 11% that of full-strength coffee. Each brand and type of coffee induced significant levels of SCEs and ERCs in AUXB1 cells. SCEs, but not ERCs, were induced in human peripheral lymphocytes. Bisulfite, which complexes with carbonyls and reduces their genotoxicity, significantly diminished the number of SCEs and ERCs found after administration of coffee. Catalase and peroxidase, enzymes that destroy hydrogen peroxide activity, had no significant effect upon the SCE and ERC frequencies in AUXB1 cultures treated with freshly brewed regular coffee. These experiments indicate that different brands and types of coffee have sufficient genotoxic activity to increase SCEs and ERCs at levels only a fraction of those normally consumed. 1,2-Dicarbonyls alone and peroxides alone do not appear to be responsible for the majority of SCEs and ERCs that were observed to be induced by dilute coffee.

  11. A second chain of human CD8 is expressed on peripheral blood lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    1988-01-01

    Human CD8 has been thought to consist of disulfide-linked homodimers and homomultimers of a single polypeptide chain homologous to mouse and rat CD8 alpha. In contrast, mouse and rat CD8 are composed of disulfide- linked heterodimers of alpha and beta chains. We have now isolated and sequenced cDNA clones encoding a human homologue of mouse and rat CD8 beta. One such clone was inserted into an expression vector and its encoded product was shown to be expressed on the cell surface after cotransfection into L cells with the human CD8 alpha gene. A second form of human CD8 beta cDNA encoding a protein with an altered cytoplasmic tail was similarly transfected, but its product could not be demonstrated on the cell surface. CD8 beta was further shown to be expressed on the surface of almost all CD8+ human peripheral blood T cells. These data provide the first evidence that human CD8 is a heterodimeric protein. PMID:3264320

  12. Novel humanized anti-CD3 antibodies induce a predominantly immunoregulatory profile in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Silva, Hernandez M; Vieira, Pedro M M M; Costa, Patricia L N; Pimentel, Bárbara M S; Moro, Ana M; Kalil, Jorge; Maranhão, Andrea Q; Coelho, Verônica; Brigido, Marcelo M

    2009-08-15

    Strategies to minimize the immunogenicity and toxicity of murine anti-CD3 antibodies (e.g. OKT3) are of special interest for organ transplantation and for the treatment of autoimmune diseases. In the present work, we have developed two humanized anti-CD3 antibodies. These molecules were shown to bind to human CD3, though less efficiently, and display less mitogenic activity than OKT3. These results prompted us to investigate whether this reduced mitogenic potential was associated with the development of anti-inflammatory properties. Indeed, in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), the humanized antibody versions induced a predominantly anti-inflammatory cytokine profile, in contrast with the pro-inflammatory profile induced by OKT3. Neither OKT3 nor the humanized versions induced the expression of IL-4, IL-2 or TGF-beta. Both humanized antibodies induced significantly lower production of IFN-gamma and IL-5 and slightly higher production of IL-10 than OKT3. This immunomodulatory profile was most evident by the 80-fold higher ratio of IL-10/IFN-gamma production in PBMCs cultured in the presence of the humanized antibodies, compared to those stimulated with OKT3. Furthermore, these humanized anti-CD3 antibodies induced a late FOXP3 gene expression while OKT3 led to a more transient expression of FOXP3. Taken our results, we suggest that these humanized anti-CD3 antibodies may promote the development of T cells with immunoregulatory activity.

  13. Impaired human responses to tetanus toxoid in vitamin A-deficient SCID mice reconstituted with human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Molrine, D C; Polk, D B; Ciamarra, A; Phillips, N; Ambrosino, D M

    1995-08-01

    Vitamin A deficiency is associated with increased childhood morbidity and mortality from respiratory and diarrheal diseases. In order to evaluate the effect of vitamin A on human antibody responses, we developed a vitamin A-deficient severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mouse model. Vitamin A-deficient mice were produced by depriving them of vitamin A at day 7 of gestation. Mice were reconstituted with human peripheral blood lymphocytes (huPBL) from tetanus toxoid immune donors at 6 weeks of age and immunized with tetanus toxoid at 6 and 8 weeks of age. Secondary human antibody responses were determined 10 days later. The geometric mean human anti-tetanus toxoid immunoglobulin G concentrations were 3.75 micrograms/ml for the deficient mice and 148 micrograms/ml for controls (P = 0.0005). Vitamin A-deficient mice had only a 2.9-fold increase in human anti-tetanus toxoid antibody compared with a 74-fold increase in controls (P < 0.01). Supplementation with vitamin A prior to reconstitution restored human antibody responses to normal. These data suggest that vitamin A deficiency impairs human antibody responses. We speculate that impaired responses could increase susceptibility to certain infections. Furthermore, we propose that effects of other nutritional deficiencies on the human immune system could be evaluated in the SCID-huPBL model.

  14. Phases of daylight and the stability of color perception in the near peripheral human retina.

    PubMed

    Panorgias, Athanasios; Kulikowski, Janus J; Parry, Neil R A; McKeefry, Declan J; Murray, Ian J

    2012-03-01

    Typical daylight extends from blue (morning sky) to orangey red (evening sky) and is represented mathematically as the Daylight Locus in color space. In this study, we investigate the impact of this daylight variation on human color vision. Thirty-eight color normal human observers performed an asymmetric color match in the near peripheral visual field. Unique hues were identified using a naming paradigm. The observers' performance for matching was almost perfectly coincident with the Daylight Locus but declined markedly in other regions. Interobserver variability reached a conspicuous minimum adjacent to the Daylight Locus and was maximal in the red and yellowish-green regions. In the naming task, unique blue and yellow were virtually coincident with the Daylight Locus. The results suggest that the mechanisms of color perception mediated by the phylogenetically older (blue-yellow) color pathway have been strongly influenced by the different phases of daylight.

  15. Peripheral Inflammation Acutely Impairs Human Spatial Memory via Actions on Medial Temporal Lobe Glucose Metabolism

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Neil A.; Doeller, Christian F.; Voon, Valerie; Burgess, Neil; Critchley, Hugo D.

    2014-01-01

    Background Inflammation impairs cognitive performance and is implicated in the progression of neurodegenerative disorders. Rodent studies demonstrated key roles for inflammatory mediators in many processes critical to memory, including long-term potentiation, synaptic plasticity, and neurogenesis. They also demonstrated functional impairment of medial temporal lobe (MTL) structures by systemic inflammation. However, human data to support this position are limited. Methods Sequential fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography together with experimentally induced inflammation was used to investigate effects of a systemic inflammatory challenge on human MTL function. Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography scanning was performed in 20 healthy participants before and after typhoid vaccination and saline control injection. After each scanning session, participants performed a virtual reality spatial memory task analogous to the Morris water maze and a mirror-tracing procedural memory control task. Results Fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography data demonstrated an acute reduction in human MTL glucose metabolism after inflammation. The inflammatory challenge also selectively compromised human spatial, but not procedural, memory; this effect that was independent of actions on motivation or psychomotor response. Effects of inflammation on parahippocampal and rhinal glucose metabolism directly mediated actions of inflammation on spatial memory. Conclusions These data demonstrate acute sensitivity of human MTL to mild peripheral inflammation, giving rise to associated functional impairment in the form of reduced spatial memory performance. Our findings suggest a mechanism for the observed epidemiologic link between inflammation and risk of age-related cognitive decline and progression of neurodegenerative disorders including Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:24534013

  16. [Acute overdosage with benzodiazepine derivatives (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Bourin, M; Breteau, M

    1979-05-01

    The study of 210 cases of voluntary intoxications by benzodiazepines alone, out of a total of 2080 intoxicated patients admitted at the Hospital of Tours, shows that when no other drugs is associated the prognosis is good, both for children and for adults. The association with ethanol does not change the prognosis. The clinical symptoms alone cannot prove the nature of the gravity of the intoxications. After having analysed the drugs present in the gastric juice, and after having checked that only benzodiazepines are implied, the patient can usually be taken care of on a non specialized ward.

  17. Identification of benzodiazepines in Artemisia dracunculus and Solanum tuberosum rationalizing their endogenous formation in plant tissue.

    PubMed

    Kavvadias, D; Abou-Mandour, A A; Czygan, F C; Beckmann, H; Sand, P; Riederer, P; Schreier, P

    2000-03-01

    Sterile cultivated plant cell tissues and cell regenerates of several species were tested for their binding affinity to the central human benzodiazepine receptor. Binding activity was found in extracts of Artemisia dracunculus cell tissue (IC(50) = 7 microg/ml) and, to a lesser extent, in plant regenerates of potato herb (Solanum tuberosum). Preparative HPLC led to the isolation of fractions with a significant displacing potency in the benzodiazepine receptor binding assay. Using on-line HPLC-electrospray-tandem mass spectrometry (HPLC-ESI-MS/MS) in the "selected reaction monitoring" (SRM) mode, delorazepam and temazepam were found in amounts of about 100 to 200 ng/g cell tissue of Artemisia dracunculus, whereas sterile potato herb contained temazepam and diazepam ranging approximately from 70 to 450 ng/g cell tissue. It is the first report on the endogenous formation of benzodiazepines by plant cells, as any interaction of microorganisms and environmental factors was excluded.

  18. THE SIGNIFICANCE OF LESIONS IN PERIPHERAL GANGLIA IN CHIMPANZEE AND IN HUMAN POLIOMYELITIS

    PubMed Central

    Bodian, David; Howe, Howard A.

    1947-01-01

    1. The peripheral ganglia of eighteen inoculated chimpanzees and thirteen uninoculated controls, and of eighteen fatal human poliomyelitis cases, were studied for histopathological evidence of the route of transmission of virus from the alimentary tract to the CNS. 2. Lesions thought to be characteristic of poliomyelitis in inoculated chimpanzees could not be sharply differentiated from lesions of unknown origin in uninoculated control animals. Moreover, although the inoculated animals as a group, in comparison with the control animals, had a greater number of infiltrative lesions in sympathetic as well as in sensory ganglia, it was not possible to make satisfactory correlations between the distribution of these lesions and the routes of inoculation. 3. In sharp contrast with chimpanzees, the celiac and stellate ganglia of the human poliomyelitis cases were free of any but insignificant infiltrative lesions. Lesions in human trigeminal and spinal sensory ganglia included neuronal damage as well as focal and perivascular inflitrative lesions, as is well known. In most ganglia, as in monkey and chimpanzee sensory ganglia, these were correlated in intensify with the degree of severity of lesions in the region of the CNS receiving their axons. This suggested that lesions in sensory ganglia probably resulted from spread of virus centrifugally from the CNS, in accord with considerable experimental evidence. 4. Two principal difficulties in the interpretation of histopathological findings in peripheral ganglia were revealed by this study. The first is that the specificity of lesions in sympathetic ganglia has not been established beyond doubt as being due to poliomyelitis. The second is that the presence of characteristic lesions in sensory ganglia does not, and cannot, reveal whether the virus reached the ganglia from the periphery or from the central nervous system, except in very early preparalytic stages or in exceptional cases of early arrest of virus spread and of

  19. Characteristics of nucleoplasmic bridges induced by 60Co γ-rays in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Hua; Lu, Xue; Li, Shuang; Chen, De-Qing; Liu, Qing-Jie

    2013-12-16

    Few studies have shown that the yields of ionising-radiation-induced nucleoplasmic bridges (NPBs) in human cells are dose dependent. However, a dose-response curve between the NPB frequency and the absorbed dose of ionising radiation has not yet been established. This study aimed to investigate NPB frequencies in human peripheral blood lymphocytes induced by cobalt-60 ((60)Co) γ-rays and to establish a dose-response curve. Human peripheral blood samples were collected from three healthy males, and some of these samples were irradiated with 0-6 Gy (60)Co γ-rays. A cytokinesis-block micronucleus cytome assay was then carried out to analyse NPBs and micronuclei (MN) in binucleated cells. The remaining blood samples were irradiated with 0, 2 and 5 Gy of γ-rays, and unstable chromosome aberrations (dicentric chromosome, ring chromosome and acentric chromosome fragment) were analysed. The correlation between NPBs and dicentric plus ring chromosome (dic+r) induced by the same γ-ray dose was also analysed. Results showed that the NPB yields among the three subjects at each dose level were not significantly different. NPBs in binucleated cells at all γ-ray doses conformed to Poisson distribution. The dose-response curve of the γ-ray-induced NPB frequencies followed the linear-quadratic model y = (1.39×10(-3))x (2) + (4.94×10(-3))x. A positive correlation was observed between the frequencies of NPB and dic+r, as well as between the frequencies of MN and acentric fragments. Therefore, NPB is an important biomarker of early chromosome damage event induced by ionising radiation.

  20. The effect of stress on core and peripheral body temperature in humans.

    PubMed

    Vinkers, Christiaan H; Penning, Renske; Hellhammer, Juliane; Verster, Joris C; Klaessens, John H G M; Olivier, Berend; Kalkman, Cor J

    2013-09-01

    Even though there are indications that stress influences body temperature in humans, no study has systematically investigated the effects of stress on core and peripheral body temperature. The present study therefore aimed to investigate the effects of acute psychosocial stress on body temperature using different readout measurements. In two independent studies, male and female participants were exposed to a standardized laboratory stress task (the Trier Social Stress Test, TSST) or a non-stressful control task. Core temperature (intestinal and temporal artery) and peripheral temperature (facial and body skin temperature) were measured. Compared to the control condition, stress exposure decreased intestinal temperature but did not affect temporal artery temperature. Stress exposure resulted in changes in skin temperature that followed a gradient-like pattern, with decreases at distal skin locations such as the fingertip and finger base and unchanged skin temperature at proximal regions such as the infra-clavicular area. Stress-induced effects on facial temperature displayed a sex-specific pattern, with decreased nasal skin temperature in females and increased cheek temperature in males. In conclusion, the amplitude and direction of stress-induced temperature changes depend on the site of temperature measurement in humans. This precludes a direct translation of the preclinical stress-induced hyperthermia paradigm, in which core temperature uniformly rises in response to stress to the human situation. Nevertheless, the effects of stress result in consistent temperature changes. Therefore, the present study supports the inclusion of body temperature as a physiological readout parameter of stress in future studies. PMID:23790072

  1. Peripheral injection of human umbilical cord blood stimulates neurogenesis in the aged rat brain

    PubMed Central

    Bachstetter, Adam D; Pabon, Mibel M; Cole, Michael J; Hudson, Charles E; Sanberg, Paul R; Willing, Alison E; Bickford, Paula C; Gemma, Carmelina

    2008-01-01

    Background Neurogenesis continues to occur throughout life but dramatically decreases with increasing age. This decrease is mostly related to a decline in proliferative activity as a result of an impoverishment of the microenvironment of the aged brain, including a reduction in trophic factors and increased inflammation. Results We determined that human umbilical cord blood mononuclear cells (UCBMC) given peripherally, by an intravenous injection, could rejuvenate the proliferative activity of the aged neural stem/progenitor cells. This increase in proliferation lasted for at least 15 days after the delivery of the UCBMC. Along with the increase in proliferation following UCBMC treatment, an increase in neurogenesis was also found in the aged animals. The increase in neurogenesis as a result of UCBMC treatment seemed to be due to a decrease in inflammation, as a decrease in the number of activated microglia was found and this decrease correlated with the increase in neurogenesis. Conclusion The results demonstrate that a single intravenous injection of UCBMC in aged rats can significantly improve the microenvironment of the aged hippocampus and rejuvenate the aged neural stem/progenitor cells. Our results raise the possibility of a peripherally administered cell therapy as an effective approach to improve the microenvironment of the aged brain. PMID:18275610

  2. Putative Epimutagens in Maternal Peripheral and Cord Blood Samples Identified Using Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Arai, Yoshikazu; Hayakawa, Koji; Arai, Daisuke; Ito, Rie; Iwasaki, Yusuke; Saito, Koichi; Akutsu, Kazuhiko; Takatori, Satoshi; Ishii, Rie; Hayashi, Rumiko; Izumi, Shun-Ichiro; Sugino, Norihiro; Kondo, Fumio; Horie, Masakazu; Nakazawa, Hiroyuki; Makino, Tsunehisa; Hirosawa, Mitsuko; Shiota, Kunio; Ohgane, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The regulation of transcription and genome stability by epigenetic systems are crucial for the proper development of mammalian embryos. Chemicals that disturb epigenetic systems are termed epimutagens. We previously performed chemical screening that focused on heterochromatin formation and DNA methylation status in mouse embryonic stem cells and identified five epimutagens: diethyl phosphate (DEP), mercury (Hg), cotinine, selenium (Se), and octachlorodipropyl ether (S-421). Here, we used human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) to confirm the effects of 20 chemicals, including the five epimutagens, detected at low concentrations in maternal peripheral and cord blood samples. Of note, these individual chemicals did not exhibit epimutagenic activity in hiPSCs. However, because the fetal environment contains various chemicals, we evaluated the effects of combined exposure to chemicals (DEP, Hg, cotinine, Se, and S-421) on hiPSCs. The combined exposure caused a decrease in the number of heterochromatin signals and aberrant DNA methylation status at multiple gene loci in hiPSCs. The combined exposure also affected embryoid body formation and neural differentiation from hiPSCs. Therefore, DEP, Hg, cotinine, Se, and S-421 were defined as an “epimutagen combination” that is effective at low concentrations as detected in maternal peripheral and cord blood. PMID:26339649

  3. Production, crystallization and neutron diffraction of fully deuterated human myelin peripheral membrane protein P2.

    PubMed

    Laulumaa, Saara; Blakeley, Matthew P; Raasakka, Arne; Moulin, Martine; Härtlein, Michael; Kursula, Petri

    2015-11-01

    The molecular details of the formation of the myelin sheath, a multilayered membrane in the nervous system, are to a large extent unknown. P2 is a peripheral membrane protein from peripheral nervous system myelin, which is believed to play a role in this process. X-ray crystallographic studies and complementary experiments have provided information on the structure-function relationships in P2. In this study, a fully deuterated sample of human P2 was produced. Crystals that were large enough for neutron diffraction were grown by a ten-month procedure of feeding, and neutron diffraction data were collected to a resolution of 2.4 Å from a crystal of 0.09 mm(3) in volume. The neutron crystal structure will allow the positions of H atoms in P2 and its fatty-acid ligand to be visualized, as well as shedding light on the fine details of the hydrogen-bonding networks within the P2 ligand-binding cavity.

  4. Regulation of Exacerbated Immune Responses in Human Peripheral Blood Cells by Hydrolysed Egg White Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Lozano-Ojalvo, Daniel; Molina, Elena; López-Fandiño, Rosina

    2016-01-01

    The anti-allergic potential of egg white protein hydrolysates (from ovalbumin, lysozyme and ovomucoid) was evaluated as their ability to hinder cytokine and IgE production by Th2-skewed human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), as well as the release of pro-inflammatory factors and generation of reactive oxygen species from Th1-stimulated peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs). The binding to IgE of egg allergic patients was determined and the peptides present in the hydrolysates were identified. The hydrolysates with alcalase down-regulated the production of Th2-biased cytokines and the secretion of IgE to the culture media of Th2-skewed PBMCs, and they significantly neutralized oxidative stress in PBLs. The hydrolysates of ovalbumin and ovomucoid with pepsin helped to re-establish the Th1/Th2 balance in Th2-biased PBMCs, while they also inhibited the release of pro-inflammatory mediators and reduced oxidative stress in PBLs treated with inflammatory stimuli. The hydrolysates with alcalase, in addition to equilibrating Th2 differentiation, exhibited a low IgE-binding. Therefore, they would elicit mild allergic reactions while retaining T cell-stimulating abilities, which might correlate with an anti-allergic benefit. PMID:27007699

  5. Regulation of Exacerbated Immune Responses in Human Peripheral Blood Cells by Hydrolysed Egg White Proteins.

    PubMed

    Lozano-Ojalvo, Daniel; Molina, Elena; López-Fandiño, Rosina

    2016-01-01

    The anti-allergic potential of egg white protein hydrolysates (from ovalbumin, lysozyme and ovomucoid) was evaluated as their ability to hinder cytokine and IgE production by Th2-skewed human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), as well as the release of pro-inflammatory factors and generation of reactive oxygen species from Th1-stimulated peripheral blood leukocytes (PBLs). The binding to IgE of egg allergic patients was determined and the peptides present in the hydrolysates were identified. The hydrolysates with alcalase down-regulated the production of Th2-biased cytokines and the secretion of IgE to the culture media of Th2-skewed PBMCs, and they significantly neutralized oxidative stress in PBLs. The hydrolysates of ovalbumin and ovomucoid with pepsin helped to re-establish the Th1/Th2 balance in Th2-biased PBMCs, while they also inhibited the release of pro-inflammatory mediators and reduced oxidative stress in PBLs treated with inflammatory stimuli. The hydrolysates with alcalase, in addition to equilibrating Th2 differentiation, exhibited a low IgE-binding. Therefore, they would elicit mild allergic reactions while retaining T cell-stimulating abilities, which might correlate with an anti-allergic benefit. PMID:27007699

  6. Matrix-free analysis of selected benzodiazepines in human serum samples using alternating trilinear decomposition modeling of fast liquid chromatography diode array detection data.

    PubMed

    Vosough, Maryam; Iravani, Negar J

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes the development and validation of a simple and efficient bioanalytical procedure for simultaneous determination of alprazolam, clonazepam, diazepam in human serum samples using high performance liquid chromatography with photodiode-array detection, regarding a fast elution methodology in 4 min. Briefly, this method consists of a simple liquid extraction step of serum samples followed by HPLC analysis on a C18 column. After confirming the absence of matrix effect, an external standard methodology has been applied for quantification purposes. Due to the presence of serum endogenous components as uncalibrated components in the sample, the second-order calibration based on alternating trilinear decomposition has been applied on a set of absorbance matrices collected as a function of retention time and wavelengths. Acceptable resolution and quantification results were achieved in the presence of matrix interferences and the second-order advantage was fully exploited. The average recoveries for alprazolam, clonazepam and diazepam were 89.1%, 96.3% and 94.7% and relative standard deviation values for intra- and inter-day precision were equal or lower than 8.1% and 9.4%, respectively. The developed method enabled us to determine the analytes in the various serum samples in the presence of overlapped profiles, while keeping experimental time and extraction step at the minimum. PMID:26653472

  7. Matrix-free analysis of selected benzodiazepines in human serum samples using alternating trilinear decomposition modeling of fast liquid chromatography diode array detection data.

    PubMed

    Vosough, Maryam; Iravani, Negar J

    2016-02-01

    This paper describes the development and validation of a simple and efficient bioanalytical procedure for simultaneous determination of alprazolam, clonazepam, diazepam in human serum samples using high performance liquid chromatography with photodiode-array detection, regarding a fast elution methodology in 4 min. Briefly, this method consists of a simple liquid extraction step of serum samples followed by HPLC analysis on a C18 column. After confirming the absence of matrix effect, an external standard methodology has been applied for quantification purposes. Due to the presence of serum endogenous components as uncalibrated components in the sample, the second-order calibration based on alternating trilinear decomposition has been applied on a set of absorbance matrices collected as a function of retention time and wavelengths. Acceptable resolution and quantification results were achieved in the presence of matrix interferences and the second-order advantage was fully exploited. The average recoveries for alprazolam, clonazepam and diazepam were 89.1%, 96.3% and 94.7% and relative standard deviation values for intra- and inter-day precision were equal or lower than 8.1% and 9.4%, respectively. The developed method enabled us to determine the analytes in the various serum samples in the presence of overlapped profiles, while keeping experimental time and extraction step at the minimum.

  8. Neutron scattering studies on protein dynamics using the human myelin peripheral membrane protein P2

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Laulumaa, Saara; Kursula, Petri; Natali, Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Myelin is a multilayered proteolipid membrane structure surrounding selected axons in the vertebrate nervous system, which allows the rapid saltatory conduction of nerve impulses. Deficits in myelin formation and maintenance may lead to chronic neurological disease. P2 is an abundant myelin protein from peripheral nerves, binding between two apposing lipid bilayers. We studied the dynamics of the human myelin protein P2 and its mutated P38G variant in hydrated powders using elastic incoherent neutron scattering. The local harmonic vibrations at low temperatures were very similar for both samples, but the mutant protein had increased flexibility and softness close to physiological temperatures. The results indicate that a drastic mutation of proline to glycine at a functional site can affect protein dynamics, and in the case of P2, they may explain functional differences between the two proteins.

  9. Clastogenic effects of food additive citric acid in human peripheral lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Ünal, Fatma; Yüzbaşıoğlu, Deniz; Aksoy, Hüseyin

    2008-01-01

    Clastogenic properties of the food additive citric acid, commonly used as an antioxidant, were analysed in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Citric acid induced a significant increase of chromosomal aberrations (CAs) at all the concentrations and treatment periods tested. Citric acid significantly decreased mitotic index (MI) at 100 and 200 μg ml−1 concentrations at 24 h, and in all concentrations at 48 h. However, it did not decrease the replication index (RI) significantly. Citric acid also significantly increased sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) at 100 and 200 μg ml−1 concentrations at 24 h, and in all concentrations at 48 h. This chemical significantly increased the micronuclei frequency (MN) compared to the negative control. It also decreased the cytokinesis-block proliferation index (CBPI), but this result was not statistically significant. PMID:19002851

  10. Shared mechanisms between Drosophila peripheral nervous system development and human neurodegenerative diseases.

    PubMed

    Charng, Wu-Lin; Yamamoto, Shinya; Bellen, Hugo J

    2014-08-01

    Signaling pathways and cellular processes that regulate neural development are used post-developmentally for proper function and maintenance of the nervous system. Genes that have been studied in the context of the development of Drosophila peripheral nervous system (PNS) and neuromuscular junction (NMJ) have been identified as players in the pathogenesis of human neurodegenerative diseases, including spinocerebellar ataxia, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and spinal muscular atrophy. Hence, by unraveling the molecular mechanisms that underlie proneural induction, cell fate determination, axonal targeting, dendritic branching, and synapse formation in Drosophila, novel features related to these disorders have been revealed. In this review, we summarize and discuss how studies of Drosophila PNS and NMJ development have provided guidance in experimental approaches for these diseases.

  11. Studying the proliferation of human peripheral blood T lymphocytes in serum-free medium.

    PubMed

    Tabakov, V U; Litvina, M M; Schepkina, J V; Jarilin, A A; Chestkov, V V

    2009-01-01

    We compared the cultivation of human peripheral blood lymphocytes in serum-free medium Hybris-2 and RPMI 1640 medium with 10% fetal bovine serum in the presence of phytohemagglutinin and interleukin-2. The optimal concentration of phytohemagglutinin significantly differed in serum-free and serum-containing media (0.5 and 5 microg/ml, [corrected] respectively). Both mitogens were more potent in stimulating the proliferation of lymphocytes in serum-free medium than in serum-containing medium. Strong proliferation of CD3(+) and CD4(+) T lymphocytes was observed in both media. The dynamics of other markers was similar in serum-free and serum-containing media. However, significant differences were revealed between individual donors. Our results indicate that the developed serum-free medium may be used in lymphocyte cultivation for scientific, diagnostic, and therapeutic purposes.

  12. Changes of human B and B-1a peripheral blood lymphocytes with age.

    PubMed

    Veneri, Dino; Franchini, Massimo; Vella, Antonio; Tridente, Giuseppe; Semenzato, Gianpietro; Pizzolo, Giovanni; Ortolani, Riccardo

    2007-08-01

    In 2057 consecutive subjects admitted to the Department of Pathology, Section of Immunology of the Verona University Hospital, CD19+ and CD5/CD19 double positive cells were determined to assess the behaviour of total peripheral B-lymphocytes and B-1a (CD5+) compartments in humans during aging. We show that the absolute number of total B lymphocytes increases about three-fold from the baseline conditions in the first year of life and progressively decreases until adult age. A slower decrease was detected from the adult age onwards. A similar behaviour has been observed within the B-1a subset of B-lymphocytes, although the decrease after the adult age seems more pronounced. Possible physiological explanations and/or implications for the disease states are taken into account.

  13. Specific high-affinity binding sites for a synthetic gliadin heptapeptide of human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Payan, D.G.; Horvath, K.; Graf, L.

    1987-03-23

    The synthetic peptide containing residues 43-49 of ..cap alpha..-gliadin, the major protein component of gluten, has previously been shown to inhibit the production of lymphokine activities by mononuclear leukocytes. The authors demonstrate using radiolabeled ..cap alpha..-gliadin(43-49) that human peripheral blood lymphocytes express approximately 20,000-25,000 surface receptors for this peptide, with a dissociation constant (K/sub D/) of 20 nM. In addition, binding is inhibited by naloxone and an enkephalin analog, thus confirming the functional correlate which demonstrates inhibition by these agents of ..cap alpha..-gliadin(43-49) functional effects. Furthermore, B-lymphocytes bind specifically a greater amount of (/sup 125/I)..cap alpha..-gliadin(43-49) than T-lymphocytes. The lymphocyte ..cap alpha..-gliadin(43-49) receptor may play an important role in mediating the immunological response to ..cap alpha..-gliadin. 16 references, 4 figures.

  14. The effects of teriflunomide on lymphocyte subpopulations in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Li; Liu, Jingchun; Delohery, Thomas; Zhang, Donghui; Arendt, Christopher; Jones, Catherine

    2013-12-15

    Teriflunomide is an inhibitor of dihydro-orotate dehydrogenase (DHODH), and is hypothesized to ameliorate multiple sclerosis by reducing proliferation of stimulated lymphocytes. We investigated teriflunomide's effects on proliferation, activation, survival, and function of stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cell subsets in vitro. Teriflunomide had little/no impact on lymphocyte activation but exerted significant dose-dependent inhibition of T- and B-cell proliferation, which was uridine-reversible (DHODH-dependent). Viability analyses showed no teriflunomide-associated cytotoxicity. Teriflunomide significantly decreased release of several pro-inflammatory cytokines from activated monocytes in a DHODH-independent fashion. In conclusion, teriflunomide acts on multiple immune cell types and processes via DHODH-dependent and independent mechanisms. PMID:24182769

  15. Grass immunotherapy induces inhibition of allergen-specific human peripheral blood mononuclear cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Baskar, S; Hamilton, R G; Norman, P S; Ansari, A A

    1997-02-01

    The peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from humans allergic to grass pollens (GR+ subjects) show strong in vitro proliferative responses to purified allergens from Lolium perenne pollen Lol p 1, and to a lesser extent to Lol p 2 and Lol p 3. By contrast, PBMC from grass allergic patients undergoing immunotherapy (GR + IT subjects) exhibit a very poor Lol p-specific proliferative response, similar to that observed in nongrass allergic subjects (GR-subjects). Unlike GR-subjects, both GR+ and GR + IT subjects have high levels of antigen-specific serum IgG and IgE antibodies to Lol p 1, Lol p 2 and Lol p 3. While GR+ subjects exhibit a significant correlation between antigen-specific serum antibody and PBMC responses, GR + IT subjects do not show a correlation between the two responses. The possible mechanisms by which immunotherapy may modulate allergen-specific T cell proliferative response are discussed.

  16. Nitinol Stent Fatigue in a Peripheral Human Artery Subjected to Pulsatile and Articulation Loading

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Harvey, Sean Michael

    2011-07-01

    Nitinol self-expanding stents are used to treat peripheral occluded vessels such as the superficial femoral artery or the carotid. The complex vessel articulation requires a stent device that is flexible and kink resistant yet durable. The present study shows how the latest advances in commercially available engineering software tools permit engineering simulations of the many aspects of the Nitinol stent design and analysis. Two stent geometries are evaluated: a helical type stent design, and a more traditional straight strut, with multiple crowns design. The fatigue performance of the two stents is compared. The results show that advanced nonlinear finite element simulations and fatigue predictions of the Nitinol stent are possible today inside realistic simulated human arteries. The finite element analysis software used in this study is SimXpert, Marc, and Mentat (MSC Software, Santa Ana, CA).

  17. The benzodiazepine withdrawal syndrome and its management.

    PubMed Central

    Onyett, S R

    1989-01-01

    The literature on benzodiazepine dependence and withdrawal is reviewed with an emphasis on social and psychological considerations. The problems of when to prescribe, identifying withdrawal symptoms, effective communication with the patient, the structure of withdrawal programmes, and the use of drugs, psychological approaches and other services are discussed. PMID:2576073

  18. Benzodiazepine Synthesis and Rapid Toxicity Assay

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Fletcher, James T.; Boriraj, Grit

    2010-01-01

    A second-year organic chemistry laboratory experiment to introduce students to general concepts of medicinal chemistry is described. Within a single three-hour time window, students experience the synthesis of a biologically active small molecule and the assaying of its biological toxicity. Benzodiazepine rings are commonly found in antidepressant…

  19. Autoradiographic localization of benzodiazepine receptor downregulation

    SciTech Connect

    Tietz, E.I.; Rosenberg, H.C.; Chiu, T.H.

    1986-01-01

    Regional differences in downregulation of brain benzodiazepine receptors were studied using a quantitative autoradiographic method. Rats were given a 4-week flurazepam treatment known to cause tolerance and receptor downregulation. A second group of rats was given a similar treatment, but for only 1 week. A third group was given a single acute dose of diazepam to produce a brain benzodiazepine-like activity equivalent to that found after the chronic treatment. Areas studied included hippocampal formation, cerebral cortex, superior colliculus, substantia nigra, dorsal geniculate nucleus, lateral amygdala and lateral hypothalamus. There was a regional variation in the degree of downregulation after 1 week of flurazepam treatment, ranging from 12% to 25%. Extending the flurazepam treatment to 4 weeks caused little further downregulation in those areas studied, except for the pars reticulata of the substantia nigra, which showed a 13% reduction in (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam binding after 1 week and a 40% reduction after 4 weeks of treatment. In a few areas, such as the lateral hypothalamus, no significant change in binding was found after 4 weeks. Acute diazepam treatment caused no change in binding. This latter finding as well as results obtained during the development of the methodology show that downregulation was not an artifact due to residual drug content of brain slices. The regional variations in degree and rate of downregulation suggest areas that may be most important for benzodiazepine tolerance and dependence and may be related to the varying time courses for tolerance to different benzodiazepine actions.

  20. Altered Distribution of Peripheral Blood Memory B Cells in Humans Chronically Infected with Trypanosoma cruzi

    PubMed Central

    Fernández, Esteban R.; Olivera, Gabriela C.; Quebrada Palacio, Luz P.; González, Mariela N.; Hernandez-Vasquez, Yolanda; Sirena, Natalia María; Morán, María L.; Ledesma Patiño, Oscar S.; Postan, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    Numerous abnormalities of the peripheral blood T cell compartment have been reported in human chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infection and related to prolonged antigenic stimulation by persisting parasites. Herein, we measured circulating lymphocytes of various phenotypes based on the differential expression of CD19, CD4, CD27, CD10, IgD, IgM, IgG and CD138 in a total of 48 T. cruzi-infected individuals and 24 healthy controls. Infected individuals had decreased frequencies of CD19+CD27+ cells, which positively correlated with the frequencies of CD4+CD27+ cells. The contraction of CD19+CD27+ cells was comprised of IgG+IgD-, IgM+IgD- and isotype switched IgM-IgD- memory B cells, CD19+CD10+CD27+ B cell precursors and terminally differentiated CD19+CD27+CD138+ plasma cells. Conversely, infected individuals had increased proportions of CD19+IgG+CD27-IgD- memory and CD19+IgM+CD27-IgD+ transitional/naïve B cells. These observations prompted us to assess soluble CD27, a molecule generated by the cleavage of membrane-bound CD27 and used to monitor systemic immune activation. Elevated levels of serum soluble CD27 were observed in infected individuals with Chagas cardiomyopathy, indicating its potentiality as an immunological marker for disease progression in endemic areas. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that chronic T. cruzi infection alters the distribution of various peripheral blood B cell subsets, probably related to the CD4+ T cell deregulation process provoked by the parasite in humans. PMID:25111833

  1. Altered distribution of peripheral blood memory B cells in humans chronically infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Esteban R; Olivera, Gabriela C; Quebrada Palacio, Luz P; González, Mariela N; Hernandez-Vasquez, Yolanda; Sirena, Natalia María; Morán, María L; Ledesma Patiño, Oscar S; Postan, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    Numerous abnormalities of the peripheral blood T cell compartment have been reported in human chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infection and related to prolonged antigenic stimulation by persisting parasites. Herein, we measured circulating lymphocytes of various phenotypes based on the differential expression of CD19, CD4, CD27, CD10, IgD, IgM, IgG and CD138 in a total of 48 T. cruzi-infected individuals and 24 healthy controls. Infected individuals had decreased frequencies of CD19+CD27+ cells, which positively correlated with the frequencies of CD4+CD27+ cells. The contraction of CD19+CD27+ cells was comprised of IgG+IgD-, IgM+IgD- and isotype switched IgM-IgD- memory B cells, CD19+CD10+CD27+ B cell precursors and terminally differentiated CD19+CD27+CD138+ plasma cells. Conversely, infected individuals had increased proportions of CD19+IgG+CD27-IgD- memory and CD19+IgM+CD27-IgD+ transitional/naïve B cells. These observations prompted us to assess soluble CD27, a molecule generated by the cleavage of membrane-bound CD27 and used to monitor systemic immune activation. Elevated levels of serum soluble CD27 were observed in infected individuals with Chagas cardiomyopathy, indicating its potentiality as an immunological marker for disease progression in endemic areas. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that chronic T. cruzi infection alters the distribution of various peripheral blood B cell subsets, probably related to the CD4+ T cell deregulation process provoked by the parasite in humans.

  2. Altered distribution of peripheral blood memory B cells in humans chronically infected with Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed

    Fernández, Esteban R; Olivera, Gabriela C; Quebrada Palacio, Luz P; González, Mariela N; Hernandez-Vasquez, Yolanda; Sirena, Natalia María; Morán, María L; Ledesma Patiño, Oscar S; Postan, Miriam

    2014-01-01

    Numerous abnormalities of the peripheral blood T cell compartment have been reported in human chronic Trypanosoma cruzi infection and related to prolonged antigenic stimulation by persisting parasites. Herein, we measured circulating lymphocytes of various phenotypes based on the differential expression of CD19, CD4, CD27, CD10, IgD, IgM, IgG and CD138 in a total of 48 T. cruzi-infected individuals and 24 healthy controls. Infected individuals had decreased frequencies of CD19+CD27+ cells, which positively correlated with the frequencies of CD4+CD27+ cells. The contraction of CD19+CD27+ cells was comprised of IgG+IgD-, IgM+IgD- and isotype switched IgM-IgD- memory B cells, CD19+CD10+CD27+ B cell precursors and terminally differentiated CD19+CD27+CD138+ plasma cells. Conversely, infected individuals had increased proportions of CD19+IgG+CD27-IgD- memory and CD19+IgM+CD27-IgD+ transitional/naïve B cells. These observations prompted us to assess soluble CD27, a molecule generated by the cleavage of membrane-bound CD27 and used to monitor systemic immune activation. Elevated levels of serum soluble CD27 were observed in infected individuals with Chagas cardiomyopathy, indicating its potentiality as an immunological marker for disease progression in endemic areas. In conclusion, our results demonstrate that chronic T. cruzi infection alters the distribution of various peripheral blood B cell subsets, probably related to the CD4+ T cell deregulation process provoked by the parasite in humans. PMID:25111833

  3. Benzodiazepines, benzodiazepine-like drugs, and typical antipsychotics impair manual dexterity in patients with schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Sasayama, Daimei; Hori, Hiroaki; Teraishi, Toshiya; Hattori, Kotaro; Ota, Miho; Matsuo, Junko; Kinoshita, Yukiko; Okazaki, Mitsutoshi; Arima, Kunimasa; Amano, Naoji; Higuchi, Teruhiko; Kunugi, Hiroshi

    2014-02-01

    Impaired dexterity is a major psychomotor deficit reported in patients with schizophrenia. In the present study, the Purdue pegboard test was used to compare the manual dexterity in patients with schizophrenia and healthy controls. We also examined the influence of antipsychotics, benzodiazepines, and benzodiazepine-like drugs on manual dexterity. Subjects were 93 patients with schizophrenia and 93 healthy controls, matched for sex and age distributions. Control subjects scored significantly higher on all scores of Purdue pegboard than patients with schizophrenia. Age, PANSS negative symptom scale, typical antipsychotic dose, and use of benzodiazepines and/or benzodiazepine-like drugs were negatively correlated with the pegboard scores in patients with schizophrenia. The present results indicate that patients with schizophrenia have impaired gross and fine fingertip dexterity compared to healthy controls. The use of typical antipsychotics and benzodiazepines and/or benzodiazepine-like drugs, but not atypical antipsychotics, had significant negative impact on dexterity in patients with schizophrenia. Psychiatrists should be aware that some psychotropic medications may enhance the disability caused by the impairment of dexterity in patients with schizophrenia.

  4. Flow cytometric assay for analysis of cytotoxic effects of potential drugs on human peripheral blood leukocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nieschke, Kathleen; Mittag, Anja; Golab, Karolina; Bocsi, Jozsef; Pierzchalski, Arkadiusz; Kamysz, Wojciech; Tarnok, Attila

    2014-03-01

    Toxicity test of new chemicals belongs to the first steps in the drug screening, using different cultured cell lines. However, primary human cells represent the human organism better than cultured tumor derived cell lines. We developed a very gentle toxicity assay for isolation and incubation of human peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) and tested it using different bioactive oligopeptides (OP). Effects of different PBL isolation methods (red blood cell lysis; Histopaque isolation among others), different incubation tubes (e.g. FACS tubes), anticoagulants and blood sources on PBL viability were tested using propidium iodide-exclusion as viability measure (incubation time: 60 min, 36°C) and flow cytometry. Toxicity concentration and time-depended effects (10-60 min, 36 °C, 0-100 μg /ml of OP) on human PBL were analyzed. Erythrocyte lysis by hypotonic shock (dH2O) was the fastest PBL isolation method with highest viability (>85%) compared to NH4Cl-Lysis (49%). Density gradient centrifugation led to neutrophil granulocyte cell loss. Heparin anticoagulation resulted in higher viability than EDTA. Conical 1.5 mL and 2 mL micro-reaction tubes (both polypropylene (PP)) had the highest viability (99% and 97%) compared to other tubes, i.e. three types of 5.0 mL round-bottom tubes PP (opaque-60%), PP (blue-62%), Polystyrene (PS-64%). Viability of PBL did not differ between venous and capillary blood. A gentle reproducible preparation and analytical toxicity-assay for human PBL was developed and evaluated. Using our assay toxicity, time-course, dose-dependence and aggregate formation by OP could be clearly differentiated and quantified. This novel assay enables for rapid and cost effective multiparametric toxicological screening and pharmacological testing on primary human PBL and can be adapted to high-throughput-screening.°z

  5. Influence of calorie reduction on DNA repair capacity of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Matt, Katja; Burger, Katharina; Gebhard, Daniel; Bergemann, Jörg

    2016-03-01

    Caloric restrictive feeding prolongs the lifespan of a variety of model organisms like rodents and invertebrates. It has been shown that caloric restriction reduces age-related as well as overall-mortality, reduces oxidative stress and influences DNA repair ability positively. There are numerous studies underlining this, but fewer studies involving humans exist. To contribute to a better understanding of the correlation of calorie reduction and DNA repair in humans, we adapted the host cell reactivation assay to an application with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Furthermore, we used this reliable and reproducible assay to research the influence of a special kind of calorie reduction, namely F. X. Mayr therapy, on DNA repair capacity. We found a positive effect in all persons with low pre-existing DNA repair capacity. In individuals with normal pre-existing DNA repair capacity, no effect on DNA repair capacity was detectable. Decline of DNA repair, accumulation of oxidative DNA damages, mitochondrial dysfunction, telomere shortening as well as caloric intake are widely thought to contribute to aging. With regard to that, our results can be considered as a strong indication that calorie reduction may support DNA repair processes and thus contribute to a healthier aging.

  6. Inter-Individual Differences in RNA Levels in Human Peripheral Blood

    PubMed Central

    Chomczynski, Piotr; Wilfinger, William W.; Eghbalnia, Hamid R.; Kennedy, Amy; Rymaszewski, Michal; Mackey, Karol

    2016-01-01

    Relatively little is known about the range of RNA levels in human blood. This report provides assessment of peripheral blood RNA level and its inter-individual differences in a group of 35 healthy humans consisting of 25 females and 10 males ranging in age from 50 to 89 years. In this group, the average total RNA level was 14.59 μg/ml of blood, with no statistically significant difference between females and males. The individual RNA level ranged from 6.7 to 22.7 μg/ml of blood. In healthy subjects, the repeated sampling of an individual’s blood showed that RNA level, whether high or low, was stable. The inter-individual differences in RNA level in blood can be attributed to both, differences in cell number and the amount of RNA per cell. The 3.4-fold range of inter-individual differences in total RNA levels, documented herein, should be taken into account when evaluating the results of quantitative RT-PCR and/or RNA sequencing studies of human blood. Based on the presented results, a comprehensive assessment of gene expression in blood should involve determination of both the amount of mRNA per unit of total RNA (U / ng RNA) and the amount of mRNA per unit of blood (U / ml blood) to assure a thorough interpretation of physiological or pathological relevance of study results. PMID:26863434

  7. Deoxynivalenol induced oxidative stress and genotoxicity in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Yang, Wei; Yu, Miao; Fu, Juan; Bao, Wei; Wang, Di; Hao, Liping; Yao, Ping; Nüssler, Andreas K; Yan, Hong; Liu, Liegang

    2014-02-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) is one of the most common mycotoxins. The aim of this study consists in using diverse cellular and molecular assays to evaluate cytotoxicity, genotoxicity as well as oxidative damage and to investigate their mechanisms in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. The human lymphocytes were cultured in eight different doses of DON (0, 6.25, 12.5, 25, 50, 100, 250 and 500 ng/mL) during 6, 12 and 24 h. DON was able to decrease cell viability and cause damage to the membrane, the chromosomes or the DNA at all times of culture. It was also able to induce lipid peroxidation and raise the levels of 8-OHdG and ROS in 6, 12 and 24 h. The results of the RT-PCR and the Western Blot indicated that DON is able to enhance mRNA or protein expressions of DNA repair genes and HO-1 in 6 h and to inhibit these expressions in 24 h. DON potentially triggers genotoxicity in human lymphocytes. This mechanism is probably related to depletion of antioxidase and oxidative damage to the DNA that reduced expression of HO-1, thereby inhibiting the ability of DNA repair.

  8. TiO2 nanoparticles and bulk material stimulate human peripheral blood mononuclear cells☆

    PubMed Central

    Becker, Kathrin; Schroecksnadel, Sebastian; Geisler, Simon; Carriere, Marie; Gostner, Johanna M.; Schennach, Harald; Herlin, Nathalie; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2014-01-01

    Nanomaterials are increasingly produced and used throughout recent years. Consequently the probability of exposure to nanoparticles has risen. Because of their small 1–100 nm size, the physicochemical properties of nanomaterials may differ from standard bulk materials and may pose a threat to human health. Only little is known about the effects of nanoparticles on the human immune system. In this study, we investigated the effects of TiO2 nanoparticles and bulk material in the in vitro model of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and cytokine-induced neopterin formation and tryptophan breakdown was monitored. Both biochemical processes are closely related to the course of diseases like infections, atherogenesis and neurodegeneration. OCTi60 (25 nm diameter) TiO2 nanoparticles and bulk material increased neopterin production in unstimulated PBMC and stimulated cells significantly, the effects were stronger for OCTi60 compared to bulk material, while P25 TiO2 (25 nm diameter) nanoparticles had only little influence. No effect of TiO2 nanoparticles on tryptophan breakdown was detected in unstimulated cells, whereas in stimulated cells, IDO activity and IFN-γ production were suppressed but only at the highest concentrations tested. Because neopterin was stimulated and tryptophan breakdown was suppressed in parallel, data suggests that the total effect of particles would be strongly pro-inflammatory. PMID:24361406

  9. Quantitative peripheral blood perturbations of γδ T cells in human disease and their clinical implications.

    PubMed

    Bank, Ilan; Marcu-Malina, Victoria

    2014-12-01

    Human γδ T cells, which play innate and adaptive, protective as well as destructive, roles in the immune response, were discovered in 1986, but the clinical significance of alterations of the levels of these cells in the peripheral blood in human diseases has not been comprehensively reviewed. Here, we review patterns of easily measurable changes of this subset of T cells in peripheral blood from relevant publications in PubMed and their correlations with specific disease categories, specific diagnoses within disease categories, and prognostic outcomes. These collective data suggest that enumeration of γδ T cells and their subsets in the peripheral blood of patients could be a useful tool to evaluate diagnosis and prognosis in the clinical setting.

  10. The Cardiovascular Effects of Morphine THE PERIPHERAL CAPACITANCE AND RESISTANCE VESSELS IN HUMAN SUBJECTS

    PubMed Central

    Zelis, Robert; Mansour, Edward J.; Capone, Robert J.; Mason, Dean T.

    1974-01-01

    attenuate the forearm arteriolar constrictor response (before morphine, + 25.7±5.4; after morphine, + 13.7±5.3 mm Hg/ml/min/100 ml, P < 0.05). However, morphine did not block the post-Valsalva overshoot of blood pressure, nor did it block the increase in forearm vascular resistance produced by the application of ice to the forehead. Similarly, morphine did not block the arteriolar or venoconstrictor effects of intra-arterially administered norepinephrine. Morphine infused into the brachial artery in doses up to 200 μg/min produced no changes in ipsilateral forearm VV[30], forearm blood flow, or calculated forearm resistance. Intra-arterial promethazine, atropine, and propranolol did not block the forearm arteriolar dilator response to intravenous morphine; however, intra-arterial phentolamine abolished the response. These data suggest that in human subjects, morphine induces a peripheral venous and arteriolar dilation by a reflex reduction in sympathetic alpha adrenergic tone. Morphine does not appear to act as a peripheral alpha adrenergic blocking agent but seems to attenuate the sympathetic efferent discharge at a central nervous system level. Images PMID:4612057

  11. Autoradiographic localization of benzodiazepine receptors in the rat kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Beaumont, K.; Healy, D.P.; Fanestil, D.D.

    1984-11-01

    The localization of benzodiazepine (BZD) receptors in the rat kidney was studied by autoradiography after in vitro labeling of kidney slices with flunitrazepam. The affinity, density, and rank order of displacement of (/sup 3/H)-flunitrazepam by several BZDs (RO 5-4864 > diazepam > clonazepam) demonstrated that binding was to BZD receptors of the peripheral type. In autoradiograms obtained with tritium-sensitive film, a high density of silver grains was obtained in the outer medulla, with lower densities in the cortex. Binding was absent from the inner medulla (papilla). In higher resolution autoradiograms obtained with an emulsion-coated cover slip procedure, silver grains were seen to be concentrated over a tubular element in both outer medulla and cortex, identifiable by morphology and distribution as the thick ascending limb of the loop of Henle and the distal convoluted tubule. The identity of the labeled tubules was confirmed by immunofluorescent localization in adjacent slices of Tamm-Horsfall protein, a specific marker for these segments of tubules. Investigation of the effects of peripherally specific BZDs such as RO 5-4864 on distal tubule function is indicated.

  12. Dynamic changes in the proteome of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with low dose ionizing radiation.

    PubMed

    Nishad, S; Ghosh, Anu

    2016-02-01

    Humans are continually exposed to ionizing radiation from natural as well as anthropogenic sources. Though biological effects of high dose radiation exposures have been well accepted, studies on low-to-moderate dose exposures (in the range of 50-500 mGy) have been strongly debated even as researchers continue to search for elusive 'radiation signatures' in humans. Proteins are considered as dynamic functional players that drive cellular responses. However, there is little proteomic information available in context of human exposure to ionizing radiation. In this study, we determined differential expressed proteins in G0 peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from healthy individuals 1h and 4h after 'ex vivo' exposure with two radiation doses (300 mGy and 1 Gy). Twenty-three proteins were found to be significantly altered in irradiated cells when compared to sham irradiated cells with fold change ± 1.5-fold (p ≤ 0.05), with only three proteins showing ≥ 2.5-fold change, either with dose or with time. Mass spectrometry analyses identified redox sensor protein, chloride intracellular channel protein 1 (CLIC-1), the antioxidant protein, peroxiredoxin-6 and the pro-survival molecular chaperone 78 KDa glucose regulated protein (GRP78) among the 23 modulated proteins. The mean coefficient of variation (CV) for the twenty-three radiation responsive protein spots was found to be 33.7% for 300 mGy and 48.3% for 1 Gy. We thus, conclude that the radiation proteomic response of G0 human PBMCs, which are in the resting stage of the cell cycle, involves moderate upregulation of protective mechanisms, with low inter-individual variability. This study will help further our understanding of cellular effects of low dose acute radiation in humans and contribute toward differential biomarker discovery. PMID:26921016

  13. Peripheral Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... Enhancing Diversity Find People About NINDS NINDS Peripheral Neuropathy Information Page Condensed from Peripheral Neuropathy Fact Sheet ... Español Additional resources from MedlinePlus What is Peripheral Neuropathy? Peripheral neuropathy describes damage to the peripheral nervous ...

  14. Skin-surface cooling elicits peripheral and visceral vasoconstriction in humans.

    PubMed

    Wilson, Thad E; Sauder, Charity L; Kearney, Matthew L; Kuipers, Nathan T; Leuenberger, Urs A; Monahan, Kevin D; Ray, Chester A

    2007-10-01

    Skin-surface cooling elicits a pronounced systemic pressor response, which has previously been reported to be associated with peripheral vasoconstriction and may not fully account for the decrease in systemic vascular conductance. To test the hypothesis that whole body skin-surface cooling would also induce renal and splanchnic vasoconstriction, 14 supine subjects performed 26 skin-surface cooling trials (15-18 degrees C water perfused through a tube-lined suit for 20 min). Oral and mean skin temperature, heart rate, stroke volume (Doppler ultrasound), mean arterial blood pressure (MAP), cutaneous blood velocity (laser-Doppler), and mean blood velocity of the brachial, celiac, renal, and superior mesenteric arteries (Doppler ultrasound) were measured during normothermia and skin-surface cooling. Cardiac output (heart rate x stroke volume) and indexes of vascular conductance (flux or blood velocity/MAP) were calculated. Skin-surface cooling increased MAP (n = 26; 78 +/- 5 to 88 +/- 5 mmHg; mean +/- SD) and decreased mean skin temperature (n = 26; 33.7 +/- 0.7 to 27.5 +/- 1.2 degrees C) and cutaneous (n = 12; 0.93 +/- 0.68 to 0.36 +/- 0.20 flux/mmHg), brachial (n = 10; 32 +/- 15 to 20 +/- 12), celiac (n = 8; 85 +/- 22 to 73 +/- 22 cm.s(-1).mmHg(-1)), superior mesenteric (n = 8; 55 +/- 16 to 48 +/- 10 cm.s(-1).mmHg(-1)), and renal (n = 8; 74 +/- 26 to 64 +/- 20 cm.s(-1).mmHg(-1); all P < 0.05) vascular conductance, without altering oral temperature, cardiac output, heart rate, or stroke volume. These data identify decreases in vascular conductance of skin and of brachial, celiac, superior mesenteric, and renal arteries. Thus it appears that vasoconstriction in both peripheral and visceral arteries contributes importantly to the pressor response produced during skin-surface cooling in humans.

  15. Stability of Radiation Induced Chromosome Damage in Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; George, K.; Willingham, V.

    2006-01-01

    Chromosome damage in an individual's peripheral blood lymphocytes can be an indicator of radiation exposure and this data can be used to evaluate dose after accidental or occupational exposure. Evidence suggests that the yield of chromosome damage in lymphocytes is also a relevant biomarker of cancer risk in humans that reflects individual cancer susceptibility. It follows that biomonitoring studies can be used to uncover subjects who are particularly susceptible to radiation damage and therefore at higher risk of cancer. Translocations and other stable aberrations are commonly believed to persist in peripheral blood cells for many years after exposure, and it has been suggested that translocations can be used for assessing retrospective radiation doses or chronic exposures. However, recent investigations suggest that translocations might not always persist indefinitely. We measured chromosome aberrations in the blood lymphocytes of six astronauts before their respective missions of approximately 3 to 6 months onboard the international space station, and again at various intervals up to 5 years after flight. In samples collected a few days after return to earth, the yield of chromosome translocations had significantly increased compared with preflight values, and results indicate that biodosimetry estimates lie within the range expected from physical dosimetry. However, for five of the astronauts, follow up analysis revealed a temporal decline in translocations with half-lives ranging from 10 to 58 months. The yield of exchanges remained unchanged for the sixth astronaut during an observation period of 5 months post-flight. These results may indicate complications with the use of stable aberrations for retrospective dose reconstruction and could affect cancer risk predictions that are estimated from yields of chromosome damage obtained shortly after exposure.

  16. Reversible Folding of Human Peripheral Myelin Protein 22, a Tetraspan Membrane Protein†

    PubMed Central

    Schlebach, Jonathan P.; Peng, Dungeng; Kroncke, Brett M.; Mittendorf, Kathleen F.; Narayan, Malathi; Carter, Bruce D.; Sanders, Charles R.

    2013-01-01

    Misfolding of the α-helical membrane protein peripheral myelin protein 22 (PMP22) has been implicated in the pathogenesis of the common neurodegenerative disease known as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease (CMTD) and also several other related peripheral neuropathies. Emerging evidence suggests that the propensity of PMP22 to misfold in the cell may be due to an intrinsic lack of conformational stability. Therefore, quantitative studies of the conformational equilibrium of PMP22 are needed to gain insight into the molecular basis of CMTD. In this work, we have investigated the folding and unfolding of wild type (WT) human PMP22 in mixed micelles. Both kinetic and thermodynamic measurements demonstrate that the denaturation of PMP22 by n-lauroyl sarcosine (LS) in dodecylphosphocholine (DPC) micelles is reversible. Assessment of the conformational equilibrium indicates that a significant fraction of unfolded PMP22 persists even in the absence of the denaturing detergent. However, we find the stability of PMP22 is increased by glycerol, which facilitates quantitation of thermodynamic parameters. To our knowledge, this work represents the first report of reversible unfolding of a eukaryotic multispan membrane protein. The results indicate that WT PMP22 possesses minimal conformational stability in micelles, which parallels its poor folding efficiency in the endoplasmic reticulum. Folding equilibrium measurements for PMP22 in mixed micelles may provide an approach to assess the effects of cellular metabolites or potential therapeutic agents on its stability. Furthermore, these results pave the way for future investigation of the effects of pathogenic mutations on the conformational equilibrium of PMP22. PMID:23639031

  17. Pro-angiogenic Cell Colonies Grown In Vitro from Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mavromatis, Kreton; Sutcliffe, Diane; Joseph, Giji; Alexander, R. Wayne; Waller, Edmund K.; Quyyumi, Arshed A.; Taylor, W. Robert

    2014-01-01

    Although multiple culture assays have been designed to identify “endothelial progenitor cells” (EPCs), the phenotype of cells grown in culture often remains undefined. We sought to define and characterize the pro-angiogenic cell population within human peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Mononuclear cells were isolated from peripheral blood and grown under angiogenic conditions for 7 days. Formed colonies (CFU-As) were identified and analyzed for proliferation, mRNA and surface antigen expression, tube-forming ability and chromosomal content. Colonies were composed of a heterogeneous group of cells expressing the leukocyte antigens CD45, CD14, and CD3, as well as the endothelial proteins vascular endothelial (VE) cadherin, von Willebrand's Factor (vWF), CD31 and endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS). Colony cells expressed increased levels of pro-angiogenic growth factors, and they formed tubes in Matrigel. In comparison with colonies from the CFU-Hill assay, our assay resulted in a greater number of colonies (19±9 vs. 13±7; p<0.0001) with a substantial number of cells expressing an endothelial phenotype (20.2±7.4% vs. 2.2±1.2% expressing eNOS, p=0006). Chromosomal analysis indicated the colony cells were bone marrow-derived. We, therefore, describe a colony forming unit assay that measures bone marrow-derived circulating mononuclear cells with the capacity to proliferate and mature into proangiogenic leukocytic and endothelial-like cells. This assay, therefore, reflects circulating, bone marrow-derived pro-angiogenic activity. PMID:22904201

  18. Peripheral vasodilatation determines cardiac output in exercising humans: insight from atrial pacing.

    PubMed

    Bada, A A; Svendsen, J H; Secher, N H; Saltin, B; Mortensen, S P

    2012-04-15

    In dogs, manipulation of heart rate has no effect on the exercise-induced increase in cardiac output. Whether these findings apply to humans remain uncertain, because of the large differences in cardiovascular anatomy and regulation. To investigate the role of heart rate and peripheral vasodilatation in the regulation of cardiac output during steady-state exercise, we measured central and peripheral haemodynamics in 10 healthy male subjects, with and without atrial pacing (100–150 beats min(−1)) during: (i) resting conditions, (ii) one-legged knee extensor exercise (24 W) and (iii) femoral arterial ATP infusion at rest. Exercise and ATP infusion increased cardiac output, leg blood flow and vascular conductance (P < 0.05), whereas cerebral perfusion remained unchanged. During atrial pacing increasing heart rate by up to 54 beats min(−1), cardiac output did not change in any of the three conditions, because of a parallel decrease in stroke volume (P < 0.01). Atrial pacing increased mean arterial pressure (MAP) at rest and during ATP infusion (P < 0.05), whereas MAP remained unchanged during exercise. Atrial pacing lowered central venous pressure (P < 0.05) and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (P < 0.05) in all conditions, whereas it did not affect pulmonary mean arterial pressure. Atrial pacing lowered the left ventricular contractility index (dP/dt) (P < 0.05) in all conditions and plasma noradrenaline levels at rest (P < 0.05), but not during exercise and ATP infusion. These results demonstrate that the elevated cardiac output during steady-state exercise is regulated by the increase in skeletal muscle blood flow and venous return to the heart, whereas the increase in heart rate appears to be secondary to the regulation of cardiac output. PMID:22351638

  19. Peripheral vasodilatation determines cardiac output in exercising humans: insight from atrial pacing

    PubMed Central

    Bada, A A; Svendsen, J H; Secher, N H; Saltin, B; Mortensen, S P

    2012-01-01

    In dogs, manipulation of heart rate has no effect on the exercise-induced increase in cardiac output. Whether these findings apply to humans remain uncertain, because of the large differences in cardiovascular anatomy and regulation. To investigate the role of heart rate and peripheral vasodilatation in the regulation of cardiac output during steady-state exercise, we measured central and peripheral haemodynamics in 10 healthy male subjects, with and without atrial pacing (100–150 beats min−1) during: (i) resting conditions, (ii) one-legged knee extensor exercise (24 W) and (iii) femoral arterial ATP infusion at rest. Exercise and ATP infusion increased cardiac output, leg blood flow and vascular conductance (P < 0.05), whereas cerebral perfusion remained unchanged. During atrial pacing increasing heart rate by up to 54 beats min−1, cardiac output did not change in any of the three conditions, because of a parallel decrease in stroke volume (P < 0.01). Atrial pacing increased mean arterial pressure (MAP) at rest and during ATP infusion (P < 0.05), whereas MAP remained unchanged during exercise. Atrial pacing lowered central venous pressure (P < 0.05) and pulmonary capillary wedge pressure (P < 0.05) in all conditions, whereas it did not affect pulmonary mean arterial pressure. Atrial pacing lowered the left ventricular contractility index (dP/dt) (P < 0.05) in all conditions and plasma noradrenaline levels at rest (P < 0.05), but not during exercise and ATP infusion. These results demonstrate that the elevated cardiac output during steady-state exercise is regulated by the increase in skeletal muscle blood flow and venous return to the heart, whereas the increase in heart rate appears to be secondary to the regulation of cardiac output. PMID:22351638

  20. Diurnal Preference Predicts Phase Differences in Expression of Human Peripheral Circadian Clock Genes

    PubMed Central

    Ferrante, Andrew; Gellerman, David; Ay, Ahmet; Woods, Kerri Pruitt; Filipowicz, Allan Michael; Jain, Kriti; Bearden, Neil

    2015-01-01

    Background: Circadian rhythms play an integral role in human behavior, physiology and health. Individual differences in daily rhythms (chronotypes) can affect individual sleep-wake cycles, activity patterns and behavioral choices. Diurnal preference, the tendency towards morningness or eveningness among individuals, has been associated with interpersonal variation in circadian clock-related output measures, including body temperature, melatonin levels and clock gene mRNA in blood, oral mucosa, and dermal fibroblast cell cultures. Methods: Here we report gene expression data from two principal clock genes sampled from hair follicle cells, a peripheral circadian clock. Hair follicle cells from fourteen individuals of extreme morning or evening chronotype were sampled at three time points. RNA was extracted and quantitative PCR assays were used to measure mRNA expression patterns of two clock genes, Per3 and Nr1d2. Results: We found significant differences in clock gene expression over time between chronotype groups, independent of gender or age of participants. Extreme evening chronotypes have a delay in phase of circadian clock gene oscillation relative to extreme morning types. Variation in the molecular clockwork of chronotype groups represents nearly three-hour phase differences (Per3: 2.61 hours; Nr1d2: 3.08 hours, both: 2.86) in circadian oscillations of these clock genes. Conclusions: The measurement of gene expression from hair follicles at three time points allows for a direct, efficient method of estimating phase shifts of a peripheral circadian clock in real-life conditions. The robust phase differences in temporal expression of clock genes associated with diurnal preferences provide the framework for further studies of the molecular mechanisms and gene-by-environment interactions underlying chronotype-specific behavioral phenomena, including social jetlag. PMID:27103930

  1. [(3)H]-girisopam, a novel selective benzodiazepine for the 2, 3-benzodiazepine binding site.

    PubMed

    Horváth, E J; Salamon, C; Bakonyi, A; Fekete, M I; Palkovits, M

    1999-07-01

    Several members of the 2,3-benzodiazepine family, such as tofisopam (Grandaxin((R))) nerisopam (GYKI-52 322) [F. Andrási, K. Horváth, E. Sineger, P. Berzsenyi, J. Borsy, A. Kenessey, M. Tarr, T. Láng, J. Korösi, T. Hámori, Neuropharmacology of a new psychotropic 2, 3-benzodiazepine, Arzneim.-Forsch. Drug. Res., 37 (1987) 1119-1124.] [1] or girisopam (GYKI-51 189) [K. Horváth, F. Andrási, P. Berzsenyi, M. Pátfalusi, M. Patthy, G. Szabó, L. Sebestyén, J. Korösi, P. Botka, T. Hámori, T. Láng, A new psychoactive 5H-2, 3-benzodiazepine with a unique spectrum of activity, Arzneim.-Forsch. Drug. Res., 39 (1989) 894-899.] [2] proved anxiolytic in man and various animal models. Moreover, girisopam could also be characterized as an atypical neuroleptic agent. In spite of the structural similarity, their pharmacological profiles differ significantly from that of the 'classical' 1,4-benzodiazepines. Importantly, according to the data obtained so far these drugs do not have an addiction potential. The novel 2,3-benzodiazepine antagonist girisopam binds with high affinity (K(d)=10.3+/-1.21 nM) and limited capacity (B(max)=6.94+/-1.8 pmol/mg protein) to a single class of recognition sites in rat striatum [J.E. Horváth, J. Hudák, M. Palkovits, Zs. Lenkei, M.I.K. Fekete, P. Arányi, A novel specific binding site for homophthalazines (formerly 2, 3-benzodiazepines) in the rat brain, Eur. J. Pharmacol., 236 (1993) 151-153.]. This protocol describes the use of [(3)H]-girisopam as a specific radioligand for the 2,3-benzodiazepines receptor.

  2. Mechanism of Activation-Induced Downregulation of Mitofusin 2 in Human Peripheral Blood T Cells.

    PubMed

    Dasgupta, Asish; Chen, Kuang-Hueih; Munk, Rachel B; Sasaki, Carl Y; Curtis, Jessica; Longo, Dan L; Ghosh, Paritosh

    2015-12-15

    Mitofusin 2 (Mfn2), a mitochondrial protein, was shown to have antiproliferative properties when overexpressed. In this article, we show that activation of resting human peripheral blood T cells caused downregulation of Mfn2 levels. This downregulation of Mfn2 was blocked by different inhibitors (mTOR inhibitor rapamycin, PI3K inhibitor LY294002, and Akt inhibitor A443654), producing cells that were arrested in the G0/G1 stage of the cell cycle. Furthermore, the activation-induced downregulation of Mfn2 preceded the entry of the cells into the cell cycle, suggesting that Mfn2 downregulation is a prerequisite for activated T cell entry into the cell cycle. Accordingly, small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of Mfn2 resulted in increased T cell proliferation. Overexpression of constitutively active AKT resulted in the downregulation of Mfn2, which can be blocked by a proteasome inhibitor. Akt-mediated downregulation of Mfn2 was via the mTORC1 pathway because this downregulation was blocked by rapamycin, and overexpression of wild-type, but not kinase-dead mTOR, caused Mfn2 downregulation. Our data suggested that activation-induced reactive oxygen species production plays an important role in the downregulation of Mfn2. Collectively, our data suggest that the PI3K-AKT-mTOR pathway plays an important role in activation-induced downregulation of Mfn2 and subsequent proliferation of resting human T cells. PMID:26566676

  3. Ceruloplasmin expression by human peripheral blood lymphocytes: a new link between immunity and iron metabolism.

    PubMed

    Banha, João; Marques, Liliana; Oliveira, Rita; Martins, Maria de Fátima; Paixão, Eleonora; Pereira, Dina; Malhó, Rui; Penque, Deborah; Costa, Luciana

    2008-02-01

    Ceruloplasmin (CP) is a multicopper oxidase involved in the acute phase reaction to stress. Although the physiological role of CP is uncertain, its role in iron (Fe) homeostasis and protection against free radical-initiated cell injury has been widely documented. Previous studies showed the existence of two molecular isoforms of CP: secreted CP (sCP) and a membrane glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored form of CP (GPI-CP). sCP is produced mainly by the liver and is abundant in human serum whereas GPI-CP is expressed in mammalian astrocytes, rat leptomeningeal cells, and Sertolli cells. Herein, we show using RT-PCR that human peripheral blood lymphocytes (huPBL) constitutively express the transcripts for both CP molecular isoforms previously reported. Also, expression of CP in huPBL is demonstrated by immunofluorescence with confocal microscopy and flow cytometry analysis using cells isolated from healthy blood donors with normal Fe status. Importantly, the results obtained show that natural killer cells have a significantly higher CP expression compared to all other major lymphocyte subsets. In this context, the involvement of lymphocyte-derived CP on host defense processes via its anti/prooxidant properties is proposed, giving further support for a close functional interaction between the immune system and the Fe metabolism.

  4. Bovine colostrum modulates immune activation cascades in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro.

    PubMed

    Jenny, Marcel; Pedersen, Ninfa R; Hidayat, Budi J; Schennach, Harald; Fuchs, Dietmar

    2010-04-01

    Bovine colostrum (BC) is the thick yellow fluid a lactating cow gives to a suckling calf during its first days of life to support the growth of the calf and prevent gastrointestinal infections until the calf has synthesized its own active immune defense system. BC contains a complex system of immune factors and has a long history of use in traditional medicine. In an approach to evaluate the effects of bovine colostrum (BC) on the T-cell/macrophage interplay, we investigated and compared the capacity of BC containing low and high amounts of lactose and lactoferrin to modulate tryptophan degradation and neopterin formation in unstimulated and mitogen-stimulated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). The present study shows significant immunomodulatory effects of these BC preparations in human PBMC, either by enhancing or suppressing the occurrence of a Th-1 type immune response. The amount of lactose present in BC seems to diminish the activity of BC in our test system, since BC with higher amounts of lactose attenuated the stimulatory as well as the suppressive activity of BC. PMID:20518274

  5. Effects of rare earth elements on telomerase activity and apoptosis of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Li; Dai, Yucheng; Yuan, Zhaokang; Li, Jie

    2007-04-01

    To study the effects of rare earth exposure on human telomerase and apoptosis of mononuclear cells from human peripheral blood (PBMNCs). The blood contents of 15 rare earth elements, including La, Ce, Pr, Nd, Sm, Eu, Gd, Tb, Dy, Ho, Er, Tm, Yb, Lu, and Y, were measured by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry. Telomeric repeat amplification protocol assay and flow cytometer analysis were carried out to analyze the telomerase activity and apoptosis of PBMNCs, respectively. The total content of rare earth elements in the blood showed significant differences between the exposed group and the control group. The rare earth exposure increased the telomerase activity and the percentages of cells in the S-phase and the G2/M phase in PBMNCs, but it had no effect on the apoptotic rate of PBMNCs. Under the exposure to lower concentrations of rare earth elements, the telomerase activity of PBMNCs in the exposed group was higher than that of the control group, and there was no effect on the apoptotic rate of PBMNCs, but promoted the diploid DNA replication and increased the percentages of G2/M- and S-phase cells.

  6. Widespread Decreased Expression of Immune Function Genes in Human Peripheral Blood Following Radiation Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Paul, Sunirmal; Smilenov, Lubomir B.; Amundson, Sally A.

    2014-01-01

    We report a large-scale reduced expression of genes in pathways related to cell-type specific immunity functions that emerges from microarray analysis 48 h after ex vivo γ-ray irradiation (0, 0.5, 2, 5, 8 Gy) of human peripheral blood from five donors. This response is similar to that seen in patients at 24 h after the start of total-body irradiation and strengthens the rationale for the ex vivo model as an adjunct to human in vivo studies. The most marked response was in genes associated with natural killer (NK) cell immune functions, reflecting a relative loss of NK cells from the population. T- and B-cell mediated immunity genes were also significantly represented in the radiation response. Combined with our previous studies, a single gene expression signature was able to predict radiation dose range with 97% accuracy at times from 6–48 h after exposure. Gene expression signatures that may report on the loss or functional deactivation of blood cell subpopulations after radiation exposure may be particularly useful both for triage biodosimetry and for monitoring the effect of radiation mitigating treatments. PMID:24168352

  7. CD1d-restricted peripheral T cell lymphoma in mice and humans.

    PubMed

    Bachy, Emmanuel; Urb, Mirjam; Chandra, Shilpi; Robinot, Rémy; Bricard, Gabriel; de Bernard, Simon; Traverse-Glehen, Alexandra; Gazzo, Sophie; Blond, Olivier; Khurana, Archana; Baseggio, Lucile; Heavican, Tayla; Ffrench, Martine; Crispatzu, Giuliano; Mondière, Paul; Schrader, Alexandra; Taillardet, Morgan; Thaunat, Olivier; Martin, Nadine; Dalle, Stéphane; Le Garff-Tavernier, Magali; Salles, Gilles; Lachuer, Joel; Hermine, Olivier; Asnafi, Vahid; Roussel, Mikael; Lamy, Thierry; Herling, Marco; Iqbal, Javeed; Buffat, Laurent; Marche, Patrice N; Gaulard, Philippe; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Defrance, Thierry; Genestier, Laurent

    2016-05-01

    Peripheral T cell lymphomas (PTCLs) are a heterogeneous entity of neoplasms with poor prognosis, lack of effective therapies, and a largely unknown pathophysiology. Identifying the mechanism of lymphomagenesis and cell-of-origin from which PTCLs arise is crucial for the development of efficient treatment strategies. In addition to the well-described thymic lymphomas, we found that p53-deficient mice also developed mature PTCLs that did not originate from conventional T cells but from CD1d-restricted NKT cells. PTCLs showed phenotypic features of activated NKT cells, such as PD-1 up-regulation and loss of NK1.1 expression. Injections of heat-killed Streptococcus pneumonia, known to express glycolipid antigens activating NKT cells, increased the incidence of these PTCLs, whereas Escherichia coli injection did not. Gene expression profile analyses indicated a significant down-regulation of genes in the TCR signaling pathway in PTCL, a common feature of chronically activated T cells. Targeting TCR signaling pathway in lymphoma cells, either with cyclosporine A or anti-CD1d blocking antibody, prolonged mice survival. Importantly, we identified human CD1d-restricted lymphoma cells within Vδ1 TCR-expressing PTCL. These results define a new subtype of PTCL and pave the way for the development of blocking anti-CD1d antibody for therapeutic purposes in humans. PMID:27069116

  8. In vitro transdifferentiation of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells to photoreceptor-like cells

    PubMed Central

    Komuta, Yukari; Ishii, Toshiyuki; Kaneda, Makoto; Ueda, Yasuji; Miyamoto, Kiyoko; Toyoda, Masashi; Umezawa, Akihiro

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Direct reprogramming is a promising, simple and low-cost approach to generate target cells from somatic cells without using induced pluripotent stem cells. Recently, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) have attracted considerable attention as a somatic cell source for reprogramming. As a cell source, PBMCs have an advantage over dermal fibroblasts with respect to the ease of collecting tissues. Based on our studies involving generation of photosensitive photoreceptor cells from human iris cells and human dermal fibroblasts by transduction of photoreceptor-related transcription factors via retrovirus vectors, we transduced these transcription factors into PBMCs via Sendai virus vectors. We found that retinal disease-related genes were efficiently detected in CRX-transduced cells, most of which are crucial to photoreceptor functions. In functional studies, a light-induced inward current was detected in some CRX-transduced cells. Moreover, by modification of the culture conditions including additional transduction of RAX1 and NEUROD1, we found a greater variety of retinal disease-related genes than that observed in CRX-transduced PBMCs. These data suggest that CRX acts as a master control gene for reprogramming PBMCs into photoreceptor-like cells and that our induced photoreceptor-like cells might contribute to individualized drug screening and disease modeling of inherited retinal degeneration. PMID:27170256

  9. In Vivo Confocal Microscopy of the Human Cornea in the Assessment of Peripheral Neuropathy and Systemic Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Ellen F.; Misra, Stuti L.; Patel, Dipika V.

    2015-01-01

    In vivo confocal microscopy (IVCM) of the living human cornea offers the ability to perform repeated imaging without tissue damage. Studies using corneal IVCM have led to significant contributions to scientific and clinical knowledge of the living cornea in health and pathological states. Recently the application of corneal IVCM beyond ophthalmology to wider clinical and research fields has been demonstrated. Abnormalities of the corneal subbasal nerve plexus have been associated with many forms of peripheral neuropathy and Langerhans cells correlate with systemic inflammatory states. There is a rapidly growing evidence base investigating the use of corneal IVCM in many systemic conditions and a well-established evidence base for IVCM imaging of the corneal subbasal plexus in diabetic peripheral neuropathy. This paper reviews the potential use of corneal IVCM in general clinical practice as a noninvasive method of assessing peripheral neuropathies, monitoring inflammatory states and clinical therapeutic response. PMID:26770980

  10. Persistent Alterations of Gene Expression Profiling of Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells From Smokers

    PubMed Central

    Weng, Daniel Y.; Chen, Jinguo; Taslim, Cenny; Hsu, Ping-Ching; Marian, Catalin; David, Sean P.; Loffredo, Christopher A.; Shields, Peter G.

    2016-01-01

    The number of validated biomarkers of tobacco smoke exposure is limited, and none exist for tobacco-related cancer. Additional biomarkers for smoke, effects on cellular systems in vivo are needed to improve early detection of lung cancer, and to assist the Food and Drug Administration in regulating exposures to tobacco products. We assessed the effects of smoking on the gene expression using human cell cultures and blood from a cross-sectional study. We profiled global transcriptional changes in cultured smokers’ peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) treated with cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) in vitro (n = 7) and from well-characterized smokers’ blood (n = 36). ANOVA with adjustment for covariates and Pearson correlation were used for statistical analysis in this study. CSC in vitro altered the expression of 1 178 genes (177 genes with > 1.5-fold-change) at P < 0.05. In vivo, PBMCs of heavy and light smokers differed for 614 genes (29 with > 1.5-fold-change) at P < 0.05 (309 remaining significant after adjustment for age, race, and gender). Forty-one genes were persistently altered both in vitro and in vivo, 22 having the same expression pattern reported for non-small cell lung cancer. Our data provides evidence that persistent alterations of gene expression in vitro and in vivo may relate to carcinogenic effects of cigarette smoke, and the identified genes may serve as potential biomarkers for cancer. The use of an in vitro model to corroborate results from human studies provides a novel way to understand human exposure and effect. PMID:26294040

  11. HCG-Activated Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMC) Promote Trophoblast Cell Invasion

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Yaqin; Guo, Yue; Zhou, Danni; Xu, Mei; Ding, Jinli; Yang, Jing

    2015-01-01

    Successful embryo implantation and placentation depend on appropriate trophoblast invasion into the maternal endometrial stroma. Human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) is one of the earliest embryo-derived secreted signals in the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) that abundantly expresses hCG receptors. The aims of this study were to estimate the effect of human embryo–secreted hCG on PBMC function and investigate the role and underlying mechanisms of activated PBMC in trophoblast invasion. Blood samples were collected from women undergoing benign gynecological surgery during the mid-secretory phase. PBMC were isolated and stimulated with or without hCG for 0 or 24 h. Interleukin-1β (IL-1β) and leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) expressions in PBMC were detected by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay and real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). The JAR cell line served as a model for trophoblast cells and was divided into four groups: control, hCG only, PBMC only, and PBMC with hCG. JAR cell invasive and proliferative abilities were detected by trans-well and CCK8 assays and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 (MMP-2), MMP-9, vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP)-1, and TIMP-2 expressions in JAR cells were detected by western blotting and real-time PCR analysis. We found that hCG can remarkably promote IL-1β and LIF promotion in PBMC after 24-h culture. PBMC activated by hCG significantly increased the number of invasive JAR cells in an invasion assay without affecting proliferation, and hCG-activated PBMC significantly increased MMP-2, MMP-9, and VEGF and decreased TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 expressions in JAR cells in a dose-dependent manner. This study demonstrated that hCG stimulates cytokine secretion in human PBMC and could stimulate trophoblast invasion. PMID:26087261

  12. Animal models of anxiety and benzodiazepine actions.

    PubMed

    Iversen, S D

    1980-01-01

    If rats trained to press a lever for food, then receive a shock to the feet following every response, their behavioural output is severely depressed. This procedure is termed immediately punishment and it was used by Geller and Seifter in the task devised to demonstrate the anxiolytic effect of benzodiazepines. These drugs and a number of others with anxiolytic activity (e. g. barbiturates, ethanol) reverse the suppression induced by the presentation of a highly aversive stimulus, like electric shock. The Geller-Seifter procedure has figured prominently in behavioural studies of benzodiazepines and in the efforts to determine the neuropharmacological basis of their anxiolytic action. Experiments involving the manipulation of brain noradrenaline (NA) and 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) levels with drugs or lesions are discussed. The Geller-Seifter procedure is, however, a time consuming and difficult behavioural baseline to work with. It is important, therefore, to devise equally specific but simpler animal models of anxiety. Electric shock, as the anxiety-inducing event has dominated the tasks devised by behavioural psychologists. It is essential to search for more biologically relevant events with which to control the level of anxiety in experimental animals. Tests involving the manipulation of novelty and uncertainty will be presented and their responsiveness to anxiolytic drugs and neuropharmacological manipulation discussed. Recent advances in defining the biochemical and pharmacological properties of benzodiazepine receptors and particularly of their differential distribution in brain, makes it likely that simple reliable animal tests of anxiety would serve neuropharmacology well and be of great value in understanding the functional importance of the benzodiazepine receptors of brain.

  13. Hidden Plasmodium falciparum parasites in human infections: different genotype distribution in the peripheral circulation and in the placenta.

    PubMed

    Schleiermacher, Dietlind; Le Hesran, Jean-Yves; Ndiaye, Jean-Louis; Perraut, Ronald; Gaye, Alioune; Mercereau-Puijalon, Odile

    2002-12-01

    Sequestration of the mature Plasmodium falciparum forms complicates detection, quantification and molecular analysis of human infections. Whether the circulating parasites represent all or only a subset of co-infecting genotypes is unclear. We have investigated this issue and compared placenta and peripheral blood msp1 and msp2 genotypes in 58 women delivering with an ICT-positive placenta in Guediawaye, Senegal. Most placenta (91%) and blood samples (98%) were multiply infected. Multiplicity of infection was positively correlated in both tissues. However, the placental and circulating genotype profiles differed markedly. Only 10% of matched peripheral blood/placenta samples had identical genotypes, whereas 74% had only partially concordant genotypes, with some alleles detected in both tissues, together with additional allele(s) detected in one tissue only. Eight women (14%) had totally discordant placental and peripheral blood genotypes. Thus, in the vast majority of cases, some sequestered genotypes remain hidden, undetected in the peripheral circulation, indicating that analysis of peripheral parasites generates a partial picture of a P. falciparum infection.

  14. Peripheral neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    Peripheral neuritis; Neuropathy - peripheral; Neuritis - peripheral; Nerve disease; Polyneuropathy ... Neuropathy is very common. There are many types and causes. Often, no cause can be found. Some ...

  15. Antigenotoxic Effect of Trametes spp. Extracts against DNA Damage on Human Peripheral White Blood Cells

    PubMed Central

    Knežević, Aleksandar; Živković, Lada; Stajić, Mirjana; Vukojević, Jelena; Milovanović, Ivan; Spremo-Potparević, Biljana

    2015-01-01

    Trametes species have been used for thousands of years in traditional and conventional medicine for the treatment of various types of diseases. The goal was to evaluate possible antigenotoxic effects of mycelium and basidiocarp extracts of selected Trametes species and to assess dependence on their antioxidant potential. Trametes versicolor, T. hirsuta, and T. gibbosa were the species studied. Antigenotoxic potentials of extracts were assessed on human peripheral white blood cells with basidiocarp and mycelium extracts of the species. The alkaline comet test was used for detection of DNA strand breaks and alkali-labile sites, as well as the extent of DNA migration. DPPH assay was used to estimate antioxidative properties of extracts. Fruiting body extracts of T. versicolor and T. gibbosa as well as T. hirsuta extracts, except that at 20.0 mg/mL, were not genotoxic agents. T. versicolor extract had at 5.0 mg/mL the greatest antigenotoxic effect in both pre- and posttreatment of leukocytes. The mycelium extracts of the three species had no genotoxic activity and significant antigenotoxic effect against H2O2-induced DNA damage, both in pre- and posttreatment. The results suggest that extracts of these three species could be considered as strong antigenotoxic agents able to stimulate genoprotective response of cells. PMID:26258163

  16. Toxicological evaluation of dextran stabilized iron oxide nanoparticles in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Easo, Sheeja Liza; Mohanan, Parayanthala Valappil

    2016-01-01

    Iron oxide nanoparticles present an attractive choice for carcinogenic cell destruction via hyperthermia treatment due to its small size and magnetic susceptibility. Dextran stabilized iron oxide nanoparticles (DIONPs) synthesized and characterized for this purpose were used to evaluate its effect on cellular uptake, cytotoxicity, and oxidative stress response in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. In the absence of efficient internalization and perceptible apoptosis, DIONPs were still capable of inducing significant levels of reactive oxygen species formation shortly after exposure. Although these particles did not cause any genotoxic effect, they enhanced the expression of a few relevant oxidative stress and antioxidant defense related genes, accompanied by an increase in the glutathione peroxidase activity. These results indicate that under the tested conditions, DIONPs induced only minimal levels of oxidative stress in lymphocytes. Understanding the biological interaction of DIONPs, the consequences as well as the associated mechanisms in vitro, together with information obtained from systemic studies, could be expected to advance the use of these particles for further clinical trials. PMID:27629807

  17. Age and metabolic risk factors associated with oxidatively damaged DNA in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Løhr, Mille; Jensen, Annie; Eriksen, Louise; Grønbæk, Morten; Loft, Steffen; Møller, Peter

    2015-02-20

    Aging is associated with oxidative stress-generated damage to DNA and this could be related to metabolic disturbances. This study investigated the association between levels of oxidatively damaged DNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and metabolic risk factors in 1,019 subjects, aged 18-93 years. DNA damage was analyzed as strand breaks by the comet assay and levels of formamidopyrimidine (FPG-) and human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase 1 (hOGG1)-sensitive sites There was an association between age and levels of FPG-sensitive sites for women, but not for men. The same tendency was observed for the level of hOGG1-sensitive sites, whereas there was no association with the level of strand breaks. The effect of age on oxidatively damaged DNA in women disappeared in multivariate models, which showed robust positive associations between DNA damage and plasma levels of triglycerides, cholesterol and glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c). In the group of men, there were significant positive associations between alcohol intake, HbA1c and FPG-sensitive sites in multivariate analysis. The levels of metabolic risk factors were positively associated with age, yet only few subjects fulfilled all metabolic syndrome criteria. In summary, positive associations between age and levels of oxidatively damaged DNA appeared mediated by age-related increases in metabolic risk factors. PMID:25650665

  18. Induction of sister chromatid exchanges by coal dust and tobacco snuff extracts in human peripheral lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Tucker, J.D.; Ong, T.

    1985-01-01

    The organic solvent extracts of sub-bituminous coal dust and tobacco snuff, both together and separately, were tested for the induction of sister chromatid exchanges (SCEs) in human peripheral lymphocytes. The results indicate that these extracts induced SCEs, and that when tested together synergistically induced SCEs in two of three donors. Studies with the organic solvent extracts of all five ranks of coal indicate that the extracts of bituminous, lignite, and peat, but not anthracite, induced SCEs. Similar experiments conducted with water extracts, induced SCEs, and that anthracite was equivocal. To determine whether individuals differed in their SCE responses to coal dust extracts, lymphocytes from five donors were tested with organic solvent extracts of bituminous and sub-bituminous coal. An analysis of variance indicates that the SCE response was significantly influenced by the donor and each of the two coal extracts. The findings presented here suggest that coal dust, with or without tobacco snuff, may play a role in the elevated incidence of gastric cancer in coal miners. Because water extracts of some ranks of coal induced SCEs, there exists the possibility of adverse environmental effects due to coal leachates.

  19. Analysis of cytotoxic effects of silver nanoclusters on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells 'in vitro'.

    PubMed

    Orta-García, Sandra Teresa; Plascencia-Villa, Germán; Ochoa-Martínez, Angeles Catalina; Ruiz-Vera, Tania; Pérez-Vázquez, Francisco Javier; Velázquez-Salazar, J Jesús; Yacamán, Miguel José; Navarro-Contreras, Hugo Ricardo; Pérez-Maldonado, Iván N

    2015-10-01

    The antimicrobial properties of silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) have made these particles one of the most used nanomaterials in consumer products. Therefore, an understanding of the interactions (unwanted toxicity) between nanoparticles and human cells is of significant interest. The aim of this study was to assess the in vitro cytotoxicity effects of silver nanoclusters (AgNC, < 2 nm diameter) on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Using flow cytometry and comet assay methods, we demonstrate that exposure of PBMC to AgNC induced intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, DNA damage and apoptosis at 3, 6 and 12 h, with a dose-dependent response (0.1, 1, 3, 5 and 30 µg ml(-1)). Advanced electron microscopy imaging of complete and ultrathin-sections of PBMC confirmed the cytotoxic effects and cell damage caused by AgNC. The present study showed that AgNC produced without coating agents induced significant cytotoxic effects on PBMC owing to their high aspect ratio and active surface area, even at much lower concentrations (<1 µg ml(-1)) than those applied in previous studies, resembling what would occur under real exposure conditions to nanosilver-functionalized consumer products.

  20. Human peripheral blood monocytes display surface antigens recognized by monoclonal antinuclear antibodies

    SciTech Connect

    Holers, V.M.; Kotzin, B.L.

    1985-09-01

    The authors used monoclonal anti-nuclear autoantibodies and indirect immunofluorescence to examine normal human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes for the presence of cell surface nuclear antigens. Only one monoclonal anti-histone antibody (MH-2) was found to bind to freshly isolated PBL, staining approximately 10% of large cells. However, after cells were placed into culture for 16-24 h, a high percentage (up to 60%) of large-sized cells were recognized by an anti-DNA (BWD-1) and several different antihistone monoclonal antibodies (BWH-1, MH-1, and MH-2). These antibodies recognize separate antigenic determinants on chromatin and histones extracted from chromatin. The histone antigen-positive cells were viable, and the monoclonal antibodies could be shown to be binding to the cell surface and not to the nucleus. Using monoclonal antibodies specific for monocytes and T cells, and complement-mediated cytotoxicity, the cells bearing histone antigens were shown to be primarily monocytes. The appearance of histone and DNA antigen-positive cells was nearly completely inhibited by the addition of low concentrations of cycloheximide at initiation of the cultures. In contrast, little effect on the percentage of positive cells was detected if cells were exposed to high doses of gamma irradiation before culture. These data further support the existence of cell surface nuclear antigens on selected cell subsets, which may provide insight into the immunopathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and related autoimmune diseases.

  1. Imaging benzodiazepine receptors in man with C-11-suriclone and positron emission tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Frost, J.J.; Dannals, R.F.; Ravert, H.T.; Wilson, A.A.; Links, J.M.; Trifiletti, R.; Snyder, S.H.; Wagner, H.N. Jr.

    1985-05-01

    Suriclone is a potent cyclopyrrolone, anti-anxiety drug which binds to the benzodiazepine receptor complex (BZR) with high affinity. Suriclone binds to a site on the BZR distinct from the site where benzodiazepines bind. The K/sub D/ of suriclone at 37oC is 0.03 nM. C-11-suriclone (SUR) was synthesized by reacting C-CH3I with the appropriate amine precursor. SUR (1 ..mu..g/kg) was injected IV into a baboon alone or with 1 mg/kg of Ro-151788, a benzodiazepine antagonist, and serial PET scans of the brain were obtained. High radioactivity concentrations were observed in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum which contain high densities of BZR, intermediate concentrations in thalamus and low concentrations in the striatum. When Ro-151788 was given a uniform distribution of radioactivity was observed; the radioactivity was reduced to ca. 25% of control values in the brain which was contained within the PET slice. SUR (0.2 ..mu..g/kg) was next administered to a human subject. From 30-60 minutes after injection high radioactivity concentrations were observed in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum, intermediate concentrations in the thalamus and a low concentration in the caudate. Radioactivity in the cerebral cortex and cerebellum decreased slowly with time, implying that binding of SUR to a high affinity site had occurred. These results demonstrate utility of SUR for measuring binding to the benzodiazepine receptor complex non-invasively in man.

  2. The effect of catechol on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (in vitro study).

    PubMed

    Bukowska, Bożena; Michałowicz, Jaromir; Marczak, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Catechol also known as pyrocatechol or 1,2-dihydroxybenzene is formed endogenously in the organism from neurotransmitters including adrenaline, noradrenaline, and dopamine. It is also a metabolite of many drugs like DOPA, isoproterenol or aspirin and it is also formed in the environment during transformation of various xenobiotics. We evaluated in vitro the effect of catechol on the structure and function of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). The cells were incubated with xenobiotic at concentration range from 2 to 500μg/mL for 1h. Human blood mononuclear cells were obtained from leucocyte-platelet buffy coat taken from healthy donors in the Blood Bank of Łódź, Poland. Using flow cytometry we have evaluated necrotic, apoptotic and morphological changes in PBMCs incubated with catechol. Moreover, we have estimated changes in reactive oxygen species (ROS) formation, protein carbonylation and lipid peroxidation in the cells studied. The compound studied provoked necrotic (from 250μg/mL), apoptotic (from 100μg/mL), and morphological changes (from 250μg/mL) in the incubated cells. We have also noted that catechol decreased H2DCF oxidation at 2 and 10μg/mL but at higher concentrations of 250 and 500μg/mL it caused statistically significant increase in the oxidation of this probe. We also observed an increase in lipid peroxidation (from 250μg/mL) and protein carbonylation (from 50μg/mL) of PBMCs. It was observed that catechol only at high concentrations was capable of inducing changes in PBMCs. The obtained results clearly showed that catechol may induce change in PBMCs only in the caste of poisoning with this compound. PMID:25528409

  3. Rapid diagnosis of human brucellosis by peripheral-blood PCR assay.

    PubMed Central

    Queipo-Ortuño, M I; Morata, P; Ocón, P; Manchado, P; Colmenero, J D

    1997-01-01

    A single-step PCR assay with genus-specific primers for the amplification of a 223-bp region of the sequence encoding a 31-kDa immunogenetic Brucella abortus protein (BCSP31) was used for the rapid diagnosis of human brucellosis. We examined peripheral blood from 47 patients, with a total of 50 cases of brucellosis, and a group of 60 control subjects, composed of patients with febrile syndromes of several etiologies other than brucellosis, asymptomatic subjects seropositive for Brucella antibodies, and healthy subjects. Diagnosis of brucellosis was established in 35 cases (70%) by isolation of Brucella in blood culture and in the other 15 cases (30%) by clinical and serological means. The sensitivity of our PCR assay was 100%, since it correctly identified all 50 cases of brucellosis, regardless of the duration of the disease, the positivity of the blood culture, or the presence of focal forms. The specificity of the test was 98.3%, and the only false-positive result was for a patient who had had brucellosis 2 months before and possibly had a self-limited relapse. In those patients who relapsed, the results of our PCR assay were positive for both the initial infection and the relapse, becoming negative once the relapse treatment was completed and remaining negative in the follow-up tests at 2, 4, and 6 months. In conclusion, these results suggest that the PCR assay is rapid and easy to perform and highly sensitive and specific, and it may therefore be considered a useful tool for diagnosis of human brucellosis. PMID:9350761

  4. Generation of iPS Cells from Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Using Episomal Vectors.

    PubMed

    Su, Ruijun Jeanna; Neises, Amanda; Zhang, Xiao-Bing

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral blood is the easy-to-access, minimally invasive, and the most abundant cell source to use for cell reprogramming. The episomal vector is among the best approaches for generating integration-free induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells due to its simplicity and affordability. Here we describe the detailed protocol for the efficient generation of integration-free iPS cells from peripheral blood mononuclear cells. With this optimized protocol, one can readily generate hundreds of iPS cell colonies from 1 ml of peripheral blood.

  5. Diazepam binding inhibitor gene expression: Location in brain and peripheral tissues of rate

    SciTech Connect

    Alho, H.; Fremeau, R.T. Jr.; Tiedge, H.; Wilcox, J.; Bovolin, P.; Brosius, J.; Roberts, J.L.; Costa, E.

    1988-09-01

    Diazepam binding inhibitor (DBI), an endogenous 10-kDa polypeptide was isolated from rat and human brain by monitoring displacement of radioactive diazepam bound to specific recognition sites in brain synaptic and mitochondrial membranes. The cellular location of DBI mRNA was studied in rat brain and selected peripheral tissues by in situ hybridization histochemistry with a /sup 35/S-labeled single-stranded complementary RNA probe. DBI mRNA was heterogeneously distributed in rat brain, with particularly high levels in the area postrema, the cerebellar cortex, and ependyma of the third ventricle. Intermediate levels were found in the olfactory bulb, pontine nuclei, inferior colliculi, arcuate nucleus, and pineal gland. Relatively low but significant levels of silver grains were observed overlying many mesencephalic and telencephalic areas that have previously been shown to contain numerous DBI-immunoreactive neurons and a high density of central benzodiazepine receptors. In situ hybridizations also revealed high levels of DBI mRNA in the posterior lobe of the pituitary gland, liver, and germinal center of the white pulp of spleen, all tissues that are rich in peripheral benzodiazepine binding sites. The tissue-specific pattern of DBI gene expression described here could be exploited to further understand the physiological function of DBI in the brain and periphery.

  6. Sensitivity of PCR and real-time PCR for the diagnosis of human visceral leishmaniasis using peripheral blood

    PubMed Central

    da Costa Lima, Manoel Sebastião; Zorzenon, Denielly Christina Rodrigues; Dorval, Maria Elizabeth Cavalheiros; Pontes, Elenir Rose Jardim Cury; Oshiro, Elisa Teruya; Cunha, Rodrigo; Andreotti, Renato; Matos, Maria de Fatima Cepa

    2013-01-01

    Objective To evaluate the effectiveness of PCR and real-time PCR for the diagnosis of human visceral leishmaniasis using peripheral blood samples. Methods DNA extraction was performed using Promega Wizard® Genomic kits. PCR employing RV1/RV2 primers yielded 145-bp amplicons. Real-time PCR was performed with the same primers and SYBR Green ROX Plus mix. These techniques were used to analyze 100 peripheral blood samples from patients with clinical signs of the disease. Results The sensitivity and specificity levels were 91,3%% and 29,6%, respectively, for real-time PCR and 97.78% and 61.82%, respectively, for PCR. Conclusions Real-time PCR proved to be a satisfactory method for the diagnosis of human visceral leishmaniasis.

  7. Microneurography as a tool in clinical neurophysiology to investigate peripheral neural traffic in humans.

    PubMed

    Mano, Tadaaki; Iwase, Satoshi; Toma, Shinobu

    2006-11-01

    Microneurography is a method using metal microelectrodes to investigate directly identified neural traffic in myelinated as well as unmyelinated efferent and afferent nerves leading to and coming from muscle and skin in human peripheral nerves in situ. The present paper reviews how this technique has been used in clinical neurophysiology to elucidate the neural mechanisms of autonomic regulation, motor control and sensory functions in humans under physiological and pathological conditions. Microneurography is particularly important to investigate efferent and afferent neural traffic in unmyelinated C fibers. The recording of efferent discharges in postganglionic sympathetic C efferent fibers innervating muscle and skin (muscle sympathetic nerve activity; MSNA and skin sympathetic nerve activity; SSNA) provides direct information about neural control of autonomic effector organs including blood vessels and sweat glands. Sympathetic microneurography has become a potent tool to reveal neural functions and dysfunctions concerning blood pressure control and thermoregulation. This recording has been used not only in wake conditions but also in sleep to investigate changes in sympathetic neural traffic during sleep and sleep-related events such as sleep apnea. The same recording was also successfully carried out by astronauts during spaceflight. Recordings of afferent discharges from muscle mechanoreceptors have been used to understand the mechanisms of motor control. Muscle spindle afferent information is particularly important for the control of fine precise movements. It may also play important roles to predict behavior outcomes during learning of a motor task. Recordings of discharges in myelinated afferent fibers from skin mechanoreceptors have provided not only objective information about mechanoreceptive cutaneous sensation but also the roles of these signals in fine motor control. Unmyelinated mechanoreceptive afferent discharges from hairy skin seem to be

  8. Change in peripheral refraction and curvature of field of the human eye with accommodation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Arthur; Zimmermann, Frederik; Whatham, Andrew; Martinez, Aldo; Delgado, Stephanie; Lazon de la Jara, Percy; Sankaridurg, Padmaja

    2009-02-01

    Recent research showed that the peripheral refractive state is a sufficient stimulus for myopia progression. This finding led to the suggestion that devices that control peripheral refraction may be efficacious in controlling myopia progression. This study aims to understand whether the optical effect of such devices may be affected by near focus. In particular, we seek to understand the influence of accommodation on peripheral refraction and curvature of field of the eye. Refraction was measured in twenty young subjects using an autorefractor at 0° (i.e. along visual axis), and 20°, 30° and 40° field angles both nasal and temporal to the visual axis. All measurements were conducted at 2.5 m, 40 cm and 30 cm viewing distances. Refractive errors were corrected using a soft contact lens during all measurements. As field angle increased, refraction became less hyperopic. Peripheral refraction also became less hyperopic at nearer viewing distances (i.e. with increasing accommodation). Astigmatism (J180) increased with field angle as well as with accommodation. Adopting a third-order aberration theory approach, the position of the Petzval surface relative to the retinal surface was estimated by considering the relative peripheral refractive error (RPRE) and J180 terms of peripheral refraction. Results for the estimated dioptric position of the Petzval surface relative to the retina showed substantial asymmetry. While temporal field tended to agree with theoretical predictions, nasal response departed dramatically from the model eye predictions. With increasing accommodation, peripheral refraction becomes less hyperopic while the Petzval surface showed asymmetry in its change in position. The change in the optical components (i.e. cornea and/or lens as opposed to retinal shape or position) is implicated as at least one of the contributors of this shift in peripheral refraction during accommodation.

  9. Dysregulation of the Peripheral and Adipose Tissue Endocannabinoid System in Human Abdominal Obesity

    PubMed Central

    Blüher, Matthias; Engeli, Stefan; Klöting, Nora; Berndt, Janin; Fasshauer, Mathias; Bátkai, Sádor; Pacher, Pál; Schön, Michael R.; Jordan, Jens; Stumvoll, Michael

    2008-01-01

    The endocannabinoid system has been suspected to contribute to the association of visceral fat accumulation with metabolic diseases. We determined whether circulating endocannabinoids are related to visceral adipose tissue mass in lean, subcutaneous obese, and visceral obese subjects (10 men and 10 women in each group). We further measured expression of the cannabinoid type 1 (CB1) receptor and fatty acid amide hydrolase (FAAH) genes in paired samples of subcutaneous and visceral adipose tissue in all 60 subjects. Circulating 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG) was significantly correlated with body fat (r = 0.45, P = 0.03), visceral fat mass (r = 0.44, P = 0.003), and fasting plasma insulin concentrations (r = 0.41, P = 0.001) but negatively correlated to glucose infusion rate during clamp (r = 0.39, P = 0.009). In visceral adipose tissue, CB1 mRNA expression was negatively correlated with visceral fat mass (r = 0.32, P = 0.01), fasting insulin (r = 0.48, P < 0.001), and circulating 2-AG (r = 0.5, P < 0.001), whereas FAAH gene expression was negatively correlated with visceral fat mass (r = 0.39, P = 0.01) and circulating 2-AG (r = 0.77, P < 0.001). Our findings suggest that abdominal fat accumulation is a critical correlate of the dysregulation of the peripheral endocannabinoid system in human obesity. Thus, the endocannabinoid system may represent a primary target for the treatment of abdominal obesity and associated metabolic changes. PMID:17065342

  10. Immunodetection of histone epitopes correlates with early stages of apoptosis in activated human peripheral T lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Zunino, S. J.; Singh, M. K.; Bass, J.; Picker, L. J.

    1996-01-01

    By coupling intracellular staining with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated labeling of internucleosomal DNA strand breaks in a flow cytometric assay, we observed a strong correlation between apoptosis-associated DNA strand breaks and immunoreactivity with the monoclonal antibody (MAb) B-F6 in activated human peripheral blood T lymphocytes (PBTs). Although MAb B-F6 has been reported to be specific for the cytokine interleukin-6, Western blot analysis of activated PBT lysates revealed that the predominant protein band detected by this MAb was 17 kd (p17), distinct from the 23-kd core protein and 26- to 30-kd mature glycosylated forms of interleukin-6. Immunoaffinity isolation and amino-terminal amino acid sequence analysis of p17 revealed identity with the histone H2B, a finding confirmed by Western blot analysis of purified histones and by similar staining of activated PBTs with an unrelated anti-histone MAb. Neither histone staining nor DNA strand breakage was observed in freshly isolated PBTs; however, after T cell activation, histone immunoreactivity appeared to precede the appearance of DNA strand breaks, with both increasing to a maximal level by day 3 after activation. Two-parameter confocal immunofluorescence microscopy of histone and DNA staining confirmed a lack of histone immunoreactivity in viable cells and demonstrated co-localization of histone epitopes with abnormally clumped chromatin in apoptotic cells. These data indicate that alteration of histone epitope accessibility is a marker of early apoptosis and suggest that multiparameter flow cytometric analysis of intracellular epitopes may be a powerful tool in the elucidation of intracellular mechanisms of apoptosis. Images Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 8 PMID:8702003

  11. Lipopolysaccharide Stimulates Butyric Acid-Induced Apoptosis in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kurita-Ochiai, Tomoko; Fukushima, Kazuo; Ochiai, Kuniyasu

    1999-01-01

    We previously reported that butyric acid, an extracellular metabolite from periodontopathic bacteria, induced apoptosis in murine thymocytes, splenic T cells, and human Jurkat T cells. In this study, we examined the ability of butyric acid to induce apoptosis in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and the effect of bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) on this apoptosis. Butyric acid significantly inhibited the anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody- and concanavalin A-induced proliferative responses in a dose-dependent fashion. This inhibition of PBMC growth by butyric acid depended on apoptosis in vitro. It was characterized by internucleosomal DNA digestion and revealed by gel electrophoresis followed by a colorimetric DNA fragmentation assay to occur in a concentration-dependent fashion. Butyric acid-induced PBMC apoptosis was accompanied by caspase-3 protease activity but not by caspase-1 protease activity. LPS potentiated butyric acid-induced PBMC apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner. Flow-cytometric analysis revealed that LPS increased the proportion of sub-G1 cells and the number of late-stage apoptotic cells induced by butyric acid. Annexin V binding experiments with fractionated subpopulations of PBMC in flow cytometory revealed that LPS accelerated the butyric acid-induced CD3+-T-cell apoptosis followed by similar levels of both CD4+- and CD8+-T-cell apoptosis. The addition of LPS to PBMC cultures did not cause DNA fragmentation, suggesting that LPS was unable to induce PBMC apoptosis directly. These data suggest that LPS, in combination with butyric acid, potentiates CD3+ PBMC T-cell apoptosis and plays a role in the apoptotic depletion of CD4+ and CD8+ cells. PMID:9864191

  12. A study of zearalenone cytotoxicity on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Vlata, Zaxarenia; Porichis, Filippos; Tzanakakis, George; Tsatsakis, Aristidis; Krambovitis, Elias

    2006-09-10

    The mycotoxin zearalenone (ZEA) is a common contaminant of all major cereal grains worldwide with estrogenic and anabolic activity. We investigated the in vitro cytopathic effects of ZEA on freshly isolated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) in relation to proliferation and cell death patterns of untreated and mitogen-activated cells. The higher concentration of 30microg/ml ZEA was found to totally inhibit T and B lymphocyte proliferation from the stimulation with phytohemagglutinin and pokeweed mitogen. The inhibitory effects of ZEA were further related to cell necrosis/apoptosis. Flow cytometry analysis showed a distinct necrotic effect on PBMC, irrespective of mitogen stimulation, whereas apoptotic activity was less evident. Necrosis was observed in both the lymphocyte and monocyte/granulocyte gates. Measurements of ZEA-induced intracellular calcium ion (Ca(2+)) mobilization showed an increase of both Ca(2+) levels and the number of cells with high Ca(2+) only in the monocyte/granulocyte gated cells. Using phenylmethyl sulfonyl fluoride (PMSF), a serine protease inhibitor, and ammonium chloride (NH(4)Cl), a lysosomal inhibitor, both associated with cell necrosis inhibition, we showed that PMSF at 0.05mM and NH(4)Cl at 1 and 10mM reduced the cytopathic effects induced by 30microg/ml ZEA, whereas apoptosis was less affected. Expose of PBMC to 1microg/ml ZEA did not alter the viability of the cells. Our results suggest that high ZEA concentrations in the blood may well exert cytotoxic effects that merit further investigation.

  13. Potential anti-inflammatory effects of Melaleuca alternifolia essential oil on human peripheral blood leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Caldefie-Chézet, F; Fusillier, C; Jarde, T; Laroye, H; Damez, M; Vasson, M-P; Guillot, J

    2006-05-01

    The fungicidal and bactericidal actions of the essential oil (EO) of Melaleuca alternifolia seem well established, but their anti-inflammatory and antioxidative effects remain unclear. This study investigated in vitro the possible role of whole Melaleuca alternifolia EO as a modulator of the inflammatory/non-specific immune response by exploring the chemotaxis and kinetic radical oxygen species (ROS) production of leukocytes and cytokine secretion in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) in humans. The influence of Melaleuca alternifolia EO on the chemotaxis under agarose of isolated neutrophils (PMNs) was evaluated. The kinetics of ROS production by stimulated total circulating leukocytes was followed over 2 h by recording the fluorescence intensity of oxidized dihydrorhodamine 123. The effects of this EO on pro-(interleukin IL-2) and anti-(IL-4 and IL10) inflammatory cytokine secretions were determined by ELISA following incubation of PBMCs with the EO for 24 h. Melaleuca alternifolia EO was inefficient on the chemotaxis of PMNs. It exerted an antioxidant effect, reducing ROS production throughout the kinetic study. Melaleuca alternifolia EO inhibited PBMC proliferation, as revealed by a reduction in IL-2 secretion by stimulated lymphocytes. This EO at 0.1% directly increased the secretion of the anti-inflammatory cytokine IL-4 compared with IL-4 secretion without EO (18.5 +/- 10.0 vs 3.3 +/- 1, p < 0.05), and also increased IL-10 secretion at 0.01% (94.9 +/- 38.7 vs 44.1 +/- 18, ns). Melaleuca alternifolia EO may not only act as an anti-inflammatory mediator through its antioxidant activity but may also efficiently protect the organism by reducing the proliferation of inflammatory cells without affecting their capacity to secrete anti-inflammatory cytokines. PMID:16619364

  14. Melittin induced cytogenetic damage, oxidative stress and changes in gene expression in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Gajski, Goran; Domijan, Ana-Marija; Žegura, Bojana; Štern, Alja; Gerić, Marko; Novak Jovanović, Ivana; Vrhovac, Ivana; Madunić, Josip; Breljak, Davorka; Filipič, Metka; Garaj-Vrhovac, Vera

    2016-02-01

    Melittin (MEL) is the main constituent and principal toxin of bee venom. It is a small basic peptide, consisting of a known amino acid sequence, with powerful haemolytic activity. Since MEL is a nonspecific cytolytic peptide that attacks lipid membranes thus leading to toxicity, the presumption is that it could have significant therapeutic benefits. The aim was to evaluate the cyto/genotoxic effects of MEL in human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBLs) and the molecular mechanisms involved using a multi-biomarker approach. We found that MEL was cytotoxic for HPBLs in a dose- and time-dependent manner. It also induced morphological changes in the cell membrane, granulation and lysis of exposed cells. After treating HPBLs with non-cytotoxic concentrations of MEL, we observed increased DNA damage including oxidative DNA damage as well as increased formation of micronuclei and nuclear buds, and decreased lymphocyte proliferation determined by comet and micronucleus assays. The observed genotoxicity coincided with increased formation of reactive oxygen species, reduction of glutathione level, increased lipid peroxidation and phospholipase C activity, showing the induction of oxidative stress. MEL also modulated the expression of selected genes involved in DNA damage response (TP53, CDKN1A, GADD45α, MDM), oxidative stress (CAT, SOD1, GPX1, GSR and GCLC) and apoptosis (BAX, BCL-2, CAS-3 and CAS-7). Results indicate that MEL is genotoxic to HPBLs and provide evidence that oxidative stress is involved in its DNA damaging effects. MEL toxicity towards normal cells has to be considered if used for potential therapeutic purposes.

  15. Human peripheral blood monocytes display surface antigens recognized by monoclonal antinuclear antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Holers, V M; Kotzin, B L

    1985-01-01

    We used monoclonal anti-nuclear autoantibodies and indirect immunofluorescence to examine normal human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes for the presence of cell surface nuclear antigens. Only one monoclonal anti-histone antibody (MH-2) was found to bind to freshly isolated PBL, staining approximately 10% of large cells. However, after cells were placed into culture for 16-24 h, a high percentage (up to 60%) of large-sized cells were recognized by an anti-DNA (BWD-1) and several different antihistone monoclonal antibodies (BWH-1, MH-1, and MH-2). These antibodies recognize separate antigenic determinants on chromatin and histones extracted from chromatin. None of the monoclonal autoantibodies appeared to bind to a significant percentage of cells of relatively small cell size, either before or after culture. The histone antigen-positive cells were viable, and the monoclonal antibodies could be shown to be binding to the cell surface and not to the nucleus. Further experiments, including those using aggregated Ig to block antibody binding, strongly indicated that anti-histone antibody binding was not Fc receptor mediated. Using monoclonal antibodies specific for monocytes and T cells, and complement-mediated cytotoxicity, the cells bearing histone antigens were shown to be primarily monocytes. The appearance of histone and DNA antigen-positive cells was nearly completely inhibited by the addition of low concentrations (0.25 micrograms/ml) of cycloheximide at initiation of the cultures. In contrast, little effect on the percentage of positive cells was detected if cells were exposed to high doses of gamma irradiation before culture. These data further support the existence of cell surface nuclear antigens on selected cell subsets, which may provide insight into the immunopathogenesis of systemic lupus erythematosus and related autoimmune diseases. Images PMID:3876357

  16. Immunological effects of the anti-programmed death-1 antibody on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Akiyama, Yasuto; Nonomura, Chizu; Kondou, Ryota; Miyata, Haruo; Ashizawa, Tadashi; Maeda, Chie; Mitsuya, Koichi; Hayashi, Nakamasa; Nakasu, Yoko; Yamaguchi, Ken

    2016-09-01

    Immune checkpoint antibody-mediated blockade has gained attention as a new cancer immunotherapy strategy. Accumulating evidence suggests that this therapy imparts a survival benefit to metastatic melanoma and non-small cell lung cancer patients. A substantial amount of data on immune checkpoint antibodies has been collected from clinical trials; however, the direct effect of the antibodies on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) has not been exclusively investigated. In this study, we developed an anti-programmed death-1 (PD-1) antibody (with biosimilarity to nivolumab) and examined the effects of the antibody on PBMCs derived from cancer patients. Specifically, we investigated the effects of the anti-PD-1 antibody on proliferation, cytokine production, cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) and regulatory T cells. These investigations yielded several important results. First, the anti-PD-1 antibody had no obvious effect on resting PBMCs; however, high levels of the anti-PD-1 antibody partly stimulated PBMC proliferation when accompanied by an anti-CD3 antibody. Second, the anti-PD-1 antibody restored the growth inhibition of anti-CD3 Ab-stimulated PBMCs mediated by PD-L1. Third, the anti-PD-1 antibody exhibited a moderate inhibitory effect on the induction of myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) by anti-CD3 antibody stimulation. Additionally, the presence of the anti-PD-1 antibody promoted antigen-specific CTL induction, which suggests that combining anti-PD-1 antibody and conventional immunotherapy treatments may have beneficial effects. These results indicate that specific cellular immunological mechanisms are partly responsible for the antitumor effect exhibited by the anti-PD-1 antibody against advanced cancers in clinical trials. PMID:27573705

  17. Calcitriol stimulates prolactin expression in non-activated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells: breaking paradigms.

    PubMed

    Díaz, Lorenza; Martínez-Reza, Isela; García-Becerra, Rocío; González, Leticia; Larrea, Fernando; Méndez, Isabel

    2011-08-01

    Calcitriol, the hormonal form of vitamin D(3), exerts immunomodulatory effects through the vitamin D(3) receptor (VDR) and increases prolactin (PRL) expression in the pituitary and decidua. Nevertheless, the effects of calcitriol upon lymphocyte PRL have not been evaluated. Therefore, we investigated calcitriol effects upon PRL in resting and phytohemagglutinin-activated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNC) and Jurkat T lymphoma cells. Immunoblots showed constitutive expression of the 50-kDa VDR species in activated PBMNC and Jurkat cells, while a 75-kDa species was recognized in both resting and activated-PBMNC. Only in resting PBMNC calcitriol significantly stimulated PRL expression in a dose-dependent manner. The positive control CYP24A1, a highly VDR-responsive gene, was stimulated by calcitriol, effect that was stronger in resting than in activated-PBMNC (P<0.05), and without effect in Jurkat cells. Calcitriol upregulation of PRL and CYP24A1 was significantly inhibited by the VDR antagonist TEI-9647. EMSA showed that resting PBMNC contain a protein that binds to DR3-type VDRE. Cell activation reduced basal CYP24A1 while induced CYP27B1, VDR and pregnane X receptor (PXR) expression. In summary, calcitriol stimulated PRL and CYP24A1 gene expression in quiescent lymphocytes through a VDR-mediated mechanism. Our results suggest that the 75-kDa VDR species could be participating in calcitriol-mediated effects, and that activation induces factors such as PXR that restrain VDR transcriptional processes. This study supports the presence of a functional VDR in quiescent lymphocytes, providing evidence to reevaluate the VDR paradigm that assumes that lymphocytes respond to calcitriol only after activation. Altogether, our results offer new insights into the mechanisms whereby PRL is regulated in immune cells.

  18. Search for mutations in the EGR2 corepressor proteins, NAB1 and NAB2, in human peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Venken, Koen; Di Maria, Emilio; Bellone, Emilia; Balestra, Piercesare; Cassandrini, Denise; Mandich, Paola; De Jonghe, Peter; Timmerman, Vincent; Svaren, John

    2002-03-01

    EGR2/Krox-20, a Cys2-His2 zinc finger transcription factor, plays an essential role in the regulation of myelination in the peripheral nervous system. Dominant and recessive mutations in EGR2 are associated with peripheral myelinopathies, such as Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease type 1, Dejerine-Sottas syndrome, and congenital hypomyelinating neuropathy. One recessive mutation (I268N) is known to affect the inhibitory domain that binds the NAB transcriptional corepressors, NAB1 and NAB2. This mutation abolishes the interaction of EGR2 with the NAB corepressors and thereby increases transcriptional activity. Therefore, we hypothesized that mutations in the EGR2-interacting domains of NAB1 and NAB2 might be associated with the pathogenesis of inherited peripheral neuropathies in currently unexplained cases. However, screening 87 such cases failed to identify any disease-causing mutations within the EGR2-interacting domains of either NAB1 or NAB2. A further mutation analysis of the complete coding regions of NAB1 and NAB2 in these genomic DNA samples did not uncover any disease-causing mutation. Therefore, our analysis indicates that mutations in the human NABI and NAB2 genes are most likely not involved in the pathogenesis of peripheral neuropathies. PMID:12030330

  19. Hypermethylation of gene promoters in peripheral blood leukocytes in humans long term after radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Kuzmina, Nina S; Lapteva, Nellya Sh; Rubanovich, Alexander V

    2016-04-01

    Some human genes known to undergo age-related promoter hypermethylation. These epigenetic modifications are similar to those occurring in the course of certain diseases, e.g. some types of cancer, which in turn may also associate with age. Given external genotoxic factors may additionally contribute to hypermethylation, this study was designed to analyzes, using methylation-sensitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR), the CpG island hypermethylation in RASSF1A, CDKN2A (including p16/INK4A and p14/ARF) and GSTP1 promoters in peripheral blood leukocytes of individuals exposed to ionizing radiation long time ago. One hundred and twenty-four irradiated subjects (24-77 years old at sampling: 83 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant clean-up workers, 21 nuclear workers, 20 residents of territories with radioactive contamination) and 208 unirradiated volunteers (19-77 years old at sampling) were enrolled. In addition, 74 non-exposed offspring (2-51 years old at sampling) born to irradiated parents were examined. The frequency of individuals displaying promoter methylation of at least one gene in exposed group was significantly higher as compared to the control group (OR=5.44, 95% CI=2.62-11.76, p=3.9×10(-7)). No significant difference was found between the frequency of subjects with the revealed promoter methylation in the group of offspring born to irradiated parents and in the control group. The increase in the number of methylated loci of RASSF1A and p14/ARF was associated with age (β=0.242; p=1.7×10(-5)). In contrast, hypermethylation of p16/INK4A and GSTP1 genes correlated with the fact of radiation exposure only (β=0.290; p=1.7×10(-7)). The latter finding demonstrates that methylation changes in blood leukocytes of healthy subjects exposed to radiation resemble those reported in human malignancies. Additional studies are required to identify the dose-response of epigenetic markers specifically associating with radiation-induced premature aging and/or with the development

  20. Hypermethylation of gene promoters in peripheral blood leukocytes in humans long term after radiation exposure.

    PubMed

    Kuzmina, Nina S; Lapteva, Nellya Sh; Rubanovich, Alexander V

    2016-04-01

    Some human genes known to undergo age-related promoter hypermethylation. These epigenetic modifications are similar to those occurring in the course of certain diseases, e.g. some types of cancer, which in turn may also associate with age. Given external genotoxic factors may additionally contribute to hypermethylation, this study was designed to analyzes, using methylation-sensitive polymerase chain reaction (PCR), the CpG island hypermethylation in RASSF1A, CDKN2A (including p16/INK4A and p14/ARF) and GSTP1 promoters in peripheral blood leukocytes of individuals exposed to ionizing radiation long time ago. One hundred and twenty-four irradiated subjects (24-77 years old at sampling: 83 Chernobyl Nuclear Power Plant clean-up workers, 21 nuclear workers, 20 residents of territories with radioactive contamination) and 208 unirradiated volunteers (19-77 years old at sampling) were enrolled. In addition, 74 non-exposed offspring (2-51 years old at sampling) born to irradiated parents were examined. The frequency of individuals displaying promoter methylation of at least one gene in exposed group was significantly higher as compared to the control group (OR=5.44, 95% CI=2.62-11.76, p=3.9×10(-7)). No significant difference was found between the frequency of subjects with the revealed promoter methylation in the group of offspring born to irradiated parents and in the control group. The increase in the number of methylated loci of RASSF1A and p14/ARF was associated with age (β=0.242; p=1.7×10(-5)). In contrast, hypermethylation of p16/INK4A and GSTP1 genes correlated with the fact of radiation exposure only (β=0.290; p=1.7×10(-7)). The latter finding demonstrates that methylation changes in blood leukocytes of healthy subjects exposed to radiation resemble those reported in human malignancies. Additional studies are required to identify the dose-response of epigenetic markers specifically associating with radiation-induced premature aging and/or with the development

  1. [Leo Sternbach, an inventor of benzodiazepines].

    PubMed

    Uchibayashi, Masao

    2007-01-01

    A biography of Leo Sternbach, an inventor of benzodiazepine tranquillizers, is presented. It consists of (1) a societal desire for lifestyle pills, (2) Leo's birth in 1908 and youth, (3) education, (4) in Vienna, (5) in Zurich, (6) at Hoffmann-La Roche, Basel, (7) to the New World, (8) at Roche, Nutley NJ, (9) invention of the new drugs, (10) revolution of people's lifestyle, and (11) reward, retirement and obituary in 2005. This paper may be the first comprehensive biography of this remarkable chemist written in Japanese.

  2. Localization of Fc gamma receptors and complement receptors CR1 on human peripheral nerve fibres by immunoelectron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Vedeler, C A; Nilsen, R; Matre, R

    1989-06-01

    The localization of receptors for the Fc part of IgG (Fc gamma R) and for the complement C3b/C4b components (CR1) on human peripheral nerve fibres was investigated by indirect immunoperoxidase staining of frozen nerve sections with monoclonal antibodies. Transmission electron microscopy revealed that Fc gamma R and CR1 are localized to the entire surface membrane and inner membrane (axolemma) of the Schwann cell. Myelin and axons were not stained. The presence of Fc gamma R and CR1 in human Schwann cells adds further evidence for the immunocompetence of these cells.

  3. Using Tutte polynomials to analyze the structure of the benzodiazepines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cadavid Muñoz, Juan José

    2014-05-01

    Graph theory in general and Tutte polynomials in particular, are implemented for analyzing the chemical structure of the benzodiazepines. Similarity analysis are used with the Tutte polynomials for finding other molecules that are similar to the benzodiazepines and therefore that might show similar psycho-active actions for medical purpose, in order to evade the drawbacks associated to the benzodiazepines based medicine. For each type of benzodiazepines, Tutte polynomials are computed and some numeric characteristics are obtained, such as the number of spanning trees and the number of spanning forests. Computations are done using the computer algebra Maple's GraphTheory package. The obtained analytical results are of great importance in pharmaceutical engineering. As a future research line, the usage of the chemistry computational program named Spartan, will be used to extent and compare it with the obtained results from the Tutte polynomials of benzodiazepines.

  4. [The comparison of tianeptine and carbamazepine in benzodiazepines withdrawal symptoms].

    PubMed

    Kornowski, Jarosław

    2002-01-01

    Dealing with benzodiazepine dependent creates as serious clinical problem that requires knowledge and experience. Abrupt discontinuation of benzodiazepines, particularly those with short half-life is not advised to avoid severe withdrawal syndrome. Reports from literature suggest use of carbamazepine and recently tianeptine as substances useful in treatment of benzodiazepine dependence. This paper presents a double-blind trial in which both, carbamazepine and tianeptine were used in treatment of benzodiazepiene withdrawal syndrome. Patient mental state was evaluated by using questionnaire SCL-90, Beck Depression Inventory and specifically designed questionnaire assessing severity of symptoms following benzodiazepine withdrawal. It appears from this study that both drugs (carbamazepine and tianeptine) are comparable, safe and efficient in treating benzodiazepine withdrawal symptoms.

  5. Cyclodextrin solubilization of benzodiazepines: formulation of midazolam nasal spray.

    PubMed

    Loftsson, T; Gudmundsdóttir, H; Sigurjónsdóttir, J F; Sigurdsson, H H; Sigfússon, S D; Másson, M; Stefánsson, E

    2001-01-01

    The cyclodextrin solubilization of three benzodiazepines, i.e. alprazolam, midazolam and triazolam, was investigated. The cyclodextrin solubilization was enhanced through ring-opening of the benzodiazepine rings and ionization of the ring-open forms. Additional enhancement was obtained through interaction of a water-soluble polymer with the cyclodextrin complexes. The ring-opening was pH-dependent and completely reversible, the ring-open forms dominating at low pH but the ring-closed forms at physiologic pH. The ring-closed forms were rapidly regenerated upon elevation of pH. In freshly collected human serum in vitro at 37 degrees C, the half-life for the first-order rate constant for the ring-closing reaction was estimated to be less than 2 min for both alprazolam and midazolam. Midazolam (17 mg/ml) was solubilized in aqueous pH 4.3 nasal formulation containing 14% (w/v) sulfobutylether beta-cyclodextrin, 0.1% (w/v) hydroxypropyl methylcellulose, preservatives and buffer salts. Six healthy volunteers received 0.06 mg/kg midazolam intranasally and 2 mg intravenously, and blood samples were collected up to 360 min after the administration. Midazolam was absorbed rapidly reaching maximum serum concentrations of 54.3+/-5.0 ng/ml at 15+/-2 min. The elimination half-life of midazolam was 2.2+/-0.3 h and the absolute availability was 73+/-7%. All mean values+/-SEM. PMID:11165818

  6. Design, Synthesis and Biological Evaluation of Sulfamide and Triazole Benzodiazepines as Novel p53-MDM2 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhiliang; Zhuang, Chunlin; Wu, Yuelin; Guo, Zizhao; Li, Jin; Dong, Guoqiang; Yao, Jianzhong; Sheng, Chunquan; Miao, Zhenyuan; Zhang, Wannian

    2014-01-01

    A series of sulfamide and triazole benzodiazepines were obtained with the principle of bioisosterism. The p53-murine double minute 2 (MDM2) inhibitory activity and in vitro antitumor activity were evaluated. Most of the novel benzodiazepines exhibited moderate protein binding inhibitory activity. Particularly, triazole benzodiazepines showed good inhibitory activity and antitumor potency. Compound 16 had promising antitumor activity against the U-2 OS human osteosarcoma cell line with an IC50 value of 4.17 μM, which was much better than that of nutlin-3. The molecular docking model also successfully predicted that this class of compounds mimicked the three critical residues of p53 binding to MDM2. PMID:25198897

  7. Chronic inorganic arsenic exposure in vitro induces a cancer cell phenotype in human peripheral lung epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Person, Rachel J.; Olive Ngalame, Ntube N.; Makia, Ngome L.; Bell, Matthew W.; Waalkes, Michael P.; Tokar, Erik J.

    2015-07-01

    Inorganic arsenic is a human lung carcinogen. We studied the ability of chronic inorganic arsenic (2 μM; as sodium arsenite) exposure to induce a cancer phenotype in the immortalized, non-tumorigenic human lung peripheral epithelial cell line, HPL-1D. After 38 weeks of continuous arsenic exposure, secreted matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) activity increased to over 200% of control, levels linked to arsenic-induced cancer phenotypes in other cell lines. The invasive capacity of these chronic arsenic-treated lung epithelial (CATLE) cells increased to 320% of control and colony formation increased to 280% of control. CATLE cells showed enhanced proliferation in serum-free media indicative of autonomous growth. Compared to control cells, CATLE cells showed reduced protein expression of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN (decreased to 26% of control) and the putative tumor suppressor gene SLC38A3 (14% of control). Morphological evidence of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) occurred in CATLE cells together with appropriate changes in expression of the EMT markers vimentin (VIM; increased to 300% of control) and e-cadherin (CDH1; decreased to 16% of control). EMT is common in carcinogenic transformation of epithelial cells. CATLE cells showed increased KRAS (291%), ERK1/2 (274%), phosphorylated ERK (p-ERK; 152%), and phosphorylated AKT1 (p-AKT1; 170%) protein expression. Increased transcript expression of metallothioneins, MT1A and MT2A and the stress response genes HMOX1 (690%) and HIF1A (247%) occurred in CATLE cells possibly in adaptation to chronic arsenic exposure. Thus, arsenic induced multiple cancer cell characteristics in human peripheral lung epithelial cells. This model may be useful to assess mechanisms of arsenic-induced lung cancer. - Highlights: • Chronic arsenic exposure transforms a human peripheral lung epithelia cell line. • Cells acquire characteristics in common with human lung adenocarcinoma cells. • These transformed cells provide a

  8. Withdrawing Benzodiazepines in Patients With Anxiety Disorders.

    PubMed

    Lader, Malcolm; Kyriacou, Andri

    2016-01-01

    The large class of CNS-depressant medications-the benzodiazepines-have been extensively used for over 50 years, anxiety disorders being one of the main indications. A substantial proportion (perhaps up to 20-30 %) of long-term users becomes physically dependent on them. Problems with their use became manifest, and dependence, withdrawal difficulties and abuse were documented by the 1980s. Many such users experience physical and psychological withdrawal symptoms on attempted cessation and may develop clinically troublesome syndromes even during slow tapering. Few studies have been conducted to establish the optimal withdrawal schedules. The usual management comprises slow withdrawal over weeks or months together with psychotherapy of various modalities. Pharmacological aids include antidepressants such as the SSRIs especially if depressive symptoms supervene. Other pharmacological agents such as the benzodiazepine antagonist, flumazenil, and the hormonal agent, melatonin, remain largely experimental. The purpose of this review is to analyse the evidence for the efficacy of the usual withdrawal regimes and the newer agents. It is concluded that little evidence exists outside the usual principles of drug withdrawal but there are some promising leads.

  9. Periodic dip of lipidperoxidation in humans: a redox signal to synchronize peripheral circadian clocks?

    PubMed

    Cardona, F

    2004-01-01

    The output generated by the endogenous circadian clock to control circadian functions and temporal organization in metazoans is unknown. Redox state perturbations generated by reactive oxygen species (ROS) and antioxidants are known to influence the expression of a number of genes and signal transduction pathways. Evidence has been recently provided that the reduced redox cofactors NAD and NADP both regulate clock gene activity in the suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) and are induced by it. Significant periodic variations of lipidperoxidation in human blood with a dip at 04.00 h have been previously reported. Such variations could be expected to alter the cellular redox state, thus possibly functioning as periodic redox signals from the master clock. To verify the existence of the mentioned variations the serum levels of malondialdehyde (MDA), a marker of lipidperoxidation, were monitored by High-Performance Liquid Chromatography in 39 healthy subjects at 3-h intervals over a 24-h period. Throughout the test period, only biological noise could be detected in all test persons. However, the normalized MDA levels at 03.00 h were significantly lower (p < 0.05 to < 0.00005) in 38 (97%) of the cases and showed a significantly lower standard deviation (p < 0.004) than at any of the other 3-h intervals, indicating a periodic dip of lipidperoxidation (PDL) in diurnal active subjects. We hypothesize that the PDL, on the basis of its time of appearance, its frequency and its potential influence on cellular redox state, represents a periodic systemic redox output of the SCN, in terms of a relatively short and sudden interruption of the daily oxidative noise. According to recent research, it could be the result of redox alterations induced by the SCN activity and at the same time the pathway by which the master clock resets and synchronizes peripheral oscillators to the light/dark cycle. Additionally, the antioxidative function of the pineal gland activity postulated elsewhere

  10. Expression of CD27 and CD23 on peripheral blood B lymphocytes in humans of different ages

    PubMed Central

    Veneri, Dino; Ortolani, Riccardo; Franchini, Massimo; Tridente, Giuseppe; Pizzolo, Giovanni; Vella, Antonio

    2009-01-01

    Background Due to the fact that the coexpression of CD23 and CD27 has been reported to occur in B lymphocytic leukaemic clones and that there is debate about CD23 expression on memory B cells, we evaluated the behaviour of naive B cells (CD23−/CD27−) and memory B cells (CD27+) in the peripheral blood of a large number of humans of all ages. B cells were also distinguished into B2 (CD5−) and B1-a cells (CD5+). Methods The cell surface expression of CD19, CD5, CD23 and CD27 was assessed on peripheral blood lymphocytes from 1,427 subjects of all ages undergoing peripheral blood immunophenotyping for a variety of reasons. Results The absolute number of B lymphocytes and the percentage of naive cells (CD23−/CD27−) decreased with age whereas there was an increase in memo ry cells (CD27+). A small subset of B cells co-expressing CD23 and CD27 was present in humans of all ages, although the majority of CD27+ cells were CD23−. The percentages and rate of increase with age of B1-a CD23+/CD27+ were slightly higher than those of B2 cell counterparts. Conclusions On the basis of our data, age-associated changes in surface markers of B cells seem to be finely balanced and probably related to functional changes after antigen encounters, while the whole peripheral blood B-cell compartment undergoes a quantitative regression. PMID:19290077

  11. Modeling leukocyte trafficking at the human blood-nerve barrier in vitro and in vivo geared towards targeted molecular therapies for peripheral neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Greathouse, Kelsey M; Palladino, Steven P; Dong, Chaoling; Helton, Eric S; Ubogu, Eroboghene E

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral neuroinflammation is characterized by hematogenous mononuclear leukocyte infiltration into peripheral nerves. Despite significant clinical knowledge, advancements in molecular biology and progress in developing specific drugs for inflammatory disorders such as rheumatoid arthritis, inflammatory bowel disease, and multiple sclerosis, there are currently no specific therapies that modulate pathogenic peripheral nerve inflammation. Modeling leukocyte trafficking at the blood-nerve barrier using a reliable human in vitro model and potential intravital microscopy techniques in representative animal models guided by human observational data should facilitate the targeted modulation of the complex inflammatory cascade needed to develop safe and efficacious therapeutics for immune-mediated neuropathies and chronic neuropathic pain. PMID:26732309

  12. Allelic Exclusion and Peripheral Reconstitution by TCR Transgenic T Cells Arising From Transduced Human Hematopoietic Stem/Progenitor Cells

    PubMed Central

    Giannoni, Francesca; Hardee, Cinnamon L; Wherley, Jennifer; Gschweng, Eric; Senadheera, Shantha; Kaufman, Michael L; Chan, Rebecca; Bahner, Ingrid; Gersuk, Vivian; Wang, Xiaoyan; Gjertson, David; Baltimore, David; Witte, Owen N; Economou, James S; Ribas, Antoni; Kohn, Donald B

    2013-01-01

    Transduction and transplantation of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC) with the genes for a T-cell receptor (TCR) that recognizes a tumor-associated antigen may lead to sustained long-term production of T cells expressing the TCR and confer specific antitumor activity. We evaluated this using a lentiviral vector (CCLc-MND-F5) carrying cDNA for a human TCR specific for an HLA-A*0201-restricted peptide of Melanoma Antigen Recognized by T cells (MART-1). CD34+ HSPC were transduced with the F5 TCR lentiviral vector or mock transduced and transplanted into neonatal NSG mice or NSG mice transgenic for human HLA-A*0201 (NSG-A2). Human CD8+ and CD4+ T cells expressing the human F5 TCR were present in the thymus, spleen, and peripheral blood after 4–5 months. Expression of human HLA-A*0201 in NSG-A2 recipient mice led to significantly increased numbers of human CD8+ and CD4+ T cells expressing the F5 TCR, compared with control NSG recipients. Transduction of the human CD34+ HSPC by the F5 TCR transgene caused a high degree of allelic exclusion, potently suppressing rearrangement of endogenous human TCR-β genes during thymopoiesis. In summary, we demonstrated the feasibility of engineering human HSPC to express a tumor-specific TCR to serve as a long-term source of tumor-targeted mature T cells for immunotherapy of melanoma. PMID:23380815

  13. Allelic exclusion and peripheral reconstitution by TCR transgenic T cells arising from transduced human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Giannoni, Francesca; Hardee, Cinnamon L; Wherley, Jennifer; Gschweng, Eric; Senadheera, Shantha; Kaufman, Michael L; Chan, Rebecca; Bahner, Ingrid; Gersuk, Vivian; Wang, Xiaoyan; Gjertson, David; Baltimore, David; Witte, Owen N; Economou, James S; Ribas, Antoni; Kohn, Donald B

    2013-05-01

    Transduction and transplantation of human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC) with the genes for a T-cell receptor (TCR) that recognizes a tumor-associated antigen may lead to sustained long-term production of T cells expressing the TCR and confer specific antitumor activity. We evaluated this using a lentiviral vector (CCLc-MND-F5) carrying cDNA for a human TCR specific for an HLA-A*0201-restricted peptide of Melanoma Antigen Recognized by T cells (MART-1). CD34(+) HSPC were transduced with the F5 TCR lentiviral vector or mock transduced and transplanted into neonatal NSG mice or NSG mice transgenic for human HLA-A*0201 (NSG-A2). Human CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells expressing the human F5 TCR were present in the thymus, spleen, and peripheral blood after 4-5 months. Expression of human HLA-A*0201 in NSG-A2 recipient mice led to significantly increased numbers of human CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells expressing the F5 TCR, compared with control NSG recipients. Transduction of the human CD34(+) HSPC by the F5 TCR transgene caused a high degree of allelic exclusion, potently suppressing rearrangement of endogenous human TCR-β genes during thymopoiesis. In summary, we demonstrated the feasibility of engineering human HSPC to express a tumor-specific TCR to serve as a long-term source of tumor-targeted mature T cells for immunotherapy of melanoma.

  14. Effects of oral eicosapentaenoic acid versus docosahexaenoic acid on human peripheral blood mononuclear cell gene expression

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Objective: Eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) have beneficial effects on inflammation and cardiovascular disease (CVD). Our aim was to assess the effect of a six-week supplementation with either olive oil, EPA, or DHA on gene expression in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (...

  15. Isolation, propagation, and titration of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 from peripheral blood of infected individuals.

    PubMed

    Schuitemaker, Hanneke; Kootstra, Neeltje A

    2005-01-01

    HIV-1 can be isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and is easily propagated on primary cells in vitro. Here we describe the method for bulk isolation of the HIV-1 quasispecies and a limiting dilution virus isolation protocol by which single coexisting clones can be obtained. In addition, methods for propagation and titration of HIV-1 are provided.

  16. Induction of chromosome aberrations by Fusarium T-2 toxin in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes and Chinese hamster fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Hsia, C.C.; Gao, Y.; Wu, J.L.; Tzian, B.

    1986-01-01

    T-2 toxin is an important representative of trichothecenes produced by various species of imperfect fungi, mainly Fusarium genus. No definite data demonstrating the carcinogenic potential of T-2 toxin had been reported up to now. The authors demonstrated that T-2 toxin reproducibly induced chromosomal structural aberrations both in cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes as well as in V/sub 79/ Chinese hamster fibroblasts. The mean percentage of cells with aberration of human lymphocytes from normal individuals induced by T-2 toxin is 49-fold (9.8%) of the mean percentage of corresponding control cultures without T-2 toxin (0.2%). T-2 toxin induced chromosome type (76%) as well as chromatid type (24%) of aberrations; among them, acentric fragment (46%) was the most common type, and chromatid gap, deletion, and chromosome gap were the next most common. T-2 toxin can induce aberrations in cells at different phases of the cell cycle. There are definite dose-effect relationships within a certain range of dosage of T-2 toxin in experiments with both human peripheral blood lymphocytes and V/sub 79/ cells. T-2 toxin exhibited three types of effects on cells, namely, mitogenic at lowest concentration, clastogenic (chromosome aberration) at median concentration, and cytotoxic at higher concentration. The dose-effect curves of these three effects are partly overlapping. Sex or age effect was not observed. The results suggest that T-2 toxin has carcinogenic potentials. The dosage of aflatoxin that can induce chromosomal aberration of human peripheral blood lymphocytes is thousands-fold of the dosage of T-2 toxin as shown in this report.

  17. Do peripheral and/or central chemoreflexes influence skin blood flow in humans?

    PubMed Central

    Heffernan, Matthew J.; Muller, Matthew D.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract Voluntary apnea activates the central and peripheral chemoreceptors, leading to a rise in sympathetic nerve activity and limb vasoconstriction (i.e., brachial blood flow velocity and forearm cutaneous vascular conductance decrease to a similar extent). Whether peripheral and/or central chemoreceptors contribute to the cutaneous vasoconstrictor response remains unknown. We performed three separate experiments in healthy young men to test the following three hypotheses. First, inhibition of peripheral chemoreceptors with brief hyperoxia inhalation (100% O2) would attenuate the cutaneous vasoconstrictor response to voluntary apnea. Second, activation of the peripheral chemoreceptors with 5 min of hypoxia (10% O2, 90% N2) would augment the cutaneous vasoconstrictor response to voluntary apnea. Third, activation of the central chemoreceptors with 5 min of hypercapnia (7% CO2, 30% O2, 63% N2) would have no influence on cutaneous responses to voluntary apnea. Studies were performed in the supine posture with skin temperature maintained at thermoneutral levels. Beat‐by‐beat blood pressure, heart rate, brachial blood flow velocity, and cutaneous vascular conductance were measured and changes from baseline were compared between treatments. Relative to room air, hyperoxia attenuated the vasoconstrictor response to voluntary apnea in both muscle (−16 ± 10 vs. −40 ± 12%, P = 0.023) and skin (−14 ± 6 vs. −24 ± 5%, P = 0.033). Neither hypoxia nor hypercapnia had significant effects on cutaneous responses to apnea. These data indicate that skin blood flow is controlled by the peripheral chemoreceptors but not the central chemoreceptors. PMID:25344478

  18. Benzodiazepine stability in postmortem samples stored at different temperatures.

    PubMed

    Melo, Paula; Bastos, M Lourdes; Teixeira, Helena M

    2012-01-01

    Benzodiazepine (lorazepam, estazolam, chlordiazepoxide, and ketazolam) stability was studied in postmortem blood, bile, and vitreous humor stored at different temperatures over six months. The influence of NaF, in blood and bile samples, was also investigated. A solid-phase extraction technique was used on all the studied samples, and benzodiazepine quantification was performed by high-performance liquid chromatography-diode-array detection. Benzodiazepine concentration remained almost stable in all samples stored at -20°C and -80°C. Estazolam appeared to be a stable benzodiazepine during the six-month study, and ketazolam proved to be the most unstable benzodiazepine. A 100% loss of ketazolam occurred in all samples stored over 1 or 2 weeks at room temperature and over 8 or 12 weeks at 4°C, with the simultaneous detection of diazepam. Chlordiazepoxide suffered complete degradation in all samples, except preserved bile samples, stored at room temperature. Samples stored at 4°C for 6 months had a 29-100% decrease in chlordiazepoxide concentration. The data obtained suggest that results from samples with these benzodiazepines stored long-term should be cautiously interpreted. Bile and vitreous humor proved to be the most advantageous samples in cases where degradation of benzodiazepines by microorganisms may occur.

  19. Repeated swim stress alters brain benzodiazepine receptors measured in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Weizman, R.; Weizman, A.; Kook, K.A.; Vocci, F.; Deutsch, S.I.; Paul, S.M.

    1989-06-01

    The effects of repeated swim stress on brain benzodiazepine receptors were examined in the mouse using both an in vivo and in vitro binding method. Specific in vivo binding of (/sup 3/H)Ro15-1788 to benzodiazepine receptors was decreased in the hippocampus, cerebral cortex, hypothalamus, midbrain and striatum after repeated swim stress (7 consecutive days of daily swim stress) when compared to nonstressed mice. In vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding was unaltered after repeated swim stress in the cerebellum and pons medulla. The stress-induced reduction in in vivo benzodiazepine receptor binding did not appear to be due to altered cerebral blood flow or to an alteration in benzodiazepine metabolism or biodistribution because there was no difference in (14C)iodoantipyrine distribution or whole brain concentrations of clonazepam after repeated swim stress. Saturation binding experiments revealed a change in both apparent maximal binding capacity and affinity after repeated swim stress. Moreover, a reduction in clonazepam's anticonvulsant potency was also observed after repeated swim stress (an increase in the ED50 dose for protection against pentylenetetrazol-induced seizures), although there was no difference in pentylenetetrazol-induced seizure threshold between the two groups. In contrast to the results obtained in vivo, no change in benzodiazepine receptor binding kinetics was observed using the in vitro binding method. These data suggest that environmental stress can alter the binding parameters of the benzodiazepine receptor and that the in vivo and in vitro binding methods can yield substantially different results.

  20. Extracellular matrix from human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells as a scaffold for peripheral nerve regeneration

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Bo; Rao, Feng; Guo, Zhi-yuan; Sun, Xun; Wang, Yi-guo; Liu, Shu-yun; Wang, Ai-yuan; Guo, Quan-yi; Meng, Hao-ye; Zhao, Qing; Peng, Jiang; Wang, Yu; Lu, Shi-bi

    2016-01-01

    The extracellular matrix, which includes collagens, laminin, or fibronectin, plays an important role in peripheral nerve regeneration. Recently, a Schwann cell-derived extracellular matrix with classical biomaterial was used to mimic the neural niche. However, extensive clinical use of Schwann cells remains limited because of the limited origin, loss of an autologous nerve, and extended in vitro culture times. In the present study, human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs), which are easily accessible and more proliferative than Schwann cells, were used to prepare an extracellular matrix. We identified the morphology and function of hUCMSCs and investigated their effect on peripheral nerve regeneration. Compared with a non-coated dish tissue culture, the hUCMSC-derived extracellular matrix enhanced Schwann cell proliferation, upregulated gene and protein expression levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor, and vascular endothelial growth factor in Schwann cells, and enhanced neurite outgrowth from dorsal root ganglion neurons. These findings suggest that the hUCMSC-derived extracellular matrix promotes peripheral nerve repair and can be used as a basis for the rational design of engineered neural niches. PMID:27630705

  1. Extracellular matrix from human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells as a scaffold for peripheral nerve regeneration.

    PubMed

    Xiao, Bo; Rao, Feng; Guo, Zhi-Yuan; Sun, Xun; Wang, Yi-Guo; Liu, Shu-Yun; Wang, Ai-Yuan; Guo, Quan-Yi; Meng, Hao-Ye; Zhao, Qing; Peng, Jiang; Wang, Yu; Lu, Shi-Bi

    2016-07-01

    The extracellular matrix, which includes collagens, laminin, or fibronectin, plays an important role in peripheral nerve regeneration. Recently, a Schwann cell-derived extracellular matrix with classical biomaterial was used to mimic the neural niche. However, extensive clinical use of Schwann cells remains limited because of the limited origin, loss of an autologous nerve, and extended in vitro culture times. In the present study, human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs), which are easily accessible and more proliferative than Schwann cells, were used to prepare an extracellular matrix. We identified the morphology and function of hUCMSCs and investigated their effect on peripheral nerve regeneration. Compared with a non-coated dish tissue culture, the hUCMSC-derived extracellular matrix enhanced Schwann cell proliferation, upregulated gene and protein expression levels of brain-derived neurotrophic factor, glial cell-derived neurotrophic factor, and vascular endothelial growth factor in Schwann cells, and enhanced neurite outgrowth from dorsal root ganglion neurons. These findings suggest that the hUCMSC-derived extracellular matrix promotes peripheral nerve repair and can be used as a basis for the rational design of engineered neural niches. PMID:27630705

  2. Effects of Dietary n-3 Fatty Acids on Hepatic and Peripheral Insulin Sensitivity in Insulin-Resistant Humans

    PubMed Central

    Lalia, Antigoni Z.; Johnson, Matthew L.; Jensen, Michael D.; Hames, Kazanna C.; Port, John D.

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Dietary n-3 polyunsaturated fatty acids, including eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA), prevent insulin resistance and stimulate mitochondrial biogenesis in rodents, but the findings of translational studies in humans are thus far ambiguous. The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of EPA and DHA on insulin sensitivity, insulin secretion, and muscle mitochondrial function in insulin-resistant, nondiabetic humans using a robust study design and gold-standard measurements. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS Thirty-one insulin-resistant adults received 3.9 g/day EPA+DHA or placebo for 6 months in a randomized double-blind study. Hyperinsulinemic-euglycemic clamp with somatostatin was used to assess hepatic and peripheral insulin sensitivity. Postprandial glucose disposal and insulin secretion were measured after a meal. Measurements were performed at baseline and after 6 months of treatment. Abdominal fat distribution was evaluated by MRI. Muscle oxidative capacity was measured in isolated mitochondria using high-resolution respirometry and noninvasively by magnetic resonance spectroscopy. RESULTS Compared with placebo, EPA+DHA did not alter peripheral insulin sensitivity, postprandial glucose disposal, or insulin secretion. Hepatic insulin sensitivity, determined from the suppression of endogenous glucose production by insulin, exhibited a small but significant improvement with EPA+DHA compared with placebo. Muscle mitochondrial function was unchanged by EPA+DHA or placebo. CONCLUSIONS This study demonstrates that dietary EPA+DHA does not improve peripheral glucose disposal, insulin secretion, or skeletal muscle mitochondrial function in insulin-resistant nondiabetic humans. There was a modest improvement in hepatic insulin sensitivity with EPA+DHA, but this was not associated with any improvements in clinically meaningful outcomes. PMID:25852206

  3. Antigen exposure shapes the ratio between antigen-specific Tregs and conventional T cells in human peripheral blood

    PubMed Central

    Su, Laura F.; del Alcazar, Daniel; Stelekati, Erietta; Wherry, E. John; Davis, Mark M.

    2016-01-01

    The T-cell receptor (TCR) is required for maturation and function of regulatory T cells (Tregs), but the ligand specificities of Tregs outside the context of transgenic TCRs are largely unknown. Using peptide–MHC tetramers, we isolated rare specific Foxp3+ cells directly ex vivo from adult peripheral blood and defined their frequency and phenotype. We find that a proportion of circulating Tregs recognize foreign antigens and the frequency of these cells are similar to that of self-reactive Tregs in the absence of cognate infection. In contrast, the frequencies of Tregs that recognize some common microbial antigens are significantly reduced in the blood of most adults. Exposure to peripheral antigens likely has a major influence on the balance between Tregs and conventional T-cell subsets because a larger proportion of flu-specific T cells has a regulatory cell phenotype in the cord blood. Consistent with this finding, we show that lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus infection can directly modulate the ratio of virus-specific effectors and Tregs in mice. The resulting change in the balance within an antigen-specific T-cell population further correlates with the magnitude of effector response and the chronicity of infection. Taken together, our data highlight the importance of antigen specificity in the functional dynamics of the T-cell repertoire. Each specific population of CD4+ T cells in human peripheral blood contains a subset of Tregs at birth, but the balance between regulatory and effector subsets changes in response to peripheral antigen exposure and this could impact the robustness of antipathogen immunity. PMID:27681619

  4. Experiences of Sleep and Benzodiazepine Use among Older Women

    PubMed Central

    Rubinstein, Robert L.

    2015-01-01

    Sleep disturbances are common among older women; however, little is known about sleep experiences among chronic benzodiazepine users. The experience of sleep, sleep troubles, and management of sleep problems were explored through semi-structured interviews with 12 women aged 65 to 92 who had used a benzodiazepine for three months or longer to treat a sleep disturbance. Themes that emerged from an interpretive phenomenological analysis included multiple reasons for sleep disruptions (health problems, mental disturbances, and sleeping arrangements); opposing effects of benzodiazepines on sleep (helps or does not work); and several supplemental sleep strategies (modification of the environment, distraction, and consumption). PMID:25581296

  5. Peripheral Inflammation is Associated with Altered Substantia Nigra Activity and Psychomotor Slowing in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Brydon, Lena; Harrison, Neil A.; Walker, Cicely; Steptoe, Andrew; Critchley, Hugo D.

    2008-01-01

    Background Systemic infections commonly cause sickness symptoms including psychomotor retardation. Inflammatory cytokines released during the innate immune response are implicated in the communication of peripheral inflammatory signals to the brain. Methods We used functional magnetic resonance brain imaging (fMRI) to investigate neural effects of peripheral inflammation following typhoid vaccination in 16 healthy men, using a double-blind, randomized, crossover-controlled design. Results Vaccination had no global effect on neurovascular coupling but markedly perturbed neural reactivity within substantia nigra during low-level visual stimulation. During a cognitive task, individuals in whom typhoid vaccination engendered higher levels of circulating interleukin-6 had significantly slower reaction time responses. Prolonged reaction times and larger interleukin-6 responses were associated with evoked neural activity within substantia nigra. Conclusions Our findings provide mechanistic insights into the interaction between inflammation and neurocognitive performance, specifically implicating circulating cytokines and midbrain dopaminergic nuclei in mediating the psychomotor consequences of systemic infection. PMID:18242584

  6. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 gp120 induces anergy in human peripheral blood lymphocytes by inducing interleukin-10 production.

    PubMed Central

    Schols, D; De Clercq, E

    1996-01-01

    The effects of recombinant gp120 on the proliferative responses and cytokine production by normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were investigated. gp120 inhibited in a dose-dependent fashion the anti-CD3 monoclonal antibody (MAb)- and concanavalin A-induced proliferative responses. The production of interleukin-2 (IL-2) and IL-4 was diminished by gp120 in the anti-CD3- and concanavalin A-stimulated cultures. In unstimulated PBMC, gp120 induced the production of considerable amounts of IL-10, gamma interferon, and tumor necrosis factor alpha. The gp120-induced reduction in the proliferative responses of PBMC was at least partially reversed by the addition of IL-2, anti-CD28 MAb, or transfectants expressing CD80, CD86, or CD40 but not with exogenous IL-4. Also, a neutralizing anti-IL-10 MAb reversed the inhibitory effect of gp120 on the proliferative responses whereas exogenous IL-10 further enhanced this inhibitory effect. These findings indicate that IL-10 plays an important role in the inhibitory effect of gp120 on PBMC proliferation. The ratio of CD3+CD4+ to CD3+CD8+ T cells was the same in gp120-treated and untreated cell cultures. No apoptosis in these two T-cell populations was observed. However, the number of activated CD3+CD4+ T cells and CD3+CD8+ T cells, as judged by CD25, CD69, and HLA-DR expression, was consistently reduced. gp120 induced the expression of IL-10 in the monocyte/macrophage population, and therefore gp120 also reduced the proliferative responses of CD4+ T-cell-depleted PBMC. Taken together, our observations point to the importance of the cytokine pattern changes and, in particular, the role of IL-10 (produced by the monocytes) in the inhibitory effect of gp120. This mechanism of gp120-induced immunosuppression, if operative in vivo, could contribute to the depressed immune responses associated with human immunodeficiency virus infection and thus have important implications for immunotherapeutic strategies to slow down disease

  7. The use of benzodiazepines in the aged patient: clinical and pharmacological considerations.

    PubMed

    Dailly, Eric; Bourin, Michel

    2008-04-01

    Benzodiazepines are widely used to treat anxiety and insomnia in elderly patients. The interest of this prescription is discussed in this article. The discussion is based on the pharmacological properties and adverse effects of benzodiazepines in the elderly subjects. The conclusions are that benzodiazepines should be rarely prescribed in elderly people; many patients treated by benzodiazepines should be withdrawn and other therapeutic strategies than benzodiazepines should be considered to treat anxiety and insomnia in the elderly patients.

  8. The application of x-ray diffraction and electron microscopy to the study of human peripheral nerve obtained by biopsy.

    PubMed

    FINEAN, J B; WOOLF, A L

    1961-03-01

    Human peripheral nerves obtained by biopsy from patients suffering from neuromuscular disorders have been studied by x-ray diffraction and electron microscopy. Few abnormal diffraction patterns have yet been recorded and their significance is not yet established. Electron micrographs have revealed wide variations in the numbers of myelinated fibres included in the nerve trunks and have facilitated a detailed study of the Schwann cell-axon relationships in the large numbers of unmyelinated fibres always present. Some indications of demyelination have been encountered.

  9. Peripheral circulation.

    PubMed

    Laughlin, M Harold; Davis, Michael J; Secher, Niels H; van Lieshout, Johannes J; Arce-Esquivel, Arturo A; Simmons, Grant H; Bender, Shawn B; Padilla, Jaume; Bache, Robert J; Merkus, Daphne; Duncker, Dirk J

    2012-01-01

    Blood flow (BF) increases with increasing exercise intensity in skeletal, respiratory, and cardiac muscle. In humans during maximal exercise intensities, 85% to 90% of total cardiac output is distributed to skeletal and cardiac muscle. During exercise BF increases modestly and heterogeneously to brain and decreases in gastrointestinal, reproductive, and renal tissues and shows little to no change in skin. If the duration of exercise is sufficient to increase body/core temperature, skin BF is also increased in humans. Because blood pressure changes little during exercise, changes in distribution of BF with incremental exercise result from changes in vascular conductance. These changes in distribution of BF throughout the body contribute to decreases in mixed venous oxygen content, serve to supply adequate oxygen to the active skeletal muscles, and support metabolism of other tissues while maintaining homeostasis. This review discusses the response of the peripheral circulation of humans to acute and chronic dynamic exercise and mechanisms responsible for these responses. This is accomplished in the context of leading the reader on a tour through the peripheral circulation during dynamic exercise. During this tour, we consider what is known about how each vascular bed controls BF during exercise and how these control mechanisms are modified by chronic physical activity/exercise training. The tour ends by comparing responses of the systemic circulation to those of the pulmonary circulation relative to the effects of exercise on the regional distribution of BF and mechanisms responsible for control of resistance/conductance in the systemic and pulmonary circulations.

  10. Atomic resolution view into the structure–function relationships of the human myelin peripheral membrane protein P2

    SciTech Connect

    Ruskamo, Salla; Yadav, Ravi P.; Sharma, Satyan; Lehtimäki, Mari; Laulumaa, Saara; Aggarwal, Shweta; Simons, Mikael; Bürck, Jochen; Ulrich, Anne S.; Juffer, André H.; Kursula, Inari; Kursula, Petri

    2014-01-01

    The structure of the human myelin peripheral membrane protein P2 has been refined at 0.93 Å resolution. In combination with functional experiments in vitro, in vivo and in silico, the fine details of the structure–function relationships in P2 are emerging. P2 is a fatty acid-binding protein expressed in vertebrate peripheral nerve myelin, where it may function in bilayer stacking and lipid transport. P2 binds to phospholipid membranes through its positively charged surface and a hydrophobic tip, and accommodates fatty acids inside its barrel structure. The structure of human P2 refined at the ultrahigh resolution of 0.93 Å allows detailed structural analyses, including the full organization of an internal hydrogen-bonding network. The orientation of the bound fatty-acid carboxyl group is linked to the protonation states of two coordinating arginine residues. An anion-binding site in the portal region is suggested to be relevant for membrane interactions and conformational changes. When bound to membrane multilayers, P2 has a preferred orientation and is stabilized, and the repeat distance indicates a single layer of P2 between membranes. Simulations show the formation of a double bilayer in the presence of P2, and in cultured cells wild-type P2 induces membrane-domain formation. Here, the most accurate structural and functional view to date on P2, a major component of peripheral nerve myelin, is presented, showing how it can interact with two membranes simultaneously while going through conformational changes at its portal region enabling ligand transfer.

  11. Eight principles for safer opioid prescribing and cautions with benzodiazepines.

    PubMed

    Webster, Lynn R; Reisfield, Gary M; Dasgupta, Nabarun

    2015-01-01

    The provision of long-term opioid analgesic therapy for chronic pain requires a careful risk/benefit analysis followed by clinical safety measures to identify and reduce misuse, abuse, and addiction and their associated morbidity and mortality. Multiple data sources show that benzodiazepines, prescribed for comorbid insomnia, anxiety, and mood disorders, heighten the risk of respiratory depression and other adverse outcomes when combined with opioid therapy. Evidence is presented for hazards associated with coadministration of opioids and benzodiazepines and the need for caution when initiating opioid therapy for chronic pain. Clinical recommendations follow, as drawn from 2 previously published literature reviews, one of which proffers 8 principles for safer opioid prescribing; the other review presents risks associated with benzodiazepines, suggests alternatives for co-prescribing benzodiazepines and opioids, and outlines recommendations regarding co-prescribing if alternative therapies are ineffective.

  12. [Should we continue to use benzodiazepines in clinical practice?].

    PubMed

    Sampogna, Gaia; Del Vecchio, Valeria; Luciano, Mario; De Rosa, Corrado; Albert, Umberto; Dell'Osso, Bernardo; Fiorillo, Andrea

    2015-06-01

    The discovery of benzodiazepines has represented a milestone in the history of pharmacological treatments and in relation to the management of anxiety, sleep and other psychiatric disorders. After several decades, these agents still represent one of the largest and most widely prescribed groups of medications, not only in the psychiatric clinical practice, but also in the whole medical field. Over the last decade, however, multiple concerns have been raised on the risks related to the prescription of benzodiazepines, for their addictive potential and for cognitive side-effects. Therefore, benzodiazepines are today considered as a double-edge sword, which should be carefully handled and preferentially prescribed by specialists (or at least under their supervision), after an adequate training. Unfortunately, this is not the case in many situations, and the need to improve training on benzodiazepines management has been recently emphasized.

  13. Is There A Problem With Benzodiazepine Prescribing In Maritime Canada?

    PubMed Central

    Sketris, Ingrid S.; MacCara, Mary E.; Purkis, Ian E.; Curry, Lynn

    1985-01-01

    The benzodiazepine prescribing habits of 64 maritime doctors were studied through collection and examination of carbon copies of all prescriptions over a 22 week period. Diazepam was the most frequently prescribed anxiolytic benzodiazepine, followed by chlordiazepoxide, then oxazepam. These three drugs accounted for almost 60% of all benzodiazepine prescriptions. Triazolam and flurazepam were prescribed eight times more frequently than the other hypnotics, nitrazepam and temazepam. The number of prescriptions judged to be inappropriately excessive was small (3.3% of 7,066). Efforts by drug manufacturers, pharmaceutical sales representatives and CME providers are needed to make the practicing physician aware of the phamacokinetics of the different benzodiazepines, so that an appropriate choice of drug and frequency of daily doses can be made. PMID:21274169

  14. Flumazenil-sensitive dose-related physical dependence in planarians produced by two benzodiazepine and one non-benzodiazepine benzodiazepine-receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Raffa, Robert B; Cavallo, Federica; Capasso, Anna

    2007-06-14

    Two benzodiazepine (midazolam and clorazepate) and one non-benzodiazepine (zolpidem) benzodiazepine-receptor agonists produced dose-related physical dependence, as evidenced by abstinence-induced decrease in planarian locomotor velocity (pLMV) when drug-exposed planarians were placed into drug-free water, but not when they were placed into drug-containing water (i.e., an abstinence-induced withdrawal, since the effect was only obtained in the removal of drug and not in the continued presence of drug). We have previously shown that the decrease in pLMV is associated with specific and transient withdrawal signs. In the present study, the selective benzodiazepine-receptor antagonist flumazenil significantly antagonized (P<0.05), by co-application, the ability of each agonist to produce the withdrawal. These results: (1) suggest that benzodiazepine-receptor agonists, for two different chemical categories, produce dose-related physical dependence manifested as abstinence-induced withdrawal in this simple and convenient model, and (2) in the absence of cloning or radioligand binding literature, suggest a possible specific interaction site (receptor?) for these compounds in planarians.

  15. Age-related accumulation of Ig VH gene somatic mutations in peripheral B cells from aged humans

    PubMed Central

    CHONG, Y; IKEMATSU, H; YAMAJI, K; NISHIMURA, M; KASHIWAGI, S; HAYASHI, J

    2003-01-01

    To investigate age-related alterations in human humoral immunity, we analysed Ig heavy chain variable region genes expressed by peripheral B cells from young and aged individuals. Three hundred and twenty-seven cDNA sequences, 163 µ and 164 γ transcripts with VH5 family genes, were analysed for somatic hypermutation and VHDJH recombinational features. Unmutated and mutated µ transcripts were interpreted as being from naive and memory IgM B cells, respectively. In young and aged individuals, the percentages of naive IgM among total µ transcripts were 39% and 42%, respectively. D and JH segment usage in naive IgM from aged individuals was similar to that from young individuals. The mutational frequencies of memory IgM were similar in young and aged individuals. γ transcripts, which are regarded as being from memory IgG B cells, showed a significantly higher mutational frequency (7·6%) in aged than in young individuals (5·8%) (P < 0·01). These findings suggest that VHDJH recombinational diversity was preserved, but that the accumulation of somatic mutations in the IgG VH region was increased in aged humans. The accumulation of somatic mutations in IgG B cells during ageing may imply that an age-related alteration exists in the selection and/or maintenance of peripheral memory B cells. PMID:12823279

  16. LDL and HDL transfer rates across peripheral microvascular endothelium agree with those predicted for passive ultrafiltration in humans

    PubMed Central

    Michel, C. Charles; Nanjee, M. Nazeem; Olszewski, Waldemar L.; Miller, Norman E.

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms by which LDLs and HDLs cross the vascular endothelium from plasma into interstitial fluid are not understood, and have never been studied in humans in vivo. We determined whether the plasma-to-lymph clearance rates of LDL and HDL conform with those predicted by passive ultrafiltration through intercellular pores, or if it is necessary to invoke an active process such as receptor-mediated transcytosis. Plasma and afferent peripheral lymph were collected under steady-state conditions from 30 healthy men, and assayed for seven globular proteins of molecular radii 2.89–8.95 nm, complement C3, and apo AI, apo AII, and apo B. Plasma-to-lymph clearance rates of the seven proteins fitted the relation expected for molecules of their size when transported through two populations of pores of radius 4.95 and 20.1 nm. The same model parameters were then found to accurately predict the clearance rates of both HDL and LDL. The apparent clearance of complement C3, previously shown to be secreted by cultured endothelium, exceeded that predicted by the model. We conclude that the transport of HDL and LDL from plasma into interstitial fluid across the peripheral vascular endothelium in healthy humans can be explained by ultrafiltration without invoking an additional active process such as transcytosis. PMID:25398615

  17. A Semi-automated Approach to Preparing Antibody Cocktails for Immunophenotypic Analysis of Human Peripheral Blood

    PubMed Central

    Koguchi, Yoshinobu; Gonzalez, Iliana L.; Meeuwsen, Tanisha L.; Miller, William L.; Haley, Daniel P.; Tanibata-Branham, Alice N.; Bahjat, Keith S.

    2016-01-01

    Immunophenotyping of peripheral blood by flow cytometry determines changes in the frequency and activation status of peripheral leukocytes during disease and treatment. It has the potential to predict therapeutic efficacy and identify novel therapeutic targets. Whole blood staining utilizes unmanipulated blood, which minimizes artifacts that can occur during sample preparation. However, whole blood staining must also be done on freshly collected blood to ensure the integrity of the sample. Additionally, it is best to prepare antibody cocktails on the same day to avoid potential instability of tandem-dyes and prevent reagent interaction between brilliant violet dyes. Therefore, whole blood staining requires careful standardization to control for intra and inter-experimental variability. Here, we report deployment of an automated liquid handler equipped with a two-dimensional (2D) barcode reader into a standard process of making antibody cocktails for flow cytometry. Antibodies were transferred into 2D barcoded tubes arranged in a 96 well format and their contents compiled in a database. The liquid handler could then locate the source antibody vials by referencing antibody names within the database. Our method eliminated tedious coordination for positioning of source antibody tubes. It provided versatility allowing the user to easily change any number of details in the antibody dispensing process such as specific antibody to use, volume, and destination by modifying the database without rewriting the scripting in the software method for each assay. A proof of concept experiment achieved outstanding inter and intra- assay precision, demonstrated by replicate preparation of an 11-color, 17-antibody flow cytometry assay. These methodologies increased overall throughput for flow cytometry assays and facilitated daily preparation of the complex antibody cocktails required for the detailed phenotypic characterization of freshly collected anticoagulated peripheral blood

  18. RAG1 and RAG2 expression by B cell subsets from human tonsil and peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Girschick, H J; Grammer, A C; Nanki, T; Mayo, M; Lipsky, P E

    2001-01-01

    It has been suggested that B cells acquire the capacity for secondary V(D)J recombination during germinal center (GC) reactions. The nature of these B cells remains controversial. Subsets of tonsil and blood B cells and also individual B cells were examined for the expression of recombination-activating gene (RAG) mRNA. Semiquantitative analysis indicated that RAG1 mRNA was present in all tonsil B cell subsets, with the largest amount found in naive B cells. RAG2 mRNA was only found in tonsil naive B cells, centrocytes, and to a lesser extent in centroblasts. Neither RAG1 nor RAG2 mRNA was routinely found in normal peripheral blood B cells. In individual tonsil B cells, RAG1 and RAG2 mRNAs were found in 18% of naive B cells, 22% of GC founder cells, 0% of centroblasts, 13% of centrocytes, and 9% of memory B cells. Individual naive tonsil B cells containing both RAG1 and RAG2 mRNA were activated (CD69(+)). In normal peripheral blood approximately 5% of B cells expressed both RAG1 and RAG2. These cells were uniformly postswitch memory B cells as documented by the coexpression of IgG mRNA. These results indicate that coordinate RAG expression is not found in normal peripheral naive B cells but is up-regulated in naive B cells which are activated in the tonsil. With the exception of centroblasts, RAG1 and RAG2 expression can be found in all components of the GC, including postswitch memory B cells, some of which may circulate in the blood of normal subjects.

  19. Stimulation through CD50 preferentially induces apoptosis of TCR1+ human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    López-Briones, S; Portales-Pérez, D P; Baranda, L; de la Fuente, H; Rosenstein, Y; González-Amaro, R

    1998-01-01

    Apoptosis has an important role in several key immunological phenomena such as regulation of the immune response, and deletion of auto-reactive cells. This phenomenon is induced following the interaction of several cell membrane receptors with their respective ligands or after cell activation. We have studied the possible effect of signaling through CD50/ICAM-3 and CD69/AIM on apoptosis of peripheral blood lymphocytes. Apoptosis was assessed by both flow cytometry analysis (content of cell DNA and binding to annexin V), and detection of DNA fragmentation by agarose gel electrophoresis. We found that a stimulatory anti-CD50 mAb was able to induce a small but significant degree of apoptosis in resting peripheral blood mononuclear cells from most donors; this effect was dose-dependent and was evident as early as at 12 h, with a maximal induction at 48 h. Studies with T and non-T cells showed that only the former cell population was sensitive to the induction of apoptosis through CD50. Further experiments revealed that the anti-ICAM-3 mAb preferentially induced apoptosis of TCR gamma delta-bearing cells. In addition, we found a significant increase in Cai2+ in PBMC stimulated with an anti-CD50 mAb, suggesting the involvement of this signaling pathway in the induction of apoptosis through this adhesion receptor. In contrast, under our experimental conditions, stimulation through CD69 did not have any effect on the induction of apoptosis on either cultured T lymphoblasts or PMA-stimulated PBMC. Our findings suggest that the interaction of CD50 with its natural ligand LFA-1 results in the induction of apoptosis in a significant fraction of resting PBMC. This phenomenon may be involved in immune regulation, lymphocyte turnover and peripheral deletion of auto-reactive cells. PMID:9929740

  20. A Semi-automated Approach to Preparing Antibody Cocktails for Immunophenotypic Analysis of Human Peripheral Blood.

    PubMed

    Koguchi, Yoshinobu; Gonzalez, Iliana L; Meeuwsen, Tanisha L; Miller, William L; Haley, Daniel P; Tanibata-Branham, Alice N; Bahjat, Keith S

    2016-01-01

    Immunophenotyping of peripheral blood by flow cytometry determines changes in the frequency and activation status of peripheral leukocytes during disease and treatment. It has the potential to predict therapeutic efficacy and identify novel therapeutic targets. Whole blood staining utilizes unmanipulated blood, which minimizes artifacts that can occur during sample preparation. However, whole blood staining must also be done on freshly collected blood to ensure the integrity of the sample. Additionally, it is best to prepare antibody cocktails on the same day to avoid potential instability of tandem-dyes and prevent reagent interaction between brilliant violet dyes. Therefore, whole blood staining requires careful standardization to control for intra and inter-experimental variability. Here, we report deployment of an automated liquid handler equipped with a two-dimensional (2D) barcode reader into a standard process of making antibody cocktails for flow cytometry. Antibodies were transferred into 2D barcoded tubes arranged in a 96 well format and their contents compiled in a database. The liquid handler could then locate the source antibody vials by referencing antibody names within the database. Our method eliminated tedious coordination for positioning of source antibody tubes. It provided versatility allowing the user to easily change any number of details in the antibody dispensing process such as specific antibody to use, volume, and destination by modifying the database without rewriting the scripting in the software method for each assay. A proof of concept experiment achieved outstanding inter and intra- assay precision, demonstrated by replicate preparation of an 11-color, 17-antibody flow cytometry assay. These methodologies increased overall throughput for flow cytometry assays and facilitated daily preparation of the complex antibody cocktails required for the detailed phenotypic characterization of freshly collected anticoagulated peripheral blood

  1. Brain concentrations of benzodiazepines are elevated in an animal model of hepatic encephalopathy

    SciTech Connect

    Basile, A.S.; Pannell, L.; Jaouni, T.; Gammal, S.H.; Fales, H.M.; Jones, E.A.; Skolnick, P. )

    1990-07-01

    Brain extracts from rats with hepatic encephalopathy due to thioacetamide-induced fulminant hepatic failure contained 4- to 6-fold higher concentrations of substances that inhibit radioligand binding to benzodiazepine receptors than corresponding control rat extracts. Both isocratic and gradient-elution HPLC indicated that this inhibitory activity was localized in 3-8 peaks with retention times corresponding to deschlorodiazepam, deschlorolorazepam, lorazepam, oxazepam, diazepam, and N-desmethyldiazepam. The presence of diazepam and N-desmethyldiazepam was confirmed by mass spectroscopy. Both mass spectroscopic and radiometric techniques indicated that the concentrations of N-desmethyldiazepam and diazepam in brain extracts from encephalopathic rats were 2-9 and 5-7 times higher, respectively, than in control brain extracts. While benzodiazepines have been identified previously in mammalian and plant tissues, this report demonstrates that concentrations of these substances are increased in a pathophysiological condition. These findings provide a rational basis for the use of benzodiazepine receptor antagonists in the management of hepatic encephalopathy in humans.

  2. Moderating Benzodiazepine Use in the Elderly: Curbing physicians' prescribing practices.

    PubMed

    Huston, P G

    1992-10-01

    In Quebec, the elderly receive 4.5 prescriptions per year for sedative-hypnotic medications, most of which are benzodiazepines. Similar rates have been documented in the rest of Canada and other Western countries. Physician prescribing practices must be moderated, as the incidence of cognitive dysfunction, injury, and hidden disorders associated with benzodiazepine use in the elderly is on the rise. Strategies to moderate sleeping pill use are discussed; a revised, less toxic approach to managing insomnia is presented. PMID:21221306

  3. Moderating Benzodiazepine Use in the Elderly: Curbing physicians' prescribing practices.

    PubMed

    Huston, P G

    1992-10-01

    In Quebec, the elderly receive 4.5 prescriptions per year for sedative-hypnotic medications, most of which are benzodiazepines. Similar rates have been documented in the rest of Canada and other Western countries. Physician prescribing practices must be moderated, as the incidence of cognitive dysfunction, injury, and hidden disorders associated with benzodiazepine use in the elderly is on the rise. Strategies to moderate sleeping pill use are discussed; a revised, less toxic approach to managing insomnia is presented.

  4. Growth of human mast cells from bone marrow and peripheral blood-derived CD34(+) pluripotent hematopoietic cells.

    PubMed

    Bandara, Geethani; Metcalfe, Dean D; Kirshenbaum, Arnold S

    2015-01-01

    Human mast cells (HuMCs) are derived from CD34(+) pluripotent hematopoietic cells which are KIT (CD117)(+) and FcεRI(-), and lack lineage-specific surface markers. Bone marrow and peripheral blood are the two readily available sources for obtaining CD34(+) cells from which HuMCs can be cultured. CD34(+) cells are isolated and enriched by magnetic separation columns and stored under specific conditions until ready for use. Alternatively, enriched CD34(+) cells may be immediately cultured in serum-free culture media containing recombinant human (rh) stem cell factor (SCF), rhIL-6, and rhIL-3 (added only during the first week). Weekly hemidepletions and removal of adherent cells and/or debris enables the investigator to obtain HuMC cultures, identified by Wright-Giemsa and acidic toluidine blue stains, by 8-10 weeks.

  5. Effects of real and simulated weightlessness on the cardiac and peripheral vascular functions of humans: A review.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hui; Wang, Hanqing; Liu, Zhiqiang

    2015-01-01

    Weightlessness is an extreme environment that can cause a series of adaptive changes in the human body. Findings from real and simulated weightlessness indicate altered cardiovascular functions, such as reduction in left ventricular (LV) mass, cardiac arrhythmia, reduced vascular tone and so on. These alterations induced by weightlessness are detrimental to the health, safety and working performance of the astronauts, therefore it is important to study the effects of weightlessness on the cardiovascular functions of humans. The cardiovascular functional alterations caused by weightlessness (including long-term spaceflight and simulated weightlessness) are briefly reviewed in terms of the cardiac and peripheral vascular functions. The alterations include: changes of shape and mass of the heart; cardiac function alterations; the cardiac arrhythmia; lower body vascular regulation and upper body vascular regulation. A series of conclusions are reported, some of which are analyzed, and a few potential directions are presented. PMID:26224491

  6. Antianxiety effect of cannabis: involvement of central benzodiazepine receptors.

    PubMed

    Sethi, B B; Trivedi, J K; Kumar, P; Gulati, A; Agarwal, A K; Sethi, N

    1986-01-01

    The present work, involving clinical, behavioral, and biochemical studies, was undertaken to elucidate the probable mechanism of the observed antianxiety effects of cannabis. The population for the clinical study consisted of 50 male chronic cannabis users who were otherwise healthy and 50 matched controls. When evaluated on Taylor's Manifest Anxiety Scale (TMA), these subjects had low anxiety scores as compared with the controls. To explore the possible interaction of cannabis with the benzodiazepine receptors, behavioral and biochemical studies in mice were devised, involving acute and chronic cannabis administration. Behavioral study revealed that mice under chronic cannabis treatment scored significantly higher on foot shock-induced aggression, but this was significantly blocked by benzodiazepine receptor antagonist. Furthermore, chronic cannabis treatment significantly (p less than 0.001) increased the frequency of licking response periodically punished by shocks. This confirms the antianxiety effect of cannabis, which also appears to be mediated through a benzodiazepine receptor, as it was reduced significantly (p less than 0.001) by a benzodiazepine receptor blocker. Specific 3H-diazepam binding was carried out in frontal cortex to assess both the population and affinity of benzodiazepine receptors. Our results indicate that acute cannabis treatment has no significant effect, whereas chronic cannabis treatment significantly increased 3H-diazepam binding as compared with controls. Scatchard analysis further reveals that increased affinity is responsible for increased binding to these receptors. It is therefore our contention that the antianxiety effect of cannabis is mediated through central benzodiazepine receptors.

  7. Analytical methodologies for the determination of benzodiazepines in biological samples.

    PubMed

    Persona, Karolina; Madej, Katarzyna; Knihnicki, Paweł; Piekoszewski, Wojciech

    2015-09-10

    Benzodiazepine drugs belong to important and most widely used medicaments. They demonstrate such therapeutic properties as anxiolytic, sedative, somnifacient, anticonvulsant, diastolic and muscle relaxant effects. However, despite the fact that benzodiazepines possess high therapeutic index and are considered to be relatively safe, their use can be dangerous when: (1) co-administered with alcohol, (2) co-administered with other medicaments like sedatives, antidepressants, neuroleptics or morphine like substances, (3) driving under their influence, (4) using benzodiazepines non-therapeutically as drugs of abuse or in drug-facilitated crimes. For these reasons benzodiazepines are still studied and determined in a variety of biological materials. In this article, sample preparation techniques which have been applied in analysis of benzodiazepine drugs in biological samples have been reviewed and presented. The next part of the article is focused on a review of analytical methods which have been employed for pharmacological, toxicological or forensic study of this group of drugs in the biological matrices. The review was preceded by a description of the physicochemical properties of the selected benzodiazepines and two, very often coexisting in the same analyzed samples, sedative-hypnotic drugs.

  8. Nanoparticles with Therapeutic Properties Generate Various Response of Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells.

    PubMed

    Szwed, Marzena; Santos-Oliveira, Ralph

    2016-06-01

    In the present study we report the interactions of four types of different nanoparticles with normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. To our research we chose four types of nanoparticles which possess therapeutic properties (Trastuzumab, ethylene-diamine-tetra-methylene-phosphonic for breast and bone cancers treatment, respectively) or can be used as the ingredients of sun-protected films (nanoemulsions with or without chitosan). By carrying out XTT survival assay we observed that both types of tested nanoemulsions suppressed the proliferation of normal lymphocytes. However, the survival of peripheral blood mononuclear cells after incubation neither with Trastuzumab nor with ethylene-diamine-tetra-methylene-phosphonic nanoparticles decreased below 80%. If the investigated nanoparticles were analyzed for their effectiveness to the induction of programmed cell death, we proved that only nanoemulsions with or without chitosan provoked an increase of the fraction of apoptotic cells. Moreover we noticed the characteristic, typical for apoptosis changes of cells morphology, which appeared in lymphocytes after all tested nanoparticles treatment. Interestingly, representative for necrosis swollen, enlarged cells were observed after nanoemulsions treatment.

  9. Habituation of the initial responses to cold water immersion in humans: a central or peripheral mechanism?

    PubMed Central

    Tipton, Michael J; Eglin, Clare M; Golden, Frank St C

    1998-01-01

    The initial respiratory and cardiac responses to cold water immersion are thought to be responsible for a significant number of open water deaths each year. Previous research has demonstrated that the magnitude of these responses can be reduced by repeated immersions in cold waterwhether the site of habituation is central or peripheral.Two groups of subjects undertook two 3 min head-out immersions in stirred water at 10 °C of the right-hand side of the body (R). Between these two immersions (3 whole days) the control group (n = 7) were not exposed to cold water, but the habituation group (n = 8) undertook a further six 3 min head-out immersions in stirred water at 10 °C of the left-hand side of the body (L).Repeated L immersions reduced (P < 0.01) the heart rate, respiratory frequency and volume responses. During the second R immersion a reduction (P < 0.05) in the magnitude of the responses evoked was seen in the habituation group but not in the control group, despite both groups having identical skin temperature profiles.It is concluded that the mechanisms involved in producing habituation of the initial responses are located more centrally than the peripheral receptors. PMID:9763650

  10. Nanoparticles with Therapeutic Properties Generate Various Response of Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells.

    PubMed

    Szwed, Marzena; Santos-Oliveira, Ralph

    2016-06-01

    In the present study we report the interactions of four types of different nanoparticles with normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells. To our research we chose four types of nanoparticles which possess therapeutic properties (Trastuzumab, ethylene-diamine-tetra-methylene-phosphonic for breast and bone cancers treatment, respectively) or can be used as the ingredients of sun-protected films (nanoemulsions with or without chitosan). By carrying out XTT survival assay we observed that both types of tested nanoemulsions suppressed the proliferation of normal lymphocytes. However, the survival of peripheral blood mononuclear cells after incubation neither with Trastuzumab nor with ethylene-diamine-tetra-methylene-phosphonic nanoparticles decreased below 80%. If the investigated nanoparticles were analyzed for their effectiveness to the induction of programmed cell death, we proved that only nanoemulsions with or without chitosan provoked an increase of the fraction of apoptotic cells. Moreover we noticed the characteristic, typical for apoptosis changes of cells morphology, which appeared in lymphocytes after all tested nanoparticles treatment. Interestingly, representative for necrosis swollen, enlarged cells were observed after nanoemulsions treatment. PMID:27427750

  11. Localization and identification of granzymes A and B-expressing cells in normal human lymphoid tissue and peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Kummer, J A; Kamp, A M; Tadema, T M; Vos, W; Meijer, C J; Hack, C E

    1995-04-01

    Cytoplasmic granules from activated natural killer (NK) and cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) contain a pore-forming protein, perforin, and several homologous serine proteinases called granzymes. Expression of these proteins correlates with the cytolytic potential of cytotoxic lymphocytes. Using a panel of MoAbs specific for human granzyme A and B, respectively, expression of these proteinases in non-pathological lymphoid tissue and peripheral blood lymphocyte (PBL) subpopulations was investigated. Using immunohistochemistry and double stainings, the phenotype of granzyme-expressing cells in lymphoid tissue was investigated. Granzyme-positive cells were detected in all lymphoid tissues tested. No large differences in the number and distribution between granzyme A- and granzyme B-positive cells were observed. The highest number of positive cells was located in the red pulp of the spleen. Significant numbers were detected in tonsil, lymph nodes, liver and thymus. Low numbers were present in the lamina propria of non-inflamed stomach, small intestine and colon. Phenotypic analysis and cell sorting showed that most of the granzyme-positive cells in lymphoid tissue and PBL consisted of CD3-CD16+CD56+ lymphocytes. Hardly any granzyme-positive CD3+CD8+ CTL were present in peripheral blood. The synthesis of granzyme A as well as B by both CD3+CD16+CD56+ and CD3+CD8+ cells in peripheral blood was increased upon IL-2 stimulation. These results indicate that in normal lymphoid tissue the predominant cytolytic cell population is formed by the NK cells, and activated CTL are rare.

  12. [Benzodiazepine receptor imaging with positron emission tomography and single photon emission tomography].

    PubMed

    Bartenstein, P; Koepp, M

    1995-06-01

    11C-Flumazenil and 123I-iomazenil are PET and SPECT ligands that bind with high affinity and selectivity to central benzodiazepine receptors. These radiopharmaceuticals are highly suitable for the localization of epileptogenic foci in partial epilepsy. With 11C-flumazenil it is possible to localize epileptogenic foci more accurately than with 18FDG. This PET ligand is also superior to the SPECT ligand and therefore with its increased availability it will possibly become more important in the presurgical assessment of patients with medically intractable temporal and especially extratemporal lobe epilepsy. Due to the high amount of cortical GABAergic synapses, 11C-flumazenil and 123I-iomazenil seem suitable as markers for the integrity of neuronal structure. With the help of these ligands, functionally disturbed areas of the brain can be differentiated from structural changes in patients with cerebral infarcts, cortical dysplasias, traumatic brain lesions or systemic degeneration. Another potential field of clinical use could be the individual pharmacological monitoring of drugs interacting with the GABAA-receptor complex. Imaging of the peripheral-type benzodiazepine receptor seems to be exclusively of scientific interest. PMID:7637827

  13. A new machine classification method applied to human peripheral blood leukocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rorvig, Mark E.; Fitzpatrick, Steven J.; Vitthal, Sanjay; Ladoulis, Charles T.

    1994-01-01

    Human beings judge images by complex mental processes, whereas computing machines extract features. By reducing scaled human judgments and machine extracted features to a common metric space and fitting them by regression, the judgments of human experts rendered on a sample of images may be imposed on an image population to provide automatic classification.

  14. The natural history of tolerance to the benzodiazepines.

    PubMed

    Higgitt, A; Fonagy, P; Lader, M

    1988-01-01

    Dependence on benzodiazepines following continued use is by now a well-documented clinical phenomenon. Benzodiazepines differ in their dependence potential. The present studies were aimed at examining the possibility that differential rates of tolerance development might account for differences in dependence risk. Four studies are reported. The first three studies concerned normal subjects. The development of tolerance over a fifteen day period was demonstrated for three different benzodiazepines (ketazolam, lorazepam and triazolam) using two paradigms. Tolerance in terms of a reduction in effectiveness of a repeated given dose was most notable for the benzodiazepine with a medium elimination half-life (lorazepam) for physiological, behavioural and subjective measures. In the case of the drug with the longest elimination half-life (ketazolam) reduction in effectiveness could only be assumed to be occurring if account was taken of the steady increase in plasma concentrations of active metabolites. For this drug it seemed that the physiological measures were those most likely to demonstrate the development of tolerance. Although triazolam showed few significant drug effects on this paradigm (testing being 12 hours after ingestion of this short half-life benzodiazepine), tolerance was seen to develop on some subjective measures. Using an alternative method of testing tolerance, assessing responses to a diazepam challenge dose, a high degree of tolerance on two-thirds of the measures was observed in subjects when pretreated with the benzodiazepine with the most marked accumulation of active metabolites (ketazolam). The other two drugs also led to tolerance development on a range of measures; this was more marked for lorazepam than triazolam. Blunting of the growth hormone response to diazepam was the most sensitive and reliable method of detecting tolerance to the benzodiazepines. Symptoms on discontinuation of the two weeks' intake of the benzodiazepines were marked

  15. High-affinity benzodiazepine receptor ligands among benzodiazepines and betacarbolines with different intrinsic activity

    SciTech Connect

    Yliniemelae, A.; Gynther, J. ); Konschin, H.; Tylli, H. ); Rouvinen, J. )

    1989-01-01

    Structural and electrostatic features of diazepam, flumazenil, and methyl betacarboline-3-carboxylate (BCCM) have been investigated using the molecular superimposition method. These high-affinity benzodiazepine (BZ) receptor ligands are structurally unrelated and they have different intrinsic activity. These ligands are superimposed in such a way that common structural and electrostatic features essential for the high receptor binding affinity overlap. In addition to this binding pharmacophore, there are roughly three separate binding zones in the BZ receptor, one for each class of ligands. The intrinsic activity of BZ receptor ligands depends on the molecular structures and the way the ligand approaches the receptor.

  16. Human central nervous system response to peripheral action of low-intensity millimeter waves

    SciTech Connect

    Lebedeva, N.N.

    1994-07-01

    We employ a modification of a psychophysical method developed by Kholodov to study electromagnetic field induced skin sensations. The main part of the setup is a program controller, which provides for the timed delivery of EMF signals and also false presentations. The EMF signals are fed in random order with a uniform distribution. The response-strength index and the false-alarm level were used to evaluate MF sensitivity. In addition, the subjects determined the presence or absence of a field according to four criteria. Forty healthy subjects ages 17 to 35 were tested on their right and left hands. Sensory data was analyzed via computer. EEG responses to peripheral action were studied in depth.

  17. Alteration of the electrophoretic mobility of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells following treatment with dimethyl sulfoxide

    SciTech Connect

    Skrabut, E.M.; Catsimpoolas, N.; Kurtz, S.R.; Griffith, A.L.; Valeri, C.R.

    1983-12-01

    Studies have been conducted to determine the effects of DMSO and freezing on the electrophoretic distribution of peripheral blood mononuclear cells. Sodium (/sup 51/Cr)chromate was used to label the cells, and the distributions of cell number and cell-associated radioactivity were determined. Cells treated with DMSO had a narrower distribution of electrophoretic mobilities when compared with those not treated. DMSO-treated cells also demonstrated a more homogeneous distribution of radioactivity relative to the cell distribution than did the nontreated cells. The freezing of DMSO-treated cells did not result in any additional alteration of electrophoretic pattern compared to DMSO treatment alone. Analysis by linear categorization techniques indicated that the DMSO-treated and nontreated cells were completely distinguished by their electrophoretic behavior.

  18. Thymosin increases production of T-cell growth factor by normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Zatz, M M; Oliver, J; Samuels, C; Skotnicki, A B; Sztein, M B; Goldstein, A L

    1984-01-01

    The in vitro incubation of phytohemagglutinin-stimulated peripheral blood lymphocytes with thymosin results in a marked and reproducible increase in production of T-cell growth factor, which is dose dependent and most pronounced in the first 24 hr of culture. Incubation of lymphocytes with thymosin alone failed to induce any production of T-cell growth factor. The biological activity of thymosin fraction 5 cannot be attributed to the activity of thymosin alpha 1, one of the well-characterized peptide components of fraction 5. These data provide the basis for (i) a potential mechanism for the in vivo immunorestorative effects of thymosin in primary and secondary immunodeficiencies and (ii) identification of an additional, but as yet undefined, immunoregulatory component of thymosin fraction 5. PMID:6609371

  19. Chronic inorganic arsenic exposure in vitro induces a cancer cell phenotype in human peripheral lung epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Person, Rachel J; Ngalame, Ntube N Olive; Makia, Ngome L; Bell, Matthew W; Waalkes, Michael P; Tokar, Erik J

    2015-07-01

    Inorganic arsenic is a human lung carcinogen. We studied the ability of chronic inorganic arsenic (2 μM; as sodium arsenite) exposure to induce a cancer phenotype in the immortalized, non-tumorigenic human lung peripheral epithelial cell line, HPL-1D. After 38 weeks of continuous arsenic exposure, secreted matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP2) activity increased to over 200% of control, levels linked to arsenic-induced cancer phenotypes in other cell lines. The invasive capacity of these chronic arsenic-treated lung epithelial (CATLE) cells increased to 320% of control and colony formation increased to 280% of control. CATLE cells showed enhanced proliferation in serum-free media indicative of autonomous growth. Compared to control cells, CATLE cells showed reduced protein expression of the tumor suppressor gene PTEN (decreased to 26% of control) and the putative tumor suppressor gene SLC38A3 (14% of control). Morphological evidence of epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) occurred in CATLE cells together with appropriate changes in expression of the EMT markers vimentin (VIM; increased to 300% of control) and e-cadherin (CDH1; decreased to 16% of control). EMT is common in carcinogenic transformation of epithelial cells. CATLE cells showed increased KRAS (291%), ERK1/2 (274%), phosphorylated ERK (p-ERK; 152%), and phosphorylated AKT1 (p-AKT1; 170%) protein expression. Increased transcript expression of metallothioneins, MT1A and MT2A and the stress response genes HMOX1 (690%) and HIF1A (247%) occurred in CATLE cells possibly in adaptation to chronic arsenic exposure. Thus, arsenic induced multiple cancer cell characteristics in human peripheral lung epithelial cells. This model may be useful to assess mechanisms of arsenic-induced lung cancer.

  20. Tetanus toxoid-specific T cell responses in severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID) mice reconstituted with human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Somasundaram, R; Jacob, L; Herlyn, D

    1995-01-01

    SCID mice reconstituted with human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) have repeatedly been shown to produce antigen-specific B cell responses. We have derived tetanus toxoid (TT)-specific human T cell lines from cells of the peritoneal cavity, spleen and lymph nodes of SCID mice reconstituted with human PBL and boosted with TT. Establishment of these cell lines was dependent on the time interval between reconstitution of the mice with human PBL and initiation of lymphocyte cultures in vitro. When lymphocytes were collected from the mice 8 weeks after reconstitution, human lymphocytes with TT-specific proliferative activity in vitro were isolated from the peritoneal cavity and spleen, but long-term cell lines could not be established after repeated lymphocyte stimulation with TT, IL-2 and autologous Epstein-Barr virus-transformed B cells. In contrast, three long-term (> 10 months) TT-specific human T cell lines were established from lymphocytes collected from two of the eight mice in the group 4 weeks after reconstitution. The T cell lines were either CD4+ (two lines derived from peritoneal cavity and lymph node, respectively) or CD8+ (one line derived from spleen) and all expressed CD3, T cell receptor alpha/beta, and human histocompatibility leucocyte class I antigen. The T cell lines, however, lacked cytotoxic, helper and suppressor activities. Thus, SCID mice can support human T cells that actively migrate to various organs and respond to antigenic stimuli both in vivo and in vitro, but these T cells lack characteristic functions. PMID:7621599

  1. Changes in transcriptional output of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells following resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Lara A; Tighe, S W; Kenefick, R W; Dragon, J; Westcott, N W; Leclair, R J

    2011-12-01

    Various types of exercise alter the population of circulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and change their transcriptional output. This work examines changes in PBMC populations and transcription in response to resistance exercise training (RET), and identify key transcriptional changes in PBMCs that may play a role in altering peripheral tissues in response to RET. Ten resistance-trained men (20-24 years), performed an acute bout of RET for ~30 min following a 12 h fast. Venous blood was sampled at rest, immediately following exercise, and at 2 h post-exercise and analyzed for total and differential leukocytes and global gene expression using Affymetrix Genechips. Results showed elevated leukocytes, monocytes, lymphocytes, and lactate values immediately post-exercise (P < 0.05) over baseline. At 2 h post-exercise, leukocytes, and granulocytes remained elevated (P < 0.05), whereas lymphocytes were lower than (P < 0.05) baseline values. Initial microarray results showed the greatest transcriptional changes in pathways related to immune response, inflammation, and cellular communication. The change in PBMC population (2 h time point) correlated with a dramatic decrease in the expression of CD160, and XCL1, markers of lymphocyte populations. At the 2 h recovery time point upregulation of matrix metalloproteinase 9, orosomucoid 1, dishevelled-associated activator of morphogenesis 2, and arginase 1 suggest an induction in muscle damage and repair during this time frame. These results demonstrate that an acute bout of RET disrupts cellular homeostasis, induces a transient redistribution of certain leukocytes, and results in transcriptional changes in PBMCs translating into systemic changes in response to RET. PMID:21437602

  2. Changes in transcriptional output of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells following resistance exercise.

    PubMed

    Carlson, Lara A; Tighe, S W; Kenefick, R W; Dragon, J; Westcott, N W; Leclair, R J

    2011-12-01

    Various types of exercise alter the population of circulating peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and change their transcriptional output. This work examines changes in PBMC populations and transcription in response to resistance exercise training (RET), and identify key transcriptional changes in PBMCs that may play a role in altering peripheral tissues in response to RET. Ten resistance-trained men (20-24 years), performed an acute bout of RET for ~30 min following a 12 h fast. Venous blood was sampled at rest, immediately following exercise, and at 2 h post-exercise and analyzed for total and differential leukocytes and global gene expression using Affymetrix Genechips. Results showed elevated leukocytes, monocytes, lymphocytes, and lactate values immediately post-exercise (P < 0.05) over baseline. At 2 h post-exercise, leukocytes, and granulocytes remained elevated (P < 0.05), whereas lymphocytes were lower than (P < 0.05) baseline values. Initial microarray results showed the greatest transcriptional changes in pathways related to immune response, inflammation, and cellular communication. The change in PBMC population (2 h time point) correlated with a dramatic decrease in the expression of CD160, and XCL1, markers of lymphocyte populations. At the 2 h recovery time point upregulation of matrix metalloproteinase 9, orosomucoid 1, dishevelled-associated activator of morphogenesis 2, and arginase 1 suggest an induction in muscle damage and repair during this time frame. These results demonstrate that an acute bout of RET disrupts cellular homeostasis, induces a transient redistribution of certain leukocytes, and results in transcriptional changes in PBMCs translating into systemic changes in response to RET.

  3. Atomic resolution view into the structure–function relationships of the human myelin peripheral membrane protein P2

    PubMed Central

    Ruskamo, Salla; Yadav, Ravi P.; Sharma, Satyan; Lehtimäki, Mari; Laulumaa, Saara; Aggarwal, Shweta; Simons, Mikael; Bürck, Jochen; Ulrich, Anne S.; Juffer, André H.; Kursula, Inari; Kursula, Petri

    2014-01-01

    P2 is a fatty acid-binding protein expressed in vertebrate peripheral nerve myelin, where it may function in bilayer stacking and lipid transport. P2 binds to phospholipid membranes through its positively charged surface and a hydrophobic tip, and accommodates fatty acids inside its barrel structure. The structure of human P2 refined at the ultrahigh resolution of 0.93 Å allows detailed structural analyses, including the full organization of an internal hydrogen-bonding network. The orientation of the bound fatty-acid carboxyl group is linked to the protonation states of two coordinating arginine residues. An anion-binding site in the portal region is suggested to be relevant for membrane interactions and conformational changes. When bound to membrane multilayers, P2 has a preferred orientation and is stabilized, and the repeat distance indicates a single layer of P2 between membranes. Simulations show the formation of a double bilayer in the presence of P2, and in cultured cells wild-type P2 induces membrane-domain formation. Here, the most accurate structural and functional view to date on P2, a major component of peripheral nerve myelin, is presented, showing how it can interact with two membranes simultaneously while going through conformational changes at its portal region enabling ligand transfer. PMID:24419389

  4. Effect of 900 MHz Electromagnetic Radiation on the Induction of ROS in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kazemi, E.; Mortazavi, S. M. J.; Ali-Ghanbari, A.; Sharifzadeh, S.; Ranjbaran, R.; Mostafavi-pour, Z.; Zal, F.; Haghani, M.

    2015-01-01

    Background Despite numerous studies over a decade, it still remains controversial about the biological effects of RF EMF emitted by mobile phone telephony. Objective Here we investigated the effect of 900 MHz GSM on the induction of oxidative stress and the level of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) in human mononuclear cells, monocytes and lymphocytes as defence system cells. Method 6 ml Peripheral Blood samples were obtained from 13 healthy volunteers (21-30 year-old). Each sample was devided into 2 groups: one was exposed RF radiation emitted from a mobile phone simulator for 2 hour and the other used as control group which was not exposed to any fields. After that, mononuclear cells were isolated from peripheral blood by density gradient centrifugation in Ficoll-Paque. The intracellular ROS content in monocytes and lymphocytes was measured by the CM-H2DCFDA fluorescence probe using flowcytometry technique. Results Our results showed significant increase in  ROS production after exposure in population rich in monocytes. This effect was not significant in population rich in lymphocytes in comparison with non exposed cells. Conclusion The results obtained in this study clearly showed the oxidative stress induction capability of RF electromagnetic field in the portion of PBMCs mostly in monocytes, like the case of exposure to micro organisms, although the advantages or disadvantages of this effect should be evaluated. PMID:26396966

  5. Peripheral blood CD5-positive B lymphocytes (B-1a cells) after allogeneic stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukaemia in humans

    PubMed Central

    Veneri, Dino; Franchini, Massimo; de Sabata, Donata; Ledro, Silvia; Vella, Antonio; Ortolani, Riccardo; Pizzolo, Giovanni; Benedetti, Fabio

    2008-01-01

    Background Only few data are available in literature regarding the reconstitution of B-1a cells after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation performed for haematological malignancies. Methods In this study we used flow cytometry to assess the reconstitution of the peripheral blood B-1a cell compartment after allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation. Cytometric analyses were performed over time on 11 consecutive patients undergoing allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation for acute myeloid leukaemia in our Haematology Unit and the results were compared with available data regarding B-1a cell reconstitution after allogeneic bone marrow stem cell transplantation. Results In spite of an earlier recovery of B-1a cells in the peripheral blood after allogeneic bone marrow transplantation, the reconstitution of this B-cell subset was similar, regardless of the source of stem cells employed. Conclusions Further studies are necessary in order to clarify the origin of B-1a cells in humans in health and illness. PMID:19112737

  6. Molecular modulators of benzodiazepine receptor ligand binding

    SciTech Connect

    Villar, H.O.; Loew, G.H. )

    1989-01-01

    Ten derivatives of {beta}-carbolines with known affinities to the GABA{sub A}/BDZ (benzodiazepine) receptor were studied using the Am 1 and MNDO/H Semiempirical techniques to identify and characterize molecular modulators of receptor recognition. Steric, lipophilic, and electrostatic properties of these compounds were calculated and examined for their possible role in recognition. Particular attention was paid to the regions around the two most favorable proton-accepting sites, the ON and the substituent at the C{sub 3} position, already implicated in recognition, as well as to the acidic N9H group that could be a proton donating center. To probe further the role of these three ligand sites in receptor interactions, a model of the receptor using three methanol molecules was made and optimum interactions of these three sites with them characterized. The results indicate some similarity in the shape of these ligands, which could reflect a steric requirement. The receptor affinity appears to be modulated to some extent by the ratio of lipophilic to hydrophilic surface, the negative potential at the {beta}N, provided there is also one at the C{sub 3} substituent confirming the importance of two accepting sites in recognition. The acidic N9H does not appear to be a modulator of affinity or does it form a stable H-bond with methanol as acceptor. The two proton donating molecules do form such a stable complex, and both are needed for high affinity.

  7. AHR-11797: a novel benzodiazepine antagonist

    SciTech Connect

    Johnson, D.N.; Kilpatrick, B.F.; Hannaman, P.K.

    1986-03-01

    AHR-11797(5,6-dihydro-6-methyl-1-phenyl-/sup 3/H-pyrrolo(3,2,1-ij)quinazolin-3-one) displaced /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam (IC/sub 50/ = 82 nM) and /sup 3/H-Ro 15-1877 (IC/sub 50/ = 104 nM) from rat brain synaptosomes. AHR-11797 did not protect mice from seizures induced by maximal electroshock or subcutaneous Metrazol (scMET), nor did it induce seizures in doses up to the lethal dose. However, at 31.6 mg/kg, IP, it significantly increased the anticonvulsant ED/sub 50/ of chlordiazepoxide (CDPX) from 1.9 to 31.6 mg/kg, IP. With 56.7 mg/kg, IP, of AHR-11797, CDPX was inactive in doses up to 100 mg/kg, IP. AHR-11797 did not significantly increase punished responding in the Geller and Seifter conflict procedure, but it did attenuate the effects of diazepam. Although the compound is without anticonvulsant or anxiolytic activity, it did have muscle relaxant properties. AHR-11797 blocked morphine-induced Straub tail in mice (ED/sub 50/ = 31 mg/kg, IP) and it selectively suppressed the polysnaptic linguomandibular reflex in barbiturate-anesthetized cats. The apparent muscle relaxant activity of AHR-11797 suggests that different receptor sites are involved for muscle relaxant vs. anxiolytic/anticonvulsant activities of the benzodiazepines.

  8. Relation between clinical mature and immature lymphocyte cells in human peripheral blood and their spatial label free scattering patterns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Lu; Zhao, Xin; Zhang, Zhenxi; Zhao, Hong; Chen, Wei; Yuan, Li

    2016-07-01

    A single living cell's light scattering pattern (LSP) in the horizontal plane, which has been denoted as the cell's "2D fingerprint," may provide a powerful label-free detection tool in clinical applications. We have recently studied the LSP in spatial scattering planes, denoted as the cell's "3D fingerprint," for mature and immature lymphocyte cells in human peripheral blood. The effects of membrane size, morphology, and the existence of the nucleus on the spatial LSP are discussed. In order to distinguish clinical label-free mature and immature lymphocytes, the special features of the spatial LSP are studied by statistical method in both the spatial and frequency domains. Spatial LSP provides rich information on the cell's morphology and contents, which can distinguish mature from immature lymphocyte cells and hence ultimately it may be a useful label-free technique for clinical leukemia diagnosis.

  9. Estrogenic xenobiotics affect the intracellular activation signal in mitogen-induced human peripheral blood lymphocytes: immunotoxicological impact.

    PubMed

    Sakabe, K; Okuma, M; Kazuno, M; Yamaguchi, T; Yoshida, T; Furuya, H; Kayama, F; Suwa, Y; Fujii, W; Fresa, K L

    1998-01-01

    The present study was an attempt to elucidate the effect of estrogenic xenobiotics on the proliferation of mitogen-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocyte (PBL). Our findings follow: (a) the proliferation of PBL in response to phytohemagglutinin (PHA) was mediated by protein kinase C activity, but estrogenic xenobiotics had a strong inhibitory effect on protein kinase C activity of PHA-stimulated PBL; (b) cytoplasmic extracts from PHA-stimulated PBL greatly activated DNA replication, but estrogenic xenobiotics had a strong inhibitory effect on these activities. The results suggest that the cytoplasmic signal-generating system in mitogen-treated PBL is inhibited by estrogenic xenobiotics, and that the defect occurs at all stages in the sequence of events leading to DNA synthesis and cell proliferation. PMID:9730256

  10. Spontaneous cytotoxicity of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells for the lymphoblastoid cell line CCRF-CEM: augmentation by bacterial lipopolysaccharide.

    PubMed Central

    Schacter, B; Kleinhenz, M E; Edmonds, K; Ellner, J J

    1981-01-01

    Spontaneous cell-mediated cytotoxicity (SCMC) of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells for a poor target, CCRF-CEM, a lymphoblastoid cell line, was rapidly and markedly elevated by E. coli lipopolysaccharide (LPS). SCMC for K562, a myeloid cell line sensitive to SCMC, was only slightly elevated by LPS. The cytotoxicities of both adherent and non-adherent mononuclear cells for CCRF-CEM were elevated. A response to LPS was found in Fc gamma R-positive and Fc gamma R-negative T cells. LPS increased the binding of non-adherent cells to both targets, but analysis of the binding suggests that a subsequent step, either triggering of the cytotoxic mechanisms or susceptibility of the target was the basis for the increased SCMC. PMID:7039896

  11. Microculture assay for isolation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 and for titration of infected peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Dimitrov, D H; Melnick, J L; Hollinger, F B

    1990-04-01

    To define the optimal conditions for human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) detection in microcultures, experiments were conducted with different ratios of patient and donor peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Donor/patient PBMC ratios ranged from 1:1 to 1:125. Optimal results were obtained when 1,500,000 donor cells were cocultured with equal or smaller quantities of patient PBMCs. Thus, virologic endpoints could be achieved by diluting patient cells. Smaller numbers of donor cells, with or without larger numbers of patients cells, resulted in lower rates of HIV isolation. Similarly, the direct stimulation of patient PBMCs with phytohemagglutinin without the addition of normal donor cells lowered the sensitivity of the assay significantly. We suggest that a microculture procedure using a fixed quantity of donor cells with different dilutions of patient cells may be useful for monitoring changing HIV levels during antiviral therapy.

  12. [Variability of DNA simple sequence repeats in peripheral blood of humans subjected to prolonged exposures of ionizing radiation].

    PubMed

    Lomaeva, M G; Malakhova, L V; Zakharova, M L; Sokolova, S N; Fomenko, L A; Antipova, V N; Soboleva, I Iu; Bezlepkin, V G; Kirillova, E N; Gaziev, A I

    2013-01-01

    Long-term post-radiation changes in the level of microsatellite DNA polymorphism in peripheral blood of the male "Mayak" employees (Ozyorsk, Russia), who had been exposed to prolonged gamma-irradiation during professional activities, were studied. DNA samples were obtained from the Radiobiology Repository of Human Tissue (Southern-Urals Biophysics Institute FMBA) and used as templates for arbitrarily primed PCR. Comparative analysis of the obtained samples of DNA fragments showed a significant increase in the number of high-molecular fragments and reduction in the number of amplified low molecular weight DNA fragments in comparison with the control. However, a direct correlation of the level of DNA polymorphism with the accumulated total dose of radiation was not found. The study of the polymorphism of microsatellite DNA repeats can be used for qualitative assessment of the levels of genetic variability.

  13. Altered cytokine production by specific human peripheral blood cell subsets immediately following space flight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, B. E.; Cubbage, M. L.; Sams, C. F.

    2000-01-01

    In this study, flow cytometry was used to positively identify the specific lymphocyte subsets exhibiting space flight-induced alterations in cytokine production. Whole blood samples were collected from 27 astronauts at three points (one preflight, two postflight) surrounding four space shuttle missions. Assays performed included serum/urine stress hormones, white blood cell (WBC) phenotyping, and intracellular cytokine production following mitogenic stimulation. Absolute levels of peripheral granulocytes were significantly elevated following space flight, but the levels of circulating lymphocytes and monocytes were unchanged. Lymphocyte subset analysis demonstrated a decreased percentage of T cells, whereas percentages of B cells and natural killer (NK) cells remained unchanged after flight. Nearly all the astronauts exhibited an increased CD4/CD8 T cell ratio. Assessment of naive (CD45RA+) vs. memory (CD45RO+) CD4+ T cell subsets was ambiguous, and subjects tended to group within specific missions. Although no significant trend was seen in absolute monocyte levels, a significant decrease in the percentage of the CD14+ CD16+ monocytes was seen following space flight in all subjects tested. T cell (CD3+) production of interleukin-2 (IL-2) was significantly decreased after space flight, as was IL-2 production by both CD4+ and CD8+ T cell subsets. Production of interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) was not altered by space flight for the CD8+ cell subset, but there was a significant decrease in IFN-gamma production for the CD4+ T cell subset. Serum and urine stress hormone analysis indicated significant physiologic stresses in astronauts following space flight. Altered peripheral leukocyte subsets, altered serum and urine stress hormone levels, and altered T cell cytokine secretion profiles were all observed postflight. In addition, there appeared to be differential susceptibility to space flight regarding cytokine secretion by T cell subsets. These alterations may be the

  14. Critical role of peripheral vasoconstriction in fatal brain hyperthermia induced by MDMA (Ecstasy) under conditions that mimic human drug use.

    PubMed

    Kiyatkin, Eugene A; Kim, Albert H; Wakabayashi, Ken T; Baumann, Michael H; Shaham, Yavin

    2014-06-01

    MDMA (Ecstasy) is an illicit drug used by young adults at hot, crowed "rave" parties, yet the data on potential health hazards of its abuse remain controversial. Here, we examined the effect of MDMA on temperature homeostasis in male rats under standard laboratory conditions and under conditions that simulate drug use in humans. We chronically implanted thermocouple microsensors in the nucleus accumbens (a brain reward area), temporal muscle, and facial skin to measure temperature continuously from freely moving rats. While focusing on brain hyperthermia, temperature monitoring from the two peripheral locations allowed us to evaluate the physiological mechanisms (i.e., intracerebral heat production and heat loss via skin surfaces) that underlie MDMA-induced brain temperature responses. Our data confirm previous reports on high individual variability and relatively weak brain hyperthermic effects of MDMA under standard control conditions (quiet rest, 22-23°C), but demonstrate dramatic enhancements of drug-induced brain hyperthermia during social interaction (exposure to male conspecific) and in warm environments (29°C). Importantly, we identified peripheral vasoconstriction as a critical mechanism underlying the activity- and state-dependent potentiation of MDMA-induced brain hyperthermia. Through this mechanism, which prevents proper heat dissipation to the external environment, MDMA at a moderate nontoxic dose (9 mg/kg or ~1/5 of LD50 in rats) can cause fatal hyperthermia under environmental conditions commonly encountered by humans. Our results demonstrate that doses of MDMA that are nontoxic under cool, quiet conditions can become highly dangerous under conditions that mimic recreational use of MDMA at rave parties or other hot, crowded venues.

  15. The in vitro genotoxic effects of a commercial formulation of alpha-cypermethrin in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Kocaman, Ayşe Yavuz; Topaktaş, Mehmet

    2009-01-01

    alpha-Cypermethrin, a highly active pyrethroid insecticide, is effective against a wide range of insects encountered in agriculture and animal husbandry. The potential genotoxicity of a commercial formulation of alpha-cypermethrin (Fastac 100 EC, containing 10% alpha-cypermethrin as the active ingredient) on human peripheral lymphocytes was examined in vitro by sister chromatid exchange (SCE), chromosomal aberrations (CAs), and micronucleus (MN) tests. The human lymphocytes were treated with 5, 10, 15, and 20 microg/ml of alpha-cypermethrin for 24- and 48-hr. alpha-Cypermethrin induced SCEs and CAs significantly at all concentrations and treatment times and MN formation was significantly induced at 5 and 10 microg/ml of alpha-cypermethrin when compared with both the control and solvent control. Binuclear cells could not be detected sufficiently in the highest two concentration of alpha-cypermethrin (15 and 20 microg/ml) for both the 24- and 48-hr treatment times. alpha-Cypermethrin decreased the proliferation index (PI) at three high concentrations (10, 15, and 20 microg/ml) for both treatment periods as compared with the control groups. In addition, alpha-cypermethrin reduced both the mitotic index (MI) and nuclear division index (NDI) significantly at all concentrations for two treatment periods. The PI and MI were reduced by alpha-cypermethrin in a concentration-dependent manner during both treatment times. In general, alpha-cypermethrin showed higher cytotoxic and cytostatic effects than positive control (MMC) at the two highest concentrations for the 24- and 48-hr treatment periods. The present study is the first to report the genotoxic and cytotoxic effects of commercial formulation of alpha-cypermethrin in peripheral blood lymphocytes.

  16. Critical Role of Peripheral Vasoconstriction in Fatal Brain Hyperthermia Induced by MDMA (Ecstasy) under Conditions That Mimic Human Drug Use

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Albert H.; Wakabayashi, Ken T.; Baumann, Michael H.; Shaham, Yavin

    2014-01-01

    MDMA (Ecstasy) is an illicit drug used by young adults at hot, crowed “rave” parties, yet the data on potential health hazards of its abuse remain controversial. Here, we examined the effect of MDMA on temperature homeostasis in male rats under standard laboratory conditions and under conditions that simulate drug use in humans. We chronically implanted thermocouple microsensors in the nucleus accumbens (a brain reward area), temporal muscle, and facial skin to measure temperature continuously from freely moving rats. While focusing on brain hyperthermia, temperature monitoring from the two peripheral locations allowed us to evaluate the physiological mechanisms (i.e., intracerebral heat production and heat loss via skin surfaces) that underlie MDMA-induced brain temperature responses. Our data confirm previous reports on high individual variability and relatively weak brain hyperthermic effects of MDMA under standard control conditions (quiet rest, 22−23°C), but demonstrate dramatic enhancements of drug-induced brain hyperthermia during social interaction (exposure to male conspecific) and in warm environments (29°C). Importantly, we identified peripheral vasoconstriction as a critical mechanism underlying the activity- and state-dependent potentiation of MDMA-induced brain hyperthermia. Through this mechanism, which prevents proper heat dissipation to the external environment, MDMA at a moderate nontoxic dose (9 mg/kg or ∼1/5 of LD50 in rats) can cause fatal hyperthermia under environmental conditions commonly encountered by humans. Our results demonstrate that doses of MDMA that are nontoxic under cool, quiet conditions can become highly dangerous under conditions that mimic recreational use of MDMA at rave parties or other hot, crowded venues. PMID:24899699

  17. Short-term in vitro responses of human peripheral blood monocytes to ferritic stainless steel fiber networks.

    PubMed

    Spear, Rose L; Brooks, Roger A; Markaki, Athina E

    2013-05-01

    Beneficial effects on bone-implant bonding may accrue from ferromagnetic fiber networks on implants which can deform in vivo inducing controlled levels of mechanical strain directly in growing bone. This approach requires ferromagnetic fibers that can be implanted in vivo without stimulating undue inflammatory cell responses or cytotoxicity. This study examines the short-term in vitro responses, including attachment, viability, and inflammatory stimulation, of human peripheral blood monocytes to 444 ferritic stainless steel fiber networks. Two types of 444 networks, differing in fiber cross section and thus surface area, were considered alongside austenitic stainless steel fiber networks, made of 316L, a widely established implant material. Similar high percent seeding efficiencies were measured by CyQuant® on all fiber networks after 48 h of cell culture. Extensive cell attachment was confirmed by fluorescence and scanning electron microscopy, which showed round monocytes attached at various depths into the fiber networks. Medium concentrations of lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) were determined as indicators of viability and inflammatory responses, respectively. Percent LDH concentrations were similar for both 444 fiber networks at all time points, whereas significantly lower than those of 316L control networks at 24 h. All networks elicited low-level secretions of TNF-α, which were significantly lower than that of the positive control wells containing zymosan. Collectively, the results indicate that 444 networks produce comparable responses to medical implant grade 316L networks and are able to support human peripheral blood monocytes in short-term in vitro cultures without inducing significant inflammatory or cytotoxic effects.

  18. Does arsenic exposure increase the risk of development of peripheral vascular diseases in humans?

    PubMed

    Yang, Chun-Yuh

    2006-10-01

    Arsenic has been well documented as a major risk factor in the development of blackfoot disease (BFD), a unique peripheral vascular disease (PVD) endemic to the southwestern coast of Taiwan, where residents imbibed artesian well water containing excessive amounts of arsenic for more than 50 yr. Long-term arsenic exposure was also reported to be associated with mortality attributed to PVD. A tap-water supply system was implemented in the early 1960s in the BFD endemic areas. Artesian well water was no longer used for drinking and cooking after the mid-1970s. The objective of this study was to examine whether mortality attributed to PVD decreased after the consumption of artesian well water containing high concentrations of arsenic ceased and, if so, when the reduction occurred. Standardized mortality ratios (SMRs) for PVD were calculated for the BFD endemic area for the years 1971-2003. Cumulative-sum techniques were used to detect the occurrence of changes in the SMRs. Data showed that mortality due to PVD declined gradually for approximately 25 to 27 yr following cessation of consumption of this arsenic artesian well water. Based on the reversibility criterion, the association between arsenic exposure and PVD-attributed mortality is likely to be causal.

  19. Differentially expressed genes in human peripheral blood as potential markers for statin response.

    PubMed

    Won, Hong-Hee; Kim, Suk Ran; Bang, Oh Young; Lee, Sang-Chol; Huh, Wooseong; Ko, Jae-Wook; Kim, Hyung-Gun; McLeod, Howard L; O'Connell, Thomas M; Kim, Jong-Won; Lee, Soo-Youn

    2012-02-01

    There is a considerable inter-individual variation in response to statin therapy and one third of patients do not meet their treatment goals. We aimed to identify differentially expressed genes that might be involved in the effects of statin treatment and to suggest potential markers to guide statin therapy. Forty-six healthy Korean subjects received atorvastatin; their whole-genome expression profiles in peripheral blood were analyzed before and after atorvastatin administration in relation with changes in lipid profiles. The expression patterns of the differentially expressed genes were also compared with the data of familial hypercholesterolemia (FH) patients and controls. Pairwise comparison analyses revealed differentially expressed genes involved in diverse biological processes and molecular functions related with immune responses. Atorvastain mainly affected antigen binding, immune or inflammatory response including interleukin pathways. Similar expression patterns of the genes were observed in patients with FH and controls. The Charcol-Leyden crystal (CLC), CCR2, CX3CR1, LRRN3, FOS, LDLR, HLA-DRB1, ERMN, and TCN1 genes were significantly associated with cholesterol levels or statin response. Interestingly, the CLC gene, which was significantly altered by atorvastatin administration and differentially expressed between FH patients and controls, showed much bigger change in high-responsive group than in low-responsive group. We identified differentially expressed genes that might be involved in mechanisms underlying the known pleiotropic effects of atorvastatin, baseline cholesterol levels, and drug response. Our findings suggest CLC as a new candidate marker for statin response, and further validation is needed.

  20. Evaluating the role of low-speed centrifugation towards transfecting human peripheral blood mononuclear cell culture.

    PubMed

    Majumdar, M; Ratho, R; Chawla, Y; Singh, M P

    2014-01-01

    The conventional method of transfection of suspension cells by chemical has proven to be very difficult. We present a new transfection protocol, wherein, low-speed centrifugation of cell culture plates immediately after adding the lipid: DNA complex significantly enhances the transfection efficiency. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) were transfected with BLOCK-iT™ Fluorescent Oligo (scrambled siRNA) and lipofectamine complex using conventional and low-speed centrifugation modified transfection protocols. The efficiency of transfection was determined using flowcytometer and cell viability was checked using MTT assay. Incorporation of low-speed centrifugation significantly enhances the transfection efficiency of BLOCK-iT™ in the suspension culture of PBMCs as compared to conventional transfection method (99.8% vs 28.3%; P < 0.0001), even at a low concentration of 40 picomoles without affecting the cell viability. Centrifugation enhanced transfection (CET) technique is simple, time-saving and novel application without compromising the cell viability in the context of recently popular RNA interference in suspension cultures of PBMCs. This undemanding modification might be applicable to a wide variety of cell lines and solve crucial problem of researchers working with RNA interference in suspension cultures. PMID:24713904

  1. Infection of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with a temperature-sensitive mutant of measles virus.

    PubMed Central

    Vydelingum, S; Ilonen, J; Salonen, R; Marusyk, R; Salmi, A

    1989-01-01

    A stable temperature-sensitive mutant of measles virus (MV ts38) was used to study the mechanism of virus-mediated immune suppression of peripheral blood mononuclear cells in vitro. Both unstimulated and phytohemagglutinin-stimulated cultures released infectious virus at 32 degrees C, whereas no virus was released at 37 degrees C, although both viral RNA and viral proteins were synthesized. However, the response of the lymphoid cells to phytohemagglutinin, concanavalin A, and herpes simplex virus antigen was decreased in the presence of MV ts38 at 37 degrees C. The viability of infected cells was not diminished, therefore excluding cell death as a reason for immunosuppression. Interleukin 2 did not play a role in the inhibitory effect of MV ts38. Antibodies to alpha interferon partially reversed the inhibitory effect of the virus infection on lymphocyte mitogenesis, thus implying that alpha interferon plays a role in the immunosuppression. Depletion experiments indicated that adherent cells play a greater role in the measles virus-induced immunosuppression than nonadherent cells. However, monocyte maturation to macrophages had no effect on the degree of immunosuppression. Images PMID:2911119

  2. Evaluation of gamma-Induced Apoptosis in Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Baranova, Elena; Boreyko, Alla; Ravnachka, Ivanka; Saveleva, Maria

    2010-01-05

    Several experiments have been performed to study regularities in the induction of apoptotic cells in human lymphocytes by {sup 60}Cogamma-rays at different times after irradiation. Apoptosis induction by {sup 60}Cogamma-rays in human lymphocytes in different cell cycle phases (G{sub 0}, S, G{sub 1}, and G{sub 2}) has been studied. The maximal apoptosis output in lymphocyte cells was observed in the S phase. Modifying effect of replicative and reparative DNA synthesis inhibitors - 1-beta-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine (Ara-C) and hydroxyurea (Hu) - on the kinetics of {sup 60}Cogamma-rays induced apoptosis in human lymphocytes has been studied.

  3. Bisphenol A and its analogs induce morphological and biochemical alterations in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (in vitro study).

    PubMed

    Michałowicz, Jaromir; Mokra, Katarzyna; Bąk, Agata

    2015-10-01

    Few studies have addressed the cellular effects of bisphenol S (BPS) and bisphenol AF (BPAF) on cells, and no study has been conducted to analyze the mechanism of action of bisphenols in blood cells. In this study, the effect of bisphenol A (BPA), bisphenol F (BPF), BPS and BPAF on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was analyzed. It was shown that BPA, BPF and BPAF in particular, decreased cell viability, which was associated with depletion of intracellular ATP level and alterations in PBMCs size and granulation. Bisphenols enhanced ROS (including OH˙) formation, which led to damage to lipids and proteins in PBMCs. The most significant alterations in ROS level were induced by BPF, and particularly BPAF. Moreover, it was shown that BPAF most strongly provoked lipid peroxidation, while BPA and BPS caused the greatest damage to proteins. It may be concluded that BPA and its analogs were capable of inducing oxidative stress and damage in PBMCs in the concentrations ranging from 0.06 to 0.5 μM (0.02-0.1 μg/ml), which may be present in human blood as a result of environmental exposure. Although, most of bisphenols studied decreased cell viability, size and ATP level at higher concentrations, BPAF exhibited its cytotoxic potential at low concentrations ranging from 0.3 to 3 μM (0.1-1.0 μg/ml) that may correspond to concentrations in humans following occupational exposure. PMID:26028149

  4. Bisphenol A and its analogs induce morphological and biochemical alterations in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (in vitro study).

    PubMed

    Michałowicz, Jaromir; Mokra, Katarzyna; Bąk, Agata

    2015-10-01

    Few studies have addressed the cellular effects of bisphenol S (BPS) and bisphenol AF (BPAF) on cells, and no study has been conducted to analyze the mechanism of action of bisphenols in blood cells. In this study, the effect of bisphenol A (BPA), bisphenol F (BPF), BPS and BPAF on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) was analyzed. It was shown that BPA, BPF and BPAF in particular, decreased cell viability, which was associated with depletion of intracellular ATP level and alterations in PBMCs size and granulation. Bisphenols enhanced ROS (including OH˙) formation, which led to damage to lipids and proteins in PBMCs. The most significant alterations in ROS level were induced by BPF, and particularly BPAF. Moreover, it was shown that BPAF most strongly provoked lipid peroxidation, while BPA and BPS caused the greatest damage to proteins. It may be concluded that BPA and its analogs were capable of inducing oxidative stress and damage in PBMCs in the concentrations ranging from 0.06 to 0.5 μM (0.02-0.1 μg/ml), which may be present in human blood as a result of environmental exposure. Although, most of bisphenols studied decreased cell viability, size and ATP level at higher concentrations, BPAF exhibited its cytotoxic potential at low concentrations ranging from 0.3 to 3 μM (0.1-1.0 μg/ml) that may correspond to concentrations in humans following occupational exposure.

  5. Altered Cytokine Production By Specific Human Peripheral Blood Cell Subsets Immediately Following Spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Crucian, Brian E.; Cubbage, Michael L.; Sams, Clarence F.

    1999-01-01

    In this study, we have attempted to combine standard immunological assays with the cellular resolving power of the flow cytometer to positively identify the specific cell types involved in spaceflight-induced immune alterations. We have obtained whole blood samples from 27 astronauts collected at three timepoints (L-10, R+0 and R+3) surrounding four recent space shuttle missions. The duration of these missions ranged from 10 to 18 days. Assays performed included serum/urine cortisol, comprehensive subset phenotyping, assessment of cellular activation markers and intracellular cytokine production following mitogenic stimulation. Absolute levels of peripheral granulocytes were significantly elevated following spaceflight, but the levels of circulating lymphocytes and monocytes were unchanged. Lymphocyte subset analysis demonstrated trends towards a decreased percentage of T cells and an increased percentage of B cells. Nearly all of the astronauts exhibited an increased CD4:CD8 ratio, which was dramatic in some individuals. Assessment of memory (CD45RA+) vs. naive (CD45RO+) CD4+ T cell subsets was more ambiguous, with subjects tending to group more as a flight crew. All subjects from one mission demonstrated an increased CD45RA:CD45RO ratio, while all subjects from another Mission demonstrated a decreased ratio. While no significant trend was seen in the monocyte population as defined by scatter, a decreased percentage of the CD14+ CD16+ monocyte subset was seen following spaceflight in all subjects tested. In general, most of the cellular changes described above which were assessed at R+O and compared to L-10 trended to pre-flight levels by R+3. Although no significant differences were seen in the expression of the cellular activation markers CD69 and CD25 following exposure to microgravity, significant alterations were seen in cytokine production in response to mitogenic activation for specific subsets. T cell (CD3+) production of IL-2 was significantly decreased

  6. Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell Function and Dendritic Cell Differentiation Are Affected by Bisphenol-A Exposure.

    PubMed

    Camarca, Alessandra; Gianfrani, Carmen; Ariemma, Fabiana; Cimmino, Ilaria; Bruzzese, Dario; Scerbo, Roberta; Picascia, Stefania; D'Esposito, Vittoria; Beguinot, Francesco; Formisano, Pietro; Valentino, Rossella

    2016-01-01

    Environmental pollutants, including endocrine disruptor chemicals (EDCs), interfere on human health, leading to hormonal, immune and metabolic perturbations. Bisphenol-A (BPA), a main component of polycarbonate plastics, has been receiving increased attention due to its worldwide distribution with a large exposure. In humans, BPA, for its estrogenic activity, may have a role in autoimmunity, inflammatory and allergic diseases. To this aim, we assessed the effect of low BPA doses on functionality of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and on in vitro differentiation of dendritic cells from monocytes (mDCs). Fresh peripheral blood samples were obtained from 12 healthy adult volunteers. PBMCs were left unstimulated or were activated with the mitogen phytohemagglutinin (PHA) or the anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies and incubated in presence or absence of BPA at 0.1 and 1nM concentrations. The immune-modulatory effect of BPA was assessed by evaluating the cell proliferation and the levels of interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-4 (IL-4), interleukin-10 (IL-10) and interleukin-13 (IL-13) secreted by PBMCs. mDCs were differentiated with IL-4 and GC-CSF with or without BPA and the expression of differentiation/maturation markers (CD11c, CD1a, CD86, HLA-DR) was evaluated by flow cytometry; furthermore, a panel of 27 different cytokines, growth factors and chemokines were assayed in the mDC culture supernatants. PBMCs proliferation significantly increased upon BPA exposure compared to BPA untreated cells. In addition, a significant decrease in IL-10 secretion was observed in PBMCs incubated with BPA, either in unstimulated or mitogen-stimulated cells, and at both 0.1 and 1nM BPA concentrations. Similarly, IL-13 was reduced, mainly in cells activated by antiCD3/CD28. By contrast, no significant changes in IFN-γ and IL-4 production were found in any condition assayed. Finally, BPA at 1nM increased the density of dendritic cells expressing CD1a and concomitantly

  7. Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cell Function and Dendritic Cell Differentiation Are Affected by Bisphenol-A Exposure

    PubMed Central

    Ariemma, Fabiana; Cimmino, Ilaria; Bruzzese, Dario; Scerbo, Roberta; Picascia, Stefania; D’Esposito, Vittoria; Beguinot, Francesco; Formisano, Pietro

    2016-01-01

    Environmental pollutants, including endocrine disruptor chemicals (EDCs), interfere on human health, leading to hormonal, immune and metabolic perturbations. Bisphenol-A (BPA), a main component of polycarbonate plastics, has been receiving increased attention due to its worldwide distribution with a large exposure. In humans, BPA, for its estrogenic activity, may have a role in autoimmunity, inflammatory and allergic diseases. To this aim, we assessed the effect of low BPA doses on functionality of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), and on in vitro differentiation of dendritic cells from monocytes (mDCs). Fresh peripheral blood samples were obtained from 12 healthy adult volunteers. PBMCs were left unstimulated or were activated with the mitogen phytohemagglutinin (PHA) or the anti-CD3 and anti-CD28 antibodies and incubated in presence or absence of BPA at 0.1 and 1nM concentrations. The immune-modulatory effect of BPA was assessed by evaluating the cell proliferation and the levels of interferon-γ (IFN-γ), interleukin-4 (IL-4), interleukin-10 (IL-10) and interleukin-13 (IL-13) secreted by PBMCs. mDCs were differentiated with IL-4 and GC-CSF with or without BPA and the expression of differentiation/maturation markers (CD11c, CD1a, CD86, HLA-DR) was evaluated by flow cytometry; furthermore, a panel of 27 different cytokines, growth factors and chemokines were assayed in the mDC culture supernatants. PBMCs proliferation significantly increased upon BPA exposure compared to BPA untreated cells. In addition, a significant decrease in IL-10 secretion was observed in PBMCs incubated with BPA, either in unstimulated or mitogen-stimulated cells, and at both 0.1 and 1nM BPA concentrations. Similarly, IL-13 was reduced, mainly in cells activated by antiCD3/CD28. By contrast, no significant changes in IFN-γ and IL-4 production were found in any condition assayed. Finally, BPA at 1nM increased the density of dendritic cells expressing CD1a and concomitantly

  8. A Burden of Rare Variants Associated with Extremes of Gene Expression in Human Peripheral Blood

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Akinsanmi, Idowu; Arafat, Dalia; Cradick, T.J.; Lee, Ciaran M.; Banskota, Samridhi; Marigorta, Urko M.; Bao, Gang; Gibson, Greg

    2016-01-01

    In order to evaluate whether rare regulatory variants in the vicinity of promoters are likely to impact gene expression, we conducted a novel burden test for enrichment of rare variants at the extremes of expression. After sequencing 2-kb promoter regions of 472 genes in 410 healthy adults, we performed a quadratic regression of rare variant count on bins of peripheral blood transcript abundance from microarrays, summing over ranks of all genes. After adjusting for common eQTLs and the major axes of gene expression covariance, a highly significant excess of variants with minor allele frequency less than 0.05 at both high and low extremes across individuals was observed. Further enrichment was seen in sites annotated as potentially regulatory by RegulomeDB, but a deficit of effects was associated with known metabolic disease genes. The main result replicates in an independent sample of 75 individuals with RNA-seq and whole-genome sequence information. Three of four predicted large-effect sites were validated by CRISPR/Cas9 knockdown in K562 cells, but simulations indicate that effect sizes need not be unusually large to produce the observed burden. Unusually divergent low-frequency promoter haplotypes were observed at 31 loci, at least 9 of which appear to be derived from Neandertal admixture, but these were not associated with divergent gene expression in blood. The overall burden test results are consistent with rare and private regulatory variants driving high or low transcription at specific loci, potentially contributing to disease. PMID:26849112

  9. Comparison of central and peripheral pharmacologic effects of biperiden and trihexyphenidyl in human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Guthrie, S K; Manzey, L; Scott, D; Giordani, B; Tandon, R

    2000-02-01

    In this double-blind, randomized study, indices of central (memory, sedation) and peripheral (salivation, ratio of R-R interval on electrocardiogram) muscarinic function were evaluated in 14 healthy volunteers who received trihexyphenidyl, biperiden, and placebo. Additionally, serum drug levels were obtained 2 hours after oral administration. All subjects participated in three study sessions. During each session, subjects received two doses of biperiden (4 mg), trihexyphenidyl (5 mg), or placebo, and four series of tests were administered. The tests included the determination of cardiac response to standing (R-R ratio), mouth salivation, finger-tapping speed, digit span (forward and backward), a selective reminding task, and visual analog scales (VAS). On the VAS, subjects rated biperiden as significantly more sedating than either trihexyphenidyl or placebo, and both biperiden and trihexyphenidyl were associated with more dizziness than was placebo. Saliva production was significantly reduced by both trihexyphenidyl and biperiden compared with placebo. Digit span performance was significantly decreased in only the backward direction. The selective reminding task revealed highly significant decrements in the number of words recalled and consistent long-term retrieval after both biperiden and trihexyphenidyl. Delayed recall was significantly decreased by both active drugs. Both trihexyphenidyl and biperiden caused a significant increase in the R-R ratio comparison with placebo. With the exception of the VAS measurement of sedation, the effects caused by biperiden and trihexyphenidyl did not differ. The results of this study do not support the hypothesis that the side effect profile of biperiden is significantly different from that of trihexyphenidyl.

  10. Thymic hormonal activity on human peripheral blood lymphocytes, in vitro. V. Effect on induction of lymphocytotoxicity.

    PubMed

    Shoham, J; Cohen, M

    1983-01-01

    Thymic hormonal effect on lymphocytotoxicity induced in vitro and its target specificity were tested using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) of healthy subjects. PBMC were treated by the thymic extract TP-1, a similarly prepared spleen extract (SE) or medium only (1 h, 37 degrees C) and then induced to express cytotoxic activity by exposure to allogeneic tumor cells in mixed cultures or by Con A stimulation. The cytotoxicity developed after several days in culture was assayed on 51Cr labelled tumor cells. TP-1 caused a significant mean enhancement of cytotoxicity induced and assayed on Raji lymphoma cells (mean % specific lysis, 31.5 +/- 2.9 without TP-1 and 53.7 +/- 3.6 with TP-1; n = 42; p less than 0.01). The scatter of individual responses to TP-1 was wide, however, and included also some cases of TP-1 induced suppression. Similar wide scatter of TP-1 effects with emphasis on TP-1 induced enhancement was observed with other tumor cell lines or with Con A as inducers. Usually, SE had no effect on induced cytotoxicity. Target selectivity (specificity) of induced cytotoxicity was tested by induction and assay on several tumor cell lines with crossing over, as well as by cold competition assay. When target selectivity was present, it was not masked by TP-1 induced enhancement. Moreover, in some cases, target selectivity became more pronounced after TP-1 treatment. However, TP-1 enhanced also Con A induced non-specific cytotoxicity. No effect of TP-1 on natural killer cell activity of fresh PBMC could be demonstrated. It is suggested that both selective cytotoxicity (T-cell dependent) and non-selective one maybe modulated directly by TP-1 and indirectly by TP-1 modified secondary interactions in culture. This profound regulatory effects could be demonstrated in the PBMC of immune-intact healthy adults.

  11. Diversion of Benzodiazepines through Healthcare Sources

    PubMed Central

    Ibañez, Gladys E.; Levi-Minzi, Maria A.; Rigg, Khary K.; Mooss, Angela D.

    2013-01-01

    Background Benzodiazepines (BZ) are often diverted from legal sources to illicit markets at various points in the distribution process which begins with a pharmaceutical manufacturer, followed by distribution to healthcare providers, and finally, to the intended users. Little is known about the extent of BZ diversion involving distribution points directly related to healthcare sources (e.g., a script doctor) as opposed to points further down the distribution chain (e.g., street dealers). The present study examines the scope of BZ diversion via mechanisms directly related to a healthcare source. It examines the association between BZ dependence and the direct utilization of particular healthcare-related diversion sources among a diverse sample of prescription drug abusers in South Florida. Method Cross-sectional data were collected from five different groups of drug users: methadone-maintenance clients (n = 247), street drug users (n = 238), public-pay treatment clients (n = 246), private-pay treatment clients (n = 228), and stimulant using men who have sex with men (MSM; n = 248). Results Findings suggest that those ages 26 to 35 years old, non-Hispanic White participants, private-pay treatment clients, those who are insured, and those with higher incomes had higher odds of utilizing healthcare diversion sources. Participants utilized a pharmacy as a diversion source more than other healthcare sources of diversion, and the highest number of BZs were obtained from doctor shopping compared to other diversion sources. Those who reported BZ dependence also had 2.5 times greater odds of using a healthcare source to obtain BZs than those who did not meet criteria for dependence. Discussion Prevention of BZ diversion through healthcare sources should include strategies to reduce doctor shopping and diversion from pharmacies. PMID:23662331

  12. Benzodiazepine harm: how can it be reduced?

    PubMed Central

    Lader, Malcolm

    2014-01-01

    The benzodiazepines (BZDs) are anxiolytics, hypnotics, anticonvulsants, muscle-relaxants and induce anaesthesia. Adverse effects comprise sedation subjectively and cognitive and psychomotor impairment objectively. Complex skills such as driving can be compromised. Paradoxical excitement can have forensic implications. Long term use beyond the licensed durations is common but both efficacy and adverse effects associated with this have been poorly documented. Withdrawal and dependence have excited particular concern, and even polemic. Perhaps a third of long term (beyond 6 months) users experience symptoms and signs on attempting to withdraw – anxiety, insomnia, muscle spasms and tension and perceptual hypersensitivity. Uncommonly, fits or a psychosis may supervene. The patterns following withdrawal vary widely. The usual method of withdrawal is slow tapering but it may not obviate the problems completely. BZDs are also drugs of abuse either on their own or in conjunction with opioids and stimulants. Claims have been made that the use of BZDs is associated with increased mortality. This is a concern in view of the widespread usage of these drugs, particularly in the elderly. All of these factors impinge on the risk : benefit ratio and the severity of the indications. Harm reduction should focus on choice of alternative treatments both psychological and pharmacological. Guidelines emphasise that BZDs are not drugs of first choice and should only be used short term. Schedules are available to educate about methods of withdrawal in current users, emphasising the slow rate of taper. General principles of harm minimization in the addiction field are appropriate to BZD abuse. PMID:22882333

  13. Stimulated human peripheral T cells produce high amounts of IL-35 protein in a proliferation-dependent manner.

    PubMed

    Guttek, Karina; Reinhold, Dirk

    2013-10-01

    The p35 subunit of IL-12 and the Epstein-Barr virus-induced gene 3 (EBI3) have been shown to form a heterodimeric cytokine, named interleukin-35 (IL-35). Recently, mRNA expression of both IL-12p35 and EBI3 was clearly shown in stimulated human T effector cells. Here, we investigated the production of IL-35 protein in human anti-CD3/CD28-stimulated pan T cells as well as T cell subpopulations using a specific human IL-35 ELISA system. We measured high concentrations of IL-35 (up to 3 ng/ml) in cell culture supernatants of stimulated pan T cells as well as CD4(+), CD8(+) and CD4(+)CD25(-) T cell subpopulations at 72 h after stimulation. Very low amounts of IL-35, in the range of 100pg/ml, were detectable in supernatants of resting T cells. These observations could be confirmed using a dot-blot assay for IL-12p35 and EBI3. High concentrations of IL-35 could be also measured in cell culture supernatants of both, resting and stimulated CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells. In order to learn more about the regulation of IL-35 production, we studied the effect of dexamethasone, cyclosporine A and rapamycin on IL-35 production of anti-CD3/CD28-stimulated human pan T cells as well as CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell subpopulations. All three drugs significantly suppressed IL-35 production of these cells in a proliferation-dependent manner. In summary, we could show that stimulated human peripheral blood T cells of healthy donors produce high amounts of IL-35 protein. However, the biological function of this cytokine remains to be elucidated.

  14. Human Peripheral Clocks: Applications for Studying Circadian Phenotypes in Physiology and Pathophysiology

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Camille; Brown, Steven A.; Dibner, Charna

    2015-01-01

    Most light-sensitive organisms on earth have acquired an internal system of circadian clocks allowing the anticipation of light or darkness. In humans, the circadian system governs nearly all aspects of physiology and behavior. Circadian phenotypes, including chronotype, vary dramatically among individuals and over individual lifespan. Recent studies have revealed that the characteristics of human skin fibroblast clocks correlate with donor chronotype. Given the complexity of circadian phenotype assessment in humans, the opportunity to study oscillator properties by using cultured primary cells has the potential to uncover molecular details difficult to assess directly in humans. Since altered properties of the circadian oscillator have been associated with many diseases including metabolic disorders and cancer, clock characteristics assessed in additional primary cell types using similar technologies might represent an important tool for exploring the connection between chronotype and disease, and for diagnostic purposes. Here, we review implications of this approach for gathering insights into human circadian rhythms and their function in health and disease. PMID:26029154

  15. Human psychophysics and rodent spinal neurones exhibit peripheral and central mechanisms of inflammatory pain in the UVB and UVB heat rekindling models.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Jessica; Sikandar, Shafaq; McMahon, Stephen B; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2015-09-01

    Translational research is key to bridging the gaps between preclinical findings and the patients, and a translational model of inflammatory pain will ideally induce both peripheral and central sensitisation, more effectively mimicking clinical pathophysiology in some chronic inflammatory conditions. We conducted a parallel investigation of two models of inflammatory pain, using ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation alone and UVB irradiation with heat rekindling. We used rodent electrophysiology and human quantitative sensory testing to characterise nociceptive processing in the peripheral and central nervous systems in both models. In both species, UVB irradiation produces peripheral sensitisation measured as augmented evoked activity of rat dorsal horn neurones and increased perceptual responses of human subjects to mechanical and thermal stimuli. In both species, UVB with heat rekindling produces central sensitisation. UVB irradiation alone and UVB with heat rekindling are translational models of inflammation that produce peripheral and central sensitisation, respectively. The predictive value of laboratory models for human pain processing is crucial for improving translational research. The discrepancy between peripheral and central mechanisms of pain is an important consideration for drug targets, and here we describe two models of inflammatory pain that involve ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation, which can employ peripheral and central sensitisation to produce mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in rats and humans. We use electrophysiology in rats to measure the mechanically- and thermally-evoked activity of rat spinal neurones and quantitative sensory testing to assess human psychophysical responses to mechanical and thermal stimulation in a model of UVB irradiation and in a model of UVB irradiation with heat rekindling. Our results demonstrate peripheral sensitisation in both species driven by UVB irradiation, with a clear mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity of

  16. Human psychophysics and rodent spinal neurones exhibit peripheral and central mechanisms of inflammatory pain in the UVB and UVB heat rekindling models.

    PubMed

    O'Neill, Jessica; Sikandar, Shafaq; McMahon, Stephen B; Dickenson, Anthony H

    2015-09-01

    Translational research is key to bridging the gaps between preclinical findings and the patients, and a translational model of inflammatory pain will ideally induce both peripheral and central sensitisation, more effectively mimicking clinical pathophysiology in some chronic inflammatory conditions. We conducted a parallel investigation of two models of inflammatory pain, using ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation alone and UVB irradiation with heat rekindling. We used rodent electrophysiology and human quantitative sensory testing to characterise nociceptive processing in the peripheral and central nervous systems in both models. In both species, UVB irradiation produces peripheral sensitisation measured as augmented evoked activity of rat dorsal horn neurones and increased perceptual responses of human subjects to mechanical and thermal stimuli. In both species, UVB with heat rekindling produces central sensitisation. UVB irradiation alone and UVB with heat rekindling are translational models of inflammation that produce peripheral and central sensitisation, respectively. The predictive value of laboratory models for human pain processing is crucial for improving translational research. The discrepancy between peripheral and central mechanisms of pain is an important consideration for drug targets, and here we describe two models of inflammatory pain that involve ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation, which can employ peripheral and central sensitisation to produce mechanical and thermal hyperalgesia in rats and humans. We use electrophysiology in rats to measure the mechanically- and thermally-evoked activity of rat spinal neurones and quantitative sensory testing to assess human psychophysical responses to mechanical and thermal stimulation in a model of UVB irradiation and in a model of UVB irradiation with heat rekindling. Our results demonstrate peripheral sensitisation in both species driven by UVB irradiation, with a clear mechanical and thermal hypersensitivity of

  17. Translating transitions – how to decipher peripheral human B cell development

    PubMed Central

    Bemark, Mats

    2015-01-01

    Abstract During the last two decades our understanding of human B cell differentiation has developed considerably. Our understanding of the human B cell compartment has advanced from a point where essentially all assays were based on the presence or not of class-switched antibodies to a level where a substantial diversity is appreciated among the cells involved. Several consecutive transitional stages that newly formed IgM expressing B cells go through after they leave the bone marrow, but before they are fully mature, have been described, and a significant complexity is also acknowledged within the IgM expressing and class-switched memory B cell compartments. It is possible to isolate plasma blasts in blood to follow the formation of plasma cells during immune responses, and the importance and uniqueness of the mucosal IgA system is now much more appreciated. Current data suggest the presence of at least one lineage of human innate-like B cells akin to B1 and/or marginal zone B cells in mice. In addition, regulatory B cells with the ability to produce IL-10 have been identified. Clinically, B cell depletion therapy is used for a broad range of conditions. The ability to define different human B cell subtypes using flow cytometry has therefore started to come into clinical use, but as our understanding of human B cell development further progresses, B cell subtype analysis will be of increasing importance in diagnosis, to measure the effect of immune therapy and to understand the underlying causes for diseases. In this review the diversity of human B cells will be discussed, with special focus on current data regarding their phenotypes and functions. PMID:26243514

  18. A Quantum of Solace: molecular electronics of benzodiazepines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Turin, Luca; Horsfield, Andrew; Stoneham, Marshall

    2011-03-01

    Benzodiazepines and related drugs modulate the activity of GABA-A receptors, the main inhibitory receptor of the central nervous system. The prevailing view is that these drugs bind at the interface between two receptor subunits and allosterically modulate the response to GABA. In this talk I shall present evidence that benzodiazepines work instead by facilitating electron transport from the cytoplasm to a crucial redox-sensitive group in the gamma subunit. If this idea is correct, benzodiazepines should not only be regarded as keys fitting into a lock, but also as one-electron chemical field-effect transistors fitting into an electronic circuit. Supported by DARPA Grant N66001-10-1-4062.

  19. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy and Catatonia in the Setting of Benzodiazepine Withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Peng, Teng J; Patchett, Nicholas D; Bernard, Sheilah A

    2016-01-01

    We report two serious and unusual complications of benzodiazepine withdrawal in a single patient: takotsubo cardiomyopathy and catatonia. This 61-year-old female patient was brought to the emergency department with lethargy and within hours had declined into a state of catatonia. Although there was never a complaint of chest pain, ECG showed deep anterior T-wave inversions and cardiac enzymes were elevated. An echocardiogram was consistent with takotsubo cardiomyopathy. She later received 1 mg of midazolam and within minutes had resolution of catatonic symptoms. Careful history revealed that she had omitted her daily dose of lorazepam for 3 days prior to admission. To our knowledge, the case presented herein is the first report of simultaneous catatonia and takotsubo cardiomyopathy in the setting of benzodiazepine withdrawal. The pathogenesis of both conditions is poorly understood but may be indirectly related to the sudden decrease in γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) signaling during benzodiazepine withdrawal. PMID:27547472

  20. Takotsubo Cardiomyopathy and Catatonia in the Setting of Benzodiazepine Withdrawal

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Teng J.

    2016-01-01

    We report two serious and unusual complications of benzodiazepine withdrawal in a single patient: takotsubo cardiomyopathy and catatonia. This 61-year-old female patient was brought to the emergency department with lethargy and within hours had declined into a state of catatonia. Although there was never a complaint of chest pain, ECG showed deep anterior T-wave inversions and cardiac enzymes were elevated. An echocardiogram was consistent with takotsubo cardiomyopathy. She later received 1 mg of midazolam and within minutes had resolution of catatonic symptoms. Careful history revealed that she had omitted her daily dose of lorazepam for 3 days prior to admission. To our knowledge, the case presented herein is the first report of simultaneous catatonia and takotsubo cardiomyopathy in the setting of benzodiazepine withdrawal. The pathogenesis of both conditions is poorly understood but may be indirectly related to the sudden decrease in γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) signaling during benzodiazepine withdrawal. PMID:27547472

  1. Tissue Distribution Dynamics of Human NK Cells Inferred from Peripheral Blood Depletion Kinetics after Sphingosine-1-Phosphate Receptor Blockade.

    PubMed

    Mehling, M; Burgener, A-V; Brinkmann, V; Bantug, G R; Dimeloe, S; Hoenger, G; Kappos, L; Hess, C

    2015-11-01

    Human natural killer (NK) cell subsets differentially distribute throughout the organism. While CD56(dim) and CD56(bright) NK cell subsets similarly reside in the bone marrow (BM), the CD56(dim) population predominantly accumulates in non-lymphoid tissues and the CD56(bright) counterpart in lymphoid tissue (LT). The dynamics with which these NK cell subsets redistribute to tissues remains unexplored. Here, we studied individuals newly exposed to fingolimod, a drug that efficiently blocks sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P)-directed lymphocyte - including NK cell - egress from tissue to blood. During an observation period of 6h peripheral blood depletion of CD56(bright) NK cells was observed 3 h after first dose of fingolimod, with 40-50% depletion after 6 h, while a decrease of the numbers of CD56(dim) NK cells did not reach the level of statistical significance. In vitro, CD56(bright) and CD56(dim) NK cells responded comparably to the BM-homing chemokine CXCL12, while CD56(bright) NK cells migrated more efficiently in gradients of the LT-homing chemokines CCL19 and CCL21. In conjuncture with these in vitro studies, the indirectly observed subset-specific depletion kinetics from blood are compatible with preferential and more rapid redistribution of CD56(bright) NK cells from blood to peripheral tissue such as LT and possibly also the inflamed central nervous system. These data shed light on an unexplored level at which access of NK cells to LT, and thus, for example antigen-presenting cells, is regulated.

  2. Development of methods to examine the effects of atmospheric particulate matter (PM) on human peripheral blood leukocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zussman, Lisa Ann

    In vitro methods to study the effect of atmospheric particulate matter (PM) on leukocyte function using human peripheral blood were developed. These methods were demonstrated using the blood of 1-5 individuals and National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST) urban PM #1648, diesel PM #1650, silica PM, and a locally collected PM sample (New Jersey PM10). For the blood samples analyzed in this study NIST urban PM and New Jersey PM10 treatment mediated the release of granule contents from peripheral blood leukocytes and induced structural changes associated with degranulation. Flow cytometry revealed PM-induced changes in phagocytosis and cell structure associated with degranulation. Transmission electron microscopy confirmed NIST urban PM-induced cell structure changes were associated with PM internalization. Colorametric and electrophoretic methods showed no PM-induced release of primary granules and a slight PM-induced release of secondary granules associated with only NIST urban PM. Enzyme Immunosorbent Assays detected increased histamine release from basophils treated with NIST urban PM, a locally collected PM, and the soluble and insoluble components of these particles. NIST urban PM was found to be a potent inducer of histamine release in 4 out of 6 individuals tested. Fractionation studies revealed that soluble (aqueous) and insoluble fractions of NIST urban PM contain histamine-releasing activity. This was also demonstrated for the New Jersey PM10 sample for which the soluble fraction exhibited the most activity. Complementary studies with inhibitors of IgE-mediated histamine release conducted on one test subject suggest that PM-induced histamine release was partially mediated by IgE. A new hypothesis has been formed, suggesting that particle toxicity is related to PM-induced histamine release. Due to the bioactive nature of histamine and its association with many cardiopulmonary responses, the PM- mediated release of histamine should be investigated

  3. A New Machine Classification Method Applied to Human Peripheral Blood Leukocytes.

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Rorvig, Mark E.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Discusses pattern classification of images by computer and describes the Two Domain Method in which expert knowledge is acquired using multidimensional scaling of judgments of dissimilarities and linear mapping. An application of the Two Domain Method that tested its power to discriminate two patterns of human blood leukocyte distribution is…

  4. Peripheral Mechanisms for Vocal Production in Birds--Differences and Similarities to Human Speech and Singing

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Riede, Tobias; Goller, Franz

    2010-01-01

    Song production in songbirds is a model system for studying learned vocal behavior. As in humans, bird phonation involves three main motor systems (respiration, vocal organ and vocal tract). The avian respiratory mechanism uses pressure regulation in air sacs to ventilate a rigid lung. In songbirds sound is generated with two independently…

  5. Maternal Gene Expression Profiling During Pregnancy And Preeclampsia In Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Rajakumar, Augustine; Tianjiao, Chu; Handley, Daniel E.; Bunce, Kimberly D.; Burke, Brian; Hubel, Carl A.; Jeyabalan, Arundhathi; Peters, David G.

    2010-01-01

    Preeclampsia is a major obstetrical complication affecting maternal and fetal health. While it is clear that there is a substantial placental contribution to preeclampsia pathogenesis, the maternal contribution is less well characterized. We therefore performed a genome wide transcriptome analysis to explore disease-associated changes in maternal gene expression patterns in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Methods Preeclampsia was defined as gestational hypertension, proteinuria and hyperurecimia. Total RNA was isolated from PBMCs obtained from women with uncomplicated pregnancies (n=5) and women with preeclamptic pregnancies (n=5). Gene expression analysis was carried out using Agilent oligonucleotide microarrays. Biological pathway analysis was undertaken using Ingenuity Pathway Analysis software. Quantitative real time PCR (QRTPCR) was performed to validate the gene expression changes of selected genes in normotensive and preeclamptic patients (n=12 each). Results We identified a total of 368 genes that were differentially expressed in women with preeclampsia compared to normal controls with false discovery rate (FDR) controlled at 10%. In follow up experiments we further analyzed the expression levels of a number of genes that were identified as altered by the microarray data including survivin (BIRC5), caveolin (CAV1), GATA binding protein-1 (GATA1), signal tranducer and activator of transcription 1 (STAT1), E2F transcription factor-1 (E2F1), fibronectin-1 (FN1), interleukin-4 (IL-4), matrix metalloprotease-9 (MMP-9) and WAP four-disulfide domain protein (WFDC-1) by QRTPCR. Additionally we performed immunoblot analysis and zymography to verify some of these candidate genes at the protein level. Computational analysis of gene function identified an anti-proliferative and altered immune function cellular phenotype in severe preeclamptic samples. Conclusions We have characterized the genome-wide mRNA expression changes associated with preeclampsia

  6. Proteomic methodological recommendations for studies involving human plasma, platelets, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    de Roos, Baukje; Duthie, Susan J; Polley, Abigael C J; Mulholland, Francis; Bouwman, Freek G; Heim, Carolin; Rucklidge, Garry J; Johnson, Ian T; Mariman, Edwin C; Daniel, Hannelore; Elliott, Ruan M

    2008-06-01

    This study was designed to develop, optimize and validate protocols for blood processing prior to proteomic analysis of plasma, platelets and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and to determine analytical variation of a single sample of depleted plasma, platelet and PBMC proteins within and between four laboratories each using their own standard operating protocols for 2D gel electrophoresis. Plasma depleted either using the Beckman Coulter IgY-12 proteome partitioning kit or the Amersham albumin and IgG depletion columns gave good quality gels, but reproducibility appeared better with the single-use immuno-affinity column. The use of the Millipore Filter Device for protein concentration gave a 16% ( p < 0.005) higher recovery of protein in flow-through sample compared with acetone precipitation. The use of OptiPrep gave the lowest level of platelet contamination (1:0.8) during the isolation of PBMC from blood. Several proteins (among which are alpha-tropomyosin, fibrinogen and coagulation factor XIII A) were identified that may be used as biomarkers of platelet contamination in future studies. When identifying preselected spots, at least three out of the four centers found similar identities for 10 out of the 10 plasma proteins, 8 out of the 10 platelet proteins and 8 out of the 10 PBMC proteins. The discrepancy in spot identifications has been described before and may be explained by the mis-selection of spots due to laboratory-to-laboratory variation in gel formats, low scores on the peptide analysis leading to no or only tentative identifications, or incomplete resolution of different proteins in what appears as a single abundant spot. The average within-laboratory coefficient of variation (CV) for each of the matched spots after automatic matching using either PDQuest or ProteomWeaver software ranged between 18 and 69% for depleted plasma proteins, between 21 and 55% for platelet proteins, and between 22 and 38% for PBMC proteins. Subsequent manual

  7. Chemical structure and properties of midazolam compared with other benzodiazepines

    PubMed Central

    Gerecke, M.

    1983-01-01

    1 A short review is given of the basic chemical development in the field of `classical' and `annelated' benzodiazepines, distinguishing between pro-drugs and directly acting compounds. 2 Some properties of midazolam that are of special interest for its practical use are discussed, such as: the basicity of its imidazole ring nitrogen, which allows water-soluble salts and well-tolerated aqueous injectable solutions to be prepared; its stability to hydrolytic degradation; its rapid metabolic inactivation, which is mainly determined by the methyl group on the imidazole ring, and which is much faster than that of classical benzodiazepines. PMID:6138062

  8. Butachlor induced dissipation of mitochondrial membrane potential, oxidative DNA damage and necrosis in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Dwivedi, Sourabh; Saquib, Quaiser; Al-Khedhairy, Abdulaziz A; Musarrat, Javed

    2012-12-01

    Butachlor is a systemic herbicide widely applied on rice, tea, wheat, beans and other crops; however, it concurrently exerts toxic effects on beneficial organisms like earthworms, aquatic invertebrates and other non-target animals including humans. Owing to the associated risk to humans, this chloroacetanilide class of herbicide was investigated with the aim to assess its potential for the (i) interaction with DNA, (ii) mitochondria membrane damage and DNA strand breaks and (iii) cell cycle arrest and necrosis in butachlor treated human peripheral blood mononuclear (PBMN) cells. Fluorescence quenching data revealed the binding constant (Ka=1.2×10(4)M(-1)) and binding capacity (n=1.02) of butachlor with ctDNA. The oxidative potential of butachlor was ascertained based on its capacity of inducing reactive oxygen species (ROS) and substantial amounts of promutagenic 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG) adducts in DNA. Also, the discernible butachlor dose-dependent reduction in fluorescence intensity of a cationic dye rhodamine (Rh-123) and increased fluorescence intensity of 2',7'-dichlorodihydro fluorescein diacetate (DCFH-DA) in treated cells signifies decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm) due to intracellular ROS generation. The comet data revealed significantly greater Olive tail moment (OTM) values in butachlor treated PBMN cells vs untreated and DMSO controls. Treatment of cultured PBMN cells for 24h resulted in significantly increased number of binucleated micronucleated (BNMN) cells with a dose dependent reduction in the nuclear division index (NDI). The flow cytometry analysis of annexin V(-)/7-AAD(+) stained cells demonstrated substantial reduction in live population due to complete loss of cell membrane integrity. Overall the data suggested the formation of butachlor-DNA complex, as an initiating event in butachlor-induced DNA damage. The results elucidated the oxidative role of butachlor in intracellular ROS production, and

  9. Cytogenetic observations in human peripheral blood leukocytes following in vitro exposure to THz radiation: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Zeni, O; Gallerano, G P; Perrotta, A; Romanò, M; Sannino, A; Sarti, M; D'Arienzo, M; Doria, A; Giovenale, E; Lai, A; Messina, G; Scarfì, M R

    2007-04-01

    Emerging technologies are considering the possible use of Terahertz radiation in different fields ranging from telecommunications to biology and biomedicine. The study of the potential effects of Terahertz radiation on biological systems is therefore an important issue in order to safely develop a variety of applications. This paper describes a pilot study devoted to determine if Terahertz radiation could induce genotoxic effects in human peripheral blood leukocytes. For this purpose, human whole blood samples from healthy donors were exposed for 20 min to Terahertz radiation. Since, to our knowledge, this is the first study devoted to the evaluation of possible genotoxic effects of such radiation, different electromagnetic conditions were considered. In particular, the frequencies of 120 and 130 GHz were chosen: the first one was tested at a specific absorption rate (SAR) of 0.4 mW g-1, while the second one was tested at SAR levels of 0.24, 1.4, and 2 mW g-1. Chromosomal damage was evaluated by means of the cytokinesis block micronucleus technique, which also gives information on cell cycle kinetics. Moreover, human whole blood samples exposed to 130 GHz at SAR levels of 1.4 and 2 mW g-1 were also tested for primary DNA damage by applying the alkaline comet assay immediately after exposure. The results obtained indicate that THz exposure, in the explored electromagnetic conditions, is not able to induce either genotoxicity or alteration of cell cycle kinetics in human blood cells from healthy subjects. PMID:17351499

  10. Radiofrequency currents exert cytotoxic effects in NB69 human neuroblastoma cells but not in peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    HERNÁNDEZ-BULE, MARÍA LUISA; ROLDÁN, ERNESTO; MATILLA, JOAQUÍN; TRILLO, MARÍA ÁNGELES; ÚBEDA, ALEJANDRO

    2012-01-01

    Recently, a number of electric and electrothermal therapies have been applied to the treatment of specific cancer types. However, the cellular and molecular mechanisms involved in the response to such therapies have not been well characterized yet. Capacitive-resistive electric transfer (CRET) therapy uses electric currents at frequencies within the 0.45–0.6 MHz range to induce hyperthermia in target tissues. Preliminary trials in cancer patients have shown consistent signs that CRET could slow down growth of tumor tissues in brain gliomas, without inducing detectable damage in the surrounding healthy tissue. Previous studies by our group have shown that subthermal treatment with 0.57-MHz electric currents can induce a cytostatic, not cytotoxic response in HepG2 human hepatocarcinoma cells; such effect being mediated by cell cycle alterations. In contrast, the study of the response of NB69 human neuroblastoma cells to the same electric treatment revealed consistent indications of cytotoxic effects. The present study extends the knowledge on the response of NB69 cells to the subthermal stimulus, comparing it to that of primary cultures of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) exposed to the same treatment. The results showed no sensitivity of PBMC to the 0.57 MHz subthermal currents and confirmed that the treatment exerts a cytotoxic action in NB69 cells. The data also revealed a previously undetected cytostatic response of the neuroblastoma cell line. CRET currents affected NB69 cell proliferation by significantly reducing the fraction of cells in the phase G2/M of the cell cycle at 12 h of exposure. These data provide new information on the mechanisms of response to CRET therapy, and are consistent with a cytotoxic and/or cytostatic action of the electric treatment, which would affect human cells of tumor origin but not normal cells with a low proliferation rate. PMID:22843038

  11. The effects of calpain inhibition upon IL-2 and CD25 expression in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Schaecher, K E; Goust, J M; Banik, N L

    2001-10-01

    Calcium is an important contributor to T cell activation; it is also the major factor in the activation of the calcium-activated neutral proteinase, calpain. For this reason, we wanted to investigate if calpain has a role in T cell activation and what aspects of this activation calpain affects. As measured by semi-quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), calpain inhibition decreased interleukin-2 (IL-2) and CD25 mRNA expression in a dose-dependent manner, at early time points following the initial activation, and over extended periods of time in activated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Using an enzyme-linked immuno-sorbent assay (ELISA) specific for human IL-2, we found that calpain inhibition decreased IL-2 secretion in a dose-dependent manner, shortly after activation, and continuously over time. Inhibiting calpain caused a dose-dependent inhibition of CD25 cell surface expression and also inhibited expression shortly after activation and for at least 48 h. This study showed that calpain has an integral role in the synthesis of the two important T cell activation factors, IL-2 and CD25. PMID:11585637

  12. Expression of transferrin receptors on mitogen-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes: relation to cellular activation and related metabolic events.

    PubMed Central

    Galbraith, R M; Galbraith, G M

    1981-01-01

    Mitogen-activated normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes bind transferrin to specific membrane receptors. In this study, lymphocytes stimulated with phytohaemagglutinin for 0-66 hr were examined to determine the relation of this phenomenon to cellular activation and related metabolic events. Transferrin receptors were first detected at 20-24 hr. This event was consistently preceded by RNA and protein turnover which commenced during the first 6 hr of culture, whereas initiation of DNA synthesis was detected concurrently with the appearance of receptors or slightly later (24-30 hr). Exposure of cells to inhibitors of RNA and protein synthesis early during culture (at 0 or 24 hr) prevented the expression of transferrin receptors, but also caused generalized metabolic failure, and abrogated cellular activation. In contrast, later addition of these agents at 48 hr did not interfere significantly with the process of activation, but did suppress the terminal increase in receptor-bearing cells observed during the final 18 hr in control cultures lacking inhibitor. After deliberate thermal stripping of receptors from activated cells, the reappearance of membrance binding sites which normally occurred within 30 min, was also blocked by cycloheximide, puromycin and actinomycin D. However, similar inhibition of DNA which was induced by hydroxyurea had much less effect upon both the initial appearance of receptors and their reappearance after ligand-induced depletion. These results demonstrate that the appearance of transferrin receptors upon human lymphocytes is dependent upon cellular activation and requires synthesis of protein and RNA. PMID:6172372

  13. Quiescent human peripheral blood lymphocytes do not contain a sizable amount of preexistent DNA single-strand breaks

    SciTech Connect

    Boerrigter, M.E.; Mullaart, E.; van der Schans, G.P.; Vijg, J.

    1989-02-01

    Sedimentation of nucleoids through neutral sucrose density gradients has shown that nucleoids isolated from phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) sediment faster than nucleoids derived from quiescent lymphocytes, which was attributed to rejoining of DNA single-strand breaks (SSB) present in the resting cells. We isolated PBL from donors and determined the amount of SSB in nonradiolabeled, untreated resting and PHA-stimulated cells by applying the alkaline filter elution technique. Calibration was based on dose-dependent induction of SSB by /sup 60/Co-gamma-radiation. Quiescent cells did not contain a sizable amount of SSB. Mitogen-stimulated cells showed equally low amounts of SSB per cell. The present study indicates that the interpretation of the results obtained with the nucleoid sedimentation technique concerning the supposed rejoining of SSB in PHA-stimulated human lymphocytes is incorrect. Other, equally sensitive, techniques such as alkaline filter elution appear to be preferable for studies on DNA damage and repair.

  14. Plant polyphenols mobilize nuclear copper in human peripheral lymphocytes leading to oxidatively generated DNA breakage: implications for an anticancer mechanism.

    PubMed

    Shamim, Uzma; Hanif, Sarmad; Ullah, M F; Azmi, Asfar S; Bhat, Showket H; Hadi, S M

    2008-08-01

    It was earlier proposed that an important anti-cancer mechanism of plant polyphenols may involve mobilization of endogenous copper ions, possibly chromatin-bound copper and the consequent pro-oxidant action. This paper shows that plant polyphenols are able to mobilize nuclear copper in human lymphocytes, leading to degradation of cellular DNA. A cellular system of lymphocytes isolated from human peripheral blood and comet assay was used for this purpose. Incubation of lymphocytes with neocuproine (a cell membrane permeable copper chelator) inhibited DNA degradation in intact lymphocytes. Bathocuproine, which is unable to permeate through the cell membrane, did not cause such inhibition. This study has further shown that polyphenols are able to degrade DNA in cell nuclei and that such DNA degradation is inhibited by neocuproine as well as bathocuproine (both of which are able to permeate the nuclear pore complex), suggesting that nuclear copper is mobilized in this reaction. Pre-incubation of lymphocyte nuclei with polyphenols indicates that it is capable of traversing the nuclear membrane. This study has also shown that polyphenols generate oxidative stress in lymphocyte nuclei which is inhibited by scavengers of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and neocuproine. These results indicate that the generation of ROS occurs through mobilization of nuclear copper resulting in oxidatively generated DNA breakage.

  15. Plant polyphenols mobilize endogenous copper in human peripheral lymphocytes leading to oxidative DNA breakage: a putative mechanism for anticancer properties.

    PubMed

    Azmi, Asfar Sohail; Bhat, Showket Hussain; Hanif, Sarmad; Hadi, S M

    2006-01-23

    Plant polyphenols are important components of human diet and a number of them are considered to possess chemopreventive and therapeutic properties against cancer. They are recognized as naturally occurring antioxidants but also act as prooxidants catalyzing DNA degradation in the presence of transition metal ions such as copper. Using human peripheral lymphocytes and Comet assay we have previously confirmed that resveratrol-Cu(II) is indeed capable of causing DNA degradation in cells. In this paper we show that the polyphenols alone (in the absence of added copper) are also capable of causing DNA breakage in cells. Incubation of lymphocytes with neocuproine inhibited the DNA degradation confirming that Cu(I) is an intermediate in the DNA cleavage reaction. Further, we have also shown that polyphenols generate oxidative stress in lymphocytes which is inhibited by scavengers of reactive oxygen species and neocuproine. These results are in further support of our hypothesis that anticancer mechanism of plant polyphenols involves mobilization of endogenous copper, possibly chromatin bound copper, and the consequent prooxidant action.

  16. Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells Cultured in Normal and Hyperglycemic Media in Simulated Microgravity Using NASA Bioreactors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lawless, DeSales

    2003-01-01

    We sought answers to several questions this summer at NASA Johnson Space Center. Initial studies involved the in vitro culture of human peripheral blood mononuclear in cells in different conditioned culture media. Several human cancer clones were similarly studied to determine responses to aberrant glycosylation by the argon laser. The cells were grown at unit gravity in flasks and in simulated microgravity using NASA bioreactors. The cells in each instance were analyzed by flow cytometry. Cell cycle analysis was acquired by staining nuclear DNA with propidium iodide. Responses to the laser stimulation was measured by observing autofluorescence emitted in the green and red spectra after stimulation. Extent of glycosylation correlated with the intensity of the laser stimulated auto-fluorescence. Our particular study was to detect and monitor aberrant glycosylation and its role in etiopathogenesis. Comparisons were made between cells known to be neoplastic and normal cell controls using the same Laser Induced Autofluorescence technique. Studies were begun after extensive literature searches on using the antigen presenting potential of dendritic cells to induce proliferation of antigen specific cytotoxic T-cells. The Sendai virus served as the antigen. Our goal is to generate sufficient numbers of such cells in the simulated microgravity environment for use in autologous transplants of virally infected individuals including those positive for hepatitis and HIV.

  17. Syzygium cumini (Jamun) reduces the radiation-induced DNA damage in the cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes: a preliminary study.

    PubMed

    Jagetia, Ganesh Chandra; Baliga, Manjeshwar Shrinath

    2002-06-01

    The effects of various concentrations (0.0, 1.56, 3.125, 6.25, 12.5, 25, 50 and 100 microg/ml) of the leaf extract of Syzygium cumini Linn. or Eugenia cumini (SC; black plum, Jamun, family Myrtaceae) was studied on the alteration in the radiation-induced micronuclei formation in the cultured human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Treatment of lymphocytes to various concentrations of SC resulted in a dose dependent increase in the micronuclei-induction, especially after 25-100 microg/ml extract. The exposure of human lymphocytes to various concentrations of SC extract before 3 Gy gamma-irradiation resulted in a significant decline in the micronuclei-induction at all the drug doses when compared with the non-drug treated irradiated cultures. A nadir in MNBNC frequency was observed for 12.5 microg/ml drug concentration, where the MNBNC frequency was approximately fourfold lower than that of the non-drug treated irradiated cultures. Therefore, this dose may be considered as an optimum dose for radiation protection. Our study demonstrates that the leaf extract of S. cumini, a plant traditionally used to treat diabetic disorders protects against the radiation-induced DNA damage. PMID:12084616

  18. In vitro and in vivo evaluation of iodine-123-Ro 16-0154: A new imaging agent for SPECT investigations of benzodiazepine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Beer, H.F.; Blaeuenstein, P.A.H.; Hasler, P.H.; Delaloye, B.; Riccabona, G.; Bangerl, I.; Hunkeler, W.; Bonetti, E.P.; Pieri, L.; Richards, J.G. )

    1990-06-01

    The flumazenil analogue, Ro 16-0154, a benzodiazepine partial inverse agonist, has been labeled by halogen exchange to enable SPECT investigations of central benzodiazepine receptors in the human brain. The purified {sup 123}I-Ro 16-0154 was found to be stable in rat brain preparations and to be metabolized in rat liver preparations. Its pharmacologic properties were comparable to those of flumazenil. The biodistribution in rats (1 hr postinjection) resulted in a high brain-to-blood ratio of 16. Clinical studies revealed images of the benzodiazepine receptor density in the brain. Since the receptor labeling was markedly reduced by injection of flumazenil, it was considered to be specific. Storage defects due to pathologic cerebral blood flow and changed receptor density were detected; this shows the potential usefulness of the substance for diagnostic purposes, e.g., the differential diagnosis of various forms of epilepsy.

  19. Bromine-75-labeled 1,4-benzodiazepines: potential agents for the mapping of benzodiazepine receptors in vivo: concise communication

    SciTech Connect

    Scholl, H.; Kloster, G.; Stoecklin, G.

    1983-05-01

    We have prepared four different 1,4-benzodiazepines, labeled at C-7 with the 1.6-hr positron emitter Br-75 or the 57-hr gamma emitter Br-77, as potential radio-pharmaceuticals for the mapping of cerebral benzodiazepine receptor areas. The triazene method was used and optimized. Yields at the no-carrier-added level were 20%. (7-/sup 75/Br)-5-(2-flophenyl)-1-methyl-1,3-dihydro-2H-1,4-benzodiazepine-2-one (Br-75 BFB) was isolated with a minimum specific activity of 20,000 Ci/mmole. Biodistribution in mice shows that BFB is taken up rapidly by the brain and is retained there at useful concentrations for significant periods of time. The maximum uptake is observed at 0.25 min. Brain-to-blood concentration ratios are larger than 2 during the interval (0.25 to 10 min) investigated.

  20. Expansion in bioreactors of human progenitor populations from cord blood and mobilized peripheral blood.

    PubMed

    Van Zant, G; Rummel, S A; Koller, M R; Larson, D B; Drubachevsky, I; Palsson, M; Emerson, S G

    1994-01-01

    Umbilical cord blood (UCB) and mobilized peripheral blood (MPB) provide an alternate source to bone marrow for transplantation. Expansion in vitro of stem/progenitor cell populations from these sources may provide adult-sized grafts otherwise not attainable because of the limited cell numbers available in the case of UCB or because of numerous rounds of apheresis required for sufficient MPB cells. We asked whether continuous perfusion culture could be employed in ex vivo expansion to produce clinically relevant numbers of stem/progenitor cells from these sources. To evaluate MPB, 1-10 million leukocytes, from patients who had received either granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (G-CSF) or cyclophosphamide and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF), were inoculated into bioreactors, with or without irradiated, allogeneic stroma. The growth factor combination in the perfusion medium consisted of interleukin-3 (IL-3), stem cell factor (SCF), GM-CSF and erythropoietin (Epo). Under the best conditions tested, total cell numbers, granulocyte-macrophage colony-forming units (CFU-GM), and long-term culture-initiating cell (LTC-IC) populations were expanded by about 50-, 80-, and 20-fold, respectively, over 14 days. At low cell inocula (1 million), the presence of stroma enhanced the expansion of total cells and CFU-GM but not of LTC-IC. When SCF was not included in the medium, both total cells and CFU-GM expanded to a much lesser extent, but again the expansion of LTC-IC was not affected. At the higher cell inoculum (10 million), expansions of total cells and CFU-GM were equivalent with or without stroma. To evaluate UCB, cells were placed into bioreactors with or without irradiated, allogeneic stroma, and the bioreactors were perfused with medium containing the four standard growth factors. After 6-14 days, in several independent experiments, 20-24 million cells were harvested from bioreactors perfused with SCF-containing medium, irrespective of the

  1. Association Between Benzodiazepine Use and Epilepsy Occurrence

    PubMed Central

    Harnod, Tomor; Wang, Yu-Chiao; Kao, Chia-Hung

    2015-01-01

    Abstract We conducted a retrospective case–control study to evaluate the association between the risk of benzodiazepine (BZD) use and epilepsy occurrence by using data from the Taiwan National Health Insurance Research Database. We recruited 1065 participants who ages 20 years or older and newly diagnosed with epilepsy (International Classification of Diseases, Ninth Revision, Clinical Modification 345) between 2004 and 2011 and assigned them to the epilepsy group. We subsequently frequency-matched them with participants in a control group (n = 4260) according to sex, age, and index year at a 1:4 ratio. A logistic regression model was employed to calculate the odds ratio (OR) for association of epilepsy with BZD exposure. Multivariate logistic regression was conducted to estimate the dose–response relationship between BZD levels and epilepsy risk. The adjusted OR (aOR) for the association of epilepsy with BZD exposure was 2.02 (95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.68–2.42). The aOR for an average BZD dose increased to 1.26 for the participants on <0.01 defined daily dose (DDD), and increased to 4.32 for those on ≥1.50 DDD. On average, when the DDD of BZD exposure increased by 100 units, the epilepsy risk increase by 1.03-fold (95% CI = 1.01–1.04, P = 0.003). The annual BZD exposure day ranges were significantly associated with epilepsy (2–7 days: aOR = 1.67; 8–35 days: aOR = 3.16; and ≥35 days: aOR = 5.60). Whenever the annual BZD exposure increased by 30 days, the risk of epilepsy notably increased by 1.03-fold (95% CI = 1.01–1.04, P < 0.001). In addition, users who quit BZD for more than 6 months still exhibited a higher risk of epilepsy than did the non-BZD users. A considerable increase in epilepsy occurrence was observed in ones with BZD use, particularly in those with prolonged use, multiple exposure, and high-dose consumption. PMID:26376408

  2. Benzodiazepine use during buprenorphine treatment for opioid dependence: Clinical and safety outcomes

    PubMed Central

    Schuman-Olivier, Zev; Hoeppner, Bettina B.; Weiss, Roger D.; Borodovsky, Jacob; Shaffer, Howard J.; Albanese, Mark J.

    2013-01-01

    Background Prescribing benzodiazepines during buprenorphine treatment is a topic of active discussion. Clinical benefit is unclear. Overdose, accidental injury, and benzodiazepine misuse remain concerns. We examine the relationship between benzodiazepine misuse history, benzodiazepine prescription, and both clinical and safety outcomes during buprenorphine treatment. Methods We retrospectively examined outpatient buprenorphine treatment records, classifying patients by past-year benzodiazepine misuse history and approved benzodiazepine prescription at intake. Primary clinical outcomes included 12-month treatment retention and urine toxicology for illicit opioids. Primary safety outcomes included total emergency department (ED) visits and odds of an ED visit related to overdose or accidental injury during treatment. Results The 12-month treatment retention rate for the sample (N = 328) was 40%. Neither benzodiazepine misuse history nor benzodiazepine prescription was associated with treatment retention or illicit opioid use. Poisson regressions of ED visits during buprenorphine treatment revealed more ED visits among those with a benzodiazepine prescription versus those without (p < 0.001); benzodiazepine misuse history had no effect. The odds of an accidental injury-related ED visit during treatment were greater among those with a benzodiazepine prescription (OR: 3.7, p < 0.01), with an enhanced effect among females (OR: 4.7, p < 0.01). Overdose was not associated with benzodiazepine misuse history or prescription. Conclusions We found no effect of benzodiazepine prescriptions on opioid treatment outcomes; however, benzodiazepine prescription was associated with more frequent ED visits and accidental injuries, especially among females. When prescribing benzodiazepines during buprenorphine treatment, patients need more education about accidental injury risk. Alternative treatments for anxiety should be considered when possible, especially among females. PMID

  3. In vitro expansion of Lin{sup +} and Lin{sup −} mononuclear cells from human peripheral blood

    SciTech Connect

    Norhaiza, H. Siti; Zarina, Z. A. Intan; Hisham, Z. A. Shahrul; Rohaya, M. A. W.

    2013-11-27

    Haematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are used in the therapy of blood disorders due to the ability of these cells to reconstitute haematopoietic lineage cells when transplanted into myeloablative recipients. However, substantial number of cells is required in order for the reconstitution to take place. Since HSCs present in low frequency, larger number of donor is required to accommodate the demand of transplantable HSCs. Therefore, in vitro expansion of HSCs will have profound impact on clinical purposes. The aim of this study was to expand lineage negative (Lin{sup −}) stem cells from human peripheral blood. Total peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMNCs) were fractionated from human blood by density gradient centrifugation. Subsequently, PBMNCs were subjected to magnetic assisted cell sorter (MACS) which depletes lineage positive (Lin{sup +}) mononuclear cells expressing lineage positive markers such as CD2, CD3, CD11b, CD14, CD15, CD16, CD19, CD56, CD123, and CD235a to obtained Lin{sup −} cell population. The ability of Lin{sup +} and Lin{sup −} to survive in vitro was explored by culturing both cell populations in complete medium consisting of Alpha-Minimal Essential Medium (AMEM) +10% (v/v) Newborn Calf Serum (NBCS)+ 2% (v/v) pen/strep. In another experiment, Lin{sup +} and Lin{sup −} were cultured with complete medium supplemented with 10ng/mL of the following growth factors: stem cell factor (SCF), interleukin (IL)-3, granulocyte-macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF), 2IU/mL of Erythropoietin (Epo) and 20ng/mL of IL-6. Three samples were monitored in static culture for 22 days. The expansion potential was assessed by the number of total viable cells, counted by trypan blue exclusion assay. It was found that Lin{sup +} mononuclear cells were not able to survive either in normal proliferation medium or proliferation medium supplemented with cytokines. Similarly, Lin{sup −} stem cells were not able to survive in proliferation medium however

  4. Evaluation of antigenotoxicity effects of umbelliprenin on human peripheral lymphocytes exposed to oxidative stress.

    PubMed

    Soltani, Fatemeh; Mosaffa, Fatemeh; Iranshahi, Mehrdad; Karimi, Gholamreza; Malekaneh, Mohammad; Haghighi, Fatemeh; Behravan, Javad

    2009-06-01

    The protective properties of a prenylated coumarin, umbelliprenin (UMB), on the human lymphocytes DNA lesions were tested. Lymphocytes were isolated from blood samples taken from healthy volunteers. DNA breaks and resistance to H(2)O(2)-induced damage were measured using a single-cell microgel electrophoresis technique under alkaline conditions (comet assay). Human lymphocytes were incubated in UMB (10, 25, 50, 100, 200, and 400 microM) alone or a combination of different concentrations of UMB (10, 25, 50, 100, 200, and 400 microM) and 25 microM H(2)O(2). Untreated cells, ascorbic acid (AA; 25, 50, 100, 200, and 400 microM) and H(2)O(2) (25 microM) were considered as negative control, positive control, and the standard antioxidant agent for our study, respectively. Single cells were analyzed with "TriTek Cometscore version 1.5" software. The DNA damage was expressed as percent tail DNA. UMB exhibited a concentration-dependent increase in protection activity against DNA damage induced by 25 microM H(2)O(2) (from 67.28% to 39.17%). The antigenotoxic activity of AA, in the range 0-50 microM, was greater than that of UMB. However, no significant difference (p > 0.05) in the protective activity was found between UMB and AA at concentrations of approximately higher than 50 microM.

  5. Quantification and characterization of ACTH-related peptides produced by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    SciTech Connect

    Pepper, G.M.; Maimon, J.; Schneider, B.S. )

    1991-04-01

    The authors have used a sensitive radioimmunoassay to quantify and characterize PBMC-associated immunoreactive ACTH (ACTH-IR). Mean ACTH content of freshly isolated human PBMCs was 3.8 {plus minus} 0.72 pg (SEM) per 10(6) cells. During 3 days of incubation ACTH-IR in conditioned media of control PBMCs increased significantly, p less than 0.02. Gel filtration chromatography revealed a minor peak of ACTH-IR coeluting with ACTH (1-39) and a major peak coeluting with ACTH (11-24). Treatment with 15 nM CRH did not alter the amount of ACTH-IR secreted or its gel pattern. Synthetic ACTH (11-24), was radioiodinated and was used for binding experiments that demonstrated specific high- and low-affinity binding sites for ACTH (11-24) on a human T cell line. These results add support for a role of ACTH and related peptides in immune regulatory systems and suggest that cell-specific post-translational processing of PBMC may generate an expanding number of biologically active moieties.

  6. Circadian rhythms in the CNS and peripheral clock disorders: human sleep disorders and clock genes.

    PubMed

    Ebisawa, Takashi

    2007-02-01

    Genetic analyses of circadian rhythm sleep disorders (CRSD), such as familial advanced sleep phase syndrome (ASPS) and delayed sleep phase syndrome (DSPS), and morningness-eveningness revealed the relationship between variations in clock genes and diurnal change in human behaviors. Variations such as T3111C in the Clock gene are reportedly associated with morningness-eveningness. Two of the pedigrees of familial ASPS (FASPS) are caused by mutations in clock genes: the S662G mutation in the Per2 gene or the T44A mutation in the casein kinase 1 delta (CK1delta) gene, although these mutations are not found in other pedigrees of FASPS. As for DSPS, a missense variation in the Per3 gene is identified as a risk factor, while the one in the CK1epsilon gene is thought to be protective. These findings suggest that further, as yet unidentified, gene variations are involved in human circadian activity. Many of the CRSD-relevant variations reported to date seem to affect the phosphorylation status of the clock proteins. A recent study using mathematical models of circadian rhythm generation has provided a new insight into the role of phosphorylation in the molecular mechanisms of these disorders. PMID:17299246

  7. Monoclonal antibody to a subset of human monocytes found only in the peripheral blood and inflammatory tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Zwadlo, G.; Schlegel, R.; Sorg, C.

    1986-07-15

    A monoclonal antibody is described that was generated by immunizing mice with cultured human blood monocytes. The antibody (27E10) belongs to the IgG1 subclass and detects a surface antigen at M/sub r/ 17,000 that is found on 20% of peripheral blood monocytes. The antigen is increasingly expressed upon culture of monocytes, reaching a maximum between days 2 and 3. Stimulation of monocytes with interferon-..gamma.. (IFN-..gamma..), 12-O-tetradecanoyl-phorbol-13-acetate (TPA), and lipopolysaccharide (LPS) Ylalanine (fMLP) increased the 27E10 antigen density. The amount of 27E10-positive cells is not or is only weakly affected. The antigen is absent from platelets, lymphotyces, and all tested human cell lines, yet it cross-reacts with 15% of freshly isolated granulocytes. By using the indirect immunoperoxidase technique, the antibody is found to be negative on cryostat sections of normal human tissue (skin, lung, and colon) and positive on only a few monocyte-like cells in liver and on part of the cells of the splenic red pulp. In inflammatory tissue, however, the antibody is positive on monocytes/macrophages and sometimes on endothelial cells and epidermal cells, depending on the stage and type of inflammation, e.g., BCG ranulomas are negative, whereas psoriasis vulgaris, atopic dermatitis, erythrodermia, pressure urticaria, and periodontitis contain positively staining cells. In contact eczemas at different times after elicitation (6 hr, 24 hr, and 72 hr), the 27E10 antigen is seen first after 24 hr on a few infiltrating monocytes/macrophages, which increase in numbers after 72 hr.

  8. Neuromagnetic recordings of the human peripheral nerve with planar SQUID gradiometers.

    PubMed

    Lang, G; Shahani, U; Weir, A I; Maas, P; Pegrum, C M; Donaldson, G B

    1998-08-01

    Magnetic fields produced by a travelling volley in the human ulnar nerve have been successfully measured in a lightly shielded environment. Recordings of the tangential component of the magnetic field were made using a planar second-order gradiometer integrated with a first-order gradiometric superconducting quantum interference device (SQUID). Devices were fabricated in our clean-room facility at the University of Strathclyde and measurements taken in an eddy-current shielded room at the Wellcome Biomagnetism Unit. We use no additional shielding and no electronic differencing or field-nulling techniques. Evoked magnetic fields of 60 fT peak-to-peak were obtained after 1536 averages but they could be seen easily as early as 512 averages. Measurements were made over four points above the ulnar nerve on the upper arm and from these the conduction velocity was calculated as 60 m s(-1).

  9. Peripheral mechanisms of thermoregulatory control of skin blood flow in aged humans

    PubMed Central

    Kenney, W. Larry

    2010-01-01

    Human skin blood flow is controlled via dual innervation from the sympathetic nervous system. Reflex cutaneous vasoconstriction and vasodilation are both impaired with primary aging, rendering the aged more vulnerable to hypothermia and cardiovascular complications from heat-related illness. Age-related alterations in the thermoregulatory control of skin blood flow occur at multiple points along the efferent arm of the reflex, including 1) diminished sympathetic outflow, 2) altered presynaptic neurotransmitter synthesis, 3) reduced vascular responsiveness, and 4) impairments in downstream (endothelial and vascular smooth muscle) second-messenger signaling. This mechanistic review highlights some of the recent findings in the area of aging and the thermoregulatory control of skin blood flow. PMID:20413421

  10. Treating acute seizures with benzodiazepines: does seizure duration matter?

    PubMed

    Naylor, David E

    2014-10-01

    Several clinical trials have shown improved seizure control and outcome by early initiation of treatment with benzodiazepines, before arrival in the emergency department and before intravenous access can be established. Here, evidence is provided and reviewed for rapid treatment of acute seizures in order to avoid the development of benzodiazepine pharmacoresistance and the emergence of self-sustaining status epilepticus. Alterations in the physiology, pharmacology, and postsynaptic level of GABA-A receptors can develop within minutes to an hour and hinder the ability of synaptic inhibition to stop seizures while also impairing the efficacy of GABAergic agents, such as benzodiazepines, to boost impaired inhibition. In addition, heightened excitatory transmission further exacerbates the inhibitory/excitatory balance and makes seizure control even more resistant to treatment. The acute increase in the surface expression of NMDA receptors during prolonged seizures also may cause excitotoxic injury, cell death, and other pathological expressions and re-arrangements of receptor subunits that all contribute to long-term sequelae such as cognitive impairment and chronic epilepsy. In conclusion, a short window of opportunity exists when seizures are maximally controlled by first-line benzodiazepine treatment. After that, multiple pathological mechanisms quickly become engaged that make seizures increasingly more difficult to control with high risk for long-term harm.

  11. A Way of Conceptualizing Benzodiazepines to Guide Clinical Use.

    PubMed

    Preskorn, Sheldon H

    2015-11-01

    Benzodiazepines are medications that are widely used for a number of different therapeutic indications and in a wide range of patients in terms of age and health status. Presented here is a simple 2 by 2 way of classifying all of the most commonly used benzodiazepines. This conceptualization is based on the most clinically relevant ways of differentiating these drugs: (a) their affinity for their common and predominant mechanism of action, the benzodiazepine-binding site of the γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-A iontropic receptor (ie, the chloride ion channel); and (b) their pharmacokinetics (ie, their half-lives and metabolism). The science underlying this conceptualization is presented and then its clinical applicability is discussed. This system can help clinicians select the most appropriate benzodiazepine for their patients and better understand how to switch between these medications to minimize withdrawal symptoms; it also provides a rational basis for cautiously using these agents in combination when necessary, in a manner analogous to the combined use of short-acting and long-acting forms of insulin.

  12. Micromolar-Affinity Benzodiazepine Receptors Regulate Voltage-Sensitive Calcium Channels in Nerve Terminal Preparations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Taft, William C.; Delorenzo, Robert J.

    1984-05-01

    Benzodiazepines in micromolar concentrations significantly inhibit depolarization-sensitive Ca2+ uptake in intact nerve-terminal preparations. Benzodiazepine inhibition of Ca2+ uptake is concentration dependent and stereospecific. Micromolar-affinity benzodiazepine receptors have been identified and characterized in brain membrane and shown to be distinct from nanomolar-affinity benzodiazepine receptors. Evidence is presented that micromolar, and not nanomolar, benzodiazepine binding sites mediate benzodiazepine inhibition of Ca2+ uptake. Irreversible binding to micromolar benzodiazepine binding sites also irreversibly blocked depolarization-dependent Ca2+ uptake in synaptosomes, indicating that these compounds may represent a useful marker for identifying the molecular components of Ca2+ channels in brain. Characterization of benzodiazepine inhibition of Ca2+ uptake demonstrates that these drugs function as Ca2+ channel antagonists, because benzodiazepines effectively blocked voltage-sensitive Ca2+ uptake inhibited by Mn2+, Co2+, verapamil, nitrendipine, and nimodipine. These results indicate that micromolar benzodiazepine binding sites regulate voltage-sensitive Ca2+ channels in brain membrane and suggest that some of the neuronal stabilizing effects of micromolar benzodiazepine receptors may be mediated by the regulation of Ca2+ conductance.

  13. Associations between whole peripheral blood fatty acids and DNA methylation in humans.

    PubMed

    de la Rocha, Carmen; Pérez-Mojica, J Eduardo; León, Silvia Zenteno-De; Cervantes-Paz, Braulio; Tristán-Flores, Fabiola E; Rodríguez-Ríos, Dalia; Molina-Torres, Jorge; Ramírez-Chávez, Enrique; Alvarado-Caudillo, Yolanda; Carmona, F Javier; Esteller, Manel; Hernández-Rivas, Rosaura; Wrobel, Katarzyna; Wrobel, Kazimierz; Zaina, Silvio; Lund, Gertrud

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acids (FA) modify DNA methylation in vitro, but limited information is available on whether corresponding associations exist in vivo and reflect any short-term effect of the diet. Associations between global DNA methylation and FAs were sought in blood from lactating infants (LI; n = 49) and adult males (AMM; n = 12) equally distributed across the three conventional BMI classes. AMM provided multiple samples at 2-hour intervals during 8 hours after either a single Western diet-representative meal (post-prandial samples) or no meal (fasting samples). Lipid/glucose profile, HDAC4 promoter and PDK4 5'UTR methylation were determined in AMM. Multiple regression analysis revealed that global (in LI) and both global and PDK4-specific DNA methylation (in AMM) were positively associated with eicosapentaenoic and arachidonic acid. HDAC4 methylation was inversely associated with arachidonic acid post-prandially in AMM. Global DNA methylation did not show any defined within-day pattern that would suggest a short-term response to the diet. Nonetheless, global DNA methylation was higher in normal weight subjects both post-prandially and in fasting and coincided with higher polyunsaturated relative to monounsaturated and saturated FAs. We show for the first time strong associations of DNA methylation with specific FAs in two human cohorts of distinct age, diet and postnatal development stage. PMID:27181711

  14. Barcoding of live human peripheral blood mononuclear cells for multiplexed mass cytometry.

    PubMed

    Mei, Henrik E; Leipold, Michael D; Schulz, Axel Ronald; Chester, Cariad; Maecker, Holden T

    2015-02-15

    Mass cytometry is developing as a means of multiparametric single-cell analysis. In this study, we present an approach to barcoding separate live human PBMC samples for combined preparation and acquisition on a cytometry by time of flight instrument. Using six different anti-CD45 Ab conjugates labeled with Pd104, Pd106, Pd108, Pd110, In113, and In115, respectively, we barcoded up to 20 samples with unique combinations of exactly three different CD45 Ab tags. Cell events carrying more than or less than three different tags were excluded from analyses during Boolean data deconvolution, allowing for precise sample assignment and the electronic removal of cell aggregates. Data from barcoded samples matched data from corresponding individually stained and acquired samples, at cell event recoveries similar to individual sample analyses. The approach greatly reduced technical noise and minimizes unwanted cell doublet events in mass cytometry data, and it reduces wet work and Ab consumption. It also eliminates sample-to-sample carryover and the requirement of instrument cleaning between samples, thereby effectively reducing overall instrument runtime. Hence, CD45 barcoding facilitates accuracy of mass cytometric immunophenotyping studies, thus supporting biomarker discovery efforts, and it should be applicable to fluorescence flow cytometry as well.

  15. Associations between whole peripheral blood fatty acids and DNA methylation in humans

    PubMed Central

    de la Rocha, Carmen; Pérez-Mojica, J. Eduardo; León, Silvia Zenteno-De; Cervantes-Paz, Braulio; Tristán-Flores, Fabiola E.; Rodríguez-Ríos, Dalia; Molina-Torres, Jorge; Ramírez-Chávez, Enrique; Alvarado-Caudillo, Yolanda; Carmona, F. Javier; Esteller, Manel; Hernández-Rivas, Rosaura; Wrobel, Katarzyna; Wrobel, Kazimierz; Zaina, Silvio; Lund, Gertrud

    2016-01-01

    Fatty acids (FA) modify DNA methylation in vitro, but limited information is available on whether corresponding associations exist in vivo and reflect any short-term effect of the diet. Associations between global DNA methylation and FAs were sought in blood from lactating infants (LI; n = 49) and adult males (AMM; n = 12) equally distributed across the three conventional BMI classes. AMM provided multiple samples at 2-hour intervals during 8 hours after either a single Western diet-representative meal (post-prandial samples) or no meal (fasting samples). Lipid/glucose profile, HDAC4 promoter and PDK4 5’UTR methylation were determined in AMM. Multiple regression analysis revealed that global (in LI) and both global and PDK4-specific DNA methylation (in AMM) were positively associated with eicosapentaenoic and arachidonic acid. HDAC4 methylation was inversely associated with arachidonic acid post-prandially in AMM. Global DNA methylation did not show any defined within-day pattern that would suggest a short-term response to the diet. Nonetheless, global DNA methylation was higher in normal weight subjects both post-prandially and in fasting and coincided with higher polyunsaturated relative to monounsaturated and saturated FAs. We show for the first time strong associations of DNA methylation with specific FAs in two human cohorts of distinct age, diet and postnatal development stage. PMID:27181711

  16. Estimation methods for human circadian phase by use of peripheral tissues.

    PubMed

    Matsumura, Ritsuko; Node, Koichi; Akashi, Makoto

    2016-09-01

    Almost all living organisms, including humans, exhibit diurnal rhythms of physiology and behavior, which are driven by the circadian clock. Many studies have found that chronic misalignment between circadian and environmental/social rhythms carries a significant risk of various disorders, including sleep disorders, metabolic syndrome, cardiovascular diseases and cancer. However, irregular sleep-wake cycles and circadian maladjustment often cause 'social jet lag', which is minor but chronic jet-lag in our daily lives. Establishment of objective and convenient circadian-phase estimation methods in the clinical setting would therefore greatly contribute not only to resolving this global health problem but also to developing chronomedicine, a clinical approach for optimizing the time of day of treatments. Traditional melatonin-based methods have limitations with respect to circadian-phase evaluation; however, estimation methods based on clock gene expression may be able to compensate for these limitations. As a representative application of circadian-phase estimation based on clock gene expression, our method of using hair follicle cells may aid in the rapid clinical detection of circadian-related sleep problems, especially circadian rhythm sleep disorders that are masked because of forced adaptation to social time schedules. PMID:27334057

  17. Central and peripheral hemodynamics in exercising humans: leg vs arm exercise.

    PubMed

    Calbet, J A L; González-Alonso, J; Helge, J W; Søndergaard, H; Munch-Andersen, T; Saltin, B; Boushel, R

    2015-12-01

    In humans, arm exercise is known to elicit larger increases in arterial blood pressure (BP) than leg exercise. However, the precise regulation of regional vascular conductances (VC) for the distribution of cardiac output with exercise intensity remains unknown. Hemodynamic responses were assessed during incremental upright arm cranking (AC) and leg pedalling (LP) to exhaustion (Wmax) in nine males. Systemic VC, peak cardiac output (Qpeak) (indocyanine green) and stroke volume (SV) were 18%, 23%, and 20% lower during AC than LP. The mean BP, the rate-pressure product and the associated myocardial oxygen demand were 22%, 12%, and 14% higher, respectively, during maximal AC than LP. Trunk VC was reduced to similar values at Wmax. At Wmax, muscle mass-normalized VC and fractional O2 extraction were lower in the arm than the leg muscles. However, this was compensated for during AC by raising perfusion pressure to increase O2 delivery, allowing a similar peak VO2 per kg of muscle mass in both extremities. In summary, despite a lower Qpeak during arm cranking the cardiovascular strain is much higher than during leg pedalling. The adjustments of regional conductances during incremental exercise to exhaustion depend mostly on the relative intensity of exercise and are limb-specific.

  18. Dimethyl fumarate activates the prostaglandin EP2 receptor and stimulates cAMP signaling in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Fiedler, Sarah E; Kerns, Amelia R; Tsang, Catherine; Tsang, Vivian; Bourdette, Dennis; Salinthone, Sonemany

    2016-06-17

    Dimethyl fumarate (DMF) was recently approved by the FDA for the treatment of relapsing remitting MS. The pathology of MS is a result of both immune dysregulation and oxidative stress induced damage, and DMF is believed to have therapeutic effects on both of these processes. However, the mechanisms of action of DMF are not fully understood. To determine if DMF is able to activate signaling cascades that affect immune dysregulation, we treated human peripheral blood mononuclear cells with DMF. We discovered that DMF stimulates cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) production after 1 min treatment in vitro. cAMP is a small molecule second messenger that has been shown to modulate immune response. Using pharmacological inhibitors, we determined that adenylyl cyclase mediates DMF induced cAMP production; DMF activated the prostaglandin EP2 receptor to produce cAMP. This response was not due to increased endogenous production of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2), but was enhanced by addition of exogenous PGE2. Furthermore, we determined that the bioactive metabolite of DMF, monomethyl fumarate (MMF), also stimulates cAMP production. These novel findings suggest that DMF may provide protection against MS by inhibiting immune cell function via the cAMP signaling pathway. PMID:27157139

  19. A human model of platelet–leucocyte adhesive interactions during controlled ischaemia in patients with peripheral vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Pasqualini, L; Pirro, M; Lombardini, R; Ciuffetti, G; Dragani, P; Mannarino, E

    2002-01-01

    Aims: In humans, little is known about the effects of platelet–leucocyte interactions on blood viscosity and microvascular perfusion. This study tested the hypotheses that (1) activation and interactions between platelets and leucocytes may have an impact on microvascular blood viscosity and perfusion in patients with stage II peripheral arterial occlusive disease, and (2) a powerful antiplatelet drug such as Clopidogrel might help to improve microvascular perfusion by reducing platelet–leucocyte activation and blood viscosity. Methods: Plasma concentrations of certain markers of leucocyte and platelet activation, in addition to low and high shear rate blood viscosity, were measured before and after a repeated exercise treadmill test. Functional parameters including maximum walking time, transcutaneous oxygen pressure, and half recovery time were also measured. Results: Blocking platelet activation only with a single dose of Clopidogrel (300 mg) did not improve microvascular blood viscosity and perfusion after repeated exercise, but a significant improvement in microvascular perfusion during controlled ischaemia and a lack of post exercise increase in low shear rate blood viscosity was achieved when both platelet and leucocyte activation were suppressed by a relatively longer treatment with Clopidogrel (four days). Conclusions: Clopidogrel, by inhibiting platelet activation and aggregation, might also block the vicious cycle of leucocyte–platelet activation, thus improving the functioning of the microcirculation. PMID:12461065

  20. Human trophoblast cells induced MDSCs from peripheral blood CD14+ myelomonocytic cells via elevated levels of CCL2

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Yun; Qu, Daiwei; Sun, Jintang; Zhao, Lei; Wang, Qingjie; Shao, Qianqian; Kong, Beihua; Zhang, Yun; Qu, Xun

    2016-01-01

    Successful human pregnancy requires the maternal immune system to recognize and tolerate the semi-allogeneic fetus. Myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs), which are capable of inhibiting T-cell responses, are highly increased in the early stages of pregnancy. Although recent reports indicate a role for MDSCs in fetal–maternal tolerance, little is known about the expansion of MDSCs during pregnancy. In the present study, we demonstrated that the trophoblast cell line HTR8/SVneo could instruct peripheral CD14+ myelomonocytic cells toward a novel subpopulation of MDSCs, denoted as CD14+HLA-DR−/low cells, with suppressive activity and increased expression of IDO1, ARG-1, and COX2. After interaction with HTR8/SVneo cells, CD14+ myelomonocytic cells secrete high levels of CCL2, promoting the expression of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3. We utilized a neutralizing monoclonal antibody to reveal the prominent role of CCL2 in the induction of CD14+HLA-DR−/low MDSCs. In combination, the results of the present study support a novel role for the cross-talk between the trophoblast cell line HTR8/SVneo and maternal CD14+ myelomonocytic cells in initiating MDSCs induction, prompting a tolerogenic immune response to ensure a successful pregnancy. PMID:26027727

  1. Induction and disappearance of DNA strand breaks in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and fibroblasts treated with methyl methanesulfonate

    SciTech Connect

    Boerrigter, M.E.T.I.; Mullaart, E.; Vijg, J. )

    1991-01-01

    The induction and disappearance of DNA single-strand breaks (SSB) in human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) and fibroblasts exposed to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) were investigated by using the alkaline filter elution assay. In the two cell types, identical amounts of SSB were induced during a 45-minute treatment with a given dose of MMS. In quiescent PBL only 9{plus minus}4% (mean {plus minus} SD) of the induced SSB had disappeared at 1 hour after exposure, whereas in phytohemagglutinin-stimulated PBL, 23 {plus minus} 12% disappeared within the same repair period. The accumulation of SSB in PBL, but not in fibroblasts, during MMS exposure in the presence of the excision-repair inhibitor 1-{beta}-D-arabinofuranosylcytosine indicated the utilization of different repair pathways in these two cell types. The generally lower rate of disappearance of MMS-induced SSB in PBL as compared to fibroblasts correlated with an increased loss of cell viability, measured by determining the incorporation of ({sup 3}H)thymidine.

  2. Effects of folic acid deficiency and MTHFRC677T polymorphisms on cytotoxicity in human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Xiayu; Liang Ziqing; Zou Tianning; Wang Xu

    2009-02-13

    Apoptosis (APO) and necrosis (NEC) are two different types of cell death occurring in response to cellular stress factors. Cells with DNA damage may undergo APO or NEC. Folate is an essential micronutrient associated with DNA synthesis, repair and methylation. Methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) regulates intracellular folate metabolism. Folate deficiency and MTHFR C677T polymorphisms have been shown to be related to DNA damage. To verify the cytotoxic effects of folate deficiency on cells with different MTHFR C677T genotypes, 15 human peripheral lymphocyte cases with different MTHFR C677T genotypes were cultured in folic acid (FA)-deficient and -sufficient media for 9 days. Cytotoxicity was quantified using the frequencies of APO and NEC as endpoints, the nuclear division index (NDI), and the number of viable cells (NVC). These results showed that FA is an important factor in reducing cytotoxicity and increasing cell proliferation. Lymphocytes with the TT genotype proliferated easily under stress and exhibited different responses to FA deficiency than lymphocytes with the CC and CT genotypes. A TT individual may accumulate more cytotoxicity under cytotoxic stress, suggesting that the effects of FA deficiency on cytotoxicity are greater than the effects in individuals with the other MTHFR C677T variants.

  3. Crotalus durissus collilineatus Venom Induces TNF-α and IL-10 Production in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ribeiro, Camila Bastos; dos Santos, Jéssica Cristina; Silva, Jacyelle Medeiros; de Godoi, Pedro Henrique Silva; Magalhães, Marta Regina; Spadafora-Ferreira, Mônica; Fonseca, Simone Gonçalves; Pfrimer, Irmtraut Araci Hoffman

    2014-01-01

    Snake venom has been the subject of numerous studies in an attempt to find properties and biological effects that may be beneficial to man. In this study we evaluated in vitro the effects of Crotalus durissus terrificus (Cdt) and Crotalus durissus collilineatus (Cdc) venom in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). At 24 h, a significant decrease of viable cells was observed in cells stimulated with the Cdc venom at 0.0005 mg/mL and 0.005 mg/mL compared to the negative control. At 48 h, a significant decrease of viable cells was observed only in cells stimulated with Cdc venom at 0.005 mg/mL. A significant increase of TNF-α and IL-10 was detected 48 hours after culture of PBMC with Cdc, but not with Cdt venom. The expression of CD69 and PD1 (programmed death-1), activation and regulatory cell markers, on CD8+ and CD8− T cells did not change in the presence of Cdt and Cdc venom. Our results suggest the presence of proinflammatory and anti-inflammatory components in the Cdc venom. Further analysis should be done to identify those Cdc venom components as it has been done for the Cdt venom by other authors, indicating that modulatory components are found in the venom of different species of Crotalus snakes. PMID:24563803

  4. Successful simultaneous measurement of cell membrane and cytokine induced phosphorylation pathways [CIPP] in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Montag, David T; Lotze, Michael T

    2006-06-30

    Phenotyping and simple enumeration of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) is of limited value for the assessment of many clinical states. As a preferred alternative, cell surface phenotyping may be combined with functional assays for enhanced assessment of altered cells circulating in patients. One simple, yet informative and rapid approach is to examine signaling within individual cells following brief periods of stimulation via flow cytometry. Although monocytes and lymphoid cells can be distinguished based on size, current permeabilization strategies necessary for identifying intracellular phosphorylated signaling molecules largely compromise the labeling of cell surface proteins used to distinguish individual cellular subsets. We have successfully developed conditions that allow for simultaneous detection of cell surface proteins and intracellular phosphorylated proteins in human PBMC following rapid in vitro cytokine stimulation. We analyzed permeabilized CD4, CD8, CD14, CD19, and CD56 expressing cells together with intracellular pSTAT1, pSTAT3, pSTAT5, pSTAT6, pp38 MAPK, or pERK1/2 within total PBMC. Of the permeabilizing conditions tested, 75% methanol enabled superior simultaneous detection of both cell surface and intracellular epitopes. This method enables the rapid functional analysis of subsets within complex cell mixtures and provides an opportunity for assessing abnormalities arising in the setting of acute or chronic inflammatory states.

  5. Mechanism and role of MCP-1 upregulation upon chikungunya virus infection in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    Ruiz Silva, Mariana; van der Ende-Metselaar, Heidi; Mulder, H. Lie; Smit, Jolanda M.; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela A.

    2016-01-01

    Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2)-mediated migration of monocytes is essential for immunological surveillance of tissues. During chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection however, excessive production of MCP-1 has been linked to disease pathogenesis. High MCP-1 serum levels are detected during the viremic phase of CHIKV infection and correlate with the virus titre. In vitro CHIKV infection was also shown to stimulate MCP-1 production in whole blood; yet the role and the mechanism of MCP-1 production upon infection of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells remain unknown. Here we found that active CHIKV infection stimulated production of MCP-1 in monocytes. Importantly however, we found that communication with other leukocytes is crucial to yield MCP-1 by monocytes upon CHIKV infection. Indeed, blocking interferon-α/β receptor or the JAK1/JAK2 signalling downstream of the receptor abolished CHIKV-mediated MCP-1 production. Additionally, we show that despite the apparent correlation between IFN type I, CHIKV replication and MCP-1, modulating the levels of the chemokine did not influence CHIKV infection. In summary, our data disclose the complexity of MCP-1 regulation upon CHIKV infection and point to a crucial role of IFNβ in the chemokine secretion. We propose that balance between these soluble factors is imperative for an appropriate host response to CHIKV infection. PMID:27558873

  6. Characterisation of the Immunomodulatory Effects of Meningococcal Opa Proteins on Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells and CD4+ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Lewis, Susan; Payne, Isabelle; Saleem, Muhammad; Derrick, Jeremy P.; Pollard, Andrew J.

    2016-01-01

    Opa proteins are major surface-expressed proteins located in the Neisseria meningitidis outer membrane, and are potential meningococcal vaccine candidates. Although Opa proteins elicit high levels of bactericidal antibodies following immunisation in mice, progress towards human clinical trials has been delayed due to previous findings that Opa inhibits T cell proliferation in some in vitro assays. However, results from previous studies are conflicting, with different Opa preparations and culture conditions being used. We investigated the effects of various Opa+ and Opa- antigens from N. meningitidis strain H44/76 in a range of in vitro conditions using peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and purified CD4+ T cells, measuring T cell proliferation by CFSE dilution using flow cytometry. Wild type recombinant and liposomal Opa proteins inhibited CD4+ T cell proliferation after stimulation with IL-2, anti-CD3 and anti-CD28, and these effects were reduced by mutation of the CEACAM1-binding region of Opa. These effects were not observed in culture with ex vivo PBMCs. Opa+ and Opa- OMVs did not consistently exert a stimulatory or inhibitory effect across different culture conditions. These data do not support a hypothesis that Opa proteins would be inhibitory to T cells if given as a vaccine component, and T cell immune responses to OMV vaccines are unlikely to be significantly affected by the presence of Opa proteins. PMID:27111850

  7. One half of the CD11b+ human peripheral blood T lymphocytes coexpresses the S-100 protein.

    PubMed Central

    Ferrari, C; Sansoni, P; Rowden, G; Manara, G C; Torresani, C; De Panfilis, G

    1988-01-01

    The expression of the CD11b antigen and the presence of the S-100 (and, specifically, its beta subunit) protein within the T4- subpopulation of normal human peripheral blood lymphocytes were investigated by panning techniques, immunofluorescence analysis and immunoelectronmicroscopy. Both antigens are known to be absent in the T4+ lymphocytes. However, CD11b+ T lymphocytes represented about 30% of the T4- population; a part of them (over 1/3) belonged to and completely filled up the T4- T8- subpopulation, whereas the remaining part (almost 2/3) shared the T8 positivity. Interestingly, S-100+ T lymphocytes, which always were CD11b+ too, represented about one half of the CD11b+ T cells, but were excluded from the T4- T8- CD11b+ subpopulation, whereas they represented up to 80% of the T4- T8+ CD11b+ subset. Such findings demonstrate that the S-100+ T lymphocytes are exclusively restricted to a discrete T cell compartment which shows the T8+ CD11b+ immunophenotype. Since such T8+ CD11b+ cells had been shown to possess suppressive capabilities, we herein propose that S-100+ lymphocytes might to some extent modulate the immune responses. However, the exact functional significance of the S-100 protein still remains unknown. Images Fig. 3 PMID:3048804

  8. Distributions of spontaneous chromosomal aberrations and of spontaneous and induced SCE and micronuclei in peripheral lymphocytes from a human population

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, M.A.; Setlow, R.B.

    1992-12-31

    Biomonitoring of human populations for exposure to genotoxic/clastogenic agents in the environment or the workplace must depend upon statistical tests for elevations in the frequencies of the biological endpoints being monitored, usually chromosomal aberrations (CA), micronuclei (MN), or sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Statistical tests are based, in turn, upon certain assumptions regarding the distribution of the test statistic. When they are often not recognized as such, tests of significance can be in error, and any conclusion drawn that there is or is not a statistically significant difference between one population sample and another maybe erroneous. In population monitoring this means either false negatives or false positives can result and it is hard to know which is worse. Furthermore, even the intelligent design of studies whose object is to test for an elevated level in an exposed population must depend upon prior knowledge of the nature of both spontaneous and induced response; if variance is large enough, a given-sized study might be inconclusive, and an adequate study simply too large-to be practical.

  9. Distributions of spontaneous chromosomal aberrations and of spontaneous and induced SCE and micronuclei in peripheral lymphocytes from a human population

    SciTech Connect

    Bender, M.A.; Setlow, R.B.

    1992-01-01

    Biomonitoring of human populations for exposure to genotoxic/clastogenic agents in the environment or the workplace must depend upon statistical tests for elevations in the frequencies of the biological endpoints being monitored, usually chromosomal aberrations (CA), micronuclei (MN), or sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) in peripheral blood lymphocytes. Statistical tests are based, in turn, upon certain assumptions regarding the distribution of the test statistic. When they are often not recognized as such, tests of significance can be in error, and any conclusion drawn that there is or is not a statistically significant difference between one population sample and another maybe erroneous. In population monitoring this means either false negatives or false positives can result and it is hard to know which is worse. Furthermore, even the intelligent design of studies whose object is to test for an elevated level in an exposed population must depend upon prior knowledge of the nature of both spontaneous and induced response; if variance is large enough, a given-sized study might be inconclusive, and an adequate study simply too large-to be practical.

  10. Thrombin inhibits IFN-gamma production in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells by promoting a Th2 profile.

    PubMed

    Naldini, Antonella; Morena, Emilia; Filippi, Irene; Pucci, Annalisa; Bucci, Mariarosaria; Cirino, Giuseppe; Carraro, Fabio

    2006-11-01

    Thrombin, the key enzyme of the coagulation cascade, is involved in inflammation. It was proposed recently that thrombin activity may play an important role in allergic inflammation. Interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) is a potent Th1-related cytokine secreted by activated T cells and is usually downregulated in allergic inflammation. We recently demonstrated that thrombin enhances interleukin-10 (IL-10) in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Thus, we hypothesized that thrombin may promote a Th2 profile. We here report that human alpha- thrombin downregulates IFN-gamma expression at both protein and mRNA levels in activated PBMCs. The use of proteolytically inactive thrombin and of the specific thrombin receptor agonist peptide, SFLLRN, shows that this downregulation is thrombin specific and requires thrombin proteolytic activity. The addition of an anti- IL-10 monoclonal antibody (mAb) to thrombin-treated PBMCs abolishes IFN-gamma downregulation, suggesting that thrombin exerts its effect through IL-10, a Th2-related cytokine. Furthermore, IFN-gamma reduction was accompanied by increased IL-4 release, as well as by an increase in the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1. In conclusion, the observation that thrombin affects the production of IFN-gamma (Th1 profile) and IL-4 (Th2 profile) provides further evidence for the role played by thrombin in modulating Th1/Th2 cytokine balance, which could be particularly relevant in allergic inflammation. PMID:17115897

  11. Dry olive leaf extract counteracts L-thyroxine-induced genotoxicity in human peripheral blood leukocytes in vitro.

    PubMed

    Topalović, Dijana Žukovec; Živković, Lada; Čabarkapa, Andrea; Djelić, Ninoslav; Bajić, Vladan; Dekanski, Dragana; Spremo-Potparević, Biljana

    2015-01-01

    The thyroid hormones change the rate of basal metabolism, modulating the consumption of oxygen and causing production of reactive oxygen species, which leads to the development of oxidative stress and DNA strand breaks. Olive (Olea europaea L.) leaf contains many potentially bioactive compounds, making it one of the most potent natural antioxidants. The objective of this study was to evaluate the genotoxicity of L-thyroxine and to investigate antioxidative and antigenotoxic potential of the standardized oleuropein-rich dry olive leaf extract (DOLE) against hydrogen peroxide and L-thyroxine-induced DNA damage in human peripheral blood leukocytes by using the comet assay. Various concentrations of the extract were tested with both DNA damage inducers, under two different experimental conditions, pretreatment and posttreatment. Results indicate that L-thyroxine exhibited genotoxic effect and that DOLE displayed protective effect against thyroxine-induced genotoxicity. The number of cells with DNA damage, was significantly reduced, in both pretreated and posttreated samples (P < 0.05). Comparing the beneficial effect of all tested concentrations of DOLE, in both experimental protocols, it appears that extract was more effective in reducing DNA damage in the pretreatment, exhibiting protective role against L-thyroxine effect. This feature of DOLE can be explained by its capacity to act as potent free radical scavenger.

  12. Mechanism and role of MCP-1 upregulation upon chikungunya virus infection in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Ruiz Silva, Mariana; van der Ende-Metselaar, Heidi; Mulder, H Lie; Smit, Jolanda M; Rodenhuis-Zybert, Izabela A

    2016-01-01

    Monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2)-mediated migration of monocytes is essential for immunological surveillance of tissues. During chikungunya virus (CHIKV) infection however, excessive production of MCP-1 has been linked to disease pathogenesis. High MCP-1 serum levels are detected during the viremic phase of CHIKV infection and correlate with the virus titre. In vitro CHIKV infection was also shown to stimulate MCP-1 production in whole blood; yet the role and the mechanism of MCP-1 production upon infection of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells remain unknown. Here we found that active CHIKV infection stimulated production of MCP-1 in monocytes. Importantly however, we found that communication with other leukocytes is crucial to yield MCP-1 by monocytes upon CHIKV infection. Indeed, blocking interferon-α/β receptor or the JAK1/JAK2 signalling downstream of the receptor abolished CHIKV-mediated MCP-1 production. Additionally, we show that despite the apparent correlation between IFN type I, CHIKV replication and MCP-1, modulating the levels of the chemokine did not influence CHIKV infection. In summary, our data disclose the complexity of MCP-1 regulation upon CHIKV infection and point to a crucial role of IFNβ in the chemokine secretion. We propose that balance between these soluble factors is imperative for an appropriate host response to CHIKV infection. PMID:27558873

  13. Procalcitonin neutralizes bacterial LPS and reduces LPS-induced cytokine release in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Procalcitonin (PCT) is a polypeptide with several cationic aminoacids in its chemical structure and it is a well known marker of sepsis. It is now emerging that PCT might exhibit some anti-inflammatory effects. The present study, based on the evaluation of the in vitro interaction between PCT and bacterial lipopolisaccharide (LPS), reports new data supporting the interesting and potentially useful anti-inflammatory activity of PCT. Results PCT significantly decreased (p < 0.05) the limulus amoebocyte lysate (LAL) assay reactivity of LPS from both Salmonella typhimurium (rough chemotype) and Escherichia coli (smooth chemotype). Subsequently, the in vitro effects of PCT on LPS-induced cytokine release were studied in human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). When LPS was pre-incubated for 30 minutes with different concentrations of PCT, the release of interleukin-10 (IL-10) and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNFα) by PBMC decreased in a concentration-dependent manner after 24 hours for IL-10 and 4 hours for TNFα. The release of monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) exhibited a drastic reduction at 4 hours for all the PCT concentrations assessed, whereas such decrease was concentration-dependent after 24 hours. Conclusions This study provides the first evidence of the capability of PCT to directly neutralize bacterial LPS, thus leading to a reduction of its major inflammatory mediators. PMID:22568957

  14. Comparison of behavioral effects after single and repeated administrations of four benzodiazepines in three mice behavioral models.

    PubMed

    Bourin, M; Hascoet, M; Mansouri, B; Colombel, M C; Bradwejn, J

    1992-06-01

    The behavioral and clinical profiles of various benzodiazepines after acute and chronic treatment are not well defined and may differ. The aim of this study was to evaluate the behavioral profiles of alprazolam, bromazepam, diazepam and lorazepam in mice after single and repeated (every half-life for seven half-lives) administrations using a stimulation-sedation test (actimeter), a myorelaxation test (rotarod), and an anxiolysis test ("four plates"). A dose range from 0.03 to 4 mg/kg was used. A single administration of alprazolam showed stimulating and anxiolytic effects which diminished after repeated administration. Lorezapam's sedative effect diminished but its anxiolytic effect increased upon repeated administration. Except for lorazepam, the myorelaxing effect of all four drugs increased after repeated treatment. These results suggest that the behavioral profile of benzodiazepines may not be identical during acute and chronic treatment. These differences may be present in clinical treatment and warrant investigation in humans.

  15. Comparison of behavioral effects after single and repeated administrations of four benzodiazepines in three mice behavioral models.

    PubMed Central

    Bourin, M; Hascoet, M; Mansouri, B; Colombel, M C; Bradwejn, J

    1992-01-01

    The behavioral and clinical profiles of various benzodiazepines after acute and chronic treatment are not well defined and may differ. The aim of this study was to evaluate the behavioral profiles of alprazolam, bromazepam, diazepam and lorazepam in mice after single and repeated (every half-life for seven half-lives) administrations using a stimulation-sedation test (actimeter), a myorelaxation test (rotarod), and an anxiolysis test ("four plates"). A dose range from 0.03 to 4 mg/kg was used. A single administration of alprazolam showed stimulating and anxiolytic effects which diminished after repeated administration. Lorezapam's sedative effect diminished but its anxiolytic effect increased upon repeated administration. Except for lorazepam, the myorelaxing effect of all four drugs increased after repeated treatment. These results suggest that the behavioral profile of benzodiazepines may not be identical during acute and chronic treatment. These differences may be present in clinical treatment and warrant investigation in humans. PMID:1637802

  16. Cordyceps sinensis: Genotoxic Potential in Human Peripheral Blood Cells and Antigenotoxic Properties Against Hydrogen Peroxide by Comet Assay.

    PubMed

    Vasiljevic, Jovana D; Zivkovic, Lada P; Cabarkapa, Andrea M; Bajic, Vladan P; Djelic, Ninoslav J; Spremo-Potparevic, Biljana M

    2016-06-01

    Context • Cordyceps sinensis (C sinensis) is a well-known, traditional, Chinese medicinal mushroom, valued for its beneficial properties for human health. C sinensis has been reported to have immunomodulatory, anticancer, antiaging, antioxidant and anti-inflammatory activity. Despite potential medicinal benefits, no previously published reports are available about the genotoxicity or antigenotoxicity of C sinensis, as detected by comet assay. Objective • The objective of the study was to evaluate both the genotoxic and antigenotoxic potential of an extract of C sinensis (CS extract) in human peripheral blood cells. Design • The research team designed a pilot study. Setting •The study was conducted at the Center for Biological Research, University of Belgrade, in Belgrade, Serbia. Participants • Participants were 6 healthy individuals (2 males and 4 females), between the ages of 20 and 45 y, recruited on a voluntary basis, who provided heparinized, peripheral blood samples. Intervention • Four concentrations of the CS extract-125 μg/mL, 250 μg/mL, 500 μg/mL, and 1000 μg/mL-were used in the treatment of tested blood cells from the blood samples. Three independent procedures were performed: (1) a genotoxicity assessment, (2) an antigenotoxicity assessment for pretreatment of human cells with the CS extract prior to their exposure to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) (ie, an evaluation of the benefits of the CS extract as a preventive agent); and (3) posttreatment of human cells with the CS extract after their exposure to H2O2 (ie, an evaluation of the benefits of the CS extract as an interventional agent). Outcome Measures • Cells were graded by eye inspection into 5 classes, depending on the extent of DNA damage, representing: (1) class A-undamaged cells with no tail (<5% damaged DNA); (2) class B-low-level damage (5%-20%); (3) class C-medium-level damage (20%-40%); (4) class D-high-level damage (40%-95%), and (5) class E-total destruction (>95%).Results

  17. CD45 epitope mapping of human CD1a+ dendritic cells and peripheral blood dendritic cells.

    PubMed Central

    Wood, G. S.; Freudenthal, P. S.; Edinger, A.; Steinman, R. M.; Warnke, R. A.

    1991-01-01

    The authors studied the pattern of leukocyte common antigen (CD45) epitope expression on dendritic cells in sections of human epidermis, tonsillar epithelium, dermatopathic lymph nodes, and in isolates from blood. The monoclonal antibodies (MAb) used were specific for all known CD45 epitopes, including the seven different CD45 common epitopes as well as the four known CD45R epitopes (two CD45RA, one CD45RB, and one CD45RO). Dendritic cells in all sites were uniformly reactive for the CD45 common epitopes tested except 2B11, which may recognize a CD45R rather than CD45 epitope. By single-label immunoperoxidase and double-label immunofluorescence epitope mapping of CD1a+ dendritic cells in tissue sections, it was generally difficult or impossible to detect expression of CD45RA, CD45RB, CD45RO, or 2B11. In blood dendritic cells, however, low levels of these CD45R epitopes were detected consistently using single-label immunoperoxidase staining of cytocentrifuge preparations. Monocytes were similar to blood dendritic cells except that the staining with MAb to CD45RO and 2B11 was slightly stronger. The authors conclude that dendritic cells differ from most subpopulations of lymphocytes in that CD45 common epitopes are readily detectable but the existing RA, RB, and RO epitopes are either undetectable or expressed at relatively low levels. These studies raise the possibility that CD1a+ dendritic cells may express a novel dominant CD45 isoform. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 PMID:1711291

  18. Phenotypic and functional cellular differences between human CD3- decidual and peripheral blood leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Deniz, G; Christmas, S E; Brew, R; Johnson, P M

    1994-05-01

    CD3- leukocyte clones derived from human decidualized endometrial tissue of first trimester pregnancy have been compared with CD3- PBL clones. Most CD3- decidual granulated leukocyte (DGL) clones were CD16- CD56+, whereas most CD3- PBL clones were CD16+ CD56+. CD3- DGL and PBL clones, whether CD16+ or not, showed MHC-nonrestricted NK cell activity. However, CD3- CD16- DGL clones had low cytotoxic activity against the NK-resistant cell line BSM, whereas CD3- CD16+ DGL and CD3- PBL clones were strongly cytotoxic. Cytolytic activity has also been investigated in respect of target cell HLA-G expression, because this nonpolymorphic class I MHC molecule is expressed selectively by invasive fetal cytotrophoblast. Class I HLA Ag loss cell mutants were killed efficiently by CD3- DGL clones. Expression of transfected HLA-B8 increased their sensitivity to lysis by most CD3- DGL clones, whereas expression of transfected HLA-G commonly led to decreased target cell killing. In addition, the effects of uncloned CD3- DGL on the one-way MLR have been examined. These cells were very poor responders and, unless cultured to induce expression of class II MHC molecules, were also very poor stimulators. When fresh CD3- DGLs were added as third-party cells, either autologous or allogeneic to responder cells, [3H]TdR incorporation was decreased in the MLR. Thus, CD3- DGL clones express MHC-nonrestricted cytolytic activity, notably against HLA-negative cells, but expression of HLA-G offers protection to target cells. In addition, CD3- DGL may function to suppress allogeneic responses.

  19. Behavioral and Neurophysiological Signatures of Benzodiazepine-Related Driving Impairments.

    PubMed

    Stone, Bradly T; Correa, Kelly A; Brown, Timothy L; Spurgin, Andrew L; Stikic, Maja; Johnson, Robin R; Berka, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Impaired driving due to drug use is a growing problem worldwide; estimates show that 18-23.5% of fatal accidents, and up to 34% of injury accidents may be caused by drivers under the influence of drugs (Drummer et al., 2003; Walsh et al., 2004; NHTSA, 2010). Furthermore, at any given time, up to 16% of drivers may be using drugs that can impair one's driving abilities (NHTSA, 2009). Currently, drug recognition experts (DREs; law enforcement officers with specialized training to identify drugged driving), have the most difficult time with identifying drivers potentially impaired on central nervous system (CNS) depressants (Smith et al., 2002). The fact that the use of benzodiazepines, a type of CNS depressant, is also associated with the greatest likelihood of causing accidents (Dassanayake et al., 2011), further emphasizes the need to improve research tools in this area which can facilitate the refinement of, or additions to, current assessments of impaired driving. Our laboratories collaborated to evaluate both the behavioral and neurophysiological effects of a benzodiazepine, alprazolam, in a driving simulation (miniSim(TM)). This drive was combined with a neurocognitive assessment utilizing time synched neurophysiology (electroencephalography, ECG). While the behavioral effects of benzodiazepines are well characterized (Rapoport et al., 2009), we hypothesized that, with the addition of real-time neurophysiology and the utilization of simulation and neurocognitive assessment, we could find objective assessments of drug impairment that could improve the detection capabilities of DREs. Our analyses revealed that (1) specific driving conditions were significantly more difficult for benzodiazepine impaired drivers and (2) the neurocognitive tasks' metrics were able to classify "impaired" vs. "unimpaired" with up to 80% accuracy based on lane position deviation and lane departures. While this work requires replication in larger studies, our results not only identified

  20. A Pharmacologically Active Monoclonal Antibody against the Human Melanocortin-4 Receptor: Effectiveness After Peripheral and Central Administration

    PubMed Central

    Peter, Jean-Christophe; Lecourt, Anne-Catherine; Weckering, Marjorie; Zipfel, Géraldine; Niehoff, Michael L.; Banks, William A.; Hofbauer, Karl G.

    2010-01-01

    The hypothalamic melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) is a constituent of an important pathway regulating food intake and energy expenditure. We produced a monoclonal antibody (mAb) directed against the N-terminal domain of the MC4R and evaluated its potential as a possible therapeutic agent. This mAb (1E8a) showed specific binding to the MC4R in human embryonic kidney 293 cells expressing the human MC4R and blocked the activity of the MC4R under basal conditions and after stimulation with α-melanocyte-stimulating hormone (α-MSH). The inverse agonist action of Agouti-related protein was significantly enhanced in the presence of mAb 1E8a. After a single intracerebroventricular injection into the third ventricle, mAb 1E8a (1 μg) increased 24-h food intake in rats. After 7 days of continuous intracerebroventricular administration, mAb 1E8a increased food intake, body weight, and fat pad weight and induced hyperglycemia. Because the complete mAb was ineffective after intravenous injection, we produced single-chain variable fragments (scFvs) derived from mAb 1E8a. In pharmacokinetic studies it was demonstrated that these scFvs crossed the blood-brain barrier and reached the hypothalamus. Consequently, the scFv 1E8a increased significantly food intake and body weight in rats after intravenous administration (300 μg/kg). The pharmacological profile of mAb 1E8a and the fact that its scFv was active after peripheral administration suggest that derivatives of anti-MC4R mAbs may be useful in the treatment of patients with anorexia or cachexia. PMID:20118207

  1. Cerebral Apolipoprotein-D Is Hypoglycosylated Compared to Peripheral Tissues and Is Variably Expressed in Mouse and Human Brain Regions

    PubMed Central

    Li, Hongyun; Ruberu, Kalani; Karl, Tim; Garner, Brett

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that cerebral apoD levels increase with age and in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). In addition, loss of cerebral apoD in the mouse increases sensitivity to lipid peroxidation and accelerates AD pathology. Very little data are available, however, regarding the expression of apoD protein levels in different brain regions. This is important as both brain lipid peroxidation and neurodegeneration occur in a region-specific manner. Here we addressed this using western blotting of seven different regions (olfactory bulb, hippocampus, frontal cortex, striatum, cerebellum, thalamus and brain stem) of the mouse brain. Our data indicate that compared to most brain regions, the hippocampus is deficient in apoD. In comparison to other major organs and tissues (liver, spleen, kidney, adrenal gland, heart and skeletal muscle), brain apoD was approximately 10-fold higher (corrected for total protein levels). Our analysis also revealed that brain apoD was present at a lower apparent molecular weight than tissue and plasma apoD. Utilising peptide N-glycosidase-F and neuraminidase to remove N-glycans and sialic acids, respectively, we found that N-glycan composition (but not sialylation alone) were responsible for this reduction in molecular weight. We extended the studies to an analysis of human brain regions (hippocampus, frontal cortex, temporal cortex and cerebellum) where we found that the hippocampus had the lowest levels of apoD. We also confirmed that human brain apoD was present at a lower molecular weight than in plasma. In conclusion, we demonstrate apoD protein levels are variable across different brain regions, that apoD levels are much higher in the brain compared to other tissues and organs, and that cerebral apoD has a lower molecular weight than peripheral apoD; a phenomenon that is due to the N-glycan content of the protein. PMID:26829325

  2. Appropriate nonwoven filters effectively capture human peripheral blood cells and mesenchymal stem cells, which show enhanced production of growth factors.

    PubMed

    Hori, Hideo; Iwamoto, Ushio; Niimi, Gen; Shinzato, Masanori; Hiki, Yoshiyuki; Tokushima, Yasuo; Kawaguchi, Kazunori; Ohashi, Atsushi; Nakai, Shigeru; Yasutake, Mikitomo; Kitaguchi, Nobuya

    2015-03-01

    Scaffolds, growth factors, and cells are three essential components in regenerative medicine. Nonwoven filters, which capture cells, provide a scaffold that localizes and concentrates cells near injured tissues. Further, the cells captured on the filters are expected to serve as a local supply of growth factors. In this study, we investigated the growth factors produced by cells captured on nonwoven filters. Nonwoven filters made of polyethylene terephthalate (PET), biodegradable polylactic acid (PLA), or chitin (1.2-22 μm fiber diameter) were cut out as 13 mm disks and placed into cell-capturing devices. Human mesenchymal stem cells derived from adipose tissues (h-ASCs) and peripheral blood cells (h-PBCs) were captured on the filter and cultured to evaluate growth factor production. The cell-capture rates strongly depended on the fiber diameter and the number of filter disks. Nonwoven filter disks were composed of PET or PLA fibers with fiber diameters of 1.2-1.8 μm captured over 70% of leukocytes or 90% of h-ASCs added. The production of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), transforming growth factor β1, and platelet-derived growth factor AB were significantly enhanced by the h-PBCs captured on PET or PLA filters. h-ASCs on PLA filters showed significantly enhanced production of VEGF. These enhancements varied with the combination of the nonwoven filter and cells. Because of the enhanced growth factor production, the proliferation of human fibroblasts increased in conditioned medium from h-PBCs on PET filters. This device consisting of nonwoven filters and cells should be investigated further for possible use in the regeneration of impaired tissues.

  3. Early effects of low dose 12C6+ ion or X-ray irradiation on human peripheral blood lymphocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yingtai; Li, Yumin; Zhang, Hong; Xie, Yi; Chen, Xuezhong; Ren, Jinyu; Zhang, Xiaowei; Zhu, Zijiang; Liu, Hongliang; Zhang, Yawei

    2010-04-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the acute effects of low dose 12C6+ ions or X-ray radiation on human immune function. The human peripheral blood lymphocytes (HPBL) of seven healthy donors were exposed to 0.05 Gy 12C6+ ions or X-ray radiation and cell responses were measured at 24 h after exposure. The cytotoxic activities of HPBL were determined by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT); the percentages of T and NK cells subsets were detected by flow cytometry; mRNA expression of interleukin (IL)-2, tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interferon (IFN)-γ were examined by real time quantitative RT-PCR (qRT-PCR); and these cytokines protein levels in supernatant of cultured cells were assayed by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISA). The results showed that the cytotoxic activity of HPBL, mRNA expression of IL-2, IFN-γ and TNF-α in HPBL and their protein levels in supernatant were significantly increased at 24 h after exposure to 0.05 Gy 12C6+ ions radiation and the effects were stronger than observed for X-ray exposure. However, there was no significant change in the percentage of T and NK cells subsets of HPBL. These results suggested that 0.05 Gy high linear energy transfer (LET) 12C6+ radiation was a more effective approach to host immune enhancement than that of low LET X-ray. We conclude that cytokines production might be used as sensitive indicators of acute response to LDI.

  4. Postprandial activation of metabolic and inflammatory signalling pathways in human peripheral mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Ehlers, Kerstin; Brand, Tina; Bangert, Adina; Hauner, Hans; Laumen, Helmut

    2014-06-28

    High-fat, high-carbohydrate (HFHC) meals induce an inflammatory response in mononuclear cells (MNC). Here, we studied the interaction between metabolic and inflammatory signalling pathways by the measurement of postprandial effects of three different test meals on intracellular Akt, S6 kinase (S6K)/mammalian target of rapamycin and NF-κB signalling in human MNC. We recruited six healthy, lean individuals. Each individual ingested three different meals in the morning separated by at least 3 d: a HFHC meal; an oral lipid-tolerance test meal; a healthy breakfast. Blood samples were obtained before and 1, 2, 4, 6 and 8 h after ingestion. Plasma insulin and IL-6 levels were measured. Intracellular metabolic and inflammatory signalling pathways were assessed by measuring the phosphorylation of Akt kinase and S6K, the degradation of inhibitory κB-α (IκB-α) protein and the DNA binding activity of NF-κB in MNC. mRNA expression levels of the Akt and NF-κB target genes Mn superoxide dismutase (MnSOD), CC-chemokine-receptor 5 (CCR5), intercellular adhesion molecule 1 (ICAM-1) and plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) were measured by quantitative RT-PCR. We found a positive correlation of Akt phosphorylation with NF-κB activation (NF-κB binding activity: r 0·4500, P= 0·0003; IκB-α protein levels: r -0·5435, P< 0·0001), a negative correlation of plasma insulin levels with NF-κB binding activity (r -0·3993, P= 0·0016) and a positive correlation of plasma insulin levels with S6K activation (r 0·4786, P< 0·0001). The activation of Akt and pro-inflammatory NF-κB signalling was supported by the up-regulation of the respective target genes MnSOD and CCR5. In conclusion, the present data suggest a postprandial interaction between the metabolic and inflammatory signalling pathways Akt and NF-κB in MNC.

  5. Benzodiazepines: rat pinealocyte binding sites and augmentation of norepinephrine-stimulated N-acetyltransferase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Matthew, E.; Parfitt, A.G.; Sugden, D.; Engelhardt, D.L.; Zimmerman, E.A.; Klein, D.C.

    1984-02-01

    Studies of (/sup 3/H)diazepam binding to intact rat pineal cells were carried out in tissue culture preparations. The binding was saturable, reversible and proportional to the number of cells used. Scatchard analysis resulted in a linear plot (Kd . 23 nM, maximum binding sites (Bmax) . 1.56 pmol/mg of protein for cells in monolayer culture; Kd . 7 nM, Bmax . 1.3 pmol/mg of protein for cells in suspension culture). Inhibition constants (Ki) for clonazepam (500 nM), flunitrazepam (38 nM) and Ro-5-4864 (5 nM) indicated that the binding sites were probably of the ''peripheral'' type. In addition, the effects of diazepam on norepinephrine-stimulated N-acetyltransferase (NAT) activity were studied in organ culture and dissociated cell culture. Diazepam (10-50 microM) both prolonged and increased the magnitude of the norepinephrine-induced increase in NAT activity but did not affect the initial rate of rise of enzyme activity. The effect was dose-dependent and was also seen with clonazepam, flunitrazepam and Ro-5-4864, but not with Ro-15-1788. Diazepam, by itself, at these concentrations, had no effect on NAT, but enzyme activity was increased by higher concentrations (0.1-1 mM). Although a relationship between the (/sup 3/H)diazepam binding sites described here and the effect of benzodiazepines on NAT cannot be established from these studies, the data suggest that the benzodiazepines may alter melatonin levels through their action on NAT.

  6. Changes in benzodiazepine/GABA receptor complex function in benzodiazepine-tolerant mice.

    PubMed

    Nutt, D J; Taylor, S C; Little, H J; Standing, B L; Gale, R G

    1988-01-01

    Mice were given flurazepam, 40 mg k-1, IP, once daily for 7 consecutive days. Twenty-four and forty-eight hours after the last injection measurements were made of the effects on convulsion threshold, body temperature and locomotor activity, of drugs acting on the GABA receptor complex. Significant decreases were seen in the hypothermic and hypomobility effects of progabide at 48 h, but no significant changes were seen in the effects of pentylenetetrazol or pentobarbitone. The actions of picrotoxin in all three types of test and the convulsant action of bicuculline (IP) were significantly decreased at 24 h but not at 48 h. The convulsive, but not the hypothermic, effects of picrotoxin were increased at the 48 h interval. These results may suggest that the chronic benzodiazepine treatment decreased some aspects of GABA receptor function at 48 h after the last dose; however, such an effect probably does not explain the previously reported increases in the effects of inverse agonists following chronic agonist treatment.

  7. Basal and pentagastrin-stimulated levels of calcitonin in thyroid and peripheral veins during normocalcemia and chronic hypercalcemia in humans.

    PubMed Central

    Ericsson, M; Berg, M; Ingemansson, S; Jernby, B; Järhult, J

    1981-01-01

    The calcitonin secretion from the thyroid C-cells was studied with a peroperative method. The calcitonin concentrations in thyroid venous effluent and peripheral veins were determined in patients who underwent operations because of thyroid and parathyroid disease. In normocalcemia the thyroid vein level of calcitonin was significantly higher than that in peripheral vein. In chronic hypercalcemia no gradient over the thyroid was demonstrable. After injection of pentagastrin into a thyroid artery a very pronounced, but transient, increase in calcitonin concentration was registered. No difference in peak value between normo- and hypercalcemia was demonstrable. The peripheral vein level was unchanged. The peroperative method is very sensitive. A marked peak in thyroid vein corresponds to unchanged values in peripheral vein. The method invites further studies with other secretagogues and receptor-blocking substances. PMID:7259337

  8. Members of the Candida parapsilosis Complex and Candida albicans are Differentially Recognized by Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Estrada-Mata, Eine; Navarro-Arias, María J.; Pérez-García, Luis A.; Mellado-Mojica, Erika; López, Mercedes G.; Csonka, Katalin; Gacser, Attila; Mora-Montes, Héctor M.

    2016-01-01

    The systemic infections caused by members of the Candida parapsilosis complex are currently associated to high morbility and mortality rates, and are considered as relevant as those caused by Candida albicans. Since the fungal cell wall is the first point of contact with the host cells, here we performed a comparison of this organelle in members of the C. parapsilosis complex, and its relevance during interaction with human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We found that the wall of the C. parapsilosis complex members is similar in composition, but differs to that from C. albicans, with less mannan content and more β-glucan and porosity levels. Furthermore, lectin-based analysis showed increased chitin and β1,3-glucan exposure at the surface of C. parapsilosis sensu lato when compared to C. albicans. Yeast cells of members of the C. parapsilosis complex stimulated more cytokine production by human PBMCs than C. albicans cells; and this significantly changed upon removal of O-linked mannans, indicating this wall component plays a significant role in cytokine stimulation by C. parapsilosis sensu lato. When inner wall components were exposed on the wall surface, C. parapsilosis sensu stricto and C. metapsilosis, but not C. orthopsilosis, stimulated higher cytokine production. Moreover, we found a strong dependency on β1,3-glucan recognition for the members of the C. parapsilosis complex, but not for live C. albicans cells; whereas TLR4 was required for TNFα production by the three members of the complex, and stimulation of IL-6 by C. orthopsilosis. Mannose receptor had a significant role during TNFα and IL-1β stimulation by members of the complex. Finally, we demonstrated that purified N- and O-mannans from either C. parapsilosis sensu lato or C. albicans are capable to block the recognition of these pathogens by human PBMCs. Together; our results suggest that the innate immune recognition of the members of the C. parapsilosis complex is differential

  9. Ellagic Acid, a Dietary Polyphenol, Inhibits Tautomerase Activity of Human Macrophage Migration Inhibitory Factor and Its Pro-inflammatory Responses in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells.

    PubMed

    Sarkar, Souvik; Siddiqui, Asim A; Mazumder, Somnath; De, Rudranil; Saha, Shubhra J; Banerjee, Chinmoy; Iqbal, Mohd S; Adhikari, Susanta; Alam, Athar; Roy, Siddhartha; Bandyopadhyay, Uday

    2015-05-27

    Ellagic acid (EA), a phenolic lactone, inhibited tautomerase activity of human macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF) noncompetitively (Ki = 1.97 ± 0.7 μM). The binding of EA to MIF was determined by following the quenching of tryptophan fluorescence. We synthesized several EA derivatives, and their structure-activity relationship studies indicated that the planar conjugated lactone moiety of EA was essential for MIF inhibition. MIF induces nuclear translocation of NF-κB and chemotaxis of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to promote inflammation. We were interested in evaluating the effect of EA on nuclear translocation of NF-κB and chemotactic activity in human PBMCs in the presence of MIF. The results showed that EA inhibited MIF-induced NF-κB nuclear translocation in PBMCs, as evident from confocal immunofluorescence microscopic data. EA also inhibited MIF-mediated chemotaxis of PBMCs. Thus, we report MIF-inhibitory activity of EA and inhibition of MIF-mediated proinflammatory responses in PBMCs by EA.

  10. Role of Carum copticum seeds in modulating chromium-induced toxicity on human bronchial epithelial cells and human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Deb, Dipanwita Dutta; Parimala, G; Devi, S Saravana; Chakrabarti, T

    2012-11-01

    Carum copticum seeds are well known for ailment of various diseases since ancient times. The present study pertains to investigate modulatory effects of methanolic extract of C. copticum seeds (MCE) against hexavalent chromium induced cytotoxicity, genotoxicity, apoptosis and oxidative stress on human bronchial epithelial cells (BEAS-2B) and isolated human peripheral blood lymphocyte (PBL) in vitro. Treatment of BEAS-2B and PBL with MCE prior to potassium dichromate (K(2)Cr(2)O(7)) treatment exhibited an increase in cell viability and decrease of DNA damage as compared to K(2)Cr(2)O(7) treatment alone, as evaluated by WST-8 and Comet assay respectively. Further, MCE administration 1h prior to graded doses of K(2)Cr(2)O(7) significantly decreased reactive oxygen species (ROS) level, increased the mitochondrial membrane potential, reduced apoptosis and caspase 3 activity. MCE also ameliorated K(2)Cr(2)O(7) induced decrease in superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx) antioxidant enzyme levels in BEAS-2B and PBL cells accompanied by reduction in lipid peroxides with maximum effect at 50 μg/ml. Thus, this study provides strong evidence to support the beneficial effect of MCE in preventing Cr(VI) induced toxicity in BEAS-2B and PBL cells.

  11. Peripheral Neuropathy

    MedlinePlus

    ... can be associated with peripheral neuropathy. Metabolic and endocrine disorders impair the body’s ability to transform nutrients into ... to neuropathies as a result of chemical imbalances. Endocrine disorders that lead to hormonal imbalances can disturb normal ...

  12. A benzodiazepine discontinuation programme does not increase the frequency of contacts with the family practice

    PubMed Central

    Gorgels, Wim; Oude Voshaar, Richard; Mol, Audrey; Van De Lisdonk, Eloy; Mulder, Jan; Van Den Hoogen, Henk; Van Balkom, Anton; Breteler, Marinus; Zitman, Frans

    2008-01-01

    Objective The efficacy of programmes to reduce long-term benzodiazepine use could be compromised by subsequent increases in contacts with the family practice. In this study the hypothesis was tested as to whether participation in a benzodiazepine discontinuation programme affects the frequency of contacts with the family practice. Design A controlled stepped-care intervention programme to decrease long-term benzodiazepine use. Setting Family practices in the Netherlands. Subjects The experimental group consisted of 996 long-term benzodiazepine users and a control group of 883 long-term benzodiazepine users. Main outcome measures Practice contacts before and up to 12 months after the start of the programme. Results There was a general tendency visible for contacts to decrease during the follow-up time. The course of the number of contacts during the follow-up was not different for the experimental and control groups (p=0.45). The level of non-benzodiazepine prescriptions was generally not altered. The number of non-benzodiazepine prescriptions decreased in benzodiazepine quitters during the follow-up of the programme. Conclusion No clinically important differences in practice contacts were observed when the course of the number of contacts and non-benzodiazepine prescriptions were compared between the experimental and control groups. Family practitioners do not have to anticipate an increased workload associated with participation in such a benzodiazepine discontinuation programme. PMID:18570004

  13. Evaluation of Genotoxic and Cytotoxic Effects in Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes Exposed In Vitro to Neonicotinoid Insecticides News

    PubMed Central

    Calderón-Segura, María Elena; Gómez-Arroyo, Sandra; Villalobos-Pietrini, Rafael; Martínez-Valenzuela, Carmen; Carbajal-López, Yolanda; Calderón-Ezquerro, María del Carmen; Cortés-Eslava, Josefina; García-Martínez, Rocío; Flores-Ramírez, Diana; Rodríguez-Romero, María Isabel; Méndez-Pérez, Patricia; Bañuelos-Ruíz, Enrique

    2012-01-01

    Calypso (thiacloprid), Poncho (clothianidin), Gaucho (imidacloprid), and Jade (imidacloprid) are commercial neonicotinoid insecticides, a new class of agrochemicals in México. However, genotoxic and cytotoxic studies have not been performed. In the present study, human peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) were exposed in vitro to different concentrations of the four insecticides. The genotoxic and cytotoxic effects were evaluated using the alkaline comet and trypan blue dye exclusion assays. DNA damage was evaluated using two genotoxicity parameters: tail length and comet frequency. Exposure to 9.5 × 10−6 to 5.7 × 10−5 M Jade; 2.8 × 10−4 to 1.7 × 10−3 M Gaucho; 0.6 × 10−1 to 1.4 × 10−1 M Calypso; 1.2 × 10−1 to 9.5 × 10−1 M Poncho for 2 h induced a significant increase DNA damage with a concentration-dependent relationship. Jade was the most genotoxic of the four insecticides studied. Cytotoxicity was observed in cells exposed to 18 × 10−3 M Jade, 2.0 × 10−3 M Gaucho, 2.0 × 10−1 M Calypso, 1.07 M Poncho, and cell death occurred at 30 × 10−3 M Jade, 3.3 × 10−3 M Gaucho, 2.8 × 10−1 M Calypso, and 1.42 M Poncho. This study provides the first report of genotoxic and cytotoxic effects in PBL following in vitro exposure to commercial neonicotinoid insecticides. PMID:22545045

  14. Ascorbic acid mobilizes endogenous copper in human peripheral lymphocytes leading to oxidative DNA breakage: a putative mechanism for anticancer properties.

    PubMed

    Bhat, Showket Hussain; Azmi, Asfar Sohail; Hanif, Sarmad; Hadi, S M

    2006-01-01

    Several decades back ascorbic acid was proposed as an effective anticancer agent. However, this idea remained controversial and the mechanism of action unclear. In this paper, we show that ascorbic acid at a concentration reported to be achievable through high doses of oral consumption is capable of cytotoxic action against normal cells. Several antioxidants of both animal as well as plant origin including ascorbic acid also possess prooxidant properties. Copper is an essential component of chromatin and can take part in redox reactions. Previously we have proposed a mechanism for the cytotoxic action of plant antioxidants against cancer cells that involves mobilization of endogenous copper ions and the consequent generation of reactive oxygen species. Using human peripheral lymphocytes and Comet assay we show here that ascorbic acid is able to cause oxidative DNA breakage in normal cells at a concentration of 100-200 microM. Neocuproine, a Cu(I) specific sequestering agent inhibited DNA breakage in a dose dependent manner indicating that Cu(I) is an intermediate in the DNA cleavage reaction. The results are in support of our above hypothesis that involves events that lead to a prooxidant action by antioxidants. The results would support the idea that even a plasma concentration of around 200 microM. would be sufficient to cause pharmacological tumor cell death particularly when copper levels are elevated. This would account for the observation of several decades back by Pauling and co-workers where oral doses of ascorbic acid in gram quantities were found to be effective in treating some cancers.

  15. Biotin uptake into human peripheral blood mononuclear cells increases early in the cell cycle, increasing carboxylase activities.

    PubMed

    Stanley, J Steven; Mock, Donald M; Griffin, Jacob B; Zempleni, Janos

    2002-07-01

    Cells respond to proliferation with increased accumulation of biotin, suggesting that proliferation enhances biotin demand. Here we determined whether peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) increase biotin uptake at specific phases of the cell cycle, and whether biotin is utilized to increase biotinylation of carboxylases. Biotin uptake was quantified in human PBMC that were arrested chemically at specific phases of the cell cycle, i.e., biotin uptake increased in the G1 phase of the cycle [658 +/- 574 amol biotin/(10(6) cells x 30 min)] and remained increased during phases S, G2, and M compared with quiescent controls [200 +/- 62 amol biotin/(10(6) cells x 30 min)]. The abundance of the sodium-dependent multivitamin transporter (SMVT, which transports biotin) was similar at all phases of the cell cycle, suggesting that transporters other than SMVT or splicing variants of SMVT may account for the increased biotin uptake observed in proliferating cells. Activities of biotin-dependent 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase and propionyl-CoA carboxylase were up to two times greater in proliferating PBMC compared with controls. The abundance of mRNA encoding 3-methylcrotonyl-CoA carboxylase and propionyl-CoA carboxylase paralleled carboxylase activities, suggesting that PBMC respond to proliferation with increased expression of genes encoding carboxylases. Similarly, expression of the gene encoding holocarboxylase synthetase (which catalyzes binding of biotin to carboxylases) increased in response to proliferation, suggesting that cellular capacity to biotinylate carboxylases was increased. In summary, these findings suggest that PBMC respond to proliferation with increased biotin uptake early in the cell cycle, and that biotin is utilized to increase activities of two of the four biotin-requiring carboxylases.

  16. Expression profile of novel cell surface molecules on different subsets of human peripheral blood antigen-presenting cells

    PubMed Central

    Damasceno, Daniela; Andrés, Martín Pérez; van den Bossche, Wouter BL; Flores-Montero, Juan; de Bruin, Sandra; Teodosio, Cristina; van Dongen, Jacques JM; Orfao, Alberto; Almeida, Julia

    2016-01-01

    Although major steps have been recently made in understanding the role of the distinct subsets of dendritic cells (DC)/antigen-presenting cells (APC), further studies are required to unravel their precise role, including in-depth immunophenotypic characterisation of these cells. Here, we used eight-colour flow cytometry to investigate the reactivity of a panel of 72 monoclonal antibodies (including those clustered in seven new Cluster of Differentiation, CD) on different subsets of APC in peripheral blood (PB) samples from five healthy adults. These experiments were performed in the context of the Tenth International Workshop on Human Leukocyte Differentiation Antigens (HLDA10). Plasmacytoid DC was the only cell population that expressed CD85g and CD195, whereas they lacked all of the other molecules investigated. In contrast, myeloid DC mostly expressed inhibitory C-type lectin receptors (CLRs) and other inhibitory-associated molecules, whereas monocytes expressed both inhibitory and activating CLRs, together with other phagocytosis-associated receptors. Within monocytes, progressively lower levels of expression were generally observed from classical monocytes (cMo) to SLAN− and SLAN+ non-classical monocytes (ncMo) for most of the molecules expressed, except for the CD368 endocytic receptor. This molecule was found to be positive only in cMo, and the CD369 and CD371 modulating/signalling receptors. In addition, the CD101 inhibitory molecule was found to be expressed at higher levels in SLAN+ vs SLAN− ncMo. In summary, the pattern of expression of the different signalling molecules and receptors analysed in this work varies among the distinct subsets of PB APCs, with similar profiles for molecules within each functional group. These findings suggest unique pattern-recognition and signalling capabilities for distinct subpopulations of APCs, and therefore, diverse functional roles. PMID:27766148

  17. Fluorescently Activated Cell Sorting Followed by Microarray Profiling of Helper T Cell Subtypes from Human Peripheral Blood

    PubMed Central

    Ono, Chiaki; Yu, Zhiqian; Kasahara, Yoshiyuki; Kikuchi, Yoshie; Ishii, Naoto; Tomita, Hiroaki

    2014-01-01

    Background Peripheral blood samples have been subjected to comprehensive gene expression profiling to identify biomarkers for a wide range of diseases. However, blood samples include red blood cells, white blood cells, and platelets. White blood cells comprise polymorphonuclear leukocytes, monocytes, and various types of lymphocytes. Blood is not distinguishable, irrespective of whether the expression profiles reflect alterations in (a) gene expression patterns in each cell type or (b) the proportion of cell types in blood. CD4+ Th cells are classified into two functionally distinct subclasses, namely Th1 and Th2 cells, on the basis of the unique characteristics of their secreted cytokines and their roles in the immune system. Th1 and Th2 cells play an important role not only in the pathogenesis of human inflammatory, allergic, and autoimmune diseases, but also in diseases that are not considered to be immune or inflammatory disorders. However, analyses of minor cellular components such as CD4+ cell subpopulations have not been performed, partly because of the limited number of these cells in collected samples. Methodology/Principal Findings We describe fluorescently activated cell sorting followed by microarray (FACS–array) technology as a useful experimental strategy for characterizing the expression profiles of specific immune cells in the circulation. We performed reproducible gene expression profiling of Th1 and Th2, respectively. Our data suggest that this procedure provides reliable information on the gene expression profiles of certain small immune cell populations. Moreover, our data suggest that GZMK, GZMH, EOMES, IGFBP3, and STOM may be novel markers for distinguishing Th1 cells from Th2 cells, whereas IL17RB and CNTNAP1 can be Th2-specific markers. Conclusions/Significance Our approach may help in identifying aberrations and novel therapeutic or diagnostic targets for diseases that affect Th1 or Th2 responses and elucidating the involvement of a

  18. Reprogramming of human peripheral blood monocytes to erythroid lineage by blocking of the PU-1 gene expression.

    PubMed

    Nouri, Masoumeh; Deezagi, Abdolkhalegh; Ebrahimi, Marzieh

    2016-03-01

    In hematopoietic system development, PU.1 and GATA-1 as lineage-specific transcription factors (TF) are expressed in common myeloid progenitors. The cross antagonism between them ascertains gene expression programs of monocytic and erythroid cells, respectively. This concept in transdifferentiation approaches has not been well considered yet, especially in intralineage conversion systems. To demonstrate whether PU.1 suppression induces monocyte lineage conversion into red blood cells, a combination of three PU.1-specific siRNAs was implemented to knock down PU.1 gene expression and generate the balance in favor of GATA-1 expression to induce erythroid differentiation. For this purpose, monocytes were isolated from human peripheral blood and transfected by PU.1 siRNAs. In transfected monocytes, the rate of PU.1 expression in mRNA level was significantly decreased until 0.38 ± 0.118 when compared to untreated monocytes at 72 h (p value ≤0.05) which resulted in significant overexpression of GATA1 of 16.1 ± 0.343-fold compared to the untreated group (p value ≤0.01). Subsequently, overexpression of hemoglobin (α 13.26 ± 1.34-fold; p value≤0.0001) and β-globin (37.55 ± 16.56-fold; p value≤0.0001) was observed when compared to control groups. The results of western immunoblotting confirm those findings too. While, reduced expression of monocyte, CD14 gene, was observed in qRT-PCR and flow cytometry results. Our results suggest that manipulating the ratio of the two TFs in bifurcation differentiation pathways via applying siRNA technology can possibly change the cells' fate as a safe way for therapeutics application.

  19. Effect of asbestos exposure on differentiation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes in mixed lymphocyte reaction of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Kumagai-Takei, Naoko; Nishimura, Yasumitsu; Maeda, Megumi; Hayashi, Hiroaki; Matsuzaki, Hidenori; Lee, Suni; Hiratsuka, Junichi; Otsuki, Takemi

    2013-07-01

    Asbestos fibers are associated with tumorigenicity, and are thought to cause mesothelioma. However, their effect on immune response remains unclear. We examined the effect of asbestos exposure on differentiation of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) in mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLR) of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) upon exposure to chrysotile B (CB) or crocidolite (CR) asbestos at 5 μg/ml for 7 days. Exposure to CB during MLR suppressed increases in the percentage and number of CD8⁺ T cells in response to allogenic cells. The cytotoxicity for allogenic targets decreased in PBMCs exposed to CB, but not CR, when compared with PBMCs without any exposure during MLR. Exposure to CB during MLR resulted in suppression of increases in granzyme B⁺ cells and IFN-γ⁺ cells. CB exposure also resulted in suppression of increases in CD45RO⁺ effector/memory cells and CD25⁺-activated cells in CD8⁺ lymphocytes, and a decrease in CD45RA⁺ cells. CB exposure suppressed the proliferation of CD8⁺ lymphocytes without an increase in annexin V⁺ apoptotic cells in CD8⁺ lymphocytes. Moreover, the production of IL-10, IFN-γ, and TNF-α, but not IL-2, decreased in the presence of CB. These results suggest that exposure to asbestos potentially suppresses the differentiation of cytotoxic T lymphocyte, accompanied by decreases in IFN-γ and TNF-α.

  20. Potential role of cortical 5-HT(2A) receptors in the anxiolytic action of cyamemazine in benzodiazepine withdrawal.

    PubMed

    Benyamina, Amine; Naassila, Mickaël; Bourin, Michel

    2012-07-30

    The antipsychotic cyamemazine is a potent serotonin 5-HT(2A) receptor (5-HT(2AR)) antagonist. A positron emission tomography (PET) study in human patients showed that therapeutic doses of cyamemazine produced near saturation of 5-HT(2AR) occupancy in the frontal cortex, whereas dopamine D(2) occupancy remained below the level for motor side effects observed with typical antipsychotics. Recently, numerous studies have revealed the involvement of 5-HT(2AR) in the pathophysiology of anxiety and a double-blind, randomized clinical trial showed similar efficacy of cyamemazine and bromazepam in reducing the anxiety associated with benzodiazepine withdrawal. Therefore, we reviewed the above articles about 5-HT(2AR) and anxiety in order to understand better the anxiolytic mechanisms of cyamemazine in benzodiazepine withdrawal. The 5-HT(2AR) is the most abundant serotonin receptor subtype in the cortex. Non-pharmacological studies with antisense oligodeoxynucleotides and genetically modified mice clearly showed that cortical 5-HT(2AR) signaling positively modulates anxiety-like behavior. With a few exceptions, most other studies reviewed here further support this view. Therefore, the anxiolytic efficacy of cyamemazine in benzodiazepine withdrawal can be due to a 5-HT(2AR) antagonistic activity at the cortical level.

  1. Damage Associated Molecular Pattern Molecule-Induced microRNAs (DAMPmiRs) in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Unlu, Sebnem; Tang, Siuwah; Wang, E. na; Martinez, Ivan; Tang, Daolin; Bianchi, Marco E.; Zeh, Herbert J.; Lotze, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    Endogenous damage associated molecular pattern molecules (DAMPs) released from necrotic, damaged or stressed cells are associated with an inflammatory response. Whether the microRNA (miR) expression signature of this response is different from that of a pathogen associated molecular pattern (PAMP)-stimulated inflammatory response is unknown. We report here that miR-34c and miR-214 are significantly expressed in fresh human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) exposed to DAMP-containing freeze-thaw lysates, or to conditioned media from serum-starved and glucose-deprived cells (p<6×10−4 and p<3.7×10−3), respectively. Interestingly, only miR-34c expression was differentially expressed in PBMCs exposed to freeze-thaw lysates or conditioned media from wildtype High Mobility Group B1 (HMGB1+/+) mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells, when compared to cultures exposed to lysates or conditioned media from HMGB1−/− MEFs. miR-155 expression in these cultures was negligible, but was significantly expressed in PBMCs stimulated with Lipopolysaccahride (LPS) or most other Toll-like receptor (TLR) ligands, making it the prototypic “PAMPmiR”. Exposure to a damaged human colorectal carcinoma cell line lysate (HCT116) similarly resulted in increased miR-34c and miR-214 levels. When PBMCs were pre-transfected with anti-miR-34c and then exposed to lysate, expression levels of IKKγ mRNA, a putative target of miR-34c, increased, while protein levels of IKKγ in cultures transfected with a pre-miR-34c were abrogated. Levels of miR-34c expression (as well as pro-inflammatory cytokines, IL-1β and TNFα) decreased when PBMC cultures were briefly pre-incubated with the K+ channel (inflammasome) inhibitor, glybenclamide, suggesting that inflammasome activation is upstream of miR-34c expression in response to DAMPs. Our findings demonstrate that a specific microRNA expression signature is associated with the inflammatory response to damaged/injured cells and carries

  2. Early peripheral lymph node involvement of human herpesvirus 8-associated, body cavity-based lymphoma in a human immunodeficiency virus-negative patient.

    PubMed

    Ariad, S; Benharroch, D; Lupu, L; Davidovici, B; Dupin, N; Boshoff, C

    2000-05-01

    Human herpesvirus 8 (HHV-8), or Kaposi sarcoma-associated herpesvirus, is a gamma herpesvirus first detected in a specimen of Kaposi sarcoma from a human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive patient. Human herpesvirus 8 is also found in an unusual clinicopathologic form of body cavity-based B-cell lymphoma, which has been named primary effusion lymphoma (PEL) and occurs primarily in HIV-positive patients. PEL is characterized by the formation of lymphomatous effusions, without obvious lymphadenopathy, tumor masses, or bone marrow involvement. Only a few cases of PEL in HIV-seronegative patients have been reported. We describe a case of an HHV-8-associated lymphoma, with ascites, pleural effusion, and axillary lymphadenopathy in an HIV-negative patient. The patient was a 68-year-old Jewish man of North African extraction, with a previous history of coronary bypass surgery and multiple blood transfusions. The pleural fluid contained large atypical lymphoid cells and was suggestive of lymphoma but could not provide a conclusive diagnosis of PEL. The lymph node contained groups of large anaplastic lymphoid cells. Polymerase chain reaction for HHV-8 performed on the lymph node specimen was positive, establishing the diagnosis of PEL. Polymerase chain reaction for Epstein-Barr virus was negative. Results of a gallium scan were normal. The patient did not respond to combination chemotherapy with cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine sulfate, and prednisone and progressively developed, massive intra-abdominal solid tumor formation. To our knowledge, this is the first report of a case of PEL that demonstrates peripheral lymph node involvement at diagnosis and the first report of PEL in an Israeli patient. PMID:10782162

  3. Beyond classical benzodiazepines: Novel therapeutic potential of GABAA receptor subtypes

    PubMed Central

    Rudolph, Uwe; Knoflach, Frédéric

    2012-01-01

    GABAA receptors are a family of ligand-gated ion channels which are essential for the regulation of central nervous system function. Benzodiazepines – which target GABAA receptors containing the α1, α2, α3, or α5 subunits non-selectively – have been in clinical use for decades and are still among the most widely prescribed drugs for the treatment of insomnia and anxiety disorders. However, their use is limited by side effects and the risk of drug dependence. In the past decade, the identification of separable key functions of GABAA receptor subtypes suggests that receptor subtype-selective compounds could overcome the limitations of classical benzodiazepines and, furthermore, might be valuable for novel indications, such as analgesia, depression, schizophrenia, cognitive enhancement and stroke. PMID:21799515

  4. Association between Benzodiazepine Use and Dementia: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Zhong, GuoChao; Wang, Yi; Zhang, Yong; Zhao, Yong

    2015-01-01

    Background The association between long-term benzodiazepine use and risk of dementia remains controversial. Therefore, current study aimed to quantify this association, and to explore a potential dose–response pattern. Methods We searched PubMed, Embase and the Cochrane Library through August 17, 2014. We included nested case-control or prospective cohort studies that provided risk estimates on the association of benzodiazepine use with risk of dementia, and a clear definition of status of benzodiazepine use. Overall effect size was calculated using a random-effects model. Findings Six studies were eligible for inclusion, involving 11,891 dementia cases and 45,391 participants. Compared with never users, pooled adjusted risk ratios (RRs) for dementia were 1.49 (95% confidence interval (CI) 1.30–1.72) for ever users, 1.55 (95% CI 1.31–1.83) for recent users, and 1.55 (95% CI 1.17–2.03) for past users. The risk of dementia increased by 22% for every additional 20 defined daily dose per year (RR, 1.22, 95%CI 1.18–1.25). When we restricted our meta-analyses to unadjusted RRs, all initial significant associations persisted. Conclusions Long-term benzodiazepine users have an increased risk of dementia compared with never users. However, findings from our study should be treated with caution due to limited studies and potential reverse causation. Large prospective cohort studies with long follow-up duration are warranted to confirm these findings. PMID:26016483

  5. Binding of several benzodiazepines to bovine serum albumin: Fluorescence study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Machicote, Roberta G.; Pacheco, María E.; Bruzzone, Liliana

    2010-10-01

    The interactions of lorazepam, oxazepam and bromazepam with bovine serum albumin (BSA) were studied by fluorescence spectrometry. The Stern-Volmer quenching constants and corresponding thermodynamic parameters Δ H, Δ G and Δ S were calculated. The binding constants and the number of binding sites were also investigated. The distances between the donor (BSA) and the acceptors (benzodiazepines) were obtained according to fluorescence resonance energy transfer and conformational changes of BSA were observed from synchronous fluorescence spectra.

  6. Sensitive gas chromatographic--mass spectrometric screening of acetylated benzodiazepines.

    PubMed

    Borrey, D; Meyer, E; Lambert, W; Van Calenbergh, S; Van Peteghem, C; De Leenheer, A P

    2001-02-23

    GC-MS screening conditions were developed for 15 low-dosed benzodiazepines, covering alprazolam, flunitrazepam, flurazepam, ketazolam, lorazepam and triazolam, and the corresponding metabolites alpha-hydroxyalprazolam, 4-hydroxyalprazolam; 7-aminoflunitrazepam, desmethylflunitrazepam, 7-aminodesmethylflunitrazepam; hydroxyethylflurazepam, N-desalkylflurazepam; oxazepam and alpha-hydroxytriazolam, respectively. Benzodiazepines are analyzed on a polydimethylsiloxane column in both the scan and the multiple ion monitoring modes using on-column injection to attain maximal sensitivity. The reactive compounds are acetylated with pyridine and acetic anhydride for 20 min. The derivatives are stable for at least 4 days. The relative standard deviation observed with standard compounds at the low nanogram-level ranged from 1.13 to 4.87% within-day and from 1.12 to 4.94% between-day. Unequivocal identification potential, high chromatographic resolution and sensitivity are combined with minimal thermal degradation. The presented screening conditions provide the basis for a unique routine screening method for low-dosed benzodiazepines with a broad polarity range.

  7. Molecular cloning of human T-cell lymphotrophic virus type I-like proviral genome from the peripheral lymphocyte DNA of a patient with chronic neurologic disorders

    SciTech Connect

    Reddy, E.P.; Mettus, R.V.; DeFreitas, E.; Wroblewska, Z.; Cisco, M.; Koprowski, H. )

    1988-05-01

    Human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1 (HTLV-I), the etiologic agent of human T-cell leukemia, has recently been shown to be associated with neurologic disorders such as tropical spastic paraparesis, HTLV-associated myelopathy, and possibly with multiple sclerosis. In this communication, the authors have examined one specific case of neurologic disorder that can be classified as multiple sclerosis or tropical spastic paraparesis. The patient suffering from chronic neurologic disorder was found to contain antibodies to HTLV-I envelope and gag proteins in his serum and cerebrospinal fluid. Lymphocytes from peripheral blood and cerebrospinal fluid of the patient were shown to express viral RNA sequences by in situ hybridization. Southern blot analysis of the patient lymphocyte DNA revealed the presence of HTLV-I-related sequences. Blot-hybridization analysis of the RNA from fresh peripheral lymphocytes stimulated with interleukin 2 revealed the presence of abundant amounts of genomic viral RNA with little or no subgenomic RNA. They have clones the proviral genome from the DNA of the peripheral lymphocytes and determined its restriction map. This analysis shows that this proviral genome is very similar if not identical to that of the prototype HTLV-I genome.

  8. Consumption of benzodiazepines in a French university hospital between 1980 and 1991.

    PubMed

    Alran, C; Damase-Michel, C; Celotto, N; Durand, M C; Montastruc, J L

    1993-01-01

    The consumption of benzodiazepines in the Toulouse university hospital from 1980 to 1991 was investigated. During this period, total annual consumption of benzodiazepines as anxiolytics remained stable, whereas their prescription as hypnotics fell (-70%). Moreover, short half-life benzodiazepines as hypnotics were preferred to long half-life ones. In parallel, there was an enhancement in new (zopiclone, zolpidem, buspirone) and old (alimemazine, hydroxyzine) drugs' consumption, the ratio benefits/risks of which have not yet been well defined. PMID:8104854

  9. Emission and absorption spectra of some bridged 1,5-benzodiazepines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mellor, J. M.; Pathirana, R. N.; Stibbard, J. H. A.

    Absorption spectra in neutral and acidic media are reported for a series of bridged 1,5-benzodiazepines, which are unable to tautomerize. Comparison is made with non-bridged 1,5-benzodiazepines capable of tautomeric rearrangement. Both bridged and non-bridged 1,5-benzodiazepines are essentially non-fluorescent due to the "proximity effect" of interaction between singlet ηπ* and ππ* states of similar energy, a phenomenon previously recognised in six-membered nitrogen heterocycles.

  10. Woodchuck dendritic cells generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells and transduced with recombinant human adenovirus serotype 5 induce antigen-specific cellular immune responses.

    PubMed

    Ochoa-Callejero, Laura; Berraondo, Pedro; Crettaz, Julien; Olagüe, Cristina; Vales, Africa; Ruiz, Juan; Prieto, Jesús; Tennant, Bud C; Menne, Stephan; González-Aseguinolaza, Gloria

    2007-05-01

    Woodchucks infected with the woodchuck hepatitis virus (WHV) is the best available animal model for testing the immunotherapeutic effects of dendritic cells (DCs) in the setting of a chronic infection, as woodchucks develop a persistent infection resembling that seen in humans infected with the hepatitis B virus. In the present study, DCs were generated from woodchuck peripheral blood mononuclear cells (wDCs) in the presence of human granulocyte macrophage colony-stimulating factor (hGM-CSF) and human interleukin 4 (hIL-4). After 7 days of culture, cells with morphology similar to DCs were stained positively with a cross-reactive anti-human CD86 antibody. Functional analysis showed that uptake of FITC-dextran by wDCs was very efficient and was partially inhibited after LPS-induced maturation. Furthermore, wDCs stimulated allogenic lymphocytes and induced proliferation. Moreover, wDCs were transduced efficiently with a human adenovirus serotype 5 for the expression of beta-galactosidase. Following transduction and in vivo administration of such DCs into woodchucks, an antigen-specific cellular immune response was induced. These results demonstrate that wDCs can be generated from the peripheral blood. Following transfection with a recombinant adenovirus wDCs can be used as a feasible and effective tool for eliciting WHV-specific T-cell responses indicating their potential to serve as prophylactic and therapeutic vaccines. PMID:17385694

  11. Preliminary crystallographic analysis of the N-terminal PDZ-like domain of periaxin, an abundant peripheral nerve protein linked to human neuropathies

    PubMed Central

    Han, Huijong; Kursula, Petri

    2013-01-01

    Periaxin (PRX) is an abundant protein in peripheral nerves and contains a predicted PDZ-like domain at its N-terminus. The large isoform, L-PRX, is required for the maintenance of myelin in the peripheral nervous system and its defects cause neurological disease. Here, the human periaxin PDZ-like domain was crystallized and X-ray diffraction data were collected to 2.85 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation. The crystal belonged to the primitive hexagonal space group P3121 or P3221, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 80.6, c = 81.0 Å, γ = 120° and either two or three molecules in the asymmetric unit. The structure of PRX will shed light on its poorly characterized function in the nervous system. PMID:23832213

  12. Effects of benzodiazepines and non-benzodiazepine compounds on the GABA-induced response in frog isolated sensory neurones.

    PubMed Central

    Yakushiji, T.; Fukuda, T.; Oyama, Y.; Akaike, N.

    1989-01-01

    1. The effects of benzodiazepines and non-benzodiazepine compounds on the gamma-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-induced chloride current (ICl) were studied in frog isolated sensory neurones by use of a concentration-jump (termed 'concentration-clamp') technique, under single-electrode voltage-clamp conditions. The drugs used were classified into four categories as follows: full benzodiazepine receptor agonists (diazepam, clonazepam, nitrazepam, midazolam, clotiazepam and etizolam), partial agonists (CL 218,872, Ro 16-6028, Ro 17-1812 and Ro 23-0364), inverse agonists (Ro 15-3505, FG 7142 and beta-CCE) and a benzodiazepine receptor antagonist, Ro 15-1788 (flumazenil). 2. All full agonists at concentrations of 3 x 10(-6) M or less increased dose-dependently the peak amplitude of ICl elicited by 3 x 10(-6) M GABA to twice to three times larger than the control. However, no further augmentation of the GABA response was observed at concentrations of 1 x 10(-5) M or higher. Partial agonists also showed a dose-dependent augmentation of the GABA response at concentrations ranging from 3 x 10(-8) M to 3 x 10(-5) M, but their efficacies of augmentation of the GABA response were only about half or less of those of full agonists. Of the inverse agonists, beta-CCE had a unique dose-dependent effect on the GABA response. Beta-CCE reduced dose-dependently the GABA response at concentrations of less than 3 x 10(-6) M, but augmented it at concentrations of 3 x 10(-5) M and 6 x 10(-5) M. The inverse agonists reduced dose-dependently the GABA response.(ABSTRACT TRUNCATED AT 250 WORDS) PMID:2574062

  13. Behavioral and Neurophysiological Signatures of Benzodiazepine-Related Driving Impairments

    PubMed Central

    Stone, Bradly T.; Correa, Kelly A.; Brown, Timothy L.; Spurgin, Andrew L.; Stikic, Maja; Johnson, Robin R.; Berka, Chris

    2015-01-01

    Impaired driving due to drug use is a growing problem worldwide; estimates show that 18–23.5% of fatal accidents, and up to 34% of injury accidents may be caused by drivers under the influence of drugs (Drummer et al., 2003; Walsh et al., 2004; NHTSA, 2010). Furthermore, at any given time, up to 16% of drivers may be using drugs that can impair one’s driving abilities (NHTSA, 2009). Currently, drug recognition experts (DREs; law enforcement officers with specialized training to identify drugged driving), have the most difficult time with identifying drivers potentially impaired on central nervous system (CNS) depressants (Smith et al., 2002). The fact that the use of benzodiazepines, a type of CNS depressant, is also associated with the greatest likelihood of causing accidents (Dassanayake et al., 2011), further emphasizes the need to improve research tools in this area which can facilitate the refinement of, or additions to, current assessments of impaired driving. Our laboratories collaborated to evaluate both the behavioral and neurophysiological effects of a benzodiazepine, alprazolam, in a driving simulation (miniSimTM). This drive was combined with a neurocognitive assessment utilizing time synched neurophysiology (electroencephalography, ECG). While the behavioral effects of benzodiazepines are well characterized (Rapoport et al., 2009), we hypothesized that, with the addition of real-time neurophysiology and the utilization of simulation and neurocognitive assessment, we could find objective assessments of drug impairment that could improve the detection capabilities of DREs. Our analyses revealed that (1) specific driving conditions were significantly more difficult for benzodiazepine impaired drivers and (2) the neurocognitive tasks’ metrics were able to classify “impaired” vs. “unimpaired” with up to 80% accuracy based on lane position deviation and lane departures. While this work requires replication in larger studies, our results not

  14. Transcriptome analysis of the human T lymphocyte cell line Jurkat and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells exposed to deoxynivalenol (DON): New mechanistic insights

    SciTech Connect

    Katika, Madhumohan R.; Hendriksen, Peter J.M.; Shao, Jia; Loveren, Henk van; Peijnenburg, Ad

    2012-10-01

    Deoxynivalenol (DON) or vomitoxin is a commonly encountered type-B trichothecene mycotoxin, produced by Fusarium species predominantly found in cereals and grains. DON is known to exert toxic effects on the gastrointestinal, reproductive and neuroendocrine systems, and particularly on the immune system. Depending on dose and exposure time, it can either stimulate or suppress immune function. The main objective of this study was to obtain a deeper insight into DON-induced effects on lymphoid cells. For this, we exposed the human T-lymphocyte cell line Jurkat and human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) to various concentrations of DON for various times and examined gene expression changes by DNA microarray analysis. Jurkat cells were exposed to 0.25 and 0.5 μM DON for 3, 6 and 24 h. Biological interpretation of the microarray data indicated that DON affects various processes in these cells: It upregulates genes involved in ribosome structure and function, RNA/protein synthesis and processing, endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, calcium-mediated signaling, mitochondrial function, oxidative stress, the NFAT and NF-κB/TNF-α pathways, T cell activation and apoptosis. The effects of DON on the expression of genes involved in ER stress, NFAT activation and apoptosis were confirmed by qRT-PCR. Other biochemical experiments confirmed that DON activates calcium-dependent proteins such as calcineurin and M-calpain that are known to be involved in T cell activation and apoptosis. Induction of T cell activation was also confirmed by demonstrating that DON activates NFATC1 and induces its translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus. For the gene expression profiling of PBMCs, cells were exposed to 2 and 4 μM DON for 6 and 24 h. Comparison of the Jurkat microarray data with those obtained with PBMCs showed that most of the processes affected by DON in the Jurkat cell line were also affected in the PBMCs. -- Highlights: ► The human T cell line Jurkat and human

  15. The Impact of Glyphosate, Its Metabolites and Impurities on Viability, ATP Level and Morphological changes in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells.

    PubMed

    Kwiatkowska, Marta; Jarosiewicz, Paweł; Michałowicz, Jaromir; Koter-Michalak, Maria; Huras, Bogumiła; Bukowska, Bożena

    2016-01-01

    The toxicity of herbicides to animals and human is an issue of worldwide concern. The present study has been undertaken to assess toxic effect of widely used pesticide-glyphosate, its metabolites: aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) and methylphosphonic acid and its impurities: N-(phosphonomethyl)iminodiacetic acid (PMIDA), N-methylglyphosate, hydroxymethylphosphonic acid and bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We have evaluated the effect of those compounds on viability, ATP level, size (FSC-A parameter) and granulation (SSC-A parameter) of the cells studied. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells were exposed to different concentrations of glyphosate, its metabolites and impurities (0.01-10 mM) for 4 and 24 h. It was found that investigated compounds caused statistically significant decrease in viability and ATP level of PBMCs. The strongest changes in cell viability and ATP level were observed after 24 h incubation of PBMCs with bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine, and particularly PMIDA. Moreover, all studied compounds changed cell granularity, while PMIDA and bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine altered PBMCs size. It may be concluded that bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine, and PMIDA caused a slightly stronger damage to PBMCs than did glyphosate. Changes in the parameters studied in PBMCs were observed only at high concentrations of the compounds examined, which clearly shows that they may occur in this cell type only as a result of acute poisoning of human organism with these substances. PMID:27280764

  16. The Impact of Glyphosate, Its Metabolites and Impurities on Viability, ATP Level and Morphological changes in Human Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kwiatkowska, Marta; Jarosiewicz, Paweł; Michałowicz, Jaromir; Koter-Michalak, Maria; Huras, Bogumiła; Bukowska, Bożena

    2016-01-01

    The toxicity of herbicides to animals and human is an issue of worldwide concern. The present study has been undertaken to assess toxic effect of widely used pesticide—glyphosate, its metabolites: aminomethylphosphonic acid (AMPA) and methylphosphonic acid and its impurities: N-(phosphonomethyl)iminodiacetic acid (PMIDA), N-methylglyphosate, hydroxymethylphosphonic acid and bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine on human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs). We have evaluated the effect of those compounds on viability, ATP level, size (FSC-A parameter) and granulation (SSC-A parameter) of the cells studied. Human peripheral blood mononuclear cells were exposed to different concentrations of glyphosate, its metabolites and impurities (0.01–10 mM) for 4 and 24 h. It was found that investigated compounds caused statistically significant decrease in viability and ATP level of PBMCs. The strongest changes in cell viability and ATP level were observed after 24 h incubation of PBMCs with bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine, and particularly PMIDA. Moreover, all studied compounds changed cell granularity, while PMIDA and bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine altered PBMCs size. It may be concluded that bis-(phosphonomethyl)amine, and PMIDA caused a slightly stronger damage to PBMCs than did glyphosate. Changes in the parameters studied in PBMCs were observed only at high concentrations of the compounds examined, which clearly shows that they may occur in this cell type only as a result of acute poisoning of human organism with these substances. PMID:27280764

  17. Enhanced peripheral visual processing in congenitally deaf humans is supported by multiple brain regions, including primary auditory cortex

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Gregory D.; Karns, Christina M.; Dow, Mark W.; Stevens, Courtney; Neville, Helen J.

    2014-01-01

    Brain reorganization associated with altered sensory experience clarifies the critical role of neuroplasticity in development. An example is enhanced peripheral visual processing associated with congenital deafness, but the neural systems supporting this have not been fully characterized. A gap in our understanding of deafness-enhanced peripheral vision is the contribution of primary auditory cortex. Previous studies of auditory cortex that use anatomical normalization across participants were limited by inter-subject variability of Heschl's gyrus. In addition to reorganized auditory cortex (cross-modal plasticity), a second gap in our understanding is the contribution of altered modality-specific cortices (visual intramodal plasticity in this case), as well as supramodal and multisensory cortices, especially when target detection is required across contrasts. Here we address these gaps by comparing fMRI signal change for peripheral vs. perifoveal visual stimulation (11–15° vs. 2–7°) in congenitally deaf and hearing participants in a blocked experimental design with two analytical approaches: a Heschl's gyrus region of interest analysis and a whole brain analysis. Our results using individually-defined primary auditory cortex (Heschl's gyrus) indicate that fMRI signal change for more peripheral stimuli was greater than perifoveal in deaf but not in hearing participants. Whole-brain analyses revealed differences between deaf and hearing participants for peripheral vs. perifoveal visual processing in extrastriate visual cortex including primary auditory cortex, MT+/V5, superior-temporal auditory, and multisensory and/or supramodal regions, such as posterior parietal cortex (PPC), frontal eye fields, anterior cingulate, and supplementary eye fields. Overall, these data demonstrate the contribution of neuroplasticity in multiple systems including primary auditory cortex, supramodal, and multisensory regions, to altered visual processing in congenitally deaf

  18. Subcellular localization and displacement by diuretics of the peripheral benzodiazepine binding site (PBS) from rat kidney

    SciTech Connect

    Lukeman, S.; Fanestil, D.

    1986-03-05

    Although the PBS has been identified in many organs, its function and cellular location are speculative. Using rapid filtration, binding of (/sup 3/H)RO 5-4864 (*RO) (.75 nM) was assessed in four subcellular fractions (.3 mg/ml) derived from depapillated rat kidney by differential centrifugation: N (450g x 2 min), O (13,000 x 10), P (105,000 x 30), and S. The binding distribution was: N-18%, O-74%, P-6%, and S-2%. Marker enzyme analysis revealed that O was enriched in mitochondria (M), lysosomes (L), peroxisomes (P), and endoplasmic reticulum (ER), but not plasma membrane, and that N contained small amounts (10-15%) of markers for the above. Repeated washing of O removed ER enzymes but preserved *RO binding. O was further fractionated with centrifugation (57,000g x 4 hr) on a linear sucrose gradient (18-65%); *RO binding then comigrated with M but not P and L markers. Centrifugation of isolated M (5500 x 10 min) on another linear sucrose gradient (37-65%) gave low and high density bands, which contained 65% and 35% of *RO binding activity, resp. *RO binding in O was specific, saturable, reversible, and inhibited by diuretics. Inhibitors with the highest potency were indacrinone (K/sub d/ = 35 ..mu..M), hydrochlorothiazide (100 ..mu..M), and ethacrynic acid (325 ..mu..M). Low potency inhibitors (K/sub d/ greater than or equal to 1 mM) included amiloride, triamterene, furosemide, bumetanide, and ozolinone.

  19. Peripheral neuropathies.

    PubMed

    Hanewinckel, R; Ikram, M A; Van Doorn, P A

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral neuropathies are diseases of the peripheral nervous system that can be divided into mononeuropathies, multifocal neuropathies, and polyneuropathies. Symptoms usually include numbness and paresthesia. These symptoms are often accompanied by weakness and can be painful. Polyneuropathies can be divided into axonal and demyelinating forms, which is important for diagnostic reasons. Most peripheral neuropathies develop over months or years, but some are rapidly progressive. Some patients only suffer from mild, unilateral, slowly progressive tingling in the fingers due to median nerve compression in the wrist (carpal tunnel syndrome), while other patients can be tetraplegic, with respiratory insufficiency within 1-2 days due to Guillain-Barré syndrome. Carpal tunnel syndrome, with a prevalence of 5% and incidence of 1-2 per 1000 person-years, is the most common mononeuropathy. Population-based data for chronic polyneuropathy are relatively scarce. Prevalence is estimated at 1% and increases to 7% in persons over 65 years of age. Incidence is approximately 1 per 1000 person-years. Immune-mediated polyneuropathies like Guillain-Barré syndrome and chronic inflammatory demyelinating polyradiculoneuropathy are rare diseases, with an annual incidence of approximately 1-2 and 0.2-0.5 per 100 000 persons respectively. Most peripheral neuropathies are more prevalent in older adults and in men, except for carpal tunnel syndrome, which is more common in women. Diabetes is a common cause of peripheral neuropathy and is associated with both mono- and polyneuropathies. Among the group of chronic polyneuropathies, in about 20-25% no direct cause can be found. These are slowly progressive axonal polyneuropathies. PMID:27637963

  20. A Question About the Safety of Buprenorphine/Naloxone and Benzodiazepine Drugs.

    PubMed

    Howland, Robert H

    2015-12-01

    Drug overdose is the leading cause of injury death in the United States, and most deaths are related to prescription drugs. A substantial proportion of these deaths involve opioid or benzodiazepine drugs, and many overdoses include a combination of both drug classes. Buprenorphine/naloxone has an unusual pharmacology that distinguishes it from other opioid drugs. Animal and human studies have found that buprenorphine is associated with a ceiling to its cardio-respiratory depressant effect at higher doses, such that it may have a wider safety margin compared to other opioid drugs. Compared to buprenorphine alone, buprenorphine/naloxone is associated with less cardiorespiratory depression. Drug safety data from the National Poison Data System, Drug Abuse Warning Network, and other sources suggest that the safety of buprenorphine/naloxone is favorable compared to the morbidity and mortality associated with other opioid drugs and other classes of psychotropic drugs. PMID:26653090

  1. Flow cytometric and immunohistochemical characterization of the gamma/delta T-lymphocyte population in normal human lymphoid tissue and peripheral blood.

    PubMed Central

    Inghirami, G.; Zhu, B. Y.; Chess, L.; Knowles, D. M.

    1990-01-01

    We determined the quantitative and topographic distribution of gamma/delta lymphocytes in normal human lymphoid tissue and peripheral blood using a monoclonal antibody that detects a framework determinant on delta molecules and delineated the immunophenotypic characteristics of the gamma/delta lymphocyte population by one- and/or two-color immunohistochemical and two- and/or three-color flow cytometric analysis. Variable, but generally small, numbers of gamma/delta lymphocytes are present in peripheral blood and in all lymphoid tissues. The vast majority, greater than or equal to 90%, of lymphoid tissue delta lymphocytes reside in interfollicular (T-cell) zones. Approximately 90% of delta thymocytes are present in the thymic medulla. The percentage of CD3-positive T cells that express delta are: spleen 12.5 +/- 8.1%, peripheral blood 4.0 +/- 3.1%, appendix 2.9 +/- 1%, lymph node 2.2 +/- 1%, thymus 1.4 +/- 0.5%, and tonsil 0.7 +/- 0.5%. We further demonstrated that 1) gamma/delta-thymocytes and gamma/delta peripheral lymphocytes express T-cell lineage restricted antigens CD3 and CD2 but only a variable subset, 30% to 90%, express T-cell lineage associated antigens CD5 and/or CD8; (2) approximately 60% of gamma/delta thymocytes express low-density CD4 while all gamma/delta peripheral lymphocytes lack detectable CD4; 3) gamma/delta lymphocytes lack natural killer (NK), macrophage, and B-cell associated antigens CD16, CD14, and CD20, respectively, but greater than or equal to 70% of gamma/delta T lymphocytes express CD11b, Leu7, and NKH-1, antigens, which are also expressed by suppressor/cytotoxic and NK cells; and 4) a large subpopulation, approximately 25%, of gamma/delta thymocytes are in S1-G2 phase, while greater than or equal to 98% of gamma/delta peripheral lymphocytes are small lymphocytes in G0-G1 phase and lack activation/proliferation markers. Together these results indicate that gamma/delta lymphocytes are resting, mature T cells that probably play a

  2. Benzodiazepines and risk of death: Results from two large cohort studies in France and UK.

    PubMed

    Palmaro, Aurore; Dupouy, Julie; Lapeyre-Mestre, Maryse

    2015-10-01

    Benzodiazepines are widely prescribed for the treatment of anxiety or insomnia, but their impact on mortality is still debated. This study investigated the impact of benzodiazepine use on short term mortality. Exposed-unexposed cohorts were constructed with the Clinical Practice Research Datalink (CPRD) in the UK and with the General Sample of Beneficiaries (EGB) in France. Benzodiazepine incident users were matched to incident users of antidepressants/non-benzodiazepine sedatives and to controls (non-users of antidepressants or anxiolytics/hypnotics) according to age and gender in both sources (and practice for the CPRD only). Survival at one year was studied using Cox regression model. In the CPRD, the final population comprised 94 123 patients per group (57 287 in the EGB). In the CPRD, adjusted HR was 3.73 in benzodiazepine users (95% CI, 3.43-4.06), and 1.61 (1.47-1.76) in antidepressant/non-benzodiazepine users compared to controls. When considering benzodiazepine use as a time-dependent covariate, adjusted HR for current use at 12 months was 1.70 (1.36-2.12). In the EGB, adjusted HR was 1.26 in benzodiazepine users (95% CI, 1.08-1.48), and 1.07 (95% CI, 0.91-1.27) in antidepressant/non-benzodiazepine users. When considering benzodiazepine use as a time-dependent covariate, adjusted HR for current use at 12 months was 1.03 (0.74-1.44). Using two nationally representative databases, we found a significant while moderate increase in all-cause mortality in relation to benzodiazepines, in a population of incident and mostly occasional users. This issue need to be monitored given the extensive use of these drugs.

  3. Expansion of natural killer cells in peripheral blood in a Japanese elderly with human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1-related skin lesions.

    PubMed

    Imashuku, Shinsaku; Kudo, Naoko; Kubo, Kagekatsu; Ohshima, Kouichi

    2014-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells were proposed to play an important role in the pathogenesis of human T-cell lymphotropic virus type 1- (HTLV-1-) associated neurologic disease. Our patient was a 77-year-old Japanese man, who had been treated for infective dermatitis associated with HTLV-1 for nearly 10 years. When referred to us, he had facial eczema/edema as well as extensive dermatitis at the neck/upper chest and nuchal area/upper back regions. Dermal lesions had CD3+CD4+ cells, but no NK cells. Flow cytometry of his peripheral blood showed a phenotype of CD2+ (97%), CD3+ (17%), CD4+ (12%), CD7+ (94%), CD8+ (6%), CD11c+ (70%), CD16+ (82%), CD19+ (0%), CD20+ (0%), CD56+ (67%), HLA-DR+ (68%), and NKp46+ (36%). Absolute numbers of CD56+NK cells in the peripheral blood were in a range of 986/μL-1,270/μL. The expanded NK cells in the peripheral blood are considered to be reactive, to maintain the confinement of the HTLV-1-positive CD4+ cells in the skin, and to prevent the progression of the disease.

  4. In vitro opioid induced proliferation of peripheral blood immune cells correlates with in vivo cold pressor pain tolerance in humans: a biological marker of pain tolerance.

    PubMed

    Hutchinson, Mark R; La Vincente, Sophie F; Somogyi, Andrew A

    2004-08-01

    There is substantial evidence for bidirectional communication between the immune system and the central nervous system, as the cells and signalling molecules of the immune system influence many central nervous system functions, for instance nociception. Opioids, such as morphine, produce analgesia and numerous other central and peripheral effects including sedation and euphoria, while their effects on the immune system are wide-ranging. There is considerable interindividual variability in basal nociception and response to opioids, however, the physiological and biological mechanisms underlying this are unclear. Therefore, we investigated the relationship between the immune system and basal nociceptive thresholds, using the proliferative response of isolated peripheral blood mononuclear cells and cold pressor pain tolerance. Here we show that the percent increase in proliferation of peripheral immune cells from 13 healthy subjects incubated with morphine ex vivo is highly correlated with the subjects' tolerance to noxious cold stimuli (Pearson r = 0.92, P < 0.0001). These pilot data provide evidence of a novel objective biological marker of pain tolerance in humans, which also links the immune and opioid systems with basal pain tolerance.

  5. Genotoxic effects of a particular mixture of acetamiprid and alpha-cypermethrin on chromosome aberration, sister chromatid exchange, and micronucleus formation in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Kocaman, Ayşe Yavuz; Topaktaş, Mehmet

    2010-04-01

    The genotoxic effects of a particular mixture of acetamiprid (Acm, neonicotinoid insecticide) and alpha-cypermethrin (alpha-cyp, pyrethroid insecticide) on human peripheral lymphocytes were examined in vitro by chromosomal aberrations (CAs), sister chromatid exchange (SCE), and micronucleus (MN) tests. The human peripheral lymphocytes were treated with 12.5 + 2.5, 15 + 5, 17.5 + 7.5, and 20 + 10 microg/mL of Acm+alpha-cyp, respectively, for 24 and 48 h. The mixture of Acm+alpha-cyp induced the CAs and SCEs at all concentrations and treatment times when compared with both the control and solvent control and these increases were concentration-dependent in both treatment times. MN formation was significantly induced at 12.5 + 2.5, 15 + 5, 17.5 + 7.5, microg/mL of Acm+alpha-cyp when compared with both controls although these increases were not concentration-dependent. Binuclear cells could not be detected sufficiently in the highest concentration of the mixture (20 + 10 microg/mL) for both the 24- and 48-h treatment times. Mitotic index (MI), proliferation index (PI) and nuclear division index (NDI) significantly decreased because of the cytotoxic and cytostatic effects of the mixture, at all concentrations for two treatment periods. Significant decreases in MI and PI were concentration dependent at both treatment times. The decrease in NDI was also concentration-dependent at 48-h treatment period. In general, Acm+alpha-cyp inhibited nuclear division more than positive control, mitomycin C (MMC) and showed a higher cytostatic effect than MMC. Furthermore, in this article, the results of combined effects of Acm+alpha-cyp were compared with the results of single effects of Acm or alpha-cyp (Kocaman and Topaktas,2007,2009, respectively). In conclusion, the particular mixture of Acm+alpha-cyp synergistically induced the genotoxicity/cytotoxicity in human peripheral blood lymphocytes.

  6. Benzodiazepine binding sites in rat interscapular brown adipose tissue: effect of cold environment, denervation and endocrine ablations

    SciTech Connect

    Solveyra, C.G.; Romeo, H.E.; Rosenstein, R.E.; Estevez, A.G.; Cardinali, D.P.

    1988-01-01

    /sup 3/H-Flunitrazepam (FNZP) binding was examined in a crude membrane fraction obtained from rat interscapular brown adipose tissue (IBAT). A single population of binding sites was apparent with dissociation constant (K/sub D/) = 0.47 +/- 0.04 uM and maximal number of binding sites (B/sub max/ = 31 +/- 5 pmol.mg prot/sup -1/. From the activity of several benzodiazepine (BZP) analogs to compete for the binding, the peripheral nature of FNZP binding was tentatively established. Similar BZP binding sites were detectable in isolated IBAT mitochondria. Exposure of rats to 4 /sup 0/C for 15 days decreased B/sub max/ significantly without affecting K/sub D/. Cold-induced decrease in B/sub max/ of BZP binding was prevented by surgical IBAT denervation. Denervation prevented or impaired the increased activity of the mitochondrial markers succinate dehydrogenase and malate dehydrogenase in IBAT of cold-exposed rats, but did not affect monoamine oxidase activity. Their results indicate that BZP binding in rat IBAT may belong to the peripheral type, is decreased by a cold environment through activation of peripheral sympathetic nerves and is affected by hypophysectomy. BZP and GDP binding in IBAT mitochondria seem not to be functionally related. 23 references, 4 figures, 3 tables.

  7. Development of a Modular Assay for Detailed Immunophenotyping of Peripheral Human Whole Blood Samples by Multicolor Flow Cytometry

    PubMed Central

    Rühle, Paul F.; Fietkau, Rainer; Gaipl, Udo S.; Frey, Benjamin

    2016-01-01

    The monitoring of immune cells gained great significance in prognosis and prediction of therapy responses. For analyzing blood samples, the multicolor flow cytometry has become the method of choice as it combines high specificity on single cell level with multiple parameters and high throughput. Here, we present a modular assay for the detailed immunophenotyping of blood (DIoB) that was optimized for an easy and direct application in whole blood samples. The DIoB assay characterizes 34 immune cell subsets that circulate the peripheral blood including all major immune cells such as T cells, B cells, natural killer (NK) cells, monocytes, dendritic cells (DCs), neutrophils, eosinophils, and basophils. In addition, it evaluates their functional state and a few non-leukocytes that also have been associated with the outcome of cancer therapy. This DIoB assay allows a longitudinal and close-meshed monitoring of a detailed immune status in patients requiring only 2.0 mL of peripheral blood and it is not restricted to peripheral blood mononuclear cells. It is currently applied for the immune monitoring of patients with glioblastoma multiforme (IMMO-GLIO-01 trial, NCT02022384), pancreatic cancer (CONKO-007 trial, NCT01827553), and head and neck cancer (DIREKHT trial, NCT02528955) and might pave the way for immune biomarker identification for prediction and prognosis of therapy outcome. PMID:27529227

  8. Positron emission tomography assessment of effects of benzodiazepines on regional glucose metabolic rate in patients with anxiety disorder

    SciTech Connect

    Buchsbaum, M.S.; Wu, J.; Haier, R.; Hazlett, E.; Ball, R.; Katz, M.; Sokolski, K.; Lagunas-Solar, M.; Langer, D.

    1987-06-22

    Patients with generalized anxiety disorder (n = 18) entered a 21-day, double-blind, placebo-controlled random assignment trial of clorazepate. Positron emission tomography with YF-deoxyglucose was carried out before and after treatment. Decreases in glucose metabolic rate in visual cortex and relative increases in the basal ganglia and thalamus were found. A correlation between regional changes in metabolic rate and regional benzodiazepine receptor binding density from other human autopsy studies was observed; brain regions highest in receptor density showed the greatest decrease in rate.

  9. Paradoxical Benzodiazepine Response: A Rationale for Bumetanide in Neurodevelopmental Disorders?

    PubMed

    Bruining, Hilgo; Passtoors, Laurien; Goriounova, Natalia; Jansen, Floor; Hakvoort, Britt; de Jonge, Maretha; Poil, Simon-Shlomo

    2015-08-01

    The diuretic agent bumetanide has recently been put forward as a novel, promising treatment of behavioral symptoms in autism spectrum disorder (ASD) and related conditions. Bumetanide can decrease neuronal chloride concentrations and may thereby reinstate γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA)-ergic inhibition in patients with neurodevelopmental disorders. However, strategies to select appropriate candidates for bumetanide treatment are lacking. We hypothesized that a paradoxical response to GABA-enforcing agents such as benzodiazepines may predict the efficacy of bumetanide treatment in neurodevelopmental disorders. We describe a case of a 10-year-old girl with ASD, epilepsy, cortical dysplasia, and a 15q11.2 duplication who had exhibited marked behavioral arousal after previous treatment with clobazam, a benzodiazepine. We hypothesized that this response indicated the presence of depolarizing excitatory GABA and started bumetanide treatment with monitoring of behavior, cognition, and EEG. The treatment resulted in a marked clinical improvement in sensory behaviors, rigidity, and memory performance, which was substantiated by questionnaires and cognitive assessments. At baseline, the girl's EEG showed a depression in absolute α power, an electrographic sign previously related to ASD, which was normalized with bumetanide treatment. The effects of bumetanide on cognition and EEG seemed to mirror the "nonparadoxical" responses to benzodiazepines in healthy subjects. In addition, temporal lobe epilepsy and cortical dysplasia have both been linked to disturbed chloride homeostasis and seem to support our assumption that the observed paradoxical response was due to GABA-mediated excitation. This case highlights that a paradoxical behavioral response to GABA-enforcing drugs may constitute a framework for targeted treatment with bumetanide. PMID:26216321

  10. Dye-labeled benzodiazepines: development of small ligands for receptor binding studies using fluorescence correlation spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Hegener, Oliver; Jordan, Randolf; Häberlein, Hanns

    2004-07-01

    To investigate benzodiazepine receptor binding studies by fluorescence correlation spectroscopy (FCS), the four fluorophores fluorescein, tetramethylrhodamine, Oregon Green 488, and Alexa 532 were coupled to the benzodiazepine Ro 07-1986/602 (Ro). Binding assays to polyclonal antibodies to benzodiazepines and at the native benzodiazepine receptor on the membrane of rat hippocampal neurons were established to examine the dye-labeled ligands for their benzodiazepine character and their binding behavior. Both the fluorescein and the Oregon Green488 moiety led to a loss of the benzodiazepine receptor binding of the corresponding Ro derivatives. Antibody recognition and interactions to the receptor were observed for the tetramethylrhodamine derivative (K(D) = 96.0 +/- 9.5 nM) but with a high amount of nonspecific binding at the cell membrane of about 50%. In saturation experiments a K(D) value of 97.2 +/- 8.5 nM was found for the Alexa Fluor 532 derivative-antibody interaction. Investigation of the binding of this ligand to the benzodiazepine receptor in FCS cell measurements led to confirmation of high specific binding behavior with a K(D) value of 9.9 +/- 1.9 nM. A nonspecific binding of <10% was observed after coincubation with 1 microM of midazolam. The different properties of the labeled benzodiazepine derivatives and the requirements of the fluorophore in small dye-labeled ligands in FCS binding studies, at the membrane of living cells, are discussed.

  11. Benzodiazepine Discontinuation among Adults with GAD: A Randomized Trial of Cognitive-Behavioral Therapy

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Gosselin, Patrick; Ladouceur, Robert; Morin, Charles M.; Dugas, Michel J.; Baillargeon, Lucie

    2006-01-01

    This study evaluated the specific effectiveness of cognitive-behavior therapy (CBT) combined with medication tapering for benzodiazepine discontinuation among generalized anxiety disorder (GAD) patients by using a nonspecific therapy control group. Sixty-one patients who had used benzodiazepines for more than 12 months were randomly assigned to…

  12. Purification of high affinity benzodiazepine receptor binding site fragments from rat brain

    SciTech Connect

    Klotz, K.L.

    1984-01-01

    In central nervous system benzodiazepine recognition sites occur on neuronal cell surfaces as one member of a multireceptor complex, including recognition sites for benzodiazepines, gamma aminobutyric acid (GABA), barbiturates and a chloride ionophore. During photoaffinity labelling, the benzodiazepine agonist, /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam, is irreversibly bound to central benzodiazepine high affinity recognition sites in the presence of ultraviolet light. In these studies a /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam radiolabel was used to track the isolation and purification of high affinity agonist binding site fragments from membrane-bound benzodiazepine receptor in rat brain. The authors present a method for limited proteolysis of /sup 3/H-flunitrazepam photoaffinity labeled rat brain membranes, generating photolabeled benzodiazepine receptor fragments containing the agonist binding site. Using trypsin chymotrypsin A/sub 4/, or a combination of these two proteases, they have demonstrated the extent and time course for partial digestion of benzodiazepine receptor, yielding photolabeled receptor binding site fragments. These photolabeled receptor fragments have been further purified on the basis of size, using ultrafiltration, gel permeation chromatography, and sodium dodecyl sulfate polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) as well as on the basis of hydrophobicity, using a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) precolumn, several HPLC elution schemes, and two different HPLC column types. Using these procedures, they have purified three photolabeled benzodiazepine receptor fragments containing the agonist binding site which appear to have a molecular weight of less than 2000 daltons each.

  13. Biochemical study of multiple drug recognition sites on central benzodiazepine receptors

    SciTech Connect

    Trifiletti, R.R.

    1986-01-01

    The benzodiazepine receptor complex of mammalian brain possesses recognition sites which mediate (at least in part) the pharmacologic actions of the 1,4-benzodiazepines and barbiturates. Evidence is provided suggesting the existence of least seven distinct drug recognition sites on this complex. Interactions between the various recognition sites have been explored using radioligand binding techniques. This information is utilized to provide a comprehensive scheme for characterizing receptor-active drugs on an anxiolytic-anticonvulsant/proconvulsant continuum using radioligand binding techniques, as well as a comprehensive program for identifying potential endogenous receptor-active substances. Further evidence is provided here supporting the notion of benzodiazepine recognition site heterogeneity. Classical 1,4-benzodiazepines do not appear to differentiate two populations of benzodiazepine receptors in an equilibrium sense, but appear to do so in a kinetic sense. An apparent physical separation of the two receptor subtypes can be achieved by differential solubilization. The benzodiazepine binding subunit can be identified by photoaffinity labeling with the benzodiazepine agonist (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepan. Conditions for reproducible partial proteolytic mapping of (/sup 3/H)flunitrazepam photoaffinity labeled receptors are established. From these maps, it is concluded that there are probably no major differences in the primary sequence of the benzodiazepine binding subunit in various regions of the rat central nervous system.

  14. Severity of arterial hypoxaemia affects the relative contributions of peripheral muscle fatigue to exercise performance in healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    Amann, Markus; Romer, Lee M; Subudhi, Andrew W; Pegelow, David F; Dempsey, Jerome A

    2007-01-01

    We examined the effects of hypoxia severity on peripheral versus central determinants of exercise performance. Eight cyclists performed constant-load exercise to exhaustion at various fractions of inspired O2 fraction (FIO2 0.21/0.15/0.10). At task failure (pedal frequency < 70% target) arterial hypoxaemia was surreptitiously reversed via acute O2 supplementation (FIO2 = 0.30) and subjects were encouraged to continue exercising. Peripheral fatigue was assessed via changes in potentiated quadriceps twitch force (ΔQtw,pot) as measured pre- versus post-exercise in response to supramaximal femoral nerve stimulation. At task failure in normoxia (haemoglobin saturation (SpO2) ∼94%, 656 ± 82 s) and moderate hypoxia (SpO2 ∼82%, 278 ± 16 s), hyperoxygenation had no significant effect on prolonging endurance time. However, following task failure in severe hypoxia (SpO2 ∼67%; 125 ± 6 s), hyperoxygenation elicited a significant prolongation of time to exhaustion (171 ± 61%). The magnitude of ΔQtw,pot at exhaustion was not different among the three trials (−35% to −36%, P = 0.8). Furthermore, quadriceps integrated EMG, blood lactate, heart rate, and effort perceptions all rose significantly throughout exercise, and to a similar extent at exhaustion following hyperoxygenation at all levels of arterial oxygenation. Since hyperoxygenation prolonged exercise time only in severe hypoxia, we repeated this trial and assessed peripheral fatigue following task failure prior to hyperoxygenation (125 ± 6 s). Although Qtw,pot was reduced from pre-exercise baseline (−23%; P < 0.01), peripheral fatigue was substantially less (P < 0.01) than that observed at task failure in normoxia and moderate hypoxia. We conclude that across the range of normoxia to severe hypoxia, the major determinants of central motor output and exercise performance switches from a predominantly peripheral origin of fatigue to a hypoxia-sensitive central component of fatigue, probably involving brain

  15. Benzodiazepine receptor and neurotransmitter studies in the brain of suicides

    SciTech Connect

    Manchon, M.; Kopp, N.; Rouzioux, J.J.; Lecestre, D.; Deluermoz, S.; Miachon, S.

    1987-12-14

    The characteristics of benzodiazepine binding sites were studied on frozen sections of hippocampus of 7 suicides and 5 controls subjects, using biochemical and autoradiographic techniques. /sup 3/H flunitrazepam was used as ligand, clonazepam and CL 218,872 as displacing agents. Some neurotransmitters or their derivatives were evaluated quantitatively in parallel in the hippocampal tissue by liquid chromatography. The authors observed mainly an increase in the Ki of CL 218,872 subtype I binding sites in suicides, and an increase in % of type I binding sites. Among neurotransmitters, only norepinephrine differed significantly between controls and suicides. 36 references, 3 figures, 1 table.

  16. Thin layer chromatographic screening for methaqualone, phenothiazines, opiates and benzodiazepines.

    PubMed

    Breiter, J; Helger, R; Interschick, E; Wüst, H

    1978-02-01

    A method is described which permits the simultaneous detection of methaqualone, phenothiazines, opiates and benzodiazepines in urine. Its diagnostic application is discussed. After cleavage of conjugates with hydrochloric acid, the substances are extracted and identified by thin-layer chromatography. In most cases analysis can be carried out using 2 solvent systems, phenothiazines, methaqualone and opiates being visualised using a three stage spray sequence. Since phenothiazines can interfere with the detection of methaqualone, a specific eluant is used to ensure reliable detection of the latter. Methaqualone can be positively identified by its characteristic metabolite pattern, whereas phenothiazines can only be detected as a group.

  17. Peripheral intravenous line - infants

    MedlinePlus

    PIV - infants; Peripheral IV - infants; Peripheral line - infants; Peripheral line - neonatal ... A peripheral intravenous line (PIV) is a small, short, plastic tube, called a catheter. A health care provider puts ...

  18. Inappropriate benzodiazepine use in older adults and the risk of fracture

    PubMed Central

    van der Hooft, Cornelis S; Schoofs, Mariëtte W C J; Ziere, Gijsbertus; Hofman, Albert; Pols, Huibert A P; Sturkenboom, Miriam C J M; Stricker, Bruno H Ch

    2008-01-01

    WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN ABOUT THIS SUBJECT Benzodiazepine use increases the risk of fracture in the elderly. It is controversial which conditions of use are most risky, e.g. use of short- or long-acting benzodiazepines, dose and duration of use. The well-known Beers criteria include statements about inappropriate benzodiazepine use in elderly and the risk of fracture, but their clinical value has never been tested in an outcome study. WHAT THIS STUDY ADDS Inappropriate benzodiazepine use according to the Beers criteria is not associated with an increased risk of fracture. Daily dose and duration of use is associated with higher risk of fracture, not the type of benzodiazepine prescribed as the Beers criteria state. AIMS The Beers criteria for prescribing in elderly are well known and used for many drug utilization studies. We investigated the clinical value of the Beers criteria for benzodiazepine use, notably the association between inappropriate use and risk of fracture. METHODS We performed a nested case–control study within the Rotterdam Study, a population-based cohort study in 7983 elderly. The proportion of ‘inappropriate’ benzodiazepine use according to the Beers criteria was compared between fracture patients and controls. ‘Inappropriate’ use for elderly implies use of some long-acting benzodiazepines and some intermediate/short-acting ones exceeding a suggested maximum daily dose. Also, alternative criteria were applied to compare the risk of fracture. Cases were defined as persons with incident fracture between 1991 and 2002 who were current benzodiazepine users on the fracture date. Controls were matched on fracture date and were also current benzodiazepine users. RESULTS The risk of fracture in ‘inappropriate’ benzodiazepine users according to the Beers criteria was not significantly different from ‘appropriate’ users [odds ratio (OR) 1.07, 95% confidence interval (CI) 0.72, 1.60]. However, a significantly higher risk of fracture was

  19. Prescription and misuse of benzodiazepines in the Federal Republic of Germany.

    PubMed

    Müller-Oerlinghausen, B

    1986-01-01

    Reliable benzodiazepine prescription data are now available for the Federal Republic of Germany by the establishment of GKV-Index. In 1981, 4 benzodiazepines were among the 25 highest ranking drugs in the FRG according to total number of prescriptions. A decline of benzodiazepine prescriptions was observed in 1983 and 1984; two short-acting compounds achieved a higher ranking position. Benzodiazepines make up to about two thirds of all psychotropic drugs prescribed. These data are compared to some figures from Scandinavian countries. In addition, prescription data of 369 outpatients of 42 psychiatrists in private practice in Berlin (West) are presented. Some data on the occurrence of abuse and dependence on benzodiazepines are presented coming from 4 different sources: The spontaneous ADR monitoring of the Medicines Commission of the German Medical Profession; a hospital-based study at the university of Göttingen; a collaborative hospital-based ADR monitoring (AMUP); an outpatient study with psychiatrists in private practice. PMID:2870514

  20. Cocoa Consumption Alters the Global DNA Methylation of Peripheral Leukocytes in Humans with Cardiovascular Disease Risk Factors: A Randomized Controlled Trial

    PubMed Central

    Crescenti, Anna; Solà, Rosa; Valls, Rosa M.; Caimari, Antoni; del Bas, Josep M.; Anguera, Anna; Anglés, Neus; Arola, Lluís

    2013-01-01

    DNA methylation regulates gene expression and can be modified by different bioactive compounds in foods, such as polyphenols. Cocoa is a rich source of polyphenols, but its role in DNA methylation is still unknown. The objective was to assess the effect of cocoa consumption on DNA methylation and to determine whether the enzymes involved in the DNA methylation process participate in the mechanisms by which cocoa exerts these effects in humans. The global DNA methylation levels in the peripheral blood were evaluated in 214 volunteers who were pre-hypertensive, stage-1 hypertensive or hypercholesterolemic. The volunteers were divided into two groups: 110 subjects who consumed cocoa (6 g/d) for two weeks and 104 control subjects. In addition, the peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from six subjects were treated with a cocoa extract to analyze the mRNA levels of the DNA methyltransferases (DNMTs), methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR), and methionine synthase reductase (MTRR) genes. Cocoa consumption significantly reduced the DNA methylation levels (2.991±0.366 vs. 3.909±0.380, p<0.001). Additionally, we found an association between the cocoa effects on DNA methylation and three polymorphisms located in the MTHFR, MTRR, and DNMT3B genes. Furthermore, in PBMCs, the cocoa extract significantly lowered the mRNA levels of the DNMTs, MTHFR, and MTRR. Our study demonstrates for the first time that the consumption of cocoa decreases the global DNA methylation of peripheral leukocytes in humans with cardiovascular risk factors. In vitro experiments with PBMCs suggest that cocoa may exert this effect partially via the down-regulation of DNMTs, MTHFR and MTRR, which are key genes involved in this epigenetic process. Trial Registration Clinicaltrials.gov NCT00511420 and NCT00502047 PMID:23840361

  1. Occurrence of drugs of abuse and benzodiazepines in river waters from the Madrid Region (Central Spain).

    PubMed

    Mendoza, A; López de Alda, M; González-Alonso, S; Mastroianni, N; Barceló, D; Valcárcel, Y

    2014-01-01

    This work investigates, for the first time, the occurrence of 10 drugs of abuse, six metabolites, and three benzodiazepines in surface waters from the Jarama and Manzanares Rivers in the Madrid Region, the most densely populated area in Spain and one of the most densely populated in Europe. The results of this study have shown the presence of 14 out of the 19 compounds analyzed at concentrations ranging from 1.45 to 1020 ng L(-1). The most ubiquitous compounds, found in 100% of the samples, were the cocaine metabolite benzoylecgonine (BE), the amphetamine-like compound ephedrine (EPH), the opioids morphine (MOR), methadone (METH), and the METH metabolite 2-ethylene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP), and the three investigated benzodiazepines alprazolam (ALP), diazepam (DIA) and lorazepam (LOR). Meanwhile, the largest concentrations observed corresponded to EPH (up to 1020 ng L(-1)), BE (823 ng L(-1)), EDDP (151 ng L(-1)), and LOR (167 ng L(-1)). The only not detected compounds were heroin (HER) and its metabolite 6-acetylmorphine (6ACM), lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and its metabolite 2-oxo-3-hydroxy-LSD (OH-LSD), and Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Overall, the levels measured are comparatively higher than those previously reported in Europe. Comparison of the results obtained for samples collected on different days (Thursday and Sunday) did not show meaningful differences between weekdays and weekends. The lack of (eco)toxicological data does not permit to predict or disregard potential adverse effects on wildlife. Risk assessment in humans would require further knowledge, not currently available, on exposure to these compounds through other routes like drinking water and/or food. PMID:24083902

  2. Occurrence of drugs of abuse and benzodiazepines in river waters from the Madrid Region (Central Spain).

    PubMed

    Mendoza, A; López de Alda, M; González-Alonso, S; Mastroianni, N; Barceló, D; Valcárcel, Y

    2014-01-01

    This work investigates, for the first time, the occurrence of 10 drugs of abuse, six metabolites, and three benzodiazepines in surface waters from the Jarama and Manzanares Rivers in the Madrid Region, the most densely populated area in Spain and one of the most densely populated in Europe. The results of this study have shown the presence of 14 out of the 19 compounds analyzed at concentrations ranging from 1.45 to 1020 ng L(-1). The most ubiquitous compounds, found in 100% of the samples, were the cocaine metabolite benzoylecgonine (BE), the amphetamine-like compound ephedrine (EPH), the opioids morphine (MOR), methadone (METH), and the METH metabolite 2-ethylene-1,5-dimethyl-3,3-diphenylpyrrolidine (EDDP), and the three investigated benzodiazepines alprazolam (ALP), diazepam (DIA) and lorazepam (LOR). Meanwhile, the largest concentrations observed corresponded to EPH (up to 1020 ng L(-1)), BE (823 ng L(-1)), EDDP (151 ng L(-1)), and LOR (167 ng L(-1)). The only not detected compounds were heroin (HER) and its metabolite 6-acetylmorphine (6ACM), lysergic acid diethylamide (LSD) and its metabolite 2-oxo-3-hydroxy-LSD (OH-LSD), and Δ(9)-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC). Overall, the levels measured are comparatively higher than those previously reported in Europe. Comparison of the results obtained for samples collected on different days (Thursday and Sunday) did not show meaningful differences between weekdays and weekends. The lack of (eco)toxicological data does not permit to predict or disregard potential adverse effects on wildlife. Risk assessment in humans would require further knowledge, not currently available, on exposure to these compounds through other routes like drinking water and/or food.

  3. Cytogenetic response to 1,2-dicarbonyls and hydrogen peroxide in Chinese hamster ovary AUXB1 cells and human peripheral lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Tucker, J D; Taylor, R T; Christensen, M L; Strout, C L; Hanna, M L; Carrano, A V

    1989-10-01

    Mutagenic 1,2-dicarbonyls have been reported to occur in coffee and other beverages and in various foods. We have measured the induction of sister-chromatid exchanges (SCEs) and endoreduplicated cells (ERCs) to determine the genotoxicity of various 1,2-dicarbonyl compounds in Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) AUXB1 cells and human peripheral lymphocytes. The 1,2-dicarbonyls glyoxal, methylglyoxal and kethoxal each induced highly significant increases in both SCEs and ERCs in AUXB1 cells. Glyoxal and kethoxal induced SCEs but not ERCs in human peripheral lymphocytes. In addition, hydrogen peroxide induced highly significant levels of SCEs and ERCs in AUXB1 cells. Bisulfite, which reacts with carbonyl groups to form addition products, significantly reduced the frequency of SCEs and the proportion of ERCs when glyoxal, methylglyoxal, kethoxal and diacetyl were administered to AUXB1 cells. In addition, bisulfite blocked the formation of ERCs, but not SCEs, induced by hydrogen peroxide. These in vitro results suggest that 1,2-dicarbonyls may play an important role in the genotoxicity of some foods and beverages.

  4. HCMV infection of humanized mice after transplantation of G-CSF-mobilized peripheral blood stem cells from HCMV-seropositive donors.

    PubMed

    Hakki, Morgan; Goldman, Devorah C; Streblow, Daniel N; Hamlin, Kimberly L; Krekylwich, Craig N; Fleming, William H; Nelson, Jay A

    2014-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection, including primary infection resulting from transmission from a seropositive donor to a seronegative recipient (D(+)/R(-)), remains a significant problem in the setting of peripheral blood stem cell transplantation (PBSCT). The lack of a suitable animal model for studying HCMV transmission after PBSCT is a major barrier to understanding this process and, consequently, developing novel interventions to prevent HCMV infection. Our previous work demonstrated that human CD34(+) progenitor cell-engrafted NOD-scid IL2Rγc(null) (NSG) mice support latent HCMV infection after direct inoculation and reactivation after treatment with granulocyte colony-stimulating factor. To more accurately recapitulate HCMV infection in the D(+)/R(-) PBSCT setting, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor-mobilized peripheral blood stem cells from seropositive donors were used to engraft NSG mice. All recipient mice demonstrated evidence of HCMV infection in liver, spleen, and bone marrow. These findings validate the NSG mouse model for studying HCMV transmission during PBSCT.

  5. High viral load in lymph nodes and latent human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in peripheral blood cells of HIV-1-infected chimpanzees.

    PubMed Central

    Saksela, K; Muchmore, E; Girard, M; Fultz, P; Baltimore, D

    1993-01-01

    We have examined human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) infection in chimpanzees by analyzing HIV-1 DNA and RNA in lymph nodes and peripheral mononuclear cells (PBMCs). Like certain asymptomatic HIV-infected persons, these chimpanzees had no detectable viral replication in their PBMCs. However, viral replication and a high viral load were observed in the lymphatic tissue. Despite the absence of viral replication in PBMCs, 1/1,000 to 1/10,000 of the PBMCs contained HIV-1 proviral DNA, and HIV transcription could be rapidly induced in these cells in vitro. These results provide direct evidence of cellular latency of HIV in vivo and suggest that HIV infection in chimpanzees may be a useful model for clinical latency of HIV infection in humans. Images PMID:8230463

  6. Neuroplasticity - exercise-induced response of peripheral brain-derived neurotrophic factor: a systematic review of experimental studies in human subjects.

    PubMed

    Knaepen, Kristel; Goekint, Maaike; Heyman, Elsa Marie; Meeusen, Romain

    2010-09-01

    Exercise is known to induce a cascade of molecular and cellular processes that support brain plasticity. Brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) is an essential neurotrophin that is also intimately connected with central and peripheral molecular processes of energy metabolism and homeostasis, and could play a crucial role in these induced mechanisms. This review provides an overview of the current knowledge on the effects of acute exercise and/or training on BDNF in healthy subjects and in persons with a chronic disease or disability. A systematic and critical literature search was conducted. Articles were considered for inclusion in the review if they were human studies, assessed peripheral (serum and/or plasma) BDNF and evaluated an acute exercise or training intervention. Nine RCTs, one randomized trial, five non-randomized controlled trials, five non-randomized non-controlled trials and four retrospective observational studies were analysed. Sixty-nine percent of the studies in healthy subjects and 86% of the studies in persons with a chronic disease or disability, showed a 'mostly transient' increase in serum or plasma BDNF concentration following an acute aerobic exercise. The two studies regarding a single acute strength exercise session could not show a significant influence on basal BDNF concentration. In studies regarding the effects of strength or aerobic training on BDNF, a difference should be made between effects on basal BDNF concentration and training-induced effects on the BDNF response following an acute exercise. Only three out of ten studies on aerobic or strength training (i.e. 30%) found a training-induced increase in basal BDNF concentration. Two out of six studies (i.e. 33%) reported a significantly higher BDNF response to acute exercise following an aerobic or strength training programme (i.e. compared with the BDNF response to an acute exercise at baseline). A few studies of low quality (i.e. retrospective observational studies) show that

  7. Analgesia and unwanted benzodiazepine effects in point-mutated mice expressing only one benzodiazepine-sensitive GABAA receptor subtype

    PubMed Central

    Ralvenius, William T.; Benke, Dietmar; Acuña, Mario A.; Rudolph, Uwe; Zeilhofer, Hanns Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Agonists at the benzodiazepine-binding site of GABAA receptors (BDZs) enhance synaptic inhibition through four subtypes (α1, α2, α3 and α5) of GABAA receptors (GABAAR). When applied to the spinal cord, they alleviate pathological pain; however, insufficient efficacy after systemic administration and undesired effects preclude their use in routine pain therapy. Previous work suggested that subtype-selective drugs might allow separating desired antihyperalgesia from unwanted effects, but the lack of selective agents has hitherto prevented systematic analyses. Here we use four lines of triple GABAAR point-mutated mice, which express only one benzodiazepine-sensitive GABAAR subtype at a time, to show that targeting only α2GABAARs achieves strong antihyperalgesia and reduced side effects (that is, no sedation, motor impairment and tolerance development). Additional pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic analyses in these mice explain why clinically relevant antihyperalgesia cannot be achieved with nonselective BDZs. These findings should foster the development of innovative subtype-selective BDZs for novel indications such as chronic pain. PMID:25865415

  8. Immunoreactivity for Choline Acetyltransferase of Peripheral-Type (pChAT) in the Trigeminal Ganglion Neurons of the Non-Human Primate Macaca fascicularis

    PubMed Central

    Koga, Tsuneyuki; Bellier, Jean-Pierre; Kimura, Hiroshi; Tooyama, Ikuo

    2013-01-01

    Transcripts of the choline acetyltransferase (ChAT) gene reveal a number of different splice variants including ChAT of a peripheral type (pChAT). Immunohistochemical staining of the brain using an antibody against pChAT clearly revealed peripheral cholinergic neurons, but failed to detect cholinergic neurons in the central nervous system. In rodents, pChAT-immunoreactivity has been detected in cholinergic parasympathetic postganglionic and enteric ganglion neurons. In addition, pChAT has been observed in non-cholinergic neurons such as peripheral sensory neurons in the trigeminal and dorsal root ganglia. The common type of ChAT (cChAT) has been investigated in many parts of the brain and the spinal cord of non-human primates, but little information is available about the localization of pChAT in primate species. Here, we report the detection of pChAT immunoreactivity in trigeminal ganglion (TG) neurons and its co-localization with Substance P (SP) and/or calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP) in the cynomolgus monkey, Macaca fascicularis. Neurons positive for pChAT were observed in a rather uniform pattern in approximately half of the trigeminal neurons throughout the TG. Most pChAT-positive neurons had small or medium-sized cell bodies. Double-immunofluorescence staining showed that 85.1% of SP-positive cells and 74.0% of CGRP-positive cells exhibited pChAT immunoreactivity. Most pChAT-positive cells were part of a larger population of neurons that co-expressed SP and/or CGRP. PMID:23720604

  9. Benzodiazepines: a major component in unintentional prescription drug overdoses with opioid analgesics.

    PubMed

    Jann, Michael; Kennedy, William Klugh; Lopez, Gaylord

    2014-02-01

    The misuse and abuse of prescription medications in the United States continues to increase despite interventions by health care professionals, regulatory, and law enforcement agencies. Opioid analgesics are the leading class of prescription drugs that have caused unintentional overdose deaths. Benzodiazepines when taken alone are relatively safe agents in overdose. However, a 5-fold increase in deaths attributed to benzodiazepines occurred from 1999 to 2009. Emergency department visits related to opioid analgesics increased by 111% followed by benzodiazepines 89%. During 2003 to 2009, the 2 prescriptions drugs with the highest increase in death rates were oxycodone 264.6% and alprazolam 233.8%. Therefore, benzodiazepines have a significant impact on prescription drug unintentional overdoses second only to the opioid analgesics. The combination prescribing of benzodiazepines and opioid analgesics commonly takes place. The pharmacokinetic drug interactions between benzodiazepines and opioid analgesics are complex. The pharmacodynamic actions of these agents differ as their combined effects produce significant respiratory depression. Physician and pharmacy shopping by patients occurs, and prescription drug-monitoring programs can provide important information on benzodiazepine and opioid analgesic prescribing patterns and patient usage. Health care professionals need to inform patients and work closely with regulatory agencies and legislatures to stem the increasing fatalities from prescription drug unintentional overdoses.

  10. The relation between the blood benzodiazepine concentration and performance in suspected impaired drivers.

    PubMed

    Smink, B E; Lusthof, K J; de Gier, J J; Uges, D R A; Egberts, A C G

    2008-11-01

    Several experimental studies have shown a negative influence of benzodiazepines on driving skills. The objective of this study is to study the relationship between the blood concentration of benzodiazepines and the influence on performance in field sobriety tests. A retrospective case file evaluation was conducted to select cases of drivers, tested positive for benzodiazepines only in the period from January 1999 to December 2004. Drivers were grouped into the categories sub therapeutic, therapeutic or elevated concentrations. The outcome of the tests (walking, walking after turn, nystagmus, Romberg's test, behavior, pupils and orientation) was binomial. A Chi square test was used to assess differences in proportions of the categorized cases. In total 171 cases were included. Observations of behavior (n=137; p<0.01), walking (n=109; p<0.01), walking after turn (n=89; p=0.02) and Romberg's test (n=88; p<0.05) were significantly related to the benzodiazepine concentration. There was no significant relation between benzodiazepine concentration and effect on pupil size, nystagmus or orientation. The results of our study indicate a relation between the concentration of benzodiazepines and the results of some performance tests. More effort is needed to standardize the tests and to determine the sensitivity and selectivity of the tests for benzodiazepines.

  11. GABAA receptors and benzodiazepines: a role for dendritic resident subunit mRNAs.

    PubMed

    Costa, E; Auta, J; Grayson, D R; Matsumoto, K; Pappas, G D; Zhang, X; Guidotti, A

    2002-11-01

    This review is designed to describe the evolution of the seminal observation made simultaneously in 1975 by Dr. W. Haefely's laboratory (Hoffman La Roche, Basel, Switzerland) and in the Laboratory of Preclinical Pharmacology (NIH, St. Elizabeths Hospital, Washington DC), that benzodiazepine action was mediated by a modulation of GABA action at GABA(A) receptors. In fact, our suggestion was that the benzodiazepine receptor was "a receptor on a receptor" and that this receptor was GABA(A). Needless to say, this suggestion created opposition, but we did not abandon the original idea, in fact, as shown in this review, there is now universal agreement with our hypothesis on the mode of action of benzodiazepines. Hence, this review deals with the allosteric modulation of GABA(A) receptors by benzodiazepines, the role of GABA(A) receptors and benzodiazepine structure diversities in this modulation, and describes the results of our attempts to establish a benzodiazepine (imidazenil) devoid of tolerance, withdrawal symptoms, and changes in the expression of GABA(A) receptor subunits during tolerance. It also deals with the idea that the synthesis of GABA(A) receptor subunits triggered by tolerance resides in dendrites and spines where mRNAs and the apparatus for this translation is located. New analytic procedures may foster progress in the understanding of tolerance to and withdrawal from benzodiazepines.

  12. Calcium-Sensing Receptor in Human Peripheral Blood T Lymphocytes Is Involved in the AMI Onset and Progression through the NF-κB Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Jing-Ya; Du, Jing-Jing; Pan, Ying; Wu, Jian; Bi, Hai-Liang; Cui, Bao-Hong; Zhai, Tai-Yu; Sun, Yong; Sun, Yi-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is a condition triggered by an inflammatory process that seriously affects human health. Calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) in T lymphocytes is involved during the inflammation reaction. However, the relationship between them is not very clear. In this study, we collected human peripheral blood T lymphocytes from patients with AMI and in different stages of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) (at the onset of AMI, the first day after PCI (PCI-1), PCI-3, and PCI-5) to study the CaSR and NF-κB pathway protein expression, cytokine release and T cell apoptosis. The results showed that the expressions of CaSR, P-p65, Caspase-12, and the secretions of Th-1 and Th-2 type cytokines were increased at the onset of AMI, especially on the PCI-1. Meanwhile, the apoptosis rate of CD3+, CD4+ and CD8+ T lymphocytes also increased. However, from PCI-3, all the indicators began to decline. In addition, we also found that positive CaSR small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection in T lymphocytes and NF-κB pathway blocker Bay-11-7082 reversed the increased expressions of CaSR, P-p65, Caspase-12, reduced the secretions of Th-1 and Th-2 type cytokines, and decreased T lymphocytes apoptosis rate not only in the AMI patients but also in the normal controls. All of these results indicated that CaSR in the human peripheral blood T lymphocytes were involved in the AMI onset and progression, which probably was related to the NF-κB pathway. Our study demonstrated the relationship between AMI and CaSR, and will provide new effective prevention theory and new targets for drug treatment. PMID:27563892

  13. High-speed flow cytometric analysis of nanoparticle targeting to rare leukemic stem cells in peripheral human blood: preliminary in-vitro studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cooper, Christy L.; Leary, James F.

    2014-03-01

    Leukemic cancer stem cells are both stem-like and leukemic-like. This complicates their detection as rare circulating tumor cells in peripheral blood of leukemia patients. The leukemic stem cells are also highly resistant to standard chemotherapeutic regimens so new therapeutic strategies need to be designed to kill the leukemic stem cells without killing normal stem cells. In these initial studies we have designed an antibody-targeted and fluorescent (Cy5.5) nanoparticle for targeting these leukemic stem cells and then introducing new strategies for killing them. Multicolor flow cytometric analyses were performed on a BD FACS Aria III. Human leukemic stem cell-like cell line RS4;11 (with putative immunophenotype CD123+/CD24+/CD38-/CD10-/Flt-3-) was used as a model human leukemic stem cell systems and were spiked into normal human peripheral blood cells containing normal blood stem-progenitor cells (immunophenotype CD123-/CD34+/CD38-) and Cy5.5-labeled nanoparticles with targeting molecule anti-CD123 antibody. An irrelevant antibody (CD71) which should not bind to any live leukemic stem cell or normal stem cell (binds erythrocytes) was used as a way of distinguishing between true-positive live and false-positive damaged/dead cells, the latter occurring at much higher frequencies than the very rare (e.g. 0.001 to 0.0001 percent frequency true leukemic stem cells). These studies are designed to measure the targeting sensitivity and specificity of the fluorescent nanoparticles to the putative rare leukemic stem cells with the eventual design to use the nanoparticles to direct killing therapeutic doses to the leukemic stem cells but not to the normal stem-progenitor cells.

  14. Assessing the genotoxicity of imidacloprid and RH-5849 in human peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro with comet assay and cytogenetic tests.

    PubMed

    Feng, Shaolong; Kong, Zhiming; Wang, Xinming; Peng, Pingan; Zeng, Eddy Y

    2005-06-01

    A combined approach employing comet assay and micronucleus (MN) and sister chromatid exchanges (SCE) tests was utilized to assess the genotoxicity of two pesticides, imidacloprid [1-(6-chloro-3-pyridylmethyl)-N-nitro-imidazolidin-2-ylideneamine] and RH-5849 [2'-benzoyl-1'-tert-butylbenzoylhydrazine], on human peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro. No significant difference in the frequencies of MN and SCE from the negative groups (P>0.05) was observed at low dose levels (i.e., 0.05 mg/L for imidacloprid and 5mg/L for RH-5849). As the concentrations of imidacloprid and RH-5849 were increased to 0.1 and 25 mg/L, respectively, significant effects to the frequencies of MN and SCE (P<0.05) were achieved relative to those of the negative controls. MN and SCE frequencies increased similarly in a dose-related manner with both pesticides. With the comet assay, however, the distribution of DNA damage grades in all the pesticide-treated groups was significantly different from those in the control (P<0.01). DNA damage scores increased with the exposure levels of both pesticides, and linear dose-effect relationships were observed for both imidacloprid (r2=0.98) and RH-5849 (r2=0.92). The cytogenetic techniques and comet assay revealed potential adverse effects of both imidacloprid and RH-5849 in human peripheral blood lymphocytes in vitro. Combination of the comet assay and cytogenetic tests appears commendable to assess the potential risks of human exposure to the pesticides.

  15. Calcium-Sensing Receptor in Human Peripheral Blood T Lymphocytes Is Involved in the AMI Onset and Progression through the NF-κB Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Jing-Ya; Du, Jing-Jing; Pan, Ying; Wu, Jian; Bi, Hai-Liang; Cui, Bao-Hong; Zhai, Tai-Yu; Sun, Yong; Sun, Yi-Hua

    2016-01-01

    Acute myocardial infarction (AMI) is a condition triggered by an inflammatory process that seriously affects human health. Calcium-sensing receptor (CaSR) in T lymphocytes is involved during the inflammation reaction. However, the relationship between them is not very clear. In this study, we collected human peripheral blood T lymphocytes from patients with AMI and in different stages of percutaneous coronary intervention (PCI) (at the onset of AMI, the first day after PCI (PCI-1), PCI-3, and PCI-5) to study the CaSR and NF-κB pathway protein expression, cytokine release and T cell apoptosis. The results showed that the expressions of CaSR, P-p65, Caspase-12, and the secretions of