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Sample records for human protein kinases

  1. Identification of human cyclin-dependent kinase 8, a putative protein kinase partner for cyclin C.

    PubMed

    Tassan, J P; Jaquenoud, M; Léopold, P; Schultz, S J; Nigg, E A

    1995-09-12

    Metazoan cyclin C was originally isolated by virtue of its ability to rescue Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells deficient in G1 cyclin function. This suggested that cyclin C might play a role in cell cycle control, but progress toward understanding the function of this cyclin has been hampered by the lack of information on a potential kinase partner. Here we report the identification of a human protein kinase, K35 [cyclin-dependent kinase 8 (CDK8)], that is likely to be a physiological partner of cyclin C. A specific interaction between K35 and cyclin C could be demonstrated after translation of CDKs and cyclins in vitro. Furthermore, cyclin C could be detected in K35 immunoprecipitates prepared from HeLa cells, indicating that the two proteins form a complex also in vivo. The K35-cyclin C complex is structurally related to SRB10-SRB11, a CDK-cyclin pair recently shown to be part of the RNA polymerase II holoenzyme of S. cerevisiae. Hence, we propose that human K35(CDK8)-cyclin C might be functionally associated with the mammalian transcription apparatus, perhaps involved in relaying growth-regulatory signals.

  2. HPLC-DAD protein kinase inhibitor analysis in human serum.

    PubMed

    Dziadosz, Marek; Lessig, Rüdiger; Bartels, Heidemarie

    2012-04-15

    We here describe an HPLC-DAD method to analyse different protein kinase inhibitors. Potential applications of this method are pharmacokinetic studies and therapeutic drug monitoring. Optimised chromatography conditions resulted in a very good separation of seven inhibitors (vatalanib, bosutinib, canertinib, tandutinib, pazopanib, dasatinib - internal standard and erlotinib). The good sensitivity makes this method competitive with LC/MS/MS. The separation was performed with a Lichrospher 100-5 RP8, 250 mm × 4 mm column maintained at 30 ± 1 °C, and with a mobile phase of 0.05 M H(3)PO(4)/KH(2)PO(4) (pH=2.3)-acetonitrile (7:3, v/v) at a flow rate of 0.7 mL/min. A simple and fast sample preparation sequence with liquid-liquid extraction led to good recoveries (73-90%) of all analytes. The recovery hardly reached 50% only for pazopanib. This method can also be used for targeted protein kinase inhibitor quantification. A perfect linearity in the validated range (20-10,000 ng/mL) and an LOQ of 20 ng/mL were achieved. The relative standard deviations and accuracies of all examined drug concentrations gave values much lower than 15% both for between- and within-batch calculations. All analysed PKIs were stable for 6 months in a 1mg/mL dimethyl sulfoxide stock solution. Vatalanib, bosutinib and erlotinib were also stable in human serum in the whole examined concentration range. PMID:22425385

  3. Phosphorylation of Human Choline Kinase Beta by Protein Kinase A: Its Impact on Activity and Inhibition

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ching Ching; Few, Ling Ling; Konrad, Manfred; See Too, Wei Cun

    2016-01-01

    Choline kinase beta (CKβ) is one of the CK isozymes involved in the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine. CKβ is important for normal mitochondrial function and muscle development as the lack of the ckβ gene in human and mice results in the development of muscular dystrophy. In contrast, CKα is implicated in tumorigenesis and has been extensively studied as an anticancer target. Phosphorylation of human CKα was found to regulate the enzyme’s activity and its subcellular location. This study provides evidence for CKβ phosphorylation by protein kinase A (PKA). In vitro phosphorylation of CKβ by PKA was first detected by phosphoprotein staining, as well as by in-gel kinase assays. The phosphorylating kinase was identified as PKA by Western blotting. CKβ phosphorylation by MCF-7 cell lysate was inhibited by a PKA-specific inhibitor peptide, and the intracellular phosphorylation of CKβ was shown to be regulated by the level of cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP), a PKA activator. Phosphorylation sites were located on CKβ residues serine-39 and serine-40 as determined by mass spectrometry and site-directed mutagenesis. Phosphorylation increased the catalytic efficiencies for the substrates choline and ATP about 2-fold, without affecting ethanolamine phosphorylation, and the S39D/S40D CKβ phosphorylation mimic behaved kinetically very similar. Remarkably, phosphorylation drastically increased the sensitivity of CKβ to hemicholinium-3 (HC-3) inhibition by about 30-fold. These findings suggest that CKβ, in concert with CKα, and depending on its phosphorylation status, might play a critical role as a druggable target in carcinogenesis. PMID:27149373

  4. ProNormz--an integrated approach for human proteins and protein kinases normalization.

    PubMed

    Subramani, Suresh; Raja, Kalpana; Natarajan, Jeyakumar

    2014-02-01

    The task of recognizing and normalizing protein name mentions in biomedical literature is a challenging task and important for text mining applications such as protein-protein interactions, pathway reconstruction and many more. In this paper, we present ProNormz, an integrated approach for human proteins (HPs) tagging and normalization. In Homo sapiens, a greater number of biological processes are regulated by a large human gene family called protein kinases by post translational phosphorylation. Recognition and normalization of human protein kinases (HPKs) is considered to be important for the extraction of the underlying information on its regulatory mechanism from biomedical literature. ProNormz distinguishes HPKs from other HPs besides tagging and normalization. To our knowledge, ProNormz is the first normalization system available to distinguish HPKs from other HPs in addition to gene normalization task. ProNormz incorporates a specialized synonyms dictionary for human proteins and protein kinases, a set of 15 string matching rules and a disambiguation module to achieve the normalization. Experimental results on benchmark BioCreative II training and test datasets show that our integrated approach achieve a fairly good performance and outperforms more sophisticated semantic similarity and disambiguation systems presented in BioCreative II GN task. As a freely available web tool, ProNormz is useful to developers as extensible gene normalization implementation, to researchers as a standard for comparing their innovative techniques, and to biologists for normalization and categorization of HPs and HPKs mentions in biomedical literature. URL: http://www.biominingbu.org/pronormz.

  5. Protein kinase C translocation in human blood platelets

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Hoauyan; Friedman, E. )

    1990-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) activity and translocation in response to the phorbol ester, phorbol 12-myristate, 13-acetate (PMA), serotonin (5-HT) and thrombin was assessed in human platelets. Stimulation with PMA and 5-HT for 10 minutes or thrombin for 1 minute elicited platelet PKC translocation from cytosol to membrane. The catecholamines, norepinephrine or epinephrine at 10 {mu}M concentrations did not induce redistribution of platelet PKC. Serotonin and the specific 5-HT{sub 2} receptor agonist, 1-(2,5-dimethoxy-4-iodophenyl)-2-amino-propane (DOI) but not the 5-HT{sub 1A} or 5-HT{sub 1B} agonists, ({plus minus}) 8-hydroxy-dipropylamino-tetralin (8-OH-DPAT) or 5-methoxy-3-3-(1,2,3,6-tetrahydro-4-pyridin) 1H-indole succinate (RU 24969) induced dose-dependent PKC translocations. Serotonin-evoked PKC translocation was blocked by selective 5-HT{sub 2} receptor antagonists, ketanserin and spiroperidol. These results suggest that, in human platelets, PMA, thrombin and 5-HT can elicit PKC translocation from cytosol to membrane. Serotonin-induced PKC translocation in platelets is mediated via 5-HT{sub 2} receptors.

  6. Structure of Human G Protein-Coupled Receptor Kinase 2 in Complex with the Kinase Inhibitor Balanol

    SciTech Connect

    Tesmer, John J.G.; Tesmer, Valerie M.; Lodowski, David T.; Steinhagen, Henning; Huber, Jochen

    2010-07-19

    G protein-coupled receptor kinase 2 (GRK2) is a pharmaceutical target for the treatment of cardiovascular diseases such as congestive heart failure, myocardial infarction, and hypertension. To better understand how nanomolar inhibition and selectivity for GRK2 might be achieved, we have determined crystal structures of human GRK2 in complex with G{beta}{gamma} in the presence and absence of the AGC kinase inhibitor balanol. The selectivity of balanol among human GRKs is assessed.

  7. Activation of protein kinase C in permeabilized human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells.

    PubMed

    Larsson, C; Saermark, T; Mau, S; Simonsson, P

    1992-08-01

    The activation of protein kinase C was investigated in digitonin-permeabilized human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells by measuring the phosphorylation of the specific protein kinase C substrate myelin basic protein4-14. The phosphorylation was inhibited by the protein kinase C inhibitory peptide PKC19-36 and was associated to a translocation of the enzyme to the membrane fractions of the SH-SY5Y cells. 1,2-Dioctanoyl-sn-glycerol had no effect on protein kinase C activity unless the calcium concentration was raised to concentrations found in stimulated cells (above 100 nM). Calcium in the absence of other activators did not stimulate protein kinase C. Phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate was not dependent on calcium for the activation or the translocation of protein kinase C. The induced activation was sustained for 10 min, and thereafter only a small net phosphorylation of the substrate could be detected. Calcium or dioctanoylglycerol, when applied alone, only caused a minor translocation, whereas in combination a marked translocation was observed. Arachidonic acid (10 microM) enhanced protein kinase C activity in the presence of submaximal concentrations of calcium and dioctanoylglycerol. Quinacrine and p-bromophenacyl bromide did not inhibit calcium- and dioctanoylglycerol-induced protein kinase C activity at concentrations which are considered to be sufficient for phospholipase A2 inhibition.

  8. Human pyruvate kinase M2: a multifunctional protein.

    PubMed

    Gupta, Vibhor; Bamezai, Rameshwar N K

    2010-11-01

    Glycolysis, a central metabolic pathway, harbors evolutionary conserved enzymes that modulate and potentially shift the cellular metabolism on requirement. Pyruvate kinase, which catalyzes the last but rate-limiting step of glycolysis, is expressed in four isozymic forms, depending on the tissue requirement. M2 isoform (PKM2) is exclusively expressed in embryonic and adult dividing/tumor cells. This tetrameric allosterically regulated isoform is intrinsically designed to downregulate its activity by subunit dissociation (into dimer), which results in partial inhibition of glycolysis at the last step. This accumulates all upstream glycolytic intermediates as an anabolic feed for synthesis of lipids and nucleic acids, whereas reassociation of PKM2 into active tetramer replenishes the normal catabolism as a feedback after cell division. In addition, involvement of this enzyme in a variety of pathways, protein-protein interactions, and nuclear transport suggests its potential to perform multiple nonglycolytic functions with diverse implications, although multidimensional role of this protein is as yet not fully explored. This review aims to provide an overview of the involvement of PKM2 in various physiological pathways with possible functional implications. PMID:20857498

  9. Human thrombopoiesis depends on Protein kinase Cδ/protein kinase Cε functional couple

    PubMed Central

    Carubbi, Cecilia; Masselli, Elena; Martini, Silvia; Galli, Daniela; Aversa, Franco; Mirandola, Prisco; Italiano, Joseph E.; Gobbi, Giuliana; Vitale, Marco

    2016-01-01

    A deeper understanding of the molecular events driving megakaryocytopoiesis and thrombopoiesis is essential to regulate in vitro and in vivo platelet production for clinical applications. We previously documented the crucial role of PKCε in the regulation of human and mouse megakaryocyte maturation and platelet release. However, since several data show that different PKC isoforms fulfill complementary functions, we targeted PKCε and PKCδ, which show functional and phenotypical reciprocity, at the same time as boosting platelet production in vitro. Results show that PKCδ, contrary to PKCε, is persistently expressed during megakaryocytic differentiation, and a forced PKCδ down-modulation impairs megakaryocyte maturation and platelet production. PKCδ and PKCε work as a functional couple with opposite roles on thrombopoiesis, and the modulation of their balance strongly impacts platelet production. Indeed, we show an imbalance of PKCδ/PKCε ratio both in primary myelofibrosis and essential thrombocythemia, featured by impaired megakaryocyte differentiation and increased platelet production, respectively. Finally, we demonstrate that concurrent molecular targeting of both PKCδ and PKCε represents a strategy for in vitro platelet factories. PMID:27081176

  10. Expression, purification and crystallization of a human tau-tubulin kinase 2 that phosphorylates tau protein

    SciTech Connect

    Kitano-Takahashi, Michiko; Morita, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Shin; Tomizawa, Kayoko; Kato, Ryohei; Tanio, Michikazu; Shirota, Yoshiko; Takahashi, Hiroshi; Sugio, Shigetoshi; Kohno, Toshiyuki

    2007-07-01

    The kinase domain (residues 1–331) of human tau-tubulin kinase 2 was expressed in insect cells, purified and crystallized. Diffraction data have been collected to 2.9 Å resolution. Tau-tubulin kinase 2 (TTBK2) is a Ser/Thr kinase that putatively phosphorylates residues Ser208 and Ser210 (numbered according to a 441-residue human tau isoform) in tau protein. Functional analyses revealed that a recombinant kinase domain (residues 1–331) of human TTBK2 expressed in insect cells with a baculovirus overexpression system retains kinase activity for tau protein. The kinase domain of TTBK2 was crystallized using the hanging-drop vapour-diffusion method. The crystals belong to space group P2{sub 1}2{sub 1}2{sub 1}, with unit-cell parameters a = 55.6, b = 113.7, c = 117.3 Å, α = β = γ = 90.0°. Diffraction data were collected to 2.9 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation at BL24XU of SPring-8.

  11. Analysis of Substrates of Protein Kinase C Isoforms in Human Breast Cells By The Traceable Kinase Method

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Xiangyu; Zhao, Xin; Abeyweera, Thushara P.; Rotenberg, Susan A.

    2012-01-01

    A previous report (Biochemistry 46: 2364–2370, 2007) described the application of The Traceable Kinase Method to identify substrates of PKCα in non-transformed human breast MCF-10A cells. Here, a non-radioactive variation of this method compared the phospho-protein profiles of three traceable PKC isoforms (α, δ and ζ) for the purpose of identifying novel, isoform-selective substrates. Each FLAG-tagged traceable kinase was expressed and co-immunoprecipitated along with high affinity substrates. The isolated kinase and its associated substrates were subjected to an in vitro phosphorylation reaction with traceable kinase-specific N6-phenyl-ATP, and the resulting phospho-proteins were analyzed by Western blot with an antibody that recognizes the phosphorylated PKC consensus site. Phospho-protein profiles generated by PKC-α and -δ were similar and differed markedly from that of PKC-ζ. Mass spectrometry of selected bands revealed known PKC substrates and several potential substrates that included the small GTPase-associated effector protein Cdc42 effector protein-4 (CEP4). Of those potential substrates tested, only CEP4 was phosphorylated by pure PKC-α, –δ, and −ζ isoforms in vitro, and by endogenous PKC isoforms in MCF-10A cells treated with DAG-lactone, a membrane permeable PKC activator. Under these conditions, the stoichiometry of CEP4 phosphorylation was 3.2 ± 0.5 (mol phospho-CEP4/mol CEP4). Following knock-down with isoform-specific shRNA-encoding plasmids, phosphorylation of CEP4 was substantially decreased in response to silencing of each of the three isoforms (PKC–α, –δ, or –ζ), whereas testing of kinase-dead mutants supported a role for only PKC-α and –δ in CEP4 phosphorylation. These findings identify CEP4 as a novel intracellular PKC substrate that is phosphorylated by multiple PKC isoforms. PMID:22897107

  12. A novel human STE20-related protein kinase, HGK, that specifically activates the c-Jun N-terminal kinase signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Yao, Z; Zhou, G; Wang, X S; Brown, A; Diener, K; Gan, H; Tan, T H

    1999-01-22

    The yeast serine/threonine kinase STE20 activates a signaling cascade that includes STE11 (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase), STE7 (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase), and FUS3/KSS1 (mitogen-activated protein kinase) in response to signals from both Cdc42 and the heterotrimeric G proteins associated with transmembrane pheromone receptors. Using degenerate polymerase chain reaction, we have isolated a human cDNA encoding a protein kinase homologous to STE20. This protein kinase, designated HPK/GCK-like kinase (HGK), has nucleotide sequences that encode an open reading frame of 1165 amino acids with 11 kinase subdomains. HGK was a serine/threonine protein kinase that specifically activated the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) signaling pathway when transfected into 293T cells, but it did not stimulate either the extracellular signal-regulated kinase or p38 kinase pathway. HGK also increased AP-1-mediated transcriptional activity in vivo. HGK-induced JNK activation was inhibited by the dominant-negative MKK4 and MKK7 mutants. The dominant-negative mutant of TAK1, but not MEKK1 or MAPK upstream kinase (MUK), strongly inhibited HGK-induced JNK activation. TNF-alpha activated HGK in 293T cells, as well as the dominant-negative HGK mutants, inhibited TNF-alpha-induced JNK activation. These results indicate that HGK, a novel activator of the JNK pathway, may function through TAK1, and that the HGK --> TAK1 --> MKK4, MKK7 --> JNK kinase cascade may mediate the TNF-alpha signaling pathway. PMID:9890973

  13. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Nef binds directly to Lck and mitogen-activated protein kinase, inhibiting kinase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Greenway, A; Azad, A; Mills, J; McPhee, D

    1996-01-01

    It is now well established that human immunodeficiency virus type I (HIV-1) Nef contributes substantially to disease pathogenesis by augmenting virus replication and markedly perturbing T-cell function. The effect of Nef on host cell activation could be explained in part by its interaction with specific cellular proteins involved in signal transduction, including at least a member of the src family kinase, Lck, and the serine/threonine kinase, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Recombinant Nef directly interacted with purified Lck and MAPK in coprecipitation experiments and binding assays. A proline-rich repeat sequence [(Pxx)4] in Nef occurring between amino acid residues 69 to 78 is highly conserved and bears strong resemblance to a defined consensus sequence identified as an SH3 binding domain present in several proteins which can interact with the SH3 domain of various signalling and cytoskeletal proteins. Binding and coprecipitation assays with short synthetic peptides corresponding to the proline-rich repeat sequence [(Pxx)4] of Nef and the SH2, SH3, or SH2 and SH3 domains of Lck revealed that the interaction between these two proteins is at least in part mediated by the proline repeat sequence of Nef and the SH3 domain of Lck. In addition to direct binding to full-length Nef, MAPK was also shown to bind the same proline repeat motif. Nef protein significantly decreased the in vitro kinase activity of Lck and MAPK. Inhibition of key members of signalling cascades, including those emanating from the T-cell receptor, by the HIV-1 Nef protein undoubtedly alters the ability of the infected T cell to respond to antigens or cytokines, facilitating HIV-1 replication and contributing to HIV-1-induced disease pathogenesis. PMID:8794306

  14. In vitro binding and phosphorylation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Nef protein by serine/threonine protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Bodéus, M; Marie-Cardine, A; Bougeret, C; Ramos-Morales, F; Benarous, R

    1995-06-01

    Although the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) nef gene still has no precisely defined function, in vivo studies have demonstrated that Nef is an important pathogenic determinant of HIV. In order to identify cellular proteins capable of binding to Nef, the HIV-1LAI nef gene product was expressed in the bacterial vector pGEX-2T as a glutathione S-transferase (GST)-Nef fusion protein. Deletion mutants corresponding to 86 and 35 N-terminal residues of the Nef protein were prepared. The GST-Nef constructs were used to identify cellular kinases capable of interacting with Nef. After incubation with a Jurkat cell lysate, the GST-Nef constructs immobilized on glutathione-agarose beads bound to cellular kinase(s) and were phosphorylated at three sites in vitro: one on threonine at position 15, one on serine between residues 1 and 35, and one on threonine between residues 36 and 86. The Nef-phosphorylating activity was inhibited by protein kinase C (PKC)-selective inhibitors. Cell fractionation showed that this Nef-binding kinase was mainly in the membrane-associated fraction. These results suggest that kinase(s) of the PKC family are specifically bound to and phosphorylate Nef in vitro. The interaction of Nef with cellular kinases and its phosphorylation may be important in mediating the effects of Nef in HIV-1 pathogenesis.

  15. Association of protein kinase FA/GSK-3alpha (a proline-directed kinase and a regulator of protooncogenes) with human cervical carcinoma dedifferentiation/progression.

    PubMed

    Yang, S D; Yu, J S; Lee, T T; Ni, M H; Yang, C C; Ho, Y S; Tsen, T Z

    1995-10-01

    Computer analysis of protein phosphorylation-sites sequence revealed that most transcriptional factors and viral oncoproteins are prime targets for regulation of proline-directed protein phosphorylation, suggesting an association of proline-directed protein kinase (PDPK) family with neoplastic transformation and tumorigenesis. In this report, an immunoprecipitate activity assay of protein kinase FA/glycogen synthase kinase-3alpha (kinase FA/GSK-3alpha) (a particular member of PDPK family) has been optimized for human cervical tissue and used to demonstrate for the first time significantly increased (P < 0.001) activity in poorly differentiated cervical carcinoma (82.8 +/- 6.6 U/mg of protein), moderately differentiated carcinoma (36.2 +/- 3.4 U/mg of protein), and well-differentiated carcinoma (18.3 +/- 2.4 U/mg of protein) from 36 human cervical carcinoma samples when compared to 12 normal controls (4.9 +/- 0.6 U/mg of protein). Immunoblotting analysis further revealed that increased activity of kinase FA/GSK-3alpha in cervical carcinoma is due to overexpression of protein synthesis of the kinase. Taken together, the results provide initial evidence that overexpression of protein synthesis and cellular activity of kinase FA/GSK-3alpha may be involved in human cervical carcinoma dedifferentiation/progression, supporting an association of proline-directed protein kinase with neoplastic transformation and tumorigenesis. Since protein kinase FA/GSK-3alpha may function as a possible regulator of transcription factors/proto-oncogenes, the results further suggest that kinase FA/GSK-3alpha may play a potential role in human cervical carcinogenesis, especially in its dedifferentiation and progression.

  16. Structural insight into nucleotide recognition by human death-associated protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    McNamara, Laurie K.; Watterson, D.M.; Brunzelle, Joseph S.

    2009-06-01

    Death-associated protein kinase (DAPK) is a member of the Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-regulated family of serine/threonine protein kinases. The role of the kinase activity of DAPK in eukaryotic cell apoptosis and the ability of bioavailable DAPK inhibitors to rescue neuronal death after brain injury have made it a drug-discovery target for neurodegenerative disorders. In order to understand the recognition of nucleotides by DAPK and to gain insight into DAPK catalysis, the crystal structure of human DAPK was solved in complex with ADP and Mg{sup 2+} at 1.85 {angstrom} resolution. ADP is a product of the kinase reaction and product release is considered to be the rate-limiting step of protein kinase catalytic cycles. The structure of DAPK-ADP-Mg{sup 2+} was compared with a newly determined DAPK-AMP-PNP-Mg{sup 2+} structure and the previously determined apo DAPK structure (PDB code 1 jks). The comparison shows that nucleotide-induced changes are localized to the glycine-rich loop region of DAPK.

  17. The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Nef protein functions as a protein kinase C substrate in vitro.

    PubMed

    Coates, K; Harris, M

    1995-04-01

    The human immunodeficiency virus type 1 Nef protein was expressed in Escherichia coli as a C-terminal fusion with glutathione S-transferase (GST). The ability of GST-Nef to act as a substrate for cellular kinases in vitro was examined by incubation of purified GST-Nef fusion proteins, immobilized on glutathione-agarose beads, with cytoplasmic extracts from a number of human cell lines. In the presence of [gamma32P]ATP, phosphorylation of Nef occurred predominantly on serine residues. Studies with protein kinase inhibitors suggested that protein kinase C (PKC) was involved in Nef phosphorylation. This was supported further by the demonstration that purified PKC was also able to phosphorylate Nef in the absence of cell extract. Serine/threonine phosphorylation of Nef was also observed in vivo when Nef was expressed with a C-terminal GST or 6-histidine tag in Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells by recombinant baculoviruses. In extracts from Jurkat T cells and U937 monocyte/macrophages Nef also associated with a 57 kDa cellular protein that was itself phosphorylated in vitro. Phosphorylation of this Nef-associated protein was inhibited by heparin and is thus likely to be mediated by casein kinase II. The observation that PKC can phosphorylate Nef in vitro raises the possibility that PKC might play a role in regulating both Nef function and the physical interactions between Nef and cellular components.

  18. Structure and transforming potential of the human cot oncogene encoding a putative protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Miyoshi, J; Higashi, T; Mukai, H; Ohuchi, T; Kakunaga, T

    1991-01-01

    A new transforming gene has been molecularly cloned from hamster SHOK cells transformed with DNA extracted from a human thyroid carcinoma cell line and named the cot (cancer Osaka thyroid) oncogene. cDNA sequencing disclosed that this oncogene codes for a protein with 415 amino acid residues, and computer matching showed 42 to 48% similarity matches with serine protein kinases. Its gene product was identified as a 52-kDa protein by transcription and translation in vitro. Expression of cot cDNA under transcriptional control by a retroviral long terminal repeat induced morphological transformation of NIH 3T3 cells as well as SHOK cells. Protein kinase activity associated with constructed p60gag-cot was detected by immune complex kinase assay with anti-gag antiserum. The cot oncogene was overexpressed in transformed SHOK cells and found to have a rearranged 3' end in the last coding exon, which probably resulted in a deletion and an altered C' terminus in the transforming protein. This DNA rearrangement appeared to have occurred during transfection of the tumor DNA into hamster SHOK cells and not in the original thyroid tumor. Images PMID:2072910

  19. Protein Kinase RNA-Like Endoplasmic Reticulum Kinase-Mediated Bcl-2 Protein Phosphorylation Contributes to Evodiamine-Induced Apoptosis of Human Renal Cell Carcinoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Wen-Shin; Chien, Chih-Chiang; Chen, Yen-Chou; Chiu, Wen-Ta

    2016-01-01

    We investigated the anticancer mechanism of evodiamine (EVO) against the viability of human A498 renal cell carcinoma (RCC) cells in vitro and in vivo. The in vitro study showed that EVO decreased the viability of A498 cells with the occurrence of apoptotic characteristics such as hypodiploid cells, DNA ladders, chromatin-condensed cells, and cleaved caspase (Casp)-3/poly(ADP ribose) polymerase (PARP) proteins. Pharmacological studies using chemical inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K) indicated that phosphorylation of the c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) protein participated in EVO-induced cell death of A498 cells, and application of the JNK inhibitor, SP600125 (SP), inhibited EVO-induced cleavage of the Casp-3/PARP proteins and chromatin condensation according to Giemsa staining. EVO disruption of the mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) with increased protein levels of the phosphorylated Bcl-2 protein (p-Bcl-2) was prevented by JNK inhibitors in A498 cells. A structure-activity relationship study showed that a methyl group at position 14 in EVO was important for its apoptotic effects and increased p-Bcl-2 protein in A498 cells. Furthermore, significant increases in the phosphorylated endoplasmic reticular stress protein, protein kinase RNA-like endoplasmic reticulum kinase (p-PERK at Thr980), by EVO were detected in A498 cells, and the PERK inhibitor, GSK2606414, significantly suppressed EVO-induced apoptosis, p-JNK, p-PERK, and cleaved PARP proteins. The in vivo study showed that EVO significantly reduced RCC growth elicited by a subcutaneous injection of A498 cells, and an increased protein level of p-PERK was observed according to an immunohistochemical analysis. Apoptosis by EVO was also demonstrated in other RCC cells such as 786-O, ACHN, and Caki-1 cells. This is the first study to demonstrate the anti-RCC effect of EVO via apoptosis in vitro and in vivo, and activation of JNK and PERK to induce Bcl-2

  20. Parasite Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases as Drug Discovery Targets to Treat Human Protozoan Pathogens

    PubMed Central

    Brumlik, Michael J.; Pandeswara, Srilakshmi; Ludwig, Sara M.; Murthy, Kruthi; Curiel, Tyler J.

    2011-01-01

    Protozoan pathogens are a highly diverse group of unicellular organisms, several of which are significant human pathogens. One group of protozoan pathogens includes obligate intracellular parasites such as agents of malaria, leishmaniasis, babesiosis, and toxoplasmosis. The other group includes extracellular pathogens such as agents of giardiasis and amebiasis. An unfortunate unifying theme for most human protozoan pathogens is that highly effective treatments for them are generally lacking. We will review targeting protozoan mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) as a novel drug discovery approach towards developing better therapies, focusing on Plasmodia, Leishmania, and Toxoplasma, about which the most is known. PMID:21637385

  1. Structural insight into nucleotide recognition by human death-associated protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    McNamara, Laurie K.; Watterson, D. Martin; Brunzelle, Joseph S.

    2009-03-01

    The crystal structures of DAPK–ADP–Mg{sup 2+} and DAPK–AMP-PNP–Mg{sup 2+} complexes were determined at 1.85 and 2.00 Å resolution, respectively. Comparison of the two nucleotide-bound states with apo DAPK revealed localized changes in the glycine-rich loop region that were indicative of a transition from a more open state to a more closed state on binding of the nucleotide substrate and to an intermediate state with the bound nucleotide product. Death-associated protein kinase (DAPK) is a member of the Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-regulated family of serine/threonine protein kinases. The role of the kinase activity of DAPK in eukaryotic cell apoptosis and the ability of bioavailable DAPK inhibitors to rescue neuronal death after brain injury have made it a drug-discovery target for neurodegenerative disorders. In order to understand the recognition of nucleotides by DAPK and to gain insight into DAPK catalysis, the crystal structure of human DAPK was solved in complex with ADP and Mg{sup 2+} at 1.85 Å resolution. ADP is a product of the kinase reaction and product release is considered to be the rate-limiting step of protein kinase catalytic cycles. The structure of DAPK–ADP–Mg{sup 2+} was compared with a newly determined DAPK–AMP-PNP–Mg{sup 2+} structure and the previously determined apo DAPK structure (PDB code http://scripts.iucr.org/cgi-bin/cr.cgi?rm). The comparison shows that nucleotide-induced changes are localized to the glycine-rich loop region of DAPK.

  2. Protein kinase C phosphorylates a recently identified membrane skeleton-associated calmodulin-binding protein in human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ling, E; Gardner, K; Bennett, V

    1986-10-25

    A membrane skeleton-associated protein with calmodulin-binding activity recently has been purified and characterized from human erythrocytes (Gardner, K. and Bennett, V. (1986) J. Biol. Chem. 261, 1339-1348). This new protein (CaM-BP103/97) has now been identified as a major substrate for protein kinase C in erythrocytes since phosphorylation of both of its subunits (Mr = 103,000 and 97,000) is elevated 3-15-fold in the presence of the phorbol ester, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol beta-acetate (TPA), under the following conditions: ghost membranes incubated with protein kinase C purified from rat brain, ghost membranes from erythrocytes pretreated with TPA, and intact erythrocytes metabolically labeled with 32PO4 and stimulated by TPA. The sites of phosphorylation of this protein by exogenous and endogenous protein kinase C are identical since two-dimensional 32P-peptide maps of both subunits labeled by either endogenous or exogenous enzyme are indistinguishable. Each subunit of CaM-BP103/97 accepts up to 3 mol of phosphate/polypeptide chain. In the presence of low calcium concentrations and in the absence of cytosol, the phosphorylation of CaM-BP103/97 is, on a molar basis, equal to or greater than that of proteins 4.1 and 4.9. As a target for both calmodulin and protein kinase C, CaM-BP103/97 is likely to play a key role in the effect of calcium on erythrocyte membrane shape and stability.

  3. Anti-immunoglobulin M activates nuclear calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II in human B lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    We and others have previously shown that the nuclear protein, Ets-1, is phosphorylated in a calcium-dependent manner after ligation of immunoglobulin (Ig) M on B lymphocytes. As this phosphorylation was independent of protein kinase C activity, we tested whether a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase (CaM kinase) might phosphorylate the Ets-1 protein after elevation of intracellular free calcium concentrations. The dephosphorylated form of Ets-1 has been shown to bind to chromatin, suggesting that the operative kinase should be detectable in the nucleus. We prepared nuclear extracts from two human B cell lines in which increased intracellular free calcium levels correlated with increased phosphorylation of the Ets-1 protein. Activity of the CaM kinases was determined using a synthetic peptide substrate both in the absence and presence of an inhibitor specific for the CaM kinase family, KN-62. Stimulation of cells with anti-IgM led to increased activity of a nuclear kinase that could phosphorylate the peptide, and this activity was reduced by 10 microM KN-62. Kinase activity was reduced in lysates preadsorbed using an antibody specific for CaM kinase II. Two-dimensional phosphopeptide maps of the Ets-1 protein from cells incubated with ionomycin or anti-IgM contained two unique phosphopeptides that were absent in untreated cells. Incubation of isolated Ets-1 protein with purified CaM kinase II produced phosphorylation of peptides that migrated identically to those found in cells incubated with either anti-IgM or ionomycin. These data suggest a model of signal transduction by the antigen receptor on B lymphocytes in which increased intracellular free calcium can rapidly activate nuclear CaM kinase II, potentially resulting in phosphorylation and regulation of DNA-binding proteins. PMID:7500040

  4. Structural basis of CX-4945 binding to human protein kinase CK2

    SciTech Connect

    Ferguson, Andrew D.; Sheth, Payal R.; Basso, Andrea D.; Paliwal, Sunil; Gray, Kimberly; Fischmann, Thierry O.; Le, Hung V.

    2012-02-07

    Protein kinase CK2 (CK2), a constitutively active serine/threonine kinase, is involved in a variety of roles essential to the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. Elevated levels of CK2 expression results in the dysregulation of key signaling pathways that regulate transcription, and has been implicated in cancer. The adenosine-5'-triphosphate-competitive inhibitor CX-4945 has been reported to show broad spectrum anti-proliferative activity in multiple cancer cell lines. Although the enzymatic IC{sub 50} of CX-4945 has been reported, the thermodynamics and structural basis of binding to CK2{alpha} remained elusive. Presented here are the crystal structures of human CK2{alpha} in complex with CX-4945 and adenylyl phosphoramidate at 2.7 and 1.3 {angstrom}, respectively. Biophysical analysis of CX-4945 binding is also described. This data provides the structural rationale for the design of more potent inhibitors against this emerging cancer target.

  5. Potential mediation of prostaglandin E2 release from isolated human parietal cells by protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Schepp, W; Schneider, J; Tatge, C; Schusdziarra, V; Classen, M

    1990-01-01

    Parietal cells are a major source of gastric mucosal prostaglandins in various species. We examined cholinergic stimulation of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) release from human parietal cells; using activators of the protein kinase C we attempted to get an indirect insight into cellular mechanisms which control PGE2 release. Gastric mucosal specimens were obtained at surgery and the cells were dispersed by collagenase and pronase E. Parietal cells were enriched to 65-80% by a Percoll gradient, and were incubated for 30 min. PGE2 release into the medium (radioimmunoassay) was 74-126 pg/10(6) cells/30 min under basal conditions and was 2.6-fold increased by carbachol (10(-5) and 10(-4) M). Similarly, PGE2 release was stimulated by phospholipase C (20-200 mU/ml, 364% above basal), 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol (10(-9)-10(-5) M, 229%), 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA; 10(-9)-10(-5) M, 283%) and calcium ionophore A23187 (10(-7)-10(-5) M, 219%). Simultaneous presence of A23187 and TPA synergistically induced stimulation which was slightly higher than the sum of the individual responses. N-(6-aminohexyl)-5-chloro-1-naphthalene sulfonamide W-7, a putative calmodulin antagonist, inhibited TPA-induced PGE2 release at concentrations regarded specific for blocking calmodulin (IC50 = 1.5 X 0(-6) M). We conclude that in human parietal cells PGE2 is released upon cholinergic stimulation and that phospholipase C and protein kinase C are involved in the control of PGE2 release. We speculate that calmodulin might interact with a protein phosphorylated by protein kinase C to cause PGE2 release.

  6. The Protein Architecture of Human Secretory Vesicles Reveals Differential Regulation of Signaling Molecule Secretion by Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Taupenot, Laurent; Ziegler, Michael; O'Connor, Daniel T.; Ma, Qi; Smoot, Michael; Ideker, Trey; Hook, Vivian

    2012-01-01

    Secretory vesicles are required for release of chemical messengers to mediate intercellular signaling among human biological systems. It is necessary to define the organization of the protein architecture of the ‘human’ dense core secretory vesicles (DCSV) to understand mechanisms for secretion of signaling molecules essential for cellular regulatory processes. This study, therefore, conducted extensive quantitative proteomics and systems biology analyses of human DCSV purified from human pheochromocytoma. Over 600 human DCSV proteins were identified with quantitative evaluation of over 300 proteins, revealing that most proteins participate in producing peptide hormones and neurotransmitters, enzymes, and the secretory machinery. Systems biology analyses provided a model of interacting DCSV proteins, generating hypotheses for differential intracellular protein kinases A and C signaling pathways. Activation of cellular PKA and PKC pathways resulted in differential secretion of neuropeptides, catecholamines, and β-amyloid of Alzheimer's disease for mediating cell-cell communication. This is the first study to define a model of the protein architecture of human DCSV for human disease and health. PMID:22916103

  7. Beta 2 integrin-dependent protein tyrosine phosphorylation and activation of the FGR protein tyrosine kinase in human neutrophils

    PubMed Central

    1994-01-01

    Stimulation of adherent human neutrophils (PMN) with tumor necrosis factor (TNF) triggers protein tyrosine phosphorylation (Fuortes, M., W. W. Jin, and C. Nathan. 1993. J. Cell Biol. 120:777-784). We investigated the dependence of this response on beta 2 integrins by using PMN isolated from a leukocyte adhesion deficiency (LAD) patient, which do not express beta 2 integrins, and by plating PMN on surface bound anti-beta 2 (CD18) antibodies. Protein tyrosine phosphorylation increased in PMN plated on fibrinogen and this phosphorylation was enhanced by TNF. Triggering of protein tyrosine phosphorylation did not occur in LAD PMN plated on fibrinogen either in the absence or the presence of TNF. Surface bound anti-CD18, but not isotype-matched anti- Class I major histocompatibility complex (MHC) antigens, antibodies triggered tyrosine phosphorylation in normal, but not in LAD PMN. As the major tyrosine phosphorylated proteins we found in our assay conditions migrated with an apparent molecular mass of 56-60 kD, we investigated whether beta 2 integrins are implicated in activation of members of the src family of intracellular protein-tyrosine kinases. We found that the fgr protein-tyrosine kinase (p58fgr) activity, and its extent of phosphorylation in tyrosine, in PMN adherent to fibrinogen, was enhanced by TNF. Activation of p58fgr in response to TNF was evident within 10 min of treatment and increased with times up to 30 min. Also other activators of beta 2 integrins such as phorbol-12- myristate 13-acetate (PMA), and formyl methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine (FMLP), induced activation of p58fgr kinase activity. Activation of p58fgr kinase activity, and phosphorylation in tyrosine, did not occur in PMN of a LAD patient in response to TNF. Soluble anti-CD18, but not anti-Class I MHC antigens, antibodies inhibited activation of p58fgr kinase activity in PMN adherent to fibrinogen in response to TNF, PMA, and FMLP. These findings demonstrate that, in PMN, beta 2 integrins

  8. The human DNA-activated protein kinase, DNA-PK: Substrate specificity

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, C.W.; Connelly, M.A.; Zhang, H.; Sipley, J.A.; Lees-Miller, S.P.; Lintott, L.G.; Sakaguchi, Kazuyasu; Appella, E.

    1994-11-05

    Although much has been learned about the structure and function of p53 and the probable sequence of subsequent events that lead to cell cycle arrest, little is known about how DNA damage is detected and the nature of the signal that is generated by DNA damage. Circumstantial evidence suggests that protein kinases may be involved. In vitro, human DNA-PK phosphorylates a variety of nuclear DNA-binding, regulatory proteins including the tumor suppressor protein p53, the single-stranded DNA binding protein RPA, the heat shock protein hsp90, the large tumor antigen (TAg) of simian virus 40, a variety of transcription factors including Fos, Jun, serum response factor (SRF), Myc, Sp1, Oct-1, TFIID, E2F, the estrogen receptor, and the large subunit of RNA polymerase II (reviewed in Anderson, 1993; Jackson et al., 1993). However, for most of these proteins, the sites that are phosphorylated by DNA-PK are not known. To determine if the sites that were phosphorylated in vitro also were phosphorylated in vivo and if DNA-PK recognized a preferred protein sequence, the authors identified the sites phosphorylated by DNA-PK in several substrates by direct protein sequence analysis. Each phosphorylated serine or threonine is followed immediately by glutamine in the polypeptide chain; at no other positions are the amino acid residues obviously constrained.

  9. Tryptase Activation of Immortalized Human Urothelial Cell Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Marentette, John O.; Hauser, Paul J.; Hurst, Robert E.; Klumpp, David J.; Rickard, Alice; McHowat, Jane

    2013-01-01

    The pathogenesis of interstitial cystitis/painful bladder syndrome (IC/PBS) is multifactorial, but likely involves urothelial cell dysfunction and mast cell accumulation in the bladder wall. Activated mast cells in the bladder wall release several inflammatory mediators, including histamine and tryptase. We determined whether mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases are activated in response to tryptase stimulation of urothelial cells derived from human normal and IC/PBS bladders. Tryptase stimulation of normal urothelial cells resulted in a 2.5-fold increase in extracellular signal regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK 1/2). A 5.5-fold increase in ERK 1/2 activity was observed in urothelial cells isolated from IC/PBS bladders. No significant change in p38 MAP kinase was observed in tryptase-stimulated normal urothelial cells but a 2.5-fold increase was observed in cells isolated from IC/PBS bladders. Inhibition of ERK 1/2 with PD98059 or inhibition of p38 MAP kinase with SB203580 did not block tryptase-stimulated iPLA2 activation. Incubation with the membrane phospholipid-derived PLA2 hydrolysis product lysoplasmenylcholine increased ERK 1/2 activity, suggesting the iPLA2 activation is upstream of ERK 1/2. Real time measurements of impedance to evaluate wound healing of cell cultures indicated increased healing rates in normal and IC/PBS urothelial cells in the presence of tryptase, with inhibition of ERK 1/2 significantly decreasing the wound healing rate of IC/PBS urothelium. We conclude that activation of ERK 1/2 in response to tryptase stimulation may facilitate wound healing or cell motility in areas of inflammation in the bladder associated with IC/PBS. PMID:23922867

  10. Kinase requirements in human cells: V. Synthetic lethal interactions between p53 and the protein kinases SGK2 and PAK3.

    PubMed

    Baldwin, Amy; Grueneberg, Dorre A; Hellner, Karin; Sawyer, Jacqueline; Grace, Miranda; Li, Wenliang; Harlow, Ed; Munger, Karl

    2010-07-13

    Cervical carcinomas are initiated through a series of well-defined stages that rely on the expression of human papillomavirus (HPV) oncogenes. A panel of 100 small hairpin RNAs that target essential kinases in many tumor types was used to study the stepwise appearance of kinase requirements during cervical tumor development. Twenty-six kinases were commonly required in three cell lines derived from frank carcinomas, and each kinase requirement was traced to the specific stage in which the requirement emerged. Six kinases became required following HPV-induced immortalization, and the requirement for two kinases, SGK2 and PAK3, was mapped to the inactivation of p53 in primary human epithelial cells. Loss of the p53 tumor suppressor in other primary epithelial cells also induced dependence on SGK2 and PAK3. Hence, SGK2 and PAK3 provide important cellular functions following p53 inactivation, fulfilling the classical definition of synthetic lethality; loss of p53, SGK2, or PAK3 alone has little effect on cell viability, whereas loss of p53 together with either SGK2 or PAK3 loss leads to cell death. Whereas tumor suppressor gene mutations are not directly druggable, other proteins or pathways that become obligatory to cell viability following tumor suppressor loss provide theoretical targets for tumor suppressor-specific drug discovery efforts. The kinases SGK2 and PAK3 may thus represent such targets for p53-specific drug development.

  11. Dematin, a human erythrocyte cytoskeletal protein, is a substrate for a recombinant FIKK kinase from Plasmodium falciparum.

    PubMed

    Brandt, Gabriel S; Bailey, Scott

    2013-09-01

    P. falciparum causes the most deadly form of malaria, resulting from the adherence of infected red blood cells to blood vessels. During the blood stage of infection, the parasite secretes a large number of proteins into the host erythrocyte. The secretion of a 20-member family of protein kinases known as FIKK kinases, after a conserved Phe-Ile-Lys-Lys sequence motif, is unique to P. falciparum. Identification of physiological substrates of these kinases may provide perspective on the importance of FIKK kinase activity to P. falciparum virulence. We demonstrate, for the first time, the heterologous expression and purification of a FIKK kinase (PfFk4.1, PFD1165w). The recombinant kinase is active against general substrates and phosphorylates itself. Having demonstrated kinase activity, we incubated recombinant Fk4.1 with parasite and human erythrocyte lysates. No parasite-derived substrates were identified. However, treatment of erythrocyte ghosts shows that the FIKK kinase Fk4.1 phosphorylates dematin, a cytoskeletal protein found at the red blood cell spectrin-actin junction.

  12. Human cervical cancer cells use Ca2+ signalling, protein tyrosine phosphorylation and MAP kinase in regulatory volume decrease.

    PubMed

    Shen, M R; Chou, C Y; Browning, J A; Wilkins, R J; Ellory, J C

    2001-12-01

    1. This study was aimed at identifying the signalling pathways involved in the activation of volume-regulatory mechanisms of human cervical cancer cells. 2. Osmotic swelling of human cervical cancer cells induced a substantial increase in intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) by the activation of Ca2+ entry across the cell membrane, as well as Ca2+ release from intracellular stores. This Ca2+ signalling was critical for the normal regulatory volume decrease (RVD) response. 3. The activation of swelling-activated ion and taurine transport was significantly inhibited by tyrosine kinase inhibitors (genistein and tyrphostin AG 1478) and potentiated by the tyrosine phosphatase inhibitor Na3VO4. However, the Src family of tyrosine kinases was not involved in regulation of the swelling-activated Cl- channel. 4. Cell swelling triggered mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase cascades leading to the activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (ERK1/ERK2) and p38 kinase. The volume-responsive ERK1/ERK2 signalling pathway linked with the activation of K+ and Cl- channels, and taurine transport. However, the volume-regulatory mechanism was independent of the activation of p38 MAP kinase. 5. The phosphorylated ERK1/ERK2 expression following a hypotonic shock was up-regulated by protein kinase C (PKC) activator phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and down-regulated by PKC inhibitor staurosporine. The response of ERK activation to hypotonicity also required Ca2+ entry and depended on tyrosine kinase and mitogen-activated/ERK-activating kinase (MEK) activity. 6. Considering the results overall, osmotic swelling promotes the activation of tyrosine kinase and ERK1/ERK2 and raises intracellular Ca2+, all of which play a crucial role in the volume-regulatory mechanism of human cervical cancer cells. PMID:11731569

  13. Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3 Protein Kinase Activity Is Frequently Elevated in Human Non-Small Cell Lung Carcinoma and Supports Tumour Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    O′Flaherty, Linda; Pardo, Olivier E.; Dzien, Piotr; Phillips, Lois; Morgan, Carys; Pawade, Joya; May, Margaret T.; Sohail, Muhammad; Hetzel, Martin R.; Seckl, Michael J.; Tavaré, Jeremy M.

    2014-01-01

    Background Glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) is a central regulator of cellular metabolism, development and growth. GSK3 activity was thought to oppose tumourigenesis, yet recent studies indicate that it may support tumour growth in some cancer types including in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). We examined the undefined role of GSK3 protein kinase activity in tissue from human NSCLC. Methods The expression and protein kinase activity of GSK3 was determined in 29 fresh frozen samples of human NSCLC and patient-matched normal lung tissue by quantitative immunoassay and western blotting for the phosphorylation of three distinct GSK3 substrates in situ (glycogen synthase, RelA and CRMP-2). The proliferation and sensitivity to the small-molecule GSK3 inhibitor; CHIR99021, of NSCLC cell lines (Hcc193, H1975, PC9 and A549) and non-neoplastic type II pneumocytes was further assessed in adherent culture. Results Expression and protein kinase activity of GSK3 was elevated in 41% of human NSCLC samples when compared to patient-matched control tissue. Phosphorylation of GSK3α/β at the inhibitory S21/9 residue was a poor biomarker for activity in tumour samples. The GSK3 inhibitor, CHIR99021 dose-dependently reduced the proliferation of three NSCLC cell lines yet was ineffective against type II pneumocytes. Conclusion NSCLC tumours with elevated GSK3 protein kinase activity may have evolved dependence on the kinase for sustained growth. Our results provide further important rationale for exploring the use of GSK3 inhibitors in treating NSCLC. PMID:25486534

  14. Structural and energetic basis of protein kinetic destabilization in human phosphoglycerate kinase 1 deficiency.

    PubMed

    Pey, Angel L; Mesa-Torres, Noel; Chiarelli, Laurent R; Valentini, Giovanna

    2013-02-19

    Protein kinetic destabilization is a common feature of many human genetic diseases. Human phosphoglycerate kinase 1 (PGK1) deficiency is a rare genetic disease caused by mutations in the PGK1 protein, which often shows reduced kinetic stability. In this work, we have performed an in-depth characterization of the thermal stability of the wild type and four disease-causing mutants (I47N, L89P, E252A, and T378P) of human PGK1. PGK1 thermal denaturation is a process under kinetic control, and it is described well by a two-state irreversible denaturation model. Kinetic analysis of differential scanning calorimetry profiles shows that the disease-causing mutations decrease PGK1 kinetic stability from ~5-fold (E252A) to ~100000-fold (L89P) compared to that of wild-type PGK1, and in some cases, mutant enzymes are denatured on a time scale of a few minutes at physiological temperature. We show that changes in protein kinetic stability are associated with large differences in enthalpic and entropic contributions to denaturation free energy barriers. It is also shown that the denaturation transition state becomes more nativelike in terms of solvent exposure as the protein is destabilized by mutations (Hammond effect). Unfolding experiments with urea further suggest a scenario in which the thermodynamic stability of PGK1 at least partly determines its kinetic stability. ATP and ADP kinetically stabilize PGK1 enzymes, and kinetic stabilization is nucleotide- and mutant-selective. Overall, our data provide insight into the structural and energetic basis underlying the low kinetic stability displayed by some mutants causing human PGK1 deficiency, which may have important implications for the development of native state kinetic stabilizers for the treatment of this disease. PMID:23336698

  15. Early events of human T lymphocyte activation are associated with type I protein kinase A activity.

    PubMed Central

    Laxminarayana, D; Berrada, A; Kammer, G M

    1993-01-01

    Human T lymphocytes possess both the type I and II isozymes of protein kinase A (PKA). The type I (PKA-I) isozyme is predominantly associated with the plasma membrane, whereas the type II (PKA-II) isozyme is primarily localized to the cytosol. Because the functions of both PKA-I and PKA-II isozymes in the biochemical events of T lymphocyte activation have not been clearly elucidated, we tested the hypothesis that very early events of normal human T lymphocyte activation are mediated by the PKA-I and/or PKA-II isozyme(s). Fresh normal human T cells and a normal human CD4+ T cell line (GK606) activated with anti-CD3-epsilon and recombinant interleukin 1 alpha (rIL-1 alpha) exhibited a peak six- to sevenfold increase of PKA phosphotransferase activity at 5 min that returned to baseline by 60 min. Similarly, both fresh T cells and the T cell line activated by phorbol myristate acetate and ionomycin demonstrated a peak eightfold increase of PKA activity by 15 min that returned toward baseline by 60 min. Chromatographic separation of the PKA isozymes and quantification of phosphotransferase activities after T cell activation by either agonist pair showed preferential activation of the PKA-I isozyme, resulting in a significant reduction in the ratio of PKA-I to PKA-II isozyme activity from 3.1:1-6.2:1 to 1.1:1-3.2:1. PKA-I isozyme activation resulted in the release of free catalytic (C) subunit, an increase in C subunit phosphotransferase activity, and the phosphorylation of T cell plasma membrane-associated proteins, p14, p17, p20, p21, p38, and p48. However, activation of the PKA-I isozyme did not appear to be required for the transcription of IL-2 mRNA, an event necessary for mitosis. These data indicate that ligand-induced T cell activation is associated with rapid activation of the PKA-I, but not PKA-II, isozyme that results in phosphorylation of plasma membrane-associated proteins. The involvement of the PKA-I isozyme during the very early events of T cell

  16. Estrogen effects on human airway smooth muscle involve cAMP and protein kinase A.

    PubMed

    Townsend, Elizabeth A; Sathish, Venkatachalem; Thompson, Michael A; Pabelick, Christina M; Prakash, Y S

    2012-11-15

    Clinically observed differences in airway reactivity and asthma exacerbations in women at different life stages suggest a role for sex steroids in modulating airway function although their targets and mechanisms of action are still being explored. We have previously shown that clinically relevant concentrations of exogenous estrogen acutely decrease intracellular calcium ([Ca(2+)](i)) in human airway smooth muscle (ASM), thereby facilitating bronchodilation. In this study, we hypothesized that estrogens modulate cyclic nucleotide regulation, resulting in decreased [Ca(2+)](i) in human ASM. In Fura-2-loaded human ASM cells, 1 nM 17β-estradiol (E(2)) potentiated the inhibitory effect of the β-adrenoceptor (β-AR) agonist isoproterenol (ISO; 100 nM) on histamine-mediated Ca(2+) entry. Inhibition of protein kinase A (PKA) activity (KT5720; 100 nM) attenuated E(2) effects on [Ca(2+)](i). Acute treatment with E(2) increased cAMP levels in ASM cells comparable to that of ISO (100 pM). In acetylcholine-contracted airways from female guinea pigs or female humans, E(2) potentiated ISO-induced relaxation. These novel data suggest that, in human ASM, physiologically relevant concentrations of estrogens act via estrogen receptors (ERs) and the cAMP pathway to nongenomically reduce [Ca(2+)](i), thus promoting bronchodilation. Activation of ERs may be a novel adjunct therapeutic avenue in reactive airway diseases in combination with established cAMP-activating therapies such as β(2)-agonists.

  17. MITF mediates cAMP-induced protein kinase C-β expression in human melanocytes

    PubMed Central

    Park, Hee-Young; Wu, Christina; Yonemoto, Laurie; Murphy-Smith, Melissa; Wu, Heng; Stachur, Christina M.; Gilchrest, Barbara A.

    2006-01-01

    The cAMP-dependent pathway up-regulates MITF (microphthalmia-associated transcription factor), important for key melanogenic proteins such as tyrosinase, TRP-1 (tyrosinase-related protein 1) and TRP-2. We asked whether MITF is also a key transcription factor for PKC-β (protein kinase C-β), required to phosphorylate otherwise inactive tyrosinase. When paired cultures of human melanocytes were treated with isobutylmethylxanthine, known to increase intracellular cAMP, both protein and mRNA levels of PKC-β were induced by 24 h. To determine whether MITF modulates PKC-β expression, paired cultures of human melanocytes were transfected with dn-MITF (dominant-negative MITF) or empty control vector. By immunoblotting, PKC-β protein was reduced by 63±3.7% within 48 h. Co-transfection of an expression vector for MITF-M, the MITF isoform specific for pigment cells, or empty control vector with a full-length PKC-β promoter–CAT (chloramphenicol acetyltransferase) reporter construct (PKC-β/CAT) into Cos-7 cells showed >60-fold increase in CAT activity. Melanocytes abundantly also expressed MITF-A, as well as the MITF-B and MITF-H isoforms. However, in contrast with MITF-M, MITF-A failed to transactivate co-expressed PKC-β/CAT or CAT constructs under the control of a full-length tyrosinase promoter. Together, these results demonstrate that MITF, specifically MITF-M, is a key transcription factor for PKC-β, linking the PKC- and cAMP-dependent pathways in regulation of melanogenesis. PMID:16411896

  18. Bivalent Inhibitors of Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Gower, Carrie M.; Chang, Matthew E. K.; Maly, Dustin J.

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinases are key players in a large number of cellular signaling pathways. Dysregulated kinase activity has been implicated in a number of diseases, and members of this enzyme family are of therapeutic interest. However, due to the fact that most inhibitors interact with the highly conserved ATP-binding sites of kinases, it is a significant challenge to develop pharmacological agents that target only one of the greater than 500 kinases present in humans. A potential solution to this problem is the development of bisubstrate and bivalent kinase inhibitors, in which an active site-directed moiety is tethered to another ligand that targets a location outside of the ATP-binding cleft. Because kinase signaling specificity is modulated by regions outside of the ATP-binding site, strategies that exploit these interactions have the potential to provide reagents with high target selectivity. This review highlights examples of kinase interaction sites that can potentially be exploited by bisubstrate and bivalent inhibitors. Furthermore, an overview of efforts to target these interactions with bisubstrate and bivalent inhibitors is provided. Finally, several examples of the successful application of these reagents in a cellular setting are described. PMID:24564382

  19. Essential role of protein kinase R antagonism by TRS1 in human cytomegalovirus replication.

    PubMed

    Braggin, Jacquelyn E; Child, Stephanie J; Geballe, Adam P

    2016-02-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) lacking TRS1 and IRS1 (HCMV[ΔI/ΔT]) cannot replicate in cell culture. Although both proteins can block the protein kinase R (PKR) pathway, they have multiple other activities and binding partners. It remains unknown which functions are essential for HCMV replication. To investigate this issue, we first identified a TRS1 mutant that is unable to bind to PKR. Like HCMV[ΔI/ΔT], a recombinant HCMV containing this mutant (HCMV[TRS1-Mut 1]) did not replicate in wild-type cells. However, HCMV[ΔI/ΔT] did replicate in cells in which PKR expression was reduced by RNA interference. Moreover, HCMV[ΔI/ΔT] and HCMV[TRS1-Mut 1] replicated to similar levels as virus containing wild-type TRS1 in cell lines in which PKR expression was knocked out by CRISPR/Cas9-mediated genome editing. These results demonstrate that the sole essential function of TRS1 is to antagonize PKR and that its other activities do not substantially enhance HCMV replication, at least in cultured human fibroblasts.

  20. Crystal structure of the kinase domain of human protein tyrosine kinase 6 (PTK6) at 2.33 Å resolution.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Manish Kumar; Kumar, Amit; Birudukota, Swarnakumari; Swaminathan, Srinivasan; Tyagi, Rajiv; Gosu, Ramachandraiah

    2016-09-16

    Human Protein tyrosine kinase 6 (PTK6) (EC:2.7.10.2), also known as the breast tumor kinase (BRK), is an intracellular non-receptor Src-related tyrosine kinase expressed in a majority of human breast tumors and breast cancer cell lines, but its expression is low or completely absent in normal mammary glands. In the recent past, several studies have suggested that PTK6 is a potential therapeutic target in cancer. To understand its structural and functional properties, the PTK6 kinase domain (PTK6-KD) gene was cloned, overexpressed in a baculo-insect cell system, purified and crystallized at room temperature. X-ray diffraction data to 2.33 Å resolution was collected on a single PTK6-KD crystal, which belonged to the triclinic space group P1. The Matthews coefficient calculation suggested the presence of four protein molecules per asymmetric unit, with a solvent content of ∼50%.The structure has been solved by molecular replacement and crystal structure data submitted to the protein data bank under the accession number 5D7V. This is the first report of apo PTK6-KD structure crystallized in DFG-in and αC-helix-out conformation. PMID:27480927

  1. Crystal structure of the kinase domain of human protein tyrosine kinase 6 (PTK6) at 2.33 Å resolution.

    PubMed

    Thakur, Manish Kumar; Kumar, Amit; Birudukota, Swarnakumari; Swaminathan, Srinivasan; Tyagi, Rajiv; Gosu, Ramachandraiah

    2016-09-16

    Human Protein tyrosine kinase 6 (PTK6) (EC:2.7.10.2), also known as the breast tumor kinase (BRK), is an intracellular non-receptor Src-related tyrosine kinase expressed in a majority of human breast tumors and breast cancer cell lines, but its expression is low or completely absent in normal mammary glands. In the recent past, several studies have suggested that PTK6 is a potential therapeutic target in cancer. To understand its structural and functional properties, the PTK6 kinase domain (PTK6-KD) gene was cloned, overexpressed in a baculo-insect cell system, purified and crystallized at room temperature. X-ray diffraction data to 2.33 Å resolution was collected on a single PTK6-KD crystal, which belonged to the triclinic space group P1. The Matthews coefficient calculation suggested the presence of four protein molecules per asymmetric unit, with a solvent content of ∼50%.The structure has been solved by molecular replacement and crystal structure data submitted to the protein data bank under the accession number 5D7V. This is the first report of apo PTK6-KD structure crystallized in DFG-in and αC-helix-out conformation.

  2. Muscarine enhances soluble amyloid precursor protein secretion in human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y by a pathway dependent on protein kinase C(alpha), src-tyrosine kinase and extracellular signal-regulated kinase but not phospholipase C.

    PubMed

    Canet-Aviles, Rosa-Maria; Anderton, Mark; Hooper, Nigel M; Turner, Anthony J; Vaughan, Peter F T

    2002-06-15

    The signalling pathways by which muscarine and epidermal growth factor (EGF) regulate the secretion of the alpha-secretase cleavage product (sAPPalpha) of the amyloid precursor protein (APP) were examined in the human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y. Using specific inhibitors it was found that over 80% of sAPPalpha secretion, enhanced by muscarine, occurred via the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK1/2) member of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) family and was dependent on protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha) and a member of the Src family of non-receptor tyrosine kinases (Src-TK). In contrast the stimulation of sAPPalpha secretion by EGF was not affected by inhibitors of PKC nor Src-TK but was dependent on ERK1/2. In addition muscarine-enhanced sAPPalpha secretion and ERK1/2 activation were inhibited 60 and 80%, respectively, by micromolar concentrations of the phosphatidylinositol 3 kinase (PI-3K) inhibitor wortmannin. In comparison wortmannin decreased EGF stimulation of sAPPalpha secretion and ERK 1/2 activation by approximately 40%. Unexpectedly, U73122, an inhibitor of phosphoinositide-specific phospholipase C, did not inhibit muscarine enhancement of sAPPalpha secretion. These data are discussed in relation to a pathway for the enhancement of sAPPalpha secretion by muscarine which involves the activation of a Src-TK by G-protein beta/gamma-subunits leading to activation of PKCalpha, and ERK1/2 by a mechanism not involving phospholipase C. PMID:12191495

  3. PUTATIVE CREATINE KINASE M-ISOFORM IN HUMAN SPERM IS IDENTIFIED AS THE 70-KILODALTON HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN HSPA2

    EPA Science Inventory

    THE PUTATIVE CREATINE KINASE M-ISOFORM IN HUMAN SPERM
    IS IDENTIFIED AS THE 70 kDa HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN HSPA2

    * Gabor Huszar1, Kathryn Stone2, David Dix3 and Lynne Vigue1
    1The Sperm Physiology Laboratory, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 2 W.M. Keck Foundatio...

  4. Protein kinase Cα protects against multidrug resistance in human colon cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Se-Kyoung; Shehzad, Adeeb; Jung, Jae-Chang; Sonn, Jong-Kyung; Lee, Jae-Tae; Park, Jeen-Woo; Lee, Young-Sup

    2012-07-01

    Multidrug resistance is the phenomenon by which, after exposure to a single chemotherapeutic agent, cancer cells evade the agent's cytotoxic effects as well as become resistant to several classes of diverse drugs. ATP-binding cassette (ABC) transporters are a family of transporter proteins that contribute to drug resistance via a n ATP - dependent drug efflux pump. P-glycoprotein (P-gp) is a prominent ABC superfamily protein encoded by the mdr gene which has the ability to mediate the cellular extrusion of xenobiotics and anticancer drugs from tumor cells. Exclusively expressed P-gp cells from the human colon cancer HCT15/DOX line showed resistance to doxorubicin while parental HCT15 cells treated with doxorubicin displayed typical signs of apoptosis. In order to verify the hypothesis that expression of MDR is controlled in part, by protein kinase C (PKC), expression patterns of different PKC isoforms were examined in both cell lines. Of the PKC isoforms evaluated, the membrane translocation and expression levels of PKCα were strikingly increased in HCT15/DOX cells. PKCα reversed doxorubicin-induced apoptosis through the scavenging of ROS as well as inhibition of PARP cleavage. In addition, inhibition of PKCα with Go6976, a specific inhibitor of classical PKC, led to reduced MDR expression and increased doxorubicin-induced apoptosis. Knockdown of PKCα by siRNA diminished the protective effects of PKCα for doxorubicin-induced apoptosis. These results suggested that over-expression and activity of PKCα is closely associated with the regulation of the MDR phenotype in human colon cancer HCT15 cells and provided insight into a new strategy for inhibiting doxorubicin resistance in human cancers. PMID:22639047

  5. Phorbol ester-induced activation of protein kinase C leads to increased formation of diacylglycerol in human neutrophils

    SciTech Connect

    Faellman, M.; Stendahl, O.; Andersson, T. )

    1989-03-01

    Human neutrophils stimulated with a phorbol ester (phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate or phorbol 12,13-dibutyrate) responded with an increase in diacylglycerol, considered the natural activator of protein kinase C. The amounts of diacylglycerol formed were considerable, reaching 700-900% of basal after 20 minutes. In contrast, 4-{alpha}-phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate did not induce any detectable formation of diacylglycerol. Simultaneously, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate exposure caused increased breakdown of both phosphatidylcholine and phosphatidylinositol 4,5-bisphosphate. These results suggest that once activated, protein kinase C can positively modulate its own activity by inducing additional formation of diacylglycerol from at least two different sources.

  6. Phosphorylation of Human CTP Synthetase 1 by Protein Kinase A: IDENTIFICATION OF Thr455 AS A MAJOR SITE OF PHOSPHORYLATION*

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Mal-Gi; Carman, George M.

    2007-01-01

    CTP synthetase is an essential enzyme that generates the CTP required for the synthesis of nucleic acids and membrane phospholipids. In this work, we examined the phosphorylation of the human CTPS1-encoded CTP synthetase 1 by protein kinase A. CTP synthetase 1 was expressed and purified from a Saccharomyces cerevisiae ura7Δ ura8Δ double mutant that lacks CTP synthetase activity. Using purified CTP synthetase 1 as a substrate, protein kinase A activity was time- and dose-dependent. The phosphorylation, which primarily occurred on a threonine residue, was accompanied by a 50% decrease in CTP synthetase 1 activity. The synthetic peptide LGKRRTLFQT that contains the protein kinase A motif for Thr455 was a substrate for protein kinase A. A Thr455 to Ala (T455A) mutation in CTP synthetase 1 was constructed by site-directed mutagenesis and was expressed and purified from the S. cerevisiae ura7Δ ura8Δ mutant. The T455A mutation caused a 78% decrease in protein kinase A phosphorylation, and the loss of the phosphothreonine residue and a major phosphopeptide that were present in the purified wild type enzyme phosphorylated by protein kinase A. The CTP synthetase 1 activity of the T455A mutant enzyme was 2-fold higher than the wild type enzyme. In addition, the T455A mutation caused a 44% decrease in the amount of human CTP synthetase 1 that was phosphorylated in S. cerevisiae cells, and this was accompanied by a 2.5-fold increase in the cellular concentration of CTP and a 1.5-fold increase in the choline-dependent synthesis of phosphatidylcholine. PMID:17189248

  7. Protein kinase G II-mediated proliferative effects in human cultured prostatic stromal cells.

    PubMed

    Cook, Anna-Louise M; Haynes, John M

    2004-02-01

    This study investigates the effect of protein kinase G (PKG) activation upon proliferation of human cultured prostatic stromal cells. The PKG II activator (8-pCPT-cGMP; IC50 of 113+/-42 nM) and the phosphodiesterase inhibitor, zaprinast (up to 50 microM), but not the PKG I isoform activators (APT-cGMP and PET-cGMP), reduced foetal calf serum-stimulated proliferation. The effect of 8-pCPT-cGMP (30 microM) was blocked by Rp-8-Br-cGMPS (5 microM) and Rp-8-pCPT-cGMP (5 microM), but not Rp-cAMPS (5 microM). 8-pCPT-cGMP (30 microM) and zaprinast (50 microM), but not PET-cGMP (30 microM), caused a significant increase in atypical nuclei and an increase in annexin-V staining. These data indicate that activation of PKG II induces apoptosis of human cultured prostatic stromal cells. PMID:14636895

  8. Monosodium urate activates Src/Pyk2/PI3 kinase and cathepsin dependent unconventional protein secretion from human primary macrophages.

    PubMed

    Välimäki, Elina; Miettinen, Juho J; Lietzén, Niina; Matikainen, Sampsa; Nyman, Tuula A

    2013-03-01

    Monosodium urate (MSU) is an endogenous danger signal that is crystallized from uric acid released from injured cells. MSU is known to activate inflammatory response in macrophages but the molecular mechanisms involved have remained uncharacterized. Activated macrophages start to secrete proteins to activate immune response and to recruit other immune cells to the site of infection and/or tissue damage. Secretome characterization after activation of innate immune system is essential to unravel the details of early phases of defense responses. Here, we have analyzed the secretome of human primary macrophages stimulated with MSU using quantitative two-dimensional gel electrophoresis based proteomics as well as high-throughput qualitative GeLC-MS/MS approach combining protein separation by SDS-PAGE and protein identification by liquid chromatography-MS/MS. Both methods showed that MSU stimulation induced robust protein secretion from lipopolysaccharide-primed human macrophages. Bioinformatic analysis of the secretome data showed that MSU stimulation strongly activates unconventional, vesicle mediated protein secretion. The unconventionally secreted proteins included pro-inflammatory cytokines like IL-1β and IL-18, interferon-induced proteins, and danger signal proteins. Also active forms of lysosomal proteases cathepsins were secreted on MSU stimulation, and cathepsin activity was essential for MSU-induced unconventional protein secretion. Additionally, proteins associated to phosphorylation events including Src family tyrosine kinases were increased in the secretome of MSU-stimulated cells. Our functional studies demonstrated that Src, Pyk2, and PI3 kinases act upstream of cathepsins to activate the overall protein secretion from macrophages. In conclusion, we provide the first comprehensive characterization of protein secretion pathways activated by MSU in human macrophages, and reveal a novel role for cathepsins and Src, Pyk2, PI3 kinases in the activation of

  9. Thermodynamics parameters for binding of halogenated benzotriazole inhibitors of human protein kinase CK2α.

    PubMed

    Winiewska, Maria; Kucińska, Katarzyna; Makowska, Małgorzata; Poznański, Jarosław; Shugar, David

    2015-10-01

    The interaction of human CK2α (hCK2α) with nine halogenated benzotriazoles, TBBt and its analogues representing all possible patterns of halogenation on the benzene ring of benzotriazole, was studied by biophysical methods. Thermal stability of protein-ligand complexes, monitored by calorimetric (DSC) and optical (DSF) methods, showed that the increase in the mid-point temperature for unfolding of protein-ligand complexes (i.e. potency of ligand binding to hCK2α) follow the inhibitory activities determined by biochemical assays. The dissociation constant for the ATP-hCK2α complex was estimated with the aid of microscale thermophoresis (MST) as 4.3±1.8 μM, and MST-derived dissociation constants determined for halogenated benzotriazoles, when converted according to known ATP concentrations, perfectly reconstruct IC50 values determined by the biochemical assays. Ligand-dependent quenching of tyrosine fluorescence, together with molecular modeling and DSC-derived heats of unfolding, support the hypothesis that halogenated benzotriazoles bind in at least two alternative orientations, and those that are efficient hCK2α inhibitors bind in the orientation which TBBt adopts in its complex with maize CK2α. DSC-derived apparent heat for ligand binding (ΔΔHbind) is driven by intermolecular electrostatic interactions between Lys68 and the triazole ring of the ligand, as indicated by a good correlation between ΔΔHbind and ligand pKa. Overall results, additionally supported by molecular modeling, confirm that a balance of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions contribute predominantly (~40 kJ/mol), relative to possible intermolecular halogen/hydrogen bonding (less than 10 kJ/mol), in binding of halogenated benzotriazoles to the ATP-binding site of hCK2α. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Inhibitors of Protein Kinases.

  10. Microbial Protein-tyrosine Kinases*

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Joseph D.; Wong, Dennis; Av-Gay, Yossef

    2014-01-01

    Microbial ester kinases identified in the past 3 decades came as a surprise, as protein phosphorylation on Ser, Thr, and Tyr amino acids was thought to be unique to eukaryotes. Current analysis of available microbial genomes reveals that “eukaryote-like” protein kinases are prevalent in prokaryotes and can converge in the same signaling pathway with the classical microbial “two-component” systems. Most microbial tyrosine kinases lack the “eukaryotic” Hanks domain signature and are designated tyrosine kinases based upon their biochemical activity. These include the tyrosine kinases termed bacterial tyrosine kinases (BY-kinases), which are responsible for the majority of known bacterial tyrosine phosphorylation events. Although termed generally as bacterial tyrosine kinases, BY-kinases can be considered as one family belonging to the superfamily of prokaryotic protein-tyrosine kinases in bacteria. Other members of this superfamily include atypical “odd” tyrosine kinases with diverse mechanisms of protein phosphorylation and the “eukaryote-like” Hanks-type tyrosine kinases. Here, we discuss the distribution, phylogeny, and function of the various prokaryotic protein-tyrosine kinases, focusing on the recently discovered Mycobacterium tuberculosis PtkA and its relationship with other members of this diverse family of proteins. PMID:24554699

  11. Role for zinc in a cellular response mediated by protein kinase C in human B lymphocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Forbes, I.J.; Zalewski, P.D.; Giannakis, C. )

    1991-07-01

    Recent studies have suggested a role for Zn{sup 2+}, distinct from that of CA{sup 2+}, in the subcellular distribution and activation of protein kinase C (PKC). Here the author show that Zn{sup 2+} is required for a cellular response mediated by PKC, the rapid loss of expression of a human B cell receptor MER, detected by resetting with mouse erythrocytes. Zn{sup 2+}, in the presence of the Zn{sup 2+} ionophore pyrithione, caused rapid inhibition of MER rosetting at concentrations which induce the translocation and activation of PKC. This required cellular uptake of Zn{sup 2+} and was blocked by 1,10-phenanthroline and TPEN which chelate Zn{sup 2+} but not Ca{sup 2+}. Gold, a metal with similar properties, also induced translocation of PKC and inhibition of MER. Phenanthroline and TPEN also blocked the inhibition of MER induced by the PKC activators phorbol ester and sodium fluoride, suggesting that endogenous cellular Zn{sup 2+} is required. They propose that some cellular actions of PKC require a Zn{sup 2+}-dependent event and that these may be a target for gold during chrysotherapy in rheumatoid arthritis.

  12. Protein Kinase C Regulation of 12-Lipoxygenase-Mediated Human Platelet Activation

    PubMed Central

    Yeung, Jennifer; Apopa, Patrick L.; Vesci, Joanne; Kenyon, Victor; Rai, Ganesha; Jadhav, Ajit; Simeonov, Anton; Holman, Theodore R.; Maloney, David J.; Boutaud, Olivier

    2012-01-01

    Platelet activation is important in the regulation of hemostasis and thrombosis. Uncontrolled activation of platelets may lead to arterial thrombosis, which is a major cause of myocardial infarction and stroke. After activation, metabolism of arachidonic acid (AA) by 12-lipoxygenase (12-LOX) may play a significant role in regulating the degree and stability of platelet activation because inhibition of 12-LOX significantly attenuates platelet aggregation in response to various agonists. Protein kinase C (PKC) activation is also known to be an important regulator of platelet activity. Using a newly developed selective inhibitor for 12-LOX and a pan-PKC inhibitor, we investigated the role of PKC in 12-LOX-mediated regulation of agonist signaling in the platelet. To determine the role of PKC within the 12-LOX pathway, a number of biochemical endpoints were measured, including platelet aggregation, calcium mobilization, and integrin activation. Inhibition of 12-LOX or PKC resulted in inhibition of dense granule secretion and attenuation of both aggregation and αIIbβ3 activation. However, activation of PKC downstream of 12-LOX inhibition rescued agonist-induced aggregation and integrin activation. Furthermore, inhibition of 12-LOX had no effect on PKC-mediated aggregation, indicating that 12-LOX is upstream of PKC. These studies support an essential role for PKC downstream of 12-LOX activation in human platelets and suggest 12-LOX as a possible target for antiplatelet therapy. PMID:22155783

  13. Expression of PDZ-binding kinase/T-LAK cell-originated protein kinase (PBK/TOPK) in human urinary bladder transitional cell carcinoma.

    PubMed

    Singh, P K; Srivastava, Anupam K; Dalela, D; Rath, S K; Goel, M M; Bhatt, M L B

    2014-06-01

    The objective of this study was to evaluate the expression pattern of PDZ-binding kinase/T-LAK cell-originated protein kinase (PBK/TOPK) and its clinical significance in human bladder cancer (BC). We detected PBK/TOPK mRNA overexpression in BC and human normal testis tissues using RT-PCR. Using qRT-PCR revealed a higher expression of PBK/TOPK in BC tissues than their adjacent noncancerous tissues (ANCTs) (p<0.0001). Cytoplasmic expression of PBK/TOPK protein was found to be positive in 64.6% (42 of 65) BC patients. Expression of PBK/TOPK protein was found to be significantly higher in muscle-invasive bladder cancer (MIBC) than in non-muscle-invasive bladder cancer (NMIBC) (86.1% vs. 37.9%, p<0.001). The immunohistochemical (IHC) expression of PBK/TOPK was found to be significantly (p<0.001) associated with the stage of disease. Study findings suggest that the PBK/TOPK mRNA/protein expression is specific to human BC and might be used as a novel target for development of cancer immunotherapy and diagnostic biomarker.

  14. Protein kinase C activates non-capacitative calcium entry in human platelets

    PubMed Central

    Rosado, Juan A; Sage, Stewart O

    2000-01-01

    In many non-excitable cells Ca2+ influx is mainly controlled by the filling state of the intracellular Ca2+ stores. It has been suggested that this store-mediated or capacitative Ca2+ entry is brought about by a physical and reversible coupling of the endoplasmic reticulum with the plasma membrane. Here we provide evidence for an additional, non-capacitative Ca2+ entry mechanism in human platelets. Changes in cytosolic Ca2+ and Sr2+ were measured in human platelets loaded with the fluorescent indicator fura-2. Depletion of the internal Ca2+ stores with thapsigargin plus a low concentration of ionomycin stimulated store-mediated cation entry, as demonstrated upon Ca2+ or Sr2+ addition. Subsequent treatment with thrombin stimulated further divalent cation entry in a concentration-dependent manner. Direct activation of protein kinase C (PKC) by phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate or 1-oleoyl-2-acetyl-sn-glycerol also stimulated divalent cation entry, without evoking the release of Ca2+ from intracellular stores. Cation entry evoked by thrombin or activators of PKC was abolished by the PKC inhibitor Ro-31-8220. Unlike store-mediated Ca2+ entry, jasplakinolide, which reorganises actin filaments into a tight cortical layer adjacent to the plasma membrane, did not inhibit divalent cation influx evoked by thrombin when applied after Ca2+ store depletion, or by activators of PKC. Thrombin also activated Ca2+ entry in platelets in which the release from intracellular stores and store-mediated Ca2+ entry were blocked by xestospongin C. These results indicate that the non-capacitative divalent cation entry pathway is regulated independently of store-mediated entry and does not require coupling of the endoplasmic reticulum and the plasma membrane. These results support the existence of a mechanism for receptor-evoked Ca2+ entry in human platelets that is independent of Ca2+ store depletion. This Ca2+ entry mechanism may be activated by occupation of G-protein-coupled receptors

  15. Phosphorylation of human small heat shock protein HspB8 (Hsp22) by ERK1 protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Shemetov, Anton A; Seit-Nebi, Alim S; Gusev, Nikolai B

    2011-09-01

    A number of phosphomimicking mutants (replacement of Ser/Thr residues by Asp) of human small heat shock protein HspB8 were obtained and phosphorylation of the wild type HspB8 and its mutants by ERK1 kinase was analyzed in vitro. Mutation S159D does not affect phosphorylation, whereas mutations S24D and S27D equally moderately inhibited and mutation T87D strongly inhibited phosphorylation of HspB8. The double mutations S24D/T87D and S27D/T87D induced very strong inhibitory effect and the triple mutations S24D/S27D/T87D completely prevented phosphorylation catalyzed by ERK1. Thus, Ser24 and Thr87, found to be phosphorylated in vivo, are among the sites phosphorylated by ERK1 in HspB8 in vitro. Mutations S24D and T87D affect intrinsic tryptophan fluorescence and susceptibility to chymotrypsinolysis of HspB8. Phosphomimicking mutations and phosphorylation promote concentration-dependent association of HspB8 subunits. Mutations S24D and S27D decrease, whereas mutation T87D increases the chaperone-like activity of HspB8. It is concluded that phosphorylation catalyzed by ERK1 might affect the structure and chaperone-like activity of HspB8 and therefore can be important for regulation of interaction of HspB8 with different target proteins.

  16. Tyrosine phosphorylation is a mandatory proximal step in radiation-induced activation of the protein kinase C signaling pathway in human B-lymphocyte precursors.

    PubMed Central

    Uckun, F M; Schieven, G L; Tuel-Ahlgren, L M; Dibirdik, I; Myers, D E; Ledbetter, J A; Song, C W

    1993-01-01

    Ionizing radiation triggers a signal in human B-lymphocyte precursors that is intimately linked to an active protein-tyrosine kinase regulatory pathway. We show that in B-lymphocyte precursors, irradiation with gamma-rays leads to (i) stimulation of phosphatidylinositol turnover; (ii) downstream activation by covalent modification of multiple serine-specific protein kinases, including protein kinase C; and (iii) activation of nuclear factor kappa B. All of the radiation-induced signals were effectively prevented by the protein-tyrosine kinase inhibitors genistein and herbimycin A. Thus, tyrosine phosphorylation is an important and perhaps mandatory proximal step in the activation of the protein kinase C signaling cascade in human B-lymphocyte precursors. Our report expands current knowledge of the radiation-induced signaling cascade by clarifying the chronological sequence of biochemical events that follow irradiation. Images PMID:8419931

  17. Modeled microgravity-induced protein kinase C isoform expression in human lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Sundaresan, A; Risin, D; Pellis, N R

    2004-06-01

    In long-term space travel, the crew is exposed to microgravity and radiation that invoke potential hazards to the immune system. T cell activation is a critical step in the immune response. Receptor-mediated signaling is inhibited in both microgravity and modeled microgravity (MMG) as reflected by diminished DNA synthesis in peripheral blood lymphocytes and their locomotion through gelled type I collagen. Direct activation of protein kinase C (PKC) bypassing cell surface events using the phorbol ester PMA rescues MMG-inhibited lymphocyte activation and locomotion, whereas the calcium ionophore ionomycin had no rescue effect. Thus calcium-independent PKC isoforms may be affected in MMG-induced locomotion inhibition and rescue. Both calcium-dependent isoforms and calcium-independent PKC isoforms were investigated to assess their expression in lymphocytes in 1 g and MMG culture. Human lymphocytes were cultured and harvested at 24, 48, 72, and 96 h, and serial samples were assessed for locomotion by using type I collagen and expression of PKC isoforms. Expression of PKC-alpha, -delta, and -epsilon was assessed by RT-PCR, flow cytometry, and immunoblotting. Results indicated that PKC isoforms delta and epsilon were downregulated by >50% at the transcriptional and translational levels in MMG-cultured lymphocytes compared with 1-g controls. Events upstream of PKC, such as phosphorylation of phospholipase Cgamma in MMG, revealed accumulation of inactive enzyme. Depressed calcium-independent PKC isoforms may be a consequence of an upstream lesion in the signal transduction pathway. The differential response among calcium-dependent and calcium-independent isoforms may actually result from MMG intrusion events earlier than PKC, but after ligand-receptor interaction.

  18. Modeled Microgravity-Induced Protein Kinase C Isoform Expression in Human Lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundaresan, A.; Risin, D.; Pellis, N. R.

    2003-01-01

    In long-term space travel, the crew is exposed to microgravity and radiation that invoke potential hazards to the immune system. T cell activation is a critical step in the immune response. Receptor-mediated signaling is inhibited both in microgravity and modeled microgravity (MMG) as reflected in diminished DNA synthess in peripheral blood lymphocytes and their locomotion through gelled type 1 collagen. Direct activation of Protein Kinase C (PKC) bypassing cell surface events using the phorbol ester PMA rescues MMG-inhibited lymphocyte activation and locomotion, whereas calcium ionophore ionomycin had no rescue effect. Thus calcium-independent PKC isoforms may be affected in MMG-induced locomotion inhibition and rescue. Both calcium-dependent isoforms and calcium-independent PKC isoforms were investigated to assess their expression in lymphocytes in 19 and MMG-culture. Human lymphocytes were cultured and harvested at 24, 48, 72 and 96 hours and serial samples assessed for locomotion using type I collagen and expression of PKC isoforms. Expression of PKC-alpha, -delta and -epsilon was assessed by RT-PCR, flow cytometry and immunoblotting. Results indicated that PKC isoforms delta and epsilon were down-regulated by more than 50% at the transcriptional and translational levels in MMG-cultured lymphocytes compared with 19 controls. Events upstream of PKC such as phosphorylation of Phospholipase C(gamma) (PLC-gamma) in MMG, revealed accumulation of inactive enzyme. Depressed Ca++ -independent PKC isoforms may be a consequence of an upstream lesion in the signal transduction pathway. The differential response among calcium-dependent and calcium-independent isoforms may actually result from MMG intrusion events earlier than, but after ligand-receptor interaction. Keywords: Signal transduction, locomotion, immunity

  19. Modeled microgravity-induced protein kinase C isoform expression in human lymphocytes

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Sundaresan, A.; Risin, D.; Pellis, N. R.

    2004-01-01

    In long-term space travel, the crew is exposed to microgravity and radiation that invoke potential hazards to the immune system. T cell activation is a critical step in the immune response. Receptor-mediated signaling is inhibited in both microgravity and modeled microgravity (MMG) as reflected by diminished DNA synthesis in peripheral blood lymphocytes and their locomotion through gelled type I collagen. Direct activation of protein kinase C (PKC) bypassing cell surface events using the phorbol ester PMA rescues MMG-inhibited lymphocyte activation and locomotion, whereas the calcium ionophore ionomycin had no rescue effect. Thus calcium-independent PKC isoforms may be affected in MMG-induced locomotion inhibition and rescue. Both calcium-dependent isoforms and calcium-independent PKC isoforms were investigated to assess their expression in lymphocytes in 1 g and MMG culture. Human lymphocytes were cultured and harvested at 24, 48, 72, and 96 h, and serial samples were assessed for locomotion by using type I collagen and expression of PKC isoforms. Expression of PKC-alpha, -delta, and -epsilon was assessed by RT-PCR, flow cytometry, and immunoblotting. Results indicated that PKC isoforms delta and epsilon were downregulated by >50% at the transcriptional and translational levels in MMG-cultured lymphocytes compared with 1-g controls. Events upstream of PKC, such as phosphorylation of phospholipase Cgamma in MMG, revealed accumulation of inactive enzyme. Depressed calcium-independent PKC isoforms may be a consequence of an upstream lesion in the signal transduction pathway. The differential response among calcium-dependent and calcium-independent isoforms may actually result from MMG intrusion events earlier than PKC, but after ligand-receptor interaction.

  20. Metformin inhibits growth of human non-small cell lung cancer cells via liver kinase B-1-independent activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    GUO, QIANQIAN; LIU, ZHIYAN; JIANG, LILI; LIU, MENGJIE; MA, JIEQUN; YANG, CHENGCHENG; HAN, LILI; NAN, KEJUN; LIANG, XUAN

    2016-01-01

    Metformin, the most widely administered oral anti-diabetic therapeutic agent, exerts its glucose-lowering effect predominantly via liver kinase B1 (LKB1)-dependent activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Accumulating evidence has demonstrated that metformin possesses potential antitumor effects. However, whether the antitumor effect of metformin is via the LKB1/AMPK signaling pathway remains to be determined. In the current study, the effects of metformin on proliferation, cell cycle progression, and apoptosis of human non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) H460 (LKB1-null) and H1299 (LKB1-positive) cells were assessed, and the role of LKB1/AMPK signaling in the anti-growth effects of metformin were investigated. Cell viability was determined using a 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, cell cycle distribution and apoptosis were assessed by flow cytometry, and protein expression levels were measured by western blotting. Metformin inhibited proliferation, induced significant cell cycle arrest at the G0–G1 phase and increased apoptosis in NSCLC cells in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, regardless of the level of LKB1 protein expression. Furthermore, knockdown of LKB1 with short hairpin RNA (shRNA) did not affect the antiproliferative effect of metformin in the H1299 cells. Metformin stimulated AMPK phosphorylation and subsequently suppressed the phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin and its downstream effector, 70-kDa ribosomal protein S6 kinase in the two cell lines. These effects were abrogated by silencing AMPK with small interfering RNA (siRNA). In addition, knockdown of AMPK with siRNA inhibited the effect of metformin on cell proliferation in the two cell lines. These results provide evidence that the growth inhibition of metformin in NSCLC cells is mediated by LKB1-independent activation of AMPK, indicating that metformin may be a potential therapeutic agent for the treatment of

  1. Problem-Solving Test: "In Vitro" Protein Kinase A Reaction

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2009-01-01

    Phosphorylation of proteins by protein kinases is an important mechanism in the regulation of protein activity. Among hundreds of protein kinases present in human cells, PKA, the first kinase discovered, belongs to the most important and best characterized group of these enzymes. The author presents an experiment that analyzes the "in vitro"…

  2. Growth Hormone Releasing Peptide-2 Attenuation of Protein Kinase C-Induced Inflammation in Human Ovarian Granulosa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Chao, Yi-Ning; Sun, David; Peng, Yen-Chun; Wu, Yuh-Lin

    2016-01-01

    Cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and interleukin-8 (IL-8) are two important inflammatory mediators in ovulation. Ghrelin may modulate inflammatory signaling via growth hormone secretagogue receptors. We investigated the role of ghrelin in KGN human ovarian granulosa cells using protein kinase C (PKC) activator phorbol 12, 13-didecanoate (PDD) and synthetic ghrelin analog growth hormone releasing peptide-2 (GHRP-2). GHRP-2 attenuated PDD-induced expression of protein and mRNA, the promoter activity of COX-2 and IL-8 genes, and the secretion of prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) and IL-8. GHRP-2 promoted the degradation of PDD-induced COX-2 and IL-8 proteins with the involvement of proteasomal and lysosomal pathways. PDD-mediated COX-2 production acts via the p38, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NF-κB) pathways; PDD-mediated IL-8 production acts via the p38, JNK and ERK pathways. GHRP-2 reduced the PDD-induced phosphorylation of p38 and JNK and activator protein 1 (AP-1) reporter activation and PDD-induced NF-κB nuclear translocation and reporter activation. The inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) and protein phosphatase 2 (PP2A) reduced the inhibitory effect of GHRP-2 on PDD-induced COX-2 and IL-8 expression. Our findings demonstrate an anti-inflammatory role for ghrelin (GHRP-2) in PKC-mediated inflammation of granulosa cells, at least in part, due to its inhibitory effect on PKC-induced activation of p38, JNK and NF-κB, possibly by targeting to MKP-1 and PP2A. PMID:27548147

  3. Inhibition of protein kinase C catalytic activity by additional regions within the human protein kinase Calpha-regulatory domain lying outside of the pseudosubstrate sequence.

    PubMed Central

    Kirwan, Angie F; Bibby, Ashley C; Mvilongo, Thierry; Riedel, Heimo; Burke, Thomas; Millis, Sherri Z; Parissenti, Amadeo M

    2003-01-01

    The N-terminal pseudosubstrate site within the protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha)-regulatory domain has long been regarded as the major determinant for autoinhibition of catalytic domain activity. Previously, we observed that the PKC-inhibitory capacity of the human PKCalpha-regulatory domain was only reduced partially on removal of the pseudosubstrate sequence [Parissenti, Kirwan, Kim, Colantonio and Schimmer (1998) J. Biol. Chem. 273, 8940-8945]. This finding suggested that one or more additional region(s) contributes to the inhibition of catalytic domain activity. To assess this hypothesis, we first examined the PKC-inhibitory capacity of a smaller fragment of the PKCalpha-regulatory domain consisting of the C1a, C1b and V2 regions [GST-Ralpha(39-177): this protein contained the full regulatory domain of human PKCalpha fused to glutathione S-transferase (GST), but lacked amino acids 1-38 (including the pseudosubstrate sequence) and amino acids 178-270 (including the C2 region)]. GST-Ralpha(39-177) significantly inhibited PKC in a phorbol-independent manner and could not bind the peptide substrate used in our assays. These results suggested that a region within C1/V2 directly inhibits catalytic domain activity. Providing further in vivo support for this hypothesis, we found that expression of N-terminally truncated pseudosubstrate-less bovine PKCalpha holoenzymes in yeast was capable of inhibiting cell growth in a phorbol-dependent manner. This suggested that additional autoinhibitory force(s) remained within the truncated holoenzymes that could be relieved by phorbol ester. Using tandem PCR-mediated mutagenesis, we observed that mutation of amino acids 33-86 within GST-Ralpha(39-177) dramatically reduced its PKC-inhibitory capacity when protamine was used as substrate. Mutagenesis of a broad range of sequences within C2 (amino acids 159-242) also significantly reduced PKC-inhibitory capacity. Taken together, these observations support strongly the existence of

  4. New potent and selective inhibitor of Pim-1/3 protein kinases sensitizes human colon carcinoma cells to doxorubicin.

    PubMed

    Moreau, Pascale; Dezhenkova, Lyubov G; Anizon, Fabrice; Nauton, Lionel; Thery, Vincent; Liang, Shuguang; Kaluzhny, Dmitry N; Shtil, Alexander A

    2014-01-01

    The Pim protein kinases (provirus insertion site of Moloney murine leukemia virus) have been identified as important actors involved in tumor cell survival, proliferation, migration and invasion. Therefore, inhibition of Pim activity by low molecular weight compounds is under investigation as a part of anticancer therapeutic strategies. We have synthesized a series of pyrrolo[2,3-a]carbazole derivatives that significantly inhibited Pim protein kinases at submicromolar concentrations. Particularly, benzodiazocine derivative 1 potently inhibited Pim-1 and -3 isoforms in in vitro kinase assays (IC50 8 nM and 13 nM, respectively), whereas Pim-2 activity was less affected (IC50 350 nM). We show here that no inhibitory effect of 1 was detectable at 1 µM against other 22 serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases. In addition, 1, possessing a planar pyrrolocarbazole scaffold, demonstrated no significant binding to DNA, nor was it a potent topoisomerase I inhibitor, suggesting that 1 is likely to be highly selective for Pim-1 and -3. Importantly, whereas 1 exerted a negligible cytotoxicity for human colon carcinoma HCT116 cell line at concentrations >10 µM within 72 h of cell exposure, it synergized at nontoxic concentrations with the antitumor drug doxorubicin (Dox) in killing HCT116 cells: IC50 of Dox alone and Dox+1 were ~200 nM and ~25 nM, respectively. These data strongly suggest that 1 emerges as a prospective antitumor drug candidate due to its selectivity to individual Pim protein kinases and the ability to potentiate the efficacy of conventional chemotherapeutics. PMID:25175798

  5. The role of small adaptor proteins in the control of oncogenic signaling driven by tyrosine kinases in human cancer

    PubMed Central

    Naudin, Cécile; Chevalier, Clément; Roche, Serge

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation on tyrosine (Tyr) residues has evolved as an important mechanism to coordinate cell communication in multicellular organisms. The importance of this process has been revealed by the discovery of the prominent oncogenic properties of tyrosine kinases (TK) upon deregulation of their physiological activities, often due to protein overexpression and/or somatic mutation. Recent reports suggest that TK oncogenic signaling is also under the control of small adaptor proteins. These cytosolic proteins lack intrinsic catalytic activity and signal by linking two functional members of a catalytic pathway. While most adaptors display positive regulatory functions, a small group of this family exerts negative regulatory functions by targeting several components of the TK signaling cascade. Here, we review how these less studied adaptor proteins negatively control TK activities and how their loss of function induces abnormal TK signaling, promoting tumor formation. We also discuss the therapeutic consequences of this novel regulatory mechanism in human oncology. PMID:26788993

  6. The UL97 protein kinase of human cytomegalovirus and homologues in other herpesviruses: impact on virus and host.

    PubMed

    Michel, Detlef; Mertens, Thomas

    2004-03-11

    The human herpesviruses, herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), HSV-2, varicella zoster virus (VZV), Epstein-Barr virus (EBV), human cytomegalovirus (HCMV), human herpesvirus 6A (HHV-6A), HHV-6B, HHV-7 and HHV-8, establish persistent infections with possible recurrence during immunosuppression. HCMV replication is inhibited by the nucleoside analogue ganciclovir (GCV), the compound of choice for the treatment of HCMV diseases and preemptive treatment of infections. The viral UL97 protein (pUL97) which shares homologies with protein kinases and bacterial phosphotransferases is able to monophosphorylate GCV. Homologues of pUL97 are found in HSV (UL13), VZV (ORF47), EBV (BGLF4), HHV-6 (U69), HHV-8 (ORF36) as well as in murine CMV (M97) or rat CMV (R97). Several indolocarbazoles have been reported to be specific inhibitors of pUL97. The protein is important for efficient replication of the virus. Autophosphorylation of pUL97 was observed using different experimental systems. Most recently, it has been shown that pUL97 interacts with the DNA polymerase processivity factor pUL44. Indolocarbazole protein kinase inhibitors are promising lead compounds for the development of more specific inhibitors of HCMV. PMID:15023359

  7. Characterization of protein tyrosine kinases from human breast cancer: involvement of the c-src oncogene product.

    PubMed

    Ottenhoff-Kalff, A E; Rijksen, G; van Beurden, E A; Hennipman, A; Michels, A A; Staal, G E

    1992-09-01

    Tyrosine phosphorylation is an important regulatory mechanism in response to the action of growth factors and oncogenes. Since many oncogenes code for tyrosine kinases, increased or altered oncogene expression may be reflected in increased tyrosine kinase activity. In a recent study (Hennipman et al., Cancer Res., 49: 516-521, 1989), we found that the tyrosine kinase activity of the cytosolic and membrane fractions of malignant human breast tissue was significantly higher compared to the benign or the normal breast tissue. Moreover, the increase in the cytosolic fractions was found to be of prognostic value. In the present study we determined the protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) activity of another 72 breast cancer specimens, and it could be shown again that the PTK activity in all 72 of these tumors was elevated compared to normal controls. We characterized these cytosolic PTKs by anion exchange chromatography using fast protein liquid chromatography, and it could be shown that at least two different forms of PTK exist. Using antibodies against a number of known oncogene products, we could determine that at least 70% of the PTK activity in the cytosol originated from the presence of the c-src oncogene product. Both of the PTK activity peaks seen in the fast protein liquid chromatography patterns could be precipitated with the anti-Src antibody. Furthermore, using the MCF-7 breast cancer cell line, it could be shown that the antibody against c-src also precipitated a part of the cytosolic PTK activity. In normal human peripheral lymphocytes, no precipitation of the cytosolic and membrane PTK activity could be achieved using the anti-Src antibody. Inasmuch as the cytosolic PTK activity parallels the malignancy in breast tumors (Hennipman et al., Cancer Res., 49: 516-521, 1989), and the majority of this activity is precipitated by anti-Src antibodies, the c-src protooncogene may play a key role in the manifestation of breast cancer.

  8. Analysis of the c-src gene product structure, abundance, and protein kinase activity in human neuroblastoma and glioblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    O'Shaughnessy, J; Deseau, V; Amini, S; Rosen, N; Bolen, J B

    1987-01-01

    We have compared in different human neuroblastoma cell lines and human glioblastoma cells the expression level, structure, and tyrosine-specific protein kinase activity of pp60c-src. Our results show that not all human neuroblastoma cell lines express pp60c-src molecules with amino-terminal structural alterations. In neuroblastoma cells which possess pp60c-src with altered gel migration, the diminished polyacrylamide gel mobility of pp60c-src was found not to be dependent upon amino-terminal phosphorylations since extensive treatment of these molecules with phosphatase did not significantly change their gel migration properties. Similar differences in gel migration were observed when RNA from the various neuroblastoma and glioblastoma cells was translated in vitro using either rabbit reticulocyte or wheat germ lysates. White the level of c-src mRNA in the different cells analyzed was found to be similar, the abundance of pp60c-src in these same cells was found to vary by as much as 12-fold. This suggests that the abundance of pp60c-src in human neuroendocrine tumors is regulated through post-transcriptional and/or post-translational events which may be related to the stage of neuronal differentiation of the cells. Based upon determination of pp60c-src abundance by immunoblot analysis, we demonstrate that pp60c-src molecules derived from human neuroblastoma and glioblastoma cells have very similar in vitro protein kinase activities.

  9. Redox Regulation of Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Truong, Thu H.; Carroll, Kate S.

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinases represent one of the largest families of genes found in eukaryotes. Kinases mediate distinct cellular processes ranging from proliferation, differentiation, survival, and apoptosis. Ligand-mediated activation of receptor kinases can lead to the production of endogenous H2O2 by membrane-bound NADPH oxidases. In turn, H2O2 can be utilized as a secondary messenger in signal transduction pathways. This review presents an overview of the molecular mechanisms involved in redox regulation of protein kinases and its effects on signaling cascades. In the first half, we will focus primarily on receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs), whereas the latter will concentrate on downstream non-receptor kinases involved in relaying stimulant response. Select examples from the literature are used to highlight the functional role of H2O2 regarding kinase activity, as well as the components involved in H2O2 production and regulation during cellular signaling. In addition, studies demonstrating direct modulation of protein kinases by H2O2 through cysteine oxidation will be emphasized. Identification of these redox-sensitive residues may help uncover signaling mechanisms conserved within kinase subfamilies. In some cases, these residues can even be exploited as targets for the development of new therapeutics. Continued efforts in this field will further basic understanding of kinase redox regulation, and delineate the mechanisms involved in physiologic and pathological H2O2 responses. PMID:23639002

  10. Histamine induces activation of protein kinase D that mediates tissue factor expression and activity in human aortic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Hao, Feng; Wu, Daniel Dongwei; Xu, Xuemin; Cui, Mei-Zhen

    2012-12-01

    Histamine, an inflammatory mediator, has been shown to influence the pathogenesis of vascular wall cells. However, the molecular basis of its influence is not well understood. Our data reveal that histamine markedly induces protein kinase D (PKD) activation in human aortic smooth muscle cells. PKD belongs to a family of serine/threonine protein kinases, and its function in vascular disease is largely unknown. Our data show that histamine-induced PKD phosphorylation is dependent on the activation of histamine receptor 1 and protein kinase C (PKC). To determine the role of PKD in the histamine pathway, we employed a small-interfering RNA approach to downregulate PKD expression and found that PKD1 and PKD2 are key mediators for expression of tissue factor (TF), which is the key initiator of blood coagulation and is important for thrombosis. Our results show that PKD2 predominantly mediates histamine-induced TF expression via the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway, whereas PKD1 mediates histamine-induced TF expression through a p38 MAPK-independent pathway. We demonstrate that histamine induces TF expression via the PKC-dependent PKD activation. Our data provide the first evidence that PKD is a new component in histamine signaling in live cells and that PKD has a novel function in the histamine signaling pathway leading to gene expression, as evidenced by TF expression. Importantly, our data reveal a regulatory link from histamine to PKD and TF, providing new insights into the mechanisms of coagulation and the development of atherothrombosis.

  11. Human Cytomegalovirus pTRS1 and pIRS1 Antagonize Protein Kinase R To Facilitate Virus Replication

    PubMed Central

    Ziehr, Benjamin; Vincent, Heather A.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) counteracts host defenses that otherwise act to limit viral protein synthesis. One such defense is the antiviral kinase protein kinase R (PKR), which inactivates the eukaryotic initiation factor 2 (eIF2) translation initiation factor upon binding to viral double-stranded RNAs. Previously, the viral TRS1 and IRS1 proteins were found to antagonize the antiviral kinase PKR outside the context of HCMV infection, and the expression of either pTRS1 or pIRS1 was shown to be necessary for HCMV replication. In this study, we found that expression of either pTRS1 or pIRS1 is necessary to prevent PKR activation during HCMV infection and that antagonism of PKR is critical for efficient viral replication. Consistent with a previous study, we observed decreased overall levels of protein synthesis, reduced viral protein expression, and diminished virus replication in the absence of both pTRS1 and pIRS1. In addition, both PKR and eIF2α were phosphorylated during infection when pTRS1 and pIRS1 were absent. We also found that expression of pTRS1 was both necessary and sufficient to prevent stress granule formation in response to eIF2α phosphorylation. Depletion of PKR prevented eIF2α phosphorylation, rescued HCMV replication and protein synthesis, and reversed the accumulation of stress granules in infected cells. Infection with an HCMV mutant lacking the pTRS1 PKR binding domain resulted in PKR activation, suggesting that pTRS1 inhibits PKR through a direct interaction. Together our results show that antagonism of PKR by HCMV pTRS1 and pIRS1 is critical for viral protein expression and efficient HCMV replication. IMPORTANCE To successfully replicate, viruses must counteract host defenses that limit viral protein synthesis. We have identified inhibition of the antiviral kinase PKR by the viral proteins TRS1 and IRS1 and shown that this is a critical step in HCMV replication. Our results suggest that inhibiting pTRS1 and pIRS1 function or

  12. AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) regulates the insulin-induced activation of the nitric oxide synthase in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Fleming, Ingrid; Schulz, Christian; Fichtlscherer, Birgit; Kemp, Bruce E; Fisslthaler, Beate; Busse, Rudi

    2003-11-01

    Little is known about the signaling cascades that eventually regulate the activity of the endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) in platelets. Here, we investigated the effects of insulin on the phosphorylation and activation of eNOS in washed human platelets and in endothelial cells. Insulin activated the protein kinase Akt in cultured endothelial cells and increased the phosphorylation of eNOS on Ser(1177) but failed to increase endothelial cyclic GMP levels or to elicit the relaxation of endothelium-intact porcine coronary arteries. In platelets, insulin also elicited the activation of Akt as well as the phosphorylation of eNOS and initiated NO production which was associated with increased cyclic GMP levels and the inhibition of thrombin-induced aggregation. The insulin-induced inhibition of aggregation was accompanied by a decreased Ca(2+) response to thrombin and was also prevented by N(omega) nitro-L-arginine. In platelets, but not in endothelial cells, insulin induced the activation of the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a metabolic stress-sensing kinase which was sensitive to the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3-K) inhibitor wortmannin and the AMPK inhibitor iodotubercidin. Moreover, the insulin-mediated inhibition of thrombin-induced aggregation was prevented by iodotubercidin. Insulin-independent activation of the AMPK using 5-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleoside, increased platelet eNOS phosphorylation, increased cyclic GMP levels and attenuated platelet aggregation. These results highlight the differences in the signal transduction cascade activated by insulin in endothelial cells and platelets, and demonstrate that insulin stimulates the formation of NO in human platelets, in the absence of an increase in Ca(2+), by acti-vating PI3-K and AMPK which phosphorylates eNOS on Ser(1177).

  13. The effects of knockdown of rho-associated kinase 1 and zipper-interacting protein kinase on gene expression and function in cultured human arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jing-Ti; Wang, Xiu-Ling; Chen, Yong-Xiang; O'Brien, Edward R; Gui, Yu; Walsh, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) and zipper-interacting protein kinase (ZIPK) have been implicated in diverse physiological functions. ROCK1 phosphorylates and activates ZIPK suggesting that at least some of these physiological functions may require both enzymes. To test the hypothesis that sequential activation of ROCK1 and ZIPK is commonly involved in regulatory pathways, we utilized siRNA to knock down ROCK1 and ZIPK in cultured human arterial smooth muscle cells (SMC). Microarray analysis using a whole-transcript expression chip identified changes in gene expression induced by ROCK1 and ZIPK knockdown. ROCK1 knockdown affected the expression of 553 genes, while ZIPK knockdown affected the expression of 390 genes. A high incidence of regulation of transcription regulator genes was observed in both knockdowns. Other affected groups included transporters, kinases, peptidases, transmembrane and G protein-coupled receptors, growth factors, phosphatases and ion channels. Only 76 differentially expressed genes were common to ROCK1 and ZIPK knockdown. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis identified five pathways shared between the two knockdowns. We focused on cytokine signaling pathways since ROCK1 knockdown up-regulated 5 and down-regulated 4 cytokine genes, in contrast to ZIPK knockdown, which affected the expression of only two cytokine genes (both down-regulated). IL-6 gene expression and secretion of IL-6 protein were up-regulated by ROCK1 knockdown, whereas ZIPK knockdown reduced IL-6 mRNA expression and IL-6 protein secretion and increased ROCK1 protein expression, suggesting that ROCK1 may inhibit IL-6 secretion. IL-1β mRNA and protein levels were increased in response to ROCK1 knockdown. Differences in the effects of ROCK1 and ZIPK knockdown on cell cycle regulatory genes suggested that ROCK1 and ZIPK regulate the cell cycle by different mechanisms. ROCK1, but not ZIPK knockdown reduced the viability and inhibited proliferation of vascular SMC. We conclude that ROCK1 and

  14. The effects of knockdown of rho-associated kinase 1 and zipper-interacting protein kinase on gene expression and function in cultured human arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Deng, Jing-Ti; Wang, Xiu-Ling; Chen, Yong-Xiang; O'Brien, Edward R; Gui, Yu; Walsh, Michael P

    2015-01-01

    Rho-associated kinase (ROCK) and zipper-interacting protein kinase (ZIPK) have been implicated in diverse physiological functions. ROCK1 phosphorylates and activates ZIPK suggesting that at least some of these physiological functions may require both enzymes. To test the hypothesis that sequential activation of ROCK1 and ZIPK is commonly involved in regulatory pathways, we utilized siRNA to knock down ROCK1 and ZIPK in cultured human arterial smooth muscle cells (SMC). Microarray analysis using a whole-transcript expression chip identified changes in gene expression induced by ROCK1 and ZIPK knockdown. ROCK1 knockdown affected the expression of 553 genes, while ZIPK knockdown affected the expression of 390 genes. A high incidence of regulation of transcription regulator genes was observed in both knockdowns. Other affected groups included transporters, kinases, peptidases, transmembrane and G protein-coupled receptors, growth factors, phosphatases and ion channels. Only 76 differentially expressed genes were common to ROCK1 and ZIPK knockdown. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis identified five pathways shared between the two knockdowns. We focused on cytokine signaling pathways since ROCK1 knockdown up-regulated 5 and down-regulated 4 cytokine genes, in contrast to ZIPK knockdown, which affected the expression of only two cytokine genes (both down-regulated). IL-6 gene expression and secretion of IL-6 protein were up-regulated by ROCK1 knockdown, whereas ZIPK knockdown reduced IL-6 mRNA expression and IL-6 protein secretion and increased ROCK1 protein expression, suggesting that ROCK1 may inhibit IL-6 secretion. IL-1β mRNA and protein levels were increased in response to ROCK1 knockdown. Differences in the effects of ROCK1 and ZIPK knockdown on cell cycle regulatory genes suggested that ROCK1 and ZIPK regulate the cell cycle by different mechanisms. ROCK1, but not ZIPK knockdown reduced the viability and inhibited proliferation of vascular SMC. We conclude that ROCK1 and

  15. Overexpression of human insulin receptor substrate 1 induces cellular transformation with activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases.

    PubMed Central

    Ito, T; Sasaki, Y; Wands, J R

    1996-01-01

    The receptor insulin substrate 1 protein (IRS-1) is a specific substrate for insulin receptor tyrosine kinase. Expression and tyrosyl phosphorylation of IRS-1 play an important role during normal hepatocyte growth, and the gene is overexpressed in hepatocellular carcinoma tissue. We determined if IRS-1 overexpression directly contributes to cellular transformation. The human IRS-1 gene was subcloned into a mammalian expression vector driven by the cytomegalovirus early promoter. NIH 3T3 cells transiently transfected with this vector subsequently developed transformed foci. Several stably transfected cell lines were established, and they grew efficiently under low-serum conditions and formed colonies when plated in soft agar. Cell lines overexpressing IRS-1 displayed increased tyrosyl phosphorylation of IRS-1 and association with Grb2 but not with the p85 subunit of phosphatidylinositol 3' kinase. Since Grb2 is a component of the son-of-sevenless-Ras pathway and upstream in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascade, enzymatic activities of the major components of this cascade, such as MAPK kinase and MAPK were evaluated and found to be substantially increased in three independent cell lines with IRS-1 protein overexpression. Such cells, when injected into nude mice, were highly tumorigenic, and there may be a correlation between the degree of MAPK activation and tumor growth rate. This report describes the generation of a transformed phenotype by overexpression of a molecule without a catalytic domain far upstream in the signal transduction cascade and suggests that prolonged activation of MAPKs by this mechanism may be one of the molecular events related to hepatocellular transformation. PMID:8622697

  16. Thrombin produces phosphorylation of cytosolic phospholipase A2 by a mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase-independent mechanism in the human astrocytoma cell line 1321N1.

    PubMed Central

    Hernández, M; Bayón, Y; Sánchez Crespo, M; Nieto, M L

    1997-01-01

    The release of [3H]arachidonic acid was studied in the 1321N1 astrocytoma cell line upon stimulation with thrombin. The effect of thrombin was antagonized by hirudin only when both compounds were added simultaneously, which suggests activation of thrombin receptor. Evidence that the cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) takes part in thrombin-induced arachidonate release was provided by the finding that thrombin induced retardation of the mobility of cPLA2 in SDS/polyacrylamide gels, which is a feature of the activation of cPLA2 by mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases. Thrombin induced activation of two members of the MAP kinase family whose consensus primary sequence appears in cPLA2, namely p42-MAP kinase and c-Jun kinase. However, the activation of c-Jun kinase preceded the phosphorylation of cPLA2 more clearly than the activation of p42-MAK kinase did. Both cPLA2 and c-Jun kinase activation were not affected by PD-98059, a specific inhibitor of MAP kinase kinases, which indeed completely blocked p42-MAP kinase shift. Heat shock, a well-known activator of c-Jun kinase, also phosphorylated cPLA2 but not p42-MAP kinase. These data indicate the existence in astrocytoma cells of a signalling pathway triggered by thrombin receptor stimulation that activates a kinase cascade acting on the Pro-Leu-Ser-Pro consensus primary sequence, activates cPLA2, and associates the release of arachidonate with nuclear signalling pathways. PMID:9359863

  17. Induction of Macrophage Function in Human THP-1 Cells Is Associated with Rewiring of MAPK Signaling and Activation of MAP3K7 (TAK1) Protein Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Richter, Erik; Ventz, Katharina; Harms, Manuela; Mostertz, Jörg; Hochgräfe, Falko

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages represent the primary human host response to pathogen infection and link the immediate defense to the adaptive immune system. Mature tissue macrophages convert from circulating monocyte precursor cells by terminal differentiation in a process that is not fully understood. Here, we analyzed the protein kinases of the human monocytic cell line THP-1 before and after induction of macrophage differentiation by using kinomics and phosphoproteomics. When comparing the macrophage-like state with the monocytic precursor, 50% of the kinome was altered in expression and even 71% of covered kinase phosphorylation sites were affected. Kinome rearrangements are for example characterized by a shift of overrepresented cyclin-dependent kinases associated with cell cycle control in monocytes to calmodulin-dependent kinases and kinases involved in proinflammatory signaling. Eventually, we show that monocyte-to-macrophage differentiation is associated with major rewiring of mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling networks and demonstrate that protein kinase MAP3K7 (TAK1) acts as the key signaling hub in bacterial killing, chemokine production and differentiation. Our study proves the fundamental role of protein kinases and cellular signaling as major drivers of macrophage differentiation and function. The finding that MAP3K7 is central to macrophage function suggests MAP3K7 and its networking partners as promising targets in host-directed therapy for macrophage-associated disease. PMID:27066479

  18. Opposing Growth Regulatory Roles of Protein Kinase D Isoforms in Human Keratinocytes*

    PubMed Central

    Ryvkin, Vladislav; Rashel, Mohammad; Gaddapara, Trivikram; Ghazizadeh, Soosan

    2015-01-01

    PKD is a family of three serine/threonine kinases (PKD-1, -2, and -3) involved in the regulation of diverse biological processes including proliferation, migration, secretion, and cell survival. We have previously shown that despite expression of all three isoforms in mouse epidermis, PKD1 plays a unique and critical role in wound healing, phorbol ester-induced hyperplasia, and tumor development. In translating our findings to the human, we discovered that PKD1 is not expressed in human keratinocytes (KCs) and there is a divergence in the expression and function of other PKD isoforms. Contrary to mouse KCs, treatment of cultured human KCs with pharmacological inhibitors of PKDs resulted in growth arrest. We found that PKD2 and PKD3 are expressed differentially in proliferating and differentiating human KCs, with the former uniformly present in both compartments whereas the latter is predominantly expressed in the proliferating compartment. Knockdown of individual PKD isoforms in human KCs revealed contrasting growth regulatory roles for PKD2 and PKD3. Loss of PKD2 enhanced KC proliferative potential while loss of PKD3 resulted in a progressive proliferation defect, loss of clonogenicity and diminished tissue regenerative ability. This proliferation defect was correlated with up-regulation of CDK4/6 inhibitor p15INK4B and induction of a p53-independent G1 cell cycle arrest. Simultaneous silencing of PKD isoforms resulted in a more pronounced proliferation defect consistent with a predominant role for PKD3 in proliferating KCs. These data underline the importance and complexity of PKD signaling in human epidermis and suggest a central role for PKD3 signaling in maintaining human epidermal homeostasis. PMID:25802335

  19. Protein kinase B modulates the sensitivity of human neuroblastoma cells to insulin-like growth factor receptor inhibition.

    PubMed

    Guerreiro, Ana S; Boller, Danielle; Shalaby, Tarek; Grotzer, Michael A; Arcaro, Alexandre

    2006-12-01

    The potential of the novel insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF-IR) inhibitor NVP-AEW541 as an antiproliferative agent in human neuroblastoma was investigated. Proliferation of a panel of neuroblastoma cell lines was inhibited by NVP-AEW541 with IC(50) values ranging from 0.15 to 5 microM. Experiments using an IGF-IR neutralizing antibody confirmed that the IGF-IR was essential to support growth of neuroblastoma cell lines. The expression levels of the IGF-IR in individual neuroblastoma cell lines did not correlate with the sensitivities to NVP-AEW541, while coexpression of the IGF-IR and the insulin receptor (IR) correlated with lower sensitivity to the inhibitor in some cell lines. Intriguingly, high levels of activation of Akt/protein kinase B (PKB) and phosphorylation of the ribosomal S6 protein were observed in neuroblastoma cell lines with decreased sensitivities to NVP-AEW541. Inhibition of Akt/PKB activity restored the sensitivity of neuroblastoma cells to the IGF-IR inhibitor. Transfection of neuroblastoma cells with activated Akt or ribosomal protein S6 kinase (S6K) decreased the sensitivity of the cells to NVP-AEW541. IGF-I-stimulated proliferation of neuroblastoma cell lines was completely blocked by NVP-AEW541, or by a combination of an inhibitor of phosphoinositide 3-kinase and rapamycin. In addition to its antiproliferative effects, NVP-AEW541 sensitized neuroblastoma cells to cisplatin-induced apoptosis. Together, our data demonstrate that NVP-AEW541 in combination with Akt/PKB inhibitors or chemotherapeutic agents may represent a novel approach to target human neuroblastoma cell proliferation.

  20. Inhibition of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase, DNA methyltransferase, and transforming growth factor-β promotes differentiation of human induced pluripotent stem cells into enterocytes.

    PubMed

    Kodama, Nao; Iwao, Takahiro; Kabeya, Tomoki; Horikawa, Takashi; Niwa, Takuro; Kondo, Yuki; Nakamura, Katsunori; Matsunaga, Tamihide

    2016-06-01

    We previously reported that small-molecule compounds were effective in generating pharmacokinetically functional enterocytes from human induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells. In this study, to determine whether the compounds promote the differentiation of human iPS cells into enterocytes, we investigated the effects of a combination of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK), DNA methyltransferase (DNMT), and transforming growth factor (TGF)-β inhibitors on intestinal differentiation. Human iPS cells cultured on feeder cells were differentiated into endodermal cells by activin A. These endodermal-like cells were then differentiated into intestinal stem cells by fibroblast growth factor 2. Finally, the cells were differentiated into enterocyte cells by epidermal growth factor and small-molecule compounds. After differentiation, mRNA expression levels and drug-metabolizing enzyme activities were measured. The mRNA expression levels of the enterocyte marker sucrase-isomaltase and the major drug-metabolizing enzyme cytochrome P450 (CYP) 3A4 were increased by a combination of MEK, DNMT, and TGF-β inhibitors. The mRNA expression of CYP3A4 was markedly induced by 1α,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3. Metabolic activities of CYP1A1/2, CYP2B6, CYP2C9, CYP2C19, CYP3A4/5, UDP-glucuronosyltransferase, and sulfotransferase were also observed in the differentiated cells. In conclusion, MEK, DNMT, and TGF-β inhibitors can be used to promote the differentiation of human iPS cells into pharmacokinetically functional enterocytes.

  1. Protein Crystals of Raf Kinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1995-01-01

    This image shows crystals of the protein raf kinase grown on Earth (photo a) and on USML-2 (photo b). The space-grown crystals are an order of magnitude larger. Principal Investigator: Dan Carter of New Century Pharmaceuticals

  2. Proteomic Interaction Patterns between Human Cyclins, the Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Ortholog pUL97 and Additional Cytomegalovirus Proteins.

    PubMed

    Steingruber, Mirjam; Kraut, Alexandra; Socher, Eileen; Sticht, Heinrich; Reichel, Anna; Stamminger, Thomas; Amin, Bushra; Couté, Yohann; Hutterer, Corina; Marschall, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-encoded cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) ortholog pUL97 associates with human cyclin B1 and other types of cyclins. Here, the question was addressed whether cyclin interaction of pUL97 and additional viral proteins is detectable by mass spectrometry-based approaches. Proteomic data were validated by coimmunoprecipitation (CoIP), Western blot, in vitro kinase and bioinformatic analyses. Our findings suggest that: (i) pUL97 shows differential affinities to human cyclins; (ii) pUL97 inhibitor maribavir (MBV) disrupts the interaction with cyclin B1, but not with other cyclin types; (iii) cyclin H is identified as a new high-affinity interactor of pUL97 in HCMV-infected cells; (iv) even more viral phosphoproteins, including all known substrates of pUL97, are detectable in the cyclin-associated complexes; and (v) a first functional validation of pUL97-cyclin B1 interaction, analyzed by in vitro kinase assay, points to a cyclin-mediated modulation of pUL97 substrate preference. In addition, our bioinformatic analyses suggest individual, cyclin-specific binding interfaces for pUL97-cyclin interaction, which could explain the different strengths of interactions and the selective inhibitory effect of MBV on pUL97-cyclin B1 interaction. Combined, the detection of cyclin-associated proteins in HCMV-infected cells suggests a complex pattern of substrate phosphorylation and a role of cyclins in the fine-modulation of pUL97 activities.

  3. Proteomic Interaction Patterns between Human Cyclins, the Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Ortholog pUL97 and Additional Cytomegalovirus Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Steingruber, Mirjam; Kraut, Alexandra; Socher, Eileen; Sticht, Heinrich; Reichel, Anna; Stamminger, Thomas; Amin, Bushra; Couté, Yohann; Hutterer, Corina; Marschall, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-encoded cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) ortholog pUL97 associates with human cyclin B1 and other types of cyclins. Here, the question was addressed whether cyclin interaction of pUL97 and additional viral proteins is detectable by mass spectrometry-based approaches. Proteomic data were validated by coimmunoprecipitation (CoIP), Western blot, in vitro kinase and bioinformatic analyses. Our findings suggest that: (i) pUL97 shows differential affinities to human cyclins; (ii) pUL97 inhibitor maribavir (MBV) disrupts the interaction with cyclin B1, but not with other cyclin types; (iii) cyclin H is identified as a new high-affinity interactor of pUL97 in HCMV-infected cells; (iv) even more viral phosphoproteins, including all known substrates of pUL97, are detectable in the cyclin-associated complexes; and (v) a first functional validation of pUL97-cyclin B1 interaction, analyzed by in vitro kinase assay, points to a cyclin-mediated modulation of pUL97 substrate preference. In addition, our bioinformatic analyses suggest individual, cyclin-specific binding interfaces for pUL97-cyclin interaction, which could explain the different strengths of interactions and the selective inhibitory effect of MBV on pUL97-cyclin B1 interaction. Combined, the detection of cyclin-associated proteins in HCMV-infected cells suggests a complex pattern of substrate phosphorylation and a role of cyclins in the fine-modulation of pUL97 activities. PMID:27548200

  4. Proteomic Interaction Patterns between Human Cyclins, the Cyclin-Dependent Kinase Ortholog pUL97 and Additional Cytomegalovirus Proteins.

    PubMed

    Steingruber, Mirjam; Kraut, Alexandra; Socher, Eileen; Sticht, Heinrich; Reichel, Anna; Stamminger, Thomas; Amin, Bushra; Couté, Yohann; Hutterer, Corina; Marschall, Manfred

    2016-01-01

    The human cytomegalovirus (HCMV)-encoded cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) ortholog pUL97 associates with human cyclin B1 and other types of cyclins. Here, the question was addressed whether cyclin interaction of pUL97 and additional viral proteins is detectable by mass spectrometry-based approaches. Proteomic data were validated by coimmunoprecipitation (CoIP), Western blot, in vitro kinase and bioinformatic analyses. Our findings suggest that: (i) pUL97 shows differential affinities to human cyclins; (ii) pUL97 inhibitor maribavir (MBV) disrupts the interaction with cyclin B1, but not with other cyclin types; (iii) cyclin H is identified as a new high-affinity interactor of pUL97 in HCMV-infected cells; (iv) even more viral phosphoproteins, including all known substrates of pUL97, are detectable in the cyclin-associated complexes; and (v) a first functional validation of pUL97-cyclin B1 interaction, analyzed by in vitro kinase assay, points to a cyclin-mediated modulation of pUL97 substrate preference. In addition, our bioinformatic analyses suggest individual, cyclin-specific binding interfaces for pUL97-cyclin interaction, which could explain the different strengths of interactions and the selective inhibitory effect of MBV on pUL97-cyclin B1 interaction. Combined, the detection of cyclin-associated proteins in HCMV-infected cells suggests a complex pattern of substrate phosphorylation and a role of cyclins in the fine-modulation of pUL97 activities. PMID:27548200

  5. Evolutionary Ancestry of Eukaryotic Protein Kinases and Choline Kinases.

    PubMed

    Lai, Shenshen; Safaei, Javad; Pelech, Steven

    2016-03-01

    The reversible phosphorylation of proteins catalyzed by protein kinases in eukaryotes supports an important role for eukaryotic protein kinases (ePKs) in the emergence of nucleated cells in the third superkingdom of life. Choline kinases (ChKs) could also be critical in the early evolution of eukaryotes, because of their function in the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine, which is unique to eukaryotic membranes. However, the genomic origins of ePKs and ChKs are unclear. The high degeneracy of protein sequences and broad expansion of ePK families have made this fundamental question difficult to answer. In this study, we identified two class-I aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases with high similarities to consensus amino acid sequences of human protein-serine/threonine kinases. Comparisons of primary and tertiary structures supported that ePKs and ChKs evolved from a common ancestor related to glutaminyl aminoacyl-tRNA synthetases, which may have been one of the key factors in the successful of emergence of ancient eukaryotic cells from bacterial colonies.

  6. Mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 mediates resistance to hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in human hepatobiliary cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Nguyen Ho-Bouldoires, Thanh Huong; Clapéron, Audrey; Mergey, Martine; Wendum, Dominique; Desbois-Mouthon, Christèle; Tahraoui, Sylvana; Fartoux, Laetitia; Chettouh, Hamza; Merabtene, Fatiha; Scatton, Olivier; Gaestel, Matthias; Praz, Françoise; Housset, Chantal; Fouassier, Laura

    2015-12-01

    The development and progression of liver cancer are characterized by increased levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS-induced oxidative stress impairs cell proliferation and ultimately leads to cell death. Although liver cancer cells are especially resistant to oxidative stress, mechanisms of such resistance remain understudied. We identified the MAPK-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2)/heat shock protein 27 (Hsp27) signaling pathway mediating defenses against oxidative stress. In addition to MK2 and Hsp27 overexpression in primary liver tumors compared to adjacent nontumorous tissues, the MK2/Hsp27 pathway is activated by hydrogen peroxide-induced oxidative stress in hepatobiliary cancer cells. MK2 inactivation or inhibition of MK2 or Hsp27 expression increases caspase-3 and PARP cleavage and DNA breaks and therefore cell death. Interestingly, MK2/Hsp27 inhibition decreases antioxidant defenses such as heme oxygenase 1 through downregulation of the transcription factor nuclear factor erythroid-derived 2-like 2. Moreover, MK2/Hsp27 inhibition decreases both phosphorylation of epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and expression of its ligand, heparin-binding EGF-like growth factor. A new identified partner of MK2, the scaffold PDZ protein EBP50, could facilitate these effects through MK2/Hsp27 pathway regulation. These findings demonstrate that the MK2/Hsp27 pathway actively participates in resistance to oxidative stress and may contribute to liver cancer progression.

  7. Family-wide Structural Analysis of Human Numb-Associated Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Sorrell, Fiona J.; Szklarz, Marta; Abdul Azeez, Kamal R.; Elkins, Jon M.; Knapp, Stefan

    2016-01-01

    Summary The highly diverse Numb-associated kinase (NAK) family has been linked to broad cellular functions including receptor-mediated endocytosis, Notch pathway modulation, osteoblast differentiation, and dendrite morphogenesis. Consequently, NAK kinases play a key role in a diverse range of diseases from Parkinson's and prostate cancer to HIV. Due to the plasticity of this kinase family, NAK kinases are often inhibited by approved or investigational drugs and have been associated with side effects, but they are also potential drug targets. The presence of cysteine residues in some NAK family members provides the possibility for selective targeting via covalent inhibition. Here we report the first high-resolution structures of kinases AAK1 and BIKE in complex with two drug candidates. The presented data allow a comprehensive structural characterization of the NAK kinase family and provide the basis for rational design of selective NAK inhibitors. PMID:26853940

  8. Family-wide Structural Analysis of Human Numb-Associated Protein Kinases.

    PubMed

    Sorrell, Fiona J; Szklarz, Marta; Abdul Azeez, Kamal R; Elkins, Jon M; Knapp, Stefan

    2016-03-01

    The highly diverse Numb-associated kinase (NAK) family has been linked to broad cellular functions including receptor-mediated endocytosis, Notch pathway modulation, osteoblast differentiation, and dendrite morphogenesis. Consequently, NAK kinases play a key role in a diverse range of diseases from Parkinson's and prostate cancer to HIV. Due to the plasticity of this kinase family, NAK kinases are often inhibited by approved or investigational drugs and have been associated with side effects, but they are also potential drug targets. The presence of cysteine residues in some NAK family members provides the possibility for selective targeting via covalent inhibition. Here we report the first high-resolution structures of kinases AAK1 and BIKE in complex with two drug candidates. The presented data allow a comprehensive structural characterization of the NAK kinase family and provide the basis for rational design of selective NAK inhibitors. PMID:26853940

  9. Synthesis and biological evaluation of novel substituted pyrrolo[1,2-a]quinoxaline derivatives as inhibitors of the human protein kinase CK2.

    PubMed

    Guillon, Jean; Le Borgne, Marc; Rimbault, Charlotte; Moreau, Stéphane; Savrimoutou, Solène; Pinaud, Noël; Baratin, Sophie; Marchivie, Mathieu; Roche, Séverine; Bollacke, Andre; Pecci, Adali; Alvarez, Lautaro; Desplat, Vanessa; Jose, Joachim

    2013-07-01

    Herein we describe the synthesis and properties of substituted phenylaminopyrrolo[1,2-a]quinoxaline-carboxylic acid derivatives as a novel class of potent inhibitors of the human protein kinase CK2. A set of 15 compounds was designed and synthesized using convenient and straightforward synthesis protocols. The compounds were tested for inhibition of human protein kinase CK2, which is a potential drug target for many diseases including inflammatory disorders and cancer. New inhibitors with IC50 in the micro- and sub-micromolar range were identified. The most promising compound, the 4-[(3-chlorophenyl)amino]pyrrolo[1,2-a]quinoxaline-3-carboxylic acid 1c inhibited human CK2 with an IC50 of 49 nM. Our findings indicate that pyrrolo[1,2-a]quinoxalines are a promising starting scaffold for further development and optimization of human protein kinase CK2 inhibitors.

  10. The Role of Misshapen NCK-related kinase (MINK), a Novel Ste20 Family Kinase, in the IRES-Mediated Protein Translation of Human Enterovirus 71

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Shi Yun; Ong, Bryan Kit Teck; Chu, Justin Jang Hann

    2015-01-01

    Human Enterovirus 71 (EV71) commonly causes Hand, Foot and Mouth Disease in young children, and occasional occurrences of neurological complications can be fatal. In this study, a high-throughput cell-based screening on the serine/threonine kinase siRNA library was performed to identify potential antiviral agents against EV71 replication. Among the hits, Misshapen/NIKs-related kinase (MINK) was selected for detailed analysis due to its strong inhibitory profile and novelty. In the investigation of the stage at which MINK is involved in EV71 replication, virus RNA transfection in MINK siRNA-treated cells continued to cause virus inhibition despite bypassing the normal entry pathway, suggesting its involvement at the post-entry stage. We have also shown that viral RNA and protein expression level was significantly reduced upon MINK silencing, suggesting its involvement in viral protein synthesis which feeds into viral RNA replication process. Through proteomic analysis and infection inhibition assay, we found that the activation of MINK was triggered by early replication events, instead of the binding and entry of the virus. Proteomic analysis on the activation profile of p38 Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase (MAPK) indicated that the phosphorylation of p38 MAPK was stimulated by EV71 infection upon MINK activation. Luciferase reporter assay further revealed that the translation efficiency of the EV71 internal ribosomal entry site (IRES) was reduced after blocking the MINK/p38 MAPK pathway. Further investigation on the effect of MINK silencing on heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein A1 (hnRNP A1) localisation demonstrated that cytoplasmic relocalisation of hnRNP A1 upon EV71 infection may be facilitated via the MINK/p38 MAPK pathway which then positively regulates the translation of viral RNA transcripts. These novel findings hence suggest that MINK plays a functional role in the IRES-mediated translation of EV71 viral RNA and may provide a potential target for the

  11. E6 variants of human papillomavirus 18 differentially modulate the protein kinase B/phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (akt/PI3K) signaling pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Contreras-Paredes, Adriana

    2009-01-05

    Intra-type genome variations of high risk Human papillomavirus (HPV) have been associated with a differential threat for cervical cancer development. In this work, the effect of HPV18 E6 isolates in Akt/PKB and Mitogen-associated protein kinase (MAPKs) signaling pathways and its implication in cell proliferation were analyzed. E6 from HPV types 16 and 18 are able to bind and promote degradation of Human disc large (hDlg). Our results show that E6 variants differentially modulate hDlg degradation, rebounding in levels of activated PTEN and PKB. HPV18 E6 variants are also able to upregulate phospho-PI3K protein, strongly correlating with activated MAPKs and cell proliferation. Data was supported by the effect of E6 silencing in HPV18-containing HeLa cells, as well as hDlg silencing in the tested cells. Results suggest that HPV18 intra-type variations may derive in differential abilities to activate cell-signaling pathways such as Akt/PKB and MAPKs, directly involved in cell survival and proliferation.

  12. The distribution of protein kinase C in human leukocytes is altered in microgravity.

    PubMed

    Schmitt, D A; Hatton, J P; Emond, C; Chaput, D; Paris, H; Levade, T; Cazenave, J P; Schaffar, L

    1996-12-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is an ubiquitous enzyme that mediates intracellular signal transduction in eukaryotes. Jurkat and U937 cells were exposed to microgravity during a Space Shuttle flight and stimulated with a radiolabeled phorbol ester (3H-PDBu) that specifically activates and labels several PKC isoforms. Both the total amount of 3H-PDBu labeling per cell and the relative distribution of labeling between subcellular compartments were altered in microgravity compared to onboard and ground 1 g control samples. The amount of total phorbol ester labeling per cell was increased approximately twofold in microgravity samples when compared with onboard 1 g samples for both cell lines. The subcellular distribution of PKC in the cytosol and nuclear fractions appeared to be correlated with the applied acceleration. In both cell types the relative amount of phorbol ester labeling in the nuclear fraction decreased with applied acceleration, whereas the labeling in cytosolic fraction increased with g level. No significant differences were observed between labeling levels in the membrane fraction in both cell types. Interleukin-1beta synthesis by U937 cells was markedly decreased in microgravity when compared to the onboard 1 g control, suggesting that the observed alterations in PKC distribution may have functional consequences. The results may have important implications for the effect of gravity on cellular signal transduction.

  13. Mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 1/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK-1/ERK) inhibitors sensitize reduced glucocorticoid response mediated by TNF{alpha} in human epidermal keratinocytes (HaCaT)

    SciTech Connect

    Onda, Kenji . E-mail: knjond@ps.toyaku.ac.jp; Nagashima, Masahiro; Kawakubo, Yo; Inoue, Shota; Hirano, Toshihiko; Oka, Kitaro

    2006-12-08

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are essential drugs administered topically or systematically for the treatment of autoimmune skin diseases such as pemphigus. However, a certain proportion of patients does not respond well to GCs. Although studies on the relationship between cytokines and GC insensitivity in local tissues have attracted attention recently, little is known about the underlying mechanism(s) for GC insensitivity in epidermal keratinocytes. Here, we report that tumor necrosis factor (TNF) {alpha} reduces GC-induced transactivation of endogenous genes as well as a reporter plasmid which contains GC responsive element (GRE) in human epidermal keratinocyte cells (HaCaT). The GC insensitivity by TNF{alpha} was not accompanied by changes in mRNA expressions of GR isoforms ({alpha} or {beta}). However, we observed that mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase-1/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (MEK-1/ERK) inhibitors (PD98059 and U0126) significantly sensitized the GC-induced transactivation of anti-inflammatory genes (glucocorticoid-induced leucine zipper (GILZ) and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase (MKP)-1) and FK506 binding protein (FKBP) 51 gene in the presence of TNF{alpha}. Additionally, we observed that TNF{alpha} reduced prednisolone (PSL)-dependent nuclear translocation of GR, which was restored by pre-treatment of MEK-1 inhibitors. This is the first study demonstrating a role of the MEK-1/ERK cascade in TNF{alpha}-mediated GC insensitivity. Our data suggest that overexpression of TNF{alpha} leads to topical GC insensitivity by reducing GR nuclear translocation in keratinocytes, and our findings also suggest that inhibiting the MEK-1/ERK cascade may offer a therapeutic potential for increasing GC efficacy in epidermis where sufficient inflammatory suppression is required.

  14. Human protein kinase inhibitor screening by capillary electrophoresis using transverse diffusion of laminar flow profiles for reactant mixing.

    PubMed

    Nehmé, Hala; Nehmé, Reine; Lafite, Pierre; Routier, Sylvain; Morin, Philippe

    2013-11-01

    A capillary electrophoresis (CE)-based enzyme assay method has been developed to screen protein kinase inhibitors. Four human kinases GSK3β, DYRK1A, CDK5/p25 and CDK1/cyclin B were chosen to test this novel method. These enzymes have been identified as very promising targets to develop treatments against cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. The efficiency of drugs against these relevant biological targets has never been carried out by CE. For this proposal, the capillary was used as a nanoreactor in which four reactants (the enzyme, its two substrates and its potential inhibitor) were successively injected, mixed by using transverse diffusion of laminar flow profiles and incubated. The adenosine 5'-diphosphate (ADP) formed during the enzymatic reaction was detected by UV and quantified. The efficiency of the developed CE method was validated by determining the IC50 values of a wide variety of inhibitors covering a large domain of affinity toward kinases and containing representative and chemically divergent skeletons. Excellent agreement was found between the results obtained by CE and those reported in the literature when using conventional radiometric enzyme assays. Moreover, CE was successfully used to determine the inhibitory effect of several potential inhibitors that was not yet assessed by conventional methods and is crucial for structure activity relation studies. This novel CE method is simple, rapid, very economic (few tens of nanoliters per IC50) and eco-friendly since no radioactivity was required. It could be extended to high-throughput screening of kinase inhibitors, which is of great interest for biomedical and pharmaceutical research fields. PMID:24075461

  15. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Linn, Anning

    1996-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK.

  16. Deficiency of Fyn protein is prerequisite for apoptosis induced by Src family kinase inhibitors in human mesothelioma cells.

    PubMed

    Eguchi, Ryoji; Kubo, Shuji; Takeda, Hiromi; Ohta, Toshiro; Tabata, Chiharu; Ogawa, Hiroyasu; Nakano, Takashi; Fujimori, Yoshihiro

    2012-05-01

    Malignant mesothelioma is an aggressive tumor arising from mesothelial cells of serous membranes. Src family kinases (SFKs) have a pivotal role in cell adhesion, proliferation, survival and apoptosis. Here, we examined the effect of SFK inhibitors in NCI-H2052, ACC-MESO-4 and NCI-H28 cells, mesothelioma cell lines and Met5A, a human non-malignant mesothelial cell line. We found that PP2, a selective SFK inhibitor, inhibited SFK activity and induced apoptosis mediated by caspase-8 in NCI-H28 but not Met5A, NCI-H2052 and ACC-MESO-4 cells. Src, Yes, Fyn and Lyn protein, which are members of the SFK, were expressed in these cell lines, whereas NCI-H28 cells were deficient in Fyn protein. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) targeting Fyn facilitated PP2-induced apoptosis mediated by caspase-8 in NCI-H2052 and ACC-MESO-4 cells. PP2 reduced Lyn protein levels and suppressed SFK activity in all mesothelioma cell lines. Lyn siRNA induced caspase-8 activation and apoptosis in NCI-H28 cells but not in NCI-H2052 and ACC-MESO-4 cells. However, double RNA interference knockdown of Fyn and Lyn induced apoptosis accompanied by caspase-8 activation in NCI-H2052 and ACC-MESO-4 cells. Dasatinib, an inhibitor of multi-tyrosine kinases including SFK, also inhibited SFK activity and induced reduction of Lyn protein levels, caspase-8 activation and apoptosis in NCI-H28 cells but not in other cell lines. Present study suggests that SFK inhibitors induce caspase-8-dependent apoptosis caused by reduction of Lyn protein in Fyn-deficient mesothelioma cells.

  17. Differential expression of a novel protein kinase in human B lymphocytes. Preferential localization in the germinal center.

    PubMed

    Katz, P; Whalen, G; Kehrl, J H

    1994-06-17

    B lymphocytes which reside in the germinal center region of lymphoid follicles are functionally and phenotypically distinct from the surrounding mantle zone B cells. We have isolated cDNA clones for several genes that are differentially expressed between these two populations of B lymphocytes. One such gene, BL44, is preferentially expressed in germinal center B cells. The nucleotide sequence of a 2,874-base pair BL44 cDNA was determined and a 2,451-bp open reading frame found that encodes for a 97-kDa serine/threonine protein kinase referred to as GC kinase. It has an NH2-terminal catalytic domain most similar to that of the Drosophila NinaC protein and the yeast STE20 protein. GC kinase mRNA transcripts are not unique to germinal center B cells and are found in several other tissues, including brain, lung, and placenta. The GC kinase protein was immunoprecipitated from transfected COS cells and from the Burkitt cell line RAMOS. GC kinase immunoprecipitated from transfected COS cells phosphorylated the substrates casein and myelin basic protein. In addition, a 97-kDa phosphoprotein likely to be GC kinase itself was detected. GC kinase may participate in an important signal transduction pathway in germinal center B cells.

  18. Structure guided design of potential inhibitors of human calcium-calmodulin dependent protein kinase IV containing pyrimidine scaffold.

    PubMed

    Naz, Huma; Jameel, Ehtesham; Hoda, Nasimul; Shandilya, Ashutosh; Khan, Parvez; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan; Jayaram, B; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2016-02-01

    Calmodulin dependent protein kinase IV (CAMKIV) belongs to the serine/threonine protein kinase family and considered as an encouraging target for the development of novel anticancer agents. The interaction and binding behavior of three designed inhibitors of human CAMKIV, containing pyrimidine scaffold, was monitored by in vitro fluorescence titration and molecular docking calculations under physiological condition. In silico docking studies were performed to screen several compounds containing pyrimidine scaffold against CAMKIV. Molecular docking calculation predicted the binding of these ligands in active-site cavity of the CAMKIV structure correlating such interactions with a probable inhibition mechanism. Finally, three active pyrimidine substituted compounds (molecules 1-3) have been successfully synthesized and characterized by (1)H and (13)C NMR. Molecule 3 is showing very high binding-affinity for the CAMKIV, with a binding constant of 2.2×10(8), M(-1) (±0.20). All three compounds are nontoxic to HEK293 cells up to 50 μM. The cell proliferation inhibition study showed that the molecule 3 has lowest IC50 value (46±1.08 μM). The theoretical and experimental observations are significantly correlated. This study reveals some important observations to generate an improved pyrimidine based compound that holds promise as a therapeutic agent for the treatment of cancer and neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26783179

  19. Matrine-induced autophagy regulated by p53 through AMP-activated protein kinase in human hepatoma cells.

    PubMed

    Xie, Shan-Bu; He, Xing-Xing; Yao, Shu-Kun

    2015-08-01

    Matrine, one of the main extract components of Sophora flavescens, has been shown to exhibit inhibitory effects on some tumors through autophagy. However, the mechanism underlying the effect of matrine remains unclear. The cultured human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2 and SMMC‑7721 were treated with matrine. Signal transduction and gene expression profile were determined. Matrine stimulated autophagy in SMMC‑7721 cells in a mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR)-dependent manner, but in an mTOR-independent manner in HepG2 cells. Next, in HepG2 cells, autophagy induced by matrine was regulated by p53 inactivation through AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) signaling transduction, then AMPK suppression switched autophagy to apoptosis. Furthermore, the interferon (IFN)-inducible genes, including interferon α-inducible protein 27 (IFI27) and interferon induced transmembrane protein 1 (IFITM1), which are downstream effector of p53, might be modulated by matrine-induced autophagy. In addition, we found that the p53 protein isoforms, p53β, p53γ, ∆133p53, and ∆133p53γ, due to alternative splicing of intron 9, might be regulated by the p53-mediated autophagy. These results show that matrine induces autophagy in human hepatoma cells through a novel mechanism, which is p53/AMPK signaling pathway involvement in matrine-promoted autophagy.

  20. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, M.; Hibi, M.; Lin, A.

    1997-02-25

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE is disclosed. The polypeptide has serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences. The method of detection of JNK is also provided. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites. 44 figs.

  1. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    2004-03-16

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  2. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning; Davis, Roger; Derijard, Benoit

    2003-02-04

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  3. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    1998-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  4. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    1999-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD or 55 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and theonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  5. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning; Davis, Roger; Derijard, Benoit

    2005-03-08

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  6. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    1997-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  7. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    1997-01-01

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  8. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Davis, Roger; Derijard, Benoit; Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    2005-01-25

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  9. Oncoprotein protein kinase

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Lin, Anning

    1999-11-30

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD or 55 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and theonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  10. p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase mediates IL-8 induction by the ribotoxin deoxynivalenol in human monocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Islam, Zahidul; Gray, Jennifer S.; Pestka, James J. . E-mail: pestka@msu.edu

    2006-06-15

    The effects of the ribotoxic trichothecene deoxynivalenol (DON) on mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-mediated IL-8 expression were investigated in cloned human monocytes and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). DON (250 to 1000 ng/ml) induced both IL-8 mRNA and IL-8 heteronuclear RNA (hnRNA), an indicator of IL-8 transcription, in the human U937 monocytic cell line in a concentration-dependent manner. Expression of IL-8 hnRNA, mRNA and protein correlated with p38 phosphorylation and was completely abrogated by the p38 MAPK inhibitor SB203580. DON at 500 ng/ml similarly induced p38-dependent IL-8 protein and mRNA expression in PBMC cultures from healthy volunteers. Significantly increased IL-6 and IL-1{beta} intracellular protein and mRNA expression was also observed in PBMC treated with DON (500 ng/ml) which were also partially p38-dependent. Flow cytometry of PBMC revealed that DON-induced p38 phosphorylation varied among individuals relative to both threshold toxin concentrations (25-100 ng/ml) and relative increases in percentages of phospho-p38{sup +} cells. DON-induced p38 activation occurred exclusively in the CD14{sup +} monocyte population. DON was devoid of agonist activity for human Toll-like receptors 2, 3, 4, 5, 7, 8 and 9. However, two other ribotoxins, emetine and anisomycin, induced p38 phosphorylation in PBMC similarly to DON. Taken together, these data suggest that (1) p38 activation was required for induction of IL-8 and proinflammatory gene expression in the monocyte and (2) DON induced p38 activation in human monocytes via the ribotoxic stress response.

  11. Anti-inflammatory effects of a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor during human endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Branger, Judith; van den Blink, Bernt; Weijer, Sebastiaan; Madwed, Jeffrey; Bos, Carina L; Gupta, Abhya; Yong, Chan-Loi; Polmar, Stephen H; Olszyna, Dariusz P; Hack, C Erik; van Deventer, Sander J H; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; van der Poll, Tom

    2002-04-15

    The p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) participates in intracellular signaling cascades resulting in inflammatory responses. Therefore, inhibition of the p38 MAPK pathway may form the basis of a new strategy for treatment of inflammatory diseases. However, p38 MAPK activation during systemic inflammation in humans has not yet been shown, and its functional significance in vivo remains unclear. Hence, we exposed 24 healthy male subjects to an i.v. dose of LPS (4 ng/kg), preceded 3 h earlier by orally administered 600 or 50 mg BIRB 796 BS (an in vitro p38 MAPK inhibitor) or placebo. Both doses of BIRB 796 BS significantly inhibited LPS-induced p38 MAPK activation in the leukocyte fraction of the volunteers. Cytokine production (TNF-alpha, IL-6, IL-10, and IL-1R antagonist) was strongly inhibited by both low and high dose p38 MAPK inhibitor. In addition, p38 MAPK inhibition diminished leukocyte responses, including neutrophilia, release of elastase-alpha(1)-antitrypsin complexes, and up-regulation of CD11b with down-regulation of L-selectin. Finally, blocking p38 MAPK decreased C-reactive protein release. These data identify p38 MAPK as a principal mediator of the inflammatory response to LPS in humans. Furthermore, the anti-inflammatory potential of an oral p38 MAPK inhibitor in humans in vivo suggests that p38 MAPK inhibitors may provide a new therapeutic option in the treatment of inflammatory diseases.

  12. Structural Properties of Human CaMKII Ca2+ /Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II using X-ray Crystallography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cao, Yumeng Melody; McSpadden, Ethan; Kuriyan, John; Department of Molecular; Cell Biology; Department of Chemistry Team

    To this day, human memory storage remains a mystery as we can at most describe the process vaguely on a cellular level. Switch-like properties of Calcium/Calmodulin-Dependent Protein Kinase II make it a leading candidate in understanding the molecular basis of human memory. The protein crystal was placed in the beam of a synchrotron source and the x-ray crystallography data was collected as reflections on a diffraction pattern that undergo Fourier transform to obtain the electron density. We observed two drastic differences from our solved structure at 2.75Å to a similar construct of the mouse CaMKII association domain. Firstly, our structure is a 6-fold symmetric dodecamer, whereas the previously published construct was a 7-fold symmetric tetradecamer. This suggests the association domain of human CaMKII is a dynamic structure that is triggered subunit exchange process. Secondly, in our structure the N-terminal tag is docked as an additional beta-strand on an uncapped beta-sheet present in each association domain protomer. This is concrete evidence of the involvement of the polypeptide docking site in the molecular mechanism underlining subunit exchange. In the future, we would like to selectively inhibit the exchange process while not disrupting the other functionalities of CaMKII.

  13. Stimulus-dependent triggering or inhibition of cytotoxicity in human cytotoxic T lymphocytes by activators of protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Schrezenmeier, H; Kurrle, R; Fleischer, B

    1986-01-01

    The influence of activators of protein kinase C (PKC) on the delivery of the lethal hit by human cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) clones was studied. In the absence of other signals, short-term incubation with two structurally unrelated activators of PKC, but not with a non-activating phorbolester, resulted in significant triggering of CTL, whereas overnight incubation with PKC activators led to reduction of cytotoxic activity. Furthermore, activation of PKC had an inhibitory effect on simultaneous triggering by anti-T3 monoclonal antibodies or by phytohaemagglutinin, but strongly enhanced the activating effect of anti-T11 antibodies. These results suggest that PKC is part of the cascade of signals transmitted within a CTL after triggering. PMID:3491782

  14. Cadmium-induced apoptosis and necrosis in human osteoblasts: role of caspases and mitogen-activated protein kinases pathways.

    PubMed

    Brama, M; Politi, L; Santini, P; Migliaccio, S; Scandurra, R

    2012-02-01

    Cadmium is a widespread environmental pollutant which induces severe toxic alterations, including osteomalacia and osteoporosis, likely by estrogen receptor-dependent mechanisms. Indeed, cadmium has been described to act as an endocrine disruptor and its toxicity is exerted both in vivo and in vitro through induction of apoptosis and/or necrosis by not fully clarified intracellular mechanism(s) of action. Aim of the present study was to further investigate the molecular mechanism by which cadmium might alter homeostasis of estrogen target cells, such as osteoblast homeostasis, inducing cell apoptosis and/or necrosis. Human osteoblastic cells (hFOB 1.19) in culture were used as an in vitro model to characterize the intracellular mechanisms induced by this heavy metal. Cells were incubated in the presence/ absence of 10-50 μM cadmium chloride at different times and DNA fragmentation and activation of procaspases- 8 and -3 were induced upon CdCl(2) treatment triggering apoptotic and necrotic pathways. Addition of caspase-8 and -3 inhibitors (Z-IETD-FMK and Z-DQMD-FMK) partially blocked these effects. No activation of procaspase-9 was observed. To determine the role of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) in these events, we investigated c-jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), p38 and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK1/2) phosphorylation which were activated by 10 μM CdCl(2). Chemical inhibitors of JNK, p38, and ERK1/2, SP600125, SB202190, and PD98059, significantly reduced the phosphorylation of the kinases and blunted apoptosis. In contrast, caspase inhibitors did not reduce the cadmium-induced MAPK phosphorylation, suggesting an independent activation of these pathways. In conclusion, at least 2 pathways appear activated by cadmium in osteoblasts: a direct induction of caspase-8 followed by activation of caspase-3 and an indirect induction by phosphorylation of ERK1/2, p38, and JNK MAPK triggering activation of caspase-8 and -3.

  15. Activation of Ras, Raf-1 and protein kinase C in differentiating human neuroblastoma cells after treatment with phorbolester and NGF.

    PubMed

    Söderholm, H; Olsson, A; Lavenius, E; Rönnstrand, L; Nånberg, E

    2001-02-01

    The human neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y/TrkA differentiates in vitro and acquires a sympathetic phenotype in response to phorbolester (activator of protein kinase C, PKC) in the presence of serum or growth factors, or nerve growth factor (NGF). We have now investigated to what extent phorbolester and NGF cause activation of Ras and Raf-1 and the involvement of PKC in this response in differentiating SH-SY5Y/TrkA cells. NGF stimulated increased accumulation of Ras-GTP and a threefold activation of Raf-1. In contrast, 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) had no effect on the amount of Ras-GTP but led to a smaller activation of Raf-1. NGF caused a limited increase in phosphorylation of Raf-1 compared with TPA, and NGF-induced Raf activity was independent of PKC. Analysis of phosphorylation of the endogenous PKC substrate myristoylated alanine-rich C-kinase substrate (MARCKS), and of subcellular distribution of PKC-alpha, -delta, and -epsilon revealed that NGF only caused a very small activation of PKC in SH-SY5Y/TrkA cells. The results identify Raf-1 as a target for both TPA- and NGF-induced signals in differentiating SH-SY5Y/TrkA cells and demonstrate that signalling to Raf-1 was mediated via distinct mechanisms.

  16. The kinetics of translocation and cellular quantity of protein kinase C in human leukocytes are modified during spaceflight

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatton, J. P.; Gaubert, F.; Lewis, M. L.; Darsel, Y.; Ohlmann, P.; Cazenave, J. P.; Schmitt, D.

    1999-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) is a family of serine/threonine kinases that play an important role in mediating intracellular signal transduction in eukaryotes. U937 cells were exposed to microgravity during a space shuttle flight and stimulated with a radiolabeled phorbol ester ([3H]PDBu) to both specifically label and activate translocation of PKC from the cytosol to the particulate fraction of the cell. Although significant translocation of PKC occurred at all g levels, the kinetics of translocation in flight were significantly different from those on the ground. In addition, the total quantity of [3H]PDBu binding PKC was increased in flight compared to cells at 1 g on the ground, whereas the quantity in hypergravity (1.4 g) was decreased with respect to 1 g. Similarly, in purified human peripheral blood T cells the quantity of PKCdelta varied in inverse proportion to the g level for some experimental treatments. In addition to these novel findings, the results confirm earlier studies which showed that PKC is sensitive to changes in gravitational acceleration. The mechanisms of cellular gravisensitivity are poorly understood but the demonstrated sensitivity of PKC to this stimulus provides us with a useful means of measuring the effect of altered gravity levels on early cell activation events.

  17. AMP-activated protein kinase: a key regulator of energy balance with many roles in human disease.

    PubMed

    Grahame Hardie, D

    2014-12-01

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a sensor of cellular energy status that regulates cellular and whole-body energy balance. A recently reported crystal structure has illuminated the complex regulatory mechanisms by which AMP and ADP cause activation of AMPK, involving phosphorylation by the upstream kinase LKB1. Once activated by falling cellular energy status, AMPK activates catabolic pathways that generate ATP whilst inhibiting anabolic pathways and other cellular processes that consume ATP. A role of AMPK is implicated in many human diseases. Mutations in the γ2 subunit cause heart disease due to excessive glycogen storage in cardiac myocytes, leading to ventricular pre-excitation. AMPK-activating drugs reverse many of the metabolic defects associated with insulin resistance, and recent findings suggest that the insulin-sensitizing effects of the widely used antidiabetic drug metformin are mediated by AMPK. The upstream kinase LKB1 is a tumour suppressor, and AMPK may exert many of its antitumour effects. AMPK activation promotes the oxidative metabolism typical of quiescent cells, rather than the aerobic glycolysis observed in tumour cells and cells involved in inflammation, explaining in part why AMPK activators have both antitumour and anti-inflammatory effects. Salicylate (the major in vivo metabolite of aspirin) activates AMPK, and this could be responsible for at least some of the anticancer and anti-inflammatory effects of aspirin. In addition to metformin and salicylates, novel drugs that modulate AMPK are likely to enter clinical trials soon. Finally, AMPK may be involved in viral infection: downregulation of AMPK during hepatitis C virus infection appears to be essential for efficient viral replication. PMID:24824502

  18. Overexpression of human selenoprotein H in neuronal cells enhances mitochondrial biogenesis and function through activation of protein kinase A, protein kinase B, and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein pathway.

    PubMed

    Mehta, Suresh L; Mendelev, Natalia; Kumari, Santosh; Andy Li, P

    2013-03-01

    Mitochondrial biogenesis is activated by nuclear encoded transcription co-activator peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α (PGC-1α), which is regulated by several upstream factors including protein kinase A and Akt/protein kinase B. We have previously shown that selenoprotein H enhances the levels of nuclear regulators for mitochondrial biogenesis, increases mitochondrial mass and improves mitochondrial respiratory rate, under physiological condition. Furthermore, overexpression of selenoprotein H protects neuronal HT22 cells from ultraviolet B irradiation-induced cell damage by lowering reactive oxygen species production, and inhibiting activation of caspase-3 and -9, as well as p53. The objective of this study is to identify the cell signaling pathways by which selenoprotein H initiates mitochondrial biogenesis. We first confirmed our previous observation that selenoprotein H transfected HT22 cells increased the protein levels of nuclear-encoded mitochondrial biogenesis factors, peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ coactivator-1α, nuclear respiratory factor 1 and mitochondrial transcription factor A. We then observed that total and phosphorylation of protein kinase A, Akt/protein kinase B and cyclic adenosine monophosphate response element-binding protein (CREB) were significantly increased in selenoprotein H transfected cells compared to vector transfected HT22 cells. To verify whether the observed stimulating effects on mitochondrial biogenesis pathways are caused by selenoprotein H and mediated through CREB, we knocked down selenoprotein H mRNA level using siRNA and inhibited CREB with napthol AS-E phosphate in selenoprotein H transfected cells and repeated the measurements of the aforementioned biomarkers. Our results revealed that silencing of selenoprotein H not only decreased the protein levels of PGC-1α, nuclear respiratory factor 1 and mitochondrial transcription factor A, but also decreased the total and

  19. Non-degradative Ubiquitination of Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Ball, K. Aurelia; Johnson, Jeffrey R.; Lewinski, Mary K.; Guatelli, John; Verschueren, Erik; Krogan, Nevan J.; Jacobson, Matthew P.

    2016-01-01

    Growing evidence supports other regulatory roles for protein ubiquitination in addition to serving as a tag for proteasomal degradation. In contrast to other common post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation, little is known about how non-degradative ubiquitination modulates protein structure, dynamics, and function. Due to the wealth of knowledge concerning protein kinase structure and regulation, we examined kinase ubiquitination using ubiquitin remnant immunoaffinity enrichment and quantitative mass spectrometry to identify ubiquitinated kinases and the sites of ubiquitination in Jurkat and HEK293 cells. We find that, unlike phosphorylation, ubiquitination most commonly occurs in structured domains, and on the kinase domain, ubiquitination is concentrated in regions known to be important for regulating activity. We hypothesized that ubiquitination, like other post-translational modifications, may alter the conformational equilibrium of the modified protein. We chose one human kinase, ZAP-70, to simulate using molecular dynamics with and without a monoubiquitin modification. In Jurkat cells, ZAP-70 is ubiquitinated at several sites that are not sensitive to proteasome inhibition and thus may have other regulatory roles. Our simulations show that ubiquitination influences the conformational ensemble of ZAP-70 in a site-dependent manner. When monoubiquitinated at K377, near the C-helix, the active conformation of the ZAP-70 C-helix is disrupted. In contrast, when monoubiquitinated at K476, near the kinase hinge region, an active-like ZAP-70 C-helix conformation is stabilized. These results lead to testable hypotheses that ubiquitination directly modulates kinase activity, and that ubiquitination is likely to alter structure, dynamics, and function in other protein classes as well. PMID:27253329

  20. Non-degradative Ubiquitination of Protein Kinases.

    PubMed

    Ball, K Aurelia; Johnson, Jeffrey R; Lewinski, Mary K; Guatelli, John; Verschueren, Erik; Krogan, Nevan J; Jacobson, Matthew P

    2016-06-01

    Growing evidence supports other regulatory roles for protein ubiquitination in addition to serving as a tag for proteasomal degradation. In contrast to other common post-translational modifications, such as phosphorylation, little is known about how non-degradative ubiquitination modulates protein structure, dynamics, and function. Due to the wealth of knowledge concerning protein kinase structure and regulation, we examined kinase ubiquitination using ubiquitin remnant immunoaffinity enrichment and quantitative mass spectrometry to identify ubiquitinated kinases and the sites of ubiquitination in Jurkat and HEK293 cells. We find that, unlike phosphorylation, ubiquitination most commonly occurs in structured domains, and on the kinase domain, ubiquitination is concentrated in regions known to be important for regulating activity. We hypothesized that ubiquitination, like other post-translational modifications, may alter the conformational equilibrium of the modified protein. We chose one human kinase, ZAP-70, to simulate using molecular dynamics with and without a monoubiquitin modification. In Jurkat cells, ZAP-70 is ubiquitinated at several sites that are not sensitive to proteasome inhibition and thus may have other regulatory roles. Our simulations show that ubiquitination influences the conformational ensemble of ZAP-70 in a site-dependent manner. When monoubiquitinated at K377, near the C-helix, the active conformation of the ZAP-70 C-helix is disrupted. In contrast, when monoubiquitinated at K476, near the kinase hinge region, an active-like ZAP-70 C-helix conformation is stabilized. These results lead to testable hypotheses that ubiquitination directly modulates kinase activity, and that ubiquitination is likely to alter structure, dynamics, and function in other protein classes as well.

  1. Protein kinase A changes calcium sensitivity but not crossbridge kinetics in human cardiac myofibrils

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Lori A.; Margulies, Ken; Buttrick, Peter; de Tombe, Pieter

    2011-01-01

    We investigated the effect of PKA treatment (1 U/ml) on the mechanical properties of isolated human cardiac myofibrils. PKA treatment was associated with significant incorporation of radiolabeled phosphate into several sarcomeric proteins including troponin I and myosin binding protein C and was also associated with a right shift in the tension-pCa relation (ΔpCa50 = 0.2 ± 0.1). PKA treatment also caused right shifts in the pCa dependence of the rate of tension development, tension redevelopment, and the linear and exponential phases of myofibril relaxation. However, there was no change in the same measures of crossbridge turnover when expressed as a function of tension. We conclude that the changes in crossbridge kinetics as a function of calcium concentration reflect a reduced tension due to a lower calcium sensitivity and that the relationship between crossbridge kinetics and tension was unchanged, indicating no direct effect of PKA treatment on crossbridge cycling. PMID:21498779

  2. Localization of the human stress responsive MAP kinase-like CSAIDs binding protein (CSBP) gene to chromosome 6p21.3/21.2

    SciTech Connect

    McDonnell, P.C.; Young, P.R.; DiLella, A.G.

    1995-09-01

    The proinflammatory cytokines interleukin 1 (IL-1) and tumor necrosis factor (TNF) play a pivotal role in the initiation of inflammatory responses. Soluble protein antagonists of IL-1 and TNF, such as IL-1ra, sTNFR-Fc fusion, and monoclonal antibodies to TNF have proven to be effective at blocking acute and chronic responses in a number of animal models of inflammatory diseases such as rheumatoid arthritis, septic shock, and inflammatory bowel disease. Consequently, there has been considerable interest in discovering compounds that could inhibit the production of these cytokines and might therefore become treatments. Recently, a structurally related series of pyridinyl imidazoles was found to block IL-1 and TNF production from LPS-stimulated human monocytes and to ameliorate inflammatory diseases significantly in vivo, leading to their being named CSAIDs (cytokine suppressive anti-inflammatory drugs). The protein target of these compounds, termed CSBP (CSAID binding protein), was discovered to be a new member of the MAP kinase family of serine-threonine protein kinases whose kinase activity is activated by LPS in human monocytes. Independently, the same kinase, or its rodent homologues, was found to respond also to chemical, thermal, and osmotic stress and IL-1 treatment. Inhibition of this kinase correlated with reduction in inflammatory cytokine production from LPS-activated monocytes. 15 refs., 1 fig.

  3. G protein-coupled receptor kinase-2 is a novel regulator of collagen synthesis in adult human cardiac fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    D'Souza, Karen M; Malhotra, Ricky; Philip, Jennifer L; Staron, Michelle L; Theccanat, Tiju; Jeevanandam, Valluvan; Akhter, Shahab A

    2011-04-29

    Cardiac fibroblasts (CF) make up 60-70% of the total cell number in the heart and play a critical role in regulating normal myocardial function and in adverse remodeling following myocardial infarction and the transition to heart failure. Recent studies have shown that increased intracellular cAMP can inhibit CF transformation and collagen synthesis in adult rat CF; however, mechanisms by which cAMP production is regulated in CF have not been elucidated. We investigated the potential role of G protein-coupled receptor kinase-2 (GRK2) in modulating collagen synthesis by adult human CF isolated from normal and failing left ventricles. Baseline collagen synthesis was elevated in failing CF and was not inhibited by β-agonist stimulation in contrast to normal controls. β-adrenergic receptor (β-AR) signaling was markedly uncoupled in the failing CF, and expression and activity of GRK2 were increased 3-fold. Overexpression of GRK2 in normal CF recapitulated a heart failure phenotype with minimal inhibition of collagen synthesis following β-agonist stimulation. In contrast, knockdown of GRK2 expression in normal CF enhanced cAMP production and led to greater β-agonist-mediated inhibition of basal and TGFβ-stimulated collagen synthesis versus control. Inhibition of GRK2 activity in failing CF by expression of the GRK2 inhibitor, GRK2ct, or siRNA-mediated knockdown restored β-agonist-stimulated inhibition of collagen synthesis and decreased collagen synthesis in response to TGFβ stimulation. GRK2 appears to play a significant role in regulating collagen synthesis in adult human CF, and increased activity of this kinase may be an important mechanism of maladaptive ventricular remodeling as mediated by cardiac fibroblasts.

  4. Brominated Flame Retardants, Tetrabromobisphenol A and Hexabromocyclododecane, Activate Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases (MAPKs) in Human Natural Killer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cato, Anita; Celada, Lindsay; Kibakaya, Esther Caroline; Simmons, Nadia; Whalen, Margaret M.

    2014-01-01

    NK cells provide a vital surveillance against virally infected cells, tumor cells, and antibody-coated cells through the release of cytolytic mediators and gamma interferon (IFN-γ). Hexabromocyclododecane (HBCD) is a brominated flame retardant used primarily in expanded (EPS) and extruded (XPS) polystyrene foams for thermal insulation in the building and construction industry. Tetrabromobisphenol A (TBBPA) is used both as a reactive and an additive flame retardant in a variety of materials. HBCD and TBBPA contaminate the environment and are found in human blood samples. In previous studies, we have shown that other environmental contaminants, such as the dibutyltin (DBT) and tributyltin (TBT), decrease NK lytic function by activating mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in the NK cells. HBCD and TBBPA also interfere with NK cell(s) lytic function. The current study evaluates whether HBCD and/or TBBPA have the capacity to activate MAPKs and MAPK kinases (MAP2Ks). The effects of concentrations of HBCD and TBBPA that inhibited lytic function on the phosphorylation state and total levels of the MAPKs (p44/42, p38, and JNK) and the phosphorylation and total levels of the MAP2Ks (MEK1/2 and MKK3/6) were examined. Results indicate that exposure of human NK cells to 10-0.5 µM HBCD or TBBPA activate MAPKs and MAP2Ks. This HBCD and TBBPA-induced activation of MAPKs may leave them unavailable for activation by virally infected or tumor target cells and thus contributes to the observed decreases in lytic function seen in NK cells exposed to HBCD and TBBPA. PMID:25341744

  5. Thermodynamic parameters for binding of some halogenated inhibitors of human protein kinase CK2

    SciTech Connect

    Winiewska, Maria; Makowska, Małgorzata; Maj, Piotr; Wielechowska, Monika; Bretner, Maria; Poznański, Jarosław; Shugar, David

    2015-01-02

    Highlights: • Two new compounds being potential human CK2a inhibitors are studied. • Their IC50 values were determined in vitro. • The heats of binding and kbind were estimated using DSC. • The increased stability of protein–ligand complexes was followed by fluorescence. • Methylated TBBt derivative (MeBr3Br) is almost as active as TBBt. - Abstract: The interaction of human CK2α with a series of tetrabromobenzotriazole (TBBt) and tetrabromobenzimidazole (TBBz) analogs, in which one of the bromine atoms proximal to the triazole/imidazole ring is replaced by a methyl group, was studied by biochemical (IC{sub 50}) and biophysical methods (thermal stability of protein–ligand complex monitored by DSC and fluorescence). Two newly synthesized tri-bromo derivatives display inhibitory activity comparable to that of the reference compounds, TBBt and TBBz, respectively. DSC analysis of the stability of protein–ligand complexes shows that the heat of ligand binding (H{sub bind}) is driven by intermolecular electrostatic interactions involving the triazole/imidazole ring, as indicated by a strong correlation between H{sub bind} and ligand pK{sub a}. Screening, based on fluorescence-monitored thermal unfolding of protein–ligand complexes, gave comparable results, clearly identifying ligands that most strongly bind to the protein. Overall results, additionally supported by molecular modeling, confirm that a balance of hydrophobic and electrostatic interactions contribute predominantly, relative to possible intermolecular halogen bonding, in binding of the ligands to the CK2α ATP-binding site.

  6. Protein kinase A signalling in Schistosoma mansoni cercariae and schistosomules.

    PubMed

    Hirst, Natasha L; Lawton, Scott P; Walker, Anthony J

    2016-06-01

    Cyclic AMP (cAMP)-dependent protein kinase/protein kinase A regulates multiple processes in eukaryotes by phosphorylating diverse cellular substrates, including metabolic and signalling enzymes, ion channels and transcription factors. Here we provide insight into protein kinase A signalling in cercariae and 24h in vitro cultured somules of the blood parasite, Schistosoma mansoni, which causes human intestinal schistosomiasis. Functional mapping of activated protein kinase A using anti-phospho protein kinase A antibodies and confocal laser scanning microscopy revealed activated protein kinase A in the central and peripheral nervous system, oral-tip sensory papillae, oesophagus and excretory system of intact cercariae. Cultured 24h somules, which biologically represent the skin-resident stage of the parasite, exhibited similar activation patterns in oesophageal and nerve tissues but also displayed striking activation at the tegument and activation in a region resembling the germinal 'stem' cell cluster. The adenylyl cyclase activator, forskolin, stimulated somule protein kinase A activation and produced a hyperkinesia phenotype. The biogenic amines, serotonin and dopamine known to be present in skin also induced protein kinase A activation in somules, whereas neuropeptide Y or [Leu(31),Pro(34)]-neuropeptide Y attenuated protein kinase A activation. However, neuropeptide Y did not block the forskolin-induced somule hyperkinesia. Bioinformatic investigation of potential protein associations revealed 193 medium confidence and 59 high confidence protein kinase A interacting partners in S. mansoni, many of which possess putative protein kinase A phosphorylation sites. These data provide valuable insight into the intricacies of protein kinase A signalling in S. mansoni and a framework for further physiological investigations into the roles of protein kinase A in schistosomes, particularly in the context of interactions between the parasite and the host. PMID:26777870

  7. Sensitization of human colon cancer cells to sodium butyrate-induced apoptosis by modulation of sphingosine kinase 2 and protein kinase D

    SciTech Connect

    Xiao, Min; Liu, Yungang; Zou, Fei

    2012-01-01

    Sphingosine kinases (SphKs) have been recognized as important proteins regulating cell proliferation and apoptosis. Of the two isoforms of SphK (SphK1 and SphK2), little is known about the functions of SphK2. Sodium butyrate (NaBT) has been established as a promising chemotherapeutic agent, but the precise mechanism for its effects is unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of SphK2 in NaBT-induced apoptosis of HCT116 colon cancer cells. The results indicated that following NaBT treatment SphK2 was translocated from the nucleus to the cytoplasm, leading to its accumulation in the cytoplasm; in the meantime, only mild apoptosis occurred. However, downregulation of SphK2 resulted in sensitized apoptosis, and overexpression of SphK2 led to even lighter apoptosis; these strongly indicate an inhibitory role of SphK2 in cell apoptosis induced by NaBT. After knocking down protein kinase D (PKD), another protein reported to be critical in cell proliferation/apoptosis process, by using siRNA, blockage of cytoplasmic accumulation of SphK2 and sensitized apoptosis following NaBT treatment were observed. The present study suggests that PKD and SphK2 may form a mechanism for the resistance of cancer cells to tumor chemotherapies, such as HCT116 colon cancer cells to NaBT, and these two proteins may become molecular targets for designation of new tumor-therapeutic drugs. -- Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer In the present study sodium butyrate (10 mM) induced mild apoptosis of cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The apoptosis was negatively regulated by cytoplasmic Sphingosine Kinase 2 (SphK2). Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Translocation of SphK2 from nucleus to cytoplasm was mediated by protein kinase D. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Downregulation of SphK2 or protein kinase D leads to sensitized cell apoptosis.

  8. Cloning of the cDNA of the heme-regulated eukaryotic initiation factor 2 alpha (eIF-2 alpha) kinase of rabbit reticulocytes: homology to yeast GCN2 protein kinase and human double-stranded-RNA-dependent eIF-2 alpha kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J J; Throop, M S; Gehrke, L; Kuo, I; Pal, J K; Brodsky, M; London, I M

    1991-01-01

    We have cloned the cDNA of the heme-regulated eIF-2 alpha kinase (HRI) of rabbit reticulocytes. In vitro translation of mRNA transcribed from the HRI cDNA yields a 90-kDa polypeptide that exhibits eIF-2 alpha kinase activity and is recognized by a monoclonal antibody directed against authentic HRI. The open reading frame sequence of the HRI cDNA contains all 11 catalytic domains of protein kinases with consensus sequences of protein-serine/threonine kinases in conserved catalytic domains VI and VIII. The HRI cDNA also contains an insert of approximately 140 amino acids between catalytic domains V and VI. The HRI cDNA coding sequence has extensive homology to GCN2 protein kinase of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and to human double-stranded-RNA-dependent eIF-2 alpha kinase. This observation suggests that GCN2 protein kinase may be an eIF-2 alpha kinase in yeast. In addition, HRI has an unusually high degree of homology to three protein kinases (NimA, Wee1, and CDC2) that are involved in the regulation of the cell cycle. Images PMID:1679235

  9. Inhibition of growth of established human glioma cell lines by modulators of the protein kinase-C system

    SciTech Connect

    Couldwell, W.T.; Antel, J.P.; Apuzzo, M.L.; Yong, V.W. )

    1990-10-01

    The protein kinase-C (PKC) second messenger system contributes to regulation of cell growth and differentiation. This study was undertaken to examine the effects of modulators of the PKC enzyme system on the state of differentiation and proliferation rates of human gliomas in vitro. The administration of the PKC-activating phorbol esters 4-beta-phorbol-12,13-dibutyrate (PDB) and phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA) resulted in a dose-related inhibition of growth of human glioma cell lines in vitro as measured by 3H-thymidine uptake. The synthetic nonphorbol PKC activator (SC-9) produced an even more pronounced decrease of 3H-thymidine uptake. Diacylglycerol, an endogenous activator of the system, applied externally, transiently decreased the proliferation, in concordance with its short-lived existence in vivo. Conversely, the administration of 4-alpha-phorbol-12,13-didecanoate (alpha-PDD), a phorbol ester that binds but does not activate the enzyme, had no effect on the proliferation rate. At the dosages that maximally decreased proliferation, there was no evidence of direct glioma cell lysis induced by these agents as measured by a chromium-release assay. Immunocytochemical analysis and cytofluorometric measurement of glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) staining in the treated cultures revealed an increase in GFAP staining over control cultures. In contrast to the response of glioma cells, nonmalignant human adult astrocytes treated with the PKC activators responded by increasing their proliferation rate. The authors postulate that the diametrically opposed effects of PKC activators on nonmalignant astrocytes versus glioma growth may be due to a high intrinsic PKC activity in glioma cells, with resultant down-regulation of enzyme activity following the administration of the pharmacological activators.

  10. Multifunctional human transcriptional coactivator protein PC4 is a substrate of Aurora kinases and activates the Aurora enzymes.

    PubMed

    Dhanasekaran, Karthigeyan; Kumari, Sujata; Boopathi, Ramachandran; Shima, Hiroki; Swaminathan, Amrutha; Bachu, Mahesh; Ranga, Udaykumar; Igarashi, Kazuhiko; Kundu, Tapas K

    2016-03-01

    Positive coactivator 4 (PC4), a human transcriptional coactivator, is involved in diverse processes like chromatin organization and transcription regulation. It is hyperphosphorylated during mitosis, with unknown significance. For the first time, we demonstrate the function of PC4 outside the nucleus upon nuclear envelope breakdown. A fraction of PC4 associates with Aurora A and Aurora B and undergoes phosphorylation, following which PC4 activates both Aurora A and B to sustain optimal kinase activity to maintain the phosphorylation gradient for the proper functioning of the mitotic machinery. This mitotic role is evident in PC4 knockdown cells where the defects are rescued only by the catalytically active Aurora kinases, but not the kinase-dead mutants. Similarly, the PC4 phosphodeficient mutant failed to rescue such defects. Hence, our observations establish a novel mitotic function of PC4 that might be dependent on Aurora kinase-mediated phosphorylation.

  11. Staphylococcal enterotoxin B initiates protein kinase C translocation and eicosanoid metabolism while inhibiting thrombin-induced aggregation in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Tran, Uyen; Boyle, Thomas; Shupp, Jeffrey W; Hammamieh, Rasha; Jett, Marti

    2006-08-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxin (SE) B, a heat-stable toxin secreted by Staphylococcus aureus, has been implicated in the pathogenesis and exacerbation of several critical illnesses. It has been hypothesized that enterotoxins may interact with blood products such as platelets, in addition to T-lymphocytes and renal proximal tubule cells. The aim of this present study was to elucidate whether SEB directly alters human platelet function. Human platelet rich plasma (PRP) was pre-incubated with SEA, SEB, SEC or TSST-1, (at various concentrations and incubation times). After incubation, PRP was exposed to thrombin and aggregation was assessed. Incubation with all toxins tested resulted in decreased aggregation, specifically; exposure to 10mu g/ml of SEB for 30 min caused a 20% decrease and a 49% decrease at 90 min. A similar reduction in aggregation was seen in samples incubated with phorbol myristate acetate, a known stimulator of protein kinase C (PKC). Further, platelets exposed to SEB exhibited an increased plasma membrane PKC activity. Sphingosine, an inhibitor of PKC proved to block the SEB-induced reduction in aggregation. SEB effects on platelet metabolism were investigated using high performance liquid chromatography showing up to a 2-fold increase of active metabolites lipoxin A4 and 12-HETE, as compared to control. These data indicate that SEB is able to induce platelet dysfunction, and these effects may be mediated through activation of PKC.

  12. Expression of protein kinase A regulatory subunits in benign and malignant human thyroid tissues: A systematic review.

    PubMed

    Del Gobbo, Alessandro; Peverelli, Erika; Treppiedi, Donatella; Lania, Andrea; Mantovani, Giovanna; Ferrero, Stefano

    2016-08-01

    In this review, we discuss the molecular mechanisms and prognostic implications of the protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway in human tumors, with special emphasis on the malignant thyroid. The PKA signaling pathway is differentially activated by the expression of regulatory subunits 1 (R1) and 2 (R2), whose levels change during development, differentiation, and neoplastic transformation. Following the identification of gene mutations within the PKA regulatory subunit R1A (PRKAR1A) that cause Carney complex-associated neoplasms, several investigators have studied PRKAR1A expression in sporadic thyroid tumors. The PKA regulatory subunit R2B (PRKAR2B) is highly expressed in benign, as well as in malignant differentiated and undifferentiated lesions. PRKAR1A is highly expressed in follicular adenomas and malignant lesions with a statistically significant gradient between benign and malignant tumors; however, it is not expressed in hyperplastic nodules. Although the importance of PKA in human malignancy outcomes is not completely understood, PRKAR1A expression correlates with tumor dimension in malignant lesions. Additional studies are needed to determine whether a relationship exists between PKA subunit expression and clinical outcomes, particularly in undifferentiated tumors. In conclusion, the R1A subunit might be a good molecular candidate for the targeted treatment of malignant thyroid tumors. PMID:27321957

  13. Staphylococcal enterotoxin B initiates protein kinase C translocation and eicosanoid metabolism while inhibiting thrombin-induced aggregation in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Tran, Uyen; Boyle, Thomas; Shupp, Jeffrey W; Hammamieh, Rasha; Jett, Marti

    2006-08-01

    Staphylococcal enterotoxin (SE) B, a heat-stable toxin secreted by Staphylococcus aureus, has been implicated in the pathogenesis and exacerbation of several critical illnesses. It has been hypothesized that enterotoxins may interact with blood products such as platelets, in addition to T-lymphocytes and renal proximal tubule cells. The aim of this present study was to elucidate whether SEB directly alters human platelet function. Human platelet rich plasma (PRP) was pre-incubated with SEA, SEB, SEC or TSST-1, (at various concentrations and incubation times). After incubation, PRP was exposed to thrombin and aggregation was assessed. Incubation with all toxins tested resulted in decreased aggregation, specifically; exposure to 10mu g/ml of SEB for 30 min caused a 20% decrease and a 49% decrease at 90 min. A similar reduction in aggregation was seen in samples incubated with phorbol myristate acetate, a known stimulator of protein kinase C (PKC). Further, platelets exposed to SEB exhibited an increased plasma membrane PKC activity. Sphingosine, an inhibitor of PKC proved to block the SEB-induced reduction in aggregation. SEB effects on platelet metabolism were investigated using high performance liquid chromatography showing up to a 2-fold increase of active metabolites lipoxin A4 and 12-HETE, as compared to control. These data indicate that SEB is able to induce platelet dysfunction, and these effects may be mediated through activation of PKC. PMID:16550298

  14. Cell cycle regulation of the activity and subcellular localization of Plk1, a human protein kinase implicated in mitotic spindle function

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    Correct assembly and function of the mitotic spindle during cell division is essential for the accurate partitioning of the duplicated genome to daughter cells. Protein phosphorylation has long been implicated in controlling spindle function and chromosome segregation, and genetic studies have identified several protein kinases and phosphatases that are likely to regulate these processes. In particular, mutations in the serine/threonine-specific Drosophila kinase polo, and the structurally related kinase Cdc5p of Saccharomyces cerevisae, result in abnormal mitotic and meiotic divisions. Here, we describe a detailed analysis of the cell cycle-dependent activity and subcellular localization of Plk1, a recently identified human protein kinase with extensive sequence similarity to both Drosophila polo and S. cerevisiae Cdc5p. With the aid of recombinant baculoviruses, we have established a reliable in vitro assay for Plk1 kinase activity. We show that the activity of human Plk1 is cell cycle regulated, Plk1 activity being low during interphase but high during mitosis. We further show, by immunofluorescent confocal laser scanning microscopy, that human Plk1 binds to components of the mitotic spindle at all stages of mitosis, but undergoes a striking redistribution as cells progress from metaphase to anaphase. Specifically, Plk1 associates with spindle poles up to metaphase, but relocalizes to the equatorial plane, where spindle microtubules overlap (the midzone), as cells go through anaphase. These results indicate that the association of Plk1 with the spindle is highly dynamic and that Plk1 may function at multiple stages of mitotic progression. Taken together, our data strengthen the notion that human Plk1 may represent a functional homolog of polo and Cdc5p, and they suggest that this kinase plays an important role in the dynamic function of the mitotic spindle during chromosome segregation. PMID:7790358

  15. A-kinase Anchoring Protein 79/150 Recruits Protein Kinase C to Phosphorylate Roundabout Receptors.

    PubMed

    Samelson, Bret K; Gore, Bryan B; Whiting, Jennifer L; Nygren, Patrick J; Purkey, Alicia M; Colledge, Marcie; Langeberg, Lorene K; Dell'Acqua, Mark L; Zweifel, Larry S; Scott, John D

    2015-05-29

    Anchoring proteins direct protein kinases and phosphoprotein phosphatases toward selected substrates to control the efficacy, context, and duration of neuronal phosphorylation events. The A-kinase anchoring protein AKAP79/150 interacts with protein kinase A (PKA), protein kinase C (PKC), and protein phosphatase 2B (calcineurin) to modulate second messenger signaling events. In a mass spectrometry-based screen for additional AKAP79/150 binding partners, we have identified the Roundabout axonal guidance receptor Robo2 and its ligands Slit2 and Slit3. Biochemical and cellular approaches confirm that a linear sequence located in the cytoplasmic tail of Robo2 (residues 991-1070) interfaces directly with sites on the anchoring protein. Parallel studies show that AKAP79/150 interacts with the Robo3 receptor in a similar manner. Immunofluorescent staining detects overlapping expression patterns for murine AKAP150, Robo2, and Robo3 in a variety of brain regions, including hippocampal region CA1 and the islands of Calleja. In vitro kinase assays, peptide spot array mapping, and proximity ligation assay staining approaches establish that human AKAP79-anchored PKC selectively phosphorylates the Robo3.1 receptor subtype on serine 1330. These findings imply that anchored PKC locally modulates the phosphorylation status of Robo3.1 in brain regions governing learning and memory and reward.

  16. Molecular Basis of the Interaction of the Human Protein Tyrosine Phosphatase Non-receptor Type 4 (PTPN4) with the Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase p38γ.

    PubMed

    Maisonneuve, Pierre; Caillet-Saguy, Célia; Vaney, Marie-Christine; Bibi-Zainab, Edoo; Sawyer, Kristi; Raynal, Bertrand; Haouz, Ahmed; Delepierre, Muriel; Lafon, Monique; Cordier, Florence; Wolff, Nicolas

    2016-08-01

    The human protein tyrosine phosphatase non-receptor type 4 (PTPN4) prevents cell death induction in neuroblastoma and glioblastoma cell lines in a PDZ·PDZ binding motifs-dependent manner, but the cellular partners of PTPN4 involved in cell protection are unknown. Here, we described the mitogen-activated protein kinase p38γ as a cellular partner of PTPN4. The main contribution to the p38γ·PTPN4 complex formation is the tight interaction between the C terminus of p38γ and the PDZ domain of PTPN4. We solved the crystal structure of the PDZ domain of PTPN4 bound to the p38γ C terminus. We identified the molecular basis of recognition of the C-terminal sequence of p38γ that displays the highest affinity among all endogenous partners of PTPN4. We showed that the p38γ C terminus is also an efficient inducer of cell death after its intracellular delivery. In addition to recruiting the kinase, the binding of the C-terminal sequence of p38γ to PTPN4 abolishes the catalytic autoinhibition of PTPN4 and thus activates the phosphatase, which can efficiently dephosphorylate the activation loop of p38γ. We presume that the p38γ·PTPN4 interaction promotes cellular signaling, preventing cell death induction.

  17. Modeling anhydrobiosis: activation of the mitogen-activated protein kinase ERK by dehydration in both human cells and nematodes.

    PubMed

    Huang, Zebo; Banton, Matthew C; Tunnacliffe, Alan

    2010-12-01

    Anhydrobiosis ("life without water") is the state of suspended animation that certain organisms, including some nematodes, tardigrades, and bdelloid rotifers, enter during desiccation. Extreme water loss imposes considerable stress on biomolecules, cells, and tissues, and must require specific sensing and response mechanisms for survival. However, these mechanisms are poorly understood, in part owing to the lack of amenable model systems. We have, therefore, begun to develop mammalian cell lines as tools for investigating the eukaryotic response to desiccation, and have an additional long-term goal of generating a desiccation-tolerant mammalian cell. Here, we investigate the role of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in controlling gene expression in response to evaporative water loss. We report that the ERK MAPK pathway inhibitor U0126 can almost completely block induction of desiccation early response genes in a human cell line, suggesting a role for the ERK signal transduction pathway in the stress response. Accordingly, ERK is activated by phosphorylation during desiccation of human cells. Importantly, nematodes also activate ERK on drying, showing that the mammalian cell model behaves similarly to invertebrates experiencing similar stress conditions. We further reveal that, in response to desiccation, human cells can rapidly initiate complex stress signaling networks involving all three MAPK pathways, with transient activation of ERK and sustained activation of JNK and p38. These results are consistent with a role for MAPK pathways in anhydrobiotic adaptation and suggest that non-anhydrobiotes are able to sense and, at least to some extent, respond appropriately to evaporative water loss.

  18. Recent advances in designing substrate-competitive protein kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Han, Ki-Cheol; Kim, So Yeon; Yang, Eun Gyeong

    2012-01-01

    Protein kinases play central roles in cellular signaling pathways and their abnormal phosphorylation activity is inseparably linked with various human diseases. Therefore, modulation of kinase activity using potent inhibitors is an attractive strategy for the treatment of human disease. While most protein kinase inhibitors in clinical development are mainly targeted to the highly conserved ATP-binding sites and thus likely promiscuously inhibit multiple kinases including kinases unrelated to diseases, protein substrate-competitive inhibitors are more selective and expected to be promising therapeutic agents. Most substrate-competitive inhibitors mimic peptides derived from substrate proteins, or from inhibitory domains within kinases or inhibitor proteins. In addition, bisubstrate inhibitors are generated by conjugating substrate-competitive peptide inhibitors to ATP-competitive inhibitors to improve affinity and selectivity. Although structural information on protein kinases provides invaluable guidance in designing substrate-competitive inhibitors, other strategies including bioinformatics, computational modeling, and high-throughput screening are often employed for developing specific substrate-competitive kinase inhibitors. This review focuses on recent advances in the design and discovery of substrate-competitive inhibitors of protein kinases.

  19. [Relationship between PTEN mutations and protein kinase B phosphorylation caused by insulin or recombinant human epidermal growth factor stimulation].

    PubMed

    Zhong, Hailan; Hu, Xianfu; Lin, Jianhua

    2016-08-01

    Objective To study the effect of phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) mutations on protein kinase B (Akt) phosphorylation of CNE-1 nasopharyngeal carcinoma cell line. Methods CNE-1 cells were cultured in RPMI1640 medium containing 100 mL/L fetal calf serum, and then transfected with wild-type PTEN (wtPTEN), mutant PTEN C124S and mutant PTEN G129E plasmid separately. After overnight serum starvation, the cells were stimulated with 0.15 IU/mL insulin or 0.3 μg/mL recombinant human epidermal growth factor (rhEGF). At last, Akt phosphorylation was evaluated by Western blotting. Results Insulin or rhEGF stimulation led to Akt activation in CNE-1 cells. The wtPTEN inhibited insulin- or rhEGF-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt. PTEN C124S mutant activated insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt, but not rhEGF-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt. PTEN G129E mutant inhibited insulin-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt. Conclusion The wtPTEN inhibited insulin- or rhEGF-stimulated phosphorylation of Akt, while PTEN C124S and G129E mutants failed to activate the phosphorylation of Akt consistently. This suggested PTEN mutations might not be correlated with activated Akt.

  20. Retinoic acid induced growth arrest of human breast carcinoma cells requires protein kinase C alpha expression and activity.

    PubMed

    Cho, Y; Tighe, A P; Talmage, D A

    1997-09-01

    Retinoic acid inhibits proliferation of hormone-dependent, but not hormone-independent breast cancer cells. Retinoic acid-induced changes in cellular proliferation and differentiation are associated with disturbances in growth factor signaling and frequently with changes in protein kinase C expression. PKC delta, epsilon, and zeta are expressed in both hormone-dependent (T-47D) and hormone-independent (MDA-MB-231) cell lines. Retinoic acid arrested T-47D proliferation, induced PKC alpha expression and concomitantly repressed PKC zeta expression. The changes in PKC alpha and PKC zeta reflect retinoic acid-induced changes in mRNA. In contrast, retinoic acid had no effect on growth, or PKC expression in MDA-MB-231 cells. Growth arrest and the induction of PKC alpha, but not the reduction in PKC zeta, resulted from selective activation of RAR alpha. In total, these results support an important role for PKC alpha in mediating the anti-proliferative action of retinoids on human breast carcinoma cells.

  1. Comparison of alkylacylglycerol vs. diacylglycerol as activators of mitogen-activated protein kinase and cytosolic phospholipase A2 in human neutrophil priming.

    PubMed

    Nixon, A B; Seeds, M C; Bass, D A; Smitherman, P K; O'Flaherty, J T; Daniel, L W; Wykle, R L

    1997-08-16

    In human neutrophils, the choline-containing phosphoglycerides contain almost equal amounts of alkylacyl- and diacyl-linked subclasses. In contrast to phosphatidylinositol hydrolysis which yields diacylglycerol, hydrolysis of choline-containing phosphoglycerides by phospholipase D coupled with phosphohydrolase yields both alkylacyl- and diacylglycerol. While diacylglycerol activates protein kinase C, alkylacylglycerol does not, and its role is unclear. Yet previous studies have shown that exogenous alkylacyl- and diacylglycerols can prime for the release of radiolabeled arachidonic acid (AA) in intact neutrophils stimulated by formyl-methionyl-leucyl-phenylalanine. We have now examined the effects of both diacylglycerol (1-oleoyl-2-acetylglycerol; OAG) and alkylacylglycerol (1-O-hexadecyl-2-acetylglycerol; EAG) on the activation of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase and the 85-kDa cytosolic phospholipase A2 (cPLA2) in human neutrophils. We observed that while OAG could effectively activate p42 and p44 MAP kinases along with cPLA2 in a time- and concentration-dependent manner, EAG could not. A novel p40 MAP kinase isoform is also present and activated in response to OAG treatment; the behavior of this MAP kinase isoform is discussed. The activation of cPLA2 and MAP kinase by 20 microM OAG could be inhibited by pretreatment with 1 microM GF-109203X, a selective inhibitor of protein kinase C. Although only OAG activated cPLA2, both OAG and EAG primed for the release of AA mass as determined by gas chromatography/mass spectrometry. The priming of AA release by OAG may be explained by the phosphorylation of cPLA2 through the activation of protein kinase C linked to MAP kinase. However, priming by EAG appears to involve a separate mechanism that is dependent on a different PLA2. Our results support a role for phospholipase D-derived products modulating the activation of cPLA2, further supporting the idea of cross-talk among various phospholipases.

  2. Phosphoproteome analysis of capacitated human sperm. Evidence of tyrosine phosphorylation of a kinase-anchoring protein 3 and valosin-containing protein/p97 during capacitation.

    PubMed

    Ficarro, Scott; Chertihin, Olga; Westbrook, V Anne; White, Forest; Jayes, Friederike; Kalab, Petr; Marto, Jarrod A; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Herr, John C; Hunt, Donald F; Visconti, Pablo E

    2003-03-28

    Before fertilization can occur, mammalian sperm must undergo capacitation, a process that requires a cyclic AMP-dependent increase in tyrosine phosphorylation. To identify proteins phosphorylated during capacitation, two-dimensional gel analysis coupled to anti-phosphotyrosine immunoblots and tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) was performed. Among the protein targets, valosin-containing protein (VCP), a homolog of the SNARE-interacting protein NSF, and two members of the A kinase-anchoring protein (AKAP) family were found to be tyrosine phosphorylated during capacitation. In addition, immobilized metal affinity chromatography was used to investigate phosphorylation sites in whole protein digests from capacitated human sperm. To increase this chromatographic selectivity for phosphopeptides, acidic residues in peptide digests were converted to their respective methyl esters before affinity chromatography. More than 60 phosphorylated sequences were then mapped by MS/MS, including precise sites of tyrosine and serine phosphorylation of the sperm tail proteins AKAP-3 and AKAP-4. Moreover, differential isotopic labeling was developed to quantify phosphorylation changes occurring during capacitation. The phosphopeptide enrichment and quantification methodology coupled to MS/MS, described here for the first time, can be employed to map and compare phosphorylation sites involved in multiple cellular processes. Although we were unable to determine the exact site of phosphorylation of VCP, we did confirm, using a cross-immunoprecipitation approach, that this protein is tyrosine phosphorylated during capacitation. Immunolocalization of VCP showed fluorescent staining in the neck of noncapacitated sperm. However, after capacitation, staining in the neck decreased, and most of the sperm showed fluorescent staining in the anterior head.

  3. Phosphorylation of the human 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 receptor by cAMP-dependent protein kinase, in vitro, and in transfected COS-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Jurutka, P W; Hsieh, J C; Haussler, M R

    1993-03-31

    We report that the human 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 receptor is an efficient substrate for cAMP-dependent protein kinase, in vitro. This phosphorylation reaction is rapid and neither dependent upon nor significantly affected by the presence of the 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 ligand. Preliminary mapping experiments utilizing C-terminal truncation mutants reveal that the primary site(s) of phosphorylation, in vitro, is localized between amino acids 133 and 201. Cotransfection of the catalytic subunit of murine cAMP-dependent protein kinase and the human 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 receptor into monkey kidney (COS-7) cells not only results in a dramatic kinase-dependent increase in receptor phosphorylation but also elicits an attenuation in 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3-dependent transcriptional activation of a reporter gene. These observations suggest a potential role for cAMP-dependent protein kinase in the modulation of 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 receptor-mediated gene regulation. PMID:8385450

  4. Small interfering-RNA to protein kinase C-delta reduces the proinflammatory effects of human C-reactive protein in biobreeding diabetic rats.

    PubMed

    Jialal, I; Machha, A; Devaraj, S

    2013-04-01

    Type 1 diabetes (T1DM) is a proinflammatory state characterized by increased C-reactive protein (CRP) levels. Previously we reported that human CRP accentuated macrophage activity in spontaneously diabetic biobreeding (BB) rats and also increased protein kinase C (PKC) delta. Hence we tested the effect of molecular inhibition of PKC delta on plasma and macrophage proinflammatory biomarkers using small interfering (si)RNA to PKC delta. Prior to administration of human CRP, daily for 3 days to diabetic rats, scrambled siRNA or siRNA to PKC delta was also delivered for the 3 days, and the animals were sacrificed on day 4. Peritoneal macrophages and plasma were obtained. Compared to scrambled siRNA, siRNA to PKC delta resulted in a significant decrease in biomediators of inflammation in plasma and from macrophages (IL-1, TNF-alpha, IL-6, MCP-1, KC/IL-8, and PAI -1). However, siRNA to PKC delta has no effect on superoxide release from macrophages. In conclusion, our novel data suggests that siRNA to PKC delta attenuates the proinflammatory effect of human CRP in spontaneously diabetic BB rats and could have implications with regard to attenuating inflammation and vascular complications in T1DM.

  5. Protein Kinase CK2 Regulates Cytoskeletal Reorganization during Ionizing Radiation-Induced Senescence of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wang, Daojing; Jang, Deok-Jin

    2009-08-21

    Human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) are critical for tissue regeneration. How hMSC respond to genotoxic stresses and potentially contribute to aging and cancer remain underexplored. We demonstrated that ionizing radiation induced cellular senescence of hMSC over a period of 10 days, showing a critical transition between day 3 and day 6. This was confirmed by senescence-associated beta-galactosidase (SA-{beta}-gal) staining, protein expression profiles of key cell cycle regulators (retinoblastoma (Rb) protein, p53, p21{sup waf1/Cip1}, and p16{sup INK4A}), and senescence-associated secretory phenotypes (SASPs) (IL-8, IL-12, GRO, and MDC). We observed dramatic cytoskeletal reorganization of hMSC through reduction of myosin-10, redistribution of myosin-9, and secretion of profilin-1. Using a SILAC-based phosphoproteomics method, we detected significant reduction of myosin-9 phosphorylation at Ser1943, coinciding with its redistribution. Importantly, through treatment with cell permeable inhibitors (4,5,6,7-tetrabromo-1H-benzotriazole (TBB) and 2-dimethylamino-4,5,6,7-tetrabromo-1H-benzimidazole (DMAT)), and gene knockdown using RNA interference, we identified CK2, a kinase responsible for myosin-9 phosphorylation at Ser1943, as a key factor contributing to the radiation-induced senescence of hMSC. We showed that individual knockdown of CK2 catalytic subunits CK2{alpha} and CK2{alpha}{prime} induced hMSC senescence. However, only knockdown of CK2{alpha} resulted in morphological phenotypes resembling those of radiation-induced senescence. These results suggest that CK2{alpha} and CK2{alpha}{prime} play differential roles in hMSC senescence progression, and their relative expression might represent a novel regulatory mechanism for CK2 activity.

  6. A novel Physarum polycephalum SR protein kinase specifically phosphorylates the RS domain of the human SR protein, ASF/SF2.

    PubMed

    Liu, Shide; Kang, Kang; Zhang, Jianhua; Ouyang, Qiuling; Zhou, Zhuolong; Tian, Shengli; Xing, Miao

    2009-08-01

    A 1591-bp cDNA of a serine-rich protein kinase (SRPK)-like protein has been identified in Physarum polycephalum (GenBank accession No. DQ140379). The cDNA contains two repeat sequences at bp 1-153 and bp 395-547. The encoding sequence is 56% homologous to human SRPK1 and is named Physarum SRPK (PSRPK). Consistent with other SRPKs, the consensus motifs of PSRPK are within the two conserved domains (CDs). However, divergent motifs between the N-terminal and CDs are much shorter than the corresponding sequences of other SRPKs. To study the structure and function of this protein, we performed co-expression experiment in Escherichia coli and in vitro phosphorylation assay to investigate the phosphorylation effect of recombinant PSRPK on the human SR protein, ASF/SF2. Western blot analysis showed that PSRPK could phosphorylate ASF/SF2 in E. coli cells. Autoradiographic examination showed that both recombinant PSRPK and a truncated form of PSRPK with a 28-aa deletion at the N-terminus could phosphorylate ASF/SF2 and a truncated form of ASF/SF2 that contains the RS domain. However, these two forms of PSRPK could not phosphorylate a truncated form ASF/SF2 that lacks the RS domain. A truncated form of PSRPK that lacks either of CDs does not have any phosphorylation activity. These results indicated that, like other SRPKs, the phosphorylation site in PSRPK is located within the RS domain of the SR protein and that its phosphorylation activity is closely associated with the two CDs. This study on the structure and function of PSRPK demonstrates that it is a new member of the SRPK family. PMID:19657567

  7. Fragment-based structure-guided drug discovery: strategy, process, and lessons from human protein kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Burley, Stephen K.; Hirst, Gavin; Sprengeler, Paul; Reich, Siegfried

    2012-04-24

    The experimental roots of fragment-based drug discovery can be found in the work of Petsko, Ringe, and coworkers, who were the first to report flooding of protein crystals with small organic solutes (e.g., compounds such as benzene with ten or fewer nonhydrogen atoms) to identify bound functional groups that might ultimately be transformed into targeted ligands. The concept of linking fragments together to increase binding affinity was described as early as 1992 by Verlinde et al. Computational screening of fragments, using tools such as DOCK or MCSS, was also described in the early 1990s. Pharmaceutical industry application of fragment screening began at Abbott Laboratories, where Fesik and coworkers pioneered 'SAR by NMR' (structure/activity relationship by nuclear magnetic resonance). In this spectroscopic approach, bound fragments are detected by NMR screening and subsequently linked together to increase affinity, as envisaged by Verlinde and coworkers. Application of x-ray crystallography to detect and identify fragment hits was also pursued at Abbott. Fragment-based drug discovery has now been under way for more than a decade. Although Fesik and coworkers popularized the notion of linking fragments (as in their highly successful BCL-2 program), tactical emphasis appears to have largely shifted from fragment condensation to fragment engineering (or growing the fragment) to increase binding affinity and selectivity. Various biotechnology companies, including SGX Pharmaceuticals, Astex, and Plexxikon, have recently demonstrated that fragment-based approaches can indeed produce development candidates suitable for Phase I studies of safety and tolerability in patients (www.clinicaltrials.gov).

  8. Human Cytomegalovirus UL97 Kinase Activity Is Required for the Hyperphosphorylation of Retinoblastoma Protein and Inhibits the Formation of Nuclear Aggresomes

    SciTech Connect

    Prichard, Mark N.; Sztul, Elizabeth; Daily, Shannon L.; Perry, Amie L.; Frederick, Samuel L.; Gill, Rachel B.; Hartline, Caroll B.; Streblow, Daniel N.; Varnum, Susan M.; Smith, Richard D.; Kern, Earl R.

    2008-05-01

    Cells infected with human cytomegalovirus in the absence of UL97 kinase activity produce large nuclear aggregates that sequester considerable quantities of viral proteins. A transient expression assay suggested that pp71 and IE1 were also involved in this process, and this suggestion was significant, since both proteins have been reported to interact with components of promyelocytic leukemia (PML) bodies (ND10) and also interact functionally with retinoblastoma pocket proteins (RB). PML bodies have been linked to the formation of nuclear aggresomes, and colocalization studies suggested that viral proteins were recruited to these structures and that UL97 kinase activity inhibited their formation. Proteins associated with PML bodies were examined by Western blot analysis, and pUL97 appeared to specifically affect the phosphorylation of RB in a kinasedependent manner. Three consensus RB binding motifs were identified in the UL97 kinase, and recombinant viruses were constructed in which each was mutated to assess a potential role in the phosphorylation of RB and the inhibition of nuclear aggresome formation. The mutation of either the conserved LxCxE RB binding moti for the lysine required for kinase activity impaired the ability of the virus to stabilize and phosphorylate RB. We concluded from these studies that both UL97 kinase activity and the LxCxE RB binding motif are required for the phosphorylation and stabilization of RB in infected cells and that this effect can be antagonized by the antiviral drug maribavir. These data also suggest a potential link between RB function and the formation of aggresomes.

  9. Rac-1 and Raf-1 kinases, components of distinct signaling pathways, activate myotonic dystrophy protein kinase

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Shimizu, M.; Wang, W.; Walch, E. T.; Dunne, P. W.; Epstein, H. F.

    2000-01-01

    Myotonic dystrophy protein kinase (DMPK) is a serine-threonine protein kinase encoded by the myotonic dystrophy (DM) locus on human chromosome 19q13.3. It is a close relative of other kinases that interact with members of the Rho family of small GTPases. We show here that the actin cytoskeleton-linked GTPase Rac-1 binds to DMPK, and coexpression of Rac-1 and DMPK activates its transphosphorylation activity in a GTP-sensitive manner. DMPK can also bind Raf-1 kinase, the Ras-activated molecule of the MAP kinase pathway. Purified Raf-1 kinase phosphorylates and activates DMPK. The interaction of DMPK with these distinct signals suggests that it may play a role as a nexus for cross-talk between their respective pathways and may partially explain the remarkable pleiotropy of DM.

  10. Constitutive activation of different Jak tyrosine kinases in human T cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) tax protein or virus-transformed cells.

    PubMed Central

    Xu, X; Kang, S H; Heidenreich, O; Okerholm, M; O'Shea, J J; Nerenberg, M I

    1995-01-01

    HTLV-1 infection causes an adult T cell leukemia in humans. The viral encoded protein tax, is thought to play an important role in oncogenesis. Our previous data obtained from a tax transgenic mouse model revealed that tax transforms mouse fibroblasts but not thymocytes, despite comparable levels of tax expression in both tissues. Constitutive tyrosine phosphorylation of a 130-kD protein(s) was observed in the tax transformed fibroblast B line and in HTLV-1 transformed human lymphoid lines, but not in thymocytes from Thy-tax transgenic mice. Phosphotyrosine immunoprecipitation followed by Western blot analysis with a set of Jak kinase specific antibodies, identified p130 as Jak2 in the tax transformed mouse fibroblastic cell line and Jak3 in HTLV-1 transformed human T cell lines. Phosphorylation of Jak2 in tax transformed cells resulted from high expression of IL-6. Tyrosine phosphorylation of this protein could also be induced in Balb/c3T3 cells using a supernatant from the B line, which was associated with induction of cell proliferation. Both phosphorylation and proliferation were inhibited by IL-6 neutralizing antibodies. Constitutive phosphorylation of Jak kinases may facilitate tumor growth in both HTLV-1 infected human T cells and the transgenic mouse model. Images PMID:7657825

  11. Physical structure and chromosomal localization of a gene encoding human p58[sup clk-1], a cell division control related protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Eipers, P.G.

    1992-01-01

    The gene for the human p58[sup clk[minus]1] protein kinase, a cell division control-related gene, has been mapped by somatic cell hybrid analyses, in situ localization with the chromosomal gene, and nested polymerase chain reaction amplification of microdissected chromosomes. These studies indicate that the expressed p58[sup clk[minus]1] chromosomal gene maps to 1p36, while a highly related p58[sup clk[minus]1] sequence of unknown nature maps to chromosome 15. Assignment of a p34[sup cdc2]-related gene to 1p36 region, including neuroblastoma, ductal carcinoma of the breast, malignant melanoma, Merkel cell carcinoma and endocrine neoplasia among others. Aberrant expression of this protein kinase negatively regulates normal cellular growth. The p58[sup clk[minus]1] protein contains a central domain of 299 amino acids that is 46% identical to human p34[sup cdc2], the master mitotic protein kinase. This dissertation details the complete structure of the p58[sup clk[minus]1] chromosomal gene, including its putative promoter region, transcriptional start sites, exonic sequences, and intron/exon boundary sequences. The gene is 10 kb in size and contains 12 exons and 11 introns. Interestingly, the rather large 2.0 kb 3[prime] untranslated region is interrupted by an intron that separates a region containing numerous AUUUA destabilization motifs from the coding region. Furthermore, the expression of this gene in normal human tissues, as well as several human tumor cell samples and lines, is examined. The origin of multiple human transcripts from the same chromosomal gene, and the possible differential stability of these various transcripts, is discussed with regard to the transcriptional and post-transcriptional regulation of this gene. This is the first report of the chromosomal gene structure of a member of the p34[sup cdc2] supergene family.

  12. Bone morphogenetic protein 2-induced human dental pulp cell differentiation involves p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated canonical WNT pathway

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jing; Ye, Ling; Hui, Tian-Qian; Yang, Dong-Mei; Huang, Ding-Ming; Zhou, Xue-Dong; Mao, Jeremy J; Wang, Cheng-Lin

    2015-01-01

    Both bone morphogenetic protein 2 (BMP2) and the wingless-type MMTV integration site (WNT)/β-catenin signalling pathway play important roles in odontoblast differentiation and dentinogenesis. Cross-talk between BMP2 and WNT/β-catenin in osteoblast differentiation and bone formation has been identified. However, the roles and mechanisms of the canonical WNT pathway in the regulation of BMP2 in dental pulp injury and repair remain largely unknown. Here, we demonstrate that BMP2 promotes the differentiation of human dental pulp cells (HDPCs) by activating WNT/β-catenin signalling, which is further mediated by p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in vitro. BMP2 stimulation upregulated the expression of β-catenin in HDPCs, which was abolished by SB203580 but not by Noggin or LDN193189. Furthermore, BMP2 enhanced cell differentiation, which was not fully inhibited by Noggin or LDN193189. Instead, SB203580 partially blocked BMP2-induced β-catenin expression and cell differentiation. Taken together, these data suggest a possible mechanism by which the elevation of β-catenin resulting from BMP2 stimulation is mediated by the p38 MAPK pathway, which sheds light on the molecular mechanisms of BMP2-mediated pulp reparative dentin formation. PMID:26047580

  13. Cytoskeletal protein kinases: titin and its relations in mechanosensing.

    PubMed

    Gautel, Mathias

    2011-07-01

    Titin, the giant elastic ruler protein of striated muscle sarcomeres, contains a catalytic kinase domain related to a family of intrasterically regulated protein kinases. The most extensively studied member of this branch of the human kinome is the Ca(2+)-calmodulin (CaM)-regulated myosin light-chain kinases (MLCK). However, not all kinases of the MLCK branch are functional MLCKs, and about half lack a CaM binding site in their C-terminal autoinhibitory tail (AI). A unifying feature is their association with the cytoskeleton, mostly via actin and myosin filaments. Titin kinase, similar to its invertebrate analogue twitchin kinase and likely other "MLCKs", is not Ca(2+)-calmodulin-activated. Recently, local protein unfolding of the C-terminal AI has emerged as a common mechanism in the activation of CaM kinases. Single-molecule data suggested that opening of the TK active site could also be achieved by mechanical unfolding of the AI. Mechanical modulation of catalytic activity might thus allow cytoskeletal signalling proteins to act as mechanosensors, creating feedback mechanisms between cytoskeletal tension and tension generation or cellular remodelling. Similar to other MLCK-like kinases like DRAK2 and DAPK1, TK is linked to protein turnover regulation via the autophagy/lysosomal system, suggesting the MLCK-like kinases have common functions beyond contraction regulation. PMID:21416260

  14. Sensitization of human umbilical vein endothelial cells to Shiga toxin: involvement of protein kinase C and NF-kappaB.

    PubMed Central

    Louise, C B; Tran, M C; Obrig, T G

    1997-01-01

    Infection of humans with Shiga toxin-producing Escherichia coli O157:H7 and Shigella dysenteriae 1 is strongly associated with vascular endothelial cell damage and the development of hemolytic-uremic syndrome. The cytotoxic effect of Shiga toxins on vascular endothelial cells in vitro is enhanced by prior exposure to bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or either of the host cytokines tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF) and interleukin-1beta (IL-1). The purpose of this study was to examine individual signal transduction components involved in the sensitization of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) to Shiga toxin 1. The results demonstrate that class I and II protein kinase C (PKC) isozymes are required for sensitization of HUVEC to Shiga toxin by phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) or LPS but not by TNF or IL-1. Thus, the specific competitive inhibitor of class I/II PKC, 1-O-hexadecyl-2-O-methyl-rac-glycerol (AMG), prevented only the action of PMA and LPS on HUVEC. Additional data obtained with ATP binding site inhibitors which affect all PKCs (i.e., classes I, II, and III) suggest that TNF may utilize class III PKC isozymes in the Shiga toxin sensitization of HUVEC. Transcriptional activator NF-kappaB did not appear to be involved in the sensitization of HUVEC to Shiga toxin by LPS, TNF, IL-1, or PMA. Thus, the specific serine protease inhibitor L-1-tosylamido-2-phenylethyl chloromethyl ketone (TPCK) did not inhibit the sensitization of HUVEC to Shiga toxin by LPS, TNF, IL-1, or PMA despite its ability to inhibit NF-kappaB activation and the induction of the NF-kappaB-dependent tissue factor gene by these agents. Finally, all-trans retinoic acid partially inhibited the sensitization of HUVEC to Shiga toxin, by unknown mechanisms which also appeared to be independent of NF-kappaB activation. These results indicate that PKC plays a role in the sensitization of HUVEC to Shiga toxin in response to some, but not all, sensitizing agents. In contrast, NF

  15. Signaling from the Human Melanocortin 1 Receptor to ERK1 and ERK2 Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases Involves Transactivation of cKIT

    PubMed Central

    Herraiz, Cecilia; Journé, Fabrice; Abdel-Malek, Zalfa; Ghanem, Ghanem; Jiménez-Cervantes, Celia; García-Borrón, José C.

    2011-01-01

    Melanocortin 1 receptor (MC1R), a Gs protein-coupled receptor expressed in melanocytes, is a major determinant of skin pigmentation, phototype and cancer risk. Upon stimulation by αMSH, MC1R triggers the cAMP and ERK1/ERK2 MAPK pathways. In mouse melanocytes, ERK activation by αMSH binding to Mc1r depends on cAMP, and melanocytes are considered a paradigm for cAMP-dependent ERK activation. However, human MC1R variants associated with red hair, fair skin [red hair color (RHC) phenotype], and increased skin cancer risk display reduced cAMP signaling but activate ERKs as efficiently as wild type in heterologous cells, suggesting independent signaling to ERKs and cAMP in human melanocytes. We show that MC1R signaling activated the ERK pathway in normal human melanocytes and melanoma cells expressing physiological levels of endogenous RHC variants. ERK activation was comparable for wild-type and mutant MC1R and was independent on cAMP because it was neither triggered by stimulation of cAMP synthesis with forskolin nor blocked by the adenylyl cyclase inhibitor 2′,5′-dideoxyadenosine. Stimulation of MC1R with αMSH did not lead to protein kinase C activation and ERK activation was unaffected by protein kinase C inhibitors. Conversely, pharmacological interference, small interfering RNA studies, expression profiles, and functional reconstitution experiments showed that αMSH-induced ERK activation resulted from Src tyrosine kinase-mediated transactivation of the stem cell factor receptor, a receptor tyrosine kinase essential for proliferation, differentiation, and survival of melanocyte precursors, thus demonstrating a functional link between the stem cell factor receptor and MC1R. Moreover, this transactivation phenomenon is unique because it is unaffected by natural mutations impairing canonical MC1R signaling through the cAMP pathway. PMID:21084381

  16. Activation of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase by celecoxib oppositely regulates survivin and gamma-H2AX in human colorectal cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Hsiao, P.-W.; Chang, C.-C.; Liu, H.-F.; Tsai, C.-M.; Chiu, Ted H.; Chao, J.-I . E-mail: chaoji@mail.tcu.edu.tw

    2007-07-01

    Cancer cells express survivin that facilitates tumorigenesis. Celecoxib has been shown to reduce human colorectal cancers. However, the role and regulation of survivin by celecoxib in colorectal carcinoma cells remain unclear. Treatment with 40-80 {mu}M celecoxib for 24 h induced cytotoxicity and proliferation inhibition via a concentration-dependent manner in RKO colorectal carcinoma cells. Celecoxib blocked the survivin protein expression and increased the phosphorylation of H2AX at serine-193 ({gamma}-H2AX). The survivin gene knockdown by transfection with a survivin siRNA revealed that the loss of survivin correlated with the expression of {gamma}-H2AX. Meanwhile, celecoxib increased caspase-3 activation and apoptosis. Celecoxib activated the phosphorylation of p38 mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase. The phosphorylated proteins of p38 MAP kinase and {gamma}-H2AX were observed in the apoptotic cells. SB203580, a specific p38 MAP kinase inhibitor, protected the survivin protein expression and decreased the levels of {gamma}-H2AX and apoptosis in the celecoxib-exposed cells. The blockade of survivin expression increased the celecoxib-induced cytotoxicity; conversely, overexpression of survivin by transfection with a survivin-expressing vector raised the cancer cell proliferation and resisted the celecoxib-induced cell death. Our results provide for the first time that p38 MAP kinase participates in the down-regulation of survivin and subsequently induces the activation of {gamma}-H2AX for mediating apoptosis following treatment with celecoxib in human colorectal cancer cells.

  17. Plant protein kinase substrates identification using protein microarrays.

    PubMed

    Ma, Shisong; Dinesh-Kumar, Savithramma P

    2015-01-01

    Protein kinases regulate signaling pathways by phosphorylating their targets. They play critical roles in plant signaling networks. Although many important protein kinases have been identified in plants, their substrates are largely unknown. We have developed and produced plant protein microarrays with more than 15,000 purified plant proteins. Here, we describe a detailed protocol to use these microarrays to identify plant protein kinase substrates via in vitro phosphorylation assays on these arrays. PMID:25930701

  18. Ten things you should know about protein kinases: IUPHAR Review 14

    PubMed Central

    Fabbro, Doriano; Cowan-Jacob, Sandra W; Moebitz, Henrik

    2015-01-01

    Many human malignancies are associated with aberrant regulation of protein or lipid kinases due to mutations, chromosomal rearrangements and/or gene amplification. Protein and lipid kinases represent an important target class for treating human disorders. This review focus on ‘the 10 things you should know about protein kinases and their inhibitors', including a short introduction on the history of protein kinases and their inhibitors and ending with a perspective on kinase drug discovery. Although the ‘10 things’ have been, to a certain extent, chosen arbitrarily, they cover in a comprehensive way the past and present efforts in kinase drug discovery and summarize the status quo of the current kinase inhibitors as well as knowledge about kinase structure and binding modes. Besides describing the potentials of protein kinase inhibitors as drugs, this review also focus on their limitations, particularly on how to circumvent emerging resistance against kinase inhibitors in oncological indications. PMID:25630872

  19. Effect of pH on the structure, function, and stability of human calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV: combined spectroscopic and MD simulation studies.

    PubMed

    Naz, Huma; Shahbaaz, Mohd; Bisetty, Krishna; Islam, Asimul; Ahmad, Faizan; Hassan, Md Imtaiyaz

    2016-06-01

    Human calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CAMKIV) is a member of Ser/Thr protein kinase family. It is regulated by the calcium-calmodulin dependent signal through a secondary messenger, Ca(2+), which leads to the activation of its autoinhibited form. The over-expression and mutation in CAMKIV as well as change in Ca(2+) concentration is often associated with numerous neurodegenerative diseases and cancers. We have successfully cloned, expressed, and purified a functionally active kinase domain of human CAMKIV. To observe the effect of different pH conditions on the structural and functional properties of CAMKIV, we have used spectroscopic techniques such as circular diachroism (CD) absorbance and fluorescence. We have observed that within the pH range 5.0-11.5, CAMKIV maintained both its secondary and tertiary structures, along with its function, whereas significant aggregation was observed at acidic pH (2.0-4.5). We have also performed ATPase activity assays under different pH conditions and found a significant correlation between the structure and enzymatic activities of CAMKIV. In-silico validations were further carried out by modeling the 3-dimensional structure of CAMKIV and then subjecting it to molecular dynamics (MD) simulations to understand its conformational behavior in explicit water conditions. A strong correlation between spectroscopic observations and the output of molecular dynamics simulation was observed for CAMKIV. PMID:27032767

  20. Involvement of protein kinase C in the mechanism of action of Escherichia coli heat-stable enterotoxin (STa) in a human colonic carcinoma cell line, COLO-205

    SciTech Connect

    Gupta, Dyuti Datta; Saha, Subhrajit; Chakrabarti, Manoj K. . E-mail: mkc_niced@yahoo.co.in

    2005-08-01

    The present study was undertaken to determine the involvement of calcium-protein kinase C pathway in the mechanism of action of Escherichia coli heat stable enterotoxin (STa) apart from STa-induced activation of guanylate cyclase in human colonic carcinoma cell line COLO-205, which was used as a model cultured cell line to study the mechanism of action of E. coli STa. In response to E. coli STa, protein kinase C (PKC) activity was increased in a time-dependent manner with its physical translocation from cytosol to membrane. Inhibition of the PKC activity in membrane fraction and inhibition of its physical translocation in response to IP{sub 3}-mediated calcium release inhibitor dantrolene suggested the involvement of intracellular store depletion in the regulation of PKC activity. Among different PKC isoforms, predominant involvement of calcium-dependent protein kinase C (PKC{alpha}) was specified using isotype-specific pseudosubstrate, which showed pronounce enzyme activity. Inhibition of enzyme activity by PKC{alpha}-specific inhibitor Goe6976 and immunoblott study employing isotype-specific antibody further demonstrated the involvement of calcium-dependent isoform of PKC in the mechanism of action of E. coli STa. Moreover, inhibition of guanylate cyclase activity by PKC{alpha}-specific inhibitor Goe6976 suggested the involvement of PKC{alpha} in the regulation of guanylate cyclase activity.

  1. Promotion of DNA strand breaks in cocultured mononuclear leukocytes by protein kinase C-dependent prooxidative interactions of benoxaprofen, human polymorphonuclear leukocytes, and ultraviolet radiation

    SciTech Connect

    Schwalb, G.; Beyers, A.D.; Anderson, R.; Nel, A.E.

    1988-06-01

    At concentrations of 5 micrograms/ml and greater the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug benoxaprofen caused dose-related activation of lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence in human polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNL). Benoxaprofen-mediated activation of lucigenin-enhanced chemiluminescence by PMNL was increased by UV radiation and was particularly sensitive to inhibition by the selective protein kinase C inhibitor H-7. To identify the molecular mechanism of the prooxidative activity of benoxaprofen, the effects of the nonsteroidal antiinflammatory drug on the activity of purified protein kinase C in a cell-free system were investigated. Benoxaprofen caused a dose-related activation of protein kinase C by interaction with the binding site for the physiological activator phosphatidylserine, but could not replace diacylglycerol. When autologous mononuclear leukocytes (MNL) were cocultured with PMNL and benoxaprofen in combination, but not individually, the frequency of DNA strand breaks in MNL was markedly increased. UV radiation significantly potentiated damage to DNA mediated by benoxaprofen and PMNL. Inclusion of superoxide dismutase, H-7, and, to a much lesser extent, catalase during exposure of MNL to benoxaprofen-activated PMNL prevented oxidant damage to DNA. These results clearly demonstrate that potentially carcinogenic prooxidative interactions, which are unlikely to be detected by conventional assays of mutagenicity, may occur between phagocytes, UV radiation, and certain pharmacological agents.

  2. Evidence that phosphorylation of human Upfl protein varies with intracellular location and is mediated by a wortmannin-sensitive and rapamycin-sensitive PI 3-kinase-related kinase signaling pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Pal, M; Ishigaki, Y; Nagy, E; Maquat, L E

    2001-01-01

    Human Upf1 protein (p), a group 1 RNA helicase, has recently been shown to function in nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) in mammalian cells. Here, we demonstrate that the estimated 3 x 10(6) copies of hUpf1 p per exponentially growing HeLa cell are essentially equally distributed among polysomal, subpolysomal, and ribosome-free fractions. We also demonstrate that hUpf1p binds RNA and is a phosphoprotein harboring phosphoserine and phosphothreonine. hUpf1p is phosphorylated to the highest extent when polysome-associated and to the lowest extent when ribosome free. We find that serum-induced phosphorylation of hUpf1p is inhibited by wortmannin at a concentration that selectively inhibits PI 3-kinase related kinases and, to a lesser extent, by rapamycin. These and other data suggest that phosphorylation is mediated by a wortmannin-sensitive and rapamycin-sensitive PI 3-kinase-related kinase signaling pathway. Comparisons are made of hUpf1p to Upf1p and SMG-2, which are the orthologs to hUpf1p in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Caenorhabditis elegans, respectively. PMID:11214180

  3. Characterization of protein kinases from Blepharisma intermedium.

    PubMed

    Beyer, J

    1975-12-01

    Three protein kinases (EC 2.7.1.37) were detected in Blepharisma and partially purified. The enzymes were most active with histone as substrate protein. The stability of the bond between phosphate and protein acceptor showed the characteristics of seryl- or threonylphosphate. Protein kinase I was solubilized by ultrasonication or freezing and thawing, while the enzymes II and III were readily solubilized by mild homogenization. Protein II and III were noticeably activated by cAMP and cGMP, while protein kinase I was inhibited by cAMP. Associated with protein kinase II and III activity was the ability to bind labeled cAMP. The following molecular weights were determined: 90000 for enzyme I, 280000 for enzyme II, and 95000 for enzyme III. Various apparent Michaelis constants were estimated.

  4. Purine inhibitors of protein kinases, G proteins and polymerases

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Nathanael S.; Schultz, Peter; Kim, Sung-Hou; Meijer, Laurent

    2001-07-03

    The present invention relates to purine analogs that inhibit, inter alia, protein kinases, G-proteins and polymerases. In addition, the present invention relates to methods of using such purine analogs to inhibit protein kinases, G-proteins, polymerases and other cellular processes and to treat cellular proliferative diseases.

  5. Abrogation of Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase and Akt Signaling by Vandetanib Synergistically Potentiates Histone Deacetylase Inhibitor-Induced Apoptosis in Human Glioma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Jane, Esther P.; Premkumar, Daniel R.; Addo-Yobo, Steven O.

    2009-01-01

    Vandetanib is a multitargeted tyrosine kinase inhibitor. Our initial studies demonstrated that this agent blocks vascular endothelial growth factor receptor, epidermal growth factor receptor, and platelet-derived growth factor receptor phosphorylation and mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)-mediated signaling in glioma cell lines in a dose-dependent manner. Despite these effects, we observed that vandetanib had little effect on apoptosis induction at clinically achievable concentrations. Because histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACIs) have been suggested to regulate signaling protein transcription and downstream interactions via modulation of protein chaperone function through the 90-kDa heat shock protein, we investigated whether combining vandetanib with an HDACI could synergistically potentiate signaling pathway inhibition and apoptosis induction in a panel of malignant human glioma cell lines. Proliferation assays, apoptosis induction studies, and Western immunoblot analysis were conducted in cells treated with vandetanib and HDACIs as single agents or in combination. Vandetanib and suberoylanalide hydroxamic acid reduced proliferation in all cell lines when used as single agents, and the combination produced marked potentiation of growth inhibition as assessed by combinatorial methods. These effects were paralleled by potentiation of Akt signaling inhibition and apoptosis induction. Our results indicate that inhibition of histone deacetylation enhances the antiproliferative effect of vandetanib in malignant human glioma cell lines by enhancing inhibition of MAPK, Akt, and other downstream effectors that may have application in combinatorial therapeutics for these tumors. PMID:19622715

  6. Retinoic acid inhibits induction of c-Jun protein by ultraviolet radiation that occurs subsequent to activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathways in human skin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Fisher, G J; Talwar, H S; Lin, J; Lin, P; McPhillips, F; Wang, Z; Li, X; Wan, Y; Kang, S; Voorhees, J J

    1998-03-15

    Human skin is exposed daily to solar ultraviolet (UV) radiation. UV induces the matrix metalloproteinases collagenase, 92-kD gelatinase, and stromelysin, which degrade skin connective tissue and may contribute to premature skin aging (photoaging). Pretreatment of skin with all-trans retinoic acid (tRA) inhibits UV induction of matrix metalloproteinases. We investigated upstream signal transduction pathways and the mechanism of tRA inhibition of UV induction of matrix metalloproteinases in human skin in vivo. Exposure of human skin in vivo to low doses of UV activated EGF receptors, the GTP-binding regulatory protein p21Ras, and stimulated mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases, extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun amino-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38. Both JNK and p38 phosphorylated, and thereby activated transcription factors c-Jun and activating transcription factor 2 (ATF-2), which bound to the c-Jun promoter and upregulated c-Jun gene expression. Elevated c-Jun, in association with constitutively expressed c-Fos, formed increased levels of transcription factor activator protein (AP) 1, which is required for transcription of matrix metalloproteinases. Pretreatment of human skin with tRA inhibited UV induction of c-Jun protein and, consequently, AP-1. c-Jun protein inhibition occurred via a posttranscriptional mechanism, since tRA did not inhibit UV induction of c-Jun mRNA. These data demonstrate, for the first time, activation of MAP kinase pathways in humans in vivo, and reveal a novel posttranscriptional mechanism by which tRA antagonizes UV activation of AP-1 by inhibiting c-Jun protein induction. Inhibition of c-Jun induction likely contributes to the previously reported prevention by tRA of UV induction of AP-1-regulated matrix-degrading metalloproteinases in human skin.

  7. Systematic deletion analysis of fission yeast protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Bimbó, Andrea; Jia, Yonghui; Poh, Siew Lay; Karuturi, R Krishna Murthy; den Elzen, Nicole; Peng, Xu; Zheng, Liling; O'Connell, Matthew; Liu, Edison T; Balasubramanian, Mohan K; Liu, Jianhua

    2005-04-01

    Eukaryotic protein kinases are key molecules mediating signal transduction that play a pivotal role in the regulation of various biological processes, including cell cycle progression, cellular morphogenesis, development, and cellular response to environmental changes. A total of 106 eukaryotic protein kinase catalytic-domain-containing proteins have been found in the entire fission yeast genome, 44% (or 64%) of which possess orthologues (or nearest homologues) in humans, based on sequence similarity within catalytic domains. Systematic deletion analysis of all putative protein kinase-encoding genes have revealed that 17 out of 106 were essential for viability, including three previously uncharacterized putative protein kinases. Although the remaining 89 protein kinase mutants were able to form colonies under optimal growth conditions, 46% of the mutants exhibited hypersensitivity to at least 1 of the 17 different stress factors tested. Phenotypic assessment of these mutants allowed us to arrange kinases into functional groups. Based on the results of this assay, we propose also the existence of four major signaling pathways that are involved in the response to 17 stresses tested. Microarray analysis demonstrated a significant correlation between the expression signature and growth phenotype of kinase mutants tested. Our complete microarray data sets are available at http://giscompute.gis.a-star.edu.sg/~gisljh/kinome. PMID:15821139

  8. Phosphorylation of the human erythrocyte glucose transporter by protein kinase C: localization of the site of in vivo and in vitro phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Deziel, M R; Lippes, H A; Rampal, A L; Jung, C Y

    1989-01-01

    1. The human erythrocyte glucose transporter was phosphorylated in vitro by protein kinase C. 2. Tryptic cleavage of phosphorylated native transporter produced two major unphosphorylated membrane-embedded fragments weighing 23 and 19 kDa and released numerous water-soluble peptides. 3. Ion-exchange FPLC of the soluble tryptic peptides resolved the mixture into two phosphopeptide peaks. 4. Tryptic digestion of glucose transporter that was phosphorylated in vivo in response to phorbol esters produced soluble phosphopeptides that eluted at identical salt concentrations. 5. Proteolytic digestion and peptide mapping of the transporter revealed that the site(s) of phosphorylation lie within the large cytoplasmic domain that bisects the molecule.

  9. Protein kinase C and P2Y12 take center stage in thrombin-mediated activation of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 in human platelets

    PubMed Central

    Moore, S F; Hunter, R W; Hers, I

    2014-01-01

    Background Rapamycin, an inhibitor of mammalian target of rapamycin complex-1 (mTORC1), reduces platelet spreading, thrombus stability, and clot retraction. Despite an important role of mTORC1 in platelet function, little is known about how it is regulated. The objective of this study was to determine the signaling pathways that regulate mTORC1 in human platelets. Methods Mammalian target of rapamycin complex-1 activation was assessed by measuring the phosphorylation of its downstream substrate ribosomal S6 kinase 1 (p70S6K). Results Thrombin or the protein kinase C (PKC) activator phorbal 12-myristate 13-acetate stimulated activation of mTORC1 in a PKC-dependent, Akt-independent manner that correlated with phosphorylation of tuberin/tuberous sclerosis 2 (TSC2) (Ser939 and Thr1462). In contrast, insulin-like growth factor 1 (IGF-1)–stimulated TSC2 phosphorylation was completely dependent on phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3 kinase)/Akt but did not result in any detectable mTORC1 activation. Early (Ser939 and Thr1462) and late (Thr1462) TSC2 phosphorylation in response to thrombin were directly PKC dependent, whereas later TSC2 (Ser939) and p70S6K phosphorylation were largely dependent on paracrine signaling through P2Y12. PKC-mediated adenosine diphosphate (ADP) secretion was essential for thrombin-stimulated mTORC1 activation, as (i) ADP rescued p70S6K phosphorylation in the presence of a PKC inhibitor and (ii) P2Y12 antagonism prevented thrombin-mediated mTORC1 activation. Rescue of mTORC1 activation with exogenous ADP was completely dependent on the Src family kinases but independent of PI3 kinase/Akt. Interestingly, although inhibition of Src blocked the ADP rescue, it had little effect on thrombin-stimulated p70S6K phosphorylation under conditions where PKC was not inhibited. Conclusion These results demonstrate that thrombin activates the mTORC1 pathway in human platelets through PKC-mediated ADP secretion and subsequent activation of P2Y12, in a manner

  10. Microgravity modifies protein kinase C isoform translocation in the human monocytic cell line U937 and human peripheral blood T-cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Hatton, Jason P.; Gaubert, Francois; Cazenave, Jean-Pierre; Schmitt, Didier; Hashemi, B. B. (Principal Investigator); Hughes-Fulford, M. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Individual protein kinase C (PKC) isoforms fulfill distinct roles in the regulation of the commitment to differentiation, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis in both monocytes and T-cells. The human monocyte like cell line U937 and T-cells were exposed to microgravity, during spaceflight and the translocation (a critical step in PKC signaling) of individual isoforms to cell particulate fraction examined. PKC activating phorbol esters induced a rapid translocation of several PKC isoforms to the particulate fraction of U937 monocytes under terrestrial gravity (1 g) conditions in the laboratory. In microgravity, the translocation of PKC beta II, delta, and epsilon in response to phorbol esters was reduced in microgravity compared to 1 g, but was enhanced in weak hypergravity (1.4 g). All isoforms showed a net increase in particulate PKC following phorbol ester stimulation, except PKC delta which showed a net decrease in microgravity. In T-cells, phorbol ester induced translocation of PKC delta was reduced in microgravity, compared to 1 g, while PKC beta II translocation was not significantly different at the two g-levels. These data show that microgravity differentially alters the translocation of individual PKC isoforms in monocytes and T-cells, thus providing a partial explanation for the modifications previously observed in the activation of these cell types under microgravity.

  11. Phosphorylation of the human leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) receptor by mitogen-activated protein kinase and the regulation of LIF receptor function by heterologous receptor activation.

    PubMed Central

    Schiemann, W P; Graves, L M; Baumann, H; Morella, K K; Gearing, D P; Nielsen, M D; Krebs, E G; Nathanson, N M

    1995-01-01

    We used a bacterially expressed fusion protein containing the entire cytoplasmic domain of the human leukemia inhibitory factor (LIF) receptor to study its phosphorylation in response to LIF stimulation. The dose- and time-dependent relationships for phosphorylation of this construct in extracts of LIF-stimulated 3T3-L1 cells were superimposable with those for the stimulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK). Indeed, phosphorylation of the cytoplasmic domain of the low-affinity LIF receptor alpha-subunit (LIFR) in Mono Q-fractionated, LIF-stimulated 3T3-L1 extracts occurred only in those fractions containing activated MAPK; Ser-1044 served as the major phosphorylation site in the human LIFR for MAPK both in agonist-stimulated 3T3-L1 lysates and by recombinant extracellular signal-regulated kinase 2 in vitro. Expression in rat H-35 hepatoma cells of LIFR or chimeric granulocyte-colony-stimulating factor receptor (G-CSFR)-LIFR mutants lacking Ser-1044 failed to affect cytokine-stimulated expression of a reporter gene under the control of the beta-fibrinogen gene promoter but eliminated the insulin-induced attenuation of cytokine-stimulated gene expression. Thus, our results identify the human LIFR as a substrate for MAPK and suggest a mechanism of heterologous receptor regulation of LIFR signaling occurring at Ser-1044. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 4 PMID:7777512

  12. RAF protein-serine/threonine kinases: Structure and regulation

    SciTech Connect

    Roskoski, Robert

    2010-08-27

    Research highlights: {yields} The formation of unique side-to-side RAF dimers is required for full kinase activity. {yields} RAF kinase inhibitors block MEK activation in cells containing oncogenic B-RAF. {yields} RAF kinase inhibitors can lead to the paradoxical increase in RAF kinase activity. -- Abstract: A-RAF, B-RAF, and C-RAF are a family of three protein-serine/threonine kinases that participate in the RAS-RAF-MEK-ERK signal transduction cascade. This cascade participates in the regulation of a large variety of processes including apoptosis, cell cycle progression, differentiation, proliferation, and transformation to the cancerous state. RAS mutations occur in 15-30% of all human cancers, and B-RAF mutations occur in 30-60% of melanomas, 30-50% of thyroid cancers, and 5-20% of colorectal cancers. Activation of the RAF kinases requires their interaction with RAS-GTP along with dephosphorylation and also phosphorylation by SRC family protein-tyrosine kinases and other protein-serine/threonine kinases. The formation of unique side-to-side RAF dimers is required for full kinase activity. RAF kinase inhibitors are effective in blocking MEK1/2 and ERK1/2 activation in cells containing the oncogenic B-RAF Val600Glu activating mutation. RAF kinase inhibitors lead to the paradoxical increase in RAF kinase activity in cells containing wild-type B-RAF and wild-type or activated mutant RAS. C-RAF plays a key role in this paradoxical increase in downstream MEK-ERK activation.

  13. COOH-terminal association of human smooth muscle calcium channel Ca(v)1.2b with Src kinase protein binding domains: effect of nitrotyrosylation.

    PubMed

    Kang, Minho; Ross, Gracious R; Akbarali, Hamid I

    2007-12-01

    The carboxyl terminus of the calcium channel plays an important role in the regulation of calcium entry, signal transduction, and gene expression. Potential protein-protein interaction sites within the COOH terminus of the L-type calcium channel include those for the SH3 and SH2 binding domains of c-Src kinase that regulates calcium currents in smooth muscle. In this study, we examined the binding sites involved in Src kinase-mediated phosphorylation of the human voltage-gated calcium channel (Ca(v)) 1.2b (hCav1.2b) and the effect of nitrotyrosylation. Cotransfection of human embryonic kidney (HEK)-293 cells with hCa(v)1.2b and c-Src resulted in tyrosine phosphorylation of the calcium channel, which was prevented by nitration of tyrosine residues by peroxynitrite. Whole cell calcium currents were reduced by 58 + 5% by the Src kinase inhibitor PP2 and 64 + 6% by peroxynitrite. Nitrotyrosylation prevented Src-mediated regulation of the currents. Glutathione S-transferase fusion protein of the distal COOH terminus of hCa(v)1.2b (1809-2138) bound to SH2 domain of Src following tyrosine phosphorylation, while binding to SH3 required the presence of the proline-rich motif. Site-directed mutation of Y(2134) prevented SH2 binding and resulted in reduced phosphorylation of hCa(v)1.2b. Within the distal COOH terminus, single, double, or triple mutations of Y(1837), Y(1861), and Y(2134) were constructed and expressed in HEK-293 cells. The inhibitory effects of PP2 and peroxynitrite on calcium currents were significantly reduced in the double mutant Y(1837-2134F). These data demonstrate that the COOH terminus of hCa(v)1.2b contains sites for the SH2 and SH3 binding of Src kinase. Nitrotyrosylation of these sites prevents Src kinase regulation and may be importantly involved in calcium influx regulation during inflammation.

  14. Protein kinase profiling assays: a technology review.

    PubMed

    Wang, Yuren; Ma, Haiching

    2015-11-01

    Protein kinases have become one of the most intensively pursued classes of drug targets for many diseases such as cancers and inflammatory diseases. Kinase profiling work seeks to understand general selectivity trends of lead compounds across the kinome, which help with target selection, compound prioritization, and potential implications in toxicity. Under the current drug discovery process, screening of compounds against comprehensive panels of kinases and their mutants has become the standard approach. Many screening assays and technologies which are compatible for high-throughput screening (HTS) against kinases have been extensively pursued and developed.

  15. Serotonin via 5-HT7 receptors activates p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and protein kinase C epsilon resulting in interleukin-6 synthesis in human U373 MG astrocytoma cells.

    PubMed

    Lieb, Klaus; Biersack, Lisa; Waschbisch, Anne; Orlikowski, Sonja; Akundi, Ravi Shankar; Candelario-Jalil, Eduardo; Hüll, Michael; Fiebich, Bernd L

    2005-05-01

    Serotonin [5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT)] is a widely distributed neurotransmitter which is involved in neuroimmunomodulatory processes. Previously, it has been demonstrated that 5-HT may induce interleukin (IL)-6 expression in primary rat hippocampal astrocytes. The present study was undertaken to investigate the molecular pathways underlying this induction of IL-6 synthesis. As a model system, we used the human astrocytoma cell line U373 MG, which synthesizes IL-6 upon stimulation with various inducers. 5-HT dose- and time-dependently induced IL-6 protein synthesis. We identified several 5-HT receptors to be expressed on U373 MG cells, including the 5-HT1D, 5-HT2A, 5-HT3 and 5-HT7 receptors. In this report, we show that the 5-HT-induced IL-6 release is mediated by the 5-HT7 receptor based on several agonist/antagonists that were used. 5-HT-induced IL-6 synthesis is inhibited by the partially selective 5-HT7 receptor antagonist, pimozide, and the selective antagonist SB269970. Furthermore, IL-6 synthesis was induced by the 5-HT7 receptor agonist carboxamidotryptamin. In addition, we found p38 MAPKs and protein kinase C (PKC) epsilon to be involved in 5-HT-induced IL-6 synthesis as specific inhibitors of these enzymes (SB202190 and RO-31-8425, respectively) blocked 5-HT-induced IL-6 synthesis. Furthermore, 5-HT mediated the phosphorylation of both p38 MAPK as well as the PKC epsilon isoform. The p42/44 MAPKs, however, were not involved in 5-HT-induced IL-6 synthesis. This study shows, for the first time, a central role of 5-HT7 receptor linked to p38 MAPK and PKC epsilon for the induction of cytokine synthesis in astrocytic cells. PMID:15836614

  16. Prostaglandin E2 and the protein kinase A pathway mediate arachidonic acid induction of c-fos in human prostate cancer cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Chen, Y.; Hughes-Fulford, M.

    2000-01-01

    Arachidonic acid (AA) is the precursor for prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) synthesis and increases growth of prostate cancer cells. To further elucidate the mechanisms involved in AA-induced prostate cell growth, induction of c-fos expression by AA was investigated in a human prostate cancer cell line, PC-3. c-fos mRNA was induced shortly after addition of AA, along with a remarkable increase in PGE2 production. c-fos expression and PGE2 production induced by AA was blocked by a cyclo-oxygenase inhibitor, flurbiprofen, suggesting that PGE2 mediated c-fos induction. Protein kinase A (PKA) inhibitor H-89 abolished induction of c-fos expression by AA, and partially inhibited PGE2 production. Protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor GF109203X had no significant effect on c-fos expression or PGE2 production. Expression of prostaglandin (EP) receptors, which mediate signal transduction from PGE2 to the cells, was examined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction in several human prostate cell lines. EP4 and EP2, which are coupled to the PKA signalling pathway, were expressed in all cells tested. Expression of EP1, which activates the PKC pathway, was not detected. The current study showed that induction of the immediate early gene c-fos by AA is mediated by PGE2, which activates the PKA pathway via the EP2/4 receptor in the PC-3 cells.

  17. Light-assisted small molecule screening against protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Inglés-Prieto, Álvaro; Reichhart, Eva; Muellner, Markus K.; Nowak, Matthias; Nijman, Sebastian M.; Grusch, Michael; Janovjak, Harald

    2015-01-01

    High-throughput live-cell screens are intricate elements of systems biology studies and drug discovery pipelines. Here, we demonstrate an optogenetics-assisted method that obviates the addition of chemical activators and reporters, reduces the number of operational steps and increases information content in a cell-based small molecule screen against human protein kinases including an orphan receptor tyrosine kinase. This blueprint for all-optical screening can be adapted to many drug targets and cellular processes. PMID:26457372

  18. Involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway in T-2 toxin-induced cell cycle alteration and apoptosis in human neuroblastoma cells.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Mona; Bhaskar, A S B; Lakshmana Rao, P V

    2015-01-01

    T-2 toxin is the most toxic trichothecene and a frequent contaminant in many agriculture products. Dietary ingestion represents the most common route of T-2 toxin exposure in humans. T-2 toxin exposure leads to many pathological conditions like nervous disorders, cardiovascular alterations, immune depression and dermal inflammation. However, the neuronal toxicity of T-2 toxin in vitro remains unclear. In the present study, we investigated the mechanism of T-2 toxin-induced apoptosis in human neuroblastoma cells (IMR-32). T-2 toxin was cytotoxic at a low concentration of 10 ng/ml. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50) of T-2 toxin was found to be 40 ng/ml as assessed by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, crystal violet dye exclusion test and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage. T-2 toxin increased intracellular reactive oxygen species generation as early as 15 min and peaked at 60 min as analyzed by flow cytometry. Annexin V + propidium iodide staining showed time-dependent increase in percent apoptotic cells. DNA gel electrophoresis showed oligonucleosomal DNA fragmentation typical of apoptotic cells. Additionally, casapse-3 activation and PARP cleavage indicated involvement of mitochondrial mediated caspase-dependent pathway of apoptosis. Cell cycle analysis revealed time-dependent increase in sub-G1 population of cells and significant up-regulation of CDK2, CDK6, cyclin A and p21 messenger RNA (mRNA) levels. Exposure to T-2 toxin induced the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), p38-mitogen-activated protein kinase and c-jun N-terminal kinases (JNK). Analysis of human phospho-mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) antibody array revealed time-dependent increase in phosphorylation. Upstream of ERK pathway Grb2, Ras and Raf and downstream transcription factors c-fos and c-jun were significantly up-regulated. Z-VAD-FMK and MAPK inhibitors (PD 98059, SB 203580 and ZM 336372) exposure prior to T-2

  19. Stimulation of the protein tyrosine kinase c-Yes but not c-Src by neurotrophins in human brain-metastatic melanoma cells.

    PubMed

    Marchetti, D; Parikh, N; Sudol, M; Gallick, G E

    1998-06-25

    The c-Yes proto-oncogene (pp62c-Yes) encodes a non-receptor-type protein tyrosine kinase (NRPTK) of the Src family. c-Yes activities and protein levels are elevated in human melanoma and melanocyte cell lines. Because the neurotrophins (NT) are important in the progression of melanoma to the brain-metastatic phenotype, we determined whether NT stimulate c-Yes activity in human MeWo melanoma cells and two variant sublines with opposite metastatic capabilities, 3 S 5 and 70W. The highly brain-metastatic 70W subline had an intrinsically higher c-Yes activity than parental MeWo or poorly metastatic 3 S 5 cells. c-Yes kinase was further induced by the prototypic human NT, nerve growth factor (NGF) in a dose and time-dependent manner. In contrast, c-Src activity (pp60-Src) was similar in all these cells and unaffected by NGF exposure. Additionally, human NGF and neurotrophin-3 stimulated c-Yes in brain-metastatic 70W cells. The magnitude of c-Yes activation correlated with the degree of invasion of 70 W cells following incubation of these neurotrophins. To further examine NT stimulation of c-Yes in melanoma cells, three additional cell lines were examined. Metastatic TXM-13 and TXM-18 increased c-Yes activity in response to NGF. In contrast, no increase was observed in low-metastatic TXM-40 cells. Together, these data suggest that altered c-Yes expression may play a role in the malignant progression of the human melanocyte towards the brain-metastatic phenotype and that NT enhance the activity of c-Yes in signaling penetration into the matrix of NT-rich stromal microenvironments such as the brain. PMID:9681823

  20. Endogenous protein phosphorylation and protein kinase activity in winged bean.

    PubMed

    Mukhopadhyay, K; Singh, M

    1997-10-01

    In winged bean (Psophocarpus tetragonolobus) protein kinases (E.C. 2.7.1.37) were found in all tissues studied. There was a significant increase in kinase activity during seed development, with a concomitant enhancement in the phosphorylation of a number of polypeptides; this was reversed in germinating seed cotyledons. Protein phosphorylation was apparently correlated with the increase in the protein content of the developing seed and the growing axis. At least three distinct autophosphorylating proteins could be distinguished in the developing seeds after SDS-PAGE, indicating the presence of different types of protein kinases in winged bean.

  1. Lysophosphatidic acid induces reactive oxygen species generation by activating protein kinase C in PC-3 human prostate cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lin, Chu-Cheng; Lin, Chuan-En; Lin, Yueh-Chien; Ju, Tsai-Kai; Huang, Yuan-Li; Lee, Ming-Shyue; Chen, Jiun-Hong; Lee, Hsinyu

    2013-11-01

    Highlights: •LPA induces ROS generation through LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 3}. •LPA induces ROS generation by activating PLC. •PKCζ mediates LPA-induced ROS generation. -- Abstract: Prostate cancer is one of the most frequently diagnosed cancers in males, and PC-3 is a cell model popularly used for investigating the behavior of late stage prostate cancer. Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) is a lysophospholipid that mediates multiple behaviors in cancer cells, such as proliferation, migration and adhesion. We have previously demonstrated that LPA enhances vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF)-C expression in PC-3 cells by activating the generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS), which is known to be an important mediator in cancer progression. Using flow cytometry, we showed that LPA triggers ROS generation within 10 min and that the generated ROS can be suppressed by pretreatment with the NADPH oxidase (Nox) inhibitor diphenylene iodonium. In addition, transfection with LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 3} siRNA efficiently blocked LPA-induced ROS production, suggesting that both receptors are involved in this pathway. Using specific inhibitors and siRNA, phospholipase C (PLC) and protein kinase C (PKC) were also suggested to participate in LPA-induced ROS generation. Overall, we demonstrated that LPA induces ROS generation in PC-3 prostate cancer cells and this is mediated through the PLC/PKC/Nox pathway.

  2. Hyperglycaemia promotes human brain microvascular endothelial cell apoptosis via induction of protein kinase C-ßI and prooxidant enzyme NADPH oxidase.

    PubMed

    Shao, Beili; Bayraktutan, Ulvi

    2014-01-01

    Blood-brain barrier disruption represents a key feature in hyperglycaemia-aggravated cerebral damage after an ischaemic stroke. Although the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown, activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is thought to play a critical role. This study examined whether apoptosis of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) might contribute to hyperglycaemia-evoked barrier damage and assessed the specific role of PKC in this phenomenon. Treatments with hyperglycaemia (25 mM) or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA, a protein kinase C activator, 100 nM) significantly increased NADPH oxidase activity, O2 (•-) generation, proapoptotic protein Bax expression, TUNEL-positive staining and caspase-3/7 activities. Pharmacological inhibition of NADPH oxidase, PKC-a, PKC-ß or PKC-ßI via their specific inhibitors and neutralisation of O2 (•-) by a cell-permeable superoxide dismutase mimetic, MnTBAP normalised all the aforementioned increases induced by hyperglycaemia. Suppression of these PKC isoforms also negated the stimulatory effects of hyperglycaemia on the protein expression of NADPH oxidase membrane-bound components, Nox2 and p22-phox which determine the overall enzymatic activity. Silencing of PKC-ßI gene through use of specific siRNAs abolished the effects of both hyperglycaemia and PMA on endothelial cell NADPH oxidase activity, O2 (•-) production and apoptosis and consequently improved the integrity and function of an in vitro model of human cerebral barrier comprising HBMEC, astrocytes and pericytes. Hyperglycaemia-mediated apoptosis of HBMEC contributes to cerebral barrier dysfunction and is modulated by sequential activations of PKC-ßI and NADPH oxidase.

  3. Hyperglycaemia promotes human brain microvascular endothelial cell apoptosis via induction of protein kinase C-ßI and prooxidant enzyme NADPH oxidase

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Beili; Bayraktutan, Ulvi

    2014-01-01

    Blood–brain barrier disruption represents a key feature in hyperglycaemia-aggravated cerebral damage after an ischaemic stroke. Although the underlying mechanisms remain largely unknown, activation of protein kinase C (PKC) is thought to play a critical role. This study examined whether apoptosis of human brain microvascular endothelial cells (HBMEC) might contribute to hyperglycaemia-evoked barrier damage and assessed the specific role of PKC in this phenomenon. Treatments with hyperglycaemia (25 mM) or phorbol myristate acetate (PMA, a protein kinase C activator, 100 nM) significantly increased NADPH oxidase activity, O2•- generation, proapoptotic protein Bax expression, TUNEL-positive staining and caspase-3/7 activities. Pharmacological inhibition of NADPH oxidase, PKC-a, PKC-ß or PKC-ßI via their specific inhibitors and neutralisation of O2•- by a cell-permeable superoxide dismutase mimetic, MnTBAP normalised all the aforementioned increases induced by hyperglycaemia. Suppression of these PKC isoforms also negated the stimulatory effects of hyperglycaemia on the protein expression of NADPH oxidase membrane-bound components, Nox2 and p22-phox which determine the overall enzymatic activity. Silencing of PKC-ßI gene through use of specific siRNAs abolished the effects of both hyperglycaemia and PMA on endothelial cell NADPH oxidase activity, O2•- production and apoptosis and consequently improved the integrity and function of an in vitro model of human cerebral barrier comprising HBMEC, astrocytes and pericytes. Hyperglycaemia-mediated apoptosis of HBMEC contributes to cerebral barrier dysfunction and is modulated by sequential activations of PKC-ßI and NADPH oxidase. PMID:24936444

  4. The extended protein kinase C superfamily.

    PubMed Central

    Mellor, H; Parker, P J

    1998-01-01

    Members of the mammalian protein kinase C (PKC) superfamily play key regulatory roles in a multitude of cellular processes, ranging from control of fundamental cell autonomous activities, such as proliferation, to more organismal functions, such as memory. However, understanding of mammalian PKC signalling systems is complicated by the large number of family members. Significant progress has been made through studies based on comparative analysis, which have defined a number of regulatory elements in PKCs which confer specific location and activation signals to each isotype. Further studies on simple organisms have shown that PKC signalling paradigms are conserved through evolution from yeast to humans, underscoring the importance of this family in cellular signalling and giving novel insights into PKC function in complex mammalian systems. PMID:9601053

  5. Protein kinase C-mediated phosphorylation and activation of PDE3A regulate cAMP levels in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Roger W; Mackintosh, Carol; Hers, Ingeborg

    2009-05-01

    The elevation of [cAMP](i) is an important mechanism of platelet inhibition and is regulated by the opposing activity of adenylyl cyclase and phosphodiesterase (PDE). In this study, we demonstrate that a variety of platelet agonists, including thrombin, significantly enhance the activity of PDE3A in a phosphorylation-dependent manner. Stimulation of platelets with the PAR-1 agonist SFLLRN resulted in rapid and transient phosphorylation of PDE3A on Ser(312), Ser(428), Ser(438), Ser(465), and Ser(492), in parallel with the PKC (protein kinase C) substrate, pleckstrin. Furthermore, phosphorylation and activation of PDE3A required the activation of PKC, but not of PI3K/PKB, mTOR/p70S6K, or ERK/RSK. Activation of PKC by phorbol esters also resulted in phosphorylation of the same PDE3A sites in a PKC-dependent, PKB-independent manner. This was further supported by the finding that IGF-1, which strongly activates PI3K/PKB, but not PKC, did not regulate PDE3A. Platelet activation also led to a PKC-dependent association between PDE3A and 14-3-3 proteins. In contrast, cAMP-elevating agents such as PGE(1) and forskolin-induced phosphorylation of Ser(312) and increased PDE3A activity, but did not stimulate 14-3-3 binding. Finally, complete antagonism of PGE(1)-evoked cAMP accumulation by thrombin required both G(i) and PKC activation. Together, these results demonstrate that platelet activation stimulates PKC-dependent phosphorylation of PDE3A on Ser(312), Ser(428), Ser(438), Ser(465), and Ser(492) leading to a subsequent increase in cAMP hydrolysis and 14-3-3 binding. PMID:19261611

  6. A YAC contig spanning a cluster of human type III receptor protein tyrosine kinase genes (PDGFRA-KIT-KDR) in chromosome segment 4q12

    SciTech Connect

    Spritz, R.A.; Strunk, K.M.; Lee, S.T.

    1994-07-15

    The authors have mapped five genes encoding protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) to the pericentromeric region of human chromosome 4. PTK4 and TYRO4, which encode nonreceptor intracellular PTKs, are located at 4p12 and 4q13, respectively. The other three genes, PDGFRA, KIT, and KDR, encode type III transmembrane receptor PTKs for known ligands. The authors have developed a contig of 29 yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs) spanning approximately 2 Mb of DNA at 4q12 that includes PDGFRA, KIT, and KDR, and have used this YAC contig to map 12 different sequence-tagged sites in this region. PDGFRA, KIT, and KDR thus constitute a cluster of genes at 4q12 encoding closely related type III receptor PTKs. Mutations of the human KIT gene result in piebaldism, an autosomal dominant disorder of melanocyte development. 42 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  7. Purine inhibitors of protein kinases, G proteins and polymerases

    DOEpatents

    Gray, Nathanael S.; Schultz, Peter; Kim, Sung-Hou; Meijer, Laurent

    2004-10-12

    The present invention relates to 2-N-substituted 6-(4-methoxybenzylamino)-9-isopropylpurines that inhibit, inter alia, protein kinases, G-proteins and polymerases. In addition, the present invention relates to methods of using such 2-N-substituted 6-(4-methoxybenzylamino)-9-isopropylpurines to inhibit protein kinases, G-proteins, polymerases and other cellular processes and to treat cellular proliferative diseases.

  8. Syk protein tyrosine kinase involves PECAM-1 signaling through tandem immunotyrosine inhibitory motifs in human THP-1 macrophages.

    PubMed

    Wang, Junchen; Wu, Yanling; Hu, Hai; Wang, Weimin; Lu, Ying; Mao, Huiming; Liu, Xiaoqing; Liu, Zhongmin; Chen, Bing-guan

    2011-01-01

    Although recent evidence supports a functional relationship between platelet endothelial cell adhesion molecule (PECAM-1) and Syk tyrosine kinase, little is known about the interaction of Syk with PECAM-1. We report that down-regulation of Syk inhibits the spreading of human THP-1 macrophage cells. Moreover, our data indicate that Syk binds PECAM-1 through its immune tyrosine-based inhibitory motif (ITIM), and dual phosphorylation of the ITIM domain of PECAM-1 leads to activation of Syk. Our results indicate that the distance between the phosphotyrosines could be up to 22 amino acids in length, depending on the conformational flexibility, and that the dual ITIM tyrosine motifs of PECAM-1 facilitate immunoreceptor tyrosine-based activation motif-like signaling. The preferential binding of PECAM-1 to Src homology region 2 domain-containing phosphatase-2 or Syk may depend on their relative affinities, and could provide a mechanism by which signal transduction from PECAM-1 is internally regulated by both positive and negative signaling enzymes. PMID:22000807

  9. Phospholipase D1 is threonine-phosphorylated in human-airway epithelial cells stimulated by sphingosine-1-phosphate by a mechanism involving Src tyrosine kinase and protein kinase Cdelta.

    PubMed Central

    Ghelli, Anna; Porcelli, Anna M; Facchini, Annalisa; Hrelia, Silvana; Flamigni, Flavio; Rugolo, Michela

    2002-01-01

    The regulatory role of protein kinase C (PKC) delta isoform in the stimulation of phospholipase D (PLD) by sphingosine-1-phosphate (SPP) in a human-airway epithelial cell line (CFNPE9o(-)) was revealed by using antisense oligodeoxynucleotide to PKCdelta, in combination with the specific inhibitor rottlerin. Cell treatment with antisense oligodeoxynucleotide, but not with sense oligodeoxynucleotide, completely eliminated PKCdelta expression and resulted in the strong inhibition of SPP-stimulated phosphatidic acid formation. Indeed, among the PKCalpha, beta, delta, epsilon and zeta isoforms expressed in these cells, only PKCdelta was activated on cell stimulation with SPP, as indicated by translocation into the membrane fraction. Furthermore, pertussis toxin and genistein eliminated both PKCdelta translocation and PLD activation. In particular, a significant reduction in phosphatidylbutanol formation by SPP was observed in the presence of 4-amino-5-(4-methylphenyl)-7-(t-butyl) pyrazolo [3,4-d] pyrimidine (PP1), an inhibitor of Src tyrosine kinase. Furthermore, the activity of Src kinase was slightly increased by SPP and inhibited by PP1. However, the level of PKCdelta tyrosine phosphorylation was not increased in SPP-stimulated cells, suggesting that Src did not directly phosphorylate PKCdelta. Finally, the level of serine phosphorylation of PLD1 and PLD2 isoforms was not changed, whereas the PLD1 isoform alone was threonine-phosphorylated in SPP-treated cells. PLD1 threonine phosphorylation was strongly inhibited by rottlerin, by anti-PKCdelta oligodeoxynucleotide and by PP1. In conclusion, in CFNPE9o(-) cells, SPP interacts with a membrane receptor linked to a G(i) type of G-protein, leading to activation of PLD, probably the PLD1 isoform, by a signalling pathway involving Src and PKCdelta. PMID:12014986

  10. SR protein kinases promote splicing of nonconsensus introns.

    PubMed

    Lipp, Jesse J; Marvin, Michael C; Shokat, Kevan M; Guthrie, Christine

    2015-08-01

    Phosphorylation of the spliceosome is essential for RNA splicing, yet how and to what extent kinase signaling affects splicing have not been defined on a genome-wide basis. Using a chemical genetic approach, we show in Schizosaccharomyces pombe that the SR protein kinase Dsk1 is required for efficient splicing of introns with suboptimal splice sites. Systematic substrate mapping in fission yeast and human cells revealed that SRPKs target evolutionarily conserved spliceosomal proteins, including the branchpoint-binding protein Bpb1 (SF1 in humans), by using an RXXSP consensus motif for substrate recognition. Phosphorylation of SF1 increases SF1 binding to introns with nonconsensus splice sites in vitro, and mutation of such sites to consensus relieves the requirement for Dsk1 and phosphorylated Bpb1 in vivo. Modulation of splicing efficiency through kinase signaling pathways may allow tuning of gene expression in response to environmental and developmental cues. PMID:26167880

  11. A novel Toxoplasma gondii calcium-dependent protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Tzen, M; Benarous, R; Dupouy-Camet, J; Roisin, M P

    2007-06-01

    Toxoplasma gondii is an obligate intracellular parasite that infects all types of cells in humans. A family of calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs), previously identified as important in the development of plants and protists, was recently shown to play a role in the infectivity of apicomplexans, and in motility and host cell invasion in particular. We report here the isolation of a new calcium-dependent protein kinase gene from the human toxoplasmosis parasite, Toxoplasma gondii. The gene consists of 12 exons. The encoded protein, TgCDPK4, consists of the four characteristic domains of members of the CDPK family and is most similar to PfCDPK2 from Plasmodium falciparum. We measured TgCDPK4 activity, induced by calcium influx, using a kinase assay. A calcium chelator (EGTA) inhibited this activity. These findings provide evidence of signal transduction involving members of the CDPK family in T. gondii.

  12. Protein kinase activators alter glial cholesterol esterification

    SciTech Connect

    Jeng, I.; Dills, C.; Klemm, N.; Wu, C.

    1986-05-01

    Similar to nonneural tissues, the activity of glial acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferase is controlled by a phosphorylation and dephosphorylation mechanism. Manipulation of cyclic AMP content did not alter the cellular cholesterol esterification, suggesting that cyclic AMP is not a bioregulator in this case. Therefore, the authors tested the effect of phorbol-12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) on cellular cholesterol esterification to determine the involvement of protein kinase C. PMA has a potent effect on cellular cholesterol esterification. PMA depresses cholesterol esterification initially, but cells recover from inhibition and the result was higher cholesterol esterification, suggesting dual effects of protein kinase C. Studies of other phorbol analogues and other protein kinase C activators such as merezein indicate the involvement of protein kinase C. Oleoyl-acetyl glycerol duplicates the effect of PMA. This observation is consistent with a diacyl-glycerol-protein kinase-dependent reaction. Calcium ionophore A23187 was ineffective in promoting the effect of PMA. They concluded that a calcium-independent and protein C-dependent pathway regulated glial cholesterol esterification.

  13. Dual activators of Protein Kinase R (PKR) and Protein Kinase R Like Kinase (PERK) Identify Common and Divergent Catalytic Targets

    PubMed Central

    Ming, Jie; Sun, Hong; Cao, Peng; Fusco, Dahlene N.; Chung, Raymond T.; Chorev, Michael; Jin, Qi; Aktas, Bertal H.

    2013-01-01

    Chemical genetics has evolved into a powerful tool for studying gene function in normal- and patho-biology. PKR and PERK, two eukaryotic translation initiation factor 2 alpha (eIF2α) kinases, play critical roles in maintenance of cellular hemostasis, metabolic stability, and anti-viral defenses. Both kinases interact with and phosphorylate additional substrates including tumor suppressor p53 and nuclear protein 90. Loss of function of both kinases has been studied by reverse genetics and recently identified inhibitors. In contrast, activating probes for studying the role of catalytic activity of these kinases are not available. We identified a 3-(2,3-dihydrobenzo[b][1,4]dioxin-6-yl)-5,7-dihydroxy-4H-chromen-4-one (DHBDC) as specific dual activator of PKR and PERK by screening a chemical library of 20,000 small molecules in a dual luciferase surrogate eIF2α phosphorylation assay. We present here extensive biological characterization and preliminary structure-activity relationship of DHBDC, which phosphorylate eIF2α by activating PKR and PERK but no other eIF2α kinases. These agents also activate downstream effectors of eIF2α phosphorylation; inducing CHOP and suppressing cyclin D1 expression and inhibiting cancer cell proliferation, all in a manner dependent on PKR and PERK. Consistent with the role of eIF2α phosphorylation in viral infection, DHBDC inhibits proliferation of human hepatitis C virus. Finally, DHBDC induces phosphorylation of Ikβα, and activates NF-κB pathway. Surprisingly, activation of NF-κB pathway is dependent on PERK but independent of PKR activity. These data indicate that DHBDC is an invaluable probe for elucidating the role of PKR and PERK in normal- and patho-biology. PMID:23784735

  14. meso-Dihydroguaiaretic acid inhibits hepatic lipid accumulation by activating AMP-activated protein kinase in human HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Lee, Myoung-Su; Kim, Kyung Jin; Kim, Daeyoung; Lee, Kyung-Eun; Hwang, Jae-Kwan

    2011-01-01

    Hepatic lipid accumulation is a major risk factor for dyslipidemia, nonalcoholic fatty liver disease, and insulin resistance. The present study was conducted to evaluate hypolipidemic effects of meso-dihydroguaiaretic acid (MDA), anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory compound isolated from the Myristica fragrans HOUTT., by oil red O staining, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and Western blot. MDA significantly inhibited insulin-induced hepatic lipid accumulation in a dose-dependent manner. The lipid-lowering effect of MDA was accompanied by increased expression of proteins involved in fatty acid oxidation and decreased expression of lipid synthetic proteins. In addition, MDA activated AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) as determined by phosphorylation of acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), a downstream target of AMPK. The effects of MDA on lipogenic protein expression were suppressed by pretreatment with compound C, an AMPK inhibitor. Taken together, these findings show that MDA inhibits insulin-induced lipid accumulation in human HepG2 cells by suppressing expression of lipogenic proteins through AMPK signaling, suggesting a potent lipid-lowering agent. PMID:21963507

  15. Subcellular proteomic approach for identifying the signaling effectors of protein kinase C-β2 under high glucose conditions in human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    ZHANG, MIN; SUN, FANG; CHEN, FANGFANG; ZHOU, BO; DUAN, YAQIAN; SU, HONG; LIN, XUEBO

    2015-01-01

    The high glucose-induced activation of protein kinase C-β2 (PKC-β2) has an essential role in the pathophysiology of diabetes-associated vascular disease. In the present study, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were cultured in high and normal glucose conditions prior to being infected with a recombinant adenovirus to induce the overexpression of PKC-β2. The activity of PKC-β2 was also decreased using a selective PKC-β2 inhibitor. A series of two-dimensional electrophoresis images detected ~800 spots in the nuclei, and ~600 spots in the cytosol. Following intra- and inter-group cross-matching, 38 significantly altered spots were identified as high glucose-induced and PKC-β2-associated nuclear proteins. In addition to the observation that the regulation of key proteins involved in the nuclear factor (NF)-κB signaling cascade occurred in the cytosol, various transcription factors, including peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor δ (PPAR-δ), were also altered in the nuclei. A human protein-protein interaction network of potential connections of PKC-β2-associated proteins was constructed in the proteomics investigation using Biological General Repository for Interaction Datasets. The results indicated that PKC-β2 may be involved in high glucose-induced glucose and lipid crosstalk by regulating PPAR-δ. In addition, NF-κB inhibitor-interacting Ras-like protein 1 may be important in the PKC-β2-NF-κB inhibitor-NF-κB signaling pathway in HUVECs under high-glucose conditions. PMID:26459836

  16. Protein kinase A and casein kinases mediate sequential phosphorylation events in the circadian negative feedback loop.

    PubMed

    Huang, Guocun; Chen, She; Li, Shaojie; Cha, Joonseok; Long, Chengzu; Li, Lily; He, Qiyang; Liu, Yi

    2007-12-15

    Regulation of circadian clock components by phosphorylation plays essential roles in clock functions and is conserved from fungi to mammals. In the Neurospora circadian negative feedback loop, FREQUENCY (FRQ) protein inhibits WHITE COLLAR (WC) complex activity by recruiting the casein kinases CKI and CKII to phosphorylate the WC proteins, resulting in the repression of frq transcription. On the other hand, CKI and CKII progressively phosphorylate FRQ to promote FRQ degradation, a process that is a major determinant of circadian period length. Here, by using whole-cell isotope labeling and quantitative mass spectrometry methods, we show that the WC-1 phosphorylation events critical for the negative feedback process occur sequentially-first by a priming kinase, then by the FRQ-recruited casein kinases. We further show that the cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) is essential for clock function and inhibits WC activity by serving as a priming kinase for the casein kinases. In addition, PKA also regulates FRQ phosphorylation, but unlike CKI and CKII, PKA stabilizes FRQ, similar to the stabilization of human PERIOD2 (hPER2) due to the phosphorylation at the familial advanced sleep phase syndrome (FASPS) site. Thus, PKA is a key clock component that regulates several critical processes in the circadian negative feedback loop. PMID:18079175

  17. Oncoprotein protein kinase antibody kit

    DOEpatents

    Karin, Michael; Hibi, Masahiko; Lin, Anning

    2008-12-23

    An isolated polypeptide (JNK) characterized by having a molecular weight of 46 kD as determined by reducing SDS-PAGE, having serine and threonine kinase activity, phosphorylating the c-Jun N-terminal activation domain and polynucleotide sequences and method of detection of JNK are provided herein. JNK phosphorylates c-Jun N-terminal activation domain which affects gene expression from AP-1 sites.

  18. Unveiling Protein Kinase A Targets in Cryptococcus neoformans Capsule Formation.

    PubMed

    Alspaugh, J Andrew

    2016-01-01

    The protein kinase A (PKA) signal transduction pathway has been associated with pathogenesis in many fungal species. Geddes and colleagues [mBio 7(1):e01862-15, 2016, doi:10.1128/mBio.01862-15] used quantitative proteomics approaches to define proteins with altered abundance during protein kinase A (PKA) activation and repression in the opportunistic human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. They observed an association between microbial PKA signaling and ubiquitin-proteasome regulation of protein homeostasis. Additionally, they correlated these processes with expression of polysaccharide capsule on the fungal cell surface, the main virulence-associated phenotype in this organism. Not only are their findings important for microbial pathogenesis, but they also support similar associations between human PKA signaling and ubiquitinated protein accumulation in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26861014

  19. Unveiling Protein Kinase A Targets in Cryptococcus neoformans Capsule Formation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The protein kinase A (PKA) signal transduction pathway has been associated with pathogenesis in many fungal species. Geddes and colleagues [mBio 7(1):e01862-15, 2016, doi:10.1128/mBio.01862-15] used quantitative proteomics approaches to define proteins with altered abundance during protein kinase A (PKA) activation and repression in the opportunistic human fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. They observed an association between microbial PKA signaling and ubiquitin-proteasome regulation of protein homeostasis. Additionally, they correlated these processes with expression of polysaccharide capsule on the fungal cell surface, the main virulence-associated phenotype in this organism. Not only are their findings important for microbial pathogenesis, but they also support similar associations between human PKA signaling and ubiquitinated protein accumulation in neurodegenerative diseases. PMID:26861014

  20. Protein Kinase A: A Master Kinase of Granulosa Cell Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Puri, Pawan; Little-Ihrig, Lynda; Chandran, Uma; Law, Nathan C.; Hunzicker-Dunn, Mary; Zeleznik, Anthony J.

    2016-01-01

    Activation of protein kinase A (PKA) by follicle stimulating hormone (FSH) transduces the signal that drives differentiation of ovarian granulosa cells (GCs). An unresolved question is whether PKA is sufficient to initiate the complex program of GC responses to FSH. We compared signaling pathways and gene expression profiles of GCs stimulated with FSH or expressing PKA-CQR, a constitutively active mutant of PKA. Both FSH and PKA-CQR stimulated the phosphorylation of proteins known to be involved in GC differentiation including CREB, ß-catenin, AKT, p42/44 MAPK, GAB2, GSK-3ß, FOXO1, and YAP. In contrast, FSH stimulated the phosphorylation of p38 MAP kinase but PKA-CQR did not. Microarray analysis revealed that 85% of transcripts that were up-regulated by FSH were increased to a comparable extent by PKA-CQR and of the transcripts that were down-regulated by FSH, 76% were also down-regulated by PKA-CQR. Transcripts regulated similarly by FSH and PKA-CQR are involved in steroidogenesis and differentiation, while transcripts more robustly up-regulated by PKA-CQR are involved in ovulation. Thus, PKA, under the conditions of our experimental approach appears to function as a master upstream kinase that is sufficient to initiate the complex pattern of intracellular signaling pathway and gene expression profiles that accompany GC differentiation. PMID:27324437

  1. Fluid shear stress activation of egr-1 transcription in cultured human endothelial and epithelial cells is mediated via the extracellular signal-related kinase 1/2 mitogen-activated protein kinase pathway.

    PubMed Central

    Schwachtgen, J L; Houston, P; Campbell, C; Sukhatme, V; Braddock, M

    1998-01-01

    The primary response transcription factor, early growth response-1 (Egr-1), is rapidly activated by a variety of extracellular stimuli. Egr-1 binds to a sequence found in the promoters of genes involved in vascular injury, such as PDGF-A and tissue factor, and trans-activates their expression in endothelial cells in response to fluid shear stress. Here we show that egr-1 mRNA is increased after 30 min of flow in human aortic endothelial cell and HeLa cell cultures. Transient transfection of HeLa cells with reporter gene constructs driven by the murine or human egr-1 5' flanking sequence revealed a five- and ninefold induction, respectively, in transcriptional activity after exposure to a shear stress of 5 dynes/cm2 for 3 h. Deletion of sequences in the murine promoter containing two AP1 sites and an inhibitory Egr-1 binding sequence, did not reduce shear stress inducibility. However, progressive deletion of five serum response elements, reduced both the basal promoter activity and its capacity to be activated by shear stress. Further examination indicated that the three upstream serum response elements are predominantly responsible for shear stress activation of the egr-1 promoter. Treatment of cells with PD98059, a specific inhibitor of mitogen-activated protein kinase-1 inhibited shear stress activation of egr-1. We suggest that egr-1 activation by shear stress involves activation of Elk-1 but not c-jun activity. These data, which are consistent with previous findings for shear mediated signaling via the mitogen-activated protein kinase cascade, now implicate shear modulation of the Egr-1 transcription factor in this pathway. PMID:9616225

  2. Phosphorylation of protein phosphatase inhibitor-1 by protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Sahin, Bogachan; Shu, Hongjun; Fernandez, Joseph; El-Armouche, Ali; Molkentin, Jeffery D; Nairn, Angus C; Bibb, James A

    2006-08-25

    Inhibitor-1 becomes a potent inhibitor of protein phosphatase 1 when phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase at Thr(35). Moreover, Ser(67) of inhibitor-1 serves as a substrate for cyclin-dependent kinase 5 in the brain. Here, we report that dephosphoinhibitor-1 but not phospho-Ser(67) inhibitor-1 was efficiently phosphorylated by protein kinase C at Ser(65) in vitro. In contrast, Ser(67) phosphorylation by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 was unaffected by phospho-Ser(65). Protein kinase C activation in striatal tissue resulted in the concomitant phosphorylation of inhibitor-1 at Ser(65) and Ser(67), but not Ser(65) alone. Selective pharmacological inhibition of protein phosphatase activity suggested that phospho-Ser(65) inhibitor-1 is dephosphorylated by protein phosphatase 1 in the striatum. In vitro studies confirmed these findings and suggested that phospho-Ser(67) protects phospho-Ser(65) inhibitor-1 from dephosphorylation by protein phosphatase 1 in vivo. Activation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors resulted in the up-regulation of diphospho-Ser(65)/Ser(67) inhibitor-1 in this tissue. In contrast, the activation of N-methyl-d-aspartate-type ionotropic glutamate receptors opposed increases in striatal diphospho-Ser(65)/Ser(67) inhibitor-1 levels. Phosphomimetic mutation of Ser(65) and/or Ser(67) did not convert inhibitor-1 into a protein phosphatase 1 inhibitor. On the other hand, in vitro and in vivo studies suggested that diphospho-Ser(65)/Ser(67) inhibitor-1 is a poor substrate for cAMP-dependent protein kinase. These observations extend earlier studies regarding the function of phospho-Ser(67) and underscore the possibility that phosphorylation in this region of inhibitor-1 by multiple protein kinases may serve as an integrative signaling mechanism that governs the responsiveness of inhibitor-1 to cAMP-dependent protein kinase activation.

  3. Novel human neutrophil agonistic properties of arsenic trioxide: involvement of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase and/or c-jun NH2-terminal MAPK but not extracellular signal-regulated kinases-1/2.

    PubMed

    Binet, François; Girard, Denis

    2008-12-01

    Arsenic trioxide (ATO) is known for treating acute promyelocytic leukemia and for inducing apoptosis and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) in promyelocytes and cancer cells. We recently reported that ATO induces neutrophil apoptosis. The aim of this study was to establish whether or not ATO recruits MAPKs in neutrophils, as well as to further investigate its agonistic properties. We found that ATO activates p38 and that, unlike H2O2, this response was not inhibited by exogenous catalase. Also, we demonstrated that ATO-induced p38 activation occurs before H2O2 generation and without a calcium burst. We next established that ATO recruits c-jun NH2-terminal (JNK) but not extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 and 2 (Erk-1/2). Using pharmacological inhibitors, we found that the proapoptotic activity of ATO occurs by a MAPK-independent mechanism. In contrast, the ability of ATO to enhance adhesion, migration, phagocytosis, release, and activity of gelatinase and degranulation of secretory, specific, and gelatinase, but not azurophilic granules, is dependent upon activation of p38 and/or JNK. This is the first study establishing that ATO possesses important agonistic properties in human neutrophils. Given the central role of neutrophils in various inflammatory disorders, we propose that ATO might have broader therapeutic implications in clinics, especially for regulating inflammation.

  4. Identification and characterization of a human mitochondrial NAD kinase.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Kazuto; Kawai, Shigeyuki; Murata, Kousaku

    2012-01-01

    NAD kinase is the sole NADP(+) biosynthetic enzyme. Despite the great significance of NADP(+), to date no mitochondrial NAD kinase has been identified in human, and the source of human mitochondrial NADP(+) remains elusive. Here we present evidence demonstrating that a human protein of unknown function, C5orf33, is a human mitochondrial NAD kinase; this protein likely represents the missing source of human mitochondrial NADP(+). The C5orf33 protein exhibits NAD kinase activity, utilizing ATP or inorganic polyphosphate, and is localized in the mitochondria of human HEK293A cells. C5orf33 mRNA is more abundant than human cytosolic NAD kinase mRNA in almost all tissues examined. We further show by database searches that some animals and protists carry C5orf33 homologues as their sole NADP(+) biosynthetic enzyme, whereas plants and fungi possess no C5orf33 homologue. These observations provide insights into eukaryotic NADP(+) biosynthesis, which has pivotal roles in cells and organelles.

  5. Controls of Nuclear Factor-Kappa B Signaling Activity by 5’-AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Activation With Examples in Human Bladder Cancer Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Jin

    2016-01-01

    Generally, both lipopolysaccharide (LPS)- and hypoxia-induced nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB) effects are alleviated through differential posttranslational modification of NF-κB phosphorylation after pretreatment with 5´-AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) activators such as 5´-aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide ribonucleotide (AICAR) or the hypoglycemic agent metformin. We found that AICAR or metformin acts as a regulator of LPS/NF-κB-or hypoxia/NF-κB-mediated cyclooxygenase induction by an AMPK-dependent mechanism with interactions between p65-NF-κB phosphorylation and acetylation, including in a human bladder cancer cell line (T24). In summary, we highlighted the regulatory interactions of AMPK activity on NF-κB induction, particularly in posttranslational phosphorylation and acetylation of NF-κB under inflammatory conditions or hypoxia environment. PMID:27706018

  6. Body weight management effect of burdock (Arctium lappa L.) root is associated with the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase in human HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Daih-Huang; Hung, Ming-Chi; Hung, Chao-Ming; Liu, Li-Min; Chen, Fu-An; Shieh, Po-Chuen; Ho, Chi-Tang; Way, Tzong-Der

    2012-10-01

    Burdock (Arcticum lappa L.) root is used in folk medicine and also as a vegetable in Asian countries. In the present study, burdock root treatment significantly reduced body weight in rats. To evaluate the bioactive compounds, we successively extracted the burdock root with ethanol (AL-1), and fractionated it with n-hexane (AL-2), ethyl acetate (AL-3), n-butanol (AL-4), and water (AL-5). Among these fractions, AL-2 contained components with the most effective hypolipidemic potential in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. AL-2 decreased the expression of fatty acid synthase (FASN) and inhibited the activity of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC) by stimulating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) through the LKB1 pathway. Three active compounds were identified from the AL-2, namely α-linolenic acid, methyl α-linolenate, and methyl oleate. These results suggest that burdock root is expected to be useful for body weight management.

  7. Body weight management effect of burdock (Arctium lappa L.) root is associated with the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase in human HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Kuo, Daih-Huang; Hung, Ming-Chi; Hung, Chao-Ming; Liu, Li-Min; Chen, Fu-An; Shieh, Po-Chuen; Ho, Chi-Tang; Way, Tzong-Der

    2012-10-01

    Burdock (Arcticum lappa L.) root is used in folk medicine and also as a vegetable in Asian countries. In the present study, burdock root treatment significantly reduced body weight in rats. To evaluate the bioactive compounds, we successively extracted the burdock root with ethanol (AL-1), and fractionated it with n-hexane (AL-2), ethyl acetate (AL-3), n-butanol (AL-4), and water (AL-5). Among these fractions, AL-2 contained components with the most effective hypolipidemic potential in human hepatoma HepG2 cells. AL-2 decreased the expression of fatty acid synthase (FASN) and inhibited the activity of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC) by stimulating AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) through the LKB1 pathway. Three active compounds were identified from the AL-2, namely α-linolenic acid, methyl α-linolenate, and methyl oleate. These results suggest that burdock root is expected to be useful for body weight management. PMID:25005949

  8. Requirement of T-lymphokine-activated killer cell-originated protein kinase for TRAIL resistance of human HeLa cervical cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Kwon, Hyeok-Ran; Lee, Ki Won; Dong, Zigang; Lee, Kyung Bok; Oh, Sang-Muk

    2010-01-01

    T-lymphokine-activated killer cell-originated protein kinase (TOPK) appears to be highly expressed in various cancer cells and to play an important role in maintaining proliferation of cancer cells. However, the underlying mechanism by which TOPK regulates growth of cancer cells remains elusive. Here we report that upregulated endogenous TOPK augments resistance of cancer cells to apoptosis induced by tumor necrosis factor-related apoptosis inducing ligand (TRAIL). Stable knocking down of TOPK markedly increased TRAIL-mediated apoptosis of human HeLa cervical cancer cells, as compared with control cells. Caspase 8 or caspase 3 activities in response to TRAIL were greatly incremented in TOPK-depleted cells. Ablation of TOPK negatively regulated TRAIL-mediated NF-{kappa}B activity. Furthermore, expression of NF-{kappa}B-dependent genes, FLICE-inhibitory protein (FLIP), inhibitor of apoptosis protein 1 (c-IAP1), or X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) was reduced in TOPK-depleted cells. Collectively, these findings demonstrated that TOPK contributed to TRAIL resistance of cancer cells via NF-{kappa}B activity, suggesting that TOPK might be a potential molecular target for successful cancer therapy using TRAIL.

  9. Analysis of mitogen-activated protein kinase activity in yeast.

    PubMed

    Elion, Elaine A; Sahoo, Rupam

    2010-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases play central roles in transmitting extracellular and intracellular information in a wide variety of situations in eukaryotic cells. Their activities are perturbed in a large number of diseases, and their activating kinases are currently therapeutic targets in cancer. MAPKs are highly conserved among all eukaryotes. MAPKs were first cloned from the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Yeast has five MAPKs and one MAPK-like kinase. The mating MAPK Fus3 is the best characterized yeast MAPK. Members of all subfamilies of human MAPKs can functionally substitute S. cerevisiae MAPKs, providing systems to use genetic approaches to study the functions of either yeast or human MAPKs and to identify functionally relevant amino acid residues that enhance or reduce the effects of therapeutically relevant inhibitors and regulatory proteins. Here, we describe an assay to measure Fus3 activity in immune complexes prepared from S. cerevisiae extracts. The assay conditions are applicable to other MAPKs, as well. PMID:20811996

  10. Therapeutic implications of a human neutralizing antibody to the macrophage-stimulating protein receptor tyrosine kinase (RON), a c-MET family member.

    PubMed

    O'Toole, Jennifer M; Rabenau, Karen E; Burns, Kerri; Lu, Dan; Mangalampalli, Venkat; Balderes, Paul; Covino, Nicole; Bassi, Rajiv; Prewett, Marie; Gottfredsen, Kimberly J; Thobe, Megan N; Cheng, Yuan; Li, Yiwen; Hicklin, Daniel J; Zhu, Zhenping; Waltz, Susan E; Hayman, Michael J; Ludwig, Dale L; Pereira, Daniel S

    2006-09-15

    RON is a member of the c-MET receptor tyrosine kinase family. Like c-MET, RON is expressed by a variety of epithelial-derived tumors and cancer cell lines and it is thought to play a functional role in tumorigenesis. To date, antagonists of RON activity have not been tested in vivo to validate RON as a potential cancer target. In this report, we used an antibody phage display library to generate IMC-41A10, a human immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) antibody that binds with high affinity (ED50 = 0.15 nmol/L) to RON and effectively blocks interaction with its ligand, macrophage-stimulating protein (MSP; IC50 = 2 nmol/L). We found IMC-41A10 to be a potent inhibitor of receptor and downstream signaling, cell migration, and tumorigenesis. It antagonized MSP-induced phosphorylation of RON, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK), and AKT in several cancer cell lines. In HT-29 colon, NCI-H292 lung, and BXPC-3 pancreatic cancer xenograft tumor models, IMC-41A10 inhibited tumor growth by 50% to 60% as a single agent, and in BXPC-3 xenografts, it led to tumor regressions when combined with Erbitux. Western blot analyses of HT-29 and NCI-H292 xenograft tumors treated with IMC-41A10 revealed a decrease in MAPK phosphorylation compared with control IgG-treated tumors, suggesting that inhibition of MAPK activity may be required for the antitumor activity of IMC-41A10. To our knowledge, this is the first demonstration that a RON antagonist and specifically an inhibitory antibody of RON negatively affects tumorigenesis. Another major contribution of this report is an extensive analysis of RON expression in approximately 100 cancer cell lines and approximately 300 patient tumor samples representing 10 major cancer types. Taken together, our results highlight the potential therapeutic usefulness of RON activity inhibition in human cancers.

  11. Multiple protein kinase pathways mediate amplified IL-6 release by human lung fibroblasts co-exposed to nickel and TLR-2 agonist, MALP-2

    SciTech Connect

    Gao Fei; Brant, Kelly A.; Ward, Rachel M.; Cattley, Richard T.; Barchowsky, Aaron; Fabisiak, James P.

    2010-09-01

    Microbial stimuli and atmospheric particulate matter (PM) interact to amplify the release of inflammatory and immune-modulating cytokines. The basis of this interaction, however, is not known. Cultured human lung fibroblasts (HLF) were used to determine whether various protein kinase pathways were involved in the release of IL-6 following combined exposure to the PM-derived metal, Ni, and M. fermentans-derived macrophage-activating lipopeptide 2 (MALP-2), a toll-like receptor 2 agonist. Synergistic release of IL-6 by MALP-2 and NiSO{sub 4} was obvious after 8 h of co-stimulation and correlated with a late phase accumulation of IL-6 mRNA. Ni and MALP-2, alone or together, all led to rapid and transient phosphorylations of ERK{sub 1/2} and JNK/SAPK of similar magnitude. p38 phosphorylation, however, was observed only after prolonged treatment of cells with both stimuli together. A constitutive level of PI3K-dependent Akt phosphorylation remained unchanged by Ni and/or MALP-2 exposure. IL-6 induced by Ni/MALP-2 co-exposure was partially dependent on activity of HIF-1{alpha} and COX-2 as shown by targeted knockdown using siRNA. IL-6 release in response to Ni/MALP-2 was partially sensitive to pharmacological inhibition of ERK{sub 1/2}, p38, and PI3K signaling. The protein kinase inhibitors had minimal or no effects on Ni/MALP-2-induced accumulation of HIF-1{alpha} protein, however, COX-2 expression and, more markedly PGE{sub 2} production, were suppressed by LY294002, SB203580, and U0126. Thus, Ni/MALP-2 interactions involve multiple protein kinase pathways (ERK{sub 1/2}, p38, and PI3K) that modulate events downstream from the early accumulation of HIF-1{alpha} to promote IL-6 gene expression directly or secondarily, through COX-2-derived autocrine products like PGE{sub 2}.

  12. Glycogen Synthase Kinase-3β (GSK3β) Negatively Regulates PTTG1/Human Securin Protein Stability, and GSK3β Inactivation Correlates with Securin Accumulation in Breast Tumors*

    PubMed Central

    Mora-Santos, Mar; Limón-Mortés, M. Cristina; Giráldez, Servando; Herrero-Ruiz, Joaquín; Sáez, Carmen; Japón, Miguel Á.; Tortolero, Maria; Romero, Francisco

    2011-01-01

    PTTG1, also known as securin, is an inactivating partner of separase, the major effector for chromosome segregation during mitosis. At the metaphase-to-anaphase transition, securin is targeted for proteasomal destruction by the anaphase-promoting complex or cyclosome, allowing activation of separase. In addition, securin is overexpressed in metastatic or genomically instable tumors, suggesting a relevant role for securin in tumor progression. Stability of securin is regulated by phosphorylation; some phosphorylated forms are degraded out of mitosis, by the action of the SKP1-CUL1-F-box protein (SCF) complex. The kinases targeting securin for proteolysis have not been identified, and mechanistic insight into the cause of securin accumulation in human cancers is lacking. Here, we demonstrate that glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK3β) phosphorylates securin to promote its proteolysis via SCFβTrCP E3 ubiquitin ligase. Importantly, a strong correlation between securin accumulation and GSK3β inactivation was observed in breast cancer tissues, indicating that GSK3β inactivation may account for securin accumulation in breast cancers. PMID:21757741

  13. Extracellular regulated protein kinases 1/2 phosphorylation is required for hepatic differentiation of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Yongmin; Zhu, Yuan; Sun, Feng; Zhang, Bin; Li, Limin; Sun, Zixuan; Li, Wei; Zhu, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have the capacity to restore liver function by differentiating into hepatocyte like cells. However, the underlying mechanisms are not well understood. Here, we have investigated the signals involved in the hepatic differentiation of human umbilical cord-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCMSCs). hUCMSCs were treated with mouse fetal liver-conditioned medium (FLCM) to induce hepatic differentiation. Flow cytometry, reverse transcription PCR, real-time PCR, immunocytochemistry, and polymerase chain reaction (PCR) array were used to detect the expression of MSC- and hepotocyte-specific markers in FLCM-treated hUCMSCs. Urea production and cytochrome P450 3A4 (CYP3A4) activity were used as indicators to evaluate liver cell characteristics. Raf/mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MEK)/extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) was analyzed in hUCMSCs by Western blotting. Following FLCM treatment, expression of MSC-specific markers decreased, while hepatocyte-specific gene expression was increased. Urea production, albumin secretion, glycogen storage, and CYP3A4 activity were significantly enhanced in FLCM-treated cells. In addition, ERK1/2 phosphorylation was increased in a time-dependent manner through Raf/MEK/ERK pathway, and phosphorylation was sustained at a high level during hepatic induction. Inhibition of ERK1/2 activation by U0126 (an ERK1/2 inhibitor) and pFLAG-CMV-ERK1(K71R) (negative mutant of ERK1) reversed the expression of liver-specific genes in hUCMSCs and affected hepatic function significantly. In summary, this work shows that ERK1/2 phosphorylation plays an important role in inducing hepatic differentiation of hUCMSCs in FLCM. PMID:25576343

  14. Filamentous actin and its associated binding proteins are the stimulatory site for 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase association within the membrane of human erythrocytes.

    PubMed

    Real-Hohn, Antonio; Zancan, Patricia; Da Silva, Daniel; Martins, Eliane R; Salgado, Leonardo T; Mermelstein, Claudia S; Gomes, Andre M O; Sola-Penna, Mauro

    2010-05-01

    Glycolytic enzymes reversibly associate with the human erythrocyte membrane (EM) as part of their regulatory mechanism. The site for this association has been described as the amino terminus of band 3, a transmembrane anion transporter. Binding of glycolytic enzymes to this site is recognized to inhibit glycolysis, since binding inhibits the catalytic activity of these enzymes, including the rate-limiting enzyme 6-phosphofructo-1-kinase (PFK). However, the existence of a putative stimulatory site for glycolytic enzymes within the EM has been proposed. PFK has been described as able to reversibly associate with other proteins, such as microtubules, which inhibit the enzyme, and filamentous actin, which activates the enzyme. Here, it is demonstrated that PFK also binds to actin filaments and its associated binding proteins in the protein meshwork that forms the erythrocyte cytoskeleton. Through fluorescence resonance energy transfer experiments using either confocal microscopy or fluorescence spectroscopy, we show that, within the EM, PFK and actin filaments containing its associated binding proteins are located close enough to propose binding between them. Moreover, specifically blocking PFK binding to band 3 results in an association of the enzyme with the EM that increases the enzyme's catalytic activity. Conversely, disruption of the association between PFK and actin filaments containing its associated binding proteins potentiates the inhibitory action of the EM on the enzyme. Furthermore, it is shown that insulin signaling increases the association of PFK to actin filaments and its associated binding proteins, revealing that this event may play a role on the stimulatory effects of insulin on erythrocyte glycolysis. In summary, the present work presents evidence that filamentous actin and its associated binding proteins are the stimulatory site for PFK within the EM.

  15. Human Neutrophil Elastase Induce Interleukin-10 Expression in Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells through Protein Kinase C Theta/Delta and Phospholipase Pathways

    PubMed Central

    Kawata, Jin; Yamaguchi, Rui; Yamamoto, Takatoshi; Ishimaru, Yasuji; Sakamoto, Arisa; Aoki, Manabu; Kitano, Masafumi; Umehashi, Misako; Hirose, Eiji; Yamaguchi, Yasuo

    2016-01-01

    Objective Neutrophils have an important role in the rapid innate immune response, and the release or active secretion of elastase from neutrophils is linked to various inflammatory responses. Purpose of this study was to determine how the human neutrophil elastase affects the interleukin-10 (IL-10) response in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC). Materials and Methods In this prospective study, changes in IL-10 messenger RNA (mRNA) and protein expression levels in monocytes derived from human PBMCs were investigated after stimulation with human neutrophil elastase (HNE). A set of inhibitors was used for examining the pathways for IL-10 production induced by HNE. Results Reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) showed that stimulation with HNE upregulated IL-10 mRNA expression by monocytes, while the enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) revealed an increase of IL-10 protein level in the culture medium. A phospholipase C inhibitor (U73122) partially blunt- ed the induction of IL-10 mRNA expression by HNE, while IL-10 mRNA expression was significantly reduced by a protein kinase C (PKC) inhibitor (Rottlerin). A calcium chelator (3,4,5-trimethoxybenzoic acid 8-(diethylamino)octyl ester: TMB-8) inhibited the response of IL-10 mRNA to stimulation by HNE. In addition, pretreatment with a broad-spectrum PKC inhibitor (Ro-318425) partly blocked the response to HNE. Finally, an inhibitor of PKC theta/delta abolished the increased level of IL-10 mRNA expression. Conclusion These results indicate that HNE mainly upregulates IL-10 mRNA ex- pression and protein production in moncytes via a novel PKC theta/delta, although partially via the conventional PKC pathway. PMID:26862528

  16. N-Farnesyloxy-norcantharimide inhibits progression of human leukemic Jurkat T cells through regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase and interleukin-2 production

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Ming-Che; Wu, Jin-Yi; Liao, Hui-Fen; Chen, Yu-Jen

    2015-01-01

    This study investigated the anticancer effects of N-farnesyloxy-norcantharimide (NOC15), a newly synthesized norcantharidin (NCTD) analogue, on human leukemic Jurkat T cells and the signaling pathway underlying its effects. We found that the half maximal inhibitory concentration (IC50) of NOC15 on Jurkat T cells is 1.4 μmol/l, which is 11.14-fold (=15.6÷1.4) smaller than the 15.6 μmol/l of NCTD on Jurkat T cells, whereas the IC50 of NOC15 on human normal lymphoblast (HNL) is 207.9 μmol/l, which is 8.17-fold (=1698.0÷207.8) smaller than the 1698.0 μmol/l of NCTD on HNL cells. These results indicated that NOC15 exerts a higher anticancer effect on Jurkat T cells and has higher toxicity toward HNL cells than NCTD. Thus, NOC15 is 1.36-fold (=11.14÷8.17) beneficial as an anticancer agent toward Jurkat T cells compared with NCTD. Moreover, NOC15 can increase the percentage of cells in the sub-G1 phase and reduce the cell viability of Jurkat T cells, stimulate p38 and extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) signaling pathway, and inhibit calcineurin expression and interleukin-2 (IL-2) production. However, NOC15 exerted no effects on the Jun-N-terminal kinase 1/2 (JNK1/2) signaling pathway, the production of IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor-α. We conclude that the anticancer activity of the newly synthesized NOC15 is 1.36-fold beneficial than NCTD as an anticancer agent and that NOC15 can increase the percentage of cells in the sub-G1 phase through the stimulation of p38 and ERK1/2 of the MAPK signaling pathway and the inhibition of calcineurin expression and IL-2 production. The NOC15 may have the potential of being developed into an anticancer agent in the future. PMID:26288134

  17. Raf kinase inhibitor protein (RKIP) inhibits the cell migration and invasion in human glioma cell lines in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lei, Xuhui; Chang, Liang; Ye, Wei; Jiang, Chuanlu; Zhang, Zhiren

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effects and the potential mechanisms of RKIP on cell migration, invasion and proliferation in human glioma cell lines in vitro. Methods: The RKIP over-expressing and RKIP knockdown human U87 glioma cells were used to reveal the effects of RKIP on human glioma cells migration, invasion and proliferation. After the recombinant plasmid pcDNA3.0-RKIP or RKIP-shRNA was transfected into the cell lines U87 by the means of liposome assay, the cells migration, invasion and proliferation were detected by wound healing, Transwell and MTT assay. Then, the levels of RKIP, MMP-3, MMP-9 and HMGA2 mRNA transcription were measured by means of RT-qPCR and levels of proteins expressions were determined using Western blot. Results: The results of MTT assay suggested that the PKIP have little inhibitive effects on glioma cells proliferation (P>0.05). The present paper showed that the migration distances in the group of RKIP-shRNA were markedly increased compared to the pcDNA3.0-RKIP and control. Similarly, the results showed that the numbers of invasion cells in RKIP-shRNA were remarkably increased than the pcDNA3.0-RKIP group and control group. Western blot and RT-qPCR suggested that over-expressions of RKIP lessened the MMP-2, MMP-9 and HMGA2 expression, however, turning down the RKIP expression showed the inverse effects. Conclusion: RKIP inhibits the cells migrations and invasions. Meanwhile, RKIP might inhibit the glioma cells through inhibiting MMPs and HMAG2 expression. Therefore, we demonstrated that RKIP is an underlying target for the treatment of glioma. PMID:26823735

  18. Protein kinase A activity at the endoplasmic reticulum surface is responsible for augmentation of human ether-a-go-go-related gene product (HERG).

    PubMed

    Sroubek, Jakub; McDonald, Thomas V

    2011-06-17

    Human ether-a-go-go-related gene product (HERG) is a cardiac potassium channel commonly implicated in the pathogenesis of the long QT syndrome, type 2 (LQT2). LQT2 mutations typically have incomplete penetrance and affect individuals at various stages of their lives; this may mirror variations in intracellular signaling and HERG regulation. Previous work showed that sustained protein kinase A (PKA) activity augments HERG protein abundance by a mechanism that includes enhanced protein translation. To investigate the subcellular site of this regulation, we generated site-specific probes to the cytoplasmic surface of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the presumed locale of channel synthesis. Real-time FRET-based indicators demonstrated both cAMP and PKA activity at the ER. A PKA inhibitor targeted to the ER surface (termed p4PKIg) completely abolished PKA-mediated augmentation of HERG in HEK293 cells as well as rat neonatal cardiomyocytes. Immunofluorescence co-localization, targeted FRET-based PKA biosensors, phospho-specific antibodies, and in vivo phosphorylation experiments confirmed that p4PKIg is preferentially active at the ER surface rather than the plasma membrane. Rerouting this inhibitor to the outer mitochondrial membrane diminishes its ability to block cAMP-dependent HERG induction. Our results support a model where PKA-dependent regulation of HERG synthesis occurs at the ER surface. Furthermore, reagents generated for this study provide novel experimental tools to probe compartmentalized cAMP/PKA signaling within cells. PMID:21536683

  19. Protein Kinase A Activity at the Endoplasmic Reticulum Surface Is Responsible for Augmentation of Human ether-a-go-go-related Gene Product (HERG)*

    PubMed Central

    Sroubek, Jakub; McDonald, Thomas V.

    2011-01-01

    Human ether-a-go-go-related gene product (HERG) is a cardiac potassium channel commonly implicated in the pathogenesis of the long QT syndrome, type 2 (LQT2). LQT2 mutations typically have incomplete penetrance and affect individuals at various stages of their lives; this may mirror variations in intracellular signaling and HERG regulation. Previous work showed that sustained protein kinase A (PKA) activity augments HERG protein abundance by a mechanism that includes enhanced protein translation. To investigate the subcellular site of this regulation, we generated site-specific probes to the cytoplasmic surface of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the presumed locale of channel synthesis. Real-time FRET-based indicators demonstrated both cAMP and PKA activity at the ER. A PKA inhibitor targeted to the ER surface (termed p4PKIg) completely abolished PKA-mediated augmentation of HERG in HEK293 cells as well as rat neonatal cardiomyocytes. Immunofluorescence co-localization, targeted FRET-based PKA biosensors, phospho-specific antibodies, and in vivo phosphorylation experiments confirmed that p4PKIg is preferentially active at the ER surface rather than the plasma membrane. Rerouting this inhibitor to the outer mitochondrial membrane diminishes its ability to block cAMP-dependent HERG induction. Our results support a model where PKA-dependent regulation of HERG synthesis occurs at the ER surface. Furthermore, reagents generated for this study provide novel experimental tools to probe compartmentalized cAMP/PKA signaling within cells. PMID:21536683

  20. Tumor necrosis factor alpha promotes the proliferation of human nucleus pulposus cells via nuclear factor-κB, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiao-Hu; Hong, Xin; Zhu, Lei; Wang, Yun-Tao; Bao, Jun-Ping; Liu, Lei; Wang, Feng

    2015-01-01

    Although tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is known to play a critical role in intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration, the effect of TNF-α on nucleus pulposus (NP) cells has not yet been elucidated. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of TNF-α on proliferation of human NP cells. NP cells were treated with different concentrations of TNF-α. Cell proliferation was determined by cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) analysis and Ki67 immunofluorescence staining, and expression of cyclin B1 was studied by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Cell cycle was measured by flow cytometry and cell apoptosis was analyzed using an Annexin V–fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) & propidium iodide (PI) apoptosis detection kit. To identify the mechanism by which TNF-α induced proliferation of NP cells, selective inhibitors of major signaling pathways were used and Western blotting was carried out. Treatment with TNF-α increased cell viability (as determined by CCK-8 analysis) and expression of cyclin B1 and the number of Ki67-positive and S-phase NP cells, indicating enhancement of proliferation. Consistent with this, NP cell apoptosis was suppressed by TNF-α treatment. Moreover, inhibition of NF-κB, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) blocked TNF-α-stimulated proliferation of NP cells. In conclusion, the current findings suggest that the effect of TNF-α on IVD degeneration involves promotion of the proliferation of human NP cells via the NF-κB, JNK, and p38 MAPK pathways. PMID:25304312

  1. Tumor necrosis factor alpha promotes the proliferation of human nucleus pulposus cells via nuclear factor-κB, c-Jun N-terminal kinase, and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Hu; Hong, Xin; Zhu, Lei; Wang, Yun-Tao; Bao, Jun-Ping; Liu, Lei; Wang, Feng; Wu, Xiao-Tao

    2015-04-01

    Although tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) is known to play a critical role in intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration, the effect of TNF-α on nucleus pulposus (NP) cells has not yet been elucidated. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of TNF-α on proliferation of human NP cells. NP cells were treated with different concentrations of TNF-α. Cell proliferation was determined by cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) analysis and Ki67 immunofluorescence staining, and expression of cyclin B1 was studied by quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Cell cycle was measured by flow cytometry and cell apoptosis was analyzed using an Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) & propidium iodide (PI) apoptosis detection kit. To identify the mechanism by which TNF-α induced proliferation of NP cells, selective inhibitors of major signaling pathways were used and Western blotting was carried out. Treatment with TNF-α increased cell viability (as determined by CCK-8 analysis) and expression of cyclin B1 and the number of Ki67-positive and S-phase NP cells, indicating enhancement of proliferation. Consistent with this, NP cell apoptosis was suppressed by TNF-α treatment. Moreover, inhibition of NF-κB, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) blocked TNF-α-stimulated proliferation of NP cells. In conclusion, the current findings suggest that the effect of TNF-α on IVD degeneration involves promotion of the proliferation of human NP cells via the NF-κB, JNK, and p38 MAPK pathways.

  2. Non-ATP competitive protein kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Garuti, L; Roberti, M; Bottegoni, G

    2010-01-01

    Protein kinases represent an attractive target in oncology drug discovery. Most of kinase inhibitors are ATP-competitive and are called type I inhibitors. The ATP-binding pocket is highly conserved among members of the kinase family and it is difficult to find selective agents. Moreover, the ATP-competitive inhibitors must compete with high intracellular ATP levels leading to a discrepancy between IC50s measured by biochemical versus cellular assays. The non-ATP competitive inhibitors, called type II and type III inhibitors, offer the possibility to overcome these problems. These inhibitors act by inducing a conformational shift in the target enzyme such that the kinase is no longer able to function. In the DFG-out form, the phenylalanine side chain moves to a new position. This movement creates a hydrophobic pocket available for occupation by the inhibitor. Some common features are present in these inhibitors. They contain a heterocyclic system that forms one or two hydrogen bonds with the kinase hinge residue. They also contain a hydrophobic moiety that occupies the pocket formed by the shift of phenylalanine from the DFG motif. Moreover, all the inhibitors bear a hydrogen bond donor-acceptor pair, usually urea or amide, that links the hinge-binding portion to the hydrophobic moiety and interacts with the allosteric site. Examples of non ATP-competitive inhibitors are available for various kinases. In this review small molecules capable of inducing the DFG-out conformation are reported, especially focusing on structural feature, SAR and biological properties.

  3. Role of protein kinase C in the TBT-induced inhibition of lytic function and MAPK activation in human natural killer cells

    PubMed Central

    Abraha, Abraham B.; Rana, Krupa; Whalen, Margaret M.

    2010-01-01

    Human natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes that destroy tumor and virally infected cells. Previous studies have shown that exposures of NK cells to tributyltin (TBT) greatly diminish their ability to destroy tumor cells (lytic function) while activating mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) (p44/42, p38, and JNK) in the NK cells. The signaling pathway that regulates NK lytic function appears to include activation of protein kinase C (PKC) as well as MAPK activity. The TBT-induced activation of MAPKs would trigger a portion of the NK lytic signaling pathway, which would then leave the NK cell unable to trigger this pathway in response to a subsequent encounter with a target cell. In the present study we evaluated the involvement of PKC in the inhibition of NK lysis of tumor cells and activation of MAPKs caused by TBT exposures. TBT caused a 2–3 fold activation of PKC at concentrations ranging from 50–300 nM (16–98 ng/mL), indicating that activation of PKC occurs in response to TBT exposures. This would then leave the NK cell unable to respond to targets. Treatment with the PKC inhibitor, bisindolylmaleimide I, caused an 85% decrease in the ability of NK cells to lyse tumor cells validating the involvement of PKC in the lytic signaling pathway. The role of PKC in the activation of MAPKs by TBT was also investigated using bisindolylmaleimide I. The results indicated that in NK cells where PKC activation was blocked there was no activation of the MAPK, p44/42 in response to TBT. However, TBT-induced activation of the MAPKs, p38 and JNK did not require PKC activation. These results indicate the pivotal role of PKC in the TBT-induced loss of NK lytic function including the activation of p44/42 by TBT in NK cells. PMID:20390410

  4. Calcium/Calmodulin-dependent Protein Kinase II is a Ubiquitous Molecule in Human Long-term Memory Synaptic Plasticity: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Ataei, Negar; Sabzghabaee, Ali Mohammad; Movahedian, Ahmad

    2015-01-01

    Background: Long-term memory is based on synaptic plasticity, a series of biochemical mechanisms include changes in structure and proteins of brain's neurons. In this article, we systematically reviewed the studies that indicate calcium/calmodulin kinase II (CaMKII) is a ubiquitous molecule among different enzymes involved in human long-term memory and the main downstream signaling pathway of long-term memory. Methods: All of the observational, case–control and review studies were considered and evaluated by the search engines PubMed, Cochrane Central Register of Controlled Trials and ScienceDirect Scopus between 1990 and February 2015. We did not carry out meta-analysis. Results: At the first search, it was fined 1015 articles which included “synaptic plasticity” OR “neuronal plasticity” OR “synaptic density” AND memory AND “molecular mechanism” AND “calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase II” OR CaMKII as the keywords. A total of 335 articles were duplicates in the databases and eliminated. A total of 680 title articles were evaluated. Finally, 40 articles were selected as reference. Conclusions: The studies have shown the most important intracellular signal of long-term memory is calcium-dependent signals. Calcium linked calmodulin can activate CaMKII. After receiving information for learning and memory, CaMKII is activated by Glutamate, the most important neurotransmitter for memory-related plasticity. Glutamate activates CaMKII and it plays some important roles in synaptic plasticity modification and long-term memory. PMID:26445635

  5. Ethanol Impairs Intestinal Barrier Function in Humans through Mitogen Activated Protein Kinase Signaling: A Combined In Vivo and In Vitro Approach

    PubMed Central

    Elamin, Elhaseen; Masclee, Ad; Troost, Freddy; Pieters, Harm-Jan; Keszthelyi, Daniel; Aleksa, Katarina; Dekker, Jan; Jonkers, Daisy

    2014-01-01

    Background Ethanol-induced gut barrier disruption is associated with several gastrointestinal and liver disorders. Aim Since human data on effects of moderate ethanol consumption on intestinal barrier integrity and involved mechanisms are limited, the objectives of this study were to investigate effects of a single moderate ethanol dose on small and large intestinal permeability and to explore the role of mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway as a primary signaling mechanism. Methods Intestinal permeability was assessed in 12 healthy volunteers after intraduodenal administration of either placebo or 20 g ethanol in a randomised cross-over trial. Localization of the tight junction (TJ) and gene expression, phosphorylation of the MAPK isoforms p38, ERK and JNK as indicative of activation were analyzed in duodenal biopsies. The role of MAPK was further examined in vitro using Caco-2 monolayers. Results Ethanol increased small and large intestinal permeability, paralleled by redistribution of ZO-1 and occludin, down-regulation of ZO-1 and up-regulation of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) mRNA expression, and increased MAPK isoforms phosphorylation. In Caco-2 monolayers, ethanol increased permeability, induced redistribution of the junctional proteins and F-actin, and MAPK and MLCK activation, as indicated by phosphorylation of MAPK isoforms and myosin light chain (MLC), respectively, which could be reversed by pretreatment with either MAPK inhibitors or the anti-oxidant L-cysteine. Conclusions Administration of moderate ethanol dosage can increase both small and colon permeability. Furthermore, the data indicate a pivotal role for MAPK and its crosstalk with MLCK in ethanol-induced intestinal barrier disruption. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT00928733 PMID:25226407

  6. Brief Report: Elastin Microfibril Interface 1 and Integrin-Linked Protein Kinase Are Novel Markers of Islet Regenerative Function in Human Multipotent Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    PubMed

    Lavoie, Jessie R; Creskey, Marybeth M; Muradia, Gauri; Bell, Gillian I; Sherman, Stephen E; Gao, Jun; Stewart, Duncan J; Cyr, Terry D; Hess, David A; Rosu-Myles, Michael

    2016-08-01

    Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) transplantation is proposed as a novel therapy for treating diabetes by promoting the regeneration of damaged islets. The clinical promise of such treatments may be hampered by a high degree of donor-related variability in MSC function and a lack of standards for comparing potency. Here, we set out to identify markers of cultured human MSCs directly associated with islet regenerative function. Stromal cultures from nine separate bone marrow donors were demonstrated to have differing capacities to reduce hyperglycemia in the NOD/SCID streptozotocin-induced diabetic model. Regenerative (R) and non-regenerative (NR) MSC cultures were directly compared using isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation (iTRAQ)-based quantitative proteomics. A total of 1,410 proteins were quantified resulting in the identification of 612 upregulated proteins and 275 downregulated proteins by ± 1.2-fold in R-MSC cultures. Elastin microfibril interface 1 (EMILIN-1), integrin-linked protein kinase (ILK), and hepatoma-derived growth factor (HDGF) were differentially expressed in R-MSCs, and Ingenuity Pathway Analyses revealed each candidate as known regulators of integrin signaling. Western blot validation of EMILIN-1, ILK, and HDGF not only showed significantly higher abundance levels in R-MSCs, as compared with NR-MSCs, but also correlated with passage-induced loss of islet-regenerative potential. Generalized estimating equation modeling was applied to examine the association between each marker and blood glucose reduction. Both EMILIN-1 and ILK were significantly associated with blood glucose lowering function in vivo. Our study is the first to identify EMILIN-1 and ILK as prospective markers of islet regenerative function in human MSCs. Stem Cells 2016;34:2249-2255. PMID:27090767

  7. Characterization of 5' end of human thromboxane receptor gene. Organizational analysis and mapping of protein kinase C--responsive elements regulating expression in platelets.

    PubMed

    D'Angelo, D D; Davis, M G; Houser, W A; Eubank, J J; Ritchie, M E; Dorn, G W

    1995-09-01

    Platelet thromboxane receptors are acutely and reversibly upregulated after acute myocardial infarction. To determine if platelet thromboxane receptors are under transcriptional control, we isolated and characterized human genomic DNA clones containing the 5' flanking region of the thromboxane receptor gene. The exon-intron structure of the 5' portion of the thromboxane receptor gene was determined initially by comparing the nucleotide sequence of the 5' flanking genomic clone with that of a novel human uterine thromboxane receptor cDNA that extended the mRNA 141 bp further upstream than the previously identified human placental cDNA. A major transcription initiation site was located in three human tissues approximately 560 bp upstream from the translation initiation codon and 380 bp upstream from any previously identified transcription initiation site. The thromboxane receptor gene has neither a TATA nor a CAAT consensus site. Promoter function of the 5' flanking region of the thromboxane receptor gene was evaluated by transfection of thromboxane receptor gene promoter/chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) chimera plasmids into platelet-like K562 cells. Thromboxane receptor promoter activity, as assessed by CAT expression, was relatively weak but was significantly enhanced by phorbol ester treatment. Functional analysis of 5' deletion constructs in transfected K562 cells and gel mobility shift localized the major phorbol ester-responsive motifs in the thromboxane receptor gene promoter to a cluster of activator protein-2 (AP-2) binding consensus sites located approximately 1.8 kb 5' from the transcription initiation site. These studies are the first to determine the structure and organization of the 5' end of the thromboxane receptor gene and demonstrate that thromboxane receptor gene expression can be regulated by activation of protein kinase C via induction of an AP-2-like nuclear factor binding to upstream promoter elements. These findings strongly suggest

  8. Mycobacterium tuberculosis Serine/Threonine Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    PRISIC, SLADJANA; HUSSON, ROBERT N.

    2014-01-01

    The Mycobacterium tuberculosis genome encodes 11 serine/threonine protein kinases (STPKs). A similar number of two-component systems are also present, indicating that these two signal transduction mechanisms are both important in the adaptation of this bacterial pathogen to its environment. The M. tuberculosis phosphoproteome includes hundreds of Ser- and Thr-phosphorylated proteins that participate in all aspects of M. tuberculosis biology, supporting a critical role for the STPKs in regulating M. tuberculosis physiology. Nine of the STPKs are receptor type kinases, with an extracytoplasmic sensor domain and an intracellular kinase domain, indicating that these kinases transduce external signals. Two other STPKs are cytoplasmic and have regulatory domains that sense changes within the cell. Structural analysis of some of the STPKs has led to advances in our understanding of the mechanisms by which these STPKs are activated and regulated. Functional analysis has provided insights into the effects of phosphorylation on the activity of several proteins, but for most phosphoproteins the role of phosphorylation in regulating function is unknown. Major future challenges include characterizing the functional effects of phosphorylation for this large number of phosphoproteins, identifying the cognate STPKs for these phosphoproteins, and determining the signals that the STPKs sense. Ultimately, combining these STPK-regulated processes into larger, integrated regulatory networks will provide deeper insight into M. tuberculosis adaptive mechanisms that contribute to tuberculosis pathogenesis. Finally, the STPKs offer attractive targets for inhibitor development that may lead to new therapies for drug-susceptible and drug-resistant tuberculosis. PMID:25429354

  9. Protein Kinase C δ: a Gatekeeper of Immune Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Salzer, Elisabeth; Santos-Valente, Elisangela; Keller, Bärbel; Warnatz, Klaus; Boztug, Kaan

    2016-10-01

    Human autoimmune disorders present in various forms and are associated with a life-long burden of high morbidity and mortality. Many different circumstances lead to the loss of immune tolerance and often the origin is suspected to be multifactorial. Recently, patients with autosomal recessive mutations in PRKCD encoding protein kinase c delta (PKCδ) have been identified, representing a monogenic prototype for one of the most prominent forms of humoral systemic autoimmune diseases, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). PKCδ is a signaling kinase with multiple downstream target proteins and with functions in various signaling pathways. Interestingly, mouse models have indicated a special role of the ubiquitously expressed protein in the control of B-cell tolerance revealed by the severe autoimmunity in Prkcd (-/-) knockout mice as the major phenotype. As such, the study of PKCδ deficiency in humans has tremendous potential in enhancing our knowledge on the mechanisms of B-cell tolerance. PMID:27541826

  10. Protein Kinase C δ: a Gatekeeper of Immune Homeostasis.

    PubMed

    Salzer, Elisabeth; Santos-Valente, Elisangela; Keller, Bärbel; Warnatz, Klaus; Boztug, Kaan

    2016-10-01

    Human autoimmune disorders present in various forms and are associated with a life-long burden of high morbidity and mortality. Many different circumstances lead to the loss of immune tolerance and often the origin is suspected to be multifactorial. Recently, patients with autosomal recessive mutations in PRKCD encoding protein kinase c delta (PKCδ) have been identified, representing a monogenic prototype for one of the most prominent forms of humoral systemic autoimmune diseases, systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). PKCδ is a signaling kinase with multiple downstream target proteins and with functions in various signaling pathways. Interestingly, mouse models have indicated a special role of the ubiquitously expressed protein in the control of B-cell tolerance revealed by the severe autoimmunity in Prkcd (-/-) knockout mice as the major phenotype. As such, the study of PKCδ deficiency in humans has tremendous potential in enhancing our knowledge on the mechanisms of B-cell tolerance.

  11. Protein kinase C controls activation of the DNA integrity checkpoint

    PubMed Central

    Soriano-Carot, María; Quilis, Inma; Bañó, M. Carmen; Igual, J. Carlos

    2014-01-01

    The protein kinase C (PKC) superfamily plays key regulatory roles in numerous cellular processes. Saccharomyces cerevisiae contains a single PKC, Pkc1, whose main function is cell wall integrity maintenance. In this work, we connect the Pkc1 protein to the maintenance of genome integrity in response to genotoxic stresses. Pkc1 and its kinase activity are necessary for the phosphorylation of checkpoint kinase Rad53, histone H2A and Xrs2 protein after deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) damage, indicating that Pkc1 is required for activation of checkpoint kinases Mec1 and Tel1. Furthermore, Pkc1 electrophoretic mobility is delayed after inducing DNA damage, which reflects that Pkc1 is post-translationally modified. This modification is a phosphorylation event mediated by Tel1. The expression of different mammalian PKC isoforms at the endogenous level in yeast pkc1 mutant cells revealed that PKCδ is able to activate the DNA integrity checkpoint. Finally, downregulation of PKCδ activity in HeLa cells caused a defective activation of checkpoint kinase Chk2 when DNA damage was induced. Our results indicate that the control of the DNA integrity checkpoint by PKC is a mechanism conserved from yeast to humans. PMID:24792164

  12. SUMOylation regulates the SNF1 protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Simpson-Lavy, Kobi J; Johnston, Mark

    2013-10-22

    The AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a major stress sensor of mammalian cells. AMPK's homolog in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the SNF1 protein kinase, is a central regulator of carbon metabolism that inhibits the Snf3/Rgt2-Rgt1 glucose sensing pathway and activates genes involved in respiration. We present evidence that glucose induces modification of the Snf1 catalytic subunt of SNF1 with the small ubiquitin-like modifier protein SUMO, catalyzed by the SUMO (E3) ligase Mms21. Our results suggest that SUMOylation of Snf1 inhibits its function in two ways: by interaction of SUMO attached to lysine 549 with a SUMO-interacting sequence motif located near the active site of Snf1, and by targeting Snf1 for destruction via the Slx5-Slx8 (SUMO-directed) ubiquitin ligase. These findings reveal another way SNF1 function is regulated in response to carbon source.

  13. Factors influencing the inhibition of protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Brockhoff, Marielle; Hau, Jean-Christophe; Fontana, Patrizia; Zimmermann, Catherine; Pover, Alain De; Erdmann, Dirk; Chène, Patrick

    2012-04-01

    The protein kinase field is a very active research area in the pharmaceutical industry and many activities are ongoing to identify inhibitors of these proteins. The design of new chemical entities with improved pharmacological properties requires a deeper understanding of the factors that modulate inhibitor-kinase interactions. In this report, we studied the effect of two of these factors--the magnesium ion cofactor and the protein substrate--on inhibitors of the type I insulin-like growth factor receptor. Our results show that the concentration of magnesium ion influences the potency of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) competitive inhibitors, suggesting an explanation for the observation that such compounds retain their nanomolar potency in cells despite the presence of millimolar levels of ATP. We also showed that the peptidic substrate affects the potency of these inhibitors in a different manner, suggesting that the influence of this substrate on compound potency should be taken into consideration during drug discovery.

  14. Immunological evidence for two physiological forms of protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Woodgett, J R; Hunter, T

    1987-01-01

    Our recently described purification scheme for rat brain protein kinase C yields an enzyme consisting of a 78/80-kilodalton (kDa) doublet upon sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (submitted for publication). Antisera against this preparation were raised in two rabbits. One of the antisera detected only the 80-kDa component by immunoblotting of purified protein kinase C and immunoprecipitated an 80-kDa [35S]methionine-labeled protein from a variety of human, rodent, and bovine cells, which was shown to represent protein kinase C by comparative one-dimensional peptide mapping. In contrast, the second antiserum detected both 78- and 80-kDa enzyme forms by immunoblotting and immunoprecipitated a [35S]methionine-labeled 78/80-kDa doublet from mammalian cells. One-dimensional peptide maps of these 78- and 80-kDa proteins were similar to those derived from the 78- and 80-kDa forms of purified protein kinase C, respectively. The two forms were not related by either partial proteolysis or differential phosphorylation, showing that two distinct forms of this enzyme exist in mammalian cells. Treatment of mouse B82 L cells with 2.5 micrograms of 12-O-tetradecanoylphorbol-13-acetate (TPA) per ml for 18 h resulted in complete loss of immunoprecipitable protein kinase C with a half time of disappearance of 48 min. Since the normal half-life of protein kinase C was greater than 24 h and the biosynthetic rate of the protein was not decreased after 18 h by TPA treatment, TPA induces down-regulation by increasing the degradation rate of the enzyme. Treatment of cells with 50 ng of TPA per ml followed by resolution of the membrane and cytosol in the presence of ethylene glycol-bis(beta-aminoethyl ether)N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid (EGTA) promoted an apparent translocation of both 78- and 80-kDa proteins from the cytosol to the membrane fraction. A similar translocation was effected by cell lysis in the presence of Ca2+, indicating the subcellular localization of

  15. Berberine Induced Apoptosis of Human Osteosarcoma Cells by Inhibiting Phosphoinositide 3 Kinase/Protein Kinase B (PI3K/Akt) Signal Pathway Activation

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Background: Osteosarcoma is a malignant tumor with high mortality but effective therapy has not yet been developed. Berberine, an isoquinoline alkaloid component in several Chinese herbs including Huanglian, has been shown to induce growth inhibition and the apoptosis of certain cancer cells. The aim of this study was to determine the role of berberine on human osteosarcoma cell lines U2OS and its potential mechanism. Methods: The proliferation effect of U20S was exanimed by 3-(4,5)-dimethylthiahiazo(-z-y1)-3,5-di- phenytetrazoliumromide (MTT) and the percentage of apoptotic cells were determined by flow cytometric analysis. The expression of PI3K, p-Akt, Bax, Bcl-2, cleavage-PARP and Caspase3 were detected by Western blott. Results: Berberine treatment caused dose-dependent inhibiting proliferation and inducing apoptosis of U20S cell. Mechanistically, berberine inhibits PI3K/AKT activation that, in turn, results in up-regulating the expression of Bax, and PARP and down-regulating the expression of Bcl-2 and caspase3. In all, berberine can suppress the proliferation and induce the apoptosis of U2OS cell through inhibiting the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway activation. Conclusion: Berberine can suppress the proliferation and induce the apoptosis of U2OS cell through inhibiting the PI3K/Akt signaling pathway activation. PMID:27398330

  16. Intrinsic resistance to selumetinib, a selective inhibitor of MEK1/2, by cAMP-dependent protein kinase A activation in human lung and colorectal cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Troiani, T; Vecchione, L; Martinelli, E; Capasso, A; Costantino, S; Ciuffreda, L P; Morgillo, F; Vitagliano, D; D'Aiuto, E; De Palma, R; Tejpar, S; Van Cutsem, E; De Lorenzi, M; Caraglia, M; Berrino, L; Ciardiello, F

    2012-01-01

    Background: MEK is activated in ∼40% colorectal cancer (CRC) and 20–30% non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Selumetinib is a selective inhibitor of MEK1/2, which is currently in clinical development. Methods: We evaluated the effects of selumetinib in vitro and in vivo in CRC and NSCLC cell lines to identify cancer cell characteristics correlating with sensitivity to MEK inhibition. Results: Five NSCLC and six CRC cell lines were treated with selumetinib and classified according to the median inhibitory concentration (IC50) values as sensitive (⩽1 μℳ) or resistant (>1 μℳ). In selumetinib-sensitive cancer cell lines, selumetinib treatment induced G1 cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis and suppression of tumour growth as xenografts in immunodeficient mice. Evaluation of intracellular effector proteins and analysis of gene mutations showed no correlation with selumetinib sensitivity. Microarray gene expression profiles revealed that the activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A (PKA) was associated with MEK inhibitor resistance. Combined targeting of both MEK and PKA resulted in cancer cell growth inhibition of MEK inhibitor-resistant cancer cell lines in vitro and in vivo. Conclusion: This study provides molecular insights to explain resistance to an MEK inhibitor in human cancer cell lines. PMID:22569000

  17. Loss of protein kinase C delta from human HaCaT keratinocytes upon ras transfection is mediated by TGF alpha.

    PubMed

    Geiges, D; Marks, F; Gschwendt, M

    1995-07-01

    The spontaneously immortalized human skin keratinocytes HaCaT contain protein kinase C (PKC) alpha, -delta, -epsilon, and -zeta. All PKC isoenzymes except PKC zeta are down-regulated by TPA as well as by bryostatin. However, with PKC delta, bryostatin but not TPA was found to be much less effective at high concentrations than at low ones. PKC delta expression at the protein and mRNA level is significantly suppressed in HaCaT cells I-7 and II-4, which are transfected with mutated c-Ha-ras. The expression of the other isoenzymes remains essentially unchanged in the ras-transfected cells compared to normal ones. PKC delta is lost when growing HaCaT cells in a medium obtained from the cultivation of ras-transfected cells ("ras-conditioned" medium). The factor secreted into the medium by the ras-transfected cells that is responsible for this effect appears to be TGF alpha, since the action of ras-conditioned medium on PKC delta expression can be overcome by the addition of an anti-TGF alpha antibody. Moreover, treatment of HaCaT cells with TGF alpha suppresses selectively the expression of the PKC isoenzyme delta.

  18. Role of Human DNA Glycosylase Nei-like 2 (NEIL2) and Single Strand Break Repair Protein Polynucleotide Kinase 3′-Phosphatase in Maintenance of Mitochondrial Genome*

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Santi M.; Hegde, Muralidhar L.; Chatterjee, Arpita; Hegde, Pavana M.; Szczesny, Bartosz; Banerjee, Dibyendu; Boldogh, Istvan; Gao, Rui; Falkenberg, Maria; Gustafsson, Claes M.; Sarkar, Partha S.; Hazra, Tapas K.

    2012-01-01

    The repair of reactive oxygen species-induced base lesions and single strand breaks (SSBs) in the nuclear genome via the base excision (BER) and SSB repair (SSBR) pathways, respectively, is well characterize, and important for maintaining genomic integrity. However, the role of mitochondrial (mt) BER and SSBR proteins in mt genome maintenance is not completely clear. Here we show the presence of the oxidized base-specific DNA glycosylase Nei-like 2 (NEIL2) and the DNA end-processing enzyme polynucleotide kinase 3′-phosphatase (PNKP) in purified human mitochondrial extracts (MEs). Confocal microscopy revealed co-localization of PNKP and NEIL2 with the mitochondrion-specific protein cytochrome c oxidase subunit 2 (MT-CO2). Further, chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis showed association of NEIL2 and PNKP with the mitochondrial genes MT-CO2 and MT-CO3 (cytochrome c oxidase subunit 3); importantly, both enzymes also associated with the mitochondrion-specific DNA polymerase γ. In cell association of NEIL2 and PNKP with polymerase γ was further confirmed by proximity ligation assays. PNKP-depleted ME showed a significant decrease in both BER and SSBR activities, and PNKP was found to be the major 3′-phosphatase in human ME. Furthermore, individual depletion of NEIL2 and PNKP in human HEK293 cells caused increased levels of oxidized bases and SSBs in the mt genome, respectively. Taken together, these studies demonstrate the critical role of NEIL2 and PNKP in maintenance of the mammalian mitochondrial genome. PMID:22130663

  19. Prokaryotic expression cloning of a novel human tyrosine kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Beeler, J.F.; LaRochelle, W.J.; Chedid, M.

    1994-02-01

    Screening of a human embryonic lung fibroblast cDNA expression library with antiphosphotyrosine antibodies led to isolation of a novel protein kinase. A clone, designated A6, contained a 3-kb cDNA insert with a predicted open reading frame of 350 amino acids. DNA sequence analysis failed to reveal any detectable similarity with previously known genes, and the predicted A6 protein lacked any of the motifs commonly conserved in the catalytic domains of protein kinases. However, the bacterially expressed {beta}-galactosidase-A6 fusion protein demonstrated both tyrosine and serine phosphorylation in an in vitro kinase assay and phosphorylated exogenous substrates including myelin basic protein specifically on tyrosine residues. The enzyme also displayed biochemical properties analogous to those of other protein tyrosine kinases. The A6 gene was found to be expressed widely at the transcript level in normal tissues and was evolutionarily conserved. Thus, A6 represents a novel tyrosine kinase which is highly divergent from previously described members of this important class of regulatory molecules. 29 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab.

  20. Protein Kinase D family kinases: roads start to segregate.

    PubMed

    Wille, Christoph; Seufferlein, Thomas; Eiseler, Tim

    2014-01-01

    Highly invasive pancreatic tumors are often recognized in late stages due to a lack of clear symptoms and pose major challenges for treatment and disease management. Broad-band Protein Kinase D (PKD) inhibitors have recently been proposed as additional treatment option for this disease. PKDs are implicated in the control of cancer cell motility, angiogenesis, proliferation and metastasis. In particular, PKD2 expression is elevated in pancreatic cancer, whereas PKD1 expression is comparably lower. In our recent study we report that both kinases control PDAC cell invasive properties in an isoform-specific, but opposing manner. PKD1 selectively mediates anti-migratory/anti-invasive features by preferential regulation of the actin-regulatory Cofilin-phosphatase Slingshot1L (SSH1L). PKD2, on the other hand enhances invasion and angiogenesis of PDAC cells in 3D-ECM cultures and chorioallantois tumor models by stimulating expression and secretion of matrix-metalloproteinase 7 and 9 (MMP7/9). MMP9 also enhances PKD2-mediated tumor angiogenesis releasing extracellular matrix-bound VEGF-A. We thus suggest high PKD2 expression and loss of PKD1 may be beneficial for tumor cells to enhance their matrix-invading abilities. In our recent study we demonstrate for the first time PKD1 and 2 isoform-selective effects on pancreatic cancer cell invasion, in-vitro and in-vivo, defining isoform-specific regulation of PKDs as a major future issue. PMID:24847910

  1. Crystal Structure of the Protein Kinase Domain of Yeast AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Snf1

    SciTech Connect

    Rudolph,M.; Amodeo, G.; Bai, Y.; Tong, L.

    2005-01-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a master metabolic regulator, and is an important target for drug development against diabetes, obesity, and other diseases. AMPK is a hetero-trimeric enzyme, with a catalytic ({alpha}) subunit, and two regulatory ({beta} and {gamma}) subunits. Here we report the crystal structure at 2.2 Angstrom resolution of the protein kinase domain (KD) of the catalytic subunit of yeast AMPK (commonly known as SNF1). The Snf1-KD structure shares strong similarity to other protein kinases, with a small N-terminal lobe and a large C-terminal lobe. Two negative surface patches in the structure may be important for the recognition of the substrates of this kinase.

  2. Involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinases and NF{kappa}B in LPS-induced CD40 expression on human monocytic cells

    SciTech Connect

    Wu Weidong | Alexis, Neil E. |; Chen Xian |; Bromberg, Philip A. |; Peden, David B. ||

    2008-04-15

    CD40 is a costimulatory molecule linking innate and adaptive immune responses to bacterial stimuli, as well as a critical regulator of functions of other costimulatory molecules. The mechanisms regulating lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced CD40 expression have not been adequately characterized in human monocytic cells. In this study we used a human monocytic cell line, THP-1, to investigate the possible mechanisms of CD40 expression following LPS exposure. Exposure to LPS resulted in a dose- and time-dependent increase in CD40 expression. Further studies using immunoblotting and pharmacological inhibitors revealed that mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and NF{kappa}B were activated by LPS exposure and involved in LPS-induced CD40 expression. Activation of MAPKs was not responsible for LPS-induced NF{kappa}B activation. TLR4 was expressed on THP-1 cells and pretreatment of cells with a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) neutralizing antibody (HTA125) significantly blunted LPS-induced MAPK and NF{kappa}B activation and ensuing CD40 expression. Additional studies with murine macrophages expressing wild type and mutated TLR4 showed that TLR4 was implicated in LPS-induced ERK and NF{kappa}B activation, and CD40 expression. Moreover, blockage of MAPK and NF{kappa}B activation inhibited LPS-induced TLR4 expression. In summary, LPS-induced CD40 expression in monocytic cells involves MAPKs and NF{kappa}B.

  3. Involvement of mitogen-activated protein kinases and NFkappaB in LPS-induced CD40 expression on human monocytic cells.

    PubMed

    Wu, Weidong; Alexis, Neil E; Chen, Xian; Bromberg, Philip A; Peden, David B

    2008-04-15

    CD40 is a costimulatory molecule linking innate and adaptive immune responses to bacterial stimuli, as well as a critical regulator of functions of other costimulatory molecules. The mechanisms regulating lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-induced CD40 expression have not been adequately characterized in human monocytic cells. In this study we used a human monocytic cell line, THP-1, to investigate the possible mechanisms of CD40 expression following LPS exposure. Exposure to LPS resulted in a dose- and time-dependent increase in CD40 expression. Further studies using immunoblotting and pharmacological inhibitors revealed that mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and NFkappaB were activated by LPS exposure and involved in LPS-induced CD40 expression. Activation of MAPKs was not responsible for LPS-induced NFkappaB activation. TLR4 was expressed on THP-1 cells and pretreatment of cells with a Toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4) neutralizing antibody (HTA125) significantly blunted LPS-induced MAPK and NFkappaB activation and ensuing CD40 expression. Additional studies with murine macrophages expressing wild type and mutated TLR4 showed that TLR4 was implicated in LPS-induced ERK and NFkappaB activation, and CD40 expression. Moreover, blockage of MAPK and NFkappaB activation inhibited LPS-induced TLR4 expression. In summary, LPS-induced CD40 expression in monocytic cells involves MAPKs and NFkappaB.

  4. Induction of cAMP-dependent protein kinase A activity in human skin fibroblasts and rat osteoblasts by extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields.

    PubMed

    Thumm, S; Löschinger, M; Glock, S; Hämmerle, H; Rodemann, H P

    1999-09-01

    Sinusoidal extremely low-frequency electromagnetic fields (ELF-EMF; 7-8 mT, 20 Hz) have already been shown to inhibit proliferation and to accelerate terminal differentiation of human skin fibroblasts in vitro. In order to elucidate the underlying processes of signal transduction, we analysed the activity of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA). EMF exposure for 60 min resulted in an increased PKA activity in human skin fibroblasts (2-fold) and rat embryonic osteoblasts (1.7-fold). Long-term exposure for up to 7 days with a constant 1 h-on/1 h-off EMF exposure rhythm indicated a transient stimulation of PKA activity during the first two exposure rhythms followed by a decrease to the baseline levels of sham-exposed controls. Based on these results, we postulate that a modulation of proliferation and differentiation processes in cells of mesenchymal origin is triggered by an immediate and transient EMF-induced increase in PKA activity. PMID:10525956

  5. Synthesis and biological evaluation of 2,6-di(furan-3-yl)anthracene-9, 10-dione as an inhibitor of human protein kinase CK2.

    PubMed

    Haidar, S; Meyers, A; Bollacke, A; Jose, J

    2015-12-01

    Protein kinase CK2 is an emerging target for the therapeutic intervention in human diseases, in particular in cancer. Inhibitors of this enzyme are at current in clinical trials indicating its drug ability. Here we report on the synthesis of two derivatives of 2,6-diaryl-anthracene-9,10-dione, one of them, 2,6-di(furan-3-yl)anthracene-9,10-dione (3), turned out to be active towards CK2, and ATP competitive with an IC50 value of 2.35 μM and a K(i) value of 1.26 μM. Molecular modeling studies were performed to explain the binding affinity of compound 3 in comparison to emodin. These indicated that unlike emodin, compound 3 was not able to perform a hydrogen bond with Lys68, although the compound fits well in the active site of human CK2α, which explains the difference in the measured affinity between those two compounds.

  6. Identification of four plastid-localized protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Richter, Andreas S; Gartmann, Hans; Fechler, Mona; Rödiger, Anja; Baginsky, Sacha; Grimm, Bernhard

    2016-06-01

    In chloroplasts, protein phosphorylation regulates important processes, including metabolism, photosynthesis, gene expression, and signaling. Because the hitherto known plastid protein kinases represent only a fraction of existing kinases, we aimed at the identification of novel plastid-localized protein kinases that potentially phosphorylate enzymes of the tetrapyrrole biosynthesis (TBS) pathway. We screened publicly available databases for proteins annotated as putative protein kinase family proteins with predicted chloroplast localization. Additionally, we analyzed chloroplast fractions which were separated by sucrose density gradient centrifugation by mass spectrometry. We identified four new candidates for protein kinases, which were confirmed to be plastid localized by expression of GFP-fusion proteins in tobacco leaves. A phosphorylation assay with the purified kinases confirmed the protein kinase activity for two of them. PMID:27214872

  7. Effects of fucoidan on proliferation, AMP-activated protein kinase, and downstream metabolism- and cell cycle-associated molecules in poorly differentiated human hepatoma HLF cells.

    PubMed

    Kawaguchi, Takumi; Hayakawa, Masako; Koga, Hironori; Torimura, Takuji

    2015-05-01

    Survival rates are low in patients with poorly differentiated hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC). Fucoidan, a sulfated polysaccharide derived from brown seaweed, has anticancer activity; however, the effects of fucoidan on poorly differentiated HCC remain unclear. In this study, we investigated the effects of fucoidan on AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK), a proliferation regulator, and its downstream metabolism- and cell cycle-related molecules in a poorly differentiated human hepatoma HLF cell line. HLF cells were treated with fucoidan (10, 50, or 100 µg/ml; n=4) or phosphate buffered saline (control; n=4) for 96 h. Proliferation was evaluated by counting cells every 24 h. AMPK, TSC2, mTOR, GSK3β, acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), ATP-citrate lyase, p53, cyclin D1, cyclin-dependent kinase (CDK) 4, and CDK6 expression and/or phosphorylation were examined by immunoblotting 24 h after treatment with 100 µg/ml fucoidan. Cell cycle progression was analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell sorter 48 h after treatment. Treatment with 50 or 100 µg/ml fucoidan significantly and dose- and time-dependently suppressed HLF cell proliferation (P<0.0001). Fucoidan induced AMPK phosphorylation on Ser172 24 h after treatment. Although no differences were seen in expression and phosphorylation levels of TSC2, mTOR, GSK3β, ATP-citrate lyase, and p53 between the control and fucoidan-treated HLF cells, fucoidan induced ACC phosphorylation on Ser79. Moreover, fucoidan decreased cyclin D1, CDK4 and CDK6 expression 24 h after treatment. Furthermore, HLF cells were arrested in the G1/S phase 48 h after fucoidan treatment. We demonstrated that fucoidan suppressed HLF cell proliferation with AMPK phosphorylation. We showed that fucoidan phosphorylated ACC and downregulated cyclin D1, CDK4 and CDK6 expression. Our findings suggest that fucoidan inhibits proliferation through AMPK-associated suppression of fatty acid synthesis and G1/S transition in HLF cells.

  8. 3pK, a new mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase located in the small cell lung cancer tumor suppressor gene region.

    PubMed Central

    Sithanandam, G; Latif, F; Duh, F M; Bernal, R; Smola, U; Li, H; Kuzmin, I; Wixler, V; Geil, L; Shrestha, S

    1996-01-01

    NotI linking clones, localized to the human chromosome 3p21.3 region and homozygously deleted in small cell lung cancer cell lines NCI-H740 and NCI-H1450, were used to search for a putative tumor suppressor gene(s). One of these clones, NL1G210, detected a 2.5-kb mRNA in all examined human tissues, expression being especially high in the heart and skeletal muscle. Two overlapping cDNA clones containing the entire open reading frame were isolated from a human heart cDNA library and fully characterized. Computer analysis and a search of the GenBank database to reveal high sequence identity of the product of this gene to serine-threonine kinases, especially to mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2, a recently described substrate of mitogen-activated kinases. Sequence identitiy was 72% at the nucleotide level and 75% at the amino acid level, strongly suggesting that this protein is a serine-threonine kinase. Here we demonstrate that the new gene, referred to as 3pK (for chromosome 3p kinase), in fact encodes a mitogen-activated protein kinase-regulated protein serine-threonine kinase with a novel substrate specificity. PMID:8622688

  9. Effects of prodigiosin family compounds from Pseudoalteromonas sp. 1020R on the activities of protein phosphatases and protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Soliev, Azamjon B; Hosokawa, Kakushi; Enomoto, Keiichi

    2015-01-01

    Pseudoalteromonas sp. strain 1020R produces prodigiosin and its closely related congeners, which differ in the length of their alkyl side chains. These red-pigmented compounds were found to exhibit cytotoxicity against human leukemia cell lines. The compounds also showed dose-dependent inhibitory effects on protein phosphatase 2A and protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B (PTP1B), while remaining relatively inactive against protein kinases, including protein tyrosine kinase, Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase and protein kinases A and C. Comparative studies of the individual pigmented compounds on PTP1B inhibition showed that as the chain length of the alkyl group at the C-3 position of the compound increased, the inhibitory effect on PTP1B decreased. These results suggest that protein phosphatases but not protein kinases might be involved in the cytotoxicity of the prodigiosin family of compounds against malignant cells.

  10. Effect of Protein Kinase C delta (PKC-δ) Inhibition on the Transcriptome of Normal and Systemic Sclerosis Human Dermal Fibroblasts In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Wermuth, Peter J.; Addya, Sankar; Jimenez, Sergio A.

    2011-01-01

    Previous studies demonstrated that protein kinase C- δ (PKC-δ) inhibition with the selective inhibitor, rottlerin, resulted in potent downregulation of type I collagen expression and production in normal human dermal fibroblasts and abrogated the exaggerated type I collagen production and expression in fibroblasts cultured from affected skin from patients with the fibrosing disorder systemic sclerosis (SSc). To elucidate the mechanisms involved in the ability of PKC-δ to regulate collagen production in fibroblasts, we examined the effects of PKC-δ inhibition on the transcriptome of normal and SSc human dermal fibroblasts. Normal and SSc human dermal fibroblasts were incubated with rottlerin (5 µM), and their gene expression was analyzed by microarrays. Pathway analysis and gene ontology analysis of differentially expressed genes in each comparison were performed. Identification of significantly overrepresented transcriptional regulatory elements (TREs) was performed using the Promoter Analysis and Interaction Network Toolset (PAINT) program. PKC-δ activity was also inhibited using RNA interference (siRNA) and by treating fibroblasts with a specific PKC-δ inhibitory cell permeable peptide. Differential gene expression of 20 genes was confirmed using real time PCR. PKC-δ inhibition caused a profound change in the transcriptome of normal and SSc human dermal fibroblasts in vitro. Pathway and gene ontology analysis identified multiple cellular and organismal pathways affected by PKC-δ inhibition. Furthermore, both pathway and PAINT analyses indicated that the transcription factor NFκB played an important role in the transcriptome changes induced by PKC-δ inhibition. Multiple genes involved in the degradation of the extracellular matrix components were significantly reduced in SSc fibroblasts and their expression was increased by PKC-δ inhibition. These results indicate that isoform-specific inhibition of PKC-δ profibrotic effects may represent a novel

  11. Targeting Human Central Nervous System Protein Kinases: An Isoform Selective p38αMAPK Inhibitor That Attenuates Disease Progression in Alzheimer’s Disease Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    The first kinase inhibitor drug approval in 2001 initiated a remarkable decade of tyrosine kinase inhibitor drugs for oncology indications, but a void exists for serine/threonine protein kinase inhibitor drugs and central nervous system indications. Stress kinases are of special interest in neurological and neuropsychiatric disorders due to their involvement in synaptic dysfunction and complex disease susceptibility. Clinical and preclinical evidence implicates the stress related kinase p38αMAPK as a potential neurotherapeutic target, but isoform selective p38αMAPK inhibitor candidates are lacking and the mixed kinase inhibitor drugs that are promising in peripheral tissue disease indications have limitations for neurologic indications. Therefore, pursuit of the neurotherapeutic hypothesis requires kinase isoform selective inhibitors with appropriate neuropharmacology features. Synaptic dysfunction disorders offer a potential for enhanced pharmacological efficacy due to stress-induced activation of p38αMAPK in both neurons and glia, the interacting cellular components of the synaptic pathophysiological axis, to be modulated. We report a novel isoform selective p38αMAPK inhibitor, MW01-18-150SRM (=MW150), that is efficacious in suppression of hippocampal-dependent associative and spatial memory deficits in two distinct synaptic dysfunction mouse models. A synthetic scheme for biocompatible product and positive outcomes from pharmacological screens are presented. The high-resolution crystallographic structure of the p38αMAPK/MW150 complex documents active site binding, reveals a potential low energy conformation of the bound inhibitor, and suggests a structural explanation for MW150’s exquisite target selectivity. As far as we are aware, MW150 is without precedent as an isoform selective p38MAPK inhibitor or as a kinase inhibitor capable of modulating in vivo stress related behavior. PMID:25676389

  12. Pyrrolopyridine inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK-2).

    PubMed

    Anderson, David R; Meyers, Marvin J; Vernier, William F; Mahoney, Matthew W; Kurumbail, Ravi G; Caspers, Nicole; Poda, Gennadiy I; Schindler, John F; Reitz, David B; Mourey, Robert J

    2007-05-31

    A new class of potent kinase inhibitors selective for mitogen-activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MAPKAP-K2 or MK-2) for the treatment of rheumatoid arthritis has been prepared and evaluated. These inhibitors have IC50 values as low as 10 nM against the target and have good selectivity profiles against a number of kinases including CDK2, ERK, JNK, and p38. These MK-2 inhibitors have been shown to suppress TNFalpha production in U397 cells and to be efficacious in an acute inflammation model. The structure-activity relationships of this series, the selectivity for MK-2 and their activity in both in vitro and in vivo models are discussed. The observed selectivity is discussed with the aid of an MK-2/inhibitor crystal structure.

  13. Regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinases by a calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase cascade.

    PubMed Central

    Enslen, H; Tokumitsu, H; Stork, P J; Davis, R J; Soderling, T R

    1996-01-01

    Membrane depolarization of NG108 cells gives rapid (< 5 min) activation of Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent protein kinase IV (CaM-KIV), as well as activation of c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK). To investigate whether the Ca2+-dependent activation of mitogen-activated protein kinases (ERK, JNK, and p38) might be mediated by the CaM kinase cascade, we have transfected PC12 cells, which lack CaM-KIV, with constitutively active mutants of CaM kinase kinase and/or CaM-KIV (CaM-KKc and CaM-KIVc, respectively). In the absence of depolarization, CaM-KKc transfection had no effect on Elk-dependent transcription of a luciferase reporter gene, whereas CaM-KIVc alone or in combination with CaM-KKc gave 7- to 10-fold and 60- to 80-fold stimulations, respectively, which were blocked by mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase phosphatase cotransfection. When epitope-tagged constructs of MAP kinases were co-transfected with CaM-KKc plus CaM-KIVc, the immunoprecipitated MAP kinases were activated 2-fold (ERK-2) and 7- to 10-fold (JNK-1 and p38). The JNK and p38 pathways were further investigated using specific c-Jun or ATF2-dependent transcriptional assays. We found that c-Jun/ATF2-dependent transcriptions were enhanced 7- to 10-fold by CaM-KIVc and 20- to 30-fold by CaM-KKc plus CaM-KIVc. In the case of the Jun-dependent transcription, this effect was not due to direct phosphorylation of c-Jun by activated CaM-KIV, since transcription was blocked by a dominant-negative JNK and by two MAP kinase phosphatases. Mutation of the phosphorylation site (Thr196) in CaM-KIV, which mediates its activation by CaM-KIV kinase, prevented activation of Elk-1, c-Jun, and ATF2 by the CaM kinase cascade. These results establish a new Ca2+-dependent mechanism for regulating MAP kinase pathways and resultant transcription. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8855261

  14. Role of protein kinase A in tax transactivation of the human T-cell leukemia virus type I long terminal repeat.

    PubMed Central

    Kadison, P; Poteat, H T; Klein, K M; Faller, D V

    1990-01-01

    The human T-cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) long terminal repeat (LTR) is inducible both by the retroviral tax gene product and by cyclic AMP in the murine thymoma S49 cell line. The cis-acting sequences that control transcriptional induction by tax and by cyclic AMP are in close proximity within the HTLV-I promoter. By using a protein kinase A (PKA)-deficient S49 mutant cell line, the response of the viral promoter to cyclic AMP was shown to depend on PKA, whereas the response to tax did not require the activity of this enzyme. Transactivation of the HTLV-I LTR by tax, however, decreased in PKA-deficient and adenylate cyclase-deficient cells. The evidence presented supports largely independent mechanisms of promoter induction by cyclic AMP and tax but also suggests a role for PKA-mediated phosphorylation in the regulation of HTLV-I LTR-driven gene expression by tax. Images PMID:2157876

  15. Altered mitogen-activated protein kinase signal transduction in human skin fibroblasts during in vitro aging: differential expression of low-density lipoprotein receptor.

    PubMed

    Bose, Chhanda; Bhuvaneswaran, Chidambaram; Udupa, Kodetthoor B

    2004-02-01

    The purpose of the study was to investigate the correlation of low-density lipoprotein receptor (LDLr) and mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) in fibroblasts after serial passage in vitro. We used early-passage ( approximately 20 mean population division, MPD) and late-passage ( approximately 60 MPD) human skin fibroblasts to study the LDLr expression and MAPK at basal and after interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) stimulation. We found a reduced LDLr expression in late-passage fibroblasts in comparison with early-passage fibroblasts, and late-passage fibroblasts showed a delayed induction of MAPK after IL-1beta stimulation, confirmed by the delay in translocation of MAPK from cytoplasmic to nuclear fraction. Using two specific inhibitors of MAPK, we could show a reduced LDLr expression in early-passage fibroblasts, indicating a direct relationship between MAPK signaling and LDLr expression. We conclude that one of the reasons for reduced LDLr gene expression in late passage fibroblast is related to MAPK signaling.

  16. Protein kinase A alterations in endocrine tumors.

    PubMed

    Yu, B; Ragazzon, B; Rizk-Rabin, M; Bertherat, J

    2012-09-01

    Various molecular and cellular alterations of the cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) pathway have been observed in endocrine tumors. Since protein kinase A (PKA) is a central key component of the cAMP pathway, studies of the alterations of PKA subunits in endocrine tumors reveal new aspects of the mechanisms of cAMP pathway alterations in human diseases. So far, most alterations have been observed for the regulatory subunits, mainly PRKAR1A and to a lower extent, PRKAR2B. One of the best examples of such alteration today is the multiple neoplasia syndrome Carney complex (CNC). The most common endocrine gland manifestations of CNC are pituitary GH-secreting adenomas, thyroid tumors, testicular tumors, and ACTH-independent Cushing's syndrome due to primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD). Heterozygous germline inactivating mutations of the PKA regulatory subunit RIα gene (PRKAR1A) are observed in about two-third of CNC patients, and also in patients with isolated PPNAD. PRKAR1A is considered as a tumor suppressor gene. Interestingly, these mutations can also be observed as somatic alterations in sporadic endocrine tumors. More than 120 different PRKAR1A mutations have been found today. Most of them lead to an unstable mutant mRNA, which will be degraded by nonsense mediated mRNA decay. In vitro and in vivo functional studies are in progress to understand the mechanisms of endocrine tumor development due to PKA regulatory subunits inactivation. PRKAR1A mutations stimulate in most models PKA activity, mimicking in some way cAMP pathway constitutive activation. Cross-talks with other signaling pathways summarized in this review have been described and might participate in endocrine tumorigenesis. PMID:22752956

  17. Soybean nodule autoregulation receptor kinase phosphorylates two kinase-associated protein phosphatases in vitro.

    PubMed

    Miyahara, Akira; Hirani, Tripty A; Oakes, Marie; Kereszt, Attila; Kobe, Bostjan; Djordjevic, Michael A; Gresshoff, Peter M

    2008-09-12

    The NARK (nodule autoregulation receptor kinase) gene, a negative regulator of cell proliferation in nodule primordia in several legumes, encodes a receptor kinase that consists of an extracellular leucine-rich repeat and an intracellular serine/threonine protein kinase domain. The putative catalytic domain of NARK was expressed and purified as a maltose-binding or a glutathione S-transferase fusion protein in Escherichia coli. The recombinant NARK proteins showed autophosphorylation activity in vitro. Several regions of the NARK kinase domain were shown by mass spectrometry to possess phosphoresidues. The kinase-inactive protein K724E failed to autophosphorylate, as did three other proteins corresponding to phenotypically detected mutants defective in whole plant autoregulation of nodulation. A wild-type NARK fusion protein transphosphorylated a kinase-inactive mutant NARK fusion protein, suggesting that it is capable of intermolecular autophosphorylation in vitro. In addition, Ser-861 and Thr-963 in the NARK kinase catalytic domain were identified as phosphorylation sites through site-directed mutagenesis. The genes coding for the kinase-associated protein phosphatases KAPP1 and KAPP2, two putative interacting components of NARK, were isolated. NARK kinase domain phosphorylated recombinant KAPP proteins in vitro. Autophosphorylated NARK kinase domain was, in turn, dephosphorylated by both KAPP1 and KAPP2. Our results suggest a model for signal transduction involving NARK in the control of nodule development.

  18. Acute activation of AMP-activated protein kinase prevents H2O2-induced premature senescence in primary human keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Ido, Yasuo; Duranton, Albert; Lan, Fan; Cacicedo, Jose M; Chen, Tai C; Breton, Lionel; Ruderman, Neil B

    2012-01-01

    We investigated the effects of AMPK on H(2)O(2)-induced premature senescence in primary human keratinocytes. Incubation with 50 µM H(2)O(2) for 2 h resulted in premature senescence with characteristic increases in senescence-associated ß-galactosidase (SA-gal) staining 3 days later and no changes in AMPK or p38 MAPK activity. The increase in SA-gal staining was preceded by increases in both p53 phosphorylation (S15) (1 h) and transactivation (6 h) and the abundance of the cyclin inhibitor p21(CIP1) (16 h). Incubation with AICAR or resveratrol, both of which activated AMPK, prevented the H(2)O(2)-induced increases in both SA-Gal staining and p21 abundance. In addition, AICAR diminished the increase in p53 transactivation. The decreases in SA-Gal expression induced by resveratrol and AICAR were prevented by the pharmacological AMPK inhibitor Compound C, expression of a DN-AMPK or AMPK knock-down with shRNA. Likewise, both knockdown of AMPK and expression of DN-AMPK were sufficient to induce senescence, even in the absence of exogenous H(2)O(2). As reported by others, we found that AMPK activation by itself increased p53 phosphorylation at S15 in embryonic fibroblasts (MEF), whereas under the same conditions it decreased p53 phosphorylation in the keratinocytes, human aortic endothelial cells, and human HT1080 fibrosarcoma cells. In conclusion, the results indicate that H(2)O(2) at low concentrations causes premature senescence in human keratinocytes by activating p53-p21(CIP1) signaling and that these effects can be prevented by acute AMPK activation and enhanced by AMPK downregulation. They also suggest that this action of AMPK may be cell or context-specific. PMID:22514710

  19. Structure of the human dimeric ATM kinase

    PubMed Central

    Lau, Wilson C. Y.; Li, Yinyin; Liu, Zhe; Gao, Yuanzhu; Zhang, Qinfen; Huen, Michael S. Y.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT DNA-double strand breaks activate the serine/threonine protein kinase ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) to initiate DNA damage signal transduction. This activation process involves autophosphorylation and dissociation of inert ATM dimers into monomers that are catalytically active. Using single-particle electron microscopy (EM), we determined the structure of dimeric ATM in its resting state. The EM map could accommodate the crystal structure of the N-terminal truncated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a closely related enzyme of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related protein kinase (PIKK) family, allowing for the localization of the N- and the C-terminal regions of ATM. In the dimeric structure, the actives sites are buried, restricting the access of the substrates to these sites. The unanticipated domain organization of ATM provides a basis for understanding its mechanism of inhibition. PMID:27097373

  20. Structure of the human dimeric ATM kinase.

    PubMed

    Lau, Wilson C Y; Li, Yinyin; Liu, Zhe; Gao, Yuanzhu; Zhang, Qinfen; Huen, Michael S Y

    2016-01-01

    DNA-double strand breaks activate the serine/threonine protein kinase ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) to initiate DNA damage signal transduction. This activation process involves autophosphorylation and dissociation of inert ATM dimers into monomers that are catalytically active. Using single-particle electron microscopy (EM), we determined the structure of dimeric ATM in its resting state. The EM map could accommodate the crystal structure of the N-terminal truncated mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), a closely related enzyme of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase-related protein kinase (PIKK) family, allowing for the localization of the N- and the C-terminal regions of ATM. In the dimeric structure, the actives sites are buried, restricting the access of the substrates to these sites. The unanticipated domain organization of ATM provides a basis for understanding its mechanism of inhibition. PMID:27097373

  1. Chromosomal assignment of the gene encoding the human 58-kDa inhibitor (PRKRI) of the interferon-induced dsRNA-activated protein kinase to chromosome 13q32

    SciTech Connect

    Korth, M.J.; Katze, M.G.; Edelhoff, S.; Disteche, C.M.

    1996-01-15

    The 58-kDa inhibitor (p58) of the interferon-induced dsRNA-activated protein kinase (PKR) is a cellular protein recruited by the influenza virus to down-regulate the activity of PKR during virus infection. The inhibitor also appears to play a role in the regulation of cellular gene expression in the absence of viral infection and has oncogenic properties when overexpressed. Using fluorescence in situ hybridization, we have mapped the p58 gene (PRKRI) to human chromosome 13 band q32. Aberrations in the structure or number of chromosome 13 have been identified in a variety of human cancers, particularly in acute leukemia. 15 refs., 1 fig.

  2. Photoinduced structural changes to protein kinase A

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rozinek, Sarah C.; Thomas, Robert J.; Brancaleon, Lorenzo

    2014-03-01

    The importance of porphyrins in organisms is underscored by the ubiquitous biological and biochemical functions that are mediated by these compounds and by their potential biomedical and biotechnological applications. Protoporphyrin IX (PPIX) is the precursor to heme and has biomedical applications such as its use as a photosensitizer in phototherapy and photodetection of cancer. Among other applications, our group has demonstrated that low-irradiance exposure to laser irradiation of PPIX, Fe-PPIX, or meso-tetrakis (4-sulfonatophenyl) porphyrin (TSPP) non-covalently docked to a protein causes conformational changes in the polypeptide. Such approach can have remarkable consequences in the study of protein structure/function relationship and can be used to prompt non-native protein properties. Therefore we have investigated protein kinase A (PKA), a more relevant protein model towards the photo-treatment of cancer. PKA's enzymatic functions are regulated by the presence of cyclic adenosine monophosphate for intracellular signal transduction involved in, among other things, stimulation of transcription, tumorigenesis in Carney complex and migration of breast carcinoma cells. Since phosphorylation is a necessary step in some cancers and inflammatory diseases, inhibiting the protein kinase, and therefore phosphorylation, may serve to treat these diseases. Changes in absorption, steady-state fluorescence, and fluorescence lifetime indicate: 1) both TSPP and PPIX non-covalently bind to PKA where they maintain photoreactivity; 2) absorptive photoproduct formation occurs only when PKA is bound to TSPP and irradiated; and 3) PKA undergoes secondary structural changes after irradiation with either porphyrin bound. These photoinduced changes could affect the protein's enzymatic and signaling capabilities.

  3. Structure and functional characterization of the atypical human kinase haspin

    PubMed Central

    Eswaran, Jeyanthy; Patnaik, Debasis; Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Wang, Fangwei; Stein, Ross L.; Murray, James W.; Higgins, Jonathan M. G.; Knapp, Stefan

    2009-01-01

    The protein kinase haspin/Gsg2 plays an important role in mitosis, where it specifically phosphorylates Thr-3 in histone H3 (H3T3). Its protein sequence is only weakly homologous to other protein kinases and lacks the highly conserved motifs normally required for kinase activity. Here we report structures of human haspin in complex with ATP and the inhibitor iodotubercidin. These structures reveal a constitutively active kinase conformation, stabilized by haspin-specific inserts. Haspin also has a highly atypical activation segment well adapted for specific recognition of the basic histone tail. Despite the lack of a DFG motif, ATP binding to haspin is similar to that in classical kinases; however, the ATP γ-phosphate forms hydrogen bonds with the conserved catalytic loop residues Asp-649 and His-651, and a His651Ala haspin mutant is inactive, suggesting a direct role for the catalytic loop in ATP recognition. Enzyme kinetic data show that haspin phosphorylates substrate peptides through a rapid equilibrium random mechanism. A detailed analysis of histone modifications in the neighborhood of H3T3 reveals that increasing methylation at Lys-4 (H3K4) strongly decreases substrate recognition, suggesting a key role of H3K4 methylation in the regulation of haspin activity. PMID:19918057

  4. Structure and functional characterization of the atypical human kinase haspin.

    PubMed

    Eswaran, Jeyanthy; Patnaik, Debasis; Filippakopoulos, Panagis; Wang, Fangwei; Stein, Ross L; Murray, James W; Higgins, Jonathan M G; Knapp, Stefan

    2009-12-01

    The protein kinase haspin/Gsg2 plays an important role in mitosis, where it specifically phosphorylates Thr-3 in histone H3 (H3T3). Its protein sequence is only weakly homologous to other protein kinases and lacks the highly conserved motifs normally required for kinase activity. Here we report structures of human haspin in complex with ATP and the inhibitor iodotubercidin. These structures reveal a constitutively active kinase conformation, stabilized by haspin-specific inserts. Haspin also has a highly atypical activation segment well adapted for specific recognition of the basic histone tail. Despite the lack of a DFG motif, ATP binding to haspin is similar to that in classical kinases; however, the ATP gamma-phosphate forms hydrogen bonds with the conserved catalytic loop residues Asp-649 and His-651, and a His651Ala haspin mutant is inactive, suggesting a direct role for the catalytic loop in ATP recognition. Enzyme kinetic data show that haspin phosphorylates substrate peptides through a rapid equilibrium random mechanism. A detailed analysis of histone modifications in the neighborhood of H3T3 reveals that increasing methylation at Lys-4 (H3K4) strongly decreases substrate recognition, suggesting a key role of H3K4 methylation in the regulation of haspin activity. PMID:19918057

  5. A sensitive flow cytometry-based nucleotide excision repair assay unexpectedly reveals that mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling does not regulate the removal of UV-induced DNA damage in human cells.

    PubMed

    Rouget, Raphael; Auclair, Yannick; Loignon, Martin; Affar, El Bachir; Drobetsky, Elliot A

    2008-02-29

    In response to diverse genotoxic stimuli (e.g. UV and cisplatin), the mitogen-activated protein kinases ERK1/2, JNK1/2, and p38alpha/beta become rapidly phosphorylated and in turn activate multiple downstream effectors that modulate apoptosis and/or growth arrest. Furthermore, previous lines of evidence have strongly suggested that ERK1/2 and JNK1/2 participate in global-genomic nucleotide excision repair, a critical antineoplastic pathway that removes helix-distorting DNA adducts induced by a variety of mutagenic agents, including UV. To rigorously evaluate the potential role of mitogen-activated protein kinases in global-genomic nucleotide excision repair, various human cell strains (primary skin fibroblasts, primary lung fibroblasts, and HCT116 colon carcinoma cells) were treated with highly specific chemical inhibitors, which, following UV exposure, (i) abrogated the capacities of ERK1/2, JNK1/2, or p38alpha/beta to phosphorylate specific downstream effectors and (ii) characteristically modulated cellular proliferation, clonogenic survival, and/or apoptosis. A highly sensitive flow cytometry-based nucleotide excision repair assay recently optimized and validated in our laboratory was then employed to directly demonstrate that the kinetics of UV DNA photoadduct repair are highly similar in mock-treated versus mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor-treated cells. These data on primary and tumor cells treated with pharmacological inhibitors were fully corroborated by repair studies using (i) short hairpin RNA-mediated knockdown of ERK1/2 or JNK1/2 in human U2OS osteosarcoma cells and (ii) expression of a dominant negative p38alpha mutant in human primary lung fibroblasts. Our results provide solid evidence for the first time, in disaccord with a burgeoning perception, that mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling does not influence the efficiency of human global-genomic nucleotide excision repair.

  6. Regulation of cAMP-dependent Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Diskar, Mandy; Zenn, Hans-Michael; Kaupisch, Alexandra; Kaufholz, Melanie; Brockmeyer, Stefanie; Sohmen, Daniel; Berrera, Marco; Zaccolo, Manuela; Boshart, Michael; Herberg, Friedrich W.; Prinz, Anke

    2010-01-01

    cAMP-dependent protein kinases are reversibly complexed with any of the four isoforms of regulatory (R) subunits, which contain either a substrate or a pseudosubstrate autoinhibitory domain. The human protein kinase X (PrKX) is an exemption as it is inhibited only by pseudosubstrate inhibitors, i.e. RIα or RIβ but not by substrate inhibitors RIIα or RIIβ. Detailed examination of the capacity of five PrKX-like kinases ranging from human to protozoa (Trypanosoma brucei) to form holoenzymes with human R subunits in living cells shows that this preference for pseudosubstrate inhibitors is evolutionarily conserved. To elucidate the molecular basis of this inhibitory pattern, we applied bioluminescence resonance energy transfer and surface plasmon resonance in combination with site-directed mutagenesis. We observed that the conserved αH-αI loop residue Arg-283 in PrKX is crucial for its RI over RII preference, as a R283L mutant was able to form a holoenzyme complex with wild type RII subunits. Changing the corresponding αH-αI loop residue in PKA Cα (L277R), significantly destabilized holoenzyme complexes in vitro, as cAMP-mediated holoenzyme activation was facilitated by a factor of 2–4, and lead to a decreased affinity of the mutant C subunit for R subunits, significantly affecting RII containing holoenzymes. PMID:20819953

  7. Protein kinase C directly phosphorylates the insulin receptor in vitro and reduces its protein-tyrosine kinase activity.

    PubMed Central

    Bollag, G E; Roth, R A; Beaudoin, J; Mochly-Rosen, D; Koshland, D E

    1986-01-01

    The beta subunit of purified insulin receptor is phosphorylated on a serine residue by purified preparations of protein kinase C (ATP: protein phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.37). This phosphorylation is inhibited by antibodies to protein kinase C and stimulated by phospholipids, diacylglycerol, and Ca2+. The phosphorylation of the receptor by protein kinase C does not affect its insulin-binding activity but does inhibit by 65% the receptor's intrinsic tyrosine-specific protein kinase activity (ATP: protein-tyrosine O-phosphotransferase, EC 2.7.1.112). These results indicate that activators of protein kinase C, such as phorbol esters, desensitize cells to insulin by direct protein kinase C action on the insulin receptor. Images PMID:3526339

  8. Protein kinase C mu is located at the Golgi compartment

    PubMed Central

    1996-01-01

    Protein kinase C mu (PKC mu) displays unusual structural features like a pleckstrin homology domain and an amino-terminal hydrophobic region with a putative leader peptide and transmembrane sequence. As a discrete location often is a direct clue to the potential biological function of a kinase, antibodies directed against unique amino- and carboxy-terminal domains of PKC mu were used to localize the protein within intracellular compartments in immunofluorescence and subcellular fractionation studies. Confocal laser scanning microscopy showed colocalization of PKC mu with the resident Golgi marker protein beta 1,4 galactosyltransferase in PKC mu transfectants and in the human hepatocellular carcinoma cell line HepG2, expressing endogenous PKC mu. Long-term treatment of cells with brefeldin A, which disintegrates the Golgi apparatus, disrupted PKC mu-specific staining. Cosegregation of PKC mu with beta 1,4 galactosyltransferase, but not with the endosomal marker rab5, upon density gradient fractionation and Western blot analysis of HepG2 cell extracts, provides independent evidence for a Golgi localization of PKC mu. Moreover, cellular sulfate uptake and Golgi-specific glycosaminoglycan sulfation was enhanced in PKC mu transfectants. Together, these data suggest that PKC mu is a resident protein kinase of the core Golgi compartment and is involved in basal transport processes. PMID:8830770

  9. Loss of Ypk1, the Yeast Homolog to the Human Serum- and Glucocorticoid-induced Protein Kinase, Accelerates Phospholipase B1-mediated Phosphatidylcholine Deacylation*

    PubMed Central

    Surlow, Beth A.; Cooley, Benjamin M.; Needham, Patrick G.; Brodsky, Jeffrey L.; Patton-Vogt, Jana

    2014-01-01

    Ypk1, the yeast homolog of the human serum- and glucocorticoid-induced kinase (Sgk1), affects diverse cellular activities, including sphingolipid homeostasis. We now report that Ypk1 also impacts the turnover of the major phospholipid, phosphatidylcholine (PC). Pulse-chase radiolabeling reveals that a ypk1Δ mutant exhibits increased PC deacylation and glycerophosphocholine production compared with wild type yeast. Deletion of PLB1, a gene encoding a B-type phospholipase that hydrolyzes PC, in a ypk1Δ mutant curtails the increased PC deacylation. In contrast to previous data, we find that Plb1 resides in the ER and in the medium. Consistent with a link between Ypk1 and Plb1, the levels of both Plb1 protein and PLB1 message are elevated in a ypk1Δ strain compared with wild type yeast. Furthermore, deletion of PLB1 in a ypk1Δ mutant exacerbates phenotypes associated with loss of YPK1, including slowed growth and sensitivity to cell wall perturbation, suggesting that increased Plb1 activity buffers against the loss of Ypk1. Because Plb1 lacks a consensus phosphorylation site for Ypk1, we probed other processes under the control of Ypk1 that might be linked to PC turnover. Inhibition of sphingolipid biosynthesis by the drug myriocin or through utilization of a lcb1-100 mutant results in increased PLB1 expression. Furthermore, we discovered that the increase in PLB1 expression observed upon inhibition of sphingolipid synthesis or loss of Ypk1 is under the control of the Crz1 transcription factor. Taken together, these results suggest a functional interaction between Ypk1 and Plb1 in which altered sphingolipid metabolism up-regulates PLB1 expression via Crz1. PMID:25258318

  10. Ionotrophic 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 receptor activates the protein kinase C-dependent phospholipase D pathway in human T-cells.

    PubMed Central

    Khan, N A; Hichami, A

    1999-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the role of the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) ionotrophic receptor 5-HT(3) in the activation of human Jurkat T-cells. 5-HT and 2-methyl-5-HT (2Me-5-HT), an agonist of the 5-HT(3) receptor, induced increases in intracellular free Na(+) concentrations, [Na(+)](i), via opening of the ionotrophic receptor in these cells. These two serotonergic (5-hydroxytryptaminergic) agents potentiated phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-induced T-cell activation. However, they failed to potentiate dioctanoglycerol-plus-ionomycin-stimulated T-cell blastogenesis. Interestingly, an inhibitor of protein kinase C (PKC), GF 109203X, curtailed significantly 5-HT and 2Me-5-HT-potentiated T-cell activation. These results demonstrate that the opening of the 5-HT(3) ionotrophic receptor is implicated in T-cell activation via the PKC pathway. Furthermore, 5-HT and 2Me-5-HT stimulated phospholipase D (PLD) activity, as measured by the production of phosphatidylethanol and phosphatidylbutanol at the expense of phosphatidic acid (PA). GF 109203X significantly curtailed the 5-HT- and 2Me-5-HT-induced PLD activity and T-cell activation. The PLD/PA pathway stimulated by these two serotonergic agents resulted in the production of 1,2-diacylglycerol (DAG) mass in Jurkat T-cells. These results altogether suggest that 5-HT and 2Me-5-HT potentiate T-cell activation via increases in [Na(+)](i) and the activation of the PKC-dependent PLD pathway. PMID:10548551

  11. Ionotrophic 5-hydroxytryptamine type 3 receptor activates the protein kinase C-dependent phospholipase D pathway in human T-cells.

    PubMed

    Khan, N A; Hichami, A

    1999-11-15

    The present study was undertaken to investigate the role of the 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT) ionotrophic receptor 5-HT(3) in the activation of human Jurkat T-cells. 5-HT and 2-methyl-5-HT (2Me-5-HT), an agonist of the 5-HT(3) receptor, induced increases in intracellular free Na(+) concentrations, [Na(+)](i), via opening of the ionotrophic receptor in these cells. These two serotonergic (5-hydroxytryptaminergic) agents potentiated phytohaemagglutinin (PHA)-induced T-cell activation. However, they failed to potentiate dioctanoglycerol-plus-ionomycin-stimulated T-cell blastogenesis. Interestingly, an inhibitor of protein kinase C (PKC), GF 109203X, curtailed significantly 5-HT and 2Me-5-HT-potentiated T-cell activation. These results demonstrate that the opening of the 5-HT(3) ionotrophic receptor is implicated in T-cell activation via the PKC pathway. Furthermore, 5-HT and 2Me-5-HT stimulated phospholipase D (PLD) activity, as measured by the production of phosphatidylethanol and phosphatidylbutanol at the expense of phosphatidic acid (PA). GF 109203X significantly curtailed the 5-HT- and 2Me-5-HT-induced PLD activity and T-cell activation. The PLD/PA pathway stimulated by these two serotonergic agents resulted in the production of 1,2-diacylglycerol (DAG) mass in Jurkat T-cells. These results altogether suggest that 5-HT and 2Me-5-HT potentiate T-cell activation via increases in [Na(+)](i) and the activation of the PKC-dependent PLD pathway.

  12. cDNA cloning, molecular characterization, and chromosomal localization of NET(EPHT2), a human EPH-related receptor protein-tyrosine kinase gene preferentially expressed in brain

    SciTech Connect

    Tang, X.X.; Yoshioka, A.; Pleasure, D.E.

    1995-09-20

    By screening a human fetal brain cDNA expression library using a monoclonal anti-phosphotyrosine antibody , we have isolated a cDNA clone encoding a receptor type protein-tyrosine kinase belonging to the EPH family, NET (neuronally expressed EPH-related tyrosine kinase). NET shows 87% homology in nucleotide sequence and 99% homology in the deduced amino acid sequence to rat elk, suggesting that NET is the human homologue of elk. The NET gene is mapped to human chromosome 3q21-q23 by PCR screening of a human rodent somatic cell hybrid panel and by fluorescence in situ hybridization. Examination of NET mRNA expression in several human tissues has shown that the NET gene is expressed preferentially in brain as a 5-kb transcript. Steady-state levels of NET mRNA in human brain are greater in the midterm fetus than in the adult. Lower levels of NET mRNA are found in fetal kidney and adult skeletal muscle. The expression pattern of NET mRNA thus differs from that of elk, suggesting that these two gene products may preform distinct roles in human and rat. NET transcripts are detected in human acid-induced neuronal differentiation. Several human tumor cell lines derived from neuroectoderm including primitive neuroblastoma also express NET transcripts. Since the NET mRNA expression in human brain is developmentally regulated and is induced during neuronal differentiation, NET potentially plays important roles in human neurogenesis. 89 refs., 7 figs.

  13. Parallel regulation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 3 (MKK3) and MKK6 in Gq-signaling cascade.

    PubMed

    Yamauchi, J; Tsujimoto, G; Kaziro, Y; Itoh, H

    2001-06-29

    Heterotrimeric G protein G(q) stimulates the activity of p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) in mammalian cells. To investigate the signaling mechanism whereby alpha and betagamma subunits of G(q) activate p38 MAPK, we introduced kinase-deficient mutants of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase 3 (MKK3), MKK4, and MKK6 into human embryonal kidney 293 cells. The activation of p38 MAPK by Galpha(q) and Gbetagamma was blocked by kinase-deficient MKK3 and MKK6 but not by kinase-deficient MKK4. In addition, Galpha(q) and Gbetagamma stimulated MKK3 and MKK6 activities. The MKK3 and MKK6 activations by Galpha(q), but not by Gbetagamma, were dependent on phospholipase C and c-Src. Galpha(q) stimulated MKK3 in a Rac- and Cdc42-dependent manner and MKK6 in a Rho-dependent manner. On the other hand, Gbetagamma activated MKK3 in a Rac- and Cdc42-dependent manner and MKK6 in a Rho-, Rac-, and Cdc42-dependent manner. Gbetagamma-induced MKK3 and MKK6 activations were dependent on a tyrosine kinase other than c-Src. These results suggest that Galpha(q) and Gbetagamma stimulate the activity of p38 MAPK by regulating MKK3 and MKK6 through parallel signaling pathways.

  14. Mitogen-activated protein kinase cascades in Vitis vinifera

    PubMed Central

    Çakır, Birsen; Kılıçkaya, Ozan

    2015-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is one of the most important mechanisms to control cellular functions in response to external and endogenous signals. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) are universal signaling molecules in eukaryotes that mediate the intracellular transmission of extracellular signals resulting in the induction of appropriate cellular responses. MAPK cascades are composed of four protein kinase modules: MAPKKK kinases (MAPKKKKs), MAPKK kinases (MAPKKKs), MAPK kinases (MAPKKs), and MAPKs. In plants, MAPKs are activated in response to abiotic stresses, wounding, and hormones, and during plant pathogen interactions and cell division. In this report, we performed a complete inventory of MAPK cascades genes in Vitis vinifera, the whole genome of which has been sequenced. By comparison with MAPK, MAPK kinases, MAPK kinase kinases and MAPK kinase kinase kinase kinase members of Arabidopsis thaliana, we revealed the existence of 14 MAPKs, 5 MAPKKs, 62 MAPKKKs, and 7 MAPKKKKs in Vitis vinifera. We identified orthologs of V. vinifera putative MAPKs in different species, and ESTs corresponding to members of MAPK cascades in various tissues. This work represents the first complete inventory of MAPK cascades in V. vinifera and could help elucidate the biological and physiological functions of these proteins in V. vinifera. PMID:26257761

  15. The Roles of Protein Kinases in Learning and Memory

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Giese, Karl Peter; Mizuno, Keiko

    2013-01-01

    In the adult mammalian brain, more than 250 protein kinases are expressed, but only a few of these kinases are currently known to enable learning and memory. Based on this information it appears that learning and memory-related kinases either impact on synaptic transmission by altering ion channel properties or ion channel density, or regulate…

  16. Mediator kinase module and human tumorigenesis

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Alison D.; Oldenbroek, Marieke; Boyer, Thomas G.

    2016-01-01

    Mediator is a conserved multi-subunit signal processor through which regulatory informatiosn conveyed by gene-specific transcription factors is transduced to RNA Polymerase II (Pol II). In humans, MED13, MED12, CDK8 and Cyclin C (CycC) comprise a four-subunit “kinase” module that exists in variable association with a 26-subunit Mediator core. Genetic and biochemical studies have established the Mediator kinase module as a major ingress of developmental and oncogenic signaling through Mediator, and much of its function in signal-dependent gene regulation derives from its resident CDK8 kinase activity. For example, CDK8-targeted substrate phosphorylation impacts transcription factor half-life, Pol II activity and chromatin chemistry and functional status. Recent structural and biochemical studies have revealed a precise network of physical and functional subunit interactions required for proper kinase module activity. Accordingly, pathologic change in this activity through altered expression or mutation of constituent kinase module subunits can have profound consequences for altered signaling and tumor formation. Herein, we review the structural organization, biological function and oncogenic potential of the Mediator kinase module. We focus principally on tumor-associated alterations in kinase module subunits for which mechanistic relationships as opposed to strictly correlative associations are established. These considerations point to an emerging picture of the Mediator kinase module as an oncogenic unit, one in which pathogenic activation/deactivation through component change drives tumor formation through perturbation of signal-dependent gene regulation. It follows that therapeutic strategies to combat CDK8-driven tumors will involve targeted modulation of CDK8 activity or pharmacologic manipulation of dysregulated CDK8-dependent signaling pathways. PMID:26182352

  17. Crystal structure of human nicotinamide riboside kinase.

    PubMed

    Khan, Javed A; Xiang, Song; Tong, Liang

    2007-08-01

    Nicotinamide riboside kinase (NRK) has an important role in the biosynthesis of NAD(+) as well as the activation of tiazofurin and other NR analogs for anticancer therapy. NRK belongs to the deoxynucleoside kinase and nucleoside monophosphate (NMP) kinase superfamily, although the degree of sequence conservation is very low. We report here the crystal structures of human NRK1 in a binary complex with the reaction product nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) at 1.5 A resolution and in a ternary complex with ADP and tiazofurin at 2.7 A resolution. The active site is located in a groove between the central parallel beta sheet core and the LID and NMP-binding domains. The hydroxyl groups on the ribose of NR are recognized by Asp56 and Arg129, and Asp36 is the general base of the enzyme. Mutation of residues in the active site can abolish the catalytic activity of the enzyme, confirming the structural observations. PMID:17698003

  18. Crystal Structure of Human Nicotinamide Riboside Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Khan,J.; Xiang, S.; Tong, L.

    2007-01-01

    Nicotinamide riboside kinase (NRK) has an important role in the biosynthesis of NAD{sup +} as well as the activation of tiazofurin and other NR analogs for anticancer therapy. NRK belongs to the deoxynucleoside kinase and nucleoside monophosphate (NMP) kinase superfamily, although the degree of sequence conservation is very low. We report here the crystal structures of human NRK1 in a binary complex with the reaction product nicotinamide mononucleotide (NMN) at 1.5 {angstrom} resolution and in a ternary complex with ADP and tiazofurin at 2.7 {angstrom} resolution. The active site is located in a groove between the central parallel {beta} sheet core and the LID and NMP-binding domains. The hydroxyl groups on the ribose of NR are recognized by Asp56 and Arg129, and Asp36 is the general base of the enzyme. Mutation of residues in the active site can abolish the catalytic activity of the enzyme, confirming the structural observations.

  19. Activation of protein tyrosine kinase: a possible requirement for fixed-bacteria and lipopolysaccharide-induced increase in human natural killer cell activity.

    PubMed

    Puente, J; Salas, M A; Canon, C; Miranda, D; Wolf, M E; Mosnaim, A D

    1996-05-01

    Preincubation of peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL) from drug-free, healthy volunteers with either the protein tyrosine kinase inhibitor genistein (GNT, n = 10, final concentration 200 microM) or the protein kinase A activator dybutiryl-cyclic-AMP (cAMP, n = 11, final concentration 10 microM), resulted in a significant inhibition of natural killer cell activity (NKCA, expressed as percentage of specific chromium release). With the exception of 4 out of the 11 cAMP-treated samples, individual values for NKCA in the drug preincubated specimens were at least 20% below the same subject baseline activity; furthermore, NKC lytic function was non-detectable in 4 out of the 10 and in 1 out of the 11 samples pretreated with either GNT or cAMP, respectively. PBL preincubation with glutaraldehyde-fixed Gram-negative bacteria (GNB, n = 13, final GNB-to-effector cell ratio of 50 : 1) resulted in a statistically significant increase in NKCA (baseline (x +/- SD) of 21.6 +/- 16.4 and bacteria treated samples of 41.5 +/- 24.6, respectively, Student's paired t-test p < 0.05). At least a 20% increase in NKC lytic function over its own baseline value was recorded for 11 out of the 13 samples tested (Table 1). Preincubation with GNB and GNT (5 samples) not only blocked the immunostimulant effects of GNB (Student's paired t-test p < 0.05), but in most cases individual values for NKCA were similar to those recorded for GNT-only treated samples. Use of cAMP instead of GNT also blocked, but to a smaller extent, the GNB-produced increases in NKC lytic function (paired Student's t-test < 0.05). PBL preincubation with lipopolysaccharide (LPS, n = 11, final concentration 50 micrograms/ml) resulted in a statistically significant increase in NKCA (baseline (x +/- SD) of 20.7 +/- 14.1 and LPS treated samples of 39.2 +/- 18.5, respectively, Student's paired t-test < 0.05). At least a 20% increase in NKCA over its own baseline value was observed for each and everyone of the 11 samples studied

  20. Chemoproteomic characterization of protein kinase inhibitors using immobilized ATP.

    PubMed

    Duncan, James S; Haystead, Timothy A J; Litchfield, David W

    2012-01-01

    Protein kinase inhibitors have emerged as indispensable tools for the elucidation of the biological functions of specific signal transduction pathways and as promising candidates for molecular-targeted therapy. However, because many protein kinase inhibitors are ATP-competitive inhibitors targeting the catalytic site of specific protein kinases, the large number of protein kinases that are encoded within eukaryotic genomes and the existence of many other cellular proteins that bind ATP result in the prospect of off-target effects for many of these compounds. Many of the potential off-target effects remain unrecognized because protein kinase inhibitors are often developed and tested primarily on the basis of in vitro assays using purified components. To overcome this limitation, we describe a systematic approach to characterize ATP-competitive protein kinase inhibitors employing ATP-sepharose to capture the purine-binding proteome from cell extracts. Protein kinase inhibitors can be used in competition experiments to prevent binding of specific cellular proteins to ATP-sepharose or to elute bound proteins from ATP-sepharose. Collectively, these strategies can enable validation of interactions between a specific protein kinase and an inhibitor in complex mixtures and can yield the identification of inhibitor targets.

  1. Mitogen-activated Protein Kinase Kinase Kinase 1 Protects against Nickel-induced Acute Lung Injury

    PubMed Central

    Mongan, Maureen; Tan, Zongqing; Chen, Liang; Peng, Zhimin; Dietsch, Maggie; Su, Bing; Leikauf, George; Xia, Ying

    2008-01-01

    Nickel compounds are environmental and occupational hazards that pose serious health problems and are causative factors of acute lung injury. The c-jun N-terminal kinases (JNKs) are regulated through a mitogen-activated protein (MAP) 3 kinase-MAP2 kinase cascade and have been implicated in nickel toxicity. In this study, we used genetically modified cells and mice to investigate the involvement of two upstream MAP3Ks, MAP3K1 and 2, in nickel-induced JNK activation and acute lung injury. In mouse embryonic fibroblasts, levels of JNK activation and cytotoxicity induced by nickel were similar in the Map3k2-null and wild-type cells but were much lower in the Map3k1/Map3k2 double-null cells. Conversely, the levels of JNK activation and cytotoxicity were unexpectedly much higher in the Map3k1-null cells. In adult mouse tissue, MAP3K1 was widely distributed but was abundantly expressed in the bronchiole epithelium of the lung. Accordingly, MAP3K1 ablation in mice resulted in severe nickel-induced acute lung injury and reduced survival. Based on these findings, we propose a role for MAP3K1 in reducing JNK activation and protecting the mice from nickel-induced acute lung injury. PMID:18467339

  2. CDPKs are dual-specificity protein kinases and tyrosine autophosphorylation attenuates kinase activity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs or CPKs) are classified as serine/threonine protein kinases but we made the surprising observation that soybean CDPK' and several Arabidopsis isoforms (AtCPK4 and AtCPK34) could also autophosphorylate on tyrosine residues. In studies with His6-GmCDPK', we ide...

  3. Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1 Tat Protein Activates Transcription Factor NF-κB through the Cellular Interferon-Inducible, Double-Stranded RNA-Dependent Protein Kinase, PKR

    PubMed Central

    Demarchi, Francesca; Gutierrez, Maria Ines; Giacca, Mauro

    1999-01-01

    The transactivator protein of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) (Tat) is a powerful activator of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), acting through degradation of the inhibitor IκB-α (F. Demarchi, F. d’Adda di Fagagna, A. Falaschi, and M. Giacca, J. Virol. 70:4427–4437, 1996). Here, we show that this activity of Tat requires the function of the cellular interferon-inducible protein kinase PKR. Tat-mediated NF-κB activation and transcriptional induction of the HIV-1 long terminal repeat were impaired in murine cells in which the PKR gene was knocked out. Both functions were restored by cotransfection of Tat with the cDNA for PKR. Expression of a dominant-negative mutant of PKR specifically reduced the levels of Tat transactivation in different human cell types. Activation of NF-κB by Tat required integrity of the basic domain of Tat; previous studies have indicated that this domain is necessary for specific Tat-PKR interaction. PMID:10400814

  4. Auxin efflux by PIN-FORMED proteins is activated by two different protein kinases, D6 PROTEIN KINASE and PINOID.

    PubMed

    Zourelidou, Melina; Absmanner, Birgit; Weller, Benjamin; Barbosa, Inês C R; Willige, Björn C; Fastner, Astrid; Streit, Verena; Port, Sarah A; Colcombet, Jean; de la Fuente van Bentem, Sergio; Hirt, Heribert; Kuster, Bernhard; Schulze, Waltraud X; Hammes, Ulrich Z; Schwechheimer, Claus

    2014-06-19

    The development and morphology of vascular plants is critically determined by synthesis and proper distribution of the phytohormone auxin. The directed cell-to-cell distribution of auxin is achieved through a system of auxin influx and efflux transporters. PIN-FORMED (PIN) proteins are proposed auxin efflux transporters, and auxin fluxes can seemingly be predicted based on the--in many cells--asymmetric plasma membrane distribution of PINs. Here, we show in a heterologous Xenopus oocyte system as well as in Arabidopsis thaliana inflorescence stems that PIN-mediated auxin transport is directly activated by D6 PROTEIN KINASE (D6PK) and PINOID (PID)/WAG kinases of the Arabidopsis AGCVIII kinase family. At the same time, we reveal that D6PKs and PID have differential phosphosite preferences. Our study suggests that PIN activation by protein kinases is a crucial component of auxin transport control that must be taken into account to understand auxin distribution within the plant.

  5. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases and Hypoxic/Ischemic Nephropathy.

    PubMed

    Luo, Fengbao; Shi, Jian; Shi, Qianqian; Xu, Xianlin; Xia, Ying; He, Xiaozhou

    2016-01-01

    Tissue hypoxia/ischemia is a pathological feature of many human disorders including stroke, myocardial infarction, hypoxic/ischemic nephropathy, as well as cancer. In the kidney, the combination of limited oxygen supply to the tissues and high oxygen demand is considered the main reason for the susceptibility of the kidney to hypoxic/ischemic injury. In recent years, increasing evidence has indicated that a reduction in renal oxygen tension/blood supply plays an important role in acute kidney injury, chronic kidney disease, and renal tumorigenesis. However, the underlying signaling mechanisms, whereby hypoxia alters cellular behaviors, remain poorly understood. Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) are key signal-transducing enzymes activated by a wide range of extracellular stimuli, including hypoxia/ischemia. There are four major family members of MAPKs: the extracellular signal-regulated kinases-1 and -2 (ERK1/2), the c-Jun N-terminal kinases (JNK), p38 MAPKs, and extracellular signal-regulated kinase-5 (ERK5/BMK1). Recent studies, including ours, suggest that these MAPKs are differentially involved in renal responses to hypoxic/ischemic stress. This review will discuss their changes in hypoxic/ischemic pathophysiology with acute kidney injury, chronic kidney diseases and renal carcinoma. PMID:27544204

  6. G protein-coupled receptor signaling via Src kinase induces endogenous human transient receptor potential vanilloid type 6 (TRPV6) channel activation.

    PubMed

    Spehr, Jennifer; Gelis, Lian; Osterloh, Markus; Oberland, Sonja; Hatt, Hanns; Spehr, Marc; Neuhaus, Eva M

    2011-04-15

    Ca(2+) homeostasis plays a critical role in a variety of cellular processes. We showed previously that stimulation of the prostate-specific G protein-coupled receptor (PSGR) enhances cytosolic Ca(2+) and inhibits proliferation of prostate cells. Here, we analyzed the signaling mechanisms underlying the PSGR-mediated Ca(2+) increase. Using complementary molecular, biochemical, electrophysiological, and live-cell imaging techniques, we found that endogenous Ca(2+)-selective transient receptor potential vanilloid type 6 (TRPV6) channels are critically involved in the PSGR-induced Ca(2+) signal. Biophysical characterization of the current activated by PSGR stimulation revealed characteristic properties of TRPV6. The molecular identity of the involved channel was confirmed using RNA interference targeting TrpV6. TRPV6-mediated Ca(2+) influx depended on Src kinase activity. Src kinase activation occurred independently of G protein activation, presumably by direct interaction with PSGR. Taken together, we report that endogenous TRPV6 channels are activated downstream of a G protein-coupled receptor and present the first physiological characterization of these channels in situ. PMID:21349844

  7. Identification of intracellular receptor proteins for activated protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Mochly-Rosen, D; Khaner, H; Lopez, J

    1991-01-01

    Protein kinase C (PKC) translocates from the cytosol to the particulate fraction on activation. This activation-induced translocation of PKC is thought to reflect PKC binding to the membrane lipids. However, immunological and biochemical data suggest that PKC may bind to proteins in the cytoskeletal elements in the particulate fraction and in the nuclei. Here we describe evidence for the presence of intracellular receptor proteins that bind activated PKC. Several proteins from the detergent-insoluble material of the particulate fraction bound PKC in the presence of phosphatidylserine and calcium; binding was further increased with the addition of diacylglycerol. Binding of PKC to two of these proteins was concentration-dependent, saturable, and specific, suggesting that these binding proteins are receptors for activated C-kinase, termed here "RACKs." PKC binds to RACKs via a site on PKC distinct from the substrate binding site. We suggest that binding to RACKs may play a role in activation-induced translocation of PKC. Images PMID:1850844

  8. Structural investigation of protein kinase C inhibitors

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Barak, D.; Shibata, M.; Rein, R.

    1991-01-01

    The phospholipid and Ca2+ dependent protein kinase (PKC) plays an essential role in a variety of cellular events. Inhibition of PKC was shown to arrest growth in tumor cell cultures making it a target for possible antitumor therapy. Calphostins are potent inhibitors of PKC with high affinity for the enzyme regulatory site. Structural characteristics of calphostins, which confer the inhibitory activity, are investigated by comparing their optimized structures with the existing models for PKC activation. The resulting model of inhibitory activity assumes interaction with two out of the three electrostatic interaction sites postulated for activators. The model shows two sites of hydrophobic interaction and enables the inhibitory activity of gossypol to be accounted for.

  9. Synthetic sulfoglycolipids targeting the serine-threonine protein kinase Akt.

    PubMed

    Costa, Barbara; Dangate, Milind; Vetro, Maria; Donvito, Giulia; Gabrielli, Luca; Amigoni, Loredana; Cassinelli, Giuliana; Lanzi, Cinzia; Ceriani, Michela; De Gioia, Luca; Filippi, Giulia; Cipolla, Laura; Zaffaroni, Nadia; Perego, Paola; Colombo, Diego

    2016-08-15

    The serine-threonine protein kinase Akt, also known as protein kinase B, is a key component of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)-Akt-mTOR axis. Deregulated activation of this pathway is frequent in human tumors and Akt-dependent signaling appears to be critical in cell survival. PI3K activation generates 3-phosphorylated phosphatidylinositols that bind Akt pleckstrin homology (PH) domain. The blockage of Akt PH domain/phosphoinositides interaction represents a promising approach to interfere with the oncogenic potential of over-activated Akt. In the present study, phosphatidyl inositol mimics based on a β-glucoside scaffold have been synthesized as Akt inhibitors. The compounds possessed one or two lipophilic moieties of different length at the anomeric position of glucose, and an acidic or basic group at C-6. Docking studies, ELISA Akt inhibition assays, and cellular assays on different cell models highlighted 1-O-octadecanoyl-2-O-β-d-sulfoquinovopyranosyl-sn-glycerol as the best Akt inhibitor among the synthesized compounds, which could be considered as a lead for further optimization in the design of Akt inhibitors.

  10. The pharmacogenomics of drug resistance to protein kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gillis, Nancy K; McLeod, Howard L

    2016-09-01

    Dysregulation of growth factor cell signaling is a major driver of most human cancers. This has led to development of numerous drugs targeting protein kinases, with demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of a wide spectrum of cancers. Despite their high initial response rates and survival benefits, the majority of patients eventually develop resistance to these targeted therapies. This review article discusses examples of established mechanisms of drug resistance to anticancer therapies, including drug target mutations or gene amplifications, emergence of alternate signaling pathways, and pharmacokinetic variation. This reveals a role for pharmacogenomic analysis to identify and monitor for resistance, with possible therapeutic strategies to combat chemoresistance. PMID:27620953

  11. The pharmacogenomics of drug resistance to protein kinase inhibitors.

    PubMed

    Gillis, Nancy K; McLeod, Howard L

    2016-09-01

    Dysregulation of growth factor cell signaling is a major driver of most human cancers. This has led to development of numerous drugs targeting protein kinases, with demonstrated efficacy in the treatment of a wide spectrum of cancers. Despite their high initial response rates and survival benefits, the majority of patients eventually develop resistance to these targeted therapies. This review article discusses examples of established mechanisms of drug resistance to anticancer therapies, including drug target mutations or gene amplifications, emergence of alternate signaling pathways, and pharmacokinetic variation. This reveals a role for pharmacogenomic analysis to identify and monitor for resistance, with possible therapeutic strategies to combat chemoresistance.

  12. Diversity, classification and function of the plant protein kinase superfamily

    PubMed Central

    Lehti-Shiu, Melissa D.; Shiu, Shin-Han

    2012-01-01

    Eukaryotic protein kinases belong to a large superfamily with hundreds to thousands of copies and are components of essentially all cellular functions. The goals of this study are to classify protein kinases from 25 plant species and to assess their evolutionary history in conjunction with consideration of their molecular functions. The protein kinase superfamily has expanded in the flowering plant lineage, in part through recent duplications. As a result, the flowering plant protein kinase repertoire, or kinome, is in general significantly larger than other eukaryotes, ranging in size from 600 to 2500 members. This large variation in kinome size is mainly due to the expansion and contraction of a few families, particularly the receptor-like kinase/Pelle family. A number of protein kinases reside in highly conserved, low copy number families and often play broadly conserved regulatory roles in metabolism and cell division, although functions of plant homologues have often diverged from their metazoan counterparts. Members of expanded plant kinase families often have roles in plant-specific processes and some may have contributed to adaptive evolution. Nonetheless, non-adaptive explanations, such as kinase duplicate subfunctionalization and insufficient time for pseudogenization, may also contribute to the large number of seemingly functional protein kinases in plants. PMID:22889912

  13. Coordinate regulation of IkappaB kinases by mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 1 and NF-kappaB-inducing kinase.

    PubMed

    Nemoto, S; DiDonato, J A; Lin, A

    1998-12-01

    IkappaB kinases (IKKalpha and IKKbeta) are key components of the IKK complex that mediates activation of the transcription factor NF-kappaB in response to extracellular stimuli such as inflammatory cytokines, viral and bacterial infection, and UV irradiation. Although NF-kappaB-inducing kinase (NIK) interacts with and activates the IKKs, the upstream kinases for the IKKs still remain obscure. We identified mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase 1 (MEKK1) as an immediate upstream kinase of the IKK complex. MEKK1 is activated by tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) and interleukin-1 and can potentiate the stimulatory effect of TNF-alpha on IKK and NF-kappaB activation. The dominant negative mutant of MEKK1, on the other hand, partially blocks activation of IKK by TNF-alpha. MEKK1 interacts with and stimulates the activities of both IKKalpha and IKKbeta in transfected HeLa and COS-1 cells and directly phosphorylates the IKKs in vitro. Furthermore, MEKK1 appears to act in parallel to NIK, leading to synergistic activation of the IKK complex. The formation of the MEKK1-IKK complex versus the NIK-IKK complex may provide a molecular basis for regulation of the IKK complex by various extracellular signals.

  14. PINCH proteins regulate cardiac contractility by modulating integrin-linked kinase-protein kinase B signaling.

    PubMed

    Meder, Benjamin; Huttner, Inken G; Sedaghat-Hamedani, Farbod; Just, Steffen; Dahme, Tillman; Frese, Karen S; Vogel, Britta; Köhler, Doreen; Kloos, Wanda; Rudloff, Jessica; Marquart, Sabine; Katus, Hugo A; Rottbauer, Wolfgang

    2011-08-01

    Integrin-linked kinase (ILK) is an essential component of the cardiac mechanical stretch sensor and is bound in a protein complex with parvin and PINCH proteins, the so-called ILK-PINCH-parvin (IPP) complex. We have recently shown that inactivation of ILK or β-parvin activity leads to heart failure in zebrafish via reduced protein kinase B (PKB/Akt) activation. Here, we show that PINCH proteins localize at sarcomeric Z disks and costameres in the zebrafish heart and skeletal muscle. To investigate the in vivo role of PINCH proteins for IPP complex stability and PKB signaling within the vertebrate heart, we inactivated PINCH1 and PINCH2 in zebrafish. Inactivation of either PINCH isoform independently leads to instability of ILK, loss of stretch-responsive anf and vegf expression, and progressive heart failure. The predominant cause of heart failure in PINCH morphants seems to be loss of PKB activity, since PKB phosphorylation at serine 473 is significantly reduced in PINCH-deficient hearts and overexpression of constitutively active PKB reconstitutes cardiac function in PINCH morphants. These findings highlight the essential function of PINCH proteins in controlling cardiac contractility by granting IPP/PKB-mediated signaling.

  15. Unveiling the Novel Dual Specificity Protein Kinases in Bacillus anthracis

    PubMed Central

    Arora, Gunjan; Sajid, Andaleeb; Arulanandh, Mary Diana; Singhal, Anshika; Mattoo, Abid R.; Pomerantsev, Andrei P.; Leppla, Stephen H.; Maiti, Souvik; Singh, Yogendra

    2012-01-01

    Dual specificity protein kinases (DSPKs) are unique enzymes that can execute multiple functions in the cell, which are otherwise performed exclusively by serine/threonine and tyrosine protein kinases. In this study, we have characterized the protein kinases Bas2152 (PrkD) and Bas2037 (PrkG) from Bacillus anthracis. Transcriptional analyses of these kinases showed that they are expressed in all phases of growth. In a serendipitous discovery, both kinases were found to be DSPKs. PrkD was found to be similar to the eukaryotic dual specificity Tyr phosphorylation-regulated kinase class of dual specificity kinases, which autophosphorylates on Ser, Thr, and Tyr residues and phosphorylates Ser and Thr residues on substrates. PrkG was found to be a bona fide dual specificity protein kinase that mediates autophosphorylation and substrate phosphorylation on Ser, Thr, and Tyr residues. The sites of phosphorylation in both of the kinases were identified through mass spectrometry. Phosphorylation on Tyr residues regulates the kinase activity of PrkD and PrkG. PrpC, the only known Ser/Thr protein phosphatase, was also found to possess dual specificity. Genistein, a known Tyr kinase inhibitor, was found to inhibit the activities of PrkD and PrkG and affect the growth of B. anthracis cells, indicating a possible role of these kinases in cell growth and development. In addition, the glycolytic enzyme pyruvate kinase was found to be phosphorylated by PrkD on Ser and Thr residues but not by PrkG. Thus, this study provides the first evidence of DSPKs in B. anthracis that belong to different classes and have different modes of regulation. PMID:22711536

  16. Heterodimerization of human orexin receptor 1 and kappa opioid receptor promotes protein kinase A/cAMP-response element binding protein signaling via a Gαs-mediated mechanism.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jing; Zhang, Rumin; Chen, Xiaoyu; Wang, Chunmei; Cai, Xin; Liu, Haiqing; Jiang, Yunlu; Liu, Chuanxin; Bai, Bo

    2015-07-01

    Orexin and dynorphin are co-expressed in the same synaptic vesicles of hypothalamic neurons and play opposing roles in cocaine self-administration, brain stimulation reward, and impulsivity in ventral tegmental area (VTA), where dopamine neurons express both OX1R and KORs. However, detailed mechanisms of how the coreleased peptides and both receptors fine-tune their signalings and physiological/behavioral effects together remain unclear. Here we explore the possibility of heterodimerization between OX1R and KOR and reveal novel signal transduction mechanisms. First, we demonstrated co-expression of OX1R and KOR in rat hippocampal neurons by single-cell PCR. Furthermore, heterodimerization between OX1R and KOR was examined using bioluminescence and fluorescence resonance energy transfer (BRET and FRET). Our data revealed that human OX1R and KOR heterodimerize, and this heterodimer associates with Gαs, leading to increased protein kinase A (PKA) signaling pathway activity, including upregulation of intracellular cAMP levels and cAMP-response element (CRE) luciferase reporter activity, resulting in increased cAMP-response element binding protein (CREB) phosphorylation. These results support the view that OX1R and KOR heterodimerization might have an anti-depressive role.

  17. Expression, purification, crystallization and preliminary crystallographic analysis of human Pim-1 kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Qian, Kevin C.; Studts, Joey; Wang, Lian; Barringer, Kevin; Kronkaitis, Anthony; Peng, Charline; Baptiste, Alistair; LaFrance, Roger; Mische, Sheenah; Farmer, Bennett

    2005-01-01

    Pim kinases, belong to a distinctive serine/threonine protein-kinase family and are involved in cytokine-induced signal transduction and the development of lymphoid malignancies. Human Pim-1 kinase has been cloned, expressed and crystallized Pim kinases, including Pim-1, Pim-2 and Pim-3, belong to a distinctive serine/threonine protein-kinase family. They are involved in cytokine-induced signal transduction and the development of lymphoid malignancies. Their kinase domains are highly homologous to one another, but share low sequence identity to other kinases. Specifically, there are two proline residues in the conserved hinge-region sequence ERPXPX separated by a residue that is non-conserved among Pim kinases. Full-length human Pim-1 kinase (1–313) was cloned and expressed in Escherichia coli as a GST-fusion protein and truncated to Pim-1 (14–313) by thrombin digestion during purification. The Pim-1 (14–313) protein was purified to high homogeneity and monodispersity. This protein preparation yielded small crystals in the initial screening and large crystals after optimization. The large crystals of apo Pim-1 enzyme diffracted to 2.1 Å resolution and belong to space group P6{sub 5}, with unit-cell parameters a = b = 95.9, c = 80.0 Å, β = 120° and one molecule per asymmetric unit.

  18. Src family protein tyrosine kinases induce autoactivation of Bruton's tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Mahajan, S; Fargnoli, J; Burkhardt, A L; Kut, S A; Saouaf, S J; Bolen, J B

    1995-01-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is tyrosine phosphorylated and enzymatically activated following ligation of the B-cell antigen receptor. These events are temporally regulated, and Btk activation follows that of various members of the Src family of protein tyrosine kinases, thus raising the possibility that Src kinases participate in the Btk activation process. We have evaluated the mechanism underlying Btk enzyme activation and have explored the potential regulatory relationship between Btk and Src protein kinases. We demonstrate in COS transient-expression assays that Btk can be activated through intramolecular autophosphorylation at tyrosine 551 and that Btk autophosphorylation is required for Btk catalytic functions. Coexpression of Btk with members of the Src family of protein tyrosine kinases, but not Syk, led to Btk tyrosine phosphorylation and activation. Using a series of point mutations in Blk (a representative Src protein kinase) and Btk, we show that Src kinases activate Btk through an indirect mechanism that requires membrane association of the Src enzymes as well as functional Btk SH3 and SH2 domains. Our results are compatible with the idea that Src protein tyrosine kinases contribute to Btk activation by indirectly stimulating Btk intramolecular autophosphorylation. PMID:7565679

  19. Src family protein tyrosine kinases induce autoactivation of Bruton's tyrosine kinase.

    PubMed

    Mahajan, S; Fargnoli, J; Burkhardt, A L; Kut, S A; Saouaf, S J; Bolen, J B

    1995-10-01

    Bruton's tyrosine kinase (Btk) is tyrosine phosphorylated and enzymatically activated following ligation of the B-cell antigen receptor. These events are temporally regulated, and Btk activation follows that of various members of the Src family of protein tyrosine kinases, thus raising the possibility that Src kinases participate in the Btk activation process. We have evaluated the mechanism underlying Btk enzyme activation and have explored the potential regulatory relationship between Btk and Src protein kinases. We demonstrate in COS transient-expression assays that Btk can be activated through intramolecular autophosphorylation at tyrosine 551 and that Btk autophosphorylation is required for Btk catalytic functions. Coexpression of Btk with members of the Src family of protein tyrosine kinases, but not Syk, led to Btk tyrosine phosphorylation and activation. Using a series of point mutations in Blk (a representative Src protein kinase) and Btk, we show that Src kinases activate Btk through an indirect mechanism that requires membrane association of the Src enzymes as well as functional Btk SH3 and SH2 domains. Our results are compatible with the idea that Src protein tyrosine kinases contribute to Btk activation by indirectly stimulating Btk intramolecular autophosphorylation. PMID:7565679

  20. Crystal structures of two aminoglycoside kinases bound with a eukaryotic protein kinase inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Fong, Desiree H; Xiong, Bing; Hwang, Jiyoung; Berghuis, Albert M

    2011-05-09

    Antibiotic resistance is recognized as a growing healthcare problem. To address this issue, one strategy is to thwart the causal mechanism using an adjuvant in partner with the antibiotic. Aminoglycosides are a class of clinically important antibiotics used for the treatment of serious infections. Their usefulness has been compromised predominantly due to drug inactivation by aminoglycoside-modifying enzymes, such as aminoglycoside phosphotransferases or kinases. These kinases are structurally homologous to eukaryotic Ser/Thr and Tyr protein kinases and it has been shown that some can be inhibited by select protein kinase inhibitors. The aminoglycoside kinase, APH(3')-IIIa, can be inhibited by CKI-7, an ATP-competitive inhibitor for the casein kinase 1. We have determined that CKI-7 is also a moderate inhibitor for the atypical APH(9)-Ia. Here we present the crystal structures of CKI-7-bound APH(3')-IIIa and APH(9)-Ia, the first structures of a eukaryotic protein kinase inhibitor in complex with bacterial kinases. CKI-7 binds to the nucleotide-binding pocket of the enzymes and its binding alters the conformation of the nucleotide-binding loop, the segment homologous to the glycine-rich loop in eukaryotic protein kinases. Comparison of these structures with the CKI-7-bound casein kinase 1 reveals features in the binding pockets that are distinct in the bacterial kinases and could be exploited for the design of a bacterial kinase specific inhibitor. Our results provide evidence that an inhibitor for a subset of APHs can be developed in order to curtail resistance to aminoglycosides.

  1. Insulin-induced Drosophila S6 kinase activation requires phosphoinositide 3-kinase and protein kinase B.

    PubMed Central

    Lizcano, Jose M; Alrubaie, Saif; Kieloch, Agnieszka; Deak, Maria; Leevers, Sally J; Alessi, Dario R

    2003-01-01

    An important mechanism by which insulin regulates cell growth and protein synthesis is through activation of the p70 ribosomal S6 protein kinase (S6K). In mammalian cells, insulin-induced PI3K (phosphoinositide 3-kinase) activation, generates the lipid second messenger PtdIns(3,4,5) P (3), which is thought to play a key role in triggering the activation of S6K. Although the major components of the insulin-signalling pathway are conserved in Drosophila, recent studies suggested that S6K activation does not require PI3K in this system. To investigate further the role of dPI3K (Drosophila PI3K) in dS6K (Drosophila S6K) activation, we examined the effect of two structurally distinct PI3K inhibitors on insulin-induced dS6K activation in Kc167 and S2 Drosophila cell lines. We found that both inhibitors prevented insulin-stimulated phosphorylation and activation of dS6K. To investigate further the role of the dPI3K pathway in regulating dS6K activation, we also used dsRNAi (double-stranded RNA-mediated interference) to decrease expression of dPI3K and the PtdIns(3,4,5) P (3) phosphatase dPTEN ( Drosophila phosphatase and tensin homologue deleted on chromosome 10) in Kc167 and S2 cells. Knock-down of dPI3K prevented dS6K activation, whereas knock-down of dPTEN, which would be expected to increase PtdIns(3,4,5) P (3) levels, stimulated dS6K activity. Moreover, when the expression of the dPI3K target, dPKB (Drosophila protein kinase B), was decreased to undetectable levels, we found that insulin could no longer trigger dS6K activation. This observation provides the first direct demonstration that dPKB is required for insulin-stimulated dS6K activation. We also present evidence that the amino-acid-induced activation of dS6K in the absence of insulin, thought to be mediated by dTOR (Drosophila target of rapamycin), which is unaffected by the inhibition of dPI3K by wortmannin. The results of the present study support the view that, in Drosophila cells, dPI3K and dPKB, as well d

  2. Transphosphorylation of E. coli proteins during production of recombinant protein kinases provides a robust system to characterize kinase specificity

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protein kinase specificity is of fundamental importance to pathway regulation and signal transduction. Here, we report a convenient system to monitor the activity and specificity of recombinant protein kinases expressed in E.coli. We apply this to the study of the cytoplasmic domain of the plant rec...

  3. AMP-activated protein kinase regulates CO2-induced alveolar epithelial dysfunction in rats and human cells by promoting Na,K-ATPase endocytosis

    PubMed Central

    Vadász, István; Dada, Laura A.; Briva, Arturo; Trejo, Humberto E.; Welch, Lynn C.; Chen, Jiwang; Tóth, Péter T.; Lecuona, Emilia; Witters, Lee A.; Schumacker, Paul T.; Chandel, Navdeep S.; Seeger, Werner; Sznajder, Jacob I.

    2008-01-01

    Hypercapnia (elevated CO2 levels) occurs as a consequence of poor alveolar ventilation and impairs alveolar fluid reabsorption (AFR) by promoting Na,K-ATPase endocytosis. We studied the mechanisms regulating CO2-induced Na,K-ATPase endocytosis in alveolar epithelial cells (AECs) and alveolar epithelial dysfunction in rats. Elevated CO2 levels caused a rapid activation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) in AECs, a key regulator of metabolic homeostasis. Activation of AMPK was mediated by a CO2-triggered increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration and Ca2+/calmodulin-dependent kinase kinase-β (CaMKK-β). Chelating intracellular Ca2+ or abrogating CaMKK-β function by gene silencing or chemical inhibition prevented the CO2-induced AMPK activation in AECs. Activation of AMPK or overexpression of constitutively active AMPK was sufficient to activate PKC-ζ and promote Na,K-ATPase endocytosis. Inhibition or downregulation of AMPK via adenoviral delivery of dominant-negative AMPK-α1 prevented CO2-induced Na,K-ATPase endocytosis. The hypercapnia effects were independent of intracellular ROS. Exposure of rats to hypercapnia for up to 7 days caused a sustained decrease in AFR. Pretreatment with a β-adrenergic agonist, isoproterenol, or a cAMP analog ameliorated the hypercapnia-induced impairment of AFR. Accordingly, we provide evidence that elevated CO2 levels are sensed by AECs and that AMPK mediates CO2-induced Na,K-ATPase endocytosis and alveolar epithelial dysfunction, which can be prevented with β-adrenergic agonists and cAMP. PMID:18188452

  4. Regulation of tomato Prf by Pto-like protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Mucyn, Tatiana S; Wu, Ai-Jiuan; Balmuth, Alexi L; Arasteh, Julia Maryam; Rathjen, John P

    2009-04-01

    Tomato Prf encodes a nucleotide-binding domain shared by Apaf-1, certain R proteins, and CED-4 fused to C-terminal leucine-rich repeats (NBARC-LRR) protein that is required for bacterial immunity to Pseudomonas syringae and sensitivity to the organophosphate fenthion. The signaling pathways involve two highly related protein kinases. Pto kinase mediates direct recognition of the bacterial effector proteins AvrPto or AvrPtoB. Fen kinase is required for fenthion sensitivity and recognition of bacterial effectors related to AvrPtoB. The role of Pto and its association with Prf has been characterized but Fen is poorly described. We show that, similar to Pto, Fen requires N-myristoylation and kinase activity for signaling and interacts with the N-terminal domain of Prf. Thus, the mechanisms of activation of Prf by the respective protein kinases are similar. Prf-Fen interaction is underlined by coregulatory mechanisms in which Prf negatively regulates Fen, most likely by controlling kinase activity. We further characterized negative regulation of Prf by Pto, and show that regulation is mediated by the previously described negative regulatory patch. Remarkably, the effectors released negative regulation of Prf in a manner dependent on Pto kinase activity. The data suggest a model in which Prf associates generally with Pto-like kinases in tightly regulated complexes, which are activated by effector-mediated disruption of negative regulation. Release of negative regulation may be a general feature of activation of NBARC-LRR proteins by cognate effectors.

  5. The Arabidopsis CDPK-SnRK superfamily of protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Hrabak, Estelle M; Chan, Catherine W M; Gribskov, Michael; Harper, Jeffrey F; Choi, Jung H; Halford, Nigel; Kudla, Jorg; Luan, Sheng; Nimmo, Hugh G; Sussman, Michael R; Thomas, Martine; Walker-Simmons, Kay; Zhu, Jian-Kang; Harmon, Alice C

    2003-06-01

    The CDPK-SnRK superfamily consists of seven types of serine-threonine protein kinases: calcium-dependent protein kinase (CDPKs), CDPK-related kinases (CRKs), phosphoenolpyruvate carboxylase kinases (PPCKs), PEP carboxylase kinase-related kinases (PEPRKs), calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CaMKs), calcium and calmodulin-dependent protein kinases (CCaMKs), and SnRKs. Within this superfamily, individual isoforms and subfamilies contain distinct regulatory domains, subcellular targeting information, and substrate specificities. Our analysis of the Arabidopsis genome identified 34 CDPKs, eight CRKs, two PPCKs, two PEPRKs, and 38 SnRKs. No definitive examples were found for a CCaMK similar to those previously identified in lily (Lilium longiflorum) and tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum) or for a CaMK similar to those in animals or yeast. CDPKs are present in plants and a specific subgroup of protists, but CRKs, PPCKs, PEPRKs, and two of the SnRK subgroups have been found only in plants. CDPKs and at least one SnRK have been implicated in decoding calcium signals in Arabidopsis. Analysis of intron placements supports the hypothesis that CDPKs, CRKs, PPCKs and PEPRKs have a common evolutionary origin; however there are no conserved intron positions between these kinases and the SnRK subgroup. CDPKs and SnRKs are found on all five Arabidopsis chromosomes. The presence of closely related kinases in regions of the genome known to have arisen by genome duplication indicates that these kinases probably arose by divergence from common ancestors. The PlantsP database provides a resource of continuously updated information on protein kinases from Arabidopsis and other plants.

  6. Phosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-stimulated protein kinase II at T286 enhances invasion and migration of human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Chi, Mengna; Evans, Hamish; Gilchrist, Jackson; Mayhew, Jack; Hoffman, Alexander; Pearsall, Elizabeth Ann; Jankowski, Helen; Brzozowski, Joshua Stephen; Skelding, Kathryn Anne

    2016-01-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-stimulated protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a multi-functional kinase that controls a range of cellular functions, including proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. The biological properties of CaMKII are regulated by multi-site phosphorylation. However, the role that CaMKII phosphorylation plays in cancer cell metastasis has not been examined. We demonstrate herein that CaMKII expression and phosphorylation at T286 is increased in breast cancer when compared to normal breast tissue, and that increased CAMK2 mRNA is associated with poor breast cancer patient prognosis (worse overall and distant metastasis free survival). Additionally, we show that overexpression of WT, T286D and T286V forms of CaMKII in MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells increases invasion, migration and anchorage independent growth, and that overexpression of the T286D phosphomimic leads to a further increase in the invasive, migratory and anchorage independent growth capacity of these cells. Pharmacological inhibition of CaMKII decreases MDA-MB-231 migration and invasion. Furthermore, we demonstrate that overexpression of T286D, but not WT or T286V-CaMKII, leads to phosphorylation of FAK, STAT5a, and Akt. These results demonstrate a novel function for phosphorylation of CaMKII at T286 in the control of breast cancer metastasis, offering a promising target for the development of therapeutics to prevent breast cancer metastasis. PMID:27605043

  7. Phosphorylation of calcium/calmodulin-stimulated protein kinase II at T286 enhances invasion and migration of human breast cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Chi, Mengna; Evans, Hamish; Gilchrist, Jackson; Mayhew, Jack; Hoffman, Alexander; Pearsall, Elizabeth Ann; Jankowski, Helen; Brzozowski, Joshua Stephen; Skelding, Kathryn Anne

    2016-01-01

    Calcium/calmodulin-stimulated protein kinase II (CaMKII) is a multi-functional kinase that controls a range of cellular functions, including proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. The biological properties of CaMKII are regulated by multi-site phosphorylation. However, the role that CaMKII phosphorylation plays in cancer cell metastasis has not been examined. We demonstrate herein that CaMKII expression and phosphorylation at T286 is increased in breast cancer when compared to normal breast tissue, and that increased CAMK2 mRNA is associated with poor breast cancer patient prognosis (worse overall and distant metastasis free survival). Additionally, we show that overexpression of WT, T286D and T286V forms of CaMKII in MDA-MB-231 and MCF-7 breast cancer cells increases invasion, migration and anchorage independent growth, and that overexpression of the T286D phosphomimic leads to a further increase in the invasive, migratory and anchorage independent growth capacity of these cells. Pharmacological inhibition of CaMKII decreases MDA-MB-231 migration and invasion. Furthermore, we demonstrate that overexpression of T286D, but not WT or T286V-CaMKII, leads to phosphorylation of FAK, STAT5a, and Akt. These results demonstrate a novel function for phosphorylation of CaMKII at T286 in the control of breast cancer metastasis, offering a promising target for the development of therapeutics to prevent breast cancer metastasis. PMID:27605043

  8. Developing irreversible inhibitors of the protein kinase cysteinome

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Qingsong; Sabnis, Yogesh; Zhao, Zheng; Zhang, Tinghu; Buhrlage, Sara J.; Jones, Lyn H.; Gray, Nathanael S.

    2013-01-01

    Protein kinases are a large family of approximately 530 highly conserved enzymes that transfer a γ-phosphate group from ATP to a variety of amino acid residues such as tyrosine, serine and threonine which serves as a ubiquitous mechanism for cellular signal transduction. The clinical success of a number of kinase-directed drugs and the frequent observation of disease causing mutations in protein kinases suggest that a large number of kinases may represent therapeutically relevant targets. To-date the majority of clinical and preclinical kinase inhibitors are ATP-competitive, non-covalent inhibitors that achieve selectivity through recognition of unique features of particular protein kinases. Recently there has been renewed interest in the development of irreversible inhibitors that form covalent bonds with cysteine or other nucleophilic residues in the ATP-binding pocket. Irreversible kinase inhibitors have a number of potential advantages including prolonged pharmacodynamics, suitability for rational design, high potency and ability to validate pharmacological specificity through mutation of the reactive cysteine residue. Here we review recent efforts to develop cysteine-targeted irreversible protein kinase inhibitors and discuss their modes of recognizing the ATP-binding pocket and their biological activity profiles. In addition, we provided an informatics assessment of the potential ‘kinase-cysteinome’ and discuss strategies for the efficient development of new covalent inhibitors. PMID:23438744

  9. Resolution of thylakoid polyphenol oxidase and a protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Race, H.L.; Davenport, J.W.; Hind, G.

    1995-12-31

    The predominant protein kinase activity in octylglucoside (OG) extracts of spinach thylakoids has been attributed to a 64-kDa protein, tp64. Recent work calls into question the relation between tp64 and protein kinase activity, which were fractionated apart using fluid phase IEF and hydroxylapatite chromatography. Hind et al. sequenced tp64 from the cDNA and showed it to be a polyphenol oxidase (PPO) homolog. Its transit peptide indicates a location for the mature protein within the thylakoid lumen, where there is presumably no ATP and where it is remote from the presumed kinase substrates: the stromally exposed regions of integral PS-II membrane proteins. Here the authors suggest that the kinase is a 64-kDa protein distinct from tp64.

  10. Distinct roles for extracellular-signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK) mitogen-activated protein kinases and phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase in the regulation of Mcl-1 synthesis.

    PubMed Central

    Schubert, K M; Duronio, V

    2001-01-01

    Alterations in the expression of various Bcl-2 family members may act as one means by which a cell's survival may be regulated. The mechanism by which cytokines regulate expression of Bcl-2 family members was examined in the haemopoietic cell line TF-1. Cytokine-induced Mcl-1 protein expression was shown to be controlled through a pathway dependent upon phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI 3-kinase). The cytokine-induced increase in mRNA transcription was not dependent upon PI 3-kinase, thus dissociating the immediate-early transcription factors responsible for Mcl-1 transcription from the PI 3-kinase signalling pathway. In contrast, Mcl-1 mRNA levels were dependent upon MEK [mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK)/extracellular-signal-regulated protein kinase kinase] activation, suggesting a role for the Ras/MEK/MAPK pathway in Mcl-1 transcription. Activation of PI 3-kinase was shown to be necessary to stimulate Mcl-1 protein translation. This was not due to any effect on prolonging the half-life of the protein. Finally, the lipid second messenger ceramide was shown to cause a reduction in Mcl-1 protein translation, probably via its ability to inhibit protein kinase B activation, providing further clues regarding the death-inducing effect of this lipid. PMID:11368774

  11. PDGF-induced receptor phosphorylation and phosphoinositide hydrolysis are unaffected by protein kinase C activation in mouse swiss 3T3 and human skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Sturani, E.; Vicentini, L.M.; Zippel, R.; Toschi, L.; Pandiella-Alonso, A.; Comoglio, P.M.; Meldolesi, J.

    1986-05-29

    Short (1-10 min) pretreatment of intact cells with activators of protein kinase C (e.g. phorbol-12 myristate, 13-acetate, PMA) affects the activity of a variety of surface receptors (for growth factors, hormones and neurotransmitters), with inhibition of transmembrane signal generation. In two types of fibroblasts it is demonstrated that the PDGF receptor is unaffected by PMA. Exposure to PMA at concentrations up to 100 nM for 10 min failed to inhibit either one of the agonist-induced, receptor-coupled responses of PDGF: the autophosphorylation of receptor molecules at tyrosine residues, and the hydrolysis of membrane polyphosphoinositides. In contrast, the EGF receptor autophosphorylation (in A 431 cells) and the bombesin-induced phosphoinositide hydrolysis were readily inhibited by PMA.

  12. Specific dephosphorylation of Janus Kinase 2 by protein tyrosine phosphatases.

    PubMed

    Li, Jianzhuo; Liu, Xidong; Chu, Huiying; Fu, Xueqi; Li, Tianbao; Hu, Lianghai; Xing, Shu; Li, Guohui; Gu, Jingkai; Zhao, Zhizhuang Joe

    2015-01-01

    Many protein kinases are activated through phosphorylation of an activation loop thereby turning on downstream signaling pathways. Activation of JAK2, a nonreceptor tyrosine kinase with an important role in growth factor and cytokine signaling, requires phosphorylation of the 1007 and 1008 tyrosyl residues. Dephosphorylation of these two sites by phosphatases presumably inactivates the enzyme, but the underlying mechanism is not known. In this study, we employed MALDI-TOF/TOF and triple quadrupole mass spectrometers to analyze qualitatively and quantitatively the dephosphorylation process by using synthetic peptides derived from the tandem autophosphorylation sites (Y1007 and Y1008) of human JAK2. We found that tyrosine phosphatases catalyzed the dephosphorylation reaction sequentially, but different enzymes exhibited different selectivity. Protein tyrosine phosphatase 1B caused rapid dephosphorylation of Y1008 followed by Y1007, while SHP1 and SHP2 selectively dephosphorylated Y1008 only, and yet HePTP randomly removed a single phosphate from either Y1007 or Y1008, leaving behind mono-phosphorylated peptides. The specificity of dephosphorylation was further confirmed by molecular modeling. The data reveal multiple modes of JAK2 regulation by tyrosine phosphatases, reflecting a complex, and intricate interplay between protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation.

  13. Exploring the function of protein kinases in schistosomes: perspectives from the laboratory and from comparative genomics

    PubMed Central

    Walker, Anthony J.; Ressurreição, Margarida; Rothermel, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Eukaryotic protein kinases are well conserved through evolution. The genome of Schistosoma mansoni, which causes intestinal schistosomiasis, encodes over 250 putative protein kinases with all of the main eukaryotic groups represented. However, unraveling functional roles for these kinases is a considerable endeavor, particularly as protein kinases regulate multiple and sometimes overlapping cell and tissue functions in organisms. In this article, elucidating protein kinase signal transduction and function in schistosomes is considered from the perspective of the state-of-the-art methodologies used and comparative organismal biology, with a focus on current advances and future directions. Using the free-living nematode Caenorhabditis elegans as a comparator we predict roles for various schistosome protein kinases in processes vital for host invasion and successful parasitism such as sensory behavior, growth and development. It is anticipated that the characterization of schistosome protein kinases in the context of parasite function will catalyze cutting edge research into host-parasite interactions and will reveal new targets for developing drug interventions against human schistosomiasis. PMID:25132840

  14. Dataset of integrin-linked kinase protein: Protein interactions in cardiomyocytes identified by mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Traister, Alexandra; Lu, Mingliang; Coles, John G; Maynes, Jason T

    2016-06-01

    Using hearts from mice overexpressing integrin linked kinase (ILK) behind the cardiac specific promoter αMHC, we have performed immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry to identify novel ILK protein:protein interactions that regulate cardiomyocyte activity and calcium flux. Integrin linked kinase complexes were captured from mouse heart lysates using a commercial antibody, with subsequent liquid chromatography tandem mass spectral analysis. Interacting partners were identified using the MASCOT server, and important interactions verified using reverse immunoprecipitation and mass spectrometry. All ILK interacting proteins were identified in a non-biased manner, and are stored in the ProteomeXchange Consortium via the PRIDE partner repository (reference ID PRIDE: PXD001053). The functional role of identified ILK interactions in cardiomyocyte function and arrhythmia were subsequently confirmed in human iPSC-cardiomyocytes. PMID:27408918

  15. Discovery and Characterization of Non-ATP Site Inhibitors of the Mitogen Activated Protein (MAP) Kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Comess, Kenneth M.; Sun, Chaohong; Abad-Zapatero, Cele; Goedken, Eric R.; Gum, Rebecca J.; Borhani, David W.; Argiriadi, Maria; Groebe, Duncan R.; Jia, Yong; Clampit, Jill E.; Haasch, Deanna L.; Smith, Harriet T.; Wang, Sanyi; Song, Danying; Coen, Michael L.; Cloutier, Timothy E.; Tang, Hua; Cheng, Xueheng; Quinn, Christopher; Liu, Bo; Xin, Zhili; Liu, Gang; Fry, Elizabeth H.; Stoll, Vincent; Ng, Teresa I.; Banach, David; Marcotte, Doug; Burns, David J.; Calderwood, David J.; Hajduk, Philip J.

    2012-03-02

    Inhibition of protein kinases has validated therapeutic utility for cancer, with at least seven kinase inhibitor drugs on the market. Protein kinase inhibition also has significant potential for a variety of other diseases, including diabetes, pain, cognition, and chronic inflammatory and immunologic diseases. However, as the vast majority of current approaches to kinase inhibition target the highly conserved ATP-binding site, the use of kinase inhibitors in treating nononcology diseases may require great selectivity for the target kinase. As protein kinases are signal transducers that are involved in binding to a variety of other proteins, targeting alternative, less conserved sites on the protein may provide an avenue for greater selectivity. Here we report an affinity-based, high-throughput screening technique that allows nonbiased interrogation of small molecule libraries for binding to all exposed sites on a protein surface. This approach was used to screen both the c-Jun N-terminal protein kinase Jnk-1 (involved in insulin signaling) and p38{alpha} (involved in the formation of TNF{alpha} and other cytokines). In addition to canonical ATP-site ligands, compounds were identified that bind to novel allosteric sites. The nature, biological relevance, and mode of binding of these ligands were extensively characterized using two-dimensional {sup 1}H/{sup 13}C NMR spectroscopy, protein X-ray crystallography, surface plasmon resonance, and direct enzymatic activity and activation cascade assays. Jnk-1 and p38{alpha} both belong to the MAP kinase family, and the allosteric ligands for both targets bind similarly on a ledge of the protein surface exposed by the MAP insertion present in the CMGC family of protein kinases and distant from the active site. Medicinal chemistry studies resulted in an improved Jnk-1 ligand able to increase adiponectin secretion in human adipocytes and increase insulin-induced protein kinase PKB phosphorylation in human hepatocytes, in

  16. Protein kinase A alterations in adrenocortical tumors.

    PubMed

    Espiard, S; Ragazzon, B; Bertherat, J

    2014-11-01

    Stimulation of the cAMP pathway by adrenocorticotropin (ACTH) is essential for adrenal cortex maintenance, glucocorticoid and adrenal androgens synthesis, and secretion. Various molecular and cellular alterations of the cAMP pathway have been observed in endocrine tumors. Protein kinase A (PKA) is a central key component of the cAMP pathway. Molecular alterations of PKA subunits have been observed in adrenocortical tumors. PKA molecular defects can be germline in hereditary disorders or somatic in sporadic tumors. Heterozygous germline inactivating mutations of the PKA regulatory subunit RIα gene (PRKAR1A) can be observed in patients with ACTH-independent Cushing's syndrome (CS) due to primary pigmented nodular adrenocortical disease (PPNAD). PRKAR1A is considered as a tumor suppressor gene. Interestingly, these mutations can also be observed as somatic alterations in sporadic cortisol-secreting adrenocortical adenomas. Germline gene duplication of the catalytic subunits Cα (PRKACA) has been observed in patients with PPNAD. Furthermore, exome sequencing revealed recently activating somatic mutations of PRKACA in about 40% of cortisol-secreting adrenocortical adenomas. In vitro and in vivo functional studies help in the progress to understand the mechanisms of adrenocortical tumors development due to PKA regulatory subunits alterations. All these alterations are observed in benign oversecreting tumors and are mimicking in some way cAMP pathway constitutive activation. On the long term, unraveling these alterations will open new strategies of pharmacological treatment targeting the cAMP pathway in adrenal tumors and cortisol-secretion disorders. PMID:25105543

  17. [Protein kinase C activation induces platelet apoptosis].

    PubMed

    Zhao, Li-Li; Chen, Meng-Xing; Zhang, Ming-Yi; Dai, Ke-Sheng

    2013-10-01

    Platelet apoptosis elucidated by either physical or chemical compound or platelet storage occurs wildly, which might play important roles in controlling the numbers and functions of circulated platelets, or in the development of some platelet-related diseases. However, up to now, a little is known about the regulatory mechanisms of platelet apoptosis. Protein kinase C (PKC) is highly expressed in platelets and plays central roles in regulating platelet functions. Although there is evidence indicating that PKC is involved in the regulation of apoptosis of nucleated cells, it is still unclear whether PKC plays a role in platelet apoptosis. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of PKC in platelet apoptosis. The effects of PKC on mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), phosphatidylserine (PS) exposure, and caspase-3 activation of platelets were analyzed by flow cytometry and Western blot. The results showed that the ΔΨm depolarization in platelets was induced by PKC activator in time-dependent manner, and the caspase-3 activation in platelets was induced by PKC in concentration-dependent manner. However, the platelets incubated with PKC inhibitor did not results in ΔΨm depolarization and PS exposure. It is concluded that the PKC activation induces platelet apoptosis through influencing the mitochondrial functions and activating caspase 3. The finds suggest a novel mechanism for PKC in regulating platelet numbers and functions, which has important pathophysiological implications for thrombosis and hemostasis.

  18. [The role of Gilgamesh protein kinase in Drosophila melanogaster spermatogenesis].

    PubMed

    Nerusheva, O O; Dorogova, N V; Gubanova, N V; Omel'ianchuk, L V

    2008-09-01

    The cellular function of the gilgamesh mutation (89B9-12) of casein kinase gene in Drosophila spermatogenesis was studied. It was demonstrated that the sterility resulting from this mutation is connected with the abnormalities in spermatid individualization. A phylogenetic study of the protein sequences of casein kinases 1 from various organisms was conducted. The Gilgamesh protein was shown to be phylogenetically closer to the cytoplasmic casein kinase family, represented by the YCK3, YCK2, and YCK1 proteins of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and animal gamma-casein kinases. It is known that these yeast casein kinases are involved in vesicular trafficking, which, in turn, is related in its genetic control to the cell membrane remodeling during spermatid individualization. Thus, the data of phylogenetic analysis fit well the results obtained by studying the mutation phenotype. PMID:18846817

  19. Multiple regulatory domains on the Byr2 protein kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Tu, H; Barr, M; Dong, D L; Wigler, M

    1997-01-01

    Byr2 protein kinase, a homolog of mammalian mitogen-activated protein kinase/extracellular signal-regulated kinase kinase (MEKK) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae STE11, is required for pheromone-induced sexual differentiation in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. Byr2 functions downstream of Ste4, Ras1, and the membrane-associated receptor-coupled heterotrimeric G-protein alpha subunit, Gpa1. Byr2 has a distinctive N-terminal kinase regulatory domain and a characteristic C-terminal kinase catalytic domain. Ste4 and Ras1 interact with the regulatory domain of Byr2 directly. Here, we define the domains of Byr2 that bind Ste4 and Ras1 and show that the Byr2 regulatory domain binds to the catalytic domain in the two-hybrid system. Using Byr2 mutants, we demonstrate that these direct physical interactions are all required for proper signaling. In particular, the physical association between Byr2 regulatory and catalytic domains appears to result in autoinhibition, the loss of which results in kinase activation. Furthermore, we provide evidence that Shk1, the S. pombe homolog of the STE20 protein kinase, can directly antagonize the Byr2 intramolecular interaction, possibly by phosphorylating Byr2. PMID:9315645

  20. Distinct expression patterns of ICK/MAK/MOK protein kinases in the intestine implicate functional diversity.

    PubMed

    Chen, Tufeng; Wu, Di; Moskaluk, Christopher A; Fu, Zheng

    2013-01-01

    ICK/MRK (intestinal cell kinase/MAK-related kinase), MAK (male germ cell-associated kinase), and MOK (MAPK/MAK/MRK-overlapping kinase) are closely related serine/threonine protein kinases in the protein kinome. The biological functions and regulatory mechanisms of the ICK/MAK/MOK family are still largely elusive. Despite significant similarities in their catalytic domains, they diverge markedly in the sequence and structural organization of their C-terminal non-catalytic domains, raising the question as to whether they have distinct, overlapping, or redundant biological functions. In order to gain insights into their biological activities and lay a fundamental groundwork for functional studies, we investigated the spatio-temporal distribution patterns and the expression dynamics of ICK/MAK/MOK protein kinases in the intestine. We found that ICK/MAK/MOK proteins display divergent expression patterns along the duodenum-to-colon axis and during postnatal murine development. Furthermore, they are differentially partitioned between intestinal epithelium and mesenchyme. A significant increase in the protein level of ICK, but not MAK, was induced in human primary colon cancer specimens. ICK protein level was up-regulated whereas MOK protein level was down-regulated in mouse intestinal adenomas as compared with their adjacent normal intestinal mucosa. These data suggest distinct roles for ICK/MAK/MOK protein kinases in the regulation of intestinal neoplasia. Taken together, our findings demonstrate that the expressions of ICK/MAK/MOK proteins in the intestinal tract can be differentially and dynamically regulated, implicating a significant functional diversity within this group of protein kinases.

  1. Protein tyrosine kinase and mitogen-activated protein kinase signalling pathways contribute to differences in heterophil-mediated innate immune responsiveness between two lines of broilers

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Protein tyrosine phosphorylation mediates signal transduction of cellular processes, with protein tyrosine kinases (PTKs) regulating virtually all signaling events. The mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) super-family consists of three conserved pathways that convert receptor activation into ce...

  2. Purification and characterization of a casein kinase 2-type protein kinase from pea nuclei

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Li, H.; Roux, S. J.

    1992-01-01

    Almost all the polyamine-stimulated protein kinase activity associated with the chromatin fraction of nuclei purified from etiolated pea (Pisum sativum L.) plumules is present in a single enzyme that can be extracted from chromatin by 0.35 molar NaCl. This protein kinase can be further purified over 2000-fold by salt fractionation and anion-exchange and casein-agarose column chromatography, after which it is more than 90% pure. The purified kinase has a specific activity of about 650 nanomoles per minute per milligram protein in the absence of polyamines, with either ATP or GTP as phosphoryl donor. Spermidine can stimulate its activity fourfold, with half-maximal activation at about 2 millimolar. Spermine and putrescine also stimulate activity, although somewhat less effectively. This kinase has a tetrameric alpha 2 beta 2 structure with a native molecular weight of 130,000, and subunit molecular weights of 36,000 for the catalytic subunit (alpha) and 29,000 for the regulatory subunit (beta). In western blot analyses, only the alpha subunit reacts strongly with polyclonal antibodies to a Drosophila casein kinase II. The pea kinase can use casein and phosvitin as artificial substrates, phosphorylating both the serine and threonine residues of casein. It has a pH optimum near 8.0, a Vmax of 1.5 micromoles per minute per milligram protein, and a Km for ATP of approximately 75 micromolar. Its activity can be almost completely inhibited by heparin at 5 micrograms per milliliter, but is relatively insensitive to concentrations of staurosporine, K252a, and chlorpromazine that strongly antagonize Ca(2+) -regulated protein kinases. These results are discussed in relation to recent findings that casein kinase 2-type kinases may phosphorylate trans-acting factors that bind to light-regulated promoters in plants.

  3. Cultivated ginseng suppresses ultraviolet B-induced collagenase activation via mitogen-activated protein kinases and nuclear factor κB/activator protein-1-dependent signaling in human dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Hwang, Yong Pil; Choi, Jae Ho; Kim, Hyung Gyun; Choi, Jun Min; Hwang, Sang Kyu; Chung, Young Chul; Jeong, Hye Gwang

    2012-06-01

    Cultivated ginseng (CG) (Panax ginseng C.A. Meyer), an herb used in Korean herbal medicine, has been widely used in China and Japan to treat fatigue and to enhance resistance to many diseases. It contains many bioactive constituents, including various ginsenosides that are believed to have antioxidant, immunostimulatory, and antiaging activities. Previous studies have revealed that treatment with Panax ginseng is significantly associated with reduced photoaging, but the underlying mode of action has not been elucidated. In this study, we hypothesized that CG inhibits ultraviolet B (UVB)-induced collagenase activation through mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and nuclear factor κB (NF-κB)/activator protein-1 (AP-1)-dependent signaling in human skin fibroblasts. HS68 cells were treated with CG, followed by irradiation with UVB. Those effects were assessed by semiquantitative polymerase chain reaction, Western blotting, and enzymic activity assays. We found that CG increased cell viability and inhibited the production of reactive oxygen species in HS68 cells exposed to UVB irradiation. Pretreatment of HS68 cells with CG inhibited UVB-induced production of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) 1 and MMP-13. Western blot analysis further revealed that CG markedly suppressed the enhancement of collagen degradation in UVB-exposed HS68 cells. Cultivated ginseng also suppressed UVB-induced activation of NF-κB, c-Jun, and c-Fos and the phosphorylation of MAPKs, which are upstream modulators of NF-κB and AP-1. These results indicate that CG inhibits UVB-induced collagenolytic MMP production by interfering with MAPK/AP-1 and NF-κB signaling and thus may be useful in the prevention and treatment of skin photoaging.

  4. Activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase is necessary but not sufficient for proliferation of human thyroid epithelial cells induced by mutant Ras.

    PubMed

    Gire, V; Marshall, C J; Wynford-Thomas, D

    1999-08-26

    Given the high frequency of ras oncogene activation in several common human cancers, its signal pathways are an important target for novel therapy. For practical reasons, however, these have been studied mainly in the context of transformation of established fibroblast cell lines, whereas ras acts at an earlier stage in human tumorigenesis and predominantly on epithelial cells. Here we have developed a more directly relevant model - human primary thyroid epithelial cells - which are a major target of naturally-occurring Ras mutation, and in which expression of mutant Ras in culture induces clonal expansion without morphological transformation, closely reproducing the phenotype of the corresponding tumour in vivo. Transient or stable expression of mutant H-ras (by scrapeloading or retroviral infection) at levels which stimulated proliferation induced sustained activation and translocation of MAP kinase (MAPK) in these cells. Inhibition of the MAPK pathway at the level of MAPKK, by expression of a dominant-negative mutant or by the pharmacological inhibitor PD98059, efficiently blocked the proliferative response. Conversely, selective activation of MAPK by a constitutively-active MAPKK1 mutant failed to mimic the action of Ras and, although this was achievable with activated Raf, micro-injection of anti-ras antibodies showed that this still required endogenous wild-type Ras function. In contrast to recent results obtained with a rodent thyroid cell line (WRT), therefore, activation of the MAPK pathway is necessary, but not sufficient, for the proliferogenic action of mutant Ras on primary human thyroid cells. These data emphasize the unreliability of extrapolation from cell lines and establish the feasibility of using a more representative human epithelial model for Ras signalling studies.

  5. Recent developments of protein kinase inhibitors as potential AD therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Tell, Volkmar; Hilgeroth, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Present Alzheimer's disease (AD) therapies suffer from inefficient effects on AD symptoms like memory or cognition, especially in later states of the disease. Used acteylcholine esterase inhibitors or the NMDA receptor antagonist memantine address one target structure which is involved in a complex, multifactorial disease progression. So the benefit for patients is presently poor. A more close insight in the AD progression identified more suggested target structures for drug development. Strategies of AD drug development concentrate on novel target structures combined with the established ones dedicated for combined therapy regimes, preferably by the use of one drug which may address two target structures. Protein kinases have been identified as promising target structures because they are involved in AD progression pathways like pathophysiological tau protein phosphorylations and amyloid β toxicity. The review article will shortly view early inhibitors of single protein kinases like glycogen synthase kinase (gsk3) β and cyclin dependent kinase 5. Novel inhibitors will be discussed which address novel AD relevant protein kinases like dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A). Moreover, multitargeting inhibitors will be presented which target several protein kinases and those which are suspected in influencing other AD relevant processes. Such a multitargeting is the most promising strategy to effectively hamper the multifactorial disease progression and thus gives perspective hopes for a future better patient benefit. PMID:24312003

  6. Recent developments of protein kinase inhibitors as potential AD therapeutics

    PubMed Central

    Tell, Volkmar; Hilgeroth, Andreas

    2013-01-01

    Present Alzheimer’s disease (AD) therapies suffer from inefficient effects on AD symptoms like memory or cognition, especially in later states of the disease. Used acteylcholine esterase inhibitors or the NMDA receptor antagonist memantine address one target structure which is involved in a complex, multifactorial disease progression. So the benefit for patients is presently poor. A more close insight in the AD progression identified more suggested target structures for drug development. Strategies of AD drug development concentrate on novel target structures combined with the established ones dedicated for combined therapy regimes, preferably by the use of one drug which may address two target structures. Protein kinases have been identified as promising target structures because they are involved in AD progression pathways like pathophysiological tau protein phosphorylations and amyloid β toxicity. The review article will shortly view early inhibitors of single protein kinases like glycogen synthase kinase (gsk3) β and cyclin dependent kinase 5. Novel inhibitors will be discussed which address novel AD relevant protein kinases like dual-specificity tyrosine phosphorylation regulated kinase 1A (DYRK1A). Moreover, multitargeting inhibitors will be presented which target several protein kinases and those which are suspected in influencing other AD relevant processes. Such a multitargeting is the most promising strategy to effectively hamper the multifactorial disease progression and thus gives perspective hopes for a future better patient benefit. PMID:24312003

  7. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinase Kinase 3 Is Required for Regulation during Dark-Light Transition.

    PubMed

    Lee, Horim

    2015-07-01

    Plant growth and development are coordinately orchestrated by environmental cues and phytohormones. Light acts as a key environmental factor for fundamental plant growth and physiology through photosensory phytochromes and underlying molecular mechanisms. Although phytochromes are known to possess serine/threonine protein kinase activities, whether they trigger a signal transduction pathway via an intracellular protein kinase network remains unknown. In analyses of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase (MAPKK, also called MKK) mutants, the mkk3 mutant has shown both a hypersensitive response in plant hormone gibberellin (GA) and a less sensitive response in red light signaling. Surprisingly, light-induced MAPK activation in wild-type (WT) seedlings and constitutive MAPK phosphorylation in dark-grown mkk3 mutant seedlings have also been found, respectively. Therefore, this study suggests that MKK3 acts in negative regulation in darkness and in light-induced MAPK activation during dark-light transition. PMID:26082029

  8. Citron kinase enhances ubiquitination of HIV-1 Gag protein and intracellular HIV-1 budding.

    PubMed

    Ding, Jiwei; Zhao, Jianyuan; Sun, Lei; Mi, Zeyun; Cen, Shan

    2016-09-01

    Assembly and budding of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) particles is a complex process involving a number of host proteins. We have previously reported that the RhoA effector citron kinase enhances HIV-1 production. However, the underlying mechanism is not clear. In this study, we found that citron kinase interacted with HIV-1 Gag protein via its zinc finger and leucine zipper domains. Electron microscopy analysis revealed that citron kinase induced viral particle assembly in multivesicular bodies (MVBs). Citron kinase enhanced ubiquitination of HIV-1 Gag protein. Knockdown of Nedd4L, a member of the HECT ubiquitin E3 ligase family, partly decreased the ability of citron kinase to enhance HIV-1 production and reduced ubiquitination of HIV-1 Gag. Interestingly, the function of citron kinase to promote HIV-1 budding was severely impaired when endogenous ALIX was knocked down. Overexpression of the AAA-type ATPase VPS4 eliminated citron-kinase-mediated enhancement of HIV-1 production. Our results suggest that citron kinase interacts with HIV-1 Gag and enhances HIV-1 production by promoting Gag ubiquitination and inducing viral release via the MVB pathway. PMID:27339686

  9. Pyruvate kinase M2 is a phosphotyrosine-binding protein

    SciTech Connect

    Christofk, H.R.; Vander Heiden, M.G.; Wu, N.; Asara, J.M.; Cantley, L.C.

    2008-06-03

    Growth factors stimulate cells to take up excess nutrients and to use them for anabolic processes. The biochemical mechanism by which this is accomplished is not fully understood but it is initiated by phosphorylation of signalling proteins on tyrosine residues. Using a novel proteomic screen for phosphotyrosine-binding proteins, we have made the observation that an enzyme involved in glycolysis, the human M2 (fetal) isoform of pyruvate kinase (PKM2), binds directly and selectively to tyrosine-phosphorylated peptides. We show that binding of phosphotyrosine peptides to PKM2 results in release of the allosteric activator fructose-1,6-bisphosphate, leading to inhibition of PKM2 enzymatic activity. We also provide evidence that this regulation of PKM2 by phosphotyrosine signalling diverts glucose metabolites from energy production to anabolic processes when cells are stimulated by certain growth factors. Collectively, our results indicate that expression of this phosphotyrosine-binding form of pyruvate kinase is critical for rapid growth in cancer cells.

  10. Development of Novel Adenosine Monophosphate-Activated Protein Kinase Activators

    PubMed Central

    Guh, Jih-Hwa; Chang, Wei-Ling; Yang, Jian; Lee, Su-Lin; Wei, Shuo; Wang, Dasheng; Kulp, Samuel K.; Chen, Ching-Shih

    2010-01-01

    In light of the unique ability of thiazolidinediones to mediate peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor (PPAR)γ-independent activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) and suppression of interleukin (IL)-6 production, we conducted a screening of an in-house, thiazolidinedione-based focused compound library to identify novel agents with these dual pharmacological activities. Cell-based assays pertinent to the activation status of AMPK and mammalian homolog of target of rapamycin (i.e., phosphorylation of AMPK and p70 ribosomal protein S6 kinase, respectively), and IL-6/IL-6 receptor signaling (i.e., IL-6 production and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 phosphorylation, respectively) in lipopolysaccharide (LPS)-stimulated THP-1 human macrophages were used to screen this compound library, which led to the identification of compound 53 (N-{4-[3-(1-Methylcyclohexylmethyl)-2,4-dioxo-thiazolidin-5-ylidene-methyl]-phenyl}-4-nitro-3-trifluoromethyl-benzenesulfonamide) as the lead agent. Evidence indicates that this drug-induced suppression of LPS-stimulated IL-6 production was attributable to AMPK activation. Furthermore, compound 53-mediated AMPK activation was demonstrated in C-26 colon adenocarcinoma cells, indicating that it is not a cell line-specific event. PMID:20170185

  11. Regulatory crosstalk by protein kinases on CFTR trafficking and activity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Farinha, Carlos Miguel; Swiatecka-Urban, Agnieszka; Brautigan, David; Jordan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily that functions as a cAMP-activated chloride ion channel in fluid-transporting epithelia. There is abundant evidence that CFTR activity (i.e. channel opening and closing) is regulated by protein kinases and phosphatases via phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Here, we review recent evidence for the role of protein kinases in regulation of CFTR delivery to and retention in the plasma membrane. We review this information in a broader context of regulation of other transporters by protein kinases because the overall functional output of transporters involves the integrated control of both their number at the plasma membrane and their specific activity. While many details of the regulation of intracellular distribution of CFTR and other transporters remain to be elucidated, we hope that this review will motivate research providing new insights into how protein kinases control membrane transport to impact health and disease.

  12. Regulatory Crosstalk by Protein Kinases on CFTR Trafficking and Activity.

    PubMed

    Farinha, Carlos M; Swiatecka-Urban, Agnieszka; Brautigan, David L; Jordan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily that functions as a cAMP-activated chloride ion channel in fluid-transporting epithelia. There is abundant evidence that CFTR activity (i.e., channel opening and closing) is regulated by protein kinases and phosphatases via phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Here, we review recent evidence for the role of protein kinases in regulation of CFTR delivery to and retention in the plasma membrane. We review this information in a broader context of regulation of other transporters by protein kinases because the overall functional output of transporters involves the integrated control of both their number at the plasma membrane and their specific activity. While many details of the regulation of intracellular distribution of CFTR and other transporters remain to be elucidated, we hope that this review will motivate research providing new insights into how protein kinases control membrane transport to impact health and disease.

  13. Regulatory Crosstalk by Protein Kinases on CFTR Trafficking and Activity

    PubMed Central

    Farinha, Carlos M.; Swiatecka-Urban, Agnieszka; Brautigan, David L.; Jordan, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Cystic Fibrosis Transmembrane Conductance Regulator (CFTR) is a member of the ATP binding cassette (ABC) transporter superfamily that functions as a cAMP-activated chloride ion channel in fluid-transporting epithelia. There is abundant evidence that CFTR activity (i.e., channel opening and closing) is regulated by protein kinases and phosphatases via phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. Here, we review recent evidence for the role of protein kinases in regulation of CFTR delivery to and retention in the plasma membrane. We review this information in a broader context of regulation of other transporters by protein kinases because the overall functional output of transporters involves the integrated control of both their number at the plasma membrane and their specific activity. While many details of the regulation of intracellular distribution of CFTR and other transporters remain to be elucidated, we hope that this review will motivate research providing new insights into how protein kinases control membrane transport to impact health and disease. PMID:26835446

  14. 4-Anilino-6-phenyl-quinoline inhibitors of mitogen activated protein kinase-activated protein kinase 2 (MK2).

    PubMed

    Olsson, Henric; Sjö, Peter; Ersoy, Oguz; Kristoffersson, Anna; Larsson, Joakim; Nordén, Bo

    2010-08-15

    A class of inhibitors of mitogen activated protein kinase-activated kinase 2 (MK2) was discovered via high-throughput screening. This compound class demonstrates activity against the enzyme with sub-microM IC(50) values, and suppresses LPS-induced TNFalpha levels in THP-1 cells. MK2 inhibition kinetic measurements indicated mixed binding approaching non-ATP competitive inhibition.

  15. Protein kinase C sensitizes olfactory adenylate cyclase

    PubMed Central

    1993-01-01

    Effects of neurotransmitters on cAMP-mediated signal transduction in frog olfactory receptor cells (ORCs) were studied using in situ spike recordings and radioimmunoassays. Carbachol, applied to the mucosal side of olfactory epithelium, amplified the electrical response of ORCs to cAMP-generating odorants, but did not affect unstimulated cells. A similar augmentation of odorant response was observed in the presence of phorbol dibutyrate (PDBu), an activator of protein kinase C (PKC). The electrical response to forskolin, an activator of adenylate cyclase (AC), was also enhanced by PDBu, and it was attenuated by the PKC inhibitor Goe 6983. Forskolin-induced accumulation of cAMP in olfactory tissue was potentiated by carbachol, serotonin, and PDBu to a similar extent. Potentiation was completely suppressed by the PKC inhibitors Goe 6983, staurosporine, and polymyxin B, suggesting that the sensitivity of olfactory AC to stimulation by odorants and forskolin was increased by PKC. Experiments with deciliated olfactory tissue indicated that sensitization of AC was restricted to sensory cilia of ORCs. To study the effects of cell Ca2+ on these mechanisms, the intracellular Ca2+ concentration of olfactory tissue was either increased by ionomycin or decreased by BAPTA/AM. Increasing cell Ca2+ had two effects on cAMP production: (a) the basal cAMP production was enhanced by a mechanism sensitive to inhibitors of calmodulin; and (b) similar to phorbol ester, cell Ca2+ caused sensitization of AC to stimulation by forskolin, an effect sensitive to Goe 6983. Decreasing cell Ca2+ below basal levels rendered AC unresponsive to stimulation by forskolin. These data suggest that a crosstalk mechanism is functional in frog ORCs, linking the sensitivity of AC to the activity of PKC. At increased activity of PKC, olfactory AC becomes more responsive to stimulation by odorants, forskolin, and cell Ca2+. Neurotransmitters appear to use this crosstalk mechanism to regulate olfactory

  16. Cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase A regulates apoptosis by stabilizing the BH3-only protein Bim.

    PubMed

    Moujalled, Diane; Weston, Ross; Anderton, Holly; Ninnis, Robert; Goel, Pranay; Coley, Andrew; Huang, David C S; Wu, Li; Strasser, Andreas; Puthalakath, Hamsa

    2011-01-01

    The proapoptotic Bcl2 homology domain 3(BH3)-only protein Bim is controlled by stringent post-translational regulation, predominantly through alterations in phosphorylation status. To identify new kinases involved in its regulation, we carried out a yeast two-hybrid screen using a non-spliceable variant of the predominant isoform--Bim(EL)--as the bait and identified the regulatory subunit of cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase A--PRKAR1A--as an interacting partner. We also show that protein kinase A (PKA) is a Bim(EL) isoform-specific kinase that promotes its stabilization. Inhibition of PKA or mutation of the PKA phosphorylation site within Bim(EL) resulted in its accelerated proteasome-dependent degradation. These results might have implications for human diseases that are characterized by abnormally increased PKA activity, such as the Carney complex and dilated cardiomyopathy. PMID:21151042

  17. Regulation of Wnt/β-Catenin Signaling by Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Verheyen, Esther M.; Gottardi, Cara J.

    2011-01-01

    The Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway plays essential roles during development and adult tissue homeostasis. Inappropriate activation of the pathway can result in a variety of malignancies. Protein kinases have emerged as key regulators at multiple steps of the Wnt pathway. In this review, we present a synthesis covering the latest information on how Wnt signaling is regulated by diverse protein kinases. PMID:19623618

  18. Effects of protein phosphatase and kinase inhibitors on the cardiac L- type Ca current suggest two sites are phosphorylated by protein kinase A and another protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    1995-01-01

    We previously showed (Frace, A.M. and H.C. Hartzell. 1993. Journal of Physiology. 472:305-326) that internal perfusion of frog atrial myocytes with the nonselective protein phosphatase inhibitors microcystin or okadaic acid produced an increase in the L-type Ca current (ICa) and a decrease in the delayed rectifier K current (IK). We hypothesized that microcystin revealed the activity of a protein kinase (PKX) that was basally active in the cardiac myocyte that could phosphorylate the Ca and K channels or regulators of the channels. The present studies were aimed at determining the nature of PKX and its phosphorylation target. The effect of internal perfusion with microcystin on ICa or IK was not attenuated by inhibitors of protein kinase A (PKA). However, the effect of microcystin on ICa was largely blocked by the nonselective protein kinase inhibitors staurosporine (10- 30 nM), K252a (250 nM), and H-7 (10 microM). Staurosporine and H-7 also decreased the stimulation of ICa by isoproterenol, but K252a was more selective and blocked the ability of microcystin to stimulate ICa without significantly reducing isoproterenol-stimulated current. Internal perfusion with selective inhibitors of protein kinase C (PKC), including the autoinhibitory pseudosubstrate PKC peptide (PKC(19-31)) and a myristoylated derivative of this peptide had no effect. External application of several PKC inhibitors had negative side effects that prevented their use as selective PKC inhibitors. Nevertheless, we conclude that PKX is not PKC. PKA and PKX phosphorylate sites with different sensitivities to the phosphatase inhibitors calyculin A and microcystin. In contrast to the results with ICa, the effect of microcystin on IK was not blocked by any of the kinase inhibitors tested, suggesting that the effect of microcystin on IK may not be mediated by a protein kinase but may be due to a direct effect of microcystin on the IK channel. PMID:8786340

  19. Pim Kinase Interacts with Nonstructural 5A Protein and Regulates Hepatitis C Virus Entry

    PubMed Central

    Park, Chorong; Min, Saehong; Park, Eun-Mee; Lim, Yun-Sook; Kang, Sangmin; Suzuki, Tetsuro; Shin, Eui-Cheol

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT The life cycle of hepatitis C virus (HCV) is highly dependent on host cellular proteins for virus propagation. In order to identify the cellular factors involved in HCV propagation, we performed protein microarray assay using the HCV nonstructural 5A (NS5A) protein as a probe. Of ∼9,000 human cellular proteins immobilized in a microarray, approximately 90 cellular proteins were identified as NS5A interactors. Of these candidates, Pim1, a member of serine/threonine kinase family composed of three different isoforms (Pim1, Pim2, and Pim3), was selected for further study. Pim kinases share a consensus sequence which overlaps with kinase activity. Pim kinase activity has been implicated in tumorigenesis. In the present study, we verified the physical interaction between NS5A and Pim1 by both in vitro pulldown and coimmunoprecipitation assays. Pim1 interacted with NS5A through amino acid residues 141 to 180 of Pim1. We demonstrated that protein stability of Pim1 was increased by NS5A protein and this increase was mediated by protein interplay. Small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown or pharmacological inhibition of Pim kinase abrogated HCV propagation. By employing HCV pseudoparticle entry and single-cycle HCV infection assays, we further demonstrated that Pim kinase was involved in HCV entry at a postbinding step. These data suggest that Pim kinase may represent a new host factor for HCV entry. IMPORTANCE Pim1 is an oncogenic serine/threonine kinase. HCV NS5A protein physically interacts with Pim1 and contributes to Pim1 protein stability. Since Pim1 protein expression level is upregulated in many cancers, NS5A-mediated protein stability may be associated with HCV pathogenesis. Either gene silencing or chemical inhibition of Pim kinase abrogated HCV propagation in HCV-infected cells. We further showed that Pim kinase was specifically required at an early entry step of the HCV life cycle. Thus, we have identified Pim kinase not only as an HCV cell

  20. Regulated protein kinases and phosphatases in cell cycle decisions

    PubMed Central

    Novak, Bela; Kapuy, Orsolya; Domingo-Sananes, Maria Rosa; Tyson, John J

    2013-01-01

    Many aspects of cell physiology are controlled by protein kinases and phosphatases, which together determine the phosphorylation state of targeted substrates. Some of these target proteins are themselves kinases or phosphatases or other components of a regulatory network characterized by feedback and feed-forward loops. In this review we describe some common regulatory motifs involving kinases, phosphatases, and their substrates, focusing particularly on bistable switches involved in cellular decision processes. These general principles are applied to cell cycle transitions, with special emphasis on the roles of regulated phosphatases in orchestrating progression from one phase to the next of the DNA replication-division cycle. PMID:20678910

  1. The Energy Landscape Analysis of Cancer Mutations in Protein Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Dixit, Anshuman; Verkhivker, Gennady M.

    2011-01-01

    The growing interest in quantifying the molecular basis of protein kinase activation and allosteric regulation by cancer mutations has fueled computational studies of allosteric signaling in protein kinases. In the present study, we combined computer simulations and the energy landscape analysis of protein kinases to characterize the interplay between oncogenic mutations and locally frustrated sites as important catalysts of allostetric kinase activation. While structurally rigid kinase core constitutes a minimally frustrated hub of the catalytic domain, locally frustrated residue clusters, whose interaction networks are not energetically optimized, are prone to dynamic modulation and could enable allosteric conformational transitions. The results of this study have shown that the energy landscape effect of oncogenic mutations may be allosteric eliciting global changes in the spatial distribution of highly frustrated residues. We have found that mutation-induced allosteric signaling may involve a dynamic coupling between structurally rigid (minimally frustrated) and plastic (locally frustrated) clusters of residues. The presented study has demonstrated that activation cancer mutations may affect the thermodynamic equilibrium between kinase states by allosterically altering the distribution of locally frustrated sites and increasing the local frustration in the inactive form, while eliminating locally frustrated sites and restoring structural rigidity of the active form. The energy landsape analysis of protein kinases and the proposed role of locally frustrated sites in activation mechanisms may have useful implications for bioinformatics-based screening and detection of functional sites critical for allosteric regulation in complex biomolecular systems. PMID:21998754

  2. Interferon-. alpha. selectively activates the. beta. isoform of protein kinase C through phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis

    SciTech Connect

    Pfeffer, L.M.; Saltiel, A.R. ); Strulovici, B. )

    1990-09-01

    The early events that occur after interferon binds to discrete cell surface receptors remain largely unknown. Human leukocyte interferon (interferon-{alpha}) rapidly increases the binding of ({sup 3}H)phorbol dibutyrate to intact HeLa cells a measure of protein kinase C activation, and induces the selective translocation of the {beta} isoform of protein kinase C from the cytosol to the particulate fraction of HeLa cells. The subcellular distribution of the {alpha} and {epsilon} isoforms is unaffected by interferon-{alpha} treatment. Activation of protein kinase C by phorbol esters mimics the inhibitory action of interferon-{alpha} on HeLa cell proliferation and down-regulation of protein kinase C blocks the induction of antiviral activity by interferon-{alpha} in HeLa cells. Increased phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis and phosphorylcholine production is accompanied by diacylglycerol production in response to interferon. However, inositol phospholipid turnover and free intracellular calcium concentration are unaffected. These results suggest that the transient increase in diacylglycerol, resulting from phosphatidylcholine hydrolysis, may selectively activate the {beta} isoform of protein kinase C. Moreover, the activation of protein kinase C is a necessary element in interferon action on cells.

  3. Silencing expression of the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase by small interfering RNA sensitizes human cells for radiation-induced chromosome damage, cell killing, and mutation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Peng, Yuanlin; Zhang, Qinming; Nagasawa, Hatsumi; Okayasu, Ryuichi; Liber, Howard L.; Bedford, Joel S.

    2002-01-01

    Targeted gene silencing in mammalian cells by RNA interference (RNAi) using small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) was recently described by Elbashir et al. (S. M. Elbashir et al., Nature (Lond.), 411: 494-498, 2001). We have used this methodology in several human cell strains to reduce expression of the Prkdc (DNA-PKcs) gene coding for the catalytic subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) that is involved in the nonhomologous end joining of DNA double-strand breaks. We have also demonstrated a radiosensitization for several phenotypic endpoints of radiation damage. In low-passage normal human fibroblasts, siRNA knock-down of DNA-PKcs resulted in a reduced capacity for restitution of radiation-induced interphase chromosome breaks as measured by premature chromosome condensation, an increased yield of acentric chromosome fragments at the first postirradiation mitosis, and an increased radiosensitivity for cell killing. For three strains of related human lymphoblasts, DNA-PKcs-targeted siRNA transfection resulted in little or no increase in radiosensitivity with respect to cell killing, a 1.5-fold decrease in induced mutant yield in TK6- and p53-null NH32 cells, but about a 2-fold increase in induced mutant yield in p53-mutant WTK1 cells at both the hypoxanthine quanine phosphoribosyl transferase (hprt) and the thymidine kinase loci.

  4. The C-terminal tail of protein kinase D2 and protein kinase D3 regulates their intracellular distribution

    SciTech Connect

    Papazyan, Romeo; Rozengurt, Enrique; Rey, Osvaldo . E-mail: orey@mednet.ucla.edu

    2006-04-14

    We generated a set of GFP-tagged chimeras between protein kinase D2 (PKD2) and protein kinase D3 (PKD3) to examine in live cells the contribution of their C-terminal region to their intracellular localization. We found that the catalytic domain of PKD2 and PKD3 can localize to the nucleus when expressed without other kinase domains. However, when the C-terminal tail of PKD2 was added to its catalytic domain, the nuclear localization of the resulting protein was inhibited. In contrast, the nuclear localization of the CD of PKD3 was not inhibited by its C-terminal tail. Furthermore, the exchange of the C-terminal tail of PKD2 and PKD3 in the full-length proteins was sufficient to exchange their intracellular localization. Collectively, these data demonstrate that the short C-terminal tail of these kinases plays a critical role in determining their cytoplasmic/nuclear localization.

  5. Dynamics of Protein Kinases: Insights from Nuclear Magnetic Resonance

    PubMed Central

    Xiao, Yao; Liddle, Jennifer C.; Pardi, Arthur; Ahn, Natalie G.

    2015-01-01

    CONSPECTUS Protein kinases are ubiquitous enzymes with critical roles in cellular processes and pathology. As a result, researchers have studied their activity and regulatory mechanisms extensively. Thousands of X-ray structures give snapshots of the architectures of protein kinases in various states of activation and ligand binding. However, the extent of and manner by which protein motions and conformational dynamics underlie the function and regulation of these important enzymes is not well understood. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) methods provide complementary information about protein conformation and dynamics in solution. However, until recently, the large size of these enzymes prevented researchers from using these methods with kinases. Developments in transverse relaxation-optimized spectroscopy (TROSY)-based techniques and more efficient isotope labeling strategies are now allowing researchers to carry out NMR studies on full-length protein kinases. In this Account, we describe recent insights into the role of dynamics in protein kinase regulation and catalysis that have been gained from NMR measurements of chemical shift changes and line broadening, residual dipolar couplings, and relaxation. These findings show strong associations between protein motion and events that control kinase activity. Dynamic and conformational changes occurring at ligand binding sites and other regulatory domains of these proteins propagate to conserved kinase core regions that mediate catalytic function. NMR measurements of slow time scale (microsecond to millisecond) motions also reveal that kinases carry out global exchange processes that synchronize multiple residues and allosteric interconversion between conformational states. Activating covalent modifications or ligand binding to form the Michaelis complex can induce these global processes. Inhibitors can also exploit the exchange properties of kinases by using conformational selection to form dynamically quenched

  6. Hypolipidemic activity of Taraxacum mongolicum associated with the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase in human HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Jin; Shieh, Po-Chuen; Lee, Jang-Chang; Chen, Fu-An; Lee, Chih-Hung; Kuo, Sheng-Chu; Ho, Chi-Tang; Kuo, Daih-Huang; Huang, Li-Jiau; Way, Tzong-Der

    2014-08-01

    This study investigated the hypolipidemic effect and potential mechanisms of T. mongolicum extracts. T. mongolicum was extracted by refluxing three times with water (TM-1), 50% ethanol (TM-2) and 95% ethanol (TM-3). TM-2 contained components with the most effective hypolipidemic potentials in HepG2 cells. Extended administration of TM-2 stimulated a significant reduction in body weight and levels of serum triglyceride LDL-C and total cholesterol in rats. To evaluate the bioactive compounds, we successively fractionated TM-2 with n-hexane (TM-4), dichloromethane (TM-5), ethyl acetate (TM-6), and water (TM-7). TM-4 fraction had the most effective hypolipidemic potential in HepG2 cells, and it decreased the expression of fatty acid synthase (FASN) and inhibited the activity of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC) through the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Linoleic acid, phytol and tetracosanol are bioactive compounds identified from TM-4. These results suggest that T. mongolicum is expected to be useful for hypolipidemic effects. PMID:24903219

  7. Inhibition of coagulation, fibrinolysis, and endothelial cell activation by a p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase inhibitor during human endotoxemia.

    PubMed

    Branger, Judith; van den Blink, Bernt; Weijer, Sebastiaan; Gupta, Abhya; van Deventer, Sander J H; Hack, C Erik; Peppelenbosch, Maikel P; van der Poll, Tom

    2003-06-01

    P38 mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) is an important component of intracellular signaling cascades that initiate various inflammatory cellular responses. To determine the role of p38 MAPK in the procoagulant response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS), 24 healthy subjects were exposed to an intravenous dose of LPS (4 ng/kg), preceded 3 hours earlier by orally administered 600 or 50 mg BIRB 796 BS (a specific p38 MAPK inhibitor), or placebo. The 600-mg dose of BIRB 796 BS strongly inhibited LPS-induced coagulation activation, as measured by plasma concentrations of the prothrombin fragment F1 + 2. BIRB 796 BS also dose dependently attenuated the activation and subsequent inhibition of the fibrinolytic system (plasma tissue-type plasminogen activator, plasmin-alpha2-antiplasmin complexes, and plasminogen activator inhibitor type 1) and endothelial cell activation (plasma soluble E-selectin and von Willebrand factor). Activation of p38 MAPK plays an important role in the procoagulant and endothelial cell response after in vivo exposure to LPS.

  8. Gene for the catalytic subunit of the human DNA-activated protein kinase maps to the site of the XRCC7 gene on chromosome 8

    SciTech Connect

    Sipley, J.D.; Anderson, C.W.; Menninger, J.C.

    1995-08-01

    The DNA-activated serine/threonine protein kinase (DNA-PK) is composed for a large ({approximately}460 kDa) catalytic polypeptide (DNA-PK{sub cs}) and Ku, a heterodimeric DNA-binding component (p70/p80) that targets DNA-PK{sub cs} to DNA. A 41-kbp segment of the DNA-PK{sub cs} gene was isolated, and a 7902-bp segment was sequenced. The sequence contains a polymorphic Pvu II restriction enzyme site, and comparing the sequence with that of the cDNA revealed the positions of nine exons. The DNA-PK{sub cs} gene was mapped to band q11 of chromosome 8 by in situ hybridization. This location is coincident with that of XRCC7, the gene that complements the DNA double-strand break repair and V(D)J recombination defects (where V is variable, D is diversity, and J is joining) of hamster V3 and murine severe combined immunodeficient (scid) cells. 50 refs., 4 figs., 2 tabs.

  9. Hypolipidemic activity of Taraxacum mongolicum associated with the activation of AMP-activated protein kinase in human HepG2 cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yan-Jin; Shieh, Po-Chuen; Lee, Jang-Chang; Chen, Fu-An; Lee, Chih-Hung; Kuo, Sheng-Chu; Ho, Chi-Tang; Kuo, Daih-Huang; Huang, Li-Jiau; Way, Tzong-Der

    2014-08-01

    This study investigated the hypolipidemic effect and potential mechanisms of T. mongolicum extracts. T. mongolicum was extracted by refluxing three times with water (TM-1), 50% ethanol (TM-2) and 95% ethanol (TM-3). TM-2 contained components with the most effective hypolipidemic potentials in HepG2 cells. Extended administration of TM-2 stimulated a significant reduction in body weight and levels of serum triglyceride LDL-C and total cholesterol in rats. To evaluate the bioactive compounds, we successively fractionated TM-2 with n-hexane (TM-4), dichloromethane (TM-5), ethyl acetate (TM-6), and water (TM-7). TM-4 fraction had the most effective hypolipidemic potential in HepG2 cells, and it decreased the expression of fatty acid synthase (FASN) and inhibited the activity of acetyl-coenzyme A carboxylase (ACC) through the phosphorylation of AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Linoleic acid, phytol and tetracosanol are bioactive compounds identified from TM-4. These results suggest that T. mongolicum is expected to be useful for hypolipidemic effects.

  10. Leishmania Infection Engages Non-Receptor Protein Kinases Differentially to Persist in Infected Hosts

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Naixin; Kima, Peter E.

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinases play important roles in the regulation of cellular activities. In cells infected by pathogens, there is an increasing appreciation that dysregulated expression of protein kinases promotes the success of intracellular infections. In Leishmania-infected cells, expression and activation of protein kinases, such as the mitogen-activated protein kinases, kinases in the PI3-kinase signaling pathway, and kinases in the NF-κB-signaling pathway, are modulated in some manner. Several recent reviews have discussed our current understanding of the roles of these kinases in Leishmania infections. Apart from the kinases in the pathways enumerated above, there are other host cell protein kinases that are activated during the Leishmania infection of mammalian cells whose roles also appear to be significant. This review discusses recent observations on the Abl family of protein kinases and the protein kinase regulated by RNA in Leishmania infections. PMID:27148265

  11. Leishmania Infection Engages Non-Receptor Protein Kinases Differentially to Persist in Infected Hosts.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Naixin; Kima, Peter E

    2016-01-01

    Protein kinases play important roles in the regulation of cellular activities. In cells infected by pathogens, there is an increasing appreciation that dysregulated expression of protein kinases promotes the success of intracellular infections. In Leishmania-infected cells, expression and activation of protein kinases, such as the mitogen-activated protein kinases, kinases in the PI3-kinase signaling pathway, and kinases in the NF-κB-signaling pathway, are modulated in some manner. Several recent reviews have discussed our current understanding of the roles of these kinases in Leishmania infections. Apart from the kinases in the pathways enumerated above, there are other host cell protein kinases that are activated during the Leishmania infection of mammalian cells whose roles also appear to be significant. This review discusses recent observations on the Abl family of protein kinases and the protein kinase regulated by RNA in Leishmania infections.

  12. Biochemical Screening of Five Protein Kinases from Plasmodium falciparum against 14,000 Cell-Active Compounds

    PubMed Central

    Crowther, Gregory J.; Hillesland, Heidi K.; Keyloun, Katelyn R.; Reid, Molly C.; Lafuente-Monasterio, Maria Jose; Ghidelli-Disse, Sonja; Leonard, Stephen E.; He, Panqing; Jones, Jackson C.; Krahn, Mallory M.; Mo, Jack S.; Dasari, Kartheek S.; Fox, Anna M. W.; Boesche, Markus; El Bakkouri, Majida; Rivas, Kasey L.; Leroy, Didier; Hui, Raymond; Drewes, Gerard; Maly, Dustin J.; Van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Ojo, Kayode K.

    2016-01-01

    In 2010 the identities of thousands of anti-Plasmodium compounds were released publicly to facilitate malaria drug development. Understanding these compounds’ mechanisms of action—i.e., the specific molecular targets by which they kill the parasite—would further facilitate the drug development process. Given that kinases are promising anti-malaria targets, we screened ~14,000 cell-active compounds for activity against five different protein kinases. Collections of cell-active compounds from GlaxoSmithKline (the ~13,000-compound Tres Cantos Antimalarial Set, or TCAMS), St. Jude Children’s Research Hospital (260 compounds), and the Medicines for Malaria Venture (the 400-compound Malaria Box) were screened in biochemical assays of Plasmodium falciparum calcium-dependent protein kinases 1 and 4 (CDPK1 and CDPK4), mitogen-associated protein kinase 2 (MAPK2/MAP2), protein kinase 6 (PK6), and protein kinase 7 (PK7). Novel potent inhibitors (IC50 < 1 μM) were discovered for three of the kinases: CDPK1, CDPK4, and PK6. The PK6 inhibitors are the most potent yet discovered for this enzyme and deserve further scrutiny. Additionally, kinome-wide competition assays revealed a compound that inhibits CDPK4 with few effects on ~150 human kinases, and several related compounds that inhibit CDPK1 and CDPK4 yet have limited cytotoxicity to human (HepG2) cells. Our data suggest that inhibiting multiple Plasmodium kinase targets without harming human cells is challenging but feasible. PMID:26934697

  13. Biochemical Screening of Five Protein Kinases from Plasmodium falciparum against 14,000 Cell-Active Compounds.

    PubMed

    Crowther, Gregory J; Hillesland, Heidi K; Keyloun, Katelyn R; Reid, Molly C; Lafuente-Monasterio, Maria Jose; Ghidelli-Disse, Sonja; Leonard, Stephen E; He, Panqing; Jones, Jackson C; Krahn, Mallory M; Mo, Jack S; Dasari, Kartheek S; Fox, Anna M W; Boesche, Markus; El Bakkouri, Majida; Rivas, Kasey L; Leroy, Didier; Hui, Raymond; Drewes, Gerard; Maly, Dustin J; Van Voorhis, Wesley C; Ojo, Kayode K

    2016-01-01

    In 2010 the identities of thousands of anti-Plasmodium compounds were released publicly to facilitate malaria drug development. Understanding these compounds' mechanisms of action--i.e., the specific molecular targets by which they kill the parasite--would further facilitate the drug development process. Given that kinases are promising anti-malaria targets, we screened ~14,000 cell-active compounds for activity against five different protein kinases. Collections of cell-active compounds from GlaxoSmithKline (the ~13,000-compound Tres Cantos Antimalarial Set, or TCAMS), St. Jude Children's Research Hospital (260 compounds), and the Medicines for Malaria Venture (the 400-compound Malaria Box) were screened in biochemical assays of Plasmodium falciparum calcium-dependent protein kinases 1 and 4 (CDPK1 and CDPK4), mitogen-associated protein kinase 2 (MAPK2/MAP2), protein kinase 6 (PK6), and protein kinase 7 (PK7). Novel potent inhibitors (IC50 < 1 μM) were discovered for three of the kinases: CDPK1, CDPK4, and PK6. The PK6 inhibitors are the most potent yet discovered for this enzyme and deserve further scrutiny. Additionally, kinome-wide competition assays revealed a compound that inhibits CDPK4 with few effects on ~150 human kinases, and several related compounds that inhibit CDPK1 and CDPK4 yet have limited cytotoxicity to human (HepG2) cells. Our data suggest that inhibiting multiple Plasmodium kinase targets without harming human cells is challenging but feasible. PMID:26934697

  14. The crystal structure of choline kinase reveals a eukaryotic protein kinase fold

    SciTech Connect

    Peisach, D.; Gee, P.; Kent, K.; Xu, Z.

    2010-03-08

    Choline kinase catalyzes the ATP-dependent phosphorylation of choline, the first committed step in the CDP-choline pathway for the biosynthesis of phosphatidylcholine. The 2.0 {angstrom} crystal structure of a choline kinase from C. elegans (CKA-2) reveals that the enzyme is a homodimeric protein with each monomer organized into a two-domain fold. The structure is remarkably similar to those of protein kinases and aminoglycoside phosphotransferases, despite no significant similarity in amino acid sequence. Comparisons to the structures of other kinases suggest that ATP binds to CKA-2 in a pocket formed by highly conserved and catalytically important residues. In addition, a choline binding site is proposed to be near the ATP binding pocket and formed by several structurally flexible loops.

  15. Targeting protein kinases in central nervous system disorders

    PubMed Central

    Chico, Laura K.; Van Eldik, Linda J.; Watterson, D. Martin

    2010-01-01

    Protein kinases are a growing drug target class in disorders in peripheral tissues, but the development of kinase-targeted therapies for central nervous system (CNS) diseases remains a challenge, largely owing to issues associated specifically with CNS drug discovery. However, several candidate therapeutics that target CNS protein kinases are now in various stages of preclinical and clinical development. We review candidate compounds and discuss selected CNS protein kinases that are emerging as important therapeutic targets. In addition, we analyse trends in small-molecule properties that correlate with key challenges in CNS drug discovery, such as blood–brain barrier penetrance and cytochrome P450-mediated metabolism, and discuss the potential of future approaches that will integrate molecular-fragment expansion with pharmacoinformatics to address these challenges. PMID:19876042

  16. African swine fever virus encodes a serine protein kinase which is packaged into virions.

    PubMed Central

    Baylis, S A; Banham, A H; Vydelingum, S; Dixon, L K; Smith, G L

    1993-01-01

    Nucleotide sequencing of the SalI j region of the virulent Malawi (LIL20/1) strain of African swine fever virus (ASFV) identified an open reading frame (ORF), designated j9L, with extensive similarity to the family of protein kinases. This ORF encodes a 35.1-kDa protein of 299 amino acids which shares 24.6% amino acid identity with the human pim-1 proto-oncogene and 21.0% identity with the vaccinia virus B1R-encoded protein kinase. The ASFV ORF contains the motifs characteristic of serine-threonine protein kinases, with the exception of the presumed ATP-binding site, which is poorly conserved. The ORF was expressed to high levels in Escherichia coli, and the recombinant enzyme phosphorylated a calf thymus histone protein on serine residues in vitro. An antibody raised to an amino-terminal peptide of the ASFV protein kinase was reactive with the recombinant protein in Western immunoblot analyses and was used to demonstrate the presence of the protein kinase in ASF virions. Images PMID:8331722

  17. Functional activation of Src family kinase yes protein is essential for the enhanced malignant properties of human melanoma cells expressing ganglioside GD3.

    PubMed

    Hamamura, Kazunori; Tsuji, Momoko; Hotta, Hiroshi; Ohkawa, Yuki; Takahashi, Masataka; Shibuya, Hidenobu; Nakashima, Hideyuki; Yamauchi, Yoshio; Hashimoto, Noboru; Hattori, Hisashi; Ueda, Minoru; Furukawa, Keiko; Furukawa, Koichi

    2011-05-27

    The possible roles of Src family kinases in the enhanced malignant properties of melanomas related to GD3 expression were analyzed. Among Src family kinases only Yes, not Fyn or Src, was functionally involved in the increased cell proliferation and invasion of GD3-expressing transfectant cells (GD3+). Yes was located upstream of p130Cas and paxillin and at an equivalent level to focal adhesion kinase. Yes underwent autophosphorylation even before serum treatment and showed stronger kinase activity in GD3+ cells than in GD3- cells following serum treatment. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments revealed that Yes bound to focal adhesion kinase or p130Cas more strongly in GD3+ cells than in GD3- cells. As a possible mechanism for the enhancing effects of GD3 on cellular phenotypes, it was shown that majority of Yes was localized in glycolipid-enriched microdomain/rafts in GD3+ cells even before serum treatment, whereas it was scarcely detected in glycolipid-enriched microdomain/rafts in GD3- cells. An in vitro kinase assay of Yes revealed that coexistence of GD3 with Yes in membranous environments enhances the kinase activity of GD3- cell-derived Yes toward enolase, p125, and Yes itself. Knockdown of GD3 synthase resulted in the alleviation of tumor phenotypes and reduced activation levels of Yes. Taken together, these results suggest a role of GD3 in the regulation of Src family kinases.

  18. Protein Kinases and Parkinson’s Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mehdi, Syed Jafar; Rosas-Hernandez, Hector; Cuevas, Elvis; Lantz, Susan M.; Barger, Steven W.; Sarkar, Sumit; Paule, Merle G.; Ali, Syed F.; Imam, Syed Z.

    2016-01-01

    Currently, the lack of new drug candidates for the treatment of major neurological disorders such as Parkinson’s disease has intensified the search for drugs that can be repurposed or repositioned for such treatment. Typically, the search focuses on drugs that have been approved and are used clinically for other indications. Kinase inhibitors represent a family of popular molecules for the treatment and prevention of various cancers, and have emerged as strong candidates for such repurposing because numerous serine/threonine and tyrosine kinases have been implicated in the pathobiology of Parkinson’s disease. This review focuses on various kinase-dependent pathways associated with the expression of Parkinson’s disease pathology, and evaluates how inhibitors of these pathways might play a major role as effective therapeutic molecules. PMID:27657053

  19. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Attenuates High Salt-Induced Activation of Epithelial Sodium Channels (ENaC) in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin-Yuan; Hu, Qing-Qing; Ma, He-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is expressed in the endothelial cells. To test whether high salt affects the NO production via regulation of endothelial ENaC, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were incubated in solutions containing either normal or high sodium (additional 20 mM NaCl). Our data showed that high sodium treatment significantly increased α-, β-, and γ-ENaC expression levels in HUVECs. Using the cell-attached patch-clamp technique, we demonstrated that high sodium treatment significantly increased ENaC open probability (PO). Moreover, nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation (Ser 1177) levels and NO production were significantly decreased by high sodium in HUVECs; the effects of high sodium on eNOS phosphorylation and NO production were inhibited by a specific ENaC blocker, amiloride. Our results showed that high sodium decreased AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation in endothelial cells. On the other hand, metformin, an AMPK activator, prevented high sodium-induced upregulation of ENaC expression and PO. Moreover, metformin prevented high salt-induced decrease in NO production and eNOS phosphorylation. These results suggest that high sodium stimulates ENaC activation by negatively modulating AMPK activity, thereby leading to reduction in eNOS activity and NO production in endothelial cells.

  20. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Attenuates High Salt-Induced Activation of Epithelial Sodium Channels (ENaC) in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Zheng, Wei-Wan; Li, Xin-Yuan; Liu, Hui-Bin; Wang, Zi-Rui; Hu, Qing-Qing; Li, Yu-Xia; Song, Bin-Lin; Lou, Jie; Wang, Qiu-Shi; Ma, He-Ping; Zhang, Zhi-Ren

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is expressed in the endothelial cells. To test whether high salt affects the NO production via regulation of endothelial ENaC, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were incubated in solutions containing either normal or high sodium (additional 20 mM NaCl). Our data showed that high sodium treatment significantly increased α-, β-, and γ-ENaC expression levels in HUVECs. Using the cell-attached patch-clamp technique, we demonstrated that high sodium treatment significantly increased ENaC open probability (P O ). Moreover, nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation (Ser 1177) levels and NO production were significantly decreased by high sodium in HUVECs; the effects of high sodium on eNOS phosphorylation and NO production were inhibited by a specific ENaC blocker, amiloride. Our results showed that high sodium decreased AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation in endothelial cells. On the other hand, metformin, an AMPK activator, prevented high sodium-induced upregulation of ENaC expression and P O . Moreover, metformin prevented high salt-induced decrease in NO production and eNOS phosphorylation. These results suggest that high sodium stimulates ENaC activation by negatively modulating AMPK activity, thereby leading to reduction in eNOS activity and NO production in endothelial cells. PMID:27635187

  1. AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Attenuates High Salt-Induced Activation of Epithelial Sodium Channels (ENaC) in Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin-Yuan; Hu, Qing-Qing; Ma, He-Ping

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies suggest that the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC) is expressed in the endothelial cells. To test whether high salt affects the NO production via regulation of endothelial ENaC, human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were incubated in solutions containing either normal or high sodium (additional 20 mM NaCl). Our data showed that high sodium treatment significantly increased α-, β-, and γ-ENaC expression levels in HUVECs. Using the cell-attached patch-clamp technique, we demonstrated that high sodium treatment significantly increased ENaC open probability (PO). Moreover, nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) phosphorylation (Ser 1177) levels and NO production were significantly decreased by high sodium in HUVECs; the effects of high sodium on eNOS phosphorylation and NO production were inhibited by a specific ENaC blocker, amiloride. Our results showed that high sodium decreased AMP-activated kinase (AMPK) phosphorylation in endothelial cells. On the other hand, metformin, an AMPK activator, prevented high sodium-induced upregulation of ENaC expression and PO. Moreover, metformin prevented high salt-induced decrease in NO production and eNOS phosphorylation. These results suggest that high sodium stimulates ENaC activation by negatively modulating AMPK activity, thereby leading to reduction in eNOS activity and NO production in endothelial cells. PMID:27635187

  2. A Novel Mode of Protein Kinase Inhibition Exploiting Hydrophobic Motifs of Autoinhibited Kinases

    SciTech Connect

    S Eathiraj; R Palma; M Hirschi; E Volckova; E Nakuci; J Castro; C Chen; T Chan; D France; M Ashwell

    2011-12-31

    Protein kinase inhibitors with enhanced selectivity can be designed by optimizing binding interactions with less conserved inactive conformations because such inhibitors will be less likely to compete with ATP for binding and therefore may be less impacted by high intracellular concentrations of ATP. Analysis of the ATP-binding cleft in a number of inactive protein kinases, particularly in the autoinhibited conformation, led to the identification of a previously undisclosed non-polar region in this cleft. This ATP-incompatible hydrophobic region is distinct from the previously characterized hydrophobic allosteric back pocket, as well as the main pocket. Generalized hypothetical models of inactive kinases were constructed and, for the work described here, we selected the fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) tyrosine kinase family as a case study. Initial optimization of a FGFR2 inhibitor identified from a library of commercial compounds was guided using structural information from the model. We describe the inhibitory characteristics of this compound in biophysical, biochemical, and cell-based assays, and have characterized the binding mode using x-ray crystallographic studies. The results demonstrate, as expected, that these inhibitors prevent activation of the autoinhibited conformation, retain full inhibitory potency in the presence of physiological concentrations of ATP, and have favorable inhibitory activity in cancer cells. Given the widespread regulation of kinases by autoinhibitory mechanisms, the approach described herein provides a new paradigm for the discovery of inhibitors by targeting inactive conformations of protein kinases.

  3. Characterization and chromosomal localization of the gene for human rhodopsin kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Khani, S.C.; Yamamoto, S.; Dryja, T.P.

    1996-08-01

    G-protein-dependent receptor kinases (GRKs) play a key role in the adapatation of receptors to persistent stimuli. In rod photoreceptors rhodopsin kinase (RK) mediates rapid densensitization of rod photoreceptors to light by catalyzing phosphorylation of the visual pigment rhodopsin. To study the structure and mechanism of FRKs in human photoreceptors, we have isolated and characterized cDNA and genomic clones derived from the human RK locus using a bovine rhodopsin kinase cDNA fragment as a probe. The RK locus, assigned to chromosome 13 band q34, is composed of seven exons that encode a protein 92% identical in amino acid sequence to bovine rhodopsin kinase. The marked difference between the structure of this gene and that of another recently clone human GRK gene suggests the existence of a wide evolutionary gap between members of the GRK gene family. 39 refs., 3 figs.

  4. Molecular cloning and characterization of human JNKK2, a novel Jun NH2-terminal kinase-specific kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Z; Wu, J; Jacinto, E; Karin, M

    1997-01-01

    At least three mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) cascades were identified in mammals, each consisting of a well-defined three-kinase module composed of a MAPK, a MAPK kinase (MAPKK), and a MAPKK kinase (MAPKKK). These cascades play key roles in relaying various physiological, environmental, or pathological signals from the environment to the transcriptional machinery in the nucleus. One of these MAPKs, c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK), stimulates the transcriptional activity of c-Jun in response to growth factors, proinflammatory cytokines, and certain environmental stresses, such as short wavelength UV light or osmotic shock. The JNKs are directly activated by the MAPKK JNKK1/SEK1/MKK4. However, inactivation of the gene encoding this MAPKK by homologous recombination suggested the existence of at least one more JNK-activating kinase. Recently, the JNK cascade was found to be structurally and functionally conserved in Drosophila, where DJNK is activated by the MAPKK DJNKK (hep). By a database search, we identified an expressed sequence tag (EST) encoding a portion of human MAPKK that is highly related to DJNKK (hep). We used this EST to isolate a full-length cDNA clone encoding a human JNKK2. We show that JNKK2 is a highly specific JNK kinase. Unlike JNKK1, it does not activate the related MAPK, p38. Although the regulation of JNKK1 activities and that of JNKK2 activities could be very similar, the two kinases may play somewhat different regulatory roles in a cell-type-dependent manner. PMID:9372971

  5. Pyruvate Kinase M2 Regulates Gene Transcription by Acting as A Protein Kinase

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Xueliang; Wang, Haizhen; Jenny, J. Yang; Liu, Xiaowei; Liu, Zhi-Ren

    2012-01-01

    Summary Pyruvate kinase isoform M2 (PKM2) is a glycolysis enzyme catalyzing conversion of phosphoenolpyruvate (PEP) to pyruvate with transferring a phosphate from PEP to ADP. We report here that PKM2 localizes to the cell nucleus. The levels of nuclear PKM2 correlate with cell proliferation. PKM2 activates transcription of MEK5 by phosphorylating stat3 at Y705. In vitro phosphorylation assays show that PKM2 is a protein kinase using PEP as phosphate donor. ADP competes with the protein substrate binding, indicating that the substrate may bind to the ADP site of PKM2. Our experiments suggest that PKM2 dimer is an active protein kinase, while the tetramer is an active pyruvate kinase. Expression a PKM2 mutant that exists as a dimer promotes cell proliferation, indicating that protein kinase activity of PKM2 plays a role in promoting cell proliferation. Our study reveals an important link between metabolism alteration and gene expression during tumor transformation and progression. PMID:22306293

  6. Allosteric activation of apicomplexan calcium-dependent protein kinases.

    PubMed

    Ingram, Jessica R; Knockenhauer, Kevin E; Markus, Benedikt M; Mandelbaum, Joseph; Ramek, Alexander; Shan, Yibing; Shaw, David E; Schwartz, Thomas U; Ploegh, Hidde L; Lourido, Sebastian

    2015-09-01

    Calcium-dependent protein kinases (CDPKs) comprise the major group of Ca2+-regulated kinases in plants and protists. It has long been assumed that CDPKs are activated, like other Ca2+-regulated kinases, by derepression of the kinase domain (KD). However, we found that removal of the autoinhibitory domain from Toxoplasma gondii CDPK1 is not sufficient for kinase activation. From a library of heavy chain-only antibody fragments (VHHs), we isolated an antibody (1B7) that binds TgCDPK1 in a conformation-dependent manner and potently inhibits it. We uncovered the molecular basis for this inhibition by solving the crystal structure of the complex and simulating, through molecular dynamics, the effects of 1B7-kinase interactions. In contrast to other Ca2+-regulated kinases, the regulatory domain of TgCDPK1 plays a dual role, inhibiting or activating the kinase in response to changes in Ca2+ concentrations. We propose that the regulatory domain of TgCDPK1 acts as a molecular splint to stabilize the otherwise inactive KD. This dependence on allosteric stabilization reveals a novel susceptibility in this important class of parasite enzymes.

  7. Apoptotic Efficacy of Etomoxir in Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells. Cooperation with Arsenic Trioxide and Glycolytic Inhibitors, and Regulation by Oxidative Stress and Protein Kinase Activities

    PubMed Central

    Estañ, María Cristina; Calviño, Eva; Calvo, Susana; Guillén-Guío, Beatriz; Boyano-Adánez, María del Carmen; de Blas, Elena; Rial, Eduardo; Aller, Patricio

    2014-01-01

    Fatty acid synthesis and oxidation are frequently exacerbated in leukemia cells, and may therefore represent a target for therapeutic intervention. In this work we analyzed the apoptotic and chemo-sensitizing action of the fatty acid oxidation inhibitor etomoxir in human acute myeloid leukemia cells. Etomoxir caused negligible lethality at concentrations up to 100 µM, but efficaciously cooperated to cause apoptosis with the anti-leukemic agent arsenic trioxide (ATO, Trisenox), and with lower efficacy with other anti-tumour drugs (etoposide, cisplatin), in HL60 cells. Etomoxir-ATO cooperation was also observed in NB4 human acute promyelocytic cells, but not in normal (non-tumour) mitogen-stimulated human peripheral blood lymphocytes. Biochemical determinations in HL60 cells indicated that etomoxir (25–200 µM) dose-dependently inhibited mitochondrial respiration while slightly stimulating glycolysis, and only caused marginal alterations in total ATP content and adenine nucleotide pool distribution. In addition, etomoxir caused oxidative stress (increase in intracellular reactive oxygen species accumulation, decrease in reduced glutathione content), as well as pro-apoptotic LKB-1/AMPK pathway activation, all of which may in part explain the chemo-sensitizing capacity of the drug. Etomoxir also cooperated with glycolytic inhibitors (2-deoxy-D-glucose, lonidamine) to induce apoptosis in HL60 cells, but not in NB4 cells. The combined etomoxir plus 2-deoxy-D-glucose treatment did not increase oxidative stress, caused moderate decrease in net ATP content, increased the AMP/ATP ratio with concomitant drop in energy charge, and caused defensive Akt and ERK kinase activation. Apoptosis generation by etomoxir plus 2-deoxy-D-glucose was further increased by co-incubation with ATO, which is apparently explained by the capacity of ATO to attenuate Akt and ERK activation. In summary, co-treatment with etomoxir may represent an interesting strategy to increase the apoptotic

  8. The human p50csk tyrosine kinase phosphorylates p56lck at Tyr-505 and down regulates its catalytic activity.

    PubMed Central

    Bergman, M; Mustelin, T; Oetken, C; Partanen, J; Flint, N A; Amrein, K E; Autero, M; Burn, P; Alitalo, K

    1992-01-01

    Protein tyrosine kinases participate in the transduction and modulation of signals that regulate proliferation and differentiation of cells. Excessive or deregulated protein tyrosine kinase activity can cause malignant transformation. The catalytic activity of the T cell protein tyrosine kinase p56lck is normally suppressed by phosphorylation of a carboxyl-terminal tyrosine, Tyr-505, by another cellular protein tyrosine kinase. Here we characterize a human cytosolic 50 kDa protein tyrosine kinase, p50csk, which specifically phosphorylates Tyr-505 of p56lck and a synthetic peptide containing this site. Phosphorylation of Tyr-505 suppressed the catalytic activity of p56lck. We suggest that p50csk negatively regulates p56lck, and perhaps other cellular src family kinases. Images PMID:1639064

  9. Protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylates human platelet inositol trisphosphate 5/sup +/-/-phosphomonoesterase (IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase) increasing phosphatase activity

    SciTech Connect

    Connolly, T.M.; Majerus, P.W.

    1986-05-01

    Phosphoinositide breakdown in response to thrombin stimulation of human platelets generates messenger molecules that activate PKC (diglyceride) and mobilize Ca/sup + +/ (inositol tris-phosphates). The water soluble products of phospholipase C-mediated metabolism of phosphatidylinositol 4,5-diphosphate are inositol 1,4,5 P/sub 3/ (IP/sub 3/) and inositol 1:2-cyclic 4,5 P/sub 3/ (cIP/sub 3/). A specific phosphatase, IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase, cleaves the 5 phosphate from IP/sub 3/ or cIP/sub 3/ to form IP/sub 2/ or cIP/sub 2/ and P/sub i/, none of which mobilizes Ca/sup + +/. Thus, the IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase may regulate cellular responses to IP/sub 3/ or cIP/sub 3/. The authors find that IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase isolated from human platelets is phosphorylated by rat brain PKC, resulting in a 4-fold increase in IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase activity. The authors phosphorylated IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase using ..gamma.. /sup 32/P-ATP and found that the labeled enzyme comigrated on SDS-PAGE with the previously described 40K protein phosphorylated in response to thrombin stimulation of platelets. The similarity of the PKC-phosphorylated IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase observed in vitro and the thrombin-stimulated phosphorylated 40K protein known to be phosphorylated by PKC in vivo, suggests that these proteins may be the same. These results suggest that platelet Ca/sup + +/ mobilization maybe regulated by PKC phosphorylation of the IP/sub 3/ 5'-p'tase and can explain the observation that phorbol ester treatment of intact human platelets results in decreased production of IP/sub 3/ and decreased Ca/sup + +/ mobilization upon subsequent thrombin addition.

  10. Properties and distribution of the protein inhibitor (Mr 17,000) of protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    McDonald, J R; Gröschel-Stewart, U; Walsh, M P

    1987-01-01

    Ca2+-dependent hydrophobic-interaction chromatography is a powerful tool for the identification and isolation of a variety of Ca2+-binding proteins which expose a hydrophobic site(s) in the presence of Ca2+ [Gopalakrishna & Anderson (1982) Biochem. Biophys. Res. Commun. 104, 830-836; Walsh, Valentine, Ngai, Carruthers & Hollenberg (1984) Biochem. J. 224, 117-127; McDonald & Walsh (1985) Biochem. J. 232, 559-567]. Using this approach, we isolated two potent and specific protein inhibitors of protein kinase C, of 17 kDa [McDonald & Walsh (1985) Biochem. J. 232, 559-567] and 12 kDa [McDonald & Walsh (1986) Biochem. Soc. Trans. 14, 585-586]. Although these inhibitors were purified by Ca2+-dependent hydrophobic-interaction chromatography and exhibit properties similar to those of calmodulin and related Ca2+-binding proteins, we were unable to demonstrate high-affinity Ca2+ binding to these inhibitors, using equilibrium dialysis. Protein kinase C exhibited half-maximal activity at 0.6 microM-Ca2+ in the presence of phospholipid and diacylglycerol, and complete inhibition by both inhibitors was observed over the range of Ca2+ concentrations examined (10 nM-10 microM). These observations suggest that the inhibitory action of these proteins does not require Ca2+. The inclusion of proteinase inhibitors during isolation of the kinase C inhibitors, as well as two-dimensional peptide mapping and amino acid analysis of the isolated proteins, suggested that the 12 kDa inhibitor is a proteolytic fragment of the 17 kDa protein which is generated during purification. Antibodies raised in rabbits against the bovine brain 17 kDa inhibitor were shown to be specific by Western immunoblotting and the competitive enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay method and were used to study the tissue and species distribution of this protein. The inhibitor was found to be present in several bovine, murine, avian and human tissues, consistent with a role in the regulation of a variety of physiological

  11. Varicella-Zoster Virus Open Reading Frame 66 Protein Kinase and Its Relationship to Alphaherpesvirus US3 Kinases

    PubMed Central

    Erazo, Angela

    2014-01-01

    The varicella-zoster virus (VZV) open reading frame (ORF) 66 encodes a basophilic kinase orthologous to the US3 protein kinases found in all alphaherpesviruses. This review summarizes current information on the ORF66 kinase, and outlines apparent differences from other US3 kinases, as well as some of the conserved functions. One critical difference is the VZV ORF66 kinase targeting of the major regulatory VZV IE62 protein to control its nuclear import and assembly into the VZV virion, which is so far unprecedented in the alphaherpesviruses. However, ORF66 targets some cellular targets which are also targeted by US3 kinases of other herpesviruses, including the histone deacetylase-1 and 2 proteins, pathways that lead to changes in actin dynamics, and the targeting of substrates of protein kinase A, including the nuclear matrix protein matrin 3. PMID:20186610

  12. Protein Kinases of the Hippo Pathway: Regulation and Substrates

    PubMed Central

    Avruch, Joseph; Zhou, Dawang; Fitamant, Julien; Bardeesy, Nabeel; Mou, Fan; Barrufet, Laura Regué

    2012-01-01

    The “Hippo” signaling pathway has emerged as a major regulator of cell proliferation and survival in metazoans. The pathway, as delineated by genetic and biochemical studies in Drosophila, consists of a kinase cascade regulated by cell-cell contact and cell polarity that inhibits the transcriptional coactivator Yorkie and its proliferative, anti-differentiation, antiapoptotic transcriptional program. The core pathway components are the GC kinase Hippo, which phosphorylates the noncatalytic polypeptide Mats/Mob1 and, with the assistance of the scaffold protein Salvador, phosphorylates the ndr-family kinase Lats. In turn phospho-Lats, after binding to phospho-Mats, autoactivates and phosphorylates Yorkie, resulting in its nuclear exit. Hippo also uses the scaffold protein Furry and a different Mob protein to control another ndr-like kinase, the morphogenetic regulator Tricornered. Architecturally homologous kinase cascades consisting of a GC kinase, a Mob protein, a scaffolding polypeptide and an ndr-like kinase are well described in yeast; in S. cerevisiae e.g., the MEN pathway promotes mitotic exit whereas the RAM network, using a different GC kinase, Mob protein, scaffold and ndr-like kinase, regulates cell polarity and morphogenesis. In mammals, the Hippo orthologues Mst1 and Mst2 utilize the Salvador ortholog WW45/Sav1 and other scaffolds to regulate the kinases Lats1/Lats2 and ndr1/ndr2. As in Drosophila, murine Mst1/Mst2, in a redundant manner, negatively regulate the Yorkie ortholog YAP in the epithelial cells of the liver and gut; loss of both Mst1 and Mst2 results in hyperproliferation and tumorigenesis that can be largely negated by reduction or elimination of YAP. Despite this conservation, considerable diversification in pathway composition and regulation is already evident; in skin e.g., YAP phosphorylation is independent of Mst1Mst2 and Lats1Lats2. Moreover, in lymphoid cells, Mst1/Mst2, under the control of the Rap1 GTPase and independent of YAP

  13. Molecular and biochemical characterisation of DNA-dependent protein kinase-defective rodent mutant irs-20.

    PubMed Central

    Priestley, A; Beamish, H J; Gell, D; Amatucci, A G; Muhlmann-Diaz, M C; Singleton, B K; Smith, G C; Blunt, T; Schalkwyk, L C; Bedford, J S; Jackson, S P; Jeggo, P A; Taccioli, G E

    1998-01-01

    The catalytic subunit of the DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) is a member of a sub-family of phosphatidylinositol (PI) 3-kinases termed PIK-related kinases. A distinguishing feature of this sub-family is the presence of a conserved C-terminal region downstream of a PI 3-kinase domain. Mutants defective in DNA-PKcs are sensitive to ionising radiation and are unable to carry out V(D)J recombination. Irs-20 is a DNA-PKcs-defective cell line with milder gamma-ray sensitivity than two previously characterised mutants, V-3 and mouse scid cells. Here we show that the DNA-PKcs protein from irs-20 cells can bind to DNA but is unable to function as a protein kinase. To verify the defect in irs-20 cells and provide insight into the function and expression of DNA-PKcs in double-strand break repair and V(D)J recombination we introduced YACs encoding human and mouse DNA-PKcs into defective mutants and achieved complementation of the defective phenotypes. Furthermore, in irs-20 we identified a mutation in DNA-PKcs that causes substitution of a lysine for a glutamic acid in the fourth residue from the C-terminus. This represents a strong candidate for the inactivating mutation and provides supportive evidence that the extreme C-terminal motif is important for protein kinase activity. PMID:9518490

  14. Purification and characterization of echinoderm casein kinase II. Regulation by protein kinase C.

    PubMed Central

    Sanghera, J S; Charlton, L A; Paddon, H B; Pelech, S L

    1992-01-01

    Casein kinase II (CKII) is one of several protein kinases that become activated before germinal-vesicle breakdown in maturing sea-star oocytes. Echinoderm CKII was purified over 11,000-fold with a recovery of approximately 10% by sequential fractionation of the oocyte cytosol on tyrosine-agarose, heparin-agarose, casein-agarose and MonoQ. The purified enzyme contained 45, 38 and 28 kDa polypeptides, which corresponded to its alpha, alpha' and beta subunits respectively. The beta-subunit was autophosphorylated on one major tryptic peptide on serine residues, whereas the alpha'-subunit incorporated phosphate into at least two tryptic peptides primarily on threonine residues. Western-blotting analysis of sea-star oocyte extracts with two different anti-peptide antibodies that recognized conserved regions of the alpha-subunit indicated that the protein levels of the alpha- and alpha'-subunits of CKII were unchanged during oocyte maturation. The purified CKII was partly inactivated (by 25%) by preincubation with protein-serine/threonine phosphatase 2A, but protein-tyrosine phosphatases had no effect. The beta-subunit of CKII was phosphorylated on a serine residue(s) up to 0.54 mol of P/mol of beta-subunit by purified protein kinase C, and this correlated with a 1.5-fold enhancement of its phosphotransferase activity with phosvitin as a substrate. CKII was not a substrate for the maturation-activated myelin basic protein kinase p44mpk from sea-star oocytes, nor for cyclic-AMP-dependent protein kinase. These studies point to possible regulation of CKII by protein phosphorylation. Images Fig. 2. Fig. 3. Fig. 4. Fig. 6. Fig. 7. PMID:1590772

  15. Actions of Rho family small G proteins and p21-activated protein kinases on mitogen-activated protein kinase family members.

    PubMed Central

    Frost, J A; Xu, S; Hutchison, M R; Marcus, S; Cobb, M H

    1996-01-01

    The mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases are a family of serine/threonine kinases that are regulated by distinct extracellular stimuli. The currently known members include extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1 (ERK1), ERK2, the c-Jun N-terminal kinase/stress-activated protein kinases (JNK/SAPKs), and p38 MAP kinases. We find that overexpression of the Ste20-related enzymes p21-activated kinase 1 (PAK1) and PAK2 in 293 cells is sufficient to activate JNK/SAPK and to a lesser extent p38 MAP kinase but not ERK2. Rat MAP/ERK kinase kinase 1 can stimulate the activity of each of these MAP kinases. Although neither activated Rac nor the PAKs stimulate ERK2 activity, overexpression of either dominant negative Rac2 or the N-terminal regulatory domain of PAK1 inhibits Ras-mediated activation of ERK2, suggesting a permissive role for Rac in the control of the ERK pathway. Furthermore, constitutively active Rac2, Cdc42hs, and RhoA synergize with an activated form of Raf to increase ERK2 activity. These findings reveal a previously unrecognized connection between Rho family small G proteins and the ERK pathway. PMID:8668187

  16. Mitogen-activated protein kinase and abscisic acid signal transduction.

    PubMed

    Heimovaara-Dijkstra, S; Testerink, C; Wang, M

    2000-01-01

    The phytohormone abscisic acid (ABA) is a classical plant hormone, responsible for regulation of abscission, diverse aspects of plant and seed development, stress responses and germination. It was found that ABA signal transduction in plants can involve the activity of type 2C-phosphatases (PP2C), calcium, potassium, pH and a transient activation of MAP kinase. The ABA signal transduction cascades have been shown to be tissue-specific, the transient activation of MAP kinase has until now only been found in barley aleurone cells. However, type 2C phosphatases are involved in the induction of most ABA responses, as shown by the PP2C-deficient abi-mutants. These phosphatases show high homology with phosphatases that regulate MAP kinase activity in yeast. In addition, the role of farnesyl transferase as a negative regulator of ABA responses also indicates towards involvement of MAP kinase in ABA signal transduction. Farnesyl transferase is known to regulate Ras proteins, Ras proteins in turn are known to regulate MAP kinase activation. Interestingly, Ras-like proteins were detected in barley aleurone cells. Further establishment of the involvement of MAP kinase in ABA signal transduction and its role therein, still awaits more study.

  17. Protein Kinase C and Extracellular Signal-Regulated Kinase Regulate Movement, Attachment, Pairing and Egg Release in Schistosoma mansoni

    PubMed Central

    Ressurreição, Margarida; De Saram, Paulu; Kirk, Ruth S.; Rollinson, David; Emery, Aidan M.; Page, Nigel M.; Davies, Angela J.; Walker, Anthony J.

    2014-01-01

    Protein kinases C (PKCs) and extracellular signal-regulated kinases (ERKs) are evolutionary conserved cell signalling enzymes that coordinate cell function. Here we have employed biochemical approaches using ‘smart’ antibodies and functional screening to unravel the importance of these enzymes to Schistosoma mansoni physiology. Various PKC and ERK isotypes were detected, and were differentially phosphorylated (activated) throughout the various S. mansoni life stages, suggesting isotype-specific roles and differences in signalling complexity during parasite development. Functional kinase mapping in adult worms revealed that activated PKC and ERK were particularly associated with the adult male tegument, musculature and oesophagus and occasionally with the oesophageal gland; other structures possessing detectable activated PKC and/or ERK included the Mehlis' gland, ootype, lumen of the vitellaria, seminal receptacle and excretory ducts. Pharmacological modulation of PKC and ERK activity in adult worms using GF109203X, U0126, or PMA, resulted in significant physiological disturbance commensurate with these proteins occupying a central position in signalling pathways associated with schistosome muscular activity, neuromuscular coordination, reproductive function, attachment and pairing. Increased activation of ERK and PKC was also detected in worms following praziquantel treatment, with increased signalling associated with the tegument and excretory system and activated ERK localizing to previously unseen structures, including the cephalic ganglia. These findings support roles for PKC and ERK in S. mansoni homeostasis, and identify these kinase groups as potential targets for chemotherapeutic treatments against human schistosomiasis, a neglected tropical disease of enormous public health significance. PMID:24921927

  18. Matrix metalloproteinase-2 and -9 are induced differently by metal nanoparticles in human monocytes: The role of oxidative stress and protein tyrosine kinase activation

    SciTech Connect

    Wan Rong; Mo Yiqun; Zhang Xing; Chien Sufan; Tollerud, David J.; Zhang Qunwei

    2008-12-01

    Recently, many studies have shown that nanoparticles can translocate from the lungs to the circulatory system. As a particulate foreign body, nanoparticles could induce host responses such as reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation, inflammatory cytokine and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) release which play a major role in tissue destruction and remodeling. However, the direct effects of nanoparticles on leukocytes, especially monocytes, are still unclear. The objective of the present study was to compare the ability of Nano-Co and Nano-TiO{sub 2} to cause alteration of transcription and activity of MMPs and to explore possible mechanisms. We hypothesized that non-toxic doses of some transition metal nanoparticles stimulate an imbalance of MMP/TIMP that cause MMP production that may contribute to their health effects. To test this hypothesis, U937 cells were treated with Nano-Co and Nano-TiO{sub 2} and cytotoxic effects and ROS generation were measured. The alteration of MMP-2 and MMP-9 expression and activity of MMP-2 and MMP-9 after exposure to these metal nanoparticles were subsequently determined. To investigate the potential signaling pathways involved in the Nano-Co-induced MMP activation, the ROS scavengers or inhibitors, AP-1 inhibitor, and protein tyrosine kinase (PTK) inhibitors were also used to pre-treat U937 cells. Our results demonstrated that exposure of U937 cells to Nano-Co, but not to Nano-TiO{sub 2}, at a dose that does not cause cytotoxicity, resulted in ROS generation and up-regulation of MMP-2 and MMP-9 mRNA expression{sub ..} Our results also showed dose- and time-related increases in pro-MMP-2 and pro-MMP-9 gelatinolytic activities in conditioned media after exposure of U937 cells to Nano-Co, but not to Nano-TiO{sub 2}. Nano-Co-induced pro-MMP-2 and pro-MMP-9 activity increases were inhibited by pre-treatment with ROS scavengers or inhibitors. We also demonstrated dose- and time-related decreases in tissue inhibitors of metalloproteinases 2

  19. Fast kinase domain-containing protein 3 is a mitochondrial protein essential for cellular respiration

    SciTech Connect

    Simarro, Maria; Gimenez-Cassina, Alfredo; Kedersha, Nancy; Lazaro, Jean-Bernard; Adelmant, Guillaume O.; Marto, Jarrod A.; Rhee, Kirsten; Tisdale, Sarah; Danial, Nika; Benarafa, Charaf; Orduna, Anonio; Anderson, Paul

    2010-10-22

    Research highlights: {yields} Five members of the FAST kinase domain-containing proteins are localized to mitochondria in mammalian cells. {yields} The FASTKD3 interactome includes proteins involved in various aspects of mitochondrial metabolism. {yields} Targeted knockdown of FASTKD3 significantly reduces basal and maximal mitochondrial oxygen consumption. -- Abstract: Fas-activated serine/threonine phosphoprotein (FAST) is the founding member of the FAST kinase domain-containing protein (FASTKD) family that includes FASTKD1-5. FAST is a sensor of mitochondrial stress that modulates protein translation to promote the survival of cells exposed to adverse conditions. Mutations in FASTKD2 have been linked to a mitochondrial encephalomyopathy that is associated with reduced cytochrome c oxidase activity, an essential component of the mitochondrial electron transport chain. We have confirmed the mitochondrial localization of FASTKD2 and shown that all FASTKD family members are found in mitochondria. Although human and mouse FASTKD1-5 genes are expressed ubiquitously, some of them are most abundantly expressed in mitochondria-enriched tissues. We have found that RNA interference-mediated knockdown of FASTKD3 severely blunts basal and stress-induced mitochondrial oxygen consumption without disrupting the assembly of respiratory chain complexes. Tandem affinity purification reveals that FASTKD3 interacts with components of mitochondrial respiratory and translation machineries. Our results introduce FASTKD3 as an essential component of mitochondrial respiration that may modulate energy balance in cells exposed to adverse conditions by functionally coupling mitochondrial protein synthesis to respiration.

  20. Toll-like receptor 2 regulates the barrier function of human bronchial epithelial monolayers through atypical protein kinase C zeta, and an increase in expression of claudin-1

    PubMed Central

    Ragupathy, Sakthikumar; Esmaeili, Farnaz; Paschoud, Serge; Sublet, Emmanuelle; Citi, Sandra; Borchard, Gerrit

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the role of Toll-like receptor (TLR) 2 in maintaining the integrity of the airway epithelial barrier using the human bronchial epithelial cell line Calu-3. Activation of TLR2 by its ligands, Pam3CysSK4 and Peptidoglycan showed a concentration dependent increase in epithelial barrier function, as measured by transepithelial electrical resistance (TEER). This was confirmed by a decrease in paracellular flux of fluorescein sodium. This TLR2 induced increase in TEER was significantly reduced by pretreatment with polyclonal anti-human TLR2-neutralizing antibody. TLR2 stimulation in Calu-3 cell monolayers resulted in an increased expression of the tight junction proteins claudin-1 and ZO-1, and a decreased expression of occludin, at both the mRNA and protein levels. A pseudosubstrate inhibitor to PKCζ significantly prevented the TLR2 mediated increase in barrier function. It also prevented the increase in claudin-1 in a concentration dependent manner up to 1 µM. TLR2 stimulation led to an increase in phosphorylation of atypical PKC ζ, which was prevented by the pseudosubstrate inhibitor in a concentration dependent manner. Taken together, our observations support a model whereby increased tight junction barrier function induced by activation of TLR2 occurs through increased expression of claudin-1, and through modulation of PKC ζ activity. PMID:25101232

  1. Tomato 14-3-3 protein TFT7 interacts with a MAP kinase kinase to regulate immunity-associated programmed cell death mediated by diverse disease resistance proteins.

    PubMed

    Oh, Chang-Sik; Martin, Gregory B

    2011-04-22

    Programmed cell death (PCD) associated with immunity is triggered when a plant disease resistance (R) protein recognizes a corresponding pathogen virulence protein. In tomato, detection by the host Pto kinase of the Pseudomonas syringae proteins AvrPto or AvrPtoB causes localized PCD. Previously, we reported that both MAPKKKα (mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase kinase) and the tomato 14-3-3 protein 7 (TFT7) positively regulate Pto-mediated PCD in tomato and Nicotiana benthamiana. In addition, in contrast to MAPKKKα, TFT7 is required for PCD mediated by four other R proteins. Here we investigate why TFT7 is required for PCD induced by diverse R proteins in plants. We discovered that a MAPKK, SlMKK2, which acts downstream of SlMAPKKKα, also interacts with TFT7 in plant cells. Gene silencing experiments revealed that the orthologous genes of both SlMKK2 and TFT7 in N. benthamiana are required for PCD mediated by the same set of R proteins. SlMKK2 and its orthologs contain a 14-3-3 binding site in their N terminus, and Thr(33) in this site is required for interaction with TFT7 in vivo. Like the structurally similar human 14-3-3ε protein, TFT7 forms a homodimer in vivo. Because TFT7 interacts with both SlMAPKKKα and SlMKK2 and also forms a homodimer, we propose that TFT7 may coordinately recruit these client proteins for efficient signal transfer, leading to PCD induction. PMID:21378171

  2. FMLP activates Ras and Raf in human neutrophils. Potential role in activation of MAP kinase.

    PubMed Central

    Worthen, G S; Avdi, N; Buhl, A M; Suzuki, N; Johnson, G L

    1994-01-01

    Chemoattractants bind to seven transmembrane-spanning, G-protein-linked receptors on polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils) and induce a variety of functional responses, including activation of microtubule-associated protein (MAP) kinase. Although the pathways by which MAP kinases are activated in neutrophils are unknown, we hypothesized that activation of the Ras/Raf pathway leading to activation of MAP/ERK kinase (MEK) would be induced by the chemoattractant f-met-leu-phe. Human neutrophils exposed to 10 nM FMLP for 30 s exhibited an MAP kinase kinase activity coeluting with MEK-1. Immunoprecipitation of Raf-1 kinase after stimulation with FMLP revealed an activity that phosphorylated MEK, was detectable at 30 s, and peaked at 2-3 min. Immunoprecipitation of Ras from both intact neutrophils labeled with [32P]orthophosphate and electropermeabilized neutrophils incubated with [32P]GTP was used to determine that FMLP treatment was associated with activation of Ras. Activation of both Ras and Raf was inhibited by treatment of neutrophils with pertussis toxin, indicating predominant linkage to the Gi2 protein. Although phorbol esters activated Raf, activation induced by FMLP appeared independent of protein kinase C, further suggesting that Gi2 was linked to Ras and Raf independent of phospholipase C and protein kinase C. Dibutyryl cAMP, which inhibits many neutrophil functional responses, blocked the activation of Raf by FMLP, suggesting that interruption of the Raf/MAP kinase pathway influences neutrophil responses to chemoattractants. These data suggest that Gi2-mediated receptor regulation of the Ras/Raf/MAP kinase pathway is a primary response to chemoattractants. Images PMID:8040337

  3. The molecular basis of targeting protein kinases in cancer therapeutics.

    PubMed

    Tsai, Chung-Jung; Nussinov, Ruth

    2013-08-01

    In this paper, we provide an overview of targeted anticancer therapies with small molecule kinase inhibitors. First, we discuss why a single constitutively active kinase emanating from a variety of aberrant genetic alterations is capable of transforming a normal cell, leading it to acquire the hallmarks of a cancer cell. To draw attention to the fact that kinase inhibition in targeted cancer therapeutics differs from conventional cytotoxic chemotherapy, we exploit a conceptual framework explaining why suppressed kinase activity will selectively kill only the so-called oncogene 'addicted' cancer cell, while sparing the healthy cell. Second, we introduce the protein kinase superfamily in light of its common active conformation with precisely positioned structural elements, and the diversified auto-inhibitory conformations among the kinase families. Understanding the detailed activation mechanism of individual kinases is essential to relate the observed oncogenic alterations to the elevated constitutively active state, to identify the mechanism of consequent drug resistance, and to guide the development of the next-generation inhibitors. To clarify the vital importance of structural guidelines in studies of oncogenesis, we explain how somatic mutations in EGFR result in kinase constitutive activation. Third, in addition to the common theme of secondary (acquired) mutations that prevent drug binding from blocking a signaling pathway which is hijacked by the aberrant activated kinase, we discuss scenarios of drug resistance and relapse by compensating lesions that bypass the inactivated pathway in a vertical or horizontal fashion. Collectively, these suggest that the future challenge of cancer therapy with small molecule kinase inhibitors will rely on the discovery of distinct combinations of optimized drugs to target individual subtypes of different cancers.

  4. Human Mitochondrial Protein Database

    National Institute of Standards and Technology Data Gateway

    SRD 131 Human Mitochondrial Protein Database (Web, free access)   The Human Mitochondrial Protein Database (HMPDb) provides comprehensive data on mitochondrial and human nuclear encoded proteins involved in mitochondrial biogenesis and function. This database consolidates information from SwissProt, LocusLink, Protein Data Bank (PDB), GenBank, Genome Database (GDB), Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM), Human Mitochondrial Genome Database (mtDB), MITOMAP, Neuromuscular Disease Center and Human 2-D PAGE Databases. This database is intended as a tool not only to aid in studying the mitochondrion but in studying the associated diseases.

  5. Eicosapentaenoic acid membrane incorporation impairs ABCA1-dependent cholesterol efflux via a protein kinase A signaling pathway in primary human macrophages.

    PubMed

    Fournier, Natalie; Tardivel, Sylviane; Benoist, Jean-François; Vedie, Benoît; Rousseau-Ralliard, Delphine; Nowak, Maxime; Allaoui, Fatima; Paul, Jean-Louis

    2016-04-01

    A diet rich in n-3/n-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs) is cardioprotective. Dietary PUFAs affect the cellular phospholipids composition, which may influence the function of membrane proteins. We investigated the impact of the membrane incorporation of several PUFAs on ABCA1-mediated cholesterol efflux, a key antiatherogenic pathway. Arachidonic acid (AA) (C20:4 n-6) and docosahexaenoic acid (DHA) (C22:6 n-3) decreased or increased cholesterol efflux from J774 mouse macrophages, respectively, whereas they had no effect on efflux from human monocyte-derived macrophages (HMDM). Importantly, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) (C20:5 n-3) induced a dose-dependent reduction of ABCA1 functionality in both cellular models (-28% for 70μM of EPA in HMDM), without any alterations in ABCA1 expression. These results show that PUFA membrane incorporation does not have the same consequences on cholesterol efflux from mouse and human macrophages. The EPA-treated HMDM exhibited strong phospholipid composition changes, with high levels of both EPA and its elongation product docosapentaenoic acid (DPA) (C22:5 n-3), which is associated with a decreased level of AA. In HMDM, EPA reduced the ATPase activity of the membrane transporter. Moreover, the activation of adenylate cyclase by forskolin and the inhibition of cAMP phosphodiesterase by isobutylmethylxanthine restored ABCA1 cholesterol efflux in EPA-treated human macrophages. In conclusion, EPA membrane incorporation reduces ABCA1 functionality in mouse macrophages as well as in primary human macrophages and this effect seems to be PKA-dependent in human macrophages.

  6. Models for the activation pathway of epidermal growth factor receptor protein-tyrosine kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Campion, S.R.; Niyogi, S.K. )

    1991-03-15

    Activation of the epidermal growth factor (EGF) receptor's intrinsic protein-tyrosine kinase activity, which occurs upon formation of the receptor-ligand complex, is the critical regulatory event affecting the subsequent EGF-dependent cellular responses leading to DNA synthesis and cell proliferation. The molecular mechanism by which EGF-dependent activation of receptor kinase activity takes place is not clearly understood. In this study, the growth factor-dependent activation of the EGF receptor tyrosine kinase was examined in vitro using detergent-solubilized, partially purified GEF receptors from A5431 human epidermoid carcinoma cells. Evaluation of the cooperativity observed in the EGF-dependent activation of soluble receptor tyrosine kinase would suggest a mechanism requiring the binding of the EGF peptide to both ligand binding sites on a receptor dimer to induce full receptor kinase activity. Equations describing potential cooperative kinase activation pathways have been examined. The theoretical system which best simulates the allosteric regulation observed in the experimental kinase activation data is that describing multiple essential activation. In addition, studies using mutant analogs of the EGF peptide ligand appear to confirm the requirement for an essential conformational change in the receptor-ligand complex to activate the receptor kinase activity. Several mutant growth factor analogues are able to occupy the ligand binding sites on the receptor without inducing the fully active receptor conformation.

  7. Malaria Protein Kinase CK2 (PfCK2) Shows Novel Mechanisms of Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Graciotti, Michele; Alam, Mahmood; Solyakov, Lev; Schmid, Ralf; Burley, Glenn; Bottrill, Andrew R.; Doerig, Christian; Cullis, Paul; Tobin, Andrew B.

    2014-01-01

    Casein kinase 2 (protein kinase CK2) is a conserved eukaryotic serine/theronine kinase with multiple substrates and roles in the regulation of cellular processes such as cellular stress, cell proliferation and apoptosis. Here we report a detailed analysis of the Plasmodium falciparum CK2, PfCK2, demonstrating that this kinase, like the mammalian orthologue, is a dual specificity kinase able to phosphorylate at both serine and tyrosine. However, unlike the human orthologue that is auto-phosphorylated on tyrosine within the activation loop, PfCK2 shows no activation loop auto-phosphorylation but rather is auto-phosphorylated at threonine 63 within subdomain I. Phosphorylation at this site in PfCK2 is shown here to regulate the intrinsic kinase activity of PfCK2. Furthermore, we generate an homology model of PfCK2 in complex with the known selective protein kinase CK2 inhibitor, quinalizarin, and in so doing identify key co-ordinating residues in the ATP binding pocket that could aid in designing selective inhibitors to PfCK2. PMID:24658579

  8. MAPK-Activated Protein Kinases (MKs): Novel Insights and Challenges.

    PubMed

    Gaestel, Matthias

    2015-01-01

    Downstream of MAPKs, such as classical/atypical ERKs and p38 MAPKs, but not of JNKs, signaling is often mediated by protein kinases which are phosphorylated and activated by MAPKs and, therefore, designated MAPK-activated protein kinases (MAPKAPKs). Recently, novel insights into the specificity of the assembly of MAPK/MAPKAPK hetero-dimeric protein kinase signaling complexes have been gained. In addition, new functional aspects of MKs have been described and established functions have been challenged. This short review will summarize recent developments including the linear motif (LM) in MKs, the ERK-independent activation of RSK, the RSK-independent effects of some RSK-inhibitors and the challenged role of MK5/PRAK in tumor suppression. PMID:26779481

  9. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity in Trypanosoma cruzi.

    PubMed Central

    Ulloa, R M; Mesri, E; Esteva, M; Torres, H N; Téllez-Iñón, M T

    1988-01-01

    A cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity from epimastigote forms of Trypanosoma cruzi was characterized. Cytosolic extracts were chromatographed on DEAE-cellulose columns, giving two peaks of kinase activity, which were eluted at 0.15 M- and 0.32 M-NaCl respectively. The second activity peak was stimulated by nanomolar concentrations of cyclic AMP. In addition, a cyclic AMP-binding protein co-eluted with the second kinase activity peak. Cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase activity was further purified by gel filtration, affinity chromatography on histone-agarose and cyclic AMP-agarose, as well as by chromatography on CM-Sephadex. The enzyme ('holoenzyme') could be partially dissociated into two different components: 'catalytic' and 'regulatory'. The 'regulatory' component had specific binding for cyclic AMP, and it inhibited phosphotransferase activity of the homologous 'catalytic component' or of the 'catalytic subunit' from bovine heart. Cyclic AMP reversed these inhibitions. A 'holoenzyme preparation' was phosphorylated in the absence of exogenous phosphate acceptor and analysed by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. A 56 kDa band was phosphorylated. The same preparation was analysed by Western blotting, by using polyclonal antibodies to the regulatory subunits of protein kinases type I or II. Both antibodies reacted with the 56 kDa band. Images Fig. 7. Fig. 8. PMID:2848508

  10. Universal quantitative kinase assay based on diagonal SCX chromatography and stable isotope dimethyl labeling provides high-definition kinase consensus motifs for PKA and human Mps1.

    PubMed

    Hennrich, Marco L; Marino, Fabio; Groenewold, Vincent; Kops, Geert J P L; Mohammed, Shabaz; Heck, Albert J R

    2013-05-01

    In order to understand cellular signaling, a clear understanding of kinase-substrate relationships is essential. Some of these relationships are defined by consensus recognition motifs present in substrates making them amendable for phosphorylation by designated kinases. Here, we explore a method that is based on two sequential steps of strong cation exchange chromatography combined with differential stable isotope labeling, to define kinase consensus motifs with high accuracy. We demonstrate the value of our method by evaluating the motifs of two very distinct kinases: cAMP regulated protein kinase A (PKA) and human monopolar spindle 1 (Mps1) kinase, also known as TTK. PKA is a well-studied basophilic kinase with a relatively well-defined motif and numerous known substrates in vitro and in vivo. Mps1, a kinase involved in chromosome segregation, has been less well characterized. Its substrate specificity is unclear and here we show that Mps1 is an acidophilic kinase with a striking tendency for phosphorylation of threonines. The final outcomes of our work are high-definition kinase consensus motifs for PKA and Mps1. Our generic method, which makes use of proteolytic cell lysates as a source for peptide-substrate libraries, can be implemented for any kinase present in the kinome.

  11. Extending Thymidine Kinase Activity to the Catalytic Repertoire of Human Deoxycytidine Kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Hazra, Saugata; Sabini, Eliszbetta; Ort, Stephan; Konrad, Manfred; Lavie, Arnon

    2009-03-04

    Salvage of nucleosides in the cytosol of human cells is carried out by deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) and thymidine kinase 1 (TK1). Whereas TK1 is only responsible for thymidine phosphorylation, dCK is capable of converting dC, dA, and dG into their monophosphate forms. Using structural data on dCK, we predicted that select mutations at the active site would, in addition to making the enzyme faster, expand the catalytic repertoire of dCK to include thymidine. Specifically, we hypothesized that steric repulsion between the methyl group of the thymine base and Arg104 is the main factor preventing the phosphorylation of thymidine by wild-type dCK. Here we present kinetic data on several dCK variants where Arg104 has been replaced by select residues, all performed in combination with the mutation of Asp133 to an alanine. We show that several hydrophobic residues at position 104 endow dCK with thymidine kinase activity. Depending on the exact nature of the mutations, the enzyme's substrate preference is modified. The R104M-D133A double mutant is a pyrimidine-specific enzyme due to large K{sub m} values with purines. The crystal structure of the double mutant R104M-D133A in complex with the L-form of thymidine supplies a structural explanation for the ability of this variant to phosphorylate thymidine and thymidine analogs. The replacement of Arg104 by a smaller residue allows L-dT to bind deeper into the active site, making space for the C5-methyl group of the thymine base. The unique catalytic properties of several of the mutants make them good candidates for suicide-gene/protein-therapy applications.

  12. Solution structure of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase

    SciTech Connect

    Trewhella, J.; Olah, G.A.; Walsh, D.A.; Mitchell, R.D.

    1998-12-31

    This is the final report of a three-year, Laboratory Directed Research and Development (LDRD) project as Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL). Protein phosphorylation is well established as one of the most important mechanisms of signal transduction and cellular regulation. Two of the key enzymes that catalyze these phosphorylation reactions are the cAMP- (PKA) and cGMP- (PKG) dependent protein kinases. PKA has served as the prototypic model of this class of enzymes that now comprises in excess of 300 phylogenetically related proteins. A large number of these protein kinases are critical for the regulation of cell function and a full analysis of their similarities and differences is essential to understand their diverse physiological roles. The cAMP-dependent protein kinase has the subunit structure R2C2, in which C and R refer to the catalytic and regulatory subunits, respectively. The cGMP-dependent protein kinase (PKG) is highly homologous to PKA but is distinguished from it by having the regulatory and catalytic domains on a contiguous polypeptide. The studies described here use small-angle scattering and Fourier Transform InfraRed (FTIR) spectroscopy to study domain movements and conformational changes in these enzymes in different functional states in order to elucidate the molecular bases for the regulation of their activities.

  13. Ethanol increases affinity of protein kinase C for phosphatidylserine

    SciTech Connect

    Chin, J.H.

    1986-03-01

    Protein kinase C is a calcium-dependent enzyme that requires phospholipid for its activation. It is present in relatively high concentration in the brain and may be involved in neuronal function. The present experiments test whether the membrane disorder induced by ethanol affects the activity of kinase C by changing its interaction with membrane lipid. Fractions rich in kinase C were purified from rat brain cytosol by DEAE-cellulose chromatography and Sephadex G-200 gel filtration. Enzyme activity was assayed by measuring the phosphorylation of histone H1. As expected, phosphatidylserine activated the enzyme, and the stimulation was further increased by the addition of calcium and/or diacylglycerol. At low concentration of free calcium (0.5-1..mu..M), ethanol (800 mM0 enhanced kinase C activity if the presence of phospholipid. similar results were observed in the absence of calcium. Double reciprocal plots of the data showed that ethanol increased the affinity of the enzyme for phosphatidylserine without affecting the V/sub max. The stimulation of kinase C activity by ethanol was not observed at high calcium concentrations. These experiments suggest that ethanol may activated protein kinase C at physiological levels of calcium by facilitating its transfer into the hydrophobic membrane environment.

  14. The Roles of NDR Protein Kinases in Hippo Signalling

    PubMed Central

    Hergovich, Alexander

    2016-01-01

    The Hippo tumour suppressor pathway has emerged as a critical regulator of tissue growth through controlling cellular processes such as cell proliferation, death, differentiation and stemness. Traditionally, the core cassette of the Hippo pathway includes the MST1/2 protein kinases, the LATS1/2 protein kinases, and the MOB1 scaffold signal transducer, which together regulate the transcriptional co-activator functions of the proto-oncoproteins YAP and TAZ through LATS1/2-mediated phosphorylation of YAP/TAZ. Recent research has identified additional kinases, such as NDR1/2 (also known as STK38/STK38L) and MAP4Ks, which should be considered as novel members of the Hippo core cassette. While these efforts helped to expand our understanding of Hippo core signalling, they also began to provide insights into the complexity and redundancy of the Hippo signalling network. Here, we focus on summarising our current knowledge of the regulation and functions of mammalian NDR kinases, discussing parallels between the NDR pathways in Drosophila and mammals. Initially, we provide a general overview of the cellular functions of NDR kinases in cell cycle progression, centrosome biology, apoptosis, autophagy, DNA damage signalling, immunology and neurobiology. Finally, we put particular emphasis on discussing NDR1/2 as YAP kinases downstream of MST1/2 and MOB1 signalling in Hippo signalling. PMID:27213455

  15. Role of Protein Kinase C, PI3-kinase and Tyrosine Kinase in Activation of MAP Kinase by Glucose and Agonists of G-protein Coupled Receptors in INS-1 Cells

    PubMed Central

    Böcker, Dietmar

    2001-01-01

    MAP (mitogen-activated protein) kinase (also called Erk 1/2) plays a crucial role in cell proliferation and differentiation. Its impact on secretory events is less well established. The interplay of protein kinase C (PKC), PI3-kinase nd cellular tyrosine kinase with MAP kinase activity using inhibitors and compounds such as glucose, phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) and agonists of G-protein coupled receptors like gastrin releasing peptide (GRP), oxytocin (OT) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic peptide (GIP) was investigated in INS-1 cells, an insulin secreting cell line. MAP kinase activity was determined by using a peptide derived from the EGF receptor as a MAP kinase substrate and [ P 32 ]ATP. Glucose as well as GRP, OT and GIP exhibited a time-dependent increase in MAP kinase activity with a maximum at time point 2.5 min. All further experiments were performed using 2.5 min incubations. The flavone PD 098059 is known to bind to the inactive forms of MEK1 (MAPK/ERK-Kinase) thus preventing activation by upstream activators. 20 μM PD 098059 ( IC 50 =51 μM) inhibited MAP kinase stimulated by either glucose, GRP, OT, GIP or PMA. Inhibiton (“downregulation”) of PKC by a long term (22h) pretreatment with 1 μM PMA did not influence MAP kinase activity when augmented by either of the above mentioned compound. To investigate whether PI3-kinase and cellular tyrosine kinase are involved in G-protein mediated effects on MAP kinase, inhibitors were used: 100 nM wortmannin (PI3-kinase inhibitor) reduced the effects of GRP, OT and GIP but not that of PMA; 100 μM genistein (tyrosine kinase inhibitor) inhibited the stimulatory effect of either above mentioned compound on MAP kinase activation. Inhibition of MAP kinase by 20 μM PD 098059 did not influence insulin secretion modulated by either compound (glucose, GRP, OT or GIP). [ H 3 ]Thymidine incorporation, however, was severely inhibited by PD 098059. Thus MAP kinase is important for INS-1 cell proliferation but

  16. PRKX, a Novel cAMP-Dependent Protein Kinase Member, Plays an Important Role in Development.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sizhou; Li, Qian; Alberts, Ian; Li, Xiaohong

    2016-03-01

    The human protein kinase X gene (PRKX) and cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) are both c-AMP-dependent serine/threonine protein kinases within the protein kinase AGC subgroup. Of all the protein kinases in this group, PRKX is the least studied. PRKX has been isolated from patients with chondrodysplasia punctate and is involved in numerous processes, including sexual differentiation and fertilization, normal kidney development and autosomal dominant polycystic kidney disease (ADPKD), blood maturation, neural development, and angiogenesis in vitro. Although the role of PRKX in development and disease has been reported recently, the underlying mechanism of PRKX activity is largely unknown. In addition, based on the expression pattern of PRKX and the extensive role of PKA in disease and development, PRKX might have additional crucial functions that have not been addressed in the literature. In this review, we summarize the characteristics and developmental functions of PRKX that have been reported by recent studies. In particular, we elucidate the structural and functional differences between PRKX and PKA, as well as the possible roles of PRKX in development and related diseases. Finally, we propose future studies that could lead to important discoveries of more PRKX functions and the underlying mechanisms involved. PMID:26252946

  17. Novel Mechanism of Impaired Function of Organic Anion-Transporting Polypeptide 1B3 in Human Hepatocytes: Post-Translational Regulation of OATP1B3 by Protein Kinase C Activation

    PubMed Central

    Powell, John; Farasyn, Taleah; Köck, Kathleen; Meng, Xiaojie; Pahwa, Sonia; Brouwer, Kim L. R.

    2014-01-01

    The organic anion-transporting polypeptide (OATP) 1B3 is a membrane transport protein that mediates hepatic uptake of many drugs and endogenous compounds. Currently, determination of OATP-mediated drug-drug interactions in vitro is focused primarily on direct substrate inhibition. Indirect inhibition of OATP1B3 activity is under-appreciated. OATP1B3 has putative protein kinase C (PKC) phosphorylation sites. Studies were designed to determine the effect of PKC activation on OATP1B3-mediated transport in human hepatocytes using cholecystokinin-8 (CCK-8), a specific OATP1B3 substrate, as the probe. A PKC activator, phorbol-12-myristate-13-acetate (PMA), did not directly inhibit [3H]CCK-8 accumulation in human sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH). However, pretreatment with PMA for as little as 10 minutes rapidly decreased [3H]CCK-8 accumulation. Treatment with a PKC inhibitor bisindolylmaleimide (BIM) I prior to PMA treatment blocked the inhibitory effect of PMA, indicating PKC activation is essential for downregulating OATP1B3 activity. PMA pretreatment did not affect OATP1B3 mRNA or total protein levels. To determine the mechanism(s) underlying the indirect inhibition of OATP1B3 activity upon PKC activation, adenoviral vectors expressing FLAG-Myc-tagged OATP1B3 (Ad-OATP1B3) were transduced into human hepatocytes; surface expression and phosphorylation of OATP1B3 were determined by biotinylation and by an anti–phosphor-Ser/Thr/Tyr antibody, respectively. PMA pretreatment markedly increased OATP1B3 phosphorylation without affecting surface or total OATP1B3 protein levels. In conclusion, PKC activation rapidly decreases OATP1B3 transport activity by post-translational regulation of OATP1B3. These studies elucidate a novel indirect inhibitory mechanism affecting hepatic uptake mediated by OATP1B3, and provide new insights into predicting OATP-mediated drug interactions between OATP substrates and kinase modulator drugs/endogenous compounds. PMID:25200870

  18. Allicin induces apoptosis of the MGC-803 human gastric carcinoma cell line through the p38 mitogen-activated protein kinase/caspase-3 signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xuecheng; Zhu, Yong; Duan, Wei; Feng, Chen; He, Xuan

    2015-04-01

    Gastric cancer is one of the most common forms of malignant tumor, and the development of anti‑gastric cancer drugs with minimal toxicity is of clinical importance. Allicin is extracted from Allium sativum (garlic). Recent research, including clinical experiments, has shown that garlic has anticancer and tumor suppressive effects. The present study aimed to investigate the effects of allicin on the MGC‑803 human gastric carcinoma cell line, and to further explore the possible mechanisms of its tumor suppressor effects. The effects of allicin on the MGC‑803 cells were initially examined using an 3‑(4,5‑dimethylthiazol‑2‑yl)‑2,5‑diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Hoechst staining was also used, in order to demonstrate the impact of allicin on MGC‑803 cell apoptosis. In addition, western blot analysis was performed to determine the abnormal expression levels of apoptosis‑associated proteins, following the treatment of MGC‑803 cells with allicin. Western blotting was also used to investigate the specific mechanisms underlying allicin‑induced apoptosis of MGC‑803 cells. The rate of MGC‑803 apoptosis was significantly increased, when the concentration and treatment time of allicin were increased. Hoechst staining detected an enhanced rate of apoptosis, and enhanced expression levels of cleaved caspase 3 were determined by western blotting. Notably, the protein expression levels of p38 were increased when the MGC‑803 cells were treated with allicin. The results of the present study suggest that allicin may inhibit the proliferation and induce the apoptosis of MGC‑803 human gastric carcinoma cells, and this may partially be achieved through the enhanced expression of p38 and cleaved caspase 3. PMID:25523417

  19. Protein kinase Czeta mediated Raf-1/extracellular-regulated kinase activation by daunorubicin.

    PubMed

    Mas, Véronique Mansat-De; Hernandez, Hélène; Plo, Isabelle; Bezombes, Christine; Maestre, Nicolas; Quillet-Mary, Anne; Filomenko, Rodolphe; Demur, Cécile; Jaffrézou, Jean-Pierre; Laurent, Guy

    2003-02-15

    In light of the emerging concept of a protective function of the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) pathway under stress conditions, we investigated the influence of the anthracycline daunorubicin (DNR) on MAPK signaling and its possible contribution to DNR-induced cytotoxicity. We show that DNR increased phosphorylation of extracellular-regulated kinases (ERKs) and stimulated activities of both Raf-1 and extracellular-regulated kinase 1 (ERK1) within 10 to 30 minutes in U937 cells. ERK1 stimulation was completely blocked by either the mitogen-induced extracellular kinase (MEK) inhibitor PD98059 or the Raf-1 inhibitor 8-bromo-cAMP (cyclic adenosine monophosphate). However, only partial inhibition of Raf-1 and ERK1 stimulation was observed with the antioxidant N-acetylcysteine (N-Ac). Moreover, the xanthogenate compound D609 that inhibits DNR-induced phosphatidylcholine (PC) hydrolysis and subsequent diacylglycerol (DAG) production, as well as wortmannin that blocks phosphoinositide-3 kinase (PI3K) stimulation, only partially inhibited Raf-1 and ERK1 stimulation. We also observed that DNR stimulated protein kinase C zeta (PKCzeta), an atypical PKC isoform, and that both D609 and wortmannin significantly inhibited DNR-triggered PKCzeta activation. Finally, we found that the expression of PKCzeta kinase-defective mutant resulted in the abrogation of DNR-induced ERK phosphorylation. Altogether, these results demonstrate that DNR activates the classical Raf-1/MEK/ERK pathway and that Raf-1 activation is mediated through complex signaling pathways that involve at least 2 contributors: PC-derived DAG and PI3K products that converge toward PKCzeta. Moreover, we show that both Raf-1 and MEK inhibitors, as well as PKCzeta inhibition, sensitized cells to DNR-induced cytotoxicity.

  20. A comprehensive protein-protein interactome for yeast PAS kinase 1 reveals direct inhibition of respiration through the phosphorylation of Cbf1.

    PubMed

    DeMille, Desiree; Bikman, Benjamin T; Mathis, Andrew D; Prince, John T; Mackay, Jordan T; Sowa, Steven W; Hall, Tacie D; Grose, Julianne H

    2014-07-15

    Per-Arnt-Sim (PAS) kinase is a sensory protein kinase required for glucose homeostasis in yeast, mice, and humans, yet little is known about the molecular mechanisms of its function. Using both yeast two-hybrid and copurification approaches, we identified the protein-protein interactome for yeast PAS kinase 1 (Psk1), revealing 93 novel putative protein binding partners. Several of the Psk1 binding partners expand the role of PAS kinase in glucose homeostasis, including new pathways involved in mitochondrial metabolism. In addition, the interactome suggests novel roles for PAS kinase in cell growth (gene/protein expression, replication/cell division, and protein modification and degradation), vacuole function, and stress tolerance. In vitro kinase studies using a subset of 25 of these binding partners identified Mot3, Zds1, Utr1, and Cbf1 as substrates. Further evidence is provided for the in vivo phosphorylation of Cbf1 at T211/T212 and for the subsequent inhibition of respiration. This respiratory role of PAS kinase is consistent with the reported hypermetabolism of PAS kinase-deficient mice, identifying a possible molecular mechanism and solidifying the evolutionary importance of PAS kinase in the regulation of glucose homeostasis.

  1. Identification of aurora kinase B and Wee1-like protein kinase as downstream targets of (V600E)B-RAF in melanoma.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Arati; Madhunapantula, SubbaRao V; Gowda, Raghavendra; Berg, Arthur; Neves, Rogerio I; Robertson, Gavin P

    2013-04-01

    BRAF is the most mutated gene in melanoma, with approximately 50% of patients containing V600E mutant protein. (V600E)B-RAF can be targeted using pharmacological agents, but resistance develops in patients by activating other proteins in the signaling pathway. Identifying downstream members in this signaling cascade is important to design strategies to avoid the development of resistance. Unfortunately, downstream proteins remain to be identified and therapeutic potential requires validation. A kinase screen was undertaken to identify downstream targets in the (V600E)B-RAF signaling cascade. Involvement of aurora kinase B (AURKB) and Wee1-like protein kinase (WEE1) as downstream proteins in the (V600E)B-RAF pathway was validated in xenografted tumors, and mechanisms of action were characterized in size- and time-matched tumors. Levels of only AURKB and WEE1 decreased in melanoma cells, when (V600E)B-RAF, mitogen-activated protein kinase 1/2, or extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 protein levels were reduced using siRNA compared with other identified kinases. AURKB and WEE1 were expressed in tumors of patients with melanoma at higher levels than observed in normal human melanocytes. Targeting these proteins reduced tumor development by approximately 70%, similar to that observed when inhibiting (V600E)B-RAF. Furthermore, protein or activity levels of AURKB and WEE1 decreased in melanoma cells when pharmacological agents targeting upstream (V600E)B-RAF or mitogen-activated protein kinase were used to inhibit the (V600E)B-RAF pathway. Thus, AURKB and WEE1 are targets and biomarkers of therapeutic efficacy, lying downstream of (V600E)B-RAF in melanomas.

  2. Identification of Aurora Kinase B and Wee1-Like Protein Kinase as Downstream Targets of V600EB-RAF in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Arati; Madhunapantula, SubbaRao V.; Gowda, Raghavendra; Berg, Arthur; Neves, Rogerio I.; Robertson, Gavin P.

    2014-01-01

    BRAF is the most mutated gene in melanoma, with approximately 50% of patients containing V600E mutant protein. V600EB-RAF can be targeted using pharmacological agents, but resistance develops in patients by activating other proteins in the signaling pathway. Identifying downstream members in this signaling cascade is important to design strategies to avoid the development of resistance. Unfortunately, downstream proteins remain to be identified and therapeutic potential requires validation. A kinase screen was undertaken to identify downstream targets in the V600EB-RAF signaling cascade. Involvement of aurora kinase B (AURKB) and Wee1-like protein kinase (WEE1) as downstream proteins in the V600EB-RAF pathway was validated in xenografted tumors, and mechanisms of action were characterized in size- and time-matched tumors. Levels of only AURKB and WEE1 decreased in melanoma cells, when V600EB-RAF, mitogen-activated protein kinase 1/2, or extracellular signal–regulated kinase 1/2 protein levels were reduced using siRNA compared with other identified kinases. AURKB and WEE1 were expressed in tumors of patients with melanoma at higher levels than observed in normal human melanocytes. Targeting these proteins reduced tumor development by approximately 70%, similar to that observed when inhibiting V600EB-RAF. Furthermore, protein or activity levels of AURKB and WEE1 decreased in melanoma cells when pharmacological agents targeting upstream V600EB-RAF or mitogen-activated protein kinase were used to inhibit the V600EB-RAF pathway. Thus, AURKB and WEE1 are targets and biomarkers of therapeutic efficacy, lying downstream of V600EB-RAF in melanomas. PMID:23416158

  3. Toll-like receptor 4 signaling is coupled to src family kinase activation, tyrosine phosphorylation of zonula adherens proteins, and opening of the paracellular pathway in human lung microvascular endothelia

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    Bacterial lipopolysaccharide (LPS) is a key mediator in the vascular leak syndromes associated with Gram-negative bacterial infections. LPS opens the paracellular pathway in pulmonary vascular endothelia through protein tyrosine phosphorylation. We now have identified the protein tyrosine kinase (PT...

  4. Protein kinase Calpha and epsilon small-molecule targeted therapeutics: a new roadmap to two Holy Grails in drug discovery?

    PubMed

    O'Brian, Catherine A; Chu, Feng; Bornmann, William G; Maxwell, David S

    2006-02-01

    Protein kinase (PK)Calpha and epsilon are rational targets for cancer therapy. However, targeted experimental therapeutics that inhibit PKCalpha or epsilon are unavailable. The authors established recently that covalent modification of an active-site cysteine in human PKCepsilon, Cys452, by small molecules, for example 2-mercaptoethanolamine, is necessary and sufficient to render PKCepsilon kinase-dead. Cys452 is conserved in only eleven human protein kinase genes, including PKCalpha. Therefore, the design of small molecules that bind PKC active sites with an electrophile substituent positioned proximal to the Cys452 side chain may lead to targeted therapeutics that selectively inhibit PKCepsilon, PKCalpha or other PKC isozymes.

  5. Protein phosphorylation systems in postmortem human brain

    SciTech Connect

    Walaas, S.I.; Perdahl-Wallace, E.; Winblad, B.; Greengard, P. )

    1989-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation systems regulated by cyclic adenosine 3',5'-monophosphate (cyclic AMP), or calcium in conjunction with calmodulin or phospholipid/diacylglycerol, have been studied by phosphorylation in vitro of particulate and soluble fractions from human postmortem brain samples. One-dimensional or two-dimensional gel electrophoretic protein separations were used for analysis. Protein phosphorylation catalyzed by cyclic AMP-dependent protein kinase was found to be highly active in both particulate and soluble preparations throughout the human CNS, with groups of both widely distributed and region-specific substrates being observed in different brain nuclei. Dopamine-innervated parts of the basal ganglia and cerebral cortex contained the phosphoproteins previously observed in rodent basal ganglia. In contrast, calcium/phospholipid-dependent and calcium/calmodulin-dependent protein phosphorylation systems were less prominent in human postmortem brain than in rodent brain, and only a few widely distributed substrates for these protein kinases were found. Protein staining indicated that postmortem proteolysis, particularly of high-molecular-mass proteins, was prominent in deeply located, subcortical regions in the human brain. Our results indicate that it is feasible to use human postmortem brain samples, when obtained under carefully controlled conditions, for qualitative studies on brain protein phosphorylation. Such studies should be of value in studies on human neurological and/or psychiatric disorders.

  6. Targeting protein kinase A in cancer therapy: an update

    PubMed Central

    Sapio, Luigi; Di Maiolo, Francesca; Illiano, Michela; Esposito, Antonietta; Chiosi, Emilio; Spina, Annamaria; Naviglio, Silvio

    2014-01-01

    Protein Kinase A (PKA) is a well known member of the serine-threonin protein kinase superfamily. PKA, also known as cAMP-dependent protein kinase, is a multi-unit protein kinase that mediates signal transduction of G-protein coupled receptors through its activation upon cAMP binding. The widespread expression of PKA subunit genes, and the myriad of mechanisms by which cAMP is regulated within a cell suggest that PKA signaling is one of extreme importance to cellular function. It is involved in the control of a wide variety of cellular processes from metabolism to ion channel activation, cell growth and differentiation, gene expression and apoptosis. Importantly, since it has been implicated in the initiation and progression of many tumors, PKA has been proposed as a novel biomarker for cancer detection, and as a potential molecular target for cancer therapy. Here, we highlight some features of cAMP/PKA signaling that are relevant to cancer biology and present an update on targeting PKA in cancer therapy. PMID:26417307

  7. Systematic discovery of linear binding motifs targeting an ancient protein interaction surface on MAP kinases.

    PubMed

    Zeke, András; Bastys, Tomas; Alexa, Anita; Garai, Ágnes; Mészáros, Bálint; Kirsch, Klára; Dosztányi, Zsuzsanna; Kalinina, Olga V; Reményi, Attila

    2015-11-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) are broadly used regulators of cellular signaling. However, how these enzymes can be involved in such a broad spectrum of physiological functions is not understood. Systematic discovery of MAPK networks both experimentally and in silico has been hindered because MAPKs bind to other proteins with low affinity and mostly in less-characterized disordered regions. We used a structurally consistent model on kinase-docking motif interactions to facilitate the discovery of short functional sites in the structurally flexible and functionally under-explored part of the human proteome and applied experimental tools specifically tailored to detect low-affinity protein-protein interactions for their validation in vitro and in cell-based assays. The combined computational and experimental approach enabled the identification of many novel MAPK-docking motifs that were elusive for other large-scale protein-protein interaction screens. The analysis produced an extensive list of independently evolved linear binding motifs from a functionally diverse set of proteins. These all target, with characteristic binding specificity, an ancient protein interaction surface on evolutionarily related but physiologically clearly distinct three MAPKs (JNK, ERK, and p38). This inventory of human protein kinase binding sites was compared with that of other organisms to examine how kinase-mediated partnerships evolved over time. The analysis suggests that most human MAPK-binding motifs are surprisingly new evolutionarily inventions and newly found links highlight (previously hidden) roles of MAPKs. We propose that short MAPK-binding stretches are created in disordered protein segments through a variety of ways and they represent a major resource for ancient signaling enzymes to acquire new regulatory roles. PMID:26538579

  8. Regulation of protein kinase B/Akt activity and Ser473 phosphorylation by protein kinase Calpha in endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Partovian, Chohreh; Simons, Michael

    2004-08-01

    Protein kinase Balpha (PKBalpha/Akt-1) is a key mediator of multiple signaling pathways involved in angiogenesis, cell proliferation and apoptosis among others. The unphosphorylated form of Akt-1 is virtually inactive and its full activation requires two phosphatidylinositol-3,4,5-triphosphate-dependent phosphorylation events, Thr308 by 3-phosphoinositide-dependent kinase-1 (PDK1) and Ser473 by an undefined kinase that has been termed PDK2. Recent studies have suggested that the Ser473 kinase is a plasma membrane raft-associated kinase. In this study we show that protein kinase Calpha (PKCalpha) translocates to the membrane rafts in response to insulin growth factor-1 (IGF-1) stimulation. Overexpression of PKCalpha increases Ser473 phosphorylation and Akt-1 activity, while inhibition of its activity or expression decreases IGF-1-dependent activation of Akt-1. Furthermore, in vitro, in the presence of phospholipids and calcium, PKCalpha directly phosphorylates Akt-1 at the Ser473 site. We conclude, therefore, that PKCalpha regulates Akt-1 activity via Ser473 phosphorylation and may function as PDK2 in endothelial cells. PMID:15157674

  9. Protein Kinase CK2 Content in GL261 Mouse Glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Ferrer-Font, Laura; Alcaraz, Estefania; Plana, Maria; Candiota, Ana Paula; Itarte, Emilio; Arús, Carles

    2016-07-01

    Glioblastoma (GBM) is the most prevalent and aggressive human glial tumour with a median survival of 14-15 months. Temozolomide (TMZ) is the standard chemotherapeutic choice for GBM treatment. Unfortunately, chemoresistence always ensues with concomitant tumour regrowth. Protein kinase CK2 (CK2) contributes to tumour development, proliferation, and suppression of apoptosis in cancer and it is overexpressed in human GBM. Targeting CK2 in GBM treatment may benefit patients. With this translational perspective in mind, we have studied the CK2 expression level by Western blot analysis in a preclinical model of GBM: GL261 cells growing orthotopically in C57BL/6 mice. The expression level of the CK2 catalytic subunit (CK2α) was higher in tumour (about 4-fold) and in contralateral brain parenchyma (more than 2-fold) than in normal brain parenchyma (p < 0.05). In contrast, no significant changes were found in CK2 regulatory subunit (CK2β) expression, suggesting an increased unbalance of CK2α/CK2β in GL261 tumours with respect to normal brain parenchyma, in agreement with a differential role of these two subunits in tumours.

  10. Microfluidic IEF technique for sequential phosphorylation analysis of protein kinases

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Nakchul; Song, Simon; Choi, Hoseok; Lim, Bu-Taek; Kim, Young-Pil

    2015-11-01

    Sequential phosphorylation of protein kinases play the important role in signal transduction, protein regulation, and metabolism in living cells. The analysis of these phosphorylation cascades will provide new insights into their physiological functions in many biological functions. Unfortunately, the existing methods are limited to analyze the cascade activity. Therefore, we suggest a microfluidic isoelectric focusing technique (μIEF) for the analysis of the cascade activity. Using the technique, we show that the sequential phosphorylation of a peptide by two different kinases can be successfully detected on a microfluidic chip. In addition, the inhibition assay for kinase activity and the analysis on a real sample have also been conducted. The results indicate that μIEF is an excellent means for studies on phosphorylation cascade activity.

  11. Rapamycin induces mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) expression through activation of protein kinase B and mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase pathways.

    PubMed

    Rastogi, Ruchi; Jiang, Zhongliang; Ahmad, Nisar; Rosati, Rita; Liu, Yusen; Beuret, Laurent; Monks, Robert; Charron, Jean; Birnbaum, Morris J; Samavati, Lobelia

    2013-11-22

    Mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1), also known as dual specificity phosphatase-1 (DUSP-1), plays a crucial role in the deactivation of MAPKs. Several drugs with immune-suppressive properties modulate MKP-1 expression as part of their mechanism of action. We investigated the effect of mTOR inhibition through rapamycin and a dual mTOR inhibitor (AZD2014) on MKP-1 expression. Low dose rapamycin led to a rapid activation of both AKT and ERK pathways with a subsequent increase in MKP-1 expression. Rapamycin treatment led to phosphorylation of CREB, transcription factor 1 (ATF1), and ATF2, three transcription factors that bind to the cyclic AMP-responsive elements on the Mkp-1 promoter. Inhibition of either the MEK/ERK or the AKT pathway attenuated rapamycin-mediated MKP-1 induction. AZD2014 did not activate AKT but activated the ERK pathway, leading to a moderate MKP-1 induction. Using bone marrow-derived macrophages (BMDMs) derived from wild-type (WT) mice or mice deficient in AKT1 and AKT2 isoforms or BMDM from targeted deficiency in MEK1 and MEK2, we show that rapamycin treatment led to an increased MKP1 expression in BMDM from WT but failed to do so in BMDMs lacking the AKT1 isoform or MEK1 and MEK2. Importantly, rapamycin pretreatment inhibited LPS-mediated p38 activation and decreased nitric oxide and IL-6 production. Our work provides a conceptual framework for the observed immune modulatory effect of mTOR inhibition.

  12. Conventional protein kinase C isoforms differentially regulate ADP- and thrombin-evoked Ca²⁺ signalling in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Lever, Robert A; Hussain, Azhar; Sun, Benjamin B; Sage, Stewart O; Harper, Alan G S

    2015-12-01

    Rises in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]cyt) are central in platelet activation, yet many aspects of the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Most studies examine how experimental manipulations affect agonist-evoked rises in [Ca(2+)]cyt, but these only monitor the net effect of manipulations on the processes controlling [Ca(2+)]cyt (Ca(2+) buffering, sequestration, release, entry and removal), and cannot resolve the source of the Ca(2+) or the transporters or channels affected. To investigate the effects of protein kinase C (PKC) on platelet Ca(2+) signalling, we here monitor Ca(2+) flux around the platelet by measuring net Ca(2+) fluxes to or from the extracellular space and the intracellular Ca(2+) stores, which act as the major sources and sinks for Ca(2+) influx into and efflux from the cytosol, as well as monitoring the cytosolic Na(+) concentration ([Na(+)]cyt), which influences platelet Ca(2+) fluxes via Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange. The intracellular store Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]st) was monitored using Fluo-5N, the extracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]ext) was monitored using Fluo-4 whilst [Ca(2+)]cyt and [Na(+)]cyt were monitored using Fura-2 and SFBI, respectively. PKC inhibition using Ro-31-8220 or bisindolylmaleimide I potentiated ADP- and thrombin-evoked rises in [Ca(2+)]cyt in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+). PKC inhibition potentiated ADP-evoked but reduced thrombin-evoked intracellular Ca(2+) release and Ca(2+) removal into the extracellular medium. SERCA inhibition using thapsigargin and 2,5-di(tert-butyl) l,4-benzohydroquinone abolished the effect of PKC inhibitors on ADP-evoked changes in [Ca(2+)]cyt but only reduced the effect on thrombin-evoked responses. Thrombin evokes substantial rises in [Na(+)]cyt which would be expected to reduce Ca(2+) removal via the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX). Thrombin-evoked rises in [Na(+)]cyt were potentiated by PKC inhibition, an effect which was not due to altered changes in non

  13. Conventional protein kinase C isoforms differentially regulate ADP- and thrombin-evoked Ca²⁺ signalling in human platelets.

    PubMed

    Lever, Robert A; Hussain, Azhar; Sun, Benjamin B; Sage, Stewart O; Harper, Alan G S

    2015-12-01

    Rises in cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]cyt) are central in platelet activation, yet many aspects of the underlying mechanisms are poorly understood. Most studies examine how experimental manipulations affect agonist-evoked rises in [Ca(2+)]cyt, but these only monitor the net effect of manipulations on the processes controlling [Ca(2+)]cyt (Ca(2+) buffering, sequestration, release, entry and removal), and cannot resolve the source of the Ca(2+) or the transporters or channels affected. To investigate the effects of protein kinase C (PKC) on platelet Ca(2+) signalling, we here monitor Ca(2+) flux around the platelet by measuring net Ca(2+) fluxes to or from the extracellular space and the intracellular Ca(2+) stores, which act as the major sources and sinks for Ca(2+) influx into and efflux from the cytosol, as well as monitoring the cytosolic Na(+) concentration ([Na(+)]cyt), which influences platelet Ca(2+) fluxes via Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchange. The intracellular store Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]st) was monitored using Fluo-5N, the extracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]ext) was monitored using Fluo-4 whilst [Ca(2+)]cyt and [Na(+)]cyt were monitored using Fura-2 and SFBI, respectively. PKC inhibition using Ro-31-8220 or bisindolylmaleimide I potentiated ADP- and thrombin-evoked rises in [Ca(2+)]cyt in the absence of extracellular Ca(2+). PKC inhibition potentiated ADP-evoked but reduced thrombin-evoked intracellular Ca(2+) release and Ca(2+) removal into the extracellular medium. SERCA inhibition using thapsigargin and 2,5-di(tert-butyl) l,4-benzohydroquinone abolished the effect of PKC inhibitors on ADP-evoked changes in [Ca(2+)]cyt but only reduced the effect on thrombin-evoked responses. Thrombin evokes substantial rises in [Na(+)]cyt which would be expected to reduce Ca(2+) removal via the Na(+)/Ca(2+) exchanger (NCX). Thrombin-evoked rises in [Na(+)]cyt were potentiated by PKC inhibition, an effect which was not due to altered changes in non

  14. Function of human cytomegalovirus UL97 kinase in viral infection and its inhibition by maribavir

    PubMed Central

    Prichard, Mark N.

    2013-01-01

    Summary The serine/threonine kinase expressed by human cytomegalovirus from gene UL97 phosphorylates the antiviral drug ganciclovir, but its biological function is the phosphorylation of its natural viral and cellular protein substrates which affect viral replication at many levels. The UL97 kinase null phenotype is therefore complex, as is the mechanism of action of maribavir, a highly specific inhibitor of its enzymatic activity. Studies that utilise the drug corroborate results from genetic approaches and together have elucidated many functions of the UL97 kinase that are critical for viral replication. The kinase phosphorylates eukaryotic elongation factor 1delta, the carboxyl terminal domain of the large subunit of RNA polymerase II, the retinoblastoma tumour suppressor and lamins A and C. Each of these is also phosphorylated and regulated by cdc2/cyclin-dependent kinase 1, suggesting that the viral kinase may perform a similar function. These and other activities of the UL97 kinase appear to stimulate the cell cycle to support viral DNA synthesis, enhance the expression of viral genes, promote virion morphogenesis and facilitate the egress of mature capsids from the nucleus. In the absence of UL97 kinase activity, viral DNA synthesis is inefficient and structural proteins are sequestered in nuclear aggresomes, reducing the efficiency of virion morphogenesis. Mature capsids that do form fail to egress the nucleus as the nuclear lamina are not dispersed by the kinase. The critical functions performed by the UL97 kinase illustrate its importance in viral replication and confirm that the kinase is a target for the development of antiviral therapies. PMID:19434630

  15. Involvement of Protein Kinase D1 in Signal Transduction from the Protein Kinase C Pathway to the Tyrosine Kinase Pathway in Response to Gonadotropin-releasing Hormone*

    PubMed Central

    Higa-Nakamine, Sayomi; Maeda, Noriko; Toku, Seikichi; Yamamoto, Hideyuki

    2015-01-01

    The receptor for gonadotropin-releasing hormone (GnRH) belongs to the G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), and its stimulation activates extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase (ERK). We found that the transactivation of ErbB4 was involved in GnRH-induced ERK activation in immortalized GnRH neurons (GT1–7 cells). We found also that GnRH induced the cleavage of ErbB4. In the present study, we examined signal transduction for the activation of ERK and the cleavage of ErbB4 after GnRH treatment. Both ERK activation and ErbB4 cleavage were completely inhibited by YM-254890, an inhibitor of Gq/11 proteins. Down-regulation of protein kinase C (PKC) markedly decreased both ERK activation and ErbB4 cleavage. Experiments with two types of PKC inhibitors, Gö 6976 and bisindolylmaleimide I, indicated that novel PKC isoforms but not conventional PKC isoforms were involved in ERK activation and ErbB4 cleavage. Our experiments indicated that the novel PKC isoforms activated protein kinase D (PKD) after GnRH treatment. Knockdown and inhibitor experiments suggested that PKD1 stimulated the phosphorylation of Pyk2 by constitutively activated Src and Fyn for ERK activation. Taken together, it is highly possible that PKD1 plays a critical role in signal transduction from the PKC pathway to the tyrosine kinase pathway. Activation of the tyrosine kinase pathway may be involved in the progression of cancer. PMID:26338704

  16. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Env7 is a novel serine/threonine kinase 16-related protein kinase and negatively regulates organelle fusion at the lysosomal vacuole.

    PubMed

    Manandhar, Surya P; Ricarte, Florante; Cocca, Stephanie M; Gharakhanian, Editte

    2013-02-01

    Membrane fusion depends on conserved components and is responsible for organelle biogenesis and vesicular trafficking. Yeast vacuoles are dynamic structures analogous to mammalian lysosomes. We report here that yeast Env7 is a novel palmitoylated protein kinase ortholog that negatively regulates vacuolar membrane fusion. Microscopic and biochemical studies confirmed the localization of tagged Env7 at the vacuolar membrane and implicated membrane association via the palmitoylation of its N-terminal Cys13 to -15. In vitro kinase assays established Env7 as a protein kinase. Site-directed mutagenesis of the Env7 alanine-proline-glutamic acid (APE) motif Glu269 to alanine results in an unstable kinase-dead allele that is stabilized and redistributed to the detergent-resistant fraction by interruption of the proteasome system in vivo. Palmitoylation-deficient Env7C13-15S is also kinase dead and mislocalizes to the cytoplasm. Microscopy studies established that env7Δ is defective in maintaining fragmented vacuoles during hyperosmotic response and in buds. ENV7 function is not redundant with a similar role of vacuolar membrane kinase Yck3, as the two do not share a substrate, and ENV7 is not a suppressor of yck3Δ. Bayesian phylogenetic analyses strongly support ENV7 as an ortholog of the gene encoding human STK16, a Golgi apparatus protein kinase with undefined function. We propose that Env7 function in fusion/fission dynamics may be conserved within the endomembrane system.

  17. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases and Mitogen Kinase Phosphatase 1: A Critical Interplay in Macrophage Biology

    PubMed Central

    Lloberas, Jorge; Valverde-Estrella, Lorena; Tur, Juan; Vico, Tania; Celada, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are necessary in multiple processes during the immune response or inflammation. This review emphasizes the critical role of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and mitogen kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) in the functional activities of macrophages. While the phosphorylation of MAPKs is required for macrophage activation or proliferation, MKP-1 dephosphorylates these kinases, thus playing a balancing role in the control of macrophage behavior. MKP-1 is a nuclear-localized dual-specificity phosphatase whose expression is regulated at multiple levels, including at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. The regulatory role of MKP-1 in the interplay between MAPK phosphorylation/dephosphorylation makes this molecule a critical regulator of macrophage biology and inflammation. PMID:27446931

  18. Mitogen-Activated Protein Kinases and Mitogen Kinase Phosphatase 1: A Critical Interplay in Macrophage Biology.

    PubMed

    Lloberas, Jorge; Valverde-Estrella, Lorena; Tur, Juan; Vico, Tania; Celada, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    Macrophages are necessary in multiple processes during the immune response or inflammation. This review emphasizes the critical role of the mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and mitogen kinase phosphatase-1 (MKP-1) in the functional activities of macrophages. While the phosphorylation of MAPKs is required for macrophage activation or proliferation, MKP-1 dephosphorylates these kinases, thus playing a balancing role in the control of macrophage behavior. MKP-1 is a nuclear-localized dual-specificity phosphatase whose expression is regulated at multiple levels, including at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level. The regulatory role of MKP-1 in the interplay between MAPK phosphorylation/dephosphorylation makes this molecule a critical regulator of macrophage biology and inflammation. PMID:27446931

  19. Glucagon receptor activates extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 via cAMP-dependent protein kinase

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Youwei; Cypess, Aaron M.; Muse, Evan D.; Wu, Cui-Rong; Unson, Cecilia G.; Merrifield, R. B.; Sakmar, Thomas P.

    2001-01-01

    We prepared a stable cell line expressing the glucagon receptor to characterize the effect of Gs-coupled receptor stimulation on extracellular signal-regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) activity. Glucagon treatment of the cell line caused a dose-dependent increase in cAMP concentration, activation of cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA), and transient release of intracellular calcium. Glucagon treatment also caused rapid dose-dependent phosphorylation and activation of mitogen-activated protein kinase kinase/ERK kinase (MEK1/2) and ERK1/2. Inhibition of either PKA or MEK1/2 blocked ERK1/2 activation by glucagon. However, no significant activation of several upstream activators of MEK, including Ras, Rap1, and Raf, was observed in response to glucagon treatment. In addition, chelation of intracellular calcium reduced glucagon-mediated ERK1/2 activation. In transient transfection experiments, glucagon receptor mutants that bound glucagon but failed to increase intracellular cAMP and calcium concentrations showed no glucagon-stimulated ERK1/2 phosphorylation. We conclude that glucagon-induced MEK1/2 and ERK1/2 activation is mediated by PKA and that an increase in intracellular calcium concentration is required for maximal ERK activation. PMID:11517300

  20. Isoform Specificity of Protein Kinase Cs in Synaptic Plasticity

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Sossin, Wayne S.

    2007-01-01

    Protein kinase Cs (PKCs) are implicated in many forms of synaptic plasticity. However, the specific isoform(s) of PKC that underlie(s) these events are often not known. We have used "Aplysia" as a model system in order to investigate the isoform specificity of PKC actions due to the presence of fewer isoforms and a large number of documented…

  1. Regulation of cholesterol esterification by protein kinase C

    SciTech Connect

    Jeng, I.; Dills, C.; Klemm, N.; Wu, C.

    1986-03-05

    They have recently identified acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferase as the key enzyme for cholesterol esterification in the central nervous system. They found that the activity of glial acyl-CoA cholesterol acyltransferase could be controlled by a phosphorylation-dephosphorylation mechanism. However, repeated attempts to identify cyclic AMP as the bioregulator for this reaction failed. Recently, they have studied the possible involvement of protein kinase C in the regulation of glial cholesterol esterification. Phorbol-12-myristate 13-acetate (PMA) can activate cellular cholesterol esterification in a complex, time-dependent manner. Phorbol analogues inactive toward protein kinase C are also ineffective in this assay. Furthermore, oleoyl-acetyl-glycerol mimics the effect of PMA, confirming the proposal that protein kinase C mediates the effect of these compounds and that the natural bioregulator is probably diacylglycerol. Receptor-mediated polyphosphatidyl-inositol cleavage often produces diacylglycerol and inositol triphosphate. The synergic effects of these two compounds are known to be necessary to elicit other biological responses. Their preliminary studies using calcium ionophore A23187 indicates that Ca/sup + +/ is not required for cellular cholesterol esterification. In sum, glial cholesterol esterification is probably regulated by a calcium-independent and protein kinase C-dependent reaction.

  2. Investigation of the flexibility of protein kinases implicated in the pathology of Alzheimer's disease.

    PubMed

    Mazanetz, Michael P; Laughton, Charles A; Fischer, Peter M

    2014-01-01

    The pathological characteristics of Alzheimer's Disease (AD) have been linked to the activity of three particular kinases--Glycogen Synthase Kinase 3β (GSK3β), Cyclin-Dependent Kinase 5 (CDK5) and Extracellular-signal Regulated Kinase 2 (ERK2). As a consequence, the design of selective, potent and drug-like inhibitors of these kinases is of particular interest. Structure-based design methods are well-established in the development of kinase inhibitors. However, progress in this field is limited by the difficulty in obtaining X-ray crystal structures suitable for drug design and by the inability of this method to resolve highly flexible regions of the protein that are crucial for ligand binding. To address this issue, we have undertaken a study of human protein kinases CDK5/p25, CDK5, ERK2 and GSK3β using both conventional molecular dynamics (MD) and the new Active Site Pressurisation (ASP) methodology, to look for kinase-specific patterns of flexibility that could be leveraged for the design of selective inhibitors. ASP was used to examine the intrinsic flexibility of the ATP-binding pocket for CDK5/p25, CDK5 and GSK3β where it is shown to be capable of inducing significant conformational changes when compared with X-ray crystal structures. The results from these experiments were used to quantify the dynamics of each protein, which supported the observations made from the conventional MD simulations. Additional information was also derived from the ASP simulations, including the shape of the ATP-binding site and the rigidity of the ATP-binding pocket. These observations may be exploited in the design of selective inhibitors of GSK3β, CDK5 and ERK2. PMID:24983862

  3. Leishmania amazonensis: PKC-like protein kinase modulates the (Na++K+)ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Almeida-Amaral, Elmo Eduardo de; Caruso-Neves, Celso; Lara, Lucienne Silva; Pinheiro, Carla Mônica; Meyer-Fernandes, José Roberto

    2007-08-01

    The present study aimed to identify the presence of protein kinase C-like (PKC-like) in Leishmania amazonensis and to elucidate its possible role in the modulation of the (Na(+)+K(+))ATPase activity. Immunoblotting experiments using antibody against a consensus sequence (Ac 543-549) of rabbit protein kinase C (PKC) revealed the presence of a protein kinase of 80 kDa in L. amazonensis. Measurements of protein kinase activity showed the presence of both (Ca(2+)-dependent) and (Ca(2+)-independent) protein kinase activity in plasma membrane and cytosol. Phorbol ester (PMA) activation of the Ca(2+)-dependent protein kinase stimulated the (Na(+)+K(+))ATPase activity, while activation of the Ca(2+)-independent protein kinase was inhibitory. Both effects of protein kinase on the (Na(+)+K(+))ATPase of the plasma membrane were lower than that observed in intact cells. PMA induced the translocation of protein kinase from cytosol to plasma membrane, indicating that the maximal effect of protein kinase on the (Na(+)+K(+))ATPase activity depends on the synergistic action of protein kinases from both plasma membrane and cytosol. This is the first demonstration of a protein kinase activated by PMA in L. amazonensis and the first evidence for a possible role in the regulation of the (Na(+)+K(+))ATPase activity in this trypanosomatid. Modulation of the (Na(+)+K(+))ATPase by protein kinase in a trypanosomatid opens up new possibilities to understand the regulation of ion homeostasis in this parasite. PMID:17475255

  4. Transduction proteins of olfactory receptor cells: identification of guanine nucleotide binding proteins and protein kinase C

    SciTech Connect

    Anholt, R.R.H.; Mumby, S.M.; Stoffers, D.A.; Girard, P.R.; Kuo, J.F.; Snyder, S.H.

    1987-02-10

    The authors have analyzed guanine nucleotide binding proteins (G-proteins) in the olfactory epithelium of Rana catesbeiana using subunit-specific antisera. The olfactory epithelium contained the ..cap alpha.. subunits of three G-proteins, migrating on polyacrylamide gels in SDS with apparent molecular weights of 45,000, 42,000, and 40,000, corresponding to G/sub s/, G/sub i/, and G/sub o/, respectively. A single ..beta.. subunit with an apparent molecular weight of 36,000 was detected. An antiserum against the ..cap alpha.. subunit of retinal transducin failed to detect immunoreactive proteins in olfactory cilia detached from the epithelium. The olfactory cilia appeared to be enriched in immunoreactive G/sub s..cap alpha../ relative to G/sub ichemically bond/ and G/sub ochemically bond/ when compared to membranes prepared from the olfactory epithelium after detachment of the cilia. Bound antibody was detected by autoradiography after incubation with (/sup 125/I)protein. Immunohistochemical studies using an antiserum against the ..beta.. subunit of G-proteins revealed intense staining of the ciliary surface of the olfactory epithelium and of the axon bundles in the lamina propria. In contrast, an antiserum against a common sequence of the ..cap alpha.. subunits preferentially stained the cell membranes of the olfactory receptor cells and the acinar cells of Bowman's glands and the deep submucosal glands. In addition to G-proteins, they have identified protein kinase C in olfactory cilia via a protein kinase C specific antiserum and via phorbol ester binding. However, in contrast to the G-proteins, protein kinase C occurred also in cilia isolated from respiratory epithelium.

  5. Regulation of blood-testis barrier by actin binding proteins and protein kinases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Nan; Tang, Elizabeth I.; Cheng, C. Yan

    2016-01-01

    The blood-testis barrier (BTB) is an important ultrastructure in the testis since the onset of spermatogenesis coincides with the establishment of a functional barrier in rodents and humans. It is also noted that a delay in the assembly of a functional BTB following treatment of neonatal rats with drugs such as diethylstilbestrol or adjudin also delays the first wave of spermiation. While the BTB is one of the tightest blood-tissue barriers, it undergoes extensive remodeling, in particular at stage VIII of the epithelial cycle to facilitate the transport of preleptotene spermatocytes connected in clones across the immunological barrier. Without this timely transport of preleptotene spermatocytes derived from type B spermatogonia, meiosis will be arrested, causing aspermatogenesis. Yet the biology and regulation of the BTB remains largely unexplored since the morphological studies in the 1970s. Recent studies, however, have shed new light on the biology of the BTB. Herein, we critically evaluate some of these findings, illustrating that the Sertoli cell BTB is regulated by actin binding proteins (ABPs), likely supported by non-receptor protein kinases, to modulate the organization of actin microfilament bundles at the site. Furthermore, microtubule (MT)-based cytoskeleton is also working in concert with the actin-based cytoskeleton to confer BTB dynamics. This timely review provides an update on the unique biology and regulation of the BTB based on the latest findings in the field, focusing on the role of ABPs and non-receptor protein kinases. PMID:26628556

  6. Competing G protein-coupled receptor kinases balance G protein and β-arrestin signaling.

    PubMed

    Heitzler, Domitille; Durand, Guillaume; Gallay, Nathalie; Rizk, Aurélien; Ahn, Seungkirl; Kim, Jihee; Violin, Jonathan D; Dupuy, Laurence; Gauthier, Christophe; Piketty, Vincent; Crépieux, Pascale; Poupon, Anne; Clément, Frédérique; Fages, François; Lefkowitz, Robert J; Reiter, Eric

    2012-01-01

    Seven-transmembrane receptors (7TMRs) are involved in nearly all aspects of chemical communications and represent major drug targets. 7TMRs transmit their signals not only via heterotrimeric G proteins but also through β-arrestins, whose recruitment to the activated receptor is regulated by G protein-coupled receptor kinases (GRKs). In this paper, we combined experimental approaches with computational modeling to decipher the molecular mechanisms as well as the hidden dynamics governing extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) activation by the angiotensin II type 1A receptor (AT(1A)R) in human embryonic kidney (HEK)293 cells. We built an abstracted ordinary differential equations (ODE)-based model that captured the available knowledge and experimental data. We inferred the unknown parameters by simultaneously fitting experimental data generated in both control and perturbed conditions. We demonstrate that, in addition to its well-established function in the desensitization of G-protein activation, GRK2 exerts a strong negative effect on β-arrestin-dependent signaling through its competition with GRK5 and 6 for receptor phosphorylation. Importantly, we experimentally confirmed the validity of this novel GRK2-dependent mechanism in both primary vascular smooth muscle cells naturally expressing the AT(1A)R, and HEK293 cells expressing other 7TMRs.

  7. Preparation and characterization of human ADCK3, a putative atypical kinase.

    PubMed

    Wheeler, Brody; Jia, Zongchao

    2015-04-01

    AarF domain containing kinase 3 (ADCK3) is a mitochondrial protein known to have a role in the electron transport chain. Despite being required for the biosynthesis of coenzyme Q10, a lipid-soluble electron transporter found to be essential for aerobic cellular respiration, the precise biological function of ADCK3 remains unknown. Patients with mutations in ADCK3 experience an onset of neurological disorders from childhood, including cerebellar ataxia and exercise intolerance. After extensive screening for soluble recombinant protein expression, an N-terminal fusion of maltose-binding protein was found to facilitate the overexpression of the human ADCK3 kinase domain in Escherichia coli as a soluble and biologically active entity. For the first time our work reveals Mg(2+)-dependent ATPase activity of ADCK3, providing strong support for the theoretical prediction of this protein being a functional atypical kinase.

  8. Human Plasma Protein C

    PubMed Central

    Kisiel, Walter

    1979-01-01

    Protein C is a vitamin K-dependent protein, which exists in bovine plasma as a precursor of a serine protease. In this study, protein C was isolated to homogeneity from human plasma by barium citrate adsorption and elution, ammonium sulfate fractionation, DEAE-Sephadex chromatography, dextran sulfate agarose chromatography, and preparative polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. Human protein C (Mr = 62,000) contains 23% carbohydrate and is composed of a light chain (Mr = 21,000) and a heavy chain (Mr = 41,000) held together by a disulfide bond(s). The light chain has an amino-terminal sequence of Ala-Asn-Ser-Phe-Leu- and the heavy chain has an aminoterminal sequence of Asp-Pro-Glu-Asp-Gln. The residues that are identical to bovine protein C are underlined. Incubation of human protein C with human α-thrombin at an enzyme to substrate weight ratio of 1:50 resulted in the formation of activated protein C, an enzyme with serine amidase activity. In the activation reaction, the apparent molecular weight of the heavy chain decreased from 41,000 to 40,000 as determined by gel electrophoresis in the presence of sodium dodecyl sulfate. No apparent change in the molecular weight of the light chain was observed in the activation process. The heavy chain of human activated protein C also contains the active-site serine residue as evidenced by its ability to react with radiolabeled diisopropyl fluorophosphate. Human activated protein C markedly prolongs the kaolin-cephalin clotting time of human plasma, but not that of bovine plasma. The amidolytic and anticoagulant activities of human activated protein C were completely obviated by prior incubation of the enzyme with diisopropyl fluorophosphate. These results indicate that human protein C, like its bovine counterpart, exists in plasma as a zymogen and is converted to a serine protease by limited proteolysis with attendant anticoagulant activity. Images PMID:468991

  9. Protein kinase inhibitors against malignant lymphoma

    PubMed Central

    D’Cruz, Osmond J; Uckun, Fatih M

    2013-01-01

    Introduction Tyrosine kinases (TKs) are intimately involved in multiple signal transduction pathways regulating survival, activation, proliferation and differentiation of lymphoid cells. Deregulation or overexpression of specific oncogenic TKs is implicated in maintaining the malignant phenotype in B-lineage lymphoid malignancies. Several novel targeted TK inhibitors (TKIs) have recently emerged as active in the treatment of relapsed or refractory B-cell lymphomas that inhibit critical signaling pathways, promote apoptotic mechanisms or modulate the tumor microenvironment. Areas covered In this review, the authors summarize the clinical outcomes of newer TKIs in various B-cell lymphomas from published and ongoing clinical studies and abstracts from major cancer and hematology conferences. Expert opinion Multiple clinical trials have demonstrated that robust antitumor activity can be obtained with TKIs directed toward specific oncogenic TKs that are genetically deregulated in various subtypes of B-cell lymphomas. Clinical success of targeting TKIs is dependent upon on identifying reliable molecular and clinical markers associated with select cohorts of patients. Further understanding of the signaling pathways should stimulate the identification of novel molecular targets and expand the development of new therapeutic options and individualized therapies. PMID:23496343

  10. Selective Phosphorylation Inhibitor of Delta Protein Kinase C-Pyruvate Dehydrogenase Kinase Protein-Protein Interactions: Application for Myocardial Injury in Vivo.

    PubMed

    Qvit, Nir; Disatnik, Marie-Hélène; Sho, Eiketsu; Mochly-Rosen, Daria

    2016-06-22

    Protein kinases regulate numerous cellular processes, including cell growth, metabolism, and cell death. Because the primary sequence and the three-dimensional structure of many kinases are highly similar, the development of selective inhibitors for only one kinase is challenging. Furthermore, many protein kinases are pleiotropic, mediating diverse and sometimes even opposing functions by phosphorylating multiple protein substrates. Here, we set out to develop an inhibitor of a selective protein kinase phosphorylation of only one of its substrates. Focusing on the pleiotropic delta protein kinase C (δPKC), we used a rational approach to identify a distal docking site on δPKC for its substrate, pyruvate dehydrogenase kinase (PDK). We reasoned that an inhibitor of PDK's docking should selectively inhibit the phosphorylation of only PDK without affecting phosphorylation of the other δPKC substrates. Our approach identified a selective inhibitor of PDK docking to δPKC with an in vitro Kd of ∼50 nM and reducing cardiac injury IC50 of ∼5 nM. This inhibitor, which did not affect the phosphorylation of other δPKC substrates even at 1 μM, demonstrated that PDK phosphorylation alone is critical for δPKC-mediated injury by heart attack. The approach we describe is likely applicable for the identification of other substrate-specific kinase inhibitors. PMID:27218445

  11. Contribution of casein kinase 2 and spleen tyrosine kinase to CFTR trafficking and protein kinase A-induced activity.

    PubMed

    Luz, Simão; Kongsuphol, Patthara; Mendes, Ana Isabel; Romeiras, Francisco; Sousa, Marisa; Schreiber, Rainer; Matos, Paulo; Jordan, Peter; Mehta, Anil; Amaral, Margarida D; Kunzelmann, Karl; Farinha, Carlos M

    2011-11-01

    Previously, the pleiotropic "master kinase" casein kinase 2 (CK2) was shown to interact with CFTR, the protein responsible for cystic fibrosis (CF). Moreover, CK2 inhibition abolished CFTR conductance in cell-attached membrane patches, native epithelial ducts, and Xenopus oocytes. CFTR possesses two CK2 phosphorylation sites (S422 and T1471), with unclear impact on its processing and trafficking. Here, we investigated the effects of mutating these CK2 sites on CFTR abundance, maturation, and degradation coupled to effects on ion channel activity and surface expression. We report that CK2 inhibition significantly decreased processing of wild-type (wt) CFTR, with no effect on F508del CFTR. Eliminating phosphorylation at S422 and T1471 revealed antagonistic roles in CFTR trafficking: S422 activation versus T1471 inhibition, as evidenced by a severe trafficking defect for the T1471D mutant. Notably, mutation of Y512, a consensus sequence for the spleen tyrosine kinase (SYK) possibly acting in a CK2 context adjacent to the common CF-causing defect F508del, had a strong effect on both maturation and CFTR currents, allowing the identification of this kinase as a novel regulator of CFTR. These results reinforce the importance of CK2 and the S422 and T1471 residues for regulation of CFTR and uncover a novel regulation of CFTR by SYK, a recognized controller of inflammation.

  12. Protein kinase A signaling during bidirectional axenic differentiation in Leishmania.

    PubMed

    Bachmaier, Sabine; Witztum, Ronit; Tsigankov, Polina; Koren, Roni; Boshart, Michael; Zilberstein, Dan

    2016-02-01

    Parasitic protozoa of the genus Leishmania are obligatory intracellular parasites that cycle between the phagolysosome of mammalian macrophages, where they proliferate as intracellular amastigotes, and the midgut of female sand flies, where they proliferate as extracellular promastigotes. Shifting between the two environments induces signaling pathway-mediated developmental processes that enable adaptation to both host and vector. Developmentally regulated expression and phosphorylation of protein kinase A subunits in Leishmania and in Trypanosoma brucei point to an involvement of protein kinase A in parasite development. To assess this hypothesis in Leishmania donovani, we determined proteome-wide changes in phosphorylation of the conserved protein kinase A phosphorylation motifs RXXS and RXXT, using a phospho-specific antibody. Rapid dephosphorylation of these motifs was observed upon initiation of promastigote to amastigote differentiation in culture. No phosphorylated sites were detected in axenic amastigotes. To analyse the kinetics of (re)phosphorylation during axenic reverse differentiation from L. donovani amastigotes to promastigotes, we first established a map of this process with morphological and molecular markers. Upon initiation, the parasites rested for 6-12 h before proliferation of an asynchronous population resumed. After early changes in cell shape, the major changes in molecular marker expression and flagella biogenesis occurred between 24 and 33 h after initiation. RXXS/T re-phosphorylation and expression of the regulatory subunit PKAR1 correlated with promastigote maturation, indicating a promastigote-specific function of protein kinase A signaling. This is supported by the localization of PKAR1 to the flagellum, an organelle reduced to a remnant in amastigote forms. We conclude that a significant increase in protein kinase A-mediated phosphorylation is part of the ordered changes that characterise the amastigote to promastigote

  13. Apoptosis of HL-60 human leukemia cells induced by Asiatic acid through modulation of B-cell lymphoma 2 family proteins and the mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Wu, Qiuling; Lv, Tingting; Chen, Yan; Wen, Lu; Zhang, Junli; Jiang, Xudong; Liu, Fang

    2015-07-01

    The toxicities of conventional chemotherapeutic agents to normal cells restrict their dosage and clinical efficacy in acute leukemia; therefore, it is important to develop novel chemotherapeutics, including natural products, which selectively target cancer-specific pathways. The present study aimed to explore the effect of the chemopreventive agent asiatic acid (AA) on the proliferation and apoptotic rate of the leukemia cell line HL-60 and investigated the mechanisms underlying its anti-tumor activity. The effect of AA on the proliferation of HL-60 cells was evaluated using the MTT assay. Annexin V-fluorescein isothiocyanate/propidium iodide double staining followed by flow cytometric analysis as well as Hoechst 33258 staining were used to analyze the apoptotic rate of the cells. Furthermore, changes of survivin, B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2), myeloid cell leukemia 1 (Mcl-1), extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), c-Jun N-terminal kinase (JNK) and p38 expressions were detected by western blot analysis. AA blocked the growth of HL-60 cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. The IC50-value of AA on HL-60 cells was 46.67 ± 5.08 µmol/l for 24 h. AA induced apoptosis in a dose-dependent manner, which was inhibited in the presence of Z-DEVD-FMK, a specific inhibitor of caspase. The anti-apoptotic proteins Bcl-2, Mcl-1 and survivin were downregulated by AA in a dose-dependent manner. Concurrently, AA inhibited ERK and p38 phosphorylation in a dose-dependent manner, while JNK phosphorylation was not affected. In conclusion, the present study indicated that the p38 and ERK pathways, as well as modulation of Bcl-2 family and survivin proteins were key regulators of apoptosis induced in HL-60 cells in response to AA.

  14. Comprehensive Characterization of AMP-Activated Protein Kinase Catalytic Domain by Top-Down Mass Spectrometry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Deyang; Peng, Ying; Ayaz-Guner, Serife; Gregorich, Zachery R.; Ge, Ying

    2016-02-01

    AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK) is a serine/threonine protein kinase that is essential in regulating energy metabolism in all eukaryotic cells. It is a heterotrimeric protein complex composed of a catalytic subunit (α) and two regulatory subunits (β and γ). C-terminal truncation of AMPKα at residue 312 yielded a protein that is active upon phosphorylation of Thr172 in the absence of β and γ subunits, which is refered to as the AMPK catalytic domain and commonly used to substitute for the AMPK heterotrimeric complex in in vitro kinase assays. However, a comprehensive characterization of the AMPK catalytic domain is lacking. Herein, we expressed a His-tagged human AMPK catalytic domin (denoted as AMPKΔ) in E. coli, comprehensively characterized AMPKΔ in its basal state and after in vitro phosphorylation using top-down mass spectrometry (MS), and assessed how phosphorylation of AMPKΔ affects its activity. Unexpectedly, we found that bacterially-expressed AMPKΔ was basally phosphorylated and localized the phosphorylation site to the His-tag. We found that AMPKΔ had noticeable basal activity and was capable of phosphorylating itself and its substrates without activating phosphorylation at Thr172. Moreover, our data suggested that Thr172 is the only site phosphorylated by its upstream kinase, liver kinase B1, and that this phosphorylation dramatically increases the kinase activity of AMPKΔ. Importantly, we demonstrated that top-down MS in conjunction with in vitro phosphorylation assay is a powerful approach for monitoring phosphorylation reaction and determining sequential order of phosphorylation events in kinase-substrate systems.

  15. Deep evolutionary conservation of an intramolecular protein kinase activation mechanism.

    PubMed

    Han, Jingfen; Miranda-Saavedra, Diego; Luebbering, Nathan; Singh, Aman; Sibbet, Gary; Ferguson, Michael A J; Cleghon, Vaughn

    2012-01-01

    DYRK-family kinases employ an intramolecular mechanism to autophosphorylate a critical tyrosine residue in the activation loop. Once phosphorylated, DYRKs lose tyrosine kinase activity and function as serine/threonine kinases. DYRKs have been characterized in organisms from yeast to human; however, all entities belong to the Unikont supergroup, only one of five eukaryotic supergroups. To assess the evolutionary age and conservation of the DYRK intramolecular kinase-activation mechanism, we surveyed 21 genomes representing four of the five eukaryotic supergroups for the presence of DYRKs. We also analyzed the activation mechanism of the sole DYRK (class 2 DYRK) present in Trypanosoma brucei (TbDYRK2), a member of the excavate supergroup and separated from Drosophila by ∼850 million years. Bioinformatics showed the DYRKs clustering into five known subfamilies, class 1, class 2, Yaks, HIPKs and Prp4s. Only class 2 DYRKs were present in all four supergroups. These diverse class 2 DYRKs also exhibited conservation of N-terminal NAPA regions located outside of the kinase domain, and were shown to have an essential role in activation loop autophosphorylation of Drosophila DmDYRK2. Class 2 TbDYRK2 required the activation loop tyrosine conserved in other DYRKs, the NAPA regions were critical for this autophosphorylation event, and the NAPA-regions of Trypanosoma and human DYRK2 complemented autophosphorylation by the kinase domain of DmDYRK2 in trans. Finally, sequential deletion analysis was used to further define the minimal region required for trans-complementation. Our analysis provides strong evidence that class 2 DYRKs were present in the primordial or root eukaryote, and suggest this subgroup may be the oldest, founding member of the DYRK family. The conservation of activation loop autophosphorylation demonstrates that kinase self-activation mechanisms are also primitive.

  16. Phosphorylation of Protein Phosphatase Inhibitor-1 by Protein Kinase C*s

    PubMed Central

    Sahin, Bogachan; Shu, Hongjun; Fernandez, Joseph; El-Armouche, Ali; Molkentin, Jeffery D.; Nairn, Angus C.; Bibb, James A.

    2015-01-01

    Inhibitor-1 becomes a potent inhibitor of protein phosphatase 1 when phosphorylated by cAMP-dependent protein kinase at Thr35. Moreover, Ser67 of inhibitor-1 serves as a substrate for cyclin-dependent kinase 5 in the brain. Here, we report that dephosphoinhibitor-1 but not phospho-Ser67 inhibitor-1 was efficiently phosphorylated by protein kinase C at Ser65 in vitro. In contrast, Ser67 phosphorylation by cyclin-dependent kinase 5 was unaffected by phospho-Ser65. Protein kinase C activation in striatal tissue resulted in the concomitant phosphorylation of inhibitor-1 at Ser65 and Ser67, but not Ser65 alone. Selective pharmacological inhibition of protein phosphatase activity suggested that phospho-Ser65 inhibitor-1 is dephosphorylated by protein phosphatase 1 in the striatum. In vitro studies confirmed these findings and suggested that phospho-Ser67 protects phospho-Ser65 inhibitor-1 from dephosphorylation by protein phosphatase 1 in vivo. Activation of group I metabotropic glutamate receptors resulted in the up-regulation of diphospho-Ser65/Ser67 inhibitor-1 in this tissue. In contrast, the activation of N-methyl-D-aspartate-type ionotropic glutamate receptors opposed increases in striatal diphospho-Ser65/Ser67 inhibitor-1 levels. Phosphomimetic mutation of Ser65 and/or Ser67 did not convert inhibitor-1 into a protein phosphatase 1 inhibitor. On the other hand, in vitro and in vivo studies suggested that diphospho-Ser65/Ser67 inhibitor-1 is a poor substrate for cAMP-dependent protein kinase. These observations extend earlier studies regarding the function of phospho-Ser67 and underscore the possibility that phosphorylation in this region of inhibitor-1 by multiple protein kinases may serve as an integrative signaling mechanism that governs the responsiveness of inhibitor-1 to cAMP-dependent protein kinase activation. PMID:16772299

  17. Purification, crystallization and preliminary X-ray diffraction analysis of the kinase domain of human tousled-like kinase 2

    SciTech Connect

    Garrote, Ana M.; Redondo, Pilar; Montoya, Guillermo; Muñoz, Inés G.

    2014-02-19

    The C-terminal kinase domain of TLK2 (a human tousled-like kinase) has been cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli followed by purification to homogeneity. Crystallization experiments in the presence of ATP-γ-S yielded crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction analysis belonging to two different space groups: tetragonal I4{sub 1}22 and cubic P2{sub 1}3. Tousled-like kinases (TLKs) are an evolutionarily conserved family of serine/threonine protein kinases involved in chromatin dynamics, including DNA replication and repair, transcription and chromosome segregation. The two members of the family reported in humans, namely TLK1 and TLK2, localize to the cell nucleus and are capable of forming homo- or hetero-oligomers by themselves. To characterize the role of TLK2, its C-terminal kinase domain was cloned and overexpressed in Escherichia coli followed by purification to homogeneity. Crystallization experiments in the presence of ATP-γ-S yielded crystals suitable for X-ray diffraction analysis belonging to two different space groups: tetragonal I4{sub 1}22 and cubic P2{sub 1}3. The latter produced the best diffracting crystal (3.4 Å resolution using synchrotron radiation), with unit-cell parameters a = b = c = 126.05 Å, α = β = γ = 90°. The asymmetric unit contained one protein molecule, with a Matthews coefficient of 4.59 Å{sup 3} Da{sup −1} and a solvent content of 73.23%.

  18. Phosphorylation of the mRNA cap binding protein and eIF-4A by different protein kinases

    SciTech Connect

    Hagedorn, C.H.

    1987-05-01

    These studies were done to determine the identity of a protein kinase that phosphorylates the mRNA cap binding protein (CBP). Two chromatographic steps (dye and ligand and ion exchange HPLC) produced a 500x purification of an enzyme activity in rabbit reticulocytes that phosphorylated CBP at serine residues. Isoelectric focusing analysis of kinase treated CBP demonstrated 5 isoelectric species of which the 2 most anodic species were phosphorylated (contained /sup 32/P). This kinase activity phosphorylated CBP when it was isolated or in the eIF-4F complex. Purified protein kinase C, cAMP or cGMP dependent protein kinase, casein kinase I or II, myosin light chain kinase or insulin receptor kinase did not significantly phosphorylate isolated CBP or CBP in the eIF-4F complex. However, cAMP and cGMP dependent protein kinases and casein kinase II phosphorylated eIF-4A but did not phosphorylate the 46 kDa component of eIF-4F. cAMP dependent protein kinase phosphorylated a approx. 220 kDa protein doublet in eIF-4F preparations. These studies indicate that CBP kinase activity probably represents a previously unidentified protein kinase. In addition, eIF-4A appears to be phosphorylated by several protein kinases whereas the 46 kDa component of the eIF-4F complex was not.

  19. Activation of G proteins and extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 phosphorylation via human dopamine D4.4 receptors: differential pathway-dependent potencies of receptor agonists.

    PubMed

    Heusler, Peter; Bruins Slot, Liesbeth; Rauly-Lestienne, Isabelle; Palmier, Christiane; Tardif, Stéphanie; Tourette, Amélie; Ailhaud, Marie-Christine; Cussac, Didier

    2009-01-01

    Agonist activity at recombinant human dopamine D4.4 receptors was compared in stably transfected CHO cells using two functional readouts: G protein activation by [35S]GTPgammaS binding and phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (pERK1/2). Results with a large series of agonists reveal markedly higher relative agonist efficacy in the pERK1/2 assay compared with [35S]GTPgammaS binding, while potencies were generally higher in the latter readout. Whereas efficacies were highly correlated when comparing both tests, potencies determined using the pERK1/2 assay were neither correlated with those for G protein activation nor with binding affinities. In order to examine if these differences may be attributable to distinct assay conditions (5 min incubation for pERK1/2 compared with binding equilibrium conditions for [35S]GTPgammaS), selected compounds were tested in a modified short-duration [35S]GTPgammaS binding assay. In these experiments, potencies were generally reduced; however, compounds exhibiting comparably high potency in the pERK1/2 assay were not affected by this duration-dependent potency shift. We conclude that assay parameters such as signal amplification and incubation time have to be considered with respect to the appropriate choice of experimental approaches that best reflect agonist activity at dopamine D4 receptors in vivo.

  20. The novel pterostilbene derivative ANK-199 induces autophagic cell death through regulating PI3 kinase class III/beclin 1/Atg‑related proteins in cisplatin‑resistant CAR human oral cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Hsieh, Min-Tsang; Chen, Hao-Ping; Lu, Chi-Cheng; Chiang, Jo-Hua; Wu, Tian-Shung; Kuo, Daih-Huang; Huang, Li-Jiau; Kuo, Sheng-Chu; Yang, Jai-Sing

    2014-08-01

    Pterostilbene is an effective chemopreventive agent against multiple types of cancer cells. A novel pterostilbene derivative, ANK-199, was designed and synthesized by our group. Its antitumor activity and mechanism in cisplatin-resistant CAR human oral cancer cells were investigated in this study. Our results show that ANK-199 has an extremely low toxicity in normal oral cell lines. The formation of autophagic vacuoles and acidic vesicular organelles (AVOs) was observed in the ANK-199-treated CAR cells by monodansylcadaverine (MDC) and acridine orange (AO) staining, suggesting that ANK-199 is able to induce autophagic cell death in CAR cells. Neither DNA fragmentation nor DNA condensation was observed, which means that ANK-199-induced cell death is not triggered by apoptosis. In accordance with morphological observation, 3-MA, a specific inhibitor of PI3K kinase class III, can inhibit the autophagic vesicle formation induced by ANK-199. In addition, ANK-199 is also able to enhance the protein levels of autophagic proteins, Atg complex, beclin 1, PI3K class III and LC3-II, and mRNA expression of autophagic genes Atg7, Atg12, beclin 1 and LC3-II in the ANK-199-treated CAR cells. A molecular signaling pathway induced by ANK-199 was therefore summarized. Results presented in this study show that ANK-199 may become a novel therapeutic reagent for the treatment of oral cancer in the near future (patent pending).

  1. Protein kinase B and extracellular signal-regulated kinase contribute to the chondroprotective effect of morroniside on osteoarthritis chondrocytes

    PubMed Central

    Cheng, Liang; Zeng, Guoqing; Liu, Zejun; Zhang, Bing; Cui, Xu; Zhao, Honghai; Zheng, Xinpeng; Song, Gang; Kang, Jian; Xia, Chun

    2015-01-01

    Despite extensive studies on the multifaceted roles of morroniside, the main active constituent of iridoid glycoside from Corni Fructus, the effect of morroniside on osteoarthritis (OA) chondrocytes remains poorly understood. Here, we investigated the influence of morroniside on cultured human OA chondrocytes and a rat experimental model of OA. The results showed that morroniside enhanced the cell viability and the levels of proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression (PCNA), type II collagen and aggrecan in human OA chondrocytes, indicating that morroniside promoted chondrocyte survival and matrix synthesis. Furthermore, different doses of morroniside activated protein kinase B (AKT) and extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) in human OA chondrocytes, and in turn, triggered AKT/S6 and ERK/P70S6K/S6 pathway, respectively. The PI3K/AKT inhibitor LY294002 or the MEK/ERK inhibitor U0126 attenuated the effect of morroniside on human OA chondrocytes, indicating that the activation of AKT and ERK contributed to the regulation of morroniside in human OA chondrocytes. In addition, the intra-articular injection of morroniside elevated the level of proteoglycans in cartilage matrix and the thickness of articular cartilage in a rat experimental model of OA, with the increase of AKT and ERK activation. As a consequence, morroniside has chondroprotective effect on OA chondrocytes, and may have the therapeutic potential for OA treatment. PMID:25754021

  2. Evolutionary paths of the cAMP-dependent protein kinase (PKA) catalytic subunits.

    PubMed

    Søberg, Kristoffer; Jahnsen, Tore; Rognes, Torbjørn; Skålhegg, Bjørn S; Laerdahl, Jon K

    2013-01-01

    3',5'-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) dependent protein kinase or protein kinase A (PKA) has served as a prototype for the large family of protein kinases that are crucially important for signal transduction in eukaryotic cells. The PKA catalytic subunits Cα and Cβ, encoded by the two genes PRKACA and PRKACB, respectively, are among the best understood and characterized human kinases. Here we have studied the evolution of this gene family in chordates, arthropods, mollusks and other animals employing probabilistic methods and show that Cα and Cβ arose by duplication of an ancestral PKA catalytic subunit in a common ancestor of vertebrates. The two genes have subsequently been duplicated in teleost fishes. The evolution of the PRKACG retroposon in simians was also investigated. Although the degree of sequence conservation in the PKA Cα/Cβ kinase family is exceptionally high, a small set of signature residues defining Cα and Cβ subfamilies were identified. These conserved residues might be important for functions that are unique to the Cα or Cβ clades. This study also provides a good example of a seemingly simple phylogenetic problem which, due to a very high degree of sequence conservation and corresponding weak phylogenetic signals, combined with problematic nonphylogenetic signals, is nontrivial for state-of-the-art probabilistic phylogenetic methods. PMID:23593352

  3. Characterization of nuclear protein kinases of Xenopus laevis oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Leiva, L.; Gonzalez, C.; Allende, C.; Allende, J.

    1986-05-01

    Xenopus laevis oocytes contain large nuclei (germinal vesicles) that can be isolated in very pure form and which permit the study of enzymatic activities present in these organelles. Incubation of pure oocyte nuclear homogenates with /sup 32/P in a buffered solution containing 5 mM MgCl/sub 2/ results in the phosphorylation of a large number of proteins by endogenous protein kinases. This phosphorylation is not affected by the addition of cyclic nucleotides or calcium ion and calmodulin. On the other hand the nuclear kinases are considerably stimulated by spermine and spermidine and strongly inhibited by heparin (10 ..mu..g/ml). Addition of exogenous protein substrates shows that the major oocyte kinases are very active with casein and phosvitin as substrates but do not phosphorylate histones or protamines. DEAE-Sephadex chromatography of the nuclear extract fractionates the casein phosphorylating activity in two main peaks. The first peak is not retained on the column equilibrated with 0.1 M NH/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and uses exclusively ATP as phosphate donor and is insensitive to polyamines or heparin. The second peak which corresponds to 70% of the casein phosphorylation elutes at 0.27 M NH/sub 2/SO/sub 4/ and uses both ATP and GTP as phosphate donors and is greatly stimulated by polyamines and completely inhibited by 10 ..mu..g/ml heparin. On this evidence the authors conclude that the major protein kinase peak corresponds to casein kinase type II which has been found in mammalian nuclei.

  4. Modulation of the chromatin phosphoproteome by the Haspin protein kinase.

    PubMed

    Maiolica, Alessio; de Medina-Redondo, Maria; Schoof, Erwin M; Chaikuad, Apirat; Villa, Fabrizio; Gatti, Marco; Jeganathan, Siva; Lou, Hua Jane; Novy, Karel; Hauri, Simon; Toprak, Umut H; Herzog, Franz; Meraldi, Patrick; Penengo, Lorenza; Turk, Benjamin E; Knapp, Stefan; Linding, Rune; Aebersold, Ruedi

    2014-07-01

    Recent discoveries have highlighted the importance of Haspin kinase activity for the correct positioning of the kinase Aurora B at the centromere. Haspin phosphorylates Thr(3) of the histone H3 (H3), which provides a signal for Aurora B to localize to the centromere of mitotic chromosomes. To date, histone H3 is the only confirmed Haspin substrate. We used a combination of biochemical, pharmacological, and mass spectrometric approaches to study the consequences of Haspin inhibition in mitotic cells. We quantified 3964 phosphorylation sites on chromatin-associated proteins and identified a Haspin protein-protein interaction network. We determined the Haspin consensus motif and the co-crystal structure of the kinase with the histone H3 tail. The structure revealed a unique bent substrate binding mode positioning the histone H3 residues Arg(2) and Lys(4) adjacent to the Haspin phosphorylated threonine into acidic binding pockets. This unique conformation of the kinase-substrate complex explains the reported modulation of Haspin activity by methylation of Lys(4) of the histone H3. In addition, the identification of the structural basis of substrate recognition and the amino acid sequence preferences of Haspin aided the identification of novel candidate Haspin substrates. In particular, we validated the phosphorylation of Ser(137) of the histone variant macroH2A as a target of Haspin kinase activity. MacroH2A Ser(137) resides in a basic stretch of about 40 amino acids that is required to stabilize extranucleosomal DNA, suggesting that phosphorylation of Ser(137) might regulate the interactions of macroH2A and DNA. Overall, our data suggest that Haspin activity affects the phosphorylation state of proteins involved in gene expression regulation and splicing.

  5. Protein kinase C mechanisms that contribute to cardiac remodelling

    PubMed Central

    Newton, Alexandra C.; Antal, Corina E.; Steinberg, Susan F.

    2016-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation is a highly-regulated and reversible process that is precisely controlled by the actions of protein kinases and protein