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  1. SIRT1 is required for mitochondrial biogenesis reprogramming in hypoxic human pulmonary arteriolar smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Pengyun; Liu, Yan; Burns, Nana; Zhao, Ke-Seng; Song, Rui

    2017-03-22

    Although recent studies have reported that mitochondria are putative oxygen sensors underlying hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction, little is known concerning the sirtuin 1 (SIRT1)-mediated mitochondrial biogenesis regulatory program in pulmonary arteriolar smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) during hypoxia/reoxygenation (H/R). We investigated the epigenetic regulatory mechanism of mitochondrial biogenesis and function in human PASMCs during H/R. Human PASMCs were exposed to hypoxia of 24-48 h and reoxygenation of 24-48 h. The expression of SIRT1 was reduced in a time-dependent manner. Mitochondrial transcription factor A (TFAM) expression was increased during hypoxia and decreased during reoxygenation, while the release of TFAM was increased in a time-dependent manner. Lentiviral overexpression of SIRT1 preserved SIRT3 deacetylase activity in human PASMCs exposed to H/R. Knockdown of PGC-1α suppressed the effect of SIRT1 on SIRT3 activity. Knockdown of SIRT3 abrogated SIRT1-mediated deacetylation of cyclophilin D (CyPD). Notably, knockdown of SIRT3 or PGC-1α suppressed the incremental effect of SIRT1 on mitochondrial TFAM, mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) content and cellular ATP levels. Importantly, polydatin restored SIRT1 levels in human PASMCs exposed to H/R. Knockdown of SIRT1 suppressed the effect of polydatin on mitochondrial TFAM, mtDNA content and cellular ATP levels. In conclusion, SIRT1 expression is decreased in human PASMCs during H/R. TFAM expression in mitochondria is reduced and the release of TFAM is increased by H/R. PGC-1α/SIRT3/CyPD mediates the protective effect of SIRT1 on expression and release of TFAM and mitochondrial biogenesis and function. Polydatin improves mitochondrial biogenesis and function by enhancing SIRT1 expression in hypoxic human PASMCs.

  2. Pharmacological evidence for a novel cysteinyl-leukotriene receptor subtype in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Walch, Laurence; Norel, Xavier; Bäck, Magnus; Gascard, Jean-Pierre; Dahlén, Sven-Erik; Brink, Charles

    2002-01-01

    To characterize the cysteinyl-leukotriene receptors (CysLT receptors) in isolated human pulmonary arteries, ring preparations were contracted with leukotriene C4 (LTC4) and leukotriene D4 (LTD4) in either the absence or presence of the selective CysLT1 receptor antagonists, ICI 198615, MK 571 or the dual CysLT1/CysLT2 receptor antagonist, BAY u9773. Since the contractions induced by the cysteinyl-leukotrienes (cysLTs) in intact preparations failed to attain a plateau response over the concentration range studied, the endothelium was removed and the tissue treated continuously with indomethacin (Rubbed+INDO). In these latter preparations, the pEC50 for LTC4 and LTD4 were not significantly different (7.61±0.07, n=20 and 7.96±0.09, n=22, respectively). However, the LTC4 and LTD4 contractions were markedly potentiated when compared with data from intact tissues. Leukotriene E4 (LTE4) did not contract human isolated pulmonary arterial preparations. In addition, treatment of preparations with LTE4 (1 μM; 30 min) did not modify either the LTC4 or LTD4 contractions. Treatment of preparations with the S-conjugated glutathione (S-hexyl-GSH; 100 μM, 30 min), an inhibitor of the metabolism of LTC4 to LTD4, did not modify LTC4 contractions. The pEC50 values for LTC4 were significantly reduced by treatment of the preparations with either ICI 198615, MK 571 or BAY u9773 and the pKB values were: 7.20, 7.02 and 6.26, respectively. In contrast, these antagonists did not modify the LTD4 pEC50 values. These findings suggest the presence of two CysLT receptors on human pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle. A CysLT1 receptor with a low affinity for CysLT1 antagonists and a novel CysLT receptor subtype, both responsible for vasoconstriction. Activation of this latter receptor by LTC4 and LTD4 induced a contractile response which was resistant to the selective CysLT1 antagonists (ICI 198615 and MK 571) as well as the non-selective (CysLT1/CysLT2) antagonist, BAY u9773. PMID

  3. Assays for in vitro monitoring of human airway smooth muscle (ASM) and human pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cell migration.

    PubMed

    Goncharova, Elena A; Goncharov, Dmitry A; Krymskaya, Vera P

    2006-01-01

    Migration of human pulmonary vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells contributes to vascular remodeling in pulmonary arterial hypertension and atherosclerosis. Evidence also indicates that, in part, migration of airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells may contribute to airway remodeling associated with asthma. Here we describe migration of VSM and ASM cells in vitro using Transwell or Boyden chamber assays. Because dissecting signaling mechanisms regulating cell migration requires molecular approaches, our protocol also describes how to assess migration of transfected VSM and ASM cells. Transwell or Boyden chamber assays can be completed in approximately 8 h and include plating of serum-deprived VSM or ASM cell suspension on membrane precoated with collagen, migration of cells toward chemotactic gradient and visual (Transwell) or digital (Boyden chamber) analysis of membrane. Although the Transwell assay is easy, the Boyden chamber assay requires hands-on experience; however, both assays are reliable cell-based approaches providing valuable information on how chemotactic and inflammatory factors modulate VSM and ASM migration.

  4. Iptakalim influences the proliferation and apoptosis of human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    LI, QINGLIN; YAN, XIAOPEI; KONG, HUI; XIE, WEIPING; WANG, HONG

    2016-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to determine the effect of an ATP-sensitive K+ (KATP) channel opener iptakalim (IPT) on the proliferation and apoptosis of human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (HPASMCs), and examine the potential value of IPT to hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (HPH) at a cellular level. HPASMCs were divided into the control, ET-1, ET-1+IPT and ET-1+IPT+glibenclamide (GLI) groups. GLI was administered 30 min prior to ET-1 and IPT. The 4 groups were incubated with corresponding reagents for 24 h. Cell viability was evaluated using a CCK-8 assay, cell proliferation by 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation assay, and cell apoptosis via the expression of apoptosis-related proteins, i.e., Bcl-2-associated X protein (Bax) and B-cell lymphoma 2 (Bcl-2) using western blotting. We incubated HPASMCs with varying concentrations of ET-1 for 24, 48 and 72 h, and found that cell survival rate was increased in a dose-dependent manner (P<0.05) rather than in a time-dependent manner (P>0.05). After co-incubation of HPASMCs with varying concentrations of IPT and ET-1 for 24 h, the cell survival rate was decreased in a dose-dependent manner. The cell survival rate in the IPT+ET-1 group was significantly lower than that in the ET-1 group (P<0.05). The cell viability (P<0.05) and proliferation (P<0.05) in the ET-1 group were higher than those in the control group, and the expression of Bax/Bcl-2 was lower than the control group (P<0.05). The cell viability (P<0.05) and proliferation (P<0.05) in the ET-1+IPT group were lower than those in the ET-1 group, and the expression of Bax/Bcl-2 was higher than that in the ET-1 group (P<0.05). The cell viability (P<0.05) and proliferation (P<0.05) in the ET-1+IPT+GLI group were higher than those in the ET-1+IPT group, and the expression of Bax/Bcl-2 was lower than that in the ET-1+IPT group (P<0.05). In conclusion, IPT inhibited ET-1-induced HPASMC proliferation and promoted cell apoptosis. Thus, it may play an

  5. Lipocalin-2 Promotes Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Proliferation by Augmenting Intracellular Iron in Human Pulmonary Arterial Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Guoliang; Liu, Shenghua; Wang, Li; Meng, Liukun; Cui, Chuanjue; Zhang, Hao; Hu, Shengshou; Ma, Ning; Wei, Yingjie

    2017-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, a feature of many conditions associated with pulmonary hypertension (PH), is increasingly recognized as a common response to promote proliferation in the walls of pulmonary arteries. Increased expression of Lipocalin-2 in PH led us to test the hypothesis that Lipocalin-2, a protein known to sequester iron and regulate it intracellularly, might facilitate the ER stress and proliferation in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). In this study, we observed greatly increased Lcn2 expression accompanied with increased ATF6 cleavage in a standard rat model of pulmonary hypertension induced by monocrotaline. In cultured human PASMCs, Lcn2 significantly promoted ER stress (determined by augmented cleavage and nuclear localization of ATF6, up-regulated transcription of GRP78 and NOGO, increased expression of SOD2, and mild augmented mitochondrial membrane potential) and proliferation (assessed by Ki67 staining and BrdU incorporation). Lcn2 promoted ER stress accompanied with augmented intracellular iron levels in human PASMCs. Treatment human PASMCs with FeSO4 induced the similar ER stress and proliferation response and iron chelator (deferoxamine) abrogated the ER stress and proliferation induced by Lcn2 in cultured human PASMCs. In conclusion, Lcn2 significantly promoted human PASMC ER stress and proliferation by augmenting intracellular iron. The up-regulation of Lcn2 probably involved in the pathogenesis and progression of PH. PMID:28255266

  6. Lipocalin-2 Promotes Endoplasmic Reticulum Stress and Proliferation by Augmenting Intracellular Iron in Human Pulmonary Arterial Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoliang; Liu, Shenghua; Wang, Li; Meng, Liukun; Cui, Chuanjue; Zhang, Hao; Hu, Shengshou; Ma, Ning; Wei, Yingjie

    2017-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress, a feature of many conditions associated with pulmonary hypertension (PH), is increasingly recognized as a common response to promote proliferation in the walls of pulmonary arteries. Increased expression of Lipocalin-2 in PH led us to test the hypothesis that Lipocalin-2, a protein known to sequester iron and regulate it intracellularly, might facilitate the ER stress and proliferation in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). In this study, we observed greatly increased Lcn2 expression accompanied with increased ATF6 cleavage in a standard rat model of pulmonary hypertension induced by monocrotaline. In cultured human PASMCs, Lcn2 significantly promoted ER stress (determined by augmented cleavage and nuclear localization of ATF6, up-regulated transcription of GRP78 and NOGO, increased expression of SOD2, and mild augmented mitochondrial membrane potential) and proliferation (assessed by Ki67 staining and BrdU incorporation). Lcn2 promoted ER stress accompanied with augmented intracellular iron levels in human PASMCs. Treatment human PASMCs with FeSO4 induced the similar ER stress and proliferation response and iron chelator (deferoxamine) abrogated the ER stress and proliferation induced by Lcn2 in cultured human PASMCs. In conclusion, Lcn2 significantly promoted human PASMC ER stress and proliferation by augmenting intracellular iron. The up-regulation of Lcn2 probably involved in the pathogenesis and progression of PH.

  7. Assays for in vitro monitoring of proliferation of human airway smooth muscle (ASM) and human pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle (VSM) cells.

    PubMed

    Goncharova, Elena A; Lim, Poay; Goncharov, Dmitry A; Eszterhas, Andrew; Panettieri, Reynold A; Krymskaya, Vera P

    2006-01-01

    Vascular and airway remodeling, which are characterized by airway smooth muscle (ASM) and pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle (VSM) proliferation, contribute to the pathology of asthma, pulmonary hypertension, restenosis and atherosclerosis. To evaluate the proliferation of VSM and ASM cells in response to mitogens, we perform a [3H]thymidine incorporation assay. The proliferation protocol takes approximately 48 h and includes stimulating cells synchronized in G0/G1 phase of the cell cycle with agonists, labeling cells with [3H]thymidine and examining levels of [3H]thymidine incorporation by scintillation counting. Although using radiolabeled [3H]thymidine incorporation is a limitation, the greatest benefit of the assay is providing reliable and statistically significant data.

  8. Hypoxia induces arginase II expression and increases viable human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell numbers via AMPKα1 signaling.

    PubMed

    Xue, Jianjing; Nelin, Leif D; Chen, Bernadette

    2017-04-01

    Pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation is one of the hallmark features of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. With only supportive treatment options available for this life-threatening disease, treating and preventing the proliferation of PASMCs is a viable therapeutic option. A key promoter of hypoxia-induced increases in the number of viable human PASMCs is arginase II, with attenuation of viable cell numbers following pharmacologic inhibition or siRNA knockdown of the enzyme. Additionally, increased levels of arginase have been demonstrated in the pulmonary vasculature of patients with pulmonary hypertension. The signaling pathways responsible for the hypoxic induction of arginase II in PASMCs, however, remain unknown. Hypoxia is a recognized activator of AMPK, which is known to be expressed in human PASMCs (hPASMCs). Activation of AMPK by hypoxia has been shown to promote cell survival in PASMCs. In addition, pharmacologic agents targeting AMPK have been shown to attenuate chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension in animal models. The present studies tested the hypothesis that hypoxia-induced arginase II expression in hPASMCs is mediated through AMPK signaling. We found that pharmacologic inhibitors of AMPK, as well as siRNA knockdown of AMPKα1, prevented hypoxia-induced arginase II. The hypoxia-induced increase in viable hPASMC numbers was also prevented following both pharmacologic inhibition and siRNA knockdown of AMPK. Furthermore, we demonstrate that overexpression of AMPK induced arginase II protein expression and viable cells numbers in hPASMCs. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  9. Functional ion channels in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells: Voltage-dependent cation channels

    PubMed Central

    Firth, Amy L.; Remillard, Carmelle V.; Platoshyn, Oleksandr; Fantozzi, Ivana; Ko, Eun A.; Yuan, Jason X.-J.

    2011-01-01

    The activity of voltage-gated ion channels is critical for the maintenance of cellular membrane potential and generation of action potentials. In turn, membrane potential regulates cellular ion homeostasis, triggering the opening and closing of ion channels in the plasma membrane and, thus, enabling ion transport across the membrane. Such transmembrane ion fluxes are important for excitation–contraction coupling in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC). Families of voltage-dependent cation channels known to be present in PASMC include voltage-gated K+ (Kv) channels, voltage-dependent Ca2+-activated K+ (Kca) channels, L- and T- type voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels, voltage-gated Na+ channels and voltage-gated proton channels. When cells are dialyzed with Ca2+-free K+- solutions, depolarization elicits four components of 4-aminopyridine (4-AP)-sensitive Kvcurrents based on the kinetics of current activation and inactivation. In cell-attached membrane patches, depolarization elicits a wide range of single-channel K+ currents, with conductances ranging between 6 and 290 pS. Macroscopic 4-AP-sensitive Kv currents and iberiotoxin-sensitive Kca currents are also observed. Transcripts of (a) two Na+ channel α-subunit genes (SCN5A and SCN6A), (b) six Ca2+ channel α–subunit genes (α1A, α1B, α1X, α1D, α1Eand α1G) and many regulatory subunits (α2δ1, β1-4, and γ6), (c) 22 Kv channel α–subunit genes (Kv1.1 - Kv1.7, Kv1.10, Kv2.1, Kv3.1, Kv3.3, Kv3.4, Kv4.1, Kv4.2, Kv5.1, Kv 6.1-Kv6.3, Kv9.1, Kv9.3, Kv10.1 and Kv11.1) and three Kv channel β-subunit genes (Kvβ1-3) and (d) four Kca channel α–subunit genes (Sloα1 and SK2-SK4) and four Kca channel β-subunit genes (Kcaβ1-4) have been detected in PASMC. Tetrodotoxin-sensitive and rapidly inactivating Na+ currents have been recorded with properties similar to those in cardiac myocytes. In the presence of 20 mM external Ca2+, membrane depolarization from a holding potential of -100 mV elicits a rapidly

  10. Fractalkine-induced smooth muscle cell proliferation in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Perros, F; Dorfmüller, P; Souza, R; Durand-Gasselin, I; Godot, V; Capel, F; Adnot, S; Eddahibi, S; Mazmanian, M; Fadel, E; Hervé, P; Simonneau, G; Emilie, D; Humbert, M

    2007-05-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is characterised by a progressive increase in pulmonary arterial resistance due to endothelial and smooth muscle cell proliferation resulting in chronic obstruction of small pulmonary arteries. There is evidence that inflammatory mechanisms may contribute to the pathogenesis of human and experimental pulmonary hypertension. The aim of the study was to address the role of fractalkine (CX3CL1) in the inflammatory responses and pulmonary vascular remodelling of a monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension model. The expression of CX3CL1 and its receptor CX3CR1 was studied in monocrotaline-induced pulmonary hypertension by means of immunohistochemistry and quantitative reverse-transcription PCR on laser-captured microdissected pulmonary arteries. It was demonstrated that CX3CL1 was expressed by inflammatory cells surrounding pulmonary arterial lesions and that smooth muscle cells from these vessels had increased CX3CR1 expression. It was then shown that cultured rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells expressed CX3CR1 and that CX3CL1 induced proliferation but not migration of these cells. In conclusion, the current authors proposed that fractalkine may act as a growth factor for pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. Chemokines may thus play a role in pulmonary artery remodelling.

  11. Activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/Akt pathway is involved in lipocalin-2-promoted human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Wang, Guoliang; Ma, Ning; Meng, Liukun; Wei, Yingjie; Gui, Jingang

    2015-12-01

    Over-activated PI3K/Akt signaling, a pathway strongly related to cancer survival and proliferation, has been reported recently to be involved in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell apoptosis and proliferation in pulmonary hypertension (PH). In this study, we observed greatly increased lipocalin-2 (Lcn2) expression accompanied with over-activated PI3K/Akt signaling in a standard rat model of PH induced by monocrotaline. In view of the close relationship between Lcn2 and PI3K/Akt pathway, we hypothesized that the up-regulated Lcn2 might be a trigger of over-activated PI3K/Akt signaling in PH. Our results showed that Lcn2 significantly activated the PI3K/Akt pathway (determined by augmented Akt phosphorylation and up-regulated Mdm2) and significantly promoted proliferation (assessed by Ki67 staining) in cultured human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. Furthermore, we demonstrated that inhibition of Akt phosphorylation (LY294002) abrogated the Lcn2-promoted proliferation in cultured human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. In conclusion, Lcn2 significantly promoted human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation by activating PI3K/Akt pathway. Further study on the role and mechanism of Lcn2 will help explore novel therapeutic strategies based on attenuating over-activated PI3K/Akt signaling in PH.

  12. [The stimulation of human pulmonary artery endothelial cells by cigarette smoke extract contributed to cell senescence and induced human pulmonary artery smooth cell migration].

    PubMed

    Cai, L; Zhu, P C; Wang, Y E; Gao, Y T; Ao, Q L

    2017-06-12

    Objective: To observe the senescent effect of human pulmonary arterial endothelial cells (HPAEC) stimulated by cigarette smoke extract (CSE) and the effect of secretion of senescent cells on human pulmonary arterial smooth muscles cell (HPASMC) proliferation and migration. Methods: HPAEC was treated with different concentrations of CSE in vitro and cell proliferation was determined by CCK8, senescence cells analyzed by detecting the β-gal activity, and the senescent proteins of cells measured by Western blot. The concentration of senescence-associated secretory phenotype (SASP) was detected by ELISA and the expression of MCP-1 and TGF-β1 was measured by Real-time PCR. The number of the proliferated cells was measured by Transwell assay and immunoflurescence. Results: The HPAEC was aging with the stimulation concentration of CSE increasing and the stimulation time prolonging (P<0.05). Western blot indicated that the senescent associated protein p53 or p21 increased markedly after 48 h and 72 h CSE-exposure (n=3, P<0.05). The SA-β-Gal staining showed that the number of senescent cells increased as the exposure time prolonged. Compared with the control group, cell viability of 48 h group(1.8±0.1) and 72 h group (1.8±0.1) decreased significantly. The flow cytometry showed a significant difference between the CSE group(14.1±1.2) and the control group(28.5±1.8) in S phase(P<0.01), indicating cell cycle arrest. The SASP was increasing as the CSE-exposure prolonged. Compared with the control group(177±39), the 48 h group(460±43) and the 72 h group(609±64) showed a marked increase in MCP-1(P<0.05). For TGF-β1, it had a same tendency and a significant difference between the control group(121±18) and the 48 h group(413±32) or 72 h group(606±67, both P<0.05). In the meantime, the bFGF increased after 48 h stimulation(291±13, P<0.05). Besides MCP-1, TGF-β1 showed a significant difference between the control group and the 72 h CSE-exposure group (P<0

  13. Resveratrol prevents hypoxia-induced arginase II expression and proliferation of human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells via Akt-dependent signaling

    PubMed Central

    Xue, Jianjing; Meng, Xiaomei; Slutzky, Jessica L.; Calvert, Andrea E.; Chicoine, Louis G.

    2014-01-01

    Pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation plays a fundamental role in the vascular remodeling seen in pulmonary hypertensive diseases associated with hypoxia. Arginase II, an enzyme regulating the first step in polyamine and proline synthesis, has been shown to play a critical role in hypoxia-induced proliferation of human PASMC (hPASMC). In addition, there is evidence that patients with pulmonary hypertension have elevated levels of arginase in the vascular wall. Resveratrol, a natural polyphenol found in red wine and grape skins, has diverse biochemical and physiological actions including antiproliferative properties. Furthermore, resveratrol has been shown to attenuate right ventricular and pulmonary artery remodeling, both pathological components of pulmonary hypertension. The present studies tested the hypothesis that resveratrol would prevent hypoxia-induced pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation by inhibiting hypoxia-induced arginase II expression. Our data indicate that hypoxia-induced hPASMC proliferation is abrogated following treatment with resveratrol. In addition, the hypoxic induction of arginase II was directly attenuated by resveratrol treatment. Furthermore, we found that the inhibitory effect of resveratrol on arginase II in hPASMC was mediated through the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway. Supporting these in vitro findings, resveratrol normalized right ventricular hypertrophy in an in vivo neonatal rat model of chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. These novel data support the notion that resveratrol may be a potential therapeutic agent in pulmonary hypertension by preventing PASMC arginase II induction and proliferation. PMID:24951775

  14. Resveratrol prevents hypoxia-induced arginase II expression and proliferation of human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells via Akt-dependent signaling.

    PubMed

    Chen, Bernadette; Xue, Jianjing; Meng, Xiaomei; Slutzky, Jessica L; Calvert, Andrea E; Chicoine, Louis G

    2014-08-15

    Pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation plays a fundamental role in the vascular remodeling seen in pulmonary hypertensive diseases associated with hypoxia. Arginase II, an enzyme regulating the first step in polyamine and proline synthesis, has been shown to play a critical role in hypoxia-induced proliferation of human PASMC (hPASMC). In addition, there is evidence that patients with pulmonary hypertension have elevated levels of arginase in the vascular wall. Resveratrol, a natural polyphenol found in red wine and grape skins, has diverse biochemical and physiological actions including antiproliferative properties. Furthermore, resveratrol has been shown to attenuate right ventricular and pulmonary artery remodeling, both pathological components of pulmonary hypertension. The present studies tested the hypothesis that resveratrol would prevent hypoxia-induced pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation by inhibiting hypoxia-induced arginase II expression. Our data indicate that hypoxia-induced hPASMC proliferation is abrogated following treatment with resveratrol. In addition, the hypoxic induction of arginase II was directly attenuated by resveratrol treatment. Furthermore, we found that the inhibitory effect of resveratrol on arginase II in hPASMC was mediated through the PI3K-Akt signaling pathway. Supporting these in vitro findings, resveratrol normalized right ventricular hypertrophy in an in vivo neonatal rat model of chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension. These novel data support the notion that resveratrol may be a potential therapeutic agent in pulmonary hypertension by preventing PASMC arginase II induction and proliferation.

  15. Agonistic Anti-PDGF Receptor Autoantibodies from Patients with Systemic Sclerosis Impact Human Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle Cells Function In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Svegliati, Silvia; Amico, Donatella; Spadoni, Tatiana; Fischetti, Colomba; Finke, Doreen; Moroncini, Gianluca; Paolini, Chiara; Tonnini, Cecilia; Grieco, Antonella; Rovinelli, Marina; Funaro, Ada; Gabrielli, Armando

    2017-01-01

    One of the earliest events in the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis (SSc) is microvasculature damage with intimal hyperplasia and accumulation of cells expressing PDGF receptor. Stimulatory autoantibodies targeting PDGF receptor have been detected in SSc patients and demonstrated to induce fibrosis in vivo and convert in vitro normal fibroblasts into SSc-like cells. Since there is no evidence of the role of anti-PDGF receptor autoantibodies in the pathogenesis of SSc vascular lesions, we investigated the biologic effect of agonistic anti-PDGF receptor autoantibodies from SSc patients on human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells and the signaling pathways involved. The synthetic (proliferation, migration, and type I collagen gene α1 chain expression) and contractile (smooth muscle-myosin heavy chain and smooth muscle-calponin expression) profiles of human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells were assessed in vitro after incubation with SSc anti-PDGF receptors stimulatory autoantibodies. The role of reactive oxygen species, NOX isoforms, and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) was investigated. Human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells acquired a synthetic phenotype characterized by higher growth rate, migratory activity, gene expression of type I collagen α1 chain, and less expression of markers characteristic of the contractile phenotype such as smooth muscle-myosin heavy chain and smooth muscle-calponin when stimulated with PDGF and autoantibodies against PDGF receptor, but not with normal IgG. This phenotypic profile is mediated by increased generation of reactive oxygen species and expression of NOX4 and mTORC1. Our data indicate that agonistic anti-PDGF receptor autoantibodies may contribute to the pathogenesis of SSc intimal hyperplasia.

  16. Agonistic Anti-PDGF Receptor Autoantibodies from Patients with Systemic Sclerosis Impact Human Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle Cells Function In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Svegliati, Silvia; Amico, Donatella; Spadoni, Tatiana; Fischetti, Colomba; Finke, Doreen; Moroncini, Gianluca; Paolini, Chiara; Tonnini, Cecilia; Grieco, Antonella; Rovinelli, Marina; Funaro, Ada; Gabrielli, Armando

    2017-01-01

    One of the earliest events in the pathogenesis of systemic sclerosis (SSc) is microvasculature damage with intimal hyperplasia and accumulation of cells expressing PDGF receptor. Stimulatory autoantibodies targeting PDGF receptor have been detected in SSc patients and demonstrated to induce fibrosis in vivo and convert in vitro normal fibroblasts into SSc-like cells. Since there is no evidence of the role of anti-PDGF receptor autoantibodies in the pathogenesis of SSc vascular lesions, we investigated the biologic effect of agonistic anti-PDGF receptor autoantibodies from SSc patients on human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells and the signaling pathways involved. The synthetic (proliferation, migration, and type I collagen gene α1 chain expression) and contractile (smooth muscle-myosin heavy chain and smooth muscle-calponin expression) profiles of human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells were assessed in vitro after incubation with SSc anti-PDGF receptors stimulatory autoantibodies. The role of reactive oxygen species, NOX isoforms, and mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) was investigated. Human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells acquired a synthetic phenotype characterized by higher growth rate, migratory activity, gene expression of type I collagen α1 chain, and less expression of markers characteristic of the contractile phenotype such as smooth muscle-myosin heavy chain and smooth muscle-calponin when stimulated with PDGF and autoantibodies against PDGF receptor, but not with normal IgG. This phenotypic profile is mediated by increased generation of reactive oxygen species and expression of NOX4 and mTORC1. Our data indicate that agonistic anti-PDGF receptor autoantibodies may contribute to the pathogenesis of SSc intimal hyperplasia. PMID:28228756

  17. A role for receptor-operated Ca2+ entry in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells in response to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Tang, C; To, W K; Meng, F; Wang, Y; Gu, Y

    2010-01-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) is an important homeostatic mechanism in which increases of [Ca2+]i are primary events. In this study, primary cultured, human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (hPASMC) were used to examine the role of TRPC channels in mediating [Ca2+]i elevations during hypoxia. Hypoxia (PO2) about 20 mm Hg) evoked a transient [Ca2+]i elevation that was reduced by removal of extracellular calcium. Nifedipine and verapamil, blockers of voltage-gated calcium channels (VGCCs), attenuated the hypoxia-induced [Ca2+)]i elevation by about 30%, suggesting the presence of alternate Ca2+ entry pathways. Expression of TRPC1 and TRPC6 in hPASMC were found by RT-PCR and confirmed by Western blot analysis. Antagonists for TRPC, 2APB and SKF96365, significantly reduced hypoxia-induced [Ca2+]i elevation by almost 60%. Both TRPC6 and TRPC1 were knocked down by siRNA, the loss of TRPC6 decreased hypoxic response down to 21% of control, whereas the knockdown of TRPC1 reduced the hypoxia response to 85%, suggesting that TRPC6 might play a central role in mediating hypoxia response in hPASMC. However, blockade of PLC pathway caused only small inhibition of the hypoxia response. In contrast, AICAR, the agonist of AMP-activated kinase (AMPK), induced a gradual [Ca2+]i elevation, whereas compound C, an antagonist of AMPK, almost abolished the hypoxia response. However, co-immunoprecipitation revealed that AMPKalpha was not colocalized with TRPC6. Our data supports a role for TRPC6 in mediation of the [Ca2+]i elevation in response to hypoxia in hPASMC and suggests that this response may be linked to cellular energy status via an activation of AMPK.

  18. Role of platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yan; Lv, Wentao; Piao, Hongying; Chu, Xiaojie; Wang, Hao

    2014-08-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a vascular remodeling disease characterized by enhanced proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) and suppressed apoptosis. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is a potent mitogen involved in cell proliferation and migration. PDGF-BB induces the proliferation and migration of PASMCs and has been proposed to be a key mediator in the progression of PAH. Previous studies have shown that PDGF and its receptor are substantially elevated in lung tissues and PASMCs isolated from patients and animals with PAH, but the underlying mechanisms are still poorly manifested. MAP kinases, including extracellular signal-regulated kinase1/2 (ERK1/2), c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase1/2 (JNK1/2), and p38 are the key intracellular signals for stimuli-induced cell proliferation, survival, and apoptosis. Therefore, the purpose of this study is to determine whether PDGF-BB on cell proliferation process is mediated through the MAP kinases pathway in human PASMCs (HPASMCs). Our results showed PDGF-BB-induced proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), Cyclin A and Cyclin E expression in a concentration-dependent manner. The expression levels of phosphorylated JNK (p-JNK) was upregulated with 20 ng/ml PDGF-BB treatment, while PDGF-BB could not increase phosphorylated ERK1/2 (p-ERK1/2) and p-38 (p-p38) expression. The effects of PDGF-BB on cell proliferation and survival were weakened after the administration of antagonist of the JNK pathway or si-JNK. In addition, PDGF-BB protected against the loss of mitochondrial membrane potentials evoked by serum deprivation (SD) in a JNK-dependent manner. These results suggest that PDGF-BB promotes HPASMCs proliferation and survival, which is likely to be mediated via the JNK pathway.

  19. Histamine-mediated Increases in Cytosolic [Ca2+] Involve Different Mechanisms in Human Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle and Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Mauban, Joseph R. H.; Wilkinson, Katherine; Schach, Christian; Yuan, Jason X.-J.

    2005-01-01

    Agonist stimulation of human pulmonary artery smooth muscle (PASMC) and endothelial (PAEC) cells with histamine showed similar spatiotemporal patterns of Ca2+ release. Both sustained elevation and oscillatory patterns of changes in cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]cyt) were observed in the absence of extracellular Ca2+. Capacitative Ca2+ entry (CCE) was induced in PASMC and PAEC by passive depletion of intracellular Ca2+ stores with 10-μM cyclopiazonic acid (CPA, for 15-30 min). The pyrazole derivative BTP2 inhibited the CPA-activated Ca2+ influx, suggesting that depletion of CPA-sensitive internal stores is sufficient to induce CCE in both PASMC and PAEC. The recourse of histamine-mediated Ca2+ release was examined after exposure of the cells to CPA, thapsigargin, caffeine, ryanodine, FCCP, or bafilomycin. In PASMC bathed in Ca2+-free solution, treatment with CPA almost abolished histamine-induced rises in [Ca2+]cyt. In PAEC bathed in Ca2+-free solution, however, treatment with CPA eliminated the histamine-induced sustained and oscillatory rises in [Ca2+]cyt, but did not affect the initial transient increase in [Ca2+]cyt. Furthermore, treatment of PAEC with a combination of CPA (or thapsigargin) and caffeine (and ryanodine), FCCP, or bafilomycin did not abolish the histamine-induced transient [Ca2+]cyt increases. These observations indicate that a) depletion of CPA-sensitive stores is sufficient to cause CCE in both PASMC and PAEC; b) induction of CCE in PAEC does not require depletion of all internal Ca2+ stores; c) the histamine-releasable internal stores in PASMC are mainly CPA-sensitive stores; d) PAEC, in addition to a functional pool that is sensitive to CPA, contain other stores that are insensitive to CPA, thapsigargin, caffeine, ryanodine, FCCP, and bafilomycin; and e) the CPA-insensitive stores in PAEC, while may not contribute to CCE, contribute to histamine-mediated Ca2+ release. PMID:16162658

  20. Airway epithelial-derived factor relaxes pulmonary vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Farah, Omar R; Li, Dongge; McIntyre, Brendan A S; Pan, Jingyi; Belik, Jaques

    2009-01-01

    The factors controlling the pulmonary vascular resistance under physiological conditions are poorly understood. We have previously reported on an apparent cross talk between the airway and adjacent pulmonary arterial bed where a factor likely derived from the bronchial epithelial cells reduced the magnitude of agonist-stimulated force in the vascular smooth muscle. The main purpose of this investigation was to evaluate whether bronchial epithelial cells release a pulmonary arterial smooth muscle relaxant factor. Conditioned media from SPOC-1 or BEAS-2B, a rat- and a human-derived bronchial epithelial cell line, respectively, were utilized. This media significantly relaxed precontracted adult but not fetal pulmonary arterial muscle in an oxygen tension-dependent manner. This response was mediated via soluble guanylate cyclase, involving AKT/PI3-kinase and neuronal nitric oxide synthase. Airway epithelial cell-conditioned media increased AKT phosphorylation in pulmonary smooth muscle cells (SMC) and reduced intracellular calcium change following ATP stimulation to a significantly greater extent than observed for bronchial SMC. The present data strongly support the evidence for bronchial epithelial cells releasing a stable and soluble factor capable of inducing pulmonary arterial SMC relaxation. We speculate that under physiological conditions, the maintenance of a low pulmonary vascular resistance, postnatally, is in part modulated by the airway epithelium.

  1. Chronic exposure to fibrin and fibrinogen differentially regulates intracellular Ca2+ in human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle and endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Firth, Amy L; Yau, Jocelyn; White, Amanda; Chiles, Peter G; Marsh, James J; Morris, Timothy A; Yuan, Jason X-J

    2009-06-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism occurs in more than half a million people a year in the United States. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) develops in approximately 4% of these patients due to unresolved thromboemboli. CTEPH is thus a relatively common, progressive, and potentially fatal disease. One currently proposed theory for the poor resolution advocates that modification of fibrinogen in CTEPH patients causes resistance of emboli to fibrinolysis. The current study investigated the regulation of cytosolic Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)](cyt)), central to the control of cell migration, proliferation, and contraction, by chronic exposure of pulmonary artery smooth muscle (PASMC) and endothelial (PAEC) cells to fibrinogen and fibrin. Basal [Ca(2+)](cyt) was substantially elevated in PAEC after culture on fibrinogen, fibrin, and thrombin and in PASMC on fibrinogen and fibrin. In PAEC, fibrinogen significantly decreased the peak [Ca(2+)](cyt) transient (P <0.001) without a change in the transient peak width (at 50% of the peak height). This response was independent of effects on the proteinase-activated receptor (PAR) 1. Furthermore, chronic exposure to thrombin, an activator of PAR, significantly reduced the peak agonist-induced Ca(2+) release in PAEC, but increased it in PASMC. The recovery rate of the agonist-induced [Ca(2+)](cyt) transients decelerated in PASMC chronically exposed to fibrin; a small increase of the peak Ca(2+) was also observed. Substantial augmentation of PASMC (but not PAEC) proliferation was observed in response to chronic fibrin exposure. In conclusion, chronic exposure to fibrinogen, fibrin, and thrombin caused differential changes in [Ca(2+)](cyt) in PAEC and PASMC. Such changes in [Ca(2+)](cyt) may contribute to vascular changes in patients who have CTEPH where the pulmonary vasculature is persistently exposed to thromboemboli.

  2. Chronic exposure to fibrin and fibrinogen differentially regulates intracellular Ca2+ in human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle and endothelial cells

    PubMed Central

    Firth, Amy L.; Yau, Jocelyn; White, Amanda; Chiles, Peter G.; Marsh, James J.; Morris, Timothy A.; Yuan, Jason X.-J.

    2009-01-01

    Acute pulmonary embolism occurs in more than half a million people a year in the United States. Chronic thromboembolic pulmonary hypertension (CTEPH) develops in ∼4% of these patients due to unresolved thromboemboli. CTEPH is thus a relatively common, progressive, and potentially fatal disease. One currently proposed theory for the poor resolution advocates that modification of fibrinogen in CTEPH patients causes resistance of emboli to fibrinolysis. The current study investigated the regulation of cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]cyt), central to the control of cell migration, proliferation, and contraction, by chronic exposure of pulmonary artery smooth muscle (PASMC) and endothelial (PAEC) cells to fibrinogen and fibrin. Basal [Ca2+]cyt was substantially elevated in PAEC after culture on fibrinogen, fibrin, and thrombin and in PASMC on fibrinogen and fibrin. In PAEC, fibrinogen significantly decreased the peak [Ca2+]cyt transient (P <0.001) without a change in the transient peak width (at 50% of the peak height). This response was independent of effects on the proteinase-activated receptor (PAR) 1. Furthermore, chronic exposure to thrombin, an activator of PAR, significantly reduced the peak agonist-induced Ca2+ release in PAEC, but increased it in PASMC. The recovery rate of the agonist-induced [Ca2+]cyt transients decelerated in PASMC chronically exposed to fibrin; a small increase of the peak Ca2+ was also observed. Substantial augmentation of PASMC (but not PAEC) proliferation was observed in response to chronic fibrin exposure. In conclusion, chronic exposure to fibrinogen, fibrin, and thrombin caused differential changes in [Ca2+]cyt in PAEC and PASMC. Such changes in [Ca2+]cyt may contribute to vascular changes in patients who have CTEPH where the pulmonary vasculature is persistently exposed to thromboemboli. PMID:19363122

  3. Deletion of STAT5a/b in Vascular Smooth Muscle Abrogates the Male Bias in Hypoxic Pulmonary Hypertension in Mice: Implications in the Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Yang-Ming; Yuan, Huijuan; Edwards, John G; Skayian, Yester; Ochani, Kanta; Miller, Edmund J; Sehgal, Pravin B

    2014-01-01

    Chronic hypoxia typically elicits pulmonary hypertension (PH) in mice with a male-dominant phenotype. There is an opposite-sex bias in human PH, with a higher prevalence in women, but greater survival (the “estrogen paradox”). We investigated the involvement of the STAT5a/b species, previously established to mediate sexual dimorphism in other contexts, in the sex bias in PH. Mice with heterozygous or homozygous deletions of the STAT5a/b locus in vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were generated in crosses between STAT5a/bfl/fl and transgelin (SM22α)-Cre+/+ parents. Wild-type (wt ) males subjected to chronic hypoxia showed significant PH and pulmonary arterial remodeling, with wt females showing minimal changes (a male-dominant phenotype). However, in conditional STAT5+/− or STAT5−/− mice, hypoxic females showed the severest manifestations of PH (a female-dominant phenotype). Immunofluorescence studies on human lung sections showed that obliterative pulmonary arterial lesions in patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) or hereditary pulmonary arterial hypertension (HPAH), both male and female, overall had reduced STAT5a/b, reduced PY-STAT5 and reduced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) GTPase atlastin-3 (ATL3). Studies of SMCs and endothelial cell (EC) lines derived from vessels isolated from lungs of male and female IPAH patients and controls revealed instances of coordinate reductions in STAT5a, STAT5b and ATL3 in IPAH-derived cells, including SMCs and ECs from the same patient. Taken together, these data provide the first definitive evidence for a contribution of STAT5a/b to the sex bias in PH in the hypoxic mouse and implicate reduced STAT5 in the pathogenesis of the human disease. PMID:25470773

  4. Carvedilol inhibits proliferation of cultured pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells of patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Fujio, Hideki; Nakamura, Kazufumi; Matsubara, Hiromi; Kusano, Kengo Fukushima; Miyaji, Katsumasa; Nagase, Satoshi; Ikeda, Tetsuya; Ogawa, Aiko; Ohta-Ogo, Keiko; Miura, Daiji; Miura, Aya; Miyazaki, Masahiro; Date, Hiroshi; Ohe, Tohru

    2006-02-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) is associated with proliferation of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in small pulmonary arteries. Inhibition of proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) may be an effective treatment of patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension. Recent studies have shown that carvedilol, an alpha- and beta-blocker with antioxidant and calcium channel blocking properties, inhibits the proliferation of cultured normal human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. In this study, we tested the hypothesis that carvedilol has antiproliferative effects on pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells of patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension. Pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells from six idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension patients who had undergone lung transplantation were cultured. To determine cell proliferation, H-thymidine incorporation was measured. Platelet-derived growth factor-induced proliferation of IPAH-PASMCs was significantly greater than that of normal control pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. Carvedilol (0.1 microM to 10 microM) inhibited the proliferation of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension-pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells in a concentration-dependent manner. Prazosin (an alpha-blocker) and N-acetyl L cysteine (an antioxidant agent) (0.1 microM to 10 microM) did not inhibit their proliferation, but the high concentration of propranolol (a beta-blocker) and nifedipine (a calcium channel blocker) (10 microM) inhibited the proliferation. The combination of propranolol and nifedipine inhibited the proliferation but only at a high concentration (10 microM) combination. Cell cycle analysis revealed that carvedilol (10 microM) significantly decreased the number of cells in S and G2/M phases. These results indicate that carvedilol inhibits the exaggerated proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells of patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension

  5. Targeting receptor tyrosine kinases and their downstream signaling with cell-penetrating peptides in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle and endothelial cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Jun; Rupasinghe, Chamila; Wilson, Jamie L; Taylor, Linda; Rahimi, Nader; Mierke, Dale; Polgar, Peter

    2015-05-01

    Cell-penetrating peptide (CPP) intracellular delivery of receptor signaling motifs provides an opportunity to regulate specific receptor tyrosine kinase signal transductions. We targeted tyrosine residues Y740 and Y751 of the PDGF receptor β (PDGFRβ) and Y1175 of the VEGF receptor 2 (VEGFR2). The Y740 and Y751 motifs activated ERK and Akt, while the Y1175 motif activated ERK. Targeting either Y740 or Y751 of the PDGFRβ in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (HPASMC) effectively inhibited PDGF activation of ERK or Akt. Interfering with the Y751 region of the PDGFRβ proved more effective than targeting the Y740 region. The phosphorylation of Y751 of the CPP and the length and exact sequence of the mimicking peptide proved crucial. On the other hand, in human pulmonary artery endothelial cell phosphorylation of the VEGFR2 Y1175 CPP was not a determinant in blockage of ERK activation. Likewise, the length of the peptide mimic was not crucial with a very small sequence containing the Y1175 remaining effective. Physiologic proof of concept for the effectiveness of the CPP was confirmed by blockage of HPASMC migration in response to PDGF following culture injury. Thus targeted blockage of tyrosine kinase receptor signaling can be very effective.

  6. Upregulated miR-17 Regulates Hypoxia-Mediated Human Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Apoptosis by Targeting Mitofusin 2

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Zheng; Li, Sujun; Zhao, Shunxin; Fa, Xianen

    2016-01-01

    Background Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a fatal disease characterized by impaired regulation of pulmonary artery vascular growth and remodeling. Aberrant expression of miR-17 has been shown to be involved in the pathogenesis of PAH, but its underlying molecular mechanism has not been elucidated. Material/Methods Mitofusin 2 (MFN2) expression was determined by qRT-PCR. The protein expression levels of MFN2, proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA), and pro-apoptotic protein cleaved Caspase-3 were measured using Western blot analysis. Cell proliferation and apoptosis were assessed by CellTiter-Glo reagent and flow cytometry, respectively. Caspase-3/7 activity was measured using an Apo-ONE Homogeneous Caspase-3/7 assay kit. The regulation of miR-17 on MFN2 expression was assessed using luciferase reporter assay system. Results miR-17 expression was upregulated in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (hPASMCs) treated with hypoxia and lung tissues of PAH patients. Inhibition of miR-17 suppressed hypoxia-induced proliferation and promoted apoptosis in hPASMCs. miR-17 inhibited MFN2 expression by binding to its 3′-UTR. Decreased cell viability and increased apoptosis and Caspase-3 activity were observed in the anti-miR-17 + siNC group compared with the anti-miR-NC + siNC group. The expression of cleaved Caspase-3 was upregulated and the expression of PCNA was downregulated in the anti-miR-17 + siNC group. Moreover, these alterations were attenuated by knockdown of MFN2. Conclusions miR-17 regulates proliferation and apoptosis in hPASMCs through MFN2 modulation. We found that miR-17 acts as a potential regulator of proliferation and apoptosis of hPASMCs, and that it might be developed as a promising new strategy for the treatment of PAH. PMID:27640178

  7. BK channels in rat and human pulmonary smooth muscle cells are BKα-β1 functional complexes lacking the oxygen-sensitive stress axis regulated exon insert

    PubMed Central

    Detweiler, Neil D.; Song, Li; McClenahan, Samantha J.; Versluis, Rachel J.; Kharade, Sujay V.; Kurten, Richard C.; Rhee, Sung W.

    2016-01-01

    Abstract A loss of K+ efflux in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) contributes to abnormal vasoconstriction and PASMC proliferation during pulmonary hypertension (PH). Activation of high-conductance Ca2+-activated (BK) channels represents a therapeutic strategy to restore K+ efflux to the affected PASMCs. However, the properties of BK channels in PASMCs—including sensitivity to BK channel openers (BKCOs)—are poorly defined. The goal of this study was to compare the properties of BK channels between PASMCs of normoxic (N) and chronic hypoxic (CH) rats and then explore key findings in human PASMCs. Polymerase chain reaction results revealed that 94.3% of transcripts encoding BKα pore proteins in PASMCs from N rats represent splice variants lacking the stress axis regulated exon insert, which confers oxygen sensitivity. Subsequent patch-clamp recordings from inside-out (I-O) patches confirmed a dense population of BK channels insensitive to hypoxia. The BK channels were highly activated by intracellular Ca2+ and the BKCO lithocholate; these responses require BKα-β1 subunit coupling. PASMCs of CH rats with established PH exhibited a profound overabundance of the dominant oxygen-insensitive BKα variant. Importantly, human BK (hBK) channels in PASMCs from human donor lungs also represented the oxygen-insensitive BKα variant activated by BKCOs. The hBK channels showed significantly enhanced Ca2+ sensitivity compared with rat BK channels. We conclude that rat BK and hBK channels in PASMCs are oxygen-insensitive BKα-β1 complexes highly sensitive to Ca2+ and the BKCO lithocholate. BK channels are overexpressed in PASMCs of a rat model of PH and may provide an abundant target for BKCOs designed to restore K+ efflux. PMID:28090300

  8. Effect of hypoxia and Beraprost sodium on human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell proliferation: the role of p27kip1

    PubMed Central

    Kadowaki, Maiko; Mizuno, Shiro; Demura, Yoshiki; Ameshima, Shingo; Miyamori, Isamu; Ishizaki, Takeshi

    2007-01-01

    Background Hypoxia induces the proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell (PASMC) in vivo and in vitro, and prostacyclin analogues are thought to inhibit the growth of PASMC. Previous studies suggest that p27kip1, a kind of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor, play an important role in the smooth muscle cell proliferation. However, the mechanism of hypoxia and the subcellular interactions between p27kip1 and prostacyclin analogues in human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell (HPASMC) are not fully understood. Methods We investigated the role of p27kip1 in the ability of Beraprost sodium (BPS; a stable prostacyclin analogue) to inhibit the proliferation of HPASMC during hypoxia. To clarify the biological effects of hypoxic air exposure and BPS on HPASMC, the cells were cultured in a hypoxic chamber under various oxygen concentrations (0.1–21%). Thereafter, DNA synthesis was measured as bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation, the cell cycle was analyzed by flow cytometry with propidium iodide staining. The p27kip1 mRNA and protein expression and it's stability was measured by real-time RT-PCR and Western blotting. Further, we assessed the role of p27kip1 in HPASMC proliferation using p27kip1 gene knockdown using small interfering RNA (siRNA) transfection. Results Although severe hypoxia (0.1% oxygen) suppressed the proliferation of serum-stimulated HPASMC, moderate hypoxia (2% oxygen) enhanced proliferation in accordance with enhanced p27kip1 protein degradation, whereas BPS suppressed HPASMC proliferation under both hypoxic and normoxic conditions by suppressing p27kip1 degradation with intracellular cAMP-elevation. The 8-bromo-cyclic adenosine monophosphate (8-Br-cAMP), a cAMP analogue, had similar action as BPS in the regulation of p27kip1. Moderate hypoxia did not affect the stability of p27kip1 protein expression, but PDGF, known as major hypoxia-induced growth factors, significantly decreased p27kip1 protein stability. We also demonstrated that

  9. Activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors in human airway smooth muscle cells has a superior anti-inflammatory profile to corticosteroids: relevance for chronic obstructive pulmonary disease therapy.

    PubMed

    Patel, Hema J; Belvisi, Maria G; Bishop-Bailey, David; Yacoub, Magdi H; Mitchell, Jane A

    2003-03-01

    Airway smooth muscle is actively involved in the inflammatory process in diseases such as chronic obstructive pulmonary disease and asthma by 1) contributing to airway narrowing through hyperplasia and hypertrophy and 2) the release of GM-CSF and G-CSF, which promotes the survival and activation of infiltrating leukocytes. Thus, the identification of novel anti-inflammatory pathways in airway smooth muscle will have important implications for the treatment of inflammatory airway disease. This study identifies such a pathway in the activation of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARs). PPAR ligands are known therapeutic agents in the treatment of diabetes; however, their role in human airway disease is unknown. We demonstrate, for the first time, that human airway smooth muscle cells express PPAR alpha and -gamma subtypes. Activation of PPAR gamma by natural and synthetic ligands inhibits serum-induced cell growth more effectively than does the steroid dexamethasone, and induces apoptosis. Moreover, PPAR gamma activation, like dexamethasone, inhibits the release of GM-CSF. However, PPAR gamma ligands, but not dexamethasone, similarly inhibits G-CSF release. These results reveal a novel anti-inflammatory pathway in human airway smooth muscle, where PPAR gamma activation has additional anti-inflammatory effects to those of steroids. Hence, PPAR ligands might act as potential treatments in human respiratory diseases.

  10. The sGC activator inhibits the proliferation and migration, promotes the apoptosis of human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells via the up regulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-2

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Shuai; Zou, Lihui; Yang, Ting; Yang, Yuanhua; Zhai, Zhenguo; Xiao, Fei; Wang, Chen

    2015-03-15

    Background: Different types of pulmonary hypertension (PH) share the same process of pulmonary vascular remodeling, the molecular mechanism of which is not entirely clarified by far. The abnormal biological behaviors of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) play an important role in this process. Objectives: We investigated the regulation of plasminogen activator inhibitor-2 (PAI-2) by the sGC activator, and explored the effect of PAI-2 on PASMCs proliferation, apoptosis and migration. Methods: After the transfection with PAI-2 overexpression vector and specific siRNAs or treatment with BAY 41-2272 (an activator of sGC), the mRNA and protein levels of PAI-2 in cultured human PASMCs were detected, and the proliferation, apoptosis and migration of PASMCs were investigated. Results: BAY 41-2272 up regulated the endogenous PAI-2 in PASMCs, on the mRNA and protein level. In PAI-2 overexpression group, the proliferation and migration of PASMCs were inhibited significantly, and the apoptosis of PASMCs was increased. In contrast, PAI-2 knockdown with siRNA increased PASMCs proliferation and migration, inhibited the apoptosis. Conclusions: PAI-2 overexpression inhibits the proliferation and migration and promotes the apoptosis of human PASMCs. Therefore, sGC activator might alleviate or reverse vascular remodeling in PH through the up-regulation of PAI-2. - Highlights: • sGC activator BAY41-2272 up regulated PAI-2 in PASMCs, on the mRNA and protein level. • PAI-2 overexpression inhibits the proliferation and migration of human PASMCs. • PAI-2 overexpression promotes the apoptosis of human PASMCs. • sGC activator might alleviate the vascular remodeling in pulmonary hypertension.

  11. CCN1 suppresses pulmonary vascular smooth muscle contraction in response to hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Lee, Seon-Jin; Zhang, Meng; Hu, Kebin; Lin, Ling; Zhang, Duo; Jin, Yang

    2015-12-01

    Pulmonary vasoconstriction and increased vascular resistance are common features in pulmonary hypertension (PH). One of the contributing factors in the development of pulmonary vasoconstriction is increased pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) contraction. Here we report that CCN1, an extracellular matrix molecule, suppressed PASMC contraction in response to hypoxia. CCN1 (Cyr61), discovered in past decade, belongs to the Cyr61-CTGF-Nov (CCN) family. It carries a variety of cellular functions, including angiogenesis and cell adhesion, death, and proliferation. Hypoxia robustly upregulated the expression of CCN1 in the pulmonary vessels and lung parenchyma. Given that CCN1 is a secreted protein and functions in a paracine manner, we examined the potential effects of CCN1 on the adjacent smooth muscle cells. Interestingly, bioactive recombinant CCN1 significantly suppressed hypoxia-induced contraction in human PASMCs in vitro. Consistently, in the in vivo functional studies, administration of bioactive CCN1 protein significantly decreased right ventricular pressure in three different PH animal models. Mechanistically, protein kinase A-pathway inhibitors abolished the effects of CCN1 in suppressing PASMC contraction. Furthermore, CCN1-inhibited smooth muscle contraction was independent of the known vasodilators, such as nitric oxide. Taken together, our studies indicated a novel cellular function of CCN1, potentially regulating the pathogenesis of PH.

  12. MURC deficiency in smooth muscle attenuates pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Nakanishi, Naohiko; Ogata, Takehiro; Naito, Daisuke; Miyagawa, Kotaro; Taniguchi, Takuya; Hamaoka, Tetsuro; Maruyama, Naoki; Kasahara, Takeru; Nishi, Masahiro; Matoba, Satoaki; Ueyama, Tomomi

    2016-01-01

    Emerging evidence suggests that caveolin-1 (Cav1) is associated with pulmonary arterial hypertension. MURC (also called Cavin-4) is a member of the cavin family, which regulates caveolar formation and functions together with caveolins. Here, we show that hypoxia increased Murc mRNA expression in the mouse lung, and that Murc-null mice exhibited attenuation of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension (PH) accompanied by reduced ROCK activity in the lung. Conditional knockout mice lacking Murc in smooth muscle also resist hypoxia-induced PH. MURC regulates the proliferation and migration of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) through Rho/ROCK signalling. Cav1 suppresses RhoA activity in PASMCs, which is reversed by MURC. MURC binds to Cav1 and inhibits the association of Cav1 with the active form of Gα13, resulting in the facilitated association of the active form of Gα13 with p115RhoGEF. These results reveal that MURC has a function in the development of PH through modulating Rho/ROCK signalling. PMID:27546070

  13. Involvement of the bone morphogenetic protein system in endothelin- and aldosterone-induced cell proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells isolated from human patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Yamanaka, Ryutaro; Otsuka, Fumio; Nakamura, Kazufumi; Yamashita, Misuzu; Otani, Hiroyuki; Takeda, Masaya; Matsumoto, Yoshinori; Kusano, Kengo F; Ito, Hiroshi; Makino, Hirofumi

    2010-05-01

    Recent genetic studies have uncovered a link between familial and idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and germline mutations in the bone morphogenetic protein type-II receptor (BMPRII). The pathology of PAH is characterized by remodeling of the pulmonary arteries due to pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) hyperproliferation. Although increased endothelial injury and impaired suppression of PASMC proliferation are both critical for the cellular pathogenesis of PAH, a detailed molecular mechanism underlying PAH has yet to be elucidated. In the present study, we investigated the roles of the BMP system and other vasoactive factors associated with PAH (including endothelin (ET), angiotensin II (Ang II) and aldosterone) in the mitotic actions of PASMCs isolated from idiopathic and secondary PAH lungs. ET1 and aldosterone stimulated PASMC proliferation of idiopathic PAH more effectively than secondary PAH, whereas Ang II and ET3 failed to activate mitosis in either of the PASMC cell type. The effects of ET1 and aldosterone were blocked by bosentan, an ET type-A/B receptor (ETA/BR) antagonist, and eplerenone, a selective mineralocorticoid receptor (MR) blocker, respectively. Among the BMP ligands examined, BMP-2 and BMP-7, but not BMP-4 or BMP-6, significantly increased cell mitosis in both PASMC cell types. Notably, ET1- and aldosterone-induced mitosis and mitogen-activated protein kinase phosphorylation were significantly increased in the presence of BMP-2 and BMP-7 in PASMCs isolated from idiopathic PAH, although additive effects were not observed in PASMCs isolated from secondary PAH. Inhibition of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1 (ERK1)/ERK2 signaling suppressed basal-, ET1- and aldosterone-induced PASMC mitosis more potently than that of stress-activated protein kinase/c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase inhibition. Given the fact that BMP-2 and BMP-7 upregulated ETA/BR and MR expression and that BMP-2 decreased 11betaHSD2 (11beta

  14. Exogenous spermine inhibits the proliferation of human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells caused by chemically-induced hypoxia via the suppression of the ERK1/2- and PI3K/AKT-associated pathways

    PubMed Central

    WEI, CAN; LI, HONG-ZHU; WANG, YUE-HONG; PENG, XUE; SHAO, HONG-JIANG; LI, HONG-XIA; BAI, SHU-ZHI; LU, XIAO-XIAO; WU, LING-YUN; WANG, RUI; XU, CHANG-QING

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary vascular remodeling is a significant pathological feature of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension (HPH), while pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation plays a leading role in pulmonary vascular remodeling. Spermine (Sp), a polyamine, plays a critical role in periodic cell proliferation and apoptosis. The present study was conducted to observe the association between hypoxia-induced PASMC proliferation and polyamine metabolism, and to explore the effects of exogenous Sp on PASMC poliferation and the related mechanisms. In the present study, PASMCs were cultured with cobalt chloride (CoCl2) to establish a hypoxia model, and Sp at various final concentrations (0.1, 1, 10 and 100 µM) was added to the medium of PASMCs 40 min prior to the induction of hypoxia. Cell proliferation was measured by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay, cell counting kit-8 assay and 5-bromo-2′-deoxyuridine (BrdU) incorporation assay. Cell cycle progression was determined by flow cytometry, and the protein expression levels of spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase (SSAT; the key enzyme in the terminal degradation of polyamine), ornithine decar boxylase (ODC; the key enzyme of polyamine biosynthesis), cyclin D1 and p27 were measured by western blot analysis. The results revealed that the proliferation of the PASMCs cultured with CoCl2 at 50 µM for 24 h markedly increased. The expression of ODC was decreased and the expression of SSAT was increased in the cells under hypoxic conditions. Exogenous Sp at concentrations of 1 and 10 µM significantly inhibited hypoxia induced PASMC proliferation, leading to cell cycle arrest at the G1/G0 phase. In addition, Sp decreased cyclin D1 expression, increased p27 expression, and suppressed the phosphorylation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) and protein kinase B (AKT); however, the above-metioned parameters were not markedly

  15. Calcium and TRP channels in pulmonary vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Landsberg, Judd W; Yuan, Jason X-J

    2004-04-01

    Ca(2+) is a major trigger for pulmonary vasoconstriction and a stimulus for pulmonary vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. The transient receptor potential cation channels participate in regulating intracellular Ca(2+) and thus vascular contractility and cell proliferation. Upregulation of genes encoding these channels is involved in the development of pulmonary hypertension.

  16. Arginase II is a target of miR-17-5p and regulates miR-17-5p expression in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Jin, Youpeng; Jin, Yi; Chen, Bernadette; Tipple, Trent E; Nelin, Leif D

    2014-07-15

    Vascular remodeling and smooth muscle cell proliferation are hallmark pathogenic features of pulmonary artery hypertension. MicroRNAs, endogenously expressed small noncoding RNAs, regulate gene expression at the posttranscriptional level. It has previously been shown that miR-17 overexpression in cultured human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (hPASMC) resulted in increased viable cell number. Previously, we have found that arginase II promotes hypoxia-induced proliferation in hPASMC. Therefore, we hypothesized that miR-17 would be upregulated by hypoxia in hPASMC and would result in greater arginase II expression. We found that levels of miR-17-5p and arginase II were significantly greater in cultured hPASMC exposed to 1% O2 for 48 h than in hPASMC exposed to 21% O2 for 48 h. Furthermore, inhibiting miR-17-5p expression decreased hypoxia-induced arginase II protein levels in hPASMC. Conversely, overexpressing miR-17-5p resulted in greater arginase II protein levels. Somewhat surprisingly, arginase II inhibition was associated with lower miR-17-5p expression in both normoxic and hypoxic hPASMC, whereas overexpressing arginase II resulted in greater miR-17-5p expression in hPASMC. These findings suggest that hypoxia-induced arginase II expression is not only regulated by miR-17-5p but also that there is a feedback loop between arginase II and miR-17-5p in hPASMC. We also found that the arginase II-mediated regulation of miR-17-5p was independent of either p53 or c-myc. We also found that l-arginine, the substrate for arginase II, and l-ornithine, the amino acid product of arginase II, were not involved in the regulation of miR-17-5p expression.

  17. Endothelial and Smooth Muscle Cell Ion Channels in Pulmonary Vasoconstriction and Vascular Remodeling

    PubMed Central

    Makino, Ayako; Firth, Amy L.; Yuan, Jason X.-J.

    2017-01-01

    The pulmonary circulation is a low resistance and low pressure system. Sustained pulmonary vasoconstriction and excessive vascular remodeling often occur under pathophysiological conditions such as in patients with pulmonary hypertension. Pulmonary vasoconstriction is a consequence of smooth muscle contraction. Many factors released from the endothelium contribute to regulating pulmonary vascular tone, while the extracellular matrix in the adventitia is the major determinant of vascular wall compliance. Pulmonary vascular remodeling is characterized by adventitial and medial hypertrophy due to fibroblast and smooth muscle cell proliferation, neointimal proliferation, intimal, and plexiform lesions that obliterate the lumen, muscularization of precapillary arterioles, and in situ thrombosis. A rise in cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]cyt) in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMC) is a major trigger for pulmonary vasoconstriction, while increased release of mitogenic factors, upregulation (or downregulation) of ion channels and transporters, and abnormalities in intracellular signaling cascades are key to the remodeling of the pulmonary vasculature. Changes in the expression, function, and regulation of ion channels in PASMC and pulmonary arterial endothelial cells play an important role in the regulation of vascular tone and development of vascular remodeling. This article will focus on describing the ion channels and transporters that are involved in the regulation of pulmonary vascular function and structure and illustrating the potential pathogenic role of ion channels and transporters in the development of pulmonary vascular disease. PMID:23733654

  18. Cyclic Stretch Affects Pulmonary Endothelial Cell Control of Pulmonary Smooth Muscle Cell Growth

    PubMed Central

    Ochoa, Cristhiaan D.; Baker, Haven; Hasak, Stephen; Matyal, Robina; Salam, Aleya; Hales, Charles A.; Hancock, William; Quinn, Deborah A.

    2008-01-01

    Endothelial cells are subjected to mechanical forces in the form of cyclic stretch resulting from blood pulsatility. Pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAECs) produce factors that stimulate and inhibit pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) growth. We hypothesized that PAECs exposed to cyclic stretch secrete proteins that inhibit PASMC growth. Media from PAECs exposed to cyclic stretch significantly inhibited PASMC growth in a time-dependent manner. Lyophilized material isolated from stretched PAEC-conditioned media significantly inhibited PASMC growth in a dose-dependent manner. This inhibition was reversed by trypsin inactivation, which is consistent with the relevant factor being a protein(s). To identify proteins that inhibited cell growth in conditioned media from stretched PAECs, we used proteomic techniques and found that thrombospondin (TSP)-1, a natural antiangiogenic factor, was up-regulated by stretch. In vitro, exogenous TSP-1 inhibited PASMC growth. TSP-1–blocking antibodies reversed conditioned media–induced inhibition of PASMC growth. Cyclic stretched PAECs secrete protein(s) that inhibit PASMC proliferation. TSP-1 may be, at least in part, responsible for this inhibition. The complete identification and understanding of the secreted proteome of stretched PAECs may lead to new insights into the pathophysiology of pulmonary vascular remodeling. PMID:18314539

  19. Smooth Muscle Proliferation and Role of the Prostacyclin (IP) Receptor in Idiopathic Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Falcetti, Emilia; Hall, Susan M.; Phillips, Peter G.; Patel, Jigisha; Morrell, Nicholas W.; Haworth, Sheila G.; Clapp, Lucie H.

    2010-01-01

    Rationale: Prostacyclin analogs, used to treat idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH), are assumed to work through prostacyclin (IP) receptors linked to cyclic AMP (cAMP) generation, although the potential to signal through peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) exists. Objectives: IP receptor and PPARγ expression may be depressed in IPAH. We wished to determine if pathways remain functional and if analogs continue to inhibit smooth muscle proliferation. Methods: We used Western blotting to determine IP receptor expression in peripheral pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) from normal and IPAH lungs and immunohistochemistry to evaluate IP receptor and PPARγ expression in distal arteries. Measurements and Main Results: Cell proliferation and cAMP assays assessed analog responses in human and mouse PASMCs and HEK-293 cells. Proliferative rates of IPAH cells were greater than normal human PASMCs. IP receptor protein levels were lower in PASMCs from patients with IPAH, but treprostinil reduced replication and treprostinil-induced cAMP elevation appeared normal. Responses to prostacyclin analogs were largely dependent on the IP receptor and cAMP in normal PASMCs, although in IP−/− receptor cells analogs inhibited growth in a cAMP-independent, PPARγ-dependent manner. In IPAH cells, antiproliferative responses to analogs were insensitive to IP receptor or adenylyl cyclase antagonists but were potentiated by a PPARγ agonist and inhibited (∼ 60%) by the PPARγ antagonist GW9662. This coincided with increased PPARγ expression in the medial layer of acinar arteries. Conclusions: The antiproliferative effects of prostacyclin analogs are preserved in IPAH despite IP receptor down-regulation and abnormal coupling. PPARγ may represent a previously unrecognized pathway by which these agents inhibit smooth muscle proliferation. PMID:20622039

  20. Proteomic analysis of vascular smooth muscle cells in physiological condition and in pulmonary arterial hypertension: Toward contractile versus synthetic phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Régent, Alexis; Ly, Kim Heang; Lofek, Sébastien; Clary, Guilhem; Tamby, Mathieu; Tamas, Nicolas; Federici, Christian; Broussard, Cédric; Chafey, Philippe; Liaudet-Coopman, Emmanuelle; Humbert, Marc; Perros, Frédéric; Mouthon, Luc

    2016-10-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) are highly specialized cells that regulate vascular tone and participate in vessel remodeling in physiological and pathological conditions. It is unclear why certain vascular pathologies involve one type of vessel and spare others. Our objective was to compare the proteomes of normal human VSMC from aorta (human aortic smooth muscle cells, HAoSMC), umbilical artery (human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells, HUASMC), pulmonary artery (HPASMC), or pulmonary artery VSMC from patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH-SMC). Proteomes of VSMC were compared by 2D DIGE and MS. Only 19 proteins were differentially expressed between HAoSMC and HPASMC while 132 and 124 were differentially expressed between HUASMC and HAoSMC or HPASMC, respectively (fold change 1.5≤ or -1.5≥, p < 0.05). As much as 336 proteins were differentially expressed between HPASMC and PAH-SMC (fold change 1.5≤ or -1.5≥, p < 0.05). HUASMC expressed increased amount of α-smooth muscle actin compared to either HPASMC or HAoSMC (although not statistically significant). In addition, PAH-SMC expressed decreased amount of smooth muscle myosin heavy chain and proliferation rate was increased compared to HPASMC thus supporting that PAH-SMC have a more synthetic phenotype. Analysis with Ingenuity identified paxillin and (embryonic lethal, abnormal vision, drosophila) like 1 (ELAVL1) as molecules linked with a lot of proteins differentially expressed between HPASMC and PAH-SMC. There was a trend toward reduced proliferation of PAH-SMC with paxillin-si-RNA and increased proliferation with ELAVL1-siRNA. Thus, VSMCs have very diverse protein content depending on their origin and this is in link with phenotypic differentiation. Paxillin targeting may be a promising treatment of PAH. ELAVL1 also participate in the regulation of PAH-SMC proliferation.

  1. miR-140-5p regulates hypoxia-mediated human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation by targeting Dnmt1 and promoting SOD2 expression

    SciTech Connect

    Zhang, Yanwei; Xu, Jing

    2016-04-22

    miR-140-5p is down-regulated in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) and experimental models of PAH, and inhibits hypoxia-mediated pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation in vitro. Delivery of synthetic miR-140-5p prevents and treats established, experimental PAH. DNA methyltransferase 1 (Dnmt1) is up-regulated in PAH associated human PASMCs (HPASMCs), which promotes the development of PAH by hypermethylation of CpG islands within the promoter for superoxide dismutase 2 (SOD2) and down-regulating SOD2 expression. We searched for miR-140-5p targets using TargetScan, PicTar and MiRanda tools, and found that Dnmt1 is a potential target of miR-140-5p. Based on these findings, we speculated that miR-140-5p might target Dnmt1 and regulate SOD2 expression to regulate hypoxia-mediated HPASMC proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation. We detected the expression of miR-140-5p, Dnmt1 and SOD2 by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) and western blot assays, respectively, and found down-regulation of miR-140-5p and SOD2 and up-regulation of Dnmt1 exist in PAH tissues and hypoxia-mediated HPASMCs. Cell proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation detection showed that miR-140-5p inhibits proliferation and promotes apoptosis and differentiation of HPASMCs in hypoxia, while the effect of Dnmt1 on hypoxia-mediated HPASMCs is reversed. Luciferase assay confirmed that miR-140-5p targets Dnmt1 directly. An inverse correlation is also found between miR-140-5p and Dnmt1 in HPASMCs. In addition, we further investigated whether miR-140-5p and Dnmt1 regulate HPASMC proliferation, apoptosis and differentiation by regulating SOD2 expression, and the results confirmed our speculation. Taken together, these results indicated that miR-140-5p at least partly targets Dnmt1 and regulates SOD2 expression to inhibit proliferation and promote apoptosis and differentiation of HPASMCs in hypoxia. - Highlights: • miR-140-5p and SOD2 are down

  2. Calcium homeostasis and sensitization in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Jernigan, Nikki L; Resta, Thomas C

    2014-04-01

    The pulmonary circulation is a low-pressure, low-resistance vascular bed with little to no resting tone under normal conditions. An increase in the [Ca(2+) ]i in PASMCs is an important determinant of contraction, migration, and proliferation. Both Ca(2+) influx through plasma membrane Ca(2+) channels and Ca(2+) release from the SR contribute to a rise in [Ca(2+) ]i . Additionally important in the pulmonary circulation are several kinase-mediated signaling pathways that act to increase the sensitivity of the contractile apparatus to [Ca(2+) ]i . Similarly, cytoskeletal processes resulting in dynamic remodeling of the actin cytoskeleton can further contribute to contractility in the pulmonary circulation. In addition to endocrine, paracrine, and autocrine factors, alveolar hypoxia is an important stimulus for pulmonary vasoconstriction. However, prolonged hypoxia is a critical pathological stimulus associated with the development of pulmonary hypertension and cor pulmonale. In this review, we will discuss recent advances in our understanding of how Ca(2+) homeostasis and sensitization regulate PASMC contractility under both physiological and pathophysiological conditions.

  3. ASIC1 contributes to pulmonary vascular smooth muscle store-operated Ca(2+) entry.

    PubMed

    Jernigan, Nikki L; Paffett, Michael L; Walker, Benjimen R; Resta, Thomas C

    2009-08-01

    Acid-sensing ion channels (ASIC) are voltage-insensitive, cationic channels that have recently been identified in vascular smooth muscle (VSM). It is possible that ASIC contribute to vascular reactivity via Na(+) and Ca(2+) conductance; however, their function in VSM is largely unknown. In pulmonary VSM, store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) plays a significant role in vasoregulatory mechanisms such as hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction and receptor-mediated arterial constriction. Therefore, we hypothesized that ASIC contribute to SOCE in pulmonary VSM. We examined SOCE resulting from depletion of intracellular Ca(2+) stores with cyclopiazonic acid in isolated small pulmonary arteries and primary cultured pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells by measuring 1) changes in VSM [Ca(2+)](i) using fura-2 indicator dye, 2) Mn(2+) quenching of fura-2 fluorescence, and 3) store-operated Ca(2+) and Na(+) currents using conventional whole cell patch-clamp configuration in voltage-clamp mode. The role of ASIC was assessed by the use of the ASIC inhibitors, amiloride, benzamil, and psalmotoxin 1, or siRNA directed towards ASIC1, ASIC2, or ASIC3 isoforms. We found that store-operated VSM [Ca(2+)](i) responses, Mn(2+) influx, and inward cationic currents were attenuated by either pharmacological ASIC inhibition or treatment with ASIC1 siRNA. These data establish a unique role for ASIC1 in mediating SOCE in pulmonary VSM and provide new insight into mechanisms of VSM Ca(2+) entry and pulmonary vasoregulation.

  4. Pulmonary artery smooth muscle hypertrophy: roles of glycogen synthase kinase-3beta and p70 ribosomal S6 kinase.

    PubMed

    Deng, Huan; Hershenson, Marc B; Lei, Jing; Anyanwu, Anuli C; Pinsky, David J; Bentley, J Kelley

    2010-06-01

    Increased medial arterial thickness is a structural change in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). The role of smooth muscle hypertrophy in this process has not been well studied. Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), transforming growth factor (TGF)-beta1, serotonin (or 5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT), and endothelin (ET)-1 have been implicated in PAH pathogenesis. We examined the effect of these mediators on human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell size, contractile protein expression, and contractile function, as well on the roles of glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3beta and p70 ribosomal S6 kinase (p70S6K), two proteins involved in translational control, in this process. Unlike epidermal growth factor, BMP-4, TGF-beta1, 5-HT, and ET-1 each increased smooth muscle cell size, contractile protein expression, fractional cell shortening, and GSK-3beta phosphorylation. GSK-3beta inhibition by lithium or SB-216763 increased cell size, protein synthesis, and contractile protein expression. Expression of a non-phosphorylatable GSK-3beta mutant blocked BMP-4-, TGF-beta1-, 5-HT-, and ET-1-induced cell size enlargement, suggesting that GSK-3beta phosphorylation is required and sufficient for cellular hypertrophy. However, BMP-4, TGF-beta1, 5-HT, and ET-1 stimulation was accompanied by an increase in serum response factor transcriptional activation but not eIF2 phosphorylation, suggesting that GSK-3beta-mediated hypertrophy occurs via transcriptional, not translational, control. Finally, BMP-4, TGF-beta1, 5-HT, and ET-1 treatment induced phosphorylation of p70S6K and ribosomal protein S6, and siRNAs against p70S6K and S6 blocked the hypertrophic response. We conclude that mediators implicated in the pathogenesis of PAH induce pulmonary arterial smooth muscle hypertrophy. Identification of the signaling pathways regulating vascular smooth muscle hypertrophy may define new therapeutic targets for PAH.

  5. Pulmonary artery smooth muscle hypertrophy: roles of glycogen synthase kinase-3β and p70 ribosomal S6 kinase

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Huan; Hershenson, Marc B.; Lei, Jing; Anyanwu, Anuli C.; Pinsky, David J.

    2010-01-01

    Increased medial arterial thickness is a structural change in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). The role of smooth muscle hypertrophy in this process has not been well studied. Bone morphogenetic proteins (BMPs), transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1, serotonin (or 5-hydroxytryptamine; 5-HT), and endothelin (ET)-1 have been implicated in PAH pathogenesis. We examined the effect of these mediators on human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell size, contractile protein expression, and contractile function, as well on the roles of glycogen synthase kinase (GSK)-3β and p70 ribosomal S6 kinase (p70S6K), two proteins involved in translational control, in this process. Unlike epidermal growth factor, BMP-4, TGF-β1, 5-HT, and ET-1 each increased smooth muscle cell size, contractile protein expression, fractional cell shortening, and GSK-3β phosphorylation. GSK-3β inhibition by lithium or SB-216763 increased cell size, protein synthesis, and contractile protein expression. Expression of a non-phosphorylatable GSK-3β mutant blocked BMP-4-, TGF-β1-, 5-HT-, and ET-1-induced cell size enlargement, suggesting that GSK-3β phosphorylation is required and sufficient for cellular hypertrophy. However, BMP-4, TGF-β1, 5-HT, and ET-1 stimulation was accompanied by an increase in serum response factor transcriptional activation but not eIF2 phosphorylation, suggesting that GSK-3β-mediated hypertrophy occurs via transcriptional, not translational, control. Finally, BMP-4, TGF-β1, 5-HT, and ET-1 treatment induced phosphorylation of p70S6K and ribosomal protein S6, and siRNAs against p70S6K and S6 blocked the hypertrophic response. We conclude that mediators implicated in the pathogenesis of PAH induce pulmonary arterial smooth muscle hypertrophy. Identification of the signaling pathways regulating vascular smooth muscle hypertrophy may define new therapeutic targets for PAH. PMID:20190034

  6. Hypoxia Does neither Stimulate Pulmonary Artery Endothelial Cell Proliferation in Mice and Rats with Pulmonary Hypertension and Vascular Remodeling nor in Human Pulmonary Artery Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Lunyin; Hales, Charles A.

    2011-01-01

    Background Hypoxia results in pulmonary hypertension and vascular remodeling due to induction of pulmonary artery cell proliferation. Besides pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells, pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAECs) are also involved in the development of pulmonary hypertension, but the effect of hypoxia on PAEC proliferation has not been completely understood. Methods We investigated PAEC proliferation in mice and rats with hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension and vascular remodeling as well as in human PAECs under hypoxia. Results and Conclusion We did not find significant PAEC proliferation in chronically hypoxic rats or mice. There was a slight decrease in proliferation in mice and rats with pulmonary hypertension and vascular remodeling. We also did not find significant human PAEC proliferation and cell cycle progression under different levels of oxygen (1, 2, 3, 5 and 10%) for one day, although the same conditions of hypoxia induced significant proliferation and cell cycle progression in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells and pulmonary artery fibroblasts. Exposure to hypoxia for 7 days also did not increase PAEC proliferation. These results demonstrated that hypoxia alone is not a stimulus to PAEC proliferation in vivo and in vitro. The present study provides a novel role for PAECs in hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension and vascular remodeling. PMID:21691120

  7. Carvacrol induces the apoptosis of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells under hypoxia.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qianlong; Fan, Kai; Wang, Peng; Yu, Juan; Liu, Ruxia; Qi, Hanping; Sun, Hongli; Cao, Yonggang

    2016-01-05

    The abnormal apoptosis of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) is an important pathophysiological process in pulmonary vascular remodeling and pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Carvacrol, an essential oil compound from oregano and thyme, has displayed antimicrobial, antitumor, and antioxidant properties. Although carvacrol has pro-apoptosis properties in tumor cells, the underlying mechanisms of carvacrol in PASMC apoptosis remain unclear. Thus, in this study, we aim to investigate the role of carvacrol in pulmonary vascular remodeling and PASMC apoptosis in hypoxia. Right Ventricular Hypertrophy Measurements and pulmonary pathomorphology data show that the ratio of the heart weight/tibia length (HW/TL), the right ventricle/left ventricle plus septum (RV/LV+S) and the medial width of the pulmonary artery increased in chronic hypoxia and were reversed by carvacrol treatment under hypoxia. Additionally, carvacrol inhibited PASMC viability, attenuated oxidative stress, induced mitochondria membrane depolarization, increased the percentage of apoptotic cells, suppressed Bcl-2 expression, decreased procaspase-3 expression, promoted caspase-3 activation, and inhibited the ERK1/2 and PI3K/Akt pathway. Taken together, these findings suggest that carvacrol attenuates the pulmonary vascular remodeling and promotes PASMC apoptosis by acting on, at least in part, the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. This process might provide us new insight into the development of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension.

  8. Phospholipase D signaling in serotonin-induced mitogenesis of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Fanburg, B L

    2008-09-01

    We have previously reported the participation of mitogen-activated protein, Rho, and phosphoinositide-3 (PI3) kinases in separate pathways in serotonin (5-HT)-induced proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (SMCs). In this study, we investigated the possible participation of phospholipase D (PLD) and phosphatidic acid (PA) in this growth process. 5-HT stimulated a time-dependent increase in [(3)H]phosphatidylbutanol and PA generation. Exposure of SMCs to 1-butanol or overexpression of an inactive mutant of human PLD1R898R blocked 5-HT-induced proliferation. Furthermore, 1-butanol inhibited 5-HT activation of S6K1 and S6 protein, downstream effectors of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR), by 80 and 72%, respectively, and partially blocked activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) by 30% but had no effect on other associated signaling pathways. Exogenous PA caused cellular proliferation and revitalized cyclin D1 expression by 5-HT of the 1-butanol-treated cells. PA also reproduced activations by 5-HT of mTOR, S6K1, and ERK. Transfection with inactive human PLD1 reduced 5-HT-induced activation of S6K1 by approximately 50%. Inhibition of 5-HT receptor 2A (R 2A) with ketaserin blocked PLD activation by 5-HT. Inhibition with PI3-kinase inhibitor failed to block either activation of PLD by 5-HT or PA-dependent S6K1 phosphorylation. Taken together, these results indicate that ligation of the 5-HTR 2A by 5-HT initiates PLD activation in SMCs, and that its product, PA, is an early signaling molecule in 5-HT-induced pulmonary artery SMC proliferation. Signaling by PA produces its downstream effects primarily through the mTOR/S6K1 pathway and to a lesser extent through the ERK pathway. Hydrolysis of cell membrane lipid may be important in vascular effects of 5-HT.

  9. Immortalization of primary human smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Perez-Reyes, N; Halbert, C L; Smith, P P; Benditt, E P; McDougall, J K

    1992-01-01

    Primary human aortic and myometrial smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were immortalized using an amphotropic recombinant retroviral construct containing the E6 and E7 open reading frames (ORFs) of human papillomavirus type 16. The SMCs expressing the E6/E7 ORFs have considerably elevated growth rates when compared with nonimmortalized control cells and show no signs of senescence with long-term passage. The first SMC line derived in this study has been maintained in continuous tissue culture for greater than 1 year (greater than 180 population doublings). The immortalized SMCs have decreased cell size and decreased content of muscle-specific alpha-actin filaments as determined by indirect immunofluorescence. Southern blot analysis has demonstrated the stable integration of the E6/E7 ORFs in the retrovirally infected cells, and radioimmunoprecipitation has confirmed the continued expression of the E6 and E7 genes. Cytogenetic studies of the SMC lines have revealed essentially diploid populations except for the myometrial clonal line, which became aneuploid at late passage (greater than 125 doublings). These cell lines were not tumorigenic in nude mice. Images PMID:1311088

  10. Grape seed procyanidin extract attenuates hypoxic pulmonary hypertension by inhibiting oxidative stress and pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells proliferation.

    PubMed

    Jin, Haifeng; Liu, Mingcheng; Zhang, Xin; Pan, Jinjin; Han, Jinzhen; Wang, Yudong; Lei, Haixin; Ding, Yanchun; Yuan, Yuhui

    2016-10-01

    Hypoxia-induced oxidative stress and excessive proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) play important roles in the pathological process of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (HPH). Grape seed procyanidin extract (GSPE) possesses antioxidant properties and has beneficial effects on the cardiovascular system. However, the effect of GSPE on HPH remains unclear. In this study, adult Sprague-Dawley rats were exposed to intermittent chronic hypoxia for 4 weeks to mimic a severe HPH condition. Hemodynamic and pulmonary pathomorphology data showed that chronic hypoxia significantly increased right ventricular systolic pressures (RVSP), weight of the right ventricle/left ventricle plus septum (RV/LV+S) ratio and median width of pulmonary arteries. GSPE attenuated the elevation of RVSP, RV/LV+S, and reduced the pulmonary vascular structure remodeling. GSPE also increased the levels of SOD and reduced the levels of MDA in hypoxia-induced HPH model. In addition, GSPE suppressed Nox4 mRNA levels, ROS production and PASMCs proliferation. Meanwhile, increased expression of phospho-STAT3, cyclin D1, cyclin D3 and Ki67 in PASMCs caused by hypoxia was down-regulated by GSPE. These results suggested that GSPE might potentially prevent HPH via antioxidant and antiproliferative mechanisms. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  11. Rat pulmonary arterial smooth muscle myosin light chain kinase and phosphatase activities decrease with age.

    PubMed

    Belik, J; Kerc, Ewa; Pato, Mary D

    2006-03-01

    We and others have shown that the fetal pulmonary arterial smooth muscle potential for contraction and relaxation is significantly reduced compared with the adult. Whether these developmental changes relate to age differences in the expression and/or activity of key enzymes regulating the smooth muscle mechanical properties has not been previously evaluated. Therefore, we studied the catalytic activities and expression of myosin light chain kinase (MLCK) and myosin light chain phosphatase (MLCP) catalytic (PP1cdelta) and regulatory (MYPT) subunits in late fetal, early newborn, and adult rat intrapulmonary arterial tissues. In keeping with the greater force development and relaxation of adult pulmonary artery, Western blot analysis showed that the MLCK, MYPT, and PP1cdelta contents increased significantly with age and were highest in the adult rat. In contrast, their specific activities (activity/enzyme content) were significantly higher in the fetal compared with the adult tissue. The fetal and newborn pulmonary arterial muscle relaxant response to the Rho-kinase inhibitor Y-27632 was greater than the adult tissue. In addition to the 130-kDa isoform of MLCK, we documented the presence of minor higher-molecular-weight embryonic isoforms in the fetus and newborn. During fetal life, the lung pulmonary arterial MLCK- and MLCP-specific activities are highest and appear to be related to Rho-kinase activation during lung morphogenesis.

  12. Pulmonary surfactant in the airway physiology: a direct relaxing effect on the smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Calkovska, A; Uhliarova, B; Joskova, M; Franova, S; Kolomaznik, M; Calkovsky, V; Smolarova, S

    2015-04-01

    Beside alveoli, surface active material plays an important role in the airway physiology. In the upper airways it primarily serves in local defense. Lower airway surfactant stabilizes peripheral airways, provides the transport and defense, has barrier and anti-edematous functions, and possesses direct relaxant effect on the smooth muscle. We tested in vitro the effect of two surfactant preparations Curosurf® and Alveofact® on the precontracted smooth muscle of intra- and extra-pulmonary airways. Relaxation was more pronounced for lung tissue strip containing bronchial smooth muscle as the primary site of surfactant effect. The study does not confirm the participation of ATP-dependent potassium channels and cAMP-regulated epithelial chloride channels known as CFTR chloride channels, or nitric oxide involvement in contractile response of smooth muscle to surfactant.By controlling wall thickness and airway diameter, pulmonary surfactant is an important component of airway physiology. Thus, surfactant dysfunction may be included in pathophysiology of asthma, COPD, or other diseases with bronchial obstruction.

  13. Insulin-like growth factor I stimulates elastin synthesis by bovine pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Badesch, D B; Lee, P D; Parks, W C; Stenmark, K R

    1989-04-14

    Insulin-like growth factor I stimulates mitogenesis in smooth muscle cells, and upregulates elastin synthesis in embryonic aortic tissue. Increased smooth muscle elastin synthesis may play an important role in vascular remodeling in chronic pulmonary hypertension. Therefore, we studied the effect of IGF-I on elastin and total protein synthesis by pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells in vitro. Tropoelastin synthesis was measured by enzyme immunoassay, and total protein synthesis was measured by [3H]-leucine incorporation. In addition, the steady-state levels of tropoelastin mRNA were determined by slot blot hybridization. Incubation of confluent cultures with various concentrations of IGF-I resulted in a dose-dependent stimulation of elastin synthesis, with a 2.4-fold increase over control levels at 1000 ng/ml of IGF. The increase in elastin synthesis was reflected by a stimulation of the steady-state levels of tropoelastin mRNA. We conclude that IGF-I has potent elastogenic effects on vascular smooth muscle cells, and speculate that it may contribute to vascular wall remodeling in chronic hypertension.

  14. [Primary culture and functional identification of distal pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells in mice].

    PubMed

    Li, M C; Chen, Y Q; Zhang, C T; Jiang, Q; Lu, W J; Wang, J

    2017-02-12

    Objective: To establish a method of isolation and primary culture of mice distal pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) and identify the functional properties. Methods: PASMCs were harvested from the distal pulmonary artery (PA) tissue of mice by enzymatic digestion of collagenaseⅠand papain; and the growth characteristics were observed under inverted microscope and identified by Immunofluorescence technique. Effects on the intracellular calcium ion concentration of distal PASMCs were detected by Fura-2-AM fluorescent probe tracer under a fluorescence microscope in Krebs solution containing clopiazonic acid (CPA) and nifedipin (Nif). Results: PASMCs density reached approximately to 80% in a typical valley-peak-like shape after 6 days. Cell α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) immunofluorescence identified that 95% of the cultured cells were PASMCs. More than 95% PASMCs responded well to calcium-potassium Krebs solution (potassium ion concentration of 60 mmol/L) and showed a rapid increase in basal [Ca(2+) ](i) after 1 minute's perfusion (Δ[Ca(2+) ](i)>50), which demonstrated that the voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCC) of distal PASMCs were in good function; after the perfusion of calcium Krebs, calcium-free/calcium-Krebs containing CPA and Nif, distal PASMCs showed two typical peaks, indicated the full function of store-operated calcium channel (SOCC) in distal PASMCs. Conclusion: This experiment successfully established a stable and reliable mice distal PASMCs model and the study of pulmonary vascular diseases could benefit from its higher purity and better functional condition.

  15. IL-22 activates oxidant signaling in pulmonary vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Bansal, Geetanjali; Das, Dividutta; Hsieh, Cheng-Ying; Wang, Yi-Hsuan; Gilmore, Brent A; Wong, Chi-Ming; Suzuki, Yuichiro J

    2013-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediate cell-signaling processes in response to various ligands and play important roles in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases. The present study reports that interleukin-22 (IL-22) elicits signal transduction in vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) through a ROS-dependent mechanism. We find that pulmonary artery SMCs express IL-22 receptor alpha 1 and that IL-22 activates STAT3 through this receptor. IL-22-induced signaling is found to be mediated by NADPH oxidase, as indicated by the observations that the inhibition and siRNA knock-down of this enzyme inhibit IL-22 signaling. IL-22 triggers the oxidative modifications of proteins through protein carbonylation and protein glutathionylation. Mass spectrometry identified some proteins that are carbonylated in response to IL-22 stimulation, including α-enolase, heat shock cognate 71kDa protein, mitochondrial 60kDa heat shock protein, and cytoplasmic 2 actin and determined that α-tubulin is glutathionylated. Protein glutathionylation and STAT3 phosphorylation are enhanced by the siRNA knock-down of glutaredoxin, while IL-22-mediated STAT3 phosphorylation is suppressed by knocking down thioredoxin interacting protein, an inhibitor of thioredoxin. IL-22 is also found to promote the growth of SMCs via NADPH oxidase. In rats, pulmonary hypertension is found to be associated with increased smooth muscle IL-22 expression. These results show that IL-22 promotes the growth of pulmonary vascular SMCs via a signaling mechanism that involves NADPH oxidase-dependent oxidation.

  16. Up-regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 subunit Raptor by aldosterone induces abnormal pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell survival patterns to promote pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Aghamohammadzadeh, Reza; Zhang, Ying-Yi; Stephens, Thomas E; Arons, Elena; Zaman, Paula; Polach, Kevin J; Matar, Majed; Yung, Lai-Ming; Yu, Paul B; Bowman, Frederick P; Opotowsky, Alexander R; Waxman, Aaron B; Loscalzo, Joseph; Leopold, Jane A; Maron, Bradley A

    2016-07-01

    Activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) subunit Raptor induces cell growth and is a downstream target of Akt. Elevated levels of aldosterone activate Akt, and, in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), correlate with pulmonary arteriole thickening, which suggests that mTORC1 regulation by aldosterone may mediate adverse pulmonary vascular remodeling. We hypothesized that aldosterone-Raptor signaling induces abnormal pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) survival patterns to promote PAH. Remodeled pulmonary arterioles from SU-5416/hypoxia-PAH rats and monocrotaline-PAH rats with hyperaldosteronism expressed increased levels of the Raptor target, p70S6K, which provided a basis for investigating aldosterone-Raptor signaling in human PASMCs. Aldosterone (10(-9) to 10(-7) M) increased Akt/mTOR/Raptor to activate p70S6K and increase proliferation, viability, and apoptosis resistance in PASMCs. In PASMCs transfected with Raptor-small interfering RNA or treated with spironolactone/eplerenone, aldosterone or pulmonary arterial plasma from patients with PAH failed to increase p70S6K activation or to induce cell survival in vitro Optimal inhibition of pulmonary arteriole Raptor was achieved by treatment with Staramine-monomethoxy polyethylene glycol that was formulated with Raptor-small interfering RNA plus spironolactone in vivo, which decreased arteriole muscularization and pulmonary hypertension in 2 experimental animal models of PAH in vivo Up-regulation of mTORC1 by aldosterone is a critical pathobiologic mechanism that controls PASMC survival to promote hypertrophic vascular remodeling and PAH.-Aghamohammadzadeh, R., Zhang, Y.-Y., Stephens, T. E., Arons, E., Zaman, P., Polach, K. J., Matar, M., Yung, L.-M., Yu, P. B., Bowman, F. P., Opotowsky, A. R., Waxman, A. B., Loscalzo, J., Leopold, J. A., Maron, B. A. Up-regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 subunit Raptor by aldosterone induces abnormal pulmonary artery smooth

  17. Transdifferentiation of pulmonary arteriolar endothelial cells into smooth muscle-like cells regulated by myocardin involved in hypoxia-induced pulmonary vascular remodelling

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Pengcheng; Huang, Lei; Ge, Xiaona; Yan, Fei; Wu, Renliang; Ao, Qilin

    2006-01-01

    Myocardin gene has been identified as a master regulator of smooth muscle cell differentiation. Smooth muscle cells play a critical role in the pathogenesis of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension (PH) and pulmonary vascular remodelling (PVR). The purpose of this study was to investigate the change of myocardin gene expression in the pulmonary vessels of hypoxia-induced PH affected by Sildenafil treatment and the involvement of endothelial cells transdifferentiation into smooth muscle cells in the process of hypoxia-induced PH and PVR. Myocardin and relative markers were investigated in animal models and cultured endothelial cells. Mean pulmonary artery pressure (mPAP) was measured. Immunohistochemistry and immunofluorescence were used to show the expression of smooth muscle α-actin (SMA), in situ hybridization (ISH) and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) were performed respectively to detect the myocardin and SMA expression at mRNA levels. Small interfering RNA (siRNA) induced suppression of myocardin in cultured cells. We confirmed that hypoxia induced the PH and PVR in rats. Sildenafil could attenuate the hypoxia-induced PH. We found that myocardin mRNA expression is upregulated significantly in the hypoxic pulmonary vessels and cultured cells but downregulated in PH with Sildenafil treatment. The porcine pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAECs) transdifferentiate into smooth muscle-like cells in hypoxic culture while the transdifferentiation did not occur when SiRNA of myocardin was applied. Our results suggest that myocardin gene, as a marker of smooth muscle cell differentiation, was expressed in the pulmonary vessels in hypoxia-induced PH rats, which could be downregulated by Sildenafil treatment, as well as in hypoxic cultured endothelial cells. Hypoxia induced the transdifferentiation of endothelial cells of vessels into smooth muscle-like cells which was regulated by myocardin. PMID:17222214

  18. Diurnal Variations in Human Pulmonary Function

    PubMed Central

    Medarov, Boris I.; Pavlov, Valentin A.; Rossoff, Leonard

    2008-01-01

    Pulmonary function has circadian modulations. Variations in human pulmonary function during the daytime hours (diurnal variations) remain to be well characterized. Discerning these variations will contribute to better understanding the relationship between biorhythms and lung physiology and to improving clinical management of pulmonary diseases. The aim of this study was to determine the magnitude of pulmonary function variability during the usual daytime hours in a population of patients referred for pulmonary function testing. Diurnal fluctuations of human pulmonary function were examined by studying retrospectively a study population of 4,756 individuals with performed pulmonary function tests. We found the lowest and highest spirometric values in the 12:00–12:59 pm and 3:00–4:59 pm time intervals respectively. The difference in the forced expiratory volume in 1 second (FEV1) between the noon (12:00–12:59 pm) and afternoon (4:00–4:59 pm) intervals was 17.6% (P<0.01). Furthermore, the highest values of diffusing capacity of the lung for carbon monoxide [DLCO] and alveolar volume [Va] were identified in the 8:00–8:59 am time interval. These findings, identifying a model of diurnal variations of pulmonary function in individuals referred for pulmonary function testing, are of interest for better understanding lung physiology and human circadian rhythms and may have clinical value in managing lung disorders. PMID:19079662

  19. Pulmonary neuroendocrine cells, airway innervation, and smooth muscle are altered in Cftr null mice.

    PubMed

    Pan, Jie; Luk, Catherine; Kent, Geraldine; Cutz, Ernest; Yeger, Herman

    2006-09-01

    The amine- and peptide-producing pulmonary neuroendocrine cells (PNEC) are widely distributed within the airway mucosa of mammalian lung as solitary cells and innervated clusters, neuroepithelial bodies (NEB), which function as airway O2 sensors. These cells express Cftr and hence could play a role in the pathophysiology of cystic fibrosis (CF) lung disease. We performed confocal microscopy and morphometric analysis on lung sections from Cftr-/- (null), Cftr+/+, and Cftr+/- (control) mice at developmental stages E20, P5, P9, and P30 to determine the distribution, frequency, and innervation of PNEC/NEB, innervation and cell mass of airway smooth muscle, and neuromuscular junctions using synaptic vesicle protein 2, smooth muscle actin, and synaptophysin markers, respectively. The mean number of PNEC/NEB in Cftr-/- mice was significantly reduced compared with control mice at E20, whereas comparable or increased numbers were observed postnatally. NEB cells in Cftr null mice showed a significant reduction in intracorpuscular nerve endings compared with control mice, which is consistent with an intrinsic abnormality of the PNEC system. The airways of Cftr-/- mice showed reduced density (approximately 20-30%) of smooth muscle innervation, decreased mean airway smooth muscle mass (approximately 35%), and reduced density (approximately 20%) of nerve endings compared with control mice. We conclude that the airways of Cftr-/- mice exhibit heretofore unappreciated structural alterations affecting cellular and neural components of the PNEC system and airway smooth muscle and its innervation resulting in blunted O2 sensing and reduced airway tonus. Cftr could play a role in the development of the PNEC system, lung innervation, and airway smooth muscle.

  20. Vasoconstrictor effect of endothelin-1 on hypertensive pulmonary arterial smooth muscle involves Rho-kinase and protein kinase C.

    PubMed

    Barman, Scott A

    2007-08-01

    Although one of the common characteristics of pulmonary hypertension is abnormal sustained vasoconstriction, the signaling pathways that mediate this heightened pulmonary vascular response are still not well defined. Protein kinase C (PKC) and Rho-kinase are regulators of smooth muscle contraction induced by G protein-coupled receptor agonists including endothelin-1 (ET-1), which has been implicated as a signaling pathway in pulmonary hypertension. Toward this end, it was hypothesized that both Rho-kinase and PKC mediate the pulmonary vascular response to ET-1 in hypertensive pulmonary arterial smooth muscle, and therefore, the purpose of this study was to determine the role of PKC and Rho-kinase signaling in ET-1-induced vasoconstriction in both normotensive (Sprague-Dawley) and hypertensive (Fawn-Hooded) rat pulmonary arterial smooth muscle. Results indicate that ET-1 caused greater vasoconstriction in hypertensive pulmonary arteries compared with the normal vessels, and treatment with the PKC antagonists chelerythrine, rottlerin, and Gö 6983 inhibited the vasoconstrictor response to ET-1 in the hypertensive vessels. In addition, the specific Rho-kinase inhibitor Y-27632 significantly attenuated the effect of ET-1 in both normotensive and hypertensive phenotypes, with greater inhibition occurring in the hypertensive arteries. Furthermore, Western blot analysis revealed that ET-1 increased RhoA expression in both normotensive and hypertensive pulmonary arteries, with expression being greater in the hypertensive state. These results suggest that both PKC and Rho/Rho-kinase mediate the heightened pulmonary vascular response to ET-1 in hypertensive pulmonary arterial smooth muscle.

  1. Smooth Muscle Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Mediates Hypoxia-Induced Pulmonary Hypertension in Neonatal Mice.

    PubMed

    Sun, Miranda; Ramchandran, Ramaswamy; Chen, Jiwang; Yang, Qiwei; Raj, J Usha

    2016-12-01

    Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-1 is a potent mitogen of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs), but its role in pulmonary vascular remodeling associated with pulmonary hypertension (PH) is not clear. In an earlier study, we implicated IGF-1 in the pathogenesis of hypoxia-induced PH in neonatal mice. In this study, we hypothesized that hypoxia-induced up-regulation of IGF-1 in vascular smooth muscle is directly responsible for pulmonary vascular remodeling and PH. We studied neonatal and adult mice with smooth muscle-specific deletion of IGF-1 and also used an inhibitor of IGF-1 receptor (IGF-1R), OSI-906, in neonatal mice. We found that, in neonatal mice, SMC-specific deletion of IGF-1 or IGF-1R inhibition with OSI-906 attenuated hypoxia-induced pulmonary vascular remodeling in small arteries, right ventricular hypertrophy, and right ventricular systolic pressure. Pulmonary arterial SMCs from IGF-1-deleted mice or after OSI-906 treatment exhibited reduced proliferative potential. However, in adult mice, smooth muscle-specific deletion of IGF-1 had no effect on hypoxia-induced PH. Our data suggest that vascular smooth muscle-derived IGF-1 plays a critical role in hypoxia-induced PH in neonatal mice but not in adult mice. We speculate that the IGF-1/IGF-1R axis is important in pathogenesis of PH in the developing lung and may be amenable to therapeutic manipulation in this age group.

  2. Toward therapeutic pulmonary alveolar regeneration in humans.

    PubMed

    Massaro, Donald; Massaro, Gloria Decarlo

    2006-11-01

    In humans, age results in loss of pulmonary alveoli; menopause accelerates loss of diffusing capacity, an index of alveolar surface area; and disease (e.g., chronic obstructive pulmonary disease) results in loss of alveoli. Thus, an important goal for investigators is to generate knowledge that allows induction of pulmonary alveolar regeneration in humans. Our enthusiasm for this goal and our assessment of its feasibility are based on work in several laboratories over the last decade that has disproved the notion that pulmonary alveoli are incapable of regeneration, and on the growing evidence that signals that regulate programs of alveolar turnover (loss and regeneration) are conserved from rodents to humans. We review animal models of alveolar loss and regeneration and their conservation during evolution, and hence their relevance to humans.

  3. Loss of smooth muscle cell hypoxia inducible factor-1α underlies increased vascular contractility in pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Barnes, Elizabeth A; Chen, Chih-Hsin; Sedan, Oshra; Cornfield, David N

    2017-02-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is an often fatal disease with limited treatment options. Whereas current data support the notion that, in pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAECs), expression of transcription factor hypoxia inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) is increased, the role of HIF-1α in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) remains controversial. This study investigates the hypothesis that, in PASMCs from patients with PAH, decreases in HIF-1α expression and activity underlie augmented pulmonary vascular contractility. PASMCs and tissues were isolated from nonhypertensive control patients and patients with PAH. Compared with controls, HIF-1α and Kv1.5 protein expression were decreased in PAH smooth muscle cells (primary culture). Myosin light chain (MLC) phosphorylation and MLC kinase (MLCK) activity-major determinants of vascular tone-were increased in patients with PAH. Cofactors involved in prolyl hydroxylase domain activity were increased in PAH smooth muscle cells. Functionally, PASMC contractility was inversely correlated with HIF-1α activity. In PASMCs derived from patients with PAH, HIF-1α expression is decreased, and MLCK activity, MLC phosphorylation, and cell contraction are increased. We conclude that compromised PASMC HIF-1α expression may contribute to the increased tone that characterizes pulmonary hypertension.-Barnes, E. A., Chen, C.-H., Sedan, O., Cornfield, D. N. Loss of smooth muscle cell hypoxia inducible factor-1α underlies increased vascular contractility in pulmonary hypertension.

  4. PDGF induces SphK1 expression via Egr-1 to promote pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Sysol, Justin R; Natarajan, Viswanathan; Machado, Roberto F

    2016-06-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive, life-threatening disease for which there is currently no curative treatment available. Pathologic changes in this disease involve remodeling of the pulmonary vasculature, including marked proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). Recently, the bioactive lipid sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and its activating kinase, sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1), have been shown to be upregulated in PAH and promote PASMC proliferation. The mechanisms regulating the transcriptional upregulation of SphK1 in PASMCs are unknown. In this study, we investigated the role of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF), a PAH-relevant stimuli associated with enhanced PASMC proliferation, on SphK1 expression regulation. In human PASMCs (hPASMCs), PDGF significantly increased SphK1 mRNA and protein expression and induced cell proliferation. Selective inhibition of SphK1 attenuated PDGF-induced hPASMC proliferation. In silico promoter analysis for SphK1 identified several binding sites for early growth response protein 1 (Egr-1), a PDGF-associated transcription factor. Luciferase assays demonstrated that PDGF activates the SphK1 promoter in hPASMCs, and truncation of the 5'-promoter reduced PDGF-induced SphK1 expression. Stimulation of hPASMCs with PDGF induced Egr-1 protein expression, and direct binding of Egr-1 to the SphK1 promoter was confirmed by chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis. Inhibition of ERK signaling prevented induction of Egr-1 by PDGF. Silencing of Egr-1 attenuated PDGF-induced SphK1 expression and hPASMC proliferation. These studies demonstrate that SphK1 is regulated by PDGF in hPASMCs via the transcription factor Egr-1, promoting cell proliferation. This novel mechanism of SphK1 regulation may be a therapeutic target in pulmonary vascular remodeling in PAH.

  5. Phagocytosis and cytokine response to rough and smooth colony variants of Mycobacterium abscessus by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells.

    PubMed

    Jönsson, Bodil; Ridell, Malin; Wold, Agnes E

    2013-01-01

    Mycobacterium abscessus is a non-tuberculous mycobacteria able to cause opportunistic infections in selected patient groups. During the last decades it has emerged as a cause of chronic pulmonary infection in patients with cystic fibrosis (CF). M. abscessus strains exhibit either smooth or rough colony morphology. Strains exhibiting the rough phenotype more often cause pulmonary infections in CF patients than did the smooth ones. Here, we examined phagocytosis and production of cytokines by human peripheral blood mononuclear cells, in response to M. abscessus strains with smooth and rough colony phenotype. The rough isolates all formed multicellular cords, similar to what is observed in Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Monocytes were generally unable to internalize these rough cord isolates, in contrast with the smooth ones. Furthermore, the rough M. abscessus strains induced a distinct cytokine profile differing from that induced by the smooth ones. Rough isolates induced significantly less IL-10 and tumour necrosis factor compared to smooth strains, but more IL-1β. Both varieties induced equal amounts of IFN-γ, IL-17, IL-23, IL-6, IL-8 and equally little IL-12. The ability to withstand phagocytosis might be a virulence factor contributing to the capacity of rough M. abscessus strains to give persistent pulmonary infections. © 2012 The Authors APMIS © 2012 APMIS.

  6. Comparative capacitative calcium entry mechanisms in canine pulmonary and renal arterial smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Wilson, Sean M; Mason, Helen S; Smith, Gregory D; Nicholson, Neil; Johnston, Louise; Janiak, Robert; Hume, Joseph R

    2002-01-01

    Experiments were performed to determine whether capacitative Ca2+ entry (CCE) can be activated in canine pulmonary and renal arterial smooth muscle cells (ASMCs) and whether activation of CCE parallels the different functional structure of the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) in these two cell types. The cytosolic [Ca2+] was measured by imaging fura-2-loaded individual cells. Increases in the cytosolic [Ca2+] due to store depletion in pulmonary ASMCs required simultaneous depletion of both the inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (InsP3)- and ryanodine (RY)-sensitive SR Ca2+ stores. In contrast, the cytosolic [Ca2+] rises in renal ASMCs occurred when the SR stores were depleted through either the InsP3 or RY pathways. The increase in the cytosolic [Ca2+] due to store depletion in both pulmonary and renal ASMCs was present in cells that were voltage clamped and was abolished when cells were perfused with a Ca2+-free bathing solution. Rapid quenching of the fura-2 signal by 100 μM Mn2+ following SR store depletion indicated that extracellular Ca2+ entry increased in both cell types and also verified that activation of CCE in pulmonary ASMCs required the simultaneous depletion of the InsP3- and RY-sensitive SR Ca2+ stores, while CCE could be activated in renal ASMCs by the depletion of either of the InsP3- or RY-sensitive SR stores. Store depletion Ca2+ entry in both pulmonary and renal ASMCs was strongly inhibited by Ni2+ (0.1–10 mM), slightly inhibited by Cd2+ (200–500 μM), but was not significantly affected by the voltage-gated Ca2+ channel (VGCC) blocker nisoldipine (10 μM). The non-selective cation channel blocker Gd3+ (100 μM) inhibited a portion of the Ca2+ entry in 6 of 18 renal but not pulmonary ASMCs. These results provide evidence that SR Ca2+ store depletion activates CCE in parallel with the organization of intracellular Ca2+ stores in canine pulmonary and renal ASMCs. PMID:12231648

  7. Periostin mediates cigarette smoke extract-induced proliferation and migration in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiao-Dong; Li, Fang; Ma, Dong-Bo; Deng, Xiang; Zhang, Hui; Gao, Jia; Hao, Li; Liu, Dan-Dan; Wang, Jing

    2016-10-01

    Cigarette smoking is an important risk factor for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) play a critical role in the pathogenesis of PAH-associated arterial remodeling. This study was done to explore the expression and biological roles of periostin in PASMCs following exposure to cigarette smoke extract (CSE). PASMCs were exposed to different concentrations of CSE and tested for gene expression and reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. PASMCs were incubated with recombinant periostin protein or transfected with small interfering RNA targeting periostin before CSE exposure and then examined for cell proliferation and migration. Compared to control cells, exposure to CSE led to a significant upregulation of periostin. Pretreatment with 5mM N-acetyl-l-cysteine (an inhibitor of ROS formation) or 10μM U0126 (an inhibitor of ERK1/2) significantly prevented the induction of periostin in CSE-treated PASMCs. The addition of recombinant periostin protein significantly enhanced the proliferation and migration of PASMCs. In contrast, knockdown of endogenous periostin counteracted the proliferation and migration of PASMCs induced by CSE treatment. In conclusion, CSE induces the expression of periostin in PASMCs via promotion of ROS and activation of ERK1/2. Periostin mediates the effects of CSE on PASMC proliferation and migration. These findings warrant further exploration of the roles of periostin in cigarette smoking-associated pulmonary arterial remodeling.

  8. Cigarette smoke extract stimulates rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation via PKC-PDGFB signaling.

    PubMed

    Xing, Ai-ping; Du, Yong-cheng; Hu, Xiao-yun; Xu, Jian-ying; Zhang, Huan-ping; Li, Yi; Nie, Xin

    2012-01-01

    Accumulating evidence suggests a direct role for cigarette smoke in pulmonary vascular remodeling, which contributes to the development of pulmonary hypertension. However, the molecular mechanisms underlying this process remain poorly understood. Platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) is a potential mitogen and chemoattractant implicated in several biological processes, including cell survival, proliferation, and migration. In this study, we investigated the effect of cigarette smoke extract (CSE) on cell proliferation of rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (rPASMCs). We found that stimulation of rPASMCs with CSE significantly increased cell proliferation and promoted cell cycle progression from G1 phase to the S and G2 phases. CSE treatment also significantly upregulated the mRNA and protein levels of PDGFB and PDGFRβ. Our study also revealed that Rottlerin, an inhibitor of PKCδ signaling, prevented CSE-induced cell proliferation, attenuated the increase of S and G2 phase populations induced by CSE treatment, and downregulated PDGFB and PDGFRβ mRNA and protein levels in rPASMCs exposed to CSE. Collectively, our data demonstrated that CSE-induced cell proliferation of rPASMCs involved upregulation of the PKCδ-PDGFB pathway.

  9. Pulmonary oedema following exercise in humans.

    PubMed

    Hodges, Alastair N H; Mayo, John R; McKenzie, Donald C

    2006-01-01

    Pulmonary physiologists have documented many transient changes in the lung and the respiratory system during and following exercise, including the incomplete oxygen saturation of arterial blood in some subjects, possibly due to transient pulmonary oedema. The large increase in pulmonary arterial pressure during exercise, leading to either increased pulmonary capillary leakage and/or pulmonary capillary stress failure, is likely to be responsible for any increase in extravascular lung water during exercise. The purpose of this article is to summarise the studies to date that have specifically examined lung water following exercise. A limited number of studies have been completed with the specific purpose of identifying pulmonary oedema following exercise or a similar intervention. Of these, approximately 50% have observed a positive change and the remaining have provided results that are either inconclusive or show no change in extravascular lung water. While it is difficult to draw a firm conclusion from these studies, we believe that pulmonary oedema does occur in some humans following exercise. As such, this is a phenomenon of significance to pulmonary and exercise physiologists. This possibility warrants further study in the area with more precise measurement tools than has previously been undertaken.

  10. Molecular and functional significance of Ca2+-activated Cl− channels in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Forrest, Abigail S.; Ayon, Ramon J.; Wiwchar, Michael; Angermann, Jeff E.; Pritchard, Harry A. T.; Singer, Cherie A.; Valencik, Maria L.; Britton, Fiona; Greenwood, Iain A.

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Increased peripheral resistance of small distal pulmonary arteries is a hallmark signature of pulmonary hypertension (PH) and is believed to be the consequence of enhanced vasoconstriction to agonists, thickening of the arterial wall due to remodeling, and increased thrombosis. The elevation in arterial tone in PH is attributable, at least in part, to smooth muscle cells of PH patients being more depolarized and displaying higher intracellular Ca2+ levels than cells from normal subjects. It is now clear that downregulation of voltage-dependent K+ channels (e.g., Kv1.5) and increased expression and activity of voltage-dependent (Cav1.2) and voltage-independent (e.g., canonical and vanilloid transient receptor potential [TRPC and TRPV]) Ca2+ channels play an important role in the functional remodeling of pulmonary arteries in PH. This review focuses on an anion-permeable channel that is now considered a novel excitatory mechanism in the systemic and pulmonary circulations. It is permeable to Cl− and is activated by a rise in intracellular Ca2+ concentration (Ca2+-activated Cl− channel, or CaCC). The first section outlines the biophysical and pharmacological properties of the channel and ends with a description of the molecular candidate genes postulated to encode for CaCCs, with particular emphasis on the bestrophin and the newly discovered TMEM16 and anoctamin families of genes. The second section provides a review of the various sources of Ca2+ activating CaCCs, which include stimulation by mobilization from intracellular Ca2+ stores and Ca2+ entry through voltage-dependent and voltage-independent Ca2+ channels. The third and final section summarizes recent findings that suggest a potentially important role for CaCCs and the gene TMEM16A in PH. PMID:26064450

  11. [Electrophysiology and calcium signalling in human bronchial smooth muscle].

    PubMed

    Marthan, R; Hyvelin, J M; Roux, E; Savineau, J P

    1999-01-01

    Recently, cells isolated from airways have been used to characterize precisely the electrophysiological properties of this smooth muscle and to describe the changes in cytosolic calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) occurring upon agonist stimulation. Although most studies have produced consistent results in terms of types of ion channel and pathways of calcium signalling implicated in the mechanical activity of airways, there are differences according to (i) the site along the bronchial tree (trachea vs. bronchi); (ii) the proliferating status of the cells (freshly isolated vs. cultured) and (iii) the species (human vs. animals). With regard to the electrophysiological properties of airway smooth muscle, the contribution to [Ca2+]i rise of Ca2+ influx through L-type voltage-dependent calcium channels depends on the balance between depolarization related to non-specific cation channel and/or chloride channel activation and hyperpolarization related to activation of a variety of potassium channels. Most of the above-mentioned channels appear to be controlled, directly or indirectly, by agonists in human bronchial smooth muscle. With regard to calcium signalling, the pattern of agonist-induced [Ca2+]i responses, the so-called [Ca2+]i oscillations, has been observed recently in freshly isolated airway smooth muscle cells. The role and the calcium sources involved in these oscillations in human bronchial smooth muscle are currently being investigated.

  12. STARS knockout attenuates hypoxia-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension by suppressing pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Shi, Zhaoling; Wu, Huajie; Luo, Jianfeng; Sun, Xin

    2017-03-01

    STARS (STriated muscle Activator of Rho Signaling) is a sarcomeric protein, which expressed early in cardiac development and involved in pathological remodeling. Abundant evidence indicated that STARS could regulate cell proliferation, but it's exact function remains unclear. In this study, we aimed to investigate the role of STARS in the proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC) and the potential effect on the progression of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). In this study, we established a PAH mouse model through chronic hypoxia exposure as reflected by the increased RVSP and RVHI. Western blot and RT-qPCR detected the increased STARS protein and mRNA levels in PAH mice. Next, we cultured the primary PASMC from PAH mice. After STARS overexpression in PASMC, STARS, SRF and Egr-1 were up-regulated significantly. The MTT assay revealed an increase in cell proliferation. Flow cytometry showed a marked inhibition of cell apoptosis. However, STARS silence in PASMC exerted opposite effects with STARS overexpression. SRF siRNA transfection blocked the effects of STARS overexpression in PASMC. In order to further confirm the role of STARS in PAH mice in vivo, we exposed STARS knockout mice to hypoxia and found lower RVSP and RVHI in knockout mice as compared with controls. Our results not only suggest that STARS plays a crucial role in the development of PAH by increasing the proliferation of PASMC through activation of the SRF/Egr-1 pathway, but also provides a new mechanism for hypoxia-induced PAH. In addition, STARS may represent a potential treatment target.

  13. Inhibition of mitochondrial fission prevents hypoxia-induced metabolic shift and cellular proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Parra, Valentina; Bravo-Sagua, Roberto; Norambuena-Soto, Ignacio; Hernández-Fuentes, Carolina P; Gómez-Contreras, Andrés G; Verdejo, Hugo E; Mellado, Rosemarie; Chiong, Mario; Lavandero, Sergio; Castro, Pablo F

    2017-07-22

    Chronic hypoxia exacerbates proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC), thereby reducing the lumen of pulmonary arteries. This leads to poor blood oxygenation and cardiac work overload, which are the basis of diseases such as pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH). Recent studies revealed an emerging role of mitochondria in PAH pathogenesis, as key regulators of cell survival and metabolism. In this work, we assessed whether hypoxia-induced mitochondrial fragmentation contributes to the alterations of both PASMC death and proliferation. In previous work in cardiac myocytes, we showed that trimetazidine (TMZ), a partial inhibitor of lipid oxidation, stimulates mitochondrial fusion and preserves mitochondrial function. Thus, here we evaluated whether TMZ-induced mitochondrial fusion can prevent human PASMC proliferation in an in vitro hypoxic model. Using confocal fluorescence microscopy, we showed that prolonged hypoxia (48h) induces mitochondrial fragmentation along with higher levels of the mitochondrial fission protein DRP1. Concomitantly, both mitochondrial potential and respiratory rates decreased, indicative of mitochondrial dysfunction. In accordance with a metabolic shift towards non-mitochondrial ATP generation, mRNA levels of glycolytic markers HK2, PFKFB2 and GLUT1 increased during hypoxia. Incubation of PASMC with TMZ, prior to hypoxia, prevented all these changes and precluded the increase in PASMC proliferation. These findings were also observed using Mdivi-1 (a pharmacological DRP1 inhibitor) or a dominant negative DRP1 K38A as pre-treatments. Altogether, our data indicate that TMZ exerts a protective role against hypoxia-induced PASMC proliferation, by preserving mitochondrial function, thus highlighting DRP1-dependent morphology as a novel therapeutic approach for diseases such as PAH. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  14. Proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells in the development of ascites syndrome in broilers induced by low ambient temperature.

    PubMed

    Wang, J; Qiao, J; Zhao, L H; Li, K; Wang, H; Xu, T; Tian, Y; Gao, M; Wang, X

    2007-12-01

    Pulmonary vascular remodelling, mainly characterized by arterial medial thickening, is an important pathological feature of broiler ascites syndrome (AS). Since vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) form the major cellular component of arterial medial layer, we speculate that VSMC proliferation is one of the causes of pulmonary arterial medial thickening in ascitic broilers. Hence, the present study was designed to investigate the role of VSMC proliferation in pulmonary vascular remodelling in development of AS induced by low ambient temperature. Broilers in control group (22 +/- 1.5 degrees C) and low temperature group (11 +/- 2 degrees C) were sampled every week at 15-50 days of age. Proliferative indexes of VSMC in pulmonary arteries were assessed with proliferating cell nuclear antigen, and the relative medial thickness (RMT) and relative wall area (RWA), as indexes of pulmonary vascular remodelling, were examined by computer-image analysing system. The results showed that the high incidence (18.75%) of AS was induced by low temperature, and a significantly increased VSMC proliferation was observed in pulmonary arteries in the low temperature group at 22-50 days of age (P < 0.05). In addition, RMT and RWA in pulmonary arteries were significantly elevated in the low temperature group from 36 days of age (P < 0.05), indicating that pulmonary vascular remodelling occurred following VSMC proliferation in AS. Our data suggest that proliferation of VSMC may facilitate pulmonary vascular remodelling and have a pivotal role in AS induced by low ambient temperature.

  15. Membrane properties of smooth muscle cells in pulmonary arteries of the rat.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, H; Twarog, B M

    1982-05-01

    Electrical properties of the membrane of smooth muscle cells in the rat main pulmonary artery (MPA) and a small pulmonary artery (SPA) were compared. MPA and SPA differed in several important respects, suggesting characteristic quantitative and qualitative differences in membrane properties. 1) Resting membrane potentials were similar in both (MPA 52.2 +/- 1.3 mV; SPA 51.5 +/- 1.7 mV). The cells displayed no spontaneous electrical activity. The muscle layers in both MPA and SPA showed cablelike properties; a graded local response to outward current pulses was observed, but no action potentials were evoked. 2) Tetraethylammonium chloride (TEA, 1-5 mM) depolarized, increased membrane resistance, and suppressed rectification in MPA. TEA strongly depolarized SPA and contraction ensued. 3) The maximum membrane depolarization produced by a 10-fold increase in extracellular [K+] was 48 mV in MPA and 47 mV in SPA. In K+-free solution gradual depolarization was observed in SPA, but the membrane potential in MPA was not modified. Restoration of K+-containing solution produced equivalent hyperpolarization in both tissues, indicating a similar degree of stimulation of electrogenic Na+-K+ pumping. 4) A Na+-deficient solution did not affect the membrane potential in MPA but depolarized SPA.

  16. Inhibitory action of relaxin on human cervical smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Norström, A; Bryman, I; Wiqvist, N; Sahni, S; Lindblom, B

    1984-09-01

    The influence of purified porcine relaxin on contractility of human cervical smooth muscle was investigated in vitro. Strips of cervical tissue were obtained by needle biopsy from pregnant and nonpregnant women and were mounted in a superfused organ chamber for isometric measurement of contractile activity. Relaxin (0.005-25 micrograms/ml) inhibited the spontaneous contractions in cervical strips from 18% of nonpregnant, 68% of early pregnant, and in 100% of term pregnant women. These results indicate that relaxin has an inhibitory action on cervical smooth muscle and that this effect is more constantly detected as pregnancy proceeds.

  17. Up-regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 subunit Raptor by aldosterone induces abnormal pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell survival patterns to promote pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Aghamohammadzadeh, Reza; Zhang, Ying-Yi; Stephens, Thomas E.; Arons, Elena; Zaman, Paula; Polach, Kevin J.; Matar, Majed; Yung, Lai-Ming; Yu, Paul B.; Bowman, Frederick P.; Opotowsky, Alexander R.; Waxman, Aaron B.; Loscalzo, Joseph; Leopold, Jane A.; Maron, Bradley A.

    2016-01-01

    Activation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 (mTORC1) subunit Raptor induces cell growth and is a downstream target of Akt. Elevated levels of aldosterone activate Akt, and, in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), correlate with pulmonary arteriole thickening, which suggests that mTORC1 regulation by aldosterone may mediate adverse pulmonary vascular remodeling. We hypothesized that aldosterone-Raptor signaling induces abnormal pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) survival patterns to promote PAH. Remodeled pulmonary arterioles from SU-5416/hypoxia-PAH rats and monocrotaline-PAH rats with hyperaldosteronism expressed increased levels of the Raptor target, p70S6K, which provided a basis for investigating aldosterone-Raptor signaling in human PASMCs. Aldosterone (10−9 to 10−7 M) increased Akt/mTOR/Raptor to activate p70S6K and increase proliferation, viability, and apoptosis resistance in PASMCs. In PASMCs transfected with Raptor–small interfering RNA or treated with spironolactone/eplerenone, aldosterone or pulmonary arterial plasma from patients with PAH failed to increase p70S6K activation or to induce cell survival in vitro. Optimal inhibition of pulmonary arteriole Raptor was achieved by treatment with Staramine-monomethoxy polyethylene glycol that was formulated with Raptor-small interfering RNA plus spironolactone in vivo, which decreased arteriole muscularization and pulmonary hypertension in 2 experimental animal models of PAH in vivo. Up-regulation of mTORC1 by aldosterone is a critical pathobiologic mechanism that controls PASMC survival to promote hypertrophic vascular remodeling and PAH.—Aghamohammadzadeh, R., Zhang, Y.-Y., Stephens, T. E., Arons, E., Zaman, P., Polach, K. J., Matar, M., Yung, L.-M., Yu, P. B., Bowman, F. P., Opotowsky, A. R., Waxman, A. B., Loscalzo, J., Leopold, J. A., Maron, B. A. Up-regulation of the mammalian target of rapamycin complex 1 subunit Raptor by aldosterone induces abnormal pulmonary artery

  18. Calcium release by noradrenaline from central sarcoplasmic reticulum in rabbit main pulmonary artery smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Kowarski, D; Shuman, H; Somlyo, A P; Somlyo, A V

    1985-01-01

    The subcellular composition of relaxed and noradrenaline-contracted rabbit main pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells was measured by electron probe X-ray microanalysis of cryosections of rapidly frozen tissue. Some of the preparations were made permeable with saponin and exposed to a known free Ca ion concentration, rapidly frozen, freeze-substituted, and also analysed by electron probe X-ray microanalysis. 98% of intracellular K could be replaced by Rb. This was done to remove the K peak that partially overlaps the Ca peak in the X-ray spectra. The final [Rb]i plus residual [K]i was not significantly different from the [K]i of normal tissue. The [Ca]i in Rb-containing tissue was not significantly different from the [Ca]i in normal, K-containing tissue. Non-mitochondrial micro-regions containing high [Ca] (up to 33 mmol/kg dry wt.) were found at sites 200 nm or more away from the plasma membrane. These micro-regions also contained high [P]. We consider the identification of these regions containing high [Ca] as sarcoplasmic reticulum (s.r.), validated by: (a) conventional electron micrographs that show no other structures in main pulmonary artery smooth muscle in sufficient quantity and location to account for the frequency of these regions, (b) the previous localization of strontium, a functional calcium analogue, in the central s.r. in these smooth muscles (Somlyo & Somlyo, 1971 a), (c) the present demonstration that the central s.r. in this tissue can accumulate large amounts of calcium oxalate. The proportion of regions containing high [Ca] (greater than 12.0 mmol/kg dry wt.) was significantly higher in relaxed (35 of 330 measurements) than in the contracted (14 of 337) tissues (P less than 0.005), or 26 of 34 vs. 6 of 31 high [Ca] measurements in regions identified as s.r. through their high phosphorus content (P less than 0.006). This difference is thought to represent Ca release from the central s.r. There was no significant difference (P greater than 0

  19. Neutrophil Elastase Is Produced by Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle Cells and Is Linked to Neointimal Lesions

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Yu-Mee; Haghighat, Leila; Spiekerkoetter, Edda; Sawada, Hirofumi; Alvira, Cristina M.; Wang, Lingli; Acharya, Swati; Rodriguez-Colon, Gabriela; Orton, Andrew; Zhao, Mingming; Rabinovitch, Marlene

    2011-01-01

    Previously, we reported that murine gammaherpesvirus-68 (M1-MHV-68) induces pulmonary artery (PA) neointimal lesions in S100A4-overexpressing, but not in wild-type (C57), mice. Lesions were associated with heightened lung elastase activity and PA elastin degradation. We now investigate a direct relationship between elastase and PA neointimal lesions, the nature and source of the enzyme, and its presence in clinical disease. We found an association exists between the percentage of PAs with neointimal lesions and elastin fragmentation in S100A4 mice 6 months after viral infection. Confocal microscopy documented the heightened susceptibility of S100A4 versus C57 PA elastin to degradation by elastase. A transient increase in lung elastase activity occurs in S100A4 mice, 7 days after M1-MHV-68, unrelated to inflammation or viral load and before neointimal lesions. Administration of recombinant elafin, an elastase-specific inhibitor, ameliorates early increases in serine elastase and attenuates later development of neointimal lesions. Neutrophils are the source of elevated elastase (NE) in the S100A4 lung, and NE mRNA and protein levels are greater in PA smooth muscle cells (SMC) from S100A4 mice than from C57 mice. Furthermore, elevated NE is observed in cultured PA SMC from idiopathic PA hypertension versus that in control lungs and localizes to neointimal lesions. Thus, PA SMC produce NE, and heightened production and activity of NE is linked to experimental and clinical pulmonary vascular disease. PMID:21763677

  20. Serotonin passes through myoendothelial gap junctions to promote pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell differentiation.

    PubMed

    Gairhe, Salina; Bauer, Natalie N; Gebb, Sarah A; McMurtry, Ivan F

    2012-11-01

    Myoendothelial gap junctional signaling mediates pulmonary arterial endothelial cell (PAEC)-induced activation of latent TGF-β and differentiation of cocultured pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs), but the nature of the signal passing from PAECs to PASMCs through the gap junctions is unknown. Because PAECs but not PASMCs synthesize serotonin, and serotonin can pass through gap junctions, we hypothesized that the monoamine is the intercellular signal. We aimed to determine whether PAEC-derived serotonin mediates PAEC-induced myoendothelial gap junction-dependent activation of TGF-β signaling and differentiation of PASMCs. Rat PAECs and PASMCs were monocultured or cocultured with (touch) or without (no-touch) direct cell-cell contact. In all cases, tryptophan hydroxylase 1 (Tph1) transcripts were expressed predominantly in PAECs. Serotonin was detected by immunostaining in both PAECs and PASMCs in PAEC/PASMC touch coculture but was not found in PASMCs in either PAEC/PASMC no-touch coculture or in PASMC/PASMC touch coculture. Furthermore, inhibition of gap junctions but not of the serotonin transporter in PAEC/PASMC touch coculture prevented serotonin transfer from PAECs to PASMCs. Inhibition of serotonin synthesis pharmacologically or by small interfering RNAs to Tph1 in PAECs inhibited the PAEC-induced activation of TGF-β signaling and differentiation of PASMCs. We concluded that serotonin synthesized by PAECs is transferred through myoendothelial gap junctions into PASMCs, where it activates TGF-β signaling and induces a more differentiated phenotype. This finding suggests a novel role of gap junction-mediated intercellular serotonin signaling in regulation of PASMC phenotype.

  1. Rat alveolar myofibroblasts acquire alpha-smooth muscle actin expression during bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis.

    PubMed Central

    Vyalov, S. L.; Gabbiani, G.; Kapanci, Y.

    1993-01-01

    The majority of fibroblasts in alveolar septa are characterized by the presence of cytoplasmic bundles of microfilaments that contain cytoplasmic actin isoforms; these cells have been named contractile interstitial cells or V-type myofibroblasts. In the rat, they express desmin as intermediate filament protein. In this study, we explored the possibility that modulation and replication of such septal fibroblasts result in the appearance of alpha-smooth muscle (alpha-SM) actin-positive myofibroblasts, typical of lung fibrosis. Experimental pulmonary fibrosis was produced by a unique intratracheal instillation of bleomycin to 28 rats. Eight additional rats used as controls received the equivalent volume of saline. Paraffin and frozen sections of lungs were examined at days 1, 3, 5 and 7 after treatment. Microfilaments and intermediate filaments were stained using antibodies against total actin, alpha-SM actin, desmin, vimentin, keratin, and SM myosin. Electron microscopic labeling of desmin and alpha-SM actin using immunogold technique was done on Lowicryl K4M resin-embedded specimens. alpha-SM actin appeared in desmin-positive alveolar fibroblasts as early as 24 hours after intratracheal bleomycin instillation; the modulation of alpha-SM actin in these cells was preceded by a lymphomonocytic infiltration of alveolar septa. Twenty-four hours to 3 days after bleomycin administration, a proliferation of alveolar myofibroblasts occurred. Fibrosis with laying down of collagen fibers took place after the above mentioned cellular modifications. Our results support the view that septal fibroblastic cells can modulate into typical alpha-SM actin-containing myofibroblasts during experimental bleomycin-induced pulmonary fibrosis. In such a modulation a possible role of cytokines, particularly of transforming growth factor-beta, is considered. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 Figure 12 Figure 13 Figure 14

  2. Resveratrol reverses monocrotaline-induced pulmonary vascular and cardiac dysfunction: a potential role for atrogin-1 in smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Paffett, Michael L; Lucas, Selita N; Campen, Matthew J

    2012-01-01

    Arterial remodeling contributes to elevated pulmonary artery (PA) pressures and right ventricular hypertrophy seen in pulmonary hypertension (PH). Resveratrol, a sirtuin-1 (SIRT1) pathway activator, can prevent the development of PH in a commonly used animal model, but it is unclear whether it can reverse established PH pathophysiology. Furthermore, atrophic ubiquitin ligases, such as atrogin-1 and MuRF-1, are known to be induced by SIRT1 activators but have not been characterized in hypertrophic vascular disease. Therefore, we hypothesized that monocrotaline (MCT)-induced PH would attenuate atrophy pathways in the PA while, conversely, SIRT1 activation (resveratrol) would reverse indices of PH and restore atrophic gene expression. Thus, we injected Sprague-Dawley rats with MCT (50 mg/kg i.p.) or saline at Day 0, and then treated with oral resveratrol or sildenafil from days 28-42 post-MCT injection. Oral resveratrol attenuated established MCT-induced PH indices, including right ventricular systolic pressure, right ventricular hypertrophy, and medial thickening of intrapulmonary arteries. Resveratrol also normalized PA atrogin-1 mRNA expression, which was significantly reduced by MCT. In cultured human PA smooth muscle cells (hPASMC), resveratrol significantly inhibited PDGF-stimulated proliferation and cellular hypertrophy, which was also associated with improvements in atrogin-1 levels. In addition, SIRT1 inhibition augmented hPASMC proliferation, as assessed by DNA mass, and suppressed atrogin mRNA expression. These findings demonstrate an inverse relationship between indices of PH and PA atrogin expression that is SIRT1 dependent and may reflect a novel role for SIRT1 in PASMCs opposing cellular hypertrophy and proliferation. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Resveratrol Reverses Monocrotaline-Induced Pulmonary Vascular and Cardiac Dysfunction: A Potential Role for Atrogin-1 in Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Paffett, Michael L.; Lucas, Selita N.; Campen, Matthew J.

    2011-01-01

    Arterial remodeling contributes to the elevated pulmonary artery (PA) pressures and right ventricular hypertrophy seen in pulmonary hypertension (PH). Resveratrol, a sirtuin-1 (SIRT1) pathway activator, can prevent the development of PH in a commonly used animal model, but it is unclear whether it can reverse established PH pathophysiology. Furthermore, atrophic ubiquitin ligases, such as atrogin-1 and MuRF-1, are known to be induced by SIRT1 activators but have not been characterized in hypertrophic vascular disease. Therefore, we hypothesized that monocrotaline (MCT)-induced PH would attenuate atrophy pathways in the PA while, conversely, SIRT1 activation (resveratrol) would reverse indices of PH and restore atrophic gene expression. Thus, we injected Sprague-Dawley rats with MCT (50 mg/kg i.p.) or saline at Day 0, and then treated with oral resveratrol or sildenafil from days 28–42 post-MCT injection. Oral resveratrol attenuated established MCT-induced PH indices, including right ventricular systolic pressure, right ventricular hypertrophy, and medial thickening of intrapulmonary arteries. Resveratrol also normalized PA atrogin-1 mRNA expression, which was significantly reduced by MCT. In cultured human PA smooth muscle cells (hPASMC), resveratrol significantly inhibited PDGF-stimulated proliferation and cellular hypertrophy, which was also associated with improvements in atrogin-1 levels. In addition, SIRT1 inhibition augmented hPASMC proliferation, as assessed by DNA mass, and suppressed atrogin mRNA expression. These findings demonstrate an inverse relationship between indices of PH and PA atrogin expression that is SIRT1 dependent and may reflect a novel role for SIRT1 in PASMCs opposing cellular hypertrophy and proliferation. PMID:22146233

  4. Nuclear fusion-independent smooth muscle differentiation of human adipose-derived stem cells induced by a smooth muscle environment.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Rong; Jack, Gregory S; Rao, Nagesh; Zuk, Patricia; Ignarro, Louis J; Wu, Benjamin; Rodríguez, Larissa V

    2012-03-01

    Human adipose-derived stem cells hASC have been isolated and were shown to have multilineage differentiation capacity. Although both plasticity and cell fusion have been suggested as mechanisms for cell differentiation in vivo, the effect of the local in vivo environment on the differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells has not been evaluated. We previously reported the in vitro capacity of smooth muscle differentiation of these cells. In this study, we evaluate the effect of an in vivo smooth muscle environment in the differentiation of hASC. We studied this by two experimental designs: (a) in vivo evaluation of smooth muscle differentiation of hASC injected into a smooth muscle environment and (b) in vitro evaluation of smooth muscle differentiation capacity of hASC exposed to bladder smooth muscle cells. Our results indicate a time-dependent differentiation of hASC into mature smooth muscle cells when these cells are injected into the smooth musculature of the urinary bladder. Similar findings were seen when the cells were cocultured in vitro with primary bladder smooth muscle cells. Chromosomal analysis demonstrated that microenvironment cues rather than nuclear fusion are responsible for this differentiation. We conclude that cell plasticity is present in hASCs, and their differentiation is accomplished in the absence of nuclear fusion. Copyright © 2011 AlphaMed Press.

  5. Role of Na+-K+ ATPase in cyclic GMP-mediated relaxation of canine pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Tamaoki, J; Tagaya, E; Nishimura, K; Isono, K; Nagai, A

    1997-01-01

    Sodium-potassium adenosine triphosphatase (Na+-K+ ATPase) plays a role in the regulation of vascular tone, but contribution of this enzyme to nitrovasodilator-induced pulmonary vasodilatation remains uncertain. We thus studied the interaction between guanosine 3′:5′-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic GMP) and Na+-K+ ATPase in smooth muscle cells isolated from canine pulmonary artery. To assess the contractile properties, changes in smooth muscle cell length were determined microscopically. Application of potassium chloride (KCl) shortened the cell length, an effect which was reduced by sodium nitroprusside and 8-bromo-cyclic GMP in a concentration-dependent manner. Pretreatment of cells with the cyclic GMP-dependent kinase inhibitor KT 5823 (2 μM) abolished the effects of sodium nitroprusside and 8-bromo-cyclic GMP. Ouabain (0.3 μM) did not alter the KCl-induced muscle shortening, but inhibited the relaxant responses to sodium nitroprusside and 8-bromo-cyclic GMP. Incubation of smooth muscle cells with sodium nitroprusside concentration-dependently increased intracellular cyclic GMP levels and ouabain-sensitive 86Rb uptake, and these values were significantly correlated. In the presence of KT 5823, sodium nitroprusside increased cyclic GMP levels but did not alter ouabain-sensitive 86Rb uptake. These results suggest that there is a link between accumulation of intracellular cyclic GMP and activation of sarcolemmal Na+-K+ ATPase in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells and that this link may be involved in the sodium nitroprusside-induced pulmonary vasodilatation. PMID:9298536

  6. Cyclic Stretch Induces Inducible Nitric Oxide Synthase and Soluble Guanylate Cyclase in Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Monica R.; Wedgwood, Stephen; Czech, Lyubov; Kim, Gina A.; Lakshminrusimha, Satyan; Schumacker, Paul T.; Steinhorn, Robin H.; Farrow, Kathryn N.

    2013-01-01

    In the pulmonary vasculature, mechanical forces such as cyclic stretch induce changes in vascular signaling, tone and remodeling. Nitric oxide is a potent regulator of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), which drives cGMP production, causing vasorelaxation. Pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) express inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS), and while iNOS expression increases during late gestation, little is known about how cyclic stretch impacts this pathway. In this study, PASMC were subjected to cyclic stretch of 20% amplitude and frequency of 1 Hz for 24 h and compared to control cells maintained under static conditions. Cyclic stretch significantly increased cytosolic oxidative stress as compared to static cells (62.9 ± 5.9% vs. 33.3 ± 5.7% maximal oxidation), as measured by the intracellular redox sensor roGFP. Cyclic stretch also increased sGCβ protein expression (2.5 ± 0.9-fold), sGC activity (1.5 ± 0.2-fold) and cGMP levels (1.8 ± 0.2-fold), as well as iNOS mRNA and protein expression (3.0 ± 0.9 and 2.6 ± 0.7-fold, respectively) relative to control cells. An antioxidant, recombinant human superoxide dismutase (rhSOD), significantly decreased stretch-induced cytosolic oxidative stress, but did not block stretch-induced sGC activity. Inhibition of iNOS with 1400 W or an iNOS-specific siRNA inhibited stretch-induced sGC activity by 30% and 68% respectively vs. static controls. In conclusion, cyclic stretch increases sGC expression and activity in an iNOS-dependent manner in PASMC from fetal lambs. The mechanism that produces iNOS and sGC upregulation is not yet known, but we speculate these effects represent an early compensatory mechanism to counteract the effects of stretch-induced oxidative stress. A better understanding of the interplay between these two distinct pathways could provide key insights into future avenues to treat infants with pulmonary hypertension. PMID:23429274

  7. Crucial role of ROCK2 in vascular smooth muscle cells for hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension in mice.

    PubMed

    Shimizu, Toru; Fukumoto, Yoshihiro; Tanaka, Shin-Ichi; Satoh, Kimio; Ikeda, Shohei; Shimokawa, Hiroaki

    2013-12-01

    Rho/Rho-kinase (ROCK) pathway in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) plays an important role in the pathogenesis of cardiovascular diseases, including pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Rho-kinase has 2 isoforms, ROCK1 and ROCK2, with different functions in different cells; ROCK1 for circulating inflammatory cells and ROCK2 for the vasculature. In the present study, we aimed to examine whether ROCK2 in VSMC is involved in the pathogenesis of PAH. In patients with PAH, the expression of ROCK2 was increased in pulmonary arterial media and primary pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells when compared with controls. To investigate the role of ROCK2 in VSMC, we generated VSMC-specific heterozygous ROCK2-deficient (ROCK2(+/-)) mice and VSMC-specific ROCK2-overexpressing transgenic (ROCK2-Tg) mice. The extent of hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension was reduced in ROCK2(+/-) mice and was enhanced in ROCK2-Tg mice compared with respective littermates. The protein expression of ROCK activity and phosphorylated extracellular signal-regulated kinase and the number of Ki67-positive proliferating cells in the lung were reduced in ROCK2(+/-) mice and were increased in ROCK2-Tg mice compared with respective littermates. In cultured mouse aortic VSMC, migration and proliferation activities were reduced in ROCK2(+/-) mice, and migration activity was increased in ROCK2-Tg mice compared with respective littermates. In addition, in primary pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells from a patient with PAH, ROCK2 was required for migration and proliferation through ROCK and extracellular signal-regulated kinase activation. ROCK2 in VSMC contributes to the pathogenesis of PAH.

  8. Hypoxia promotes cell proliferation by modulating E2F1 in chicken pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we sought to investigate the expression of the transcription factor E2F1 in chicken pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells upon hypoxia exposure, as well as the role that E2F1 played in the regulation of cell proliferation. Isolated chicken pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells were subjected to hypoxia or normoxia for indicated time points. Cell viability, DNA synthesis, cell cycle profile, and expression of E2F1 were analyzed. The results showed that hypoxia promoted cell proliferation and DNA synthesis which was accompanied by an increased S phase entry and upregulation of E2F1 at mRNA and protein levels. Using siRNA technology, we demonstrated that gene inactivation of endogenous E2F1 abolished hypoxia-induced cell proliferation, DNA synthesis, and S phase entry compared with negative siRNA transfected cells. These results suggest that hypoxia-induced proliferation is mediated by inducing E2F1 in chicken pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells. PMID:23902684

  9. Oxidative stress-induced mitochondrial dysfunction drives inflammation and airway smooth muscle remodeling in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

    PubMed

    Wiegman, Coen H; Michaeloudes, Charalambos; Haji, Gulammehdi; Narang, Priyanka; Clarke, Colin J; Russell, Kirsty E; Bao, Wuping; Pavlidis, Stelios; Barnes, Peter J; Kanerva, Justin; Bittner, Anton; Rao, Navin; Murphy, Michael P; Kirkham, Paul A; Chung, Kian Fan; Adcock, Ian M

    2015-09-01

    Inflammation and oxidative stress play critical roles in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Mitochondrial oxidative stress might be involved in driving the oxidative stress-induced pathology. We sought to determine the effects of oxidative stress on mitochondrial function in the pathophysiology of airway inflammation in ozone-exposed mice and human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells. Mice were exposed to ozone, and lung inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), and mitochondrial function were determined. Human ASM cells were isolated from bronchial biopsy specimens from healthy subjects, smokers, and patients with COPD. Inflammation and mitochondrial function in mice and human ASM cells were measured with and without the presence of the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoQ. Mice exposed to ozone, a source of oxidative stress, had lung inflammation and AHR associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and reflected by decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), increased mitochondrial oxidative stress, and reduced mitochondrial complex I, III, and V expression. Reversal of mitochondrial dysfunction by the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoQ reduced inflammation and AHR. ASM cells from patients with COPD have reduced ΔΨm, adenosine triphosphate content, complex expression, basal and maximum respiration levels, and respiratory reserve capacity compared with those from healthy control subjects, whereas mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were increased. Healthy smokers were intermediate between healthy nonsmokers and patients with COPD. Hydrogen peroxide induced mitochondrial dysfunction in ASM cells from healthy subjects. MitoQ and Tiron inhibited TGF-β-induced ASM cell proliferation and CXCL8 release. Mitochondrial dysfunction in patients with COPD is associated with excessive mitochondrial ROS levels, which contribute to enhanced inflammation and cell hyperproliferation. Targeting mitochondrial ROS represents

  10. Oxidative stress–induced mitochondrial dysfunction drives inflammation and airway smooth muscle remodeling in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease

    PubMed Central

    Wiegman, Coen H.; Michaeloudes, Charalambos; Haji, Gulammehdi; Narang, Priyanka; Clarke, Colin J.; Russell, Kirsty E.; Bao, Wuping; Pavlidis, Stelios; Barnes, Peter J.; Kanerva, Justin; Bittner, Anton; Rao, Navin; Murphy, Michael P.; Kirkham, Paul A.; Chung, Kian Fan; Adcock, Ian M.; Brightling, Christopher E.; Davies, Donna E.; Finch, Donna K.; Fisher, Andrew J.; Gaw, Alasdair; Knox, Alan J.; Mayer, Ruth J.; Polkey, Michael; Salmon, Michael; Singh, David

    2015-01-01

    Background Inflammation and oxidative stress play critical roles in patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Mitochondrial oxidative stress might be involved in driving the oxidative stress–induced pathology. Objective We sought to determine the effects of oxidative stress on mitochondrial function in the pathophysiology of airway inflammation in ozone-exposed mice and human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells. Methods Mice were exposed to ozone, and lung inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR), and mitochondrial function were determined. Human ASM cells were isolated from bronchial biopsy specimens from healthy subjects, smokers, and patients with COPD. Inflammation and mitochondrial function in mice and human ASM cells were measured with and without the presence of the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoQ. Results Mice exposed to ozone, a source of oxidative stress, had lung inflammation and AHR associated with mitochondrial dysfunction and reflected by decreased mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), increased mitochondrial oxidative stress, and reduced mitochondrial complex I, III, and V expression. Reversal of mitochondrial dysfunction by the mitochondria-targeted antioxidant MitoQ reduced inflammation and AHR. ASM cells from patients with COPD have reduced ΔΨm, adenosine triphosphate content, complex expression, basal and maximum respiration levels, and respiratory reserve capacity compared with those from healthy control subjects, whereas mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels were increased. Healthy smokers were intermediate between healthy nonsmokers and patients with COPD. Hydrogen peroxide induced mitochondrial dysfunction in ASM cells from healthy subjects. MitoQ and Tiron inhibited TGF-β–induced ASM cell proliferation and CXCL8 release. Conclusions Mitochondrial dysfunction in patients with COPD is associated with excessive mitochondrial ROS levels, which contribute to enhanced inflammation and cell

  11. Experimental model of human corpus cavernosum smooth muscle relaxation.

    PubMed

    Regadas, Rommel P; Moraes, Maria E A; Mesquita, Francisco J C; Cerqueira, Joao B G; Gonzaga-Silva, Lucio F

    2010-01-01

    To describe a technique for en bloc harvesting of the corpus cavernosum, cavernous artery and urethra from transplant organ donors and contraction-relaxation experiments with corpus cavernosum smooth muscle. The corpus cavernosum was dissected to the point of attachment with the crus penis. A 3 cm segment (corpus cavernosum and urethra) was isolated and placed in ice-cold sterile transportation buffer. Under magnification, the cavernous artery was dissected. Thus, 2 cm fragments of cavernous artery and corpus cavernosum were obtained. Strips measuring 3 x 3 x 8 mm(3) were then mounted vertically in an isolated organ bath device. Contractions were measured isometrically with a Narco-Biosystems force displacement transducer (model F-60, Narco-Biosystems, Houston, TX, USA) and recorded on a 4-channel Narco-Biosystems desk model polygraph. Phenylephrine (1 microM) was used to induce tonic contractions in the corpus cavernosum (3-5 g tension) and cavernous artery (0.5-1 g tension) until reaching a plateau. After precontraction, smooth muscle relaxants were used to produce relaxation-response curves (10(-12) M to 10(-4) M). Sodium nitroprusside was used as a relaxation control. The harvesting technique and the smooth muscle contraction-relaxation model described in this study were shown to be useful instruments in the search for new drugs for the treatment of human erectile dysfunction.

  12. Transdifferentiation of human endothelial progenitors into smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Ji, HaYeun; Atchison, Leigh; Chen, Zaozao; Chakraborty, Syandan; Jung, Youngmee; Truskey, George A; Christoforou, Nicolas; Leong, Kam W

    2016-04-01

    Access to smooth muscle cells (SMC) would create opportunities for tissue engineering, drug testing, and disease modeling. Herein we report the direct conversion of human endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) to induced smooth muscle cells (iSMC) by induced expression of MYOCD. The EPC undergo a cytoskeletal rearrangement resembling that of mesenchymal cells within 3 days post initiation of MYOCD expression. By day 7, the reprogrammed cells show upregulation of smooth muscle markers ACTA2, MYH11, and TAGLN by qRT-PCR and ACTA2 and MYH11 expression by immunofluorescence. By two weeks, they resemble umbilical artery SMC in microarray gene expression analysis. The iSMC, in contrast to EPC control, show calcium transients in response to phenylephrine stimulation and a contractility an order of magnitude higher than that of EPC as determined by traction force microscopy. Tissue-engineered blood vessels constructed using iSMC show functionality with respect to flow- and drug-mediated vasodilation and vasoconstriction.

  13. Muscarinic receptor subtypes in human and rat colon smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Gómez, A; Martos, F; Bellido, I; Marquez, E; Garcia, A J; Pavia, J; Sanchez de la Cuesta, F

    1992-06-09

    Muscarinic receptor subtypes in human and rat colon smooth muscle homogenates were characterized with [3H]N-methylscopolamine ([3H]NMS) by ligand binding studies. [3H]NMS saturation experiments show the existence of a homogeneous population of non-interacting binding sites with similar affinity (KD values of 1.38 +/- 0.20 nM in human colon smooth muscle and 1.48 +/- 0.47 nM in rat colon smooth muscle) and with Hill slopes close to unity in both samples of tissue. However, a significant (P less than 0.01) increase in muscarinic receptor density (Bmax) is found in human colon (29.9 +/- 2.9 fmol/mg protein) compared with rat colon (17.2 +/- 1.5 fmol/mg protein). Inhibition of [3H]NMS binding by non-labelled compounds shows the following order in human colon: atropine greater than AF-DX 116 greater than pirenzepine. Whereas in rat colon the rank order obtained is atropine greater than pirenzepine greater than AF-DX 116. Atropine and pirenzepine bind to a homogeneous population of binding sites, although pirenzepine shows higher affinity to bind to the sites present in rat colon (Ki = 1.08 +/- 0.08 microM) than those in human colon (Ki = 1.74 +/- 0.02 microM) (P less than 0.05). Similarly, IC50 values obtained in AF-DX 116 competition experiments were significantly different (P less than 0.01) in human colon (IC50 = 1.69 +/- 0.37 microM) than in rat colon (IC50 = 3.78 +/- 0.75 microM). Unlike atropine and pirenzepine, the inhibition of [3H]NMS binding by AF-DX 116 did not yield a simple mass-action binding curve (nH less than 1, P less than 0.01) suggesting the presence of more than one subtype of muscarinic receptor in both species. Computer analysis of these curves with a two binding site model suggests the presence of two populations of receptor. The apparent Ki1 value for the high affinity binding site is 0.49 +/- 0.07 microM for human colon smooth muscle and 0.33 +/- 0.05 microM for rat colon smooth muscle. The apparent Ki2 for the low affinity binding site is 8

  14. Reactive oxygen species and RhoA signaling in vascular smooth muscle: role in chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension.

    PubMed

    Resta, Thomas C; Broughton, Brad R S; Jernigan, Nikki L

    2010-01-01

    Increases in myofilament Ca2+ sensitivity resulting from stimulation of RhoA and Rho kinase represent a primary mechanism of vasoconstriction and associated pulmonary hypertension resulting from chronic hypoxia (CH). This chapter summarizes recent advances in the understanding of RhoA/Rho kinase signaling mechanisms in pulmonary vascular smooth muscle (VSM) that increase the sensitivity of the contractile apparatus to Ca2+ and contribute to vasoconstriction in this setting. Such advances include the discovery of myogenic tone in small pulmonary arteries from CH rats that contributes to vasoconstriction through a mechanism inherent to the VSM, dependent on Rho kinase-induced Ca2+ sensitization but independent of L-type voltage-gated Ca2+ channels. Additional studies have revealed an important contribution of superoxide anion (O2-)-induced RhoA activation to both receptor-mediated and membrane depolarization-induced myofilament Ca2+ sensitization in hypertensive pulmonary arteries. Xanthine oxidase and NADPH oxidase isoforms are potential sources of O2- that mediate RhoA-dependent vasoconstriction and associated pulmonary hypertension.

  15. Inhibition of FHL1 inhibits cigarette smoke extract-induced proliferation in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Yuping; Pu, Guimei; Chen, Chengshui; Yang, Li

    2015-09-01

    Cigarette smoke can induce pulmonary vascular remodeling, which involves pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation, resulting in pulmonary hypertension in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. FHL1 is a member of the FHL subfamily, characterized by an N‑terminal half LIM domain, followed by four complete LIM domains, and has been suggested to be critical in cell proliferation. However, the effects of FHL1 on cigarette smoke‑induced PASMC proliferation and the precise molecular mechanism remain to be elucidated. The present study demonstrated that the protein expression of FHL1 correlated with cigarette smoke extract (CSE)‑induced PASMC proliferation. Knockdown of the expression of FHL1 using siRNA significantly suppressed cell proliferation and inhibited the cell cycle transition between the G1 and S phase by regulating the cyclin‑dependent kinase pathway at the basal level and following CSE stimulation. By contrast, overexpressing FHL1 using an adenovirus increased cell proliferation and promoted the cell cycle transition between the G1 and S phase. Furthermore, CSE significantly increased the protein expression of FHL1, however, exerted no effect on the mRNA expression levels. This alteration was due to the prolonged FHL1 half‑life, leading to the antagonizing of protein degradation. Collectively, these data suggested that FHL1 may be involved in excessive cell proliferation and may represent a potential therapeutic target for pulmonary hypertension.

  16. Effects of lubiprostone on human uterine smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Cuppoletti, John; Malinowska, Danuta H; Chakrabarti, Jayati; Ueno, Ryuji

    2008-06-01

    Lubiprostone, a bicyclic fatty acid derivative and member of a new class of compounds called prostones, locally activates ClC-2 Cl(-) channels without activation of prostaglandin receptors. The present study was specifically designed to test and compare lubiprostone and prostaglandin effects at the cellular level using human uterine smooth muscle cells. Effects on [Ca(2+)](i), membrane potential and [cAMP](i) in human uterine smooth muscle cells were measured. 10 nM lubiprostone significantly decreased [Ca(2+)](i) from 188 to 27 nM, which was unaffected by 100 nM SC-51322, a prostaglandin EP receptor antagonist. In contrast 10nM PGE(2) and PGE(1) both increased [Ca(2+)](i) 3-5-fold which was blocked by SC-51322. Similarly, lubiprostone and prostaglandins had opposite/different effects on membrane potential and [cAMP](i). Lubiprostone caused SC-51322-insensitive membrane hyperpolarization and no effect on [cAMP](i). PGE(2) and PGE(1) both caused SC-51322-sensitive membrane depolarization and increased [cAMP](i). Lubiprostone has fundamentally different cellular effects from prostaglandins that are not mediated by EP receptors.

  17. Effects of chronic exposure to cigarette smoke on canonical transient receptor potential expression in rat pulmonary arterial smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Wang, Jian; Chen, Yuqin; Lin, Chunyi; Jia, Jing; Tian, Lichun; Yang, Kai; Zhao, Lei; Lai, Ning; Jiang, Qian; Sun, Yueqian; Zhong, Nanshan; Ran, Pixin; Lu, Wenju

    2014-02-15

    To clarify the possible mechanism of cigarette smoke (CS)-induced pulmonary hypertension and furthermore provide effective targets for prevention and treatment, the effects of chronic CS on rat pulmonary arterial smooth muscle in vivo and nicotine treatment on rat pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) in vitro were investigated. In this study, we demonstrated that chronic CS exposure led to rat weight loss, right ventricular hypertrophy, and pulmonary arterial remodeling. A fluorescence microscope was used to measure intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) in rat distal PASMCs. Results showed that basal [Ca(2+)]i and store-operated calcium entry (SOCE) levels in PASMCs from 3- and 6-mo CS-exposed rats were markedly higher than those in cells from the unexposed control animals (the increases in 6-mo CS group were more significant than that in 3-mo group), accompanied with increased canonical transient receptor potential 1 (TRPC1) and TRPC6 expression at both mRNA and protein levels in isolated distal PA. Simultaneously, in vitro study showed that nicotine treatment (10 nM) significantly increased basal [Ca(2+)]i and SOCE and upregulated TRPC1 and TRPC6 expression in cultured rat distal PASMCs. TRPC siRNA knockdown strategies revealed that the elevations of basal [Ca(2+)]i and SOCE induced by nicotine in PASMCs were TRPC1 and TRPC6 dependent. These results suggested that chronic CS-induced changes in vascular tone and structure in PA and the development of pulmonary hypertension might be largely due to upregulation of TRPC1 and TRPC6 expression in PASMCs, in which nicotine played an important role.

  18. Calpain-2 activates Akt via TGF-β1-mTORC2 pathway in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Abeyrathna, Prasanna; Kovacs, Laszlo; Han, Weihong; Su, Yunchao

    2016-07-01

    Calpain is a family of calcium-dependent nonlysosomal neutral cysteine endopeptidases. Akt is a serine/threonine kinase that belongs to AGC kinases and plays important roles in cell survival, growth, proliferation, angiogenesis, and cell metabolism. Both calpain and Akt are the downstream signaling molecules of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) and mediate PDGF-induced collagen synthesis and proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) in pulmonary vascular remodeling. We found that inhibitions of calpain-2 by using calpain inhibitor MDL28170 and calpain-2 small interfering RNA attenuated Akt phosphorylations at serine-473 (S473) and threonine-308 (T308), as well as collagen synthesis and cell proliferation of PASMCs induced by PDGF. Overexpression of calpain-2 in PASMCs induced dramatic increases in Akt phosphorylations at S473 and T308. Moreover, knockout of calpain attenuated Akt phosphorylations at S473 and T308 in smooth muscle of pulmonary arterioles of mice with chronic hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. The cell-permeable-specific transforming growth factor (TGF)-β receptor inhibitor SB431542 attenuated Akt phosphorylations at both S473 and T308 induced by PDGF and by overexpressed calpain-2 in PASMCs. Furthermore, SB-431452 and knocking down activin receptor-like kinase-5 significantly reduced PDGF-induced collagen synthesis and cell proliferation of PASMCs. Nevertheless, neutralizing extracellular TGF-β1 using a cell-impermeable TGF-β1 neutralizing antibody did not affect PDGF-induced Akt phosphorylations at S473 and T308. Furthermore, inhibition of mammalian target of rapamycin complex 2 (mTORC2) by knocking down its component protein Rictor prevented Akt phosphorylations at S473 and T308 induced by PDGF and by overexpressed calpain-2. These data provide first evidence supporting that calpain-2 upregulates PDGF-induced Akt phosphorylation in pulmonary vascular remodeling via an intracrine TGF-β1/mTORC2 mechanism.

  19. Slow receptor dissociation kinetics differentiate macitentan from other endothelin receptor antagonists in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Gatfield, John; Mueller Grandjean, Celia; Sasse, Thomas; Clozel, Martine; Nayler, Oliver

    2012-01-01

    Two endothelin receptor antagonists (ERAs), bosentan and ambrisentan, are currently approved for the treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a devastating disease involving an activated endothelin system and aberrant contraction and proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC). The novel ERA macitentan has recently concluded testing in a Phase III morbidity/mortality clinical trial in PAH patients. Since the association and dissociation rates of G protein-coupled receptor antagonists can influence their pharmacological activity in vivo, we used human PASMC to characterize inhibitory potency and receptor inhibition kinetics of macitentan, ambrisentan and bosentan using calcium release and inositol-1-phosphate (IP(1)) assays. In calcium release assays macitentan, ambrisentan and bosentan were highly potent ERAs with K(b) values of 0.14 nM, 0.12 nM and 1.1 nM, respectively. Macitentan, but not ambrisentan and bosentan, displayed slow apparent receptor association kinetics as evidenced by increased antagonistic potency upon prolongation of antagonist pre-incubation times. In compound washout experiments, macitentan displayed a significantly lower receptor dissociation rate and longer receptor occupancy half-life (ROt(1/2)) compared to bosentan and ambrisentan (ROt(1/2):17 minutes versus 70 seconds and 40 seconds, respectively). Because of its lower dissociation rate macitentan behaved as an insurmountable antagonist in calcium release and IP(1) assays, and unlike bosentan and ambrisentan it blocked endothelin receptor activation across a wide range of endothelin-1 (ET-1) concentrations. However, prolongation of the ET-1 stimulation time beyond ROt(1/2) rendered macitentan a surmountable antagonist, revealing its competitive binding mode. Bosentan and ambrisentan behaved as surmountable antagonists irrespective of the assay duration and they lacked inhibitory activity at high ET-1 concentrations. Thus, macitentan is a competitive ERA with

  20. Neurophysiology and Neuroanatomy of Smooth Pursuit in Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lencer, Rebekka; Trillenberg, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Smooth pursuit eye movements enable us to focus our eyes on moving objects by utilizing well-established mechanisms of visual motion processing, sensorimotor transformation and cognition. Novel smooth pursuit tasks and quantitative measurement techniques can help unravel the different smooth pursuit components and complex neural systems involved…

  1. Neurophysiology and Neuroanatomy of Smooth Pursuit in Humans

    ERIC Educational Resources Information Center

    Lencer, Rebekka; Trillenberg, Peter

    2008-01-01

    Smooth pursuit eye movements enable us to focus our eyes on moving objects by utilizing well-established mechanisms of visual motion processing, sensorimotor transformation and cognition. Novel smooth pursuit tasks and quantitative measurement techniques can help unravel the different smooth pursuit components and complex neural systems involved…

  2. A critical role of nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase in human telomerase reverse transcriptase induction by resveratrol in aortic smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Peixin; Riordan, Sean M.; Heruth, Daniel P.; Grigoryev, Dmitry N.; Zhang, Li Qin; Ye, Shui Qing

    2015-01-01

    Aging is the predominant risk factor for cardiovascular diseases and contributes to a considerably more severe outcome in patients with acute myocardial infarction. Resveratrol, a polyphenol found in red wine, is a caloric restriction mimetic with potential anti-aging properties which has emerged as a beneficial nutraceutical for patients with cardiovascular disease. Although resveratrol is widely consumed as a nutritional supplement, its mechanism of action remains to be elucidated fully. Here, we report that resveratrol activates human nicotinamide phosphoribosyltransferase (NAMPT), SIRT4 and telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) in human aortic smooth muscle cells. Similar observations were obtained in resveratrol treated C57BL/6J mouse heart and liver tissues. Resverotrol can also augment telomerase activity in both human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells and A549 cells. Blocking NAMPT and SIRT4 expression prevents induction of hTERT in human aortic smooth muscle cells while overexpression of NAMPT elevates the telomerase activity induced by resveratrol in A549 cells. Together, these results identify a NAMPT-SIRT4-hTERT axis as a novel mechanism by which resveratrol may affect the anti-aging process in human aortic smooth muscle cells, mouse hearts and other cells. These findings enrich our understanding of the positive effects of resveratrol in human cardiovascular diseases. PMID:25926556

  3. Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction: redox regulation of O2-sensitive K+ channels by a mitochondrial O2-sensor in resistance artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Michelakis, Evangelos D; Thébaud, Bernard; Weir, E Kenneth; Archer, Stephen L

    2004-12-01

    Hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) is a widely-conserved mechanism for matching ventilation and perfusion that optimizes systemic PO(2). HPV is elicited by moderate alveolar hypoxia through a mechanism that is intrinsic to the pulmonary circulation, particularly the resistance pulmonary arteries (PA), and is robust even in isolated perfused lungs. Although modulated by the endothelium, HPV persists in denuded PA rings and PA smooth muscle cells (PASMC). Beginning within seconds of hypoxia, HPV plateaus in minutes and persists for hours. During focal hypoxia (e.g. atelectasis), HPV is restricted to the vascular segments serving hypoxic lobes, and diverts blood to better-ventilated segments without causing pulmonary hypertension (PHT). However, with global hypoxia, as occurs at high altitude or in the fetal lung, HPV increases pulmonary vascular resistance (PVR) and may contribute to PHT. This review focuses on a comprehensive Redox Theory of HPV but considers relevant modulatory factors (endothelin), triggering stimuli (cyclic ADP-ribose-induced release of sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) Ca(2+)) and sustaining pathways (Rho kinase-modulated Ca(2+) sensitization of the contractile apparatus). The Redox Theory proposes that an O(2)-sensor in resistance PASMC (complexes I and III of the mitochondrial electron transport chain (ETC)) generates reactive O(2) species (ROS) in proportion to PO(2). During normoxia, a redox mediator, like hydrogen peroxide (H(2)O(2)), maintains voltage-gated O(2)-sensitive K(+) channels (Kv) in an oxidized open state. Hypoxic withdrawal of ROS inhibits Kv channels, thereby depolarizing PASMCs, activating L-type voltage-gated Ca(2+) channels, enhancing Ca(2+) influx and promoting vasoconstriction. The role of O(2)-sensitive K(+) channels is conserved in most specialized O(2)-sensitive tissues, including the ductus arteriosus and carotid body. The unique occurrence of hypoxic vasoconstriction in the pulmonary circulation relates to the

  4. Sildenafil inhibits chronically hypoxic upregulation of canonical transient receptor potential expression in rat pulmonary arterial smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Wenju; Zhang, Dandan; Peng, Gongyong; Li, Bing; Zhong, Nanshan

    2010-01-01

    In pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs), Ca2+ influx through store-operated Ca2+ channels thought to be composed of canonical transient receptor potential (TRPC) proteins is an important determinant of intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) and pulmonary vascular tone. Sildenafil, a type V phosphodiesterase inhibitor that increases cellular cGMP, is recently identified as a promising agent for treatment of pulmonary hypertension. We previously demonstrated that chronic hypoxia elevated basal [Ca2+]i in PASMCs due in large part to enhanced store-operated Ca2+ entry (SOCE); moreover, ex vivo exposure to prolonged hypoxia (4% O2 for 60 h) upregulated TRPC1 and TRPC6 expression in PASMCs. We examined the effect of sildenafil on basal [Ca2+]i, SOCE, and the expression of TRPC in PASMCs under prolonged hypoxia exposure. We also examined the effect of sildenafil on TRPC1 and TRPC6 expression in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle (PA) from rats that developed chronically hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (CHPH). Compared with vehicle control, treatment with sildenafil (300 nM) inhibited prolonged hypoxia induced increases of 1) basal [Ca2+]i, 2) SOCE, and 3) mRNA and protein expression of TRPC in PASMCs. Moreover, sildenafil (50 mg · kg−1 · day−1) inhibited mRNA and protein expression of TRPC1 and TRPC6 in PA from chronically hypoxic (10% O2 for 21 days) rats, which was associated with decreased right ventricular pressure and right ventricular hypertrophy. Furthermore, we found, in PASMCs exposed to prolonged hypoxia, that knockdown of TRPC1 or TRPC6 by their specific small interference RNA attenuated the hypoxic increases of SOCE and basal [Ca2+]i, suggesting a cause and effect link between increases of TRPC1 and TRPC6 expression and the hypoxic increases of SOCE and basal [Ca2+]i. These results suggest that sildenafil may alter basal [Ca2+]i in PASMCs by decreasing SOCE through downregulation of TRPC1 and TRPC6 expression, thereby contributing to

  5. Innervation of extraocular pulley smooth muscle in monkeys and humans.

    PubMed

    Demer, J L; Poukens, V; Miller, J M; Micevych, P

    1997-08-01

    Soft pulleys stabilize paths and determine pulling directions of the extraocular muscles (EOMs). This study was conducted to characterize innervation of smooth muscles (SMs) supporting these pulleys. Cadaveric human and monkey orbits were step and serially sectioned for histochemical and immunohistochemical staining. Before perfusion, the superior cervical ganglia of one monkey had been injected with the anterograde tracer Phaseolus vulgaris leukoagglutinin (PHA-L). Immunoperoxidase staining to human SM alpha-actin confirmed pulley SM. Monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies were used to demonstrate PHA-L, tyrosine hydroxylase, dopamine beta-hydroxylase, phenylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase, neuronal nitric oxide synthase (NOS), and synaptophysin. The NADPH-diaphorase reaction was also used as a marker for NOS and the acetylcholinesterase (AChE) reaction for acetylcholine. Pulleys, consisting of collagen and elastin sleeves supported by connective tissue containing SM, were observed around rectus muscles of humans and monkeys. The human and monkey SM was richly innervated. Axons terminating in motor end plates within SM bundles were immunoreactive to PHA-L, tyrosine hydroxylase, and dopamine beta-hydroxylase, but not phenylethanolamine-N-methyltransferase, indicating innervation of pulley SM from the superior cervical ganglion by projections using norepinephrine. Smaller axons and motor end plates were also demonstrated in SM, using NADPH-diaphorase and NOS immunoreactivity, indicating nitroxidergic innervation, and using AchE, indicating cholinergic parasympathetic innervation. The pterygopalatine and, to a lesser extent, the ciliary ganglia, but not the Edinger-Westphal nucleus, contained cells immunoreactive to NOS, suggesting that nitroxidergic innervation to pulley SM is mainly from the pterygopalatine ganglion. The SM suspensions of human and monkey EOM pulleys are similar and receive rich innervation involving multiple neurotransmitters. These complex

  6. Inhibitory effects of simvastatin on platelet-derived growth factor signaling in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells from patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Ikeda, Tetsuya; Nakamura, Kazufumi; Akagi, Satoshi; Kusano, Kengo Fukushima; Matsubara, Hiromi; Fujio, Hideki; Ogawa, Aiko; Miura, Aya; Miura, Daiji; Oto, Takahiro; Yamanaka, Ryutaro; Otsuka, Fumio; Date, Hiroshi; Ohe, Tohru; Ito, Hiroshi

    2010-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) is a progressive disease characterized by inappropriate increase of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) leading to occlusion of pulmonary arterioles. Inhibition of platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) signaling is starting to garner attention as a targeted therapy for IPAH. We assessed the inhibitory effects of simvastatin, a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutanyl coenzyme A reductase inhibitor, on PDGF-induced proliferation and migration of PASMCs obtained from 6 patients with IPAH who underwent lung transplantation. PDGF stimulation caused a significantly higher growth rate of PASMCs from patients with IPAH than that of normal control PASMCs as assessed by (3)H-thymidine incorporation. Simvastatin (0.1 micromol/L) significantly inhibited PDGF-induced cell proliferation of PASMCs from patients with IPAH but did not inhibit proliferation of normal control cells at the same concentration. Western blot analysis revealed that simvastatin significantly increased the expression of cell cycle inhibitor p27. PDGF significantly increased the migration distance of IPAH-PASMCs compared with that of normal PASMCs, and simvastatin (1 micromol/L) significantly inhibited PDGF-induced migration. Immunofluorescence staining revealed that simvastatin (1 micromol/L) inhibited translocation of Rho A from the cytoplasm to membrane and disorganized actin fibers in PASMCs from patients with IPAH. In conclusion, simvastatin had inhibitory effects on inappropriate PDGF signaling in PASMCs from patients with IPAH.

  7. Dynamin-Related Protein 1 (DRP1)-Mediated Mitochondrial Mitotic Fission Permits Hyperproliferation of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells and Offers a Novel Therapeutic Target in Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Marsboom, Glenn; Toth, Peter T; RyaN, John J.; Hong, Zhigang; Wu, Xichen; Fang, Yong-Hu; Thenappan, Thenappan; Piao, Lin; Zhang, Hannah J; Pogoriler, Jennifer; Chen, Yimei; Morrow, Erik; Weir, E Kenneth; Rehman, Jalees; Archer, Stephen L

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a lethal syndrome characterized by pulmonary vascular obstruction due in part to pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) hyperproliferation. Mitochondrial fragmentation and normoxic activation of hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) have been observed in PAH PASMCs, however their relationship and relevance to the development of PAH is unknown. Dynamin-related protein-1 (DRP1) is a GTPase that, when activated by kinases that phosphorylate Serine-616, causes mitochondrial fission. It is however unknown whether mitochondrial fission is a prerequisite for proliferation. Objective We hypothesize that DRP1 activation is responsible for increased mitochondrial fission in PAH PASMCs and that DRP1 inhibition may slow proliferation and have therapeutic potential. Methods and Results Experiments were conducted using human control and PAH lungs (n=5) and PASMCs in culture. Parallel experiments were performed in rat lung sections and PASMCs and in rodent PAH models induced by the HIF-1α activator, cobalt, chronic hypoxia, and monocrotaline. HIF-1α activation in human PAH leads to mitochondrial fission by cyclin B1/CDK1-dependent phosphorylation of DRP1 at Serine-616. In normal PASMC, HIF-1α activation by CoCl2 or desferrioxamine causes DRP1-mediated fission. HIF-1α inhibition reduces DRP1 activation, prevents fission and reduces PASMC proliferation. Both the DRP1 inhibitor Mdivi-1 and siDRP1 prevent mitotic fission and arrest PAH PASMCs at the G2/M interphase. Mdivi-1 is antiproliferative in human PAH PASMC and in rodent models. Mdivi-1 improves exercise capacity, right ventricular function and hemodynamics in experimental PAH. Conclusion DRP-1-mediated mitotic fission is a cell cycle checkpoint that can be therapeutically targeted in hyperproliferative disorders such as PAH. PMID:22511751

  8. Iptakalim inhibits PDGF-BB-induced human airway smooth muscle cells proliferation and migration.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenrui; Kong, Hui; Zeng, Xiaoning; Wang, Jingjing; Wang, Zailiang; Yan, Xiaopei; Wang, Yanli; Xie, Weiping; Wang, Hong

    2015-08-15

    Chronic airway diseases are characterized by airway remodeling which is attributed partly to the proliferation and migration of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). ATP-sensitive potassium (KATP) channels have been identified in ASMCs. Mount evidence has suggested that KATP channel openers can reduce airway hyperresponsiveness and alleviate airway remodeling. Opening K(+) channels triggers K(+) efflux, which leading to membrane hyperpolarization, preventing Ca(2+)entry through closing voltage-operated Ca(2+) channels. Intracellular Ca(2+) is the most important regulator of muscle contraction, cell proliferation and migration. K(+) efflux decreases Ca(2+) influx, which consequently influences ASMCs proliferation and migration. As a KATP channel opener, iptakalim (Ipt) has been reported to restrain the proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) involved in vascular remodeling, while little is known about its impact on ASMCs. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of Ipt on human ASMCs and the mechanisms underlying. Results obtained from cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8), flow cytometry and 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation showed that Ipt significantly inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced ASMCs proliferation. ASMCs migration induced by PDGF-BB was also suppressed by Ipt in transwell migration and scratch assay. Besides, the phosphorylation of Ca(2+)/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), extracellular regulated protein kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), protein kinase B (Akt), and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element binding protein (CREB) were as well alleviated by Ipt administration. Furthermore, we found that the inhibition of Ipt on the PDGF-BB-induced proliferation and migration in human ASMCs was blocked by glibenclamide (Gli), a selective KATP channel antagonist. These findings provide a strong evidence to support that Ipt antagonize the proliferating and migrating effects of PDGF-BB on

  9. Properties of a novel K+ current that is active at resting potential in rabbit pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, A M; Osipenko, O N; Gurney, A M

    1996-01-01

    1. An outward current (IK(N)) was identified in rabbit pulmonary artery myocytes, which persisted after Ca(2+)-activated and ATP-sensitive K+ currents were blocked by TEA (10 mM) and glibenclamide (10 microM), respectively, and after A-like (IK(A)) and delayed rectifer (IK(V)) K+ currents were inactivated by clamping the cell at 0 mV for 10 min. It was found in smooth muscle cells at all levels of the pulmonary arterial tree. 2. The relationship between the reversal potential of IK(N) and the extracellular K+ concentration ([K+]o) was close to that expected for a K(+)-selective channel. Deviation from Nernstian behaviour at low [K+)o could be accounted for by the presence of an accompanying leakage current. 3. IK(N) is voltage gated. It has a low threshold for activation, between -80 and -65 mV, and activates slowly without delay. Activation follows an exponential time course with a time constant of 1.6 s at -60 mV. Deactivation is an order of magnitude faster than activation, with a time constant of 107 ms at -60 mV. 4. IK(N) showed a similar sensitivity to 4-aminopyridine as IK(A) and IK(V), with 49% inhibition at 10 mM. The current was not blocked by microM quinine, which did inhibit IK(A) and IK(V), by 51 and 47%, respectively. 5. Activation of IK(N) was detected at potentials close to the resting membrane potential of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells, under physiological conditions. Thus it is likely to contribute to the resting membrane potential of these cells. PMID:8910225

  10. 8,9-Epoxyeicosatrienoic acid analog protects pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells from apoptosis via ROCK pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Ma, Jun; Zhang, Lei; Li, Shanshan; Liu, Shulin; Ma, Cui; Li, Weiyang; Falck, J.R.; Manthati, Vijay L.; Reddy, D. Sudarshan; Medhora, Meetha; Jacobs, Elizabeth R.; Zhu, Daling

    2010-08-15

    Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), metabolites of arachidonic acid (AA) catalyzed by cytochrome P450 (CYP), have many essential biologic roles in the cardiovascular system including inhibition of apoptosis in cardiomyocytes. In the present study, we tested the potential of 8,9-EET and derivatives to protect pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) from starvation induced apoptosis. We found 8,9-epoxy-eicos-11(Z)-enoic acid (8,9-EET analog (214)), but not 8,9-EET, increased cell viability, decreased activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9, and decreased TUNEL-positive cells or nuclear condensation induced by serum deprivation (SD) in PASMCs. These effects were reversed after blocking the Rho-kinase (ROCK) pathway with Y-27632 or HA-1077. Therefore, 8,9-EET analog (214) protects PASMC from serum deprivation-induced apoptosis, mediated at least in part via the ROCK pathway. Serum deprivation of PASMCs resulted in mitochondrial membrane depolarization, decreased expression of Bcl-2 and enhanced expression of Bax, all effects were reversed by 8,9-EET analog (214) in a ROCK dependent manner. Because 8,9-EET and not the 8,9-EET analog (214) protects pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAECs), these observations suggest the potential to differentially promote apoptosis or survival with 8,9-EET or analogs in pulmonary arteries.

  11. 8,9-Epoxyeicosatrienoic acid analog protects pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells from apoptosis via ROCK pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Jun; Zhang, Lei; Li, Shanshan; Liu, Shulin; Ma, Cui; Li, Weiyang; Falck, J.R.; Manthati, Vijay L.; Reddy, D. Sudarshan; Medhora, Meetha; Jacobs, Elizabeth R.; Zhu, Daling

    2010-01-01

    Epoxyeicosatrienoic acids (EETs), metabolites of arachidonic acid (AA) catalyzed by cytochrome P450 (CYP), have many essential biologic roles in the cardiovascular system including inhibition of apoptosis in cardiomyocytes. In the present study, we tested the potential of 8,9-EET and derivatives to protect pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) from starvation induced apoptosis. We found 8,9-epoxy-eicos-11(Z)-enoic acid (8,9-EET analog(214)), but not 8,9-EET, increased cell viability, decreased activation of caspase-3 and caspase-9, and decreased TUNEL-positive cells or nuclear condensation induced by serum deprivation (SD) in PASMCs. These effects were reversed after blocking the Rho-kinase (ROCK) pathway with Y-27632 or HA-1077. Therefore, 8,9-EET analog(214) protects PASMC from serum deprivation-induced apoptosis, mediated at least in part via the ROCK pathway. Serum deprivation of PASMCs resulted in mitochondrial membrane depolarization, decreased expression of Bcl-2 and enhanced expression of Bax, all effects were reversed by 8,9-EET analog(214) in a ROCK dependent manner. Because 8,9-EET and not the 8,9-EET analog(214) protects pulmonary artery endothelial cells (PAECs), these observations suggest the potential to differentially promote apoptosis or survival with 8,9-EET or analogs in pulmonary arteries. PMID:20493836

  12. Activation of AMPK inhibits PDGF-induced pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells proliferation and its potential mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Song, Yang; Wu, Yuanyuan; Su, Xiaofan; Zhu, Yanting; Liu, Lu; Pan, Yilin; Zhu, Bo; Yang, Lan; Gao, Li; Li, Manxiang

    2016-05-01

    The aims of the present study were to examine signaling mechanisms for PDGF-induced pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC) proliferation and to determine the effect of AMPK activation on PDGF-induced PASMC proliferation and its underlying mechanisms. PDGF activated PI3K/Akt/mTOR signaling pathway, and this in turn up-regulated Skp2 and consequently reduced p27 leading to PASMC proliferation. Prior incubation of PASMC with metformin induced a dramatic AMPK activation and significantly blocked PDGF-induced cell proliferation. PASMC lacking AMPKα2 were resistant to the inhibitory effect of metformin on PDGF-induced cell proliferation. Metformin did not affect Akt activation but blocked mTOR phosphorylation in response to PDGF; these were accompanied by the reversion of Skp2 up-regulation and p27 reduction. Our study suggests that the activation of AMPK negatively regulates mTOR activity to suppress PASMC proliferation and therefore has a potential value in the prevention and treatment of pulmonary hypertension by negatively modulating pulmonary vascular remodeling.

  13. Statins inhibit pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation by upregulation of HO-1 and p21WAF1.

    PubMed

    Li, Manxiang; Liu, Yuan; Shi, Hongyang; Zhang, Yonghong; Wang, Guizuo; Xu, Jing; Lu, Jiamei; Zhang, Dexin; Xie, Xinming; Han, Dong; Wu, Yuanyuan; Li, Shaojun

    2012-10-01

    Simvastatin is a 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl-CoA reductase inhibitor, which has been shown to ameliorate the development of pulmonary hypertension in animal model by suppression of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) proliferation, yet its underlying molecular mechanisms are not completely understood. In this study, we show that simvastatin dose-dependently inhibited serotonin-stimulated PASMCs proliferation. This was accompanied with the parallel induction of heme oxyganase-1 (HO-1) and upregulation of p21(WAF1). More importantly, we found that Tin-protoporphyrin (SnPP), a selective inhibitor of HO-1, could block the effect of simvastatin on inhibition of cell proliferation in response to serotonin and abolish simvastatin-induced p21(WAF1) expression. The inhibitive effect of simvastatin on cell proliferation was also significantly suppressed by silencing p21(WAF1) with siRNA transfection. The extent of effect of SnPP on inhibition of cell proliferation was similar to that of lack of p21(WAF1) by siRNA transfection. Taken together, our study suggests that simvastatin inhibits PASMCs proliferation by sequential upregulation of HO-1 and p21(WAF1) to benefit pulmonary hypertension.

  14. Differential oxygen sensitivity of calcium channels in rabbit smooth muscle cells of conduit and resistance pulmonary arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Franco-Obregón, A; López-Barneo, J

    1996-01-01

    1. Calcium currents were recorded from smooth muscle cells dispersed from conduit and resistance rabbit pulmonary arteries. We tested the hypothesis that Ca2+ channel activity was regulated by environmental O2 tension. 2. Conduit (proximal) and resistance (distal) myocytes differ in their Ca2+ channel density and responses to low PO2. Ca2+ current density in distal myocytes (20.7 +/- 7.4 pA pF-1, n = 10) is almost twice the value in proximal myocytes (12.6 +/- 5.5 pA pF-1, n = 39). In proximal myocytes, the predominant response to reductions in PO2 is inhibition of the calcium current (n = 12) at membrane potentials below 0 mV, whereas potentiation of current amplitude is observed in distal myocytes (n = 24). 3. Hypoxia also produces opposite shifts in the conductance-voltage relationships along the voltage axis. The average displacements induced by low PO2 are +5.05 +/- 2.98 mV (n = 5) in proximal myocytes and -6.06 +/- 2.45 (n = 10) in distal myocytes. 4. These findings demonstrate longitudinal differences in Ca2+ channel density and O2 sensitivity in myocytes along the pulmonary arterial tree. These results may help to understand the differential reactivity to hypoxia of the pulmonary vasculature: vasodilatation in conduit arteries and vasoconstriction in resistance vessels. Images Figure 4 PMID:8866874

  15. Altered expression of nuclear and cytoplasmic histone H1 in pulmonary artery and pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells in patients with IPAH

    PubMed Central

    Talati, Megha; Seeley, Erin; Ihida-Stansbury, Kaori; Delisser, Horace; McDonald, Hayes; Ye, Fei; Zhang, Xueqiong; Shyr, Yu; Caprioli, Richard; Meyrick, Barbara

    2012-01-01

    The pathogenesis of idiopathic pulmonary hypertension is poorly understood. This paper utilized histology-based Matrix-Assisted Laser Desorption Ionization Mass Spectrometry (MALDI MS) to identify as-yet unknown proteins that may be associated with the structural changes in the pulmonary arterial walls of patients with IPAH. The technology identified significant increases in two fragments of histone H1 in the IPAH cases compared to controls. This finding was further examined using immunofluorescence techniques applied to sections from IPAH and control pulmonary arteries. In addition, cultured pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) were utilized for Western analysis of histone H1 and importin β and importin 7, immunoprecipitation and assessment of nucleosomal repeat length (NRL). Immunofluorescence techniques revealed that nuclear expression of histone H1 was decreased and the chromatin was less compact in the IPAH cases than in the controls; furthermore, some cases showed a marked increase in cytoplasmic histone H1 expression. Using nuclear and cytoplasmic fractions of cultured PASMCs, we confirmed the reduction in histone H1 in the nucleus and an increase in the cytoplasm in IPAH cells compared to controls. Immunoprecipitation demonstrated a decreased association of histone H1 with importin β while importin 7 was unchanged in the IPAH cells compared to controls. The assessment of NRL revealed that the distance between nucleosomes was increased by ~20 bp in IPAH compared to controls. We conclude that at least two factors contribute to the reduction in nuclear histone H1—fragmentation of the protein and decreased import of histone H1 into the nucleus by importins. We further suggest that the decreased nuclear H1 contributes the less compact nucleosomal pattern in IPAH and this, in turn, contributes to the increase in NRL. PMID:23130102

  16. Heparin inhibits human coronary artery smooth muscle cell migration.

    PubMed

    Kohno, M; Yokokawa, K; Yasunari, K; Minami, M; Kano, H; Mandal, A K; Yoshikawa, J

    1998-09-01

    Heparin, an anticoagulant, has been shown to reduce neointimal proliferation and restenosis following vascular injury in experimental studies, but the clinical trials of heparin in coronary balloon angioplasty have been negative. The current study, therefore, examined the effect of heparin on basal or stimulated migration by serum and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB in cultured human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (SMCs) by Boyden's chamber method. In addition, the reversibility of the heparin effect on human coronary artery SMC migration was examined. Fetal calf serum (FCS) and PDGF-BB stimulated SMC migration in a concentration-dependent manner. Heparin in moderate to high concentration (10 to 100 U/mL) exhibited concentration-related inhibition of FCS- and PDGF-BB-stimulated SMC migration; however, a low concentration (1 U/mL) of heparin had no inhibitory effects. Heparin also had weak inhibitory effects on nonstimulated SMC migration. The SMCs that were exposed to a high concentration (100 U/mL) of heparin for 6 hours were capable of migrating after a short lag period of removal of heparin from the culture medium. These SMCs also showed recovery of responses to FCS and PDGF-BB by migrating significantly greater than the nonstimulated level. Furthermore, heparin-containing medium did not contain detached cells. These results indicate that heparin inhibits human coronary artery SMC migration, especially when stimulated by FCS or PDGF-BB, and that this inhibitory effect of heparin is reversible and not simply a function of killing cells.

  17. NO Hyperpolarizes Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle Cells and Decreases the Intracellular Ca2+ Concentration by Activating Voltage-Gated K+ Channels

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yuan, Xiao-Jian; Tod, Mary L.; Rubin, Lewis J.; Blaustein, Mordecai P.

    1996-09-01

    NO causes pulmonary vasodilation in patients with pulmonary hypertension. In pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells, the activity of voltage-gated K+ (KV) channels controls resting membrane potential. In turn, membrane potential is an important regulator of the intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) and pulmonary vascular tone. We used patch clamp methods to determine whether the NO-induced pulmonary vasodilation is mediated by activation of KV channels. Quantitative fluorescence microscopy was employed to test the effect of NO on the depolarization-induced rise in [Ca2+]i. Blockade of KV channels by 4-aminopyridine (5 mM) depolarized pulmonary artery myocytes to threshold for initiation of Ca2+ action potentials, and thereby increased [Ca2+]i. NO (≈ 3 μ M) and the NO-generating compound sodium nitroprusside (5-10 μ M) opened KV channels in rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. The enhanced K+ currents then hyperpolarized the cells, and blocked Ca2+-dependent action potentials, thereby preventing the evoked increases in [Ca2+]i. Nitroprusside also increased the probability of KV channel opening in excised, outside-out membrane patches. This raises the possibility that NO may act either directly on the channel protein or on a closely associated molecule rather than via soluble guanylate cyclase. In isolated pulmonary arteries, 4-aminopyridine significantly inhibited NO-induced relaxation. We conclude that NO promotes the opening of KV channels in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells. The resulting membrane hyperpolarization, which lowers [Ca2+]i, is apparently one of the mechanisms by which NO induces pulmonary vasodilation.

  18. Iptakalim inhibits PDGF-BB-induced human airway smooth muscle cells proliferation and migration

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Wenrui; Kong, Hui; Zeng, Xiaoning; Wang, Jingjing; Wang, Zailiang; Yan, Xiaopei; Wang, Yanli; Xie, Weiping Wang, Hong

    2015-08-15

    Chronic airway diseases are characterized by airway remodeling which is attributed partly to the proliferation and migration of airway smooth muscle cells (ASMCs). ATP-sensitive potassium (K{sub ATP}) channels have been identified in ASMCs. Mount evidence has suggested that K{sub ATP} channel openers can reduce airway hyperresponsiveness and alleviate airway remodeling. Opening K{sup +} channels triggers K{sup +} efflux, which leading to membrane hyperpolarization, preventing Ca{sup 2+}entry through closing voltage-operated Ca{sup 2+} channels. Intracellular Ca{sup 2+} is the most important regulator of muscle contraction, cell proliferation and migration. K{sup +} efflux decreases Ca{sup 2+} influx, which consequently influences ASMCs proliferation and migration. As a K{sub ATP} channel opener, iptakalim (Ipt) has been reported to restrain the proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) involved in vascular remodeling, while little is known about its impact on ASMCs. The present study was designed to investigate the effects of Ipt on human ASMCs and the mechanisms underlying. Results obtained from cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8), flow cytometry and 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) incorporation showed that Ipt significantly inhibited platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB-induced ASMCs proliferation. ASMCs migration induced by PDGF-BB was also suppressed by Ipt in transwell migration and scratch assay. Besides, the phosphorylation of Ca{sup 2+}/calmodulin-dependent kinase II (CaMKII), extracellular regulated protein kinases 1/2 (ERK1/2), protein kinase B (Akt), and cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) response element binding protein (CREB) were as well alleviated by Ipt administration. Furthermore, we found that the inhibition of Ipt on the PDGF-BB-induced proliferation and migration in human ASMCs was blocked by glibenclamide (Gli), a selective K{sub ATP} channel antagonist. These findings provide a strong evidence to support that Ipt

  19. Salidroside blocks the proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells induced by platelet‑derived growth factor‑BB.

    PubMed

    Chen, Changgui; Tang, Yanhong; Deng, Wei; Huang, Congxin; Wu, Tianyi

    2014-08-01

    The proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) contributes to the development of pulmonary vascular remodeling, ultimately leading to pulmonary hypertension. In this study, the effects and molecular mechanisms of salidroside on the platelet‑derived growth factor (PDGF)‑BB‑induced proliferation of primary cultured rat PASMCs were investigated. The presented data demonstrated that salidroside significantly inhibited the proliferation and DNA synthesis of PASMCs induced by PDGF‑BB in a dose‑ and time‑dependent manner, without cell cytotoxicity. In accordance with these findings, salidroside blocked progression through G0/G1 to S phase of the cell cycle. The salidroside‑induced inhibition of the cell cycle was associated with the inhibition of cyclin D1, cyclin E, cyclin‑dependent kinase 2 (CDK2) and CDK4 mRNA expression, as well as an increase in the mRNA expression of p27 in PDGF‑BB‑stimulated PASMCs. Further experiments showed that the beneficial effect of salidroside on blocking the proliferation of PASMCs was associated with the suppression of the AKT/glycogen synthase kinase 3 β (GSK3β) signaling pathway, but did not involve the extracellular signal‑regulated kinase 1/2, p38 and c‑Jun‑N‑terminal kinase signaling pathways. These results indicate that salidroside suppresses PDGF‑BB‑induced PASMC proliferation through the AKT/GSK3β signaling pathway and suggests that it may be a feasible therapy for pulmonary vascular remodeling diseases.

  20. Neurophysiology and neuroanatomy of smooth pursuit in humans.

    PubMed

    Lencer, Rebekka; Trillenberg, Peter

    2008-12-01

    Smooth pursuit eye movements enable us to focus our eyes on moving objects by utilizing well-established mechanisms of visual motion processing, sensorimotor transformation and cognition. Novel smooth pursuit tasks and quantitative measurement techniques can help unravel the different smooth pursuit components and complex neural systems involved in its control. The maintenance of smooth pursuit is driven by a combination of the prediction of target velocity and visual feedback about performance quality, thus a combination of retinal and extraretinal information that has to be integrated in various networks. Different models of smooth pursuit with specific in- and output parameters have been developed for a better understanding of the underlying neurophysiological mechanisms and to make quantitative predictions that can be tested in experiments. Functional brain imaging and neurophysiological studies have defined motion sensitive visual area V5, frontal (FEF) and supplementary (SEF) eye fields as core cortical smooth pursuit regions. In addition, a dense neural network is involved in the adjustment of an optimal smooth pursuit response by integrating also extraretinal information. These networks facilitate interaction of the smooth pursuit system with multiple other visual and non-visual sensorimotor systems on the cortical and subcortical level. Future studies with fMRI advanced techniques (e.g., event-related fMRI) promise to provide an insight into how smooth pursuit eye movements are linked to specific brain activation. Applying this approach to neurological and also mental illness can reveal distinct disturbances within neural networks being present in these disorders and also the impact of medication on this circuitry.

  1. Electron Microscopy Observation of Human Pulmonary Ultrastructure in Two Patients with High-Altitude Pulmonary Edema.

    PubMed

    Droma, Yunden; Kato, Akane; Ichiyama, Takashi; Kobayashi, Nobumitsu; Honda, Takayuki; Uehara, Takeshi; Hanaoka, Masayuki

    2017-09-01

    We examined the pulmonary ultrastructure in tissue from two patients with high-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) by electron microscopy. In one case, we found that neutrophils were trapped in pulmonary capillary lumen of alveolar-capillary wall and part of the cytoplasm of a neutrophil protruded and adhered to the capillary endothelium. There were several degranulated vacuoles in the cytoplasm of the neutrophil. The pulmonary capillary wall was deformed, thickened, and swollen and there was evidence of degeneration. In another case, infiltration of neutrophils and macrophages, proliferation of type II pneumocytes, and numerous red blood cells were also observed in alveolar air space. These electron microscopic ultrastructural observations illustrate for the first time damage to the pulmonary alveolar-capillary barrier in lung tissue of humans with advanced HAPE.

  2. Mesenchymal stem cell-conditioned media suppresses inflammation-associated overproliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells in a rat model of pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    LIU, JUNFENG; HAN, ZHIBO; HAN, ZHONGCHAO; HE, ZHIXU

    2016-01-01

    Inflammation-associated overproliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) is considered to be involved in the pathogenesis of pulmonary hypertension (PH). The administration of mesenchymal stem cell-conditioned media (MSC-CM) has displayed benefits in the treatment of PH, however, the exact mechanism has yet to be elucidated. The present study aimed to determine whether MSC-CM is able to suppress overproliferation of PASMCs in PH via immunoregulation. By the administration of MSC-CM to monocrotaline (MCT)-induced PH rats, and the development of an in vitro co-culture system comprised of PASMCs and activated T cells, the therapeutic effects of MSC-CM on PH, and the changes in the expression of correlated factors, including TNF-α, calcineurin (CaN) and nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT), were assessed. Immunohistochemical staining results indicated that MSC-CM was able to significantly suppress the production of TNF-α in MCT-induced PH and co-culture systems; and reverse transcription-quantitative polymerase chain reaction results showed significant downregulation of the expression of CaN and NFATc2 in PASMCs (P<0.01). Furthermore, MSC-CM was able to significantly suppress CaN activity and NFATc2 activation (P<0.01), thus inhibiting the overproliferation of PASMCs. Finally, MSC-CM improved abnormalities in hemodynamics and pulmonary histology in MCT-induced PH. In conclusion, the findings of the current study suggest that administration of MSC-CM has the potential to suppress inflammation-associated overproliferation of PASMCs due to its immunosuppressive effects in PH and, thus, may serve as a beneficial therapeutic strategy. PMID:26893632

  3. TNFα decreases mitochondrial movement in human airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Delmotte, Philippe; Zavaletta, Vanessa A; Thompson, Michael A; Prakash, Y S; Sieck, Gary C

    2017-07-01

    In airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells, excitation-contraction coupling is accomplished via a cascade of events that connect an elevation of cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]cyt) with cross-bridge attachment and ATP-consuming mechanical work. Excitation-energy coupling is mediated by linkage of the elevation of [Ca(2+)]cyt to an increase in mitochondrial Ca(2+) concentration, which in turn stimulates ATP production. Proximity of mitochondria to the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR) and plasma membrane is thought to be an important mechanism to facilitate mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake. In this regard, mitochondrial movement in ASM cells may be key in establishing proximity. Mitochondria also move where ATP or Ca(2+) buffering is needed. Mitochondrial movement is mediated through interactions with the Miro-Milton molecular complex, which couples mitochondria to kinesin motors at microtubules. We examined mitochondrial movement in human ASM cells and hypothesized that, at basal [Ca(2+)]cyt levels, mitochondrial movement is necessary to establish proximity of mitochondria to the SR and that, during the transient increase in [Ca(2+)]cyt induced by agonist stimulation, mitochondrial movement is reduced, thereby promoting transient mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake. We further hypothesized that airway inflammation disrupts basal mitochondrial movement via a reduction in Miro and Milton expression, thereby disrupting the ability of mitochondria to establish proximity to the SR and, thus, reducing transient mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake during agonist activation. The reduced proximity of mitochondria to the SR may affect establishment of transient "hot spots" of higher [Ca(2+)]cyt at the sites of SR Ca(2+) release that are necessary for mitochondrial Ca(2+) uptake via the mitochondrial Ca(2+) uniporter. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  4. BMP type II receptor deficiency confers resistance to growth inhibition by TGF-β in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells: role of proinflammatory cytokines

    PubMed Central

    Davies, Rachel J.; Holmes, Alan M.; Deighton, John; Long, Lu; Yang, Xudong; Barker, Lucy; Walker, Christoph; Budd, David C.; Upton, Paul D.

    2012-01-01

    Mutations in the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) type II receptor (BMPR-II) underlie most cases of heritable pulmonary arterial hypertension (HPAH) and a significant proportion of sporadic cases. Pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) from patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) not only exhibit attenuated growth suppression by BMPs, but an abnormal mitogenic response to transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1. We sought to define the mechanism underlying this loss of the antiproliferative effects of TGF-β1 in BMPR-II-deficient PASMCs. The effect of TGF-β1 on PASMC proliferation was characterized in three different models of BMPR-II dysfunction: 1) HPAH PASMCs, 2) Bmpr2+/− mouse PASMCs, and 3) control human PASMCs transfected with BMPR-II small interfering RNA. BMPR-II reduction consistently conferred insensitivity to growth inhibition by TGF-β1. This was not associated with altered canonical TGF-β1/Smad signaling but was associated with a secreted factor. Microarray analysis revealed that the transcriptional responses to TGF-β1 differed between control and HPAH PASMCs, particularly regarding genes associated with interleukins and inflammation. HPAH PASMCs exhibited enhanced IL-6 and IL-8 induction by TGF-β1, an effect reversed by NF-κB inhibition. Moreover, neutralizing antibodies to IL-6 or IL-8 restored the antiproliferative effect of TGF-β1 in HPAH PASMCs. This study establishes that BMPR-II deficiency leads to failed growth suppression by TGF-β1 in PASMCs. This effect is Smad-independent but is associated with inappropriately altered NF-κB signaling and enhanced induction of IL-6 and IL-8 expression. Our study provides a rationale to test anti-interleukin therapies as an intervention to neutralize this inappropriate response and restore the antiproliferative response to TGF-β1. PMID:22227206

  5. BMP type II receptor deficiency confers resistance to growth inhibition by TGF-β in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells: role of proinflammatory cytokines.

    PubMed

    Davies, Rachel J; Holmes, Alan M; Deighton, John; Long, Lu; Yang, Xudong; Barker, Lucy; Walker, Christoph; Budd, David C; Upton, Paul D; Morrell, Nicholas W

    2012-03-15

    Mutations in the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) type II receptor (BMPR-II) underlie most cases of heritable pulmonary arterial hypertension (HPAH) and a significant proportion of sporadic cases. Pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) from patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) not only exhibit attenuated growth suppression by BMPs, but an abnormal mitogenic response to transforming growth factor (TGF)-β1. We sought to define the mechanism underlying this loss of the antiproliferative effects of TGF-β1 in BMPR-II-deficient PASMCs. The effect of TGF-β1 on PASMC proliferation was characterized in three different models of BMPR-II dysfunction: 1) HPAH PASMCs, 2) Bmpr2(+/-) mouse PASMCs, and 3) control human PASMCs transfected with BMPR-II small interfering RNA. BMPR-II reduction consistently conferred insensitivity to growth inhibition by TGF-β1. This was not associated with altered canonical TGF-β1/Smad signaling but was associated with a secreted factor. Microarray analysis revealed that the transcriptional responses to TGF-β1 differed between control and HPAH PASMCs, particularly regarding genes associated with interleukins and inflammation. HPAH PASMCs exhibited enhanced IL-6 and IL-8 induction by TGF-β1, an effect reversed by NF-κB inhibition. Moreover, neutralizing antibodies to IL-6 or IL-8 restored the antiproliferative effect of TGF-β1 in HPAH PASMCs. This study establishes that BMPR-II deficiency leads to failed growth suppression by TGF-β1 in PASMCs. This effect is Smad-independent but is associated with inappropriately altered NF-κB signaling and enhanced induction of IL-6 and IL-8 expression. Our study provides a rationale to test anti-interleukin therapies as an intervention to neutralize this inappropriate response and restore the antiproliferative response to TGF-β1.

  6. Autacoid and anaphylactic reactivity of pulmonary and hepatic smooth musculature of the cat.

    PubMed

    Chand, N; Eyre, P

    1977-10-01

    Histamine, 2-methylhistamine (2-MeH: a relatively specific H1 receptor agonist), 5-HT, carbachol, bradykinin (BK) and PGF2alpha contract isolated cat pulmonary vein, artery and hepatic vein. PGE1, PGF2alpha and 4-methylhistamine (4-MeH: a relatively specific H2-receptor agonist) contract pulmonary arterial strips but further increase in the dose of PGE1 produces relaxation. Isoproterenol relaxes partially contracted blood vessels at low doses, but contracts at high doses. Cat trachea contracts to 5-HT, acetylcholine and carbachol but is insensitive to histamine, its analogues, BK and PGF2alpha. However, partially contracted trachea relaxes to histamine, 4-MeH, 2-MeH, isoprenaline, BK, PGE1, E2 and F2alpha. PGF2alpha and SRS-A contract cat bronchus. Isoprenaline, PGE1 and E2 relax cat bronchus contracted to carbachol, 5-HT, PGF2alpha, SRS-A and antigen. The in vitro anaphylactic contraction (Schultz-Dale reaction) of isolated pulmonary and hepatic veins, bronchus and trachea from horse plasma sensitized cat suggested the involvement of lung and liver in anaphylaxis of the cat.

  7. Sildenefil increases connexin 40 in smooth muscle cells through activation of BMP pathways in pulmonary arterial hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Lei; Yin, Ning; Hu, Liang; Fan, Huanhuan; Yu, Di; Zhang, Weiyan; Wang, Song; Feng, Yu; Fan, Changfeng; Cao, Fang; Mo, Xuming

    2014-01-01

    Background: Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a cardiovascular disorder associated with enhanced proliferation and suppressed apoptosis of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). The sildenafil can regulate the Connexin (Cx) 43 in the PASMCs and thus inhibit the PASMCs proliferation and the remodeling of pulmonary arterial. However, how sildenafil exert regulation in the Cx40 in the PASMCs in PAH remains unclear. Methods and results: Using the rat PAH model induced by the monocrotoline, we demonstrated that the Cx40 in the PASMCs is down-regulated in the PAH. The sildenafil promotes the up-regulation of Cx40 in the PASMCs via bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) signaling, accompanied by an anti-proliferative response in PASMCs. Inhibition of the BMP axis reverses the up-regulation of Cx40 and anti-proliferation of the sildenafil in these cells. In monocrotaline-induced PAH rat models, which display reduced levels of BMP signaling, this study further indicates that the BMP-Cx40 axis is activated in lungs following the sildenafil treatment. Furthermore, we also find in vitro that sildenafil increases the Cx40 expression of PASMCs isolated from MCT-PAH rats and inhibit the proliferation of these cells. These phenomenon are reversed by LDN-193189, the antagonist of type II receptor for bone morphogenetic protein (BMPR2) treatment, providing strong evidence for the protect effect of sildenafil and the BMP-Cx40 axis involvement. Conclusions: Taken together, these data suggest the sildenafil activate BMP-Cx40 signaling in the PAH. This axis may be a potential therapeutic target in PAH. PMID:25197339

  8. Aquaporin 1-mediated changes in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell migration and proliferation involve β-catenin.

    PubMed

    Yun, Xin; Jiang, Haiyang; Lai, Ning; Wang, Jian; Shimoda, Larissa A

    2017-08-10

    Exposure to hypoxia induces migration and proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs), leading to vascular remodeling and contributing to the development of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. The mechanisms controlling PASMC growth and motility are incompletely understood, although aquaporin 1 plays an important role. In tumor, kidney and stem cells, AQP1 has been shown to interact with β-catenin, a dual function protein that activates the transcription of crucial target genes (i.e., c-Myc and cyclin D1) related to cell migration and proliferation. Thus, the goal of this study was to examine mechanisms by which AQP1 mediates PASMC migration and proliferation, with a focus on β-catenin. Using primary rat PASMCs from resistance level pulmonary arteries infected with adenoviral constructs containing GFP (control; AdGFP), wild-type AQP1 (AdAQP1) or AQP1 with the C-terminal tail deleted (AdAQP1M), we demonstrated that increasing AQP1 expression using AdAQP1 upregulated β-catenin protein levels and the expression (mRNA and protein) of the known β-catenin targets, c-Myc and cyclin D1. In contrast, infection with AdAQP1M had no effect on any of these variables. Using silencing approaches to reduce β-catenin levels prevented both hypoxia- and AQP1-induced migration and proliferation of PASMCs. Thus, our results indicate that elevated AQP1 levels upregulate β-catenin protein levels, via a mechanism requiring the AQP1 C-terminal tail, enhancing expression of β-catenin targets and promoting PASMC proliferation and migration. Copyright © 2016, American Journal of Physiology-Lung Cellular and Molecular Physiology.

  9. Effects of cigarette smoke extract on human airway smooth muscle cells in COPD.

    PubMed

    Chen, Ling; Ge, Qi; Tjin, Gavin; Alkhouri, Hatem; Deng, Linghong; Brandsma, Corry-Anke; Adcock, Ian; Timens, Wim; Postma, Dirkje; Burgess, Janette K; Black, Judith L; Oliver, Brian G G

    2014-09-01

    We hypothesised that the response to cigarette smoke in airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells from smokers with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) would be intrinsically different from smokers without COPD, producing greater pro-inflammatory mediators and factors relating to airway remodelling. ASM cells were obtained from smokers with or without COPD, and then stimulated with cigarette smoke extract (CSE) or transforming growth factor-β1. The production of chemokines and matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were measured by ELISA, and the deposition of collagens by extracellular matrix ELISA. The effects of CSE on cell attachment and wound healing were measured by toluidine blue attachment and cell tracker green wound healing assays. CSE increased the release of CXCL8 and CXCL1 from human ASM cells, and cells from smokers with COPD produced more CSE-induced CXCL1. The production of MMP-1, -3 and -10, and the deposition of collagen VIII alpha 1 (COL8A1) were increased by CSE, especially in the COPD group which had higher production of MMP-1 and deposition of COL8A1. CSE decreased ASM cell attachment and wound healing in the COPD group only. ASM cells from smokers with COPD were more sensitive to CSE stimulation, which may explain, in part, why some smokers develop COPD.

  10. Hemoglobin induced cell trauma indirectly influences endothelial TLR9 activity resulting in pulmonary vascular smooth muscle cell activation

    PubMed Central

    Loomis, Zoe; Eigenberger, Paul; Redinius, Katherine; Lisk, Christina; Karoor, Vijaya; Nozik-Grayck, Eva; Ferguson, Scott K.; Hassell, Kathryn; Nuss, Rachelle; Stenmark, Kurt; Buehler, Paul; Irwin, David C.

    2017-01-01

    It is now well established that both inherited and acquired forms of hemolytic disease can promote pulmonary vascular disease consequent of free hemoglobin (Hb) induced NO scavenging, elevations in reactive oxygen species and lipid peroxidation. It has recently been reported that oxidative stress can activate NFkB through a toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9) mediated pathway; further, TLR9 can be activated by either nuclear or mitochondrial DNA liberated by stress induced cellular trauma. We hypothesis that Hb induced lipid peroxidation and subsequent endothelial cell trauma is linked to TLR9 activation, resulting in IL-6 mediated pulmonary smooth muscle cell proliferation. We examined the effects of Hb on rat pulmonary artery endothelial and smooth muscle cells (rPAEC and rPASMC, respectively), and then utilized TLR9 and IL6 inhibitors, as well as the Hb and heme binding proteins (haptoglobin (Hp) and hemopexin (Hpx), respectively) to further elucidate the aforementioned mediators. Further, we explored the effects of Hb in vivo utilizing endothelial cell (EC) specific myeloid differentiation primary response gene-88 (MyD88) and TLR9 null mice. Our data show that oxidized Hb induces lipid peroxidation, cellular toxicity (5.5 ± 1.7 fold; p≤0.04), increased TLR9 activation (60%; p = 0.01), and up regulated IL6 expression (1.75±0.3 fold; p = 0.04) in rPAEC. Rat PASMC exhibited a more proliferative state (13 ± 1%; p = 0.01) when co-cultured with Hb activated rPAEC. These effects were attenuated with the sequestration of Hb or heme by Hp and Hpx as well as with TLR9 an IL-6 inhibition. Moreover, in both EC-MyD88 and TLR9 null mice Hb-infusion resulted in less lung IL-6 expression compared to WT cohorts. These results demonstrate that Hb-induced lipid peroxidation can initiate a modest TLR9 mediated inflammatory response, subsequently generating an activated SMC phenotype. PMID:28152051

  11. [Pulmonary complications in children with human immunodeficiency virus infection].

    PubMed

    Brockmann V, Pablo; Viviani S, Támara; Peña D, Anamaría

    2007-08-01

    Pulmonary complications in children infected by human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) are common and may be the first manifestation of acquired immunodeficiency syndrome (AIDS). The aim of our study was to review pulmonary diseases and complications in pediatric patients with HIV infection in a large tertiary hospital in Santiago, Chile. We performed a retrospective, descriptive analysis of 17 patients with HIV infection controlled at the Hospital Dr. Sótero del Rio. Respiratory complications/diseases were: overall pneumonia (n: 14), recurrent pneumonia (n: 10), citomegalovirus associated pneumonia (n: 4), Pneumocystis jiroveci associated pneumonia (n: 1) pulmonary tuberculosis (n: 1), lymphoid interstitial pneumonia (n: 3) and chronic pulmonary disease (n: 7). Microorganisms isolated were mostly atypical and frequently associated with severe and chronic pulmonary damage. A high degree of suspicion is required to detect atypical microorganisms promptly, in order to rapidly implement pathogen targeted therapy that could potentially decrease the possibility of sequelae.

  12. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Expressing eNOS and a Cav1 Mutant Inhibit Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation in a Rat Model of Pulmonary Hypertension.

    PubMed

    Chen, Haiying; Yang, Hongli; Yue, Hongmei; Strappe, Pádraig Michael; Xia, Peng; Pan, Li; Zhang, Yingxin; Chai, Shoudong; Chen, Shuangfeng; Ma, Longle; Wang, Lexin

    2017-05-01

    This study aimed to investigate the effect of bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells (rBMSCs) transduced with lentiviral vectors expressing endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and/or a mutant caveolin-1(F92A-Cav1), on the pulmonary haemodynamics and structure in a rat model of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Pulmonary arterial hypertension was induced with monocrotaline (MCT) in 60 adult male Wistar rats prior to delivery of lentiviral vector transduced rBMSCs expressing Cav1, eNOS and/or F92A-Cav1. Changes in pulmonary haemodynamics, right ventricular hypertrophy index (RVHI), and serum nitric oxide (NO) were evaluated. Ultrastructure changes in lung tissues were observed by transmission electron microscopy. Expression of Kruppel-like factor 4 (KLF4), p53, P21, eNOS, and alpha-smooth muscle actin were evaluated by real time PCR, western blotting or immunohistochemistry. Treatment of PAH rats with gene modified rBMSCs (eNOS +/- Cav1 F92A) decreased right ventricular systolic pressure and improved pulmonary haemodynamics. The protein of alpha-smooth muscle actin expression was decreased whilst KLF4, p53, P21, eNOS expression, and serum NO concentration was elevated. The survival rate of rats in the treatment groups was also improved, after 35 days of observation. Intravenous delivery of rBMSCs expressing eNOS/F92A-Cav1 to PAH rats inhibits pulmonary vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation, and improves pulmonary haemodynamics, vascular remodelling and short-term survival. Activation of KLF4-p53 signalling pathway may be involved in these beneficial effects. Copyright © 2016 Australian and New Zealand Society of Cardiac and Thoracic Surgeons (ANZSCTS) and the Cardiac Society of Australia and New Zealand (CSANZ). Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Lymphatic Stomata in the Adult Human Pulmonary Ligament

    PubMed Central

    Miura, Masahiro; Iobe, Hiroaki; Kudo, Tomoo; Shimazu, Yoshihito; Aoba, Takaaki; Okudela, Koji; Nagahama, Kiyotaka; Sakamaki, Kentaro; Yoshida, Maki; Nagao, Toshitaka; Nakaya, Takeo; Kurata, Atsushi; Ohtani, Osamu

    2015-01-01

    Abstract Background: Lymphatic stomata are small lymphatic openings in the serosal membrane that communicate with the serosal cavity. Although these stomata have primarily been studied in experimental mammals, little is known concerning the presence and properties of lymphatic stomata in the adult human pleura. Thus, adult human pleurae were examined for the presence or absence of lymphatic stomata. Methods and Results: A total of 26 pulmonary ligaments (13 left and 13 right) were obtained from 15 adult human autopsy cases and examined using electron and light microscopy. The microscopic studies revealed the presence of apertures fringed with D2-40-positive, CD31-positive, and cytokeratin-negative endothelial cells directly communicating with submesothelial lymphatics in all of the pulmonary ligaments. The apertures' sizes and densities varied from case to case according to the serial tissue section. The medians of these aperture sizes ranged from 2.25 to 8.75 μm in the left pulmonary ligaments and from 2.50 to 12.50 μm in the right pulmonary ligaments. The densities of the apertures ranged from 2 to 9 per mm2 in the left pulmonary ligaments and from 2 to 18 per mm2 in the right pulmonary ligaments. However, no significant differences were found regarding the aperture size (p=0.359) and density (p=0.438) between the left and the right pulmonary ligaments. Conclusions: Our study revealed that apertures exhibit structural adequacy as lymphatic stomata on the surface of the pulmonary ligament, thereby providing evidence that lymphatic stomata are present in the adult human pleura. PMID:25526320

  14. Regulation of human airway smooth muscle cell migration and relevance to asthma.

    PubMed

    Salter, Brittany; Pray, Cara; Radford, Katherine; Martin, James G; Nair, Parameswaran

    2017-08-16

    Airway remodelling is an important feature of asthma pathogenesis. A key structural change inherent in airway remodelling is increased airway smooth muscle mass. There is emerging evidence to suggest that the migration of airway smooth muscle cells may contribute to cellular hyperplasia, and thus increased airway smooth muscle mass. The precise source of these cells remains unknown. Increased airway smooth muscle mass may be collectively due to airway infiltration of myofibroblasts, neighbouring airway smooth muscle cells in the bundle, or circulating hemopoietic progenitor cells. However, the relative contribution of each cell type is not well understood. In addition, although many studies have identified pro and anti-migratory agents of airway smooth muscle cells, whether these agents can impact airway remodelling in the context of human asthma, remains to be elucidated. As such, further research is required to determine the exact mechanism behind airway smooth muscle cell migration within the airways, how much this contributes to airway smooth muscle mass in asthma, and whether attenuating this migration may provide a therapeutic avenue for asthma. In this review article, we will discuss the current evidence with respect to the regulation of airway smooth muscle cell migration in asthma.

  15. The Cl− channel blocker niflumic acid releases Ca2+ from an intracellular store in rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Cruickshank, Stuart F; Baxter, Lynne M; Drummond, Robert M

    2003-01-01

    The effect of the Cl− channel blockers niflumic acid (NFA), 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid (NPPB), 4,4′-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2′-disulfonic acid (DIDS), and anthracene-9-carboxylic acid (A-9-C), on Ca2+ signalling in rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells was examined. Intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) was monitored with either fura-2 or fluo-4, and caffeine was used to activate the ryanodine receptor, thereby releasing Ca2+ from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). NFA and NPPB significantly increased basal [Ca2+]i and attenuated the caffeine-induced increase in [Ca2+]i. These Cl− channel blockers also increased the half-time (t1/2) to peak for the caffeine-induced [Ca2+]i transient, and slowed the removal of Ca2+ from the cytosol following application of caffeine. Since DIDS and A-9-C were found to adversely affect fura-2 fluorescence, fluo-4 was used to monitor intracellular Ca2+ in studies involving these Cl− channel blockers. Both DIDS and A-9-C increased basal fluo-4 fluorescence, indicating an increase in intracellular Ca2+, and while DIDS had no significant effect on the t1/2 to peak for the caffeine-induced Ca2+ transient, it was significantly increased by A-9-C. In the absence of extracellular Ca2+, NFA significantly increased basal [Ca2+]i, suggesting that the release of Ca2+ from an intracellular store was responsible for the observed effect. Depleting the SR with the combination of caffeine and cyclopiazonic acid prevented the increase in basal [Ca2+]i induced by NFA. Additionally, incubating the cells with ryanodine also prevented the increase in basal [Ca2+]i induced by NFA. These data show that Cl− channel blockers have marked effects on Ca2+ signalling in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. Furthermore, examination of the NFA-induced increase in [Ca2+]i indicates that it is likely due to Ca2+ release from an intracellular store, most probably the SR. PMID:14623766

  16. The Cl(-) channel blocker niflumic acid releases Ca(2+) from an intracellular store in rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Cruickshank, Stuart F; Baxter, Lynne M; Drummond, Robert M

    2003-12-01

    The effect of the Cl- channel blockers niflumic acid (NFA), 5-nitro-2-(3-phenylpropylamino)-benzoic acid (NPPB), 4,4'-diisothiocyanatostilbene-2,2'-disulfonic acid (DIDS), and anthracene-9-carboxylic acid (A-9-C), on Ca2+ signalling in rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells was examined. Intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) was monitored with either fura-2 or fluo-4, and caffeine was used to activate the ryanodine receptor, thereby releasing Ca2+ from the sarcoplasmic reticulum (SR). NFA and NPPB significantly increased basal [Ca2+]i and attenuated the caffeine-induced increase in [Ca2+]i. These Cl- channel blockers also increased the half-time (t1/2) to peak for the caffeine-induced [Ca2+]i transient, and slowed the removal of Ca2+ from the cytosol following application of caffeine. Since DIDS and A-9-C were found to adversely affect fura-2 fluorescence, fluo-4 was used to monitor intracellular Ca2+ in studies involving these Cl- channel blockers. Both DIDS and A-9-C increased basal fluo-4 fluorescence, indicating an increase in intracellular Ca2+, and while DIDS had no significant effect on the t1/2 to peak for the caffeine-induced Ca2+ transient, it was significantly increased by A-9-C. In the absence of extracellular Ca2+, NFA significantly increased basal [Ca2+]i, suggesting that the release of Ca2+ from an intracellular store was responsible for the observed effect. Depleting the SR with the combination of caffeine and cyclopiazonic acid prevented the increase in basal [Ca2+]i induced by NFA. Additionally, incubating the cells with ryanodine also prevented the increase in basal [Ca2+]i induced by NFA. These data show that Cl- channel blockers have marked effects on Ca2+ signalling in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. Furthermore, examination of the NFA-induced increase in [Ca2+]i indicates that it is likely due to Ca2+ release from an intracellular store, most probably the SR.

  17. Important role of PLC-γ1 in hypoxic increase in intracellular calcium in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Yadav, Vishal R.; Song, Tengyao; Joseph, Leroy; Mei, Lin; Zheng, Yun-Min

    2013-01-01

    An increase in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) induces hypoxic cellular responses in the lungs; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain incompletely understood. We report, for the first time, that acute hypoxia significantly enhances phospholipase C (PLC) activity in mouse resistance pulmonary arteries (PAs), but not in mesenteric arteries. Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining reveal the expression of PLC-γ1 protein in PAs and PASMCs, respectively. The activity of PLC-γ1 is also augmented in PASMCs following hypoxia. Lentiviral shRNA-mediated gene knockdown of mitochondrial complex III Rieske iron-sulfur protein (RISP) to inhibit reactive oxygen species (ROS) production prevents hypoxia from increasing PLC-γ1 activity in PASMCs. Myxothiazol, a mitochondrial complex III inhibitor, reduces the hypoxic response as well. The PLC inhibitor U73122, but not its inactive analog U73433, attenuates the hypoxic vasoconstriction in PAs and hypoxic increase in [Ca2+]i in PASMCs. PLC-γ1 knockdown suppresses its protein expression and the hypoxic increase in [Ca2+]i. Hypoxia remarkably increases inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) production, which is blocked by U73122. The IP3 receptor (IP3R) antagonist 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) or xestospongin-C inhibits the hypoxic increase in [Ca2+]i. PLC-γ1 knockdown or U73122 reduces H2O2-induced increase in [Ca2+]i in PASMCs and contraction in PAs. 2-APB and xestospongin-C produce similar inhibitory effects. In conclusion, our findings provide novel evidence that hypoxia activates PLC-γ1 by increasing RISP-dependent mitochondrial ROS production in the complex III, which causes IP3 production, IP3R opening, and Ca2+ release, playing an important role in hypoxic Ca2+ and contractile responses in PASMCs. PMID:23204067

  18. Important role of PLC-γ1 in hypoxic increase in intracellular calcium in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Yadav, Vishal R; Song, Tengyao; Joseph, Leroy; Mei, Lin; Zheng, Yun-Min; Wang, Yong-Xiao

    2013-02-01

    An increase in intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) induces hypoxic cellular responses in the lungs; however, the underlying molecular mechanisms remain incompletely understood. We report, for the first time, that acute hypoxia significantly enhances phospholipase C (PLC) activity in mouse resistance pulmonary arteries (PAs), but not in mesenteric arteries. Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence staining reveal the expression of PLC-γ1 protein in PAs and PASMCs, respectively. The activity of PLC-γ1 is also augmented in PASMCs following hypoxia. Lentiviral shRNA-mediated gene knockdown of mitochondrial complex III Rieske iron-sulfur protein (RISP) to inhibit reactive oxygen species (ROS) production prevents hypoxia from increasing PLC-γ1 activity in PASMCs. Myxothiazol, a mitochondrial complex III inhibitor, reduces the hypoxic response as well. The PLC inhibitor U73122, but not its inactive analog U73433, attenuates the hypoxic vasoconstriction in PAs and hypoxic increase in [Ca(2+)](i) in PASMCs. PLC-γ1 knockdown suppresses its protein expression and the hypoxic increase in [Ca(2+)](i). Hypoxia remarkably increases inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP(3)) production, which is blocked by U73122. The IP(3) receptor (IP(3)R) antagonist 2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate (2-APB) or xestospongin-C inhibits the hypoxic increase in [Ca(2+)](i). PLC-γ1 knockdown or U73122 reduces H(2)O(2)-induced increase in [Ca(2+)](i) in PASMCs and contraction in PAs. 2-APB and xestospongin-C produce similar inhibitory effects. In conclusion, our findings provide novel evidence that hypoxia activates PLC-γ1 by increasing RISP-dependent mitochondrial ROS production in the complex III, which causes IP(3) production, IP(3)R opening, and Ca(2+) release, playing an important role in hypoxic Ca(2+) and contractile responses in PASMCs.

  19. Lack of synergistic interaction between quercetin and catechin in systemic and pulmonary vascular smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Menendez, Carmen; Jimenez, Rosario; Moreno, Laura; Galindo, Pilar; Cogolludo, Angel; Duarte, Juan; Perez-Vizcaino, Francisco

    2011-05-01

    Due to their ubiquitous distribution, flavonoids from different classes are commonly present together in foods. However, little is known about the interactions between them. The flavonol quercetin and the flavan-3-ol (+)-catechin are among the most abundant flavonoids in the diet. In the present study, we have analysed the interactions between these two flavonoids on vascular function using two pure compounds and mixtures of these flavonoids in 1:0·1, 1:1 or 1:10 proportions. Quercetin induced a more potent concentration-dependent relaxant effect than catechin in the isolated rat aorta, and the isobolographic analysis of the mixtures showed no synergistic or antagonistic effects between them, i.e. their effects were additive. Quercetin was more potent in mesenteric than in pulmonary arteries. Catechin had weak effects in these vessels and did not modify the effects of quercetin. Endothelial dysfunction induced by increased oxidative stress by the superoxide dismutase inhibitor diethyldithiocarbamate was prevented by quercetin, whereas catechin showed a weak effect and the 1:1 mixture an intermediate effect compared with the pure compounds. Quercetin but not catechin showed a pro-oxidant and NO-scavenging effect, which was not prevented by catechin. In conclusion, catechin was less potent than quercetin as a vasodilator, pro-oxidant or to prevent endothelial dysfunction, and there were no synergistic interactions between quercetin and catechin.

  20. Transgenic expression of human matrix metalloproteinase-9 augments monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension in mice

    PubMed Central

    George, Joseph; D’Armiento, Jeanine

    2013-01-01

    Objectives Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by intimal lesions, right ventricular hypertrophy, and adventitial thickening of pulmonary arteries with progressive pulmonary hypertension. This investigation was aimed to examine the effects of transgenic expression of human matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in the pathogenesis of PAH. Methods PAH was induced using serial subcutaneous administration of monocrotaline (MCT). Right ventricular pressure was measured through the right jugular vein using a 1.4F Millar Mikro-tip catheter-transducer. Zymography, western blotting, and quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) were carried out for MMP-9. Immunohistochemistry was performed for α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and Mac-3 antigen. Results Measurement of right ventricular pressure demonstrated 2.5-fold and 3.7-fold elevation after the administration of MCT in wild-type and MMP-9 transgenic mice, respectively. Zymography, western blotting, and qRT-PCR depicted increased activity and expression of MMP-9 after treatment with MCT, which were augmented in transgenic mice. There was marked pulmonary inflammation with extensive infiltration of mononuclear cells, which was more intense in MMP-9 transgenic mice. SMA and Mac-3 staining demonstrated hypertrophy of pulmonary arteries with occlusion of precapillary vessels and extensive infiltration of macrophages, respectively. All these changes were aggravated in MCT-treated MMP-9 transgenic mice when compared to normal littermates. Conclusion Our study demonstrated that the MCT-induced PAH in mouse is a reproducible and potentially valuable animal model for the human disease. Our results further demonstrated that MMP-9 plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of PAH and effective blocking of MMP-9 could provide an option in the therapeutic intervention of human PAH. PMID:21063214

  1. Transgenic expression of human matrix metalloproteinase-9 augments monocrotaline-induced pulmonary arterial hypertension in mice.

    PubMed

    George, Joseph; D'Armiento, Jeanine

    2011-02-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is characterized by intimal lesions, right ventricular hypertrophy, and adventitial thickening of pulmonary arteries with progressive pulmonary hypertension. This investigation was aimed to examine the effects of transgenic expression of human matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9) in the pathogenesis of PAH. PAH was induced using serial subcutaneous administration of monocrotaline (MCT). Right ventricular pressure was measured through the right jugular vein using a 1.4F Millar Mikro-tip catheter-transducer. Zymography, western blotting, and quantitative reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) were carried out for MMP-9. Immunohistochemistry was performed for α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and Mac-3 antigen. Measurement of right ventricular pressure demonstrated 2.5-fold and 3.7-fold elevation after the administration of MCT in wild-type and MMP-9 transgenic mice, respectively. Zymography, western blotting, and qRT-PCR depicted increased activity and expression of MMP-9 after treatment with MCT, which were augmented in transgenic mice. There was marked pulmonary inflammation with extensive infiltration of mononuclear cells, which was more intense in MMP-9 transgenic mice. SMA and Mac-3 staining demonstrated hypertrophy of pulmonary arteries with occlusion of precapillary vessels and extensive infiltration of macrophages, respectively. All these changes were aggravated in MCT-treated MMP-9 transgenic mice when compared to normal littermates. Our study demonstrated that the MCT-induced PAH in mouse is a reproducible and potentially valuable animal model for the human disease. Our results further demonstrated that MMP-9 plays a significant role in the pathogenesis of PAH and effective blocking of MMP-9 could provide an option in the therapeutic intervention of human PAH.

  2. Ligand-Independent Activation of Platelet-Derived Growth Factor Receptor β during Human Immunodeficiency Virus-Transactivator of Transcription and Cocaine-Mediated Smooth Muscle Hyperplasia.

    PubMed

    Dalvi, Pranjali N; Gupta, Vijayalaxmi G; Griffin, Brooke R; O'Brien-Ladner, Amy; Dhillon, Navneet K

    2015-09-01

    Our previous study supports an additive effect of cocaine to human immunodeficiency virus infection in the development of pulmonary arteriopathy through enhancement of proliferation of pulmonary smooth muscle cells (SMCs), while also suggesting involvement of platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR) activation in the absence of further increase in PDGF-BB ligand. Redox-related signaling pathways have been shown to regulate tyrosine kinase receptors independent of ligand binding, so we hypothesized that simultaneous treatment of SMCs with transactivator of transcription (Tat) and cocaine may be able to indirectly activate PDGFR through modulation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) without the need for PDGF binding. We found that blocking the binding of ligand using suramin or monoclonal IMC-3G3 antibody significantly reduced ligand-induced autophosphorylation of Y1009 without affecting ligand-independent transphosphorylation of Y934 residue on PDGFRβ in human pulmonary arterial SMCs treated with both cocaine and Tat. Combined treatment of human pulmonary arterial SMCs with cocaine and Tat resulted in augmented production of superoxide radicals and hydrogen peroxide when compared with either treatment alone. Inhibition of this ROS generation prevented cocaine- and Tat-mediated Src activation and transphosphorylation of PDGFRβ at Y934 without any changes in phosphorylation of Y1009, in addition to attenuation of smooth muscle hyperplasia. Furthermore, pretreatment with an Src inhibitor, PP2, also suppressed cocaine- and Tat-mediated enhanced Y934 phosphorylation and smooth muscle proliferation. Finally, we report total abrogation of cocaine- and Tat-mediated synergistic increase in cell proliferation on inhibition of both ligand-dependent and ROS/Src-mediated ligand-independent phosphorylation of PDGFRβ.

  3. Voltage-gated sodium channel expressed in cultured human smooth muscle cells: involvement of SCN9A.

    PubMed

    Jo, Taisuke; Nagata, Taiji; Iida, Haruko; Imuta, Hiroyuki; Iwasawa, Kuniaki; Ma, Ji; Hara, Kei; Omata, Masao; Nagai, Ryozo; Takizawa, Hajime; Nagase, Takahide; Nakajima, Toshiaki

    2004-06-04

    Voltage-gated Na(+) channel (I(Na)) is expressed under culture conditions in human smooth muscle cells (hSMCs) such as coronary myocytes. The aim of this study is to clarify the physiological, pharmacological and molecular characteristics of I(Na) expressed in cultured hSMCs obtained from bronchus, main pulmonary and coronary artery. I(Na), was recorded in these hSMCs and inhibited by tetrodotoxin (TTX) with an IC(50) value of approximately 10 nM. Reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analysis of mRNA showed the prominent expression of transcripts for SCN9A, which was consistent with the results of real-time quantitative RT-PCR. These results provide novel evidence that TTX-sensitive Na(+) channel expressed in cultured hSMCs is mainly composed of Na(v)1.7.

  4. Caffeine inhibits InsP3 responses and capacitative calcium entry in canine pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Hume, Joseph R.; McAllister, Claire E.; Wilson, Sean M

    2009-01-01

    Caffeine is a well described and characterized ryanodine receptor (RyR) activator. Previous evidence from independent research studies also indicate caffeine inhibits InsP3 receptor functionality, which is important to activation of capacitative Ca2+ entry (CCE) in some cell types. In addition, RyR activation elicits excitatory-coupled Ca2+ entry (ECCE) in skeletal muscle myotubes. Recent studies by our group show that canine pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) have functional InsP3 receptors as well as RyRs, and that CCE is dependent on InsP3 receptor activity. The potential for caffeine to activate ECCE as well as inhibit InsP3 receptor function and CCE was examined using fura-2 fluorescent imaging in canine PASMCs. The data show caffeine causes transient as well as sustained cytosolic Ca2+ increases, though this is not due to CCE or ECCE activity as evidenced by a lack of an increase in Mn2+ quench of fura-2. The experiments also show caffeine reversibly inhibits 5-HT elicited – InsP3 mediated Ca2+ responses with an IC50 of 6.87 × 10−4 M and 10 mM caffeine fully inhibits CCE. These studies provide the first evidence that caffeine is an inhibitor of InsP3 generated Ca2+ signals and CCE in PASMCs. PMID:19084078

  5. Caffeine inhibits InsP3 responses and capacitative calcium entry in canine pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Hume, Joseph R; McAllister, Claire E; Wilson, Sean M

    2009-01-01

    Caffeine is a well described and characterized ryanodine receptor (RyR) activator. Previous evidence from independent research studies also indicate caffeine inhibits InsP3 receptor functionality, which is important to activation of capacitative Ca2+ entry (CCE) in some cell types. In addition, RyR activation elicits excitatory-coupled Ca2+ entry (ECCE) in skeletal muscle myotubes. Recent studies by our group show that canine pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) have functional InsP3 receptors as well as RyRs, and that CCE is dependent on InsP3 receptor activity. The potential for caffeine to activate ECCE as well as inhibit InsP3 receptor function and CCE was examined using fura-2 fluorescent imaging in canine PASMCs. The data show caffeine causes transient as well as sustained cytosolic Ca2+ increases, though this is not due to CCE or ECCE activity as evidenced by a lack of an increase in Mn2+ quench of fura-2. The experiments also show caffeine reversibly inhibits 5-HT elicited-InsP3 mediated Ca2+ responses with an IC50 of 6.87x10(-4) M and 10 mM caffeine fully inhibits CCE. These studies provide the first evidence that caffeine is an inhibitor of InsP3 generated Ca2+ signals and CCE in PASMCs.

  6. Primary pulmonary hypertension associated with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed Central

    Golpe, R.; Fernandez-Infante, B.; Fernandez-Rozas, S.

    1998-01-01

    Several cardiorespiratory diseases can complicate human immunodeficiency virus infection. Primary pulmonary hypertension is a rare clinical disorder which carries a bad prognosis. More than 90 cases of HIV-associated primary pulmonary hypertension have been reported to date. Although its pathogenesis remains unknown, some evidence suggests a possible role for the virus itself in its development. Genetic susceptibility may also be implicated. The clinical and histopathologic features of this entity do not differ from those of classic primary pulmonary hypertension. The diagnosis requires a high degree of clinical suspicion and a careful evaluation to rule out causes of secondary pulmonary hypertension. In addition to supportive measures, anticoagulation and vasodilators have been used to treat this disorder, although sufficient data regarding long-term results with these therapies are lacking. PMID:9799910

  7. Primary pulmonary hypertension associated with human immunodeficiency virus infection.

    PubMed

    Golpe, R; Fernandez-Infante, B; Fernandez-Rozas, S

    1998-07-01

    Several cardiorespiratory diseases can complicate human immunodeficiency virus infection. Primary pulmonary hypertension is a rare clinical disorder which carries a bad prognosis. More than 90 cases of HIV-associated primary pulmonary hypertension have been reported to date. Although its pathogenesis remains unknown, some evidence suggests a possible role for the virus itself in its development. Genetic susceptibility may also be implicated. The clinical and histopathologic features of this entity do not differ from those of classic primary pulmonary hypertension. The diagnosis requires a high degree of clinical suspicion and a careful evaluation to rule out causes of secondary pulmonary hypertension. In addition to supportive measures, anticoagulation and vasodilators have been used to treat this disorder, although sufficient data regarding long-term results with these therapies are lacking.

  8. BMP4 inhibits PDGF-induced proliferation and collagen synthesis via PKA-mediated inhibition of calpain-2 in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Cai, Pengcheng; Kovacs, Laszlo; Dong, Sam; Wu, Guangyu; Su, Yunchao

    2017-05-01

    In the present study, we investigated the effect of bone morphogenetic protein 4 (BMP4) on PDGF-induced cell proliferation and collagen synthesis in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). Normal human PASMCs were incubated with and without PDGF-BB in the absence and presence of BMP4 for 0.5 to 24 h. The protein levels of collagen-I, p-Smad2/3, p-Smad1/5, and intracellular active TGF-β1, calpain activity, and cell proliferation were then measured. The results showed that BMP4 induced an increase in p-Smad1/5 but had no effect on the protein levels of collagen-I, p-Smad2/3, and intracellular active TGF-β1 and calpain activity in control PASMCs. Nevertheless, BMP4 attenuated increases in cell proliferation and protein levels of collagen-I, p-Smad2/3, and intracellular active TGF-β1 and calpain activity in PASMCs exposed to PDGF-BB. Moreover, BMP4 increased PKA activity and inhibition of PKA prevented the inhibitory effects of BMP4 on PDGF-BB-induced calpain activation in normal PASMCs. The PKA activator forskolin recapitulated the suppressive effect of BMP4 on PDGF-induced calpain activation. Furthermore, BMP4 prevented a PDGF-induced decrease in calpain-2 phosphorylation at serine-369 in normal PASMCs. Finally, BMP4 did not attenuate PDGF-induced increases in cell proliferation, collagen-I protein levels, and calpain activation and did not induce PKA activation and did not prevent a PDGF-induced decrease in calpain-2 phosphorylation at serine-369 in PASMCs from idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) patients. These data demonstrate that BMP4 inhibits PDGF-induced cell proliferation and collagen synthesis via PKA-mediated inhibition of calpain-2 in normal PASMCs. The inhibitory effects of BMP4 on PDGF-induced cell proliferation, collagen synthesis, and calpain-2 activation are impaired in PASMCs from PAH patients, which may contribute to pulmonary vascular remodeling in PAH.

  9. Suppression of Akt1 phosphorylation by adenoviral transfer of the PTEN gene inhibits hypoxia-induced proliferation of rat pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Luo, Chunxia; Yi, Bin; Bai, Li; Xia, Yongzhi; Wang, Guansong; Qian, Guisheng; Feng, Hua

    2010-07-02

    Recent findings identify the role of proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) in pulmonary vascular remodeling. Phosphoinositide 3 kinase (PI3K) and serine/threonine kinase (Akt) proteins are expressed in vascular smooth muscle cells. In addition, phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) has been identified as a negative regulator of cytokine signaling that inhibits the PI3K-Akt pathway. However, little is known about the role of PTEN/Akt signaling in hypoxia-associated vascular remodeling. In this study, we found that hypoxia-induced the expression of Akt1 mRNA and phosphorylated protein by at least twofold in rat PASMCs. Phospho-PTEN significantly decreased in the nuclei of PASMCs after hypoxic stimulation. After forcing over-expression of PTEN by adenovirus-mediated PTEN (Ad-PTEN) transfection, the expression of phospho-Akt1 was significantly suppressed in PASMCs at all time-points measured. Additionally, we showed here that hypoxia increased proliferation of PASMCs by nearly twofold and over-expression of PTEN significantly inhibited hypoxia-induced PASMCs proliferation. These findings suggest that phospho-PTEN loss in the nuclei of PASMCs under hypoxic conditions may be the major cause of aberrant activation of Akt1 and may, therefore, play an important role in hypoxia-associated pulmonary arterial remodeling. Finally, the fact that transfection with Ad-PTEN inhibits the phosphorylation of Akt1 in PASMCs suggests a potential therapeutic effect on hypoxia-associated pulmonary arterial remodeling.

  10. SREBP inhibits VEGF expression in human smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Motoyama, Koka; Fukumoto, Shinya . E-mail: sfukumoto@med.osaka-cu.ac.jp; Koyama, Hidenori; Emoto, Masanori; Shimano, Hitoshi; Maemura, Koji; Nishizawa, Yoshiki

    2006-03-31

    Sterol regulatory element-binding proteins (SREBPs) are transcription factors that regulate expression of genes encoding enzymes for lipid biosynthesis. SREBPs are activated by HMG-CoA reductase inhibitors (statins). Statins have been also reported to suppress vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Therefore, we hypothesized that SREBPs are involved in statin-mediated regulation of VEGF production in VSMCs. SREBP1 was robustly expressed, and was activated by atorvastatin in VSMCs, as demonstrated by increased levels of the mature nuclear form of SREBP1, and increased promoter activities of a reporter containing sterol regulatory elements by atorvastatin. Moreover, overexpression of SREBP1a dose-dependently suppressed VEGF promoter activity. Site-specific mutation or deletion of the proximal Sp1 sites reduced the inhibitory effects of SREBP1a on VEGF promoter activity. These data demonstrated that SREBP1, activated by atorvastatin, suppressed VEGF expression through the indirect interaction with the proximal tandem Sp1 sites in VSMCs.

  11. Identification of human pulmonary alkaline phosphatase isoenzymes.

    PubMed

    Capelli, A; Cerutti, C G; Lusuardi, M; Donner, C F

    1997-04-01

    An increase of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity has been observed in the bronchoalveolar lavage fluid (BALF) of patients affected by pulmonary fibrosis in chronic interstitial lung disorders. To characterize the ALP isoenzymes in such cases, we used gel filtration, agarose gel electrophoresis, heat and amino acid inhibition assays, wheat-germ agglutinin (WGA) precipitation, and an immunoassay specific for the bone-isoform of ALP. Only one anodic band representing a high-molecular-weight isoform of ALP (Mr approximately 2,000 kDa) was observed on electrophoresis of BALF. The inhibition assay results were consistent for a tissue-nonspecific isoenzyme sensitive to a temperature of 56 degrees C (71.9 +/- 2.5% inhibition) and to homoarginine (65.7 +/- 1.9%), and resistant to L-phenylalanine and L-leucine. Less than 13% of ALP activity was heat-stable. After incubation of BALF specimens with glycosyl-phosphatidylinositol-phospholipase D plus Nonidet P-40, or with phosphatidylinositol-phospholipase C alone, an electrophoretic cathodic band (Mr approximately 220 kDa) appeared near the bone band of a standard serum. With the WGA assay, 84.4 +/- 3.3% of ALP precipitated and the band disappeared. After immunoassay for the bone isoform, a mean of less than 5% enzyme activity was measured. We conclude that the ALP found in BALF is a pulmonary isoform of a tissue nonspecific isoenzyme.

  12. [Pulmonary arterial hypertension associated to human immunodeficiency virus].

    PubMed

    Sandoval-Gutiérrez, José Luis; Santos-Martínez, Luis Efren; Rodríguez-Silverio, Juan; Baranda-Tovar, Francisco Martín; Rivera-Rosales, Rosa María; Flores-Murrieta, Francisco Javier

    2015-01-01

    From the advent of the highly effective antiretroviral treatment, the life expectancy of patients with human immunodeficiency virus has increased significantly. At present, the causes of death are non-infectious complications. Between them, the pulmonary arterial hypertension has a special importance. It is important early detection to establish the therapeutic, with the objective of preventing a fatal outcome to future.

  13. Ranolazine inhibits voltage-gated mechanosensitive sodium channels in human colon circular smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Neshatian, Leila; Strege, Peter R.; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Kraichely, Robert E.; Mazzone, Amelia; Bernard, Cheryl E.; Cima, Robert R.; Larson, David W.; Dozois, Eric J.; Kline, Crystal F.; Mohler, Peter J.; Beyder, Arthur

    2015-01-01

    Human jejunum smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) express the SCN5A-encoded voltage-gated, mechanosensitive sodium channel NaV1.5. NaV1.5 contributes to small bowel excitability, and NaV1.5 inhibitor ranolazine produces constipation by an unknown mechanism. We aimed to determine the presence and molecular identity of Na+ current in the human colon smooth muscle and to examine the effects of ranolazine on Na+ current, mechanosensitivity, and smooth muscle contractility. Inward currents were recorded by whole cell voltage clamp from freshly dissociated human colon SMCs at rest and with shear stress. SCN5A mRNA and NaV1.5 protein were examined by RT-PCR and Western blots, respectively. Ascending human colon strip contractility was examined in a muscle bath preparation. SCN5A mRNA and NaV1.5 protein were identified in human colon circular muscle. Freshly dissociated human colon SMCs had Na+ currents (−1.36 ± 0.36 pA/pF), shear stress increased Na+ peaks by 17.8 ± 1.8% and accelerated the time to peak activation by 0.7 ± 0.3 ms. Ranolazine (50 μM) blocked peak Na+ current by 43.2 ± 9.3% and inhibited shear sensitivity by 25.2 ± 3.2%. In human ascending colon strips, ranolazine decreased resting tension (31%), reduced the frequency of spontaneous events (68%), and decreased the response to smooth muscle electrical field stimulation (61%). In conclusion, SCN5A-encoded NaV1.5 is found in human colonic circular smooth muscle. Ranolazine blocks both peak amplitude and mechanosensitivity of Na+ current in human colon SMCs and decreases contractility of human colon muscle strips. Our data provide a likely mechanistic explanation for constipation induced by ranolazine. PMID:26185330

  14. Smooth muscle in the wall of the developing human urinary bladder and urethra.

    PubMed Central

    Gilpin, S A; Gosling, J A

    1983-01-01

    A series of human fetal and neonatal specimens ranging in age from the second month of intrauterine development to 4 1/2 years after birth has been examined using histological and histochemical techniques. In both sexes histologically differentiated smooth muscle cells were evident in the bladder wall from the 52 mm crown-rump length stage onwards--urethral smooth muscle was not distinguishable until 119 mm crown-rump length. In addition to relatively late differentiation, urethral smooth muscle was histochemically distinct from the urinary bladder detrusor muscle. Sex differences in the arrangement and innervation of smooth muscle in the proximal urethra have also been observed, and these findings lend support to the presence of a pre-prostatic urethra sphincter. It seems likely that this sphincter acts principally to prevent reflux of ejaculate into the bladder during seminal emission. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 Fig. 5 Fig. 6 Fig. 7 PMID:6654742

  15. Differential regulation of smooth muscle markers in human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hegner, Björn; Weber, Manfred; Dragun, Duska; Schulze-Lohoff, Eckhard

    2005-06-01

    To study smooth-muscle differentiation and de-differentiation of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), which have been shown to enter the circulation and to contribute to vascular repair and atherosclerosis. Human MSCs from bone marrow were cultured with 20% fetal calf serum (FCS) or with 10% FCS and various concentrations of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO). Expression of smooth muscle markers was determined by Western blot analysis and immunofluorescence. For signalling studies, involvement of the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) pathway was tested by treatment with rapamycin. MSCs cultured with 20% FCS acquired a smooth muscle-like appearance and expressed the smooth muscle (sm) markers sm-alpha-actin, desmin, sm-calponin and myosin light chain kinase (MLCK). DMSO induced a spindle-like morphology with marked reduction of stress fibers. As judged by Western blot analysis, treatment with 2.5% DMSO strongly downregulated expression of sm-calponin (-85%), short MLCK (-98%) and sm-alpha-actin expression (-51%). Reduced calponin expression was detected by day 2 of treatment with 0.5-2.5% DMSO. After withdrawal of DMSO, MSCs regained high expression of sm-calponin. Treatment with 6 nmol/l rapamycin partly antagonized the effect of DMSO, indicating the involvement of mTOR in regulation of the smooth muscle phenotype of MSCs. DMSO strongly downregulates the smooth muscle markers sm-calponin, short MLCK and sm-alpha-actin in human MSCs, indicating a transition from a smooth muscle-like phenotype to an undifferentiated state by an mTOR-dependent mechanism. Regulating the phenotype of human MSCs may be of relevance for novel therapeutic approaches in atherosclerosis and intimal hyperplasia after vascular injury.

  16. Hypoxic Pulmonary Vasoconstriction in Humans: Tale or Myth

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, A.; Suleiman, M.S.; George, S.J.; Loubani, M.; Morice, A.

    2017-01-01

    Hypoxic Pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) describes the physiological adaptive process of lungs to preserves systemic oxygenation. It has clinical implications in the development of pulmonary hypertension which impacts on outcomes of patients undergoing cardiothoracic surgery. This review examines both acute and chronic hypoxic vasoconstriction focusing on the distinct clinical implications and highlights the role of calcium and mitochondria in acute versus the role of reactive oxygen species and Rho GTPases in chronic HPV. Furthermore it identifies gaps of knowledge and need for further research in humans to clearly define this phenomenon and the underlying mechanism. PMID:28217180

  17. Cross-talk between p(38)MAPK and G iα in regulating cPLA 2 activity by ET-1 in pulmonary smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Chakraborti, Sajal; Chowdhury, Animesh; Chakraborti, Tapati

    2015-02-01

    Endothelin-1 (ET-1) is known as the most potent vasoconstrictor yet described. Infusion of ET-1 into isolated rabbit lung has been shown to cause pulmonary vasoconstriction with the involvement of arachidonic acid metabolites. Given the potency of arachidonic acid metabolites, the activity of phospholipase A2 must be tightly regulated. Herein, we determined the mechanisms by which ET-1 stimulates cPLA2 activity during ET-1 stimulation of bovine pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. We demonstrated that (i) treatment of bovine pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells with ET-1 stimulates cPLA2 activity in the cell membrane; (ii) ET-1 caused increase in O 2 (·-) production occurs via NADPH oxidase-dependent mechanism; (iii) ET-1-stimulated NADPH oxidase activity is markedly prevented upon pretreatment with PKC-ζ inhibitor, indicating that PKC-ζ plays a prominent role in this scenario; (iv) ET-1-induced NADPH oxidase-derived O 2 (·-) stimulates an aprotinin sensitive protease activity due to prominent increase in [Ca(2+)]i; (v) the aprotinin sensitive protease plays a pivotal role in activating PKC-α, which in turn phosphorylates p(38)MAPK and subsequently Giα leading to the activation of cPLA2. Taken together, we suggest that cross-talk between p(38)MAPK and Giα with the involvement of PKC-ζ, NADPH oxidase-derived O 2 (·-) , [Ca(2+)]i, aprotinin-sensitive protease and PKC-α play a pivotal role for full activation of cPLA2 during ET-1 stimulation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells.

  18. Human insulin microcrystals with lactose carriers for pulmonary delivery.

    PubMed

    Lim, Se-Hwan; Park, Hye Won; Shin, Chang-Hoon; Kwon, Jai-Hyun; Kim, Chan-Wha

    2009-12-01

    Dry powder formulations for pulmonary delivery are attractive because many issues of solubility and stability can be minimized. Human insulin microcrystals with lactose carriers were produced for pulmonary delivery. The average particle diameter was 2.3 microm, with a narrow, monodispersed size distribution. The percentages of high molecular weight proteins (%HMWPs), other insulin-related compounds (%OIRCs), and A-21 desamido insulin (%D(es)) were very low throughout the microcrystal preparation process. Administration of the microcrystal powder by intratracheal insufflation significantly reduced the blood glucose levels of Sprague-Dawley rats. The percent minimum reductions of the blood glucose concentration (%MRBG) produced by the insulin microcrystal powder and by an insulin solution reached 40.4% and 33.4% of the initial glucose levels respectively, and their bioavailability relative to subcutaneous injection (F) was 15% and 10% respectively. These results confirm that the insulin microcrystal powder prepared is suitable for pulmonary delivery in an effective dosage form.

  19. Baicalin Inhibits Hypoxia-Induced Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation via the AKT/HIF-1α/p27-Associated Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lin; Pu, Zhichen; Wang, Junsong; Zhang, Zhifeng; Hu, Dongmei; Wang, Junjie

    2014-01-01

    Baicalin, a flavonoid compound purified from the dry roots of Scutellaria baicalensis Georgi, has been shown to possess various pharmacological actions. Previous studies have revealed that baicalin inhibits the growth of cancer cells through the induction of apoptosis. Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a devastating disease characterized by enhanced pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMCs) proliferation and suppressed apoptosis. However, the potential mechanism of baicalin in the regulation of PASMC proliferation and the prevention of cardiovascular diseases remains unexplored. To test the effects of baicalin on hypoxia, we used rats treated with or without baicalin (100 mg·kg−1 each rat) at the beginning of the third week after hypoxia. Hemodynamic and pulmonary pathomorphology data showed that right ventricular systolic pressures (RVSP), the weight of the right ventricle/left ventricle plus septum (RV/LV + S) ratio and the medial width of pulmonary arterioles were much higher in chronic hypoxia. However, baicalin treatment repressed the elevation of RVSP, RV/LV + S and attenuated the pulmonary vascular structure remodeling (PVSR) of pulmonary arterioles induced by chronic hypoxia. Additionally, baicalin (10 and 20 μmol·L−1) treatment suppressed the proliferation of PASMCs and attenuated the expression of hypoxia-inducible factor-α (HIF-α) under hypoxia exposure. Meanwhile, baicalin reversed the hypoxia-induced reduction of p27 and increased AKT/protein kinase B phosphorylation p-AKT both in vivo and in vitro. These results suggested that baicalin could effectively attenuate PVSR and hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. PMID:24821539

  20. Pri-microRNA-124 rs531564 polymorphism minor allele increases the risk of pulmonary artery hypertension by abnormally enhancing proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Quanzhong; Qian, Zongjie; Wang, Linqing

    2017-01-01

    MicroRNA-124 (miR-124) has been reported to be downregulated in the cells exposed to hypoxia, which was confirmed in our study. We then used online microRNA target prediction tools to identify GRB2, SMAD5, and JAG1 as the candidate target genes of miR-124, and we next validated GRB2 as a direct gene by using luciferase reporter system. We also established the regulatory relationship between miR-124 and GRB2 by showing the negative linear relationship between GRB2 and miR-124 expression. Furthermore, we investigated the miR-124 and GRB2 expression levels of different genotypes including CC (n=30), GC (n=18), and GG (n=4), which supported the hypothesis that the presence of minor allele (C) of rs531564 polymorphism compromised the expression of miR-124. Meanwhile, we also conducted real-time polymerase chain reaction and Western blot analysis to study the expression of GRB2 among different genotypes or pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) treated with miR-124 mimics, GRB2 small interfering RNA, and miR-124 inhibitors, respectively, and found that introduction of miR-124 or GRB2 small interfering RNA could reduce the expression of GRB2 and inhibit the proliferation of PASMCs, while miR-124 upregulated the expression of GRB2 and promoted the proliferation of PASMCs. A total of 412 COPD patients with PAH (n=182) or without PAH (n=230) were recruited in this study, and more individuals carrying at least one minor allele of rs531564 were found in the COPD patients with PAH than in those without PAH (odds ratio: 0.61, 95% confidence interval: 0.41-0.91; P=0.166). In conclusion, the presence of rs531564 minor allele may increase the risk of PAH in COPD by reducing miR-124 expression, increasing GRB2 expression, and promoting the proliferation of PASMCs.

  1. Vascular Remodeling in Pulmonary Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Shimoda, Larissa A; Laurie, Steven S.

    2013-01-01

    Pulmonary hypertension is a complex, progressive condition arising from a variety of genetic and pathogenic causes. Patients present with a spectrum of histologic and pathophysiological features, likely reflecting the diversity in underlying pathogenesis. It is widely recognized that structural alterations in the vascular wall contribute to all forms of pulmonary hypertension. Features characteristic of the remodeled vasculature in patients with pulmonary hypertension include increased stiffening of the elastic proximal pulmonary arteries, thickening of the intimal and/or medial layer of muscular arteries, development of vaso-occlusive lesions and the appearance of cells expressing smooth muscle specific markers in normally non-muscular small diameter vessels, resulting from proliferation and migration of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells and cellular trans-differentiation. The development of several animal models of pulmonary hypertension has provided the means to explore the mechanistic underpinnings of pulmonary vascular remodeling, although none of the experimental models currently used entirely replicates the pulmonary arterial hypertension observed in patients. Herein, we provide an overview of the histological abnormalities observed in humans with pulmonary hypertension and in preclinical models and discuss insights gained regarding several key signaling pathways contributing to the remodeling process. In particular, we will focus on the roles of ion homeostasis, endothelin-1, serotonin, bone morphogenetic proteins, Rho kinase and hypoxia-inducible factor 1 in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle and endothelial cells, highlighting areas of cross-talk between these pathways and potentials for therapeutic targeting. PMID:23334338

  2. Model emulates human smooth pursuit system producing zero-latency target tracking.

    PubMed

    Bahill, A T; McDonald, J D

    1983-01-01

    Humans can overcome the 150 ms time delay of the smooth pursuit eye movement system and track smoothly moving visual targets with zero-latency. Our target-selective adaptive control model can also overcome an inherent time delay and produce zero-latency tracking. No other model or man-made system can do this. Our model is physically realizable and physiologically realistic. The technique used in our model should be useful for analyzing other time-delay systems, such as man-machine systems and robots.

  3. Dihydropyridine Ca2+ Channel Blockers Increase Cytosolic [Ca2+] by Activating Ca2+-sensing Receptors in Pulmonary Arterial Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Yamamura, Aya; Yamamura, Hisao; Guo, Qiang; Zimnicka, Adriana M.; Wan, Jun; Ko, Eun A.; Smith, Kimberly A.; Pohl, Nicole M.; Song, Shanshan; Zeifman, Amy; Makino, Ayako; Yuan, Jason X.J.

    2013-01-01

    Rationale An increase in cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]cyt) in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC) is a major trigger for pulmonary vasoconstriction and an important stimulus for PASMC proliferation and pulmonary vascular remodeling. The dihydropyridine Ca2+ channel blockers, such as nifedipine, have been used for treatment of idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH). Objective Our previous study demonstrated that the Ca2+-sensing receptor (CaSR) was upregulated and the extracellular Ca2+-induced increase in [Ca2+]cyt was enhanced in PASMC from patients with IPAH and animals with experimental pulmonary hypertension. Here, we report that the dihydropyridines (e.g., nifedipine) increase [Ca2+]cyt by activating CaSR in PASMC from IPAH patients (in which CaSR is upregulated), but not in normal PASMC. Methods and Results The nifedipine-mediated increase in [Ca2+]cyt in IPAH-PASMC was concentration dependent with an EC50 of 0.20 µM. Knockdown of CaSR with siRNA in IPAH-PASMC significantly inhibited the nifedipine-induced increase in [Ca2+]cyt, whereas overexpression of CaSR in normal PASMC conferred the nifedipine-induced rise in [Ca2+]cyt. Other dihydropyridines, nicardipine and Bay K8644, had similar augmenting effects on the CaSR-mediated increase in [Ca2+]cyt in IPAH-PASMC; however, the non-dihydropyridine blockers, such as diltiazem and verapamil, had no effect on the CaSR-mediated rise in [Ca2+]cyt. Conclusions The dihydropyridine derivatives increase [Ca2+]cyt by potentiating the activity of CaSR in PASMC independently of their blocking (or activating) effect on Ca2+ channels; therefore, it is possible that use the dihydropyridine Ca2+ channel blockers (e.g., nifedipine) to treat IPAH patients with upregulated CaSR in PASMC may exacerbate pulmonary hypertension. PMID:23300272

  4. Pulmonary ultrastructure of the late aspects of human paraquat poisoning.

    PubMed Central

    Dearden, L. C.; Fairshter, R. D.; McRae, D. M.; Smith, W. R.; Glauser, F. L.; Wilson, A. F.

    1978-01-01

    The pulmonary ultrastructure of the late aspects of a case of human paraquat poisoning is investigated and compared with normal human pulmonary ultrastructure. Alveoli in the paraquat patient are numerically reduced in comparison to the control. They are filled with edematous proteinaceous plasma-like fluid containing erythrocytes, macrophages, leukocytes, fibroblast-like cells, platelets, and fibrin. These alveoli are lined by granular pneumocytes. Interstitial areas in the paraquat patient are greatly expanded and there are no alveolar septums. Interstitial areas contain proteinaceous plasma-like material, collagen, fibrin, platelets, mature fibroblasts, plasma cells, many leukocytes, numerous erythrocytes, and capillaries. Capillary permeability seems to be enhanced in the paraquat patient either by vesicles forming transendothelial channels or pores or by disruption of endothelial cells. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figures 3-7 Figure 8 Figure 9 Figure 10 Figure 11 PMID:213978

  5. The Na+/H+ exchanger contributes to increased smooth muscle proliferation and migration in a rat model of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Huetsch, John C; Jiang, Haiyang; Larrain, Carolina; Shimoda, Larissa A

    2016-03-01

    Increased muscularity of small pulmonary vessels, involving enhanced proliferation and migration of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs), is a key component of the vascular remodeling underlying the development of pulmonary hypertension (PH). Stimuli such as growth factors and hypoxia induce PASMC alkalinization, proliferation, and migration through upregulation of the Na(+)/H(+) exchanger (NHE), inhibition of which prevents the development of hypoxia-induced vascular remodeling and PH. We wanted to explore whether NHE was also necessary for pathologic PASMC proliferation and migration in a model of pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a severe form of PH not associated with persistent hypoxia. PASMCs were isolated from rats exposed to SU5416-hypoxia (SuHx) followed by return to normoxia and from vehicle controls. We measured resting intracellular pH (pHi) and NHE activity using the pH-sensitive fluorescent dye BCECF-AM. PASMC proliferation and migration were assessed using BrdU incorporation and transwell filters, respectively. NHE activity was increased in SuHx PASMCs, although resting pHi was unchanged. SuHx PASMCs also exhibited increased proliferation and migration relative to controls, which was attenuated in the setting of pharmacologic inhibition of NHE. Our findings suggest that increased NHE activity contributes to pathologic PASMC function in the SuHx model of PAH, although this effect does not appear to be mediated by global changes in pHi homeostasis.

  6. MicroRNA-190 regulates hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction by targeting a voltage-gated K⁺ channel in arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Li, Shan-Shan; Ran, Ya-Juan; Zhang, Dan-Dan; Li, Shu-Zhen; Zhu, Daling

    2014-06-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is associated with sustained vasoconstriction, profound structural remodeling of vasculatures and alterations in Ca(2+) homeostasis in arterial smooth muscle cells (SMCs), while the underlying mechanisms are still elusive. By regulating the expression of proteins, microRNAs (miRNAs) are known to play an important role in cell fates including differentiation, apoptosis and proliferation, and may be involved in the development of PAH. Based on our previous study, hypoxia produced a significant increase of the miR-190 level in the pulmonary artery (PA), here, we used synthetic miR-190 to mimic the increase in hypoxic conditions and showed evidence for the effects of miR-190 on pulmonary arterial vasoconstriction and Ca(2+) influx in arterial SMCs. Synthetic miR-190 remarkably enhanced the vasoconstriction responses to phenylephrine (PE) and KCl. The voltage-gated K(+) channel subfamily member, Kcnq5, mRNA was shown to be a target for miR-190. Meanwhile, miR-190 antisense oligos can partially reverse the effects of miR-190 on PASMCs and PAs. Therefore, these results suggest that miR-190 appears to be a positive regulator of Ca(2+) influx, and plays an important role in hypoxic pulmonary vascular constriction. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. [Vascular smooth muscle cells from human umbilical artery undergo osteoblast differentiation and calcification in vitro].

    PubMed

    Guo, Yong Ping; Sun, Ming Shu; Qian, Jia Qi; Ni, Zhao Hui

    2008-04-01

    To research if the vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) from human umbilical artery undergo osteoblast differentiation spontaneously in vitro. The growth curve of vascular smooth muscle cells from human umbilical artery was obtained by MTT method. The course of multicell nodule formation spontaneously by VSMCs was observed morphologically. The apoptosis of VSMCs in the nodules was detected by Hoechst 33258 and TUNEL methods respectively. The expression of alkaline phosphotase in the nodules was detected by immunohistochemical method. And the calcification was studied with transmission electron microscope and by alizarin red S respectively. We found that the umbilical artery smooth muscle cells confluenced after 7 days of passage and exhibited typical "hill and valley" pattern under light microscope. The cells grew into aggregation and formed nodules at the "hill" region with culture-time prolongation. After 4-5 weeks culture, these nodules built up and calcified spontaneously. We also found alkaline phosphotase expression and apoptosis of VSMCs in these nodules at the same time. We conclude that the vascular smooth muscle cells from human umbilical artery just like from aortic artery can undergo osteoblast differentiation spontaneously in vitro, and apoptosis participate this procedure probably.

  8. Smooth versus Textured Surfaces: Feature-Based Category Selectivity in Human Visual Cortex

    PubMed Central

    Tootell, Roger

    2016-01-01

    Abstract In fMRI studies, human lateral occipital (LO) cortex is thought to respond selectively to images of objects, compared with nonobjects. However, it remains unresolved whether all objects evoke equivalent levels of activity in LO, and, if not, which image features produce stronger activation. Here, we used an unbiased parametric texture model to predict preferred versus nonpreferred stimuli in LO. Observation and psychophysical results showed that predicted preferred stimuli (both objects and nonobjects) had smooth (rather than textured) surfaces. These predictions were confirmed using fMRI, for objects and nonobjects. Similar preferences were also found in the fusiform face area (FFA). Consistent with this: (1) FFA and LO responded more strongly to nonfreckled (smooth) faces, compared with otherwise identical freckled (textured) faces; and (2) strong functional connections were found between LO and FFA. Thus, LO and FFA may be part of an information-processing stream distinguished by feature-based category selectivity (smooth > textured). PMID:27699206

  9. Influence of micropattern width on differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells to vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Nakamoto, Tomoko; Wang, Xinlong; Kawazoe, Naoki; Chen, Guoping

    2014-10-01

    In recent years, various approaches have been taken to generate functional muscle tissue by tissue engineering. However, in vitro methods to generate smooth muscle with physiologically aligned structure remains limited. In order to mimic the in vivo highly organized structure of smooth muscle cells, we used micropatterning technology for engineering parallel aligned cells. In this study, a gradient micropattern of different width of cell-adhesive polystyrene stripes (5, 10, 20, 40, 60, 80, 100, 200, 400, 600, 800 and 1000μm) was prepared and the effects of micropattern width on human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) orientation, morphology and smooth muscle cell differentiation were investigated. The width of micropattern stripes showed obvious effect on cell orientation, morphology and smooth muscle cell differentiation. The cells showed higher degree of orientation when the micropattern stripes became narrower. Higher expression of calponin and smooth muscle actin was observed among the narrow micropatterns ranging from 200μm to 20μm, compared to the non-patterned area and wide micropattern areas which showed similar levels of expression.

  10. Human pulmonary dirofilariasis coexisting with intercostal neurilemmoma: a case report and literature review.

    PubMed

    Li, Chia-Ying; Chang, Yih-Leong; Lee, Yung-Chie

    2013-10-01

    Human pulmonary dirofilariasis (HPD) is a rare zoonotic infection caused by Dirofilaria immitis. Dogs are the definite hosts and humans are infected occasionally via a vector, generally a mosquito. Most thoracic neurilemmoma arise in the mediastinum and fewer tumors originate peripherally from the intercostal nerves. Most patients with HPD or thoracic neurilemmoma are asymptomatic and these diseases are often discovered incidentally. We present a 53-year-old female who was found to have a pulmonary nodule and a chest wall nodule during a routine health examination. She underwent a video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) with partial lung resection and local excision of the chest wall. The pathological examination revealed a coiled, degenerating Dirofilariasis immitis worm surrounded by granulomatous inflammation with caseous necrosis and a neurilemmoma composed of S-100 protein immunoreactive but smooth muscle actin negative spindle cells. Because these diseases are self-limiting and make further treatment unnecessary, video-assisted thoracoscopic surgery (VATS) is considered preferable and less invasive for definitive diagnosis and management.

  11. A new paradigm for the role of smooth muscle cells in the human cervix.

    PubMed

    Vink, Joy Y; Qin, Sisi; Brock, Clifton O; Zork, Noelia M; Feltovich, Helen M; Chen, Xiaowei; Urie, Paul; Myers, Kristin M; Hall, Timothy J; Wapner, Ronald; Kitajewski, Jan K; Shawber, Carrie J; Gallos, George

    2016-10-01

    Premature cervical remodeling resulting in spontaneous preterm birth may begin with premature failure or relaxation at the internal os (termed "funneling"). To date, we do not understand why the internal os fails or why funneling occurs in some cases of premature cervical remodeling. Although the human cervix is thought to be mostly collagen with minimal cellular content, cervical smooth muscle cells are present in the cervix and can cause cervical tissue contractility. To understand why the internal os relaxes or why funneling occurs in some cases of premature cervical remodeling, we sought to evaluate cervical smooth muscle cell content and distribution throughout human cervix and correlate if cervical smooth muscle organization influences regional cervical tissue contractility. Using institutional review board-approved protocols, nonpregnant women <50 years old undergoing hysterectomy for benign indications were consented. Cervical tissue from the internal and external os were immunostained for smooth muscle cell markers (α-smooth muscle actin, smooth muscle protein 22 calponin) and contraction-associated proteins (connexin 43, cyclooxygenase-2, oxytocin receptor). To evaluate cervical smooth muscle cell morphology throughout the entire cervix, whole cervical slices were obtained from the internal os, midcervix, and external os and immunostained with smooth muscle actin. To correlate tissue structure with function, whole slices from the internal and external os were stimulated to contract with 1 μmol/L of oxytocin in organ baths. In separate samples, we tested if the cervix responds to a common tocolytic, nifedipine. Cervical slices from the internal os were treated with oxytocin alone or oxytocin + increasing doses of nifedipine to generate a dose response and half maximal inhibitory concentration. Student t test was used where appropriate. Cervical tissue was collected from 41 women. Immunohistochemistry showed cervical smooth muscle cells at the internal

  12. Ranolazine inhibits voltage-gated mechanosensitive sodium channels in human colon circular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Neshatian, Leila; Strege, Peter R; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Kraichely, Robert E; Mazzone, Amelia; Bernard, Cheryl E; Cima, Robert R; Larson, David W; Dozois, Eric J; Kline, Crystal F; Mohler, Peter J; Beyder, Arthur; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2015-09-15

    Human jejunum smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and interstitial cells of Cajal (ICCs) express the SCN5A-encoded voltage-gated, mechanosensitive sodium channel NaV1.5. NaV1.5 contributes to small bowel excitability, and NaV1.5 inhibitor ranolazine produces constipation by an unknown mechanism. We aimed to determine the presence and molecular identity of Na(+) current in the human colon smooth muscle and to examine the effects of ranolazine on Na(+) current, mechanosensitivity, and smooth muscle contractility. Inward currents were recorded by whole cell voltage clamp from freshly dissociated human colon SMCs at rest and with shear stress. SCN5A mRNA and NaV1.5 protein were examined by RT-PCR and Western blots, respectively. Ascending human colon strip contractility was examined in a muscle bath preparation. SCN5A mRNA and NaV1.5 protein were identified in human colon circular muscle. Freshly dissociated human colon SMCs had Na(+) currents (-1.36 ± 0.36 pA/pF), shear stress increased Na(+) peaks by 17.8 ± 1.8% and accelerated the time to peak activation by 0.7 ± 0.3 ms. Ranolazine (50 μM) blocked peak Na(+) current by 43.2 ± 9.3% and inhibited shear sensitivity by 25.2 ± 3.2%. In human ascending colon strips, ranolazine decreased resting tension (31%), reduced the frequency of spontaneous events (68%), and decreased the response to smooth muscle electrical field stimulation (61%). In conclusion, SCN5A-encoded NaV1.5 is found in human colonic circular smooth muscle. Ranolazine blocks both peak amplitude and mechanosensitivity of Na(+) current in human colon SMCs and decreases contractility of human colon muscle strips. Our data provide a likely mechanistic explanation for constipation induced by ranolazine. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  13. Smooth Brucella strains invade and replicate in human lung epithelial cells without inducing cell death.

    PubMed

    Ferrero, Mariana C; Fossati, Carlos A; Baldi, Pablo C

    2009-04-01

    Inhalation is a common route for Brucella infection. We investigated whether Brucella species can invade and replicate within alveolar(A549) and bronchial (Calu-6 and 16HBE14o-) human epithelial cells. The number of adherent and intracellular bacteria was higher for rough strains (Brucella canis and Brucella abortus RB51) than for smooth strains (B. abortus 2308 and Brucella suis 1330). Only smooth strains exhibited efficient intracellular replication (1.5-3.5 log increase at 24 h p.i.). A B. abortus mutant with defective expression of the type IV secretion system did not replicate. B. abortus internalization was inhibited by specific inhibitors of microfilaments, microtubules and PI3-kinase activity. As assessed with fluorescent probes, B. abortus infection did not affect the viability of A549 and 16HBE14o- cells, but increased the percentage of injured cells (both strains) and dead cells (RB51) in Calu-6 cultures. LDH levels were increased in supernatants of Calu-6 and 16HBE14o- cells infected with B. abortus RB51, and to a lower extent in Calu-6 infected with B. abortus 2308. No apoptosis was detected by TUNEL upon infection with smooth or rough B. abortus. This study shows that smooth brucellae can infect and replicate in human respiratory epithelial cells inducing minimal or null cytotoxicity. (c) 2009 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  14. Primary pulmonary hypertension, Castleman's disease and human herpesvirus-8.

    PubMed

    Bull, T M; Cool, C D; Serls, A E; Rai, P R; Parr, J; Neid, J M; Geraci, M W; Campbell, T B; Voelkel, N F; Badesch, D B

    2003-09-01

    Primary pulmonary hypertension (PPH) and Castleman's disease (CD) are rare conditions infrequently encountered in clinical practice. In this paper, two patients diagnosed with both of these diseases are reported. The authors speculate that rather than being a chance occurrence, these conditions are linked by a common angio-proliferative mechanism. Therefore, an association between infection with the human herpesvirus-8 and the diseases of PPH and CD was sought. Evidence of human herpesvirus-8 infection was found in the lung tissue and, specifically, in the plexiform lesions from one of the patients.

  15. Prostanoid EP1- and TP-receptors involved in the contraction of human pulmonary veins

    PubMed Central

    Walch, Laurence; de Montpreville, Vincent; Brink, Charles; Norel, Xavier

    2001-01-01

    To characterize the prostanoid receptors (TP, FP, EP1 and/or EP3) involved in the vasoconstriction of human pulmonary veins, isolated venous preparations were challenged with different prostanoid-receptor agonists in the absence or presence of selective antagonists. The stable thromboxane A2 mimetic, U46619, was a potent constrictor agonist on human pulmonary veins (pEC50=8.60±0.11 and Emax=4.61±0.46 g; n=15). The affinity values for two selective TP-antagonists (BAY u3405 and GR32191B) versus U46619 were BAY u3405: pA2=8.94±0.23 (n=3) and GR32191B: apparent pKB=8.25±0.34 (n=3), respectively. These results are consistent with the involvement of TP-receptor in the U46619 induced contractions. The two EP1-/EP3- agonists (17-phenyl-PGE2 and sulprostone) induced contraction of human pumonary veins (pEC50=8.56±0.18; Emax=0.56±0.24 g; n=5 and pEC50=7.65±0.13; Emax=1.10±0.12 g; n=14, respectively). The potency ranking for these agonists: 17-phenyl-PGE2>sulprostone suggests the involvement of an EP1-receptor rather than EP3. In addition, the contractions induced by sulprostone, 17-phenyl-PGE2 and the IP-/EP1- agonist (iloprost) were blocked by the DP-/EP1-/EP2-receptor antagonist (AH6809) as well as by the EP1 antagonist (SC19220). PGF2α induced small contractions which were blocked by AH6809 while fluprostenol was ineffective. These results indicate that FP-receptors are not implicated in the contraction of human pulmonary veins. These data suggest that the contractions induced by prostanoids involved TP- and EP1-receptors in human pulmonary venous smooth muscle. PMID:11739243

  16. Galectin‑3 induces the phenotype transformation of human vascular smooth muscle cells via the canonical Wnt signaling.

    PubMed

    Tian, Lei; Chen, Kan; Cao, Jiatian; Han, Zhihua; Wang, Yue; Gao, Lin; Fan, Yuqi; Wang, Changqian

    2017-06-01

    Galectin‑3, a galactoside‑binding protein, is highly expressed in carotid plaques and plays an important role in the atherosclerotic lesions. The phenotype transformation of vascular smooth muscle cells is the basic pathological change of atherosclerosis. This study investigated the effects of exogenous galectin‑3 on the function and phenotype transformation of human umbilical vascular smooth muscle cells (HUSMC). In this study, we treated vascular smooth muscle cells with recombinant galectin‑3 and tested its effect on cell proliferation, migration, and phenotype transformation. Our results showed that exogenous galectin‑3 promoted human umbilical vascular smooth muscle cells (HUSMC) proliferation and migration. Exogenous galectin‑3 enhanced the expression of the smooth muscle synthetic protein osteopontin, smooth muscle contractile proteins calponin and smooth muscle α‑actin. The galectin‑3‑induced change in cell phenotype was associated with the activation of canonical Wnt signaling, as measured by β‑catenin axin2 and cyclin D1 expression. β‑catenin inhibition by small interfering RNA reduced cell proliferation, decreased cell motility, and blocked galectin‑3‑induced phenotype transformation of human umbilical vascular smooth muscle cells (HUSMC). Our data suggest galectin‑3 promotes the phenotype transformation of human umbilical vascular smooth muscle cells (HUSMC) by activating Wnt/β‑catenin signaling pathway.

  17. [Cigarette smoke exposure induced pulmonary artery pressure increase through inhibiting Kv1.5 and Kv2.1 mRNA expression in rat pulmonary artery smooth muscles].

    PubMed

    Lin, Chun-yi; Wan, Li-mei; Chen, Yu-qin; Ou, Huan-tao; Zhao, Lei; Liang, Yu-ting; Ma, Ran; Lu, Wen-ju; Wang, Jian

    2012-09-01

    To investigate the effect of cigarette smoke exposure on Kv1.5 and Kv2.1 mRNA expression in rat pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs), and further to clarify the possible mechanism of cigarette smoking induced pulmonary arterial hypertension. Primary cell culture and animal experiments were used in this study. Rat distal PASMCs were isolated and cultured by collagenase digestion. PASMCs were treated by nicotine 100 nmol/L. After 48 h, Kv1.5 and Kv2.1 mRNA expression were detected by real-time quantitative PCR and compared with the control group. Rat model of chronic exposure to cigarette smoke was established. Thirty-six male SD rats were randomly divided equally into 6 groups: (1) 1 month control group; (2) 1 month cigarette exposure group; (3) 3 month control group; (4) 3 month cigarette exposure group; (5) 6 month control group; (6) 6 month cigarette exposure group. Direct right heart manometry, HE staining and real-time quantitative PCR were used to detect the effect of smoke exposure on rat right ventricular systolic pressure (RVSP), mean pressure (mPAP), right ventricular hypertrophy index [RV/(LV + S)] as well as Kv1.5 and Kv2.1 mRNA expression on pulmonary artery smooth muscle at different time points (1 month, 3 months and 6 months). The mPAP and RVSP in cigarette smoke exposure 6 month group were (13.08 ± 0.64) mm Hg and (29.73 ± 0.83) mm Hg, slightly higher than those in the control 6 month group [(10.16 ± 0.44) mm Hg and (22.56 ± 0.64) mm Hg] (P < 0.01). The ratio of Kv1.5 mRNA expression in distal pulmonary arteries in 1 month, 3 month, 6 month cigarette exposure group to that in control groups was (52 ± 11)%, (64 ± 19)% and (75 ± 11)% (P < 0.05). The ratio of Kv2.1 mRNA expression in distal pulmonary arteries in 1 month, 3 month, 6 month cigarette exposure groups to that in control groups was (51.0 ± 18.6)%, (78.7 ± 10.1)% and (71.4 ± 2.3)% (P < 0.01); Chronic exposure to cigarette smoke significantly decreased Kv1.5 and Kv2.1 m

  18. Tachyphylaxis to beta-adrenoceptor agonists in human bronchial smooth muscle: studies in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Davis, C; Conolly, M E

    1980-01-01

    In studies on human isolated peripheral airway smooth muscle; 1 A concentration dependent beta-adrenoceptor tachyphylaxis was observed to isoprenaline. 2 Cross desensitization to other beta-adrenoceptor agonists was demonstrated. 3 The desensitization was reversible with time. Hydrocortisone appeared to accelerate the recovery from the desensitized state. Low concentration isoprenaline (10(-9) mol l-1) prevented recovery whereas cyclohexamide 1.8 x 10(-4) mol l-1 had no noticeable effect on recovery. Continued occupancy of the receptor appears to prevent recovery. The recovery from the desensitized state does not apparently require synthesis of new proteins. 4 Bronchial wall cyclic AMP response to isoprenaline was attenuated after isoprenaline induced desensitization whereas total phosphodiesterase activity of bronchial wall was not altered by desensitization. Thus by exclusion the adenylate cyclase receptor complex may be altered in human peripheral airway smooth muscle beta-adrenoceptor tachyphylaxis. PMID:6108126

  19. A critical role for p130Cas in the progression of pulmonary hypertension in humans and rodents

    PubMed Central

    Tu, Ly; De Man, Frances; Girerd, Barbara; Huertas, Alice; Chaumais, Marie-Camille; Lecerf, Florence; François, Charlène; Perros, Frédéric; Dorfmüller, Peter; Fadel, Elie; Montani, David; Eddahibi, Saadia; Humbert, Marc; Guignabert, Christophe

    2012-01-01

    Rationale Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) is a progressive and fatal disease characterized by pulmonary arterial muscularization due to excessive pulmonary vascular cell proliferation and migration, a phenotype dependent upon growth factors and activation of receptor tyrosine kinases (RTKs). p130Cas is an adaptor protein involved in several cellular signaling pathways that control cell migration, proliferation and survival. Objectives We hypothesized that in experimental and human PAH p130Cas signaling is over-activated, thereby facilitating the intracellular transmission of signal induced by fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2, epidermal growth factor (EGF), and platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF). Measurements and Main Results In PAH patients, levels of p130Cas protein and/or activity are higher in the serum, in walls of distal pulmonary arteries, in cultured smooth muscle (PA-SMCs) and pulmonary endothelial cells (P-ECs) than controls. These abnormalities in the p130Cas signaling were also found to be in the chronically hypoxic mice and monocrotaline-injected rats as models of human PAH. We next obtained evidence for convergence and amplification of the growth-stimulating effect of EGF, FGF2 and PDGF signaling pathways via p130Cas signaling pathway. Finally, we found that daily treatment with each of the EGF-R inhibitor gefitinib, the FGF-R inhibitor dovitinib and the PDGF-R inhibitor imatinib started 2 weeks after a subcutaneous monocrotaline injection substantially attenuate the abnormal increase in p130cas and ERK1/2 activation and regress established PH. Conclusions Our findings demonstrate that p130Cas signaling plays a critical role in experimental and iPAH by modulating pulmonary vascular cell migration, proliferation and by acting as an amplifier of RTKs downstream signals. PMID:22798315

  20. Differential Effect of Zoledronic Acid on Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Albadawi, Hassan; Haurani, Mounir J.; Oklu, Rahmi; Trubiano, Jordan P.; Laub, Peter J.; Yoo, Hyung-Jin; Watkins, Michael T.

    2012-01-01

    Introduction The activation of human vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation, adhesion and migration is essential for intimal hyperplasia formation. These experiments were designed to test whether Zoledronic Acid (ZA) would modulate indices of human smooth muscle cell activation, exert differential effects on proliferating vs. quiescent cells and determine whether these effects were dependent on GTPase binding proteins prenylation. ZA was chosen for testing in these experiments because it is clinically used in humans with cancer, and has been shown to modulate rat smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration. Methods Human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMC) were cultured under either proliferating or growth arrest (quiescent) conditions in the presence or absence of ZA for 48 hours, whereupon the effect of ZA on HASMC proliferation, cellular viability, metabolic activity and membrane integrity were compared. In addition, the effect of ZA on adhesion and migration were assessed in proliferating cells. The effect of increased concentration of ZA on the mevalonate pathway and genomic/cellular stress related poly ADP Ribose polymerase (PARP) enzyme activity were assessed using the relative prenylation of Rap-1A/B protein and the formation of poly ADP- ribosylated proteins (PAR) respectively. Results There was a dose dependent inhibition of cellular proliferation, adhesion and migration following ZA treatment. ZA treatment decreased indices of cellular viability and significantly increased membrane injury in proliferating vs. quiescent cells. This was correlated with the appearance of unprenylated Rap-1A protein and dose dependent down regulation of PARP activity. Conclusions These data suggest that ZA is effective in inhibiting HASMC proliferation, adhesion and migration which coincide with the appearance of unprenylated RAP-1A/B protein, thereby suggesting that the mevalonate pathway may play a role in the inhibition of HASMC activation. PMID:23164362

  1. Red cell pulmonary transit times through the healthy human lung.

    PubMed

    Zavorsky, G S; Walley, K R; Russell, J A

    2003-03-01

    It has previously been postulated that rapid red cell capillary transit through the human lung plays a role in the mechanism of diffusion limitation in some endurance athletes. Methodological limitations currently prevent researchers from directly measuring pulmonary capillary transit times in humans during exercise; however, first pass radionuclide cardiography allows direct measurement of red blood cell (RBC) transit times through the whole lung at various exercise intensities. We examined the relationship between mean whole lung red cell pulmonary transit times (cardiopulmonary transit times or CPTT) and different levels of flow in 88 healthy humans (76 males, 12 females) from several studies (mean age 31 years). The pooled data suggest that the relationship between CPTT and cardiac index (CI), beginning at rest and progressing through to maximum exercise demonstrates that CPTT reaches its minimum value when CI is about 8.1 l m2 x min(-1) (2.5-3 times the CI value at rest), and does not significantly change with further increases in CI. Cardiopulmonary blood volume (CPBV) index also does not change significantly until CI reaches 2.5 to 3 times the CI value at rest and then increases roughly linearly after that point. Consequently, the systematic increase in CPBV index with increasing pulmonary blood flow between 8.1 and 20 l m2 x min(-1) displays an adaptive response of the cardiopulmonary system by augmenting CPBV (and perhaps pulmonary capillary blood volume through distension and recruitment) to offset the reduction in CPTT, as no significant difference in mean CPTT is observed between these levels of flow (P > 0.05). Therefore, these data demonstrate that CPBV does not reach maximum capacity during strenuous or maximum exercise. This does not support the principle of quarter-power allometric scaling for flow when explaining modifications during exercise. Therefore, we speculate that the observed relationships between CPTT, CBPV index and flow may prevent

  2. Characterization of optimal resting tension in human pulmonary arteries

    PubMed Central

    Hussain, Azar; Bennett, Robert T; Chaudhry, Mubarak A; Qadri, Syed S; Cowen, Mike; Morice, Alyn H; Loubani, Mahmoud

    2016-01-01

    AIM To determine the optimum resting tension (ORT) for in vitro human pulmonary artery (PA) ring preparations. METHODS Pulmonary arteries were dissected from disease free sections of the resected lung in the operating theatre and tissue samples were directly sent to the laboratory in Krebs-Henseleit solution (Krebs). The pulmonary arteries were then cut into 2 mm long rings. PA rings were mounted in 25 mL organ baths or 8 mL myograph chambers containing Krebs compound (37 °C, bubbled with 21% O2: 5% CO2) to measure changes in isometric tension. The resting tension was set at 1-gram force (gf) with vessels being left static to equilibrate for duration of one hour. Baseline contractile reactions to 40 mmol/L KCl were obtained from a resting tension of 1 gf. Contractile reactions to 40 mmol/L KCl were then obtained from stepwise increases in resting tension (1.2, 1.4, 1.6, 1.8 and 2.0 gf). RESULTS Twenty PA rings of internal diameter between 2-4 mm were prepared from 4 patients. In human PA rings incrementing the tension during rest stance by 0.6 gf, up to 1.6 gf significantly augmented the 40 mmol/L KCl stimulated tension. Further enhancement of active tension by 0.4 gf, up to 2.0 gf mitigate the 40 mmol/L KCl stimulated reaction. Both Myograph and the organ bath demonstrated identical conclusions, supporting that the radial optimal resting tension for human PA ring was 1.61 g. CONCLUSION The radial optimal resting tension in our experiment is 1.61 gf (15.78 mN) for human PA rings. PMID:27721938

  3. Integrin ligands mobilize Ca2+ from ryanodine receptor-gated stores and lysosome-related acidic organelles in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Umesh, Anita; Thompson, Michael A; Chini, Eduardo N; Yip, Kay-Pong; Sham, James S K

    2006-11-10

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) protein receptors, or integrins, participate in vascular remodeling and the systemic myogenic response. Synthetic ligands and ECM fragments regulate the vascular smooth muscle cell contractile state by altering intracellular Ca2+ levels ([Ca2+]i). Information on the Ca2+ effect of integrins in vascular smooth muscle cells is limited, but nonexistent in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). We therefore characterized integrin expression in endothelium-denuded pulmonary arteries, and explored [Ca2+]i mobilization pathways induced by soluble ligands in rat PASMCs. Reverse transcriptase-PCR showed mRNA expression of integrins alpha1, alpha2, alpha3, alpha4, alpha5, alpha7, alpha8, alpha(v), beta1, beta3, and beta4, and immunoblots of alpha5, alpha(v), beta1, and beta3 confirmed protein expression. Exposure of PASMCs to integrin-binding peptides (0.5 mM) containing the arginine-glycine-aspartate (RGD) motif elicited [Ca2+]i responses with an order of potency of GRGDNP > GRGDSP > GRGDTP = cyclo-RGD. Pharmacological analysis revealed that the GRGDSP-induced Ca2+ response was unrelated to Ca2+ influx and the inositol triphosphate receptor-gated Ca2+ store, but partially blocked by ryanodine or inhibition of lysosome-related acidic organelles with bafilomycin A1. Simultaneous inhibition of both pathways was necessary to abolish the response. GRGDSP treatment increased cyclic ADP-ribose, the endogenous activator of ryanodine receptors, by 70%. GRGDSP also rapidly reduced Lysotracker Red accumulation, confirming direct modulation of acidic organelles. These data are the first demonstration of integrin-mediated Ca2+ regulation in PASMCs. The presence of an array of integrins, and activation of ryanodine-sensitive Ca2+ stores and lysosome-like organelles by GRGDSP suggest important roles for integrin-dependent Ca2+ signaling in regulating PASMC function.

  4. Surgical Skin Markers Impair Human Saphenous Vein Graft Smooth Muscle and Endothelial Function

    PubMed Central

    EAGLE, SUSAN; BROPHY, COLLEEN M.; KOMALAVILAS, PADMINI; HOCKING, KYLE; PUTUMBAKA, GOWTHAMI; OSGOOD, MICHAEL; SEXTON, KEVIN; LEACCHE, MARZIA; CHEUNG-FLYNN, JOYCE

    2012-01-01

    Marking human saphenous vein graft (HSV) with a surgical skin marker to prevent twisting on implantation is a common practice in peripheral and coronary artery bypass procedures. This study is designed to examine the effects of surgical skin markers on the HSV smooth muscle and endothelial functional responses. De-identified HSV remnants were collected during peripheral and coronary artery bypass procedures. Physiologic responses of the HSV were measured using a muscle bath. Veins that were marked with surgical skin markers intraoperatively generated significantly less contractile force to depolarizing KCl (110 mM) and receptor-mediated contractile agonists than unmarked HSV, suggesting that surgical skin markers impaired HSV smooth muscle contractility. To directly access the effects of chemical components in the surgical skin markers, unmarked HSV was exposed to isopropyl alcohol (a solvent commonly used in surgical skin markers) or methylene blue (a dye). Smooth muscle contractility was significantly reduced by isopropyl alcohol and methylene blue. Endothelial-dependent relaxation to carbachol was significantly reduced after exposure to surgical skin markers. Our data demonstrated that marking HSV with surgical skin markers reduces smooth muscle and endothelial functional viability. PMID:21944360

  5. Biliverdin reductase/bilirubin mediates the anti-apoptotic effect of hypoxia in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells through ERK1/2 pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Song, Shasha; Wang, Shuang; Ma, Jun; Yao, Lan; Xing, Hao; Zhang, Lei; Liao, Lin; Zhu, Daling

    2013-08-01

    Inhibition of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cell (PASMC) apoptosis induced by hypoxia plays an important role in pulmonary arterial remodeling leading to aggravate hypoxic pulmonary arterial hypertension. However, the mechanisms of hypoxia acting on PASMC apoptosis remain exclusive. Biliverdin reductase (BVR) has many essential biologic roles in physiological and pathological processes. Nevertheless, it is unclear whether the hypoxia-induced inhibition on PASMC apoptosis is mediated by BVR. In the present work, we found BVR majorly localized in PASMCs and was up-regulated in levels of protein and mRNA by hypoxia. Then we studied the contribution of BVR to anti-apoptotic response of hypoxia in PASMCs. Our results showed that siBVR, blocking generation of bilirubin, reversed the effect of hypoxia on enhancing cell survival and apoptotic protein (Bcl-2, procasepase-9, procasepase-3) expression, preventing nuclear shrinkage, DNA fragmentation and mitochondrial depolarization in starved PASMCs, which were recovered by exogenous bilirubin. Moreover, the inhibitory effect of bilirubin on PASMC apoptosis under hypoxic condition was blocked by the inhibitor of ERK1/2 pathway. Taken together, our data indicate that BVR contributes to the inhibitory process of hypoxia on PASMC apoptosis, which is mediated by bilirubin through ERK1/2 pathway. Highlights: • BVR expresses in PASMC and is up-regulated by hypoxia in protein and mRNA levels. • BVR/bilirubin contribute to the inhibitive process of hypoxia on PASMC apoptosis. • Bilirubin protects PASMC from apoptosis under hypoxia via ERK1/2 pathway.

  6. CCN2 promotes cigarette smoke-induced proliferation of rat pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells through upregulating cyclin D1 expression.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ran; Xu, Yong-jian; Liu, Xian-sheng; Zeng, Da-xiong; Xiang, Min

    2012-01-01

    Cigarette smoke has been demonstrated to induce pulmonary vascular remodeling, which is characterized by medial thickening of the pulmonary arteries mainly resulting from the abnormal proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). However, the molecular mechanism underlying this process is still unclear. In the present study, we investigated whether CCN2 regulated rat PASMCs (rPASMCs) proliferation induced by cigarette smoke extract (CSE) and nicotine by upregulating cyclin D1 in vitro. CCN2 siRNA or cyclin D1 siRNA were transfected to rPASMCs which were then exposed to CSE and nicotine. Both mRNA and protein expressions of CCN2 were significantly increased in rPASMCs treated with 2% CSE or 1 µM nicotine, which markedly promoted the proliferation of rPASMCs. CCN2 siRNA inhibited the proliferation of rPASMCs induced by CSE or nicotine. Furthermore, CCN2 siRNA markedly suppressed the mRNA and protein expressions of cyclin D1 in rPASMCs and led to cell cycle arrest in G0/G1 phase resulting in reduced rPASMCs proliferation. These findings suggest that CCN2 contributes to the CSE and nicotine-induced proliferation of rPASMCs at least in part by upregulating cyclin D1 expression. Copyright © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  7. Protein kinase Cα stimulates hypoxia‑induced pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation in rats through activating the extracellular signal‑regulated kinase 1/2 pathway.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Rui; Shi, Yiwei; Zeng, Chao; Yu, Wenyan; Zhang, Aizhen; Du, Yongcheng

    2017-09-12

    Hypoxic pulmonary hypertension (HPH) may contribute to vascular remodeling, and pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) proliferation has an important role in this process. However, no relevant information concerning the role and mechanism of protein kinase C (PKC)α in hypoxia‑induced rat PASMC proliferation has been elucidated. The present study aimed to further investigate this by comparison of rat PASMC proliferation among normoxia for 72 h (21% O2), hypoxia for 72 h (3% O2), hypoxia + promoter 12‑myristate 13‑acetate control, hypoxia + safingol control, hypoxia + PD98059 control and hypoxia + U0126 control groups. The present study demonstrated that protein expression levels of PKCα in rat PASMCs were elevated. In conclusion, through activating the extracellular signal‑regulated 1/2 signaling pathway, PKCα is involved in and initiates PASMC proliferation, thus bringing about pulmonary artery hypertension. These results add to the understanding of the mechanism PKCα in PH formation and lays a theoretical basis for prevention as well as treatment of HPH.

  8. Human pluripotent stem cell-derived TSC2-haploinsufficient smooth muscle cells recapitulate features of Lymphangioleiomyomatosis.

    PubMed

    Julian, Lisa M; Delaney, Sean P; Wang, Ying; Goldberg, Alexander A; Doré, Carole; Yockell-Lelièvre, Julien; Tam, Roger Y; Giannikou, Krinio; McMurray, Fiona; Shoichet, Molly S; Harper, Mary-Ellen; Henske, Elizabeth P; Kwiatkowski, David J; Darling, Thomas N; Moss, Joel; Kristof, Arnold S; Stanford, William L

    2017-08-22

    Lymphangioleiomyomatosis (LAM) is a progressive destructive neoplasm of the lung associated with inactivating mutations in the TSC1 or TSC2 tumor suppressor genes. Cell or animal models that accurately reflect the pathology of LAM have been challenging to develop. Here we generated a robust human cell model of LAM by reprogramming TSC2 mutation-bearing fibroblasts from a patient with both Tuberous Sclerosis Complex (TSC) and LAM (TSC-LAM) into induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), followed by selection of cells that resemble those found in LAM tumors by unbiased in vivo differentiation. We established expandable cell lines under smooth muscle cell (SMC) growth conditions that retained a patient-specific genomic TSC2+/- mutation and recapitulated the molecular and functional characteristics of pulmonary LAM cells. These include multiple indicators of hyperactive mTORC1 signaling, presence of specific neural crest and SMC markers, expression of VEGF-D and female sex hormone receptors, reduced autophagy, and metabolic reprogramming. Intriguingly, the LAM-like features of these cells suggest that haploinsufficiency at the TSC2 locus contributed to LAM pathology, and demonstrated that iPSC reprogramming and SMC lineage differentiation of somatic patient cells with germline mutations was a viable approach to generate LAM-like cells. The patient-derived SMC lines we have developed thus represent a novel cellular model of LAM which can advance our understanding of disease pathogenesis and develop therapeutic strategies against LAM. Copyright ©2017, American Association for Cancer Research.

  9. Macrophages and smooth muscle cells express lipoprotein lipase in human and rabbit atherosclerotic lesions.

    PubMed Central

    Ylä-Herttuala, S; Lipton, B A; Rosenfeld, M E; Goldberg, I J; Steinberg, D; Witztum, J L

    1991-01-01

    Lipoprotein lipase (LPL; EC 3.1.1.34) may promote atherogenesis by producing remnant lipoproteins on the endothelial surface and by acting on lipoproteins in the artery wall. In vitro, smooth muscle cells and macrophages synthesize LPL, but in human carotid lesions only a few smooth muscle cells were reported to contain LPL protein. Endothelial cells do not synthesize LPL in vitro, but in normal arteries intense immunostaining for LPL is present on the endothelium. We used Northern blot analysis, in situ hybridization, and immunocytochemistry of human and rabbit arteries to determine cellular distribution and the site of the synthesis of LPL in atherosclerotic lesions. Northern blot analysis showed that LPL mRNA was detectable in macrophage-derived foam cells isolated from arterial lesions of "ballooned" cholesterol-fed rabbits. In situ hybridization studies of atherosclerotic lesions with an antisense riboprobe showed a strong hybridization signal for LPL mRNA in some, but not all, lesion macrophages, which were mostly located in the subendothelial and edge areas of the lesions. Also, some smooth muscle cells in lesion areas also expressed LPL mRNA. Immunocytochemistry of frozen sections of rabbit lesions with a monoclonal antibody to human milk LPL showed intense staining for LPL protein in macrophage-rich intimal lesions. The results suggest that lesion macrophages and macrophage-derived foam cells express LPL mRNA and protein. Some smooth muscle cells in the lesion areas also synthesize LPL. These data are consistent with an important role for LPL in atherogenesis. Images PMID:1719546

  10. Long-term expression of human adenosine deaminase in vascular smooth muscle cells of rats: A model for gene therapy

    SciTech Connect

    Lynch, C.M.; Miller, A.D. ); Clowes, M.M.; Osborne, W.R.A.; Clowes, A.W. )

    1992-02-01

    Gene transfer into vascular smooth muscle cells in animals was examined by using recombinant retroviral vectors containing an Escherichia coli {beta}-galactosidase gene or a human adenosine deaminase gene. Direct gene transfer by infusion of virus into rat carotid arteries was not observed. However, gene transfer by infection of smooth muscle cells in culture and seeding of the transduced cells onto arteries that had been denuded of endothelial cells was successful. Potentially therapeutic levels of human adenosine deaminase activity were detected over 6 months of observation, indicating the utility of vascular smooth muscle cells for gene therapy in humans.

  11. Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Humanized Mice Infected with HIV-1

    PubMed Central

    Nusbaum, Rebecca J.; Calderon, Veronica E.; Huante, Matthew B.; Sutjita, Putri; Vijayakumar, Sudhamathi; Lancaster, Katrina L.; Hunter, Robert L.; Actor, Jeffrey K.; Cirillo, Jeffrey D.; Aronson, Judith; Gelman, Benjamin B.; Lisinicchia, Joshua G.; Valbuena, Gustavo; Endsley, Janice J.

    2016-01-01

    Co-infection with HIV increases the morbidity and mortality associated with tuberculosis due to multiple factors including a poorly understood microbial synergy. We developed a novel small animal model of co-infection in the humanized mouse to investigate how HIV infection disrupts pulmonary containment of Mtb. Following dual infection, HIV-infected cells were localized to sites of Mtb-driven inflammation and mycobacterial replication in the lung. Consistent with disease in human subjects, we observed increased mycobacterial burden, loss of granuloma structure, and increased progression of TB disease, due to HIV co-infection. Importantly, we observed an HIV-dependent pro-inflammatory cytokine signature (IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα, and IL-8), neutrophil accumulation, and greater lung pathology in the Mtb-co-infected lung. These results suggest that in the early stages of acute co-infection in the humanized mouse, infection with HIV exacerbates the pro-inflammatory response to pulmonary Mtb, leading to poorly formed granulomas, more severe lung pathology, and increased mycobacterial burden and dissemination. PMID:26908312

  12. Pulmonary Tuberculosis in Humanized Mice Infected with HIV-1.

    PubMed

    Nusbaum, Rebecca J; Calderon, Veronica E; Huante, Matthew B; Sutjita, Putri; Vijayakumar, Sudhamathi; Lancaster, Katrina L; Hunter, Robert L; Actor, Jeffrey K; Cirillo, Jeffrey D; Aronson, Judith; Gelman, Benjamin B; Lisinicchia, Joshua G; Valbuena, Gustavo; Endsley, Janice J

    2016-02-24

    Co-infection with HIV increases the morbidity and mortality associated with tuberculosis due to multiple factors including a poorly understood microbial synergy. We developed a novel small animal model of co-infection in the humanized mouse to investigate how HIV infection disrupts pulmonary containment of Mtb. Following dual infection, HIV-infected cells were localized to sites of Mtb-driven inflammation and mycobacterial replication in the lung. Consistent with disease in human subjects, we observed increased mycobacterial burden, loss of granuloma structure, and increased progression of TB disease, due to HIV co-infection. Importantly, we observed an HIV-dependent pro-inflammatory cytokine signature (IL-1β, IL-6, TNFα, and IL-8), neutrophil accumulation, and greater lung pathology in the Mtb-co-infected lung. These results suggest that in the early stages of acute co-infection in the humanized mouse, infection with HIV exacerbates the pro-inflammatory response to pulmonary Mtb, leading to poorly formed granulomas, more severe lung pathology, and increased mycobacterial burden and dissemination.

  13. Wall stretch and thromboxane A₂ activate NO synthase (eNOS) in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells via H₂O₂ and Akt-dependent phosphorylation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hae Jin; Yoo, Hae Young; Jang, Ji Hyun; Lin, Hai Yue; Seo, Eun Yeong; Zhang, Yin Hua; Kim, Sung Joon

    2016-04-01

    Pulmonary arteries (PAs) have high compliance, buffering the wide ranges of blood flow. Here, we addressed a hypothesis that PA smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) express nitric oxide synthases (NOS) that might be activated by mechanical stress and vasoactive agonists. In the myograph study of endothelium-denuded rat PAs, NOS inhibition (L-NAME) induced strong contraction (96 % of 80 mM KCl-induced contraction (80K)) in the presence of 5 nM U46619 (thromboxane A2 (TXA2) analogue) with relatively high basal stretch (2.94 mN, S(+)). With lower basal stretch (0.98 mN, S(-)), however, L-NAME application following U46619 (TXA2/L-NAME) induced weak contraction (27 % of 80K). Inhibitors of nNOS and iNOS had no such effect in S(+) PAs. In endothelium-denuded S(+) mesenteric and renal arteries, TXA2/L-NAME-induced contraction was only 18 and 21 % of 80K, respectively. Expression of endothelial-type NOS (eNOS) in rat PASMCs was confirmed by RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry. Even in S(-) PAs, pretreatment with H2O2 (0.1-10 μM) effectively increased the sensitivity to TXA2/L-NAME (105 % of 80K). Vice versa, NADPH oxidase inhibitors, reactive oxygen species scavengers, or an Akt inhibitor (SC-66) suppressed TXA2/L-NAME-induced contraction in S(+) PAs. In a human PASMC line, immunoblot analysis showed the following: (1) eNOS expression, (2) Ser(1177) phosphorylation by U46619 and H2O2, and (3) Akt activation (Ser(473) phosphorylation) by U46619. In the cell-attached patch clamp study, H2O2 facilitated membrane stretch-activated cation channels in rat PASMCs. Taken together, the muscular eNOS in PAs can be activated by TXA2 and mechanical stress via H2O2 and Akt-mediated signaling, which may counterbalance the contractile signals from TXA2 and mechanical stimuli.

  14. Long Non-Coding RNA LnRPT is Regulated by PDGF-BB and Modulates Proliferation of Pulmonary Artery Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jidong; Guo, Jiao; Cui, Xiaolei; Dai, Yan; Tang, Zhixiong; Qu, Junle; Raj, J Usha; Hu, Qinghua; Gou, Deming

    2017-09-15

    Pulmonary artery hypertension (PAH) is a rare and fatal disorder with extensive remodeling of pulmonary arteries mediated by hyperproliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC). Aberrant platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF) activity can lead to hyperproliferation of PASMC, however, little is known about the role of long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) in this process. Using RNA sequencing (RNA-seq), we identified 725 lncRNAs in rat PASMC (RPASMC), 95 of which were expressed differentially in response to PDGF-BB treatment. Depletion of 4 lncRNAs affected proliferation of RPASMC, as measured by EdU incorporation assay. Among these, one lncRNA named LnRPT (lncRNA regulated by PDGF and TGFβ) was the most potent one to promote proliferation of PASMC when knocked down. Oppositely, proliferation of PASMC was repressed when LnRPT was overexpressed. Mechanistically, lnRPT inhibited the expression of two genes involved in the Notch signaling pathway, notch3 and jag1, as well as the cell cycle regulating genes, ccna2. In addition, downregulation of LnRPT induced by PDGF-BB was abrogated when PI3K activity was inhibited with pictilisib. Downregulation of LnRPT was also observed in the pulmonary arteries of MCT-induced PAH rats. These data provide novel insights into the effects of PDGF-BB on lncRNA expression in PASMC, and identify one lncRNA, LnRPT, which was implied in PAH development, as a regulator of PASMC proliferation through mediating the Notch signaling pathway and cell cycle.

  15. Comparison of human bronchiolar smooth muscle responsiveness in vitro with histological signs of inflammation.

    PubMed Central

    de Jongste, J C; Mons, H; Van Strik, R; Bonta, I L; Kerrebijn, K F

    1987-01-01

    A study was carried out to test the hypothesis that chronic inflammation is associated with increased sensitivity or contractility of human airway smooth muscle. Bronchiolar strips from 30 patients, 12 of whom had chronic bronchitis, were examined in the organ bath for their responses to histamine, methacholine, and leukotriene (LT) C4. The same airways were also studied histologically and small airway disease was quantified by subjective grading of the degree of inflammatory cell infiltration, smooth muscle hypertrophy, fibrosis, and goblet cell hyperplasia. The degree of small airway disease varied widely among patients both with and without chronic bronchitis. Multiple regression analysis failed to show increased sensitivity (-log EC50) to histamine, methacholine, or LTC4 in relation to small airway disease. In contrast, the only significant correlations found were between a decreased -log EC50 to histamine and methacholine and an increased small airway disease score. Contractile responses (Tmax) to histamine and methacholine in peripheral airways tended to be higher in patients with chronic bronchitis than in those without. Tmax was not related to small airway disease scores. These results suggest that chronic airway inflammation does not cause in vitro hyperresponsiveness of human small airway smooth muscle. Images PMID:3321543

  16. Evidence against vasoactive intestinal polypeptide as the relaxant neurotransmitter in human cavernosal smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Pickard, R. S.; Powell, P. H.; Zar, M. A.

    1993-01-01

    1. The putative role of vasoactive intestinal polypeptide (VIP) as the relaxant neurotransmitter in human cavernosal smooth muscle has been studied in isolated tissue preparations. 2. Consistent neurogenic relaxations were evoked by electrical field stimulation (EFS; 2-64 pulses/train, 0.8 ms pulse duration, 10 Hz). VIP (0.1-3 microM) relaxed cavernosal smooth muscle in a dose-dependent fashion. Relaxant responses to both EFS and VIP were reduced in tissue from impotent men. 3. Neurogenic relaxant responses were not diminished in the presence of the VIP-inactivating peptidase, alpha-chymotrypsin (alpha-CT, 2 units ml-1). In contrast VIP-induced relaxations were completely abolished. 4. Inhibition of nitric oxide synthase by NG-nitro-L-arginine (30 microM), and of guanylate cyclase by methylene blue (50 microM) caused highly significant reductions of neurogenic relaxant responses whereas VIP-evoked relaxations were unaffected. 5. It is concluded that VIP-evoked relaxations are not mediated by the NO-guanosine 3':5'-cyclic monophosphate (cyclic GMP) pathway and that VIP release is not essential for neurogenic relaxation of human cavernosal smooth muscle. VIP does not therefore act as the major relaxant neurotransmitter in this tissue. PMID:8095418

  17. Otilonium bromide inhibits calcium entry through L-type calcium channels in human intestinal smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Strege, P R; Evangelista, S; Lyford, G L; Sarr, M G; Farrugia, G

    2004-04-01

    Otilonium bromide (OB) is used as an intestinal antispasmodic. The mechanism of action of OB is not completely understood. As Ca(2+) entry into intestinal smooth muscle is required to trigger contractile activity, our hypothesis was that OB blocked Ca(2+) entry through L-type Ca(2+) channels. Our aim was to determine the effects of OB on Ca(2+), Na(+) and K(+) ion channels in human jejunal circular smooth muscle cells and on L-type Ca(2+) channels expressed heterologously in HEK293 cells. Whole cell currents were recorded using standard patch clamp techniques. Otilonium bromide (0.09-9 micromol L(-1)) was used as this reproduced clinical intracellular concentrations. In human circular smooth muscle cells, OB inhibited L-type Ca(2+) current by 25% at 0.9 micromol L(-1) and 90% at 9 micromol L(-1). Otilonium bromide had no effect on Na(+) or K(+) currents. In HEK293 cells, 1 micromol L(-1) OB significantly inhibited the expressed L-type Ca(2+) channels. Truncation of the alpha(1C) subunit C and N termini did not block the inhibitory effects of OB. Otilonium bromide inhibited Ca(2+) entry through L-type Ca(2+) at concentrations similar to intestinal tissue levels. This effect may underlie the observed muscle relaxant effects of the drug.

  18. Premature birth is associated with not fully differentiated contractile smooth muscle cells in human umbilical artery.

    PubMed

    Roffino, S; Lamy, E; Foucault-Bertaud, A; Risso, F; Reboul, R; Tellier, E; Chareyre, C; Dignat-George, F; Simeoni, U; Charpiot, P

    2012-06-01

    Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) participate to the regulation of peripheral arterial resistance and blood pressure. To assume their function, SMCs differentiate throughout the normal vascular development from a synthetic phenotype towards a fully differentiated contractile phenotype by acquiring a repertoire of proteins involved in contraction. In human fetal muscular arteries and umbilical arteries (UAs), no data are available regarding the differentiation of SMCs during the last trimester of gestation. The objective of this study was to characterize the phenotype of SMCs during this gestation period in human UAs. We investigated the phenotype of SMCs in human UAs from very preterm (28-31 weeks of gestation), late preterm (32-35 weeks) and term (37-41 weeks) newborns using biochemical and immunohistochemical detection of α-actin, smooth muscle myosin heavy chain, smoothelin, and non-muscle myosin heavy chain. We found that the number of SMCs positive for smoothelin in UAs increased with gestational age. Western blot analysis revealed a higher content of smoothelin in term compared to very preterm UAs. These results show that SMCs in human UAs gradually acquire a fully differentiated contractile phenotype during the last trimester of gestation and thus that premature birth is associated with not fully differentiated contractile SMCs in human UAs. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Targeting Pulmonary Endothelial Hemoglobin α Improves Nitric Oxide Signaling and Reverses Pulmonary Artery Endothelial Dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, Roger A; Miller, Megan P; Hahn, Scott A; Galley, Joseph C; Bauer, Eileen; Bachman, Timothy; Hu, Jian; Sembrat, John; Goncharov, Dmitry; Mora, Ana L; Rojas, Mauricio; Goncharova, Elena; Straub, Adam C

    2017-08-11

    Pulmonary hypertension is characterized by pulmonary endothelial dysfunction. Previous work showed that systemic artery endothelial cells express hemoglobin α to control nitric oxide diffusion, but the role of this system in the pulmonary circulation has not been evaluated. We hypothesize that up-regulation of hemoglobin α in pulmonary endothelial cells contributes to nitric oxide depletion and pulmonary vascular dysfunction in pulmonary hypertension. Co-cultures of human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells and distal pulmonary arterial vascular smooth muscle cells, lung tissue from control and pulmonary hypertensive lungs, and a mouse model of chronic hypoxia-induced pulmonary hypertension were used. Immunohistochemical, immunoblot analyses, spectrophotometry, and blood vessel myography experiments were performed in this study. We find increased expression of hemoglobin α in pulmonary endothelium from humans and mice with pulmonary hypertension compared to controls. In addition, we show up-regulation of hemoglobin α in human pulmonary endothelial cells co-cultured with pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells in hypoxia. We treated pulmonary endothelial cells with a hemoglobin α mimetic peptide that disrupts the association of hemoglobin α with endothelial nitric oxide synthase, and found that cells treated with the peptide exhibited increased nitric oxide signaling compared to a scrambled peptide. Myography experiments using pulmonary arteries from hypoxic mice show that the hemoglobin α mimetic peptide enhanced vasodilation in response to acetylcholine. Our findings reveal that endothelial hemoglobin α functions as an endogenous scavenger of nitric oxide in the pulmonary endothelium. Targeting this pathway may offer a novel therapeutic target to increase endogenous levels of nitric oxide in pulmonary hypertension.

  20. Effect of miR-23a on anoxia-induced phenotypic transformation of smooth muscle cells of rat pulmonary arteries and regulatory mechanism

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Li; Gao, Haixiang; Li, Chunzhi; Han, Xiaowen; Qi, Xiaoyong

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the possible implication of miR-23a in anoxia-induced phenotypic transformation of the pulmonary arterial smooth muscle and studied the mechanism of upregulation of miR-23a expression in anoxia. The collagenase digestion method was used for preparing rat primary pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) culture. SM-MHC, SM-α-actin, calponin-1 and SM22α protein expression levels were evaluated using western blot analysis after the ASMCs were subjected to anoxia treatment (3% O2). Transfection with miR-23a mimics were conducted when PASMCs were under normoxia and anoxia conditions. EdU staining was used to detect the proliferative activity of PASMCs. Cells were transfected with HIF-1α specific siRNA under anoxia condition. RT-qPCR was used to detect miR-23a expression in PASMCs. Chromatin immunoprecipitation method was employed to verify the binding sites of HIF-1α. The dual-luciferase reporter gene was used to study the role of HIF-1 and its binding sites. Rat hypoxic pulmonary hypertension models were established to study the expression of miR-23a using RT-qPCR method and to verify the expression of miR-23a in the arteriole of the rat pulmonary. Our results showed that compared with normoxia condition, under anoxia condition (3% O2), the expression levels of the contractile phenotype marker proteins decreased significantly after 24 and 48 h. The positive rate of the EdU staining increased significantly and the expression of miR-23a increased. Transfection with miR-23a-mimic downregulated the expression of contractile marker proteins and improved the positive rate of the EdU staining under normoxia. Anoxia and transfection with HIF-1α enhanced the activity of the wild-type Luc-miR-23a-1 (WT) reporter gene. We concluded that miR-23a participated in the anoxia-induced phenotypic transformation of PASMCs. Increased expression of miR-23a under anoxia may primarily be due to miR-23a-1 and miR-23a-3 upregulation. The anoxia-induced upregulation of

  1. Altered Expression of Human Smooth Muscle Myosin Phosphatase Targeting (MYPT) Isovariants with Pregnancy and Labor.

    PubMed

    Lartey, Jon; Taggart, Julie; Robson, Stephen; Taggart, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Myosin light-chain phosphatase is a trimeric protein that hydrolyses phosphorylated myosin II light chains (MYLII) to cause relaxation in smooth muscle cells including those of the uterus. A major component of the phosphatase is the myosin targeting subunit (MYPT), which directs a catalytic subunit to dephosphorylate MYLII. There are 5 main MYPT family members (MYPT1 (PPP1R12A), MYPT2 (PPP1R12B), MYPT3 (PPP1R16A), myosin binding subunit 85 MBS85 (PPP1R12C) and TIMAP (TGF-beta-inhibited membrane-associated protein (PPP1R16B)). Nitric oxide (NO)-mediated smooth muscle relaxation has in part been attributed to activation of the phosphatase by PKG binding to a leucine zipper (LZ) dimerization domain located at the carboxyl-terminus of PPP1R12A. In animal studies, alternative splicing of PPP1R12A can lead to the inclusion of a 31-nucleotide exonic segment that generates a LZ negative (LZ-) isovariant rendering the phosphatase less sensitive to NO vasodilators and alterations in PPP1R12ALZ- and LZ+ expression have been linked to phenotypic changes in smooth muscle function. Moreover, PPP1R12B and PPP1R12C, but not PPP1R16A or PPP1R16B, have the potential for LZ+/LZ- alternative splicing. Yet, by comparison to animal studies, the information on human MYPT genomic sequences/mRNA expressions is scant. As uterine smooth muscle undergoes substantial remodeling during pregnancy we were interested in establishing the patterns of expression of human MYPT isovariants during this process and also following labor onset as this could have important implications for determining successful pregnancy outcome. We used cross-species genome alignment, to infer putative human sequences not available in the public domain, and isovariant-specific quantitative PCR, to analyse the expression of mRNA encoding putative LZ+ and LZ- forms of PPP1R12A, PPP1R12B and PPP1R12C as well as canonical PPP1R16A and PPP1R16B genes in human uterine smooth muscle from non-pregnant, pregnant and in

  2. Altered Expression of Human Smooth Muscle Myosin Phosphatase Targeting (MYPT) Isovariants with Pregnancy and Labor

    PubMed Central

    Taggart, Julie; Robson, Stephen; Taggart, Michael

    2016-01-01

    Background Myosin light-chain phosphatase is a trimeric protein that hydrolyses phosphorylated myosin II light chains (MYLII) to cause relaxation in smooth muscle cells including those of the uterus. A major component of the phosphatase is the myosin targeting subunit (MYPT), which directs a catalytic subunit to dephosphorylate MYLII. There are 5 main MYPT family members (MYPT1 (PPP1R12A), MYPT2 (PPP1R12B), MYPT3 (PPP1R16A), myosin binding subunit 85 MBS85 (PPP1R12C) and TIMAP (TGF-beta-inhibited membrane-associated protein (PPP1R16B)). Nitric oxide (NO)-mediated smooth muscle relaxation has in part been attributed to activation of the phosphatase by PKG binding to a leucine zipper (LZ) dimerization domain located at the carboxyl-terminus of PPP1R12A. In animal studies, alternative splicing of PPP1R12A can lead to the inclusion of a 31-nucleotide exonic segment that generates a LZ negative (LZ-) isovariant rendering the phosphatase less sensitive to NO vasodilators and alterations in PPP1R12ALZ- and LZ+ expression have been linked to phenotypic changes in smooth muscle function. Moreover, PPP1R12B and PPP1R12C, but not PPP1R16A or PPP1R16B, have the potential for LZ+/LZ- alternative splicing. Yet, by comparison to animal studies, the information on human MYPT genomic sequences/mRNA expressions is scant. As uterine smooth muscle undergoes substantial remodeling during pregnancy we were interested in establishing the patterns of expression of human MYPT isovariants during this process and also following labor onset as this could have important implications for determining successful pregnancy outcome. Objectives We used cross-species genome alignment, to infer putative human sequences not available in the public domain, and isovariant-specific quantitative PCR, to analyse the expression of mRNA encoding putative LZ+ and LZ- forms of PPP1R12A, PPP1R12B and PPP1R12C as well as canonical PPP1R16A and PPP1R16B genes in human uterine smooth muscle from non

  3. Human immunodeficiency virus, herpes virus infections, and pulmonary vascular disease.

    PubMed

    Flores, Sonia C; Almodovar, Sharilyn

    2013-01-01

    The following state-of-the-art seminar was delivered as part of the Aspen Lung Conference on Pulmonary Hypertension and Vascular Diseases held in Aspen, Colorado in June 2012. This paper will summarize the lecture and present results from a nonhuman primate model of infection with Simian (Human) Immunodeficiency Virus - nef chimeric virions as well as the idea that polymorphisms in the HIV-1 nef gene may be driving the immune response that results in exuberant inflammation and aberrant endothelial cell (EC) function. We will present data gathered from primary HIV nef isolates where we tested the biological consequences of these polymorphisms and how their presence in human populations may predict patients at risk for developing this disease. In this article, we also discuss how a dysregulated immune system, in conjunction with a viral infection, could contribute to pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Both autoimmune diseases and some viruses are associated with defects in the immune system, primarily in the function of regulatory T cells. These T-cell defects may be a common pathway in the formation of plexiform lesions. Regardless of the route by which viruses may lead to PAH, it is important to recognize their role in this rare disease.

  4. Human immunodeficiency virus, herpes virus infections, and pulmonary vascular disease

    PubMed Central

    Flores, Sonia C.; Almodovar, Sharilyn

    2013-01-01

    The following state-of-the-art seminar was delivered as part of the Aspen Lung Conference on Pulmonary Hypertension and Vascular Diseases held in Aspen, Colorado in June 2012. This paper will summarize the lecture and present results from a nonhuman primate model of infection with Simian (Human) Immunodeficiency Virus - nef chimeric virions as well as the idea that polymorphisms in the HIV-1 nef gene may be driving the immune response that results in exuberant inflammation and aberrant endothelial cell (EC) function. We will present data gathered from primary HIV nef isolates where we tested the biological consequences of these polymorphisms and how their presence in human populations may predict patients at risk for developing this disease. In this article, we also discuss how a dysregulated immune system, in conjunction with a viral infection, could contribute to pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). Both autoimmune diseases and some viruses are associated with defects in the immune system, primarily in the function of regulatory T cells. These T-cell defects may be a common pathway in the formation of plexiform lesions. Regardless of the route by which viruses may lead to PAH, it is important to recognize their role in this rare disease. PMID:23662195

  5. Robust derivation of epicardium and its differentiated smooth muscle cell progeny from human pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Iyer, Dharini; Gambardella, Laure; Bernard, William G; Serrano, Felipe; Mascetti, Victoria L; Pedersen, Roger A; Talasila, Amarnath; Sinha, Sanjay

    2015-04-15

    The epicardium has emerged as a multipotent cardiovascular progenitor source with therapeutic potential for coronary smooth muscle cell, cardiac fibroblast (CF) and cardiomyocyte regeneration, owing to its fundamental role in heart development and its potential ability to initiate myocardial repair in injured adult tissues. Here, we describe a chemically defined method for generating epicardium and epicardium-derived smooth muscle cells (EPI-SMCs) and CFs from human pluripotent stem cells (HPSCs) through an intermediate lateral plate mesoderm (LM) stage. HPSCs were initially differentiated to LM in the presence of FGF2 and high levels of BMP4. The LM was robustly differentiated to an epicardial lineage by activation of WNT, BMP and retinoic acid signalling pathways. HPSC-derived epicardium displayed enhanced expression of epithelial- and epicardium-specific markers, exhibited morphological features comparable with human foetal epicardial explants and engrafted in the subepicardial space in vivo. The in vitro-derived epicardial cells underwent an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition when treated with PDGF-BB and TGFβ1, resulting in vascular SMCs that displayed contractile ability in response to vasoconstrictors. Furthermore, the EPI-SMCs displayed low density lipoprotein uptake and effective lowering of lipoprotein levels upon treatment with statins, similar to primary human coronary artery SMCs. Cumulatively, these findings suggest that HPSC-derived epicardium and EPI-SMCs could serve as important tools for studying human cardiogenesis, and as a platform for vascular disease modelling and drug screening.

  6. Robust derivation of epicardium and its differentiated smooth muscle cell progeny from human pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Iyer, Dharini; Gambardella, Laure; Bernard, William G.; Serrano, Felipe; Mascetti, Victoria L.; Pedersen, Roger A.; Talasila, Amarnath; Sinha, Sanjay

    2015-01-01

    The epicardium has emerged as a multipotent cardiovascular progenitor source with therapeutic potential for coronary smooth muscle cell, cardiac fibroblast (CF) and cardiomyocyte regeneration, owing to its fundamental role in heart development and its potential ability to initiate myocardial repair in injured adult tissues. Here, we describe a chemically defined method for generating epicardium and epicardium-derived smooth muscle cells (EPI-SMCs) and CFs from human pluripotent stem cells (HPSCs) through an intermediate lateral plate mesoderm (LM) stage. HPSCs were initially differentiated to LM in the presence of FGF2 and high levels of BMP4. The LM was robustly differentiated to an epicardial lineage by activation of WNT, BMP and retinoic acid signalling pathways. HPSC-derived epicardium displayed enhanced expression of epithelial- and epicardium-specific markers, exhibited morphological features comparable with human foetal epicardial explants and engrafted in the subepicardial space in vivo. The in vitro-derived epicardial cells underwent an epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition when treated with PDGF-BB and TGFβ1, resulting in vascular SMCs that displayed contractile ability in response to vasoconstrictors. Furthermore, the EPI-SMCs displayed low density lipoprotein uptake and effective lowering of lipoprotein levels upon treatment with statins, similar to primary human coronary artery SMCs. Cumulatively, these findings suggest that HPSC-derived epicardium and EPI-SMCs could serve as important tools for studying human cardiogenesis, and as a platform for vascular disease modelling and drug screening. PMID:25813541

  7. Subcellular distribution patterns and elevated expression of GNA11 and GNA14 proteins in the lungs of humans with pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Lei, Wei; Chen, Puwen; Yue, Yuxia; He, Yuan; Shui, Xiaorong; Li, Guoming; Zhang, Liangqing; Huang, Shian; Chen, Can

    2014-09-01

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), a progressive and devastating disease, is characterized by abnormal proliferation of pulmonary artery endothelial and smooth muscle cells. GTP-binding protein subunits, GNA11 and GNA14, transmembrane and intracellular signaling molecules, participate in the regulating endothelial function and vascular development. We followed the expression of GNA11 and GNA14 in human lungs in control and PAH patients using immunohistochemical and Western blot analyses. Both GNA11 and GNA14 were expressed in lung tissue, primarily in artery endothelial and smooth muscle cells. Expression was more pronounced in PAH lung tissues compared with controls. Using immunocytochemistry and laser scanning confocal microscopy, the subcellular distribution of GNA11 and GNA14 in human pulmonary arterial endothelial (HPAECs) and smooth muscle (HPASMCs) cells in culture was investigated. GNA11 was predominantly localized in the cytoplasm and nucleus of HPASMCs, but it was only found in the cytoplasm of HPAECs. On the other hand, GNA14 immunolocalized to the nucleus and cytoplasm of both HPAECs and HPASMCs. Based on bioinformatic analyses, nuclear localization signal and transmembrane topology confirm the different subcellular distributions of GNA11 and GNA14. The data suggest that GNA11 and GNA14 are related to PAH pathogenesis, and help further functional studies of these proteins in this severe disease. © 2014 International Federation for Cell Biology.

  8. Inhibition of DNA nanotube-conjugated mTOR siRNA on the growth of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    You, Zaichun; Qian, Hang; Wang, Changzheng; He, Binfeng; Yan, Jiawei; Mao, Chengde; Wang, Guansong

    2015-12-01

    Here we provide raw and processed data and methods behind mTOR siRNA loaded DNA nanotubes (siRNA-DNA-NTs) in the growth of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) under both normoxic and hypoxic condition, and also related to (You et al., Biomaterials, 2015, 67:137-150, [1]). The MTT analysis, Semi-quantitative RT-PCR data presented here were used to probe cytotoxicity of mTOR siRNA-DNA-NT complex in its TAE-Mg(2+) buffer. siRNA-DNA-NTs have a lower cytotoxicity and higher transfection efficiency and can, based on inhibition of mTOR expression, decrease PASMCs growth both hypoxic and normal condition.

  9. Heparin fragments inhibit human vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation in vitro

    SciTech Connect

    Selden, S.C.; Johnson, W.V.; Maciag, T.

    1986-03-01

    The authors have examined the effect of heparin on human abdominal aortic smooth muscle cell growth. Cell proliferation was inhibited by more than 90% at a concentration of 20 ..mu..g/ml in a 12 day growth assay using heparin from Sigma, Upjohn or Calbiochem. Additionally, 200 ..mu..g/ml Upjohn heparin inhibits /sup 3/H-thymidine incorporation by 50% in short term assays using serum or purified platelet-derived growth factor (25-100ng/ml) to initiate the cell cycle. Homogeneous size classes of heparin fragments were prepared by nitrous acid cleavage and BioGel P-10 filtration chromatography. Deca-, octa-, hexa-, tetra-, and di-saccharides inhibited proliferation by 90% at concentrations of 280, 320, 260, 180 and 100 ..mu..g/ml, respectively, in a 12 day growth assay. These data confirm the work of Castellot et.al. and extend the range of inhibitory fragments down to the tetra- and di-saccharide size. These data suggest, therefore, that di-saccharide subunit of heparin is sufficient to inhibit vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation. The authors are now examining the role of the anhydromannose moiety on the reducing end of the nitrous acid generated fragments as a possible mediator of heparin-induced inhibition of vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation.

  10. Matrix metalloproteinase expression and activity in human airway smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Elshaw, Shona R; Henderson, Neil; Knox, Alan J; Watson, Susan A; Buttle, David J; Johnson, Simon R

    2004-01-01

    Airway remodelling is a feature of chronic asthma comprising smooth muscle hypertrophy and deposition of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins. Matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) breakdown ECM, are involved in tissue remodelling and have been implicated in airway remodelling. Although mesenchymal cells are an important source of MMPs, little data are available on airway smooth muscle (ASM) derived MMPs. We therefore investigated MMP and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase (TIMP) production and activity in human ASM cells.MMPs and TIMPs were examined using quantitative real-time RT–PCR, Western blotting, zymography and a quench fluorescence (QF) assay of total MMP activity.The most abundant MMPs were pro-MMP-2, pro- MMP-3, active MMP-3 and MT1-MMP. TIMP-1 and TIMP-2 expression was low in cell lysates but high in conditioned medium. High TIMP secretion was confirmed by the ability of ASM-conditioned medium to inhibit recombinant MMP-2 in a QF assay. Thrombin increased MMP activity by activation of pro-MMP-2 independent of the conventional smooth muscle thrombin receptors PAR 1 and 4.In conclusion, ASM cells express pro-MMP-2, pro and active MMP-3, MMP-9 and MT1-MMP. Unstimulated cells secrete excess TIMP 1 and 2, preventing proteolytic activity. MMP-2 can be activated by thrombin which may contribute to airway remodelling. PMID:15265805

  11. Bioengineered internal anal sphincter derived from isolated human internal anal sphincter smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Somara, Sita; Gilmont, Robert R; Dennis, Robert G; Bitar, Khalil N

    2009-07-01

    The internal anal sphincter (IAS) is a specialized circular smooth muscle that maintains rectoanal continence. In vitro models are needed to study the pathophysiology of human IAS disorders. We bioengineered sphincteric rings from human IAS smooth muscle cells (SMC) and investigated their response to cholinergic stimulation as well as investigated whether protein kinase C (PKC) and Rho kinase signaling pathways remain functional. 3-Dimensional bioengineered ring (3DBR) model of the human IAS was constructed from isolated human IAS SMC obtained from surgery. Contractile properties and force generation in response to acetylcholine, PKC inhibitor calphostin-C, Rho/ROCK inhibitor Y-27632, permeable Rho/ROCK inhibitor c3-exoenzyme, and PKC activator PdBU was measured. The human IAS 3DBR has the essential characteristics of physiologically functional IAS; it generated a spontaneous myogenic basal tone, and the constructs were able to relax in response to relaxants and contract in response to contractile agents. The constructs generated dose-dependent force in response to acetylcholine. Basal tone was significantly reduced by calphostin-C but not with Y-27632. Acetylcholine-induced force generation was also significantly reduced by calphostin-C but not with Y-27632. PdBU generated force that was equal in magnitude to acetylcholine. Thus, calphostin-C inhibited PdBU-induced force generation, whereas Y-27632 and c3 exoenzyme did not. These data indicate that basal tone and acetylcholine-induced force generation depend on signaling through the PKC pathway in human IAS; PKC-mediated force generation is independent of the Rho/ROCK pathway. This human IAS 3DBR model can be used to study the pathophysiology associated with IAS malfunctions.

  12. Fluid flow releases fibroblast growth factor-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhoads, D. N.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.

    2000-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that fluid shear stress regulates the release of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 is a potent mitogen that is involved in the response to vascular injury and is expressed in a wide variety of cell types. FGF-2 is found in the cytoplasm of cells and outside cells, where it associates with extracellular proteoglycans. To test the hypothesis that shear stress regulates FGF-2 release, cells were exposed to flow, and FGF-2 amounts were measured from the conditioned medium, pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment), and cell lysate. Results from the present study show that after 15 minutes of shear stress at 25 dyne/cm(2) in a parallel-plate flow system, a small but significant fraction (17%) of the total FGF-2 was released from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 levels in the circulating medium increased 10-fold over medium from static controls (P<0.01). A 50% increase in FGF-2 content versus control (P<0.01) was found in the pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment). Furthermore, a significant decrease in FGF-2 was detected in the cell lysate, indicating that FGF-2 was released from inside the cell. Cell permeability studies with fluorescent dextran were performed to examine whether transient membrane disruption caused FGF-2 release. Flow cytometry detected a 50% increase in mean fluorescence of cells exposed to 25 dyne/cm(2) versus control cells. This indicates that the observed FGF-2 release from human aortic smooth muscle cells is likely due to transient membrane disruption on initiation of flow.

  13. Fluid flow releases fibroblast growth factor-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Rhoads, D. N.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.

    2000-01-01

    This study tested the hypothesis that fluid shear stress regulates the release of fibroblast growth factor (FGF)-2 from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 is a potent mitogen that is involved in the response to vascular injury and is expressed in a wide variety of cell types. FGF-2 is found in the cytoplasm of cells and outside cells, where it associates with extracellular proteoglycans. To test the hypothesis that shear stress regulates FGF-2 release, cells were exposed to flow, and FGF-2 amounts were measured from the conditioned medium, pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment), and cell lysate. Results from the present study show that after 15 minutes of shear stress at 25 dyne/cm(2) in a parallel-plate flow system, a small but significant fraction (17%) of the total FGF-2 was released from human aortic smooth muscle cells. FGF-2 levels in the circulating medium increased 10-fold over medium from static controls (P<0.01). A 50% increase in FGF-2 content versus control (P<0.01) was found in the pericellular fraction (extracted by heparin treatment). Furthermore, a significant decrease in FGF-2 was detected in the cell lysate, indicating that FGF-2 was released from inside the cell. Cell permeability studies with fluorescent dextran were performed to examine whether transient membrane disruption caused FGF-2 release. Flow cytometry detected a 50% increase in mean fluorescence of cells exposed to 25 dyne/cm(2) versus control cells. This indicates that the observed FGF-2 release from human aortic smooth muscle cells is likely due to transient membrane disruption on initiation of flow.

  14. An electrophysiological study of the smooth muscle of the human colon.

    PubMed Central

    Kirk, D.

    1981-01-01

    Electrical recordings were made in vitro from preparations of human colonic smooth muscle from surgically resected specimens. The behaviour of the taenia consisted of regular spike action potentials based on a slow wave rhythm (22 +/- 5 c.p.m.), with tetanic contractions of the muscle. The actions of cholinergic drugs were studied and experiments performed to investigate the mechanism of the action potentials. The circular muscle produced clusters of spikes with solitary contractions. The differences between the two muscle layers may be of relevance to understanding the colonic electromyogram as recorded in vivo. PMID:7294682

  15. Remeshed smoothed particle hydrodynamics simulation of the mechanical behavior of human organs.

    PubMed

    Hieber, Simone E; Walther, Jens H; Koumoutsakos, Petros

    2004-01-01

    In computer aided surgery the accurate simulation of the mechanical behavior of human organs is essential for the development of surgical simulators. In this paper we introduce particle based simulations of two different human organ materials modeled as linear viscoelastic solids. The constitutive equations for the material behavior are discretized using a particle approach based on the Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (SPH) method while the body surface is tracked using level sets. A key aspect of this approach is its flexibility which allows the simulation of complex time varying topologies with large deformations. The accuracy of the original formulation is significantly enhanced by using a particle reinitialization technique resulting in remeshed Smoothed Particle Hydrodynamics (rSPH). The mechanical parameters of the systems used in the simulations are derived from experimental measurements on human cadaver organs. We compare the mechanical behavior of liver- and kidney-like materials based on the dynamic simulations of a tensile test case. Moreover, we present a particle based reconstruction of the liver topology and its strain distribution under a small local load. Finally, we demonstrate a unified formulation of fluid structure interaction based on particle methods.

  16. Isolation of vascular smooth muscle antigen-reactive CD4(+)αβTh1 clones that induce pulmonary vasculitis in MRL/Mp-Fas(+/+) mice.

    PubMed

    Fujita, Yoshimasa; Fujii, Takao; Shimizu, Hironori; Sato, Tomomi; Nakamura, Takuji; Iwao, Haruka; Nakajima, Akio; Miki, Miyuki; Sakai, Tomoyuki; Kawanami, Takafumi; Tanaka, Masao; Masaki, Yasufumi; Fukushima, Toshihiro; Okazaki, Toshiro; Umehara, Hisanori; Mimori, Tsuneyo

    2016-05-01

    Here, we established CD4(+)αβTh1 clones specific for rat vascular smooth muscle antigen (VSMAg) that induced vasculitis lesions in the lungs of MRL/Mp-Fas(+/+) mice following adoptive transfer. Six different T cell clones, MV1b1 (Vβ1), MV1b4 (Vβ4), MV1b8.3 (Vβ8.3), MV1b61 (Vβ6), MV1b62 (Vβ6), and MV1b63 (Vβ6), were isolated from the MV1 T cell line from the regional lymph nodes of immunized MRL/Mp-Fas(+/+) mice; the three (Vβ6) clones had unique CDR3 amino acid sequences. Following stimulation with VSMAg-pulsed antigen presenting cells, MV1b61 and MV1b62 failed to secrete interferon-γ and tumor necrosis factor-α, although the other four clones secreted high levels of both cytokines. In adoptive transfer experiments, MV1b61 and MV1b62 did not induce organ involvement including pulmonary vasculitis. In contrast, MV1b1, MV1b4, MV1b8.3, and MV1b63 induced perivascular mononuclear cell infiltration in pulmonary small arteries. These clones may provide useful tools for investigating the underlying mechanisms of vasculitis syndromes and for developing therapeutic strategies.

  17. Subacute hypoxia suppresses Kv3.4 channel expression and whole-cell K+ currents through endogenous 15-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Guo, Lei; Tang, Xiaobo; Tian, Hua; Liu, Ye; Wang, Zhigang; Wu, Hong; Wang, Jing; Guo, Sholi; Zhu, Daling

    2008-06-10

    We have previously reported that subacute hypoxia activates lung 15-lipoxygenase (15-LOX), which catalyzes arachidonic acid to produce 15-HETE, leading to constriction of neonatal rabbit pulmonary arteries. Subacute hypoxia suppresses Kv3.4 channel expression and results in an inhibition of whole-cell K(+) currents (I(K)). Although the Kv channel inhibition is likely to be mediated through 15-HETE, direct evidence is still lacking. To reveal the role of the 15-LOX/15-HETE pathway in the hypoxia-induced down-regulation of Kv3.4 channel expression and inhibition of I(K), we performed studies using 15-LOX blockers, whole-cell patch-clamp, semi-quantitative PCR, ELISA and Western blot analysis. We found that Kv3.4 channel expression at the mRNA and protein levels was greatly up-regulated in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells after blockade of 15-LOX by CDC or NDGA. The 15-LOX blockade also partially restored I(K). In comparison, 15-HETE had a stronger effect than 12-HETE on the expression of Kv3.4 channels. 5-HETE had no noticeable effect on Kv3.4 channel expression. These data indicate that the 15-LOX pathway via its metabolite, 15-HETE, seems to play a role in the down-regulation of Kv3.4 expression and I(K) inhibition after subacute hypoxia.

  18. Knockdown of AMPKα2 Promotes Pulmonary Arterial Smooth Muscle Cells Proliferation via mTOR/Skp2/p27Kip1 Signaling Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Ke, Rui; Liu, Lu; Zhu, Yanting; Li, Shaojun; Xie, Xinming; Li, Fangwei; Song, Yang; Yang, Lan; Gao, Li; Li, Manxiang

    2016-01-01

    It has been shown that activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) suppresses proliferation of a variety of tumor cells as well as nonmalignant cells. In this study, we used post-transcriptional gene silencing with small interfering RNA (siRNA) to specifically examine the effect of AMPK on pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) proliferation and to further elucidate its underlying molecular mechanisms. Our results showed that knockdown of AMPKα2 promoted primary cultured PASMCs proliferation; this was accompanied with the elevation of phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and S-phase kinase-associated protein 2 (Skp2) protein level and reduction of p27Kip1. Importantly, prior silencing of mTOR with siRNA abolished AMPKα2 knockdown-induced Skp2 upregulation, p27Kip1 reduction as well as PASMCs proliferation. Furthermore, pre-depletion of Skp2 by siRNA also eliminated p27Kip1 downregulation and PASMCs proliferation caused by AMPKα2 knockdown. Taken together, our study indicates that AMPKα2 isoform plays an important role in regulation of PASMCs proliferation by modulating mTOR/Skp2/p27Kip1 axis, and suggests that activation of AMPKα2 might have potential value in the prevention and treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension. PMID:27258250

  19. Knockdown of AMPKα2 Promotes Pulmonary Arterial Smooth Muscle Cells Proliferation via mTOR/Skp2/p27(Kip1) Signaling Pathway.

    PubMed

    Ke, Rui; Liu, Lu; Zhu, Yanting; Li, Shaojun; Xie, Xinming; Li, Fangwei; Song, Yang; Yang, Lan; Gao, Li; Li, Manxiang

    2016-05-31

    It has been shown that activation of adenosine monophosphate-activated protein kinase (AMPK) suppresses proliferation of a variety of tumor cells as well as nonmalignant cells. In this study, we used post-transcriptional gene silencing with small interfering RNA (siRNA) to specifically examine the effect of AMPK on pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) proliferation and to further elucidate its underlying molecular mechanisms. Our results showed that knockdown of AMPKα2 promoted primary cultured PASMCs proliferation; this was accompanied with the elevation of phosphorylation of mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and S-phase kinase-associated protein 2 (Skp2) protein level and reduction of p27(Kip1). Importantly, prior silencing of mTOR with siRNA abolished AMPKα2 knockdown-induced Skp2 upregulation, p27(Kip1) reduction as well as PASMCs proliferation. Furthermore, pre-depletion of Skp2 by siRNA also eliminated p27(Kip1) downregulation and PASMCs proliferation caused by AMPKα2 knockdown. Taken together, our study indicates that AMPKα2 isoform plays an important role in regulation of PASMCs proliferation by modulating mTOR/Skp2/p27(Kip1) axis, and suggests that activation of AMPKα2 might have potential value in the prevention and treatment of pulmonary arterial hypertension.

  20. Capsaicin-induced Ca(2+) signaling is enhanced via upregulated TRPV1 channels in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells from patients with idiopathic PAH.

    PubMed

    Song, Shanshan; Ayon, Ramon J; Yamamura, Aya; Yamamura, Hisao; Dash, Swetaleena; Babicheva, Aleksandra; Tang, Haiyang; Sun, Xutong; Cordery, Arlette G; Khalpey, Zain; Black, Stephen M; Desai, Ankit A; Rischard, Franz; McDermott, Kimberly M; Garcia, Joe G N; Makino, Ayako; Yuan, Jason X-J

    2017-03-01

    Capsaicin is an active component of chili pepper and a pain relief drug. Capsaicin can activate transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) channels to increase cytosolic Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)]cyt). A rise in [Ca(2+)]cyt in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) is an important stimulus for pulmonary vasoconstriction and vascular remodeling. In this study, we observed that a capsaicin-induced increase in [Ca(2+)]cyt was significantly enhanced in PASMCs from patients with idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension (IPAH) compared with normal PASMCs from healthy donors. In addition, the protein expression level of TRPV1 in IPAH PASMCs was greater than in normal PASMCs. Increasing the temperature from 23 to 43°C, or decreasing the extracellular pH value from 7.4 to 5.9 enhanced capsaicin-induced increases in [Ca(2+)]cyt; the acidity (pH 5.9)- and heat (43°C)-mediated enhancement of capsaicin-induced [Ca(2+)]cyt increases were greater in IPAH PASMCs than in normal PASMCs. Decreasing the extracellular osmotic pressure from 310 to 200 mOsmol/l also increased [Ca(2+)]cyt, and the hypo-osmolarity-induced rise in [Ca(2+)]cyt was greater in IPAH PASMCs than in healthy PASMCs. Inhibition of TRPV1 (with 5'-IRTX or capsazepine) or knockdown of TRPV1 (with short hairpin RNA) attenuated capsaicin-, acidity-, and osmotic stretch-mediated [Ca(2+)]cyt increases in IPAH PASMCs. Capsaicin induced phosphorylation of CREB by raising [Ca(2+)]cyt, and capsaicin-induced CREB phosphorylation were significantly enhanced in IPAH PASMCs compared with normal PASMCs. Pharmacological inhibition and knockdown of TRPV1 attenuated IPAH PASMC proliferation. Taken together, the capsaicin-mediated [Ca(2+)]cyt increase due to upregulated TRPV1 may be a critical pathogenic mechanism that contributes to augmented Ca(2+) influx and excessive PASMC proliferation in patients with IPAH. Copyright © 2017 the American Physiological Society.

  1. Sodium tanshinone IIA sulfonate inhibits hypoxia-induced enhancement of SOCE in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells via the PKG-PPAR-γ signaling axis.

    PubMed

    Jiang, Qian; Lu, Wenju; Yang, Kai; Hadadi, Cyrus; Fu, Xin; Chen, Yuqin; Yun, Xin; Zhang, Jie; Li, Meichan; Xu, Lei; Tang, Haiyang; Yuan, Jason X-J; Wang, Jian; Sun, Dejun

    2016-07-01

    Our laboratory previously showed that sodium tanshinone IIA sulfonate (STS) inhibited store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) through store-operated Ca(2+) channels (SOCC) via downregulating the expression of transient receptor potential canonical proteins (TRPC), which contribute to the formation of SOCC (Wang J, Jiang Q, Wan L, Yang K, Zhang Y, Chen Y, Wang E, Lai N, Zhao L, Jiang H, Sun Y, Zhong N, Ran P, Lu W. Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol 48: 125-134, 2013). The detailed molecular mechanisms by which STS inhibits SOCE and downregulates TRPC, however, remain largely unknown. We have previously shown that, under hypoxic conditions, inhibition of protein kinase G (PKG) and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPAR-γ) signaling axis results in the upregulation of TRPC (Wang J, Yang K, Xu L, Zhang Y, Lai N, Jiang H, Zhang Y, Zhong N, Ran P, Lu W. Am J Respir Cell Mol Biol 49: 231-240, 2013). This suggests that strategies targeting the restoration of this signaling pathway may be an effective treatment strategy for pulmonary hypertension. In this study, our results demonstrated that STS treatment can effectively prevent the hypoxia-mediated inhibition of the PKG-PPAR-γ signaling axis in rat distal pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) and distal pulmonary arteries. These effects of STS treatment were blocked by pharmacological inhibition or specific small interfering RNA knockdown of either PKG or PPAR-γ. Moreover, targeted PPAR-γ agonist markedly enhanced the beneficial effects of STS. These results comprehensively suggest that STS treatment can prevent hypoxia-mediated increases in intracellular calcium homeostasis and cell proliferation, by targeting and restoring the hypoxia-inhibited PKG-PPAR-γ signaling pathway in PASMCs.

  2. Duration of pulmonary function adaptation to ozone in humans

    SciTech Connect

    Kulle, T.J.; Sauder, L.R.; Kerr, H.D.; Farrell, B.P.; Bermel, M.S.; Smith, D.M.

    1982-11-01

    The duration of pulmonary function adaptation subsequent to cessation of a 5-day repeated ozone (O/sub 3/) exposure was studied in 24 nonsmoking human subjects. A three-week, 3 hr/day study ws conducted. The subjects received filtered air on Week 1 and 0.4 ppm O/sub 3/ on Week 2. During Week 3, 13 subjects were re-exposed to O/sub 3/ on Friday and 11 were re-exposed to O/sub 3/ on Tuesday. Spirometric measurements (FVC and FEV/sub 1/) and bronchial reactivity to methacholine showed adapation within 2-3 days of the repeated daily exposures (Week 2). Although the duration of adaptation seen with bronchial reactivity appears longer than 7-days, the FVC and FEV/sub 1/ clearly demonstrated complete loss of adaptation by 7 days, with a trend toward significance by 4 days. We concluded, therefore, the loss of ozone adaptation in pulmonary function is a gradual phenomenon lasting less than 7 days following cessation of repeated daily exposures.

  3. [High altitude pulmonary edema. An experiment of nature to study the underlying mechanisms of hypoxic pulmonary hypertension and pulmonary edema in humans].

    PubMed

    Schwab, Marcos; Jayet, Pierre-Yves; Allemann, Yves; Sartori, Claudio; Scherrer, Urs

    2007-01-01

    High altitude constitutes an exciting natural laboratory for medical research. Over the past decade, it has become clear that the results of high-altitude research may have important implications not only for the understanding of diseases in the millions of people living permanently at high altitude, but also for the treatment of hypoxemia-related disease states in patients living at low altitude. High-altitude pulmonary edema (HAPE) is a life-threatening condition occurring in predisposed, but otherwise healthy subjects, and, therefore, allows to study underlying mechanisms of pulmonary edema in humans, in the absence of confounding factors. Over the past decade, evidence has accumulated that HAPE results from the conjunction of two major defects, augmented alveolar fluid flooding resulting from exaggerated hypoxic pulmonary hypertension, and impaired alveolar fluid clearance related to defective respiratory transepithelial sodium transport. Here, after a brief presentation of the clinical features of HAPE, we review this novel concept. We provide experimental evidence for the novel concept that impaired pulmonary endothelial and epithelial nitric oxide synthesis and/or bioavailability may represent the central underlying defect predisposing to exaggerated hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction and alveolar fluid flooding. We demonstrate that exaggerated pulmonary hypertension, while possibly a condition sine qua non, may not be sufficient to cause HAPE, and how defective alveolar fluid clearance may represent a second important pathogenic mechanism. Finally, we outline how this insight gained from studies in HAPE may be translated into the management of hypoxemia related disease states in general.

  4. Involvement of gap junctions between smooth muscle cells in sustained hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction development: a potential role for 15-HETE and 20-HETE.

    PubMed

    Kizub, Igor V; Lakhkar, Anand; Dhagia, Vidhi; Joshi, Sachindra R; Jiang, Houli; Wolin, Michael S; Falck, John R; Koduru, Sreenivasulu Reddy; Errabelli, Ramu; Jacobs, Elizabeth R; Schwartzman, Michal L; Gupte, Sachin A

    2016-04-15

    In response to hypoxia, the pulmonary artery normally constricts to maintain optimal ventilation-perfusion matching in the lung, but chronic hypoxia leads to the development of pulmonary hypertension. The mechanisms of sustained hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (HPV) remain unclear. The aim of this study was to determine the role of gap junctions (GJs) between smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in the sustained HPV development and involvement of arachidonic acid (AA) metabolites in GJ-mediated signaling. Vascular tone was measured in bovine intrapulmonary arteries (BIPAs) using isometric force measurement technique. Expression of contractile proteins was determined by Western blot. AA metabolites in the bath fluid were analyzed by mass spectrometry. Prolonged hypoxia elicited endothelium-independent sustained HPV in BIPAs. Inhibition of GJs by 18β-glycyrrhetinic acid (18β-GA) and heptanol, nonspecific blockers, and Gap-27, a specific blocker, decreased HPV in deendothelized BIPAs. The sustained HPV was not dependent on Ca(2+) entry but decreased by removal of Ca(2+) and by Rho-kinase inhibition with Y-27632. Furthermore, inhibition of GJs decreased smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC) expression and myosin light chain phosphorylation in BIPAs. Interestingly, inhibition of 15- and 20-hydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid (HETE) synthesis decreased HPV in deendothelized BIPAs. 15-HETE- and 20-HETE-stimulated constriction of BIPAs was inhibited by 18β-GA and Gap-27. Application of 15-HETE and 20-HETE to BIPAs increased SM-MHC expression, which was also suppressed by 18β-GA and by inhibitors of lipoxygenase and cytochrome P450 monooxygenases. More interestingly, 15,20-dihydroxyeicosatetraenoic acid and 20-OH-prostaglandin E2, novel derivatives of 20-HETE, were detected in tissue bath fluid and synthesis of these derivatives was almost completely abolished by 18β-GA. Taken together, our novel findings show that GJs between SMCs are involved in the sustained HPV in BIPAs, and

  5. Contribution of human smooth muscle cells to amyloid angiopathy in AL (light-chain) amyloidosis.

    PubMed

    Vora, Moiz; Kevil, Christopher G; Herrera, Guillermo A

    2017-01-01

    Amyloid light-chain (AL) amyloidosis is a disease process that often compromises the peripheral vascular system and leads to systemic end-organ dysfunction. Although amyloid formation in vessel walls is a multifaceted process, the assembly of the native light chains (LCs) into amyloid fibrils is central to its pathogenesis. Recent evidence suggests that endocytosis and endolysosomal processing of immunoglobin LCs by host cells is essential to the formation of amyloid fibrils that are deposited in at least some tissues. The aim of this study was to elucidate the role of vascular smooth muscle in amyloid angiopathy. Human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (SMCs) were grown on coverslips, four chamber glass slides, and growth factor-reduced Matrigel matrix in the presence of 10 µg/ml of ALs (λ and κ isotypes), nonamyloidogenic LCs, and culture medium (negative control) for 48 and 72 hours. Thereafter, a detailed light microscopic, immunohistochemical, and ultrastructural evaluation was conducted to verify amyloid deposition and characterize the role of SMCs in the formation of amyloid deposits in the various experimental conditions. Amyloid deposits were detected extracellulary as early as 48 hours after exposure of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) to AL-LCs (amyloidogenic light chains) as confirmed by affinity to Congo red dye, thioflavin T fluorescence, and transmission electron microscopy. No amyloid was present in the cultures of SMCs treated with medium alone or nonamyloidogenic LCs. SMCs associated with amyloid deposits exhibited CD68, lysosome-associated membrane protein 1-1, and intracellular lambda light chain expression and only focal smooth muscle actin and muscle-specific actin positivity. Electron microscopy revealed these cells to have an expanded mature lysosomal compartment closely associated with deposits of newly formed amyloid fibrils. The interaction of amyloidogenic LCs with VSMCs is necessary for the formation of amyloid fibrils that are

  6. Prostanoid receptors mediating contraction in rat, macaque and human bladder smooth muscle in vitro.

    PubMed

    Root, James A; Davey, Dorren A; Af Forselles, Kerry J

    2015-12-15

    Selective prostaglandin EP1 antagonists have been suggested for the treatment of bladder dysfunction. This study assessed the contractile prostanoid receptor subtypes in human and non-human bladder in vitro. Classical tissue bath studies were conducted using bladder strips exposed to prostanoid agonists and antagonists. Prostaglandin E2 (PGE2) contracted rat, macaque and human bladder smooth muscle strips (pEC50 7.91±0.06 (n=7), 6.40±0.13 (n=7), and 6.07±0.11 (n=5), respectively). The EP1 receptor antagonist, PF2907617 (300nM), caused a rightward shift of the PGE2 concentration-response curve in the rat bladder only (pKB 8.40±0.15, n=3). PGE2 responses in rat and macaque bladders, but not human, were antagonised by the EP3 antagonist CJ24979 (1µM). Sulprostone, a mixed EP1/EP3/FP receptor agonist, induced potent contractions of rat bladder muscle (pEC50 7.94±0.31, n=6). The FP receptor agonist, prostaglandin F2α (PGF2α), induced bladder contraction in all species tested, but with a lower potency in rat. The selective FP receptor agonist latanoprost caused potent contractions of macaque and human bladder strips only. SQ29548, a selective TP antagonist, and GW848687X, a mixed EP1/TP antagonist caused rightward shifts of the concentration-response curves to the selective TP agonist, U46619 (pKB estimates 8.53±0.07 and 7.56±0.06, n=3, respectively). Responses to U46619 were absent in rat preparations. These data suggest significant species differences exist in bladder contractile prostanoid receptor subtypes. We conclude that the EP1 subtype does not represent the best approach to the clinical treatment of bladder disorders targeting inhibition of smooth muscle contraction.

  7. Expression of smooth muscle-specific proteins in myoepithelium and stromal myofibroblasts of normal and malignant human breast tissue.

    PubMed Central

    Lazard, D; Sastre, X; Frid, M G; Glukhova, M A; Thiery, J P; Koteliansky, V E

    1993-01-01

    The expression of several differentiation markers in normal human mammary gland myoepithelium and in certain stromal fibroblasts ("myofibroblasts") associated with breast carcinomas was studied by immunofluorescence microscopy of frozen sections. Several antibodies to smooth muscle-specific proteins (smooth muscle alpha-actin, smooth muscle myosin heavy chains, calponin, alpha 1-integrin, and high molecular weight caldesmon) and to epithelial-specific proteins (cytokeratins, E-cadherin, and desmoplakin) were used to show that myoepithelial cells concomitantly express epithelial and smooth muscle markers whereas adjacent luminal cells express only epithelial markers. The same antibodies were used to establish that stromal myofibroblasts exhibit smooth muscle phenotypic properties characterized by the expression of all the smooth muscle markers examined except for high molecular weight caldesmon. In addition, both myoepithelium and myofibroblasts show a significant degree of heterogeneity in smooth muscle protein expression. Thus, myoepithelial cells and stromal myofibroblasts are epithelial and mesenchymal cells, respectively, which coordinately express a set of smooth muscle markers while maintaining their specific original features. The dual nature of myoepithelial cells and the phenotypic transition of fibroblasts to myofibroblasts are examples of the plasticity of the differentiated cell phenotype. Images PMID:8430113

  8. Proteomic network analysis of human uterine smooth muscle in pregnancy, labor, and preterm labor

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Craig; Quilici, David R.; Schlauch, Karen A.; Buxton, Iain L. O.

    2015-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms involved in human uterine quiescence during gestation and the induction of labor at term or preterm are not completely known. Preterm delivery is associated with major morbidity and mortality and current efforts to prevent delivery until term are largely ineffective. Identification and semi-quantification of proteomic changes in uterine smooth muscle during pregnancy will allow for targeted research into how quiescence is maintained and what changes are associated with induction of labor. Examining preterm labor in this context will provide potential therapeutic targets for the management of preterm labor. We have recently performed two dimensional liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry on myometrial proteins isolated from pregnant patients in labor, pregnant patients not in labor, and pregnant patients in labor preterm. Using a conservative false discovery rate of 1% we have identified 2132 protein groups using this method and semi-quantitative spectral counting shows 201 proteins that have disparate levels of expression in preterm laboring samples. To our knowledge this is the first large scale proteomic study examining human uterine smooth muscle and this initial work has provided a target list for future experiments that can address how changing protein levels are involved in the induction of labor at term and preterm. PMID:26413312

  9. The 5-hydroxytryptamine transporter is functional in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells proliferation and is regulated by Interleukin-1 beta

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qing-Jie; Wang, Dong; Tang, Cheng-Chun

    2015-01-01

    Abnormal human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (hCASMCs) proliferation and migration are key factors in coronary artery restenosis after percutaneous coronary intervention. Platelets release 5-hydroxytryptamine (5-HT), which is a strong mitogen for pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells proliferation and migration. Here, we investigated the effects of 5-HT and role of 5-HT transporter (5-HTT) on hCASMCs proliferation and migration. The 5-HT (10-6-10-5 mol/l) significantly increased hCASMCs proliferation and migration, and these effects were inhibited by fluoxetine (10-5 mol/l) and citalopram (10-6 mol/l), two 5-HTT blocker. Overexpression in hCASMCs enhanced 5-HT induced cells proliferation and migration. The 5-HTT and interleukin-1 beta (IL-1β) expression were increased in rat balloon injury carotid arteries. Treatment with IL-1β (10 ng/ml, 3d) upregulates 5-HTT expression in hCASMCs and increased 5-HT induced currents in Human Embryonic Kidney 293-5-HTT cells. PMID:26221231

  10. Pharmacological evidence for putative CCK1 receptor heterogeneity in human colon smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Morton, M F; Harper, E A; Tavares, I A; Shankley, N P

    2002-01-01

    The pharmacology of the cholecystokinin CCK1 receptors endogenously expressed in human gallbladder and human ascending colon smooth muscle tissue was compared using radioligand binding assays. Saturation analysis of the interaction between the radiolabelled, selective CCK1-receptor antagonist, [3H]-L-364,718, and enriched gastrointestinal tissue membranes suggested the presence of multiple binding sites in human colon but not human gallbladder. Competition studies, using a range of structurally diverse, CCK-receptor selective ligands provided further evidence for CCK1 receptor heterogeneity in human colon tissue (nH values significantly less than unity for SR27897=0.77±0.07, 2-NAP=0.73±0.03, YM220=0.70±0.09 and PD-134,308=0.83±0.01). Moreover, the competition data for SR27897, 2-NAP and YM220 were consistent with the interaction of these compounds at two binding sites. In contrast, in the human gallbladder assay, a single binding site model provided a good fit of the competition curve data obtained with all the CCK receptor selective compounds. The data obtained are consistent with the presence of a single CCK1 receptor binding site in the gallbladder but not in the colon. A two-site analysis of the colon data, indicated that one of the two sites was indistinguishable from that characterized in the gallbladder. The molecular basis of the apparent receptor heterogeneity in the colon remains to be established. PMID:12110612

  11. Anatomy of the human penis: the relationship of the architecture between skeletal and smooth muscles.

    PubMed

    Hsu, Geng-Long; Hsieh, Cheng-Hsing; Wen, Hsien-Sheng; Hsu, Wen-Long; Wu, Chih-Hsiung; Fong, Tsorng-Harn; Chen, Shyh-Chyan; Tseng, Guo-Fang

    2004-01-01

    To investigate the anatomy of the ischiocavernosus muscle, bulbospongiosus muscle, and tunica albuginea and to determine their relationships to smooth muscle, which is a key element of penile sinusoids, we performed cadaveric dissection and histologic examinations of 35 adult human male cadavers. The tunica of the corpora cavernosa is a bilayered structure that can be divided into an inner circular layer and an outer longitudinal layer. The outer longitudinal layer is an incomplete coat that is absent between the 5-o'clock and 7-o'clock positions where 2 triangular ligamentous structures form. These structures, termed the ventral thickening, are a continuation of the anterior fibers of the left and right bulbospongiosus muscles. On the dorsal aspect, between the 1-o'clock and 11-o'clock positions, is a region called the dorsal thickening, a radiating aspect of the bilateral ischiocavernosus muscles. In the corpora cavernosa, skeletal muscle contains and supports smooth muscle, which is an essential element in the sinusoids. This relationship plays an important part in the blood vessels' ability to supply the blood to meet the requirements for erection, whereas in the corpus spongiosum, skeletal muscle partially entraps the smooth muscle to allow ejaculation when erect. In the glans penis, however, the distal ligament, a continuation of the outer longitudinal layer of the tunica, is arranged centrally and acts as a trunk of the glans penis. Without this strong ligament, the glans would be too weak to bear the buckling pressure generated during coitus. A significant difference exists in the thickness of the dorsal thickening, the ventral thickening, and the distal ligament between the potent and impotent groups (P < or =.01). Together, the anatomic relationships between skeletal muscle and smooth muscle within the human penis explain many physiologic phenomena, such as erection, ejaculation, the intracavernous pressure surge during ejaculation, and the pull

  12. Real-time imaging of ATP release induced by mechanical stretch in human airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Takahara, Norihiro; Ito, Satoru; Furuya, Kishio; Naruse, Keiji; Aso, Hiromichi; Kondo, Masashi; Sokabe, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Yoshinori

    2014-12-01

    Airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells within the airway walls are continually exposed to mechanical stimuli, and exhibit various functions in response to these mechanical stresses. ATP acts as an extracellular mediator in the airway. Moreover, extracellular ATP is considered to play an important role in the pathophysiology of asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. However, it is not known whether ASM cells are cellular sources of ATP secretion in the airway. We therefore investigated whether mechanical stretch induces ATP release from ASM cells. Mechanical stretch was applied to primary human ASM cells cultured on a silicone chamber coated with type I collagen using a stretching apparatus. Concentrations of ATP in cell culture supernatants measured by luciferin-luciferase bioluminescence were significantly elevated by cyclic stretch (12 and 20% strain). We further visualized the stretch-induced ATP release from the cells in real time using a luminescence imaging system, while acquiring differential interference contrast cell images with infrared optics. Immediately after a single uniaxial stretch for 1 second, strong ATP signals were produced by a certain population of cells and spread to surrounding spaces. The cyclic stretch-induced ATP release was significantly reduced by inhibitors of Ca(2+)-dependent vesicular exocytosis, 1,2-bis(o-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N',N'-tetraacetic acid tetraacetoxymethyl ester, monensin, N-ethylmaleimide, and bafilomycin. In contrast, the stretch-induced ATP release was not inhibited by a hemichannel blocker, carbenoxolone, or blockade of transient receptor potential vanilloid 4 by short interfering RNA transfection or ruthenium red. These findings reveal a novel property of ASM cells: mechanically induced ATP release may be a cellular source of ATP in the airway.

  13. Regulatory mechanism of human vascular smooth muscle cell phenotypic transformation induced by NELIN

    PubMed Central

    PEI, CHANGAN; QIN, SHIYONG; WANG, MINGHAI; ZHANG, SHUGUANG

    2015-01-01

    Vascular disorders, including hypertension, atherosclerosis and restenosis, arise from dysregulation of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) differentiation, which can be controlled by regulatory factors. The present study investigated the regulatory mechanism of the phenotypic transformation of human VSMCs by NELIN in order to evaluate its potential as a preventive and therapeutic of vascular disorders. An in vitro model of NELIN-overexpressing VSMCs was prepared by transfection with a lentiviral (LV) vector (NELIN-VSMCs) and NELIN was slienced using an a lentiviral vector with small interfering (si)RNA in another group (LV-NELIN-siRNA-VSMCs). The effects of NELIN overexpression or knockdown on the phenotypic transformation of human VSMCs were observed, and its regulatory mechanism was studied. Compared with the control group, cells in the NELIN-VSMCs group presented a contractile phenotype with a significant increase of NELIN mRNA, NELIN protein, smooth muscle (SM)α-actin and total Ras homolog gene family member A (RhoA) protein expression. The intra-nuclear translocation of SMα-actin-serum response factor (SMα-actin-SRF) occurred in these cells simultaneously. Following exposure to Rho kinsase inhibitor Y-27632, SRF and SMα-actin expression decreased. However, cells in the LV-NELIN-siRNA-VSMCs group presented a synthetic phenotype, and the expression of NELIN mRNA, NELIN protein, SMα-actin protein and total RhoA protein was decreased. The occurrence of SRF extra-nuclear translocation was observed. In conclusion, the present study suggested that NELIN was able to activate regulatory factors of SMα-actin, RhoA and SRF successively in human VSMCs cultured in vitro. Furthermore, NELIN-induced phenotypic transformation of human VSMCs was regulated via the RhoA/SRF signaling pathway. The results of the present study provide a foundation for the use of NELIN in preventive and therapeutic treatment of vascular remodeling diseases, including varicosity and

  14. Activation properties of chemically skinned fibres from human isolated bronchial smooth muscle.

    PubMed Central

    Savineau, J P; Marthan, R

    1994-01-01

    1. The contractile activation properties of human isolated bronchial smooth muscle were investigated using chemically (beta-escin) skinned strips. 2. Concentration-dependent contractions were induced by free ion concentrations of Ca2+ (0.5-3 microM), Sr2+ (2-200 microM) and Ba2+ (50-1000 microM). The resulting -log[cation]-tension relationships were fitted by sigmoidal curves with EC50 values (cation concentration required to produce half-maximal tension) and co-operativity factors (Hill coefficient, nH) of, respectively, 0.25 microM and 3.4 for Ca2+, 12 microM and 2.64 for Sr2+ and 100 microM and 1.73 for Ba2+. Maximal responses to Sr2+ and Ba2+ were 125.5 +/- 15.4 and 96 +/- 8.1% (n = 5) respectively of the maximum tension induced by Ca2+. 3. Trifluoperazine (5-100 microM), cyclic AMP (50-300 microM) and cyclic GMP (50-100 microM) each antagonized Ca2+ in a concentration-dependent manner. On the other hand, okadaic acid (OA, 0.2-1 microM) potentiated Ca2+ and increased the maximum response to Ca2+ (+25 +/- 5.4%, n = 5, for 1 microM OA). 4. This study has demonstrated the high Ca2+ sensitivity of the activation mechanism of human isolated bronchial smooth muscle. It also suggests that control of the contractile machinery in the human bronchus involves processes of phosphorylation and dephosphorylation. The beta-escin-treated human bronchus may be a useful model for investigating the cellular basis of some pathophysiological processes such as bronchial hyper-responsiveness. PMID:8014904

  15. Applying cybernetic technology to diagnose human pulmonary sounds.

    PubMed

    Chen, Mei-Yung; Chou, Cheng-Han

    2014-06-01

    Chest auscultation is a crucial and efficient method for diagnosing lung disease; however, it is a subjective process that relies on physician experience and the ability to differentiate between various sound patterns. Because the physiological signals composed of heart sounds and pulmonary sounds (PSs) are greater than 120 Hz and the human ear is not sensitive to low frequencies, successfully making diagnostic classifications is difficult. To solve this problem, we constructed various PS recognition systems for classifying six PS classes: vesicular breath sounds, bronchial breath sounds, tracheal breath sounds, crackles, wheezes, and stridor sounds. First, we used a piezoelectric microphone and data acquisition card to acquire PS signals and perform signal preprocessing. A wavelet transform was used for feature extraction, and the PS signals were decomposed into frequency subbands. Using a statistical method, we extracted 17 features that were used as the input vectors of a neural network. We proposed a 2-stage classifier combined with a back-propagation (BP) neural network and learning vector quantization (LVQ) neural network, which improves classification accuracy by using a haploid neural network. The receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve verifies the high performance level of the neural network. To expand traditional auscultation methods, we constructed various PS diagnostic systems that can correctly classify the six common PSs. The proposed device overcomes the lack of human sensitivity to low-frequency sounds and various PS waves, characteristic values, and a spectral analysis charts are provided to elucidate the design of the human-machine interface.

  16. Bioengineering functional human sphincteric and non-sphincteric gastrointestinal smooth muscle constructs.

    PubMed

    Rego, Stephen L; Zakhem, Elie; Orlando, Giuseppe; Bitar, Khalil N

    2016-04-15

    Digestion and motility of luminal content through the gastrointestinal (GI) tract are achieved by cooperation between distinct cell types. Much of the 3 dimensional (3D) in vitro modeling used to study the GI physiology and disease focus solely on epithelial cells and not smooth muscle cells (SMCs). SMCs of the gut function either to propel and mix luminal contents (phasic; non-sphincteric) or to act as barriers to prevent the movement of luminal materials (tonic; sphincteric). Motility disorders including pyloric stenosis and chronic intestinal pseudoobstruction (CIPO) affect sphincteric and non-sphincteric SMCs, respectively. Bioengineering offers a useful tool to develop functional GI tissue mimics that possess similar characteristics to native tissue. The objective of this study was to bioengineer 3D human pyloric sphincter and small intestinal (SI) constructs in vitro that recapitulate the contractile phenotypes of sphincteric and non-sphincteric human GI SMCs. Bioengineered 3D human pylorus and circular SI SMC constructs were developed and displayed a contractile phenotype. Constructs composed of human pylorus SMCs displayed tonic SMC characteristics, including generation of basal tone, at higher levels than SI SMC constructs which is similar to what is seen in native tissue. Both constructs contracted in response to potassium chloride (KCl) and acetylcholine (ACh) and relaxed in response to vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP). These studies provide the first bioengineered human pylorus constructs that maintain a sphincteric phenotype. These bioengineered constructs provide appropriate models to study motility disorders of the gut or replacement tissues for various GI organs.

  17. Little ROCK is a ROCK1 pseudogene expressed in human smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Sequencing of the human genome has identified numerous chromosome copy number additions and subtractions that include stable partial gene duplications and pseudogenes that when not properly annotated can interfere with genetic analysis. As an example of this problem, an evolutionary chromosome event in the primate ancestral chromosome 18 produced a partial duplication and inversion of rho-associated protein kinase 1 (ROCK1 -18q11.1, 33 exons) in the subtelomeric region of the p arm of chromosome 18 detectable only in humans. ROCK1 and the partial gene copy, which the gene databases also currently call ROCK1, include non-unique single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Results Here, we characterize this partial gene copy of the human ROCK1, termed Little ROCK, located at 18p11.32. Little ROCK includes five exons, four of which share 99% identity with the terminal four exons of ROCK1 and one of which is unique to Little ROCK. In human while ROCK1 is expressed in many organs, Little ROCK expression is restricted to vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) lines and organs rich in smooth muscle. The single nucleotide polymorphism database (dbSNP) lists multiple variants contained in the region shared by ROCK1 and Little ROCK. Using gene and cDNA sequence analysis we clarified the origins of two non-synonymous SNPs annotated in the genome to actually be fixed differences between the ROCK1 and the Little ROCK gene sequences. Two additional coding SNPs were valid polymorphisms selectively within Little ROCK. Little ROCK-Green Fluorescent fusion proteins were highly unstable and degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system in vitro. Conclusion In this report we have characterized Little ROCK (ROCK1P1), a human expressed pseudogene derived from partial duplication of ROCK1. The large number of pseudogenes in the human genome creates significant genetic diversity. Our findings emphasize the importance of taking into consideration pseudogenes in all candidate gene and

  18. Little ROCK is a ROCK1 pseudogene expressed in human smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Montefusco, Maria Claudia; Merlo, Kristen; Bryan, Crystal D; Surks, Howard K; Reis, Steven E; Mendelsohn, Michael E; Huggins, Gordon S

    2010-04-14

    Sequencing of the human genome has identified numerous chromosome copy number additions and subtractions that include stable partial gene duplications and pseudogenes that when not properly annotated can interfere with genetic analysis. As an example of this problem, an evolutionary chromosome event in the primate ancestral chromosome 18 produced a partial duplication and inversion of rho-associated protein kinase 1 (ROCK1 -18q11.1, 33 exons) in the subtelomeric region of the p arm of chromosome 18 detectable only in humans. ROCK1 and the partial gene copy, which the gene databases also currently call ROCK1, include non-unique single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs). Here, we characterize this partial gene copy of the human ROCK1, termed Little ROCK, located at 18p11.32. Little ROCK includes five exons, four of which share 99% identity with the terminal four exons of ROCK1 and one of which is unique to Little ROCK. In human while ROCK1 is expressed in many organs, Little ROCK expression is restricted to vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) lines and organs rich in smooth muscle. The single nucleotide polymorphism database (dbSNP) lists multiple variants contained in the region shared by ROCK1 and Little ROCK. Using gene and cDNA sequence analysis we clarified the origins of two non-synonymous SNPs annotated in the genome to actually be fixed differences between the ROCK1 and the Little ROCK gene sequences. Two additional coding SNPs were valid polymorphisms selectively within Little ROCK. Little ROCK-Green Fluorescent fusion proteins were highly unstable and degraded by the ubiquitin-proteasome system in vitro. In this report we have characterized Little ROCK (ROCK1P1), a human expressed pseudogene derived from partial duplication of ROCK1. The large number of pseudogenes in the human genome creates significant genetic diversity. Our findings emphasize the importance of taking into consideration pseudogenes in all candidate gene and genome-wide association studies, as

  19. Differentiation of Human Induced-Pluripotent Stem Cells into Smooth-Muscle Cells: Two Novel Protocols

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Libang; Geng, Zhaohui; Nickel, Thomas; Johnson, Caitlin; Gao, Lin; Dutton, James; Hou, Cody; Zhang, Jianyi

    2016-01-01

    Conventional protocols for differentiating human induced-pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) into smooth-muscle cells (SMCs) can be inefficient and generally fail to yield cells with a specific SMC phenotype (i.e., contractile or synthetic SMCs). Here, we present two novel hiPSC-SMC differentiation protocols that yield SMCs with predominantly contractile or synthetic phenotypes. Flow cytometry analyses of smooth-muscle actin (SMA) expression indicated that ~45% of the cells obtained with each protocol assumed an SMC phenotype, and that the populations could be purified to ~95% via metabolic selection. Assessments of cellular mRNA and/or protein levels indicated that SMA, myosin heavy chain II, collagen 1, calponin, transgelin, connexin 43, and vimentin expression in the SMCs obtained via the Contractile SMC protocol and in SMCs differentiated via a traditional protocol were similar, while SMCs produced via the Sythetic SMC protocol expressed less calponin, more collagen 1, and more connexin 43. Differences were also observed in functional assessments of the two SMC populations: the two-dimensional surface area of Contractile SMCs declined more extensively (to 12% versus 44% of original size) in response to carbachol treatment, while quantification of cell migration and proliferation were greater in Synthetic SMCs. Collectively, these data demonstrate that our novel differentiation protocols can efficiently generate SMCs from hiPSCs. PMID:26771193

  20. Co-cultivation of human aortic smooth muscle cells with epicardial adipocytes affects their proliferation rate.

    PubMed

    Ždychová, J; Čejková, S; Králová Lesná, I; Králová, A; Malušková, J; Janoušek, L; Kazdová, L

    2014-01-01

    The abnormal proliferation of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) is thought to play a role in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Adipocytes produce several bioactive paracrine substances that can affect the growth and migration of VSMCs. Our study focuses on the direct effect of the bioactive substances in conditioned media (CM) that was obtained by incubation with primary adipocyte-derived cell lines, including cell lines derived from both preadipocytes and from more mature cells, on the proliferation rate of human aortic smooth muscle cells (HAoSMCs). We used a Luminex assay to measure the adipokine content of the CM and showed that there was a higher concentration of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 in renal preadipocyte-CM compared with the HAoSMC control (p<0.5). The addition of both renal preadipocyte- and epicardial adipocyte- CM resulted in the elevated production of vascular endothelial growth factor compared with the control HASoSMC CM (p<0.001). The adiponectin content in renal adipocyte-CM was increased compared to all the remaining adipocyte-CM (p<0.01). Moreover, the results showed a higher proliferation rate of HAoSMCs after co-culture with epicardial adipocyte-CM compared to the HAoSMC control (p<0.05). These results suggest that bioactive substances produced by adipocytes have a stimulatory effect on the proliferation of VSMCs.

  1. Intracellular Ca(2+) remodeling during the phenotypic journey of human coronary smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Muñoz, Eva; Hernández-Morales, Miriam; Sobradillo, Diego; Rocher, Asunción; Núñez, Lucía; Villalobos, Carlos

    2013-11-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cells undergo phenotypic switches after damage which may contribute to proliferative disorders of the vessel wall. This process has been related to remodeling of Ca(2+) channels. We have tested the ability of cultured human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (hCASMCs) to return from a proliferative to a quiescent behavior and the contribution of intracellular Ca(2+) remodeling to the process. We found that cultured, early passage hCASMCs showed a high proliferation rate, sustained increases in cytosolic [Ca(2+)] in response to angiotensin II, residual voltage-operated Ca(2+) entry, increased Stim1 and enhanced store-operated currents. Non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drugs inhibited store-operated Ca(2+) entry and abolished cell proliferation in a mitochondria-dependent manner. After a few passages, hCASMCs turned to a quiescent phenotype characterized by lack of proliferation, oscillatory Ca(2+) response to angiotensin II, increased Ca(2+) store content, enhanced voltage-operated Ca(2+) entry and Cav1.2 expression, and decreases in Stim1, store-operated current and store-operated Ca(2+) entry. We conclude that proliferating hCASMCs return to quiescence and this switch is associated to a remodeling of Ca(2+) channels and their control by subcellular organelles, thus providing a window of opportunity for targeting phenotype-specific Ca(2+) channels involved in proliferation. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Alpha-smooth muscle actin expression and structure integrity in chondrogenesis of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    PubMed

    Hung, Shih-Chieh; Kuo, Pei-Yin; Chang, Ching-Fang; Chen, Tain-Hsiung; Ho, Larry Low-Tone

    2006-06-01

    The expression of alpha-smooth muscle actin (SMA) by human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) during chondrogenesis was investigated by the use of pellet culture. Undifferentiated hMSCs expressed low but detectable amounts of SMA and the addition of transforming growth factor beta1 (TGF-beta1) to the culture medium increased SMA expression in a dose-dependent manner. Differentiation in pellet culture was rapidly induced in the presence of TGF-beta1 and was accompanied by the development of annular layers at the surface of the pellet. These peripheral layers lacked expression of glycosaminoglycan and type II collagen during early differentiation. Progress in differentiation increased the synthesis of glycosaminoglycan and type II collagen and the expression of SMA in these layers. Double-staining for type II collagen and SMA by immunofluorescence demonstrated the differentiation of hMSCs into cells positive for these two proteins. The addition of cytochalasin D, a potent inhibitor of the polymerization of actin microfilaments, caused damage to the structural integrity and surface smoothness of the chondrogenic pellets. The SMA-positive cells in the peripheral layers of the chondrogenic pellets mimic those within the superficial layer of articular cartilage and are speculated to play a major role in cartilage development and maintenance.

  3. Receptor-based differences in human aortic smooth muscle cell membrane stiffness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, H.; Kamm, R. D.; So, P. T.; Lee, R. T.

    2001-01-01

    Cells respond to mechanical stimuli with diverse molecular responses. The nature of the sensory mechanism involved in mechanotransduction is not known, but integrins may play an important role. The integrins are linked to both the cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix, suggesting that probing cells via integrins should yield different mechanical properties than probing cells via non-cytoskeleton-associated receptors. To test the hypothesis that the mechanical properties of a cell are dependent on the receptor on which the stress is applied, human aortic smooth muscle cells were plated, and magnetic beads, targeted either to the integrins via fibronectin or to the transferrin receptor by use of an IgG antibody, were attached to the cell surface. The resistance of the cell to deformation ("stiffness") was estimated by oscillating the magnetic beads at 1 Hz by use of single-pole magnetic tweezers at 2 different magnitudes. The ratio of bead displacements at different magnitudes was used to explore the mechanical properties of the cells. Cells stressed via the integrins required approximately 10-fold more force to obtain the same bead displacements as the cells stressed via the transferrin receptors. Cells stressed via integrins showed stiffening behavior as the force was increased, whereas this stiffening was significantly less for cells stressed via the transferrin receptor (P<0.001). Mechanical characteristics of vascular smooth muscle cells depend on the receptor by which the stress is applied, with integrin-based linkages demonstrating cell-stiffening behavior.

  4. Receptor-based differences in human aortic smooth muscle cell membrane stiffness

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Huang, H.; Kamm, R. D.; So, P. T.; Lee, R. T.

    2001-01-01

    Cells respond to mechanical stimuli with diverse molecular responses. The nature of the sensory mechanism involved in mechanotransduction is not known, but integrins may play an important role. The integrins are linked to both the cytoskeleton and extracellular matrix, suggesting that probing cells via integrins should yield different mechanical properties than probing cells via non-cytoskeleton-associated receptors. To test the hypothesis that the mechanical properties of a cell are dependent on the receptor on which the stress is applied, human aortic smooth muscle cells were plated, and magnetic beads, targeted either to the integrins via fibronectin or to the transferrin receptor by use of an IgG antibody, were attached to the cell surface. The resistance of the cell to deformation ("stiffness") was estimated by oscillating the magnetic beads at 1 Hz by use of single-pole magnetic tweezers at 2 different magnitudes. The ratio of bead displacements at different magnitudes was used to explore the mechanical properties of the cells. Cells stressed via the integrins required approximately 10-fold more force to obtain the same bead displacements as the cells stressed via the transferrin receptors. Cells stressed via integrins showed stiffening behavior as the force was increased, whereas this stiffening was significantly less for cells stressed via the transferrin receptor (P<0.001). Mechanical characteristics of vascular smooth muscle cells depend on the receptor by which the stress is applied, with integrin-based linkages demonstrating cell-stiffening behavior.

  5. Heparin induces the expression of specific matrix proteins by human intestinal smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cochran, D.L.; Perr, H.; Graham, M.F.; Diegelmann, R.F.

    1986-03-01

    Human intestinal smooth muscle (HISM) cells have recently been identified as the major cell type responsible for stricture formation in Crohn's disease. Heparin, a sulfated glycosaminoglycan, has been shown to be a key modulator of vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) growth both in vivo and in vitro and to affect the phenotypic expression of proteins made by VSMC. Heparin has also been shown to effect the growth of HISM cells and in this report the authors demonstrate that heparin also has very specific effects on proteins released by HISM cells in vitro. Examination of the proteins in the culture medium of heparin-treated HISM cells observed at 3 time points following sparse plating and proliferation revealed an increase in /sup 35/S-methionine-labeled 200, 37, and 35 kd proteins. A transient effect on a 48 kd protein was observed in substrate-attached material left on the culture dish after the cells were removed with EGTA. No effects on intracellular labeled proteins could be demonstrated. The protein phenotype of HISM cells exposed to heparin appears very similar to that observed in VSMC. The release of specific proteins following exposure to heparin does not appear to be species specific. This response to heparin may reflect a significant influence of this glycosaminoglycan on the phenotypic expression of these cells.

  6. Enhanced elastin synthesis and maturation in human vascular smooth muscle tissue derived from induced-pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Eoh, Joon H; Shen, Nian; Burke, Jacqueline A; Hinderer, Svenja; Xia, Zhiyong; Schenke-Layland, Katja; Gerecht, Sharon

    2017-04-01

    Obtaining vascular smooth muscle tissue with mature, functional elastic fibers is a key obstacle in tissue-engineered blood vessels. Poor elastin secretion and organization leads to a loss of specialization in contractile smooth muscle cells, resulting in over proliferation and graft failure. In this study, human induced-pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) were differentiated into early smooth muscle cells, seeded onto a hybrid poly(ethylene glycol) dimethacrylate/poly (l-lactide) (PEGdma-PLA) scaffold and cultured in a bioreactor while exposed to pulsatile flow, towards maturation into contractile smooth muscle tissue. We evaluated the effects of pulsatile flow on cellular organization as well as elastin expression and assembly in the engineered tissue compared to a static control through immunohistochemistry, gene expression and functionality assays. We show that culturing under pulsatile flow resulted in organized and functional hiPSC derived smooth muscle tissue. Immunohistochemistry analysis revealed hiPSC-smooth muscle tissue with robust, well-organized cells and elastic fibers and the supporting microfibril proteins necessary for elastic fiber assembly. Through qRT-PCR analysis, we found significantly increased expression of elastin, fibronectin, and collagen I, indicating the synthesis of necessary extracellular matrix components. Functionality assays revealed that hiPSC-smooth muscle tissue cultured in the bioreactor had an increased calcium signaling and contraction in response to a cholinergic agonist, significantly higher mature elastin content and improved mechanical properties in comparison to the static control. The findings presented here detail an effective approach to engineering elastic human vascular smooth muscle tissue with the functionality necessary for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine applications. Obtaining robust, mature elastic fibers is a key obstacle in tissue-engineered blood vessels. Human induced-pluripotent stem cells have

  7. Human Pulmonary Infection by the Zoonotic Metastrongylus salmi Nematode. The First Reported Case in the Americas.

    PubMed

    Calvopina, Manuel; Caballero, Henry; Morita, Tatsushi; Korenaga, Masataka

    2016-10-05

    Pulmonary metastrongylosis, a zoonotic disease found primarily in pigs, is caused by eight different species of the cosmopolitan nematode Metastrongylus genus. To date, only four human cases have been reported, all from Europe. Herein, a severe case of pulmonary infection caused by Metastrongylus salmi in an Ecuadorian man, with successful treatment with ivermectin, is described. © The American Society of Tropical Medicine and Hygiene.

  8. Human Pulmonary Infection by the Zoonotic Metastrongylus salmi Nematode. The First Reported Case in the Americas

    PubMed Central

    Calvopina, Manuel; Caballero, Henry; Morita, Tatsushi; Korenaga, Masataka

    2016-01-01

    Pulmonary metastrongylosis, a zoonotic disease found primarily in pigs, is caused by eight different species of the cosmopolitan nematode Metastrongylus genus. To date, only four human cases have been reported, all from Europe. Herein, a severe case of pulmonary infection caused by Metastrongylus salmi in an Ecuadorian man, with successful treatment with ivermectin, is described. PMID:27382078

  9. Copper dependence of angioproliferation in pulmonary arterial hypertension in rats and humans.

    PubMed

    Bogaard, Harm J; Mizuno, Shiro; Guignabert, Christophe; Al Hussaini, Aysar A; Farkas, Daniela; Ruiter, Gerrina; Kraskauskas, Donatas; Fadel, Elie; Allegood, Jeremy C; Humbert, Marc; Vonk Noordegraaf, Anton; Spiegel, Sarah; Farkas, Laszlo; Voelkel, Norbert F

    2012-05-01

    Obliteration of the vascular lumen by endothelial cell growth is a hallmark of many forms of severe pulmonary arterial hypertension. Copper plays a significant role in the control of endothelial cell proliferation in cancer and wound-healing. We sought to determine whether angioproliferation in rats with experimental pulmonary arterial hypertension and pulmonary microvascular endothelial cell proliferation in humans depend on the proangiogenic action of copper. A copper-depleted diet prevented, and copper chelation with tetrathiomolybdate reversed, the development of severe experimental pulmonary arterial hypertension. The copper chelation-induced reopening of obliterated vessels was caused by caspase-independent apoptosis, reduced vessel wall cell proliferation, and a normalization of vessel wall structure. No evidence was found for a role of super oxide-1 inhibition or lysyl-oxidase-1 inhibition in the reversal of angioproliferation. Tetrathiomolybdate inhibited the proliferation of human pulmonary microvascular endothelial cells, isolated from explanted lungs from control subjects and patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension. These data suggest that the inhibition of endothelial cell proliferation by a copper-restricting strategy could be explored as a new therapeutic approach in pulmonary arterial hypertension. It remains to be determined, however, whether potential toxicity to the right ventricle is offset by the beneficial pulmonary vascular effects of antiangiogenic treatment in patients with pulmonary arterial hypertension.

  10. Smooth enlargement of human standing sway by instability due to weak reaction floor and noise

    PubMed Central

    Funato, Tetsuro; Aoi, Shinya; Tomita, Nozomi; Tsuchiya, Kazuo

    2016-01-01

    Human quiet standing is accompanied by body sway. The amplitude of this body sway is known to be larger than would be predicted from simple noise effects, and sway characteristics are changed by neurological disorders. This large sway is thought to arise from nonlinear control with prolonged periods of no control (intermittent control), and a nonlinear control system of this kind has been predicted to exhibit bifurcation. The presence of stability-dependent transition enables dynamic reaction that depends on the stability of the environment, and can explain the change in sway characteristics that accompanies some neurological disorders. This research analyses the characteristics of a system model that induces transition, and discusses whether human standing reflects such a mechanism. In mathematical analysis of system models, (intermittent control-like) nonlinear control with integral control is shown to exhibit Hopf bifurcation. Moreover, from the analytical solution of the system model with noise, noise is shown to work to smooth the enlargement of sway around the bifurcation point. This solution is compared with measured human standing sway on floors with different stabilities. By quantitatively comparing the control parameters between human observation and model prediction, enlargement of sway is shown to appear as predicted by the model analysis. PMID:26909186

  11. MEF2C-MYOCD and Leiomodin1 Suppression by miRNA-214 Promotes Smooth Muscle Cell Phenotype Switching in Pulmonary Arterial Hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Sahoo, Sanghamitra; Meijles, Daniel N.; Al Ghouleh, Imad; Tandon, Manuj; Cifuentes-Pagano, Eugenia; Sembrat, John; Rojas, Mauricio; Goncharova, Elena; Pagano, Patrick J.

    2016-01-01

    Background Vascular hyperproliferative disorders are characterized by excessive smooth muscle cell (SMC) proliferation leading to vessel remodeling and occlusion. In pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), SMC phenotype switching from a terminally differentiated contractile to synthetic state is gaining traction as our understanding of the disease progression improves. While maintenance of SMC contractile phenotype is reportedly orchestrated by a MEF2C-myocardin (MYOCD) interplay, little is known regarding molecular control at this nexus. Moreover, the burgeoning interest in microRNAs (miRs) provides the basis for exploring their modulation of MEF2C-MYOCD signaling, and in turn, a pro-proliferative, synthetic SMC phenotype. We hypothesized that suppression of SMC contractile phenotype in pulmonary hypertension is mediated by miR-214 via repression of the MEF2C-MYOCD-leiomodin1 (LMOD1) signaling axis. Methods and Results In SMCs isolated from a PAH patient cohort and commercially obtained hPASMCs exposed to hypoxia, miR-214 expression was monitored by qRT-PCR. miR-214 was upregulated in PAH- vs. control subject hPASMCs as well as in commercially obtained hPASMCs exposed to hypoxia. These increases in miR-214 were paralleled by MEF2C, MYOCD and SMC contractile protein downregulation. Of these, LMOD1 and MEF2C were directly targeted by the miR. Mir-214 overexpression mimicked the PAH profile, downregulating MEF2C and LMOD1. AntagomiR-214 abrogated hypoxia-induced suppression of the contractile phenotype and its attendant proliferation. Anti-miR-214 also restored PAH-PASMCs to a contractile phenotype seen during vascular homeostasis. Conclusions Our findings illustrate a key role for miR-214 in modulation of MEF2C-MYOCD-LMOD1 signaling and suggest that an antagonist of miR-214 could mitigate SMC phenotype changes and proliferation in vascular hyperproliferative disorders including PAH. PMID:27144530

  12. Mechanism by which nuclear factor-kappa beta (NF-kB) regulates ovine fetal pulmonary vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation.

    PubMed

    Ogbozor, Uchenna D; Opene, Michael; Renteria, Lissette S; McBride, Shaemion; Ibe, Basil O

    2015-09-01

    Platelet activating factor (PAF) modulates ovine fetal pulmonary hemodynamic. PAF acts through its receptors (PAFR) in pulmonary vascular smooth muscle cells (PVSMC) to phosphorylate and induce nuclear translocation of NF-kB p65 leading to PVSMC proliferation. However, the interaction of NF-kB p65 and PAF in the nuclear domain to effect PVSMC cell growth is not clearly defined. We used siRNA-dependent translation initiation arrest to study a mechanism by which NF-kB p65 regulates PAF stimulation of PVSMC proliferation. Our hypotheses are: (a) PAF induces NF-kB p65 DNA binding and (b) NF-kB p65 siRNA attenuates PAF stimulation of PVSMC proliferation. For DNA binding, cells were fed 10 nM PAF with and without PAFR antagonists WEB 2170, CV 3988 or BN 52021 and incubated for 12 h. DNA binding was measured by specific ELISA. For NF-kB p65 siRNA effect, starved cells transfected with the siRNA were incubated for 24 h with and without 10 nM PAF. Cell proliferation was measured by DNA synthesis while expression of NF-kB p65 and PAFR protein was measured by Western blotting. In both studies, the effect of 10% FBS alone was used as the positive control. In general, PAF stimulated DNA binding which was inhibited by PAFR antagonists. siRNAs to NF-kB p65 and PAFR significantly attenuated cell proliferation compared to 10% FBS and PAF effect. Inclusion of PAF in siRNA-treated cells did not reverse inhibitory effect of NF-kB p65 siRNA on DNA synthesis. PAFR expression was inhibited in siRNA-treated cells. These data show that PAF-stimulation of PVSMC proliferation occurs via a PAFR-NF-kB p65 linked pathway.

  13. Smooth Muscle-Like Cells Generated from Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells Display Marker Gene Expression and Electrophysiological Competence Comparable to Bladder Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Brun, Juliane; Lutz, Katrin A.; Neumayer, Katharina M. H.; Klein, Gerd; Seeger, Tanja; Uynuk-Ool, Tatiana; Wörgötter, Katharina; Schmid, Sandra; Kraushaar, Udo; Guenther, Elke; Rolauffs, Bernd; Aicher, Wilhelm K.; Hart, Melanie L.

    2015-01-01

    The use of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) differentiated toward a smooth muscle cell (SMC) phenotype may provide an alternative for investigators interested in regenerating urinary tract organs such as the bladder where autologous smooth muscle cells cannot be used or are unavailable. In this study we measured the effects of good manufacturing practice (GMP)-compliant expansion followed by myogenic differentiation of human MSCs on the expression of a range of contractile (from early to late) myogenic markers in relation to the electrophysiological parameters to assess the functional role of the differentiated MSCs and found that differentiation of MSCs associated with electrophysiological competence comparable to bladder SMCs. Within 1–2 weeks of myogenic differentiation, differentiating MSCs significantly expressed alpha smooth muscle actin (αSMA; ACTA2), transgelin (TAGLN), calponin (CNN1), and smooth muscle myosin heavy chain (SM-MHC; MYH11) according to qRT-PCR and/or immunofluorescence and Western blot. Voltage-gated Na+ current levels also increased within the same time period following myogenic differentiation. In contrast to undifferentiated MSCs, differentiated MSCs and bladder SMCs exhibited elevated cytosolic Ca2+ transients in response to K+-induced depolarization and contracted in response to K+ indicating functional maturation of differentiated MSCs. Depolarization was suppressed by Cd2+, an inhibitor of voltage-gated Ca2+-channels. The expression of Na+-channels was pharmacologically identified as the Nav1.4 subtype, while the K+ and Ca2+ ion channels were identified by gene expression of KCNMA1, CACNA1C and CACNA1H which encode for the large conductance Ca2+-activated K+ channel BKCa channels, Cav1.2 L-type Ca2+ channels and Cav3.2 T-type Ca2+ channels, respectively. This protocol may be used to differentiate adult MSCs into smooth muscle-like cells with an intermediate-to-late SMC contractile phenotype exhibiting voltage-gated ion channel

  14. The rhythmic expression of clock genes attenuated in human plaque-derived vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Changpo; Tang, Xiao; Zhu, Zhu; Liao, Xiaohong; Zhao, Ran; Fu, Weiguo; Chen, Bin; Jiang, Junhao; Qian, Ruizhe; Guo, Daqiao

    2014-01-13

    Acute myocardial infarction and stroke are more likely to occur in the early morning. Circadian pacemakers are considered to be involved in the process. Many peripheral tissues and cells also contain clock systems. In this study, we examined whether the primary cultured human plaque-derived vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) process circadian rhythmicity; furthermore, we investigated the expression difference of clock genes between normal human carotid VSMCs and human plaque-derived VSMCs. Fifty-six human carotid plaques provided the atherosclerotic tissue, and 21 samples yielded viable cultured primary VSMCs. The normal carotid VSMCs were cultured from donors' normal carotids. The mRNA levels of the target genes were measured by Quantitative Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (qRT-PCR). After serum shock, both types of cells showed clear circadian expressions of Bmal1, Cry1, Cry2, Per1, Per2, Per3 and Rev-erbα mRNA; meanwhile the Clock mRNA show a rhythmic expression in plaque-derived SMCs but not in normal carotid VSMCs. The expression levels of these main clock genes were significantly attenuated in human plaque-derived VSMCs compared with normal human carotid VSMCs. The rhythm of Bmal1 mRNA in plaque-derived VSMCs was changed. The present results demonstrate that the human plaque-derived VSMCs possess different circadian rhythmicity from that of normal carotid VSMCs. The rhythm changes of clock genes in plaque-derived VSMCs may be involved in the process of atherosclerosis and finally promote the rupture of plaque.

  15. Role of curcumin in PLD activation by Arf6-cytohesin1 signaling axis in U46619-stimulated pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Chakraborti, Sajal; Sarkar, Jaganmay; Bhuyan, Rajabrata; Chakraborti, Tapati

    2017-08-05

    Phospholipase D (PLD) catalyzes the hydrolysis of phosphatidylcholine to produce phosphatidic acid (PA) which in some cell types play a pivotal role in agonist-induced increase in NADPH oxidase-derived [Formula: see text]production. Involvement of ADP ribosylation factor (Arf) in agonist-induced activation of PLD is known for smooth muscle cells of systemic arteries, but not in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs). Additionally, role of cytohesin in this scenario is unknown in PASMCs. We, therefore, determined the involvement of Arf and cytohesin in U46619-induced stimulation of PLD in PASMCs, and the probable mechanism by which curcumin, a natural phenolic compound, inhibits the U46619 response. Treatment of PASMCs with U46619 stimulated PLD activity in the cell membrane, which was inhibited upon pretreatment with SQ29548 (Tp receptor antagonist), FIPI (PLD inhibitor), SecinH3 (inhibitor of cytohesins), and curcumin. Transfection of the cells with Tp, Arf-6, and cytohesin-1 siRNA inhibited U46619-induced activation of PLD. Upon treatment of the cells with U46619, Arf-6 and cytohesin-1 were translocated and associated in the cell membrane, which were not inhibited upon pretreatment of the cells with curcumin. Cytohesin-1 appeared to be necessary for in vitro binding of GTPγS with Arf-6; however, addition of curcumin inhibited binding of GTPγS with Arf-6 even in the presence of cytohesin-1. Our computational study suggests that although curcumin to some extent binds with Tp receptor, yet the inhibition of Arf6GDP to Arf6GTP conversion appeared to be an important mechanism by which curcumin inhibits U46619-induced increase in PLD activity in PASMCs.

  16. Glycosaminoglycans and Glucose Prevent Apoptosis in 4-Methylumbelliferone-treated Human Aortic Smooth Muscle Cells*

    PubMed Central

    Vigetti, Davide; Rizzi, Manuela; Moretto, Paola; Deleonibus, Sara; Dreyfuss, Jonathan M.; Karousou, Evgenia; Viola, Manuela; Clerici, Moira; Hascall, Vincent C.; Ramoni, Marco F.; De Luca, Giancarlo; Passi, Alberto

    2011-01-01

    Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) have a pivotal role in cardiovascular diseases and are responsible for hyaluronan (HA) deposition in thickening vessel walls. HA regulates SMC proliferation, migration, and inflammation, which accelerates neointima formation. We used the HA synthesis inhibitor 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) to reduce HA production in human aortic SMCs and found a significant increase of apoptotic cells. Interestingly, the exogenous addition of HA together with 4-MU reduced apoptosis. A similar anti-apoptotic effect was observed also by adding other glycosaminoglycans and glucose to 4-MU-treated cells. Furthermore, the anti-apoptotic effect of HA was mediated by Toll-like receptor 4, CD44, and PI3K but not by ERK1/2. PMID:21768115

  17. Glycosaminoglycans and glucose prevent apoptosis in 4-methylumbelliferone-treated human aortic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Vigetti, Davide; Rizzi, Manuela; Moretto, Paola; Deleonibus, Sara; Dreyfuss, Jonathan M; Karousou, Evgenia; Viola, Manuela; Clerici, Moira; Hascall, Vincent C; Ramoni, Marco F; De Luca, Giancarlo; Passi, Alberto

    2011-10-07

    Smooth muscle cells (SMCs) have a pivotal role in cardiovascular diseases and are responsible for hyaluronan (HA) deposition in thickening vessel walls. HA regulates SMC proliferation, migration, and inflammation, which accelerates neointima formation. We used the HA synthesis inhibitor 4-methylumbelliferone (4-MU) to reduce HA production in human aortic SMCs and found a significant increase of apoptotic cells. Interestingly, the exogenous addition of HA together with 4-MU reduced apoptosis. A similar anti-apoptotic effect was observed also by adding other glycosaminoglycans and glucose to 4-MU-treated cells. Furthermore, the anti-apoptotic effect of HA was mediated by Toll-like receptor 4, CD44, and PI3K but not by ERK1/2.

  18. Smooth-muscle-like cells derived from human embryonic stem cells support and augment cord-like structures in vitro.

    PubMed

    Vo, Elaine; Hanjaya-Putra, Donny; Zha, Yuanting; Kusuma, Sravanti; Gerecht, Sharon

    2010-06-01

    Engineering vascularized tissue is crucial for its successful implantation, survival, and integration with the host tissue. Vascular smooth muscle cells (v-SMCs) provide physical support to the vasculature and aid in maintaining endothelial viability. In this study, we show an efficient derivation of v-SMCs from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs), and demonstrate their functionality and ability to support the vasculature in vitro. Human ESCs were differentiated in monolayers and supplemented with platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) and transforming growth factor-beta 1 (TGF-beta1). Human ESC-derived smooth-muscle-like cells (SMLCs) were found to highly express specific smooth muscle cell (SMC) markers--including alpha-smooth muscle actin, calponin, SM22, and smooth muscle myosin heavy chain--to produce and secrete fibronectin and collagen, and to contract in response to carbachol. In vitro tubulogenesis assays revealed that these hESC-derived SMLCs interacted with human endothelial progenitor cell (EPCs) to form longer and thicker cord-like structures in vitro. We have demonstrated a simple protocol for the efficient derivation of highly purified SMLCs from hESCs. These in vitro functional SMLCs interacted with EPCs to support and augment capillary-like structures (CLSs), demonstrating the potential of hESCs as a cell source for therapeutic vascular tissue engineering.

  19. [mRNA-binding protein Human-antigen R regulates α-SMA expression in human bronchia smooth muscle cells].

    PubMed

    Yan, Di; Gu, Xianmin; Jiang, Shujuan; Wang, Yuhong

    2015-10-13

    To investigate the role of mRNA binding protein Human-antigen R (HuR) in the over-expression of α-Smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) stimulated by Platelet-derived Growth Factor (PDGF) in cultured human bronchia smooth muscle cells. Human bronchia smooth muscle cells cultured in vitro were divided into 0, 6, 12 and 24 h groups according to the time of PDGF treatment. Total HuR protein and total α-SMA protein expression were detected by Western blot. Total HuR mRNA and total α-SMA mRNA level were determined by quantitative real time-polymerase chain reaction. RNA interference technology was used to down-regulate HuR protein level to study the protective effect of HuR in PDGF-stimulated α-SMA protein expression. PDGF up-regulated the expression of HuR in a time-dependent manner. The relative expression levels of whole-cell HuR protein and mRNA in 0, 6, 12, 24 h groups were 0.23±0.09, 0.42±0.11, 0.93±0.21, 1.37±0.28; 1.00±0.00, 1.09±0.03, 1.16±0.03, 1.27±0.02 (all P<0.05). The relative expression levels of α-SMA protein and mRNA in 0, 6, 12, 24 h group also showed an increase trend marked in a time-dependent manner (1.03±0.08, 1.20±0.09, 1.39±0.11, 1.58±0.10; 1.00±0.00, 1.17±0.02, 1.23±0.02, 1.45±0.03; all P<0.05). Using RNA interference technology to down-regulate HuR protein level, there was a decrease in α-SMA protein expression. PDGF stimulation can increase the expression of HuR and α-SMA in the smooth muscle cells, and HuR protein is involved in the expression of α-SMA protein stimulated by PDGF.

  20. Effect of dexamethasone on voltage-gated Na+ channel in cultured human bronchial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Nakajima, Toshiaki; Jo, Taisuke; Meguro, Kentaro; Oonuma, Hitoshi; Ma, Ji; Kubota, Nami; Imuta, Hiroyuki; Takano, Haruhito; Iida, Haruko; Nagase, Takahide; Nagata, Taiji

    2008-06-06

    Voltage-gated Na(+) channel (I(Na)) encoded by SCN9A mRNA is expressed in cultured human bronchial smooth muscle cells. We investigated the effects of dexamethasone on I(Na), by using whole-cell voltage clamp techniques, reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR), and quantitative real-time RT-PCR. Acute application of dexamethasone (10(-6) M) did not affect I(Na). However, the percentage of the cells with I(Na) was significantly less in cells pretreated with dexamethasone for 48 h, and the current-density of I(Na) adjusted by cell capacitance in cells with I(Na) was also decreased in cells treated with dexamethasone. RT-PCR analysis showed that alpha and beta subunits mRNA of I(Na) mainly consisted of SCN9A and SCN1beta, respectively. Treatment with dexamethasone for 24-48 h inhibited the expression of SCN9A mRNA. The inhibitory effect of dexamethasone was concentration-dependent, and was observed at a concentration higher than 0.1 nM. The effect of dexamethasone on SCN9A mRNA was not blocked by spironolactone, but inhibited by mifepristone. The inhibitory effects of dexamethasone on SCN9A mRNA could not be explained by the changes of the stabilization of mRNA measured by using actinomycin D. These results suggest that dexamethasone inhibited I(Na) encoded by SCN9A mRNA in cultured human bronchial smooth muscle cells by inhibiting the transcription via the glucocorticoid receptor.

  1. Effects of menthol on circular smooth muscle of human colon: analysis of the mechanism of action.

    PubMed

    Amato, Antonella; Liotta, Rosa; Mulè, Flavia

    2014-10-05

    Menthol is the major constituent of peppermint oil, an herbal preparation commonly used to treat nausea, spasms during colonoscopy and irritable bowel disease. The mechanism responsible for its spasmolytic action remains unclear. The aims of this study were to investigate the effects induced by menthol on the human distal colon mechanical activity in vitro and to analyze the mechanism of action. The spontaneous or evoked-contractions of the circular smooth muscle were recorded using vertical organ bath. Menthol (0.1 mM-30 mM) reduced, in a concentration-dependent manner, the amplitude of the spontaneous contractions without affecting the frequency and the resting basal tone. The inhibitory effect was not affected by 5-benzyloxytryptamine (1 μM), a transient receptor potential-melastatin8 channel antagonist, or tetrodotoxin (1 μM), a neural blocker, or 1H-[1,2,4] oxadiazolo [4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (10 µM), inhibitor of nitric oxide (NO)-sensitive soluble guanylyl cyclase, or tetraethylammonium (10 mM), a blocker of potassium (K+)-channels. On the contrary, nifedipine (3 nM), a voltage-activated L-type Ca2+ channel blocker, significantly reduced the inhibitory menthol actions. Menthol also reduced in a concentration-dependent manner the contractile responses caused by exogenous application of Ca2+ (75-375 μM) in a Ca2+-free solution, or induced by potassium chloride (KCl; 40 mM). Moreover menthol (1-3 mM) strongly reduced the electrical field stimulation (EFS)-evoked atropine-sensitive contractions and the carbachol-contractile responses. The present results suggest that menthol induces spasmolytic effects in human colon circular muscle inhibiting directly the gastrointestinal smooth muscle contractility, through the block of Ca2+ influx through sarcolemma L-type Ca2+ channels.

  2. IL-22 modulates inflammatory properties of human primary aortic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Gorzelak-Pabis, Paulina; Chałubiński, Maciej; Wojdan, Katarzyna; Łuczak, Emilia; Borowiec, Maciej; Broncel, Marlena

    2017-01-01

    IL-22 is expressed at barrier surfaces, which suggests its critical role in the maintenance of normal barrier homeostasis and tissue repair. IL-22 can both promote pathological inflammation and prevent the destruction of tissues. The functional outcomes of IL-22 on vascular smooth muscle cells, which are shown to regulate immune processes within the vascular wall and which are involved in certain pathologies, have not been analyzed. The effect of IL-22 on the expression of novel antiand pro-inflammatory and barrier disrupting cytokines, apoptosis and the expression of adhesive molecules in human primary aortic smooth muscle cells (AoSMC) was investigated. Human AoSMC were induced with IL-22 for 24 h in vitro. The influence of IL-22 on IL-35 subunits EBI3 and p35, IL-33, IFN-γ and VEGF mRNA expression in Ao-SMC were assessed using real-time PCR. Additionally, the surface expression of ICAM-1 and apoptosis of AoSMC were analyzed in the flow cytometer. IL-22 caused a 2- and 3-fold increase of mRNA expression of the EBI3 and p35 IL-35 subunits, and a 40% decrease of IL-33 mRNA expression in AoSMC. Additionally, IL-22 decreased ICAM-1 expression on the surface of AoSMC by 30%. However, IL-22 affected neither IFN-γ and VEGF mRNA expression in AoSMC nor their apoptosis and viability. Our data suggest that IL-22, which is released by Th22 and NK cells, may be an agent affecting the inflammatory response of AoSMC, and thus it may regulate immune homeostasis of the vascular wall.

  3. Biomechanical effects of environmental and engineered particles on human airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Berntsen, P; Park, C Y; Rothen-Rutishauser, B; Tsuda, A; Sager, T M; Molina, R M; Donaghey, T C; Alencar, A M; Kasahara, D I; Ericsson, T; Millet, E J; Swenson, J; Tschumperlin, D J; Butler, J P; Brain, J D; Fredberg, J J; Gehr, P; Zhou, E H

    2010-06-06

    The past decade has seen significant increases in combustion-generated ambient particles, which contain a nanosized fraction (less than 100 nm), and even greater increases have occurred in engineered nanoparticles (NPs) propelled by the booming nanotechnology industry. Although inhalation of these particulates has become a public health concern, human health effects and mechanisms of action for NPs are not well understood. Focusing on the human airway smooth muscle cell, here we show that the cellular mechanical function is altered by particulate exposure in a manner that is dependent upon particle material, size and dose. We used Alamar Blue assay to measure cell viability and optical magnetic twisting cytometry to measure cell stiffness and agonist-induced contractility. The eight particle species fell into four categories, based on their respective effect on cell viability and on mechanical function. Cell viability was impaired and cell contractility was decreased by (i) zinc oxide (40-100 nm and less than 44 microm) and copper(II) oxide (less than 50 nm); cell contractility was decreased by (ii) fluorescent polystyrene spheres (40 nm), increased by (iii) welding fumes and unchanged by (iv) diesel exhaust particles, titanium dioxide (25 nm) and copper(II) oxide (less than 5 microm), although in none of these cases was cell viability impaired. Treatment with hydrogen peroxide up to 500 microM did not alter viability or cell mechanics, suggesting that the particle effects are unlikely to be mediated by particle-generated reactive oxygen species. Our results highlight the susceptibility of cellular mechanical function to particulate exposures and suggest that direct exposure of the airway smooth muscle cells to particulates may initiate or aggravate respiratory diseases.

  4. Oxidized low density lipoprotein (LDL) affects hyaluronan synthesis in human aortic smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Viola, Manuela; Bartolini, Barbara; Vigetti, Davide; Karousou, Evgenia; Moretto, Paola; Deleonibus, Sara; Sawamura, Tatsuya; Wight, Thomas N; Hascall, Vincent C; De Luca, Giancarlo; Passi, Alberto

    2013-10-11

    Thickening of the vessel in response to high low density lipoprotein(s) (LDL) levels is a hallmark of atherosclerosis, characterized by increased hyaluronan (HA) deposition in the neointima. Human native LDL trapped within the arterial wall undergoes modifications such as oxidation (oxLDL). The aim of our study is to elucidate the link between internalization of oxLDL and HA production in vitro, using human aortic smooth muscle cells. LDL were used at an effective protein concentration of 20-50 μg/ml, which allowed 80% cell viability. HA content in the medium of untreated cells was 28.9 ± 3.7 nmol HA-disaccharide/cell and increased after oxLDL treatment to 53.9 ± 5.6. OxLDL treatments doubled the transcripts of HA synthase HAS2 and HAS3. Accumulated HA stimulated migration of aortic smooth muscle cells and monocyte adhesiveness to extracellular matrix. The effects induced by oxLDL were inhibited by blocking LOX-1 scavenger receptor with a specific antibody (10 μg/ml). The cholesterol moiety of LDL has an important role in HA accumulation because cholesterol-free oxLDL failed to induce HA synthesis. Nevertheless, cholesterol-free oxLDL and unmodified cholesterol (20 μg/ml) induce only HAS3 transcription, whereas 22,oxysterol affects both HAS2 and HAS3. Moreover, HA deposition was associated with higher expression of endoplasmic reticulum stress markers (CHOP and GRP78). Our data suggest that HA synthesis can be induced in response to specific oxidized sterol-related species delivered through oxLDL.

  5. Insulin-like growth factor I and protein kinase C activation stimulate pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell proliferation through separate but synergistic pathways.

    PubMed

    Dempsey, E C; Stenmark, K R; McMurtry, I F; O'Brien, R F; Voelkel, N F; Badesch, D B

    1990-07-01

    Smooth muscle cell (SMC) hyperplasia is an important component of vascular remodeling in chronic hypoxic pulmonary hypertension. The mechanisms underlying SMC proliferation in the remodeling process are poorly understood, but may involve insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I). This study investigates the potential proliferative effects of IGF-I on SMC cultured from the pulmonary arteries (PA) of neonatal calves. We hypothesized that IGF-I stimulates PA SMC proliferation through a protein kinase C (PKC)-independent pathway, but that PKC activation would augment this proliferative response. Incorporation of 3H-thymidine was used as an index of cellular proliferation, and was correlated with subsequent changes in cell counts. Under serum-free conditions, IGF-I (100 ng/ml) induced a 6-fold increase in thymidine incorporation by quiescent PA SMC. This stimulation was not blocked by dihydrosphingosine, an inhibitor of PKC activation. Phorbol myristate acetate (PMA) (1 nM), a membrane-permeable PKC activator, induced a 12-fold increase in thymidine incorporation which was 70% inhibited by dihydrosphingosine. Co-incubation with IGF-I and PMA caused a 60-fold increase in thymidine incorporation, which was 30% inhibited by dihydrosphingosine. This synergistic increase in thymidine incorporation was associated with a subsequent significant increase in cell number. PKC-downregulated cells (1,000 nM PMA x 30 hr) proliferated in response to IGF-I but not PMA, and did not demonstrate synergism with the combination of IGF-I and PMA. The threshold concentrations of IGF-I and PMA for synergism were approximately 1 ng/ml and 1 pM, respectively. We conclude that IGF-I stimulates neonatal PA SMC proliferation via a PKC-independent pathway, and that trace amounts of PKC activators are capable of synergistically augmenting this response. We speculate that the synergistic stimulation of SMC proliferation by IGF-I and PKC activators may play an important role in hypertensive pulmonary

  6. Pharmacological evidence for putative CCK(1) receptor heterogeneity in human colon smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Morton, M F; Harper, E A; Tavares, I A; Shankley, N P

    2002-07-01

    1. The pharmacology of the cholecystokinin CCK(1) receptors endogenously expressed in human gallbladder and human ascending colon smooth muscle tissue was compared using radioligand binding assays. 2. Saturation analysis of the interaction between the radiolabelled, selective CCK(1)-receptor antagonist, [(3)H]-L-364,718, and enriched gastrointestinal tissue membranes suggested the presence of multiple binding sites in human colon but not human gallbladder. 3. Competition studies, using a range of structurally diverse, CCK-receptor selective ligands provided further evidence for CCK(1) receptor heterogeneity in human colon tissue (n(H) values significantly less than unity for SR27897=0.77+/-0.07, 2-NAP=0.73+/-0.03, YM220=0.70+/-0.09 and PD-134,308=0.83+/-0.01). Moreover, the competition data for SR27897, 2-NAP and YM220 were consistent with the interaction of these compounds at two binding sites. In contrast, in the human gallbladder assay, a single binding site model provided a good fit of the competition curve data obtained with all the CCK receptor selective compounds. 4. The data obtained are consistent with the presence of a single CCK(1) receptor binding site in the gallbladder but not in the colon. A two-site analysis of the colon data, indicated that one of the two sites was indistinguishable from that characterized in the gallbladder. The molecular basis of the apparent receptor heterogeneity in the colon remains to be established. British Journal of Pharmacology (2002) 136, 873-882

  7. Expression and function of K(V)2-containing channels in human urinary bladder smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Hristov, Kiril L; Chen, Muyan; Afeli, Serge A Y; Cheng, Qiuping; Rovner, Eric S; Petkov, Georgi V

    2012-06-01

    The functional role of the voltage-gated K(+) (K(V)) channels in human detrusor smooth muscle (DSM) is largely unexplored. Here, we provide molecular, electrophysiological, and functional evidence for the expression of K(V)2.1, K(V)2.2, and the electrically silent K(V)9.3 subunits in human DSM. Stromatoxin-1 (ScTx1), a selective inhibitor of K(V)2.1, K(V)2.2, and K(V)4.2 homotetrameric channels and of K(V)2.1/9.3 heterotetrameric channels, was used to examine the role of these channels in human DSM function. Human DSM tissues were obtained during open bladder surgeries from patients without a history of overactive bladder. Freshly isolated human DSM cells were studied using RT-PCR, immunocytochemistry, live-cell Ca(2+) imaging, and the perforated whole cell patch-clamp technique. Isometric DSM tension recordings of human DSM isolated strips were conducted using tissue baths. RT-PCR experiments showed mRNA expression of K(V)2.1, K(V)2.2, and K(V)9.3 (but not K(V)4.2) channel subunits in human isolated DSM cells. K(V)2.1 and K(V)2.2 protein expression was confirmed by Western blot analysis and immunocytochemistry. Perforated whole cell patch-clamp experiments revealed that ScTx1 (100 nM) inhibited the amplitude of the voltage step-induced K(V) current in freshly isolated human DSM cells. ScTx1 (100 nM) significantly increased the intracellular Ca(2+) level in DSM cells. In human DSM isolated strips, ScTx1 (100 nM) increased the spontaneous phasic contraction amplitude and muscle force, and enhanced the amplitude of the electrical field stimulation-induced contractions within the range of 3.5-30 Hz stimulation frequencies. These findings reveal that ScTx1-sensitive K(V)2-containing channels are key regulators of human DSM excitability and contractility and may represent new targets for pharmacological or genetic intervention for bladder dysfunction.

  8. MiR-328 targeting PIM-1 inhibits proliferation and migration of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells in PDGFBB signaling pathway

    PubMed Central

    Qian, Zhengjiang; Zhang, Limin; Chen, Jidong; Li, Yanjiao; Kang, Kang; Qu, Junle; Wang, Zhiwei; Zhai, Yujia; Li, Li; Gou, Deming

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) have been recognized to mediate PDGF-induced cell dysregulation, but their exact functions remain to be elucidated. By using a sensitive S-Poly(T) Plus qRT-PCR method, the expression profiling of 1,078 miRNAs were investigated in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) with or without PDGFBB stimulation. MiR-328 was found as a prominent down-regulated miRNA, displaying a specific dose- and time-dependent downregulation upon PDGFBB exposure. Functional analyses revealed that miR-328 could inhibit PASMCs proliferation and migration both with and without PDGFBB treatment. The Ser/Thr-protein kinase-1 (PIM-1) was identified as a direct target of miR-328, and functionally confirmed by a rescue experiment. In addition, the decrease of miR-328 by PDGFBB might be due to the increased expression of DNA methylation transferase 1 (DNMT1) and DNA methylation. Finally, serum miR-328 level was downregulated in PAH patients associated with congenital heart disease (CHD- PAH). Overall, this study provides critical insight into fundamental regulatory mechanism of miR-328 in PDGFBB-activited PASMCs via targeting PIM- 1, and implies the potential of serum miR-328 level as a circulating biomarker for CHD- PAH diagnosis. PMID:27448984

  9. Transforming growth factor type beta specifically stimulates synthesis of proteoglycan in human adult arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed Central

    Chen, J K; Hoshi, H; McKeehan, W L

    1987-01-01

    Myo-intimal proteoglycan metabolism is thought to be important in blood vessel homeostasis, blood clotting, atherogenesis, and atherosclerosis. Human platelet-derived transforming growth factor type beta (TGF-beta) specifically stimulated synthesis of at least two types of chondroitin sulfate proteoglycans in nonproliferating human adult arterial smooth muscle cells in culture. Stimulation of smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis by smooth muscle cell growth promoters (epidermal growth factor, platelet-derived growth factor, and heparin-binding growth factors) was less than 20% of that elicited by TGF-beta. TGF-beta neither significantly stimulated proliferation of quiescent smooth muscle cells nor inhibited proliferating cells. The extent of TGF-beta stimulation of smooth muscle cell proteoglycan synthesis was similar in both nonproliferating and growth-stimulated cells. TGF-beta, which is a reversible inhibitor of endothelial cell proliferation, had no comparable effect on endothelial cell proteoglycan synthesis. These results are consistent with the hypothesis that TGF-beta is a cell-type-specific regulator of proteoglycan synthesis in human blood vessels and may contribute to the myo-intimal accumulation of proteoglycan in atherosclerotic lesions. Images PMID:3474655

  10. Pulmonary manifestations of human herpesvirus-8 during HIV infection.

    PubMed

    Borie, Raphael; Cadranel, Jacques; Guihot, Amélie; Marcelin, Anne Geneviève; Galicier, Lionel; Couderc, Louis-Jean

    2013-10-01

    Human herpesvirus (HHV)-8 is an oncogenic gamma herpesvirus that was first described in 1994 in Kaposi sarcoma lesions. HHV-8 is involved in the pathophysiological features of multicentric Castleman's disease (MCD) and primary effusion lymphoma (PEL), both rare B-cell lymphoproliferative diseases. HHV-8-related tumours occur almost exclusively in immunocompromised patients, mostly those with HIV infection. Combined antiretroviral therapies have reduced the incidence of Kaposi sarcoma but not MCD and PEL. HHV-8-related diseases frequently exhibit pulmonary involvement, which may indicate the disease. Kaposi sarcoma in the lung is often asymptomatic but may require specific therapy. It mostly shows cutaneous or mucosal involvement. Patients with typical MCD present fever and lymphadenopathy associated with interstitial lung disease without opportunistic infection. Specific treatment may be urgent. PEL provokes a febrile, lymphocytic-exudative pleural effusion, without a pleural mass on computed tomography scan. Rapid diagnosis prevents unnecessary examinations and leads to specific, rapid treatment. Therapy is complex, combining antiretroviral therapy and chemotherapy.

  11. Human Regional Pulmonary Gas Exchange with Xenon Polarization Transfer (XTC)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Muradian, Iga; Butler, James; Hrovat, Mirko; Topulos, George; Hersman, Elizabeth; Ruset, Iulian; Covrig, Silviu; Frederick, Eric; Ketel, Stephen; Hersman, F. W.; Patz, Samuel

    2007-03-01

    Xenon Transfer Contrast (XTC) is an existing imaging method (Ruppert et al, Magn Reson Med, 51:676-687, 2004) that measures the fraction F of ^129Xe magnetization that diffuses from alveolar gas spaces to septal parenchymal tissue in lungs in a specified exchange time. As previously implemented, XTC is a 2-breath method and has been demonstrated in anesthetized animals. To use XTC in humans and to avoid issues associated with obtaining identical gas volumes on subsequent breath-hold experiments as well as precise image registration in post-processing, a single breath XTC method was developed that acquires three consecutive gradient echo images in an 8s acquisition. We report here initial measurements of the mean and variance of F for 5 normal healthy subjects as well as 7 asymptomatic smokers. The experiments were performed at two lung volumes (˜45 and 65% of TLC). We found that both the mean and variance of F increased with smoking history. In comparison, standard pulmonary function tests such as DLCO FEV1 showed no correlation with smoking history.

  12. Zero-stress states of human pulmonary arteries and veins.

    PubMed

    Huang, W; Yen, R T

    1998-09-01

    The zero-stress states of the pulmonary arteries and veins from order 3 to order 9 were determined in six normal human lungs within 15 h postmortem. The zero-stress state of each vessel was obtained by cutting the vessel transversely into a series of short rings, then cutting each ring radially, which caused the ring to spring open into a sector. Each sector was characterized by its opening angle. The mean opening angle varied between 92 and 163 degrees in the arterial tree and between 89 and 128 degrees in the venous tree. There was a tendency for opening angles to increase as the sizes of the arteries and veins increased. We computed the residual strains based on the experimental measurements and estimated the residual stresses according to Hooke's law. We found that the inner wall of a vessel at the state in which the internal pressure, external pressure, and longitudinal stress are all zero was under compression and the outer wall was in tension, and that the magnitude of compressive stress was greater than the magnitude of tensile stress.

  13. Human isolated bronchial smooth muscle contains functional ryanodine/caffeine-sensitive Ca-release channels.

    PubMed

    Hyvelin, J M; Martin, C; Roux, E; Marthan, R; Savineau, J P

    2000-08-01

    Human bronchial smooth muscle (HBSM) contraction is implicated in a variety of respiratory diseases, including asthma. Yet, the presence of an operative calcium-induced calcium release (CICR) mechanism, identified in various smooth muscles, has not been established in HBSM. We therefore studied Ca-releasing mechanisms in HBSM obtained at thoracotomy with special attention to ryanodine-sensitive receptor channels (RyRs). In freshly isolated bronchial myocytes, ryanodine (0.5 to 50 microM) and caffeine (1 to 25 mM) induced transient increases in the cytoplasmic calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)). Higher ryanodine concentrations (> 100 microM) inhibited the caffeine-induced [Ca(2+)](i) response, which was also blocked in the presence of tetracaine (300 microM) or ruthenium red (200 microM), two potent CICR inhibitors. In HBSM strips, caffeine induced a transient contraction which, likewise, was inhibited by ryanodine and tetracaine. However, ryanodine (200 microM) modified neither the [Ca(2+)](i) response nor the contraction induced by K(+)-rich (110 mM) solution. Reverse transcriptase/polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and RNase protection assay performed in HBSM have revealed the existence of mRNAs encoding only the type 3 RyR. We also characterized acetylcholine-induced [Ca(2+)](i) and contractile responses. None of these responses was altered by ryanodine or by tetracaine. These results demonstrate, for the first time, the existence of functional RyRs in HBSM cells which, owing to the type of isoform or the amount of protein expressed, are not involved, under physiologic conditions, in depolarization- or agonist-induced contraction.

  14. Smoking and Female Sex: Independent Predictors of Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells Stiffening

    PubMed Central

    Dinardo, Carla Luana; Santos, Hadassa Campos; Vaquero, André Ramos; Martelini, André Ricardo; Dallan, Luis Alberto Oliveira; Alencar, Adriano Mesquita; Krieger, José Eduardo; Pereira, Alexandre Costa

    2015-01-01

    Aims Recent evidence shows the rigidity of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) contributes to vascular mechanics. Arterial rigidity is an independent cardiovascular risk factor whose associated modifications in VSMC viscoelasticity have never been investigated. This study’s objective was to evaluate if the arterial rigidity risk factors aging, African ancestry, female sex, smoking and diabetes mellitus are associated with VMSC stiffening in an experimental model using a human derived vascular smooth muscle primary cell line repository. Methods Eighty patients subjected to coronary artery bypass surgery were enrolled. VSMCs were extracted from internal thoracic artery fragments and mechanically evaluated using Optical Magnetic Twisting Cytometry assay. The obtained mechanical variables were correlated with the clinical variables: age, gender, African ancestry, smoking and diabetes mellitus. Results The mechanical variables Gr, G’r and G”r had a normal distribution, demonstrating an inter-individual variability of VSMC viscoelasticity, which has never been reported before. Female sex and smoking were independently associated with VSMC stiffening: Gr (apparent cell stiffness) p = 0.022 and p = 0.018, R2 0.164; G’r (elastic modulus) p = 0.019 and p = 0.009, R2 0.184 and G”r (dissipative modulus) p = 0.011 and p = 0.66, R2 0.141. Conclusion Female sex and smoking are independent predictors of VSMC stiffening. This pro-rigidity effect represents an important element for understanding the vascular rigidity observed in post-menopausal females and smokers, as well as a potential therapeutic target to be explored in the future. There is a significant inter-individual variation of VSMC viscoelasticity, which is slightly modulated by clinical variables and probably relies on molecular factors. PMID:26661469

  15. Distinct Effects of Inorganic Phosphate on Cell Cycle and Apoptosis in Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Rahabi-Layachi, Haifa; Ourouda, Roger; Boullier, Agnes; Massy, Ziad A; Amant, Carole

    2015-02-01

    Inorganic phosphate (Pi) is an essential nutrient to all living organisms. Nevertheless, hyperphosphatemia is now recognized as a risk factor for cardiovascular events and mortality in chronic kidney disease (CKD) patients. To our knowledge, the mechanisms by which elevated Pi alters smooth muscle cell proliferation have been poorly addressed. Therefore, in this study, we investigated the effects of Pi on cell cycle regulation and apoptosis in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HAoSMC). HAoSMC were treated with physiologic (1 mM) or high (2 and 3 mM) Pi concentrations. We showed that Pi not only decreased significantly cell viability (P < 0.001) but also induced apoptosis of HAoSMC. Moreover, Pi treatment blocked G1/S cell cycle progression by increasing cell number in G0/G1 phase up to 82.4 ± 3.4% for 3 mM vs 76.2 ± 3.1% for control (P < 0.01) while decreasing cell number in S phase. Accordingly, this was associated with a decrease protein expression of cyclin E and its associated CDK (CDK2), and phosphorylated retinoblastoma protein. Moreover, we observed an increase of protein expression of cell cycle inhibitors p15, p21, and p27. Interestingly, we also found that induction of cell cycle arrest was partially dependent on phosphate uptake. Our results demonstrated that Pi reduced HAoSMC proliferation by inducing apoptosis and cell cycle arrest. Indeed, we showed for the first time that Pi affected HAoSMC cell cycle by blocking G1/S progression. These findings would be useful for a better understanding of molecular mechanisms involved in vascular complications observed in CKD patients. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  16. Downregulation of microRNA-637 Increases Risk of Hypoxia-Induced Pulmonary Hypertension by Modulating Expression of Cyclin Dependent Kinase 6 (CDK6) in Pulmonary Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sang, Hai-yan; Jin, Ying-li; Zhang, Wen-qi; Chen, Li-bo

    2016-01-01

    Background The objective of this study was to investigate the molecular mechanism by which miR-637 interferes with the expression of CDK6, which contributes to the development of pulmonary hypertension (PH) with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD). Material/Methods We used an online miRNA database to identify CDK6 as a virtual target of miR-637, and validated the hypothesis using luciferase assay. Furthermore, we transfected SMCs with miR-637 mimics and inhibitor, and expression of CDK6 was determined using Western blot and real-time PCR. Results In this study, we identified CDK6 as a target of miR-637 in smooth muscle cells (SMCs), and determined the expression of miR-637 in SMCs from PH patients with COPD and normal controls. We also identified the exact miR-637 binding site in the 3′UTR of CDK6 by using a luciferase reporter system. The mRNA and protein expression levels of CDK6 in SMCs from PH patients with COPD were clearly upregulated compared with the normal controls. Cells exposed to hypoxia also showed notably increased CKD6 mRNA and protein expression levels, and when treated with miR-637 or CDK6 siRNA, this increase in CKD6 expression was clearly attenuated. Additionally, cell viability and cell cycle analysis showed that hypoxia markedly increased viability of SMCs by causing an accumulation in S phase, which was relieved by the introduction of miR-637 or CDK6 siRNA. Conclusions Our study proved that the CDK6 gene is a target of miR-637, and demonstrated the regulatory association between miR-637 and CDK6, suggesting a possible therapeutic target for PH, especially in patients with COPD. PMID:27794186

  17. [Effects of human tissue kallikrein gene transfer on the migration of vascular smooth muscule cells].

    PubMed

    Yu, Hui-zhen; Xie, Liang-di; Zhu, Peng-li; Xu, Chang-sheng

    2010-04-01

    To investigate the effects of adenovirus-mediated human tissue kallikrein (Ad-hKLK1) gene transfer on platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB)-induced migration of vascular smooth muscle cells from spontaneously hypertensive rats (VSMC(SHR)). A bicistronic recombinant adenovirus vector (Ad-hKLK1) carrying the target hKLK1 gene and the reporter gene EGFP was constructed. VSMCs isolated from the thoracic aorta of male SHR were passaged, and the quiescent VSMC(SHR) in passages 3-6 seeded in 6-well plates were treated with Ad-hKLK1 and control virus. Human PDGF-BB or icatibant Hoe140, a BK B2 antagonistat, was used as the chemoattractant and placed in the bottom chamber of the Boyden chamber. The mRNA expressions of bradykinin B1 receptor and B2 receptor were detected by RT-PCR in VSMC(SHR). hKLK1 gene transfer significantly inhibited PDGF-BB-induced migration of VSMC(SHR), with the peak inhibition rate of 34.6% (P<0.001). PDGF-BB significantly increased the mRNA expression of B2 receptor but not B1 receptor in VSMC(SHR). hKLK1 gene transfer can inhibit the migration of VSMC(SHR) induced by PDGF-BB, and the inhibitory effects may be not mediated by bradykinin B2 receptor.

  18. Monocyte-expressed urokinase regulates human vascular smooth muscle cell migration in a coculture model.

    PubMed

    Kusch, Angelika; Tkachuk, Sergey; Lutter, Steffen; Haller, Hermann; Dietz, Rainer; Lipp, Martin; Dumler, Inna

    2002-01-01

    Interactions of vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC) with monocytes recruited to the arterial wall at a site of injury, with resultant modulation of VSMC growth and migration, are central to the development of vascular intimal thickening. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA) expressed by monocytes is a potent chemotactic factor for VSMC and might serve for the acceleration of vascular remodeling. In this report, we demonstrate that coculture of human VSMC with freshly isolated peripheral blood-derived human monocytes results in significant VSMC migration that increases during the coculture period. Accordingly, VSMC adhesion was inhibited with similar kinetics. VSMC proliferation, however, was not affected and remained at the same basal level during the whole period of coculture. The increase of VSMC migration in coculture was equivalent to the uPA-induced migration of monocultured VSMC and was blocked by addition into coculture of soluble uPAR (suPAR). Analysis of uPA and uPAR expression in cocultured cells demonstrated that monocytes are a major source of uPA, whose expression increases in coculture five-fold, whereas VSMC display an increased expression of cell surface-associated uPAR. These findings indicate that upregulated uPA production by monocytes following vascular injury acts most likely as an endogenous activator of VSMC migration contributing to the remodeling of vessel walls.

  19. Interaction between human monocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells induces vascular endothelial growth factor expression.

    PubMed

    Hojo, Y; Ikeda, U; Maeda, Y; Takahashi, M; Takizawa, T; Okada, M; Funayama, H; Shimada, K

    2000-05-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate whether synthesis of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), a major mitogen for vascular endothelial cells, was induced by a cell-to-cell interaction between monocytes and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). Human VSMCs and THP-1 cells (human monocytoid cell) were cocultured. VEGF levels in the coculture medium were determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. Northern blot analysis of VEGF mRNA was performed using a specific cDNA probe. Immunohistochemistry was performed to determine which types of cell produce VEGF. Adding THP-1 cells to VSMCs for 24 h increased VEGF levels of the culture media, 8- and 10-fold relative to those of THP-1 cells and VSMCs alone, respectively. Northern blot analysis showed that VEGF mRNA expression was induced in the cocultured cells and peaked after 12 h. Immunohistochemistry disclosed that both types of cell in the coculture produced VEGF. Separate coculture experiments revealed that both direct contact and a soluble factor(s) contributed to VEGF production. Neutralizing anti-interleukin (IL)-6 antibody inhibited VEGF production by the coculture of THP-1 cells and VSMCs. A cell-to-cell interaction between monocytes and VSMCs induced VEGF synthesis in both types of cell. An IL-6 mediated mechanism is at least partially involved in VEGF production by the cocultures. Local VEGF production induced by a monocyte-VSMC interaction may play an important role in atherosclerosis and vascular remodeling.

  20. Monocyte prostaglandins inhibit procollagen secretion by human vascular smooth muscle cells: implications for plaque stability.

    PubMed

    Fitzsimmons, C; Proudfoot, D; Bowyer, D E

    1999-02-01

    Extracellular matrix remodelling occurs during atherosclerosis dictating the structure of the plaque and thus the resistance to rupture. Monocytes and macrophages are believed to play a role in this remodelling. In the present study, filter-separated co-culture has been used to study the effect of monocytes on procollagen turnover by human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMC). In this system, freshly isolated human peripheral blood monocytes inhibited procollagen secretion from VSMC without affecting either degradation of procollagen, or DNA synthesis by the VSMC. Insertion of a 12 kDa dialysis membrane between the two cell types and treatment with indomethacin showed that the inhibitory factor was of low molecular weight and was cyclooxygenase-dependent. Pre-incubation of each cell type with indomethacin demonstrated that monocyte, but not VSMC cyclooxygenase was required. Thus, the inhibitory effect on procollagen secretion was due, most likely, to monocyte prostaglandins. Neither inhibition of thromboxane synthetase, nor blocking IL-1 activity, reduced the inhibitory activity. Addition of prostaglandins PGE1, PGE2 and PGF2alpha to VSMC cultures caused a reduction in procollagen secretion which was equivalent to, but was not additive with, the maximal effect achieved by monocytes. Monocytes and macrophages are a major source of prostaglandins and these molecules are likely to play an important role in collagen turnover within lesions.

  1. Fetal human airway smooth muscle cell production of leukocyte chemoattractants is differentially regulated by fluticasone.

    PubMed

    Pearson, Helen; Britt, Rodney D; Pabelick, Christine M; Prakash, Y S; Amrani, Yassine; Pandya, Hitesh C

    2015-12-01

    Adult human airway smooth muscle (ASM) produce cytokines involved in recruitment and survival of leukocytes within airway walls. Cytokine generation by adult ASM is glucocorticoid-sensitive. Whether developing lung ASM produces cytokines in a glucocorticoid-sensitive fashion is unknown. Cultured fetal human ASM cells stimulated with TNF-α (0-20 ng/ml) were incubated with TNF-α receptor-blocking antibodies, fluticasone (1 and 100 nm), or vehicle. Supernatants and cells were assayed for the production of CCL5, CXCL10, and CXCL8 mRNA and protein and glucocorticoid receptor phosphorylation. CCL5, CXCL10, and CXCL8 mRNA and protein production by fetal ASM cell was significantly and dose-dependently following TNF-α treatment. Cytokine mRNA and protein production were effectively blocked by TNF-α R1 and R2 receptor neutralizing antibodies but variably inhibited by fluticasone. TNF-α-induced TNF-R1 and R2 receptor mRNA expression was only partially attenuated by fluticasone. Glucocorticoid receptor phosphorylation at serine (Ser) 211 but not at Ser 226 was enhanced by fluticasone. Production of CCL5, CXCL10, and CXCL8 by fetal ASM appears to involve pathways that are both qualitatively and mechanistically distinct to those described for adult ASM. The findings imply developing ASM has potential to recruit leukocyte into airways and, therefore, of relevance to childhood airway diseases.

  2. Fetal human airway smooth muscle cell production of leukocyte chemoattractants is differentially regulated by fluticasone

    PubMed Central

    Pearson, Helen; Britt, Rodney D.; Pabelick, Christine M.; Prakash, Y.S.; Amrani, Yassine; Pandya, Hitesh C.

    2016-01-01

    Background Adult human airway smooth muscle (ASM) produce cytokines involved in recruitment and survival of leukocytes within airway walls. Cytokine generation by adult ASM is glucocorticoid-sensitive. Whether developing lung ASM produces cytokines in a glucocorticoid-sensitive fashion is unknown. Methods Cultured fetal human ASM cells stimulated with TNF-α (0–20 ng/ml) were incubated with TNF-α receptor-blocking antibodies, fluticasone (1 and 100 nm), or vehicle. Supernatants and cells were assayed for the production of CCL5, CXCL10, and CXCL8 mRNA and protein and glucocorticoid receptor phosphorylation. Results CCL5, CXCL10, and CXCL8 mRNA and protein production by fetal ASM cell was significantly and dose-dependently following TNF-α treatment. Cytokine mRNA and protein production were effectively blocked by TNF-α R1 and R2 receptor neutralizing antibodies but variably inhibited by fluticasone. TNF-α-induced TNF-R1 and R2 receptor mRNA expression was only partially attenuated by fluticasone. Glucocorticoid receptor phosphorylation at serine (Ser) 211 but not at Ser 226 was enhanced by fluticasone. Conclusion Production of CCL5, CXCL10, and CXCL8 by fetal ASM appears to involve pathways that are both qualitatively and mechanistically distinct to those described for adult ASM. The findings imply developing ASM has potential to recruit leukocyte into airways and, therefore, of relevance to childhood airway diseases. PMID:26331770

  3. Nitric oxide production by cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells: stimulation by fluid flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadaki, M.; Tilton, R. G.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.

    1998-01-01

    This study demonstrated that exposure of cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells (SMC) to fluid flow resulted in nitric oxide (NO) production, monitored by nitrite and guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate production. A rapid burst in nitrite production rate was followed by a more gradual increase throughout the period of flow exposure. Neither the initial burst nor the prolonged nitrite production was dependent on the level of shear stress in the range of 1.1-25 dyn/cm2. Repeated exposure to shear stress after a 30-min static period restimulated nitrite production similar to the initial burst. Ca(2+)-calmodulin antagonists blocked the initial burst in nitrite release. An inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) blocked nitrite production, indicating that changes in nitrite reflect NO production. Treatment with dexamethasone or cycloheximide had no effect on nitrite production. Monoclonal antibodies directed against the inducible and endothelial NOS isoforms showed no immunoreactivity on Western blots, whereas monoclonal antibodies directed against the neuronal NOS gave specific products. These findings suggest that human aortic SMC express a constitutive neuronal NOS isoform, the enzymatic activity of which is modulated by flow.

  4. Dihydrotestosterone alters cyclooxygenase-2 levels in human coronary artery smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Osterlund, Kristen L.; Handa, Robert J.

    2010-01-01

    Both protective and nonprotective effects of androgens on the cardiovascular system have been reported. Our previous studies show that the potent androgen receptor (AR) agonist dihydrotestosterone (DHT) increases levels of the vascular inflammatory mediator cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 in rodent cerebral arteries independent of an inflammatory stimulus. Little is known about the effects of androgens on inflammation in human vascular tissues. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that DHT alters COX-2 levels in the absence and presence of induced inflammation in primary human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMC). Furthermore, we tested the ancillary hypothesis that DHT's effects on COX-2 levels are AR-dependent. Cells were treated with DHT (10 nM) or vehicle for 6 h in the presence or absence of LPS or IL-1β. Similar to previous observations in rodent arteries, in HCASMC, DHT alone increased COX-2 levels compared with vehicle. This effect of DHT was attenuated in the presence of the AR antagonist bicalutamide. Conversely, in the presence of LPS or IL-1β, increases in COX-2 were attenuated by cotreatment with DHT. Bicalutamide did not affect this response, suggesting that DHT-induced decreases in COX-2 levels occur independent of AR stimulation. Thus we conclude that DHT differentially influences COX-2 levels under physiological and pathophysiological conditions in HCASMC. This effect of DHT on COX-2 involves AR-dependent and- independent mechanisms, depending on the physiological state of the cell. PMID:20103743

  5. Nitric oxide production by cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells: stimulation by fluid flow

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Papadaki, M.; Tilton, R. G.; Eskin, S. G.; McIntire, L. V.

    1998-01-01

    This study demonstrated that exposure of cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells (SMC) to fluid flow resulted in nitric oxide (NO) production, monitored by nitrite and guanosine 3',5'-cyclic monophosphate production. A rapid burst in nitrite production rate was followed by a more gradual increase throughout the period of flow exposure. Neither the initial burst nor the prolonged nitrite production was dependent on the level of shear stress in the range of 1.1-25 dyn/cm2. Repeated exposure to shear stress after a 30-min static period restimulated nitrite production similar to the initial burst. Ca(2+)-calmodulin antagonists blocked the initial burst in nitrite release. An inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase (NOS) blocked nitrite production, indicating that changes in nitrite reflect NO production. Treatment with dexamethasone or cycloheximide had no effect on nitrite production. Monoclonal antibodies directed against the inducible and endothelial NOS isoforms showed no immunoreactivity on Western blots, whereas monoclonal antibodies directed against the neuronal NOS gave specific products. These findings suggest that human aortic SMC express a constitutive neuronal NOS isoform, the enzymatic activity of which is modulated by flow.

  6. Olfactory Receptors Modulate Physiological Processes in Human Airway Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Kalbe, Benjamin; Knobloch, Jürgen; Schulz, Viola M.; Wecker, Christine; Schlimm, Marian; Scholz, Paul; Jansen, Fabian; Stoelben, Erich; Philippou, Stathis; Hecker, Erich; Lübbert, Hermann; Koch, Andrea; Hatt, Hanns; Osterloh, Sabrina

    2016-01-01

    Pathophysiological mechanisms in human airway smooth muscle cells (HASMCs) significantly contribute to the progression of chronic inflammatory airway diseases with limited therapeutic options, such as severe asthma and COPD. These abnormalities include the contractility and hyperproduction of inflammatory proteins. To develop therapeutic strategies, key pathological mechanisms, and putative clinical targets need to be identified. In the present study, we demonstrated that the human olfactory receptors (ORs) OR1D2 and OR2AG1 are expressed at the RNA and protein levels in HASMCs. Using fluorometric calcium imaging, specific agonists for OR2AG1 and OR1D2 were identified to trigger transient Ca2+ increases in HASMCs via a cAMP-dependent signal transduction cascade. Furthermore, the activation of OR2AG1 via amyl butyrate inhibited the histamine-induced contraction of HASMCs, whereas the stimulation of OR1D2 with bourgeonal led to an increase in cell contractility. In addition, OR1D2 activation induced the secretion of IL-8 and GM-CSF. Both effects were inhibited by the specific OR1D2 antagonist undecanal. We herein provide the first evidence to show that ORs are functionally expressed in HASMCs and regulate pathophysiological processes. Therefore, ORs might be new therapeutic targets for these diseases, and blocking ORs could be an auspicious strategy for the treatment of early-stage chronic inflammatory lung diseases. PMID:27540365

  7. Effects of valsartan on angiotensin II-induced migration of human coronary artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Kohno, M; Ohmori, K; Nozaki, S; Mizushige, K; Yasunari, K; Kano, H; Minami, M; Yoshikawa, J

    2000-11-01

    The migration as well as proliferation of coronary artery medial smooth muscle cells (SMC) into the intima is proposed to be an important process of intimal thickening in coronary atherosclerosis. In the current study, we examined the effects of the angiotensin type 1 receptor antagonist valsartan on angiotensin II (Ang II)-induced migration of cultured human coronary artery SMC using Boyden's chamber methods. Ang II significantly stimulated human coronary artery SMC migration in a concentration-dependent manner between 10(-6) and 10(-8) mol/l when cells of passage 4 to 6 were used. However, the migration response to Ang II was moderately decreased in cells of passage 10 to 12, and was markedly decreased in cells of passage 15 to 17, compared to that of passage 4 to 6. Ang II-induced migration was blocked by the Ang II type 1 (AT1) receptor antagonist valsartan in a concentration-dependent manner. By contrast, the Ang II type 2 (AT2) receptor antagonist PD 123319 did not affect Ang II-induced migration. Ang II modestly increased the cell number of human coronary artery SMC after a 24-h incubation. This increase in cell numbers was also clearly blocked by valsartan, but not by PD 123319. These results indicate that Ang II stimulates migration as well as proliferation via AT1 receptors in human coronary artery SMC when cells of passage 4 to 6 are used. Valsartan may prevent the progression of coronary atherosclerosis through an inhibition of Ang II-induced migration and proliferation in these cells, although in vivo evidence is lacking.

  8. TRPC3 regulates release of brain-derived neurotrophic factor from human airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Vohra, Pawan K; Thompson, Michael A; Sathish, Venkatachalem; Kiel, Alexander; Jerde, Calvin; Pabelick, Christina M; Singh, Brij B; Prakash, Y S

    2013-12-01

    Exogenous brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) enhances Ca(2+) signaling and cell proliferation in human airway smooth muscle (ASM), especially with inflammation. Human ASM also expresses BDNF, raising the potential for autocrine/paracrine effects. The mechanisms by which ASM BDNF secretion occurs are not known. Transient receptor potential channels (TRPCs) regulate a variety of intracellular processes including store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE; including in ASM) and secretion of factors such as cytokines. In human ASM, we tested the hypothesis that TRPC3 regulates BDNF secretion. At baseline, intracellular BDNF was present, and BDNF secretion was detectable by enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) of cell supernatants or by real-time fluorescence imaging of cells transfected with GFP-BDNF vector. Exposure to the pro-inflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor-alpha (TNFα) (20ng/ml, 48h) or a mixture of allergens (ovalbumin, house dust mite, Alternaria, and Aspergillus extracts) significantly enhanced BDNF secretion and increased TRPC3 expression. TRPC3 knockdown (siRNA or inhibitor Pyr3; 10μM) blunted BDNF secretion, and prevented inflammation effects. Chelation of extracellular Ca(2+) (EGTA; 1mM) or intracellular Ca(2+) (BAPTA; 5μM) significantly reduced secreted BDNF, as did the knockdown of SOCE proteins STIM1 and Orai1 or plasma membrane caveolin-1. Functionally, secreted BDNF had autocrine effects suggested by phosphorylation of high-affinity tropomyosin-related kinase TrkB receptor, prevented by chelating extracellular BDNF with chimeric TrkB-Fc. These data emphasize the role of TRPC3 and Ca(2+) influx in the regulation of BDNF secretion by human ASM and the enhancing effects of inflammation. Given the BDNF effects on Ca(2+) and cell proliferation, BDNF secretion may contribute to altered airway structure and function in diseases such as asthma.

  9. Glycosylated human oxyhaemoglobin activates nuclear factor-κB and activator protein-1 in cultured human aortic smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Peiró, Concepción; Matesanz, Nuria; Nevado, Julián; Lafuente, Nuria; Cercas, Elena; Azcutia, Verónica; Vallejo, Susana; Rodríguez-Mañas, Leocadio; Sánchez-Ferrer, Carlos F

    2003-01-01

    Diabetic vessels undergo structural changes that are linked to a high incidence of cardiovascular diseases. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) mediate cell signalling in the vasculature, where they can promote cell growth and activate redox-regulated transcription factors, like activator protein-1 (AP-1) or nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB), which are involved in remodelling and inflammation processes. Amadori adducts, formed through nonenzymatic glycosylation, can contribute to ROS formation in diabetes. In this study, we analysed whether Amadori-modified human oxyhaemoglobin, glycosylated at either normal (N-Hb) or elevated (E-Hb) levels, can induce cell growth and activate AP-1 and NF-κB in cultured human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMC). E-Hb (1 nM–1 μM), but not N-Hb, promoted a concentration-dependent increase in cell size from nanomolar concentrations, although it failed to stimulate HASMC proliferation. At 10 nM, E-Hb stimulated both AP-1 and NF-κB activity, as assessed by transient transfection, electromobility shift assays or immunofluorescence staining. The effects of E-Hb resembled those of the proinflammatory cytokine tumour necrosis factor-α (TNF-α). E-Hb enhanced intracellular superoxide anions content and its effects on HASMC were abolished by different ROS scavengers. In conclusion, E-Hb stimulates growth and activates AP-1 and NF-κB in human vascular smooth muscle by redox-sensitive pathways, thus suggesting a possible direct role for Amadori adducts in diabetic vasculopathy. PMID:14504138

  10. Tumor necrosis factor gene expression in human vascular intimal smooth muscle cells detected by in situ hybridization.

    PubMed Central

    Barath, P.; Fishbein, M. C.; Cao, J.; Berenson, J.; Helfant, R. H.; Forrester, J. S.

    1990-01-01

    We used immunohistochemistry to detect tumor necrosis factor (TNF) and in situ hybridization to detect TNF messenger RNA (mRNA) in the intimal mesenchymal-appearing cells and in the medial smooth muscle cells of human atherosclerotic arteries. Medial smooth muscle cells showed localization of immunoreactive TNF on the cell surface and did not express TNF mRNA. Conversely, in intimal mesenchymal-appearing cells, TNF was localized in the cytoplasm and TNF mRNA was expressed by in situ hybridization. Thus 89% of intimal cells were immunohistochemically positive for TNF, 96% of them were positive by in situ hybridization, and 76% were positive for the smooth muscle cell marker, HHF35. Our results suggest that intimal mesenchymal-appearing cells are mostly, but not exclusively, derived from smooth muscle cells. These cells express TNF, whereas the medial smooth muscle cells in the atherosclerotic human arteries do not. The expression of TNF by these mesenchymal-appearing cells may have implications regarding the evolution of the atherosclerotic plaque. Images Figure 1 to Figure 4 Figure 3 PMID:1698022

  11. Effect of the endothelin family of peptides on human coronary artery smooth-muscle cell migration.

    PubMed

    Kohno, M; Yokokawa, K; Yasunari, K; Kano, H; Minami, M; Yoshikawa, J

    1998-01-01

    The migration of coronary artery medial smooth-muscle cells (SMCs) is one of the key events in the process of intimal thickening in coronary atherosclerotic lesions. The objectives of the present study were to determine whether any of the three isoforms of endothelin (ET), ET-1, ET-2, and ET-3, or an intermediate form of ET, big ET-1, induces migration of human coronary artery SMCs, and to investigate the possible interaction of ET peptides and well-known migration-stimulatory factors, platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-BB and angiotensin II (Ang II), on SMC migration by the Boyden's chamber method. None of the ET peptides alone induced SMC migration between 10(-9) and 10(-7) mol/L. In contrast, ET-1 and ET-2 significantly induced SMC migration in the presence of low concentrations of PDGF-BB (0.5 ng/mL) or Ang II (10(-9) mol/L), although ET-3 was less active (ET-1 = ET-2 > ET-3). In contrast, big ET-1 was without significant activity on PDGF-BB-or Ang II-induced SMC migration. The potentiation of SMC migration by ET peptides was clearly inhibited by the ETA receptor antagonist BG-123 in a concentration-dependent manner. These results suggest that the ET family of peptides, especially ET-1 and ET-2, can induce human coronary artery SMC migration in combination with PDGF-BB or Ang II, probably via ETA receptors. Taken together with the finding that the concentrations of ET, PDGF-BB and Ang II are locally increased at sites of endothelial injury, this indicates that ET may be an initial stimulus for human coronary artery medial SMC recruitment during coronary atherosclerosis, possibly in combination with PDGF-BB or Ang II.

  12. Inhibition of hypoxia-induced proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells by a mTOR siRNA-loaded cyclodextrin nanovector.

    PubMed

    Liu, Xueping; Wang, Guansong; You, Zaichun; Qian, Pin; Chen, Huaping; Dou, Yin; Wei, Zhenghua; Chen, Yan; Mao, Chengde; Zhang, Jianxiang

    2014-05-01

    The proliferation of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) is a key pathophysiological component of vascular remodeling in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH), an intractable disease, for which pharmacotherapy is limited and only slight improvement in survival outcomes have achieved over the past few decades. RNA interference provides a highly promising strategy to the treatment of this chronic lung disease, while efficient delivery of small interfering RNA (siRNA) remains a key challenge for the development of clinically acceptable siRNA therapeutics. With the aim to construct useful nanomedicines, the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) siRNA was loaded into hybrid nanoparticles based on low molecular weight (Mw) polyethylenimine (PEI) and a pH-responsive cyclodextrin material (Ac-aCD) or poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA). This hybrid nanoplatform gave rise to desirable siRNA loading, and the payload release could be modulated by the hydrolysis characteristics of carrier materials. Fluorescence observation and flow cytometry quantification suggested that both Ac-aCD and PLGA nanovectors (NVs) may enter PASMCs under either normoxia or hypoxia conditions as well as in the presence of serum, with uptake and transfection efficiency significantly higher than those of cationic vectors such as PEI with Mw of 25 kDa (PEI25k) and Lipofectamine 2000 (Lipo 2k). Hybrid Ac-aCD or PLGA NV containing siRNA remarkably inhibited proliferation and activated apoptosis of hypoxic PASMCs, largely resulting from effective suppression of mTOR signaling as evidenced by significantly lowered expression of mTOR mRNA and phosphorylated protein. Moreover, these hybrid nanomedicines were more effective than commonly used cationic vectors like PEI25k and Lipo 2k, with respect to cell growth inhibition, apoptosis activation, and expression attenuation of mTOR mRNA and protein. Therefore, mTOR siRNA nanomedicines based on hybrid Ac-aCD or PLGA NV may be promising therapeutics

  13. Endocrine and cytokine responses in humans with pulmonary tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Rey, Adriana Del; Mahuad, Carolina V; Bozza, Verónica V; Bogue, Cristina; Farroni, Miguel A; Bay, María Luisa; Bottasso, Oscar A; Besedovsky, Hugo O

    2007-02-01

    Endocrine responses during chronic infections such as lung tuberculosis are poorly characterized. Hormonal changes are likely to occur since some of the cytokines produced during this disease could affect endocrine mechanisms that, in turn, influence the course of infectious/inflammatory processes. A main purpose of this work was to study endocrine responses involving pituitary, adrenal, gonadal, and thyroid hormones in parallel to IFN-gamma, IL-10, and IL-6 levels in tuberculosis patients with different degree of pulmonary involvement. We have also studied whether products derived from peripheral immune cells obtained from the patients can affect the in vitro production of adrenal steroids. The population studied comprised HIV-negative newly diagnosed, untreated male patients with mild, moderate, and advanced lung tuberculosis, and matched, healthy controls. IFN-gamma, IL-10, and IL-6 levels were elevated in patients with tuberculosis. Dehydroepiandrosterone and testosterone levels were profoundly decreased and growth hormone levels were markedly elevated in patients, in parallel to modest increases in cortisol, estradiol, prolactin, and thyroid hormone concentrations. Supernatants of peripheral blood mononuclear cells obtained from the patients and stimulated in vitro with Mycobacterium tuberculosis antigens significantly inhibited dehydroepiandrosterone secretion by the human adrenal cell line NCI-H295-R. These results support the hypothesis that at least some of the endocrine changes observed in the patients may be mediated by endogenous cytokines. The endocrine profile of tuberculosis patients would favor a reduction of protective cell-mediated immunity and an exacerbation of inflammation leading to perpetuation of the lung injury and to the hypercatabolic condition that characterizes this disease.

  14. Cigarette smoke and α,β-unsaturated aldehydes elicit VEGF release through the p38 MAPK pathway in human airway smooth muscle cells and lung fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Volpi, Giorgia; Facchinetti, Fabrizio; Moretto, Nadia; Civelli, Maurizio; Patacchini, Riccardo

    2011-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND PURPOSE Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is an angiogenic factor known to be elevated in the sputum of asymptomatic smokers as well as smokers with bronchitis type of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. The aim of this study was to investigate whether acute exposure to cigarette smoke extract altered VEGF production in lung parenchymal cells. EXPERIMENTAL APPROACH We exposed human airway smooth muscle cells (ASMC), normal human lung fibroblasts (NHLF) and small airways epithelial cells (SAEC) to aqueous cigarette smoke extract (CSE) in order to investigate the effect of cigarette smoke on VEGF expression and release. KEY RESULTS Vascular endothelial growth factor release was elevated by sub-toxic concentrations of CSE in both ASMC and NHLF, but not in SAEC. CSE-evoked VEGF release was mimicked by its component acrolein at concentrations (10–100 µM) found in CSE, and prevented by the antioxidant and α,β-unsaturated aldehyde scavenger, N-acetylcysteine (NAC). Both CSE and acrolein (30 µM) induced VEGF mRNA expression in ASMC cultures, suggesting an effect at transcriptional level. Crotonaldehyde and 4-hydroxy-2-nonenal, an endogenous α,β-unsaturated aldehyde, stimulated VEGF release, as did H2O2. CSE-evoked VEGF release was accompanied by rapid and lasting phosphorylation of p38 MAPK (mitogen-activated protein kinase), which was abolished by NAC and mimicked by acrolein. Both CSE- and acrolein-evoked VEGF release were blocked by selective inhibition of p38 MAPK signalling. CONCLUSIONS AND IMPLICATIONS α,β-Unsaturated aldehydes and possibly reactive oxygen species contained in cigarette smoke stimulate VEGF expression and release from pulmonary cells through p38 MAPK signalling. PMID:21306579

  15. Human discrimination of visual direction of motion with and without smooth pursuit eye movements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krukowski, Anton E.; Pirog, Kathleen A.; Beutter, Brent R.; Brooks, Kevin R.; Stone, Leland S.

    2003-01-01

    It has long been known that ocular pursuit of a moving target has a major influence on its perceived speed (Aubert, 1886; Fleischl, 1882). However, little is known about the effect of smooth pursuit on the perception of target direction. Here we compare the precision of human visual-direction judgments under two oculomotor conditions (pursuit vs. fixation). We also examine the impact of stimulus duration (200 ms vs. 800 ms) and absolute direction (cardinal vs. oblique). Our main finding is that direction discrimination thresholds in the fixation and pursuit conditions are indistinguishable. Furthermore, the two oculomotor conditions showed oblique effects of similar magnitudes. These data suggest that the neural direction signals supporting perception are the same with or without pursuit, despite remarkably different retinal stimulation. During fixation, the stimulus information is restricted to large, purely peripheral retinal motion, while during steady-state pursuit, the stimulus information consists of small, unreliable foveal retinal motion and a large efference-copy signal. A parsimonious explanation of our findings is that the signal limiting the precision of direction judgments is a neural estimate of target motion in head-centered (or world-centered) coordinates (i.e., a combined retinal and eye motion signal) as found in the medial superior temporal area (MST), and not simply an estimate of retinal motion as found in the middle temporal area (MT).

  16. On the Visual Input Driving Human Smooth-Pursuit Eye Movements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Stone, Leland S.; Beutter, Brent R.; Lorenceau, Jean

    1996-01-01

    Current computational models of smooth-pursuit eye movements assume that the primary visual input is local retinal-image motion (often referred to as retinal slip). However, we show that humans can pursue object motion with considerable accuracy, even in the presence of conflicting local image motion. This finding indicates that the visual cortical area(s) controlling pursuit must be able to perform a spatio-temporal integration of local image motion into a signal related to object motion. We also provide evidence that the object-motion signal that drives pursuit is related to the signal that supports perception. We conclude that current models of pursuit should be modified to include a visual input that encodes perceived object motion and not merely retinal image motion. Finally, our findings suggest that the measurement of eye movements can be used to monitor visual perception, with particular value in applied settings as this non-intrusive approach would not require interrupting ongoing work or training.

  17. Modeling the human development index and the percentage of poor people using quantile smoothing splines

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulyani, Sri; Andriyana, Yudhie; Sudartianto

    2017-03-01

    Mean regression is a statistical method to explain the relationship between the response variable and the predictor variable based on the central tendency of the data (mean) of the response variable. The parameter estimation in mean regression (with Ordinary Least Square or OLS) generates a problem if we apply it to the data with a symmetric, fat-tailed, or containing outlier. Hence, an alternative method is necessary to be used to that kind of data, for example quantile regression method. The quantile regression is a robust technique to the outlier. This model can explain the relationship between the response variable and the predictor variable, not only on the central tendency of the data (median) but also on various quantile, in order to obtain complete information about that relationship. In this study, a quantile regression is developed with a nonparametric approach such as smoothing spline. Nonparametric approach is used if the prespecification model is difficult to determine, the relation between two variables follow the unknown function. We will apply that proposed method to poverty data. Here, we want to estimate the Percentage of Poor People as the response variable involving the Human Development Index (HDI) as the predictor variable.

  18. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering microscopy of human smooth muscle cells in bioengineered tissue scaffolds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Brackmann, Christian; Esguerra, Maricris; Olausson, Daniel; Delbro, Dick; Krettek, Alexandra; Gatenholm, Paul; Enejder, Annika

    2011-02-01

    The integration of living, human smooth muscle cells in biosynthesized cellulose scaffolds was monitored by nonlinear microscopy toward contractile artificial blood vessels. Combined coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) and second harmonic generation (SHG) microscopy was applied for studies of the cell interaction with the biopolymer network. CARS microscopy probing CH2-groups at 2845 cm-1 permitted three-dimensional imaging of the cells with high contrast for lipid-rich intracellular structures. SHG microscopy visualized the fibers of the cellulose scaffold, together with a small signal obtained from the cytoplasmic myosin of the muscle cells. From the overlay images we conclude a close interaction between cells and cellulose fibers. We followed the cell migration into the three-dimensional structure, illustrating that while the cells submerge into the scaffold they extrude filopodia on top of the surface. A comparison between compact and porous scaffolds reveals a migration depth of <10 μm for the former, whereas the porous type shows cells further submerged into the cellulose. Thus, the scaffold architecture determines the degree of cell integration. We conclude that the unique ability of nonlinear microscopy to visualize the three-dimensional composition of living, soft matter makes it an ideal instrument within tissue engineering.

  19. Human discrimination of visual direction of motion with and without smooth pursuit eye movements

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Krukowski, Anton E.; Pirog, Kathleen A.; Beutter, Brent R.; Brooks, Kevin R.; Stone, Leland S.

    2003-01-01

    It has long been known that ocular pursuit of a moving target has a major influence on its perceived speed (Aubert, 1886; Fleischl, 1882). However, little is known about the effect of smooth pursuit on the perception of target direction. Here we compare the precision of human visual-direction judgments under two oculomotor conditions (pursuit vs. fixation). We also examine the impact of stimulus duration (200 ms vs. 800 ms) and absolute direction (cardinal vs. oblique). Our main finding is that direction discrimination thresholds in the fixation and pursuit conditions are indistinguishable. Furthermore, the two oculomotor conditions showed oblique effects of similar magnitudes. These data suggest that the neural direction signals supporting perception are the same with or without pursuit, despite remarkably different retinal stimulation. During fixation, the stimulus information is restricted to large, purely peripheral retinal motion, while during steady-state pursuit, the stimulus information consists of small, unreliable foveal retinal motion and a large efference-copy signal. A parsimonious explanation of our findings is that the signal limiting the precision of direction judgments is a neural estimate of target motion in head-centered (or world-centered) coordinates (i.e., a combined retinal and eye motion signal) as found in the medial superior temporal area (MST), and not simply an estimate of retinal motion as found in the middle temporal area (MT).

  20. Transcriptional profiling of human smooth muscle cells infected with gingipain and fimbriae mutants of Porphyromonas gingivalis

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Boxi; Sirsjö, Allan; Khalaf, Hazem; Bengtsson, Torbjörn

    2016-01-01

    Porphyromonas gingivalis (P. gingivalis) is considered to be involved in the development of atherosclerosis. However, the role of different virulence factors produced by P. gingivalis in this process is still uncertain. The aim of this study was to investigate the transcriptional profiling of human aortic smooth muscle cells (AoSMCs) infected with wild type, gingipain mutants or fimbriae mutants of P. gingivalis. AoSMCs were exposed to wild type (W50 and 381), gingipain mutants (E8 and K1A), or fimbriae mutants (DPG-3 and KRX-178) of P. gingivalis. We observed that wild type P. gingivalis changes the expression of a considerable larger number of genes in AoSMCs compare to gingipain and fimbriae mutants, respectively. The results from pathway analysis revealed that the common differentially expressed genes for AoSMCs infected by 3 different wild type P. gingivalis strains were enriched in pathways of cancer, cytokine-cytokine receptor interaction, regulation of the actin cytoskeleton, focal adhesion, and MAPK signaling pathway. Disease ontology analysis showed that various strains of P. gingivalis were associated with different disease profilings. Our results suggest that gingipains and fimbriae, especially arginine-specific gingipain, produced by P. gingivalis play important roles in the association between periodontitis and other inflammatory diseases, including atherosclerosis. PMID:26907358

  1. Spatial and temporal traction response in human airway smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolic-Norrelykke, Iva Marija; Butler, James P.; Chen, Jianxin; Wang, Ning

    2002-01-01

    Tractions that cells exert on their substrates are essential in cell spreading, migration, and contraction. These tractions can be determined by plating the cells on a flexible gel and measuring the deformation of the gel by using fluorescent beads embedded just below the surface of the gel. In this article we describe the image correlation method (ICM) optimized for determining the displacement field of the gel under a contracting cell. For the calculation of the traction field from the displacement field we use the recently developed method of Fourier transform traction cytometry (FTTC). The ICM and FTTC methods are applied to human airway smooth muscle cells during stimulation with the contractile agonist histamine or the relaxing agonist isoproterenol. The overall intensity of the cell contraction (the median traction magnitude, the energy transferred from the cell to the gel, and the net contractile moment) increased after activation with histamine, and decreased after treatment with isoproterenol. Cells exhibited regional differences in the time course of traction during the treatment. Both temporal evolution and magnitude of traction increase induced by histamine varied markedly among different cell protrusions, whereas the nuclear region showed the smallest response. These results suggest that intracellular mediators of cell adhesion and contraction respond to contractile stimuli with different rates and intensities in different regions of the cell.

  2. Cigarette smoke-induced mitochondrial fragmentation and dysfunction in human airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Aravamudan, Bharathi; Kiel, Alexander; Freeman, Michelle; Delmotte, Philippe; Thompson, Michael; Vassallo, Robert; Sieck, Gary C; Pabelick, Christina M; Prakash, Y S

    2014-05-01

    The balance between mitochondrial fission and fusion is crucial for mitochondria to perform its normal cellular functions. We hypothesized that cigarette smoke (CS) disrupts this balance and enhances mitochondrial dysfunction in the airway. In nonasthmatic human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells, CS extract (CSE) induced mitochondrial fragmentation and damages their networked morphology in a concentration-dependent fashion, via increased expression of mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) and decreased fusion protein mitofusin (Mfn) 2. CSE effects on Drp1 vs. Mfn2 and mitochondrial network morphology involved reactive oxygen species (ROS), activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt), protein kinase C (PKC) and proteasome pathways, as well as transcriptional regulation via factors such as NF-κB and nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2. Inhibiting Drp1 prevented CSE effects on mitochondrial networks and ROS generation, whereas blocking Mfn2 had the opposite, detrimental effect. In ASM from asmatic patients, mitochondria exhibited substantial morphological defects at baseline and showed increased Drp1 but decreased Mfn2 expression, with exacerbating effects of CSE. Overall, these results highlight the importance of mitochondrial networks and their regulation in the context of cellular changes induced by insults such as inflammation (as in asthma) or CS. Altered mitochondrial fission/fusion proteins have a further potential to influence parameters such as ROS and cell proliferation and apoptosis relevant to airway diseases.

  3. Spatial and temporal traction response in human airway smooth muscle cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Tolic-Norrelykke, Iva Marija; Butler, James P.; Chen, Jianxin; Wang, Ning

    2002-01-01

    Tractions that cells exert on their substrates are essential in cell spreading, migration, and contraction. These tractions can be determined by plating the cells on a flexible gel and measuring the deformation of the gel by using fluorescent beads embedded just below the surface of the gel. In this article we describe the image correlation method (ICM) optimized for determining the displacement field of the gel under a contracting cell. For the calculation of the traction field from the displacement field we use the recently developed method of Fourier transform traction cytometry (FTTC). The ICM and FTTC methods are applied to human airway smooth muscle cells during stimulation with the contractile agonist histamine or the relaxing agonist isoproterenol. The overall intensity of the cell contraction (the median traction magnitude, the energy transferred from the cell to the gel, and the net contractile moment) increased after activation with histamine, and decreased after treatment with isoproterenol. Cells exhibited regional differences in the time course of traction during the treatment. Both temporal evolution and magnitude of traction increase induced by histamine varied markedly among different cell protrusions, whereas the nuclear region showed the smallest response. These results suggest that intracellular mediators of cell adhesion and contraction respond to contractile stimuli with different rates and intensities in different regions of the cell.

  4. Bioengineering functional human aortic vascular smooth-muscle strips in vitro.

    PubMed

    Hecker, Louise; Khait, Luda; Welsh, Michael J; Birla, Ravi

    2008-07-01

    The contraction and relaxation of VSM (vascular smooth muscle) are responsible for the maintenance of vascular tone, which is a major determinant of blood pressure. However, the molecular events leading to the contraction and relaxation of VSM are poorly understood. The development of three-dimensional bioengineered tissues provides an opportunity to investigate the molecular events controlling vascular tone in vitro. In the present study we used fibrin-gel casting to bioengineer functional VSM strips from primary human aortic VSM cells. Our bioengineered VSM strips are functionally similar to VSM in vivo and remained viable in culture for up to 5 weeks. VSM strips demonstrate spontaneous basal tone and can generate an active force (contraction) of up to 85.2 microN on stimulation with phenylephrine. Bioengineered VSM strips exhibited Ca(2+)-dependent contraction and calcium-independent relaxation. The development of functional bioengineered VSM tissue provides a new in vitro model system that can be used to investigate the molecular events controlling vascular tone.

  5. Physiological effects of androgens on human vascular endothelial and smooth muscle cells in culture.

    PubMed

    Nheu, Lina; Nazareth, Lester; Xu, Guo-Ying; Xiao, Fu-Ying; Luo, Rui-Zhi; Komesaroff, Paul; Ling, Shanhong

    2011-12-20

    Androgenic hormones are associated with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease, although the underlying cellular and molecular mechanisms remain unclear. This study examines the impact of androgens on the physiology of human vascular endothelial cells (EC) and smooth muscle cells (SMC) in culture. Cells were incubated with testosterone, dihydrotestosterone (DHT) or dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) at various physiological concentrations (5-50 nM) in the present or absence of an androgen receptor (AR) blocker flutamide (100 nM). Cell growth and death, DNA and collagen synthesis, and gene protein expression were assessed. It was shown that: (1) DHEA protected EC from superoxide injury via AR-independent mechanisms; (2) testosterone induced DNA synthesis and growth in EC via an AR-independent manner with activation of ERK1/2 activity; (3) DHT inhibited DNA synthesis and growth in EC in an AR-dependent manner; (4) testosterone and DHT enhanced ERK1/2 activation and proliferation in SMC via AR-independent and -dependent pathways, respectively; and (5) these androgens did not significantly affect collagen synthesis in SMC. We conclude that androgens possess multiple effects on vascular cells via either AR-dependent or -independent mechanisms. Testosterone and DHEA may be "beneficial" in preventing atherosclerosis by improving EC growth and survival; in contrast, stimulation of VSMC proliferation by testosterone and DHT is potentially "harmful". The relationship of these in vitro effects by androgens to in vivo vascular function and atherogenesis needs to be further clarified. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Vitamin D attenuates cytokine-induced remodeling in human fetal airway smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Britt, Rodney D; Faksh, Arij; Vogel, Elizabeth R; Thompson, Michael A; Chu, Vivian; Pandya, Hitesh C; Amrani, Yassine; Martin, Richard J; Pabelick, Christina M; Prakash, Y S

    2015-06-01

    Asthma in the pediatric population remains a significant contributor to morbidity and increasing healthcare costs. Vitamin D3 insufficiency and deficiency have been associated with development of asthma. Recent studies in models of adult airway diseases suggest that the bioactive Vitamin D3 metabolite, calcitriol (1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 ; 1,25(OH)2 D3 ), modulates responses to inflammation; however, this concept has not been explored in developing airways in the context of pediatric asthma. We used human fetal airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells as a model of the early postnatal airway to explore how calcitriol modulates remodeling induced by pro-inflammatory cytokines. Cells were pre-treated with calcitriol and then exposed to TNFα or TGFβ for up to 72 h. Matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) activity, production of extracellular matrix (ECM), and cell proliferation were assessed. Calcitriol attenuated TNFα enhancement of MMP-9 expression and activity. Additionally, calcitriol attenuated TNFα and TGFβ-induced collagen III expression and deposition, and separately, inhibited proliferation of fetal ASM cells induced by either inflammatory mediator. Analysis of signaling pathways suggested that calcitriol effects in fetal ASM involve ERK signaling, but not other major inflammatory pathways. Overall, our data demonstrate that calcitriol can blunt multiple effects of TNFα and TGFβ in developing airway, and point to a potentially novel approach to alleviating structural changes in inflammatory airway diseases of childhood.

  7. Human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived vascular smooth muscle cells: differentiation and therapeutic potential.

    PubMed

    Ayoubi, Sohrab; Sheikh, Søren P; Eskildsen, Tilde V

    2017-09-01

    Cardiovascular diseases remain the leading cause of death worldwide and current treatment strategies have limited effect of disease progression. It would be desirable to have better models to study developmental and pathological processes and model vascular diseases in laboratory settings. To this end, human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) have generated great enthusiasm, and have been a driving force for development of novel strategies in drug discovery and regenerative cell-therapy for the last decade. Hence, investigating the mechanisms underlying the differentiation of hiPSCs into specialized cell types such as cardiomyocytes, endothelial cells, and vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) may lead to a better understanding of developmental cardiovascular processes and potentiate progress of safe autologous regenerative therapies in pathological conditions. In this review, we summarize the latest trends on differentiation protocols of hiPSC-derived VSMCs and their potential application in vascular research and regenerative therapy. Published on behalf of the European Society of Cardiology. All rights reserved. © The Author 2017. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Cigarette smoke-induced mitochondrial fragmentation and dysfunction in human airway smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Aravamudan, Bharathi; Kiel, Alexander; Freeman, Michelle; Delmotte, Philippe; Thompson, Michael; Vassallo, Robert; Sieck, Gary C.; Pabelick, Christina M.

    2014-01-01

    The balance between mitochondrial fission and fusion is crucial for mitochondria to perform its normal cellular functions. We hypothesized that cigarette smoke (CS) disrupts this balance and enhances mitochondrial dysfunction in the airway. In nonasthmatic human airway smooth muscle (ASM) cells, CS extract (CSE) induced mitochondrial fragmentation and damages their networked morphology in a concentration-dependent fashion, via increased expression of mitochondrial fission protein dynamin-related protein 1 (Drp1) and decreased fusion protein mitofusin (Mfn) 2. CSE effects on Drp1 vs. Mfn2 and mitochondrial network morphology involved reactive oxygen species (ROS), activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK), phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/protein kinase B (Akt), protein kinase C (PKC) and proteasome pathways, as well as transcriptional regulation via factors such as NF-κB and nuclear erythroid 2-related factor 2. Inhibiting Drp1 prevented CSE effects on mitochondrial networks and ROS generation, whereas blocking Mfn2 had the opposite, detrimental effect. In ASM from asmatic patients, mitochondria exhibited substantial morphological defects at baseline and showed increased Drp1 but decreased Mfn2 expression, with exacerbating effects of CSE. Overall, these results highlight the importance of mitochondrial networks and their regulation in the context of cellular changes induced by insults such as inflammation (as in asthma) or CS. Altered mitochondrial fission/fusion proteins have a further potential to influence parameters such as ROS and cell proliferation and apoptosis relevant to airway diseases. PMID:24610934

  9. Inhibition of human arterial smooth muscle cell growth by human monocyte/macrophages: a co-culture study.

    PubMed

    Proudfoot, D; Fitzsimmons, C; Torzewski, J; Bowyer, D E

    1999-07-01

    Monocyte/macrophages produce a variety of substances which may influence the function of smooth muscle cells (SMC). During atherogenesis, macrophages are thought to modulate SMC migration, proliferation and synthesis of extracellular matrix. Such modulation is the balance between stimulatory and inhibitory influences. Thus, for example, our earlier studies have shown that macrophages not only secrete mitogens, but also produce small molecular weight inhibitors of SMC proliferation. In the present study, we have used a co-culture system in which human monocyte/macrophages were separated from human arterial SMC (hSMC) by a filter with the optional addition of a 12 kDa cut-off dialysis membrane, in order to assess their effect on hSMC growth. We have found that human peripheral blood-derived monocytes produced a substance of < 12 kDa that inhibited hSMC growth in the co-culture system. The monocyte-derived factor causing this effect was completely blocked by indomethacin, indicating that growth-inhibitory factors produced by the monocytes were cyclooxygenase products. We have shown that PGE1 and PGE2 inhibit hSMC growth, making them likely candidates for the effector molecules released from monocytes in our co-culture system.

  10. Lipopolysaccharide and Interleukin 1 Augment the Effects of Hypoxia and Inflammation in Human Pulmonary Arterial Tissue

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ziesche, Rolf; Petkov, Venzeslav; Williams, John; Zakeri, Schaker M.; Mosgoller, Wilhelm; Knofler, Martin; Block, Lutz H.

    1996-10-01

    The combined effects of hypoxia and interleukin 1, lipopolysaccharide, or tumor necrosis factor α on the expression of genes encoding endothelial constitutive and inducible nitric oxide synthases, endothelin 1, interleukin 6, and interleukin 8 were investigated in human primary pulmonary endothelial cells and whole pulmonary artery organoid cultures. Hypoxia decreased the expression of constitutive endothelial nitric oxide synthase (NOS-3) mRNA and NOS-3 protein as compared with normoxic conditions. The inhibition of expression of NOS-3 corresponded with a reduced production of NO. A combination of hypoxia with bacterial lipopolysaccharide, interleukin 1β , or tumor necrosis factor α augmented both effects. In contrast, the combination of hypoxia and the inflammatory mediators superinduced the expression of endothelin 1, interleukin 6, and interleukin 8. Here, we have shown that inflammatory mediators aggravate the effect of hypoxia on the down-regulation of NOS-3 and increase the expression of proinflammatory cytokines in human pulmonary endothelial cells and whole pulmonary artery organoid cultures.

  11. Lipoprotein(a) Promotes Smooth Muscle Cell Proliferation and Dedifferentiation in Atherosclerotic Lesions of Human Apo(a) Transgenic Rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Ichikawa, Tomonaga; Unoki, Hiroyuki; Sun, Huijun; Shimoyamada, Hiroaki; Marcovina, Santica; Shikama, Hisataka; Watanabe, Teruo; Fan, Jianglin

    2002-01-01

    Elevated plasma lipoprotein(a) [Lp(a)] levels constitute an independent risk factor for the development of atherosclerosis. However, the mechanism underlying Lp(a) atherogenicity is unclear. Recently, we demonstrated that Lp(a) may potentially be proatherogenic in transgenic rabbits expressing human apolipoprotein(a) [apo(a)]. In this study, we further investigated atherosclerotic lesions of transgenic rabbits by morphometry and immunohistochemistry. On a cholesterol diet, human apo(a) transgenic rabbits had more extensive atherosclerotic lesions of the aorta, carotid artery, iliac artery, and coronary artery than did nontransgenic littermate rabbits as defined by increased intimal lesion area. Enhanced lesion development in transgenic rabbits was characterized by increased accumulation of smooth muscle cells, that was often associated with the Lp(a) deposition. To explore the possibility that Lp(a) may be involved in the smooth-muscle cell phenotypic modulation, we stained the lesions using a panel of monoclonal antibodies against smooth-muscle myosin heavy-chain isoforms (SM1, SM2, and SMemb) and basic transcriptional element binding protein-2 (BTEB2). We found that a large number of smooth muscle cells located in the apo(a)-containing areas of transgenic rabbits were positive for SMemb and BTEB2, suggesting that these smooth muscle cells were either immature or in the state of activation. In addition, transgenic rabbits showed delayed fibrinolytic activity accompanied by increased plasma plasminogen activator inhibitor-1. We conclude that Lp(a) may enhance the lesion development by mediating smooth muscle cell proliferation and dedifferentiation possibly because of impaired fibrinolytic activity. PMID:11786416

  12. Human Embryonic Stem Cell Derived Vascular Progenitor Cells Capable of Endothelial and Smooth Muscle Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Hill, Katherine L; Obrtlikova, Petra; Alvarez, Diego F; King, Judy A; Keirstead, Susan A; Allred, Jeremy R; Kaufman, Dan S

    2010-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Previous studies have demonstrated development of endothelial cells (ECs) and smooth muscle cells (SMCs) as separate cell lineages derived from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs). We demonstrate CD34+ cells isolated from differentiated hESCs function as vascular progenitor cells capable of producing both ECs and SMCs. These studies better define the developmental origin and reveal the relationship between these two cell types, as well as provide a more complete biological characterization. MATERIALS AND METHODS hESCs are co-cultured on M2-10B4 stromal cells or Wnt1 expressing M2-10B4 for 13–15 days to generate a CD34+ cell population. These cells are isolated using a magnetic antibody separation kit and cultured on fibronectin coated dishes in EC medium. To induce SMC differentiation, culture medium is changed and a morphological and phenotypic change occurs within 24–48 hours. RESULTS CD34+ vascular progenitor cells give rise to ECs and SMCs. The two populations express respective cell specific transcripts and proteins, exhibit intracellular calcium in response to various agonists, and form robust tube-like structures when co-cultured in Matrigel. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) cultured under SMC conditions do not exhibit a change in phenotype or genotype. Wnt1 overexpressing stromal cells produced an increased number of progenitor cells. CONCLUSIONS The ability to generate large numbers of ECs and SMCs from a single vascular progenitor cell population is promising for therapeutic use to treat a variety of diseased and ischemic conditions. The step-wise differentiation outlined here is an efficient, reproducible method with potential for large scale cultures suitable for clinical applications. PMID:20067819

  13. BKCa channel regulates calcium oscillations induced by alpha-2-macroglobulin in human myometrial smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Wakle-Prabagaran, Monali; Lorca, Ramón A.; Ma, Xiaofeng; Stamnes, Susan J.; Amazu, Chinwendu; Hsiao, Jordy J.; Hyrc, Krzysztof L.; Wright, Michael E.; England, Sarah K.

    2016-01-01

    The large-conductance, voltage-gated, calcium (Ca2+)-activated potassium channel (BKCa) plays an important role in regulating Ca2+ signaling and is implicated in the maintenance of uterine quiescence during pregnancy. We used immunopurification and mass spectrometry to identify proteins that interact with BKCa in myometrium samples from term pregnant (≥37 wk gestation) women. From this screen, we identified alpha-2-macroglobulin (α2M). We then used immunoprecipitation followed by immunoblot and the proximity ligation assay to confirm the interaction between BKCa and both α2M and its receptor, low-density lipoprotein receptor-related protein 1 (LRP1), in cultured primary human myometrial smooth muscle cells (hMSMCs). Single-channel electrophysiological recordings in the cell-attached configuration demonstrated that activated α2M (α2M*) increased the open probability of BKCa in an oscillatory pattern in hMSMCs. Furthermore, α2M* caused intracellular levels of Ca2+ to oscillate in oxytocin-primed hMSMCs. The initiation of oscillations required an interaction between α2M* and LRP1. By using Ca2+-free medium and inhibitors of various Ca2+ signaling pathways, we demonstrated that the oscillations required entry of extracellular Ca2+ through store-operated Ca2+ channels. Finally, we found that the specific BKCa blocker paxilline inhibited the oscillations, whereas the channel opener NS11021 increased the rate of these oscillations. These data demonstrate that α2M* and LRP1 modulate the BKCa channel in human myometrium and that BKCa and its immunomodulatory interacting partners regulate Ca2+ dynamics in hMSMCs during pregnancy. PMID:27044074

  14. Heterogeneity of smooth muscle cells in atheromatous plaque of human aorta.

    PubMed Central

    Babaev, V. R.; Bobryshev, Y. V.; Stenina, O. V.; Tararak, E. M.; Gabbiani, G.

    1990-01-01

    This study was undertaken to investigate the expression of cytoskeletal proteins and the ultrastructure of cells in normal intima and atheromatous plaque of human aorta. It has been established, using double-labeling immunofluorescence, that smooth muscle cells (SMC) in normal aortic intima contain myosin, vimentin, and alpha-actin but do not react with antibodies against desmin. In contrast, 7 of 28 atherosclerotic plaques contained many cells expressing desmin in addition to the other cytoskeletal proteins characteristic of normal intima SMC. These cells were localized predominantly in the plaque cap and had the ultrastructural features of modulated SMC, ie, well-developed endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus. Besides, some cells in the 13 atherosclerotic plaques proved to be myosin, alpha actin, and desmin negative but contained vimentin and actin as revealed by fluorescent phalloidin. These cells were found in the immediate proximity of atheromatous material and reacted with a monoclonal antibody specific to SMC surface protein (11G10) but not with monoclonal anti-muscle actin (HHF35) and anti-macrophage (HAM56) antibodies. Electron microscopy of this plaque zone revealed that the cytoplasm of these cells was filled with rough endoplasmic reticulum and a developed Golgi complex. At the same time, a certain proportion of cells in this region retained morphologic features of differentiated SMC such as the presence of a basal lamina and myofilament bundles. The revealed peculiarities of cytoskeletal protein expression and the ultrastructure of cells in human aortic atherosclerotic plaques may be explained by a phenotypic modulation of vascular SMC. Images Figure 4 Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 Figure 6 Figure 7 PMID:2190471

  15. The human uterine smooth muscle S-nitrosoproteome fingerprint in pregnancy, labor, and preterm labor.

    PubMed

    Ulrich, Craig; Quilici, David R; Schlauch, Karen A; Buxton, Iain L O

    2013-10-15

    Molecular mechanisms involved in uterine quiescence during gestation and those responsible for induction of labor at term are incompletely known. More than 10% of babies born worldwide are premature and 1,000,000 die annually. Preterm labor results in preterm delivery in 50% of cases in the United States explaining 75% of fetal morbidity and mortality. There is no Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment to prevent preterm delivery. Nitric oxide-mediated relaxation of human uterine smooth muscle is independent of global elevation of cGMP following activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase. S-nitrosation is a likely mechanism to explain cGMP-independent relaxation to nitric oxide and may reveal S-nitrosated proteins as new therapeutic targets for the treatment of preterm labor. Employing S-nitrosoglutathione as an nitric oxide donor, we identified 110 proteins that are S-nitrosated in 1 or more states of human pregnancy. Using area under the curve of extracted ion chromatograms as well as normalized spectral counts to quantify relative expression levels for 62 of these proteins, we show that 26 proteins demonstrate statistically significant S-nitrosation differences in myometrium from spontaneously laboring preterm patients compared with nonlaboring patients. We identified proteins that were up-S-nitrosated as well as proteins that were down-S-nitrosated in preterm laboring tissues. Identification and relative quantification of the S-nitrosoproteome provide a fingerprint of proteins that can form the basis of hypothesis-directed efforts to understand the regulation of uterine contraction-relaxation and the development of new treatment for preterm labor.

  16. The human uterine smooth muscle S-nitrosoproteome fingerprint in pregnancy, labor, and preterm labor

    PubMed Central

    Ulrich, Craig; Quilici, David R.; Schlauch, Karen A.

    2013-01-01

    Molecular mechanisms involved in uterine quiescence during gestation and those responsible for induction of labor at term are incompletely known. More than 10% of babies born worldwide are premature and 1,000,000 die annually. Preterm labor results in preterm delivery in 50% of cases in the United States explaining 75% of fetal morbidity and mortality. There is no Food and Drug Administration-approved treatment to prevent preterm delivery. Nitric oxide-mediated relaxation of human uterine smooth muscle is independent of global elevation of cGMP following activation of soluble guanylyl cyclase. S-nitrosation is a likely mechanism to explain cGMP-independent relaxation to nitric oxide and may reveal S-nitrosated proteins as new therapeutic targets for the treatment of preterm labor. Employing S-nitrosoglutathione as an nitric oxide donor, we identified 110 proteins that are S-nitrosated in 1 or more states of human pregnancy. Using area under the curve of extracted ion chromatograms as well as normalized spectral counts to quantify relative expression levels for 62 of these proteins, we show that 26 proteins demonstrate statistically significant S-nitrosation differences in myometrium from spontaneously laboring preterm patients compared with nonlaboring patients. We identified proteins that were up-S-nitrosated as well as proteins that were down-S-nitrosated in preterm laboring tissues. Identification and relative quantification of the S-nitrosoproteome provide a fingerprint of proteins that can form the basis of hypothesis-directed efforts to understand the regulation of uterine contraction-relaxation and the development of new treatment for preterm labor. PMID:23948706

  17. Sildenafil as treatment for Human Immunodeficiency Virus-related pulmonary hypertension in a child.

    PubMed

    Wong, Abdul Rahim; Rasool, Aida Hanum G; Abidin, Nik Zainal; Noor, Abdul Rahmand; Quah, Ban Seng

    2006-03-01

    Human Immunodeficiency Virus (HIV)-related pulmonary hypertension is a relatively rare disease that can affect HIV sufferers. This is almost always associated with a poor outcome and death. An 18 month-old girl, probably the youngest on record, was diagnosed to have pulmonary hypertension (PHT) and retrospectively found to have HIV infection. Sildenafil was used to control her PHT and she remains alive even after 2 years.

  18. Regional pulmonary perfusion following human heart-lung transplantation

    SciTech Connect

    Lisbona, R.; Hakim, T.S.; Dean, G.W.; Langleben, D.; Guerraty, A.; Levy, R.D. )

    1989-08-01

    Ventilation and perfusion scans were obtained in six subjects who had undergone heart-lung transplantation with consequent denervation of the cardiopulmonary axis. Two of the subjects had developed obliterative bronchiolitis, which is believed to be a form of chronic rejection. Their pulmonary function tests demonstrated airflow obstruction and their scintigraphic studies were abnormal. In the remaining four subjects without obstructive airways disease, ventilation and planar perfusion scans were normal. Single photon emission computed tomography imaging of pulmonary perfusion in these patients revealed a layered distribution of blood flow indistinguishable from that of normal individuals. It is concluded that neurogenic mechanisms have little influence on the pattern of local pulmonary blood flow at rest.

  19. Contrasting effects of ascorbate and iron on the pulmonary vascular response to hypoxia in humans.

    PubMed

    Talbot, Nick P; Croft, Quentin P; Curtis, M Kate; Turner, Brandon E; Dorrington, Keith L; Robbins, Peter A; Smith, Thomas G

    2014-12-01

    Hypoxia causes an increase in pulmonary artery pressure. Gene expression controlled by the hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF) family of transcription factors plays an important role in the underlying pulmonary vascular responses. The hydroxylase enzymes that regulate HIF are highly sensitive to varying iron availability, and iron status modifies the pulmonary vascular response to hypoxia, possibly through its effects on HIF. Ascorbate (vitamin C) affects HIF hydroxylation in a similar manner to iron and may therefore have similar pulmonary effects. This study investigated the possible contribution of ascorbate availability to hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction in humans. Seven healthy volunteers undertook a randomized, controlled, double-blind, crossover protocol which studied the effects of high-dose intravenous ascorbic acid (total 6 g) on the pulmonary vascular response to 5 h of sustained hypoxia. Systolic pulmonary artery pressure (SPAP) was assessed during hypoxia by Doppler echocardiography. Results were compared with corresponding data from a similar study investigating the effect of intravenous iron, in which SPAP was measured in seven healthy volunteers during 8 h of sustained hypoxia. Consistent with other studies, iron supplementation profoundly inhibited hypoxic pulmonary vasoconstriction (P < 0.001). In contrast, supraphysiological supplementation of ascorbate did not affect the increase in pulmonary artery pressure induced by several hours of hypoxia (P = 0.61). We conclude that ascorbate does not interact with hypoxia and the pulmonary circulation in the same manner as iron. Whether the effects of iron are HIF-mediated remains unknown, and the extent to which ascorbate contributes to HIF hydroxylation in vivo is also unclear.

  20. A rare case of human pulmonary dirofilariasis with a growing pulmonary nodule after migrating infiltration shadows, mimicking primary lung carcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Haro, Akira; Tamiya, Sadafumi; Nagashima, Akira

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Pulmonary dirofilariasis is a rare pulmonary parasitic infection by the nematode Dirofilaria immitis. It is characterized by an asymptomatic pulmonary nodule usually seen on chest X-ray. The differential diagnosis of pulmonary dirofilariasis includes other pulmonary diseases, primary lung carcinoma and metastatic lung tumor. Case presentation Pulmonary dirofilariasis was diagnosed in a woman who presented with interstitial pneumonia. Growth of the pulmonary nodule was detected subsequent to hemoptysis. The histological diagnosis was made based on a wedge resection performed under video-associated thoracic surgery (VATS). Conclusion Pulmonary dirofilariasis often varies in its clinical course. The diagnosis is best made using wedge resection under VATS. PMID:27015012

  1. Smooth Muscle Progenitor Cells Derived From Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Induce Histologic Changes in Injured Urethral Sphincter.

    PubMed

    Li, Yanhui; Wen, Yan; Wang, Zhe; Wei, Yi; Wani, Prachi; Green, Morgaine; Swaminathan, Ganesh; Ramamurthi, Anand; Pera, Renee Reijo; Chen, Bertha

    2016-12-01

    : Data suggest that myoblasts from various sources, including bone marrow, skeletal muscle, and adipose tissue, can restore muscle function in patients with urinary incontinence. Animal data have indicated that these progenitor cells exert mostly a paracrine effect on the native tissues rather than cell regeneration. Limited knowledge is available on the in vivo effect of human stem cells or muscle progenitors on injured muscles. We examined in vivo integration of smooth muscle progenitor cells (pSMCs) derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs). pSMCs were derived from a human embryonic stem cell line (H9-ESCs) and two induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) lines. pSMCs were injected periurethrally into urethral injury rat models (2 × 10(6) cells per rat) or intramuscularly into severe combined immunodeficiency mice. Histologic and quantitative image analysis revealed that the urethras in pSMC-treated rats contained abundant elastic fibers and thicker muscle layers compared with the control rats. Western blot confirmed increased elastin/collagen III content in the urethra and bladder of the H9-pSMC-treated rats compared with controls. iPSC-pSMC treatment also showed similar trends in elastin and collagen III. Human elastin gene expression was not detectable in rodent tissues, suggesting that the extracellular matrix synthesis resulted from the native rodent tissues rather than from the implanted human cells. Immunofluorescence staining and in vivo bioluminescence imaging confirmed long-term engraftment of pSMCs into the host urethra and the persistence of the smooth muscle phenotype. Taken together, the data suggest that hPSC-derived pSMCs facilitate restoration of urethral sphincter function by direct smooth muscle cell regeneration and by inducing native tissue elastin/collagen III remodeling. The present study provides evidence that a pure population of human smooth muscle progenitor cells (pSMCs) derived from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) (human

  2. Overloading human aortic smooth muscle cells with low density lipoprotein-cholesteryl esters reproduces features of atherosclerosis in vitro.

    PubMed Central

    Goldstein, J L; Anderson, R G; Buja, L M; Basu, S K; Brown, M S

    1977-01-01

    Human aortic smooth muscle cells accumulate only small amounts of cholesteryl esters in tissue culture, even when incubated for prolonged periods with high levels of plasma low density lipoprotein (LDL). This failure to overaccumulate LDL-cholesteryl esters is due to an LDL-mediated feedback suppression of the activity of the cell surface LDL receptor, a regulatory action that limits the rate at which the cells take up LDL. This regulatory system can be bypassed by incubating smooth muscle cells with LDL that has been given a strong positive charge by covalent linkage with N,N-dimethyl-1,3-propanediamine (DMPA-LDL). The unregulated uptake of DMPA-LDL produces a massive deposition of cholesteryl esters in the form of inclusions within the cell. These inclusions take up lipid stains and exhibit positive birefringence with formée crosses that are typical of liquid crystals of cholesteryl esters. By electron microscopy, the cholesteryl ester inclusions appear as homogeneous gray cytoplasmic lipid droplets. The current studies demonstrate that the unregulated uptake of LDL-cholesteryl esters by human aortic smooth muscle cells can reproduce in vitro the major biochemical and morphological alterations that occur within smooth muscle cells in vivo during the process of atherosclerosis. Images PMID:193874

  3. Expression of myosin isoforms in the smooth muscle of human corpus cavernosum.

    PubMed

    Koi, P T; Milhoua, P M; Monrose, V; Melman, A; DiSanto, M E

    2007-01-01

    The molecular interaction between smooth muscle (SM) myosin and actin in the corpus cavernosum (CC) determines the erectile state of the penis. A key mechanism regulating this interaction and subsequent development and maintenance of force is alternative splicing of SM myosin heavy chain (MHC) and 17 kDa essential SM myosin light chain (MLC) pre-mRNAs. Our aim was to examine the relative SM myosin isoform composition in human CC. Tissue samples were obtained from 18 patients with erectile dysfunction (ED), Peyronie's disease, or both. One specimen was obtained during a transgender operation. Patients then were stratified according to presence of diabetes mellitus, hypertension, ED, or Peyronie's disease, as well as failure of phosphodiesterase-5 (PDE5) inhibitors and history of previous pelvic or penile surgeries, radiation, or both. Our results revealed that all human CC samples expressed only the SM-A isoform. There was a predominance of SM2 isoform mRNA relative to SM1 across all samples, with a mean of 63.8%, which correlated with protein analysis by gel electrophoresis. A statistically significant difference was found between patients who had undergone previous pelvic surgery, radiation, or both and those who did not. The ratio of LC(17b) to LC(17a) was approximately 1:1 for all patients, with a mean of 48.9% LC(17b). Statistical difference was seen in the relative ratio of LC(17b) to LC(17a) among the group who failed conservative therapy with PDE5 inhibitors compared with all others. In conclusion, we determined the SM myosin isoform composition of human CC and present for the first time differences in relative myosin isoform expression among patients with several risk factors contributing to their cause of ED. Our data reflect the fact that alternative splicing events in the MHC and 17 kDa MLC pre-mRNA may be a possible molecular mechanism involved in the altered contractility of the CCSM in patients with ED.

  4. Pharmacologic characterization of the oxytocin receptor in human uterine smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    Tahara, Atsuo; Tsukada, Junko; Tomura, Yuichi; Wada, Koh-ichi; Kusayama, Toshiyuki; Ishii, Noe; Yatsu, Takeyuki; Uchida, Wataru; Tanaka, Akihiro

    2000-01-01

    [3H]-oxytocin was used to characterize the oxytocin receptor found in human uterine smooth muscle cells (USMC). Specific binding of [3H]-oxytocin to USMC plasma membranes was dependent upon time, temperature and membrane protein concentration. Scatchard plot analysis of equilibrium binding data revealed the existence of a single class of high-affinity binding sites with an apparent equilibrium dissociation constant (Kd) of 0.76 nM and a maximum receptor density (Bmax) of 153 fmol mg−1 protein. The Hill coefficient (nH) did not differ significantly from unity, suggesting binding to homogenous, non-interacting receptor populations. Competitive inhibition of [3H]-oxytocin binding showed that oxytocin and vasopressin (AVP) receptor agonists and antagonists displaced [3H]-oxytocin in a concentration-dependent manner. The order of potencies for peptide agonists and antagonists was: oxytocin>[Asu1,6]-oxytocin>AVP= atosiban>d(CH2)5Tyr(Me)AVP>[Thr4,Gly7]-oxytocin>dDAVP, and for nonpeptide antagonists was: L-371257>YM087>SR 49059>OPC-21268>SR 121463A>OPC-31260. Oxytocin significantly induced concentration-dependent increase in intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and hyperplasia in USMC. The oxytocin receptor antagonists, atosiban and L-371257, potently and concentration-dependently inhibited oxytocin-induced [Ca2+]i increase and hyperplasia. In contrast, the V1A receptor selective antagonist, SR 49059, and the V2 receptor selective antagonist, SR 121463A, did not potently inhibit oxytocin-induced [Ca2+]i increase and hyperplasia. The potency order of antagonists in inhibiting oxytocin-induced [Ca2+]i increase and hyperplasia was similar to that observed in radioligand binding assays. In conclusion, these data provide evidence that the high-affinity [3H]-oxytocin binding site found in human USMC is a functional oxytocin receptor coupled to [Ca2+]i increase and cell growth. Thus human USMC may prove to be a valuable tool in further investigation of the

  5. Early Transcriptomic Response to LDL and oxLDL in Human Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Damián-Zamacona, Salvador; Toledo-Ibelles, Paola; Ibarra-Abundis, Mabel Z.; Uribe-Figueroa, Laura; Hernández-Lemus, Enrique; Macedo-Alcibia, Karla Paola; Delgado–Coello, Blanca; Mas-Oliva, Jaime; Reyes-Grajeda, Juan Pablo

    2016-01-01

    Background Although nowadays it is well known that the human transcriptome can importantly vary according to external or environmental condition, the reflection of this concept when studying oxidative stress and its direct relationship with gene expression profiling during the process of atherogenesis has not been thoroughly achieved. Objective The ability to analyze genome-wide gene expression through transcriptomics has shown that the genome responds dynamically to diverse stimuli. Here, we describe the transcriptome of human vascular smooth muscle cells (hVSMC) stimulated by native and oxidized low-density lipoprotein (nLDL and oxLDL respectively), with the aim of assessing the early molecular changes that induce a response in this cell type resulting in a transcriptomic transformation. This expression has been demonstrated in atherosclerotic plaques in vivo and in vitro, particularly in the light of the oxidative modification hypothesis of atherosclerosis. Approach and Results Total RNA was isolated with TRIzol reagent (Life Technologies) and quality estimated using an Agilent 2100 bioanalyzer. The transcriptome of hVSMC under different experimental conditions (1,5 and 24 hours for nLDL and oxLDL) was obtained using the GeneChip Human Gene 1.0 ST (Affymetrix) designed to measure gene expression of 28,869 well-annotated genes. A fixed fold-change cut-off corresponding to ± 2 was used to identify genes exhibiting the most significant variation and statistical significance (P< 0.05), and 8 genes validated by qPCR using Taqman probes. Conclusions 10 molecular processes were significantly affected in hVSMC: Apoptosis and cell cycle, extracellular matrix remodeling, DNA repair, cholesterol efflux, cGMP biosynthesis, endocytic mechanisms, calcium homeostasis, redox balance, membrane trafficking and finally, the immune response to inflammation. The evidence we present supporting the hypothesis for the involvement of oxidative modification of several processes and

  6. Pulmonary surfactant mitigates silver nanoparticle toxicity in human alveolar type-I-like epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Sweeney, Sinbad; Leo, Bey Fen; Chen, Shu; Abraham-Thomas, Nisha; Thorley, Andrew J; Gow, Andrew; Schwander, Stephan; Zhang, Junfeng Jim; Shaffer, Milo S P; Chung, Kian Fan; Ryan, Mary P; Porter, Alexandra E; Tetley, Teresa D

    2016-09-01

    Accompanying increased commercial applications and production of silver nanomaterials is an increased probability of human exposure, with inhalation a key route. Nanomaterials that deposit in the pulmonary alveolar region following inhalation will interact firstly with pulmonary surfactant before they interact with the alveolar epithelium. It is therefore critical to understand the effects of human pulmonary surfactant when evaluating the inhalation toxicity of silver nanoparticles. In this study, we evaluated the toxicity of AgNPs on human alveolar type-I-like epithelial (TT1) cells in the absence and presence of Curosurf(®) (a natural pulmonary surfactant substitute), hypothesising that the pulmonary surfactant would act to modify toxicity. We demonstrated that 20nm citrate-capped AgNPs induce toxicity in human alveolar type I-like epithelial cells and, in agreement with our hypothesis, that pulmonary surfactant acts to mitigate this toxicity, possibly through reducing AgNP dissolution into cytotoxic Ag(+) ions. For example, IL-6 and IL-8 release by TT1 cells significantly increased 10.7- and 35-fold, respectively (P<0.01), 24h after treatment with 25μg/ml AgNPs. In contrast, following pre-incubation of AgNPs with Curosurf(®), this effect was almost completely abolished. We further determined that the mechanism of this toxicity is likely associated with Ag(+) ion release and lysosomal disruption, but not with increased reactive oxygen species generation. This study provides a critical understanding of the toxicity of AgNPs in target human alveolar type-I-like epithelial cells and the role of pulmonary surfactant in mitigating this toxicity. The observations reported have important implications for the manufacture and application of AgNPs, in particular for applications involving use of aerosolised AgNPs. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Regional differences of energetics, mechanics, and kinetics of myosin cross-bridge in human ureter smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Vargiu, Romina; Perinu, Anna; Tintrup, Frank; Broccia, Francesca; Lisa, Antonello De

    2015-01-01

    This study provides information about baseline mechanical properties of the entire muscle and the molecular contractile mechanism in human ureter smooth muscle and proposed to investigate if changes in mechanical motor performance in different regions of isolated human ureter are attributable to differences in myosin crossbridge interactions. Classic mechanical, contraction and energetic parameters derived from the tension-velocity relationship were studied in ureteral smooth muscle strips oriented longitudinally and circularly from abdominal and pelvic human ureter parts. By applying of Huxley's mathematical model we calculated the total working crossbridge number per mm(2) (Ψ), elementary force per single crossbridge (Π0), duration of maximum rate constant of crossbridge attachment 1/f1 and detachment 1/g2 and peak mechanical efficiency (Eff.max). Abdominal longitudinal smooth muscle strips exhibited significantly higher maximum isometric tension and faster maximum unloaded shortening velocity compared to pelvic ones. Contractile differences were associated with significantly higher crossbridge number per mm(2). Abdominal longitudinal muscle strips showed a lower duration of maximum rate constant of crossbridge attachment and detachment and higher peak mechanical efficiency than pelvic ones. Such data suggest that the abdominal human ureter showed better mechanical motor performance mainly related to a higher crossbridge number and crossbridge kinetics differences. Such results were more evident in the longitudinal rather than in the circular layer.

  8. Nanonet force microscopy for measuring forces in single smooth muscle cells of the human aorta.

    PubMed

    Hall, Alexander; Chan, Patrick; Sheets, Kevin; Apperson, Matthew; Delaughter, Christopher; Gleason, Thomas G; Phillippi, Julie A; Nain, Amrinder

    2017-07-07

    A number of innovative methods exist to measure cell-matrix adhesive forces, but they have yet to accurately describe and quantify the intricate interplay of a cell and its fibrous extracellular matrix (ECM). In cardiovascular pathologies, such as aortic aneurysm, new knowledge on the involvement of cell-matrix forces could lead to elucidation of disease mechanisms. To better understand this dynamics, we measured primary human aortic single smooth muscle cell (SMC) forces using nanonet force microscopy in both inside-out (I-O intrinsic contractility) and outside-in (O-I external perturbation) modes. For SMC populations, we measured the I-O and O-I forces to be 12.9 ± 1.0 and 57.9 ± 2.5 nN, respectively. Exposure of cells to oxidative stress conditions caused a force decrease of 57 and 48% in I-O and O-I modes, respectively, and an increase in migration rate by 2.5-fold. Finally, in O-I mode, we cyclically perturbed cells at constant strain of varying duration to simulate in vivo conditions of the cardiac cycle and found that I-O forces decrease with increasing duration and O-I forces decreased by half at shorter cycle times. Thus our findings highlight the need to study forces exerted and felt by cells simultaneously to comprehensively understand force modulation in cardiovascular disease. © 2017 Hall et al. This article is distributed by The American Society for Cell Biology under license from the author(s). Two months after publication it is available to the public under an Attribution–Noncommercial–Share Alike 3.0 Unported Creative Commons License (http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc-sa/3.0).

  9. Sex-specific pharmacological modulation of autophagic process in human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Campesi, Ilaria; Occhioni, Stefano; Capobianco, Giampiero; Fois, Marco; Montella, Andrea; Dessole, Salvatore; Franconi, Flavia

    2016-11-01

    Sex has largely been neglected in cell studies. Therefore, we investigated the occurrence of sexual dimorphism in human umbilical artery smooth muscle cells (HUASMCs). In particular, we investigated the existence of sex differences in basal and in drug-induced autophagy, a process involved in cardiovascular diseases. HUASMCs were isolated from healthy and normal weight male and female newborns (MHUASMCs and FHUASMCs, respectively). Expression of the primary molecules involved in the autophagic process [beclin-1 and microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (LC3)], and PmTOR were detected using western blotting in basal conditions, after serum starvation, rapamycin and verapamil treatments. The level of constitutive autophagy, measured as the LC3II/I ratio, was similar in male and female HUASMCs in the basal condition. Serum starvation promoted autophagy in both cell types, but the increase was more pronounced in FHUASMCs, while 250nM rapamycin induced autophagy only in female cells. Moreover, the level of verapamil-induced autophagy was not different between the two sexes. Notably, in the basal condition, Beclin-1 was more elevated in MHUASMCs than in FHUASMCs, and the difference disappeared after serum starvation and exposure to rapamycin. After exposure to verapamil, the differences in Beclin-1 increased, with more elevated expression levels in female cells. PmTor did not differ in basal conditions, but it was significantly down-regulated by starvation only in FHUASMCs and by rapamycin both in male and female cells. Finally, a strong negative correlation was observed between the newborn's weight and basal autophagy in female cells and between the newborn's weight and the LC3II/I ratio in male verapamil-treated cells. These results indicate that sex-differences begin in utero, are parameter-specific and drug specific suggesting that HUASMCs are a suitable model for the screening of drugs and to study the influence of sex. The sex differences in the autophagy

  10. Calcium Phosphate Crystals from Uremic Serum Promote Osteogenic Differentiation in Human Aortic Smooth Muscle Cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Yaorong; Zhang, Lin; Ni, Zhaohui; Qian, Jiaqi; Fang, Wei

    2016-11-01

    Recent study demonstrated that calcium phosphate (CaP) crystals isolated from high phosphate medium were a key contributor to arterial calcification. The present study further investigated the effects of CaP crystals induced by uremic serum on calcification of human aortic smooth muscle cells. This may provide a new insight for the development of uremic cardiovascular calcification. We tested the effects of uremic serum or normal serum on cell calcification. Calcification was visualized by staining and calcium deposition quantified. Expression of various bone-calcifying genes was detected by real-time PCR, and protein levels were quantified by western blotting or enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays. Pyrophosphate was used to investigate the effects of CaP crystals' inhibition. Finally, CaP crystals were separated from uremic serum to determine its specific pro-calcification effects. Uremic serum incubation resulted in progressively increased calcification staining and increased calcium deposition in HASMCs after 4, 8 and 12 days (P vs 0 day <0.001 for all). Compared to cells incubated in control serum, uremic serum significantly induced the mRNA expression of bone morphogenetic factor-2, osteopontin and RUNX2, and increased their protein levels as well (P < 0.05 for all). Inhibition of CaP crystals with pyrophosphate incubation prevented calcium deposition and bone-calcifying gene over-expression increased by uremic serum. CaP crystals, rather than the rest of uremic serum, were responsible for these effects. Uremic serum accelerates arterial calcification by mediating osteogenic differentiation. This effect might be mainly attributed to the CaP crystal content.

  11. A phospholipase Cγ1-activated pathway regulates transcription in human vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Hunter, Irene; Mascall, Keith S; Ramos, Joe W; Nixon, Graeme F

    2011-06-01

    Growth factor-induced repression of smooth muscle (SM) cell marker genes is an integral part of vascular SM (VSM) cell proliferation. This is partly regulated via translocation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2) to the nucleus which activates the transcription factor Elk-1. The mediators involved in ERK1/2 nuclear translocation in VSM cells are unknown. The aim of this study is to examine the mechanisms which regulate growth factor-induced nuclear translocation of ERK1/2 and gene expression in VSM cells. In cultured human VSM cells, phospholipase C (PLC)γ1 expression was required for platelet-derived growth factor (PDGF)-induced ERK1/2 nuclear translocation, Elk-1 phosphorylation, and subsequent repression of SM α-actin gene expression. The mechanisms of a role for PLCγ1 in ERK1/2 nuclear localization were further examined by investigating interacting proteins. The ERK1/2-binding phosphoprotein, protein enriched in astrocytes-15 (PEA-15), was phosphorylated by PDGF and this phosphorylation required activation of PLCγ1. In cells pre-treated with PEA-15 siRNA, ERK1/2 distribution significantly increased in the nucleus and resulted in decreased SM α-actin expression and increased VSM cell proliferation. Overexpression of PEA-15 increased ERK1/2 localization in the cytoplasm. The regulatory role of PEA-15 phosphorylation was assessed. In VSM cells overexpressing a non-phosphorylatable form of PEA-15, PDGF-induced ERK1/2 nuclear localization was inhibited. These results suggest that PEA-15 phosphorylation by PLCγ1 is required for PDGF-induced ERK1/2 nuclear translocation. This represents an important level of phenotypic control by directly affecting Elk-1-dependent transcription and ultimately SM cell marker protein expression in VSM cells.

  12. Experimental evidence and mathematical modeling of thermal effects on human colonic smooth muscle contractility.

    PubMed

    Altomare, A; Gizzi, A; Guarino, M P L; Loppini, A; Cocca, S; Dipaola, M; Alloni, R; Cicala, M; Filippi, S

    2014-07-01

    It has been shown, in animal models, that gastrointestinal tract (GIT) motility is influenced by temperature; nevertheless, the basic mechanism governing thermal GIT smooth muscle responses has not been fully investigated. Studies based on physiologically tuned mathematical models have predicted that thermal inhomogeneity may induce an electrochemical destabilization of peristaltic activity. In the present study, the effect of thermal cooling on human colonic muscle strip (HCMS) contractility was studied. HCMSs were obtained from disease-free margins of resected segments for cancer. After removal of the mucosa and serosa layers, strips were mounted in separate chambers. After 30 min, spontaneous contractions developed, which were measured using force displacement transducers. Temperature was changed every hour (37, 34, and 31°C). The effect of cooling was analyzed on mean contractile activity, oscillation amplitude, frequency, and contraction to ACh (10(-5) M). At 37°C, HCMSs developed a stable phasic contraction (~0.02 Hz) with a significant ACh-elicited mean contractile response (31% and 22% compared with baseline in the circular and longitudinal axis, respectively). At a lower bath temperature, higher mean contractile amplitude was observed, and it increased in the presence of ACh (78% and 43% higher than the basal tone in the circular and longitudinal axis, respectively, at 31°C). A simplified thermochemomechanical model was tuned on experimental data characterizing the stress state coupling the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration to tissue temperature. In conclusion, acute thermal cooling affects colonic muscular function. Further studies are needed to establish the exact mechanisms involved to better understand clinical consequences of hypothermia on intestinal contractile activity.

  13. Keratose Hydrogels Promote Vascular Smooth Muscle Differentiation from C-kit Positive Human Cardiac Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Ledford, Benjamin T; Simmons, Jamelle; Chen, Miao; Fan, Huimin; Barron, Catherine; Liu, Zhongmin; Van Dyke, Mark; He, Jia-Qiang

    2017-03-28

    Stem cell-based therapies have demonstrated great potential for the treatment of cardiac diseases, e.g., myocardial infarction; however, low cell viability, low retention/engraftment, and uncontrollable in vivo differentiation after transplantation are still major limitations, which lead low therapeutic efficiency. Biomaterials provide a promising solution to overcome these issues due to their biocompatibility, biodegradability, low/non-immunogenicity, and low/non-cytotoxicity. The present study aims to investigate the impacts of Keratose (KOS) hydrogel biomaterial on cellular viability, proliferation, and differentiation of c-kit+ human cardiac stem cells (hCSCs). Briefly, hCSCs were cultured on both KOS hydrogel-coated dishes and regular tissue culture dishes (Blank control). Cell viability, stemness, proliferation, cellular morphology, and cardiac lineage differentiation were compared between KOS hydrogel and the Blank control at different time points. We found that KOS hydrogel is effective in maintaining hCSCs without any observable toxic effects, although cell size and proliferation rate appeared smaller on the KOS hydrogel compared to the Blank control. To our surprise, KOS hydrogel significantly promoted vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) differentiation (~72%), while on the Blank control dishes, most of the hCSCs (~78%) became cardiomyocytes. Further, we also observed "endothelial cell tube-like" microstructures formed by differentiated VSMCs only on KOS hydrogel, suggesting a potential capability of the hCSC-derived VSMCs for in vitro angiogenesis. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report to discover the preferred differentiation of hCSCs toward VSMCs on KOS hydrogel. The underlying mechanism remains unknown. This innovative methodology may offer a new approach to generate a robust number of VSMCs simply by culturing hCSCs on KOS hydrogel, and the resulting VSMCs may be used in animal studies and clinical trials in

  14. Soluble guanylate cyclase modulators blunt hyperoxia effects on calcium responses of developing human airway smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Britt, Rodney D; Thompson, Michael A; Kuipers, Ine; Stewart, Alecia; Vogel, Elizabeth R; Thu, James; Martin, Richard J; Pabelick, Christina M; Prakash, Y S

    2015-09-15

    Exposure to moderate hyperoxia in prematurity contributes to subsequent airway dysfunction and increases the risk of developing recurrent wheeze and asthma. The nitric oxide (NO)-soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC)-cyclic GMP (cGMP) axis modulates airway tone by regulating airway smooth muscle (ASM) intracellular Ca(2+) ([Ca(2+)]i) and contractility. However, the effects of hyperoxia on this axis in the context of Ca(2+)/contractility are not known. In developing human ASM, we explored the effects of novel drugs that activate sGC independent of NO on alleviating hyperoxia (50% oxygen)-induced enhancement of Ca(2+) responses to bronchoconstrictor agonists. Treatment with BAY 41-2272 (sGC stimulator) and BAY 60-2770 (sGC activator) increased cGMP levels during exposure to 50% O2. Although 50% O2 did not alter sGCα1 or sGCβ1 expression, BAY 60-2770 did increase sGCβ1 expression. BAY 41-2272 and BAY 60-2770 blunted Ca(2+) responses to histamine in cells exposed to 50% O2. The effects of BAY 41-2272 and BAY 60-2770 were reversed by protein kinase G inhibition. These novel data demonstrate that BAY 41-2272 and BAY 60-2770 stimulate production of cGMP and blunt hyperoxia-induced increases in Ca(2+) responses in developing ASM. Accordingly, sGC stimulators/activators may be a useful therapeutic strategy in improving bronchodilation in preterm infants.

  15. Mechanical stretch is a highly selective regulator of gene expression in human bladder smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Adam, Rosalyn M; Eaton, Samuel H; Estrada, Carlos; Nimgaonkar, Ashish; Shih, Shu-Ching; Smith, Lois E H; Kohane, Isaac S; Bägli, Darius; Freeman, Michael R

    2004-12-15

    Application of mechanical stimuli has been shown to alter gene expression in bladder smooth muscle cells (SMC). To date, only a limited number of "stretch-responsive" genes in this cell type have been reported. We employed oligonucleotide arrays to identify stretch-sensitive genes in primary culture human bladder SMC subjected to repetitive mechanical stimulation for 4 h. Differential gene expression between stretched and nonstretched cells was assessed using Significance Analysis of Microarrays (SAM). Expression of 20 out of 11,731 expressed genes ( approximately 0.17%) was altered >2-fold following stretch, with 19 genes induced and one gene (FGF-9) repressed. Using real-time RT-PCR, we tested independently the responsiveness of 15 genes to stretch and to platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB), another hypertrophic stimulus for bladder SMC. In response to both stimuli, expression of 13 genes increased, 1 gene (FGF-9) decreased, and 1 gene was unchanged. Six transcripts (HB-EGF, BMP-2, COX-2, LIF, PAR-2, and FGF-9) were evaluated using an ex vivo rat model of bladder distension. HB-EGF, BMP-2, COX-2, LIF, and PAR-2 increased with bladder stretch ex vivo, whereas FGF-9 decreased, consistent with expression changes observed in vitro. In silico analysis of microarray data using the FIRED algorithm identified c-jun, AP-1, ATF-2, and neurofibromin-1 (NF-1) as potential transcriptional mediators of stretch signals. Furthermore, the promoters of 9 of 13 stretch-responsive genes contained AP-1 binding sites. These observations identify stretch as a highly selective regulator of gene expression in bladder SMC. Moreover, they suggest that mechanical and growth factor signals converge on common transcriptional regulators that include members of the AP-1 family.

  16. [Effects of arsenic trioxide on human coronary smooth muscle cells: experiment in vitro].

    PubMed

    Luan, Tian-Zhu; Fu, Song-Bin; Zhou, Li-Jun; Li, Wei-Min; Huang, Yong-Lin

    2009-01-13

    To study the apoptotic effects of arsenic trioxide on human coronary smooth muscle cells (HCSMCs). HCSMCs were cultured and randomly divided into 5 groups to be treated by arsenic trioxide of the concentrations 1.0, 2.0, 3.0, 4.0, and 5.0 micromol/L for 48 h. Cell growth curve was drawn by MTT method. DNA electrophoresis was used to observe the apoptosis. Western blotting was conducted to examine the protein expression of Bax, an apoptosis-promoting gene, and Bcl-2, an apoptosis-inhibiting gene. Other HCSMCs were cultured with 4.0 micromol/L arsenic trioxide for 48 h, then transmission electron microscopy was used to observe the ultra-structure and TUNEL was used to detect the percentage of apoptotic cells. HCSMCs not treated with arsenic trioxide were used as control group. Arsenic trioxide of different concentrations inhibited the proliferation of HCSMCs dose and time-dependently. When the concentration of arsenic trioxide was 5.0 micromol/L the number of living cells was (4.41 +/- 0.10) x 10(5)/ml, significantly lower than that of the control group [(30.11 +/- 0.93) x 10(5)/ml, P < 0.05]. Apoptosis bodies were observed under the transmission electron microscope. DNA electrophoresis showed hazy ladders, especially when the concentrations were 3.0 - 4.0 micromol/L. When the concentration was 5.0 micromol/L the number of necrotic cells increased remarkably and apoptosis became less significant. TUNEL showed that the apoptotic cells increased from 16.0% +/- 3.1% to 38.7% +/- 2.7% (P < 0.05). MTT test showed that arsenic trioxide decreased the absorbance of HCSMCs dose and time-dependently. Western blotting showed that the Bcl-2 expression was decreased and the expression of Bax increased after treatment of arsenic trioxide. Arsenic trioxide exerts an apoptotic effect on HCSMCs.

  17. Concerted upregulation of CLP36 and smooth muscle actin protein expression in human endometrium during decidualization.

    PubMed

    Miehe, Ulrich; Neumaier-Wagner, Peruka; Kadyrov, Mamed; Goyal, Pankaj; Alfer, Joachim; Rath, Werner; Huppertz, Berthold

    2005-01-01

    The human endometrium prepares for implantation of the blastocyst by reorganization of its whole cellular network. Endometrial stroma cells change their phenotype starting around the 23rd day of the menstrual cycle. These predecidual stroma cells first appear next to spiral arteries, and after implantation these cells further differentiate into decidual stroma cells. The phenotypical changes in these cells during decidualization are characterized by distinct changes in the actin filaments and filament-related proteins such as alpha-actinin. The carboxy-terminal LIM domain protein with a molecular weight of 36 kDa (CLP36) is a cytoskeletal component that has been shown to associate with contractile actin filaments and to bind to alpha-actinin supporting a role for CLP36 in cytoskeletal reorganization and signal transduction by binding to signaling proteins. The expression patterns of CLP36, alpha-actinin and actin were studied in endometrial stroma cells from different stages of the menstrual cycle and in decidual stroma cells from the 6th week of gestation until the end of pregnancy. During the menstrual cycle, CLP36 is only expressed in the luminal and glandular epithelium but not in endometrial stroma cells. During decidualization and throughout pregnancy, a parallel upregulation of CLP36 and smooth muscle actin, an early marker of decidualization in the baboon, was observed in endometrial decidual cells. Since both proteins maintain a high expression level throughout pregnancy, a role of both proteins is suggested in the stabilization of the cytoskeleton of these cells that come into close contact with invading trophoblast cells.

  18. Immune receptors and adhesion molecules in human pulmonary leptospirosis.

    PubMed

    Del Carlo Bernardi, Fabiola; Ctenas, Bruno; da Silva, Luiz Fernando Ferraz; Nicodemo, Antonio Carlos; Saldiva, Paulo Hilário Nascimento; Dolhnikoff, Marisa; Mauad, Thais

    2012-10-01

    Pulmonary involvement in leptospirosis has been increasingly reported in the last 20 years, being related to the severity and mortality of the disease. The pathogenesis of pulmonary hemorrhage in leptospirosis is not understood. Lung endothelial cells have been proposed as targets in the pathogenesis of lung involvement in leptospirosis through the activation of Toll-like receptor 2 or the complement system, which stimulates the release of cytokines that lead to the activation of adhesion molecules. The aim of this study was to investigate the involvement of immune pathways and of the intercellular and vascular cell adhesion molecules (intercellular adhesion molecule and vascular cell adhesion molecule, respectively) in the lungs of patients with pulmonary involvement of leptospirosis. We studied the lungs of 18 patients who died of leptospirosis and compared them with 2 groups of controls: normal and noninfectious hemorrhagic lungs. Using immunohistochemistry and image analysis, we quantified the expression of the C3a anaphylatoxin receptor, intercellular adhesion molecule, vascular cell adhesion molecule, and Toll-like receptor 2 in small pulmonary vessels and in the alveolar septa. There was an increased expression of intercellular adhesion molecule (P < .03) and C3a anaphylatoxin receptor (P < .008) in alveolar septa in the leptospirosis group compared with the normal and hemorrhagic controls. In the vessels of the leptospirosis group, there was an increased expression of intercellular adhesion molecule (P = .004), vascular cell adhesion molecule (P = .030), and Toll-like receptor 2 (P = .042) compared with the normal group. Vascular cell adhesion molecule expression in vessels was higher in the leptospirosis group compared with the hemorrhagic group (P = .015). Our results indicate that immune receptors and adhesion molecules participate in the phenomena leading to pulmonary hemorrhage in leptospirosis. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Decreased vascular smooth muscle cell density in medial degeneration of human abdominal aortic aneurysms.

    PubMed Central

    López-Candales, A.; Holmes, D. R.; Liao, S.; Scott, M. J.; Wickline, S. A.; Thompson, R. W.

    1997-01-01

    Abdominal aortic aneurysms (AAAs) are characterized by structural deterioration of the aortic wall leading to progressive aortic dilatation and eventual rupture. The histopathological changes in AAAs are particularly evident within the elastic media, which is normally dominated by vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs). To determine whether a decrease in vascular SMCs contributes to medial degeneration, we measured SMC density in 21 normal and pathological human abdominal aortic tissue specimens using immunohistochemistry for alpha-SMC actin and direct cell counts (medial SMCs per high-power field (HPF)). Medial SMC density was not significantly different between normal aorta (n = 5; 199.5 +/- 14.9 SMCs/HPF) and atherosclerotic occlusive disease (n = 6; 176.4 +/- 13.9 SMCs/HPF), but it was reduced by 74% in AAA (n = 10; 50.9 +/- 6.1 SMCs/HPF; P < 0.01 versus normal aorta). Light and electron microscopy revealed no evidence of overt cellular necrosis, but SMCs in AAAs exhibited ultrastructural changes consistent with apoptosis. Using in situ end-labeling (ISEL) of fragmented DNA to detect apoptotic cells, up to 30% of aortic wall cells were ISEL positive in AAAs. By double-labeling techniques, many of these cells were alpha-actin-positive SMCs distributed throughout the degenerative media. In contrast, ISEL-positive cells were observed only within the intimal plaque in atherosclerotic occlusive disease. The amount of p53 protein detected by immunoblotting was increased nearly fourfold in AAA compared with normal aorta and atherosclerotic occlusive disease (P < 0.01), and immunoreactive p53 was localized to lymphocytes and residual SMCs in the aneurysm wall. Using reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction assays a substantial amount of p53 mRNA expression was observed in AAAs. These results demonstrate that medial SMC density is significantly decreased in human AAA tissues associated with evidence of SMC apoptosis and increased production of p53, a potential

  20. Therapeutic Targeting of CC Ligand 21 or CC Chemokine Receptor 7 Abrogates Pulmonary Fibrosis Induced by the Adoptive Transfer of Human Pulmonary Fibroblasts to Immunodeficient Mice

    PubMed Central

    Pierce, Elizabeth M.; Carpenter, Kristin; Jakubzick, Claudia; Kunkel, Steven L.; Flaherty, Kevin R.; Martinez, Fernando J.; Hogaboam, Cory M.

    2007-01-01

    Idiopathic interstitial pneumonias (IIPs) are a collection of pulmonary fibrotic diseases of unknown etiopathogenesis. CC chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7) is expressed in IIP biopsies and primary fibroblast lines, but its role in pulmonary fibrosis was not previously examined. To study the in vivo role of CCR7 in a novel model of pulmonary fibrosis, 1.0 × 106 primary fibroblasts grown from idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis/usual interstitial pneumonia, nonspecific interstitial pneumonia, or histologically normal biopsies were injected intravenously into C.B-17 severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID)/beige (bg) mice. At days 35 and 63 after idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis/usual interstitial pneumonia fibroblast injection, patchy interstitial fibrosis and increased hydroxyproline were present in the lungs of immunodeficient mice. Adoptively transferred nonspecific interstitial pneumonia fibroblasts caused a more diffuse interstitial fibrosis and increased hydroxyproline levels at both times, but injected normal human fibroblasts did not induce interstitial remodeling changes in C.B-17SCID/bg mice. Systemic therapeutic immunoneutralization of either human CCR7 or CC ligand 21, its ligand, significantly attenuated the pulmonary fibrosis in groups of C.B-17SCID/bg mice that received either type of IIP fibroblasts. Thus, the present study demonstrates that pulmonary fibrosis is initiated by the intravenous introduction of primary human fibroblast lines into immunodeficient mice, and this fibrotic response is dependent on the interaction between CC ligand 21 and CCR7. PMID:17392156

  1. Urotensin II contributes to collagen synthesis and up-regulates Egr-1 expression in cultured pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells through the ERK1/2 pathway

    SciTech Connect

    Li, Wei; Cai, Zhifeng; Liu, Mengmeng; Zhao, Cuifen; Li, Dong; Lv, Chenguang; Wang, Yuping; Xu, Tengfei

    2015-11-27

    Aim: The objective of this study was to investigate the effects of urotensin II (UII) treatment on the proliferation and collagen synthesis of cultured rat pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) and to explore whether these effects are mediated by mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) signaling pathways and early growth response 1 (Egr-1). Methods: The proliferation of cultured PASMCs stimulated with different doses of UII was detected by BrdU incorporation. The mRNA expression levels of procollagen I (procol I), procollagen III (procol III), extracellular regulated protein kinase 1/2 (ERK1/2), stress-stimulated protein kinase (Sapk), p38 MAPK (p38), and Egr-1 mRNA in cultured PASMCs after treatment with UII, the UII-specific antagonist urantide, and the ERK1/2 inhibitor PD98059 were detected by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR), and the protein expression levels of procol I, procol III, phosphorylated (p)-ERK1/2, p-Sapk, p-p38, and Egr-1 were detected by Western blotting. Results: Treatment with UII increased the proliferation of cultured PASMCs in a dose-dependent manner (P < 0.05). However, treatment with urantide and PD98059 inhibited the promoting effect of UII on PASMC proliferation (P < 0.05). Real-time PCR analysis showed that UII up-regulated the expression of procol I, procol III, ERK1/2, Sapk, and Egr-1 mRNA (P < 0.05), but not p38 mRNA. However, the up-regulating effect of UII was inhibited by PD98059 and urantide. Western blotting analysis showed that UII increased the synthesis of collagen I, collagen III, p-ERK1/2, p-Sapk, and Egr-1, and these effects also were inhibited by PD98059 and urantide (P < 0.05). Conclusions: Egr-1 participates in the UII-mediated proliferation and collagen synthesis of cultured rat PASMCs via activation of the ERK1/2 signaling pathway.

  2. [Chronic hypoxia increases intracellular Ca(2+) concentration and augments proliferation by enhancing store-operated Ca(2+) entry in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells].

    PubMed

    Peng, G Y; Xu, J; Liu, R M; Hong, W; He, X M; Lin, Y E

    2016-09-01

    To determine whether store-operated Ca(2+) entry (SOCE) is involved in chronic hypoxia-induced alteration of intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+) ]i) and proliferation in pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells (PASMC). Rat PASMCs were cultured and treated in normoxia (21%O2) or hypoxia (4%O2) condition. The proliferation of PASMC was detected by cell counting kit-8 (CCK-8) assay. [Ca(2+) ]i, SOCE and the effects of store-operated Ca(2+) channel (SOCC) inhibitors, SKF96365 and NiCl2, on SOCE in hypoxic PASMCs were tested by InCyte [Ca(2+) ]i measurement system. Hypoxia for 24-60 h augmented PASMC proliferation (1.12±0.09 vs 0.71±0.05, P<0.05) and [Ca(2+) ]i [(214.8 ± 20.4) nmol/L vs (115.2±13.2) nmol/L, P<0.05] in a time-dependent manner with the maximum effect at 60 h. Perfusion of Ca(2+) -free Krebs solution containing nifedipine (5 μmol/L), cyclopiazonic acid (CPA, 10 μmol/L) in PASMCs caused a small transient increase of [Ca(2+) ]i with peak [Ca(2+) ]i (113.3±49.3) nmol/L.Chronic hypoxia (4% O2, 60 h) enhanced [Ca(2+) ]i level with peak value of (193.2±22.7) nmol/L (P<0.05) in PASMC.After restoration of extracellular Ca(2+) , CPA caused marked increase of [Ca(2+) ]i with peak value of (328.0 ±56.7) nmol/L.Chronic hypoxia strengthened CPA-induced increase of [Ca(2+) ]i with peak value of (526.0±33.7) nmol/L (P<0.05) in PASMCs.Either SKF96365 50 μmol/L or NiCl2 500 μmol/L distinctly attenuated CPA-induced enhancement of [Ca(2+) ]i, the peak value of which dropped from (526.0±33.7) nmol/L to (170.4±26.4) nmol/L (P<0.05) or (177.4±45.9) nmol/L (P<0.05) respectively. Chronic hypoxia boosts the release of Ca(2+) from sarcoplasmic reticulum and promotes the activity of SOCC and SOCE, leading to [Ca(2+) ]i elevation and proliferation of rat PASMCs.

  3. Human motion perception and smooth eye movements show similar directional biases for elongated apertures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beutter, B. R.; Stone, L. S.

    1998-01-01

    Although numerous studies have examined the relationship between smooth-pursuit eye movements and motion perception, it remains unresolved whether a common motion-processing system subserves both perception and pursuit. To address this question, we simultaneously recorded perceptual direction judgments and the concomitant smooth eye-movement response to a plaid stimulus that we have previously shown generates systematic perceptual errors. We measured the perceptual direction biases psychophysically and the smooth eye-movement direction biases using two methods (standard averaging and oculometric analysis). We found that the perceptual and oculomotor biases were nearly identical, suggesting that pursuit and perception share a critical motion processing stage, perhaps in area MT or MST of extrastriate visual cortex.

  4. Human motion perception and smooth eye movements show similar directional biases for elongated apertures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beutter, B. R.; Stone, L. S.

    1998-01-01

    Although numerous studies have examined the relationship between smooth-pursuit eye movements and motion perception, it remains unresolved whether a common motion-processing system subserves both perception and pursuit. To address this question, we simultaneously recorded perceptual direction judgments and the concomitant smooth eye-movement response to a plaid stimulus that we have previously shown generates systematic perceptual errors. We measured the perceptual direction biases psychophysically and the smooth eye-movement direction biases using two methods (standard averaging and oculometric analysis). We found that the perceptual and oculomotor biases were nearly identical, suggesting that pursuit and perception share a critical motion processing stage, perhaps in area MT or MST of extrastriate visual cortex.

  5. Human Motion Perception and Smooth Eye Movements Show Similar Directional Biases for Elongated Apertures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beutter, Brent R.; Stone, Leland S.

    1997-01-01

    Although numerous studies have examined the relationship between smooth-pursuit eye movements and motion perception, it remains unresolved whether a common motion-processing system subserves both perception and pursuit. To address this question, we simultaneously recorded perceptual direction judgments and the concomitant smooth eye movement response to a plaid stimulus that we have previously shown generates systematic perceptual errors. We measured the perceptual direction biases psychophysically and the smooth eye-movement direction biases using two methods (standard averaging and oculometric analysis). We found that the perceptual and oculomotor biases were nearly identical suggesting that pursuit and perception share a critical motion processing stage, perhaps in area MT or MST of extrastriate visual cortex.

  6. Human Motion Perception and Smooth Eye Movements Show Similar Directional Biases for Elongated Apertures

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Beutter, Brent R.; Stone, Leland S.

    1997-01-01

    Although numerous studies have examined the relationship between smooth-pursuit eye movements and motion perception, it remains unresolved whether a common motion-processing system subserves both perception and pursuit. To address this question, we simultaneously recorded perceptual direction judgments and the concomitant smooth eye movement response to a plaid stimulus that we have previously shown generates systematic perceptual errors. We measured the perceptual direction biases psychophysically and the smooth eye-movement direction biases using two methods (standard averaging and oculometric analysis). We found that the perceptual and oculomotor biases were nearly identical suggesting that pursuit and perception share a critical motion processing stage, perhaps in area MT or MST of extrastriate visual cortex.

  7. Active macrophage-associated TGF-beta co-localizes with type I procollagen gene expression in atherosclerotic human pulmonary arteries.

    PubMed Central

    Bahadori, L.; Milder, J.; Gold, L.; Botney, M.

    1995-01-01

    Vascular remodeling in adult atherosclerotic pulmonary arteries is characterized by discrete areas of neointimal smooth muscle cell extracellular matrix gene expression in close proximity to non-foamy macrophages, suggesting regulation by local macrophage-associated factors. The purpose of these studies was to begin addressing the role of putative macrophage-associated factors such as transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta), by determining the spatial relationship between TGF-beta and neointimal matrix gene expression in human atherosclerotic pulmonary arteries. For example, the participation of TGF-beta in vascular remodeling could be inferred by its colocalization with non-foamy macrophages in areas of active matrix synthesis. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry demonstrated focal neointimal procollagen gene expression in close association with non-foamy but not foamy macrophages. Immunohistochemistry with isoform-specific anti-TGF-beta antibodies demonstrated all three isoforms of TGF-beta associated with non-foamy macrophages, but foamy macrophages were not immunoreactive. Neointimal and medial smooth muscle cells stained lightly. In contrast, intense TGF-beta immunoreactivity was also associated with medial smooth muscle cells in normal nonremodeling vessels. Immunohistochemistry with antibodies specific for latent TGF-beta was similar to immunohistochemistry for mature TGF-beta in both remodeling and nonremodeling vessels. Finally, using an antibody specific for active TGF-beta 1, immunoreactivity was only seen in non-foamy neointimal macrophages but not in foamy macrophages or medial smooth muscle cells from hypertensive or normal vessels. These observations suggest non-foamy macrophages may participate in modulating matrix gene expression in atherosclerotic remodeling via a TGF-beta-dependent mechanism. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 4 Figure 5 PMID:7747808

  8. Differential effects of blinks on horizontal saccade and smooth pursuit initiation in humans.

    PubMed

    Rambold, Holger; El Baz, Ieman; Helmchen, Christoph

    2004-06-01

    Blinks executed during eye movements affect kinetic eye movement parameters, e.g., peak velocity of saccades is decreased, their duration is increased, but their amplitude is not altered. This effect is mainly explained by the decreased activity of premotor neurons in the brainstem: omni-pause neurons (OPN) in the nucleus raphe interpositus. Previous studies examined the immediate effect of blinks directly on eye movements but not their effect when they are elicited several hundred milliseconds before the eye movements. In order to address this question we tested blinks elicited before the target onset of saccades and pursuit and compared the results to the gap effect: if a fixation light is extinguished for several hundred milliseconds, the reaction time (latency) for subsequent saccades or smooth pursuit eye movements is decreased. Monocular eye and lid movements were recorded in nine healthy subjects using the scleral search-coil system. Laser stimuli were front-projected onto a tangent screen in front of the subjects. Horizontal step-ramp smooth pursuit of 20 deg/s was elicited in one session, or 5 deg horizontal visually guided saccades in another experimental session. In one-third of the trials (smooth pursuit or saccades) the fixation light was extinguished for 200 ms before stimulus onset (gap condition), and in another third of the trials reflexive blinks were elicited by a short airpuff before the stimulus onset (blink condition). The last third of the trials served as controls (control condition). Stimulus direction and the three conditions were randomized for saccades and smooth pursuit separately. The latency of the step-ramp smooth pursuit in the blink condition was found to be decreased by 10 ms, which was less than in the gap condition (38 ms). However, the initial acceleration and steady-state velocity of smooth pursuit did not differ in the three conditions. In contrast, the latency of the saccades in the gap condition was decreased by 39 ms, but

  9. The induction of nitric oxide-mediated relaxation of human isolated pulmonary arteries by PACAP

    PubMed Central

    Cardell, Lars Olaf; Hjert, Ola; Uddman, Rolf

    1997-01-01

    The effects of pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) and vasoactive intestinal peptide (VIP) were analysed in human isolated circular segments of pulmonary arteries. Guinea-pig pulmonary arteries were used for comparison. The responses obtained were analysed in relation to the vascular endothelium and the nitric oxide (NO) synthase inhibitor NG-monomethyl L-arginine (L-NMMA).PACAP and VIP induced concentration-dependent relaxations of precontracted pulmonary arteries. The maximal dilator response (Imax,%) and the potency (pEC50 value) were the same for both peptides, and there were no differences in the effects obtained on human and guinea-pig segments. PACAP and VIP were both more potent that acetylcholine (ACh).Removal of the vascular endothelium abolished the PACAP induced dilator response in pulmonary arteries from both species. The VIP induced dilatation was unaffected, whereas the response to ACh was abolished. L-NMMA given before PACAP inhibited the dilatation. Furthermore, L-NMMA also reversed the dilatation already induced by PACAP and excess concentrations of L-arginine restored the dilator response of the L-NMMA treated arteries.PACAP is a potent dilator of human pulmonary arteries. Although the dilator effect seems to be similar in amplitude to the one induced by VIP, the present results suggest differences in the underlying mechanisms of action (endothelium-dependency) between the two peptides. PMID:9134222

  10. The purinergic component of human bladder smooth muscle cells’ proliferation and contraction under physiological stretch

    SciTech Connect

    Wazir, Romel; Luo, De-Yi; Tian, Ye; Yue, Xuan; Li, Hong; Wang, Kun-Jie

    2013-07-26

    Highlights: •Stretch induces proliferation and contraction. •Optimum applied stretch in vitro is 5% and 10% equibiaxial stretching respectively. •Expression of P2X1 and P2X2 is upregulated after application of stretch. •P2X2 is possibly more susceptible to stretch related changes. •Purinoceptors functioning may explain conditions with atropine resistance. -- Abstract: Objective: To investigate whether cyclic stretch induces proliferation and contraction of human smooth muscle cells (HBSMCs), mediated by P2X purinoceptor 1 and 2 and the signal transduction mechanisms of this process. Methods: HBSMCs were seeded on silicone membrane and stretched under varying parameters; (equibiaxial elongation: 2.5%, 5%, 10%, 15%, 20%, 25%), (Frequency: 0.05 Hz, 0.1 Hz, 0.2 Hz, 0.5 Hz, 1 Hz). 5-Bromo-2-deoxyuridine assay was employed for proliferative studies. Contractility of the cells was determined using collagen gel contraction assay. After optimal physiological stretch was established; P2X1 and P2X2 were analyzed by real time polymerase chain reaction and Western Blot. Specificity of purinoceptors was maintained by employing specific inhibitors; (NF023 for P2X1, and A317491for P2X2), in some experiments. Results: Optimum proliferation and contractility were observed at 5% and 10% equibiaxial stretching respectively, applied at a frequency of 0.1 Hz; At 5% stretch, proliferation increased from 0.837 ± 0.026 (control) to 1.462 ± 0.023%, p < 0.05. Mean contraction at 10% stretching increased from 31.7 ± 2.3%, (control) to 78.28 ±1.45%, p < 0.05. Expression of P2X1 and P2X2 was upregulated after application of stretch. Inhibition had effects on proliferation (1.232 ± 0.051, p < 0.05 NF023) and (1.302 ± 0.021, p < 0.05 A314791) while contractility was markedly reduced (68.24 ± 2.31, p < 0.05 NF023) and (73.2 ± 2.87, p < 0.05 A314791). These findings shows that mechanical stretch can promote magnitude-dependent proliferative and contractile modulation of HBSMCs in

  11. Free Fatty Acid Palmitate Impairs the Vitality and Function of Cultured Human Bladder Smooth Muscle Cells

    PubMed Central

    Oberbach, Andreas; Schlichting, Nadine; Heinrich, Marco; Till, Holger; Stolzenburg, Jens-Uwe; Neuhaus, Jochen

    2012-01-01

    Background Incidence of urinary tract infections is elevated in patients with diabetes mellitus. Those patients show increased levels of the saturated free fatty acid palmitate. As recently shown metabolic alterations induced by palmitate include production and secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokine interleukine-6 (IL-6) in cultured human bladder smooth muscle cells (hBSMC). Here we studied the influence of palmitate on vital cell properties, for example, regulation of cell proliferation, mitochondrial enzyme activity and antioxidant capacity in hBSMC, and analyzed the involvement of major cytokine signaling pathways. Methodology/Principal Findings HBSMC cultures were set up from bladder tissue of patients undergoing cystectomy and stimulated with palmitate. We analyzed cell proliferation, mitochondrial enzyme activity, and antioxidant capacity by ELISA and confocal immunofluorescence. In signal transduction inhibition experiments we evaluated the involvement of NF-κB, JAK/STAT, MEK1, PI3K, and JNK in major cytokine signaling pathway regulation. We found: (i) palmitate decreased cell proliferation, increased mitochondrial enzyme activity and antioxidant capacity; (ii) direct inhibition of cytokine receptor by AG490 even more strongly suppressed cell proliferation in palmitate-stimulated cells, while counteracting palmitate-induced increase of antioxidant capacity; (iii) in contrast knockdown of the STAT3 inhibitor SOCS3 increased cell proliferation and antioxidant capacity; (iv) further downstream JAK/STAT3 signaling cascade the inhibition of PI3K or JNK enhanced palmitate induced suppression of cell proliferation; (v) increase of mitochondrial enzyme activity by palmitate was enhanced by inhibition of PI3K but counteracted by inhibition of MEK1. Conclusions/Significance Saturated free fatty acids (e.g., palmitate) cause massive alterations in vital cell functions of cultured hBSMC involving distinct major cytokine signaling pathways. Thereby, certain

  12. Integration of proteomic and transcriptomic profiles identifies a novel PDGF-MYC network in human smooth muscle cells

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Platelet-derived growth factor-BB (PDGF-BB) has been implicated in the proliferation, migration and synthetic activities of smooth muscle cells that characterize physiologic and pathologic tissue remodeling in hollow organs. However, neither the molecular basis of PDGFR-regulated signaling webs, nor the extent to which specific components within these networks could be exploited for therapeutic benefit has been fully elucidated. Results Expression profiling and quantitative proteomics analysis of PDGF-treated primary human bladder smooth muscle cells identified 1,695 genes and 241 proteins as differentially expressed versus non-treated cells. Analysis of gene expression data revealed MYC, JUN, EGR1, MYB, RUNX1, as the transcription factors most significantly networked with up-regulated genes. Forty targets were significantly altered at both the mRNA and protein levels. Proliferation, migration and angiogenesis were the biological processes most significantly associated with this signature, and MYC was the most highly networked master regulator. Alterations in master regulators and gene targets were validated in PDGF-stimulated smooth muscle cells in vitro and in a model of bladder injury in vivo. Pharmacologic inhibition of MYC and JUN confirmed their role in SMC proliferation and migration. Network analysis identified the diaphanous-related formin 3 as a novel PDGF target regulated by MYC and JUN, which was necessary for PDGF-stimulated lamellipodium formation. Conclusions These findings provide the first systems-level analysis of the PDGF-regulated transcriptome and proteome in normal smooth muscle cells. The analyses revealed an extensive cohort of PDGF-dependent biological processes and connected key transcriptional effectors to their regulation, significantly expanding current knowledge of PDGF-stimulated signaling cascades. These observations also implicate MYC as a novel target for pharmacological intervention in fibroproliferative expansion of

  13. Oxytocin receptors expressed and coupled to Ca2+ signalling in a human vascular smooth muscle cell line.

    PubMed

    Yazawa, H; Hirasawa, A; Horie, K; Saita, Y; Iida, E; Honda, K; Tsujimoto, G

    1996-03-01

    1. In a human vascular smooth muscle cell line (HVSMC), binding experiments with [3H]-arginine8-vasopressin (AVP) have shown the existence of a homogeneous population of binding sites with affinity (Kd value) of 0.65 nM and a maximum number of binding sites (Bmax) of 122 fmol mg-1 protein. 2. Nonlabelled compounds compete for [3H]-AVP binding in the HVSMC membrane with an order of potency of oxytocin > lyspressin > or = AVP > Thr4, Gly7-oxytocin > (beta-mercapto-beta-beta-cyclopentamethylenepropionyl-O-Me Tyr2, Arg8) vasopressin > desmopressin > OPC21268 > OPC31260. This order was markedly different from that observed in rat vascular smooth muscle cells (A10), a well-established V1A receptor system. 3. In HVSMC both oxytocin and AVP increased inositol 1,4,5-trisphosphate (IP3) production and [Ca2+]i response, but the efficacy of the responses was greater for oxytocin than AVP. 4. Reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assay detected only oxytocin receptor but not V1A or V2 receptors in HVSMC, whereas only V1A receptors were found in A10 cells. 5. In conclusion, in HVSMC only oxytocin receptors are expressed among the vasopressin receptor family, and they coupled to phosphatidyl inositol (PI) turnover/Ca2+ signalling. This unexpected observation should provide new insight into the functional role of the oxytocin receptor in a human vascular smooth muscle cell line.

  14. H2 Receptor-Mediated Relaxation of Circular Smooth Muscle in Human Gastric Corpus: the Role of Nitric Oxide (NO).

    PubMed

    Lee, Sang Eok; Kim, Dae Hoon; Kim, Young Chul; Han, Joung-Ho; Choi, Woong; Kim, Chan Hyung; Jeong, Hye Won; Park, Seon-Mee; Yun, Sei Jin; Choi, Song-Yi; Sung, Rohyun; Kim, Young Ho; Yoo, Ra Young; Sun, Park Hee; Kim, Heon; Song, Young-Jin; Xu, Wen-Xie; Yun, Hyo-Yung; Lee, Sang Jin

    2014-10-01

    This study was designed to examine the effects of histamine on gastric motility and its specific receptor in the circular smooth muscle of the human gastric corpus. Histamine mainly produced tonic relaxation in a concentration-dependent and reversible manner, although histamine enhanced contractility in a minor portion of tissues tested. Histamine-induced tonic relaxation was nerve-insensitive because pretreatment with nerve blockers cocktail (NBC) did not inhibit relaxation. Additionally, K(+) channel blockers, such as tetraethylammonium (TEA), apamin (APA), and glibenclamide (Glib), had no effect. However, N(G)-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester (L-NAME) and 1H-(1,2,4)oxadiazolo (4,3-A) quinoxalin-1-one (ODQ), an inhibitor of soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC), did inhibit histamine-induced tonic relaxation. In particular, histamine-induced tonic relaxation was converted to tonic contraction by pretreatment with L-NAME. Ranitidine, the H2 receptor blocker, inhibited histamine-induced tonic relaxation. These findings suggest that histamine produced relaxation in circular smooth muscle of human gastric smooth muscle through H2 receptor and NO/sGC pathways.

  15. Dextromethorphan mediated bitter taste receptor activation in the pulmonary circuit causes vasoconstriction.

    PubMed

    Upadhyaya, Jasbir D; Singh, Nisha; Sikarwar, Anurag S; Chakraborty, Raja; Pydi, Sai P; Bhullar, Rajinder P; Dakshinamurti, Shyamala; Chelikani, Prashen

    2014-01-01

    Activation of bitter taste receptors (T2Rs) in human airway smooth muscle cells leads to muscle relaxation and bronchodilation. This finding led to our hypothesis that T2Rs are expressed in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells and might be involved in regulating the vascular tone. RT-PCR was performed to reveal the expression of T2Rs in human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. Of the 25 T2Rs, 21 were expressed in these cells. Functional characterization was done by calcium imaging after stimulating the cells with different bitter agonists. Increased calcium responses were observed with most of the agonists, the largest increase seen for dextromethorphan. Previously in site-directed mutational studies, we have characterized the response of T2R1 to dextromethorphan, therefore, T2R1 was selected for further analysis in this study. Knockdown with T2R1 specific shRNA decreased mRNA levels, protein levels and dextromethorphan-induced calcium responses in pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells by up to 50%. To analyze if T2Rs are involved in regulating the pulmonary vascular tone, ex vivo studies using pulmonary arterial and airway rings were pursued. Myographic studies using porcine pulmonary arterial and airway rings showed that stimulation with dextromethorphan led to contraction of the pulmonary arterial and relaxation of the airway rings. This study shows that dextromethorphan, acting through T2R1, causes vasoconstrictor responses in the pulmonary circuit and relaxation in the airways.

  16. Characterization of the EP receptor types that mediate longitudinal smooth muscle contraction of human colon, mouse colon and mouse ileum.

    PubMed

    Fairbrother, S E; Smith, J E; Borman, R A; Cox, H M

    2011-08-01

    Prostaglandin E(2) (PGE(2) ) is an inflammatory mediator implicated in several gastrointestinal pathologies that affect normal intestinal transit. The aim was to establish the contribution of the four EP receptor types (EP(1-4) ), in human colon, that mediate PGE(2) -induced longitudinal smooth muscle contraction. Changes in isometric muscle tension of human colon, mouse colon and mouse ileum were measured in organ baths in response to receptor-specific agonists and antagonists. In addition, lidocaine was used to block neurogenic activity to investigate whether EP receptors were pre- or post-junctional. PGE(2) contracted longitudinal muscle from human and mouse colon and mouse ileum. These contractions were inhibited by the EP(1) receptor antagonist, EP(1) A in human colon, whereas a combination of EP(1) A and the EP(3) antagonist, L798106 inhibited agonist responses in both mouse preparations. The EP(3) agonist, sulprostone also increased muscle tension in both mouse tissues, and these responses were inhibited by lidocaine in the colon but not in the ileum. Although PGE(2) consistently contracted all three muscle preparations, butaprost decreased tension by activating smooth muscle EP(2) receptors in both colonic tissues. Alternatively, in mouse ileum, butaprost responses were lidocaine-sensitive, suggesting that it was activating prejunctional EP(2) receptors on inhibitory motor neurons. Conversely, EP(4) receptors were not functional in all the intestinal muscle preparations tested. PGE(2) -induced contraction of longitudinal smooth muscle is mediated by EP(1) receptors in human colon and by a combination of EP(1) and EP(3) receptors in mouse intestine, whereas EP(2) receptors modulate relaxation in all three preparations. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Basally activated nonselective cation currents regulate the resting membrane potential in human and monkey colonic smooth muscle

    PubMed Central

    Dwyer, Laura; Rhee, Poong-Lyul; Lowe, Vanessa; Zheng, Haifeng; Peri, Lauren; Ro, Seungil; Sanders, Kenton M.

    2011-01-01

    Resting membrane potential (RMP) plays an important role in determining the basal excitability of gastrointestinal smooth muscle. The RMP in colonic muscles is significantly less negative than the equilibrium potential of K+, suggesting that it is regulated not only by K+ conductances but by inward conductances such as Na+ and/or Ca2+. We investigated the contribution of nonselective cation channels (NSCC) to the RMP in human and monkey colonic smooth muscle cells (SMC) using voltage- and current-clamp techniques. Qualitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction was performed to examine potential molecular candidates for these channels among the transient receptor potential (TRP) channel superfamily. Spontaneous transient inward currents and holding currents were recorded in human and monkey SMC. Replacement of extracellular Na+ with equimolar tetraethylammonium or Ca2+ with Mn2+ inhibited basally activated nonselective cation currents. Trivalent cations inhibited these channels. Under current clamp, replacement of extracellular Na+ with N-methyl-d-glucamine or addition of trivalent cations caused hyperpolarization. Three unitary conductances of NSCC were observed in human and monkey colonic SMC. Molecular candidates for basally active NSCC were TRPC1, C3, C4, C7, M2, M4, M6, M7, V1, and V2 in human and monkey SMC. Comparison of the biophysical properties of these TRP channels with basally active NSCC (bINSCC) suggests that TRPM4 and specific TRPC heteromultimer combinations may underlie the three single-channel conductances of bINSCC. In conclusion, these findings suggest that basally activated NSCC contribute to the RMP in human and monkey colonic SMC and therefore may play an important role in determining basal excitability of colonic smooth muscle. PMID:21566016

  18. CD16⁺ monocytes with smooth muscle cell characteristics are reduced in human renal chronic transplant dysfunction.

    PubMed

    Boersema, M; van den Born, J C; van Ark, J; Harms, G; Seelen, M A; van Dijk, M C R F; van Goor, H; Navis, G J; Popa, E R; Hillebrands, J L

    2015-05-01

    In chronic transplant dysfunction (CTD), persistent (allo)immune-mediated inflammation eventually leads to tissue remodeling including neointima formation in intragraft arteries. We previously showed that recipient-derived neointimal α-SMA(+) smooth muscle-like cells are present in human renal allografts with CTD. Human PBMC contain myeloid cells capable of differentiating into α-SMA(+) cells in vitro; the phenotype of the ancestral subset is as yet unknown. This study aimed to investigate whether monocyte subsets contain cells with smooth muscle-like cell differentiation capacity and whether CTD in renal transplant recipients is associated with a shift in these monocyte subsets. To accomplish this goal, monocyte subsets from healthy controls were sorted based on CD14 and CD16 expression to investigate gene expression levels of mesenchymal markers α-SMA and SM22α. CD14(+)/CD16(++) monocytes displayed increased α-SMA and SM22α mRNA expression compared with CD14(++)/CD16(-) monocytes, suggesting increased differentiation potential toward smooth muscle-like cells. Flow cytometry revealed that in non-CTD transplant recipients the percentage of CD14(+)/CD16(++) monocytes was reduced, with an even further reduction in patients with CTD. To determine a potential correlation between CD14(+)/CD16(++) monocytes and α-SMA(+) cell outgrowth potential in vitro, PBMC of healthy controls and transplant recipients with and without CTD were cultured under fibrotic culture conditions, and indeed a significant correlation (p=0.0002, r=0.62) was observed. Finally, double staining for α-SMA and CD16 revealed presence of α-SMA(+)CD16(+) cells in kidney explants from CTD patients, albeit at very low numbers. Our data represent evidence that, compared to CD14(++)CD16(-) monocytes, CD14(+)CD16(++) monocytes have an increased expression of smooth muscle cell-associated genes. This monocyte subpopulation is reduced in renal transplant patients with CTD, possibly due to selective

  19. Phosphodiesterase 5 inhibitors augment UT-15C-stimulated ATP release from erythrocytes of humans with pulmonary arterial hypertension.

    PubMed

    Bowles, Elizabeth A; Moody, Gina N; Yeragunta, Yashaswini; Stephenson, Alan H; Ellsworth, Mary L; Sprague, Randy S

    2015-01-01

    Both prostacyclin analogs and phosphodiesterase 5 (PDE5) inhibitors are effective treatments for pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). In addition to direct effects on vascular smooth muscle, prostacyclin analogs increase cAMP levels and ATP release from healthy human erythrocytes. We hypothesized that UT-15C, an orally available form of the prostacyclin analog, treprostinil, would stimulate ATP release from erythrocytes of humans with PAH and that this release would be augmented by PDE5 inhibitors. Erythrocytes were isolated and the effect of UT-15C on cAMP levels and ATP release were measured in the presence and absence of the PDE5 inhibitors, zaprinast or tadalafil. In addition, the ability of a soluble guanylyl cyclase inhibitor to prevent the effects of tadalafil was determined. Erythrocytes of healthy humans and humans with PAH respond to UT-15C with increases in cAMP levels and ATP release. In both groups, UT-15C-induced ATP release was potentiated by zaprinast and tadalafil. The effect of tadalafil was prevented by pre-treatment with an inhibitor of soluble guanylyl cyclase in healthy human erythrocytes. Importantly, UT-15C-induced ATP release was greater in PAH erythrocytes than in healthy human erythrocytes in both the presence and the absence of PDE5 inhibitors. The finding that prostacyclin analogs and PDE5 inhibitors work synergistically to enhance release of the potent vasodilator ATP from PAH erythrocytes provides a new rationale for the co-administration of these drugs in this disease. Moreover, these results suggest that the erythrocyte is a novel target for future drug development for the treatment of PAH.

  20. Increased responsiveness of human pulmonary arteries in patients with positive bronchodilator response.

    PubMed Central

    Cases, E.; Vila, J. M.; Medina, P.; Aldasoro, M.; Segarra, G.; Lluch, S.

    1996-01-01

    1. The effects of noradrenaline, endothelin-1, acetylcholine and sodium nitroprusside were studied in isolated pulmonary arteries obtained from 14 patients undergoing lobectomy for lung carcinoma. Seven patients had shown increased response to a bronchodilator test prior to operation. In the remaining patients (control) the bronchodilator test was negative. 2. Artery rings from patients with a positive bronchodilator response showed greater contraction to noradrenaline (pD2 = 6.44 +/- 0.1; Emax = 93 +/- 9% of response to 100 mM KCl) and endothelin-1 (pD2 = 8.92 +/- 0.1; Emax = 130 +/- 16%) than the rings from control patients (pD2 = 6.04 +/- 0.08; Emax = 56 +/- 8% for noradrenaline; pD2 = 8.29 +/- 0.1; Emax = 78 +/- 10% for endothelin-1). There was no significant difference in the contractile responses to 100 mM KCl between arteries from either group of patients. 3. Arterial rings from patients with a positive bronchodilator test achieved 96 +/- 3% of maximal relaxation in response to acetylcholine, whereas rings from control patients achieved a maximal relaxation of 72 +/- 5%. Rings from both the controls and the patients with a positive bronchodilator test achieved complete relaxation in response to sodium nitroprusside but pD2 values were significantly higher in patients with a positive bronchodilator test. 4. Removal of endothelium or treatment with NG-nitro-L-arginine methyl ester of artery rings from both the control and the patients with a positive bronchodilator test reduced the relaxation to acetylcholine (P < 0.05) but did not modify relaxation to sodium nitroprusside. 5. It is concluded that responsiveness of pulmonary arterial smooth muscle to dilator and constrictor agents is increased in patients showing reversibility of airway constriction. Thus hyperresponsiveness of airway smooth muscle may be associated with a similar phenomenon in the surrounding vascular smooth muscle. PMID:8968540

  1. First Human Case of Pulmonary Fungal Ball Due to a Perenniporia Species (a Basidiomycete)

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Kshitij; Kathuria, Shallu; Singh, Pradeep Kumar; Roy, P.; Gaur, S. N.; Rodrigues, Anderson M.; de Hoog, G. S.; Meis, Jacques F.

    2012-01-01

    Perenniporia species are basidiomycetes, resupinate shelf fungi responsible for white rot decay of wood. Here, we report for the first time an intracavitary pulmonary fungal ball due to a species of Perenniporia that has not been recognized so far as a human pathogen. The fungus was identified by sequencing of the partial ribosomal operon of a culture from a clinical specimen. PMID:22895039

  2. LTB4 activates pulmonary artery adventitial fibroblasts in pulmonary hypertension

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xinguo; Tamosiuniene, Rasa; Sung, Yon K.; Shuffle, Eric M.; Tu, Allen B.; Valenzuela, Antonia; Jiang, Shirley; Zamanian, Roham T.; Fiorentino, David F.; Voelkel, Norbert F.; Peters-Golden, Marc; Stenmark, Kurt R.; Chung, Lorinda; Rabinovitch, Marlene; Nicolls, Mark R.

    2015-01-01

    A recent study demonstrated a significant role for leukotriene B4 (LTB4) causing pulmonary vascular remodeling in pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH). LTB4 was found to directly injure luminal endothelial cells and promote growth of the smooth muscle cell layer of pulmonary arterioles. The purpose of the current study was to determine the effects of LTB4 on the pulmonary adventitial layer, largely composed of fibroblasts. Here, we demonstrate that LTB4 enhanced human pulmonary artery adventitial fibroblast (HPAAF) proliferation, migration and differentiation in a dose-dependent manner through its cognate G-protein coupled receptor, BLT1. LTB4 activated HPAAF by up-regulating p38 MAPK as well as Nox4 signaling pathways. In an autoimmune model of PH, inhibition of these pathways blocked perivascular inflammation, decreased Nox4 expression, reduced reactive oxygen species production, reversed arteriolar adventitial fibroblast activation and attenuated PH development. This study uncovers a novel mechanism by which LTB4 further promotes PAH pathogenesis, beyond its established effects on endothelial and smooth muscle cells, by activating adventitial fibroblasts. PMID:26558820

  3. Role of protein kinase C in phospholemman mediated regulation of α₂β₁ isozyme of Na⁺/K⁺-ATPase in caveolae of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Dey, Kuntal; Roy, Soumitra; Ghosh, Biswarup; Chakraborti, Sajal

    2012-04-01

    We have recently reported that α(2)β(1) and α(1)β(1) isozymes of Na(+)/K(+)-ATPase (NKA) are localized in the caveolae whereas only the α(1)β(1) isozyme of NKA is localized in the non-caveolae fraction of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell membrane. It is well known that different isoforms of NKA are regulated differentially by PKA and PKC, but the mechanism is not known in the caveolae of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells. Herein, we examined whether this regulation occurs through phospholemman (PLM) in the caveolae. Our results suggest that PKC mediated phosphorylation of PLM occurs only when it is associated with the α(2) isoform of NKA, whereas phosphorylation of PLM by PKA occurs when it is associated with the α(1) isoform of NKA. To investigate the mechanism of regulation of α(2) isoform of NKA by PKC-mediated phosphorylation of PLM, we have purified PLM from the caveolae and reconstituted into the liposomes. Our result revealed that (i) in the reconstituted liposomes phosphorylated PLM (PKC mediated) stimulate NKA activity, which appears to be due to an increase in the turnover number of the enzyme; (ii) phosphorylated PLM did not change the affinity of the pump for Na(+); and (iii) even after phosphorylation by PKC, PLM still remains associated with the α(2) isoform of NKA.

  4. Utility of a novel error-stepping method to improve gradient-based parameter identification by increasing the smoothness of the local objective surface: a case-study of pulmonary mechanics.

    PubMed

    Docherty, Paul D; Schranz, Christoph; Chase, J Geoffrey; Chiew, Yeong Shiong; Möller, Knut

    2014-05-01

    Accurate model parameter identification relies on accurate forward model simulations to guide convergence. However, some forward simulation methodologies lack the precision required to properly define the local objective surface and can cause failed parameter identification. The role of objective surface smoothness in identification of a pulmonary mechanics model was assessed using forward simulation from a novel error-stepping method and a proprietary Runge-Kutta method. The objective surfaces were compared via the identified parameter discrepancy generated in a Monte Carlo simulation and the local smoothness of the objective surfaces they generate. The error-stepping method generated significantly smoother error surfaces in each of the cases tested (p<0.0001) and more accurate model parameter estimates than the Runge-Kutta method in three of the four cases tested (p<0.0001) despite a 75% reduction in computational cost. Of note, parameter discrepancy in most cases was limited to a particular oblique plane, indicating a non-intuitive multi-parameter trade-off was occurring. The error-stepping method consistently improved or equalled the outcomes of the Runge-Kutta time-integration method for forward simulations of the pulmonary mechanics model. This study indicates that accurate parameter identification relies on accurate definition of the local objective function, and that parameter trade-off can occur on oblique planes resulting prematurely halted parameter convergence. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Cell-to-cell contact of human monocytes with infected arterial smooth-muscle cells enhances growth of Chlamydia pneumoniae.

    PubMed

    Puolakkainen, Mirja; Campbell, Lee Ann; Lin, Tsun-Mei; Richards, Theresa; Patton, Dorothy L; Kuo, Cho-Chou

    2003-02-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae can infect arterial cells. It has been shown that coculture of human monocytes (U937) and endothelial cells promotes infection of C. pneumoniae in endothelial cells and that the enhancement was mediated by a soluble factor (insulin-like growth factor 2) secreted by monocytes. In this study, it is shown that coculture of monocytes with C. pneumoniae enhances infection of C. pneumoniae in arterial smooth-muscle cells 5.3-fold at a monocyte-to-smooth-muscle cell ratio of 5. However, unlike endothelial cells, no enhancement was observed if monocytes were placed in cell culture inserts or if conditioned medium from monocyte cultures was used, which suggests that cell-to-cell contact is critical. The addition of mannose 6-phosphate or octyl glucoside, a nonionic detergent containing a sugar group, to cocultures inhibited the enhancement. These findings suggest that the monocyte-smooth-muscle cell interaction may be mediated by mannose 6-phosphate receptors present on monocytes.

  6. Bone morphogenetic protein-2 activates NADPH oxidase to increase endoplasmic reticulum stress and human coronary artery smooth muscle cell calcification.

    PubMed

    Liberman, Marcel; Johnson, Rebecca C; Handy, Diane E; Loscalzo, Joseph; Leopold, Jane A

    2011-09-30

    Bone morphogenetic protein-2 (BMP-2) increases oxidant stress and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress to stimulate differentiation of osteoblasts; however, the role of these signaling pathways in the transition of smooth muscle cells to a calcifying osteoblast-like phenotype remains incompletely characterized. We, therefore, treated human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCSMC) with BMP-2 (100ng/mL) and found an increase in NADPH oxidase activity and oxidant stress that occurred via activation of the bone morphogenetic protein receptor 2 and Smad 1 signaling. BMP-2-mediated oxidant stress also increased endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress demonstrated by increased expression of GRP78, phospho-IRE1α, and the transcription factor XBP1. Analysis of a 1kb segment of the Runx2 promoter revealed an XBP1 binding site; electrophoretic mobility shift and chromatin immunoprecipitation assays demonstrated that XBP1 bound to the Runx2 promoter at this site in BMP-2-treated HCSMC. Inhibition of oxidant stress or ER stress decreased Runx2 expression, intracellular calcium deposition, and mineralization of BMP-2-treated HCSMC. Thus, in HCSMC, BMP-2 increases oxidant stress and ER stress to increase Runx2 expression and promote vascular smooth muscle cell calcification. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Hyperphosphatemia induces cellular senescence in human aorta smooth muscle cells through integrin linked kinase (ILK) up-regulation.

    PubMed

    Troyano, Nuria; Nogal, María Del; Mora, Inés; Diaz-Naves, Manuel; Lopez-Carrillo, Natalia; Sosa, Patricia; Rodriguez-Puyol, Diego; Olmos, Gemma; Ruiz-Torres, María P

    2015-12-01

    Aging is conditioned by genetic and environmental factors. Hyperphosphatemia is related to some pathologies, affecting to vascular cells behavior. This work analyze whether high concentration of extracellular phosphate induces vascular smooth muscle cells senescence, exploring the intracellular mechanisms and highlighting the in vivo relevance of this phenomenon. Human aortic smooth muscle cells treated with β-Glycerophosphate (BGP, 10mM) suffered cellular senescence by increasing p53, p21 and p16 expression and the senescence associated β-galactosidase activity. In parallel, BGP induced ILK overexpression, dependent on the IGF-1 receptor activation, and oxidative stress. Down-regulating ILK expression prevented BGP-induced senescence and oxidative stress. Aortic rings from young rats treated with 10mM BGP for 48h, showed increased p53, p16 and ILK expression and SA-β-gal activity. Seven/eight nephrectomized rats feeding a hyperphosphatemic diet and fifteenth- month old mice showed hyperphosphatemia and aortic ILK, p53 and p16 expression. In conclusion, we demonstrated that high extracellular concentration of phosphate induced senescence in cultured smooth muscle through the activation of IGF-1 receptor and ILK overexpression and provided solid evidences for the in vivo relevance of these results since aged animals showed high levels of serum phosphate linked to increased expression of ILK and senescence genes. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Human coronary artery smooth muscle cell response to a novel PLA textile/fibrin gel composite scaffold.

    PubMed

    Gundy, Sarah; Manning, Grainne; O'Connell, Enda; Ellä, Ville; Harwoko, Marvi Sri; Rochev, Yuri; Smith, Terry; Barron, Valerie

    2008-11-01

    Previous studies have demonstrated the potential of fibrin as a cell carrier for cardiovascular tissue engineering applications. Unfortunately, fibrin exhibits poor mechanical properties. One method of addressing this issue is to incorporate a textile in fibrin to provide structural support. However, it is first necessary to develop a deeper understanding of the effect of the textile on cell response. In this study, the cytotoxicity of a polylactic acid (PLA) warp-knit textile was assessed with human coronary artery smooth muscle cells (HCASMC). Subsequently, quantitative reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (qRT-PCR) was employed to examine the gene expression of HCASMC embedded in fibrin with and without the textile. Five genes were examined over a 3-week period: smooth muscle alpha-actin (SMalphaA), myosin heavy chain 11 smooth muscle (SM1/SM2), calponin, myosin heavy chain 10 non-muscle (SMemb) and collagen. Additionally, a microarray analysis was performed to examine a wider range of genes. The knitting process did not adversely affect the cell response; there was no dramatic change in cell number or metabolic rate compared to the negative control. After 3 weeks, there was no significant difference in gene expression, except for a slight decrease of 10% in SMemb in the fibrin with textile. After 3 weeks, there were no obvious cytotoxic effects observed as a result of the knitting process and the gene expression profile did not appear to be altered in the presence of the mesh in the fibrin gel.

  9. Pulmonary hypertension and vascular oxidative damage in cigarette smoke exposed eNOS(-/-) mice and human smokers.

    PubMed

    Wright, J L; Zhou, S; Churg, A

    2012-09-01

    Cigarette smoke is known to be associated with pulmonary hypertension in humans and in animal models. Although the etiology of pulmonary hypertension in smokers is not understood, recent work has suggested a role for inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in inducing oxidative stress. To further evaluate this question, we assessed eNOS-/- mice exposed to air or cigarette smoke for the presence of pulmonary hypertension and examined vascular remodeling and expression of nitrotyrosine, a marker of reactive nitrogen species-induced oxidative damage, using immunohistochemistry. To ascertain whether oxidants may play a role in humans, we also examined lung tissue from nonsmokers, and patients with chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) with and without pulmonary hypertension. We found that eNOS(-/-) mice developed increased pulmonary arterial pressure after six months cigarette smoke exposure, and this was associated with vascular remodeling and increased vascular nitrotyrosine staining. iNOS gene expression was decreased in the pulmonary arteries of the smoke exposed animals, and no protein was detectable by immunohistochemistry. In humans, vascular nitrotyrosine staining intensity was increased in smokers with COPD compared to nonsmokers, and further increased in smokers with combined COPD and pulmonary hypertension. We conclude that cigarette smoke-induced pulmonary hypertension is associated with evidence of oxidative vascular damage by reactive nitrogen species, but that iNOS does not appear to be the major contributor to such damage. Most likely the source of reactive nitrogen species is the cigarette smoke itself.

  10. [Pulmonary pathology in fatal human influenza A (H1N1) infection].

    PubMed

    Duan, Xue-jing; Li, Yong; Gong, En-cong; Wang, Jue; Lü, Fu-dong; Zhang, He-qiu; Sun, Lin; Yue, Zhu-jun; Song, Chen-chao; Zhang, Shi-Jie; Li, Ning; Dai, Jie

    2011-12-01

    To study the pulmonary pathology in patients died of fatal human influenza A(H1N1) infection. Eight cases of fatal human influenza A (H1N1) infection, including 2 autopsy cases and 6 paramortem needle puncture biopsies, were enrolled into the study. Histologic examination, immunohistochemitry, flow cytometry and Western blotting were carried out. The major pathologic changes included necrotizing bronchiolitis with surrounding inflammation, diffuse alveolar damage and pulmonary hemorrhage. Influenza viral antigen expression was detected in the lung tissue by Western blotting. Immunohistochemical study demonstrated the presence of nuclear protein and hemagglutinin virus antigens in parts of trachea, bronchial epithelium and glands, alveolar epithelium, macrophages and endothelium. Flow cytometry showed that the apoptotic rate of type II pneumocytes (32.15%, 78.15%) was significantly higher than that of the controls (1.93%, 3.77%). Necrotizing bronchiolitis, diffuse alveolar damage and pulmonary hemorrhage followed by pulmonary fibrosis in late stage are the major pathologic changes in fatal human influenza A (H1N1) infection.

  11. New stent surface materials: the impact of polymer-dependent interactions of human endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and platelets.

    PubMed

    Busch, Raila; Strohbach, Anne; Rethfeldt, Stefanie; Walz, Simon; Busch, Mathias; Petersen, Svea; Felix, Stephan; Sternberg, Katrin

    2014-02-01

    Despite the development of new coronary stent technologies, in-stent restenosis and stent thrombosis are still clinically relevant. Interactions of blood and tissue cells with the implanted material may represent an important cause of these side effects. We hypothesize material-dependent interaction of blood and tissue cells. The aim of this study is accordingly to investigate the impact of vascular endothelial cells, smooth muscle cells and platelets with various biodegradable polymers to identify a stent coating or platform material that demonstrates excellent endothelial-cell-supportive and non-thrombogenic properties. Human umbilical venous endothelial cells, human coronary arterial endothelial cells and human coronary arterial smooth muscle cells were cultivated on the surfaces of two established biostable polymers used for drug-eluting stents, namely poly(ethylene-co-vinylacetate) (PEVA) and poly(butyl methacrylate) (PBMA). We compared these polymers to new biodegradable polyesters poly(l-lactide) (PLLA), poly(3-hydroxybutyrate) (P(3HB)), poly(4-hydroxybutyrate) (P(4HB)) and a polymeric blend of PLLA/P(4HB) in a ratio of 78/22% (w/w). Biocompatibility tests were performed under static and dynamic conditions. Measurement of cell proliferation, viability, glycocalix width, eNOS and PECAM-1 mRNA expression revealed strong material dependency among the six polymer samples investigated. Only the polymeric blend of PLLA/P(4HB) achieved excellent endothelial markers of biocompatibility. Data show that PLLA and P(4HB) tend to a more thrombotic response, whereas the polymer blend is characterized by a lower thrombotic potential. These data demonstrate material-dependent endothelialization, smooth muscle cell growth and thrombogenicity. Although polymers such as PEVA and PBMA are already commonly used for vascular implants, they did not sufficiently meet the criteria for biocompatibility. The investigated biodegradable polymeric blend PLLA/P(4HB) evidently represents a

  12. Evidence for a M1 muscarinic receptor on the endothelium of human pulmonary veins

    PubMed Central

    Walch, Laurence; Gascard, Jean-Pierre; Dulmet, Elisabeth; Brink, Charles; Norel, Xavier

    2000-01-01

    To characterize the muscarinic receptors on human pulmonary veins associated with the acetylcholine (ACh)-induced relaxation, isolated venous and arterial preparations were pre-contracted with noradrenaline (10 μM) and were subsequently challenged with ACh in the absence or presence of selective muscarinic antagonists.ACh relaxed venous preparations derived from human lung with a pD2 value of 5.82±0.09 (n=16). In venous preparations where the endothelium had been removed, the ACh relaxations were abolished (n=4). ACh relaxed arterial preparations with a pD2 value of 7.06±0.14 (n=5).Atropine (1 μM), the non selective antagonist for muscarinic receptors, inhibited ACh-induced relaxations in human pulmonary veins. The affinity value (pKB value) for atropine was: 8.64±0.10 (n=5). The selective muscarinic antagonists (darifenacin (M3), himbacine (M2,M4), methoctramine (M2) and pFHHSiD (M1,M3)) also inhibited ACh-induced relaxations in venous preparations. The pKB values obtained for these antagonists were not those predicted for the involvement of M2–5 receptors in the ACh-induced relaxation in human pulmonary veins.The pKB value for darifenacin (1 μM) was significantly greater in human pulmonary arterial (8.63±0.14) than in venous (7.41±0.20) preparations derived from three lung samples.In human pulmonary veins, the pKB values for pirenzepine (0.5 and 1 μM), a selective antagonist for M1 receptors, were: 7.89±0.24 (n=7) and 8.18±0.22 (n=5), respectively. In the venous preparations, the pKB values derived from the functional studies with all the different muscarinic antagonists used were correlated (r=0.89; P=0.04; slope=0.78) with the affinity values (pKi values) previously published for human cloned m1 receptors in CHO cells.These results suggest that the relaxations induced by ACh are due to the activation of M1 receptors on endothelial cells in isolated human pulmonary veins. PMID:10781000

  13. Effects of Surface Smoothness on Inertial Particle Deposition in Human Nasal Models

    PubMed Central

    Schroeter, Jeffry D.; Garcia, Guilherme J. M.; Kimbell, Julia S.

    2010-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictions of inertial particle deposition have not compared well with data from nasal replicas due to effects of surface texture and the resolution of tomographic images. To study effects of geometric differences between CFD models and nasal replicas, nasal CFD models with different levels of surface smoothness were reconstructed from the same MRI data used to construct the nasal replica used by Kelly et al. (2004) [Aerosol Sci. Technol. 38:1063–1071]. One CFD model in particular was reconstructed without any surface smoothing to preserve the detailed topology present in the nasal replica. Steady-state inspiratory airflow and Lagrangian particle tracking were simulated using Fluent software. Particle deposition estimates from the smoother models under-predicted nasal deposition from replica casts, which was consistent with previous findings. These discrepancies were overcome by including surface artifacts that were not present in the reduced models and by plotting deposition efficiency versus the Stokes number, where the characteristic diameter was defined in terms of the pressure-flow relationship to account for changes in airflow resistance due to wall roughness. These results indicate that even slight geometric differences have significant effects on nasal deposition and that this information should be taken into account when comparing particle deposition data from CFD models with experimental data from nasal replica casts. PMID:21339833

  14. Effects of Surface Smoothness on Inertial Particle Deposition in Human Nasal Models.

    PubMed

    Schroeter, Jeffry D; Garcia, Guilherme J M; Kimbell, Julia S

    2011-01-01

    Computational fluid dynamics (CFD) predictions of inertial particle deposition have not compared well with data from nasal replicas due to effects of surface texture and the resolution of tomographic images. To study effects of geometric differences between CFD models and nasal replicas, nasal CFD models with different levels of surface smoothness were reconstructed from the same MRI data used to construct the nasal replica used by Kelly et al. (2004) [Aerosol Sci. Technol. 38:1063-1071]. One CFD model in particular was reconstructed without any surface smoothing to preserve the detailed topology present in the nasal replica. Steady-state inspiratory airflow and Lagrangian particle tracking were simulated using Fluent software. Particle deposition estimates from the smoother models under-predicted nasal deposition from replica casts, which was consistent with previous findings. These discrepancies were overcome by including surface artifacts that were not present in the reduced models and by plotting deposition efficiency versus the Stokes number, where the characteristic diameter was defined in terms of the pressure-flow relationship to account for changes in airflow resistance due to wall roughness. These results indicate that even slight geometric differences have significant effects on nasal deposition and that this information should be taken into account when comparing particle deposition data from CFD models with experimental data from nasal replica casts.

  15. PKC-DEPENDENT REGULATION OF Kv7.5 CHANNELS BY THE BRONCHOCONSTRICTOR HISTAMINE IN HUMAN AIRWAY SMOOTH MUSCLE CELLS.

    PubMed

    Haick, Jennifer M; Brueggemann, Lioubov I; Cribbs, Leanne L; Denning, Mitchell F; Schwartz, Jeffrey; Byron, Kenneth L

    2017-03-10

    Kv7 potassium channels have recently been found to be expressed and functionally important for relaxation of airway smooth muscle. Previous research suggests that native Kv7 currents are inhibited following treatment of freshly isolated airway smooth muscle cells with bronchoconstrictor agonists, and in intact airways inhibition of Kv7 channels is sufficient to induce bronchiolar constriction. However, the mechanism by which Kv7 currents are inhibited by bronchoconstrictor agonists has yet to be elucidated. In the present study, native Kv7 currents in cultured human trachealis smooth muscle cells (HTSMCs) were observed to be inhibited upon treatment with histamine; inhibition of Kv7 currents was associated with membrane depolarization and an increase in cytosolic Ca2+ ([Ca2+]cyt). The latter response was inhibited by verapamil, a blocker of L-type voltage sensitive Ca2+ channels (VSCCs). Protein kinase C (PKC) has been implicated as a mediator of bronchoconstrictor actions, though the targets of PKC are not clearly established. We found that histamine treatment significantly and dose-dependently suppressed currents through overexpressed wild-type human Kv7.5 (hKv7.5) channels in cultured HTSMCs, and this effect was inhibited by the PKC inhibitor Ro-31-8220 (3 µM). The PKC-dependent suppression of hKv7.5 currents corresponded with a PKC-dependent increase in hKv7.5 channel phosphorylation. Knocking down or inhibiting PKCα, or mutating hKv7.5 serine 441 to alanine, abolished the inhibitory effects of histamine on hKv7.5 currents. These findings provide the first evidence linking PKC activation to suppression of Kv7 currents, membrane depolarization, and Ca2+ influx via L-type VSCCs as a mechanism for histamine-induced bronchoconstriction.

  16. The role of K⁺ conductances in regulating membrane excitability in human gastric corpus smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ji Yeon; Ko, Eun-Ju; Ahn, Ki Duck; Kim, Sung; Rhee, Poong-Lyul

    2015-04-01

    Changes in resting membrane potential (RMP) regulate membrane excitability. K(+) conductance(s) are one of the main factors in regulating RMP. The functional role of K(+) conductances has not been studied the in human gastric corpus smooth muscles (HGCS). To examine the role of K(+) channels in regulation of RMP in HGCS we employed microelectrode recordings, patch-clamp, and molecular approaches. Tetraethylammonium and charybdotoxin did not affect the RMP, suggesting that BK channels are not involved in regulating RMP. Apamin, a selective small conductance Ca(2+)-activated K(+) channel (SK) blocker, did not show a significant effect on the membrane excitability. 4-Aminopyridine, a Kv channel blocker, caused depolarization and increased the duration of slow wave potentials. 4-Aminopyridine also inhibited a delayed rectifying K(+) current in isolated smooth muscle cells. End-product RT-PCR gel detected Kv1.2 and Kv1.5 in human gastric corpus muscles. Glibenclamide, an ATP-sensitive K(+) channel (KATP) blocker, did not induce depolarization, but nicorandil, a KATP opener, hyperpolarized HGCS, suggesting that KATP are expressed but not basally activated. Kir6.2 transcript, a pore-forming subunit of KATP was expressed in HGCS. A low concentration of Ba(2+), a Kir blocker, induced strong depolarization. Interestingly, Ba(2+)-sensitive currents were minimally expressed in isolated smooth muscle cells under whole-cell patch configuration. KCNJ2 (Kir2.1) transcript was expressed in HGCS. Unique K(+) conductances regulate the RMP in HGCS. Delayed and inwardly rectifying K(+) channels are the main candidates in regulating membrane excitability in HGCS. With the development of cell dispersion techniques of interstitial cells, the cell-specific functional significance will require further analysis.

  17. Functional expression of γ-amino butyric acid transporter 2 in human and guinea pig airway epithelium and smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Zaidi, Sarah; Gallos, George; Yim, Peter D; Xu, Dingbang; Sonett, Joshua R; Panettieri, Reynold A; Gerthoffer, William; Emala, Charles W

    2011-08-01

    γ-Amino butyric acid (GABA) is a primary inhibitory neurotransmitter in the central nervous system, and is classically released by fusion of synaptic vesicles with the plasma membrane or by egress via GABA transporters (GATs). Recently, a GABAergic system comprised of GABA(A) and GABA(B) receptors has been identified on airway epithelial and smooth muscle cells that regulate mucus secretion and contractile tone of airway smooth muscle (ASM). In addition, the enzyme that synthesizes GABA, glutamic acid decarboxylase, has been identified in airway epithelial cells; however, the mechanism(s) by which this synthesized GABA is released from epithelial intracellular stores is unknown. We questioned whether any of the four known isoforms of GATs are functionally expressed in ASM or epithelial cells. We detected mRNA and protein expression of GAT2 and -4, and isoforms of glutamic acid decarboxylase in native and cultured human ASM and epithelial cells. In contrast, mRNA encoding vesicular GAT (VGAT), the neuronal GABA transporter, was not detected. Functional inhibition of (3)H-GABA uptake was demonstrated using GAT2 and GAT4/betaine-GABA transporter 1 (BGT1) inhibitors in both human ASM and epithelial cells. These results demonstrate that two isoforms of GATs, but not VGAT, are expressed in both airway epithelial and smooth muscle cells. They also provide a mechanism by which locally synthesized GABA can be released from these cells into the airway to activate GABA(A) channels and GABA(B) receptors, with subsequent autocrine and/or paracrine signaling effects on airway epithelium and ASM.

  18. [Effect of oxymatrine on vascular calcification of humans umbilical vein smooth muscle cells and its underlying mechanism].

    PubMed

    Wang, Xiumei; Zhang, Juan; Zhang, Minghao; Liu, Shuang; Li, Guizhong; Cao, Jun

    2012-04-01

    To observe the effect of oxymatrine (OMT) on calcification of humans umbilical vein smooth muscle cells and its underlying mechanism. Human umbilical vein smooth muscle cells (HUSMCs) were calcified by beta-giycerophos-phosphate (beta-GP) and then divided into 6 groups: the control group, the calcification group, the pure OMT group, and lower, middle and higher-dosage OMT groups. Cell calcification were observed by Von Kossa staining, calcium content in HUSMCs were determined by the colorimetric method, the alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity in HUSMCs were determined by phenyl diphosphate-2-sodium, the osteocalcin (OC) level in HUSMCs were determined by radioimmunossay, the transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) level in HUSMC culture medium and the content changes in psmad2/3 and smad2/3 were determined by the ELISA method, and the expression of Core binding factor alpha1 (Cbfalpha1) protein in HUSMCs were determined by western blot method. Compared with the control group, the calcification group showed a great number of black granules among the smooth muscle cells and significant increase in the content of calcium and OC and the activity of ALP; OMT intervention can decrease the content of calcium, OC, TGF-beta1, psmad2/3 and Cbfalpha1 and the activity of ALP. And high-dosage OMT group had better effect than middle and low-dosage groups. OMT can effectively inhibit beta-GP-induced HUSMC calcification and its effect on reducing TGF-beta1, psmad2/3 and Cbfalpha1 may be one of its mechanisms in inhibiting HVSMC calcification.

  19. Scanning electron microscopic examination of human pulmonary capillaries using a latex replication method.

    PubMed

    Kendall, M W; Eissmann, E

    1980-03-01

    The human pulmonary microvasculature from the apical bronchopulmonary segment was studied by scanning electron microscopy using latex replicas. The latex replica was composed of a blend of vinyl chloride latexes using a plasticized vinyl chloride copolymer with a vinyl chloride copolymer. The polymerized latex produced a cast of the pulmonary arterial vascular tree, including the capillary patterns, which freely anastomose, thereby draining blood into pulmonary veinules and veins. The latex was injected via a gravity flow system modified from its earlier application in Guinea pig lungs. The apparently normal lungs from two recently deceased humans (dead for 5-6 hours and held in refrigeration) were perfused with heparinized Ringer's solution and subsequently injected with latex. The resulting latex casts of the capillaries revealed a three-dimensional network arranged in irregular vascular rings or ovals. This pattern was most conspicuous in deep and intermediate bronchopulmonary segmental areas. However, the subpleural capillaries produced casts that often terminated blindly, as observed with stereo SEm, suggesting that these vessels may tend to form thrombi more easily as compared with capillaries from other regions of the lung alveoli. The pulmonary arteriolar replicas contained indentations representing endothelial cell nuclei, and the capillary replicas projected oval evaginations that may represent discrete loci or capillary mural attenuations.

  20. Expression of WNT5A in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis and Its Control by TGF-β and WNT7B in Human Lung Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Newman, Donna R; Sills, W Shane; Hanrahan, Katherine; Ziegler, Amanda; Tidd, Kathleen McGinnis; Cook, Elizabeth; Sannes, Philip L

    2016-02-01

    The wingless (Wnt) family of signaling ligands contributes significantly to lung development and is highly expressed in patients with usual interstitial pneumonia (UIP). We sought to define the cellular distribution of Wnt5A in the lung tissue of patients with idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and the signaling ligands that control its expression in human lung fibroblasts and IPF myofibroblasts. Tissue sections from 40 patients diagnosed with IPF or UIP were probed for the immunolocalization of Wnt5A. Further, isolated lung fibroblasts from normal or IPF human lungs, adenovirally transduced for the overexpression or silencing of Wnt7B or treated with TGF-β1 or its inhibitor, were analyzed for Wnt5A protein expression. Wnt5A was expressed in IPF lungs by airway and alveolar epithelium, smooth muscle cells, endothelium, and myofibroblasts of fibroblastic foci and throughout the interstitium. Forced overexpression of Wnt7B with or without TGF-β1 treatment significantly increased Wnt5A protein expression in normal human smooth muscle cells and fibroblasts but not in IPF myofibroblasts where Wnt5A was already highly expressed. The results demonstrate a wide distribution of Wnt5A expression in cells of the IPF lung and reveal that it is significantly increased by Wnt7B and TGF-β1, which, in combination, could represent key signaling pathways that modulate the pathogenesis of IPF. © 2016 The Histochemical Society.

  1. Pulmonary lesions in cats with diabetes mellitus.

    PubMed

    Mexas, Angela M; Hess, Rebecka S; Hawkins, Eleanor C; Martin, Linda D

    2006-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus (DM) is a common endocrinopathy of cats and humans. Although few studies have examined the effects of DM on the pulmonary system, changes in pulmonary function and immunology in humans with type I and II diabetes, and pulmonary lesions in a murine diabetic model have been documented. Our objective was to determine whether pulmonary lesions occurred in cats with DM. Medical records and necropsy evaluations of 42 cats with DM were compared with those of 45 age-matched, nondiabetic cats for the presence of clinical evidence of respiratory disease and pulmonary histopathological findings at the time of necropsy. No statistical difference was noted in the presence of clinical evidence of respiratory disease between cats with diabetes and control cats. Nevertheless, there was a significant association between the presence of abnormal pulmonary histopathology and DM (P = .018, odds ratio = 3 inclusive of all cats; P = .005, odds ratio = 5 when non-DM cats with overt clinical evidence of respiratory disease were excluded). Pulmonary abnormalities detected by histopathological examination in cats with diabetes included congestion and edema, histiocytosis, pneumonia, smooth muscle hypertrophy, fibrosis, mineralization, neoplasia, and type II pneumocyte hyperplasia. The observed association between DM and pulmonary lesions in cats, independent of clinical evidence of respiratory disease, emphasizes the need for careful assessment of the respiratory tract in sick cats with diabetes.

  2. Butyrate stimulates the growth of human intestinal smooth muscle cells by activation of Yes-Associated Protein.

    PubMed

    Dai, Li-Na; Yan, Jun-Kai; Xiao, Yong-Tao; Wen, Jie; Zhang, Tian; Zhou, Ke-Jun; Wang, Yang; Cai, Wei

    2017-08-23

    Intestinal smooth muscle cells play a critical role in the remodeling of intestinal structure and functional adaptation after bowel resection. Recent studies have shown that supplementation of butyrate (Bu) contributes to the compensatory expansion of a muscular layer of the residual intestine in a rodent model of short-bowel syndrome (SBS). However, the underlying mechanism remains elusive. In this study, we found that the growth of human intestinal smooth muscle cells (HISMCs) was significantly stimulated by Bu via activation of Yes-Associated Protein (YAP). Incubation with 0.5 mM Bu induced a distinct proliferative effect on HISMCs, as indicated by the promotion of cell cycle progression and increased DNA replication. Notably, YAP silencing by RNA interference or its specific inhibitor significantly abolished the proliferative effect of Bu on HISMCs. Furthermore, Bu induced YAP expression and enhanced the translocation of YAP from the cytoplasm to the nucleus, which led to changes in the expression of mitogenesis genes, including TEAD1, TEAD4, CTGF and Cyr61. These results provide evidence that Bu stimulates the growth of human intestinal muscle cells by activation of YAP, which may be a potential treatment for improving intestinal adaptation. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved. This article is protected by copyright. All rights reserved.

  3. Minimally modified low density lipoprotein induces monocyte chemotactic protein 1 in human endothelial cells and smooth muscle cells

    SciTech Connect

    Cushing, S.D.; Berliner, J.A.; Valente, A.J.; Territo, M.C.; Navab, M.; Parhami, F.; Gerrity, R.; Schwartz, C.J.; Fogelman, A.M.

    1990-07-01

    After exposure to low density lipoprotein (LDL) that had been minimally modified by oxidation (MM-LDL), human endothelial cells (EC) and smooth muscle cells (SMC) cultured separately or together produced 2- to 3-fold more monocyte chemotactic activity than did control cells or cells exposed to freshly isolated LDL. This increase in monocyte chemotactic activity was paralleled by increases in mRNA levels for a monocyte chemotactic protein 1 (MCP-1) that is constitutively produced by the human glioma U-105MG cell line. Antibody that had been prepared against cultured baboon smooth muscle cell chemotactic factor (anti-SMCF) did not inhibit monocyte migration induced by the potent bacterial chemotactic factor f-Met-Leu-Phe. However, anti-SMCF completely inhibited the monocyte chemotactic activity found in the media of U-105MG cells, EC, and SMC before and after exposure to MM-LDL. Moreover, monocyte migration into the subendothelial space of a coculture of EC and SMC that had been exposed to MM-LDL was completely inhibited by anti-SMCF. Anti-SMCF specifically immunoprecipitated 10-kDa and 12.5-kDa proteins from EC. Incorporation of (35S)methionine into the immunoprecipitated proteins paralleled the monocyte chemotactic activity found in the medium of MM-LDL stimulated EC and the levels of MCP-1 mRNA found in the EC. We conclude that SMCF is in fact MCP-1 and MCP-1 is induced by MM-LDL.

  4. Determinants of ventilation and pulmonary artery pressure during early acclimatization to hypoxia in humans.

    PubMed

    Fatemian, Marzieh; Herigstad, Mari; Croft, Quentin P P; Formenti, Federico; Cardenas, Rosa; Wheeler, Carly; Smith, Thomas G; Friedmannova, Maria; Dorrington, Keith L; Robbins, Peter A

    2016-03-01

    Pulmonary ventilation and pulmonary arterial pressure both rise progressively during the first few hours of human acclimatization to hypoxia. These responses are highly variable between individuals, but the origin of this variability is unknown. Here, we sought to determine whether the variabilities between different measures of response to sustained hypoxia were related, which would suggest a common source of variability. Eighty volunteers individually underwent an 8-h isocapnic exposure to hypoxia (end-tidal P(O2)=55 Torr) in a purpose-built chamber. Measurements of ventilation and pulmonary artery systolic pressure (PASP) assessed by Doppler echocardiography were made during the exposure. Before and after the exposure, measurements were made of the ventilatory sensitivities to acute isocapnic hypoxia (G(pO2)) and hyperoxic hypercapnia, the latter divided into peripheral (G(pCO2)) and central (G(cCO2)) components. Substantial acclimatization was observed in both ventilation and PASP, the latter being 40% greater in women than men. No correlation was found between the magnitudes of pulmonary ventilatory and pulmonary vascular responses. For G(pO2), G(pCO2) and G(cC O2), but not the sensitivity of PASP to acute hypoxia, the magnitude of the increase during acclimatization was proportional to the pre-acclimatization value. Additionally, the change in G(pO2) during acclimatization to hypoxia correlated well with most other measures of ventilatory acclimatization. Of the initial measurements prior to sustained hypoxia, only G(pCO2) predicted the subsequent rise in ventilation and change in G(pO2) during acclimatization. We conclude that the magnitudes of the ventilatory and pulmonary vascular responses to sustained hypoxia are predominantly determined by different factors and that the initial G(pCO2) is a modest predictor of ventilatory acclimatization. © 2015 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd on behalf of The Physiological

  5. Role of Spm-Cer-S1P signalling pathway in MMP-2 mediated U46619-induced proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells: protective role of epigallocatechin-3-gallate.

    PubMed

    Chowdhury, Animesh; Sarkar, Jaganmay; Chakraborti, Tapati; Chakraborti, Sajal

    2015-10-01

    During remodelling of pulmonary artery, marked proliferation of pulmonary artery smooth muscle cells (PASMCs) occurs, which contributes to pulmonary hypertension. Thromboxane A2 (TxA2) has been shown to produce pulmonary hypertension. The present study investigates the inhibitory effect of epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) on the TxA2 mimetic, U46619-induced proliferation of PASMCs. U46619 at a concentration of 10 nM induces maximum proliferation of bovine PASMCs. Both pharmacological and genetic inhibitors of p(38)MAPK, NF-κB and MMP-2 significantly inhibit U46619-induced cell proliferation. EGCG markedly abrogate U46619-induced p(38)MAPK phosphorylation, NF-κB activation, proMMP-2 expression and activation, and also the cell proliferation. U46619 causes an increase in the activation of sphingomyelinase (SMase) and sphingosine kinase (SPHK) and also increase sphingosine 1 phosphate (S1P) level. U46619 also induces phosphorylation of ERK1/2, which phosphorylates SPHK leading to an increase in S1P level. Both pharmacological and genetic inhibitors of SMase and SPHK markedly inhibit U46619-induced cell proliferation. Additionally, pharmacological and genetic inhibitors of MMP-2 markedly abrogate U46619-induced SMase activity and S1P level. EGCG markedly inhibit U46619-induced SMase activity, ERK1/2 and SPHK phosphorylation and S1P level in the cells. Overall, Sphingomyeline-Ceramide-Sphingosine-1-phosphate (Spm-Cer-S1P) signalling axis plays an important role in MMP-2 mediated U46619-induced proliferation of PASMCs. Importantly, EGCG inhibits U46619 induced increase in MMP-2 activation by modulating p(38)MAPK-NFκB pathway and subsequently prevents the cell proliferation. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  6. Effect of all-trans retinoic acids (ATRA) on the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in the lung tissues of rats with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH).

    PubMed

    Xin, Y; Lv, J-Q; Wang, Y-Z; Zhang, J; Zhang, X

    2015-11-13

    The effect of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) on the expression of α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) in rats with pulmonary arterial hypertension (PAH) was studied, and the mechanism of the effect of ATRA on PAH was proposed. Thirty male SD rats were randomly divided into normal control, monocrotaline (MCT) model, and ATRA [30 mg/(kg.day)]intervention groups (N = 10 each). The mean pulmonary arterial pressure was recorded. Right ventricular hypertrophy index (RVHI) was calculated (weight of right ventricle: total weight of left ventricle and interventricular septum). The percentages of wall thickness of pulmonary arteriole (WT) to external diameter of artery (WT%) and vascular wall area (WA) to total vascular area (WA%) were determined. Real-time fluorescence-based quantitative PCR and western blot analyses were employed to detect the α-SMA mRNA and protein expressions. The mean pulmonary arterial pressure, RVHI, WT%, and WA% were all obviously higher in the model group than in the control and intervention groups. The values of these indicators in the intervention group were also higher than those in the control group (P < 0.01). The mRNA and protein expression levels of α-SMA were significantly higher in the lung tissue of model rats than those in the control and intervention groups. However, the intervention group showed no statistically significant differences in α-SMA mRNA and protein expression levels compared to the control (P < 0.05). ATRA inhibited the α-SMA mRNA and protein expressionin the lung tissues of rats with MCT-induced PAH, and could be used to treat PAH.

  7. Plasma Metabolomics in Human Pulmonary Tuberculosis Disease: A Pilot Study

    PubMed Central

    Frediani, Jennifer K.; Jones, Dean P.; Tukvadze, Nestan; Uppal, Karan; Sanikidze, Eka; Kipiani, Maia; Tran, ViLinh T.; Hebbar, Gautam; Walker, Douglas I.; Kempker, Russell R.; Kurani, Shaheen S.; Colas, Romain A.; Dalli, Jesmond; Tangpricha, Vin; Serhan, Charles N.; Blumberg, Henry M.; Ziegler, Thomas R.

    2014-01-01

    We aimed to characterize metabolites during tuberculosis (TB) disease and identify new pathophysiologic pathways involved in infection as well as biomarkers of TB onset, progression and resolution. Such data may inform development of new anti-tuberculosis drugs. Plasma samples from adults with newly diagnosed pulmonary TB disease and their matched, asymptomatic, sputum culture-negative household contacts were analyzed using liquid chromatography high-resolution mass spectrometry (LC-MS) to identify metabolites. Statistical and bioinformatics methods were used to select accurate mass/charge (m/z) ions that were significantly different between the two groups at a false discovery rate (FDR) of q<0.05. Two-way hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) was used to identify clusters of ions contributing to separation of cases and controls, and metabolomics databases were used to match these ions to known metabolites. Identity of specific D-series resolvins, glutamate and Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb)-derived trehalose-6-mycolate was confirmed using LC-MS/MS analysis. Over 23,000 metabolites were detected in untargeted metabolomic analysis and 61 metabolites were significantly different between the two groups. HCA revealed 8 metabolite clusters containing metabolites largely upregulated in patients with TB disease, including anti-TB drugs, glutamate, choline derivatives, Mycobacterium tuberculosis-derived cell wall glycolipids (trehalose-6-mycolate and phosphatidylinositol) and pro-resolving lipid mediators of inflammation, known to stimulate resolution, efferocytosis and microbial killing. The resolvins were confirmed to be RvD1, aspirin-triggered RvD1, and RvD2. This study shows that high-resolution metabolomic analysis can differentiate patients with active TB disease from their asymptomatic household contacts. Specific metabolites upregulated in the plasma of patients with active TB disease, including Mtb-derived glycolipids and resolvins, have potential as biomarkers

  8. The Impact of Vitamin D on Asthmatic Human Airway Smooth Muscle

    PubMed Central

    Hall, Sannette C.; Fischer, Kimberly D.; Agrawal, Devendra K.

    2016-01-01

    Asthma is a chronic heterogeneous disorder, which involves airway inflammation, airway hyperresponsiveness (AHR) and airway remodeling. The airway smooth muscle (ASM) bundle regulates the broncho-motor tone and plays a critical role in AHR as well as orchestrating inflammation. Vitamin D deficiency has been linked to increased severity and exacerbations of symptoms in asthmatic patients. It has been shown to modulate both immune and structural cells, including ASM cells, in inflammatory diseases. Given that current asthma therapies have not been successful in reversing airway remodeling, vitamin D supplementation as a potential therapeutic option has gained a great deal of attention. Here, we highlight the potential immunomodulatory properties of vitamin D in regulating ASM function and airway inflammation in bronchial asthma. PMID:26634624

  9. The Function of Vascular Smooth Muscle Phosphodiesterase III is Preserved in Healthy Human Aging

    PubMed Central

    Elvebak, Rachel L.; Eisenach, John H.; Joyner, Michael J.; Nicholson, Wayne T.

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Phosphodiesterase (PDE) III is an enzyme in vascular smooth muscle that metabolizes cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP). Milrinone inhibits PDE III, increasing the availability of cAMP. Cyclic guanosine monophosphate (cGMP), which is regulated by nitric oxide (NO), also inhibits PDE III. The endothelial NO component of prostacyclin (PGI2)‐mediated vasodilation is reduced in aging. This study investigated if PGI2‐mediated vasodilation during concomitant inhibition of endothelial NO and smooth muscle PDE III is affected by healthy aging. PDE III was inhibited with milrinone in 10 older subjects and 10 young matched controls while simultaneously infusing NG‐monomethyl‐l‐arginine acetate (l‐NMMA) to remove the confounding inhibitory effects of cGMP on PDE III. Incremental doses of PGI2 and sodium nitroprusside (SNP) were administered to the brachial artery during separate trials. l‐NMMA decreased baseline blood flow similarly, and the addition of milrinone increased baseline blood flow similarly in both groups. The forearm blood flow responses to PGI2 were similar between groups (younger: 7.62 ± 0.72; older: 6.88 ± 0.81 mL•dL−1 FAV•min−1 at the highest dose of PGI2). SNP responses were also similar. This study suggests that the vasodilator pathway associated with PDE III function, the bioavailability of cAMP, and the interaction with cGMP may be preserved in healthy aging. Clin Trans Sci 2010; Volume 3: 239–242. PMID:21500398

  10. Comparing supportive properties of poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA), PLGA/collagen and human amniotic membrane for human urothelial and smooth muscle cells engineering.

    PubMed

    Sharifiaghdas, Farzaneh; Naji, Mohammad; Sarhangnejad, Reza; Rajabi-Zeleti, Sareh; Mirzadeh, Hamid; Zandi, Mojgan; Saeed, Mahdi

    2014-07-08

    To compare human urothelial and smooth muscle cells attachment and proliferation using three different matrices; poly lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA), PLGA/collagen and human amniotic membrane (hAM). Human urothelial and smooth muscle cells were cultured and examined for expression of urothelium (pancytokeratin and uroplakin III) and smooth muscle cells [desmin and alpha smooth muscle actin (α-SMA)] markers. Cells were cultured on three scaffolds; PLGA, PLGA/collagen and hAM. Thereafter, they were analyzed for cell growth on days 1, 3, 7, 14 and 21 after seeding by 3-(4, 5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl)-2, 5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay. Scaffolds were fixed and processed for hematoxylin and eosin (H&E) staining and immunohistochemistry against their cell specific markers after 7 and 14 days of culture. MTT assay results revealed that collagen has improved cell attachment features of PLGA and led to significant increase of MTT signal in PLGA/collagen compared to PLGA (P < .001) and hAM (P < .001). hAM was a weaker matrix for both cell types as demonstrated in MTT assay and scanning electron microscope (SEM) images. SEM micrographs showed normal phenotype and distribution on PLGA and PLGA/collagen. In the same line, cells formed a well-developed layer either on PLGA or PLGA/collagen, which maintained expression of their corresponding markers. Our findings demonstrated significant improvement of cell attachment and growth achieved by collagen coating (PLGA/collagen) compared to PLGA and hAM. hAM despite of its natural entity was a weaker matrix for bladder engineering purposes.

  11. Specific high-affinity binding of high density lipoproteins to cultured human skin fibroblasts and arterial smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Biesbroeck, R; Oram, J F; Albers, J J; Bierman, E L

    1983-03-01

    Binding of human high density lipoproteins (HDL, d = 1.063-1.21) to cultured human fibroblasts and human arterial smooth muscle cells was studied using HDL subjected to heparin-agarose affinity chromatography to remove apoprotein (apo) E and B. Saturation curves for binding of apo E-free 125I-HDL showed at least two components: low-affinity nonsaturable binding and high-affinity binding that saturated at approximately 20 micrograms HDL protein/ml. Scatchard analysis of high-affinity binding of apo E-free 125I-HDL to normal fibroblasts yielded plots that were significantly linear, indicative of a single class of binding sites. Saturation curves for binding of both 125I-HDL3 (d = 1.125-1.21) and apo E-free 125I-HDL to low density lipoprotein (LDL) receptor-negative fibroblasts also showed high-affinity binding that yielded linear Scatchard plots. On a total protein basis, HDL2 (d = 1.063-1.10), HDL3 and very high density lipoproteins (VHDL, d = 1.21-1.25) competed as effectively as apo E-free HDL for binding of apo E-free 125I-HDL to normal fibroblasts. Also, HDL2, HDL3, and VHDL competed similarly for binding of 125I-HDL3 to LDL receptor-negative fibroblasts. In contrast, LDL was a weak competitor for HDL binding. These results indicate that both human fibroblasts and arterial smooth muscle cells possess specific high affinity HDL binding sites. As indicated by enhanced LDL binding and degradation and increased sterol synthesis, apo E-free HDL3 promoted cholesterol efflux from fibroblasts. These effects also saturated at HDL3 concentrations of 20 micrograms/ml, suggesting that promotion of cholesterol efflux by HDL is mediated by binding to the high-affinity cell surface sites.

  12. Cholesterol crystallization in human atherosclerosis is triggered in smooth muscle cells during the transition from fatty streak to fibroatheroma.

    PubMed

    Ho-Tin-Noé, Benoît; Vo, Sophie; Bayles, Richard; Ferrière, Stephen; Ladjal, Hayette; Toumi, Sondes; Deschildre, Catherine; Ollivier, Véronique; Michel, Jean-Baptiste

    2017-04-01

    Recent studies have shown that in addition to being major constituents of the atheromatous core, solid cholesterol crystals (CCs) promote atherosclerotic lesion development and rupture by causing mechanical damage and exerting cytotoxic and pro-inflammatory effects. These findings suggest that targeting CCs might represent a therapeutic strategy for plaque stabilization. However, little is known about how cholesterol crystallization is initiated in human atherothrombotic disease. Here, we investigated these mechanisms. We performed a thorough immunohistological analysis of non-embedded, minimally processed human aortic tissues, combining polarized light and fluorescence microscopy. We found that CC formation was initiated during the fatty streak to fibroatheroma transition in tight association with the death of intralesional smooth muscle cells (SMCs). Cholesterol-loaded human SMCs were capable of producing CCs in vitro, a process that was enhanced by type I collagen and by inhibition of autophagy and cholesterol esterification. The fibrous transition, which was characterized by increased type I collagen expression, was associated with changes in the expression of autophagy and cholesterol flux-related genes, including a decrease in the autophagic adapter p62 and an increase in the cholesterol intracellular transporter Niemann-Pick C1. Collagen was identified as a potent inducer of these changes in SMCs. Collagen-induced changes in cholesterol metabolism and autophagy flux in smooth muscle foam cells at the fibrolipid transition likely contribute to initiate cholesterol crystallization in human atherosclerosis. Also, our data are in support of a protective role of autophagy against CC formation. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 Pathological Society of Great Britain and Ireland. Published by John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  13. Metformin Reverses Development of Pulmonary Hypertension via Aromatase Inhibition.

    PubMed

    Dean, Afshan; Nilsen, Margaret; Loughlin, Lynn; Salt, Ian P; MacLean, Margaret R

    2016-08-01

    Females are more susceptible to pulmonary arterial hypertension than males, although the reasons remain unclear. The hypoglycemic drug, metformin, is reported to have multiple actions, including the inhibition of aromatase and stimulation of AMP-activated protein kinase. Inhibition of aromatase using anastrazole is protective in experimental pulmonary hypertension but whether metformin attenuates pulmonary hypertension through this mechanism remains unknown. We investigated whether metformin affected aromatase activity and if it could reduce the development of pulmonary hypertension in the sugen 5416/hypoxic rat model. We also investigated its influence on proliferation in human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells. Metformin reversed right ventricular systolic pressure, right ventricular hypertrophy, and decreased pulmonary vascular remodeling in the rat. Furthermore, metformin increased rat lung AMP-activated protein kinase signaling, decreased lung and circulating estrogen levels, levels of aromatase, the estrogen metabolizing enzyme; cytochrome P450 1B1 and its transcription factor; the aryl hydrocarbon receptor. In human pulmonary arterial smooth muscle cells, metformin decreased proliferation and decreased estrogen synthesis by decreasing aromatase activity through the PII promoter site of Cyp19a1 Thus, we report for the first time that metformin can reverse pulmonary hypertension through inhibition of aromatase and estrogen synthesis in a manner likely to be mediated by AMP-activated protein kinase.

  14. Theophylline prevents NAD{sup +} depletion via PARP-1 inhibition in human pulmonary epithelial cells

    SciTech Connect

    Moonen, Harald J.J. . E-mail: h.moonen@grat.unimaas.nl; Geraets, Liesbeth; Vaarhorst, Anika; Bast, Aalt; Wouters, Emiel F.M.; Hageman, Geja J.

    2005-12-30

    Oxidative DNA damage, as occurs during exacerbations in chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD), highly activates the nuclear enzyme poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase-1 (PARP-1). This can lead to cellular depletion of its substrate NAD{sup +}, resulting in an energy crisis and ultimately in cell death. Inhibition of PARP-1 results in preservation of the intracellular NAD{sup +} pool, and of NAD{sup +}-dependent cellular processes. In this study, PARP-1 activation by hydrogen peroxide decreased intracellular NAD{sup +} levels in human pulmonary epithelial cells, which was found to be prevented in a dose-dependent manner by theophylline, a widely used compound in the treatment of COPD. This enzyme inhibition by theophylline was confirmed in an ELISA using purified human PARP-1 and was found to be competitive by nature. These findings provide new mechanistic insights into the therapeutic effect of theophylline in oxidative stress-induced lung pathologies.

  15. Pulmonary hypertension

    MedlinePlus

    Pulmonary arterial hypertension; Sporadic primary pulmonary hypertension; Familial primary pulmonary hypertension; Idiopathic pulmonary arterial hypertension; Primary pulmonary hypertension; PPH; Secondary pulmonary ...

  16. Novel effect of 2-aminoethoxydiphenylborate through inhibition of calcium sensitization induced by Rho kinase activation in human detrusor smooth muscle.

    PubMed

    Shahab, Nouval; Kajioka, Shunichi; Takahashi, Ryosuke; Hayashi, Maya; Nakayama, Shinsuke; Sakamoto, Kazuyuki; Takeda, Masahiro; Masuda, Noriyuki; Naito, Seiji

    2013-05-15

    Since the introduction of 2-aminoethoxydiphenylborate (2-APB) as a membrane permeable modulator of inositol (1,4,5)-trisphosphate receptors, subsequent studies have revealed additional actions of this chemical on multiple Ca(2+)-permeable ionic channels in the plasma membrane. However, no reports have yet examined 2-APB as a modulator targeting contractile machinery in smooth muscle, independent of Ca(2+) mobilization, namely Ca(2+) sensitization. Here, we assessed whether or not 2-APB affects intracellular signaling pathways of Ca(2+) sensitization for contraction using α-toxin permeabilized human detrusor smooth muscle. Although contractions were induced by application of Ca(2+)-containing bath solutions, 2-APB had little effect on contractions induced by 1 µM Ca(2+) alone but significantly reversed the carbachol-induced augmentation of Ca(2+)-induced contraction in the presence of guanosine triphosphate (carbachol-induced Ca(2+) sensitization). The rho kinase inhibitor Y-27632 and protein kinase C inhibitor GF-109203X also reversed the carbachol-mediated Ca(2+) sensitization. Additional application of 2-APB caused a small but significant further attenuation of the contraction in the presence of GF-109203X but not in the presence of Y-27632. Like carbachol, the rho kinase activator; sphingosylphosphorylcholine, protein kinase C activator; phorbol 12,13 dibutyrate, and myosin light chain phosphatase inhibitor; calyculin-A all induced Ca(2+) sensitization. However, the inhibitory activity of 2-APB was limited with sphingosylphosphorylcholine-induced Ca(2+) sensitization. This study revealed a novel inhibitory effect of 2-APB on smooth muscle contractility through inhibition of the rho kinase pathway.

  17. Human bronchial smooth muscle cells express adenylyl cyclase isoforms 2, 4, and 6 in distinct membrane microdomains.

    PubMed

    Bogard, Amy S; Xu, Congfeng; Ostrom, Rennolds S

    2011-04-01

    Adenylyl cyclases (AC) are important regulators of airway smooth muscle function, because β-adrenergic receptor (AR) agonists stimulate AC activity and increase airway diameter. We assessed expression of AC isoforms in human bronchial smooth muscle cells (hBSMC). Reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction and immunoblot analyses detected expression of AC2, AC4, and AC6. Forskolin-stimulated AC activity in membranes from hBSMC displayed Ca(2+)-inhibited and G(βγ)-stimulated AC activity, consistent with expression of AC6, AC2, and AC4. Isoproterenol-stimulated AC activity was inhibited by Ca(2+) but unaltered by G(βγ), whereas butaprost-stimulated AC activity was stimulated by G(βγ) but unaffected by Ca(2+) addition. Using sucrose density centrifugation to isolate lipid raft fractions, we found that only AC6 localized in lipid raft fractions, whereas AC2 and AC4 localized in nonraft fractions. Immunoisolation of caveolae using caveolin-1 antibodies yielded Ca(2+)-inhibited AC activity (consistent with AC6 expression), whereas the nonprecipitated material displayed G(βγ)-stimulated AC activity (consistent with expression of AC2 and/or AC4). Overexpression of AC6 enhanced cAMP production in response to isoproterenol and beraprost but did not increase responses to prostaglandin E(2) or butaprost. β(2)AR, but not prostanoid EP(2) or EP(4) receptors, colocalized with AC5/6 in lipid raft fractions. Thus, particular G protein-coupled receptors couple to discreet AC isoforms based, in part, on their colocalization in membrane microdomains. These different cAMP signaling compartments in airway smooth muscle cells are responsive to different hormones and neurotransmitters and can be regulated by different coincident signals such as Ca(2+) and G(βγ).

  18. Interactions between heart rate variability and pulmonary gas exchange efficiency in humans.

    PubMed

    Sin, Peter Y W; Webber, Matthew R; Galletly, Duncan C; Ainslie, Philip N; Brown, Stephen J; Willie, Chris K; Sasse, Alexander; Larsen, Peter D; Tzeng, Yu-Chieh

    2010-07-01

    The respiratory component of heart rate variability (respiratory sinus arrhythmia, RSA) has been associated with improved pulmonary gas exchange efficiency in humans via the apparent clustering and scattering of heart beats in time with the inspiratory and expiratory phases of alveolar ventilation, respectively. However, since human RSA causes only marginal redistribution of heart beats to inspiration, we tested the hypothesis that any association between RSA amplitude and pulmonary gas exchange efficiency may be indirect. In 11 patients with fixed-rate cardiac pacemakers and 10 healthy control subjects, we recorded R-R intervals, respiratory flow, end-tidal gas tension and the ventilatory equivalents for carbon dioxide and oxygen during 'fast' (0.25 Hz) and 'slow' paced breathing (0.10 Hz). Mean heart rate, mean arterial blood pressure, mean arterial pressure fluctuations, tidal volume, end-tidal CO(2), and were similar between pacemaker and control groups in both the fast and slow breathing conditions. Although pacemaker patients had no RSA and slow breathing was associated with a 2.5-fold RSA amplitude increase in control subjects (39 +/- 21 versus 97 +/- 45 ms, P < 0.001), comparable (main effect for breathing frequency, F(1,19) = 76.54, P < 0.001) and reductions (main effect for breathing frequency, F(1,19) = 23.90, P < 0.001) were observed for both cohorts during slow breathing. In addition, the degree of (r = 0.36, P = 0.32) and reductions (r = 0.29, P = 0.43) from fast to slow breathing were not correlated to the degree of associated RSA amplitude enhancements in control subjects. These findings suggest that the association between RSA amplitude and pulmonary gas exchange efficiency during variable-frequency paced breathing observed in prior human work is not contingent on RSA being present. Therefore, whether RSA serves an intrinsic physiological function in optimizing pulmonary gas exchange efficiency in humans requires further experimental validation.

  19. Cyclic peptide *CRRETAWAC* attenuates fibronectin-induced cytokine secretion of human airway smooth muscle cells by inhibiting FAK and p38 MAPK.

    PubMed

    Chu, Mengdi; Ji, Jiani; Cao, Wenhao; Zhang, Huojun; Meng, Dan; Xie, Bangruan; Xu, Shuyun

    2017-10-01

    α5β1 integrin is highly expressed in airway smooth muscle cells and mediate the adhesion of airway smooth muscle cells to fibronectin to regulate airway remodelling in asthma. This study aimed to investigate the effects of synthetic cyclic peptide *CRRETAWAC* on fibronectin-induced cytokine secretion of airway smooth muscle cells and the underlying mechanism. Human airway smooth muscle cells were isolated and treated with fibronectin, IL-13, *CRRETAWAC* peptide, α5β1 integrin-blocking antibody, FAK inhibitor or p38 MAPK inhibitor. The transcription and secretion of eotaxin-1 and RANTES were detected by real-time PCR and ELISA, respectively. The phosphorylation of FAK and MAPKs including p38, ERK1/2 and JNK1/2 was detected by Western blot analysis. The transcription and secretion of eotaxin-1 and RANTES increased in airway smooth muscle cells cultured in fibronectin-coated plates. However, α5β1 integrin-blocking antibody, *CRRETAWAC* peptide, FAK inhibitor or p38 MAPK inhibitor significantly reduced mRNA levels and the secretion of eotaxin-1 and RANTES in airway smooth muscle cells cultured in fibronectin-coated plates. In addition, the phosphorylation of FAK and p38 MAPK was significantly increased in airway smooth muscle cells cultured in fibronectin-coated plates compared to the cells cultured in uncoated plates and was significantly reduced in airway smooth muscle cells treated with *CRRETAWAC* peptide. Fibronectin induces cytokine synthesis and secretion of airway smooth muscle cells. Peptide *CRRETAWAC* antagonizes fibronectin-induced cytokine synthesis and secretion of airway smooth muscle cells via the inhibition of FAK and p38 MAPK, and is a potential agent for the therapy of asthma. © 2017 The Authors. Journal of Cellular and Molecular Medicine published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd and Foundation for Cellular and Molecular Medicine.

  20. Vagal nerve activity contributes to improve the efficiency of pulmonary gas exchange in hypoxic humans.

    PubMed

    Ito, Shoji; Sasano, Hiroshi; Sasano, Nobuko; Hayano, Junichiro; Fisher, Joseph A; Katsuya, Hirotada

    2006-09-01

    The aim of this study was to test our hypothesis that both phasic cardiac vagal activity and tonic pulmonary vagal activity, estimated as respiratory sinus arrhythmia (RSA) and anatomical dead space volume, respectively, contribute to improve the efficiency of pulmonary gas exchange in humans. We examined the effect of blocking vagal nerve activity with atropine on pulmonary gas exchange. Ten healthy volunteers inhaled hypoxic gas with constant tidal volume and respiratory frequency through a respiratory circuit with a respiratory analyser. Arterial partial pressure of O(2) (P(aO(2))) and arterial oxygen saturation (S(pO(2))) were measured, and alveolar-to-arterial P(O(2)) difference (D(A-aO(2))) was calculated. Anatomical dead space (V(D,an)), alveolar dead space (V(D,alv)) and the ratio of physiological dead space to tidal volume (V(D,phys)/V(T)) were measured. Electrocardiogram was recorded, and the amplitude of R-R interval variability in the high-frequency component (RRIHF) was utilized as an index of RSA magnitude. These parameters of pulmonary function were measured before and after administration of atropine (0.02 mg kg(-1)). Decreased RRIHF (P < 0.01) was accompanied by decreases in P(aO(2)) and S(pO(2)) (P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively) and an increase in D(A-aO(2)) (P < 0.05). Anatomical dead space, V(D,alv) and V(D,phys)/V(T) increased (P < 0.01, P < 0.05 and P < 0.01, respectively) after atropine administration. The blockade of the vagal nerve with atropine resulted in an increase in V(D,an) and V(D,alv) and a deterioration of pulmonary oxygenation, accompanied by attenuation of RSA. Our findings suggest that both phasic cardiac and tonic pulmonary vagal nerve activity contribute to improve the efficiency of pulmonary gas exchange in hypoxic conscious humans.

  1. NFATc3 and VIP in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease

    PubMed Central

    Szema, Anthony M.; Forsyth, Edward; Ying, Benjamin; Hamidi, Sayyed A.; Chen, John J.; Hwang, Sonya; Li, Jonathan C.; Sabatini Dwyer, Debra; Ramiro-Diaz, Juan M.; Giermakowska, Wieslawa; Gonzalez Bosc, Laura V.

    2017-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are both debilitating lung diseases which can lead to hypoxemia and pulmonary hypertension (PH). Nuclear Factor of Activated T-cells (NFAT) is a transcription factor implicated in the etiology of vascular remodeling in hypoxic PH. We have previously shown that mice lacking the ability to generate Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide (VIP) develop spontaneous PH, pulmonary arterial remodeling and lung inflammation. Inhibition of NFAT attenuated PH in these mice suggesting a connection between NFAT and VIP. To test the hypotheses that: 1) VIP inhibits NFAT isoform c3 (NFATc3) activity in pulmonary vascular smooth muscle cells; 2) lung NFATc3 activation is associated with disease severity in IPF and COPD patients, and 3) VIP and NFATc3 expression correlate in lung tissue from IPF and COPD patients. NFAT activity was determined in isolated pulmonary arteries from NFAT-luciferase reporter mice. The % of nuclei with NFAT nuclear accumulation was determined in primary human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) cultures; in lung airway epithelia and smooth muscle and pulmonary endothelia and smooth muscle from IPF and COPD patients; and in PASMC from mouse lung sections by fluorescence microscopy. Both NFAT and VIP mRNA levels were measured in lungs from IPF and COPD patients. Empirical strategies applied to test hypotheses regarding VIP, NFATc3 expression and activity, and disease type and severity. This study shows a significant negative correlation between NFAT isoform c3 protein expression levels in PASMC, activity of NFATc3 in pulmonary endothelial cells, expression and activity of NFATc3 in bronchial epithelial cells and lung function in IPF patients, supporting the concept that NFATc3 is activated in the early stages of IPF. We further show that there is a significant positive correlation between NFATc3 mRNA expression and VIP RNA expression only in lungs from IPF patients. In

  2. NFATc3 and VIP in Idiopathic Pulmonary Fibrosis and Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease.

    PubMed

    Szema, Anthony M; Forsyth, Edward; Ying, Benjamin; Hamidi, Sayyed A; Chen, John J; Hwang, Sonya; Li, Jonathan C; Sabatini Dwyer, Debra; Ramiro-Diaz, Juan M; Giermakowska, Wieslawa; Gonzalez Bosc, Laura V

    2017-01-01

    Idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease (COPD) are both debilitating lung diseases which can lead to hypoxemia and pulmonary hypertension (PH). Nuclear Factor of Activated T-cells (NFAT) is a transcription factor implicated in the etiology of vascular remodeling in hypoxic PH. We have previously shown that mice lacking the ability to generate Vasoactive Intestinal Peptide (VIP) develop spontaneous PH, pulmonary arterial remodeling and lung inflammation. Inhibition of NFAT attenuated PH in these mice suggesting a connection between NFAT and VIP. To test the hypotheses that: 1) VIP inhibits NFAT isoform c3 (NFATc3) activity in pulmonary vascular smooth muscle cells; 2) lung NFATc3 activation is associated with disease severity in IPF and COPD patients, and 3) VIP and NFATc3 expression correlate in lung tissue from IPF and COPD patients. NFAT activity was determined in isolated pulmonary arteries from NFAT-luciferase reporter mice. The % of nuclei with NFAT nuclear accumulation was determined in primary human pulmonary artery smooth muscle cell (PASMC) cultures; in lung airway epithelia and smooth muscle and pulmonary endothelia and smooth muscle from IPF and COPD patients; and in PASMC from mouse lung sections by fluorescence microscopy. Both NFAT and VIP mRNA levels were measured in lungs from IPF and COPD patients. Empirical strategies applied to test hypotheses regarding VIP, NFATc3 expression and activity, and disease type and severity. This study shows a significant negative correlation between NFAT isoform c3 protein expression levels in PASMC, activity of NFATc3 in pulmonary endothelial cells, expression and activity of NFATc3 in bronchial epithelial cells and lung function in IPF patients, supporting the concept that NFATc3 is activated in the early stages of IPF. We further show that there is a significant positive correlation between NFATc3 mRNA expression and VIP RNA expression only in lungs from IPF patients. In

  3. Doppler echo evaluation of pulmonary venous-left atrial pressure gradients: human and numerical model studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firstenberg, M. S.; Greenberg, N. L.; Smedira, N. G.; Prior, D. L.; Scalia, G. M.; Thomas, J. D.; Garcia, M. J.

    2000-01-01

    The simplified Bernoulli equation relates fluid convective energy derived from flow velocities to a pressure gradient and is commonly used in clinical echocardiography to determine pressure differences across stenotic orifices. Its application to pulmonary venous flow has not been described in humans. Twelve patients undergoing cardiac surgery had simultaneous high-fidelity pulmonary venous and left atrial pressure measurements and pulmonary venous pulsed Doppler echocardiography performed. Convective gradients for the systolic (S), diastolic (D), and atrial reversal (AR) phases of pulmonary venous flow were determined using the simplified Bernoulli equation and correlated with measured actual pressure differences. A linear relationship was observed between the convective (y) and actual (x) pressure differences for the S (y = 0.23x + 0.0074, r = 0.82) and D (y = 0.22x + 0.092, r = 0.81) waves, but not for the AR wave (y = 0. 030x + 0.13, r = 0.10). Numerical modeling resulted in similar slopes for the S (y = 0.200x - 0.127, r = 0.97), D (y = 0.247x - 0. 354, r = 0.99), and AR (y = 0.087x - 0.083, r = 0.96) waves. Consistent with numerical modeling, the convective term strongly correlates with but significantly underestimates actual gradient because of large inertial forces.

  4. Doppler echo evaluation of pulmonary venous-left atrial pressure gradients: human and numerical model studies

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Firstenberg, M. S.; Greenberg, N. L.; Smedira, N. G.; Prior, D. L.; Scalia, G. M.; Thomas, J. D.; Garcia, M. J.

    2000-01-01

    The simplified Bernoulli equation relates fluid convective energy derived from flow velocities to a pressure gradient and is commonly used in clinical echocardiography to determine pressure differences across stenotic orifices. Its application to pulmonary venous flow has not been described in humans. Twelve patients undergoing cardiac surgery had simultaneous high-fidelity pulmonary venous and left atrial pressure measurements and pulmonary venous pulsed Doppler echocardiography performed. Convective gradients for the systolic (S), diastolic (D), and atrial reversal (AR) phases of pulmonary venous flow were determined using the simplified Bernoulli equation and correlated with measured actual pressure differences. A linear relationship was observed between the convective (y) and actual (x) pressure differences for the S (y = 0.23x + 0.0074, r = 0.82) and D (y = 0.22x + 0.092, r = 0.81) waves, but not for the AR wave (y = 0. 030x + 0.13, r = 0.10). Numerical modeling resulted in similar slopes for the S (y = 0.200x - 0.127, r = 0.97), D (y = 0.247x - 0. 354, r = 0.99), and AR (y = 0.087x - 0.083, r = 0.96) waves. Consistent with numerical modeling, the convective term strongly correlates with but significantly underestimates actual gradient because of large inertial forces.

  5. Differential expression of the keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) and KGF receptor genes in human vascular smooth muscle cells and arteries.

    PubMed

    Winkles, J A; Alberts, G F; Chedid, M; Taylor, W G; DeMartino, S; Rubin, J S

    1997-12-01

    Keratinocyte growth factor (KGF) is a secreted member of the fibroblast growth factor (FGF) family of heparin-binding proteins. Studies reported to date indicate that it functions primarily as an important paracrine mediator of epithelial cell growth and differentiation. KGF appears to act via binding to a specific FGF receptor-2 isoform generated by an alternative splicing mechanism. To determine whether KGF may play a role in vascular smooth muscle cell (SMC) biology, we investigated KGF and KGF receptor gene expression in human SMC cultured in vitro as well as in several human nonatherosclerotic artery and atheroma specimens. KGF mRNA but not KGF receptor mRNA was expressed by SMCs, as determined by Northern blot hybridization analysis or reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assays, respectively. Additional experiments demonstrated that 1) human SMCs produce and secrete mitogenically active KGF and that 2) the cytokine interleukin-1 increases KGF mRNA and protein levels in human SMCs. We also found that KGF transcripts but not KGF receptor transcripts were expressed in control and atherosclerotic human arteries. Taken together, these results indicate that KGF is unlikely to be involved in SMC growth regulation unless it can function intracellularly or interact with a presently unidentified KGF receptor.

  6. G-Protein-Coupled Receptor 35 Mediates Human Saphenous Vein Vascular Smooth Muscle Cell Migration and Endothelial Cell Proliferation

    PubMed Central

    McCallum, Jennifer E.; Mackenzie, Amanda E.; Divorty, Nina; Clarke, Carolyn; Delles, Christian; Milligan, Graeme; Nicklin, Stuart A.

    2016-01-01

    Vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) migration and proliferation is central to neointima formation in vein graft failure following coronary artery bypass. However, there are currently no pharmacological interventions that prevent vein graft failure through intimal occlusion. It is hence a therapeutic target. Here, we investigated the contribution of GPR35 to human VSMC and endothelial cell (EC) migration, using a scratch-wound assay, and also the contribution to proliferation, using MTS and BrdU assays, in in vitro models using recently characterized human GPR35 ortholog-selective small-molecule agonists and antagonists. Real-time PCR studies showed GPR35 to be robustly expressed in human VSMCs and ECs. Stimulation of GPR35, with either the human-selective agonist pamoic acid or the reference agonist zaprinast, promoted VSMC migration in the scratch-wound assay. These effects were blocked by coincubation with either of the human GPR35-specific antagonists, CID-2745687 or ML-145. These GPR35-mediated effects were produced by inducing alterations in the actin cytoskeleton via the Rho A/Rho kinase signaling axis. Additionally, the agonist ligands stimulated a proliferative response in ECs. These studies highlight the potential that small molecules that stimulate or block GPR35 activity can modulate vascular proliferation and migration. These data propose GPR35 as a translational therapeutic target in vascular remodeling. PMID:27064272

  7. Human and Canine Pulmonary Blastomycosis, North Carolina, 2001–2002

    PubMed Central

    Langley, Rick L.; Gerkin, Susan R.; Torok, Michelle R.; MacCormack, J. Newton

    2006-01-01

    We investigated a cluster of blastomycosis in 8 humans and 4 dogs in a rural North Carolina community. Delayed diagnosis, difficulty isolating Blastomyces dermatitidis in nature, and lack of a sensitive and specific test to assess exposure make outbreaks of this disease difficult to study. PMID:16965704

  8. The nuclear receptor NOR-1/NR4A3 regulates the multifunctional glycoprotein vitronectin in human vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Martí-Pàmies, Ingrid; Cañes, Laia; Alonso, Judith; Rodríguez, Cristina; Martínez-González, José

    2017-10-01

    The nuclear receptor NOR-1 (NR4A3) has recently been involved in the regulation of extracellular matrix (ECM) proteins associated with neointimal thickening and the vascular control of hemostasis. We sought to find as-yet unidentified NOR-1 target genes in human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). An in silico analysis identified putative NOR-1 response elements in the proximal promoter region of several genes encoding for ECM proteins, including vitronectin (VTN). Lentiviral overexpression of NOR-1 strongly increased VTN mRNA and protein levels, whereas NOR-1 silencing significantly reduced VTN expression. Deletion and site-directed mutagenesis studies, as well as EMSA and chromatin immunoprecipitation, identified the NBRE(-202/-195) site in the VTN promoter as an essential element for NOR-1 responsiveness. Furthermore, NOR-1 and VTN colocalized in VSMCs in human atherosclerotic lesions. VTN levels were increased in cell supernatants from VSMCs that overexpress NOR-1. Cell supernatants from VSMCs overexpressing NOR-1 induced cell migration to a greater extent than supernatants from control cells, and this effect was attenuated when cell supernatants were preincubated with anti-VTN blocking antibodies or VTN was silenced in supernatant-generating cells. These results indicate that VTN is a target of NOR-1 and suggest that this multifunctional glycoprotein may participate in vascular responses mediated by this nuclear receptor.-Martí-Pàmies, I., Cañes, L., Alonso, J., Rodríguez, C., Martínez-González, J. The nuclear receptor NOR-1/NR4A3 regulates the multifunctional glycoprotein vitronectin in human vascular smooth muscle cells. © FASEB.

  9. A novel inhibitory effect of oxazol-5-one compounds on ROCKII signaling in human coronary artery vascular smooth muscle cells.

    PubMed

    Al-Ghabkari, Abdulhameed; Deng, Jing-Ti; McDonald, Paul C; Dedhar, Shoukat; Alshehri, Mana; Walsh, Michael P; MacDonald, Justin A

    2016-08-30

    The selectivity of (4Z)-2-(4-chloro-3-nitrophenyl)-4-(pyridin-3-ylmethylidene)-1,3-oxazol-5-one (DI) for zipper-interacting protein kinase (ZIPK) was previously described by in silico computational modeling, screening a large panel of kinases, and determining the inhibition efficacy. Our assessment of DI revealed another target, the Rho-associated coiled-coil-containing protein kinase 2 (ROCKII). In vitro studies showed DI to be a competitive inhibitor of ROCKII (Ki, 132 nM with respect to ATP). This finding was supported by in silico molecular surface docking of DI with the ROCKII ATP-binding pocket. Time course analysis of myosin regulatory light chain (LC20) phosphorylation catalyzed by ROCKII in vitro revealed a significant decrease upon treatment with DI. ROCKII signaling was investigated in situ in human coronary artery vascular smooth muscle cells (CASMCs). ROCKII down-regulation using siRNA revealed several potential substrates involved in smooth muscle contraction (e.g., LC20, Par-4, MYPT1) and actin cytoskeletal dynamics (cofilin). The application of DI to CASMCs attenuated LC20, Par-4, LIMK, and cofilin phosphorylations. Notably, cofilin phosphorylation was not significantly decreased with a novel ZIPK selective inhibitor (HS-38). In addition, CASMCs treated with DI underwent cytoskeletal changes that were associated with diminution of cofilin phosphorylation. We conclude that DI is not selective for ZIPK and is a potent inhibitor of ROCKII.

  10. Grape seed procyanidin b2 inhibits human aortic smooth muscle cell proliferation and migration induced by advanced glycation end products.

    PubMed

    Cai, Qian; Li, Bao-ying; Gao, Hai-qing; Zhang, Jian-hua; Wang, Jun-fu; Yu, Fei; Yin, Mei; Zhang, Zhen

    2011-01-01

    Advanced glycation end product (AGE)-induced vascular smooth muscle cell (VSMC) proliferation is vital to the progression of diabetic vasculopathy. A grape seed procyanidin extract has been reported to possess anti-oxidative and anti-inflammatory properties and to display a significant cardiovascular protective effect, but little is know about the underlying mechanism. The objective of this present study was to determine whether GSPB2 (grape seed procyanidin B2), which is a dimeric procyanidin and more biologically active, could inhibit AGE-induced VSMC proliferation by affecting the production of ubiquitin COOH-terminal hydrolase 1 (UCH-L1), the degradation of IκB-α and nuclear translocation of NF-κB in human aortic smooth muscle cells (HASMCs). Our data show that GSPB2 preincubation markedly inhibited AGE-induced proliferation and migration of HASMCs in a dose-dependent manner and upregulated the protein level of UCH-L1. Further studies revealed that the GSPB2 pretreatment markedly attenuated the degradation of IκB-α and nuclear translocation of NF-κB by modulating ubiquitination of IκB-α in AGE-exposed HASMCs. These results collectively suggest that AGE-induced HASMC proliferation and migration was suppressed by GSPB2 through regulating UCH-L1 and ubiquitination of IκB-α. GSPB2 may therefore have therapeutic potential in preventing and treating vascular complications of diabet