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Sample records for human rad51 variant

  1. Interactions involving the Rad51 paralogs Rad51C and XRCC3 in human cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiese, Claudia; Collins, David W.; Albala, Joanna S.; Thompson, Larry H.; Kronenberg, Amy; Schild, David; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Homologous recombinational repair of DNA double-strand breaks and crosslinks in human cells is likely to require Rad51 and the five Rad51 paralogs (XRCC2, XRCC3, Rad51B/Rad51L1, Rad51C/Rad51L2 and Rad51D/Rad51L3), as has been shown in chicken and rodent cells. Previously, we reported on the interactions among these proteins using baculovirus and two- and three-hybrid yeast systems. To test for interactions involving XRCC3 and Rad51C, stable human cell lines have been isolated that express (His)6-tagged versions of XRCC3 or Rad51C. Ni2+-binding experiments demonstrate that XRCC3 and Rad51C interact in human cells. In addition, we find that Rad51C, but not XRCC3, interacts directly or indirectly with Rad51B, Rad51D and XRCC2. These results argue that there are at least two complexes of Rad51 paralogs in human cells (Rad51C-XRCC3 and Rad51B-Rad51C-Rad51D-XRCC2), both containing Rad51C. Moreover, Rad51 is not found in these complexes. X-ray treatment did not alter either the level of any Rad51 paralog or the observed interactions between paralogs. However, the endogenous level of Rad51C is moderately elevated in the XRCC3-overexpressing cell line, suggesting that dimerization between these proteins might help stabilize Rad51C.

  2. Complex formation by the human Rad51B and Rad51C DNA repair proteins and their activities in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lio, Yi-Ching; Mazin, Alexander V.; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.; Chen, David J.

    2003-01-01

    The human Rad51 protein is essential for DNA repair by homologous recombination. In addition to Rad51 protein, five paralogs have been identified: Rad51B/Rad51L1, Rad51C/Rad51L2, Rad51D/Rad51L3, XRCC2, and XRCC3. To further characterize a subset of these proteins, recombinant Rad51, Rad51B-(His)(6), and Rad51C proteins were individually expressed employing the baculovirus system, and each was purified from Sf9 insect cells. Evidence from nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid pull-down experiments demonstrates a highly stable Rad51B.Rad51C heterodimer, which interacts weakly with Rad51. Rad51B and Rad51C proteins were found to bind single- and double-stranded DNA and to preferentially bind 3'-end-tailed double-stranded DNA. The ability to bind DNA was elevated with mixed Rad51 and Rad51C, as well as with mixed Rad51B and Rad51C, compared with that of the individual protein. In addition, both Rad51B and Rad51C exhibit DNA-stimulated ATPase activity. Rad51C displays an ATP-independent apparent DNA strand exchange activity, whereas Rad51B shows no such activity; this apparent strand exchange ability results actually from a duplex DNA destabilization capability of Rad51C. By analogy to the yeast Rad55 and Rad57, our results suggest that Rad51B and Rad51C function through interactions with the human Rad51 recombinase and play a crucial role in the homologous recombinational repair pathway.

  3. The Tumor-Associated Variant RAD51 G151D Induces a Hyper-Recombination Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Marsden, Carolyn G.; Jensen, Ryan B.; Zagelbaum, Jennifer; Rothenberg, Eli; Morrical, Scott W.; Wallace, Susan S.; Sweasy, Joann B.

    2016-01-01

    The RAD51 protein plays a key role in the homology-directed repair of DNA double-strand breaks and is important for maintaining genome stability. Here we report on a novel human RAD51 variant found in an aggressive and therapy-refractive breast carcinoma. Expression of the RAD51 G151D variant in human breast epithelial cells increases the levels of homology-directed repair. Expression of RAD51 G151D in cells also promotes high levels of chromosomal aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges. In vitro, the purified RAD51 G151D protein directly and significantly enhances DNA strand exchange activity in the presence of RPA. In concordance with this result, co-incubation of G151D with BRCA2 resulted in a much higher level of strand-exchange activity compared to WT RAD51. Strikingly, the RAD51 G151D variant confers resistance to multiple DNA damaging agents, including ionizing radiation, mitomycin C, and doxorubicin. Our findings demonstrate that the RAD51 G151D somatic variant has a novel hyper-recombination phenotype and suggest that this property of the protein is important for the repair of DNA damage, leading to drug resistance. PMID:27513445

  4. ATP-dependent nucleosome unwrapping catalyzed by human RAD51.

    PubMed

    North, Justin A; Amunugama, Ravindra; Klajner, Marcelina; Bruns, Aaron N; Poirier, Michael G; Fishel, Richard

    2013-08-01

    Double-strand breaks (DSB) occur in chromatin following replication fork collapse and chemical or physical damage [Symington and Gautier (Double-strand break end resection and repair pathway choice. Annu. Rev. Genet. 2011;45:247-271.)] and may be repaired by homologous recombination (HR) and non-homologous end-joining. Nucleosomes are the fundamental units of chromatin and must be remodeled during DSB repair by HR [Andrews and Luger (Nucleosome structure(s) and stability: variations on a theme. Annu. Rev. Biophys. 2011;40:99-117.)]. Physical initiation of HR requires RAD51, which forms a nucleoprotein filament (NPF) that catalyzes homologous pairing and strand exchange (recombinase) between DNAs that ultimately bridges the DSB gap [San Filippo, Sung and Klein. (Mechanism of eukaryotic HR. Annu. Rev. Biochem. 2008;77:229-257.)]. RAD51 forms an NPF on single-stranded DNA and double-stranded DNA (dsDNA). Although the single-stranded DNA NPF is essential for recombinase initiation, the role of the dsDNA NPF is less clear. Here, we demonstrate that the human RAD51 (HsRAD51) dsDNA NPF disassembles nucleosomes by unwrapping the DNA from the core histones. HsRAD51 that has been constitutively or biochemically activated for recombinase functions displays significantly reduced nucleosome disassembly activity. These results suggest that HsRAD51 can perform ATP hydrolysis-dependent nucleosome disassembly in addition to its recombinase functions. PMID:23757189

  5. Tumor-associated mutations in a conserved structural motif alter physical and biochemical properties of human RAD51 recombinase

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Jianhong; Morrical, Milagros D.; Donigan, Katherine A.; Weidhaas, Joanne B.; Sweasy, Joann B.; Averill, April M.; Tomczak, Jennifer A.; Morrical, Scott W.

    2015-01-01

    Human RAD51 protein catalyzes DNA pairing and strand exchange reactions that are central to homologous recombination and homology-directed DNA repair. Successful recombination/repair requires the formation of a presynaptic filament of RAD51 on ssDNA. Mutations in BRCA2 and other proteins that control RAD51 activity are associated with human cancer. Here we describe a set of mutations associated with human breast tumors that occur in a common structural motif of RAD51. Tumor-associated D149N, R150Q and G151D mutations map to a Schellman loop motif located on the surface of the RecA homology domain of RAD51. All three variants are proficient in DNA strand exchange, but G151D is slightly more sensitive to salt than wild-type (WT). Both G151D and R150Q exhibit markedly lower catalytic efficiency for adenosine triphosphate hydrolysis compared to WT. All three mutations alter the physical properties of RAD51 nucleoprotein filaments, with G151D showing the most dramatic changes. G151D forms mixed nucleoprotein filaments with WT RAD51 that have intermediate properties compared to unmixed filaments. These findings raise the possibility that mutations in RAD51 itself may contribute to genome instability in tumor cells, either directly through changes in recombinase properties, or indirectly through changes in interactions with regulatory proteins. PMID:25539919

  6. Ca2+ activates human homologous recombination protein Rad51 by modulating its ATPase activity

    PubMed Central

    Bugreev, Dmitry V.; Mazin, Alexander V.

    2004-01-01

    Human Rad51 (hRad51) protein plays a key role in homologous recombination and DNA repair. hRad51 protein forms a helical filament on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), which performs the basic steps of homologous recombination: a search for homologous double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) and DNA strand exchange. hRad51 protein possesses DNA-dependent ATPase activity; however, the role of this activity has not been understood. Our current results show that Ca2+ greatly stimulates DNA strand exchange activity of hRad51 protein. We found that Ca2+ exerts its stimulatory effect by modulating the ATPase activity of hRad51 protein. Our data demonstrate that, in the presence of Mg2+, the hRad51-ATP-ssDNA filament is quickly converted to an inactive hRad51-ADP-ssDNA form, due to relatively rapid ATP hydrolysis and slow dissociation of ADP. Ca2+ maintains the active hRad51-ATP-ssDNA filament by reducing the ATP hydrolysis rate. These findings demonstrate a crucial role of the ATPase activity in regulation of DNA strand exchange activity of hRad51 protein. This mechanism of Rad51 protein regulation by modulating its ATPase activity is evolutionarily recent; we found no such mechanism for yeast Rad51 (yRad51) protein. PMID:15226506

  7. A region of human BRCA2 containing multiple BRC repeats promotes RAD51-mediated strand exchange.

    PubMed

    Shivji, Mahmud K K; Davies, Owen R; Savill, Jane M; Bates, Debbie L; Pellegrini, Luca; Venkitaraman, Ashok R

    2006-01-01

    Human BRCA2, a breast and ovarian cancer suppressor, binds to the DNA recombinase RAD51 through eight conserved BRC repeats, motifs of approximately 30 residues, dispersed across a large region of the protein. BRCA2 is essential for homologous recombination in vivo, but isolated BRC repeat peptides can prevent the assembly of RAD51 into active nucleoprotein filaments in vitro, suggesting a model in which BRCA2 sequesters RAD51 in undamaged cells, and promotes recombinase function after DNA damage. How BRCA2 might fulfill these dual functions is unclear. We have purified a fragment of human BRCA2 (BRCA2(BRC1-8)) with 1127 residues spanning all 8 BRC repeats but excluding the C-terminal DNA-binding domain (BRCA2(CTD)). BRCA2(BRC1-8) binds RAD51 nucleoprotein filaments in a ternary complex, indicating it may organize RAD51 on DNA. Human RAD51 is relatively ineffective in vitro at strand exchange between homologous DNA molecules unless non-physiological ions like NH4+ are present. In an ionic milieu more typical of the mammalian nucleus, BRCA2(BRCI-8) stimulates RAD51-mediated strand exchange, suggesting it may be an essential co-factor in vivo. Thus, the human BRC repeats, embedded within their surronding sequences as an eight-repeat unit, mediate homologous recombination independent of the BRCA2(CTD) through a previously unrecognized role in control of RAD51 activity.

  8. RAD54 family translocases counter genotoxic effects of RAD51 in human tumor cells

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Jennifer M.; Dusad, Kritika; Wright, William Douglass; Grubb, Jennifer; Budke, Brian; Heyer, Wolf-Dietrich; Connell, Philip P.; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Bishop, Douglas K.

    2015-01-01

    The RAD54 family DNA translocases have several biochemical activities. One activity, demonstrated previously for the budding yeast translocases, is ATPase-dependent disruption of RAD51-dsDNA binding. This activity is thought to promote dissociation of RAD51 from heteroduplex DNA following strand exchange during homologous recombination. In addition, previous experiments in budding yeast have shown that the same activity of Rad54 removes Rad51 from undamaged sites on chromosomes; mutants lacking Rad54 accumulate nonrepair-associated complexes that can block growth and lead to chromosome loss. Here, we show that human RAD54 also promotes the dissociation of RAD51 from dsDNA and not ssDNA. We also show that translocase depletion in tumor cell lines leads to the accumulation of RAD51 on chromosomes, forming complexes that are not associated with markers of DNA damage. We further show that combined depletion of RAD54L and RAD54B and/or artificial induction of RAD51 overexpression blocks replication and promotes chromosome segregation defects. These results support a model in which RAD54L and RAD54B counteract genome-destabilizing effects of direct binding of RAD51 to dsDNA in human tumor cells. Thus, in addition to having genome-stabilizing DNA repair activity, human RAD51 has genome-destabilizing activity when expressed at high levels, as is the case in many human tumors. PMID:25765654

  9. Elevated recombination in immortal human cells is mediated by HsRAD51 recombinase.

    PubMed

    Xia, S J; Shammas, M A; Shmookler Reis, R J

    1997-12-01

    Normal diploid cells have a limited replicative potential in culture, with progressively increasing interdivision time. Rarely, cell lines arise which can divide indefinitely; like tumor cells, such "immortal" lines display frequent chromosomal aberrations which may reflect high rates of recombination. Recombination frequencies within a plasmid substrate were 3.5-fold higher in nine immortal human cell lines than in six untransformed cell strains. Expression of HsRAD51, a human homolog of the yeast RAD51 and Escherichia coli recA recombinase genes, was 4.5-fold higher in immortal cell lines than in mortal cells. Stable transformation of human fibroblasts with simian virus 40 large T antigen prior to cell immortalization increased both chromosomal recombination and the level of HsRAD51 transcripts by two- to fivefold. T-antigen induction of recombination was efficiently blocked by introduction of HsRAD51 antisense (but not control) oligonucleotides spanning the initiation codon, implying that HsRAD51 expression mediates augmented recombination. Since p53 binds and inactivates HsRAD51, T-antigen-p53 association may block such inactivation and liberate HsRAD51. Upregulation of HsRAD51 transcripts in T-antigen-transformed and other immortal cells suggests that recombinase activation can also occur at the RNA level and may facilitate cell transformation to immortality.

  10. Real-time assembly and disassembly of human RAD51 filaments on individual DNA molecules

    PubMed Central

    van der Heijden, Thijn; Seidel, Ralf; Modesti, Mauro; Kanaar, Roland; Wyman, Claire; Dekker, Cees

    2007-01-01

    The human DNA repair protein RAD51 is the crucial component of helical nucleoprotein filaments that drive homologous recombination. The molecular mechanistic details of how this structure facilitates the requisite DNA strand rearrangements are not known but must involve dynamic interactions between RAD51 and DNA. Here, we report the real-time kinetics of human RAD51 filament assembly and disassembly on individual molecules of both single- and double-stranded DNA, as measured using magnetic tweezers. The relative rates of nucleation and filament extension are such that the observed filament formation consists of multiple nucleation events that are in competition with each other. For varying concentration of RAD51, a Hill coefficient of 4.3 ± 0.5 is obtained for both nucleation and filament extension, indicating binding to dsDNA with a binding unit consisting of multiple (≥4) RAD51 monomers. We report Monte Carlo simulations that fit the (dis)assembly data very well. The results show that, surprisingly, human RAD51 does not form long continuous filaments on DNA. Instead each nucleoprotein filament consists of a string of many small filament patches that are only a few tens of monomers long. The high flexibility and dynamic nature of this arrangement is likely to facilitate strand exchange. PMID:17709342

  11. RAD51 and Breast Cancer Susceptibility: No Evidence for Rare Variant Association in the Breast Cancer Family Registry Study

    PubMed Central

    Le Calvez-Kelm, Florence; Oliver, Javier; Damiola, Francesca; Forey, Nathalie; Robinot, Nivonirina; Durand, Geoffroy; Voegele, Catherine; Vallée, Maxime P.; Byrnes, Graham; Registry, Breast Cancer Family; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Andrulis, Irene L.; John, Esther M.; Tavtigian, Sean V.; Lesueur, Fabienne

    2012-01-01

    Background Although inherited breast cancer has been associated with germline mutations in genes that are functionally involved in the DNA homologous recombination repair (HRR) pathway, including BRCA1, BRCA2, TP53, ATM, BRIP1, CHEK2 and PALB2, about 70% of breast cancer heritability remains unexplained. Because of their critical functions in maintaining genome integrity and already well-established associations with breast cancer susceptibility, it is likely that additional genes involved in the HRR pathway harbor sequence variants associated with increased risk of breast cancer. RAD51 plays a central biological function in DNA repair and despite the fact that rare, likely dysfunctional variants in three of its five paralogs, RAD51C, RAD51D, and XRCC2, have been associated with breast and/or ovarian cancer risk, no population-based case-control mutation screening data are available for the RAD51 gene. We thus postulated that RAD51 could harbor rare germline mutations that confer increased risk of breast cancer. Methodology/Principal Findings We screened the coding exons and proximal splice junction regions of the gene for germline sequence variation in 1,330 early-onset breast cancer cases and 1,123 controls from the Breast Cancer Family Registry, using the same population-based sampling and analytical strategy that we developed for assessment of rare sequence variants in ATM and CHEK2. In total, 12 distinct very rare or private variants were characterized in RAD51, with 10 cases (0.75%) and 9 controls (0.80%) carrying such a variant. Variants were either likely neutral missense substitutions (3), silent substitutions (4) or non-coding substitutions (5) that were predicted to have little effect on efficiency of the splicing machinery. Conclusion Altogether, our data suggest that RAD51 tolerates so little dysfunctional sequence variation that rare variants in the gene contribute little, if anything, to breast cancer susceptibility. PMID:23300655

  12. RAD51 interacts with the evolutionarily conserved BRC motifs in the human breast cancer susceptibility gene brca2.

    PubMed

    Wong, A K; Pero, R; Ormonde, P A; Tavtigian, S V; Bartel, P L

    1997-12-19

    Recent work has shown that the murine BRCA2 tumor suppressor protein interacts with the murine RAD51 protein. This interaction suggests that BRCA2 participates in DNA repair. Residues 3196-3232 of the murine BRCA2 protein were shown to be involved in this interaction. Here, we report the detailed mapping of additional domains that are involved in interactions between the human homologs of these two proteins. Through yeast two-hybrid and biochemical assays, we demonstrate that the RAD51 protein interacts specifically with the eight evolutionarily conserved BRC motifs encoded in exon 11 of brca2 and with a similar motif found in a Caenorhabditis elegans hypothetical protein. Deletion analysis demonstrates that residues 98-339 of human RAD51 interact with the 59-residue minimal region that is conserved in all BRC motifs. These data suggest that the BRC repeats function to bind RAD51.

  13. Prodigiosin-induced cytotoxicity involves RAD51 down-regulation through the JNK and p38 MAPK pathways in human breast carcinoma cell lines.

    PubMed

    Lu, Chien-Hsing; Lin, Shin-Chang; Yang, Shu-Yi; Pan, Mu-Yun; Lin, Yun-Wei; Hsu, Chun-Yi; Wei, Yu-Hong; Chang, Jo-Shu; Chang, Chia-Che

    2012-07-01

    RAD51 is essential for homologous recombination (HR)-mediated repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in mammalian cells. RAD51 is an attractive target for anticancer drugs, given high RAD51 levels are frequently observed in many human tumors and associated with increased resistance to DSBs-inducing chemotherapeutics. Prodigiosin is a bacterial tripyrrole pigment with potent anticancer activity and also provokes DSBs. We hereby aimed to elucidate the role of RAD51 in prodigiosin-induced cytotoxicity. Prodigiosin was found to down-regulate RAD51 in multiple human breast carcinoma cell lines irrespective of p53 status. Mechanistically, prodigiosin lowered RAD51 mRNA expression, whereas blockade of proteasome-mediated degradation failed to restore RAD51 levels following prodigiosin treatment. In addition, prodigiosin triggered phosphorylation of JNK and p38 MAPK, while pharmacological inhibition of JNK or p38 MAPK attenuated prodigiosin-mediated inhibition of RAD51 mRNA expression. Lastly, cells with enforced RAD51 expression showed increased resistance to prodigiosin-induced cytotoxicity as well as inhibition of colony formation. Collectively, we conclude that RAD51 down-regulation represents one of the modes of prodigiosin's cytotoxic action, ostensibly by augmenting the genotoxic effect of prodigiosin through suppression of RAD51-mediated HR repair. Our findings further implicate the use of prodigiosin to potentiate the cytotoxicity of DSB-inducing chemotherapeutics through RAD51 down-regulation.

  14. A variant of the breast cancer type 2 susceptibility protein (BRC) repeat is essential for the RECQL5 helicase to interact with RAD51 recombinase for genome stabilization.

    PubMed

    Islam, M Nurul; Paquet, Nicolas; Fox, David; Dray, Eloise; Zheng, Xiao-Feng; Klein, Hannah; Sung, Patrick; Wang, Weidong

    2012-07-01

    The BRC repeat is a structural motif in the tumor suppressor BRCA2 (breast cancer type 2 susceptibility protein), which promotes homologous recombination (HR) by regulating RAD51 recombinase activity. To date, the BRC repeat has not been observed in other proteins, so that its role in HR is inferred only in the context of BRCA2. Here, we identified a BRC repeat variant, named BRCv, in the RECQL5 helicase, which possesses anti-recombinase activity in vitro and suppresses HR and promotes cellular resistance to camptothecin-induced replication stress in vivo. RECQL5-BRCv interacted with RAD51 through two conserved motifs similar to those in the BRCA2-BRC repeat. Mutations of either motif compromised functions of RECQL5, including association with RAD51, inhibition of RAD51-mediated D-loop formation, suppression of sister chromatid exchange, and resistance to camptothecin-induced replication stress. Potential BRCvs were also found in other HR regulatory proteins, including Srs2 and Sgs1, which possess anti-recombinase activities similar to that of RECQL5. A point mutation in the predicted Srs2-BRCv disrupted the ability of the protein to bind RAD51 and to inhibit D-loop formation. Thus, BRC is a common RAD51 interaction module that can be utilized by different proteins to either promote HR, as in the case of BRCA2, or to suppress HR, as in RECQL5.

  15. Identification and characterization of human Rad51 inhibitors by screening of an existing drug library.

    PubMed

    Normand, Anaïs; Rivière, Emmanuelle; Renodon-Cornière, Axelle

    2014-10-01

    Homologous Recombination (HR) plays an essential role in cellular proliferation and in maintaining genomic stability by repairing DNA double-stranded breaks that appear during replication. Rad51, a key protein of HR in eukaryotes, can have an elevated expression level in tumor cells, which correlates with their resistance to anticancer therapies. Therefore, targeted inhibition of Rad51 through inhibitor may improve the tumor response to these therapies. In order to identify small molecules that inhibit Rad51 activity, we screened the Prestwick Library (1120 molecules) for their effect on the strand exchange reaction catalyzed by Rad51. We found that Chicago Sky Blue (CSB) is a potent inhibitor of Rad51, showing IC₅₀ values in the low nanomolar range (400 nM). Biochemical analysis demonstrated that the inhibitory mechanism probably occurs by disrupting the Rad51 association with the single-stranded DNA, which prevents the nucleoprotein filament formation, the first step of the protein activity. Structure Activity Relationship analysis with a number of compounds that shared structure homology with CSB was also performed. The sensitivity of Rad51 inhibition to CSB modifications suggests specific interactions between the molecule and Rad51 nucleofilament. CSB and some of its analogs open up new perspectives in the search for agents capable of potentiating chemo- and radio-therapy treatments for cancer. Moreover, these compounds may be excellent tools to analyze Rad51 cellular functions. Our study also highlights how CSB and its analogs, which are frequently used in colorants, stains and markers, could be responsible of unwanted side effects by perturbing the DNA repair process. PMID:25124703

  16. Induction of Rad51 protein levels by p38 MAPK decreases cytotoxicity and mutagenicity in benzo[a]pyrene-exposed human lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, S.-M.; Wang, L.-H.; Hong, J.-H.; Lin, Y.-W.

    2008-08-01

    Rad51 is an essential component of the homologous recombination repair pathway. Abnormal expression of Rad51 has been reported in various carcinomas. Benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), a polycyclic hydrocarbon carcinogen found in the environment, induces cancer in multiple organs. B[a]P has been shown to activate the p38 MAPK signaling pathway in mammalian cells. The prime purpose of this study was to determine how B[a]P activates the p38 MAPK signaling pathway, and how this then regulates Rad51 expression in human cancer cells. Exposure of human lung cancer cells with B[a]P increased Rad51 protein levels in a time- and dose-dependent fashion. B[a]P also induced Rad51 mRNA and protein synthesis. Blockage of p38 MAPK activation by SB202190 or small interfering RNA (si-p38) decreased B[a]P-elicited Rad51 protein levels by increasing Rad51 protein instability, but did not affect Rad51 mRNA transcription. Furthermore, enhancement of p38 MAPK signaling by constitutively active MKK6 (MKK6E) increased Rad51 protein levels and protein stability. Moreover, B[a]P-induced cytotoxicity and mutagenicity were significantly increased in cells depleted of endogenous Rad51. Taken together, these results indicate that Rad51 protein provides a critical role in inhibiting the cytotoxicity and mutagenicity of B[a]P in B[a]P-treated human lung cancer cells. Furthermore, the work points to an unexpected role of p38 MAPK signaling in the control of Rad51 protein stability in response to B[a]P exposure.

  17. p53 is involved in clearance of ionizing radiation-induced RAD51 foci in a human colon cancer cell line

    SciTech Connect

    Orre, Lukas M. . E-mail: Lukas.Orre@ki.se; Stenerloew, Bo; Dhar, Sumeer; Larsson, Rolf; Lewensohn, Rolf; Lehtioe, Janne

    2006-04-21

    We have investigated p53-related differences in cellular response to DNA damaging agents, focusing on p53s effects on RAD51 protein level and sub-cellular localization post exposure to ionizing radiation. In a human colon cancer cell line, HCT116 and its isogenic p53-/- subcell line we show here p53-independent RAD51 foci formation but interestingly the resolution of RAD51 foci showed clear p53 dependence. In p53 wt cells, but not in p53-/- cells, RAD51 protein level decreased 48 h post irradiation and fluorescence immunostaining showed resolution of RAD51 foci and relocalization of RAD51 to nucleoli at time points corresponding to the decrease in RAD51 protein level. Both cell lines rejoined DNA double strand breaks efficiently with similar kinetics and p53 status did not influence sensitivity to DNA damaging agents. We suggest that p53 has a role in RAD51 clearance post DSB repair and that nucleoli might be sites of RAD51 protein degradation.

  18. Selective chromatid segregation mechanism invoked for the human congenital mirror hand movement disorder development by RAD51 mutations: a hypothesis.

    PubMed

    Klar, Amar J S

    2014-01-01

    The vertebrate body plan externally is largely symmetrical across the midline but internal organs develop asymmetrically. The biological basis of asymmetric organ development has been investigated extensively for years, although the proposed mechanisms remain controversial. By comparison, the biological origin of external organs symmetry has not been extensively investigated. Bimanual hand control is one such external organs symmetry allowing independent motor control movements of both hands to a person. This gap in our knowledge is illustrated by the recent reports of heterozygous rad51 mutations causing mysterious symptoms of congenital mirror hand movement disorder (MM) in humans with 50% penetrance by an unknown mechanism. The analysis of mutations that vary symmetry or asymmetry could be exploited to decipher the mechanisms of laterality development. Here I present a hypothesis for explaining 50% penetrance of the rad51 mutation. The MM's origin is explained with the Somatic Strand-specific Imprinting and selective sister chromatid Segregation (SSIS) hypothesis proposed originally as the mechanism of asymmetric cell division to promote visceral organs body plan laterality development in vertebrates. By hypothesis, random sister chromatid segregation in mitosis occurs for a specific chromosome due to rad51/RAD51 constitution causing MM disorder development in 50% of subjects. PMID:25210500

  19. Inhibition of filament formation of human Rad51 protein by a small peptide derived from the BRC-motif of the BRCA2 protein.

    PubMed

    Nomme, Julian; Takizawa, Yoshimasa; Martinez, Susan F; Renodon-Cornière, Axelle; Fleury, Fabrice; Weigel, Pierre; Yamamoto, Ken-ichi; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi; Takahashi, Masayuki

    2008-05-01

    Human Rad51 is a key element of recombinational DNA repair and is related to the resistance of cancer cells to chemo- and radiotherapies. The protein is thus a potential target of anti-cancer treatment. The crystallographic analysis shows that the BRC-motif of the BRCA2 tumor suppressor is in contact with the subunit-subunit interface of Rad51 and could thus prevent filament formation of Rad51. However, biochemical analysis indicates that a BRC-motif peptide of 69 amino acids preferentially binds to the N-terminal part of Rad51. We show experimentally that a short peptide of 28 amino acids derived from the BRC4 motif binds to the subunit-subunit interface and dissociates its filament, both in the presence and absence of DNA, certainly by binding to dissociated monomers. The inhibition is efficient and specific for Rad51: the peptide does not even interact with Rad51 homologs or prevent their interaction with DNA. Neither the N-terminal nor the C-terminal half of the peptide interacts with human Rad51, indicating that both parts are involved in the interaction, as expected from the crystal structure. These results suggest the possibility of developing inhibitors of human Rad51 based on this peptide.

  20. Interrogation of the protein-protein interactions between human BRCA2 BRC repeats and RAD51 reveals atomistic determinants of affinity.

    PubMed

    Cole, Daniel J; Rajendra, Eeson; Roberts-Thomson, Meredith; Hardwick, Bryn; McKenzie, Grahame J; Payne, Mike C; Venkitaraman, Ashok R; Skylaris, Chris-Kriton

    2011-07-01

    The breast cancer suppressor BRCA2 controls the recombinase RAD51 in the reactions that mediate homologous DNA recombination, an essential cellular process required for the error-free repair of DNA double-stranded breaks. The primary mode of interaction between BRCA2 and RAD51 is through the BRC repeats, which are ∼35 residue peptide motifs that interact directly with RAD51 in vitro. Human BRCA2, like its mammalian orthologues, contains 8 BRC repeats whose sequence and spacing are evolutionarily conserved. Despite their sequence conservation, there is evidence that the different human BRC repeats have distinct capacities to bind RAD51. A previously published crystal structure reports the structural basis of the interaction between human BRC4 and the catalytic core domain of RAD51. However, no structural information is available regarding the binding of the remaining seven BRC repeats to RAD51, nor is it known why the BRC repeats show marked variation in binding affinity to RAD51 despite only subtle sequence variation. To address these issues, we have performed fluorescence polarisation assays to indirectly measure relative binding affinity, and applied computational simulations to interrogate the behaviour of the eight human BRC-RAD51 complexes, as well as a suite of BRC cancer-associated mutations. Our computational approaches encompass a range of techniques designed to link sequence variation with binding free energy. They include MM-PBSA and thermodynamic integration, which are based on classical force fields, and a recently developed approach to computing binding free energies from large-scale quantum mechanical first principles calculations with the linear-scaling density functional code onetep. Our findings not only reveal how sequence variation in the BRC repeats directly affects affinity with RAD51 and provide significant new insights into the control of RAD51 by human BRCA2, but also exemplify a palette of computational and experimental tools for the

  1. RAD51AP2, a novel vertebrate- and meiotic-specific protein, sharesa conserved RAD51-interacting C-terminal domain with RAD51AP1/PIR51

    SciTech Connect

    Kovalenko, Oleg V.; Wiese, Claudia; Schild, David

    2006-07-25

    Many interacting proteins regulate and/or assist the activities of RAD51, a recombinase which plays a critical role in both DNA repair and meiotic recombination. Yeast two-hybrid screening of a human testis cDNA library revealed a new protein, RAD51AP2 (RAD51 Associated Protein 2), that interacts strongly with RAD51. A full-length cDNA clone predicts a novel vertebrate specific protein of 1159 residues, and the RAD51AP2 transcript was observed only in meiotic tissue (i.e. adult testis and fetal ovary), suggesting a meiotic-specific function for RAD51AP2. In HEK293 cells the interaction of RAD51 with an ectopically-expressed recombinant large fragment of RAD51AP2 requires the C-terminal 57 residues of RAD51AP2. This RAD51-binding region shows 81% homology to the C-terminus of RAD51AP1/PIR51, an otherwise totally unrelated RAD51-binding partner that is ubiquitously expressed. Analyses using truncations and point mutations in both RAD51AP1 and RAD51AP2 demonstrate that these proteins use the same structural motif for RAD51 binding. RAD54 shares some homology with this RAD51-binding motif, but this homologous region plays only an accessory role to the adjacent main RAD51-interacting region, which has been narrowed here to 40 amino acids. A novel protein, RAD51AP2, has been discovered that interacts with RAD51 through a C-terminal motif also present in RAD51AP1.

  2. Nuclear localization of Rad51B is independent of BRCA2

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, K A; Hinz, J M; Yamada, A; Thompson, L H; Albala, J S

    2005-06-28

    Human Rad51 is critical for the maintenance of genome stability through its role in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Rad51B (Rad51L1/hRec2) is one of the five known paralogs of human Rad51 found in a multi-protein complex with three other Rad51 paralogs, Rad51C, Rad51D and Xrcc2. Examination of EGFP-Rad51B fusion protein in HeLa S3 cells and immunofluorescence in several human cell lines confirms the nuclear localization of Rad51B. This is the first report to detail putative interactions of a Rad51 paralog protein with BRCA2. Utilization of a BRCA2 mutant cell line, CAPAN-1 suggests that Rad51B localizes to the nucleus independent of BRCA2. Although both Rad51B and BRCA2 are clearly involved in the homologous recombinational repair pathway, Rad51B and BRCA2 do not appear to associate directly. Furthermore, mutations in the KKLK motif of Rad51B, amino acid residues 4-7, mislocalizes Rad51B to the cytoplasm suggesting that this is the nuclear localization signal for the Rad51B protein. Examination of wild-type EGFP-Rad51B fusion protein in mammalian cells deficient in Rad51C showed that Rad51B localizes to the nucleus independent of Rad51C; further suggesting that Rad51B, like Rad51C, contains its own nuclear localization signal.

  3. The BRC repeats of human BRCA2 differentially regulate RAD51 binding on single- versus double-stranded DNA to stimulate strand exchange.

    PubMed

    Shivji, Mahmud K K; Mukund, Shreyas R; Rajendra, Eeson; Chen, Shaoxia; Short, Judith M; Savill, Jane; Klenerman, David; Venkitaraman, Ashok R

    2009-08-11

    The breast and ovarian cancer suppressor BRCA2 controls the enzyme RAD51 during homologous DNA recombination (HDR) to preserve genome stability. BRCA2 binds to RAD51 through 8 conserved BRC repeat motifs dispersed in an 1127-residue region (BRCA2([BRC1-8])). Here, we show that BRCA2([BRC1-8]) exerts opposing effects on the binding of RAD51 to single-stranded (ss) versus double-stranded (ds) DNA substrates, enhancing strand exchange. BRCA2([BRC1-8]) alters the electrophoretic mobility of RAD51 bound to an ssDNA substrate, accompanied by an increase in ssDNA-bound protein assemblies, revealed by electron microscopy. Single-molecule fluorescence spectroscopy shows that BRCA2([BRC1-8]) promotes RAD51 loading onto ssDNA. In contrast, BRCA2([BRC1-8]) has a different effect on RAD51 assembly on dsDNA; it suppresses and slows this process. When homologous ssDNA and dsDNA are both present, BRCA2([BRC1-8]) stimulates strand exchange, with delayed RAD51 loading onto dsDNA accompanying the appearance of joint molecules representing recombination products. Collectively, our findings suggest that BRCA2([BRC1-8]) targets RAD51 to ssDNA while inhibiting dsDNA binding and that these contrasting activities together bolster one another to stimulate HDR. Our work provides fresh insight into the mechanism of HDR in humans, and its regulation by the BRCA2 tumor suppressor.

  4. Promotion of Homologous Recombination and Genomic Stability by RAD51AP1 via RAD51 Recombinase Enhancement

    PubMed Central

    Wiese, Claudia; Dray, Eloïse; Groesser, Torsten; Filippo, Joseph San; Shi, Idina; Collins, David W.; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Williams, Gareth; Rydberg, Bjorn; Sung, Patrick; Schild, David

    2007-01-01

    Summary Homologous recombination (HR) repairs chromosome damage and is indispensable for tumor suppression in humans. RAD51 mediates the DNA strand pairing step in HR. RAD51AP1 (RAD51 Associated Protein 1) is a RAD51-interacting protein whose function has remained elusive. Knockdown of RAD51AP1 in human cells by RNA interference engenders sensitivity to different types of genotoxic stress, and RAD51AP1 is epistatic to the HR protein XRCC3. Moreover, RAD51AP1-depleted cells are impaired for the recombinational repair of a DNA double-strand break and exhibit chromatid breaks both spontaneously and upon DNA damaging treatment. Purified RAD51AP1 binds both dsDNA and a D-loop structure, and, only when able to interact with RAD51, greatly stimulates the RAD51-mediated D-loop reaction. Biochemical and cytological results show that RAD51AP1 functions at a step subsequent to the assembly of the RAD51-ssDNA nucleoprotein filament. Our findings provide evidence that RAD51AP1 helps maintain genomic integrity via RAD51 recombinase enhancement. PMID:17996711

  5. Promotion of Homologous Recombination and Genomic Stability byRAD51AP1 via RAD51 Recombinase Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Wiese, Claudia; Dray, Eloise; Groesser, Torsten; San Filippo,Joseph; Shi, Idina; Collins, David W.; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Williams,Gareth; Rydberg, Bjorn; Sung, Patrick; Schild, David

    2007-04-11

    Homologous recombination (HR) repairs chromosome damage and is indispensable for tumor suppression in humans. RAD51 mediates the DNA strand pairing step in HR. RAD51AP1 (RAD51 Associated Protein 1) is a RAD51-interacting protein whose function has remained elusive. Knockdown of RAD51AP1 in human cells by RNA interference engenders sensitivity to different types of genotoxic stress. Moreover, RAD51AP1-depleted cells are impaired for the recombinational repair of a DNA double-strand break and exhibit chromatid breaks both spontaneously and upon DNA damaging treatment. Purified RAD51AP1 binds dsDNA and RAD51, and it greatly stimulates the RAD51-mediated D-loop reaction. Biochemical and cytological results show that RAD51AP1 functions at a step subsequent to the assembly of the RAD51-ssDNA nucleoprotein filament. Our findings provide the first evidence that RAD51AP1 helps maintain genomic integrity via RAD51 recombinase enhancement.

  6. Design of potent inhibitors of human RAD51 recombinase based on BRC motifs of BRCA2 protein: modeling and experimental validation of a chimera peptide.

    PubMed

    Nomme, Julian; Renodon-Cornière, Axelle; Asanomi, Yuya; Sakaguchi, Kazuyasu; Stasiak, Alicja Z; Stasiak, Andrzej; Norden, Bengt; Tran, Vinh; Takahashi, Masayuki

    2010-08-12

    We have previously shown that a 28-amino acid peptide derived from the BRC4 motif of BRCA2 tumor suppressor inhibits selectively human RAD51 recombinase (HsRad51). With the aim of designing better inhibitors for cancer treatment, we combined an in silico docking approach with in vitro biochemical testing to construct a highly efficient chimera peptide from eight existing human BRC motifs. We built a molecular model of all BRC motifs complexed with HsRad51 based on the crystal structure of the BRC4 motif-HsRad51 complex, computed the interaction energy of each residue in each BRC motif, and selected the best amino acid residue at each binding position. This analysis enabled us to propose four amino acid substitutions in the BRC4 motif. Three of these increased the inhibitory effect in vitro, and this effect was found to be additive. We thus obtained a peptide that is about 10 times more efficient in inhibiting HsRad51-ssDNA complex formation than the original peptide.

  7. Valine 1532 of human BRC repeat 4 plays an important role in the interaction between BRCA2 and RAD51.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Kazuhiko; Yoshikawa, Yasunaga; Yoshimatsu, Kumiko; Oonuma, Toshina; Tomioka, Yukiko; Takeda, Eichi; Arikawa, Jiro; Mominoki, Katsumi; Omi, Toshinori; Hashizume, Kazuyoshi; Morimatsu, Masami

    2011-06-23

    The breast cancer susceptibility protein BRCA2 is essential for recombinational DNA repair. BRCA2 specifically binds to RAD51 via eight BRC repeat motifs and delivers RAD51 to double-stranded DNA breaks. In this study, a mammalian two-hybrid assay and competitive ELISA showed that the interaction between BRC repeat 4 (BRC4) and RAD51 was strengthened by the substitution of a single BRC4 amino acid from valine to isoleucine (V1532I). However, the cancer-associated V1532F mutant exhibited very weak interaction with RAD51. This study used a comparative analysis of BRC4 between animal species to identify V1532 as an important residue that interacts with RAD51.

  8. A Dominant Mutation in Human RAD51 Reveals Its Function in DNA Interstrand Crosslink Repair Independent of Homologous Recombination.

    PubMed

    Wang, Anderson T; Kim, Taeho; Wagner, John E; Conti, Brooke A; Lach, Francis P; Huang, Athena L; Molina, Henrik; Sanborn, Erica M; Zierhut, Heather; Cornes, Belinda K; Abhyankar, Avinash; Sougnez, Carrie; Gabriel, Stacey B; Auerbach, Arleen D; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C; Smogorzewska, Agata

    2015-08-01

    Repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks requires action of multiple DNA repair pathways, including homologous recombination. Here, we report a de novo heterozygous T131P mutation in RAD51/FANCR, the key recombinase essential for homologous recombination, in a patient with Fanconi anemia-like phenotype. In vitro, RAD51-T131P displays DNA-independent ATPase activity, no DNA pairing capacity, and a co-dominant-negative effect on RAD51 recombinase function. However, the patient cells are homologous recombination proficient due to the low ratio of mutant to wild-type RAD51 in cells. Instead, patient cells are sensitive to crosslinking agents and display hyperphosphorylation of Replication Protein A due to increased activity of DNA2 and WRN at the DNA interstrand crosslinks. Thus, proper RAD51 function is important during DNA interstrand crosslink repair outside of homologous recombination. Our study provides a molecular basis for how RAD51 and its associated factors may operate in a homologous recombination-independent manner to maintain genomic integrity. PMID:26253028

  9. Roles of C-Terminal Region of Yeast and Human Rad52 in Rad51-Nucleoprotein Filament Formation and ssDNA Annealing

    PubMed Central

    Khade, Nilesh V.; Sugiyama, Tomohiko

    2016-01-01

    Yeast Rad52 (yRad52) has two important functions at homologous DNA recombination (HR); annealing complementary single-strand DNA (ssDNA) molecules and recruiting Rad51 recombinase onto ssDNA (recombination mediator activity). Its human homolog (hRAD52) has a lesser role in HR, and apparently lacks mediator activity. Here we show that yRad52 can load human Rad51 (hRAD51) onto ssDNA complexed with yeast RPA in vitro. This is biochemically equivalent to mediator activity because it depends on the C-terminal Rad51-binding region of yRad52 and on functional Rad52-RPA interaction. It has been reported that the N-terminal two thirds of both yRad52 and hRAD52 is essential for binding to and annealing ssDNA. Although a second DNA binding region has been found in the C-terminal region of yRad52, its role in ssDNA annealing is not clear. In this paper, we also show that the C-terminal region of yRad52, but not of hRAD52, is involved in ssDNA annealing. This suggests that the second DNA binding site is required for the efficient ssDNA annealing by yRad52. We propose an updated model of Rad52-mediated ssDNA annealing. PMID:27362509

  10. RAD51AP2, a novel vertebrate- and meiotic-specific protein, shares a conserved RAD51-interacting C-terminal domain with RAD51AP1/PIR51

    PubMed Central

    Kovalenko, Oleg V.; Wiese, Claudia; Schild, David

    2006-01-01

    Many interacting proteins regulate and/or assist the activities of RAD51, a recombinase which plays a critical role in both DNA repair and meiotic recombination. Yeast two-hybrid screening of a human testis cDNA library revealed a new protein, RAD51AP2 (RAD51 Associated Protein 2), that interacts strongly with RAD51. A full-length cDNA clone predicts a novel vertebrate-specific protein of 1159 residues, and the RAD51AP2 transcript was observed only in meiotic tissue (i.e. adult testis and fetal ovary), suggesting a meiotic-specific function for RAD51AP2. In HEK293 cells the interaction of RAD51 with an ectopically-expressed recombinant large fragment of RAD51AP2 requires the C-terminal 57 residues of RAD51AP2. This RAD51-binding region shows 81% homology to the C-terminus of RAD51AP1/PIR51, an otherwise totally unrelated RAD51-binding partner that is ubiquitously expressed. Analyses using truncations and point mutations in both RAD51AP1 and RAD51AP2 demonstrate that these proteins use the same structural motif for RAD51 binding. RAD54 shares some homology with this RAD51-binding motif, but this homologous region plays only an accessory role to the adjacent main RAD51-interacting region, which has been narrowed here to 40 amino acids. A novel protein, RAD51AP2, has been discovered that interacts with RAD51 through a C-terminal motif also present in RAD51AP1. PMID:16990250

  11. Nanoscopic exclusion between Rad51 and 53BP1 after ion irradiation in human HeLa cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reindl, Judith; Drexler, Guido A.; Girst, Stefanie; Greubel, Christoph; Siebenwirth, Christian; Drexler, Sophie E.; Dollinger, Günther; Friedl, Anna A.

    2015-12-01

    Many proteins involved in detection, signalling and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) accumulate in large number in the vicinity of DSB sites, forming so called foci. Emerging evidence suggests that these foci are sub-divided in structural or functional domains. We use stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy to investigate localization of mediator protein 53BP1 and recombination factor Rad51 after irradiation of cells with low linear energy transfer (LET) protons or high LET carbon ions. With a resolution better than 100 nm, STED microscopy and image analysis using a newly developed analyzing algorithm, the reduced product of the differences from the mean, allowed us to demonstrate that with both irradiation types Rad51 occupies spherical regions of about 200 nm diameter. These foci locate within larger 53BP1 accumulations in regions of local 53BP1 depletion, similar to what has been described for the localization of Brca1, CtIP and RPA. Furthermore, localization relative to 53BP1 and size of Rad51 foci was not different after irradiation with low and high LET radiation. As expected, 53BP1 foci induced by low LET irradiation mostly contained one Rad51 focal structure, while after high LET irradiation, most foci contained >1 Rad51 accumulation.

  12. Human CST Facilitates Genome-wide RAD51 Recruitment to GC-Rich Repetitive Sequences in Response to Replication Stress.

    PubMed

    Chastain, Megan; Zhou, Qing; Shiva, Olga; Whitmore, Leanne; Jia, Pingping; Dai, Xueyu; Huang, Chenhui; Fadri-Moskwik, Maria; Ye, Ping; Chai, Weihang

    2016-08-01

    The telomeric CTC1/STN1/TEN1 (CST) complex has been implicated in promoting replication recovery under replication stress at genomic regions, yet its precise role is unclear. Here, we report that STN1 is enriched at GC-rich repetitive sequences genome-wide in response to hydroxyurea (HU)-induced replication stress. STN1 deficiency exacerbates the fragility of these sequences under replication stress, resulting in chromosome fragmentation. We find that upon fork stalling, CST proteins form distinct nuclear foci that colocalize with RAD51. Furthermore, replication stress induces physical association of CST with RAD51 in an ATR-dependent manner. Strikingly, CST deficiency diminishes HU-induced RAD51 foci formation and reduces RAD51 recruitment to telomeres and non-telomeric GC-rich fragile sequences. Collectively, our findings establish that CST promotes RAD51 recruitment to GC-rich repetitive sequences in response to replication stress to facilitate replication restart, thereby providing insights into the mechanism underlying genome stability maintenance.

  13. Assessment of DNA binding to human Rad51 protein by using quartz crystal microbalance and atomic force microscopy: effects of ADP and BRC4-28 peptide inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Esnault, Charles; Renodon-Cornière, Axelle; Takahashi, Masayuki; Casse, Nathalie; Delorme, Nicolas; Louarn, Guy; Fleury, Fabrice; Pilard, Jean-François; Chénais, Benoît

    2014-12-01

    The interaction of human Rad51 protein (HsRad51) with single-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (ssDNA) was investigated by using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) monitoring and atomic force microscopy (AFM) visualization. Gold surfaces for QCM and AFM were modified by electrografting of the in situ generated aryldiazonium salt from the sulfanilic acid to obtain the organic layer Au-ArSO3 H. The Au-ArSO3 H layer was activated by using a solution of PCl5 in CH2 Cl2 to give a Au-ArSO2 Cl layer. The modified surface was then used to immobilize long ssDNA molecules. The results obtained showed that the presence of adenosine diphosphate promotes the protein autoassociation rather than nucleation around DNA. In addition, when the BRC4-28 peptide inhibitor was used, both QCM and AFM confirmed the inhibitory effect of BRC4-28 toward HsRad51 autoassociation. Altogether these results show the suitability of this modified surface to investigate the kinetics and structure of DNA-protein interactions and for the screening of inhibitors.

  14. TODRA, a lncRNA at the RAD51 Locus, Is Oppositely Regulated to RAD51, and Enhances RAD51-Dependent DSB (Double Strand Break) Repair

    PubMed Central

    Renbaum, Paul; Zeligson, Sharon; Eini, Lital; Bashari, Dana; Smith, Yoav; Lahad, Amnon; Goldberg, Michal; Ginsberg, Doron; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat

    2015-01-01

    Expression of RAD51, a crucial player in homologous recombination (HR) and DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair, is dysregulated in human tumors, and can contribute to genomic instability and tumor progression. To further understand RAD51 regulation we functionally characterized a long non-coding (lnc) RNA, dubbed TODRA (Transcribed in the Opposite Direction of RAD51), transcribed 69bp upstream to RAD51, in the opposite direction. We demonstrate that TODRA is an expressed transcript and that the RAD51 promoter region is bidirectional, supporting TODRA expression (7-fold higher than RAD51 in this assay, p = 0.003). TODRA overexpression in HeLa cells induced expression of TPIP, a member of the TPTE family which includes PTEN. Similar to PTEN, we found that TPIP co-activates E2F1 induction of RAD51. Analysis of E2F1's effect on the bidirectional promoter showed that E2F1 binding to the same site that promotes RAD51 expression, results in downregulation of TODRA. Moreover, TODRA overexpression induces HR in a RAD51-dependent DSB repair assay, and increases formation of DNA damage-induced RAD51-positive foci. Importantly, gene expression in breast tumors supports our finding that E2F1 oppositely regulates RAD51 and TODRA: increased RAD51 expression, which is associated with an aggressive tumor phenotype (e.g. negative correlation with positive ER (r = -0.22, p = 0.02) and positive PR status (r = -0.27, p<0.001); positive correlation with ki67 status (r = 0.36, p = 0.005) and HER2 amplification (r = 0.41, p = 0.001)), correlates as expected with lower TODRA and higher E2F1 expression. However, although E2F1 induction resulted in TPIP downregulation in cell lines, we find that TPIP expression in tumors is not reduced despite higher E2F1 expression, perhaps contributing to increased RAD51 expression. Our results identify TPIP as a novel E2F1 co-activator, suggest a similar role for other TPTEs, and indicate that the TODRA lncRNA affects RAD51 dysregulation and RAD51

  15. RAD51B in Familial Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Pelttari, Liisa M; Khan, Sofia; Vuorela, Mikko; Kiiski, Johanna I; Vilske, Sara; Nevanlinna, Viivi; Ranta, Salla; Schleutker, Johanna; Winqvist, Robert; Kallioniemi, Anne; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Figueroa, Jonine; Pharoah, Paul D P; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Dunning, Alison M; García-Closas, Montserrat; Bolla, Manjeet K; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Wang, Qin; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Rosenberg, Efraim H; Fasching, Peter A; Beckmann, Matthias W; Peto, Julian; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian; Burwinkel, Barbara; Surowy, Harald; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Benitez, Javier; González-Neira, Anna; Neuhausen, Susan L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Van Dyck, Laurien; Janssen, Hilde; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Hallberg, Emily; Olson, Janet E; Giles, Graham G; Milne, Roger L; Haiman, Christopher A; Schumacher, Fredrick; Simard, Jacques; Dumont, Martine; Kristensen, Vessela; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Zheng, Wei; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene L; Glendon, Gord; Devilee, Peter; Seynaeve, Caroline; Hooning, Maartje J; Collée, Margriet; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert N; Hamann, Ute; Torres, Diana; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Couch, Fergus J; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Orr, Nick; Swerdlow, Anthony; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Czene, Kamila; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F; Mattson, Johanna; Blomqvist, Carl; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Nevanlinna, Heli

    2016-01-01

    Common variation on 14q24.1, close to RAD51B, has been associated with breast cancer: rs999737 and rs2588809 with the risk of female breast cancer and rs1314913 with the risk of male breast cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of RAD51B variants in breast cancer predisposition, particularly in the context of familial breast cancer in Finland. We sequenced the coding region of RAD51B in 168 Finnish breast cancer patients from the Helsinki region for identification of possible recurrent founder mutations. In addition, we studied the known rs999737, rs2588809, and rs1314913 SNPs and RAD51B haplotypes in 44,791 breast cancer cases and 43,583 controls from 40 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) that were genotyped on a custom chip (iCOGS). We identified one putatively pathogenic missense mutation c.541C>T among the Finnish cancer patients and subsequently genotyped the mutation in additional breast cancer cases (n = 5259) and population controls (n = 3586) from Finland and Belarus. No significant association with breast cancer risk was seen in the meta-analysis of the Finnish datasets or in the large BCAC dataset. The association with previously identified risk variants rs999737, rs2588809, and rs1314913 was replicated among all breast cancer cases and also among familial cases in the BCAC dataset. The most significant association was observed for the haplotype carrying the risk-alleles of all the three SNPs both among all cases (odds ratio (OR): 1.15, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11-1.19, P = 8.88 x 10-16) and among familial cases (OR: 1.24, 95% CI: 1.16-1.32, P = 6.19 x 10-11), compared to the haplotype with the respective protective alleles. Our results suggest that loss-of-function mutations in RAD51B are rare, but common variation at the RAD51B region is significantly associated with familial breast cancer risk. PMID:27149063

  16. RAD51B in Familial Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pelttari, Liisa M.; Khan, Sofia; Vuorela, Mikko; Kiiski, Johanna I.; Vilske, Sara; Nevanlinna, Viivi; Ranta, Salla; Schleutker, Johanna; Winqvist, Robert; Kallioniemi, Anne; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Figueroa, Jonine; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Dunning, Alison M.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Wang, Qin; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Rosenberg, Efraim H.; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Peto, Julian; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Burwinkel, Barbara; Surowy, Harald; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Benitez, Javier; González-Neira, Anna; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Van Dyck, Laurien; Janssen, Hilde; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Hallberg, Emily; Olson, Janet E.; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Simard, Jacques; Dumont, Martine; Kristensen, Vessela; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Zheng, Wei; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Devilee, Peter; Seynaeve, Caroline; Hooning, Maartje J.; Collée, Margriet; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert N.; Hamann, Ute; Torres, Diana; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Couch, Fergus J.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Orr, Nick; Swerdlow, Anthony; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Czene, Kamila; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F.; Mattson, Johanna; Blomqvist, Carl; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Nevanlinna, Heli

    2016-01-01

    Common variation on 14q24.1, close to RAD51B, has been associated with breast cancer: rs999737 and rs2588809 with the risk of female breast cancer and rs1314913 with the risk of male breast cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of RAD51B variants in breast cancer predisposition, particularly in the context of familial breast cancer in Finland. We sequenced the coding region of RAD51B in 168 Finnish breast cancer patients from the Helsinki region for identification of possible recurrent founder mutations. In addition, we studied the known rs999737, rs2588809, and rs1314913 SNPs and RAD51B haplotypes in 44,791 breast cancer cases and 43,583 controls from 40 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) that were genotyped on a custom chip (iCOGS). We identified one putatively pathogenic missense mutation c.541C>T among the Finnish cancer patients and subsequently genotyped the mutation in additional breast cancer cases (n = 5259) and population controls (n = 3586) from Finland and Belarus. No significant association with breast cancer risk was seen in the meta-analysis of the Finnish datasets or in the large BCAC dataset. The association with previously identified risk variants rs999737, rs2588809, and rs1314913 was replicated among all breast cancer cases and also among familial cases in the BCAC dataset. The most significant association was observed for the haplotype carrying the risk-alleles of all the three SNPs both among all cases (odds ratio (OR): 1.15, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11–1.19, P = 8.88 x 10−16) and among familial cases (OR: 1.24, 95% CI: 1.16–1.32, P = 6.19 x 10−11), compared to the haplotype with the respective protective alleles. Our results suggest that loss-of-function mutations in RAD51B are rare, but common variation at the RAD51B region is significantly associated with familial breast cancer risk. PMID:27149063

  17. The role of repair protein Rad51 in synergistic cytotoxicity and mutagenicity induced by epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor (Gefitinib, Iressa{sup R}) and benzo[a]pyrene in human lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, J.-C.; Hong, J.-H.; Wang, L.-H.; Lin, Y.-W.

    2008-05-01

    Rad51 protein is essential for homologous recombination repair of DNA damage, and is over-expressed in chemo- or radioresistant carcinomas. The polycyclic hydrocarbon carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) affects MAPKs transduction pathways. Gefitinib (Iressa{sup R}, ZD1839) is a selective epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor that blocks growth factor-mediated cell proliferation and ERK1/2 activation. We hypothesized that gefitinib enhances B[a]P-mediated cytotoxicity by decreasing ERK1/2 activation. Exposure of human lung cancer cells to gefitinib decreased B[a]P-elicited ERK1/2 activation and induced Rad51 protein expression. Gefitinib and B[a]P co-treatment decreased Rad51 protein stability by triggering degradation via a 26S proteasome-dependent pathway. Expression of constitutive active MKK1/2 vectors (MKK1/2-CA) rescues the decreased ERK1/2 activity, and restores Rad51 protein level and stability under gefitinib and B[a]P co-treatment. Gefitinib enhances B[a]P-induced growth inhibition, cytotoxicity and mutagenicity. Co-treatment with gefitinib and B[a]P can further inhibit cell growth significantly after depletion of endogenous Rad51 by siRad51 RNA transfection. Enhancement of ERK1/2 activation by MKK1-CA expression decrease B[a]P- and gefitinib-induced cytotoxicity, and B[a]P-induced mutagenicity. Rad51 protein protects lung cancer cells from synergistic cytotoxic and mutagenic effects induced by gefitinib and B[a]P. Suppression of Rad51 protein expression may be a novel lung cancer therapeutic modality to overcome drug resistance to gefitinib.

  18. Disparate requirements for the Walker A and B ATPase motifs ofhuman RAD51D in homologous recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Wiese, Claudia; Hinz, John M.; Tebbs, Robert S.; Nham, Peter B.; Urbin, Salustra S.; Collins, David W.; Thompson, Larry H.; Schild, David

    2006-04-21

    In vertebrates, homologous recombinational repair (HRR) requires RAD51 and five RAD51 paralogs (XRCC2, XRCC3, RAD51B, RAD51C, and RAD51D) that all contain conserved Walker A and B ATPase motifs. In human RAD51D we examined the requirement for these motifs in interactions with XRCC2 and RAD51C, and for survival of cells in response to DNA interstrand crosslinks. Ectopic expression of wild type human RAD51D or mutants having a non-functional A or B motif was used to test for complementation of a rad51d knockout hamster CHO cell line. Although A-motif mutants complement very efficiently, B-motif mutants do not. Consistent with these results, experiments using the yeast two- and three-hybrid systems show that the interactions between RAD51D and its XRCC2 and RAD51C partners also require a functional RAD51D B motif, but not motif A. Similarly, hamster Xrcc2 is unable to bind to the non-complementing human RAD51D B-motif mutants in co-immunoprecipitation assays. We conclude that a functional Walker B motif, but not A motif, is necessary for RAD51D's interactions with other paralogs and for efficient HRR. We present a model in which ATPase sites are formed in a bipartite manner between RAD51D and other RAD51 paralogs.

  19. Interactions among Trypanosoma brucei RAD51 paralogues in DNA repair and antigenic variation

    PubMed Central

    Dobson, Rachel; Stockdale, Christopher; Lapsley, Craig; Wilkes, Jonathan; McCulloch, Richard

    2011-01-01

    Homologous recombination in Trypanosoma brucei is used for moving variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) genes into expression sites during immune evasion by antigenic variation. A major route for such VSG switching is gene conversion reactions in which RAD51, a universally conserved recombinase, catalyses homology-directed strand exchange. In any eukaryote, RAD51-directed strand exchange in vivo is mediated by further factors, including RAD51-related proteins termed Rad51 paralogues. These appear to be ubiquitously conserved, although their detailed roles in recombination remain unclear. In T. brucei, four putative RAD51 paralogue genes have been identified by sequence homology. Here we show that all four RAD51 paralogues act in DNA repair, recombination and RAD51 subnuclear dynamics, though not equivalently, while mutation of only one RAD51 paralogue gene significantly impedes VSG switching. We also show that the T. brucei RAD51 paralogues interact, and that the complexes they form may explain the distinct phenotypes of the mutants as well as observed expression interdependency. Finally, we document the Rad51 paralogues that are encoded by a wide range of protists, demonstrating that the Rad51 paralogue repertoire in T. brucei is unusually large among microbial eukaryotes and that one member of the protein family corresponds with a key, conserved eukaryotic Rad51 paralogue. PMID:21615552

  20. Interactions among Trypanosoma brucei RAD51 paralogues in DNA repair and antigenic variation.

    PubMed

    Dobson, Rachel; Stockdale, Christopher; Lapsley, Craig; Wilkes, Jonathan; McCulloch, Richard

    2011-07-01

    Homologous recombination in Trypanosoma brucei is used for moving variant surface glycoprotein (VSG) genes into expression sites during immune evasion by antigenic variation. A major route for such VSG switching is gene conversion reactions in which RAD51, a universally conserved recombinase, catalyses homology-directed strand exchange. In any eukaryote, RAD51-directed strand exchange in vivo is mediated by further factors, including RAD51-related proteins termed Rad51 paralogues. These appear to be ubiquitously conserved, although their detailed roles in recombination remain unclear. In T. brucei, four putative RAD51 paralogue genes have been identified by sequence homology. Here we show that all four RAD51 paralogues act in DNA repair, recombination and RAD51 subnuclear dynamics, though not equivalently, while mutation of only one RAD51 paralogue gene significantly impedes VSG switching. We also show that the T. brucei RAD51 paralogues interact, and that the complexes they form may explain the distinct phenotypes of the mutants as well as observed expression interdependency. Finally, we document the Rad51 paralogues that are encoded by a wide range of protists, demonstrating that the Rad51 paralogue repertoire in T. brucei is unusually large among microbial eukaryotes and that one member of the protein family corresponds with a key, conserved eukaryotic Rad51 paralogue.

  1. Rad51 supports triple negative breast cancer metastasis

    PubMed Central

    Wiegmans, Adrian P; Al-Ejeh, Fares; Chee, Nicole; Yap, Pei-Yi; Gorski, Julia J; Silva, Leonard Da; Bolderson, Emma; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Anderson, Robin; Simpson, Peter T; Lakhani, Sunil R; Khanna, Kum Kum

    2014-01-01

    In contrast to extensive studies on familial breast cancer, it is currently unclear whether defects in DNA double strand break (DSB) repair genes play a role in sporadic breast cancer development and progression. We performed analysis of immunohistochemistry in an independent cohort of 235 were sporadic breast tumours. This analysis suggested that RAD51 expression is increased during breast cancer progression and metastasis and an oncogenic role for RAD51 when deregulated. Subsequent knockdown of RAD51 repressed cancer cell migration in vitro and reduced primary tumor growth in a syngeneic mouse model in vivo. Loss of RAD51 also inhibited associated metastasis not only in syngeneic mice but human xenografts and changed the metastatic gene expression profile of cancer cells, consistent with inhibition of distant metastasis. This demonstrates for the first time a new function of RAD51 that may underlie the proclivity of patients with RAD51 overexpression to develop distant metastasis. RAD51 is a potential biomarker and attractive drug target for metastatic triple negative breast cancer, with the capability to extend the survival of patients, which is less than 6 months. PMID:24811120

  2. Astaxanthin down-regulates Rad51 expression via inactivation of AKT kinase to enhance mitomycin C-induced cytotoxicity in human non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jen-Chung; Chen, Jyh-Cheng; Wang, Tai-Jing; Zheng, Hao-Yu; Chen, Wen-Ching; Chang, Po-Yuan; Lin, Yun-Wei

    2016-04-01

    Astaxanthin has been demonstrated to exhibit a wide range of beneficial effects, including anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties. However, the molecular mechanism of astaxanthin-induced cytotoxicity in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells has not been identified. Rad51 plays a central role in homologous recombination, and studies show that chemo-resistant carcinomas exhibit high levels of Rad51 expression. In this study, astaxanthin treatment inhibited cell viability and proliferation of two NSCLC cells, A549 and H1703. Astaxanthin treatment (2.5-20 μM) decreased Rad51 expression and phospho-AKT(Ser473) protein level in a time and dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, expression of constitutively active AKT (AKT-CA) vector rescued the decreased Rad51 mRNA and protein levels in astaxanthin-treated NSCLC cells. Combined treatment with phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitors (LY294002 or wortmannin) further decreased the Rad51 expression in astaxanthin-exposed A549 and H1703 cells. Knockdown of Rad51 expression by transfection with si-Rad51 RNA or cotreatment with LY294002 further enhanced the cytotoxicity and cell growth inhibition of astaxanthin. Additionally, mitomycin C (MMC) as an anti-tumor antibiotic is widely used in clinical NSCLC chemotherapy. Combination of MMC and astaxanthin synergistically resulted in cytotoxicity and cell growth inhibition in NSCLC cells, accompanied with reduced phospho-AKT(Ser473) level and Rad51 expression. Overexpression of AKT-CA or Flag-tagged Rad51 reversed the astaxanthin and MMC-induced synergistic cytotoxicity. In contrast, pretreatment with LY294002 further decreased the cell viability in astaxanthin and MMC co-treated cells. In conclusion, astaxanthin enhances MMC-induced cytotoxicity by decreasing Rad51 expression and AKT activation. These findings may provide rationale to combine astaxanthin with MMC for the treatment of NSCLC.

  3. Differential roles of XRCC2 in S-phase RAD51 focus formation induced by DNA replication inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, C; Liu, N

    2004-05-14

    RAD51 proteins accumulate in discrete nuclear foci in response to DNA damage. Previous studies demonstrated that human RAD51 paralogs (RAD51B, RAD51C, RAD51D, XRCC2 and XRCC3) are essential for the assembly of RAD51 foci induced by ionizing radiation and cross-linking agents. Here we report that XRCC2 also plays important roles in RAD51 focus formation induced by replication arrest during S-phase of cell cycle. In wild-type hamster V79 cells treated with hydroxyurea (HU), RAD51 protein form punctuate nuclear foci, accompanied by increased RAD51 protein level in both cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions, and increased association of RAD51 with chromatin. In contrast, xrcc2 hamster mutant irs1 cells are deficient in the formation of RAD51 foci after HU treatment, suggesting that the function of XRCC2 is required for the assembly of RAD51 at HU-induced stalled replication forks. Interestingly, we found that irs1 cells are able to form intact RAD51 foci in S-phase cells treated with thymidine (TR) or aphidicolin, although irs1 cells are hypersensitive to both HU and TR. Our findings suggest that there may be two distinct pathways (XRCC2-dependent or XRCC2-independent) involved in loading of RAD51 onto stalled replication forks, probably depending upon the structure of DNA lesions.

  4. Rad51C deficiency destabilizes XRCC3, impairs recombination and radiosensitizes S/G2-phase cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lio, Yi-Ching; Schild, David; Brenneman, Mark A.; Redpath, J. Leslie; Chen, David J.

    2004-05-01

    The highly conserved Rad51 protein plays an essential role in repairing DNA damage through homologous recombination. In vertebrates, five Rad51 paralogs (Rad51B, Rad51C, Rad51D, XRCC2, XRCC3) are expressed in mitotically growing cells, and are thought to play mediating roles in homologous recombination, though their precise functions remain unclear. Here we report the use of RNA interference to deplete expression of Rad51C protein in human HT1080 and HeLa cells. In HT1080 cells, depletion of Rad51C by small interfering RNA caused a significant reduction of frequency in homologous recombination. The level of XRCC3 protein was also sharply reduced in Rad51C-depleted HeLa cells, suggesting that XRCC3 is dependent for its stability upon heterodimerization with Rad51C. In addition, Rad51C-depleted HeLa cells showed hypersensitivity to the DNA cross-linking agent mitomycin C, and moderately increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Importantly, the radiosensitivity of Rad51C-deficient HeLa cells was evident in S and G{sub 2}/M phases of the cell cycle but not in G{sub 1} phase. Together, these results provide direct cellular evidence for the importance of human Rad51C in homologous recombinational repair.

  5. Homologous recombination repair signaling in chemical carcinogenesis: prolonged particulate hexavalent chromium exposure suppresses the Rad51 response in human lung cells.

    PubMed

    Qin, Qin; Xie, Hong; Wise, Sandra S; Browning, Cynthia L; Thompson, Kelsey N; Holmes, Amie L; Wise, John Pierce

    2014-11-01

    The aim of this study was to focus on hexavalent chromium, [Cr(VI)], a chemical carcinogen and major public health concern, and consider its ability to impact DNA double strand break repair. We further focused on particulate Cr(VI), because it is the more potent carcinogenic form of Cr(VI). DNA double strand break repair serves to protect cells against the detrimental effects of DNA double strand breaks. For particulate Cr(VI), data show DNA double strand break repair must be overcome for neoplastic transformation to occur. Acute Cr(VI) exposures reveal a robust DNA double strand break repair response, however, longer exposures have not been considered. Using the comet assay, we found longer exposures to particulate zinc chromate induced concentration-dependent increases in DNA double strand breaks indicating breaks were occurring throughout the exposure time. Acute (24 h) exposure induced DNA double strand break repair signaling by inducing Mre11 foci formation, ATM phosphorylation and phosphorylated ATM foci formation, Rad51 protein levels and Rad51 foci formation. However, longer exposures reduced the Rad51 response. These data indicate a major chemical carcinogen can simultaneously induce DNA double strand breaks and alter their repair and describe a new and important aspect of the carcinogenic mechanism for Cr(VI). PMID:25173789

  6. Structural and torsional properties of the RAD51-dsDNA nucleoprotein filament

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Mina; Lipfert, Jan; Sanchez, Humberto; Wyman, Claire; Dekker, Nynke H.

    2013-01-01

    Human RAD51 is a key protein in the repair of DNA by homologous recombination. Its assembly onto DNA, which induces changes in DNA structure, results in the formation of a nucleoprotein filament that forms the basis of strand exchange. Here, we determine the structural and mechanical properties of RAD51-dsDNA filaments. Our measurements use two recently developed magnetic tweezers assays, freely orbiting magnetic tweezers and magnetic torque tweezers, designed to measure the twist and torque of individual molecules. By directly monitoring changes in DNA twist on RAD51 binding, we determine the unwinding angle per RAD51 monomer to be 45°, in quantitative agreement with that of its bacterial homolog, RecA. Measurements of the torque that is built up when RAD51-dsDNA filaments are twisted show that under conditions that suppress ATP hydrolysis the torsional persistence length of the RAD51-dsDNA filament exceeds that of its RecA counterpart by a factor of three. Examination of the filament’s torsional stiffness for different combinations of divalent ions and nucleotide cofactors reveals that the Ca2+ ion, apart from suppressing ATPase activity, plays a key role in increasing the torsional stiffness of the filament. These quantitative measurements of RAD51-imposed DNA distortions and accumulated mechanical stress suggest a finely tuned interplay between chemical and mechanical interactions within the RAD51 nucleoprotein filament. PMID:23703213

  7. Enhancement of the RAD51 Recombinase Activity by the Tumor Suppressor PALB2

    SciTech Connect

    Dray, Eloise; Etchin, Julia; Wiese, Claudia; Saro, Dorina; Williams, Gareth J.; Hammel, Michal; Yu, Xiong; Galkin, Vitold E.; Liu, Dongqing; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Sy, Shirley M-H.; Egelman, Edward; Chen, Junjie; Sung, Patrick; Schild, D.

    2010-08-24

    Homologous recombination mediated by the RAD51 recombinase helps eliminate chromosomal lesions, such as DNA double-stranded breaks induced by radiation or arising from injured DNA replication forks. The tumor suppressors BRCA2 and PALB2 act together to deliver RAD51 to chromosomal lesions to initiate repair. Here we document a new function of PALB2 in the enhancement of RAD51's ability to form the D-loop. We show that PALB2 binds DNA and physically interacts with RAD51. Importantly, while PALB2 alone stimulates D-loop formation, a cooperative effect is seen with RAD51AP1, an enhancer of RAD51. This stimulation stems from PALB2's ability to function with RAD51 and RAD51AP1 to assemble the synaptic complex. Our results help unveil a multi-faceted role of PALB2 in chromosome damage repair. Since PALB2 mutations can cause breast and other tumors or lead to Fanconi anemia, our findings are important for understanding the mechanism of tumor suppression in humans.

  8. Characterization of the Interaction between the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad51 Recombinase and the DNA Translocase Rdh54*

    PubMed Central

    Santa Maria, Sergio R.; Kwon, YoungHo; Sung, Patrick; Klein, Hannah L.

    2013-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rdh54 protein is a member of the Swi2/Snf2 family of DNA translocases required for meiotic and mitotic recombination and DNA repair. Rdh54 interacts with the general recombinases Rad51 and Dmc1 and promotes D-loop formation with either recombinase. Rdh54 also mediates the removal of Rad51 from undamaged chromatin in mitotic cells, which prevents formation of nonrecombinogenic complexes that can otherwise become toxic for cell growth. To determine which of the mitotic roles of Rdh54 are dependent on Rad51 complex formation, we finely mapped the Rad51 interaction domain in Rdh54, generated N-terminal truncation variants, and characterized their attributes biochemically and in cells. Here, we provide evidence suggesting that the N-terminal region of Rdh54 is not necessary for the response to the DNA-damaging agent methyl methanesulfonate. However, truncation variants missing 75–200 residues at the N terminus are sensitive to Rad51 overexpression. Interestingly, a hybrid protein containing the N-terminal region of Rad54, responsible for Rad51 interaction, fused to the Swi2/Snf2 core of Rdh54 is able to effectively complement the sensitivity to both methyl methanesulfonate and excess Rad51 in rdh54 null cells. Altogether, these results reveal a distinction between damage sensitivity and Rad51 removal with regard to Rdh54 interaction with Rad51. PMID:23798704

  9. Associations of common variants at 1p11.2 and 14q24.1 (RAD51L1) with breast cancer risk and heterogeneity by tumor subtype: findings from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium†

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Jonine D.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Humphreys, Manjeet; Platte, Radka; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Apicella, Carmel; Hammet, Fleur; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Tollenaar, Rob A.E.M.; Van't Veer, Laura J.; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Strick, Reiner; Peto, Julian; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Sawyer, Elinor; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Federik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Bojesen, Stig; Flyger, Henrik; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Benítez, Javier; Milne, Roger L.; Ignacio Arias, Jose; Zamora, M. Pilar; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Rahman, Nazneen; Turnbull, Clare; Seal, Sheila; Renwick, Anthony; Brauch, Hiltrud; Justenhoven, Christina; Brüning, Thomas; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hein, Rebecca; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Dörk, Thilo; Schürmann, Peter; Bremer, Michael; Hillemanns, Peter; Nevanlinna, Heli; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia; Antonenkova, Natalia; Rogov, Yuri I.; Karstens, Johann Hinrich; Bermisheva, Marina; Prokofieva, Darya; Hanafievich Gantcev, Shamil; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Soini, Ylermi; Kataja, Vesa; Lambrechts, Diether; Yesilyurt, Betül T.; Chrisiaens, Marie-Rose; Peeters, Stephanie; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Couch, Fergus; Lee, Adam M.; Diasio, Robert; Wang, Xianshu; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Maclean, Catriona; Offit, Ken; Robson, Mark; Joseph, Vijai; Gaudet, Mia; John, Esther M.; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene; Knight, Julia A.; Marie Mulligan, Anna; O'Malley, Frances P.; Brinton, Louise A.; Sherman, Mark E.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Chanock, Stephen J.; Hooning, Maartje; Martens, John W.M.; van den Ouweland, Ans M.W.; Collée, J. Margriet; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Cox, Angela; Brock, Ian W.; Reed, Malcolm W.R.; Cross, Simon S.; Pharoah, Paul; Dunning, Alison M.; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Ahn, Sei-Hyun; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Shen, Chen-Yang; Ding, Shian-ling; Hsu, Huan-Ming; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Ashworth, Alan; Swerdlow, Anthony; Jones, Michael; Orr, Nick; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Egan, Kathleen; Newcomb, Polly; Titus-Ernstoff, Linda; Easton, Doug; Spurdle, Amanda B.

    2011-01-01

    A genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 1p11.2 and 14q24.1 (RAD51L1) as breast cancer susceptibility loci. The initial GWAS suggested stronger effects for both loci for estrogen receptor (ER)-positive tumors. Using data from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC), we sought to determine whether risks differ by ER, progesterone receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), grade, node status, tumor size, and ductal or lobular morphology. We genotyped rs11249433 at 1p.11.2, and two highly correlated SNPs rs999737 and rs10483813 (r2= 0.98) at 14q24.1 (RAD51L1), for up to 46 036 invasive breast cancer cases and 46 930 controls from 39 studies. Analyses by tumor characteristics focused on subjects reporting to be white women of European ancestry and were based on 25 458 cases, of which 87% had ER data. The SNP at 1p11.2 showed significantly stronger associations with ER-positive tumors [per-allele odds ratio (OR) for ER-positive tumors was 1.13, 95% CI = 1.10–1.16 and, for ER-negative tumors, OR was 1.03, 95% CI = 0.98–1.07, case-only P-heterogeneity = 7.6 × 10−5]. The association with ER-positive tumors was stronger for tumors of lower grade (case-only P= 6.7 × 10−3) and lobular histology (case-only P= 0.01). SNPs at 14q24.1 were associated with risk for most tumor subtypes evaluated, including triple-negative breast cancers, which has not been described previously. Our results underscore the need for large pooling efforts with tumor pathology data to help refine risk estimates for SNP associations with susceptibility to different subtypes of breast cancer. PMID:21852249

  10. Suppression of OsRAD51D results in defects in reproductive development in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Byun, Mi Young; Kim, Woo Taek

    2014-07-01

    The cellular roles of RAD51 paralogs in somatic and reproductive growth have been extensively described in a wide range of animal systems and, to a lesser extent, in Arabidopsis, a dicot model plant. Here, the OsRAD51D gene was identified and characterized in rice (Oryza sativa L.), a monocot model crop. In the rice genome, three alternative OsRAD51D mRNA splicing variants, OsRAD51D.1, OsRAD51D.2, and OsRAD51D.3, were predicted. Yeast two-hybrid studies, however, showed that only OsRAD51D.1 interacted with OsRAD51B and OsRAD51C paralogs, suggesting that OsRAD51D.1 is a functional OsRAD51D protein in rice. Loss-of-function osrad51d mutant rice plants displayed normal vegetative growth. However, the mutant plants were defective in reproductive growth, resulting in sterile flowers. Homozygous osrad51d mutant flowers exhibited impaired development of lemma and palea and contained unusual numbers of stamens and stigmas. During early meiosis, osrad51d pollen mother cells (PMCs) failed to form normal homologous chromosome pairings. In subsequent meiotic progression, mutant PMCs represented fragmented chromosomes. The osrad51d pollen cells contained numerous abnormal micro-nuclei that resulted in malfunctioning pollen. The abnormalities of heterozygous mutant and T2 Ubi:RNAi-OsRAD51D RNAi-knock-down transgenic plants were intermediate between those of wild type and homozygous mutant plants. The osrad51d and Ubi:RNAi-OsRAD51D plants contained longer telomeres compared with wild type plants, indicating that OsRAD51D is a negative factor for telomere lengthening. Overall, these results suggest that OsRAD51D plays a critical role in reproductive growth in rice. This essential function of OsRAD51D is distinct from Arabidopsis, in which AtRAD51D is not an essential factor for meiosis or reproductive development.

  11. Contribution of Germline Mutations in the RAD51B, RAD51C, and RAD51D Genes to Ovarian Cancer in the Population

    PubMed Central

    Song, Honglin; Dicks, Ed; Ramus, Susan J.; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Intermaggio, Maria P.; Hayward, Jane; Edlund, Christopher K.; Conti, David; Harrington, Patricia; Fraser, Lindsay; Philpott, Susan; Anderson, Christopher; Rosenthal, Adam; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Bowtell, David D.; Alsop, Kathryn; Cicek, Mine S.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Alsop, Jennifer; Jimenez-Linan, Mercedes; Høgdall, Estrid; Høgdall, Claus K.; Jensen, Allan; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger; Lubiński, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Jakubowska, Anna; Gronwald, Jacek; Poblete, Samantha; Lele, Shashi; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Odunsi, Kunle; Goode, Ellen L.; Menon, Usha; Jacobs, Ian J.; Gayther, Simon A.; Pharoah, Paul D.P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to estimate the contribution of deleterious mutations in the RAD51B, RAD51C, and RAD51D genes to invasive epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) in the population and in a screening trial of individuals at high risk of ovarian cancer. Patients and Methods The coding sequence and splice site boundaries of the three RAD51 genes were sequenced and analyzed in germline DNA from a case-control study of 3,429 patients with invasive EOC and 2,772 controls as well as in 2,000 unaffected women who were BRCA1/BRCA2 negative from the United Kingdom Familial Ovarian Cancer Screening Study (UK_FOCSS) after quality-control analysis. Results In the case-control study, we identified predicted deleterious mutations in 28 EOC cases (0.82%) compared with three controls (0.11%; P < .001). Mutations in EOC cases were more frequent in RAD51C (14 occurrences, 0.41%) and RAD51D (12 occurrences, 0.35%) than in RAD51B (two occurrences, 0.06%). RAD51C mutations were associated with an odds ratio of 5.2 (95% CI, 1.1 to 24; P = .035), and RAD51D mutations conferred an odds ratio of 12 (95% CI, 1.5 to 90; P = .019). We identified 13 RAD51 mutations (0.65%) in unaffected UK_FOCSS participants (RAD51C, n = 7; RAD51D, n = 5; and RAD51B, n = 1), which was a significantly greater rate than in controls (P < .001); furthermore, RAD51 mutation carriers were more likely than noncarriers to have a family history of ovarian cancer (P < .001). Conclusion These results confirm that RAD51C and RAD51D are moderate ovarian cancer susceptibility genes and suggest that they confer levels of risk of EOC that may warrant their use alongside BRCA1 and BRCA2 in routine clinical genetic testing. PMID:26261251

  12. Two classes of BRC repeats in BRCA2 promote RAD51 nucleoprotein filament function by distinct mechanisms.

    PubMed

    Carreira, Aura; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C

    2011-06-28

    The human tumor suppressor protein BRCA2 plays a key role in recombinational DNA repair. BRCA2 recruits RAD51 to sites of DNA damage through interaction with eight conserved motifs of approximately 35 amino acids, the BRC repeats; however, the specific function of each repeat remains unclear. Here, we investigated the function of the individual BRC repeats by systematically analyzing their effects on RAD51 activities. Our results reveal the existence of two categories of BRC repeats that display unique functional characteristics. One group, comprising BRC1, -2, -3, and -4, binds to free RAD51 with high affinity. The second group, comprising BRC5, -6, -7, and -8, binds to free RAD51 with low affinity but binds to the RAD51-ssDNA filament with high affinity. Each member of the first group reduces the ATPase activity of RAD51, whereas none of the BRC repeats of the second group affects this activity. Thus, through different mechanisms, both types of BRC repeats bind to and stabilize the RAD51 nucleoprotein filament on ssDNA. In addition, members of the first group limit binding of RAD51 to duplex DNA, where members of the second group do not. Only the first group enhances DNA strand exchange by RAD51. Our results suggest that the two groups of BRC repeats have differentially evolved to ensure efficient formation of a nascent RAD51 filament on ssDNA by promoting its nucleation and growth, respectively. We propose that the BRC repeats cooperate in a partially redundant but reinforcing manner to ensure a high probability of RAD51 filament formation.

  13. Synthesis, Molecular Modeling, and Biological Evaluation of Novel RAD51 Inhibitors

    PubMed Central

    Zhu, Jiewen; Chen, Hongyuan; Guo, Xuning Emily; Qiu, Xiao-Long; Hu, Chun-Mei; Chamberlin, A. Richard; Lee, Wen-Hwa

    2015-01-01

    RAD51 recombinase plays a critical role for cancer cell proliferation and survival. Targeting RAD51 is therefore an attractive strategy for treating difficult-to-treat cancers, e.g. triple negative breast cancers which are often resistant to existing therapeutics. To this end, we have designed, synthesized and evaluated a panel of new RAD51 inhibitors, denoted IBR compounds. Among these compounds, we have identified a novel small molecule RAD51 inhibitor, IBR120, which exhibited a 4.8-fold improved growth inhibition activity in triple negative human breast cancer cell line MBA-MD-468. IBR120 also inhibited the proliferation of a broad spectrum of other cancer cell types. Approximately 10-fold difference between the IC50 values in normal and cancer cells were observed. Moreover, IBR120 was capable of disrupting RAD51 multimerization, impairing homologous recombination repair, and inducing apoptotic cell death. Therefore, these novel RAD51 inhibitors may serve as potential candidates for the development of pharmaceutical strategies against difficult-to-treat cancers. PMID:25874343

  14. Overexpressed of RAD51 suppresses recombination defects: a possible mechanism to reverse genomic instability

    SciTech Connect

    Schild, David; Wiese, Claudia

    2009-10-15

    RAD51, a key protein in the homologous recombinational DNA repair (HRR) pathway, is the major strand-transferase required for mitotic recombination. An important early step in HRR is the formation of single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA) coated by RPA (a ss-DNA binding protein). Displacement of RPA by RAD51 is highly regulated and facilitated by a number of different proteins known as the 'recombination mediators'. To assist these recombination mediators, a second group of proteins also is required and we are defining these proteins here as 'recombination co-mediators'. Defects in either recombination mediators or comediators, including BRCA1 and BRCA2, lead to impaired HRR that can genetically be complemented for (i.e. suppressed) by overexpression of RAD51. Defects in HRR have long been known to contribute to genomic instability leading to tumor development. Since genomic instability also slows cell growth, precancerous cells presumably require genomic restabilization to gain a growth advantage. RAD51 is overexpressed in many tumors, and therefore, we hypothesize that the complementing ability of elevated levels of RAD51 in tumors with initial HRR defects limits genomic instability during carcinogenic progression. Of particular interest, this model may also help explain the high frequency of TP53 mutations in human cancers, since wild-type p53 represses RAD51.

  15. BRCA2 BRC motifs bind RAD51-DNA filaments.

    PubMed

    Galkin, Vitold E; Esashi, Fumiko; Yu, Xiong; Yang, Shixin; West, Stephen C; Egelman, Edward H

    2005-06-14

    Germ-line mutations in BRCA2 account for approximately half the cases of autosomal dominant familial breast cancers. BRCA2 has been shown to interact directly with RAD51, an essential component of the cellular machinery for homologous recombination and the maintenance of genome stability. Interactions between BRCA2 and RAD51 take place by means of the conserved BRC repeat regions of BRCA2. Previously, it was shown that peptides corresponding to BRC3 or BRC4 bind RAD51 monomers and block RAD51-DNA filament formation. In this work, we further analyze these interactions and find that at lower molar ratios BRC3 or BRC4 actually bind and form stable complexes with RAD51-DNA nucleoprotein filaments. Only at high concentrations of the BRC repeats are filaments disrupted. The specific protein-protein contacts occur in the RAD51 filament by means of the N-terminal domain of RAD51 for BRC3 and the nucleotide-binding core of RAD51 for BRC4. These observations show that the BRC repeats bind distinct regions of RAD51 and are nonequivalent in their mode of interaction. The results provide insight into why mutation in just one of the eight BRC repeats would affect the way that BRCA2 protein interacts with the RAD51 filament. Disruption of a single RAD51 interaction site, one of several simultaneous interactions occurring throughout the BRC repeat-containing exon 11 of BRCA2, might modulate the ability of RAD51 to promote recombinational repair and lead to an increased risk of breast cancer.

  16. TOPBP1 regulates RAD51 phosphorylation and chromatin loading and determines PARP inhibitor sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Moudry, Pavel; Watanabe, Kenji; Wolanin, Kamila M.; Bartkova, Jirina; Wassing, Isabel E.; Watanabe, Sugiko; Strauss, Robert; Troelsgaard Pedersen, Rune; Oestergaard, Vibe H.; Lisby, Michael; Andújar-Sánchez, Miguel; Maya-Mendoza, Apolinar; Esashi, Fumiko; Lukas, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    Topoisomerase IIβ-binding protein 1 (TOPBP1) participates in DNA replication and DNA damage response; however, its role in DNA repair and relevance for human cancer remain unclear. Here, through an unbiased small interfering RNA screen, we identified and validated TOPBP1 as a novel determinant whose loss sensitized human cells to olaparib, an inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. We show that TOPBP1 acts in homologous recombination (HR) repair, impacts olaparib response, and exhibits aberrant patterns in subsets of human ovarian carcinomas. TOPBP1 depletion abrogated RAD51 loading to chromatin and formation of RAD51 foci, but without affecting the upstream HR steps of DNA end resection and RPA loading. Furthermore, TOPBP1 BRCT domains 7/8 are essential for RAD51 foci formation. Mechanistically, TOPBP1 physically binds PLK1 and promotes PLK1 kinase–mediated phosphorylation of RAD51 at serine 14, a modification required for RAD51 recruitment to chromatin. Overall, our results provide mechanistic insights into TOPBP1’s role in HR, with potential clinical implications for cancer treatment. PMID:26811421

  17. TOPBP1 regulates RAD51 phosphorylation and chromatin loading and determines PARP inhibitor sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Moudry, Pavel; Watanabe, Kenji; Wolanin, Kamila M; Bartkova, Jirina; Wassing, Isabel E; Watanabe, Sugiko; Strauss, Robert; Troelsgaard Pedersen, Rune; Oestergaard, Vibe H; Lisby, Michael; Andújar-Sánchez, Miguel; Maya-Mendoza, Apolinar; Esashi, Fumiko; Lukas, Jiri; Bartek, Jiri

    2016-02-01

    Topoisomerase IIβ-binding protein 1 (TOPBP1) participates in DNA replication and DNA damage response; however, its role in DNA repair and relevance for human cancer remain unclear. Here, through an unbiased small interfering RNA screen, we identified and validated TOPBP1 as a novel determinant whose loss sensitized human cells to olaparib, an inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. We show that TOPBP1 acts in homologous recombination (HR) repair, impacts olaparib response, and exhibits aberrant patterns in subsets of human ovarian carcinomas. TOPBP1 depletion abrogated RAD51 loading to chromatin and formation of RAD51 foci, but without affecting the upstream HR steps of DNA end resection and RPA loading. Furthermore, TOPBP1 BRCT domains 7/8 are essential for RAD51 foci formation. Mechanistically, TOPBP1 physically binds PLK1 and promotes PLK1 kinase-mediated phosphorylation of RAD51 at serine 14, a modification required for RAD51 recruitment to chromatin. Overall, our results provide mechanistic insights into TOPBP1's role in HR, with potential clinical implications for cancer treatment. PMID:26811421

  18. Interaction with the BRCA2 C terminus protects RAD51-DNA filaments from disassembly by BRC repeats.

    PubMed

    Davies, Owen Richard; Pellegrini, Luca

    2007-06-01

    BRCA2 has an essential function in DNA repair by homologous recombination, interacting with RAD51 via short motifs in the middle and at the C terminus of BRCA2. Here, we report that a conserved 36-residue sequence of human BRCA2 encoded by exon 27 (BRCA2Exon27) interacts with RAD51 through the specific recognition of oligomerized RAD51 ATPase domains. BRCA2Exon27 binding stabilizes the RAD51 nucleoprotein filament against disassembly by BRC repeat 4. The protection is specific for RAD51 filaments formed on single-stranded DNA and is lost when BRCA2Exon27 is phosphorylated on Ser3291. We propose that productive recombination results from the functional balance between the different RAD51-binding modes [corrected] of the BRC repeat and exon 27 regions of BRCA2. Our results further suggest a mechanism in which CDK phosphorylation of BRCA2Exon27 at the G2-M transition alters the balance in favor of RAD51 filament disassembly, thus terminating recombination.

  19. Rad51 Regulates Reprogramming Efficiency through DNA Repair Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Jae-Young; Kim, Dae-Kwan; Ko, Jeong-Jae; Kim, Keun Pil; Park, Kyung-Soon

    2016-01-01

    Rad51 is a key component of homologous recombination (HR) to repair DNA double-strand breaks and it forms Rad51 recombinase filaments of broken single-stranded DNA to promote HR. In addition to its role in DNA repair and cell cycle progression, Rad51 contributes to the reprogramming process during the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells. In light of this, we performed reprogramming experiments to examine the effect of co-expression of Rad51 and four reprogramming factors, Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc, on the reprogramming efficiency. Co-expression of Rad51 significantly increased the numbers of alkaline phosphatase-positive colonies and embryonic stem cell-like colonies during the process of reprogramming. Co-expression ofRad51 significantly increased the expression of epithelial markers at an early stage of reprogramming compared with control cells. Phosphorylated histone H2AX (γH2AX), which initiates the DNA double-strand break repair system, was highly accumulated in reprogramming intermediates upon co-expression of Rad51. This study identified a novel role of Rad51 in enhancing the reprogramming efficiency, possibly by facilitating mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition and by regulating a DNA damage repair pathway during the early phase of the reprogramming process. PMID:27660832

  20. Rad51 Regulates Reprogramming Efficiency through DNA Repair Pathway.

    PubMed

    Lee, Jae-Young; Kim, Dae-Kwan; Ko, Jeong-Jae; Kim, Keun Pil; Park, Kyung-Soon

    2016-06-01

    Rad51 is a key component of homologous recombination (HR) to repair DNA double-strand breaks and it forms Rad51 recombinase filaments of broken single-stranded DNA to promote HR. In addition to its role in DNA repair and cell cycle progression, Rad51 contributes to the reprogramming process during the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells. In light of this, we performed reprogramming experiments to examine the effect of co-expression of Rad51 and four reprogramming factors, Oct4, Sox2, Klf4, and c-Myc, on the reprogramming efficiency. Co-expression of Rad51 significantly increased the numbers of alkaline phosphatase-positive colonies and embryonic stem cell-like colonies during the process of reprogramming. Co-expression ofRad51 significantly increased the expression of epithelial markers at an early stage of reprogramming compared with control cells. Phosphorylated histone H2AX (γH2AX), which initiates the DNA double-strand break repair system, was highly accumulated in reprogramming intermediates upon co-expression of Rad51. This study identified a novel role of Rad51 in enhancing the reprogramming efficiency, possibly by facilitating mesenchymal-to-epithelial transition and by regulating a DNA damage repair pathway during the early phase of the reprogramming process. PMID:27660832

  1. Interactions between canine RAD51 and full length or truncated BRCA2 BRC repeats.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, K; Yoshikawa, Y; Oonuma, T; Tomioka, Y; Hashizume, K; Morimatsu, M

    2011-11-01

    In humans, mutations in the gene for the breast cancer susceptibility protein BRCA2 affect its interactions with the recombinase RAD51 and are associated with an increased risk of cancer. This interaction occurs through a series of eight BRC repeat sequences in BRCA2. A mammalian two-hybrid assay using individual BRC repeats demonstrated that BRC6 did not bind to RAD51, whereas there was strong (BRC1, 2 and 4), intermediate (BRC8), or weak (BRC3, 5 and 7) binding of other BRC repeats to RAD51. In serial deletion mutation experiments, binding strengths were increased when the C-terminal BRC repeat was removed from BRC1-8, BRC1-5 and BRC1-3. These results may provide an insight into the effects of missense or truncation mutations in BRCA2 in canine tumours.

  2. RAD51-dependent break-induced replication differs in kinetics and checkpoint responses from RAD51-mediated gene conversion.

    PubMed

    Malkova, Anna; Naylor, Maria L; Yamaguchi, Miyuki; Ira, Grzegorz; Haber, James E

    2005-02-01

    Diploid Saccharomyces cells experiencing a double-strand break (DSB) on one homologous chromosome repair the break by RAD51-mediated gene conversion >98% of the time. However, when extensive homologous sequences are restricted to one side of the DSB, repair can occur by both RAD51-dependent and RAD51-independent break-induced replication (BIR) mechanisms. Here we characterize the kinetics and checkpoint dependence of RAD51-dependent BIR when the DSB is created within a chromosome. Gene conversion products appear within 2 h, and there is little, if any, induction of the DNA damage checkpoint; however, RAD51-dependent BIR occurs with a further delay of 2 to 4 h and cells arrest in response to the G(2)/M DNA damage checkpoint. RAD51-dependent BIR does not require special facilitating sequences that are required for a less efficient RAD51-independent process. RAD51-dependent BIR occurs efficiently in G(2)-arrested cells. Once repair is initiated, the rate of repair replication during BIR is comparable to that of normal DNA replication, as copying of >100 kb is completed less than 30 min after repair DNA synthesis is detected close to the DSB.

  3. The carboxyl-terminal of BRCA1 is required for subnuclear assembly of RAD51 after treatment with cisplatin but not ionizing radiation in human breast and ovarian cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Chenyi; Huang Peng; Liu Jinsong . E-mail: jliu@mdanderson.org

    2005-10-28

    BRCA1 plays an important role in maintaining genomic stability through its involvement in DNA repair. Although it is known that BRCA1 and RAD51 form distinct DNA repair subnuclear complexes, or foci, following environmental insults to the DNA, the role of BRCA1 in this process remains to be characterized. The purpose of the study was therefore to determine the role of BRCA1 in the formation of RAD51 foci following treatment with cisplatin and ionizing radiation. We found that although a functional BRCA1 is required for the subnuclear assembly of BRCA1 foci following treatment with either ionizing radiation or cisplatin, a functional BRCA1 is required for RAD51 foci to form following treatment with cisplatin but not with ionizing radiation. Similar results were obtained in SKOV-3 cells when the level of BRCA1 expression was knocked down by stable expression of a retrovirus-mediated small-interfering RNA against BRCA1. We also found that the carboxyl-terminal of BRCA1 contains uncharacterized phosphorylation sites that are responsive to cisplatin. The functional BRCA1 is also required for breast and ovarian cancer cells to mount resistance to cisplatin. These results suggest that the carboxyl-terminal of BRCA1 is required for the cisplatin-induced recruitment of RAD51 to the DNA-damage site, which may contribute to cisplatin resistance.

  4. Promotion of Homologous Recombination by SWS-1 in Complex with RAD-51 Paralogs in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    McClendon, T Brooke; Sullivan, Meghan R; Bernstein, Kara A; Yanowitz, Judith L

    2016-05-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) repairs cytotoxic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) with high fidelity. Deficiencies in HR result in genome instability. A key early step in HR is the search for and invasion of a homologous DNA template by a single-stranded RAD-51 nucleoprotein filament. The Shu complex, composed of a SWIM domain-containing protein and its interacting RAD51 paralogs, promotes HR by regulating RAD51 filament dynamics. Despite Shu complex orthologs throughout eukaryotes, our understanding of its function has been most extensively characterized in budding yeast. Evolutionary analysis of the SWIM domain identified Caenorhabditis elegans sws-1 as a putative homolog of the yeast Shu complex member Shu2. Using a CRISPR-induced nonsense allele of sws-1, we show that sws-1 promotes HR in mitotic and meiotic nuclei. sws-1 mutants exhibit sensitivity to DSB-inducing agents and fail to form mitotic RAD-51 foci following treatment with camptothecin. Phenotypic similarities between sws-1 and the two RAD-51 paralogs rfs-1 and rip-1 suggest that they function together. Indeed, we detect direct interaction between SWS-1 and RIP-1 by yeast two-hybrid assay that is mediated by the SWIM domain in SWS-1 and the Walker B motif in RIP-1 Furthermore, RIP-1 bridges an interaction between SWS-1 and RFS-1, suggesting that RIP-1 facilitates complex formation with SWS-1 and RFS-1 We propose that SWS-1, RIP-1, and RFS-1 compose a C. elegans Shu complex. Our work provides a new model for studying Shu complex disruption in the context of a multicellular organism that has important implications as to why mutations in the human RAD51 paralogs are associated with genome instability.

  5. Promotion of Homologous Recombination by SWS-1 in Complex with RAD-51 Paralogs in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed

    McClendon, T Brooke; Sullivan, Meghan R; Bernstein, Kara A; Yanowitz, Judith L

    2016-05-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) repairs cytotoxic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) with high fidelity. Deficiencies in HR result in genome instability. A key early step in HR is the search for and invasion of a homologous DNA template by a single-stranded RAD-51 nucleoprotein filament. The Shu complex, composed of a SWIM domain-containing protein and its interacting RAD51 paralogs, promotes HR by regulating RAD51 filament dynamics. Despite Shu complex orthologs throughout eukaryotes, our understanding of its function has been most extensively characterized in budding yeast. Evolutionary analysis of the SWIM domain identified Caenorhabditis elegans sws-1 as a putative homolog of the yeast Shu complex member Shu2. Using a CRISPR-induced nonsense allele of sws-1, we show that sws-1 promotes HR in mitotic and meiotic nuclei. sws-1 mutants exhibit sensitivity to DSB-inducing agents and fail to form mitotic RAD-51 foci following treatment with camptothecin. Phenotypic similarities between sws-1 and the two RAD-51 paralogs rfs-1 and rip-1 suggest that they function together. Indeed, we detect direct interaction between SWS-1 and RIP-1 by yeast two-hybrid assay that is mediated by the SWIM domain in SWS-1 and the Walker B motif in RIP-1 Furthermore, RIP-1 bridges an interaction between SWS-1 and RFS-1, suggesting that RIP-1 facilitates complex formation with SWS-1 and RFS-1 We propose that SWS-1, RIP-1, and RFS-1 compose a C. elegans Shu complex. Our work provides a new model for studying Shu complex disruption in the context of a multicellular organism that has important implications as to why mutations in the human RAD51 paralogs are associated with genome instability. PMID:26936927

  6. Rad51 Inhibits Translocation Formation by Non-Conservative Homologous Recombination in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Manthey, Glenn M.; Bailis, Adam M.

    2010-01-01

    Chromosomal translocations are a primary biological response to ionizing radiation (IR) exposure, and are likely to result from the inappropriate repair of the DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) that are created. An abundance of repetitive sequences in eukaryotic genomes provides ample opportunity for such breaks to be repaired by homologous recombination (HR) between non-allelic repeats. Interestingly, in the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae the central strand exchange protein, Rad51 that is required for DSB repair by gene conversion between unlinked repeats that conserves genomic structure also suppresses translocation formation by several HR mechanisms. In particular, Rad51 suppresses translocation formation by single-strand annealing (SSA), perhaps the most efficient mechanism for translocation formation by HR in both yeast and mammalian cells. Further, the enhanced translocation formation that emerges in the absence of Rad51 displays a distinct pattern of genetic control, suggesting that this occurs by a separate mechanism. Since hypomorphic mutations in RAD51 in mammalian cells also reduce DSB repair by conservative gene conversion and stimulate non-conservative repair by SSA, this mechanism may also operate in humans and, perhaps contribute to the genome instability that propels the development of cancer. PMID:20686691

  7. Trypanosoma brucei BRCA2 acts in a life cycle-specific genome stability process and dictates BRC repeat number-dependent RAD51 subnuclear dynamics.

    PubMed

    Trenaman, Anna; Hartley, Claire; Prorocic, Marko; Passos-Silva, Danielle G; van den Hoek, Moniek; Nechyporuk-Zloy, Volodymyr; Machado, Carlos R; McCulloch, Richard

    2013-01-01

    Trypanosoma brucei survives in mammals through antigenic variation, which is driven by RAD51-directed homologous recombination of Variant Surface Glycoproteins (VSG) genes, most of which reside in a subtelomeric repository of >1000 silent genes. A key regulator of RAD51 is BRCA2, which in T. brucei contains a dramatic expansion of a motif that mediates interaction with RAD51, termed the BRC repeats. BRCA2 mutants were made in both tsetse fly-derived and mammal-derived T. brucei, and we show that BRCA2 loss has less impact on the health of the former. In addition, we find that genome instability, a hallmark of BRCA2 loss in other organisms, is only seen in mammal-derived T. brucei. By generating cells expressing BRCA2 variants with altered BRC repeat numbers, we show that the BRC repeat expansion is crucial for RAD51 subnuclear dynamics after DNA damage. Finally, we document surprisingly limited co-localization of BRCA2 and RAD51 in the T. brucei nucleus, and we show that BRCA2 mutants display aberrant cell division, revealing a function distinct from BRC-mediated RAD51 interaction. We propose that BRCA2 acts to maintain the huge VSG repository of T. brucei, and this function has necessitated the evolution of extensive RAD51 interaction via the BRC repeats, allowing re-localization of the recombinase to general genome damage when needed.

  8. Roles of Rad51 paralogs for promoting homologous recombination in Leishmania infantum

    PubMed Central

    Genois, Marie-Michelle; Plourde, Marie; Éthier, Chantal; Roy, Gaétan; Poirier, Guy G.; Ouellette, Marc; Masson, Jean-Yves

    2015-01-01

    To achieve drug resistance Leishmania parasite alters gene copy number by using its repeated sequences widely distributed through the genome. Even though homologous recombination (HR) is ascribed to maintain genome stability, this eukaryote exploits this potent mechanism driven by the Rad51 recombinase to form beneficial extrachromosomal circular amplicons. Here, we provide insights on the formation of these circular amplicons by analyzing the functions of the Rad51 paralogs. We purified three Leishmania infantum Rad51 paralogs homologs (LiRad51-3, LiRad51-4 and LiRad51-6) all of which directly interact with LiRad51. LiRad51-3, LiRad51-4 and LiRad51-6 show differences in DNA binding and annealing capacities. Moreover, it is also noteworthy that LiRad51-3 and LiRad51-4 are able to stimulate Rad51-mediated D-loop formation. In addition, we succeed to inactivate the LiRad51-4 gene and report a decrease of circular amplicons in this mutant. The LiRad51-3 gene was found to be essential for cell viability. Thus, we propose that the LiRad51 paralogs play crucial functions in extrachromosomal circular DNA amplification to circumvent drug actions and preserve survival. PMID:25712090

  9. Roles of Rad51 paralogs for promoting homologous recombination in Leishmania infantum.

    PubMed

    Genois, Marie-Michelle; Plourde, Marie; Éthier, Chantal; Roy, Gaétan; Poirier, Guy G; Ouellette, Marc; Masson, Jean-Yves

    2015-03-11

    To achieve drug resistance Leishmania parasite alters gene copy number by using its repeated sequences widely distributed through the genome. Even though homologous recombination (HR) is ascribed to maintain genome stability, this eukaryote exploits this potent mechanism driven by the Rad51 recombinase to form beneficial extrachromosomal circular amplicons. Here, we provide insights on the formation of these circular amplicons by analyzing the functions of the Rad51 paralogs. We purified three Leishmania infantum Rad51 paralogs homologs (LiRad51-3, LiRad51-4 and LiRad51-6) all of which directly interact with LiRad51. LiRad51-3, LiRad51-4 and LiRad51-6 show differences in DNA binding and annealing capacities. Moreover, it is also noteworthy that LiRad51-3 and LiRad51-4 are able to stimulate Rad51-mediated D-loop formation. In addition, we succeed to inactivate the LiRad51-4 gene and report a decrease of circular amplicons in this mutant. The LiRad51-3 gene was found to be essential for cell viability. Thus, we propose that the LiRad51 paralogs play crucial functions in extrachromosomal circular DNA amplification to circumvent drug actions and preserve survival.

  10. XRCC3 ATPase activity is required for normal XRCC3-Rad51C complex dynamics and homologous recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, N; Hinz, J; Kopf, V L; Segalle, K; Thompson, L

    2004-02-25

    Homologous recombinational repair is a major DNA repair pathway that preserves chromosomal integrity by removing double-strand breaks, crosslinks, and other DNA damage. In eukaryotic cells, the Rad51 paralogs (XRCC2, XRCC3, Rad51B, Rad51C, and Rad51D) are involved in this process, although their exact functions are largely undetermined. All five paralogs contain ATPase motifs, and XRCC3 appears to exist in a single complex with Rad51C. To begin to examine the function of this Rad51C-XRCC3 complex, we generated mammalian expression vectors that produce human wild-type XRCC3 or mutant XRCC3 with either a non-conservative mutation (K113A) or a conservative mutation (K113R) in the GKT Walker A box of the ATPase motif. The three vectors were independently transfected into Xrcc3-deficient irs1SF CHO cells. Wild-type XRCC3 complemented irs1SF cells, albeit to varying degrees, while ATPase mutants had no complementing activity, even when the mutant protein was expressed at comparable levels to that in wild-type-complemented clones. Because of the mutants' dysfunction, we propose that ATP binding and hydrolyzing activities of XRCC3 are essential. We tested in vitro complex formation by wild-type and mutant XRCC3 with His6-tagged Rad51C upon coexpression in bacteria, nickel affinity purification, and western blotting. Wild-type and K113A mutant XRCC3 formed stable complexes with Rad51C and co-purified with Rad51C, while the K113R mutant did not and was predominantly insoluble. Addition of 5 mM ATP, but not ADP, also abolished complex formation by the wild-type proteins. These results suggest that XRCC3 is likely to regulate the dissociation and formation of Rad51C-XRCC3 complex through ATP binding and hydrolysis, with both processes being essential for the complex's ability to participate in HRR.

  11. Rad51–Rad52 Mediated Maintenance of Centromeric Chromatin in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    Mitra, Sreyoshi; Gómez-Raja, Jonathan; Larriba, Germán; Dubey, Dharani Dhar; Sanyal, Kaustuv

    2014-01-01

    Specification of the centromere location in most eukaryotes is not solely dependent on the DNA sequence. However, the non-genetic determinants of centromere identity are not clearly defined. While multiple mechanisms, individually or in concert, may specify centromeres epigenetically, most studies in this area are focused on a universal factor, a centromere-specific histone H3 variant CENP-A, often considered as the epigenetic determinant of centromere identity. In spite of variable timing of its loading at centromeres across species, a replication coupled early S phase deposition of CENP-A is found in most yeast centromeres. Centromeres are the earliest replicating chromosomal regions in a pathogenic budding yeast Candida albicans. Using a 2-dimensional agarose gel electrophoresis assay, we identify replication origins (ORI7-LI and ORI7-RI) proximal to an early replicating centromere (CEN7) in C. albicans. We show that the replication forks stall at CEN7 in a kinetochore dependent manner and fork stalling is reduced in the absence of the homologous recombination (HR) proteins Rad51 and Rad52. Deletion of ORI7-RI causes a significant reduction in the stalled fork signal and an increased loss rate of the altered chromosome 7. The HR proteins, Rad51 and Rad52, have been shown to play a role in fork restart. Confocal microscopy shows declustered kinetochores in rad51 and rad52 mutants, which are evidence of kinetochore disintegrity. CENP-ACaCse4 levels at centromeres, as determined by chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) experiments, are reduced in absence of Rad51/Rad52 resulting in disruption of the kinetochore structure. Moreover, western blot analysis reveals that delocalized CENP-A molecules in HR mutants degrade in a similar fashion as in other kinetochore mutants described before. Finally, co-immunoprecipitation assays indicate that Rad51 and Rad52 physically interact with CENP-ACaCse4 in vivo. Thus, the HR proteins Rad51 and Rad52 epigenetically maintain

  12. Transcriptional profile of the homologous recombination machinery and characterization of the EhRAD51 recombinase in response to DNA damage in Entamoeba histolytica

    PubMed Central

    López-Casamichana, Mavil; Orozco, Esther; Marchat, Laurence A; López-Camarillo, César

    2008-01-01

    Background In eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells, homologous recombination is an accurate mechanism to generate genetic diversity, and it is also used to repair DNA double strand-breaks. RAD52 epistasis group genes involved in recombinational DNA repair, including mre11, rad50, nsb1/xrs2, rad51, rad51c/rad57, rad51b/rad55, rad51d, xrcc2, xrcc3, rad52, rad54, rad54b/rdh54 and rad59 genes, have been studied in human and yeast cells. Notably, the RAD51 recombinase catalyses strand transfer between a broken DNA and its undamaged homologous strand, to allow damaged region repair. In protozoan parasites, homologous recombination generating antigenic variation and genomic rearrangements is responsible for virulence variation and drug resistance. However, in Entamoeba histolytica the protozoan parasite responsible for human amoebiasis, DNA repair and homologous recombination mechanisms are still unknown. Results In this paper, we initiated the study of the mechanism for DNA repair by homologous recombination in the primitive eukaryote E. histolytica using UV-C (150 J/m2) irradiated trophozoites. DNA double strand-breaks were evidenced in irradiated cells by TUNEL and comet assays and evaluation of the EhH2AX histone phosphorylation status. In E. histolytica genome, we identified genes homologous to yeast and human RAD52 epistasis group genes involved in DNA double strand-breaks repair by homologous recombination. Interestingly, the E. histolytica RAD52 epistasis group related genes were differentially expressed before and after UV-C treatment. Next, we focused on the characterization of the putative recombinase EhRAD51, which conserves the typical architecture of RECA/RAD51 proteins. Specific antibodies immunodetected EhRAD51 protein in both nuclear and cytoplasmic compartments. Moreover, after DNA damage, EhRAD51 was located as typical nuclear foci-like structures in E. histolytica trophozoites. Purified recombinant EhRAD51 exhibited DNA binding and pairing activities and

  13. NUCKS1 is a novel RAD51AP1 paralog important for homologous recombination and genome stability

    PubMed Central

    Parplys, Ann C.; Zhao, Weixing; Sharma, Neelam; Groesser, Torsten; Liang, Fengshan; Maranon, David G.; Leung, Stanley G.; Grundt, Kirsten; Dray, Eloïse; Idate, Rupa; Østvold, Anne Carine; Schild, David; Sung, Patrick; Wiese, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    NUCKS1 (nuclear casein kinase and cyclin-dependent kinase substrate 1) is a 27 kD chromosomal, vertebrate-specific protein, for which limited functional data exist. Here, we demonstrate that NUCKS1 shares extensive sequence homology with RAD51AP1 (RAD51 associated protein 1), suggesting that these two proteins are paralogs. Similar to the phenotypic effects of RAD51AP1 knockdown, we find that depletion of NUCKS1 in human cells impairs DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR) and chromosome stability. Depletion of NUCKS1 also results in greatly increased cellular sensitivity to mitomycin C (MMC), and in increased levels of spontaneous and MMC-induced chromatid breaks. NUCKS1 is critical to maintaining wild type HR capacity, and, as observed for a number of proteins involved in the HR pathway, functional loss of NUCKS1 leads to a slow down in DNA replication fork progression with a concomitant increase in the utilization of new replication origins. Interestingly, recombinant NUCKS1 shares the same DNA binding preference as RAD51AP1, but binds to DNA with reduced affinity when compared to RAD51AP1. Our results show that NUCKS1 is a chromatin-associated protein with a role in the DNA damage response and in HR, a DNA repair pathway critical for tumor suppression. PMID:26323318

  14. NUCKS1 is a novel RAD51AP1 paralog important for homologous recombination and genome stability

    SciTech Connect

    Parplys, Ann C.; Zhao, Weixing; Sharma, Neelam; Groesser, Torsten; Liang, Fengshan; Maranon, David G.; Leung, Stanley G.; Grundt, Kirsten; Dray, Eloïse; Idate, Rupa; Østvold, Anne Carine; Schild, David; Sung, Patrick; Wiese, Claudia

    2015-08-31

    NUCKS1 (nuclear casein kinase and cyclin-dependent kinase substrate 1) is a 27 kD chromosomal, vertebrate-specific protein, for which limited functional data exist. Here, we demonstrate that NUCKS1 shares extensive sequence homology with RAD51AP1 (RAD51 associated protein 1), suggesting that these two proteins are paralogs. Similar to the phenotypic effects of RAD51AP1 knockdown, we find that depletion of NUCKS1 in human cells impairs DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR) and chromosome stability. Depletion of NUCKS1 also results in greatly increased cellular sensitivity to mitomycin C (MMC), and in increased levels of spontaneous and MMC-induced chromatid breaks. NUCKS1 is critical to maintaining wild type HR capacity, and, as observed for a number of proteins involved in the HR pathway, functional loss of NUCKS1 leads to a slow down in DNA replication fork progression with a concomitant increase in the utilization of new replication origins. Interestingly, recombinant NUCKS1 shares the same DNA binding preference as RAD51AP1, but binds to DNA with reduced affinity when compared to RAD51AP1. Finally, our results show that NUCKS1 is a chromatin-associated protein with a role in the DNA damage response and in HR, a DNA repair pathway critical for tumor suppression.

  15. NUCKS1 is a novel RAD51AP1 paralog important for homologous recombination and genome stability.

    PubMed

    Parplys, Ann C; Zhao, Weixing; Sharma, Neelam; Groesser, Torsten; Liang, Fengshan; Maranon, David G; Leung, Stanley G; Grundt, Kirsten; Dray, Eloïse; Idate, Rupa; Østvold, Anne Carine; Schild, David; Sung, Patrick; Wiese, Claudia

    2015-11-16

    NUCKS1 (nuclear casein kinase and cyclin-dependent kinase substrate 1) is a 27 kD chromosomal, vertebrate-specific protein, for which limited functional data exist. Here, we demonstrate that NUCKS1 shares extensive sequence homology with RAD51AP1 (RAD51 associated protein 1), suggesting that these two proteins are paralogs. Similar to the phenotypic effects of RAD51AP1 knockdown, we find that depletion of NUCKS1 in human cells impairs DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR) and chromosome stability. Depletion of NUCKS1 also results in greatly increased cellular sensitivity to mitomycin C (MMC), and in increased levels of spontaneous and MMC-induced chromatid breaks. NUCKS1 is critical to maintaining wild type HR capacity, and, as observed for a number of proteins involved in the HR pathway, functional loss of NUCKS1 leads to a slow down in DNA replication fork progression with a concomitant increase in the utilization of new replication origins. Interestingly, recombinant NUCKS1 shares the same DNA binding preference as RAD51AP1, but binds to DNA with reduced affinity when compared to RAD51AP1. Our results show that NUCKS1 is a chromatin-associated protein with a role in the DNA damage response and in HR, a DNA repair pathway critical for tumor suppression. PMID:26323318

  16. NUCKS1 is a novel RAD51AP1 paralog important for homologous recombination and genome stability

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Parplys, Ann C.; Zhao, Weixing; Sharma, Neelam; Groesser, Torsten; Liang, Fengshan; Maranon, David G.; Leung, Stanley G.; Grundt, Kirsten; Dray, Eloïse; Idate, Rupa; et al

    2015-08-31

    NUCKS1 (nuclear casein kinase and cyclin-dependent kinase substrate 1) is a 27 kD chromosomal, vertebrate-specific protein, for which limited functional data exist. Here, we demonstrate that NUCKS1 shares extensive sequence homology with RAD51AP1 (RAD51 associated protein 1), suggesting that these two proteins are paralogs. Similar to the phenotypic effects of RAD51AP1 knockdown, we find that depletion of NUCKS1 in human cells impairs DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR) and chromosome stability. Depletion of NUCKS1 also results in greatly increased cellular sensitivity to mitomycin C (MMC), and in increased levels of spontaneous and MMC-induced chromatid breaks. NUCKS1 is critical to maintainingmore » wild type HR capacity, and, as observed for a number of proteins involved in the HR pathway, functional loss of NUCKS1 leads to a slow down in DNA replication fork progression with a concomitant increase in the utilization of new replication origins. Interestingly, recombinant NUCKS1 shares the same DNA binding preference as RAD51AP1, but binds to DNA with reduced affinity when compared to RAD51AP1. Finally, our results show that NUCKS1 is a chromatin-associated protein with a role in the DNA damage response and in HR, a DNA repair pathway critical for tumor suppression.« less

  17. Molecular Basis for Enhancement of the Meiotic DMCI Recombinase by RAD51AP1

    SciTech Connect

    Dray, Eloise; Dunlop, Myun Hwa; Kauppi, Liisa; San Filippo, Joseph San; Wiese, Claudia; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Begovic, Sead; Schild, David; Jasin, Maria; Keeney, Scott; Sung, Patrick

    2010-11-05

    Homologous recombination is needed for meiotic chromosome segregation, genome maintenance, and tumor suppression. RAD51AP1 (RAD51 Associated Protein 1) has been shown to interact with and enhance the recombinase activity of RAD51. Accordingly, genetic ablation of RAD51AP1 leads to enhanced sensitivity to and also chromosome aberrations upon DNA damage, demonstrating a role for RAD51AP1 in mitotic homologous recombination. Here we show physical association of RAD51AP1 with the meiosis-specific recombinase DMC1 and a stimulatory effect of RAD51AP1 on the DMC1-mediated D-loop reaction. Mechanistic studies have revealed that RAD51AP1 enhances the ability of the DMC1 presynaptic filament to capture the duplex DNA partner and to assemble the synaptic complex, in which the recombining DNA strands are homologously aligned. We also provide evidence that functional co-operation is dependent on complex formation between DMC1 and RAD51AP1, and that distinct epitopes in RAD51AP1 mediate interactions with RAD51 and DMC1. Finally, we show that RAD51AP1 is expressed in mouse testes, and that RAD51AP1 foci co-localize with a subset of DMC1 foci in spermatocytes. These results suggest that RAD51AP1 also serves an important role in meiotic homologous recombination.

  18. Significance of ligand interactions involving Hop2-Mnd1 and the RAD51 and DMC1 recombinases in homologous DNA repair and XX ovarian dysgenesis.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Weixing; Sung, Patrick

    2015-04-30

    The evolutionarily conserved Hop2-Mnd1 complex is a key cofactor for the meiosis-specific recombinase Dmc1. However, emerging evidence has revealed that Hop2-Mnd1 is expressed in somatic tissues, primary human fibroblasts and cell lines, and that it functions in conjunction with the Rad51 recombinase to repair damaged telomeres via the alternate lengthening of telomeres mechanism. Here, we reveal how distinct DNA-binding activities of Hop2-Mnd1 mediate the stabilization of the RAD51-ssDNA presynaptic filament or stimulate the homologous DNA pairing reaction. We have also endeavored to define the interface that governs the assembly of the higher order complex of Hop2-Mnd1 with RAD51. Unexpectedly, we find that ATP enhances the interaction between Hop2-Mnd1 and RAD51, and that both Hop2 and Mnd1 are involved in RAD51 interaction via their C-terminal regions. Importantly, mutations introduced into these Hop2 and Mnd1 domains, including the HOP2 p.del201Glu mutation present in a patient of XX ovarian dysgenesis, diminish the association and functional synergy of Hop2-Mnd1 with both RAD51 and DMC1. Our findings help delineate the intricate manner in which Hop2-Mnd1 engages and functions with RAD51 and DMC1 in mammalian cells and speak to the possible cause of XX ovarian dysgenesis.

  19. Chromatin architecture may dictate the target site for DMC1, but not for RAD51, during homologous pairing

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Wataru; Takaku, Motoki; Machida, Shinichi; Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Maehara, Kazumitsu; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotes, genomic DNA is compacted as chromatin, in which histones and DNA form the nucleosome as the basic unit. DMC1 and RAD51 are essential eukaryotic recombinases that mediate homologous chromosome pairing during homologous recombination. However, the means by which these two recombinases distinctly function in chromatin have remained elusive. Here we found that, in chromatin, the human DMC1-single-stranded DNA complex bypasses binding to the nucleosome, and preferentially promotes homologous pairing at the nucleosome-depleted regions. Consistently, DMC1 forms ternary complex recombination intermediates with the nucleosome-free DNA or the nucleosome-depleted DNA region. Surprisingly, removal of the histone tails improperly enhances the nucleosome binding by DMC1. In contrast, RAD51 does not specifically target the nucleosome-depleted region in chromatin. These are the first demonstrations that the chromatin architecture specifies the sites to promote the homologous recombination reaction by DMC1, but not by RAD51. PMID:27052786

  20. RAD51 and BRCA2 enhance oncolytic adenovirus type 5 activity in ovarian cancer

    PubMed Central

    Tookman, Laura A.; Browne, Ashley K.; Connell, Claire M.; Bridge, Gemma; Ingemarsdotter, Carin K.; Dowson, Suzanne; Shibata, Atsushi; Lockley, Michelle; Martin, Sarah A.; McNeish, Iain A.

    2015-01-01

    Homologous Recombination (HR) function is critically important in High Grade Serous Ovarian Cancer (HGSOC). HGSOC with intact HR has a worse prognosis and is less likely to respond to platinum chemotherapy and PARP inhibitors. Oncolytic adenovirus, a novel therapy for human malignancies, stimulates a potent DNA damage response that influences overall anti-tumor activity. Here, the importance of HR was investigated by determining the efficacy of adenovirus type 5 (Ad5) vectors in ovarian cancer. Using matched BRCA2 mutant and wild-type HGSOC cells, it was demonstrated that intact HR function promotes viral DNA replication and augments overall efficacy, without influencing viral DNA processing. These data were confirmed in a wider panel of HR competent and defective ovarian cancer lines. Mechanistically, both BRCA2 and RAD51 localize to viral replication centers within the infected cell nucleus and that RAD51 localization occurs independently of BRCA2. In addition, a direct interaction was identified between RAD51 and adenovirus E2 DNA binding protein. Finally, using functional assays of HR competence, despite inducing degradation of MRE11, Ad5 infection does not alter cellular ability to repair DNA double strand break damage via HR. These data reveal that Ad5 redistributes critical HR components to viral replication centers and enhances cytotoxicity. Implications Oncolytic adenoviral therapy may be most clinically relevant in tumors with intact HR function. PMID:26452665

  1. Polymorphisms of canine BRCA2 BRC repeats affecting interaction with RAD51.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Kazuhiko; Ishiguro-Oonuma, Toshina; Yoshikawa, Yasunaga; Udagawa, Chihiro; Kato, Yuiko; Watanabe, Masami; Bonkobara, Makoto; Morimatsu, Masami; Omi, Toshinori

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA2 leading to the failure of interactions with the recombinase RAD51 are associated with an increased risk of cancer in humans. This interaction depends on the eight BRC repeat (BRC1-8) sequences in BRCA2. We previously reported that canine BRC3 has two polymorphisms (T1425P and K1435R) influencing the interaction with RAD51, and 1435R was identified in mammary tumor dog samples. In this study, we investigated the sequence variations of BRC3 and 4 in 236 dogs of five breeds. Allele frequencies of 1425P and 1435R were 0.063 and 0.314, respectively, and there was no other polymorphism in the sequenced region. A mammalian two-hybrid assay using BRC3-4 sequences demonstrated that 1425P allele reduced the binding strength with RAD51 but 1435R had no effect. These results may provide an insight into the functions of not only individual but also multiple BRC repeats of BRCA2 in dogs.

  2. Polymorphisms of canine BRCA2 BRC repeats affecting interaction with RAD51.

    PubMed

    Ochiai, Kazuhiko; Ishiguro-Oonuma, Toshina; Yoshikawa, Yasunaga; Udagawa, Chihiro; Kato, Yuiko; Watanabe, Masami; Bonkobara, Makoto; Morimatsu, Masami; Omi, Toshinori

    2015-01-01

    Mutations in the breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA2 leading to the failure of interactions with the recombinase RAD51 are associated with an increased risk of cancer in humans. This interaction depends on the eight BRC repeat (BRC1-8) sequences in BRCA2. We previously reported that canine BRC3 has two polymorphisms (T1425P and K1435R) influencing the interaction with RAD51, and 1435R was identified in mammary tumor dog samples. In this study, we investigated the sequence variations of BRC3 and 4 in 236 dogs of five breeds. Allele frequencies of 1425P and 1435R were 0.063 and 0.314, respectively, and there was no other polymorphism in the sequenced region. A mammalian two-hybrid assay using BRC3-4 sequences demonstrated that 1425P allele reduced the binding strength with RAD51 but 1435R had no effect. These results may provide an insight into the functions of not only individual but also multiple BRC repeats of BRCA2 in dogs. PMID:25876666

  3. Chinese Herbal Mixture, Tien-Hsien Liquid, Induces G2/M Cycle Arrest and Radiosensitivity in MCF-7 Human Breast Cancer Cells through Mechanisms Involving DNMT1 and Rad51 Downregulation

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Jyh-Ming; Yang, Chia-Ming; Kuo, Hui-Ching; Chang, Chia-Lun; Lee, Hsin-Lun; Lai, I-Chun; Chuang, Shuang-En

    2016-01-01

    The Chinese herbal mixture, Tien-Hsien Liquid (THL), has been proven to suppress the growth and invasiveness of cancer cells and is currently regarded as a complementary medicine for the treatment of cancer. Our previous study using acute promyelocytic leukemia cells uncovered its effect on the downregulation of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) which is often overexpressed in cancer cells resulting in the repression of tumor suppressors via hypermethylation. Herein, we explored the effects of THL in MCF-7 breast cancer cells that also demonstrate elevated DNMT1. The results show that THL dose-dependently downregulated DNMT1 accompanied by the induction of tumor suppressors such as p21 and p15. THL arrested cell cycle in G2/M phase and decreased the protein levels of cyclin A, cyclin B1, phospho-pRb, and AKT. DNMT1 inhibition was previously reported to exert a radiosensitizing effect in cancer cells through the repression of DNA repair. We found that THL enhanced radiation-induced clonogenic cell death in MCF-7 cells and decreased the level of DNA double-strand break repair protein, Rad51. Our observations may be the result of DNMT1 downregulation. Due to the fact that DNMT1 inhibition is now a mainstream strategy for anticancer therapy, further clinical trials of THL to confirm its clinical efficacy are warranted. PMID:27525019

  4. Rad51c- and Trp53-double-mutant mouse model reveals common features of homologous recombination-deficient breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Tumiati, M; Munne, P M; Edgren, H; Eldfors, S; Hemmes, A; Kuznetsov, S G

    2016-09-01

    Almost half of all hereditary breast cancers (BCs) are associated with germ-line mutations in homologous recombination (HR) genes. However, the tumor phenotypes associated with different HR genes vary, making it difficult to define the role of HR in BC predisposition. To distinguish between HR-dependent and -independent features of BCs, we generated a mouse model in which an essential HR gene, Rad51c, is knocked-out specifically in epidermal tissues. Rad51c is one of the key mediators of HR and a well-known BC predisposition gene. Here, we demonstrate that deletion of Rad51c invariably requires inactivation of the Trp53 tumor suppressor (TP53 in humans) to produce mammary carcinomas in 63% of female mice. Nonetheless, loss of Rad51c shortens the latency of Trp53-deficient mouse tumors from 11 to 6 months. Remarkably, the histopathological features of Rad51c-deficient mammary carcinomas, such as expression of hormone receptors and luminal epithelial markers, faithfully recapitulate the histopathology of human RAD51C-mutated BCs. Similar to other BC models, Rad51c/p53 double-mutant mouse mammary tumors also reveal a propensity for genomic instability, but lack the focal amplification of the Met locus or distinct mutational signatures reported for other HR genes. Using the human mammary epithelial cell line MCF10A, we show that deletion of TP53 can rescue RAD51C-deficient cells from radiation-induced cellular senescence, whereas it exacerbates their centrosome amplification and nuclear abnormalities. Altogether, our data indicate that a trend for genomic instability and inactivation of Trp53 are common features of HR-mediated BCs, whereas histopathology and somatic mutation patterns are specific for different HR genes. PMID:26820992

  5. Design, synthesis, and characterization of BRC4 mutants based on the crystal structure of BRC4-RAD51(191-220).

    PubMed

    Zhao, Dongxin; Lu, Kui

    2015-11-01

    Breast cancer susceptibility gene 2 (BRCA2)-a human tumor suppressor gene-is related to various malignancies such as breast and ovarian cancer. This gene can induce the key protein RAD51 recombinase, which is involved in homologous recombination with single-stranded DNA in the human body and can regulate RAD51 to complete the repair of damaged double-stranded DNA. Eight highly conserved BRC repeat motifs in BRCA2 protein serve as sites for the interaction between BRCA2 and RAD51. BRCA2 regulates RAD51 through these motifs. However, the mechanism of this interaction still requires further research. In this study, the BRC4 motif that demonstrated strong interaction with RAD51 was selected as template peptide. On the basis of known data regarding the crystal structure of the BRC4-RAD51(191-220) complex, a series of BRC4 mutants was designed using PyMOL software based on the sequence of BRC4, and polypeptides were synthesized by the Fmoc solid-phase method. After purification by reversed-phase high-performance liquid chromatography, the purity of the polypeptides reached >95 %. The primary determination of circular dichroism spectra showed that the polypeptides exhibited slight changes in secondary structure, which indicated that mutation on the non-conserved sites in BRC4 probably affected the interaction with BRC4. These findings will facilitate research on the interaction between targeting peptides and BRC4 mutants, as well the basic rules covering this interaction. PMID:26522863

  6. The BRC repeats in BRCA2 are critical for RAD51 binding and resistance to methyl methanesulfonate treatment.

    PubMed

    Chen, P L; Chen, C F; Chen, Y; Xiao, J; Sharp, Z D; Lee, W H

    1998-04-28

    The BRCA2 gene was identified based on its involvement in familial breast cancer. The analysis of its sequence predicts that the gene encodes a protein with 3,418 amino acids but provides very few clues pointing to its biological function. In an attempt to address this question, specific antibodies were prepared that identified the gene product of BRCA2 as a 390-kDa nuclear protein. Furthermore, direct binding of human RAD51 to each of the four single 30-amino acid BRC repeats located at the 5' portion of exon 11 of BRCA2 was demonstrated. Such an interaction is significant, as BRCA2 and RAD51 can be reciprocally coimmunoprecipitated by each of the individual, specific antibodies and form complexes in vivo. Inferring from the function of RAD51 in DNA repair, human pancreatic cancer cells, Capan-1, expressing truncated BRCA2 were shown to be hypersensitive to methyl methanesulfonate (MMS) treatment. Exogenous expression of wild-type BRCA2, but not BRC-deleted mutants, in Capan-1 cells confers resistance to MMS treatment. These results suggest that the interaction between the BRC repeats of BRCA2 and RAD51 is critical for cellular response to DNA damage caused by MMS.

  7. Nap1 stimulates homologous recombination by RAD51 and RAD54 in higher-ordered chromatin containing histone H1.

    PubMed

    Machida, Shinichi; Takaku, Motoki; Ikura, Masae; Sun, Jiying; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Kobayashi, Wataru; Kinomura, Aiko; Osakabe, Akihisa; Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Horikoshi, Yasunori; Fukuto, Atsuhiko; Matsuda, Ryo; Ura, Kiyoe; Tashiro, Satoshi; Ikura, Tsuyoshi; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2014-01-01

    Homologous recombination plays essential roles in mitotic DNA double strand break (DSB) repair and meiotic genetic recombination. In eukaryotes, RAD51 promotes the central homologous-pairing step during homologous recombination, but is not sufficient to overcome the reaction barrier imposed by nucleosomes. RAD54, a member of the ATP-dependent nucleosome remodeling factor family, is required to promote the RAD51-mediated homologous pairing in nucleosomal DNA. In higher eukaryotes, most nucleosomes form higher-ordered chromatin containing the linker histone H1. However, the mechanism by which RAD51/RAD54-mediated homologous pairing occurs in higher-ordered chromatin has not been elucidated. In this study, we found that a histone chaperone, Nap1, accumulates on DSB sites in human cells, and DSB repair is substantially decreased in Nap1-knockdown cells. We determined that Nap1 binds to RAD54, enhances the RAD54-mediated nucleosome remodeling by evicting histone H1, and eventually stimulates the RAD51-mediated homologous pairing in higher-ordered chromatin containing histone H1. PMID:24798879

  8. Caffeine inhibits gene conversion by displacing Rad51 from ssDNA.

    PubMed

    Tsabar, Michael; Mason, Jennifer M; Chan, Yuen-Ling; Bishop, Douglas K; Haber, James E

    2015-08-18

    Efficient repair of chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs) by homologous recombination relies on the formation of a Rad51 recombinase filament that forms on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) created at DSB ends. This filament facilitates the search for a homologous donor sequence and promotes strand invasion. Recently caffeine treatment has been shown to prevent gene targeting in mammalian cells by increasing non-productive Rad51 interactions between the DSB and random regions of the genome. Here we show that caffeine treatment prevents gene conversion in yeast, independently of its inhibition of the Mec1(ATR)/Tel1(ATM)-dependent DNA damage response or caffeine's inhibition of 5' to 3' resection of DSB ends. Caffeine treatment results in a dosage-dependent eviction of Rad51 from ssDNA. Gene conversion is impaired even at low concentrations of caffeine, where there is no discernible dismantling of the Rad51 filament. Loss of the Rad51 filament integrity is independent of Srs2's Rad51 filament dismantling activity or Rad51's ATPase activity and does not depend on non-specific Rad51 binding to undamaged double-stranded DNA. Caffeine treatment had similar effects on irradiated HeLa cells, promoting loss of previously assembled Rad51 foci. We conclude that caffeine treatment can disrupt gene conversion by disrupting Rad51 filaments.

  9. Caffeine inhibits gene conversion by displacing Rad51 from ssDNA

    PubMed Central

    Tsabar, Michael; Mason, Jennifer M.; Chan, Yuen-Ling; Bishop, Douglas K.; Haber, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Efficient repair of chromosomal double-strand breaks (DSBs) by homologous recombination relies on the formation of a Rad51 recombinase filament that forms on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) created at DSB ends. This filament facilitates the search for a homologous donor sequence and promotes strand invasion. Recently caffeine treatment has been shown to prevent gene targeting in mammalian cells by increasing non-productive Rad51 interactions between the DSB and random regions of the genome. Here we show that caffeine treatment prevents gene conversion in yeast, independently of its inhibition of the Mec1ATR/Tel1ATM-dependent DNA damage response or caffeine's inhibition of 5′ to 3′ resection of DSB ends. Caffeine treatment results in a dosage-dependent eviction of Rad51 from ssDNA. Gene conversion is impaired even at low concentrations of caffeine, where there is no discernible dismantling of the Rad51 filament. Loss of the Rad51 filament integrity is independent of Srs2's Rad51 filament dismantling activity or Rad51's ATPase activity and does not depend on non-specific Rad51 binding to undamaged double-stranded DNA. Caffeine treatment had similar effects on irradiated HeLa cells, promoting loss of previously assembled Rad51 foci. We conclude that caffeine treatment can disrupt gene conversion by disrupting Rad51 filaments. PMID:26019181

  10. Characterization of strand exchange activity of yeast Rad51 protein.

    PubMed Central

    Namsaraev, E; Berg, P

    1997-01-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae RAD51 gene product takes part in genetic recombination and repair of DNA double strand breaks. Rad51, like Escherichia coli RecA, catalyzes strand exchange between homologous circular single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) and linear double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) in the presence of ATP and ssDNA-binding protein. The formation of joint molecules between circular ssDNA and linear dsDNA is initiated at either the 5' or the 3' overhanging end of the complementary strand; joint molecules are formed only if the length of the overhanging end is more than 1 nucleotide. Linear dsDNAs with recessed complementary or blunt ends are not utilized. The polarity of strand exchange depends upon which end is used to initiate the formation of joint molecules. Joint molecules formed via the 5' end are processed by branch migration in the 3'-to-5' direction with respect to ssDNA, and joint molecules formed with a 3' end are processed in the opposite direction. PMID:9271413

  11. Mammalian RAD51 paralogs protect nascent DNA at stalled forks and mediate replication restart.

    PubMed

    Somyajit, Kumar; Saxena, Sneha; Babu, Sharath; Mishra, Anup; Nagaraju, Ganesh

    2015-11-16

    Mammalian RAD51 paralogs are implicated in the repair of collapsed replication forks by homologous recombination. However, their physiological roles in replication fork maintenance prior to fork collapse remain obscure. Here, we report on the role of RAD51 paralogs in short-term replicative stress devoid of DSBs. We show that RAD51 paralogs localize to nascent DNA and common fragile sites upon replication fork stalling. Strikingly, RAD51 paralogs deficient cells exhibit elevated levels of 53BP1 nuclear bodies and increased DSB formation, the latter being attributed to extensive degradation of nascent DNA at stalled forks. RAD51C and XRCC3 promote the restart of stalled replication in an ATP hydrolysis dependent manner by disengaging RAD51 and other RAD51 paralogs from the halted forks. Notably, we find that Fanconi anemia (FA)-like disorder and breast and ovarian cancer patient derived mutations of RAD51C fails to protect replication fork, exhibit under-replicated genomic regions and elevated micro-nucleation. Taken together, RAD51 paralogs prevent degradation of stalled forks and promote the restart of halted replication to avoid replication fork collapse, thereby maintaining genomic integrity and suppressing tumorigenesis.

  12. Strand pairing by Rad54 and Rad51 is enhanced by chromatin.

    PubMed

    Alexiadis, Vassilios; Kadonaga, James T

    2002-11-01

    We investigated the role of chromatin in the catalysis of homologous strand pairing by Rad54 and Rad51. Rad54 is related to the ATPase subunits of chromatin-remodeling factors, whereas Rad51 is related to bacterial RecA. In the absence of superhelical tension, we found that the efficiency of strand pairing with chromatin is >100-fold higher than that with naked DNA. In addition, we observed that Rad54 and Rad51 function cooperatively in the ATP-dependent remodeling of chromatin. These findings indicate that Rad54 and Rad51 have evolved to function with chromatin, the natural substrate, rather than with naked DNA. PMID:12414729

  13. The BRC repeats of BRCA2 modulate the DNA-binding selectivity of RAD51.

    PubMed

    Carreira, Aura; Hilario, Jovencio; Amitani, Ichiro; Baskin, Ronald J; Shivji, Mahmud K K; Venkitaraman, Ashok R; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C

    2009-03-20

    The breast cancer susceptibility protein, BRCA2, is essential for recombinational DNA repair. BRCA2 delivers RAD51 to double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) breaks through interaction with eight conserved, approximately 35 amino acid motifs, the BRC repeats. Here we show that the solitary BRC4 promotes assembly of RAD51 onto single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), but not dsDNA, to stimulate DNA strand exchange. BRC4 acts by blocking ATP hydrolysis and thereby maintaining the active ATP-bound form of the RAD51-ssDNA filament. Single-molecule visualization shows that BRC4 does not disassemble RAD51-dsDNA filaments but rather blocks nucleation of RAD51 onto dsDNA. Furthermore, this behavior is manifested by a domain of BRCA2 comprising all eight BRC repeats. These results establish that the BRC repeats modulate RAD51-DNA interaction in two opposing but functionally reinforcing ways: targeting active RAD51 to ssDNA and prohibiting RAD51 nucleation onto dsDNA. Thus, BRCA2 recruits RAD51 to DNA breaks and, we propose, the BRC repeats regulate DNA-binding selectivity.

  14. Identification and characterization of the RAD51 gene from the ciliate Tetrahymena thermophila.

    PubMed Central

    Campbell, C; Romero, D P

    1998-01-01

    The RAD51 gene is a eukaryotic homolog of rec A, a critical component in homologous recombination and DNA repair pathways in Escherichia coli . We have cloned the RAD51 homolog from Tetrahymena thermophila , a ciliated protozoan. Tetrahymena thermophila RAD51 encodes a 36.3 kDa protein whose amino acid sequence is highly similar to representative Rad51 homologs from other eukaryotic taxa. Recombinant Rad51 protein was purified to near homogeneity following overproduction in a bacterial expression system. The purified protein binds to both single- and double-stranded DNA, possesses a DNA-dependent ATPase activity and promotes intermolecular ligation of linearized plasmid DNA. While steady-state levels of Rad51 mRNA are low in normally growing cells, treatment with UV light resulted in a >100-fold increase in mRNA levels. This increase in mRNA was time dependent, but relatively independent of UV dose over a range of 1400-5200 J/m2. Western blot analysis confirmed that Rad51 protein levels increase upon UV irradiation. Exposure to the alkylating agent methyl methane sulfonate also resulted in substantially elevated Rad51 protein levels in treated cells, with pronounced localization in the macronucleus. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that ciliates such as T.thermophila utilize a Rad51-dependent pathway to repair damaged DNA. PMID:9628914

  15. Curcumin enhances the mitomycin C-induced cytotoxicity via downregulation of MKK1/2-ERK1/2-mediated Rad51 expression in non-small cell lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Jen-Chung; Tsai, Min-Shao; Weng, Shao-Hsing; Kuo, Ya-Hsun; Chiu, Yu-Fan; Lin, Yun-Wei

    2011-09-15

    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane), a major active component of turmeric (Curcuma longa), has been reported to suppress the proliferation of a wide variety of tumor cells. Rad51 is a key protein in the homologous recombination (HR) pathway of DNA double-strand break repair, and HR represents a novel target for cancer therapy. A high expression of Rad51 has been reported in chemo- or radio-resistant carcinomas. Therefore, in the current study, we will examine whether curcumin could enhance the effects of mitomycin C (MMC), a DNA interstrand cross-linking agent, to induce cytotoxicity by decreasing Rad51 expression. Exposure of two human non-small lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines (A549 and H1975) to curcumin could suppress MMC-induced MKK1/2-ERK1/2 signal activation and Rad51 protein expression. Enhancement of ERK1/2 activation by constitutively active MKK1/2 (MKK1/2-CA) increased Rad51 protein levels in curcumin and MMC co-treated human lung cells. Moreover, the synergistic cytotoxic effect induced by curcumin combined with MMC was decreased by MKK1-CA-mediated enhancement of ERK1/2 activation by a significant degree. In contrast, MKK1/2 inhibitor, U0126 was shown to augment the cytotoxicity of curcumin and MMC through downregulation of ERK1/2 activation and Rad51 expression. Depletion of endogenous Rad51 expression by siRad51 RNA transfection significantly enhanced MMC and/or curcumin induced cell death and cell growth inhibition. In contrast, an overexpression of Rad51 protected lung cancer cells from synergistic cytotoxic effects induced by curcumin and MMC. We concluded that Rad51 inhibition may be an additional action mechanism for enhancing the chemosensitization of MMC by curcumin in NSCLC. - Highlights: > Curcumin downregulates MKK-ERK-mediated Rad51 expression. > Curcumin enhances mitomycin C-induced cytotoxicity. > Rad51 protects cells from cytotoxic effects induced by curcumin and mitomycin C. > Rad51 inhibition enhances the chemosensitization of mitomycin C by

  16. Polymorphisms of homologous recombination RAD51, RAD51B, XRCC2, and XRCC3 genes and the risk of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Nowacka-Zawisza, Maria; Wiśnik, Ewelina; Wasilewski, Andrzej; Skowrońska, Milena; Forma, Ewa; Bryś, Magdalena; Różański, Waldemar; Krajewska, Wanda M

    2015-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms in DNA repair genes may induce individual variations in DNA repair capacity, which may in turn contribute to the risk of cancer developing. Homologous recombination repair (HRR) plays a critical role in maintaining chromosomal integrity and protecting against carcinogenic factors. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between prostate cancer risk and the presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genes involved in HRR, that is, RAD51 (rs1801320 and rs1801321), RAD51B (rs10483813 and rs3784099), XRCC2 (rs3218536), and XRCC3 (rs861539). Polymorphisms were analyzed by PCR-RFLP and Real-Time PCR in 101 patients with prostate adenocarcinoma and 216 age- and sex-matched controls. A significant relationship was detected between the RAD51 gene rs1801320 polymorphism and increased prostate cancer risk. Our results indicate that the RAD51 gene rs1801320 polymorphism may contribute to prostate cancer susceptibility in Poland. PMID:26339569

  17. RAD51 135G→C Modifies Breast Cancer Risk among BRCA2 Mutation Carriers: Results from a Combined Analysis of 19 Studies

    PubMed Central

    Antoniou, Antonis C. ; Sinilnikova, Olga M. ; Simard, Jacques ; Léoné, Mélanie ; Dumont, Martine ; Neuhausen, Susan L. ; Struewing, Jeffery P. ; Stoppa-Lyonnet, Dominique ; Barjhoux, Laure ; Hughes, David J. ; Coupier, Isabelle ; Belotti, Muriel ; Lasset, Christine ; Bonadona, Valérie ; Bignon, Yves-Jean ; Rebbeck, Timothy R. ; Wagner, Theresa ; Lynch, Henry T. ; Domchek, Susan M. ; Nathanson, Katherine L. ; Garber, Judy E. ; Weitzel, Jeffrey ; Narod, Steven A. ; Tomlinson, Gail ; Olopade, Olufunmilayo I. ; Godwin, Andrew ; Isaacs, Claudine ; Jakubowska, Anna ; Lubinski, Jan ; Gronwald, Jacek ; Górski, Bohdan ; Byrski, Tomasz ; Huzarski, Tomasz ; Peock, Susan ; Cook, Margaret ; Baynes, Caroline ; Murray, Alexandra ; Rogers, Mark ; Daly, Peter A. ; Dorkins, Huw ; Schmutzler, Rita K. ; Versmold, Beatrix ; Engel, Christoph ; Meindl, Alfons ; Arnold, Norbert ; Niederacher, Dieter ; Deissler, Helmut ; Spurdle, Amanda B. ; Chen, Xiaoqing ; Waddell, Nicola ; Cloonan, Nicole ; Kirchhoff, Tomas ; Offit, Kenneth ; Friedman, Eitan ; Kaufmann, Bella ; Laitman, Yael ; Galore, Gilli ; Rennert, Gad ; Lejbkowicz, Flavio ; Raskin, Leon ; Andrulis, Irene L. ; Ilyushik, Eduard ; Ozcelik, Hilmi ; Devilee, Peter ; Vreeswijk, Maaike P. G. ; Greene, Mark H. ; Prindiville, Sheila A. ; Osorio, Ana ; Benítez, Javier ; Zikan, Michal ; Szabo, Csilla I. ; Kilpivaara, Outi ; Nevanlinna, Heli ; Hamann, Ute ; Durocher, Francine ; Arason, Adalgeir ; Couch, Fergus J. ; Easton, Douglas F. ; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia 

    2007-01-01

    RAD51 is an important component of double-stranded DNA–repair mechanisms that interacts with both BRCA1 and BRCA2. A single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) in the 5′ untranslated region (UTR) of RAD51, 135G→C, has been suggested as a possible modifier of breast cancer risk in BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers. We pooled genotype data for 8,512 female mutation carriers from 19 studies for the RAD51 135G→C SNP. We found evidence of an increased breast cancer risk in CC homozygotes (hazard ratio [HR] 1.92 [95% confidence interval {CI} 1.25–2.94) but not in heterozygotes (HR 0.95 [95% CI 0.83–1.07]; P=.002, by heterogeneity test with 2 degrees of freedom [df]). When BRCA1 and BRCA2 mutation carriers were analyzed separately, the increased risk was statistically significant only among BRCA2 mutation carriers, in whom we observed HRs of 1.17 (95% CI 0.91–1.51) among heterozygotes and 3.18 (95% CI 1.39–7.27) among rare homozygotes (P=.0007, by heterogeneity test with 2 df). In addition, we determined that the 135G→C variant affects RAD51 splicing within the 5′ UTR. Thus, 135G→C may modify the risk of breast cancer in BRCA2 mutation carriers by altering the expression of RAD51. RAD51 is the first gene to be reliably identified as a modifier of risk among BRCA1/2 mutation carriers. PMID:17999359

  18. S100A11 plays a role in homologous recombination and genome maintenance by influencing the persistence of RAD51 in DNA repair foci.

    PubMed

    Foertsch, Franziska; Szambowska, Anna; Weise, Anja; Zielinski, Alexandra; Schlott, Bernhard; Kraft, Florian; Mrasek, Kristin; Borgmann, Kerstin; Pospiech, Helmut; Grosse, Frank; Melle, Christian

    2016-10-17

    The repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) by homologous recombination (HR) is an essential process in maintenance of chromosomal stability. A key player of HR is the strand exchange factor RAD51 whose assembly at sites of DNA damage is tightly regulated. We detected an endogenous complex of RAD51 with the calcium-binding protein S100A11, which is localized at sites of DNA repair in HaCaT cells as well as in normal human epidermal keratinocytes (NHEK) synchronized in S phase. In biochemical assays, we revealed that S100A11 enhanced the RAD51 strand exchange activity. When cells expressing a S100A11 mutant lacking the ability to bind Ca(2+), a prolonged persistence of RAD51 in repair sites and nuclear γH2AX foci was observed suggesting an incomplete DNA repair. The same phenotype became apparent when S100A11 was depleted by RNA interference. Furthermore, down-regulation of S100A11 resulted in both reduced sister chromatid exchange confirming the restriction of the recombination capacity of the cells, and in an increase of chromosomal aberrations reflecting the functional requirement of S100A11 for the maintenance of genomic stability. Our data indicate that S100A11 is involved in homologous recombination by regulating the appearance of RAD51 in DSB repair sites. This function requires the calcium-binding activity of S100A11. PMID:27590262

  19. RAD51 plays a crucial role in halting cell death program induced by ionizing radiation in bovine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Kujjo, Loro L; Ronningen, Reg; Ross, Pablo; Pereira, Ricardo J G; Rodriguez, Ramon; Beyhan, Zeki; Goissis, Marcelo D; Baumann, Thomas; Kagawa, Wataru; Camsari, Cagri; Smith, George W; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Cibelli, Jose B; Perez, Gloria I

    2012-03-01

    Reproductive health of humans and animals exposed to daily irradiants from solar/cosmic particles remains largely understudied. We evaluated the sensitivities of bovine and mouse oocytes to bombardment by krypton-78 (1 Gy) or ultraviolet B (UV-B; 100 microjoules). Mouse oocytes responded to irradiation by undergoing massive activation of caspases, rapid loss of energy without cytochrome-c release, and subsequent necrotic death. In contrast, bovine oocytes became positive for annexin-V, exhibited cytochrome-c release, and displayed mild activation of caspases and downstream DNAses but with the absence of a complete cell death program; therefore, cytoplasmic fragmentation was never observed. However, massive cytoplasmic fragmentation and increased DNA damage were induced experimentally by both inhibiting RAD51 and increasing caspase 3 activity before irradiation. Microinjection of recombinant human RAD51 prior to irradiation markedly decreased both cytoplasmic fragmentation and DNA damage in both bovine and mouse oocytes. RAD51 response to damaged DNA occurred faster in bovine oocytes than in mouse oocytes. Therefore, we conclude that upon exposure to irradiation, bovine oocytes create a physiologically indeterminate state of partial cell death, attributed to rapid induction of DNA repair and low activation of caspases. The persistence of these damaged cells may represent an adaptive mechanism with potential implications for livestock productivity and long-term health risks associated with human activity in space. PMID:22190703

  20. RAD51 plays a crucial role in halting cell death program induced by ionizing radiation in bovine oocytes.

    PubMed

    Kujjo, Loro L; Ronningen, Reg; Ross, Pablo; Pereira, Ricardo J G; Rodriguez, Ramon; Beyhan, Zeki; Goissis, Marcelo D; Baumann, Thomas; Kagawa, Wataru; Camsari, Cagri; Smith, George W; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Cibelli, Jose B; Perez, Gloria I

    2012-03-01

    Reproductive health of humans and animals exposed to daily irradiants from solar/cosmic particles remains largely understudied. We evaluated the sensitivities of bovine and mouse oocytes to bombardment by krypton-78 (1 Gy) or ultraviolet B (UV-B; 100 microjoules). Mouse oocytes responded to irradiation by undergoing massive activation of caspases, rapid loss of energy without cytochrome-c release, and subsequent necrotic death. In contrast, bovine oocytes became positive for annexin-V, exhibited cytochrome-c release, and displayed mild activation of caspases and downstream DNAses but with the absence of a complete cell death program; therefore, cytoplasmic fragmentation was never observed. However, massive cytoplasmic fragmentation and increased DNA damage were induced experimentally by both inhibiting RAD51 and increasing caspase 3 activity before irradiation. Microinjection of recombinant human RAD51 prior to irradiation markedly decreased both cytoplasmic fragmentation and DNA damage in both bovine and mouse oocytes. RAD51 response to damaged DNA occurred faster in bovine oocytes than in mouse oocytes. Therefore, we conclude that upon exposure to irradiation, bovine oocytes create a physiologically indeterminate state of partial cell death, attributed to rapid induction of DNA repair and low activation of caspases. The persistence of these damaged cells may represent an adaptive mechanism with potential implications for livestock productivity and long-term health risks associated with human activity in space.

  1. Role of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Rad51 paralogs in sister chromatid recombination.

    PubMed

    Mozlin, Amy M; Fung, Cindy W; Symington, Lorraine S

    2008-01-01

    Rad51 requires a number of other proteins, including the Rad51 paralogs, for efficient recombination in vivo. Current evidence suggests that the yeast Rad51 paralogs, Rad55 and Rad57, are important in formation or stabilization of the Rad51 nucleoprotein filament. To gain further insights into the function of the Rad51 paralogs, reporters were designed to measure spontaneous or double-strand break (DSB)-induced sister or nonsister recombination. Spontaneous sister chromatid recombination (SCR) was reduced 6000-fold in the rad57 mutant, significantly more than in the rad51 mutant. Although the DSB-induced recombination defect of rad57 was suppressed by overexpression of Rad51, elevated temperature, or expression of both mating-type alleles, the rad57 defect in spontaneous SCR was not strongly suppressed by these same factors. In addition, the UV sensitivity of the rad57 mutant was not strongly suppressed by MAT heterozygosity, even though Rad51 foci were restored under these conditions. This lack of suppression suggests that Rad55 and Rad57 have different roles in the recombinational repair of stalled replication forks compared with DSB repair. Furthermore, these data suggest that most spontaneous SCR initiates from single-stranded gaps formed at stalled replication forks rather than DSBs.

  2. Overlapping mechanisms promote postsynaptic RAD-51 filament disassembly during meiotic double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Ward, Jordan D; Muzzini, Diego M; Petalcorin, Mark I R; Martinez-Perez, Enrique; Martin, Julie S; Plevani, Paolo; Cassata, Giuseppe; Marini, Federica; Boulton, Simon J

    2010-01-29

    Homologous recombination (HR) is essential for repair of meiotic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Although the mechanisms of RAD-51-DNA filament assembly and strand exchange are well characterized, the subsequent steps of HR are less well defined. Here, we describe a synthetic lethal interaction between the C. elegans helicase helq-1 and RAD-51 paralog rfs-1, which results in a block to meiotic DSB repair after strand invasion. Whereas RAD-51-ssDNA filaments assemble at meiotic DSBs with normal kinetics in helq-1, rfs-1 double mutants, persistence of RAD-51 foci and genetic interactions with rtel-1 suggest a failure to disassemble RAD-51 from strand invasion intermediates. Indeed, purified HELQ-1 and RFS-1 independently bind to and promote the disassembly of RAD-51 from double-stranded, but not single-stranded, DNA filaments via distinct mechanisms in vitro. These results indicate that two compensating activities are required to promote postsynaptic RAD-51 filament disassembly, which are collectively essential for completion of meiotic DSB repair.

  3. Mek1 Down Regulates Rad51 Activity during Yeast Meiosis by Phosphorylation of Hed1.

    PubMed

    Callender, Tracy L; Laureau, Raphaelle; Wan, Lihong; Chen, Xiangyu; Sandhu, Rima; Laljee, Saif; Zhou, Sai; Suhandynata, Ray T; Prugar, Evelyn; Gaines, William A; Kwon, YoungHo; Börner, G Valentin; Nicolas, Alain; Neiman, Aaron M; Hollingsworth, Nancy M

    2016-08-01

    During meiosis, programmed double strand breaks (DSBs) are repaired preferentially between homologs to generate crossovers that promote proper chromosome segregation at Meiosis I. In many organisms, there are two strand exchange proteins, Rad51 and the meiosis-specific Dmc1, required for interhomolog (IH) bias. This bias requires the presence, but not the strand exchange activity of Rad51, while Dmc1 is responsible for the bulk of meiotic recombination. How these activities are regulated is less well established. In dmc1Δ mutants, Rad51 is actively inhibited, thereby resulting in prophase arrest due to unrepaired DSBs triggering the meiotic recombination checkpoint. This inhibition is dependent upon the meiosis-specific kinase Mek1 and occurs through two different mechanisms that prevent complex formation with the Rad51 accessory factor Rad54: (i) phosphorylation of Rad54 by Mek1 and (ii) binding of Rad51 by the meiosis-specific protein Hed1. An open question has been why inhibition of Mek1 affects Hed1 repression of Rad51. This work shows that Hed1 is a direct substrate of Mek1. Phosphorylation of Hed1 at threonine 40 helps suppress Rad51 activity in dmc1Δ mutants by promoting Hed1 protein stability. Rad51-mediated recombination occurring in the absence of Hed1 phosphorylation results in a significant increase in non-exchange chromosomes despite wild-type levels of crossovers, confirming previous results indicating a defect in crossover assurance. We propose that Rad51 function in meiosis is regulated in part by the coordinated phosphorylation of Rad54 and Hed1 by Mek1.

  4. Mek1 Down Regulates Rad51 Activity during Yeast Meiosis by Phosphorylation of Hed1

    PubMed Central

    Callender, Tracy L.; Laljee, Saif; Zhou, Sai; Suhandynata, Ray T.; Gaines, William A.; Kwon, YoungHo; Börner, G. Valentin; Nicolas, Alain; Neiman, Aaron M.

    2016-01-01

    During meiosis, programmed double strand breaks (DSBs) are repaired preferentially between homologs to generate crossovers that promote proper chromosome segregation at Meiosis I. In many organisms, there are two strand exchange proteins, Rad51 and the meiosis-specific Dmc1, required for interhomolog (IH) bias. This bias requires the presence, but not the strand exchange activity of Rad51, while Dmc1 is responsible for the bulk of meiotic recombination. How these activities are regulated is less well established. In dmc1Δ mutants, Rad51 is actively inhibited, thereby resulting in prophase arrest due to unrepaired DSBs triggering the meiotic recombination checkpoint. This inhibition is dependent upon the meiosis-specific kinase Mek1 and occurs through two different mechanisms that prevent complex formation with the Rad51 accessory factor Rad54: (i) phosphorylation of Rad54 by Mek1 and (ii) binding of Rad51 by the meiosis-specific protein Hed1. An open question has been why inhibition of Mek1 affects Hed1 repression of Rad51. This work shows that Hed1 is a direct substrate of Mek1. Phosphorylation of Hed1 at threonine 40 helps suppress Rad51 activity in dmc1Δ mutants by promoting Hed1 protein stability. Rad51-mediated recombination occurring in the absence of Hed1 phosphorylation results in a significant increase in non-exchange chromosomes despite wild-type levels of crossovers, confirming previous results indicating a defect in crossover assurance. We propose that Rad51 function in meiosis is regulated in part by the coordinated phosphorylation of Rad54 and Hed1 by Mek1. PMID:27483004

  5. Mek1 Down Regulates Rad51 Activity during Yeast Meiosis by Phosphorylation of Hed1.

    PubMed

    Callender, Tracy L; Laureau, Raphaelle; Wan, Lihong; Chen, Xiangyu; Sandhu, Rima; Laljee, Saif; Zhou, Sai; Suhandynata, Ray T; Prugar, Evelyn; Gaines, William A; Kwon, YoungHo; Börner, G Valentin; Nicolas, Alain; Neiman, Aaron M; Hollingsworth, Nancy M

    2016-08-01

    During meiosis, programmed double strand breaks (DSBs) are repaired preferentially between homologs to generate crossovers that promote proper chromosome segregation at Meiosis I. In many organisms, there are two strand exchange proteins, Rad51 and the meiosis-specific Dmc1, required for interhomolog (IH) bias. This bias requires the presence, but not the strand exchange activity of Rad51, while Dmc1 is responsible for the bulk of meiotic recombination. How these activities are regulated is less well established. In dmc1Δ mutants, Rad51 is actively inhibited, thereby resulting in prophase arrest due to unrepaired DSBs triggering the meiotic recombination checkpoint. This inhibition is dependent upon the meiosis-specific kinase Mek1 and occurs through two different mechanisms that prevent complex formation with the Rad51 accessory factor Rad54: (i) phosphorylation of Rad54 by Mek1 and (ii) binding of Rad51 by the meiosis-specific protein Hed1. An open question has been why inhibition of Mek1 affects Hed1 repression of Rad51. This work shows that Hed1 is a direct substrate of Mek1. Phosphorylation of Hed1 at threonine 40 helps suppress Rad51 activity in dmc1Δ mutants by promoting Hed1 protein stability. Rad51-mediated recombination occurring in the absence of Hed1 phosphorylation results in a significant increase in non-exchange chromosomes despite wild-type levels of crossovers, confirming previous results indicating a defect in crossover assurance. We propose that Rad51 function in meiosis is regulated in part by the coordinated phosphorylation of Rad54 and Hed1 by Mek1. PMID:27483004

  6. Two modules in the BRC repeats of BRCA2 mediate structural and functional interactions with the RAD51 recombinase.

    PubMed

    Rajendra, Eeson; Venkitaraman, Ashok R

    2010-01-01

    The breast and ovarian cancer suppressor protein BRCA2 controls the RAD51 recombinase in reactions that lead to homologous DNA recombination (HDR). BRCA2 binds RAD51 via eight conserved BRC repeat motifs of approximately 35 amino acids, each with a varying capacity to bind RAD51. BRC repeats both promote and inhibit RAD51 assembly on different DNA substrates to regulate HDR, but the structural basis for these functions is unclear. Here, we demarcate two tetrameric clusters of hydrophobic residues in the BRC repeats, interacting with distinct pockets in RAD51, and show that the co-location of both modules within a single BRC repeat is necessary for BRC-RAD51 binding and function. The two modules comprise the sequence FxxA, known to inhibit RAD51 assembly by blocking the oligomerization interface, and a previously unrecognized tetramer with the consensus sequence LFDE, which binds to a RAD51 pocket distinct from this interface. The LFDE motif is essential in BRC repeats for modes of RAD51 binding both permissive and inhibitory to RAD51 oligomerization. Targeted insertion of point mutations in RAD51 that disrupt the LFDE-binding pocket impair its assembly at DNA damage sites in living cells. Our findings suggest a model for the modular architecture of BRC repeats that provides fresh insight into the mechanisms regulating homologous DNA recombination.

  7. Visualizing the Nonhomogeneous Structure of RAD51 Filaments Using Nanofluidic Channels.

    PubMed

    Fornander, Louise H; Frykholm, Karolin; Fritzsche, Joachim; Araya, Joshua; Nevin, Philip; Werner, Erik; Çakır, Ali; Persson, Fredrik; Garcin, Edwige B; Beuning, Penny J; Mehlig, Bernhard; Modesti, Mauro; Westerlund, Fredrik

    2016-08-23

    RAD51 is the key component of the homologous recombination pathway in eukaryotic cells and performs its task by forming filaments on DNA. In this study we investigate the physical properties of RAD51 filaments formed on DNA using nanofluidic channels and fluorescence microscopy. Contrary to the bacterial ortholog RecA, RAD51 forms inhomogeneous filaments on long DNA in vitro, consisting of several protein patches. We demonstrate that a permanent "kink" in the filament is formed where two patches meet if the stretch of naked DNA between the patches is short. The kinks are readily seen in the present microscopy approach but would be hard to identify using conventional single DNA molecule techniques where the DNA is more stretched. We also demonstrate that protein patches separated by longer stretches of bare DNA roll up on each other and this is visualized as transiently overlapping filaments. RAD51 filaments can be formed at several different conditions, varying the cation (Mg(2+) or Ca(2+)), the DNA substrate (single-stranded or double-stranded), and the RAD51 concentration during filament nucleation, and we compare the properties of the different filaments formed. The results provide important information regarding the physical properties of RAD51 filaments but also demonstrate that nanofluidic channels are perfectly suited to study protein-DNA complexes. PMID:27479732

  8. The role of Rad51 in safeguarding mitochondrial activity during the meiotic cell cycle in mammalian oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyeoung-Hwa; Park, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Eun-Young; Ko, Jung-Jae; Park, Kyung-Soon; Lee, Kyung-Ah

    2016-01-01

    Rad51 is a conserved eukaryotic protein that mediates the homologous recombination repair of DNA double-strand breaks that occur during mitosis and meiosis. In addition, Rad51 promotes mitochondrial DNA synthesis when replication stress is increased. Rad51 also regulates cell cycle progression by preserving the G2/M transition in embryonic stem cells. In this study, we report a novel function of Rad51 in regulating mitochondrial activity during in vitro maturation of mouse oocytes. Suppression of Rad51 by injection of Rad51 dsRNA into germinal vesicle-stage oocytes resulted in arrest of meiosis in metaphase I. Rad51-depleted oocytes showed chromosome misalignment and failures in spindle aggregation, affecting the completion of cytokinesis. We found that Rad51 depletion was accompanied by decreased ATP production and mitochondrial membrane potential and increased DNA degradation. We further demonstrated that the mitochondrial defect activated autophagy in Rad51-depleted oocytes. Taken together, we concluded that Rad51 functions to safeguard mitochondrial integrity during the meiotic maturation of oocytes. PMID:27677401

  9. RNF138 interacts with RAD51D and is required for DNA interstrand crosslink repair and maintaining chromosome integrity.

    PubMed

    Yard, Brian D; Reilly, Nicole M; Bedenbaugh, Michael K; Pittman, Douglas L

    2016-06-01

    The RAD51 family is integral for homologous recombination (HR) mediated DNA repair and maintaining chromosome integrity. RAD51D, the fourth member of the family, is a known ovarian cancer susceptibility gene and required for the repair of interstrand crosslink DNA damage and preserving chromosomal stability. In this report, we describe the RNF138 E3 ubiquitin ligase that interacts with and ubiquitinates the RAD51D HR protein. RNF138 is a member of an E3 ligase family that contains an amino-terminal RING finger domain and a putative carboxyl-terminal ubiquitin interaction motif. In mammalian cells, depletion of RNF138 increased the stability of the RAD51D protein, suggesting that RNF138 governs ubiquitin-proteasome-mediated degradation of RAD51D. However, RNF138 depletion conferred sensitivity to DNA damaging agents, reduced RAD51 focus formation, and increased chromosomal instability. Site-specific mutagenesis of the RNF138 RING finger domain demonstrated that it was necessary for RAD51D ubiquitination. Presence of RNF138 also enhanced the interaction between RAD51D and a known interacting RAD51 family member XRCC2 in a yeast three-hybrid assay. Therefore, RNF138 is a newly identified regulatory component of the HR mediated DNA repair pathway that has implications toward understanding how ubiquitination modifies the functions of the RAD51 paralog protein complex.

  10. Distinct binding of BRCA2 BRC repeats to RAD51 generates differential DNA damage sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Gouri; Jimenez-Sainz, Judit; Presti, Thomas; Nguyen, Tiffany; Jensen, Ryan B

    2016-06-20

    BRCA2 is a multi-faceted protein critical for the proper regulation of homology-directed repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Elucidating the mechanistic features of BRCA2 is crucial for understanding homologous recombination and how patient-derived mutations impact future cancer risk. Eight centrally located BRC repeats in BRCA2 mediate binding and regulation of RAD51 on resected DNA substrates. Herein, we dissect the biochemical and cellular features of the BRC repeats tethered to the DNA binding domain of BRCA2. To understand how the BRC repeats and isolated domains of BRCA2 contribute to RAD51 binding, we analyzed both the biochemical and cellular properties of these proteins. In contrast to the individual BRC repeat units, we find that the BRC5-8 region potentiates RAD51-mediated DNA strand pairing and provides complementation functions exceeding those of BRC repeats 1-4. Furthermore, BRC5-8 can efficiently repair nuclease-induced DNA double-strand breaks and accelerate the assembly of RAD51 repair complexes upon DNA damage. These findings highlight the importance of the BRC5-8 domain in stabilizing the RAD51 filament and promoting homology-directed repair under conditions of cellular DNA damage.

  11. Dbl2 Regulates Rad51 and DNA Joint Molecule Metabolism to Ensure Proper Meiotic Chromosome Segregation

    PubMed Central

    Hyppa, Randy W.; Benko, Zsigmond; Misova, Ivana; Schleiffer, Alexander; Smith, Gerald R.; Gregan, Juraj

    2016-01-01

    To identify new proteins required for faithful meiotic chromosome segregation, we screened a Schizosaccharomyces pombe deletion mutant library and found that deletion of the dbl2 gene led to missegregation of chromosomes during meiosis. Analyses of both live and fixed cells showed that dbl2Δ mutant cells frequently failed to segregate homologous chromosomes to opposite poles during meiosis I. Removing Rec12 (Spo11 homolog) to eliminate meiotic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) suppressed the segregation defect in dbl2Δ cells, indicating that Dbl2 acts after the initiation of meiotic recombination. Analyses of DSBs and Holliday junctions revealed no significant defect in their formation or processing in dbl2Δ mutant cells, although some Rec12-dependent DNA joint molecules persisted late in meiosis. Failure to segregate chromosomes in the absence of Dbl2 correlated with persistent Rad51 foci, and deletion of rad51 or genes encoding Rad51 mediators also suppressed the segregation defect of dbl2Δ. Formation of foci of Fbh1, an F-box helicase that efficiently dismantles Rad51-DNA filaments, was impaired in dbl2Δ cells. Our results suggest that Dbl2 is a novel regulator of Fbh1 and thereby Rad51-dependent DSB repair required for proper meiotic chromosome segregation and viable sex cell formation. The wide conservation of these proteins suggests that our results apply to many species. PMID:27304859

  12. Distinct binding of BRCA2 BRC repeats to RAD51 generates differential DNA damage sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Gouri; Jimenez-Sainz, Judit; Presti, Thomas; Nguyen, Tiffany; Jensen, Ryan B.

    2016-01-01

    BRCA2 is a multi-faceted protein critical for the proper regulation of homology-directed repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Elucidating the mechanistic features of BRCA2 is crucial for understanding homologous recombination and how patient-derived mutations impact future cancer risk. Eight centrally located BRC repeats in BRCA2 mediate binding and regulation of RAD51 on resected DNA substrates. Herein, we dissect the biochemical and cellular features of the BRC repeats tethered to the DNA binding domain of BRCA2. To understand how the BRC repeats and isolated domains of BRCA2 contribute to RAD51 binding, we analyzed both the biochemical and cellular properties of these proteins. In contrast to the individual BRC repeat units, we find that the BRC5–8 region potentiates RAD51-mediated DNA strand pairing and provides complementation functions exceeding those of BRC repeats 1–4. Furthermore, BRC5–8 can efficiently repair nuclease-induced DNA double-strand breaks and accelerate the assembly of RAD51 repair complexes upon DNA damage. These findings highlight the importance of the BRC5–8 domain in stabilizing the RAD51 filament and promoting homology-directed repair under conditions of cellular DNA damage. PMID:27084934

  13. Identification of Rad51 regulation by BRCA2 using Caenorhabditis elegans BRCA2 and bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Min, Jaewon; Park, Pil-gu; Ko, Eunkyong; Choi, Eunhee; Lee, Hyunsook

    2007-11-03

    BRCA2 is involved in double-stranded DNA break repair by binding and regulating Rad51-mediated homologous recombination. Insights as to how BRCA2 regulates Rad51-mediated DNA repair arose from in vitro biochemical studies on fragments of BRCA2. However, the large 400-kDa BRCA2 protein has hampered our ability to understand the entire process by which full-length BRCA2 regulates Rad51. Here, we show that CeBRC-2, which is only one tenth the size of mammalian BRCA2, complemented BRCA2-deficiency in Rad51 regulation. CeBRC-2 was able to bind to mammalian Rad51 (mRad51) and form distinct nuclear foci when they interacted. In our bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis (BiFC), we show that the strength of the interaction between CeBRC-2 and mRad51 increased markedly after DNA damage. The BRC motif of CeBRC-2 was responsible for binding mRad51, but without the OB fold, the complex was unable to target damaged DNA. When CeBRC-2 was introduced into BRCA2-deficient cells, it restored Rad51 foci after DNA damage. Our study suggests a mode of action for BRCA2 with regard to DNA repair.

  14. SUMO modification regulates BLM and RAD51 interaction at damaged replication forks.

    PubMed

    Ouyang, Karen J; Woo, Leslie L; Zhu, Jianmei; Huo, Dezheng; Matunis, Michael J; Ellis, Nathan A

    2009-12-01

    The gene mutated in Bloom's syndrome, BLM, is important in the repair of damaged replication forks, and it has both pro- and anti-recombinogenic roles in homologous recombination (HR). At damaged forks, BLM interacts with RAD51 recombinase, the essential enzyme in HR that catalyzes homology-dependent strand invasion. We have previously shown that defects in BLM modification by the small ubiquitin-related modifier (SUMO) cause increased gamma-H2AX foci. Because the increased gamma-H2AX could result from defective repair of spontaneous DNA damage, we hypothesized that SUMO modification regulates BLM's function in HR repair at damaged forks. To test this hypothesis, we treated cells that stably expressed a normal BLM (BLM+) or a SUMO-mutant BLM (SM-BLM) with hydroxyurea (HU) and examined the effects of stalled replication forks on RAD51 and its DNA repair functions. HU treatment generated excess gamma-H2AX in SM-BLM compared to BLM+ cells, consistent with a defect in replication-fork repair. SM-BLM cells accumulated increased numbers of DNA breaks and were hypersensitive to DNA damage. Importantly, HU treatment failed to induce sister-chromatid exchanges in SM-BLM cells compared to BLM+ cells, indicating a specific defect in HR repair and suggesting that RAD51 function could be compromised. Consistent with this hypothesis, RAD51 localization to HU-induced repair foci was impaired in SM-BLM cells. These data suggested that RAD51 might interact noncovalently with SUMO. We found that in vitro RAD51 interacts noncovalently with SUMO and that it interacts more efficiently with SUMO-modified BLM compared to unmodified BLM. These data suggest that SUMOylation controls the switch between BLM's pro- and anti-recombinogenic roles in HR. In the absence of BLM SUMOylation, BLM perturbs RAD51 localization at damaged replication forks and inhibits fork repair by HR. Conversely, BLM SUMOylation relieves its inhibitory effects on HR, and it promotes RAD51 function.

  15. Suppression of mutagenesis by Rad51D-mediated homologous recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Hinz, J M; Tebbs, R S; Wilson, P F; Nham, P B; Salazar, E P; Nagasawa, H; Urbin, S S; Thompson, L H

    2005-11-15

    Homologous recombinational repair (HRR) restores chromatid breaks arising during DNA replication and prevents chromosomal rearrangements that can occur from the misrepair of such breaks. In vertebrates, five Rad51 paralogs are identified that contribute in a nonessential but critical manner to HRR efficiency. We constructed and characterized a Rad51D knockout cell line in widely studied CHO cells. The rad51d mutant (51D1) displays sensitivity to a wide spectrum of induced DNA damage, indicating the broad relevance of HRR to genotoxicity. Untreated 51D1 cells exhibit {approx}5-fold elevated chromosomal breaks, a 12-fold increased rate of hprt mutation, and 4- to 10-fold increased rates of gene amplification at the dhfr and CAD loci, respectively. These results explicitly show the quantitative importance of HHR in preventing these types genetic alterations, which are associated with carcinogenesis. Thus, HRR copes in an error-free manner with spontaneous DNA damage encountered during DNA replication, and Rad51D is essential for this fidelity.

  16. RPA and Rad51 constitute a cell intrinsic mechanism to protect the cytosol from self DNA.

    PubMed

    Wolf, Christine; Rapp, Alexander; Berndt, Nicole; Staroske, Wolfgang; Schuster, Max; Dobrick-Mattheuer, Manuela; Kretschmer, Stefanie; König, Nadja; Kurth, Thomas; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Kast, Karin; Cardoso, M Cristina; Günther, Claudia; Lee-Kirsch, Min Ae

    2016-01-01

    Immune recognition of cytosolic DNA represents a central antiviral defence mechanism. Within the host, short single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) continuously arises during the repair of DNA damage induced by endogenous and environmental genotoxic stress. Here we show that short ssDNA traverses the nuclear membrane, but is drawn into the nucleus by binding to the DNA replication and repair factors RPA and Rad51. Knockdown of RPA and Rad51 enhances cytosolic leakage of ssDNA resulting in cGAS-dependent type I IFN activation. Mutations in the exonuclease TREX1 cause type I IFN-dependent autoinflammation and autoimmunity. We demonstrate that TREX1 is anchored within the outer nuclear membrane to ensure immediate degradation of ssDNA leaking into the cytosol. In TREX1-deficient fibroblasts, accumulating ssDNA causes exhaustion of RPA and Rad51 resulting in replication stress and activation of p53 and type I IFN. Thus, the ssDNA-binding capacity of RPA and Rad51 constitutes a cell intrinsic mechanism to protect the cytosol from self DNA. PMID:27230542

  17. RPA and Rad51 constitute a cell intrinsic mechanism to protect the cytosol from self DNA

    PubMed Central

    Wolf, Christine; Rapp, Alexander; Berndt, Nicole; Staroske, Wolfgang; Schuster, Max; Dobrick-Mattheuer, Manuela; Kretschmer, Stefanie; König, Nadja; Kurth, Thomas; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Kast, Karin; Cardoso, M. Cristina; Günther, Claudia; Lee-Kirsch, Min Ae

    2016-01-01

    Immune recognition of cytosolic DNA represents a central antiviral defence mechanism. Within the host, short single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) continuously arises during the repair of DNA damage induced by endogenous and environmental genotoxic stress. Here we show that short ssDNA traverses the nuclear membrane, but is drawn into the nucleus by binding to the DNA replication and repair factors RPA and Rad51. Knockdown of RPA and Rad51 enhances cytosolic leakage of ssDNA resulting in cGAS-dependent type I IFN activation. Mutations in the exonuclease TREX1 cause type I IFN-dependent autoinflammation and autoimmunity. We demonstrate that TREX1 is anchored within the outer nuclear membrane to ensure immediate degradation of ssDNA leaking into the cytosol. In TREX1-deficient fibroblasts, accumulating ssDNA causes exhaustion of RPA and Rad51 resulting in replication stress and activation of p53 and type I IFN. Thus, the ssDNA-binding capacity of RPA and Rad51 constitutes a cell intrinsic mechanism to protect the cytosol from self DNA. PMID:27230542

  18. Cancer-associated mutations in BRC domains of BRCA2 affect homologous recombination induced by Rad51.

    PubMed

    Tal, Asaf; Arbel-Goren, Rinat; Stavans, Joel

    2009-11-13

    The tumor suppressor BRCA2 protein plays a major role in the regulation of Rad51-catalyzed homologous recombination. BRCA2 interacts with monomeric Rad51 primarily via conserved BRC domains and coordinates the formation of Rad51 filaments at double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) breaks. A number of cancer-associated mutations in BRC4 and BRC2 domains have been reported. To elucidate their effects on homologous recombination, we studied Rad51 filament formation on single-stranded DNA and dsDNA substrates and Rad51-catalyzed strand exchange, in the presence of wild-type and mutated peptides of either BRC4 or BRC2. While the wild-type BRC2 and BRC4 peptides inhibited filament formation and, thus, strand exchange, the mutated forms decreased significantly these inhibitory effects. These results are consistent with a three-dimensional model for the interface between individual BRC repeats and Rad51. We suggest that mutations at sites crucial for the association between Rad51 and BRC domains impair the ability of BRCA2 to recruit Rad51 to dsDNA breaks, hampering recombinational repair.

  19. Hydroxyurea-stalled replication forks become progressively inactivated and require two different RAD51-mediated pathways for restart and repair.

    PubMed

    Petermann, Eva; Orta, Manuel Luís; Issaeva, Natalia; Schultz, Niklas; Helleday, Thomas

    2010-02-26

    Faithful DNA replication is essential to all life. Hydroxyurea (HU) depletes the cells of dNTPs, which initially results in stalled replication forks that, after prolonged treatment, collapse into DSBs. Here, we report that stalled replication forks are efficiently restarted in a RAD51-dependent process that does not trigger homologous recombination (HR). The XRCC3 protein, which is required for RAD51 foci formation, is also required for replication restart of HU-stalled forks, suggesting that RAD51-mediated strand invasion supports fork restart. In contrast, replication forks collapsed by prolonged replication blocks do not restart, and global replication is rescued by new origin firing. We find that RAD51-dependent HR is triggered for repair of collapsed replication forks, without apparent restart. In conclusion, our data suggest that restart of stalled replication forks and HR repair of collapsed replication forks require two distinct RAD51-mediated pathways.

  20. A novel Fanconi anaemia subtype associated with a dominant-negative mutation in RAD51

    PubMed Central

    Ameziane, Najim; May, Patrick; Haitjema, Anneke; van de Vrugt, Henri J.; van Rossum-Fikkert, Sari E.; Ristic, Dejan; Williams, Gareth J.; Balk, Jesper; Rockx, Davy; Li, Hong; Rooimans, Martin A.; Oostra, Anneke B.; Velleuer, Eunike; Dietrich, Ralf; Bleijerveld, Onno B.; Maarten Altelaar, A. F.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Joenje, Hans; Glusman, Gustavo; Roach, Jared; Hood, Leroy; Galas, David; Wyman, Claire; Balling, Rudi; den Dunnen, Johan; de Winter, Johan P.; Kanaar, Roland; Gelinas, Richard; Dorsman, Josephine C.

    2015-01-01

    Fanconi anaemia (FA) is a hereditary disease featuring hypersensitivity to DNA cross-linker-induced chromosomal instability in association with developmental abnormalities, bone marrow failure and a strong predisposition to cancer. A total of 17 FA disease genes have been reported, all of which act in a recessive mode of inheritance. Here we report on a de novo g.41022153G>A; p.Ala293Thr (NM_002875) missense mutation in one allele of the homologous recombination DNA repair gene RAD51 in an FA-like patient. This heterozygous mutation causes a novel FA subtype, ‘FA-R', which appears to be the first subtype of FA caused by a dominant-negative mutation. The patient, who features microcephaly and mental retardation, has reached adulthood without the typical bone marrow failure and paediatric cancers. Together with the recent reports on RAD51-associated congenital mirror movement disorders, our results point to an important role for RAD51-mediated homologous recombination in neurodevelopment, in addition to DNA repair and cancer susceptibility. PMID:26681308

  1. A novel Fanconi anaemia subtype associated with a dominant-negative mutation in RAD51.

    PubMed

    Ameziane, Najim; May, Patrick; Haitjema, Anneke; van de Vrugt, Henri J; van Rossum-Fikkert, Sari E; Ristic, Dejan; Williams, Gareth J; Balk, Jesper; Rockx, Davy; Li, Hong; Rooimans, Martin A; Oostra, Anneke B; Velleuer, Eunike; Dietrich, Ralf; Bleijerveld, Onno B; Maarten Altelaar, A F; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Joenje, Hans; Glusman, Gustavo; Roach, Jared; Hood, Leroy; Galas, David; Wyman, Claire; Balling, Rudi; den Dunnen, Johan; de Winter, Johan P; Kanaar, Roland; Gelinas, Richard; Dorsman, Josephine C

    2015-01-01

    Fanconi anaemia (FA) is a hereditary disease featuring hypersensitivity to DNA cross-linker-induced chromosomal instability in association with developmental abnormalities, bone marrow failure and a strong predisposition to cancer. A total of 17 FA disease genes have been reported, all of which act in a recessive mode of inheritance. Here we report on a de novo g.41022153G>A; p.Ala293Thr (NM_002875) missense mutation in one allele of the homologous recombination DNA repair gene RAD51 in an FA-like patient. This heterozygous mutation causes a novel FA subtype, 'FA-R', which appears to be the first subtype of FA caused by a dominant-negative mutation. The patient, who features microcephaly and mental retardation, has reached adulthood without the typical bone marrow failure and paediatric cancers. Together with the recent reports on RAD51-associated congenital mirror movement disorders, our results point to an important role for RAD51-mediated homologous recombination in neurodevelopment, in addition to DNA repair and cancer susceptibility. PMID:26681308

  2. Clinical Characteristics of Ovarian Cancer Classified by BRCA1, BRCA2, and RAD51C Status

    PubMed Central

    Cunningham, J. M.; Cicek, M. S.; Larson, N. B.; Davila, J.; Wang, C.; Larson, M. C.; Song, H.; Dicks, E. M.; Harrington, P.; Wick, M.; Winterhoff, B. J.; Hamidi, H.; Konecny, G. E.; Chien, J.; Bibikova, M.; Fan, J.-B.; Kalli, K. R.; Lindor, N. M.; Fridley, B. L.; Pharoah, P. P. D.; Goode, E. L.

    2014-01-01

    We evaluated homologous recombination deficient (HRD) phenotypes in epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) considering BRCA1, BRCA2, and RAD51C in a large well-annotated patient set. We evaluated EOC patients for germline deleterious mutations (n = 899), somatic mutations (n = 279) and epigenetic alterations (n = 482) in these genes using NGS and genome-wide methylation arrays. Deleterious germline mutations were identified in 32 (3.6%) patients for BRCA1, in 28 (3.1%) for BRCA2 and in 26 (2.9%) for RAD51C. Ten somatically sequenced patients had deleterious alterations, six (2.1%) in BRCA1 and four (1.4%) in BRCA2. Fifty two patients (10.8%) had methylated BRCA1 or RAD51C. HRD patients with germline or somatic alterations in any gene were more likely to be high grade serous, have an earlier diagnosis age and have ovarian and/or breast cancer family history. The HRD phenotype was most common in high grade serous EOC. Identification of EOC patients with an HRD phenotype may help tailor specific therapies. PMID:24504028

  3. Screening for RAD51 and BRCA2 BRC repeat mutations in breast and ovarian cancer families.

    PubMed

    Rapakko, Katrin; Heikkinen, Katri; Karppinen, Sanna-Maria; Winqvist, Robert

    2006-05-01

    Together, germline mutations in the two major susceptibility genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 account for approximately 20-30% and 70-80% of the familial breast and ovarian cancer cases, respectively. This indicates involvement of additional susceptibility genes, perhaps in combination with a polygenic effect. However, it is also possible that part of the mutations disrupting BRCA1 and BRCA2 function still remains to be discovered. In response to double-strand DNA damage the co-operation between RAD51 and BRCA2 is of great importance, and the conserved BRC repeat motifs in BRCA2 are crucial for this interaction. In the current study, patients belonging to 126 breast and/or ovarian cancer families were screened for RAD51 and BRCA2 BRC repeat mutations in order to uncover aberrations that may contribute to hereditary cancer susceptibility. The performed study revealed several novel alterations, however, none of them appeared to be disease-related. Thus, it seems likely that germline mutations in the highly conserved RAD51 gene are extremely rare and generally poorly tolerated.

  4. Genetic variability of Xrcc3 and Rad51 modulates the risk of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Gresner, Peter; Gromadzinska, Jolanta; Polanska, Kinga; Twardowska, Ewa; Jurewicz, Joanna; Wasowicz, Wojciech

    2012-08-10

    A case-control study was conducted to analyze the possible associations between the head and neck cancer (HNC) risk and fourteen single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and haplotypes in Xrcc3 and Rad51 genes. This study involved 81 HNC cases and 111 healthy control subjects. A significant risk-increasing effect of rs3212057 (p.Arg94His) SNP in Xrcc3 (OR=6.6; p<0.01) was observed. On the other hand, risk-decreasing effect was found for rs5030789 (g.3997A>G) and rs1801321 (c.-60G>T) in 5' near gene and 5'UTR regions of Rad51, respectively (OR=0.3 and OR=0.2, p<0.05, respectively). Moreover, these effects were shown to be modulated by tobacco-smoking status and gene-gene interactions. Concluding, the genetic variability of Xrcc3 and/or Rad51 genes might be of relevance with respect to HNC risk. PMID:22613844

  5. Rad51C: a novel suppressor gene modulates the risk of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Gresner, Peter; Gromadzinska, Jolanta; Twardowska, Ewa; Rydzynski, Konrad; Wasowicz, Wojciech

    2014-04-01

    We conducted a case-control study to investigate the possible association between the head and neck cancer (HNC) and genetic variability of Rad51C tumor suppressor gene. Eight polymorphic sites spanning over non-coding regions of Rad51C promoter, exon 1 and intron 1 were genotyped in 81 HNC cases and 156 healthy controls using the real-time PCR technique. One investigated site turned out to be not polymorphic, while among the remaining seven sites a significant HNC risk-increasing effect was found for rs16943176 (c.-118G>A), rs12946397 (c.-26C>T) and rs17222691 (c.145+947C>T) on both allelic (OR=1.8; p<0.05) and genotypic (OR=2.0; p<0.05) level. Furthermore, our data seem to provide marginal evidence, that this effect might possibly be confined to women only (OR=2.8; p=0.05 for allelic and OR=3.7; p=0.05 for genotypic comparisons). These SNPs were found to co-segregate together forming two distinct, HNC risk-modulating haplotypes. The genetic variability of Rad51C might thus be of relevance with respect to HNC risk. PMID:24631219

  6. Tel1 and Rad51 are involved in the maintenance of telomeres with capping deficiency.

    PubMed

    Di Domenico, Enea Gino; Mattarocci, Stefano; Cimino-Reale, Graziella; Parisi, Paola; Cifani, Noemi; D'Ambrosio, Ettore; Zakian, Virginia A; Ascenzioni, Fiorentina

    2013-07-01

    Vertebrate-like T2AG3 telomeres in tlc1-h yeast consist of short double-stranded regions and long single-stranded overhang (G-tails) and, although based on Tbf1-capping activity, they are capping deficient. Consistent with this idea, we observe Y' amplification because of homologous recombination, even in the presence of an active telomerase. In these cells, Y' amplification occurs by different pathways: in Tel1(+) tlc1h cells, it is Rad51-dependent, whereas in the absence of Tel1, it depends on Rad50. Generation of telomeric G-tail, which is cell cycle regulated, depends on the MRX (Mre11-Rad50-Xrs2) complex in tlc1h cells or is MRX-independent in tlc1h tel1Δ mutants. Unexpectedly, we observe telomere elongation in tlc1h lacking Rad51 that seems to act as a telomerase competitor for binding to telomeric G-tails. Overall, our results show that Tel1 and Rad51 have multiple roles in the maintenance of vertebrate-like telomeres in yeast, supporting the idea that they may participate to evolutionary conserved telomere protection mechanism/s acting at uncapped telomeres.

  7. ATM/ATR-mediated phosphorylation of PALB2 promotes RAD51 function.

    PubMed

    Ahlskog, Johanna K; Larsen, Brian D; Achanta, Kavya; Sørensen, Claus S

    2016-05-01

    DNA damage activates the ATM and ATR kinases that coordinate checkpoint and DNA repair pathways. An essential step in homology-directed repair (HDR) of DNA breaks is the formation of RAD51 nucleofilaments mediated by PALB2-BRCA2; however, roles of ATM and ATR in this critical step of HDR are poorly understood. Here, we show that PALB2 is markedly phosphorylated in response to genotoxic stresses such as ionizing radiation and hydroxyurea. This response is mediated by the ATM and ATR kinases through three N-terminal S/Q-sites in PALB2, the consensus target sites for ATM and ATR Importantly, a phospho-deficient PALB2 mutant is unable to support proper RAD51 foci formation, a key PALB2 regulated repair event, whereas a phospho-mimicking PALB2 version supports RAD51 foci formation. Moreover, phospho-deficient PALB2 is less potent in HDR than wild-type PALB2. Further, this mutation reveals a separation in PALB2 function, as the PALB2-dependent checkpoint response is normal in cells expressing the phospho-deficient PALB2 mutant. Collectively, our findings highlight a critical importance of PALB2 phosphorylation as a novel regulatory step in genome maintenance after genotoxic stress. PMID:27113759

  8. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms (SNPs) of RAD51-G172T and XRCC2-41657C/T Homologous Recombination Repair Genes and the Risk of Triple- Negative Breast Cancer in Polish Women.

    PubMed

    Michalska, Magdalena M; Samulak, Dariusz; Romanowicz, Hanna; Smolarz, Beata

    2015-09-01

    Double strand DNA breaks are the most dangerous DNA damage which, if non-repaired or misrepaired, may result in genomic instability, cancer transformation or cell death. RAD51 and XRCC2 encode proteins that are important for the repair of double-strand DNA breaks by homologous recombination. Therefore, genetic variability in these genes may contribute to the occurrence and progression of triple-negative breast cancer. The polymorphisms of the XRCC2 gene -41657C/T (rs718282) and of the RAD51 gene, -172G/T (rs1801321), were investigated by PCR-RFLP in 70 patients with triple-negative breast cancer and 70 age- and sex matched non-cancer controls. The obtained results demonstrated a significant positive association between the RAD51 T/T genotype and TNBC, with an adjusted odds ratio (OR) of 4.94 (p = 0.001). The homozygous T/T genotype was found in 60 % of TNBC cases and in 14 % of the used controls. Variant 172 T allele of RAD51 increased cancer risk (OR = 2.81 (1.72-4.58), p < .0001). No significant associations were observed between -41657C/T genotype of XRCC2 and the incidence of TNBC. There were no significant differences between the distribution of XRCC2 -41657C/T genotypes in the subgroups assigned to histological grades. The obtained results indicate that the polymorphism of RAD51, but not of XRCC2 gene, may be positively associated with the incidence of triple-negative breast carcinoma in the population of Polish women.

  9. Enhanced Histone Deacetylase Activity in Malignant Melanoma Provokes RAD51 and FANCD2-Triggered Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Krumm, Andrea; Barckhausen, Christina; Kücük, Pelin; Tomaszowski, Karl-Heinz; Loquai, Carmen; Fahrer, Jörg; Krämer, Oliver Holger; Kaina, Bernd; Roos, Wynand Paul

    2016-05-15

    DNA-damaging anticancer drugs remain a part of metastatic melanoma therapy. Epigenetic reprogramming caused by increased histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity arising during tumor formation may contribute to resistance of melanomas to the alkylating drugs temozolomide, dacarbazine, and fotemustine. Here, we report on the impact of class I HDACs on the response of malignant melanoma cells treated with alkylating agents. The data show that malignant melanomas in situ contain a high level of HDAC1/2 and malignant melanoma cells overexpress HDAC1/2/3 compared with noncancer cells. Furthermore, pharmacologic inhibition of class I HDACs sensitizes malignant melanoma cells to apoptosis following exposure to alkylating agents, while not affecting primary melanocytes. Inhibition of HDAC1/2/3 caused sensitization of melanoma cells to temozolomide in vitro and in melanoma xenografts in vivo HDAC1/2/3 inhibition resulted in suppression of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair by homologous recombination because of downregulation of RAD51 and FANCD2. This sensitized cells to the cytotoxic DNA lesion O(6)-methylguanine and caused a synthetic lethal interaction with the PARP-1 inhibitor olaparib. Furthermore, knockdown experiments identified HDAC2 as being responsible for the regulation of RAD51. The influence of class I HDACs on DSB repair by homologous recombination and the possible clinical implication on malignant melanoma therapy with temozolomide and other alkylating drugs suggests a combination approach where class I HDAC inhibitors such as valproic acid or MS-275 (entinostat) appear to counteract HDAC- and RAD51/FANCD2-mediated melanoma cell resistance. Cancer Res; 76(10); 3067-77. ©2016 AACR. PMID:26980768

  10. Gefitinib Synergizes with Irinotecan to Suppress Hepatocellular Carcinoma via Antagonizing Rad51-Mediated DNA-Repair

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Xueming; Chen, Min; Zhu, Yuanrun; Xu, Li; Zhu, Hong; Yang, Bo; Luo, Peihua; He, Qiaojun

    2016-01-01

    Chemotherapy is the only choice for most of the advanced hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients, while few agents were available, making it an urgent need to develop new chemotherapy strategies. A phase II clinical trial suggested that the efficacy of irinotecan in HCC was limited due to dose-dependent toxicities. Here, we found that gefitinib exhibited synergistic activity in combination with SN-38, an active metabolite of irinotecan, in HCC cell lines. And the enhanced apoptosis induced by gefitinib plus SN-38 was a result from caspase pathway activation. Mechanistically, gefitinib dramatically promoted the ubiquitin–proteasome-dependent degradation of Rad51 protein, suppressed the DNA repair, gave rise to more DNA damages, and ultimately resulted in the synergism of these two agents. In addition, the increased antitumor efficacy of gefitinib combined with irinotecan was further validated in a HepG2 xenograft mice model. Taken together, our data demonstrated for the first time that the combination of irinotecan and gefitinib showed potential benefit in HCC, which suggests that Rad51 is a promising target and provides a rationale for clinical trials investigating the efficacy of the combination of topoisomerase I inhibitors and gefitinib in HCC. PMID:26752698

  11. An integrated in silico approach to analyze the involvement of single amino acid polymorphisms in FANCD1/BRCA2-PALB2 and FANCD1/BRCA2-RAD51 complex.

    PubMed

    Doss, C George Priya; Nagasundaram, N

    2014-11-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive human disease characterized by genomic instability and a marked increase in cancer risk. The importance of FANCD1 gene is manifested by the fact that deleterious amino acid substitutions were found to confer susceptibility to hereditary breast and ovarian cancers. Attaining experimental knowledge about the possible disease-associated substitutions is laborious and time consuming. The recent introduction of genome variation analyzing in silico tools have the capability to identify the deleterious variants in an efficient manner. In this study, we conducted in silico variation analysis of deleterious non-synonymous SNPs at both functional and structural level in the breast cancer and FA susceptibility gene BRCA2/FANCD1. To identify and characterize deleterious mutations in this study, five in silico tools based on two different prediction methods namely pathogenicity prediction (SIFT, PolyPhen, and PANTHER), and protein stability prediction (I-Mutant 2.0 and MuStab) were analyzed. Based on the deleterious scores that overlap in these in silico approaches, and the availability of three-dimensional structures, structure analysis was carried out with the major mutations that occurred in the native protein coded by FANCD1/BRCA2 gene. In this work, we report the results of the first molecular dynamics (MD) simulation study performed to analyze the structural level changes in time scale level with respect to the native and mutated protein complexes (G25R, W31C, W31R in FANCD1/BRCA2-PALB2, and F1524V, V1532F in FANCD1/BRCA2-RAD51). Analysis of the MD trajectories indicated that predicted deleterious variants alter the structural behavior of BRCA2-PALB2 and BRCA2-RAD51 protein complexes. In addition, statistical analysis was employed to test the significance of these in silico tool predictions. Based on these predictions, we conclude that the identification of disease-related SNPs by in silico methods, in combination with MD

  12. Rad52-mediated DNA annealing after Rad51-mediated DNA strand exchange promotes second ssDNA capture.

    PubMed

    Sugiyama, Tomohiko; Kantake, Noriko; Wu, Yun; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C

    2006-11-29

    Rad51, Rad52, and RPA play central roles in homologous DNA recombination. Rad51 mediates DNA strand exchange, a key reaction in DNA recombination. Rad52 has two distinct activities: to recruit Rad51 onto single-strand (ss)DNA that is complexed with the ssDNA-binding protein, RPA, and to anneal complementary ssDNA complexed with RPA. Here, we report that Rad52 promotes annealing of the ssDNA strand that is displaced by DNA strand exchange by Rad51 and RPA, to a second ssDNA strand. An RPA that is recombination-deficient (RPA(rfa1-t11)) failed to support annealing, explaining its in vivo phenotype. Escherichia coli RecO and SSB proteins, which are functional homologues of Rad52 and RPA, also facilitated the same reaction, demonstrating its conserved nature. We also demonstrate that the two activities of Rad52, recruiting Rad51 and annealing DNA, are coordinated in DNA strand exchange and second ssDNA capture. PMID:17093500

  13. Structure-activity relationship of the peptide binding-motif mediating the BRCA2:RAD51 protein-protein interaction.

    PubMed

    Scott, Duncan E; Marsh, May; Blundell, Tom L; Abell, Chris; Hyvönen, Marko

    2016-04-01

    RAD51 is a recombinase involved in the homologous recombination of double-strand breaks in DNA. RAD51 forms oligomers by binding to another molecule of RAD51 via an 'FxxA' motif, and the same recognition sequence is similarly utilised to bind BRCA2. We have tabulated the effects of mutation of this sequence, across a variety of experimental methods and from relevant mutations observed in the clinic. We use mutants of a tetrapeptide sequence to probe the binding interaction, using both isothermal titration calorimetry and X-ray crystallography. Where possible, comparison between our tetrapeptide mutational study and the previously reported mutations is made, discrepancies are discussed and the importance of secondary structure in interpreting alanine scanning and mutational data of this nature is considered.

  14. On the role of AtDMC1, AtRAD51 and its paralogs during Arabidopsis meiosis

    PubMed Central

    Pradillo, Mónica; Varas, Javier; Oliver, Cecilia; Santos, Juan L.

    2014-01-01

    Meiotic recombination plays a critical role in achieving accurate chromosome segregation and increasing genetic diversity. Many studies, mostly in yeast, have provided important insights into the coordination and interplay between the proteins involved in the homologous recombination pathway, especially the recombinase RAD51 and the meiosis-specific DMC1. Here we summarize the current progresses on the function of both recombinases and the CX3 complex encoded by AtRAD51 paralogs, in the plant model species Arabidopsis thaliana. Similarities and differences respect to the function of these proteins in other organisms are also indicated. PMID:24596572

  15. Caffeine suppresses homologous recombination through interference with RAD51-mediated joint molecule formation.

    PubMed

    Zelensky, Alex N; Sanchez, Humberto; Ristic, Dejan; Vidic, Iztok; van Rossum-Fikkert, Sari E; Essers, Jeroen; Wyman, Claire; Kanaar, Roland

    2013-07-01

    Caffeine is a widely used inhibitor of the protein kinases that play a central role in the DNA damage response. We used chemical inhibitors and genetically deficient mouse embryonic stem cell lines to study the role of DNA damage response in stable integration of the transfected DNA and found that caffeine rapidly, efficiently and reversibly inhibited homologous integration of the transfected DNA as measured by several homologous recombination-mediated gene-targeting assays. Biochemical and structural biology experiments revealed that caffeine interfered with a pivotal step in homologous recombination, homologous joint molecule formation, through increasing interactions of the RAD51 nucleoprotein filament with non-homologous DNA. Our results suggest that recombination pathways dependent on extensive homology search are caffeine-sensitive and stress the importance of considering direct checkpoint-independent mechanisms in the interpretation of the effects of caffeine on DNA repair.

  16. BRCA2 diffuses as oligomeric clusters with RAD51 and changes mobility after DNA damage in live cells.

    PubMed

    Reuter, Marcel; Zelensky, Alex; Smal, Ihor; Meijering, Erik; van Cappellen, Wiggert A; de Gruiter, H Martijn; van Belle, Gijsbert J; van Royen, Martin E; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B; Essers, Jeroen; Kanaar, Roland; Wyman, Claire

    2014-12-01

    Genome maintenance by homologous recombination depends on coordinating many proteins in time and space to assemble at DNA break sites. To understand this process, we followed the mobility of BRCA2, a critical recombination mediator, in live cells at the single-molecule level using both single-particle tracking and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. BRCA2-GFP and -YFP were compared to distinguish diffusion from fluorophore behavior. Diffusive behavior of fluorescent RAD51 and RAD54 was determined for comparison. All fluorescent proteins were expressed from endogenous loci. We found that nuclear BRCA2 existed in oligomeric clusters, and exhibited heterogeneous mobility. DNA damage increased BRCA2 transient binding, presumably including binding to damaged sites. Despite its very different size, RAD51 displayed mobility similar to BRCA2, which indicates physical interaction between these proteins both before and after induction of DNA damage. We propose that BRCA2-mediated sequestration of nuclear RAD51 serves to prevent inappropriate DNA interactions and that all RAD51 is delivered to DNA damage sites in association with BRCA2.

  17. Peptide aptamer mimicking RAD51-binding domain of BRCA2 inhibits DNA damage repair and survival in Trypanosoma brucei.

    PubMed

    Hall, Mack; Misra, Smita; Chaudhuri, Minu; Chaudhuri, Gautam

    2011-05-01

    The eukaryotic DNA recombination repair protein BRCA2 is functional in the parasitic protozoan Trypanosoma brucei. The mechanism of the involvement of BRCA2 in homologous recombination includes its interaction with the DNA recombinase proteins of the RAD51 family. BRCA2 is known to interact with RAD51 through its unique and essential BRC sequence motifs. T. brucei BRCA2 homolog (TbBRCA2) has fifteen repeating BRC motifs as compared to mammalian BRCA2 that has only eight. We report here our yeast 2-hybrid analysis studies on the interactions of TbBRCA2 BRC motifs with five different RAD51 paralogues of T. brucei. Our study revealed that a single BRC motif is sufficient to bind to these RAD51 paralogues. To test the possibility whether a single 44 amino acid long repeating unit of the TbBRCA2 BRC motif may be exploited as an inhibitor of T. brucei growth, we ectopically expressed this peptide segment in the procyclic form of the parasite and evaluated its effects on cell survival as well as the sensitivity of these cells to the DNA damaging agent methyl methane sulfonate (MMS). Expression of a single BRC motif led to MMS sensitivity and inhibited cellular proliferation in T. brucei.

  18. Polymorphism within the distal RAD51 gene promoter is associated with colorectal cancer in a Polish population

    PubMed Central

    Mucha, Bartosz; Kabzinski, Jacek; Dziki, Adam; Przybylowska-Sygut, Karolina; Sygut, Andrzej; Majsterek, Ireneusz; Dziki, Lukasz

    2015-01-01

    Background: colorectal cancer (CRC) is one of the most common cancers in developed countries. Annually, over one million of new cases in the world are recorded. Majority of CRCs occur sporadically with dominant phenotype of chromosomal instability (CIN). Permanent exposure to DNA damaging agents such as ionizing radiation result in DNA double-stranded breaks, which create favorable conditions for chromosomal aberration to arise. Homologous recombination repair (HRR) is the leading process engaged in maintaining of the genome integrity. RAD51 protein was recognized as crucial in HRR. Single nucleotide polymorphisms are the primary source of genetic variation which presence in the RAD51 promoter region can affect on its expression and consequently modulate HR efficiency. Objectives: The aim of this study was to analyze the distribution of genotypes and allele frequencies of -4791A/T and -4601A/G RAD51 gene polymorphisms, followed by an assessment of their relationship with the risk of CRC. Material and methods: The study included 115 patients with confirmed CRC. Control group was consisted of 118 cancer-free individuals with a negative family history. The genotypes were identified by PCR-RFLP method. Conclusion: This study revealed statistically significant association between appearance of G/A genotype in position -4601 of RAD51 gene and CRC risk. PMID:26617897

  19. Rad51 recombinase prevents Mre11 nuclease-dependent degradation and excessive PrimPol-mediated elongation of nascent DNA after UV irradiation.

    PubMed

    Vallerga, María Belén; Mansilla, Sabrina F; Federico, María Belén; Bertolin, Agustina P; Gottifredi, Vanesa

    2015-12-01

    After UV irradiation, DNA polymerases specialized in translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) aid DNA replication. However, it is unclear whether other mechanisms also facilitate the elongation of UV-damaged DNA. We wondered if Rad51 recombinase (Rad51), a factor that escorts replication forks, aids replication across UV lesions. We found that depletion of Rad51 impairs S-phase progression and increases cell death after UV irradiation. Interestingly, Rad51 and the TLS polymerase polη modulate the elongation of nascent DNA in different ways, suggesting that DNA elongation after UV irradiation does not exclusively rely on TLS events. In particular, Rad51 protects the DNA synthesized immediately before UV irradiation from degradation and avoids excessive elongation of nascent DNA after UV irradiation. In Rad51-depleted samples, the degradation of DNA was limited to the first minutes after UV irradiation and required the exonuclease activity of the double strand break repair nuclease (Mre11). The persistent dysregulation of nascent DNA elongation after Rad51 knockdown required Mre11, but not its exonuclease activity, and PrimPol, a DNA polymerase with primase activity. By showing a crucial contribution of Rad51 to the synthesis of nascent DNA, our results reveal an unanticipated complexity in the regulation of DNA elongation across UV-damaged templates.

  20. Rad51 recombinase prevents Mre11 nuclease-dependent degradation and excessive PrimPol-mediated elongation of nascent DNA after UV irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Vallerga, María Belén; Mansilla, Sabrina F.; Federico, María Belén; Bertolin, Agustina P.; Gottifredi, Vanesa

    2015-01-01

    After UV irradiation, DNA polymerases specialized in translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) aid DNA replication. However, it is unclear whether other mechanisms also facilitate the elongation of UV-damaged DNA. We wondered if Rad51 recombinase (Rad51), a factor that escorts replication forks, aids replication across UV lesions. We found that depletion of Rad51 impairs S-phase progression and increases cell death after UV irradiation. Interestingly, Rad51 and the TLS polymerase polη modulate the elongation of nascent DNA in different ways, suggesting that DNA elongation after UV irradiation does not exclusively rely on TLS events. In particular, Rad51 protects the DNA synthesized immediately before UV irradiation from degradation and avoids excessive elongation of nascent DNA after UV irradiation. In Rad51-depleted samples, the degradation of DNA was limited to the first minutes after UV irradiation and required the exonuclease activity of the double strand break repair nuclease (Mre11). The persistent dysregulation of nascent DNA elongation after Rad51 knockdown required Mre11, but not its exonuclease activity, and PrimPol, a DNA polymerase with primase activity. By showing a crucial contribution of Rad51 to the synthesis of nascent DNA, our results reveal an unanticipated complexity in the regulation of DNA elongation across UV-damaged templates. PMID:26627254

  1. Rad51 recombinase prevents Mre11 nuclease-dependent degradation and excessive PrimPol-mediated elongation of nascent DNA after UV irradiation.

    PubMed

    Vallerga, María Belén; Mansilla, Sabrina F; Federico, María Belén; Bertolin, Agustina P; Gottifredi, Vanesa

    2015-12-01

    After UV irradiation, DNA polymerases specialized in translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) aid DNA replication. However, it is unclear whether other mechanisms also facilitate the elongation of UV-damaged DNA. We wondered if Rad51 recombinase (Rad51), a factor that escorts replication forks, aids replication across UV lesions. We found that depletion of Rad51 impairs S-phase progression and increases cell death after UV irradiation. Interestingly, Rad51 and the TLS polymerase polη modulate the elongation of nascent DNA in different ways, suggesting that DNA elongation after UV irradiation does not exclusively rely on TLS events. In particular, Rad51 protects the DNA synthesized immediately before UV irradiation from degradation and avoids excessive elongation of nascent DNA after UV irradiation. In Rad51-depleted samples, the degradation of DNA was limited to the first minutes after UV irradiation and required the exonuclease activity of the double strand break repair nuclease (Mre11). The persistent dysregulation of nascent DNA elongation after Rad51 knockdown required Mre11, but not its exonuclease activity, and PrimPol, a DNA polymerase with primase activity. By showing a crucial contribution of Rad51 to the synthesis of nascent DNA, our results reveal an unanticipated complexity in the regulation of DNA elongation across UV-damaged templates. PMID:26627254

  2. Associations of UBE2I with RAD52, UBL1, p53, and RAD51 proteins in a yeast two-hybrid system

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Zhiyuan; Pardington-Purtymun, P.E.; Comeaux, J.C.

    1996-10-15

    The yeast RAD52-dependent pathway is involved in DNA recombination and double-strand break repair. Yeast ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme UBC9 participates in S- and M-phase cyclin degradation and mitotic control. Using the human RAD52 protein as the bait in a yeast two-hybrid system, we have identified a human homolog of yeast UBC9, designated UBE2I, that interacts with RAD52, RAD51, p53, and a ubiquitin-like protein UBL1. These interactions are UBE2I-specific, since another DNA repair-related ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, RAD6 (UBC2), does not interact with these proteins. The interaction of UBE2I with RAD52 is mediated by RAD52`s self-association region. These results suggest that the RAD52-dependent processes, cell cycle control, p53-mediated pathway(s), and ubiquitination interact through human UBE2I. 22 refs., 3 figs.

  3. Insights into the mechanism of Rad51 recombinase from the structure and properties of a filament interface mutant

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jianhong; Villanueva, Nicolas; Rould, Mark A.; Morrical, Scott W.

    2010-09-03

    Rad51 protein promotes homologous recombination in eukaryotes. Recombination activities are activated by Rad51 filament assembly on ssDNA. Previous studies of yeast Rad51 showed that His352 occupies an important position at the filament interface, where it could relay signals between subunits and active sites. To investigate, we characterized yeast Rad51 H352A and H352Y mutants, and solved the structure of H352Y. H352A forms catalytically competent but salt-labile complexes on ssDNA. In contrast, H352Y forms salt-resistant complexes on ssDNA, but is defective in nucleotide exchange, RPA displacement and strand exchange with full-length DNA substrates. The 2.5 {angstrom} crystal structure of H352Y reveals a right-handed helical filament in a high-pitch (130 {angstrom}) conformation with P61 symmetry. The catalytic core and dimer interface regions of H352Y closely resemble those of DNA-bound Escherichia coli RecA protein. The H352Y mutation stabilizes Phe187 from the adjacent subunit in a position that interferes with the {gamma}-phosphate-binding site of the Walker A motif/P-loop, potentially explaining the limited catalysis observed. Comparison of Rad51 H352Y, RecA-DNA and related structures reveals that the presence of bound DNA correlates with the isomerization of a conserved cis peptide near Walker B to the trans configuration, which appears to prime the catalytic glutamate residue for ATP hydrolysis.

  4. Specific inhibition of Wee1 kinase and Rad51 recombinase: A strategy to enhance the sensitivity of leukemic T-cells to ionizing radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks

    SciTech Connect

    Havelek, Radim; Cmielova, Jana; Kralovec, Karel; Bruckova, Lenka; Bilkova, Zuzana; Fousova, Ivana; Sinkorova, Zuzana; Vavrova, Jirina; Rezacova, Martina

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • Pre-treatment with the inhibitors increased the sensitivity of Jurkat cells to irradiation. • Combining both inhibitors together resulted in a G2 cell cycle arrest abrogation in Jurkat. • Jurkat cells pre-treated with inhibitors were positive for γH2AX foci 24 h upon irradiation. • Pre-treatment with Rad51 RI-1 had no effect on apoptosis induction in MOLT-4 cells. • When dosed together, the combination decreased MOLT-4 cell survival. - Abstract: Present-day oncology sees at least two-thirds of cancer patients receiving radiation therapy as a part of their anticancer treatment. The objectives of the current study were to investigate the effects of the small molecule inhibitors of Wee1 kinase II (681641) and Rad51 (RI-1) on cell cycle progression, DNA double-strand breaks repair and apoptosis following ionizing radiation exposure in human leukemic T-cells Jurkat and MOLT-4. Pre-treatment with the Wee1 681641 or Rad51 RI-1 inhibitor alone increased the sensitivity of Jurkat cells to irradiation, however combining both inhibitors together resulted in a further enhancement of apoptosis. Jurkat cells pre-treated with inhibitors were positive for γH2AX foci 24 h upon irradiation. MOLT-4 cells were less affected by inhibitors application prior to ionizing radiation exposure. Pre-treatment with Rad51 RI-1 had no effect on apoptosis induction; however Wee1 681641 increased ionizing radiation-induced cell death in MOLT-4 cells.

  5. RAD51C deficiency in mice results in early prophase I arrest in males and sister chromatid separation at metaphase II in females

    PubMed Central

    Kuznetsov, Sergey; Pellegrini, Manuela; Shuda, Kristy; Fernandez-Capetillo, Oscar; Liu, Yilun; Martin, Betty K.; Burkett, Sandra; Southon, Eileen; Pati, Debananda; Tessarollo, Lino; West, Stephen C.; Donovan, Peter J.; Nussenzweig, Andre; Sharan, Shyam K.

    2007-01-01

    RAD51C is a member of the RecA/RAD51 protein family, which is known to play an important role in DNA repair by homologous recombination. In mice, it is essential for viability. Therefore, we have generated a hypomorphic allele of Rad51c in addition to a null allele. A subset of mice expressing the hypomorphic allele is infertile. This infertility is caused by sexually dimorphic defects in meiotic recombination, revealing its two distinct functions. Spermatocytes undergo a developmental arrest during the early stages of meiotic prophase I, providing evidence for the role of RAD51C in early stages of RAD51-mediated recombination. In contrast, oocytes can progress normally to metaphase I after superovulation but display precocious separation of sister chromatids, aneuploidy, and broken chromosomes at metaphase II. These defects suggest a possible late role of RAD51C in meiotic recombination. Based on the marked reduction in Holliday junction (HJ) resolution activity in Rad51c-null mouse embryonic fibroblasts, we propose that this late function may be associated with HJ resolution. PMID:17312021

  6. Origins and evolution of the recA/RAD51 gene family: evidence for ancient gene duplication and endosymbiotic gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Lin, Zhenguo; Kong, Hongzhi; Nei, Masatoshi; Ma, Hong

    2006-07-01

    The bacterial recA gene and its eukaryotic homolog RAD51 are important for DNA repair, homologous recombination, and genome stability. Members of the recA/RAD51 family have functions that have differentiated during evolution. However, the evolutionary history and relationships of these members remains unclear. Homolog searches in prokaryotes and eukaryotes indicated that most eubacteria contain only one recA. However, many archaeal species have two recA/RAD51 homologs (RADA and RADB), and eukaryotes possess multiple members (RAD51, RAD51B, RAD51C, RAD51D, DMC1, XRCC2, XRCC3, and recA). Phylogenetic analyses indicated that the recA/RAD51 family can be divided into three subfamilies: (i) RADalpha, with highly conserved functions; (ii) RADbeta, with relatively divergent functions; and (iii) recA, functioning in eubacteria and eukaryotic organelles. The RADalpha and RADbeta subfamilies each contain archaeal and eukaryotic members, suggesting that a gene duplication occurred before the archaea/eukaryote split. In the RADalpha subfamily, eukaryotic RAD51 and DMC1 genes formed two separate monophyletic groups when archaeal RADA genes were used as an outgroup. This result suggests that another duplication event occurred in the early stage of eukaryotic evolution, producing the DMC1 clade with meiosis-specific genes. The RADbeta subfamily has a basal archaeal clade and five eukaryotic clades, suggesting that four eukaryotic duplication events occurred before animals and plants diverged. The eukaryotic recA genes were detected in plants and protists and showed strikingly high levels of sequence similarity to recA genes from proteobacteria or cyanobacteria. These results suggest that endosymbiotic transfer of recA genes occurred from mitochondria and chloroplasts to nuclear genomes of ancestral eukaryotes.

  7. Small-Molecule Inhibitors That Target Protein–Protein Interactions in the RAD51 Family of Recombinases

    PubMed Central

    Scott, Duncan E; Coyne, Anthony G; Venkitaraman, Ashok; Blundell, Tom L; Abell, Chris; Hyvönen, Marko

    2015-01-01

    The development of small molecules that inhibit protein–protein interactions continues to be a challenge in chemical biology and drug discovery. Herein we report the development of indole-based fragments that bind in a shallow surface pocket of a humanised surrogate of RAD51. RAD51 is an ATP-dependent recombinase that plays a key role in the repair of double-strand DNA breaks. It both self-associates, forming filament structures with DNA, and interacts with the BRCA2 protein through a common “FxxA” tetrapeptide motif. We elaborated previously identified fragment hits that target the FxxA motif site and developed small-molecule inhibitors that are approximately 500-fold more potent than the initial fragments. The lead compounds were shown to compete with the BRCA2-derived Ac-FHTA-NH2 peptide and the self-association peptide of RAD51, but they had no effect on ATP binding. This study is the first reported elaboration of small-molecular-weight fragments against this challenging target. PMID:25470112

  8. A mutation in mouse rad51 results in an early embryonic lethal that is suppressed by a mutation in p53.

    PubMed Central

    Lim, D S; Hasty, P

    1996-01-01

    RecA in Escherichia coli and its homolog, ScRad51 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are known to be essential for recombinational repair. The homolog of RecA and ScRad51 in mice, MmRad51, was mutated to determine its function. Mutant embryos arrested early during development. A decrease in cell proliferation, followed by programmed cell death and chromosome loss, was observed. Radiation sensitivity was demonstrated in trophectoderm-derived cells. Interestingly, embryonic development progressed further in a p53 null background; however, fibroblasts derived from double-mutant embryos failed to proliferate in tissue culture. PMID:8943369

  9. Expression of BRC repeats in breast cancer cells disrupts the BRCA2-Rad51 complex and leads to radiation hypersensitivity and loss of G(2)/M checkpoint control.

    PubMed

    Chen, C F; Chen, P L; Zhong, Q; Sharp, Z D; Lee, W H

    1999-11-12

    BRCA2 is a breast tumor suppressor with a potential function in the cellular response to DNA damage. BRCA2 binds to Rad51 through its BRC repeats. In support of the biological significance of this interaction, we found that the complex of BRCA2 and Rad51 in breast cancer MCF-7 cells was diminished upon conditional expression of a wild-type, but not a mutated, BRC4 repeat using the tetracycline-inducible system. Cells expressing a wild-type BRC4 repeat showed hypersensitivity to gamma-irradiation, an inability to form Rad51 radiation-induced foci, and a failure of radiation-induced G(2)/M, but not G(1)/S, checkpoint control. These results strongly suggest that the interaction between BRCA2 and Rad51 mediated by BRC repeats is critical for the cellular response to DNA damage.

  10. Rad51 Nucleoprotein Filament Disassembly Captured Using Fluorescent Plasmodium falciparum SSB as a Reporter for Single-Stranded DNA

    PubMed Central

    Davenport, Eric Parker; Harris, Derek F.; Origanti, Sofia

    2016-01-01

    Single-stranded DNA binding (SSB) proteins coordinate DNA replication, repair, and recombination and are critical for maintaining genomic integrity. SSB binds to single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) rapidly and with very high affinity making it a useful molecular tool to detect free ssDNA in solution. We have labeled SSB from Plasmodium falciparum (Pf-SSB) with the MDCC (7-diethylamino-3-((((2-maleimidyl)ethyl)amino)-carbonyl)coumarin) fluorophore which yields a four-fold increase in fluorescence upon binding to ssDNA. Pf-SSBMDCC binding to DNA is unaffected by NaCl or Mg2+ concentration and does not display salt-dependent changes in DNA binding modes or cooperative binding on long DNA substrates. These features are unique to Pf-SSB, making it an ideal tool to probe the presence of free ssDNA in any biochemical reaction. Using this Pf-SSBMDCC probe as a sensor for free ssDNA, we have investigated the clearing of preformed yeast Rad51 nucleoprotein filaments by the Srs2 helicase during HR. Our studies provide a rate for the disassembly of the Rad51 filament by full length Srs2 on long ssDNA substrates. Mutations in the conserved 2B domain in the homologous bacterial UvrD, Rep and PcrA helicases show an enhancement of DNA unwinding activity, but similar mutations in Srs2 do not affect its DNA unwinding or Rad51 clearing properties. These studies showcase the utility of the Pf-SSB probe in mechanistic investigation of enzymes that function in DNA metabolism. PMID:27416037

  11. Variant (Swine Origin) Influenza Viruses in Humans

    MedlinePlus

    ... What's this? Submit Button Past Newsletters Variant Influenza Viruses: Background and CDC Risk Assessment and Reporting Language: ... Background CDC Assessment Reporting Background On Variant Influenza Viruses Swine flu viruses do not normally infect humans. ...

  12. BRG1 promotes the repair of DNA double-strand breaks by facilitating the replacement of RPA with RAD51

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Wenjing; Wang, Ruoxi; Chen, Hongyu; Wang, Xiaolin; Xiao, Ting; Boldogh, Istvan; Ba, Xueqing; Han, Liping; Zeng, Xianlu

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are a type of lethal DNA damage. The repair of DSBs requires tight coordination between the factors modulating chromatin structure and the DNA repair machinery. BRG1, the ATPase subunit of the chromatin remodelling complex Switch/Sucrose non-fermentable (SWI/SNF), is often linked to tumorigenesis and genome instability, and its role in DSB repair remains largely unclear. In the present study, we show that BRG1 is recruited to DSB sites and enhances DSB repair. Using DR-GFP and EJ5-GFP reporter systems, we demonstrate that BRG1 facilitates homologous recombination repair rather than nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ) repair. Moreover, the BRG1–RAD52 complex mediates the replacement of RPA with RAD51 on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) to initiate DNA strand invasion. Loss of BRG1 results in a failure of RAD51 loading onto ssDNA, abnormal homologous recombination repair and enhanced DSB-induced lethality. Our present study provides a mechanistic insight into how BRG1, which is known to be involved in chromatin remodelling, plays a substantial role in the homologous recombination repair pathway in mammalian cells. PMID:25395584

  13. Modulation of Homology-Directed Repair in T98G Glioblastoma Cells Due to Interactions between Wildtype p53, Rad51 and HCMV IE1-72

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Amit S.; Fortunato, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a ubiquitous pathogen capable of causing life threatening consequences in neonates and immune-compromised individuals. HCMV inflicts site-specific double strand breaks (DSBs) in the cellular genome. DNA damage infliction raises the corollary question of virus modulation of DNA repair. We recently reported HDR was stimulated in wt human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs) during fully permissive infection or expression of the HCMV protein IE1-72 (IE72). These studies have been extended into semi-permissive T98G glioblastoma cells. T98Gs encode a mutant p53, which may contribute to their high baseline rate of HDR. We fully expected HCMV infection to increase HDR in T98Gs, similar to its effects in HFFs. Surprisingly in T98Gs HCMV infection, or sole expression of IE72, decreased HDR by two-fold. Transient expression of wt p53 in T98Gs also reduced HDR by two-fold. Dual transient expression of wt p53 and IE72 restored high baseline HDR levels. GST pulldown experiments revealed that both IE72 and wt p53 bound the important HDR protein, Rad51. We conclude that the expression of certain HCMV proteins can modulate HDR in an infected cell, dependent upon p53 status. We propose a model of the protein interactions explaining this behavior. PMID:24576846

  14. Sensitization of Tumor to {sup 212}Pb Radioimmunotherapy by Gemcitabine Involves Initial Abrogation of G2 Arrest and Blocked DNA Damage Repair by Interference With Rad51

    SciTech Connect

    Yong, Kwon Joong; Milenic, Diane E.; Baidoo, Kwamena E.; Brechbiel, Martin W.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To elucidate the mechanism of the therapeutic efficacy of targeted α-particle radiation therapy using {sup 212}Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab together with gemcitabine for treatment of disseminated peritoneal cancers. Methods and Materials: Mice bearing human colon cancer LS-174T intraperitoneal xenografts were pretreated with gemcitabine, followed by {sup 212}Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab and compared with controls. Results: Treatment with {sup 212}Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab increased the apoptotic rate in the S-phase-arrested tumors induced by gemcitabine at earlier time points (6 to 24 hours). {sup 212}Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab after gemcitabine pretreatment abrogated G2/M arrest at the same time points, which may be associated with the inhibition of Chk1 phosphorylation and, in turn, cell cycle perturbation, resulting in apoptosis. {sup 212}Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab treatment after gemcitabine pretreatment caused depression of DNA synthesis, DNA double-strand breaks, accumulation of unrepaired DNA, and down-regulation of Rad51 protein, indicating that DNA damage repair was blocked. In addition, modification in the chromatin structure of p21 may be associated with transcriptionally repressed chromatin states, indicating that the open structure was delayed at earlier time points. Conclusion: These findings suggest that the cell-killing efficacy of {sup 212}Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab after gemcitabine pretreatment may be associated with abrogation of the G2/M checkpoint, inhibition of DNA damage repair, and chromatin remodeling.

  15. Panobinostat Enhances Cytarabine and Daunorubicin Sensitivities in AML Cells through Suppressing the Expression of BRCA1, CHK1, and Rad51

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Holly; Caldwell, J. Timothy; Chen, Wei; Inaba, Hiroto; Xu, Xuelian; Buck, Steven A.; Taub, Jeffrey W.; Baker, Sharyn D.; Ge, Yubin

    2013-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remains a challenging disease to treat and urgently requires new therapies to improve its treatment outcome. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the cooperative antileukemic activities of panobinostat and cytarabine or daunorubicin (DNR) in AML cell lines and diagnostic blast samples in vitro and in vivo. Panobinostat suppressed expression of BRCA1, CHK1, and RAD51 in AML cells in a dose-dependent manner. Further, panobinostat significantly increased cytarabine- or DNR-induced DNA double-strand breaks and apoptosis, and abrogated S and/or G2/M cell cycle checkpoints. Analogous results were obtained by shRNA knockdown of BRCA1, CHK1, or RAD51. Cotreatment of NOD-SCID-IL2Rγnull mice bearing AML xenografts with panobinostat and cytarabine significantly increased survival compared to either cytarabine or panobinostat treatment alone. Additional studies revealed that panobinostat suppressed the expression of BRCA1, CHK1, and RAD51 through downregulation of E2F1 transcription factor. Our results establish a novel mechanism underlying the cooperative antileukemic activities of these drug combinations in which panobinostat suppresses expression of BRCA1, CHK1, and RAD51 to enhance cytarabine and daunorubicin sensitivities in AML cells. PMID:24244429

  16. RAD51 G135C genetic polymorphism and their potential role in gastric cancer induced by Helicobacter pylori infection in Bhutan.

    PubMed

    Trang, T T H; Nagashima, H; Uchida, T; Mahachai, V; Vilaichone, R-K; Tshering, L; Binh, T T; Yamaoka, Y

    2016-01-01

    In order to evaluate the role of the RAD51 G135C genetic polymorphism on the risk of gastric cancer induced by Helicobacter pylori infection, we determined allele frequency and genotype distribution of this polymorphism in Bhutan--a population documented with high prevalence of gastric cancer and extremely high prevalence of H. pylori infection. The status of RAD51 G135C was examined by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of PCR amplified fragments and sequencing. Histological scores were evaluated according to the updated Sydney system. G135C carriers showed significantly higher scores for intestinal metaplasia in the antrum than G135G carriers [mean (median) 0·33 (0) vs. 0·08 (0), P = 0·008]. Higher scores for intestinal metaplasia of G135C carriers compared to those of G135G carriers were also observed in H. pylori-positive patients [0·3 (0) vs. 0·1 (0), P = 0·002] and H. pylori-positive patients with gastritis [0·4 (0) vs. 0·1 (0), P = 0·002] but were not found in H. pylori-negative patients. Our findings revealed that a combination of H. pylori infection and RAD51 G135C genotype of the host showed an increasing score for intestinal metaplasia. Therefore, RAD51 G135C might be the important predictor for gastric cancer of H. pylori-infected patients.

  17. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Dmc1 and Rad51 proteins preferentially function with Tid1 and Rad54 proteins, respectively, to promote DNA strand invasion during genetic recombination.

    PubMed

    Nimonkar, Amitabh V; Dombrowski, Christopher C; Siino, Joseph S; Stasiak, Alicja Z; Stasiak, Andrzej; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C

    2012-08-17

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Dmc1 and Tid1 proteins are required for the pairing of homologous chromosomes during meiotic recombination. This pairing is the precursor to the formation of crossovers between homologs, an event that is necessary for the accurate segregation of chromosomes. Failure to form crossovers can have serious consequences and may lead to chromosomal imbalance. Dmc1, a meiosis-specific paralog of Rad51, mediates the pairing of homologous chromosomes. Tid1, a Rad54 paralog, although not meiosis-specific, interacts with Dmc1 and promotes crossover formation between homologs. In this study, we show that purified Dmc1 and Tid1 interact physically and functionally. Dmc1 forms stable nucleoprotein filaments that can mediate DNA strand invasion. Tid1 stimulates Dmc1-mediated formation of joint molecules. Under conditions optimal for Dmc1 reactions, Rad51 is specifically stimulated by Rad54, establishing that Dmc1-Tid1 and Rad51-Rad54 function as specific pairs. Physical interaction studies show that specificity in function is not dictated by direct interactions between the proteins. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that Rad51-Rad54 function together to promote intersister DNA strand exchange, whereas Dmc1-Tid1 tilt the bias toward interhomolog DNA strand exchange.

  18. RAD51 G135C genetic polymorphism and their potential role in gastric cancer induced by Helicobacter pylori infection in Bhutan.

    PubMed

    Trang, T T H; Nagashima, H; Uchida, T; Mahachai, V; Vilaichone, R-K; Tshering, L; Binh, T T; Yamaoka, Y

    2016-01-01

    In order to evaluate the role of the RAD51 G135C genetic polymorphism on the risk of gastric cancer induced by Helicobacter pylori infection, we determined allele frequency and genotype distribution of this polymorphism in Bhutan--a population documented with high prevalence of gastric cancer and extremely high prevalence of H. pylori infection. The status of RAD51 G135C was examined by restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis of PCR amplified fragments and sequencing. Histological scores were evaluated according to the updated Sydney system. G135C carriers showed significantly higher scores for intestinal metaplasia in the antrum than G135G carriers [mean (median) 0·33 (0) vs. 0·08 (0), P = 0·008]. Higher scores for intestinal metaplasia of G135C carriers compared to those of G135G carriers were also observed in H. pylori-positive patients [0·3 (0) vs. 0·1 (0), P = 0·002] and H. pylori-positive patients with gastritis [0·4 (0) vs. 0·1 (0), P = 0·002] but were not found in H. pylori-negative patients. Our findings revealed that a combination of H. pylori infection and RAD51 G135C genotype of the host showed an increasing score for intestinal metaplasia. Therefore, RAD51 G135C might be the important predictor for gastric cancer of H. pylori-infected patients. PMID:26119522

  19. CHK1 and RAD51 activation after DNA damage is regulated via urokinase receptor/TLR4 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Narayanaswamy, Pavan B; Tkachuk, Sergey; Haller, Hermann; Dumler, Inna; Kiyan, Yulia

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms of DNA damage and repair signaling are not completely understood that hinder the efficiency of cancer therapy. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (PLAUR) is highly expressed in most solid cancers and serves as a marker of poor prognosis. We show that PLAUR actively promotes DNA repair in cancer cells. On the contrary, downregulation of PLAUR expression results in delayed DNA repair. We found PLAUR to be essential for activation of Checkpoint kinase 1 (CHK1); maintenance of cell cycle arrest after DNA damage in a TP53-dependent manner; expression, nuclear import and recruitment to DNA-damage foci of RAD51 recombinase, the principal protein involved in the homologous recombination repair pathway. Underlying mechanism implies auto-/paracrine signaling of PLAUR/TLR4 receptor complex leading to activation of CHK1 and DNA repair. The signaling is induced by a danger molecule released by DNA-damaged cells and mediates, at least partially, activation of DNA-damage response. This study describes a new mechanism of DNA repair activation initiated by auto-/paracrine signaling of membrane receptors PLAUR/TLR4. It adds to the understanding of role of PLAUR in cancer and provides a rationale for therapeutic targeting of PLAUR/TLR4 interaction in TP53-positive cancers. PMID:27685627

  20. In Vivo Delivery of miR-34a Sensitizes Lung Tumors to Radiation Through RAD51 Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Cortez, Maria Angelica; Valdecanas, David; Niknam, Sharareh; Peltier, Heidi J; Diao, Lixia; Giri, Uma; Komaki, Ritsuko; Calin, George A; Gomez, Daniel R; Chang, Joe Y; Heymach, John Victor; Bader, Andreas G; Welsh, James William

    2015-01-01

    MiR-34a, an important tumor-suppressing microRNA, is downregulated in several types of cancer; loss of its expression has been linked with unfavorable clinical outcomes in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), among others. MiR-34a represses several key oncogenic proteins, and a synthetic mimic of miR-34a is currently being tested in a cancer trial. However, little is known about the potential role of miR-34a in regulating DNA damage response and repair. Here, we demonstrate that miR-34a directly binds to the 3' untranslated region of RAD51 and regulates homologous recombination, inhibiting double-strand-break repair in NSCLC cells. We further demonstrate the therapeutic potential of miR-34a delivery in combination with radiotherapy in mouse models of lung cancer. Collectively, our results suggest that administration of miR-34a in combination with radiotherapy may represent a novel strategy for treating NSCLC. PMID:26670277

  1. In Vivo Delivery of miR-34a Sensitizes Lung Tumors to Radiation Through RAD51 Regulation.

    PubMed

    Cortez, Maria Angelica; Valdecanas, David; Niknam, Sharareh; Peltier, Heidi J; Diao, Lixia; Giri, Uma; Komaki, Ritsuko; Calin, George A; Gomez, Daniel R; Chang, Joe Y; Heymach, John Victor; Bader, Andreas G; Welsh, James William

    2015-01-01

    MiR-34a, an important tumor-suppressing microRNA, is downregulated in several types of cancer; loss of its expression has been linked with unfavorable clinical outcomes in non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC), among others. MiR-34a represses several key oncogenic proteins, and a synthetic mimic of miR-34a is currently being tested in a cancer trial. However, little is known about the potential role of miR-34a in regulating DNA damage response and repair. Here, we demonstrate that miR-34a directly binds to the 3' untranslated region of RAD51 and regulates homologous recombination, inhibiting double-strand-break repair in NSCLC cells. We further demonstrate the therapeutic potential of miR-34a delivery in combination with radiotherapy in mouse models of lung cancer. Collectively, our results suggest that administration of miR-34a in combination with radiotherapy may represent a novel strategy for treating NSCLC. PMID:26670277

  2. Different mating-type-regulated genes affect the DNA repair defects of Saccharomyces RAD51, RAD52 and RAD55 mutants.

    PubMed

    Valencia-Burton, Maria; Oki, Masaya; Johnson, Jean; Seier, Tracey A; Kamakaka, Rohinton; Haber, James E

    2006-09-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells expressing both a- and alpha-mating-type (MAT) genes (termed mating-type heterozygosity) exhibit higher rates of spontaneous recombination and greater radiation resistance than cells expressing only MATa or MATalpha. MAT heterozygosity suppresses recombination defects of four mutations involved in homologous recombination: complete deletions of RAD55 or RAD57, an ATPase-defective Rad51 mutation (rad51-K191R), and a C-terminal truncation of Rad52, rad52-Delta327. We investigated the genetic basis of MAT-dependent suppression of these mutants by deleting genes whose expression is controlled by the Mata1-Matalpha2 repressor and scoring resistance to both campothecin (CPT) and phleomycin. Haploid rad55Delta strains became more damage resistant after deleting genes required for nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), a process that is repressed in MATa/MATalpha cells. Surprisingly, NHEJ mutations do not suppress CPT sensitivity of rad51-K191R or rad52-Delta327. However, rad51-K191R is uniquely suppressed by deleting the RME1 gene encoding a repressor of meiosis or its coregulator SIN4; this effect is independent of the meiosis-specific homolog, Dmc1. Sensitivity of rad52-Delta327 to CPT was unexpectedly increased by the MATa/MATalpha-repressed gene YGL193C, emphasizing the complex ways in which MAT regulates homologous recombination. The rad52-Delta327 mutation is suppressed by deleting the prolyl isomerase Fpr3, which is not MAT regulated. rad55Delta is also suppressed by deletion of PST2 and/or YBR052C (RFS1, rad55 suppressor), two members of a three-gene family of flavodoxin-fold proteins that associate in a nonrandom fashion with chromatin. All three recombination-defective mutations are made more sensitive by deletions of Rad6 and of the histone deacetylases Rpd3 and Ume6, although these mutations are not themselves CPT or phleomycin sensitive.

  3. Complex formation in yeast double-strand break repair: participation of Rad51, Rad52, Rad55, and Rad57 proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Hays, S L; Firmenich, A A; Berg, P

    1995-01-01

    The repair of DNA double-strand breaks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires genes of the RAD52 epistasis group, of which RAD55 and RAD57 are members. Here, we show that the x-ray sensitivity of rad55 and rad57 mutant strains is suppressible by overexpression of RAD51 or RAD52. Virtually complete suppression is provided by the simultaneous overexpression of RAD51 and RAD52. This suppression occurs at 23 degrees C, where these mutants are more sensitive to x-rays, as well as at 30 degrees C and 36 degrees C. In addition, a recombination defect of rad55 and rad57 mutants is similarly suppressed. Direct in vivo interactions between the Rad51 and Rad55 proteins, and between Rad55 and Rad57, have also been identified by using the two-hybrid system. These results indicate that these four proteins constitute part of a complex, a "recombinosome," to effect the recombinational repair of double-strand breaks. PMID:7624345

  4. Augmentation of Response to Chemotherapy by microRNA-506 Through Regulation of RAD51 in Serous Ovarian Cancers

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Guoyan; Yang, Da; Rupaimoole, Rajesha; Pecot, Chad V.; Sun, Yan; Mangala, Lingegowda S.; Li, Xia; Ji, Ping; Cogdell, David; Hu, Limei; Wang, Yingmei; Rodriguez-Aguayo, Cristian; Lopez-Berestein, Gabriel; Shmulevich, Ilya; De Cecco, Loris; Chen, Kexin; Mezzanzanica, Delia; Xue, Fengxia; Sood, Anil K.

    2015-01-01

    Background: Chemoresistance is a major challenge in cancer treatment. miR-506 is a potent inhibitor of the epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT), which is also associated with chemoresistance. We characterized the role of miR-506 in chemotherapy response in high-grade serous ovarian cancers. Methods: We used Kaplan-Meier and log-rank methods to analyze the relationship between miR-506 and progression-free and overall survival in The Cancer Genome Atlas (TCGA) (n = 468) and Bagnoli (n = 130) datasets, in vitro experiments to study whether miR-506 is associated with homologous recombination, and response to chemotherapy agents. We used an orthotopic ovarian cancer mouse model (n = 10 per group) to test the effect of miR-506 on cisplatin and PARP inhibitor sensitivity. All statistical tests were two-sided. Results: MiR-506 was associated with better response to therapy and longer progression-free and overall survival in two independent epithelial ovarian cancer patient cohorts (PFS: high vs low miR-506 expression; Bagnoli: hazard ratio [HR] = 3.06, 95% confidence interval [CI] = 1.90 to 4.70, P < .0001; TCGA: HR = 1.49, 95% CI = 1.00 to 2.25, P = 0.04). MiR-506 sensitized cells to DNA damage through directly targeting the double-strand DNA damage repair gene RAD51. Systemic delivery of miR-506 in 8–12 week old female athymic nude mice statistically significantly augmented the cisplatin and olaparib response (mean tumor weight ± SD, control miRNA plus cisplatin vs miR-506 plus cisplatin: 0.36±0.05g vs 0.07±0.02g, P < .001; control miRNA plus olaparib vs miR-506 plus olaparib: 0.32±0.13g vs 0.05±0.02g, P = .045, respectively), thus recapitulating the clinical observation. Conclusions: MiR-506 is a robust clinical marker for chemotherapy response and survival in serous ovarian cancers and has important therapeutic value in sensitizing cancer cells to chemotherapy. PMID:25995442

  5. Replication-Competent Adenovirus Formation in 293 Cells: the Recombination-Based Rate Is Influenced by Structure and Location of the Transgene Cassette and Not Increased by Overproduction of HsRad51, Rad51-Interacting, or E2F Family Proteins

    PubMed Central

    Duigou, Gregory J.; Young, C. S. H.

    2005-01-01

    Propagation of E1 region replacement adenovirus vectors in 293 cells results in the rare appearance of replication-competent adenovirus (RCA). The RCA genome contains E1 DNA acquired from the 293 cellular genome. The Luria-Delbrück fluctuation test was adapted to measure RCA formation rates. To test if structure affected rate, we measured rates during the production of adenovirus vectors with genomes containing three different expression cassette arrangements. The vectors had different extents of sequence identity with integrated Ad5 DNA of 293 cells and had different distributions of identity flanking the expression cassettes. Empty cassette vector RCA rates ranged from 2.5 × 10−8 to 5.6 × 10−10. The extent of sequence identity was not an accurate RCA rate predictor. The vector with the highest RCA rate also had the least overall sequence identity. To define factors controlling RCA generation, adenovirus vectors expressing E2F family proteins, known to modulate recombination gene expression, and overexpressing the human Rad51 recombination protein were analyzed. Compared to their corresponding empty vectors, RCA rates were not increased but were slightly decreased. Initial results suggested expression cassette orientation and/or transcription direction as potential RCA rate modifiers. Testing adenovirus vectors with identical transgene cassettes oriented in opposite directions suggested that transcription direction was not the basis of these rate differences. Thus, the overall structure and location of the transgene cassette had the largest effect on RCA rate. The RCA fluctuation test should be useful for investigators who require accurate measurements of targeted recombination and the probability of RCA formation during stock production. PMID:15827158

  6. Human mitochondrial variants influence on oxygen consumption.

    PubMed

    Marcuello, Ana; Martínez-Redondo, Diana; Dahmani, Yahya; Casajús, José A; Ruiz-Pesini, Eduardo; Montoya, Julio; López-Pérez, Manuel J; Díez-Sánchez, Carmen

    2009-02-01

    This work investigates if human mitochondrial variants influence on maximal oxygen consumption (VO(2max)). With this purpose we recruited, as a uniform population in term of nutritional habits and life style, 114 healthy male Spanish subjects that practiced fitness exercises 3-4 times a week. Once mtDNA haplogroups were determined, we found that J presents with lower VO(2max) (P=0.02) than nonJ variants. J has been related with a lower efficiency of electron transport chain (ETC), diminished ATP and ROS production. Thus, the difficult to compensate the mitochondrial energetic deficiency could explain the accumulation of J haplogroup in LHON and multiple sclerosis. Furthermore, the lower ROS production associated to J could also account for the accrual of this variant in elderly people consequent to a decreased oxidative damage.

  7. A unique DNase activity shares the active site with ATPase activity of the RecA/Rad51 homologue (Pk-REC) from a hyperthermophilic archaeon.

    PubMed

    Rashid, N; Morikawa, M; Kanaya, S; Atomi, H; Imanaka, T

    1999-02-19

    A RecA/Rad51 homologue from Pyrococcus kodakaraensis KOD1 (Pk-REC) is the smallest protein among various RecA/Rad51 homologues. Nevertheless, Pk-Rec is a super multifunctional protein and shows a deoxyribonuclease activity. This deoxyribonuclease activity was inhibited by 3 mM or more ATP, suggesting that the catalytic centers of the ATPase and deoxyribonuclease activities are overlapped. To examine whether these two enzymatic activities share the same active site, a number of site-directed mutations were introduced into Pk-REC and the ATPase and deoxyribonuclease activities of the mutant proteins were determined. The mutant enzyme in which double mutations Lys-33 to Ala and Thr-34 to Ala were introduced, fully lost both of these activities, indicating that Lys-33 and/or Thr-34 are important for both ATPase and deoxyribonuclease activities. The mutation of Asp-112 to Ala slightly and almost equally reduced both ATPase and deoxyribonuclease activities. In addition, the mutation of Glu-54 to Gln did not seriously affect the ATPase, deoxyribonuclease, and UV tolerant activities. These results strongly suggest that the active sites of the ATPase and deoxyribonuclease activities of Pk-REC are common. It is noted that unlike Glu-96 in Escherichia coli RecA, which has been proposed to be a catalytic residue for the ATPase activity, the corresponding residual Glu-54 in Pk-REC is not involved in the catalytic function of the protein.

  8. Guidelines for investigating causality of sequence variants in human disease.

    PubMed

    MacArthur, D G; Manolio, T A; Dimmock, D P; Rehm, H L; Shendure, J; Abecasis, G R; Adams, D R; Altman, R B; Antonarakis, S E; Ashley, E A; Barrett, J C; Biesecker, L G; Conrad, D F; Cooper, G M; Cox, N J; Daly, M J; Gerstein, M B; Goldstein, D B; Hirschhorn, J N; Leal, S M; Pennacchio, L A; Stamatoyannopoulos, J A; Sunyaev, S R; Valle, D; Voight, B F; Winckler, W; Gunter, C

    2014-04-24

    The discovery of rare genetic variants is accelerating, and clear guidelines for distinguishing disease-causing sequence variants from the many potentially functional variants present in any human genome are urgently needed. Without rigorous standards we risk an acceleration of false-positive reports of causality, which would impede the translation of genomic research findings into the clinical diagnostic setting and hinder biological understanding of disease. Here we discuss the key challenges of assessing sequence variants in human disease, integrating both gene-level and variant-level support for causality. We propose guidelines for summarizing confidence in variant pathogenicity and highlight several areas that require further resource development.

  9. Brief Report: Identification of BACH2 and RAD51B as Rheumatoid Arthritis Susceptibility Loci in a Meta-Analysis of Genome-Wide Data

    PubMed Central

    McAllister, Kate; Yarwood, Annie; Bowes, John; Orozco, Gisela; Viatte, Sebastian; Diogo, Dorothée; Hocking, Lynne J; Steer, Sophia; Wordsworth, Paul; Wilson, A G; Morgan, Ann W; Kremer, Joel M; Pappas, Dimitrios; Gregersen, Peter; Klareskog, Lars; Plenge, Robert; Barton, Anne; Greenberg, Jeffrey; Worthington, Jane; Eyre, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Objective A recent high-density fine-mapping (ImmunoChip) study of genetic associations in rheumatoid arthritis (RA) identified 14 risk loci with validated genome-wide significance, as well as a number of loci showing associations suggestive of significance (P = 5 × 10−5 < 5 × 10−8), but these have yet to be replicated. The aim of this study was to determine whether these potentially significant loci are involved in the pathogenesis of RA, and to explore whether any of the loci are associated with a specific RA serotype. Methods A total of 16 single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) were selected for genotyping and association analyses in 2 independent validation cohorts, comprising 6,106 RA cases and 4,290 controls. A meta-analysis of the data from the original ImmunoChip discovery cohort and from both validation cohorts was carried out, for a combined total of 17,581 RA cases and 20,160 controls. In addition, stratified analysis of patient subsets, defined according to their anti–cyclic citrullinated peptide (anti-CCP) antibody status, was performed. Results A significant association with RA risk (P < 0.05) was replicated for 6 of the SNPs assessed in the validation cohorts. All SNPs in the validation study had odds ratios (ORs) for RA susceptibility in the same direction as those in the ImmunoChip discovery study. One SNP, rs72928038, mapping to an intron of BACH2, achieved genome-wide significance in the meta-analysis (P = 1.2 × 10−8, OR 1.12), and a second SNP, rs911263, mapping to an intron of RAD51B, was significantly associated in the anti-CCP–positive RA subgroup (P = 4 × 10−8, OR 0.89), confirming that both are RA susceptibility loci. Conclusion This study provides robust evidence for an association of RA susceptibility with genes involved in B cell differentiation (BACH2) and DNA repair (RAD51B). The finding that the RAD51B gene exhibited different associations based on serologic subtype adds to the expanding knowledge base in defining

  10. Characterization of recombinase DMC1B and its functional role as Rad51 in DNA damage repair in Giardia duodenalis trophozoites.

    PubMed

    Torres-Huerta, Ana Laura; Martínez-Miguel, Rosa María; Bazán-Tejeda, María Luisa; Bermúdez-Cruz, Rosa María

    2016-08-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a highly conserved pathway for the repair of chromosomes that harbor DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs). The recombinase RAD51 plays a key role by catalyzing the pairing of homologous DNA molecules and the exchange of information between them. Two putative DMC1 homologs (DMC1A and DMC1B) have been identified in Giardia duodenalis. In terms of sequences, GdDMC1A and GdDMC1B bear all of the characteristic recombinase domains: DNA binding domains (helix-turn-helix motif, loops 1 and 2), an ATPcap and Walker A and B motifs associated with ATP binding and hydrolysis. Because GdDMC1B is expressed at the trophozoite stage and GdDMC1A is expressed in the cyst stage, we cloned the giardial dmc1B gene and expressed and purified its protein to determine its activities, including DNA binding, ATP hydrolysis, and DNA strand exchange. Our results revealed that it possessed these activities, and they were modulated by divalent metal ions in different manners. GdDMC1B expression at the protein and transcript levels, as well as its subcellular localization in trophozoites upon DNA damage, was assessed. We found a significant increase in GdDMC1B transcript and protein levels after ionizing radiation treatment. Additionally, GdDMC1B protein was mostly located in the nucleus of trophozoites after DNA damage. These results indicate that GdDMC1B is the recombinase responsible for DSBs repair in the trophozoite; therefore, a functional Rad51 role is proposed for GdDMC1B.

  11. Non-coding genetic variants in human disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng; Lupski, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variants, including single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) and copy number variants (CNVs), in the non-coding regions of the human genome can play an important role in human traits and complex diseases. Most of the genome-wide association study (GWAS) signals map to non-coding regions and potentially point to non-coding variants, whereas their functional interpretation is challenging. In this review, we discuss the human non-coding variants and their contributions to human diseases in the following four parts. (i) Functional annotations of non-coding SNPs mapped by GWAS: we discuss recent progress revealing some of the molecular mechanisms for GWAS signals affecting gene function. (ii) Technical progress in interpretation of non-coding variants: we briefly describe some of the technologies for functional annotations of non-coding variants, including the methods for genome-wide mapping of chromatin interaction, computational tools for functional predictions and the new genome editing technologies useful for dissecting potential functional consequences of non-coding variants. (iii) Non-coding CNVs in human diseases: we review our emerging understanding the role of non-coding CNVs in human disease. (iv) Compound inheritance of large genomic deletions and non-coding variants: compound inheritance at a locus consisting of coding variants plus non-coding ones is described. PMID:26152199

  12. The chromatin assembly factor 1 promotes Rad51-dependent template switches at replication forks by counteracting D-loop disassembly by the RecQ-type helicase Rqh1.

    PubMed

    Pietrobon, Violena; Fréon, Karine; Hardy, Julien; Costes, Audrey; Iraqui, Ismail; Ochsenbein, Françoise; Lambert, Sarah A E

    2014-10-01

    At blocked replication forks, homologous recombination mediates the nascent strands to switch template in order to ensure replication restart, but faulty template switches underlie genome rearrangements in cancer cells and genomic disorders. Recombination occurs within DNA packaged into chromatin that must first be relaxed and then restored when recombination is completed. The chromatin assembly factor 1, CAF-1, is a histone H3-H4 chaperone involved in DNA synthesis-coupled chromatin assembly during DNA replication and DNA repair. We reveal a novel chromatin factor-dependent step during replication-coupled DNA repair: Fission yeast CAF-1 promotes Rad51-dependent template switches at replication forks, independently of the postreplication repair pathway. We used a physical assay that allows the analysis of the individual steps of template switch, from the recruitment of recombination factors to the formation of joint molecules, combined with a quantitative measure of the resulting rearrangements. We reveal functional and physical interplays between CAF-1 and the RecQ-helicase Rqh1, the BLM homologue, mutations in which cause Bloom's syndrome, a human disease associating genome instability with cancer predisposition. We establish that CAF-1 promotes template switch by counteracting D-loop disassembly by Rqh1. Consequently, the likelihood of faulty template switches is controlled by antagonistic activities of CAF-1 and Rqh1 in the stability of the D-loop. D-loop stabilization requires the ability of CAF-1 to interact with PCNA and is thus linked to the DNA synthesis step. We propose that CAF-1 plays a regulatory role during template switch by assembling chromatin on the D-loop and thereby impacting the resolution of the D-loop. PMID:25313826

  13. Frequency of thermostability variants: estimation of total rare variant frequency in human populations

    SciTech Connect

    Mohrenweiser, H.W.; Neel, J.V.

    1981-09-01

    Eight erythrocyte enzymes were examine for thermostability in an unselected sample of 100 newborn infants. Three thermolabile variants, one each of lactate dehydrogenase, glucosephosphate isomerase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, were identified, none of which was detectable as a variant by standard electrophoretic techniques. All were inherited. This frequency of 3.8 heritable thermostability variants per 1000 determinations is to be compared with a frequency of electrophoretically detectable variants of 1.1 per 1000 determinations, a frequency of 2.4 enzyme-deficiency variants per 1000 determinations, and a frequency of individuals with rare enzyme deficiency or electrophoretic or thermostability (or both) variants at these loci is 8.4 per 1000 determinations. A similar distribution and frequency is seen when the comparison is limited to the seven loci studied by all techniques. it is clear that not all of the electrophoretic and thermostability variants present in the population are detected by the techniques used in this study. Accordingly, it is estimated that the true frequency of carriers of a rare variant for each of these enzyme-coding loci averages greater than 10/1000. Some implications of these frequencies for human disease are discussed.

  14. A genome-wide IR-induced RAD51 foci RNAi screen identifies CDC73 involved in chromatin remodeling for DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Herr, Patrick; Lundin, Cecilia; Evers, Bastiaan; Ebner, Daniel; Bauerschmidt, Christina; Kingham, Guy; Palmai-Pallag, Timea; Mortusewicz, Oliver; Frings, Oliver; Sonnhammer, Erik; Helleday, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    To identify new regulators of homologous recombination repair, we carried out a genome-wide short-interfering RNA screen combined with ionizing irradiation using RAD51 foci formation as readout. All candidates were confirmed by independent short-interfering RNAs and validated in secondary assays like recombination repair activity and RPA foci formation. Network analysis of the top modifiers identified gene clusters involved in recombination repair as well as components of the ribosome, the proteasome and the spliceosome, which are known to be required for effective DNA repair. We identified and characterized the RNA polymerase II-associated protein CDC73/Parafibromin as a new player in recombination repair and show that it is critical for genomic stability. CDC73 interacts with components of the SCF/Cullin and INO80/NuA4 chromatin-remodeling complexes to promote Histone ubiquitination. Our findings indicate that CDC73 is involved in local chromatin decondensation at sites of DNA damage to promote DNA repair. This function of CDC73 is related to but independent of its role in transcriptional elongation. PMID:27462432

  15. Brh2 and Rad51 promote telomere maintenance in Ustilago maydis, a new model system of DNA repair proteins at telomeres.

    PubMed

    Yu, Eun Young; Kojic, Milorad; Holloman, William K; Lue, Neal F

    2013-07-01

    Recent studies implicate a number of DNA repair proteins in mammalian telomere maintenance. However, because several key repair proteins in mammals are missing from the well-studied budding and fission yeast, their roles at telomeres cannot be modeled in standard fungi. In this report, we explored the dimorphic fungus Ustilago maydis as an alternative model for telomere research. This fungus, which belongs to the phylum Basidiomycota, has a telomere repeat unit that is identical to the mammalian repeat, as well as a constellation of DNA repair proteins that more closely mimic the mammalian collection. We showed that the two core components of homology-directed repair (HDR) in U. maydis, namely Brh2 and Rad51, both promote telomere maintenance in telomerase positive cells, just like in mammals. In addition, we found that Brh2 is localized to telomeres in vivo, suggesting that it acts directly at chromosome ends. We surveyed a series of mutants with DNA repair defects, and found many of them to have short telomeres. Our results indicate that factors involved in DNA repair are probably also needed for optimal telomere maintenance in U. maydis, and that this fungus is a useful alternative model system for telomere research.

  16. Human FABP1 T94A variant enhances cholesterol uptake.

    PubMed

    Huang, Huan; McIntosh, Avery L; Landrock, Kerstin K; Landrock, Danilo; Storey, Stephen M; Martin, Gregory G; Gupta, Shipra; Atshaves, Barbara P; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2015-07-01

    Although expression of the human liver fatty acid binding protein (FABP1) T94A variant alters serum lipoprotein cholesterol levels in human subjects, nothing is known whereby the variant elicits these effects. This issue was addressed by in vitro cholesterol binding assays using purified recombinant wild-type (WT) FABP1 T94T and T94A variant proteins and in cultured primary human hepatocytes expressing the FABP1 T94T (genotyped as TT) or T94A (genotyped as CC) proteins. The human FABP1 T94A variant protein had 3-fold higher cholesterol-binding affinity than the WT FABP1 T94T as shown by NBD-cholesterol fluorescence binding assays and by cholesterol isothermal titration microcalorimetry (ITC) binding assays. CC variant hepatocytes also exhibited 30% higher total FABP1 protein. HDL- and LDL-mediated NBD-cholesterol uptake was faster in CC variant than TT WT human hepatocytes. VLDL-mediated uptake of NBD-cholesterol did not differ between CC and TT human hepatocytes. The increased HDL- and LDL-mediated NBD-cholesterol uptake was not associated with any significant change in mRNA levels of SCARB1, LDLR, CETP, and LCAT encoding the key proteins in lipoprotein cholesterol uptake. Thus, the increased HDL- and LDL-mediated NBD-cholesterol uptake by CC hepatocytes may be associated with higher affinity of T94A protein for cholesterol and/or increased total T94A protein level. PMID:25732850

  17. Identification of the meiotic toolkit in diatoms and exploration of meiosis-specific SPO11 and RAD51 homologs in the sexual species Pseudo-nitzschia multistriata and Seminavis robusta

    DOE PAGESBeta

    Patil, Shrikant; Moeys, Sara; von Dassow, Peter; Huysman, Marie J. J.; Mapleson, Daniel; De Veylder, Lieven; Sanges, Remo; Vyverman, Wim; Montresor, Marina; Ferrante, Maria Immacolata

    2015-11-14

    Sexual reproduction is an obligate phase in the life cycle of most eukaryotes. Meiosis varies among organisms, which is reflected by the variability of the gene set associated to the process. Diatoms are unicellular organisms that belong to the stramenopile clade and have unique life cycles that can include a sexual phase. The exploration of five diatom genomes and one diatom transcriptome led to the identification of 42 genes potentially involved in meiosis. While these include the majority of known meiosis-related genes, several meiosis-specific genes, including DMC1, could not be identified. Furthermore, phylogenetic analyses supported gene identification and revealed ancestralmore » loss and recent expansion in the RAD51 family in diatoms. The two sexual species Pseudo-nitzschia multistriata and Seminavis robusta were used to explore the expression of meiosis-related genes: RAD21, SPO11-2, RAD51-A, RAD51-B and RAD51-C were upregulated during meiosis, whereas other paralogs in these families showed no differential expression patterns, suggesting that they may play a role during vegetative divisions. An almost identical toolkit is shared among Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries and Fragilariopsis cylindrus, as well as two species for which sex has not been observed, Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Thalassiosira pseudonana, suggesting that these two may retain a facultative sexual phase. Lastly, our results reveal the conserved meiotic toolkit in six diatom species and indicate that Stramenopiles share major modifications of canonical meiosis processes ancestral to eukaryotes, with important divergences in each Kingdom.« less

  18. Low-dose irradiation promotes Rad51 expression by down-regulating miR-193b-3p in hepatocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eon-Seok; Won, Yeo Jin; Kim, Byoung-Chul; Park, Daeui; Bae, Jin-Han; Park, Seong-Joon; Noh, Sung Jin; Kang, Yeong-Rok; Choi, Si Ho; Yoon, Je-Hyun; Heo, Kyu; Yang, Kwangmo; Son, Tae Gen

    2016-05-01

    Current evidence indicates that there is a relationship between microRNA (miRNA)-mediated gene silencing and low-dose irradiation (LDIR) responses. Here, alterations of miRNA expression in response to LDIR exposure in male BALB/c mice and three different types of hepatocytes were investigated. The miRNome of the LDIR-exposed mouse spleens (0.01 Gy, 6.5 mGy/h) was analyzed, and the expression of miRNA and mRNA was validated by qRT-PCR. Western blotting, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), and luciferase assays were also performed to evaluate the interaction between miRNAs and their target genes and to gain insight into the regulation of miRNA expression. The expression of miRNA-193b-3p was down-regulated in the mouse spleen and liver and in various hepatocytes (NCTC, Hepa, and HepG2 cell lines) in response to LDIR. The down-regulation of miR-193b-3p expression was caused by histone deacetylation on the miR-193b-3p promoter in the HepG2 cells irradiated with 0.01 Gy. However, the alteration of histone deacetylation and miR-193b-3p and Rad51 expression in response to LDIR was restored by pretreatment with N-acetyl-cyctein. In conclusion, we provide evidence that miRNA responses to LDIR include the modulation of cellular stress responses and repair mechanisms.

  19. Low-dose irradiation promotes Rad51 expression by down-regulating miR-193b-3p in hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Eon-Seok; Won, Yeo Jin; Kim, Byoung-Chul; Park, Daeui; Bae, Jin-Han; Park, Seong-Joon; Noh, Sung Jin; Kang, Yeong-Rok; Choi, Si Ho; Yoon, Je-Hyun; Heo, Kyu; Yang, Kwangmo; Son, Tae Gen

    2016-01-01

    Current evidence indicates that there is a relationship between microRNA (miRNA)-mediated gene silencing and low-dose irradiation (LDIR) responses. Here, alterations of miRNA expression in response to LDIR exposure in male BALB/c mice and three different types of hepatocytes were investigated. The miRNome of the LDIR-exposed mouse spleens (0.01 Gy, 6.5 mGy/h) was analyzed, and the expression of miRNA and mRNA was validated by qRT-PCR. Western blotting, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), and luciferase assays were also performed to evaluate the interaction between miRNAs and their target genes and to gain insight into the regulation of miRNA expression. The expression of miRNA-193b-3p was down-regulated in the mouse spleen and liver and in various hepatocytes (NCTC, Hepa, and HepG2 cell lines) in response to LDIR. The down-regulation of miR-193b-3p expression was caused by histone deacetylation on the miR-193b-3p promoter in the HepG2 cells irradiated with 0.01 Gy. However, the alteration of histone deacetylation and miR-193b-3p and Rad51 expression in response to LDIR was restored by pretreatment with N-acetyl-cyctein. In conclusion, we provide evidence that miRNA responses to LDIR include the modulation of cellular stress responses and repair mechanisms. PMID:27225532

  20. Variants of human papillomavirus type 16 predispose toward persistent infection.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lei; Liao, Hong; Yang, Binlie; Geffre, Christopher P; Zhang, Ai; Zhou, Aizhi; Cao, Huimin; Wang, Jieru; Zhang, Zhenbo; Zheng, Wenxin

    2015-01-01

    A cohort study of 292 Chinese women was conducted to determine the relationship between human papillomavirus (HPV) type 16 variants and persistent viral infection. Enrolled patients were HPV16 positive and had both normal cytology and histology. Flow-through hybridization and gene chip technology was used to identify the HPV type. A PCR sequencing assay was performed to find HPV16 E2, E6 and E7 gene variants. The associations between these variants and HPV16 persistent infection was analyzed by Fisher's exact test. It was found that the variants T178G, T350G and A442C in the E6 gene, as well as C3158A and G3248A variants in the E2 gene were associated with persistent HPV16 infection. No link was observed between E7 variants and persistent viral infection. Our findings suggest that detection of specific HPV variants would help identify patients who are at high risk for viral persistence and development of cervical neoplasia.

  1. A variant of human transferrin with abnormal properties.

    PubMed Central

    Evans, R W; Williams, J; Moreton, K

    1982-01-01

    Screening of human serum samples by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis in the presence of 6 M-urea revealed an individual who is heterozygous for a variant transferrin. The variant transferrin is able to bind two atoms of iron, but the iron in the C-terminal binding site is bound abnormally, as judged by its spectral properties, and is dissociated from the protein on electrophoresis in the presence of 6 M-urea. The iron-free C-terminal domain of the variant protein is less stable than normal to thermal and urea denaturation. Structural changes in the variant protein have not yet been characterized. Images Fig. 1. Fig. 2. Fig. 6. Fig. 9. PMID:7082283

  2. Human AZU-1 gene, variants thereof and expressed gene products

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Huei-Mei; Bissell, Mina

    2004-06-22

    A human AZU-1 gene, mutants, variants and fragments thereof. Protein products encoded by the AZU-1 gene and homologs encoded by the variants of AZU-1 gene acting as tumor suppressors or markers of malignancy progression and tumorigenicity reversion. Identification, isolation and characterization of AZU-1 and AZU-2 genes localized to a tumor suppressive locus at chromosome 10q26, highly expressed in nonmalignant and premalignant cells derived from a human breast tumor progression model. A recombinant full length protein sequences encoded by the AZU-1 gene and nucleotide sequences of AZU-1 and AZU-2 genes and variant and fragments thereof. Monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies specific to AZU-1, AZU-2 encoded protein and to AZU-1, or AZU-2 encoded protein homologs.

  3. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures.

    PubMed

    Hibar, Derrek P; Stein, Jason L; Renteria, Miguel E; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S; Armstrong, Nicola J; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M; Boks, Marco P; Bralten, Janita; Brown, Andrew A; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R K; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; den Braber, Anouk; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L; Grimm, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Woldehawariat, Girma; Holmes, Avram J; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H; Olde Loohuis, Loes M; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Mather, Karen A; Mattheisen, Manuel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Nho, Kwangsik; Papmeyer, Martina; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Risacher, Shannon L; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rose, Emma J; Salami, Alireza; Sämann, Philipp G; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J; Shin, Jean; Strike, Lachlan T; Teumer, Alexander; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M J; van Eijk, Kristel R; Walters, Raymond K; Westlye, Lars T; Whelan, Christopher D; Winkler, Anderson M; Zwiers, Marcel P; Alhusaini, Saud; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Ehrlich, Stefan; Hakobjan, Marina M H; Hartberg, Cecilie B; Haukvik, Unn K; Heister, Angelien J G A M; Hoehn, David; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Liewald, David C M; Lopez, Lorna M; Makkinje, Remco R R; Matarin, Mar; Naber, Marlies A M; McKay, D Reese; Needham, Margaret; Nugent, Allison C; Pütz, Benno; Royle, Natalie A; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Trabzuni, Daniah; van der Marel, Saskia S L; van Hulzen, Kimm J E; Walton, Esther; Wolf, Christiane; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A; Bastin, Mark E; Brodaty, Henry; Bulayeva, Kazima B; Carless, Melanie A; Cichon, Sven; Corvin, Aiden; Curran, Joanne E; Czisch, Michael; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Dillman, Allissa; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D; Erk, Susanne; Fedko, Iryna O; Ferrucci, Luigi; Foroud, Tatiana M; Fox, Peter T; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J Raphael; Göring, Harald H H; Green, Robert C; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K; Hartman, Catharina A; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hernandez, Dena G; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Kanai, Ryota; Keil, Maria; Kent, Jack W; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B; Lawrie, Stephen M; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L; McMahon, Katie L; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W; Mostert, Jeanette C; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Nalls, Michael A; Nichols, Thomas E; Nilsson, Lars G; Nöthen, Markus M; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Pike, G Bruce; Potkin, Steven G; Reinvang, Ivar; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rosen, Glenn D; Rujescu, Dan; Schnell, Knut; Schofield, Peter R; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M; Sussmann, Jessika E; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W; Traynor, Bryan J; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A; Valdés Hernández, Maria C; van 't Ent, Dennis; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Wee, Nic J A; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Veltman, Dick J; Wassink, Thomas H; Westman, Eric; Zielke, Ronald H; Zonderman, Alan B; Ashbrook, David G; Hager, Reinmar; Lu, Lu; McMahon, Francis J; Morris, Derek W; Williams, Robert W; Brunner, Han G; Buckner, Randy L; Buitelaar, Jan K; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dale, Anders M; Davies, Gareth E; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C; Espeseth, Thomas; Gollub, Randy L; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hosten, Norbert; Kahn, René S; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nauck, Matthias; Nyberg, Lars; Pandolfo, Massimo; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Roffman, Joshua L; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Smoller, Jordan W; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Haren, Neeltje E M; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W; Wen, Wei; White, Tonya; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I; Brouwer, Rachel M; Cannon, Dara M; Cookson, Mark R; de Geus, Eco J C; Deary, Ian J; Donohoe, Gary; Fernández, Guillén; Fisher, Simon E; Francks, Clyde; Glahn, David C; Grabe, Hans J; Gruber, Oliver; Hardy, John; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Jönsson, Erik G; Kloszewska, Iwona; Lovestone, Simon; Mattay, Venkata S; Mecocci, Patrizia; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; Ophoff, Roel A; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Ryten, Mina; Sachdev, Perminder S; Saykin, Andrew J; Simmons, Andy; Singleton, Andrew; Soininen, Hilkka; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Weale, Michael E; Weinberger, Daniel R; Adams, Hieab H H; Launer, Lenore J; Seiler, Stephan; Schmidt, Reinhold; Chauhan, Ganesh; Satizabal, Claudia L; Becker, James T; Yanek, Lisa; van der Lee, Sven J; Ebling, Maritza; Fischl, Bruce; Longstreth, W T; Greve, Douglas; Schmidt, Helena; Nyquist, Paul; Vinke, Louis N; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Xue, Luting; Mazoyer, Bernard; Bis, Joshua C; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Seshadri, Sudha; Ikram, M Arfan; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J; Schumann, Gunter; Franke, Barbara; Thompson, Paul M; Medland, Sarah E

    2015-04-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement, learning, memory and motivation, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magnetic resonance images of 30,717 individuals from 50 cohorts. We identify five novel genetic variants influencing the volumes of the putamen and caudate nucleus. We also find stronger evidence for three loci with previously established influences on hippocampal volume and intracranial volume. These variants show specific volumetric effects on brain structures rather than global effects across structures. The strongest effects were found for the putamen, where a novel intergenic locus with replicable influence on volume (rs945270; P = 1.08 × 10(-33); 0.52% variance explained) showed evidence of altering the expression of the KTN1 gene in both brain and blood tissue. Variants influencing putamen volume clustered near developmental genes that regulate apoptosis, axon guidance and vesicle transport. Identification of these genetic variants provides insight into the causes of variability in human brain development, and may help to determine mechanisms of neuropsychiatric dysfunction.

  4. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures.

    PubMed

    Hibar, Derrek P; Stein, Jason L; Renteria, Miguel E; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S; Armstrong, Nicola J; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M; Boks, Marco P; Bralten, Janita; Brown, Andrew A; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R K; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; den Braber, Anouk; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L; Grimm, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Woldehawariat, Girma; Holmes, Avram J; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H; Olde Loohuis, Loes M; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Mather, Karen A; Mattheisen, Manuel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Nho, Kwangsik; Papmeyer, Martina; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Risacher, Shannon L; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rose, Emma J; Salami, Alireza; Sämann, Philipp G; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J; Shin, Jean; Strike, Lachlan T; Teumer, Alexander; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M J; van Eijk, Kristel R; Walters, Raymond K; Westlye, Lars T; Whelan, Christopher D; Winkler, Anderson M; Zwiers, Marcel P; Alhusaini, Saud; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Ehrlich, Stefan; Hakobjan, Marina M H; Hartberg, Cecilie B; Haukvik, Unn K; Heister, Angelien J G A M; Hoehn, David; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Liewald, David C M; Lopez, Lorna M; Makkinje, Remco R R; Matarin, Mar; Naber, Marlies A M; McKay, D Reese; Needham, Margaret; Nugent, Allison C; Pütz, Benno; Royle, Natalie A; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Trabzuni, Daniah; van der Marel, Saskia S L; van Hulzen, Kimm J E; Walton, Esther; Wolf, Christiane; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A; Bastin, Mark E; Brodaty, Henry; Bulayeva, Kazima B; Carless, Melanie A; Cichon, Sven; Corvin, Aiden; Curran, Joanne E; Czisch, Michael; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Dillman, Allissa; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D; Erk, Susanne; Fedko, Iryna O; Ferrucci, Luigi; Foroud, Tatiana M; Fox, Peter T; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J Raphael; Göring, Harald H H; Green, Robert C; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K; Hartman, Catharina A; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hernandez, Dena G; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Kanai, Ryota; Keil, Maria; Kent, Jack W; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B; Lawrie, Stephen M; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L; McMahon, Katie L; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W; Mostert, Jeanette C; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Nalls, Michael A; Nichols, Thomas E; Nilsson, Lars G; Nöthen, Markus M; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Pike, G Bruce; Potkin, Steven G; Reinvang, Ivar; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rosen, Glenn D; Rujescu, Dan; Schnell, Knut; Schofield, Peter R; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M; Sussmann, Jessika E; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W; Traynor, Bryan J; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A; Valdés Hernández, Maria C; van 't Ent, Dennis; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Wee, Nic J A; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Veltman, Dick J; Wassink, Thomas H; Westman, Eric; Zielke, Ronald H; Zonderman, Alan B; Ashbrook, David G; Hager, Reinmar; Lu, Lu; McMahon, Francis J; Morris, Derek W; Williams, Robert W; Brunner, Han G; Buckner, Randy L; Buitelaar, Jan K; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dale, Anders M; Davies, Gareth E; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C; Espeseth, Thomas; Gollub, Randy L; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hosten, Norbert; Kahn, René S; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nauck, Matthias; Nyberg, Lars; Pandolfo, Massimo; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Roffman, Joshua L; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Smoller, Jordan W; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Haren, Neeltje E M; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W; Wen, Wei; White, Tonya; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I; Brouwer, Rachel M; Cannon, Dara M; Cookson, Mark R; de Geus, Eco J C; Deary, Ian J; Donohoe, Gary; Fernández, Guillén; Fisher, Simon E; Francks, Clyde; Glahn, David C; Grabe, Hans J; Gruber, Oliver; Hardy, John; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Jönsson, Erik G; Kloszewska, Iwona; Lovestone, Simon; Mattay, Venkata S; Mecocci, Patrizia; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; Ophoff, Roel A; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Ryten, Mina; Sachdev, Perminder S; Saykin, Andrew J; Simmons, Andy; Singleton, Andrew; Soininen, Hilkka; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Weale, Michael E; Weinberger, Daniel R; Adams, Hieab H H; Launer, Lenore J; Seiler, Stephan; Schmidt, Reinhold; Chauhan, Ganesh; Satizabal, Claudia L; Becker, James T; Yanek, Lisa; van der Lee, Sven J; Ebling, Maritza; Fischl, Bruce; Longstreth, W T; Greve, Douglas; Schmidt, Helena; Nyquist, Paul; Vinke, Louis N; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Xue, Luting; Mazoyer, Bernard; Bis, Joshua C; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Seshadri, Sudha; Ikram, M Arfan; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J; Schumann, Gunter; Franke, Barbara; Thompson, Paul M; Medland, Sarah E

    2015-04-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement, learning, memory and motivation, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magnetic resonance images of 30,717 individuals from 50 cohorts. We identify five novel genetic variants influencing the volumes of the putamen and caudate nucleus. We also find stronger evidence for three loci with previously established influences on hippocampal volume and intracranial volume. These variants show specific volumetric effects on brain structures rather than global effects across structures. The strongest effects were found for the putamen, where a novel intergenic locus with replicable influence on volume (rs945270; P = 1.08 × 10(-33); 0.52% variance explained) showed evidence of altering the expression of the KTN1 gene in both brain and blood tissue. Variants influencing putamen volume clustered near developmental genes that regulate apoptosis, axon guidance and vesicle transport. Identification of these genetic variants provides insight into the causes of variability in human brain development, and may help to determine mechanisms of neuropsychiatric dysfunction. PMID:25607358

  5. Common gene variants, mortality and extreme longevity in humans.

    PubMed

    Heijmans, B T; Westendorp, R G; Slagboom, P E

    2000-09-01

    Genetic factors influence variation in human life span. The fast technological advancements in genome research and the methodology for statistical analysis of complex traits provided new tools to unravel these genetic influences. Most of the genetic epidemiology and quantitative genetics is focused on the dissection of the genetic component of specific diseases rather than of human life span. Nevertheless, common variants of 22 genes have been tested for their contribution to mortality in the general population and extreme longevity in one or more studies. These studies provide indications as to the nature of biological pathways that might play a role in human ageing. Perhaps even more important at this time is the fact that they give valuable insights in the strengths and weaknesses of current strategies to identify gene variants affecting human life span and point at more powerful approaches.

  6. A PYY Q62P variant linked to human obesity

    SciTech Connect

    Ahituv, Nadav; Kavaslar, Nihan; Schackwitz, Wendy; Ustaszewska,Anna; Collier, John Michael; Hebert, Sybil; Doelle, Heather; Dent,Robert; Pennacchio, Len A.; McPherson, Ruth

    2005-06-27

    Members of the pancreatic polypeptide family and the irreceptors have been implicated in the control of food intake in rodents and humans. To investigate whether nucleotide changes in these candidate genes result in abnormal weight in humans, we sequenced the coding exons and splice sites of seven family members (NPY, PYY, PPY, NPY1R, NPY2R, NPY4R, and NPY5R) in a large cohort of extremely obese (n=379) and lean (n=378) individuals. In total we found eleven rare non-synonymous variants, four of which exhibited familial segregation, NPY1R L53P and PPY P63L with leanness and NPY2R D42G and PYY Q62P with obesity. Functional analysis of the obese variants revealed NPY2R D42G to have reduced cell surface expression, while previous cell culture based studies indicated variant PYY Q62P to have altered receptor binding selectivity and we show that it fails to reduce food intake through mouse peptide injection experiments. These results support that rare non-synonymous variants within these genes can alter susceptibility to human body mass index extremes.

  7. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures

    PubMed Central

    Hibar, Derrek P.; Stein, Jason L.; Renteria, Miguel E.; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S.; Armstrong, Nicola J.; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M.; Boks, Marco P.; Bralten, Janita; Brown, Andrew A.; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R. K.; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; den Braber, Anouk; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L.; Grimm, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Woldehawariat, Girma; Holmes, Avram J.; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H.; Olde Loohuis, Loes M.; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Mather, Karen A.; Mattheisen, Manuel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Nho, Kwangsik; Papmeyer, Martina; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Risacher, Shannon L.; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rose, Emma J.; Salami, Alireza; Sämann, Philipp G.; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J.; Shin, Jean; Strike, Lachlan T.; Teumer, Alexander; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M. J.; van Eijk, Kristel R.; Walters, Raymond K.; Westlye, Lars T.; Whelan, Christopher D.; Winkler, Anderson M.; Zwiers, Marcel P.; Alhusaini, Saud; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Ehrlich, Stefan; Hakobjan, Marina M. H.; Hartberg, Cecilie B.; Haukvik, Unn K.; Heister, Angelien J. G. A. M.; Hoehn, David; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Liewald, David C. M.; Lopez, Lorna M.; Makkinje, Remco R. R.; Matarin, Mar; Naber, Marlies A. M.; McKay, D. Reese; Needham, Margaret; Nugent, Allison C.; Pütz, Benno; Royle, Natalie A.; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Trabzuni, Daniah; van der Marel, Saskia S. L.; van Hulzen, Kimm J. E.; Walton, Esther; Wolf, Christiane; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A.; Bastin, Mark E.; Brodaty, Henry; Bulayeva, Kazima B.; Carless, Melanie A.; Cichon, Sven; Corvin, Aiden; Curran, Joanne E.; Czisch, Michael; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Dillman, Allissa; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D.; Erk, Susanne; Fedko, Iryna O.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Fox, Peter T.; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Göring, Harald H. H.; Green, Robert C.; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hernandez, Dena G.; Heslenfeld, Dirk J.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R.; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Kanai, Ryota; Keil, Maria; Kent, Jack W.; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B.; Lawrie, Stephen M.; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L.; McMahon, Katie L.; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mostert, Jeanette C.; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Nalls, Michael A.; Nichols, Thomas E.; Nilsson, Lars G.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L.; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Pike, G. Bruce; Potkin, Steven G.; Reinvang, Ivar; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rosen, Glenn D.; Rujescu, Dan; Schnell, Knut; Schofield, Peter R.; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M.; Sussmann, Jessika E.; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A.; Valdés Hernández, Maria C.; van ’t Ent, Dennis; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Wee, Nic J. A.; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Veltman, Dick J.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Westman, Eric; Zielke, Ronald H.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Ashbrook, David G.; Hager, Reinmar; Lu, Lu; McMahon, Francis J.; Morris, Derek W.; Williams, Robert W.; Brunner, Han G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D.; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dale, Anders M.; Davies, Gareth E.; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C.; Espeseth, Thomas; Gollub, Randy L.; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hosten, Norbert; Kahn, René S.; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nauck, Matthias; Nyberg, Lars; Pandolfo, Massimo; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Smoller, Jordan W.; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Haren, Neeltje E. M.; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W.; Wen, Wei; White, Tonya; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A.; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Brouwer, Rachel M.; Cannon, Dara M.; Cookson, Mark R.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Deary, Ian J.; Donohoe, Gary; Fernández, Guillén; Fisher, Simon E.; Francks, Clyde; Glahn, David C.; Grabe, Hans J.; Gruber, Oliver; Hardy, John; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E.; Jönsson, Erik G.; Kloszewska, Iwona; Lovestone, Simon; Mattay, Venkata S.; Mecocci, Patrizia; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M.; Ophoff, Roel A.; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Ryten, Mina; Sachdev, Perminder S.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Simmons, Andy; Singleton, Andrew; Soininen, Hilkka; Wardlaw, Joanna M.; Weale, Michael E.; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Adams, Hieab H. H.; Launer, Lenore J.; Seiler, Stephan; Schmidt, Reinhold; Chauhan, Ganesh; Satizabal, Claudia L.; Becker, James T.; Yanek, Lisa; van der Lee, Sven J.; Ebling, Maritza; Fischl, Bruce; Longstreth, W. T.; Greve, Douglas; Schmidt, Helena; Nyquist, Paul; Vinke, Louis N.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Xue, Luting; Mazoyer, Bernard; Bis, Joshua C.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Seshadri, Sudha; Ikram, M. Arfan; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Schumann, Gunter; Franke, Barbara; Thompson, Paul M.; Medland, Sarah E.

    2015-01-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences1. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement2, learning, memory3 and motivation4, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease2. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magnetic resonance images of 30,717 individuals from 50 cohorts. We identify five novel genetic variants influencing the volumes of the putamen and caudate nucleus. We also find stronger evidence for three loci with previously established influences on hippocampal volume5 and intracranial volume6. These variants show specific volumetric effects on brain structures rather than global effects across structures. The strongest effects were found for the putamen, where a novel intergenic locus with replicable influence on volume (rs945270; P = 1.08 × 10−33; 0.52% variance explained) showed evidence of altering the expression of the KTN1 gene in both brain and blood tissue. Variants influencing putamen volume clustered near developmental genes that regulate apoptosis, axon guidance and vesicle transport. Identification of these genetic variants provides insight into the causes of variability inhuman brain development, and may help to determine mechanisms of neuropsychiatric dysfunction. PMID:25607358

  8. Soluble variants of human recombinant glutaminyl cyclase.

    PubMed

    Castaldo, Cristiana; Ciambellotti, Silvia; de Pablo-Latorre, Raquel; Lalli, Daniela; Porcari, Valentina; Turano, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant human Glutaminyl Cyclase expressed in E. coli is produced as inclusion bodies. Lack of glycosylation is the main origin of its accumulation in insoluble aggregates. Mutation of single isolated hydrophobic amino acids into negative amino acids was not able to circumvent inclusion bodies formation. On the contrary, substitution with carboxyl-terminal residues of two or three aromatic residues belonging to extended hydrophobic patches on the protein surface provided soluble but still active forms of the protein. These mutants could be expressed in isotopically enriched forms for NMR studies and the maximal attainable concentration was sufficient for the acquisition of (1)H-(15)N HSQC spectra that represent the starting point for future drug development projects targeting Alzheimer's disease. PMID:23977104

  9. Soluble Variants of Human Recombinant Glutaminyl Cyclase

    PubMed Central

    Castaldo, Cristiana; Ciambellotti, Silvia; de Pablo-Latorre, Raquel; Lalli, Daniela; Porcari, Valentina; Turano, Paola

    2013-01-01

    Recombinant human Glutaminyl Cyclase expressed in E. coli is produced as inclusion bodies. Lack of glycosylation is the main origin of its accumulation in insoluble aggregates. Mutation of single isolated hydrophobic amino acids into negative amino acids was not able to circumvent inclusion bodies formation. On the contrary, substitution with carboxyl-terminal residues of two or three aromatic residues belonging to extended hydrophobic patches on the protein surface provided soluble but still active forms of the protein. These mutants could be expressed in isotopically enriched forms for NMR studies and the maximal attainable concentration was sufficient for the acquisition of 1H-15N HSQC spectra that represent the starting point for future drug development projects targeting Alzheimer’s disease. PMID:23977104

  10. Exploring the role of copy number variants in human adaptation

    PubMed Central

    Iskow, Rebecca C.; Gokcumen, Omer; Lee, Charles

    2012-01-01

    Over the past decade, the ubiquity of copy number variants (CNVs, the gain or loss of genomic material) in the genomes of healthy humans has become apparent. Although some of these variants are associated with disorders, a handful of studies documented an adaptive advantage conferred by CNVs. In this review, we propose that CNVs are substrates for human evolution and adaptation. We discuss the possible mechanisms and evolutionary processes in which CNVs are selected, outline the current challenges in identifying these loci, and highlight that copy number variable regions allow for the creation of novel genes that may diversify the repertoire of such genes in response to rapidly changing environments. We expect that many more adaptive CNVs will be discovered in the coming years, and we believe that these new findings will contribute to our understanding of human-specific phenotypes. PMID:22483647

  11. Interaction of human butyrylcholinesterase variants with bambuterol and terbutaline.

    PubMed

    Kovarik, Zrinka; Simeon-Rudolf, Vera

    2004-04-01

    Bambuterol, a dimethylcarbamate, carbamoylates butyrylcholinesterase (BChE; EC 3.1.1.8). The carbamoylated enzyme is not very stable and the final product of the two-step hydrolysis is a bronchodilator drug, terbutaline (1-(3,5-dihydroxyphenyl)-2-t-butylamino-ethanol sulphate). Both bambuterol and terbutaline inhibit BChE, but their affinities differ in human serum BChE variants (U, A, F, K and S) due to their positive charge. Bambuterol inhibition rate constants for the homozygous usual (UU), Kalow (KK), fluoride-resistant (FF) or atypical (AA) variant ranged from 4.4 to 0.085min (-1)microM(-1). Terbutaline showed competitive reversible inhibition for all BChE variants. The dissociation constants for UU, FF and AA homozygotes were 0.18, 0.31 and 3.3 mM, respectively. The inhibition rate or dissociation constants for heterozygotes were distributed between the respective constants for the corresponding homozygotes. A 50-fold difference in inhibition between the UU and AA enzyme might affect terbutaline release in humans. The affinity of all studied BChE variants for terbutaline was low, which suggests that terbutaline originating from bambuterol hydrolysis should not affect the hydrolysis of bambuterol by BChE. PMID:15449725

  12. Simulating Sequences of the Human Genome with Rare Variants

    PubMed Central

    Peng, Bo; Liu, Xiaoming

    2011-01-01

    Objective Simulated samples have been widely used in the development of efficient statistical methods identifying genetic variants that predispose to human genetic diseases. Although it is well known that natural selection has a strong influence on the number and diversity of rare genetic variations in human populations, existing simulation methods are limited in their ability to simulate multi-locus selection models with realistic distributions of the random fitness effects of newly arising mutants. Methods We developed a computer program to simulate large populations of gene sequences using a forward-time simulation approach. This program is capable of simulating several multi-locus fitness schemes with arbitrary diploid single-locus selection models with random or locus-specific fitness effects. Arbitrary quantitative trait or disease models can be applied to the simulated populations from which individual- or family-based samples can be drawn and analyzed. Results Using realistic demographic and natural selection models estimated from empirical sequence data, datasets simulated using our method differ significantly in the number and diversity of rare variants from datasets simulated using existing methods that ignore natural selection. Our program thus provides a useful tool to simulate datasets with realistic distributions of rare genetic variants for the study of genetic diseases caused by such variants. PMID:21212684

  13. Variobox: automatic detection and annotation of human genetic variants.

    PubMed

    Gaspar, Paulo; Lopes, Pedro; Oliveira, Jorge; Santos, Rosário; Dalgleish, Raymond; Oliveira, José Luís

    2014-02-01

    Triggered by the sequencing of the human genome, personalized medicine has been one of the fastest growing research areas in the last decade. Multiple software and hardware technologies have been developed by several projects, culminating in the exponential growth of genetic data. Considering the technological developments in this field, it is now fairly easy and inexpensive to obtain genetic profiles for unique individuals, such as those performed by several genetic analysis companies. The availability of computational tools that simplify genetic data analysis and the disclosure of biomedical evidences are of utmost importance. We present Variobox, a desktop tool to annotate, analyze, and compare human genes. Variobox obtains variant annotation data from WAVe, protein metadata annotations from Protein Data Bank, and sequences are obtained from Locus Reference Genomic or RefSeq databases. To explore the data, Variobox provides an advanced sequence visualization that enables agile navigation through genetic regions. DNA sequencing data can be compared with reference sequences retrieved from LRG or RefSeq records, identifying and automatically annotating new potential variants. These features and data, ranging from patient sequences to HGVS-compliant variant descriptions, are combined in an intuitive interface to analyze genes and variants. Variobox is a Java application, available at http://bioinformatics.ua.pt/variobox.

  14. PCSK1 Variants and Human Obesity.

    PubMed

    Ramos-Molina, B; Martin, M G; Lindberg, I

    2016-01-01

    PCSK1, encoding prohormone convertase 1/3 (PC1/3), was one of the first genes linked to monogenic early-onset obesity. PC1/3 is a protease involved in the biosynthetic processing of a variety of neuropeptides and prohormones in endocrine tissues. PC1/3 activity is essential for the activating cleavage of many peptide hormone precursors implicated in the regulation of food ingestion, glucose homeostasis, and energy homeostasis, for example, proopiomelanocortin, proinsulin, proglucagon, and proghrelin. A large number of genome-wide association studies in a variety of different populations have now firmly established a link between three PCSK1 polymorphisms frequent in the population and increased risk of obesity. Human subjects with PC1/3 deficiency, a rare autosomal-recessive disorder caused by the presence of loss-of-function mutations in both alleles, are obese and display a complex set of endocrinopathies. Increasing numbers of genetic diagnoses of infants with persistent diarrhea has recently led to the finding of many novel PCSK1 mutations. PCSK1-deficient infants experience severe intestinal malabsorption during the first years of life, requiring controlled nutrition; these children then become hyperphagic, with associated obesity. The biochemical characterization of novel loss-of-function PCSK1 mutations has resulted in the discovery of new pathological mechanisms affecting the cell biology of the endocrine cell beyond simple loss of enzyme activity, for example, dominant-negative effects of certain mutants on wild-type PC1/3 protein, and activation of the cellular unfolded protein response by endoplasmic reticulum-retained mutants. A better understanding of these molecular and cellular pathologies may illuminate possible treatments for the complex endocrinopathy of PCSK1 deficiency, including obesity. PMID:27288825

  15. Human genomic disease variants: A neutral evolutionary explanation

    PubMed Central

    Dudley, Joel T.; Kim, Yuseob; Liu, Li; Markov, Glenn J.; Gerold, Kristyn; Chen, Rong; Butte, Atul J.; Kumar, Sudhir

    2012-01-01

    Many perspectives on the role of evolution in human health include nonempirical assumptions concerning the adaptive evolutionary origins of human diseases. Evolutionary analyses of the increasing wealth of clinical and population genomic data have begun to challenge these presumptions. In order to systematically evaluate such claims, the time has come to build a common framework for an empirical and intellectual unification of evolution and modern medicine. We review the emerging evidence and provide a supporting conceptual framework that establishes the classical neutral theory of molecular evolution (NTME) as the basis for evaluating disease- associated genomic variations in health and medicine. For over a decade, the NTME has already explained the origins and distribution of variants implicated in diseases and has illuminated the power of evolutionary thinking in genomic medicine. We suggest that a majority of disease variants in modern populations will have neutral evolutionary origins (previously neutral), with a relatively smaller fraction exhibiting adaptive evolutionary origins (previously adaptive). This pattern is expected to hold true for common as well as rare disease variants. Ultimately, a neutral evolutionary perspective will provide medicine with an informative and actionable framework that enables objective clinical assessment beyond convenient tendencies to invoke past adaptive events in human history as a root cause of human disease. PMID:22665443

  16. Single Nucleotide Polymorphisms in Noncoding Regions of Rad51C Do Not Change the Risk of Unselected Breast Cancer but They Modulate the Level of Oxidative Stress and the DNA Damage Characteristics: A Case-Control Study

    PubMed Central

    Gresner, Peter; Gromadzinska, Jolanta; Jablonska, Ewa; Stepnik, Maciej; Zambrano Quispe, Oscar; Twardowska, Ewa; Wasowicz, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Deleterious and missense mutations of RAD51C have recently been suggested to modulate the individual susceptibility to hereditary breast and ovarian cancer and unselected ovarian cancer, but not unselected breast cancer (BrC). We enrolled 132 unselected BrC females and 189 cancer-free female subjects to investigate whether common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in non-coding regions of RAD51C modulate the risk of BrC, and whether they affect the level of oxidative stress and the extent/characteristics of DNA damage. Neither SNPs nor reconstructed haplotypes were found to significantly affect the unselected BrC risk. Contrary to this, carriers of rs12946522, rs16943176, rs12946397 and rs17222691 rare-alleles were found to present significantly increased level of blood plasma TBARS compared to respective wild-type homozygotes (p<0.05). Furthermore, these carriers showed significantly decreased fraction of oxidatively generated DNA damage (34% of total damaged DNA) in favor of DNA strand breakage, with no effect on total DNA damage, unlike respective wild-types, among which more evenly distributed proportions between oxidatively damaged DNA (48% of total DNA damage) and DNA strand breakage was found (p<0.0005 for the difference). Such effects were found among both the BrC cases and healthy subjects, indicating that they cannot be assumed as causal factors contributing to BrC development. PMID:25343521

  17. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in noncoding regions of Rad51C do not change the risk of unselected breast cancer but they modulate the level of oxidative stress and the DNA damage characteristics: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Gresner, Peter; Gromadzinska, Jolanta; Jablonska, Ewa; Stepnik, Maciej; Zambrano Quispe, Oscar; Twardowska, Ewa; Wasowicz, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Deleterious and missense mutations of RAD51C have recently been suggested to modulate the individual susceptibility to hereditary breast and ovarian cancer and unselected ovarian cancer, but not unselected breast cancer (BrC). We enrolled 132 unselected BrC females and 189 cancer-free female subjects to investigate whether common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in non-coding regions of RAD51C modulate the risk of BrC, and whether they affect the level of oxidative stress and the extent/characteristics of DNA damage. Neither SNPs nor reconstructed haplotypes were found to significantly affect the unselected BrC risk. Contrary to this, carriers of rs12946522, rs16943176, rs12946397 and rs17222691 rare-alleles were found to present significantly increased level of blood plasma TBARS compared to respective wild-type homozygotes (p<0.05). Furthermore, these carriers showed significantly decreased fraction of oxidatively generated DNA damage (34% of total damaged DNA) in favor of DNA strand breakage, with no effect on total DNA damage, unlike respective wild-types, among which more evenly distributed proportions between oxidatively damaged DNA (48% of total DNA damage) and DNA strand breakage was found (p<0.0005 for the difference). Such effects were found among both the BrC cases and healthy subjects, indicating that they cannot be assumed as causal factors contributing to BrC development.

  18. Effect of species-specific differences in chromosome morphology on chromatin compaction and the frequency and distribution of RAD51 and MLH1 foci in two bovid species: cattle (Bos taurus) and the common eland (Taurotragus oryx).

    PubMed

    Sebestova, Hana; Vozdova, Miluse; Kubickova, Svatava; Cernohorska, Halina; Kotrba, Radim; Rubes, Jiri

    2016-03-01

    Meiotic recombination between homologous chromosomes is crucial for their correct segregation into gametes and for generating diversity. We compared the frequency and distribution of MLH1 foci and RAD51 foci, synaptonemal complex (SC) length and DNA loop size in two related Bovidae species that share chromosome arm homology but show an extreme difference in their diploid chromosome number: cattle (Bos taurus, 2n = 60) and the common eland (Taurotragus oryx, 2nmale = 31). Compared to cattle, significantly fewer MLH1 foci per cell were observed in the common eland, which can be attributed to the lower number of initial double-strand breaks (DSBs) detected as RAD51 foci in leptonema. Despite the significantly shorter total autosomal SC length and longer DNA loop size of the common eland bi-armed chromosomes compared to those of bovine acrocentrics, the overall crossover density in the common eland was still lower than in cattle, probably due to the reduction in the number of MLH1 foci in the proximal regions of the bi-armed chromosomes. The formation of centric fusions during karyotype evolution of the common eland accompanied by meiotic chromatin compaction has greater implications in the reduction in the number of DSBs in leptonema than in the decrease of MLH1 foci number in pachynema. PMID:26194101

  19. Single nucleotide polymorphisms in noncoding regions of Rad51C do not change the risk of unselected breast cancer but they modulate the level of oxidative stress and the DNA damage characteristics: a case-control study.

    PubMed

    Gresner, Peter; Gromadzinska, Jolanta; Jablonska, Ewa; Stepnik, Maciej; Zambrano Quispe, Oscar; Twardowska, Ewa; Wasowicz, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Deleterious and missense mutations of RAD51C have recently been suggested to modulate the individual susceptibility to hereditary breast and ovarian cancer and unselected ovarian cancer, but not unselected breast cancer (BrC). We enrolled 132 unselected BrC females and 189 cancer-free female subjects to investigate whether common single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in non-coding regions of RAD51C modulate the risk of BrC, and whether they affect the level of oxidative stress and the extent/characteristics of DNA damage. Neither SNPs nor reconstructed haplotypes were found to significantly affect the unselected BrC risk. Contrary to this, carriers of rs12946522, rs16943176, rs12946397 and rs17222691 rare-alleles were found to present significantly increased level of blood plasma TBARS compared to respective wild-type homozygotes (p<0.05). Furthermore, these carriers showed significantly decreased fraction of oxidatively generated DNA damage (34% of total damaged DNA) in favor of DNA strand breakage, with no effect on total DNA damage, unlike respective wild-types, among which more evenly distributed proportions between oxidatively damaged DNA (48% of total DNA damage) and DNA strand breakage was found (p<0.0005 for the difference). Such effects were found among both the BrC cases and healthy subjects, indicating that they cannot be assumed as causal factors contributing to BrC development. PMID:25343521

  20. Rare structural variants of human and murine uroporphyrinogen I synthase.

    PubMed Central

    Meisler, M H; Carter, M L

    1980-01-01

    An isoelectric focusing method for detection of structural variants of the enzyme uroporphyrinogen I synthase [porphobilinogen ammonia-lyase (polymerizing), EC 4.3.1.8] in mammalian tissues has been developed. Mouse and human erythrocytes contain one or two major isozymes of uroporphyrinogen I synthase, respectively. Other tissues contain a set of more acidic isozymes that are encoded by the same structural gene as the erythrocyte isozymes. Mouse populations studied with this method were monomorphic for uroporphyrinogen I synthase, with the exception of one feral mouse population. The pedigree of a human family with a rare structural variant is consistent with autosomal linkage of the structural gene. This system provides a convenient isozyme marker for genetic studies and will facilitate determination of the chromosomal location of the uroporphyrinogen I synthase locus. Images PMID:6930671

  1. Patterns of Variant Polyadenylation Signal Usage in Human Genes

    PubMed Central

    Beaudoing, Emmanuel; Freier, Susan; Wyatt, Jacqueline R.; Claverie, Jean-Michel; Gautheret, Daniel

    2000-01-01

    The formation of mature mRNAs in vertebrates involves the cleavage and polyadenylation of the pre-mRNA, 10–30 nt downstream of an AAUAAA or AUUAAA signal sequence. The extensive cDNA data now available shows that these hexamers are not strictly conserved. In order to identify variant polyadenylation signals on a large scale, we compared over 8700 human 3′ untranslated sequences to 157,775 polyadenylated expressed sequence tags (ESTs), used as markers of actual mRNA 3′ ends. About 5600 EST-supported putative mRNA 3′ ends were collected and analyzed for significant hexameric sequences. Known polyadenylation signals were found in only 73% of the 3′ fragments. Ten single-base variants of the AAUAAA sequence were identified with a highly significant occurrence rate, potentially representing 14.9% of the actual polyadenylation signals. Of the mRNAs, 28.6% displayed two or more polyadenylation sites. In these mRNAs, the poly(A) sites proximal to the coding sequence tend to use variant signals more often, while the 3′-most site tends to use a canonical signal. The average number of ESTs associated with each signal type suggests that variant signals (including the common AUUAAA) are processed less efficiently than the canonical signal and could therefore be selected for regulatory purposes. However, the position of the site in the untranslated region may also play a role in polyadenylation rate. PMID:10899149

  2. Oncogenic potential diverge among human papillomavirus type 16 natural variants

    SciTech Connect

    Sichero, Laura; Simao Sobrinho, Joao; Lina Villa, Luisa

    2012-10-10

    We compared E6/E7 protein properties of three different HPV-16 variants: AA, E-P and E-350G. Primary human foreskin keratinocytes (PHFK) were transduced with HPV-16 E6 and E7 and evaluated for proliferation and ability to grow in soft agar. E-P infected keratinocytes presented the lowest efficiency in colony formation. AA and E-350G keratinocytes attained higher capacity for in vitro transformation. We observed similar degradation of TP53 among HPV-16 variants. Furthermore, we accessed the expression profile in early (p5) and late passage (p30) transduced cells of 84 genes commonly involved in carcinogenesis. Most differences could be attributed to HPV-16 E6/E7 expression. In particular, we detected different expression of ITGA2 and CHEK2 in keratinocytes infected with AA and AA/E-350G late passage cells, respectively, and higher expression of MAP2K1 in E-350G transduced keratinocytes. Our results indicate differences among HPV-16 variants that could explain, at least in part, differences in oncogenic potential attributed to these variants.

  3. Biochemical analysis of the human ENA/VASP-family proteins, MENA, VASP and EVL, in homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Takaku, Motoki; Ueno, Hiroyuki; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2011-06-01

    MENA, VASP and EVL are members of the ENA/VASP family of proteins and are involved in cytoplasmic actin remodeling. Previously, we found that EVL directly interacts with RAD51, an essential protein in the homologous recombinational repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs) and stimulates the RAD51-mediated recombination reactions in vitro. The EVL-knockdown MCF7 cells exhibited a clear reduction in RAD51-foci formation, suggesting that EVL may function in the DSB repair pathway through RAD51-mediated homologous recombination. However, the DSB repair defects were less significant in the EVL-knockdown cells, implying that two EVL paralogues, MENA and VASP, may complement the EVL function in human cells. Therefore, in the present study, we purified human MENA, VASP and EVL as recombinant proteins, and compared their biochemical activities in vitro. We found that all three proteins commonly exhibited the RAD51 binding, DNA binding and DNA-annealing activities. Stimulation of the RAD51-mediated homologous pairing was also observed with all three proteins. In addition, surface plasmon resonance analyses revealed that MENA, VASP and EVL mutually interacted. These results support the ideas that the ENA/VASP-family proteins are functionally redundant in homologous recombination, and that all three may be involved in the DSB repair pathway in humans.

  4. A core activity associated with the N terminus of the yeast RAD52 protein is revealed by RAD51 overexpression suppression of C-terminal rad52 truncation alleles.

    PubMed Central

    Asleson, E N; Okagaki, R J; Livingston, D M

    1999-01-01

    C-terminal rad52 truncation and internal deletion mutants were characterized for their ability to repair MMS-induced double-strand breaks and to produce viable spores during meiosis. The rad52-Delta251 allele, encoding the N-terminal 251 amino acids of the predicted 504-amino-acid polypeptide, supports partial activity for both functions. Furthermore, RAD51 overexpression completely suppresses the MMS sensitivity of a rad52-Delta251 mutant. The absence of the C terminus in the truncated protein makes it likely that suppression occurs by bypassing the C-terminal functions of Rad52p. RAD51 overexpression does not suppress the low level of spore viability that the rad52-Delta251 allele causes and only partially suppresses the defect in rad52 alleles encoding the N-terminal 292 or 327 amino acids. The results of this study also show that intragenic complementation between rad52 alleles is governed by a complex relationship that depends heavily on the two alleles involved and their relative dosage. In heteroallelic rad52 diploids, the rad52-Delta251 allele does not complement rad52 missense mutations altering residues 61 or 64 in the N terminus. However, complementation is achieved with each of these missense alleles when the rad52-Delta251 allele is overexpressed. Complementation also occurs between rad52-Delta327 and an internal deletion allele missing residues 210 through 327. We suggest that the first 251 amino acids of Rad52p constitute a core domain that provides critical RAD52 activities. PMID:10511548

  5. New polymorphic variants of human blood clotting factor IX

    SciTech Connect

    Surin, V.L.; Luk`yanenko, A.V.; Tagiev, A.F.; Smirnova, O.V.; Plutalov, O.V.; Berlin, Yu.A.

    1995-04-01

    The polymorphism of Alu-repeats, which are located in the introns of the human factor IX gene (copies 1-3), was studied. To identify polymorphic variants, direct sequencing of PCR products that contained appropriate repeats was used. In each case, 20 unrelated X chromosomes were studied. A polymorphic Dra I site was found near the 3{prime}-end of Alu copy 3 within the region of the polyA tract. A PCR-based testing system with internal control of restriction hydrolysis was suggested. Testing 81 unrelated X chromosomes revealed that the frequency of the polymorphic Dra I site is 0.23. Taq I polymorphism, which was revealed in Alu copy 4 of factor IX gene in our previous work, was found to be closely linked to Dra I polymorphism. Studies in linkage between different types of polymorphisms of the factor IX gene revealed the presence of a rare polymorphism in intron a that was located within the same minisatellite region as the known polymorphic insertion 50 bp/Dde I. However, the size of the insertion in our case was 26 bp. Only one polymorphic variant was found among over 150 unrelated X chromosomes derived from humans from Moscow and its vicinity. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  6. Intrahaplotypic Variants Differentiate Complex Linkage Disequilibrium within Human MHC Haplotypes.

    PubMed

    Lam, Tze Hau; Tay, Matthew Zirui; Wang, Bei; Xiao, Ziwei; Ren, Ee Chee

    2015-11-23

    Distinct regions of long-range genetic fixation in the human MHC region, known as conserved extended haplotypes (CEHs), possess unique genomic characteristics and are strongly associated with numerous diseases. While CEHs appear to be homogeneous by SNP analysis, the nature of fine variations within their genomic structure is unknown. Using multiple, MHC-homozygous cell lines, we demonstrate extensive sequence conservation in two common Asian MHC haplotypes: A33-B58-DR3 and A2-B46-DR9. However, characterization of phase-resolved MHC haplotypes revealed unique intra-CEH patterns of variation and uncovered 127 single nucleotide variants (SNVs) which are missing from public databases. We further show that the strong linkage disequilibrium structure within the human MHC that typically confounds precise identification of genetic features can be resolved using intra-CEH variants, as evidenced by rs3129063 and rs448489, which affect expression of ZFP57, a gene important in methylation and epigenetic regulation. This study demonstrates an improved strategy that can be used towards genetic dissection of diseases.

  7. Status quo of annotation of human disease variants

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background The ever on-going technical developments in Next Generation Sequencing have led to an increase in detected disease related mutations. Many bioinformatics approaches exist to analyse these variants, and of those the methods that use 3D structure information generally outperform those that do not use this information. 3D structure information today is available for about twenty percent of the human exome, and homology modelling can double that fraction. This percentage is rapidly increasing so that we can expect to analyse the majority of all human exome variants in the near future using protein structure information. Results We collected a test dataset of well-described mutations in proteins for which 3D-structure information is available. This test dataset was used to analyse the possibilities and the limitations of methods based on sequence information alone, hybrid methods, machine learning based methods, and structure based methods. Conclusions Our analysis shows that the use of structural features improves the classification of mutations. This study suggests strategies for future analyses of disease causing mutations, and it suggests which bioinformatics approaches should be developed to make progress in this field. PMID:24305467

  8. Fire Usage and Ancient Hominin Detoxification Genes: Protective Ancestral Variants Dominate While Additional Derived Risk Variants Appear in Modern Humans

    PubMed Central

    Alink, Gerrit M.; Scherjon, Fulco; MacDonald, Katharine; Smith, Alison C.; Nijveen, Harm; Roebroeks, Wil

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the defence capacity of ancient hominins against toxic substances may contribute importantly to the reconstruction of their niche, including their diets and use of fire. Fire usage implies frequent exposure to hazardous compounds from smoke and heated food, known to affect general health and fertility, probably resulting in genetic selection for improved detoxification. To investigate whether such genetic selection occurred, we investigated the alleles in Neanderthals, Denisovans and modern humans at gene polymorphisms well-known to be relevant from modern human epidemiological studies of habitual tobacco smoke exposure and mechanistic evidence. We compared these with the alleles in chimpanzees and gorillas. Neanderthal and Denisovan hominins predominantly possess gene variants conferring increased resistance to these toxic compounds. Surprisingly, we observed the same in chimpanzees and gorillas, implying that less efficient variants are derived and mainly evolved in modern humans. Less efficient variants are observable from the first early Upper Palaeolithic hunter-gatherers onwards. While not clarifying the deep history of fire use, our results highlight the long-term stability of the genes under consideration despite major changes in the hominin dietary niche. Specifically for detoxification gene variants characterised as deleterious by epidemiological studies, our results confirm the predominantly recent appearance reported for deleterious human gene variants, suggesting substantial impact of recent human population history, including pre-Holocene expansions. PMID:27655273

  9. Hydroxyurea induces de novo copy number variants in human cells.

    PubMed

    Arlt, Martin F; Ozdemir, Alev Cagla; Birkeland, Shanda R; Wilson, Thomas E; Glover, Thomas W

    2011-10-18

    Copy number variants (CNVs) are widely distributed throughout the human genome, where they contribute to genetic variation and phenotypic diversity. Spontaneous CNVs are also a major cause of genetic and developmental disorders and arise frequently in cancer cells. As with all mutation classes, genetic and environmental factors almost certainly increase the risk for new and deleterious CNVs. However, despite the importance of CNVs, there is limited understanding of these precipitating risk factors and the mechanisms responsible for a large percentage of CNVs. Here we report that low doses of hydroxyurea, an inhibitor of ribonucleotide reductase and an important drug in the treatment of sickle cell disease and other diseases induces a high frequency of de novo CNVs in cultured human cells that resemble pathogenic and aphidicolin-induced CNVs in size and breakpoint structure. These CNVs are distributed throughout the genome, with some hotspots of de novo CNV formation. Sequencing revealed that CNV breakpoint junctions are characterized by short microhomologies, blunt ends, and short insertions. These data provide direct experimental support for models of replication-error origins of CNVs and suggest that any agent or condition that leads to replication stress has the potential to induce deleterious CNVs. In addition, they point to a need for further study of the genomic consequences of the therapeutic use of hydroxyurea.

  10. Human papillomavirus type-16 variants in Quechua aboriginals from Argentina.

    PubMed

    Picconi, María Alejandra; Alonio, Lidia Virginia; Sichero, Laura; Mbayed, Viviana; Villa, Luisa Lina; Gronda, Jorge; Campos, Rodolfo; Teyssié, Angélica

    2003-04-01

    Cervical carcinoma is the leading cause of cancer death in Quechua indians from Jujuy (northwestern Argentina). To determine the prevalence of HPV-16 variants, 106 HPV-16 positive cervical samples were studied, including 33 low-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (LSIL), 28 high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (HSIL), 9 invasive cervical cancer (ICC), and 36 samples from women with normal colposcopy and cytology. HPV genome variability was examined in the L1 and E6 genes by PCR-hybridization. In a subset of 20 samples, a LCR fragment was also analyzed by PCR-sequencing. Most variants belonged to the European branch with subtle differences that depended on the viral gene fragment studied. Only about 10% of the specimens had non-European variants, including eight Asian-American, two Asian, and one North-American-1. E6 gene analysis revealed that 43% of the samples were identical to HPV-16 prototype, while 57% corresponded to variants. Interestingly, the majority (87%) of normal smears had HPV-16 prototype, whereas variants were detected mainly in SIL and ICC. LCR sequencing yielded 80% of variants, including 69% of European, 19% Asian-American, and 12% Asian. We identified a new variant, the Argentine Quechua-51 (AQ-51), similar to B-14 plus two additional changes: G7842-->A and A7837-->C; phylogenetic inference allocated it in the Asian-American branch. The high proportion of European variants may reflect Spanish colonial influence on these native Inca descendants. The predominance of HPV-16 variants in pathologic samples when compared to normal controls could have implications for the natural history of cervical lesions.

  11. rVarBase: an updated database for regulatory features of human variants.

    PubMed

    Guo, Liyuan; Du, Yang; Qu, Susu; Wang, Jing

    2016-01-01

    We present here the rVarBase database (http://rv.psych.ac.cn), an updated version of the rSNPBase database, to provide reliable and detailed regulatory annotations for known and novel human variants. This update expands the database to include additional types of human variants, such as copy number variations (CNVs) and novel variants, and include additional types of regulatory features. Now rVarBase annotates variants in three dimensions: chromatin states of the surrounding regions, overlapped regulatory elements and variants' potential target genes. Two new types of regulatory elements (lncRNAs and miRNA target sites) have been introduced to provide additional annotation. Detailed information about variants' overlapping transcription factor binding sites (TFBSs) (often less than 15 bp) within experimentally supported TF-binding regions (∼ 150 bp) is provided, along with the binding motifs of matched TF families. Additional types of extended variants and variant-associated phenotypes were also added. In addition to the enrichment in data content, an element-centric search module was added, and the web interface was refined. In summary, rVarBase hosts more types of human variants and includes more types of up-to-date regulatory information to facilitate in-depth functional research and to provide practical clues for experimental design. PMID:26503253

  12. Expression and characterization of three Aurora kinase C splice variants found in human oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fellmeth, Jessica E.; Gordon, Derek; Robins, Christian E.; Scott, Richard T.; Treff, Nathan R.; Schindler, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome segregation is an extensively choreographed process yet errors still occur frequently in female meiosis, leading to implantation failure, miscarriage or offspring with developmental disorders. Aurora kinase C (AURKC) is a component of the chromosome passenger complex and is highly expressed in gametes. Studies in mouse oocytes indicate that AURKC is required to regulate chromosome segregation during meiosis I; however, little is known about the functional significance of AURKC in human oocytes. Three splice variants of AURKC exist in testis tissue. To determine which splice variants human oocytes express, we performed quantitative real-time PCR using single oocytes and found expression of all three variants. To evaluate the functional differences between the variants, we created green fluorescent protein-tagged constructs of each variant to express in oocytes from Aurkc−/− mice. By quantifying metaphase chromosome alignment, cell cycle progression, phosphorylation of INCENP and microtubule attachments to kinetochores, we found that AURKC_v1 was the most capable of the variants at supporting metaphase I chromosome segregation. AURKC_v3 localized to chromosomes properly and supported cell cycle progression to metaphase II, but its inability to correct erroneous microtubule attachments to kinetochores meant that chromosome segregation was not as accurate compared with the other two variants. Finally, when we expressed the three variants simultaneously, error correction was more robust than when they were expressed on their own. Therefore, oocytes express three variants of AURKC that are not functionally equivalent in supporting meiosis, but fully complement meiosis when expressed simultaneously. PMID:25995441

  13. The dermal-epidermal junction of human skin contains a novel laminin variant

    PubMed Central

    1992-01-01

    We report the identification of a novel laminin variant that appears to be unique to a subset of epithelial basement membranes. The variant contains two chains electrophoretically and immunologically identical to the B1 and B2 chains. Epitopes contained in the laminin A chain are absent from the molecule, and a 190-kD chain substitutes for the A chain. V8 protease analysis and Western blotting studies indicate that the variant 190-kD chain shows structural and immunological similarity to the 200-kD chain of kalinin. Rotary shadowing analysis indicates that the 190-kD chain contributes a large globular structure to the variant long arm, but lacks the short arm contributed to laminin by the A chain. The variant is produced by cultured skin explants, human keratinocytes and a squamous cell carcinoma line, and is present in human amniotic fluid. Polyclonal antibodies raised to kalinin, a recently characterized novel component of anchoring filaments, and mAb BM165 which recognizes a subunit of kalinin (Rousselle et al., 1991) cross react with the variant under nonreducing conditions. Immunohistological surveys of human tissues using the crossreacting antikalinin antiserum indicate that the distribution of this laminin variant is at least restricted to anchoring filament containing basement membranes. We propose the name K-laminin for this variant. PMID:1383241

  14. Identification of the meiotic toolkit in diatoms and exploration of meiosis-specific SPO11 and RAD51 homologs in the sexual species Pseudo-nitzschia multistriata and Seminavis robusta

    SciTech Connect

    Patil, Shrikant; Moeys, Sara; von Dassow, Peter; Huysman, Marie J. J.; Mapleson, Daniel; De Veylder, Lieven; Sanges, Remo; Vyverman, Wim; Montresor, Marina; Ferrante, Maria Immacolata

    2015-11-14

    Sexual reproduction is an obligate phase in the life cycle of most eukaryotes. Meiosis varies among organisms, which is reflected by the variability of the gene set associated to the process. Diatoms are unicellular organisms that belong to the stramenopile clade and have unique life cycles that can include a sexual phase. The exploration of five diatom genomes and one diatom transcriptome led to the identification of 42 genes potentially involved in meiosis. While these include the majority of known meiosis-related genes, several meiosis-specific genes, including DMC1, could not be identified. Furthermore, phylogenetic analyses supported gene identification and revealed ancestral loss and recent expansion in the RAD51 family in diatoms. The two sexual species Pseudo-nitzschia multistriata and Seminavis robusta were used to explore the expression of meiosis-related genes: RAD21, SPO11-2, RAD51-A, RAD51-B and RAD51-C were upregulated during meiosis, whereas other paralogs in these families showed no differential expression patterns, suggesting that they may play a role during vegetative divisions. An almost identical toolkit is shared among Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries and Fragilariopsis cylindrus, as well as two species for which sex has not been observed, Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Thalassiosira pseudonana, suggesting that these two may retain a facultative sexual phase. Lastly, our results reveal the conserved meiotic toolkit in six diatom species and indicate that Stramenopiles share major modifications of canonical meiosis processes ancestral to eukaryotes, with important divergences in each Kingdom.

  15. Adaptive Human CDKAL1 Variants Underlie Hormonal Response Variations at the Enteroinsular Axis

    PubMed Central

    Chang, Chia Lin; Cai, James J.; Huang, Shang Yu; Cheng, Po Jen; Chueh, Ho Yen; Hsu, Sheau Yu Teddy

    2014-01-01

    Recent analyses have identified positively selected loci that explain differences in immune responses, body forms, and adaptations to extreme climates, but variants that describe adaptations in energy-balance regulation remain underexplored. To identify variants that confer adaptations in energy-balance regulation, we explored the evolutionary history and functional associations of candidate variants in 207 genes. We screened single nucleotide polymorphisms in genes that had been associated with energy-balance regulation for unusual genetic patterns in human populations, followed by studying associations among selected variants and serum levels of GIP, insulin, and C-peptide in pregnant women after an oral glucose tolerance test. Our analysis indicated that 5′ variants in CDKAL1, CYB5R4, GAD2, and PPARG are marked with statistically significant signals of gene–environment interactions. Importantly, studies of serum hormone levels showed that variants in CDKAL1 are associated with glucose-induced GIP and insulin responses (p<0.05). On the other hand, a GAD2 variant exhibited a significant association with glucose-induced C-peptide response. In addition, simulation analysis indicated that a type 2 diabetes risk variant in CDKAL1 (rs7754840) was selected in East Asians ∼6,900 years ago. Taken together, these data indicated that variants in CDKAL1 and GAD2 were targets of prior environmental selection. Because the selection of the CDKAL1 variant overlapped with the selection of a cluster of GIP variants in the same population ∼11,800 to 2,000 years ago, we speculate that these regulatory genes at the human enteroinsular axis could be highly responsive to environmental selection in recent human history. PMID:25222615

  16. A multi-stage genome-wide association in breast cancer identifies two novel risk alleles at 1p11.2 and 14q24.1 (RAD51L1)

    PubMed Central

    Thomas, Gilles; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Kraft, Peter; Yeager, Meredith; Wacholder, Sholom; Cox, David G.; Hankinson, Susan E.; Hutchinson, Amy; Wang, Zhaoming; Yu, Kai; Chatterjee, Nilanjan; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Gonzalez-Bosquet, Jesus; Prokunina-Olsson, Ludmila; Orr, Nick; Willett, Walter C.; Colditz, Graham A.; Ziegler, Regina G.; Berg, Christine D.; Buys, Saundra S.; McCarty, Catherine A.; Feigelson, Heather Spencer; Calle, Eugenia E.; Thun, Michael J.; Diver, Ryan; Prentice, Ross; Jackson, Rebecca; Kooperberg, Charles; Chlebowski, Rowan; Lissowska, Jolanta; Peplonska, Beata; Brinton, Louise A.; Sigurdson, Alice; Doody, Michele; Bhatti, Parveen; Alexander, Bruce H.; Buring, Julie; Lee, I-Min; Vatten, Lars J; Hveem, Kristian; Kumle, Merethe; Hayes, Richard B.; Tucker, Margaret; Gerhard, Daniela S.; Fraumeni, Joseph F.; Hoover, Robert N.; Chanock, Stephen J; Hunter, David J.

    2010-01-01

    The Cancer Genetic Markers of Susceptibility (CGEMS) initiative has conducted a three-stage genome-wide association study (GWAS) of breast cancer in 9,770 cases and 10,799 controls. In Stage 1, we genotyped 528,173 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in 1,145 cases of invasive breast cancer among postmenopausal white women, and 1,142 controls; in Stage 2, 24,909 SNPs with low p values observed in Stage 1 were analyzed in 4,547 cases and 4,434 controls. In Stage 3 we investigated 21 loci in 4,078 cases and 5,223 controls with low p values from Stage 1 and 2 combined. Two novel loci achieved genome-wide significance. A pericentromeric SNP on chromosome 1p11.2, rs11249433, (p=6.74 × 10-10 adjusted genotype test with 2 degrees of freedom) resides in a large block of linkage disequilibrium neighboring NOTCH2 and FCGR1B and is predominantly associated with estrogen receptor-positive breast cancer. A second SNP, rs999737 on chromosome 14q24.1 (p=1.74 × 10−7), localizes to RAD51L1, a gene in the homologous recombination DNA repair pathway, a prior candidate pathway for breast cancer susceptibility. We confirmed previously reported markers on chromosome 2q35, 5q11.2, 5p12, 8q24, 10q26, and 16q12.1. Our results underscore the importance of large-scale replication in the identification of low penetrance breast cancer alleles. PMID:19330030

  17. A Core-tailored Platform for Pinpointing Clinically Relevant Variants in Human Genomes and Exomes

    PubMed Central

    Richards, D.; Flannery, R.; Kramer, A.; Kutchma, A.; Lerman, J.; Leschly, J.; Majumdar, S.; Marshall, N.; Molloy, M.; Muthiah, A.; Ning, A.; O'Connor, R.; Patel, K.; Rajaraman, V.; Rebres, R.; Sarver, A.; Su, H.; Zhou, W.; Zhu, X.; Bassett, D.; Pearson, Nathan

    2013-01-01

    Genomic studies of human disease and drug response aim to find one or a few causal variants among millions of possible candidates. A streamlined platform for quickly and reliably assessing each variant called in such studies can save months of tedious effort, speeding discoveries for core labs' clinical and research clients, and freeing core staff to solve other data analysis challenges posed by broader clientele. Made to help cores and their clients quickly interpret human genomes, the Ingenuity® Variant Analysis™ platform (www.ingenuity.com/variants) lets users upload, annotate, and thoroughly compare whole or partial human genomes, to smartly shortlist candidate variants, genes, and pathways that may best explain user-specified phenotype(s). Leveraging Ingenuity's deep, structured knowledge base of published findings and robust predictive insight, Variant Analysis runs sophisticated tests of family- and population-scale genetic association, tailored to the user's study design and phenotype, via a simple, fluid interface that also lets one easily review, revise, and share findings. To meet the distinctive challenges of clinical genome interpretation, we have comprehensively curated published clinical assessments and population incidence of individual human sequence variants, supplementing gene- and pathway-level functional knowledge. To help researchers identify new causal candidates, we have built and validated Variant Analysis to run gene- and pathway-level burden tests ∼100x faster than conventional methods. And, by letting users easily and securely share genome data and findings with collaborators, the platform mediates efficient collaborative discovery among researchers studying similar or (as mutual controls) distinct rare diseases. Combining sophisticated functional analytics; statistically robust genetic analysis at the variant, gene, and pathway levels in an intuitive interface, the Variant Analysis platform is built to meet the varied genome

  18. Alternative splicing variants of human Fbx4 disturb cyclin D1 proteolysis in human cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Xiufeng; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Jie; Li, Meng; Zhang, Xiaolei; Tu, Jing; Sun, Shiqin; Chen, Xiangmei; Lu, Fengmin

    2014-04-25

    Highlights: • The expression of Fbx4 was significantly lower in HCC tissues. • Novel splicing variants of Fbx4 were identified. • These novel variants are much more abundant in human cancer tissues and cells. • The novel Fbx4 isoforms could promote cell proliferation and migration in vitro. • These isoforms showed less capability for cyclin D1 binding and degradation. - Abstract: Fbx4 is a specific substrate recognition component of SCF ubiquitin ligases that catalyzes the ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of cyclin D1 and Trx1. Two isoforms of human Fbx4 protein, the full length Fbx4α and the C-terminal truncated Fbx4β have been identified, but their functions remain elusive. In this study, we demonstrated that the mRNA level of Fbx4 was significantly lower in hepatocellular carcinoma tissues than that in the corresponding non-tumor tissues. More importantly, we identified three novel splicing variants of Fbx4: Fbx4γ (missing 168–245nt of exon1), Fbx4δ (missing exon6) and a N-terminal reading frame shift variant (missing exon2). Using cloning sequencing and RT-PCR, we demonstrated these novel splice variants are much more abundant in human cancer tissues and cell lines than that in normal tissues. When expressed in Sk-Hep1 and NIH3T3 cell lines, Fbx4β, Fbx4γ and Fbx4δ could promote cell proliferation and migration in vitro. Concordantly, these isoforms could disrupt cyclin D1 degradation and therefore increase cyclin D1 expression. Moreover, unlike the full-length isoform Fbx4α that mainly exists in cytoplasm, Fbx4β, Fbx4γ, and Fbx4δ locate in both cytoplasm and nucleus. Since cyclin D1 degradation takes place in cytoplasm, the nuclear distribution of these Fbx4 isoforms may not be involved in the down-regulation of cytoplasmic cyclin D1. These results define the impact of alternative splicing on Fbx4 function, and suggest that the attenuated cyclin D1 degradation by these novel Fbx4 isoforms provides a new insight for aberrant

  19. Delivering Antisense Morpholino Oligonucleotides to Target Telomerase Splice Variants in Human Embryonic Stem Cells.

    PubMed

    Radan, Lida; Hughes, Chris S; Teichroeb, Jonathan H; Postovit, Lynne-Marie; Betts, Dean H

    2016-01-01

    Morpholino oligonucleotides (MO) are an innovative tool that provides a means for examining and modifying gene expression outcomes by antisense interaction with targeted RNA transcripts. The site-specific nature of their binding facilitates focused modulation to alter splice variant expression patterns. Here we describe the steric-blocking of human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) Δα and Δβ splice variants using MO to examine cellular outcomes related to pluripotency and differentiation in human embryonic stem cells.

  20. Expression of the human growth hormone variant gene in cultured fibroblasts and transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Selden, R.F.; Wagner, T.E.; Blethen, S.; Yun, J.S.; Rowe, M.E.; Goodman, H.M. )

    1988-11-01

    The nucleotide sequence of the human growth hormone variant gene, one of the five members of the growth hormone gene family, predicts that it encodes a growth hormone-like protein. As a first step in determining whether this gene is functional in humans, the authors have expressed a mouse methallothionein I/human growth hormone variant fusion gene in mouse L cells and in transgenic mice. The growth hormone variant protein expressed in transiently transfected L cells is distinct from growth hormone itself with respect to reactivity with anti-growth hormone monoclonal antibodies, behavior during column chromatography, and isoelectric point. Transgenic mice expressing the growth hormone variant protein are 1.4- to 1.9-fold larger than nontransgenic controls, suggesting that the protein has growth-promoting properties.

  1. Towards Precision Medicine: Advances in Computational Approaches for the Analysis of Human Variants

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Thomas A; Doughty, Emily; Kann, Maricel G

    2013-01-01

    Variations and similarities in our individual genomes are part of our history, our heritage, and our identity. Some human genomic variants are associated with common traits such as hair and eye color, while others are associated with susceptibility to disease or response to drug treatment. Identifying the human variations producing clinically relevant phenotypic changes is critical for providing accurate and personalized diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment for diseases. Furthermore, a better understanding of the molecular underpinning of disease can lead to development of new drug targets for precision medicine. Several resources have been designed for collecting and storing human genomic variations in highly structured, easily accessible databases. Unfortunately, a vast amount of information about these genetic variants and their functional and phenotypic associations is currently buried in the literature, only accessible by manual curation or sophisticated text mining technology to extract the relevant information. In addition, the low cost of sequencing technologies coupled with increasing computational power has enabled the development of numerous computational methodologies to predict the pathogenicity of human variants. This review provides a detailed comparison of current human variant resources, including HGMD, OMIM, ClinVar, and UniProt/Swiss-Prot, followed by an overview of the computational methods and techniques used to leverage the available data to predict novel deleterious variants. We expect these resources and tools to become the foundation for understanding the molecular details of genomic variants leading to disease, which in turn will enable the promise of precision medicine. PMID:23962656

  2. Integrative annotation of variants from 1092 humans: application to cancer genomics.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Ekta; Fu, Yao; Colonna, Vincenza; Mu, Xinmeng Jasmine; Kang, Hyun Min; Lappalainen, Tuuli; Sboner, Andrea; Lochovsky, Lucas; Chen, Jieming; Harmanci, Arif; Das, Jishnu; Abyzov, Alexej; Balasubramanian, Suganthi; Beal, Kathryn; Chakravarty, Dimple; Challis, Daniel; Chen, Yuan; Clarke, Declan; Clarke, Laura; Cunningham, Fiona; Evani, Uday S; Flicek, Paul; Fragoza, Robert; Garrison, Erik; Gibbs, Richard; Gümüs, Zeynep H; Herrero, Javier; Kitabayashi, Naoki; Kong, Yong; Lage, Kasper; Liluashvili, Vaja; Lipkin, Steven M; MacArthur, Daniel G; Marth, Gabor; Muzny, Donna; Pers, Tune H; Ritchie, Graham R S; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey A; Sisu, Cristina; Wei, Xiaomu; Wilson, Michael; Xue, Yali; Yu, Fuli; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T; Yu, Haiyuan; Rubin, Mark A; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Gerstein, Mark

    2013-10-01

    Interpreting variants, especially noncoding ones, in the increasing number of personal genomes is challenging. We used patterns of polymorphisms in functionally annotated regions in 1092 humans to identify deleterious variants; then we experimentally validated candidates. We analyzed both coding and noncoding regions, with the former corroborating the latter. We found regions particularly sensitive to mutations ("ultrasensitive") and variants that are disruptive because of mechanistic effects on transcription-factor binding (that is, "motif-breakers"). We also found variants in regions with higher network centrality tend to be deleterious. Insertions and deletions followed a similar pattern to single-nucleotide variants, with some notable exceptions (e.g., certain deletions and enhancers). On the basis of these patterns, we developed a computational tool (FunSeq), whose application to ~90 cancer genomes reveals nearly a hundred candidate noncoding drivers. PMID:24092746

  3. Integrative annotation of variants from 1092 humans: application to cancer genomics.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Ekta; Fu, Yao; Colonna, Vincenza; Mu, Xinmeng Jasmine; Kang, Hyun Min; Lappalainen, Tuuli; Sboner, Andrea; Lochovsky, Lucas; Chen, Jieming; Harmanci, Arif; Das, Jishnu; Abyzov, Alexej; Balasubramanian, Suganthi; Beal, Kathryn; Chakravarty, Dimple; Challis, Daniel; Chen, Yuan; Clarke, Declan; Clarke, Laura; Cunningham, Fiona; Evani, Uday S; Flicek, Paul; Fragoza, Robert; Garrison, Erik; Gibbs, Richard; Gümüs, Zeynep H; Herrero, Javier; Kitabayashi, Naoki; Kong, Yong; Lage, Kasper; Liluashvili, Vaja; Lipkin, Steven M; MacArthur, Daniel G; Marth, Gabor; Muzny, Donna; Pers, Tune H; Ritchie, Graham R S; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey A; Sisu, Cristina; Wei, Xiaomu; Wilson, Michael; Xue, Yali; Yu, Fuli; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T; Yu, Haiyuan; Rubin, Mark A; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Gerstein, Mark

    2013-10-01

    Interpreting variants, especially noncoding ones, in the increasing number of personal genomes is challenging. We used patterns of polymorphisms in functionally annotated regions in 1092 humans to identify deleterious variants; then we experimentally validated candidates. We analyzed both coding and noncoding regions, with the former corroborating the latter. We found regions particularly sensitive to mutations ("ultrasensitive") and variants that are disruptive because of mechanistic effects on transcription-factor binding (that is, "motif-breakers"). We also found variants in regions with higher network centrality tend to be deleterious. Insertions and deletions followed a similar pattern to single-nucleotide variants, with some notable exceptions (e.g., certain deletions and enhancers). On the basis of these patterns, we developed a computational tool (FunSeq), whose application to ~90 cancer genomes reveals nearly a hundred candidate noncoding drivers.

  4. Altered expression of Ano1 variants in human diabetic gastroparesis.

    PubMed

    Mazzone, Amelia; Bernard, Cheryl E; Strege, Peter R; Beyder, Arthur; Galietta, Luis J V; Pasricha, Pankaj J; Rae, James L; Parkman, Henry P; Linden, David R; Szurszewski, Joseph H; Ördög, Tamas; Gibbons, Simon J; Farrugia, Gianrico

    2011-04-15

    Diabetes affects many organs including the stomach. Altered number and function of interstitial cells of Cajal (ICC), the gastrointestinal pacemaker cells, underlie a number of gastrointestinal motility disorders, including diabetic gastroparesis. In the muscle layers, ICC selectively express Ano1, thought to underlie classical Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) currents. Mice homozygous for Ano1 knock-out exhibit abnormal ICC function and motility. Several transcripts for Ano1 are generated by alternative splicing of four exons. Here, we report expression levels of transcripts encoded by alternative splicing of Ano1 gene in gastric muscles of patients with diabetic gastroparesis and nondiabetic control tissues. Expression of mRNA from two alternatively transcribed exons are significantly different between patients and controls. Furthermore, patients with diabetic gastroparesis express mRNA for a previously unknown variant of Ano1. The 5' end of this novel variant lacks exons 1 and 2 and part of exon 3. Expression of this variant in HEK cells produces a decreased density of Ca(2+)-activated Cl(-) currents that exhibit slower kinetics compared with the full-length Ano1. These results identify important changes in expression and splicing of Ano1 in patients with diabetic gastroparesis that alter the electrophysiological properties of the channel. Changes in Ano1 expression in ICC may directly contribute to diabetic gastroparesis. PMID:21349842

  5. The Characteristics of Heterozygous Protein Truncating Variants in the Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    McLaren, Paul J.; Mohammadi, Pejman; Tardaguila, Manuel; Chaturvedi, Nimisha; Fellay, Jacques; Telenti, Amalio

    2015-01-01

    Sequencing projects have identified large numbers of rare stop-gain and frameshift variants in the human genome. As most of these are observed in the heterozygous state, they test a gene’s tolerance to haploinsufficiency and dominant loss of function. We analyzed the distribution of truncating variants across 16,260 autosomal protein coding genes in 11,546 individuals. We observed 39,893 truncating variants affecting 12,062 genes, which significantly differed from an expectation of 12,916 genes under a model of neutral de novo mutation (p<10−4). Extrapolating this to increasing numbers of sequenced individuals, we estimate that 10.8% of human genes do not tolerate heterozygous truncating variants. An additional 10 to 15% of truncated genes may be rescued by incomplete penetrance or compensatory mutations, or because the truncating variants are of limited functional impact. The study of protein truncating variants delineates the essential genome and, more generally, identifies rare heterozygous variants as an unexplored source of diversity of phenotypic traits and diseases. PMID:26642228

  6. Macro histone variants are critical for the differentiation of human pluripotent cells.

    PubMed

    Barrero, María J; Sese, Borja; Martí, Mercè; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2013-05-31

    We have previously shown that macro histone variants (macroH2A) are expressed at low levels in stem cells and are up-regulated during differentiation. Here we show that the knockdown of macro histone variants impaired the in vitro and in vivo differentiation of human pluripotent cells, likely through defects in the silencing of pluripotency-related genes. ChIP experiments showed that during differentiation macro histone variants are recruited to the regulatory regions of pluripotency and developmental genes marked with H3K27me3 contributing to the silencing of these genes.

  7. Expression of CD44 variants in human inflammatory synovitis

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, L.P.; Haynes, B.F.; McCachren, S.

    1995-11-01

    The cell surface hyaluronate receptor CD44 has previously been shown to have immunomodulatory activity and to be upregulated in inflammatory synovitis. Since these findings were reported, the genomic structure of CD44 has been delineated, and multiple splice variants have been described. Therefore, we determined which CD44 variant exons are present during inflammatory synovitis by a combination of Northern blot analysis and reverse transcription followed by polymerase chain reaction amplification of synovial RNA. Immunohistochemical staining was used to define the sites of expression of individual v6 and v9 exons in synovial tissue. The standard (S) or hematopoietic isoform, CD44S, was the predominant form of CD44 expressed in synovium and was expressed by most cell types. Other isoforms, containing alternatively spliced exons in the proximal extracellular domain, were found by RT-PCR, but at lower levels than CD44S. The second most prevalent form was CD44E, which has an insertion of three exons (v8-v10) in the proximal extracellular domain. Immunohistochemical studies showed that reactivity with v9-specific antibodies was primarily in macrophages, particularly those in the synovial lining layer. CD44 exon v6, previously reported to be important in immune activation and in epithelial tumor metastasis, was also expressed in synovial lining cells and in occasional synovial interstitial cells. The presence of CD44 variants containing v9 in rheumatoid synovial macrophages may be important in the adhesion and activation of mononuclear phagocytes in the synovium and, thus, may be a target for novel antiinflammatory therapies in the future. The role of CD44 isoforms in cellular adhesion, immune activation, and joint erosion in inflammatory synovitis deserves further study. 7 figs., 2 tabs., 56 refs.

  8. Transcriptome Sequencing of a Large Human Family Identifies the Impact of Rare Noncoding Variants

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Battle, Alexis; Karczewski, Konrad J.; Zappala, Zach; Knowles, David A.; Smith, Kevin S.; Kukurba, Kim R.; Wu, Eric; Simon, Noah; Montgomery, Stephen B.

    2014-01-01

    Recent and rapid human population growth has led to an excess of rare genetic variants that are expected to contribute to an individual’s genetic burden of disease risk. To date, much of the focus has been on rare protein-coding variants, for which potential impact can be estimated from the genetic code, but determining the impact of rare noncoding variants has been more challenging. To improve our understanding of such variants, we combined high-quality genome sequencing and RNA sequencing data from a 17-individual, three-generation family to contrast expression quantitative trait loci (eQTLs) and splicing quantitative trait loci (sQTLs) within this family to eQTLs and sQTLs within a population sample. Using this design, we found that eQTLs and sQTLs with large effects in the family were enriched with rare regulatory and splicing variants (minor allele frequency < 0.01). They were also more likely to influence essential genes and genes involved in complex disease. In addition, we tested the capacity of diverse noncoding annotation to predict the impact of rare noncoding variants. We found that distance to the transcription start site, evolutionary constraint, and epigenetic annotation were considerably more informative for predicting the impact of rare variants than for predicting the impact of common variants. These results highlight that rare noncoding variants are important contributors to individual gene-expression profiles and further demonstrate a significant capability for genomic annotation to predict the impact of rare noncoding variants. PMID:25192044

  9. The evolution and functional impact of human deletion variants shared with archaic hominin genomes.

    PubMed

    Lin, Yen-Lung; Pavlidis, Pavlos; Karakoc, Emre; Ajay, Jerry; Gokcumen, Omer

    2015-04-01

    Allele sharing between modern and archaic hominin genomes has been variously interpreted to have originated from ancestral genetic structure or through non-African introgression from archaic hominins. However, evolution of polymorphic human deletions that are shared with archaic hominin genomes has yet to be studied. We identified 427 polymorphic human deletions that are shared with archaic hominin genomes, approximately 87% of which originated before the Human-Neandertal divergence (ancient) and only approximately 9% of which have been introgressed from Neandertals (introgressed). Recurrence, incomplete lineage sorting between human and chimp lineages, and hominid-specific insertions constitute the remaining approximately 4% of allele sharing between humans and archaic hominins. We observed that ancient deletions correspond to more than 13% of all common (>5% allele frequency) deletion variation among modern humans. Our analyses indicate that the genomic landscapes of both ancient and introgressed deletion variants were primarily shaped by purifying selection, eliminating large and exonic variants. We found 17 exonic deletions that are shared with archaic hominin genomes, including those leading to three fusion transcripts. The affected genes are involved in metabolism of external and internal compounds, growth and sperm formation, as well as susceptibility to psoriasis and Crohn's disease. Our analyses suggest that these "exonic" deletion variants have evolved through different adaptive forces, including balancing and population-specific positive selection. Our findings reveal that genomic structural variants that are shared between humans and archaic hominin genomes are common among modern humans and can influence biomedically and evolutionarily important phenotypes.

  10. First Case of Human Rabies in Chile Caused by an Insectivorous Bat Virus Variant

    PubMed Central

    Favi, Myriam; Yung, Verónica; Chala, Evelyn; López, Luis R.

    2002-01-01

    The first human rabies case in Chile since 1972 occurred in March 1996 in a patient without history of known exposure. Antigenic and genetic characterization of the rabies isolate indicated that its reservoir was the insectivorous bat Tadarida brasiliensis. This is the first human rabies case caused by an insectivorous bat rabies virus variant reported in Latin America. PMID:11749754

  11. Identification of Claudin 1 Transcript Variants in Human Invasive Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Zelinski, Teresa; Xie, Jiuyong; Cooper, Steven; Penner, Carla; Leygue, Etienne; Myal, Yvonne

    2016-01-01

    Background The claudin 1 tight junction protein, solely responsible for the barrier function of epithelial cells, is frequently down regulated in invasive human breast cancer. The underlying mechanism is largely unknown, and no obvious mutations in the claudin 1 gene (CLDN1) have been identified to date in breast cancer. Since many genes have been shown to undergo deregulation through splicing and mis-splicing events in cancer, the current study was undertaken to investigate the occurrence of transcript variants for CLDN1 in human invasive breast cancer. Methods RT-PCR analysis of CLDN1 transcripts was conducted on RNA isolated from 12 human invasive breast tumors. The PCR products from each tumor were resolved by agarose gel electrophoresis, cloned and sequenced. Genomic DNA was also isolated from each of the 12 tumors and amplified using PCR CLDN1 specific primers. Sanger sequencing and single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) analyses were conducted. Results A number of CLDN1 transcript variants were identified in these breast tumors. All variants were shorter than the classical CLDN1 transcript. Sequence analysis of the PCR products revealed several splice variants, primarily in exon 1 of CLDN1; resulting in truncated proteins. One variant, V1, resulted in a premature stop codon and thus likely led to nonsense mediated decay. Interestingly, another transcript variant, V2, was not detected in normal breast tissue samples. Further, sequence analysis of the tumor genomic DNA revealed SNPs in 3 of the 4 coding exons, including a rare missense SNP (rs140846629) in exon 2 which represents an Ala124Thr substitution. To our knowledge this is the first report of CLDN1 transcript variants in human invasive breast cancer. These studies suggest that alternate splicing may also be a mechanism by which claudin 1 is down regulated at both the mRNA and protein levels in invasive breast cancer and may provide novel insights into how CLDN1 is reduced or silenced in human breast

  12. Insight into Neutral and Disease-Associated Human Genetic Variants through Interpretable Predictors

    PubMed Central

    van den Berg, Bastiaan A.; Reinders, Marcel J. T.; de Ridder, Dick; de Beer, Tjaart A. P.

    2015-01-01

    A variety of methods that predict human nonsynonymous single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) to be neutral or disease-associated have been developed over the last decade. These methods are used for pinpointing disease-associated variants in the many variants obtained with next-generation sequencing technologies. The high performances of current sequence-based predictors indicate that sequence data contains valuable information about a variant being neutral or disease-associated. However, most predictors do not readily disclose this information, and so it remains unclear what sequence properties are most important. Here, we show how we can obtain insight into sequence characteristics of variants and their surroundings by interpreting predictors. We used an extensive range of features derived from the variant itself, its surrounding sequence, sequence conservation, and sequence annotation, and employed linear support vector machine classifiers to enable extracting feature importance from trained predictors. Our approach is useful for providing additional information about what features are most important for the predictions made. Furthermore, for large sets of known variants, it can provide insight into the mechanisms responsible for variants being disease-associated. PMID:25826299

  13. Inexpensive and Highly Reproducible Cloud-Based Variant Calling of 2,535 Human Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Shringarpure, Suyash S.; Carroll, Andrew; De La Vega, Francisco M.; Bustamante, Carlos D.

    2015-01-01

    Population scale sequencing of whole human genomes is becoming economically feasible; however, data management and analysis remains a formidable challenge for many research groups. Large sequencing studies, like the 1000 Genomes Project, have improved our understanding of human demography and the effect of rare genetic variation in disease. Variant calling on datasets of hundreds or thousands of genomes is time-consuming, expensive, and not easily reproducible given the myriad components of a variant calling pipeline. Here, we describe a cloud-based pipeline for joint variant calling in large samples using the Real Time Genomics population caller. We deployed the population caller on the Amazon cloud with the DNAnexus platform in order to achieve low-cost variant calling. Using our pipeline, we were able to identify 68.3 million variants in 2,535 samples from Phase 3 of the 1000 Genomes Project. By performing the variant calling in a parallel manner, the data was processed within 5 days at a compute cost of $7.33 per sample (a total cost of $18,590 for completed jobs and $21,805 for all jobs). Analysis of cost dependence and running time on the data size suggests that, given near linear scalability, cloud computing can be a cheap and efficient platform for analyzing even larger sequencing studies in the future. PMID:26110529

  14. A high-quality human reference panel reveals the complexity and distribution of genomic structural variants

    PubMed Central

    Hehir-Kwa, Jayne Y.; Marschall, Tobias; Kloosterman, Wigard P.; Francioli, Laurent C.; Baaijens, Jasmijn A.; Dijkstra, Louis J.; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Koval, Vyacheslav; Thung, Djie Tjwan; Wardenaar, René; Renkens, Ivo; Coe, Bradley P.; Deelen, Patrick; de Ligt, Joep; Lameijer, Eric-Wubbo; van Dijk, Freerk; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Bovenberg, Jasper A.; de Craen, Anton J. M.; Beekman, Marian; Hofman, Albert; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce; Platteel, Mathieu; Du, Yuanping; Chen, Ruoyan; Cao, Hongzhi; Cao, Rui; Sun, Yushen; Cao, Jeremy Sujie; Neerincx, Pieter B. T.; Dijkstra, Martijn; Byelas, George; Kanterakis, Alexandros; Bot, Jan; Vermaat, Martijn; Laros, Jeroen F. J.; den Dunnen, Johan T.; de Knijff, Peter; Karssen, Lennart C.; van Leeuwen, Elisa M.; Amin, Najaf; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Estrada, Karol; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Kattenberg, V. Mathijs; van Enckevort, David; Mei, Hailiang; Santcroos, Mark; van Schaik, Barbera D. C.; Handsaker, Robert E.; McCarroll, Steven A.; Ko, Arthur; Sudmant, Peter; Nijman, Isaac J.; Uitterlinden, André G.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Eichler, Evan E.; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Swertz, Morris A.; Wijmenga, Cisca; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B.; Slagboom, P. Eline; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Schönhuth, Alexander; Ye, Kai; Guryev, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Structural variation (SV) represents a major source of differences between individual human genomes and has been linked to disease phenotypes. However, the majority of studies provide neither a global view of the full spectrum of these variants nor integrate them into reference panels of genetic variation. Here, we analyse whole genome sequencing data of 769 individuals from 250 Dutch families, and provide a haplotype-resolved map of 1.9 million genome variants across 9 different variant classes, including novel forms of complex indels, and retrotransposition-mediated insertions of mobile elements and processed RNAs. A large proportion are previously under reported variants sized between 21 and 100 bp. We detect 4 megabases of novel sequence, encoding 11 new transcripts. Finally, we show 191 known, trait-associated SNPs to be in strong linkage disequilibrium with SVs and demonstrate that our panel facilitates accurate imputation of SVs in unrelated individuals. PMID:27708267

  15. Genome Annotation by Shotgun Inactivation of a Native Gene in Hemizygous Cells: Application to BRCA2 with Implication of Hypomorphic Variants

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Soma; Bhunia, Anil K.; Paun, Bogdan C.; Gilbert, Samuel F.; Dhru, Urmil; Patel, Kalpesh; Kern, Scott E.

    2015-01-01

    The greatest interpretive challenge of modern medicine may be to functionally annotate the vast variation of human genomes. Demonstrating a proposed approach, we created a library of BRCA2 exon 27 shotgun-mutant plasmids including solitary and multiplex mutations to generate human knockin clones using homologous recombination. This 55-mutation, 13-clone syngeneic variance library (SyVaL) comprised severely affected clones having early-stop nonsense mutations, functionally hypomorphic clones having multiple missense mutations emphasizing the potential to identify and assess hypomorphic mutations in novel proteomic and epidemiologic studies, and neutral clones having multiple missense mutations. Efficient coverage of nonessential amino acids was provided by mutation multiplexing. Severe mutations were distinguished from hypomorphic or neutral changes by chemosensitivity assays (hypersensitivity to mitomycin C and acetaldehyde), by analysis of RAD51 focus formation, and by mitotic multipolarity. A multiplex unbiased approach of generating all-human SyVaLs in medically important genes, with random mutations in native genes, would provide databases of variants that could be functionally annotated without concerns arising from exogenous cDNA constructs or interspecies interactions, as a basis for subsequent proteomic domain mapping or clinical calibration if desired. Such gene-irrelevant approaches could be scaled up for multiple genes of clinical interest, providing distributable cellular libraries linked to public-shared functional databases. PMID:25451944

  16. Multiple loss-of-function variants of taste receptors in modern humans.

    PubMed

    Fujikura, Kohei

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the knowledge of interindividual taste differences, the underlying genetic backgrounds have remained to be fully elucidated. Much of the taste variation among different mammalian species can be explained by pseudogenization of taste receptors. Here I investigated whether the most recent disruptions of taste receptor genes segregate with their intact forms in modern humans by analyzing 14 ethnically diverse populations. The results revealed an unprecedented prevalence of 25 segregating loss-of-function (LoF) taste receptor variants, identifying one of the most pronounced cases of functional population diversity in the human genome. LoF variant frequency in taste receptors (2.10%) was considerably higher than the overall LoF frequency in human genome (0.16%). In particular, molecular evolutionary rates of candidate sour (14.7%) and bitter (1.8%) receptors were far higher in humans than those of sweet (0.02%), salty (0.05%), and umami (0.17%) receptors compared with other carnivorous mammals, although not all of the taste receptors were identified. Many LoF variants are population-specific, some of which arose even after population differentiation, not before divergence of the modern and archaic human. I conclude that modern humans might have been losing some sour and bitter receptor genes because of high-frequency LoF variants. PMID:26307445

  17. Multiple loss-of-function variants of taste receptors in modern humans

    PubMed Central

    Fujikura, K.

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the knowledge of interindividual taste differences, the underlying genetic backgrounds have remained to be fully elucidated. Much of the taste variation among different mammalian species can be explained by pseudogenization of taste receptors. Here I investigated whether the most recent disruptions of taste receptor genes segregate with their intact forms in modern humans by analyzing 14 ethnically diverse populations. The results revealed an unprecedented prevalence of 25 segregating loss-of-function (LoF) taste receptor variants, identifying one of the most pronounced cases of functional population diversity in the human genome. LoF variant frequency in taste receptors (2.10%) was considerably higher than the overall LoF frequency in human genome (0.16%). In particular, molecular evolutionary rates of candidate sour (14.7%) and bitter (1.8%) receptors were far higher in humans than those of sweet (0.02%), salty (0.05%), and umami (0.17%) receptors compared with other carnivorous mammals, although not all of the taste receptors were identified. Many LoF variants are population-specific, some of which arose even after population differentiation, not before divergence of the modern and archaic human. I conclude that modern humans might have been losing some sour and bitter receptor genes because of high-frequency LoF variants. PMID:26307445

  18. Patterns and functional implications of rare germline variants across 12 cancer types

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Charles; Xie, Mingchao; Wendl, Michael C.; Wang, Jiayin; McLellan, Michael D.; Leiserson, Mark D. M.; Huang, Kuan-lin; Wyczalkowski, Matthew A.; Jayasinghe, Reyka; Banerjee, Tapahsama; Ning, Jie; Tripathi, Piyush; Zhang, Qunyuan; Niu, Beifang; Ye, Kai; Schmidt, Heather K.; Fulton, Robert S.; McMichael, Joshua F.; Batra, Prag; Kandoth, Cyriac; Bharadwaj, Maheetha; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Miller, Christopher A.; Kanchi, Krishna L.; Eldred, James M.; Larson, David E.; Welch, John S.; You, Ming; Ozenberger, Bradley A.; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Walter, Matthew J.; Ellis, Matthew J.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Graubert, Timothy A.; Dipersio, John F.; Ley, Timothy J.; Wilson, Richard K.; Goodfellow, Paul J.; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Chen, Feng; Johnson, Kimberly J.; Parvin, Jeffrey D.; Ding, Li

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale cancer sequencing data enable discovery of rare germline cancer susceptibility variants. Here we systematically analyse 4,034 cases from The Cancer Genome Atlas cancer cases representing 12 cancer types. We find that the frequency of rare germline truncations in 114 cancer-susceptibility-associated genes varies widely, from 4% (acute myeloid leukaemia (AML)) to 19% (ovarian cancer), with a notably high frequency of 11% in stomach cancer. Burden testing identifies 13 cancer genes with significant enrichment of rare truncations, some associated with specific cancers (for example, RAD51C, PALB2 and MSH6 in AML, stomach and endometrial cancers, respectively). Significant, tumour-specific loss of heterozygosity occurs in nine genes (ATM, BAP1, BRCA1/2, BRIP1, FANCM, PALB2 and RAD51C/D). Moreover, our homology-directed repair assay of 68 BRCA1 rare missense variants supports the utility of allelic enrichment analysis for characterizing variants of unknown significance. The scale of this analysis and the somatic-germline integration enable the detection of rare variants that may affect individual susceptibility to tumour development, a critical step toward precision medicine. PMID:26689913

  19. Patterns and functional implications of rare germline variants across 12 cancer types.

    PubMed

    Lu, Charles; Xie, Mingchao; Wendl, Michael C; Wang, Jiayin; McLellan, Michael D; Leiserson, Mark D M; Huang, Kuan-Lin; Wyczalkowski, Matthew A; Jayasinghe, Reyka; Banerjee, Tapahsama; Ning, Jie; Tripathi, Piyush; Zhang, Qunyuan; Niu, Beifang; Ye, Kai; Schmidt, Heather K; Fulton, Robert S; McMichael, Joshua F; Batra, Prag; Kandoth, Cyriac; Bharadwaj, Maheetha; Koboldt, Daniel C; Miller, Christopher A; Kanchi, Krishna L; Eldred, James M; Larson, David E; Welch, John S; You, Ming; Ozenberger, Bradley A; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Walter, Matthew J; Ellis, Matthew J; Mardis, Elaine R; Graubert, Timothy A; Dipersio, John F; Ley, Timothy J; Wilson, Richard K; Goodfellow, Paul J; Raphael, Benjamin J; Chen, Feng; Johnson, Kimberly J; Parvin, Jeffrey D; Ding, Li

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale cancer sequencing data enable discovery of rare germline cancer susceptibility variants. Here we systematically analyse 4,034 cases from The Cancer Genome Atlas cancer cases representing 12 cancer types. We find that the frequency of rare germline truncations in 114 cancer-susceptibility-associated genes varies widely, from 4% (acute myeloid leukaemia (AML)) to 19% (ovarian cancer), with a notably high frequency of 11% in stomach cancer. Burden testing identifies 13 cancer genes with significant enrichment of rare truncations, some associated with specific cancers (for example, RAD51C, PALB2 and MSH6 in AML, stomach and endometrial cancers, respectively). Significant, tumour-specific loss of heterozygosity occurs in nine genes (ATM, BAP1, BRCA1/2, BRIP1, FANCM, PALB2 and RAD51C/D). Moreover, our homology-directed repair assay of 68 BRCA1 rare missense variants supports the utility of allelic enrichment analysis for characterizing variants of unknown significance. The scale of this analysis and the somatic-germline integration enable the detection of rare variants that may affect individual susceptibility to tumour development, a critical step toward precision medicine. PMID:26689913

  20. Expression of splice variants of mts1 gene in normal and neoplastic human tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Ambartsumyan, N.S. |; Grigorian, M.S.; Lukanidin, E.M.

    1995-09-01

    Data on cloning of cDNA corresponding to human mts1 gene transcripts are presented. By comparing nucleotide sequences of the genomic DNA clone and cDNA of mts1, it was shown that human osteosarcoma OHS cells contain two alternative splice variants of mts1 transcripts. Alternative splicing occurs in the 5{prime}-untranslated region of the mts1 pre-mRNA. Both splice variants, hu-mts1 and hu-mts1(var), demonstrate similar stability in the cells, and each contains one open reading frame for the MTS1 protein. However, the two types of transcripts are translated with different effectiveness. The level of transcription of mts1 splice variants in different normal and neoplastic tissues and cell lines varies significantly. The role of alternative splicing as the mechanism responsible for posttranscriptional regulation of mts1 gene expression is discussed. 31 refs., 5 figs.

  1. Modeling of protein-anion exchange resin interaction for the human growth hormone charge variants.

    PubMed

    Lapelosa, Mauro; Patapoff, Thomas W; Zarraga, Isidro E

    2015-12-01

    Modeling ion exchange chromatography (IEC) behavior has generated significant interest because of the wide use of IEC as an analytical technique as well as a preparative protein purification process; indeed there is a need for better understanding of what drives the unique behavior of protein charge variants. We hypothesize that a complex protein molecule, which contains both hydrophobic and charged moieties, would interact strongly with an in silico designed resin through charged electrostatic patches on the surface of the protein. In the present work, variants of recombinant human growth hormone that mimic naturally-occurring deamidation products were produced and characterized in silico. The study included these four variants: rhGH, N149D, N152D, and N149D/N152D. Poisson-Boltzmann calculations were used to determine surface electrostatic potential. Metropolis Monte Carlo simulations were carried out with the resulting variants to simulate IEC systems, examining the free energy of the interaction of the protein with an in silico anion exchange column represented by polylysine polypeptide. The results show that the charge variants have different average binding energies and the free energy of interaction can be used to predict the retention time for the different variants.

  2. Human Apolipoprotein A-I Natural Variants: Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Amyloidogenic Propensity

    PubMed Central

    Ramella, Nahuel A.; Schinella, Guillermo R.; Ferreira, Sergio T.; Prieto, Eduardo D.; Vela, María E.; Ríos, José Luis

    2012-01-01

    Human apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I)-derived amyloidosis can present with either wild-type (Wt) protein deposits in atherosclerotic plaques or as a hereditary form in which apoA-I variants deposit causing multiple organ failure. More than 15 single amino acid replacement amyloidogenic apoA-I variants have been described, but the molecular mechanisms involved in amyloid-associated pathology remain largely unknown. Here, we have investigated by fluorescence and biochemical approaches the stabilities and propensities to aggregate of two disease-associated apoA-I variants, apoA-IGly26Arg, associated with polyneuropathy and kidney dysfunction, and apoA-ILys107-0, implicated in amyloidosis in severe atherosclerosis. Results showed that both variants share common structural properties including decreased stability compared to Wt apoA-I and a more flexible structure that gives rise to formation of partially folded states. Interestingly, however, distinct features appear to determine their pathogenic mechanisms. ApoA-ILys107-0 has an increased propensity to aggregate at physiological pH and in a pro-inflammatory microenvironment than Wt apoA-I, whereas apoA-IGly26Arg elicited macrophage activation, thus stimulating local chronic inflammation. Our results strongly suggest that some natural mutations in apoA-I variants elicit protein tendency to aggregate, but in addition the specific interaction of different variants with macrophages may contribute to cellular stress and toxicity in hereditary amyloidosis. PMID:22952757

  3. Human longevity is influenced by many genetic variants: evidence from 75,000 UK Biobank participants

    PubMed Central

    Pilling, Luke C.; Atkins, Janice L.; Bowman, Kirsty; Jones, Samuel E.; Tyrrell, Jessica; Beaumont, Robin N.; Ruth, Katherine S.; Tuke, Marcus A.; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Wood, Andrew R.; Freathy, Rachel M.; Murray, Anna; Weedon, Michael N.; Xue, Luting; Lunetta, Kathryn; Murabito, Joanne M.; Harries, Lorna W.; Robine, Jean-Marie; Brayne, Carol; Kuchel, George A.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Frayling, Timothy M.; Melzer, David

    2016-01-01

    Variation in human lifespan is 20 to 30% heritable in twins but few genetic variants have been identified. We undertook a Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS) using age at death of parents of middle-aged UK Biobank participants of European decent (n=75,244 with father's and/or mother's data, excluding early deaths). Genetic risk scores for 19 phenotypes (n=777 proven variants) were also tested. In GWAS, a nicotine receptor locus (CHRNA3, previously associated with increased smoking and lung cancer) was associated with fathers' survival. Less common variants requiring further confirmation were also identified. Offspring of longer lived parents had more protective alleles for coronary artery disease, systolic blood pressure, body mass index, cholesterol and triglyceride levels, type-1 diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease and Alzheimer's disease. In candidate analyses, variants in the TOMM40/APOE locus were associated with longevity, but FOXO variants were not. Associations between extreme longevity (mother >=98 years, fathers >=95 years, n=1,339) and disease alleles were similar, with an additional association with HDL cholesterol (p=5.7×10-3). These results support a multiple protective factors model influencing lifespan and longevity (top 1% survival) in humans, with prominent roles for cardiovascular-related pathways. Several of these genetically influenced risks, including blood pressure and tobacco exposure, are potentially modifiable. PMID:27015805

  4. Human longevity is influenced by many genetic variants: evidence from 75,000 UK Biobank participants.

    PubMed

    Pilling, Luke C; Atkins, Janice L; Bowman, Kirsty; Jones, Samuel E; Tyrrell, Jessica; Beaumont, Robin N; Ruth, Katherine S; Tuke, Marcus A; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Wood, Andrew R; Freathy, Rachel M; Murray, Anna; Weedon, Michael N; Xue, Luting; Lunetta, Kathryn; Murabito, Joanne M; Harries, Lorna W; Robine, Jean-Marie; Brayne, Carol; Kuchel, George A; Ferrucci, Luigi; Frayling, Timothy M; Melzer, David

    2016-03-01

    Variation in human lifespan is 20 to 30% heritable in twins but few genetic variants have been identified. We undertook a Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS) using age at death of parents of middle-aged UK Biobank participants of European decent (n=75,244 with father's and/or mother's data, excluding early deaths). Genetic risk scores for 19 phenotypes (n=777 proven variants) were also tested. In GWAS, a nicotine receptor locus(CHRNA3, previously associated with increased smoking and lung cancer) was associated with fathers' survival. Less common variants requiring further confirmation were also identified. Offspring of longer lived parents had more protective alleles for coronary artery disease, systolic blood pressure, body mass index, cholesterol and triglyceride levels, type-1 diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease and Alzheimer's disease. In candidate analyses, variants in the TOMM40/APOE locus were associated with longevity, but FOXO variants were not. Associations between extreme longevity (mother >=98 years, fathers >=95 years, n=1,339) and disease alleles were similar, with an additional association with HDL cholesterol (p=5.7x10-3). These results support a multiple protective factors model influencing lifespan and longevity (top 1% survival) in humans, with prominent roles for cardiovascular-related pathways. Several of these genetically influenced risks, including blood pressure and tobacco exposure, are potentially modifiable. PMID:27015805

  5. Evolution and classification of oncogenic human papillomavirus types and variants associated with cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zigui; de Freitas, Luciana Bueno; Burk, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    The nomenclature of human papillomavirus (HPV) is established by the International Committee on Taxonomy of Virus (ICTV). However, the ICTV does not set standards for HPV below species levels. This chapter describes detailed genotyping methods for determining and classifying HPV variants. PMID:25348294

  6. FTO Obesity Variant Circuitry and Adipocyte Browning in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Claussnitzer, Melina; Dankel, Simon N.; Kim, Kyoung-Han; Quon, Gerald; Meuleman, Wouter; Haugen, Christine; Glunk, Viktoria; Sousa, Isabel S.; Beaudry, Jacqueline L.; Puviindran, Vijitha; Abdennur, Nezar A.; Liu, Jannel; Svensson, Per-Arne; Hsu, Yi-Hsiang; Drucker, Daniel J.; Mellgren, Gunnar; Hui, Chi-Chung; Hauner, Hans; Kellis, Manolis

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND Genomewide association studies can be used to identify disease-relevant genomic regions, but interpretation of the data is challenging. The FTO region harbors the strongest genetic association with obesity, yet the mechanistic basis of this association remains elusive. METHODS We examined epigenomic data, allelic activity, motif conservation, regulator expression, and gene coexpression patterns, with the aim of dissecting the regulatory circuitry and mechanistic basis of the association between the FTO region and obesity. We validated our predictions with the use of directed perturbations in samples from patients and from mice and with endogenous CRISPR–Cas9 genome editing in samples from patients. RESULTS Our data indicate that the FTO allele associated with obesity represses mitochondrial thermogenesis in adipocyte precursor cells in a tissue-autonomous manner. The rs1421085 T-to-C single-nucleotide variant disrupts a conserved motif for the ARID5B repressor, which leads to derepression of a potent preadipocyte enhancer and a doubling of IRX3 and IRX5 expression during early adipocyte differentiation. This results in a cell-autonomous developmental shift from energy-dissipating beige (brite) adipocytes to energy-storing white adipocytes, with a reduction in mitochondrial thermogenesis by a factor of 5, as well as an increase in lipid storage. Inhibition of Irx3 in adipose tissue in mice reduced body weight and increased energy dissipation without a change in physical activity or appetite. Knockdown of IRX3 or IRX5 in primary adipocytes from participants with the risk allele restored thermogenesis, increasing it by a factor of 7, and overexpression of these genes had the opposite effect in adipocytes from nonrisk-allele carriers. Repair of the ARID5B motif by CRISPR–Cas9 editing of rs1421085 in primary adipocytes from a patient with the risk allele restored IRX3 and IRX5 repression, activated browning expression programs, and restored thermogenesis

  7. Variant human phosphoribosylpyrophosphate synthetase altered in regulatory and catalytic functions.

    PubMed Central

    Becker, M A; Raivio, K O; Bakay, B; Adams, W B; Nyhan, W L

    1980-01-01

    An inherited, structurally abnormal and superactive form of the enzyme 5-phosphoribosyl 1-pyrophosphate (PP-ribose-P) synthetase (EC 2.7.6.1) has been characterized in fibroblasts cultured from a 14-yr-old male (S.M.) with clinical manifestations of uric acid overproduction present since infancy. PP-ribose-P synthetase from the cells of this child showed four- to fivefold greater than normal resistance to purine nucleotide (ADP and GDP) feedback inhibition of enzyme activity and hyperbolic rather than sigmoidal inorganic phosphate (Pi) activation in incompletely dialyzed extracts. Excessive maximal velocity of the enzyme reaction catalyzed by the mutant enzyme was indicated by: enzyme activities twice those of normal at all concentrations of Pi in chromatographed fibroblast extracts; normal affinity constants for substrates and for the activator, Mg2+; and twofold greater than normal activity per immunoreactive enzyme molecule. The mutant enzyme thus possessed deficient regulatory and superactive catalytic properties, two mechanisms previously demonstrated individually to underlie the excessive PPRribose-P and uric acid synthesis of affected members of families with superactive PP-ribose-P synthetases. Increased PP-ribose-P concentration (4-fold) and generation (2.7-fold) and enhanced rates of PP-ribose-P dependent purine synthetic reactions, including purine synthesis de novo, in S.M. fibroblasts confirmed the functional significance of this patient's mutant enzyme. Diminished stability of the variant PP-ribose-P synthetase was manifested in vitro by increased thermal lability and in vivo by deficiency of enzyme activity at Pi concentrations greater than 0.3 mM in hemolysates and by an accelerated, age-related decrement in enzyme activity in lysates of erythrocytes separated by specific density. Despite the diminished amount of PP-ribose-P synthetase in the S.M. erythrocyte population, S.M. erythrocytes had increased PP-ribose-P concentration and increased rates

  8. Plasma proteomics, the Human Proteome Project, and cancer-associated alternative splice variant proteins.

    PubMed

    Omenn, Gilbert S

    2014-05-01

    This article addresses three inter-related subjects: the development of the Human Plasma Proteome Peptide Atlas, the launch of the Human Proteome Project, and the emergence of alternative splice variant transcripts and proteins as important features of evolution and pathogenesis. The current Plasma Peptide Atlas provides evidence on which peptides have been detected for every protein confidently identified in plasma; there are links to their spectra and their estimated abundance, facilitating the planning of targeted proteomics for biomarker studies. The Human Proteome Project (HPP) combines a chromosome-centric C-HPP with a biology and disease-driven B/D-HPP, upon a foundation of mass spectrometry, antibody, and knowledgebase resource pillars. The HPP aims to identify the approximately 7000 "missing proteins" and to characterize all proteins and their many isoforms. Success will enable the larger research community to utilize newly-available peptides, spectra, informative MS transitions, and databases for targeted analyses of priority proteins for each organ and disease. Among the isoforms of proteins, splice variants have the special feature of greatly enlarging protein diversity without enlarging the genome; evidence is accumulating of striking differential expression of splice variants in cancers. In this era of RNA-sequencing and advanced mass spectrometry, it is no longer sufficient to speak simply of increased or decreased expression of genes or proteins without carefully examining the splice variants in the protein mixture produced from each multi-exon gene. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biomarkers: A Proteomic Challenge.

  9. On human disease-causing amino acid variants: statistical study of sequence and structural patterns

    PubMed Central

    Alexov, Emil

    2015-01-01

    Statistical analysis was carried out on large set of naturally occurring human amino acid variations and it was demonstrated that there is a preference for some amino acid substitutions to be associated with diseases. At an amino acid sequence level, it was shown that the disease-causing variants frequently involve drastic changes of amino acid physico-chemical properties of proteins such as charge, hydrophobicity and geometry. Structural analysis of variants involved in diseases and being frequently observed in human population showed similar trends: disease-causing variants tend to cause more changes of hydrogen bond network and salt bridges as compared with harmless amino acid mutations. Analysis of thermodynamics data reported in literature, both experimental and computational, indicated that disease-causing variants tend to destabilize proteins and their interactions, which prompted us to investigate the effects of amino acid mutations on large databases of experimentally measured energy changes in unrelated proteins. Although the experimental datasets were linked neither to diseases nor exclusory to human proteins, the observed trends were the same: amino acid mutations tend to destabilize proteins and their interactions. Having in mind that structural and thermodynamics properties are interrelated, it is pointed out that any large change of any of them is anticipated to cause a disease. PMID:25689729

  10. The Evolution and Functional Impact of Human Deletion Variants Shared with Archaic Hominin Genomes

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Yen-Lung; Pavlidis, Pavlos; Karakoc, Emre; Ajay, Jerry; Gokcumen, Omer

    2015-01-01

    Allele sharing between modern and archaic hominin genomes has been variously interpreted to have originated from ancestral genetic structure or through non-African introgression from archaic hominins. However, evolution of polymorphic human deletions that are shared with archaic hominin genomes has yet to be studied. We identified 427 polymorphic human deletions that are shared with archaic hominin genomes, approximately 87% of which originated before the Human–Neandertal divergence (ancient) and only approximately 9% of which have been introgressed from Neandertals (introgressed). Recurrence, incomplete lineage sorting between human and chimp lineages, and hominid-specific insertions constitute the remaining approximately 4% of allele sharing between humans and archaic hominins. We observed that ancient deletions correspond to more than 13% of all common (>5% allele frequency) deletion variation among modern humans. Our analyses indicate that the genomic landscapes of both ancient and introgressed deletion variants were primarily shaped by purifying selection, eliminating large and exonic variants. We found 17 exonic deletions that are shared with archaic hominin genomes, including those leading to three fusion transcripts. The affected genes are involved in metabolism of external and internal compounds, growth and sperm formation, as well as susceptibility to psoriasis and Crohn’s disease. Our analyses suggest that these “exonic” deletion variants have evolved through different adaptive forces, including balancing and population-specific positive selection. Our findings reveal that genomic structural variants that are shared between humans and archaic hominin genomes are common among modern humans and can influence biomedically and evolutionarily important phenotypes. PMID:25556237

  11. Human selenophosphate synthetase 1 has five splice variants with unique interactions, subcellular localizations and expression patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jin Young; Lee, Kwang Hee; Shim, Myoung Sup; Shin, Hyein; Xu, Xue-Ming; Carlson, Bradley A.; Hatfield, Dolph L.; Lee, Byeong Jae

    2010-06-18

    Selenophosphate synthetase 1 (SPS1) is an essential cellular gene in higher eukaryotes. Five alternative splice variants of human SPS1 (major type, {Delta}E2, {Delta}E8, +E9, +E9a) were identified wherein +E9 and +E9a make the same protein. The major type was localized in both the nuclear and plasma membranes, and the others in the cytoplasm. All variants form homodimers, and in addition, the major type forms a heterodimer with {Delta}E2, and {Delta}E8 with +E9. The level of expression of each splice variant was different in various cell lines. The expression of each alternative splice variant was regulated during the cell cycle. The levels of the major type and {Delta}E8 were gradually increased until G2/M phase and then gradually decreased. {Delta}E2 expression peaked at mid-S phase and then gradually decreased. However, +E9/+E9a expression decreased gradually after cell cycle arrest. The possible involvement of SPS1 splice variants in cell cycle regulation is discussed.

  12. Antigenic Relatedness of Norovirus GII.4 Variants Determined by Human Challenge Sera

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Ying-Chun; Zhang, Xu-Fu; Xia, Ming; Tan, Ming; Quigley, Christina; Lei, Wen; Fang, Hao; Zhong, Weiming; Lee, Bonita; Pang, Xiaoli; Nie, Jun; Jiang, Xi

    2015-01-01

    The GII.4 noroviruses (NoVs) are a single genotype that is responsible for over 50% of NoV gastroenteritis epidemics worldwide. However, GII.4 NoVs have been found to undergo antigenic drifts, likely selected by host herd immunity, which raises an issue for vaccine strategies against NoVs. We previously characterized GII.4 NoV antigenic variations and found significant levels of antigenic relatedness among different GII.4 variants. Further characterization of the genetic and antigenic relatedness of recent GII.4 variants (2008b and 2010 cluster) was performed in this study. The amino acid sequences of the receptor binding interfaces were highly conserved among all GII.4 variants from the past two decades. Using serum samples from patients enrolled in a GII.4 virus challenge study, significant cross-reactivity between major GII.4 variants from 1998 to 2012 was observed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and HBGA receptor blocking assays. The overall abilities of GII.4 NoVs to bind to the A/B/H HBGAs were maintained while their binding affinities to individual ABH antigens varied. These results highlight the importance of human HBGAs in NoV evolution and how conserved antigenic types impact vaccine development against GII.4 variants. PMID:25915764

  13. Impact of Interacting Functional Variants in COMT on Regional Gray Matter Volume in Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Honea, Robyn; Verchinski, Beth A.; Pezawas, Lukas; Kolachana, Bhaskar S.; Callicott, Joseph H.; Mattay, Venkata S.; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Background Functional variants in the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene have been shown to impact cognitive function, cortical physiology and risk for schizophrenia. A recent study showed that previously reported effects of the functional val158met SNP (rs4680) on brain function are modified by other functional SNPs and haplotypes in the gene, though it was unknown if these effects are also seen in brain structure. Methods We used voxel-based morphometry to investigate the impact of multiple functional variants in COMT on gray matter volume in a large group of 151 healthy volunteers from the CBDB/NIMH Genetic Study of Schizophrenia. Results We found that the previously described rs4680 val risk variant affects hippocampal and dorsolateral prefrontal (DLPFC) gray matter volume. In addition, we found that this SNP interacts with a variant in the P2 promoter region (rs2097603) in predicting changes in hippocampal gray matter volume consistent with a nonlinear effect of extracellular dopamine. Conclusions We report evidence that interacting functional variants in COMT affect gray matter regional volume in hippocampus and DLPFC, providing further in vivo validation of the biological impact of complex genetic variation in COMT on neural systems relevant for the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and extending observations of nonlinear dependence of prefrontal neurons on extracellular dopamine to the domain of human brain structure. PMID:19071221

  14. SMaSH: a benchmarking toolkit for human genome variant calling

    PubMed Central

    Talwalkar, Ameet; Liptrap, Jesse; Newcomb, Julie; Hartl, Christopher; Terhorst, Jonathan; Curtis, Kristal; Bresler, Ma’ayan; Song, Yun S.; Jordan, Michael I.; Patterson, David

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Computational methods are essential to extract actionable information from raw sequencing data, and to thus fulfill the promise of next-generation sequencing technology. Unfortunately, computational tools developed to call variants from human sequencing data disagree on many of their predictions, and current methods to evaluate accuracy and computational performance are ad hoc and incomplete. Agreement on benchmarking variant calling methods would stimulate development of genomic processing tools and facilitate communication among researchers. Results: We propose SMaSH, a benchmarking methodology for evaluating germline variant calling algorithms. We generate synthetic datasets, organize and interpret a wide range of existing benchmarking data for real genomes and propose a set of accuracy and computational performance metrics for evaluating variant calling methods on these benchmarking data. Moreover, we illustrate the utility of SMaSH to evaluate the performance of some leading single-nucleotide polymorphism, indel and structural variant calling algorithms. Availability and implementation: We provide free and open access online to the SMaSH tool kit, along with detailed documentation, at smash.cs.berkeley.edu Contact: ameet@cs.berkeley.edu or pattrsn@cs.berkeley.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24894505

  15. SCN5A variant that blocks fibroblast growth factor homologous factor regulation causes human arrhythmia

    PubMed Central

    Musa, Hassan; Kline, Crystal F.; Sturm, Amy C.; Murphy, Nathaniel; Adelman, Sara; Wang, Chaojian; Yan, Haidun; Johnson, Benjamin L.; Csepe, Thomas A.; Kilic, Ahmet; Higgins, Robert S. D.; Janssen, Paul M. L.; Fedorov, Vadim V.; Weiss, Raul; Salazar, Christina; Hund, Thomas J.; Pitt, Geoffrey S.; Mohler, Peter J.

    2015-01-01

    Nav channels are essential for metazoan membrane depolarization, and Nav channel dysfunction is directly linked with epilepsy, ataxia, pain, arrhythmia, myotonia, and irritable bowel syndrome. Human Nav channelopathies are primarily caused by variants that directly affect Nav channel permeability or gating. However, a new class of human Nav channelopathies has emerged based on channel variants that alter regulation by intracellular signaling or cytoskeletal proteins. Fibroblast growth factor homologous factors (FHFs) are a family of intracellular signaling proteins linked with Nav channel regulation in neurons and myocytes. However, to date, there is surprisingly little evidence linking Nav channel gene variants with FHFs and human disease. Here, we provide, to our knowledge, the first evidence that mutations in SCN5A (encodes primary cardiac Nav channel Nav1.5) that alter FHF binding result in human cardiovascular disease. We describe a five*generation kindred with a history of atrial and ventricular arrhythmias, cardiac arrest, and sudden cardiac death. Affected family members harbor a novel SCN5A variant resulting in p.H1849R. p.H1849R is localized in the central binding core on Nav1.5 for FHFs. Consistent with these data, Nav1.5 p.H1849R affected interaction with FHFs. Further, electrophysiological analysis identified Nav1.5 p.H1849R as a gain-of-function for INa by altering steady-state inactivation and slowing the rate of Nav1.5 inactivation. In line with these data and consistent with human cardiac phenotypes, myocytes expressing Nav1.5 p.H1849R displayed prolonged action potential duration and arrhythmogenic afterdepolarizations. Together, these findings identify a previously unexplored mechanism for human Nav channelopathy based on altered Nav1.5 association with FHF proteins. PMID:26392562

  16. Human keratin 8 variants promote mouse acetaminophen hepatotoxicity coupled with JNK activation and protein adduct formation

    PubMed Central

    Guldiken, Nurdan; Zhou, Qin; Kucukoglu, Ozlem; Rehm, Melanie; Levada, Kateryna; Gross, Annika; Kwan, Raymond; James, Laura P.; Trautwein, Christian; Omary, M. Bishr; Strnad, Pavel

    2015-01-01

    Background and aims Keratins 8 and 18 (K8/K18) are the intermediate filaments proteins of simple-type digestive epithelia, and provide important cytoprotective function. K8/K18 variants predispose humans to chronic liver disease progression and to poor outcomes in acute acetaminophen (APAP)-related liver failure. Given that K8 G62C and R341H/R341C are common K8 variants in European and North American populations, we studied their biological significance using transgenic mice. Methods Mice that overexpress the human K8 variants R341H or R341C were generated and used together with previously described mice that overexpress wild-type (WT) K8 or K8 G62C. Mice were injected with 600 mg/kg APAP, or underwent bile duct ligation (BDL). Livers were evaluated by microarray analysis, quantitative RT-PCR, immunoblotting, histological and immunological staining, and biochemical assays. Results Under basal conditions, the K8 G62C/R341H/R341C variant-expressing mice did not show an obvious liver phenotype or altered keratin filament distribution, while K8 G62C/R341C animals had aberrant disulphide-crosslinked keratins. Animals carrying the K8 variants displayed limited gene expression changes but had lower nicotinamide N-methyl transferase (NNMT) levels and were predisposed to APAP-induced hepatotoxicity. NNMT represents a novel K8/K18-associated protein that becomes upregulated after K8/K18 transfection. The more pronounced liver damage was accompanied by increased and prolonged JNK activation; elevated APAP protein adducts; K8 hyperphosphorylation at S74/S432 with enhanced K8 solubility; and prominent pericentral keratin network disruption. No differences in APAP serum levels, glutathione or ATP levels were noted. BDL resulted in similar liver injury and biliary fibrosis in all mouse genotypes. Conclusion Expression of human K8 variants G62C, R341H, or R341C in mice predisposes to acute acetaminophen hepatotoxicity, thereby providing direct evidence for the importance of these

  17. Human acetyl CoA:arylamine N-acetyltransferase variants generated by random mutagenesis.

    PubMed

    Summerscales, Joanna E; Josephy, P David

    2004-01-01

    Acetyl CoA:arylamine N-acetyltransferase (NAT) enzymes catalyze the N-acetylation of aromatic amines and the O-acetylation of aryl hydroxylamines, reactions that govern the disposition and toxicity of many drugs and carcinogens. The human NAT genes and enzymes NAT1 and NAT2 are highly polymorphic and constitute one of the best studied examples of the genetic control of drug metabolism. Naturally occurring human NAT variants provide limited insight into the relationship between NAT amino acid sequence and enzyme activity. We have shown previously that the expression of recombinant NAT2 in bacterial tester strains results in greatly enhanced sensitivity to mutagenic nitroaromatic compounds (which are reduced to aryl hydroxylamines by bacterial enzymes). We hypothesized that random mutagenesis combined with rapid screening could be used to identify functionally significant amino acid residues in NAT enzymes. Pools of NAT2 variants were generated by polymerase chain reaction-mediated random mutagenesis of the complete coding sequence. Reversion induced by a NAT-dependent mutagen, 3-methyl-2-nitroimidazo[4,5-f]quinoline, was used as the basis for screening these pools to identify variants with altered enzyme activity. Eighteen variants were characterized by quantitative mutagenicity assays and enzyme kinetic measurements. This approach can provide new insight into the biochemistry of enzymes involved in the metabolic activation of mutagens. PMID:14722254

  18. Common variants spanning PLK4 are associated with mitotic-origin aneuploidy in human embryos.

    PubMed

    McCoy, Rajiv C; Demko, Zachary; Ryan, Allison; Banjevic, Milena; Hill, Matthew; Sigurjonsson, Styrmir; Rabinowitz, Matthew; Fraser, Hunter B; Petrov, Dmitri A

    2015-04-10

    Aneuploidy, the inheritance of an atypical chromosome complement, is common in early human development and is the primary cause of pregnancy loss. By screening day-3 embryos during in vitro fertilization cycles, we identified an association between aneuploidy of putative mitotic origin and linked genetic variants on chromosome 4 of maternal genomes. This associated region contains a candidate gene, Polo-like kinase 4 (PLK4), that plays a well-characterized role in centriole duplication and has the ability to alter mitotic fidelity upon minor dysregulation. Mothers with the high-risk genotypes contributed fewer embryos for testing at day 5, suggesting that their embryos are less likely to survive to blastocyst formation. The associated region coincides with a signature of a selective sweep in ancient humans, suggesting that the causal variant was either the target of selection or hitchhiked to substantial frequency.

  19. Human genomics. Effect of predicted protein-truncating genetic variants on the human transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Manuel A; Pirinen, Matti; Conrad, Donald F; Lek, Monkol; Tsang, Emily K; Karczewski, Konrad J; Maller, Julian B; Kukurba, Kimberly R; DeLuca, David S; Fromer, Menachem; Ferreira, Pedro G; Smith, Kevin S; Zhang, Rui; Zhao, Fengmei; Banks, Eric; Poplin, Ryan; Ruderfer, Douglas M; Purcell, Shaun M; Tukiainen, Taru; Minikel, Eric V; Stenson, Peter D; Cooper, David N; Huang, Katharine H; Sullivan, Timothy J; Nedzel, Jared; Bustamante, Carlos D; Li, Jin Billy; Daly, Mark J; Guigo, Roderic; Donnelly, Peter; Ardlie, Kristin; Sammeth, Michael; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T; McCarthy, Mark I; Montgomery, Stephen B; Lappalainen, Tuuli; MacArthur, Daniel G

    2015-05-01

    Accurate prediction of the functional effect of genetic variation is critical for clinical genome interpretation. We systematically characterized the transcriptome effects of protein-truncating variants, a class of variants expected to have profound effects on gene function, using data from the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) and Geuvadis projects. We quantitated tissue-specific and positional effects on nonsense-mediated transcript decay and present an improved predictive model for this decay. We directly measured the effect of variants both proximal and distal to splice junctions. Furthermore, we found that robustness to heterozygous gene inactivation is not due to dosage compensation. Our results illustrate the value of transcriptome data in the functional interpretation of genetic variants. PMID:25954003

  20. A naturally occurring variant of the human prion protein completely prevents prion disease

    PubMed Central

    Asante, Emmanuel A.; Smidak, Michelle; Grimshaw, Andrew; Houghton, Richard; Tomlinson, Andrew; Jeelani, Asif; Jakubcova, Tatiana; Hamdan, Shyma; Richard-Londt, Angela; Linehan, Jacqueline M.; Brandner, Sebastian; Alpers, Michael; Whitfield, Jerome; Mead, Simon; Wadsworth, Jonathan D.F.; Collinge, John

    2015-01-01

    Mammalian prions, transmissible agents causing lethal neurodegenerative diseases, are composed of assemblies of misfolded cellular prion protein (PrP) 1. A novel PrP variant, G127V, was under positive evolutionary selection during the epidemic of kuru, an acquired prion disease epidemic of the Fore population in Papua New Guinea, and appeared to provide strong protection against disease in the heterozygous state2. We have now investigated the protective role of this variant and its interaction with the common worldwide M129V PrP polymorphism; V127 was seen exclusively on a M129 PRNP allele. Here we demonstrate that transgenic mice expressing both variant and wild type human PrP are completely resistant to both kuru and classical CJD prions (which are closely similar) but can be infected with variant CJD prions, a human prion strain resulting from exposure to BSE prions to which the Fore were not exposed. Remarkably however, mice expressing only PrP V127 were completely resistant to all prion strains demonstrating a different molecular mechanism to M129V, which provides its relative protection against classical CJD and kuru in the heterozygous state. Indeed this single amino acid substitution (G→V) at a residue invariant in vertebrate evolution is as protective as deletion of the protein. Further study in transgenic mice expressing different ratios of variant and wild type PrP indicates that not only is PrP V127 completely refractory to prion conversion, but acts as a potent dose-dependent inhibitor of wild type prion propagation. PMID:26061765

  1. Stability and Cu(II) Binding of Prion Protein Variants Related to Inherited Human Prion Diseases

    PubMed Central

    Cereghetti, Grazia M.; Schweiger, Arthur; Glockshuber, Rudi; Van Doorslaer, Sabine

    2003-01-01

    All inherited forms of human prion diseases are linked with mutations in the prion protein (PrP) gene. Here we have investigated the stability and Cu(II) binding properties of three recombinant variants of murine full-length PrP(23–231)-containing destabilizing point mutations that are associated with human Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker disease (F198S), Creutzfeld-Jakob disease (E200K), and fatal familial insomnia (D178N) by electron paramagnetic resonance and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Furthermore, we analyzed the variants H140S, H177S, and H187S of the isolated C-terminal domain of murine PrP, mPrP(121–231), to test a role of the histidine residues in Cu(II) binding. The F198S and E200K variants of PrP(23–231) differed in Cu(II) binding from the wild-type mPrP(23–231). However, circular dichroism spectroscopy indicated that the variants and the wild type did not undergo conformational changes in the presence of Cu(II). The D178N variant showed a high tendency to aggregate at pH 7.4 both with and without Cu(II). At lower pH values, it showed the same Cu(II) binding behavior as the wild type. The analysis allowed for a better location of the Cu(II) binding sites in the C-terminal part of the protein. Our present data indicate that hereditary forms of prion diseases cannot be rationalized on the basis of altered Cu(II) binding or mutation-induced protein destabilization alone. PMID:12609901

  2. A naturally occurring variant of the human prion protein completely prevents prion disease.

    PubMed

    Asante, Emmanuel A; Smidak, Michelle; Grimshaw, Andrew; Houghton, Richard; Tomlinson, Andrew; Jeelani, Asif; Jakubcova, Tatiana; Hamdan, Shyma; Richard-Londt, Angela; Linehan, Jacqueline M; Brandner, Sebastian; Alpers, Michael; Whitfield, Jerome; Mead, Simon; Wadsworth, Jonathan D F; Collinge, John

    2015-06-25

    Mammalian prions, transmissible agents causing lethal neurodegenerative diseases, are composed of assemblies of misfolded cellular prion protein (PrP). A novel PrP variant, G127V, was under positive evolutionary selection during the epidemic of kuru--an acquired prion disease epidemic of the Fore population in Papua New Guinea--and appeared to provide strong protection against disease in the heterozygous state. Here we have investigated the protective role of this variant and its interaction with the common, worldwide M129V PrP polymorphism. V127 was seen exclusively on a M129 PRNP allele. We demonstrate that transgenic mice expressing both variant and wild-type human PrP are completely resistant to both kuru and classical Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) prions (which are closely similar) but can be infected with variant CJD prions, a human prion strain resulting from exposure to bovine spongiform encephalopathy prions to which the Fore were not exposed. Notably, mice expressing only PrP V127 were completely resistant to all prion strains, demonstrating a different molecular mechanism to M129V, which provides its relative protection against classical CJD and kuru in the heterozygous state. Indeed, this single amino acid substitution (G→V) at a residue invariant in vertebrate evolution is as protective as deletion of the protein. Further study in transgenic mice expressing different ratios of variant and wild-type PrP indicates that not only is PrP V127 completely refractory to prion conversion but acts as a potent dose-dependent inhibitor of wild-type prion propagation.

  3. A naturally occurring variant of the human prion protein completely prevents prion disease.

    PubMed

    Asante, Emmanuel A; Smidak, Michelle; Grimshaw, Andrew; Houghton, Richard; Tomlinson, Andrew; Jeelani, Asif; Jakubcova, Tatiana; Hamdan, Shyma; Richard-Londt, Angela; Linehan, Jacqueline M; Brandner, Sebastian; Alpers, Michael; Whitfield, Jerome; Mead, Simon; Wadsworth, Jonathan D F; Collinge, John

    2015-06-25

    Mammalian prions, transmissible agents causing lethal neurodegenerative diseases, are composed of assemblies of misfolded cellular prion protein (PrP). A novel PrP variant, G127V, was under positive evolutionary selection during the epidemic of kuru--an acquired prion disease epidemic of the Fore population in Papua New Guinea--and appeared to provide strong protection against disease in the heterozygous state. Here we have investigated the protective role of this variant and its interaction with the common, worldwide M129V PrP polymorphism. V127 was seen exclusively on a M129 PRNP allele. We demonstrate that transgenic mice expressing both variant and wild-type human PrP are completely resistant to both kuru and classical Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) prions (which are closely similar) but can be infected with variant CJD prions, a human prion strain resulting from exposure to bovine spongiform encephalopathy prions to which the Fore were not exposed. Notably, mice expressing only PrP V127 were completely resistant to all prion strains, demonstrating a different molecular mechanism to M129V, which provides its relative protection against classical CJD and kuru in the heterozygous state. Indeed, this single amino acid substitution (G→V) at a residue invariant in vertebrate evolution is as protective as deletion of the protein. Further study in transgenic mice expressing different ratios of variant and wild-type PrP indicates that not only is PrP V127 completely refractory to prion conversion but acts as a potent dose-dependent inhibitor of wild-type prion propagation. PMID:26061765

  4. Variants selected by treatment of human immunodeficiency virus-infected cells with an immunotoxin

    PubMed Central

    1990-01-01

    An immunotoxin has been made by coupling anti-human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) envelope antibody 907 to ricin A chain (907-RAC). 907 recognizes an epitope within the immunodominant PB-1 loop of gp120. Variant cells were selected by cloning persistently infected H9/human T lymphocyte virus IIIB cells in the presence of the immunotoxin. Clones resistant to 907-RAC arose at a frequency of 0.1-1.0%. Seven clones were selected for intensive analysis. When studied, these clones fell into two distinct groups, members of which appeared to be identical, suggesting that the variation arose before the selection process. In contrast to the parent cells, none of the cloned variants produced infectious HIV. The first set of clones, designated the "E" variants, expressed decreased levels of the HIV envelope on the cell surface. However, levels of intracellular HIV antigens and reverse transcriptase were equal to or greater than that of the parental cell line. Radioimmunoprecipitation demonstrated that the gp160 was truncated to 145 kD (gp120 was normal length), capable of binding to CD4, and, unlike normal gp160, was released in its unprocessed form into the cellular supernatant. Sequence analysis demonstrated that a deletion at codon 687 of the envelope gene resulted in the production of this truncated protein. Ultrastructural analysis of E variants demonstrated some budding forms of virus, but also large numbers of HIV within intracellular vesicles. The second set of variants, the "F" series, produced no HIV antigens, reverse transcriptase, nor was there ultrastructural evidence of virus. However, proviral DNA was present. Virus could not be induced with agents known to activate latent HIV. These cells also lacked cell surface CD4 and could not be infected with HIV. These studies demonstrate that variation in HIV can affect the phenotype of the cells carrying the altered virus, allowing for escape from immunologic destruction. The E variants may serve as prototypes for

  5. Characterization of Primary Isolate-Like Variants of Simian-Human Immunodeficiency Virus

    PubMed Central

    Crawford, John M.; Earl, Patricia L.; Moss, Bernard; Reimann, Keith A.; Wyand, Michael S.; Manson, Kelledy H.; Bilska, Miroslawa; Zhou, Jin Tao; Pauza, C. David; Parren, Paul W. H. I.; Burton, Dennis R.; Sodroski, Joseph G.; Letvin, Norman L.; Montefiori, David C.

    1999-01-01

    Several different strains of simian-human immunodeficiency virus (SHIV) that contain the envelope glycoproteins of either T-cell-line-adapted (TCLA) strains or primary isolates of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) are now available. One of the advantages of these chimeric viruses is their application to studies of HIV-1-specific neutralizing antibodies in preclinical AIDS vaccine studies in nonhuman primates. In this regard, an important consideration is the spectrum of antigenic properties exhibited by the different envelope glycoproteins used for SHIV construction. The antigenic properties of six SHIV variants were characterized here in neutralization assays with recombinant soluble CD4 (rsCD4), monoclonal antibodies, and serum samples from SHIV-infected macaques and HIV-1-infected individuals. Neutralization of SHIV variants HXBc2, KU2, 89.6, and 89.6P by autologous and heterologous sera from SHIV-infected macaques was restricted to an extent that these viruses may be considered heterologous to one another in their major neutralization determinants. Little or no variation was seen in the neutralization determinants on SHIV variants 89.6P, 89.6PD, and SHIV-KB9. Neutralization of SHIV HXBc2 by sera from HXBc2-infected macaques could be blocked with autologous V3-loop peptide; this was less true in the case of SHIV 89.6 and sera from SHIV 89.6-infected macaques. The poorly immunogenic but highly conserved epitope for monoclonal antibody IgG1b12 was a target for neutralization on SHIV variants HXBc2, KU2, and 89.6 but not on 89.6P and KB9. The 2G12 epitope was a target for neutralization on all five SHIV variants. SHIV variants KU2, 89.6, 89.6P, 89.6PD, and KB9 exhibited antigenic properties characteristic of primary isolates by being relatively insensitive to neutralization in peripheral blood mononuclear cells with serum samples from HIV-1-infected individuals and 12-fold to 38-fold less sensitive to inhibition with recombinant soluble CD4 than TCLA

  6. Structure of human nucleosome containing the testis-specific histone variant TSH2B

    SciTech Connect

    Urahama, Takashi; Horikoshi, Naoki; Osakabe, Akihisa; Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2014-03-25

    The crystal structure of human nucleosome containing the testis-specific TSH2B variant has been determined. The TSH2B Ser85 residue does not interact with H4 in the nucleosome, and induces a local structural difference between TSH2B and H2B in nucleosomes. The human histone H2B variant TSH2B is highly expressed in testis and may function in the chromatin transition during spermatogenesis. In the present study, the crystal structure of the human testis-specific nucleosome containing TSH2B was determined at 2.8 Å resolution. A local structural difference between TSH2B and canonical H2B in nucleosomes was detected around the TSH2B-specific amino-acid residue Ser85. The TSH2B Ser85 residue does not interact with H4 in the nucleosome, but in the canonical nucleosome the H2B Asn84 residue (corresponding to the TSH2B Ser85 residue) forms water-mediated hydrogen bonds with the H4 Arg78 residue. In contrast, the other TSH2B-specific amino-acid residues did not induce any significant local structural changes in the TSH2B nucleosome. These findings may provide important information for understanding how testis-specific histone variants form nucleosomes during spermatogenesis.

  7. Comparison of Sequencing Platforms for Single Nucleotide Variant Calls in a Human Sample

    PubMed Central

    Miller, Webb; Guillory, Joseph; Stinson, Jeremy; Seshagiri, Somasekar

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation sequencings platforms coupled with advanced bioinformatic tools enable re-sequencing of the human genome at high-speed and large cost savings. We compare sequencing platforms from Roche/454(GS FLX), Illumina/HiSeq (HiSeq 2000), and Life Technologies/SOLiD (SOLiD 3 ECC) for their ability to identify single nucleotide substitutions in whole genome sequences from the same human sample. We report on significant GC-related bias observed in the data sequenced on Illumina and SOLiD platforms. The differences in the variant calls were investigated with regards to coverage, and sequencing error. Some of the variants called by only one or two of the platforms were experimentally tested using mass spectrometry; a method that is independent of DNA sequencing. We establish several causes why variants remained unreported, specific to each platform. We report the indel called using the three sequencing technologies and from the obtained results we conclude that sequencing human genomes with more than a single platform and multiple libraries is beneficial when high level of accuracy is required. PMID:23405114

  8. dbDNV: a resource of duplicated gene nucleotide variants in human genome.

    PubMed

    Ho, Meng-Ru; Tsai, Kuo-Wang; Chen, Chun-houh; Lin, Wen-chang

    2011-01-01

    Gene duplications are scattered widely throughout the human genome. A single-base difference located in nearly identical duplicated segments may be misjudged as a single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) from individuals. This imperfection is undistinguishable in current genotyping methods. As the next-generation sequencing technologies become more popular for sequence-based association studies, numerous ambiguous SNPs are rapidly accumulated. Thus, analyzing duplication variations in the reference genome to assist in preventing false positive SNPs is imperative. We have identified >10% of human genes associated with duplicated gene loci (DGL). Through meticulous sequence alignments of DGL, we systematically designated 1,236,956 variations as duplicated gene nucleotide variants (DNVs). The DNV database (dbDNV) (http://goods.ibms.sinica.edu.tw/DNVs/) has been established to promote more accurate variation annotation. Aside from the flat file download, users can explore the gene-related duplications and the associated DNVs by DGL and DNV searches, respectively. In addition, the dbDNV contains 304,110 DNV-coupled SNPs. From DNV-coupled SNP search, users observe which SNP records are also variants among duplicates. This is useful while ∼58% of exonic SNPs in DGL are DNV-coupled. Because of high accumulation of ambiguous SNPs, we suggest that annotating SNPs with DNVs possibilities should improve association studies of these variants with human diseases.

  9. Comparison of sequencing platforms for single nucleotide variant calls in a human sample.

    PubMed

    Ratan, Aakrosh; Miller, Webb; Guillory, Joseph; Stinson, Jeremy; Seshagiri, Somasekar; Schuster, Stephan C

    2013-01-01

    Next-generation sequencings platforms coupled with advanced bioinformatic tools enable re-sequencing of the human genome at high-speed and large cost savings. We compare sequencing platforms from Roche/454(GS FLX), Illumina/HiSeq (HiSeq 2000), and Life Technologies/SOLiD (SOLiD 3 ECC) for their ability to identify single nucleotide substitutions in whole genome sequences from the same human sample. We report on significant GC-related bias observed in the data sequenced on Illumina and SOLiD platforms. The differences in the variant calls were investigated with regards to coverage, and sequencing error. Some of the variants called by only one or two of the platforms were experimentally tested using mass spectrometry; a method that is independent of DNA sequencing. We establish several causes why variants remained unreported, specific to each platform. We report the indel called using the three sequencing technologies and from the obtained results we conclude that sequencing human genomes with more than a single platform and multiple libraries is beneficial when high level of accuracy is required.

  10. Characterization of DNA variants in the human kinome in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Divyansh; Qi, Yuan; Jiang, Tingting; Liu, Xiuping; Shi, Weiwei; Wali, Vikram B.; Turk, Benjamin; Ross, Jeffrey S; Fraser Symmans, W; Pusztai, Lajos; Hatzis, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Kinases play a key role in cancer biology, and serve as potential clinically useful targets for designing cancer therapies. We examined nucleic acid variations in the human kinome and several known cancer-related genes in breast cancer. DNA was extracted from fine needle biopsies of 73 primary breast cancers and 19 metastatic lesions. Targeted sequencing of 518 kinases and 68 additional cancer related genes was performed using the SOLiD sequencing platform. We detected 1561 unique, non-synonymous variants in kinase genes in the 92 cases, and 74 unique variants in 43 kinases that were predicted to have major functional impact on the protein. Three kinase groups—CMGC, STE and TKL—showed greater mutational load in metastatic compared to primary cancer samples, however, after correction for multiple testing the difference was significant only for the TKL group (P = 0.04). We also observed that a higher proportion of histologic grade 1 and 2 cases had high functional impact variants in the SCYL2 gene compared with grade 3 cases. Our findings indicate that individual breast cancers harbor a substantial number of potentially functionally important nucleotide variations in kinase genes, most of which are present in unique combinations and include both somatic and germline functional variants. PMID:26420498

  11. Characterization of DNA variants in the human kinome in breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Agarwal, Divyansh; Qi, Yuan; Jiang, Tingting; Liu, Xiuping; Shi, Weiwei; Wali, Vikram B; Turk, Benjamin; Ross, Jeffrey S; Fraser Symmans, W; Pusztai, Lajos; Hatzis, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Kinases play a key role in cancer biology, and serve as potential clinically useful targets for designing cancer therapies. We examined nucleic acid variations in the human kinome and several known cancer-related genes in breast cancer. DNA was extracted from fine needle biopsies of 73 primary breast cancers and 19 metastatic lesions. Targeted sequencing of 518 kinases and 68 additional cancer related genes was performed using the SOLiD sequencing platform. We detected 1561 unique, non-synonymous variants in kinase genes in the 92 cases, and 74 unique variants in 43 kinases that were predicted to have major functional impact on the protein. Three kinase groups--CMGC, STE and TKL--showed greater mutational load in metastatic compared to primary cancer samples, however, after correction for multiple testing the difference was significant only for the TKL group (P = 0.04). We also observed that a higher proportion of histologic grade 1 and 2 cases had high functional impact variants in the SCYL2 gene compared with grade 3 cases. Our findings indicate that individual breast cancers harbor a substantial number of potentially functionally important nucleotide variations in kinase genes, most of which are present in unique combinations and include both somatic and germline functional variants. PMID:26420498

  12. Distinct chromatin signature of histone H3 variant H3.3 in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Snyers, Luc; Zupkovitz, Gordin; Almeder, Marlene; Fliesser, Marianne; Stoisser, Anja; Weipoltshammer, Klara; Schöfer, Christian

    2014-01-01

    Actively transcribed regions of the genome have been found enriched for the histone H3 variant H3.3. This variant is incorporated into nucleosomes throughout the cell cycle whereas the canonical isoforms are predominately deposited in association with replication. In order to obtain a global picture of the deposition pattern at the single cell level we expressed H3.3 in both normal and malignant human cells and analyzed nuclei using conventional and structured illumination imaging (SIM). We found that the distribution pattern of H3.3 in interphase differs from that of the canonical histone H3 variants and this difference is conveyed to mitotic chromosomes which display a distinct H3.3 banding pattern. Histone H3.3 localization positively correlated with markers for transcriptionally active chromatin and, notably, H3.3 was almost completely absent from the inactive X chromosome. Collectively, our data show that histone variant H3.3 occupies distinct intranuclear chromatin domains and that these genomic loci are associated with gene expression. PMID:25482197

  13. Characterization of DNA variants in the human kinome in breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Divyansh; Qi, Yuan; Jiang, Tingting; Liu, Xiuping; Shi, Weiwei; Wali, Vikram B.; Turk, Benjamin; Ross, Jeffrey S.; Fraser Symmans, W.; Pusztai, Lajos; Hatzis, Christos

    2015-09-01

    Kinases play a key role in cancer biology, and serve as potential clinically useful targets for designing cancer therapies. We examined nucleic acid variations in the human kinome and several known cancer-related genes in breast cancer. DNA was extracted from fine needle biopsies of 73 primary breast cancers and 19 metastatic lesions. Targeted sequencing of 518 kinases and 68 additional cancer related genes was performed using the SOLiD sequencing platform. We detected 1561 unique, non-synonymous variants in kinase genes in the 92 cases, and 74 unique variants in 43 kinases that were predicted to have major functional impact on the protein. Three kinase groups—CMGC, STE and TKL—showed greater mutational load in metastatic compared to primary cancer samples, however, after correction for multiple testing the difference was significant only for the TKL group (P = 0.04). We also observed that a higher proportion of histologic grade 1 and 2 cases had high functional impact variants in the SCYL2 gene compared with grade 3 cases. Our findings indicate that individual breast cancers harbor a substantial number of potentially functionally important nucleotide variations in kinase genes, most of which are present in unique combinations and include both somatic and germline functional variants.

  14. Many amino acid substitution variants identified in DNA repair genes during human population screenings are predicted to impact protein function

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, T; Jones, I M; Mohrenweiser, H W

    2003-11-03

    Over 520 different amino acid substitution variants have been previously identified in the systematic screening of 91 human DNA repair genes for sequence variation. Two algorithms were employed to predict the impact of these amino acid substitutions on protein activity. Sorting Intolerant From Tolerant (SIFT) classified 226 of 508 variants (44%) as ''Intolerant''. Polymorphism Phenotyping (PolyPhen) classed 165 of 489 amino acid substitutions (34%) as ''Probably or Possibly Damaging''. Another 9-15% of the variants were classed as ''Potentially Intolerant or Damaging''. The results from the two algorithms are highly associated, with concordance in predicted impact observed for {approx}62% of the variants. Twenty one to thirty one percent of the variant proteins are predicted to exhibit reduced activity by both algorithms. These variants occur at slightly lower individual allele frequency than do the variants classified as ''Tolerant'' or ''Benign''. Both algorithms correctly predicted the impact of 26 functionally characterized amino acid substitutions in the APE1 protein on biochemical activity, with one exception. It is concluded that a substantial fraction of the missense variants observed in the general human population are functionally relevant. These variants are expected to be the molecular genetic and biochemical basis for the associations of reduced DNA repair capacity phenotypes with elevated cancer risk.

  15. Genome-wide scan of healthy human connectome discovers SPON1 gene variant influencing dementia severity

    PubMed Central

    Jahanshad, Neda; Rajagopalan, Priya; Hua, Xue; Hibar, Derrek P.; Nir, Talia M.; Toga, Arthur W.; Jack, Clifford R.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Green, Robert C.; Weiner, Michael W.; Medland, Sarah E.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Hansell, Narelle K.; McMahon, Katie L.; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Thompson, Paul M.; Weiner, Michael; Aisen, Paul; Weiner, Michael; Aisen, Paul; Petersen, Ronald; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Trojanowski, John Q.; Toga, Arthur W.; Beckett, Laurel; Green, Robert C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Morris, John; Liu, Enchi; Green, Robert C.; Montine, Tom; Petersen, Ronald; Aisen, Paul; Gamst, Anthony; Thomas, Ronald G.; Donohue, Michael; Walter, Sarah; Gessert, Devon; Sather, Tamie; Beckett, Laurel; Harvey, Danielle; Gamst, Anthony; Donohue, Michael; Kornak, John; Jack, Clifford R.; Dale, Anders; Bernstein, Matthew; Felmlee, Joel; Fox, Nick; Thompson, Paul; Schuff, Norbert; Alexander, Gene; DeCarli, Charles; Jagust, William; Bandy, Dan; Koeppe, Robert A.; Foster, Norm; Reiman, Eric M.; Chen, Kewei; Mathis, Chet; Morris, John; Cairns, Nigel J.; Taylor-Reinwald, Lisa; Trojanowki, J.Q.; Shaw, Les; Lee, Virginia M.Y.; Korecka, Magdalena; Toga, Arthur W.; Crawford, Karen; Neu, Scott; Saykin, Andrew J.; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Potkin, Steven; Shen, Li; Khachaturian, Zaven; Frank, Richard; Snyder, Peter J.; Molchan, Susan; Kaye, Jeffrey; Quinn, Joseph; Lind, Betty; Dolen, Sara; Schneider, Lon S.; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Spann, Bryan M.; Brewer, James; Vanderswag, Helen; Heidebrink, Judith L.; Lord, Joanne L.; Petersen, Ronald; Johnson, Kris; Doody, Rachelle S.; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S.; Bell, Karen L.; Morris, John C.; Ances, Beau; Carroll, Maria; Leon, Sue; Mintun, Mark A.; Schneider, Stacy; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Clark, David; Grossman, Hillel; Mitsis, Effie; Romirowsky, Aliza; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Shah, Raj C.; Duara, Ranjan; Varon, Daniel; Roberts, Peggy; Albert, Marilyn; Onyike, Chiadi; Kielb, Stephanie; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J.; Glodzik, Lidia; De Santi, Susan; Doraiswamy, P. Murali; Petrella, Jeffrey R.; Coleman, R. Edward; Arnold, Steven E.; Karlawish, Jason H.; Wolk, David; Smith, Charles D.; Jicha, Greg; Hardy, Peter; Lopez, Oscar L.; Oakley, MaryAnn; Simpson, Donna M.; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Goldstein, Bonnie S.; Martin, Kim; Makino, Kelly M.; Ismail, M. Saleem; Brand, Connie; Mulnard, Ruth A.; Thai, Gaby; Mc-Adams-Ortiz, Catherine; Womack, Kyle; Mathews, Dana; Quiceno, Mary; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; King, Richard; Weiner, Myron; Martin-Cook, Kristen; DeVous, Michael; Levey, Allan I.; Lah, James J.; Cellar, Janet S.; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Anderson, Heather S.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Apostolova, Liana; Lu, Po H.; Bartzokis, George; Silverman, Daniel H.S.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Parfitt, Francine; Johnson, Heather; Farlow, Martin R.; Hake, Ann Marie; Matthews, Brandy R.; Herring, Scott; van Dyck, Christopher H.; Carson, Richard E.; MacAvoy, Martha G.; Chertkow, Howard; Bergman, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Black, Sandra; Stefanovic, Bojana; Caldwell, Curtis; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek Robin; Feldman, Howard; Mudge, Benita; Assaly, Michele; Kertesz, Andrew; Rogers, John; Trost, Dick; Bernick, Charles; Munic, Donna; Kerwin, Diana; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Lipowski, Kristina; Wu, Chuang-Kuo; Johnson, Nancy; Sadowsky, Carl; Martinez, Walter; Villena, Teresa; Turner, Raymond Scott; Johnson, Kathleen; Reynolds, Brigid; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Marshall, Gad; Frey, Meghan; Yesavage, Jerome; Taylor, Joy L.; Lane, Barton; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Sabbagh, Marwan; Belden, Christine; Jacobson, Sandra; Kowall, Neil; Killiany, Ronald; Budson, Andrew E.; Norbash, Alexander; Johnson, Patricia Lynn; Obisesan, Thomas O.; Wolday, Saba; Bwayo, Salome K.; Lerner, Alan; Hudson, Leon; Ogrocki, Paula; Fletcher, Evan; Carmichael, Owen; Olichney, John; DeCarli, Charles; Kittur, Smita; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T.-Y.; Bartha, Rob; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Preda, Adrian; Nguyen, Dana; Tariot, Pierre; Fleisher, Adam; Reeder, Stephanie; Bates, Vernice; Capote, Horacio; Rainka, Michelle; Scharre, Douglas W.; Kataki, Maria; Zimmerman, Earl A.; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Blank, Karen; Anderson, Karen; Saykin, Andrew J.; Santulli, Robert B.; Schwartz, Eben S.; Sink, Kaycee M.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Garg, Pradeep; Watkins, Franklin; Ott, Brian R.; Querfurth, Henry; Tremont, Geoffrey; Salloway, Stephen; Malloy, Paul; Correia, Stephen; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Mintzer, Jacobo; Longmire, Crystal Flynn; Spicer, Kenneth; Finger, Elizabeth; Rachinsky, Irina; Rogers, John; Kertesz, Andrew; Drost, Dick

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant connectivity is implicated in many neurological and psychiatric disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease and schizophrenia. However, other than a few disease-associated candidate genes, we know little about the degree to which genetics play a role in the brain networks; we know even less about specific genes that influence brain connections. Twin and family-based studies can generate estimates of overall genetic influences on a trait, but genome-wide association scans (GWASs) can screen the genome for specific variants influencing the brain or risk for disease. To identify the heritability of various brain connections, we scanned healthy young adult twins with high-field, high-angular resolution diffusion MRI. We adapted GWASs to screen the brain’s connectivity pattern, allowing us to discover genetic variants that affect the human brain’s wiring. The association of connectivity with the SPON1 variant at rs2618516 on chromosome 11 (11p15.2) reached connectome-wide, genome-wide significance after stringent statistical corrections were enforced, and it was replicated in an independent subsample. rs2618516 was shown to affect brain structure in an elderly population with varying degrees of dementia. Older people who carried the connectivity variant had significantly milder clinical dementia scores and lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease. As a posthoc analysis, we conducted GWASs on several organizational and topological network measures derived from the matrices to discover variants in and around genes associated with autism (MACROD2), development (NEDD4), and mental retardation (UBE2A) significantly associated with connectivity. Connectome-wide, genome-wide screening offers substantial promise to discover genes affecting brain connectivity and risk for brain diseases. PMID:23471985

  16. Genome-wide scan of healthy human connectome discovers SPON1 gene variant influencing dementia severity.

    PubMed

    Jahanshad, Neda; Rajagopalan, Priya; Hua, Xue; Hibar, Derrek P; Nir, Talia M; Toga, Arthur W; Jack, Clifford R; Saykin, Andrew J; Green, Robert C; Weiner, Michael W; Medland, Sarah E; Montgomery, Grant W; Hansell, Narelle K; McMahon, Katie L; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J; Thompson, Paul M

    2013-03-19

    Aberrant connectivity is implicated in many neurological and psychiatric disorders, including Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. However, other than a few disease-associated candidate genes, we know little about the degree to which genetics play a role in the brain networks; we know even less about specific genes that influence brain connections. Twin and family-based studies can generate estimates of overall genetic influences on a trait, but genome-wide association scans (GWASs) can screen the genome for specific variants influencing the brain or risk for disease. To identify the heritability of various brain connections, we scanned healthy young adult twins with high-field, high-angular resolution diffusion MRI. We adapted GWASs to screen the brain's connectivity pattern, allowing us to discover genetic variants that affect the human brain's wiring. The association of connectivity with the SPON1 variant at rs2618516 on chromosome 11 (11p15.2) reached connectome-wide, genome-wide significance after stringent statistical corrections were enforced, and it was replicated in an independent subsample. rs2618516 was shown to affect brain structure in an elderly population with varying degrees of dementia. Older people who carried the connectivity variant had significantly milder clinical dementia scores and lower risk of Alzheimer's disease. As a posthoc analysis, we conducted GWASs on several organizational and topological network measures derived from the matrices to discover variants in and around genes associated with autism (MACROD2), development (NEDD4), and mental retardation (UBE2A) significantly associated with connectivity. Connectome-wide, genome-wide screening offers substantial promise to discover genes affecting brain connectivity and risk for brain diseases.

  17. M2SG: mapping human disease-related genetic variants to protein sequences and genomic loci

    PubMed Central

    Ji, Renkai; Cong, Qian; Li, Wenlin; Grishin, Nick V.

    2013-01-01

    Summary: Online Mendelian Inheritance in Man (OMIM) is a manually curated compendium of human genetic variants and the corresponding phenotypes, mostly human diseases. Instead of directly documenting the native sequences for gene entries, OMIM links its entries to protein and DNA sequences in other databases. However, because of the existence of gene isoforms and errors in OMIM records, mapping a specific OMIM mutation to its corresponding protein sequence is not trivial. Combining computer programs and extensive manual curation of OMIM full-text descriptions and original literature, we mapped 98% of OMIM amino acid substitutions (AASs) and all SwissProt Variant (SwissVar) disease-related AASs to reference sequences and confidently mapped 99.96% of all AASs to the genomic loci. Based on the results, we developed an online database and interactive web server (M2SG) to (i) retrieve the mapped OMIM and SwissVar variants for a given protein sequence; and (ii) obtain related proteins and mutations for an input disease phenotype. This database will be useful for analyzing sequences, understanding the effect of mutations, identifying important genetic variations and designing experiments on a protein of interest. Availability and implementation: The database and web server are freely available at http://prodata.swmed.edu/M2S/mut2seq.cgi. Contact: grishin@chop.swmed.edu Supplementary information: Supplementary data are available at Bioinformatics online. PMID:24002112

  18. Discovery of Novel Splice Variants and Regulatory Mechanisms for Microsomal Triglyceride Transfer Protein in Human Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takashi; Swift, Larry L.

    2016-01-01

    Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) is a unique lipid transfer protein essential for the assembly of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins by the liver and intestine. Previous studies in mice identified a splice variant of MTP with an alternate first exon. Splice variants of human MTP have not been reported. Using PCR approaches we have identified two splice variants in human tissues, which we have named MTP-B and MTP-C. MTP-B has a unique first exon (Ex1B) located 10.5 kb upstream of the first exon (Ex1A) for canonical MTP (MTP-A); MTP-C contains both first exons for MTP-A and MTP-B. MTP-B was found in a number of tissues, whereas MTP-C was prominent in brain and testis. MTP-B does not encode a protein; MTP-C encodes the same protein encoded by MTP-A, although MTP-C translation is strongly inhibited by regulatory elements within its 5′-UTR. Using luciferase assays, we demonstrate that the promoter region upstream of exon 1B is quite adequate to drive expression of MTP. We conclude that alternate splicing plays a key role in regulating cellular MTP levels by introducing distinct promoter regions and unique 5′-UTRs, which contain elements that alter translation efficiency, enabling the cell to optimize MTP activity. PMID:27256115

  19. Discovery of Novel Splice Variants and Regulatory Mechanisms for Microsomal Triglyceride Transfer Protein in Human Tissues.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takashi; Swift, Larry L

    2016-01-01

    Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) is a unique lipid transfer protein essential for the assembly of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins by the liver and intestine. Previous studies in mice identified a splice variant of MTP with an alternate first exon. Splice variants of human MTP have not been reported. Using PCR approaches we have identified two splice variants in human tissues, which we have named MTP-B and MTP-C. MTP-B has a unique first exon (Ex1B) located 10.5 kb upstream of the first exon (Ex1A) for canonical MTP (MTP-A); MTP-C contains both first exons for MTP-A and MTP-B. MTP-B was found in a number of tissues, whereas MTP-C was prominent in brain and testis. MTP-B does not encode a protein; MTP-C encodes the same protein encoded by MTP-A, although MTP-C translation is strongly inhibited by regulatory elements within its 5'-UTR. Using luciferase assays, we demonstrate that the promoter region upstream of exon 1B is quite adequate to drive expression of MTP. We conclude that alternate splicing plays a key role in regulating cellular MTP levels by introducing distinct promoter regions and unique 5'-UTRs, which contain elements that alter translation efficiency, enabling the cell to optimize MTP activity. PMID:27256115

  20. Clinical Interpretation of Variants from Next-Generation Sequencing: The 2016 Scientific Meeting of the Human Genome Variation Society.

    PubMed

    Oetting, William S; Brookes, Anthony J; Béroud, Christophe; Taschner, Peter E

    2016-10-01

    The 2016 scientific meeting of the Human Genome Variation Society (HGVS; http://www.hgvs.org) was held on the 20th of May in Barcelona, Spain, with the theme of "Clinical Interpretation of Variants from Next-Generation Sequencing."

  1. Human Thromboxane A2 Receptor Genetic Variants: In Silico, In Vitro and “In Platelet” Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Gleim, Scott; Stitham, Jeremiah; Tang, Wai Ho; Li, Hong; Douville, Karen; Chelikani, Prashen; J.Rade, Jeffrey; Martin, Kathleen A.; Hwa, John

    2013-01-01

    Thromboxane and its receptor have emerged as key players in modulating vascular thrombotic events. Thus, a dysfunctional hTP genetic variant may protect against (hypoactivity) or promote (hyperactivity) vascular events, based upon its activity on platelets. After extensive in silico analysis, six hTP-α variants were selected (C68S, V80E, E94V, A160T, V176E, and V217I) for detailed biochemical studies based on structural proximity to key regions involved in receptor function and in silico predictions. Variant biochemical profiles ranged from severe instability (C68S) to normal (V217I), with most variants demonstrating functional alteration in binding, expression or activation (V80E, E94V, A160T, and V176E). In the absence of patient platelet samples, we developed and validated a novel megakaryocyte based system to evaluate human platelet function in the presence of detected dysfunctional genetic variants. Interestingly, variant V80E exhibited reduced platelet activation whereas A160T demonstrated platelet hyperactivity. This report provides the most comprehensive in silico, in vitro and “in platelet” evaluation of hTP variants to date and highlightscurrent inherent problems in evaluating genetic variants, with possible solutions. The study additionally provides clinical relevance to characterized dysfunctional hTP variants. PMID:23840660

  2. Familial advanced sleep-phase syndrome: A short-period circadian rhythm variant in humans.

    PubMed

    Jones, C R; Campbell, S S; Zone, S E; Cooper, F; DeSano, A; Murphy, P J; Jones, B; Czajkowski, L; Ptácek, L J

    1999-09-01

    Biological circadian clocks oscillate with an approximately 24-hour period, are ubiquitous, and presumably confer a selective advantage by anticipating the transitions between day and night. The circadian rhythms of sleep, melatonin secretion and body core temperature are thought to be generated by the suprachiasmatic nucleus of the hypothalamus, the anatomic locus of the mammalian circadian clock. Autosomal semi-dominant mutations in rodents with fast or slow biological clocks (that is, short or long endogenous period lengths; tau) are associated with phase-advanced or delayed sleep-wake rhythms, respectively. These models predict the existence of familial human circadian rhythm variants but none of the human circadian rhythm disorders are known to have a familial tendency. Although a slight 'morning lark' tendency is common, individuals with a large and disabling sleep phase-advance are rare. This disorder, advanced sleep-phase syndrome, is characterized by very early sleep onset and offset; only two cases are reported in young adults. Here we describe three kindreds with a profound phase advance of the sleep-wake, melatonin and temperature rhythms associated with a very short tau. The trait segregates as an autosomal dominant with high penetrance. These kindreds represent a well-characterized familial circadian rhythm variant in humans and provide a unique opportunity for genetic analysis of human circadian physiology. PMID:10470086

  3. A Human Variant of Glucose-Regulated Protein 94 That Inefficiently Supports IGF Production.

    PubMed

    Marzec, Michal; Hawkes, Colin P; Eletto, Davide; Boyle, Sarah; Rosenfeld, Ron; Hwa, Vivian; Wit, Jan M; van Duyvenvoorde, Hermine A; Oostdijk, Wilma; Losekoot, Monique; Pedersen, Oluf; Yeap, Bu Beng; Flicker, Leon; Barzilai, Nir; Atzmon, Gil; Grimberg, Adda; Argon, Yair

    2016-05-01

    IGFs are critical for normal intrauterine and childhood growth and sustaining health throughout life. We showed previously that the production of IGF-1 and IGF-2 requires interaction with the chaperone glucose-regulated protein 94 (GRP94) and that the amount of secreted IGFs is proportional to the GRP94 activity. Therefore, we tested the hypothesis that functional polymorphisms of human GRP94 affect IGF production and thereby human health. We describe a hypomorphic variant of human GRP94, P300L, whose heterozygous carriers have 9% lower circulating IGF-1 concentration. P300L was found first in a child with primary IGF deficiency and was later shown to be a noncommon single-nucleotide polymorphism with frequencies of 1%-4% in various populations. When tested in the grp94(-/-) cell-based complementation assay, P300L supported only approximately 58% of IGF secretion relative to wild-type GRP94. Furthermore, recombinant P300L showed impaired nucleotide binding activity. These in vitro data strongly support a causal relationship between the GRP94 variant and the decreased concentration of circulating IGF-1, as observed in human carriers of P300L. Thus, mutations in GRP94 that affect its IGF chaperone activity represent a novel causal genetic mechanism that limits IGF biosynthesis, quite a distinct mechanism from the known genes in the GH/IGF signaling network.

  4. The human gene damage index as a gene-level approach to prioritizing exome variants

    PubMed Central

    Itan, Yuval; Shang, Lei; Boisson, Bertrand; Patin, Etienne; Bolze, Alexandre; Moncada-Vélez, Marcela; Scott, Eric; Ciancanelli, Michael J.; Lafaille, Fabien G.; Markle, Janet G.; Martinez-Barricarte, Ruben; de Jong, Sarah Jill; Kong, Xiao-Fei; Nitschke, Patrick; Belkadi, Aziz; Bustamante, Jacinta; Puel, Anne; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Stenson, Peter D.; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Cooper, David N.; Quintana-Murci, Lluis; Claverie, Jean-Michel; Zhang, Shen-Ying; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2015-01-01

    The protein-coding exome of a patient with a monogenic disease contains about 20,000 variants, only one or two of which are disease causing. We found that 58% of rare variants in the protein-coding exome of the general population are located in only 2% of the genes. Prompted by this observation, we aimed to develop a gene-level approach for predicting whether a given human protein-coding gene is likely to harbor disease-causing mutations. To this end, we derived the gene damage index (GDI): a genome-wide, gene-level metric of the mutational damage that has accumulated in the general population. We found that the GDI was correlated with selective evolutionary pressure, protein complexity, coding sequence length, and the number of paralogs. We compared GDI with the leading gene-level approaches, genic intolerance, and de novo excess, and demonstrated that GDI performed best for the detection of false positives (i.e., removing exome variants in genes irrelevant to disease), whereas genic intolerance and de novo excess performed better for the detection of true positives (i.e., assessing de novo mutations in genes likely to be disease causing). The GDI server, data, and software are freely available to noncommercial users from lab.rockefeller.edu/casanova/GDI. PMID:26483451

  5. The human gene damage index as a gene-level approach to prioritizing exome variants.

    PubMed

    Itan, Yuval; Shang, Lei; Boisson, Bertrand; Patin, Etienne; Bolze, Alexandre; Moncada-Vélez, Marcela; Scott, Eric; Ciancanelli, Michael J; Lafaille, Fabien G; Markle, Janet G; Martinez-Barricarte, Ruben; de Jong, Sarah Jill; Kong, Xiao-Fei; Nitschke, Patrick; Belkadi, Aziz; Bustamante, Jacinta; Puel, Anne; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Stenson, Peter D; Gleeson, Joseph G; Cooper, David N; Quintana-Murci, Lluis; Claverie, Jean-Michel; Zhang, Shen-Ying; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2015-11-01

    The protein-coding exome of a patient with a monogenic disease contains about 20,000 variants, only one or two of which are disease causing. We found that 58% of rare variants in the protein-coding exome of the general population are located in only 2% of the genes. Prompted by this observation, we aimed to develop a gene-level approach for predicting whether a given human protein-coding gene is likely to harbor disease-causing mutations. To this end, we derived the gene damage index (GDI): a genome-wide, gene-level metric of the mutational damage that has accumulated in the general population. We found that the GDI was correlated with selective evolutionary pressure, protein complexity, coding sequence length, and the number of paralogs. We compared GDI with the leading gene-level approaches, genic intolerance, and de novo excess, and demonstrated that GDI performed best for the detection of false positives (i.e., removing exome variants in genes irrelevant to disease), whereas genic intolerance and de novo excess performed better for the detection of true positives (i.e., assessing de novo mutations in genes likely to be disease causing). The GDI server, data, and software are freely available to noncommercial users from lab.rockefeller.edu/casanova/GDI. PMID:26483451

  6. In silico prediction of splice-altering single nucleotide variants in the human genome.

    PubMed

    Jian, Xueqiu; Boerwinkle, Eric; Liu, Xiaoming

    2014-12-16

    In silico tools have been developed to predict variants that may have an impact on pre-mRNA splicing. The major limitation of the application of these tools to basic research and clinical practice is the difficulty in interpreting the output. Most tools only predict potential splice sites given a DNA sequence without measuring splicing signal changes caused by a variant. Another limitation is the lack of large-scale evaluation studies of these tools. We compared eight in silico tools on 2959 single nucleotide variants within splicing consensus regions (scSNVs) using receiver operating characteristic analysis. The Position Weight Matrix model and MaxEntScan outperformed other methods. Two ensemble learning methods, adaptive boosting and random forests, were used to construct models that take advantage of individual methods. Both models further improved prediction, with outputs of directly interpretable prediction scores. We applied our ensemble scores to scSNVs from the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer database. Analysis showed that predicted splice-altering scSNVs are enriched in recurrent scSNVs and known cancer genes. We pre-computed our ensemble scores for all potential scSNVs across the human genome, providing a whole genome level resource for identifying splice-altering scSNVs discovered from large-scale sequencing studies.

  7. In silico prediction of splice-altering single nucleotide variants in the human genome

    PubMed Central

    Jian, Xueqiu; Boerwinkle, Eric; Liu, Xiaoming

    2014-01-01

    In silico tools have been developed to predict variants that may have an impact on pre-mRNA splicing. The major limitation of the application of these tools to basic research and clinical practice is the difficulty in interpreting the output. Most tools only predict potential splice sites given a DNA sequence without measuring splicing signal changes caused by a variant. Another limitation is the lack of large-scale evaluation studies of these tools. We compared eight in silico tools on 2959 single nucleotide variants within splicing consensus regions (scSNVs) using receiver operating characteristic analysis. The Position Weight Matrix model and MaxEntScan outperformed other methods. Two ensemble learning methods, adaptive boosting and random forests, were used to construct models that take advantage of individual methods. Both models further improved prediction, with outputs of directly interpretable prediction scores. We applied our ensemble scores to scSNVs from the Catalogue of Somatic Mutations in Cancer database. Analysis showed that predicted splice-altering scSNVs are enriched in recurrent scSNVs and known cancer genes. We pre-computed our ensemble scores for all potential scSNVs across the human genome, providing a whole genome level resource for identifying splice-altering scSNVs discovered from large-scale sequencing studies. PMID:25416802

  8. A new human erythrocyte variant (Ph) containing an abnormal membrane sialoglycoprotein

    PubMed Central

    Tanner, Michael J. A.; Anstee, David J.; Mawby, William J.

    1980-01-01

    1. A new human erythrocyte variant (Ph) is described. The variant contains an unusual sialic acid-rich glycoprotein in addition to the blood-group-MN([unk])- and blood-group-Ss(δ)-active sialoglycoproteins found in normal erythrocytes. 2. The unusual component Ph has an apparent mol.wt. of 32000 on sodium dodecyl sulphate/polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. The Ph component is not degraded during trypsin treatment of intact erythrocytes. 3. The Ph component was labelled by lacto-peroxidase-mediated radioiodination of intact erythrocytes and was found to be present in amounts approximately equimolar to α-sialoglycoprotein in the variant erythrocytes. 4. The Ph component had receptors for the lectins from Maclura aurantiaca (osage orange) and Triticum vulgaris (wheat-germ), but lacked a receptor for the Phaseolus vulgaris (red kidney bean) lectin, suggesting that it carries only O-linked oligosaccharides. 5. The presence of the Ph component in these erythrocytes does not correspond to any of the known blood-group-MNSs-related antigens examined. 6. We suggest that this component may be a hybrid polypeptide containing the N-terminal portion derived from normal δ-sialoglycoprotein, and the C-terminal portion from normal α-sialoglycoprotein, in a manner similar to the anti-Lepore haemoglobin. ImagesFig. 3.Fig. 4.Fig. 5. PMID:7396858

  9. Generation of new cytotoxic human ribonuclease variants directed to the nucleus.

    PubMed

    Vert, Anna; Castro, Jessica; Ruiz-Martínez, Santiago; Tubert, Pere; Escribano, Diego; Ribó, Marc; Vilanova, Maria; Benito, Antoni

    2012-10-01

    Ribonucleases are promising agents for use in anticancer therapy. Engineering a nuclear localization signal into the sequence of the human pancreatic ribonuclease has been revealed as a new strategy to endow this enzyme with cytotoxic activity against tumor cells. We previously described a cytotoxic human pancreatic ribonuclease variant, named PE5, which is able to cleave nuclear RNA, inducing the apoptosis of cancer cells and reducing the amount of P-glycoprotein in different multidrug-resistant cell lines. These results open the opportunity to use this ribonuclease in combination with other chemotherapeutics. In this work, we have investigated how to improve the properties of PE5 as an antitumor drug candidate. When attempting to develop a recombinant protein as a drug, two of the main desirable attributes are minimum immunogenicity and maximum potency. The improvements of PE5 have been designed in both senses. First, in order to reduce the potential immunogenicity of the protein, we have studied which residues mutated on PE5 can be reverted to those of the wild-type human pancreatic ribonuclease sequence without affecting its cytotoxicity. Second, we have investigated the effect of introducing an additional nuclear localization signal at different sites of PE5 in an effort to obtain a more cytotoxic enzyme. We show that the nuclear localization signal location is critical for the cytotoxicity. One of these variants, named NLSPE5, presents about a 10-fold increase in cytotoxicity respective to PE5. This variant induces apoptosis and kills the cells using the same mechanism as PE5.

  10. Rapid identification of human SNAP-25 transcript variants by a miniaturized capillary electrophoresis system.

    PubMed

    Németh, Nóra; Kerékgyártó, Márta; Sasvári-Székely, Mária; Rónai, Zsolt; Guttman, András

    2014-02-01

    The 25 kDa synaptosomal-associated protein (SNAP-25) is a crucial component of the soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor complex and plays an important role in neurotransmission in the central nervous system. SNAP-25 has two different splice variants, SNAP-25a and SNAP-25b, differing in nine amino acids that results in a slight functional alteration of the generated soluble N-ethylmaleimide-sensitive factor attachment protein receptor complex. Two independent techniques, a PCR-miniaturized CE method and a real-time PCR based approach were elaborated for the specific and quantitative detection of the two SNAP-25 transcription variants. DNA-constructs coding for the two isoforms were used for optimization. Excellent specificity was observed with the use of our previously described highly sensitive miniaturized CE system in combination with quantitative PCR. The ratio of the two isoforms were reliably detected in a range of at least four orders of magnitude with a linear regression of R(2) = 0.987. Expression of the two isoforms was determined in human samples, where SNAP-25 was detected even in non-neural tissues, although at approximately a 100-fold lower level compared to the central nervous system. The relative amount of the SNAP-25b isoform was higher in the brain, whereas expression of SNAP-25a variant proved to be slightly higher in extra-neural cell types. The genomics approach in conjunction with the miniaturized CE system introduced in this paper is readily applicable for rapid alternative splice variant analysis.

  11. Expression of human BRCA1 variants in mouse ES cells allows functional analysis of BRCA1 mutations.

    PubMed

    Chang, Suhwan; Biswas, Kajal; Martin, Betty K; Stauffer, Stacey; Sharan, Shyam K

    2009-10-01

    To date, inheritance of a mutant BRCA1 or BRCA2 gene is the best-established indicator of an increased risk of developing breast cancer. Sequence analysis of these genes is being used to identify BRCA1/2 mutation carriers, though these efforts are hampered by the high frequency of variants of unknown clinical significance (VUSs). Functional evaluation of such variants has been restricted due to lack of a physiologically relevant assay. In this study we developed a functional assay using mouse ES cells to study variants of BRCA1. We introduced BAC clones with human wild-type BRCA1 or variants into Brca1-null ES cells and confirmed that only wild-type and a known neutral variant rescued cell lethality. The same neutral variant was also able to rescue embryogenesis in Brca1-null mice. A test of several BRCT domain mutants revealed all to be deleterious, including a VUS. Furthermore, we used this assay to determine the effects of BRCA1 variants on cell cycle regulation, differentiation, and genomic stability. Importantly, we discovered that ES cells rescued by S1497A BRCA1 exhibited significant hypersensitivity after gamma-irradiation. Our results demonstrate that this ES cell-based assay is a powerful and reliable method for analyzing the functional impact of BRCA1 variants, which we believe could be used to determine which patients may require preventative treatments. PMID:19770520

  12. Ancient human sialic acid variant restricts an emerging zoonotic malaria parasite

    PubMed Central

    Dankwa, Selasi; Lim, Caeul; Bei, Amy K.; Jiang, Rays H. Y.; Abshire, James R.; Patel, Saurabh D.; Goldberg, Jonathan M.; Moreno, Yovany; Kono, Maya; Niles, Jacquin C.; Duraisingh, Manoj T.

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium knowlesi is a zoonotic parasite transmitted from macaques causing malaria in humans in Southeast Asia. Plasmodium parasites bind to red blood cell (RBC) surface receptors, many of which are sialylated. While macaques synthesize the sialic acid variant N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc), humans cannot because of a mutation in the enzyme CMAH that converts N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) to Neu5Gc. Here we reconstitute CMAH in human RBCs for the reintroduction of Neu5Gc, which results in enhancement of P. knowlesi invasion. We show that two P. knowlesi invasion ligands, PkDBPβ and PkDBPγ, bind specifically to Neu5Gc-containing receptors. A human-adapted P. knowlesi line invades human RBCs independently of Neu5Gc, with duplication of the sialic acid-independent invasion ligand, PkDBPα and loss of PkDBPγ. Our results suggest that absence of Neu5Gc on human RBCs limits P. knowlesi invasion, but that parasites may evolve to invade human RBCs through the use of sialic acid-independent pathways. PMID:27041489

  13. A second DNA binding site in human BRCA2 promotes homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    von Nicolai, Catharina; Ehlén, Åsa; Martin, Charlotte; Zhang, Xiaodong; Carreira, Aura

    2016-01-01

    BRCA2 tumour-suppressor protein is well known for its role in DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR); assisting the loading of RAD51 recombinase at DNA double-strand breaks. This function is executed by the C-terminal DNA binding domain (CTD) which binds single-stranded (ss)DNA, and the BRC repeats, which bind RAD51 and modulate its assembly onto ssDNA. Paradoxically, analysis of cells resistant to DNA damaging agents missing the CTD restore HR proficiency, suggesting another domain may take over its function. Here, we identify a region in the N terminus of BRCA2 that exhibits DNA binding activity (NTD) and provide evidence for NTD promoting RAD51-mediated HR. A missense variant detected in breast cancer patients located in the NTD impairs HR stimulation on dsDNA/ssDNA junction containing substrates. These findings shed light on the function of the N terminus of BRCA2 and have implications for the evaluation of breast cancer variants. PMID:27628236

  14. A second DNA binding site in human BRCA2 promotes homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    von Nicolai, Catharina; Ehlén, Åsa; Martin, Charlotte; Zhang, Xiaodong; Carreira, Aura

    2016-01-01

    BRCA2 tumour-suppressor protein is well known for its role in DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR); assisting the loading of RAD51 recombinase at DNA double-strand breaks. This function is executed by the C-terminal DNA binding domain (CTD) which binds single-stranded (ss)DNA, and the BRC repeats, which bind RAD51 and modulate its assembly onto ssDNA. Paradoxically, analysis of cells resistant to DNA damaging agents missing the CTD restore HR proficiency, suggesting another domain may take over its function. Here, we identify a region in the N terminus of BRCA2 that exhibits DNA binding activity (NTD) and provide evidence for NTD promoting RAD51-mediated HR. A missense variant detected in breast cancer patients located in the NTD impairs HR stimulation on dsDNA/ssDNA junction containing substrates. These findings shed light on the function of the N terminus of BRCA2 and have implications for the evaluation of breast cancer variants. PMID:27628236

  15. Accumulation of distinct prelamin A variants in human diploid fibroblasts differentially affects cell homeostasis

    SciTech Connect

    Candelario, Jose; Borrego, Stacey; Reddy, Sita; Comai, Lucio

    2011-02-01

    Lamin A is a component of the nuclear lamina that plays a major role in the structural organization and function of the nucleus. Lamin A is synthesized as a prelamin A precursor which undergoes four sequential post-translational modifications to generate mature lamin A. Significantly, a large number of point mutations in the LMNA gene cause a range of distinct human disorders collectively known as laminopathies. The mechanisms by which mutations in lamin A affect cell function and cause disease are unclear. Interestingly, recent studies have suggested that alterations in the normal lamin A pathway can contribute to cellular dysfunction. Specifically, we and others have shown, at the cellular level, that in the absence of mutations or altered splicing events, increased expression of wild-type prelamin A results in a growth defective phenotype that resembles that of cells expressing the mutant form of lamin A, termed progerin, associated with Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria syndrome (HGPS). Remarkably, the phenotypes of cells expressing elevated levels of wild-type prelamin A can be reversed by either treatment with farnesyltransferase inhibitors or overexpression of ZMPSTE24, a critical prelamin A processing enzyme, suggesting that minor increases in the steady-state levels of one or more prelamin A intermediates is sufficient to induce cellular toxicity. Here, to investigate the molecular basis of the lamin A pathway toxicity, we characterized the phenotypic changes occurring in cells expressing distinct prelamin A variants mimicking specific prelamin A processing intermediates. This analysis demonstrates that distinct prelamin A variants differentially affect cell growth, nuclear membrane morphology, nuclear distribution of lamin A and the fundamental process of transcription. Expression of prelamin A variants that are constitutively farnesylated induced the formation of lamin A aggregates and dramatic changes in nuclear membrane morphology, which led to reduced

  16. MSV3d: database of human MisSense Variants mapped to 3D protein structure.

    PubMed

    Luu, Tien-Dao; Rusu, Alin-Mihai; Walter, Vincent; Ripp, Raymond; Moulinier, Luc; Muller, Jean; Toursel, Thierry; Thompson, Julie D; Poch, Olivier; Nguyen, Hoan

    2012-01-01

    The elucidation of the complex relationships linking genotypic and phenotypic variations to protein structure is a major challenge in the post-genomic era. We present MSV3d (Database of human MisSense Variants mapped to 3D protein structure), a new database that contains detailed annotation of missense variants of all human proteins (20 199 proteins). The multi-level characterization includes details of the physico-chemical changes induced by amino acid modification, as well as information related to the conservation of the mutated residue and its position relative to functional features in the available or predicted 3D model. Major releases of the database are automatically generated and updated regularly in line with the dbSNP (database of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism) and SwissVar releases, by exploiting the extensive Décrypthon computational grid resources. The database (http://decrypthon.igbmc.fr/msv3d) is easily accessible through a simple web interface coupled to a powerful query engine and a standard web service. The content is completely or partially downloadable in XML or flat file formats. Database URL: http://decrypthon.igbmc.fr/msv3d.

  17. From the periphery to centre stage: de novo single nucleotide variants play a key role in human genetic disease.

    PubMed

    Ku, Chee-Seng; Tan, Eng King; Cooper, David N

    2013-04-01

    Human germline mutations arise anew during meiosis in every generation. Such spontaneously occurring genetic variants are termed de novo mutations. Although the introduction of microarray based approaches led to the discovery of numerous de novo copy number variants underlying a range of human genetic conditions, de novo single nucleotide variants (SNVs) remained refractory to analysis at the whole genome level until the advent of next generation sequencing technologies such as whole genome sequencing and whole exome sequencing. These approaches have recently allowed the estimation of the mutation rate of de novo SNVs and greatly increased our understanding of their contribution to human genetic disease. Indeed, de novo SNVs have been found to underlie various common human neurodevelopmental conditions such as schizophrenia, autism and intellectual disability, as well as sporadic cases of rare Mendelian disorders. In many cases, however, confirmation of the pathogenicity of identified de novo SNVs remains a major challenge. PMID:23396985

  18. dbWGFP: a database and web server of human whole-genome single nucleotide variants and their functional predictions

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Jiaxin; Wu, Mengmeng; Li, Lianshuo; Liu, Zhuo; Zeng, Wanwen; Jiang, Rui

    2016-01-01

    The recent advancement of the next generation sequencing technology has enabled the fast and low-cost detection of all genetic variants spreading across the entire human genome, making the application of whole-genome sequencing a tendency in the study of disease-causing genetic variants. Nevertheless, there still lacks a repository that collects predictions of functionally damaging effects of human genetic variants, though it has been well recognized that such predictions play a central role in the analysis of whole-genome sequencing data. To fill this gap, we developed a database named dbWGFP (a database and web server of human whole-genome single nucleotide variants and their functional predictions) that contains functional predictions and annotations of nearly 8.58 billion possible human whole-genome single nucleotide variants. Specifically, this database integrates 48 functional predictions calculated by 17 popular computational methods and 44 valuable annotations obtained from various data sources. Standalone software, user-friendly query services and free downloads of this database are available at http://bioinfo.au.tsinghua.edu.cn/dbwgfp. dbWGFP provides a valuable resource for the analysis of whole-genome sequencing, exome sequencing and SNP array data, thereby complementing existing data sources and computational resources in deciphering genetic bases of human inherited diseases. PMID:26989155

  19. dbWGFP: a database and web server of human whole-genome single nucleotide variants and their functional predictions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiaxin; Wu, Mengmeng; Li, Lianshuo; Liu, Zhuo; Zeng, Wanwen; Jiang, Rui

    2016-01-01

    The recent advancement of the next generation sequencing technology has enabled the fast and low-cost detection of all genetic variants spreading across the entire human genome, making the application of whole-genome sequencing a tendency in the study of disease-causing genetic variants. Nevertheless, there still lacks a repository that collects predictions of functionally damaging effects of human genetic variants, though it has been well recognized that such predictions play a central role in the analysis of whole-genome sequencing data. To fill this gap, we developed a database named dbWGFP (a database and web server of human whole-genome single nucleotide variants and their functional predictions) that contains functional predictions and annotations of nearly 8.58 billion possible human whole-genome single nucleotide variants. Specifically, this database integrates 48 functional predictions calculated by 17 popular computational methods and 44 valuable annotations obtained from various data sources. Standalone software, user-friendly query services and free downloads of this database are available at http://bioinfo.au.tsinghua.edu.cn/dbwgfp. dbWGFP provides a valuable resource for the analysis of whole-genome sequencing, exome sequencing and SNP array data, thereby complementing existing data sources and computational resources in deciphering genetic bases of human inherited diseases. PMID:26989155

  20. Attenuation of Human Enterovirus 71 High-Replication-Fidelity Variants in AG129 Mice

    PubMed Central

    Meng, Tao

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT In a screen for ribavirin resistance, a novel high-fidelity variant of human enterovirus 71 (EV71) with the single amino acid change L123F in its RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp or 3D) was identified. Based on the crystal structure of EV71 RdRp, L123 locates at the entrance of the RNA template binding channel, which might form a fidelity checkpoint. EV71 RdRp-L123F variants generated less progeny in a guanidine resistance assay and virus populations with lower mutation frequencies in cell culture passage due to their higher replication fidelity. However, compared with wild-type viruses, they did not show growth defects. In vivo infections further revealed that high-fidelity mutations L123F and G64R (previously reported) negatively impacted EV71 fitness and greatly reduced viral pathogenicity alone or together in AG129 mice. Interestingly, a variant with double mutations, RG/B4-G64R/L123F (where RG/B4 is an EV71 genotype B4 virus constructed by reverse genetics [RG])showed higher fidelity in vitro and less virulence in vivo than any one of the above two single mutants. The 50% lethal dose (LD50) of the double mutant increased more than 500 times compared with the LD50 of wild-type RG/B4 in mice. The results indicated that these high-fidelity variants exhibited an attenuated pathogenic phenotype in vivo and offer promise as a live attenuated EV71 vaccine. IMPORTANCE The error-prone nature of the RNA-dependent RNA polymerase (RdRp) of RNA viruses during replication results in quasispecies and aids survival of virus populations under a wide range of selective pressures. Virus variants with higher replication fidelity exhibit lower genetic diversity and attenuated pathogenicity in vivo. Here, we identified a novel high-fidelity mutation L123F in the RdRp of human enterovirus 71 (EV71). We further elucidated that EV71 variants with the RdRp-L123F mutation and/or the previously identified high-fidelity mutation RdRp-G64R were attenuated in an AG129 mouse model

  1. C282Y-HFE Gene Variant Affects Cholesterol Metabolism in Human Neuroblastoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ali-Rahmani, Fatima; Huang, Michael A.; Schengrund, C.-L.; Connor, James R.; Lee, Sang Y.

    2014-01-01

    Although disruptions in the maintenance of iron and cholesterol metabolism have been implicated in several cancers, the association between variants in the HFE gene that is associated with cellular iron uptake and cholesterol metabolism has not been studied. The C282Y-HFE variant is a risk factor for different cancers, is known to affect sphingolipid metabolism, and to result in increased cellular iron uptake. The effect of this variant on cholesterol metabolism and its possible relevance to cancer phenotype was investigated using wild type (WT) and C282Y-HFE transfected human neuroblastoma SH-SY5Y cells. Expression of C282Y-HFE in SH-SY5Y cells resulted in a significant increase in total cholesterol as well as increased transcription of a number of genes involved in its metabolism compared to cells expressing WT-HFE. The marked increase in expression of NPC1L1 relative to that of most other genes, was accompanied by a significant increase in expression of NPC1, a protein that functions in cholesterol uptake by cells. Because inhibitors of cholesterol metabolism have been proposed to be beneficial for treating certain cancers, their effect on the viability of C282Y-HFE neuroblastoma cells was ascertained. C282Y-HFE cells were significantly more sensitive than WT-HFE cells to U18666A, an inhibitor of desmosterol Δ24-reductase the enzyme catalyzing the last step in cholesterol biosynthesis. This was not seen for simvastatin, ezetimibe, or a sphingosine kinase inhibitor. These studies indicate that cancers presenting in carriers of the C282Y-HFE allele might be responsive to treatment designed to selectively reduce cholesterol content in their tumor cells. PMID:24533143

  2. Cis and trans effects of human genomic variants on gene expression.

    PubMed

    Bryois, Julien; Buil, Alfonso; Evans, David M; Kemp, John P; Montgomery, Stephen B; Conrad, Donald F; Ho, Karen M; Ring, Susan; Hurles, Matthew; Deloukas, Panos; Davey Smith, George; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T

    2014-07-01

    Gene expression is a heritable cellular phenotype that defines the function of a cell and can lead to diseases in case of misregulation. In order to detect genetic variations affecting gene expression, we performed association analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and copy number variants (CNVs) with gene expression measured in 869 lymphoblastoid cell lines of the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) cohort in cis and in trans. We discovered that 3,534 genes (false discovery rate (FDR) = 5%) are affected by an expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) in cis and 48 genes are affected in trans. We observed that CNVs are more likely to be eQTLs than SNPs. In addition, we found that variants associated to complex traits and diseases are enriched for trans-eQTLs and that trans-eQTLs are enriched for cis-eQTLs. As a variant affecting both a gene in cis and in trans suggests that the cis gene is functionally linked to the trans gene expression, we looked specifically for trans effects of cis-eQTLs. We discovered that 26 cis-eQTLs are associated to 92 genes in trans with the cis-eQTLs of the transcriptions factors BATF3 and HMX2 affecting the most genes. We then explored if the variation of the level of expression of the cis genes were causally affecting the level of expression of the trans genes and discovered several causal relationships between variation in the level of expression of the cis gene and variation of the level of expression of the trans gene. This analysis shows that a large sample size allows the discovery of secondary effects of human variations on gene expression that can be used to construct short directed gene regulatory networks.

  3. Cis and Trans Effects of Human Genomic Variants on Gene Expression

    PubMed Central

    Bryois, Julien; Buil, Alfonso; Evans, David M.; Kemp, John P.; Montgomery, Stephen B.; Conrad, Donald F.; Ho, Karen M.; Ring, Susan; Hurles, Matthew; Deloukas, Panos; Davey Smith, George; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.

    2014-01-01

    Gene expression is a heritable cellular phenotype that defines the function of a cell and can lead to diseases in case of misregulation. In order to detect genetic variations affecting gene expression, we performed association analysis of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) and copy number variants (CNVs) with gene expression measured in 869 lymphoblastoid cell lines of the Avon Longitudinal Study of Parents and Children (ALSPAC) cohort in cis and in trans. We discovered that 3,534 genes (false discovery rate (FDR) = 5%) are affected by an expression quantitative trait locus (eQTL) in cis and 48 genes are affected in trans. We observed that CNVs are more likely to be eQTLs than SNPs. In addition, we found that variants associated to complex traits and diseases are enriched for trans-eQTLs and that trans-eQTLs are enriched for cis-eQTLs. As a variant affecting both a gene in cis and in trans suggests that the cis gene is functionally linked to the trans gene expression, we looked specifically for trans effects of cis-eQTLs. We discovered that 26 cis-eQTLs are associated to 92 genes in trans with the cis-eQTLs of the transcriptions factors BATF3 and HMX2 affecting the most genes. We then explored if the variation of the level of expression of the cis genes were causally affecting the level of expression of the trans genes and discovered several causal relationships between variation in the level of expression of the cis gene and variation of the level of expression of the trans gene. This analysis shows that a large sample size allows the discovery of secondary effects of human variations on gene expression that can be used to construct short directed gene regulatory networks. PMID:25010687

  4. Functional characterization of the human organic cation transporter 2 variant p.270Ala>Ser.

    PubMed

    Zolk, Oliver; Solbach, Thomas F; König, Jörg; Fromm, Martin F

    2009-06-01

    The organic cation transporter 2 (OCT2, SLC22A2) plays an important role for renal drug elimination. Recent clinical studies indicate an impact of the frequent nonsynonymous c.808G>T (p.270Ala>Ser) polymorphism on renal clearance of metformin and the extent of the metformin-cimetidine interaction. The role of this polymorphism for renal disposition of endogenous compounds and drugs other than metformin has not been investigated. In addition, it is unclear whether the observed genotype dependence of an OCT2-mediated drug-drug interaction might occur also with other OCT inhibitors. To address these issues, we generated human embryonic kidney cells stably expressing wild-type OCT2 or the p.270Ala>Ser variant. No differences in protein expression levels and membrane incorporation pattern were observed between the two cell lines. The p.270Ala>Ser variant significantly impaired uptake kinetics of 1-methyl-4-phenylpyridinium, dopamine, norepinephrine, and propranolol. V(max) values were significantly reduced for uptake of all four compounds mediated by the p.270Ala>Ser variant compared with wild-type OCT2. In addition, a significant difference in the affinity to wild-type and mutant OCT2 was observed for dopamine (K(m) dopamine: 932 +/- 77 versus 1285 +/- 132 microM). Moreover, out of a set of 27 compounds p.270Ala>Ser OCT2 was significantly less sensitive to inhibition by cimetidine, flurazepam, metformin, mexiletine, propranolol, and verapamil than wild-type OCT2 (e.g., for propranolol: IC(50) wild type versus p.270Ala>Ser 189 versus 895 microM, P < 0.001). Our results indicate that the common OCT2 c.808G>T single nucleotide polymorphism significantly alters uptake of endogenous compounds and drugs. Moreover, for selected compounds the extent of OCT2-mediated drug interactions could depend on OCT2 c.808G>T genotype. PMID:19251820

  5. Consequences of a Human TRPA1 Genetic Variant on the Perception of Nociceptive and Olfactory Stimuli

    PubMed Central

    Heimann, Dirk; Doehring, Alexandra; Walter, Carmen; Dimova, Violeta; Geisslinger, Gerd; Lötsch, Jörn

    2014-01-01

    Background TRPA1 ion channels are involved in nociception and are also excited by pungent odorous substances. Based on reported associations of TRPA1 genetics with increased sensitivity to thermal pain stimuli, we therefore hypothesized that this association also exists for increased olfactory sensitivity. Methods Olfactory function and nociception was compared between carriers (n = 38) and non-carriers (n = 43) of TRPA1 variant rs11988795 G>A, a variant known to enhance cold pain perception. Olfactory function was quantified by assessing the odor threshold, odor discrimination and odor identification, and by applying 200-ms pulses of H2S intranasal. Nociception was assessed by measuring pain thresholds to experimental nociceptive stimuli (blunt pressure, electrical stimuli, cold and heat stimuli, and 200-ms intranasal pulses of CO2). Results Among the 11 subjects with moderate hyposmia, carriers of the minor A allele (n = 2) were underrepresented (34 carriers among the 70 normosmic subjects; p = 0.049). Moreover, carriers of the A allele discriminated odors significantly better than non-carriers (13.1±1.5 versus 12.3±1.6 correct discriminations) and indicated a higher intensity of the H2S stimuli (29.2±13.2 versus 21±12.8 mm VAS, p = 0.006), which, however, could not be excluded to have involved a trigeminal component during stimulation. Finally, the increased sensitivity to thermal pain could be reproduced. Conclusions The findings are in line with a previous association of a human TRPA1 variant with nociceptive parameters and extend the association to the perception of odorants. However, this addresses mainly those stimulants that involve a trigeminal component whereas a pure olfactory effect may remain disputable. Nevertheless, findings suggest that future TRPA1 modulating drugs may modify the perception of odorants. PMID:24752136

  6. Polymorphic Variants of Human Rhodanese Exhibit Differences in Thermal Stability and Sulfur Transfer Kinetics.

    PubMed

    Libiad, Marouane; Sriraman, Anusha; Banerjee, Ruma

    2015-09-25

    Rhodanese is a component of the mitochondrial H2S oxidation pathway. Rhodanese catalyzes the transfer of sulfane sulfur from glutathione persulfide (GSSH) to sulfite generating thiosulfate and from thiosulfate to cyanide generating thiocyanate. Two polymorphic variations have been identified in the rhodanese coding sequence in the French Caucasian population. The first, 306A→C, has an allelic frequency of 1% and results in an E102D substitution in the encoded protein. The second polymorphism, 853C→G, has an allelic frequency of 5% and leads to a P285A substitution. In this study, we have examined differences in the stability between wild-type rhodanese and the E102D and P285A variants and in the kinetics of the sulfur transfer reactions. The Asp-102 and Ala-285 variants are more stable than wild-type rhodanese and exhibit kcat/Km,CN values that are 17- and 1.6-fold higher, respectively. All three rhodanese forms preferentially catalyze sulfur transfer from GSSH to sulfite, generating thiosulfate and glutathione. The kcat/Km,sulfite values for the variants in the sulfur transfer reaction from GSSH to sulfite were 1.6- (Asp-102) and 4-fold (Ala-285) lower than for wild-type rhodanese, whereas the kcat/Km,GSSH values were similar for all three enzymes. Thiosulfate-dependent H2S production in murine liver lysate is low, consistent with a role for rhodanese in sulfide oxidation. Our studies show that polymorphic variations that are distant from the active site differentially modulate the sulfurtransferase activity of human rhodanese to cyanide versus sulfite and might be important in differences in susceptibility to diseases where rhodanese dysfunction has been implicated, e.g. inflammatory bowel diseases.

  7. Polymorphic Variants of Human Rhodanese Exhibit Differences in Thermal Stability and Sulfur Transfer Kinetics*

    PubMed Central

    Libiad, Marouane; Sriraman, Anusha; Banerjee, Ruma

    2015-01-01

    Rhodanese is a component of the mitochondrial H2S oxidation pathway. Rhodanese catalyzes the transfer of sulfane sulfur from glutathione persulfide (GSSH) to sulfite generating thiosulfate and from thiosulfate to cyanide generating thiocyanate. Two polymorphic variations have been identified in the rhodanese coding sequence in the French Caucasian population. The first, 306A→C, has an allelic frequency of 1% and results in an E102D substitution in the encoded protein. The second polymorphism, 853C→G, has an allelic frequency of 5% and leads to a P285A substitution. In this study, we have examined differences in the stability between wild-type rhodanese and the E102D and P285A variants and in the kinetics of the sulfur transfer reactions. The Asp-102 and Ala-285 variants are more stable than wild-type rhodanese and exhibit kcat/Km,CN values that are 17- and 1.6-fold higher, respectively. All three rhodanese forms preferentially catalyze sulfur transfer from GSSH to sulfite, generating thiosulfate and glutathione. The kcat/Km,sulfite values for the variants in the sulfur transfer reaction from GSSH to sulfite were 1.6- (Asp-102) and 4-fold (Ala-285) lower than for wild-type rhodanese, whereas the kcat/Km,GSSH values were similar for all three enzymes. Thiosulfate-dependent H2S production in murine liver lysate is low, consistent with a role for rhodanese in sulfide oxidation. Our studies show that polymorphic variations that are distant from the active site differentially modulate the sulfurtransferase activity of human rhodanese to cyanide versus sulfite and might be important in differences in susceptibility to diseases where rhodanese dysfunction has been implicated, e.g. inflammatory bowel diseases. PMID:26269602

  8. A donor splice mutation and a single-base deletion produce two carboxyl-terminal variants of human serum albumin

    SciTech Connect

    Watkins, S.; Madison, J.; Davis, E.; Sakamoto, Yasushi; Putnam, F.W. ); Galliano, M.; Minchiotti, L. )

    1991-07-15

    At least 35 allelic variants of human serum albumin have been sequenced at the protein level. All except two COOH-terminal variants, Catania and Venezia, are readily explainable as single-point substitutions. The two chain-termination variants are clustered in certain locations in Italy and are found in numerous unrelated individuals. In order to correlate the protein change in these variants with the corresponding DNA mutation, the two variant albumin genes have been cloned, sequenced, and compared to normal albumin genomic DNA. In the Catania variant, a single base deletion and subsequent frameshift leads to a shortened and altered COOH terminus. Albumin Venezia is caused by a mutation that alters the first consensus nucleotide of the 5{prime} donor splice junction of intron 14 and the 3{prime} end of exon 14, which is shortened from 68 to 43 base pairs. This change leads to an exon skipping event resulting in direct splicing of exon 13 to exon 15. The predicted Venezia albumin product has a truncated amino acid sequence (580 residues instead of 585), and the COOH-terminal sequence is altered after Glu-571. The variant COOH terminus ends with the dibasic sequence Arg-Lys that is apparently removed through stepwise cleavage by serum carboxypeptidase B to yield several forms of circulating albumin.

  9. Modeling recent human evolution in mice by expression of a selected EDAR variant

    PubMed Central

    Kamberov, Yana G.; Wang, Sijia; Tan, Jingze; Gerbault, Pascale; Wark, Abigail; Tan, Longzhi; Yang, Yajun; Li, Shilin; Tang, Kun; Chen, Hua; Powell, Adam; Itan, Yuval; Fuller, Dorian; Lohmueller, Jason; Mao, Junhao; Schachar, Asa; Paymer, Madeline; Hostetter, Elizabeth; Byrne, Elizabeth; Burnett, Melissa; McMahon, Andrew P.; Thomas, Mark G.; Lieberman, Daniel E.; Jin, Li; Tabin, Clifford J.; Morgan, Bruce A.; Sabeti, Pardis C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary An adaptive variant of the human Ectodysplasin receptor, EDARV370A, is one of the strongest candidates of recent positive selection from genome-wide scans. We have modeled EDAR370A in mice and characterized its phenotype and evolutionary origins in humans. Our computational analysis suggests the allele arose in Central China approximately 30,000 years ago. Although EDAR370A has been associated with increased scalp hair thickness and changed tooth morphology in humans, its direct biological significance and potential adaptive role remain unclear. We generated a knock-in mouse model and find that, as in humans, hair thickness is increased in EDAR370A mice. We identify novel biological targets affected by the mutation, including mammary and eccrine glands. Building on these results, we find that EDAR370A is associated with an increased number of active eccrine glands in the Han Chinese. This interdisciplinary approach yields unique insight into the generation of adaptive variation among modern humans. PMID:23415220

  10. Recognition of influenza H3N2 variant virus by human neutralizing antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Bangaru, Sandhya; Nieusma, Travis; Kose, Nurgun; Thornburg, Natalie J.; Kaplan, Bryan S.; King, Hannah G.; Singh, Vidisha; Lampley, Rebecca M.; Cisneros, Alberto; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Edupuganti, Srilatha; Lai, Lilin; Richt, Juergen A.; Webby, Richard J.; Ward, Andrew B.; Crowe, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Since 2011, over 300 human cases of infection, especially in exposed children, with the influenza A H3N2 variant (H3N2v) virus that circulates in swine in the US have been reported. The structural and genetic basis for the lack of protection against H3N2v induced by vaccines containing seasonal H3N2 antigens is poorly understood. We isolated 17 human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that neutralized H3N2v virus from subjects experimentally immunized with an H3N2v candidate vaccine. Six mAbs exhibited very potent neutralizing activity (IC50 < 200 ng/ml) against the H3N2v virus but not against current human H3N2 circulating strains. Fine epitope mapping and structural characterization of antigen-antibody complexes revealed that H3N2v specificity was attributable to amino acid polymorphisms in the 150-loop and the 190-helix antigenic sites on the hemagglutinin protein. H3N2v-specific antibodies also neutralized human H3N2 influenza strains naturally circulating between 1995 and 2005. These results reveal a high level of antigenic relatedness between the swine H3N2v virus and previously circulating human strains, consistent with the fact that early human H3 seasonal strains entered the porcine population in the 1990s and reentered the human population, where they had not been circulating, as H3N2v about a decade later. The data also explain the increased susceptibility to H3N2v viruses in young children, who lack prior exposure to human seasonal strains from the 1990s. PMID:27482543

  11. Molecular Mechanism of Wide Photoabsorption Spectral Shifts of Color Variants of Human Cellular Retinol Binding Protein II.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Cheng; Kamiya, Motoshi; Uchida, Yoshihiro; Hayashi, Shigehiko

    2015-10-21

    Color variants of human cellular retinol binding protein II (hCRBPII) created by protein engineering were recently shown to exhibit anomalously wide photoabsorption spectral shifts over ∼200 nm across the visible region. The remarkable phenomenon provides a unique opportunity to gain insight into the molecular basis of the color tuning of retinal binding proteins for understanding of color vision as well as for engineering of novel color variants of retinal binding photoreceptor proteins employed in optogenetics. Here, we report a theoretical investigation of the molecular mechanism underlying the anomalously wide spectral shifts of the color variants of hCRBPII. Computational modeling of the color variants with hybrid molecular simulations of free energy geometry optimization succeeded in reproducing the experimentally observed wide spectral shifts, and revealed that protein flexibility, through which the active site structure of the protein and bound water molecules is altered by remote mutations, plays a significant role in inducing the large spectral shifts.

  12. Genome-Wide Functional Annotation of Human Protein-Coding Splice Variants Using Multiple Instance Learning.

    PubMed

    Panwar, Bharat; Menon, Rajasree; Eksi, Ridvan; Li, Hong-Dong; Omenn, Gilbert S; Guan, Yuanfang

    2016-06-01

    The vast majority of human multiexon genes undergo alternative splicing and produce a variety of splice variant transcripts and proteins, which can perform different functions. These protein-coding splice variants (PCSVs) greatly increase the functional diversity of proteins. Most functional annotation algorithms have been developed at the gene level; the lack of isoform-level gold standards is an important intellectual limitation for currently available machine learning algorithms. The accumulation of a large amount of RNA-seq data in the public domain greatly increases our ability to examine the functional annotation of genes at isoform level. In the present study, we used a multiple instance learning (MIL)-based approach for predicting the function of PCSVs. We used transcript-level expression values and gene-level functional associations from the Gene Ontology database. A support vector machine (SVM)-based 5-fold cross-validation technique was applied. Comparatively, genes with multiple PCSVs performed better than single PCSV genes, and performance also improved when more examples were available to train the models. We demonstrated our predictions using literature evidence of ADAM15, LMNA/C, and DMXL2 genes. All predictions have been implemented in a web resource called "IsoFunc", which is freely available for the global scientific community through http://guanlab.ccmb.med.umich.edu/isofunc . PMID:27142340

  13. Genetic variants influencing effectiveness of exercise training programmes in obesity - an overview of human studies.

    PubMed

    Leońska-Duniec, A; Ahmetov, I I; Zmijewski, P

    2016-09-01

    Frequent and regular physical activity has significant benefits for health, including improvement of body composition and help in weight control. Consequently, promoting training programmes, particularly in those who are genetically predisposed, is a significant step towards controlling the presently increasing epidemic of obesity. Although the physiological responses of the human body to exercise are quite well described, the genetic background of these reactions still remains mostly unknown. This review not only summarizes the current evidence, through a literature review and the results of our studies on the influence of gene variants on the characteristics and range of the body's adaptive response to training, but also explores research organization problems, future trends, and possibilities. We describe the most reliable candidate genetic markers that are involved in energy balance pathways and body composition changes in response to training programmes, such as FTO, MC4R, ACE, PPARG, LEP, LEPR, ADRB2, and ADRB3. This knowledge can have an enormous impact not only on individualization of exercise programmes to make them more efficient and safer, but also on improved recovery, traumatology, medical care, diet, supplementation and many other areas. Nevertheless, the current studies still represent only the first steps towards a better understanding of the genetic factors that influence obesity-related traits, as well as gene variant x physical activity interactions, so further research is necessary. PMID:27601774

  14. Genetic variants influencing effectiveness of exercise training programmes in obesity – an overview of human studies

    PubMed Central

    Ahmetov, II; Zmijewski, P

    2016-01-01

    Frequent and regular physical activity has significant benefits for health, including improvement of body composition and help in weight control. Consequently, promoting training programmes, particularly in those who are genetically predisposed, is a significant step towards controlling the presently increasing epidemic of obesity. Although the physiological responses of the human body to exercise are quite well described, the genetic background of these reactions still remains mostly unknown. This review not only summarizes the current evidence, through a literature review and the results of our studies on the influence of gene variants on the characteristics and range of the body's adaptive response to training, but also explores research organization problems, future trends, and possibilities. We describe the most reliable candidate genetic markers that are involved in energy balance pathways and body composition changes in response to training programmes, such as FTO, MC4R, ACE, PPARG, LEP, LEPR, ADRB2, and ADRB3. This knowledge can have an enormous impact not only on individualization of exercise programmes to make them more efficient and safer, but also on improved recovery, traumatology, medical care, diet, supplementation and many other areas. Nevertheless, the current studies still represent only the first steps towards a better understanding of the genetic factors that influence obesity-related traits, as well as gene variant x physical activity interactions, so further research is necessary.

  15. Identification of common variants associated with human hippocampal and intracranial volumes

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Jason L; Medland, Sarah E; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Hibar, Derrek P; Senstad, Rudy E; Winkler, Anderson M; Toro, Roberto; Appel, Katja; Bartecek, Richard; Bergmann, Ørjan; Bernard, Manon; Brown, Andrew A; Cannon, Dara M; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Christoforou, Andrea; Domin, Martin; Grimm, Oliver; Hollinshead, Marisa; Holmes, Avram J; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Langan, Camilla; Lopez, Lorna M; Hansell, Narelle K; Hwang, Kristy S; Kim, Sungeun; Laje, Gonzalo; Lee, Phil H; Liu, Xinmin; Loth, Eva; Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Mattingsdal, Morten; Mohnke, Sebastian; Maniega, Susana Muñoz; Nho, Kwangsik; Nugent, Allison C; O’Brien, Carol; Papmeyer, Martina; Pütz, Benno; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Rasmussen, Jerod; Rijpkema, Mark; Risacher, Shannon L; Roddey, J Cooper; Rose, Emma J; Ryten, Mina; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Strengman, Eric; Teumer, Alexander; Trabzuni, Daniah; Turner, Jessica; van Eijk, Kristel; van Erp, Theo G M; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Wittfeld, Katharina; Wolf, Christiane; Woudstra, Saskia; Aleman, Andre; Alhusaini, Saud; Almasy, Laura; Binder, Elisabeth B; Brohawn, David G; Cantor, Rita M; Carless, Melanie A; Corvin, Aiden; Czisch, Michael; Curran, Joanne E; Davies, Gail; de Almeida, Marcio A A; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D; Erk, Susanne; Fagerness, Jesen; Fox, Peter T; Freimer, Nelson B; Gill, Michael; Göring, Harald H H; Hagler, Donald J; Hoehn, David; Holsboer, Florian; Hoogman, Martine; Hosten, Norbert; Jahanshad, Neda; Johnson, Matthew P; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Kent, Jack W; Kochunov, Peter; Lancaster, Jack L; Lawrie, Stephen M; Liewald, David C; Mandl, René; Matarin, Mar; Mattheisen, Manuel; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Moses, Eric K; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Nauck, Matthias; Nöthen, Markus M; Olvera, Rene L; Pandolfo, Massimo; Pike, G Bruce; Puls, Ralf; Reinvang, Ivar; Rentería, Miguel E; Rietschel, Marcella; Roffman, Joshua L; Royle, Natalie A; Rujescu, Dan; Savitz, Jonathan; Schnack, Hugo G; Schnell, Knut; Seiferth, Nina; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M; Valdés Hernández, Maria C; Van den Heuvel, Martijn; van der Wee, Nic J; Van Haren, Neeltje E M; Veltman, Joris A; Völzke, Henry; Walker, Robert; Westlye, Lars T; Whelan, Christopher D; Agartz, Ingrid; Boomsma, Dorret I; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Dale, Anders M; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C; Hagoort, Peter; Hall, Jeremy; Heinz, Andreas; Jack, Clifford R; Foroud, Tatiana M; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Macciardi, Fabio; Montgomery, Grant W; Poline, Jean Baptiste; Porteous, David J; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Starr, John M; Sussmann, Jessika; Toga, Arthur W; Veltman, Dick J; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W; Bis, Joshua C; Ikram, M Arfan; Smith, Albert V; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Tzourio, Christophe; Vernooij, Meike W; Launer, Lenore J; DeCarli, Charles; Seshadri, Sudha; Andreassen, Ole A; Apostolova, Liana G; Bastin, Mark E; Blangero, John; Brunner, Han G; Buckner, Randy L; Cichon, Sven; Coppola, Giovanni; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Deary, Ian J; Donohoe, Gary; de Geus, Eco J C; Espeseth, Thomas; Fernández, Guillén; Glahn, David C; Grabe, Hans J; Hardy, John; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Jenkinson, Mark; Kahn, René S; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; McMahon, Francis J; McMahon, Katie L; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Morris, Derek W; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nichols, Thomas E; Ophoff, Roel A; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Penninx, Brenda W; Potkin, Steven G; Sämann, Philipp G; Saykin, Andrew J; Schumann, Gunter; Smoller, Jordan W; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Weale, Michael E; Martin, Nicholas G; Franke, Barbara; Wright, Margaret J; Thompson, Paul M

    2013-01-01

    Identifying genetic variants influencing human brain structures may reveal new biological mechanisms underlying cognition and neuropsychiatric illness. The volume of the hippocampus is a biomarker of incipient Alzheimer’s disease1,2 and is reduced in schizophrenia3, major depression4 and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy5. Whereas many brain imaging phenotypes are highly heritable6,7, identifying and replicating genetic influences has been difficult, as small effects and the high costs of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have led to underpowered studies. Here we report genome-wide association meta-analyses and replication for mean bilateral hippocampal, total brain and intracranial volumes from a large multinational consortium. The intergenic variant rs7294919 was associated with hippocampal volume (12q24.22; N = 21,151; P = 6.70 × 10−16) and the expression levels of the positional candidate gene TESC in brain tissue. Additionally, rs10784502, located within HMGA2, was associated with intracranial volume (12q14.3; N = 15,782; P = 1.12 × 10−12). We also identified a suggestive association with total brain volume at rs10494373 within DDR2 (1q23.3; N = 6,500; P = 5.81 × 10−7). PMID:22504417

  16. Genetic variants influencing effectiveness of exercise training programmes in obesity – an overview of human studies

    PubMed Central

    Ahmetov, II; Zmijewski, P

    2016-01-01

    Frequent and regular physical activity has significant benefits for health, including improvement of body composition and help in weight control. Consequently, promoting training programmes, particularly in those who are genetically predisposed, is a significant step towards controlling the presently increasing epidemic of obesity. Although the physiological responses of the human body to exercise are quite well described, the genetic background of these reactions still remains mostly unknown. This review not only summarizes the current evidence, through a literature review and the results of our studies on the influence of gene variants on the characteristics and range of the body's adaptive response to training, but also explores research organization problems, future trends, and possibilities. We describe the most reliable candidate genetic markers that are involved in energy balance pathways and body composition changes in response to training programmes, such as FTO, MC4R, ACE, PPARG, LEP, LEPR, ADRB2, and ADRB3. This knowledge can have an enormous impact not only on individualization of exercise programmes to make them more efficient and safer, but also on improved recovery, traumatology, medical care, diet, supplementation and many other areas. Nevertheless, the current studies still represent only the first steps towards a better understanding of the genetic factors that influence obesity-related traits, as well as gene variant x physical activity interactions, so further research is necessary. PMID:27601774

  17. Identification of common variants associated with human hippocampal and intracranial volumes.

    PubMed

    Stein, Jason L; Medland, Sarah E; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Hibar, Derrek P; Senstad, Rudy E; Winkler, Anderson M; Toro, Roberto; Appel, Katja; Bartecek, Richard; Bergmann, Ørjan; Bernard, Manon; Brown, Andrew A; Cannon, Dara M; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Christoforou, Andrea; Domin, Martin; Grimm, Oliver; Hollinshead, Marisa; Holmes, Avram J; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Langan, Camilla; Lopez, Lorna M; Hansell, Narelle K; Hwang, Kristy S; Kim, Sungeun; Laje, Gonzalo; Lee, Phil H; Liu, Xinmin; Loth, Eva; Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Mattingsdal, Morten; Mohnke, Sebastian; Maniega, Susana Muñoz; Nho, Kwangsik; Nugent, Allison C; O'Brien, Carol; Papmeyer, Martina; Pütz, Benno; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Rasmussen, Jerod; Rijpkema, Mark; Risacher, Shannon L; Roddey, J Cooper; Rose, Emma J; Ryten, Mina; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Strengman, Eric; Teumer, Alexander; Trabzuni, Daniah; Turner, Jessica; van Eijk, Kristel; van Erp, Theo G M; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Wittfeld, Katharina; Wolf, Christiane; Woudstra, Saskia; Aleman, Andre; Alhusaini, Saud; Almasy, Laura; Binder, Elisabeth B; Brohawn, David G; Cantor, Rita M; Carless, Melanie A; Corvin, Aiden; Czisch, Michael; Curran, Joanne E; Davies, Gail; de Almeida, Marcio A A; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D; Erk, Susanne; Fagerness, Jesen; Fox, Peter T; Freimer, Nelson B; Gill, Michael; Göring, Harald H H; Hagler, Donald J; Hoehn, David; Holsboer, Florian; Hoogman, Martine; Hosten, Norbert; Jahanshad, Neda; Johnson, Matthew P; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Kent, Jack W; Kochunov, Peter; Lancaster, Jack L; Lawrie, Stephen M; Liewald, David C; Mandl, René; Matarin, Mar; Mattheisen, Manuel; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Moses, Eric K; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Nauck, Matthias; Nöthen, Markus M; Olvera, Rene L; Pandolfo, Massimo; Pike, G Bruce; Puls, Ralf; Reinvang, Ivar; Rentería, Miguel E; Rietschel, Marcella; Roffman, Joshua L; Royle, Natalie A; Rujescu, Dan; Savitz, Jonathan; Schnack, Hugo G; Schnell, Knut; Seiferth, Nina; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M; Valdés Hernández, Maria C; Van den Heuvel, Martijn; van der Wee, Nic J; Van Haren, Neeltje E M; Veltman, Joris A; Völzke, Henry; Walker, Robert; Westlye, Lars T; Whelan, Christopher D; Agartz, Ingrid; Boomsma, Dorret I; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Dale, Anders M; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C; Hagoort, Peter; Hall, Jeremy; Heinz, Andreas; Jack, Clifford R; Foroud, Tatiana M; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Macciardi, Fabio; Montgomery, Grant W; Poline, Jean Baptiste; Porteous, David J; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Starr, John M; Sussmann, Jessika; Toga, Arthur W; Veltman, Dick J; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W; Bis, Joshua C; Ikram, M Arfan; Smith, Albert V; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Tzourio, Christophe; Vernooij, Meike W; Launer, Lenore J; DeCarli, Charles; Seshadri, Sudha; Andreassen, Ole A; Apostolova, Liana G; Bastin, Mark E; Blangero, John; Brunner, Han G; Buckner, Randy L; Cichon, Sven; Coppola, Giovanni; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Deary, Ian J; Donohoe, Gary; de Geus, Eco J C; Espeseth, Thomas; Fernández, Guillén; Glahn, David C; Grabe, Hans J; Hardy, John; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Jenkinson, Mark; Kahn, René S; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; McMahon, Francis J; McMahon, Katie L; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Morris, Derek W; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nichols, Thomas E; Ophoff, Roel A; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Penninx, Brenda W; Potkin, Steven G; Sämann, Philipp G; Saykin, Andrew J; Schumann, Gunter; Smoller, Jordan W; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Weale, Michael E; Martin, Nicholas G; Franke, Barbara; Wright, Margaret J; Thompson, Paul M

    2012-04-15

    Identifying genetic variants influencing human brain structures may reveal new biological mechanisms underlying cognition and neuropsychiatric illness. The volume of the hippocampus is a biomarker of incipient Alzheimer's disease and is reduced in schizophrenia, major depression and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Whereas many brain imaging phenotypes are highly heritable, identifying and replicating genetic influences has been difficult, as small effects and the high costs of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have led to underpowered studies. Here we report genome-wide association meta-analyses and replication for mean bilateral hippocampal, total brain and intracranial volumes from a large multinational consortium. The intergenic variant rs7294919 was associated with hippocampal volume (12q24.22; N = 21,151; P = 6.70 × 10(-16)) and the expression levels of the positional candidate gene TESC in brain tissue. Additionally, rs10784502, located within HMGA2, was associated with intracranial volume (12q14.3; N = 15,782; P = 1.12 × 10(-12)). We also identified a suggestive association with total brain volume at rs10494373 within DDR2 (1q23.3; N = 6,500; P = 5.81 × 10(-7)).

  18. Telomere length and expression of human telomerase reverse transcriptase splice variants in chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    PubMed

    Palma, Marzia; Parker, Anton; Hojjat-Farsangi, Mohammad; Forster, Jade; Kokhaei, Parviz; Hansson, Lotta; Osterborg, Anders; Mellstedt, Håkan

    2013-07-01

    Telomerase activity and telomere length (TL) are prognostic markers in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL). The rate-limiting component of telomerase is human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT), for which multiple transcripts exist. Two splicing sites, α and β, have been described that generate deleted transcripts. Only the full-length (FL; α⁺β⁺) transcript translates into a functional protein. The aim of this work was to characterize hTERT splice variants in CLL in relation to disease activity, clinical stage, immunoglobulin heavy chain variable (IGHV) genes mutational status, and TL. Real-time polymerase chain reaction assays were validated for quantification of the hTERT transcripts with either α deletion (del-α; α⁻β⁺)), β deletion (del-β; α⁺β⁻) or both α and β deletions (del-αβ; α⁻β⁻). The splice variant expression pattern was studied in 97 patients with CLL, 6 healthy control subjects, and one CD34 cell sample. TL was assessed with real-time polymerase chain reaction in 71 of 97 samples. Thirty-two percent of the cases did not express any of the splice variants. Average FL expression was 5.5-fold higher in IGHV-unmutated (n = 35) compared with mutated (n = 59) patients (p < 0.0001). FL levels correlated directly with the percentage of IGHV homology (r = 0.34; p = 0.0007) and inversely with TL (r = -0.44; p = 0.0001). Overall, FL expression correlated significantly with that of the other splice variants. All transcripts were more frequently expressed in progressive compared with nonprogressive patients (p < 0.0001 for FL and del-α; p = 0.01 for del-β; and p = 0.006 for del-αβ). This study provides a detailed insight into the hTERT transcript pattern in CLL, highlighting the necessity of subgrouping patients according to IGHV mutation status when analyzing hTERT expression.

  19. Altered tumor formation and evolutionary selection of genetic variants in the human MDM4 oncogene.

    PubMed

    Atwal, Gurinder Singh; Kirchhoff, Tomas; Bond, Elisabeth E; Montagna, Marco; Monagna, Marco; Menin, Chiara; Bertorelle, Roberta; Scaini, Maria Chiara; Bartel, Frank; Böhnke, Anja; Pempe, Christina; Gradhand, Elise; Hauptmann, Steffen; Offit, Kenneth; Levine, Arnold J; Bond, Gareth L

    2009-06-23

    A large body of evidence strongly suggests that the p53 tumor suppressor pathway is central in reducing cancer frequency in vertebrates. The protein product of the haploinsufficient mouse double minute 2 (MDM2) oncogene binds to and inhibits the p53 protein. Recent studies of human genetic variants in p53 and MDM2 have shown that single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) can affect p53 signaling, confer cancer risk, and suggest that the pathway is under evolutionary selective pressure (1-4). In this report, we analyze the haplotype structure of MDM4, a structural homolog of MDM2, in several different human populations. Unusual patterns of linkage disequilibrium (LD) in the haplotype distribution of MDM4 indicate the presence of candidate SNPs that may also modify the efficacy of the p53 pathway. Association studies in 5 different patient populations reveal that these SNPs in MDM4 confer an increased risk for, or early onset of, human breast and ovarian cancers in Ashkenazi Jewish and European cohorts, respectively. This report not only implicates MDM4 as a key regulator of tumorigenesis in the human breast and ovary, but also exploits for the first time evolutionary driven linkage disequilibrium as a means to select SNPs of p53 pathway genes that might be clinically relevant.

  20. A mouse model for a partially inactive obesity-associated human MC3R variant

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bonggi; Koo, Jashin; Yun Jun, Joo; Gavrilova, Oksana; Lee, Yongjun; Seo, Arnold Y.; Taylor-Douglas, Dezmond C.; Adler-Wailes, Diane C.; Chen, Faye; Gardner, Ryan; Koutzoumis, Dimitri; Sherafat Kazemzadeh, Roya; Roberson, Robin B.; Yanovski, Jack A.

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported children homozygous for two MC3R sequence variants (C17A+G241A) have greater fat mass than controls. Here we show, using homozygous knock-in mouse models in which we replace murine Mc3r with wild-type human (MC3RhWT/hWT) and double-mutant (C17A+G241A) human (MC3RhDM/hDM) MC3R, that MC3RhDM/hDM have greater weight and fat mass, increased energy intake and feeding efficiency, but reduced length and fat-free mass compared with MC3RhWT/hWT. MC3RhDM/hDM mice do not have increased adipose tissue inflammatory cell infiltration or greater expression of inflammatory markers despite their greater fat mass. Serum adiponectin levels are increased in MC3RhDM/hDM mice and MC3RhDM/hDM human subjects. MC3RhDM/hDM bone- and adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiate into adipocytes that accumulate more triglyceride than MC3RhWT/hWT MSCs. MC3RhDM/hDM impacts nutrient partitioning to generate increased adipose tissue that appears metabolically healthy. These data confirm the importance of MC3R signalling in human metabolism and suggest a previously-unrecognized role for the MC3R in adipose tissue development. PMID:26818770

  1. Structural difference at the active site of dibucaine resistant variant of human plasma cholinesterase.

    PubMed Central

    Muensch, H; Yoshida, A; Altland, K; Jensen, W; Goedde, H W

    1978-01-01

    Human plasma cholinesterase from five different genotypes -- E1U E1U, E1U E1A, E1A E1A, E1U E1S, E1A E1S, and E1U E1U C5+ -- was purified 8,000 fold from serum by a two-step procedure involving chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and preparative disc electrophoresis. The esterases were labeled with diisopropyl-1, 3-C14-fluorophosphate (DFP) aminoethylated, and digested by trypsin. The trytic digests were subjected to high voltage electrophoresis, and the radioactive peptides were detected by radioautography. Comparison of the peptides revealed different electrophoretic mobilities of the usual and atypical (dibucaine resistant) plasma cholinesterase peptides. The results are consistent with a structural abnormality of the active center in the variant enzyme. No difference was observed an the esteratic site of the enzyme with C5 component. Images Fig. 1 PMID:677127

  2. Promoter variants determine γ-aminobutyric acid homeostasis-related gene transcription in human epileptic hippocampi.

    PubMed

    Pernhorst, Katharina; Raabe, Anna; Niehusmann, Pitt; van Loo, Karen M J; Grote, Alexander; Hoffmann, Per; Cichon, Sven; Sander, Thomas; Schoch, Susanne; Becker, Albert J

    2011-12-01

    The functional consequences of single nucleotide polymorphisms associated with episodic brain disorders such as epilepsy and depression are unclear. Allelic associations with generalized epilepsies have been reported for single nucleotide polymorphisms rs1883415 (ALDH5A1; succinic semialdehyde dehydrogenase) and rs4906902 (GABRB3; GABAA β3), both of which are present in the 5' regulatory region of genes involved in γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) homeostasis. To address their allelic association with episodic brain disorders and allele-specific impact on the transcriptional regulation of these genes in human brain tissue, DNA and messenger RNA (mRNA) isolated from hippocampi were obtained at epilepsy surgery of 146 pharmacoresistant mesial temporal lobe epilepsy (mTLE) patients and from 651 healthy controls. We found that the C allele of rs1883415 is accumulated to a greater extentin mTLE versus controls. By real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction analyses, individuals homozygous for the C allele showed higher ALDH5A1 mRNA expression. The rs4906902 G allele of the GABRB3 gene was overrepresented in mTLE patients with depression; individuals homozygous for the G allele showed reduced GABRB3 mRNA expression. Bioinformatic analyses suggest that rs1883415 and rs4906902 alter the DNA binding affinity of the transcription factors Egr-3 in ALDH5A1 and MEF-2 in GABRB3 promoters, respectively. Using in vitro luciferase transfection assays, we observed that, in both cases, the transcription factors regulate gene expression depending on the allelic variant in the same direction as in the human hippocampi. Our data suggest that distinct promoter variants may sensitize individuals for differential, potentially stimulus-induced alterations of GABA homeostasis-relevant gene expression. This might contribute to the episodic onset of symptoms and point to new targets for pharmacotherapies.

  3. Identification and characterization of human xylosyltransferase II promoter single nucleotide variants.

    PubMed

    Faust, Isabel; Böker, Kai Oliver; Eirich, Christina; Akkermann, Dagmar; Kuhn, Joachim; Knabbe, Cornelius; Hendig, Doris

    2015-03-20

    The human isoenzymes xylosyltransferase-I and -II (XT-I, XT-II) catalyze the rate-limiting step in proteoglycan biosynthesis. Therefore, serum XT activity, mainly representing XT-II activity, displays a powerful biomarker to quantify the actual proteoglycan synthesis rate. Serum XT activity is increased up to 44% in disorders which are characterized by an altered proteoglycan metabolism, whereby underlying regulatory mechanisms remain unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate new regulatory pathways by identifying and characterizing naturally occurring XYLT2 promoter sequence variants as well as their potential influence on promoter activity and serum XT activity. XYLT2 promoter single nucleotide variants (SNVs) were identified and genotyped in the genomic DNA of 100 healthy blood donors by promoter amplification and sequencing or restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. The SNVs were characterized by an in silico analysis considering genetic linkage and transcription factor binding sites (TBSs). The influence of SNVs on promoter activity and serum XT activity was determined by dual luciferase reporter assay and HPLC-ESI mass spectrometry. Allele frequencies of seven XYLT2 promoter sequence variants identified were investigated. In silico analyses revealed a strong genetic linkage of SNVs c.-80delG and c.-188G > A, c.-80delG and c.-1443G > A, as well as c.-188G > A and c.-1443G > A. However, despite the generation of several SNV-associated changes in TBSs in silico, XYLT2 promoter SNVs did not significantly affect promoter activity. Serum XT activities of SNV carriers deviated up to 8% from the wild-type, whereby the differences were also not statistically significant. This is the first study which identifies, genotypes and characterizes XYLT2 promoter SNVs. Our results reveal a weak genetic heterogeneity and a strong conservation of the human XYLT2 promoter region. Since the SNVs detected could be excluded as causatives for strong

  4. Identification and characterization of human xylosyltransferase II promoter single nucleotide variants.

    PubMed

    Faust, Isabel; Böker, Kai Oliver; Eirich, Christina; Akkermann, Dagmar; Kuhn, Joachim; Knabbe, Cornelius; Hendig, Doris

    2015-03-20

    The human isoenzymes xylosyltransferase-I and -II (XT-I, XT-II) catalyze the rate-limiting step in proteoglycan biosynthesis. Therefore, serum XT activity, mainly representing XT-II activity, displays a powerful biomarker to quantify the actual proteoglycan synthesis rate. Serum XT activity is increased up to 44% in disorders which are characterized by an altered proteoglycan metabolism, whereby underlying regulatory mechanisms remain unclear. The aim of this study was to investigate new regulatory pathways by identifying and characterizing naturally occurring XYLT2 promoter sequence variants as well as their potential influence on promoter activity and serum XT activity. XYLT2 promoter single nucleotide variants (SNVs) were identified and genotyped in the genomic DNA of 100 healthy blood donors by promoter amplification and sequencing or restriction fragment length polymorphism analysis. The SNVs were characterized by an in silico analysis considering genetic linkage and transcription factor binding sites (TBSs). The influence of SNVs on promoter activity and serum XT activity was determined by dual luciferase reporter assay and HPLC-ESI mass spectrometry. Allele frequencies of seven XYLT2 promoter sequence variants identified were investigated. In silico analyses revealed a strong genetic linkage of SNVs c.-80delG and c.-188G > A, c.-80delG and c.-1443G > A, as well as c.-188G > A and c.-1443G > A. However, despite the generation of several SNV-associated changes in TBSs in silico, XYLT2 promoter SNVs did not significantly affect promoter activity. Serum XT activities of SNV carriers deviated up to 8% from the wild-type, whereby the differences were also not statistically significant. This is the first study which identifies, genotypes and characterizes XYLT2 promoter SNVs. Our results reveal a weak genetic heterogeneity and a strong conservation of the human XYLT2 promoter region. Since the SNVs detected could be excluded as causatives for strong

  5. Splice variant PRKC-ζ-PrC is a novel biomarker of human prostate cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yao, S; Ireland, S J; Bee, A; Beesley, C; Forootan, S S; Dodson, A; Dickinson, T; Gerard, P; Lian, L-Y; Risk, J M; Smith, P; Malki, M I; Ke, Y; Cooper, C S; Gosden, C; Foster, C S

    2012-01-01

    Background: Previously, using gene-knockdown techniques together with genome expression array analysis, we showed the gene protein Kinase C (PKC)-zeta (PRKCZ) to mediate the malignant phenotype of human prostate cancer. However, according to NCBI, the gene has undergone several major iterations. Therefore, to understand the relationship between its structure and biological activities, we have analysed its expressed sequence in prostate cancer cell lines and tissues. Methods: Transcriptome-walking and targeted PCR were used to sequence the mRNA transcribed from PRKCZ. Hydropathy analysis was employed to analyse the hypothetical protein sequence subsequently translated and to identify an appropriate epitope to generate a specific monoclonal antibody. Results: A novel sequence was identified within the 3′-terminal domain of human PRKCZ that, in prostate cancer cell lines and tissues, is expressed during transcription and thereafter translated into protein (designated PKC-ζ-PrC) independent of conventional PKC-ζ-a. The monoclonal antibody detected expression of this 96 kD protein only within malignant prostatic epithelium. Interpretation: Transcription and translation of this gene sequence, including previous intronic sequences, generates a novel specific biomarker of human prostate cancer. The presence of catalytic domains characteristic of classic PKC-β and atypical PKC-ι within PKC-ζ-PrC provides a potential mechanism for this PRKCZ variant to modulate the malignant prostatic phenotype out-with normal cell-regulatory control. PMID:22644296

  6. Molecular Insights into the Dynamics of Pharmacogenetically Important N-Terminal Variants of the Human β2-Adrenergic Receptor

    PubMed Central

    Sengupta, Durba; Joshi, Manali

    2014-01-01

    The human β2-adrenergic receptor (β2AR), a member of the G-protein coupled receptor (GPCR) family, is expressed in bronchial smooth muscle cells. Upon activation by agonists, β2AR causes bronchodilation and relief in asthma patients. The N-terminal polymorphism of β2AR at the 16th position, Arg16Gly, has warranted a lot of attention since it is linked to variations in response to albuterol (agonist) treatment. Although the β2AR is one of the well-studied GPCRs, the N-terminus which harbors this mutation, is absent in all available experimental structures. The goal of this work was to study the molecular level differences between the N-terminal variants using structural modeling and atomistic molecular dynamics simulations. Our simulations reveal that the N-terminal region of the Arg variant shows greater dynamics than the Gly variant, leading to differential placement. Further, the position and dynamics of the N-terminal region, further, affects the ligand binding-site accessibility. Interestingly, long-range effects are also seen at the ligand binding site, which is marginally larger in the Gly as compared to the Arg variant resulting in the preferential docking of albuterol to the Gly variant. This study thus reveals key differences between the variants providing a molecular framework towards understanding the variable drug response in asthma patients. PMID:25501358

  7. Molecular Imprint of Exposure to Naturally Occurring Genetic Variants of Human Cytomegalovirus on the T cell Repertoire

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Smith, Corey; Gras, Stephanie; Brennan, Rebekah M.; Bird, Nicola L.; Valkenburg, Sophie A.; Twist, Kelly-Anne; Burrows, Jacqueline M.; Miles, John J.; Chambers, Daniel; Bell, Scott; Campbell, Scott; Kedzierska, Katherine; Burrows, Scott R.; Rossjohn, Jamie; Khanna, Rajiv

    2014-02-01

    Exposure to naturally occurring variants of herpesviruses in clinical settings can have a dramatic impact on anti-viral immunity. Here we have evaluated the molecular imprint of variant peptide-MHC complexes on the T-cell repertoire during human cytomegalovirus (CMV) infection and demonstrate that primary co-infection with genetic variants of CMV was coincident with development of strain-specific T-cell immunity followed by emergence of cross-reactive virus-specific T-cells. Cross-reactive CMV-specific T cells exhibited a highly conserved public T cell repertoire, while T cells directed towards specific genetic variants displayed oligoclonal repertoires, unique to each individual. T cell recognition foot-print and pMHC-I structural analyses revealed that the cross-reactive T cells accommodate alterations in the pMHC complex with a broader foot-print focussing on the core of the peptide epitope. These findings provide novel molecular insight into how infection with naturally occurring genetic variants of persistent human herpesviruses imprints on the evolution of the anti-viral T-cell repertoire.

  8. ESTviewer: a web interface for visualizing mouse, rat, cattle, pig and chicken conserved ESTs in human genes and human alternatively spliced variants.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng-Chi; Chuang, Trees-Juen

    2005-05-15

    ESTviewer is a web application for interactively visualizing human gene structures, with emphasis on mammalian and avian expressed sequence tags (ESTs) that are conserved in the human genome and alternatively spliced (AS) variants. AS variants from the UCSC, Vega and PSEP annotations are presented in this application for comparison. EST data from six species, human, mouse, rat, cattle, pig and chicken, are mapped to the human genome to show cross-species EST conservation in annotated exonic and intronic regions. Cross-species EST conservation is evolutionarily and functionally important because it represents the effects of selection pressure on genic regions and transcriptome over evolutionary time. Emphatically, ESTviewer provides a convenient tool to compare highly conserved non-human ESTs and human AS variants. The application takes human gene accession Ids or coordinates of genomic sequences as inputs and presents annotated gene structures and their AS variants. In addition, the lengths and percentages of human genic regions covered by ESTs are displayed to show the level of EST coverage of different species. The percentages of the UCSC, Vega and PSEP annotated exons covered by ESTs of the six studied species are also displayed in the interface.

  9. Multiple Advantageous Amino Acid Variants in the NAT2 Gene in Human Populations

    PubMed Central

    Luca, Francesca; Bubba, Giuseppina; Basile, Massimo; Brdicka, Radim; Michalodimitrakis, Emmanuel; Rickards, Olga; Vershubsky, Galina; Quintana-Murci, Lluis; Kozlov, Andrey I.; Novelletto, Andrea

    2008-01-01

    Background Genetic variation at NAT2 has been long recognized as the cause of differential ability to metabolize a wide variety of drugs of therapeutic use. Here, we explore the pattern of genetic variation in 12 human populations that significantly extend the geographic range and resolution of previous surveys, to test the hypothesis that different dietary regimens and lifestyles may explain inter-population differences in NAT2 variation. Methodology/Principal Findings The entire coding region was resequenced in 98 subjects and six polymorphic positions were genotyped in 150 additional subjects. A single previously undescribed variant was found (34T>C; 12Y>H). Several aspects of the data do not fit the expectations of a neutral model, as assessed by coalescent simulations. Tajima's D is positive in all populations, indicating an excess of intermediate alleles. The level of between-population differentiation is low, and is mainly accounted for by the proportion of fast vs. slow acetylators. However, haplotype frequencies significantly differ across groups of populations with different subsistence. Conclusions/Significance Data on the structure of haplotypes and their frequencies are compatible with a model in which slow-causing variants were present in widely dispersed populations before major shifts to pastoralism and/or agriculture. In this model, slow-causing mutations gained a selective advantage in populations shifting from hunting-gathering to pastoralism/agriculture. We suggest the diminished dietary availability of folates resulting from the nutritional shift, as the possible cause of the fitness increase associated to haplotypes carrying mutations that reduce enzymatic activity. PMID:18773084

  10. Structural Characterization of Human 8-Oxoguanine DNA Glycosylase Variants Bearing Active Site Mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Radom,C.; Banerjee, A.; Verdine, G.

    2007-01-01

    The human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (hOGG1) protein is responsible for initiating base excision DNA repair of the endogenous mutagen 8-oxoguanine. Like nearly all DNA glycosylases, hOGG1 extrudes its substrate from the DNA helix and inserts it into an extrahelical enzyme active site pocket lined with residues that participate in lesion recognition and catalysis. Structural analysis has been performed on mutant versions of hOGG1 having changes in catalytic residues but not on variants having altered 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (oxoG) contact residues. Here we report high resolution structural analysis of such recognition variants. We found that Ala substitution at residues that contact the phosphate 5 to the lesion (H270A mutation) and its Watson-Crick face (Q315A mutation) simply removed key functionality from the contact interface but otherwise had no effect on structure. Ala substitution at the only residue making an oxoG-specific contact (G42A mutation) introduced torsional stress into the DNA contact surface of hOGG1, but this was overcome by local interactions within the folded protein, indicating that this oxoG recognition motif is 'hardwired'. Introduction of a side chain intended to sterically obstruct the active site pocket (Q315F mutation) led to two different structures, one of which (Q315F{sup *149}) has the oxoG lesion in an exosite flanking the active site and the other of which (Q315F{sup *292}) has the oxoG inserted nearly completely into the lesion recognition pocket. The latter structure offers a view of the latest stage in the base extrusion pathway yet observed, and its lack of catalytic activity demonstrates that the transition state for displacement of the lesion base is geometrically demanding.

  11. Identifying Darwinian Selection Acting on Different Human APOL1 Variants among Diverse African Populations

    PubMed Central

    Ko, Wen-Ya; Rajan, Prianka; Gomez, Felicia; Scheinfeldt, Laura; An, Ping; Winkler, Cheryl A.; Froment, Alain; Nyambo, Thomas B.; Omar, Sabah A.; Wambebe, Charles; Ranciaro, Alessia; Hirbo, Jibril B.; Tishkoff, Sarah A.

    2013-01-01

    Disease susceptibility can arise as a consequence of adaptation to infectious disease. Recent findings have suggested that higher rates of chronic kidney disease (CKD) in individuals with recent African ancestry might be attributed to two risk alleles (G1 and G2) at the serum-resistance-associated (SRA)-interacting-domain-encoding region of APOL1. These two alleles appear to have arisen adaptively, possibly as a result of their protective effects against human African trypanosomiasis (HAT), or African sleeping sickness. In order to explore the distribution of potential functional variation at APOL1, we studied nucleotide variation in 187 individuals across ten geographically and genetically diverse African ethnic groups with exposure to two Trypanosoma brucei subspecies that cause HAT. We observed unusually high levels of nonsynonymous polymorphism in the regions encoding the functional domains that are required for lysing parasites. Whereas allele frequencies of G2 were similar across all populations (3%–8%), the G1 allele was only common in the Yoruba (39%). Additionally, we identified a haplotype (termed G3) that contains a nonsynonymous change at the membrane-addressing-domain-encoding region of APOL1 and is present in all populations except for the Yoruba. Analyses of long-range patterns of linkage disequilibrium indicate evidence of recent selection acting on the G3 haplotype in Fulani from Cameroon. Our results indicate that the G1 and G2 variants in APOL1 are geographically restricted and that there might be other functional variants that could play a role in HAT resistance and CKD risk in African populations. PMID:23768513

  12. A mouse model for a partially inactive obesity-associated human MC3R variant.

    PubMed

    Lee, Bonggi; Koo, Jashin; Yun Jun, Joo; Gavrilova, Oksana; Lee, Yongjun; Seo, Arnold Y; Taylor-Douglas, Dezmond C; Adler-Wailes, Diane C; Chen, Faye; Gardner, Ryan; Koutzoumis, Dimitri; Sherafat Kazemzadeh, Roya; Roberson, Robin B; Yanovski, Jack A

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported children homozygous for two MC3R sequence variants (C17A+G241A) have greater fat mass than controls. Here we show, using homozygous knock-in mouse models in which we replace murine Mc3r with wild-type human (MC3R(hWT/hWT)) and double-mutant (C17A+G241A) human (MC3R(hDM/hDM)) MC3R, that MC3R(hDM/hDM) have greater weight and fat mass, increased energy intake and feeding efficiency, but reduced length and fat-free mass compared with MC3R(hWT/hWT). MC3R(hDM/hDM) mice do not have increased adipose tissue inflammatory cell infiltration or greater expression of inflammatory markers despite their greater fat mass. Serum adiponectin levels are increased in MC3R(hDM/hDM) mice and MC3R(hDM/hDM) human subjects. MC3R(hDM/hDM) bone- and adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiate into adipocytes that accumulate more triglyceride than MC3R(hWT/hWT) MSCs. MC3R(hDM/hDM) impacts nutrient partitioning to generate increased adipose tissue that appears metabolically healthy. These data confirm the importance of MC3R signalling in human metabolism and suggest a previously-unrecognized role for the MC3R in adipose tissue development. PMID:26818770

  13. HGV&TB: a comprehensive online resource on human genes and genetic variants associated with tuberculosis.

    PubMed

    Sahajpal, Ruchika; Kandoi, Gaurav; Dhiman, Heena; Raj, Sweety; Scaria, Vinod; Bhartiya, Deeksha; Hasija, Yasha

    2014-01-01

    Tuberculosis (TB) is an infectious disease caused by fastidious pathogen Mycobacterium tuberculosis. TB has emerged as one of the major causes of mortality in the developing world. Role of host genetic factors that modulate disease susceptibility have not been studied widely. Recent studies have reported few genetic loci that provide impetus to this area of research. The availability of tools has enabled genome-wide scans for disease susceptibility loci associated with infectious diseases. Till now, information on human genetic variations and their associated genes that modulate TB susceptibility have not been systematically compiled. In this work, we have created a resource: HGV&TB, which hosts genetic variations reported to be associated with TB susceptibility in humans. It currently houses information on 307 variations in 98 genes. In total, 101 of these variations are exonic, whereas 78 fall in intronic regions. We also analysed the pathogenicity of the genetic variations, their phenotypic consequences and ethnic origin. Using various computational analyses, 30 variations of the 101 exonic variations were predicted to be pathogenic. The resource is freely available at http://genome.igib.res.in/hgvtb/index.html. Using integrative analysis, we have shown that the disease associated variants are selectively enriched in the immune signalling pathways which are crucial in the pathophysiology of TB. Database URL: http://genome.igib.res.in/hgvtb/index.html

  14. Human gene-centered transcription factor networks for enhancers and disease variants.

    PubMed

    Fuxman Bass, Juan I; Sahni, Nidhi; Shrestha, Shaleen; Garcia-Gonzalez, Aurian; Mori, Akihiro; Bhat, Numana; Yi, Song; Hill, David E; Vidal, Marc; Walhout, Albertha J M

    2015-04-23

    Gene regulatory networks (GRNs) comprising interactions between transcription factors (TFs) and regulatory loci control development and physiology. Numerous disease-associated mutations have been identified, the vast majority residing in non-coding regions of the genome. As current GRN mapping methods test one TF at a time and require the use of cells harboring the mutation(s) of interest, they are not suitable to identify TFs that bind to wild-type and mutant loci. Here, we use gene-centered yeast one-hybrid (eY1H) assays to interrogate binding of 1,086 human TFs to 246 enhancers, as well as to 109 non-coding disease mutations. We detect both loss and gain of TF interactions with mutant loci that are concordant with target gene expression changes. This work establishes eY1H assays as a powerful addition to the toolkit of mapping human GRNs and for the high-throughput characterization of genomic variants that are rapidly being identified by genome-wide association studies.

  15. Human Gene-Centered Transcription Factor Networks for Enhancers and Disease Variants

    PubMed Central

    Bass, Juan I. Fuxman; Sahni, Nidhi; Shrestha, Shaleen; Garcia-Gonzalez, Aurian; Mori, Akihiro; Bhat, Numana; Yi, Song; Hill, David E.; Vidal, Marc; Walhout, Albertha J.M.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Gene regulatory networks (GRNs) comprising interactions between transcription factors (TFs) and regulatory loci control development and physiology. Numerous disease-associated mutations have been identified, the vast majority residing in non-coding regions of the genome. As current GRN mapping methods test one TF at a time and require the use of cells harboring the mutation(s) of interest, they are not suitable to identify TFs that bind to wild type and mutant loci. Here, we use gene-centered yeast one-hybrid (eY1H) assays to interrogate binding of 1,086 human TFs to 246 enhancers, as well as to 109 non-coding disease mutations. We detect both loss and gain of TF interactions with mutant loci that are concordant with target gene expression changes. This work establishes eY1H assays as a powerful addition to the toolkit of mapping human GRNs and for the high-throughput characterization of genomic variants that are rapidly being identified by genome-wide association studies. PMID:25910213

  16. Joint Bayesian inference of risk variants and tissue-specific epigenomic enrichments across multiple complex human diseases

    PubMed Central

    Li, Yue; Kellis, Manolis

    2016-01-01

    Genome wide association studies (GWAS) provide a powerful approach for uncovering disease-associated variants in human, but fine-mapping the causal variants remains a challenge. This is partly remedied by prioritization of disease-associated variants that overlap GWAS-enriched epigenomic annotations. Here, we introduce a new Bayesian model RiVIERA (Risk Variant Inference using Epigenomic Reference Annotations) for inference of driver variants from summary statistics across multiple traits using hundreds of epigenomic annotations. In simulation, RiVIERA promising power in detecting causal variants and causal annotations, the multi-trait joint inference further improved the detection power. We applied RiVIERA to model the existing GWAS summary statistics of 9 autoimmune diseases and Schizophrenia by jointly harnessing the potential causal enrichments among 848 tissue-specific epigenomics annotations from ENCODE/Roadmap consortium covering 127 cell/tissue types and 8 major epigenomic marks. RiVIERA identified meaningful tissue-specific enrichments for enhancer regions defined by H3K4me1 and H3K27ac for Blood T-Cell specifically in the nine autoimmune diseases and Brain-specific enhancer activities exclusively in Schizophrenia. Moreover, the variants from the 95% credible sets exhibited high conservation and enrichments for GTEx whole-blood eQTLs located within transcription-factor-binding-sites and DNA-hypersensitive-sites. Furthermore, joint modeling the nine immune traits by simultaneously inferring and exploiting the underlying epigenomic correlation between traits further improved the functional enrichments compared to single-trait models. PMID:27407109

  17. A ubiquitous splice variant and a common polymorphism affect heterologous expression of recombinant human SCN5A heart sodium channels.

    PubMed

    Makielski, Jonathan C; Ye, Bin; Valdivia, Carmen R; Pagel, Matthew D; Pu, Jielin; Tester, David J; Ackerman, Michael J

    2003-10-31

    Amino acid sequence variations in SCN5A are known to affect function of wild-type channels and also those with coexisting mutations; therefore, it is important to know the exact sequence and function of channels most commonly present in human myocardium. SCN5A was analyzed in control panels of human alleles, demonstrating that the existing clones (hH1, hH1a, hH1b) each contained a rare variant and thus none represented the common sequence. Confirming prior work, the H558R polymorphism was present in approximately 30% of subjects. Quantitative mRNA analysis from human hearts showed that a shorter 2015 amino acid splice variant lacking glutamine at position 1077 (Q1077del) made up 65% of the transcript in every heart examined. Age, sex, race, or structural heart disease did not affect this proportion of Q1077del. Estimated population frequencies for the four common variants were 25% SCN5A, 10% [H558R], 45% [Q1077del], and 20% [H558R;Q1077del], where the reference sequence SCN5A is GenBank AC137587. When expressed in HEK-293 cells, these common variants had a more positive mid-point of the voltage dependence of inactivation than the standard clone hH1. Also, channels containing Q1077 expressed smaller currents. When H558R was present with Q1077 ([H558R]), current expression was profoundly reduced despite normal trafficking to the cell surface. Thus, four variant sequences for SCN5A are commonly present in human myocardium and they exhibit functional differences among themselves and with the previous standard clone. These results have implications for the choice of background sequence for experiments with heterologous expression systems, and possibly implications for electrophysiological function in vivo. PMID:14500339

  18. Evidence for evolutionary and nonevolutionary forces shaping the distribution of human genetic variants near transcription start sites.

    PubMed

    Scala, Giovanni; Affinito, Ornella; Miele, Gennaro; Monticelli, Antonella; Cocozza, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    The regions surrounding transcription start sites (TSSs) of genes play a critical role in the regulation of gene expression. At the same time, current evidence indicates that these regions are particularly stressed by transcription-related mutagenic phenomena. In this work we performed a genome-wide analysis of the distribution of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) inside the 10 kb region flanking human TSSs by dividing SNPs into four classes according to their frequency (rare, two intermediate classes, and common). We found that, in this 10 kb region, the distribution of variants depends on their frequency and on their localization relative to the TSS. We found that the distribution of variants is generally different for TSSs located inside or outside of CpG islands. We found a significant relationship between the distribution of rare variants and nucleosome occupancy scores. Furthermore, our analysis suggests that evolutionary (purifying selection) and nonevolutionary (biased gene conversion) forces both play a role in determining the relative SNP frequency around TSSs. Finally, we analyzed the potential pathogenicity of each class of variant using the Combined Annotation Dependent Depletion score. In conclusion, this study provides a novel and detailed view of the distribution of genomic variants around TSSs, providing insight into the forces that instigate and maintain variability in such critical regions.

  19. Expression of senescent antigen on erythrocytes infected with a knobby variant of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    SciTech Connect

    Winograd, E.; Greenan, J.R.T.; Sherman, I.W.

    1987-04-01

    Erythrocytes infected with a knobby variant of Plasmodium falciparum selectively bind IgG autoantibodies in normal human serum. Quantification of membrane-bound IgG, by use of /sup 125/I-labeled protein A, revealed that erythrocytes infected with the knobby variant bound 30 times more protein A than did noninfected erythrocytes; infection with a knobless variant resulted in less than a 2-fold difference compared with noninfected erythrocytes. IgG binding to knobby erythrocytes appeared to be related to parasite development, since binding of /sup 125/I-labeled protein A to cells bearing young trophozoites (less than 20 hr after parasite invasion) was similar to binding to uninfected erythrocytes. By immunoelectron microscopy, the membrane-bound IgG on erythrocytes infected with the knobby variant was found to be preferentially associated with the protuberances (knobs) of the plasma membrane. The removal of aged or senescent erythrocytes from the peripheral circulation is reported to involve the binding of specific antibodies to an antigen (senescent antigen) related to the major erythrocyte membrane protein band 3. Since affinity-purified autoantibodies against band 3 specifically bound to the plasma membrane of erythrocytes infected with the knobby variant of P. falciparum, it is clear that the malaria parasite induces expression of senescent antigen.

  20. Phylogenetically related, clinically different: human papillomaviruses 6 and 11 variants distribution in genital warts and in laryngeal papillomatosis.

    PubMed

    Godínez, J M; Nicolás-Párraga, S; Pimenoff, V N; Mengual-Chuliá, B; Muñoz, N; Bosch, F X; Sánchez, G I; McCloskey, J; Bravo, I G

    2014-06-01

    Genital warts (GWs) and laryngeal papillomatosis (LP) are two usually benign pathologies related to infection with human papillomaviruses (HPVs), mainly HPV6 and HPV11. The aim of this work was to describe the genetic diversity of HPV6 and HPV11 isolates found in GWs and LPs, and to analyse the differential involvement of viral variants in either lesion. A total of 231 samples diagnosed as GWs (n = 198) or LP (n = 33) and caused by HPV6 or HPV11 monoinfections were analysed. The phylogenetic relationships of the retrieved viral sequences were explored. We have identified the long control region and the intergenic E2-L2 region as the two most variable regions in both HPV6 and HPV11 genomes. We have generated new HPV6 (n = 166) or HPV11 (n = 65) partial sequences from GWs and LPs lesions spanning both regions and studied them in the context of all available sequences of both types (final n = 412). Our results show a significant (p <0.01) differential presence of HPV6 variants among both pathologies, with HPV6 B variants being preferentially found in GW versus LP samples. No differential involvement of HPV11 variants was observed. Our findings suggest that different HPV6 variants may either show differential tropism or have different potential to induce lesions in different epithelia.

  1. Krüppeling erythropoiesis: an unexpected broad spectrum of human red blood cell disorders due to KLF1 variants

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Andrew; Xu, Xiangmin; Higgs, Douglas R.; Patrinos, George P.; Arnaud, Lionel; Bieker, James J.

    2016-01-01

    Until recently our approach to analyzing human genetic diseases has been to accurately phenotype patients and sequence the genes known to be associated with those phenotypes; for example, in thalassemia, the globin loci are analyzed. Sequencing has become increasingly accessible, and thus a larger panel of genes can be analyzed and whole exome and/or whole genome sequencing can be used when no variants are found in the candidate genes. By using such approaches in patients with unexplained anemias, we have discovered that a broad range of hitherto unrelated human red cell disorders are caused by variants in KLF1, a master regulator of erythropoiesis, which were previously considered to be extremely rare causes of human genetic disease. PMID:26903544

  2. Krüppeling erythropoiesis: an unexpected broad spectrum of human red blood cell disorders due to KLF1 variants.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Andrew; Xu, Xiangmin; Higgs, Douglas R; Patrinos, George P; Arnaud, Lionel; Bieker, James J; Philipsen, Sjaak

    2016-04-14

    Until recently our approach to analyzing human genetic diseases has been to accurately phenotype patients and sequence the genes known to be associated with those phenotypes; for example, in thalassemia, the globin loci are analyzed. Sequencing has become increasingly accessible, and thus a larger panel of genes can be analyzed and whole exome and/or whole genome sequencing can be used when no variants are found in the candidate genes. By using such approaches in patients with unexplained anemias, we have discovered that a broad range of hitherto unrelated human red cell disorders are caused by variants in KLF1, a master regulator of erythropoiesis, which were previously considered to be extremely rare causes of human genetic disease. PMID:26903544

  3. A CHRNA5 Smoking Risk Variant Decreases the Aversive Effects of Nicotine in Humans.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kevin P; DeVito, Elise E; Herman, Aryeh I; Valentine, Gerald W; Gelernter, Joel; Sofuoglu, Mehmet

    2015-11-01

    Genome-wide association studies have implicated the CHRNA5-CHRNA3-CHRNB4 gene cluster in risk for heavy smoking and several smoking-related disorders. The heavy smoking risk allele might reduce the aversive effects of nicotine, but this hypothesis has not been tested in humans. We evaluated the effects of a candidate causal variant in CHRNA5, rs16969968, on the acute response to nicotine in European American (EA) and African American (AA) smokers (n=192; 50% AA; 73% male). Following overnight abstinence from nicotine, participants completed a protocol that included an intravenous (IV) dose of saline and two escalating IV doses of nicotine. The outcomes evaluated were the aversive, pleasurable, and stimulatory ratings of nicotine's effects, cardiovascular reactivity to nicotine, withdrawal severity, and cognitive performance before and after the nicotine administration session. The heavy smoking risk allele (rs16969968*A; frequency=28% (EA) and 6% (AA)) was associated with lower ratings of aversive effects (P<5 × 10(-8)) with marked specificity. This effect was evident in EA and AA subjects analyzed as separate groups and was most robust at the highest nicotine dose. Rs16969968*A was also associated with greater improvement on a measure of cognitive control (Stroop Task) following nicotine administration. These findings support differential aversive response to nicotine as one likely mechanism for the association of CHRNA5-CHRNA3-CHRNB4 with heavy smoking. PMID:25948103

  4. [Rare variants of Hb D Punjab, Hb O Arab and polymorphism of human hemoglobins].

    PubMed

    Spivak, V A; Tasheva, E S; Aseeva, E A; Tokarev, Iu N

    1986-03-01

    This report describes the occurrence, study and molecular diagnostics of 40 Hb O Arab beta 121 Glu Lys cases and 4 Hb D punjab beta 121 Glu Gln cases in Bulgaria. Hematological, morphological and clinical data for 12 patients with Hb O arab are listed. Among them we observed 7 simple heterozygotes for Hb O Arab/Hb A, two double heterozygotes-compounds for Hb O/beta+-thalassemia and three compounds for Hb O/beta 0-thalassemia (the latter assumed). Also, general hematological, morphological and clinical data are presented for 4 Hb D Punjab carriers, from which two are simple heterozygotes and two are assumed, as compounds for Hb D/beta 0-thalassemia. The consideration of heterozygosity, homozygosity for both abnormal hemoglobins and of the compound state of Hb O or Hb D/beta-thalassemia or HbS types let us suggest the relative neutrality of the variants and the limitation in their distribution, depending on genetic structure of populations, where they spread. It may be concluded that human hemoglobin is characterized by marked monomorphism. At the same time, the high frequency of HbS, HbE and HbC in some populations can be well explained by contemporary selectionism; the distribution of relatively neutral Hb D Punjab and Hb O Arab with some limitations can follow Kimura's neutralism concept. PMID:3957034

  5. Rare Syndromes and Common Variants of the Brain-Derived Neurotrophic Factor Gene in Human Obesity.

    PubMed

    Han, J C

    2016-01-01

    Rare genetic disorders that cause BDNF haploinsufficiency, such as WAGR syndrome, 11p deletion, and 11p inversion, serve as models for understanding the role of BDNF in human energy balance and neurocognition. Patients with BDNF haploinsufficiency or inactivating mutations of the BDNF receptor exhibit hyperphagia, childhood-onset obesity, intellectual disability, and impaired nociception. Prader-Willi, Smith-Magenis, and ROHHAD syndromes are separate genetic disorders that do not directly affect the BDNF locus but share many similar clinical features with BDNF haploinsufficiency, and BDNF insufficiency is believed to possibly contribute to the pathophysiology of each of these conditions. In the general population, common variants of BDNF that affect BDNF gene expression or BDNF protein processing have also been associated with modest alterations in energy balance and cognitive functioning. Thus, variable degrees of BDNF insufficiency appear to contribute to a spectrum of excess weight gain and cognitive impairment that ranges in phenotypic severity. In this modern era of precision medicine, genotype-specific therapies aimed at increasing BDNF signaling in patients with rare and common disorders associated with BDNF insufficiency could serve as useful approaches for treating obesity and neurodevelopmental disorders. PMID:27288826

  6. Conformational analysis of HAMLET, the folding variant of human alpha-lactalbumin associated with apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Casbarra, Annarita; Birolo, Leila; Infusini, Giuseppe; Dal Piaz, Fabrizio; Svensson, Malin; Pucci, Piero; Svanborg, Catharina; Marino, Gennaro

    2004-05-01

    A combination of hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange and limited proteolysis experiments coupled to mass spectrometry analysis was used to depict the conformation in solution of HAMLET, the folding variant of human alpha-lactalbumin, complexed to oleic acid, that induces apoptosis in tumor and immature cells. Although near- and far-UV CD and fluorescence spectroscopy were not able to discriminate between HAMLET and apo-alpha-lactalbumin, H/D exchange experiments clearly showed that they correspond to two distinct conformational states, with HAMLET incorporating a greater number of deuterium atoms than the apo and holo forms. Complementary proteolysis experiments revealed that HAMLET and apo are both accessible to proteases in the beta-domain but showed substantial differences in accessibility to proteases at specific sites. The overall results indicated that the conformational changes associated with the release of Ca2+ are not sufficient to induce the HAMLET conformation. Metal depletion might represent the first event to produce a partial unfolding in the beta-domain of alpha-lactalbumin, but some more unfolding is needed to generate the active conformation HAMLET, very likely allowing the protein to bind the C18:1 fatty acid moiety. On the basis of these data, a putative binding site of the oleic acid, which stabilizes the HAMLET conformation, is proposed.

  7. Human Brown Fat Inducible Thioesterase Variant 2 (BFIT2) Cellular Localization and Catalytic Function#

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Danqi; Latham, John; Zhao, Hong; Bisoffi, Marco; Farelli, Jeremiah; Dunaway-Mariano, Debra

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian brown fat inducible thioesterase variant 2 (BFIT2), also known as ACOT11, is a multi-modular protein containing two consecutive hotdog-fold domains and a C-terminal steroidogenic acute regulatory protein related lipid transfer (START) domain (StarD14). In this study, we demonstrate that the N-terminal region of human BFIT2 (hBFIT2) constitutes a mitochondrial location signal sequence, which undergoes mitochondria-dependent posttranslational cleavage. The mature hBFIT2 is shown to be located in the mitochondrial matrix whereas the paralog “cytoplasmic acetyl-CoA hydrolase” (CACH, also known as ACOT12) was found in the cytoplam. In-vitro activity analysis of full-length hBFIT2 isolated from stably transfected HEK293 cells demonstrates selective thioesterase activity directed towards long chain fatty acyl-CoA thioesters, thus distinguishing BFIT2 catalytic function from that of CACH. The results from a protein-lipid overlay test indicate that the hBFIT2 StarD14 domain binds phosphatidylinositol 4-phosphate. PMID:22897136

  8. A CHRNA5 Smoking Risk Variant Decreases the Aversive Effects of Nicotine in Humans.

    PubMed

    Jensen, Kevin P; DeVito, Elise E; Herman, Aryeh I; Valentine, Gerald W; Gelernter, Joel; Sofuoglu, Mehmet

    2015-11-01

    Genome-wide association studies have implicated the CHRNA5-CHRNA3-CHRNB4 gene cluster in risk for heavy smoking and several smoking-related disorders. The heavy smoking risk allele might reduce the aversive effects of nicotine, but this hypothesis has not been tested in humans. We evaluated the effects of a candidate causal variant in CHRNA5, rs16969968, on the acute response to nicotine in European American (EA) and African American (AA) smokers (n=192; 50% AA; 73% male). Following overnight abstinence from nicotine, participants completed a protocol that included an intravenous (IV) dose of saline and two escalating IV doses of nicotine. The outcomes evaluated were the aversive, pleasurable, and stimulatory ratings of nicotine's effects, cardiovascular reactivity to nicotine, withdrawal severity, and cognitive performance before and after the nicotine administration session. The heavy smoking risk allele (rs16969968*A; frequency=28% (EA) and 6% (AA)) was associated with lower ratings of aversive effects (P<5 × 10(-8)) with marked specificity. This effect was evident in EA and AA subjects analyzed as separate groups and was most robust at the highest nicotine dose. Rs16969968*A was also associated with greater improvement on a measure of cognitive control (Stroop Task) following nicotine administration. These findings support differential aversive response to nicotine as one likely mechanism for the association of CHRNA5-CHRNA3-CHRNB4 with heavy smoking.

  9. Autoimmune disease-associated variants of extracellular endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 induce altered innate immune responses by human immune cells.

    PubMed

    Aldhamen, Yasser A; Pepelyayeva, Yuliya; Rastall, David P W; Seregin, Sergey S; Zervoudi, Efthalia; Koumantou, Despoina; Aylsworth, Charles F; Quiroga, Dionisia; Godbehere, Sarah; Georgiadis, Dimitris; Stratikos, Efstratios; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    Endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 (ERAP1) gene polymorphisms have been linked to several autoimmune diseases; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying these associations are not well understood. Recently, we demonstrated that ERAP1 regulates key aspects of the innate immune response. Previous studies show ERAP1 to be endoplasmic reticulum-localized and secreted during inflammation. Herein, we investigate the possible roles that ERAP1 polymorphic variants may have in modulating the innate immune responses of human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (hPBMCs) using two experimental methods: extracellular exposure of hPBMCs to ERAP1 variants and adenovirus (Ad)-based ERAP1 expression. We found that exposure of hPBMCs to ERAP1 variant proteins as well as ERAP1 overexpression by Ad5 vectors increased inflammatory cytokine and chemokine production, and enhanced immune cell activation. Investigating the molecular mechanisms behind these responses revealed that ERAP1 is able to activate innate immunity via multiple pathways, including the NLRP3 (NOD-like receptor, pyrin domain-containing 3) inflammasome. Importantly, these responses varied if autoimmune disease-associated variants of ERAP1 were examined in the assay systems. Unexpectedly, blocking ERAP1 cellular internalization augmented IL-1β production. To our knowledge, this is the first report identifying ERAP1 as being involved in modulating innate responses of human immune cells, a finding that may explain why ERAP1 has been genetically associated with several autoimmune diseases.

  10. Identification of de novo copy number variants associated with human disorders of sexual development.

    PubMed

    Tannour-Louet, Mounia; Han, Shuo; Corbett, Sean T; Louet, Jean-Francois; Yatsenko, Svetlana; Meyers, Lindsay; Shaw, Chad A; Kang, Sung-Hae L; Cheung, Sau Wai; Lamb, Dolores J

    2010-01-01

    Disorders of sexual development (DSD), ranging in severity from genital abnormalities to complete sex reversal, are among the most common human birth defects with incidence rates reaching almost 3%. Although causative alterations in key genes controlling gonad development have been identified, the majority of DSD cases remain unexplained. To improve the diagnosis, we screened 116 children born with idiopathic DSD using a clinically validated array-based comparative genomic hybridization platform. 8951 controls without urogenital defects were used to compare with our cohort of affected patients. Clinically relevant imbalances were found in 21.5% of the analyzed patients. Most anomalies (74.2%) evaded detection by the routinely ordered karyotype and were scattered across the genome in gene-enriched subtelomeric loci. Among these defects, confirmed de novo duplication and deletion events were noted on 1p36.33, 9p24.3 and 19q12-q13.11 for ambiguous genitalia, 10p14 and Xq28 for cryptorchidism and 12p13 and 16p11.2 for hypospadias. These variants were significantly associated with genitourinary defects (P = 6.08×10(-12)). The causality of defects observed in 5p15.3, 9p24.3, 22q12.1 and Xq28 was supported by the presence of overlapping chromosomal rearrangements in several unrelated patients. In addition to known gonad determining genes including SRY and DMRT1, novel candidate genes such as FGFR2, KANK1, ADCY2 and ZEB2 were encompassed. The identification of risk germline rearrangements for urogenital birth defects may impact diagnosis and genetic counseling and contribute to the elucidation of the molecular mechanisms underlying the pathogenesis of human sexual development. PMID:21048976

  11. Genetic variants of human organic anion transporter 4 demonstrate altered transport of endogenous substrates

    PubMed Central

    Shima, James E.; Komori, Takafumi; Taylor, Travis R.; Stryke, Doug; Kawamoto, Michiko; Johns, Susan J.; Carlson, Elaine J.; Ferrin, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Apical reabsorption from the urine has been shown to be important for such processes as the maintenance of critical metabolites in the blood and the excretion of nephrotoxic compounds. The solute carrier (SLC) transporter OAT4 (SLC22A11) is expressed on the apical membrane of renal proximal tubule cells and is known to mediate the transport of a variety of xenobiotic and endogenous organic anions. Functional characterization of genetic variants of apical transporters thought to mediate reabsorption, such as OAT4, may provide insight into the genetic factors influencing the complex pathways involved in drug elimination and metabolite reclamation occurring in the kidney. Naturally occurring genetic variants of OAT4 were identified in public databases and by resequencing DNA samples from 272 individuals comprising 4 distinct ethnic groups. Nine total nonsynonymous variants were identified and functionally assessed using uptake of three radiolabeled substrates. A nonsense variant, R48Stop, and three other variants (R121C, V155G, and V155M) were found at frequencies of at least 2% in an ethnic group specific fashion. The L29P, R48Stop, and H469R variants displayed a complete loss of function, and kinetic analysis identified a reduced Vmax in the common nonsynonymous variants. Plasma membrane levels of OAT4 protein were absent or reduced in the nonfunctional variants, providing a mechanistic reason for the observed loss of function. Characterization of the genetic variants of reabsorptive transporters such as OAT4 is an important step in understanding variability in tubular reabsorption with important implications in innate homeostatic processes and drug disposition. PMID:20668102

  12. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 variants with increased replicative capacity develop during the asymptomatic stage before disease progression.

    PubMed

    Connor, R I; Ho, D D

    1994-07-01

    We examined the replicative properties of a series of sequential isolates and biological clones of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) obtained from an individual who progressed from seroconversion to AIDS in approximately 5 years. HIV-1 isolated soon after seroconversion replicated slowly and to low levels in cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells; however, subsequent isolates obtained during asymptomatic infection showed a marked increase in replication kinetics. This was examined in more detail by using a panel of 35 biological clones of HIV-1 generated from sequential patient peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples. Each clone was evaluated for replication in primary macrophages and CD4+ T lymphocytes and for the ability to induce syncytium formation in MT-2 cell cultures. Consistent with earlier observations, we found that all of the clones isolated just after seroconversion were slowly replicating and non-syncytium inducing (NSI). However, NSI variants with increased replication kinetics in macrophages were identified soon thereafter. These variants preceded the appearance of NSI and syncytium-inducing variants, with rapid replication in both macrophages and CD4+ T lymphocytes. To determine whether changes in the rate of replication could be traced to the early stages of the virus life cycle, PCR assays were used to evaluate entry and reverse transcription of selected biological clones in macrophages and CD4+ T lymphocytes. We found there was no inherent block to entry or reverse transcription for the slowly replicating variants; however, this does not preclude the possibility that small differences in the rate of entry may account for larger differences in the replication kinetics over many cycles. Overall, our results demonstrate that rapidly replicating variants of HIV-1 emerge during the asymptomatic period in a patient who subsequently progressed clinically, suggesting that these variants may play an important role in HIV-1 pathogenesis

  13. Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 variants with increased replicative capacity develop during the asymptomatic stage before disease progression.

    PubMed Central

    Connor, R I; Ho, D D

    1994-01-01

    We examined the replicative properties of a series of sequential isolates and biological clones of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) obtained from an individual who progressed from seroconversion to AIDS in approximately 5 years. HIV-1 isolated soon after seroconversion replicated slowly and to low levels in cultures of peripheral blood mononuclear cells; however, subsequent isolates obtained during asymptomatic infection showed a marked increase in replication kinetics. This was examined in more detail by using a panel of 35 biological clones of HIV-1 generated from sequential patient peripheral blood mononuclear cell samples. Each clone was evaluated for replication in primary macrophages and CD4+ T lymphocytes and for the ability to induce syncytium formation in MT-2 cell cultures. Consistent with earlier observations, we found that all of the clones isolated just after seroconversion were slowly replicating and non-syncytium inducing (NSI). However, NSI variants with increased replication kinetics in macrophages were identified soon thereafter. These variants preceded the appearance of NSI and syncytium-inducing variants, with rapid replication in both macrophages and CD4+ T lymphocytes. To determine whether changes in the rate of replication could be traced to the early stages of the virus life cycle, PCR assays were used to evaluate entry and reverse transcription of selected biological clones in macrophages and CD4+ T lymphocytes. We found there was no inherent block to entry or reverse transcription for the slowly replicating variants; however, this does not preclude the possibility that small differences in the rate of entry may account for larger differences in the replication kinetics over many cycles. Overall, our results demonstrate that rapidly replicating variants of HIV-1 emerge during the asymptomatic period in a patient who subsequently progressed clinically, suggesting that these variants may play an important role in HIV-1 pathogenesis

  14. Prioritizing Variants in Complete Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Genes in Patients Lacking Known BRCA Mutations.

    PubMed

    Caminsky, Natasha G; Mucaki, Eliseos J; Perri, Ami M; Lu, Ruipeng; Knoll, Joan H M; Rogan, Peter K

    2016-07-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 testing for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) does not identify all pathogenic variants. Sequencing of 20 complete genes in HBOC patients with uninformative test results (N = 287), including noncoding and flanking sequences of ATM, BARD1, BRCA1, BRCA2, CDH1, CHEK2, EPCAM, MLH1, MRE11A, MSH2, MSH6, MUTYH, NBN, PALB2, PMS2, PTEN, RAD51B, STK11, TP53, and XRCC2, identified 38,372 unique variants. We apply information theory (IT) to predict and prioritize noncoding variants of uncertain significance in regulatory, coding, and intronic regions based on changes in binding sites in these genes. Besides mRNA splicing, IT provides a common framework to evaluate potential affinity changes in transcription factor (TFBSs), splicing regulatory (SRBSs), and RNA-binding protein (RBBSs) binding sites following mutation. We prioritized variants affecting the strengths of 10 splice sites (four natural, six cryptic), 148 SRBS, 36 TFBS, and 31 RBBS. Three variants were also prioritized based on their predicted effects on mRNA secondary (2°) structure and 17 for pseudoexon activation. Additionally, four frameshift, two in-frame deletions, and five stop-gain mutations were identified. When combined with pedigree information, complete gene sequence analysis can focus attention on a limited set of variants in a wide spectrum of functional mutation types for downstream functional and co-segregation analysis. PMID:26898890

  15. Impact of predicted protein-truncating genetic variants on the human transcriptome

    PubMed Central

    Rivas, Manuel A.; Pirinen, Matti; Conrad, Donald F.; Lek, Monkol; Tsang, Emily K.; Karczewski, Konrad J.; Maller, Julian B.; Kukurba, Kimberly R.; DeLuca, David; Fromer, Menachem; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Smith, Kevin S.; Zhang, Rui; Zhao, Fengmei; Banks, Eric; Poplin, Ryan; Ruderfer, Douglas; Purcell, Shaun M.; Tukiainen, Taru; Minikel, Eric V.; Stenson, Peter D.; Cooper, David N.; Huang, Katharine H.; Sullivan, Timothy J.; Nedzel, Jared; Bustamante, Carlos D.; Li, Jin Billy; Daly, Mark J.; Guigo, Roderic; Donnelly, Peter; Ardlie, Kristin; Sammeth, Michael; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil; McCarthy, Mark I.; Montgomery, Stephen B.; Lappalainen, Tuuli; MacArthur, Daniel G.

    2015-01-01

    Accurate prediction of the functional impact of genetic variation is critical for clinical genome interpretation. We systematically characterized the transcriptome effects of protein-truncating variants (PTVs), a class of variants expected to have profound impacts on gene function, using data from the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) and Geuvadis projects. We quantitate tissue-specific and positional effects on nonsense-mediated transcript decay, and present an improved predictive model for this decay. We directly measure the impact of variants both proximal and distal to splice junctions. Furthermore, we find that robustness to heterozygous gene inactivation is not due to dosage compensation. Our results illustrate the value of transcriptome data in the functional interpretation of genetic variants. PMID:25954003

  16. Identification of polymorphisms and sequence variants in the human homologue of the mouse natural resistance-associated macrophage protein gene

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jing; Fujiwara, T.M.; Buu, N.T.; Sanchez, F.O.; Cellier, M.; Paradis, A.J.; Frappier, D.; Skamene, E.; Gros, P.; Morgan, K.

    1995-04-01

    The most common mycobacterial disease in humans is tuberculosis, and there is evidence for genetic factors in susceptibility to tuberculosis. In the mouse, the Bcg gene controls macrophage priming for activation and is a major gene for susceptibility to infection with mycobacteria. A candidate gene for Bcg was identified by positional cloning and was designated {open_quotes}natural resistance-associated macrophage protein gene{close_quotes} (Nramp1), and the human homologue (NRAMP1) has recently been cloned. Here we report (1) the physical mapping NRAMP1 close to VIL in chromosome region 2q35 by PCR analysis of somatic cell hybrids and YAC cloning and (2) the identification of nine sequence variants in NRAMP1. Of the four variants in the coding region, there were two missense mutations and two silent substitutions. The missense mutations were a conservative alanine-to-valine substitution at codon 318 in exon9 and an aspartic acid-to-asparagine substitution at codon 543 in the predicted cytoplasmic tail of the NRAMP1 protein. A microsatellite was located in the immediate 5{prime} region of the gene, three variants were in introns, and one variant was located in the 3{prime} UTR. The allele frequencies of each of the nine variants were determined in DNA samples of 60 Caucasians and 20 Asians. In addition, we have physically linked two highly polymorphic microsatellite markers, D2S104 and D2S173, to NRAMP1 on a 1.5-Mb YAC contig. These molecular markers will be useful to assess the role of NRAMP1 in susceptibility to tuberculosis and other macrophage-mediated diseases. 40 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  17. Amino acid substitutions in genetic variants of human serum albumin and in sequences inferred from molecular cloning

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, N.; Takahashi, Y.; Blumberg, B.S.; Putnam, F.W.

    1987-07-01

    The structural changes in four genetic variants of human serum albumin were analyzed by tandem high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) of the tryptic peptides, HPLC mapping and isoelectric focusing of the CNBr fragments, and amino acid sequence analysis of the purified peptides. Lysine-372 of normal (common) albumin A was changed to glutamic acid both in albumin Naskapi, a widespread polymorphic variant of North American Indians, and in albumin Mersin found in Eti Turks. The two variants also exhibited anomalous migration in NaDodSO/sub 4//PAGE, which is attributed to a conformational change. The identity of albumins Naskapi and Mersin may have originated through descent from a common mid-Asiatic founder of the two migrating ethnic groups, or it may represent identical but independent mutations of the albumin gene. In albumin Adana, from Eti Turks, the substitution site was not identified but was localized to the region from positions 447 through 548. The substitution of aspartic acid-550 by glycine was found in albumin Mexico-2 from four individuals of the Pima tribe. Although only single-point substitutions have been found in these and in certain other genetic variants of human albumin, five differences exist in the amino acid sequences inferred from cDNA sequences by workers in three other laboratories. However, our results on albumin A and on 14 different genetic variants accord with the amino acid sequence of albumin deduced from the genomic sequence. The apparent amino acid substitutions inferred from comparison of individual cDNA sequences probably reflect artifacts in cloning or in cDNA sequence analysis rather than polymorphism of the coding sections of the albumin gene.

  18. Amino acid substitutions in genetic variants of human serum albumin and in sequences inferred from molecular cloning.

    PubMed

    Takahashi, N; Takahashi, Y; Blumberg, B S; Putnam, F W

    1987-07-01

    The structural changes in four genetic variants of human serum albumin were analyzed by tandem high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) of the tryptic peptides, HPLC mapping and isoelectric focusing of the CNBr fragments, and amino acid sequence analysis of the purified peptides. Lysine-372 of normal (common) albumin A was changed to glutamic acid both in albumin Naskapi, a widespread polymorphic variant of North American Indians, and in albumin Mersin found in Eti Turks. The two variants also exhibited anomalous migration in NaDodSO4/PAGE, which is attributed to a conformational change. The identity of albumins Naskapi and Mersin may have originated through descent from a common mid-Asiatic founder of the two migrating ethnic groups, or it may represent identical but independent mutations of the albumin gene. In albumin Adana, from Eti Turks, the substitution site was not identified but was localized to the region from positions 447 through 548. The substitution of aspartic acid-550 by glycine was found in albumin Mexico-2 from four individuals of the Pima tribe. Although only single-point substitutions have been found in these and in certain other genetic variants of human albumin, five differences exist in the amino acid sequences inferred from cDNA sequences by workers in three other laboratories. However, our results on albumin A and on 14 different genetic variants accord with the amino acid sequence of albumin deduced from the genomic sequence. The apparent amino acid substitutions inferred from comparison of individual cDNA sequences probably reflect artifacts in cloning or in cDNA sequence analysis rather than polymorphism of the coding sections of the albumin gene.

  19. 1918 Influenza receptor binding domain variants bind and replicate in primary human airway cells regardless of receptor specificity.

    PubMed

    Davis, A Sally; Chertow, Daniel S; Kindrachuk, Jason; Qi, Li; Schwartzman, Louis M; Suzich, Jon; Alsaaty, Sara; Logun, Carolea; Shelhamer, James H; Taubenberger, Jeffery K

    2016-06-01

    The 1918 influenza pandemic caused ~50 million deaths. Many questions remain regarding the origin, pathogenicity, and mechanisms of human adaptation of this virus. Avian-adapted influenza A viruses preferentially bind α2,3-linked sialic acids (Sia) while human-adapted viruses preferentially bind α2,6-linked Sia. A change in Sia preference from α2,3 to α2,6 is thought to be a requirement for human adaptation of avian influenza viruses. Autopsy data from 1918 cases, however, suggest that factors other than Sia preference played a role in viral binding and entry to human airway cells. Here, we evaluated binding and entry of five 1918 influenza receptor binding domain variants in a primary human airway cell model along with control avian and human influenza viruses. We observed that all five variants bound and entered cells efficiently and that Sia preference did not predict entry of influenza A virus to primary human airway cells evaluated in this model. PMID:27062579

  20. 1918 Influenza receptor binding domain variants bind and replicate in primary human airway cells regardless of receptor specificity.

    PubMed

    Davis, A Sally; Chertow, Daniel S; Kindrachuk, Jason; Qi, Li; Schwartzman, Louis M; Suzich, Jon; Alsaaty, Sara; Logun, Carolea; Shelhamer, James H; Taubenberger, Jeffery K

    2016-06-01

    The 1918 influenza pandemic caused ~50 million deaths. Many questions remain regarding the origin, pathogenicity, and mechanisms of human adaptation of this virus. Avian-adapted influenza A viruses preferentially bind α2,3-linked sialic acids (Sia) while human-adapted viruses preferentially bind α2,6-linked Sia. A change in Sia preference from α2,3 to α2,6 is thought to be a requirement for human adaptation of avian influenza viruses. Autopsy data from 1918 cases, however, suggest that factors other than Sia preference played a role in viral binding and entry to human airway cells. Here, we evaluated binding and entry of five 1918 influenza receptor binding domain variants in a primary human airway cell model along with control avian and human influenza viruses. We observed that all five variants bound and entered cells efficiently and that Sia preference did not predict entry of influenza A virus to primary human airway cells evaluated in this model.

  1. Complete Genome Sequences of Eight Human Papillomavirus Type 16 Asian American and European Variant Isolates from Cervical Biopsies and Lesions in Indian Women

    PubMed Central

    Mandal, Paramita; Sen, Shrinka; Bhattacharya, Amrapali; Roy Chowdhury, Rahul; Mondal, Nidhu Ranjan

    2016-01-01

    Human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16), a member of the Papillomaviridae family, is the primary etiological agent of cervical cancer. Here, we report the complete genome sequences of four HPV16 Asian American variants and four European variants, isolated from cervical biopsies and scrapings in India. PMID:27198009

  2. Homologous recombination and human health: the roles of BRCA1, BRCA2, and associated proteins.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Rohit; Zhang, Yu; Feng, Weiran; Jasin, Maria

    2015-04-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a major pathway for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks in mammalian cells, the defining step of which is homologous strand exchange directed by the RAD51 protein. The physiological importance of HR is underscored by the observation of genomic instability in HR-deficient cells and, importantly, the association of cancer predisposition and developmental defects with mutations in HR genes. The tumor suppressors BRCA1 and BRCA2, key players at different stages of HR, are frequently mutated in familial breast and ovarian cancers. Other HR proteins, including PALB2 and RAD51 paralogs, have also been identified as tumor suppressors. This review summarizes recent findings on BRCA1, BRCA2, and associated proteins involved in human disease with an emphasis on their molecular roles and interactions. PMID:25833843

  3. Epistatic interaction of genetic depression risk variants in the human subgenual cingulate cortex during memory encoding

    PubMed Central

    Schott, B H; Assmann, A; Schmierer, P; Soch, J; Erk, S; Garbusow, M; Mohnke, S; Pöhland, L; Romanczuk-Seiferth, N; Barman, A; Wüstenberg, T; Haddad, L; Grimm, O; Witt, S; Richter, S; Klein, M; Schütze, H; Mühleisen, T W; Cichon, S; Rietschel, M; Noethen, M M; Tost, H; Gundelfinger, E D; Düzel, E; Heinz, A; Meyer-Lindenberg, A; Seidenbecher, C I; Walter, H

    2014-01-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies have pointed to single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in genes encoding the neuronal calcium channel CaV1.2 (CACNA1C; rs1006737) and the presynaptic active zone protein Piccolo (PCLO; rs2522833) as risk factors for affective disorders, particularly major depression. Previous neuroimaging studies of depression-related endophenotypes have highlighted the role of the subgenual cingulate cortex (CG25) in negative mood and depressive psychopathology. Here, we aimed to assess how recently associated PCLO and CACNA1C depression risk alleles jointly affect memory-related CG25 activity as an intermediate phenotype in clinically healthy humans. To investigate the combined effects of rs1006737 and rs2522833 on the CG25 response, we conducted three functional magnetic resonance imaging studies of episodic memory formation in three independent cohorts (N=79, 300, 113). An epistatic interaction of PCLO and CACNA1C risk alleles in CG25 during memory encoding was observed in all groups, with carriers of no risk allele and of both risk alleles showing higher CG25 activation during encoding when compared with carriers of only one risk allele. Moreover, PCLO risk allele carriers showed lower memory performance and reduced encoding-related hippocampal activation. In summary, our results point to region-specific epistatic effects of PCLO and CACNA1C risk variants in CG25, potentially related to episodic memory. Our data further suggest that genetic risk factors on the SNP level do not necessarily have additive effects but may show complex interactions. Such epistatic interactions might contribute to the ‘missing heritability' of complex phenotypes. PMID:24643163

  4. Variants in Striatin Gene are Associated with Salt Sensitive Blood Pressure in Mice and Humans

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Bei; Williams, Jonathan; Lasky-Su, Jessica; Baudrand, Rene; Yao, Tham; Moize, Burhanuddin; Hafiz, Wan M; Romero, Jose R.; Adler, Gail K.; Ferri, Claudio; Hopkins, Paul N.; Pojoga, Luminita H.; Williams, Gordon H.

    2015-01-01

    Striatin is a novel protein that interacts with steroid receptors and modifies rapid, non-genomic activity in vitro. We tested the hypothesis that striatin would in turn affect mineralocorticoid receptor function and consequently sodium, water, and blood pressure homeostasis in an animal model. We evaluated salt sensitivity of blood pressure in novel striatin heterozygote knockout mice. When compared with wild type, striatin heterozygote exhibited a significant increase in blood pressure when sodium intake was increased from restricted (0.03%) to liberal (1.6%) sodium). Further, renal expression of mineralocorticoid receptor and its genomic downstream targets serum/glucocoticoid-regulated kinase 1 and epithelial sodium channel were increased in striatin heterozygote versus wild type mice on liberal sodium intake while the pAkt/Akt ratio, readout of mineralocoriticoid receptor's rapid, non-genomic pathway, was reduced. To determine the potential clinical relevance of these findings, we tested the association between single nucleotide polymorphic variants of striatin gene and salt sensitivity of blood presure in 366 Caucasian hypertensive subjects. HapMap derived tagging single nucleotide polymorphisms identified an association between rs2540923 with salt sensitivity of blood pressure (OR, 6.25; 95% CI 1.7-20; P=0.01). These data provide the first in vivo evidence in humans and rodents that associates striatin with markers of mineralocoriticoid receptor activity. The data also support the hypothesis that the rapid, non-genomic mineralocoriticoid receptor pathway (mediated via striatin) has a role in modulating the interaction between salt intake and blood pressure. PMID:25368024

  5. Interaction of pneumolysin-sufficient and -deficient isogenic variants of Streptococcus pneumoniae with human respiratory mucosa.

    PubMed Central

    Rayner, C F; Jackson, A D; Rutman, A; Dewar, A; Mitchell, T J; Andrew, P W; Cole, P J; Wilson, R

    1995-01-01

    Streptococcus pneumoniae is the most common cause of community-acquired pneumonia, and pneumolysin, a hemolytic toxin, is thought to be an important virulence factor. We have studied the interaction of a pneumolysin-sufficient type II S. pneumoniae strain (PL+) and an otherwise identical pneumolysin-deficient derivative (PL-) with human respiratory mucosa in an organ culture with an air interface for up to 48 h. Ciliary beat frequency (CBF) was measured by a photometric technique, and adherence to and invasion of the epithelium were assessed by scanning and transmission electron microscopy. PL+ and PL- caused a progressive fall in CBF compared with the control which became significant (P < 0.01) at 24 h for PL+ and at 48 h for PL-. At 24 h, there was a significant increase in the percentage of the mucosa of the organ culture that was damaged for PL+ compared with the control (P < 0.01) and PL- (P < 0.02). At 48 h, there was a significant increase in mucosal damage for both PL+ (P < 0.005) and PL- (P < 0.05) compared with the control. At 24 and 48 h, PL+ and PL- adhered predominantly to mucus and damaged cells. PL+ infection alone caused separation of tight junctions between epithelial cells, and at 48 h PL+ cells were adherent to the separated edges of otherwise healthy unciliated cells. PL+ and PL- both caused damage to the epithelial cell ultrastructure. S. pneumoniae infection caused patchy damage to the respiratory mucosa and a lowered CBF. These changes were more severe and occurred earlier with the pneumolysin-sufficient variant. PMID:7822008

  6. An Antagonistic Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Variant Inhibits VEGF-Stimulated Receptor Autophosphorylation and Proliferation of Human Endothelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemeister, Gerhard; Schirner, Michael; Reusch, Petra; Barleon, Bernhard; Marme, Dieter; Martiny-Baron, Georg

    1998-04-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent mitogen with a unique specificity for endothelial cells and a key mediator of aberrant endothelial cell proliferation and vascular permeability in a variety of human pathological situations, such as tumor angiogenesis, diabetic retinopathy, rheumatoid arthritis, or psoriasis. VEGF is a symmetric homodimeric molecule with two receptor binding interfaces lying on each pole of the molecule. Herein we report on the construction and recombinant expression of an asymmetric heterodimeric VEGF variant with an intact receptor binding interface at one pole and a mutant receptor binding interface at the second pole of the dimer. This VEGF variant binds to VEGF receptors but fails to induce receptor activation. In competition experiments, the heterodimeric VEGF variant antagonizes VEGF-stimulated receptor autophosphorylation and proliferation of endothelial cells. A 15-fold excess of the heterodimer was sufficient to inhibit VEGF-stimulated endothelial cell proliferation by 50%, and a 100-fold excess resulted in an almost complete inhibition. By using a rational approach that is based on the structure of VEGF, we have shown the feasibility to construct a VEGF variant that acts as an VEGF antagonist.

  7. Variant upstream regulatory region sequences differentially regulate human papillomavirus type 16 DNA replication throughout the viral life cycle.

    PubMed

    Hubert, Walter G

    2005-05-01

    While the central role of the viral upstream regulatory region (URR) in the human papillomavirus (HPV) life cycle has been well established, its effects on viral replication factor expression and plasmid replication of HPV type 16 (HPV16) remain unclear. Some nonprototypic variants of HPV16 contain altered URR sequences and are considered to increase the oncogenic risk of infections. To determine the relationship between viral replication and variant URRs, hybrid viral genomes were constructed with the replication-competent HPV16 prototype W12 and analyzed in assays which recapitulate the different phases of normal viral replication. The establishment efficiencies of hybrid HPV16 genomes differed about 20-fold among European prototypes and variants from Africa and America. Generally, European and African genomes exhibited the lowest replication efficiencies. The high replication levels observed with American variants were primarily attributable to their efficient expression of the replication factors E1 and E2. The maintenance levels of these viral genomes varied about fivefold, which correlated with their respective establishment phenotypes and published P(97) activities. Vegetative DNA amplification could also be observed with replicating HPV16 genomes. These results indicate that efficient E1/E2 expression and elevated plasmid replication levels during the persistent stage of infection may comprise a risk factor in HPV16-mediated oncogenesis.

  8. Plasma Proteomics, The Human Proteome Project, and Cancer-Associated Alternative Splice Variant Proteins☆, ☆☆

    PubMed Central

    Omenn, Gilbert S.

    2016-01-01

    This article addresses three inter-related subjects: the development of the Human Plasma Proteome Peptide Atlas, the launch of the Human Proteome Project, and the emergence of alternative splice variant transcripts and proteins as important features of evolution and pathogenesis. The current Plasma Peptide Atlas provides evidence on which peptides have been detected for every protein confidently identified in plasma; there are links to their spectra and their estimated abundance, facilitating the planning of targeted proteomics for biomarker studies. The Human Proteome Project (HPP) combines a chromosome-centric C-HPP with a biology and disease-driven B/D-HPP, upon a foundation of mass spectrometry, antibody, and knowledgebase resource pillars. The HPP aims to identify the approximately 7000 “missing proteins” and to characterize all proteins and their many isoforms. Success will enable the larger research community to utilize newly-available peptides, spectra, informative MS transitions, and databases for targeted analyses of priority proteins for each organ and disease. Among the isoforms of proteins, splice variants have the special feature of greatly enlarging protein diversity without enlarging the genome; evidence is accumulating of striking differential expression of splice variants in cancers. In this era of RNA-sequencing and advanced mass spectrometry, it is no longer sufficient to speak simply of increased or decreased expression of genes or proteins without carefully examining the splice variants in the protein mixture produced from each multi-exon gene. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biomarkers: A Proteomic Challenge. PMID:24211518

  9. Effects of the missense mutations in canine BRCA2 on BRC repeat 3 functions and comparative analyses between canine and human BRC repeat 3.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Yasunaga; Ochiai, Kazuhiko; Morimatsu, Masami; Suzuki, Yu; Wada, Seiichi; Taoda, Takahiro; Iwai, Satomi; Chikazawa, Seishiro; Orino, Koichi; Watanabe, Kiyotaka

    2012-01-01

    Mammary tumors are the most common tumor type in both human and canine females. Mutations in the breast cancer susceptibility gene, BRCA2, have been found in most cases of inherited human breast cancer. Similarly, the canine BRCA2 gene locus has been associated with mammary tumors in female dogs. However, deleterious mutations in canine BRCA2 have not been reported, thus far. The BRCA2 protein is involved in homologous recombination repair via its interaction with RAD51 recombinase, an interaction mediated by 8 BRC repeats. These repeats are 26-amino acid, conserved motifs in mammalian BRCA2. Previous structural analyses of cancer-associated mutations affecting the BRC repeats have shown that the weakening of RAD51's affinity for even 1 repeat is sufficient to increase breast cancer susceptibility. In this study, we focused on 2 previously reported canine BRCA2 mutations (T1425P and K1435R) in BRC repeat 3 (BRC3), derived from mammary tumor samples. These mutations affected the interaction of canine BRC3 with RAD51, and were considered deleterious. Two BRC3 mutations (K1440R and K1440E), reported in human breast cancer patients, occur at amino acids corresponding to those of the K1435R mutation in dogs. These mutations affected the interaction of canine BRC3 with RAD51, and may also be considered deleterious. The two BRC3 mutations and a substitution (T1430P), corresponding to T1425P in canine BRCA2, were examined for their effects on human BRC3 function and the results were compared between species. The corresponding mutations and the substitution showed similar results in both human and canine BRC3. Therefore, canine BRCA2 may be a good model for studying human breast cancer caused by BRCA2 mutations.

  10. Effects of the missense mutations in canine BRCA2 on BRC repeat 3 functions and comparative analyses between canine and human BRC repeat 3.

    PubMed

    Yoshikawa, Yasunaga; Ochiai, Kazuhiko; Morimatsu, Masami; Suzuki, Yu; Wada, Seiichi; Taoda, Takahiro; Iwai, Satomi; Chikazawa, Seishiro; Orino, Koichi; Watanabe, Kiyotaka

    2012-01-01

    Mammary tumors are the most common tumor type in both human and canine females. Mutations in the breast cancer susceptibility gene, BRCA2, have been found in most cases of inherited human breast cancer. Similarly, the canine BRCA2 gene locus has been associated with mammary tumors in female dogs. However, deleterious mutations in canine BRCA2 have not been reported, thus far. The BRCA2 protein is involved in homologous recombination repair via its interaction with RAD51 recombinase, an interaction mediated by 8 BRC repeats. These repeats are 26-amino acid, conserved motifs in mammalian BRCA2. Previous structural analyses of cancer-associated mutations affecting the BRC repeats have shown that the weakening of RAD51's affinity for even 1 repeat is sufficient to increase breast cancer susceptibility. In this study, we focused on 2 previously reported canine BRCA2 mutations (T1425P and K1435R) in BRC repeat 3 (BRC3), derived from mammary tumor samples. These mutations affected the interaction of canine BRC3 with RAD51, and were considered deleterious. Two BRC3 mutations (K1440R and K1440E), reported in human breast cancer patients, occur at amino acids corresponding to those of the K1435R mutation in dogs. These mutations affected the interaction of canine BRC3 with RAD51, and may also be considered deleterious. The two BRC3 mutations and a substitution (T1430P), corresponding to T1425P in canine BRCA2, were examined for their effects on human BRC3 function and the results were compared between species. The corresponding mutations and the substitution showed similar results in both human and canine BRC3. Therefore, canine BRCA2 may be a good model for studying human breast cancer caused by BRCA2 mutations. PMID:23071527

  11. A Novel BHLHE41 Variant is Associated with Short Sleep and Resistance to Sleep Deprivation in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Pellegrino, Renata; Kavakli, Ibrahim Halil; Goel, Namni; Cardinale, Christopher J.; Dinges, David F.; Kuna, Samuel T.; Maislin, Greg; Van Dongen, Hans P.A.; Tufik, Sergio; Hogenesch, John B.; Hakonarson, Hakon; Pack, Allan I.

    2014-01-01

    Study Objectives: Earlier work described a mutation in DEC2 also known as BHLHE41 (basic helix-loophelix family member e41) as causal in a family of short sleepers, who needed just 6 h sleep per night. We evaluated whether there were other variants of this gene in two well-phenotyped cohorts. Design: Sequencing of the BHLHE41 gene, electroencephalographic data, and delta power analysis and functional studies using cell-based luciferase. Results: We identified new variants of the BHLHE41 gene in two cohorts who had either acute sleep deprivation (n = 200) or chronic partial sleep deprivation (n = 217). One variant, Y362H, at another location in the same exon occurred in one twin in a dizygotic twin pair and was associated with reduced sleep duration, less recovery sleep following sleep deprivation, and fewer performance lapses during sleep deprivation than the homozygous twin. Both twins had almost identical amounts of non rapid eye movement (NREM) sleep. This variant reduced the ability of BHLHE41 to suppress CLOCK/BMAL1 and NPAS2/BMAL1 transactivation in vitro. Another variant in the same exome had no effect on sleep or response to sleep deprivation and no effect on CLOCK/BMAL1 transactivation. Random mutagenesis identified a number of other variants of BHLHE41 that affect its function. Conclusions: There are a number of mutations of BHLHE41. Mutations reduce total sleep while maintaining NREM sleep and provide resistance to the effects of sleep loss. Mutations that affect sleep also modify the normal inhibition of BHLHE41 of CLOCK/BMAL1 transactivation. Thus, clock mechanisms are likely involved in setting sleep length and the magnitude of sleep homeostasis. Citation: Pellegrino R, Kavakli IH, Goel N, Cardinale CJ, Dinges DF, Kuna ST, Maislin G, Van Dongen HP, Tufik S, Hogenesch JB, Hakonarson H, Pack AI. A novel BHLHE41 variant is associated with short sleep and resistance to sleep deprivation in humans. SLEEP 2014;37(8):1327-1336. PMID:25083013

  12. Differential Selection of Specific Human Immunodeficiency Virus Type 1/JC499 Variants after Mucosal and Parenteral Inoculation of Chimpanzees

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Qing; Fultz, Patricia N.

    2002-01-01

    Regardless of the route of transmission, it is generally accepted that the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) quasispecies transmitted from an infected individual to an uninfected individual is genetically homogeneous. This finding and the observation that HIV-1 genotypes in recipients are minor variants in the donors suggest strongly that selection for specific variants occurs. However, most analyses have been limited to the V3 region of env. In addition, the exact time at which most new infections occurred was not known, making it almost impossible to analyze virus populations present in donor-recipient pairs at the time of HIV-1 transmission. To circumvent this problem, three chimpanzees were inoculated with a genetically defined stock of cell-free HIV-1/JC499 by one of three routes: intravenously or via the cervical or penile mucosa. PCR products of the C2-to-V5 region of env were amplified from both proviral DNA and virion RNA in blood samples collected soon after infection and were screened by heteroduplex analysis (HDA). Those PCR products with distinct HDA banding patterns were cloned and sequenced. In all three animals, transmitted variants encoded one of two V3-loop populations identified in the inoculum, indicating relative homogeneity in this region. However, different virus populations, defined by combinations of specific V4 and V5 sequences, were found when variants in the animal inoculated intravenously (at least 13 V4-plus-V5 combinations) were compared with those in the two animals inoculated by the mucosal routes (limited to only four V4-plus-V5 combinations). The only V4-plus-V5 population in variants found in all three chimpanzees was the major population in the inoculum, which contained viruses with more than 30 different V4-plus-V5 combinations. That the majority of the V4-plus-V5 genotypes in variants transmitted to all three animals were minor populations in the inoculum indicated that selective transmission defined by the V4-plus

  13. iFish: predicting the pathogenicity of human nonsynonymous variants using gene-specific/family-specific attributes and classifiers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Wei, Liping

    2016-08-16

    Accurate prediction of the pathogenicity of genomic variants, especially nonsynonymous single nucleotide variants (nsSNVs), is essential in biomedical research and clinical genetics. Most current prediction methods build a generic classifier for all genes. However, different genes and gene families have different features. We investigated whether gene-specific and family-specific customized classifiers could improve prediction accuracy. Customized gene-specific and family-specific attributes were selected with AIC, BIC, and LASSO, and Support Vector Machine classifiers were generated for 254 genes and 152 gene families, covering a total of 5,985 genes. Our results showed that the customized attributes reflected key features of the genes and gene families, and the customized classifiers achieved higher prediction accuracy than the generic classifier. The customized classifiers and the generic classifier for other genes and families were integrated into a new tool named iFish (integrated Functional inference of SNVs in human, http://ifish.cbi.pku.edu.cn). iFish outperformed other methods on benchmark datasets as well as on prioritization of candidate causal variants from whole exome sequencing. iFish provides a user-friendly web-based interface and supports other functionalities such as integration of genetic evidence. iFish would facilitate high-throughput evaluation and prioritization of nsSNVs in human genetics research.

  14. Neanderthal origin of the haplotypes carrying the functional variant Val92Met in the MC1R in modern humans.

    PubMed

    Ding, Qiliang; Hu, Ya; Xu, Shuhua; Wang, Chuan-Chao; Li, Hui; Zhang, Ruyue; Yan, Shi; Wang, Jiucun; Jin, Li

    2014-08-01

    Skin color is one of the most visible and important phenotypes of modern humans. Melanocyte-stimulating hormone and its receptor played an important role in regulating skin color. In this article, we present evidence of Neanderthal introgression encompassing the melanocyte-stimulating hormone receptor gene MC1R. The haplotypes from Neanderthal introgression diverged with the Altai Neanderthal 103.3 ka, which postdates the anatomically modern human-Neanderthal divergence. We further discovered that all of the putative Neanderthal introgressive haplotypes carry the Val92Met variant, a loss-of-function variant in MC1R that is associated with multiple dermatological traits including skin color and photoaging. Frequency of this Neanderthal introgression is low in Europeans (∼5%), moderate in continental East Asians (∼30%), and high in Taiwanese aborigines (60-70%). As the putative Neanderthal introgressive haplotypes carry a loss-of-function variant that could alter the function of MC1R and is associated with multiple traits related to skin color, we speculate that the Neanderthal introgression may have played an important role in the local adaptation of Eurasians to sunlight intensity.

  15. iFish: predicting the pathogenicity of human nonsynonymous variants using gene-specific/family-specific attributes and classifiers.

    PubMed

    Wang, Meng; Wei, Liping

    2016-01-01

    Accurate prediction of the pathogenicity of genomic variants, especially nonsynonymous single nucleotide variants (nsSNVs), is essential in biomedical research and clinical genetics. Most current prediction methods build a generic classifier for all genes. However, different genes and gene families have different features. We investigated whether gene-specific and family-specific customized classifiers could improve prediction accuracy. Customized gene-specific and family-specific attributes were selected with AIC, BIC, and LASSO, and Support Vector Machine classifiers were generated for 254 genes and 152 gene families, covering a total of 5,985 genes. Our results showed that the customized attributes reflected key features of the genes and gene families, and the customized classifiers achieved higher prediction accuracy than the generic classifier. The customized classifiers and the generic classifier for other genes and families were integrated into a new tool named iFish (integrated Functional inference of SNVs in human, http://ifish.cbi.pku.edu.cn). iFish outperformed other methods on benchmark datasets as well as on prioritization of candidate causal variants from whole exome sequencing. iFish provides a user-friendly web-based interface and supports other functionalities such as integration of genetic evidence. iFish would facilitate high-throughput evaluation and prioritization of nsSNVs in human genetics research. PMID:27527004

  16. iFish: predicting the pathogenicity of human nonsynonymous variants using gene-specific/family-specific attributes and classifiers

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meng; Wei, Liping

    2016-01-01

    Accurate prediction of the pathogenicity of genomic variants, especially nonsynonymous single nucleotide variants (nsSNVs), is essential in biomedical research and clinical genetics. Most current prediction methods build a generic classifier for all genes. However, different genes and gene families have different features. We investigated whether gene-specific and family-specific customized classifiers could improve prediction accuracy. Customized gene-specific and family-specific attributes were selected with AIC, BIC, and LASSO, and Support Vector Machine classifiers were generated for 254 genes and 152 gene families, covering a total of 5,985 genes. Our results showed that the customized attributes reflected key features of the genes and gene families, and the customized classifiers achieved higher prediction accuracy than the generic classifier. The customized classifiers and the generic classifier for other genes and families were integrated into a new tool named iFish (integrated Functional inference of SNVs in human, http://ifish.cbi.pku.edu.cn). iFish outperformed other methods on benchmark datasets as well as on prioritization of candidate causal variants from whole exome sequencing. iFish provides a user-friendly web-based interface and supports other functionalities such as integration of genetic evidence. iFish would facilitate high-throughput evaluation and prioritization of nsSNVs in human genetics research. PMID:27527004

  17. Isolation and characterization of a variant of human papillomavirus type 11 from a nasal inverting (Schneiderian) papilloma.

    PubMed

    Pater, A; Gardner, H; Respler, D S; Jahn, A; Pater, M M

    1988-06-01

    We have previously reported the presence of a variant of human papillomavirus (HPV) type 11 in a nasal inverting papilloma [Respler et al., 1987]. In the present study, we have cloned molecularly the DNA of this variant at its unique restriction enzyme Bam HI site into lambda BF101 phage. Restriction enzyme mapping and DNA sequencing revealed that the genome of this virus contained an extra 531 base pair (bp) which was the repeat of most of the noncoding region (ncr) of HPV 11. Insertion of transcriptional control elements, including the repeated sequence, in front of the chloramphenicol acetyltransferase (CAT) gene resulted in a 5- to 30-fold increase in expression in transfected cells, as compared to the constructs containing a single ncr of HPV 11. This increased expression was due to enhanced levels of CAT RNA the synthesis of which is initiated by the viral promoter element. PMID:2839608

  18. Allele Specific Expression of MICA Variants in Human Fibroblasts Suggests a Pathogenic Mechanism.

    PubMed

    Shi, Chunhua; Li, Hongye; Couturier, Jacob P; Yang, Karen; Guo, Xinjian; He, Dongyi; Lewis, Dorothy E; Zhou, Xiaodong

    2015-01-01

    The major histocompatibility complex class I chain-related gene A (MICA) is involved in immune responses of both nature killer (NK) cells and subsets of T cells with its receptor NKG2D. MICA is highly polymorphic in sequence which leads to MICA protein variants with distinct features. Specific polymorphisms of MICA have been associated with inflammatory diseases, including ankylosing spondylitis (AS), ulcerative colitis (UC) and Behçet's disease. Studies herein characterize expression features of three MICA variants including MICA*008, a common variant in general population, and *MICA*007 and *019, which are associated with susceptibility to inflammatory diseases. MICA*019 was highly expressed on the surface of fibroblasts whereas expression of MICA*007 was the lowest in the culture supernatant. MICA*008 had low cell surface expression but was the only MICA allele in which exosomal material was detected. Surface or membrane-bound MICA activates NKG2D-mediated cytotoxicity, whereas soluble and exosomal MICAs down-regulate NKG2D. Therefore, comparisons of these three MICA variants in fibroblasts provides insight into understanding how MICA associated immune responses could be regulated to influence levels of inflammation.

  19. Selective phthalate activation of naturally occurring human constitutive androstane receptor splice variants and the pregnane X receptor.

    PubMed

    DeKeyser, Joshua G; Laurenzana, Elizabeth M; Peterson, Eric C; Chen, Tao; Omiecinski, Curtis J

    2011-04-01

    Phthalates and other endocrine-disruptive chemicals are manufactured in large quantities for use as plasticizers and other commercial applications, resulting in ubiquitous human exposure and thus, concern regarding their toxicity. Innate defense against small molecule exposures is controlled in large part by the constitutive androstane receptor (CAR) and the pregnane X receptor (PXR). The human CAR gene undergoes multiple alternative splicing events resulting in the CAR2 and CAR3 variant receptors. Recent studies from our laboratory show that CAR2 is potently and specifically activated by di(2-ethylhexyl) phthalate (DEHP). We hypothesized that alternative splicing is a mechanism for increasing CAR's functional diversity, broadening the human receptors' repertoire of response to environmental xenobiotics. In these studies, we examine the interaction of alternatively spliced CARs and PXR with a range of suspected endocrine disruptors, including phthalates, bisphenol A (BPA), and 4-N-nonylphenol (NP). Transactivation and two-hybrid studies in COS-1 cells revealed differential selectivity of endocrine-disrupting chemicals for the variant CAR and PXR. Ex vivo studies showed DEHP and di-isononyl phthalate potently induced CYP2B6 and CYP3A4 expression in human hepatocytes. Mutation analysis of CAR2, in silico modeling, and ligand docking studies suggested that the SPTV amino acid insertion of CAR2 creates a unique ligand-binding pocket. Alternative gene splicing results in variant CAR receptors that selectively recognize phthalates and BPA. The interaction of phthalates with CAR and PXR suggests a xenobiotic response that is complex and biologically redundant.

  20. ERβ splice variant expression in four large cohorts of human breast cancer patient tumors.

    PubMed

    Wimberly, Hallie; Han, Gang; Pinnaduwage, Dushanthi; Murphy, Leigh C; Yang, Xiaohong Rose; Andrulis, Irene L; Sherman, Mark; Figueroa, Jonine; Rimm, David L

    2014-08-01

    Though the role of Estrogen Receptor (ER)α in breast cancer has been studied extensively, there is little consensus about the role of alternative ER isoform ERβ in breast cancer biology. ERβ has significant sequence homology to ERα but is located on a different chromosome and maintains both overlapping and unique functional attributes. Five variants exist, resulting from alternative splicing of the C-terminal region of ERβ. The relevance of ERβ variants in breast cancer outcomes and response to therapy is difficult to assess because of conflicting reports in the literature, likely due to variable methods used to assess ERβ in patient tumors. Here, we quantitatively assess expression of ERβ splice variants on over 2,000 breast cancer patient samples. Antibodies against ERβ variants were validated for staining specificity in cell lines by siRNA knockdown of ESR2 and staining reproducibility on formalin-fixed paraffin-embedded tissue by quantitative immunofluorescence (QIF) using AQUA technology. We found antibodies against splice variants ERβ1 and ERβ5, but not ERβ2/cx, which were sensitive, specific, and reproducible. QIF staining of validated antibodies showed both ERβ1 and ERβ5 QIF scores, which have a normal (bell shaped) distribution on most cohorts assessed, and their expression is significantly associated with each other. Extensive survival analyses show that ERβ1 is not a prognostic or predictive biomarker for breast cancer. ERβ5 appears to be a context-dependent marker of worse outcome in HER2-positive and triple-negative patients, suggesting an unknown biological function in the absence of ERα.

  1. A Burden of Rare Variants Associated with Extremes of Gene Expression in Human Peripheral Blood

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Jing; Akinsanmi, Idowu; Arafat, Dalia; Cradick, T.J.; Lee, Ciaran M.; Banskota, Samridhi; Marigorta, Urko M.; Bao, Gang; Gibson, Greg

    2016-01-01

    In order to evaluate whether rare regulatory variants in the vicinity of promoters are likely to impact gene expression, we conducted a novel burden test for enrichment of rare variants at the extremes of expression. After sequencing 2-kb promoter regions of 472 genes in 410 healthy adults, we performed a quadratic regression of rare variant count on bins of peripheral blood transcript abundance from microarrays, summing over ranks of all genes. After adjusting for common eQTLs and the major axes of gene expression covariance, a highly significant excess of variants with minor allele frequency less than 0.05 at both high and low extremes across individuals was observed. Further enrichment was seen in sites annotated as potentially regulatory by RegulomeDB, but a deficit of effects was associated with known metabolic disease genes. The main result replicates in an independent sample of 75 individuals with RNA-seq and whole-genome sequence information. Three of four predicted large-effect sites were validated by CRISPR/Cas9 knockdown in K562 cells, but simulations indicate that effect sizes need not be unusually large to produce the observed burden. Unusually divergent low-frequency promoter haplotypes were observed at 31 loci, at least 9 of which appear to be derived from Neandertal admixture, but these were not associated with divergent gene expression in blood. The overall burden test results are consistent with rare and private regulatory variants driving high or low transcription at specific loci, potentially contributing to disease. PMID:26849112

  2. Altered Proteome of Burkholderia pseudomallei Colony Variants Induced by Exposure to Human Lung Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Al-Maleki, Anis Rageh; Mariappan, Vanitha; Vellasamy, Kumutha Malar; Tay, Sun Tee; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei primary diagnostic cultures demonstrate colony morphology variation associated with expression of virulence and adaptation proteins. This study aims to examine the ability of B. pseudomallei colony variants (wild type [WT] and small colony variant [SCV]) to survive and replicate intracellularly in A549 cells and to identify the alterations in the protein expression of these variants, post-exposure to the A549 cells. Intracellular survival and cytotoxicity assays were performed followed by proteomics analysis using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. B. pseudomallei SCV survive longer than the WT. During post-exposure, among 259 and 260 protein spots of SCV and WT, respectively, 19 were differentially expressed. Among SCV post-exposure up-regulated proteins, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, fructose-bisphosphate aldolase (CbbA) and betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase were associated with adhesion and virulence. Among the down-regulated proteins, enolase (Eno) is implicated in adhesion and virulence. Additionally, post-exposure expression profiles of both variants were compared with pre-exposure. In WT pre- vs post-exposure, 36 proteins were differentially expressed. Of the up-regulated proteins, translocator protein, Eno, nucleoside diphosphate kinase (Ndk), ferritin Dps-family DNA binding protein and peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase B were implicated in invasion and virulence. In SCV pre- vs post-exposure, 27 proteins were differentially expressed. Among the up-regulated proteins, flagellin, Eno, CbbA, Ndk and phenylacetate-coenzyme A ligase have similarly been implicated in adhesion, invasion. Protein profiles differences post-exposure provide insights into association between morphotypic and phenotypic characteristics of colony variants, strengthening the role of B. pseudomallei morphotypes in pathogenesis of melioidosis. PMID:25996927

  3. Altered Proteome of Burkholderia pseudomallei Colony Variants Induced by Exposure to Human Lung Epithelial Cells.

    PubMed

    Al-Maleki, Anis Rageh; Mariappan, Vanitha; Vellasamy, Kumutha Malar; Tay, Sun Tee; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei primary diagnostic cultures demonstrate colony morphology variation associated with expression of virulence and adaptation proteins. This study aims to examine the ability of B. pseudomallei colony variants (wild type [WT] and small colony variant [SCV]) to survive and replicate intracellularly in A549 cells and to identify the alterations in the protein expression of these variants, post-exposure to the A549 cells. Intracellular survival and cytotoxicity assays were performed followed by proteomics analysis using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. B. pseudomallei SCV survive longer than the WT. During post-exposure, among 259 and 260 protein spots of SCV and WT, respectively, 19 were differentially expressed. Among SCV post-exposure up-regulated proteins, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, fructose-bisphosphate aldolase (CbbA) and betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase were associated with adhesion and virulence. Among the down-regulated proteins, enolase (Eno) is implicated in adhesion and virulence. Additionally, post-exposure expression profiles of both variants were compared with pre-exposure. In WT pre- vs post-exposure, 36 proteins were differentially expressed. Of the up-regulated proteins, translocator protein, Eno, nucleoside diphosphate kinase (Ndk), ferritin Dps-family DNA binding protein and peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase B were implicated in invasion and virulence. In SCV pre- vs post-exposure, 27 proteins were differentially expressed. Among the up-regulated proteins, flagellin, Eno, CbbA, Ndk and phenylacetate-coenzyme A ligase have similarly been implicated in adhesion, invasion. Protein profiles differences post-exposure provide insights into association between morphotypic and phenotypic characteristics of colony variants, strengthening the role of B. pseudomallei morphotypes in pathogenesis of melioidosis. PMID:25996927

  4. Human Papillomavirus Type 6 and 11 Genetic Variants Found in 71 Oral and Anogenital Epithelial Samples from Australia

    PubMed Central

    Danielewski, Jennifer A.; Garland, Suzanne M.; McCloskey, Jenny; Hillman, Richard J.; Tabrizi, Sepehr N.

    2013-01-01

    Genetic variation of 49 human papillomavirus (HPV) 6 and 22 HPV11 isolates from recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) (n = 17), genital warts (n = 43), anal cancer (n = 6) and cervical neoplasia cells (n = 5), was determined by sequencing the long control region (LCR) and the E6 and E7 genes. Comparative analysis of genetic variability was examined to determine whether different disease states resulting from HPV6 or HPV11 infection cluster into distinct variant groups. Sequence variation analysis of HPV6 revealed that isolates cluster into variants within previously described HPV6 lineages, with the majority (65%) clustering to HPV6 sublineage B1 across the three genomic regions examined. Overall 72 HPV6 and 25 HPV11 single nucleotide variations, insertions and deletions were observed within samples examined. In addition, missense alterations were observed in the E6/E7 genes for 6 HPV6 and 5 HPV11 variants. No nucleotide variations were identified in any isolates at the four E2 binding sites for HPV6 or HPV11, nor were any isolates found to be identical to the HPV6 lineage A or HPV11 sublineage A1 reference genomes. Overall, a high degree of sequence conservation was observed between isolates across each of the regions investigated for both HPV6 and HPV11. Genetic variants identified a slight association with HPV6 and anogenital lesions (p = 0.04). This study provides important information on the genetic diversity of circulating HPV 6 and HPV11 variants within the Australian population and supports the observation that the majority of HPV6 isolates cluster to the HPV6 sublineage B1 with anogenital lesions demonstrating an association with this sublineage (p = 0.02). Comparative analysis of Australian isolates for both HPV6 and HPV11 to those from other geographical regions based on the LCR revealed a high degree of sequence similarity throughout the world, confirming previous observations that there are no geographically specific

  5. Surface plasmon resonance-based competition assay to assess the sera reactivity of variants of humanized antibodies.

    PubMed

    Gonzales, Noreen R; Schuck, Peter; Schlom, Jeffrey; Kashmiri, Syed V S

    2002-10-15

    While clinical trials are the only way to evaluate the immunogenicity, in patients, of murine or genetically engineered humanized variants of a potentially therapeutic or diagnostic monoclonal antibody (MAb), ethical and logistical considerations of clinical trials do not permit the evaluation of variants of a given MAb that are generated to minimize its immunogenicity. The most promising variant could be identified by comparing the reactivities of the parental antibody (Ab) and its variants to the sera of patients containing anti-variable region (anti-VR) Abs to the administered parental Ab. We have developed a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) biosensor-based assay to monitor the binding of the sera anti-VR Abs to the parental Ab and the inhibition of this binding by the variants. SPR biosensors allow the real-time detection and monitoring of the binding between an immobilized protein and its soluble ligand without the need for prior purification and labeling of the mobile analyte. This new assay requires no radiolabeling, is relatively less time-consuming, and uses only small amounts of serum (5-20 microl of diluted serum) through a new microfluidic sample handling technique. To validate the assay, we have tested the relative reactivities of the CDR-grafted anti-carcinoma Ab, HuCC49, and its two variants, designated V5 and V10, to the sera of patients who were earlier administered radiolabeled murine CC49 in a clinical trial. A comparison of IC(50)s (the concentrations of the competitor Abs required for 50% inhibition of the binding of sera to immobilized HuCC49) showed that V5 and V10 were less reactive than HuCC49 to the three patients' sera tested. We have also demonstrated, for the first time, the specific detection and comparison of relative amounts of anti-VR Abs present in the sera of different patients without prior removal of anti-murine Fc Abs and/or circulating antigen. This may facilitate the rapid screening, for the presence of anti-VR Abs, of the

  6. Amyloidogenic propensity of a natural variant of human apolipoprotein A-I: stability and interaction with ligands.

    PubMed

    Rosú, Silvana A; Rimoldi, Omar J; Prieto, Eduardo D; Curto, Lucrecia M; Delfino, José M; Ramella, Nahuel A; Tricerri, M Alejandra

    2015-01-01

    A number of naturally occurring mutations of human apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) have been associated with hereditary amyloidoses. The molecular mechanisms involved in amyloid-associated pathology remain largely unknown. Here we examined the effects of the Arg173Pro point mutation in apoA-I on the structure, stability, and aggregation propensity, as well as on the ability to bind to putative ligands. Our results indicate that the mutation induces a drastic loss of stability, and a lower efficiency to bind to phospholipid vesicles at physiological pH, which could determine the observed higher tendency to aggregate as pro-amyloidogenic complexes. Incubation under acidic conditions does not seem to induce significant desestabilization or aggregation tendency, neither does it contribute to the binding of the mutant to sodium dodecyl sulfate. While the binding to this detergent is higher for the mutant as compared to wt apoA-I, the interaction of the Arg173Pro variant with heparin depends on pH, being lower at pH 5.0 and higher than wt under physiological pH conditions. We suggest that binding to ligands as heparin or other glycosaminoglycans could be key events tuning the fine details of the interaction of apoA-I variants with the micro-environment, and probably eliciting the toxicity of these variants in hereditary amyloidoses. PMID:25950566

  7. Amyloidogenic Propensity of a Natural Variant of Human Apolipoprotein A-I: Stability and Interaction with Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Rosú, Silvana A.; Rimoldi, Omar J.; Prieto, Eduardo D.; Curto, Lucrecia M.; Delfino, José M.

    2015-01-01

    A number of naturally occurring mutations of human apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) have been associated with hereditary amyloidoses. The molecular mechanisms involved in amyloid-associated pathology remain largely unknown. Here we examined the effects of the Arg173Pro point mutation in apoA-I on the structure, stability, and aggregation propensity, as well as on the ability to bind to putative ligands. Our results indicate that the mutation induces a drastic loss of stability, and a lower efficiency to bind to phospholipid vesicles at physiological pH, which could determine the observed higher tendency to aggregate as pro-amyloidogenic complexes. Incubation under acidic conditions does not seem to induce significant desestabilization or aggregation tendency, neither does it contribute to the binding of the mutant to sodium dodecyl sulfate. While the binding to this detergent is higher for the mutant as compared to wt apoA-I, the interaction of the Arg173Pro variant with heparin depends on pH, being lower at pH 5.0 and higher than wt under physiological pH conditions. We suggest that binding to ligands as heparin or other glycosaminoglycans could be key events tuning the fine details of the interaction of apoA-I variants with the micro-environment, and probably eliciting the toxicity of these variants in hereditary amyloidoses. PMID:25950566

  8. Kangaroo IGF-II is structurally and functionally similar to the human [Ser29]-IGF-II variant.

    PubMed

    Yandell, C A; Francis, G L; Wheldrake, J F; Upton, Z

    1999-06-01

    Kangaroo IGF-II has been purified from western grey kangaroo (Macropus fuliginosus) serum and characterised in a number of in vitro assays. In addition, the complete cDNA sequence of mature IGF-II has been obtained by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Comparison of the kangaroo IGF-II cDNA sequence with known IGF-II sequences from other species revealed that it is very similar to the human variant, [Ser29]-hIGF-II. Both the variant and kangaroo IGF-II contain an insert of nine nucleotides that encode the amino acids Leu-Pro-Gly at the junction of the B and C domains of the mature protein. The deduced kangaroo IGF-II protein sequence also contains three other amino acid changes that are not observed in human IGF-II. These amino acid differences share similarities with the changes described in many of the IGF-IIs reported for non-mammalian species. Characterisation of human IGF-II, kangaroo IGF-II, chicken IGF-II and [Ser29]-hIGF-II in a number of in vitro assays revealed that all four proteins are functionally very similar. No significant differences were observed in the ability of the IGF-IIs to bind to the bovine IGF-II/cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor or to stimulate protein synthesis in rat L6 myoblasts. However, differences were observed in their abilities to bind to IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs) present in human serum. Kangaroo, chicken and [Ser29]-hIGF-II had lower apparent affinities for human IGFBPs than did human IGF-II. Thus, it appears that the major circulating form of IGF-II in the kangaroo and a minor form of IGF-II found in human serum are structurally and functionally very similar. This suggests that the splice site that generates both the variant and major form of human IGF-II must have evolved after the divergence of marsupials from placental mammals.

  9. Selection of multiple human immunodeficiency virus type 1 variants that encode viral proteases with decreased sensitivity to an inhibitor of the viral protease.

    PubMed Central

    Kaplan, A H; Michael, S F; Wehbie, R S; Knigge, M F; Paul, D A; Everitt, L; Kempf, D J; Norbeck, D W; Erickson, J W; Swanstrom, R

    1994-01-01

    Inhibitors of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease represent a promising addition to the available agents used to inhibit virus replication in a therapeutic setting. HIV-1 is capable of generating phenotypic variants in the face of a variety of selective pressures. The potential to generate variants with reduced sensitivity to a protease inhibitor was examined by selecting for virus growth in cell culture in the presence of the protease inhibitor A-77003. Virus variants grew out in the presence of the inhibitor, and these variants encoded proteases with reduced sensitivity to the inhibitor. Variants were identified that encoded changes in each of the three subsites of the protease that interact with the inhibitor. HIV-1 displays significant potential for altering its interaction with this protease inhibitor, suggesting the need for multiple protease inhibitors with varying specificities. Images PMID:8202533

  10. Novel inhibitors of human leukocyte elastase and cathepsin G. Sequence variants of squash seed protease inhibitor with altered protease selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    McWherter, C.A.; Walkenhorst, W.F.; Glover, G.I. ); Campbell, E.J. )

    1989-07-11

    Novel peptide inhibitors of human leukocyte elastase (HLE) and cathepsin G (CG) were prepared by solid-phase peptide synthesis of P1 amino acid sequence variants of Curcurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor III (CMTI-III), a 29-residue peptide found in squash seed. A systematic study of P1 variants indicated that P1, Arg, Lys, Leu, Ala, Phe, and Met inhibit trypsin; P1, Val, Ile, Gly, Leu, Ala, Phe, and Met inhibit HLE; P1 Leu, Ala, Phe, and Met inhibit CG and chymotrypsin. Variants with P1, Val, Ile, or Gly were selective inhibitors of HLE, while inhibition of trypsin required P1 amino acids with an unbranched {beta} carbon. Studies of Val-5-CMTI-III (P1 Val) inhibition of HLE demonstrated a 1:1 binding stoichiometry with a (K{sub i}){sub app} of 8.7 nM. Inhibition of HLE by Gly-5-CMTI-III indicated a significant role for reactive-site structural moieties other than the P1 side chain. Val-5-CMTI-III inhibited both HLE and human polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) proteolysis of surface-bound {sup 125}I-labeled fibronectin. Val-5-CMTI-III was more effective at preventing turnover of a peptide p-nitroanilide substrate than halting dissolution of {sup 125}I-labeled fibronectin. It was about as effective as human serum {alpha}{sub 1}-proteinase inhibitor in preventing PMN degradation of the connective tissue substrate. In addition to providing interesting candidates for controlling inflammatory cell proteolytic injury, the CMTI-based inhibitors are ideal for studying molecular recognition because of their small size, their ease of preparation, and the availability of sensitive and quantitative assays for intermolecular interactions.

  11. Predominant human herpesvirus 6 variant A infant infections in an HIV-1 endemic region of Sub-Saharan Africa.

    PubMed

    Bates, Matthew; Monze, Mwaka; Bima, Humphrey; Kapambwe, Mirriam; Clark, David; Kasolo, Francis C; Gompels, Ursula A

    2009-05-01

    Human herpesvirus 6, HHV-6, commonly infects children, causing febrile illness and can cause more severe pathology, especially in an immune compromised setting. There are virulence distinctions between variants HHV-6A and B, with evidence for increased severity and neurotropism for HHV-6A. While HHV-6B is the predominant infant infection in USA, Europe and Japan, HHV-6A appears rare. Here HHV-6 prevalence, loads and variant genotypes, in asymptomatic compared to symptomatic infants were investigated from an African region with endemic HIV-1/AIDS. DNA was extracted from blood or sera from asymptomatic infants at 6 and 18 months age in a population-based micronutrient study, and from symptomatic infants hospitalised for febrile disease. DNA was screened by qualitative and quantitative real-time PCR, then genotyped by sequencing at variable loci, U46 (gN) and U47 (gO). HIV-1 serostatus of infants and mothers were also determined. HHV-6 DNA prevalence rose from 15% to 22% (80/371) by 18 months. At 6 months, infants born to HIV-1 positive mothers had lower HHV-6 prevalence (11%, 6/53), but higher HCMV prevalence (25%, 17/67). HHV-6 positive febrile hospitalized infants had higher HIV-1, 57% (4/7), compared to asymptomatic infants, 3% (2/74). HHV-6A was detected exclusively in 86% (48/56) of asymptomatic HHV-6 positive samples genotyped. Co-infections with both strain variants were linked with higher viral loads and found in 13% (7/56) asymptomatic infants and 43% (3/7) HIV-1 positive febrile infants. Overall, the results show HHV-6A as the predominant variant significantly associated with viremic infant-infections in this African population, distinct from other global cohorts, suggesting emergent infections elsewhere. PMID:19319952

  12. Differential tropism of human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) variants and induction of latency by HHV-6A in oligodendrocytes.

    PubMed

    Ahlqvist, Jenny; Fotheringham, Julie; Akhyani, Nahid; Yao, Karen; Fogdell-Hahn, Anna; Jacobson, Steven

    2005-08-01

    Human herpesvirus 6 (HHV-6) is a ubiquitous beta -herpesvirus associated with a number of clinical disorders. Two closely but biologically distinct variants have been described. HHV-6 variant B causes the common childhood disease exhanthem subitum, and although the pathologic characteristics for HHV-6 variant A are less well defined, HHV-6A has been suggested to be more neurotropic. We studied the effect of both HHV-6 variants in an oligodendrocyte cell line (MO3.13). Infection of M03.13 was monitored by cytopathic effect (CPE), quantitative TaqMan PCR for viral DNA in cells and supernatant, reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) to detect viral RNA, and indirect immunofluorescence (IFA) to detect viral protein expression. HHV-6A infection induced significantly more CPE than infection with HHV-6B. HHV-6B induced an abortive infection associated with a decrease of the initial viral DNA load over time, early RNA expression, and no expression of viral antigen. In contrast, infection with HHV-6A DNA persisted in cells for at least 62 days. During the acute phase of infection with HHV-6A, intracellular and extracellular viral load increased and cells expressed the viral protein IE-2 and gp116/54/64. No HHV-6A RNA or protein was expressed after 30 days post infection, suggesting that HHV-6A formed a latent infection. These studies provide in vitro support to the hypothesis that HHV-6 can actively infect oligodendrocytes. Our results suggest that HHV-6A and HHV-6B have different tropism in MO3.13 cells and that an initially active HHV-6A infection can develop latency. Differences between HHV-6A and -6B infection in different neural cell types may be associated with different neurological diseases. PMID:16162481

  13. Genetic variants in AVPR1A linked to autism predict amygdala activation and personality traits in healthy humans

    PubMed Central

    Meyer-Lindenberg, A; Kolachana, B; Gold, B; Olsh, A; Nicodemus, KK; Mattay, V; Dean, M; Weinberger, DR

    2009-01-01

    In mammals, the neuropeptide vasopressin is a key molecule for complex emotional and social behaviours. Two microsatellite polymorphisms, RS1 and RS3, near the promoter of AVPR1A, encoding the receptor subtype most heavily implicated in behaviour regulation, have been linked to autism and behavioural traits. However, the impact of these variants on human brain function is unknown. Here we show that human amygdala function is strongly associated with genetic variation in AVPR1A. Using an imaging genetics approach in a sample of 121 volunteers studied with an emotional face-matching paradigm, we found that differential activation of amygdala is observed in carriers of risk alleles for RS3 and RS1. Alleles in RS1 previously reported to be significantly over- and undertransmitted to autistic probands showed opposing effects on amygdala activation. Furthermore, we show functional difference in human brain between short and long repeat lengths that mirror findings recently obtained in a corresponding variant in voles. Our results indicate a neural mechanism mediating genetic risk for autism through an impact on amygdala signalling and provide a rationale for exploring therapeutic strategies aimed at abnormal amygdala function in this disorder. PMID:18490926

  14. Genetic instability in lymphoblastoid cell lines expressing biallelic and monoallelic variants in the human MUTYH gene.

    PubMed

    Grasso, Francesca; Giacomini, Elisa; Sanchez, Massimo; Degan, Paolo; Gismondi, Viviana; Mazzei, Filomena; Varesco, Liliana; Viel, Alessandra; Bignami, Margherita

    2014-07-15

    The MUTYH DNA glycosylase counteracts mutagenesis by removing adenine misincorporated opposite DNA 8-oxo-7,8-dihydro-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG). Biallelic germline mutations in MUTYH cause the autosomal recessive MUTYH-associated polyposis (MAP). The impact on genetic instability of the p.Tyr179Cys and p.Arg245His MUTYH variants was evaluated in lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) derived from MAP patients and their relatives in comparison to wild-type LCLs. No difference in MUTYH expression was identified between wild type and LCLs with the p.Tyr179Cys, while the p.Arg245His mutation was associated with an unstable MUTYH protein. LCLs homozygous for the p.Tyr179Cys or the p.Arg245His variant contained increased DNA 8-oxodG levels and exhibited a mutator phenotype at the PIG-A gene. The extent of the increased spontaneous mutation frequency was 3-fold (range 1.6- to 4.6-fold) in four independent LCLs carrying the p.Tyr179Cys variant, while a larger increase (6-fold) was observed in two p.Arg245His LCLs. A similar hypermutability and S-phase delay following treatment with KBrO3 was observed in LCLs homozygous for either variant. When genetic instability was investigated in monoallelic p.Arg245His carriers, mutant frequencies showed an increase which is intermediate between wild-type and homozygous cells, whereas the mutator effect in heterozygous p.Tyr179Cys LCLs was similar to that in homozygotes. These findings indicate that the type of MUTYH mutation can affect the extent of genome instability associated with MUTYH inactivation. In addition, the mild spontaneous mutator phenotype observed in monoallelic carriers highlights the biological importance of this gene in the protection of the genome against endogenous DNA damage.

  15. Is there a difference among human populations in the rate with which mutation produces electrophoretic variants?

    PubMed Central

    Neel, J V; Rothman, E

    1981-01-01

    Data are summarized that suggest that tropical-zone/tribal/nonindustrialized populations have higher frequencies of certain types of protein variants than temperate-zone/civilized/industrial populations, and it is demonstrated that these differences are not an artifact produced by the contagious type of sampling used with respect to tribal populations. Evidence is reviewed that suggests that a possible explanation of this difference is higher mutation rates in the tribal populations studied. PMID:6942419

  16. Changes in localization of human discs large (hDlg) during keratinocyte differentiation is associated with expression of alternatively spliced hDlg variants

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, S. . E-mail: s.roberts@bham.ac.uk; Calautti, E.; Vanderweil, S.; Nguyen, H.O.; Foley, A.; Baden, H.P.; Viel, A.

    2007-07-15

    Alternative spliced variants of the human discs large (hDlg) tumour suppressor are characterized by combinations of insertions. Here, using insertions I2- and I3-specific antibodies, we show that I2 and I3 variants have distinct distributions in epidermal and cervical epithelia. In skin and cervix, I3 variants are found in the cytoplasm. Cytoplasmic localization of I3 variants decreases as cervical keratinocytes differentiate, concomitant with relocalization to the cell periphery. I2 variants are found at the cell periphery of differentiated epidermal and cervical keratinocytes. Nuclear localization of I2 variants was evident in both tissues, with concentration of nuclear I2 variants in basal and parabasal cervical keratinocytes. A prominent nuclear localization of hDlg in cells of hyperproliferative layers of psoriatic lesions, but not in mature differentiated keratinocytes, together with I2 redistribution in differentiating keratinocytes, suggests that nuclear hDlg functions may be pertinent to growth of undifferentiated cells. Supporting our findings in squamous tissues, a decrease of nuclear hDlg and an increase of membrane-bound and cytoplasmic hDlg upon calcium-induced keratinocyte differentiation were not concomitant processes. Furthermore, we confirm that the exit of I2 variants from the nucleus is linked to stimulation of epithelial differentiation. The dynamic redistribution of hDlg also correlated with a marked increase in the expression of I3 variants while the level of I2 variants showed only a moderate decrease. Because changes in the intracellular distribution of hDlg splice variants, and in their expression levels, correlate with changes in differentiation state we hypothesize that the different hDlg isoforms play distinct roles at various stages of epithelial differentiation.

  17. Rare variants in NR2F2 cause congenital heart defects in humans.

    PubMed

    Al Turki, Saeed; Manickaraj, Ashok K; Mercer, Catherine L; Gerety, Sebastian S; Hitz, Marc-Phillip; Lindsay, Sarah; D'Alessandro, Lisa C A; Swaminathan, G Jawahar; Bentham, Jamie; Arndt, Anne-Karin; Louw, Jacoba; Low, Jacoba; Breckpot, Jeroen; Gewillig, Marc; Thienpont, Bernard; Abdul-Khaliq, Hashim; Harnack, Christine; Hoff, Kirstin; Kramer, Hans-Heiner; Schubert, Stephan; Siebert, Reiner; Toka, Okan; Cosgrove, Catherine; Watkins, Hugh; Lucassen, Anneke M; O'Kelly, Ita M; Salmon, Anthony P; Bu'lock, Frances A; Granados-Riveron, Javier; Setchfield, Kerry; Thornborough, Chris; Brook, J David; Mulder, Barbara; Klaassen, Sabine; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Devriendt, Koen; Fitzpatrick, David F; Wilson, David I; Mital, Seema; Hurles, Matthew E

    2014-04-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHDs) are the most common birth defect worldwide and are a leading cause of neonatal mortality. Nonsyndromic atrioventricular septal defects (AVSDs) are an important subtype of CHDs for which the genetic architecture is poorly understood. We performed exome sequencing in 13 parent-offspring trios and 112 unrelated individuals with nonsyndromic AVSDs and identified five rare missense variants (two of which arose de novo) in the highly conserved gene NR2F2, a very significant enrichment (p = 7.7 × 10(-7)) compared to 5,194 control subjects. We identified three additional CHD-affected families with other variants in NR2F2 including a de novo balanced chromosomal translocation, a de novo substitution disrupting a splice donor site, and a 3 bp duplication that cosegregated in a multiplex family. NR2F2 encodes a pleiotropic developmental transcription factor, and decreased dosage of NR2F2 in mice has been shown to result in abnormal development of atrioventricular septa. Via luciferase assays, we showed that all six coding sequence variants observed in individuals significantly alter the activity of NR2F2 on target promoters.

  18. Rare Variants in NR2F2 Cause Congenital Heart Defects in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Al Turki, Saeed; Manickaraj, Ashok K.; Mercer, Catherine L.; Gerety, Sebastian S.; Hitz, Marc-Phillip; Lindsay, Sarah; D’Alessandro, Lisa C.A.; Swaminathan, G. Jawahar; Bentham, Jamie; Arndt, Anne-Karin; Low, Jacoba; Breckpot, Jeroen; Gewillig, Marc; Thienpont, Bernard; Abdul-Khaliq, Hashim; Harnack, Christine; Hoff, Kirstin; Kramer, Hans-Heiner; Schubert, Stephan; Siebert, Reiner; Toka, Okan; Cosgrove, Catherine; Watkins, Hugh; Lucassen, Anneke M.; O’Kelly, Ita M.; Salmon, Anthony P.; Bu’Lock, Frances A.; Granados-Riveron, Javier; Setchfield, Kerry; Thornborough, Chris; Brook, J. David; Mulder, Barbara; Klaassen, Sabine; Bhattacharya, Shoumo; Devriendt, Koen; FitzPatrick, David F.; Wilson, David I.; Mital, Seema; Hurles, Matthew E.

    2014-01-01

    Congenital heart defects (CHDs) are the most common birth defect worldwide and are a leading cause of neonatal mortality. Nonsyndromic atrioventricular septal defects (AVSDs) are an important subtype of CHDs for which the genetic architecture is poorly understood. We performed exome sequencing in 13 parent-offspring trios and 112 unrelated individuals with nonsyndromic AVSDs and identified five rare missense variants (two of which arose de novo) in the highly conserved gene NR2F2, a very significant enrichment (p = 7.7 × 10−7) compared to 5,194 control subjects. We identified three additional CHD-affected families with other variants in NR2F2 including a de novo balanced chromosomal translocation, a de novo substitution disrupting a splice donor site, and a 3 bp duplication that cosegregated in a multiplex family. NR2F2 encodes a pleiotropic developmental transcription factor, and decreased dosage of NR2F2 in mice has been shown to result in abnormal development of atrioventricular septa. Via luciferase assays, we showed that all six coding sequence variants observed in individuals significantly alter the activity of NR2F2 on target promoters. PMID:24702954

  19. Chemical and enzymological characterization of an Indonesian variant of human erythrocyte carbonic anhydrase II, CAII Jogjakarta (17 Lys leads to Glu).

    PubMed

    Jones, G L; Sofro, A S; Shaw, D C

    1982-10-01

    A new variant of human erythrocyte carbonic anhydrase II (CAII) was discovered in a single heterozygous individual during routine screening of blood samples from the island of Java in Indonesia. The normal and variant components of the heterozygous CAII mixture were resolved by isoelectric focusing following purification by a specific affinity matrix. Specific esterase activities and Michaelis-Menten constants were identical. Only very small differences were noted with respect to inhibition by acetazolamide and chloride. Double diffusion analysis showed the immunological identify of the normal and variant enzymes. The variant CAII was considerably less heat stable than the normal enzyme. The variant was slightly more stable than the normal enzyme upon dialysis against the zinc chelator dipicolinic acid (PDCA), indicating a tighter binding of zinc than the normal enzyme. Analysis of tryptic peptides from the normal and variant enzymes indicated that, in the variant, lysine at position 17 from the N terminus had changed to glutamic acid. The differences in physiochemical properties observed for the normal and variant enzyme are discussed in relation to the possible effects of this substitution on the structure of the CAII molecule. PMID:6817747

  20. Genetic variants of Adam17 differentially regulate TGFβ signaling to modify vascular pathology in mice and humans

    PubMed Central

    Kawasaki, Kyoko; Freimuth, Julia; Meyer, Dominique S.; Lee, Marie M.; Tochimoto-Okamoto, Akiko; Benzinou, Michael; Clermont, Frederic F.; Wu, Gloria; Roy, Ritu; Letteboer, Tom G. W.; Ploos van Amstel, Johannes Kristian; Giraud, Sophie; Dupuis-Girod, Sophie; Lesca, Gaeten; Westermann, Cornelius J. J.; Coffey, Robert J.; Akhurst, Rosemary J.

    2014-01-01

    Outcome of TGFβ1 signaling is context dependent and differs between individuals due to germ-line genetic variation. To explore innate genetic variants that determine differential outcome of reduced TGFβ1 signaling, we dissected the modifier locus Tgfbm3, on mouse chromosome 12. On a NIH/OlaHsd genetic background, the Tgfbm3bC57 haplotype suppresses prenatal lethality of Tgfb1−/− embryos and enhances nuclear accumulation of mothers against decapentaplegic homolog 2 (Smad2) in embryonic cells. Amino acid polymorphisms within a disintegrin and metalloprotease 17 (Adam17) can account, at least in part, for this Tgfbm3b effect. ADAM17 is known to down-regulate Smad2 signaling by shedding the extracellular domain of TGFβRI, and we show that the C57 variant is hypomorphic for down-regulation of Smad2/3-driven transcription. Genetic variation at Tgfbm3 or pharmacological inhibition of ADAM17, modulates postnatal circulating endothelial progenitor cell (CEPC) numbers via effects on TGFβRI activity. Because CEPC numbers correlate with angiogenic potential, this suggests that variant Adam17 is an innate modifier of adult angiogenesis, acting through TGFβR1. To determine whether human ADAM17 is also polymorphic and interacts with TGFβ signaling in human vascular disease, we investigated hereditary hemorrhagic telangiectasia (HHT), which is caused by mutations in TGFβ/bone morphogenetic protein receptor genes, ENG, encoding endoglin (HHT1), or ACVRL1 encoding ALK1 (HHT2), and considered a disease of excessive abnormal angiogenesis. HHT manifests highly variable incidence and severity of clinical features, ranging from small mucocutaneous telangiectases to life-threatening visceral and cerebral arteriovenous malformations (AVMs). We show that ADAM17 SNPs associate with the presence of pulmonary AVM in HHT1 but not HHT2, indicating genetic variation in ADAM17 can potentiate a TGFβ-regulated vascular disease. PMID:24812125

  1. Ratios of Four STAT3 Splice Variants in Human Eosinophils and Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma Cells.

    PubMed

    Turton, Keren B; Annis, Douglas S; Rui, Lixin; Esnault, Stephane; Mosher, Deane F

    2015-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is a key mediator of leukocyte differentiation and proliferation. The 3' end of STAT3 transcripts is subject to two alternative splicing events. One results in either full-length STAT3α or in STAT3β, which lacks part of the C-terminal transactivation domain. The other is at a tandem donor (5') splice site and results in the codon for Ser-701 being included (S) or excluded (ΔS). Despite the proximity of Ser-701 to the site of activating phosphorylation at Tyr-705, ΔS/S splicing has barely been studied. Sequencing of cDNA from purified eosinophils revealed the presence of four transcripts (S-α, ΔS-α, S-β, and ΔS-β) rather than the three reported in publically available databases from which ΔS-β is missing. To gain insight into regulation of the two alternative splicing events, we developed a quantitative(q) PCR protocol to compare transcript ratios in eosinophils in which STAT3 is upregulated by cytokines, activated B cell diffuse large B cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) cells in which STAT3 is dysregulated, and in germinal center B cell-like DLBCL cells in which it is not. With the exception of one line of activated B cell DLCBL cells, the four variants were found in roughly the same ratios despite differences in total levels of STAT3 transcripts. S-α was the most abundant, followed by S-β. ΔS-α and ΔS-β together comprised 15.6 ± 4.0 % (mean ± SD, n = 21) of the total. The percentage of STAT3β variants that were ΔS was 1.5-fold greater than of STAT3α variants that were ΔS. Inspection of Illumina's "BodyMap" RNA-Seq database revealed that the ΔS variant accounts for 10-26 % of STAT3 transcripts across 16 human tissues, with less variation than three other genes with the identical tandem donor splice site sequence. Thus, it seems likely that all cells contain the S-α, ΔS-α, S-β, and ΔS-β variants of STAT3.

  2. Ratios of Four STAT3 Splice Variants in Human Eosinophils and Diffuse Large B Cell Lymphoma Cells

    PubMed Central

    Turton, Keren B.; Annis, Douglas S.; Rui, Lixin; Esnault, Stephane; Mosher, Deane F.

    2015-01-01

    Signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) is a key mediator of leukocyte differentiation and proliferation. The 3' end of STAT3 transcripts is subject to two alternative splicing events. One results in either full-length STAT3α or in STAT3β, which lacks part of the C-terminal transactivation domain. The other is at a tandem donor (5') splice site and results in the codon for Ser-701 being included (S) or excluded (ΔS). Despite the proximity of Ser-701 to the site of activating phosphorylation at Tyr-705, ΔS/S splicing has barely been studied. Sequencing of cDNA from purified eosinophils revealed the presence of four transcripts (S-α, ΔS-α, S-β, and ΔS-β) rather than the three reported in publically available databases from which ΔS-β is missing. To gain insight into regulation of the two alternative splicing events, we developed a quantitative(q) PCR protocol to compare transcript ratios in eosinophils in which STAT3 is upregulated by cytokines, activated B cell diffuse large B cell Lymphoma (DLBCL) cells in which STAT3 is dysregulated, and in germinal center B cell-like DLBCL cells in which it is not. With the exception of one line of activated B cell DLCBL cells, the four variants were found in roughly the same ratios despite differences in total levels of STAT3 transcripts. S-α was the most abundant, followed by S-β. ΔS-α and ΔS-β together comprised 15.6±4.0 % (mean±SD, n=21) of the total. The percentage of STAT3β variants that were ΔS was 1.5-fold greater than of STAT3α variants that were ΔS. Inspection of Illumina’s “BodyMap” RNA-Seq database revealed that the ΔS variant accounts for 10-26 % of STAT3 transcripts across 16 human tissues, with less variation than three other genes with the identical tandem donor splice site sequence. Thus, it seems likely that all cells contain the S-α, ΔS-α, S-β, and ΔS-β variants of STAT3. PMID:25984943

  3. GnRH-Deficient Phenotypes in Humans and Mice with Heterozygous Variants in KISS1/Kiss1

    PubMed Central

    Chan, Yee-Ming; Broder-Fingert, Sarabeth; Paraschos, Sophia; Lapatto, Risto; Au, Margaret; Hughes, Virginia; Bianco, Suzy D. C.; Min, Le; Plummer, Lacey; Cerrato, Felecia; De Guillebon, Adelaide; Wu, I-Hsuan; Wahab, Fazal; Dwyer, Andrew; Kirsch, Susan; Quinton, Richard; Cheetham, Timothy; Ozata, Metin; Ten, Svetlana; Chanoine, Jean-Pierre; Pitteloud, Nelly; Martin, Kathryn A.; Schiffmann, Raphael; Van der Kamp, Hetty J.; Nader, Shahla; Hall, Janet E.; Kaiser, Ursula B.

    2011-01-01

    Context: KISS1 is a candidate gene for GnRH deficiency. Objective: Our objective was to identify deleterious mutations in KISS1. Patients and Methods: DNA sequencing and assessment of the effects of rare sequence variants (RSV) were conducted in 1025 probands with GnRH-deficient conditions. Results: Fifteen probands harbored 10 heterozygous RSV in KISS1 seen in less than 1% of control subjects. Of the variants that reside within the mature kisspeptin peptide, p.F117L (but not p.S77I, p.Q82K, p.H90D, or p.P110T) reduces inositol phosphate generation. Of the variants that lie within the coding region but outside the mature peptide, p.G35S and p.C53R (but not p.A129V) are predicted in silico to be deleterious. Of the variants that lie outside the coding region, one (g.1-3659C→T) impairs transcription in vitro, and another (c.1-7C→T) lies within the consensus Kozak sequence. Of five probands tested, four had abnormal baseline LH pulse patterns. In mice, testosterone decreases with heterozygous loss of Kiss1 and Kiss1r alleles (wild-type, 274 ± 99, to double heterozygotes, 69 ± 16 ng/dl; r2 = 0.13; P = 0.03). Kiss1/Kiss1r double-heterozygote males have shorter anogenital distances (13.0 ± 0.2 vs. 15.6 ± 0.2 mm at P34, P < 0.001), females have longer estrous cycles (7.4 ± 0.2 vs. 5.6 ± 0.2 d, P < 0.01), and mating pairs have decreased litter frequency (0.59 ± 0.09 vs. 0.71 ± 0.06 litters/month, P < 0.04) and size (3.5 ± 0.2 vs. 5.4 ± 0.3 pups/litter, P < 0.001) compared with wild-type mice. Conclusions: Deleterious, heterozygous RSV in KISS1 exist at a low frequency in GnRH-deficient patients as well as in the general population in presumably normal individuals. As in Kiss1+/−/Kiss1r+/− mice, heterozygous KISS1 variants in humans may work with other genetic and/or environmental factors to cause abnormal reproductive function. PMID:21880801

  4. Evidence for trisulfide bonds in a recombinant variant of a human IgG2 monoclonal antibody.

    PubMed

    Pristatsky, Pavlo; Cohen, Steven L; Krantz, Debra; Acevedo, Jillian; Ionescu, Roxana; Vlasak, Josef

    2009-08-01

    The hinge region of human IgG2 contains four cysteine residues involved in disulfide linkages between the heavy chains, as well as the heavy and light chains. These linkages provide the fundamental framework of three distinct IgG2 disulfide isoforms recently described. Here, we detail another, disulfide-related post-translational modification in a recombinant variant of human IgG2. Heterogeneity associated with this antibody was separated into several fractions by anion-exchange chromatography (AEX), which is an important initial step that highlights the resolving power of surface charge-based HPLC techniques. Mass spectrometry of the intact antibody revealed weakly resolved discrete covalent additions of 25-35 Da in one of the two main AEX fractions. Digestion by endoproteinase Lys-C performed under nonreducing conditions, as well as tandem MS experiments, narrowed the modification to the peptide-containing disulfide-bridged hinge structure. High mass resolution and accuracy measurements of the peptide strongly suggested an addition of one or two S atoms. The modification could be eliminated by a mild reducing treatment of the intact antibody. Overall, these findings are consistent with the replacement of up to two disulfide bridges (S-S) with a like number of trisulfides (S-S-S) in the antibody hinge. The trisulfide modification is rather uncommon for proteins and its possible origins in the IgG2 variant are discussed.

  5. Tandem RNA Chimeras Contribute to Transcriptome Diversity in Human Population and Are Associated with Intronic Genetic Variants

    PubMed Central

    Greger, Liliana; Su, Jing; Rung, Johan; Ferreira, Pedro G.; Lappalainen, Tuuli; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T.; Brazma, Alvis

    2014-01-01

    Chimeric RNAs originating from two or more different genes are known to exist not only in cancer, but also in normal tissues, where they can play a role in human evolution. However, the exact mechanism of their formation is unknown. Here, we use RNA sequencing data from 462 healthy individuals representing 5 human populations to systematically identify and in depth characterize 81 RNA tandem chimeric transcripts, 13 of which are novel. We observe that 6 out of these 81 chimeras have been regarded as cancer-specific. Moreover, we show that a prevalence of long introns at the fusion breakpoint is associated with the chimeric transcripts formation. We also find that tandem RNA chimeras have lower abundances as compared to their partner genes. Finally, by combining our results with genomic data from the same individuals we uncover intronic genetic variants associated with the chimeric RNA formation. Taken together our findings provide an important insight into the chimeric transcripts formation and open new avenues of research into the role of intronic genetic variants in post-transcriptional processing events. PMID:25133550

  6. Common variants in the human platelet PAR4 thrombin receptor alter platelet function and differ by race.

    PubMed

    Edelstein, Leonard C; Simon, Lukas M; Lindsay, Cory R; Kong, Xianguo; Teruel-Montoya, Raúl; Tourdot, Benjamin E; Chen, Edward S; Ma, Lin; Coughlin, Shaun; Nieman, Marvin; Holinstat, Michael; Shaw, Chad A; Bray, Paul F

    2014-11-27

    Human platelets express 2 thrombin receptors: protease-activated receptor (PAR)-1 and PAR4. Recently, we reported 3.7-fold increased PAR4-mediated aggregation kinetics in platelets from black subjects compared with white subjects. We now show that platelets from blacks (n = 70) express 14% more PAR4 protein than those from whites (n = 84), but this difference is not associated with platelet PAR4 function. Quantitative trait locus analysis identified 3 common single nucleotide polymorphisms in the PAR4 gene (F2RL3) associated with PAR4-induced platelet aggregation. Among these single nucleotide polymorphisms, rs773902 determines whether residue 120 in transmembrane domain 2 is an alanine (Ala) or threonine (Thr). Compared with the Ala120 variant, Thr120 was more common in black subjects than in white subjects (63% vs 19%), was associated with higher PAR4-induced human platelet aggregation and Ca2+ flux, and generated greater inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate in transfected cells. A second, less frequent F2RL3 variant, Phe296Val, was only observed in blacks and abolished the enhanced PAR4-induced platelet aggregation and 1,4,5-triphosphate generation associated with PAR4-Thr120. PAR4 genotype did not affect vorapaxar inhibition of platelet PAR1 function, but a strong pharmacogenetic effect was observed with the PAR4-specific antagonist YD-3 [1-benzyl-3(ethoxycarbonylphenyl)-indazole]. These findings may have an important pharmacogenetic effect on the development of new PAR antagonists.

  7. Common variants in the human platelet PAR4 thrombin receptor alter platelet function and differ by race

    PubMed Central

    Edelstein, Leonard C.; Simon, Lukas M.; Lindsay, Cory R.; Kong, Xianguo; Teruel-Montoya, Raúl; Tourdot, Benjamin E.; Chen, Edward S.; Ma, Lin; Coughlin, Shaun; Nieman, Marvin; Holinstat, Michael; Shaw, Chad A.

    2014-01-01

    Human platelets express 2 thrombin receptors: protease-activated receptor (PAR)-1 and PAR4. Recently, we reported 3.7-fold increased PAR4-mediated aggregation kinetics in platelets from black subjects compared with white subjects. We now show that platelets from blacks (n = 70) express 14% more PAR4 protein than those from whites (n = 84), but this difference is not associated with platelet PAR4 function. Quantitative trait locus analysis identified 3 common single nucleotide polymorphisms in the PAR4 gene (F2RL3) associated with PAR4-induced platelet aggregation. Among these single nucleotide polymorphisms, rs773902 determines whether residue 120 in transmembrane domain 2 is an alanine (Ala) or threonine (Thr). Compared with the Ala120 variant, Thr120 was more common in black subjects than in white subjects (63% vs 19%), was associated with higher PAR4-induced human platelet aggregation and Ca2+ flux, and generated greater inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate in transfected cells. A second, less frequent F2RL3 variant, Phe296Val, was only observed in blacks and abolished the enhanced PAR4-induced platelet aggregation and 1,4,5-triphosphate generation associated with PAR4-Thr120. PAR4 genotype did not affect vorapaxar inhibition of platelet PAR1 function, but a strong pharmacogenetic effect was observed with the PAR4-specific antagonist YD-3 [1-benzyl-3(ethoxycarbonylphenyl)-indazole]. These findings may have an important pharmacogenetic effect on the development of new PAR antagonists. PMID:25293779

  8. Biochemical analysis of human POLG2 variants associated with mitochondrial disease

    PubMed Central

    Young, Matthew J.; Longley, Matthew J.; Li, Fang-Yuan; Kasiviswanathan, Rajesh; Wong, Lee-Jun; Copeland, William C.

    2011-01-01

    Defects in mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) maintenance comprise an expanding repertoire of polymorphic diseases caused, in part, by mutations in the genes encoding the p140 mtDNA polymerase (POLG), its p55 accessory subunit (POLG2) or the mtDNA helicase (C10orf2). In an exploration of nuclear genes for mtDNA maintenance linked to mitochondrial disease, eight heterozygous mutations (six novel) in POLG2 were identified in one control and eight patients with POLG-related mitochondrial disease that lacked POLG mutations. Of these eight mutations, we biochemically characterized seven variants [c.307G>A (G103S); c.457C>G (L153V); c.614C>G (P205R); c.1105A>G (R369G); c.1158T>G (D386E); c.1268C>A (S423Y); c.1423_1424delTT (L475DfsX2)] that were previously uncharacterized along with the wild-type protein and the G451E pathogenic variant. These seven mutations encode amino acid substitutions that map throughout the protein, including the p55 dimer interface and the C-terminal domain that interacts with the catalytic subunit. Recombinant proteins harboring these alterations were assessed for stimulation of processive DNA synthesis, binding to the p140 catalytic subunit, binding to dsDNA and self-dimerization. Whereas the G103S, L153V, D386E and S423Y proteins displayed wild-type behavior, the P205R and R369G p55 variants had reduced stimulation of processivity and decreased affinity for the catalytic subunit. Additionally, the L475DfsX2 variant, which possesses a C-terminal truncation, was unable to bind the p140 catalytic subunit, unable to bind dsDNA and formed aberrant oligomeric complexes. Our biochemical analysis helps explain the pathogenesis of POLG2 mutations in mitochondrial disease and emphasizes the need to quantitatively characterize the biochemical consequences of newly discovered mutations before classifying them as pathogenic. PMID:21555342

  9. High conservation level of CD8(+) T cell immunogenic regions within an unusual H1N2 human influenza variant.

    PubMed

    Komadina, Naomi; Quiñones-Parra, Sergio M; Kedzierska, Katherine; McCaw, James M; Kelso, Anne; Leder, Karin; McVernon, Jodie

    2016-10-01

    Current seasonal influenza vaccines require regular updates due to antigenic drift causing loss of effectiveness and therefore providing little or no protection against novel influenza A subtypes. Next generation vaccines capable of eliciting CD8(+) T cell (CTL) mediated cross-protective immunity may offer a long-term alternative strategy. However, measuring pre- and existing levels of CTL cross-protection in humans is confounded by differences in infection histories across individuals. During 2000-2003, H1N2 viruses circulated persistently in the human population for the first time and we hypothesized that the viral nucleoprotein (NP) contained novel CTL epitopes that may have contributed to the survival of the viruses. This study describes the immunogenic NP peptides of H1N1, H2N2, and H3N2 influenza viruses isolated from humans over the past century, 1918-2003, by comparing this historical dataset to reference NP peptides from H1N2 that circulated in humans during 2000-2003. Observed peptides sequences ranged from highly conserved (15%) to highly variable (12%), with variation unrelated to reported immunodominance. No unique NP peptides which were exclusive to the H1N2 viruses were noted. However, the virus had inherited the NP from a recently emerged H3N2 variant containing novel peptides, which may have assisted its persistence. Any advantage due to this novelty was subsequently lost with emergence of a newer H3N2 variant in 2003. Our approach has potential to provide insight into the population context in which influenza viruses emerge, and may help to inform immunogenic peptide selection for CTL-inducing influenza vaccines. J. Med. Virol. 88:1725-1732, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  10. A massively parallel pipeline to clone DNA variants and examine molecular phenotypes of human disease mutations.

    PubMed

    Wei, Xiaomu; Das, Jishnu; Fragoza, Robert; Liang, Jin; Bastos de Oliveira, Francisco M; Lee, Hao Ran; Wang, Xiujuan; Mort, Matthew; Stenson, Peter D; Cooper, David N; Lipkin, Steven M; Smolka, Marcus B; Yu, Haiyuan

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the functional relevance of DNA variants is essential for all exome and genome sequencing projects. However, current mutagenesis cloning protocols require Sanger sequencing, and thus are prohibitively costly and labor-intensive. We describe a massively-parallel site-directed mutagenesis approach, "Clone-seq", leveraging next-generation sequencing to rapidly and cost-effectively generate a large number of mutant alleles. Using Clone-seq, we further develop a comparative interactome-scanning pipeline integrating high-throughput GFP, yeast two-hybrid (Y2H), and mass spectrometry assays to systematically evaluate the functional impact of mutations on protein stability and interactions. We use this pipeline to show that disease mutations on protein-protein interaction interfaces are significantly more likely than those away from interfaces to disrupt corresponding interactions. We also find that mutation pairs with similar molecular phenotypes in terms of both protein stability and interactions are significantly more likely to cause the same disease than those with different molecular phenotypes, validating the in vivo biological relevance of our high-throughput GFP and Y2H assays, and indicating that both assays can be used to determine candidate disease mutations in the future. The general scheme of our experimental pipeline can be readily expanded to other types of interactome-mapping methods to comprehensively evaluate the functional relevance of all DNA variants, including those in non-coding regions.

  11. Swine Influenza/Variant Influenza Viruses

    MedlinePlus

    ... Humans Key Facts about Human Infections with Variant Viruses Interim Guidance for Clinicians on Human Infections Background, Risk Assessment & Reporting Reported Infections with Variant Influenza Viruses in the United States since 2005 Prevention Treatment ...

  12. An Escherichia coli Expression Assay and Screen for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Protease Variants with Decreased Susceptibility to Indinavir

    PubMed Central

    Melnick, Laurence; Yang, Shiow-Shong; Rossi, Rick; Zepp, Charlie; Heefner, Donald

    1998-01-01

    We have developed a recombinant Escherichia coli screening system for the rapid detection and identification of amino acid substitutions in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease associated with decreased susceptibility to the protease inhibitor indinavir (MK-639; Merck & Co.). The assay depends upon the correct processing of a segment of the HIV-1 HXB2 gag-pol polyprotein followed by detection of HIV reverse transcriptase activity by a highly sensitive, colorimetric enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The highly sensitive system detects the contributions of single substitutions such as I84V, L90M, and L63P. The combination of single substitutions further decreases the sensitivity to indinavir. We constructed a library of HIV protease variant genes containing dispersed mutations and, using the E. coli recombinant system, screened for mutants with decreased indinavir sensitivity. The discovered HIV protease variants contain amino acid substitutions commonly associated with indinavir resistance in clinical isolates, including the substitutions L90M, L63P, I64V, V82A, L24I, and I54T. One substitution, W6R, is also frequently found by the screen and has not been reported elsewhere. Of a total of 12,000 isolates that were screened, 12 protease variants with decreased sensitivity to indinavir were found. The L63P substitution, which is also associated with indinavir resistance, increases the stability of the isolated protease relative to that of the native HXB2 protease. The rapidity, sensitivity, and accuracy of this screen also make it useful for screening for novel inhibitors. We have found the approach described here to be useful for the detection of amino acid substitutions in HIV protease that have been associated with drug resistance as well as for the screening of novel compounds for inhibitory activity. PMID:9835523

  13. Human infections with influenza A(H3N2) variant virus in the United States, 2011-2012.

    PubMed

    Epperson, Scott; Jhung, Michael; Richards, Shawn; Quinlisk, Patricia; Ball, Lauren; Moll, Mària; Boulton, Rachelle; Haddy, Loretta; Biggerstaff, Matthew; Brammer, Lynnette; Trock, Susan; Burns, Erin; Gomez, Thomas; Wong, Karen K; Katz, Jackie; Lindstrom, Stephen; Klimov, Alexander; Bresee, Joseph S; Jernigan, Daniel B; Cox, Nancy; Finelli, Lyn

    2013-07-01

    BACKGROUND. During August 2011-April 2012, 13 human infections with influenza A(H3N2) variant (H3N2v) virus were identified in the United States; 8 occurred in the prior 2 years. This virus differs from previous variant influenza viruses in that it contains the matrix (M) gene from the Influenza A(H1N1)pdm09 pandemic influenza virus. METHODS. A case was defined as a person with laboratory-confirmed H3N2v virus infection. Cases and contacts were interviewed to determine exposure to swine and other animals and to assess potential person-to-person transmission. RESULTS. Median age of cases was 4 years, and 12 of 13 (92%) were children. Pig exposure was identified in 7 (54%) cases. Six of 7 cases with swine exposure (86%) touched pigs, and 1 (14%) was close to pigs without known direct contact. Six cases had no swine exposure, including 2 clusters of suspected person-to-person transmission. All cases had fever; 12 (92%) had respiratory symptoms, and 3 (23%) were hospitalized for influenza. All 13 cases recovered. CONCLUSIONS. H3N2v virus infections were identified at a high rate from August 2011 to April 2012, and cases without swine exposure were identified in influenza-like illness outbreaks, indicating that limited person-to-person transmission likely occurred. Variant influenza viruses rarely result in sustained person-to-person transmission; however, the potential for this H3N2v virus to transmit efficiently is of concern. With minimal preexisting immunity in children and the limited cross-protective effect from seasonal influenza vaccine, the majority of children are susceptible to infection with this novel influenza virus.

  14. Understanding the role of Leu22 variants in methotrexate resistance: comparison of wild-type and Leu22Arg variant mouse and human dihydrofolate reductase ternary crystal complexes with methotrexate and NADPH.

    PubMed

    Cody, Vivian; Luft, Joe R; Pangborn, Walt

    2005-02-01

    Structural data are reported to 2.5 A resolution for the first full analysis of the methotrexate-resistant Leu22Arg (L22R) variant of mouse dihydrofolate reductase (mDHFR) crystallized as a ternary complex with methotrexate (MTX) and the cofactor NADPH. These results are compared with the MTX and NADPH ternary complexes of L22R human DHFR (hDHFR) and those of mouse and human wild-type DHFR enzymes. The conformation of mDHFR Arg22 is such that it makes hydrogen-bonding contacts with Asp21, Trp24 and a structural water molecule, observations which were not made in the L22R hDHFR ternary complex. These data show that there is little difference between the structures of the wild type and L22R variant for either mouse or human DHFR; however, there are significant differences between the species. Comparison of these structures reveals that the active site of mDHFR is larger than that in the hDHFR structure. In mDHFR, the position of MTX is shifted 0.6 A toward helix C (residues 59-65), which in turn is shifted 1.2 A away from the active site relative to that observed in the hDHFR ternary complexes. In the L22R variant mDHFR structure, MTX makes shorter contacts to the conserved residues Ile7, Val115 and Tyr121 than in the L22R variant human DHFR structure. These contacts are comparable in both wild-type enzymes. The unexpected results from this comparison of the mouse and human DHFR complexes bound with the same ligand and cofactor illustrate the importance of detailed study of several species of enzyme, even when there is a high sequence homology between them. These data suggest that the differences in binding interactions of the L22R variant are in agreement with the weaker binding affinity for MTX in the variant enzymes; the larger size of the binding site in mDHFR supports the observation that the binding affinity of MTX for L22R mDHFR is significantly weaker than that of the L22R hDHFR enzyme.

  15. Global and Local Conformation of Human IgG Antibody Variants Rationalizes Loss of Thermodynamic Stability.

    PubMed

    Edgeworth, Matthew J; Phillips, Jonathan J; Lowe, David C; Kippen, Alistair D; Higazi, Daniel R; Scrivens, James H

    2015-12-01

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are a major class of medicines, with high specificity and affinity towards targets spanning many disease areas. The antibody Fc (fragment crystallizable) region is a vital component of existing antibody therapeutics, as well as many next generation biologic medicines. Thermodynamic stability is a critical property for the development of stable and effective therapeutic proteins. Herein, a combination of ion-mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) and hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) approaches have been used to inform on the global and local conformation and dynamics of engineered IgG Fc variants with reduced thermodynamic stability. The changes in conformation and dynamics have been correlated with their thermodynamic stability to better understand the destabilising effect of functional IgG Fc mutations and to inform engineering of future therapeutic proteins.

  16. Novel Variants of the Human Flavin-Containing Monooxygenase 3 (FMO3) Gene Associated with Trimethylaminuria

    PubMed Central

    Motika, Meike S.; Zhang, Jun; Zheng, Xueying; Riedler, Kiersten; Cashman, John R.

    2009-01-01

    The disorder trimethylaminuria (TMAu) often manifests itself in a body odor for individuals affected. TMAu is due to decreased metabolism of dietary-derived trimethylamine (TMA). In a healthy individual, 95% or more of TMA is converted by the flavin-containing monooxygenase 3 (FMO3, EC 1.14.13.8) to non-odorous trimethylamine N-oxide (TMA N-oxide). Several single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) of the FMO3 gene have been described and result in an enzyme with decreased or abolished functional activity for TMA N-oxygenation thus leading to TMAu. Herein, we report two novel mutations observed from phenotyping and genotyping two self-reporting individuals. Sequence analysis of the exon regions of the FMO3 gene of a young woman with severe TMAu revealed heterozygous mutations at positions 187 (V187A), 158 (E158K), 308 (E308G), and 305 (E305X). Familial genetic analysis showed that the E158K/V187A/E308G derived from the same allele from the mother, and the E305X was derived from the father. FMO3 variants V187A and V187A/E158K were characterized for oxygenation of several common FMO3 substrates (i.e., 5- and 8-DPT, mercaptoimidazole (MMI), TMA, and sulindac sulfide) and for its thermal stability. Our findings show that with the combination of V187A/E158K mutations in FMO3, the enzyme activity is severely affected and possibly contributes to the TMAu observed. In another study, genotyping analysis of a 17 year old female revealed a mutation that caused a frame shift after K415 and resulted in a protein variant with only 486 amino acid residues that was associated with severe TMAu. PMID:19321370

  17. RHAMM splice variants confer radiosensitivity in human breast cancer cell lines

    PubMed Central

    Schütze, Alexandra; Vogeley, Christian; Gorges, Tobias; Twarock, Sören; Butschan, Jonas; Babayan, Anna; Klein, Diana; Knauer, Shirley K.; Metzen, Eric; Müller, Volkmar; Jendrossek, Verena; Pantel, Klaus; Milde-Langosch, Karin

    2016-01-01

    Biomarkers for prognosis in radiotherapy-treated breast cancer patients are urgently needed and important to stratify patients for adjuvant therapies. Recently, a role of the receptor of hyaluronan-mediated motility (RHAMM) has been suggested for tumor progression. Our aim was (i) to investigate the prognostic value of RHAMM in breast cancer and (ii) to unravel its potential function in the radiosusceptibility of breast cancer cells. We demonstrate that RHAMM mRNA expression in breast cancer biopsies is inversely correlated with tumor grade and overall survival. Radiosusceptibility in vitro was evaluated by sub-G1 analysis (apoptosis) and determination of the proliferation rate. The potential role of RHAMM was addressed by short interfering RNAs against RHAMM and its splice variants. High expression of RHAMMv1/v2 in p53 wild type cells (MCF-7) induced cellular apoptosis in response to ionizing radiation. In comparison, in p53 mutated cells (MDA-MB-231) RHAMMv1/v2 was expressed sparsely resulting in resistance towards irradiation induced apoptosis. Proliferation capacity was not altered by ionizing radiation in both cell lines. Importantly, pharmacological inhibition of the major ligand of RHAMM, hyaluronan, sensitized both cell lines towards radiation induced cell death. Based on the present data, we conclude that the detection of RHAMM splice variants in correlation with the p53 mutation status could help to predict the susceptibility of breast cancer cells to radiotherapy. Additionally, our studies raise the possibility that the response to radiotherapy in selected cohorts may be improved by pharmaceutical strategies against RHAMM and its ligand hyaluronan. PMID:26870892

  18. Gain-o