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Sample records for human rad51 variant

  1. Interactions involving the Rad51 paralogs Rad51C and XRCC3 in human cells

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Wiese, Claudia; Collins, David W.; Albala, Joanna S.; Thompson, Larry H.; Kronenberg, Amy; Schild, David; Chatterjee, A. (Principal Investigator)

    2002-01-01

    Homologous recombinational repair of DNA double-strand breaks and crosslinks in human cells is likely to require Rad51 and the five Rad51 paralogs (XRCC2, XRCC3, Rad51B/Rad51L1, Rad51C/Rad51L2 and Rad51D/Rad51L3), as has been shown in chicken and rodent cells. Previously, we reported on the interactions among these proteins using baculovirus and two- and three-hybrid yeast systems. To test for interactions involving XRCC3 and Rad51C, stable human cell lines have been isolated that express (His)6-tagged versions of XRCC3 or Rad51C. Ni2+-binding experiments demonstrate that XRCC3 and Rad51C interact in human cells. In addition, we find that Rad51C, but not XRCC3, interacts directly or indirectly with Rad51B, Rad51D and XRCC2. These results argue that there are at least two complexes of Rad51 paralogs in human cells (Rad51C-XRCC3 and Rad51B-Rad51C-Rad51D-XRCC2), both containing Rad51C. Moreover, Rad51 is not found in these complexes. X-ray treatment did not alter either the level of any Rad51 paralog or the observed interactions between paralogs. However, the endogenous level of Rad51C is moderately elevated in the XRCC3-overexpressing cell line, suggesting that dimerization between these proteins might help stabilize Rad51C.

  2. Complex formation by the human Rad51B and Rad51C DNA repair proteins and their activities in vitro

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Lio, Yi-Ching; Mazin, Alexander V.; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C.; Chen, David J.

    2003-01-01

    The human Rad51 protein is essential for DNA repair by homologous recombination. In addition to Rad51 protein, five paralogs have been identified: Rad51B/Rad51L1, Rad51C/Rad51L2, Rad51D/Rad51L3, XRCC2, and XRCC3. To further characterize a subset of these proteins, recombinant Rad51, Rad51B-(His)(6), and Rad51C proteins were individually expressed employing the baculovirus system, and each was purified from Sf9 insect cells. Evidence from nickel-nitrilotriacetic acid pull-down experiments demonstrates a highly stable Rad51B.Rad51C heterodimer, which interacts weakly with Rad51. Rad51B and Rad51C proteins were found to bind single- and double-stranded DNA and to preferentially bind 3'-end-tailed double-stranded DNA. The ability to bind DNA was elevated with mixed Rad51 and Rad51C, as well as with mixed Rad51B and Rad51C, compared with that of the individual protein. In addition, both Rad51B and Rad51C exhibit DNA-stimulated ATPase activity. Rad51C displays an ATP-independent apparent DNA strand exchange activity, whereas Rad51B shows no such activity; this apparent strand exchange ability results actually from a duplex DNA destabilization capability of Rad51C. By analogy to the yeast Rad55 and Rad57, our results suggest that Rad51B and Rad51C function through interactions with the human Rad51 recombinase and play a crucial role in the homologous recombinational repair pathway.

  3. The Tumor-Associated Variant RAD51 G151D Induces a Hyper-Recombination Phenotype

    PubMed Central

    Marsden, Carolyn G.; Jensen, Ryan B.; Zagelbaum, Jennifer; Rothenberg, Eli; Morrical, Scott W.; Wallace, Susan S.; Sweasy, Joann B.

    2016-01-01

    The RAD51 protein plays a key role in the homology-directed repair of DNA double-strand breaks and is important for maintaining genome stability. Here we report on a novel human RAD51 variant found in an aggressive and therapy-refractive breast carcinoma. Expression of the RAD51 G151D variant in human breast epithelial cells increases the levels of homology-directed repair. Expression of RAD51 G151D in cells also promotes high levels of chromosomal aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges. In vitro, the purified RAD51 G151D protein directly and significantly enhances DNA strand exchange activity in the presence of RPA. In concordance with this result, co-incubation of G151D with BRCA2 resulted in a much higher level of strand-exchange activity compared to WT RAD51. Strikingly, the RAD51 G151D variant confers resistance to multiple DNA damaging agents, including ionizing radiation, mitomycin C, and doxorubicin. Our findings demonstrate that the RAD51 G151D somatic variant has a novel hyper-recombination phenotype and suggest that this property of the protein is important for the repair of DNA damage, leading to drug resistance. PMID:27513445

  4. The Tumor-Associated Variant RAD51 G151D Induces a Hyper-Recombination Phenotype.

    PubMed

    Marsden, Carolyn G; Jensen, Ryan B; Zagelbaum, Jennifer; Rothenberg, Eli; Morrical, Scott W; Wallace, Susan S; Sweasy, Joann B

    2016-08-01

    The RAD51 protein plays a key role in the homology-directed repair of DNA double-strand breaks and is important for maintaining genome stability. Here we report on a novel human RAD51 variant found in an aggressive and therapy-refractive breast carcinoma. Expression of the RAD51 G151D variant in human breast epithelial cells increases the levels of homology-directed repair. Expression of RAD51 G151D in cells also promotes high levels of chromosomal aberrations and sister chromatid exchanges. In vitro, the purified RAD51 G151D protein directly and significantly enhances DNA strand exchange activity in the presence of RPA. In concordance with this result, co-incubation of G151D with BRCA2 resulted in a much higher level of strand-exchange activity compared to WT RAD51. Strikingly, the RAD51 G151D variant confers resistance to multiple DNA damaging agents, including ionizing radiation, mitomycin C, and doxorubicin. Our findings demonstrate that the RAD51 G151D somatic variant has a novel hyper-recombination phenotype and suggest that this property of the protein is important for the repair of DNA damage, leading to drug resistance.

  5. Interaction of p53 with the human Rad51 protein.

    PubMed Central

    Buchhop, S; Gibson, M K; Wang, X W; Wagner, P; Stürzbecher, H W; Harris, C C

    1997-01-01

    p53 is thought to function in the maintenance of genomic stability by modulating transcription and interacting with cellular proteins to influence the cell cycle, DNA repair and apoptosis. p53 mutations occur in >50% of human cancers, and cells which lack wild type p53 accumulate karyotypic abnormalities such as amplifications, deletions, inversions and translocations. We propose that p53 hinders these promiscuous recombinational events by interacting with cellular recombination and repair machinery. We recently reported that p53 can directly bind in vivo to human Rad51 (hRad51) protein and in vitro to its bacterial homologue RecA. We used GST-fusion and his-tagged protein systems to further investigate the physical interaction between p53 and hRad51, homologue of the yeast Rad51 protein that is involved in recombination and DNA double strand repair. The hRad51 binds to wild-type p53 and to a lesser extent, point mutants 135Y, 249S and 273H. This binding is not mediated by a DNA or RNA intermediate. Mapping studies using a panel of p53 deletion mutants indicate that hRad51 could bind to two regions of p53; one between amino acids 94 and 160 and a second between 264 and 315. Addition of anti-p53 antibody PAb421 (epitope 372-381 amino acids) inhibited the interaction with hRad51. In contrast, p53 interacts with the region between aa 125 and 220 of hRad51, which is highly conserved among Rad51 related proteins from bacteria to human. In Escherichia coli ecA protein, this region is required for homo-oligomerization, suggesting that p53 might disrupt the interaction between RecA and Rad51 subunits, thus inhibiting biochemical functions of Rad51 like proteins. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that p53 interaction with hRAD51 may influence DNA recombination and repair and that additional modifications of p53 by mutation and protein binding may affect this interaction. PMID:9380510

  6. RI-1: a chemical inhibitor of RAD51 that disrupts homologous recombination in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Budke, Brian; Logan, Hillary L.; Kalin, Jay H.; Zelivianskaia, Anna S.; Cameron McGuire, William; Miller, Luke L.; Stark, Jeremy M.; Kozikowski, Alan P.; Bishop, Douglas K.; Connell, Philip P.

    2012-01-01

    Homologous recombination serves multiple roles in DNA repair that are essential for maintaining genomic stability. We here describe RI-1, a small molecule that inhibits the central recombination protein RAD51. RI-1 specifically reduces gene conversion in human cells while stimulating single strand annealing. RI-1 binds covalently to the surface of RAD51 protein at cysteine 319 that likely destabilizes an interface used by RAD51 monomers to oligomerize into filaments on DNA. Correspondingly, the molecule inhibits the formation of subnuclear RAD51 foci in cells following DNA damage, while leaving replication protein A focus formation unaffected. Finally, it potentiates the lethal effects of a DNA cross-linking drug in human cells. Given that this inhibitory activity is seen in multiple human tumor cell lines, RI-1 holds promise as an oncologic drug. Furthermore, RI-1 represents a unique tool to dissect the network of reaction pathways that contribute to DNA repair in cells. PMID:22573178

  7. Protein dynamics of human RPA and RAD51 on ssDNA during assembly and disassembly of the RAD51 filament

    PubMed Central

    Ma, Chu Jian; Gibb, Bryan; Kwon, YoungHo; Sung, Patrick; Greene, Eric C.

    2017-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a crucial pathway for double-stranded DNA break (DSB) repair. During the early stages of HR, the newly generated DSB ends are processed to yield long single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) overhangs, which are quickly bound by replication protein A (RPA). RPA is then replaced by the DNA recombinase Rad51, which forms extended helical filaments on the ssDNA. The resulting nucleoprotein filament, known as the presynaptic complex, is responsible for pairing the ssDNA with homologous double-stranded DNA (dsDNA), which serves as the template to guide DSB repair. Here, we use single-molecule imaging to visualize the interplay between human RPA (hRPA) and human RAD51 during presynaptic complex assembly and disassembly. We demonstrate that ssDNA-bound hRPA can undergo facilitated exchange, enabling hRPA to undergo rapid exchange between free and ssDNA-bound states only when free hRPA is present in solution. Our results also indicate that the presence of free hRPA inhibits RAD51 filament nucleation, but has a lesser impact upon filament elongation. This finding suggests that hRPA exerts important regulatory influence over RAD51 and may in turn affect the properties of the assembled RAD51 filament. These experiments provide an important basis for further investigations into the regulation of human presynaptic complex assembly. PMID:27903895

  8. Targeting human Rad51 by specific DNA aptamers induces inhibition of homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Susan F; Renodon-Cornière, Axelle; Nomme, Julian; Eveillard, Damien; Fleury, Fabrice; Takahashi, Masayuki; Weigel, Pierre

    2010-12-01

    Human Rad51 (HsRad51), a key element of the homologous recombination repair pathway, is related to the resistance of cancer cells to chemo- and radio-therapies. This protein is thus a good target for the development of anti-cancer treatments. We have searched for new inhibitors directed against HsRad51 using the Systematic Evolution of Ligands by EXponential enrichment (SELEX) approach. We have selected three aptamers displaying strong effects on strand exchange activity. Analysis by circular dichroism shows that they are highly structured DNA molecules. Our results also show that they affect the first step of the strand exchange reaction by promoting the dissociation of DNA from the ATP/HsRad51/DNA complex. Moreover, these inhibitors bind only weakly to RecA, a prokaryotic ortholog of HsRad51. Both the specificity and the efficiency of their inhibition of recombinase activity offer an analytical tool based on molecular recognition and the prospect of developing new therapeutic agents.

  9. Stimulation of the Human RAD51 Nucleofilament Restricts HIV-1 Integration In Vitro and in Infected Cells

    PubMed Central

    Cosnefroy, O.; Tocco, A.; Lesbats, P.; Thierry, S.; Calmels, C.; Wiktorowicz, T.; Reigadas, S.; Kwon, Y.; De Cian, A.; Desfarges, S.; Bonot, P.; San Filippo, J.; Litvak, S.; Le Cam, E.; Rethwilm, A.; Fleury, H.; Connell, P. P.; Sung, P.; Delelis, O.; Andréola, M. L.

    2012-01-01

    Stable HIV-1 replication requires the DNA repair of the integration locus catalyzed by cellular factors. The human RAD51 (hRAD51) protein plays a major role in homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair and was previously shown to interact with HIV-1 integrase (IN) and inhibit its activity. Here we determined the molecular mechanism of inhibition of IN. Our standard in vitro integration assays performed under various conditions promoting or inhibiting hRAD51 activity demonstrated that the formation of an active hRAD51 nucleofilament is required for optimal inhibition involving an IN-DNA complex dissociation mechanism. Furthermore we show that this inhibition mechanism can be promoted in HIV-1-infected cells by chemical stimulation of the endogenous hRAD51 protein. This hRAD51 stimulation induced both an enhancement of the endogenous DNA repair process and the inhibition of the integration step. Elucidation of this molecular mechanism leading to the restriction of viral proliferation paves the way to a new concept of antiretroviral therapy based on the enhancement of endogenous hRAD51 recombination activity and highlights the functional interaction between HIV-1 IN and hRAD51. PMID:22013044

  10. Variation in the RAD51 gene and familial breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Lose, Felicity; Lovelock, Paul; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Mann, Graham J; Pupo, Gulietta M; Spurdle, Amanda B

    2006-01-01

    Introduction Human RAD51 is a homologue of the Escherichia coli RecA protein and is known to function in recombinational repair of double-stranded DNA breaks. Mutations in the lower eukaryotic homologues of RAD51 result in a deficiency in the repair of double-stranded DNA breaks. Loss of RAD51 function would therefore be expected to result in an elevated mutation rate, leading to accumulation of DNA damage and, hence, to increased cancer risk. RAD51 interacts directly or indirectly with a number of proteins implicated in breast cancer, such as BRCA1 and BRCA2. Similar to BRCA1 mice, RAD51-/- mice are embryonic lethal. The RAD51 gene region has been shown to exhibit loss of heterozygosity in breast tumours, and deregulated RAD51 expression in breast cancer patients has also been reported. Few studies have investigated the role of coding region variation in the RAD51 gene in familial breast cancer, with only one coding region variant – exon 6 c.449G>A (p.R150Q) – reported to date. Methods All nine coding exons of the RAD51 gene were analysed for variation in 46 well-characterised, BRCA1/2-negative breast cancer families using denaturing high-performance liquid chromatography. Genotyping of the exon 6 p.R150Q variant was performed in an additional 66 families. Additionally, lymphoblastoid cell lines from breast cancer patients were subjected to single nucleotide primer extension analysis to assess RAD51 expression. Results No coding region variation was found, and all intronic variation detected was either found in unaffected controls or was unlikely to have functional consequences. Single nucleotide primer extension analysis did not reveal any allele-specific changes in RAD51 expression in all lymphoblastoid cell lines tested. Conclusion Our study indicates that RAD51 is not a major familial breast cancer predisposition gene. PMID:16762046

  11. A Small Molecule Inhibitor of Human RAD51 Potentiates Breast Cancer Cell Killing by Therapeutic Agents in Mouse Xenografts

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Fei; Mazin, Alexander V.

    2014-01-01

    The homologous recombination pathway is responsible for the repair of DNA double strand breaks. RAD51, a key homologous recombination protein, promotes the search for homology and DNA strand exchange between homologous DNA molecules. RAD51 is overexpressed in a variety of cancer cells. Downregulation of RAD51 by siRNA increases radio- or chemo-sensitivity of cancer cells. We recently developed a specific RAD51 small molecule inhibitor, B02, which inhibits DNA strand exchange activity of RAD51 in vitro. In this study, we used human breast cancer cells MDA-MB-231 to investigate the ability of B02 to inhibit RAD51 and to potentiate an anti-cancer effect of chemotherapeutic agents including doxorubicin, etoposide, topotecan, and cisplatin. We found that the combination of B02 with cisplatin has the strongest killing effect on the cancer cells. We then tested the effect of B02 and cisplatin on the MDA-MB-231 cell proliferation in mouse xenografts. Our results showed that B02 significantly enhances the therapeutic effect of cisplatin on tumor cells in vivo. Our current data demonstrate that use of RAD51-specific small molecule inhibitor represents a feasible strategy of a combination anti-cancer therapy. PMID:24971740

  12. Homologous Recombination Repair Factors Rad51 and BRCA1 Are Necessary for Productive Replication of Human Papillomavirus 31

    PubMed Central

    Chappell, William H.; Gautam, Dipendra; Ok, Suzan T.; Johnson, Bryan A.; Anacker, Daniel C.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT High-risk human papillomavirus 31 (HPV31)-positive cells exhibit constitutive activation of the ATM-dependent DNA damage response (DDR), which is necessary for productive viral replication. In response to DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), ATM activation leads to DNA repair through homologous recombination (HR), which requires the principal recombinase protein Rad51, as well as BRCA1. Previous studies from our lab demonstrated that Rad51 and BRCA1 are expressed at high levels in HPV31-positive cells and localize to sites of viral replication. These results suggest that HPV may utilize ATM activity to increase HR activity as a means to facilitate viral replication. In this study, we demonstrate that high-risk HPV E7 expression alone is sufficient for the increase in Rad51 and BRCA1 protein levels. We have found that this increase occurs, at least in part, at the level of transcription. Studies analyzing protein stability indicate that HPV may also protect Rad51 and BRCA1 from turnover, contributing to the overall increase in cellular levels. We also demonstrate that Rad51 is bound to HPV31 genomes, with binding increasing per viral genome upon productive replication. We have found that depletion of Rad51 and BRCA1, as well as inhibition of Rad51's recombinase activity, abrogates productive viral replication upon differentiation. Overall, these results indicate that Rad51 and BRCA1 are required for the process of HPV31 genome amplification and suggest that productive replication occurs in a manner dependent upon recombination. IMPORTANCE Productive replication of HPV31 requires activation of an ATM-dependent DNA damage response, though how ATM activity contributes to replication is unclear. Rad51 and BRCA1 play essential roles in repair of double-strand breaks, as well as the restart of stalled replication forks through homologous recombination (HR). Given that ATM activity is required to initiate HR repair, coupled with the requirement of Rad51 and BRCA1 for

  13. Functions of Human Rad51 and Other Recombination Factors in DNA Double-Strand Break Repair

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2002-06-01

    cells express five Rad5l-like proteins - XRCC2, XRCC3 , Rad51B, Rad51C and Rad51D. These Rad51 paralogs are important for homologous recombination and...complex with 42-kD Rad5 IC species was detected. The observed sizes XRCC3 (Schild et al. 2000; Kurumizaka et al. 2001; Mas- A kIa a-Rad51B kDa a-RadSIC...RadS1C XRCC3 or that the XRCC3 -Rad51C complex was not A x-Rad5l B retained on the Q column. 07a 0- The results above indicated that Rad5lB and Rad5lC

  14. Rad51-mediated replication fork reversal is a global response to genotoxic treatments in human cells

    PubMed Central

    Zellweger, Ralph; Dalcher, Damian; Mutreja, Karun; Berti, Matteo; Schmid, Jonas A.; Herrador, Raquel; Vindigni, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Replication fork reversal protects forks from breakage after poisoning of Topoisomerase 1. We here investigated fork progression and chromosomal breakage in human cells in response to a panel of sublethal genotoxic treatments, using other topoisomerase poisons, DNA synthesis inhibitors, interstrand cross-linking inducers, and base-damaging agents. We used electron microscopy to visualize fork architecture under these conditions and analyzed the association of specific molecular features with checkpoint activation. Our data identify replication fork uncoupling and reversal as global responses to genotoxic treatments. Both events are frequent even after mild treatments that do not affect fork integrity, nor activate checkpoints. Fork reversal was found to be dependent on the central homologous recombination factor RAD51, which is consistently present at replication forks independently of their breakage, and to be antagonized by poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase/RECQ1-regulated restart. Our work establishes remodeling of uncoupled forks as a pivotal RAD51-regulated response to genotoxic stress in human cells and as a promising target to potentiate cancer chemotherapy. PMID:25733714

  15. Induction of Rad51 protein levels by p38 MAPK decreases cytotoxicity and mutagenicity in benzo[a]pyrene-exposed human lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Chuang, S.-M.; Wang, L.-H.; Hong, J.-H.; Lin, Y.-W.

    2008-08-01

    Rad51 is an essential component of the homologous recombination repair pathway. Abnormal expression of Rad51 has been reported in various carcinomas. Benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P), a polycyclic hydrocarbon carcinogen found in the environment, induces cancer in multiple organs. B[a]P has been shown to activate the p38 MAPK signaling pathway in mammalian cells. The prime purpose of this study was to determine how B[a]P activates the p38 MAPK signaling pathway, and how this then regulates Rad51 expression in human cancer cells. Exposure of human lung cancer cells with B[a]P increased Rad51 protein levels in a time- and dose-dependent fashion. B[a]P also induced Rad51 mRNA and protein synthesis. Blockage of p38 MAPK activation by SB202190 or small interfering RNA (si-p38) decreased B[a]P-elicited Rad51 protein levels by increasing Rad51 protein instability, but did not affect Rad51 mRNA transcription. Furthermore, enhancement of p38 MAPK signaling by constitutively active MKK6 (MKK6E) increased Rad51 protein levels and protein stability. Moreover, B[a]P-induced cytotoxicity and mutagenicity were significantly increased in cells depleted of endogenous Rad51. Taken together, these results indicate that Rad51 protein provides a critical role in inhibiting the cytotoxicity and mutagenicity of B[a]P in B[a]P-treated human lung cancer cells. Furthermore, the work points to an unexpected role of p38 MAPK signaling in the control of Rad51 protein stability in response to B[a]P exposure.

  16. Ribozyme minigene-mediated RAD51 down-regulation increases radiosensitivity of human prostate cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Collis, S. J.; Tighe, A.; Scott, S. D.; Roberts, S. A.; Hendry, J. H.; Margison, G. P.

    2001-01-01

    The strand transferase RAD51 is a component of the homologous recombination repair pathway. To examine the contribution of RAD51 to the genotoxic effects of ionising radiation, we have used a novel ribozyme strategy. A reporter gene vector was constructed so that expression of an inserted synthetic double-stranded ribozyme-encoding oligonucleotide would be under the control of the cytomegalovirus immediate-early gene enhancer/promoter system. The prostate tumour cell line LNCaP was transfected with this vector or a control vector, and a neomycin resistance gene on the vector was used to create geneticin-resistant stable cell lines. Three stable cell lines were shown by western blot analysis to have significant down-regulation of RAD51 to 20–50% of the levels expressed in control cell lines. All three cell lines had a similar increased sensitivity to γ-irradiation by 70 and 40%, respectively, compared to normal and empty vector-transfected cells, corresponding to dose-modifying factors of ∼2.0 and 1.5 in the mid-range of the dose-response curves. The amount of RAD51 protein in transfected cell lines was shown to strongly correlate with the α parameter obtained from fitted survival curves. These results highlight the importance of RAD51 in cellular responses to radiation and are the first to indicate the potential use of RAD51-targeted ribozyme minigenes in tumour radiosensitisation. PMID:11266555

  17. Ribozyme minigene-mediated RAD51 down-regulation increases radiosensitivity of human prostate cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Collis, S J; Tighe, A; Scott, S D; Roberts, S A; Hendry, J H; Margison, G P

    2001-04-01

    The strand transferase RAD51 is a component of the homologous recombination repair pathway. To examine the contribution of RAD51 to the genotoxic effects of ionising radiation, we have used a novel ribozyme strategy. A reporter gene vector was constructed so that expression of an inserted synthetic double-stranded ribozyme-encoding oligonucleotide would be under the control of the cytomegalovirus immediate-early gene enhancer/promoter system. The prostate tumour cell line LNCaP was transfected with this vector or a control vector, and a neomycin resistance gene on the vector was used to create geneticin-resistant stable cell lines. Three stable cell lines were shown by western blot analysis to have significant down-regulation of RAD51 to 20-50% of the levels expressed in control cell lines. All three cell lines had a similar increased sensitivity to gamma-irradiation by 70 and 40%, respectively, compared to normal and empty vector-transfected cells, corresponding to dose-modifying factors of approximately 2.0 and 1.5 in the mid-range of the dose-response curves. The amount of RAD51 protein in transfected cell lines was shown to strongly correlate with the alpha parameter obtained from fitted survival curves. These results highlight the importance of RAD51 in cellular responses to radiation and are the first to indicate the potential use of RAD51-targeted ribozyme minigenes in tumour radiosensitisation.

  18. RAD51AP2, a novel vertebrate- and meiotic-specific protein, sharesa conserved RAD51-interacting C-terminal domain with RAD51AP1/PIR51

    SciTech Connect

    Kovalenko, Oleg V.; Wiese, Claudia; Schild, David

    2006-07-25

    Many interacting proteins regulate and/or assist the activities of RAD51, a recombinase which plays a critical role in both DNA repair and meiotic recombination. Yeast two-hybrid screening of a human testis cDNA library revealed a new protein, RAD51AP2 (RAD51 Associated Protein 2), that interacts strongly with RAD51. A full-length cDNA clone predicts a novel vertebrate specific protein of 1159 residues, and the RAD51AP2 transcript was observed only in meiotic tissue (i.e. adult testis and fetal ovary), suggesting a meiotic-specific function for RAD51AP2. In HEK293 cells the interaction of RAD51 with an ectopically-expressed recombinant large fragment of RAD51AP2 requires the C-terminal 57 residues of RAD51AP2. This RAD51-binding region shows 81% homology to the C-terminus of RAD51AP1/PIR51, an otherwise totally unrelated RAD51-binding partner that is ubiquitously expressed. Analyses using truncations and point mutations in both RAD51AP1 and RAD51AP2 demonstrate that these proteins use the same structural motif for RAD51 binding. RAD54 shares some homology with this RAD51-binding motif, but this homologous region plays only an accessory role to the adjacent main RAD51-interacting region, which has been narrowed here to 40 amino acids. A novel protein, RAD51AP2, has been discovered that interacts with RAD51 through a C-terminal motif also present in RAD51AP1.

  19. Isolation of novel human and mouse genes of the recA/RAD51 recombination-repair gene family.

    PubMed Central

    Cartwright, R; Dunn, A M; Simpson, P J; Tambini, C E; Thacker, J

    1998-01-01

    Genes from the recA/RAD51 family play essential roles in homologous recombination in all organisms. Using sequence homologies from eukaryotic members of this family we have identified fragments of two additional mammalian genes with homology to RAD51. Cloning the full-length cDNAs for both human and mouse genes showed that the sequences are highly conserved, and that the predicted proteins have characteristic features of this gene family. One of the novel genes (R51H2) occurs in two forms in human cDNA, differing extensively at the 3' end, probably due to an unusual form of alternative splicing. The new genes (R51H2 and R51H3) were mapped to human chromosomes 14q23-24 and 17q1.2, respectively. Expression studies showed that R51H2 is expressed at lower levels than R51H3 , but that expression of both genes occurs at elevated levels in the testis compared with other tissues. The combination of gene structure conservation and the transcript expression patterns suggests that these new members of the recA/RAD51 family may also function in homologous recombination-repair pathways. PMID:9512535

  20. Nuclear localization of Rad51B is independent of BRCA2

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, K A; Hinz, J M; Yamada, A; Thompson, L H; Albala, J S

    2005-06-28

    Human Rad51 is critical for the maintenance of genome stability through its role in the repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Rad51B (Rad51L1/hRec2) is one of the five known paralogs of human Rad51 found in a multi-protein complex with three other Rad51 paralogs, Rad51C, Rad51D and Xrcc2. Examination of EGFP-Rad51B fusion protein in HeLa S3 cells and immunofluorescence in several human cell lines confirms the nuclear localization of Rad51B. This is the first report to detail putative interactions of a Rad51 paralog protein with BRCA2. Utilization of a BRCA2 mutant cell line, CAPAN-1 suggests that Rad51B localizes to the nucleus independent of BRCA2. Although both Rad51B and BRCA2 are clearly involved in the homologous recombinational repair pathway, Rad51B and BRCA2 do not appear to associate directly. Furthermore, mutations in the KKLK motif of Rad51B, amino acid residues 4-7, mislocalizes Rad51B to the cytoplasm suggesting that this is the nuclear localization signal for the Rad51B protein. Examination of wild-type EGFP-Rad51B fusion protein in mammalian cells deficient in Rad51C showed that Rad51B localizes to the nucleus independent of Rad51C; further suggesting that Rad51B, like Rad51C, contains its own nuclear localization signal.

  1. Promotion of Homologous Recombination and Genomic Stability byRAD51AP1 via RAD51 Recombinase Enhancement

    SciTech Connect

    Wiese, Claudia; Dray, Eloise; Groesser, Torsten; San Filippo,Joseph; Shi, Idina; Collins, David W.; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Williams,Gareth; Rydberg, Bjorn; Sung, Patrick; Schild, David

    2007-04-11

    Homologous recombination (HR) repairs chromosome damage and is indispensable for tumor suppression in humans. RAD51 mediates the DNA strand pairing step in HR. RAD51AP1 (RAD51 Associated Protein 1) is a RAD51-interacting protein whose function has remained elusive. Knockdown of RAD51AP1 in human cells by RNA interference engenders sensitivity to different types of genotoxic stress. Moreover, RAD51AP1-depleted cells are impaired for the recombinational repair of a DNA double-strand break and exhibit chromatid breaks both spontaneously and upon DNA damaging treatment. Purified RAD51AP1 binds dsDNA and RAD51, and it greatly stimulates the RAD51-mediated D-loop reaction. Biochemical and cytological results show that RAD51AP1 functions at a step subsequent to the assembly of the RAD51-ssDNA nucleoprotein filament. Our findings provide the first evidence that RAD51AP1 helps maintain genomic integrity via RAD51 recombinase enhancement.

  2. Nanoscopic exclusion between Rad51 and 53BP1 after ion irradiation in human HeLa cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Reindl, Judith; Drexler, Guido A.; Girst, Stefanie; Greubel, Christoph; Siebenwirth, Christian; Drexler, Sophie E.; Dollinger, Günther; Friedl, Anna A.

    2015-12-01

    Many proteins involved in detection, signalling and repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) accumulate in large number in the vicinity of DSB sites, forming so called foci. Emerging evidence suggests that these foci are sub-divided in structural or functional domains. We use stimulated emission depletion (STED) microscopy to investigate localization of mediator protein 53BP1 and recombination factor Rad51 after irradiation of cells with low linear energy transfer (LET) protons or high LET carbon ions. With a resolution better than 100 nm, STED microscopy and image analysis using a newly developed analyzing algorithm, the reduced product of the differences from the mean, allowed us to demonstrate that with both irradiation types Rad51 occupies spherical regions of about 200 nm diameter. These foci locate within larger 53BP1 accumulations in regions of local 53BP1 depletion, similar to what has been described for the localization of Brca1, CtIP and RPA. Furthermore, localization relative to 53BP1 and size of Rad51 foci was not different after irradiation with low and high LET radiation. As expected, 53BP1 foci induced by low LET irradiation mostly contained one Rad51 focal structure, while after high LET irradiation, most foci contained >1 Rad51 accumulation.

  3. Dose–Response Curves of the FDXR and RAD51 Genes with 6 and 18 MV Beam Energies in Human Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes

    PubMed Central

    Saberi, Alihossein; Khodamoradi, Ehsan; Tahmasebi Birgani, Mohammad Javad; Makvandi, Manoochehr; Noori, Bijan

    2016-01-01

    Background Rapid dose assessment using biological dosimetry methods is essential to increase the chance of survival of exposed individuals in radiation accidents. Objectives We compared the expression levels of the FDXR and RAD51 genes at 6 and 18 MV beam energies in human peripheral blood lymphocytes. The results of our study can be used to analyze radiation energy in biological dosimetry. Methods For this in vitro experimental study, from 36 students in the medical physics and virology departments, seven voluntary, healthy, non-smoking male blood donors of Khuzestan ethnicity with no history of exposure to ionization radiation were selected using simple randomized sampling. Sixty-three peripheral blood samples were collected from the seven healthy donors. Human peripheral blood was then exposed to doses of 0, 0.2, 0.5, 2, and 4 Gy with 6 and 18 MV beam energies in a Linac Varian 2100C/D (Varian, USA) at Golestan hospital in Ahvaz, Iran. After RNA extraction and cDNA synthesis, the expression levels of FDXR and RAD51 were determined 24 hours post-irradiation using the gel-purified reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) technique and TaqMan strategy (by real-time PCR). Results The expression level of FDXR gene was significantly increased at doses of 2 Gy and 4 Gy in the 6 - 18 MV energy range (P < 0.001 and P < 0.008, respectively). The medians with interquartile ranges (IQRs) of the copy numbers of the FDXR gene at 2 Gy and 4 Gy doses under 6 and 18 MV beam energies were 2393.59 (1798.21, 2575.37) and 2983.00 (2199.48, 3643.82) and 3779.12 (3051.40, 5120.74) and 5051.26 (4704.83, 5859.17), respectively. However, RAD51 gene expression levels only showed a significant difference between samples at a dose of 2 Gy with 6 and 18 MV beam energies, respectively (P < 0.040). The medians with IQRs of the copy numbers of the RAD51 gene were 2092.77 (1535.78, 2705.61) and 3412.57 (2979.72, 4530.61) at beam energies of 6 and 18 MV, respectively. Conclusions

  4. Assessment of DNA binding to human Rad51 protein by using quartz crystal microbalance and atomic force microscopy: effects of ADP and BRC4-28 peptide inhibitor.

    PubMed

    Esnault, Charles; Renodon-Cornière, Axelle; Takahashi, Masayuki; Casse, Nathalie; Delorme, Nicolas; Louarn, Guy; Fleury, Fabrice; Pilard, Jean-François; Chénais, Benoît

    2014-12-01

    The interaction of human Rad51 protein (HsRad51) with single-stranded deoxyribonucleic acid (ssDNA) was investigated by using quartz crystal microbalance (QCM) monitoring and atomic force microscopy (AFM) visualization. Gold surfaces for QCM and AFM were modified by electrografting of the in situ generated aryldiazonium salt from the sulfanilic acid to obtain the organic layer Au-ArSO3 H. The Au-ArSO3 H layer was activated by using a solution of PCl5 in CH2 Cl2 to give a Au-ArSO2 Cl layer. The modified surface was then used to immobilize long ssDNA molecules. The results obtained showed that the presence of adenosine diphosphate promotes the protein autoassociation rather than nucleation around DNA. In addition, when the BRC4-28 peptide inhibitor was used, both QCM and AFM confirmed the inhibitory effect of BRC4-28 toward HsRad51 autoassociation. Altogether these results show the suitability of this modified surface to investigate the kinetics and structure of DNA-protein interactions and for the screening of inhibitors.

  5. TODRA, a lncRNA at the RAD51 Locus, Is Oppositely Regulated to RAD51, and Enhances RAD51-Dependent DSB (Double Strand Break) Repair.

    PubMed

    Gazy, Inbal; Zeevi, David A; Renbaum, Paul; Zeligson, Sharon; Eini, Lital; Bashari, Dana; Smith, Yoav; Lahad, Amnon; Goldberg, Michal; Ginsberg, Doron; Levy-Lahad, Ephrat

    2015-01-01

    Expression of RAD51, a crucial player in homologous recombination (HR) and DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair, is dysregulated in human tumors, and can contribute to genomic instability and tumor progression. To further understand RAD51 regulation we functionally characterized a long non-coding (lnc) RNA, dubbed TODRA (Transcribed in the Opposite Direction of RAD51), transcribed 69bp upstream to RAD51, in the opposite direction. We demonstrate that TODRA is an expressed transcript and that the RAD51 promoter region is bidirectional, supporting TODRA expression (7-fold higher than RAD51 in this assay, p = 0.003). TODRA overexpression in HeLa cells induced expression of TPIP, a member of the TPTE family which includes PTEN. Similar to PTEN, we found that TPIP co-activates E2F1 induction of RAD51. Analysis of E2F1's effect on the bidirectional promoter showed that E2F1 binding to the same site that promotes RAD51 expression, results in downregulation of TODRA. Moreover, TODRA overexpression induces HR in a RAD51-dependent DSB repair assay, and increases formation of DNA damage-induced RAD51-positive foci. Importantly, gene expression in breast tumors supports our finding that E2F1 oppositely regulates RAD51 and TODRA: increased RAD51 expression, which is associated with an aggressive tumor phenotype (e.g. negative correlation with positive ER (r = -0.22, p = 0.02) and positive PR status (r = -0.27, p<0.001); positive correlation with ki67 status (r = 0.36, p = 0.005) and HER2 amplification (r = 0.41, p = 0.001)), correlates as expected with lower TODRA and higher E2F1 expression. However, although E2F1 induction resulted in TPIP downregulation in cell lines, we find that TPIP expression in tumors is not reduced despite higher E2F1 expression, perhaps contributing to increased RAD51 expression. Our results identify TPIP as a novel E2F1 co-activator, suggest a similar role for other TPTEs, and indicate that the TODRA lncRNA affects RAD51 dysregulation and RAD51

  6. RAD51B in Familial Breast Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Pelttari, Liisa M.; Khan, Sofia; Vuorela, Mikko; Kiiski, Johanna I.; Vilske, Sara; Nevanlinna, Viivi; Ranta, Salla; Schleutker, Johanna; Winqvist, Robert; Kallioniemi, Anne; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V.; Figueroa, Jonine; Pharoah, Paul D. P.; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Dunning, Alison M.; García-Closas, Montserrat; Bolla, Manjeet K.; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Wang, Qin; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Rosenberg, Efraim H.; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Peto, Julian; dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Sawyer, Elinor J.; Tomlinson, Ian; Burwinkel, Barbara; Surowy, Harald; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Bojesen, Stig E.; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Benitez, Javier; González-Neira, Anna; Neuhausen, Susan L.; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K.; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Hartikainen, Jaana M.; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Van Dyck, Laurien; Janssen, Hilde; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Hallberg, Emily; Olson, Janet E.; Giles, Graham G.; Milne, Roger L.; Haiman, Christopher A.; Schumacher, Fredrick; Simard, Jacques; Dumont, Martine; Kristensen, Vessela; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Zheng, Wei; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene L.; Glendon, Gord; Devilee, Peter; Seynaeve, Caroline; Hooning, Maartje J.; Collée, Margriet; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S.; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert N.; Hamann, Ute; Torres, Diana; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Couch, Fergus J.; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Orr, Nick; Swerdlow, Anthony; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Czene, Kamila; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F.; Mattson, Johanna; Blomqvist, Carl; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Nevanlinna, Heli

    2016-01-01

    Common variation on 14q24.1, close to RAD51B, has been associated with breast cancer: rs999737 and rs2588809 with the risk of female breast cancer and rs1314913 with the risk of male breast cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of RAD51B variants in breast cancer predisposition, particularly in the context of familial breast cancer in Finland. We sequenced the coding region of RAD51B in 168 Finnish breast cancer patients from the Helsinki region for identification of possible recurrent founder mutations. In addition, we studied the known rs999737, rs2588809, and rs1314913 SNPs and RAD51B haplotypes in 44,791 breast cancer cases and 43,583 controls from 40 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) that were genotyped on a custom chip (iCOGS). We identified one putatively pathogenic missense mutation c.541C>T among the Finnish cancer patients and subsequently genotyped the mutation in additional breast cancer cases (n = 5259) and population controls (n = 3586) from Finland and Belarus. No significant association with breast cancer risk was seen in the meta-analysis of the Finnish datasets or in the large BCAC dataset. The association with previously identified risk variants rs999737, rs2588809, and rs1314913 was replicated among all breast cancer cases and also among familial cases in the BCAC dataset. The most significant association was observed for the haplotype carrying the risk-alleles of all the three SNPs both among all cases (odds ratio (OR): 1.15, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11–1.19, P = 8.88 x 10−16) and among familial cases (OR: 1.24, 95% CI: 1.16–1.32, P = 6.19 x 10−11), compared to the haplotype with the respective protective alleles. Our results suggest that loss-of-function mutations in RAD51B are rare, but common variation at the RAD51B region is significantly associated with familial breast cancer risk. PMID:27149063

  7. RAD51B in Familial Breast Cancer.

    PubMed

    Pelttari, Liisa M; Khan, Sofia; Vuorela, Mikko; Kiiski, Johanna I; Vilske, Sara; Nevanlinna, Viivi; Ranta, Salla; Schleutker, Johanna; Winqvist, Robert; Kallioniemi, Anne; Dörk, Thilo; Bogdanova, Natalia V; Figueroa, Jonine; Pharoah, Paul D P; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Dunning, Alison M; García-Closas, Montserrat; Bolla, Manjeet K; Dennis, Joe; Michailidou, Kyriaki; Wang, Qin; Hopper, John L; Southey, Melissa C; Rosenberg, Efraim H; Fasching, Peter A; Beckmann, Matthias W; Peto, Julian; Dos-Santos-Silva, Isabel; Sawyer, Elinor J; Tomlinson, Ian; Burwinkel, Barbara; Surowy, Harald; Guénel, Pascal; Truong, Thérèse; Bojesen, Stig E; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Benitez, Javier; González-Neira, Anna; Neuhausen, Susan L; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Brenner, Hermann; Arndt, Volker; Meindl, Alfons; Schmutzler, Rita K; Brauch, Hiltrud; Brüning, Thomas; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Mannermaa, Arto; Hartikainen, Jaana M; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Van Dyck, Laurien; Janssen, Hilde; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Rudolph, Anja; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Hallberg, Emily; Olson, Janet E; Giles, Graham G; Milne, Roger L; Haiman, Christopher A; Schumacher, Fredrick; Simard, Jacques; Dumont, Martine; Kristensen, Vessela; Borresen-Dale, Anne-Lise; Zheng, Wei; Beeghly-Fadiel, Alicia; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene L; Glendon, Gord; Devilee, Peter; Seynaeve, Caroline; Hooning, Maartje J; Collée, Margriet; Cox, Angela; Cross, Simon S; Shah, Mitul; Luben, Robert N; Hamann, Ute; Torres, Diana; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Couch, Fergus J; Yannoukakos, Drakoulis; Orr, Nick; Swerdlow, Anthony; Darabi, Hatef; Li, Jingmei; Czene, Kamila; Hall, Per; Easton, Douglas F; Mattson, Johanna; Blomqvist, Carl; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Nevanlinna, Heli

    2016-01-01

    Common variation on 14q24.1, close to RAD51B, has been associated with breast cancer: rs999737 and rs2588809 with the risk of female breast cancer and rs1314913 with the risk of male breast cancer. The aim of this study was to investigate the role of RAD51B variants in breast cancer predisposition, particularly in the context of familial breast cancer in Finland. We sequenced the coding region of RAD51B in 168 Finnish breast cancer patients from the Helsinki region for identification of possible recurrent founder mutations. In addition, we studied the known rs999737, rs2588809, and rs1314913 SNPs and RAD51B haplotypes in 44,791 breast cancer cases and 43,583 controls from 40 studies participating in the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC) that were genotyped on a custom chip (iCOGS). We identified one putatively pathogenic missense mutation c.541C>T among the Finnish cancer patients and subsequently genotyped the mutation in additional breast cancer cases (n = 5259) and population controls (n = 3586) from Finland and Belarus. No significant association with breast cancer risk was seen in the meta-analysis of the Finnish datasets or in the large BCAC dataset. The association with previously identified risk variants rs999737, rs2588809, and rs1314913 was replicated among all breast cancer cases and also among familial cases in the BCAC dataset. The most significant association was observed for the haplotype carrying the risk-alleles of all the three SNPs both among all cases (odds ratio (OR): 1.15, 95% confidence interval (CI): 1.11-1.19, P = 8.88 x 10-16) and among familial cases (OR: 1.24, 95% CI: 1.16-1.32, P = 6.19 x 10-11), compared to the haplotype with the respective protective alleles. Our results suggest that loss-of-function mutations in RAD51B are rare, but common variation at the RAD51B region is significantly associated with familial breast cancer risk.

  8. The role of repair protein Rad51 in synergistic cytotoxicity and mutagenicity induced by epidermal growth factor receptor inhibitor (Gefitinib, Iressa{sup R}) and benzo[a]pyrene in human lung cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, J.-C.; Hong, J.-H.; Wang, L.-H.; Lin, Y.-W.

    2008-05-01

    Rad51 protein is essential for homologous recombination repair of DNA damage, and is over-expressed in chemo- or radioresistant carcinomas. The polycyclic hydrocarbon carcinogen benzo[a]pyrene (B[a]P) affects MAPKs transduction pathways. Gefitinib (Iressa{sup R}, ZD1839) is a selective epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitor that blocks growth factor-mediated cell proliferation and ERK1/2 activation. We hypothesized that gefitinib enhances B[a]P-mediated cytotoxicity by decreasing ERK1/2 activation. Exposure of human lung cancer cells to gefitinib decreased B[a]P-elicited ERK1/2 activation and induced Rad51 protein expression. Gefitinib and B[a]P co-treatment decreased Rad51 protein stability by triggering degradation via a 26S proteasome-dependent pathway. Expression of constitutive active MKK1/2 vectors (MKK1/2-CA) rescues the decreased ERK1/2 activity, and restores Rad51 protein level and stability under gefitinib and B[a]P co-treatment. Gefitinib enhances B[a]P-induced growth inhibition, cytotoxicity and mutagenicity. Co-treatment with gefitinib and B[a]P can further inhibit cell growth significantly after depletion of endogenous Rad51 by siRad51 RNA transfection. Enhancement of ERK1/2 activation by MKK1-CA expression decrease B[a]P- and gefitinib-induced cytotoxicity, and B[a]P-induced mutagenicity. Rad51 protein protects lung cancer cells from synergistic cytotoxic and mutagenic effects induced by gefitinib and B[a]P. Suppression of Rad51 protein expression may be a novel lung cancer therapeutic modality to overcome drug resistance to gefitinib.

  9. Disparate requirements for the Walker A and B ATPase motifs ofhuman RAD51D in homologous recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Wiese, Claudia; Hinz, John M.; Tebbs, Robert S.; Nham, Peter B.; Urbin, Salustra S.; Collins, David W.; Thompson, Larry H.; Schild, David

    2006-04-21

    In vertebrates, homologous recombinational repair (HRR) requires RAD51 and five RAD51 paralogs (XRCC2, XRCC3, RAD51B, RAD51C, and RAD51D) that all contain conserved Walker A and B ATPase motifs. In human RAD51D we examined the requirement for these motifs in interactions with XRCC2 and RAD51C, and for survival of cells in response to DNA interstrand crosslinks. Ectopic expression of wild type human RAD51D or mutants having a non-functional A or B motif was used to test for complementation of a rad51d knockout hamster CHO cell line. Although A-motif mutants complement very efficiently, B-motif mutants do not. Consistent with these results, experiments using the yeast two- and three-hybrid systems show that the interactions between RAD51D and its XRCC2 and RAD51C partners also require a functional RAD51D B motif, but not motif A. Similarly, hamster Xrcc2 is unable to bind to the non-complementing human RAD51D B-motif mutants in co-immunoprecipitation assays. We conclude that a functional Walker B motif, but not A motif, is necessary for RAD51D's interactions with other paralogs and for efficient HRR. We present a model in which ATPase sites are formed in a bipartite manner between RAD51D and other RAD51 paralogs.

  10. Mutation Analysis of the RAD51C and RAD51D Genes in High-Risk Ovarian Cancer Patients and Families from the Czech Republic

    PubMed Central

    Janatova, Marketa; Soukupova, Jana; Stribrna, Jana; Kleiblova, Petra; Vocka, Michal; Boudova, Petra; Kleibl, Zdenek

    2015-01-01

    Recent studies have conferred that the RAD51C and RAD51D genes, which code for the essential proteins involved in homologous recombination, are ovarian cancer (OC) susceptibility genes that may explain genetic risks in high-risk patients. We performed a mutation analysis in 171 high-risk BRCA1 and BRCA2 negative OC patients, to evaluate the frequency of hereditary RAD51C and RAD51D variants in Czech population. The analysis involved direct sequencing, high resolution melting and multiple ligation-dependent probe analysis. We identified two (1.2%) and three (1.8%) inactivating germline mutations in both respective genes, two of which (c.379_380insG, p.P127Rfs*28 in RAD51C and c.879delG, p.C294Vfs*16 in RAD51D) were novel. Interestingly, an indicative family cancer history was not present in four carriers. Moreover, the ages at the OC diagnoses in identified mutation carriers were substantially lower than those reported in previous studies (four carriers were younger than 45 years). Further, we also described rare missense variants, two in RAD51C and one in RAD51D whose clinical significance needs to be verified. Truncating mutations and rare missense variants ascertained in OC patients were not detected in 1226 control samples. Although the cumulative frequency of RAD51C and RAD51D truncating mutations in our patients was lower than that of the BRCA1 and BRCA2 genes, it may explain OC susceptibility in approximately 3% of high-risk OC patients. Therefore, an RAD51C and RAD51D analysis should be implemented into the comprehensive multi-gene testing for high-risk OC patients, including early-onset OC patients without a family cancer history. PMID:26057125

  11. Minocycline enhances mitomycin C-induced cytotoxicity through down-regulating ERK1/2-mediated Rad51 expression in human non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jen-Chung; Wang, Tai-Jing; Chang, Po-Yuan; Syu, Jhan-Jhang; Chen, Jyh-Cheng; Chen, Chien-Yu; Jian, Yun-Ting; Jian, Yi-Jun; Zheng, Hao-Yu; Chen, Wen-Ching; Lin, Yun-Wei

    2015-10-01

    Minocycline is a semisynthetic tetracycline derivative; it has anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer effects distinct from its antimicrobial function. However, the molecular mechanism of minocycline-induced cytotoxicity in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells has not been identified. Rad51 plays a central role in homologous recombination and high levels of Rad51 expression are observed in chemo- or radioresistant carcinomas. Our previous studies have shown that the MKK1/2-ERK1/2 signal pathway maintains the expression of Rad51 in NSCLC cells. In this study, minocycline treatment inhibited cell viability and proliferation of two NSCLC cells, A549 and H1975. Treatment with minocycline decreased Rad51 mRNA and protein levels through MKK1/2-ERK1/2 inactivation. Furthermore, expression of constitutively active MKK1 (MKK1-CA) vectors significantly rescued the decreased Rad51 protein and mRNA levels in minocycline-treated NSCLC cells. However, combined treatment with MKK1/2 inhibitor U0126 and minocycline further decreased the Rad51 expression and cell viability of NSCLC cells. Knocking down Rad51 expression by transfection with small interfering RNA of Rad51 enhanced the cytotoxicity and cell growth inhibition of minocycline. Mitomycin C (MMC) is typically used as a first or second line regimen to treat NSCLC. Compared to a single agent alone, MMC combined with minocycline resulted in cytotoxicity and cell growth inhibition synergistically in NSCLC cells, accompanied with reduced activation of phospho-ERK1/2, and reduced Rad51 protein levels. Overexpression of MKK1-CA or Flag-tagged Rad51 could reverse the minocycline and MMC-induced synergistic cytotoxicity. These findings may have implications for the rational design of future drug regimens incorporating minocycline and MMC for the treatment of NSCLC.

  12. Astaxanthin down-regulates Rad51 expression via inactivation of AKT kinase to enhance mitomycin C-induced cytotoxicity in human non-small cell lung cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ko, Jen-Chung; Chen, Jyh-Cheng; Wang, Tai-Jing; Zheng, Hao-Yu; Chen, Wen-Ching; Chang, Po-Yuan; Lin, Yun-Wei

    2016-04-01

    Astaxanthin has been demonstrated to exhibit a wide range of beneficial effects, including anti-inflammatory and anti-cancer properties. However, the molecular mechanism of astaxanthin-induced cytotoxicity in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells has not been identified. Rad51 plays a central role in homologous recombination, and studies show that chemo-resistant carcinomas exhibit high levels of Rad51 expression. In this study, astaxanthin treatment inhibited cell viability and proliferation of two NSCLC cells, A549 and H1703. Astaxanthin treatment (2.5-20 μM) decreased Rad51 expression and phospho-AKT(Ser473) protein level in a time and dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, expression of constitutively active AKT (AKT-CA) vector rescued the decreased Rad51 mRNA and protein levels in astaxanthin-treated NSCLC cells. Combined treatment with phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K) inhibitors (LY294002 or wortmannin) further decreased the Rad51 expression in astaxanthin-exposed A549 and H1703 cells. Knockdown of Rad51 expression by transfection with si-Rad51 RNA or cotreatment with LY294002 further enhanced the cytotoxicity and cell growth inhibition of astaxanthin. Additionally, mitomycin C (MMC) as an anti-tumor antibiotic is widely used in clinical NSCLC chemotherapy. Combination of MMC and astaxanthin synergistically resulted in cytotoxicity and cell growth inhibition in NSCLC cells, accompanied with reduced phospho-AKT(Ser473) level and Rad51 expression. Overexpression of AKT-CA or Flag-tagged Rad51 reversed the astaxanthin and MMC-induced synergistic cytotoxicity. In contrast, pretreatment with LY294002 further decreased the cell viability in astaxanthin and MMC co-treated cells. In conclusion, astaxanthin enhances MMC-induced cytotoxicity by decreasing Rad51 expression and AKT activation. These findings may provide rationale to combine astaxanthin with MMC for the treatment of NSCLC.

  13. A new protein complex promoting the assembly of Rad51 filaments

    PubMed Central

    Sasanuma, Hiroyuki; Tawaramoto, Maki S.; Lao, Jessica P.; Hosaka, Harumi; Sanda, Eri; Suzuki, Mamoru; Yamashita, Eiki; Hunter, Neil; Shinohara, Miki; Nakagawa, Atsushi; Shinohara, Akira

    2015-01-01

    During homologous recombination, eukaryotic RecA homologue Rad51 assembles into a nucleoprotein filament on single-stranded DNA to catalyse homologous pairing and DNA-strand exchange with a homologous template. Rad51 nucleoprotein filaments are highly dynamic and regulated via the coordinated actions of various accessory proteins including Rad51 mediators. Here, we identify a new Rad51 mediator complex. The PCSS complex, comprising budding yeast Psy3, Csm2, Shu1 and Shu2 proteins, binds to recombination sites and is required for Rad51 assembly and function during meiosis. Within the heterotetramer, Psy3-Csm2 constitutes a core sub-complex with DNA-binding activity. In vitro, purified Psy3-Csm2 stabilizes the Rad51–single-stranded DNA complex independently of nucleotide cofactor. The mechanism of Rad51 stabilization is inferred by our high-resolution crystal structure, which reveals Psy3-Csm2 to be a structural mimic of the Rad51-dimer, a fundamental unit of the Rad51-filament. Together, these results reveal a novel molecular mechanism for this class of Rad51-mediators, which includes the human Rad51 paralogues. PMID:23575680

  14. A novel role for the DNA repair gene Rad51 in Netrin-1 signalling

    PubMed Central

    Glendining, K. A.; Markie, D.; Gardner, R. J. M.; Franz, E. A.; Robertson, S. P.; Jasoni, C. L.

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in RAD51 have recently been linked to human Congenital Mirror Movements (CMM), a developmental disorder of the motor system. The only gene previously linked to CMM encodes the Netrin-1 receptor DCC, which is important for formation of corticospinal and callosal axon tracts. Thus, we hypothesised that Rad51 has a novel role in Netrin-1-mediated axon development. In mouse primary motor cortex neurons, Rad51 protein was redistributed distally down the axon in response to Netrin-1, further suggesting a functional link between the two. We next manipulated Rad51 expression, and assessed Netrin-1 responsiveness. Rad51 siRNA knockdown exaggerated Netrin-1-mediated neurite branching and filopodia formation. RAD51 overexpression inhibited these responses, whereas overexpression of the CMM-linked R250Q mutation, a predicted loss-of-function, had no effect. Thus, Rad51 appears to negatively regulate Netrin-1 signalling. Finally, we examined whether Rad51 might operate by modulating the expression of the Unc5 family, known negative regulators of Netrin-1-responsiveness. Unc5b and Unc5c transcripts were downregulated in response to Rad51 knockdown, and upregulated with RAD51 overexpression, but not R250Q. Thus, Rad51 negatively regulates Netrin-1 signalling, at least in part, by modulating the expression of Unc5s. Imbalance of positive and negative influences is likely to lead to aberrant motor system development resulting in CMMs. PMID:28057929

  15. Overexpression of Rad51 Predicts Poor Prognosis in Colorectal Cancer: Our Experience with 54 Patients

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Feng; Liao, Dian-ying; Xie, Li; Wang, Jin; Luo, Feng

    2017-01-01

    Background Aberrant Rad51 expression is implicated in the progression of human malignancies. However, the role of Rad51 in colorectal cancer (CRC) remains undefined. This study aimed to establish a relationship between Rad51 and clinicopathologic features of CRC. Methods We retrospectively examined the paraffin-embedded tissue samples obtained from 54 patients with CRC who had received surgical therapies at our institution during 2006–2008. Rad51 expression in adenocarcinoma, paracancerous tissue, and normal colonic tissue was determined by immunohistochemistry. The correlation between Rad51 immunoreactivity and clinicopathologic features of these patients was evaluated. Results Rad51 immunoreactivity was detected in 67% of adenocarcinoma, 48% of paracancerous tissue, and 27% of normal colonic mucosa. Rad51 expression in adenocarcinoma was significantly higher than normal colonic tissue (p < 0.05). Rad51 was also overexpressed in poorly differentiated tumors and tumor samples from patients with lymph node metastasis (p < 0.05). Patients with Rad51 overexpression had a 69% two-year survival, 49% three-year survival, and 16% five-year survival, considerably worse than patients with negative Rad51 expression (p < 0.05). Conclusion Our data suggest that Rad51 overexpression is correlated with malignant phenotypes of CRC and may predict poor prognosis for these patients. PMID:28099437

  16. Differential roles of XRCC2 in S-phase RAD51 focus formation induced by DNA replication inhibitors

    SciTech Connect

    Lim, C; Liu, N

    2004-05-14

    RAD51 proteins accumulate in discrete nuclear foci in response to DNA damage. Previous studies demonstrated that human RAD51 paralogs (RAD51B, RAD51C, RAD51D, XRCC2 and XRCC3) are essential for the assembly of RAD51 foci induced by ionizing radiation and cross-linking agents. Here we report that XRCC2 also plays important roles in RAD51 focus formation induced by replication arrest during S-phase of cell cycle. In wild-type hamster V79 cells treated with hydroxyurea (HU), RAD51 protein form punctuate nuclear foci, accompanied by increased RAD51 protein level in both cytoplasmic and nuclear fractions, and increased association of RAD51 with chromatin. In contrast, xrcc2 hamster mutant irs1 cells are deficient in the formation of RAD51 foci after HU treatment, suggesting that the function of XRCC2 is required for the assembly of RAD51 at HU-induced stalled replication forks. Interestingly, we found that irs1 cells are able to form intact RAD51 foci in S-phase cells treated with thymidine (TR) or aphidicolin, although irs1 cells are hypersensitive to both HU and TR. Our findings suggest that there may be two distinct pathways (XRCC2-dependent or XRCC2-independent) involved in loading of RAD51 onto stalled replication forks, probably depending upon the structure of DNA lesions.

  17. Detection and sequence analysis of the DNA repair gene RAD51 in the Korean spider Callobius koreanus (Amaurobiidae).

    PubMed

    Kim, J Y; Park, Y C

    2015-11-19

    We identified a partial sequence (483 bp) of the RAD51 gene from the Korean spider Callobius koreanus. Sequence variation was found at one position during alignment with the human RAD51 gene sequence. This partial sequence included the region corresponding to exon 4 in the human RAD51 gene, which encodes 39 amino acids. These results show that the RAD51 gene is highly conserved between human and spiders.

  18. Germline mutation in the RAD51B gene confers predisposition to breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Most currently known breast cancer predisposition genes play a role in DNA repair by homologous recombination. Recent studies conducted on RAD51 paralogs, involved in the same DNA repair pathway, have identified rare germline mutations conferring breast and/or ovarian cancer predisposition in the RAD51C, RAD51D and XRCC2 genes. The present study analysed the five RAD51 paralogs (RAD51B, RAD51C, RAD51D, XRCC2, XRCC3) to estimate their contribution to breast and ovarian cancer predisposition. Methods The study was conducted on 142 unrelated patients with breast and/or ovarian cancer either with early onset or with a breast/ovarian cancer family history. Patients were referred to a French family cancer clinic and had been previously tested negative for a BRCA1/2 mutation. Coding sequences of the five genes were analysed by EMMA (Enhanced Mismatch Mutation Analysis). Detected variants were characterized by Sanger sequencing analysis. Results Three splicing mutations and two likely deleterious missense variants were identified: RAD51B c.452 + 3A > G, RAD51C c.706-2A > G, RAD51C c.1026 + 5_1026 + 7del, RAD51B c.475C > T/p.Arg159Cys and XRCC3 c.448C > T/p.Arg150Cys. No RAD51D and XRCC2 gene mutations were detected. These mutations and variants were detected in families with both breast and ovarian cancers, except for the RAD51B c.475C > T/p.Arg159Cys variant that occurred in a family with 3 breast cancer cases. Conclusions This study identified the first RAD51B mutation in a breast and ovarian cancer family and is the first report of XRCC3 mutation analysis in breast and ovarian cancer. It confirms that RAD51 paralog mutations confer breast and ovarian cancer predisposition and are rare events. In view of the low frequency of RAD51 paralog mutations, international collaboration of family cancer clinics will be required to more accurately estimate their penetrance and establish clinical guidelines in carrier individuals. PMID

  19. Novel insights into RAD51 activity and regulation during homologous recombination and DNA replication

    PubMed Central

    Godin, Stephen K.; Sullivan, Meghan R.; Bernstein, Kara A.

    2016-01-01

    In this review we focus on new insights that challenge our understanding of homologous recombination (HR) and Rad51 regulation. Recent advances using high resolution microscopy and single molecule techniques have broadened our knowledge of Rad51 filament formation and strand invasion at double-strand break (DSB) sites and at replication forks, which are one of most physiologically relevant forms of HR from yeast to humans. Rad51 filament formation and strand invasion is regulated by many mediator proteins such as the Rad51 paralogues and the Shu complex, consisting of a Shu2/SWS1 family member and additional Rad51 paralogues. Importantly, a novel RAD-51 paralogue was discovered in C. elegans and its in vitro characterization has demonstrated a new function for the worm RAD-51 paralogues during HR. Conservation of the human RAD51 paralogues function during HR and repair of replicative damage demonstrate how the RAD51 mediators play a critical role in human health and genomic integrity. Together, these new findings provide a framework for understanding RAD51 and its mediators in DNA repair during multiple cellular contexts. PMID:27224545

  20. Rad51 activates polyomavirus JC early transcription.

    PubMed

    White, Martyn K; Kaminski, Rafal; Khalili, Kamel; Wollebo, Hassen S

    2014-01-01

    The human neurotropic polyomavirus JC (JCV) causes the fatal CNS demyelinating disease progressive multifocal leukoencephalopathy (PML). JCV infection is very common and after primary infection, the virus is able to persist in an asymptomatic state. Rarely, and usually only under conditions of immune impairment, JCV re-emerges to actively replicate in the astrocytes and oligodendrocytes of the brain causing PML. The regulatory events involved in the reactivation of active viral replication in PML are not well understood but previous studies have implicated the transcription factor NF-κB acting at a well-characterized site in the JCV noncoding control region (NCCR). NF-κB in turn is regulated in a number of ways including activation by cytokines such as TNF-α, interactions with other transcription factors and epigenetic events involving protein acetylation--all of which can regulate the transcriptional activity of JCV. Active JCV infection is marked by the occurrence of rapid and extensive DNA damage in the host cell and the induction of the expression of cellular proteins involved in DNA repair including Rad51, a major component of the homologous recombination-directed double-strand break DNA repair machinery. Here we show that increased Rad51 expression activates the JCV early promoter. This activation is co-operative with the stimulation caused by NF-κB p65, abrogated by mutation of the NF-κB binding site or siRNA to NFκB p65 and enhanced by the histone deacetylase inhibitor sodium butyrate. These data indicate that the induction of Rad51 resulting from infection with JCV acts through NF-κB via its binding site to stimulate JCV early transcription. We suggest that this provides a novel positive feedback mechanism to enhance viral gene expression during the early stage of JCV infection.

  1. A novel interation of nucleolin with Rad51

    SciTech Connect

    De, Ananya; Donahue, Sarah L.; Tabah, Azah; Castro, Nancy E.; Mraz, Naomi; Cruise, Jennifer L.; Campbell, Colin . E-mail: campb034@umn.edu

    2006-05-26

    Nucleolin associates with various DNA repair, recombination, and replication proteins, and possesses DNA helicase, strand annealing, and strand pairing activities. Examination of nuclear protein extracts from human somatic cells revealed that nucleolin and Rad51 co-immunoprecipitate. Furthermore, purified recombinant Rad51 associates with in vitro transcribed and translated nucleolin. Electroporation-mediated introduction of anti-nucleolin antibody resulted in a 10- to 20-fold reduction in intra-plasmid homologous recombination activity in human fibrosarcoma cells. Additionally, introduction of anti-nucleolin antibody sensitized cells to death induced by the topoisomerase II inhibitor, amsacrine. Introduction of anti-Rad51 antibody also reduced intra-plasmid homologous recombination activity and induced hypersensitivity to amsacrine-induced cell death. Co-introduction of anti-nucleolin and anti-Rad51 antibodies did not produce additive effects on homologous recombination or on cellular sensitivity to amsacrine. The association of the two proteins raises the intriguing possibility that nucleolin binding to Rad51 may function to regulate homologous recombinational repair of chromosomal DNA.

  2. Rad51C deficiency destabilizes XRCC3, impairs recombination and radiosensitizes S/G2-phase cells

    SciTech Connect

    Lio, Yi-Ching; Schild, David; Brenneman, Mark A.; Redpath, J. Leslie; Chen, David J.

    2004-05-01

    The highly conserved Rad51 protein plays an essential role in repairing DNA damage through homologous recombination. In vertebrates, five Rad51 paralogs (Rad51B, Rad51C, Rad51D, XRCC2, XRCC3) are expressed in mitotically growing cells, and are thought to play mediating roles in homologous recombination, though their precise functions remain unclear. Here we report the use of RNA interference to deplete expression of Rad51C protein in human HT1080 and HeLa cells. In HT1080 cells, depletion of Rad51C by small interfering RNA caused a significant reduction of frequency in homologous recombination. The level of XRCC3 protein was also sharply reduced in Rad51C-depleted HeLa cells, suggesting that XRCC3 is dependent for its stability upon heterodimerization with Rad51C. In addition, Rad51C-depleted HeLa cells showed hypersensitivity to the DNA cross-linking agent mitomycin C, and moderately increased sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Importantly, the radiosensitivity of Rad51C-deficient HeLa cells was evident in S and G{sub 2}/M phases of the cell cycle but not in G{sub 1} phase. Together, these results provide direct cellular evidence for the importance of human Rad51C in homologous recombinational repair.

  3. Endogenous levels of Rad51 and Brca2 are required for homologous recombination and regulated by homeostatic re-balancing.

    PubMed

    Magwood, Alissa C; Malysewich, Michael J; Cealic, Iulia; Mundia, Maureen M; Knapp, Jennifer; Baker, Mark D

    2013-12-01

    Stable expression of Rad51 siRNA was used to generate mouse hybridoma cell lines in which endogenous Rad51 levels were depleted by as much as 60%. Stable Rad51 knockdowns feature reduced homologous recombination responses. The relative ease with which stable Rad51 knockdowns were recovered was surprising, given the embryonic lethality of Rad51 ablation. Interestingly, Rad51-depleted hybridoma cell lines are characterized by reduced levels of p53 protein. Completely unexpected, was the finding that Rad51-depleted hybridoma cell lines are also reduced for the breast cancer susceptibility 2 (Brca2) protein. Additionally, hybridoma cell lines that are siRNA depleted for mouse Brca2 show a corresponding reduction in Rad51 and p53 proteins. Furthermore, cellular levels of Rad51, Brca2 and p53 can be elevated in these cell lines by ectopic expression of wild-type human Rad51 and wild-type human BRCA2. In marked contrast, hybridoma cell lines that are siRNA depleted for mouse p53 feature relatively normal Rad51 and Brca2 levels. These results suggest that cellular levels of Brca2 and Rad51 are mutually dependent on each other, and that low levels of these proteins provide selective pressure for reduction of p53, which permits cell growth.

  4. Rad51 Paralogs Remodel Pre-synaptic Rad51 Filaments to Stimulate Homologous Recombination

    PubMed Central

    Taylor, Martin R.G.; Špírek, Mário; Chaurasiya, Kathy R.; Ward, Jordan D.; Carzaniga, Raffaella; Yu, Xiong; Egelman, Edward H.; Collinson, Lucy M.; Rueda, David; Krejci, Lumir; Boulton, Simon J.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Repair of DNA double strand breaks by homologous recombination (HR) is initiated by Rad51 filament nucleation on single-stranded DNA (ssDNA), which catalyzes strand exchange with homologous duplex DNA. BRCA2 and the Rad51 paralogs are tumor suppressors and critical mediators of Rad51. To gain insight into Rad51 paralog function, we investigated a heterodimeric Rad51 paralog complex, RFS-1/RIP-1, and uncovered the molecular basis by which Rad51 paralogs promote HR. Unlike BRCA2, which nucleates RAD-51-ssDNA filaments, RFS-1/RIP-1 binds and remodels pre-synaptic filaments to a stabilized, “open,” and flexible conformation, in which the ssDNA is more accessible to nuclease digestion and RAD-51 dissociation rate is reduced. Walker box mutations in RFS-1, which abolish filament remodeling, fail to stimulate RAD-51 strand exchange activity, demonstrating that remodeling is essential for RFS-1/RIP-1 function. We propose that Rad51 paralogs stimulate HR by remodeling the Rad51 filament, priming it for strand exchange with the template duplex. PMID:26186187

  5. Enhancement of the RAD51 Recombinase Activity by the Tumor Suppressor PALB2

    SciTech Connect

    Dray, Eloise; Etchin, Julia; Wiese, Claudia; Saro, Dorina; Williams, Gareth J.; Hammel, Michal; Yu, Xiong; Galkin, Vitold E.; Liu, Dongqing; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Sy, Shirley M-H.; Egelman, Edward; Chen, Junjie; Sung, Patrick; Schild, D.

    2010-08-24

    Homologous recombination mediated by the RAD51 recombinase helps eliminate chromosomal lesions, such as DNA double-stranded breaks induced by radiation or arising from injured DNA replication forks. The tumor suppressors BRCA2 and PALB2 act together to deliver RAD51 to chromosomal lesions to initiate repair. Here we document a new function of PALB2 in the enhancement of RAD51's ability to form the D-loop. We show that PALB2 binds DNA and physically interacts with RAD51. Importantly, while PALB2 alone stimulates D-loop formation, a cooperative effect is seen with RAD51AP1, an enhancer of RAD51. This stimulation stems from PALB2's ability to function with RAD51 and RAD51AP1 to assemble the synaptic complex. Our results help unveil a multi-faceted role of PALB2 in chromosome damage repair. Since PALB2 mutations can cause breast and other tumors or lead to Fanconi anemia, our findings are important for understanding the mechanism of tumor suppression in humans.

  6. RAD51 genotype and triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC) risk in Polish women.

    PubMed

    Smolarz, Beata; Zadrożny, Marek; Duda-Szymańska, Joanna; Makowska, Marianna; Samulak, Dariusz; Michalska, Magdalena M; Mojs, Ewa; Bryś, Magdalena; Forma, Ewa; Romanowicz-Makowska, Hanna

    2013-04-01

    The most lethal damage for the cell among all damage is double-strand breaks (DSB) of DNA. DSB cause development of cancer diseases including the triple-negative molecular subtype of breast cancer. The aim of this work was to evaluate the single nucleotide polymorphism -135G>C (rs1801320) of the RAD51 gene encoding DNA repair proteins by homologous recombination (HR) in triple-negative breast cancer (TNBC). We assessed the RAD51 -135G>C polymorphism in 50 women with triple-negative breast cancer and in 50 women from the control group. RAD51 polymorphism was analysed by the PCR-RFLP (restriction fragment length polymorphism) technique. Our results demonstrated a significant positive association between the RAD51 C/C genotype and TNBC, with an adjusted odds ratio (OR) of 5.95 (p = 0.002). The homozygous C/C genotype was found in 68% of breast cancer cases and 20% of controls. The variant 135C allele of RAD51 increased TNBC risk. This is the first study linking single nucleotide polymorphisms of the RAD51 gene with TNBC incidence in the population of Polish women. In conclusion, RAD51 polymorphisms may be regarded as predictive factors of triple-negative breast cancer in the female population. Large studies are needed to confirm our findings.

  7. Suppression of OsRAD51D results in defects in reproductive development in rice (Oryza sativa L.).

    PubMed

    Byun, Mi Young; Kim, Woo Taek

    2014-07-01

    The cellular roles of RAD51 paralogs in somatic and reproductive growth have been extensively described in a wide range of animal systems and, to a lesser extent, in Arabidopsis, a dicot model plant. Here, the OsRAD51D gene was identified and characterized in rice (Oryza sativa L.), a monocot model crop. In the rice genome, three alternative OsRAD51D mRNA splicing variants, OsRAD51D.1, OsRAD51D.2, and OsRAD51D.3, were predicted. Yeast two-hybrid studies, however, showed that only OsRAD51D.1 interacted with OsRAD51B and OsRAD51C paralogs, suggesting that OsRAD51D.1 is a functional OsRAD51D protein in rice. Loss-of-function osrad51d mutant rice plants displayed normal vegetative growth. However, the mutant plants were defective in reproductive growth, resulting in sterile flowers. Homozygous osrad51d mutant flowers exhibited impaired development of lemma and palea and contained unusual numbers of stamens and stigmas. During early meiosis, osrad51d pollen mother cells (PMCs) failed to form normal homologous chromosome pairings. In subsequent meiotic progression, mutant PMCs represented fragmented chromosomes. The osrad51d pollen cells contained numerous abnormal micro-nuclei that resulted in malfunctioning pollen. The abnormalities of heterozygous mutant and T2 Ubi:RNAi-OsRAD51D RNAi-knock-down transgenic plants were intermediate between those of wild type and homozygous mutant plants. The osrad51d and Ubi:RNAi-OsRAD51D plants contained longer telomeres compared with wild type plants, indicating that OsRAD51D is a negative factor for telomere lengthening. Overall, these results suggest that OsRAD51D plays a critical role in reproductive growth in rice. This essential function of OsRAD51D is distinct from Arabidopsis, in which AtRAD51D is not an essential factor for meiosis or reproductive development.

  8. Associations of common variants at 1p11.2 and 14q24.1 (RAD51L1) with breast cancer risk and heterogeneity by tumor subtype: findings from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium†

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Jonine D.; Garcia-Closas, Montserrat; Humphreys, Manjeet; Platte, Radka; Hopper, John L.; Southey, Melissa C.; Apicella, Carmel; Hammet, Fleur; Schmidt, Marjanka K.; Broeks, Annegien; Tollenaar, Rob A.E.M.; Van't Veer, Laura J.; Fasching, Peter A.; Beckmann, Matthias W.; Ekici, Arif B.; Strick, Reiner; Peto, Julian; dos Santos Silva, Isabel; Fletcher, Olivia; Johnson, Nichola; Sawyer, Elinor; Tomlinson, Ian; Kerin, Michael; Burwinkel, Barbara; Marme, Federik; Schneeweiss, Andreas; Sohn, Christof; Bojesen, Stig; Flyger, Henrik; Nordestgaard, Børge G.; Benítez, Javier; Milne, Roger L.; Ignacio Arias, Jose; Zamora, M. Pilar; Brenner, Hermann; Müller, Heiko; Arndt, Volker; Rahman, Nazneen; Turnbull, Clare; Seal, Sheila; Renwick, Anthony; Brauch, Hiltrud; Justenhoven, Christina; Brüning, Thomas; Chang-Claude, Jenny; Hein, Rebecca; Wang-Gohrke, Shan; Dörk, Thilo; Schürmann, Peter; Bremer, Michael; Hillemanns, Peter; Nevanlinna, Heli; Heikkinen, Tuomas; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Blomqvist, Carl; Bogdanova, Natalia; Antonenkova, Natalia; Rogov, Yuri I.; Karstens, Johann Hinrich; Bermisheva, Marina; Prokofieva, Darya; Hanafievich Gantcev, Shamil; Khusnutdinova, Elza; Lindblom, Annika; Margolin, Sara; Chenevix-Trench, Georgia; Beesley, Jonathan; Chen, Xiaoqing; Mannermaa, Arto; Kosma, Veli-Matti; Soini, Ylermi; Kataja, Vesa; Lambrechts, Diether; Yesilyurt, Betül T.; Chrisiaens, Marie-Rose; Peeters, Stephanie; Radice, Paolo; Peterlongo, Paolo; Manoukian, Siranoush; Barile, Monica; Couch, Fergus; Lee, Adam M.; Diasio, Robert; Wang, Xianshu; Giles, Graham G.; Severi, Gianluca; Baglietto, Laura; Maclean, Catriona; Offit, Ken; Robson, Mark; Joseph, Vijai; Gaudet, Mia; John, Esther M.; Winqvist, Robert; Pylkäs, Katri; Jukkola-Vuorinen, Arja; Grip, Mervi; Andrulis, Irene; Knight, Julia A.; Marie Mulligan, Anna; O'Malley, Frances P.; Brinton, Louise A.; Sherman, Mark E.; Lissowska, Jolanta; Chanock, Stephen J.; Hooning, Maartje; Martens, John W.M.; van den Ouweland, Ans M.W.; Collée, J. Margriet; Hall, Per; Czene, Kamila; Cox, Angela; Brock, Ian W.; Reed, Malcolm W.R.; Cross, Simon S.; Pharoah, Paul; Dunning, Alison M.; Kang, Daehee; Yoo, Keun-Young; Noh, Dong-Young; Ahn, Sei-Hyun; Jakubowska, Anna; Lubinski, Jan; Jaworska, Katarzyna; Durda, Katarzyna; Sangrajrang, Suleeporn; Gaborieau, Valerie; Brennan, Paul; McKay, James; Shen, Chen-Yang; Ding, Shian-ling; Hsu, Huan-Ming; Yu, Jyh-Cherng; Anton-Culver, Hoda; Ziogas, Argyrios; Ashworth, Alan; Swerdlow, Anthony; Jones, Michael; Orr, Nick; Trentham-Dietz, Amy; Egan, Kathleen; Newcomb, Polly; Titus-Ernstoff, Linda; Easton, Doug; Spurdle, Amanda B.

    2011-01-01

    A genome-wide association study (GWAS) identified single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) at 1p11.2 and 14q24.1 (RAD51L1) as breast cancer susceptibility loci. The initial GWAS suggested stronger effects for both loci for estrogen receptor (ER)-positive tumors. Using data from the Breast Cancer Association Consortium (BCAC), we sought to determine whether risks differ by ER, progesterone receptor (PR), human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 (HER2), grade, node status, tumor size, and ductal or lobular morphology. We genotyped rs11249433 at 1p.11.2, and two highly correlated SNPs rs999737 and rs10483813 (r2= 0.98) at 14q24.1 (RAD51L1), for up to 46 036 invasive breast cancer cases and 46 930 controls from 39 studies. Analyses by tumor characteristics focused on subjects reporting to be white women of European ancestry and were based on 25 458 cases, of which 87% had ER data. The SNP at 1p11.2 showed significantly stronger associations with ER-positive tumors [per-allele odds ratio (OR) for ER-positive tumors was 1.13, 95% CI = 1.10–1.16 and, for ER-negative tumors, OR was 1.03, 95% CI = 0.98–1.07, case-only P-heterogeneity = 7.6 × 10−5]. The association with ER-positive tumors was stronger for tumors of lower grade (case-only P= 6.7 × 10−3) and lobular histology (case-only P= 0.01). SNPs at 14q24.1 were associated with risk for most tumor subtypes evaluated, including triple-negative breast cancers, which has not been described previously. Our results underscore the need for large pooling efforts with tumor pathology data to help refine risk estimates for SNP associations with susceptibility to different subtypes of breast cancer. PMID:21852249

  9. RAD51B Activity and Cell Cycle Regulation in Response to DNA Damage in Breast Cancer Cell Lines

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Phoebe S; Fang, Jun; Jessop, Lea; Myers, Timothy; Raj, Preethi; Hu, Nan; Wang, Chaoyu; Taylor, Philip R; Wang, Jianjun; Khan, Javed; Jasin, Maria; Chanock, Stephen J

    2014-01-01

    Common genetic variants mapping to two distinct regions of RAD51B, a paralog of RAD51, have been associated with breast cancer risk in genome-wide association studies (GWAS). RAD51B is a plausible candidate gene because of its established role in the homologous recombination (HR) process. How germline genetic variation in RAD51B confers susceptibility to breast cancer is not well understood. Here, we investigate the molecular function of RAD51B in breast cancer cell lines by knocking down RAD51B expression by small interfering RNA and treating cells with DNA-damaging agents, namely cisplatin, hydroxyurea, or methyl-methanesulfonate. Our results show that RAD51B-depleted breast cancer cells have increased sensitivity to DNA damage, reduced efficiency of HR, and altered cell cycle checkpoint responses. The influence of RAD51B on the cell cycle checkpoint is independent of its role in HR and further studies are required to determine whether these functions can explain the RAD51B breast cancer susceptibility alleles. PMID:25368520

  10. Development of Small Molecules that Specifically Inhibit the D-loop Activity of RAD51.

    PubMed

    Lv, Wei; Budke, Brian; Pawlowski, Michal; Connell, Philip P; Kozikowski, Alan P

    2016-05-26

    RAD51 is the central protein in homologous recombination (HR) DNA repair and represents a therapeutic target in oncology. Herein we report a novel class of RAD51 inhibitors that were identified by high throughput screening. In contrast to many previously reported RAD51 inhibitors, our lead compound 1 is capable of blocking RAD51-mediated D-loop formation (IC50 21.3 ± 7.8 μM) at concentrations that do not influence RAD51 binding to ssDNA. In human cells, 1 inhibits HR (IC50 13.1 ± 1.6 μM) without blocking RAD51's ability to assemble into subnuclear foci at sites of DNA damage. We determined that the active constituent of 1 is actually an oxidized derivative (termed RI(dl)-1 or 8) of the original screening compound. Our SAR campaign also yielded RI(dl)-2 (hereafter termed 9h), which effectively blocks RAD51's D-loop activity in biochemical systems (IC50 11.1 ± 1.3 μM) and inhibits HR activity in human cells (IC50 3.0 ± 1.8 μM).

  11. Functional Validation of Rare Human Genetic Variants Involved in Homologous Recombination Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Min-Soo; Yu, Mi; Kim, Kyoung-Yeon; Park, Geun-Hee; Kwack, KyuBum; Kim, Keun P.

    2015-01-01

    Systems for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are necessary to maintain genome integrity and normal functionality of cells in all organisms. Homologous recombination (HR) plays an important role in repairing accidental and programmed DSBs in mitotic and meiotic cells, respectively. Failure to repair these DSBs causes genome instability and can induce tumorigenesis. Rad51 and Rad52 are two key proteins in homologous pairing and strand exchange during DSB-induced HR; both are highly conserved in eukaryotes. In this study, we analyzed pathogenic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in human RAD51 and RAD52 using the Polymorphism Phenotyping (PolyPhen) and Sorting Intolerant from Tolerant (SIFT) algorithms and observed the effect of mutations in highly conserved domains of RAD51 and RAD52 on DNA damage repair in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based system. We identified a number of rad51 and rad52 alleles that exhibited severe DNA repair defects. The functionally inactive SNPs were located near ATPase active site of Rad51 and the DNA binding domain of Rad52. The rad51-F317I, rad52-R52W, and rad52-G107C mutations conferred hypersensitivity to methyl methane sulfonate (MMS)-induced DNA damage and were defective in HR-mediated DSB repair. Our study provides a new approach for detecting functional and loss-of-function genetic polymorphisms and for identifying causal variants in human DNA repair genes that contribute to the initiation or progression of cancer. PMID:25938495

  12. Functional Validation of Rare Human Genetic Variants Involved in Homologous Recombination Using Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Min-Soo; Yu, Mi; Kim, Kyoung-Yeon; Park, Geun-Hee; Kwack, KyuBum; Kim, Keun P

    2015-01-01

    Systems for the repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are necessary to maintain genome integrity and normal functionality of cells in all organisms. Homologous recombination (HR) plays an important role in repairing accidental and programmed DSBs in mitotic and meiotic cells, respectively. Failure to repair these DSBs causes genome instability and can induce tumorigenesis. Rad51 and Rad52 are two key proteins in homologous pairing and strand exchange during DSB-induced HR; both are highly conserved in eukaryotes. In this study, we analyzed pathogenic single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in human RAD51 and RAD52 using the Polymorphism Phenotyping (PolyPhen) and Sorting Intolerant from Tolerant (SIFT) algorithms and observed the effect of mutations in highly conserved domains of RAD51 and RAD52 on DNA damage repair in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae-based system. We identified a number of rad51 and rad52 alleles that exhibited severe DNA repair defects. The functionally inactive SNPs were located near ATPase active site of Rad51 and the DNA binding domain of Rad52. The rad51-F317I, rad52-R52W, and rad52-G107C mutations conferred hypersensitivity to methyl methane sulfonate (MMS)-induced DNA damage and were defective in HR-mediated DSB repair. Our study provides a new approach for detecting functional and loss-of-function genetic polymorphisms and for identifying causal variants in human DNA repair genes that contribute to the initiation or progression of cancer.

  13. An optimized RAD51 inhibitor that disrupts homologous recombination without requiring Michael acceptor reactivity

    PubMed Central

    Budke, Brian; Kalin, Jay H.; Pawlowski, Michal; Zelivianskaia, Anna S.; Wu, Megan; Kozikowski, Alan P.; Connell, Philip P.

    2013-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is an essential process in cells that provides repair of DNA double-strand breaks and lesions that block DNA replication. RAD51 is an evolutionarily conserved protein that is central to HR. Overexpression of RAD51 protein is common in cancer cells and represents a potential therapeutic target in oncology. We previously described a chemical inhibitor of RAD51, called RI-1 (referred to as compound 1 in this report). The chloromaleimide group of this compound is thought to act as a Michael acceptor and react with the thiol group on C319 of RAD51, using a conjugate addition-elimination mechanism. In order to reduce the likelihood of off-target effects and to improve compound stability in biological systems, we developed an analog of compound 1 that lacks maleimide-based reactivity but retains RAD51 inhibitory activity. This compound, 1-(3,4-dichlorophenyl)-3-(4-methoxyphenyl)-4-morpholino-1H-pyrrole-2,5-dione, named RI-2 (referred to as compound 7a in this report), appears to bind reversibly to the same site on the RAD51 protein as does compound 1. Like compound 1, compound 7a specifically inhibits HR repair in human cells. PMID:23231413

  14. Overexpressed of RAD51 suppresses recombination defects: a possible mechanism to reverse genomic instability

    SciTech Connect

    Schild, David; Wiese, Claudia

    2009-10-15

    RAD51, a key protein in the homologous recombinational DNA repair (HRR) pathway, is the major strand-transferase required for mitotic recombination. An important early step in HRR is the formation of single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA) coated by RPA (a ss-DNA binding protein). Displacement of RPA by RAD51 is highly regulated and facilitated by a number of different proteins known as the 'recombination mediators'. To assist these recombination mediators, a second group of proteins also is required and we are defining these proteins here as 'recombination co-mediators'. Defects in either recombination mediators or comediators, including BRCA1 and BRCA2, lead to impaired HRR that can genetically be complemented for (i.e. suppressed) by overexpression of RAD51. Defects in HRR have long been known to contribute to genomic instability leading to tumor development. Since genomic instability also slows cell growth, precancerous cells presumably require genomic restabilization to gain a growth advantage. RAD51 is overexpressed in many tumors, and therefore, we hypothesize that the complementing ability of elevated levels of RAD51 in tumors with initial HRR defects limits genomic instability during carcinogenic progression. Of particular interest, this model may also help explain the high frequency of TP53 mutations in human cancers, since wild-type p53 represses RAD51.

  15. NEK8 regulates DNA damage-induced RAD51 foci formation and replication fork protection

    PubMed Central

    Abeyta, Antonio; Castella, Maria; Jacquemont, Celine; Taniguchi, Toshiyasu

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Proteins essential for homologous recombination play a pivotal role in the repair of DNA double strand breaks, DNA inter-strand crosslinks and replication fork stability. Defects in homologous recombination also play a critical role in the development of cancer and the sensitivity of these cancers to chemotherapy. RAD51, an essential factor for homologous recombination and replication fork protection, accumulates and forms immunocytochemically detectable nuclear foci at sites of DNA damage. To identify kinases that may regulate RAD51 localization to sites of DNA damage, we performed a human kinome siRNA library screen, using DNA damage-induced RAD51 foci formation as readout. We found that NEK8, a NIMA family kinase member, is required for efficient DNA damage-induced RAD51 foci formation. Interestingly, knockout of Nek8 in murine embryonic fibroblasts led to cellular sensitivity to the replication inhibitor, hydroxyurea, and inhibition of the ATR kinase. Furthermore, NEK8 was required for proper replication fork protection following replication stall with hydroxyurea. Loading of RAD51 to chromatin was decreased in NEK8-depleted cells and Nek8-knockout cells. Single-molecule DNA fiber analyses revealed that nascent DNA tracts were degraded in the absence of NEK8 following treatment with hydroxyurea. Consistent with this, Nek8-knockout cells showed increased chromosome breaks following treatment with hydroxyurea. Thus, NEK8 plays a critical role in replication fork stability through its regulation of the DNA repair and replication fork protection protein RAD51. PMID:27892797

  16. Overexpression of RAD51 suppresses recombination defects: a possible mechanism to reverse genomic instability

    PubMed Central

    Schild, David; Wiese, Claudia

    2010-01-01

    RAD51, a key protein in the homologous recombinational DNA repair (HRR) pathway, is the major strand-transferase required for mitotic recombination. An important early step in HRR is the formation of single-stranded DNA (ss-DNA) coated by RPA (a ss-DNA-binding protein). Displacement of RPA by RAD51 is highly regulated and facilitated by a number of different proteins known as the ‘recombination mediators’. To assist these recombination mediators, a second group of proteins also is required and we are defining these proteins here as ‘recombination co-mediators’. Defects in either recombination mediators or co-mediators, including BRCA1 and BRCA2, lead to impaired HRR that can genetically be complemented for (i.e. suppressed) by overexpression of RAD51. Defects in HRR have long been known to contribute to genomic instability leading to tumor development. Since genomic instability also slows cell growth, precancerous cells presumably require genomic re-stabilization to gain a growth advantage. RAD51 is overexpressed in many tumors, and therefore, we hypothesize that the complementing ability of elevated levels of RAD51 in tumors with initial HRR defects limits genomic instability during carcinogenic progression. Of particular interest, this model may also help explain the high frequency of TP53 mutations in human cancers, since wild-type p53 represses RAD51 expression. PMID:19942681

  17. ASCIZ regulates lesion-specific Rad51 focus formation and apoptosis after methylating DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    McNees, Carolyn J; Conlan, Lindus A; Tenis, Nora; Heierhorst, Jörg

    2005-01-01

    Nuclear Rad51 focus formation is required for homology-directed repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs), but its regulation in response to non-DSB lesions is poorly understood. Here we report a novel human SQ/TQ cluster domain-containing protein termed ASCIZ that forms Rad51-containing foci in response to base-modifying DNA methylating agents but not in response to DSB-inducing agents. ASCIZ foci seem to form prior to Rad51 recruitment, and an ASCIZ core domain can concentrate Rad51 in focus-like structures independently of DNA damage. ASCIZ depletion dramatically increases apoptosis after methylating DNA damage and impairs Rad51 focus formation in response to methylating agents but not after ionizing radiation. ASCIZ focus formation and increased apoptosis in ASCIZ-depleted cells depend on the mismatch repair protein MLH1. Interestingly, ASCIZ foci form efficiently during G1 phase, when sister chromatids are unavailable as recombination templates. We propose that ASCIZ acts as a lesion-specific focus scaffold in a Rad51-dependent pathway that resolves cytotoxic repair intermediates, most likely single-stranded DNA gaps, resulting from MLH1-dependent processing of base lesions. PMID:15933716

  18. Contribution of Germline Mutations in the RAD51B, RAD51C, and RAD51D Genes to Ovarian Cancer in the Population

    PubMed Central

    Song, Honglin; Dicks, Ed; Ramus, Susan J.; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Intermaggio, Maria P.; Hayward, Jane; Edlund, Christopher K.; Conti, David; Harrington, Patricia; Fraser, Lindsay; Philpott, Susan; Anderson, Christopher; Rosenthal, Adam; Gentry-Maharaj, Aleksandra; Bowtell, David D.; Alsop, Kathryn; Cicek, Mine S.; Cunningham, Julie M.; Fridley, Brooke L.; Alsop, Jennifer; Jimenez-Linan, Mercedes; Høgdall, Estrid; Høgdall, Claus K.; Jensen, Allan; Kjaer, Susanne Krüger; Lubiński, Jan; Huzarski, Tomasz; Jakubowska, Anna; Gronwald, Jacek; Poblete, Samantha; Lele, Shashi; Sucheston-Campbell, Lara; Moysich, Kirsten B.; Odunsi, Kunle; Goode, Ellen L.; Menon, Usha; Jacobs, Ian J.; Gayther, Simon A.; Pharoah, Paul D.P.

    2015-01-01

    Purpose The aim of this study was to estimate the contribution of deleterious mutations in the RAD51B, RAD51C, and RAD51D genes to invasive epithelial ovarian cancer (EOC) in the population and in a screening trial of individuals at high risk of ovarian cancer. Patients and Methods The coding sequence and splice site boundaries of the three RAD51 genes were sequenced and analyzed in germline DNA from a case-control study of 3,429 patients with invasive EOC and 2,772 controls as well as in 2,000 unaffected women who were BRCA1/BRCA2 negative from the United Kingdom Familial Ovarian Cancer Screening Study (UK_FOCSS) after quality-control analysis. Results In the case-control study, we identified predicted deleterious mutations in 28 EOC cases (0.82%) compared with three controls (0.11%; P < .001). Mutations in EOC cases were more frequent in RAD51C (14 occurrences, 0.41%) and RAD51D (12 occurrences, 0.35%) than in RAD51B (two occurrences, 0.06%). RAD51C mutations were associated with an odds ratio of 5.2 (95% CI, 1.1 to 24; P = .035), and RAD51D mutations conferred an odds ratio of 12 (95% CI, 1.5 to 90; P = .019). We identified 13 RAD51 mutations (0.65%) in unaffected UK_FOCSS participants (RAD51C, n = 7; RAD51D, n = 5; and RAD51B, n = 1), which was a significantly greater rate than in controls (P < .001); furthermore, RAD51 mutation carriers were more likely than noncarriers to have a family history of ovarian cancer (P < .001). Conclusion These results confirm that RAD51C and RAD51D are moderate ovarian cancer susceptibility genes and suggest that they confer levels of risk of EOC that may warrant their use alongside BRCA1 and BRCA2 in routine clinical genetic testing. PMID:26261251

  19. FANCI-FANCD2 stabilizes the RAD51-DNA complex by binding RAD51 and protects the 5'-DNA end.

    PubMed

    Sato, Koichi; Shimomuki, Mayo; Katsuki, Yoko; Takahashi, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Wataru; Ishiai, Masamichi; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Takata, Minoru; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2016-12-15

    The FANCI-FANCD2 (I-D) complex is considered to work with RAD51 to protect the damaged DNA in the stalled replication fork. However, the means by which this DNA protection is accomplished have remained elusive. In the present study, we found that the I-D complex directly binds to RAD51, and stabilizes the RAD51-DNA filament. Unexpectedly, the DNA binding activity of FANCI, but not FANCD2, is explicitly required for the I-D complex-mediated RAD51-DNA filament stabilization. The RAD51 filament stabilized by the I-D complex actually protects the DNA end from nucleolytic degradation by an FA-associated nuclease, FAN1. This DNA end protection is not observed with the RAD51 mutant from FANCR patient cells. These results clearly answer the currently enigmatic question of how RAD51 functions with the I-D complex to prevent genomic instability at the stalled replication fork.

  20. Promotion of RAD51-mediated Homologous DNA Pairing by the RAD51AP1-UAF1 Complex

    PubMed Central

    Liang, Fengshan; Longerich, Simonne; Miller, Adam S.; Tang, Caroline; Buzovetsky, Olga; Xiong, Yong; Maranon, David G.; Wiese, Claudia; Kupfer, Gary M.; Sung, Patrick

    2017-01-01

    Summary The UAF1-USP1 complex deubiquitinates FANCD2 during execution of the Fanconi anemia DNA damage response pathway. As such, UAF1 depletion results in persistent FANCD2 ubiquitination and DNA damage hypersensitivity. UAF1 deficient cells are also impaired for DNA repair by homologous recombination. Herein, we show that UAF1 binds DNA and forms a dimeric complex with RAD51AP1, an accessory factor of the RAD51 recombinase, and a trimeric complex with RAD51 through RAD51AP1. Two SUMO-like domains in UAF1 and a SUMO-interacting motif in RAD51AP1 mediate complex formation. Importantly, UAF1 enhances RAD51-mediated homologous DNA pairing in a manner that is dependent on complex formation with RAD51AP1 but independent of USP1. Mechanistically, RAD51AP1-UAF1 co-operates with RAD51 to assemble the synaptic complex, a critical nucleoprotein intermediate in homologous recombination, and cellular studies reveal the biological significance of the RAD51AP1-UAF1 protein complex. Our findings provide insights into an apparently USP1-independent role of UAF1 in genome maintenance. PMID:27239033

  1. TOPBP1 regulates RAD51 phosphorylation and chromatin loading and determines PARP inhibitor sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Moudry, Pavel; Watanabe, Kenji; Wolanin, Kamila M.; Bartkova, Jirina; Wassing, Isabel E.; Watanabe, Sugiko; Strauss, Robert; Troelsgaard Pedersen, Rune; Oestergaard, Vibe H.; Lisby, Michael; Andújar-Sánchez, Miguel; Maya-Mendoza, Apolinar; Esashi, Fumiko; Lukas, Jiri

    2016-01-01

    Topoisomerase IIβ-binding protein 1 (TOPBP1) participates in DNA replication and DNA damage response; however, its role in DNA repair and relevance for human cancer remain unclear. Here, through an unbiased small interfering RNA screen, we identified and validated TOPBP1 as a novel determinant whose loss sensitized human cells to olaparib, an inhibitor of poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase. We show that TOPBP1 acts in homologous recombination (HR) repair, impacts olaparib response, and exhibits aberrant patterns in subsets of human ovarian carcinomas. TOPBP1 depletion abrogated RAD51 loading to chromatin and formation of RAD51 foci, but without affecting the upstream HR steps of DNA end resection and RPA loading. Furthermore, TOPBP1 BRCT domains 7/8 are essential for RAD51 foci formation. Mechanistically, TOPBP1 physically binds PLK1 and promotes PLK1 kinase–mediated phosphorylation of RAD51 at serine 14, a modification required for RAD51 recruitment to chromatin. Overall, our results provide mechanistic insights into TOPBP1’s role in HR, with potential clinical implications for cancer treatment. PMID:26811421

  2. The RAD51-stimulatory compound RS-1 can exploit the RAD51 overexpression that exists in cancer cells and tumors

    PubMed Central

    Mason, Jennifer M; Logan, Hillary L.; Budke, Brian; Wu, Megan; Pawlowski, Michal; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.; Kozikowski, Alan P.; Bishop, Douglas K.; Connell, Philip P.

    2014-01-01

    RAD51 is the central protein that catalyzes DNA repair via homologous recombination (HR), a process that ensures genomic stability. RAD51 protein is commonly expressed at high levels in cancer cells relative to their non-cancerous precursors. High levels of RAD51 expression can lead to the formation of genotoxic RAD51 protein complexes on undamaged chromatin. We developed a therapeutic approach that exploits this potentially toxic feature of malignancy, using compounds that stimulate the DNA binding activity of RAD51 to promote cancer cell death. A panel of immortalized cell lines was challenged with the RAD51-stimulatory compound RS-1. Resistance to RS-1 tended to occur in cells with higher levels of RAD54L and RAD54B, which are Swi2/Snf2-related translocases known to dissociate RAD51 filaments from double-stranded DNA. In PC3 prostate cancer cells, RS-1 induced lethality was accompanied by the formation of microscopically visible RAD51 nuclear protein foci occurring in the absence of any DNA-damaging treatment. Treatment with RS-1 promoted significant anti-tumor responses in a mouse model, providing proof of principle for this novel therapeutic strategy. PMID:24753542

  3. RAD51-dependent break-induced replication differs in kinetics and checkpoint responses from RAD51-mediated gene conversion.

    PubMed

    Malkova, Anna; Naylor, Maria L; Yamaguchi, Miyuki; Ira, Grzegorz; Haber, James E

    2005-02-01

    Diploid Saccharomyces cells experiencing a double-strand break (DSB) on one homologous chromosome repair the break by RAD51-mediated gene conversion >98% of the time. However, when extensive homologous sequences are restricted to one side of the DSB, repair can occur by both RAD51-dependent and RAD51-independent break-induced replication (BIR) mechanisms. Here we characterize the kinetics and checkpoint dependence of RAD51-dependent BIR when the DSB is created within a chromosome. Gene conversion products appear within 2 h, and there is little, if any, induction of the DNA damage checkpoint; however, RAD51-dependent BIR occurs with a further delay of 2 to 4 h and cells arrest in response to the G(2)/M DNA damage checkpoint. RAD51-dependent BIR does not require special facilitating sequences that are required for a less efficient RAD51-independent process. RAD51-dependent BIR occurs efficiently in G(2)-arrested cells. Once repair is initiated, the rate of repair replication during BIR is comparable to that of normal DNA replication, as copying of >100 kb is completed less than 30 min after repair DNA synthesis is detected close to the DSB.

  4. The carboxyl-terminal of BRCA1 is required for subnuclear assembly of RAD51 after treatment with cisplatin but not ionizing radiation in human breast and ovarian cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Zhou Chenyi; Huang Peng; Liu Jinsong . E-mail: jliu@mdanderson.org

    2005-10-28

    BRCA1 plays an important role in maintaining genomic stability through its involvement in DNA repair. Although it is known that BRCA1 and RAD51 form distinct DNA repair subnuclear complexes, or foci, following environmental insults to the DNA, the role of BRCA1 in this process remains to be characterized. The purpose of the study was therefore to determine the role of BRCA1 in the formation of RAD51 foci following treatment with cisplatin and ionizing radiation. We found that although a functional BRCA1 is required for the subnuclear assembly of BRCA1 foci following treatment with either ionizing radiation or cisplatin, a functional BRCA1 is required for RAD51 foci to form following treatment with cisplatin but not with ionizing radiation. Similar results were obtained in SKOV-3 cells when the level of BRCA1 expression was knocked down by stable expression of a retrovirus-mediated small-interfering RNA against BRCA1. We also found that the carboxyl-terminal of BRCA1 contains uncharacterized phosphorylation sites that are responsive to cisplatin. The functional BRCA1 is also required for breast and ovarian cancer cells to mount resistance to cisplatin. These results suggest that the carboxyl-terminal of BRCA1 is required for the cisplatin-induced recruitment of RAD51 to the DNA-damage site, which may contribute to cisplatin resistance.

  5. High-resolution structure of the presynaptic RAD51 filament on single-stranded DNA by electron cryo-microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Short, Judith M.; Liu, Yang; Chen, Shaoxia; Soni, Neelesh; Madhusudhan, Mallur S.; Shivji, Mahmud K.K.; Venkitaraman, Ashok R.

    2016-01-01

    Homologous DNA recombination (HR) by the RAD51 recombinase enables error-free DNA break repair. To execute HR, RAD51 first forms a presynaptic filament on single-stranded (ss) DNA, which catalyses pairing with homologous double-stranded (ds) DNA. Here, we report a structure for the presynaptic human RAD51 filament at 3.5–5.0Å resolution using electron cryo-microscopy. RAD51 encases ssDNA in a helical filament of 103Å pitch, comprising 6.4 protomers per turn, with a rise of 16.1Å and a twist of 56.2°. Inter-protomer distance correlates with rotation of an α-helical region in the core catalytic domain that is juxtaposed to ssDNA, suggesting how the RAD51–DNA interaction modulates protomer spacing and filament pitch. We map Fanconi anaemia-like disease-associated RAD51 mutations, clarifying potential phenotypes. We predict binding sites on the presynaptic filament for two modules present in each BRC repeat of the BRCA2 tumour suppressor, a critical HR mediator. Structural modelling suggests that changes in filament pitch mask or expose one binding site with filament-inhibitory potential, rationalizing the paradoxical ability of the BRC repeats to either stabilize or inhibit filament formation at different steps during HR. Collectively, our findings provide fresh insight into the structural mechanism of HR and its dysregulation in human disease. PMID:27596592

  6. Real-time solution measurement of RAD51- and RecA-mediated strand assimilation without background annealing.

    PubMed

    Budke, Brian; Chan, Yuen-Ling; Bishop, Douglas K; Connell, Philip P

    2013-07-01

    RAD51 is the central strand exchange recombinase in somatic homologous recombination, providing genomic stability and promoting resistance to DNA damage. An important tool for mechanistic studies of RAD51 is the D-loop or strand assimilation assay, which measures the ability of RAD51-coated single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) to search for, invade and exchange ssDNA strands with a homologous duplex DNA target. As cancer cells generally overexpress RAD51, the D-loop assay has also emerged as an important tool in oncologic drug design programs for targeting RAD51. Previous studies have adapted the traditional gel-based D-loop assay by using fluorescence-based substrates, which in principle allow for use in high-throughput screening platforms. However, these existing D-loop methods depend on linear oligonucleotide DNA duplex targets, and these substrates enable recombinase-independent ssDNA annealing that can obscure the recombinase-dependent strand assimilation signal. This compelled us to fundamentally re-design this assay, using a fluorescent target substrate that consists of a covalently closed linear double-hairpin dsDNA. This new microplate-based method represents a fast, inexpensive and non-radioactive alternative to existing D-loop assays. It provides accurate kinetic analysis of strand assimilation in high-throughput and performs well with human RAD51 and Escherichia coli RecA protein. This advance will aid in both mechanistic studies of homologous recombination and drug screening programs.

  7. Polymorphisms of RAD51B are associated with rheumatoid arthritis and erosion in rheumatoid arthritis patients

    PubMed Central

    Zhi, Liqiang; Yao, Shuxin; Ma, Wenlong; Zhang, Weijie; Chen, Honggan; Li, Meng; Ma, Jianbing

    2017-01-01

    Rheumatoid arthritis (RA) is a common, chronic autoimmune disease affecting 0.5–1.0% of adults worldwide, including approximately 4.5–5.0 million patients in China. The genetic etiology and pathogenesis of RA have not yet been fully elucidated. Recently, one new RA susceptibility gene (RAD51B) has been identified in Korean and European populations. In this study, we designed a two-stage case-control study to further assess the relationship of common variants in the RAD51B gene with increased risk of RA in a total of 965 RA patients and 2,511 unrelated healthy controls of Han Chinese ancestry. We successfully identified a common variant, rs911263, as being significantly associated with the disease status of RA (P = 4.8 × 10−5, OR = 0.64). In addition, this SNP was shown to be related to erosion, a clinical assessment of disease severity in RA (P = 2.89 × 10−5, OR = 0.52). These findings shed light on the role of RAD51B in the onset and severity of RA. More research in the future is needed to clarify the underlying functional link between rs911263 and the disease. PMID:28361912

  8. XRCC3 ATPase activity is required for normal XRCC3-Rad51C complex dynamics and homologous recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Yamada, N; Hinz, J; Kopf, V L; Segalle, K; Thompson, L

    2004-02-25

    Homologous recombinational repair is a major DNA repair pathway that preserves chromosomal integrity by removing double-strand breaks, crosslinks, and other DNA damage. In eukaryotic cells, the Rad51 paralogs (XRCC2, XRCC3, Rad51B, Rad51C, and Rad51D) are involved in this process, although their exact functions are largely undetermined. All five paralogs contain ATPase motifs, and XRCC3 appears to exist in a single complex with Rad51C. To begin to examine the function of this Rad51C-XRCC3 complex, we generated mammalian expression vectors that produce human wild-type XRCC3 or mutant XRCC3 with either a non-conservative mutation (K113A) or a conservative mutation (K113R) in the GKT Walker A box of the ATPase motif. The three vectors were independently transfected into Xrcc3-deficient irs1SF CHO cells. Wild-type XRCC3 complemented irs1SF cells, albeit to varying degrees, while ATPase mutants had no complementing activity, even when the mutant protein was expressed at comparable levels to that in wild-type-complemented clones. Because of the mutants' dysfunction, we propose that ATP binding and hydrolyzing activities of XRCC3 are essential. We tested in vitro complex formation by wild-type and mutant XRCC3 with His6-tagged Rad51C upon coexpression in bacteria, nickel affinity purification, and western blotting. Wild-type and K113A mutant XRCC3 formed stable complexes with Rad51C and co-purified with Rad51C, while the K113R mutant did not and was predominantly insoluble. Addition of 5 mM ATP, but not ADP, also abolished complex formation by the wild-type proteins. These results suggest that XRCC3 is likely to regulate the dissociation and formation of Rad51C-XRCC3 complex through ATP binding and hydrolysis, with both processes being essential for the complex's ability to participate in HRR.

  9. Roles of Rad51 paralogs for promoting homologous recombination in Leishmania infantum

    PubMed Central

    Genois, Marie-Michelle; Plourde, Marie; Éthier, Chantal; Roy, Gaétan; Poirier, Guy G.; Ouellette, Marc; Masson, Jean-Yves

    2015-01-01

    To achieve drug resistance Leishmania parasite alters gene copy number by using its repeated sequences widely distributed through the genome. Even though homologous recombination (HR) is ascribed to maintain genome stability, this eukaryote exploits this potent mechanism driven by the Rad51 recombinase to form beneficial extrachromosomal circular amplicons. Here, we provide insights on the formation of these circular amplicons by analyzing the functions of the Rad51 paralogs. We purified three Leishmania infantum Rad51 paralogs homologs (LiRad51-3, LiRad51-4 and LiRad51-6) all of which directly interact with LiRad51. LiRad51-3, LiRad51-4 and LiRad51-6 show differences in DNA binding and annealing capacities. Moreover, it is also noteworthy that LiRad51-3 and LiRad51-4 are able to stimulate Rad51-mediated D-loop formation. In addition, we succeed to inactivate the LiRad51-4 gene and report a decrease of circular amplicons in this mutant. The LiRad51-3 gene was found to be essential for cell viability. Thus, we propose that the LiRad51 paralogs play crucial functions in extrachromosomal circular DNA amplification to circumvent drug actions and preserve survival. PMID:25712090

  10. Polymorphisms in RAD51 and their relation with breast cancer in Saudi females.

    PubMed

    Tulbah, Sahar; Alabdulkarim, Huda; Alanazi, Mohammad; Parine, Narasimha Reddy; Shaik, Jilani; Pathan, Akbar Ali Khan; Al-Amri, Abdullah; Khan, Wajahatullah; Warsy, Arjumand

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed at investigating the relationship between rs1801320 (G>C), rs1801321 (G>T), and rs2619681 (C>T) RAD51 gene polymorphisms and the risk of breast cancer development in Saudi females. The genotypes were analyzed using TaqMan genotyping assay and polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. The genotype and allele frequencies were computed using chi-square or Fisher's exact test (two-tailed) by SPSS 21 software. The results showed that rs1801321G>T GG genotype and G allele frequency were strongly (P<0.0001) related to an elevated risk of breast cancer, while the mutant T allele appeared to provide protection against breast cancer development as observed from the significantly lower (P<0.0001) frequencies of the TT and GT genotypes in cancer patients compared to the healthy controls. The variant rs1801320G>C showed no significant differences in the frequencies of the genotypes and alleles in the patients and the control groups. The CC genotype and C allele frequency of rs2619681 (C>T) variant were significantly (P=0.012) higher in cancer patients, whereas the T allele showed a protective effect against cancer development. The frequencies of the three single-nucleotide polymorphisms did not differ in cancer patients with different tumor grades and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 status (+ or -). However, the genotype frequency of rs1801320 (135G>C) differed in the patients with estrogen receptor (ER)+ and ER-, where CC genotype showed a significantly higher prevalence in the females with ER- who were suffering from breast cancer. In addition, the frequency of C allele of rs2619681 (C>T) was also significantly higher in the breast cancer patients who were ER+ and progesterone receptor (PR)+ compared to those with ER- and PR-. In the Saudi females, rs1801320 did not show an association with risk of breast cancer. Taken together, the results suggest that RAD51 rs1801321 polymorphism may be involved in the etiology of

  11. Polymorphisms in RAD51 and their relation with breast cancer in Saudi females

    PubMed Central

    Tulbah, Sahar; Alabdulkarim, Huda; Alanazi, Mohammad; Parine, Narasimha Reddy; Shaik, Jilani; Pathan, Akbar Ali Khan; Al-Amri, Abdullah; Khan, Wajahatullah; Warsy, Arjumand

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed at investigating the relationship between rs1801320 (G>C), rs1801321 (G>T), and rs2619681 (C>T) RAD51 gene polymorphisms and the risk of breast cancer development in Saudi females. The genotypes were analyzed using TaqMan genotyping assay and polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism. The genotype and allele frequencies were computed using chi-square or Fisher’s exact test (two-tailed) by SPSS 21 software. The results showed that rs1801321G>T GG genotype and G allele frequency were strongly (P<0.0001) related to an elevated risk of breast cancer, while the mutant T allele appeared to provide protection against breast cancer development as observed from the significantly lower (P<0.0001) frequencies of the TT and GT genotypes in cancer patients compared to the healthy controls. The variant rs1801320G>C showed no significant differences in the frequencies of the genotypes and alleles in the patients and the control groups. The CC genotype and C allele frequency of rs2619681 (C>T) variant were significantly (P=0.012) higher in cancer patients, whereas the T allele showed a protective effect against cancer development. The frequencies of the three single-nucleotide polymorphisms did not differ in cancer patients with different tumor grades and human epidermal growth factor receptor 2 status (+ or −). However, the genotype frequency of rs1801320 (135G>C) differed in the patients with estrogen receptor (ER)+ and ER−, where CC genotype showed a significantly higher prevalence in the females with ER− who were suffering from breast cancer. In addition, the frequency of C allele of rs2619681 (C>T) was also significantly higher in the breast cancer patients who were ER+ and progesterone receptor (PR)+ compared to those with ER− and PR−. In the Saudi females, rs1801320 did not show an association with risk of breast cancer. Taken together, the results suggest that RAD51 rs1801321 polymorphism may be involved in the

  12. Disruption of Brca2-Rad51 Complex in Breast Cancer Cells: Therapeutic Implications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2006-09-01

    complexes include the Rad51 paralogs family members such as (Rad51, Rad52, Rad54, Rad51B, Rad51C, Rad51D,Xrcc2and Xrcc3 ) and the breast cancer...DNA recombination from the structure of a RAD51-BRCA2 complex. Nature 2002, 420, 287-293. 5. Xu ZY, Loignon M, Han FY, Panasci L, Aloyz R.. Xrcc3 ...Pharmacol Exp Ther. 2005, 314:495-505. 6. Xu ZY, Loignon M, Han FY, Panasci L, Aloyz R. Xrcc3 induces cisplatin resistance by stimulation of Rad51

  13. Cloning the RAD51 homologue of Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

    PubMed Central

    Muris, D F; Vreeken, K; Carr, A M; Broughton, B C; Lehmann, A R; Lohman, P H; Pastink, A

    1993-01-01

    The RAD51 gene of Saccharomyces cerevisiae encodes a RecA like protein, which is involved in the recombinational repair of double strand breaks. We have isolated the RAD51 homologue, rhp51+, of the distantly related yeast strain Schizosaccharomyces pombe by heterologous hybridization. DNA sequence analysis of the rhp51+ gene revealed an open reading frame of 365 amino acids. Comparison of the amino acid sequences of RAD51 and rhp51+ showed a high level of conservation: 69% identical amino acids. There are two Mlul sites in the upstream region which may be associated with cell cycle regulation of the rhp51+ gene. The rhp51+ null allele, constructed by disruption of the coding region, is extremely sensitive to X-rays, indicating that the rhp51+ gene, like RAD51, is also involved in the repair of X-ray damage. The structural and functional homology between rhp51+ and RAD51 suggests evolutionary conservation of certain steps in the recombinational repair pathway. Images PMID:8233794

  14. Dynamic unwrapping of nucleosomes by HsRAD51 that includes sliding and rotational motion of histone octamers

    PubMed Central

    Senavirathne, Gayan; Mahto, Santosh K.; Hanne, Jeungphill; O'Brian, Daniel; Fishel, Richard

    2017-01-01

    Wrapping of genomic DNA into nucleosomes poses thermodynamic and kinetic barriers to biological processes such as replication, transcription, repair and recombination. Previous biochemical studies have demonstrated that in the presence of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) the human RAD51 (HsRAD51) recombinase can form a nucleoprotein filament (NPF) on double-stranded DNA (dsDNA) that is capable of unwrapping the nucleosomal DNA from the histone octamer (HO). Here, we have used single molecule Förster Resonance Energy Transfer (smFRET) to examine the real time nucleosome dynamics in the presence of the HsRAD51 NPF. We show that oligomerization of HsRAD51 leads to stepwise, but stochastic unwrapping of the DNA from the HO in the presence of ATP. The highly reversible dynamics observed in single-molecule trajectories suggests an antagonistic mechanism between HsRAD51 binding and rewrapping of the DNA around the HO. These stochastic dynamics were independent of the nucleosomal DNA sequence or the asymmetry created by the presence of a linker DNA. We also observed sliding and rotational oscillations of the HO with respect to the nucleosomal DNA. These studies underline the dynamic nature of even tightly associated protein–DNA complexes such as nucleosomes. PMID:27738136

  15. NUCKS1 is a novel RAD51AP1 paralog important for homologous recombination and genome stability

    SciTech Connect

    Parplys, Ann C.; Zhao, Weixing; Sharma, Neelam; Groesser, Torsten; Liang, Fengshan; Maranon, David G.; Leung, Stanley G.; Grundt, Kirsten; Dray, Eloïse; Idate, Rupa; Østvold, Anne Carine; Schild, David; Sung, Patrick; Wiese, Claudia

    2015-08-31

    NUCKS1 (nuclear casein kinase and cyclin-dependent kinase substrate 1) is a 27 kD chromosomal, vertebrate-specific protein, for which limited functional data exist. Here, we demonstrate that NUCKS1 shares extensive sequence homology with RAD51AP1 (RAD51 associated protein 1), suggesting that these two proteins are paralogs. Similar to the phenotypic effects of RAD51AP1 knockdown, we find that depletion of NUCKS1 in human cells impairs DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR) and chromosome stability. Depletion of NUCKS1 also results in greatly increased cellular sensitivity to mitomycin C (MMC), and in increased levels of spontaneous and MMC-induced chromatid breaks. NUCKS1 is critical to maintaining wild type HR capacity, and, as observed for a number of proteins involved in the HR pathway, functional loss of NUCKS1 leads to a slow down in DNA replication fork progression with a concomitant increase in the utilization of new replication origins. Interestingly, recombinant NUCKS1 shares the same DNA binding preference as RAD51AP1, but binds to DNA with reduced affinity when compared to RAD51AP1. Finally, our results show that NUCKS1 is a chromatin-associated protein with a role in the DNA damage response and in HR, a DNA repair pathway critical for tumor suppression.

  16. Arabidopsis BRCA2 and RAD51 proteins are specifically involved in defense gene transcription during plant immune responses

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Shui; Durrant, Wendy E.; Song, Junqi; Spivey, Natalie W.; Dong, Xinnian

    2010-01-01

    Systemic acquired resistance (SAR) is a plant immune response associated with both transcriptional reprogramming and increased homologous DNA recombination (HR). SNI1 is a negative regulator of SAR and HR, as indicated by the increased basal expression of defense genes and HR in sni1. We found that the sni1 phenotypes are rescued by mutations in BREAST CANCER 2 (BRCA2). In humans, BRCA2 is a mediator of RAD51 in pairing of homologous DNA. Mutations in BRCA2 cause predisposition to breast/ovarian cancers; however, the role of the BRCA2–RAD51 complex in transcriptional regulation remains unclear. In Arabidopsis, both brca2 and rad51 were found to be hypersusceptible not only to genotoxic substances, but also to pathogen infections. A whole-genome microarray analysis showed that downstream of NPR1, BRCA2A is a major regulator of defense-related gene transcription. ChIP demonstrated that RAD51 is specifically recruited to the promoters of defense genes during SAR. This recruitment is dependent on the SAR signal salicylic acid (SA) and on the function of BRCA2. This study provides the molecular evidence showing that the BRCA2–RAD51 complex, known for its function in HR, also plays a direct and specific role in transcription regulation during plant immune responses. PMID:21149701

  17. NUCKS1 is a novel RAD51AP1 paralog important for homologous recombination and genome stability

    DOE PAGES

    Parplys, Ann C.; Zhao, Weixing; Sharma, Neelam; ...

    2015-08-31

    NUCKS1 (nuclear casein kinase and cyclin-dependent kinase substrate 1) is a 27 kD chromosomal, vertebrate-specific protein, for which limited functional data exist. Here, we demonstrate that NUCKS1 shares extensive sequence homology with RAD51AP1 (RAD51 associated protein 1), suggesting that these two proteins are paralogs. Similar to the phenotypic effects of RAD51AP1 knockdown, we find that depletion of NUCKS1 in human cells impairs DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR) and chromosome stability. Depletion of NUCKS1 also results in greatly increased cellular sensitivity to mitomycin C (MMC), and in increased levels of spontaneous and MMC-induced chromatid breaks. NUCKS1 is critical to maintainingmore » wild type HR capacity, and, as observed for a number of proteins involved in the HR pathway, functional loss of NUCKS1 leads to a slow down in DNA replication fork progression with a concomitant increase in the utilization of new replication origins. Interestingly, recombinant NUCKS1 shares the same DNA binding preference as RAD51AP1, but binds to DNA with reduced affinity when compared to RAD51AP1. Finally, our results show that NUCKS1 is a chromatin-associated protein with a role in the DNA damage response and in HR, a DNA repair pathway critical for tumor suppression.« less

  18. NUCKS1 is a novel RAD51AP1 paralog important for homologous recombination and genome stability

    PubMed Central

    Parplys, Ann C.; Zhao, Weixing; Sharma, Neelam; Groesser, Torsten; Liang, Fengshan; Maranon, David G.; Leung, Stanley G.; Grundt, Kirsten; Dray, Eloïse; Idate, Rupa; Østvold, Anne Carine; Schild, David; Sung, Patrick; Wiese, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    NUCKS1 (nuclear casein kinase and cyclin-dependent kinase substrate 1) is a 27 kD chromosomal, vertebrate-specific protein, for which limited functional data exist. Here, we demonstrate that NUCKS1 shares extensive sequence homology with RAD51AP1 (RAD51 associated protein 1), suggesting that these two proteins are paralogs. Similar to the phenotypic effects of RAD51AP1 knockdown, we find that depletion of NUCKS1 in human cells impairs DNA repair by homologous recombination (HR) and chromosome stability. Depletion of NUCKS1 also results in greatly increased cellular sensitivity to mitomycin C (MMC), and in increased levels of spontaneous and MMC-induced chromatid breaks. NUCKS1 is critical to maintaining wild type HR capacity, and, as observed for a number of proteins involved in the HR pathway, functional loss of NUCKS1 leads to a slow down in DNA replication fork progression with a concomitant increase in the utilization of new replication origins. Interestingly, recombinant NUCKS1 shares the same DNA binding preference as RAD51AP1, but binds to DNA with reduced affinity when compared to RAD51AP1. Our results show that NUCKS1 is a chromatin-associated protein with a role in the DNA damage response and in HR, a DNA repair pathway critical for tumor suppression. PMID:26323318

  19. Molecular Basis for Enhancement of the Meiotic DMCI Recombinase by RAD51AP1

    SciTech Connect

    Dray, Eloise; Dunlop, Myun Hwa; Kauppi, Liisa; San Filippo, Joseph San; Wiese, Claudia; Tsai, Miaw-Sheue; Begovic, Sead; Schild, David; Jasin, Maria; Keeney, Scott; Sung, Patrick

    2010-11-05

    Homologous recombination is needed for meiotic chromosome segregation, genome maintenance, and tumor suppression. RAD51AP1 (RAD51 Associated Protein 1) has been shown to interact with and enhance the recombinase activity of RAD51. Accordingly, genetic ablation of RAD51AP1 leads to enhanced sensitivity to and also chromosome aberrations upon DNA damage, demonstrating a role for RAD51AP1 in mitotic homologous recombination. Here we show physical association of RAD51AP1 with the meiosis-specific recombinase DMC1 and a stimulatory effect of RAD51AP1 on the DMC1-mediated D-loop reaction. Mechanistic studies have revealed that RAD51AP1 enhances the ability of the DMC1 presynaptic filament to capture the duplex DNA partner and to assemble the synaptic complex, in which the recombining DNA strands are homologously aligned. We also provide evidence that functional co-operation is dependent on complex formation between DMC1 and RAD51AP1, and that distinct epitopes in RAD51AP1 mediate interactions with RAD51 and DMC1. Finally, we show that RAD51AP1 is expressed in mouse testes, and that RAD51AP1 foci co-localize with a subset of DMC1 foci in spermatocytes. These results suggest that RAD51AP1 also serves an important role in meiotic homologous recombination.

  20. FANCI-FANCD2 stabilizes the RAD51-DNA complex by binding RAD51 and protects the 5′-DNA end

    PubMed Central

    Sato, Koichi; Shimomuki, Mayo; Katsuki, Yoko; Takahashi, Daisuke; Kobayashi, Wataru; Ishiai, Masamichi; Miyoshi, Hiroyuki; Takata, Minoru; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    The FANCI-FANCD2 (I-D) complex is considered to work with RAD51 to protect the damaged DNA in the stalled replication fork. However, the means by which this DNA protection is accomplished have remained elusive. In the present study, we found that the I-D complex directly binds to RAD51, and stabilizes the RAD51-DNA filament. Unexpectedly, the DNA binding activity of FANCI, but not FANCD2, is explicitly required for the I-D complex-mediated RAD51-DNA filament stabilization. The RAD51 filament stabilized by the I-D complex actually protects the DNA end from nucleolytic degradation by an FA-associated nuclease, FAN1. This DNA end protection is not observed with the RAD51 mutant from FANCR patient cells. These results clearly answer the currently enigmatic question of how RAD51 functions with the I-D complex to prevent genomic instability at the stalled replication fork. PMID:27694619

  1. Chromatin architecture may dictate the target site for DMC1, but not for RAD51, during homologous pairing

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Wataru; Takaku, Motoki; Machida, Shinichi; Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Maehara, Kazumitsu; Ohkawa, Yasuyuki; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2016-01-01

    In eukaryotes, genomic DNA is compacted as chromatin, in which histones and DNA form the nucleosome as the basic unit. DMC1 and RAD51 are essential eukaryotic recombinases that mediate homologous chromosome pairing during homologous recombination. However, the means by which these two recombinases distinctly function in chromatin have remained elusive. Here we found that, in chromatin, the human DMC1-single-stranded DNA complex bypasses binding to the nucleosome, and preferentially promotes homologous pairing at the nucleosome-depleted regions. Consistently, DMC1 forms ternary complex recombination intermediates with the nucleosome-free DNA or the nucleosome-depleted DNA region. Surprisingly, removal of the histone tails improperly enhances the nucleosome binding by DMC1. In contrast, RAD51 does not specifically target the nucleosome-depleted region in chromatin. These are the first demonstrations that the chromatin architecture specifies the sites to promote the homologous recombination reaction by DMC1, but not by RAD51. PMID:27052786

  2. Rad51 and Rad52 Are Involved in Homologous Recombination of Replicating Herpes Simplex Virus DNA

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Ka-Wei; Norberg, Peter; Holmudden, Martin; Elias, Per; Liljeqvist, Jan-Åke

    2014-01-01

    Replication of herpes simplex virus 1 is coupled to recombination, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this process are poorly characterized. The role of Rad51 and Rad52 recombinases in viral recombination was examined in human fibroblast cells 1BR.3.N (wild type) and in GM16097 with replication defects caused by mutations in DNA ligase I. Intermolecular recombination between viruses, tsS and tsK, harboring genetic markers gave rise to ∼17% recombinants in both cell lines. Knock-down of Rad51 and Rad52 by siRNA reduced production of recombinants to 11% and 5%, respectively, in wild type cells and to 3% and 5%, respectively, in GM16097 cells. The results indicate a specific role for Rad51 and Rad52 in recombination of replicating herpes simplex virus 1 DNA. Mixed infections using clinical isolates with restriction enzyme polymorphisms in the US4 and US7 genes revealed recombination frequencies of 0.7%/kbp in wild type cells and 4%/kbp in GM16097 cells. Finally, tandem repeats in the US7 gene remained stable upon serial passage, indicating a high fidelity of recombination in infected cells. PMID:25365323

  3. Rad51 and Rad52 are involved in homologous recombination of replicating herpes simplex virus DNA.

    PubMed

    Tang, Ka-Wei; Norberg, Peter; Holmudden, Martin; Elias, Per; Liljeqvist, Jan-Åke

    2014-01-01

    Replication of herpes simplex virus 1 is coupled to recombination, but the molecular mechanisms underlying this process are poorly characterized. The role of Rad51 and Rad52 recombinases in viral recombination was examined in human fibroblast cells 1BR.3.N (wild type) and in GM16097 with replication defects caused by mutations in DNA ligase I. Intermolecular recombination between viruses, tsS and tsK, harboring genetic markers gave rise to ∼17% recombinants in both cell lines. Knock-down of Rad51 and Rad52 by siRNA reduced production of recombinants to 11% and 5%, respectively, in wild type cells and to 3% and 5%, respectively, in GM16097 cells. The results indicate a specific role for Rad51 and Rad52 in recombination of replicating herpes simplex virus 1 DNA. Mixed infections using clinical isolates with restriction enzyme polymorphisms in the US4 and US7 genes revealed recombination frequencies of 0.7%/kbp in wild type cells and 4%/kbp in GM16097 cells. Finally, tandem repeats in the US7 gene remained stable upon serial passage, indicating a high fidelity of recombination in infected cells.

  4. Association between the RAD51 135 G>C Polymorphism and Risk of Cancer: A Meta-Analysis of 19,068 Cases and 22,630 Controls

    PubMed Central

    He, Xiao-Feng; Li, An-Ping; Cai, Yong-Lin; Xu, Na; Sun, Shu-Mei; Wu, Bing-Yi

    2013-01-01

    Background RAD51 135G>C can modify promoter activity and the penetrance of BRCA1/2 mutations, which plays vital roles in the etiology of various cancer. To date, previous published data on the association between RAD51 135G>C polymorphism and cancer risk remained controversial. Recent meta-analysis only analyzed RAD51 135G>C polymorphism with breast cancer risk, but the results were also inconsistent. Methods A meta-analysis based on 39 case-control studies was performed to investigate the association between cancer susceptibility and RAD51 135G>C. Odds ratios (OR) with 95% confidence intervals (CIs) were used to assess the association in different inheritance models. Heterogeneity among studies was tested and sensitivity analysis was applied. Results Overall, no significant association was found between RAD51 135G>C polymorphism and cancer susceptibility in any genetic model. In further stratified analysis, significantly elevated breast cancer risk was observed in BRCA2 mutation carriers (recessive model: OR = 4.88, 95% CI = 1.10–21.67; additive model: OR = 4.92, 95% CI = 1.11–21.83). Conclusions This meta-analysis suggests that RAD51 variant 135C homozygote is associated with elevated breast cancer risk among BRCA2 mutation carriers. Moreover, our work also points out the importance of new studies for RAD51 135G>C association in acute myeloid leukemia, especially in Caucasians, where at least some of the covariates responsible for heterogeneity could be controlled, to obtain a more conclusive understanding about the function of the RAD51 135G>C polymorphism in cancer development. PMID:24040396

  5. Rad51c- and Trp53-double-mutant mouse model reveals common features of homologous recombination-deficient breast cancers.

    PubMed

    Tumiati, M; Munne, P M; Edgren, H; Eldfors, S; Hemmes, A; Kuznetsov, S G

    2016-09-01

    Almost half of all hereditary breast cancers (BCs) are associated with germ-line mutations in homologous recombination (HR) genes. However, the tumor phenotypes associated with different HR genes vary, making it difficult to define the role of HR in BC predisposition. To distinguish between HR-dependent and -independent features of BCs, we generated a mouse model in which an essential HR gene, Rad51c, is knocked-out specifically in epidermal tissues. Rad51c is one of the key mediators of HR and a well-known BC predisposition gene. Here, we demonstrate that deletion of Rad51c invariably requires inactivation of the Trp53 tumor suppressor (TP53 in humans) to produce mammary carcinomas in 63% of female mice. Nonetheless, loss of Rad51c shortens the latency of Trp53-deficient mouse tumors from 11 to 6 months. Remarkably, the histopathological features of Rad51c-deficient mammary carcinomas, such as expression of hormone receptors and luminal epithelial markers, faithfully recapitulate the histopathology of human RAD51C-mutated BCs. Similar to other BC models, Rad51c/p53 double-mutant mouse mammary tumors also reveal a propensity for genomic instability, but lack the focal amplification of the Met locus or distinct mutational signatures reported for other HR genes. Using the human mammary epithelial cell line MCF10A, we show that deletion of TP53 can rescue RAD51C-deficient cells from radiation-induced cellular senescence, whereas it exacerbates their centrosome amplification and nuclear abnormalities. Altogether, our data indicate that a trend for genomic instability and inactivation of Trp53 are common features of HR-mediated BCs, whereas histopathology and somatic mutation patterns are specific for different HR genes.

  6. Association between RAD 51 rs1801320 and susceptibility to glioblastoma.

    PubMed

    Franceschi, S; Tomei, S; Mazzanti, C M; Lessi, F; Aretini, P; La Ferla, M; De Gregorio, V; Pasqualetti, F; Zavaglia, K; Bevilacqua, G; Naccarato, A G

    2016-01-01

    Glioblastoma is the most common and aggressive malignant primary brain tumor. Despite decades of research and the advent of new therapies, patients with glioblastoma continue to have a very poor prognosis. Radiation therapy has a major role as adjuvant treatment for glioblastoma following surgical resection. Many studies have shown that polymorphisms of genes involved in pathways of DNA repair may affect the sensitivity of the cells to treatment. Although the role of these polymorphisms has been investigated in relation to response to radiotherapy, their role as predisposing factors to glioblastoma has not been clarified yet. In the present study, we evaluated the association between polymorphisms in DNA repair genes, namely: XRCC1 rs25487, XRCC3 rs861539 and RAD51 rs1801320, with the susceptibility to develop glioblastoma. Eighty-five glioblastoma patients and 70 matched controls were recruited for this study. Data from the 1000 Genomes Project (98 Tuscans) were also downloaded and used for the association analysis. Subjects carrying RAD51 rs1801320 GC genotype showed an increased risk of glioblastoma (GC vs GG, χ(2) = 10.75; OR 3.0087; p = 0.0010). The C allele was also significantly associated to glioblastoma (χ(2) = 8.66; OR 2.5674; p = 0.0032). Moreover, RAD51 rs1801320 C allele increased the risk to develop glioblastoma also when combined to XRCC1 rs25487 G allele and XRCC3 rs861539 C allele (χ(2) = 6.558; p = 0.0053).

  7. Combined effect of polymorphisms in Rad51 and Xrcc3 on breast cancer risk and chromosomal radiosensitivity.

    PubMed

    Vral, A; Willems, P; Claes, K; Poppe, B; Perletti, Gianpaolo; Thierens, H

    2011-01-01

    Enhanced in vitro chromosomal radiosensitivity (CRS) has been proposed as a marker for low-penetrance gene mutations predisposing to breast cancer (BC). Since the double strand break (DSB) is the most detrimental form of DNA damage induced by ionizing radiation, it is possible that mutations in genes encoding proteins involved in DSB repair affect breast cancer risk. The purpose of the present study was to examine whether five single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in Rad51 and Xrcc3 (rs1801320, rs1801321, rs1799796, rs861539 and rs1799794) exhibited an association with breast cancer susceptibility in a Belgian population of BC patients with a known or putative genetic predisposition. We also ascertained whether a relationship exists between the occurrence of the variant alleles of these variations and in vitro CRS. Blood samples were obtained from BC patients and from the control population that included healthy female individuals. Variations in the 5' UTR of Rad51 and Xrcc3 were genotyped, and statistical analysis was performed. The results showed that low-penetrant variations in Rad51 and Xrcc3, two proteins belonging to the homologous recombination DSB repair pathway, may modify BC risk in patients already carrying a pathological mutation in the highly penetrant BC genes BRCA1 and BRCA2. Combined risk genotype analysis revealed that Rad51 SNPs enhance BC risk in BRCA2 patients, whereas Xrcc3 SNPs significantly enhance BC risk in carriers of BRCA1 mutations and in patients with hereditary BC. When four putative risk genotypes of Rad51 and Xrcc3 were combined, positive significant odds ratios were obtained in the entire patient population and in patients with a hereditary history of disease. Although obtained from a limited number of patients, our data are supportive of a polygenic model whereby combinations of weak variations are responsible for an enhanced BC risk by acting jointly with high-penetrant mutations in BRCA1 or BRCA2.

  8. Chinese Herbal Mixture, Tien-Hsien Liquid, Induces G2/M Cycle Arrest and Radiosensitivity in MCF-7 Human Breast Cancer Cells through Mechanisms Involving DNMT1 and Rad51 Downregulation

    PubMed Central

    Chow, Jyh-Ming; Yang, Chia-Ming; Kuo, Hui-Ching; Chang, Chia-Lun; Lee, Hsin-Lun; Lai, I-Chun; Chuang, Shuang-En

    2016-01-01

    The Chinese herbal mixture, Tien-Hsien Liquid (THL), has been proven to suppress the growth and invasiveness of cancer cells and is currently regarded as a complementary medicine for the treatment of cancer. Our previous study using acute promyelocytic leukemia cells uncovered its effect on the downregulation of DNA methyltransferase 1 (DNMT1) which is often overexpressed in cancer cells resulting in the repression of tumor suppressors via hypermethylation. Herein, we explored the effects of THL in MCF-7 breast cancer cells that also demonstrate elevated DNMT1. The results show that THL dose-dependently downregulated DNMT1 accompanied by the induction of tumor suppressors such as p21 and p15. THL arrested cell cycle in G2/M phase and decreased the protein levels of cyclin A, cyclin B1, phospho-pRb, and AKT. DNMT1 inhibition was previously reported to exert a radiosensitizing effect in cancer cells through the repression of DNA repair. We found that THL enhanced radiation-induced clonogenic cell death in MCF-7 cells and decreased the level of DNA double-strand break repair protein, Rad51. Our observations may be the result of DNMT1 downregulation. Due to the fact that DNMT1 inhibition is now a mainstream strategy for anticancer therapy, further clinical trials of THL to confirm its clinical efficacy are warranted. PMID:27525019

  9. Rad51 Protein Expression and Survival in Patients with Glioblastoma Multiforme

    SciTech Connect

    Welsh, James W. Ellsworth, Ron K.; Kumar, Rachit; Fjerstad, Kyle; Martinez, Jesse; Nagel, Raymond B.; Eschbacher, Jennifer; Stea, Baldassarre

    2009-07-15

    Purpose: Treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) continues to pose a significant therapeutic challenge, with most tumors recurring within the previously irradiated tumor bed. To improve outcomes, we must be able to identify and treat resistant cell populations. Rad51, an enzyme involved in homologous recombinational repair, leads to increased resistance of tumor cells to cytotoxic treatments such as radiotherapy. We hypothesized that Rad51 might contribute to GBM's apparent radioresistance and consequently influence survival. Methods and Materials: A total of 68 patients with an initial diagnosis of GBM were retrospectively evaluated; for 10 of these patients, recurrent tumor specimens were used to construct a tissue microarray. Rad51 protein expression was then correlated with the actual and predicted survival using recursive partitioning analysis. Results: Rad51 protein was elevated in 53% of the GBM specimens at surgery. The Rad51 levels correlated directly with survival, with a median survival of 15 months for patients with elevated Rad51 compared with 9 months for patients with low or absent levels of Rad51 (p = .05). At disease recurrence, 70% of patients had additional increases in Rad51 protein. Increased Rad51 levels at disease recurrence similarly predicted for improved overall survival, with a mean survival of 16 months from the second craniotomy compared with only 4 months for patients with low Rad51 levels (p = .13). Conclusion: Elevated levels of the double-stranded DNA repair protein Rad51 predicted for an increase survival duration in patients with GBM, at both initial tumor presentation and disease recurrence.

  10. Nap1 stimulates homologous recombination by RAD51 and RAD54 in higher-ordered chromatin containing histone H1.

    PubMed

    Machida, Shinichi; Takaku, Motoki; Ikura, Masae; Sun, Jiying; Suzuki, Hidekazu; Kobayashi, Wataru; Kinomura, Aiko; Osakabe, Akihisa; Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Horikoshi, Yasunori; Fukuto, Atsuhiko; Matsuda, Ryo; Ura, Kiyoe; Tashiro, Satoshi; Ikura, Tsuyoshi; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2014-05-06

    Homologous recombination plays essential roles in mitotic DNA double strand break (DSB) repair and meiotic genetic recombination. In eukaryotes, RAD51 promotes the central homologous-pairing step during homologous recombination, but is not sufficient to overcome the reaction barrier imposed by nucleosomes. RAD54, a member of the ATP-dependent nucleosome remodeling factor family, is required to promote the RAD51-mediated homologous pairing in nucleosomal DNA. In higher eukaryotes, most nucleosomes form higher-ordered chromatin containing the linker histone H1. However, the mechanism by which RAD51/RAD54-mediated homologous pairing occurs in higher-ordered chromatin has not been elucidated. In this study, we found that a histone chaperone, Nap1, accumulates on DSB sites in human cells, and DSB repair is substantially decreased in Nap1-knockdown cells. We determined that Nap1 binds to RAD54, enhances the RAD54-mediated nucleosome remodeling by evicting histone H1, and eventually stimulates the RAD51-mediated homologous pairing in higher-ordered chromatin containing histone H1.

  11. RAD51, XRCC3, and XRCC2 mutation screening in Finnish breast cancer families.

    PubMed

    Pelttari, Liisa M; Kiiski, Johanna I; Ranta, Salla; Vilske, Sara; Blomqvist, Carl; Aittomäki, Kristiina; Nevanlinna, Heli

    2015-01-01

    Majority of the known breast cancer susceptibility genes have a role in DNA repair and the most important high-risk genes BRCA1 and BRCA2 are specifically involved in the homologous recombination repair (HRR) of DNA double-strand breaks. A central player in HRR is RAD51 that binds DNA at the damage site. The RAD51 paralogs RAD51B, RAD51C, RAD51D, XRCC2, and XRCC3 facilitate the binding of RAD51 to DNA. While germline mutations in RAD51C and RAD51D are associated with high ovarian cancer risk and RAD51B polymorphisms with breast cancer, the contribution of RAD51, XRCC3, and XRCC2 is more unclear. To investigate the role of RAD51, XRCC3, and XRCC2 in breast cancer predisposition and to identify putative recurrent founder mutations in the Finnish population where such mutations have been observed in most of the currently known susceptibility genes, we screened 182 familial Finnish breast or ovarian cancer patients for germline variation in the RAD51and XRCC3 genes and 342 patients for variation in XRCC2, with a subset of the patients selected on the basis of decreased RAD51 protein expression on tumors. We also performed haplotype analyses for 1516 breast cancer cases and 1234 controls to assess the common variation in these genes. No pathogenic mutations were detected in any of the genes and the distribution of haplotypes was similar between cases and controls. Our results suggest that RAD51, XRCC3, and XRCC2 do not substantially contribute to breast cancer predisposition in the Finnish population.

  12. DrRad51 is required for chiasmata formation in meiosis in planarian Dugesia ryukyuensis.

    PubMed

    Chinone, Ayako; Matsumoto, Midori

    2014-05-01

    Rad51, a conserved eukaryotic protein, mediates the homologous-recombination repair of DNA double-strand breaks that occur during both mitosis and meiosis. During prophase I of meiosis, homologous recombination enhances the linkage between homologous chromosomes to increase the accuracy of segregation at anaphase I. In polyploidy situations, however, difficulties with homologous chromosome segregation often disrupt meiosis. Yet, triploid individuals of the planarian Dugesia ryukyuensis are able to produce functional gametes through a specialized form of meiosis. To shed light on the molecular mechanisms that promote successful meiosis in triploid D. ryukyuensis, we investigated rad51 gene function. We isolated three genes of the Rad51 family, the Rad51 homolog Dr-rad51 and the Rad51 paralogs Dr-rad51B and Dr-rad51C. Dr-rad51 was expressed in germ-line and presumably in somatic stem cells, but was not necessary for the regeneration of somatic tissue. RNA-interference (RNAi) depletion of Dr-rad51 during sexualization did not affect chromosome behavior in zygotene oocytes, but did result in the loss of chiasmata at the diplotene stage. Thus, homologous recombination does not appear to be necessary for synapsis, but is needed for crossover and proper segregation in D. ryukyuensis.

  13. Role for Caspase-Mediated Cleavage of Rad51 in Induction of Apoptosis by DNA Damage

    PubMed Central

    Huang, YinYin; Nakada, Shuji; Ishiko, Takatoshi; Utsugisawa, Taiju; Datta, Rakesh; Kharbanda, Surender; Yoshida, Kiyotsugu; Talanian, Robert V.; Weichselbaum, Ralph; Kufe, Donald; Yuan, Zhi-Min

    1999-01-01

    We report here that the Rad51 recombinase is cleaved in mammalian cells during the induction of apoptosis by ionizing radiation (IR) exposure. The results demonstrate that IR induces Rad51 cleavage by a caspase-dependent mechanism. Further support for involvement of caspases is provided by the finding that IR-induced proteolysis of Rad51 is inhibited by Ac-DEVD-CHO. In vitro studies show that Rad51 is cleaved by caspase 3 at a DVLD/N site. Stable expression of a Rad51 mutant in which the aspartic acid residues were mutated to alanines (AVLA/N) confirmed that the DVLD/N site is responsible for the cleavage of Rad51 in IR-induced apoptosis. The functional significance of Rad51 proteolysis is supported by the finding that, unlike intact Rad51, the N- and C-terminal cleavage products fail to exhibit recombinase activity. In cells, overexpression of the Rad51(D-A) mutant had no effect on activation of caspase 3 but did abrogate in part the apoptotic response to IR exposure. We conclude that proteolytic inactivation of Rad51 by a caspase-mediated mechanism contributes to the cell death response induced by DNA damage. PMID:10082566

  14. Disruption of Brca2-Rad51 Complex in Breast Cancer Cells: Therapeutic Implications

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-09-01

    Rad51B, Rad51 C, Rad51D,Xrcc2and Xrcc3 ) and the breast cancer associated proteins,BRCAI and BRCA2. Defective cell lines in each of the above...Aloyz recombination from the structure of a RAD5 I-BRCA2 complex. Nature 2002, 420, 287-293. 5. Xu ZY, Loignon M, Han FY, Panasci L, Aloyz R.. Xrcc3

  15. Curcumin enhances the mitomycin C-induced cytotoxicity via downregulation of MKK1/2-ERK1/2-mediated Rad51 expression in non-small cell lung cancer cells

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, Jen-Chung; Tsai, Min-Shao; Weng, Shao-Hsing; Kuo, Ya-Hsun; Chiu, Yu-Fan; Lin, Yun-Wei

    2011-09-15

    Curcumin (diferuloylmethane), a major active component of turmeric (Curcuma longa), has been reported to suppress the proliferation of a wide variety of tumor cells. Rad51 is a key protein in the homologous recombination (HR) pathway of DNA double-strand break repair, and HR represents a novel target for cancer therapy. A high expression of Rad51 has been reported in chemo- or radio-resistant carcinomas. Therefore, in the current study, we will examine whether curcumin could enhance the effects of mitomycin C (MMC), a DNA interstrand cross-linking agent, to induce cytotoxicity by decreasing Rad51 expression. Exposure of two human non-small lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines (A549 and H1975) to curcumin could suppress MMC-induced MKK1/2-ERK1/2 signal activation and Rad51 protein expression. Enhancement of ERK1/2 activation by constitutively active MKK1/2 (MKK1/2-CA) increased Rad51 protein levels in curcumin and MMC co-treated human lung cells. Moreover, the synergistic cytotoxic effect induced by curcumin combined with MMC was decreased by MKK1-CA-mediated enhancement of ERK1/2 activation by a significant degree. In contrast, MKK1/2 inhibitor, U0126 was shown to augment the cytotoxicity of curcumin and MMC through downregulation of ERK1/2 activation and Rad51 expression. Depletion of endogenous Rad51 expression by siRad51 RNA transfection significantly enhanced MMC and/or curcumin induced cell death and cell growth inhibition. In contrast, an overexpression of Rad51 protected lung cancer cells from synergistic cytotoxic effects induced by curcumin and MMC. We concluded that Rad51 inhibition may be an additional action mechanism for enhancing the chemosensitization of MMC by curcumin in NSCLC. - Highlights: > Curcumin downregulates MKK-ERK-mediated Rad51 expression. > Curcumin enhances mitomycin C-induced cytotoxicity. > Rad51 protects cells from cytotoxic effects induced by curcumin and mitomycin C. > Rad51 inhibition enhances the chemosensitization of mitomycin C by

  16. A peptide nucleic acid targeting nuclear RAD51 sensitizes multiple myeloma cells to melphalan treatment

    PubMed Central

    Alagpulinsa, David Abasiwani; Yaccoby, Shmuel; Ayyadevara, Srinivas; Shmookler Reis, Robert Joseph

    2015-01-01

    RAD51-mediated recombinational repair is elevated in multiple myeloma (MM) and predicts poor prognosis. RAD51 has been targeted to selectively sensitize and/or kill tumor cells. Here, we employed a peptide nucleic acid (PNA) to inhibit RAD51 expression in MM cells. We constructed a PNA complementary to a unique segment of the RAD51 gene promoter, spanning the transcription start site, and conjugated it to a nuclear localization signal (PKKKRKV) to enhance cellular uptake and nuclear delivery without transfection reagents. This synthetic construct, (PNArad51_nls), significantly reduced RAD51 transcripts in MM cells, and markedly reduced the number and intensity of de novo and melphalan-induced nuclear RAD51 foci, while increasing the level of melphalan-induced γH2AX foci. Melphalan alone markedly induced the expression of 5 other genes involved in homologous-recombination repair, yet suppression of RAD51 by PNArad51_nls was sufficient to synergize with melphalan, producing significant synthetic lethality of MM cells in vitro. In a SCID-rab mouse model mimicking the MM bone marrow microenvironment, treatment with PNArad51_nls ± melphalan significantly suppressed tumor growth after 2 weeks, whereas melphalan plus control PNArad4µ_nls was ineffectual. This study highlights the importance of RAD51 in myeloma growth and is the first to demonstrate that anti-RAD51 PNA can potentiate conventional MM chemotherapy. PMID:25996477

  17. Estrogen induces RAD51C expression and localization to sites of DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Alayev, Anya; Salamon, Rachel S; Manna, Subrata; Schwartz, Naomi S; Berman, Adi Y; Holz, Marina K

    2016-12-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a conserved process that maintains genome stability and cell survival by repairing DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). The RAD51-related family of proteins is involved in repair of DSBs; consequently, deregulation of RAD51 causes chromosomal rearrangements and stimulates tumorigenesis. RAD51C has been identified as a potential tumor suppressor and a breast and ovarian cancer susceptibility gene. Recent studies have also implicated estrogen as a DNA-damaging agent that causes DSBs. We found that in ERα-positive breast cancer cells, estrogen transcriptionally regulates RAD51C expression in ERα-dependent mechanism. Moreover, estrogen induces RAD51C assembly into nuclear foci at DSBs, which is a precursor to RAD51 complex recruitment to the nucleus. Additionally, disruption of ERα signaling by either anti-estrogens or siRNA prevented estrogen induced upregulation of RAD51C. We have also found an association of a worse clinical outcome between RAD51C expression and ERα status of tumors. These findings provide insight into the mechanism of genomic instability in ERα-positive breast cancer and suggest that individuals with mutations in RAD51C that are exposed to estrogen would be more susceptible to accumulation of DNA damage, leading to cancer progression.

  18. Correlation between selected XRCC2, XRCC3 and RAD51 gene polymorphisms and primary breast cancer in women in Pakistan.

    PubMed

    Qureshi, Z; Mahjabeen, I; Baig, Rm; Kayani, Ma

    2014-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms in homologous recombination repair genes cause an abnormal development of cancerous cells. In the present study we evaluated the possibility of breast cancer association with single nucleotide polymorphisms of RAD51, XRCC2 and XRCC3 genes. Polymorphisms selected in this study were RAD51 135G/C, XRCC2 Arg188His; and XRCC3 Thr241Met. Each polymorphism was genotyped using Polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism in study cohort of 306 females (156 breast cancer patients and 150 controls). We observed that heterozygous variant genotype (GC) of RAD51 135 G/C polymorphism was associated with a significantly (OR=2.70; 95%CI (0.63-1.79); p<0.03) increased risk of breast cancer. In case of the XRCC3 gene we observed that frequency of heterozygous (OR=2.88; 95%CI (1.02-8.14); p<0.02) and homozygous (OR=1.46; 95%CI (0.89-2.40); p<0.04) genotype of Thr241Met polymorphism were significantly higher in breast cancer patients. For the Arg188His polymorphism of XRCC2, ~2fold increase in breast cancer risk (OR=1.6, 95%CI = 0.73-3.50) was associated with GA genotype with a p value for trend of 0.03. Our results suggest that the 135G/C polymorphism of the RAD51, Thr241Met polymorphism of XRCC3 and Arg188His polymorphism of XRCC2 can be independent markers of breast cancer risk in Pakistan.

  19. Oleandrin induces DNA damage responses in cancer cells by suppressing the expression of Rad51

    PubMed Central

    Bao, Zhengqiang; Tian, Baoping; Wang, Xiaohui; Feng, Hanrong; Liang, Ye; Chen, Zhihua; Li, Wen; Shen, Huahao; Ying, Songmin

    2016-01-01

    Oleandrin is a monomeric compound extracted from leaves and seeds of Nerium oleander. It had been reported that oleandrin could effectively inhibit the growth of human cancer cells. However, the specific mechanisms of the oleandrin-induced anti-tumor effects remain largely unclear. Genomic instability is one of the main features of cancer cells, it can be the combined effect of DNA damage and tumour-specific DNA repair defects. DNA damage plays important roles during tumorigenesis. In fact, most of the current chemotherapy agents were designed to kill cancer cells by inducing DNA damage. In this study, we found that oleandrin was effective to induce apoptosis in cancer cells, and cause rapid DNA damage response, represented by nuclear RPA (Replication Protein A, a single strand DNA binding protein) and γH2AX(a marker for DNA double strand breaks) foci formation. Interestingly, expression of RAD51, a key protein involved in homologous recombination (HR), was suppressed while XRCC1 was up-regulated in oleandrin treated cancer cells. These results suggested that XRCC1 may play a predominant role in repairing oleandrin-induced DNA damage. Collectively, oleandrin may be a potential anti-tumor agent by suppressing the expression of Rad51. PMID:27449097

  20. Yeast Mph1 helicase dissociates Rad51-made D-loops: implications for crossover control in mitotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Prakash, Rohit; Satory, Dominik; Dray, Eloïse; Papusha, Almas; Scheller, Jürgen; Kramer, Wilfried; Krejci, Lumir; Klein, Hannah; Haber, James E; Sung, Patrick; Ira, Grzegorz

    2009-01-01

    Eukaryotes possess mechanisms to limit crossing over during homologous recombination, thus avoiding possible chromosomal rearrangements. We show here that budding yeast Mph1, an ortholog of human FancM helicase, utilizes its helicase activity to suppress spontaneous unequal sister chromatid exchanges and DNA double-strand break-induced chromosome crossovers. Since the efficiency and kinetics of break repair are unaffected, Mph1 appears to channel repair intermediates into a noncrossover pathway. Importantly, Mph1 works independently of two other helicases-Srs2 and Sgs1-that also attenuate crossing over. By chromatin immunoprecipitation, we find targeting of Mph1 to double-strand breaks in cells. Purified Mph1 binds D-loop structures and is particularly adept at unwinding these structures. Importantly, Mph1, but not a helicase-defective variant, dissociates Rad51-made D-loops. Overall, the results from our analyses suggest a new role of Mph1 in promoting the noncrossover repair of DNA double-strand breaks.

  1. Polymorphisms of Homologous Recombination RAD51, RAD51B, XRCC2, and XRCC3 Genes and the Risk of Prostate Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Nowacka-Zawisza, Maria; Wiśnik, Ewelina; Wasilewski, Andrzej; Skowrońska, Milena; Forma, Ewa; Bryś, Magdalena; Różański, Waldemar; Krajewska, Wanda M.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms in DNA repair genes may induce individual variations in DNA repair capacity, which may in turn contribute to the risk of cancer developing. Homologous recombination repair (HRR) plays a critical role in maintaining chromosomal integrity and protecting against carcinogenic factors. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between prostate cancer risk and the presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genes involved in HRR, that is, RAD51 (rs1801320 and rs1801321), RAD51B (rs10483813 and rs3784099), XRCC2 (rs3218536), and XRCC3 (rs861539). Polymorphisms were analyzed by PCR-RFLP and Real-Time PCR in 101 patients with prostate adenocarcinoma and 216 age- and sex-matched controls. A significant relationship was detected between the RAD51 gene rs1801320 polymorphism and increased prostate cancer risk. Our results indicate that the RAD51 gene rs1801320 polymorphism may contribute to prostate cancer susceptibility in Poland. PMID:26339569

  2. Polymorphisms of homologous recombination RAD51, RAD51B, XRCC2, and XRCC3 genes and the risk of prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Nowacka-Zawisza, Maria; Wiśnik, Ewelina; Wasilewski, Andrzej; Skowrońska, Milena; Forma, Ewa; Bryś, Magdalena; Różański, Waldemar; Krajewska, Wanda M

    2015-01-01

    Genetic polymorphisms in DNA repair genes may induce individual variations in DNA repair capacity, which may in turn contribute to the risk of cancer developing. Homologous recombination repair (HRR) plays a critical role in maintaining chromosomal integrity and protecting against carcinogenic factors. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the relationship between prostate cancer risk and the presence of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the genes involved in HRR, that is, RAD51 (rs1801320 and rs1801321), RAD51B (rs10483813 and rs3784099), XRCC2 (rs3218536), and XRCC3 (rs861539). Polymorphisms were analyzed by PCR-RFLP and Real-Time PCR in 101 patients with prostate adenocarcinoma and 216 age- and sex-matched controls. A significant relationship was detected between the RAD51 gene rs1801320 polymorphism and increased prostate cancer risk. Our results indicate that the RAD51 gene rs1801320 polymorphism may contribute to prostate cancer susceptibility in Poland.

  3. Meiotic recombination in Arabidopsis is catalysed by DMC1, with RAD51 playing a supporting role.

    PubMed

    Da Ines, Olivier; Degroote, Fabienne; Goubely, Chantal; Amiard, Simon; Gallego, Maria E; White, Charles I

    2013-01-01

    Recombination establishes the chiasmata that physically link pairs of homologous chromosomes in meiosis, ensuring their balanced segregation at the first meiotic division and generating genetic variation. The visible manifestation of genetic crossing-overs, chiasmata are the result of an intricate and tightly regulated process involving induction of DNA double-strand breaks and their repair through invasion of a homologous template DNA duplex, catalysed by RAD51 and DMC1 in most eukaryotes. We describe here a RAD51-GFP fusion protein that retains the ability to assemble at DNA breaks but has lost its DNA break repair capacity. This protein fully complements the meiotic chromosomal fragmentation and sterility of Arabidopsis rad51, but not rad51 dmc1 mutants. Even though DMC1 is the only active meiotic strand transfer protein in the absence of RAD51 catalytic activity, no effect on genetic map distance was observed in complemented rad51 plants. The presence of inactive RAD51 nucleofilaments is thus able to fully support meiotic DSB repair and normal levels of crossing-over by DMC1. Our data demonstrate that RAD51 plays a supporting role for DMC1 in meiotic recombination in the flowering plant, Arabidopsis.

  4. FBH1 helicase disrupts RAD51 filaments in vitro and modulates homologous recombination in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Simandlova, Jitka; Zagelbaum, Jennifer; Payne, Miranda J; Chu, Wai Kit; Shevelev, Igor; Hanada, Katsuhiro; Chatterjee, Sujoy; Reid, Dylan A; Liu, Ying; Janscak, Pavel; Rothenberg, Eli; Hickson, Ian D

    2013-11-22

    Efficient repair of DNA double strand breaks and interstrand cross-links requires the homologous recombination (HR) pathway, a potentially error-free process that utilizes a homologous sequence as a repair template. A key player in HR is RAD51, the eukaryotic ortholog of bacterial RecA protein. RAD51 can polymerize on DNA to form a nucleoprotein filament that facilitates both the search for the homologous DNA sequences and the subsequent DNA strand invasion required to initiate HR. Because of its pivotal role in HR, RAD51 is subject to numerous positive and negative regulatory influences. Using a combination of molecular genetic, biochemical, and single-molecule biophysical techniques, we provide mechanistic insight into the mode of action of the FBH1 helicase as a regulator of RAD51-dependent HR in mammalian cells. We show that FBH1 binds directly to RAD51 and is able to disrupt RAD51 filaments on DNA through its ssDNA translocase function. Consistent with this, a mutant mouse embryonic stem cell line with a deletion in the FBH1 helicase domain fails to limit RAD51 chromatin association and shows hyper-recombination. Our data are consistent with FBH1 restraining RAD51 DNA binding under unperturbed growth conditions to prevent unwanted or unscheduled DNA recombination.

  5. Targeted disruption of the Rad51 gene leads to lethality in embryonic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Tsuzuki, T; Fujii, Y; Sakumi, K; Tominaga, Y; Nakao, K; Sekiguchi, M; Matsushiro, A; Yoshimura, Y; MoritaT

    1996-01-01

    The mouse Rad51 gene is a mammalian homologue of the Escherichia coli recA and yeast RAD51 genes, both of which are involved in homologous recombination and DNA repair. To elucidate the physiological role of RAD51 protein, the gene was targeted in embryonic stem (ES) cells. Mice heterozygous for the Rad51 null mutation were intercrossed and their offspring were genotyped. There were no homozygous (Rad51-/-) pups among 148 neonates examined but a few Rad51-/- embryos were identified when examined during the early stages of embryonic development. Doubly knocked-out ES cells were not detected under conditions of selective growth. These results are interpreted to mean that RAD51 protein plays an essential role in the proliferation of cell. The homozygous Rad51 null mutation can be categorized in cell-autonomous defects. Pre-implantational lethal mutations that disrupt basic molecular functions will thus interfere with cell viability. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:8692798

  6. ER stress suppresses DNA double-strand break repair and sensitizes tumor cells to ionizing radiation by stimulating proteasomal degradation of Rad51.

    PubMed

    Yamamori, Tohru; Meike, Shunsuke; Nagane, Masaki; Yasui, Hironobu; Inanami, Osamu

    2013-10-11

    In this study, we provide evidence that endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress suppresses DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair and increases radiosensitivity of tumor cells by altering Rad51 levels. We show that the ER stress inducer tunicamycin stimulates selective degradation of Rad51 via the 26S proteasome, impairing DSB repair and enhancing radiosensitivity in human lung cancer A549 cells. We also found that glucose deprivation, which is a physiological inducer of ER stress, triggered similar events. These findings suggest that ER stress caused by the intratumoral environment influences tumor radiosensitivity, and that it has potential as a novel target to improve cancer radiotherapy.

  7. Association of RAD 51 135 G/C, 172 G/T and XRCC3 Thr241Met gene polymorphisms with increased risk of head and neck cancer.

    PubMed

    Kayani, Mahmood Akhtar; Khan, Sumeera; Baig, Ruqia Mehmood; Mahjabeen, Ishrat

    2014-01-01

    Homologous recombination repair (HRR) plays an important role in protection against carcinogenic factors. Genes regulating the HRR mechanisms may impair their functions and consequently result in increased cancer susceptibility. RAD 51 and XRCC3 are key regulators of the HRR pathway and genetic variability in these may contribute to the appearance and progression of various cancers including head and neck cancer (HNC). The aim of the present study was to compare the distribution of genotypes of RAD51 (135G/C, 172 G/T) and XRCC3 (Thr241Met) polymorphisms between HNC patients and controls. Each polymorphism was genotyped using the polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymerase (PCR-RFLP) technique in 200 pathologically confirmed HNC patients along with 150 blood samples from normal, disease free healthy individuals. We observed that homozygous variant CC genotype of RAD51 135G/C was associated with a 2.5 fold increased HNC risk (OR=2.5; 95%CI=0.69-9.53; p<0.02), while second polymorphism of RAD 51 172 G/T, heterozygous variant GT genotype was associated with a 1.68 fold (OR=1.68; 95%CI=1.08-2.61; p<0.02) elevation when compared with controls. In the case of the Thr241Met polymorphism of XRCC3, we observed a 16 fold (OR=16; 95% CI= 3.78-69.67; p<0.0002) increased HNC risk in patients compared to controls. These results further suggested that RAD51 (135G/C, 172 G/T) and XRCC3 (Thr241Met) polymorphisms may be effective biomarkers for genetic susceptibility to HNC. Larger studies are needed to confirm our findings and identify the underlying mechanisms.

  8. Overlapping mechanisms promote postsynaptic RAD-51 filament disassembly during meiotic double-strand break repair.

    PubMed

    Ward, Jordan D; Muzzini, Diego M; Petalcorin, Mark I R; Martinez-Perez, Enrique; Martin, Julie S; Plevani, Paolo; Cassata, Giuseppe; Marini, Federica; Boulton, Simon J

    2010-01-29

    Homologous recombination (HR) is essential for repair of meiotic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). Although the mechanisms of RAD-51-DNA filament assembly and strand exchange are well characterized, the subsequent steps of HR are less well defined. Here, we describe a synthetic lethal interaction between the C. elegans helicase helq-1 and RAD-51 paralog rfs-1, which results in a block to meiotic DSB repair after strand invasion. Whereas RAD-51-ssDNA filaments assemble at meiotic DSBs with normal kinetics in helq-1, rfs-1 double mutants, persistence of RAD-51 foci and genetic interactions with rtel-1 suggest a failure to disassemble RAD-51 from strand invasion intermediates. Indeed, purified HELQ-1 and RFS-1 independently bind to and promote the disassembly of RAD-51 from double-stranded, but not single-stranded, DNA filaments via distinct mechanisms in vitro. These results indicate that two compensating activities are required to promote postsynaptic RAD-51 filament disassembly, which are collectively essential for completion of meiotic DSB repair.

  9. The host factor RAD51 is involved in mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV) DNA replication.

    PubMed

    Suyal, Geetika; Mukherjee, Sunil K; Choudhury, Nirupam R

    2013-09-01

    Geminiviruses replicate their single-stranded genomes with the help of only a few viral factors and various host cellular proteins primarily by rolling-circle replication (RCR) and/or recombination-dependent replication. AtRAD51 has been identified, using the phage display technique, as a host factor that potentially interacts with the Rep protein of mungbean yellow mosaic India virus (MYMIV), a member of the genus Begomovirus. In this study, we demonstrate the interaction between MYMIV Rep and a host factor, AtRAD51, using yeast two-hybrid and β-galactosidase assays, and this interaction was confirmed using a co-immunoprecipitation assay. The AtRAD51 protein complemented the rad51∆ mutation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae in an ex vivo yeast-based geminivirus DNA replication restoration assay. The semiquantitative RT-PCR and northern hybridization data revealed a higher level of expression of the Rad51 transcript in MYMIV-infected mungbean than in uninfected, healthy plants. Our findings provide evidence for a possible cross-talk between RAD51 and MYMIV Rep, which essentially controls viral DNA replication in plants, presumably in conjunction with other host factors. The present study demonstrates for the first time the involvement of a eukaryotic RAD51 protein in MYMIV replication, and this is expected to shed light on the machinery involved in begomovirus DNA replication.

  10. Modulation of Saccharomyces Cerevisiae DNA Double-Strand Break Repair by Srs2 and Rad51

    PubMed Central

    Milne, G. T.; Ho, T.; Weaver, D. T.

    1995-01-01

    RAD52 function is required for virtually all DNA double-strand break repair and recombination events in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. To gain greater insight into the mechanism of RAD52-mediated repair, we screened for genes that suppress partially active alleles of RAD52 when mutant or overexpressed. Described here is the isolation of a phenotypic null allele of SRS2 that suppressed multiple alleles of RAD52 (rad52B, rad52D, rad52-1 and KlRAD52) and RAD51 (KlRAD51) but failed to suppress either a rad52δ or a rad51δ. These results indicate that SRS2 antagonizes RAD51 and RAD52 function in recombinational repair. The mechanism of suppression of RAD52 alleles by srs2 is distinct from that which has been previously described for RAD51 overexpression, as both conditions were shown to act additively with respect to the rad52B allele. Furthermore, overexpression of either RAD52 or RAD51 enhanced the recombination-dependent sensitivity of an srs2δ RAD52 strain, suggesting that RAD52 and RAD51 positively influence recombinational repair mechanisms. Thus, RAD52-dependent recombinational repair is controlled both negatively and positively. PMID:7768432

  11. Mek1 Down Regulates Rad51 Activity during Yeast Meiosis by Phosphorylation of Hed1

    PubMed Central

    Callender, Tracy L.; Laljee, Saif; Zhou, Sai; Suhandynata, Ray T.; Gaines, William A.; Kwon, YoungHo; Börner, G. Valentin; Nicolas, Alain; Neiman, Aaron M.

    2016-01-01

    During meiosis, programmed double strand breaks (DSBs) are repaired preferentially between homologs to generate crossovers that promote proper chromosome segregation at Meiosis I. In many organisms, there are two strand exchange proteins, Rad51 and the meiosis-specific Dmc1, required for interhomolog (IH) bias. This bias requires the presence, but not the strand exchange activity of Rad51, while Dmc1 is responsible for the bulk of meiotic recombination. How these activities are regulated is less well established. In dmc1Δ mutants, Rad51 is actively inhibited, thereby resulting in prophase arrest due to unrepaired DSBs triggering the meiotic recombination checkpoint. This inhibition is dependent upon the meiosis-specific kinase Mek1 and occurs through two different mechanisms that prevent complex formation with the Rad51 accessory factor Rad54: (i) phosphorylation of Rad54 by Mek1 and (ii) binding of Rad51 by the meiosis-specific protein Hed1. An open question has been why inhibition of Mek1 affects Hed1 repression of Rad51. This work shows that Hed1 is a direct substrate of Mek1. Phosphorylation of Hed1 at threonine 40 helps suppress Rad51 activity in dmc1Δ mutants by promoting Hed1 protein stability. Rad51-mediated recombination occurring in the absence of Hed1 phosphorylation results in a significant increase in non-exchange chromosomes despite wild-type levels of crossovers, confirming previous results indicating a defect in crossover assurance. We propose that Rad51 function in meiosis is regulated in part by the coordinated phosphorylation of Rad54 and Hed1 by Mek1. PMID:27483004

  12. Xrcc3 induces cisplatin resistance by stimulation of Rad51-related recombinational repair, S-phase checkpoint activation, and reduced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Xu, Zhi-Yuan; Loignon, Martin; Han, Fei-Yu; Panasci, Lawrence; Aloyz, Raquel

    2005-08-01

    Eukaryotic cells respond to DNA damage by activation of DNA repair, cell cycle arrest, and apoptosis. Several reports suggest that such responses may be coordinated by communication between damage repair proteins and proteins signaling other cellular responses. The Rad51-guided homologous recombination repair system plays an important role in the recognition and repair of DNA interstrand crosslinks (ICLs), and cells deficient in this repair pathway become hypersensitive to ICL-inducing agents such as cisplatin and melphalan. We investigated the possible role of the Rad51-paralog protein Xrcc3 in drug resistance. Xrcc3 overexpression in MCF-7 cells resulted in 1) a 2- to 6-fold resistance to cisplatin/melphalan, 2) a 2-fold increase in drug-induced Rad51 foci, 3) an increased cisplatin-induced S-phase arrest, 4) decreased cisplatin-induced apoptosis, and 5) increased cisplatin-induced DNA synthesis arrest. Interestingly, Xrcc3 overexpression did not alter the doubling time or cell cycle progression in the absence of DNA damage. Furthermore, Xrcc3 overexpression is associated with increased Rad51C protein levels consistent with the known interaction of these two proteins. Our results demonstrate that Xrcc3 is an important factor in DNA cross-linking drug resistance in human tumor cells and suggest that the response of the homologous recombinational repair machinery and cell cycle checkpoints to DNA cross-linking agents is intertwined.

  13. DNA repair and cytotoxic drugs: the potential role of RAD51 in clinical outcome of non-small-cell lung cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Nogueira, Augusto; Assis, Joana; Catarino, Raquel; Medeiros, Rui

    2013-04-01

    Many of the cytotoxic drugs used in the treatment of non-small-cell lung carcinoma patients can interfere with DNA activity and the definition of an individual DNA repair profile could be a key strategy to achieve better response to chemotherapeutic treatment. Although DNA repair mechanisms are important factors in the prevention of carcinogenesis, these molecular pathways are also involved in therapy response. RAD51 is a crucial element in DNA repair by homologous recombination and has been shown to interfere with the prognosis of patients treated with chemoradiotherapy. There is increasing evidence that genetic polymorphisms in repair enzymes can influence DNA repair capacity and, consequently, affect chemotherapy efficacy. We conducted this review to show the possible influence of the RAD51 genetic variants in damage repair capacity and treatment response in non-small-cell lung carcinoma patients.

  14. The role of Rad51 in safeguarding mitochondrial activity during the meiotic cell cycle in mammalian oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyeoung-Hwa; Park, Ji-Hoon; Kim, Eun-Young; Ko, Jung-Jae; Park, Kyung-Soon; Lee, Kyung-Ah

    2016-01-01

    Rad51 is a conserved eukaryotic protein that mediates the homologous recombination repair of DNA double-strand breaks that occur during mitosis and meiosis. In addition, Rad51 promotes mitochondrial DNA synthesis when replication stress is increased. Rad51 also regulates cell cycle progression by preserving the G2/M transition in embryonic stem cells. In this study, we report a novel function of Rad51 in regulating mitochondrial activity during in vitro maturation of mouse oocytes. Suppression of Rad51 by injection of Rad51 dsRNA into germinal vesicle-stage oocytes resulted in arrest of meiosis in metaphase I. Rad51-depleted oocytes showed chromosome misalignment and failures in spindle aggregation, affecting the completion of cytokinesis. We found that Rad51 depletion was accompanied by decreased ATP production and mitochondrial membrane potential and increased DNA degradation. We further demonstrated that the mitochondrial defect activated autophagy in Rad51-depleted oocytes. Taken together, we concluded that Rad51 functions to safeguard mitochondrial integrity during the meiotic maturation of oocytes. PMID:27677401

  15. Distinct binding of BRCA2 BRC repeats to RAD51 generates differential DNA damage sensitivity

    PubMed Central

    Chatterjee, Gouri; Jimenez-Sainz, Judit; Presti, Thomas; Nguyen, Tiffany; Jensen, Ryan B.

    2016-01-01

    BRCA2 is a multi-faceted protein critical for the proper regulation of homology-directed repair of DNA double-strand breaks. Elucidating the mechanistic features of BRCA2 is crucial for understanding homologous recombination and how patient-derived mutations impact future cancer risk. Eight centrally located BRC repeats in BRCA2 mediate binding and regulation of RAD51 on resected DNA substrates. Herein, we dissect the biochemical and cellular features of the BRC repeats tethered to the DNA binding domain of BRCA2. To understand how the BRC repeats and isolated domains of BRCA2 contribute to RAD51 binding, we analyzed both the biochemical and cellular properties of these proteins. In contrast to the individual BRC repeat units, we find that the BRC5–8 region potentiates RAD51-mediated DNA strand pairing and provides complementation functions exceeding those of BRC repeats 1–4. Furthermore, BRC5–8 can efficiently repair nuclease-induced DNA double-strand breaks and accelerate the assembly of RAD51 repair complexes upon DNA damage. These findings highlight the importance of the BRC5–8 domain in stabilizing the RAD51 filament and promoting homology-directed repair under conditions of cellular DNA damage. PMID:27084934

  16. Resolving RAD51C function in late stages of homologous recombination

    PubMed Central

    Sharan, Shyam K; Kuznetsov, Sergey G

    2007-01-01

    DNA double strand breaks are efficiently repaired by homologous recombination. One of the last steps of this process is resolution of Holliday junctions that are formed at the sites of genetic exchange between homologous DNA. Although various resolvases with Holliday junctions processing activity have been identified in bacteriophages, bacteria and archaebacteria, eukaryotic resolvases have been elusive. Recent biochemical evidence has revealed that RAD51C and XRCC3, members of the RAD51-like protein family, are involved in Holliday junction resolution in mammalian cells. However, purified recombinant RAD51C and XRCC3 proteins have not shown any Holliday junction resolution activity. In addition, these proteins did not reveal the presence of a nuclease domain, which raises doubts about their ability to function as a resolvase. Furthermore, oocytes from infertile Rad51C mutant mice exhibit precocious separation of sister chromatids at metaphase II, a phenotype that reflects a defect in sister chromatid cohesion, not a lack of Holliday junction resolution. Here we discuss a model to explain how a Holliday junction resolution defect can lead to sister chromatid separation in mouse oocytes. We also describe other recent in vitro and in vivo evidence supporting a late role for RAD51C in homologous recombination in mammalian cells, which is likely to be resolution of the Holliday junction. PMID:17547768

  17. Dbl2 Regulates Rad51 and DNA Joint Molecule Metabolism to Ensure Proper Meiotic Chromosome Segregation

    PubMed Central

    Hyppa, Randy W.; Benko, Zsigmond; Misova, Ivana; Schleiffer, Alexander; Smith, Gerald R.; Gregan, Juraj

    2016-01-01

    To identify new proteins required for faithful meiotic chromosome segregation, we screened a Schizosaccharomyces pombe deletion mutant library and found that deletion of the dbl2 gene led to missegregation of chromosomes during meiosis. Analyses of both live and fixed cells showed that dbl2Δ mutant cells frequently failed to segregate homologous chromosomes to opposite poles during meiosis I. Removing Rec12 (Spo11 homolog) to eliminate meiotic DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) suppressed the segregation defect in dbl2Δ cells, indicating that Dbl2 acts after the initiation of meiotic recombination. Analyses of DSBs and Holliday junctions revealed no significant defect in their formation or processing in dbl2Δ mutant cells, although some Rec12-dependent DNA joint molecules persisted late in meiosis. Failure to segregate chromosomes in the absence of Dbl2 correlated with persistent Rad51 foci, and deletion of rad51 or genes encoding Rad51 mediators also suppressed the segregation defect of dbl2Δ. Formation of foci of Fbh1, an F-box helicase that efficiently dismantles Rad51-DNA filaments, was impaired in dbl2Δ cells. Our results suggest that Dbl2 is a novel regulator of Fbh1 and thereby Rad51-dependent DSB repair required for proper meiotic chromosome segregation and viable sex cell formation. The wide conservation of these proteins suggests that our results apply to many species. PMID:27304859

  18. The β-isoform of BCCIP promotes ADP release from the RAD51 presynaptic filament and enhances homologous DNA pairing

    PubMed Central

    Kelso, Andrew A.; Goodson, Steven D.; Watts, Leah E.; Ledford, LeAnna L.; Waldvogel, Sarah M.; Diehl, J. Nathaniel; Shah, Shivani B.; Say, Amanda F.; White, Julie D.; Sehorn, Michael G.

    2017-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a template-driven repair pathway that mends DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs), and thus helps to maintain genome stability. The RAD51 recombinase facilitates DNA joint formation during HR, but to accomplish this task, RAD51 must be loaded onto the single-stranded DNA. DSS1, a candidate gene for split hand/split foot syndrome, provides the ability to recognize RPA-coated ssDNA to the tumor suppressor BRCA2, which is complexed with RAD51. Together BRCA2-DSS1 displace RPA and load RAD51 onto the ssDNA. In addition, the BRCA2 interacting protein BCCIP normally colocalizes with chromatin bound BRCA2, and upon DSB induction, RAD51 colocalizes with BRCA2-BCCIP foci. Down-regulation of BCCIP reduces DSB repair and disrupts BRCA2 and RAD51 foci formation. While BCCIP is known to interact with BRCA2, the relationship between BCCIP and RAD51 is not known. In this study, we investigated the biochemical role of the β-isoform of BCCIP in relation to the RAD51 recombinase. We demonstrate that BCCIPβ binds DNA and physically and functionally interacts with RAD51 to stimulate its homologous DNA pairing activity. Notably, this stimulatory effect is not the result of RAD51 nucleoprotein filament stabilization; rather, we demonstrate that BCCIPβ induces a conformational change within the RAD51 filament that promotes release of ADP to help maintain an active presynaptic filament. Our findings reveal a functional role for BCCIPβ as a RAD51 accessory factor in HR. PMID:27694622

  19. Development of Anti-Cancer Therapeutics That Modulate the RAD51-BRCA2 Complex

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2005-03-01

    the Rad5 I -Brca2 interaction. 14. SUBJECT TERMS 15. NUMBER OF PAGES BRCA2, RAD51 Recombination 47 16. PRICE CODE 17. SECURITY CLASSIFICATION 18 ...randomly mutated baits for their interaction with Rad54, Rad5 1, the BRC motif, and Brca2 exon 27. We have isolated 18 mutations in Rad51 that impair...24 59 75 0 18 93 Mitomycin C 30 93 4.60 13 66 30 96 27 14 I 42 ’Calculated without chromatid gaps. b’Gaps" defined as discontinuities smaller than the

  20. RAD51 and XRCC3 gene polymorphisms and the risk of developing acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Hamdy, Mona S; El-Haddad, Alaa M; Bahaa El-Din, Neveen M; Makhlouf, Manal Mohamed; Abdel-Hamid, Samah M

    2011-10-01

    RAD51 (Rec A homolog of E. coli) is a polymorphic gene and one of the central proteins in homologous recombination-DNA-double-stand breaks (HR-DNA-DSB) repair pathway, which is vital in maintaining genetic stability within a cell. The x-ray repair cross complementing (XRCC3) protein also functions in HR-DNA-DSB repair pathway and directly interacts with and stabilizes RAD51 and the closely related RAD51C. The aim of this study was to determine the prevalence of the RAD51 and XRCC3 repair gene polymorphisms among acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients and to define their role in development of AML and its correlation with the clinical presentation, laboratory data as well as treatment outcome using polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism assay in 50 de novo AML patients as well as 30 healthy subjects as a control group. Our study revealed that RAD51 G135C and XRCC3 Thr241Met alleles were associated with increased risk of AML with odds ratio (OR) of 2.833 and 2.909 and 95% confidence interval (CI) of 1.527 to 8.983 and 1.761 to 9.788, respectively. Moreover, when combining the 2 genes polymorphisms, a significant elevation of the risk of AML was found with OR of 3.124 and 95% CI of 1.872 to 11.243. As regards treatment outcome, a highly statistical significant difference was found between XRCC3 genotypes with P value of 0.001, whereas no significant difference was present between RAD51 genotypes with P value of 0.29. This clarifies that XRCC3 gene polymorphisms was found to have a significant impact on the risk of treatment failure with OR of 3.560 and 95% CI of 1.167 to 10.875; however, RAD51 gene polymorphism was not found to have an equivalent effect with OR of 2.813 and 95% CI of 0.933 to 10.828. So XRCC3 gene polymorphism might be considered as a prognostic marker in AML. In conclusion, RAD51 and XRCC3 genes polymorphisms may play an important role in the development of AML.

  1. Suppression of mutagenesis by Rad51D-mediated homologous recombination

    SciTech Connect

    Hinz, J M; Tebbs, R S; Wilson, P F; Nham, P B; Salazar, E P; Nagasawa, H; Urbin, S S; Thompson, L H

    2005-11-15

    Homologous recombinational repair (HRR) restores chromatid breaks arising during DNA replication and prevents chromosomal rearrangements that can occur from the misrepair of such breaks. In vertebrates, five Rad51 paralogs are identified that contribute in a nonessential but critical manner to HRR efficiency. We constructed and characterized a Rad51D knockout cell line in widely studied CHO cells. The rad51d mutant (51D1) displays sensitivity to a wide spectrum of induced DNA damage, indicating the broad relevance of HRR to genotoxicity. Untreated 51D1 cells exhibit {approx}5-fold elevated chromosomal breaks, a 12-fold increased rate of hprt mutation, and 4- to 10-fold increased rates of gene amplification at the dhfr and CAD loci, respectively. These results explicitly show the quantitative importance of HHR in preventing these types genetic alterations, which are associated with carcinogenesis. Thus, HRR copes in an error-free manner with spontaneous DNA damage encountered during DNA replication, and Rad51D is essential for this fidelity.

  2. Involvement of ATM in homologous recombination after end resection and RAD51 nucleofilament formation.

    PubMed

    Bakr, A; Oing, C; Köcher, S; Borgmann, K; Dornreiter, I; Petersen, C; Dikomey, E; Mansour, W Y

    2015-03-31

    Ataxia-telangiectasia mutated (ATM) is needed for the initiation of the double-strand break (DSB) repair by homologous recombination (HR). ATM triggers DSB end resection by stimulating the nucleolytic activity of CtIP and MRE11 to generate 3'-ssDNA overhangs, followed by RPA loading and RAD51 nucleofilament formation. Here we show for the first time that ATM is also needed for later steps in HR after RAD51 nucleofilament formation. Inhibition of ATM after completion of end resection did not affect RAD51 nucleofilament formation, but resulted in HR deficiency as evidenced by (i) an increase in the number of residual RAD51/γH2AX foci in both S and G2 cells, (ii) the decrease in HR efficiency as detected by HR repair substrate (pGC), (iii) a reduced SCE rate and (iv) the radiosensitization of cells by PARP inhibition. This newly described role for ATM was found to be dispensable in heterochromatin-associated DSB repair, as KAP1-depletion did not alleviate the HR-deficiency when ATM was inhibited after end resection. Moreover, we demonstrated that ATR can partly compensate for the deficiency in early, but not in later, steps of HR upon ATM inhibition. Taken together, we describe here for the first time that ATM is needed not only for the initiation but also for the completion of HR.

  3. A distinct replication fork protection pathway connects Fanconi anemia tumor suppressors to RAD51-BRCA1/2.

    PubMed

    Schlacher, Katharina; Wu, Hong; Jasin, Maria

    2012-07-10

    Genes mutated in patients with Fanconi anemia (FA) interact with the DNA repair genes BRCA1 and BRCA2/FANCD1 to suppress tumorigenesis, but the molecular functions ascribed to them cannot fully explain all of their cellular roles. Here, we show a repair-independent requirement for FA genes, including FANCD2, and BRCA1 in protecting stalled replication forks from degradation. Fork protection is surprisingly rescued in FANCD2-deficient cells by elevated RAD51 levels or stabilized RAD51 filaments. Moreover, FANCD2-mediated fork protection is epistatic with RAD51 functions, revealing an unanticipated fork protection pathway that connects FA genes to RAD51 and the BRCA1/2 breast cancer suppressors. Collective results imply a unified molecular mechanism for repair-independent functions of FA, RAD51, and BRCA1/2 proteins in preventing genomic instability and suppressing tumorigenesis.

  4. RECK impedes DNA repair by inhibiting the erbB/JAB1/Rad51 signaling axis and enhances chemosensitivity of breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Hong, Kun-Jing; Hsu, Ming-Chuan; Hung, Wen-Chun

    2015-01-01

    The reversion-inducing cysteine-rich protein with kazal motif (RECK) is an endogenous matrix metalloproteinase (MMP) inhibitor and a tumor suppressor. Its expression is dramatically down-regulated in human cancers. Our recent results suggest a novel MMP-independent anti-cancer activity of RECK by inhibiting the erbB signaling. Activation of the erbB signaling is associated with chemotherapeutic resistance, however, whether RECK could modulate drug sensitivity is still unknown. Here we demonstrated that expression of RECK induced the activation of ATM and ATR pathways, and the formation of γ-H2AX foci in breast cancer cells. RECK inhibited the erbB signaling and attenuated the expression of the downstream molecules Jun activation domain-binding protein 1 (JAB1) and the DNA repair protein RAD51 to impede DNA repair and to increase drug sensitivity. Treatment of epidermal growth factor or over-expression of HER-2 effectively reversed the inhibitory effect of RECK. In addition, ectopic expression of JAB1 counteracted RECK-induced RAD51 reduction and drug sensitization. Our results elucidate a novel function of RECK to modulate DNA damage response and drug resistance by inhibiting the erbB/Jab1/RAD51 signaling axis. Restoration of RECK expression in breast cancer cells may increase sensitivity to chemotherapeutic agents. PMID:26396917

  5. Expression of EhRAD54, EhRAD51, and EhBLM proteins during DNA repair by homologous recombination in Entamoeba histolytica.

    PubMed

    Charcas-Lopez, Ma del Socorro; Garcia-Morales, Lorena; Pezet-Valdez, Marisol; Lopez-Camarillo, Cesar; Zamorano-Carrillo, Absalom; Marchat, Laurence A

    2014-01-01

    Entamoeba histolytica, the protozoan responsible for human amoebiasis, exhibits a great genome plasticity that is probably related to homologous recombination events. It contains the RAD52 epistasis group genes, including Ehrad51 and Ehrad54, and the Ehblm gene, which are key homologous recombination factors in other organisms. Ehrad51 and Ehrad54 genes are differentially transcribed in trophozoites when DNA double-strand breaks are induced by ultraviolet-C irradiation. Moreover, the EhRAD51 recombinase is overexpressed at 30 min in the nucleus. Here, we extend our analysis of the homologous recombination mechanism in E. histolytica by studying EhRAD51, EhRAD54, and EhBLM expression in response to DNA damage. Bioinformatic analyses show that EhRAD54 has the molecular features of homologous proteins, indicating that it may have similar functions. Western blot assays evidence the differential expression of EhRAD51, EhRAD54, and EhBLM at different times after DNA damage, suggesting their potential roles in the different steps of homologous recombination in this protozoan.

  6. Mutant IDH1-driven cellular transformation increases RAD51-mediated homologous recombination and temozolomide resistance.

    PubMed

    Ohba, Shigeo; Mukherjee, Joydeep; See, Wendy L; Pieper, Russell O

    2014-09-01

    Isocitrate dehydrogenase 1 (IDH1) mutations occur in most lower grade glioma and not only drive gliomagenesis but are also associated with longer patient survival and improved response to temozolomide. To investigate the possible causative relationship between these events, we introduced wild-type (WT) or mutant IDH1 into immortalized, untransformed human astrocytes, then monitored transformation status and temozolomide response. Temozolomide-sensitive parental cells exhibited DNA damage (γ-H2AX foci) and a prolonged G2 cell-cycle arrest beginning three days after temozolomide (100 μmol/L, 3 hours) exposure and persisting for more than four days. The same cells transformed by expression of mutant IDH1 exhibited a comparable degree of DNA damage and cell-cycle arrest, but both events resolved significantly faster in association with increased, rather than decreased, clonogenic survival. The increases in DNA damage processing, cell-cycle progression, and clonogenicity were unique to cells transformed by mutant IDH1, and were not noted in cells transformed by WT IDH1 or an oncogenic form (V12H) of Ras. Similarly, these effects were not noted following introduction of mutant IDH1 into Ras-transformed cells or established glioma cells. They were, however, associated with increased homologous recombination (HR) and could be reversed by the genetic or pharmacologic suppression of the HR DNA repair protein RAD51. These results show that mutant IDH1 drives a unique set of transformative events that indirectly enhance HR and facilitate repair of temozolomide-induced DNA damage and temozolomide resistance. The results also suggest that inhibitors of HR may be a viable means to enhance temozolomide response in IDH1-mutant glioma.

  7. Rad51 and Rad54 promote noncrossover recombination between centromere repeats on the same chromatid to prevent isochromosome formation

    PubMed Central

    Onaka, Atsushi T.; Toyofuku, Naoko; Inoue, Takahiro; Okita, Akiko K.; Sagawa, Minami; Su, Jie; Shitanda, Takeshi; Matsuyama, Rei; Zafar, Faria; Takahashi, Tatsuro S.; Masukata, Hisao; Nakagawa, Takuro

    2016-01-01

    Centromeres consist of DNA repeats in many eukaryotes. Non-allelic homologous recombination (HR) between them can result in gross chromosomal rearrangements (GCRs). In fission yeast, Rad51 suppresses isochromosome formation that occurs between inverted repeats in the centromere. However, how the HR enzyme prevents homology-mediated GCRs remains unclear. Here, we provide evidence that Rad51 with the aid of the Swi/Snf-type motor protein Rad54 promotes non-crossover recombination between centromere repeats to prevent isochromosome formation. Mutations in Rad51 and Rad54 epistatically increased the rates of isochromosome formation and chromosome loss. In sharp contrast, these mutations decreased gene conversion between inverted repeats in the centromere. Remarkably, analysis of recombinant DNAs revealed that rad51 and rad54 increase the proportion of crossovers. In the absence of Rad51, deletion of the structure-specific endonuclease Mus81 decreased both crossovers and isochromosomes, while the cdc27/pol32-D1 mutation, which impairs break-induced replication, did not. We propose that Rad51 and Rad54 promote non-crossover recombination between centromere repeats on the same chromatid, thereby suppressing crossover between non-allelic repeats on sister chromatids that leads to chromosomal rearrangements. Furthermore, we found that Rad51 and Rad54 are required for gene silencing in centromeres, suggesting that HR also plays a role in the structure and function of centromeres. PMID:27697832

  8. Mechanism of RAD51-dependent DNA interstrand cross-link repair.

    PubMed

    Long, David T; Räschle, Markus; Joukov, Vladimir; Walter, Johannes C

    2011-07-01

    DNA interstrand cross-links (ICLs) are toxic DNA lesions whose repair in S phase of eukaryotic cells is incompletely understood. In Xenopus egg extracts, ICL repair is initiated when two replication forks converge on the lesion. Dual incisions then create a DNA double-strand break (DSB) in one sister chromatid, whereas lesion bypass restores the other sister. We report that the broken sister chromatid is repaired via RAD51-dependent strand invasion into the regenerated sister. Recombination acts downstream of FANCI-FANCD2, yet RAD51 binds ICL-stalled replication forks independently of FANCI-FANCD2 and before DSB formation. Our results elucidate the functional link between the Fanconi anemia pathway and the recombination machinery during ICL repair. In addition, they demonstrate the complete repair of a DSB via homologous recombination in vitro.

  9. A novel Fanconi anaemia subtype associated with a dominant-negative mutation in RAD51

    PubMed Central

    Ameziane, Najim; May, Patrick; Haitjema, Anneke; van de Vrugt, Henri J.; van Rossum-Fikkert, Sari E.; Ristic, Dejan; Williams, Gareth J.; Balk, Jesper; Rockx, Davy; Li, Hong; Rooimans, Martin A.; Oostra, Anneke B.; Velleuer, Eunike; Dietrich, Ralf; Bleijerveld, Onno B.; Maarten Altelaar, A. F.; Meijers-Heijboer, Hanne; Joenje, Hans; Glusman, Gustavo; Roach, Jared; Hood, Leroy; Galas, David; Wyman, Claire; Balling, Rudi; den Dunnen, Johan; de Winter, Johan P.; Kanaar, Roland; Gelinas, Richard; Dorsman, Josephine C.

    2015-01-01

    Fanconi anaemia (FA) is a hereditary disease featuring hypersensitivity to DNA cross-linker-induced chromosomal instability in association with developmental abnormalities, bone marrow failure and a strong predisposition to cancer. A total of 17 FA disease genes have been reported, all of which act in a recessive mode of inheritance. Here we report on a de novo g.41022153G>A; p.Ala293Thr (NM_002875) missense mutation in one allele of the homologous recombination DNA repair gene RAD51 in an FA-like patient. This heterozygous mutation causes a novel FA subtype, ‘FA-R', which appears to be the first subtype of FA caused by a dominant-negative mutation. The patient, who features microcephaly and mental retardation, has reached adulthood without the typical bone marrow failure and paediatric cancers. Together with the recent reports on RAD51-associated congenital mirror movement disorders, our results point to an important role for RAD51-mediated homologous recombination in neurodevelopment, in addition to DNA repair and cancer susceptibility. PMID:26681308

  10. Enhanced Histone Deacetylase Activity in Malignant Melanoma Provokes RAD51 and FANCD2-Triggered Drug Resistance.

    PubMed

    Krumm, Andrea; Barckhausen, Christina; Kücük, Pelin; Tomaszowski, Karl-Heinz; Loquai, Carmen; Fahrer, Jörg; Krämer, Oliver Holger; Kaina, Bernd; Roos, Wynand Paul

    2016-05-15

    DNA-damaging anticancer drugs remain a part of metastatic melanoma therapy. Epigenetic reprogramming caused by increased histone deacetylase (HDAC) activity arising during tumor formation may contribute to resistance of melanomas to the alkylating drugs temozolomide, dacarbazine, and fotemustine. Here, we report on the impact of class I HDACs on the response of malignant melanoma cells treated with alkylating agents. The data show that malignant melanomas in situ contain a high level of HDAC1/2 and malignant melanoma cells overexpress HDAC1/2/3 compared with noncancer cells. Furthermore, pharmacologic inhibition of class I HDACs sensitizes malignant melanoma cells to apoptosis following exposure to alkylating agents, while not affecting primary melanocytes. Inhibition of HDAC1/2/3 caused sensitization of melanoma cells to temozolomide in vitro and in melanoma xenografts in vivo HDAC1/2/3 inhibition resulted in suppression of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair by homologous recombination because of downregulation of RAD51 and FANCD2. This sensitized cells to the cytotoxic DNA lesion O(6)-methylguanine and caused a synthetic lethal interaction with the PARP-1 inhibitor olaparib. Furthermore, knockdown experiments identified HDAC2 as being responsible for the regulation of RAD51. The influence of class I HDACs on DSB repair by homologous recombination and the possible clinical implication on malignant melanoma therapy with temozolomide and other alkylating drugs suggests a combination approach where class I HDAC inhibitors such as valproic acid or MS-275 (entinostat) appear to counteract HDAC- and RAD51/FANCD2-mediated melanoma cell resistance. Cancer Res; 76(10); 3067-77. ©2016 AACR.

  11. Together yes, but not coupled: new insights into the roles of RAD51 and DMC1 in plant meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Pradillo, Mónica; López, Eva; Linacero, Rosario; Romero, Concepción; Cuñado, Nieves; Sánchez-Morán, Eugenio; Santos, Juan L

    2012-03-01

    The eukaryotic recombinases RAD51 and DMC1 are essential for DNA strand-exchange between homologous chromosomes during meiosis. RAD51 is also expressed during mitosis, and mediates homologous recombination (HR) between sister chromatids. It has been suggested that DMC1 might be involved in the switch from intersister chromatid recombination in somatic cells to interhomolog meiotic recombination. At meiosis, the Arabidopsis Atrad51 null mutant fails to synapse and has extensive chromosome fragmentation. The Atdmc1 null mutant is also asynaptic, but in this case chromosome fragmentation is absent. Thus in plants, AtDMC1 appears to be indispensable for interhomolog homologous recombination, whereas AtRAD51 seems to be more involved in intersister recombination. In this work, we have studied a new AtRAD51 knock-down mutant, Atrad51-2, which expresses only a small quantity of RAD51 protein. Atrad51-2 mutant plants are sterile and hypersensitive to DNA double-strand break induction, but their vegetative development is apparently normal. The meiotic phenotype of the mutant consists of partial synapsis, an elevated frequency of univalents, a low incidence of chromosome fragmentation and multivalent chromosome associations. Surprisingly, non-homologous chromosomes are involved in 51% of bivalents. The depletion of AtDMC1 in the Atrad51-2 background results in the loss of bivalents and in an increase of chromosome fragmentation. Our results suggest that a critical level of AtRAD51 is required to ensure the fidelity of HR during interchromosomal exchanges. Assuming the existence of asymmetrical DNA strand invasion during the initial steps of recombination, we have developed a working model in which the initial step of strand invasion is mediated by AtDMC1, with AtRAD51 required to check the fidelity of this process.

  12. An integrated in silico approach to analyze the involvement of single amino acid polymorphisms in FANCD1/BRCA2-PALB2 and FANCD1/BRCA2-RAD51 complex.

    PubMed

    Doss, C George Priya; Nagasundaram, N

    2014-11-01

    Fanconi anemia (FA) is an autosomal recessive human disease characterized by genomic instability and a marked increase in cancer risk. The importance of FANCD1 gene is manifested by the fact that deleterious amino acid substitutions were found to confer susceptibility to hereditary breast and ovarian cancers. Attaining experimental knowledge about the possible disease-associated substitutions is laborious and time consuming. The recent introduction of genome variation analyzing in silico tools have the capability to identify the deleterious variants in an efficient manner. In this study, we conducted in silico variation analysis of deleterious non-synonymous SNPs at both functional and structural level in the breast cancer and FA susceptibility gene BRCA2/FANCD1. To identify and characterize deleterious mutations in this study, five in silico tools based on two different prediction methods namely pathogenicity prediction (SIFT, PolyPhen, and PANTHER), and protein stability prediction (I-Mutant 2.0 and MuStab) were analyzed. Based on the deleterious scores that overlap in these in silico approaches, and the availability of three-dimensional structures, structure analysis was carried out with the major mutations that occurred in the native protein coded by FANCD1/BRCA2 gene. In this work, we report the results of the first molecular dynamics (MD) simulation study performed to analyze the structural level changes in time scale level with respect to the native and mutated protein complexes (G25R, W31C, W31R in FANCD1/BRCA2-PALB2, and F1524V, V1532F in FANCD1/BRCA2-RAD51). Analysis of the MD trajectories indicated that predicted deleterious variants alter the structural behavior of BRCA2-PALB2 and BRCA2-RAD51 protein complexes. In addition, statistical analysis was employed to test the significance of these in silico tool predictions. Based on these predictions, we conclude that the identification of disease-related SNPs by in silico methods, in combination with MD

  13. Rad54 functions as a heteroduplex DNA pump modulated by its DNA substrates and Rad51 during D loop formation.

    PubMed

    Wright, William Douglass; Heyer, Wolf-Dietrich

    2014-02-06

    The displacement loop (D loop) is the product of homology search and DNA strand invasion, constituting a central intermediate in homologous recombination (HR). In eukaryotes, the Rad51 DNA strand exchange protein is assisted in D loop formation by the Rad54 motor protein. Curiously, Rad54 also disrupts D loops. How these opposing activities are coordinated toward productive recombination is unknown. Moreover, a seemingly disparate function of Rad54 is removal of Rad51 from heteroduplex DNA (hDNA) to allow HR-associated DNA synthesis. Here, we uncover features of D loop formation/dissociation dynamics, employing Rad51 filaments formed on ssDNAs that mimic the physiological length and structure of in vivo substrates. The Rad54 motor is activated by Rad51 bound to synapsed DNAs and guided by a ssDNA-binding domain. We present a unified model wherein Rad54 acts as an hDNA pump that drives D loop formation while simultaneously removing Rad51 from hDNA, consolidating both ATP-dependent activities of Rad54 into a single mechanistic step.

  14. RAD51 inhibition in triple negative breast cancer cells is challenged by compensatory survival signaling and requires rational combination therapy

    PubMed Central

    Wiegmans, Adrian P.; Miranda, Mariska; Wen, Shu Wen

    2016-01-01

    The molecular rationale to induce synthetic lethality, by targeting defective homologous recombination repair in triple negative breast cancer (TNBC), has proven to have several shortcomings. Not meeting the expected minimal outcomes in clinical trials has highlighted common clinical resistance mechanisms including; increased expression of the target gene PARP1, increased expression or reversion mutation of BRCA1, or up-regulation of the compensatory homologous recombination protein RAD51. Indeed, RAD51 has been demonstrated to be an alternative synthetic lethal target in BRCA1-mutated cancers. To overcome selective pressure on DNA repair pathways, we examined new potential targets within TNBC that demonstrate synthetic lethality in association with RAD51 depletion. We confirmed complementary targets of PARP1/2 and DNA-PK as well as a new synthetic lethality combination with p38. p38 is considered a relevant target in breast cancer, as it has been implicated in resistance to chemotherapy, including tamoxifen. We show that the combination of targeting RAD51 and p38 inhibits cell proliferation both in vitro and in vivo, which was further enhanced by targeting of PARP1. Analysis of the molecular mechanisms revealed that depletion of RAD51 increased ERK1/2 and p38 signaling. Our results highlight a potential compensatory mechanism via p38 that limits DNA targeted therapy. PMID:27507046

  15. Formation of higher-order nuclear Rad51 structures is functionally linked to p21 expression and protection from DNA damage-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Raderschall, Elke; Bazarov, Alex; Cao, Jiangping; Lurz, Rudi; Smith, Avril; Mann, Wolfgang; Ropers, Hans-Hilger; Sedivy, John M; Golub, Efim I; Fritz, Eberhard; Haaf, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    After exposure of mammalian cells to DNA damage, the endogenous Rad51 recombination protein is concentrated in multiple discrete foci, which are thought to represent nuclear domains for recombinational DNA repair. Overexpressed Rad51 protein forms foci and higher-order nuclear structures, even in the absence of DNA damage, in cells that do not undergo DNA replication synthesis. This correlates with increased expression of the cyclin-dependent kinase (Cdk) inhibitor p21. Following DNA damage, constitutively Rad51-overexpressing cells show reduced numbers of DNA breaks and chromatid-type chromosome aberrations and a greater resistance to apoptosis. In contrast, Rad51 antisense inhibition reduces p21 protein levels and sensitizes cells to etoposide treatment. Downregulation of p21 inhibits Rad51 foci formation in both normal and Rad51-overexpressing cells. Collectively, our results show that Rad51 expression, Rad51 foci formation and p21 expression are interrelated, suggesting a functional link between mammalian Rad51 protein and p21-mediated cell cycle regulation. This mechanism may contribute to a highly effective recombinational DNA repair in cell cycle-arrested cells and protection against DNA damage-induced apoptosis.

  16. Genetic polymorphisms of RAD51 and XRCC3 and acute myeloid leukemia risk: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Li, Cuiping; Liu, Yun; Hu, Zhen; Zhou, Yang

    2014-06-01

    Studies on gene polymorphisms of RAD51 and X-ray repair cross-complementing group 3 (XRCC3) and acute myeloid leukemia risk (AML) are conflicting and there is no recent meta-analysis. Therefore, the purpose of this study was to evaluate the effect of RAD51 G135C and XRCC3 Thr241Met genotypes on AML susceptibility. We conducted a systematic search of three databases including PubMed and EMBASE for the period up to 20 February 2013 and identified 43 relevant studies. Six eligible studies were eventually selected for RAD51 (1764 cases and 3469 controls) and six studies for XRCC3 (1352 cases and 2582 controls). Pooled odds ratios (ORs) and 95% confidence intervals (CIs) for the risk of AML associated with RAD51 and XRCC3 were appropriately calculated based on fixed- or random-effects models. The quality of studies was evaluated using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale (NOS). Subgroup analyses were performed among Asian, Caucasian and other populations. The pooled results showed that the leukemia risk was not significantly associated with RAD51: the same results were obtained among any subgroup analysis. No significant association was demonstrated for AML risk with XRCC3 in the total population, but elevated associations were observed in Caucasians for the homozygote and recessive comparison (Met/Met vs. Thr/Thr, OR = 1.67, 95% CI = 1.09-2.57, p = 0.019; recessive model, OR = 1.78, 95% CI = 1.19-2.65, p = 0.005). This meta-analysis provides evidence that the RAD51 and XRCC3 polymorphisms are not associated with an increased risk of AML in the total population.

  17. Rad51-dependent DNA structures accumulate at damaged replication forks in sgs1 mutants defective in the yeast ortholog of BLM RecQ helicase.

    PubMed

    Liberi, Giordano; Maffioletti, Giulio; Lucca, Chiara; Chiolo, Irene; Baryshnikova, Anastasia; Cotta-Ramusino, Cecilia; Lopes, Massimo; Pellicioli, Achille; Haber, James E; Foiani, Marco

    2005-02-01

    S-phase cells overcome chromosome lesions through replication-coupled recombination processes that seem to be assisted by recombination-dependent DNA structures and/or replication-related sister chromatid junctions. RecQ helicases, including yeast Sgs1 and human BLM, have been implicated in both replication and recombination and protect genome integrity by preventing unscheduled mitotic recombination events. We have studied the RecQ helicase-mediated mechanisms controlling genome stability by analyzing replication forks encountering a damaged template in sgs1 cells. We show that, in sgs1 mutants, recombination-dependent cruciform structures accumulate at damaged forks. Their accumulation requires Rad51 protein, is counteracted by Srs2 DNA helicase, and does not prevent fork movement. Sgs1, but not Srs2, promotes resolution of these recombination intermediates. A functional Rad53 checkpoint kinase that is known to protect the integrity of the sister chromatid junctions is required for the accumulation of recombination intermediates in sgs1 mutants. Finally, top3 and top3 sgs1 mutants accumulate the same structures as sgs1 cells. We suggest that, in sgs1 cells, the unscheduled accumulation of Rad51-dependent cruciform structures at damaged forks result from defective maturation of recombination-dependent intermediates that originate from the replication-related sister chromatid junctions. Our findings might contribute to explaining some of the recombination defects of BLM cells.

  18. Brca2, Rad51 and Mre11: performing balancing acts on replication forks.

    PubMed

    Costanzo, Vincenzo

    2011-10-10

    Homologous recombination (HR) is required for faithful repair of double strand breaks (DSBs) and is believed to be important for DNA replication under stressful conditions in unicellular organisms. However, its role during DNA replication in high eukaryotes has always been elusive. In particular, due to the essential nature of its main players it has been difficult to dissect the direct role of HR in DNA replication. Recent studies revealed that some key HR factors such as Rad51 and BRCA2 play unexpected functions during DNA replication by protecting nascent DNA from Mre11 mediated degradation, which takes place at stalled replication forks. These novel functions appear to be essential to ensure smooth progression of DNA replication and to promote maintenance of genome stability.

  19. (−)-Guaiol regulates RAD51 stability via autophagy to induce cell apoptosis in non-small cell lung cancer

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Qingyuan; Wu, Jianchun; Luo, Yingbin; Huang, Nan; Zhen, Ni; Zhou, Yun; Sun, Fenyong; Li, Zhi

    2016-01-01

    (−)-Guaiol, generally known as an antibacterial compound, has been found in many medicinal plants. Its roles in tumor suppression are still under investigation. In the study, we mainly focused on exploring its applications in dealing with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) and the underlying mechanisms. Here, we show that (−)-Guaiol significantly inhibits cell growth of NSCLC cells both in vitro and in vivo. Further high throughput analysis reveals that RAD51, a pivotal factor in homologous recombination repair, is a potential target for it. The following mechanism studies show that (−)-Guaiol is involved in cell autophagy to regulate the expression of RAD51, leading to double-strand breaks triggered cell apoptosis. Moreover, targeting RAD51, which is highly overexpressed in the lung adenocarcinoma tissues, can significantly increase the chemosensitivity of NSCLC cells to (−)-Guaiol both in vitro and in vivo. All in all, our studies provide an attractive insight in applying (−)-Guaiol into NSCLC treatments and further suggest that knockdown of oncogenic RAD51 will greatly enhance the chemosensitivity of patients with NSCLC. PMID:27566579

  20. Small Rad51 and Dmc1 Complexes Often Co-occupy Both Ends of a Meiotic DNA Double Strand Break.

    PubMed

    Brown, M Scott; Grubb, Jennifer; Zhang, Annie; Rust, Michael J; Bishop, Douglas K

    2015-12-01

    The Eukaryotic RecA-like proteins Rad51 and Dmc1 cooperate during meiosis to promote recombination between homologous chromosomes by repairing programmed DNA double strand breaks (DSBs). Previous studies showed that Rad51 and Dmc1 form partially overlapping co-foci. Here we show these Rad51-Dmc1 co-foci are often arranged in pairs separated by distances of up to 400 nm. Paired co-foci remain prevalent when DSBs are dramatically reduced or when strand exchange or synapsis is blocked. Super-resolution dSTORM microscopy reveals that individual foci observed by conventional light microscopy are often composed of two or more substructures. The data support a model in which the two tracts of ssDNA formed by a single DSB separate from one another by distances of up to 400 nm, with both tracts often bound by one or more short (about 100 nt) Rad51 filaments and also by one or more short Dmc1 filaments.

  1. BRCA2 diffuses as oligomeric clusters with RAD51 and changes mobility after DNA damage in live cells

    PubMed Central

    Reuter, Marcel; Zelensky, Alex; Smal, Ihor; Meijering, Erik; van Cappellen, Wiggert A.; de Gruiter, H. Martijn; van Belle, Gijsbert J.; van Royen, Martin E.; Houtsmuller, Adriaan B.; Essers, Jeroen; Kanaar, Roland

    2014-01-01

    Genome maintenance by homologous recombination depends on coordinating many proteins in time and space to assemble at DNA break sites. To understand this process, we followed the mobility of BRCA2, a critical recombination mediator, in live cells at the single-molecule level using both single-particle tracking and fluorescence correlation spectroscopy. BRCA2-GFP and -YFP were compared to distinguish diffusion from fluorophore behavior. Diffusive behavior of fluorescent RAD51 and RAD54 was determined for comparison. All fluorescent proteins were expressed from endogenous loci. We found that nuclear BRCA2 existed in oligomeric clusters, and exhibited heterogeneous mobility. DNA damage increased BRCA2 transient binding, presumably including binding to damaged sites. Despite its very different size, RAD51 displayed mobility similar to BRCA2, which indicates physical interaction between these proteins both before and after induction of DNA damage. We propose that BRCA2-mediated sequestration of nuclear RAD51 serves to prevent inappropriate DNA interactions and that all RAD51 is delivered to DNA damage sites in association with BRCA2. PMID:25488918

  2. Cellular Dynamics of Rad51 and Rad54 in Response to Postreplicative Stress and DNA Damage in HeLa Cells

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Eui-Hwan; Yoon, Seobin; Hahn, Yoonsoo; Kim, Keun P.

    2017-01-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is necessary for maintenance of genomic integrity and prevention of various mutations in tumor suppressor genes and proto-oncogenes. Rad51 and Rad54 are key HR factors that cope with replication stress and DNA breaks in eukaryotes. Rad51 binds to single-stranded DNA (ssDNA) to form the presynaptic filament that promotes a homology search and DNA strand exchange, and Rad54 stimulates the strand-pairing function of Rad51. Here, we studied the molecular dynamics of Rad51 and Rad54 during the cell cycle of HeLa cells. These cells constitutively express Rad51 and Rad54 throughout the entire cell cycle, and the formation of foci immediately increased in response to various types of DNA damage and replication stress, except for caffeine, which suppressed the Rad51-dependent HR pathway. Depletion of Rad51 caused severe defects in response to postreplicative stress. Accordingly, HeLa cells were arrested at the G2–M transition although a small amount of Rad51 was steadily maintained in HeLa cells. Our results suggest that cell cycle progression and proliferation of HeLa cells can be tightly controlled by the abundance of HR proteins, which are essential for the rapid response to postreplicative stress and DNA damage stress. PMID:28190324

  3. Rad51 recombinase prevents Mre11 nuclease-dependent degradation and excessive PrimPol-mediated elongation of nascent DNA after UV irradiation.

    PubMed

    Vallerga, María Belén; Mansilla, Sabrina F; Federico, María Belén; Bertolin, Agustina P; Gottifredi, Vanesa

    2015-12-01

    After UV irradiation, DNA polymerases specialized in translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) aid DNA replication. However, it is unclear whether other mechanisms also facilitate the elongation of UV-damaged DNA. We wondered if Rad51 recombinase (Rad51), a factor that escorts replication forks, aids replication across UV lesions. We found that depletion of Rad51 impairs S-phase progression and increases cell death after UV irradiation. Interestingly, Rad51 and the TLS polymerase polη modulate the elongation of nascent DNA in different ways, suggesting that DNA elongation after UV irradiation does not exclusively rely on TLS events. In particular, Rad51 protects the DNA synthesized immediately before UV irradiation from degradation and avoids excessive elongation of nascent DNA after UV irradiation. In Rad51-depleted samples, the degradation of DNA was limited to the first minutes after UV irradiation and required the exonuclease activity of the double strand break repair nuclease (Mre11). The persistent dysregulation of nascent DNA elongation after Rad51 knockdown required Mre11, but not its exonuclease activity, and PrimPol, a DNA polymerase with primase activity. By showing a crucial contribution of Rad51 to the synthesis of nascent DNA, our results reveal an unanticipated complexity in the regulation of DNA elongation across UV-damaged templates.

  4. Rad51 recombinase prevents Mre11 nuclease-dependent degradation and excessive PrimPol-mediated elongation of nascent DNA after UV irradiation

    PubMed Central

    Vallerga, María Belén; Mansilla, Sabrina F.; Federico, María Belén; Bertolin, Agustina P.; Gottifredi, Vanesa

    2015-01-01

    After UV irradiation, DNA polymerases specialized in translesion DNA synthesis (TLS) aid DNA replication. However, it is unclear whether other mechanisms also facilitate the elongation of UV-damaged DNA. We wondered if Rad51 recombinase (Rad51), a factor that escorts replication forks, aids replication across UV lesions. We found that depletion of Rad51 impairs S-phase progression and increases cell death after UV irradiation. Interestingly, Rad51 and the TLS polymerase polη modulate the elongation of nascent DNA in different ways, suggesting that DNA elongation after UV irradiation does not exclusively rely on TLS events. In particular, Rad51 protects the DNA synthesized immediately before UV irradiation from degradation and avoids excessive elongation of nascent DNA after UV irradiation. In Rad51-depleted samples, the degradation of DNA was limited to the first minutes after UV irradiation and required the exonuclease activity of the double strand break repair nuclease (Mre11). The persistent dysregulation of nascent DNA elongation after Rad51 knockdown required Mre11, but not its exonuclease activity, and PrimPol, a DNA polymerase with primase activity. By showing a crucial contribution of Rad51 to the synthesis of nascent DNA, our results reveal an unanticipated complexity in the regulation of DNA elongation across UV-damaged templates. PMID:26627254

  5. Associations of UBE2I with RAD52, UBL1, p53, and RAD51 proteins in a yeast two-hybrid system

    SciTech Connect

    Shen, Zhiyuan; Pardington-Purtymun, P.E.; Comeaux, J.C.

    1996-10-15

    The yeast RAD52-dependent pathway is involved in DNA recombination and double-strand break repair. Yeast ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme UBC9 participates in S- and M-phase cyclin degradation and mitotic control. Using the human RAD52 protein as the bait in a yeast two-hybrid system, we have identified a human homolog of yeast UBC9, designated UBE2I, that interacts with RAD52, RAD51, p53, and a ubiquitin-like protein UBL1. These interactions are UBE2I-specific, since another DNA repair-related ubiquitin-conjugating enzyme, RAD6 (UBC2), does not interact with these proteins. The interaction of UBE2I with RAD52 is mediated by RAD52`s self-association region. These results suggest that the RAD52-dependent processes, cell cycle control, p53-mediated pathway(s), and ubiquitination interact through human UBE2I. 22 refs., 3 figs.

  6. Collaborative roles of gammaH2AX and the Rad51 paralog Xrcc3 in homologous recombinational repair.

    PubMed

    Sonoda, Eiichiro; Zhao, Guang Yu; Kohzaki, Masaoki; Dhar, Pawan Kumar; Kikuchi, Koji; Redon, Christophe; Pilch, Duane R; Bonner, William M; Nakano, Atsushi; Watanabe, Masami; Nakayama, Tatsuo; Takeda, Shunichi; Takami, Yasunari

    2007-03-01

    One of the earliest events in the signal transduction cascade that initiates a DNA damage checkpoint is the phosphorylation on serine 139 of histone H2AX (gammaH2AX) at DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs). However, the role of gammaH2AX in DNA repair is poorly understood. To address this question, we generated chicken DT40 cells carrying a serine to alanine mutation at position 139 of H2AX (H2AX(-/S139A)) and examined their DNA repair capacity. H2AX(-/S139A) cells exhibited defective homologous recombinational repair (HR) as manifested by delayed Rad51 focus formation following ionizing radiation (IR) and hypersensitivity to the topoisomerase I inhibitor, camptothecin (CPT), which causes DSBs at replication blockage. Deletion of the Rad51 paralog gene, XRCC3, also delays Rad51 focus formation. To test the interaction of Xrcc3 and gammaH2AX, we disrupted XRCC3 in H2AX(-/S139A) cells. XRCC3(-/-)/H2AX(-/S139A) mutants were not viable, although this synthetic lethality was reversed by inserting a transgene that conditionally expresses wild-type H2AX. Upon repression of the wild-type H2AX transgene, XRCC3(-/-)/H2AX(-/S139A) cells failed to form Rad51 foci and exhibited markedly increased levels of chromosomal aberrations after CPT treatment. These results indicate that H2AX and XRCC3 act in separate arms of a branched pathway to facilitate Rad51 assembly.

  7. Genome stability of Arabidopsis atm, ku80 and rad51b mutants: somatic and transgenerational responses to stress.

    PubMed

    Yao, Youli; Bilichak, Andriy; Titov, Viktor; Golubov, Andrey; Kovalchuk, Igor

    2013-06-01

    DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) can be repaired via two main mechanisms: non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR). Our previous work showed that exposure to abiotic stresses resulted in an increase in point mutation frequency (PMF) and homologous recombination frequency (HRF), and these changes were heritable. We hypothesized that mutants impaired in DSB recognition and repair would also be deficient in somatic and transgenerational changes in PMF and HRF. To test this hypothesis, we analyzed the genome stability of the Arabidopsis thaliana mutants deficient in ATM (communication between DNA strand break recognition and the repair machinery), KU80 (deficient in NHEJ) and RAD51B (deficient in HR repair) genes. We found that all three mutants exhibited higher levels of DSBs. Plants impaired in ATM had a lower spontaneous PMF and HRF, whereas ku80 plants had higher frequencies. Plants impaired in RAD51B had a lower HRF. HRF in wild-type, atm and rad51b plants increased in response to several abiotic stressors, whereas it did not increase in ku80 plants. The progeny of stressed wild-type and ku80 plants exhibited an increase in HRF in response to all stresses, and the increase was higher in ku80 plants. The progeny of atm plants showed an increase in HRF only when the parental generation was exposed to cold or flood, whereas the progeny of rad51b plants completely lacked a transgenerational increase in HRF. Our experiments showed that mutants impaired in the recognition and repair of DSBs exhibited changes in the efficiency of DNA repair as reflected by changes in strand breaks, point mutation and HRF. They also showed that the HR RAD51B protein and the protein ATM that recognized damaged DNA might play an important role in transgenerational changes in HRF.

  8. Insights into the mechanism of Rad51 recombinase from the structure and properties of a filament interface mutant

    SciTech Connect

    Chen, Jianhong; Villanueva, Nicolas; Rould, Mark A.; Morrical, Scott W.

    2010-09-03

    Rad51 protein promotes homologous recombination in eukaryotes. Recombination activities are activated by Rad51 filament assembly on ssDNA. Previous studies of yeast Rad51 showed that His352 occupies an important position at the filament interface, where it could relay signals between subunits and active sites. To investigate, we characterized yeast Rad51 H352A and H352Y mutants, and solved the structure of H352Y. H352A forms catalytically competent but salt-labile complexes on ssDNA. In contrast, H352Y forms salt-resistant complexes on ssDNA, but is defective in nucleotide exchange, RPA displacement and strand exchange with full-length DNA substrates. The 2.5 {angstrom} crystal structure of H352Y reveals a right-handed helical filament in a high-pitch (130 {angstrom}) conformation with P61 symmetry. The catalytic core and dimer interface regions of H352Y closely resemble those of DNA-bound Escherichia coli RecA protein. The H352Y mutation stabilizes Phe187 from the adjacent subunit in a position that interferes with the {gamma}-phosphate-binding site of the Walker A motif/P-loop, potentially explaining the limited catalysis observed. Comparison of Rad51 H352Y, RecA-DNA and related structures reveals that the presence of bound DNA correlates with the isomerization of a conserved cis peptide near Walker B to the trans configuration, which appears to prime the catalytic glutamate residue for ATP hydrolysis.

  9. Specific inhibition of Wee1 kinase and Rad51 recombinase: A strategy to enhance the sensitivity of leukemic T-cells to ionizing radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks

    SciTech Connect

    Havelek, Radim; Cmielova, Jana; Kralovec, Karel; Bruckova, Lenka; Bilkova, Zuzana; Fousova, Ivana; Sinkorova, Zuzana; Vavrova, Jirina; Rezacova, Martina

    2014-10-24

    Highlights: • Pre-treatment with the inhibitors increased the sensitivity of Jurkat cells to irradiation. • Combining both inhibitors together resulted in a G2 cell cycle arrest abrogation in Jurkat. • Jurkat cells pre-treated with inhibitors were positive for γH2AX foci 24 h upon irradiation. • Pre-treatment with Rad51 RI-1 had no effect on apoptosis induction in MOLT-4 cells. • When dosed together, the combination decreased MOLT-4 cell survival. - Abstract: Present-day oncology sees at least two-thirds of cancer patients receiving radiation therapy as a part of their anticancer treatment. The objectives of the current study were to investigate the effects of the small molecule inhibitors of Wee1 kinase II (681641) and Rad51 (RI-1) on cell cycle progression, DNA double-strand breaks repair and apoptosis following ionizing radiation exposure in human leukemic T-cells Jurkat and MOLT-4. Pre-treatment with the Wee1 681641 or Rad51 RI-1 inhibitor alone increased the sensitivity of Jurkat cells to irradiation, however combining both inhibitors together resulted in a further enhancement of apoptosis. Jurkat cells pre-treated with inhibitors were positive for γH2AX foci 24 h upon irradiation. MOLT-4 cells were less affected by inhibitors application prior to ionizing radiation exposure. Pre-treatment with Rad51 RI-1 had no effect on apoptosis induction; however Wee1 681641 increased ionizing radiation-induced cell death in MOLT-4 cells.

  10. Rad51 and RecA juxtapose dsDNA ends ready for DNA ligase-catalyzed end-joining under recombinase-suppressive conditions.

    PubMed

    Konomura, Naoto; Arai, Naoto; Shinohara, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Jun; Iwasaki, Wakana; Ikawa, Shukuko; Kusano, Kohji; Shibata, Takehiko

    2017-01-09

    RecA-family recombinase-catalyzed ATP-dependent homologous joint formation is critical for homologous recombination, in which RecA or Rad51 binds first to single-stranded (ss)DNA and then interacts with double-stranded (ds)DNA. However, when RecA or Rad51 interacts with dsDNA before binding to ssDNA, the homologous joint-forming activity of RecA or Rad51 is quickly suppressed. We found that under these and adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-generating suppressive conditions for the recombinase activity, RecA or Rad51 at similar optimal concentrations enhances the DNA ligase-catalyzed dsDNA end-joining (DNA ligation) about 30- to 40-fold. The DNA ligation enhancement by RecA or Rad51 transforms most of the substrate DNA into multimers within 2-5 min, and for this enhancement, ADP is the common and best cofactor. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is effective for RecA, but not for Rad51. Rad51/RecA-enhanced DNA ligation depends on dsDNA-binding, as shown by a mutant, and is independent of physical interactions with the DNA ligase. These observations demonstrate the common and unique activities of RecA and Rad51 to juxtapose dsDNA-ends in preparation for covalent joining by a DNA ligase. This new in vitro function of Rad51 provides a simple explanation for our genetic observation that Rad51 plays a role in the fidelity of the end-joining of a reporter plasmid DNA, by yeast canonical non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) in vivo.

  11. Down-Regulation of Rad51 Activity during Meiosis in Yeast Prevents Competition with Dmc1 for Repair of Double-Strand Breaks

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Yan; Gaines, William A.; Callender, Tracy; Busygina, Valeria; Oke, Ashwini; Sung, Patrick; Fung, Jennifer C.; Hollingsworth, Nancy M.

    2014-01-01

    Interhomolog recombination plays a critical role in promoting proper meiotic chromosome segregation but a mechanistic understanding of this process is far from complete. In vegetative cells, Rad51 is a highly conserved recombinase that exhibits a preference for repairing double strand breaks (DSBs) using sister chromatids, in contrast to the conserved, meiosis-specific recombinase, Dmc1, which preferentially repairs programmed DSBs using homologs. Despite the different preferences for repair templates, both Rad51 and Dmc1 are required for interhomolog recombination during meiosis. This paradox has recently been explained by the finding that Rad51 protein, but not its strand exchange activity, promotes Dmc1 function in budding yeast. Rad51 activity is inhibited in dmc1Δ mutants, where the failure to repair meiotic DSBs triggers the meiotic recombination checkpoint, resulting in prophase arrest. The question remains whether inhibition of Rad51 activity is important during wild-type meiosis, or whether inactivation of Rad51 occurs only as a result of the absence of DMC1 or checkpoint activation. This work shows that strains in which mechanisms that down-regulate Rad51 activity are removed exhibit reduced numbers of interhomolog crossovers and noncrossovers. A hypomorphic mutant, dmc1-T159A, makes less stable presynaptic filaments but is still able to mediate strand exchange and interact with accessory factors. Combining dmc1-T159A with up-regulated Rad51 activity reduces interhomolog recombination and spore viability, while increasing intersister joint molecule formation. These results support the idea that down-regulation of Rad51 activity is important during meiosis to prevent Rad51 from competing with Dmc1 for repair of meiotic DSBs. PMID:24465215

  12. Rad51 and RecA juxtapose dsDNA ends ready for DNA ligase-catalyzed end-joining under recombinase-suppressive conditions

    PubMed Central

    Konomura, Naoto; Arai, Naoto; Shinohara, Takeshi; Kobayashi, Jun; Iwasaki, Wakana; Ikawa, Shukuko; Kusano, Kohji; Shibata, Takehiko

    2017-01-01

    RecA-family recombinase-catalyzed ATP-dependent homologous joint formation is critical for homologous recombination, in which RecA or Rad51 binds first to single-stranded (ss)DNA and then interacts with double-stranded (ds)DNA. However, when RecA or Rad51 interacts with dsDNA before binding to ssDNA, the homologous joint-forming activity of RecA or Rad51 is quickly suppressed. We found that under these and adenosine diphosphate (ADP)-generating suppressive conditions for the recombinase activity, RecA or Rad51 at similar optimal concentrations enhances the DNA ligase-catalyzed dsDNA end-joining (DNA ligation) about 30- to 40-fold. The DNA ligation enhancement by RecA or Rad51 transforms most of the substrate DNA into multimers within 2–5 min, and for this enhancement, ADP is the common and best cofactor. Adenosine triphosphate (ATP) is effective for RecA, but not for Rad51. Rad51/RecA-enhanced DNA ligation depends on dsDNA-binding, as shown by a mutant, and is independent of physical interactions with the DNA ligase. These observations demonstrate the common and unique activities of RecA and Rad51 to juxtapose dsDNA-ends in preparation for covalent joining by a DNA ligase. This new in vitro function of Rad51 provides a simple explanation for our genetic observation that Rad51 plays a role in the fidelity of the end-joining of a reporter plasmid DNA, by yeast canonical non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) in vivo. PMID:27794044

  13. Moonlighting at replication forks - a new life for homologous recombination proteins BRCA1, BRCA2 and RAD51.

    PubMed

    Kolinjivadi, Arun Mouli; Sannino, Vincenzo; de Antoni, Anna; Técher, Hervé; Baldi, Giorgio; Costanzo, Vincenzo

    2017-01-12

    Coordination between DNA replication and DNA repair ensures maintenance of genome integrity, which is lost in cancer cells. Emerging evidence has linked homologous recombination (HR) proteins RAD51, BRCA1 and BRCA2 to the stability of nascent DNA. This function appears to be distinct from double-strand break (DSB) repair and is in part due to the prevention of MRE11-mediated degradation of nascent DNA at stalled forks. The role of RAD51 in fork protection resembles the activity described for its prokaryotic orthologue RecA, which prevents nuclease-mediated degradation of DNA and promotes replication fork restart in cells challenged by DNA-damaging agents. Here, we examine the mechanistic aspects of HR-mediated fork protection, addressing the crosstalk between HR and replication proteins.

  14. Ubiquitylation of Rad51d Mediated by E3 Ligase Rnf138 Promotes the Homologous Recombination Repair Pathway

    PubMed Central

    Han, Deqiang; Liang, Junbo; Lu, Yalan; Xu, Longchang; Miao, Shiying; Lu, Lin-Yu; Song, Wei; Wang, Linfang

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitylation has an important role as a signal transducer that regulates protein function, subcellular localization, or stability during the DNA damage response. In this study, we show that Ring domain E3 ubiquitin ligases RNF138 is recruited to DNA damage site quickly. And the recruitment is mediated through its Zinc finger domains. We further confirm that RNF138 is phosphorylated by ATM at Ser124. However, the phosphorylation was dispensable for recruitment to the DNA damage site. Our findings also indicate that RAD51 assembly at DSB sites following irradiation is dramatically affected in RNF138-deficient cells. Hence, RNF138 is likely involved in regulating homologous recombination repair pathway. Consistently, efficiency of homologous recombination decreased observably in RNF138-depleted cells. In addition, RNF138-deficient cell is hypersensitive to DNA damage insults, such as IR and MMS. And the comet assay confirmed that RNF138 directly participated in DNA damage repair. Moreover, we find that RAD51D directly interacted with RNF138. And the recruitment of RAD51D to DNA damage site is delayed and unstable in RNF138-depleted cells. Taken together, these results suggest that RNF138 promotes the homologous recombination repair pathway. PMID:27195665

  15. Chromatin organization revealed by nanostructure of irradiation induced γH2AX, 53BP1 and Rad51 foci

    PubMed Central

    Reindl, Judith; Girst, Stefanie; Walsh, Dietrich W. M.; Greubel, Christoph; Schwarz, Benjamin; Siebenwirth, Christian; Drexler, Guido A.; Friedl, Anna A.; Dollinger, Günther

    2017-01-01

    The spatial distribution of DSB repair factors γH2AX, 53BP1 and Rad51 in ionizing radiation induced foci (IRIF) in HeLa cells using super resolution STED nanoscopy after low and high linear energy transfer (LET) irradiation was investigated. 53BP1 and γH2AX form IRIF with same mean size of (540 ± 40) nm after high LET irradiation while the size after low LET irradiation is significantly smaller. The IRIF of both repair factors show nanostructures with partial anti-correlation. These structures are related to domains formed within the chromatin territories marked by γH2AX while 53BP1 is mainly situated in the perichromatin region. The nanostructures have a mean size of (129 ± 6) nm and are found to be irrespective of the applied LET and the labelled damage marker. In contrast, Rad51 shows no nanostructure and a mean size of (143 ± 13) nm independent of LET. Although Rad51 is surrounded by 53BP1 it strongly anti-correlates meaning an exclusion of 53BP1 next to DSB when decision for homologous DSB repair happened. PMID:28094292

  16. Stimulation of fission yeast and mouse Hop2-Mnd1 of the Dmc1 and Rad51 recombinases

    PubMed Central

    Ploquin, Mickaël; Petukhova, Galina V.; Morneau, Dany; Déry, Ugo; Bransi, Ali; Stasiak, Andrzej; Camerini-Otero, R. Daniel; Masson, Jean-Yves

    2007-01-01

    Genetic analysis of fission yeast suggests a role for the spHop2–Mnd1 proteins in the Rad51 and Dmc1-dependent meiotic recombination pathways. In order to gain biochemical insights into this process, we purified Schizosaccharomyces pombe Hop2-Mnd1 to homogeneity. spHop2 and spMnd1 interact by co-immunoprecipitation and two-hybrid analysis. Electron microscopy reveals that S. pombe Hop2–Mnd1 binds single-strand DNA ends of 3′-tailed DNA. Interestingly, spHop2-Mnd1 promotes the renaturation of complementary single-strand DNA and catalyses strand exchange reactions with short oligonucleotides. Importantly, we show that spHop2-Mnd1 stimulates spDmc1-dependent strand exchange and strand invasion. Ca2+ alleviate the requirement for the order of addition of the proteins on DNA. We also demonstrate that while spHop2-Mnd1 affects spDmc1 specifically, mHop2 or mHop2-Mnd1 stimulates both the hRad51 and hDmc1 recombinases in strand exchange assays. Thus, our results suggest a crucial role for S. pombe and mouse Hop2-Mnd1 in homologous pairing and strand exchange and reveal evolutionary divergence in their specificity for the Dmc1 and Rad51 recombinases. PMID:17426123

  17. CBP and p300 histone acetyltransferases contribute to homologous recombination by transcriptionally activating the BRCA1 and RAD51 genes.

    PubMed

    Ogiwara, Hideaki; Kohno, Takashi

    2012-01-01

    Histone acetylation at DNA double-strand break (DSB) sites by CBP and p300 histone acetyltransferases (HATs) is critical for the recruitment of DSB repair proteins to chromatin. Here, we show that CBP and p300 HATs also function in DSB repair by transcriptionally activating the BRCA1 and RAD51 genes, which are involved in homologous recombination (HR), a major DSB repair system. siRNA-mediated depletion of CBP and p300 impaired HR activity and downregulated BRCA1 and RAD51 at the protein and mRNA levels. Chromatin immunoprecipitation assays showed that CBP and p300 bind to the promoter regions of the BRCA1 and RAD51 genes, and that depletion of CBP and/or p300 reduces H3 and H4 acetylation and inhibits binding of the transcription factor E2F1 to these promoters. Depletion of CBP and p300 impaired DNA damage-induced phosphorylation and chromatin binding of the single-strand DNA-binding protein RPA following BRCA1-mediated DNA end resection. Consistent with this, subsequent phosphorylation of CHK1 and activation of the G2/M damage checkpoint were also impaired. These results indicate that the HATs CBP and p300 play multiple roles in the activation of the cellular response to DSBs.

  18. Germline Mutations in PALB2, BRCA1, and RAD51C, Which Regulate DNA Recombination Repair, in Patients With Gastric Cancer.

    PubMed

    Sahasrabudhe, Ruta; Lott, Paul; Bohorquez, Mabel; Toal, Ted; Estrada, Ana P; Suarez, John J; Brea-Fernández, Alejandro; Cameselle-Teijeiro, José; Pinto, Carla; Ramos, Irma; Mantilla, Alejandra; Prieto, Rodrigo; Corvalan, Alejandro; Norero, Enrique; Alvarez, Carolina; Tapia, Teresa; Carvallo, Pilar; Gonzalez, Luz M; Cock-Rada, Alicia; Solano, Angela; Neffa, Florencia; Della Valle, Adriana; Yau, Chris; Soares, Gabriela; Borowsky, Alexander; Hu, Nan; He, Li-Ji; Han, Xiao-You; Taylor, Philip R; Goldstein, Alisa M; Torres, Javier; Echeverry, Magdalena; Ruiz-Ponte, Clara; Teixeira, Manuel R; Carvajal-Carmona, Luis G

    2017-04-01

    Up to 10% of cases of gastric cancer are familial, but so far, only mutations in CDH1 have been associated with gastric cancer risk. To identify genetic variants that affect risk for gastric cancer, we collected blood samples from 28 patients with hereditary diffuse gastric cancer (HDGC) not associated with mutations in CDH1 and performed whole-exome sequence analysis. We then analyzed sequences of candidate genes in 333 independent HDGC and non-HDGC cases. We identified 11 cases with mutations in PALB2, BRCA1, or RAD51C genes, which regulate homologous DNA recombination. We found these mutations in 2 of 31 patients with HDGC (6.5%) and 9 of 331 patients with sporadic gastric cancer (2.8%). Most of these mutations had been previously associated with other types of tumors and partially co-segregated with gastric cancer in our study. Tumors that developed in patients with these mutations had a mutation signature associated with somatic homologous recombination deficiency. Our findings indicate that defects in homologous recombination increase risk for gastric cancer.

  19. Enhanced dependency of KRAS-mutant colorectal cancer cells on RAD51-dependent homologous recombination repair identified from genetic interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Kalimutho, Murugan; Bain, Amanda L; Mukherjee, Bipasha; Nag, Purba; Nanayakkara, Devathri M; Harten, Sarah K; Harris, Janelle L; Subramanian, Goutham N; Sinha, Debottam; Shirasawa, Senji; Srihari, Sriganesh; Burma, Sandeep; Khanna, Kum Kum

    2017-02-07

    Activating KRAS mutations drive colorectal cancer tumorigenesis and influence response to anti-EGFR-targeted therapy. Despite recent advances in understanding Ras signaling biology and the revolution in therapies for melanoma using BRAF inhibitors, no targeted agents have been effective in KRAS-mutant cancers, mainly due to activation of compensatory pathways. Here, by leveraging the largest synthetic lethal genetic interactome in yeast, we identify that KRAS-mutated colorectal cancer cells have augmented homologous recombination repair (HRR) signaling. We found that KRAS mutation resulted in slowing and stalling of the replication fork and accumulation of DNA damage. Moreover, we found that KRAS-mutant HCT116 cells have an increase in MYC-mediated RAD51 expression with a corresponding increase in RAD51 recruitment to irradiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) compared to genetically complemented isogenic cells. MYC depletion using RNA interference significantly reduced IR-induced RAD51 foci formation and HRR. On the contrary, overexpression of either HA-tagged wild-type (WT) MYC or phospho-mutant S62A increased RAD51 protein levels and hence IR-induced RAD51 foci. Likewise, depletion of RAD51 selectively induced apoptosis in HCT116-mutant cells by increasing DSBs. Pharmacological inhibition targeting HRR signaling combined with PARP inhibition selectivity killed KRAS-mutant cells. Interestingly, these differences were not seen in a second isogenic pair of KRAS WT and mutant cells (DLD-1), likely due to their nondependency on the KRAS mutation for survival. Our data thus highlight a possible mechanism by which KRAS-mutant-dependent cells drive HRR in vitro by upregulating MYC-RAD51 expression. These data may offer a promising therapeutic vulnerability in colorectal cancer cells harboring otherwise nondruggable KRAS mutations, which warrants further investigation in vivo.

  20. BRCA2 and RAD51 promote double-strand break formation and cell death in response to gemcitabine.

    PubMed

    Jones, Rebecca M; Kotsantis, Panagiotis; Stewart, Grant S; Groth, Petra; Petermann, Eva

    2014-10-01

    Replication inhibitors cause replication fork stalling and double-strand breaks (DSB) that result from processing of stalled forks. During recovery from replication blocks, the homologous recombination (HR) factor RAD51 mediates fork restart and DSB repair. HR defects therefore sensitize cells to replication inhibitors, with clear implications for cancer therapy. Gemcitabine is a potent replication inhibitor used to treat cancers with mutations in HR genes such as BRCA2. Here, we investigate why, paradoxically, mutations in HR genes protect cells from killing by gemcitabine. Using DNA replication and DNA damage assays in mammalian cells, we show that even short gemcitabine treatments cause persistent replication inhibition. BRCA2 and RAD51 are recruited to chromatin early after removal of the drug, actively inhibit replication fork progression, and promote the formation of MUS81- and XPF-dependent DSBs that remain unrepaired. Our data suggest that HR intermediates formed at gemcitabine-stalled forks are converted into DSBs and thus contribute to gemcitabine-induced cell death, which could have implications for the treatment response of HR-deficient tumors.

  1. Somatic SNPs of the BRCA2 gene at the fragments encoding RAD51 binding sites of canine mammary tumors.

    PubMed

    Ozmen, O; Kul, S; Risvanli, A; Ozalp, G; Sabuncu, A; Kul, O

    2017-01-30

    Mammary tumors are the most common tumor type both in women and in female dogs. In women, heritable breast cancers have been linked mutations in the breast cancer susceptibility gene BRCA2 and it contains eight BRC repeats in exon 11 that bind to RAD51. In this study, we investigated the sequence variations of BRC1-BRC8 and C-terminus of canine BRCA2 gene. From a total of 64 canine patients with mammary tumors, 31 mammary tumors with benign and malign carcinomas and the 3 normal mammary glands were used for the study. In this study, 19 SNPs of exon 11 of BRCA2 in canine mammary tumors were detected for the first time. The c.2383A>C (T1425P) SNP was found to be the most probable disease-associated nsSNP. Our findings suggest that T1425P variation in BRC3 to be the most probable disease-associated nsSNP and may affect RAD51 binding strength.

  2. Variant (Swine Origin) Influenza Viruses in Humans

    MedlinePlus

    ... What's this? Submit Button Past Newsletters Variant Influenza Viruses: Background and CDC Risk Assessment and Reporting Language: ... Background CDC Assessment Reporting Background On Variant Influenza Viruses Swine flu viruses do not normally infect humans. ...

  3. Fanconi anemia complementation group D2 (FANCD2) functions independently of BRCA2- and RAD51-associated homologous recombination in response to DNA damage.

    PubMed

    Ohashi, Akihiro; Zdzienicka, Malgorzata Z; Chen, Junjie; Couch, Fergus J

    2005-04-15

    The BRCA2 breast cancer tumor suppressor is involved in the repair of double strand breaks and broken replication forks by homologous recombination through its interaction with DNA repair protein Rad51. Cells defective in BRCA2.FANCD1 are extremely sensitive to mitomycin C (MMC) similarly to cells deficient in any of the Fanconi anemia (FA) complementation group proteins (FANC). These observations suggest that the FA pathway and the BRCA2 and Rad51 repair pathway may be linked, although a functional connection between these pathways in DNA damage signaling remains to be determined. Here, we systematically investigated the interaction between these pathways. We show that in response to DNA damage, BRCA2-dependent Rad51 nuclear focus formation was normal in the absence of FANCD2 and that FANCD2 nuclear focus formation and mono-ubiquitination appeared normal in BRCA2-deficient cells. We report that the absence of BRCA2 substantially reduced homologous recombination repair of DNA breaks, whereas the absence of FANCD2 had little effect. Furthermore, we established that depletion of BRCA2 or Rad51 had a greater effect on cell survival in response to MMC than depletion of FANCD2 and that depletion of BRCA2 in FANCD2 mutant cells further sensitized these cells to MMC. Our results suggest that FANCD2 mediates double strand DNA break repair independently of Rad51-associated homologous recombination.

  4. A novel allele of RAD52 that causes severe DNA repair and recombination deficiencies only in the absence of RAD51 or RAD59.

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Y; Davis, A P; Symington, L S

    1999-01-01

    With the use of an intrachromosomal inverted repeat as a recombination reporter, we have shown that mitotic recombination is dependent on the RAD52 gene, but reduced only fivefold by mutation of RAD51. RAD59, a component of the RAD51-independent pathway, was identified previously by screening for mutations that reduced inverted-repeat recombination in a rad51 strain. Here we describe a rad52 mutation, rad52R70K, that also reduced recombination synergistically in a rad51 background. The phenotype of the rad52R70K strain, which includes weak gamma-ray sensitivity, a fourfold reduction in the rate of inverted-repeat recombination, elevated allelic recombination, sporulation proficiency, and a reduction in the efficiency of mating-type switching and single-strand annealing, was similar to that observed for deletion of the RAD59 gene. However, rad52R70K rad59 double mutants showed synergistic defects in ionizing radiation resistance, sporulation, and mating-type switching. These results suggest that Rad52 and Rad59 have partially overlapping functions and that Rad59 can substitute for this function of Rad52 in a RAD51 rad52R70K strain. PMID:10545446

  5. RAD51 and XRCC3 polymorphisms: impact on the risk and treatment outcomes of de novo inv(16) or t(16;16)/CBFβ-MYH11(+) acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Liu, Liang; Yang, Lin; Mi, Yingchang; Wang, Jianxiang; Li, Jianyong; Zhang, Yue; Ma, Xiaotang; Qin, Tiejun; Xu, Zefeng; Xiao, Zhijian

    2011-08-01

    DNA double-strand break repair via homologous recombination (HR) is essential in maintaining genetic integrity, and may modulate susceptibility to the development of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and influence outcomes of AML. This study was designed to evaluate the effects of polymorphisms in HR repair genes RAD51 and XRCC3 on the risk and treatment outcomes of inv(16)/t(16;16)/CBFβ-MYH11(+) AML. The distribution of polymorphisms in RAD51-G135C and XRCC3-Thr241Met were studied by PCR-RFLP analysis in 625 cases of de novo AML, including 105 cases with inv(16)/t(16;16)/CBFβ-MYH11, 806 family controls and 704 volunteer controls. It was found that the XRCC3-241Met variant significantly increased the risk of the development of the AML with inv(16)/t(16;16) as compared with both the volunteer control (OR=7.22; 95% CI, 4.37-11.91) and the family control (OR=7.99; 95% CI, 5.03-12.69). A retrospective study conducted in 103 inv(16)/t(16;16) AML patients. In multivariate analysis for the potential prognostic factors, the XRCC3-241Met variant significantly reduced disease-free survival (DFS) in complete remission (CR) achieved patients (HR=2.34, 95% CI, 1.32-4.16). These data indicate that the XRCC3-241Met variant may not be only a susceptibility factor to the AML with inv(16)/t(16;16), but also an independent poor-prognostic factor for this AML subtype.

  6. Modulation of Homology-Directed Repair in T98G Glioblastoma Cells Due to Interactions between Wildtype p53, Rad51 and HCMV IE1-72

    PubMed Central

    Kulkarni, Amit S.; Fortunato, Elizabeth A.

    2014-01-01

    Human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is a ubiquitous pathogen capable of causing life threatening consequences in neonates and immune-compromised individuals. HCMV inflicts site-specific double strand breaks (DSBs) in the cellular genome. DNA damage infliction raises the corollary question of virus modulation of DNA repair. We recently reported HDR was stimulated in wt human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs) during fully permissive infection or expression of the HCMV protein IE1-72 (IE72). These studies have been extended into semi-permissive T98G glioblastoma cells. T98Gs encode a mutant p53, which may contribute to their high baseline rate of HDR. We fully expected HCMV infection to increase HDR in T98Gs, similar to its effects in HFFs. Surprisingly in T98Gs HCMV infection, or sole expression of IE72, decreased HDR by two-fold. Transient expression of wt p53 in T98Gs also reduced HDR by two-fold. Dual transient expression of wt p53 and IE72 restored high baseline HDR levels. GST pulldown experiments revealed that both IE72 and wt p53 bound the important HDR protein, Rad51. We conclude that the expression of certain HCMV proteins can modulate HDR in an infected cell, dependent upon p53 status. We propose a model of the protein interactions explaining this behavior. PMID:24576846

  7. CRISPR Technology Reveals RAD(51)-ical Mechanisms of Repair in Roundworms: An Educational Primer for Use with "Promotion of Homologous Recombination by SWS-1 in Complex with RAD-51 Paralogs in Caenorhabditis elegans".

    PubMed

    Turcotte, Carolyn A; Andrews, Nicolas P; Sloat, Solomon A; Checchi, Paula M

    2016-11-01

    The mechanisms cells use to maintain genetic fidelity via DNA repair and the accuracy of these processes have garnered interest from scientists engaged in basic research to clinicians seeking improved treatment for cancer patients. Despite the continued advances, many details of DNA repair are still incompletely understood. In addition, the inherent complexity of DNA repair processes, even at the most fundamental level, makes it a challenging topic. This primer is meant to assist both educators and students in using a recent paper, "Promotion of homologous recombination by SWS-1 in complex with RAD-51 paralogs in Caenorhabditis elegans," to understand mechanisms of DNA repair. The goals of this primer are to highlight and clarify several key techniques utilized, with special emphasis on the clustered, regularly interspaced, short palindromic repeats technique and the ways in which it has revolutionized genetics research, as well as to provide questions for deeper in-class discussion.

  8. Sensitization of Tumor to {sup 212}Pb Radioimmunotherapy by Gemcitabine Involves Initial Abrogation of G2 Arrest and Blocked DNA Damage Repair by Interference With Rad51

    SciTech Connect

    Yong, Kwon Joong; Milenic, Diane E.; Baidoo, Kwamena E.; Brechbiel, Martin W.

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: To elucidate the mechanism of the therapeutic efficacy of targeted α-particle radiation therapy using {sup 212}Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab together with gemcitabine for treatment of disseminated peritoneal cancers. Methods and Materials: Mice bearing human colon cancer LS-174T intraperitoneal xenografts were pretreated with gemcitabine, followed by {sup 212}Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab and compared with controls. Results: Treatment with {sup 212}Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab increased the apoptotic rate in the S-phase-arrested tumors induced by gemcitabine at earlier time points (6 to 24 hours). {sup 212}Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab after gemcitabine pretreatment abrogated G2/M arrest at the same time points, which may be associated with the inhibition of Chk1 phosphorylation and, in turn, cell cycle perturbation, resulting in apoptosis. {sup 212}Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab treatment after gemcitabine pretreatment caused depression of DNA synthesis, DNA double-strand breaks, accumulation of unrepaired DNA, and down-regulation of Rad51 protein, indicating that DNA damage repair was blocked. In addition, modification in the chromatin structure of p21 may be associated with transcriptionally repressed chromatin states, indicating that the open structure was delayed at earlier time points. Conclusion: These findings suggest that the cell-killing efficacy of {sup 212}Pb-TCMC-trastuzumab after gemcitabine pretreatment may be associated with abrogation of the G2/M checkpoint, inhibition of DNA damage repair, and chromatin remodeling.

  9. Elevated Estrogen Receptor-α in VHL-Deficient Condition Induces Microtubule Organizing Center Amplification via Disruption of BRCA1/Rad51 Interaction

    PubMed Central

    Jung, Youn-Sang; Chun, Ho-Young; Yoon, Min-Ho; Park, Bum-Joon

    2014-01-01

    Since loss of VHL is frequently detected early phase genetic event in human renal cell carcinoma, pVHL is assumed to be indispensable for suppression of tumor initiation step. However, induction of HIF-1α, target of pVHL E3 ligase, is more adequate to angiogenesis step after tumor mass formation. Concerning this, it has been reported that pVHL is involved in centrosome location during metaphase and regulates ER-α signaling. Here, we provide the evidences that pVHL-mediated ER-α suppression is critical for microtubule organizing center (MTOC) maintaining and elevated ER-α promotes MTOC amplification through disruption of BRCA1-Rad51 interaction. In fact, numerous MTOC in VHL- or BRCA1-deficient cells are reduced by Fulvestrant, inhibitor of ER-α expression as well as antagonist. In addition, we reveal that activation of ER signaling can increase γ-tubulin, core factor of TuRC and render the resistance to Taxol. Thus, Fulvestrant but not Tamoxifen, antagonist against ER-α, can restore the Taxol sensitivity in VHL- or BRCA1-deficient cells. Our results suggest that pVHL-mediated ER-α suppression is important for regulation of MTOC as well as drug resistance. PMID:25499220

  10. Panobinostat enhances cytarabine and daunorubicin sensitivities in AML cells through suppressing the expression of BRCA1, CHK1, and Rad51.

    PubMed

    Xie, Chengzhi; Drenberg, Christina; Edwards, Holly; Caldwell, J Timothy; Chen, Wei; Inaba, Hiroto; Xu, Xuelian; Buck, Steven A; Taub, Jeffrey W; Baker, Sharyn D; Ge, Yubin

    2013-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) remains a challenging disease to treat and urgently requires new therapies to improve its treatment outcome. In this study, we investigated the molecular mechanisms underlying the cooperative antileukemic activities of panobinostat and cytarabine or daunorubicin (DNR) in AML cell lines and diagnostic blast samples in vitro and in vivo. Panobinostat suppressed expression of BRCA1, CHK1, and RAD51 in AML cells in a dose-dependent manner. Further, panobinostat significantly increased cytarabine- or DNR-induced DNA double-strand breaks and apoptosis, and abrogated S and/or G2/M cell cycle checkpoints. Analogous results were obtained by shRNA knockdown of BRCA1, CHK1, or RAD51. Cotreatment of NOD-SCID-IL2Rγ(null) mice bearing AML xenografts with panobinostat and cytarabine significantly increased survival compared to either cytarabine or panobinostat treatment alone. Additional studies revealed that panobinostat suppressed the expression of BRCA1, CHK1, and RAD51 through downregulation of E2F1 transcription factor. Our results establish a novel mechanism underlying the cooperative antileukemic activities of these drug combinations in which panobinostat suppresses expression of BRCA1, CHK1, and RAD51 to enhance cytarabine and daunorubicin sensitivities in AML cells.

  11. Saccharomyces cerevisiae Dmc1 and Rad51 proteins preferentially function with Tid1 and Rad54 proteins, respectively, to promote DNA strand invasion during genetic recombination.

    PubMed

    Nimonkar, Amitabh V; Dombrowski, Christopher C; Siino, Joseph S; Stasiak, Alicja Z; Stasiak, Andrzej; Kowalczykowski, Stephen C

    2012-08-17

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae Dmc1 and Tid1 proteins are required for the pairing of homologous chromosomes during meiotic recombination. This pairing is the precursor to the formation of crossovers between homologs, an event that is necessary for the accurate segregation of chromosomes. Failure to form crossovers can have serious consequences and may lead to chromosomal imbalance. Dmc1, a meiosis-specific paralog of Rad51, mediates the pairing of homologous chromosomes. Tid1, a Rad54 paralog, although not meiosis-specific, interacts with Dmc1 and promotes crossover formation between homologs. In this study, we show that purified Dmc1 and Tid1 interact physically and functionally. Dmc1 forms stable nucleoprotein filaments that can mediate DNA strand invasion. Tid1 stimulates Dmc1-mediated formation of joint molecules. Under conditions optimal for Dmc1 reactions, Rad51 is specifically stimulated by Rad54, establishing that Dmc1-Tid1 and Rad51-Rad54 function as specific pairs. Physical interaction studies show that specificity in function is not dictated by direct interactions between the proteins. Our data are consistent with the hypothesis that Rad51-Rad54 function together to promote intersister DNA strand exchange, whereas Dmc1-Tid1 tilt the bias toward interhomolog DNA strand exchange.

  12. CHK1 and RAD51 activation after DNA damage is regulated via urokinase receptor/TLR4 signaling

    PubMed Central

    Narayanaswamy, Pavan B; Tkachuk, Sergey; Haller, Hermann; Dumler, Inna; Kiyan, Yulia

    2016-01-01

    Mechanisms of DNA damage and repair signaling are not completely understood that hinder the efficiency of cancer therapy. Urokinase-type plasminogen activator receptor (PLAUR) is highly expressed in most solid cancers and serves as a marker of poor prognosis. We show that PLAUR actively promotes DNA repair in cancer cells. On the contrary, downregulation of PLAUR expression results in delayed DNA repair. We found PLAUR to be essential for activation of Checkpoint kinase 1 (CHK1); maintenance of cell cycle arrest after DNA damage in a TP53-dependent manner; expression, nuclear import and recruitment to DNA-damage foci of RAD51 recombinase, the principal protein involved in the homologous recombination repair pathway. Underlying mechanism implies auto-/paracrine signaling of PLAUR/TLR4 receptor complex leading to activation of CHK1 and DNA repair. The signaling is induced by a danger molecule released by DNA-damaged cells and mediates, at least partially, activation of DNA-damage response. This study describes a new mechanism of DNA repair activation initiated by auto-/paracrine signaling of membrane receptors PLAUR/TLR4. It adds to the understanding of role of PLAUR in cancer and provides a rationale for therapeutic targeting of PLAUR/TLR4 interaction in TP53-positive cancers. PMID:27685627

  13. Reduced FANCD2 influences spontaneous SCE and RAD51 foci formation in uveal melanoma and Fanconi anaemia.

    PubMed

    Gravells, P; Hoh, L; Solovieva, S; Patil, A; Dudziec, E; Rennie, I G; Sisley, K; Bryant, H E

    2013-11-14

    Uveal melanoma (UM) is unique among cancers in displaying reduced endogenous levels of sister chromatid exchange (SCE). Here we demonstrate that FANCD2 expression is reduced in UM and that ectopic expression of FANCD2 increased SCE. Similarly, FANCD2-deficient fibroblasts (PD20) derived from Fanconi anaemia patients displayed reduced spontaneous SCE formation relative to their FANCD2-complemented counterparts, suggesting that this observation is not specific to UM. In addition, spontaneous RAD51 foci were reduced in UM and PD20 cells compared with FANCD2-proficient cells. This is consistent with a model where spontaneous SCEs are the end product of endogenous recombination events and implicates FANCD2 in the promotion of recombination-mediated repair of endogenous DNA damage and in SCE formation during normal DNA replication. In both UM and PD20 cells, low SCE was reversed by inhibiting DNA-PKcs (DNA-dependent protein kinase, catalytic subunit). Finally, we demonstrate that both PD20 and UM are sensitive to acetaldehyde, supporting a role for FANCD2 in repair of lesions induced by such endogenous metabolites. Together, these data suggest FANCD2 may promote spontaneous SCE by influencing which double-strand break repair pathway predominates during normal S-phase progression.

  14. Atmospheric-pressure plasma jet induces DNA double-strand breaks that require a Rad51-mediated homologous recombination for repair in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yoonna; Kim, Kangil; Kang, Kyu-Tae; Lee, Jong-Soo; Yang, Sang Sik; Chung, Woo-Hyun

    2014-10-15

    Non-thermal plasma generated under atmospheric pressure produces a mixture of chemically reactive molecules and has been developed for a number of biomedical applications. Recently, plasma jet has been proposed as novel cancer therapies based on the observation that free radicals generated by plasma jet induce mitochondria-mediated apoptotic cell death. We show here that air plasma jet induces DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) in yeast chromosomes leading to genomic instability and loss of viability, which are alleviated by Rad51, the yeast homolog of Escherichiacoli RecA recombinase, through DNA damage repair by a homologous recombination (HR) process. Hypersensitivity of rad51 mutant to air plasma was not restored by antioxidant treatment unlike sod1 mutant that was highly sensitive to reactive oxygen species (ROS) challenge, suggesting that plasma jet induces DSB-mediated cell death independent of ROS generation. These results may provide a new insight into the mechanism of air plasma jet-induced cell death.

  15. Different mating-type-regulated genes affect the DNA repair defects of Saccharomyces RAD51, RAD52 and RAD55 mutants.

    PubMed

    Valencia-Burton, Maria; Oki, Masaya; Johnson, Jean; Seier, Tracey A; Kamakaka, Rohinton; Haber, James E

    2006-09-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells expressing both a- and alpha-mating-type (MAT) genes (termed mating-type heterozygosity) exhibit higher rates of spontaneous recombination and greater radiation resistance than cells expressing only MATa or MATalpha. MAT heterozygosity suppresses recombination defects of four mutations involved in homologous recombination: complete deletions of RAD55 or RAD57, an ATPase-defective Rad51 mutation (rad51-K191R), and a C-terminal truncation of Rad52, rad52-Delta327. We investigated the genetic basis of MAT-dependent suppression of these mutants by deleting genes whose expression is controlled by the Mata1-Matalpha2 repressor and scoring resistance to both campothecin (CPT) and phleomycin. Haploid rad55Delta strains became more damage resistant after deleting genes required for nonhomologous end-joining (NHEJ), a process that is repressed in MATa/MATalpha cells. Surprisingly, NHEJ mutations do not suppress CPT sensitivity of rad51-K191R or rad52-Delta327. However, rad51-K191R is uniquely suppressed by deleting the RME1 gene encoding a repressor of meiosis or its coregulator SIN4; this effect is independent of the meiosis-specific homolog, Dmc1. Sensitivity of rad52-Delta327 to CPT was unexpectedly increased by the MATa/MATalpha-repressed gene YGL193C, emphasizing the complex ways in which MAT regulates homologous recombination. The rad52-Delta327 mutation is suppressed by deleting the prolyl isomerase Fpr3, which is not MAT regulated. rad55Delta is also suppressed by deletion of PST2 and/or YBR052C (RFS1, rad55 suppressor), two members of a three-gene family of flavodoxin-fold proteins that associate in a nonrandom fashion with chromatin. All three recombination-defective mutations are made more sensitive by deletions of Rad6 and of the histone deacetylases Rpd3 and Ume6, although these mutations are not themselves CPT or phleomycin sensitive.

  16. Yap1 and Skn7 genetically interact with Rad51 in response to oxidative stress and DNA double-strand break in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    PubMed

    Yi, Dae Gwan; Kim, Myung Ju; Choi, Ji Eun; Lee, Jihyun; Jung, Joohee; Huh, Won-Ki; Chung, Woo-Hyun

    2016-12-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS)-mediated DNA adducts as well as DNA strand breaks are highly mutagenic leading to genomic instability and tumorigenesis. DNA damage repair pathways and oxidative stress response signaling have been proposed to be highly associated, but the underlying interaction remains unknown. In this study, we employed mutant strains lacking Rad51, the homolog of E. coli RecA recombinase, and Yap1 or Skn7, two major transcription factors responsive to ROS, to examine genetic interactions between double-strand break (DSB) repair proteins and cellular redox regulators in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Abnormal expression of YAP1 or SKN7 aggravated the mutation rate of rad51 mutants and their sensitivity to DSB- or ROS-generating reagents. Rad51 deficiency exacerbated genome instability in the presence of increased levels of ROS, and the accumulation of DSB lesions resulted in elevated intracellular ROS levels. Our findings suggest that evident crosstalk between DSB repair pathways and ROS signaling proteins contributes to cell survival and maintenance of genome integrity in response to genotoxic stress.

  17. Complex formation in yeast double-strand break repair: participation of Rad51, Rad52, Rad55, and Rad57 proteins.

    PubMed Central

    Hays, S L; Firmenich, A A; Berg, P

    1995-01-01

    The repair of DNA double-strand breaks in Saccharomyces cerevisiae requires genes of the RAD52 epistasis group, of which RAD55 and RAD57 are members. Here, we show that the x-ray sensitivity of rad55 and rad57 mutant strains is suppressible by overexpression of RAD51 or RAD52. Virtually complete suppression is provided by the simultaneous overexpression of RAD51 and RAD52. This suppression occurs at 23 degrees C, where these mutants are more sensitive to x-rays, as well as at 30 degrees C and 36 degrees C. In addition, a recombination defect of rad55 and rad57 mutants is similarly suppressed. Direct in vivo interactions between the Rad51 and Rad55 proteins, and between Rad55 and Rad57, have also been identified by using the two-hybrid system. These results indicate that these four proteins constitute part of a complex, a "recombinosome," to effect the recombinational repair of double-strand breaks. PMID:7624345

  18. Histone deacetylases 1 and 2 cooperate in regulating BRCA1, CHK1, and RAD51 expression in acute myeloid leukemia cells

    PubMed Central

    Edwards, Holly; Wang, Guan; Taub, Jeffrey W; Ge, Yubin

    2017-01-01

    Resistance to chemotherapy and a high relapse rate highlight the importance of finding new therapeutic options for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Histone deacetylase (HDAC) inhibitors (HDACIs) are a promising class of drugs for the treatment of AML. HDACIs have limited single-agent clinical activities, but when combined with conventional or investigational drugs they have demonstrated favorable outcomes. Previous studies have shown that decreasing expression of important DNA damage repair proteins enhances standard chemotherapy drugs. In our recent studies, the pan-HDACI panobinostat has been shown to enhance conventional chemotherapy drugs cytarabine and daunorubicin in AML cells by decreasing the expression of BRCA1, CHK1, and RAD51. In this study, we utilized class- and isoform-specific HDACIs and shRNA knockdown of individual HDACs to determine which HDACs are responsible for decreased expression of BRCA1, CHK1, and RAD51 following pan-HDACI treatment in AML cells. We found that inhibition of both HDAC1 and HDAC2 was necessary to decrease the expression of BRCA1, CHK1, and RAD51, enhance cytarabine- or daunorubicin-induced DNA damage and apoptosis, and abrogate cytarabine- or daunorubicin-induced cell cycle checkpoint activation in AML cells. These findings may aid in the development of rationally designed drug combinations for the treatment of AML. PMID:28030834

  19. Oversized AAV transductifon is mediated via a DNA-PKcs-independent, Rad51C-dependent repair pathway.

    PubMed

    Hirsch, Matthew L; Li, Chengwen; Bellon, Isabella; Yin, Chaoying; Chavala, Sai; Pryadkina, Marina; Richard, Isabelle; Samulski, Richard Jude

    2013-12-01

    A drawback of gene therapy using adeno-associated virus (AAV) is the DNA packaging restriction of the viral capsid (<4.7 kb). Recent observations demonstrate oversized AAV genome transduction through an unknown mechanism. Herein, AAV production using an oversized reporter (6.2 kb) resulted in chloroform and DNase-resistant particles harboring distinct "fragment" AAV (fAAV) genomes (5.0, 2.4, and 1.6 kb). Fractionation experiments determined that only the larger "fragments" mediated transduction in vitro, and relatively efficient transduction was also demonstrated in the muscle, the eye, and the liver. In contrast with concatemerization-dependent large-gene delivery by split AAV, fAAV transduction is independent of the catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs) in vitro and in vivo while disproportionately reliant on the DNA strand-annealing protein Rad51C. Importantly, fAAV's unique dependence on DNA repair proteins, compared with intact AAV, strongly suggests that the majority of oversized AAV transduction is mediated by fragmented genomes. Although fAAV transduction is less efficient than intact AAV, it is enhanced fourfold in muscle and sevenfold in the retina compared with split AAV transduction. Furthermore, fAAV carrying codon-optimized therapeutic dysferlin cDNA in a 7.5 kb expression cassette restored dysferlin levels in a dystrophic model. Collectively, oversized AAV genome transduction requires unique DNA repair pathways and offers an alternative, more efficient strategy for large-gene therapy.

  20. Novel Human Butyrylcholinesterase Variants: Toward Organophosphonate Detoxication

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Human butyrylcholinesterase (hBChE) is currently being developed as a detoxication enzyme for stoichiometric binding and/or catalytic hydrolysis of organophosphates. Herein, we describe the use of a molecular evolution method to develop novel hBChE variants with increased resistance to stereochemically defined nerve agent model compounds of soman, sarin, and cyclosarin. Novel hBChE variants (Y332S, D340H, and Y332S/D340H) were identified with an increased resistance to nerve agent model compounds that retained robust intrinsic catalytic efficiency. Molecular dynamics simulations of these variants revealed insights into the mechanism by which these structural changes conferred nerve agent model compound resistance. PMID:24902043

  1. Rad18 is required for functional interactions between FANCD2, BRCA2, and Rad51 to repair DNA topoisomerase 1-poisons induced lesions and promote fork recovery

    PubMed Central

    Tripathi, Kaushlendra; Mani, Chinnadurai; Clark, David W; Palle, Komaraiah

    2016-01-01

    Camptothecin (CPT) and its analogues are chemotherapeutic agents that covalently and reversibly link DNA Topoisomerase I to its nicked DNA intermediate eliciting the formation of DNA double strand breaks (DSB) during replication. The repair of these DSB involves multiple DNA damage response and repair proteins. Here we demonstrate that CPT-induced DNA damage promotes functional interactions between BRCA2, FANCD2, Rad18, and Rad51 to repair the replication-associated DSB through homologous recombination (HR). Loss of any of these proteins leads to equal disruption of HR repair, causes chromosomal aberrations and sensitizes cells to CPT. Rad18 appears to function upstream in this repair pathway as its downregulation prevents activation of FANCD2, diminishes BRCA2 and Rad51 protein levels, formation of nuclear foci of all three proteins and recovery of stalled or collapsed replication forks in response to CPT. Taken together this work further elucidates the complex interplay of DNA repair proteins in the repair of replication-associated DSB. PMID:26871286

  2. Role of the insulin-like growth factor I/insulin receptor substrate 1 axis in Rad51 trafficking and DNA repair by homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Trojanek, Joanna; Ho, Thu; Del Valle, Luis; Nowicki, Michal; Wang, Jin Ying; Lassak, Adam; Peruzzi, Francesca; Khalili, Kamel; Skorski, Tomasz; Reiss, Krzysztof

    2003-11-01

    The receptor for insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-IR) controls normal and pathological growth of cells. DNA repair pathways represent an unexplored target through which the IGF-IR signaling system might support pathological growth leading to cellular transformation. However, this study demonstrates that IGF-I stimulation supports homologous recombination-directed DNA repair (HRR). This effect involves an interaction between Rad51 and the major IGF-IR signaling molecule, insulin receptor substrate 1 (IRS-1). The binding occurs within the cytoplasm, engages the N-terminal domain of IRS-1, and is attenuated by IGF-I-mediated IRS-1 tyrosine phosphorylation. In the absence of IGF-I stimulation, or if mutated IGF-IR fails to phosphorylate IRS-1, localization of Rad51 to the sites of damaged DNA is diminished. These results point to a direct role of IRS-1 in HRR and suggest a novel role for the IGF-IR/IRS-1 axis in supporting the stability of the genome.

  3. Rad51/Dmc1 paralogs and mediators oppose DNA helicases to limit hybrid DNA formation and promote crossovers during meiotic recombination

    PubMed Central

    Lorenz, Alexander; Mehats, Alizée; Osman, Fekret; Whitby, Matthew C.

    2014-01-01

    During meiosis programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are repaired by homologous recombination using the sister chromatid or the homologous chromosome (homolog) as a template. This repair results in crossover (CO) and non-crossover (NCO) recombinants. Only CO formation between homologs provides the physical linkages guiding correct chromosome segregation, which are essential to produce healthy gametes. The factors that determine the CO/NCO decision are still poorly understood. Using Schizosaccharomyces pombe as a model we show that the Rad51/Dmc1-paralog complexes Rad55-Rad57 and Rdl1-Rlp1-Sws1 together with Swi5-Sfr1 play a major role in antagonizing both the FANCM-family DNA helicase/translocase Fml1 and the RecQ-type DNA helicase Rqh1 to limit hybrid DNA formation and promote Mus81-Eme1-dependent COs. A common attribute of these protein complexes is an ability to stabilize the Rad51/Dmc1 nucleoprotein filament, and we propose that it is this property that imposes constraints on which enzymes gain access to the recombination intermediate, thereby controlling the manner in which it is processed and resolved. PMID:25414342

  4. Rad51/Dmc1 paralogs and mediators oppose DNA helicases to limit hybrid DNA formation and promote crossovers during meiotic recombination.

    PubMed

    Lorenz, Alexander; Mehats, Alizée; Osman, Fekret; Whitby, Matthew C

    2014-12-16

    During meiosis programmed DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) are repaired by homologous recombination using the sister chromatid or the homologous chromosome (homolog) as a template. This repair results in crossover (CO) and non-crossover (NCO) recombinants. Only CO formation between homologs provides the physical linkages guiding correct chromosome segregation, which are essential to produce healthy gametes. The factors that determine the CO/NCO decision are still poorly understood. Using Schizosaccharomyces pombe as a model we show that the Rad51/Dmc1-paralog complexes Rad55-Rad57 and Rdl1-Rlp1-Sws1 together with Swi5-Sfr1 play a major role in antagonizing both the FANCM-family DNA helicase/translocase Fml1 and the RecQ-type DNA helicase Rqh1 to limit hybrid DNA formation and promote Mus81-Eme1-dependent COs. A common attribute of these protein complexes is an ability to stabilize the Rad51/Dmc1 nucleoprotein filament, and we propose that it is this property that imposes constraints on which enzymes gain access to the recombination intermediate, thereby controlling the manner in which it is processed and resolved.

  5. Expression of PH Domain Leucine-rich Repeat Protein Phosphatase, Forkhead Homeobox Type O 3a and RAD51, and their Relationships with Clinicopathologic Features and Prognosis in Ovarian Serous Adenocarcinoma

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jun; Wang, Jun-Chao; Li, Yue-Hong; Wang, Rui-Xue; Fan, Xiao-Mei

    2017-01-01

    Background: Ovarian serous adenocarcinoma can be divided into low- and high-grade tumors, which exhibit substantial differences in pathogenesis, clinicopathology, and prognosis. This study aimed to investigate the differences in the PH domain leucine-rich repeat protein phosphatase (PHLPP), forkhead homeobox type O 3a (FoxO3a), and RAD51 protein expressions, and their associations with prognosis in patients with low- and high-grade ovarian serous adenocarcinomas. Methods: The PHLPP, FoxO3a, and RAD51 protein expressions were examined in 94 high- and 26 low-grade ovarian serous adenocarcinomas by immunohistochemistry. The differences in expression and their relationships with pathological features and prognosis were analyzed. Results: In high-grade serous adenocarcinomas, the positive rates of PHLPP and FoxO3a were 24.5% and 26.6%, while in low-grade tumors, they were 23.1% and 26.9%, respectively (P < 0.05 vs. the control specimens; low- vs. high-grade: P > 0.05). The positive rates of RAD51 were 70.2% and 65.4% in high- and low-grade serous adenocarcinomas, respectively (P < 0.05 vs. the control specimens; low- vs. high-grade: P > 0.05). Meanwhile, in high-grade tumors, Stage III/IV tumors and lymph node and omental metastases were significantly associated with lower PHLPP and FoxO3a and higher RAD51 expression. The 5-year survival rates of patients with PHLPP- and FoxO3a-positive high-grade tumors (43.5% and 36.0%) were significantly higher than in patients with PHLPP-negative tumors (5.6% and 7.2%, respectively; P < 0.05). Similarly, the 5-year survival rate of RAD51-positive patients (3.0%) was significantly lower than in negative patients (42.9%; P < 0.05). In low-grade tumors, the PHLPP, FoxO3a, and RAD51 expressions were not significantly correlated with lymph node metastasis, omental metastasis, Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics stage, or prognosis. Conclusions: Abnormal PHLPP, FoxO3a, and RAD51 protein expressions may be involved in the development

  6. Characterization of recombinase DMC1B and its functional role as Rad51 in DNA damage repair in Giardia duodenalis trophozoites.

    PubMed

    Torres-Huerta, Ana Laura; Martínez-Miguel, Rosa María; Bazán-Tejeda, María Luisa; Bermúdez-Cruz, Rosa María

    2016-08-01

    Homologous recombination (HR) is a highly conserved pathway for the repair of chromosomes that harbor DNA double-stranded breaks (DSBs). The recombinase RAD51 plays a key role by catalyzing the pairing of homologous DNA molecules and the exchange of information between them. Two putative DMC1 homologs (DMC1A and DMC1B) have been identified in Giardia duodenalis. In terms of sequences, GdDMC1A and GdDMC1B bear all of the characteristic recombinase domains: DNA binding domains (helix-turn-helix motif, loops 1 and 2), an ATPcap and Walker A and B motifs associated with ATP binding and hydrolysis. Because GdDMC1B is expressed at the trophozoite stage and GdDMC1A is expressed in the cyst stage, we cloned the giardial dmc1B gene and expressed and purified its protein to determine its activities, including DNA binding, ATP hydrolysis, and DNA strand exchange. Our results revealed that it possessed these activities, and they were modulated by divalent metal ions in different manners. GdDMC1B expression at the protein and transcript levels, as well as its subcellular localization in trophozoites upon DNA damage, was assessed. We found a significant increase in GdDMC1B transcript and protein levels after ionizing radiation treatment. Additionally, GdDMC1B protein was mostly located in the nucleus of trophozoites after DNA damage. These results indicate that GdDMC1B is the recombinase responsible for DSBs repair in the trophozoite; therefore, a functional Rad51 role is proposed for GdDMC1B.

  7. RAD52 inactivation is synthetically lethal with deficiencies in BRCA1 and PALB2 in addition to BRCA2 through RAD51-mediated homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Lok, B H; Carley, A C; Tchang, B; Powell, S N

    2013-07-25

    Synthetic lethality is an approach to study selective cell killing based on genotype. Previous work in our laboratory has shown that loss of RAD52 is synthetically lethal with BRCA2 deficiency, while exhibiting no impact on cell growth and viability in BRCA2-proficient cells. We now show that this same synthetically lethal relationship is evident in cells with deficiencies in BRCA1 or PALB2, which implicates BRCA1, PALB2 and BRCA2 in an epistatic relationship with one another. When RAD52 was depleted in BRCA1- or PALB2-deficient cells, a severe reduction in plating efficiency was observed, with many abortive attempts at cell division apparent in the double-depleted background. In contrast, when RAD52 was depleted in a BRCA1- or PALB2-wildtype background, a negligible decrease in colony survival was observed. The frequency of ionizing radiation-induced RAD51 foci formation and double-strand break-induced homologous recombination (HR) was decreased by 3- and 10-fold, respectively, when RAD52 was knocked down in BRCA1- or PALB2-depleted cells, with minimal effect in BRCA1- or PALB2-proficient cells. RAD52 function was independent of BRCA1 status, as evidenced by the lack of any defect in RAD52 foci formation in BRCA1-depleted cells. Collectively, these findings suggest that RAD52 is an alternative repair pathway of RAD51-mediated HR, and a target for therapy in cells deficient in the BRCA1-PALB2-BRCA2 repair pathway.

  8. Constitutive promoter methylation of BRCA1 and RAD51C in patients with familial ovarian cancer and early-onset sporadic breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hansmann, Tamara; Pliushch, Galyna; Leubner, Monika; Kroll, Patricia; Endt, Daniela; Gehrig, Andrea; Preisler-Adams, Sabine; Wieacker, Peter; Haaf, Thomas

    2012-11-01

    Genetic defects in breast cancer (BC) susceptibility genes, most importantly BRCA1 and BRCA2, account for ~40% of hereditary BC and ovarian cancer (OC). Little is known about the contribution of constitutive (soma-wide) epimutations to the remaining cases. We developed bisulfite pyrosequencing assays to screen >600 affected BRCA1/BRCA2 mutation-negative patients from the German Consortium for Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer for constitutive hypermethylation of ATM, BRCA1, BRCA2, RAD51C, PTEN and TP53 in blood cells. In a second step, patients with ≥6% promoter methylation were analyzed by bisulfite plasmid sequencing to demonstrate the presence of hypermethylated alleles (epimutations), indicative of epigenetic gene silencing. Altogether we identified nine (1.4%) patients with constitutive BRCA1 and three (0.5%) with RAD51C hypermethylation. Epimutations were found in both sporadic cases, in particular in 2 (5.5%) of 37 patients with early-onset BC, and familial cases, in particular 4 (10%) of 39 patients with OC. Hypermethylation was always confined to one of the two parental alleles in a subset (12-40%) of the analyzed cells. Because epimutations occurred in cell types from different embryonal layers, they most likely originated in single cells during early somatic development. We propose that analogous to germline genetic mutations constitutive epimutations may serve as the first hit of tumor development. Because the role of constitutive epimutations in cancer development is likely to be largely underestimated, future strategies for effective testing of susceptibility to BC and OC should include an epimutation screen.

  9. Non-coding genetic variants in human disease.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Feng; Lupski, James R

    2015-10-15

    Genetic variants, including single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) and copy number variants (CNVs), in the non-coding regions of the human genome can play an important role in human traits and complex diseases. Most of the genome-wide association study (GWAS) signals map to non-coding regions and potentially point to non-coding variants, whereas their functional interpretation is challenging. In this review, we discuss the human non-coding variants and their contributions to human diseases in the following four parts. (i) Functional annotations of non-coding SNPs mapped by GWAS: we discuss recent progress revealing some of the molecular mechanisms for GWAS signals affecting gene function. (ii) Technical progress in interpretation of non-coding variants: we briefly describe some of the technologies for functional annotations of non-coding variants, including the methods for genome-wide mapping of chromatin interaction, computational tools for functional predictions and the new genome editing technologies useful for dissecting potential functional consequences of non-coding variants. (iii) Non-coding CNVs in human diseases: we review our emerging understanding the role of non-coding CNVs in human disease. (iv) Compound inheritance of large genomic deletions and non-coding variants: compound inheritance at a locus consisting of coding variants plus non-coding ones is described.

  10. Non-coding genetic variants in human disease

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Feng; Lupski, James R.

    2015-01-01

    Genetic variants, including single-nucleotide variants (SNVs) and copy number variants (CNVs), in the non-coding regions of the human genome can play an important role in human traits and complex diseases. Most of the genome-wide association study (GWAS) signals map to non-coding regions and potentially point to non-coding variants, whereas their functional interpretation is challenging. In this review, we discuss the human non-coding variants and their contributions to human diseases in the following four parts. (i) Functional annotations of non-coding SNPs mapped by GWAS: we discuss recent progress revealing some of the molecular mechanisms for GWAS signals affecting gene function. (ii) Technical progress in interpretation of non-coding variants: we briefly describe some of the technologies for functional annotations of non-coding variants, including the methods for genome-wide mapping of chromatin interaction, computational tools for functional predictions and the new genome editing technologies useful for dissecting potential functional consequences of non-coding variants. (iii) Non-coding CNVs in human diseases: we review our emerging understanding the role of non-coding CNVs in human disease. (iv) Compound inheritance of large genomic deletions and non-coding variants: compound inheritance at a locus consisting of coding variants plus non-coding ones is described. PMID:26152199

  11. The chromatin assembly factor 1 promotes Rad51-dependent template switches at replication forks by counteracting D-loop disassembly by the RecQ-type helicase Rqh1.

    PubMed

    Pietrobon, Violena; Fréon, Karine; Hardy, Julien; Costes, Audrey; Iraqui, Ismail; Ochsenbein, Françoise; Lambert, Sarah A E

    2014-10-01

    At blocked replication forks, homologous recombination mediates the nascent strands to switch template in order to ensure replication restart, but faulty template switches underlie genome rearrangements in cancer cells and genomic disorders. Recombination occurs within DNA packaged into chromatin that must first be relaxed and then restored when recombination is completed. The chromatin assembly factor 1, CAF-1, is a histone H3-H4 chaperone involved in DNA synthesis-coupled chromatin assembly during DNA replication and DNA repair. We reveal a novel chromatin factor-dependent step during replication-coupled DNA repair: Fission yeast CAF-1 promotes Rad51-dependent template switches at replication forks, independently of the postreplication repair pathway. We used a physical assay that allows the analysis of the individual steps of template switch, from the recruitment of recombination factors to the formation of joint molecules, combined with a quantitative measure of the resulting rearrangements. We reveal functional and physical interplays between CAF-1 and the RecQ-helicase Rqh1, the BLM homologue, mutations in which cause Bloom's syndrome, a human disease associating genome instability with cancer predisposition. We establish that CAF-1 promotes template switch by counteracting D-loop disassembly by Rqh1. Consequently, the likelihood of faulty template switches is controlled by antagonistic activities of CAF-1 and Rqh1 in the stability of the D-loop. D-loop stabilization requires the ability of CAF-1 to interact with PCNA and is thus linked to the DNA synthesis step. We propose that CAF-1 plays a regulatory role during template switch by assembling chromatin on the D-loop and thereby impacting the resolution of the D-loop.

  12. Specific interaction between DNA polymerase II (PolD) and RadB, a Rad51/Dmc1 homolog, in Pyrococcus furiosus.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, I; Morikawa, K; Ishino, Y

    1999-12-15

    Pyrococcus furiosus has an operon containing the DNA polymerase II (PolD) gene and three other genes. Using a two-hybrid screening to examine the interactions of the proteins encoded by the operon, we identified a specific interaction between the second subunit of PolD (DP1) and a Rad51/Dmc1 homologous protein (RadB). To ensure the specific interaction between these two proteins, each gene in the operon was expressed in Escherichia coli or insect cells separately and the products were purified. The in vitro analyses using the purified proteins also showed the interaction between DP1 and RadB. The deletion mutant analysis of DP1 revealed that a region important for binding with RadB is located in the central part of the sequence (amino acid residues 206-498). This region has an overlap to the C-terminal half (amino acids 334-613), which is highly conserved among euryarchaeal DP1s and is essential for the activity of PolD. Our results suggest that, although RadB does not noticeably affect the primer extension ability of PolD in vitro, PolD may utilize the RadB protein in DNA synthesis under certain conditions.

  13. A genome-wide IR-induced RAD51 foci RNAi screen identifies CDC73 involved in chromatin remodeling for DNA repair

    PubMed Central

    Herr, Patrick; Lundin, Cecilia; Evers, Bastiaan; Ebner, Daniel; Bauerschmidt, Christina; Kingham, Guy; Palmai-Pallag, Timea; Mortusewicz, Oliver; Frings, Oliver; Sonnhammer, Erik; Helleday, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    To identify new regulators of homologous recombination repair, we carried out a genome-wide short-interfering RNA screen combined with ionizing irradiation using RAD51 foci formation as readout. All candidates were confirmed by independent short-interfering RNAs and validated in secondary assays like recombination repair activity and RPA foci formation. Network analysis of the top modifiers identified gene clusters involved in recombination repair as well as components of the ribosome, the proteasome and the spliceosome, which are known to be required for effective DNA repair. We identified and characterized the RNA polymerase II-associated protein CDC73/Parafibromin as a new player in recombination repair and show that it is critical for genomic stability. CDC73 interacts with components of the SCF/Cullin and INO80/NuA4 chromatin-remodeling complexes to promote Histone ubiquitination. Our findings indicate that CDC73 is involved in local chromatin decondensation at sites of DNA damage to promote DNA repair. This function of CDC73 is related to but independent of its role in transcriptional elongation. PMID:27462432

  14. Frequency of thermostability variants: estimation of total rare variant frequency in human populations

    SciTech Connect

    Mohrenweiser, H.W.; Neel, J.V.

    1981-09-01

    Eight erythrocyte enzymes were examine for thermostability in an unselected sample of 100 newborn infants. Three thermolabile variants, one each of lactate dehydrogenase, glucosephosphate isomerase, and glucose-6-phosphate dehydrogenase, were identified, none of which was detectable as a variant by standard electrophoretic techniques. All were inherited. This frequency of 3.8 heritable thermostability variants per 1000 determinations is to be compared with a frequency of electrophoretically detectable variants of 1.1 per 1000 determinations, a frequency of 2.4 enzyme-deficiency variants per 1000 determinations, and a frequency of individuals with rare enzyme deficiency or electrophoretic or thermostability (or both) variants at these loci is 8.4 per 1000 determinations. A similar distribution and frequency is seen when the comparison is limited to the seven loci studied by all techniques. it is clear that not all of the electrophoretic and thermostability variants present in the population are detected by the techniques used in this study. Accordingly, it is estimated that the true frequency of carriers of a rare variant for each of these enzyme-coding loci averages greater than 10/1000. Some implications of these frequencies for human disease are discussed.

  15. Identification of the meiotic toolkit in diatoms and exploration of meiosis-specific SPO11 and RAD51 homologs in the sexual species Pseudo-nitzschia multistriata and Seminavis robusta

    DOE PAGES

    Patil, Shrikant; Moeys, Sara; von Dassow, Peter; ...

    2015-11-14

    Sexual reproduction is an obligate phase in the life cycle of most eukaryotes. Meiosis varies among organisms, which is reflected by the variability of the gene set associated to the process. Diatoms are unicellular organisms that belong to the stramenopile clade and have unique life cycles that can include a sexual phase. The exploration of five diatom genomes and one diatom transcriptome led to the identification of 42 genes potentially involved in meiosis. While these include the majority of known meiosis-related genes, several meiosis-specific genes, including DMC1, could not be identified. Furthermore, phylogenetic analyses supported gene identification and revealed ancestralmore » loss and recent expansion in the RAD51 family in diatoms. The two sexual species Pseudo-nitzschia multistriata and Seminavis robusta were used to explore the expression of meiosis-related genes: RAD21, SPO11-2, RAD51-A, RAD51-B and RAD51-C were upregulated during meiosis, whereas other paralogs in these families showed no differential expression patterns, suggesting that they may play a role during vegetative divisions. An almost identical toolkit is shared among Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries and Fragilariopsis cylindrus, as well as two species for which sex has not been observed, Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Thalassiosira pseudonana, suggesting that these two may retain a facultative sexual phase. Lastly, our results reveal the conserved meiotic toolkit in six diatom species and indicate that Stramenopiles share major modifications of canonical meiosis processes ancestral to eukaryotes, with important divergences in each Kingdom.« less

  16. denovo-db: a compendium of human de novo variants

    PubMed Central

    Turner, Tychele N.; Yi, Qian; Krumm, Niklas; Huddleston, John; Hoekzema, Kendra; F. Stessman, Holly A.; Doebley, Anna-Lisa; Bernier, Raphael A.; Nickerson, Deborah A.; Eichler, Evan E.

    2017-01-01

    Whole-exome and whole-genome sequencing have facilitated the large-scale discovery of de novo variants in human disease. To date, most de novo discovery through next-generation sequencing focused on congenital heart disease and neurodevelopmental disorders (NDDs). Currently, de novo variants are one of the most significant risk factors for NDDs with a substantial overlap of genes involved in more than one NDD. To facilitate better usage of published data, provide standardization of annotation, and improve accessibility, we created denovo-db (http://denovo-db.gs.washington.edu), a database for human de novo variants. As of July 2016, denovo-db contained 40 different studies and 32,991 de novo variants from 23,098 trios. Database features include basic variant information (chromosome location, change, type); detailed annotation at the transcript and protein levels; severity scores; frequency; validation status; and, most importantly, the phenotype of the individual with the variant. We included a feature on our browsable website to download any query result, including a downloadable file of the full database with additional variant details. denovo-db provides necessary information for researchers to compare their data to other individuals with the same phenotype and also to controls allowing for a better understanding of the biology of de novo variants and their contribution to disease. PMID:27907889

  17. Low-dose irradiation promotes Rad51 expression by down-regulating miR-193b-3p in hepatocytes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Eon-Seok; Won, Yeo Jin; Kim, Byoung-Chul; Park, Daeui; Bae, Jin-Han; Park, Seong-Joon; Noh, Sung Jin; Kang, Yeong-Rok; Choi, Si Ho; Yoon, Je-Hyun; Heo, Kyu; Yang, Kwangmo; Son, Tae Gen

    2016-05-01

    Current evidence indicates that there is a relationship between microRNA (miRNA)-mediated gene silencing and low-dose irradiation (LDIR) responses. Here, alterations of miRNA expression in response to LDIR exposure in male BALB/c mice and three different types of hepatocytes were investigated. The miRNome of the LDIR-exposed mouse spleens (0.01 Gy, 6.5 mGy/h) was analyzed, and the expression of miRNA and mRNA was validated by qRT-PCR. Western blotting, chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP), and luciferase assays were also performed to evaluate the interaction between miRNAs and their target genes and to gain insight into the regulation of miRNA expression. The expression of miRNA-193b-3p was down-regulated in the mouse spleen and liver and in various hepatocytes (NCTC, Hepa, and HepG2 cell lines) in response to LDIR. The down-regulation of miR-193b-3p expression was caused by histone deacetylation on the miR-193b-3p promoter in the HepG2 cells irradiated with 0.01 Gy. However, the alteration of histone deacetylation and miR-193b-3p and Rad51 expression in response to LDIR was restored by pretreatment with N-acetyl-cyctein. In conclusion, we provide evidence that miRNA responses to LDIR include the modulation of cellular stress responses and repair mechanisms.

  18. Somatic Variants in the Human Lens Epithelium: A Preliminary Assessment

    PubMed Central

    Mesa, Rosana; Tyagi, Manoj; Harocopos, George; Vollman, David; Bassnett, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Purpose We hypothesize that somatic mutations accumulate in cells of the human lens and may contribute to the development of cortical or posterior sub-capsular cataracts. Here, we used a Next-generation sequencing (NGS) strategy to screen for low-allelic frequency variants in DNA extracted from human lens epithelial samples. Methods Next-Generation sequencing of 151 cancer-related genes (WUCaMP2 panel) was performed on DNA extracted from post-mortem or surgical specimens obtained from 24 individuals. Usually, pairwise comparisons were made between two or more ocular samples from the same individual, allowing putative somatic variants detected in lens samples to be differentiated from germline variants. Results Use of a targeted hybridization approach enabled high sequence coverage (>1000-fold) of the WUCaMP2 genes. In addition to high-frequency variants (corresponding to homozygous or heterozygous SNPs and Indels), somatic variants with allelic frequencies of 1-4% were detected in the lens epithelial samples. The presence of one such variant, a T > C point substitution at position 32907082 in BRCA2, was verified subsequently using droplet digital PCR. Conclusions Low-allelic fraction variants are present in the human lens epithelium, at frequencies consistent with the presence of millimeter-sized clones. PMID:27537255

  19. Human RECQ Helicase Pathogenic Variants, Population Variation and "Missing" Diseases.

    PubMed

    Fu, Wenqing; Ligabue, Alessio; Rogers, Kai J; Akey, Joshua M; Monnat, Raymond J

    2017-02-01

    Heritable loss of function mutations in the human RECQ helicase genes BLM, WRN, and RECQL4 cause Bloom, Werner, and Rothmund-Thomson syndromes, cancer predispositions with additional developmental or progeroid features. In order to better understand RECQ pathogenic and population variation, we systematically analyzed genetic variation in all five human RECQ helicase genes. A total of 3,741 unique base pair-level variants were identified, across 17,605 potential mutation sites. Direct counting of BLM, RECQL4, and WRN pathogenic variants was used to determine aggregate and disease-specific carrier frequencies. The use of biochemical and model organism data, together with computational prediction, identified over 300 potentially pathogenic population variants in RECQL and RECQL5, the two RECQ helicases that are not yet linked to a heritable deficiency syndrome. Despite the presence of these predicted pathogenic variants in the human population, we identified no individuals homozygous for any biochemically verified or predicted pathogenic RECQL or RECQL5 variant. Nor did we find any individual heterozygous for known pathogenic variants in two or more of the disease-associated RECQ helicase genes BLM, RECQL4, or WRN. Several postulated RECQ helicase deficiency syndromes-RECQL or RECQL5 loss of function, or compound haploinsufficiency for the disease-associated RECQ helicases-may remain missing, as they likely incompatible with life.

  20. Human AZU-1 gene, variants thereof and expressed gene products

    DOEpatents

    Chen, Huei-Mei; Bissell, Mina

    2004-06-22

    A human AZU-1 gene, mutants, variants and fragments thereof. Protein products encoded by the AZU-1 gene and homologs encoded by the variants of AZU-1 gene acting as tumor suppressors or markers of malignancy progression and tumorigenicity reversion. Identification, isolation and characterization of AZU-1 and AZU-2 genes localized to a tumor suppressive locus at chromosome 10q26, highly expressed in nonmalignant and premalignant cells derived from a human breast tumor progression model. A recombinant full length protein sequences encoded by the AZU-1 gene and nucleotide sequences of AZU-1 and AZU-2 genes and variant and fragments thereof. Monoclonal or polyclonal antibodies specific to AZU-1, AZU-2 encoded protein and to AZU-1, or AZU-2 encoded protein homologs.

  1. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures.

    PubMed

    Hibar, Derrek P; Stein, Jason L; Renteria, Miguel E; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S; Armstrong, Nicola J; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M; Boks, Marco P; Bralten, Janita; Brown, Andrew A; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R K; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; den Braber, Anouk; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L; Grimm, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Woldehawariat, Girma; Holmes, Avram J; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H; Olde Loohuis, Loes M; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Mather, Karen A; Mattheisen, Manuel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Nho, Kwangsik; Papmeyer, Martina; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Risacher, Shannon L; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rose, Emma J; Salami, Alireza; Sämann, Philipp G; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J; Shin, Jean; Strike, Lachlan T; Teumer, Alexander; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M J; van Eijk, Kristel R; Walters, Raymond K; Westlye, Lars T; Whelan, Christopher D; Winkler, Anderson M; Zwiers, Marcel P; Alhusaini, Saud; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Ehrlich, Stefan; Hakobjan, Marina M H; Hartberg, Cecilie B; Haukvik, Unn K; Heister, Angelien J G A M; Hoehn, David; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Liewald, David C M; Lopez, Lorna M; Makkinje, Remco R R; Matarin, Mar; Naber, Marlies A M; McKay, D Reese; Needham, Margaret; Nugent, Allison C; Pütz, Benno; Royle, Natalie A; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Trabzuni, Daniah; van der Marel, Saskia S L; van Hulzen, Kimm J E; Walton, Esther; Wolf, Christiane; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A; Bastin, Mark E; Brodaty, Henry; Bulayeva, Kazima B; Carless, Melanie A; Cichon, Sven; Corvin, Aiden; Curran, Joanne E; Czisch, Michael; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Dillman, Allissa; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D; Erk, Susanne; Fedko, Iryna O; Ferrucci, Luigi; Foroud, Tatiana M; Fox, Peter T; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J Raphael; Göring, Harald H H; Green, Robert C; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K; Hartman, Catharina A; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hernandez, Dena G; Heslenfeld, Dirk J; Hoekstra, Pieter J; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Kanai, Ryota; Keil, Maria; Kent, Jack W; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B; Lawrie, Stephen M; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L; McMahon, Katie L; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W; Mostert, Jeanette C; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Nalls, Michael A; Nichols, Thomas E; Nilsson, Lars G; Nöthen, Markus M; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Pike, G Bruce; Potkin, Steven G; Reinvang, Ivar; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rosen, Glenn D; Rujescu, Dan; Schnell, Knut; Schofield, Peter R; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M; Sussmann, Jessika E; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W; Traynor, Bryan J; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A; Valdés Hernández, Maria C; van 't Ent, Dennis; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Wee, Nic J A; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Veltman, Dick J; Wassink, Thomas H; Westman, Eric; Zielke, Ronald H; Zonderman, Alan B; Ashbrook, David G; Hager, Reinmar; Lu, Lu; McMahon, Francis J; Morris, Derek W; Williams, Robert W; Brunner, Han G; Buckner, Randy L; Buitelaar, Jan K; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dale, Anders M; Davies, Gareth E; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C; Espeseth, Thomas; Gollub, Randy L; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hosten, Norbert; Kahn, René S; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nauck, Matthias; Nyberg, Lars; Pandolfo, Massimo; Penninx, Brenda W J H; Roffman, Joshua L; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Smoller, Jordan W; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Haren, Neeltje E M; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W; Wen, Wei; White, Tonya; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I; Brouwer, Rachel M; Cannon, Dara M; Cookson, Mark R; de Geus, Eco J C; Deary, Ian J; Donohoe, Gary; Fernández, Guillén; Fisher, Simon E; Francks, Clyde; Glahn, David C; Grabe, Hans J; Gruber, Oliver; Hardy, John; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Jönsson, Erik G; Kloszewska, Iwona; Lovestone, Simon; Mattay, Venkata S; Mecocci, Patrizia; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; Ophoff, Roel A; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Ryten, Mina; Sachdev, Perminder S; Saykin, Andrew J; Simmons, Andy; Singleton, Andrew; Soininen, Hilkka; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Weale, Michael E; Weinberger, Daniel R; Adams, Hieab H H; Launer, Lenore J; Seiler, Stephan; Schmidt, Reinhold; Chauhan, Ganesh; Satizabal, Claudia L; Becker, James T; Yanek, Lisa; van der Lee, Sven J; Ebling, Maritza; Fischl, Bruce; Longstreth, W T; Greve, Douglas; Schmidt, Helena; Nyquist, Paul; Vinke, Louis N; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Xue, Luting; Mazoyer, Bernard; Bis, Joshua C; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Seshadri, Sudha; Ikram, M Arfan; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J; Schumann, Gunter; Franke, Barbara; Thompson, Paul M; Medland, Sarah E

    2015-04-09

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement, learning, memory and motivation, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magnetic resonance images of 30,717 individuals from 50 cohorts. We identify five novel genetic variants influencing the volumes of the putamen and caudate nucleus. We also find stronger evidence for three loci with previously established influences on hippocampal volume and intracranial volume. These variants show specific volumetric effects on brain structures rather than global effects across structures. The strongest effects were found for the putamen, where a novel intergenic locus with replicable influence on volume (rs945270; P = 1.08 × 10(-33); 0.52% variance explained) showed evidence of altering the expression of the KTN1 gene in both brain and blood tissue. Variants influencing putamen volume clustered near developmental genes that regulate apoptosis, axon guidance and vesicle transport. Identification of these genetic variants provides insight into the causes of variability in human brain development, and may help to determine mechanisms of neuropsychiatric dysfunction.

  2. A PYY Q62P variant linked to human obesity

    SciTech Connect

    Ahituv, Nadav; Kavaslar, Nihan; Schackwitz, Wendy; Ustaszewska,Anna; Collier, John Michael; Hebert, Sybil; Doelle, Heather; Dent,Robert; Pennacchio, Len A.; McPherson, Ruth

    2005-06-27

    Members of the pancreatic polypeptide family and the irreceptors have been implicated in the control of food intake in rodents and humans. To investigate whether nucleotide changes in these candidate genes result in abnormal weight in humans, we sequenced the coding exons and splice sites of seven family members (NPY, PYY, PPY, NPY1R, NPY2R, NPY4R, and NPY5R) in a large cohort of extremely obese (n=379) and lean (n=378) individuals. In total we found eleven rare non-synonymous variants, four of which exhibited familial segregation, NPY1R L53P and PPY P63L with leanness and NPY2R D42G and PYY Q62P with obesity. Functional analysis of the obese variants revealed NPY2R D42G to have reduced cell surface expression, while previous cell culture based studies indicated variant PYY Q62P to have altered receptor binding selectivity and we show that it fails to reduce food intake through mouse peptide injection experiments. These results support that rare non-synonymous variants within these genes can alter susceptibility to human body mass index extremes.

  3. Common genetic variants influence human subcortical brain structures

    PubMed Central

    Hibar, Derrek P.; Stein, Jason L.; Renteria, Miguel E.; Arias-Vasquez, Alejandro; Desrivières, Sylvane; Jahanshad, Neda; Toro, Roberto; Wittfeld, Katharina; Abramovic, Lucija; Andersson, Micael; Aribisala, Benjamin S.; Armstrong, Nicola J.; Bernard, Manon; Bohlken, Marc M.; Boks, Marco P.; Bralten, Janita; Brown, Andrew A.; Chakravarty, M. Mallar; Chen, Qiang; Ching, Christopher R. K.; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; den Braber, Anouk; Giddaluru, Sudheer; Goldman, Aaron L.; Grimm, Oliver; Guadalupe, Tulio; Hass, Johanna; Woldehawariat, Girma; Holmes, Avram J.; Hoogman, Martine; Janowitz, Deborah; Jia, Tianye; Kim, Sungeun; Klein, Marieke; Kraemer, Bernd; Lee, Phil H.; Olde Loohuis, Loes M.; Luciano, Michelle; Macare, Christine; Mather, Karen A.; Mattheisen, Manuel; Milaneschi, Yuri; Nho, Kwangsik; Papmeyer, Martina; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Risacher, Shannon L.; Roiz-Santiañez, Roberto; Rose, Emma J.; Salami, Alireza; Sämann, Philipp G.; Schmaal, Lianne; Schork, Andrew J.; Shin, Jean; Strike, Lachlan T.; Teumer, Alexander; van Donkelaar, Marjolein M. J.; van Eijk, Kristel R.; Walters, Raymond K.; Westlye, Lars T.; Whelan, Christopher D.; Winkler, Anderson M.; Zwiers, Marcel P.; Alhusaini, Saud; Athanasiu, Lavinia; Ehrlich, Stefan; Hakobjan, Marina M. H.; Hartberg, Cecilie B.; Haukvik, Unn K.; Heister, Angelien J. G. A. M.; Hoehn, David; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Liewald, David C. M.; Lopez, Lorna M.; Makkinje, Remco R. R.; Matarin, Mar; Naber, Marlies A. M.; McKay, D. Reese; Needham, Margaret; Nugent, Allison C.; Pütz, Benno; Royle, Natalie A.; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Trabzuni, Daniah; van der Marel, Saskia S. L.; van Hulzen, Kimm J. E.; Walton, Esther; Wolf, Christiane; Almasy, Laura; Ames, David; Arepalli, Sampath; Assareh, Amelia A.; Bastin, Mark E.; Brodaty, Henry; Bulayeva, Kazima B.; Carless, Melanie A.; Cichon, Sven; Corvin, Aiden; Curran, Joanne E.; Czisch, Michael; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Dillman, Allissa; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D.; Erk, Susanne; Fedko, Iryna O.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Fox, Peter T.; Fukunaga, Masaki; Gibbs, J. Raphael; Göring, Harald H. H.; Green, Robert C.; Guelfi, Sebastian; Hansell, Narelle K.; Hartman, Catharina A.; Hegenscheid, Katrin; Heinz, Andreas; Hernandez, Dena G.; Heslenfeld, Dirk J.; Hoekstra, Pieter J.; Holsboer, Florian; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Ikeda, Masashi; Jack, Clifford R.; Jenkinson, Mark; Johnson, Robert; Kanai, Ryota; Keil, Maria; Kent, Jack W.; Kochunov, Peter; Kwok, John B.; Lawrie, Stephen M.; Liu, Xinmin; Longo, Dan L.; McMahon, Katie L.; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Mohnke, Sebastian; Montgomery, Grant W.; Mostert, Jeanette C.; Mühleisen, Thomas W.; Nalls, Michael A.; Nichols, Thomas E.; Nilsson, Lars G.; Nöthen, Markus M.; Ohi, Kazutaka; Olvera, Rene L.; Perez-Iglesias, Rocio; Pike, G. Bruce; Potkin, Steven G.; Reinvang, Ivar; Reppermund, Simone; Rietschel, Marcella; Romanczuk-Seiferth, Nina; Rosen, Glenn D.; Rujescu, Dan; Schnell, Knut; Schofield, Peter R.; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M.; Sussmann, Jessika E.; Thalamuthu, Anbupalam; Toga, Arthur W.; Traynor, Bryan J.; Troncoso, Juan; Turner, Jessica A.; Valdés Hernández, Maria C.; van ’t Ent, Dennis; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Wee, Nic J. A.; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Veltman, Dick J.; Wassink, Thomas H.; Westman, Eric; Zielke, Ronald H.; Zonderman, Alan B.; Ashbrook, David G.; Hager, Reinmar; Lu, Lu; McMahon, Francis J.; Morris, Derek W.; Williams, Robert W.; Brunner, Han G.; Buckner, Randy L.; Buitelaar, Jan K.; Cahn, Wiepke; Calhoun, Vince D.; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L.; Crespo-Facorro, Benedicto; Dale, Anders M.; Davies, Gareth E.; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C.; Espeseth, Thomas; Gollub, Randy L.; Ho, Beng-Choon; Hoffmann, Wolfgang; Hosten, Norbert; Kahn, René S.; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nauck, Matthias; Nyberg, Lars; Pandolfo, Massimo; Penninx, Brenda W. J. H.; Roffman, Joshua L.; Sisodiya, Sanjay M.; Smoller, Jordan W.; van Bokhoven, Hans; van Haren, Neeltje E. M.; Völzke, Henry; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W.; Wen, Wei; White, Tonya; Agartz, Ingrid; Andreassen, Ole A.; Blangero, John; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Brouwer, Rachel M.; Cannon, Dara M.; Cookson, Mark R.; de Geus, Eco J. C.; Deary, Ian J.; Donohoe, Gary; Fernández, Guillén; Fisher, Simon E.; Francks, Clyde; Glahn, David C.; Grabe, Hans J.; Gruber, Oliver; Hardy, John; Hashimoto, Ryota; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E.; Jönsson, Erik G.

    2015-01-01

    The highly complex structure of the human brain is strongly shaped by genetic influences1. Subcortical brain regions form circuits with cortical areas to coordinate movement2, learning, memory3 and motivation4, and altered circuits can lead to abnormal behaviour and disease2. To investigate how common genetic variants affect the structure of these brain regions, here we conduct genome-wide association studies of the volumes of seven subcortical regions and the intracranial volume derived from magnetic resonance images of 30,717 individuals from 50 cohorts. We identify five novel genetic variants influencing the volumes of the putamen and caudate nucleus. We also find stronger evidence for three loci with previously established influences on hippocampal volume5 and intracranial volume6. These variants show specific volumetric effects on brain structures rather than global effects across structures. The strongest effects were found for the putamen, where a novel intergenic locus with replicable influence on volume (rs945270; P = 1.08 × 10−33; 0.52% variance explained) showed evidence of altering the expression of the KTN1 gene in both brain and blood tissue. Variants influencing putamen volume clustered near developmental genes that regulate apoptosis, axon guidance and vesicle transport. Identification of these genetic variants provides insight into the causes of variability inhuman brain development, and may help to determine mechanisms of neuropsychiatric dysfunction. PMID:25607358

  4. Effect of species-specific differences in chromosome morphology on chromatin compaction and the frequency and distribution of RAD51 and MLH1 foci in two bovid species: cattle (Bos taurus) and the common eland (Taurotragus oryx).

    PubMed

    Sebestova, Hana; Vozdova, Miluse; Kubickova, Svatava; Cernohorska, Halina; Kotrba, Radim; Rubes, Jiri

    2016-03-01

    Meiotic recombination between homologous chromosomes is crucial for their correct segregation into gametes and for generating diversity. We compared the frequency and distribution of MLH1 foci and RAD51 foci, synaptonemal complex (SC) length and DNA loop size in two related Bovidae species that share chromosome arm homology but show an extreme difference in their diploid chromosome number: cattle (Bos taurus, 2n = 60) and the common eland (Taurotragus oryx, 2nmale = 31). Compared to cattle, significantly fewer MLH1 foci per cell were observed in the common eland, which can be attributed to the lower number of initial double-strand breaks (DSBs) detected as RAD51 foci in leptonema. Despite the significantly shorter total autosomal SC length and longer DNA loop size of the common eland bi-armed chromosomes compared to those of bovine acrocentrics, the overall crossover density in the common eland was still lower than in cattle, probably due to the reduction in the number of MLH1 foci in the proximal regions of the bi-armed chromosomes. The formation of centric fusions during karyotype evolution of the common eland accompanied by meiotic chromatin compaction has greater implications in the reduction in the number of DSBs in leptonema than in the decrease of MLH1 foci number in pachynema.

  5. Biochemical analysis of the human ENA/VASP-family proteins, MENA, VASP and EVL, in homologous recombination.

    PubMed

    Takaku, Motoki; Ueno, Hiroyuki; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2011-06-01

    MENA, VASP and EVL are members of the ENA/VASP family of proteins and are involved in cytoplasmic actin remodeling. Previously, we found that EVL directly interacts with RAD51, an essential protein in the homologous recombinational repair of double-strand breaks (DSBs) and stimulates the RAD51-mediated recombination reactions in vitro. The EVL-knockdown MCF7 cells exhibited a clear reduction in RAD51-foci formation, suggesting that EVL may function in the DSB repair pathway through RAD51-mediated homologous recombination. However, the DSB repair defects were less significant in the EVL-knockdown cells, implying that two EVL paralogues, MENA and VASP, may complement the EVL function in human cells. Therefore, in the present study, we purified human MENA, VASP and EVL as recombinant proteins, and compared their biochemical activities in vitro. We found that all three proteins commonly exhibited the RAD51 binding, DNA binding and DNA-annealing activities. Stimulation of the RAD51-mediated homologous pairing was also observed with all three proteins. In addition, surface plasmon resonance analyses revealed that MENA, VASP and EVL mutually interacted. These results support the ideas that the ENA/VASP-family proteins are functionally redundant in homologous recombination, and that all three may be involved in the DSB repair pathway in humans.

  6. Rare structural variants of human and murine uroporphyrinogen I synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Meisler, M.H.; Carter, M.L.C.

    1980-05-01

    An isoelectric focusing method for detection of structural variants of the enzyme uroporphyrinogen I synthase (porphobilinogen ammonia-lyase (polymerizing), EC 4.3.1.8) in mammalian tissues has been developed. Mouse and human erythrocytes contain one or two major isozymes of uroporphyrinogen I synthase, respectively. Other tissues contain a set of more acidic isozymes that are encoded by the same structural gene as the erythrocyte isozymes. Mouse populations studied with this method were monomorphic for uroporphyrinogen I synthase, with the exception of one feral mouse population. The pedigree of a human family with a rare structural variant is consistent with autosomal linkage of the structural gene. This system provides a convenient isozyme marker for genetic studies and will facilitate determination of the chromosomal location of the uroporphyrinogen I synthase locus.

  7. Oncogenic potential diverge among human papillomavirus type 16 natural variants

    SciTech Connect

    Sichero, Laura; Simao Sobrinho, Joao; Lina Villa, Luisa

    2012-10-10

    We compared E6/E7 protein properties of three different HPV-16 variants: AA, E-P and E-350G. Primary human foreskin keratinocytes (PHFK) were transduced with HPV-16 E6 and E7 and evaluated for proliferation and ability to grow in soft agar. E-P infected keratinocytes presented the lowest efficiency in colony formation. AA and E-350G keratinocytes attained higher capacity for in vitro transformation. We observed similar degradation of TP53 among HPV-16 variants. Furthermore, we accessed the expression profile in early (p5) and late passage (p30) transduced cells of 84 genes commonly involved in carcinogenesis. Most differences could be attributed to HPV-16 E6/E7 expression. In particular, we detected different expression of ITGA2 and CHEK2 in keratinocytes infected with AA and AA/E-350G late passage cells, respectively, and higher expression of MAP2K1 in E-350G transduced keratinocytes. Our results indicate differences among HPV-16 variants that could explain, at least in part, differences in oncogenic potential attributed to these variants.

  8. Human GRIN2B variants in neurodevelopmental disorders

    PubMed Central

    Hu, Chun; Chen, Wenjuan; Myers, Scott J.; Yuan, Hongjie; Traynelis, Stephen F.

    2016-01-01

    The development of whole exome/genome sequencing technologies has given rise to an unprecedented volume of data linking patient genomic variability to brain disorder phenotypes. A surprising number of variants have been found in the N-methyl-D-aspartate receptor (NMDAR) gene family, with the GRIN2B gene encoding the GluN2B subunit being implicated in many cases of neurodevelopmental disorders, which are psychiatric conditions originating in childhood and include language, motor, and learning disorders, autism spectrum disorder (ASD), attention deficit hyperactivity disorder (ADHD), developmental delay, epilepsy, and schizophrenia. The GRIN2B gene plays a crucial role in normal neuronal development and is important for learning and memory. Mutations in human GRIN2B were distributed throughout the entire gene in a number of patients with various neuropsychiatric and developmental disorders. Studies that provide functional analysis of variants are still lacking, however current analysis of de novo variants that segregate with disease cases such as intellectual disability, developmental delay, ASD or epileptic encephalopathies reveal altered NMDAR function. Here, we summarize the current reports of disease-associated variants in GRIN2B from patients with multiple neurodevelopmental disorders, and discuss implications, highlighting the importance of functional analysis and precision medicine therapies. PMID:27818011

  9. Bias of selection on human copy-number variants.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Duc-Quang; Webber, Caleb; Ponting, Chris P

    2006-02-01

    Although large-scale copy-number variation is an important contributor to conspecific genomic diversity, whether these variants frequently contribute to human phenotype differences remains unknown. If they have few functional consequences, then copy-number variants (CNVs) might be expected both to be distributed uniformly throughout the human genome and to encode genes that are characteristic of the genome as a whole. We find that human CNVs are significantly overrepresented close to telomeres and centromeres and in simple tandem repeat sequences. Additionally, human CNVs were observed to be unusually enriched in those protein-coding genes that have experienced significantly elevated synonymous and nonsynonymous nucleotide substitution rates, estimated between single human and mouse orthologues. CNV genes encode disproportionately large numbers of secreted, olfactory, and immunity proteins, although they contain fewer than expected genes associated with Mendelian disease. Despite mouse CNVs also exhibiting a significant elevation in synonymous substitution rates, in most other respects they do not differ significantly from the genomic background. Nevertheless, they encode proteins that are depleted in olfactory function, and they exhibit significantly decreased amino acid sequence divergence. Natural selection appears to have acted discriminately among human CNV genes. The significant overabundance, within human CNVs, of genes associated with olfaction, immunity, protein secretion, and elevated coding sequence divergence, indicates that a subset may have been retained in the human population due to the adaptive benefit of increased gene dosage. By contrast, the functional characteristics of mouse CNVs either suggest that advantageous gene copies have been depleted during recent selective breeding of laboratory mouse strains or suggest that they were preferentially fixed as a consequence of the larger effective population size of wild mice. It thus appears that CNV

  10. The influence of genomic context on mutation patterns in the human genome inferred from rare variants.

    PubMed

    Schaibley, Valerie M; Zawistowski, Matthew; Wegmann, Daniel; Ehm, Margaret G; Nelson, Matthew R; St Jean, Pamela L; Abecasis, Gonçalo R; Novembre, John; Zöllner, Sebastian; Li, Jun Z

    2013-12-01

    Understanding patterns of spontaneous mutations is of fundamental interest in studies of human genome evolution and genetic disease. Here, we used extremely rare variants in humans to model the molecular spectrum of single-nucleotide mutations. Compared to common variants in humans and human-chimpanzee fixed differences (substitutions), rare variants, on average, arose more recently in the human lineage and are less affected by the potentially confounding effects of natural selection, population demographic history, and biased gene conversion. We analyzed variants obtained from a population-based sequencing study of 202 genes in >14,000 individuals. We observed considerable variability in the per-gene mutation rate, which was correlated with local GC content, but not recombination rate. Using >20,000 variants with a derived allele frequency ≤ 10(-4), we examined the effect of local GC content and recombination rate on individual variant subtypes and performed comparisons with common variants and substitutions. The influence of local GC content on rare variants differed from that on common variants or substitutions, and the differences varied by variant subtype. Furthermore, recombination rate and recombination hotspots have little effect on rare variants of any subtype, yet both have a relatively strong impact on multiple variant subtypes in common variants and substitutions. This observation is consistent with the effect of biased gene conversion or selection-dependent processes. Our results highlight the distinct biases inherent in the initial mutation patterns and subsequent evolutionary processes that affect segregating variants.

  11. Differences in the rare variant spectrum among human populations

    PubMed Central

    Mathieson, Iain; Reich, David

    2017-01-01

    Mutations occur at vastly different rates across the genome, and populations, leading to differences in the spectrum of segregating polymorphisms. Here, we investigate variation in the rare variant spectrum in a sample of human genomes representing all major world populations. We find at least two distinct signatures of variation. One, consistent with a previously reported signature is characterized by an increased rate of TCC>TTC mutations in people from Western Eurasia and South Asia, likely related to differences in the rate, or efficiency of repair, of damage due to deamination of methylated guanine. We describe the geographic extent of this signature and show that it is detectable in the genomes of ancient, but not archaic humans. The second signature is private to certain Native American populations, and is concentrated at CpG sites. We show that this signature is not driven by differences in the CpG mutation rate, but is a result of the fact that highly mutable CpG sites are more likely to undergo multiple independent mutations across human populations, and the spectrum of such mutations is highly sensitive to recent demography. Both of these effects dramatically affect the spectrum of rare variants across human populations, and should be taken into account when using mutational clocks to make inference about demography. PMID:28146552

  12. Single-strand DNA-mediated targeted mutagenesis of genomic DNA in early mouse embryos is stimulated by Rad51/54 and by Ku70/86 inhibition.

    PubMed

    Morozov, V; Wawrousek, E F

    2008-03-01

    Low and variable efficiency is a major problem in targeted gene alteration, which is used as a primary tool in gene therapy and animal model studies. We tested several types of constructs alone, or in combination with other factors, to introduce a point mutation into the alphaB-crystallin gene in one-celled mouse embryos. We found that co-injection of ssDNA along with antibodies against Ku70/86, or supplementing the system with hRad51/hRad54, increases efficiency of targeted mutagenesis. These findings suggest that proteins in the homologous recombination DNA repair pathway contribute, and that proteins involved in the alternative nonhomologous end-joining pathway inhibit, ssDNA-mediated targeted mutagenesis. This is the first successful demonstration of targeted mutation in early mouse embryos. This novel methodology of supplying protein factors to stimulate gene modification in the nucleus has not been previously reported.

  13. New polymorphic variants of human blood clotting factor IX

    SciTech Connect

    Surin, V.L.; Luk`yanenko, A.V.; Tagiev, A.F.; Smirnova, O.V.; Plutalov, O.V.; Berlin, Yu.A.

    1995-04-01

    The polymorphism of Alu-repeats, which are located in the introns of the human factor IX gene (copies 1-3), was studied. To identify polymorphic variants, direct sequencing of PCR products that contained appropriate repeats was used. In each case, 20 unrelated X chromosomes were studied. A polymorphic Dra I site was found near the 3{prime}-end of Alu copy 3 within the region of the polyA tract. A PCR-based testing system with internal control of restriction hydrolysis was suggested. Testing 81 unrelated X chromosomes revealed that the frequency of the polymorphic Dra I site is 0.23. Taq I polymorphism, which was revealed in Alu copy 4 of factor IX gene in our previous work, was found to be closely linked to Dra I polymorphism. Studies in linkage between different types of polymorphisms of the factor IX gene revealed the presence of a rare polymorphism in intron a that was located within the same minisatellite region as the known polymorphic insertion 50 bp/Dde I. However, the size of the insertion in our case was 26 bp. Only one polymorphic variant was found among over 150 unrelated X chromosomes derived from humans from Moscow and its vicinity. 10 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab.

  14. Fire Usage and Ancient Hominin Detoxification Genes: Protective Ancestral Variants Dominate While Additional Derived Risk Variants Appear in Modern Humans

    PubMed Central

    Alink, Gerrit M.; Scherjon, Fulco; MacDonald, Katharine; Smith, Alison C.; Nijveen, Harm; Roebroeks, Wil

    2016-01-01

    Studies of the defence capacity of ancient hominins against toxic substances may contribute importantly to the reconstruction of their niche, including their diets and use of fire. Fire usage implies frequent exposure to hazardous compounds from smoke and heated food, known to affect general health and fertility, probably resulting in genetic selection for improved detoxification. To investigate whether such genetic selection occurred, we investigated the alleles in Neanderthals, Denisovans and modern humans at gene polymorphisms well-known to be relevant from modern human epidemiological studies of habitual tobacco smoke exposure and mechanistic evidence. We compared these with the alleles in chimpanzees and gorillas. Neanderthal and Denisovan hominins predominantly possess gene variants conferring increased resistance to these toxic compounds. Surprisingly, we observed the same in chimpanzees and gorillas, implying that less efficient variants are derived and mainly evolved in modern humans. Less efficient variants are observable from the first early Upper Palaeolithic hunter-gatherers onwards. While not clarifying the deep history of fire use, our results highlight the long-term stability of the genes under consideration despite major changes in the hominin dietary niche. Specifically for detoxification gene variants characterised as deleterious by epidemiological studies, our results confirm the predominantly recent appearance reported for deleterious human gene variants, suggesting substantial impact of recent human population history, including pre-Holocene expansions. PMID:27655273

  15. Fire Usage and Ancient Hominin Detoxification Genes: Protective Ancestral Variants Dominate While Additional Derived Risk Variants Appear in Modern Humans.

    PubMed

    Aarts, Jac M M J G; Alink, Gerrit M; Scherjon, Fulco; MacDonald, Katharine; Smith, Alison C; Nijveen, Harm; Roebroeks, Wil

    Studies of the defence capacity of ancient hominins against toxic substances may contribute importantly to the reconstruction of their niche, including their diets and use of fire. Fire usage implies frequent exposure to hazardous compounds from smoke and heated food, known to affect general health and fertility, probably resulting in genetic selection for improved detoxification. To investigate whether such genetic selection occurred, we investigated the alleles in Neanderthals, Denisovans and modern humans at gene polymorphisms well-known to be relevant from modern human epidemiological studies of habitual tobacco smoke exposure and mechanistic evidence. We compared these with the alleles in chimpanzees and gorillas. Neanderthal and Denisovan hominins predominantly possess gene variants conferring increased resistance to these toxic compounds. Surprisingly, we observed the same in chimpanzees and gorillas, implying that less efficient variants are derived and mainly evolved in modern humans. Less efficient variants are observable from the first early Upper Palaeolithic hunter-gatherers onwards. While not clarifying the deep history of fire use, our results highlight the long-term stability of the genes under consideration despite major changes in the hominin dietary niche. Specifically for detoxification gene variants characterised as deleterious by epidemiological studies, our results confirm the predominantly recent appearance reported for deleterious human gene variants, suggesting substantial impact of recent human population history, including pre-Holocene expansions.

  16. Estrogen Receptor Mutants/Variants in Human Breast Cancer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1996-12-01

    tumors. Cloning and sequencing of the larger RT-PCR products identified three different types: a complete duplication of exon 6 occurring in 7.5 % of...generation of the exon deleted ER variant mRNAs and the truncated clone 4 type ER variant mRNA5 is likely to occur via an alternative splicing...Task 5). These include the clone 4 ER truncated variant and variants deleted in exon 2, exon 3, exons 2-3, exon 5 or exon 7. The next question addressed

  17. Methylation of RAD51B, XRCC3 and other homologous recombination genes is associated with expression of immune checkpoints and an inflammatory signature in squamous cell carcinoma of the head and neck, lung and cervix

    PubMed Central

    Rieke, Damian T.; Ochsenreither, Sebastian; Klinghammer, Konrad; Seiwert, Tanguy Y.; Klauschen, Frederick; Tinhofer, Inge; Keilholz, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Immune checkpoints are emerging treatment targets, but mechanisms underlying checkpoint expression are poorly understood. Since alterations in DNA repair genes have been connected to the efficacy of checkpoint inhibitors, we investigated associations between methylation of DNA repair genes and CTLA4 and CD274 (PD-L1) expression. A list of DNA repair genes (179 genes) was selected from the literature, methylation status and expression of inflammation-associated genes (The Cancer Genome Atlas data) was correlated in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC), cervical and lung squamous cell carcinoma. A significant positive correlation of the methylation status of 15, 3 and 2 genes with checkpoint expression was identified, respectively. RAD51B methylation was identified in all cancer subtypes. In HNSCC and cervical cancer, there was significant enrichment for homologous recombination genes. Methylation of the candidate genes was also associated with expression of other checkpoints, ligands, MHC- and T-cell associated genes as well as an interferon-inflammatory immune gene signature, predictive for the efficacy of PD-1 inhibition in HNSCC. Homologous recombination deficiency might therefore be mediated by DNA repair gene hypermethylation and linked to an immune-evasive phenotype in SCC. The methylation status of these genes could represent a new predictive biomarker for immune checkpoint inhibition. PMID:27683114

  18. Homologous and homeologous intermolecular gene conversion are not differentially affected by mutations in the DNA damage or the mismatch repair genes RAD1, RAD50, RAD51, RAD52, RAD54, PMS1 and MSH2

    SciTech Connect

    Porter, G.; Westmoreland, J.; Priebe, S.

    1996-06-01

    Mismatch repair (MMR) genes or genes involved in both DNA damage repair and homologous recombination might affect homeologous vs. homologous recombination differentially. Spontaneous mitotic gene conversion between a chromosome and a homologous or homeologous donor sequence (14% diverged) on a single copy plasmid was examined in wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains and in MMR or DNA damage repair mutants. Homologous recombination in rad51, rad52 and rad54 mutants was considerably reduced, while there was little effect of rad1, rad50, pms1 and msh2 null mutations. DNA divergence resulted in no differential effect on recombination rates in the wild type or the mutants; there was only a five- to 10-fold reduction in homeologous relative to homologous recombination regardless of background. Since DNA divergence is known to affect recombination in some systems, we propose that differences in the role of MMR depends on the mode of recombination and/or the level of divergence. Based on analysis of the recombination breakpoints, there is a minimum of three homologous bases required at a recombination junction. A comparison of Rad{sup +} vs. rad52 strains revealed that while all conversion tracts are continuous, elimination of RAD52 leads to the appearance of a novel class of very short conversion tracts. 67 refs., 5 figs., 4 tabs.

  19. Homologous and Homeologous Intermolecular Gene Conversion Are Not Differentially Affected by Mutations in the DNA Damage or the Mismatch Repair Genes Rad1, Rad50, Rad51, Rad52, Rad54, Pms1 and Msh2

    PubMed Central

    Porter, G.; Westmoreland, J.; Priebe, S.; Resnick, M. A.

    1996-01-01

    Mismatch repair (MMR) genes or genes involved in both DNA damage repair and homologous recombination might affect homeologous vs. homologous recombination differentially. Spontaneous mitotic gene conversion between a chromosome and a homologous or homeologous donor sequence (14% diverged) on a single copy plasmid was examined in wild-type Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains and in MMR or DNA damage repair mutants. Homologous recombination in rad51, rad52 and rad54 mutants was considerably reduced, while there was little effect of rad1, rad50, pms1 and msh2 null mutations. DNA divergence resulted in no differential effect on recombination rates in the wild type or the mutants; there was only a five- to 10-fold reduction in homeologous relative to homologous recombination regardless of background. Since DNA divergence is known to affect recombination in some systems, we propose that differences in the role of MMR depends on the mode of recombination and/or the level of divergence. Based on analysis of the recombination breakpoints, there is a minimum of three homologous bases required at a recombination junction. A comparison of Rad(+) vs. rad52 strains revealed that while all conversion tracts are continuous, elimination of RAD52 leads to the appearance of a novel class of very short conversion tracts. PMID:8725224

  20. A systematic survey of loss-of-function variants in human protein-coding genes.

    PubMed

    MacArthur, Daniel G; Balasubramanian, Suganthi; Frankish, Adam; Huang, Ni; Morris, James; Walter, Klaudia; Jostins, Luke; Habegger, Lukas; Pickrell, Joseph K; Montgomery, Stephen B; Albers, Cornelis A; Zhang, Zhengdong D; Conrad, Donald F; Lunter, Gerton; Zheng, Hancheng; Ayub, Qasim; DePristo, Mark A; Banks, Eric; Hu, Min; Handsaker, Robert E; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey A; Fromer, Menachem; Jin, Mike; Mu, Xinmeng Jasmine; Khurana, Ekta; Ye, Kai; Kay, Mike; Saunders, Gary Ian; Suner, Marie-Marthe; Hunt, Toby; Barnes, If H A; Amid, Clara; Carvalho-Silva, Denise R; Bignell, Alexandra H; Snow, Catherine; Yngvadottir, Bryndis; Bumpstead, Suzannah; Cooper, David N; Xue, Yali; Romero, Irene Gallego; Wang, Jun; Li, Yingrui; Gibbs, Richard A; McCarroll, Steven A; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T; Pritchard, Jonathan K; Barrett, Jeffrey C; Harrow, Jennifer; Hurles, Matthew E; Gerstein, Mark B; Tyler-Smith, Chris

    2012-02-17

    Genome-sequencing studies indicate that all humans carry many genetic variants predicted to cause loss of function (LoF) of protein-coding genes, suggesting unexpected redundancy in the human genome. Here we apply stringent filters to 2951 putative LoF variants obtained from 185 human genomes to determine their true prevalence and properties. We estimate that human genomes typically contain ~100 genuine LoF variants with ~20 genes completely inactivated. We identify rare and likely deleterious LoF alleles, including 26 known and 21 predicted severe disease-causing variants, as well as common LoF variants in nonessential genes. We describe functional and evolutionary differences between LoF-tolerant and recessive disease genes and a method for using these differences to prioritize candidate genes found in clinical sequencing studies.

  1. Mutations in the paralogous human alpha-globin genes yielding identical hemoglobin variants.

    PubMed

    Moradkhani, Kamran; Préhu, Claude; Old, John; Henderson, Shirley; Balamitsa, Vera; Luo, Hong-Yuan; Poon, Man-Chiu; Chui, David H K; Wajcman, Henri; Patrinos, George P

    2009-06-01

    The human alpha-globin genes are paralogues, sharing a high degree of DNA sequence similarity and producing an identical alpha-globin chain. Over half of the alpha-globin structural variants reported to date are only characterized at the amino acid level. It is likely that a fraction of these variants, with phenotypes differing from one observation to another, may be due to the same mutation but on a different alpha-globin gene. There have been very few previous examples of hemoglobin variants that can be found at both HBA1 and HBA2 genes. Here, we report the results of a systematic multicenter study in a large multiethnic population to identify such variants and to analyze their differences from a functional and evolutionary perspective. We identified 14 different Hb variants resulting from identical mutations on either one of the two human alpha-globin paralogue genes. We also showed that the average percentage of hemoglobin variants due to a HBA2 gene mutation (alpha2) is higher than the percentage of hemoglobin variants due to the same HBA1 gene mutation (alpha1) and that the alpha2/alpha1 ratio varied between variants. These alpha-globin chain variants have most likely occurred via recurrent mutations, gene conversion events, or both. Based on these data, we propose a nomenclature for hemoglobin variants that fall into this category.

  2. Purification and properties of molecular-weight variants of human placental alkaline phosphatase

    PubMed Central

    Ghosh, Nimai K.; Fishman, William H.

    1968-01-01

    1. Alkaline phosphatase of human placenta was purified by a procedure involving homogenization with tris buffer, pH8·6, extraction with butanol, ammonium sulphate fractionation, exposure to heat, ethanol fractionation, gel filtration, triethylaminoethylcellulose anion-exchange chromatography, continuous curtain electrophoresis on paper and equilibrium dialysis. Methods for both laboratory-scale and large-scale preparation were devised. 2. Two major molecular-weight variants designated A and B were separated by molecular sieving with Sephadex G-200 and variant A was purified 4000-fold. 3. Variant B, which comes off the Sephadex G-200 column before variant A, is the electrophoretically slower-moving species on starch gel and is quite heterogeneous. 4. Purified variant A was fairly homogeneous on the basis of electrophoretic studies on starch gel and Sephadex gel, ultracentrifugation and immunodiffusion. 5. The respective molecular weights for variants A and B were 70000 and over 200000 on the basis of sucrose-density-gradient ultracentrifugation. Variant A exhibited a sedimentation coefficient of 4·2s. 6. Crystalline variant B could be converted into fast-moving variant A and vice versa. 7. Kinetic studies indicated no difference between the two variants. These include linear rates of hydrolysis, pH optimum, Michaelis constants and uncompetitive stereospecific l-phenylalanine inhibition. 8. The amino acid compositions of variants A and B and of placental albumin were determined. ImagesFig. 3.Fig. 5.Fig. 7.Fig. 8.Fig. 9. PMID:4970595

  3. Detection and Impact of Rare Regulatory Variants in Human Disease

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xin; Montgomery, Stephen B.

    2013-01-01

    Advances in genome sequencing are providing unprecedented resolution of rare and private variants. However, methods which assess the effect of these variants have relied predominantly on information within coding sequences. Assessing their impact in non-coding sequences remains a significant contemporary challenge. In this review, we highlight the role of regulatory variation as causative agents and modifiers of monogenic disorders. We further discuss how advances in functional genomics are now providing new opportunity to assess the impact of rare non-coding variants and their role in disease. PMID:23755067

  4. Identification of the meiotic toolkit in diatoms and exploration of meiosis-specific SPO11 and RAD51 homologs in the sexual species Pseudo-nitzschia multistriata and Seminavis robusta

    SciTech Connect

    Patil, Shrikant; Moeys, Sara; von Dassow, Peter; Huysman, Marie J. J.; Mapleson, Daniel; De Veylder, Lieven; Sanges, Remo; Vyverman, Wim; Montresor, Marina; Ferrante, Maria Immacolata

    2015-11-14

    Sexual reproduction is an obligate phase in the life cycle of most eukaryotes. Meiosis varies among organisms, which is reflected by the variability of the gene set associated to the process. Diatoms are unicellular organisms that belong to the stramenopile clade and have unique life cycles that can include a sexual phase. The exploration of five diatom genomes and one diatom transcriptome led to the identification of 42 genes potentially involved in meiosis. While these include the majority of known meiosis-related genes, several meiosis-specific genes, including DMC1, could not be identified. Furthermore, phylogenetic analyses supported gene identification and revealed ancestral loss and recent expansion in the RAD51 family in diatoms. The two sexual species Pseudo-nitzschia multistriata and Seminavis robusta were used to explore the expression of meiosis-related genes: RAD21, SPO11-2, RAD51-A, RAD51-B and RAD51-C were upregulated during meiosis, whereas other paralogs in these families showed no differential expression patterns, suggesting that they may play a role during vegetative divisions. An almost identical toolkit is shared among Pseudo-nitzschia multiseries and Fragilariopsis cylindrus, as well as two species for which sex has not been observed, Phaeodactylum tricornutum and Thalassiosira pseudonana, suggesting that these two may retain a facultative sexual phase. Lastly, our results reveal the conserved meiotic toolkit in six diatom species and indicate that Stramenopiles share major modifications of canonical meiosis processes ancestral to eukaryotes, with important divergences in each Kingdom.

  5. Expression and characterization of three Aurora kinase C splice variants found in human oocytes.

    PubMed

    Fellmeth, Jessica E; Gordon, Derek; Robins, Christian E; Scott, Richard T; Treff, Nathan R; Schindler, Karen

    2015-08-01

    Chromosome segregation is an extensively choreographed process yet errors still occur frequently in female meiosis, leading to implantation failure, miscarriage or offspring with developmental disorders. Aurora kinase C (AURKC) is a component of the chromosome passenger complex and is highly expressed in gametes. Studies in mouse oocytes indicate that AURKC is required to regulate chromosome segregation during meiosis I; however, little is known about the functional significance of AURKC in human oocytes. Three splice variants of AURKC exist in testis tissue. To determine which splice variants human oocytes express, we performed quantitative real-time PCR using single oocytes and found expression of all three variants. To evaluate the functional differences between the variants, we created green fluorescent protein-tagged constructs of each variant to express in oocytes from Aurkc(-/-) mice. By quantifying metaphase chromosome alignment, cell cycle progression, phosphorylation of INCENP and microtubule attachments to kinetochores, we found that AURKC_v1 was the most capable of the variants at supporting metaphase I chromosome segregation. AURKC_v3 localized to chromosomes properly and supported cell cycle progression to metaphase II, but its inability to correct erroneous microtubule attachments to kinetochores meant that chromosome segregation was not as accurate compared with the other two variants. Finally, when we expressed the three variants simultaneously, error correction was more robust than when they were expressed on their own. Therefore, oocytes express three variants of AURKC that are not functionally equivalent in supporting meiosis, but fully complement meiosis when expressed simultaneously.

  6. Expression and characterization of three Aurora kinase C splice variants found in human oocytes

    PubMed Central

    Fellmeth, Jessica E.; Gordon, Derek; Robins, Christian E.; Scott, Richard T.; Treff, Nathan R.; Schindler, Karen

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome segregation is an extensively choreographed process yet errors still occur frequently in female meiosis, leading to implantation failure, miscarriage or offspring with developmental disorders. Aurora kinase C (AURKC) is a component of the chromosome passenger complex and is highly expressed in gametes. Studies in mouse oocytes indicate that AURKC is required to regulate chromosome segregation during meiosis I; however, little is known about the functional significance of AURKC in human oocytes. Three splice variants of AURKC exist in testis tissue. To determine which splice variants human oocytes express, we performed quantitative real-time PCR using single oocytes and found expression of all three variants. To evaluate the functional differences between the variants, we created green fluorescent protein-tagged constructs of each variant to express in oocytes from Aurkc−/− mice. By quantifying metaphase chromosome alignment, cell cycle progression, phosphorylation of INCENP and microtubule attachments to kinetochores, we found that AURKC_v1 was the most capable of the variants at supporting metaphase I chromosome segregation. AURKC_v3 localized to chromosomes properly and supported cell cycle progression to metaphase II, but its inability to correct erroneous microtubule attachments to kinetochores meant that chromosome segregation was not as accurate compared with the other two variants. Finally, when we expressed the three variants simultaneously, error correction was more robust than when they were expressed on their own. Therefore, oocytes express three variants of AURKC that are not functionally equivalent in supporting meiosis, but fully complement meiosis when expressed simultaneously. PMID:25995441

  7. Hundreds of variants clustered in genomic loci and biological pathways affect human height

    PubMed Central

    Lango Allen, Hana; Estrada, Karol; Lettre, Guillaume; Berndt, Sonja I.; Weedon, Michael N.; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Willer, Cristen J.; Jackson, Anne U.; Vedantam, Sailaja; Raychaudhuri, Soumya; Ferreira, Teresa; Wood, Andrew R.; Weyant, Robert J.; Segrè, Ayellet V.; Speliotes, Elizabeth K.; Wheeler, Eleanor; Soranzo, Nicole; Park, Ju-Hyun; Yang, Jian; Gudbjartsson, Daniel; Heard-Costa, Nancy L.; Randall, Joshua C.; Qi, Lu; Smith, Albert Vernon; Mägi, Reedik; Pastinen, Tomi; Liang, Liming; Heid, Iris M.; Luan, Jian'an; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Winkler, Thomas W.; Goddard, Michael E.; Lo, Ken Sin; Palmer, Cameron; Workalemahu, Tsegaselassie; Aulchenko, Yurii S.; Johansson, Åsa; Zillikens, M.Carola; Feitosa, Mary F.; Esko, Tõnu; Johnson, Toby; Ketkar, Shamika; Kraft, Peter; Mangino, Massimo; Prokopenko, Inga; Absher, Devin; Albrecht, Eva; Ernst, Florian; Glazer, Nicole L.; Hayward, Caroline; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Jacobs, Kevin B.; Knowles, Joshua W.; Kutalik, Zoltán; Monda, Keri L.; Polasek, Ozren; Preuss, Michael; Rayner, Nigel W.; Robertson, Neil R.; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Tyrer, Jonathan P.; Voight, Benjamin F.; Wiklund, Fredrik; Xu, Jianfeng; Zhao, Jing Hua; Nyholt, Dale R.; Pellikka, Niina; Perola, Markus; Perry, John R.B.; Surakka, Ida; Tammesoo, Mari-Liis; Altmaier, Elizabeth L.; Amin, Najaf; Aspelund, Thor; Bhangale, Tushar; Boucher, Gabrielle; Chasman, Daniel I.; Chen, Constance; Coin, Lachlan; Cooper, Matthew N.; Dixon, Anna L.; Gibson, Quince; Grundberg, Elin; Hao, Ke; Junttila, M. Juhani; Kaplan, Lee M.; Kettunen, Johannes; König, Inke R.; Kwan, Tony; Lawrence, Robert W.; Levinson, Douglas F.; Lorentzon, Mattias; McKnight, Barbara; Morris, Andrew P.; Müller, Martina; Ngwa, Julius Suh; Purcell, Shaun; Rafelt, Suzanne; Salem, Rany M.; Salvi, Erika; Sanna, Serena; Shi, Jianxin; Sovio, Ulla; Thompson, John R.; Turchin, Michael C.; Vandenput, Liesbeth; Verlaan, Dominique J.; Vitart, Veronique; White, Charles C.; Ziegler, Andreas; Almgren, Peter; Balmforth, Anthony J.; Campbell, Harry; Citterio, Lorena; De Grandi, Alessandro; Dominiczak, Anna; Duan, Jubao; Elliott, Paul; Elosua, Roberto; Eriksson, Johan G.; Freimer, Nelson B.; Geus, Eco J.C.; Glorioso, Nicola; Haiqing, Shen; Hartikainen, Anna-Liisa; Havulinna, Aki S.; Hicks, Andrew A.; Hui, Jennie; Igl, Wilmar; Illig, Thomas; Jula, Antti; Kajantie, Eero; Kilpeläinen, Tuomas O.; Koiranen, Markku; Kolcic, Ivana; Koskinen, Seppo; Kovacs, Peter; Laitinen, Jaana; Liu, Jianjun; Lokki, Marja-Liisa; Marusic, Ana; Maschio, Andrea; Meitinger, Thomas; Mulas, Antonella; Paré, Guillaume; Parker, Alex N.; Peden, John F.; Petersmann, Astrid; Pichler, Irene; Pietiläinen, Kirsi H.; Pouta, Anneli; Ridderstråle, Martin; Rotter, Jerome I.; Sambrook, Jennifer G.; Sanders, Alan R.; Schmidt, Carsten Oliver; Sinisalo, Juha; Smit, Jan H.; Stringham, Heather M.; Walters, G.Bragi; Widen, Elisabeth; Wild, Sarah H.; Willemsen, Gonneke; Zagato, Laura; Zgaga, Lina; Zitting, Paavo; Alavere, Helene; Farrall, Martin; McArdle, Wendy L.; Nelis, Mari; Peters, Marjolein J.; Ripatti, Samuli; van Meurs, Joyce B.J.; Aben, Katja K.; Ardlie, Kristin G; Beckmann, Jacques S.; Beilby, John P.; Bergman, Richard N.; Bergmann, Sven; Collins, Francis S.; Cusi, Daniele; den Heijer, Martin; Eiriksdottir, Gudny; Gejman, Pablo V.; Hall, Alistair S.; Hamsten, Anders; Huikuri, Heikki V.; Iribarren, Carlos; Kähönen, Mika; Kaprio, Jaakko; Kathiresan, Sekar; Kiemeney, Lambertus; Kocher, Thomas; Launer, Lenore J.; Lehtimäki, Terho; Melander, Olle; Mosley, Tom H.; Musk, Arthur W.; Nieminen, Markku S.; O'Donnell, Christopher J.; Ohlsson, Claes; Oostra, Ben; Palmer, Lyle J.; Raitakari, Olli; Ridker, Paul M.; Rioux, John D.; Rissanen, Aila; Rivolta, Carlo; Schunkert, Heribert; Shuldiner, Alan R.; Siscovick, David S.; Stumvoll, Michael; Tönjes, Anke; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; van Ommen, Gert-Jan; Viikari, Jorma; Heath, Andrew C.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Province, Michael A.; Kayser, Manfred; Arnold, Alice M.; Atwood, Larry D.; Boerwinkle, Eric; Chanock, Stephen J.; Deloukas, Panos; Gieger, Christian; Grönberg, Henrik; Hall, Per; Hattersley, Andrew T.; Hengstenberg, Christian; Hoffman, Wolfgang; Lathrop, G.Mark; Salomaa, Veikko; Schreiber, Stefan; Uda, Manuela; Waterworth, Dawn; Wright, Alan F.; Assimes, Themistocles L.; Barroso, Inês; Hofman, Albert; Mohlke, Karen L.; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Caulfield, Mark J.; Cupples, L.Adrienne; Erdmann, Jeanette; Fox, Caroline S.; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gyllensten, Ulf; Harris, Tamara B.

    2010-01-01

    Most common human traits and diseases have a polygenic pattern of inheritance: DNA sequence variants at many genetic loci influence phenotype. Genome-wide association (GWA) studies have identified >600 variants associated with human traits1, but these typically explain small fractions of phenotypic variation, raising questions about the utility of further studies. Here, using 183,727 individuals, we show that hundreds of genetic variants, in at least 180 loci, influence adult height, a highly heritable and classic polygenic trait2,3. The large number of loci reveals patterns with important implications for genetic studies of common human diseases and traits. First, the 180 loci are not random, but instead are enriched for genes that are connected in biological pathways (P=0.016), and that underlie skeletal growth defects (P<0.001). Second, the likely causal gene is often located near the most strongly associated variant: in 13 of 21 loci containing a known skeletal growth gene, that gene was closest to the associated variant. Third, at least 19 loci have multiple independently associated variants, suggesting that allelic heterogeneity is a frequent feature of polygenic traits, that comprehensive explorations of already-discovered loci should discover additional variants, and that an appreciable fraction of associated loci may have been identified. Fourth, associated variants are enriched for likely functional effects on genes, being over-represented amongst variants that alter amino acid structure of proteins and expression levels of nearby genes. Our data explain ∼10% of the phenotypic variation in height, and we estimate that unidentified common variants of similar effect sizes would increase this figure to ∼16% of phenotypic variation (∼20% of heritable variation). Although additional approaches are needed to fully dissect the genetic architecture of polygenic human traits, our findings indicate that GWA studies can identify large numbers of loci that

  8. Alternative splicing variants of human Fbx4 disturb cyclin D1 proteolysis in human cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Chu, Xiufeng; Zhang, Ting; Wang, Jie; Li, Meng; Zhang, Xiaolei; Tu, Jing; Sun, Shiqin; Chen, Xiangmei; Lu, Fengmin

    2014-04-25

    Highlights: • The expression of Fbx4 was significantly lower in HCC tissues. • Novel splicing variants of Fbx4 were identified. • These novel variants are much more abundant in human cancer tissues and cells. • The novel Fbx4 isoforms could promote cell proliferation and migration in vitro. • These isoforms showed less capability for cyclin D1 binding and degradation. - Abstract: Fbx4 is a specific substrate recognition component of SCF ubiquitin ligases that catalyzes the ubiquitination and subsequent degradation of cyclin D1 and Trx1. Two isoforms of human Fbx4 protein, the full length Fbx4α and the C-terminal truncated Fbx4β have been identified, but their functions remain elusive. In this study, we demonstrated that the mRNA level of Fbx4 was significantly lower in hepatocellular carcinoma tissues than that in the corresponding non-tumor tissues. More importantly, we identified three novel splicing variants of Fbx4: Fbx4γ (missing 168–245nt of exon1), Fbx4δ (missing exon6) and a N-terminal reading frame shift variant (missing exon2). Using cloning sequencing and RT-PCR, we demonstrated these novel splice variants are much more abundant in human cancer tissues and cell lines than that in normal tissues. When expressed in Sk-Hep1 and NIH3T3 cell lines, Fbx4β, Fbx4γ and Fbx4δ could promote cell proliferation and migration in vitro. Concordantly, these isoforms could disrupt cyclin D1 degradation and therefore increase cyclin D1 expression. Moreover, unlike the full-length isoform Fbx4α that mainly exists in cytoplasm, Fbx4β, Fbx4γ, and Fbx4δ locate in both cytoplasm and nucleus. Since cyclin D1 degradation takes place in cytoplasm, the nuclear distribution of these Fbx4 isoforms may not be involved in the down-regulation of cytoplasmic cyclin D1. These results define the impact of alternative splicing on Fbx4 function, and suggest that the attenuated cyclin D1 degradation by these novel Fbx4 isoforms provides a new insight for aberrant

  9. Rare and low-frequency variants in human common diseases and other complex traits.

    PubMed

    Lettre, Guillaume

    2014-11-01

    In humans, most of the genetic variation is rare and often population-specific. Whereas the role of rare genetic variants in familial monogenic diseases is firmly established, we are only now starting to explore the contribution of this class of genetic variation to human common diseases and other complex traits. Such large-scale experiments are possible due to the development of next-generation DNA sequencing. Early findings suggested that rare and low-frequency coding variation might have a large effect on human phenotypes (eg, PCSK9 missense variants on low-density lipoprotein-cholesterol and coronary heart diseases). This observation sparked excitement in prognostic and diagnostic medicine, as well as in genetics-driven strategies to develop new drugs. In this review, I describe results and present initial conclusions regarding some of the recent rare and low-frequency variant discoveries. We can already assume that most phenotype-associated rare and low-frequency variants have modest-to-weak phenotypical effect. Thus, we will need large cohorts to identify them, as for common variants in genome-wide association studies. As we expand the list of associated rare and low-frequency variants, we can also better recognise the current limitations: we need to develop better statistical methods to optimally test association with rare variants, including non-coding variation, and to account for potential confounders such as population stratification.

  10. Towards Precision Medicine: Advances in Computational Approaches for the Analysis of Human Variants

    PubMed Central

    Peterson, Thomas A; Doughty, Emily; Kann, Maricel G

    2013-01-01

    Variations and similarities in our individual genomes are part of our history, our heritage, and our identity. Some human genomic variants are associated with common traits such as hair and eye color, while others are associated with susceptibility to disease or response to drug treatment. Identifying the human variations producing clinically relevant phenotypic changes is critical for providing accurate and personalized diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment for diseases. Furthermore, a better understanding of the molecular underpinning of disease can lead to development of new drug targets for precision medicine. Several resources have been designed for collecting and storing human genomic variations in highly structured, easily accessible databases. Unfortunately, a vast amount of information about these genetic variants and their functional and phenotypic associations is currently buried in the literature, only accessible by manual curation or sophisticated text mining technology to extract the relevant information. In addition, the low cost of sequencing technologies coupled with increasing computational power has enabled the development of numerous computational methodologies to predict the pathogenicity of human variants. This review provides a detailed comparison of current human variant resources, including HGMD, OMIM, ClinVar, and UniProt/Swiss-Prot, followed by an overview of the computational methods and techniques used to leverage the available data to predict novel deleterious variants. We expect these resources and tools to become the foundation for understanding the molecular details of genomic variants leading to disease, which in turn will enable the promise of precision medicine. PMID:23962656

  11. Integrative annotation of variants from 1092 humans: application to cancer genomics.

    PubMed

    Khurana, Ekta; Fu, Yao; Colonna, Vincenza; Mu, Xinmeng Jasmine; Kang, Hyun Min; Lappalainen, Tuuli; Sboner, Andrea; Lochovsky, Lucas; Chen, Jieming; Harmanci, Arif; Das, Jishnu; Abyzov, Alexej; Balasubramanian, Suganthi; Beal, Kathryn; Chakravarty, Dimple; Challis, Daniel; Chen, Yuan; Clarke, Declan; Clarke, Laura; Cunningham, Fiona; Evani, Uday S; Flicek, Paul; Fragoza, Robert; Garrison, Erik; Gibbs, Richard; Gümüs, Zeynep H; Herrero, Javier; Kitabayashi, Naoki; Kong, Yong; Lage, Kasper; Liluashvili, Vaja; Lipkin, Steven M; MacArthur, Daniel G; Marth, Gabor; Muzny, Donna; Pers, Tune H; Ritchie, Graham R S; Rosenfeld, Jeffrey A; Sisu, Cristina; Wei, Xiaomu; Wilson, Michael; Xue, Yali; Yu, Fuli; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T; Yu, Haiyuan; Rubin, Mark A; Tyler-Smith, Chris; Gerstein, Mark

    2013-10-04

    Interpreting variants, especially noncoding ones, in the increasing number of personal genomes is challenging. We used patterns of polymorphisms in functionally annotated regions in 1092 humans to identify deleterious variants; then we experimentally validated candidates. We analyzed both coding and noncoding regions, with the former corroborating the latter. We found regions particularly sensitive to mutations ("ultrasensitive") and variants that are disruptive because of mechanistic effects on transcription-factor binding (that is, "motif-breakers"). We also found variants in regions with higher network centrality tend to be deleterious. Insertions and deletions followed a similar pattern to single-nucleotide variants, with some notable exceptions (e.g., certain deletions and enhancers). On the basis of these patterns, we developed a computational tool (FunSeq), whose application to ~90 cancer genomes reveals nearly a hundred candidate noncoding drivers.

  12. MutS homologue hMSH5: recombinational DSB repair and non-synonymous polymorphic variants.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiling; Xu, Yang; Feng, Katey; Tompkins, Joshua D; Her, Chengtao

    2013-01-01

    Double-strand breaks (DSBs) constitute the most deleterious form of DNA lesions that can lead to genome alterations and cell death, and the vast majority of DSBs arise pathologically in response to DNA damaging agents such as ionizing radiation (IR) and chemotherapeutic agents. Recent studies have implicated a role for the human MutS homologue hMSH5 in homologous recombination (HR)-mediated DSB repair and the DNA damage response. In the present study, we show that hMSH5 promotes HR-based DSB repair, and this property resides in the carboxyl-terminal portion of the protein. Our results demonstrate that DSB-triggered hMSH5 chromatin association peaks at the proximal regions of the DSB and decreases gradually with increased distance from the break. Furthermore, the DSB-triggered hMSH5 chromatin association is preceded by and relies on the assembly of hMRE11 and hRad51 at the proximal regions of the DSB. Lastly, the potential effects of hMSH5 non-synonymous variants (L85F, Y202C, V206F, R351G, L377F, and P786S) on HR and cell survival in response to DSB-inducing anticancer agents have been analyzed. These experiments show that the expression of hMSH5 variants elicits different survival responses to anticancer drugs cisplatin, bleomycin, doxorubicin and camptothecin. However, the effects of hMSH5 variants on survival responses to DSB-inducing agents are not directly correlated to their effects exerted on HR-mediated DSB repair, suggesting that the roles of hMSH5 variants in the processes of DNA damage response and repair are multifaceted.

  13. The Human Variome Project: ensuring the quality of DNA variant databases in inherited renal disease.

    PubMed

    Savige, Judy; Dalgleish, Raymond; Cotton, Richard Gh; den Dunnen, Johan T; Macrae, Finlay; Povey, Sue

    2015-11-01

    A recent review identified 60 common inherited renal diseases caused by DNA variants in 132 different genes. These diseases can be diagnosed with DNA sequencing, but each gene probably also has a thousand normal variants. Many more normal variants have been characterised by individual laboratories than are reported in the literature or found in publicly accessible collections. At present, testing laboratories must assess each novel change they identify for pathogenicity, even when this has been done elsewhere previously, and the distinction between normal and disease-associated variants is particularly an issue with the recent surge in exomic sequencing and gene discovery projects. The Human Variome Project recommends the establishment of gene-specific DNA variant databases to facilitate the sharing of DNA variants and decisions about likely disease causation. Databases improve diagnostic accuracy and testing efficiency, and reduce costs. They also help with genotype-phenotype correlations and predictive algorithms. The Human Variome Project advocates databases that use standardised descriptions, are up-to-date, include clinical information and are freely available. Currently, the genes affected in the most common inherited renal diseases correspond to 350 different variant databases, many of which are incomplete or have insufficient clinical details for genotype-phenotype correlations. Assistance is needed from nephrologists to maximise the usefulness of these databases for the diagnosis and management of inherited renal disease.

  14. A novel splice variant of human gene NPL, mainly expressed in human liver, kidney and peripheral blood leukocyte.

    PubMed

    Wu, Maoqing; Gu, Shaohua; Xu, Jian; Zou, Xianqiong; Zheng, Huarui; Jin, Zhe; Xie, Yi; Ji, Chaoneng; Mao, Yumin

    2005-04-01

    From the human fetal brain cDNA library constructed by our lab, a novel variant cDNA of a human gene was successfully cloned and identified. Because the gene has been named N-acetylneuraminate pyruvate lyase (NPL), accordingly we term our splice variant NPL_v2. The cDNA of NPL_v2 has a full-length open reading frame (ORF) from the nucleotide position 320 to 1225 that encodes a protein comprising 301 amino acids. SMART analysis showed that our hypothetical protein has one dihydrodipicolinate synthase (DHDPS) domain. Phosphorylation analysis of the deduced protein show that there are five phosphorylation sites including three "serine" and two "threonine" at the region that are not found in other splice variant. RT-PCR experiment revealed that our splice variant of the gene is mainly expressed in human placenta, liver, kidney, pancreas, spleen, thymus, ovary, small intestine and peripheral blood leukocyte.

  15. Structural comparisons of two allelic variants of human placental alkaline phosphatase.

    PubMed

    Millán, J L; Stigbrand, T; Jörnvall, H

    1985-01-01

    A simple immunosorbent purification scheme based on monoclonal antibodies has been devised for human placental alkaline phosphatase. The two most common allelic variants, S and F, have similar amino acid compositions with identical N-terminal amino acid sequences through the first 13 residues. Both variants have identical lectin binding properties towards concanavalin A, lentil-lectin, wheat germ agglutinin, phytohemagglutinin and soybean agglutinin, and identical carbohydrate contents as revealed by methylation analysis. CNBr fragments of the variants demonstrate identical high performance liquid chromatography patterns. The carbohydrate containing fragment is different from the 32P-labeled active site fragment and the N-terminal fragment.

  16. Macro histone variants are critical for the differentiation of human pluripotent cells.

    PubMed

    Barrero, María J; Sese, Borja; Martí, Mercè; Izpisua Belmonte, Juan Carlos

    2013-05-31

    We have previously shown that macro histone variants (macroH2A) are expressed at low levels in stem cells and are up-regulated during differentiation. Here we show that the knockdown of macro histone variants impaired the in vitro and in vivo differentiation of human pluripotent cells, likely through defects in the silencing of pluripotency-related genes. ChIP experiments showed that during differentiation macro histone variants are recruited to the regulatory regions of pluripotency and developmental genes marked with H3K27me3 contributing to the silencing of these genes.

  17. Alternative spliced variants in the pantetheinase family of genes expressed in human neutrophils.

    PubMed

    Nitto, Takeaki; Inoue, Teruo; Node, Koichi

    2008-12-15

    Pantetheinase (EC 3.5.1.92) is an enzyme that hydrolyzes pantetheine, an intermediate metabolite of coenzyme A, into pantothenic acid (vitamin B(5)) and cysteamine, a potent antioxidant. The pantetheinase gene family consists of three independent genes, pantetheinase/vanin-1/VNN1, GPI-80/VNN2 and vanin-3/VNN3 that are each composed of seven exons. We herein report that human neutrophils express transcripts encoding at least nine splice variants of VNN3 and four splice variants of GPI-80/VNN2. Analysis of the DNA sequence of the human VNN3 gene demonstrated that the VNN3 locus in the human genome as well as the sequence of cDNA clones obtained in this study does not encode the complete VNN3 protein, as previously reported due to a frame shift caused by lack of one nucleotide. Moreover, the VNN3 locus indeed encodes smaller peptides compared to the proteins encoded by the mouse orthologous gene, vanin-3. The anti-GPI-80 monoclonal antibody 3H9 recognized amino acids 120-179 of the GPI-80/VNN2 protein as shown by the results of immunoblotting with recombinant GPI-80/VNN2 variant proteins. Immunoblotting with human neutrophil lysate suggests that the GPI-80/VNN2 variants exist in human neutrophils. The existence of splice variants in the pantetheinase gene family suggests the possibility of alternative roles in addition to canonical enzymatic activity in human neutrophils.

  18. Expression of CD44 variants in human inflammatory synovitis

    SciTech Connect

    Hale, L.P.; Haynes, B.F.; McCachren, S.

    1995-11-01

    The cell surface hyaluronate receptor CD44 has previously been shown to have immunomodulatory activity and to be upregulated in inflammatory synovitis. Since these findings were reported, the genomic structure of CD44 has been delineated, and multiple splice variants have been described. Therefore, we determined which CD44 variant exons are present during inflammatory synovitis by a combination of Northern blot analysis and reverse transcription followed by polymerase chain reaction amplification of synovial RNA. Immunohistochemical staining was used to define the sites of expression of individual v6 and v9 exons in synovial tissue. The standard (S) or hematopoietic isoform, CD44S, was the predominant form of CD44 expressed in synovium and was expressed by most cell types. Other isoforms, containing alternatively spliced exons in the proximal extracellular domain, were found by RT-PCR, but at lower levels than CD44S. The second most prevalent form was CD44E, which has an insertion of three exons (v8-v10) in the proximal extracellular domain. Immunohistochemical studies showed that reactivity with v9-specific antibodies was primarily in macrophages, particularly those in the synovial lining layer. CD44 exon v6, previously reported to be important in immune activation and in epithelial tumor metastasis, was also expressed in synovial lining cells and in occasional synovial interstitial cells. The presence of CD44 variants containing v9 in rheumatoid synovial macrophages may be important in the adhesion and activation of mononuclear phagocytes in the synovium and, thus, may be a target for novel antiinflammatory therapies in the future. The role of CD44 isoforms in cellular adhesion, immune activation, and joint erosion in inflammatory synovitis deserves further study. 7 figs., 2 tabs., 56 refs.

  19. Identification of androgen receptor variants in testis from humans and other vertebrates.

    PubMed

    Laurentino, S S; Pinto, P I S; Tomás, J; Cavaco, J E; Sousa, M; Barros, A; Power, D M; Canário, A V M; Socorro, S

    2013-06-01

    The androgen receptor (AR) is a ligand-activated transcription factor member of the nuclear receptor superfamily. The existence of alternatively spliced variants is well recognised for several members of this superfamily, most of them having functional importance. For example, several testicular oestrogen receptor variants have been suggested to play a role in the regulation of spermatogenesis. However, information on AR variants is mostly related to cancer and androgen insensitivity syndrome (AIS) cases. The objective of this study was to investigate the expression of AR variants in the testis from humans and other vertebrates. Four AR variants [ARΔ2(Stop) , ARΔ2(23Stop) , ARΔ3 and ARΔ4(120)] were identified in human testis. ARΔ2(Stop) and ARΔ3, with exon 2 or 3 deleted, respectively, were also expressed in human liver, lung, kidney and heart. In addition, ARΔ2(Stop) was expressed in rat and gilthead seabream testis, while an ARΔ3 was detected in African clawed frog testis. This is the first report revealing the existence of AR variants in the testis of evolutionarily distant vertebrate species and in nonpathological tissues. These data suggest the functional importance of these novel AR forms and demonstrate a complexity in AR signalling that is not exclusive of pathological conditions.

  20. Patterns and functional implications of rare germline variants across 12 cancer types

    PubMed Central

    Lu, Charles; Xie, Mingchao; Wendl, Michael C.; Wang, Jiayin; McLellan, Michael D.; Leiserson, Mark D. M.; Huang, Kuan-lin; Wyczalkowski, Matthew A.; Jayasinghe, Reyka; Banerjee, Tapahsama; Ning, Jie; Tripathi, Piyush; Zhang, Qunyuan; Niu, Beifang; Ye, Kai; Schmidt, Heather K.; Fulton, Robert S.; McMichael, Joshua F.; Batra, Prag; Kandoth, Cyriac; Bharadwaj, Maheetha; Koboldt, Daniel C.; Miller, Christopher A.; Kanchi, Krishna L.; Eldred, James M.; Larson, David E.; Welch, John S.; You, Ming; Ozenberger, Bradley A.; Govindan, Ramaswamy; Walter, Matthew J.; Ellis, Matthew J.; Mardis, Elaine R.; Graubert, Timothy A.; Dipersio, John F.; Ley, Timothy J.; Wilson, Richard K.; Goodfellow, Paul J.; Raphael, Benjamin J.; Chen, Feng; Johnson, Kimberly J.; Parvin, Jeffrey D.; Ding, Li

    2015-01-01

    Large-scale cancer sequencing data enable discovery of rare germline cancer susceptibility variants. Here we systematically analyse 4,034 cases from The Cancer Genome Atlas cancer cases representing 12 cancer types. We find that the frequency of rare germline truncations in 114 cancer-susceptibility-associated genes varies widely, from 4% (acute myeloid leukaemia (AML)) to 19% (ovarian cancer), with a notably high frequency of 11% in stomach cancer. Burden testing identifies 13 cancer genes with significant enrichment of rare truncations, some associated with specific cancers (for example, RAD51C, PALB2 and MSH6 in AML, stomach and endometrial cancers, respectively). Significant, tumour-specific loss of heterozygosity occurs in nine genes (ATM, BAP1, BRCA1/2, BRIP1, FANCM, PALB2 and RAD51C/D). Moreover, our homology-directed repair assay of 68 BRCA1 rare missense variants supports the utility of allelic enrichment analysis for characterizing variants of unknown significance. The scale of this analysis and the somatic-germline integration enable the detection of rare variants that may affect individual susceptibility to tumour development, a critical step toward precision medicine. PMID:26689913

  1. Refolded Recombinant Human Paraoxonase 1 Variant Exhibits Prophylactic Activity Against Organophosphate Poisoning.

    PubMed

    Bajaj, Priyanka; Tripathy, Rajan K; Aggarwal, Geetika; Datusalia, Ashok K; Sharma, Shyam S; Pande, Abhay H

    2016-09-01

    Organophosphate (OP) compounds are neurotoxic chemicals, and current treatments available for OP-poisoning are considered as unsatisfactory and inadequate. There is an urgent need for the development of more effective treatment(s) for OP-poisoning. Human paraoxonase 1 (h-PON1) is known to hydrolyze a variety of OP-compounds and is a leading candidate for the development of prophylactic and therapeutic agent against OP-poisoning in humans. Non-availability of effective system(s) for the production of recombinant h-PON1 (rh-PON1) makes it hard to produce improved variant(s) of this enzyme and analyze their in vivo efficacy in animal models. Production of recombinant h-PON1 (rh-PON1) using an Escherichia coli expression system is a key to develop variant(s) of h-PON1. Recently, we have developed a procedure to produce active rh-PON1 enzymes by using E. coli expression system. In this study, we have characterized the OP-hydrolyzing properties of refolded rh-PON1(wt) and rh-PON1(H115W;R192K) variant. Our results show that refolded rh-PON1(H115W;R192K) variant exhibit enhanced OP-hydrolyzing activity in in vitro and ex vivo assays and exhibited prophylactic activity in mouse model of OP-poisoning, suggesting that refolded rh-PON1 can be developed as a therapeutic candidate.

  2. Production and characterization of genetically modified human IL-11 variants.

    PubMed

    Sano, Emiko; Takei, Toshiaki; Ueda, Takuya; Tsumoto, Kouhei

    2017-02-01

    Interleukin-11 (IL-11) has been expected as a drug on severe thrombocytopenia caused by myelo-suppressive chemotherapy. Whereas, development of IL-11 inhibitor is also expected for a treatment against IL-11 related cancer progression. Here, we will demonstrate the creation of various kinds of genetically modified hIL-11s. Modified vectors were constructed by introducing N- or O-glycosylation site on the region of hIL-11 that does not belong to the core α-helical motif based on the predicted secondary structure. N-terminal (N: between 22 to 23 aa), the first loop (M1:70 to 71 aa), the second loop (M2:114-115 aa), the third loop (M3:160-161 aa) and C-terminal (C: 200- aa) were selected for modification. A large scale production system was established and the characteristics of modified hIL-11s were evaluated. The structure was analyzed by amino acid sequence and composition analysis and CD-spectra. Glycan was assessed by monosaccharide composition analysis. Growth promoting activity and biological stability were analyzed by proliferation of T1165 cells. N-terminal modified proteins were well glycosylated and produced. Growth activity of 3NN with NASNASNAS sequence on N-terminal was about tenfold higher than wild type (WT). Structural and biological stabilities of 3NN were also better than WT and residence time in mouse blood was longer than WT. M1 variants lacked growth activity though they are well glycosylated and secondary structure is very stable. Both of 3NN and OM1 with AAATPAPG on M1 associated with hIL-11R strongly. These results indicate N-terminal and M1 variants will be expected for practical use as potent agonists or antagonists of hIL-11.

  3. A high-quality human reference panel reveals the complexity and distribution of genomic structural variants

    PubMed Central

    Hehir-Kwa, Jayne Y.; Marschall, Tobias; Kloosterman, Wigard P.; Francioli, Laurent C.; Baaijens, Jasmijn A.; Dijkstra, Louis J.; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Koval, Vyacheslav; Thung, Djie Tjwan; Wardenaar, René; Renkens, Ivo; Coe, Bradley P.; Deelen, Patrick; de Ligt, Joep; Lameijer, Eric-Wubbo; van Dijk, Freerk; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Bovenberg, Jasper A.; de Craen, Anton J. M.; Beekman, Marian; Hofman, Albert; Willemsen, Gonneke; Wolffenbuttel, Bruce; Platteel, Mathieu; Du, Yuanping; Chen, Ruoyan; Cao, Hongzhi; Cao, Rui; Sun, Yushen; Cao, Jeremy Sujie; Neerincx, Pieter B. T.; Dijkstra, Martijn; Byelas, George; Kanterakis, Alexandros; Bot, Jan; Vermaat, Martijn; Laros, Jeroen F. J.; den Dunnen, Johan T.; de Knijff, Peter; Karssen, Lennart C.; van Leeuwen, Elisa M.; Amin, Najaf; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Estrada, Karol; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Kattenberg, V. Mathijs; van Enckevort, David; Mei, Hailiang; Santcroos, Mark; van Schaik, Barbera D. C.; Handsaker, Robert E.; McCarroll, Steven A.; Ko, Arthur; Sudmant, Peter; Nijman, Isaac J.; Uitterlinden, André G.; van Duijn, Cornelia M.; Eichler, Evan E.; de Bakker, Paul I. W.; Swertz, Morris A.; Wijmenga, Cisca; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B.; Slagboom, P. Eline; Boomsma, Dorret I.; Schönhuth, Alexander; Ye, Kai; Guryev, Victor

    2016-01-01

    Structural variation (SV) represents a major source of differences between individual human genomes and has been linked to disease phenotypes. However, the majority of studies provide neither a global view of the full spectrum of these variants nor integrate them into reference panels of genetic variation. Here, we analyse whole genome sequencing data of 769 individuals from 250 Dutch families, and provide a haplotype-resolved map of 1.9 million genome variants across 9 different variant classes, including novel forms of complex indels, and retrotransposition-mediated insertions of mobile elements and processed RNAs. A large proportion are previously under reported variants sized between 21 and 100 bp. We detect 4 megabases of novel sequence, encoding 11 new transcripts. Finally, we show 191 known, trait-associated SNPs to be in strong linkage disequilibrium with SVs and demonstrate that our panel facilitates accurate imputation of SVs in unrelated individuals. PMID:27708267

  4. A high-quality human reference panel reveals the complexity and distribution of genomic structural variants.

    PubMed

    Hehir-Kwa, Jayne Y; Marschall, Tobias; Kloosterman, Wigard P; Francioli, Laurent C; Baaijens, Jasmijn A; Dijkstra, Louis J; Abdellaoui, Abdel; Koval, Vyacheslav; Thung, Djie Tjwan; Wardenaar, René; Renkens, Ivo; Coe, Bradley P; Deelen, Patrick; de Ligt, Joep; Lameijer, Eric-Wubbo; van Dijk, Freerk; Hormozdiari, Fereydoun; Uitterlinden, André G; van Duijn, Cornelia M; Eichler, Evan E; de Bakker, Paul I W; Swertz, Morris A; Wijmenga, Cisca; van Ommen, Gert-Jan B; Slagboom, P Eline; Boomsma, Dorret I; Schönhuth, Alexander; Ye, Kai; Guryev, Victor

    2016-10-06

    Structural variation (SV) represents a major source of differences between individual human genomes and has been linked to disease phenotypes. However, the majority of studies provide neither a global view of the full spectrum of these variants nor integrate them into reference panels of genetic variation. Here, we analyse whole genome sequencing data of 769 individuals from 250 Dutch families, and provide a haplotype-resolved map of 1.9 million genome variants across 9 different variant classes, including novel forms of complex indels, and retrotransposition-mediated insertions of mobile elements and processed RNAs. A large proportion are previously under reported variants sized between 21 and 100 bp. We detect 4 megabases of novel sequence, encoding 11 new transcripts. Finally, we show 191 known, trait-associated SNPs to be in strong linkage disequilibrium with SVs and demonstrate that our panel facilitates accurate imputation of SVs in unrelated individuals.

  5. Four novel ULBP splice variants are ligands for human NKG2D.

    PubMed

    Cao, Wei; Xi, Xueyan; Wang, Zhun; Dong, Liling; Hao, Zhiyong; Cui, Lianxian; Ma, Chi; He, Wei

    2008-08-01

    UL16-binding proteins [ULBPs, also termed as retinoic acid early transcripts (RAET1) molecules] are frequently expressed by malignant transformed cells and stimulate anti-tumor immune responses mediated by NKG2D-positive NK cells, CD8(+) alphabeta T cells and gammadelta T cells in vitro and in vivo. In this study, we identified four novel functional splice variants of ULBPs including ULBP4-I, ULBP4-II, ULBP4-III and RAET1G3 in HepG2 liver carcinoma cells, WISH human amnion cells, Hep-2 larynx carcinoma cells and K562 leukemia cells, respectively, by reverse transcription-PCR and T vector cloning strategy. Analysis of alignments of amino acid sequences of the splice variants illustrated that there were important modifications between splice variants and their individual parental ULBP. All ULBP4 splice variants (ULBP4-I, ULBP4-II and ULBP4-III) were type 1 membrane-spanning molecules and had the ability to bind with human NKG2D receptor in vitro. Ectopic expressions of ULBP4 and ULBP4 splice variants resulted in the enhanced cytotoxic sensitivity of target cells against NK cells, which could be blocked by anti-NKG2D mAb. Moreover, co-culture-free soluble forms of ULBP4 splice variants (their alpha1 + alpha2 ectodomains) and RAET1G3 (soluble splice variant of RAET1G2) with NK cells down-regulated the cell surface expression of NKG2D. Finally, immobilized in a plate-bound form of RAET1G3 stimulated NK cells to secrete IFN-gamma. Taken together, all the identified functional splice variants will help to advance our knowledge regarding the overall functions of ULBP gene family.

  6. Multiple loss-of-function variants of taste receptors in modern humans

    PubMed Central

    Fujikura, K.

    2015-01-01

    Despite recent advances in the knowledge of interindividual taste differences, the underlying genetic backgrounds have remained to be fully elucidated. Much of the taste variation among different mammalian species can be explained by pseudogenization of taste receptors. Here I investigated whether the most recent disruptions of taste receptor genes segregate with their intact forms in modern humans by analyzing 14 ethnically diverse populations. The results revealed an unprecedented prevalence of 25 segregating loss-of-function (LoF) taste receptor variants, identifying one of the most pronounced cases of functional population diversity in the human genome. LoF variant frequency in taste receptors (2.10%) was considerably higher than the overall LoF frequency in human genome (0.16%). In particular, molecular evolutionary rates of candidate sour (14.7%) and bitter (1.8%) receptors were far higher in humans than those of sweet (0.02%), salty (0.05%), and umami (0.17%) receptors compared with other carnivorous mammals, although not all of the taste receptors were identified. Many LoF variants are population-specific, some of which arose even after population differentiation, not before divergence of the modern and archaic human. I conclude that modern humans might have been losing some sour and bitter receptor genes because of high-frequency LoF variants. PMID:26307445

  7. Functional analysis of human BRCA2 variants using a mouse embryonic stem cell-based assay.

    PubMed

    Kuznetsov, Sergey G; Chang, Suhwan; Sharan, Shyam K

    2010-01-01

    We describe here a comprehensive and reliable assay to test the functional significance of variants of unknown clinical significance (VUS) identified in the human breast cancer susceptibility gene, BRCA2. The assay is based on the ability of human BRCA2 to complement the loss of endogenous Brca2 in mouse embryonic stem cells. The procedure involves generation of a desired mutation in BRCA2 present in a bacterial artificial chromosome (BAC) and the introduction of the BAC into ES cells engineered for the assay. These ES cells have one null and one conditional allele of Brca2. First, the effect of the BRCA2 variants on the viability of ES cells is tested by Cre-mediated deletion of the conditional allele. Subsequently, variants that result in viable ES cells are examined for their effect on known functions of BRCA2 using a variety of functional assays such as sensitivity to genotoxic agents, in vivo and in vitro proliferation, effect on homologous recombination and genomic stability. The method described herein allows for the analysis of three to five sequence variants within 2-3 months. This approach can also be used for functional analysis of variants identified in other human disease genes that result in a phenotype detectable in ES cells.

  8. Expression of splice variants of mts1 gene in normal and neoplastic human tissues

    SciTech Connect

    Ambartsumyan, N.S. |; Grigorian, M.S.; Lukanidin, E.M.

    1995-09-01

    Data on cloning of cDNA corresponding to human mts1 gene transcripts are presented. By comparing nucleotide sequences of the genomic DNA clone and cDNA of mts1, it was shown that human osteosarcoma OHS cells contain two alternative splice variants of mts1 transcripts. Alternative splicing occurs in the 5{prime}-untranslated region of the mts1 pre-mRNA. Both splice variants, hu-mts1 and hu-mts1(var), demonstrate similar stability in the cells, and each contains one open reading frame for the MTS1 protein. However, the two types of transcripts are translated with different effectiveness. The level of transcription of mts1 splice variants in different normal and neoplastic tissues and cell lines varies significantly. The role of alternative splicing as the mechanism responsible for posttranscriptional regulation of mts1 gene expression is discussed. 31 refs., 5 figs.

  9. Modeling of protein-anion exchange resin interaction for the human growth hormone charge variants.

    PubMed

    Lapelosa, Mauro; Patapoff, Thomas W; Zarraga, Isidro E

    2015-12-01

    Modeling ion exchange chromatography (IEC) behavior has generated significant interest because of the wide use of IEC as an analytical technique as well as a preparative protein purification process; indeed there is a need for better understanding of what drives the unique behavior of protein charge variants. We hypothesize that a complex protein molecule, which contains both hydrophobic and charged moieties, would interact strongly with an in silico designed resin through charged electrostatic patches on the surface of the protein. In the present work, variants of recombinant human growth hormone that mimic naturally-occurring deamidation products were produced and characterized in silico. The study included these four variants: rhGH, N149D, N152D, and N149D/N152D. Poisson-Boltzmann calculations were used to determine surface electrostatic potential. Metropolis Monte Carlo simulations were carried out with the resulting variants to simulate IEC systems, examining the free energy of the interaction of the protein with an in silico anion exchange column represented by polylysine polypeptide. The results show that the charge variants have different average binding energies and the free energy of interaction can be used to predict the retention time for the different variants.

  10. Human Apolipoprotein A-I Natural Variants: Molecular Mechanisms Underlying Amyloidogenic Propensity

    PubMed Central

    Ramella, Nahuel A.; Schinella, Guillermo R.; Ferreira, Sergio T.; Prieto, Eduardo D.; Vela, María E.; Ríos, José Luis

    2012-01-01

    Human apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I)-derived amyloidosis can present with either wild-type (Wt) protein deposits in atherosclerotic plaques or as a hereditary form in which apoA-I variants deposit causing multiple organ failure. More than 15 single amino acid replacement amyloidogenic apoA-I variants have been described, but the molecular mechanisms involved in amyloid-associated pathology remain largely unknown. Here, we have investigated by fluorescence and biochemical approaches the stabilities and propensities to aggregate of two disease-associated apoA-I variants, apoA-IGly26Arg, associated with polyneuropathy and kidney dysfunction, and apoA-ILys107-0, implicated in amyloidosis in severe atherosclerosis. Results showed that both variants share common structural properties including decreased stability compared to Wt apoA-I and a more flexible structure that gives rise to formation of partially folded states. Interestingly, however, distinct features appear to determine their pathogenic mechanisms. ApoA-ILys107-0 has an increased propensity to aggregate at physiological pH and in a pro-inflammatory microenvironment than Wt apoA-I, whereas apoA-IGly26Arg elicited macrophage activation, thus stimulating local chronic inflammation. Our results strongly suggest that some natural mutations in apoA-I variants elicit protein tendency to aggregate, but in addition the specific interaction of different variants with macrophages may contribute to cellular stress and toxicity in hereditary amyloidosis. PMID:22952757

  11. Rare and low-frequency coding variants alter human adult height.

    PubMed

    Marouli, Eirini; Graff, Mariaelisa; Medina-Gomez, Carolina; Lo, Ken Sin; Wood, Andrew R; Kjaer, Troels R; Fine, Rebecca S; Lu, Yingchang; Schurmann, Claudia; Highland, Heather M; Rüeger, Sina; Thorleifsson, Gudmar; Justice, Anne E; Lamparter, David; Stirrups, Kathleen E; Turcot, Valérie; Young, Kristin L; Winkler, Thomas W; Esko, Tõnu; Karaderi, Tugce; Locke, Adam E; Masca, Nicholas G D; Ng, Maggie C Y; Mudgal, Poorva; Rivas, Manuel A; Vedantam, Sailaja; Mahajan, Anubha; Guo, Xiuqing; Abecasis, Goncalo; Aben, Katja K; Adair, Linda S; Alam, Dewan S; Albrecht, Eva; Allin, Kristine H; Allison, Matthew; Amouyel, Philippe; Appel, Emil V; Arveiler, Dominique; Asselbergs, Folkert W; Auer, Paul L; Balkau, Beverley; Banas, Bernhard; Bang, Lia E; Benn, Marianne; Bergmann, Sven; Bielak, Lawrence F; Blüher, Matthias; Boeing, Heiner; Boerwinkle, Eric; Böger, Carsten A; Bonnycastle, Lori L; Bork-Jensen, Jette; Bots, Michiel L; Bottinger, Erwin P; Bowden, Donald W; Brandslund, Ivan; Breen, Gerome; Brilliant, Murray H; Broer, Linda; Burt, Amber A; Butterworth, Adam S; Carey, David J; Caulfield, Mark J; Chambers, John C; Chasman, Daniel I; Chen, Yii-Der Ida; Chowdhury, Rajiv; Christensen, Cramer; Chu, Audrey Y; Cocca, Massimiliano; Collins, Francis S; Cook, James P; Corley, Janie; Galbany, Jordi Corominas; Cox, Amanda J; Cuellar-Partida, Gabriel; Danesh, John; Davies, Gail; de Bakker, Paul I W; de Borst, Gert J; de Denus, Simon; de Groot, Mark C H; de Mutsert, Renée; Deary, Ian J; Dedoussis, George; Demerath, Ellen W; den Hollander, Anneke I; Dennis, Joe G; Di Angelantonio, Emanuele; Drenos, Fotios; Du, Mengmeng; Dunning, Alison M; Easton, Douglas F; Ebeling, Tapani; Edwards, Todd L; Ellinor, Patrick T; Elliott, Paul; Evangelou, Evangelos; Farmaki, Aliki-Eleni; Faul, Jessica D; Feitosa, Mary F; Feng, Shuang; Ferrannini, Ele; Ferrario, Marco M; Ferrieres, Jean; Florez, Jose C; Ford, Ian; Fornage, Myriam; Franks, Paul W; Frikke-Schmidt, Ruth; Galesloot, Tessel E; Gan, Wei; Gandin, Ilaria; Gasparini, Paolo; Giedraitis, Vilmantas; Giri, Ayush; Girotto, Giorgia; Gordon, Scott D; Gordon-Larsen, Penny; Gorski, Mathias; Grarup, Niels; Grove, Megan L; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Gustafsson, Stefan; Hansen, Torben; Harris, Kathleen Mullan; Harris, Tamara B; Hattersley, Andrew T; Hayward, Caroline; He, Liang; Heid, Iris M; Heikkilä, Kauko; Helgeland, Øyvind; Hernesniemi, Jussi; Hewitt, Alex W; Hocking, Lynne J; Hollensted, Mette; Holmen, Oddgeir L; Hovingh, G Kees; Howson, Joanna M M; Hoyng, Carel B; Huang, Paul L; Hveem, Kristian; Ikram, M Arfan; Ingelsson, Erik; Jackson, Anne U; Jansson, Jan-Håkan; Jarvik, Gail P; Jensen, Gorm B; Jhun, Min A; Jia, Yucheng; Jiang, Xuejuan; Johansson, Stefan; Jørgensen, Marit E; Jørgensen, Torben; Jousilahti, Pekka; Jukema, J Wouter; Kahali, Bratati; Kahn, René S; Kähönen, Mika; Kamstrup, Pia R; Kanoni, Stavroula; Kaprio, Jaakko; Karaleftheri, Maria; Kardia, Sharon L R; Karpe, Fredrik; Kee, Frank; Keeman, Renske; Kiemeney, Lambertus A; Kitajima, Hidetoshi; Kluivers, Kirsten B; Kocher, Thomas; Komulainen, Pirjo; Kontto, Jukka; Kooner, Jaspal S; Kooperberg, Charles; Kovacs, Peter; Kriebel, Jennifer; Kuivaniemi, Helena; Küry, Sébastien; Kuusisto, Johanna; La Bianca, Martina; Laakso, Markku; Lakka, Timo A; Lange, Ethan M; Lange, Leslie A; Langefeld, Carl D; Langenberg, Claudia; Larson, Eric B; Lee, I-Te; Lehtimäki, Terho; Lewis, Cora E; Li, Huaixing; Li, Jin; Li-Gao, Ruifang; Lin, Honghuang; Lin, Li-An; Lin, Xu; Lind, Lars; Lindström, Jaana; Linneberg, Allan; Liu, Yeheng; Liu, Yongmei; Lophatananon, Artitaya; Luan, Jian'an; Lubitz, Steven A; Lyytikäinen, Leo-Pekka; Mackey, David A; Madden, Pamela A F; Manning, Alisa K; Männistö, Satu; Marenne, Gaëlle; Marten, Jonathan; Martin, Nicholas G; Mazul, Angela L; Meidtner, Karina; Metspalu, Andres; Mitchell, Paul; Mohlke, Karen L; Mook-Kanamori, Dennis O; Morgan, Anna; Morris, Andrew D; Morris, Andrew P; Müller-Nurasyid, Martina; Munroe, Patricia B; Nalls, Mike A; Nauck, Matthias; Nelson, Christopher P; Neville, Matt; Nielsen, Sune F; Nikus, Kjell; Njølstad, Pål R; Nordestgaard, Børge G; Ntalla, Ioanna; O'Connel, Jeffrey R; Oksa, Heikki; Loohuis, Loes M Olde; Ophoff, Roel A; Owen, Katharine R; Packard, Chris J; Padmanabhan, Sandosh; Palmer, Colin N A; Pasterkamp, Gerard; Patel, Aniruddh P; Pattie, Alison; Pedersen, Oluf; Peissig, Peggy L; Peloso, Gina M; Pennell, Craig E; Perola, Markus; Perry, James A; Perry, John R B; Person, Thomas N; Pirie, Ailith; Polasek, Ozren; Posthuma, Danielle; Raitakari, Olli T; Rasheed, Asif; Rauramaa, Rainer; Reilly, Dermot F; Reiner, Alex P; Renström, Frida; Ridker, Paul M; Rioux, John D; Robertson, Neil; Robino, Antonietta; Rolandsson, Olov; Rudan, Igor; Ruth, Katherine S; Saleheen, Danish; Salomaa, Veikko; Samani, Nilesh J; Sandow, Kevin; Sapkota, Yadav; Sattar, Naveed; Schmidt, Marjanka K; Schreiner, Pamela J; Schulze, Matthias B; Scott, Robert A; Segura-Lepe, Marcelo P; Shah, Svati; Sim, Xueling; Sivapalaratnam, Suthesh; Small, Kerrin S; Smith, Albert Vernon; Smith, Jennifer A; Southam, Lorraine; Spector, Timothy D; Speliotes, Elizabeth K; Starr, John M; Steinthorsdottir, Valgerdur; Stringham, Heather M; Stumvoll, Michael; Surendran, Praveen; 't Hart, Leen M; Tansey, Katherine E; Tardif, Jean-Claude; Taylor, Kent D; Teumer, Alexander; Thompson, Deborah J; Thorsteinsdottir, Unnur; Thuesen, Betina H; Tönjes, Anke; Tromp, Gerard; Trompet, Stella; Tsafantakis, Emmanouil; Tuomilehto, Jaakko; Tybjaerg-Hansen, Anne; Tyrer, Jonathan P; Uher, Rudolf; Uitterlinden, André G; Ulivi, Sheila; van der Laan, Sander W; Van Der Leij, Andries R; van Duijn, Cornelia M; van Schoor, Natasja M; van Setten, Jessica; Varbo, Anette; Varga, Tibor V; Varma, Rohit; Edwards, Digna R Velez; Vermeulen, Sita H; Vestergaard, Henrik; Vitart, Veronique; Vogt, Thomas F; Vozzi, Diego; Walker, Mark; Wang, Feijie; Wang, Carol A; Wang, Shuai; Wang, Yiqin; Wareham, Nicholas J; Warren, Helen R; Wessel, Jennifer; Willems, Sara M; Wilson, James G; Witte, Daniel R; Woods, Michael O; Wu, Ying; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Yao, Jie; Yao, Pang; Yerges-Armstrong, Laura M; Young, Robin; Zeggini, Eleftheria; Zhan, Xiaowei; Zhang, Weihua; Zhao, Jing Hua; Zhao, Wei; Zhao, Wei; Zheng, He; Zhou, Wei; Rotter, Jerome I; Boehnke, Michael; Kathiresan, Sekar; McCarthy, Mark I; Willer, Cristen J; Stefansson, Kari; Borecki, Ingrid B; Liu, Dajiang J; North, Kari E; Heard-Costa, Nancy L; Pers, Tune H; Lindgren, Cecilia M; Oxvig, Claus; Kutalik, Zoltán; Rivadeneira, Fernando; Loos, Ruth J F; Frayling, Timothy M; Hirschhorn, Joel N; Deloukas, Panos; Lettre, Guillaume

    2017-02-09

    Height is a highly heritable, classic polygenic trait with approximately 700 common associated variants identified through genome-wide association studies so far. Here, we report 83 height-associated coding variants with lower minor-allele frequencies (in the range of 0.1-4.8%) and effects of up to 2 centimetres per allele (such as those in IHH, STC2, AR and CRISPLD2), greater than ten times the average effect of common variants. In functional follow-up studies, rare height-increasing alleles of STC2 (giving an increase of 1-2 centimetres per allele) compromised proteolytic inhibition of PAPP-A and increased cleavage of IGFBP-4 in vitro, resulting in higher bioavailability of insulin-like growth factors. These 83 height-associated variants overlap genes that are mutated in monogenic growth disorders and highlight new biological candidates (such as ADAMTS3, IL11RA and NOX4) and pathways (such as proteoglycan and glycosaminoglycan synthesis) involved in growth. Our results demonstrate that sufficiently large sample sizes can uncover rare and low-frequency variants of moderate-to-large effect associated with polygenic human phenotypes, and that these variants implicate relevant genes and pathways.

  12. Signatures of natural selection on genetic variants affecting complex human traits.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Ge; Muglia, Louis J; Chakraborty, Ranajit; Akey, Joshua M; Williams, Scott M

    2013-12-01

    It has recently been hypothesized that polygenic adaptation, resulting in modest allele frequency changes at many loci, could be a major mechanism behind the adaptation of complex phenotypes in human populations. Here we leverage the large number of variants that have been identified through genome-wide association (GWA) studies to comprehensively study signatures of natural selection on genetic variants associated with complex traits. Using population differentiation based methods, such as FST and phylogenetic branch length analyses, we systematically examined nearly 1300 SNPs associated with 38 complex phenotypes. Instead of detecting selection signatures at individual variants, we aimed to identify combined evidence of natural selection by aggregating signals across many trait associated SNPs. Our results have revealed some general features of polygenic selection on complex traits associated variants. First, natural selection acting on standing variants associated with complex traits is a common phenomenon. Second, characteristics of selection for different polygenic traits vary both temporarily and geographically. Third, some studied traits (e.g. height and urate level) could have been the primary targets of selection, as indicated by the significant correlation between the effect sizes and the estimated strength of selection in the trait associated variants; however, for most traits, the allele frequency changes in trait associated variants might have been driven by the selection on other correlated phenotypes. Fourth, the changes in allele frequencies as a result of selection can be highly stochastic, such that, polygenic adaptation may accelerate differentiation in allele frequencies among populations, but generally does not produce predictable directional changes. Fifth, multiple mechanisms (pleiotropy, hitchhiking, etc) may act together to govern the changes in allele frequencies of genetic variants associated with complex traits.

  13. Multiple conformations of a human interleukin-3 variant.

    PubMed Central

    Feng, Y.; Hood, W. F.; Forgey, R. W.; Abegg, A. L.; Caparon, M. H.; Thiele, B. R.; Leimgruber, R. M.; McWherter, C. A.

    1997-01-01

    Interleukin-3 (IL-3) is a cytokine that stimulates the proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic cells. The hyperactive hIL-3 variant SC-55494 was shown to have at least two major conformations by high-resolution NMR spectroscopy. Mutants of SC-55494 were constructed in which alanine was substituted for proline in order to test the hypothesis that proline cis-trans isomerization is the source of the observed conformational heterogeneity, as well as to evaluate the effect of prolyl peptide bond configuration on biological activity. NMR spectra of four single proline-to-alamine mutants (P30A, P31A, P33A, and P37A) retain doubled resonances, while spectra of the double mutant P30A/P31A and the quadruple mutant P30A/P31A/P33A/ P37A are substantially free of heterogeneity. These observations suggest that the two major conformations in SC-55494 correspond to cis and trans isomers of either or both of the R29-P30 and P30-P31 peptide bonds. All six mutants had somewhat lower cell proliferative activity than SC-55494, with relative activities ranging from 40 to 80%. The P37A mutant has a binding affinity to the low-affinity IL-3 receptor alpha-subunit statistically equivalent to SC-55494, while P30A, P31A, and P33A each had about two-fold decreases, and P30A/P31A and P30A/P31A/P33A/P37A had four-fold decreases. These findings suggest an important role for the cis configuration of either or both of the R29-P30 and P30-P31 peptide bonds in IL-3 for optimal interaction with the receptor alpha-subunit. PMID:9260293

  14. Classification and nomenclature system for Human Alphapapillomavirus variants: general features, nucleotide landmarks and assignment of HPV6 and HPV11 isolates to variant lineages

    PubMed Central

    Burk, R. D.; Chen, Z.; Harari, A.; Smith, B. C.; Kocjan, B. J.; Maver, P. J.; Poljak, M.

    2013-01-01

    Background Papillomaviruses constitute a family of viruses that can be classified into genera, species and types based on their viral genome heterogeneity. Currently circulating infectious human Alphapapillomaviruses (alpha-PVs) constitute a set of viral genomes that have evolved from archaic times and display features of host co-speciation. Viral variants are more recently evolved genomes that require a standardized classification and nomenclature. Objectives To describe a system for the classification and nomenclature of HPV viral variants and provide landmarks for the numbering of nucleotide positions. Methods The complete 8 kb genomes of the alpha-9 species group and HPV6 and 11 types, collected from isolates throughout the world were obtained from published reports and GenBank. Complete genomes for each HPV type were aligned using the E1 start codon and sequence divergence was calculated by global and pairwise alignments using the MUSCLE program. Phylogenetic trees were constructed from the aligned sequences using a maximum likelihood method (RAxML). Results Pairwise comparisons of nucleotide differences between complete genomes of each type from alpha-9 HPV isolates (HPV16, 31, 33, 35, 52, 58 and 67) revealed a trimodal distribution. Maximum heterogeneity for variants within a type varied from 0.6%-2.3%. Nucleotide differences of approximately 1.0%-10.0% and 0.5%-1.0% of the complete genomes were used to define variant lineages and sublineages, respectively. Analysis of 43 HPV6 complete genomes indicated the presence of 2 variant lineages, whereas 32 HPV11 isolates were highly similar and clustered into 2 sublineages. A table was constructed of the human alpha-PV landmark nucleotide sequences for future reference and alignments. Conclusions A proposed nomenclature system for viral variants and coordination of nucleotide positions will facilitate the comparison of variants across geographic regions and amongst different populations. In addition, this system

  15. Germ-line variant of human NTH1 DNA glycosylase induces genomic instability and cellular transformation.

    PubMed

    Galick, Heather A; Kathe, Scott; Liu, Minmin; Robey-Bond, Susan; Kidane, Dawit; Wallace, Susan S; Sweasy, Joann B

    2013-08-27

    Base excision repair (BER) removes at least 20,000 DNA lesions per human cell per day and is critical for the maintenance of genomic stability. We hypothesize that aberrant BER, resulting from mutations in BER genes, can lead to genomic instability and cancer. The first step in BER is catalyzed by DNA N-glycosylases. One of these, n(th) endonuclease III-like (NTH1), removes oxidized pyrimidines from DNA, including thymine glycol. The rs3087468 single nucleotide polymorphism of the NTH1 gene is a G-to-T base substitution that results in the NTH1 D239Y variant protein that occurs in ∼6.2% of the global population and is found in Europeans, Asians, and sub-Saharan Africans. In this study, we functionally characterize the effect of the D239Y variant expressed in immortal but nontransformed human and mouse mammary epithelial cells. We demonstrate that expression of the D239Y variant in cells also expressing wild-type NTH1 leads to genomic instability and cellular transformation as assessed by anchorage-independent growth, focus formation, invasion, and chromosomal aberrations. We also show that cells expressing the D239Y variant are sensitive to ionizing radiation and hydrogen peroxide and accumulate double strand breaks after treatment with these agents. The DNA damage response is also activated in D239Y-expressing cells. In combination, our data suggest that individuals possessing the D239Y variant are at risk for genomic instability and cancer.

  16. Human longevity is influenced by many genetic variants: evidence from 75,000 UK Biobank participants.

    PubMed

    Pilling, Luke C; Atkins, Janice L; Bowman, Kirsty; Jones, Samuel E; Tyrrell, Jessica; Beaumont, Robin N; Ruth, Katherine S; Tuke, Marcus A; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Wood, Andrew R; Freathy, Rachel M; Murray, Anna; Weedon, Michael N; Xue, Luting; Lunetta, Kathryn; Murabito, Joanne M; Harries, Lorna W; Robine, Jean-Marie; Brayne, Carol; Kuchel, George A; Ferrucci, Luigi; Frayling, Timothy M; Melzer, David

    2016-03-01

    Variation in human lifespan is 20 to 30% heritable in twins but few genetic variants have been identified. We undertook a Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS) using age at death of parents of middle-aged UK Biobank participants of European decent (n=75,244 with father's and/or mother's data, excluding early deaths). Genetic risk scores for 19 phenotypes (n=777 proven variants) were also tested. In GWAS, a nicotine receptor locus(CHRNA3, previously associated with increased smoking and lung cancer) was associated with fathers' survival. Less common variants requiring further confirmation were also identified. Offspring of longer lived parents had more protective alleles for coronary artery disease, systolic blood pressure, body mass index, cholesterol and triglyceride levels, type-1 diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease and Alzheimer's disease. In candidate analyses, variants in the TOMM40/APOE locus were associated with longevity, but FOXO variants were not. Associations between extreme longevity (mother >=98 years, fathers >=95 years, n=1,339) and disease alleles were similar, with an additional association with HDL cholesterol (p=5.7x10-3). These results support a multiple protective factors model influencing lifespan and longevity (top 1% survival) in humans, with prominent roles for cardiovascular-related pathways. Several of these genetically influenced risks, including blood pressure and tobacco exposure, are potentially modifiable.

  17. Human longevity is influenced by many genetic variants: evidence from 75,000 UK Biobank participants

    PubMed Central

    Pilling, Luke C.; Atkins, Janice L.; Bowman, Kirsty; Jones, Samuel E.; Tyrrell, Jessica; Beaumont, Robin N.; Ruth, Katherine S.; Tuke, Marcus A.; Yaghootkar, Hanieh; Wood, Andrew R.; Freathy, Rachel M.; Murray, Anna; Weedon, Michael N.; Xue, Luting; Lunetta, Kathryn; Murabito, Joanne M.; Harries, Lorna W.; Robine, Jean-Marie; Brayne, Carol; Kuchel, George A.; Ferrucci, Luigi; Frayling, Timothy M.; Melzer, David

    2016-01-01

    Variation in human lifespan is 20 to 30% heritable in twins but few genetic variants have been identified. We undertook a Genome Wide Association Study (GWAS) using age at death of parents of middle-aged UK Biobank participants of European decent (n=75,244 with father's and/or mother's data, excluding early deaths). Genetic risk scores for 19 phenotypes (n=777 proven variants) were also tested. In GWAS, a nicotine receptor locus (CHRNA3, previously associated with increased smoking and lung cancer) was associated with fathers' survival. Less common variants requiring further confirmation were also identified. Offspring of longer lived parents had more protective alleles for coronary artery disease, systolic blood pressure, body mass index, cholesterol and triglyceride levels, type-1 diabetes, inflammatory bowel disease and Alzheimer's disease. In candidate analyses, variants in the TOMM40/APOE locus were associated with longevity, but FOXO variants were not. Associations between extreme longevity (mother >=98 years, fathers >=95 years, n=1,339) and disease alleles were similar, with an additional association with HDL cholesterol (p=5.7×10-3). These results support a multiple protective factors model influencing lifespan and longevity (top 1% survival) in humans, with prominent roles for cardiovascular-related pathways. Several of these genetically influenced risks, including blood pressure and tobacco exposure, are potentially modifiable. PMID:27015805

  18. Evolution and classification of oncogenic human papillomavirus types and variants associated with cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Zigui; de Freitas, Luciana Bueno; Burk, Robert D.

    2015-01-01

    The nomenclature of human papillomavirus (HPV) is established by the International Committee on Taxonomy of Virus (ICTV). However, the ICTV does not set standards for HPV below species levels. This chapter describes detailed genotyping methods for determining and classifying HPV variants. PMID:25348294

  19. Estrogen Receptor Mutants/Variants in Human Breast Cancer.

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1997-12-01

    Recherche Louis- Charles Simard, Montreal, Canada. Four nor- mal human breast tissues from reduction mammoplasties of pre- menopausal women were obtained...to hormone resistance. Cancer Res 1990; 50: 6208-17. 22. Karnik PS, Kulkarni S, Lui XP, Budd GT, Bukowski RM. Estrogen receptor mutations in

  20. Plasma proteomics, the Human Proteome Project, and cancer-associated alternative splice variant proteins.

    PubMed

    Omenn, Gilbert S

    2014-05-01

    This article addresses three inter-related subjects: the development of the Human Plasma Proteome Peptide Atlas, the launch of the Human Proteome Project, and the emergence of alternative splice variant transcripts and proteins as important features of evolution and pathogenesis. The current Plasma Peptide Atlas provides evidence on which peptides have been detected for every protein confidently identified in plasma; there are links to their spectra and their estimated abundance, facilitating the planning of targeted proteomics for biomarker studies. The Human Proteome Project (HPP) combines a chromosome-centric C-HPP with a biology and disease-driven B/D-HPP, upon a foundation of mass spectrometry, antibody, and knowledgebase resource pillars. The HPP aims to identify the approximately 7000 "missing proteins" and to characterize all proteins and their many isoforms. Success will enable the larger research community to utilize newly-available peptides, spectra, informative MS transitions, and databases for targeted analyses of priority proteins for each organ and disease. Among the isoforms of proteins, splice variants have the special feature of greatly enlarging protein diversity without enlarging the genome; evidence is accumulating of striking differential expression of splice variants in cancers. In this era of RNA-sequencing and advanced mass spectrometry, it is no longer sufficient to speak simply of increased or decreased expression of genes or proteins without carefully examining the splice variants in the protein mixture produced from each multi-exon gene. This article is part of a Special Issue entitled: Biomarkers: A Proteomic Challenge.

  1. A general framework for estimating the relative pathogenicity of human genetic variants

    PubMed Central

    Kircher, Martin; Witten, Daniela M.; Jain, Preti; O’Roak, Brian J.; Cooper, Gregory M.; Shendure, Jay

    2014-01-01

    Our capacity to sequence human genomes has exceeded our ability to interpret genetic variation. Current genomic annotations tend to exploit a single information type (e.g. conservation) and/or are restricted in scope (e.g. to missense changes). Here, we describe Combined Annotation Dependent Depletion (CADD), a framework that objectively integrates many diverse annotations into a single, quantitative score. We implement CADD as a support vector machine trained to differentiate 14.7 million high-frequency human derived alleles from 14.7 million simulated variants. We pre-compute “C-scores” for all 8.6 billion possible human single nucleotide variants and enable scoring of short insertions/deletions. C-scores correlate with allelic diversity, annotations of functionality, pathogenicity, disease severity, experimentally measured regulatory effects, and complex trait associations, and highly rank known pathogenic variants within individual genomes. The ability of CADD to prioritize functional, deleterious, and pathogenic variants across many functional categories, effect sizes and genetic architectures is unmatched by any current annotation. PMID:24487276

  2. A splice variant of the human phosphohistidine phosphatase 1 (PHPT1) is degraded by the proteasome.

    PubMed

    Inturi, Raviteja; Wäneskog, Marcus; Vlachakis, Dimitrios; Ali, Yeasmeen; Ek, Pia; Punga, Tanel; Bjerling, Pernilla

    2014-12-01

    Regulation of protein activity by phosphorylation is central in many cellular processes. Phosphorylation of serine, threonine and tyrosine residues is well documented and studied. In addition, other amino acids, like histidine can be phosphorylated, but neither the mechanism nor the function of this modification is well understood. Nevertheless, there is a 14 kDa enzyme with phosphohistidine phosphatase activity, named PHPT1, found in most animals, but not in bacteria, plant or fungi. There are a few splice variant transcripts formed from the human PHPT1 locus and some of them are predicted to form variant proteins, but studies of these proteins are lacking. In order to get insight into the possible function of the variant transcripts encoded at the PHPT1 locus, ectopic expression of PHPT1 transcript variant 6, predicted to be degraded by the non-sense mediated mRNA decay pathway, in HeLa cells was undertaken. In HeLa cells the splice variant protein was degraded by the proteasome, unlike the wild type protein. Using an in silico modeling approach the variant C-terminal end of the proteins were predicted to form different secondary structures that might explain the different properties of the two proteins. The specific degradation of the PHPT1 splice variant indicates that at least for the PHPT1 protein, the quality control and the self-guarding of the cellular system works at two levels, first at the RNA level, aberrant transcripts are degraded by the non-sense mediated mRNA decay pathway, and the small amount of proteins that are formed will be degraded by the proteasome.

  3. Characterization of a human papillomavirus type 16 variant-dependent neutralizing epitope.

    PubMed Central

    Roden, R B; Armstrong, A; Haderer, P; Christensen, N D; Hubbert, N L; Lowy, D R; Schiller, J T; Kirnbauer, R

    1997-01-01

    We have determined that three type-specific and conformationally dependent monoclonal antibodies, H16.E70, H16.U4, and H16.V5, neutralize pseudotype human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) virions in vitro. H16.U4 and H16.V5 neutralized pseudotype virions derived from the German HPV16 variant 114K and the Zairian variant Z-1194 with equal efficiency. In contrast, neutralization of Z-1194 pseudotype virions by H16.E70 was two orders of magnitude weaker than neutralization of 114K pseudotype virions. This difference correlated with enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay reactivity of H16.E70 to L1 virus-like particles of the two variants. A substitution at residue 282 of L1 was responsible for this differential reactivity, suggesting that this residue constitutes part of the H16.E70 epitope. PMID:9223527

  4. Impact of Interacting Functional Variants in COMT on Regional Gray Matter Volume in Human Brain

    PubMed Central

    Honea, Robyn; Verchinski, Beth A.; Pezawas, Lukas; Kolachana, Bhaskar S.; Callicott, Joseph H.; Mattay, Venkata S.; Weinberger, Daniel R.; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas

    2009-01-01

    Background Functional variants in the catechol-O-methyltransferase (COMT) gene have been shown to impact cognitive function, cortical physiology and risk for schizophrenia. A recent study showed that previously reported effects of the functional val158met SNP (rs4680) on brain function are modified by other functional SNPs and haplotypes in the gene, though it was unknown if these effects are also seen in brain structure. Methods We used voxel-based morphometry to investigate the impact of multiple functional variants in COMT on gray matter volume in a large group of 151 healthy volunteers from the CBDB/NIMH Genetic Study of Schizophrenia. Results We found that the previously described rs4680 val risk variant affects hippocampal and dorsolateral prefrontal (DLPFC) gray matter volume. In addition, we found that this SNP interacts with a variant in the P2 promoter region (rs2097603) in predicting changes in hippocampal gray matter volume consistent with a nonlinear effect of extracellular dopamine. Conclusions We report evidence that interacting functional variants in COMT affect gray matter regional volume in hippocampus and DLPFC, providing further in vivo validation of the biological impact of complex genetic variation in COMT on neural systems relevant for the pathophysiology of schizophrenia and extending observations of nonlinear dependence of prefrontal neurons on extracellular dopamine to the domain of human brain structure. PMID:19071221

  5. Human selenophosphate synthetase 1 has five splice variants with unique interactions, subcellular localizations and expression patterns

    SciTech Connect

    Kim, Jin Young; Lee, Kwang Hee; Shim, Myoung Sup; Shin, Hyein; Xu, Xue-Ming; Carlson, Bradley A.; Hatfield, Dolph L.; Lee, Byeong Jae

    2010-06-18

    Selenophosphate synthetase 1 (SPS1) is an essential cellular gene in higher eukaryotes. Five alternative splice variants of human SPS1 (major type, {Delta}E2, {Delta}E8, +E9, +E9a) were identified wherein +E9 and +E9a make the same protein. The major type was localized in both the nuclear and plasma membranes, and the others in the cytoplasm. All variants form homodimers, and in addition, the major type forms a heterodimer with {Delta}E2, and {Delta}E8 with +E9. The level of expression of each splice variant was different in various cell lines. The expression of each alternative splice variant was regulated during the cell cycle. The levels of the major type and {Delta}E8 were gradually increased until G2/M phase and then gradually decreased. {Delta}E2 expression peaked at mid-S phase and then gradually decreased. However, +E9/+E9a expression decreased gradually after cell cycle arrest. The possible involvement of SPS1 splice variants in cell cycle regulation is discussed.

  6. A low density microarray method for the identification of human papillomavirus type 18 variants.

    PubMed

    Meza-Menchaca, Thuluz; Williams, John; Rodríguez-Estrada, Rocío B; García-Bravo, Aracely; Ramos-Ligonio, Ángel; López-Monteon, Aracely; Zepeda, Rossana C

    2013-09-26

    We describe a novel microarray based-method for the screening of oncogenic human papillomavirus 18 (HPV-18) molecular variants. Due to the fact that sequencing methodology may underestimate samples containing more than one variant we designed a specific and sensitive stacking DNA hybridization assay. This technology can be used to discriminate between three possible phylogenetic branches of HPV-18. Probes were attached covalently on glass slides and hybridized with single-stranded DNA targets. Prior to hybridization with the probes, the target strands were pre-annealed with the three auxiliary contiguous oligonucleotides flanking the target sequences. Screening HPV-18 positive cell lines and cervical samples were used to evaluate the performance of this HPV DNA microarray. Our results demonstrate that the HPV-18's variants hybridized specifically to probes, with no detection of unspecific signals. Specific probes successfully reveal detectable point mutations in these variants. The present DNA oligoarray system can be used as a reliable, sensitive and specific method for HPV-18 variant screening. Furthermore, this simple assay allows the use of inexpensive equipment, making it accessible in resource-poor settings.

  7. A Low Density Microarray Method for the Identification of Human Papillomavirus Type 18 Variants

    PubMed Central

    Meza-Menchaca, Thuluz; Williams, John; Rodríguez-Estrada, Rocío B.; García-Bravo, Aracely; Ramos-Ligonio, Ángel; López-Monteon, Aracely; Zepeda, Rossana C.

    2013-01-01

    We describe a novel microarray based-method for the screening of oncogenic human papillomavirus 18 (HPV-18) molecular variants. Due to the fact that sequencing methodology may underestimate samples containing more than one variant we designed a specific and sensitive stacking DNA hybridization assay. This technology can be used to discriminate between three possible phylogenetic branches of HPV-18. Probes were attached covalently on glass slides and hybridized with single-stranded DNA targets. Prior to hybridization with the probes, the target strands were pre-annealed with the three auxiliary contiguous oligonucleotides flanking the target sequences. Screening HPV-18 positive cell lines and cervical samples were used to evaluate the performance of this HPV DNA microarray. Our results demonstrate that the HPV-18's variants hybridized specifically to probes, with no detection of unspecific signals. Specific probes successfully reveal detectable point mutations in these variants. The present DNA oligoarray system can be used as a reliable, sensitive and specific method for HPV-18 variant screening. Furthermore, this simple assay allows the use of inexpensive equipment, making it accessible in resource-poor settings. PMID:24077317

  8. Antigenic Relatedness of Norovirus GII.4 Variants Determined by Human Challenge Sera

    PubMed Central

    Dai, Ying-Chun; Zhang, Xu-Fu; Xia, Ming; Tan, Ming; Quigley, Christina; Lei, Wen; Fang, Hao; Zhong, Weiming; Lee, Bonita; Pang, Xiaoli; Nie, Jun; Jiang, Xi

    2015-01-01

    The GII.4 noroviruses (NoVs) are a single genotype that is responsible for over 50% of NoV gastroenteritis epidemics worldwide. However, GII.4 NoVs have been found to undergo antigenic drifts, likely selected by host herd immunity, which raises an issue for vaccine strategies against NoVs. We previously characterized GII.4 NoV antigenic variations and found significant levels of antigenic relatedness among different GII.4 variants. Further characterization of the genetic and antigenic relatedness of recent GII.4 variants (2008b and 2010 cluster) was performed in this study. The amino acid sequences of the receptor binding interfaces were highly conserved among all GII.4 variants from the past two decades. Using serum samples from patients enrolled in a GII.4 virus challenge study, significant cross-reactivity between major GII.4 variants from 1998 to 2012 was observed using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and HBGA receptor blocking assays. The overall abilities of GII.4 NoVs to bind to the A/B/H HBGAs were maintained while their binding affinities to individual ABH antigens varied. These results highlight the importance of human HBGAs in NoV evolution and how conserved antigenic types impact vaccine development against GII.4 variants. PMID:25915764

  9. Differential expression of a human kallikrein 5 (KLK5) splice variant in ovarian and prostate cancer.

    PubMed

    Kurlender, Lisa; Yousef, George M; Memari, Nader; Robb, John-Desmond; Michael, Iacovos P; Borgoño, Carla; Katsaros, Dionyssios; Stephan, Carsten; Jung, Klaus; Diamandis, Eleftherios P

    2004-01-01

    The presence of more than one mRNA form is common among kallikrein genes. We identified an mRNA transcript of the human kallikrein gene 5 (KLK5), denoted KLK5 splice variant 1 (KLK5-SV1). This variant has a different 5'-splice site, but encodes the same protein as the classical KLK5 transcript. RT-PCR analysis of this variant transcript expression in 29 human tissues indicated highest expression in the cervix, salivary gland, kidney, mammary gland, and skin. Comparative analysis of the expression levels of KLK5-SV1, another splice variant named KLK5 splice variant 2 (KLK5-SV2), and the classical KLK5 form showed that out of all three mRNA transcripts, the classical form is predominantly expressed (found in more tissues and at higher expression levels) followed by KLK5-SV1. KLK5-SV1 is expressed at high levels in ovarian, pancreatic, breast and prostate cancer cell lines. KLK5-SV1 was also found to be expressed in 9/10 ovarian cancer tissues, but it was not found in one normal ovarian tissue tested. Hormonal regulation experiments suggest that KLK5-SV1 is regulated by steroid hormones in the BT-474 breast cancer cell line. Furthermore, this variant had significantly higher expression in normal prostate tissues compared to their matched cancer tissue counterparts. KLK5-SV1 may have clinical utility in various malignancies and should be further explored as a potential new biomarker for prostate and ovarian cancer.

  10. Site-specific semisynthetic variant of human hemoglobin

    SciTech Connect

    Hefta, S.A.; Lyle, S.B.; Busch, M.R.; Harris, D.E.; Matthew, J.B.; Gurd, F.R.N.

    1988-02-01

    A single round of Edman degradation was employed to remove the NH/sub 2/-terminal valine from isolated ..cap alpha.. chains of human hemoglobin. Reconstitution of normal ..beta.. chains with truncated or substituted ..cap alpha.. chains was used to form truncated (des-Val/sup 1/-..cap alpha..1) and substituted (((1-/sup 13/C)Gly/sup 1/)..cap alpha..1) tetrameric hemoglobin analogs. Structural homology of the analogs with untreated native hemoglobin was established by using several spectroscopic and physical methods. Functional studies indicate that the reconstituted tetrameric protein containing des-Val/sup 1/-..cap alpha.. chains has a higher affinity for oxygen, is less influenced by chloride ions or 2,3-biphosphoglycerate, and shows lower cooperativity than native hemoglobin. These results confirm the key functional role of the ..cap alpha..-chain NH/sub 2/ terminus in mediating cooperative oxygen binding across the dimer interface. The NH/sub 2/-terminal pK/sub 1/2/ value was determined for the (/sup 13/C)glycine-substituted analog to be 7.46 +/- 0.09 at 15/sup 0/C in the carbon monoxide-liganded form. This value, measured directly by /sup 13/C NMR, agrees with the determination made by the less-direct /sup 13/CO/sub 2/ method and confirms the role of this residue as a contributor to the alkaline Bohr effect; however, it is consistent with the presence of an NH/sub 2/-terminal salt bridge to the carboxylate of Arg-141 of the ..cap alpha.. chain in the liganded form.

  11. Isolation and characterization of new exon 11-associated N-terminal splice variants of the human mu opioid receptor gene.

    PubMed

    Xu, Jin; Xu, Mingming; Hurd, Yasmin L; Pasternak, Gavril W; Pan, Ying-Xian

    2009-02-01

    Alternative splicing of the mu opioid receptor genes to create multiple mu receptor subtypes has been demonstrated in animals and humans. Previously, we identified a number of C-terminal variants in mice, rats and human, followed by several N-terminal variants associated with a new upstream exon in mice (exon 11). Behavioral studies in exon 11 knockout mice suggest an important role for the exon 11 variants in the analgesic actions of heroin and morphine-6beta-glucuronide, but not morphine or methadone. We now have identified a homologous human exon 11 and three similar human exon 11-associated variants, suggesting conservation of exon 11 and its associated variants across species. hMOR-1i has an additional 93 amino acids at the tip of the N-terminus but is otherwise identical to hMOR-1. When expressed in Chinese hamster ovary cells, the additional 93 amino acids in hMOR-1i had little effect on opioid binding, but significantly altered agonist-induced G-protein activation. hMOR-1G1 and hMOR-1G2 predicted six transmembrane domain variants, similar to those seen in mice. The regional expression of these exon 11-associated variants, as determined by RT-PCR, varied markedly, implying region-specific alternative splicing. The presence of exon 11-associated variants in humans raises questions regarding their potential role in heroin and morphine-6beta-glucuronide actions in people as they do in mice.

  12. Model-based prediction of human hair color using DNA variants.

    PubMed

    Branicki, Wojciech; Liu, Fan; van Duijn, Kate; Draus-Barini, Jolanta; Pośpiech, Ewelina; Walsh, Susan; Kupiec, Tomasz; Wojas-Pelc, Anna; Kayser, Manfred

    2011-04-01

    Predicting complex human phenotypes from genotypes is the central concept of widely advocated personalized medicine, but so far has rarely led to high accuracies limiting practical applications. One notable exception, although less relevant for medical but important for forensic purposes, is human eye color, for which it has been recently demonstrated that highly accurate prediction is feasible from a small number of DNA variants. Here, we demonstrate that human hair color is predictable from DNA variants with similarly high accuracies. We analyzed in Polish Europeans with single-observer hair color grading 45 single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) from 12 genes previously associated with human hair color variation. We found that a model based on a subset of 13 single or compound genetic markers from 11 genes predicted red hair color with over 0.9, black hair color with almost 0.9, as well as blond, and brown hair color with over 0.8 prevalence-adjusted accuracy expressed by the area under the receiver characteristic operating curves (AUC). The identified genetic predictors also differentiate reasonably well between similar hair colors, such as between red and blond-red, as well as between blond and dark-blond, highlighting the value of the identified DNA variants for accurate hair color prediction.

  13. Expression and functional characterization of CD33 transcript variants in human acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    Laszlo, George S.; Harrington, Kimberly H.; Gudgeon, Chelsea J.; Beddoe, Mary E.; Fitzgibbon, Matthew P.; Ries, Rhonda E.; Lamba, Jatinder K.; McIntosh, Martin W.; Meshinchi, Soheil; Walter, Roland B.

    2016-01-01

    With the demonstration of improved survival of some acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients with the CD33 antibody-drug conjugate, gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO), CD33 has been validated as a target for antigen-specific immunotherapy. Since previous studies identified a CD33 splice variant missing exon 2 (CD33∆E2) and, consequently, the immune-dominant membrane-distal V-set domain, we investigated the expression and functional characteristics of CD33 transcript variants in AML. In primary AML specimens, we not only found full-length CD33 (CD33FL) and CD33∆E2 but also corresponding variants containing an alternate exon 7 predicted to encode a CD33 protein lacking most of the intracellular domain (CD33E7a and, not previously described, CD33∆E2,E7a) in almost all cases. In acute leukemia cell sublines engineered to express individual CD33 splice variants, all splice variants had endocytic properties. CD33FL and CD33E7a mediated similar degrees of GO cytotoxicity, whereas CD33∆E2 and CD33∆E2,E7a could not serve as target for GO. Co-expression of CD33∆E2 did not interfere with CD33FL endocytosis and did not impact CD33FL-mediated GO cytotoxicity. Together, our findings document a greater-than-previously thought complexity of CD33 expression in human AML. They identify CD33 variants that lack exon 2 and are not recognized by current CD33-directed therapeutics as potential target for future unconjugated or conjugated antibodies. PMID:27248327

  14. Human genomics. Effect of predicted protein-truncating genetic variants on the human transcriptome.

    PubMed

    Rivas, Manuel A; Pirinen, Matti; Conrad, Donald F; Lek, Monkol; Tsang, Emily K; Karczewski, Konrad J; Maller, Julian B; Kukurba, Kimberly R; DeLuca, David S; Fromer, Menachem; Ferreira, Pedro G; Smith, Kevin S; Zhang, Rui; Zhao, Fengmei; Banks, Eric; Poplin, Ryan; Ruderfer, Douglas M; Purcell, Shaun M; Tukiainen, Taru; Minikel, Eric V; Stenson, Peter D; Cooper, David N; Huang, Katharine H; Sullivan, Timothy J; Nedzel, Jared; Bustamante, Carlos D; Li, Jin Billy; Daly, Mark J; Guigo, Roderic; Donnelly, Peter; Ardlie, Kristin; Sammeth, Michael; Dermitzakis, Emmanouil T; McCarthy, Mark I; Montgomery, Stephen B; Lappalainen, Tuuli; MacArthur, Daniel G

    2015-05-08

    Accurate prediction of the functional effect of genetic variation is critical for clinical genome interpretation. We systematically characterized the transcriptome effects of protein-truncating variants, a class of variants expected to have profound effects on gene function, using data from the Genotype-Tissue Expression (GTEx) and Geuvadis projects. We quantitated tissue-specific and positional effects on nonsense-mediated transcript decay and present an improved predictive model for this decay. We directly measured the effect of variants both proximal and distal to splice junctions. Furthermore, we found that robustness to heterozygous gene inactivation is not due to dosage compensation. Our results illustrate the value of transcriptome data in the functional interpretation of genetic variants.

  15. Rare Loss-of-Function Variants in NPC1 Predispose to Human Obesity.

    PubMed

    Liu, Ruixin; Zou, Yaoyu; Hong, Jie; Cao, Min; Cui, Bin; Zhang, Huiwen; Chen, Maopei; Shi, Juan; Ning, Tinglu; Zhao, Shaoqian; Liu, Wen; Xiong, Hui; Wei, Cuijie; Qiu, Zhengqing; Gu, Weiqiong; Zhang, Yifei; Li, Wanyu; Miao, Lin; Sun, Yingkai; Yang, Minglan; Wang, Rui; Ma, Qinyun; Xu, Min; Xu, Yu; Wang, Tiange; Chan, Kei-Hang Katie; Zuo, Xianbo; Chen, Haoyan; Qi, Lu; Lai, Shenghan; Duan, Shumin; Song, Baoliang; Bi, Yufang; Liu, Simin; Wang, Weiqing; Ning, Guang; Wang, Jiqiu

    2017-04-01

    Some Shanghai Clinical Center f a role of Niemann-Pick type C1 (NPC1) for obesity traits. However, whether the loss-of-function mutations in NPC1 cause adiposity in humans remains unknown. We recruited 25 probands with rare autosomal-recessive Niemann-Pick type C (NP-C) disease and their parents in assessment of the effect of heterozygous NPC1 mutations on adiposity. We found that male NPC1(+/-) carriers had a significantly higher BMI than matched control subjects or the whole population-based control subjects. Consistently, male NPC1(+/-) mice had increased fat storage while eating a high-fat diet. We further conducted an in-depth assessment of rare variants in the NPC1 gene in young, severely obese subjects and lean control subjects and identified 17 rare nonsynonymous/frameshift variants in NPC1 (minor allele frequency <1%) that were significantly associated with an increased risk of obesity (3.40% vs. 0.73%, respectively, in obese patients and control subjects, P = 0.0008, odds ratio = 4.8, 95% CI 1.7-13.2), indicating that rare NPC1 variants were enriched in young, morbidly obese Chinese subjects. Importantly, participants carrying rare variants with severely damaged cholesterol-transporting ability had more fat accumulation than those with mild/no damage rare variants. In summary, rare loss-of-function NPC1 mutations were identified as being associated with human adiposity with a high penetrance, providing potential therapeutic interventions for obesity in addition to the role of NPC1 in the familial NP-C disease.

  16. Enhanced Proteolytic Processing of Recombinant Human Coagulation Factor VIII B-Domain Variants by Recombinant Furins.

    PubMed

    Demasi, Marcos A; de S Molina, Erika; Bowman-Colin, Christian; Lojudice, Fernando H; Muras, Angelita; Sogayar, Mari C

    2016-06-01

    Recombinant human factor VIII (rFVIII) is used in replacement therapy for hemophilia A. Current research efforts are focused on bioengineering rFVIII molecules to improve its secretion efficiency and stability, limiting factors for its efficient production. However, high expression yield in mammalian cells of these rFVIII variants is generally associated with limited proteolytic processing. Non-processed single-chain polypeptides constitute non-natural FVIII molecule configurations with unpredictable toxicity and/or antigenicity. Our main objective was to demonstrate the feasibility of promoting full-proteolytic processing of an rFVIII variant retaining a portion of the B-domain, converting it into the smallest natural activatable form of rFVIII, while keeping its main advantage, i.e., improved secretion efficiency. We generated and employed a CHO-DG44 cell clone producing an rFVIII variant retaining a portion of the B-domain and the FVIII native cleavage site between Arg(1648) and Glu(1649). By bioengineering CHO-DG44 cells to express stably the recombinant human endoproteases PACE, PACE-SOL, PCSK5, PCSK6, or PCKS7, we were able to achieve complete intra- or extracellular proteolytic processing of this rFVIII variant. Additionally, our quantitative data indicated that removal of the B-domain segment by intracellular proteolytic processing does not interfere with this rFVIII variant secretion efficiency. This work also provides the first direct evidence of (1) intracellular cleavage at the Arg(1648) FVIII processing site promoted by wild-type PACE and PCSK7 and (2) proteolytic processing at the Arg(1648) FVIII processing site by PCSK6.

  17. A naturally occurring variant of the human prion protein completely prevents prion disease.

    PubMed

    Asante, Emmanuel A; Smidak, Michelle; Grimshaw, Andrew; Houghton, Richard; Tomlinson, Andrew; Jeelani, Asif; Jakubcova, Tatiana; Hamdan, Shyma; Richard-Londt, Angela; Linehan, Jacqueline M; Brandner, Sebastian; Alpers, Michael; Whitfield, Jerome; Mead, Simon; Wadsworth, Jonathan D F; Collinge, John

    2015-06-25

    Mammalian prions, transmissible agents causing lethal neurodegenerative diseases, are composed of assemblies of misfolded cellular prion protein (PrP). A novel PrP variant, G127V, was under positive evolutionary selection during the epidemic of kuru--an acquired prion disease epidemic of the Fore population in Papua New Guinea--and appeared to provide strong protection against disease in the heterozygous state. Here we have investigated the protective role of this variant and its interaction with the common, worldwide M129V PrP polymorphism. V127 was seen exclusively on a M129 PRNP allele. We demonstrate that transgenic mice expressing both variant and wild-type human PrP are completely resistant to both kuru and classical Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease (CJD) prions (which are closely similar) but can be infected with variant CJD prions, a human prion strain resulting from exposure to bovine spongiform encephalopathy prions to which the Fore were not exposed. Notably, mice expressing only PrP V127 were completely resistant to all prion strains, demonstrating a different molecular mechanism to M129V, which provides its relative protection against classical CJD and kuru in the heterozygous state. Indeed, this single amino acid substitution (G→V) at a residue invariant in vertebrate evolution is as protective as deletion of the protein. Further study in transgenic mice expressing different ratios of variant and wild-type PrP indicates that not only is PrP V127 completely refractory to prion conversion but acts as a potent dose-dependent inhibitor of wild-type prion propagation.

  18. Human infections with influenza A(H3N2) variant virus in the United States, 2011-2012

    Technology Transfer Automated Retrieval System (TEKTRAN)

    BACKGROUND. During August 2011-April 2012, 13 human infections with influenza A(H3N2) variant (H3N2v) virus were identified in the United States; 8 occurred in the prior 2 years. This virus differs from previous variant influenza viruses in that it contains the matrix (M) gene from the Influenza A(H...

  19. Structure of human nucleosome containing the testis-specific histone variant TSH2B

    SciTech Connect

    Urahama, Takashi; Horikoshi, Naoki; Osakabe, Akihisa; Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2014-03-25

    The crystal structure of human nucleosome containing the testis-specific TSH2B variant has been determined. The TSH2B Ser85 residue does not interact with H4 in the nucleosome, and induces a local structural difference between TSH2B and H2B in nucleosomes. The human histone H2B variant TSH2B is highly expressed in testis and may function in the chromatin transition during spermatogenesis. In the present study, the crystal structure of the human testis-specific nucleosome containing TSH2B was determined at 2.8 Å resolution. A local structural difference between TSH2B and canonical H2B in nucleosomes was detected around the TSH2B-specific amino-acid residue Ser85. The TSH2B Ser85 residue does not interact with H4 in the nucleosome, but in the canonical nucleosome the H2B Asn84 residue (corresponding to the TSH2B Ser85 residue) forms water-mediated hydrogen bonds with the H4 Arg78 residue. In contrast, the other TSH2B-specific amino-acid residues did not induce any significant local structural changes in the TSH2B nucleosome. These findings may provide important information for understanding how testis-specific histone variants form nucleosomes during spermatogenesis.

  20. Chromosome Y genetic variants: impact in animal models and on human disease

    PubMed Central

    Prokop, J. W.

    2015-01-01

    Chromosome Y (chrY) variation has been associated with many complex diseases ranging from cancer to cardiovascular disorders. Functional roles of chrY genes outside of testes are suggested by the fact that they are broadly expressed in many other tissues and correspond to regulators of basic cellular functions (such as transcription, translation, and protein stability). However, the unique genetic properties of chrY (including the lack of meiotic crossover and the presence of numerous highly repetitive sequences) have made the identification of causal variants very difficult. Despite the prior lack of reliable sequences and/or data on genetic polymorphisms, earlier studies with animal chrY consomic strains have made it possible to narrow down the phenotypic contributions of chrY. Some of the evidence so far indicates that chrY gene variants associate with regulatory changes in the expression of other autosomal genes, in part via epigenetic effects. In humans, a limited number of studies have shown associations between chrY haplotypes and disease traits. However, recent sequencing efforts have made it possible to greatly increase the identification of genetic variants on chrY, which promises that future association of chrY with disease traits will be further refined. Continuing studies (both in humans and in animal models) will be critical to help explain the many sex-biased disease states in human that are contributed to not only by the classical sex steroid hormones, but also by chrY genetics. PMID:26286457

  1. Characterization of DNA variants in the human kinome in breast cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Agarwal, Divyansh; Qi, Yuan; Jiang, Tingting; Liu, Xiuping; Shi, Weiwei; Wali, Vikram B.; Turk, Benjamin; Ross, Jeffrey S.; Fraser Symmans, W.; Pusztai, Lajos; Hatzis, Christos

    2015-09-01

    Kinases play a key role in cancer biology, and serve as potential clinically useful targets for designing cancer therapies. We examined nucleic acid variations in the human kinome and several known cancer-related genes in breast cancer. DNA was extracted from fine needle biopsies of 73 primary breast cancers and 19 metastatic lesions. Targeted sequencing of 518 kinases and 68 additional cancer related genes was performed using the SOLiD sequencing platform. We detected 1561 unique, non-synonymous variants in kinase genes in the 92 cases, and 74 unique variants in 43 kinases that were predicted to have major functional impact on the protein. Three kinase groups—CMGC, STE and TKL—showed greater mutational load in metastatic compared to primary cancer samples, however, after correction for multiple testing the difference was significant only for the TKL group (P = 0.04). We also observed that a higher proportion of histologic grade 1 and 2 cases had high functional impact variants in the SCYL2 gene compared with grade 3 cases. Our findings indicate that individual breast cancers harbor a substantial number of potentially functionally important nucleotide variations in kinase genes, most of which are present in unique combinations and include both somatic and germline functional variants.

  2. Subcellular localization of human heparanase and its alternative splice variant in COS-7 cells.

    PubMed

    Sato, Mayumi; Amemiya, Kana; Hayakawa, Sumio; Munakata, Hiroshi

    2008-08-01

    Heparanase, the enzyme that degrades heparan sulfate, has been implicated to play important and characteristic roles in organogenesis, tissue organization, cell migration, and tumor metastasis. Clarification of its expression, its intracellular sorting, and its secretion is, therefore, of much importance to understand its role in cell biology. In addition to the 1.7 Kb transcript previously reported, we detected a 1.5 Kb transcript of human heparanase by RT-PCR. The smaller transcript was shown to be an alternatively spliced variant lacking exon 5, which contains the essential glutamic acid residue required for enzyme activity. When expressed in COS-7 cells this variant did not show any heparanase activity. Full-length heparanase and the exon 5-deleted splice variant were expressed in COS-7 cells and examined by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Both proteins co-localized with calnexin, a marker protein for the endoplasmic reticulum, and they co-immunoprecipitated with calnexin. Both proteins were postulated to be precursors based upon the results of SDS-PAGE analyses. Treatment with endoglycosidases revealed that all potential N-glycosylation sites in the proteins were glycosylated. Tunicamycin treatment of transfected COS-7 cells inhibited N-glycosylation but did not change the subcellular localization. These results indicate that overexpressed heparanase and its splice variant localize to the endoplasmic reticulum independent of glycosylation in COS-7 cells.

  3. Characterization of DNA variants in the human kinome in breast cancer

    PubMed Central

    Agarwal, Divyansh; Qi, Yuan; Jiang, Tingting; Liu, Xiuping; Shi, Weiwei; Wali, Vikram B.; Turk, Benjamin; Ross, Jeffrey S; Fraser Symmans, W; Pusztai, Lajos; Hatzis, Christos

    2015-01-01

    Kinases play a key role in cancer biology, and serve as potential clinically useful targets for designing cancer therapies. We examined nucleic acid variations in the human kinome and several known cancer-related genes in breast cancer. DNA was extracted from fine needle biopsies of 73 primary breast cancers and 19 metastatic lesions. Targeted sequencing of 518 kinases and 68 additional cancer related genes was performed using the SOLiD sequencing platform. We detected 1561 unique, non-synonymous variants in kinase genes in the 92 cases, and 74 unique variants in 43 kinases that were predicted to have major functional impact on the protein. Three kinase groups—CMGC, STE and TKL—showed greater mutational load in metastatic compared to primary cancer samples, however, after correction for multiple testing the difference was significant only for the TKL group (P = 0.04). We also observed that a higher proportion of histologic grade 1 and 2 cases had high functional impact variants in the SCYL2 gene compared with grade 3 cases. Our findings indicate that individual breast cancers harbor a substantial number of potentially functionally important nucleotide variations in kinase genes, most of which are present in unique combinations and include both somatic and germline functional variants. PMID:26420498

  4. Association of human papillomavirus type 16 and its genetic variants with cervical lesion in Korea.

    PubMed

    Park, Jeong Su; Shin, Sue; Kim, Eui-Chong; Kim, Ji Eun; Kim, Yong Beom; Oh, Sohee; Roh, Eun Youn; Yoon, Jong Hyun

    2016-11-01

    Persistent human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV16) is the major risk factor for cervical cancer. HPV16 intratypic variants differ in their geographical distribution and oncogenic potential. This study aimed to analyze the distribution of HPV16 variants and their association with cervical lesion histopathology in Korean women. In total, 133 HPV16-positive cervical samples from women admitted to Seoul National University Boramae Hospital were analyzed by sequencing E6, E7, and L1 genes and the long control region (LCR), and the variant distribution according to cervical lesion grade was determined. Isolates were grouped into a phylogenetic lineage, and A1-3, A4, C, and D sublineages were detected in 54.1, 37.8, 0.7, and 7.4% of samples, respectively. The most commonly observed LCR variations were 7521G>A (91.5%), 7730A>C (59.6%), and 7842G>A (59.6%). Furthermore, A4 or D sublineage-positive women had a higher risk for cervical cancer than women who were positive for A1-3. Among HPV phylogenetic clusters, A1-3 was the predominant sublineage, and within A1-3, the 350G polymorphism was highly frequent. These results differed from those of previous studies in Korea and other Asian countries. The findings suggest that cervical neoplasia incidence in HPV16-infected patients could be affected by the distribution of HPV16 variants in the population.

  5. A POMC variant implicates beta-melanocyte-stimulating hormone in the control of human energy balance.

    PubMed

    Lee, Yung Seng; Challis, Ben G; Thompson, Darren A; Yeo, Giles S H; Keogh, Julia M; Madonna, Michael E; Wraight, Vicki; Sims, Matthew; Vatin, Vincent; Meyre, David; Shield, Julian; Burren, Christine; Ibrahim, Zala; Cheetham, Tim; Swift, Peter; Blackwood, Anthea; Hung, Chiao-Chien Connie; Wareham, Nicholas J; Froguel, Philippe; Millhauser, Glenn L; O'Rahilly, Stephen; Farooqi, I Sadaf

    2006-02-01

    The melanocortin-4 receptor (MC4R) plays a critical role in the control of energy balance. Of its two pro-opiomelanocortin (POMC)-derived ligands, alpha- and beta-MSH, the majority of attention has focused on alpha-MSH, partly reflecting the absence of beta-MSH in rodents. We screened the POMC gene in 538 patients with severe, early-onset obesity and identified five unrelated probands who were heterozygous for a rare missense variant in the region encoding beta-MSH, Tyr221Cys. This frequency was significantly increased (p < 0.001) compared to the general UK Caucasian population and the variant cosegregated with obesity/overweight in affected family members. Compared to wild-type beta-MSH, the variant peptide was impaired in its ability to bind to and activate signaling from the MC4R. Obese children carrying the Tyr221Cys variant were hyperphagic and showed increased linear growth, both of which are features of MC4R deficiency. These studies support a role for beta-MSH in the control of human energy homeostasis.

  6. Brain expression genome-wide association study (eGWAS) identifies human disease-associated variants.

    PubMed

    Zou, Fanggeng; Chai, High Seng; Younkin, Curtis S; Allen, Mariet; Crook, Julia; Pankratz, V Shane; Carrasquillo, Minerva M; Rowley, Christopher N; Nair, Asha A; Middha, Sumit; Maharjan, Sooraj; Nguyen, Thuy; Ma, Li; Malphrus, Kimberly G; Palusak, Ryan; Lincoln, Sarah; Bisceglio, Gina; Georgescu, Constantin; Kouri, Naomi; Kolbert, Christopher P; Jen, Jin; Haines, Jonathan L; Mayeux, Richard; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A; Farrer, Lindsay A; Schellenberg, Gerard D; Petersen, Ronald C; Graff-Radford, Neill R; Dickson, Dennis W; Younkin, Steven G; Ertekin-Taner, Nilüfer

    2012-01-01

    Genetic variants that modify brain gene expression may also influence risk for human diseases. We measured expression levels of 24,526 transcripts in brain samples from the cerebellum and temporal cortex of autopsied subjects with Alzheimer's disease (AD, cerebellar n=197, temporal cortex n=202) and with other brain pathologies (non-AD, cerebellar n=177, temporal cortex n=197). We conducted an expression genome-wide association study (eGWAS) using 213,528 cisSNPs within ± 100 kb of the tested transcripts. We identified 2,980 cerebellar cisSNP/transcript level associations (2,596 unique cisSNPs) significant in both ADs and non-ADs (q<0.05, p=7.70 × 10(-5)-1.67 × 10(-82)). Of these, 2,089 were also significant in the temporal cortex (p=1.85 × 10(-5)-1.70 × 10(-141)). The top cerebellar cisSNPs had 2.4-fold enrichment for human disease-associated variants (p<10(-6)). We identified novel cisSNP/transcript associations for human disease-associated variants, including progressive supranuclear palsy SLCO1A2/rs11568563, Parkinson's disease (PD) MMRN1/rs6532197, Paget's disease OPTN/rs1561570; and we confirmed others, including PD MAPT/rs242557, systemic lupus erythematosus and ulcerative colitis IRF5/rs4728142, and type 1 diabetes mellitus RPS26/rs1701704. In our eGWAS, there was 2.9-3.3 fold enrichment (p<10(-6)) of significant cisSNPs with suggestive AD-risk association (p<10(-3)) in the Alzheimer's Disease Genetics Consortium GWAS. These results demonstrate the significant contributions of genetic factors to human brain gene expression, which are reliably detected across different brain regions and pathologies. The significant enrichment of brain cisSNPs among disease-associated variants advocates gene expression changes as a mechanism for many central nervous system (CNS) and non-CNS diseases. Combined assessment of expression and disease GWAS may provide complementary information in discovery of human disease variants with functional implications. Our findings

  7. Brain Expression Genome-Wide Association Study (eGWAS) Identifies Human Disease-Associated Variants

    PubMed Central

    Crook, Julia; Pankratz, V. Shane; Carrasquillo, Minerva M.; Rowley, Christopher N.; Nair, Asha A.; Middha, Sumit; Maharjan, Sooraj; Nguyen, Thuy; Ma, Li; Malphrus, Kimberly G.; Palusak, Ryan; Lincoln, Sarah; Bisceglio, Gina; Georgescu, Constantin; Kouri, Naomi; Kolbert, Christopher P.; Jen, Jin; Haines, Jonathan L.; Mayeux, Richard; Pericak-Vance, Margaret A.; Farrer, Lindsay A.; Schellenberg, Gerard D.; Petersen, Ronald C.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Dickson, Dennis W.; Younkin, Steven G.; Ertekin-Taner, Nilüfer

    2012-01-01

    Genetic variants that modify brain gene expression may also influence risk for human diseases. We measured expression levels of 24,526 transcripts in brain samples from the cerebellum and temporal cortex of autopsied subjects with Alzheimer's disease (AD, cerebellar n = 197, temporal cortex n = 202) and with other brain pathologies (non–AD, cerebellar n = 177, temporal cortex n = 197). We conducted an expression genome-wide association study (eGWAS) using 213,528 cisSNPs within ±100 kb of the tested transcripts. We identified 2,980 cerebellar cisSNP/transcript level associations (2,596 unique cisSNPs) significant in both ADs and non–ADs (q<0.05, p = 7.70×10−5–1.67×10−82). Of these, 2,089 were also significant in the temporal cortex (p = 1.85×10−5–1.70×10−141). The top cerebellar cisSNPs had 2.4-fold enrichment for human disease-associated variants (p<10−6). We identified novel cisSNP/transcript associations for human disease-associated variants, including progressive supranuclear palsy SLCO1A2/rs11568563, Parkinson's disease (PD) MMRN1/rs6532197, Paget's disease OPTN/rs1561570; and we confirmed others, including PD MAPT/rs242557, systemic lupus erythematosus and ulcerative colitis IRF5/rs4728142, and type 1 diabetes mellitus RPS26/rs1701704. In our eGWAS, there was 2.9–3.3 fold enrichment (p<10−6) of significant cisSNPs with suggestive AD–risk association (p<10−3) in the Alzheimer's Disease Genetics Consortium GWAS. These results demonstrate the significant contributions of genetic factors to human brain gene expression, which are reliably detected across different brain regions and pathologies. The significant enrichment of brain cisSNPs among disease-associated variants advocates gene expression changes as a mechanism for many central nervous system (CNS) and non–CNS diseases. Combined assessment of expression and disease GWAS may provide complementary information in discovery of human disease variants with

  8. Three functional variants of IFN regulatory factor 5 (IRF5) define risk and protective haplotypes for human lupus

    PubMed Central

    Graham, Robert R.; Kyogoku, Chieko; Sigurdsson, Snaevar; Vlasova, Irina A.; Davies, Leela R. L.; Baechler, Emily C.; Plenge, Robert M.; Koeuth, Thearith; Ortmann, Ward A.; Hom, Geoffrey; Bauer, Jason W.; Gillett, Clarence; Burtt, Noel; Cunninghame Graham, Deborah S.; Onofrio, Robert; Petri, Michelle; Gunnarsson, Iva; Svenungsson, Elisabet; Rönnblom, Lars; Nordmark, Gunnel; Gregersen, Peter K.; Moser, Kathy; Gaffney, Patrick M.; Criswell, Lindsey A.; Vyse, Timothy J.; Syvänen, Ann-Christine; Bohjanen, Paul R.; Daly, Mark J.; Behrens, Timothy W.; Altshuler, David

    2007-01-01

    Systematic genome-wide studies to map genomic regions associated with human diseases are becoming more practical. Increasingly, efforts will be focused on the identification of the specific functional variants responsible for the disease. The challenges of identifying causal variants include the need for complete ascertainment of genetic variants and the need to consider the possibility of multiple causal alleles. We recently reported that risk of systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) is strongly associated with a common SNP in IFN regulatory factor 5 (IRF5), and that this variant altered spicing in a way that might provide a functional explanation for the reproducible association to SLE risk. Here, by resequencing and genotyping in patients with SLE, we find evidence for three functional alleles of IRF5: the previously described exon 1B splice site variant, a 30-bp in-frame insertion/deletion variant of exon 6 that alters a proline-, glutamic acid-, serine- and threonine-rich domain region, and a variant in a conserved polyA+ signal sequence that alters the length of the 3′ UTR and stability of IRF5 mRNAs. Haplotypes of these three variants define at least three distinct levels of risk to SLE. Understanding how combinations of variants influence IRF5 function may offer etiological and therapeutic insights in SLE; more generally, IRF5 and SLE illustrates how multiple common variants of the same gene can together influence risk of common disease. PMID:17412832

  9. Many amino acid substitution variants identified in DNA repair genes during human population screenings are predicted to impact protein function

    SciTech Connect

    Xi, T; Jones, I M; Mohrenweiser, H W

    2003-11-03

    Over 520 different amino acid substitution variants have been previously identified in the systematic screening of 91 human DNA repair genes for sequence variation. Two algorithms were employed to predict the impact of these amino acid substitutions on protein activity. Sorting Intolerant From Tolerant (SIFT) classified 226 of 508 variants (44%) as ''Intolerant''. Polymorphism Phenotyping (PolyPhen) classed 165 of 489 amino acid substitutions (34%) as ''Probably or Possibly Damaging''. Another 9-15% of the variants were classed as ''Potentially Intolerant or Damaging''. The results from the two algorithms are highly associated, with concordance in predicted impact observed for {approx}62% of the variants. Twenty one to thirty one percent of the variant proteins are predicted to exhibit reduced activity by both algorithms. These variants occur at slightly lower individual allele frequency than do the variants classified as ''Tolerant'' or ''Benign''. Both algorithms correctly predicted the impact of 26 functionally characterized amino acid substitutions in the APE1 protein on biochemical activity, with one exception. It is concluded that a substantial fraction of the missense variants observed in the general human population are functionally relevant. These variants are expected to be the molecular genetic and biochemical basis for the associations of reduced DNA repair capacity phenotypes with elevated cancer risk.

  10. T3 Regulates a Human Macrophage-Derived TSH-β Splice Variant: Implications for Human Bone Biology.

    PubMed

    Baliram, R; Latif, R; Morshed, S A; Zaidi, M; Davies, T F

    2016-09-01

    TSH and thyroid hormones (T3 and T4) are intimately involved in bone biology. We have previously reported the presence of a murine TSH-β splice variant (TSH-βv) expressed specifically in bone marrow-derived macrophages and that exerted an osteoprotective effect by inducing osteoblastogenesis. To extend this observation and its relevance to human bone biology, we set out to identify and characterize a TSH-β variant in human macrophages. Real-time PCR analyses using human TSH-β-specific primers identified a 364-bp product in macrophages, bone marrow, and peripheral blood mononuclear cells that was sequence verified and was homologous to a human TSH-βv previously reported. We then examined TSH-βv regulation using the THP-1 human monocyte cell line matured into macrophages. After 4 days, 46.1% of the THP-1 cells expressed the macrophage markers CD-14 and macrophage colony-stimulating factor and exhibited typical morphological characteristics of macrophages. Real-time PCR analyses of these cells treated in a dose-dependent manner with T3 showed a 14-fold induction of human TSH-βv mRNA and variant protein. Furthermore, these human TSH-βv-positive cells, induced by T3 exposure, had categorized into both M1 and M2 macrophage phenotypes as evidenced by the expression of macrophage colony-stimulating factor for M1 and CCL-22 for M2. These data indicate that in hyperthyroidism, bone marrow resident macrophages have the potential to exert enhanced osteoprotective effects by oversecreting human TSH-βv, which may exert its local osteoprotective role via osteoblast and osteoclast TSH receptors.

  11. Genome-wide scan of healthy human connectome discovers SPON1 gene variant influencing dementia severity.

    PubMed

    Jahanshad, Neda; Rajagopalan, Priya; Hua, Xue; Hibar, Derrek P; Nir, Talia M; Toga, Arthur W; Jack, Clifford R; Saykin, Andrew J; Green, Robert C; Weiner, Michael W; Medland, Sarah E; Montgomery, Grant W; Hansell, Narelle K; McMahon, Katie L; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Martin, Nicholas G; Wright, Margaret J; Thompson, Paul M

    2013-03-19

    Aberrant connectivity is implicated in many neurological and psychiatric disorders, including Alzheimer's disease and schizophrenia. However, other than a few disease-associated candidate genes, we know little about the degree to which genetics play a role in the brain networks; we know even less about specific genes that influence brain connections. Twin and family-based studies can generate estimates of overall genetic influences on a trait, but genome-wide association scans (GWASs) can screen the genome for specific variants influencing the brain or risk for disease. To identify the heritability of various brain connections, we scanned healthy young adult twins with high-field, high-angular resolution diffusion MRI. We adapted GWASs to screen the brain's connectivity pattern, allowing us to discover genetic variants that affect the human brain's wiring. The association of connectivity with the SPON1 variant at rs2618516 on chromosome 11 (11p15.2) reached connectome-wide, genome-wide significance after stringent statistical corrections were enforced, and it was replicated in an independent subsample. rs2618516 was shown to affect brain structure in an elderly population with varying degrees of dementia. Older people who carried the connectivity variant had significantly milder clinical dementia scores and lower risk of Alzheimer's disease. As a posthoc analysis, we conducted GWASs on several organizational and topological network measures derived from the matrices to discover variants in and around genes associated with autism (MACROD2), development (NEDD4), and mental retardation (UBE2A) significantly associated with connectivity. Connectome-wide, genome-wide screening offers substantial promise to discover genes affecting brain connectivity and risk for brain diseases.

  12. Genome-wide scan of healthy human connectome discovers SPON1 gene variant influencing dementia severity

    PubMed Central

    Jahanshad, Neda; Rajagopalan, Priya; Hua, Xue; Hibar, Derrek P.; Nir, Talia M.; Toga, Arthur W.; Jack, Clifford R.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Green, Robert C.; Weiner, Michael W.; Medland, Sarah E.; Montgomery, Grant W.; Hansell, Narelle K.; McMahon, Katie L.; de Zubicaray, Greig I.; Martin, Nicholas G.; Wright, Margaret J.; Thompson, Paul M.; Weiner, Michael; Aisen, Paul; Weiner, Michael; Aisen, Paul; Petersen, Ronald; Jack, Clifford R.; Jagust, William; Trojanowski, John Q.; Toga, Arthur W.; Beckett, Laurel; Green, Robert C.; Saykin, Andrew J.; Morris, John; Liu, Enchi; Green, Robert C.; Montine, Tom; Petersen, Ronald; Aisen, Paul; Gamst, Anthony; Thomas, Ronald G.; Donohue, Michael; Walter, Sarah; Gessert, Devon; Sather, Tamie; Beckett, Laurel; Harvey, Danielle; Gamst, Anthony; Donohue, Michael; Kornak, John; Jack, Clifford R.; Dale, Anders; Bernstein, Matthew; Felmlee, Joel; Fox, Nick; Thompson, Paul; Schuff, Norbert; Alexander, Gene; DeCarli, Charles; Jagust, William; Bandy, Dan; Koeppe, Robert A.; Foster, Norm; Reiman, Eric M.; Chen, Kewei; Mathis, Chet; Morris, John; Cairns, Nigel J.; Taylor-Reinwald, Lisa; Trojanowki, J.Q.; Shaw, Les; Lee, Virginia M.Y.; Korecka, Magdalena; Toga, Arthur W.; Crawford, Karen; Neu, Scott; Saykin, Andrew J.; Foroud, Tatiana M.; Potkin, Steven; Shen, Li; Khachaturian, Zaven; Frank, Richard; Snyder, Peter J.; Molchan, Susan; Kaye, Jeffrey; Quinn, Joseph; Lind, Betty; Dolen, Sara; Schneider, Lon S.; Pawluczyk, Sonia; Spann, Bryan M.; Brewer, James; Vanderswag, Helen; Heidebrink, Judith L.; Lord, Joanne L.; Petersen, Ronald; Johnson, Kris; Doody, Rachelle S.; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Chowdhury, Munir; Stern, Yaakov; Honig, Lawrence S.; Bell, Karen L.; Morris, John C.; Ances, Beau; Carroll, Maria; Leon, Sue; Mintun, Mark A.; Schneider, Stacy; Marson, Daniel; Griffith, Randall; Clark, David; Grossman, Hillel; Mitsis, Effie; Romirowsky, Aliza; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Shah, Raj C.; Duara, Ranjan; Varon, Daniel; Roberts, Peggy; Albert, Marilyn; Onyike, Chiadi; Kielb, Stephanie; Rusinek, Henry; de Leon, Mony J.; Glodzik, Lidia; De Santi, Susan; Doraiswamy, P. Murali; Petrella, Jeffrey R.; Coleman, R. Edward; Arnold, Steven E.; Karlawish, Jason H.; Wolk, David; Smith, Charles D.; Jicha, Greg; Hardy, Peter; Lopez, Oscar L.; Oakley, MaryAnn; Simpson, Donna M.; Porsteinsson, Anton P.; Goldstein, Bonnie S.; Martin, Kim; Makino, Kelly M.; Ismail, M. Saleem; Brand, Connie; Mulnard, Ruth A.; Thai, Gaby; Mc-Adams-Ortiz, Catherine; Womack, Kyle; Mathews, Dana; Quiceno, Mary; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; King, Richard; Weiner, Myron; Martin-Cook, Kristen; DeVous, Michael; Levey, Allan I.; Lah, James J.; Cellar, Janet S.; Burns, Jeffrey M.; Anderson, Heather S.; Swerdlow, Russell H.; Apostolova, Liana; Lu, Po H.; Bartzokis, George; Silverman, Daniel H.S.; Graff-Radford, Neill R.; Parfitt, Francine; Johnson, Heather; Farlow, Martin R.; Hake, Ann Marie; Matthews, Brandy R.; Herring, Scott; van Dyck, Christopher H.; Carson, Richard E.; MacAvoy, Martha G.; Chertkow, Howard; Bergman, Howard; Hosein, Chris; Black, Sandra; Stefanovic, Bojana; Caldwell, Curtis; Hsiung, Ging-Yuek Robin; Feldman, Howard; Mudge, Benita; Assaly, Michele; Kertesz, Andrew; Rogers, John; Trost, Dick; Bernick, Charles; Munic, Donna; Kerwin, Diana; Mesulam, Marek-Marsel; Lipowski, Kristina; Wu, Chuang-Kuo; Johnson, Nancy; Sadowsky, Carl; Martinez, Walter; Villena, Teresa; Turner, Raymond Scott; Johnson, Kathleen; Reynolds, Brigid; Sperling, Reisa A.; Johnson, Keith A.; Marshall, Gad; Frey, Meghan; Yesavage, Jerome; Taylor, Joy L.; Lane, Barton; Rosen, Allyson; Tinklenberg, Jared; Sabbagh, Marwan; Belden, Christine; Jacobson, Sandra; Kowall, Neil; Killiany, Ronald; Budson, Andrew E.; Norbash, Alexander; Johnson, Patricia Lynn; Obisesan, Thomas O.; Wolday, Saba; Bwayo, Salome K.; Lerner, Alan; Hudson, Leon; Ogrocki, Paula; Fletcher, Evan; Carmichael, Owen; Olichney, John; DeCarli, Charles; Kittur, Smita; Borrie, Michael; Lee, T.-Y.; Bartha, Rob; Johnson, Sterling; Asthana, Sanjay; Carlsson, Cynthia M.; Potkin, Steven G.; Preda, Adrian; Nguyen, Dana; Tariot, Pierre; Fleisher, Adam; Reeder, Stephanie; Bates, Vernice; Capote, Horacio; Rainka, Michelle; Scharre, Douglas W.; Kataki, Maria; Zimmerman, Earl A.; Celmins, Dzintra; Brown, Alice D.; Pearlson, Godfrey D.; Blank, Karen; Anderson, Karen; Saykin, Andrew J.; Santulli, Robert B.; Schwartz, Eben S.; Sink, Kaycee M.; Williamson, Jeff D.; Garg, Pradeep; Watkins, Franklin; Ott, Brian R.; Querfurth, Henry; Tremont, Geoffrey; Salloway, Stephen; Malloy, Paul; Correia, Stephen; Rosen, Howard J.; Miller, Bruce L.; Mintzer, Jacobo; Longmire, Crystal Flynn; Spicer, Kenneth; Finger, Elizabeth; Rachinsky, Irina; Rogers, John; Kertesz, Andrew; Drost, Dick

    2013-01-01

    Aberrant connectivity is implicated in many neurological and psychiatric disorders, including Alzheimer’s disease and schizophrenia. However, other than a few disease-associated candidate genes, we know little about the degree to which genetics play a role in the brain networks; we know even less about specific genes that influence brain connections. Twin and family-based studies can generate estimates of overall genetic influences on a trait, but genome-wide association scans (GWASs) can screen the genome for specific variants influencing the brain or risk for disease. To identify the heritability of various brain connections, we scanned healthy young adult twins with high-field, high-angular resolution diffusion MRI. We adapted GWASs to screen the brain’s connectivity pattern, allowing us to discover genetic variants that affect the human brain’s wiring. The association of connectivity with the SPON1 variant at rs2618516 on chromosome 11 (11p15.2) reached connectome-wide, genome-wide significance after stringent statistical corrections were enforced, and it was replicated in an independent subsample. rs2618516 was shown to affect brain structure in an elderly population with varying degrees of dementia. Older people who carried the connectivity variant had significantly milder clinical dementia scores and lower risk of Alzheimer’s disease. As a posthoc analysis, we conducted GWASs on several organizational and topological network measures derived from the matrices to discover variants in and around genes associated with autism (MACROD2), development (NEDD4), and mental retardation (UBE2A) significantly associated with connectivity. Connectome-wide, genome-wide screening offers substantial promise to discover genes affecting brain connectivity and risk for brain diseases. PMID:23471985

  13. Quantifying unobserved protein-coding variants in human populations provides a roadmap for large-scale sequencing projects

    PubMed Central

    Zou, James; Valiant, Gregory; Valiant, Paul; Karczewski, Konrad; Chan, Siu On; Samocha, Kaitlin; Lek, Monkol; Sunyaev, Shamil; Daly, Mark; MacArthur, Daniel G.

    2016-01-01

    As new proposals aim to sequence ever larger collection of humans, it is critical to have a quantitative framework to evaluate the statistical power of these projects. We developed a new algorithm, UnseenEst, and applied it to the exomes of 60,706 individuals to estimate the frequency distribution of all protein-coding variants, including rare variants that have not been observed yet in the current cohorts. Our results quantified the number of new variants that we expect to identify as sequencing cohorts reach hundreds of thousands of individuals. With 500K individuals, we find that we expect to capture 7.5% of all possible loss-of-function variants and 12% of all possible missense variants. We also estimate that 2,900 genes have loss-of-function frequency of <0.00001 in healthy humans, consistent with very strong intolerance to gene inactivation. PMID:27796292

  14. Discovery of Novel Splice Variants and Regulatory Mechanisms for Microsomal Triglyceride Transfer Protein in Human Tissues.

    PubMed

    Suzuki, Takashi; Swift, Larry L

    2016-06-03

    Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) is a unique lipid transfer protein essential for the assembly of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins by the liver and intestine. Previous studies in mice identified a splice variant of MTP with an alternate first exon. Splice variants of human MTP have not been reported. Using PCR approaches we have identified two splice variants in human tissues, which we have named MTP-B and MTP-C. MTP-B has a unique first exon (Ex1B) located 10.5 kb upstream of the first exon (Ex1A) for canonical MTP (MTP-A); MTP-C contains both first exons for MTP-A and MTP-B. MTP-B was found in a number of tissues, whereas MTP-C was prominent in brain and testis. MTP-B does not encode a protein; MTP-C encodes the same protein encoded by MTP-A, although MTP-C translation is strongly inhibited by regulatory elements within its 5'-UTR. Using luciferase assays, we demonstrate that the promoter region upstream of exon 1B is quite adequate to drive expression of MTP. We conclude that alternate splicing plays a key role in regulating cellular MTP levels by introducing distinct promoter regions and unique 5'-UTRs, which contain elements that alter translation efficiency, enabling the cell to optimize MTP activity.

  15. Discovery of Novel Splice Variants and Regulatory Mechanisms for Microsomal Triglyceride Transfer Protein in Human Tissues

    PubMed Central

    Suzuki, Takashi; Swift, Larry L.

    2016-01-01

    Microsomal triglyceride transfer protein (MTP) is a unique lipid transfer protein essential for the assembly of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins by the liver and intestine. Previous studies in mice identified a splice variant of MTP with an alternate first exon. Splice variants of human MTP have not been reported. Using PCR approaches we have identified two splice variants in human tissues, which we have named MTP-B and MTP-C. MTP-B has a unique first exon (Ex1B) located 10.5 kb upstream of the first exon (Ex1A) for canonical MTP (MTP-A); MTP-C contains both first exons for MTP-A and MTP-B. MTP-B was found in a number of tissues, whereas MTP-C was prominent in brain and testis. MTP-B does not encode a protein; MTP-C encodes the same protein encoded by MTP-A, although MTP-C translation is strongly inhibited by regulatory elements within its 5′-UTR. Using luciferase assays, we demonstrate that the promoter region upstream of exon 1B is quite adequate to drive expression of MTP. We conclude that alternate splicing plays a key role in regulating cellular MTP levels by introducing distinct promoter regions and unique 5′-UTRs, which contain elements that alter translation efficiency, enabling the cell to optimize MTP activity. PMID:27256115

  16. Dosage sensitivity is a major determinant of human copy number variant pathogenicity

    PubMed Central

    Rice, Alan M.; McLysaght, Aoife

    2017-01-01

    Human copy number variants (CNVs) account for genome variation an order of magnitude larger than single-nucleotide polymorphisms. Although much of this variation has no phenotypic consequences, some variants have been associated with disease, in particular neurodevelopmental disorders. Pathogenic CNVs are typically very large and contain multiple genes, and understanding the cause of the pathogenicity remains a major challenge. Here we show that pathogenic CNVs are significantly enriched for genes involved in development and genes that have greater evolutionary copy number conservation across mammals, indicative of functional constraints. Conversely, genes found in benign CNV regions have more variable copy number. These evolutionary constraints are characteristic of genes in pathogenic CNVs and can only be explained by dosage sensitivity of those genes. These results implicate dosage sensitivity of individual genes as a common cause of CNV pathogenicity. These evolutionary metrics suggest a path to identifying disease genes in pathogenic CNVs. PMID:28176757

  17. The human gene damage index as a gene-level approach to prioritizing exome variants

    PubMed Central

    Itan, Yuval; Shang, Lei; Boisson, Bertrand; Patin, Etienne; Bolze, Alexandre; Moncada-Vélez, Marcela; Scott, Eric; Ciancanelli, Michael J.; Lafaille, Fabien G.; Markle, Janet G.; Martinez-Barricarte, Ruben; de Jong, Sarah Jill; Kong, Xiao-Fei; Nitschke, Patrick; Belkadi, Aziz; Bustamante, Jacinta; Puel, Anne; Boisson-Dupuis, Stéphanie; Stenson, Peter D.; Gleeson, Joseph G.; Cooper, David N.; Quintana-Murci, Lluis; Claverie, Jean-Michel; Zhang, Shen-Ying; Abel, Laurent; Casanova, Jean-Laurent

    2015-01-01

    The protein-coding exome of a patient with a monogenic disease contains about 20,000 variants, only one or two of which are disease causing. We found that 58% of rare variants in the protein-coding exome of the general population are located in only 2% of the genes. Prompted by this observation, we aimed to develop a gene-level approach for predicting whether a given human protein-coding gene is likely to harbor disease-causing mutations. To this end, we derived the gene damage index (GDI): a genome-wide, gene-level metric of the mutational damage that has accumulated in the general population. We found that the GDI was correlated with selective evolutionary pressure, protein complexity, coding sequence length, and the number of paralogs. We compared GDI with the leading gene-level approaches, genic intolerance, and de novo excess, and demonstrated that GDI performed best for the detection of false positives (i.e., removing exome variants in genes irrelevant to disease), whereas genic intolerance and de novo excess performed better for the detection of true positives (i.e., assessing de novo mutations in genes likely to be disease causing). The GDI server, data, and software are freely available to noncommercial users from lab.rockefeller.edu/casanova/GDI. PMID:26483451

  18. Puzzling role of genetic risk factors in human longevity: "risk alleles" as pro-longevity variants.

    PubMed

    Ukraintseva, Svetlana; Yashin, Anatoliy; Arbeev, Konstantin; Kulminski, Alexander; Akushevich, Igor; Wu, Deqing; Joshi, Gaurang; Land, Kenneth C; Stallard, Eric

    2016-02-01

    Complex diseases are major contributors to human mortality in old age. Paradoxically, many genetic variants that have been associated with increased risks of such diseases are found in genomes of long-lived people, and do not seem to compromise longevity. Here we argue that trade-off-like and conditional effects of genes can play central role in this phenomenon and in determining longevity. Such effects may occur as result of: (i) antagonistic influence of gene on the development of different health disorders; (ii) change in the effect of gene on vulnerability to death with age (especially, from "bad" to "good"); (iii) gene-gene interaction; and (iv) gene-environment interaction, among other factors. A review of current knowledge provides many examples of genetic factors that may increase the risk of one disease but reduce chances of developing another serious health condition, or improve survival from it. Factors that may increase risk of a major disease but attenuate manifestation of physical senescence are also discussed. Overall, available evidence suggests that the influence of a genetic variant on longevity may be negative, neutral or positive, depending on a delicate balance of the detrimental and beneficial effects of such variant on multiple health and aging related traits. This balance may change with age, internal and external environments, and depend on genetic surrounding. We conclude that trade-off-like and conditional genetic effects are very common and may result in situations when a disease "risk allele" can also be a pro-longevity variant, depending on context. We emphasize importance of considering such effects in both aging research and disease prevention.

  19. Differential expression and HIV-1 regulation of μ-opioid receptor splice variants across human central nervous system cell types.

    PubMed

    Dever, Seth M; Xu, Ruqiang; Fitting, Sylvia; Knapp, Pamela E; Hauser, Kurt F

    2012-06-01

    The μ-opioid receptor (MOR) is known to undergo extensive alternative splicing as numerous splice variants of MOR have been identified. However, the functional significance of MOR variants, as well as how splice variants other than MOR-1 might differentially regulate human immunodeficiency virus type-1 (HIV-1) pathogenesis in the central nervous system (CNS), or elsewhere, has largely been ignored. Our findings suggest that there are specific differences in the MOR variant expression profile among CNS cell types, and that the expression levels of these variants are differentially regulated by HIV-1. While MOR-1A mRNA was detected in astroglia, microglia, and neurons, MOR-1 and MOR-1X were only found in astroglia. Expression of the various forms of MOR along with the chimeric G protein qi5 in HEK-293T cells resulted in differences in calcium/NFAT signaling with morphine treatment, suggesting that MOR variant expression might underlie functional differences in MOR-effector coupling and intracellular signaling across different cell types. Furthermore, the data suggest that the expression of MOR-1 and other MOR variants may also be differentially regulated in the brains of HIV-infected subjects with varying levels of neurocognitive impairment. Overall, the results reveal an unexpected finding that MOR-1 may not be the predominant form of MOR expressed by some CNS cell types and that other splice variants of MOR-1, with possible differing functions, may contribute to the diversity of MOR-related processes in the CNS.

  20. Ancient human sialic acid variant restricts an emerging zoonotic malaria parasite.

    PubMed

    Dankwa, Selasi; Lim, Caeul; Bei, Amy K; Jiang, Rays H Y; Abshire, James R; Patel, Saurabh D; Goldberg, Jonathan M; Moreno, Yovany; Kono, Maya; Niles, Jacquin C; Duraisingh, Manoj T

    2016-04-04

    Plasmodium knowlesi is a zoonotic parasite transmitted from macaques causing malaria in humans in Southeast Asia. Plasmodium parasites bind to red blood cell (RBC) surface receptors, many of which are sialylated. While macaques synthesize the sialic acid variant N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc), humans cannot because of a mutation in the enzyme CMAH that converts N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) to Neu5Gc. Here we reconstitute CMAH in human RBCs for the reintroduction of Neu5Gc, which results in enhancement of P. knowlesi invasion. We show that two P. knowlesi invasion ligands, PkDBPβ and PkDBPγ, bind specifically to Neu5Gc-containing receptors. A human-adapted P. knowlesi line invades human RBCs independently of Neu5Gc, with duplication of the sialic acid-independent invasion ligand, PkDBPα and loss of PkDBPγ. Our results suggest that absence of Neu5Gc on human RBCs limits P. knowlesi invasion, but that parasites may evolve to invade human RBCs through the use of sialic acid-independent pathways.

  1. Ancient human sialic acid variant restricts an emerging zoonotic malaria parasite

    PubMed Central

    Dankwa, Selasi; Lim, Caeul; Bei, Amy K.; Jiang, Rays H. Y.; Abshire, James R.; Patel, Saurabh D.; Goldberg, Jonathan M.; Moreno, Yovany; Kono, Maya; Niles, Jacquin C.; Duraisingh, Manoj T.

    2016-01-01

    Plasmodium knowlesi is a zoonotic parasite transmitted from macaques causing malaria in humans in Southeast Asia. Plasmodium parasites bind to red blood cell (RBC) surface receptors, many of which are sialylated. While macaques synthesize the sialic acid variant N-glycolylneuraminic acid (Neu5Gc), humans cannot because of a mutation in the enzyme CMAH that converts N-acetylneuraminic acid (Neu5Ac) to Neu5Gc. Here we reconstitute CMAH in human RBCs for the reintroduction of Neu5Gc, which results in enhancement of P. knowlesi invasion. We show that two P. knowlesi invasion ligands, PkDBPβ and PkDBPγ, bind specifically to Neu5Gc-containing receptors. A human-adapted P. knowlesi line invades human RBCs independently of Neu5Gc, with duplication of the sialic acid-independent invasion ligand, PkDBPα and loss of PkDBPγ. Our results suggest that absence of Neu5Gc on human RBCs limits P. knowlesi invasion, but that parasites may evolve to invade human RBCs through the use of sialic acid-independent pathways. PMID:27041489

  2. β Subunits Functionally Differentiate Human Kv4.3 Potassium Channel Splice Variants

    PubMed Central

    Abbott, Geoffrey W.

    2017-01-01

    The human ventricular cardiomyocyte transient outward K+ current (Ito) mediates the initial phase of myocyte repolarization and its disruption is implicated in Brugada Syndrome and heart failure (HF). Human cardiac Ito is generated primarily by two Kv4.3 splice variants (Kv4.3L and Kv4.3S, diverging only by a C-terminal, S6-proximal, 19-residue stretch unique to Kv4.3L), which are differentially remodeled in HF, but considered functionally alike at baseline. Kv4.3 is regulated in human heart by β subunits including KChIP2b and KCNEs, but their effects were previously assumed to be Kv4.3 isoform-independent. Here, this assumption was tested experimentally using two-electrode voltage-clamp analysis of human subunits co-expressed in Xenopus laevis oocytes. Unexpectedly, Kv4.3L-KChIP2b channels exhibited up to 8-fold lower current augmentation, 40% slower inactivation, and 5 mV-shifted steady-state inactivation compared to Kv4.3S-KChIP2b. A synthetic peptide mimicking the 19-residue stretch diminished these differences, reinforcing the importance of this segment in mediating Kv4.3 regulation by KChIP2b. KCNE subunits induced further functional divergence, including a 7-fold increase in Kv4.3S-KCNE4-KChIP2b current compared to Kv4.3L-KCNE4-KChIP2b. The discovery of β-subunit-dependent functional divergence in human Kv4.3 splice variants suggests a C-terminal signaling hub is crucial to governing β-subunit effects upon Kv4.3, and demonstrates the potential significance of differential Kv4.3 gene-splicing and β subunit expression in myocyte physiology and pathobiology. PMID:28228734

  3. Accumulation of distinct prelamin A variants in human diploid fibroblasts differentially affects cell homeostasis

    SciTech Connect

    Candelario, Jose; Borrego, Stacey; Reddy, Sita; Comai, Lucio

    2011-02-01

    Lamin A is a component of the nuclear lamina that plays a major role in the structural organization and function of the nucleus. Lamin A is synthesized as a prelamin A precursor which undergoes four sequential post-translational modifications to generate mature lamin A. Significantly, a large number of point mutations in the LMNA gene cause a range of distinct human disorders collectively known as laminopathies. The mechanisms by which mutations in lamin A affect cell function and cause disease are unclear. Interestingly, recent studies have suggested that alterations in the normal lamin A pathway can contribute to cellular dysfunction. Specifically, we and others have shown, at the cellular level, that in the absence of mutations or altered splicing events, increased expression of wild-type prelamin A results in a growth defective phenotype that resembles that of cells expressing the mutant form of lamin A, termed progerin, associated with Hutchinson-Gilford Progeria syndrome (HGPS). Remarkably, the phenotypes of cells expressing elevated levels of wild-type prelamin A can be reversed by either treatment with farnesyltransferase inhibitors or overexpression of ZMPSTE24, a critical prelamin A processing enzyme, suggesting that minor increases in the steady-state levels of one or more prelamin A intermediates is sufficient to induce cellular toxicity. Here, to investigate the molecular basis of the lamin A pathway toxicity, we characterized the phenotypic changes occurring in cells expressing distinct prelamin A variants mimicking specific prelamin A processing intermediates. This analysis demonstrates that distinct prelamin A variants differentially affect cell growth, nuclear membrane morphology, nuclear distribution of lamin A and the fundamental process of transcription. Expression of prelamin A variants that are constitutively farnesylated induced the formation of lamin A aggregates and dramatic changes in nuclear membrane morphology, which led to reduced

  4. IgG Fc variant cross-reactivity between human and rhesus macaque FcγRs.

    PubMed

    Boesch, Austin W; Miles, Adam R; Chan, Ying N; Osei-Owusu, Nana Y; Ackerman, Margaret E

    2017-01-05

    Non-human primate (NHP) studies are often an essential component of antibody development efforts before human trials. Because the efficacy or toxicity of candidate antibodies may depend on their interactions with Fcγ receptors (FcγR) and their resulting ability to induce FcγR-mediated effector functions such as antibody-dependent cell-meditated cytotoxicity and phagocytosis (ADCP), the evaluation of human IgG variants with modulated affinity toward human FcγR is becoming more prevalent in both infectious disease and oncology studies in NHP. Reliable translation of these results necessitates analysis of the cross-reactivity of these human Fc variants with NHP FcγR. We report evaluation of the binding affinities of a panel of human IgG subclasses, Fc amino acid point mutants and Fc glycosylation variants against the common allotypes of human and rhesus macaque FcγR by applying a high-throughput array-based surface plasmon resonance platform. The resulting data indicate that amino acid variation present in rhesus FcγRs can result in disrupted, matched, or even increased affinity of IgG Fc variants compared with human FcγR orthologs. These observations emphasize the importance of evaluating species cross-reactivity and developing an understanding of the potential limitations or suitability of representative in vitro and in vivo models before human clinical studies when either efficacy or toxicity may be associated with FcγR engagement.

  5. Structure of human nucleosome containing the testis-specific histone variant TSH2B.

    PubMed

    Urahama, Takashi; Horikoshi, Naoki; Osakabe, Akihisa; Tachiwana, Hiroaki; Kurumizaka, Hitoshi

    2014-04-01

    The human histone H2B variant TSH2B is highly expressed in testis and may function in the chromatin transition during spermatogenesis. In the present study, the crystal structure of the human testis-specific nucleosome containing TSH2B was determined at 2.8 Å resolution. A local structural difference between TSH2B and canonical H2B in nucleosomes was detected around the TSH2B-specific amino-acid residue Ser85. The TSH2B Ser85 residue does not interact with H4 in the nucleosome, but in the canonical nucleosome the H2B Asn84 residue (corresponding to the TSH2B Ser85 residue) forms water-mediated hydrogen bonds with the H4 Arg78 residue. In contrast, the other TSH2B-specific amino-acid residues did not induce any significant local structural changes in the TSH2B nucleosome. These findings may provide important information for understanding how testis-specific histone variants form nucleosomes during spermatogenesis.

  6. Chromatin stretch enhancer states drive cell-specific gene regulation and harbor human disease risk variants

    PubMed Central

    Parker, Stephen C. J.; Stitzel, Michael L.; Taylor, D. Leland; Orozco, Jose Miguel; Erdos, Michael R.; Akiyama, Jennifer A.; van Bueren, Kelly Lammerts; Chines, Peter S.; Narisu, Narisu; Black, Brian L.; Visel, Axel; Pennacchio, Len A.; Collins, Francis S.; Becker, Jesse; Benjamin, Betty; Blakesley, Robert; Bouffard, Gerry; Brooks, Shelise; Coleman, Holly; Dekhtyar, Mila; Gregory, Michael; Guan, Xiaobin; Gupta, Jyoti; Han, Joel; Hargrove, April; Johnson, Taccara; Legaspi, Richelle; Lovett, Sean; Maduro, Quino; Masiello, Cathy; Maskeri, Baishali; McDowell, Jenny; Montemayor, Casandra; Mullikin, James; Park, Morgan; Riebow, Nancy; Schandler, Karen; Schmidt, Brian; Sison, Christina; Stantripop, Mal; Thomas, James; Thomas, Pam; Vemulapalli, Meg; Young, Alice

    2013-01-01

    Chromatin-based functional genomic analyses and genomewide association studies (GWASs) together implicate enhancers as critical elements influencing gene expression and risk for common diseases. Here, we performed systematic chromatin and transcriptome profiling in human pancreatic islets. Integrated analysis of islet data with those from nine cell types identified specific and significant enrichment of type 2 diabetes and related quantitative trait GWAS variants in islet enhancers. Our integrated chromatin maps reveal that most enhancers are short (median = 0.8 kb). Each cell type also contains a substantial number of more extended (≥3 kb) enhancers. Interestingly, these stretch enhancers are often tissue-specific and overlap locus control regions, suggesting that they are important chromatin regulatory beacons. Indeed, we show that (i) tissue specificity of enhancers and nearby gene expression increase with enhancer length; (ii) neighborhoods containing stretch enhancers are enriched for important cell type–specific genes; and (iii) GWAS variants associated with traits relevant to a particular cell type are more enriched in stretch enhancers compared with short enhancers. Reporter constructs containing stretch enhancer sequences exhibited tissue-specific activity in cell culture experiments and in transgenic mice. These results suggest that stretch enhancers are critical chromatin elements for coordinating cell type–specific regulatory programs and that sequence variation in stretch enhancers affects risk of major common human diseases. PMID:24127591

  7. Chromatin stretch enhancer states drive cell-specific gene regulation and harbor human disease risk variants.

    PubMed

    Parker, Stephen C J; Stitzel, Michael L; Taylor, D Leland; Orozco, Jose Miguel; Erdos, Michael R; Akiyama, Jennifer A; van Bueren, Kelly Lammerts; Chines, Peter S; Narisu, Narisu; Black, Brian L; Visel, Axel; Pennacchio, Len A; Collins, Francis S

    2013-10-29

    Chromatin-based functional genomic analyses and genomewide association studies (GWASs) together implicate enhancers as critical elements influencing gene expression and risk for common diseases. Here, we performed systematic chromatin and transcriptome profiling in human pancreatic islets. Integrated analysis of islet data with those from nine cell types identified specific and significant enrichment of type 2 diabetes and related quantitative trait GWAS variants in islet enhancers. Our integrated chromatin maps reveal that most enhancers are short (median = 0.8 kb). Each cell type also contains a substantial number of more extended (≥ 3 kb) enhancers. Interestingly, these stretch enhancers are often tissue-specific and overlap locus control regions, suggesting that they are important chromatin regulatory beacons. Indeed, we show that (i) tissue specificity of enhancers and nearby gene expression increase with enhancer length; (ii) neighborhoods containing stretch enhancers are enriched for important cell type-specific genes; and (iii) GWAS variants associated with traits relevant to a particular cell type are more enriched in stretch enhancers compared with short enhancers. Reporter constructs containing stretch enhancer sequences exhibited tissue-specific activity in cell culture experiments and in transgenic mice. These results suggest that stretch enhancers are critical chromatin elements for coordinating cell type-specific regulatory programs and that sequence variation in stretch enhancers affects risk of major common human diseases.

  8. MSV3d: database of human MisSense Variants mapped to 3D protein structure.

    PubMed

    Luu, Tien-Dao; Rusu, Alin-Mihai; Walter, Vincent; Ripp, Raymond; Moulinier, Luc; Muller, Jean; Toursel, Thierry; Thompson, Julie D; Poch, Olivier; Nguyen, Hoan

    2012-01-01

    The elucidation of the complex relationships linking genotypic and phenotypic variations to protein structure is a major challenge in the post-genomic era. We present MSV3d (Database of human MisSense Variants mapped to 3D protein structure), a new database that contains detailed annotation of missense variants of all human proteins (20 199 proteins). The multi-level characterization includes details of the physico-chemical changes induced by amino acid modification, as well as information related to the conservation of the mutated residue and its position relative to functional features in the available or predicted 3D model. Major releases of the database are automatically generated and updated regularly in line with the dbSNP (database of Single Nucleotide Polymorphism) and SwissVar releases, by exploiting the extensive Décrypthon computational grid resources. The database (http://decrypthon.igbmc.fr/msv3d) is easily accessible through a simple web interface coupled to a powerful query engine and a standard web service. The content is completely or partially downloadable in XML or flat file formats. Database URL: http://decrypthon.igbmc.fr/msv3d.

  9. Estimating the effect of human base excision repair protein variants on the repair of oxidative DNA base damage.

    PubMed

    Sokhansanj, Bahrad A; Wilson, David M

    2006-05-01

    Epidemiologic studies have revealed a complex association between human genetic variance and cancer risk. Quantitative biological modeling based on experimental data can play a critical role in interpreting the effect of genetic variation on biochemical pathways relevant to cancer development and progression. Defects in human DNA base excision repair (BER) proteins can reduce cellular tolerance to oxidative DNA base damage caused by endogenous and exogenous sources, such as exposure to toxins and ionizing radiation. If not repaired, DNA base damage leads to cell dysfunction and mutagenesis, consequently leading to cancer, disease, and aging. Population screens have identified numerous single-nucleotide polymorphism variants in many BER proteins and some have been purified and found to exhibit mild kinetic defects. Epidemiologic studies have led to conflicting conclusions on the association between single-nucleotide polymorphism variants in BER proteins and cancer risk. Using experimental data for cellular concentration and the kinetics of normal and variant BER proteins, we apply a previously developed and tested human BER pathway model to (i) estimate the effect of mild variants on BER of abasic sites and 8-oxoguanine, a prominent oxidative DNA base modification, (ii) identify ranges of variation associated with substantial BER capacity loss, and (iii) reveal nonintuitive consequences of multiple simultaneous variants. Our findings support previous work suggesting that mild BER variants have a minimal effect on pathway capacity whereas more severe defects and simultaneous variation in several BER proteins can lead to inefficient repair and potentially deleterious consequences of cellular damage.

  10. Crystal structure of a supercharged variant of the human enteropeptidase light chain.

    PubMed

    Simeonov, Peter; Zahn, Michael; Sträter, Norbert; Zuchner, Thole

    2012-07-01

    The highly specific serine protease human enteropeptidase light chain cleaves the Asp4Lys recognition sequence and represents an interesting enzyme for biotechnological applications. The human enzyme shows 10 times faster kinetics compared to other animal sources but low solubility under low salt conditions, which hampers protein production and crystallization. Therefore, a supercharged variant (N6D/G21D/G22D/N142D/K210E/C112S) with increased solubility was used for crystallization. The structure (resolution, 1.9 Å) displays a typical α/β trypsin-like serine protease-fold. The mutations introduced for protein supercharging generate larger clusters of negative potential on both sites of the active cleft but do not affect the structural integrity of the protein.

  11. dbWGFP: a database and web server of human whole-genome single nucleotide variants and their functional predictions.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jiaxin; Wu, Mengmeng; Li, Lianshuo; Liu, Zhuo; Zeng, Wanwen; Jiang, Rui

    2016-01-01

    The recent advancement of the next generation sequencing technology has enabled the fast and low-cost detection of all genetic variants spreading across the entire human genome, making the application of whole-genome sequencing a tendency in the study of disease-causing genetic variants. Nevertheless, there still lacks a repository that collects predictions of functionally damaging effects of human genetic variants, though it has been well recognized that such predictions play a central role in the analysis of whole-genome sequencing data. To fill this gap, we developed a database named dbWGFP (a database and web server of human whole-genome single nucleotide variants and their functional predictions) that contains functional predictions and annotations of nearly 8.58 billion possible human whole-genome single nucleotide variants. Specifically, this database integrates 48 functional predictions calculated by 17 popular computational methods and 44 valuable annotations obtained from various data sources. Standalone software, user-friendly query services and free downloads of this database are available at http://bioinfo.au.tsinghua.edu.cn/dbwgfp. dbWGFP provides a valuable resource for the analysis of whole-genome sequencing, exome sequencing and SNP array data, thereby complementing existing data sources and computational resources in deciphering genetic bases of human inherited diseases.

  12. Variants of stretch-activated two-pore potassium channel TREK-1 associated with preterm labor in humans.

    PubMed

    Wu, Yi-Ying; Singer, Cherie A; Buxton, Iain L O

    2012-10-01

    Spontaneous preterm labor (PTL) is a uniquely human problem that results in preterm delivery of an underdeveloped fetus. The underlying cause remains elusive. The cost to societies in human suffering and treasure is enormous. The stretch-activated two pore potassium channel TREK-1 is up-regulated during gestation to term such that it may maintain uterine quiescence by hyperpolarizing the smooth muscle cell membrane. We have hypothesized that the human TREK-1 channel is involved in myometrial relaxation during pregnancy and that splice variants of the TREK-1 channel expressed in preterm myometrium are associated with preterm delivery by interaction with full-length TREK-1. We detected three wild-type human TREK-1 transcript isoforms in nonpregnant and pregnant human myometrium. Using RT-PCR, we identified five unique TREK-1 splice variants in myometrium from women in PTL. These myometrial TREK-1 variants lack either the pore or the transmembrane domains or both. In transiently transfected HEK293T cells, wild-type TREK-1 was predominantly expressed at the plasma membrane. However, individual splice variants were expressed uniformly throughout the cell. Wild-type TREK-1 was localized at the plasma membrane and cytoplasm close to the plasma membrane when coexpressed with each splice variant. Co-immunoprecipitation of FLAG epitope-tagged TREK-1 and six-His epitope-tagged splice variants using Ni bead columns successfully pulled down wild-type TREK-1. These results suggest that each of four TREK-1 splice variants interacts with full-length wild-type TREK-1 and that in vivo, such interactions may contribute to a PTL phenotype.

  13. NF-κB and Androgen Receptor Variant Expression Correlate with Human BPH progression

    PubMed Central

    Austin, David C; Strand, Douglas W; Love, Harold L; Franco, Omar E; Jang, Alex; Grabowska, Magdalena M; Miller, Nicole L; Hameed, Omar; Clark, Peter E; Fowke, Jay H; Matusik, Robert J; Jin, Ren J; Hayward, Simon W

    2016-01-01

    Background Benign prostatic hyperplasia (BPH) is a common, chronic progressive disease. Inflammation is associated with prostatic enlargement and resistance to 5α-reductase inhibitor (5ARI) therapy. Activation of the nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) pathway is linked to both inflammation and ligand-independent prostate cancer progression. Methods NF-κB activation and androgen receptor variant (AR-V) expression were quantified in transition zone tissue samples from patients with a wide range of AUASS from incidental BPH in patients treated for low grade, localized peripheral zone prostate cancer to advanced disease requiring surgical intervention. To further investigate these pathways, human prostatic stromal and epithelial cell lines were transduced with constitutively active or kinase dead forms of IKK2 to regulate canonical NF-κB activity. The effects on AR full length (AR-FL) and androgen-independent AR-V expression as well as cellular growth and differentiation were assessed. Results Canonical NF-κB signaling was found to be upregulated in late versus early stage BPH, and to be strongly associated with non-insulin dependent diabetes mellitus. Elevated expression of AR-variant 7 (AR-V7), but not other AR variants, was found in advanced BPH samples. Expression of AR-V7 significantly correlated with the patient AUASS and TRUS volume. Forced activation of canonical NF-κB in human prostatic epithelial and stromal cells resulted in elevated expression of both AR-FL and AR-V7, with concomitant ligand-independent activation of AR reporters. Activation of NF-κB and over expression of AR-V7 in human prostatic epithelial cells maintained cell viability in the face of 5ARI treatment. Conclusion Activation of NF-κB and AR-V7 in the prostate is associated with increased disease severity. AR-V7 expression is inducible in human prostate cells by forced activation of NF-κB resulting in resistance to 5ARI treatment, suggesting a potential mechanism by which patients may

  14. Characterization of a novel splice variant of δ ENaC subunit in human lungs

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Run-Zhen; Nie, Hong-Guang; Su, Xue-Feng; Han, Dong-Yun; Lee, Andrew; Huang, Yao; Chang, Yongchang; Matalon, Sadis

    2012-01-01

    Salt absorption via apical epithelial sodium channels (ENaC) is a critical rate-limiting process in maintaining airway and lung lining fluid at the physiological level. δ ENaC (termed δ1 in this article) has been detected in human lung epithelial cells in addition to α, β, and γ subunits (Ji HL, Su XF, Kedar S, Li J, Barbry P, Smith PR, Matalon S, Benos DJ. J Biol Chem 281: 8233–8241, 2006; Nie HG, Chen L, Han DY, Li J, Song WF, Wei SP, Fang XH, Gu X, Matalon S, Ji HL, J Physiol 587: 2663–2676, 2009) and may contribute to the differences in the biophysical properties of amiloride-inhibitable cation channels in pulmonary epithelial cells. Here we cloned a splicing variant of the δ1 ENaC, namely, δ2 ENaC in human bronchoalveolar epithelial cells (16HBEo). δ2 ENaC possesses 66 extra amino acids attached to the distal amino terminal tail of the δ1 ENaC. δ2 ENaC was expressed in both alveolar type I and II cells of human lungs as revealed by in situ hybridization and real-time RT-PCR. To characterize the biophysical and pharmacological features of the splicing variant, we injected Xenopus oocytes with human ENaC cRNAs and measured whole cell and single channel currents of δ1βγ, δ2βγ, and αβγ channels. Oocytes injected with δ2βγ cRNAs exhibited whole cell currents significantly greater than those expressing δ1βγ and αβγ channels. Single channel activity, unitary conductance, and open probability of δ2βγ channels were significantly greater compared with δ1βγ and αβγ channels. In addition, δ2βγ and δ1βγ channels displayed significant differences in apparent Na+ affinity, dissociation constant for amiloride (Kiamil), the EC50 for capsazepine activation, and gating kinetics by protons. Channels comprising of this novel splice variant may contribute to the diversities of native epithelial Na+ channels. PMID:22505667

  15. Increased Risk of Lung Cancer Associated with a Functionally Impaired Polymorphic Variant of the Human DNA Glycosylase NEIL2

    PubMed Central

    Dey, Sanjib; Maiti, Amit K; Hegde, Muralidhar L; Hegde, Pavana M; Boldogh, Istvan; Sarkar, Partha S; Abdel-Rahman, Sherif Z; Sarker, Altaf H.; Hang, Bo; Xie, Jingwu; Tomkinson, Alan E; Zhou, Mian; Shen, Binghui; Wang, Guanghai; Wu, Chen; Yu, Dianke; Lin, Dongxin; Cardenas, Victor; Hazra, Tapas K

    2012-01-01

    Human NEIL2, one of five oxidized base-specific DNA glycosylases, is unique in preferentially repairing oxidative damage in transcribed genes. Here we show that depletion of NEIL2 causes a 6- to 7-fold increase in spontaneous mutation frequency in the HPRT gene of the V79 Chinese hamster lung cell line. This prompted us to screen for NEIL2 variants in lung cancer patients’ genomic DNA. We identified several polymorphic variants, among which R103Q and R257L were frequently observed in lung cancer patients. We then characterized these variants biochemically, and observed a modest decrease in DNA glycosylase activity relative to the wild type (WT) only with the R257L mutant protein. However, in reconstituted repair assays containing WT NEIL2 or its R257L and R103Q variants together with other DNA base excision repair (BER) proteins (PNKP, Polβ, Lig IIIα and XRCC1) or using NEIL2-FLAG immunocomplexes, an ~ 5-fold decrease in repair was observed with the R257L variant compared to WT or R103Q NEIL2, apparently due to the R257L mutant’s lower affinity for other repair proteins, particularly Polβ. Notably, increased endogenous DNA damage was observed in NEIL2 variant (R257L)-expressing cells relative to WT cells. Taken together, our results suggest that the decreased DNA repair capacity of the R257L variant can induce mutations that lead to lung cancer development. PMID:22497777

  16. Modeling recent human evolution in mice by expression of a selected EDAR variant

    PubMed Central

    Kamberov, Yana G.; Wang, Sijia; Tan, Jingze; Gerbault, Pascale; Wark, Abigail; Tan, Longzhi; Yang, Yajun; Li, Shilin; Tang, Kun; Chen, Hua; Powell, Adam; Itan, Yuval; Fuller, Dorian; Lohmueller, Jason; Mao, Junhao; Schachar, Asa; Paymer, Madeline; Hostetter, Elizabeth; Byrne, Elizabeth; Burnett, Melissa; McMahon, Andrew P.; Thomas, Mark G.; Lieberman, Daniel E.; Jin, Li; Tabin, Clifford J.; Morgan, Bruce A.; Sabeti, Pardis C.

    2013-01-01

    Summary An adaptive variant of the human Ectodysplasin receptor, EDARV370A, is one of the strongest candidates of recent positive selection from genome-wide scans. We have modeled EDAR370A in mice and characterized its phenotype and evolutionary origins in humans. Our computational analysis suggests the allele arose in Central China approximately 30,000 years ago. Although EDAR370A has been associated with increased scalp hair thickness and changed tooth morphology in humans, its direct biological significance and potential adaptive role remain unclear. We generated a knock-in mouse model and find that, as in humans, hair thickness is increased in EDAR370A mice. We identify novel biological targets affected by the mutation, including mammary and eccrine glands. Building on these results, we find that EDAR370A is associated with an increased number of active eccrine glands in the Han Chinese. This interdisciplinary approach yields unique insight into the generation of adaptive variation among modern humans. PMID:23415220

  17. Evidence for differences in the binding of drugs to the two main genetic variants of human alpha 1-acid glycoprotein.

    PubMed Central

    Herve, F; Gomas, E; Duche, J C; Tillement, J P

    1993-01-01

    1. Human alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (AAG), a plasma transport protein, has three main genetic variants. F1. S and A. Native commercial AAG (a mixture of almost equal proportions of these three variants) has been separated by chromatography into variants which correspond to the proteins of the two genes which code for AAG in humans: the A variant and a mixture of the F1 and S variants (60% F1 and 40% S). Their binding properties towards imipramine, warfarin and mifepristone were studied by equilibrium dialysis. 2. The F1S variant mixture strongly bound warfarin and mifepristone with an affinity of 1.89 and 2.06 x 10(6) l mol-1, respectively, but had a low affinity for imipramine. Conversely, the A variant strongly bound imipramine with an affinity of 0.98 x 10(6) l mol-1. The low degree of binding of warfarin and mifepristone to the A variant sample was explained by the presence of protein contaminants in this sample. These results indicate specific drug transport roles for each variant, with respect to its separate genetic origin. 3. Control binding experiments performed with (unfractionated) commercial AAG and with AAG isolated from individuals with either the F1/A or S/A phenotypes, agreed with these findings. The results for the binding of warfarin and mifepristone by the AAG samples were similar to those obtained with the F1S mixture: the mean high-affinity association constant of the AAG samples for each drug was of the same order as that of the F1S mixture: the decrease in the number of binding sites of the AAG samples, as compared with the F1S mixture, was explained by the smaller proportion of variants F1 and/or S in these samples. Conversely, results of the imipramine binding study with the AAG samples concurred with those for the binding of this basic drug by the A variant, with respect to the proportion of the A variant in these samples. Images Figure 1 PMID:9114911

  18. Evidence for differences in the binding of drugs to the two main genetic variants of human alpha 1-acid glycoprotein.

    PubMed

    Herve, F; Gomas, E; Duche, J C; Tillement, J P

    1993-09-01

    1. Human alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (AAG), a plasma transport protein, has three main genetic variants. F1. S and A. Native commercial AAG (a mixture of almost equal proportions of these three variants) has been separated by chromatography into variants which correspond to the proteins of the two genes which code for AAG in humans: the A variant and a mixture of the F1 and S variants (60% F1 and 40% S). Their binding properties towards imipramine, warfarin and mifepristone were studied by equilibrium dialysis. 2. The F1S variant mixture strongly bound warfarin and mifepristone with an affinity of 1.89 and 2.06 x 10(6) l mol-1, respectively, but had a low affinity for imipramine. Conversely, the A variant strongly bound imipramine with an affinity of 0.98 x 10(6) l mol-1. The low degree of binding of warfarin and mifepristone to the A variant sample was explained by the presence of protein contaminants in this sample. These results indicate specific drug transport roles for each variant, with respect to its separate genetic origin. 3. Control binding experiments performed with (unfractionated) commercial AAG and with AAG isolated from individuals with either the F1/A or S/A phenotypes, agreed with these findings. The results for the binding of warfarin and mifepristone by the AAG samples were similar to those obtained with the F1S mixture: the mean high-affinity association constant of the AAG samples for each drug was of the same order as that of the F1S mixture: the decrease in the number of binding sites of the AAG samples, as compared with the F1S mixture, was explained by the smaller proportion of variants F1 and/or S in these samples. Conversely, results of the imipramine binding study with the AAG samples concurred with those for the binding of this basic drug by the A variant, with respect to the proportion of the A variant in these samples.

  19. Recognition of influenza H3N2 variant virus by human neutralizing antibodies

    PubMed Central

    Bangaru, Sandhya; Nieusma, Travis; Kose, Nurgun; Thornburg, Natalie J.; Kaplan, Bryan S.; King, Hannah G.; Singh, Vidisha; Lampley, Rebecca M.; Cisneros, Alberto; Edwards, Kathryn M.; Edupuganti, Srilatha; Lai, Lilin; Richt, Juergen A.; Webby, Richard J.; Ward, Andrew B.; Crowe, James E.

    2016-01-01

    Since 2011, over 300 human cases of infection, especially in exposed children, with the influenza A H3N2 variant (H3N2v) virus that circulates in swine in the US have been reported. The structural and genetic basis for the lack of protection against H3N2v induced by vaccines containing seasonal H3N2 antigens is poorly understood. We isolated 17 human monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) that neutralized H3N2v virus from subjects experimentally immunized with an H3N2v candidate vaccine. Six mAbs exhibited very potent neutralizing activity (IC50 < 200 ng/ml) against the H3N2v virus but not against current human H3N2 circulating strains. Fine epitope mapping and structural characterization of antigen-antibody complexes revealed that H3N2v specificity was attributable to amino acid polymorphisms in the 150-loop and the 190-helix antigenic sites on the hemagglutinin protein. H3N2v-specific antibodies also neutralized human H3N2 influenza strains naturally circulating between 1995 and 2005. These results reveal a high level of antigenic relatedness between the swine H3N2v virus and previously circulating human strains, consistent with the fact that early human H3 seasonal strains entered the porcine population in the 1990s and reentered the human population, where they had not been circulating, as H3N2v about a decade later. The data also explain the increased susceptibility to H3N2v viruses in young children, who lack prior exposure to human seasonal strains from the 1990s. PMID:27482543

  20. Genetic variants influencing effectiveness of exercise training programmes in obesity – an overview of human studies

    PubMed Central

    Ahmetov, II; Zmijewski, P

    2016-01-01

    Frequent and regular physical activity has significant benefits for health, including improvement of body composition and help in weight control. Consequently, promoting training programmes, particularly in those who are genetically predisposed, is a significant step towards controlling the presently increasing epidemic of obesity. Although the physiological responses of the human body to exercise are quite well described, the genetic background of these reactions still remains mostly unknown. This review not only summarizes the current evidence, through a literature review and the results of our studies on the influence of gene variants on the characteristics and range of the body's adaptive response to training, but also explores research organization problems, future trends, and possibilities. We describe the most reliable candidate genetic markers that are involved in energy balance pathways and body composition changes in response to training programmes, such as FTO, MC4R, ACE, PPARG, LEP, LEPR, ADRB2, and ADRB3. This knowledge can have an enormous impact not only on individualization of exercise programmes to make them more efficient and safer, but also on improved recovery, traumatology, medical care, diet, supplementation and many other areas. Nevertheless, the current studies still represent only the first steps towards a better understanding of the genetic factors that influence obesity-related traits, as well as gene variant x physical activity interactions, so further research is necessary. PMID:27601774

  1. Structure-function relationships of brazzein variants with altered interactions with the human sweet taste receptor.

    PubMed

    Singarapu, Kiran K; Tonelli, Marco; Markley, John L; Assadi-Porter, Fariba M

    2016-03-01

    Brazzein (Brz) is a small (54 amino acid residue) sweet tasting protein with physical and taste properties superior to other non-carbohydrate sweeteners. In an investigation of sequence-dependent functional properties of the protein, we used NMR spectroscopy to determine the three-dimensional structures and dynamic properties of two Brz variants: one with a single-site substitution (D40K), which is three-fold sweeter than wild-type Brz, and one with a two-residue insertion between residues 18 and 19 (ins18 RI19 ), which is devoid of sweetness. Although the three-dimensional folds of the two variants were very similar to wild-type Brz, they exhibited local conformational and dynamic differences. The D40K substitution abolished the strong inter-stand H-bond between the side chains of residues Gln46 and Asp40 present in wild-type Brz and increased the flexibility of the protein especially at the mutation site. This increased flexibility presumably allows this site to interact more strongly with the G-protein coupled human sweet receptor. On the other hand, the Arg-Ile insertion within Loop9-19 leads to distortion of this loop and stiffening of the adjacent site whose flexibility appears to be required for productive interaction with the sweet receptor.

  2. Identification of common variants associated with human hippocampal and intracranial volumes.

    PubMed

    Stein, Jason L; Medland, Sarah E; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Hibar, Derrek P; Senstad, Rudy E; Winkler, Anderson M; Toro, Roberto; Appel, Katja; Bartecek, Richard; Bergmann, Ørjan; Bernard, Manon; Brown, Andrew A; Cannon, Dara M; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Christoforou, Andrea; Domin, Martin; Grimm, Oliver; Hollinshead, Marisa; Holmes, Avram J; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Langan, Camilla; Lopez, Lorna M; Hansell, Narelle K; Hwang, Kristy S; Kim, Sungeun; Laje, Gonzalo; Lee, Phil H; Liu, Xinmin; Loth, Eva; Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Mattingsdal, Morten; Mohnke, Sebastian; Maniega, Susana Muñoz; Nho, Kwangsik; Nugent, Allison C; O'Brien, Carol; Papmeyer, Martina; Pütz, Benno; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Rasmussen, Jerod; Rijpkema, Mark; Risacher, Shannon L; Roddey, J Cooper; Rose, Emma J; Ryten, Mina; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Strengman, Eric; Teumer, Alexander; Trabzuni, Daniah; Turner, Jessica; van Eijk, Kristel; van Erp, Theo G M; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Wittfeld, Katharina; Wolf, Christiane; Woudstra, Saskia; Aleman, Andre; Alhusaini, Saud; Almasy, Laura; Binder, Elisabeth B; Brohawn, David G; Cantor, Rita M; Carless, Melanie A; Corvin, Aiden; Czisch, Michael; Curran, Joanne E; Davies, Gail; de Almeida, Marcio A A; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D; Erk, Susanne; Fagerness, Jesen; Fox, Peter T; Freimer, Nelson B; Gill, Michael; Göring, Harald H H; Hagler, Donald J; Hoehn, David; Holsboer, Florian; Hoogman, Martine; Hosten, Norbert; Jahanshad, Neda; Johnson, Matthew P; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Kent, Jack W; Kochunov, Peter; Lancaster, Jack L; Lawrie, Stephen M; Liewald, David C; Mandl, René; Matarin, Mar; Mattheisen, Manuel; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Moses, Eric K; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Nauck, Matthias; Nöthen, Markus M; Olvera, Rene L; Pandolfo, Massimo; Pike, G Bruce; Puls, Ralf; Reinvang, Ivar; Rentería, Miguel E; Rietschel, Marcella; Roffman, Joshua L; Royle, Natalie A; Rujescu, Dan; Savitz, Jonathan; Schnack, Hugo G; Schnell, Knut; Seiferth, Nina; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M; Valdés Hernández, Maria C; Van den Heuvel, Martijn; van der Wee, Nic J; Van Haren, Neeltje E M; Veltman, Joris A; Völzke, Henry; Walker, Robert; Westlye, Lars T; Whelan, Christopher D; Agartz, Ingrid; Boomsma, Dorret I; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Dale, Anders M; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C; Hagoort, Peter; Hall, Jeremy; Heinz, Andreas; Jack, Clifford R; Foroud, Tatiana M; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Macciardi, Fabio; Montgomery, Grant W; Poline, Jean Baptiste; Porteous, David J; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Starr, John M; Sussmann, Jessika; Toga, Arthur W; Veltman, Dick J; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W; Bis, Joshua C; Ikram, M Arfan; Smith, Albert V; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Tzourio, Christophe; Vernooij, Meike W; Launer, Lenore J; DeCarli, Charles; Seshadri, Sudha; Andreassen, Ole A; Apostolova, Liana G; Bastin, Mark E; Blangero, John; Brunner, Han G; Buckner, Randy L; Cichon, Sven; Coppola, Giovanni; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Deary, Ian J; Donohoe, Gary; de Geus, Eco J C; Espeseth, Thomas; Fernández, Guillén; Glahn, David C; Grabe, Hans J; Hardy, John; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Jenkinson, Mark; Kahn, René S; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; McMahon, Francis J; McMahon, Katie L; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Morris, Derek W; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nichols, Thomas E; Ophoff, Roel A; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Penninx, Brenda W; Potkin, Steven G; Sämann, Philipp G; Saykin, Andrew J; Schumann, Gunter; Smoller, Jordan W; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Weale, Michael E; Martin, Nicholas G; Franke, Barbara; Wright, Margaret J; Thompson, Paul M

    2012-04-15

    Identifying genetic variants influencing human brain structures may reveal new biological mechanisms underlying cognition and neuropsychiatric illness. The volume of the hippocampus is a biomarker of incipient Alzheimer's disease and is reduced in schizophrenia, major depression and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Whereas many brain imaging phenotypes are highly heritable, identifying and replicating genetic influences has been difficult, as small effects and the high costs of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have led to underpowered studies. Here we report genome-wide association meta-analyses and replication for mean bilateral hippocampal, total brain and intracranial volumes from a large multinational consortium. The intergenic variant rs7294919 was associated with hippocampal volume (12q24.22; N = 21,151; P = 6.70 × 10(-16)) and the expression levels of the positional candidate gene TESC in brain tissue. Additionally, rs10784502, located within HMGA2, was associated with intracranial volume (12q14.3; N = 15,782; P = 1.12 × 10(-12)). We also identified a suggestive association with total brain volume at rs10494373 within DDR2 (1q23.3; N = 6,500; P = 5.81 × 10(-7)).

  3. Analysis of Sequence Variation and Risk Association of Human Papillomavirus 52 Variants Circulating in Korea

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Youn Jin; Ki, Eun Young; Zhang, Chuqing; Ho, Wendy C. S.; Lee, Sung-Jong; Jeong, Min Jin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Human papillomavirus (HPV) 52 is a carcinogenic, high-risk genotype frequently detected in cervical cancer cases from East Asia, including Korea. Materials and Methods Sequences of HPV52 detected in 91 cervical samples collected from women attending Seoul St. Mary’s Hospital were analyzed. HPV52 genomic sequences were obtained by polymerase chain reaction (PCR)-based sequencing and analyzed using Seq-Scape software, and phylogenetic trees were constructed using MEGA6 software. Results Of the 91 cervical samples, 40 were normal, 22 were low-grade lesions, 21 were high-grade lesions and 7 were squamous cell carcinomas. Four HPV52 variant lineages (A, B, C and D) were identified. Lineage B was the most frequently detected lineage, followed by lineage C. By analyzing the two most frequently detected lineages (B and C), we found that distinct variations existed in each lineage. We also found that a lineage B-specific mutation K93R (A379G) was associated with an increased risk of cervical neoplasia. Conclusions To our knowledge, we are the first to reveal the predominance of the HPV52 lineages, B and C, in Korea. We also found these lineages harbored distinct genetic alterations that may affect oncogenicity. Our findings increase our understanding on the heterogeneity of HPV52 variants, and may be useful for the development of new diagnostic assays and therapeutic vaccines. PMID:27977741

  4. Identification and characterization of a human smad3 splicing variant lacking part of the linker region.

    PubMed

    Kjellman, Christian; Honeth, Gabriella; Järnum, Sofia; Lindvall, Magnus; Darabi, Anna; Nilsson, Ingar; Edvardsen, Klaus; Salford, Leif G; Widegren, Bengt

    2004-03-03

    Smad3 is one of the signal transducers that are activated in response to transforming growth factor-beta (TGF-beta). We have identified and characterized a splicing variant of smad3. The splicing variant (smad3-Delta3) lacks exon 3 resulting in a truncated linker region. We could detect mRNA expression of smad3-Delta3 in all investigated human tissues. Real-time PCR analyses demonstrated that the fraction of smad3-Delta3 mRNA compared to normal smad3 varies between tissues. The amount of spliced mRNA was estimated to represent 0.5-5% of the normal smad3 mRNA. When smad3-Delta3 is overexpressed in a fibrosarcoma cell line, the Smad3-Delta3 is translocated to the nucleus upon TGF-beta stimulation and binds the Smad responsive element. Using a CAGA luciferase reporter system, we demonstrate that Smad3-Delta3 has transcriptional activity and we conclude that Smad3-Delta3 possesses functional transactivating properties.

  5. Isoform/variant mRNAs for sex steroid hormone receptors in humans.

    PubMed

    Hirata, Shuji; Shoda, Tomoko; Kato, Junzo; Hoshi, Kazuhiko

    2003-04-01

    The open reading frames of human sex steroid hormone receptors (hSSHRs) are composed of eight exons. In addition, the presence of various exons - including 5'-untranslated exons, alternative coding exons and novel 'intronic' exons - has been demonstrated in the genes encoding hSSHRs. The isoform/variant hSSHR mRNAs generated from thes e exons can be tentatively classified into seven types. In type 1, different mRNAs are generated with the use of alternative transcription start sites. In type 2, one or more exons are skipped. In type 3, one or more exons are duplicated. In type 4, distinct mRNAs containing different 5'-untranslated exon(s) are synthesized. In type 5, distinct mRNAs possessing different coding exon(s) are generated. In type 6, mRNA is synthesized by intronic exons and coding exons 4/5-8. In type 7, mRNA with insertion of intronic exon(s) is generated. Here, we review the isoform/variant hSSHR mRNAs and the structure of the genes encoding them.

  6. Identification of common variants associated with human hippocampal and intracranial volumes

    PubMed Central

    Stein, Jason L; Medland, Sarah E; Vasquez, Alejandro Arias; Hibar, Derrek P; Senstad, Rudy E; Winkler, Anderson M; Toro, Roberto; Appel, Katja; Bartecek, Richard; Bergmann, Ørjan; Bernard, Manon; Brown, Andrew A; Cannon, Dara M; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Christoforou, Andrea; Domin, Martin; Grimm, Oliver; Hollinshead, Marisa; Holmes, Avram J; Homuth, Georg; Hottenga, Jouke-Jan; Langan, Camilla; Lopez, Lorna M; Hansell, Narelle K; Hwang, Kristy S; Kim, Sungeun; Laje, Gonzalo; Lee, Phil H; Liu, Xinmin; Loth, Eva; Lourdusamy, Anbarasu; Mattingsdal, Morten; Mohnke, Sebastian; Maniega, Susana Muñoz; Nho, Kwangsik; Nugent, Allison C; O’Brien, Carol; Papmeyer, Martina; Pütz, Benno; Ramasamy, Adaikalavan; Rasmussen, Jerod; Rijpkema, Mark; Risacher, Shannon L; Roddey, J Cooper; Rose, Emma J; Ryten, Mina; Shen, Li; Sprooten, Emma; Strengman, Eric; Teumer, Alexander; Trabzuni, Daniah; Turner, Jessica; van Eijk, Kristel; van Erp, Theo G M; van Tol, Marie-Jose; Wittfeld, Katharina; Wolf, Christiane; Woudstra, Saskia; Aleman, Andre; Alhusaini, Saud; Almasy, Laura; Binder, Elisabeth B; Brohawn, David G; Cantor, Rita M; Carless, Melanie A; Corvin, Aiden; Czisch, Michael; Curran, Joanne E; Davies, Gail; de Almeida, Marcio A A; Delanty, Norman; Depondt, Chantal; Duggirala, Ravi; Dyer, Thomas D; Erk, Susanne; Fagerness, Jesen; Fox, Peter T; Freimer, Nelson B; Gill, Michael; Göring, Harald H H; Hagler, Donald J; Hoehn, David; Holsboer, Florian; Hoogman, Martine; Hosten, Norbert; Jahanshad, Neda; Johnson, Matthew P; Kasperaviciute, Dalia; Kent, Jack W; Kochunov, Peter; Lancaster, Jack L; Lawrie, Stephen M; Liewald, David C; Mandl, René; Matarin, Mar; Mattheisen, Manuel; Meisenzahl, Eva; Melle, Ingrid; Moses, Eric K; Mühleisen, Thomas W; Nauck, Matthias; Nöthen, Markus M; Olvera, Rene L; Pandolfo, Massimo; Pike, G Bruce; Puls, Ralf; Reinvang, Ivar; Rentería, Miguel E; Rietschel, Marcella; Roffman, Joshua L; Royle, Natalie A; Rujescu, Dan; Savitz, Jonathan; Schnack, Hugo G; Schnell, Knut; Seiferth, Nina; Smith, Colin; Steen, Vidar M; Valdés Hernández, Maria C; Van den Heuvel, Martijn; van der Wee, Nic J; Van Haren, Neeltje E M; Veltman, Joris A; Völzke, Henry; Walker, Robert; Westlye, Lars T; Whelan, Christopher D; Agartz, Ingrid; Boomsma, Dorret I; Cavalleri, Gianpiero L; Dale, Anders M; Djurovic, Srdjan; Drevets, Wayne C; Hagoort, Peter; Hall, Jeremy; Heinz, Andreas; Jack, Clifford R; Foroud, Tatiana M; Le Hellard, Stephanie; Macciardi, Fabio; Montgomery, Grant W; Poline, Jean Baptiste; Porteous, David J; Sisodiya, Sanjay M; Starr, John M; Sussmann, Jessika; Toga, Arthur W; Veltman, Dick J; Walter, Henrik; Weiner, Michael W; Bis, Joshua C; Ikram, M Arfan; Smith, Albert V; Gudnason, Vilmundur; Tzourio, Christophe; Vernooij, Meike W; Launer, Lenore J; DeCarli, Charles; Seshadri, Sudha; Andreassen, Ole A; Apostolova, Liana G; Bastin, Mark E; Blangero, John; Brunner, Han G; Buckner, Randy L; Cichon, Sven; Coppola, Giovanni; de Zubicaray, Greig I; Deary, Ian J; Donohoe, Gary; de Geus, Eco J C; Espeseth, Thomas; Fernández, Guillén; Glahn, David C; Grabe, Hans J; Hardy, John; Hulshoff Pol, Hilleke E; Jenkinson, Mark; Kahn, René S; McDonald, Colm; McIntosh, Andrew M; McMahon, Francis J; McMahon, Katie L; Meyer-Lindenberg, Andreas; Morris, Derek W; Müller-Myhsok, Bertram; Nichols, Thomas E; Ophoff, Roel A; Paus, Tomas; Pausova, Zdenka; Penninx, Brenda W; Potkin, Steven G; Sämann, Philipp G; Saykin, Andrew J; Schumann, Gunter; Smoller, Jordan W; Wardlaw, Joanna M; Weale, Michael E; Martin, Nicholas G; Franke, Barbara; Wright, Margaret J; Thompson, Paul M

    2013-01-01

    Identifying genetic variants influencing human brain structures may reveal new biological mechanisms underlying cognition and neuropsychiatric illness. The volume of the hippocampus is a biomarker of incipient Alzheimer’s disease1,2 and is reduced in schizophrenia3, major depression4 and mesial temporal lobe epilepsy5. Whereas many brain imaging phenotypes are highly heritable6,7, identifying and replicating genetic influences has been difficult, as small effects and the high costs of magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) have led to underpowered studies. Here we report genome-wide association meta-analyses and replication for mean bilateral hippocampal, total brain and intracranial volumes from a large multinational consortium. The intergenic variant rs7294919 was associated with hippocampal volume (12q24.22; N = 21,151; P = 6.70 × 10−16) and the expression levels of the positional candidate gene TESC in brain tissue. Additionally, rs10784502, located within HMGA2, was associated with intracranial volume (12q14.3; N = 15,782; P = 1.12 × 10−12). We also identified a suggestive association with total brain volume at rs10494373 within DDR2 (1q23.3; N = 6,500; P = 5.81 × 10−7). PMID:22504417

  7. Human 5–HT4 and 5–HT7 Receptor Splice Variants: Are they Important?

    PubMed Central

    Coupar, Ian M; Desmond, Paul V; Irving, Helen R

    2007-01-01

    G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs), which are encoded by >300 genes in the human genome, are by far the largest class of targets for modern drugs. These macromolecules display inherent adaptability of function, which is partly due to the production of different forms of the receptor protein. These are commonly called ‘isoforms’ or ‘splice variants’ denoting the molecular process of their production/assembly. Not all GPCRs are expressed as splice variants, but certain subclasses of 5–HT receptors are for example, the 5–HT4 and 5–HT7 receptors. There are at least 11 human 5–HT4 and three h5–HT7 receptor splice variants. This review describestheir discoveries, nomenclature and structures. The discovery that particular splice variants are tissue specific (or prominent) has highlighted their potential as future drug targets. In particular, this review examines the functional relevance of different 5–HT4 and 5–HT7 receptor splice variants. Examples are given to illustrate that splice variants have differential modulatory influences on signalling processes. Differences in agonist potency and efficacies and also differences in desensitisation rates to 5–HT occur with both 5–HT4 and 5–HT7 receptor splice variants. The known and candidate signalling systems that allow for splice variant specific responses include GPCR interacting proteins (GIPs) and GPCR receptor kinases (GRKs) which are examined.Finally, the relevance of 5–HT receptor splice variants to clinical medicine and to the pharmaceutical industry is discussed. PMID:19305739

  8. A mouse model for a partially inactive obesity-associated human MC3R variant

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Bonggi; Koo, Jashin; Yun Jun, Joo; Gavrilova, Oksana; Lee, Yongjun; Seo, Arnold Y.; Taylor-Douglas, Dezmond C.; Adler-Wailes, Diane C.; Chen, Faye; Gardner, Ryan; Koutzoumis, Dimitri; Sherafat Kazemzadeh, Roya; Roberson, Robin B.; Yanovski, Jack A.

    2016-01-01

    We previously reported children homozygous for two MC3R sequence variants (C17A+G241A) have greater fat mass than controls. Here we show, using homozygous knock-in mouse models in which we replace murine Mc3r with wild-type human (MC3RhWT/hWT) and double-mutant (C17A+G241A) human (MC3RhDM/hDM) MC3R, that MC3RhDM/hDM have greater weight and fat mass, increased energy intake and feeding efficiency, but reduced length and fat-free mass compared with MC3RhWT/hWT. MC3RhDM/hDM mice do not have increased adipose tissue inflammatory cell infiltration or greater expression of inflammatory markers despite their greater fat mass. Serum adiponectin levels are increased in MC3RhDM/hDM mice and MC3RhDM/hDM human subjects. MC3RhDM/hDM bone- and adipose tissue-derived mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) differentiate into adipocytes that accumulate more triglyceride than MC3RhWT/hWT MSCs. MC3RhDM/hDM impacts nutrient partitioning to generate increased adipose tissue that appears metabolically healthy. These data confirm the importance of MC3R signalling in human metabolism and suggest a previously-unrecognized role for the MC3R in adipose tissue development. PMID:26818770

  9. Transmissibility of Variant Influenza From Swine to Humans: A Modeling Approach

    PubMed Central

    Wong, Karen K.; Gambhir, Manoj; Finelli, Lyn; Swerdlow, David L.; Ostroff, Stephen; Reed, Carrie

    2015-01-01

    Background Respiratory illness was reported among humans and swine at an agricultural fair in 2011; 3 human infections with an influenza A(H3N2) variant (H3N2v) virus were confirmed. Using epidemiologic investigation data, we sought to estimate H3N2v transmissibility from swine to humans. Methods We developed a model of H3N2v transmission among swine and humans and fit it to data from a cohort of 100 agricultural club members reporting swine contact to estimate transmissibility. A sensitivity analysis was performed varying H3N2v prevalence in the club cohort. Using the best-fit transmission probability, we simulated the number of swine-acquired infections among all fair attendees. Results We estimated the best-fit probability of swine-to-human H3N2v transmission per minute of swine contact. Applying this probability to 14 910 people with swine contact at the fair, we estimate that there were 80 (95% confidence interval [CI], 40–133) H3N2v infections among persons aged <20 years and 58 (95% CI, 29–96) H3N2v infections among person aged ≥20 years. Conclusions Using early data from investigation of a new virus with unclear transmission properties, we estimated the transmissibility of H3N2v from swine to humans and the burden of H3N2v among fair attendees. Although the risk of H3N2v virus infection is small for fair attendees with minimal swine contact, large populations attend agricultural events each year, and human cases will likely occur when infected swine are present. PMID:23794727

  10. The Asian-American E6 variant protein of human papillomavirus 16 alone is sufficient to promote immortalization, transformation, and migration of primary human foreskin keratinocytes.

    PubMed

    Niccoli, Sarah; Abraham, Suraj; Richard, Christina; Zehbe, Ingeborg

    2012-11-01

    We examined how well the human papillomavirus (HPV) E6 oncogene can function in the absence of the E7 oncogene during the carcinogenic process in human keratinocytes using a common HPV variant strongly associated with cervical cancer: the Asian-American E6 variant (AAE6). This E6 variant is 20 times more frequently detected in cervical cancer than the prototype European E6 variant, as evidenced by independent epidemiological data. Using cell culture and cell-based functional assays, we assessed how this variant can perform crucial carcinogenesis steps compared to the prototype E6 variant. The ability to immortalize and transform primary human foreskin keratinocytes (PHFKs) to acquire resilient phenotypes and the ability to promote cell migration were evaluated. The immortalization capability was assayed based on population doublings, number of passages, surpassing mortality stages 1 and 2, human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) expression, and the ability to overcome G(1) arrest via p53 degradation. Transformation and migration efficiency were analyzed using a combination of functional cell-based assays. We observed that either AAE6 or prototype E6 proteins alone were sufficient to immortalize PHFKs, although AAE6 was more potent in doing so. The AAE6 variant protein alone pushed PHFKs through transformation and significantly increased their migration ability over that of the E6 prototype. Our findings are in line with epidemiological data that the AA variant of HPV16 confers an increased risk over the European prototype for cervical cancer, as evidenced by a superior immortalization, transformation, and metastatic potential.

  11. Determination of genetic transferrin variants in human serum by high-resolution capillary zone electrophoresis(†).

    PubMed

    Caslavska, Jitka; Joneli, Jeannine; Wanzenried, Ursula; Schiess, Jeannette; Lanz, Christian; Thormann, Wolfgang

    2014-07-01

    High-resolution capillary zone electrophoresis in the routine arena with stringent quality assurance is employed for the determination of carbohydrate-deficient transferrin in human serum. The assay comprises mixing of human serum with a Fe(III) -containing solution prior to analysis of the iron-saturated mixture in a dynamically double-coated capillary using a commercial buffer at alkaline pH. In contrast to other assays, it provides sufficient resolution for proper recognition of genetic transferrin variants. Analysis of 7290 patient sera revealed 166 isoform patterns that could be assigned to genetic variants, namely, 109 BC, 53 CD, one BD and three CC variants. Several subtypes of transferrin D can be distinguished as they have large enough differences in pI values. Subtypes of transferrin C and B cannot be resolved. However, analysis of the detection time ratios of tetrasialo isoforms of transferrin BC and transferrin CD variants revealed multimodal frequency histograms, indicating the presence of subtypes of transferrin C, B and D. The data gathered over 11 years demonstrate the robustness of the high-resolution capillary zone electrophoresis assay. This is the first account of a capillary zone electrophoresis based carbohydrate-deficient transferrin assay with a broad overview on transferrin isoform patterns associated with genetic transferrin variants.

  12. ESTviewer: a web interface for visualizing mouse, rat, cattle, pig and chicken conserved ESTs in human genes and human alternatively spliced variants.

    PubMed

    Chen, Feng-Chi; Chuang, Trees-Juen

    2005-05-15

    ESTviewer is a web application for interactively visualizing human gene structures, with emphasis on mammalian and avian expressed sequence tags (ESTs) that are conserved in the human genome and alternatively spliced (AS) variants. AS variants from the UCSC, Vega and PSEP annotations are presented in this application for comparison. EST data from six species, human, mouse, rat, cattle, pig and chicken, are mapped to the human genome to show cross-species EST conservation in annotated exonic and intronic regions. Cross-species EST conservation is evolutionarily and functionally important because it represents the effects of selection pressure on genic regions and transcriptome over evolutionary time. Emphatically, ESTviewer provides a convenient tool to compare highly conserved non-human ESTs and human AS variants. The application takes human gene accession Ids or coordinates of genomic sequences as inputs and presents annotated gene structures and their AS variants. In addition, the lengths and percentages of human genic regions covered by ESTs are displayed to show the level of EST coverage of different species. The percentages of the UCSC, Vega and PSEP annotated exons covered by ESTs of the six studied species are also displayed in the interface.

  13. Analysis of 6,515 exomes reveals the recent origin of most human protein-coding variants.

    PubMed

    Fu, Wenqing; O'Connor, Timothy D; Jun, Goo; Kang, Hyun Min; Abecasis, Goncalo; Leal, Suzanne M; Gabriel, Stacey; Rieder, Mark J; Altshuler, David; Shendure, Jay; Nickerson, Deborah A; Bamshad, Michael J; Akey, Joshua M

    2013-01-10

    Establishing the age of each mutation segregating in contemporary human populations is important to fully understand our evolutionary history and will help to facilitate the development of new approaches for disease-gene discovery. Large-scale surveys of human genetic variation have reported signatures of recent explosive population growth, notable for an excess of rare genetic variants, suggesting that many mutations arose recently. To more quantitatively assess the distribution of mutation ages, we resequenced 15,336 genes in 6,515 individuals of European American and African American ancestry and inferred the age of 1,146,401 autosomal single nucleotide variants (SNVs). We estimate that approximately 73% of all protein-coding SNVs and approximately 86% of SNVs predicted to be deleterious arose in the past 5,000-10,000 years. The average age of deleterious SNVs varied significantly across molecular pathways, and disease genes contained a significantly higher proportion of recently arisen deleterious SNVs than other genes. Furthermore, European Americans had an excess of deleterious variants in essential and Mendelian disease genes compared to African Americans, consistent with weaker purifying selection due to the Out-of-Africa dispersal. Our results better delimit the historical details of human protein-coding variation, show the profound effect of recent human history on the burden of deleterious SNVs segregating in contemporary populations, and provide important practical information that can be used to prioritize variants in disease-gene discovery.

  14. Structural Characterization of Human 8-Oxoguanine DNA Glycosylase Variants Bearing Active Site Mutations

    SciTech Connect

    Radom,C.; Banerjee, A.; Verdine, G.

    2007-01-01

    The human 8-oxoguanine DNA glycosylase (hOGG1) protein is responsible for initiating base excision DNA repair of the endogenous mutagen 8-oxoguanine. Like nearly all DNA glycosylases, hOGG1 extrudes its substrate from the DNA helix and inserts it into an extrahelical enzyme active site pocket lined with residues that participate in lesion recognition and catalysis. Structural analysis has been performed on mutant versions of hOGG1 having changes in catalytic residues but not on variants having altered 7,8-dihydro-8-oxoguanine (oxoG) contact residues. Here we report high resolution structural analysis of such recognition variants. We found that Ala substitution at residues that contact the phosphate 5 to the lesion (H270A mutation) and its Watson-Crick face (Q315A mutation) simply removed key functionality from the contact interface but otherwise had no effect on structure. Ala substitution at the only residue making an oxoG-specific contact (G42A mutation) introduced torsional stress into the DNA contact surface of hOGG1, but this was overcome by local interactions within the folded protein, indicating that this oxoG recognition motif is 'hardwired'. Introduction of a side chain intended to sterically obstruct the active site pocket (Q315F mutation) led to two different structures, one of which (Q315F{sup *149}) has the oxoG lesion in an exosite flanking the active site and the other of which (Q315F{sup *292}) has the oxoG inserted nearly completely into the lesion recognition pocket. The latter structure offers a view of the latest stage in the base extrusion pathway yet observed, and its lack of catalytic activity demonstrates that the transition state for displacement of the lesion base is geometrically demanding.

  15. Identification of a novel splice variant isoform of TREM-1 in human neutrophil granules1

    PubMed Central

    Baruah, Sankar; Keck, Kathy; Vrenios, Michelle; Pope, Marshall; Pearl, Merideth; Doerschug, Kevin; Klesney-Tait, Julia

    2015-01-01

    Triggering receptor expressed on myeloid cells-1 (TREM-1) is critical for inflammatory signal amplification. Humans have two forms of TREM-1: a membrane receptor (mbTREM-1), associated with the adaptor DAP12, and a soluble receptor detected at times of infection. The membrane receptor isoform acts synergistically with the TLR pathway to promote cytokine secretion and neutrophil migration while the soluble receptor functions as a counter regulatory molecule. In multiple models of sepsis, exogenous administration of soluble forms of TREM-1 attenuates inflammation and markedly improves survival. Despite intense interest in soluble TREM-1 both as a clinical predictor of survival and as a therapeutic tool, the origin of native soluble TREM-1 remains controversial. Utilizing human neutrophils, we identified a 15 kDa TREM-1 isoform in primary (azurophilic) and secondary (specific) granules. Mass spectrometric analysis, ELISA, and immunoblot confirm that the 15 kD protein is a novel splice variant of TREM-1 (TREM-1sv). Neutrophil stimulation with P. aeruginosa, LPS, or PAM(3)Cys4 resulted in degranulation and release of TREM-1sv. The addition of exogenous TREM-1sv inhibited TREM-1 receptor mediated proinflammatory cytokine production. Thus these data reveal that TREM-1 isoforms simultaneously activate and inhibit inflammation via the canonical membrane TREM-1 molecule and this newly discovered granular isoform, TREM-1sv. PMID:26561551

  16. Human Gene-Centered Transcription Factor Networks for Enhancers and Disease Variants

    PubMed Central

    Bass, Juan I. Fuxman; Sahni, Nidhi; Shrestha, Shaleen; Garcia-Gonzalez, Aurian; Mori, Akihiro; Bhat, Numana; Yi, Song; Hill, David E.; Vidal, Marc; Walhout, Albertha J.M.

    2015-01-01

    SUMMARY Gene regulatory networks (GRNs) comprising interactions between transcription factors (TFs) and regulatory loci control development and physiology. Numerous disease-associated mutations have been identified, the vast majority residing in non-coding regions of the genome. As current GRN mapping methods test one TF at a time and require the use of cells harboring the mutation(s) of interest, they are not suitable to identify TFs that bind to wild type and mutant loci. Here, we use gene-centered yeast one-hybrid (eY1H) assays to interrogate binding of 1,086 human TFs to 246 enhancers, as well as to 109 non-coding disease mutations. We detect both loss and gain of TF interactions with mutant loci that are concordant with target gene expression changes. This work establishes eY1H assays as a powerful addition to the toolkit of mapping human GRNs and for the high-throughput characterization of genomic variants that are rapidly being identified by genome-wide association studies. PMID:25910213

  17. Alternatively Spliced Human TREK-1 Variants Alter TREK-1 Channel Function and Localization1

    PubMed Central

    Cowles, Chad L.; Wu, Yi-Ying; Barnett, Scott D.; Lee, Michael T.; Burkin, Heather R.; Buxton, Iain L.O.

    2015-01-01

    TREK-1, an outward-rectifying potassium channel activated by stretch, is found in the myometrium of pregnant women. Decreased expression of TREK-1 near term suggests that TREK-1 may contribute to uterine quiescence during gestation. Five alternatively spliced TREK-1 variants were identified in the myometrium of mothers who delivered spontaneously preterm (<37 wk), leading to the hypothesis that these TREK-1 variants could interfere with TREK-1 function or expression. To investigate a potential role for these variants, immunofluorescence, cell surface assays, Western blots, and patch clamp were employed to study TREK-1 and TREK-1 variants expressed in HEK293T cells. The results of this study demonstrate that coexpression of TREK-1 with TREK-1 variants alters TREK-1 expression and suppresses channel function. Each variant affected TREK-1 in a disparate manner. In HEK293T cells coexpressing TREK-1 and each variant, TREK-1 membrane expression was diminished with compartmentalization inside the cell. When expressed alone, individual variants displayed channel properties that were significantly decreased compared to full-length TREK-1. In coexpression studies using patch clamp, basal TREK-1 currents were reduced by ∼64% (4.3 vs. 12.0 pA/pF) on average at 0 mV when coexpressed with each variant. TREK-1 currents that were activated by intracellular acidosis were reduced an average of ∼77% (21.4 vs. 94.5 pA/pF) at 0 mV when cells were transfected with TREK-1 and any one of the splice variants. These data correlate the presence of TREK-1 variants to reduced TREK-1 activity, suggesting a pathological role for TREK-1 variants in preterm labor. PMID:26400398

  18. Alternatively Spliced Human TREK-1 Variants Alter TREK-1 Channel Function and Localization.

    PubMed

    Cowles, Chad L; Wu, Yi-Ying; Barnett, Scott D; Lee, Michael T; Burkin, Heather R; Buxton, Iain L O

    2015-11-01

    TREK-1, an outward-rectifying potassium channel activated by stretch, is found in the myometrium of pregnant women. Decreased expression of TREK-1 near term suggests that TREK-1 may contribute to uterine quiescence during gestation. Five alternatively spliced TREK-1 variants were identified in the myometrium of mothers who delivered spontaneously preterm (<37 wk), leading to the hypothesis that these TREK-1 variants could interfere with TREK-1 function or expression. To investigate a potential role for these variants, immunofluorescence, cell surface assays, Western blots, and patch clamp were employed to study TREK-1 and TREK-1 variants expressed in HEK293T cells. The results of this study demonstrate that coexpression of TREK-1 with TREK-1 variants alters TREK-1 expression and suppresses channel function. Each variant affected TREK-1 in a disparate manner. In HEK293T cells coexpressing TREK-1 and each variant, TREK-1 membrane expression was diminished with compartmentalization inside the cell. When expressed alone, individual variants displayed channel properties that were significantly decreased compared to full-length TREK-1. In coexpression studies using patch clamp, basal TREK-1 currents were reduced by ∼64% (4.3 vs. 12.0 pA/pF) on average at 0 mV when coexpressed with each variant. TREK-1 currents that were activated by intracellular acidosis were reduced an average of ∼77% (21.4 vs. 94.5 pA/pF) at 0 mV when cells were transfected with TREK-1 and any one of the splice variants. These data correlate the presence of TREK-1 variants to reduced TREK-1 activity, suggesting a pathological role for TREK-1 variants in preterm labor.

  19. Highly efficient biallelic genome editing of human ES/iPS cells using a CRISPR/Cas9 or TALEN system.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Kazuo; Igai, Keisuke; Hagihara, Yasuko; Hashimoto, Rina; Hanawa, Morifumi; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Tachibana, Masashi; Sakurai, Fuminori; Yamamoto, Takashi; Mizuguchi, Hiroyuki

    2017-02-21

    Genome editing research of human ES/iPS cells has been accelerated by clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats/CRISPR-associated 9 (CRISPR/Cas9) and transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALEN) technologies. However, the efficiency of biallelic genetic engineering in transcriptionally inactive genes is still low, unlike that in transcriptionally active genes. To enhance the biallelic homologous recombination efficiency in human ES/iPS cells, we performed screenings of accessorial genes and compounds. We found that RAD51 overexpression and valproic acid treatment enhanced biallelic-targeting efficiency in human ES/iPS cells regardless of the transcriptional activity of the targeted locus. Importantly, RAD51 overexpression and valproic acid treatment synergistically increased the biallelic homologous recombination efficiency. Our findings would facilitate genome editing study using human ES/iPS cells.

  20. Deep Sequencing Reveals Potential Antigenic Variants at Low Frequencies in Influenza A Virus-Infected Humans

    PubMed Central

    Dinis, Jorge M.; Florek, Nicholas W.; Fatola, Omolayo O.; Moncla, Louise H.; Mutschler, James P.; Charlier, Olivia K.; Meece, Jennifer K.; Belongia, Edward A.

    2016-01-01

    . We characterized here the genetic and potential antigenic diversity of influenza viruses infecting humans, some of whom became infected despite recent vaccination. Influenza virus between- and within-host genetic diversity was not significantly different in nonvaccinated and vaccinated humans, suggesting that vaccine-induced immunity does not exert strong selective pressure on viruses replicating in individual people. We found low-frequency mutations, below the detection threshold of traditional surveillance methods, in nonvaccinated and vaccinated humans that were recently associated with antibody escape. Interestingly, these potential antigenic variants did not reach fixation in infected people, suggesting that other evolutionary factors may be hindering their emergence in individual humans. PMID:26739054

  1. Evidence for evolutionary and nonevolutionary forces shaping the distribution of human genetic variants near transcription start sites.

    PubMed

    Scala, Giovanni; Affinito, Ornella; Miele, Gennaro; Monticelli, Antonella; Cocozza, Sergio

    2014-01-01

    The regions surrounding transcription start sites (TSSs) of genes play a critical role in the regulation of gene expression. At the same time, current evidence indicates that these regions are particularly stressed by transcription-related mutagenic phenomena. In this work we performed a genome-wide analysis of the distribution of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) inside the 10 kb region flanking human TSSs by dividing SNPs into four classes according to their frequency (rare, two intermediate classes, and common). We found that, in this 10 kb region, the distribution of variants depends on their frequency and on their localization relative to the TSS. We found that the distribution of variants is generally different for TSSs located inside or outside of CpG islands. We found a significant relationship between the distribution of rare variants and nucleosome occupancy scores. Furthermore, our analysis suggests that evolutionary (purifying selection) and nonevolutionary (biased gene conversion) forces both play a role in determining the relative SNP frequency around TSSs. Finally, we analyzed the potential pathogenicity of each class of variant using the Combined Annotation Dependent Depletion score. In conclusion, this study provides a novel and detailed view of the distribution of genomic variants around TSSs, providing insight into the forces that instigate and maintain variability in such critical regions.

  2. Expression of senescent antigen on erythrocytes infected with a knobby variant of the human malaria parasite Plasmodium falciparum

    SciTech Connect

    Winograd, E.; Greenan, J.R.T.; Sherman, I.W.

    1987-04-01

    Erythrocytes infected with a knobby variant of Plasmodium falciparum selectively bind IgG autoantibodies in normal human serum. Quantification of membrane-bound IgG, by use of /sup 125/I-labeled protein A, revealed that erythrocytes infected with the knobby variant bound 30 times more protein A than did noninfected erythrocytes; infection with a knobless variant resulted in less than a 2-fold difference compared with noninfected erythrocytes. IgG binding to knobby erythrocytes appeared to be related to parasite development, since binding of /sup 125/I-labeled protein A to cells bearing young trophozoites (less than 20 hr after parasite invasion) was similar to binding to uninfected erythrocytes. By immunoelectron microscopy, the membrane-bound IgG on erythrocytes infected with the knobby variant was found to be preferentially associated with the protuberances (knobs) of the plasma membrane. The removal of aged or senescent erythrocytes from the peripheral circulation is reported to involve the binding of specific antibodies to an antigen (senescent antigen) related to the major erythrocyte membrane protein band 3. Since affinity-purified autoantibodies against band 3 specifically bound to the plasma membrane of erythrocytes infected with the knobby variant of P. falciparum, it is clear that the malaria parasite induces expression of senescent antigen.

  3. Phylogenetically related, clinically different: human papillomaviruses 6 and 11 variants distribution in genital warts and in laryngeal papillomatosis.

    PubMed

    Godínez, J M; Nicolás-Párraga, S; Pimenoff, V N; Mengual-Chuliá, B; Muñoz, N; Bosch, F X; Sánchez, G I; McCloskey, J; Bravo, I G

    2014-06-01

    Genital warts (GWs) and laryngeal papillomatosis (LP) are two usually benign pathologies related to infection with human papillomaviruses (HPVs), mainly HPV6 and HPV11. The aim of this work was to describe the genetic diversity of HPV6 and HPV11 isolates found in GWs and LPs, and to analyse the differential involvement of viral variants in either lesion. A total of 231 samples diagnosed as GWs (n = 198) or LP (n = 33) and caused by HPV6 or HPV11 monoinfections were analysed. The phylogenetic relationships of the retrieved viral sequences were explored. We have identified the long control region and the intergenic E2-L2 region as the two most variable regions in both HPV6 and HPV11 genomes. We have generated new HPV6 (n = 166) or HPV11 (n = 65) partial sequences from GWs and LPs lesions spanning both regions and studied them in the context of all available sequences of both types (final n = 412). Our results show a significant (p <0.01) differential presence of HPV6 variants among both pathologies, with HPV6 B variants being preferentially found in GW versus LP samples. No differential involvement of HPV11 variants was observed. Our findings suggest that different HPV6 variants may either show differential tropism or have different potential to induce lesions in different epithelia.

  4. Rare deleterious variants in GRHL3 are associated with human spina bifida.

    PubMed

    Lemay, Philippe; De Marco, Patrizia; Emond, Alexandre; Spiegelman, Dan; Dionne-Laporte, Alexandre; Laurent, Sandra; Merello, Elisa; Accogli, Andrea; Rouleau, Guy A; Capra, Valeria; Kibar, Zoha

    2017-03-08

    Neural tube defects, including spina bifida, are among the most common birth defects caused by failure of neural tube closure during development. They have a complex etiology involving largely undetermined environmental and genetic factors. Previous studies in mouse models have implicated the transcription factor Grhl3 as an important factor in the pathogenesis of spina bifida. In the present study, we conducted a resequencing analysis of GRHL3 in a cohort of 233 familial and sporadic cases of spina bifida. We identified two novel truncating variants: one homozygous frameshift variant, p.Asp16Aspfs*10, in two affected siblings and one heterozygous intronic splicing variant, p.Ala318Glyfs*26. We also identified five missense variants, one of which was demonstrated to reduce the activation of gene targets in a luciferase reporter assay. With the previously identified p.Arg391Cys variant, eight variants were found in GRHL3. Comparison of the variant rate between our cohort and the ExAC database identified a significant enrichment of deleterious variants in GRHL3 in the whole gene and the transactivation region in spina bifida patients. These data provide strong evidence for a role of GRHL3 as a predisposing factor to spina bifida and will help dissect the complex etiology and pathogenic mechanisms of these malformations.

  5. Krüppeling erythropoiesis: an unexpected broad spectrum of human red blood cell disorders due to KLF1 variants

    PubMed Central

    Perkins, Andrew; Xu, Xiangmin; Higgs, Douglas R.; Patrinos, George P.; Arnaud, Lionel; Bieker, James J.

    2016-01-01

    Until recently our approach to analyzing human genetic diseases has been to accurately phenotype patients and sequence the genes known to be associated with those phenotypes; for example, in thalassemia, the globin loci are analyzed. Sequencing has become increasingly accessible, and thus a larger panel of genes can be analyzed and whole exome and/or whole genome sequencing can be used when no variants are found in the candidate genes. By using such approaches in patients with unexplained anemias, we have discovered that a broad range of hitherto unrelated human red cell disorders are caused by variants in KLF1, a master regulator of erythropoiesis, which were previously considered to be extremely rare causes of human genetic disease. PMID:26903544

  6. Krüppeling erythropoiesis: an unexpected broad spectrum of human red blood cell disorders due to KLF1 variants.

    PubMed

    Perkins, Andrew; Xu, Xiangmin; Higgs, Douglas R; Patrinos, George P; Arnaud, Lionel; Bieker, James J; Philipsen, Sjaak

    2016-04-14

    Until recently our approach to analyzing human genetic diseases has been to accurately phenotype patients and sequence the genes known to be associated with those phenotypes; for example, in thalassemia, the globin loci are analyzed. Sequencing has become increasingly accessible, and thus a larger panel of genes can be analyzed and whole exome and/or whole genome sequencing can be used when no variants are found in the candidate genes. By using such approaches in patients with unexplained anemias, we have discovered that a broad range of hitherto unrelated human red cell disorders are caused by variants in KLF1, a master regulator of erythropoiesis, which were previously considered to be extremely rare causes of human genetic disease.

  7. Conformational analysis of HAMLET, the folding variant of human α-lactalbumin associated with apoptosis

    PubMed Central

    Casbarra, Annarita; Birolo, Leila; Infusini, Giuseppe; Dal Piaz, Fabrizio; Svensson, Malin; Pucci, Piero; Svanborg, Catharina; Marino, Gennaro

    2004-01-01

    A combination of hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange and limited proteolysis experiments coupled to mass spectrometry analysis was used to depict the conformation in solution of HAMLET, the folding variant of human α-lactalbumin, complexed to oleic acid, that induces apoptosis in tumor and immature cells. Although near- and far-UV CD and fluorescence spectroscopy were not able to discriminate between HAMLET and apo-α-lactalbumin, H/D exchange experiments clearly showed that they correspond to two distinct conformational states, with HAMLET incorporating a greater number of deuterium atoms than the apo and holo forms. Complementary proteolysis experiments revealed that HAMLET and apo are both accessible to proteases in the β-domain but showed substantial differences in accessibility to proteases at specific sites. The overall results indicated that the conformational changes associated with the release of Ca2+ are not sufficient to induce the HAMLET conformation. Metal depletion might represent the first event to produce a partial unfolding in the β-domain of α-lactalbumin, but some more unfolding is needed to generate the active conformation HAMLET, very likely allowing the protein to bind the C18:1 fatty acid moiety. On the basis of these data, a putative binding site of the oleic acid, which stabilizes the HAMLET conformation, is proposed. PMID:15075403

  8. Conformational analysis of HAMLET, the folding variant of human alpha-lactalbumin associated with apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Casbarra, Annarita; Birolo, Leila; Infusini, Giuseppe; Dal Piaz, Fabrizio; Svensson, Malin; Pucci, Piero; Svanborg, Catharina; Marino, Gennaro

    2004-05-01

    A combination of hydrogen/deuterium (H/D) exchange and limited proteolysis experiments coupled to mass spectrometry analysis was used to depict the conformation in solution of HAMLET, the folding variant of human alpha-lactalbumin, complexed to oleic acid, that induces apoptosis in tumor and immature cells. Although near- and far-UV CD and fluorescence spectroscopy were not able to discriminate between HAMLET and apo-alpha-lactalbumin, H/D exchange experiments clearly showed that they correspond to two distinct conformational states, with HAMLET incorporating a greater number of deuterium atoms than the apo and holo forms. Complementary proteolysis experiments revealed that HAMLET and apo are both accessible to proteases in the beta-domain but showed substantial differences in accessibility to proteases at specific sites. The overall results indicated that the conformational changes associated with the release of Ca2+ are not sufficient to induce the HAMLET conformation. Metal depletion might represent the first event to produce a partial unfolding in the beta-domain of alpha-lactalbumin, but some more unfolding is needed to generate the active conformation HAMLET, very likely allowing the protein to bind the C18:1 fatty acid moiety. On the basis of these data, a putative binding site of the oleic acid, which stabilizes the HAMLET conformation, is proposed.

  9. Identification of a splice-site mutation in the human growth hormone-variant gene.

    PubMed Central

    MacLeod, J N; Liebhaber, S A; MacGillivray, M H; Cooke, N E

    1991-01-01

    The human growth-hormone-variant (hGH-V) gene normally expresses two alternatively spliced forms of mRNA--hGH-V and hGH-V2--in the placenta. hGH-V2 mRNA differs from hGH-V rDNA by the retention of intron 4 and represents approximately 15% of transcripts at term. In a survey of hGH-V gene expression in 20 placentas of gestational age 8-40 wk, we detected a single placenta that contained, in addition to the two normal hGH-V mRNA species, a set of two slightly larger hGH-V mRNAs. Sequence analysis of the elongated hGH-V mRNA demonstrated retention of the first 12 bases of intron 2, resulting from both a base substitution at the intron 2 splice-donor dinucleotide (GT----AT) and activation of a cryptic splice-donor site 12 bases downstream. Survey of a total of 60 additional chromosomes failed to reveal additional incidence of this mutation. The mutation, which we have designated hGH-Vintron 2, pos 1 (G----A), represents both an initial example of a nondeletional mutation within the hGH-V gene and corresponding structural alteration in the encoded hGH-V hormone. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 4 PMID:2035535

  10. Prioritizing Variants in Complete Hereditary Breast and Ovarian Cancer Genes in Patients Lacking Known BRCA Mutations.

    PubMed

    Caminsky, Natasha G; Mucaki, Eliseos J; Perri, Ami M; Lu, Ruipeng; Knoll, Joan H M; Rogan, Peter K

    2016-07-01

    BRCA1 and BRCA2 testing for hereditary breast and ovarian cancer (HBOC) does not identify all pathogenic variants. Sequencing of 20 complete genes in HBOC patients with uninformative test results (N = 287), including noncoding and flanking sequences of ATM, BARD1, BRCA1, BRCA2, CDH1, CHEK2, EPCAM, MLH1, MRE11A, MSH2, MSH6, MUTYH, NBN, PALB2, PMS2, PTEN, RAD51B, STK11, TP53, and XRCC2, identified 38,372 unique variants. We apply information theory (IT) to predict and prioritize noncoding variants of uncertain significance in regulatory, coding, and intronic regions based on changes in binding sites in these genes. Besides mRNA splicing, IT provides a common framework to evaluate potential affinity changes in transcription factor (TFBSs), splicing regulatory (SRBSs), and RNA-binding protein (RBBSs) binding sites following mutation. We prioritized variants affecting the strengths of 10 splice sites (four natural, six cryptic), 148 SRBS, 36 TFBS, and 31 RBBS. Three variants were also prioritized based on their predicted effects on mRNA secondary (2°) structure and 17 for pseudoexon activation. Additionally, four frameshift, two in-frame deletions, and five stop-gain mutations were identified. When combined with pedigree information, complete gene sequence analysis can focus attention on a limited set of variants in a wide spectrum of functional mutation types for downstream functional and co-segregation analysis.

  11. Genomic variants reveal differential evolutionary constraints on human transglutaminases and point towards unrecognized significance of transglutaminase 2

    PubMed Central

    Thangaraju, Kiruphagaran; Király, Róbert; Demény, Máté A.; András Mótyán, János; Fuxreiter, Mónika; Fésüs, László

    2017-01-01

    Transglutaminases (TGMs) catalyze Ca2+-dependent transamidation of proteins with specified roles in blood clotting (F13a) and in cornification (TGM1, TGM3). The ubiquitous TGM2 has well described enzymatic and non-enzymatic functions but in-spite of numerous studies its physiological function in humans has not been defined. We compared data on non-synonymous single nucleotide variations (nsSNVs) and loss-of-function variants on TGM1-7 and F13a from the Exome aggregation consortium dataset, and used computational and biochemical analysis to reveal the roles of damaging nsSNVs of TGM2. TGM2 and F13a display rarer damaging nsSNV sites than other TGMs and sequence of TGM2, F13a and TGM1 are evolutionary constrained. TGM2 nsSNVs are predicted to destabilize protein structure, influence Ca2+ and GTP regulation, and non-enzymatic interactions, but none coincide with conserved functional sites. We have experimentally characterized six TGM2 allelic variants detected so far in homozygous form, out of which only one, p.Arg222Gln, has decreased activities. Published exome sequencing data from various populations have not uncovered individuals with homozygous loss-of-function variants for TGM2, TGM3 and TGM7. Thus it can be concluded that human transglutaminases differ in harboring damaging variants and TGM2 is under purifying selection suggesting that it may have so far not revealed physiological functions. PMID:28248968

  12. Autoimmune disease-associated variants of extracellular endoplasmic reticulum aminopeptidase 1 induce altered innate immune responses by human immune cells

    PubMed Central

    Aldhamen, Yasser A.; Pepelyayeva, Yuliya; Rastall, David P.W.; Seregin, Sergey S.; Zervoudi, Efthalia; Koumantou, Despoina; Aylsworth, Charles F.; Quiroga, Dionisia; Godbehere, Sarah; Georgiadis, Dimitris; Stratikos, Efstratios; Amalfitano, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    ERAP1 gene polymorphisms have been linked to several autoimmune diseases; however, the molecular mechanisms underlying these associations are not well understood. Recently, we have demonstrated that ERAP1 regulates key aspects of the innate immune response. Moreover, previous studies show ERAP1 to be ER-localized and secreted during inflammation. Herein, we investigate the possible roles that ERAP1 polymorphic variants may have in modulating innate immune responses of human PBMCs using two experimental methods: extracellular exposure of hPBMCs to ERAP1 variants and adenovirus-based ERAP1 expression. We found that exposure of hPBMCs to ERAP1 variant proteins as well as ERAP1 overexpression by Ad vectors increased inflammatory cytokine and chemokine production, and enhanced immune cell activation. Investigating the molecular mechanisms behind these responses revealed that ERAP1 is able to activate innate immunity via multiple pathways, including the NLRP3 inflammasome. Importantly, these responses varied if autoimmune-disease-associated variants of ERAP1 were examined in the assay systems. Unexpectedly, blocking ERAP1 cellular internalization augmented IL-1β production. To our knowledge, this is the first report identifying ERAP1 as being involved in modulating innate responses of human immune cells, a finding that may explain why ERAP1 has been genetically associated with several autoimmune diseases. PMID:25591727

  13. Mosaic Uniparental Disomies and Aneuploidies as Large Structural Variants of the Human Genome

    PubMed Central

    Rodríguez-Santiago, Benjamín; Malats, Núria; Rothman, Nathaniel; Armengol, Lluís; Garcia-Closas, Montse; Kogevinas, Manolis; Villa, Olaya; Hutchinson, Amy; Earl, Julie; Marenne, Gaëlle; Jacobs, Kevin; Rico, Daniel; Tardón, Adonina; Carrato, Alfredo; Thomas, Gilles; Valencia, Alfonso; Silverman, Debra; Real, Francisco X.; Chanock, Stephen J.; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A.

    2010-01-01

    Mosaicism is defined as the coexistence of cells with different genetic composition within an individual, caused by postzygotic somatic mutation. Although somatic mosaicism for chromosomal abnormalities is a well-established cause of developmental and somatic disorders and has also been detected in different tissues, its frequency and extent in the adult normal population are still unknown. We provide here a genome-wide survey of mosaic genomic variation obtained by analyzing Illumina 1M SNP array data from blood or buccal DNA samples of 1991 adult individuals from the Spanish Bladder Cancer/EPICURO genome-wide association study. We found mosaic abnormalities in autosomes in 1.7% of samples, including 23 segmental uniparental disomies, 8 complete trisomies, and 11 large (1.5–37 Mb) copy-number variants. Alterations were observed across the different autosomes with recurrent events in chromosomes 9 and 20. No case-control differences were found in the frequency of events or the percentage of cells affected, thus indicating that most rearrangements found are not central to the development of bladder cancer. However, five out of six events tested were detected in both blood and bladder tissue from the same individual, indicating an early developmental origin. The high cellular frequency of the anomalies detected and their presence in normal adult individuals suggest that this type of mosaicism is a widespread phenomenon in the human genome. Somatic mosaicism should be considered in the expanding repertoire of inter- and intraindividual genetic variation, some of which may cause somatic human diseases but also contribute to modifying inherited disorders and/or late-onset multifactorial traits. PMID:20598279

  14. The human liver fatty acid binding protein T94A variant alters the structure, stability, and interaction with fibrates.

    PubMed

    Martin, Gregory G; McIntosh, Avery L; Huang, Huan; Gupta, Shipra; Atshaves, Barbara P; Landrock, Kerstin K; Landrock, Danilo; Kier, Ann B; Schroeder, Friedhelm

    2013-12-23

    Although the human liver fatty acid binding protein (L-FABP) T94A variant arises from the most commonly occurring single-nucleotide polymorphism in the entire FABP family, there is a complete lack of understanding regarding the role of this polymorphism in human disease. It has been hypothesized that the T94A substitution results in the complete loss of ligand binding ability and function analogous to that seen with L-FABP gene ablation. This possibility was addressed using the recombinant human wild-type (WT) T94T and T94A variant L-FABP and cultured primary human hepatocytes. Nonconservative replacement of the medium-sized, polar, uncharged T residue with a smaller, nonpolar, aliphatic A residue at position 94 of the human L-FABP significantly increased the L-FABP α-helical structure content at the expense of β-sheet content and concomitantly decreased the thermal stability. T94A did not alter the binding affinities for peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα) agonist ligands (phytanic acid, fenofibrate, and fenofibric acid). While T94A did not alter the impact of phytanic acid and only slightly altered that of fenofibrate on the human L-FABP secondary structure, the active metabolite fenofibric acid altered the T94A secondary structure much more than that of the WT T94T L-FABP. Finally, in cultured primary human hepatocytes, the T94A variant exhibited a significantly reduced extent of fibrate-mediated induction of PPARα-regulated proteins such as L-FABP, FATP5, and PPARα itself. Thus, while the T94A substitution did not alter the affinity of the human L-FABP for PPARα agonist ligands, it significantly altered the human L-FABP structure, stability, and conformational and functional response to fibrate.

  15. Analysis of human papillomavirus 16 variants and risk for cervical cancer in Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Hang, Dong; Yin, Yin; Han, Jing; Jiang, Jie; Ma, Hongxqia; Xie, Shuanghua; Feng, Xiaoshuang; Zhang, Kai; Hu, Zhibin; Shen, Hongbing; Clifford, Gary M; Dai, Min; Li, Ni

    2016-01-15

    HPV16 is the most carcinogenic HPV type, but only a minority of HPV16 infections progress to cancer. Intratype genetic variants of HPV16 have been suggested to confer differential carcinogenicity. To investigate risk implications of HPV16 variants among Chinese women, a case-control study was conducted with 298 cervical cancer patients and 85 controls (all HPV16-positive). HPV16 isolates were predominantly of the A variant lineage, and variants of A4 (previously named "Asian") sublineage were common. A4/Asian variants were significantly associated with increased risk of cervical cancer compared to A1-3 (OR=1.72, 95% CI=1.04-2.85). Furthermore, a meta-analysis including 703 cases and 323 controls from East Asia confirmed the association (OR=2.82, 95% CI=1.44-5.52). In conclusion, A4 variants appear to predict higher risk of cervical cancer among HPV16-positive women, which may provide clues to the genetic basis of differences in the carcinogenicity of HPV16 variants.

  16. Genetic variants of human organic anion transporter 4 demonstrate altered transport of endogenous substrates.

    PubMed

    Shima, James E; Komori, Takafumi; Taylor, Travis R; Stryke, Doug; Kawamoto, Michiko; Johns, Susan J; Carlson, Elaine J; Ferrin, Thomas E; Giacomini, Kathleen M

    2010-10-01

    Apical reabsorption from the urine has been shown to be important for such processes as the maintenance of critical metabolites in the blood and the excretion of nephrotoxic compounds. The solute carrier (SLC) transporter OAT4 (SLC22A11) is expressed on the apical membrane of renal proximal tubule cells and is known to mediate the transport of a variety of xenobiotic and endogenous organic anions. Functional characterization of genetic variants of apical transporters thought to mediate reabsorption, such as OAT4, may provide insight into the genetic factors influencing the complex pathways involved in drug elimination and metabolite reclamation occurring in the kidney. Naturally occurring genetic variants of OAT4 were identified in public databases and by resequencing DNA samples from 272 individuals comprising 4 distinct ethnic groups. Nine total nonsynonymous variants were identified and functionally assessed using uptake of three radiolabeled substrates. A nonsense variant, R48Stop, and three other variants (R121C, V155G, and V155M) were found at frequencies of at least 2% in an ethnic group specific fashion. The L29P, R48Stop, and H469R variants displayed a complete loss of function, and kinetic analysis identified a reduced V(max) in the common nonsynonymous variants. Plasma membrane levels of OAT4 protein were absent or reduced in the nonfunctional variants, providing a mechanistic reason for the observed loss of function. Characterization of the genetic variants of reabsorptive transporters such as OAT4 is an important step in understanding variability in tubular reabsorption with important implications in innate homeostatic processes and drug disposition.

  17. Genetic variants of human organic anion transporter 4 demonstrate altered transport of endogenous substrates

    PubMed Central

    Shima, James E.; Komori, Takafumi; Taylor, Travis R.; Stryke, Doug; Kawamoto, Michiko; Johns, Susan J.; Carlson, Elaine J.; Ferrin, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Apical reabsorption from the urine has been shown to be important for such processes as the maintenance of critical metabolites in the blood and the excretion of nephrotoxic compounds. The solute carrier (SLC) transporter OAT4 (SLC22A11) is expressed on the apical membrane of renal proximal tubule cells and is known to mediate the transport of a variety of xenobiotic and endogenous organic anions. Functional characterization of genetic variants of apical transporters thought to mediate reabsorption, such as OAT4, may provide insight into the genetic factors influencing the complex pathways involved in drug elimination and metabolite reclamation occurring in the kidney. Naturally occurring genetic variants of OAT4 were identified in public databases and by resequencing DNA samples from 272 individuals comprising 4 distinct ethnic groups. Nine total nonsynonymous variants were identified and functionally assessed using uptake of three radiolabeled substrates. A nonsense variant, R48Stop, and three other variants (R121C, V155G, and V155M) were found at frequencies of at least 2% in an ethnic group specific fashion. The L29P, R48Stop, and H469R variants displayed a complete loss of function, and kinetic analysis identified a reduced Vmax in the common nonsynonymous variants. Plasma membrane levels of OAT4 protein were absent or reduced in the nonfunctional variants, providing a mechanistic reason for the observed loss of function. Characterization of the genetic variants of reabsorptive transporters such as OAT4 is an important step in understanding variability in tubular reabsorption with important implications in innate homeostatic processes and drug disposition. PMID:20668102

  18. Altered cell surface expression of human MC1R variant receptor alleles associated with red hair and skin cancer risk.

    PubMed

    Beaumont, Kimberley A; Newton, Richard A; Smit, Darren J; Leonard, J Helen; Stow, Jennifer L; Sturm, Richard A

    2005-08-01

    The human melanocortin-1 receptor gene (MC1R) encodes a G-protein coupled receptor that is primarily expressed on melanocytes, where it plays a key role in pigmentation regulation. Variant alleles are associated with red hair colour and fair skin, known as the RHC phenotype, as well as skin cancer risk. The R151C, R160W and D294H alleles, designated 'R', are strongly associated with the RHC phenotype and have been proposed to result in loss of function receptors due to impaired G-protein coupling. We recently provided evidence that the R151C and R160W variants can efficiently couple to G-proteins in response to alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone. The possibility that altered cellular localization of the R151C and R160W variant receptors could underlie their association with RHC was therefore considered. Using immunofluorescence and ligand binding studies, we found that melanocytic cells exogenously or endogenously expressing MC1R show strong surface localization of the wild-type and D294H alleles but markedly reduced cell surface expression of the R151C and R160W receptors. In additional exogenous expression studies, the R variant D84E and the rare I155T variant, also demonstrated a significant reduction in plasma membrane receptor numbers. The V60L, V92M and R163Q weakly associated RHC alleles, designated 'r', were expressed with normal or intermediate cell surface receptor levels. These results indicate that reduced receptor coupling activity may not be the only contributing factor to the genetic association between the MC1R variants and the RHC phenotype, with MC1R polymorphisms now linked to a change in receptor localization.

  19. Cross-protection of the Bivalent Human Papillomavirus (HPV) Vaccine Against Variants of Genetically Related High-Risk HPV Infections

    PubMed Central

    Harari, Ariana; Chen, Zigui; Rodríguez, Ana Cecilia; Hildesheim, Allan; Porras, Carolina; Herrero, Rolando; Wacholder, Sholom; Panagiotou, Orestis A.; Befano, Brian; Burk, Robert D.; Schiffman, Mark

    2016-01-01

    Background. Results from the Costa Rica Vaccine Trial (CVT) demonstrated partial cross-protection by the bivalent human papillomavirus (HPV) vaccine, which targets HPV-16 and HPV-18, against HPV-31, -33, and -45 infection and an increased incidence of HPV-51 infection. Methods. A study nested within the CVT intention-to-treat cohort was designed to assess high-risk HPV variant lineage–specific vaccine efficacy (VE). The 2 main end points were (1) long-term incident infections persisting for ≥2 years and/or progression to high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesions (ie, cervical intraepithelial neoplasia grade 2/3 [CIN 2/3]) and (2) incident transient infections lasting for <2 years. For efficiency, incident infections due to HPV-16, -18, -31, -33, -35, -45, and -51 resulting in persistent infection and/or CIN 2/3 were matched (ratio, 1:2) to the more-frequent transient viral infections, by HPV type. Variant lineages were determined by sequencing the upstream regulatory region and/or E6 region. Results. VEs against persistent or transient infections with HPV-16, -18, -33, -35, -45, and -51 did not differ significantly by variant lineage. As the possible exception, VEs against persistent infection and/or CIN 2/3 due to HPV-31 A/B and HPV-31C variants were −7.1% (95% confidence interval [CI], −33.9% to 0%) and 86.4% (95% CI, 65.1%–97.1%), respectively (P = .02 for test of equal VE). No difference in VE was observed by variant among transient HPV-31 infections (P = .68). Conclusions. Overall, sequence variation at the variant level does not appear to explain partial cross-protection by the bivalent HPV vaccine. PMID:26518044

  20. Glycolysis controls the induction of human regulatory T cells by modulating the expression of FOXP3 exon 2 splicing variants

    PubMed Central

    De Rosa, Veronica; Galgani, Mario; Porcellini, Antonio; Colamatteo, Alessandra; Santopaolo, Marianna; Zuchegna, Candida; Romano, Antonella; De Simone, Salvatore; Procaccini, Claudio; La Rocca, Claudia; Carrieri, Pietro Biagio; Maniscalco, Giorgia Teresa; Salvetti, Marco; Buscarinu, Maria Chiara; Franzese, Adriana; Mozzillo, Enza; La Cava, Antonio; Matarese, Giuseppe

    2016-01-01

    Human regulatory T cells (Treg cells) that develop from conventional T cells (Tconv cells) following suboptimal stimulation via the T cell antigen receptor (TCR) (induced Treg cells (iTreg cells)) express the transcription factor Foxp3, are suppressive, and display an active proliferative and metabolic state. Here we found that the induction and suppressive function of iTreg cells tightly depended on glycolysis, which controlled Foxp3 splicing variants containing exon 2 (Foxp3-E2) through the glycolytic enzyme enolase-1. The Foxp3-E2–related suppressive activity of iTreg cells was altered in human autoimmune diseases, including multiple sclerosis and type 1 diabetes, and was associated with impaired glycolysis and signaling via interleukin 2. This link between glycolysis and Foxp3-E2 variants via enolase-1 shows a previously unknown mechanism for controlling the induction and function of Treg cells in health and in autoimmunity. PMID:26414764

  1. Amino acid substitutions in genetic variants of human serum albumin and in sequences inferred from molecular cloning

    SciTech Connect

    Takahashi, N.; Takahashi, Y.; Blumberg, B.S.; Putnam, F.W.

    1987-07-01

    The structural changes in four genetic variants of human serum albumin were analyzed by tandem high-pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) of the tryptic peptides, HPLC mapping and isoelectric focusing of the CNBr fragments, and amino acid sequence analysis of the purified peptides. Lysine-372 of normal (common) albumin A was changed to glutamic acid both in albumin Naskapi, a widespread polymorphic variant of North American Indians, and in albumin Mersin found in Eti Turks. The two variants also exhibited anomalous migration in NaDodSO/sub 4//PAGE, which is attributed to a conformational change. The identity of albumins Naskapi and Mersin may have originated through descent from a common mid-Asiatic founder of the two migrating ethnic groups, or it may represent identical but independent mutations of the albumin gene. In albumin Adana, from Eti Turks, the substitution site was not identified but was localized to the region from positions 447 through 548. The substitution of aspartic acid-550 by glycine was found in albumin Mexico-2 from four individuals of the Pima tribe. Although only single-point substitutions have been found in these and in certain other genetic variants of human albumin, five differences exist in the amino acid sequences inferred from cDNA sequences by workers in three other laboratories. However, our results on albumin A and on 14 different genetic variants accord with the amino acid sequence of albumin deduced from the genomic sequence. The apparent amino acid substitutions inferred from comparison of individual cDNA sequences probably reflect artifacts in cloning or in cDNA sequence analysis rather than polymorphism of the coding sections of the albumin gene.

  2. Identification of polymorphisms and sequence variants in the human homologue of the mouse natural resistance-associated macrophage protein gene

    SciTech Connect

    Liu, Jing; Fujiwara, T.M.; Buu, N.T.; Sanchez, F.O.; Cellier, M.; Paradis, A.J.; Frappier, D.; Skamene, E.; Gros, P.; Morgan, K.

    1995-04-01

    The most common mycobacterial disease in humans is tuberculosis, and there is evidence for genetic factors in susceptibility to tuberculosis. In the mouse, the Bcg gene controls macrophage priming for activation and is a major gene for susceptibility to infection with mycobacteria. A candidate gene for Bcg was identified by positional cloning and was designated {open_quotes}natural resistance-associated macrophage protein gene{close_quotes} (Nramp1), and the human homologue (NRAMP1) has recently been cloned. Here we report (1) the physical mapping NRAMP1 close to VIL in chromosome region 2q35 by PCR analysis of somatic cell hybrids and YAC cloning and (2) the identification of nine sequence variants in NRAMP1. Of the four variants in the coding region, there were two missense mutations and two silent substitutions. The missense mutations were a conservative alanine-to-valine substitution at codon 318 in exon9 and an aspartic acid-to-asparagine substitution at codon 543 in the predicted cytoplasmic tail of the NRAMP1 protein. A microsatellite was located in the immediate 5{prime} region of the gene, three variants were in introns, and one variant was located in the 3{prime} UTR. The allele frequencies of each of the nine variants were determined in DNA samples of 60 Caucasians and 20 Asians. In addition, we have physically linked two highly polymorphic microsatellite markers, D2S104 and D2S173, to NRAMP1 on a 1.5-Mb YAC contig. These molecular markers will be useful to assess the role of NRAMP1 in susceptibility to tuberculosis and other macrophage-mediated diseases. 40 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs.

  3. Detection and differentiation of human parvovirus variants by commercial quantitative real-time PCR tests.

    PubMed

    Hokynar, Kati; Norja, Päivi; Laitinen, Harri; Palomäki, Pekka; Garbarg-Chenon, Antoine; Ranki, Annamari; Hedman, Klaus; Söderlund-Venermo, Maria

    2004-05-01

    Parvovirus B19 causes a variety of diseases in humans, with outcomes ranging from asymptomatic to severe, such as chronic anemia in immunocompromised patients or fetal hydrops and death after maternal infection during pregnancy. The virus may be transmitted via plasma-derived products. According to the results of solvent-detergent safety studies, an upper limit of B19 DNA in plasma pools was recently defined. To restrict the input of B19 virus into production pools, a quantitative nucleic acid test is a prerequisite. We examined the suitability of the two commercial quantitative B19 PCR tests, LightCycler-Parvovirus B19 quantification kit (Roche Diagnostics) and RealArt Parvo B19 LC PCR (Artus) for detection, quantification, and differentiation of the three known B19 genotypes, including the newly described erythrovirus variants (genotypes 2 and 3). The former kit was highly sensitive for genotype 1 but was not suitable for detection of genotype 2 or one of two genotype 3 strains. The latter kit detected and differentiated all three genotypes, albeit with lower sensitivity for one of the genotype-3 strains. We furthermore assessed the prevalence of the three B19 virus genotypes in blood donors, by screening pooled plasma samples derived from 140,160 Finnish blood-donor units. None of the pools contained detectable levels of B19 virus genotypes 2 or 3. The origin, mode of transmission, and clinical significance of these genotypes are unknown and deserve further study. The RealArt Parvo B19 LC PCR is suitable for detection, quantification, and differentiation of all three B19 virus genotypes in molecular and clinical research.

  4. Serotonin (5-HT) receptor 5A sequence variants affect human plasma triglyceride levels

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Y.; Smith, E. M.; Baye, T. M.; Eckert, J. V.; Abraham, L. J.; Moses, E. K.; Kissebah, A. H.; Martin, L. J.

    2010-01-01

    Neurotransmitters such as serotonin (5-hydroxytryptamine, 5-HT) work closely with leptin and insulin to fine-tune the metabolic and neuroendocrine responses to dietary intake. Losing the sensitivity to excess food intake can lead to obesity, diabetes, and a multitude of behavioral disorders. It is largely unclear how different serotonin receptor subtypes respond to and integrate metabolic signals and which genetic variations in these receptor genes lead to individual differences in susceptibility to metabolic disorders. In an obese cohort of families of Northern European descent (n = 2,209), the serotonin type 5A receptor gene, HTR5A, was identified as a prominent factor affecting plasma levels of triglycerides (TG), supported by our data from both genome-wide linkage and targeted association analyses using 28 publicly available and 12 newly discovered single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs), of which 3 were strongly associated with plasma TG levels (P < 0.00125). Bayesian quantitative trait nucleotide (BQTN) analysis identified a putative causal promoter SNP (rs3734967) with substantial posterior probability (P = 0.59). Functional analysis of rs3734967 by electrophoretic mobility shift assay (EMSA) showed distinct binding patterns of the two alleles of this SNP with nuclear proteins from glioma cell lines. In conclusion, sequence variants in HTR5A are strongly associated with high plasma levels of TG in a Northern European population, suggesting a novel role of the serotonin receptor system in humans. This suggests a potential brain-specific regulation of plasma TG levels, possibly by alteration of the expression of HTR5A. PMID:20388841

  5. Clinically relevant variants - identifying, collecting, interpreting, and disseminating: the 2013 annual scientific meeting of the Human Genome Variation Society.

    PubMed

    Stanley, Christine M; Sunyaev, Shamil R; Greenblatt, Marc S; Oetting, William S

    2014-04-01

    The dramatic advances in genetic sequencing technologies used in research laboratories are now entering the clinic, and applications of whole-genome and whole-exome sequencing to disease diagnosis, predisposition, and treatment will soon be commonplace. However, the standards and methods for identifying clinically relevant variants are currently being debated and defined. Multiple agencies worldwide have recognized that we have reached an exciting and critical transition point into the clinic, and many important issues are being discussed that impact how genetic variation data in the clinic will be interpreted and used. The 2013 annual scientific meeting of the Human Genome Variation Society (HGVS) had as its main theme the discovery, interpretation, and dissemination of clinically relevant DNA variants. The meeting featured the continuously developing technology of databasing genetic variation and computational tools for allelic variant discovery. Attention was given to curating and integrating these data with clinical findings, including approaches to distinguish between functional alleles underlying clinical phenotypes and benign sequence variants and making data sources interoperable and functional for clinical diagnostic utility, citing examples in specific diseases.

  6. An Antagonistic Vascular Endothelial Growth Factor (VEGF) Variant Inhibits VEGF-Stimulated Receptor Autophosphorylation and Proliferation of Human Endothelial Cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Siemeister, Gerhard; Schirner, Michael; Reusch, Petra; Barleon, Bernhard; Marme, Dieter; Martiny-Baron, Georg

    1998-04-01

    Vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) is a potent mitogen with a unique specificity for endothelial cells and a key mediator of aberrant endothelial cell proliferation and vascular permeability in a variety of human pathological situations, such as tumor angiogenesis, diabetic retinopathy, rheumatoid arthritis, or psoriasis. VEGF is a symmetric homodimeric molecule with two receptor binding interfaces lying on each pole of the molecule. Herein we report on the construction and recombinant expression of an asymmetric heterodimeric VEGF variant with an intact receptor binding interface at one pole and a mutant receptor binding interface at the second pole of the dimer. This VEGF variant binds to VEGF receptors but fails to induce receptor activation. In competition experiments, the heterodimeric VEGF variant antagonizes VEGF-stimulated receptor autophosphorylation and proliferation of endothelial cells. A 15-fold excess of the heterodimer was sufficient to inhibit VEGF-stimulated endothelial cell proliferation by 50%, and a 100-fold excess resulted in an almost complete inhibition. By using a rational approach that is based on the structure of VEGF, we have shown the feasibility to construct a VEGF variant that acts as an VEGF antagonist.

  7. Variants of the protein PRDM9 differentially regulate a set of human meiotic recombination hotspots highly active in African populations.

    PubMed

    Berg, Ingrid L; Neumann, Rita; Sarbajna, Shriparna; Odenthal-Hesse, Linda; Butler, Nicola J; Jeffreys, Alec J

    2011-07-26

    PRDM9 is a major specifier of human meiotic recombination hotspots, probably via binding of its zinc-finger repeat array to a DNA sequence motif associated with hotspots. However, our view of PRDM9 regulation, in terms of motifs defined and hotspots studied, has a strong bias toward the PRDM9 A variant particularly common in Europeans. We show that population diversity can reveal a second class of hotspots specifically activated by PRDM9 variants common in Africans but rare in Europeans. These African-enhanced hotspots nevertheless share very similar properties with their counterparts activated by the A variant. The specificity of hotspot activation is such that individuals with differing PRDM9 genotypes, even within the same population, can use substantially if not completely different sets of hotspots. Each African-enhanced hotspot is activated by a distinct spectrum of PRDM9 variants, despite the fact that all are predicted to bind the same sequence motif. This differential activation points to complex interactions between the zinc-finger array and hotspots and identifies features of the array that might be important in controlling hotspot activity.

  8. Cross-resistance analysis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 variants individually selected for resistance to five different protease inhibitors.

    PubMed Central

    Tisdale, M; Myers, R E; Maschera, B; Parry, N R; Oliver, N M; Blair, E D

    1995-01-01

    Human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) protease inhibitor-resistant variants, isolated on passage of HIV-1HXB2 in MT-4 cells with five different protease inhibitors, have been examined for cross-resistance to five inhibitors. The protease inhibitors studied were Ro 31-8959, A-77003, XM323, L-735,524, and VX-478. Resistant variants with two to four mutations within their protease sequence and 9- to 40-fold-decreased susceptibility were selected for all five inhibitors within six to eight passes in cell culture. Passage of a zidovudine-resistant mutant in Ro 31-8959 generated a dual reverse transcriptase- and protease-resistant virus. Variants were cloned directly into a modified pHXB2-D infectious clone for cross-resistance analysis. Although the resistant variants selected possessed different combinations of protease mutations for each inhibitor, many showed cross-resistance to the other inhibitors, and one showed cross-resistance to all five inhibitors. Interestingly, some mutants showed increased susceptibility to some inhibitors. Further HIV passage studies in the combined presence of two protease inhibitors demonstrated that in vitro it was possible to delay significantly selection of mutations producing resistance to one or both inhibitors. These studies indicate that there may be some rationale for combining different protease inhibitors as well as protease and reverse transcriptase inhibitors in HIV combination therapy. PMID:7486905

  9. Mapping of six somatic linker histone H1 variants in human breast cancer cells uncovers specific features of H1.2.

    PubMed

    Millán-Ariño, Lluís; Islam, Abul B M M K; Izquierdo-Bouldstridge, Andrea; Mayor, Regina; Terme, Jean-Michel; Luque, Neus; Sancho, Mónica; López-Bigas, Núria; Jordan, Albert

    2014-04-01

    Seven linker histone H1 variants are present in human somatic cells with distinct prevalence across cell types. Despite being key structural components of chromatin, it is not known whether the different variants have specific roles in the regulation of nuclear processes or are differentially distributed throughout the genome. Using variant-specific antibodies to H1 and hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged recombinant H1 variants expressed in breast cancer cells, we have investigated the distribution of six H1 variants in promoters and genome-wide. H1 is depleted at promoters depending on its transcriptional status and differs between variants. Notably, H1.2 is less abundant than other variants at the transcription start sites of inactive genes, and promoters enriched in H1.2 are different from those enriched in other variants and tend to be repressed. Additionally, H1.2 is enriched at chromosomal domains characterized by low guanine-cytosine (GC) content and is associated with lamina-associated domains. Meanwhile, other variants are associated with higher GC content, CpG islands and gene-rich domains. For instance, H1.0 and H1X are enriched at gene-rich chromosomes, whereas H1.2 is depleted. In short, histone H1 is not uniformly distributed along the genome and there are differences between variants, H1.2 being the one showing the most specific pattern and strongest correlation with low gene expression.

  10. Mapping of six somatic linker histone H1 variants in human breast cancer cells uncovers specific features of H1.2

    PubMed Central

    Millán-Ariño, Lluís; Islam, Abul B. M. M. K.; Izquierdo-Bouldstridge, Andrea; Mayor, Regina; Terme, Jean-Michel; Luque, Neus; Sancho, Mónica; López-Bigas, Núria; Jordan, Albert

    2014-01-01

    Seven linker histone H1 variants are present in human somatic cells with distinct prevalence across cell types. Despite being key structural components of chromatin, it is not known whether the different variants have specific roles in the regulation of nuclear processes or are differentially distributed throughout the genome. Using variant-specific antibodies to H1 and hemagglutinin (HA)-tagged recombinant H1 variants expressed in breast cancer cells, we have investigated the distribution of six H1 variants in promoters and genome-wide. H1 is depleted at promoters depending on its transcriptional status and differs between variants. Notably, H1.2 is less abundant than other variants at the transcription start sites of inactive genes, and promoters enriched in H1.2 are different from those enriched in other variants and tend to be repressed. Additionally, H1.2 is enriched at chromosomal domains characterized by low guanine–cytosine (GC) content and is associated with lamina-associated domains. Meanwhile, other variants are associated with higher GC content, CpG islands and gene-rich domains. For instance, H1.0 and H1X are enriched at gene-rich chromosomes, whereas H1.2 is depleted. In short, histone H1 is not uniformly distributed along the genome and there are differences between variants, H1.2 being the one showing the most specific pattern and strongest correlation with low gene expression. PMID:24476918

  11. Fc gamma receptor III on human neutrophils. Allelic variants have functionally distinct capacities.

    PubMed Central

    Salmon, J E; Edberg, J C; Kimberly, R P

    1990-01-01

    As a model system to explore the functional consequences of structural variants of human Fc gamma receptors (Fc gamma R), we have investigated Fc gamma R-mediated phagocytosis in relation to the NA1-NA2 polymorphism of Fc gamma RIII (CD16) on neutrophils (Fc gamma RIIIPMN). The neutrophil-specific NA antigen system is a biallelic polymorphism with codominant expression demonstrating a gene dose effect with the anti-NA1 MAb CLB-gran 11 in a large donor population. To explore the impact of this allelic variation of Fc gamma RIIIPMN on phagocytosis, we used two Fc gamma RIII-dependent probes, IgG-sensitized erythrocytes (EA) and concanavalin. A-treated erythrocytes (E-ConA). Comparison of Fc gamma R-mediated phagocytosis by PMN from NA1 subjects and from NA2 subjects showed lower levels of phagocytosis of both probes by the NA2 individuals. The difference was most pronounced with lightly opsonized EA: at the lowest level of sensitization the phagocytic index was 72% lower for NA2 donors, whereas at the highest level of sensitization it was 21% lower (P less than 0.003). Blockade of Fc gamma RII with MAb IV.3 Fab amplified by threefold the difference between NA1 and NA2 donors. NA1 and NA2 individuals had identical phagocytic capacities for the non-Fc gamma RIII probes, serum-treated and heat-treated zymosan. These individuals did not show differential quantitative cell surface expression of Fc gamma RIIIPMN measured by a panel of anti-CD16 MAb (3G8, CLB FcR-gran 1, VEP13, BW209/2) and by Scatchard analysis of 125I-IgG dimer binding. The difference in Fc gamma R-mediated phagocytosis was not explicable on the basis of differential collaboration of Fc gamma RIIIPMN alleles with Fc gamma RII, since (a) the difference in phagocytic capacity between NA1 and NA2 individuals was readily apparent with the E-ConA probe (which is independent of Fc gamma RII) and (b) the difference in phagocytosis of EA was magnified by Fc gamma RII blockade. The demonstration that allelic

  12. Prevalence of human papillomavirus infection and phylogenetic analysis of HPV-16 E6 variants among infected women from Northern Brazil

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background The main cause of cervical cancer in the world is high risks human papillomavirus infection (mainly represented by HPV-16 and HPV-18), that are associated to the development of malign transformation of the epithelium. HPV prevalence exhibits a wide geographical variability and HPV-16 variants have been related to an increased risk of developing cervical intraepithelial lesion. The aim of this study was to describe DNA-HPV prevalence and HPV-16 variants among a women population from Northern Brazil. Methods One hundred and forty three women, during routine cervical cancer screening, at Juruti Project, fulfilled an epidemiological inquiry and were screened through a molecular HPV test. HPV-16 variants were determined by sequencing the HPV-16 E6 open reading frame. Results Forty two samples were considered HPV positive (29.4%). None of those had abnormal cytology results. HPV prevalence varied between different age groups (Z(U) = 14.62; p = <0.0001) and high-risk HPVs were more frequent among younger ages. The most prevalent type was HPV-16 (14%) and it variants were classified, predominantly, as European (87.5%). Conclusions HPV prevalence in our population was higher than described by others and the most prevalent HPV types were high-risk HPVs. The European HPV-16 variant was the most prevalent among HPV-16 positive samples. Our study reinforces the fact that women with normal cytology and a positive molecular test for high-risk HPVs should be submitted to continuous follow up, in order to verify persistence of infection, promoting an early diagnosis of cervical cancer and/or its precursors. PMID:25143783

  13. Interaction between polymorphisms of the Human Leukocyte Antigen and HPV-16 Variants on the risk of invasive cervical cancer

    PubMed Central

    de Araujo Souza, Patricia S; Maciag, Paulo C; Ribeiro, Karina B; Petzl-Erler, Maria Luiza; Franco, Eduardo L; Villa, Luisa L

    2008-01-01

    Background Persistent infection with oncogenic types of human papillomavirus (HPV) is the major risk factor for invasive cervical cancer (ICC), and non-European variants of HPV-16 are associated with an increased risk of persistence and ICC. HLA class II polymorphisms are also associated with genetic susceptibility to ICC. Our aim is to verify if these associations are influenced by HPV-16 variability. Methods We characterized HPV-16 variants by PCR in 107 ICC cases, which were typed for HLA-DQA1, DRB1 and DQB1 genes and compared to 257 controls. We measured the magnitude of associations by logistic regression analysis. Results European (E), Asian-American (AA) and African (Af) variants were identified. Here we show that inverse association between DQB1*05 (adjusted odds ratio [OR] = 0.66; 95% confidence interval [CI]: 0.39–1.12]) and HPV-16 positive ICC in our previous report was mostly attributable to AA variant carriers (OR = 0.27; 95%CI: 0.10–0.75). We observed similar proportions of HLA DRB1*1302 carriers in E-P positive cases and controls, but interestingly, this allele was not found in AA cases (p = 0.03, Fisher exact test). A positive association with DRB1*15 was observed in both groups of women harboring either E (OR = 2.99; 95% CI: 1.13–7.86) or AA variants (OR = 2.34; 95% CI: 1.00–5.46). There was an inverse association between DRB1*04 and ICC among women with HPV-16 carrying the 350T [83L] single nucleotide polymorphism in the E6 gene (OR = 0.27; 95% CI: 0.08–0.96). An inverse association between DQB1*05 and cases carrying 350G (83V) variants was also found (OR = 0.37; 95% CI: 0.15–0.89). Conclusion Our results suggest that the association between HLA polymorphism and risk of ICC might be influenced by the distribution of HPV-16 variants. PMID:18721466

  14. The role of the human ABCG2 multidrug transporter and its variants in cancer therapy and toxicology.

    PubMed

    Cervenak, Judit; Andrikovics, Hajnalka; Ozvegy-Laczka, Csilla; Tordai, Attila; Német, Katalin; Váradi, András; Sarkadi, Balázs

    2006-03-08

    The human multidrug resistance ABC transporters provide a protective function in our body against a large number of toxic compounds. These proteins, residing in the plasma membrane, perform an active, ATP-dependent extrusion of such xenobiotics. However, the same proteins are also used by the tumor cells to fight various anticancer agents. ABCG2 is an important member of the multidrug resistance proteins, an 'ABC half transporter', which functions as a homodimer in the cell membrane. In this review, we provide a basic overview of ABCG2 function in physiology and drug metabolism, but concentrate on the discussion of mutations and polymorphisms discovered in this protein. Interestingly, a single nucleotide mutation, changing amino acid 482 from arginine to threonine or glycine in ABCG2, results in a major increase in the catalytic activity and a wider drug recognition by this protein. Still, this mutation proved to be an in vitro artifact, produced only in heavily drug-selected cell lines. In contrast, at least two, but possibly more polymorphic variants of ABCG2 were found to be present in large human populations with different ethnic background. However, currently available experimental data regarding the cellular expression, localization and function of these ABCG2 variants are strongly contradictory. Since, the proteins produced by these variant alleles may differently modulate cancer treatment, general drug absorption and toxicity, may represent risk factors in fetal toxicity, or alter the differentiation of stem cells, their exact characterization is a major challenge in this field.

  15. Neanderthal origin of the haplotypes carrying the functional variant Val92Met in the MC1R in modern humans.

    PubMed

    Ding, Qiliang; Hu, Ya; Xu, Shuhua; Wang, Chuan-Chao; Li, Hui; Zhang, Ruyue; Yan, Shi; Wang, Jiucun; Jin, Li

    2014-08-01

    Skin color is one of the most visible and important phenotypes of modern humans. Melanocyte-stimulating hormone and its receptor played an important role in regulating skin color. In this article, we present evidence of Neanderthal introgression encompassing the melanocyte-stimulating hormone receptor gene MC1R. The haplotypes from Neanderthal introgression diverged with the Altai Neanderthal 103.3 ka, which postdates the anatomically modern human-Neanderthal divergence. We further discovered that all of the putative Neanderthal introgressive haplotypes carry the Val92Met variant, a loss-of-function variant in MC1R that is associated with multiple dermatological traits including skin color and photoaging. Frequency of this Neanderthal introgression is low in Europeans (∼5%), moderate in continental East Asians (∼30%), and high in Taiwanese aborigines (60-70%). As the putative Neanderthal introgressive haplotypes carry a loss-of-function variant that could alter the function of MC1R and is associated with multiple traits related to skin color, we speculate that the Neanderthal introgression may have played an important role in the local adaptation of Eurasians to sunlight intensity.

  16. Directed evolution of chemotaxis inhibitory protein of Staphylococcus aureus generates biologically functional variants with reduced interaction with human antibodies.

    PubMed

    Gustafsson, Erika; Rosén, Anna; Barchan, Karin; van Kessel, Kok P M; Haraldsson, Karin; Lindman, Stina; Forsberg, Cecilia; Ljung, Lill; Bryder, Karin; Walse, Björn; Haas, Pieter-Jan; van Strijp, Jos A G; Furebring, Christina

    2010-02-01

    Chemotaxis inhibitory protein of Staphylococcus aureus (CHIPS) is a protein that binds and blocks the C5a receptor (C5aR) and formylated peptide receptor, thereby inhibiting the immune cell recruitment associated with inflammation. If CHIPS was less reactive with existing human antibodies, it would be a promising anti-inflammatory drug candidate. Therefore, we applied directed evolution and computational/rational design to the CHIPS gene in order to generate new CHIPS variants displaying lower interaction with human IgG, yet retaining biological function. The optimization was performed in four rounds: one round of random mutagenesis to add diversity into the CHIPS gene and three rounds of DNA recombination by Fragment INduced Diversity (FIND). Every round was screened by phage selection and/or ELISA for decreased interaction with human IgG and retained C5aR binding. The mean binding of human anti-CHIPS IgG decreased with every round of evolution. For further optimization, new amino acid substitutions were introduced by rational design, based on the mutations identified during directed evolution. Finally, seven CHIPS variants with low interaction with human IgG and retained C5aR blocking capacity could be identified.

  17. Human papillomavirus type 16 long control region and E6 variants stratified by cervical disease stage

    PubMed Central

    Marongiu, Luigi; Godi, Anna; Parry, John V.; Beddows, Simon

    2014-01-01

    Objective Certain intra-type variants of HPV16 have been shown to be associated with an increased risk of developing high grade cervical disease, but their potential association is confounded by apparent geographic and phylogenetic lineage dependency. The objective of this study was to evaluate the relationship between HPV16 sequence variants and cervical disease stage in monospecific infection samples from a single lineage (European, EUR) in England. Methods One hundred and twelve women singly infected with HPV16 and displaying normal and abnormal cytology grades were selected. An 1187 bp fragment encompassing the entire LCR and a portion of the E6 open reading frame was sequenced to identify intra-type variants. Intra-type diversity was estimated using Shannon entropy. Results Almost all samples (110/112; 98%) were assigned to the EUR lineage, one sample was classified as European-Asian (EAS) and another African (Afr1a). The mean pairwise distance of the EUR sequences in this study was low (0.29%; 95%CI 0.13–0.45%) but there were nevertheless several sites in the LCR (n = 5) and E6 (n = 2) that exhibited a high degree of entropy. None of these sites, however, including the T350G non-synonymous (L83V) substitution in E6, alone or in combination, were found to be associated with cervical disease stage. Conclusions Despite using single infection samples and samples from a single variant lineage, intra-type variants of HPV16 were not differentially associated with cervical disease. Monitoring intra-lineage, site-specific variants, such as T350G, is unlikely to be of diagnostic value. PMID:24823962

  18. Human papillomavirus 16 non-European variants are preferentially associated with high-grade cervical lesions.

    PubMed

    Freitas, Luciana Bueno; Chen, Zigui; Muqui, Elaine Freire; Boldrini, Neide Aparecida Tosato; Miranda, Angélica Espinosa; Spano, Liliana Cruz; Burk, Robert D

    2014-01-01

    HPV16 accounts for 50-70% of cervical cancer cases worldwide. Characterization of HPV16 variants previously indicated that they differ in risks for viral persistence, progression to cervical precancer and malignant cancer. The aim of this study was to examine the association of severity of disease with HPV16 variants identified in specimens (n = 281) obtained from a Cervical Pathology and Colposcopy outpatient clinic in the University Hospital of Espírito Santo State, Southeastern Brazil, from April 2010 to November 2011. All cytologic and histologic diagnoses were determined prior to definitive treatment. The DNA was isolated using QIAamp DNA Mini Kit and HPV was detected by amplification with PGMY09/11 primers and positive samples were genotyped by RFLP analyses and reverse line blot. The genomes of the HPV16 positive samples were sequenced, from which variant lineages were determined. Chi2 statistics was performed to test the association of HPV16 variants between case and control groups. The prevalence of HR-HPV types in variants. Classification of disease into CIN3+ vs. variants with an increased risk of CIN3+ is consistent with an HPV16 genetically determined enhanced oncogenicity. The prevalence of genetic variants of HPV16 is distributed across different geographical areas and with recent population admixture, only empiric data will provide information on the highest risk HPV16 variants within a given population.

  19. Different Association of Human Papillomavirus 16 Variants with Early and Late Presentation of Cervical Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Alfaro, Ana; Juárez-Torres, Eligia; Medina-Martínez, Ingrid; Mateos-Guerrero, Norma; Bautista-Huerta, Maura; Román-Bassaure, Edgar; Villegas-Sepúlveda, Nicolás; Berumen, Jaime

    2016-01-01

    The median age of cervical cancer (CC) presentation coincides with the mean age of menopause presentation (49 years) in Mexico. Here, we investigated the association between different HPV16 variants and early (≤ 49 years) or delayed (≥ 50 years) CC presentation. We conducted a case-case study that included 462 CCs, 386 squamous cell carcinomas (SCC), 63 adenocarcinomas (ACC), and 13 additional cell types. Variants were identified by PCR and DNA sequencing. The risk conferred by each variant for developing CC earlier than 50 years was analyzed using a univariate logistic regression model considering old-aged patients (≥ 50 years) and non-HPV16 cases as the reference variables. Overall, the frequency of HPV16 was 50.9%, and the only identified variants were the European A1/2 (31.2%) and the Asian-American D2 (10.8%), and D3 (8.9%). D2 was mainly associated with ≤ 49-year-old patients (15.9%); A1/2 was uniformly distributed between the two age groups (~31%), whereas D3 increased with age to a frequency of 11.8% in the older group. Only the D2 variant conferred a 3.3-fold increase in the risk of developing CC before 50 years of age (OR = 3.3, 95% CI = 1.7–6.6, p < 0.001) in relation with non-HPV16 cases. Remarkably, this risk was higher for ACC (OR = 6.0, 95% CI = 1.1–33, p < 0.05) than for SCC (OR = 2.8, 95% CI = 1.3–5.9, p < 0.01). Interestingly, when analyzing only the HPV16-positive CC, D2 increases (OR = 2.5, 95% CI = 1.2–5, p < 0.05) and D3 decreases (OR = 0.45, 95% CI 0.2–0.9, p < 0.05) the risk to develop CC before 50 years old in relation with A1/2 variant. These results indicated that D2 variant is associated with early and D3 with delayed CC presentation, whereas A1/2 variant was uniformly distributed between the two age groups. PMID:28036379

  20. Selection and analysis of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 variants with increased resistance to ABT-538, a novel protease inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Markowitz, M; Mo, H; Kempf, D J; Norbeck, D W; Bhat, T N; Erickson, J W; Ho, D D

    1995-01-01

    Inhibitors of the human immunodeficiency virus protease represent a promising new class of antiretroviral drugs for the treatment of AIDS. We now report the in vitro selection of viral variants with decreased sensitivity to a symmetry-based protease inhibitor, ABT-538, currently being tested in clinical trials. Molecular characterization of the variants shows that an isoleucine-to-valine substitution at position 84 results in a substantial decrease in sensitivity to the drug. Moreover, an additional mutation at position 82, valine to phenylalanine, further decreases viral susceptibility to ABT-538. Three-dimensional analysis of the protease-drug complex provides a structural explanation for the relative drug resistance induced by these two mutations. These findings emphasize the importance of closely monitoring patients receiving ABT-538 for the emergence of viral resistance and provide information that may prove useful in designing the next generation of protease inhibitors. PMID:7815532

  1. Naturally Occurring Genetic Variants in Human Chromogranin A (CHGA) Associated with Hypertension as well as Hypertensive Renal Disease

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Yuqing; Rao, Fangwen; Wen, Gen; Gayen, Jiaur R.; Zhang, Kuixing; Vaingankar, Sucheta M.; Biswas, Nilima; Mahata, Manjula; Friese, Ryan S.; Fung, Maple M.; Salem, Rany M.; Nievergelt, Caroline; Bhatnagar, Vibha; Hook, Vivian Y.; Ziegler, Michael G.; Mahata, Sushil K.; Hamilton, Bruce A.

    2010-01-01

    Chromogranin A (CHGA) plays a fundamental role in the biogenesis of catecholamine secretory granules. Changes in storage and release of CHGA in clinical and experimental hypertension prompted us to study whether genetic variation at the CHGA locus might contribute to alterations in autonomic function, and hence hypertension and its target organ consequences such as hypertensive renal disease (nephrosclerosis). Systematic polymorphism discovery across the human CHGA locus revealed both common and unusual variants in both the open reading frame and such regulatory regions as the proximal promoter and 3′-UTR. In chromaffin cell-transfected CHGA 3′-UTR and promoter/luciferase reporter plasmids, the functional consequences of the regulatory/non-coding allelic variants were documented. Variants in both the proximal promoter and the 3′-UTR displayed statistical associations with hypertension. Genetic variation in the proximal CHGA promoter predicted glomerular filtration rate in healthy twins. However, for hypertensive renal damage, both end-stage renal disease and rate of progression of earlier disease were best predicted by variants in the 3′-UTR. Finally, mechanistic studies were undertaken initiated by the clue that CHGA promoter variation predicted circulating endothelin-1. In cultured endothelial cells, CHGA triggered co-release of not only the vasoconstrictor and pro-fibrotic endothelin-1, but also the pro-coagulant von Willebrand Factor and the pro-angiogenic angiopoietin-2. These findings, coupled with stimulation of endothelin-1 release from glomerular capillary endothelial cells by CHGA, suggest a plausible mechanism whereby genetic variation at the CHGA locus eventuates in alterations in human renal function. These results document the consequences of genetic variation at the CHGA locus for cardiorenal disease and suggest mechanisms whereby such variation achieves functional effects. PMID:21061160

  2. Naturally occurring genetic variants in human chromogranin A (CHGA) associated with hypertension as well as hypertensive renal disease.

    PubMed

    Chen, Yuqing; Rao, Fangwen; Wen, Gen; Gayen, Jiaur R; Zhang, Kuixing; Vaingankar, Sucheta M; Biswas, Nilima; Mahata, Manjula; Friese, Ryan S; Fung, Maple M; Salem, Rany M; Nievergelt, Caroline; Bhatnagar, Vibha; Hook, Vivian Y; Ziegler, Michael G; Mahata, Sushil K; Hamilton, Bruce A; O'Connor, Daniel T

    2010-11-01

    Chromogranin A (CHGA) plays a fundamental role in the biogenesis of catecholamine secretory granules. Changes in storage and release of CHGA in clinical and experimental hypertension prompted us to study whether genetic variation at the CHGA locus might contribute to alterations in autonomic function, and hence hypertension and its target organ consequences such as hypertensive renal disease (nephrosclerosis). Systematic polymorphism discovery across the human CHGA locus revealed both common and unusual variants in both the open reading frame and such regulatory regions as the proximal promoter and 30-UTR. In chromaffin cell-transfected CHGA 30-UTR and promoter/luciferase reporter plasmids, the functional consequences of the regulatory/non-coding allelic variants were documented. Variants in both the proximal promoter and the 30-UTR displayed statistical associations with hypertension. Genetic variation in the proximal CHGA promoter predicted glomerular filtration rate in healthy twins. However, for hypertensive renal damage, both end-stage renal disease and rate of progression of earlier disease were best predicted by variants in the 30-UTR. Finally, mechanistic studies were undertaken initiated by the clue that CHGA promoter variation predicted circulating endothelin-1. In cultured endothelial cells, CHGA triggered co-release of not only the vasoconstrictor and pro-fibrotic endothelin-1, but also the pro-coagulant von Willebrand Factor and the pro-angiogenic angiopoietin-2. These findings, coupled with stimulation of endothelin-1 release from glomerular capillary endothelial cells by CHGA, suggest a plausible mechanism whereby genetic variation at the CHGA locus eventuates in alterations in human renal function. These results document the consequences of genetic variation at the CHGA locus for cardiorenal disease and suggest mechanisms whereby such variation achieves functional effects.

  3. Alternative splicing variants of carbonic anhydrase IX in human non-small cell lung cancer.

    PubMed

    Malentacchi, Francesca; Simi, Lisa; Nannelli, Caterina; Andreani, Matteo; Janni, Alberto; Pastorekova, Silvia; Orlando, Claudio

    2009-06-01

    In human cancers, carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX) contributes to maintain intracellular and extracellular pH under hypoxic conditions, but also influences regulation of cell proliferation and tumor progression. CaIX was previously indicated as an independent prognostic marker in non-small cell lung carcinoma (NSCLC). Very recently a CAIX alternative splicing isoform, generating a transcript lacking of exons 8-9, was detected in cancer cells independently from the levels of hypoxia. This alternative splicing (AS) generates a truncated protein lacking the transmembrane region, the intracellular tail and the C-terminal of the catalytic domain and competes with the full-length (FL) isoform in the regulation of the extracellular pH, mainly in a mild hypoxic status. In the present study we measured the mRNA expression of FL and AS CAIX isoforms in 101 NSCLC and in paired not affected tissues. The two isoforms were coexpressed in all NSCLC and normal tissues but while AS mRNA was prevalent in normal tissues (66+/-3%), the FL isoform was higher in NSCLC (58+/-2%, p=0.001). FL mRNA, but not AS, was statistically increased in NSCLC (p=0.01) and showed a statistical association with lymphnode involvement (p=0.009) and tumor stage (p=0.04). Global survival analysis of cancer/related death showed that high levels of FL mRNA were predictive of unfavorable outcome (p<0.0001) and shorter disease-free survival (p<0.0001). Multivariate analysis indicated that FL is an independent prognostic factor for overall survival and higher levels of mRNA in NSCLC sensibly increase hazard ratio ( approximately sixfold). In conclusion, our results seems to indicate that, at least in NSCLC, FL CAIX is the most accurate surrogate of hypoxic stress and represents the only variant with a prognostic role. These data indicate the importance of a separate measurement of the two isoforms in cancer and the need of an accurate re-evaluation of most studies on the clinical role of CAIX in cancer diagnosis.

  4. Structural insights into human angiogenin variants implicated in Parkinson’s disease and Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis

    PubMed Central

    Bradshaw, William J.; Rehman, Saima; Pham, Tram T. K.; Thiyagarajan, Nethaji; Lee, Rebecca L.; Subramanian, Vasanta; Acharya, K. Ravi

    2017-01-01

    Mutations in Angiogenin (ANG), a member of the Ribonuclease A superfamily (also known as RNase 5) are known to be associated with Amyotrophic Lateral Sclerosis (ALS, motor neurone disease) (sporadic and familial) and Parkinson’s Disease (PD). In our previous studies we have shown that ANG is expressed in neurons during neuro-ectodermal differentiation, and that it has both neurotrophic and neuroprotective functions. In addition, in an extensive study on selective ANG-ALS variants we correlated the structural changes to the effects on neuronal survival and the ability to induce stress granules in neuronal cell lines. Furthermore, we have established that ANG-ALS variants which affect the structure of the catalytic site and either decrease or increase the RNase activity affect neuronal survival. Neuronal cell lines expressing the ANG-ALS variants also lack the ability to form stress granules. Here, we report a detailed experimental structural study on eleven new ANG-PD/ALS variants which will have implications in understanding the molecular basis underlying their role in PD and ALS. PMID:28176817

  5. Pseudomonas aeruginosa variants isolated from patients with cystic fibrosis are killed by a bactericidal protein from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes.

    PubMed Central

    Siefferman, C M; Regelmann, W E; Gray, B H

    1991-01-01

    The susceptibility of paired mucoid and nonmucoid variants of Pseudomonas aeruginosa isolated from 13 patients with cystic fibrosis (CF) to killing by a 55,000-Da bactericidal protein (BP55) from human polymorphonuclear leukocytes was studied. Mucoid and nonmucoid variants were equally sensitive to killing by BP55 at both pH 5.6 and pH 7.2. Eleven of the isolates were resistant to the bactericidal activity of 10% normal human serum but were as sensitive as the serum-sensitive isolates to BP55. Similarly, the 15 isolates with lipopolysaccharides (LPS) containing O-polysaccharide side chains (smooth LPS) were as sensitive to BP55 as those isolates with rough LPS.P. aeruginosa isolates from patients in poor clinical condition were more likely to have LPS of the smooth type and to be resistant to killing by 10% human serum than the isolates from patients in good clinical condition. We have concluded that the susceptibility of the P. aeruginosa isolates from patients with CF to killing by BP55 does not correlate with mucoid or nonmucoid variations, with the presence or absence of smooth LPS, or with the sensitivity or resistance to killing by normal human serum. Images PMID:1903774

  6. Association of common variants in TOMM40/APOE/APOC1 region with human longevity in a Chinese population.

    PubMed

    Lin, Rong; Zhang, Yunxia; Yan, Dongjing; Liao, Xiaoping; Gong, Gu; Hu, Junjie; Fu, Yunxin; Cai, Wangwei

    2016-04-01

    Apolipoprotein E (APOE), translocase of outer mitochondrial membrane 40 homolog (TOMM40) and apolipoprotein C-I (APOC1) may extend lifespan by marked delay or escape from age-related diseases. This study aimed to elucidate the association of human longevity with genetic variations in TOMM40/APOE/APOC1 region in a Chinese population. Ten tag single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in the TOMM40/APOE/APOC1 region were successfully genotyped in 616 unrelated long-lived individuals and 846 younger controls. Of the 10 SNPs, rs7254892 in 5' upstream of TOMM40 showed significant association with human longevity (G/A-A/A vs G/G: odds ratio (OR)=1.59, 95% confidence interval (CI)=1.20-2.09, P=0.0011, Bonferroni corrected P (Pc)=0.033). The haplotype analysis suggested that individuals carrying the haplotype A-A-A-A-T-A-T-G-C-A (rs7254892-rs157580-rs2075649-rs2075650-rs157582-rs8106922-rs1160985-rs405697-rs439401-rs445925) tended to have longer lifespan than those carrying the most common haplotype G-G-A-A-C-A-C-A-T-G (OR=1.59, 95% CI=1.19-2.12, P=0.0018, Pc=0.0216). These findings indicated that variants in TOMM40/APOE/APOC1 region might be associated with human longevity. Further studies are needed to identify the causal genetic variants influencing human longevity.

  7. Altered Proteome of Burkholderia pseudomallei Colony Variants Induced by Exposure to Human Lung Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Al-Maleki, Anis Rageh; Mariappan, Vanitha; Vellasamy, Kumutha Malar; Tay, Sun Tee; Vadivelu, Jamuna

    2015-01-01

    Burkholderia pseudomallei primary diagnostic cultures demonstrate colony morphology variation associated with expression of virulence and adaptation proteins. This study aims to examine the ability of B. pseudomallei colony variants (wild type [WT] and small colony variant [SCV]) to survive and replicate intracellularly in A549 cells and to identify the alterations in the protein expression of these variants, post-exposure to the A549 cells. Intracellular survival and cytotoxicity assays were performed followed by proteomics analysis using two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. B. pseudomallei SCV survive longer than the WT. During post-exposure, among 259 and 260 protein spots of SCV and WT, respectively, 19 were differentially expressed. Among SCV post-exposure up-regulated proteins, glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase, fructose-bisphosphate aldolase (CbbA) and betaine aldehyde dehydrogenase were associated with adhesion and virulence. Among the down-regulated proteins, enolase (Eno) is implicated in adhesion and virulence. Additionally, post-exposure expression profiles of both variants were compared with pre-exposure. In WT pre- vs post-exposure, 36 proteins were differentially expressed. Of the up-regulated proteins, translocator protein, Eno, nucleoside diphosphate kinase (Ndk), ferritin Dps-family DNA binding protein and peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerase B were implicated in invasion and virulence. In SCV pre- vs post-exposure, 27 proteins were differentially expressed. Among the up-regulated proteins, flagellin, Eno, CbbA, Ndk and phenylacetate-coenzyme A ligase have similarly been implicated in adhesion, invasion. Protein profiles differences post-exposure provide insights into association between morphotypic and phenotypic characteristics of colony variants, strengthening the role of B. pseudomallei morphotypes in pathogenesis of melioidosis. PMID:25996927

  8. Fractionation of the genetic variants of human alpha 1-acid glycoprotein in the native form by chromatography on an immobilized copper(II) affinity adsorbent. Heterogeneity of the separate variants by isoelectrofocusing and by concanavalin A affinity chromatography.

    PubMed

    Hervé, F; Gomas, E; Duché, J C; Tillement, J P

    1993-05-19

    Fractionation of the three main genetic variants (F1, S and A) of human alpha 1-acid glycoprotein (AAG), in their native (sialylated) form, by chromatography on immobilized copper(II) affinity adsorbent was investigated. This chromatographic method had been previously developed to fractionate the desialylated protein variants. For that purpose, the three main AAG phenotypes samples (F1S/A, F1/A and S/A), which had been previously isolated from individual human plasma samples, and an AAG sample from commercial source (a mixture of the phenotypes) were used in the native form. Affinity chromatography of these different samples on an iminodiacetate Sepharose-copper(II) gel at pH 7 resolved two protein peaks, irrespective of the origin of the native AAG sample used. The unbound peak 1 was found to consist of the F1, the S or both variants, depending on the phenotype of the AAG sample used in the chromatography. The bound peak 2 was found to consist of the A variant in a pure form. The fractionation results obtained with native AAG were found to be the same as those originally yielded by the desialylated protein. However, comparison of the interactions of native and desialylated AAG with immobilized copper(II) ions, using an affinity chromatographic method and a non-chromatographic equilibrium binding technique, respectively, showed that desialylation increased the non-specific interactions of the protein with immobilized copper(II) ions. The AAG variants were not fractionated when affinity chromatography was performed using immobilized zinc, nickel or cobalt(II) ions, instead of copper. After purification of each variant in the sialylated form (F1, S and A), their respective heterogeneity was studied by analytical isoelectrofocusing with carrier ampholytes in the pH range 2.5-4.5. In addition, the lectin-binding behaviour of the separate sialylated AAG variants was investigated by affinity chromatography on immobilized concanavalin A.

  9. Co-expression of the human cannabinoid receptor coding region splice variants (hCB₁) affects the function of hCB₁ receptor complexes.

    PubMed

    Bagher, Amina M; Laprairie, Robert B; Kelly, Melanie E M; Denovan-Wright, Eileen M

    2013-12-05

    The human type 1 cannabinoid (hCB1) receptor is expressed at high levels in the central nervous system. mRNA variants of the coding region of this receptor, human cannabinoid hCB1a and hCB1b receptors, have been identified, their biological function remains unclear. The present study demonstrated that the three human cannabinoid hCB1 coding region variants are expressed in the human and monkey (Macaca fascicularis) brain. Western blot analyses of homogenates from different regions of the monkey brain demonstrated that proteins with the expected molecular weights of the cannabinoid CB1, CB1a and CB1b receptors were co-expressed throughout the brain. Given the co-localization of these receptors, we hypothesized that physical interactions between the three splice variants may affect cannabinoid pharmacology. The human cannabinoid hCB1, hCB1a, and hCB1b receptors formed homodimers and heterodimers, as determined by BRET in transiently transfected HEK 293A cells. We found that the co-expression of the human cannabinoid hCB1 and each of the splice variants increased cell surface expression of the human cannabinoid hCB1 receptor and increased Gi/o-dependent ERK phosphorylation in response to cannabinoid agonists. Therefore, the human cannabinoid hCB1 coding region splice variants play an important physiological role in the activity of the endocannabinoid system.

  10. Biochemical analysis of six genetic variants of error-prone human DNA polymerase ι involved in translesion DNA synthesis.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jinsook; Song, Insil; Jo, Ara; Shin, Joo-Ho; Cho, Hana; Eoff, Robert L; Guengerich, F Peter; Choi, Jeong-Yun

    2014-10-20

    DNA polymerase (pol) ι is the most error-prone among the Y-family polymerases that participate in translesion synthesis (TLS). Pol ι can bypass various DNA lesions, e.g., N(2)-ethyl(Et)G, O(6)-methyl(Me)G, 8-oxo-7,8-dihydroguanine (8-oxoG), and an abasic site, though frequently with low fidelity. We assessed the biochemical effects of six reported genetic variations of human pol ι on its TLS properties, using the recombinant pol ι (residues 1-445) proteins and DNA templates containing a G, N(2)-EtG, O(6)-MeG, 8-oxoG, or abasic site. The Δ1-25 variant, which is the N-terminal truncation of 25 residues resulting from an initiation codon variant (c.3G > A) and also is the formerly misassigned wild-type, exhibited considerably higher polymerase activity than wild-type with Mg(2+) (but not with Mn(2+)), coinciding with its steady-state kinetic data showing a ∼10-fold increase in kcat/Km for nucleotide incorporation opposite templates (only with Mg(2+)). The R96G variant, which lacks a R96 residue known to interact with the incoming nucleotide, lost much of its polymerase activity, consistent with the kinetic data displaying 5- to 72-fold decreases in kcat/Km for nucleotide incorporation opposite templates either with Mg(2+) or Mn(2+), except for that opposite N(2)-EtG with Mn(2+) (showing a 9-fold increase for dCTP incorporation). The Δ1-25 variant bound DNA 20- to 29-fold more tightly than wild-type (with Mg(2+)), but the R96G variant bound DNA 2-fold less tightly than wild-type. The DNA-binding affinity of wild-type, but not of the Δ1-25 variant, was ∼7-fold stronger with 0.15 mM Mn(2+) than with Mg(2+). The results indicate that the R96G variation severely impairs most of the Mg(2+)- and Mn(2+)-dependent TLS abilities of pol ι, whereas the Δ1-25 variation selectively and substantially enhances the Mg(2+)-dependent TLS capability of pol ι, emphasizing the potential translational importance of these pol ι genetic variations, e.g., individual differences

  11. Human papillomavirus type 6 and 11 genetic variants found in 71 oral and anogenital epithelial samples from Australia.

    PubMed

    Danielewski, Jennifer A; Garland, Suzanne M; McCloskey, Jenny; Hillman, Richard J; Tabrizi, Sepehr N

    2013-01-01

    Genetic variation of 49 human papillomavirus (HPV) 6 and 22 HPV11 isolates from recurrent respiratory papillomatosis (RRP) (n = 17), genital warts (n = 43), anal cancer (n = 6) and cervical neoplasia cells (n = 5), was determined by sequencing the long control region (LCR) and the E6 and E7 genes. Comparative analysis of genetic variability was examined to determine whether different disease states resulting from HPV6 or HPV11 infection cluster into distinct variant groups. Sequence variation analysis of HPV6 revealed that isolates cluster into variants within previously described HPV6 lineages, with the majority (65%) clustering to HPV6 sublineage B1 across the three genomic regions examined. Overall 72 HPV6 and 25 HPV11 single nucleotide variations, insertions and deletions were observed within samples examined. In addition, missense alterations were observed in the E6/E7 genes for 6 HPV6 and 5 HPV11 variants. No nucleotide variations were identified in any isolates at the four E2 binding sites for HPV6 or HPV11, nor were any isolates found to be identical to the HPV6 lineage A or HPV11 sublineage A1 reference genomes. Overall, a high degree of sequence conservation was observed between isolates across each of the regions investigated for both HPV6 and HPV11. Genetic variants identified a slight association with HPV6 and anogenital lesions (p = 0.04). This study provides important information on the genetic diversity of circulating HPV 6 and HPV11 variants within the Australian population and supports the observation that the majority of HPV6 isolates cluster to the HPV6 sublineage B1 with anogenital lesions demonstrating an association with this sublineage (p = 0.02). Comparative analysis of Australian isolates for both HPV6 and HPV11 to those from other geographical regions based on the LCR revealed a high degree of sequence similarity throughout the world, confirming previous observations that there are no geographically specific variants for these HPV types.

  12. Intramolecular relationships in cholinesterases revealed by oocyte expression of site-directed and natural variants of human BCHE.

    PubMed Central

    Neville, L F; Gnatt, A; Loewenstein, Y; Seidman, S; Ehrlich, G; Soreq, H

    1992-01-01

    Structure-function relationships of cholinesterases (CHEs) were studied by expressing site-directed and naturally occurring mutants of human butyrylcholinesterase (BCHE) in microinjected Xenopus oocytes. Site-directed mutagenesis of the conserved electronegative Glu441,Ile442,Glu443 domain to Gly441,Ile442,Gln443 drastically reduced the rate of butyrylthiocholine (BTCh) hydrolysis and caused pronounced resistance to dibucaine binding. These findings implicate the charged Glu441,Ile442,Glu443 domain as necessary for a functional CHE catalytic triad as well as for binding quinoline derivatives. Asp70 to Gly substitution characteristic of 'atypical' BCHE, failed to alter its Km towards BTCh or dibucaine binding but reduced hydrolytic activity to 25% of control. Normal hydrolytic activity was restored to Gly70 BCHE by additional His114 or Tyr561 mutations, both of which co-appear with Gly70 in natural BCHE variants, which implies a likely selection advantage for these double BCHE mutants over the single Gly70 BCHE variant. Gly70 BCHE variants also displayed lower binding as compared with Asp70 BCHE to cholinergic drugs, certain choline esters and solanidine. These effects were ameliorated in part by additional mutations or in binding solanidine complexed with sugar residues. These observations indicate that structural interactions exist between N' and C' terminal domains in CHEs which contribute to substrate and inhibitor binding and suggest a crucial involvement of both electrostatic and hydrophobic domains in the build-up of the CHE active center. Images PMID:1373381

  13. Amyloidogenic Propensity of a Natural Variant of Human Apolipoprotein A-I: Stability and Interaction with Ligands

    PubMed Central

    Rosú, Silvana A.; Rimoldi, Omar J.; Prieto, Eduardo D.; Curto, Lucrecia M.; Delfino, José M.

    2015-01-01

    A number of naturally occurring mutations of human apolipoprotein A-I (apoA-I) have been associated with hereditary amyloidoses. The molecular mechanisms involved in amyloid-associated pathology remain largely unknown. Here we examined the effects of the Arg173Pro point mutation in apoA-I on the structure, stability, and aggregation propensity, as well as on the ability to bind to putative ligands. Our results indicate that the mutation induces a drastic loss of stability, and a lower efficiency to bind to phospholipid vesicles at physiological pH, which could determine the observed higher tendency to aggregate as pro-amyloidogenic complexes. Incubation under acidic conditions does not seem to induce significant desestabilization or aggregation tendency, neither does it contribute to the binding of the mutant to sodium dodecyl sulfate. While the binding to this detergent is higher for the mutant as compared to wt apoA-I, the interaction of the Arg173Pro variant with heparin depends on pH, being lower at pH 5.0 and higher than wt under physiological pH conditions. We suggest that binding to ligands as heparin or other glycosaminoglycans could be key events tuning the fine details of the interaction of apoA-I variants with the micro-environment, and probably eliciting the toxicity of these variants in hereditary amyloidoses. PMID:25950566

  14. Human OCT2 variant c.808G>T confers protection effect against cisplatin-induced ototoxicity

    PubMed Central

    Lanvers-Kaminsky, Claudia; Sprowl, Jason A; Malath, Ingrid; Deuster, Dirk; Eveslage, Maria; Schlatter, Eberhard; Mathijssen, Ron HJ; Boos, Joachim; Jürgens, Heribert; am Zehnhoff-Dinnesen, Antionette G; Sparreboom, Alex; Ciarimboli, Giuliano

    2016-01-01

    Aim Assuming that genetic variants of the SLC22A2 and SLC31A1 transporter affect patients’ susceptibility to cisplatin-induced ototoxicity, we compared the distribution of 11 SLC22A2 variants and the SLC31A1 variant rs10981694 between patients with and without cisplatin-induced ototoxicity. Patients & methods Genotyping was performed in 64 pediatric patients and significant findings were re-evaluated in 66 adults. Results The SLC22A2 polymorphism rs316019 (c.808G>T; Ser270Ala) was significantly associated with protection from cisplatin-induced ototoxicity in the pediatric (p = 0.022) and the adult cohort (p = 0.048; both: Fisher’s exact test). This result was confirmed by multiple logistic regression analysis accounting for age which was identified as a relevant factor for ototoxicity as well (rs316019: OR [G/T vs G/G] = 0.12, p = 0.009; age: OR [per year]: 0.84, p = 0.02). Conclusion These results identified rs316019 as potential pharmacogenomic marker for cisplatin-induced ototoxicity and point to a critical role of SLC22A2 for cisplatin transport in humans and its contribution to the organ specific side effects of this drug. PMID:25823781

  15. Kangaroo IGF-II is structurally and functionally similar to the human [Ser29]-IGF-II variant.

    PubMed

    Yandell, C A; Francis, G L; Wheldrake, J F; Upton, Z

    1999-06-01

    Kangaroo IGF-II has been purified from western grey kangaroo (Macropus fuliginosus) serum and characterised in a number of in vitro assays. In addition, the complete cDNA sequence of mature IGF-II has been obtained by reverse-transcription polymerase chain reaction. Comparison of the kangaroo IGF-II cDNA sequence with known IGF-II sequences from other species revealed that it is very similar to the human variant, [Ser29]-hIGF-II. Both the variant and kangaroo IGF-II contain an insert of nine nucleotides that encode the amino acids Leu-Pro-Gly at the junction of the B and C domains of the mature protein. The deduced kangaroo IGF-II protein sequence also contains three other amino acid changes that are not observed in human IGF-II. These amino acid differences share similarities with the changes described in many of the IGF-IIs reported for non-mammalian species. Characterisation of human IGF-II, kangaroo IGF-II, chicken IGF-II and [Ser29]-hIGF-II in a number of in vitro assays revealed that all four proteins are functionally very similar. No significant differences were observed in the ability of the IGF-IIs to bind to the bovine IGF-II/cation-independent mannose 6-phosphate receptor or to stimulate protein synthesis in rat L6 myoblasts. However, differences were observed in their abilities to bind to IGF-binding proteins (IGFBPs) present in human serum. Kangaroo, chicken and [Ser29]-hIGF-II had lower apparent affinities for human IGFBPs than did human IGF-II. Thus, it appears that the major circulating form of IGF-II in the kangaroo and a minor form of IGF-II found in human serum are structurally and functionally very similar. This suggests that the splice site that generates both the variant and major form of human IGF-II must have evolved after the divergence of marsupials from placental mammals.

  16. Novel inhibitors of human leukocyte elastase and cathepsin G. Sequence variants of squash seed protease inhibitor with altered protease selectivity

    SciTech Connect

    McWherter, C.A.; Walkenhorst, W.F.; Glover, G.I. ); Campbell, E.J. )

    1989-07-11

    Novel peptide inhibitors of human leukocyte elastase (HLE) and cathepsin G (CG) were prepared by solid-phase peptide synthesis of P1 amino acid sequence variants of Curcurbita maxima trypsin inhibitor III (CMTI-III), a 29-residue peptide found in squash seed. A systematic study of P1 variants indicated that P1, Arg, Lys, Leu, Ala, Phe, and Met inhibit trypsin; P1, Val, Ile, Gly, Leu, Ala, Phe, and Met inhibit HLE; P1 Leu, Ala, Phe, and Met inhibit CG and chymotrypsin. Variants with P1, Val, Ile, or Gly were selective inhibitors of HLE, while inhibition of trypsin required P1 amino acids with an unbranched {beta} carbon. Studies of Val-5-CMTI-III (P1 Val) inhibition of HLE demonstrated a 1:1 binding stoichiometry with a (K{sub i}){sub app} of 8.7 nM. Inhibition of HLE by Gly-5-CMTI-III indicated a significant role for reactive-site structural moieties other than the P1 side chain. Val-5-CMTI-III inhibited both HLE and human polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN) proteolysis of surface-bound {sup 125}I-labeled fibronectin. Val-5-CMTI-III was more effective at preventing turnover of a peptide p-nitroanilide substrate than halting dissolution of {sup 125}I-labeled fibronectin. It was about as effective as human serum {alpha}{sub 1}-proteinase inhibitor in preventing PMN degradation of the connective tissue substrate. In addition to providing interesting candidates for controlling inflammatory cell proteolytic injury, the CMTI-based inhibitors are ideal for studying molecular recognition because of their small size, their ease of preparation, and the availability of sensitive and quantitative assays for intermolecular interactions.

  17. Pathogenic cellular role of the p.L104P human cationic trypsinogen variant in chronic pancreatitis

    PubMed Central

    Balázs, Anita; Hegyi, Péter

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the PRSS1 gene encoding human cationic trypsinogen are associated with hereditary and sporadic chronic pancreatitis. High-penetrance PRSS1 mutations found in hereditary pancreatitis alter activation and/or degradation of cationic trypsinogen, thereby promoting intrapancreatic trypsinogen activation. In contrast, a number of rare PRSS1 variants identified in subjects with sporadic chronic pancreatitis cause misfolding and endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress. Mutation p.L104P is unique among natural PRSS1 variants, since it affects the substrate binding site of trypsin. The aim of the present study was to establish the clinical significance of variant p.L104P through functional analysis. We found that p.L104P trypsin exhibited decreased activity on peptide and protein substrates; however, autoactivation was slightly accelerated. Remarkably, binding of the physiological trypsin inhibitor serine protease inhibitor Kazal type 1 (SPINK1) was decreased by 70-fold. In the presence of the trypsinogen-degrading enzyme chymotrypsin C, mutant p.L104P autoactivated to higher trypsin levels than wild-type trypsinogen. This apparent resistance to degradation was due to slower cleavage at Arg122 rather than Leu81. Finally, secretion of mutant p.L104P from transfected cells was markedly reduced due to intracellular retention and aggregation with concomitant elevation of ER stress markers. We conclude that PRSS1 variant p.L104P exhibits a variety of phenotypic changes that can increase risk for chronic pancreatitis. Mutation-induced misfolding and associated ER stress are the dominant effects that support a direct pathogenic role in chronic pancreatitis. PMID:26822915

  18. Genetic variants in AVPR1A linked to autism predict amygdala activation and personality traits in healthy humans.

    PubMed

    Meyer-Lindenberg, A; Kolachana, B; Gold, B; Olsh, A; Nicodemus, K K; Mattay, V; Dean, M; Weinberger, D R

    2009-10-01

    In mammals, the neuropeptide vasopressin is a key molecule for complex emotional and social behaviours. Two microsatellite polymorphisms, RS1 and RS3, near the promoter of AVPR1A, encoding the receptor subtype most heavily implicated in behaviour regulation, have been linked to autism and behavioural traits. However, the impact of these variants on human brain function is unknown. Here we show that human amygdala function is strongly associated with genetic variation in AVPR1A. Using an imaging genetics approach in a sample of 121 volunteers studied with an emotional face-matching paradigm, we found that differential activation of amygdala is observed in carriers of risk alleles for RS3 and RS1. Alleles in RS1 previously reported to be significantly over- and undertransmitted to autistic probands showed opposing effects on amygdala activation. Furthermore, we show functional difference in human brain between short and long repeat lengths that mirror findings recently obtained in a corresponding variant in voles. Our results indicate a neural mechanism mediating genetic risk for autism through an impact on amygdala signalling and provide a rationale for exploring therapeutic strategies aimed at abnormal amygdala function in this disorder.

  19. Common exonic missense variants in the C2 domain of the human KIBRA protein modify lipid binding and cognitive performance.

    PubMed

    Duning, K; Wennmann, D O; Bokemeyer, A; Reissner, C; Wersching, H; Thomas, C; Buschert, J; Guske, K; Franzke, V; Flöel, A; Lohmann, H; Knecht, S; Brand, S-M; Pöter, M; Rescher, U; Missler, M; Seelheim, P; Pröpper, C; Boeckers, T M; Makuch, L; Huganir, R; Weide, T; Brand, E; Pavenstädt, H; Kremerskothen, J

    2013-06-18

    The human KIBRA gene has been linked to human cognition through a lead intronic single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP; rs17070145) that is associated with episodic memory performance and the risk to develop Alzheimer's disease. However, it remains unknown how this relates to the function of the KIBRA protein. Here, we identified two common missense SNPs (rs3822660G/T [M734I], rs3822659T/G [S735A]) in exon 15 of the human KIBRA gene to affect cognitive performance, and to be in almost complete linkage disequilibrium with rs17070145. The identified SNPs encode variants of the KIBRA C2 domain with distinct Ca(2+) dependent binding preferences for monophosphorylated phosphatidylinositols likely due to differences in the dynamics and folding of the lipid-binding pocket. Our results further implicate the KIBRA protein in higher brain function and provide direction to the cellular pathways involved.

  20. Common exonic missense variants in the C2 domain of the human KIBRA protein modify lipid binding and cognitive performance

    PubMed Central

    Duning, K; Wennmann, D O; Bokemeyer, A; Reissner, C; Wersching, H; Thomas, C; Buschert, J; Guske, K; Franzke, V; Flöel, A; Lohmann, H; Knecht, S; Brand, S-M; Pöter, M; Rescher, U; Missler, M; Seelheim, P; Pröpper, C; Boeckers, T M; Makuch, L; Huganir, R; Weide, T; Brand, E; Pavenstädt, H; Kremerskothen, J

    2013-01-01

    The human KIBRA gene has been linked to human cognition through a lead intronic single-nucleotide polymorphism (SNP; rs17070145) that is associated with episodic memory performance and the risk to develop Alzheimer's disease. However, it remains unknown how this relates to the function of the KIBRA protein. Here, we identified two common missense SNPs (rs3822660G/T [M734I], rs3822659T/G [S735A]) in exon 15 of the human KIBRA gene to affect cognitive performance, and to be in almost complete linkage disequilibrium with rs17070145. The identified SNPs encode variants of the KIBRA C2 domain with distinct Ca2+ dependent binding preferences for monophosphorylated phosphatidylinositols likely due to differences in the dynamics and folding of the lipid-binding pocket. Our results further implicate the KIBRA protein in higher brain function and provide direction to the cellular pathways involved. PMID:23778582

  1. The Human Central Canal of the Spinal Cord: A Comprehensive Review of its Anatomy, Embryology, Molecular Development, Variants, and Pathology

    PubMed Central

    Henry, Brandon M; Tomaszewski, Krzysztof A; Loukas, Marios; Iwanaga, Joe; Oskouian, Rod J; Tubbs, R. Shane

    2016-01-01

    The human central canal of the spinal cord is often overlooked. However, with advancements in imaging quality, this structure can be visualized in more detail than ever before. Therefore, a timely review of this part of the cord seemed warranted. Using standard search engines, a literature review was performed for the development, anatomy, and pathology involving the central canal. Clinicians who treat patients with issues near the spine or interpret imaging of the spinal cord should be familiar with the morphology and variants of the central canal.   PMID:28097078

  2. Is there a difference among human populations in the rate with which mutation produces electrophoretic variants?

    PubMed Central

    Neel, J V; Rothman, E

    1981-01-01

    Data are summarized that suggest that tropical-zone/tribal/nonindustrialized populations have higher frequencies of certain types of protein variants than temperate-zone/civilized/industrial populations, and it is demonstrated that these differences are not an artifact produced by the contagious type of sampling used with respect to tribal populations. Evidence is reviewed that suggests that a possible explanation of this difference is higher mutation rates in the tribal populations studied. PMID:6942419

  3. Variant-specific persistence of infections with human papillomavirus Types 31, 33, 45, 56 and 58 and risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia.

    PubMed

    Xi, Long Fu; Schiffman, Mark; Koutsky, Laura A; Hughes, James P; Hulbert, Ayaka; Shen, Zhenping; Galloway, Denise A; Kiviat, Nancy B

    2016-09-01

    In our previous study of the etiologic role of oncogenic human papillomavirus (HPV) types other than HPV16 and 18, we observed a significantly higher risk of cervical intraepithelial neoplasia Grades 2-3 (CIN2/3) associated with certain lineages of HPV types 31/33/45/56/58 [called high-risk (HR) variants] compared with non-HR variants. This study was to examine whether these intra-type variants differ in persistence of the infection and persistence-associated risk of CIN2/3. Study subjects were women who had any of HPV types 31/33/45/56/58 newly detected during a 2-year follow-up with 6-month intervals. For each type, the first positive sample was used for variant characterization. The association of reverting-to-negativity with group of the variants and CIN2/3 with length of positivity was assessed using discrete Cox regression and logistic regression, respectively. Of the 598 newly detected, type-specific HPV infections, 312 became undetectable during follow-up. Infections with HR, compared with non-HR, variants were marginally more likely to become negative [adjusted hazard ratio = 1.3; 95% confidence interval (CI), 0.9-1.8]. The adjusted odds ratio associating with the development of CIN2/3 was 3.0 (95% CI, 1.2-7.4) for persistent infections with HR variants for 6 months and 10.0 (95% CI, 3.8-38.0) for persistent infections with HR variants for 12-18 months as compared with the first positive detection of HR variants. Among women with non-HR variants, there were no appreciable differences in risk of CIN2/3 by length of positivity. Findings suggest that the lineage-associated risk of CIN2/3 was not mediated through a prolonged persistent infection, but oncogenic heterogeneity of the variants.

  4. Changes in localization of human discs large (hDlg) during keratinocyte differentiation is associated with expression of alternatively spliced hDlg variants

    SciTech Connect

    Roberts, S. . E-mail: s.roberts@bham.ac.uk; Calautti, E.; Vanderweil, S.; Nguyen, H.O.; Foley, A.; Baden, H.P.; Viel, A.

    2007-07-15

    Alternative spliced variants of the human discs large (hDlg) tumour suppressor are characterized by combinations of insertions. Here, using insertions I2- and I3-specific antibodies, we show that I2 and I3 variants have distinct distributions in epidermal and cervical epithelia. In skin and cervix, I3 variants are found in the cytoplasm. Cytoplasmic localization of I3 variants decreases as cervical keratinocytes differentiate, concomitant with relocalization to the cell periphery. I2 variants are found at the cell periphery of differentiated epidermal and cervical keratinocytes. Nuclear localization of I2 variants was evident in both tissues, with concentration of nuclear I2 variants in basal and parabasal cervical keratinocytes. A prominent nuclear localization of hDlg in cells of hyperproliferative layers of psoriatic lesions, but not in mature differentiated keratinocytes, together with I2 redistribution in differentiating keratinocytes, suggests that nuclear hDlg functions may be pertinent to growth of undifferentiated cells. Supporting our findings in squamous tissues, a decrease of nuclear hDlg and an increase of membrane-bound and cytoplasmic hDlg upon calcium-induced keratinocyte differentiation were not concomitant processes. Furthermore, we confirm that the exit of I2 variants from the nucleus is linked to stimulation of epithelial differentiation. The dynamic redistribution of hDlg also correlated with a marked increase in the expression of I3 variants while the level of I2 variants showed only a moderate decrease. Because changes in the intracellular distribution of hDlg splice variants, and in their expression levels, correlate with changes in differentiation state we hypothesize that the different hDlg isoforms play distinct roles at various stages of epithelial differentiation.

  5. Characterization of splice variants of the genes encoding human mitochondrial HMG-CoA lyase and HMG-CoA synthase, the main enzymes of the ketogenesis pathway.

    PubMed

    Puisac, Beatriz; Ramos, Mónica; Arnedo, María; Menao, Sebastián; Gil-Rodríguez, María Concepción; Teresa-Rodrigo, María Esperanza; Pié, Angeles; de Karam, Juan Carlos; Wesselink, Jan-Jaap; Giménez, Ignacio; Ramos, Feliciano J; Casals, Nuria; Gómez-Puertas, Paulino; Hegardt, Fausto G; Pié, Juan

    2012-04-01

    The genes HMGCS2 and HMGCL encode the two main enzymes for ketone-body synthesis, mitochondrial HMG-CoA synthase and HMG-CoA lyase. Here, we identify and describe possible splice variants of these genes in human tissues. We detected an alternative transcript of HMGCS2 carrying a deletion of exon 4, and two alternative transcripts of HMGCL with deletions of exons 5 and 6, and exons 5, 6 and 7, respectively. All splice variants maintained the reading frame. However, Western blot studies and overexpression measurements in eukaryotic or prokaryotic cell models did not reveal HL or mHS protein variants. Both genes showed a similar distribution of the inactive variants in different tissues. Surprisingly, the highest percentages were found in tissues where almost no ketone bodies are synthesized: heart, skeletal muscle and brain. Our results suggest that alternative splicing might coordinately block the two main enzymes of ketogenesis in specific human tissues.

  6. TGF-beta(1) regulation of human AT(1) receptor mRNA splice variants harboring exon 2.

    PubMed

    Martin, Mickey M; Buckenberger, Jessica A; Knoell, Daren L; Strauch, Arthur R; Elton, Terry S

    2006-04-25

    At least four alternatively spliced mRNAs can be synthesized from the human AT(1)R (hAT(1)R) gene that differ only in the inclusion or exclusion of exon 2 and/or 3. RT-PCR experiments demonstrate that splice variants harboring exon 2 accounts for at least 30% of all the hAT(1)R mRNA transcripts expressed in the human tissues investigated. Since exon 2 contains two upstream AUGs or open reading frames (uORFs), we hypothesized that these AUGs would inhibit the translation of the downstream hAT(1)R protein ORF harbored in exon 4. This study demonstrates that the inclusion of exon 2 in hAT(1)R mRNA transcripts dramatically reduces hAT(1)R protein levels (nine-fold) and significantly attenuates Ang II responsiveness ( approximately four-fold). Interestingly, only when both AUGs were mutated in combination were the hAT(1)R density and Ang II signaling levels comparable with those values obtained using mRNA splice variants that did not include exon 2. This observation is consistent with a model where the majority of the ribosomes likely translate uORF#1 and are then unable to reinitiate at the downstream hAT(1)R ORF, in part due to the presence of AUG#2 and to the short intercistronic spacing. Importantly, TGF-beta(1) treatment (4ng/ml for 4h) of fibroblasts up-regulated hAT(1)R mRNA splice variants, which harbored exon 2, six-fold. Since AT(1)R activation is closely associated with cardiovascular disease, the inclusion of exon 2 by alternative splicing represents a novel mechanism to reduce the overall production of the hAT(1)R protein and possibly limit the potential pathological effects of AT(1)R activation.

  7. Common variants in the human platelet PAR4 thrombin receptor alter platelet function and differ by race

    PubMed Central

    Edelstein, Leonard C.; Simon, Lukas M.; Lindsay, Cory R.; Kong, Xianguo; Teruel-Montoya, Raúl; Tourdot, Benjamin E.; Chen, Edward S.; Ma, Lin; Coughlin, Shaun; Nieman, Marvin; Holinstat, Michael; Shaw, Chad A.

    2014-01-01

    Human platelets express 2 thrombin receptors: protease-activated receptor (PAR)-1 and PAR4. Recently, we reported 3.7-fold increased PAR4-mediated aggregation kinetics in platelets from black subjects compared with white subjects. We now show that platelets from blacks (n = 70) express 14% more PAR4 protein than those from whites (n = 84), but this difference is not associated with platelet PAR4 function. Quantitative trait locus analysis identified 3 common single nucleotide polymorphisms in the PAR4 gene (F2RL3) associated with PAR4-induced platelet aggregation. Among these single nucleotide polymorphisms, rs773902 determines whether residue 120 in transmembrane domain 2 is an alanine (Ala) or threonine (Thr). Compared with the Ala120 variant, Thr120 was more common in black subjects than in white subjects (63% vs 19%), was associated with higher PAR4-induced human platelet aggregation and Ca2+ flux, and generated greater inositol 1,4,5-triphosphate in transfected cells. A second, less frequent F2RL3 variant, Phe296Val, was only observed in blacks and abolished the enhanced PAR4-induced platelet aggregation and 1,4,5-triphosphate generation associated with PAR4-Thr120. PAR4 genotype did not affect vorapaxar inhibition of platelet PAR1 function, but a strong pharmacogenetic effect was observed with the PAR4-specific antagonist YD-3 [1-benzyl-3(ethoxycarbonylphenyl)-indazole]. These findings may have an important pharmacogenetic effect on the development of new PAR antagonists. PMID:25293779

  8. Recombinant Human Butyrylcholinesterase G390V, the Fluoride-2 Variant, Expressed in Chinese Hamster Ovary Cells, Is a Low Affinity Variant

    DTIC Science & Technology

    1993-07-01

    The scarcity of the homozygous fluoride sodium fluoride, tacrine, dibucaine, amodiaquin, and variant has made it difficult to study this variant, and... phenylacetate (0.8 mM) as substrate. Progressive inhibition by te- was measured in the same pH range in the presence of 50 uM traisopropylpyrophosphoramide (iso...percentage inhibition by sodium fluoride of usual from 10 to 200 uM. Residual activity was measured by Ellman’s and fluoride BuChE is maximum (7, 14). method

  9. Characterization of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 variants with increased resistance to a C2-symmetric protease inhibitor.

    PubMed Central

    Ho, D D; Toyoshima, T; Mo, H; Kempf, D J; Norbeck, D; Chen, C M; Wideburg, N E; Burt, S K; Erickson, J W; Singh, M K

    1994-01-01

    Inhibitors of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease represent a promising class of antiviral drugs for the treatment of AIDS, and several are now in clinical trials. Here, we report the in vitro selection of viral variants with decreased sensitivity to a C2-symmetric protease inhibitor (A-77003). We show that a single amino acid substitution (Arg to Gln or Lys) at position 8 of the protease results in a substantial decrease in the inhibitory activity of the drug on the enzyme and a comparable increase in viral resistance. These findings, when analyzed by using the three-dimensional structure of the protease-drug complex, provide a strategic guide for the future development of inhibitors of the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 protease. Images PMID:8107264

  10. High conservation level of CD8(+) T cell immunogenic regions within an unusual H1N2 human influenza variant.

    PubMed

    Komadina, Naomi; Quiñones-Parra, Sergio M; Kedzierska, Katherine; McCaw, James M; Kelso, Anne; Leder, Karin; McVernon, Jodie

    2016-10-01

    Current seasonal influenza vaccines require regular updates due to antigenic drift causing loss of effectiveness and therefore providing little or no protection against novel influenza A subtypes. Next generation vaccines capable of eliciting CD8(+) T cell (CTL) mediated cross-protective immunity may offer a long-term alternative strategy. However, measuring pre- and existing levels of CTL cross-protection in humans is confounded by differences in infection histories across individuals. During 2000-2003, H1N2 viruses circulated persistently in the human population for the first time and we hypothesized that the viral nucleoprotein (NP) contained novel CTL epitopes that may have contributed to the survival of the viruses. This study describes the immunogenic NP peptides of H1N1, H2N2, and H3N2 influenza viruses isolated from humans over the past century, 1918-2003, by comparing this historical dataset to reference NP peptides from H1N2 that circulated in humans during 2000-2003. Observed peptides sequences ranged from highly conserved (15%) to highly variable (12%), with variation unrelated to reported immunodominance. No unique NP peptides which were exclusive to the H1N2 viruses were noted. However, the virus had inherited the NP from a recently emerged H3N2 variant containing novel peptides, which may have assisted its persistence. Any advantage due to this novelty was subsequently lost with emergence of a newer H3N2 variant in 2003. Our approach has potential to provide insight into the population context in which influenza viruses emerge, and may help to inform immunogenic peptide selection for CTL-inducing influenza vaccines. J. Med. Virol. 88:1725-1732, 2016. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  11. An Escherichia coli Expression Assay and Screen for Human Immunodeficiency Virus Protease Variants with Decreased Susceptibility to Indinavir

    PubMed Central

    Melnick, Laurence; Yang, Shiow-Shong; Rossi, Rick; Zepp, Charlie; Heefner, Donald

    1998-01-01

    We have developed a recombinant Escherichia coli screening system for the rapid detection and identification of amino acid substitutions in the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) protease associated with decreased susceptibility to the protease inhibitor indinavir (MK-639; Merck & Co.). The assay depends upon the correct processing of a segment of the HIV-1 HXB2 gag-pol polyprotein followed by detection of HIV reverse transcriptase activity by a highly sensitive, colorimetric enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay. The highly sensitive system detects the contributions of single substitutions such as I84V, L90M, and L63P. The combination of single substitutions further decreases the sensitivity to indinavir. We constructed a library of HIV protease variant genes containing dispersed mutations and, using the E. coli recombinant system, screened for mutants with decreased indinavir sensitivity. The discovered HIV protease variants contain amino acid substitutions commonly associated with indinavir resistance in clinical isolates, including the substitutions L90M, L63P, I64V, V82A, L24I, and I54T. One substitution, W6R, is also frequently found by the screen and has not been reported elsewhere. Of a total of 12,000 isolates that were screened, 12 protease variants with decreased sensitivity to indinavir were found. The L63P substitution, which is also associated with indinavir resistance, increases the stability of the isolated protease relative to that of the native HXB2 protease. The rapidity, sensitivity, and accuracy of this screen also make it useful for screening for novel inhibitors. We have found the approach described here to be useful for the detection of amino acid substitutions in HIV protease that have been associated with drug resistance as well as for the screening of novel compounds for inhibitory activity. PMID:9835523

  12. N-Glycan-dependent and -independent Quality Control of Human δ Opioid Receptor N-terminal Variants*

    PubMed Central

    Lackman, Jarkko J.; Markkanen, Piia M. H.; Hogue, Mireille; Bouvier, Michel; Petäjä-Repo, Ulla E.

    2014-01-01

    Quality control (QC) in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) scrutinizes newly synthesized proteins and directs them either to ER export or ER-associated degradation (ERAD). Here, we demonstrate that the human δ-opioid receptor (hδOR) is subjected to ERQC in both N-glycan-dependent and -independent manners. This was shown by investigating the biosynthesis and trafficking of wild-type and non-N-glycosylated F27C variants in metabolic pulse-chase assays coupled with flow cytometry and cell surface biotinylation. Both QC mechanisms distinguished the minute one-amino acid difference between the variants, targeting a large fraction of hδOR-Cys27 to ERAD. However, the N-glycan-independent QC was unable to compensate the N-glycan-dependent pathway, and some incompletely folded non-N-glycosylated hδOR-Cys27 reached the cell surface in conformation incompatible with ligand binding. The turnover of receptors associating with the molecular chaperone calnexin (CNX) was significantly slower for the hδOR-Cys27, pointing to an important role of CNX in the hδOR N-glycan-dependent QC. This was further supported by the fact that inhibiting the co-translational interaction of hδOR-Cys27 precursors with CNX led to their ERAD. Opioid receptor pharmacological chaperones released the CNX-bound receptors to ER export and, furthermore, were able to rescue the Cys27 variant from polyubiquitination and retrotranslocation to the cytosol whether carrying N-glycans or not. Taken together, the hδOR appears to rely primarily on the CNX-mediated N-glycan-dependent QC that has the capacity to assist in folding, whereas the N-glycan-independent mechanism constitutes an alternative, although less accurate, system for directing misfolded/incompletely folded receptors to ERAD, possibly in altered cellular conditions. PMID:24798333

  13. Global and Local Conformation of Human IgG Antibody Variants Rationalizes Loss of Thermodynamic Stability.

    PubMed

    Edgeworth, Matthew J; Phillips, Jonathan J; Lowe, David C; Kippen, Alistair D; Higazi, Daniel R; Scrivens, James H

    2015-12-07

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG) monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) are a major class of medicines, with high specificity and affinity towards targets spanning many disease areas. The antibody Fc (fragment crystallizable) region is a vital component of existing antibody therapeutics, as well as many next generation biologic medicines. Thermodynamic stability is a critical property for the development of stable and effective therapeutic proteins. Herein, a combination of ion-mobility mass spectrometry (IM-MS) and hydrogen/deuterium exchange mass spectrometry (HDX-MS) approaches have been used to inform on the global and local conformation and dynamics of engineered IgG Fc variants with reduced thermodynamic stability. The changes in conformation and dynamics have been correlated with their thermodynamic stability to better understand the destabilising effect of functional IgG Fc mutations and to inform engineering of future therapeutic proteins.

  14. Gain-of-function missense variant in SLC12A2, encoding the bumetanide-sensitive NKCC1 cotransporter, identified in human schizophrenia.

    PubMed

    Merner, Nancy D; Mercado, Adriana; Khanna, Arjun R; Hodgkinson, Alan; Bruat, Vanessa; Awadalla, Philip; Gamba, Gerardo; Rouleau, Guy A; Kahle, Kristopher T

    2016-06-01

    Perturbations of γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA) neurotransmission in the human prefrontal cortex have been implicated in the pathogenesis of schizophrenia (SCZ), but the mechanisms are unclear. NKCC1 (SLC12A2) is a Cl(-)-importing cation-Cl(-) cotransporter that contributes to the maintenance of depolarizing GABA activity in immature neurons, and variation in SLC12A2 has been shown to increase the risk for schizophrenia via alterations of NKCC1 mRNA expression. However, no disease-causing mutations or functional variants in NKCC1 have been identified in human patients with SCZ. Here, by sequencing three large French-Canadian (FC) patient cohorts of SCZ, autism spectrum disorders (ASD), and intellectual disability (ID), we identified a novel heterozygous NKCC1 missense variant (p.Y199C) in SCZ. This variant is located in an evolutionarily conserved residue in the critical N-terminal regulatory domain and exhibits high predicted pathogenicity. No NKCC1 variants were detected in ASD or ID, and no KCC3 variants were identified in any of the three neurodevelopmental disorder cohorts. Functional experiments show Y199C is a gain-of-function variant, increasing Cl(-)-dependent and bumetanide-sensitive NKCC1 activity even in conditions in which the transporter is normally functionally silent (hypotonicity). These data are the first to describe a functional missense variant in SLC12A2 in human SCZ, and suggest that genetically encoded dysregulation of NKCC1 may be a risk factor for, or contribute to the pathogenesis of, human SCZ.

  15. Combinatorial RNA Interference Therapy Prevents Selection of Pre-existing HBV Variants in Human Liver Chimeric Mice

    PubMed Central

    Shih, Yao-Ming; Sun, Cheng-Pu; Chou, Hui-Hsien; Wu, Tzu-Hui; Chen, Chun-Chi; Wu, Ping-Yi; Enya Chen, Yu-Chen; Bissig, Karl-Dimiter; Tao, Mi-Hua

    2015-01-01

    Selection of escape mutants with mutations within the target sequence could abolish the antiviral RNA interference activity. Here, we investigated the impact of a pre-existing shRNA-resistant HBV variant on the efficacy of shRNA therapy. We previously identified a highly potent shRNA, S1, which, when delivered by an adeno-associated viral vector, effectively inhibits HBV replication in HBV transgenic mice. We applied the “PICKY” software to systemically screen the HBV genome, then used hydrodynamic transfection and HBV transgenic mice to identify additional six highly potent shRNAs. Human liver chimeric mice were infected with a mixture of wild-type and T472C HBV, a S1-resistant HBV variant, and then treated with a single or combined shRNAs. The presence of T472C mutant compromised the therapeutic efficacy of S1 and resulted in replacement of serum wild-type HBV by T472C HBV. In contrast, combinatorial therapy using S1 and P28, one of six potent shRNAs, markedly reduced titers for both wild-type and T472C HBV. Interestingly, treatment with P28 alone led to the emergence of escape mutants with mutations in the P28 target region. Our results demonstrate that combinatorial RNAi therapy can minimize the escape of resistant viral mutants in chronic HBV patients. PMID:26482836

  16. Expression of familial Alzheimer's disease-linked human presenilin 1 variants impair enrichment-induced adult hippocampal neurogenesis.

    PubMed

    Veeraraghavalu, Karthikeyan; Choi, Se Hoon; Sisodia, Sangram S

    2010-01-01

    Presenilin 1 (PS1) plays a critical role in neurogenesis both during development and in the adult. We recently reported that ubiquitous expression of familial, early-onset Alzheimer's disease-linked PS1 mutants impairs enrichment-induced proliferation and neurogenesis of hippocampal neural progenitor cells (NPCs) in a non-cell autonomous manner. The impairments in proliferation and neurogenesis are, at least in part, due to alterations in the levels of specific chemokines and growth factors secreted from microglia expressing familial Alzheimer's disease-linked PS1 variants. To test our hypothesis that the fate of hippocampal NPCs in PS1 mutant mice is largely determined by cellular factors produced within the niche itself, we are examining the fate of NPCs from hippocampi of wild-type human PS1 or PS1 mutant mice that are marked with green fluorescent protein and BrdU following transplantation into heterologous hosts. In parallel, we have generated transgenic mice that harbor a transgene encoding the PS1DeltaE9 variant flanked with loxP sites that can be conditionally deleted in a temporal and/or spatial manner using specific cre driver lines. These studies will allow us to assess the contributions of varying cell types within the hippocampal stem cell niche that express mutant PS1 to NPC proliferation and differentiation.

  17. Genetic variants in human leukocyte antigen/DP-DQ influence both hepatitis B virus clearance and hepatocellular carcinoma development.

    PubMed

    Hu, Lingmin; Zhai, Xiangjun; Liu, Jibin; Chu, Minjie; Pan, Shandong; Jiang, Jie; Zhang, Yixin; Wang, Hua; Chen, Jianguo; Shen, Hongbing; Hu, Zhibin

    2012-05-01

    Recent genome-wide association studies showed that four single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DP (rs3077 and rs9277535) and HLA-DQ (rs2856718 and rs7453920) were associated with chronic hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection in Japanese populations. More than 75% of hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) patients are attributable to persistent infection of hepatitis B virus (HBV), especially in China. We genotyped these four SNPs in 1,300 HBV-positive HCC patients, 1,344 persistent HBV carriers, and 1,344 persons with HBV natural clearance from Southeast China to further test the associations of HLA-DP/DQ variants and with risk of both HBV clearance and HCC development. Logistic regression analyses showed that HLA-DQ rs2856718 significantly decre