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Sample records for human serum endogenous

  1. Validation of radioimmunoassay for human lactalbumin in the serum by testing the endogenous antibodies interference.

    PubMed

    Zangerle, P F; Franchimont, P

    1985-10-01

    For re-establishing the value of human lactalbumin as a functional marker of normal and pathological activity of the breast a sensitive and specific radioimmunoassay was established with the prior important control of the interference of endogenous antibodies. The specificity of the assay was assessed by the absence of interference from other proteins in milk or in breast cyst fluid, various hormones and tumor markers. Bovine lactalbumin showed incomplete and weak cross-reactivity. By an enzymoimmunoassay method it was shown that all the 222 human sera studied contain IgG immunoglobulins which bind bovine and human lactalbumin with greater reactivity of children's serum and without relationship to the blood groups. The maximum affinity constant of these endogenous immunoglobulins determined by the radioimmunoassay method is 4.5 times greater for bovine (Kd = 18 X 4(-11) M) than for human (Kd = 4 X 10(-11) M) lactalbumin. These endogenous anti-lactalbumin immunoglobulins caused no interference in the radioimmunoassay as shown by the complete correlation between the concentrations of human lactalbumin previously incubated and added to sera containing high-affinity antibodies and those measured directly in the radioimmunoassay. This lack of interference was explained by the higher (22-fold) affinity constant of the rabbit antiserum against human lactalbumin (Kd = 9 X 10(-12) M). The study of endogenous antibodies by the two enzymes and radioimmunoassay methods is needed before assessing and using a radioimmunoassay of human lactalbumin in serum.

  2. ASSAYS FOR ENDOGENOUS COMPONENTS OF HUMAN MILK: COMPARISON OF FRESH AND FROZEN SAMPLES AND CORRESPONDING ANALYTES IN SERUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Breast milk is a primary source of nutrition that contains many endogenous compounds that may affect infant development. The goals of this study were to develop reliable assays for selected endogenous breast milk components and to compare levels of those in milk and serum collect...

  3. ASSAYS FOR ENDOGENOUS COMPONENTS OF HUMAN MILK: COMPARISON OF FRESH AND FROZEN SAMPLES AND CORRESPONDING ANALYTES IN SERUM

    EPA Science Inventory

    Breast milk is a primary source of nutrition that contains many endogenous compounds that may affect infant development. The goals of this study were to develop reliable assays for selected endogenous breast milk components and to compare levels of those in milk and serum collect...

  4. Possible human endogenous cryogens.

    PubMed

    Shido, Osamu; Sugimoto, Naotoshi

    2011-06-01

    Anapyrexia, which is a regulated fall in core temperature, is beneficial for animals and humans when the oxygen supply is limited, e.g., hypoxic, ischemic, or histotoxic hypoxia, since at low body temperature the tissues require less oxygen due to Q(10). Besides hypoxia, anapyrexia can be induced various exogenous and endogenous substances, named cryogens. However, there are only a few reports investigating endogenous cryogens in mammals. We have experienced one patient who suffered from severe hypothermia. The patient seemed to be excessively producing endogenous peptidergic cryogenic substances the molecular weight of which may be greater than 30 kDa. In animal studies, the patient's cryogen appeared to affect metabolic functions, including thermogenic threshold temperatures, and then to produce hypothermia. Since endogenous cryogenic substances may be regarded as useful tool in human activities, e.g., during brain hypothermia therapy or staying in a space station or spaceship, further studies may be needed to identify human endogenous cryogens.

  5. Endogenous Acute Phase Serum Amyloid A Lacks Pro-Inflammatory Activity, Contrasting the Two Recombinant Variants That Activate Human Neutrophils through Different Receptors

    PubMed Central

    Christenson, Karin; Björkman, Lena; Ahlin, Sofie; Olsson, Maja; Sjöholm, Kajsa; Karlsson, Anna; Bylund, Johan

    2013-01-01

    Most notable among the acute phase proteins is serum amyloid A (SAA), levels of which can increase 1000-fold during infections, aseptic inflammation, and/or trauma. Chronically elevated SAA levels are associated with a wide variety of pathological conditions, including obesity and rheumatic diseases. Using a recombinant hybrid of the two human SAA isoforms (SAA1 and 2) that does not exist in vivo, numerous in vitro studies have given rise to the notion that acute phase SAA is a pro-inflammatory molecule with cytokine-like properties. It is however unclear whether endogenous acute phase SAA per se mediates pro-inflammatory effects. We tested this in samples from patients with inflammatory arthritis and in a transgenic mouse model that expresses human SAA1. Endogenous human SAA did not drive production of pro-inflammatory IL-8/KC in either of these settings. Human neutrophils derived from arthritis patients displayed no signs of activation, despite being exposed to severely elevated SAA levels in circulation, and SAA-rich sera also failed to activate cells in vitro. In contrast, two recombinant SAA variants (the hybrid SAA and SAA1) both activated human neutrophils, inducing L-selectin shedding, production of reactive oxygen species, and production of IL-8. The hybrid SAA was approximately 100-fold more potent than recombinant SAA1. Recombinant hybrid SAA and SAA1 activated neutrophils through different receptors, with recombinant SAA1 being a ligand for formyl peptide receptor 2 (FPR2). We conclude that even though recombinant SAAs can be valuable tools for studying neutrophil activation, they do not reflect the nature of the endogenous protein. PMID:23626589

  6. Precipitation and selective extraction of human serum endogenous peptides with analysis by quadrupole time-of-flight mass spectrometry reveals posttranslational modifications and low-abundance peptides.

    PubMed

    Williams, Declan; Ackloo, Suzanne; Zhu, Peihong; Bowden, Peter; Evans, Kenneth R; Addison, Christina L; Lock, Chris; Marshall, John G

    2010-02-01

    The endogenous peptides of human serum may have regulatory functions, have been associated with physiological states, and their modifications may reveal some mechanisms of disease. In order to correlate levels of specific peptides with disease alongside internal standards, the polypeptides must first be reliably extracted and identified. Endogenous blood peptides can be effectively enriched by precipitation of the serum with organic solvents followed by selective extraction of peptides using aqueous solutions modified with organic solvents. Polypeptides on filter paper were assayed with Coomasie brilliant blue binding. The polypeptides were resolved by detergent tricine polyacrylamide electrophoresis and visualized by diamine silver staining. Peptides in the extracts were collected by C18 and analyzed by matrix-assisted laser desorption/ionization and liquid chromatography-electrospray ionization-tandem mass spectrometry (MS/MS) quadrupole time-of-flight MS/MS. Peptides were resolved as multiple isotopic peaks in MS mode with mass deviation of 0.1 Da or less and similar accuracy for fragments. The sensitivity of MS and MS/MS analysis was estimated to be in the picomolar range or less. The peptide composition of the extracts was dependent on solvent formulation. Multiple peptides from apolipoproteins, complement proteins, coagulation factors, and many others were identified by X!Tandem with high mass accuracy of peptide ions and fragments from collision-induced dissociation. Many previously unreported posttranslational modifications of peptides including phosphorylations, oxidations, glycosylations, and others were detected with high mass accuracy and may be of clinical importance. About 4,630 redundant peptides were identified with 99% confidence separately, and together some 1,251 distinct proteins were identified with 99% confidence or greater using the Paragon algorithm.

  7. Longitudinal monitoring of endogenous steroids in human serum by UHPLC-MS/MS as a tool to detect testosterone abuse in sports.

    PubMed

    Ponzetto, Federico; Mehl, Florence; Boccard, Julien; Baume, Norbert; Rudaz, Serge; Saugy, Martial; Nicoli, Raul

    2016-01-01

    The detection of testosterone abuse in sports is routinely achieved through the 'steroidal module' of the Athlete Biological Passport by GC-MS(/MS) quantification of selected endogenous anabolic androgenic steroids (EAAS) from athletes' urines. To overcome some limitations of the "urinary steroid profile" such as the presence of confounding factors (ethnicity, enzyme polymorphism, bacterial contamination, and ethanol), ultrahigh performance liquid chromatography (UHPLC) measurements of blood concentrations of testosterone, its major metabolites, and precursors could represent an interesting and complementary strategy. In this work, two UHPLC-MS/MS methods were developed for the quantification of testosterone and related compounds in human serum, including major progestogens, corticoids, and estrogens. The validated methods were then used for the analyses of serum samples collected from 19 healthy male volunteers after oral and transdermal testosterone administration. Results from unsupervised multiway analysis allowed variations of target analytes to be assessed simultaneously over a 96-h time period. Except for alteration of concentration values due to the circadian rhythm, which concerns mainly corticosteroids, DHEA, and progesterone, significant variations linked to the oral and transdermal testosterone administration were observed for testosterone, DHT, and androstenedione. As a second step of analysis, the longitudinal monitoring of these biomarkers using intra-individual thresholds showed, in comparison to urine, significant improvements in the detection of testosterone administration, especially for volunteers with del/del genotype for phase II UGT2B17 enzyme, not sensitive to the main urinary marker, T/E ratio. A substantial extension of the detection window after transdermal testosterone administration was also observed in serum matrix. The longitudinal follow-up proposed in this study represents a first example of 'blood steroid profile' in doping control

  8. NMR identification of endogenous metabolites interacting with fatted and non-fatted human serum albumin in blood plasma: Fatty acids influence the HSA-metabolite interaction.

    PubMed

    Jupin, Marc; Michiels, Paul J; Girard, Frederic C; Spraul, Manfred; Wijmenga, Sybren S

    2013-03-01

    Metabolites and their concentrations are direct reporters on body biochemistry. Thanks to technical developments metabolic profiling of body fluids, such as blood plasma, by for instance NMR has in the past decade become increasingly accurate enabling successful clinical diagnostics. Human Serum Albumin (HSA) is the main plasma protein (∼60% of all plasma protein) and responsible for the transport of endogenous (e.g. fatty acids) and exogenous metabolites, which it achieves thanks to its multiple binding sites and its flexibility. HSA has been extensively studied with regard to its binding of drugs (exogenous metabolites), but only to a lesser extent with regard to its binding of endogenous (non-fatty acid) metabolites. To obtain correct NMR measured metabolic profiles of blood plasma and/or potentially extract information on HSA and fatty acids content, it is necessary to characterize these endogenous metabolite/plasma protein interactions. Here, we investigate these metabolite-HSA interactions in blood plasma and blood plasma mimics. The latter contain the roughly twenty metabolites routinely detected by NMR (also most abundant) in normal relative concentrations with fatted or non-fatted HSA added or not. First, we find that chemical shift changes are small and seen only for a few of the metabolites. In contrast, a significant number of the metabolites display reduced resonance integrals and reduced free concentrations in the presence of HSA or fatted HSA. For slow-exchange (or strong) interactions, NMR resonance integrals report the free metabolite concentration, while for fast exchange (weak binding) the chemical shift reports on the binding. Hence, these metabolites bind strongly to HSA and/or fatted HSA, but to a limited degree because for most metabolites their concentration is smaller than the HSA concentration. Most interestingly, fatty acids decrease the metabolite-HSA binding quite significantly for most of the interacting metabolites. We further find

  9. NMR identification of endogenous metabolites interacting with fatted and non-fatted human serum albumin in blood plasma: Fatty acids influence the HSA-metabolite interaction

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jupin, Marc; Michiels, Paul J.; Girard, Frederic C.; Spraul, Manfred; Wijmenga, Sybren S.

    2013-03-01

    Metabolites and their concentrations are direct reporters on body biochemistry. Thanks to technical developments metabolic profiling of body fluids, such as blood plasma, by for instance NMR has in the past decade become increasingly accurate enabling successful clinical diagnostics. Human Serum Albumin (HSA) is the main plasma protein (∼60% of all plasma protein) and responsible for the transport of endogenous (e.g. fatty acids) and exogenous metabolites, which it achieves thanks to its multiple binding sites and its flexibility. HSA has been extensively studied with regard to its binding of drugs (exogenous metabolites), but only to a lesser extent with regard to its binding of endogenous (non-fatty acid) metabolites. To obtain correct NMR measured metabolic profiles of blood plasma and/or potentially extract information on HSA and fatty acids content, it is necessary to characterize these endogenous metabolite/plasma protein interactions. Here, we investigate these metabolite-HSA interactions in blood plasma and blood plasma mimics. The latter contain the roughly twenty metabolites routinely detected by NMR (also most abundant) in normal relative concentrations with fatted or non-fatted HSA added or not. First, we find that chemical shift changes are small and seen only for a few of the metabolites. In contrast, a significant number of the metabolites display reduced resonance integrals and reduced free concentrations in the presence of HSA or fatted HSA. For slow-exchange (or strong) interactions, NMR resonance integrals report the free metabolite concentration, while for fast exchange (weak binding) the chemical shift reports on the binding. Hence, these metabolites bind strongly to HSA and/or fatted HSA, but to a limited degree because for most metabolites their concentration is smaller than the HSA concentration. Most interestingly, fatty acids decrease the metabolite-HSA binding quite significantly for most of the interacting metabolites. We further find

  10. Human endogenous retroviruses and cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Cao, María; Iduma, Paola; Karachaliou, Niki; Santarpia, Mariacarmela; Blanco, Julià; Rosell, Rafael

    2016-01-01

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) are retroviruses that infected human genome millions of years ago and have persisted throughout human evolution. About 8% of our genome is composed of HERVs, most of which are nonfunctional because of epigenetic control or deactivating mutations. However, a correlation between HERVs and human cancer has been described and many tumors, such as melanoma, breast cancer, germ cell tumors, renal cancer or ovarian cancer, express HERV proteins, mainly HERV-K (HML6) and HERV-K (HML2). Although the causative role of HERVs in cancer is controversial, data from animal models demonstrated that endogenous retroviruses are potentially oncogenic. HERV protein expression in human cells generates an immune response by activating innate and adaptive immunities. Some HERV-derived peptides have antigenic properties. For example, HERV-K (HML-6) encodes the HER-K MEL peptide recognized by CD8+ lymphocytes. In addition, HERVs are two-edged immunomodulators. HERVs show immunosuppressive activity. The presence of genomic retroviral elements in host-cell cytosol may activate an interferon type I response. Therefore, targeting HERVs through cellular vaccines or immunomodulatory drugs combined with checkpoint inhibitors is attracting interest because they could be active in human tumors. PMID:28154780

  11. "Reverse genomics" and human endogenous retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Markovitz, David M

    2014-01-01

    Over millions of years, actively replicating retroviruses entered the human genome and through time became a stable and substantial part of the inherited genetic material. A remarkable 8% of the human genome is accounted for by endogenous retroviruses, whose biological importance has not yet been elucidated. In studying the RNA of these endogenous retroviruses in the blood of living human subjects with HIV infection, we have discovered a whole new family of these viruses that had been hidden in the centromeres of specific human chromosomes. These retroviruses have specific sequences that can elucidate their chromosome of origin. As centromeres represent the most substantial remaining frontier of human genomics, these viral sequences can provide a "bar-code" that can be used to study the role of centromeres in biology and in disease. This work also highlights the efficacy of using "reverse genomics" to understand and annotate the human genome.

  12. Feeding Releases Endogenous Opioids in Humans.

    PubMed

    Tuulari, Jetro J; Tuominen, Lauri; de Boer, Femke E; Hirvonen, Jussi; Helin, Semi; Nuutila, Pirjo; Nummenmaa, Lauri

    2017-08-23

    The endogenous opioid system supports a multitude of functions related to appetitive behavior in humans and animals, and it has been proposed to govern hedonic aspects of feeding thus contributing to the development of obesity. Here we used positron emission tomography to investigate whether feeding results in hedonia-dependent endogenous opioid release in humans. Ten healthy males were recruited for the study. They were scanned with the μ-opioid-specific ligand [(11)C]carfentanil three times, as follows: after a palatable meal, a nonpalatable meal, and after an overnight fast. Subjective mood, satiety, and circulating hormone levels were measured. Feeding induced significant endogenous opioid release throughout the brain. This response was more pronounced following a nonpalatable meal versus a palatable meal, and independent of the subjective hedonic responses to feeding. We conclude that feeding consistently triggers cerebral opioid release even in the absence of subjective pleasure associated with feeding, suggesting that metabolic and homeostatic rather than exclusively hedonic responses play a role in the feeding-triggered cerebral opioid release.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT The endogenous opioid system supports both hedonic and homeostatic functions. It has been proposed that overeating and concomitant opioid release could downregulate opioid receptors and promote the development of obesity. However, it remains unresolved whether feeding leads to endogenous opioid release in humans. We used in vivo positron emission tomography to test whether feeding triggers cerebral opioid release and whether this response is associated with pleasurable sensations. We scanned volunteers using the μ-opioid receptor-specific radioligand [(11)C]carfentanil three times, as follows: after an overnight fast, after consuming a palatable meal, and after consuming a nonpalatable meal. Feeding led to significant endogenous opioid release, and this occurred also in the absence of feeding

  13. Analysis of the Human Endogenous Coregulator Complexome

    PubMed Central

    Malovannaya, Anna; Lanz, Rainer B.; Jung, Sung Yun; Bulynko, Yaroslava; Le, Nguyen T.; Chan, Doug W.; Ding, Chen; Shi, Yi; Yucer, Nur; Krenciute, Giedre; Kim, Beom-Jun; Li, Chunshu; Chen, Rui; Li, Wei; Wang, Yi; O’Malley, Bert W.; Qin, Jun

    2011-01-01

    Summary Elucidation of endogenous cellular protein-protein interactions and their networks is most desirable for biological studies. Here we report our study of endogenous human coregulator protein complex networks obtained from integrative mass spectrometry-based analysis of 3,290 affinity purifications. By preserving weak protein interactions during complex isolation and utilizing high levels of reciprocity in the large dataset we identified many unreported protein associations, such as a transcriptional network formed by ZMYND8, ZNF687 and ZNF592. Furthermore, our work revealed a tiered interplay within networks that share common proteins, providing a conceptual organization of a cellular proteome composed of minimal endogenous modules (MEMOs), functional uniCOREs and regulatory complex-complex interaction networks (CCIs). This resource will effectively fill a void in linking correlative genomic studies with an understanding of transcriptional regulatory protein functions within the proteome for formulation and testing of new hypotheses. PMID:21620140

  14. The Human Serum Metabolome

    PubMed Central

    Psychogios, Nikolaos; Hau, David D.; Peng, Jun; Guo, An Chi; Mandal, Rupasri; Bouatra, Souhaila; Sinelnikov, Igor; Krishnamurthy, Ramanarayan; Eisner, Roman; Gautam, Bijaya; Young, Nelson; Xia, Jianguo; Knox, Craig; Dong, Edison; Huang, Paul; Hollander, Zsuzsanna; Pedersen, Theresa L.; Smith, Steven R.; Bamforth, Fiona; Greiner, Russ; McManus, Bruce; Newman, John W.; Goodfriend, Theodore; Wishart, David S.

    2011-01-01

    Continuing improvements in analytical technology along with an increased interest in performing comprehensive, quantitative metabolic profiling, is leading to increased interest pressures within the metabolomics community to develop centralized metabolite reference resources for certain clinically important biofluids, such as cerebrospinal fluid, urine and blood. As part of an ongoing effort to systematically characterize the human metabolome through the Human Metabolome Project, we have undertaken the task of characterizing the human serum metabolome. In doing so, we have combined targeted and non-targeted NMR, GC-MS and LC-MS methods with computer-aided literature mining to identify and quantify a comprehensive, if not absolutely complete, set of metabolites commonly detected and quantified (with today's technology) in the human serum metabolome. Our use of multiple metabolomics platforms and technologies allowed us to substantially enhance the level of metabolome coverage while critically assessing the relative strengths and weaknesses of these platforms or technologies. Tables containing the complete set of 4229 confirmed and highly probable human serum compounds, their concentrations, related literature references and links to their known disease associations are freely available at http://www.serummetabolome.ca. PMID:21359215

  15. Circulating Hepcidin-25 Is Reduced by Endogenous Estrogen in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Lehtihet, Mikael; Bonde, Ylva; Beckman, Lena; Berinder, Katarina; Hoybye, Charlotte; Rudling, Mats; Sloan, John H.; Konrad, Robert J.; Angelin, Bo

    2016-01-01

    Objective Hepcidin reduces iron absorption by binding to the intestinal iron transporter ferroportin, thereby causing its degradation. Although short-term administration of testosterone or growth hormone (GH) has been reported to decrease circulating hepcidin levels, little is known about how hepcidin is influenced in human endocrine conditions associated with anemia. Research design and methods We used a sensitive and specific dual–monoclonal antibody sandwich immunoassay to measure hepcidin-25 in patients (a) during initiation of in vitro fertilization when endogenous estrogens were elevated vs. suppressed, (b) with GH deficiency before and after 12 months substitution treatment, (c) with hyperthyroidism before and after normalization, and (d) with hyperprolactinemia before and after six months of treatment with a dopamine agonist. Results In response to a marked stimulation of endogenous estrogen production, median hepcidin levels decreased from 4.85 to 1.43 ng/mL (p < 0.01). Hyperthyroidism, hyperprolactinemia, or GH substitution to GH-deficient patients did not influence serum hepcidin-25 levels. Conclusions In humans, gonadotropin-stimulated endogenous estrogen markedly decreases circulating hepcidin-25 levels. No clear and stable correlation between iron biomarkers and hepcidin-25 was seen before or after treatment of hyperthyroidism, hyperprolactinemia or growth hormone deficiency. PMID:26866603

  16. Rapid LC-MS/MS method for the determination of 4-hydroxycholesterol/cholesterol ratio in serum as endogenous biomarker for CYP3A activity in human and foals.

    PubMed

    Hasan, Mahmoud; Siegmund, Werner; Oswald, Stefan

    2016-10-15

    Cytochrome P450 3A (CYP) enzymes are involved in the elimination of many drugs and are known to be regulated by several environmental factors. Thus, it was the aim of this study to develop and validate an analytical method allowing estimation of the hepatic CYP3A enzyme activity using the 4-hydroxycholesterol to cholesterol ratio as an endogenous biomarker in serum. Both compounds were isolated from the biological matrix by liquid-liquid extraction using n-hexane after saponification with ethanolic sodium methoxide solution (2M) to cleave the steroids from their esterified forms without any kind of further derivatization. Chromatographic separation was achieved on a reversed-phase column (SupelcoAcsentis(®), C8) within 7min using an isocratic elution with ammonium acetate 5mM (pH=3.8, 10%) and acetonitrile (90%) at a flow rate of 300μl/min. d6-cholesterol and d7-4β-hydroxycholesterol were used as internal standards. Detection was done on a triple quadrupole mass spectrometer using the following mass transitions: 369.3/161.5, 369.3/147.1 and 369.3/95.2 for cholesterol; 385.2/367.4, 385.2/109.1 for 4-hydroxycholesterol; 374.4/152.7 and 392.2/108.9 for d6-cholesterol and d7-4-hydroxycholesterol, respectively as the internal standards. The method was validated according to current bioanalytical guidelines considering selectivity, linearity, accuracy, precision, recovery, stability. The analytical range was 5-250 and 50-1000ng/ml, for 4-hydroxycholesterol and cholesterol, respectively. The method was shown to be selective for both compounds with good linearity over the selected range (r>0.99) as well as good within- and between day accuracy (error: -1.2-3.7% for 4-hydroxycholesterol and -7.7-9.5% for cholesterol) and within- and between day precision (2.1-14.6% for 4-hydroxycholesterol and 1.1-14.9% for cholesterol). Recovery was found to be over 80% for both analytes while significant stability issues could not be observed. Finally, the validated assay was applied

  17. Bilirubin is an Endogenous Antioxidant in Human Vascular Endothelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Ziberna, Lovro; Martelanc, Mitja; Franko, Mladen; Passamonti, Sabina

    2016-01-01

    Bilirubin is a standard serum biomarker of liver function. Inexplicably, it is inversely correlated with cardiovascular disease risk. Given the role of endothelial dysfunction in originating cardiovascular diseases, direct analysis of bilirubin in the vascular endothelium would shed light on these relationships. Hence, we used high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with thermal lens spectrometric detection and diode array detection for the determination of endogenous cellular IXα-bilirubin. To confirm the isomer IXα-bilirubin, we used ultra-performance liquid chromatography coupled with a high-resolution mass spectrometer using an electrospray ionization source, as well as tandem mass spectrometric detection. We measured bilirubin in both arterial and venous rat endothelium (0.9–1.5 pmol mg−1 protein). In the human endothelial Ea.hy926 cell line, we demonstrated that intracellular bilirubin (3–5 pmol mg−1 protein) could be modulated by either extracellular bilirubin uptake, or by up-regulation of heme oxygenase-1, a cellular enzyme related to endogenous bilirubin synthesis. Moreover, we determined intracellular antioxidant activity by bilirubin, with EC50 = 11.4 ± 0.2 nM, in the range of reported values of free serum bilirubin (8.5–13.1 nM). Biliverdin showed similar antioxidant properties as bilirubin. We infer from these observations that intra-endothelial bilirubin oscillates, and may thus be a dynamic factor of the endothelial function. PMID:27381978

  18. Expanded metabolomics approach to profiling endogenous carbohydrates in the serum of ovarian cancer patients.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Yu; Li, Li; Zhu, Bangjie; Liu, Feng; Wang, Yan; Gu, Xue; Yan, Chao

    2016-01-01

    We applied hydrophilic interaction liquid chromatography coupled with tandem mass spectrometry to the quantitative analysis of serum from 58 women, including ovarian cancer patients, ovarian benign tumor patients, and healthy controls. All of these ovarian cancer and ovarian benign tumor patients have elevated cancer antigen 125, which makes them clinically difficult to differentiate the malignant from the benign. All of the 16 endogenous carbohydrates were quantitatively detected in the human sera, of which, eight endogenous carbohydrates were significantly different (P-value < 0.05) between the ovarian cancer and healthy control. According to the receiver operating characteristic curve analysis, arabitol was the most potentially specific biomarker for discriminating ovarian cancer from healthy control, having an area under the curve of 0.911. A panel of metabolite markers composed of maltose, maltotriose, raffinose, and mannitol was selected, which was able to discriminate the ovarian cancer from the benign ovarian tumor counterparts, with an area under concentration-time curve value of 0.832. Endogenous carbohydrates in the expanded metabolomics approach after the global metabolic profiling are characterized and are potential biomarkers for the early diagnosis of ovarian cancer.

  19. Susceptibility of human liver cells to porcine endogenous retrovirus.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xinzi; Qi, Lin; Li, Zhiguo; Chi, Hao; Lin, Wanjun; Wang, Yan; Jiang, Zesheng; Pan, Mingxin; Gao, Yi

    2013-12-01

    The risk of porcine endogenous retrovirus infection is a major barrier for pig-to-human xenotransplant. Porcine endogenous retrovirus, present in porcine cells, can infect many human and nonhuman primate cells in vitro, but there is no evidence available about in vitro infection of human liver cells. We investigated the susceptibility of different human liver cells to porcine endogenous retrovirus. The supernatant from a porcine kidney cell line was added to human liver cells, including a normal hepatocyte cell line (HL-7702 cells), primary hepatocytes (Phh cells), and a liver stellate cell line (Lx-2 cells), and to human embryonic kidney cells as a reference control. Expression of the porcine endogenous retrovirus antigen p15E in the human cells was evaluated with polymerase chain reaction, reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction, and Western blot. The porcine endogenous retrovirus antigen p15E was not expressed in any human liver cells (HL-7702, Phh, or Lx-2 cells) that had been exposed to supernatants from porcine kidney cell lines. Porcine endogenous retrovirus-specific fragments were amplified in human kidney cells. Human liver cells tested were not susceptible to infection by porcine endogenous retrovirus. Therefore, not all human cells are susceptible to porcine endogenous retrovirus.

  20. CRISPR RNA-guided activation of endogenous human genes.

    PubMed

    Maeder, Morgan L; Linder, Samantha J; Cascio, Vincent M; Fu, Yanfang; Ho, Quan H; Joung, J Keith

    2013-10-01

    Short guide RNAs (gRNAs) can direct catalytically inactive CRISPR-associated 9 nuclease (dCas9) to repress endogenous genes in bacteria and human cells. Here we show that single or multiple gRNAs can direct dCas9 fused to a VP64 transcriptional activation domain to increase expression of endogenous human genes. This proof-of-principle work shows that clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeat (CRISPR)-Cas systems can target heterologous effector domains to endogenous sites in human cells.

  1. An increase in lipoprotein oxidation and endogenous lipid peroxides in serum of obese women.

    PubMed

    Mutlu-Türkoğlu, U; Oztezcan, S; Telci, A; Orhan, Y; Aykaç-Toker, G; Sivas, A; Uysal, M

    2003-02-01

    Endogenous malondialdehyde and diene conjugate levels, the susceptibility of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins to copper-induced lipid peroxidation, and antibody titer against oxidized low-density lipoproteins were increased, but serum antioxidant activity was unchanged in obese women. Serum cholesterol, low-density lipoproteincholesterol, and trigliceride levels were also elevated, but high-density lipoprotein-cholesterol levels remained unchanged in obese women. In vitro, oxidation of apolipoprotein B-containing lipoproteins and levels of antibody against oxidized low-density lipoprotein correlated with body mass index, serum total cholesterol, and low-density lipoproteincholesterol levels in obese women. These results indicate that obesity is associated with increases in endogenous lipid peroxides, oxidation of low-density lipoproteins, and lipids in serum.

  2. Endogenous Semaphorin-7A Impedes Human Lung Fibroblast Differentiation

    PubMed Central

    Esnault, Stephane; Torr, Elizabeth E.; Bernau, Ksenija; Johansson, Mats W.; Kelly, Elizabeth A.; Sandbo, Nathan; Jarjour, Nizar N.

    2017-01-01

    Semaphorin-7A is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol-anchored protein, initially characterized as an axon guidance protein. Semaphorin-7A also contributes to immune cell regulation and may be an essential pro-fibrotic factor when expressed by non-fibroblast cell types (exogenous). In mouse models, semaphorin-7A was shown to be important for TGF-ß1-induced pulmonary fibrosis characterized by myofibroblast accumulation and extracellular matrix deposition, but the cell-specific role of semaphorin-7A was not examined in fibroblasts. The purpose of this study is to determine semaphorin-7A expression by fibroblasts and to investigate the function of endogenously expressed semaphorin-7A in primary human lung fibroblasts (HLF). Herein, we show that non-fibrotic HLF expressed high levels of cell surface semaphorin-7A with little dependence on the percentage of serum or recombinant TGF-ß1. Semaphorin-7A siRNA strongly decreased semaphorin-7A mRNA expression and reduced cell surface semaphorin-7A. Reduction of semaphorin-7A induced increased proliferation and migration of non-fibrotic HLF. Also, independent of the presence of TGF-ß1, the decline of semaphorin-7A by siRNA was associated with increased α-smooth muscle actin production and gene expression of periostin, fibronectin, laminin, and serum response factor (SRF), indicating differentiation into a myofibroblast. Conversely, overexpression of semaphorin-7A in the NIH3T3 fibroblast cell line reduced the production of pro-fibrotic markers. The inverse association between semaphorin-7A and pro-fibrotic fibroblast markers was further analyzed using HLF from idiopathic pulmonary fibrosis (IPF) (n = 6) and non-fibrotic (n = 7) lungs. Using these 13 fibroblast lines, we observed that semaphorin-7A and periostin expression were inversely correlated. In conclusion, our study indicates that endogenous semaphorin-7A in HLF plays a role in maintaining fibroblast homeostasis by preventing up-regulation of pro-fibrotic genes. Therefore

  3. Antibodies to endogenous tear protein in normal human tears.

    PubMed

    Remington, Susann G; Crow, Jean M; Nelson, J Daniel

    2009-10-01

    To identify endogenous tear proteins immunoselected by antibodies from normal human ocular tears. Proteins were immunoselected from normal human tear samples without the addition of primary antibodies. Captured proteins were electrophoresed in polyacrylamide gels and silver stained. Human tears were also used as primary antibodies on immunoblots of tear proteins. Lysozyme, lipocalin-1, and lactoferrin were immunoselected from normal human tear samples without the addition of primary antibodies. Antibodies from normal tears recognized lysozyme on immunoblots of tear proteins. Normal human ocular tears contain antibodies to endogenous tear protein.

  4. Triacylglycerol composition of human endogenous lipoproteins.

    PubMed

    Lajos, S; Katalin, R; László, T; Miklós, M; István, K; László, R

    1995-01-01

    The intact triacylglycerol profiles for VLDL and LDL of healthy and primary hypertriglyceridemic patients were obtained by high temperature capillary gas chromatography. The data were treated by the methods of computerized analysis. Marked individual heterogeneity was found. This can be explained by either genetic polymorphism or multiple lipoprotein triacylglycerol pools within one density class. Suspecting genetic polymorphism and determination type IV (familial hypertriglyceridemia) seems to be a pure overproduction of endogenous VLDL, while in type II B (familial combined hyperlipidemia) an altered mechanism of triacyglycerol synthesis can be supposed.

  5. The effect of grapefruit intake on endogenous serum estrogen levels in postmenopausal women.

    PubMed

    Monroe, Kristine R; Stanczyk, Frank Z; Besinque, Kathleen H; Pike, Malcolm C

    2013-01-01

    Although grapefruit intake leads to elevated serum estrogen levels when hormones are taken orally, there are no published data on the effect on endogenous levels. We conducted a pilot dietary intervention study among healthy postmenopausal volunteers to test whole grapefruit, 2 juices, and 1 grapefruit soda. Fifty-nine participants were recruited through the Love/Avon Army of Women. The study consisted of a 3-wk run-in, 2 wk of grapefruit intake, and a 1-wk wash-out. Eight fasting blood samples were collected. An additional 5 samples drawn at 1, 2, 4, 8, and 10 hr after grapefruit intake were collected during an acute-phase study for 10 women. Serum assays for estrone (E1), estradiol (E2), estrone-3-sulfate (E1S), dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate, and sex hormone-binding globulin were conducted. Whole grapefruit intake had significant effects on endogenous E1S. Peak effects were seen at 8 hr, increasing by 26% from baseline. No changes in mean E1 or E2 with whole fruit intake were observed. In contrast, fresh juice, bottled juice, and soda intake all had significant lowering effects on E2. The findings suggest an important interaction between grapefruit intake and endogenous estrogen levels. Because endogenous estrogen levels are associated with breast cancer risk, further research is warranted.

  6. Systematic evaluation of serum and plasma collection on the endogenous metabolome.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Zhi; Chen, Yanhua; He, Jiuming; Xu, Jing; Zhang, Ruiping; Mao, Yan; Abliz, Zeper

    2017-02-01

    In metabolomics research, the use of different blood collection methods may influence endogenous metabolites. Ultra HPLC coupled with MS/MS was applied together with multivariate statistics to investigate metabolomics differences in serum and plasma samples handled by different anticoagulants. A total of 135 known representative metabolites were assessed for comprehensive evaluation of the effects of anticoagulants. Exogenous factors, including separation gel ingredients from the serum collection tubes and the anticoagulants, affected mass spectrometer detection. Heparin plasma yielded the best detection of different functional groups and is therefore the optimal blood specimen for metabolomics research, followed by potassium oxalate plasma.

  7. Characterization of endogenous human promyelocytic leukemia isoforms.

    PubMed

    Condemine, Wilfried; Takahashi, Yuki; Zhu, Jun; Puvion-Dutilleul, Francine; Guegan, Sarah; Janin, Anne; de Thé, Hugues

    2006-06-15

    Promyelocytic leukemia (PML) has been implicated in a variety of functions, including control of TP53 function and modulation of cellular senescence. Sumolated PML is the organizer of mature PML bodies, recruiting a variety of proteins onto these nuclear domains. The PML gene is predicted to encode a variety of protein isoforms. Overexpression of only one of them, PML-IV, promotes senescence in human diploid fibroblasts, whereas PML-III was proposed to specifically interact with the centrosome. We show that all PML isoform proteins are expressed in cell lines or primary cells. Unexpectedly, we found that PML-III, PML-IV, and PML-V are quantitatively minor isoforms compared with PML-I/II and could not confirm the centrosomal targeting of PML-III. Stable expression of each isoform, in a pml-null background, yields distinct subcellular localization patterns, suggesting that, like in other RBCC/TRIM proteins, the COOH-terminal domains of PML are involved in interactions with specific cellular components. Only the isoform-specific sequences of PML-I and PML-V are highly conserved between man and mouse. That PML-I contains all conserved exons and is more abundantly expressed than PML-IV suggests that it is a critical contributor to PML function(s).

  8. Social Laughter Triggers Endogenous Opioid Release in Humans.

    PubMed

    Manninen, Sandra; Tuominen, Lauri; Dunbar, Robin I; Karjalainen, Tomi; Hirvonen, Jussi; Arponen, Eveliina; Hari, Riitta; Jääskeläinen, Iiro P; Sams, Mikko; Nummenmaa, Lauri

    2017-06-21

    The size of human social networks significantly exceeds the network that can be maintained by social grooming or touching in other primates. It has been proposed that endogenous opioid release after social laughter would provide a neurochemical pathway supporting long-term relationships in humans (Dunbar, 2012), yet this hypothesis currently lacks direct neurophysiological support. We used PET and the μ-opioid-receptor (MOR)-specific ligand [(11)C]carfentanil to quantify laughter-induced endogenous opioid release in 12 healthy males. Before the social laughter scan, the subjects watched laughter-inducing comedy clips with their close friends for 30 min. Before the baseline scan, subjects spent 30 min alone in the testing room. Social laughter increased pleasurable sensations and triggered endogenous opioid release in thalamus, caudate nucleus, and anterior insula. In addition, baseline MOR availability in the cingulate and orbitofrontal cortices was associated with the rate of social laughter. In a behavioral control experiment, pain threshold-a proxy of endogenous opioidergic activation-was elevated significantly more in both male and female volunteers after watching laughter-inducing comedy versus non-laughter-inducing drama in groups. Modulation of the opioidergic activity by social laughter may be an important neurochemical pathway that supports the formation, reinforcement, and maintenance of human social bonds.SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Social contacts are vital to humans. The size of human social networks significantly exceeds the network that can be maintained by social grooming in other primates. Here, we used PET to show that endogenous opioid release after social laughter may provide a neurochemical mechanism supporting long-term relationships in humans. Participants were scanned twice: after a 30 min social laughter session and after spending 30 min alone in the testing room (baseline). Endogenous opioid release was stronger after laughter versus the

  9. Binding of aluminum to human serum transferrin, human serum albumin and rat serum proteins

    SciTech Connect

    El-Sebae, A.K.H.; Zeid, M.M.A.; Abdel-Rahman, F.H.; Saleh, M.A. . Environmental Chemistry and Toxicology Lab.)

    1994-01-01

    Human serum transferrin (HSTF), human serum albumin (HSA) and rat serum were compared for their interaction with AlCl[sub 3], in a Tris-HCl buffer solutions. The AlCl[sub 3] was tested in series of concentrations in the range of 50 [mu]M up to 500 [mu]M. HSTF, HSA and their 1:1 mixture and rat serum were incubated at 37 C with series of AlCl[sub 3] concentrations. The protein profile of the incubated solutions were compared to control using SDS-PAGE and FPLC tests. The results indicated that HSTF was more specifically responsive to AlCl[sub 3] showing a characteristic increase in it UV absorption, peak and area dimensions. Simultaneously, HSA was less affected, but it showed a significant shift with an increase in molecular weight accompanied with a change in its profile. The respective bands of transferrin and albumin in rat serum behaved similarly.

  10. Does hepatic metabolism of melatonin affect the endogenous serum melatonin level in man?

    PubMed

    Ursing, C; Härtter, S; von Bahr, C; Tybring, G; Bertilsson, L; Röjdmark, S

    2002-05-01

    Melatonin (MT) is metabolized in the liver by cytochrome P450 (CYP) 1A2 but its importance for the metabolic process has not been fully elucidated. Therefore, the objective of this investigation was to study whether patients with different CYP1A2 activity would have different nocturnal serum MT levels. For that purpose serum MT concentrations were determined every second hour during the night in 12 healthy subjects and their MT areas under the curve (MT-AUCs) were calculated. Caffeine (CA) clearance was determined in advance. It is generally accepted that CA clearance reflects CYP1A2 activity. This made it possible to evaluate whether a relationship prevails between endogenous MT-AUCs and CYP1A2 activity. If CYP1A2 is of importance for the metabolism of MT one would expect to find an inverse correlation between the MT-AUCs and the CA clearance. However, such correlation did not exist in the current study (Rs=-0.021, NS). Since endogenous MT-AUC is dependent not only on MT elimination by CYP1A2 but also on MT secretion, it is possible that an increased MT secretion counter-balances an increased hepatic MT metabolism. If so, this could explain why the MT-AUCs and the CA clearance values were not inversely correlated in this study.

  11. Immunoassay for human serum hemojuvelin

    PubMed Central

    Brasse-Lagnel, Carole; Poli, Maura; Lesueur, Céline; Grandchamp, Bernard; Lavoinne, Alain; Beaumont, Carole; Bekri, Soumeya

    2010-01-01

    Background Hemojuvelin, a critical regulator of iron homeostasis, is involved in the regulation of hepcidin expression and iron homeostasis. It is expressed both as a membrane-bound form and as a soluble one. Serum hemojuvelin can be produced by secretion following furin cleavage or by proteolytic cleavage of the membrane-bound form by matriptase 2 (TMPRSS6). These forms contribute to down-regulation of hepcidin expression upon iron deficiency or hypoxia. This study describes the development and validation of the first enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for hemojuvelin in human serum. Design and Methods This assay is based on the use of a recombinant human repulsive guidance molecule-c peptide and a polyclonal antibody against hemojuvelin able to recognize the recombinant peptide and the native soluble hemojuvelin by immunoprecipitation. Results The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay was validated and appeared to be a robust method with intra- and inter-coefficients of variance ranging from 2.6% to 15%. The assay was able to quantify hemojuvelin levels in a control population within a range from 0.88 to 1.14 mg/L. Patients with iron-refractory iron-deficiency anemia with a mutation in the TMPRSS6 gene were found to have lower levels of circulating hemojuvelin than those in healthy patients. The enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay also showed that soluble hemojuvelin levels were significantly higher in patients with anemia of chronic disease than in control individuals. Conclusions This enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay has a good specificity and sensitivity for the quantification of soluble hemojuvelin in human serum and could be a valuable aid to understanding the physiological role of this protein. PMID:20713458

  12. Menaquinones content of human serum and feces

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Bacterially-synthesized menaquinones (MKn) may contribute to vitamin K (VK) nutriture. There are limited data on interindividual variability in endogenous MK synthesis and its relation to circulating forms of VK. Serum and fecal VK concentrations were assessed in 13 healthy adults (45-65 yr) consumi...

  13. On the classification and evolution of endogenous retrovirus: human endogenous retroviruses may not be 'human' after all.

    PubMed

    Escalera-Zamudio, Marina; Greenwood, Alex D

    2016-01-01

    Retroviruses, as part of their replication cycle, become integrated into the genome of their host. When this occurs in the germline the integrated proviruses can become an endogenous retrovirus (ERV) which may eventually become fixed in the population. ERVs are present in the genomes of all vertebrates including humans, where more than 50 groups of human endogenous retrovirus (HERVs) have been described within the last 30 years. Despite state-of-the-art genomic tools available for retroviral discovery and the large number of retroviral sequences described to date, there are still gaps in understanding retroviral macroevolutionary patterns and host-retrovirus interactions and a lack of a coherent systematic classification particularly for HERVs. Here, we discuss the current knowledge on ERV (and HERV) classification, distribution and origins focusing on the role of cross-species transmission in retroviral diversity. © 2016 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Endogenous neurogenesis in the human brain following cerebral infarction.

    PubMed

    Minger, Stephen L; Ekonomou, Antigoni; Carta, Eloisa M; Chinoy, Amish; Perry, Robert H; Ballard, Clive G

    2007-01-01

    Increased endogenous neurogenesis has a significant regenerative role in many experimental models of cerebrovascular diseases, but there have been very few studies in humans. We therefore examined whether there was evidence of altered endogenous neurogenesis in an 84-year-old patient who suffered a cerebrovascular accident 1 week prior to death. Using antibodies that specifically label neural stem/neural progenitor cells, we examined the presence of immunopositive cells around and distant from the infarcted area, and compared this with a control, age-matched individual. Interestingly, a large number of neural stem cells, vascular endothelial growth factor-immunopositive cells and new blood vessels were observed only around the region of infarction, and none in the corresponding brain areas of the healthy control. In addition, an increased number of neural stem cells was observed in the neurogenic region of the lateral ventricle wall. Our results suggest increased endogenous neurogenesis associated with neovascularization and migration of newly-formed cells towards a region of cerebrovascular damage in the adult human brain and highlight possible mechanisms underlying this process.

  15. Estimated Net Endogenous Acid Production and Serum Bicarbonate in African Americans with Chronic Kidney Disease

    PubMed Central

    Appel, Lawrence J.; Astor, Brad C.; Miller, Edgar R.; Beddhu, Srinivasan; Woodward, Mark; Parekh, Rulan S.; Anderson, Cheryl A.M.

    2011-01-01

    Summary Background and objectives Metabolic acidosis may contribute to morbidity and disease progression in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The ratio of dietary protein, the major source of nonvolatile acid, to dietary potassium, which is naturally bound to alkali precursors, can be used to estimate net endogenous acid production (NEAP). We tested the association between estimated NEAP and serum bicarbonate in patients with CKD. Design, setting, participants, & measurements NEAP was estimated among 462 African American adults with hypertensive CKD using published equations: NEAP (mEq/d) = −10.2 + 54.5 (protein [g/d]/potassium [mEq/d]). Dietary protein and potassium intake were estimated from 24-hour urinary excretion of urea nitrogen and potassium, respectively. All of the eligible measurements during follow-up were modeled using generalized linear regression clustered by participant and adjusted for demographics, 24-hour urinary sodium, kidney function, and selected medications. Results Higher NEAP was associated with lower serum bicarbonate in a graded fashion (P trend < 0.001). Serum bicarbonate was 1.27 mEq/L lower among those in the highest compared with the lowest quartile of NEAP (P < 0.001). There was a greater difference in serum bicarbonate between the highest and lowest quartiles of NEAP among patients with stage 4/5 CKD (−2.43 mEq/L, P < 0.001) compared with those with stage 2/3 disease (−0.77 mEq/L, P = 0.01; P-interaction = 0.02). Conclusions Reducing NEAP, through reduction of dietary protein and increased intake of fruits and vegetables, may prevent metabolic acidosis in patients with CKD. PMID:21700817

  16. Estimated net endogenous acid production and serum bicarbonate in African Americans with chronic kidney disease.

    PubMed

    Scialla, Julia J; Appel, Lawrence J; Astor, Brad C; Miller, Edgar R; Beddhu, Srinivasan; Woodward, Mark; Parekh, Rulan S; Anderson, Cheryl A M

    2011-07-01

    Metabolic acidosis may contribute to morbidity and disease progression in patients with chronic kidney disease (CKD). The ratio of dietary protein, the major source of nonvolatile acid, to dietary potassium, which is naturally bound to alkali precursors, can be used to estimate net endogenous acid production (NEAP). We tested the association between estimated NEAP and serum bicarbonate in patients with CKD. NEAP was estimated among 462 African American adults with hypertensive CKD using published equations: NEAP (mEq/d) = -10.2 + 54.5 (protein [g/d]/potassium [mEq/d]). Dietary protein and potassium intake were estimated from 24-hour urinary excretion of urea nitrogen and potassium, respectively. All of the eligible measurements during follow-up were modeled using generalized linear regression clustered by participant and adjusted for demographics, 24-hour urinary sodium, kidney function, and selected medications. Higher NEAP was associated with lower serum bicarbonate in a graded fashion (P trend < 0.001). Serum bicarbonate was 1.27 mEq/L lower among those in the highest compared with the lowest quartile of NEAP (P < 0.001). There was a greater difference in serum bicarbonate between the highest and lowest quartiles of NEAP among patients with stage 4/5 CKD (-2.43 mEq/L, P < 0.001) compared with those with stage 2/3 disease (-0.77 mEq/L, P = 0.01; P-interaction = 0.02). Reducing NEAP, through reduction of dietary protein and increased intake of fruits and vegetables, may prevent metabolic acidosis in patients with CKD.

  17. The endogenous cannabinoid anandamide inhibits human breast cancer cell proliferation

    PubMed Central

    De Petrocellis, Luciano; Melck, Dominique; Palmisano, Antonella; Bisogno, Tiziana; Laezza, Chiara; Bifulco, Maurizio; Di Marzo, Vincenzo

    1998-01-01

    Anandamide was the first brain metabolite shown to act as a ligand of “central” CB1 cannabinoid receptors. Here we report that the endogenous cannabinoid potently and selectively inhibits the proliferation of human breast cancer cells in vitro. Anandamide dose-dependently inhibited the proliferation of MCF-7 and EFM-19 cells with IC50 values between 0.5 and 1.5 μM and 83–92% maximal inhibition at 5–10 μM. The proliferation of several other nonmammary tumoral cell lines was not affected by 10 μM anandamide. The anti-proliferative effect of anandamide was not due to toxicity or to apoptosis of cells but was accompanied by a reduction of cells in the S phase of the cell cycle. A stable analogue of anandamide (R)-methanandamide, another endogenous cannabinoid, 2-arachidonoylglycerol, and the synthetic cannabinoid HU-210 also inhibited EFM-19 cell proliferation, whereas arachidonic acid was much less effective. These cannabimimetic substances displaced the binding of the selective cannabinoid agonist [3H]CP 55,940 to EFM-19 membranes with an order of potency identical to that observed for the inhibition of EFM-19 cell proliferation. Moreover, anandamide cytostatic effect was inhibited by the selective CB1 receptor antagonist SR 141716A. Cell proliferation was arrested by a prolactin mAb and enhanced by exogenous human prolactin, whose mitogenic action was reverted by very low (0.1–0.5 μM) doses of anandamide. Anandamide suppressed the levels of the long form of the prolactin receptor in both EFM-19 and MCF-7 cells, as well as a typical prolactin-induced response, i.e., the expression of the breast cancer cell susceptibility gene brca1. These data suggest that anandamide blocks human breast cancer cell proliferation through CB1-like receptor-mediated inhibition of endogenous prolactin action at the level of prolactin receptor. PMID:9653194

  18. Light-induced suppression of endogenous circadian amplitude in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewett, Megan; Czeisler, Charles A.; Kronauer, Richard E.

    1991-01-01

    A recent demonstration that the phase of the human circadian pacemaker could be inverted using an unconventional three-cycle stimulus has led to an investigation of whether critically timed exposure to a more moderate stimulus could drive that oscillator toward its singularity, a phaseless position at which the amplitude of circadian oscillation is zero. It is reported here that exposure of humans to fewer cycles of bright light, centered around the time at which the human circadian pacemaker is most sensitive to light-induced phase shifts, can markedly attenuate endogenous cicadian amplitude. In some cases this results in an apparent loss of rhythmicity, as expected to occur in the region of singularity.

  19. Light-induced suppression of endogenous circadian amplitude in humans

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Jewett, Megan; Czeisler, Charles A.; Kronauer, Richard E.

    1991-01-01

    A recent demonstration that the phase of the human circadian pacemaker could be inverted using an unconventional three-cycle stimulus has led to an investigation of whether critically timed exposure to a more moderate stimulus could drive that oscillator toward its singularity, a phaseless position at which the amplitude of circadian oscillation is zero. It is reported here that exposure of humans to fewer cycles of bright light, centered around the time at which the human circadian pacemaker is most sensitive to light-induced phase shifts, can markedly attenuate endogenous cicadian amplitude. In some cases this results in an apparent loss of rhythmicity, as expected to occur in the region of singularity.

  20. Development of diamond-lanthanide metal oxide affinity composites for the selective capture of endogenous serum phosphopeptides.

    PubMed

    Hussain, Dilshad; Musharraf, Syed Ghulam; Najam-ul-Haq, Muhammad

    2016-02-01

    Development of affinity materials for the selective enrichment of phosphopeptides has attracted attention during the last decade. In this work, diamond-lanthanum oxide and diamond-samarium oxide composites have been fabricated via the hydrothermal method. The composites are characterized by scanning electron microscopy (SEM), energy dispersive X-Ray spectroscopy (EDAX), and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The analyses confirm the size and composition of the nanocomposites. They have been applied to selectively capture phosphorylated peptides from standard proteins (β-casein and BSA). Selectivity is calculated as 1:3000 and 1:1500 while sensitivity down to 1 and 20 fmol for diamond-lanthanum oxide and diamond-samarium oxide nanocomposites, respectively. Enrichment efficiency has also been evaluated for non-fat milk digest where 18 phosphopeptides are enriched. Total of 213 and 187 phosphopeptides are captured from tryptic digest of HeLa cells extracted proteins by diamond-lanthanum oxide and diamond-samarium oxide, respectively. Finally, human serum, without any pre-treatment, is applied and nanocomposites capture the endogenous serum phosphopeptides.

  1. Molecular functions of human endogenous retroviruses in health and disease.

    PubMed

    Suntsova, Maria; Garazha, Andrew; Ivanova, Alena; Kaminsky, Dmitry; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Buzdin, Anton

    2015-10-01

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) and related genetic elements form 504 distinct families and occupy ~8% of human genome. Recent success of high-throughput experimental technologies facilitated understanding functional impact of HERVs for molecular machinery of human cells. HERVs encode active retroviral proteins, which may exert important physiological functions in the body, but also may be involved in the progression of cancer and numerous human autoimmune, neurological and infectious diseases. The spectrum of related malignancies includes, but not limits to, multiple sclerosis, psoriasis, lupus, schizophrenia, multiple cancer types and HIV. In addition, HERVs regulate expression of the neighboring host genes and modify genomic regulatory landscape, e.g., by providing regulatory modules like transcription factor binding sites (TFBS). Indeed, recent bioinformatic profiling identified ~110,000 regulatory active HERV elements, which formed at least ~320,000 human TFBS. These and other peculiarities of HERVs might have played an important role in human evolution and speciation. In this paper, we focus on the current progress in understanding of normal and pathological molecular niches of HERVs, on their implications in human evolution, normal physiology and disease. We also review the available databases dealing with various aspects of HERV genetics.

  2. Quantitative bioanalysis of strontium in human serum by inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry

    PubMed Central

    Somarouthu, Srikanth; Ohh, Jayoung; Shaked, Jonathan; Cunico, Robert L; Yakatan, Gerald; Corritori, Suzana; Tami, Joe; Foehr, Erik D

    2015-01-01

    Aim: A bioanalytical method using inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectrometry to measure endogenous levels of strontium in human serum was developed and validated. Results & methodology: This article details the experimental procedures used for the method development and validation thus demonstrating the application of the inductively-coupled plasma-mass spectrometry method for quantification of strontium in human serum samples. The assay was validated for specificity, linearity, accuracy, precision, recovery and stability. Significant endogenous levels of strontium are present in human serum samples ranging from 19 to 96 ng/ml with a mean of 34.6 ± 15.2 ng/ml (SD). Discussion & conclusion: Calibration procedures and sample pretreatment were simplified for high throughput analysis. The validation demonstrates that the method was sensitive, selective for quantification of strontium (88Sr) and is suitable for routine clinical testing of strontium in human serum samples. PMID:28031925

  3. Discovery of unfixed endogenous retrovirus insertions in diverse human populations

    PubMed Central

    Wildschutte, Julia Halo; Williams, Zachary H.; Montesion, Meagan; Subramanian, Ravi P.; Kidd, Jeffrey M.; Coffin, John M.

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) have contributed to more than 8% of the human genome. The majority of these elements lack function due to accumulated mutations or internal recombination resulting in a solitary (solo) LTR, although members of one group of human ERVs (HERVs), HERV-K, were recently active with members that remain nearly intact, a subset of which is present as insertionally polymorphic loci that include approximately full-length (2-LTR) and solo-LTR alleles in addition to the unoccupied site. Several 2-LTR insertions have intact reading frames in some or all genes that are expressed as functional proteins. These properties reflect the activity of HERV-K and suggest the existence of additional unique loci within humans. We sought to determine the extent to which other polymorphic insertions are present in humans, using sequenced genomes from the 1000 Genomes Project and a subset of the Human Genome Diversity Project panel. We report analysis of a total of 36 nonreference polymorphic HERV-K proviruses, including 19 newly reported loci, with insertion frequencies ranging from <0.0005 to >0.75 that varied by population. Targeted screening of individual loci identified three new unfixed 2-LTR proviruses within our set, including an intact provirus present at Xq21.33 in some individuals, with the potential for retained infectivity. PMID:27001843

  4. Concentration of endogenous estrogens and estrogen metabolites in the NCI-60 human tumor cell lines

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background Endogenous estrogens and estrogen metabolites play an important role in the pathogenesis and development of human breast, endometrial, and ovarian cancers. Increasing evidence also supports their involvement in the development of certain lung, colon and prostate cancers. Methods In this study we systemically surveyed endogenous estrogen and estrogen metabolite levels in each of the NCI-60 human tumor cell lines, which include human breast, central nerve system, colon, ovarian, prostate, kidney and non-small cell lung cancers, as well as melanomas and leukemia. The absolute abundances of these metabolites were measured using a liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry method that has been previously utilized for biological fluids such as serum and urine. Results Endogenous estrogens and estrogen metabolites were found in all NCI-60 human tumor cell lines and some were substantially elevated and exceeded the levels found in well known estrogen-dependent and estrogen receptor-positive tumor cells such as MCF-7 and T-47D. While estrogens were expected to be present at high levels in cell lines representing the female reproductive system (that is, breast and ovarian), other cell lines, such as leukemia and colon, also contained very high levels of these steroid hormones. The leukemia cell line RMPI-8226 contained the highest levels of estrone (182.06 pg/106 cells) and 17β-estradiol (753.45 pg/106 cells). In comparison, the ovarian cancer cell line with the highest levels of these estrogens contained only 19.79 and 139.32 pg/106 cells of estrone and 17β-estradiol, respectively. The highest levels of estrone and 17β-estradiol in breast cancer cell lines were only 8.45 and 87.37 pg/106 cells in BT-549 and T-47D cells, respectively. Conclusions The data provided evidence for the presence of significant amounts of endogenous estrogens and estrogen metabolites in cell lines not commonly associated with these steroid hormones. This broad discovery of

  5. Genomic Flexibility of Human Endogenous Retrovirus Type K

    PubMed Central

    Dube, Derek; Contreras-Galindo, Rafael; He, Shirley; King, Steven R.; Gonzalez-Hernandez, Marta J.; Gitlin, Scott D.; Kaplan, Mark H.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Human endogenous retrovirus type K (HERV-K) proviruses are scattered throughout the human genome, but as no infectious HERV-K virus has been detected to date, the mechanism by which these viruses replicated and populated the genome remains unresolved. Here, we provide evidence that, in addition to the RNA genomes that canonical retroviruses package, modern HERV-K viruses can contain reverse-transcribed DNA (RT-DNA) genomes. Indeed, reverse transcription of genomic HERV-K RNA into the DNA form is able to occur in three distinct times and locations: (i) in the virus-producing cell prior to viral release, yielding a DNA-containing extracellular virus particle similar to the spumaviruses; (ii) within the extracellular virus particle itself, transitioning from an RNA-containing particle to a DNA-containing particle; and (iii) after entry of the RNA-containing virus into the target cell, similar to canonical retroviruses, such as murine leukemia virus and HIV. Moreover, using a resuscitated HERV-K virus construct, we show that both viruses with RNA genomes and viruses with DNA genomes are capable of infecting target cells. This high level of genomic flexibility historically could have permitted these viruses to replicate in various host cell environments, potentially assisting in their many integration events and resulting in their high prevalence in the human genome. Moreover, the ability of modern HERV-K viruses to proceed through reverse transcription and package RT-DNA genomes suggests a higher level of replication competency than was previously understood, and it may be relevant in HERV-K-associated human diseases. IMPORTANCE Retroviral elements comprise at least 8% of the human genome. Of all the endogenous retroviruses, HERV-K viruses are the most intact and biologically active. While a modern infectious HERV-K has yet to be found, HERV-K activation has been associated with cancers, autoimmune diseases, and HIV-1 infection. Thus, determining how this

  6. Inequality in Human Capital and Endogenous Credit Constraints.

    PubMed

    Hai, Rong; Heckman, James J

    2017-04-01

    This paper investigates the determinants of inequality in human capital with an emphasis on the role of the credit constraints. We develop and estimate a model in which individuals face uninsured human capital risks and invest in education, acquire work experience, accumulate assets and smooth consumption. Agents can borrow from the private lending market and from government student loan programs. The private market credit limit is explicitly derived by extending the natural borrowing limit of Aiyagari (1994) to incorporate endogenous labor supply, human capital accumulation, psychic costs of working, and age. We quantify the effects of cognitive ability, noncognitive ability, parental education, and parental wealth on educational attainment, wages, and consumption. We conduct counterfactual experiments with respect to tuition subsidies and enhanced student loan limits and evaluate their effects on educational attainment and inequality. We compare the performance of our model with an influential ad hoc model in the literature with education-specific fixed loan limits. We find evidence of substantial life cycle credit constraints that affect human capital accumulation and inequality. The constrained fall into two groups: those who are permanently poor over their lifetimes and a group of well-endowed individuals with rising high levels of acquired skills who are constrained early in their life cycles. Equalizing cognitive and noncognitive ability has dramatic effects on inequality. Equalizing parental backgrounds has much weaker effects. Tuition costs have weak effects on inequality.

  7. New insight into transcription of human endogenous retroviral elements.

    PubMed

    Pačes, Jan; Huang, Yao-Ting; Pačes, Václav; Rídl, Jakub; Chang, Chung-Ming

    2013-03-25

    It is generally assumed that human endogenous retroviral elements (HERVs) belong to the class of genomic repetitive nucleotide sequences often called 'junk DNA'. These elements were categorized to families, and members of some of these families (e.g. HERV-H, HERV-W and HERV-K) were shown to be transcribed. These transcriptions were associated with several severe diseases such as mental disorders, AIDS, autoimmune diseases and cancer. In this review we discuss several bioinformatics strategies for genome-wide scan of HERVs transcription using high-throughput RNA sequencing on several platforms. We show that many more HERVs than previously described are transcribed to various levels and we discuss possible implications of these transcriptions.

  8. Endogenous opioids regulate social threat learning in humans

    PubMed Central

    Haaker, Jan; Yi, Jonathan; Petrovic, Predrag; Olsson, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Many fearful expectations are shaped by observation of aversive outcomes to others. Yet, the neurochemistry regulating social learning is unknown. Previous research has shown that during direct (Pavlovian) threat learning, information about personally experienced outcomes is regulated by the release of endogenous opioids, and activity within the amygdala and periaqueductal gray (PAG). Here we report that blockade of this opioidergic circuit enhances social threat learning through observation in humans involving activity within the amygdala, midline thalamus and the PAG. In particular, anticipatory responses to learned threat cues (CS) were associated with temporal dynamics in the PAG, coding the observed aversive outcomes to other (observational US). In addition, pharmacological challenge of the opioid receptor function is classified by distinct brain activity patterns during the expression of conditioned threats. Our results reveal an opioidergic circuit that codes the observed aversive outcomes to others into threat responses and long-term memory in the observer. PMID:28541285

  9. Serum amyloid A is an endogenous ligand that differentially induces IL-12 and IL-23.

    PubMed

    He, Rong; Shepard, Larry W; Chen, Jia; Pan, Zhixing K; Ye, Richard D

    2006-09-15

    The acute-phase proteins, C-reactive protein and serum amyloid A (SAA), are biomarkers of infection and inflammation. However, their precise role in immunity and inflammation remains undefined. We report in this study a novel property of SAA in the differential induction of Th1-type immunomodulatory cytokines IL-12 and IL-23. In peripheral blood monocytes and the THP-1 monocytic cell line, SAA induces the expression of IL-12p40, a subunit shared by IL-12 and IL-23. SAA-stimulated expression of IL-12p40 was rapid (< or = 4 h), sustainable (> or = 20 h), potent (up to 3380 pg/ml/10(6) cells in 24 h), and insensitive to polymyxin B treatment. The SAA-stimulated IL-12p40 secretion required de novo protein synthesis and was accompanied by activation of the transcription factors NF-kappaB and C/EBP. Expression of IL-12p40 required activation of the p38 MAPK and PI3K. Interestingly, the SAA-induced IL-12p40 production was accompanied by a sustained expression of IL-23p19, but not IL-12p35, resulting in preferential secretion of IL-23, but not IL-12. These results identify SAA as an endogenous ligand that potentially activates the IL-23/IL-17 pathway and present a novel mechanism for regulation of inflammation and immunity by an acute-phase protein.

  10. Serum sample containing endogenous antibodies interfering with multiple hormone immunoassays. Laboratory strategies to detect interference.

    PubMed

    García-González, Elena; Aramendía, Maite; Álvarez-Ballano, Diego; Trincado, Pablo; Rello, Luis

    2016-04-01

    Endogenous antibodies (EA) may interfere with immunoassays, causing erroneous results for hormone analyses. As (in most cases) this interference arises from the assay format and most immunoassays, even from different manufacturers, are constructed in a similar way, it is possible for a single type of EA to interfere with different immunoassays. Here we describe the case of a patient whose serum sample contains EA that interfere several hormones tests. We also discuss the strategies deployed to detect interference. Over a period of four years, a 30-year-old man was subjected to a plethora of laboratory and imaging diagnostic procedures as a consequence of elevated hormone results, mainly of pituitary origin, which did not correlate with the overall clinical picture. Once analytical interference was suspected, the best laboratory approaches to investigate it were sample reanalysis on an alternative platform and sample incubation with antibody blocking tubes. Construction of an in-house 'nonsense' sandwich assay was also a valuable strategy to confirm interference. In contrast, serial sample dilutions were of no value in our case, while polyethylene glycol (PEG) precipitation gave inconclusive results, probably due to the use of inappropriate PEG concentrations for several of the tests assayed. Clinicians and laboratorians must be aware of the drawbacks of immunometric assays, and alert to the possibility of EA interference when results do not fit the clinical pattern.

  11. Systems Proteomics View of the Endogenous Human Claudin Protein Family

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Fei; Koval, Michael; Ranganathan, Shoba; Fanayan, Susan; Hancock, William S.; Lundberg, Emma K.; Beavis, Ronald C.; Lane, Lydie; Duek, Paula; McQuade, Leon; Kelleher, Neil L.; Baker, Mark S.

    2016-01-01

    Claudins are the major transmembrane protein components of tight junctions in human endothelia and epithelia. Tissue-specific expression of claudin members suggests that this protein family is not only essential for sustaining the role of tight junctions in cell permeability control but also vital in organizing cell contact signaling by protein–protein interactions. How this protein family is collectively processed and regulated is key to understanding the role of junctional proteins in preserving cell identity and tissue integrity. The focus of this review is to first provide a brief overview of the functional context, on the basis of the extensive body of claudin biology research that has been thoroughly reviewed, for endogenous human claudin members and then ascertain existing and future proteomics techniques that may be applicable to systematically characterizing the chemical forms and interacting protein partners of this protein family in human. The ability to elucidate claudin-based signaling networks may provide new insight into cell development and differentiation programs that are crucial to tissue stability and manipulation. PMID:26680015

  12. Serum uric acid in relation to endogenous reproductive hormones during the menstrual cycle: findings from the BioCycle study

    PubMed Central

    Mumford, Sunni L.; Dasharathy, Sonya S.; Pollack, Anna Z.; Perkins, Neil J.; Mattison, Donald R.; Cole, Stephen R.; Wactawski-Wende, Jean; Schisterman, Enrique F.

    2013-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Do uric acid levels across the menstrual cycle show associations with endogenous estradiol (E2) and reproductive hormone concentrations in regularly menstruating women? SUMMARY ANSWER Mean uric acid concentrations were highest during the follicular phase, and were inversely associated with E2 and progesterone, and positively associated with FSH. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY E2 may decrease serum levels of uric acid in post-menopausal women; however, the interplay between endogenous reproductive hormones and uric acid levels among regularly menstruating women has not been elucidated. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION The BioCycle study was a prospective cohort study conducted at the University at Buffalo research centre from 2005 to 2007, which followed healthy women for one (n = 9) or 2 (n = 250) menstrual cycle(s). PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS Participants were healthy women aged 18–44 years. Hormones and uric acid were measured in serum eight times each cycle for up to two cycles. Marginal structural models with inverse probability of exposure weights were used to evaluate the associations between endogenous hormones and uric acid concentrations. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE Uric acid levels were observed to vary across the menstrual cycle, with the lowest levels observed during the luteal phase. Every log-unit increase in E2 was associated with a decrease in uric acid of 1.1% (β = −0.011; 95% confidence interval (CI): −0.019, −0.004; persistent-effects model), and for every log-unit increase in progesterone, uric acid decreased by ∼0.8% (β = −0.008; 95% CI: −0.012, −0.004; persistent-effects model). FSH was positively associated with uric acid concentrations, such that each log-unit increase was associated with a 1.6% increase in uric acid (β = 0.016; 95% CI: 0.005, 0.026; persistent-effects model). Progesterone and FSH were also associated with uric acid levels in acute-effects models. Of 509 cycles, 42 were anovulatory

  13. Inhibition of endogenous human dentin MMPs by Gluma

    PubMed Central

    Sabatini, Camila; Scheffel, Débora L.S.; Scheffel, Régis H.; Agee, Kelli A.; Rouch, Katelyn; Takahashi, Masahiro; Breschi, Lorenzo; Mazzoni, Annalisa; Tjäderhane, Leo; Tay, Franklin R.; Pashley, David H.

    2014-01-01

    Objective The objective of this study was to determine if Gluma dentin desensitizer (5.0% glutaraldehyde and 35% HEMA in water) can inhibit the endogenous MMPs of dentin matrices in 60 sec. and to evaluate its effect on dentin matrix stiffness and dry mass weight. Methods Dentin beams of 2×1×6 mm were obtained from extracted human third molars coronal dentin. To measure the influence of Gluma treatment time on total MMP activity of dentin, beams were dipped in 37% phosphoric acid (PA) for 15 sec. and rinsed in water. The acid-etched beams were then dipped in Gluma for 5, 15, 30 or 60 sec., rinsed in water and incubated into SensoLyte generic MMP substrate (AnaSpec, Inc.) for 60 min. Controls were dipped in water for 60 sec. Additional beams of 1×1×6 mm were completely demineralized in 37% PA for 18 h, rinsed and used to evaluate changes on the dry weight and modulus of elasticity (E) after 60 sec. of Gluma treatment followed by incubation in simulated body fluid buffer for zero, one or four weeks. E was measured by 3-pt flexure. Results Gluma treatment inhibited total MMP activity of acid-etched dentin by 44, 50, 84, 86 % after 5, 15, 30 or 60 sec. of exposure, respectively. All completely demineralized dentin beams lost stiffness after one and four weeks, with no significant differences between the control and Gluma-treated dentin. Gluma treatment for 60 sec. yielded significantly less dry mass loss than the control after four weeks. Significance The use of Gluma may contribute to the preservation of adhesive interfaces by its cross-linking and inhibitory properties of endogenous dentin MMPs. PMID:24846803

  14. An endogenous circadian rhythm of respiratory control in humans

    PubMed Central

    Spengler, Christina M; Czeisler, Charles A; Shea, Steven A

    2000-01-01

    Many physiological and behavioural functions have circadian rhythms – endogenous oscillations with a period of approximately 24 h that can occur even in the absence of sleep. We determined whether there is an endogenous circadian rhythm in breathing, metabolism and ventilatory chemosensitivity in humans. Ten healthy, adult males were studied throughout 4 days in a stable laboratory environment. After two initial baseline days (16 h wakefulness plus 8 h sleep) that served to achieve a steady state, subjects were studied under constant behavioural and environmental conditions throughout 41 h of wakefulness. Ventilation, metabolism and the magnitude of the hypercapnic ventilatory response (HCVR) were measured every 2 h. Individuals’ data were aligned according to circadian phase (core body temperature minimum; CBTmin) and averaged. In the group average data, there was a significant and large amplitude circadian variation in HCVR slope (average of ±0.4 l min−1 mmHg−1; corresponding to ±12.1 % of 24 h mean), and a smaller amplitude rhythm in the HCVR x-axis intercept (average of ±1.1 mmHg; ±2.1 % of 24 h mean). Despite a significant circadian variation in metabolism (±3.2 % of 24 h mean), there were no detectable rhythms in tidal volume, respiratory frequency or ventilation. This small discrepancy between metabolism and ventilation led to a small but significant circadian variation in end-tidal PCO2(PET,CO2; ±0.6 mmHg; ±1.5 % of 24 h mean). The circadian minima of the group-averaged respiratory variables occurred 6-8 h earlier than CBTmin, suggesting that endogenous changes in CBT across the circadian cycle have less of an effect on respiration than equivalent experimentally induced changes in CBT. Throughout these circadian changes, there were no correlations between HCVR parameters (slope or x-axis intercept) and either resting ventilation or resting PET,CO2. This suggests that ventilation and PET,CO2 are little influenced by central chemosensory

  15. Human endogenous retrovirus-K contributes to motor neuron disease.

    PubMed

    Li, Wenxue; Lee, Myoung-Hwa; Henderson, Lisa; Tyagi, Richa; Bachani, Muzna; Steiner, Joseph; Campanac, Emilie; Hoffman, Dax A; von Geldern, Gloria; Johnson, Kory; Maric, Dragan; Morris, H Douglas; Lentz, Margaret; Pak, Katherine; Mammen, Andrew; Ostrow, Lyle; Rothstein, Jeffrey; Nath, Avindra

    2015-09-30

    The role of human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) in disease pathogenesis is unclear. We show that HERV-K is activated in a subpopulation of patients with sporadic amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and that its envelope (env) protein may contribute to neurodegeneration. The virus was expressed in cortical and spinal neurons of ALS patients, but not in neurons from control healthy individuals. Expression of HERV-K or its env protein in human neurons caused retraction and beading of neurites. Transgenic animals expressing the env gene developed progressive motor dysfunction accompanied by selective loss of volume of the motor cortex, decreased synaptic activity in pyramidal neurons, dendritic spine abnormalities, nucleolar dysfunction, and DNA damage. Injury to anterior horn cells in the spinal cord was manifested by muscle atrophy and pathological changes consistent with nerve fiber denervation and reinnervation. Expression of HERV-K was regulated by TAR (trans-activation responsive) DNA binding protein 43, which binds to the long terminal repeat region of the virus. Thus, HERV-K expression within neurons of patients with ALS may contribute to neurodegeneration and disease pathogenesis. Copyright © 2015, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  16. Human endogenous retroviruses and chosen disease parameters in morphea

    PubMed Central

    Dańczak-Pazdrowska, Aleksandra; Szramka-Pawlak, Beata; Żaba, Ryszard; Osmola-Mańkowska, Agnieszka; Silny, Wojciech

    2017-01-01

    Introduction Morphea (localized scleroderma) is a relatively rare disease characterized by excessive skin fibrosis. Human endogenous retroviruses (HERV) are largely distributed within the human genome with hundreds of thousands of elements. The HERV have been widely studied in autoimmune disorders, yet hardly ever assessed in diseases with a good prognosis such as morphea. Aim In this study we focus on the possible relations between the expression of chosen HERV and factors influencing the pathomechanism of the disease, such as age, sex, titres of anti-nuclear antibodies, as well as duration, activity, and severity of the disease (LoSSI index). Material and methods Real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR) targeting six HERV sequences of interest were performed on samples derived from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and skin biopsies. Results In PBMC we found a statistically significant negative correlation between HERV-W env expression and LoSSI index (p = 0.01). Additionally, HERV-W env was downregulated in patients with the active form of morphea. In all other cases we found no correlation whatsoever nor statistically significant differences below the p = 0.05 threshold. Conclusions Morphea seems to be an autoimmune disease where the impact of HERV is not so apparent. It seems that probing many patients for the expression of just a few sequences is not as effective as previously expected. For initial studies of HERV in other diseases we recommend high throughput techniques such as HERV-dedicated DNA microarrays or massive parallel sequencing. PMID:28261031

  17. Lipid Removal from Human Serum Samples

    PubMed Central

    Castro, Arnold R.; Morrill, William E.; Pope, Victoria

    2000-01-01

    The efficacy of lipid removal from human serum samples obtained by using Cleanascite HC, a commercially available product, was compared to that obtained by the standard chloroform method. Separate samples of 21 frozen, banked human serum samples used in the preparation of samples for proficiency testing were treated with either Cleanascite HC or chloroform. The lipid content was measured before and after treatment. The total percentages of lipid removed ranged from 61 to 70% with Cleanascite HC and from 60 to 62% with chloroform. The advantage of Cleanascite HC over chloroform is based on the simplicity of the procedure with Cleanascite HC without the environmental concerns inherent in the use of chloroform. In 15 serum samples known to contain antibodies to treponemal and nontreponemal syphilis antigens, Cleanascite HC bound some immunoglobulin, but with only minimal loss of reactivity in the serologic tests for syphilis. Cleanascite HC is therefore an acceptable alternative to chloroform for lipid reduction in human serum samples. PMID:10702492

  18. Exogenous delta⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol influences circulating endogenous cannabinoids in humans.

    PubMed

    Walter, Carmen; Ferreirós, Nerea; Bishay, Philipp; Geisslinger, Gerd; Tegeder, Irmgard; Lötsch, Jörn

    2013-10-01

    Delta⁹-tetrahydrocannabinol (THC) competes with the endogenous cannabinoids arachidonoyl ethanolamide (anandamide) and 2-arachidonoyl glycerol (2-AG) at cannabinoid receptors. This may cause adaptive changes in the endocannabinoid signaling cascade with possible consequences for the biological functions of the endocannabinoid system. We show that administration of a single oral dose of 20 mg THC to 30 healthy volunteers resulted in higher circulating concentrations of anandamide, 2-AG, palmitoyl ethanolamide, and oleoylethanolamide at 2 and 3 hours after administration as compared with placebo. At 2 hours after THC administration, changes in oleoylethanolamide plasma concentrations from baseline were linearly related to the THC plasma concentrations. In rats, treatment with the CB₁/CB₂ agonist WIN 55,212 also increased plasma endocannabinoid concentrations. However, this was associated with a decrease of ethanolamide endocannabinoids in specific brain regions including spinal cord, cortex, and hypothalamus; whereas 2-arachidonoyl glycerol increased in the cortex. Thus, administration of THC to human volunteers influenced the concentrations of circulating endocannabinoids, which was mimicked by WIN-55,212 in rats, suggesting that exogenous cannabinoids may lead to changes in the endocannabinoid system that can be detected in plasma.

  19. Definition and variation of human endogenous retrovirus H.

    PubMed

    Jern, Patric; Sperber, Göran O; Blomberg, Jonas

    2004-09-15

    We defined the abundant human endogenous retrovirus group HERV-H based on pol similarity. Among 3661 pol-containing elements, 1124 integrations were similar to HERV-H RGH2 pol using translated pol sequences. A clustering procedure lessened these to 234 representatives, amenable to detailed study. Among the 1124, 926 clustered into HERV-H and 106 into adjacent HERV-H-like, the remainder being more distant to HERV-H. The HERV-H group was divided into RTVLH2-like (705 elements) and RGH2-like (77 elements) subgroups. Among 926 HERV-H, LTR differences were 1-33%, 10% had env, 78% had gag, 66% had a histidine primer binding site (PBS), and 3% (both subgroups) had a phenylalanine PBS. Allelic differences in env were studied using a convenient temperature gradient gel electrophoresis (TGGE) method and a genomic single nucleotide polymorphism (SNP) search. A pattern of abundant defective elements and less abundant less defective ones led us to formulate a "midwife" master model where more complete elements help the others in trans to transpose.

  20. Endogenous ways to stimulate brown adipose tissue in humans.

    PubMed

    Broeders, Evie; Bouvy, Nicole D; van Marken Lichtenbelt, Wouter D

    2015-03-01

    Obesity is the result of disequilibrium between energy intake and energy expenditure (EE). Successful long-term weight loss is difficult to achieve with current strategies for the correction of this caloric imbalance. Non-shivering thermogenesis (NST) in brown adipose tissue (BAT) is a possible therapeutic target for the prevention and treatment of obesity and associated metabolic diseases. In recent years, more knowledge about the function and stimulation of bat has been obtained. The sympathetic nervous system (SNS) is currently seen as the main effector for brown fat function. Also, interplay between the thyroid axis and SNS plays an important role in BAT thermogenesis. Almost daily new pathways for the induction of BAT thermogenesis and 'browning' of white adipose tissue (WAT) are identified. Especially the activation of BAT via endogenous pathways has received strong scientific attention. Here we will discuss the relevance of several pathways in activating BAT and their implications for the treatment of obesity. In this review we will focus on the discussion of the most promising endocrine and paracrine pathways to stimulate BAT, by factors and pathways that naturally occur in the human body.

  1. Human sperm tail proteome suggests new endogenous metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Alexandra; Castillo, Judit; Estanyol, Josep Maria; Ballescà, José Luís; Ramalho-Santos, João; Oliva, Rafael

    2013-02-01

    Proteomic studies are contributing greatly to our understanding of the sperm cell, and more detailed descriptions are expected to clarify additional cellular and molecular sperm attributes. The aim of this study was to characterize the subcellular proteome of the human sperm tail and, hopefully, identify less concentrated proteins (not found in whole cell proteome studies). Specifically, we were interested in characterizing the sperm metabolic proteome and gaining new insights into the sperm metabolism issue. Sperm were isolated from normozoospermic semen samples and depleted of any contaminating leukocytes. Tail fractions were obtained by means of sonication followed by sucrose-gradient ultracentrifugation, and their purity was confirmed via various techniques. Liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry of isolated sperm tail peptides resulted in the identification of 1049 proteins, more than half of which had not been previously described in human sperm. The categorization of proteins according to their function revealed two main groups: proteins related to metabolism and energy production (26%), and proteins related to sperm tail structure and motility (11%). Interestingly, a great proportion of the metabolic proteome (24%) comprised enzymes involved in lipid metabolism, including enzymes for mitochondrial beta-oxidation. Unexpectedly, we also identified various peroxisomal proteins, some of which are known to be involved in the oxidation of very long chain fatty acids. Analysis of our data using Reactome suggests that both mitochondrial and peroxisomal pathways might indeed be active in sperm, and that the use of fatty acids as fuel might be more preponderant than previously thought. In addition, incubation of sperm with the fatty acid oxidation inhibitor etomoxir resulted in a significant decrease in sperm motility. Contradicting a common concept in the literature, we suggest that the male gamete might have the capacity to obtain energy from endogenous

  2. Deficiency of Endogenous Acute Phase Serum Amyloid A Does Not Impact Atherosclerotic Lesions in ApoE-/- Mice

    PubMed Central

    De Beer, Maria C; Wroblewski, Joanne M; Noffsinger, Victoria P; Rateri, Debra L; Howatt, Deborah A; Balakrishnan, Anju; Ji, Ailing; Shridas, Preetha; Thompson, Joel C; van der Westhuyzen, Deneys R; Tannock, Lisa R; Daugherty, Alan; Webb, Nancy R; De Beer, Frederick C

    2014-01-01

    Objective Although elevated plasma concentrations of serum amyloid A (SAA) are strongly associated with increased risk for atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease in humans, the role of SAA in the pathogenesis of lesion formation remains obscure. Our goal was to determine the impact of SAA deficiency on atherosclerosis in hypercholesterolemic mice. Approach and Results ApoE-/- mice, either wild type or deficient in both major acute phase SAA isoforms, SAA1.1 and SAA2.1 (SAAWT and SAAKO, respectively), were fed a normal rodent diet for 50 weeks. Female, but not male SAAKO mice had a modest increase (22%; p ≤ 0.05) in plasma cholesterol concentrations and a 53% increase in adipose mass compared to SAAWT mice that did not impact the plasma cytokine levels or the expression of adipose tissue inflammatory markers. SAA deficiency did not impact lipoprotein cholesterol distributions or plasma triglyceride concentrations in either male or female mice. Atherosclerotic lesion areas measured on the intimal surfaces of the arch, thoracic, and abdominal regions were not significantly different between SAAKO and SAAWT mice in either gender. To accelerate lesion formation, mice were fed a Western diet for 12 weeks. SAA deficiency had no effect on diet-induced alterations in plasma cholesterol, triglyceride or cytokine concentrationsn or on aortic atherosclerotic lesion areas in either male or female mice. In addition, SAA deficiency in male mice had no effect on lesion areas or macrophage accumulation in the aortic roots. Conclusions The absence of endogenous SAA1.1 and 2.1 does not impact atherosclerotic lipid deposition in apoE-/- mice fed either normal or Western diets. PMID:24265416

  3. RELIABLE ASSAYS FOR DETERMINING ENDOGENOUS COMPONENTS OF HUMAN MILK

    EPA Science Inventory

    Healthy women from 18-38 years old (N=25) fasted for several hours and twice donated blood and milk (postpartum 2-7 weeks and 3-4 months) for the EPA's Methods Advancement for Milk Analysis study, a pilot for the National Children's Study (NCS). Endogenous components were chosen...

  4. RELIABLE ASSAYS FOR DETERMINING ENDOGENOUS COMPONENTS OF HUMAN MILK

    EPA Science Inventory

    Healthy women from 18-38 years old (N=25) fasted for several hours and twice donated blood and milk (postpartum 2-7 weeks and 3-4 months) for the EPA's Methods Advancement for Milk Analysis study, a pilot for the National Children's Study (NCS). Endogenous components were chosen...

  5. Role of Endogenous Cholecystokinin on Growth of Human Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Matters, Gail L.; McGovern, Christopher; Harms, John F.; Markovic, Kevin; Anson, Krystal; Jayakumar, Calpurnia; Martenis, Melissa; Awad, Christina; Smith, Jill P.

    2012-01-01

    Cholecystokinin (CCK) and gastrin stimulate growth of pancreatic cancer. Although down regulation of gastrin inhibits growth of pancreatic cancer, the contribution of endogenous CCK to tumor growth is unknown. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the role of endogenous CCK on autocrine growth of pancreatic cancer. Pancreatic cancer cell lines were analyzed for CCK mRNA and peptide expression by real time RT-PCR and radioimmunoassay, respectively. The effect of endogenous CCK on growth was evaluated by treating cancer cells with CCK neutralizing antibodies and by down regulating CCK mRNA by RNAi. Wild type pancreatic cancer cells expressed significantly lower CCK mRNA and peptide levels than gastrin. Neither treatment of pancreatic cancer cells with CCK antibodies nor the down regulation of CCK mRNA and peptide by shRNAs altered growth in vitro or in vivo. Conversely, when gastrin mRNA expression was down regulated, the same cells failed to produce tumors in spite of having sustained levels of endogenous CCK. Pancreatic cancer cells produce CCK and gastrin; however, the autocrine production of gastrin is more important for stimulating tumor growth. PMID:21186400

  6. Endogenous Human Brain Dynamics Recover Slowly Following Cognitive Effort

    PubMed Central

    Barnes, Anna; Bullmore, Edward T.; Suckling, John

    2009-01-01

    Background In functional magnetic resonance imaging, the brain's response to experimental manipulation is almost always assumed to be independent of endogenous oscillations. To test this, we addressed the possible interaction between cognitive task performance and endogenous fMRI oscillations in an experiment designed to answer two questions: 1) Does performance of a cognitively effortful task significantly change fractal scaling properties of fMRI time series compared to their values before task performance? 2) If so, can we relate the extent of task-related perturbation to the difficulty of the task? Methodology/Principal Findings Using a novel continuous acquisition “rest-task-rest” design, we found that endogenous dynamics tended to recover their pre-task parameter values relatively slowly, over the course of several minutes, following completion of one of two versions of the n-back working memory task and that the rate of recovery was slower following completion of the more demanding (n = 2) version of the task. Conclusion/Significance This result supports the model that endogenous low frequency oscillatory dynamics are relevant to the brain's response to exogenous stimulation. Moreover, it suggests that large-scale neurocognitive systems measured using fMRI, like the heart and other physiological systems subjected to external demands for enhanced performance, can take a considerable period of time to return to a stable baseline state. PMID:19680553

  7. English walnuts (Juglans regia L.) protect endogenous antioxidants in humans

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Ellagic acid monomers, polymeric tannins and related phenolic compounds isolated from English walnuts (Juglans regia L.) have been reported to inhibit LDL oxidation ex vivo and decrease biomarkers of oxidative stress in animal models. To determine whether dietary and endogenous antioxidants are pres...

  8. The association between human endogenous retroviruses and multiple sclerosis: A systematic review and meta-analysis

    PubMed Central

    Morandi, Elena; Tanasescu, Radu; Tarlinton, Rachael E.; Constantinescu, Cris S.; Zhang, Weiya; Tench, Christopher

    2017-01-01

    Background The interaction between genetic and environmental factors is crucial to multiple sclerosis (MS) pathogenesis. Human Endogenous Retroviruses (HERVs) are endogenous viral elements of the human genome whose expression is associated with MS. Objective To perform a systematic review and meta-analysis and to assess qualitative and quantitative evidence on the expression of HERV families in MS patients. Methods Medline, Embase and the Cochrane Library were searched for published studies on the association of HERVs and MS. Meta-analysis was performed on the HERV-W family. Odds Ratio (OR) and 95% confidence interval (CI) were calculated for association. Results 43 reports were extracted (25 related to HERV-W, 13 to HERV-H, 9 to HERV-K, 5 to HRES-1 and 1 to HER-15 family). The analysis showed an association between expression of all HERV families and MS. For HERV-W, adequate data was available for meta-analysis. Results from meta-analyses of HERV-W were OR = 22.66 (95%CI 6.32 to 81.20) from 4 studies investigating MSRV/HERV-W (MS-associated retrovirus) envelope mRNA in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, OR = 44.11 (95%CI 12.95 to 150.30) from 6 studies of MSRV/HERV-W polymerase mRNA in serum/plasma and OR = 6.00 (95%CI 3.35 to 10.74) from 4 studies of MSRV/HERV-W polymerase mRNA in CSF. Conclusions This systematic review and meta-analysis shows an association between expression of HERVs, and in particular the HERV-W family, and MS. PMID:28207850

  9. A validated LC-MS/MS method for the quantitative measurement of creatinine as an endogenous biomarker in human plasma.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Yue; Liu, Guowen; Angeles, Aida; Christopher, Lisa J; Wang, Zhaoqing; Arnold, Mark E; Shen, Jim X

    2016-10-01

    Creatinine is an endogenous compound generated from creatine by normal muscular metabolism. It is an important indicator of renal function and the serum level is routinely monitored in clinical labs. Results & methodology: Surrogate analyte (d3-creatinine) was used for calibration standard and quality control preparation and the relative instrument response ratio between creatinine and d3-creatinine was used to calculate the endogenous creatinine concentrations. A fit-for-purpose strategy of using a surrogate analyte and authentic matrix was adopted for this validation. The assay was the first human plasma assay using such strategy and was successfully applied to a clinical study to confirm a transient elevation of creatinine observed using an existing clinical assay.

  10. An Endogenous Mediator of Depression of Amino Acids and Trace Metals in Serum during Typhoid Fever

    DTIC Science & Technology

    symptoms after an oral dose of 100,000 virulent Salmonella typhosa. When a 1.0-ml sample of sterile serum from volunteers who were ill with typhoid fever was...leukocytes) was present in the blood during typhoid fever and served as a mediator for the observed depression in zinc and amino acids in serum. The

  11. Thermal diffusivity of human serum and plasma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mayén-Mondragón, R.; Yánez-Limón, J. M.; Palomares, P.; Sosa, M.; Bernal-Alvarado, J.

    2005-06-01

    Using a thermal lens experimental set up, the thermal diffusivity of human serum and plasma were measured. Several samples were studied and the results are reported as the average, including the standard deviation. The samples of serum and plasma were obtained in healthy adult donors from the Guanajuato State Blood Transfusion Center, Mexico; the donors were clinically tested and they were free of hepatitis, AIDS and other infectious diseases. The parameters reported were obtained using the thermal lens aberrant model with the lasers arranged in the mismatched mode.

  12. The International Standard for Human Syphilitic Serum

    PubMed Central

    Bentzon, M. Weis; Krag, P.

    1961-01-01

    Following the establishment by WHO of International Reference Preparations of Cardiolipin and Egg Lecithin to facilitate reproduction of cardiolipin antigens for use in serological tests for syphilis, a series of studies has been carried out between co-operating laboratories in several parts of the world, aiming at the establishment of an international standard preparation for freeze-dried human syphilitic serum. The WHO Expert Committee on Biological Standardization, in 1957, established the new International Standard for Human Syphilitic Serum which is now available to national laboratories from the International Laboratory for Biological Standards, Statens Serum-institut, Copenhagen. The International Unit of Human Syphilitic Serum is equivalent to 3.617 mg of the freeze-dried International Standard. A solution containing 8 International Units per ml can be obtained by reconstituting the contents of one ampoule of the International Standard in 6.1 ml of 0.6% saline. The new Standard will allow major serological laboratories to calibrate their national reference sera in terms of the International Unit; the comparability of results from different areas will be improved by this procedure. Technical details are given on the investigations preceding the establishment of the Standard. The analysis of the collaborative assay between co-operating laboratories also includes data on titres, reactivity, turbidity and other technical aspects. PMID:20604087

  13. Immunogenicity of bivalent human papillomavirus DNA vaccine using human endogenous retrovirus envelope-coated baculoviral vectors in mice and pigs.

    PubMed

    Lee, Hee-Jung; Hur, Yoon-Ki; Cho, Youn-Dong; Kim, Mi-Gyeong; Lee, Hoon-Taek; Oh, Yu-Kyoung; Kim, Young Bong

    2012-01-01

    Human papillomavirus is known to be the major pathogen of cervical cancer. Here, we report the efficacy of a bivalent human papillomavirus type 16 and 18 DNA vaccine system following repeated dosing in mice and pigs using a recombinant baculovirus bearing human endogenous retrovirus envelope protein (AcHERV) as a vector. The intramuscular administration of AcHERV-based HPV16L1 and HPV18L1 DNA vaccines induced antigen-specific serum IgG, vaginal IgA, and neutralizing antibodies to levels comparable to those achieved using the commercially marketed vaccine Cervarix. Similar to Cervarix, AcHERV-based bivalent vaccinations completely blocked subsequent vaginal challenge with HPV type-specific pseudovirions. However, AcHERV-based bivalent vaccinations induced significantly higher cell-mediated immune responses than Cervarix, promoting 4.5- (HPV16L1) and 3.9-(HPV18L1) fold higher interferon-γ production in splenocytes upon stimulation with antigen type-specific pseudovirions. Repeated dosing did not affect the immunogenicity of AcHERV DNA vaccines. Three sequential immunizations with AcHERV-HP18L1 DNA vaccine followed by three repeated dosing with AcHERV-HP16L1 over 11 weeks induced an initial production of anti-HPV18L1 antibody followed by subsequent induction of anti-HPV16L1 antibody. Finally, AcHERV-based bivalent DNA vaccination induced antigen-specific serum IgG immune responses in pigs. These results support the further development of AcHERV as a bivalent human papillomavirus DNA vaccine system for use in preventing the viral infection as well as treating the infected women by inducing both humoral and cell-mediated immune responses. Moreover, the possibility of repeated dosing indicates the utility of AcHERV system for reusable vectors of other viral pathogen vaccines.

  14. (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Human Serum Albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1989-01-01

    (PCG) Protein Crystal Growth Human Serum Albumin. Contributes to many transport and regulatory processes and has multifunctional binding properties which range from various metals, to fatty acids, hormones, and a wide spectrum of therapeutic drugs. The most abundant protein of the circulatory system. It binds and transports an incredible variety of biological and pharmaceutical ligands throughout the blood stream. Principal Investigator on STS-26 was Larry DeLucas.

  15. Serum concentrations of selected endogenous estrogen and estrogen metabolites in pre- and post-menopausal Chinese women with osteoarthritis.

    PubMed

    Gao, W; Zeng, C; Cai, D; Liu, B; Li, Y; Wen, X; Chen, Y

    2010-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate whether serum levels of selected endogenous estrogens and their metabolites are involved in the pathogenesis of osteoarthritis in pre- and post-menopausal women with osteoarthritis. Sixty-four patients with osteoarthritis (OA) of the knee, 48 patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) of the knee, and 48 healthy women were included in this study. Serum concentrations of estradiol and estrogen metabolites, such as 2- hydroxyestrone, 2-hydroxyestradiol, and 16α-hydroxyestrone, were measured by high performance liquid chromatography-mass spectrometry. Our results show that the serum concentrations of free estradiol and total 2-hydroxyestrone were significantly lower in pre-menopausal women with OA compared to the levels detected in the control groups (RA and healthy women). While serum concentrations of free and total estradiol in post-menopausal women with OA was significantly decreased compared to those of the control groups, the level of total 2-hydroxyestradiol significantly increased in postmenopausal women. Furthermore, the total 2-hydroxyestrone concentration positively correlated with the total estradiol level in pre-menopausal women with OA. In addition, the total 2- hydroxyestradiol level positively correlated with free and total estradiol levels in post-menopausal women with OA. In conclusion, estradiol and estrogen metabolites, including 2-hydroxyestrone and 2-hydroxyestradiol, were found in the sera of pre- and post-menopausal women with OA. Except for free and total estradiol deficiency, a decreased serum level of total 2- hydroxyestrone in pre-menopausal women and an increased total 2-hydroxyestradiol level in post-menopausal women with OA may also correlate with the pathogenesis of female OA.

  16. Allogenic human serum, a clinical grade serum supplement for promoting human periodontal ligament stem cell expansion.

    PubMed

    Arpornmaeklong, Premjit; Sutthitrairong, Chotika; Jantaramanant, Piyathida; Pripatnanont, Prisana

    2016-12-13

    Exposing human periodontal ligament stem cells (hPDLSCs) to animal proteins during cell expansion would compromise quality and safety of the hPDLSCs for clinical applications. The current study aimed to evaluate the replacement of animal-based serum by human serum for the expansion of hPDLSCs. hPDLSCs were cultured in culture media supplemented with four types of serums: Group A: fetal bovine serum (FBS); Group B: allogeneic human male AB serum (HS); Group C: in-house autologous (Auto-HS); and Group D: in-house allogeneic human serums (Allo-HS). Exhibitions of mesenchymal stem cell characteristics of hPDLSCs were examined. Then, growth and osteogenic (OS) differentiation potential of hPDLSCs in FBS and HS at passages 5 and 15 were compared to investigate the effects of serum supplements on growth and expansion stability of the expanded hPDLSCs. After that, growth and OS differentiation of hPDLSCs in Auto- and Allo-HS were investigated. Flow cytometrical analyses, functional differentiations, cell growth kinetic, cytogenetic analysis, alkaline phosphatase and calcium content assays, and oil red O and von Kossa staining were performed. Results showed that at passage 5, HS promoted growth and OS differentiation of hPDLSCs and extensive cell expansion, decreased growth and differentiation potential of the expanded hPDLSCs, particularly in HS. Growth and OS differentiation of hPDLSCs in Auto-HS and Allo-HS were not different. In summary, allogeneic human serum could be a replacement to FBS for hPDLSC expansion. In vitro cell expansion of hPDLSCs should be minimal to ensure optimal cell quality. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  17. Endogenous small RNAs in grain: semi-quantification and sequence homology to human and animal genes.

    PubMed

    Ivashuta, Sergey I; Petrick, Jay S; Heisel, Sara E; Zhang, Yuanji; Guo, Liang; Reynolds, Tracey L; Rice, James F; Allen, Edwards; Roberts, James K

    2009-02-01

    Small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) and microRNAs (miRNAs) are effector molecules of RNA interference (RNAi), a highly conserved RNA-based gene suppression mechanism in plants, mammals and other eukaryotes. Endogenous RNAi-based gene suppression has been harnessed naturally and through conventional breeding to achieve desired plant phenotypes. The present study demonstrates that endogenous small RNAs, such as siRNAs and miRNAs, are abundant in soybean seeds, corn kernels, and rice grain, plant tissues that are traditionally used for food and feed. Numerous endogenous plant small RNAs were found to have perfect complementarity to human genes as well as those of other mammals. The abundance of endogenous small RNA molecules in grain from safely consumed food and feed crops such as soybean, corn, and rice and the homology of a number of these dietary small RNAs to human and animal genomes and transcriptomes establishes a history of safe consumption for dietary small RNAs.

  18. Partial characterization of endogenous digoxinlike substance in human urine

    SciTech Connect

    Vinge, E.; Ekman, R.

    1988-01-01

    Urinary samples were collected from individuals not taking cardiac glycosides. Aliquots of 30 ml were passed through preparative octadecylsilane-bonded phase columns and eluted in fractions by stepwise increasing concentrations of acetonitrile. Eluted fractions were analysed for their contents of endogenous digoxinlike substance (EDLS) by radioimmunoassay of digoxin and by a bioassay of cardiac glycosides, which measures the uptake of rubidium (/sup 86/Rb) by erythrocytes as an index of Na+, K+-ATPase activity. In both assays, digoxinlike activity was found in several fractions, but the highest values were consistently measured in the fractions eluted with 40% acetonitrile. Greater amounts of EDLS were recovered from the urine of pregnant women than from the urine of men and nonpregnant women.

  19. Longitudinal study of serum antibody responses to bovine retinal S-antigen in endogenous granulomatous uveitis.

    PubMed Central

    Abrahams, I W; Gregerson, D S

    1983-01-01

    Twelve patients with granulomatous uveitis were followed up longitudinally for as long as 20 months after their initial visit, and multiple serum antibody titres to bovine retinal S-antigen were determined and compared with the clinical activity at the time of each sampling. In those patients who presented with highly active lesions which then resolved during the course of the study without recurrences (7 toxoplasmosis and 1 pars planitis) the antibody titres reached a peak approximately 2 months after the initial visit and declined thereafter. No correlation of serum anti-S titres with clinical activity or predictable pattern of titres could be found in those patients who had recurrences during the course of the study (3 granulomatous iridocyclitis and 1 ocular sarcoidosis). PMID:6615754

  20. Endogenous benzodiazepine-like compounds and diazepam binding inhibitor in serum of patients with liver cirrhosis with and without overt encephalopathy

    PubMed Central

    Avallone, R; Zeneroli, M; Venturini, I; Corsi, L; Schreier, P; Kleinschnitz, M; Ferrarese, C; Farina, F; Baraldi, C; Pecora, N; Frigo, M; Baraldi, M

    1998-01-01

    Background/Aim—Despite some controversy, it has been suggested that endogenous benzodiazepine plays a role in the pathogenesis of hepatic encephalopathy. The aim of the present study was to evaluate the concentrations of endogenous benzodiazepines and the peptide, diazepam binding inhibitor, in the blood of patients with liver cirrhosis with and without overt encephalopathy, and to compare these levels with those of consumers of commercial benzodiazepines. 
Subjects—Normal subjects (90), benzodiazepine consumers (14), and cirrhotic patients (113) were studied. 
Methods—Endogenous benzodiazepines were measured by the radioligand binding technique after high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) purification. The presence of diazepam and N-desmethyldiazepam was assayed by HPLC-electrospray tandem mass spectrometry. Diazepam binding inhibitor was studied in serum by radioimmunoassay. 
Results—Endogenous benzodiazepines were below the limit of detection in 7% of patients with encephalopathy. When detectable, their levels were at least comparable with those of benzodiazepine consumers and correlated with the liver dysfunction but not the stage of encephalopathy. Serum levels of diazepam binding inhibitor tended to decrease when endogenous benzodiazepines levels increased. 
Conclusions—Endogenous benzodiazepines may accumulate in patients with liver cirrhosis during the course of the disease, and the phenomenon appears to be independent of the presence or absence of encephalopathy. 

 Keywords: benzodiazepine consumers; diazepam binding inhibitor; endogenous benzodiazepines; liver cirrhosis; overt hepatic encephalopathy PMID:9691927

  1. The role of human endogenous retroviruses in brain development and function.

    PubMed

    Mortelmans, Kristien; Wang-Johanning, Feng; Johanning, Gary L

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous retroviral sequences are spread throughout the genome of all humans, and make up about 8% of the genome. Despite their prevalence, the function of human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) in humans is largely unknown. In this review we focus on the brain, and evaluate studies in animal models that address mechanisms of endogenous retrovirus activation in the brain and central nervous system (CNS). One such study in mice found that TRIM28, a protein critical for mouse early development, regulates transcription and silencing of endogenous retroviruses in neural progenitor cells. Another intriguing finding in human brain cells and mouse models was that endogenous retrovirus HERV-K appears to be protective against neurotoxins. We also report on studies that associate HERVs with human diseases of the brain and CNS. There is little doubt of an association between HERVs and a number of CNS diseases. However, a cause and effect relationship between HERVs and these diseases has not yet been established. © 2016 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  2. Polymerized soluble venom--human serum albumin

    SciTech Connect

    Patterson, R.; Suszko, I.M.; Grammer, L.C.

    1985-03-01

    Extensive previous studies have demonstrated that attempts to produce polymers of Hymenoptera venoms for human immunotherapy resulted in insoluble precipitates that could be injected with safety but with very limited immunogenicity in allergic patients. We now report soluble polymers prepared by conjugating bee venom with human serum albumin with glutaraldehyde. The bee venom-albumin polymer (BVAP) preparation was fractionated on Sephacryl S-300 to have a molecular weight range higher than catalase. /sup 125/I-labeled bee venom phospholipase A was almost completely incorporated into BVAP. Rabbit antibody responses to bee venom and bee venom phospholipase A were induced by BVAP. Human antisera against bee venom were absorbed by BVAP. No new antigenic determinants on BVAP were present as evidenced by absorption of antisera against BVAP by bee venom and albumin. BVAP has potential immunotherapeutic value in patients with anaphylactic sensitivity to bee venom.

  3. Human endogenous retroviruses: nature, occurrence, and clinical implications in human disease.

    PubMed Central

    Urnovitz, H B; Murphy, W H

    1996-01-01

    Retroviral diagnostics have become standard in human laboratory medicine. While current emphasis is placed on the human exogenous viruses (human immunodeficiency virus and human T-cell leukemia virus), evidence implicating human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) in various human disease entities continues to mount. Literature on the occurrence of HERVs in human tissues and cells was analyzed. Substantial evidence documents that retrovirus particles were clearly demonstrable in various tissues and cells in both health and disease and were abundant in the placenta and that their occurrence could be implicated in some of the reproductive diseases. The characteristics of HERVs are summarized, mechanisms of replication and regulation are outlined, and the consistent hormonal responsiveness of HERVs is noted. Clear evidence implicating HERV gene products as participants in glomerulonephritis in some cases of systemic lupus erythematosus is adduced. Data implicating HERVs as etiologic factors in reproductive diseases, in some of the autoimmune diseases, in some forms of rheumatoid arthritis and connective tissue disease, in psoriasis, and in some of the inflammatory neurologic diseases are reviewed. The current major needs are to improve methods for HERV detection, to identify the most appropriate HERV prototypes, and to develop diagnostic reagents so that the putative biologic and pathologic roles of HERVs can be better evaluated. PMID:8665478

  4. Interaction of Citrinin with Human Serum Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Poór, Miklós; Lemli, Beáta; Bálint, Mónika; Hetényi, Csaba; Sali, Nikolett; Kőszegi, Tamás; Kunsági-Máté, Sándor

    2015-01-01

    Citrinin (CIT) is a mycotoxin produced by several Aspergillus, Penicillium, and Monascus species. CIT occurs worldwide in different foods and drinks and causes health problems for humans and animals. Human serum albumin (HSA) is the most abundant plasma protein in human circulation. Albumin forms stable complexes with many drugs and xenobiotics; therefore, HSA commonly plays important role in the pharmacokinetics or toxicokinetics of numerous compounds. However, the interaction of CIT with HSA is poorly characterized yet. In this study, the complex formation of CIT with HSA was investigated using fluorescence spectroscopy and ultrafiltration techniques. For the deeper understanding of the interaction, thermodynamic, and molecular modeling studies were performed as well. Our results suggest that CIT forms stable complex with HSA (logK ~ 5.3) and its primary binding site is located in subdomain IIA (Sudlow’s Site I). In vitro cell experiments also recommend that CIT-HSA interaction may have biological relevance. Finally, the complex formations of CIT with bovine, porcine, and rat serum albumin were investigated, in order to test the potential species differences of CIT-albumin interactions. PMID:26633504

  5. Prehistoric enemies within: The contribution of human endogenous retroviruses to neurological diseases. Meeting report: "Second International Workshop on Human Endogenous Retroviruses and Disease", Washington DC, March 13th and 14th 2017.

    PubMed

    Kremer, David; Glanzman, Robert; Traboulsee, Anthony; Nath, Avindra; Groc, Laurent; Horwitz, Marc; Göttle, Peter; Perron, Hervé; Gold, Julian; Hartung, Hans-Peter; Küry, Patrick

    2017-07-01

    The Second International Workshop on Human Endogenous Retroviruses and Disease, Washington DC, March 13-14 2017 brought together international basic and clinical scientists investigating the involvement of human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) in complex human diseases. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  6. Purification of rabbit and human serum paraoxonase.

    PubMed

    Furlong, C E; Richter, R J; Chapline, C; Crabb, J W

    1991-10-22

    Rabbit serum paraoxonase/arylesterase has been purified to homogeneity by Cibacron Blue-agarose chromatography, gel filtration, DEAE-Trisacryl M chromatography, and preparative SDS gel electrophoresis. Renaturation (Copeland et al., 1982) and activity staining of the enzyme resolved by SDS gel electrophoresis allowed for identification and purification of paraoxonase. Two bands of active enzyme were purified by this procedure (35,000 and 38,000). Enzyme electroeluted from the preparative gels was reanalyzed by analytical SDS gel electrophoresis, and two higher molecular weight bands (43,000 and 48,000) were observed in addition to the original bands. This suggested that repeat electrophoresis resulted in an unfolding or other modification and slower migration of some of the purified protein. The lower mobility bands stained weakly for paraoxonase activity in preparative gels. Bands of each molecular weight species were electroblotted onto PVDF membranes and sequenced. The gas-phase sequence analysis showed that both the active bands and apparent molecular weight bands had identical amino-terminal sequences. Amino acid analysis of the four electrophoretic components from PVDF membranes also indicated compositional similarity. The amino-terminal sequences are typical of the leader sequences of secreted proteins. Human serum paraoxonase was purified by a similar procedure, and ten residues of the amino terminus were sequenced by gas-phase procedures. One amino acid difference between the first ten residues of human and rabbit was observed.

  7. Extraction of perfluorinated alkyl acids from human serum for determination of the combined xenoestrogenic transactivity: a method development.

    PubMed

    Bjerregaard-Olesen, Christian; Bossi, Rossana; Bech, Bodil Hammer; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva Cecilie

    2015-06-01

    Humans are exposed to perfluorinated alkyl acids (PFAAs) through food, drinking water, consumer products, dust, etc. The human metabolism and excretion of the long-chain PFAAs is slow with half-lives up to 8.8years. Studies suggest that the PFAAs are potential endocrine-disrupting compounds that might affect human health. We developed a method for extraction of PFAAs from human serum with simultaneous removal of endogenous sex hormones. The developed method includes solid phase extraction, liquid/liquid extraction, HPLC fractionation and weak anion exchange. The method was validated by extraction of seven persistent PFAAs spiked to human male serum obtaining mean recoveries between 49.6% and 78.6%. Using an estrogen receptor (ER) transactivation luciferase reporter gene assay, analysis of the extracted PFAA serum fraction from three pregnant women showed the ER-active endogenous hormones were removed. The developed method was further documented by extraction of the PFAAs from the serum of 18 Danish pregnant women. The PFAA fraction from three of the 18 samples significantly induced the ER-transactivity. Upon co-exposure with the natural ER-ligand 17β-estradiol (E2), 17 of the 18 PFAA fractions caused a significant further increase of the E2 induced ER-transactivity. In conclusion, we developed a method to extract PFAAs from human serum, and the method documentation suggested that PFAAs at the levels found in human serum can transactivate the ER. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. Monomethylarsonous acid inhibited endogenous cholesterol biosynthesis in human skin fibroblasts

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Lei; Xiao, Yongsheng; Wang, Yinsheng

    2014-05-15

    Human exposure to arsenic in drinking water is a widespread public health concern, and such exposure is known to be associated with many human diseases. The detailed molecular mechanisms about how arsenic species contribute to the adverse human health effects, however, remain incompletely understood. Monomethylarsonous acid [MMA(III)] is a highly toxic and stable metabolite of inorganic arsenic. To exploit the mechanisms through which MMA(III) exerts its cytotoxic effect, we adopted a quantitative proteomic approach, by coupling stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC) with LC-MS/MS analysis, to examine the variation in the entire proteome of GM00637 human skin fibroblasts following acute MMA(III) exposure. Among the ∼ 6500 unique proteins quantified, ∼ 300 displayed significant changes in expression after exposure with 2 μM MMA(III) for 24 h. Subsequent analysis revealed the perturbation of de novo cholesterol biosynthesis, selenoprotein synthesis and Nrf2 pathways evoked by MMA(III) exposure. Particularly, MMA(III) treatment resulted in considerable down-regulation of several enzymes involved in cholesterol biosynthesis. In addition, real-time PCR analysis showed reduced mRNA levels of select genes in this pathway. Furthermore, MMA(III) exposure contributed to a distinct decline in cellular cholesterol content and significant growth inhibition of multiple cell lines, both of which could be restored by supplementation of cholesterol to the culture media. Collectively, the present study demonstrated that the cytotoxicity of MMA(III) may arise, at least in part, from the down-regulation of cholesterol biosynthesis enzymes and the resultant decrease of cellular cholesterol content. - Highlights: • MMA(III)-induced perturbation of the entire proteome of GM00637 cells is studied. • Quantitative proteomic approach revealed alterations of multiple cellular pathways. • MMA(III) inhibits de novo cholesterol biosynthesis. • MMA

  9. Cell lineage analysis in human brain using endogenous retroelements

    PubMed Central

    Evrony, Gilad D.; Lee, Eunjung; Mehta, Bhaven K.; Benjamini, Yuval; Johnson, Robert M.; Cai, Xuyu; Yang, Lixing; Haseley, Psalm; Lehmann, Hillel S.; Park, Peter J.; Walsh, Christopher A.

    2015-01-01

    Summary Somatic mutations occur during brain development and are increasingly implicated as a cause of neurogenetic disease. However, the patterns in which somatic mutations distribute in the human brain are unknown. We used high-coverage whole-genome sequencing of single neurons from a normal individual to identify spontaneous somatic mutations as clonal marks to track cell lineages in human brain. Somatic mutation analyses in >30 locations throughout the nervous system identified multiple lineages and sub-lineages of cells marked by different LINE-1 (L1) retrotransposition events and subsequent mutation of poly-A microsatellites within L1. One clone contained thousands of cells limited to the left middle frontal gyrus, whereas a second distinct clone contained millions of cells distributed over the entire left hemisphere. These patterns mirror known somatic mutation disorders of brain development, and suggest that focally distributed mutations are also prevalent in normal brains. Single-cell analysis of somatic mutation enables tracing of cell lineage clones in human brain. PMID:25569347

  10. ATP-dependent degradation of /sup 125/I-bovine serum albumin by rabbit reticulocytes does not need repression of an endogenous inhibitor

    SciTech Connect

    Saus, J.; Timoneda, J.

    1987-01-01

    The ubiquitin-dependent proteolysis of /sup 125/I-bovine serum albumin in rabbit reticulocytes has been investigated. Using various reticulocyte fractions (reticulocyte protease, inhibitor-free protease, ubiquitin and inhibitor) in the presence or absence of ATP, we found that the repression of an endogenous inhibitor, as suggested by others for alpha-casein proteolysis, is unlikely for bovine serum albumin. Therefore, differences exist in the ATP-dependent proteolytic pathway of rabbit reticulocytes depending on the substrate. Fractionation of the reticulocyte ATP-dependent proteolytic system revealed at least two proteolytic and two inhibitory fractions involved in the proteolysis of bovine serum albumin.

  11. Effects of positive acceleration on the metabolism of endogenous carbon monoxide and serum lipid in atherosclerotic rabbits

    PubMed Central

    Luo, Huilan; Chen, Yongsheng; Wang, Junhua

    2010-01-01

    Background: Atherosclerosis (AS) is caused mainly due to the increase in the serum lipid, thrombosis, and injuries of the endothelial cells. During aviation, the incremental load of positive acceleration that leads to dramatic stress reactions and hemodynamic changes may predispose pilots to functional disorders and even pathological changes of organs. However, much less is known on the correlation between aviation and AS pathogenesis. Methods and Results: A total of 32 rabbits were randomly divided into 4 groups with 8 rabbits in each group. The control group was given a high cholesterol diet but no acceleration exposure, whereas the other 3 experimental groups were treated with a high cholesterol diet and acceleration exposure for 4, 8, and 12 weeks, respectively. In each group, samples of celiac vein blood and the aorta were collected after the last exposure for the measurement of endogenous CO and HO-1 activities, as well as the levels of total cholesterol (TC), triglyceride (TG), high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C). As compared with the control group, the endocardial CO content and the HO-1 activity in aortic endothelial cells were significantly elevated at the 4th, 8th, and 12th weekend, respectively (P < 0.05 or <0.01). And these measures tended upward as the exposure time was prolonged. Levels of TC and LDL-C in the experimental groups were significantly higher than those in the control group, presenting an upward tendency. Levels of TG were found significantly increased in the 8-week-exposure group, but significantly declined in the 12-week-exposure group (still higher than those in the control group). Levels of the HDL-C were increased in the 4-week-exposure group, declined in the 8-week-exposure group, and once more increased in the 12-week-exposure group, without significant differences with the control group. Conclusions: Positive acceleration exposure may lead to a significant increase of

  12. The activation of human endogenous retrovirus K (HERV-K) is implicated in melanoma cell malignant transformation.

    PubMed

    Serafino, A; Balestrieri, E; Pierimarchi, P; Matteucci, C; Moroni, G; Oricchio, E; Rasi, G; Mastino, A; Spadafora, C; Garaci, E; Vallebona, P Sinibaldi

    2009-03-10

    Melanoma development is a multi-step process arising from a series of genetic and epigenetic events. Although the sequential stages involved in progression from melanocytes to malignant melanoma are clearly defined, our current understanding of the mechanisms leading to melanoma onset is still incomplete. Growing evidence show that the activation of endogenous retroviral sequences might be involved in transformation of melanocytes as well as in the increased ability of melanoma cells to escape immune surveillance. Here we show that human melanoma cells in vitro undergo a transition from adherent to a more malignant, non-adherent phenotype when exposed to stress conditions. Melanoma-derived non-adherent cells are characterized by an increased proliferative potential and a decreased expression of both HLA class I molecules and Melan-A/MART-1 antigen, similarly to highly malignant cells. These phenotypic and functional modifications are accompanied by the activation of human endogenous retrovirus K expression (HERV-K) and massive production of viral-like particles. Down-regulation of HERV-K expression by RNA interference prevents the transition from the adherent to the non-adherent growth phenotype in low serum. These results implicate HERV-K in at least some critical steps of melanoma progression.

  13. The activation of human endogenous retrovirus K (HERV-K) is implicated in melanoma cell malignant transformation

    SciTech Connect

    Serafino, A. Balestrieri, E.; Pierimarchi, P.; Matteucci, C.; Moroni, G.; Oricchio, E.; Rasi, G.; Mastino, A.; Spadafora, C.; Garaci, E.; Vallebona, P. Sinibaldi

    2009-03-10

    Melanoma development is a multi-step process arising from a series of genetic and epigenetic events. Although the sequential stages involved in progression from melanocytes to malignant melanoma are clearly defined, our current understanding of the mechanisms leading to melanoma onset is still incomplete. Growing evidence show that the activation of endogenous retroviral sequences might be involved in transformation of melanocytes as well as in the increased ability of melanoma cells to escape immune surveillance. Here we show that human melanoma cells in vitro undergo a transition from adherent to a more malignant, non-adherent phenotype when exposed to stress conditions. Melanoma-derived non-adherent cells are characterized by an increased proliferative potential and a decreased expression of both HLA class I molecules and Melan-A/MART-1 antigen, similarly to highly malignant cells. These phenotypic and functional modifications are accompanied by the activation of human endogenous retrovirus K expression (HERV-K) and massive production of viral-like particles. Down-regulation of HERV-K expression by RNA interference prevents the transition from the adherent to the non-adherent growth phenotype in low serum. These results implicate HERV-K in at least some critical steps of melanoma progression.

  14. Antioxidant flavonoids bind human serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kanakis, C. D.; Tarantilis, P. A.; Polissiou, M. G.; Diamantoglou, S.; Tajmir-Riahi, H. A.

    2006-10-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is a principal extracellular protein with a high concentration in blood plasma and carrier for many drugs to different molecular targets. Flavonoids are powerful antioxidants and prevent DNA damage. The antioxidative protections are related to their binding modes to DNA duplex and complexation with free radicals in vivo. However, flavonoids are known to inhibit the activities of several enzymes such as calcium phospholipid-dependent protein kinase, tyrosine protein kinase from rat lung, phosphorylase kinase, phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase and DNA topoisomerases that exhibit the importance of flavonoid-protein interaction. This study was designed to examine the interaction of human serum albumin (HSA) with quercetin (que), kaempferol (kae) and delphinidin (del) in aqueous solution at physiological conditions, using constant protein concentration of 0.25 mM (final) and various drug contents of 1 μM-1 mM. FTIR and UV-vis spectroscopic methods were used to determine the polyphenolic binding mode, the binding constant and the effects of flavonoid complexation on protein secondary structure. The spectroscopic results showed that flavonoids are located along the polypeptide chains through H-bonding interactions with overall affinity constant of Kque = 1.4 × 10 4 M -1, Kkae = 2.6 × 10 5 M -1 and Kdel = 4.71 × 10 5 M -1. The protein secondary structure showed no alterations at low pigment concentration (1 μM), whereas at high flavonoid content (1 mM), major reduction of α-helix from 55% (free HSA) to 42-46% and increase of β-sheet from 15% (free HSA) to 17-19% and β-anti from 7% (free HSA) to 10-20% occurred in the flavonoid-HSA adducts. The major reduction of HSA α-helix is indicative of a partial protein unfolding upon flavonoid interaction.

  15. Human RECQL5 participates in the removal of endogenous DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Tadokoro, Takashi; Ramamoorthy, Mahesh; Popuri, Venkateswarlu; May, Alfred; Tian, Jingyan; Sykora, Peter; Rybanska, Ivana; Wilson, David M.; Croteau, Deborah L.; Bohr, Vilhelm A.

    2012-01-01

    Human RECQL5 is a member of the RecQ helicase family, which maintains genome stability via participation in many DNA metabolic processes, including DNA repair. Human cells lacking RECQL5 display chromosomal instability. We find that cells depleted of RECQL5 are sensitive to oxidative stress, accumulate endogenous DNA damage, and increase the cellular poly(ADP-ribosyl)ate response. In contrast to the RECQ helicase family members WRN, BLM, and RECQL4, RECQL5 accumulates at laser-induced single-strand breaks in normal human cells. RECQL5 depletion affects the levels of PARP-1 and XRCC1, and our collective results suggest that RECQL5 modulates and/or directly participates in base excision repair of endogenous DNA damage, thereby promoting chromosome stability in normal human cells. PMID:22973052

  16. Fluorescence spectroscopy for endogenous porphyrins in human facial skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Seo, I.; Tseng, S. H.; Cula, G. O.; Bargo, P. R.; Kollias, N.

    2009-02-01

    The activity of certain bacteria in skin is known to correlate to the presence of porphyrins. In particular the presence of coproporphyrin produced by P.acnes inside plugged pores has been correlated to acne vulgaris. Another porphyrin encountered in skin is protoporphyrin IX, which is produced by the body in the pathway for production of heme. In the present work, a fluorescence spectroscopy system was developed to measure the characteristic spectrum and quantify the two types of porphyrins commonly present in human facial skin. The system is comprised of a Xe lamp both for fluorescence excitation and broadband light source for diffuse reflectance measurements. A computer-controlled filter wheel enables acquisition of sequential spectra, first excited by blue light at 405 nm then followed by the broadband light source, at the same location. The diffuse reflectance spectrum was used to correct the fluorescence spectrum due to the presence of skin chromophores, such as blood and melanin. The resulting fluorescence spectra were employed for the quantification of porphyrin concentration in a population of healthy subjects. The results show great variability on the concentration of these porphyrins and further studies are being conducted to correlate them with skin conditions such as inflammation and acne vulgaris.

  17. Serologic analysis of anti-porcine endogenous retroviruses immune responses in humans after ex vivo transgenic pig liver perfusion.

    PubMed

    Xu, Hui; Sharma, Ajay; Okabe, Jeannine; Cui, Cunqi; Huang, Liping; Wei, Yuan Yuan; Wan, Hua; Lei, Ying; Logan, John S; Levy, Marlon F; Byrne, Guerard W

    2003-01-01

    Improvements in xenotransplantation may significantly increase the availability of organs for human transplantation. The use of porcine organs, however, has raised concern about possible transmission of porcine endogenous retroviruses (PERV) to the recipients. The authors developed monoclonal antibodies specific to the PERV Gag viral product and show that these antibodies can detect PERV antigen under a variety of assay conditions, including enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), Western blot, and immunofluorescence staining methods. Two patients in fulminant hepatic failure were treated by extracorporeal perfusion using transgenic porcine livers before receiving orthotopic liver transplants. Despite the use of immune suppression that allowed survival of the allograft, these patients both showed a strong immune response to the xenograft suggesting a largely intact capability to mount a humoral immune response. However, analysis of patient serum samples over a 3 to 4 year period has showed no evidence of an immune response to PERV antigens, suggesting a lack of PERV infection.

  18. Endogenous lysophosphatidic acid (LPA1 ) receptor agonists demonstrate ligand bias between calcium and ERK signalling pathways in human lung fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Sattikar, Afrah; Dowling, Mark R; Rosethorne, Elizabeth M

    2017-02-01

    Human lung fibroblasts (HLF) express high levels of the LPA1 receptor, a GPCR that responds to the endogenous lipid mediator, lysophosphatidic acid (LPA). Several molecular species or analogues of LPA exist and have been detected in biological fluids such as serum and plasma. The most widely expressed of the LPA receptor family is the LPA1 receptor, which predominantly couples to Gq/11 , Gi/o and G12/13 proteins. This promiscuity of coupling raises the possibility that some of the LPA analogues may bias the LPA1 receptor towards one signalling pathway over another. Here, we have explored the signalling profiles of a range of LPA analogues in HLF that endogenously express the LPA1 receptor. HLF were treated with LPA analogues and receptor activation monitored via calcium mobilization and ERK phosphorylation. These analyses demonstrated that the 16:0, 17:0, 18:2 and C18:1 LPA analogues appear to exhibit ligand bias between ERK phosphorylation and calcium mobilization when compared with 18:1 LPA, one of the most abundant forms of LPA that has been found in human plasma. The importance of LPA as a key signalling molecule is shown by its widespread occurrence in biological fluids and its association with disease conditions such as fibrosis and cancer. These findings have important, as yet unexplored, implications for the (patho-) physiological signalling of the LPA1 receptor, as it may be influenced not only by the concentration of endogenous ligand but the isoform as well. © 2016 The British Pharmacological Society.

  19. Endogenous bile acid disposition in rat and human sandwich-cultured hepatocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Marion, Tracy L.; Perry, Cassandra H.; St Claire, Robert L.; Brouwer, Kim L.R.

    2012-05-15

    Sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH) are used commonly to investigate hepatic transport protein-mediated uptake and biliary excretion of substrates. However, little is known about the disposition of endogenous bile acids (BAs) in SCH. In this study, four endogenous conjugated BAs common to rats and humans [taurocholic acid (TCA), glycocholic acid (GCA), taurochenodeoxycholic acid (TCDCA), and glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA)], as well as two BA species specific to rodents (α- and β-tauromuricholic acid; α/β TMCA), were profiled in primary rat and human SCH. Using B-CLEAR{sup ®} technology, BAs were measured in cells + bile canaliculi, cells, and medium of SCH by LC-MS/MS. Results indicated that, just as in vivo, taurine-conjugated BA species were predominant in rat SCH, while glycine-conjugated BAs were predominant in human SCH. Total intracellular BAs remained relatively constant over days in culture in rat SCH. Total BAs in control (CTL) cells + bile, cells, and medium were approximately 3.4, 2.9, and 8.3-fold greater in human than in rat. The estimated intracellular concentrations of the measured total BAs were 64.3 ± 5.9 μM in CTL rat and 183 ± 56 μM in CTL human SCH, while medium concentrations of the total BAs measured were 1.16 ± 0.21 μM in CTL rat SCH and 9.61 ± 6.36 μM in CTL human SCH. Treatment of cells for 24 h with 10 μM troglitazone (TRO), an inhibitor of the bile salt export pump (BSEP) and the Na{sup +}-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP), had no significant effect on endogenous BAs measured at the end of the 24-h culture period, potentially due to compensatory mechanisms that maintain BA homeostasis. These data demonstrate that BAs in SCH are similar to in vivo, and that SCH may be a useful in vitro model to study alterations in BA disposition if species differences are taken into account. -- Highlights: ► Bile acids (BAs) were measured in rat and human sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH). ► Cell and medium BA

  20. The human endogenous circadian system causes greatest platelet activation during the biological morning independent of behaviors.

    PubMed

    Scheer, Frank A J L; Michelson, Alan D; Frelinger, Andrew L; Evoniuk, Heather; Kelly, Erin E; McCarthy, Mary; Doamekpor, Lauren A; Barnard, Marc R; Shea, Steven A

    2011-01-01

    Platelets are involved in the thromboses that are central to myocardial infarctions and ischemic strokes. Such adverse cardiovascular events have day/night patterns with peaks in the morning (~9 AM), potentially related to endogenous circadian clock control of platelet activation. The objective was to test if the human endogenous circadian system influences (1) platelet function and (2) platelet response to standardized behavioral stressors. We also aimed to compare the magnitude of any effects on platelet function caused by the circadian system with that caused by varied standardized behavioral stressors, including mental arithmetic, passive postural tilt and mild cycling exercise. We studied 12 healthy adults (6 female) who lived in individual laboratory suites in dim light for 240 h, with all behaviors scheduled on a 20-h recurring cycle to permit assessment of endogenous circadian function independent from environmental and behavioral effects including the sleep/wake cycle. Circadian phase was assessed from core body temperature. There were highly significant endogenous circadian rhythms in platelet surface activated glycoprotein (GP) IIb-IIIa, GPIb and P-selectin (6-17% peak-trough amplitudes; p ≤ 0.01). These circadian peaks occurred at a circadian phase corresponding to 8-9 AM. Platelet count, ATP release, aggregability, and plasma epinephrine also had significant circadian rhythms but with later peaks (corresponding to 3-8 PM). The circadian effects on the platelet activation markers were always larger than that of any of the three behavioral stressors. These data demonstrate robust effects of the endogenous circadian system on platelet activation in humans--independent of the sleep/wake cycle, other behavioral influences and the environment. The 9 AM timing of the circadian peaks of the three platelet surface markers, including platelet surface activated GPIIb-IIIa, the final common pathway of platelet aggregation, suggests that endogenous circadian

  1. HIV-1 interacts with human endogenous retrovirus K (HML-2) envelopes derived from human primary lymphocytes.

    PubMed

    Brinzevich, Daria; Young, George R; Sebra, Robert; Ayllon, Juan; Maio, Susan M; Deikus, Gintaras; Chen, Benjamin K; Fernandez-Sesma, Ana; Simon, Viviana; Mulder, Lubbertus C F

    2014-06-01

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) are viruses that have colonized the germ line and spread through vertical passage. Only the more recently acquired HERVs, such as the HERV-K (HML-2) group, maintain coding open reading frames. Expression of HERV-Ks has been linked to different pathological conditions, including HIV infection, but our knowledge on which specific HERV-Ks are expressed in primary lymphocytes currently is very limited. To identify the most expressed HERV-Ks in an unbiased manner, we analyzed their expression patterns in peripheral blood lymphocytes using Pacific Biosciences (PacBio) single-molecule real-time (SMRT) sequencing. We observe that three HERV-Ks (KII, K102, and K18) constitute over 90% of the total HERV-K expression in primary human lymphocytes of five different donors. We also show experimentally that two of these HERV-K env sequences (K18 and K102) retain their ability to produce full-length and posttranslationally processed envelope proteins in cell culture. We show that HERV-K18 Env can be incorporated into HIV-1 but not simian immunodeficiency virus (SIV) particles. Moreover, HERV-K18 Env incorporation into HIV-1 virions is dependent on HIV-1 matrix. Taken together, we generated high-resolution HERV-K expression profiles specific for activated human lymphocytes. We found that one of the most abundantly expressed HERV-K envelopes not only makes a full-length protein but also specifically interacts with HIV-1. Our findings raise the possibility that these endogenous retroviral Env proteins could directly influence HIV-1 replication. Here, we report the HERV-K expression profile of primary lymphocytes from 5 different healthy donors. We used a novel deep-sequencing technology (PacBio SMRT) that produces the long reads necessary to discriminate the complexity of HERV-K expression. We find that primary lymphocytes express up to 32 different HERV-K envelopes, and that at least two of the most expressed Env proteins retain their ability to

  2. Resveratrol binding to human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    N' soukpoe-Kossi, C N; St-Louis, C; Beauregard, M; Subirade, M; Carpentier, R; Hotchandani, S; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2006-12-01

    Resveratrol (Res), a polyphenolic compound found largely in the skin of red grape and wine, exhibits a wide range of pharmaceutical properties and plays a role in prevention of human cardiovascular diseases [Pendurthi et al., Arterioscler. Thromb. Vasc. Biol. 19, 419-426 (1999)]. It shows a strong affinity towards protein binding and used as inhibitor for cyclooxygenase and ribonuclease reductase. The aim of this study was to examine the interaction of resveratrol with human serum albumin (HSA) in aqueous solution at physiological conditions, using a constant protein concentration (0.3 mM) and various pigment contents (microM to mM). FTIR, UV-Visible, CD, and fluorescence spectroscopic methods were used to determine the resveratrol binding mode, the binding constant and the effects of pigment complexation on protein secondary structure. Structural analysis showed that resveratrol bind non-specifically (H-bonding) via polypeptide polar groups with overall binding constant of K(Res) = 2.56 x 10(5) M(-1). The protein secondary structure, analysed by CD spectroscopy, showed no major alterations at low resveratrol concentrations (0.125 mM), whereas at high pigment content (1 mM), major increase of alpha-helix from 57% (free HSA) to 62% and a decrease of beta-sheet from 10% (free HSA) to 7% occurred in the resveratrol-HSA complexes. The results indicate a partial stabilization of protein secondary structure at high resveratrol content.

  3. Targeted quantification of low ng/mL level proteins in human serum without immunoaffinity depletion.

    PubMed

    Shi, Tujin; Sun, Xuefei; Gao, Yuqian; Fillmore, Thomas L; Schepmoes, Athena A; Zhao, Rui; He, Jintang; Moore, Ronald J; Kagan, Jacob; Rodland, Karin D; Liu, Tao; Liu, Alvin Y; Smith, Richard D; Tang, Keqi; Camp, David G; Qian, Wei-Jun

    2013-07-05

    We recently reported an antibody-free targeted protein quantification strategy, termed high-pressure, high-resolution separations with intelligent selection and multiplexing (PRISM), for achieving significantly enhanced sensitivity using selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry. Integrating PRISM with front-end IgY14 immunoaffinity depletion, sensitive detection of targeted proteins at 50-100 pg/mL levels in human blood plasma/serum was demonstrated. However, immunoaffinity depletion is often associated with undesired losses of target proteins of interest. Herein we report further evaluation of PRISM-SRM quantification of low-abundance serum proteins without immunoaffinity depletion. Limits of quantification (LOQ) at low ng/mL levels with a median coefficient of variation (CV) of ∼12% were achieved for proteins spiked into human female serum. PRISM-SRM provided >100-fold improvement in the LOQ when compared to conventional LC-SRM measurements. PRISM-SRM was then applied to measure several low-abundance endogenous serum proteins, including prostate-specific antigen (PSA), in clinical prostate cancer patient sera. PRISM-SRM enabled confident detection of all target endogenous serum proteins except the low pg/mL-level cardiac troponin T. A correlation coefficient >0.99 was observed for PSA between the results from PRISM-SRM and immunoassays. Our results demonstrate that PRISM-SRM can successfully quantify low ng/mL proteins in human plasma or serum without depletion. We anticipate broad applications for PRISM-SRM quantification of low-abundance proteins in candidate biomarker verification and systems biology studies.

  4. Targeted quantification of low ng/mL level proteins in human serum without immunoaffinity depletion

    PubMed Central

    Shi, Tujin; Sun, Xuefei; Gao, Yuqian; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Zhao, Rui; He, Jintang; Moore, Ronald J.; Kagan, Jacob; Rodland, Karin D.; Liu, Tao; Liu, Alvin Y.; Smith, Richard D.; Tang, Keqi; Camp, David G.; Qian, Wei-Jun

    2013-01-01

    We recently reported an antibody-free targeted protein quantification strategy, termed high-pressure, high-resolution separations with intelligent selection and multiplexing (PRISM) for achieving significantly enhanced sensitivity using selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry. Integrating PRISM with front-end IgY14 immunoaffinity depletion, sensitive detection of targeted proteins at 50–100 pg/mL levels in human blood plasma/serum was demonstrated. However, immunoaffinity depletion is often associated with undesired losses of target proteins of interest. Herein we report further evaluation of PRISM-SRM quantification of low-abundance serum proteins without immunoaffinity depletion. Limits of quantification (LOQ) at low ng/mL levels with a median coefficient of variation (CV) of ~12% were achieved for proteins spiked into human female serum. PRISM-SRM provided >100-fold improvement in the LOQ when compared to conventional LC-SRM measurements. PRISM-SRM was then applied to measure several low-abundance endogenous serum proteins, including prostate-specific antigen (PSA), in clinical prostate cancer patient sera. PRISM-SRM enabled confident detection of all target endogenous serum proteins except the low pg/mL-level cardiac troponin T. A correlation coefficient >0.99 was observed for PSA between the results from PRISM-SRM and immunoassays. Our results demonstrate that PRISM-SRM can successful quantify low ng/mL proteins in human plasma or serum without depletion. We anticipate broad applications for PRISM-SRM quantification of low-abundance proteins in candidate biomarker verification and systems biology studies. PMID:23763644

  5. Lipid composition of human serum lipoproteins

    PubMed Central

    Skipski, V. P.; Barclay, Marion; Barclay, R. K.; Fetzer, Valentina A.; Good, J. J.; Archibald, F. M.

    1967-01-01

    1. The lipid compositions of the low-density lipoproteins, the high-density lipoproteins and the ultracentrifugal residue of human serum are presented, with emphasis on certain lipoprotein classes and lipid components not previously described. 2. Except for the lipoproteins with the lowest and highest densities, there is a trend for stepwise successive increase or, respectively, decrease in the relative amounts of the main constituents of lipoproteins. 3. High-density lipoprotein-2 and high-density lipoprotein-3 have different amounts of certain lipids; high-density lipoprotein-2 has relatively more free cholesterol and sphingomyelin; high-density lipoprotein-3 has more free fatty acids, diglycerides and ceramide monohexosides. 4. All the lipoproteins contain hydrocarbons of the alkane series. The greatest amount, which averages 4·4% of total lipid extracted, is in the ultracentrifugal residue; n-alkanes comprise 18–50% of the hydrocarbons. 5. All the lipoproteins contain ceramide monohexosides. The highest relative contents of these glycolipids are in high-density lipoprotein-3 and in the ultracentrifugal residue. 6. The ultracentrifugal residue contains 55% of the total quantity of free fatty acids present in serum. The remaining free fatty acids are distributed among the other lipoprotein classes. 7. The choline-containing phospholipids (phosphatidylcholine, lysophosphatidylcholine and sphingomyelin) comprise about 90% of the phospholipids in all the lipoprotein classes except the low-density lipoprotein-2, which contains about 80% of these phospholipids. 8. The presence of a large amount of lysophosphatidylcholine in the ultracentrifugal residue and the successive decrease of sphingomyelin from the low-density lipoprotein-1 to the ultracentrifugal residue was confirmed. 9. The low-density lipoprotein-2 and the ultracentrifugal residue are characterized by relatively high contents of the lower glycerides. PMID:6048776

  6. Human gut endogenous proteins as a potential source of angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE-I)-, renin inhibitory and antioxidant peptides.

    PubMed

    Dave, Lakshmi A; Hayes, Maria; Montoya, Carlos A; Rutherfurd, Shane M; Moughan, Paul J

    2016-02-01

    It is well known that endogenous bioactive proteins and peptides play a substantial role in the body's first line of immunological defence, immune-regulation and normal body functioning. Further, the peptides derived from the luminal digestion of proteins are also important for body function. For example, within the peptide database BIOPEP (http://www.uwm.edu.pl/biochemia/index.php/en/biopep) 12 endogenous antimicrobial and 64 angiotensin-I-converting enzyme (ACE-I) inhibitory peptides derived from human milk and plasma proteins are listed. The antimicrobial peptide database (http://aps.unmc.edu/AP/main.php) lists over 111 human host-defence peptides. Several endogenous proteins are secreted in the gut and are subject to the same gastrointestinal digestion processes as food proteins derived from the diet. The human gut endogenous proteins (GEP) include mucins, serum albumin, digestive enzymes, hormones, and proteins from sloughed off epithelial cells and gut microbiota, and numerous other secreted proteins. To date, much work has been carried out regarding the health altering effects of food-derived bioactive peptides but little attention has been paid to the possibility that GEP may also be a source of bioactive peptides. In this review, we discuss the potential of GEP to constitute a gut cryptome from which bioactive peptides such as ACE-I inhibitory, renin inhibitory and antioxidant peptides may be derived. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. DNA topology influences molecular machine lifetime in human serum.

    PubMed

    Goltry, Sara; Hallstrom, Natalya; Clark, Tyler; Kuang, Wan; Lee, Jeunghoon; Jorcyk, Cheryl; Knowlton, William B; Yurke, Bernard; Hughes, William L; Graugnard, Elton

    2015-06-21

    DNA nanotechnology holds the potential for enabling new tools for biomedical engineering, including diagnosis, prognosis, and therapeutics. However, applications for DNA devices are thought to be limited by rapid enzymatic degradation in serum and blood. Here, we demonstrate that a key aspect of DNA nanotechnology-programmable molecular shape-plays a substantial role in device lifetimes. These results establish the ability to operate synthetic DNA devices in the presence of endogenous enzymes and challenge the textbook view of near instantaneous degradation.

  8. A scalable strategy for high-throughput GFP tagging of endogenous human proteins

    PubMed Central

    Leonetti, Manuel D.; Sekine, Sayaka; Kamiyama, Daichi; Weissman, Jonathan S.; Huang, Bo

    2016-01-01

    A central challenge of the postgenomic era is to comprehensively characterize the cellular role of the ∼20,000 proteins encoded in the human genome. To systematically study protein function in a native cellular background, libraries of human cell lines expressing proteins tagged with a functional sequence at their endogenous loci would be very valuable. Here, using electroporation of Cas9 nuclease/single-guide RNA ribonucleoproteins and taking advantage of a split-GFP system, we describe a scalable method for the robust, scarless, and specific tagging of endogenous human genes with GFP. Our approach requires no molecular cloning and allows a large number of cell lines to be processed in parallel. We demonstrate the scalability of our method by targeting 48 human genes and show that the resulting GFP fluorescence correlates with protein expression levels. We next present how our protocols can be easily adapted for the tagging of a given target with GFP repeats, critically enabling the study of low-abundance proteins. Finally, we show that our GFP tagging approach allows the biochemical isolation of native protein complexes for proteomic studies. Taken together, our results pave the way for the large-scale generation of endogenously tagged human cell lines for the proteome-wide analysis of protein localization and interaction networks in a native cellular context. PMID:27274053

  9. Activation of endogenous opioid gene expression in human keratinocytes and fibroblasts by pulsed radiofrequency energy fields

    PubMed Central

    Moffett, John; Fray, Linley M; Kubat, Nicole J

    2012-01-01

    Background Pulsed radiofrequency energy (PRFE) fields are being used increasingly for the treatment of pain arising from dermal trauma. However, despite their increased use, little is known about the biological and molecular mechanism(s) responsible for PRFE-mediated analgesia. In general, current therapeutics used for analgesia target either endogenous factors involved in inflammation, or act on endogenous opioid pathways. Methods and Results Using cultured human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) and human epidermal keratinocytes (HEK), we investigated the effect of PRFE treatment on factors, which are involved in modulating peripheral analgesia in vivo. We found that PRFE treatment did not inhibit cyclooxygenase enzyme activity, but instead had a positive effect on levels of endogenous opioid precursor mRNA (proenkephalin, pro-opiomelanocortin, prodynorphin) and corresponding opioid peptide. In HEK cells, increases in opioid mRNA were dependent, at least in part, on endothelin-1. In HDF cells, additional pathways also appear to be involved. PRFE treatment was also followed by changes in endogenous expression of several cytokines, including increased levels of interleukin-10 mRNA and decreased levels of interleukin-1β mRNA in both cell types. Conclusion These findings provide a new insight into the molecular mechanism underlying PRFE-mediated analgesia reported in the clinical setting. PMID:23055776

  10. Activation of endogenous opioid gene expression in human keratinocytes and fibroblasts by pulsed radiofrequency energy fields.

    PubMed

    Moffett, John; Fray, Linley M; Kubat, Nicole J

    2012-01-01

    Pulsed radiofrequency energy (PRFE) fields are being used increasingly for the treatment of pain arising from dermal trauma. However, despite their increased use, little is known about the biological and molecular mechanism(s) responsible for PRFE-mediated analgesia. In general, current therapeutics used for analgesia target either endogenous factors involved in inflammation, or act on endogenous opioid pathways. Using cultured human dermal fibroblasts (HDF) and human epidermal keratinocytes (HEK), we investigated the effect of PRFE treatment on factors, which are involved in modulating peripheral analgesia in vivo. We found that PRFE treatment did not inhibit cyclooxygenase enzyme activity, but instead had a positive effect on levels of endogenous opioid precursor mRNA (proenkephalin, pro-opiomelanocortin, prodynorphin) and corresponding opioid peptide. In HEK cells, increases in opioid mRNA were dependent, at least in part, on endothelin-1. In HDF cells, additional pathways also appear to be involved. PRFE treatment was also followed by changes in endogenous expression of several cytokines, including increased levels of interleukin-10 mRNA and decreased levels of interleukin-1β mRNA in both cell types. These findings provide a new insight into the molecular mechanism underlying PRFE-mediated analgesia reported in the clinical setting.

  11. Farm Animal Serum Proteomics and Impact on Human Health

    PubMed Central

    Girolamo, Francesco Di; D’Amato, Alfonsina; Lante, Isabella; Signore, Fabrizio; Muraca, Marta; Putignani, Lorenza

    2014-01-01

    Due to the incompleteness of animal genome sequencing, the analysis and characterization of serum proteomes of most farm animals are still in their infancy, compared to the already well-documented human serum proteome. This review focuses on the implications of the farm animal serum proteomics in order to identify novel biomarkers for animal welfare, early diagnosis, prognosis and monitoring of infectious disease treatment, and develop new vaccines, aiming at determining the reciprocal benefits for humans and animals. PMID:25257521

  12. Farm animal serum proteomics and impact on human health.

    PubMed

    Di Girolamo, Francesco; D'Amato, Alfonsina; Lante, Isabella; Signore, Fabrizio; Muraca, Marta; Putignani, Lorenza

    2014-09-01

    Due to the incompleteness of animal genome sequencing, the analysis and characterization of serum proteomes of most farm animals are still in their infancy, compared to the already well-documented human serum proteome. This review focuses on the implications of the farm animal serum proteomics in order to identify novel biomarkers for animal welfare, early diagnosis, prognosis and monitoring of infectious disease treatment, and develop new vaccines, aiming at determining the reciprocal benefits for humans and animals.

  13. Interaction of amphiphilic drugs with human and bovine serum albumins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Khan, Abbul Bashar; Khan, Javed Masood; Ali, Mohd. Sajid; Khan, Rizwan Hasan; Kabir-ud-Din

    2012-11-01

    To know the interaction of amphiphilic drugs nortriptyline hydrochloride (NOT) and promazine hydrochloride (PMZ) with serum albumins (i.e., human serum albumin (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA)), techniques of UV-visible, fluorescence, and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies are used. The binding affinity is more in case of PMZ with both the serum albumins. The quenching rate constant (kq) values suggest a static quenching process for all the drug-serum albumin interactions. The UV-visible results show that the change in protein conformation of PMZ-serum albumin interactions are more prominent as compared to NOT-serum albumin interactions. The CD results also explain the conformational changes in the serum albumins on binding with the drugs. The increment in %α-helical structure is slightly more for drug-BSA complexes as compared to drug-HSA complexes.

  14. Interaction of amphiphilic drugs with human and bovine serum albumins.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abbul Bashar; Khan, Javed Masood; Ali, Mohd Sajid; Khan, Rizwan Hasan; Kabir-Ud-Din

    2012-11-01

    To know the interaction of amphiphilic drugs nortriptyline hydrochloride (NOT) and promazine hydrochloride (PMZ) with serum albumins (i.e., human serum albumin (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA)), techniques of UV-visible, fluorescence, and circular dichroism (CD) spectroscopies are used. The binding affinity is more in case of PMZ with both the serum albumins. The quenching rate constant (k(q)) values suggest a static quenching process for all the drug-serum albumin interactions. The UV-visible results show that the change in protein conformation of PMZ-serum albumin interactions are more prominent as compared to NOT-serum albumin interactions. The CD results also explain the conformational changes in the serum albumins on binding with the drugs. The increment in %α-helical structure is slightly more for drug-BSA complexes as compared to drug-HSA complexes.

  15. Review: Glycation of human serum albumin

    PubMed Central

    Anguizola, Jeanethe; Matsuda, Ryan; Barnaby, Omar S.; Joseph, K.S.; Wa, Chunling; DeBolt, Erin; Koke, Michelle; Hage, David S.

    2013-01-01

    Glycation involves the non-enzymatic addition of reducing sugars and/or their reactive degradation products to amine groups on proteins. This process is promoted by the presence of elevated blood glucose concentrations in diabetes and occurs with various proteins that include human serum albumin (HSA). This review examines work that has been conducted in the study and analysis of glycated HSA. The general structure and properties of HSA are discussed, along with the reactions that can lead to modification of this protein during glycation. The use of glycated HSA as a short-to-intermediate term marker for glycemic control in diabetes is examined, and approaches that have been utilized for measuring glycated HSA are summarized. Structural studies of glycated HSA are reviewed, as acquired for both in vivo and in vitro glycated HSA, along with data that have been obtained on the rate and thermodynamics of HSA glycation. In addition, this review considers various studies that have investigated the effects of glycation on the binding of HSA with drugs, fatty acids and other solutes and the potential clinical significance of these effects. PMID:23891854

  16. Are typical human serum BPA concentrations measurable and sufficient to be estrogenic in the general population?

    PubMed

    Teeguarden, Justin; Hanson-Drury, Sesha; Fisher, Jeffrey W; Doerge, Daniel R

    2013-12-01

    Mammalian estrogen receptors modulate many physiological processes. Chemicals with structural features similar to estrogens can interact with estrogen receptors to produce biological effects similar to those caused by endogenous estrogens in the body. Bisphenol A (BPA) is a structural analogue of estrogen that binds to estrogen receptors. Exposure to BPA in humans is virtually ubiquitous in industrialized societies, but BPA is rapidly detoxified by metabolism and does not accumulate in the body. Whether or not serum concentrations of BPA in humans are sufficiently high to disrupt normal estrogen-related biology is the subject of intense political and scientific debate. Here we show a convergence of robust methods for measuring or calculating serum concentrations of BPA in humans from 93 published studies of more than 30,000 individuals in 19 countries across all life stages. Typical serum BPA concentrations are orders of magnitude lower than levels measurable by modern analytical methods and below concentrations required to occupy more than 0.0009% of Type II Estrogen Binding Sites, GPR30, ERα or ERβ receptors. Occupancies would be higher, but ≤0.04%, for the highest affinity receptor, ERRγ. Our results show limited or no potential for estrogenicity in humans, and question reports of measurable BPA in human serum.

  17. Serum endogenous secretory RAGE level is an independent risk factor for the progression of carotid atherosclerosis in type 1 diabetes.

    PubMed

    Katakami, Naoto; Matsuhisa, Munehide; Kaneto, Hideaki; Matsuoka, Taka-aki; Sakamoto, Ken'ya; Yasuda, Tetsuyuki; Umayahara, Yutaka; Kosugi, Keisuke; Yamasaki, Yoshimitsu

    2009-05-01

    Advanced glycation end-products (AGEs) and the receptor for AGEs (RAGE) system plays an important role in the development of atherosclerosis. It has been recently reported that endogenous secretory RAGE (esRAGE) and total soluble RAGE (sRAGE) levels are associated with diabetic complications. The aim of the present study is to longitudinally evaluate the association between esRAGE and sRAGE levels and the progression of carotid intima-media thickness (IMT), a surrogate marker of atherosclerosis. Japanese type 1 diabetic patients (n=47, aged 24.0+/-3.1 years) were enrolled into a 4-year follow-up study and annual measurements of serum esRAGE and sRAGE levels and IMTs were performed. At baseline, mean-IMT was inversely correlated with circulating esRAGE levels (r=-0.317, p=0.0292), whereas there was not statistical significance between mean-IMT and sRAGE levels. Mean-IMT significantly increased during the follow-up period (from 0.63+/-0.10 to 0.67+/-0.10mm, p=0.0022). Annual increase in mean-IMT (=(mean-IMT after 4 years-mean-IMT at baseline)/4) was positively correlated with the arithmetic average of systolic blood pressure (r=0.310, p=0.0332) and triglyceride (r=0.337, p=0.0201), and inversely correlated with circulating esRAGE levels (r=-0.360, p=0.0124) and sRAGE levels (r=-0.406, p=0.0042) during the follow-up period. Furthermore, stepwise multivariate regression analyses revealed that continuous low levels of circulating esRAGE and sRAGE were determinants of the progression of mean-IMT independently of conventional risk factors. Circulating esRAGE level as well as sRAGE level was an independent risk factor for the progression of carotid IMT in type 1 diabetic subjects.

  18. Natural Endogenous Human Matriptase and Prostasin Undergo Zymogen Activation via Independent Mechanisms in an Uncoupled Manner

    PubMed Central

    Su, Hui Chen; Liang, Yan A.; Lai, Ying-Jung J.; Chiu, Yi-Lin; Barndt, Robert B.; Shiao, Frank; Chang, Hsiang-Hua D.; Lu, Dajun D.; Huang, Nanxi; Tseng, Chun-Che; Wang, Jehng-Kang; Lee, Ming-Shyue; Johnson, Michael D.; Huang, Shih-Ming; Lin, Chen-Yong

    2016-01-01

    The membrane-associated serine proteases matriptase and prostasin are believed to function in close partnership. Their zymogen activation has been reported to be tightly coupled, either as a matriptase-initiated proteolytic cascade or through a mutually dependent mechanism involving the formation of a reciprocal zymogen activation complex. Here we show that this putative relationship may not apply in the context of human matriptase and prostasin. First, the tightly coupled proteolytic cascade between matriptase and prostasin might not occur when modest matriptase activation is induced by sphingosine 1-phospahte in human mammary epithelial cells. Second, prostasin is not required and/or involved in matriptase autoactivation because matriptase can undergo zymogen activation in cells that do not endogenously express prostasin. Third, matriptase is not required for and/or involved in prostasin activation, since activated prostasin can be detected in cells expressing no endogenous matriptase. Finally, matriptase and prostasin both undergo zymogen activation through an apparently un-coupled mechanism in cells endogenously expressing both proteases, such as in Caco-2 cells. In these human enterocytes, matriptase is detected primarily in the zymogen form and prostasin predominantly as the activated form, either in complexes with protease inhibitors or as the free active form. The negligible levels of prostasin zymogen with high levels of matriptase zymogen suggests that the reciprocal zymogen activation complex is likely not the mechanism for matriptase zymogen activation. Furthermore, high level prostasin activation still occurs in Caco-2 variants with reduced or absent matriptase expression, indicating that matriptase is not required and/or involved in prostasin zymogen activation. Collectively, these data suggest that any functional relationship between natural endogenous human matriptase and prostasin does not occur at the level of zymogen activation. PMID:27936035

  19. Endogenous Hydrogen Sulfide Enhances Cell Proliferation of Human Gastric Cancer AGS Cells.

    PubMed

    Sekiguchi, Fumiko; Sekimoto, Teruki; Ogura, Ayaka; Kawabata, Atsufumi

    2016-01-01

    Hydrogen sulfide (H2S), the third gasotransmitter, is endogenously generated by certain H2S synthesizing enzymes, including cystathionine-γ-lyase (CSE) and cystathionine-β-synthase (CBS) from L-cysteine in the mammalian body. Several studies have shown that endogenous and exogenous H2S affects the proliferation of cancer cells, although the effects of H2S appear to vary with cell type, being either promotive or suppressive. In the present study, we determined whether endogenously formed H2S regulates proliferation in human gastric cancer AGS cells. CSE, but not CBS, was expressed in AGS cells. CSE inhibitors, DL-propargylglycine (PPG) and β-cyano-L-alanine (BCA), significantly suppressed the proliferation of AGS cells in a concentration-dependent manner. CSE inhibitors did not increase lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) release in the same concentration range. The inhibitory effects of PPG and BCA on cell proliferation were reversed by repetitive application of NaHS, a donor of H2S. Interestingly, nuclear condensation and fragmentation were detected in AGS cells treated with PPG or BCA. These results suggest that endogenous H2S produced by CSE may contribute to the proliferation of gastric cancer AGS cells, most probably through anti-apoptotic actions.

  20. Mechanistic peptidomics: factors that dictate specificity in the formation of endogenous peptides in human milk.

    PubMed

    Guerrero, Andres; Dallas, David C; Contreras, Stephanie; Chee, Sabrina; Parker, Evan A; Sun, Xin; Dimapasoc, Lauren; Barile, Daniela; German, J Bruce; Lebrilla, Carlito B

    2014-12-01

    An extensive mass spectrometry analysis of the human milk peptidome has revealed almost 700 endogenous peptides from 30 different proteins. Two in-house computational tools were created and used to visualize and interpret the data through both alignment of the peptide quasi-molecular ion intensities and estimation of the differential enzyme participation. These results reveal that the endogenous proteolytic activity in the mammary gland is remarkably specific and well conserved. Certain proteins-not necessarily the most abundant ones-are digested by the proteases present in milk, yielding endogenous peptides from selected regions. Our results strongly suggest that factors such as the presence of specific proteases, the position and concentration of cleavage sites, and, more important, the intrinsic disorder of segments of the protein drive this proteolytic specificity in the mammary gland. As a consequence of this selective hydrolysis, proteins that typically need to be cleaved at specific positions in order to exert their activity are properly digested, and bioactive peptides encoded in certain protein sequences are released. Proteins that must remain intact in order to maintain their activity in the mammary gland or in the neonatal gastrointestinal tract are unaffected by the hydrolytic environment present in milk. These results provide insight into the intrinsic structural mechanisms that facilitate the selectivity of the endogenous milk protease activity and might be useful to those studying the peptidomes of other biofluids.

  1. Mechanistic Peptidomics: Factors That Dictate Specificity in the Formation of Endogenous Peptides in Human Milk*

    PubMed Central

    Guerrero, Andres; Dallas, David C.; Contreras, Stephanie; Chee, Sabrina; Parker, Evan A.; Sun, Xin; Dimapasoc, Lauren; Barile, Daniela; German, J. Bruce; Lebrilla, Carlito B.

    2014-01-01

    An extensive mass spectrometry analysis of the human milk peptidome has revealed almost 700 endogenous peptides from 30 different proteins. Two in-house computational tools were created and used to visualize and interpret the data through both alignment of the peptide quasi-molecular ion intensities and estimation of the differential enzyme participation. These results reveal that the endogenous proteolytic activity in the mammary gland is remarkably specific and well conserved. Certain proteins—not necessarily the most abundant ones—are digested by the proteases present in milk, yielding endogenous peptides from selected regions. Our results strongly suggest that factors such as the presence of specific proteases, the position and concentration of cleavage sites, and, more important, the intrinsic disorder of segments of the protein drive this proteolytic specificity in the mammary gland. As a consequence of this selective hydrolysis, proteins that typically need to be cleaved at specific positions in order to exert their activity are properly digested, and bioactive peptides encoded in certain protein sequences are released. Proteins that must remain intact in order to maintain their activity in the mammary gland or in the neonatal gastrointestinal tract are unaffected by the hydrolytic environment present in milk. These results provide insight into the intrinsic structural mechanisms that facilitate the selectivity of the endogenous milk protease activity and might be useful to those studying the peptidomes of other biofluids. PMID:25172956

  2. The Impact of Environmental and Endogenous Damage on Somatic Mutation Load in Human Skin Fibroblasts

    PubMed Central

    Saini, Natalie; Chan, Kin; Grimm, Sara A.; Dai, Shuangshuang; Fargo, David C.; Kaufmann, William K.; Taylor, Jack A.; Lee, Eunjung; Cortes-Ciriano, Isidro; Park, Peter J.; Schurman, Shepherd H.; Malc, Ewa P.; Mieczkowski, Piotr A.

    2016-01-01

    Accumulation of somatic changes, due to environmental and endogenous lesions, in the human genome is associated with aging and cancer. Understanding the impacts of these processes on mutagenesis is fundamental to understanding the etiology, and improving the prognosis and prevention of cancers and other genetic diseases. Previous methods relying on either the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells, or sequencing of single-cell genomes were inherently error-prone and did not allow independent validation of the mutations. In the current study we eliminated these potential sources of error by high coverage genome sequencing of single-cell derived clonal fibroblast lineages, obtained after minimal propagation in culture, prepared from skin biopsies of two healthy adult humans. We report here accurate measurement of genome-wide magnitude and spectra of mutations accrued in skin fibroblasts of healthy adult humans. We found that every cell contains at least one chromosomal rearrangement and 600–13,000 base substitutions. The spectra and correlation of base substitutions with epigenomic features resemble many cancers. Moreover, because biopsies were taken from body parts differing by sun exposure, we can delineate the precise contributions of environmental and endogenous factors to the accrual of genetic changes within the same individual. We show here that UV-induced and endogenous DNA damage can have a comparable impact on the somatic mutation loads in skin fibroblasts. Trial Registration ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01087307 PMID:27788131

  3. The Impact of Environmental and Endogenous Damage on Somatic Mutation Load in Human Skin Fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Saini, Natalie; Roberts, Steven A; Klimczak, Leszek J; Chan, Kin; Grimm, Sara A; Dai, Shuangshuang; Fargo, David C; Boyer, Jayne C; Kaufmann, William K; Taylor, Jack A; Lee, Eunjung; Cortes-Ciriano, Isidro; Park, Peter J; Schurman, Shepherd H; Malc, Ewa P; Mieczkowski, Piotr A; Gordenin, Dmitry A

    2016-10-01

    Accumulation of somatic changes, due to environmental and endogenous lesions, in the human genome is associated with aging and cancer. Understanding the impacts of these processes on mutagenesis is fundamental to understanding the etiology, and improving the prognosis and prevention of cancers and other genetic diseases. Previous methods relying on either the generation of induced pluripotent stem cells, or sequencing of single-cell genomes were inherently error-prone and did not allow independent validation of the mutations. In the current study we eliminated these potential sources of error by high coverage genome sequencing of single-cell derived clonal fibroblast lineages, obtained after minimal propagation in culture, prepared from skin biopsies of two healthy adult humans. We report here accurate measurement of genome-wide magnitude and spectra of mutations accrued in skin fibroblasts of healthy adult humans. We found that every cell contains at least one chromosomal rearrangement and 600–13,000 base substitutions. The spectra and correlation of base substitutions with epigenomic features resemble many cancers. Moreover, because biopsies were taken from body parts differing by sun exposure, we can delineate the precise contributions of environmental and endogenous factors to the accrual of genetic changes within the same individual. We show here that UV-induced and endogenous DNA damage can have a comparable impact on the somatic mutation loads in skin fibroblasts. Trial Registration: ClinicalTrials.gov NCT01087307.

  4. Human serum metabolic profiles are age dependent

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Zhonghao; Zhai, Guangju; Singmann, Paula; He, Ying; Xu, Tao; Prehn, Cornelia; Römisch-Margl, Werner; Lattka, Eva; Gieger, Christian; Soranzo, Nicole; Heinrich, Joachim; Standl, Marie; Thiering, Elisabeth; Mittelstraß, Kirstin; Wichmann, Heinz-Erich; Peters, Annette; Suhre, Karsten; Li, Yixue; Adamski, Jerzy; Spector, Tim D; Illig, Thomas; Wang-Sattler, Rui

    2012-01-01

    Understanding the complexity of aging is of utmost importance. This can now be addressed by the novel and powerful approach of metabolomics. However, to date, only a few metabolic studies based on large samples are available. Here, we provide novel and specific information on age-related metabolite concentration changes in human homeostasis. We report results from two population-based studies: the KORA F4 study from Germany as a discovery cohort, with 1038 female and 1124 male participants (32–81 years), and the TwinsUK study as replication, with 724 female participants. Targeted metabolomics of fasting serum samples quantified 131 metabolites by FIA-MS/MS. Among these, 71/34 metabolites were significantly associated with age in women/men (BMI adjusted). We further identified a set of 13 independent metabolites in women (with P values ranging from 4.6 × 10−04 to 7.8 × 10−42, αcorr = 0.004). Eleven of these 13 metabolites were replicated in the TwinsUK study, including seven metabolite concentrations that increased with age (C0, C10:1, C12:1, C18:1, SM C16:1, SM C18:1, and PC aa C28:1), while histidine decreased. These results indicate that metabolic profiles are age dependent and might reflect different aging processes, such as incomplete mitochondrial fatty acid oxidation. The use of metabolomics will increase our understanding of aging networks and may lead to discoveries that help enhance healthy aging. PMID:22834969

  5. Polyamine analogues bind human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Beauchemin, R; N'soukpoé-Kossi, C N; Thomas, T J; Thomas, T; Carpentier, R; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2007-10-01

    Polyamine analogues show antitumor activity in experimental models, and their ability to alter activity of cytotoxic chemotherapeutic agents in breast cancer is well documented. Association of polyamines with nucleic acids and protein is included in their mechanism of action. The aim of this study was to examine the interaction of human serum albumin (HSA) with several polyamine analogues, such as 1,11-diamino-4,8-diazaundecane (333), 3,7,11,15-tetrazaheptadecane.4HCl (BE-333), and 3,7,11,15,19-pentazahenicosane.5HCl (BE-3333), in aqueous solution at physiological conditions using a constant protein concentration and various polyamine contents (microM to mM). FTIR, UV-visible, and CD spectroscopic methods were used to determine the polyamine binding mode and the effects of polyamine complexation on protein stability and secondary structure. Structural analysis showed that polyamines bind nonspecifically (H-bonding) via polypeptide polar groups with binding constants of K333 = 9.30 x 10(3) M(-1), KBE-333 = 5.63 x 10(2) M(-1), and KBE-3333 = 3.66 x 10(2) M(-1). The protein secondary structure showed major alterations with a reduction of alpha-helix from 55% (free protein) to 43-50% and an increase of beta-sheet from 17% (free protein) to 29-36% in the 333, BE-333, and BE-3333 complexes, indicating partial protein unfolding upon polyamine interaction. HSA structure was less perturbed by polyamine analogues compared to those of the biogenic polyamines.

  6. Endogenous hydrogen sulfide is involved in osteogenic differentiation in human periodontal ligament cells.

    PubMed

    Cen, Sheng-Dan; Yu, Wen-Bin; Ren, Man-Man; Chen, Li-Jiao; Sun, Chao-Fan; Ye, Zhi-Li; Deng, Hui; Hu, Rong-Dang

    2016-08-01

    Endogenous hydrogen sulfide (H2S) has recently emerged as an important intracellular gaseous signaling molecule within cellular systems. Endogenous H2S is synthesized from l-cysteine via cystathionine β-synthase and cystathionine γ-lyase and it regulates multiple signaling pathways in mammalian cells. Indeed, aberrant H2S levels have been linked to defects in bone formation in experimental mice. The aim of this study was to examine the potential production mechanism and function of endogenous H2S within primary human periodontal ligament cells (PDLCs). Primary human PDLCs were obtained from donor molars with volunteer permission. Immunofluorescent labeling determined expression of the H2S synthetase enzymes. These enzymes were inhibited with D,L-propargylglycine or hydroxylamine to examine the effects of H2S signaling upon the osteogenic differentiation of PDLCs. Gene and protein expression levels of osteogenic markers in conjunction with ALP staining and activity and alizarin red S staining of calcium deposition were used to assay the progression of osteogenesis under different treatment conditions. Cultures were exposed to Wnt3a treatment to assess downstream signaling mechanisms. In this study, we show that H2S is produced by human PDLCs via the cystathionine β-synthase/cystathionine γ-lyase pathway to promote their osteogenic differentiation. These levels must be carefully maintained as excessive or deficient H2S levels temper the observed osteogenic effect by inhibiting Wnt/β-catenin signaling. These results demonstrate that optimal concentrations of endogenous H2S must be maintained within PDLCs to promote osteogenic differentiation by activating the Wnt/β-catenin signaling cascade. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Transplanted human bone marrow progenitor subtypes stimulate endogenous islet regeneration and revascularization.

    PubMed

    Bell, Gillian I; Broughton, Heather C; Levac, Krysta D; Allan, David A; Xenocostas, Anargyros; Hess, David A

    2012-01-01

    Transplanted murine bone marrow (BM) progenitor cells recruit to the injured pancreas and induce endogenous beta cell proliferation to improve islet function. To enrich for analogous human progenitor cell types that stimulate islet regeneration, we purified human BM based on high-aldehyde dehydrogenase activity (ALDH(hi)), an enzymatic function conserved in hematopoietic, endothelial, and mesenchymal progenitor lineages. We investigated the contributions of ALDH(hi) mixed progenitor cells or culture-expanded, ALDH-purified multipotent stromal cell (MSC) subsets to activate endogenous programs for islet regeneration after transplantation into streptozotocin-treated NOD/SCID mice. Intravenous injection of uncultured BM ALDH(hi) cells improved systemic hyperglycemia and augmented insulin secretion by increasing islet size and vascularization, without increasing total islet number. Augmented proliferation within regenerated endogenous islets and associated vascular endothelium indicated the induction of islet-specific proliferative and pro-angiogenic programs. Although cultured MSC from independent human BM samples showed variable capacity to improve islet function, and prolonged expansion diminished hyperglycemic recovery, transplantation of ALDH-purified regenerative MSC reduced hyperglycemia and augmented total beta cell mass by stimulating the formation of small beta cell clusters associated with the ductal epithelium, without evidence of increased islet vascularization or Ngn3(+) endocrine precursor activation. Thus, endogenous islet recovery after progenitor cell transplantation can occur via distinct regenerative mechanisms modulated by subtypes of progenitor cells administered. Further, understanding of how these islet regenerative and pro-angiogenic programs are activated by specific progenitor subsets may provide new approaches for combination cellular therapies to combat diabetes.

  8. Endogenous cannabinoid receptor ligand induces the migration of human natural killer cells.

    PubMed

    Kishimoto, Seishi; Muramatsu, Mayumi; Gokoh, Maiko; Oka, Saori; Waku, Keizo; Sugiura, Takayuki

    2005-02-01

    2-Arachidonoylglycerol is an endogenous ligand for the cannabinoid receptors (CB1 and CB2). Evidence is gradually accumulating which shows that 2-arachidonoylglycerol plays important physiological roles in several mammalian tissues and cells, yet the details remain ambiguous. In this study, we first examined the effects of 2-arachidonoylglycerol on the motility of human natural killer cells. We found that 2-arachidonoylglycerol induces the migration of KHYG-1 cells (a natural killer leukemia cell line) and human peripheral blood natural killer cells. The migration of natural killer cells induced by 2-arachidonoylglycerol was abolished by treating the cells with SR144528, a CB2 receptor antagonist, suggesting that the CB2 receptor is involved in the 2-arachidonoylglycerol-induced migration. In contrast to 2-arachidonoylglycerol, anandamide, another endogenous cannabinoid receptor ligand, did not induce the migration. Delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol, a major psychoactive constituent of marijuana, also failed to induce the migration; instead, the addition of delta9-tetrahydrocannabinol together with 2-arachidonoylglycerol abolished the migration induced by 2-arachidonoylglycerol. It is conceivable that the endogenous ligand for the cannabinoid receptor, that is, 2-arachidonoylglycerol, affects natural killer cell functions such as migration, thereby contributing to the host-defense mechanism against infectious viruses and tumor cells.

  9. Reprogramming triggers endogenous L1 and Alu retrotransposition in human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    PubMed

    Klawitter, Sabine; Fuchs, Nina V; Upton, Kyle R; Muñoz-Lopez, Martin; Shukla, Ruchi; Wang, Jichang; Garcia-Cañadas, Marta; Lopez-Ruiz, Cesar; Gerhardt, Daniel J; Sebe, Attila; Grabundzija, Ivana; Merkert, Sylvia; Gerdes, Patricia; Pulgarin, J Andres; Bock, Anja; Held, Ulrike; Witthuhn, Anett; Haase, Alexandra; Sarkadi, Balázs; Löwer, Johannes; Wolvetang, Ernst J; Martin, Ulrich; Ivics, Zoltán; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Garcia-Perez, Jose L; Faulkner, Geoffrey J; Schumann, Gerald G

    2016-01-08

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are capable of unlimited proliferation and can differentiate in vitro to generate derivatives of the three primary germ layers. Genetic and epigenetic abnormalities have been reported by Wissing and colleagues to occur during hiPSC derivation, including mobilization of engineered LINE-1 (L1) retrotransposons. However, incidence and functional impact of endogenous retrotransposition in hiPSCs are yet to be established. Here we apply retrotransposon capture sequencing to eight hiPSC lines and three human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines, revealing endogenous L1, Alu and SINE-VNTR-Alu (SVA) mobilization during reprogramming and pluripotent stem cell cultivation. Surprisingly, 4/7 de novo L1 insertions are full length and 6/11 retrotransposition events occurred in protein-coding genes expressed in pluripotent stem cells. We further demonstrate that an intronic L1 insertion in the CADPS2 gene is acquired during hiPSC cultivation and disrupts CADPS2 expression. These experiments elucidate endogenous retrotransposition, and its potential consequences, in hiPSCs and hESCs.

  10. Reprogramming triggers endogenous L1 and Alu retrotransposition in human induced pluripotent stem cells

    PubMed Central

    Klawitter, Sabine; Fuchs, Nina V.; Upton, Kyle R.; Muñoz-Lopez, Martin; Shukla, Ruchi; Wang, Jichang; Garcia-Cañadas, Marta; Lopez-Ruiz, Cesar; Gerhardt, Daniel J.; Sebe, Attila; Grabundzija, Ivana; Merkert, Sylvia; Gerdes, Patricia; Pulgarin, J. Andres; Bock, Anja; Held, Ulrike; Witthuhn, Anett; Haase, Alexandra; Sarkadi, Balázs; Löwer, Johannes; Wolvetang, Ernst J.; Martin, Ulrich; Ivics, Zoltán; Izsvák, Zsuzsanna; Garcia-Perez, Jose L.; Faulkner, Geoffrey J.; Schumann, Gerald G.

    2016-01-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs) are capable of unlimited proliferation and can differentiate in vitro to generate derivatives of the three primary germ layers. Genetic and epigenetic abnormalities have been reported by Wissing and colleagues to occur during hiPSC derivation, including mobilization of engineered LINE-1 (L1) retrotransposons. However, incidence and functional impact of endogenous retrotransposition in hiPSCs are yet to be established. Here we apply retrotransposon capture sequencing to eight hiPSC lines and three human embryonic stem cell (hESC) lines, revealing endogenous L1, Alu and SINE-VNTR-Alu (SVA) mobilization during reprogramming and pluripotent stem cell cultivation. Surprisingly, 4/7 de novo L1 insertions are full length and 6/11 retrotransposition events occurred in protein-coding genes expressed in pluripotent stem cells. We further demonstrate that an intronic L1 insertion in the CADPS2 gene is acquired during hiPSC cultivation and disrupts CADPS2 expression. These experiments elucidate endogenous retrotransposition, and its potential consequences, in hiPSCs and hESCs. PMID:26743714

  11. Is endogenous glycerol a determinant of stratum corneum hydration in humans?

    PubMed

    Choi, Eung Ho; Man, Mao-Qiang; Wang, Fusheng; Zhang, Xinjiang; Brown, Barbara E; Feingold, Kenneth R; Elias, Peter M

    2005-08-01

    Although stratum corneum (SC) hydration has been primarily of concern to the cosmetic industry, it serves an important biosensor function. In murine models, not only deiminated products of filaggrin-derived amino acids ("NMF") but also endogenous glycerol from circulation into the epidermis via aquaporin 3 channel and from triglyceride turnover in sebaceous glands (SG) are important determinants. We assessed here whether endogenous glycerol could also be linked to SC hydration in humans. SG-enriched sites are more hydrated than SG-impoverished sites, and SC hydration correlates with both sebum production and SC glycerol content, but the correlation is more significant for SC glycerol content than for sebum content. Moreover, gender-related differences in sebum content are not associated with altered SC hydration. SC hydration is also linked to SC glycerol content in SG-impoverished sites, suggesting a role for non-SG-derived (? from circulation) glycerol in SC hydration. Finally, short-term water immersion produces a parallel decline in SC hydration and SC glycerol content, with glycerol levels returning to normal over several hours. These results suggest that endogenous glycerol of both circulatory and SG origin comprises an H2O-extractable pool that influences SC hydration in humans. These results also provide a rationale for the development of glycerol-containing therapeutic moisturizers.

  12. Elevated levels of the serum endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase and metabolic control in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes.

    PubMed

    Xiong, Yan; Fu, Yun-feng; Fu, Si-hai; Zhou, Hong-hao

    2003-08-01

    This study was designed to determine the relationship between elevated levels of the endogenous inhibitor of nitric oxide synthase, asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA), and metabolic control in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes. Serum levels of ADMA were measured by high-performance liquid chromatography at 8 weeks after diabetes was induced. Endothelium-dependent relaxation to acetylcholine was tested in aortic rings from nondiabetic age-matched control, untreated diabetic, and insulin-treated diabetic rats to evaluate endothelial function. Serum concentrations of glucose, glycosylated serum protein, and malondialdehyde were examined to estimate metabolic control. Serum levels of ADMA increased dramatically in untreated diabetic rats compared with control rats. This elevation in ADMA levels was accompanied by impairment of the endothelium-dependent relaxation response to acetylcholine in aortic rings. Long-term insulin treatment not only prevented the elevation of serum ADMA levels, but also improved the impairment of endothelium-dependent relaxation in diabetic rats. Serum levels of glucose, glycosylated serum protein, and malondialdehyde were significantly increased in parallel with the elevation of ADMA in untreated diabetic rats compared with control rats. These parameters were normalized after diabetic rats received insulin treatment for 8 weeks. These results provide the first evidence that an elevation in the concentration of ADMA in rats with streptozotocin-induced diabetes is closely related to metabolic control of the disease.

  13. [Influence of the human blood serum on contractility and beta-adrenoreactyvity of the isolated human myocardium].

    PubMed

    Korotaeva, K N; Viaznikov, V A; Tsirkin, V I; Kostiaev, A A

    2011-01-01

    On strips of the isolated myocardium of right hearts auriculum of the 43 patients with ischemic illness of heart and 9 patients with heart diseases of various ethyology at statement venous canule during aorto-coronary shunting, estimated influence of adrenaline (10(-9)-10(-4) g/ml) on amplitude caused by electrostimulus (1H, 5ms, 25-30 V) contractions, and also inotropic and adrenomodulation activity of serum blood (in dilution 1 : 10000, 1: 1000, 1 : 500, 1: 100, 1 : 50, 1: 10 and 1 : 5) nonpregnant women. Direct dependence of amplitude of contraction on size of fraction of of blood emission on Teyholts is revealed. It means, that strips of right auriculum myocardium reflect contractility of a left ventriculum myocardium. Adrenaline in concentration 10(-7)-10(-6) g/ml dependent of dose raised amplitude of the caused contraction not influencing it in concentration of 10(-9) and 10(-8) g/ml (the constant of dissotiation has 2 x 10(-7) g/ml), that as a whole, speaks about decrease in efficiency of activation beta-AP. Blood Serum in dissolutions 1 : 10000-1 : 50 did not influence on amplitude of contraction, and in dissolutions 1 : 10 and 1 : 5 strengthened it, that speaks presence in blood the endogenous activator of myocyte contractility (EAMC). Serum showed beta-adrenomodulation activity that speaks presence in it endogenous sensitizer of beta-adrenoreceptors (ESBAR) and endogenous blocker of beta-adrenoreceptors (EBBAR). In particular, in experiences with adrenaline in subthreshold concentration (10(-8) g/ml) serum showed ESBAR-activity (in dissolutions 1 : 1000, 1 : 500, 1 : 100 and 1 : 50), and in experiences with adrenaline in as much as possible effective concentration (10(-6) g/ml) serum showed ESBAR-activity (in dissolutions 1 : 50 and 1 : 10) and EBBAR-activity (in dissolutions 1:500) Hence, containing in blood serum endogenous modulators of beta-adrenoreactivity - ESBAR and EBBAR can modulate efficiency of beta-adrenoreceptors activation of human

  14. Human autologous serum as a substitute for fetal bovine serum in human Schwann cell culture.

    PubMed

    Goodarzi, Parisa; Arjmand, Babak; Emami-Razavi, Seyed Hassan; Soleimani, Masoud; Khodadadi, Abbas; Mohamadi-Jahani, Fereshteh; Aghayan, Hamid Reza

    2014-01-01

    Nowadays, cell -based and tissue engineered products have opened new horizons in treatment of incurable nervous system disorders. The number of studies on the role of Schwann cells (SC) in treating nervous disorders is higher than other cell types. Different protocols have been suggested for isolation and expansion of SC which most of them have used multiple growth factors, mitogens and fetal bovine sera (FBS) in culture medium. Because of potential hazards of animal-derived reagents, this study was designed to evaluate the effect of replacing FBS with human autologous serum (HAS) on SC's yield and culture parameters. Samples from 10 peripheral nerve biopsies were retrieved and processed under aseptic condition. The isolated cells cultured in FBS (1st group) or autologous serum (2nd group). After primary culture the cells were seeded at 10000 cell/cm2 in a 12 wells cell culture plate for each group. At 100% confluency, the cell culture parameters (count, viability, purity and culture duration) of 2 groups were compared using paired t-test. The average donors' age was 35.80 (SD=13.35) and except for 1 sample the others cultured successfully. In first group, the averages of cell purity, viability and culture duration were 97% (SD=1.32), 97/33% (SD=1.22) and 11.77 (SD=2.58) days respectively. This parameters were 97.33% (SD=1.00), 97.55% (SD=1.33) and 10.33 days (SD=1.65) in second group. The difference of cell count, purity and viability were not significant between 2 groups (P>0.05). The cells of second group reached to 100% confluency in shorter period of time (P=0.03). The results of this study showed that autologous serum can be a good substitute for FBS in human SC culture. This can reduce the costs and improve the safety of cell product for clinical application.

  15. Endogenous Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase N-Terminal Tagging Affects Human Telomerase Function at Telomeres In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chiba, Kunitoshi; Vogan, Jacob M.; Wu, Robert A.; Gill, Manraj S.; Zhang, Xiaozhu; Collins, Kathleen

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Telomerase action at telomeres is essential for the immortal phenotype of stem cells and the aberrant proliferative potential of cancer cells. Insufficient telomere maintenance can cause stem cell and tissue failure syndromes, while increased telomerase levels are associated with tumorigenesis. Both pathologies can arise from only small perturbation of telomerase function. To analyze telomerase at its low endogenous expression level, we genetically engineered human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) to express various N-terminal fusion proteins of the telomerase reverse transcriptase from its endogenous locus. Using this approach, we found that these modifications can perturb telomerase function in hPSCs and cancer cells, resulting in telomere length defects. Biochemical analysis suggests that this defect is multileveled, including changes in expression and activity. These findings highlight the unknown complexity of telomerase structural requirements for expression and function in vivo. PMID:27872149

  16. Endogenous Telomerase Reverse Transcriptase N-Terminal Tagging Affects Human Telomerase Function at Telomeres In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Chiba, Kunitoshi; Vogan, Jacob M; Wu, Robert A; Gill, Manraj S; Zhang, Xiaozhu; Collins, Kathleen; Hockemeyer, Dirk

    2017-02-01

    Telomerase action at telomeres is essential for the immortal phenotype of stem cells and the aberrant proliferative potential of cancer cells. Insufficient telomere maintenance can cause stem cell and tissue failure syndromes, while increased telomerase levels are associated with tumorigenesis. Both pathologies can arise from only small perturbation of telomerase function. To analyze telomerase at its low endogenous expression level, we genetically engineered human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) to express various N-terminal fusion proteins of the telomerase reverse transcriptase from its endogenous locus. Using this approach, we found that these modifications can perturb telomerase function in hPSCs and cancer cells, resulting in telomere length defects. Biochemical analysis suggests that this defect is multileveled, including changes in expression and activity. These findings highlight the unknown complexity of telomerase structural requirements for expression and function in vivo. Copyright © 2017 American Society for Microbiology.

  17. Replication of many human viruses is refractory to inhibition by endogenous cellular microRNAs.

    PubMed

    Bogerd, Hal P; Skalsky, Rebecca L; Kennedy, Edward M; Furuse, Yuki; Whisnant, Adam W; Flores, Omar; Schultz, Kimberly L W; Putnam, Nicole; Barrows, Nicholas J; Sherry, Barbara; Scholle, Frank; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A; Griffin, Diane E; Cullen, Bryan R

    2014-07-01

    The issue of whether viruses are subject to restriction by endogenous microRNAs (miRNAs) and/or by virus-induced small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) in infected human somatic cells has been controversial. Here, we address this question in two ways. First, using deep sequencing, we demonstrate that infection of human cells by the RNA virus dengue virus (DENV) or West Nile virus (WNV) does not result in the production of any virus-derived siRNAs or viral miRNAs. Second, to more globally assess the potential of small regulatory RNAs to inhibit virus replication, we used gene editing to derive human cell lines that lack a functional Dicer enzyme and that therefore are unable to produce miRNAs or siRNAs. Infection of these cells with a wide range of viruses, including DENV, WNV, yellow fever virus, Sindbis virus, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, measles virus, influenza A virus, reovirus, vesicular stomatitis virus, human immunodeficiency virus type 1, or herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), failed to reveal any enhancement in the replication of any of these viruses, although HSV-1, which encodes at least eight Dicer-dependent viral miRNAs, did replicate somewhat more slowly in the absence of Dicer. We conclude that most, and perhaps all, human viruses have evolved to be resistant to inhibition by endogenous human miRNAs during productive replication and that dependence on a cellular miRNA, as seen with hepatitis C virus, is rare. How viruses have evolved to avoid inhibition by endogenous cellular miRNAs, which are generally highly conserved during metazoan evolution, remains to be determined. Importance: Eukaryotic cells express a wide range of small regulatory RNAs, including miRNAs, that have the potential to inhibit the expression of mRNAs that show sequence complementarity. Indeed, previous work has suggested that endogenous miRNAs have the potential to inhibit viral gene expression and replication. Here, we demonstrate that the replication of a wide range of

  18. Replication of Many Human Viruses Is Refractory to Inhibition by Endogenous Cellular MicroRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Bogerd, Hal P.; Skalsky, Rebecca L.; Kennedy, Edward M.; Furuse, Yuki; Whisnant, Adam W.; Flores, Omar; Schultz, Kimberly L. W.; Putnam, Nicole; Barrows, Nicholas J.; Sherry, Barbara; Scholle, Frank; Garcia-Blanco, Mariano A.; Griffin, Diane E.

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT The issue of whether viruses are subject to restriction by endogenous microRNAs (miRNAs) and/or by virus-induced small interfering RNAs (siRNAs) in infected human somatic cells has been controversial. Here, we address this question in two ways. First, using deep sequencing, we demonstrate that infection of human cells by the RNA virus dengue virus (DENV) or West Nile virus (WNV) does not result in the production of any virus-derived siRNAs or viral miRNAs. Second, to more globally assess the potential of small regulatory RNAs to inhibit virus replication, we used gene editing to derive human cell lines that lack a functional Dicer enzyme and that therefore are unable to produce miRNAs or siRNAs. Infection of these cells with a wide range of viruses, including DENV, WNV, yellow fever virus, Sindbis virus, Venezuelan equine encephalitis virus, measles virus, influenza A virus, reovirus, vesicular stomatitis virus, human immunodeficiency virus type 1, or herpes simplex virus 1 (HSV-1), failed to reveal any enhancement in the replication of any of these viruses, although HSV-1, which encodes at least eight Dicer-dependent viral miRNAs, did replicate somewhat more slowly in the absence of Dicer. We conclude that most, and perhaps all, human viruses have evolved to be resistant to inhibition by endogenous human miRNAs during productive replication and that dependence on a cellular miRNA, as seen with hepatitis C virus, is rare. How viruses have evolved to avoid inhibition by endogenous cellular miRNAs, which are generally highly conserved during metazoan evolution, remains to be determined. IMPORTANCE Eukaryotic cells express a wide range of small regulatory RNAs, including miRNAs, that have the potential to inhibit the expression of mRNAs that show sequence complementarity. Indeed, previous work has suggested that endogenous miRNAs have the potential to inhibit viral gene expression and replication. Here, we demonstrate that the replication of a wide range of

  19. Square Wave Voltammetric Determination of Diclofenac in Pharmaceutical Preparations and Human Serum.

    PubMed

    Ciltas, Ulvihan; Yilmaz, Bilal; Kaban, Selcuk; Akcay, Bilge Kaan; Nazik, Gulsah

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a simple and reliable square wave voltammetric (SWV) method was developed and validated for determination of diclofenac in pharmaceutical preparations and human serum. The proposed method was based on electrooxidation of diclofenac at platinum electrode in 0.1 M TBAClO4/acetonitrile solution. The well-defined two oxidation peaks were observed at 0.87 and 1.27 V, respectively. Calibration curves that were obtained by using current values measured for second peak were linear over the concentration range of 1.5-17.5 μg mL(-1) and 2-20 μg mL(-1) in supporting electrolyte and serum, respectively. Precision and accuracy were also checked in all media. Intra- and inter-day precision values for diclofenac were less than 3.64, and accuracy (relative error) was better than 2.49%. Developed method in this study is accurate, precise and can be easily applied to Diclomec, Dicloflam and Voltaren tablets as pharmaceutical preparation. Also, the proposed technique was successfully applied to spiked human serum samples. No electroactive interferences from the endogenous substances were found in human serum.

  20. Square Wave Voltammetric Determination of Diclofenac in Pharmaceutical Preparations and Human Serum

    PubMed Central

    Ciltas, Ulvihan; Yilmaz, Bilal; Kaban, Selcuk; Akcay, Bilge Kaan; Nazik, Gulsah

    2015-01-01

    In this study, a simple and reliable square wave voltammetric (SWV) method was developed and validated for determination of diclofenac in pharmaceutical preparations and human serum. The proposed method was based on electrooxidation of diclofenac at platinum electrode in 0.1 M TBAClO4/acetonitrile solution. The well-defined two oxidation peaks were observed at 0.87 and 1.27 V, respectively. Calibration curves that were obtained by using current values measured for second peak were linear over the concentration range of 1.5-17.5 μg mL-1 and 2-20 μg mL-1 in supporting electrolyte and serum, respectively. Precision and accuracy were also checked in all media. Intra- and inter-day precision values for diclofenac were less than 3.64, and accuracy (relative error) was better than 2.49%. Developed method in this study is accurate, precise and can be easily applied to Diclomec, Dicloflam and Voltaren tablets as pharmaceutical preparation. Also, the proposed technique was successfully applied to spiked human serum samples. No electroactive interferences from the endogenous substances were found in human serum. PMID:26330859

  1. 99M-technetium labeled macroaggregated human serum albumin pharmaceutical

    DOEpatents

    Winchell, Harry S.; Barak, Morton; Van Fleet, III, Parmer

    1977-05-17

    A reagent comprising macroaggregated human serum albumin having dispersed therein particles of stannous tin and a method for instantly making a labeled pharmaceutical therefrom, are disclosed. The labeled pharmaceutical is utilized in organ imaging.

  2. Detection of the human endogenous retrovirus ERV3-encoded Env-protein in human tissues using antibody-based proteomics.

    PubMed

    Fei, Chen; Atterby, Christina; Edqvist, Per-Henrik; Pontén, Fredrik; Zhang, Wei Wei; Larsson, Erik; Ryan, Frank P

    2014-01-01

    There is growing evidence to suggest that human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) have contributed to human evolution, being expressed in development, normal physiology and disease. A key difficulty in the scientific evaluation of this potential viral contribution is the accurate demonstration of virally expressed protein in specific human cells and tissues. In this study, we have adopted the endogenous retrovirus, ERV3, as our test model in developing a reliable high-capacity methodology for the expression of such endogenous retrovirus-coded protein. Two affinity-purified polyclonal antibodies to ERV3 Env-encoded protein were generated to detect the corresponding protein expression pattern in specific human cells, tissues and organs. Sampling included normal tissues from 144 individuals ranging from childhood to old age. This included more than forty different tissues and organs and some 216 different cancer tissues representing the twenty commonest forms of human cancer. The Rudbeck Laboratory, Uppsala University and Uppsala University Hospital, Uppsala, Sweden. The potential expression at likely physiological level of the ERV3Env encoded protein in a wide range of human cells, tissues and organs. We found that ERV3 encoded Env protein is expressed at substantive levels in placenta, testis, adrenal gland, corpus luteum, Fallopian tubes, sebaceous glands, astrocytes, bronchial epithelium and the ducts of the salivary glands. Substantive expression was also seen in a variety of epithelial cells as well as cells known to undergo fusion in inflammation and in normal physiology, including fused macrophages, myocardium and striated muscle. This contrasted strongly with the low levels expressed in other tissues types. These findings suggest that this virus plays a significant role in human physiology and may also play a possible role in disease. This technique can now be extended to the study of other HERV genomes within the human chromosomes that may have contributed to

  3. An endogenous tumour-promoting ligand of the human aryl hydrocarbon receptor.

    PubMed

    Opitz, Christiane A; Litzenburger, Ulrike M; Sahm, Felix; Ott, Martina; Tritschler, Isabel; Trump, Saskia; Schumacher, Theresa; Jestaedt, Leonie; Schrenk, Dieter; Weller, Michael; Jugold, Manfred; Guillemin, Gilles J; Miller, Christine L; Lutz, Christian; Radlwimmer, Bernhard; Lehmann, Irina; von Deimling, Andreas; Wick, Wolfgang; Platten, Michael

    2011-10-05

    Activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR) by environmental xenobiotic toxic chemicals, for instance 2,3,7,8-tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (dioxin), has been implicated in a variety of cellular processes such as embryogenesis, transformation, tumorigenesis and inflammation. But the identity of an endogenous ligand activating the AHR under physiological conditions in the absence of environmental toxic chemicals is still unknown. Here we identify the tryptophan (Trp) catabolite kynurenine (Kyn) as an endogenous ligand of the human AHR that is constitutively generated by human tumour cells via tryptophan-2,3-dioxygenase (TDO), a liver- and neuron-derived Trp-degrading enzyme not yet implicated in cancer biology. TDO-derived Kyn suppresses antitumour immune responses and promotes tumour-cell survival and motility through the AHR in an autocrine/paracrine fashion. The TDO-AHR pathway is active in human brain tumours and is associated with malignant progression and poor survival. Because Kyn is produced during cancer progression and inflammation in the local microenvironment in amounts sufficient for activating the human AHR, these results provide evidence for a previously unidentified pathophysiological function of the AHR with profound implications for cancer and immune biology.

  4. Identification of an infectious progenitor for the multiple-copy HERV-K human endogenous retroelements

    PubMed Central

    Dewannieux, Marie; Harper, Francis; Richaud, Aurélien; Letzelter, Claire; Ribet, David; Pierron, Gérard; Heidmann, Thierry

    2006-01-01

    Human Endogenous Retroviruses are expected to be the remnants of ancestral infections of primates by active retroviruses that have thereafter been transmitted in a Mendelian fashion. Here, we derived in silico the sequence of the putative ancestral “progenitor” element of one of the most recently amplified family—the HERV-K family—and constructed it. This element, Phoenix, produces viral particles that disclose all of the structural and functional properties of a bona-fide retrovirus, can infect mammalian, including human, cells, and integrate with the exact signature of the presently found endogenous HERV-K progeny. We also show that this element amplifies via an extracellular pathway involving reinfection, at variance with the non-LTR-retrotransposons (LINEs, SINEs) or LTR-retrotransposons, thus recapitulating ex vivo the molecular events responsible for its dissemination in the host genomes. We also show that in vitro recombinations among present-day human HERV-K (also known as ERVK) loci can similarly generate functional HERV-K elements, indicating that human cells still have the potential to produce infectious retroviruses. PMID:17077319

  5. Novel Transgenic Mouse Model for Studying Human Serum Albumin as a Biomarker of Carcinogenic Exposure.

    PubMed

    Sheng, Jonathan; Wang, Yi; Turesky, Robert J; Kluetzman, Kerri; Zhang, Qing-Yu; Ding, Xinxin

    2016-05-16

    Albumin is a commonly used serum protein for studying human exposure to xenobiotic compounds, including therapeutics and environmental pollutants. Often, the reactivity of albumin with xenobiotic compounds is studied ex vivo with human albumin or plasma/serum samples. Some studies have characterized the reactivity of albumin with chemicals in rodent models; however, differences between the orthologous peptide sequences of human and rodent albumins can result in the formation of different types of chemical-protein adducts with different interaction sites or peptide sequences. Our goal is to generate a human albumin transgenic mouse model that can be used to establish human protein biomarkers of exposure to hazardous xenobiotics for human risk assessment via animal studies. We have developed a human albumin transgenic mouse model and characterized the genotype and phenotype of the transgenic mice. The presence of the human albumin gene in the genome of the model mouse was confirmed by genomic PCR analysis, whereas liver-specific expression of the transgenic human albumin mRNA was validated by RT-PCR analysis. Further immunoblot and mass spectrometry analyses indicated that the transgenic human albumin protein is a full-length, mature protein, which is less abundant than the endogenous mouse albumin that coexists in the serum of the transgenic mouse. The transgenic protein was able to form ex vivo adducts with a genotoxic metabolite of 2-amino-1-methyl-6-phenylimidazo[4,5-b]pyridine, a procarcinogenic heterocyclic aromatic amine formed in cooked meat. This novel human albumin transgenic mouse model will facilitate the development and validation of albumin-carcinogen adducts as biomarkers of xenobiotic exposure and/or toxicity in humans.

  6. Endogenous Human MDM2-C Is Highly Expressed in Human Cancers and Functions as a p53-Independent Growth Activator

    PubMed Central

    Okoro, Danielle R.; Arva, Nicoleta; Gao, Chong; Polotskaia, Alla; Puente, Cindy; Rosso, Melissa; Bargonetti, Jill

    2013-01-01

    Human cancers over-expressing mdm2, through a T to G variation at a single nucleotide polymorphism at position 309 (mdm2 SNP309), have functionally inactivated p53 that is not effectively degraded. They also have high expression of the alternatively spliced transcript, mdm2-C. Alternatively spliced mdm2 transcripts are expressed in many forms of human cancer and when they are exogenously expressed they transform human cells. However no study to date has detected endogenous MDM2 protein isoforms. Studies with exogenous expression of splice variants have been carried out with mdm2-A and mdm2-B, but the mdm2-C isoform has remained virtually unexplored. We addressed the cellular influence of exogenously expressed MDM2-C, and asked if endogenous MDM2-C protein was present in human cancers. To detect endogenous MDM2-C protein, we created a human MDM2-C antibody to the splice junction epitope of exons four and ten (MDM2 C410) and validated the antibody with in vitro translated full length MDM2 compared to MDM2-C. Interestingly, we discovered that MDM2-C co-migrates with MDM2-FL at approximately 98 kDa. Using the validated C410 antibody, we detected high expression of endogenous MDM2-C in human cancer cell lines and human cancer tissues. In the estrogen receptor positive (ER+) mdm2 G/G SNP309 breast cancer cell line, T47D, we observed an increase in endogenous MDM2-C protein with estrogen treatment. MDM2-C localized to the nucleus and the cytoplasm. We examined the biological activity of MDM2-C by exogenously expressing the protein and observed that MDM2-C did not efficiently target p53 for degradation or reduce p53 transcriptional activity. Exogenous expression of MDM2-C in p53-null human cancer cells increased colony formation, indicating p53-independent tumorigenic properties. Our data indicate a role for MDM2-C that does not require the inhibition of p53 for increasing cancer cell proliferation and survival. PMID:24147044

  7. Endogenous human MDM2-C is highly expressed in human cancers and functions as a p53-independent growth activator.

    PubMed

    Okoro, Danielle R; Arva, Nicoleta; Gao, Chong; Polotskaia, Alla; Puente, Cindy; Rosso, Melissa; Bargonetti, Jill

    2013-01-01

    Human cancers over-expressing mdm2, through a T to G variation at a single nucleotide polymorphism at position 309 (mdm2 SNP309), have functionally inactivated p53 that is not effectively degraded. They also have high expression of the alternatively spliced transcript, mdm2-C. Alternatively spliced mdm2 transcripts are expressed in many forms of human cancer and when they are exogenously expressed they transform human cells. However no study to date has detected endogenous MDM2 protein isoforms. Studies with exogenous expression of splice variants have been carried out with mdm2-A and mdm2-B, but the mdm2-C isoform has remained virtually unexplored. We addressed the cellular influence of exogenously expressed MDM2-C, and asked if endogenous MDM2-C protein was present in human cancers. To detect endogenous MDM2-C protein, we created a human MDM2-C antibody to the splice junction epitope of exons four and ten (MDM2 C410) and validated the antibody with in vitro translated full length MDM2 compared to MDM2-C. Interestingly, we discovered that MDM2-C co-migrates with MDM2-FL at approximately 98 kDa. Using the validated C410 antibody, we detected high expression of endogenous MDM2-C in human cancer cell lines and human cancer tissues. In the estrogen receptor positive (ER+) mdm2 G/G SNP309 breast cancer cell line, T47D, we observed an increase in endogenous MDM2-C protein with estrogen treatment. MDM2-C localized to the nucleus and the cytoplasm. We examined the biological activity of MDM2-C by exogenously expressing the protein and observed that MDM2-C did not efficiently target p53 for degradation or reduce p53 transcriptional activity. Exogenous expression of MDM2-C in p53-null human cancer cells increased colony formation, indicating p53-independent tumorigenic properties. Our data indicate a role for MDM2-C that does not require the inhibition of p53 for increasing cancer cell proliferation and survival.

  8. Sensory Neuropeptides and Endogenous Opioids Expression in Human Dental Pulp with Asymptomatic Inflammation: In Vivo Study

    PubMed Central

    Chavarria-Bolaños, Daniel; Flores-Reyes, Hector; Lombana-Sanchez, Nelson; Cerda-Cristerna, Bernardino; Pozos-Guillen, Amaury

    2015-01-01

    Purpose. This study quantified the expression of substance P (SP), calcitonin gene-related peptide (CGRP), β-endorphins (β-End), and methionine-enkephalin (Met-Enk) in human dental pulp following orthodontic intrusion. Methods. Eight patients were selected according to preestablished inclusion criteria. From each patient, two premolars (indicated for extraction due to orthodontic reasons) were randomly assigned to two different groups: the asymptomatic inflammation group (EXPg), which would undergo controlled intrusive force for seven days, and the control group (CTRg), which was used to determine the basal levels of each substance. Once extracted, dental pulp tissue was prepared to determine the expression levels of both neuropeptides and endogenous opioids by radioimmunoassay (RIA). Results. All samples from the CTRg exhibited basal levels of both neuropeptides and endogenous opioids. By day seven, all patients were asymptomatic, even when all orthodontic-intrusive devices were still active. In the EXPg, the SP and CGRP exhibited statistically significant different levels. Although none of the endogenous opioids showed statistically significant differences, they all expressed increasing trends in the EXPg. Conclusions. SP and CGRP were identified in dental pulp after seven days of controlled orthodontic intrusion movement, even in the absence of pain. PMID:26538838

  9. Infectious Entry Pathway Mediated by the Human Endogenous Retrovirus K Envelope Protein

    PubMed Central

    Robinson, Lindsey R.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs), the majority of which exist as degraded remnants of ancient viruses, comprise approximately 8% of the human genome. The youngest human ERVs (HERVs) belong to the HERV-K(HML-2) subgroup and were endogenized within the past 1 million years. The viral envelope protein (ENV) facilitates the earliest events of endogenization (cellular attachment and entry), and here, we characterize the requirements for HERV-K ENV to mediate infectious cell entry. Cell-cell fusion assays indicate that a minimum of two events are required for fusion, proteolytic processing by furin-like proteases and exposure to acidic pH. We generated an infectious autonomously replicating recombinant vesicular stomatitis virus (VSV) in which the glycoprotein was replaced by HERV-K ENV. HERV-K ENV imparts an endocytic entry pathway that requires dynamin-mediated membrane scission and endosomal acidification but is distinct from clathrin-dependent or macropinocytic uptake pathways. The lack of impediments to the replication of the VSV core in eukaryotic cells allowed us to broadly survey the HERV-K ENV-dictated tropism. Unlike extant betaretroviral envelopes, which impart a narrow species tropism, we found that HERV-K ENV mediates broad tropism encompassing cells from multiple mammalian and nonmammalian species. We conclude that HERV-K ENV dictates an evolutionarily conserved entry pathway and that the restriction of HERV-K to primate genomes reflects downstream stages of the viral replication cycle. IMPORTANCE Approximately 8% of the human genome is of retroviral origin. While many of those viral genomes have become inactivated, some copies of the most recently endogenized human retrovirus, HERV-K, can encode individual functional proteins. Here, we characterize the envelope protein (ENV) of the virus to define how it mediates infection of cells. We demonstrate that HERV-K ENV undergoes a proteolytic processing step and triggers membrane fusion in response to

  10. [Molecular and pathological analyses of newly established transgenic rats carrying human endogenous retrovirus gene, ERV3].

    PubMed

    Tanaka, S

    2000-03-01

    Endogeneous retroviruses are known to be integrated in eukaryotic genome as proviral DNA similarly to infectious retroviruses. They are present in many kinds of living things, but their functions, especially those in humans, are unclear. To investigate the function of human endogeneous retroviruses, we chose endogeneous retrovirus type 3 (ERV3) which is a single copy type of human endogeneous retrovirus with mRNA expression in organ tissues in vivo. The full provirus genome of ERV3 was subcloned as a transgene and two lines of transgenic rats carrying ERV3 gene (ERV3 rats) were established. One line of ERV3 rats, ETR5, showed tandem insertion of multiple copies of the transgene and expressed ERV3 mRNA in various organs. High levels of the mRNA expression were detected in both lacrimal and salivary glands. In placentas, where ERV3 is expected to express at high levels in humans, the mRNA expression was evident from 12 days gestation in ETR5 rats. Another line, ETR16, showed a single copy insertion and expressed ERV3 mRNAs only in the lacrimal and salivary glands. By Northern analysis, the expected size (3.5 kb) of ERV3 env transcription as was already shown in human tissues was confirmed in ETR16, but high expression of an additional large transcript (4.0 kb) was detected in ETR5. The result of RT-PCR analysis of the transcript in ETR5 indicated that the tandem insertion in ETR5 genome probably caused mis-promoting and mis-terminal poly(A) splicing in the 3'LTR, resulting in the extension of ERV3 env transcript to 4.0 kb mRNA with an addition of nontranslated LTR sequence. By Western blot using an antiserum against oligopeptides synthesized from ERV3 env sequences, protein product of the transgene was shown to be an 85 kDa band in the lacrimal gland of ETR5. Although no pathological significance was evident in these transgenic rats under conditions without any treatment, ERV3 rats may be a suitable model for analysis of the ERV3 function in vivo.

  11. Atomic structure and chemistry of human serum albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    He, Xiao M.; Carter, Daniel C.

    1992-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of human serum albumin has been determined crystallographically to a resolution of 2.8 A. It comprises three homologous domains that assemble to form a heart-shaped molecule. Each domain is a product of two subdomains that possess common structural motifs. The principal regions of ligand binding to human serum albumin are located in hydrophobic cavities in subdomains IIA and ILIA, which exhibit similar chemistry. The structure explains numerous physical phenomena and should provide insight into future pharmacokinetic and genetically engineered therapeutic applications of serum albumin.

  12. Novel Endogenous Retrovirus in Rabbits Previously Reported as Human Retrovirus 5

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, David J.; Voisset, Cécile; Venables, Patrick J. W.; Weiss, Robin A.

    2002-01-01

    Human retrovirus 5 (HRV-5) represented a fragment of a novel retrovirus sequence identified in human RNA and DNA preparations. In this study, the genome of HRV-5 was cloned and sequenced and integration sites were analyzed. Using PCR and Southern hybridization, we showed that HRV-5 is not integrated into human DNA. A survey of other species revealed that HRV-5 is present in the genomic DNA of the European rabbit (Oryctolagus cuniculus) and belongs to an endogenous retrovirus family found in rabbits. The presence of rabbit sequences flanking HRV-5 proviruses in human DNA extracts suggested that rabbit DNA was present in our human extracts, and this was confirmed by PCR analysis that revealed the presence of rabbit mitochondrial DNA sequences in four of five human DNA preparations tested. The origin of the rabbit DNA and HRV-5 in human DNA preparations remains unclear, but laboratory contamination cannot explain the preferential detection of HRV-5 in inflammatory diseases and lymphomas reported previously. This is the first description of a retrovirus genome in rabbits, and sequence analysis shows that it is related to but distinct from A-type retroelements of mice and other rodents. The species distribution of HRV-5 is restricted to rabbits; other species, including other members of the order Lagomorpha, do not contain this sequence. Analysis of HRV-5 expression by Northern hybridization and reverse transcriptase PCR indicates that the virus is transcribed at a low level in many rabbit tissues. In light of these findings we propose that the sequence previously designated HRV-5 should now be denoted RERV-H (for rabbit endogenous retrovirus H). PMID:12072509

  13. Antimicrobial activity and mechanism of PDC213, an endogenous peptide from human milk.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yazhou; Zhou, Yahui; Liu, Xiao; Zhang, Fan; Yan, Linping; Chen, Ling; Wang, Xing; Ruan, Hongjie; Ji, Chenbo; Cui, Xianwei; Wang, Jiaqin

    2017-02-26

    Human milk has always been considered an ideal source of elemental nutrients to both preterm and full term infants in order to optimally develop the infant's tissues and organs. Recently, hundreds of endogenous milk peptides were identified in human milk. These peptides exhibited angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibition, immunomodulation, or antimicrobial activity. Here, we report the antimicrobial activity and mechanism of a novel type of human antimicrobial peptide (AMP), termed PDC213 (peptide derived from β-Casein 213-226 aa). PDC213 is an endogenous peptide and is present at higher levels in preterm milk than in full term milk. The inhibitory concentration curve and disk diffusion tests showed that PDC213 had obvious antimicrobial against S. aureus and Y. enterocolitica, the common nosocomial pathogens in neonatal intensive care units (NICUs). Fluorescent dye methods, electron microscopy experiments and DNA-binding activity assays further indicated that PDC213 can permeabilize bacterial membranes and cell walls rather than bind intracellular DNA to kill bacteria. Together, our results suggest that PDC213 is a novel type of AMP that warrants further investigation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Role of endogenous basic fibroblast growth factor in stem cells isolated from human exfoliated deciduous teeth.

    PubMed

    Nowwarote, Nunthawan; Pavasant, Prasit; Osathanon, Thanaphum

    2015-03-01

    This study aimed to investigate the role of endogenous basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) in stem cells isolated from human exfoliated deciduous teeth. Cells were isolated from dental pulp tissues of human exfoliated deciduous teeth. The expression of stem cell markers was determined using conventional semi-quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR) and flow cytometry. The multipotential differentiation ability was also examined. The lentiviral shRNA or fibroblast growth factor receptor (FGFR) inhibitor was employed to inhibit bFGF mRNA expression and signal transduction, respectively. The colony formation ability was determined by low-density cell seeding protocol. The mRNA expression was evaluated using real-time quantitative PCR. The osteogenic differentiation was examined using alkaline phosphatase enzymatic activity assay and alizarin red staining. The results demonstrated that the cells isolated from human exfoliated deciduous teeth (SHEDs) exhibited stem cell characteristics, regarding marker expression and multipotential differentiation ability (osteogenic, adipogenic, and neurogenic lineage). The sh-bFGF transduced SHEDs had lower colony forming unit and higher mineralization than those of the control. Similarly, the decrease of colony number and the increase of mineral deposition were noted upon exposing cells to FGFR chemical inhibitor. These results imply that the endogenous bFGF may participate in the colony formation and osteogenic differentiation ability. In addition, the inhibition of bFGF signalling may be useful to enhance osteogenic differentiation of stem cells. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Endogenous opioid release in the human brain reward system induced by acute amphetamine administration.

    PubMed

    Colasanti, Alessandro; Searle, Graham E; Long, Christopher J; Hill, Samuel P; Reiley, Richard R; Quelch, Darren; Erritzoe, David; Tziortzi, Andri C; Reed, Laurence J; Lingford-Hughes, Anne R; Waldman, Adam D; Schruers, Koen R J; Matthews, Paul M; Gunn, Roger N; Nutt, David J; Rabiner, Eugenii A

    2012-09-01

    We aimed to demonstrate a pharmacologically stimulated endogenous opioid release in the living human brain by evaluating the effects of amphetamine administration on [(11)C]carfentanil binding with positron emission tomography (PET). Twelve healthy male volunteers underwent [(11)C]carfentanil PET before and 3 hours after a single oral dose of d-amphetamine (either a "high" dose, .5 mg/kg, or a sub-pharmacological "ultra-low" dose, 1.25 mg total dose or approximately .017 mg/kg). Reductions in [(11)C]carfentanil binding from baseline to post-amphetamine scans (ΔBP(ND)) after the "high" and "ultra-low" amphetamine doses were assessed in 10 regions of interest. [(11)C]carfentanil binding was reduced after the "high" but not the "ultra-low" amphetamine dose in the frontal cortex, putamen, caudate, thalamus, anterior cingulate, and insula. Our findings indicate that oral amphetamine administration induces endogenous opioid release in different areas of human brain, including basal ganglia, frontal cortex areas, and thalamus. The combination of an amphetamine challenge and [(11)C]carfentanil PET is a practical and robust method to probe the opioid system in the living human brain. Copyright © 2012 Society of Biological Psychiatry. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Superoxide dismutase protects Escherichia coli against killing by human serum.

    PubMed

    McManus, D C; Josephy, P D

    1995-02-20

    To assess the role of superoxide dismutase in protecting Escherichia coli from killing by human serum and neutrophils, we constructed isogenic, smooth-lipopolysaccharide K-12 strains, either sod wild-type, delta sodA, or delta sodA delta sodB. The delta sodA delta sodB strain was killed by serum much more readily than either the wild-type or delta sodA strain. After allowing for this serum sensitivity difference, the delta sodA delta sodB strain also showed increased susceptibility to phagocytic killing by human neutrophils. These results indicate that superoxide dismutase protects E. coli from killing by serum (complement system) and by human neutrophils, possibly by a role in maintaining bacterial membrane structure.

  17. Purification of NAD(+) glycohydrolase from human serum.

    PubMed

    Coşkun, Ozlem; Nurten, Rüstem

    2013-07-01

    In the present study, NAD(+) glycohydrolase was purified from serum samples collected from healthy individuals using ammonium sulfate fractionation, Affi-Gel blue (Cibacron Blue F3GA) affinity chromatography, Sephadex G-100 column chromatography and isoelectric focusing. The final step was followed by a second Sephadex G-100 column chromatography assay in order to remove the ampholytes from the isoelectric focusing step. In terms of enhancement of specific activity, the NAD(+) glycohydrolase protein was purified ∼480-fold, with a yield of 1% compared with the initial serum fraction. The purified fraction appeared to be homogeneous, with a molecular weight of 39 kDa, as revealed by sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (SDS-PAGE) analysis, and also corresponded to the soluble (monomeric) form of surface antigen CD38.

  18. Serum factors involved in human microvascular endothelial cell morphogenesis.

    PubMed

    Harvey, Kevin; Siddiqui, Rafat A; Sliva, Daniel; Garcia, Joe G N; English, Denis

    2002-09-01

    Our previous studies have demonstrated that lipid and protein angiogenic factors operate in tandem to induce optimal angiogenic responses in vivo. This study was undertaken to clarify the nature of the substances in human serum that are responsible for its remarkable ability to promote capillary morphogenesis in vitro. The ability of dilute (2%) human serum to promote the morphogenic differentiation of human dermal microvascular endothelial cells on Matrigel supports was depleted by more than 50% by treatment of the serum with activated charcoal, a procedure that effectively removes biologically active lipid growth factors. The remainder of the activity within serum was lost on heating to 60 degrees C for 60 minutes, indicating the involvement of a protein in the response. The ability of charcoal-treated serum to promote capillary morphogenesis was completely restored by the addition of sphingosine 1-phosphate (SPP, 500 nmol/L), but other lipids thought to be released into serum during clotting were ineffective. In addition, basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF) effectively restored the ability of heat-treated serum to promote endothelial cell morphogenesis, but other protein growth factors, including vascular endothelial growth factor and platelet-derived growth factor, were ineffective. Together, SPP and bFGF were as effective as whole serum in promoting capillary morphogenesis. Responses to purified SPP were entirely sensitive to the effects of preexposure of the cells to pertussis toxin, whereas responses to bFGF were entirely pertussis toxin-resistant. Consistent with our hypothesis that two distinct factors in serum play a role in promoting capillary morphogenesis, responses induced by serum were inhibited approximately 50% by preexposure of endothelial cells to pertussis toxin. We conclude that platelet-released SPP acts in conjunction with circulating bFGF to promote capillary formation by microvascular endothelial cells. Lipid and protein growth factors

  19. Relationship between bradykinin-induced relaxation and endogenous epoxyeicosanoid synthesis in human bronchi.

    PubMed

    Tabet, Yacine; Sirois, Marco; Sirois, Chantal; Rizcallah, Edmond; Rousseau, Éric

    2013-04-15

    Epoxyeicosanoids (EETs) are produced by cytochrome P-450 epoxygenase; however, it is not yet known what triggers their endogenous production in epithelial cells. The relaxing effects of bradykinin are known to be related to endogenous production of epithelial-derived hyperpolarizing factors (EpDHF). Because of their effects on membrane potential, EETs have been reported to be EpDHF candidates (Benoit C, Renaudon B, Salvail D, Rousseau E. Am J Physiol Lung Cell Mol Physiol 280: L965-L973, 2001.). Thus, we hypothesized that bradykinin (BK) may stimulate endogenous EET production in human bronchi. To test this hypothesis, the relaxing and hyperpolarizing effects of BK and 14,15-EET were quantified on human bronchi, as well as the effects of various enzymatic inhibitors on these actions. One micromolar BK or 1 μM 14,15-EET induced a 45% relaxation on the tension induced by 30 nM U-46619 [a thromboxane-prostanoid (TP)-receptor agonist]. These BK-relaxing effects were reduced by 42% upon addition of 10 nM iberiotoxin [a large-conductance Ca(2+)-sensitive K(+) (BK(Ca)) channel blocker], by 27% following addition of 3 μM 14,15-epoxyeicosa-5(Z)-enoic acid (an EET antagonist), and by 32% with 3 μM N-methanesulfonyl-6-(2-propargyloxyphenyl)hexanamide (MS-PPOH, an epoxygenase inhibitor). Hence, BK and 14,15-EET display net hyperpolarizing effects on airway smooth muscle cells that are related to the activation of BK(Ca) channels and ultimately yielding to relaxation. Data also indicate that 3 μM MS-PPOH reduced the hyperpolarizing effects of BK by 43%. Together, the present data support the current hypothesis suggesting a direct relationship between BK and the production of EET regioisomers. Because of its potent anti-inflammatory and relaxing properties, epoxyeicosanoid signaling may represent a promising target in asthma and chronic obstructive pulmonary disease.

  20. Utility of next-generation RNA-sequencing in identifying chimeric transcription involving human endogenous retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Sokol, Martin; Jessen, Karen Margrethe; Pedersen, Finn Skou

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have shown that human endogenous retroviruses and endogenous retrovirus-like repeats (here collectively HERVs) impose direct regulation on human genes through enhancer and promoter motifs present in their long terminal repeats (LTRs). Although chimeric transcription in which novel gene isoforms containing retroviral and human sequence are transcribed from viral promoters are commonly associated with disease, regulation by HERVs is beneficial in other settings; for example, in human testis chimeric isoforms of TP63 induced by an ERV9 LTR protect the male germ line upon DNA damage by inducing apoptosis, whereas in the human globin locus the γ- and β-globin switch during normal hematopoiesis is mediated by complex interactions of an ERV9 LTR and surrounding human sequence. The advent of deep sequencing or next-generation sequencing (NGS) has revolutionized the way researchers solve important scientific questions and develop novel hypotheses in relation to human genome regulation. We recently applied next-generation paired-end RNA-sequencing (RNA-seq) together with chromatin immunoprecipitation with sequencing (ChIP-seq) to examine ERV9 chimeric transcription in human reference cell lines from Encyclopedia of DNA Elements (ENCODE). This led to the discovery of advanced regulation mechanisms by ERV9s and other HERVs across numerous human loci including transcription of large gene-unannotated genomic regions, as well as cooperative regulation by multiple HERVs and non-LTR repeats such as Alu elements. In this article, well-established examples of human gene regulation by HERVs are reviewed followed by a description of paired-end RNA-seq, and its application in identifying chimeric transcription genome-widely. Based on integrative analyses of RNA-seq and ChIP-seq, data we then present novel examples of regulation by ERV9s of tumor suppressor genes CADM2 and SEMA3A, as well as transcription of an unannotated region. Taken together, this article highlights

  1. Endogenous Bile Acid Disposition in Rat and Human Sandwich-Cultured Hepatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Marion, Tracy L.; Perry, Cassandra H.; St. Claire, Robert L.; Brouwer, Kim L. R.

    2013-01-01

    Sandwich-cultured hepatocytes (SCH) are used commonly to investigate hepatic transport protein-mediated uptake and biliary excretion of substrates. However, little is known about the disposition of endogenous bile acids (BAs) in SCH. In this study, four endogenous conjugated BAs common to rats and humans [taurocholic acid (TCA), glycocholic acid (GCA), taurochenodeoxycholic acid (TCDCA), and glycochenodeoxycholic acid (GCDCA)], as well as two BA species specific to rodents (α- and β-tauromuricholic acid; α/β TMCA), were profiled in primary rat and human SCH. Using B-CLEAR® technology, BAs were measured in cells+bile canaliculi, cells, and medium of SCH by LC-MS/MS. Results indicated that, just as in vivo, taurine-conjugated BA species were predominant in rat SCH, while glycine-conjugated BAs were predominant in human SCH. Total intracellular BAs remained relatively constant over days in culture in rat SCH. Total BAs in control (CTL) cells+bile, cells, and medium were approximately 3.4, 2.9, and 8.3-fold greater in human than in rat. The estimated intracellular concentrations of the measured total BAs were 64.3 ± 5.85 μM in CTL rat and 183 ± 55.6 μM in CTL human SCH, while medium concentrations of the total BAs measured were 1.16 ± 0.210 μM in CTL rat SCH and 9.61 ± 6.36 μM in CTL human SCH. Treatment of cells for 24 h with 10 μM troglitazone (TRO), an inhibitor of the bile salt export pump (BSEP) and the Na+-taurocholate cotransporting polypeptide (NTCP), had no significant effect on endogenous BAs measured at the end of the 24-h culture period, potentially due to compensatory mechanisms that maintain BA homeostasis. These data demonstrate that BAs in SCH are similar to in vivo, and that SCH may be a useful in vitro model to study alterations in BA disposition if species differences are taken into account. PMID:22342602

  2. DNA topology influences molecular machine lifetime in human serum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Goltry, Sara; Hallstrom, Natalya; Clark, Tyler; Kuang, Wan; Lee, Jeunghoon; Jorcyk, Cheryl; Knowlton, William B.; Yurke, Bernard; Hughes, William L.; Graugnard, Elton

    2015-06-01

    DNA nanotechnology holds the potential for enabling new tools for biomedical engineering, including diagnosis, prognosis, and therapeutics. However, applications for DNA devices are thought to be limited by rapid enzymatic degradation in serum and blood. Here, we demonstrate that a key aspect of DNA nanotechnology--programmable molecular shape--plays a substantial role in device lifetimes. These results establish the ability to operate synthetic DNA devices in the presence of endogenous enzymes and challenge the textbook view of near instantaneous degradation.DNA nanotechnology holds the potential for enabling new tools for biomedical engineering, including diagnosis, prognosis, and therapeutics. However, applications for DNA devices are thought to be limited by rapid enzymatic degradation in serum and blood. Here, we demonstrate that a key aspect of DNA nanotechnology--programmable molecular shape--plays a substantial role in device lifetimes. These results establish the ability to operate synthetic DNA devices in the presence of endogenous enzymes and challenge the textbook view of near instantaneous degradation. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: DNA sequences, fluorophore and quencher properties, equipment design, and degradation studies. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr02283e

  3. GC-FID determination and pharmacokinetic studies of oleanolic acid in human serum.

    PubMed

    Rada, Mirela; Castellano, José María; Perona, Javier S; Guinda, Ángeles

    2015-11-01

    Analytical interest of OA determination in human serum has increased owing to the increasing interest in pharmaceutical research by pharmaceutical properties. A simple, specific, precise and accurate GC method with flame ionization detector (FID) developed and validated for the determination of oleanolic acid (OA) in human serum (HS). To an aliquot of HS, internal standard was added and a combination of liquid-liquid extraction with a mixture of diethyl ether-isopropyl alcohol, filtration and consecutive GC resulted in separation and quantification of OA. The organic phase was analyzed using a GC system equipped with a 30 × 0.25 mm i.d. Rtx-65TG capillary column and FID detection. Total chromatographic time was 10 min and no interfering peaks from endogenous components in blank serum were observed. The OA/internal standard peak area ratio was linearly fitted to the OA concentration (r = 0.992) over the range 10-1500 ng/mL. The mean serum extraction recovery of OA was 96.7 ± 1.0% and the lower limit of quantification based on 5 mL of serum was 10.7 ng/mL. The intra-day coefficient of variation ranged from 1.3 to 3.6% and inter-day varied from 1.4 to 4.5%. The developed method was used to study the pharmacokinetics of OA after oral administration in humans. The assay was simple, sensitive, precise and accurate for the use in the study of the mechanisms of absorption and distribution of OA in humans. Copyright © 2015 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  4. Serum-Induced Differentiation of Human Meibomian Gland Epithelial Cells

    PubMed Central

    Sullivan, David A.; Liu, Yang; Kam, Wendy R.; Ding, Juan; Green, Karin M.; Shaffer, Scott A.; Hatton, Mark P.; Liu, Shaohui

    2014-01-01

    Purpose. We hypothesize that culturing immortalized human meibomian gland epithelial cells in serum-containing medium will induce their differentiation. The purpose of this investigation was to begin to test our hypothesis, and explore the impact of serum on gene expression and lipid accumulation in human meibomian gland epithelial cells. Methods. Immortalized and primary human meibomian gland epithelial cells were cultured in the presence or absence of serum. Cells were evaluated for lysosome and lipid accumulation, polar and neutral lipid profiles, and gene expression. Results. Our results support our hypothesis that serum stimulates the differentiation of human meibomian gland epithelial cells. This serum-induced effect is associated with a significant increase in the expression of genes linked to cell differentiation, epithelium development, the endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, vesicles, and lysosomes, and a significant decrease in gene activity related to the cell cycle, mitochondria, ribosomes, and translation. These cellular responses are accompanied by an accumulation of lipids within lysosomes, as well as alterations in the fatty acid content of polar and nonpolar lipids. Of particular importance, our results show that the molecular and biochemical changes of immortalized human meibomian gland epithelial cells during differentiation are analogous to those of primary cells. Conclusions. Overall, our findings indicate that immortalized human meibomian gland epithelial cells may serve as an ideal preclinical model to identify factors that control cellular differentiation in the meibomian gland. PMID:24867579

  5. Human Endogenous Retrovirus Protein Activates Innate Immunity and Promotes Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis in Mice

    PubMed Central

    Perron, Hervé; Dougier-Reynaud, Hei-Lanne; Lomparski, Christina; Popa, Iuliana; Firouzi, Reza; Bertrand, Jean-Baptiste; Marusic, Suzana; Portoukalian, Jacques; Jouvin-Marche, Evelyne; Villiers, Christian L.; Touraine, Jean-Louis; Marche, Patrice N.

    2013-01-01

    Multiple sclerosis (MS) is a complex multifactorial disease of the central nervous system (CNS) for which animal models have mainly addressed downstream immunopathology but not potential inducers of autoimmunity. In the absence of a pathogen known to cause neuroinflammation in MS, Mycobacterial lysate is commonly used in the form of complete Freund's adjuvant to induce autoimmunity to myelin proteins in Experimental Allergic Encephalomyelitis (EAE), an animal model for MS. The present study demonstrates that a protein from the human endogenous retrovirus HERV-W family (MSRV-Env) can be used instead of mycobacterial lysate to induce autoimmunity and EAE in mice injected with MOG, with typical anti-myelin response and CNS lesions normally seen in this model. MSRV-Env was shown to induce proinflammatory response in human macrophage cells through TLR4 activation pathway. The present results demonstrate a similar activation of murine dendritic cells and show the ability of MSRV-Env to trigger EAE in mice. In previous studies, MSRV-Env protein was reproducibly detected in MS brain lesions within microglia and perivascular macrophages. The present results are therefore likely to provide a model for MS, in which the upstream adjuvant triggering neuroinflammation is the one detected in MS active lesions. This model now allows pre-clinical studies with therapeutic agents targeting this endogenous retroviral protein in MS. PMID:24324591

  6. Human endogenous retrovirus type I-related viruses have an apparently widespread distribution within vertebrates.

    PubMed Central

    Martin, J; Herniou, E; Cook, J; Waugh O'Neill, R; Tristem, M

    1997-01-01

    Retroviruses from lower vertebrate hosts have been poorly characterized to date. Few sequences have been isolated, and those which have been reported are all highly divergent when compared to the retroviruses known to be harbored by mammals and birds. Here we show that retroviruses with significant homology to the human endogenous retrovirus type I (HERV-I) are present within the genomes of fish, reptiles, birds, and mammals and that they may well be widespread within many vertebrates. Phylogenetic analysis of nucleotide sequences strongly supported the inclusion of viruses from each of these vertebrate classes into one monophyletic group. This analysis also demonstrated that the HERV-I-related viruses are more closely related to retroviruses belonging to the murine leukemia virus genus than to members of the other retroviral genera. The presence of HERV-I-related retroviruses in so many disparate vertebrate hosts suggests that other endogenous human retroviruses may also have a much wider distribution than is currently appreciated. PMID:8985368

  7. Association of Endogenous Retroviruses and Long Terminal Repeats with Human Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Katoh, Iyoko; Kurata, Shun-ichi

    2013-01-01

    Since the human genome sequences became available in 2001, our knowledge about the human transposable elements which comprise ∼40% of the total nucleotides has been expanding. Non-long terminal repeat (non-LTR) retrotransposons are actively transposing in the present-day human genome, and have been found to cause ∼100 identified clinical cases of varied disorders. In contrast, almost all of the human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) originating from ancient infectious retroviruses lost their infectivity and transposing activity at various times before the human-chimpanzee speciation (∼6 million years ago), and no known HERV is presently infectious. Insertion of HERVs and mammalian apparent LTR retrotransposons (MaLRs) into the chromosomal DNA influenced a number of host genes in various modes during human evolution. Apart from the aspect of genome evolution, HERVs and solitary LTRs being suppressed in normal biological processes can potentially act as extra transcriptional apparatuses of cellular genes by re-activation in individuals. There has been a reasonable prediction that aberrant LTR activation could trigger malignant disorders and autoimmune responses if epigenetic changes including DNA hypomethylation occur in somatic cells. Evidence supporting this hypothesis has begun to emerge only recently: a MaLR family LTR activation in the pathogenesis of Hodgkin’s lymphoma and a HERV-E antigen expression in an anti-renal cell carcinoma immune response. This mini review addresses the impacts of the remnant-form LTR retrotransposons on human pathogenesis. PMID:24062987

  8. Endogenous digitalis

    PubMed Central

    Bagrov, Alexei Y; Shapiro, Joseph I

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY Endogenous digitalis-like factors, also called cardiotonic steroids, have been thought for nearly half a century to have important roles in health and disease. The endogenous cardiotonic steroids ouabain and marinobufagenin have been identified in humans, and an effector mechanism has been delineated by which these hormones signal through the sodium/potassium-transporting ATPase. These findings have increased interest in this field substantially. Although cardiotonic steroids were first considered important in the regulation of renal sodium transport and arterial pressure, subsequent work has implicated these hormones in the control of cell growth, apoptosis and fibrosis, among other processes. This Review focuses on the role of endogenous cardiotonic steroids in the pathophysiology of essential hypertension, congestive heart failure, end-stage renal disease and pre-eclampsia. We also discuss potential therapeutic strategies that have emerged as a result of the increased understanding of the regulation and actions of cardiotonic steroids. PMID:18542120

  9. Characteristics of aldosterone binding in rat and human serum.

    PubMed

    Coirini, H; White, A; Marusic, E T; De Nicola, A F

    1982-01-01

    Binding of cortisol and corticosterone by serum proteins is well established, but discrepancies exist regarding aldosterone. We have observed that approximately 1% of 3H-aldosterone incubated with rat serum was bound in a time-dependent process, although it was not competed by a large excess of non-radioactive aldosterone, assessed by Florisil separation or gel filtration on Sephadex G-50 columns. After electrophoresis on cellulose acetate of rat serum incubated with 3H-aldosterone, specific or non-specific binding to protein fractions was not obtained. Further, a 10 000-fold molar excess of aldosterone (10 microM) displaced only 34% of the bound 3H-aldosterone to rat serum, preventing the calculation of the IC50 value. Increasing concentrations of aldosterone (3-83 nM) did not displace 3H-corticosterone bound in rat serum to presumably corticosterone binding globulin (CBG). In contrast, inhibition of this binding by 3-83 nM corticosterone was concentration dependent, showing an IC50 value of 10(-8) M. In normal human serum, binding of 3H-aldosterone demonstrated competition by a 100 and 1 000-fold excess of aldosterone. Displacement curves of 3H corticosterone bound to human serum by 1.7-75 nM corticosterone or 0.05-8.8 microM aldosterone yielded IC50 values in the range of 10(-8) M for corticosterone and 10(-6) M for aldosterone. With horse serum, aldosterone's binding affinity was three orders of magnitude lower than that of corticosterone. These studies suggest that in the rat aldosterone was loosely and weakly bound to a high capacity binder, possibly albumin. In agreement with the work of others, in humans aldosterone may be bound to both CBG and albumin. The current data do not substantiate for the presence of specific aldosterone binding proteins in serum.

  10. [Phosphonate esterase activity in human serum (author's transl)].

    PubMed

    Labadie, M; Laplaud, P M; Lachatre, G; Breton, J C

    1980-02-01

    A simple methodology for the spectrophotometric assay of phosphonate esterase activity in human serum samples is described, featuring incubation at 30 degrees C in a medium containing p-nitrophenol and phenyl-phosphonic acid ester. Reproducibility of the method as well a mean values in normal patients vs age and sex are reported. Serum activity appears to be increased almost exclusively during pregnancy or administration of estrogenic drugs (as oral contraceptives or in prostate neoplasms).

  11. Friends-enemies: endogenous retroviruses are major transcriptional regulators of human DNA

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buzdin, Anton A.; Prassolov, Vladimir; Garazha, Andrew V.

    2017-06-01

    Endogenous retroviruses are mobile genetic elements hardly distinguishable from infectious, or “exogenous”, retroviruses at the time of insertion in the host DNA. Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) are not rare. They gave rise to multiple families of closely related mobile elements that occupy 8% of the human genome. Together, they shape genomic regulatory landscape by providing at least 320,000 human transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) located on 110,000 individual HERV elements. The HERVs host as many as 155,000 mapped DNaseI hypersensitivity sites, which denote loci active in the regulation of gene expression or chromatin structure. The contemporary view of the HERVs evolutionary dynamics suggests that at the early stages after insertion, the HERV is treated by the host cells as a foreign genetic element, and is likely to be suppressed by the targeted methylation and mutations. However, at the later stages, when significant number of mutations has been already accumulated and when the retroviral genes are broken, the regulatory potential of a HERV may be released and recruited to modify the genomic balance of transcription factor binding sites. This process goes together with further accumulation and selection of mutations, which reshape the regulatory landscape of the human DNA. However, developmental reprogramming, stress or pathological conditions like cancer, inflammation and infectious diseases, can remove the blocks limiting expression and HERV-mediated host gene regulation. This, in turn, can dramatically alter the gene expression equilibrium and shift it to a newer state, thus further amplifying instability and exacerbating the stressful situation.

  12. Dynamic interactions between plasma IL-1 family cytokines and central endogenous opioid neurotransmitter function in humans.

    PubMed

    Prossin, Alan R; Zalcman, Steven S; Heitzeg, Mary M; Koch, Alisa E; Campbell, Phillip L; Phan, K Luan; Stohler, Christian S; Zubieta, Jon-Kar

    2015-02-01

    Evidence in animal models suggests IL-1 family cytokines interact with central endogenous opioid neurotransmitter systems, inducing or perpetuating pathological states such as persistent pain syndromes, depression, substance use disorders, and their comorbidity. Understanding these interactions in humans is particularly relevant to understanding pathological states wherein this neurotransmitter system is implicated (ie, persistent pain, mood disorders, substance use disorders, etc). Here, we examined relationships between IL-1β, IL-1ra, and functional measures of the endogenous opioid system in 34 healthy volunteers, in the absence and presence of a standardized sustained muscular pain challenge, a psychophysical challenge with emotionally and physically stressful components. Mu-opioid receptor availability in vivo was examined with [(11)C]carfentanil positron emission tomography (PET) scanning. Sex and neuroticism impacted IL-1 family cytokines; higher baseline IL-1β and IL-1ra was identified in females with lower neuroticism. Higher baseline IL-1β was also associated with reduced μ-opioid receptor availability (amygdala) and greater pain sensitivity. The pain challenge increased IL-1β in females with high neuroticism. Strong associations between IL-1ra (an anti-nociceptive cytokine) and μ-opioid receptor activation (VP/NAcc) were identified during the pain challenge and the resulting analgesic effect of μ-opioid receptor activation was moderated by changes in IL-1β whereby volunteers with greater pain induced increase in IL-1β experienced less endogenous opioid analgesia. This study demonstrates the presence of relationships between inflammatory factors and a specific central neurotransmitter system and circuitry, of relevance to understanding interindividual variations in regulation of responses to pain and other physical and emotional stressors.

  13. Dynamic Interactions Between Plasma IL-1 Family Cytokines and Central Endogenous Opioid Neurotransmitter Function in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Prossin, Alan R; Zalcman, Steven S; Heitzeg, Mary M; Koch, Alisa E; Campbell, Phillip L; Phan, K Luan; Stohler, Christian S; Zubieta, Jon-Kar

    2015-01-01

    Evidence in animal models suggests IL-1 family cytokines interact with central endogenous opioid neurotransmitter systems, inducing or perpetuating pathological states such as persistent pain syndromes, depression, substance use disorders, and their comorbidity. Understanding these interactions in humans is particularly relevant to understanding pathological states wherein this neurotransmitter system is implicated (ie, persistent pain, mood disorders, substance use disorders, etc). Here, we examined relationships between IL-1β, IL-1ra, and functional measures of the endogenous opioid system in 34 healthy volunteers, in the absence and presence of a standardized sustained muscular pain challenge, a psychophysical challenge with emotionally and physically stressful components. Mu-opioid receptor availability in vivo was examined with [11C]carfentanil positron emission tomography (PET) scanning. Sex and neuroticism impacted IL-1 family cytokines; higher baseline IL-1β and IL-1ra was identified in females with lower neuroticism. Higher baseline IL-1β was also associated with reduced μ-opioid receptor availability (amygdala) and greater pain sensitivity. The pain challenge increased IL-1β in females with high neuroticism. Strong associations between IL-1ra (an anti-nociceptive cytokine) and μ-opioid receptor activation (VP/NAcc) were identified during the pain challenge and the resulting analgesic effect of μ-opioid receptor activation was moderated by changes in IL-1β whereby volunteers with greater pain induced increase in IL-1β experienced less endogenous opioid analgesia. This study demonstrates the presence of relationships between inflammatory factors and a specific central neurotransmitter system and circuitry, of relevance to understanding interindividual variations in regulation of responses to pain and other physical and emotional stressors. PMID:25139063

  14. Serum cystatin C-A useful endogenous marker of renal function in intensive care unit patients at risk for or with acute renal failure?

    PubMed

    Royakkers, Annick A N M; van Suijlen, Jeroen D E; Hofstra, Lieuwe S; Kuiper, Michael A; Bouman, Catherine S C; Spronk, Peter E; Schultz, Marcus J

    2007-01-01

    Critically ill patients are at high risk for developing acute renal failure (ARF). The prevention of ARF is of outmost importance in order to improve the increased morbidity and mortality associated with ARF. Unfortunately, there is lack of adequate endogenous markers that can identify renal dysfunction early - this hampers timely application of measures to prevent further renal damage. The use of exogenous markers of renal function is not only time-consuming but also expensive, and therefore can not be used on a regular basis in the intensive care unit. Both the presently used endogenous and exogenous markers are not reliable during continuous renal replacement therapy (CRRT) because these markers are removed by the therapy itself impeding early detection of recovering of renal function. Cystatin C has been proposed as an alternative endogenous marker of renal function for more than 15 years. In this manuscript we review the literature on the role of cystatin C as marker for renal function, focusing on the critically ill patient. Serum cystatin C concentrations have been found to relate to renal impairment and suggest that cystatin C is more sensitive to detect mild decreases in GFR. Cystatin C could be an important tool both to recognize early renal dysfunction and to identify renal recovery while on CRRT in the critically ill patient, however, we are in need of more studies.

  15. Clinical breath analysis: Discriminating between human endogenous compounds and exogenous (environmental) chemical confounders

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in exhaled breath originate from current or previous environmental exposures (exogenous compounds) and internal metabolic anabolic and catabolic) production (endogenous compounds). The origins of certain VOCs in breath presumed to be endogenous ...

  16. Clinical breath analysis: Discriminating between human endogenous compounds and exogenous (environmental) chemical confounders

    EPA Science Inventory

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in exhaled breath originate from current or previous environmental exposures (exogenous compounds) and internal metabolic anabolic and catabolic) production (endogenous compounds). The origins of certain VOCs in breath presumed to be endogenous ...

  17. Serum Albumin Domain Structures in Human Blood Serum by Mass Spectrometry and Computational Biology.

    PubMed

    Belsom, Adam; Schneider, Michael; Fischer, Lutz; Brock, Oliver; Rappsilber, Juri

    2016-03-01

    Chemical cross-linking combined with mass spectrometry has proven useful for studying protein-protein interactions and protein structure, however the low density of cross-link data has so far precluded its use in determining structures de novo. Cross-linking density has been typically limited by the chemical selectivity of the standard cross-linking reagents that are commonly used for protein cross-linking. We have implemented the use of a heterobifunctional cross-linking reagent, sulfosuccinimidyl 4,4'-azipentanoate (sulfo-SDA), combining a traditional sulfo-N-hydroxysuccinimide (sulfo-NHS) ester and a UV photoactivatable diazirine group. This diazirine yields a highly reactive and promiscuous carbene species, the net result being a greatly increased number of cross-links compared with homobifunctional, NHS-based cross-linkers. We present a novel methodology that combines the use of this high density photo-cross-linking data with conformational space search to investigate the structure of human serum albumin domains, from purified samples, and in its native environment, human blood serum. Our approach is able to determine human serum albumin domain structures with good accuracy: root-mean-square deviation to crystal structure are 2.8/5.6/2.9 Å (purified samples) and 4.5/5.9/4.8Å (serum samples) for domains A/B/C for the first selected structure; 2.5/4.9/2.9 Å (purified samples) and 3.5/5.2/3.8 Å (serum samples) for the best out of top five selected structures. Our proof-of-concept study on human serum albumin demonstrates initial potential of our approach for determining the structures of more proteins in the complex biological contexts in which they function and which they may require for correct folding. Data are available via ProteomeXchange with identifier PXD001692. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  18. Normal level of sepsis-associated phenylcarboxylic acids in human serum.

    PubMed

    Beloborodova, N V; Moroz, V V; Osipov, A A; Bedova, A Yu; Olenin, A Yu; Getsina, M L; Karpova, O V; Olenina, E G

    2015-03-01

    Previous studies showed that large amounts of phenylcarboxylic acids (PhCAs) are accumulated in a septic patient's blood due to increased endogenous and microbial phenylalanine and tyrosine biotransformation. Frequently, biochemical aromatic amino acid transformation into PhCAs is considered functionally insignificant for people without monogenetic hereditary diseases. The blood of healthy people contains the same PhCAs that are typical for septic patients as shown in this paper. The overall serum PhCAs level was 6 µM on average as measured by gas chromatography with flame ionization detection. This level is a stable biochemical parameter indicating the normal metabolism of aromatic amino acids. The concentrations of PhCAs in the metabolic profile of healthy people are distributed as follows: phenylacetic ≈ p-hydroxyphenyllactic > p-hydroxyphenylacetic > phenyllactic ≈ phenylpropionic > benzoic. We conclude that maintaining of stable PhCAs level in the serum is provided as the result of integration of human endogenous metabolic pathways and microbiota.

  19. Comparison of serum and cell-specific cytokines in humans.

    PubMed

    Jason, J; Archibald, L K; Nwanyanwu, O C; Byrd, M G; Kazembe, P N; Dobbie, H; Jarvis, W R

    2001-11-01

    Cytokines function at the cellular, microenvironmental level, but human cytokine assessment is most commonly done at the macro level, by measuring serum cytokines. The relationships between serum and cellular cytokines, if there are any, are undefined. In a study of hospitalized patients in Malawi, we compared cytometrically assessed, cell-specific cytokine data to serum interleukin 2 (IL-2), IL-4, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, gamma interferon (IFN-gamma), and tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) levels in 16 children and 71 (IL-2, -4, -6, -10) or 159 (IL-8, IFN-gamma, and TNF-alpha) adults, using Wilcoxon rank sum tests and Pearson's (r(p)) and Spearman's (r(s)) rank correlations. For the entire study group, correlations between identical serum and cellular cytokines mainly involved IL-8 and IFN-gamma, were few, and were weakly positive (r < 0.40). Blood culture-positive persons had the most and strongest correlations, including those between serum IL-2 levels and the percentages of lymphocytes spontaneously making IL-2 (r(s) = +0.74), serum IL-8 levels and the percentages of lymphocytes spontaneously making IL-8 (r(p) = +0.66), and serum IL-10 levels and the percentages of CD8(+) T cells making TNF-alpha (r(p) = +0.89). Human immunodeficiency virus (HIV)-positive persons had the next largest number of correlations, including several serum IL-8 level correlations, correlation of serum IL-10 levels with the percentages of lymphocytes producing induced IL-10 (r(s) = +0.36), and correlation of serum IFN-gamma levels and the percentages of lymphocytes spontaneously making both IL-6 and IFN-gamma in the same cell (r(p) = +0.59). HIV-negative, malaria smear-positive, and pediatric patients had few significant correlations; for the second and third of these subgroups, serum IL-8 level was correlated with the percentage of CD8(-) T cells producing induced IL-8 (r(s) = +0.40 and r(s) = +0.56, respectively). Thus, the strength of associations between serum and cellular cytokines

  20. Endogenous cholecystokinin in postprandial lower esophageal sphincter function and fundic tone in humans.

    PubMed

    Zerbib, F; Bruley Des Varannes, S; Scarpignato, C; Leray, V; D'Amato, M; Rozé, C; Galmiche, J P

    1998-12-01

    Transient lower esophageal sphincter (LES) relaxations (TLESRs) are the main underlying mechanism of gastroesophageal reflux. Although CCK acts through CCK-A receptors to increase the TLESRs induced by gastric distension, the respective roles of endogenous CCK and fundic tone in triggering postprandial TLESRs remain unknown. The aim of this study was to determine the effect of the CCK-A receptor antagonist, loxiglumide, on postprandial LES function and fundic tone in humans. LES motor events and fundic tone were simultaneously monitored in two groups of healthy volunteers. Recordings were performed during fasting and for 3 h after a liquid meal (200 ml/200 kcal) administered either orally or intraduodenally at a rate mimicking gastric emptying. Each subject received loxiglumide (10 mg. kg-1. h-1) or saline (control) in randomized order, which was started 40 min before the meal and maintained for 3 h thereafter. After the oral meal, loxiglumide significantly reduced TLESRs (P = 0.002) without significantly affecting LES pressure and fundic tone. After duodenal infusion of the meal, loxiglumide totally abolished the increase in TLESRs, reduced LES pressure fall (P < 0.02), and strongly inhibited fundic relaxation (P = 0.0001). We concluded that endogenous CCK is involved in the postprandial control of both LES function and fundic tone through activation of CCK-A receptors.

  1. Transcripts from a novel human KRAB zinc finger gene contain spliced Alu and endogenous retroviral segments

    SciTech Connect

    Baban, S.; Freeman, J.D.; Mager, D.L.

    1996-05-01

    During the course of an investigation into the potential effects of endogenous retroviruses on adjacent gene expression, we isolated two cDNA clones containing a small sequence segment belonging to the human endogenous retrovirus family, HERV-H. Characterization of the clones revealed that they represent transcripts from a novel KRAB zinc finger gene termed ZNF177. The two cDNA clones differ at their 5{prime} termini and in the presence of a 559-bp internal exon. The clone containing this internal exon has six imperfect zinc finger motifs followed by seven perfect copies of the C{sub 2}H{sub 2} type but has a frame shift between the KRAB domain and the downstream zinc finger region. The smaller clone lacks the six imperfect motifs and has an intact ORF. The 5{prime} putative untranslated regions of both cDNAs contain an 86-bp HERV-H env segment and a segment of an Alu repeat, both in the antisense orientation, that have been incorporated by splicing. RT-PCR experiments show evidence of alternative splicing but the majority of transcripts appear to contain the Alu and env segments. Genomic PCR and hybridization experiments suggest that a partial HERV-H element is integrated within the ZNF177 locus, which Southern analysis has shown to be a single-copy gene. Northern and RT-PCR analyses suggest that ZNF177 is transcribed at a low level in a variety of cell types. 41 refs., 8 figs.

  2. Multisite Promiscuity in the Processing of Endogenous Substrates By Human Carboxylesterase 1

    SciTech Connect

    Bencharit, S.; Edwards, C.C.; Morton, C.L.; Howard-Williams, E.L.; Kuhn, P.; Potter, P.M.; Redinbo, M.R.; /North Carolina U. /St. Jude Children's Hosp., Memphis /SLAC, SSRL

    2007-01-16

    Human carboxylesterase 1 (hCE1) is a drug and endobiotic-processing serine hydrolase that exhibits relatively broad substrate specificity. It has been implicated in a variety of endogenous cholesterol metabolism pathways including the following apparently disparate reactions: cholesterol ester hydrolysis (CEH), fatty acyl Coenzyme A hydrolysis (FACoAH), acyl-Coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransfer (ACAT), and fatty acyl ethyl ester synthesis (FAEES). The structural basis for the ability of hCE1 to perform these catalytic actions involving large substrates and products has remained unclear. Here we present four crystal structures of the hCE1 glycoprotein in complexes with the following endogenous substrates or substrate analogues: Coenzyme A, the fatty acid palmitate, and the bile acids cholate and taurocholate. While the active site of hCE1 was known to be promiscuous and capable of interacting with a variety of chemically distinct ligands, these structures reveal that the enzyme contains two additional ligand-binding sites and that each site also exhibits relatively non-specific ligand-binding properties. Using this multisite promiscuity, hCE1 appears structurally capable of assembling several catalytic events depending, apparently, on the physiological state of the cellular environment. These results expand our understanding of enzyme promiscuity and indicate that, in the case of hCE1, multiple non-specific sites are employed to perform distinct catalytic actions.

  3. Multisite Promiscuity in the Processing of Endogenous Substrates by Human Carboxylesterase 1

    PubMed Central

    Bencharit, Sompop; Edwards, Carol C.; Morton, Christopher L.; Howard-Williams, Escher L.; Kuhn, Peter; Potter, Philip M.; Redinbo, Matthew R.

    2006-01-01

    Human carboxylesterase 1 (hCE1) is a drug- and endobiotic-processing serine hydrolase that exhibits relatively broad substrate specificity. It has been implicated in a variety of endogenous cholesterol metabolism pathways including the following apparently disparate reactions: cholesterol ester hydrolysis (CEH), fatty acyl Coenzyme A hydrolysis (FACoAH), acyl-CoenzymeA:cholesterol acyltransfer (ACAT), and fatty acyl ethyl ester synthesis (FAEES). The structural basis for the ability of hCE1 to perform these catalytic actions involving large substrates and products has remained unclear. Here we present four crystal structures of the hCE1 glycoprotein in various complexes with endogenous substrates or substrate analogues: Coenzyme A, the fatty acid palmitate, and the bile acids cholate and taurocholate. While the active site of hCE1 was known to be promiscuous and capable of interacting with a variety of chemically-distinct ligands, these structures reveal that the enzyme contains two additional ligand binding sites and that each site also exhibits relatively non-specific ligand binding properties. Using this multisite promiscuity, hCE1 appears structurally capable of assembling several catalytic events depending, apparently, on the physiological state of the cellular environment. These results expand our understanding of enzyme promiscuity and indicate that, in the case of hCE1, multiple non-specific sites are employed to perform distinct catalytic actions. PMID:16962139

  4. A low percentage of autologous serum can replace bovine serum to engineer human nasal cartilage.

    PubMed

    Wolf, F; Haug, M; Farhadi, J; Candrian, C; Martin, I; Barbero, A

    2008-02-05

    For the generation of cell-based therapeutic products, it would be preferable to avoid the use of animal-derived components. Our study thus aimed at investigating the possibility to replace foetal bovine serum (FBS) with autologous serum (AS) for the engineering of cartilage grafts using expanded human nasal chondrocytes (HNC). HNC isolated from 7 donors were expanded in medium containing 10% FBS or AS at different concentrations (2%, 5% and 10%) and cultured in pellets using serum-free medium or in Hyaff(R)-11 meshes using medium containing FBS or AS. Tissue forming capacity was assessed histologically (Safranin O), immunohistochemically (type II collagen) and biochemically (glycosaminoglycans -GAG- and DNA). Differences among experimental groups were assessed by Mann Whitney tests. HNC expanded under the different serum conditions proliferated at comparable rates and generated cartilaginous pellets with similar histological appearance and amounts of GAG. Tissues generated by HNC from different donors cultured in Hyaff(R)-11 had variable quality, but the accumulated GAG amounts were comparable among the different serum conditions. Staining intensity for collagen type II was consistent with GAG deposition. Among the different serum conditions tested, the use of 2% AS resulted in the lowest variability in the GAG contents of generated tissues. In conclusion, a low percentage of AS can replace FBS both during the expansion and differentiation of HNC and reduce the variability in the quality of the resulting engineered cartilage tissues.

  5. The increase in human plasma antioxidant capacity after acute coffee intake is not associated with endogenous non-enzymatic antioxidant components.

    PubMed

    Moura-Nunes, Nathália; Perrone, Daniel; Farah, Adriana; Donangelo, Carmen M

    2009-01-01

    This study evaluated the association between the main plasma endogenous non-enzymatic antioxidant components and the increase in human antioxidant capacity (AC) after acute coffee intake. Ten adults were tested before and 90 min after consumption of coffee or water, in a crossover design, with a 7-day interval between tests. AC (FRAP and TRAP), ascorbic acid, α-tocopherol and γ-tocopherol, albumin, bilirubin and uric acid were analyzed in plasma/serum. After coffee consumption FRAP and TRAP increased 2.6% and 7.6% (P<0.05), whereas after water consumption FRAP and TRAP decreased 2.5% and 1.0% (P <0.05), respectively. In general, AC assays correlated with uric acid and α-tocopherol (r >0.75; P <0.04), independently of treatment and time point. Changes in AC assays after coffee intake did not correlate with endogenous components, which remained unchanged. These results suggest that coffee components spare endogenous antioxidants or are themselves the main contributors to plasma AC increase after coffee intake.

  6. Detection and quantification of ATP in human blood serum.

    PubMed

    Akdeniz, Ali; Caglayan, Mehmet Gokhan; Polivina, Irina; Anzenbacher, Pavel

    2016-08-21

    Two fluorometric sensors based on the tri-serine tri-lactone scaffold and thiourea or sulfonamide moieties serving as hydrogen bond donors allowing for anion binding are described. The sensor utilizing thiourea as a recognition moiety shows fluorescence enhancement while the sensor with sulfonamide shows quenching upon addition of phosphates. Sensor arrays composed of two sensors are able to discriminate structurally similar organic phosphates in the presence of interferents in human blood serum. The quantitative analysis of ATP in human blood serum shows high accuracy (the root mean square error of prediction, 1.65%) without requiring any sample pretreatment.

  7. Measurement of human serum IgD levels.

    PubMed

    Overed-Sayer, Catherine L; Mosedale, David E; Goodall, Margaret; Grainger, David J

    2009-04-01

    This unit describes an ELISA for the quantitative measurement of IgD levels in human serum. The ELISA is highly specific and sensitive, with a minimum detectable concentration of 30 pg/ml and more than 10,000-fold specificity for IgD over all other human immunoglobulins. Linear dilution characteristics enable measurement of IgD concentrations ranging over 5 orders of magnitude. These factors are vital for the IgD assay, since IgD makes up only a small proportion of the total immunoglobulins present in normal sera, and IgD serum concentrations are known to vary widely between individuals.

  8. Sequences Of Amino Acids For Human Serum Albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C.

    1992-01-01

    Sequences of amino acids defined for use in making polypeptides one-third to one-sixth as large as parent human serum albumin molecule. Smaller, chemically stable peptides have diverse applications including service as artificial human serum and as active components of biosensors and chromatographic matrices. In applications involving production of artificial sera from new sequences, little or no concern about viral contaminants. Smaller genetically engineered polypeptides more easily expressed and produced in large quantities, making commercial isolation and production more feasible and profitable.

  9. The HERV-K Human Endogenous Retrovirus Envelope Protein Antagonizes Tetherin Antiviral Activity

    PubMed Central

    Lemaître, Cécile; Harper, Francis; Pierron, Gérard

    2014-01-01

    ABSTRACT Endogenous retroviruses are the remnants of past retroviral infections that are scattered within mammalian genomes. In humans, most of these elements are old degenerate sequences that have lost their coding properties. The HERV-K(HML2) family is an exception: it recently amplified in the human genome and corresponds to the most active proviruses, with some intact open reading frames and the potential to encode viral particles. Here, using a reconstructed consensus element, we show that HERV-K(HML2) proviruses are able to inhibit Tetherin, a cellular restriction factor that is active against most enveloped viruses and acts by keeping the viral particles attached to the cell surface. More precisely, we identify the Envelope protein (Env) as the viral effector active against Tetherin. Through immunoprecipitation experiments, we show that the recognition of Tetherin is mediated by the surface subunit of Env. Similar to Ebola glycoprotein, HERV-K(HML2) Env does not mediate Tetherin degradation or cell surface removal; therefore, it uses a yet-undescribed mechanism to inactivate Tetherin. We also assessed all natural complete alleles of endogenous HERV-K(HML2) Env described to date for their ability to inhibit Tetherin and found that two of them (out of six) can block Tetherin restriction. However, due to their recent amplification, HERV-K(HML2) elements are extremely polymorphic in the human population, and it is likely that individuals will not all possess the same anti-Tetherin potential. Because of Tetherin's role as a restriction factor capable of inducing innate immune responses, this could have functional consequences for individual responses to infection. IMPORTANCE Tetherin, a cellular protein initially characterized for its role against HIV-1, has been proven to counteract numerous enveloped viruses. It blocks the release of viral particles from producer cells, keeping them tethered to the cell surface. Several viruses have developed strategies to

  10. Homogeneous substrate-labeled fluorescent immunoassay for human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Patinkin, J; Inbar, D; Ben-Gigi, C; Derfler, S; Klausner, Y; Fridlender, B

    1983-01-01

    A homogeneous substrate-labeled fluorescent immunoassay for human serum albumin (HSA) has been developed, similar to previously described immunoassays for Immunoglobulin G and Immunoglobulin M. HSA was covalently linked to 6-(7-beta-galactosylcoumarin-3-carboxamide) hexylamine. The resulting conjugate had minimal fluorescence at 450 nm (with excitation at 400 nm). However, when the acetal linkage of the galactosyl moiety was hydrolyzed by beta-galactosidase, a substantial increase in the fluorescence was obtained. This increase was specifically inhibited by antibody to HSA. A competitive binding immunoassay was established by letting the conjugate compete with HSA in the serum for the limited number of antibody-binding sites. The level of fluorescence resulting from the addition of enzyme was proportional to the amount of HSA in the serum. Precision, analytical recovery and serum dilution studies were carried out on the assay. The immunoassay was compared to an albumin assay using the dye-binding method.

  11. New bioinformatic tool for quick identification of functionally relevant endogenous retroviral inserts in human genome.

    PubMed

    Garazha, Andrew; Ivanova, Alena; Suntsova, Maria; Malakhova, Galina; Roumiantsev, Sergey; Zhavoronkov, Alex; Buzdin, Anton

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) and LTR retrotransposons (LRs) occupy ∼8% of human genome. Deep sequencing technologies provide clues to understanding of functional relevance of individual ERVs/LRs by enabling direct identification of transcription factor binding sites (TFBS) and other landmarks of functional genomic elements. Here, we performed the genome-wide identification of human ERVs/LRs containing TFBS according to the ENCODE project. We created the first interactive ERV/LRs database that groups the individual inserts according to their familial nomenclature, number of mapped TFBS and divergence from their consensus sequence. Information on any particular element can be easily extracted by the user. We also created a genome browser tool, which enables quick mapping of any ERV/LR insert according to genomic coordinates, known human genes and TFBS. These tools can be used to easily explore functionally relevant individual ERV/LRs, and for studying their impact on the regulation of human genes. Overall, we identified ∼110,000 ERV/LR genomic elements having TFBS. We propose a hypothesis of "domestication" of ERV/LR TFBS by the genome milieu including subsequent stages of initial epigenetic repression, partial functional release, and further mutation-driven reshaping of TFBS in tight coevolution with the enclosing genomic loci.

  12. TRPV4 is endogenously expressed in vertebrate spermatozoa and regulates intracellular calcium in human sperm.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashutosh; Majhi, Rakesh Kumar; Swain, Nirlipta; Giri, S C; Kar, Sujata; Samanta, Luna; Goswami, Chandan

    2016-05-13

    Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid sub-type 4 (TRPV4) is a non-selective cationic channel involved in regulation of temperature, osmolality and different ligand-dependent Ca(2+)-influx. Recently, we have demonstrated that TRPV4 is conserved in all vertebrates. Now we demonstrate that TRPV4 is endogenously expressed in all vertebrate sperm cells ranging from fish to mammals. In human sperm, TRPV4 is present as N-glycosylated protein and its activation induces Ca(2+)-influx. Its expression and localization differs in swim-up and swim-down cells suggesting that TRPV4 is an important determining factor for sperm motility. We demonstrate that pharmacological activation or inhibition of TRPV4 regulates Ca(2+)-wave propagation from head to tail. Such findings may have wide application in male fertility-infertility, contraception and conservation of endangered species as well. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. Synthesis, Assembly, and Processing of the Env ERVWE1/Syncytin Human Endogenous Retroviral Envelope

    PubMed Central

    Cheynet, V.; Ruggieri, A.; Oriol, G.; Blond, J.-L.; Boson, B.; Vachot, L.; Verrier, B.; Cosset, F.-L.; Mallet, F.

    2005-01-01

    Syncytin is a fusogenic protein involved in the formation of the placental syncytiotrophoblast layer. This protein is encoded by the envelope gene of the ERVWE1 proviral locus belonging to the human endogenous retrovirus W (HERV-W) family. The HERV-W infectious ancestor entered the primate lineage 25 to 40 million years ago. Although the syncytin fusion property has been clearly demonstrated, little is known about this cellular protein maturation process with respect to classical infectious retrovirus envelope proteins. Here we show that the cellular syncytin protein is synthesized as a glycosylated gPr73 precursor cleaved into two mature proteins, a gp50 surface subunit (SU) and a gp24 transmembrane subunit (TM). These SU and TM subunits are found associated as homotrimers. The intracytoplasmic tail is critical to the fusogenic phenotype, although its cleavage requirements seem to have diverged from those of classical retroviral maturation. PMID:15827173

  14. Synthesis, assembly, and processing of the Env ERVWE1/syncytin human endogenous retroviral envelope.

    PubMed

    Cheynet, V; Ruggieri, A; Oriol, G; Blond, J-L; Boson, B; Vachot, L; Verrier, B; Cosset, F-L; Mallet, F

    2005-05-01

    Syncytin is a fusogenic protein involved in the formation of the placental syncytiotrophoblast layer. This protein is encoded by the envelope gene of the ERVWE1 proviral locus belonging to the human endogenous retrovirus W (HERV-W) family. The HERV-W infectious ancestor entered the primate lineage 25 to 40 million years ago. Although the syncytin fusion property has been clearly demonstrated, little is known about this cellular protein maturation process with respect to classical infectious retrovirus envelope proteins. Here we show that the cellular syncytin protein is synthesized as a glycosylated gPr73 precursor cleaved into two mature proteins, a gp50 surface subunit (SU) and a gp24 transmembrane subunit (TM). These SU and TM subunits are found associated as homotrimers. The intracytoplasmic tail is critical to the fusogenic phenotype, although its cleavage requirements seem to have diverged from those of classical retroviral maturation.

  15. Insertional polymorphisms: a new lease of life for endogenous retroviruses in human disease.

    PubMed

    Moyes, David; Griffiths, David J; Venables, Patrick J

    2007-07-01

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) result from ancestral infection by infectious viruses over millions of years of primate evolution. Some are transcriptionally active, express proteins and therefore have the potential to cause disease. Here we review the controversial attempts to link them with cancer and autoimmunity. The main difficulty is that most HERVs investigated to date are present at the same locus in 100% of the population. However, a new class of insertionally polymorphic HERV-K family members, present in a minority of individuals, has recently been described. We propose that insertionally polymorphic HERVs could be novel genetic risk factors and hence provide a new lease of life for research into HERVs and disease.

  16. Lipid-Conjugation of Endogenous Neuropeptides: Improved Biotherapy against Human Pancreatic Cancer

    PubMed Central

    Gopalakrishnan, Gopakumar; Lepetre, Sinda; Maksimenko, Andrei; Mura, Simona; Desmaële, Didier; Couvreur, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    Neuropeptides are small neuronal signaling molecules that act as neuromodulators for a variety of neural functions including analgesia, reproduction, social behavior, learning, and memory. One of the endogenous neuropeptides—Met-Enkephalin (Met-Enk), has been shown to display an inhibitory effect on cell proliferation and differentiation. Here, a novel lipid-modification approach is shown to create a small library of neuropeptides that will allow increased bioavailability and plasma stability after systemic administration. It is demonstrated, on an experimental model of human pancreatic adenocarcinoma, that lipid conjugation of Met-Enk enhances its tumor suppression efficacy compared to its nonlipidated counterparts, both in vitro and in vivo. More strikingly, the in vivo studies show that a combination therapy with a reduced concentration of Gemcitabine has suppressed the tumor growth considerably even three weeks after the last treatment. PMID:25694262

  17. Endogenous attention signals evoked by threshold contrast detection in human superior colliculus.

    PubMed

    Katyal, Sucharit; Ress, David

    2014-01-15

    Human superior colliculus (SC) responds in a retinotopically selective manner when attention is deployed on a high-contrast visual stimulus using a discrimination task. To further elucidate the role of SC in endogenous visual attention, high-resolution fMRI was used to demonstrate that SC also exhibits a retinotopically selective response for covert attention in the absence of significant visual stimulation using a threshold-contrast detection task. SC neurons have a laminar organization according to their function, with visually responsive neurons present in the superficial layers and visuomotor neurons in the intermediate layers. The results show that the response evoked by the threshold-contrast detection task is significantly deeper than the response evoked by the high-contrast speed discrimination task, reflecting a functional dissociation of the attentional enhancement of visuomotor and visual neurons, respectively. Such a functional dissociation of attention within SC laminae provides a subcortical basis for the oculomotor theory of attention.

  18. Interactions of human Myosin Va isoforms, endogenously expressed in human melanocytes, are tightly regulated by the tail domain.

    PubMed

    Westbroek, Wendy; Lambert, Jo; Bahadoran, Philippe; Busca, Roser; Herteleer, Marie Chantal; Smit, Nico; Mommaas, Mieke; Ballotti, Robert; Naeyaert, Jean Marie

    2003-03-01

    Primary human epidermal melanocytes express six endogenous isoforms of the human actin-associated myosin Va motor protein, involved in organelle transport. As isoforms containing exon F are most abundant in melanocytes, we hypothesized that these isoforms probably have a melanocyte-specific function. To uncover the biologic role of the six isoforms we introduced enhanced green fluorescent protein (eGFP)-myosin Va tail constructs in human melanocytes. We found that the medial tail, undergoing alternative splicing, has to be expressed in combination with the globular tail in order to obtain clear colocalization with organelles. Our data show that isoforms lacking exon F but containing exon D are associated with vesicles near the Golgi area. Myosin Va isoforms containing exon F are able to colocalize with and influence melanosome distribution by indirect interaction with rab27a and direct interaction with melanophilin. These results indicate that the myosin Va medial tail domain provides the globular tail domain with organelle-interacting specificity.

  19. The aliens inside human DNA: HERV-W/MSRV/syncytin-1 endogenous retroviruses and neurodegeneration.

    PubMed

    Dolei, Antonina; Uleri, Elena; Ibba, Gabriele; Caocci, Maurizio; Piu, Claudia; Serra, Caterina

    2015-07-04

    The human genome contains remnants of ancestral retroviruses now endogenously transmitted, called human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs). HERVs can be variably expressed, and both beneficial and detrimental effects have described. This review focuses on the MSRV and syncytin-1 HERV-W elements in relationship to neurodegeneration in view of their neuro-pathogenic and immune-pathogenic properties. Multiple sclerosis (MS) and a neurodegenerative disease (neuroAIDS) are reported in this review. In vivo studies in patients and controls for molecular epidemiology and follow-up studies are reviewed, along with in vitro cellular studies of the effects of treatments and of molecular mechanisms. HERV-W/MSRV has been repeatedly found in MS patients (in blood, spinal fluid, and brain samples), and MRSV presence/load strikingly parallels MS stages and active/remission phases, as well as therapy outcome. The DNA of MS patients has increased MSRVenv copies, while syncytin-1 copies are unchanged in controls. Presence of MSRV in the spinal fluid predicted the worst MS progression, ten years in advance. The Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) activates HERV-W/MSRV both in vitro and in vivo. With respect to neuroAIDS, the HIV transactivator of transcription (Tat) protein activates HERV-W/MSRV in monocytes/macrophages and astrocytes indirectly by interaction with TLR4 and induction of TNFa. HERV-W/MSRV can be considered a biomarker for MS behavior and therapy outcome. Regarding MS pathogenesis, we postulate the possibility for EBV of an initial trigger of future MS, years later, and for MSRV of a direct role of effector of neuropathogenesis during MS. Additionally, HERV-W/MSR/syncytin-1 activation by HIV Tat could contribute to the HIV-related neurodegeneration.

  20. Endogenous BMPR-IB signaling is required for early osteoblast differentiation of human bone cells.

    PubMed

    Singhatanadgit, Weerachai; Olsen, Irwin

    2011-03-01

    Osteoblast differentiation is tightly regulated by a number of cytokines and growth factors, including bone morphogenetic proteins (BMP) which stimulate osteoblast differentiation by signal transduction via three BMP receptors (BMPR-IA, -IB and -II). Although the mechanisms which regulate osteoblast differentiation are not fully understood, it is possible that endogenous BMPR signaling could play an important part in this process. To test this hypothesis, we have examined the expression and the functional significance of BMPR during osteoblast differentiation of primary human bone cells. The results showed that although the expression of BMPR-IA and -II transcripts were constantly expressed while the bone cells underwent osteoblast differentiation, the level of BMPR-IB mRNA was transiently, but significantly, up-regulated by threefold on day 3. This increase in BMPR-IB expression was found to be associated with the significant up-regulation of core binding factor alpha 1 (Cbfa1) and alkaline phosphatase (ALP) transcripts as well as the ALP activity, the well-established early markers of osteoblast differentiation. Transfection of bone cells with BMPR-IB small interfering RNA (siRNA) was found to significantly ablate the expression of BMPR-IB which subsequently resulted in reduction of Cbfa1 and ALP mRNA as well as the ALP activity. Moreover, exogenously added BMP-2 failed to rescue osteoblast differentiation of BMPR-IB siRNA-transfected bone cells. In conclusion, the present study has shown that endogenous BMPR-IB signaling is required for early phase of osteoblast differentiation of human bone cells in vitro, suggesting that BMPR-IB could be a therapeutic target for initiating bone healing in vivo.

  1. Deep Sequencing Reveals Low Incidence of Endogenous LINE-1 Retrotransposition in Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells

    PubMed Central

    Arokium, Hubert; Kim, Namshin; Liang, Min; Presson, Angela P.; Chen, Irvin S.

    2014-01-01

    Long interspersed element-1 (LINE-1 or L1) retrotransposition induces insertional mutations that can result in diseases. It was recently shown that the copy number of L1 and other retroelements is stable in induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). However, by using an engineered reporter construct over-expressing L1, another study suggests that reprogramming activates L1 mobility in iPSCs. Given the potential of human iPSCs in therapeutic applications, it is important to clarify whether these cells harbor somatic insertions resulting from endogenous L1 retrotransposition. Here, we verified L1 expression during and after reprogramming as well as potential somatic insertions driven by the most active human endogenous L1 subfamily (L1Hs). Our results indicate that L1 over-expression is initiated during the reprogramming process and is subsequently sustained in isolated clones. To detect potential somatic insertions in iPSCs caused by L1Hs retotransposition, we used a novel sequencing strategy. As opposed to conventional sequencing direction, we sequenced from the 3′ end of L1Hs to the genomic DNA, thus enabling the direct detection of the polyA tail signature of retrotransposition for verification of true insertions. Deep coverage sequencing thus allowed us to detect seven potential somatic insertions with low read counts from two iPSC clones. Negative PCR amplification in parental cells, presence of a polyA tail and absence from seven L1 germline insertion databases highly suggested true somatic insertions in iPSCs. Furthermore, these insertions could not be detected in iPSCs by PCR, likely due to low abundance. We conclude that L1Hs retrotransposes at low levels in iPSCs and therefore warrants careful analyses for genotoxic effects. PMID:25289675

  2. Constitutive Aberrant Endogenous Interleukin-1 Facilitates Inflammation and Growth in Human Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Yong; Ekmekcioglu, Suhendan; Liu, Ping; Duncan, Lyn M.; Lizée, Gregory; Poindexter, Nancy; Grimm, Elizabeth A.

    2011-01-01

    Interleukin-1-mediated inflammation is proposed to contribute to the development and progression of some cancers. IL-1 family member proteins are known to be expressed constitutively in many melanoma tumor cells, and we hypothesize that these support molecular pathways of inflammation and facilitate tumor growth. To investigate the expression of IL-1α and IL-1β in melanoma patients, and their association with disease progression, immunohistochemical staining was performed on tissues from 170 patients including benign nevi, primary melanomas, and metastatic melanomas. IL-1β levels were low (or zero) in benign nevi, and higher in primary and metastatic melanomas (P<0.0001). IL-1α was expressed in about 73% of nevi and 55% of metastatic melanomas, with levels significantly higher in primary tumors (P<0.0001); most (98%) primary melanoma samples were positive for IL-1α. In vitro studies with 7 human melanoma cell lines showed that 5 cell lines expressed IL-1α and IL-1β proteins and mRNA. We identified for the first time several important downstream signaling pathways affected by endogenous IL-1, including reactive oxygen and nitrogen species, COX-2, and phosphorylated IκB and SAPK/JNK; all of which were decreased by siRNA to IL-1s. Downregulation of IL-1α, IL-1β, or MyD88 substantially increased p21 and p53 levels. Treatment with IL-1 receptor type I neutralizing antibody or IL-1-pathway-specific siRNAs led to growth arrest in IL-1-positive melanoma cells. Furthermore, blocking the IL-1 pathway increased autophagy in IL-1-positive melanoma cells. These results indicate that the endogenous IL-1 system is functional in most human melanoma, and interrupting its signaling inhibits the growth of IL-1-positive melanoma cells. PMID:21954434

  3. Identification of Exogenous Forms of Human-Tropic Porcine Endogenous Retrovirus in Miniature Swine

    PubMed Central

    Wood, James C.; Quinn, Gary; Suling, Kristen M.; Oldmixon, Beth A.; Van Tine, Brian A.; Cina, Robert; Arn, Scott; Huang, Christine A.; Scobie, Linda; Onions, David E.; Sachs, David H.; Schuurman, Henk-Jan; Fishman, Jay A.; Patience, Clive

    2004-01-01

    The replication of porcine endogenous retrovirus subgroup A (PERV-A) and PERV-B in certain human cell lines indicates that PERV may pose an infectious risk in clinical xenotransplantation. We have previously reported that human-tropic PERVs isolated from infected human cells following cocultivation with miniature swine peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) are recombinants of PERV-A with PERV-C. Here, we report that these recombinants are exogenous viruses in miniature swine; i.e., they are not present in the germ line DNA. These viruses were invariably present in miniature swine that transmitted PERV to human cells and were also identified in some miniature swine that lacked this ability. These data, together with the demonstration of the absence of both replication-competent PERV-A and recombinant PERV-A/C loci in the genome of miniature swine (L. Scobie, S. Taylor, J. C. Wood, K. M. Suling, G. Quinn, C. Patience, H.-J. Schuurman, and D. E. Onions, J. Virol. 78:2502-2509, 2004), indicate that exogenous PERV is the principal source of human-tropic virus in these animals. Interestingly, strong expression of PERV-C in PBMC correlated with an ability of the PBMC to transmit PERV-A/C recombinants in vitro, indicating that PERV-C may be an important factor affecting the production of human-tropic PERV. In light of these observations, the safety of clinical xenotransplantation from miniature swine will be most enhanced by the utilization of source animals that do not transmit PERV to either human or porcine cells. Such animals were identified within the miniature swine herd and may further enhance the safety of clinical xenotransplantation. PMID:14963150

  4. Endogenous myelin basic protein-serum factors (MBP-SFs) in Lewis rats. Evidence for their heterogeneity and reactivity with anti-MBP antibodies of different affinities.

    PubMed

    Day, E D; Varitek, V A; Paterson, P Y

    1981-01-01

    MBP-SF, previously described as an endogenous myelin basic protein-serum factor in Lewis rats with a suggested function as a neuroautotolerogen, appears not to be a single factor but a heterogeneous collection of serum factors (MBP-SFs), most probably small fragments of MBP, each cross-reactive with a different region of the multideterminant parent molecule. The heterogeneity of the MBP-SFs in any serum sample is defined and limited by the spectrum of binding affinities of the antibody populations represented in a given reagent anti-MBP antiserum. Some samples of normal Lewis rat serum have been found to contain high affinity MBP-SFs which coexist with low affinity anti-MBP antibodies whereas other sera have shown the reversed pattern, viz. low affinity MBP-SFs and high affinity antibodies. Additional sera have been found to contain MBP-SFs of several different affinities. In time-course studies of rats sensitized to neuroantigen-adjuvant a variety of MBP-SFs and anti-MBP antibodies of different affinities may be observed in sequentially collected sera from a given animal. In no animal has any serum sample been found to contain the full spectrum of MBP-SFs. Although some MBP-SFs have been found to increase temporarily during the 2nd week after neuroantigen/CFA sensitization, all MBP-SFs tend to disappear in the 2nd week and to be replaced by anti-MBP antibodies of differing affinities 3-4 weeks following sensitization.

  5. Assessment of Potential Cross-Reactivity of Human Endogenous Matrix Metalloproteinases with Collagenase Clostridium histolyticum Antibodies in Human Sera Obtained from Patients with Dupuytren's Contracture

    PubMed Central

    Edkins, Thomas J.; Koller-Eichhorn, Roland; Alhadeff, Jack A.; Mayer, Ulrich; Faust, Heinrich

    2012-01-01

    Collagenase Clostridium histolyticum (CCH) contains a fixed ratio of class I (AUX-I) and class II (AUX-II) collagenases and is used as treatment for Dupuytren's contracture. These two Zn-dependent enzymes, produced by the Gram-positive bacterium Clostridium histolyticum, are related functionally to matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) which, among other functions, degrade the extracellular matrix. Since AUX-I and AUX-II exhibit sequence similarities to human MMPs, we assessed MMP-1 (interstitial collagenase), MMP-2 (gelatinase A), MMP-3 (stromelysin 1), MMP-8 (collagenase 2), and MMP-13 (collagenase 3) for cross-reactivity with anti-AUX-I and anti-AUX-II antibodies in patient serum. Serum samples from 71 subjects enrolled in a long-term clinical study (58 males and 13 females; 63 ± 10 years old [mean ± standard error]) were evaluated for cross-reactivity with the five MMPs using the two validated enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays (ELISAs). Inhibition cutoff points for anti-AUX-I and anti-AUX-II antibodies were based on assay inhibition obtained with a nonspecific protein, bovine gamma globulin, which was tested for each clinical sample. No MMP cross-reactivity was found for any of the 71 clinical antibody-positive sera evaluated. Sequence identity assessments indicated minimal, nonmeaningful alignments of the MMPs and AUX-I/AUX-II. Furthermore, clinical adverse event assessments indicated no safety signals related to MMP inhibition. The bioanalytical results, sequence identity, and clinical assessments consistently did not demonstrate cross-reactivity between CCH antidrug antibodies and endogenous human matrix metalloproteinases. The results presented here suggest that treatment of Dupuytren's contracture patients with CCH does not lead to any clinical adverse events associated with MMP inhibition. PMID:22357647

  6. Acute Consumption of Flavan-3-ol-Enriched Dark Chocolate Affects Human Endogenous Metabolism.

    PubMed

    Ostertag, Luisa M; Philo, Mark; Colquhoun, Ian J; Tapp, Henri S; Saha, Shikha; Duthie, Garry G; Kemsley, E Kate; de Roos, Baukje; Kroon, Paul A; Le Gall, Gwénaëlle

    2017-07-07

    Flavan-3-ols and methylxanthines have potential beneficial effects on human health including reducing cardiovascular risk. We performed a randomized controlled crossover intervention trial to assess the acute effects of consumption of flavan-3-ol-enriched dark chocolate, compared with standard dark chocolate and white chocolate, on the human metabolome. We assessed the metabolome in urine and blood plasma samples collected before and at 2 and 6 h after consumption of chocolates in 42 healthy volunteers using a nontargeted metabolomics approach. Plasma samples were assessed and showed differentiation between time points with no further separation among the three chocolate treatments. Multivariate statistics applied to urine samples could readily separate the postprandial time points and distinguish between the treatments. Most of the markers responsible for the multivariate discrimination between the chocolates were of dietary origin. Interestingly, small but significant level changes were also observed for a subset of endogenous metabolites. (1)H NMR revealed that flavan-3-ol-enriched dark chocolate and standard dark chocolate reduced urinary levels of creatinine, lactate, some amino acids, and related degradation products and increased the levels of pyruvate and 4-hydroxyphenylacetate, a phenolic compound of bacterial origin. This study demonstrates that an acute chocolate intervention can significantly affect human metabolism.

  7. Expression of the endogenous, nicotinic acetylcholine receptor ligand, SLURP-1, in human colon cancer.

    PubMed

    Pettersson, A; Nordlander, S; Nylund, G; Khorram-Manesh, A; Nordgren, S; Delbro, D S

    2008-10-01

    1. Secreted mammalian Ly-6/urokinase plasminogen activator receptor-related protein-1 (SLURP-1) is a recently discovered endogenous ligand at the alpha7 subunit of the nicotinic acetylcholine receptors. Previous reports have shown that SLURP-1 is expressed in normal human keratinocytes seemingly with a pro-apoptotic function. Conversely, such expression was markedly attenuated in transformed cells and it was suggested that the molecule could convey protection against malignant transformation. 2. In this study, we demonstrated the mRNA expression (by RT-PCR) and protein expression (by Western blotting and immunocytochemistry) of SLURP-1 in the human colon cancer cell line, HT-29. 3. Furthermore, we demonstrated the expression of SLURP-1 (by immunohistochemistry) in tumour cells of human colon cancer tissue, and, to a greater extent, in immune and smooth muscle cells of adjacent, macroscopically tumour-free colon tissue. 4. The current findings suggest that SLURP-1 participates in the regulation of gut immune functions and motility, as well as possibly playing a role in colon carcinogenesis/cancer progression.

  8. Radiation-induced human endogenous retrovirus (HERV)-R env gene expression by epigenetic control.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ja-Rang; Ahn, Kung; Kim, Yun-Ji; Jung, Yi-Deun; Kim, Heui-Soo

    2012-11-01

    It is commonly accepted that ionizing radiation induces genomic instability by changes in genomic structure, epigenetic regulation and gene expression. Human endogenous retroviruses (HERV)-R also are often differentially expressed between normal and disease tissues under unstable genomic conditions and are implicated in the pathogenesis of several human diseases. To understand the influence of ionizing radiation on HERV-R expression, we performed quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analyses using γ-irradiated normal human cells. Compared to nonirradiated cells, HERV-R expression was up-regulated in γ-irradiated cells. The regulatory mechanism of HERV-R expression in irradiated cells was investigated by methylation analyses of HERV-R 5'LTRs and treatment with garcinol. These data indicated that the up-regulated transcription of HERV-R may be regulated by radiation-induced epigenetic changes induced by histone modification, and thus could be of great importance for understanding the relationship between radiation-induced biological effects and transposable elements.

  9. A contaminant-free assessment of Endogenous Retroviral RNA in human plasma

    PubMed Central

    Karamitros, Timokratis; Paraskevis, Dimitrios; Hatzakis, Angelos; Psichogiou, Mina; Elefsiniotis, Ioannis; Hurst, Tara; Geretti, Anna-Maria; Beloukas, Apostolos; Frater, John; Klenerman, Paul; Katzourakis, Aris; Magiorkinis, Gkikas

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) comprise 6–8% of the human genome. HERVs are silenced in most normal tissues, up-regulated in stem cells and in placenta but also in cancer and HIV-1 infection. Crucially, there are conflicting reports on detecting HERV RNA in non-cellular clinical samples such as plasma that suggest the study of HERV RNA can be daunting. Indeed, we find that the use of real-time PCR in a quality assured clinical laboratory setting can be sensitive to low-level proviral contamination. We developed a mathematical model for low-level contamination that allowed us to design a laboratory protocol and standard operating procedures for robust measurement of HERV RNA. We focus on one family, HERV-K HML-2 (HK2) that has been most recently active even though they invaded our ancestral genomes almost 30 millions ago. We extensively validated our experimental design on a model cell culture system showing high sensitivity and specificity, totally eliminating the proviral contamination. We then tested 236 plasma samples from patients infected with HIV-1, HCV or HBV and found them to be negative. The study of HERV RNA for human translational studies should be performed with extensively validated protocols and standard operating procedures to control the widespread low-level human DNA contamination. PMID:27640347

  10. Human erythrocytes inhibit complement-mediated solubilization of immune complexes by human serum

    SciTech Connect

    Dorval, B.L.

    1987-01-01

    The aim of this study was to develop an autologus human system to evaluate the effects of human erythrocytes on solubilization of immune complex precipitates (IC) by human serum. Incubation of IC with fresh human serum or guinea pig serum resulted in solubilization of IC. When packed erythrocytes were added to human serum or guinea pig serum binding of IC to the erythrocyte occurred and IC solubilization was inhibited significantly (p <.025). Sheep erythrocytes did not bind IC or inhibit IC solubilization. To evaluate the role of human erythrocyte complement receptor (CR1) on these findings, human erythrocytes were treated with trypsin or anti-CR1 antibodies. Both treatments abrogated IC binding to human erythrocytes but did not affect the ability of the human erythrocyte to inhibit IC solubilization. Radioimmunoassay was used to measure C3, C4 and C5 activation in human serum after incubation with IC, human erythrocytes, human erythrocytes plus IC, whole blood or in whole blood plus IC.

  11. Activation of the estrogen receptor by human serum extracts containing mixtures of perfluorinated alkyl acids from pregnant women.

    PubMed

    Bjerregaard-Olesen, Christian; Ghisari, Mandana; Bonefeld-Jørgensen, Eva C

    2016-11-01

    Humans are exposed to a wide variety of perfluorinated alkyl acids (PFAAs). Several studies have found xenoestrogenic activity of single PFAAs. Studies on mixture effects of the PFAAs are however sparse. In the present study, we aimed to determine the xenoestrogenic activity in human serum extracts containing mixtures of PFAAs. Recently we developed a method to extract the PFAAs from human serum with simultaneous removal of endogenous hormones and interfering steroid metabolites. We used this method to extract the PFAAs from serum of 397 Danish nulliparous pregnant women followed by analysis of estrogen receptor (ER) transactivation using MVLN cells carrying an estrogen response element luciferase reporter vector. Using 17β-estradiol (E2) concentration-transactivation curves, we calculated the estradiol equivalents (EEQ) for the extracts containing the PFAAs. Fifty-two percent of the PFAA serum extracts agonized the ER transactivation, and 46% enhanced the E2-induced ER transactivation. We found positive linear concentration-response associations between the ER transactivation and the PFAA serum levels. For the relatively few PFAA extracts that antagonized the ER in the presence of 24 pM E2 (n=38, 10%), we found inverse linear associations between the ER transactivation and the PFAA serum levels. The results indicated that the serum extracts induced the ER in a non-monotonic concentration dependent manner. The median EEQ of the extracts containing the PFAAs corresponds to the effect of 0.5pg E2 per mL serum. In conclusion, we observed that most of the extracts containing the PFAA mixtures from pregnant women's serum agonized the ER and enhanced the E2-induced effects in non-monotonic concentration-dependent manners. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. lnCeDB: database of human long noncoding RNA acting as competing endogenous RNA.

    PubMed

    Das, Shaoli; Ghosal, Suman; Sen, Rituparno; Chakrabarti, Jayprokas

    2014-01-01

    Long noncoding RNA (lncRNA) influences post-transcriptional regulation by interfering with the microRNA (miRNA) pathways, acting as competing endogenous RNA (ceRNA). These lncRNAs have miRNA responsive elements (MRE) in them, and control endogenous miRNAs available for binding with their target mRNAs, thus reducing the repression of these mRNAs. lnCeDB provides a database of human lncRNAs (from GENCODE 19 version) that can potentially act as ceRNAs. The putative mRNA targets of human miRNAs and the targets mapped to AGO clipped regions are collected from TargetScan and StarBase respectively. The lncRNA targets of human miRNAs (up to GENCODE 11) are downloaded from miRCode database. miRNA targets on the rest of the GENCODE 19 lncRNAs are predicted by our algorithm for finding seed-matched target sites. These putative miRNA-lncRNA interactions are mapped to the Ago interacting regions within lncRNAs. To find out the likelihood of an lncRNA-mRNA pair for actually being ceRNA we take recourse to two methods. First, a ceRNA score is calculated from the ratio of the number of shared MREs between the pair with the total number of MREs of the individual candidate gene. Second, the P-value for each ceRNA pair is determined by hypergeometric test using the number of shared miRNAs between the ceRNA pair against the number of miRNAs interacting with the individual RNAs. Typically, in a pair of RNAs being targeted by common miRNA(s), there should be a correlation of expression so that the increase in level of one ceRNA results in the increased level of the other ceRNA. Near-equimolar concentration of the competing RNAs is associated with more profound ceRNA effect. In lnCeDB one can not only browse for lncRNA-mRNA pairs having common targeting miRNAs, but also compare the expression of the pair in 22 human tissues to estimate the chances of the pair for actually being ceRNAs. Downloadable freely from http://gyanxet-beta.com/lncedb/.

  13. Impact of Catheter Arteriography on the Serum Level of Asymmetric Dimethylarginine, an Endogenous Inhibitor of Nitric Oxide Synthase

    SciTech Connect

    Bozlar, Ugur Ugurel, Mehmet Sahin; Ozcan, Omer; Cakir, Erdinc; Ustunsoz, Bahri; Ucoz, Taner; Bilgi, Cumhur; Somuncu, Ibrahim

    2008-05-15

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the instantaneous impact of catheter arteriography on blood asymmetric dimethylarginine (ADMA) levels in accordance with patient- and procedure-related variables. Sixty-eight patients (16 women, 52 men; mean age, 45.6 {+-} 20.1 years; range, 20-79 years) referred for cerebral or peripheral catheter arteriography were recruited for the study. Pre- and postarteriography arterial blood ADMA levels were determined by high-performance liquid chromatographic technique. Type of nonionic iodinated contrast media used, duration of procedure, patient gender, and patient age were noted and evaluated as possible factors that could influence serum ADMA levels in arteriography procedures. Prearteriography ADMA levels decreased significantly after arteriography in general (pre, 1.16 {+-} 0.96 {mu}mol/L; post, 1.08 {+-} 0.80 {mu}mol/L; p = 0.002). Males tended to have lower postarteriography serum ADMA levels (p = 0.005). Serum ADMA levels tended to get lower after peripheral arteriography procedures (p = 0.005) and when iohexol, 350 mg I/ml, was used as the contrast agent (p = 0.017). In conclusion, ADMA level does not seem to be subject to acute elevation after catheter arteriography; on the contrary, its level may decrease in general. Moreover, a reduction in serum ADMA level may be expected, especially in male patients, in patients who undergo a peripheral arteriography procedure, or when iohexol, 350 mg I/ml, is used as the contrast agent.

  14. Isolation of human anti-serum albumin Fab antibodies with an extended serum-half life.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hyeon-Ju; Kim, Hye-Jin; Cha, Sang-Hoon

    2016-01-01

    The serum albumin (SA) has been exploited to generate long-acting biotherapeutics by taking advantage of the FcRn-mediated recycling mechanism in a direct or an indirect way. Since Fab fragments have been proven to be clinically safe for human usage, we assumed that human anti-SA Fab antibodies could have a great potential as a carrier molecule to extend the serum half-life of therapeutic proteins. We, herein, had attempted to isolate anti-SA Fab antibodies from HuDVFab-8L antibody library via a phage display technology, and identified eight discrete human Fab antibodies. One of the Fab antibodies, SL335, showed the strongest binding reactivity to human SA with nM range of affinity at both pH 6 and pH 7.4, and cross-reacted to SAs from various species including rat, mouse, canine and monkey. The in vivo pharmacokinetic assay using a rat model indicated that SL335 has approximately 10 fold longer serum half-life and 26 to 44-fold increase in AUC0 → ∞ compared to the negative control Fab molecule in both intravenous and subcutaneous administrations. Knowing that Fabs have proven to be safe in clinics for a long time, SL335 seems to have a great potential in generating long-acting protein drugs by tagging effector molecules with either chemical conjugation or genetic fusion.

  15. Dried Plum Ingestion Increases the Osteoblastogenic Capacity of Human Serum.

    PubMed

    Delgado Cuenca, Paulina; Almaiman, Lama; Schenk, Simon; Kern, Mark; Hooshmand, Shirin

    2017-07-01

    In cell culture studies, dried plum (Prunus domestica L.) polyphenols increased osteoblast alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity, mineralized nodule formation, and the expression of the bone marker genes runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX2) and osterix. The purpose of this study was to determine whether human serum collected 1 and 2 h after dried plum ingestion influenced osteoblast cell activity and gene expression. Five healthy women ingested 100 g of dried plum, and serum samples were collected at baseline (before dried plum ingestion) and 1 and 2 h postingestion of dried plum. MC3T3-E1 osteoblast cells were treated (2% of medium) with these serum samples for 3 or 9 days. Intracellular and extracellular ALP activities were significantly increased after 3 or 9 days of treatment with serum both postingestion time points, with no effect seen in baseline samples. Also, serum obtained 1 and 2 h postingestion significantly increased the mRNA expression of bone markers RUNX2 and connexin43 (CX43) after both 3 and 9 days of incubation periods. Finally, serum obtained 1 and 2 h postingestion increased the mRNA expression of β-catenin after 9 days of incubation. We conclude that osteoblast activity and function are increased by dried plum ingestion, which may, in part, explain its beneficial effects on bone health.

  16. Opium and heroin alter biochemical parameters of human's serum.

    PubMed

    Kouros, Divsalar; Tahereh, Haghpanah; Mohammadreza, Afarinesh; Minoo, Mahmoudi Zarandi

    2010-05-01

    Iran is a significant consumer of opium, and, generally, of opioids, in the world. Addiction is one of the important issues of the 21st century and is an imperative issue in Iran. Long-term consumption of opioids affects homeostasis. To determine the effects of opium and heroin consumption on serum biochemical parameters. In a cross-sectional study, subjects who had consumed heroin (n = 35) or opium (n = 42) for more than two years and 35 nonaddict volunteers as the control group were compared in regard to various biochemical parameters such as fasting blood sugar (FBS), Na(+), K(+), Ca(2+), blood urea nitrogen (BUN), uric acid (UA), triglyceride (TG), cholesterol, creatinine, and total protein. Chromatography was used to confirm opioid consumption, and the concentration of biochemical parameters was determined by laboratory diagnostic tests on serum. No significant differences were found in Na(+), Ca(2+), BUN, UA, TG, creatinine, and total protein concentrations among the three groups. FBS, K(+), and UA levels were significantly lower in opium addicts compared to the control group. Serum Ca(2+) concentration of heroin addicts showed a significant decrease compared to that of the control group. Both addict groups showed a significant decrease in serum cholesterol levels. Chronic use of opium and heroin can change serum FBS, K(+), Ca(2+), UA, and cholesterol. This study, one of few on the effects of opium on serum biochemical parameters in human subjects, has the potential to contribute to the investigation of new approaches for further basic studies.

  17. Inhibitory capacity of human serum on induced microsomal lipoperoxidation.

    PubMed

    Hicks, J J; Medina-Navarro, R

    1995-01-01

    The capacity of human serum for inhibiting in vitro the membrane lipoperoxidation induced by a controlled system (ADP/NADPH + H+/Fe3+) was demonstrated. A concentration of 8 nmol of malondialdehyde was produced in 20 min in rat liver microsomes (1.5 mg of protein) after exposure to an induced lipoperoxidation mixture. Addition of 100 microliters (13.89 mg of protein) of human serum decreased malondialdehyde production nearly 50%. An increase of 25.97% of the inhibitory capacity of serum was obtained by the in vitro addition of 10 microliters/ml of vitamin E. Ten volunteers were supplemented with 400 mg of vitamin E and 1 g of vitamin C/daily for 2 weeks. Their serum inhibitory capacity increased in 12% (p < 0.05). The serum inhibitory capacity for microsomal lipoperoxidation is described herein, and we propose its utilization as an index to determine the individual nonspecific antioxidative defenses against free radical injury and lipoperoxidation in relation to exposure to air pollutants, tobacco smoke, and several acute and chronic diseases, including the hypoxia-reperfusion phenomena.

  18. Targeted quantification of low ng/mL level proteins in human serum without immunoaffinity depletion

    SciTech Connect

    Shi, Tujin; Sun, Xuefei; Gao, Yuqian; Fillmore, Thomas L.; Schepmoes, Athena A.; Zhao, Rui; He, Jintang; Moore, Ronald J.; Kagan, Jacob; Rodland, Karin D.; Liu, Tao; Liu, Alvin Y.; Smith, Richard D.; Tang, Keqi; Camp, David G.; Qian, Weijun

    2013-07-05

    We recently reported an antibody-free targeted protein quantification strategy, termed high-pressure, high-resolution separations with intelligent selection and multiplexing (PRISM) for achieving significantly enhanced sensitivity using selected reaction monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry. Integrating PRISM with front-end IgY14 immunoaffinity depletion, sensitive detection of targeted proteins at 50-100 pg/mL levels in human blood plasma/serum was demonstrated. However, immunoaffinity depletion is often associated with undesired losses of target proteins of interest. Herein we report further evaluation of PRISM-SRM quantification of low-abundance serum proteins without immunoaffinity depletion and the multiplexing potential of this technique. Limits of quantification (LOQs) at low ng/mL levels with a median CV of ~12% were achieved for proteins spiked into human female serum using as little as 2 µL serum. PRISM-SRM provided up to ~1000-fold improvement in the LOQ when compared to conventional SRM measurements. Multiplexing capability of PRISM-SRM was also evaluated by two sets of serum samples with 6 and 21 target peptides spiked at the low attomole/µL levels. The results from SRM measurements for pooled or post-concatenated samples were comparable to those obtained from individual peptide fractions in terms of signal-to-noise ratios and SRM peak area ratios of light to heavy peptides. PRISM-SRM was applied to measure several ng/mL-level endogenous plasma proteins, including prostate-specific antigen, in clinical patient sera where correlation coefficients > 0.99 were observed between the results from PRISM-SRM and ELISA assays. Our results demonstrate that PRISM-SRM can be successfully used for quantification of low-abundance endogenous proteins in highly complex samples. Moderate throughput (50 samples/week) can be achieved by applying the post-concatenation or fraction multiplexing strategies. We anticipate broad applications for targeted PRISM

  19. The purification and properties of ferritin from human serum.

    PubMed Central

    Worwood, M; Dawkins, S; Wagstaff, M; Jacobs, A

    1976-01-01

    1. Ferritin has been isolated from the serum of four patients with iron overload by using two methods. 2. In method A, the serum was adjusted to pH 4.8 and heated to 70 degrees C. After removal of denatured protein, ferritin was concentrated and further purified by ion-exchange chromatography and gel filtration. In most cases, only a partial purification was achieved. 3. In method B, ferritin was extracted from the serum with a column of immuno-adsorbent [anti-(human ferritin)] and released from the column with 3M-KSCN. Further purification was achieved by anion-exchange chromatography followed by the removal of remaining contaminating serum proteins by means of a second immunoadsorbent. Purifications of up to 31 000-fold were achieved, and the homogeneity of the final preparations was demonstrated by polyacrylamide-gel electrophoresis. 4. Serum ferritin purified by either method has the same elution volume as human spleen ferritin on gel filtration on Sephadex G-200. Serum ferritin has a relatively low iron content and iron/protein ratios of 0.023 and 0.067 (mug of Fe/mug of protein) were found in two pure preparations. On anion-exchange chromatography serum ferritin has a low affinity for the column when compared with various tissue ferritins. Isoelectric focusing has demonstrated the presence of a high proportion of isoferritins of relatively high pI. 5. Possible mechanisms for the release of ferritin into the circulation are briefly discussed. Images PLATE 2 PLATE 1 PMID:962866

  20. Endogenous Protein Interactome of Human UDP-Glucuronosyltransferases Exposed by Untargeted Proteomics

    PubMed Central

    Rouleau, Michèle; Audet-Delage, Yannick; Desjardins, Sylvie; Rouleau, Mélanie; Girard-Bock, Camille; Guillemette, Chantal

    2017-01-01

    The conjugative metabolism mediated by UDP-glucuronosyltransferase enzymes (UGTs) significantly influences the bioavailability and biological responses of endogenous molecule substrates and xenobiotics including drugs. UGTs participate in the regulation of cellular homeostasis by limiting stress induced by toxic molecules, and by controlling hormonal signaling networks. Glucuronidation is highly regulated at genomic, transcriptional, post-transcriptional and post-translational levels. However, the UGT protein interaction network, which is likely to influence glucuronidation, has received little attention. We investigated the endogenous protein interactome of human UGT1A enzymes in main drug metabolizing non-malignant tissues where UGT expression is most prevalent, using an unbiased proteomics approach. Mass spectrometry analysis of affinity-purified UGT1A enzymes and associated protein complexes in liver, kidney and intestine tissues revealed an intricate interactome linking UGT1A enzymes to multiple metabolic pathways. Several proteins of pharmacological importance such as transferases (including UGT2 enzymes), transporters and dehydrogenases were identified, upholding a potential coordinated cellular response to small lipophilic molecules and drugs. Furthermore, a significant cluster of functionally related enzymes involved in fatty acid β-oxidation, as well as in the glycolysis and glycogenolysis pathways were enriched in UGT1A enzymes complexes. Several partnerships were confirmed by co-immunoprecipitations and co-localization by confocal microscopy. An enhanced accumulation of lipid droplets in a kidney cell model overexpressing the UGT1A9 enzyme supported the presence of a functional interplay. Our work provides unprecedented evidence for a functional interaction between glucuronidation and bioenergetic metabolism. PMID:28217095

  1. Endogenous Opioid Mechanisms Are Implicated in Obesity and Weight Loss in Humans.

    PubMed

    Burghardt, Paul R; Rothberg, Amy E; Dykhuis, Kate E; Burant, Charles F; Zubieta, Jon-Kar

    2015-08-01

    Successful long-term weight loss is challenging. Brain endogenous opioid systems regulate associated processes; however, their role in the maintenance of weight loss has not been adequately explored in humans. In a preliminary study, the objective was to assess central μ-opioid receptor (MOR) system involvement in eating behaviors and their relationship to long-term maintenance of weight loss. This was a case-control study with follow-up of the treatment group at 1 year after intervention. The study was conducted at a tertiary care university medical center. Lean healthy (n = 7) and chronically obese (n = 7) men matched for age and ethnicity participated in the study. MOR availability measures were acquired with positron emission tomography and [(11)C]carfentanil. Lean healthy men were scanned twice under both fasted and fed conditions. Obese men were placed on a very low-calorie diet to achieve 15% weight loss from baseline weight and underwent two positron emission tomography scans before and two after weight loss, incorporating both fasted and fed states. Brain MOR availability and activation were measured by reductions in MOR availability (nondisplaceable binding potential) from the fed compared with the fasted-state scans. Baseline MOR nondisplaceable binding potential was reduced in obese compared with the lean and partially recovered obese after weight loss in regions that regulate homeostatic, hedonic, and emotional responses to feeding. Reductions in negative affect and feeding-induced MOR system activation in the right temporal pole were highly correlated in leans but not in obese men. A trend for an association between MOR activation in the right temporal pole before weight loss and weight regain 1 year was found. Although these preliminary studies have a small sample size, these results suggest that obesity and diet-induced weight loss impact central MOR binding and endogenous opioid system function. MOR system activation in response to an acute meal

  2. Activation and regulation of endogenous retroviral genes in the human pituitary gland and related endocrine tumours.

    PubMed

    Buslei, Rolf; Strissel, Pamela L; Henke, Christine; Schey, Regina; Lang, Nadine; Ruebner, Matthias; Stolt, Claus C; Fabry, Ben; Buchfelder, Michael; Strick, Reiner

    2015-02-01

    Adenohypophysis (AH) hormone-producing cells represent the origin of diverse groups of pituitary adenomas (PA). Deregulation of hypothalamic hormone receptors, growth factors and cAMP signalling have been implicated in the aetiology of PA. Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs) are derived from past exogenous retroviral infections and represent more than 8% of the human genome. Some ERV genes encode open reading frames and produce functional proteins, for example, the ERVW-1 envelope gene Syncytin-1, essential for placentogenesis, but also deregulated in human tumours. Data concerning ERV expression in the AH and related endocrine tumours are missing. Syncytin-1 protein was analysed in normal AH (n = 15) and compared with five PA subtypes (n = 117) by immunohistochemistry. Absolute gene expression of 20 ERV functional envelope genes and ERVW-5 gag was measured. PA tissues were examined for Syncytin-1 and the cAMP signalling marker phospho-CREB-Ser133 using immunohistochemistry. Isolated primary human PA cells were treated with different hormones. Murine embryonic and adult pituitary gland ERV expressions were compared with human AH. Syncytin-1 protein colocalized with corticotropic cells of AH. In contrast, all PA demonstrated significant Syncytin-1 protein overexpression, supporting deregulation. All other ERV genes showed significant up-regulations in different PA subtypes. Phospho-CREB-Ser133 and Syncytin-1 colocalized in PA cells. Cultivated primary PA cells with ACTH or CRH induced their respective receptors and ERV genes. Syncytin-A/-B, murine orthologues to human Syncytin-1/-2, localized to embryonic and adult pituitary glands demonstrating functional mammalian conservation. Deregulated ERV genes may contribute to PA development via cAMP signalling. © 2014 British Neuropathological Society.

  3. Foetal bovine serum-derived exosomes affect yield and phenotype of human cardiac progenitor cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Angelini, Francesco; Ionta, Vittoria; Rossi, Fabrizio; Miraldi, Fabio; Messina, Elisa; Giacomello, Alessandro

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) represent a powerful tool in cardiac regenerative medicine. Pre-clinical studies suggest that most of the beneficial effects promoted by the injected cells are due to their paracrine activity exerted on endogenous cells and tissue. Exosomes are candidate mediators of this paracrine effects. According to their potential, many researchers have focused on characterizing exosomes derived from specific cell types, but, up until now, only few studies have analyzed the possible in vitro effects of bovine serum-derived exosomes on cell proliferation or differentiation. Methods: The aim of this study was to analyse, from a qualitative and quantitative point of view, the in vitro effects of bovine serum exosomes on human CPCs cultured either as cardiospheres or as monolayers of cardiosphere-forming cells. Results: Effects on proliferation, yield and molecular patterning were detected. We show, for the first time, that exogenous bovine exosomes support the proliferation and migration of human cardiosphere-forming cells, and that their depletion affects cardiospheres formation, in terms of size, yield and extra-cellular matrix production. Conclusion: These results stress the importance of considering differential biological effects of exogenous cell culture supplements on the final phenotype of primary human cell cultures. PMID:27340620

  4. Profiling human serum antibodies with a carbohydrate antigen microarray

    PubMed Central

    Oyelaran, Oyindasola; McShane, Lisa M.; Dodd, Lori; Gildersleeve, Jeffrey C.

    2009-01-01

    Carbohydrate antigen arrays (glycan arrays) have been recently developed for the high-throughput analysis of carbohydrate macromolecule interactions. When profiling serum, information about experimental variability, inter-individual biological variability, and intra-individual temporal variability is critical. In this report, we describe the characterization of a carbohydrate antigen array and assay for profiling human serum. Through optimization of assay conditions and development of a normalization strategy, we obtain highly reproducible results with a within-experiment coefficient of variation (CV) of 10.8% and an overall CV (across multiple batches of slides and days) of 28.5%. We also report antibody profiles for 48 human subjects and evaluate for the first time the effects of age, race, sex, geographic location, and blood type on antibody profiles for a large set of carbohydrate antigens. We found significant dependence on age and blood type of antibody levels for a variety of carbohydrates. Finally, we conducted a longitudinal study with a separate group of 7 serum donors to evaluate the variation in anti-carbohydrate antibody levels within an individual over a period ranging from 3 to 13 weeks and found that, for nearly all antigens on our array, antibody levels are generally stable over this period. The results presented here provide the most comprehensive evaluation of experimental and biological variation reported to date for a glycan array and have significant implications for studies involving human serum profiling. PMID:19624168

  5. Autoimmune anti-androgen-receptor antibodies in human serum.

    PubMed Central

    Liao, S; Witte, D

    1985-01-01

    Circulating autoantibodies to human and rat androgen receptors are present at high titers in the blood sera of some patients with prostate diseases. The antibodies from some serum samples were associated with a purified IgG fraction and interacted with the 3.8S cytosolic androgen-receptor complexes of rat ventral prostate to form 9- to 12S units. Other serum samples, however, formed 14- to 19S units, suggesting that other immunoglobulins might be involved. In the presence of an anti-human immunoglobulin as a second antibody, the androgen-receptor-antibody complexes could be immunoprecipitated. The antibodies interacted with the nuclear and the cytosolic androgen-receptor complexes, either the DNA-binding or the nonbinding form, but not with receptors for estradiol, progestin, or dexamethasone from a variety of sources. Human testosterone/estradiol-binding globulin, rat epididymal androgen-binding protein, or rat prostate alpha-protein (a nonreceptor steroid-binding protein) also did not interact with the antibodies to form immunoprecipitates. About 37% of male and 3% of female serum samples screened had significant antibody titer. The chance of finding serum with a high titer is much better in males older than 66 years than in the younger males or females at all ages. The presence of the high-titer antibodies may make it possible to prepare monoclonal antibodies to androgen receptors without purification of the receptors for immunization. PMID:3866227

  6. Influence of White and Gray Matter Connections on Endogenous Human Cortical Oscillations.

    PubMed

    Hawasli, Ammar H; Kim, DoHyun; Ledbetter, Noah M; Dahiya, Sonika; Barbour, Dennis L; Leuthardt, Eric C

    2016-01-01

    Brain oscillations reflect changes in electrical potentials summated across neuronal populations. Low- and high-frequency rhythms have different modulation patterns. Slower rhythms are spatially broad, while faster rhythms are more local. From this observation, we hypothesized that low- and high-frequency oscillations reflect white- and gray-matter communications, respectively, and synchronization between low-frequency phase with high-frequency amplitude represents a mechanism enabling distributed brain-networks to coordinate local processing. Testing this common understanding, we selectively disrupted white or gray matter connections to human cortex while recording surface field potentials. Counter to our original hypotheses, we found that cortex consists of independent oscillatory-units (IOUs) that maintain their own complex endogenous rhythm structure. IOUs are differentially modulated by white and gray matter connections. White-matter connections maintain topographical anatomic heterogeneity (i.e., separable processing in cortical space) and gray-matter connections segregate cortical synchronization patterns (i.e., separable temporal processing through phase-power coupling). Modulation of distinct oscillatory modules enables the functional diversity necessary for complex processing in the human brain.

  7. Influence of White and Gray Matter Connections on Endogenous Human Cortical Oscillations

    PubMed Central

    Hawasli, Ammar H.; Kim, DoHyun; Ledbetter, Noah M.; Dahiya, Sonika; Barbour, Dennis L.; Leuthardt, Eric C.

    2016-01-01

    Brain oscillations reflect changes in electrical potentials summated across neuronal populations. Low- and high-frequency rhythms have different modulation patterns. Slower rhythms are spatially broad, while faster rhythms are more local. From this observation, we hypothesized that low- and high-frequency oscillations reflect white- and gray-matter communications, respectively, and synchronization between low-frequency phase with high-frequency amplitude represents a mechanism enabling distributed brain-networks to coordinate local processing. Testing this common understanding, we selectively disrupted white or gray matter connections to human cortex while recording surface field potentials. Counter to our original hypotheses, we found that cortex consists of independent oscillatory-units (IOUs) that maintain their own complex endogenous rhythm structure. IOUs are differentially modulated by white and gray matter connections. White-matter connections maintain topographical anatomic heterogeneity (i.e., separable processing in cortical space) and gray-matter connections segregate cortical synchronization patterns (i.e., separable temporal processing through phase-power coupling). Modulation of distinct oscillatory modules enables the functional diversity necessary for complex processing in the human brain. PMID:27445767

  8. Partial characterization of a novel endogenous opioid in human cerebrospinal fluid

    SciTech Connect

    Miller, B.E.; Lipman, J.J.; Byrne, W.L.

    1987-12-07

    Human cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) contains many uncharacterized endogenous opioids, in addition to the known enkephalins, endorphins, and dynorphins. These opioids may be separated by gel filtration chromatography and identified by radioreceptor assay for opioid activity. One region of the chromatographic elution profile, designated Peak B has previously been shown to be related to the pain status of chronic pain patients. The authors now report that human Peak B isolated from the CSF of pain-free elective surgery patients is present at a typical concentration equivalent in activity to 1.4 pmol of morphine sulfate per ml of CSF measured by radioreceptor assay. At a dose of 0.06 and 0.12 pmol morphine sulfate equivalents of CSF (MSE), injected into the cerebroventricular system of the mouse, Peak B produced an antinociceptive effect, the intensity and duration of which was dose-dependent and which was antagonized by naloxone. The mouse vas deferens (MVD) preparation was inhibited by Peak B in a manner that was sensitive to antagonism by naloxone only at low (< 1.0 ..mu..M) but not at higher (>6.0 ..mu..M) concentrations of the antagonist. Peak B activity in the MVD assay was unaffected by treatment with trypsin or ..cap alpha..-chymotrypsin. 32 references, 4 figures, 1 table.

  9. Molecular cloning and functional characterization of the human endogenous retrovirus K113.

    PubMed

    Beimforde, Nadine; Hanke, Kirsten; Ammar, Ismahen; Kurth, Reinhard; Bannert, Norbert

    2008-02-05

    The human endogenous retrovirus-K113 (HERV-K113) is the most complete HERV known to date. It contains open reading frames for all viral proteins. Depending on ethnicity, up to 30% of the human population carries the provirus on chromosome 19. To facilitate molecular and functional studies, we have cloned the HERV-K113 sequence into a small plasmid vector and characterized its functional properties. Here we show that based on a substantial LTR-promoter activity, full length messenger RNA and spliced env-, rec- and 1.5 kb (hel)-transcripts are produced. The envelope protein of HERV-K113 is synthesized as an 85 kDa precursor that is found partially processed. The accessory Rec protein is highly expressed and accumulates in the nucleus. Expression analysis revealed synthesis of the Gag precursor and the protease. However, the cloned HERV-K113 provirus is not replication competent. It carries inactivating mutations in the reverse transcriptase gene. These mutations can be reversed to reconstitute the active enzyme, but the reversion is not sufficient to reconstitute replication capacity of the virus.

  10. Human endogenous retrovirus K and cancer: Innocent bystander or tumorigenic accomplice?

    PubMed

    Downey, Ronan F; Sullivan, Francis J; Wang-Johanning, Feng; Ambs, Stefan; Giles, Francis J; Glynn, Sharon A

    2015-09-15

    Harbored as relics of ancient germline infections, human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) now constitute up to 8% of our genome. A proportion of this sequence has been co-opted for molecular and cellular processes, beneficial to human physiology, such as the fusogenic activity of the envelope protein, a vital component of placentogenesis. However, the discovery of high levels of HERV-K mRNA and protein and even virions in a wide array of cancers has revealed that HERV-K may be playing a more sinister role-a role as an etiological agent in cancer itself. Whether the presence of this retroviral material is simply an epiphenomenon, or an actual causative factor, is a hotly debated topic. This review will summarize the current state of knowledge regarding HERV-K and cancer and attempt to outline the potential mechanisms by which HERV-K could be involved in the onset and promotion of carcinogenesis. © 2014 The Authors. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of UICC.

  11. Activity in the human superior colliculus relating to endogenous saccade preparation and execution

    PubMed Central

    Furlan, Michele; Smith, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    In recent years a small number of studies have applied functional imaging techniques to investigate visual responses in the human superior colliculus (SC), but few have investigated its oculomotor functions. Here, in two experiments, we examined activity associated with endogenous saccade preparation. We used 3-T fMRI to record the hemodynamic activity in the SC while participants were either preparing or executing saccadic eye movements. Our results showed that not only executing a saccade (as previously shown) but also preparing a saccade produced an increase in the SC hemodynamic activity. The saccade-related activity was observed in the contralateral and to a lesser extent the ipsilateral SC. A second experiment further examined the contralateral mapping of saccade-related activity with a larger range of saccade amplitudes. Increased activity was again observed in both the contralateral and ipsilateral SC that was evident for large as well as small saccades. This suggests that the ipsilateral component of the increase in BOLD is not due simply to small-amplitude saccades producing bilateral activity in the foveal fixation zone. These studies provide the first evidence of presaccadic preparatory activity in the human SC and reveal that fMRI can detect activity consistent with that of buildup neurons found in the deeper layers of the SC in studies of nonhuman primates. PMID:26041830

  12. Activity in the human superior colliculus relating to endogenous saccade preparation and execution.

    PubMed

    Furlan, Michele; Smith, Andrew T; Walker, Robin

    2015-08-01

    In recent years a small number of studies have applied functional imaging techniques to investigate visual responses in the human superior colliculus (SC), but few have investigated its oculomotor functions. Here, in two experiments, we examined activity associated with endogenous saccade preparation. We used 3-T fMRI to record the hemodynamic activity in the SC while participants were either preparing or executing saccadic eye movements. Our results showed that not only executing a saccade (as previously shown) but also preparing a saccade produced an increase in the SC hemodynamic activity. The saccade-related activity was observed in the contralateral and to a lesser extent the ipsilateral SC. A second experiment further examined the contralateral mapping of saccade-related activity with a larger range of saccade amplitudes. Increased activity was again observed in both the contralateral and ipsilateral SC that was evident for large as well as small saccades. This suggests that the ipsilateral component of the increase in BOLD is not due simply to small-amplitude saccades producing bilateral activity in the foveal fixation zone. These studies provide the first evidence of presaccadic preparatory activity in the human SC and reveal that fMRI can detect activity consistent with that of buildup neurons found in the deeper layers of the SC in studies of nonhuman primates.

  13. Ligand binding strategies of human serum albumin: how can the cargo be utilized?

    PubMed

    Varshney, Ankita; Sen, Priyankar; Ahmad, Ejaz; Rehan, Mohd; Subbarao, Naidu; Khan, Rizwan Hasan

    2010-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA), being the most abundant carrier protein in blood and a modern day clinical tool for drug delivery, attracts high attention among biologists. Hence, its unfolding/refolding strategies and exogenous/endogenous ligand binding preference are of immense use in therapeutics and clinical biochemistry. Among its fellow proteins albumin is known to carry almost every small molecule. Thus, it is a potential contender for being a molecular cargo/or nanovehicle for clinical, biophysical and industrial purposes. Nonetheless, its structure and function are largely regulated by various chemical and physical factors to accommodate HSA to its functional purpose. This multifunctional protein also possesses enzymatic properties which may be used to convert prodrugs to active therapeutics. This review aims to highlight current overview on the binding strategies of protein to various ligands that may be expected to lead to significant clinical applications.

  14. Quantification of retinoid concentrations in human serum and brain tumor tissues.

    PubMed

    Ali, Ramadan; Campos, Benito; Dyckhoff, Gerhard; Haefeli, Walter E; Herold-Mende, Christel; Burhenne, Jürgen

    2012-05-06

    Retinoic acid signaling is essential for central nervous system (CNS) differentiation and appears to be impaired in tumors. Thus far, there are no established methods to quantify relevant retinoids (all-trans-retinoic acid, 9-cis-retinoic acid, 13-cis retinoic acid, and retinol) in human brain tumors. We developed a single step extraction and quantification procedure for polar and apolar retinoids in normal tissue, lipid-rich brain tumor tissues, and serum. This quantification procedure is based on high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) with diode-array detection (DAD) using all-trans-acitretin as an internal standard and extraction by liquid-liquid partition with ethyl acetate and borate buffer at pH 9. Recovery with this extraction procedure was higher than earlier (two-step) liquid-liquid extraction procedures based on hexane, NaOH, and HCl. The overall quantification procedure was validated according to Food and Drug Administration (FDA) guidelines and fulfilled all criteria of accuracy, precision, selectivity, recovery, and stability. The overall method accuracy varied between -5.6% and +5.4% for serum and -3.8% and +6.2% for tissues, and overall precision ranged from 3.1% to 6.9% for serum and 2.1% to 8.3% for tissues (%CV batch-to-batch). The lower limit of quantification for all compounds in tumor tissue (and serum) was 3.9 ng g(-1) (ng mL(-1)). Using this assay, photodegradation of the retinoids was evaluated and endogenous polar and apolar retinoids were quantified in sera and brain tumor tissues of patients and compared with serum and tonsil tissue concentrations of controls. It may thus serve as a suitable method for the characterization of retinoid uptake and metabolism in the respective compartments. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Integration and Fixation Preferences of Human and Mouse Endogenous Retroviruses Uncovered with Functional Data Analysis.

    PubMed

    Campos-Sánchez, Rebeca; Cremona, Marzia A; Pini, Alessia; Chiaromonte, Francesca; Makova, Kateryna D

    2016-06-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs), the remnants of retroviral infections in the germ line, occupy ~8% and ~10% of the human and mouse genomes, respectively, and affect their structure, evolution, and function. Yet we still have a limited understanding of how the genomic landscape influences integration and fixation of ERVs. Here we conducted a genome-wide study of the most recently active ERVs in the human and mouse genome. We investigated 826 fixed and 1,065 in vitro HERV-Ks in human, and 1,624 fixed and 242 polymorphic ETns, as well as 3,964 fixed and 1,986 polymorphic IAPs, in mouse. We quantitated >40 human and mouse genomic features (e.g., non-B DNA structure, recombination rates, and histone modifications) in ±32 kb of these ERVs' integration sites and in control regions, and analyzed them using Functional Data Analysis (FDA) methodology. In one of the first applications of FDA in genomics, we identified genomic scales and locations at which these features display their influence, and how they work in concert, to provide signals essential for integration and fixation of ERVs. The investigation of ERVs of different evolutionary ages (young in vitro and polymorphic ERVs, older fixed ERVs) allowed us to disentangle integration vs. fixation preferences. As a result of these analyses, we built a comprehensive model explaining the uneven distribution of ERVs along the genome. We found that ERVs integrate in late-replicating AT-rich regions with abundant microsatellites, mirror repeats, and repressive histone marks. Regions favoring fixation are depleted of genes and evolutionarily conserved elements, and have low recombination rates, reflecting the effects of purifying selection and ectopic recombination removing ERVs from the genome. In addition to providing these biological insights, our study demonstrates the power of exploiting multiple scales and localization with FDA. These powerful techniques are expected to be applicable to many other genomic investigations.

  16. Integration and Fixation Preferences of Human and Mouse Endogenous Retroviruses Uncovered with Functional Data Analysis

    PubMed Central

    Pini, Alessia; Chiaromonte, Francesca; Makova, Kateryna D.

    2016-01-01

    Endogenous retroviruses (ERVs), the remnants of retroviral infections in the germ line, occupy ~8% and ~10% of the human and mouse genomes, respectively, and affect their structure, evolution, and function. Yet we still have a limited understanding of how the genomic landscape influences integration and fixation of ERVs. Here we conducted a genome-wide study of the most recently active ERVs in the human and mouse genome. We investigated 826 fixed and 1,065 in vitro HERV-Ks in human, and 1,624 fixed and 242 polymorphic ETns, as well as 3,964 fixed and 1,986 polymorphic IAPs, in mouse. We quantitated >40 human and mouse genomic features (e.g., non-B DNA structure, recombination rates, and histone modifications) in ±32 kb of these ERVs’ integration sites and in control regions, and analyzed them using Functional Data Analysis (FDA) methodology. In one of the first applications of FDA in genomics, we identified genomic scales and locations at which these features display their influence, and how they work in concert, to provide signals essential for integration and fixation of ERVs. The investigation of ERVs of different evolutionary ages (young in vitro and polymorphic ERVs, older fixed ERVs) allowed us to disentangle integration vs. fixation preferences. As a result of these analyses, we built a comprehensive model explaining the uneven distribution of ERVs along the genome. We found that ERVs integrate in late-replicating AT-rich regions with abundant microsatellites, mirror repeats, and repressive histone marks. Regions favoring fixation are depleted of genes and evolutionarily conserved elements, and have low recombination rates, reflecting the effects of purifying selection and ectopic recombination removing ERVs from the genome. In addition to providing these biological insights, our study demonstrates the power of exploiting multiple scales and localization with FDA. These powerful techniques are expected to be applicable to many other genomic investigations

  17. Levels of recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor in serum are inversely correlated with circulating neutrophil counts.

    PubMed Central

    Takatani, H; Soda, H; Fukuda, M; Watanabe, M; Kinoshita, A; Nakamura, T; Oka, M

    1996-01-01

    Recombinant human granulocyte colony-stimulating factor (rhG-CSF) is effective in countering chemotherapy-induced neutropenia. However, serum rhG-CSF levels cannot be maintained throughout the course of rhG-CSF therapy. The drop in serum rhG-CSF levels may vary with the duration of rhG-CSF administration or with the circulating neutrophil counts. We investigated the relationship between serum G-CSF levels and circulating neutrophil counts and the pharmacokinetics of rhG-CSF for patients with lung cancer who had been treated with myelosuppressive chemotherapy and then with subcutaneous rhG-CSF (lenograstim, 2 micrograms per kg of body weight per day). Twelve patients were randomly assigned to four groups with different rhG-CSF therapy schedules. Serum G-CSF levels were measured by an enzyme immunoassay method. Serum G-CSF levels during the rhG-CSF therapy greatly exceeded endogenous G-CSF levels and were mainly due to the presence of exogenous rhG-CSF rather than increased levels of endogenous G-CSF. Despite the duration of rhG-CSF administration, serum G-CSF levels during rhG-CSF therapy were inversely correlated with circulating neutrophil counts (r2 = 0.73, P < 0.0001). The value for the area under the concentration-time curve of rhG-CSF on the day of neutrophilia was lower than that on the day of neutropenia (P < 0.05). Our results suggest that the fall in serum G-CSF levels during rhG-CSF therapy may result from increased clearance and/or decreased absorption of rhG-CSF, two processes related to circulating neutrophil counts. PMID:8849265

  18. Acoustic analysis of the composition of human blood serum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gurbatov, S. N.; Demin, I. Yu.; Klemina, A. V.; Klemin, V. A.

    2009-10-01

    New acoustic methods of determining total protein, protein fractions, and lipid components of the human blood serum are presented. Acoustic methods are based on high-precision measurements of velocity and temperature dependences and frequency and temperature dependences of ultrasound absorption. Acoustic characteristics of the blood serum were measured using the method of a fixed length interferometer in acoustic cells ˜80 mcl in volume in the temperature range from 15 to 40°C and the 4-9 MHz frequency range with the acoustic analyzer developed by BIOM company. An error in measuring ultrasound velocity in the blood serum was 3 × 10-5; that of absorption, 2 × 10-2. The developed acoustic methods were clinically tested and recommended for application at clinical diagnostic laboratories with RF treatment-and-prophylactics establishments.

  19. Human serum paraoxonase (PON1) isozymes Q and R hydrolyze lactones and cyclic carbonate esters.

    PubMed

    Billecke, S; Draganov, D; Counsell, R; Stetson, P; Watson, C; Hsu, C; La Du, B N

    2000-11-01

    It is well established that human serum paraoxonase (PON1) catalyzes the hydrolysis of organophosphate insecticides and nerve agents, as well as that of a number of aromatic carboxylic acid esters. Our laboratory has recently found a new class of PON1 substrates that includes at least 30 lactones and cyclic carbonate esters. The lactone substrates vary in their ring size from 4 to 7 atoms. Substituents on the ring carbons may enhance or reduce the rate of lactone hydrolysis. An appreciable degree of stereospecificity exists with some activities differing up to 9-fold between enantiomers (i.e., S-alpha-hydroxy-gamma-butyrolactone is hydrolyzed 5 to 9 times faster than the R form). Thiolactones are hydrolyzed less efficiently, and some lactams are potent inhibitors. Four lactone-containing drugs-spironolactone, mevastatin, simvastatin, and lovastatin-have been identified as substrates for PON1. All lactone substrates are hydrolyzed by both the Q and R isozymes of human serum PON1. However, some lactone substrates are hydrolyzed faster by the Q than R isozyme, whereas others show a reverse preference. Moreover, these new substrates include homogentisic acid lactone, mevalonic acid lactone, homocysteine thiolactone, and gamma-hydroxybutyric acid lactone-all lactone forms of endogenous compounds. It is reasonable to expect that further investigations may uncover PON1 lactone substrates that are, themselves, endogenous compounds. In this article we characterize the basic enzymatic properties of PON1's newly identified hydrolytic activities with lactone and cyclic carbonate ester substrates and compare these properties with those of representative arylesters and organophosphates.

  20. The major acute-phase protein, serum amyloid P component, in mice is not involved in endogenous resistance against tumor necrosis factor alpha-induced lethal hepatitis, shock, and skin necrosis.

    PubMed

    Van Molle, W; Hochepied, T; Brouckaert, P; Libert, C

    2000-09-01

    The proinflammatory cytokine tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) induces lethal hepatitis when injected into D-(+)-galactosamine-sensitized mice on the one hand or systemic inflammatory response syndrome (SIRS) in normal mice on the other hand. We studied whether serum amyloid P component (SAP), the major acute-phase protein in mice, plays a protective role in both lethal models. For this purpose, we used SAP(0/0) mice generated by gene targeting. We studied the lethal response of SAP(0/0) or SAP(+/+) mice to both lethal triggers but found no differences in the sensitivity of both types of mice. We also investigated whether SAP is involved in establishing two types of endogenous protection: one using a single injection of interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta) for desensitization and clearly involving a liver protein, the other by tolerizing mice for 5 days using small doses of human TNF-alpha. Although after IL-1beta or after tolerization the SAP levels in the serum had risen fourfold in the control mice and not in the SAP(0/0) mice, the same extents of desensitization and tolerization were achieved. Finally, we observed that the induction of hemorrhagic necrosis in the skin of mice by two consecutive local injections with TNF-alpha was not altered in SAP(0/0) mice. We conclude that the presence or absence of SAP has no influence on the sensitivity of mice to TNF-alpha-induced hepatitis, SIRS, and hemorrhagic necrosis or on the endogenous protective mechanisms of desensitization or tolerization.

  1. Identification of late assembly domains of the human endogenous retrovirus-K(HML-2).

    PubMed

    Chudak, Claudia; Beimforde, Nadine; George, Maja; Zimmermann, Anja; Lausch, Veronika; Hanke, Kirsten; Bannert, Norbert

    2013-11-19

    Late assembly (L)-domains are protein interaction motifs, whose dysfunction causes characteristic budding defects in enveloped viruses. Three different amino acid motifs, namely PT/SAP, PPXY and YPX(n)L have been shown to play a major role in the release of exogenous retroviruses. Although the L-domains of exogenous retroviruses have been studied comprehensively, little is known about these motifs in endogenous human retroviruses. Using a molecular clone of the human endogenous retrovirus K113 that had been engineered to reverse the presumed non-synonymous postinsertional mutations in the major genes, we identified three functional L-domains of the virus, all located in the Gag p15 protein. A consensus PTAP tetrapeptide serves as the core of a main L-domain for the virus and its inactivation reduces virus release in HEK 293T cells by over 80%. Electron microscopy of cells expressing the PTAP mutant revealed predominantly late budding structures and budding chains at the plasma membrane. The fact that this motif determines subcellular colocalization with Tsg101, an ESCRT-I complex protein known to bind to the core tetrapeptide, supports its role as an L-domain. Moreover, two YPX(n)L motifs providing additional L-domain function were identified in the p15 protein. One is adjacent to the PTAP sequence and the other is in the p15 N-terminus. Mutations in either motif diminishes virus release and induces an L-domain phenotype while inactivation of all three L-domains results in a complete loss of particle release in HEK 293T cells. The flexibility of the virus in the use of L-domains for gaining access to the ESCRT machinery is demonstrated by overexpression of Tsg101 which rescues the release of the YPX(n)L mutants. Similarly, overexpression of Alix not only enhances release of the PTAP mutant by a factor of four but also the release of a triple mutant, indicating that additional cryptic YPX(n)L domains with a low affinity for Alix may be present. No L-domain activity

  2. Identification of late assembly domains of the human endogenous retrovirus-K(HML-2)

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Late assembly (L)-domains are protein interaction motifs, whose dysfunction causes characteristic budding defects in enveloped viruses. Three different amino acid motifs, namely PT/SAP, PPXY and YPXnL have been shown to play a major role in the release of exogenous retroviruses. Although the L-domains of exogenous retroviruses have been studied comprehensively, little is known about these motifs in endogenous human retroviruses. Results Using a molecular clone of the human endogenous retrovirus K113 that had been engineered to reverse the presumed non-synonymous postinsertional mutations in the major genes, we identified three functional L-domains of the virus, all located in the Gag p15 protein. A consensus PTAP tetrapeptide serves as the core of a main L-domain for the virus and its inactivation reduces virus release in HEK 293T cells by over 80%. Electron microscopy of cells expressing the PTAP mutant revealed predominantly late budding structures and budding chains at the plasma membrane. The fact that this motif determines subcellular colocalization with Tsg101, an ESCRT-I complex protein known to bind to the core tetrapeptide, supports its role as an L-domain. Moreover, two YPXnL motifs providing additional L-domain function were identified in the p15 protein. One is adjacent to the PTAP sequence and the other is in the p15 N-terminus. Mutations in either motif diminishes virus release and induces an L-domain phenotype while inactivation of all three L-domains results in a complete loss of particle release in HEK 293T cells. The flexibility of the virus in the use of L-domains for gaining access to the ESCRT machinery is demonstrated by overexpression of Tsg101 which rescues the release of the YPXnL mutants. Similarly, overexpression of Alix not only enhances release of the PTAP mutant by a factor of four but also the release of a triple mutant, indicating that additional cryptic YPXnL domains with a low affinity for Alix may be present. No L

  3. Elevated serum level of human alkaline phosphatase in obesity.

    PubMed

    Khan, Abdul Rehman; Awan, Fazli Rabbi; Najam, Syeda Sadia; Islam, Mehboob; Siddique, Tehmina; Zain, Maryam

    2015-11-01

    To investigate a correlation between serum alkaline phosphatase level and body mass index in human subjects. The comparative cross-sectional study was carried out at the National Institute for Biotechnology and Genetic Engineering, Faisalabad, Pakistan, from April 2012 to June 2013. Blood serum alkaline phosphatase levels were estimated and the subjects were divided into three sub-groups on the basis of their body mass. normal weight (<25kg/m2), overweight (25-27kg/m2) and obese (>27kg/m2) subjects. The serum samples were used for the estimation of clinically important biochemical parameters, using commercial kits on clinical chemistry analyser. Of the 197 subjects, 97(49%) were obese and 100(51%) were non-obese. The serum alkaline phosphatase level increased in obese (214±6.4 IU/L) compared to the non-obese subjects (184.5±5 IU/L). Furthermore, a significant linear relationship (r=0.3;p-0.0001) was found between serum alkaline phosphatase and body mass index. Other biochemical variables were not correlated to the body mass index. Over activity and higher amounts of alkaline phosphatase were linked to the development of obesity.

  4. Prediction of the Pharmacokinetic Parameters of Triptolide in Rats Based on Endogenous Molecules in Pre-Dose Baseline Serum

    PubMed Central

    Aa, Jiye; Zheng, Tian; Shi, Jian; Li, Mengjie; Wang, Xinwen; Zhao, Chunyan; Xiao, Wenjing; Yu, Xiaoyi; Sun, Runbin; Gu, Rongrong; Zhou, Jun; Wu, Liang; Hao, Gang; Zhu, Xuanxuan; Wang, Guangji

    2012-01-01

    Background Individual variances usually affect drug metabolism and disposition, and hence result in either ineffectiveness or toxicity of a drug. In addition to genetic polymorphism, the multiple confounding factors of lifestyles, such as dietary preferences, contribute partially to individual variances. However, the difficulty of quantifying individual diversity greatly challenges the realization of individualized drug therapy. This study aims at quantitative evaluating the association between individual variances and the pharmacokinetics. Methodology/Principal Findings Molecules in pre-dose baseline serum were profiled using gas chromatography mass spectrometry to represent the individual variances of the model rats provided with high fat diets (HFD), routine chows and calorie restricted (CR) chows. Triptolide and its metabolites were determined using high performance liquid chromatography mass spectrometry. Metabonomic and pharmacokinetic data revealed that rats treated with the varied diets had distinctly different metabolic patterns and showed differential Cmax values, AUC and drug metabolism after oral administration of triptolide. Rats with fatty chows had the lowest Cmax and AUC values and the highest percentage of triptolide metabolic transformation, while rats with CR chows had the highest Cmax and AUC values and the least percentage of triptolide transformation. Multivariate linear regression revealed that in baseline serum, the concentrations of creatinine and glutamic acid, which is the precursor of GSH, were linearly negatively correlated to Cmax and AUC values. The glutamic acid and creatinine in baseline serum were suggested as the potential markers to represent individual diversity and as predictors of the disposal and pharmacokinetics of triptolide. Conclusions/Significance These results highlight the robust potential of metabonomics in characterizing individual variances and identifying relevant markers that have the potential to facilitate

  5. Endogenous Human Milk Peptide Release Is Greater after Preterm Birth than Term Birth123

    PubMed Central

    Dallas, David C; Smink, Christina J; Robinson, Randall C; Tian, Tian; Guerrero, Andres; Parker, Evan A; Smilowitz, Jennifer T; Hettinga, Kasper A; Underwood, Mark A; Lebrilla, Carlito B; German, J Bruce; Barile, Daniela

    2015-01-01

    Background: Hundreds of naturally occurring milk peptides are present in term human milk. Preterm milk is produced before complete maturation of the mammary gland, which could change milk synthesis and secretion processes within the mammary gland, leading to differences in protein expression and enzymatic activity, thereby resulting in an altered peptide profile. Objective: This study examined differences in peptides present between milk from women delivering at term and women delivering prematurely. Methods: Nano-LC tandem mass spectrometry was employed to identify naturally occurring peptides and compare their abundances between term and preterm human milk samples at multiple time points over lactation. Term milk samples were collected from 8 mothers and preterm milk was collected from 14 mothers. The 28 preterm and 32 term human milk samples were divided into 4 groups based on day of collection (<14, 14–28, 29–41, and 42–58 d). Results: Preterm milk peptide counts, ion abundance, and concentration were significantly higher in preterm milk than term milk. Bioinformatic analysis of the cleavage sites for peptides identified suggested that plasmin was more active in preterm milk than term milk and that cytosol aminopeptidase and carboxypeptidase B2 likely contribute to extensive milk protein breakdown. Many identified milk peptides in both term and preterm milk overlapped with known functional peptides, including antihypertensive, antimicrobial, and immunomodulatory peptides. Conclusion: The high protein degradation by endogenous proteases in preterm milk might attenuate problems because of the preterm infant’s immature digestive system. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01817127. PMID:25540406

  6. Endogenous human milk peptide release is greater after preterm birth than term birth.

    PubMed

    Dallas, David C; Smink, Christina J; Robinson, Randall C; Tian, Tian; Guerrero, Andres; Parker, Evan A; Smilowitz, Jennifer T; Hettinga, Kasper A; Underwood, Mark A; Lebrilla, Carlito B; German, J Bruce; Barile, Daniela

    2015-03-01

    Hundreds of naturally occurring milk peptides are present in term human milk. Preterm milk is produced before complete maturation of the mammary gland, which could change milk synthesis and secretion processes within the mammary gland, leading to differences in protein expression and enzymatic activity, thereby resulting in an altered peptide profile. This study examined differences in peptides present between milk from women delivering at term and women delivering prematurely. Nano-LC tandem mass spectrometry was employed to identify naturally occurring peptides and compare their abundances between term and preterm human milk samples at multiple time points over lactation. Term milk samples were collected from 8 mothers and preterm milk was collected from 14 mothers. The 28 preterm and 32 term human milk samples were divided into 4 groups based on day of collection (<14, 14-28, 29-41, and 42-58 d). Preterm milk peptide counts, ion abundance, and concentration were significantly higher in preterm milk than term milk. Bioinformatic analysis of the cleavage sites for peptides identified suggested that plasmin was more active in preterm milk than term milk and that cytosol aminopeptidase and carboxypeptidase B2 likely contribute to extensive milk protein breakdown. Many identified milk peptides in both term and preterm milk overlapped with known functional peptides, including antihypertensive, antimicrobial, and immunomodulatory peptides. The high protein degradation by endogenous proteases in preterm milk might attenuate problems because of the preterm infant's immature digestive system. This trial was registered at clinicaltrials.gov as NCT01817127. © 2015 American Society for Nutrition.

  7. The Unexplored Roles of Human Serum IgA

    PubMed Central

    Leong, Ka Wai

    2014-01-01

    The roles of human serum IgA, in contrast to that of mucosal IgA, are relatively unexplored. Previous studies have shown that IgA mediates either pro- or anti-inflammatory effects in innate immune cells. Serum IgA has been shown to interact with many proteins and glycoproteins of which the functions and mechanisms are not fully characterized. Here, we present fresh perspectives into the roles of serum IgA, describing novel IgA–protein interactions, the importance of its glycosylation status in normal functions, and the plausible role of IgA as a driver and regulator of autoimmune diseases/immune overactivation. Other potential roles, including the regulation of cytokines, effector cell function, and homeostasis, are considered in view of the maintenance of immune function. We anticipate future research to uncover new anti-inflammatory or pro-inflammatory roles of human serum IgA in immune functions and dysfunctions, with implications on systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). PMID:25188736

  8. Synergistic effect of exogeneous and endogeneous electrostimulation on osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells seeded on silk scaffolds.

    PubMed

    Çakmak, Anıl S; Çakmak, Soner; White, James D; Raja, Waseem K; Kim, Kyungsook; Yiğit, Sezin; Kaplan, David L; Gümüşderelioğlu, Menemşe

    2016-04-01

    Bioelectrical regulation of bone fracture healing is important for many cellular events such as proliferation, migration, and differentiation. The aim of this study was to investigate the osteogenic differentiation potential of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) cultivated on silk scaffolds in response to different modes of electrostimulation (e.g., exogeneous and/or endogeneous). Endogeneous electrophysiology was altered through the use of monensin (10 nM) and glibenclamide (10 μM), along with external electrostimulation (60 kHz; 100-500 mV). Monensin enhanced the expression of early osteogenic markers such as alkaline phosphatase (ALP) and runt-related transcription factor 2 (RUNX-2). When exogeneous electrostimulation was combined with glibenclamide, more mature osteogenic marker upregulation based on bone sialoprotein expression (BSP) and mineralization was found. These results suggest the potential to exploit both exogeneous and endogeneous biophysical control of cell functions towards tissue-specific goals.

  9. Dietary fiber intake and endogenous serum hormone levels in naturally postmenopausal Mexican American women: the Multiethnic Cohort Study.

    PubMed

    Monroe, Kristine R; Murphy, Suzanne P; Henderson, Brian E; Kolonel, Laurence N; Stanczyk, Frank Z; Adlercreutz, Herman; Pike, Malcolm C

    2007-01-01

    This study investigated dietary fiber intake in association with serum estrogen levels in naturally postmenopausal Latina women with a wide range of fiber intake. Estrone (E1), estradiol (E2), and sex-hormone-binding globulin (SHBG) were measured in 242 women. Associations between estrogen levels and intake of dietary fiber, including insoluble and soluble fractions, quantified from a food frequency questionnaire, were examined. The biomarker enterolactone was also measured. After adjustment for age, weight, and other nondietary factors, dietary fiber intake was inversely associated with E1 and E2; there was a 22% and 17% decrease (2Ptrend=0.023 and 0.045) among subjects in the highest quintile of intake compared with the lowest. Fitting dietary fiber together with soluble and insoluble nonstarch polysaccharides (NSP) showed a much greater decrease in E1 and E2 (47% and 41%, respectively) while increased soluble NSP intake showed increases in E1 and E2 (64% and 69%, respectively). Two foods, avocado and grapefruit, showed significant positive associations with E1 (2Ptrend=0.029 and 0.015, respectively). This study suggests that different components of dietary fiber may have very significant different effects on serum estrogen levels. The suggestive findings relating increased estrogen levels to avocado and grapefruit intakes need confirmation.

  10. Endogenous oils derived from human adipocytes are potent adjuvants that promote IL-1α-dependent inflammation.

    PubMed

    Tynan, Graham A; Hearnden, Claire H; Oleszycka, Ewa; Lyons, Claire L; Coutts, Graham; O'Connell, Jean; Corrigan, Michelle A; Lynch, Lydia; Campbell, Matthew; Callanan, John J; Mok, Kenneth H; Geoghegan, Justin; O'Farrelly, Cliona; Allan, Stuart M; Roche, Helen M; O'Shea, Donal B; Lavelle, Ed C

    2014-06-01

    Obesity is characterized by chronic inflammation associated with neutrophil and M1 macrophage infiltration into white adipose tissue. However, the mechanisms underlying this process remain largely unknown. Based on the ability of oil-based adjuvants to induce immune responses, we hypothesized that endogenous oils derived from necrotic adipocytes may function as an immunological "danger signal." Here we show that endogenous oils of human origin are potent adjuvants, enhancing antibody responses to a level comparable to Freund's incomplete adjuvant. The endogenous oils were capable of promoting interleukin (IL)-1α-dependent recruitment of neutrophils and M1-like macrophages, while simultaneously diminishing M2-like macrophages. We found that endogenous oils from subcutaneous and omental adipocytes, and from healthy and unhealthy obese individuals, promoted comparable inflammatory responses. Furthermore, we also confirmed that white adipocytes in visceral fat of metabolically unhealthy obese (MUO) individuals are significantly larger than those in metabolically healthy obese individuals. Since adipocyte size is positively correlated with adipocyte death, we propose that endogenous oils have a higher propensity to be released from hypertrophied visceral fat in MUO individuals and that this is the key factor in driving inflammation. In summary, this study shows that adipocytes contain a potent oil adjuvant which drives IL-1α-dependent proinflammatory responses in vivo.

  11. Standardisation of the quantitation of serum amyloid A protein (SAA) in human serum.

    PubMed

    Godenir, N L; Jeenah, M S; Coetzee, G A; Van der Westhuyzen, D R; Strachan, A F; De Beer, F C

    1985-11-07

    An adequate method for standardising the quantitation of serum amyloid A protein (SAA) in human serum was developed. Acute phase high density lipoprotein3 (HDL3) was used as a standard. The concentration of the SAA in the standard was determined by the use of purified SAA. After protein determination, various concentrations of purified SAA were run on SDS-polyacrylamide gel together with the HDL3 standard containing an unknown amount of SAA amongst the apolipoproteins. From the standard curve obtained by pyridine extraction (Coomassie blue colour yield at A605 nm) the concentration of SAA in the HDL3 standard was determined. An established immunoradiometric assay (IRMA) for SAA was standardised with the HDL3. SAA concentrations in normal and acute phase sera were determined.

  12. Label-free in vivo imaging of human leukocytes using two-photon excited endogenous fluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zeng, Yan; Yan, Bo; Sun, Qiqi; Teh, Seng Khoon; Zhang, Wei; Wen, Zilong; Qu, Jianan Y.

    2013-04-01

    We demonstrate that two-photon excited endogenous fluorescence enables label-free morphological and functional imaging of various human blood cells. Specifically, we achieved distinctive morphological contrast to visualize morphology of important leukocytes, such as polymorphonuclear structure of granulocyte and mononuclear feature of agranulocyte, through the employment of the reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) fluorescence signals. In addition, NADH fluorescence images clearly reveal the morphological transformation process of neutrophils during disease-causing bacterial infection. Our findings also show that time-resolved NADH fluorescence can be potentially used for functional imaging of the phagocytosis of pathogens by leukocytes (neutrophils) in vivo. In particular, we found that free-to-bound NADH ratios measured in infected neutrophils increased significantly, which is consistent with a previous study that the energy consumed in the phagocytosis of neutrophils is mainly generated through the glycolysis pathway that leads to the accumulation of free NADH. Future work will focus on further developing and applying label-free imaging technology to investigate leukocyte-related diseases and disorders.

  13. CRISPR-on system for the activation of the endogenous human INS gene.

    PubMed

    Giménez, C A; Ielpi, M; Mutto, A; Grosembacher, L; Argibay, P; Pereyra-Bonnet, F

    2016-06-01

    Advances in the field of epigenetics have allowed the design of new therapeutic strategies to address complex diseases such as type 1 diabetes (T1D). Clustered regularly interspaced short palindromic repeats (CRISPR)-on is a novel and powerful RNA-guided transcriptional activator system that can turn on specific gene expression; however, it remains unclear whether this system can be widely used or whether its use will be restricted depending on cell types, methylation promoter statuses or the capacity to modulate chromatin state. Our results revealed that the CRISPR-on system fused with transcriptional activators (dCas9-VP160) activated endogenous human INS, which is a silenced gene with a fully methylated promoter. Similarly, we observed a synergistic effect on gene activation when multiple single guide RNAs were used, and the transcriptional activation was maintained until day 21. Regarding the epigenetic profile, the targeted promoter gene did not exhibit alteration in its methylation status but rather exhibited altered levels of H3K9ac following treatment. Importantly, we showed that dCas9-VP160 acts on patients' cells in vitro, particularly the fibroblasts of patients with T1D.

  14. Significant effects of mild endogenous hormonal changes in humans: considerations for low-dose testing.

    PubMed

    Brucker-Davis, F; Thayer, K; Colborn, T

    2001-03-01

    We review the significant and adverse health effects that can occur with relatively small endogenous hormonal changes in pubertal and adult humans. We discuss the effects of hormonal changes that occur within normal physiologic ranges--such as the rising levels of estrogen in peripuberty, which cause growth spurts at low levels and then the fusion of epiphyses at higher levels--and the hormonal variations during the menstrual cycle and their relation to genital phenotypic changes and intercurrent disease evolution. We turn next to adaptive changes in gonadal and other functions during aging, exercise, stress, starvation, and chronic diseases, which can serve as models for the effects of exogenous, hormonally active compounds. Then we review the states of borderline hormonal imbalances such as subclinical (having few or very mild symptoms, if any) hypothyroidism or hyperthyroidism, glucose intolerance, and other endocrine conditions. Finally, we review the deleterious systemic effects of gonadal imbalance. Information stemming from clinical observations leads to the concept of "no threshold" within the endocrine system and thus illustrates the importance of considering low-dose testing for chemicals that interfere with hormonal activity. We also urge attention to more sensitive, less visible end points such as osteoporosis, increased risk for cardiovascular disease, or cognitive changes.

  15. Interactive association of drugs binding to human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng; Zhang, Yao; Liang, Hong

    2014-02-27

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is an abundant plasma protein, which attracts great interest in the pharmaceutical industry since it can bind a remarkable variety of drugs impacting their delivery and efficacy and ultimately altering the drug's pharmacokinetic and pharmacodynamic properties. Additionally, HSA is widely used in clinical settings as a drug delivery system due to its potential for improving targeting while decreasing the side effects of drugs. It is thus of great importance from the viewpoint of pharmaceutical sciences to clarify the structure, function, and properties of HSA-drug complexes. This review will succinctly outline the properties of binding site of drugs in IIA subdomain within the structure of HSA. We will also give an overview on the binding characterization of interactive association of drugs to human serum albumin that may potentially lead to significant clinical applications.

  16. Differences between endogenous and exogenous emotion inhibition in the human brain.

    PubMed

    Kühn, Simone; Haggard, Patrick; Brass, Marcel

    2014-05-01

    The regulation of emotions is an integral part of our mental health. It has only recently been investigated using brain imaging techniques. In most studies, participants are instructed by a cue to inhibit a specific emotional reaction. The aim of the present study was to investigate the alternative situation where a person decides to inhibit an emotion as an act of endogenous self-control. Healthy participants viewed highly arousing pictures with negative valence. In the endogenous condition, participants could freely choose on each trial to inhibit or feel the emotions elicited by the picture. In an exogenous condition, a visual cue instructed them to either feel or inhibit the emotion elicited by the picture. Participants' subjective ratings of intensity of experienced emotion showed an interaction effect between source of control (endogenous/exogenous) and feel/inhibit based on a stronger modulation between feel and inhibition for the endogenous compared to the exogenous condition. Endogenous inhibition of emotions was associated with dorso-medial prefrontal cortex activation, whereas exogenous inhibition was found associated with lateral prefrontal cortex activation. Thus, the brain regions for both endogenous and exogenous inhibition of emotion are highly similar to those for inhibition of motor actions in Brass and Haggard (J Neurosci 27:9141-9145, 2007), Kühn et al. (Hum Brain Mapp 30:2834-2843, 2009). Functional connectivity analyses showed that dorsofrontomedial cortex exerts greater control onto pre-supplementary motor area during endogenous inhibition compared to endogenous feel. This functional dissociation between an endogenous, fronto-medial and an exogenous, fronto-lateral inhibition centre has important implications for our understanding of emotion regulation in health and psychopathology.

  17. Regulation of human eosinophil degranulation and activation by endogenous phospholipase A2.

    PubMed Central

    White, S R; Strek, M E; Kulp, G V; Spaethe, S M; Burch, R A; Neeley, S P; Leff, A R

    1993-01-01

    The unique granular proteins of eosinophils may have a pathogenetic role in asthma and in the defense against parasitic infestations. However, the mechanisms regulating eosinophil degranulation are largely unknown. We examined the hypothesis that release of these proteins is regulated by endogenous activation of phospholipase A2. Human eosinophils (HE) were isolated from the peripheral blood of 42 subjects either by Percoll density separation or by negative-selection immunomagnetic fractionation. Eosinophil activation was initiated in vitro with 10(-6) M FMLP and 5 micrograms/ml cytochalasin B and was assessed by measurement of eosinophil peroxidase (EPO), leukotriene C4 (LTC4) and superoxide radical (.O2-) secretion. Treatment of HE with 100 microM mepacrine before activation blocked EPO release (2.0 +/- 0.2 vs 10.2 +/- 2.1% cell content for activated HE, P < 0.004, n = 9), .O2- generation (2.6 +/- 0.9 vs 44.2 +/- 10.8 nmol/ml per 10(6) HE, P < 0.002, n = 5), and LTC4 secretion (68.2 +/- 32.2 vs 1,125.2 +/- 526.8 pg/ml per 10(6) HE, P < 0.04, n = 8). Pretreatment of HE with 100 microM 4-bromophenacyl bromide before activation similarly blocked EPO release, .O2- generation and LTC4 secretion. Addition of AA to HE after treatment with 100 microM mepacrine and before subsequent activation reversed the inhibition of both EPO (10.4 +/- 2.2% with 1 microM AA vs 2.0 +/- 0.2% for mepacrine, n = 5, P < 0.02) and LTC4 secretion (695.1 +/- 412.9 with 10 microM AA vs 68.2 +/- 32.2 pg/ml per 10(6) HE for mepacrine, n = 8, P < 0.04), but did not reverse inhibition of .O2- generation by mepacrine. We demonstrate that secretion of preformed cytotoxic proteins and .O2- by eosinophils is regulated endogenously by phospholipase A2. PMID:8387540

  18. Endogenous Opioid Mechanisms Are Implicated in Obesity and Weight Loss in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Rothberg, Amy E.; Dykhuis, Kate E.; Burant, Charles F.; Zubieta, Jon-Kar

    2015-01-01

    Context: Successful long-term weight loss is challenging. Brain endogenous opioid systems regulate associated processes; however, their role in the maintenance of weight loss has not been adequately explored in humans. Objective: In a preliminary study, the objective was to assess central μ-opioid receptor (MOR) system involvement in eating behaviors and their relationship to long-term maintenance of weight loss. Design: This was a case-control study with follow-up of the treatment group at 1 year after intervention. Setting: The study was conducted at a tertiary care university medical center. Participants: Lean healthy (n = 7) and chronically obese (n = 7) men matched for age and ethnicity participated in the study. Interventions: MOR availability measures were acquired with positron emission tomography and [11C]carfentanil. Lean healthy men were scanned twice under both fasted and fed conditions. Obese men were placed on a very low-calorie diet to achieve 15% weight loss from baseline weight and underwent two positron emission tomography scans before and two after weight loss, incorporating both fasted and fed states. Main Outcome Measures: Brain MOR availability and activation were measured by reductions in MOR availability (nondisplaceable binding potential) from the fed compared with the fasted-state scans. Results: Baseline MOR nondisplaceable binding potential was reduced in obese compared with the lean and partially recovered obese after weight loss in regions that regulate homeostatic, hedonic, and emotional responses to feeding. Reductions in negative affect and feeding-induced MOR system activation in the right temporal pole were highly correlated in leans but not in obese men. A trend for an association between MOR activation in the right temporal pole before weight loss and weight regain 1 year was found. Conclusions: Although these preliminary studies have a small sample size, these results suggest that obesity and diet-induced weight loss impact

  19. The amplitude of endogenous melatonin production is not affected by melatonin treatment in humans.

    PubMed

    Matsumoto, M; Sack, R L; Blood, M L; Lewy, A J

    1997-01-01

    A physiological dose of melatonin (0.5 mg) or placebo was given at bedtime to night shift workers (n = 21) for seven days, and endogenous melatonin profiles were measured on the eighth day. The amplitude of endogenous melatonin secretion was unchanged by treatment. Also, a melatonin treatment trial using a 50 mg daily bedtime dose for 37 days to a blind subject resulted in no change in the endogenous melatonin profile. We conclude that circulating melatonin can shift the phase, but does not alter the amplitude, of pineal melatonin secretion.

  20. Exosome enrichment of human serum using multiple cycles of centrifugation.

    PubMed

    Kim, Jeongkwon; Tan, Zhijing; Lubman, David M

    2015-09-01

    In this work, we compared the use of repeated cycles of centrifugation at conventional speeds for enrichment of exosomes from human serum compared to the use of ultracentrifugation (UC). After removal of cells and cell debris, a speed of 110 000 × g or 40 000 × g was used for the UC or centrifugation enrichment process, respectively. The enriched exosomes were analyzed using the bicinchoninic acid assay, 1D gel separation, transmission electron microscopy, Western blotting, and high-resolution LC-MS/MS analysis. It was found that a five-cycle repetition of UC or centrifugation is necessary for successful removal of nonexosomal proteins in the enrichment of exosomes from human serum. More significantly, 5× centrifugation enrichment was found to provide similar or better performance than 5× UC enrichment in terms of enriched exosome protein amount, Western blot band intensity for detection of CD-63, and numbers of identified exosome-related proteins and cluster of differentiation (CD) proteins. A total of 478 proteins were identified in the LC-MS/MS analyses of exosome proteins obtained from 5× UCs and 5× centrifugations including many important CD membrane proteins. The presence of previously reported exosome-related proteins including key exosome protein markers demonstrates the utility of this method for analysis of proteins in human serum.

  1. Stability of some atypical antipsychotics in human plasma, haemolysed whole blood, oral fluid, human serum and calf serum.

    PubMed

    Fisher, Danielle S; Partridge, Suzanne J; Handley, Simon A; Flanagan, Robert J

    2013-06-10

    Long-term stability data of atypical antipsychotics in different matrices are not widely available. The aim of this work was to assess the stability of amisulpride, aripiprazole and dehydroaripiprazole, clozapine and norclozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone and 9-hydroxyrisperidone, and sulpiride in human EDTA plasma, heparinised haemolysed human whole blood, oral fluid, human serum, and newborn calf serum stored in tightly capped plastic containers under a range of conditions. Measurements were performed by LC-MS/MS. Analyte instability was defined as a deviation of 15% or greater from the expected concentration. All analytes were stable following 3 freeze-thaw cycles in human plasma, and were stable in this matrix for at least 5 days at ambient temperature (olanzapine, 3 days); 4 weeks at 2-8°C (olanzapine, 2 weeks), and 2 years at -20°C (except for dehydroaripiprazole, olanzapine, and quetiapine, 1 year). In human serum, aripiprazole, dehydroaripiprazole, norclozapine, olanzapine, quetiapine, risperidone, 9-hydroxyrisperidone, and sulpiride were unstable after 5 days at ambient temperature, 3 weeks at 2-8°C, and 9 months at -20°C. Olanzapine was unstable in whole blood and oral fluid under most conditions studied, although prior addition of ascorbic acid had a moderate stabilising effect. All other analytes were stable in whole blood and oral fluid for at least 2 days at ambient temperature, 1 week at 2-8°C, and 2 months at -20°C (clozapine and norclozapine, 1 month whole blood). These results confirm that plasma (EDTA anticoagulant) is the sample of choice for TDM of atypical antipsychotics. Delayed (more than 1 week) analysis of patient samples should be undertaken with caution, especially with serum and with haemolysed whole blood. With olanzapine, only plasma collected and stored appropriately is likely to give reliable quantitative results.

  2. Human Endogenous Retrovirus Expression Profiles in Samples from Brains of Patients with Schizophrenia and Bipolar Disorders

    PubMed Central

    Frank, Oliver; Giehl, Michelle; Zheng, Chun; Hehlmann, Rüdiger; Leib-Mösch, Christine; Seifarth, Wolfgang

    2005-01-01

    The detection and identification of retroviral transcripts in brain samples, cerebrospinal fluid, and plasma of individuals with recent-onset schizophrenia and schizoaffective disorders suggest that activation or upregulation of distinct human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) may play a role in the etiopathogenesis of neuropsychiatric diseases. To test this hypothesis, we performed a comprehensive microarray-based analysis of HERV transcriptional activity in human brains. We investigated 50 representative members of 20 HERV families in a total of 215 brain samples derived from individuals with schizophrenia or bipolar disorders and matched controls. A characteristic brain-specific retroviral activity profile was found that consists of members of the class I families HERV-E, HERV-F, and ERV9 and members of HERV-K taxa. In addition to these constitutively expressed HERVs, a number of differentially active HERV elements were identified in all brain samples independent of the disease pattern that may reflect differences in the genetic background of the tested individuals. Only a subgroup of the HML-2 family (HERV-K10) was significantly overrepresented in both bipolar-disorder- and schizophrenia-associated samples compared to healthy brains, suggesting a potential association with disease. Real-time PCR analysis of HERV env transcripts with coding capacity potentially involved in neuroinflammatory conditions revealed that env expression of HERV-W, HERV-FRD, and HML-2 remains unaffected regardless of the clinical picture. Our data suggest that HERV transcription in brains is weakly correlated with schizophrenia and related diseases but may be influenced by the individual genetic background, brain-infiltrating immune cells, or medical treatment. PMID:16103141

  3. Dynamic regulation of human endogenous retroviruses mediates factor-induced reprogramming and differentiation potential

    PubMed Central

    Ohnuki, Mari; Tanabe, Koji; Sutou, Kenta; Teramoto, Ito; Sawamura, Yuka; Narita, Megumi; Nakamura, Michiko; Tokunaga, Yumie; Nakamura, Masahiro; Watanabe, Akira; Yamanaka, Shinya; Takahashi, Kazutoshi

    2014-01-01

    Pluripotency can be induced in somatic cells by overexpressing transcription factors, including POU class 5 homeobox 1 (OCT3/4), sex determining region Y-box 2 (SOX2), Krüppel-like factor 4 (KLF4), and myelocytomatosis oncogene (c-MYC). However, some induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) exhibit defective differentiation and inappropriate maintenance of pluripotency features. Here we show that dynamic regulation of human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) is important in the reprogramming process toward iPSCs, and in re-establishment of differentiation potential. During reprogramming, OCT3/4, SOX2, and KLF4 transiently hyperactivated LTR7s—the long-terminal repeats of HERV type-H (HERV-H)—to levels much higher than in embryonic stem cells by direct occupation of LTR7 sites genome-wide. Knocking down LTR7s or long intergenic non-protein coding RNA, regulator of reprogramming (lincRNA-RoR), a HERV-H–driven long noncoding RNA, early in reprogramming markedly reduced the efficiency of iPSC generation. KLF4 and LTR7 expression decreased to levels comparable with embryonic stem cells once reprogramming was complete, but failure to resuppress KLF4 and LTR7s resulted in defective differentiation. We also observed defective differentiation and LTR7 activation when iPSCs had forced expression of KLF4. However, when aberrantly expressed KLF4 or LTR7s were suppressed in defective iPSCs, normal differentiation was restored. Thus, a major mechanism by which OCT3/4, SOX2, and KLF4 promote human iPSC generation and reestablish potential for differentiation is by dynamically regulating HERV-H LTR7s. PMID:25097266

  4. Expression of human endogenous retrovirus type K envelope glycoprotein in insect and mammalian cells.

    PubMed Central

    Tönjes, R R; Limbach, C; Löwer, R; Kurth, R

    1997-01-01

    The human endogenous retrovirus type K (HERV-K) family codes for the human teratocarcinoma-derived retrovirus (HTDV) particles. The existence of the envelope protein (ENV) of HERV-K encoded by the subgenomic env mRNA has not yet been demonstrated. To study the genetic requirements for successful expression of ENV, we have constructed a series of recombinant HERV-K env expression vectors for infection and transfection experiments in insect cells and mammalian cells, respectively. Six baculovirus constructs bearing full-length or truncated HERV-K env with or without homologous or heterologous signal peptides were used for infections of insect cells. All recombinant baculoviruses yielded ENV proteins with the expected molecular masses. The full-length 80- to 90-kDa HERV-K ENV protein including the cORF leader sequence was glycosylated in insect cells. In addition, the 14-kDa cORF protein was expressed due to splicing of the full-length env mRNA. The ENV precursor protein is not cleaved to the surface (SU) and transmembrane (TM) glycoproteins; it does not appear on the surface of infected insect cells and is not secreted into the medium. For ENV expression in COS cells, plasmid vectors harboring the cytomegalovirus immediate-early promoter/intron A element and the tissue plasminogen activator (t-PA) signal peptide or the homologous HERV-K signal peptide upstream of the env gene were employed. Glycosylated and uncleaved ENV was expressed as in GH teratocarcinoma cells but at higher levels. The heterologous t-PA signal sequence was instrumental for expression of HERV-K ENV on the cell surface. Hence, we have shown for the first time that the HERV-K env gene has the potential to be expressed as a full-length envelope protein with appropriate glycosylation. In addition, our data provide explanations for the lack of infectivity of HERV-K/HTDV particles. PMID:9060628

  5. Serum Level of Endogenous Secretory Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products and Other Factors in Type 2 Diabetic Patients With Mild Cognitive Impairment

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Gang; Cai, Liangchun; Chen, Bin; Liang, Jixing; Lin, Fenhui; Li, Liantao; Lin, Lixiang; Yao, Jin; Wen, Junping; Huang, Huibin

    2011-01-01

    OBJECTIVE Determine the serum levels of endogenous secretory receptor for advanced glycation end products (esRAGEs) in patients with type 2 diabetes and mild cognitive impairment (MCI) and in control patients with type 2 diabetes but no MCI, and examine the relationship of esRAGE and MCI with other clinical factors. RESEARCH DESIGN AND METHODS A total of 101 patients with type 2 diabetes who were hospitalized in the Department of Endocrinology at Fujian Provincial Hospital between January 2010 and January 2011 were enrolled. There were 58 patients with MCI and 43 patients without MCI (control). Serum levels of esRAGE were measured using an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Other clinical parameters were also measured. RESULTS Type 2 diabetic patients with MCI had a longer duration of diabetes; elevated HbA1c, total cholesterol (CHOL), LDL cholesterol (LDL-C), triglyceride (TG), intima-media thickness, C-reactive protein (CRP), and brachial-ankle pulse wave velocity (ba-PWV); and lower ankle brachial index (ABI) and esRAGE relative to the control group. Among patients with MCI, the Montreal Cognitive Assessment (MoCA) score was positively correlated with serum esRAGE but negatively correlated with CHOL. Spearman rank correlation analysis indicated that esRAGE was positively correlated with MoCA score and ABI but negatively correlated with ba-PWV, CHOL, TG, and CRP in all subjects. CONCLUSIONS Our results suggest that esRAGE may be a potential protective factor for dyslipidemia, atherosclerosis, and MCI in patients with type 2 diabetes. PMID:22011410

  6. A chromatography/tandem mass spectrometry method for the simultaneous profiling of ten endogenous steroids, including progesterone, adrenal precursors, androgens and estrogens, using low serum volume.

    PubMed

    Caron, Patrick; Turcotte, Véronique; Guillemette, Chantal

    2015-12-01

    Measurement of a large set of sex steroids in clinical epidemiology and laboratory research with reliable methods providing low quantification limits and using a limited volume of blood sample represents a significant challenge. We report a new validated gas chromatography selected reaction monitoring - tandem mass spectrometry assay (GC-MS/MS) for the simultaneous quantification of ten endogenous steroids including progesterone (PROG), dehydroepiandrosterone (DHEA), androstenediol (5-diol), androstenedione (4-dione), testosterone (T), dihydrotestosterone (DHT), androsterone (ADT), 5alpha-androstan-3beta-17beta-diol (3β-diol), estrone (E1) and estradiol (E2). After addition of stable isotope internal standards, the approach involved the combination of liquid-liquid extraction, derivatization and solid-phase extraction for injection into the GC system and multiple reaction monitoring (MRM). The method presents high reproducibility for all analytical parameters in 250 μl serum samples. The lower limit of quantification (LLOQ) were of 100 pg/ml for DHEA, 50 pg/ml for PROG, 5-diol, 4-dione and ADT, 30 pg/ml for T, 10 pg/ml for 3β-diol and DHT, 5 pg/ml for E1, and 1 pg/ml for E2. The applicability of the validated method to determine the concentrations of these 10 steroids was successfully tested on serum from men (n=15), premenopausal (n=10) and postmenopausal women (n=20), and is currently used for larger cancer-related epidemiology studies. One of the most considerable advantages over existing methods is the simultaneous determination of ten steroids in a limited volume of serum that will help conserve important clinical samples from existing biobanks.

  7. Is really endogenous ghrelin a hunger signal in chickens? Association of GHSR SNPs with increase appetite, growth traits, expression and serum level of GHRL, and GH.

    PubMed

    El-Magd, Mohammed Abu; Saleh, Ayman A; Abdel-Hamid, Tamer M; Saleh, Rasha M; Afifi, Mohammed A

    2016-10-01

    Chicken growth hormone secretagogue receptor (GHSR) is a receptor for ghrelin (GHRL), a peptide hormone produced by chicken proventriculus, which stimulates growth hormone (GH) release and food intake. The purpose of this study was to search for single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in exon 2 of GHSR gene and to analyze their effect on the appetite, growth traits and expression levels of GHSR, GHRL, and GH genes as well as serum levels of GH and GHRL in Mandara chicken. Two adjacent SNPs, A239G and G244A, were detected in exon 2 of GHSR gene. G244A SNP was non-synonymous mutation and led to replacement of lysine amino acid (aa) by arginine aa, while A239G SNP was synonymous mutation. The combined genotypes of A239G and G244A SNPs produced three haplotypes; GG/GG, GG/AG, AG/AG, which associated significantly (P<0.05) with growth traits (body weight, average daily gain, shank length, keel length, chest circumference) at age from >4 to 16w. Chickens with the homozygous GG/GG haplotype showed higher growth performance than other chickens. The two SNPs were also correlated with mRNA levels of GHSR and GH (in pituitary gland), and GHRL (in proventriculus and hypothalamus) as well as with serum level of GH and GHRL. Also, chickens with GG/GG haplotype showed higher mRNA and serum levels. This is the first study to demonstrate that SNPs in GHSR can increase appetite, growth traits, expression and level of GHRL, suggesting a hunger signal role for endogenous GHRL.

  8. Identification and Characterization of Novel Human Endogenous Retrovirus Families by Phylogenetic Screening of the Human Genome Mapping Project Database

    PubMed Central

    Tristem, Michael

    2000-01-01

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) were first identified almost 20 years ago, and since then numerous families have been described. It has, however, been difficult to obtain a good estimate of both the total number of independently derived families and their relationship to each other as well as to other members of the family Retroviridae. In this study, I used sequence data derived from over 150 novel HERVs, obtained from the Human Genome Mapping Project database, and a variety of recently identified nonhuman retroviruses to classify the HERVs into 22 independently acquired families. Of these, 17 families were loosely assigned to the class I HERVs, 3 to the class II HERVs and 2 to the class III HERVs. Many of these families have been identified previously, but six are described here for the first time and another four, for which only partial sequence information was previously available, were further characterized. Members of each of the 10 families are defective, and calculation of their integration dates suggested that most of them are likely to have been present within the human lineage since it diverged from the Old World monkeys more than 25 million years ago. PMID:10729147

  9. Replication of alpha-satellite DNA arrays in endogenous human centromeric regions and in human artificial chromosome

    PubMed Central

    Erliandri, Indri; Fu, Haiqing; Nakano, Megumi; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Miga, Karen H.; Liskovykh, Mikhail; Earnshaw, William C.; Masumoto, Hiroshi; Kouprina, Natalay; Aladjem, Mirit I.; Larionov, Vladimir

    2014-01-01

    In human chromosomes, centromeric regions comprise megabase-size arrays of 171 bp alpha-satellite DNA monomers. The large distances spanned by these arrays preclude their replication from external sites and imply that the repetitive monomers contain replication origins. However, replication within these arrays has not previously been profiled and the role of alpha-satellite DNA in initiation of DNA replication has not yet been demonstrated. Here, replication of alpha-satellite DNA in endogenous human centromeric regions and in de novo formed Human Artificial Chromosome (HAC) was analyzed. We showed that alpha-satellite monomers could function as origins of DNA replication and that replication of alphoid arrays organized into centrochromatin occurred earlier than those organized into heterochromatin. The distribution of inter-origin distances within centromeric alphoid arrays was comparable to the distribution of inter-origin distances on randomly selected non-centromeric chromosomal regions. Depletion of CENP-B, a kinetochore protein that binds directly to a 17 bp CENP-B box motif common to alpha-satellite DNA, resulted in enrichment of alpha-satellite sequences for proteins of the ORC complex, suggesting that CENP-B may have a role in regulating the replication of centromeric regions. Mapping of replication initiation sites in the HAC revealed that replication preferentially initiated in transcriptionally active regions. PMID:25228468

  10. 21 CFR 866.5700 - Whole human plasma or serum immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2011-04-01 2011-04-01 false Whole human plasma or serum immunological test... Systems § 866.5700 Whole human plasma or serum immunological test system. (a) Identification. A whole human plasma or serum immunological test system is a device that consists of reagents used to measure by...

  11. 21 CFR 866.5700 - Whole human plasma or serum immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Whole human plasma or serum immunological test... Systems § 866.5700 Whole human plasma or serum immunological test system. (a) Identification. A whole human plasma or serum immunological test system is a device that consists of reagents used to measure...

  12. 21 CFR 866.5700 - Whole human plasma or serum immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2012-04-01 2012-04-01 false Whole human plasma or serum immunological test... Systems § 866.5700 Whole human plasma or serum immunological test system. (a) Identification. A whole human plasma or serum immunological test system is a device that consists of reagents used to measure by...

  13. 21 CFR 866.5700 - Whole human plasma or serum immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2013-04-01 2013-04-01 false Whole human plasma or serum immunological test... Systems § 866.5700 Whole human plasma or serum immunological test system. (a) Identification. A whole human plasma or serum immunological test system is a device that consists of reagents used to measure by...

  14. 21 CFR 866.5700 - Whole human plasma or serum immunological test system.

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 8 2014-04-01 2014-04-01 false Whole human plasma or serum immunological test... Systems § 866.5700 Whole human plasma or serum immunological test system. (a) Identification. A whole human plasma or serum immunological test system is a device that consists of reagents used to measure by...

  15. Characterization of carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) as an endogenous marker of chronic hypoxia in live human tumor cells

    SciTech Connect

    Vordermark, Dirk . E-mail: vordermark_d@klinik.uni-wuerzburg.de; Kaffer, Anja; Riedl, Susanne; Katzer, Astrid; Flentje, Michael

    2005-03-15

    Purpose: Published clinical studies provide conflicting data regarding the prognostic significance of carbonic anhydrase IX (CA IX) overexpression as an endogenous marker of tumor hypoxia and its comparability with other methods of hypoxia detection. We performed a systematic analysis of CA IX protein levels under various in vitro conditions of tumor hypoxia in HT 1080 human fibrosarcoma and FaDu human pharyngeal carcinoma cells. Because sorting of live CA IX positive cells from tumors provides a tool to study the radiosensitivity of chronically hypoxic cells, we modified and tested a CA IX flow cytometry protocol on mixed hypoxic/aerobic suspensions of HT 1080 and FaDu cells. Methods and materials: HT 1080 and FaDu cells were treated with up to 24 h of in vitro hypoxia and up to 96 h of reoxygenation. To test the effect of nonhypoxic stimuli, glucose and serum availability, pH and cell density were modified. CA IX protein was quantified in Western blots of whole-cell lysates. Mixed suspensions with known percentages of hypoxic cells were prepared for CA IX flow cytometry. The same mixtures were assayed for clonogenic survival after 10 Gy. Results: Hypoxia-induced CA IX protein expression was seen after >6 h at {<=}5% O{sub 2}, and protein was stable over 96 h of reoxygenation in both cell lines. Glucose deprivation abolished the hypoxic CA IX response, and high cell density caused CA IX induction under aerobic conditions. Measured percentages of CA IX-positive cells in mixtures closely reflected known percentages of hypoxic cells in HT 1080 and were associated with radioresistance of mixtures after 10 Gy. Conclusion: CA IX is a stable marker of current or previous chronic hypoxia but influenced by nonhypoxic stimuli. Except the time course of accumulation, all properties of this marker resembled our previous findings for hypoxia-inducible factor-1{alpha}. A modified flow cytometry protocol provided good separability of CA IX-negative and -positive cells in vitro

  16. A soluble envelope protein of endogenous retrovirus (FeLIX) present in serum of domestic cats mediates infection of a pathogenic variant of feline leukemia virus.

    PubMed

    Sakaguchi, Shoichi; Shojima, Takayuki; Fukui, Daisuke; Miyazawa, Takayuki

    2015-03-01

    T-lymphotropic feline leukemia virus (FeLV-T), a highly pathogenic variant of FeLV, induces severe immunosuppression in cats. FeLV-T is fusion defective because in its PHQ motif, a gammaretroviral consensus motif in the N terminus of an envelope protein, histidine is replaced with aspartate. Infection by FeLV-T requires FeLIX, a truncated envelope protein encoded by an endogenous FeLV, for transactivation of infectivity and Pit1 for binding FeLIX. Although Pit1 is present in most tissues in cats, the expression of FeLIX is limited to certain cells in lymphoid organs. Therefore, the host cell range of FeLV-T was thought to be restricted to cells expressing FeLIX. However, because FeLIX is a soluble factor and is expressed constitutively in lymphoid organs, we presumed it to be present in blood and evaluated its activities in sera of various mammalian species using a pseudotype assay. We demonstrated that cat serum has FeLIX activity at a functional level, suggesting that FeLIX is present in the blood and that FeLV-T may be able to infect cells expressing Pit1 regardless of the expression of FeLIX in vivo. In addition, FeLIX activities in sera were detected only in domestic cats and not in other feline species tested. To our knowledge, this is the first report to prove that a large amount of truncated envelope protein of endogenous retrovirus is circulating in the blood to facilitate the infection of a pathogenic exogenous retrovirus. © 2015 The Authors.

  17. Complement Interaction with Trypanosomatid Promastigotes in Normal Human Serum

    PubMed Central

    Domínguez, Mercedes; Moreno, Inmaculada; López-Trascasa, Margarita; Toraño, Alfredo

    2002-01-01

    In normal human serum (NHS), axenic promastigotes of Crithidia, Phytomonas, and Leishmania trigger complement activation, and from 1.2 to 1.8 × 105 C3 molecules are deposited per promastigote within 2.5 min. In Leishmania, promastigote C3 binding capacity remains constant during in vitro metacyclogenesis. C3 deposition on promastigotes activated through the classical complement pathway reaches a 50% maximum after ∼50 s, and represents >85% of total C3 bound. In C1q- and C2-deficient human sera, promastigotes cannot activate the classical pathway (CP) unless purified C1q or C2 factors, respectively, are supplemented, demonstrating a requirement for CP factor in promastigote C3 opsonization. NHS depleted of natural anti-Leishmania antibodies cannot trigger promastigote CP activation, but IgM addition restores C3 binding. Furthermore, Leishmania binds natural antibodies in ethylenediaminetetracetic acid (EDTA)-treated NHS; after EDTA removal, promastigote-bound IgM triggers C3 deposition in natural antibody-depleted NHS. Serum collectins and pentraxins thus do not participate significantly in NHS promastigote C3 opsonization. Real-time kinetic analysis of promastigote CP-mediated lysis indicates that between 85–95% of parasites are killed within 2.5 min of serum contact. These data indicate that successful Leishmania infection in man must immediately follow promastigote transmission, and that Leishmania evasion strategies are shaped by the selective pressure exerted by complement. PMID:11854358

  18. Beer consumption and changes in stability of human serum proteins.

    PubMed

    Gorinstein, S; Caspi, A; Goshev, I; Moncheva, S; Zemser, M; Weisz, M; Libman, I; Lerner, H T; Trakhtenberg, S; Martín-Belloso, O

    2001-03-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate the influence of beer consumption (BC) on the functional and structural properties of human serum proteins (HSP). Thirty-eight volunteers (after coronary bypass) were divided into two groups: experimental (EG) and control (CG). Nineteen volunteers of the EG consumed 330 mL per day of beer (about 20 g of alcohol) for 30 consecutive days. The CG volunteers consumed mineral water instead of beer. Blood samples were collected from EG and CG patients before and after the experiment. Albumin (Alb), globulin (Glo), and methanol-precipitable proteins (MPP) from human serum were denatured with 8 M urea. Fluorescence and electrophoresis were employed in order to elucidate urea-induced conformational changes and structural behavior of proteins. The measured fluorescence emission spectra were used to estimate the stability of native and denatured protein fractions before and after BC. It was found that before BC the fractions most stable to urea denaturation were Glo, Alb, and MPP fractions. After BC in most of the beer-consuming patients (EG) some changes in native and denatured protein fractions were detected: a tendency to lower stability and minor structural deviations. These qualitative changes were more profound in MPP than in Alb and Glo. Thus, Glo is more resistible to alcohol influence than Alb, which in turn is more resistible than MPP. No serum protein changes were detected in patients of CG.

  19. Tumor Biomarker Glycoproteins in the Seminal Plasma of Healthy Human Males Are Endogenous Ligands for DC-SIGN*

    PubMed Central

    Clark, Gary F.; Grassi, Paola; Pang, Poh-Choo; Panico, Maria; Lafrenz, David; Drobnis, Erma Z.; Baldwin, Michael R.; Morris, Howard R.; Haslam, Stuart M.; Schedin-Weiss, Sophia; Sun, Wei; Dell, Anne

    2012-01-01

    DC-SIGN is an immune C-type lectin that is expressed on both immature and mature dendritic cells associated with peripheral and lymphoid tissues in humans. It is a pattern recognition receptor that binds to several pathogens including HIV-1, Ebola virus, Mycobacterium tuberculosis, Candida albicans, Helicobacter pylori, and Schistosoma mansoni. Evidence is now mounting that DC-SIGN also recognizes endogenous glycoproteins, and that such interactions play a major role in maintaining immune homeostasis in humans and mice. Autoantigens (neoantigens) are produced for the first time in the human testes and other organs of the male urogenital tract under androgenic stimulus during puberty. Such antigens trigger autoimmune orchitis if the immune response is not tightly regulated within this system. Endogenous ligands for DC-SIGN could play a role in modulating such responses. Human seminal plasma glycoproteins express a high level of terminal Lewisx and Lewisy carbohydrate antigens. These epitopes react specifically with the lectin domains of DC-SIGN. However, because the expression of these sequences is necessary but not sufficient for interaction with DC-SIGN, this study was undertaken to determine if any seminal plasma glycoproteins are also endogenous ligands for DC-SIGN. Glycoproteins bearing terminal Lewisx and Lewisy sequences were initially isolated by lectin affinity chromatography. Protein sequencing established that three tumor biomarker glycoproteins (clusterin, galectin-3 binding glycoprotein, prostatic acid phosphatase) and protein C inhibitor were purified by using this affinity method. The binding of DC-SIGN to these seminal plasma glycoproteins was demonstrated in both Western blot and immunoprecipitation studies. These findings have confirmed that human seminal plasma contains endogenous glycoprotein ligands for DC-SIGN that could play a role in maintaining immune homeostasis both in the male urogenital tract and the vagina after coitus. PMID:21986992

  20. Using lysine adducts of human serum albumin to investigate the disposition of exogenous formaldehyde in human blood

    PubMed Central

    Regazzoni, Luca G.; Grigoryan, Hasmik; Ji, Zhiying; Chen, Xi; Daniels, Sarah I.; Huang, Deyin; Sanchez, Sylvia; Tang, Naijun; Sillé, Fenna C. M.; Iavarone, Anthony T.; Williams, Evan R.; Zhang, Luoping; Rappaport, Stephen M.

    2017-01-01

    Formaldehyde is a human carcinogen that readily binds to nucleophiles, including proteins and DNA. To investigate whether exogenous formaldehyde produces adducts in extracellular fluids, we characterized modifications to human serum albumin (HSA) following incubation of whole blood, plasma, and saliva with formaldehyde at concentrations of 1, 10 and 100 μM. The only HSA locus that showed the presence of formaldehyde modifications was Lys199. A N(6)-Lys adduct with added mass of 12 Da, representing a putative intramolecular crosslink, was detected in biological fluids that had been incubated with formaldehyde but not in control fluids. An adduct representing N(6)-Lys formylation was detected in all fluids, but levels did not increase above control values over the tested range of formaldehyde concentrations. An adduct representing N(6)-Lys199 acetylation was also measured in all samples. We then applied the assay to repeated samples of human plasma from 6 nonsmoking volunteer subjects (from Berkeley, CA), and single samples of serum from 15 workers exposed to airborne formaldehyde at about 1.5 ppm in a production facility and 15 control workers from Tianjin, China. Although all human plasma/serum samples contained basal levels of the products of N(6)-Lys formylation and acetylation, the putative crosslink product was not detected. Since the putative crosslink was observed in plasma incubated with formaldehyde at 1 μM, this suggests that the endogenous concentration of formaldehyde in serum was much lower than reported in the literature. Furthermore, concentrations of the formyl adduct were not higher in workers exposed to formaldehyde at about 1.5 ppm than in controls. Follow-up in vitro experiments with gaseous formaldehyde at 1.4 ppm detected the putative crosslink in plasma but not whole blood. This combination of results suggests that N(6) formylation occurs within cells with subsequent release of adducted HSA to the systemic circulation. Comparing across human

  1. Using lysine adducts of human serum albumin to investigate the disposition of exogenous formaldehyde in human blood.

    PubMed

    Regazzoni, Luca G; Grigoryan, Hasmik; Ji, Zhiying; Chen, Xi; Daniels, Sarah I; Huang, Deyin; Sanchez, Sylvia; Tang, Naijun; Sillé, Fenna C M; Iavarone, Anthony T; Williams, Evan R; Zhang, Luoping; Rappaport, Stephen M

    2017-02-15

    Formaldehyde is a human carcinogen that readily binds to nucleophiles, including proteins and DNA. To investigate whether exogenous formaldehyde produces adducts in extracellular fluids, we characterized modifications to human serum albumin (HSA) following incubation of whole blood, plasma, and saliva with formaldehyde at concentrations of 1, 10 and 100μM. The only HSA locus that showed the presence of formaldehyde modifications was Lys199. A N(6)-Lys adduct with added mass of 12Da, representing a putative intramolecular crosslink, was detected in biological fluids that had been incubated with formaldehyde but not in control fluids. An adduct representing N(6)-Lys formylation was detected in all fluids, but levels did not increase above control values over the tested range of formaldehyde concentrations. An adduct representing N(6)-Lys199 acetylation was also measured in all samples. We then applied the assay to repeated samples of human plasma from 6 nonsmoking volunteer subjects (from Berkeley, CA), and single samples of serum from 15 workers exposed to airborne formaldehyde at about 1.5ppm in a production facility and 15 control workers from Tianjin, China. Although all human plasma/serum samples contained basal levels of the products of N(6)-Lys formylation and acetylation, the putative crosslink product was not detected. Since the putative crosslink was observed in plasma incubated with formaldehyde at 1μM, this suggests that the endogenous concentration of formaldehyde in serum was much lower than reported in the literature. Furthermore, concentrations of the formyl adduct were not higher in workers exposed to formaldehyde at about 1.5ppm than in controls. Follow-up in vitro experiments with gaseous formaldehyde at 1.4ppm detected the putative crosslink in plasma but not whole blood. This combination of results suggests that N(6) formylation occurs within cells with subsequent release of adducted HSA to the systemic circulation. Comparing across human

  2. Human neural stem cells promote proliferation of endogenous neural stem cells and enhance angiogenesis in ischemic rat brain.

    PubMed

    Ryu, Sun; Lee, Seung-Hoon; Kim, Seung U; Yoon, Byung-Woo

    2016-02-01

    Transplantation of human neural stem cells into the dentate gyrus or ventricle of rodents has been reportedly to enhance neurogenesis. In this study, we examined endogenous stem cell proliferation and angiogenesis in the ischemic rat brain after the transplantation of human neural stem cells. Focal cerebral ischemia in the rat brain was induced by middle cerebral artery occlusion. Human neural stem cells were transplanted into the subventricular zone. The behavioral performance of human neural stem cells-treated ischemic rats was significantly improved and cerebral infarct volumes were reduced compared to those in untreated animals. Numerous transplanted human neural stem cells were alive and preferentially localized to the ipsilateral ischemic hemisphere. Furthermore, 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine-labeled endogenous neural stem cells were observed in the subventricular zone and hippocampus, where they differentiated into cells immunoreactive for the neural markers doublecortin, neuronal nuclear antigen NeuN, and astrocyte marker glial fibrillary acidic protein in human neural stem cells-treated rats, but not in the untreated ischemic animals. The number of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine-positive ⁄ anti-von Willebrand factor-positive proliferating endothelial cells was higher in the ischemic boundary zone of human neural stem cells-treated rats than in controls. Finally, transplantation of human neural stem cells in the brains of rats with focal cerebral ischemia promoted the proliferation of endogenous neural stem cells and their differentiation into mature neural-like cells, and enhanced angiogenesis. This study provides valuable insights into the effect of human neural stem cell transplantation on focal cerebral ischemia, which can be applied to the development of an effective therapy for stroke.

  3. Endogenous optical biomarkers of normal and human papillomavirus immortalized epithelial cells.

    PubMed

    Mujat, Claudia; Greiner, Cherry; Baldwin, Amy; Levitt, Jonathan M; Tian, Fenghua; Stucenski, Lee A; Hunter, Martin; Kim, Young L; Backman, Vadim; Feld, Michael; Münger, Karl; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2008-01-15

    Cellular transformation is associated with a number of phenotypic, cell biological, biochemical and metabolic alterations. The detection and classification of morphological cellular abnormalities represents the foundation of classical histopathology and remains an important mainstay in the clinic. More recently, significant effort is being expended towards the development of noninvasive modalities for the detection of cancer at an early stage, when therapeutic interventions are highly successful. Methods that rely on the detection of optical signatures represent one class of such approaches that have yielded promising results. In our study, we have applied two spectroscopic imaging approaches to systematically identify in a quantitative manner the fluorescence and light scattering signatures of subcellular abnormalities that are associated with cellular transformation. Notably, we find that tryptophan images reveal not only intensity but also localization differences between normal and human papillomavirus immortalized cells, possibly originating from changes in the expression, 3D packing and organization of proteins and protein-rich subcellular organelles. Additionally, we detect alterations in cellular metabolism through quantitative evaluation of the NADH, FAD fluorescence and the corresponding redox ratio. Finally, we use light scattering spectroscopy to identify differences in nuclear morphology and subcellular organization that occur from the nanometer to the micrometer scale. Thus, these optical approaches provide complementary biomarkers based on endogenous fluorescence and scattering cellular changes that occur at the molecular, biochemical and morphological level. Since they obviate the need for staining and tissue removal and can be easily combined, they provide desirable options for further clinical development and assessment. Copyright 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  4. [Escherichia coli L-asparaginase induces phosphorylation of endogenous polypeptides in human immune cells].

    PubMed

    Mercado, L; Arenas, G

    1999-12-01

    To detect patterns of endogenous polypeptide phosphorylation in monocyte, lymphocyte, and polymorphonuclear leukocyte populations, induced by the products of the catalytic action of L-asparaginase (EcA). Monocytes, polymorphonuclear cells and lymphocytes were isolated from heparinized blood from healthy, voluntary donors. The samples were incubated in 0.4 mCi/ml of [gamma-32P]H3PO4, with: 1 microgram/microliter of EcA, EcA and the substrate or with the products of EcA's catalytic activity: NH4+ and aspartate. The cells were lysated and electrophoresed using denaturing polyacrylamide gels that were then exposed on radiographic plates. The levels of polypeptide phosphorylation were quantified by computer densitometric analysis. The autoradiographs and the densitometric quantification of the electrophoretic profiles of monocytes, polymorphonuclear leukocytes, and lymphocytes revealed an increase in polypeptide phosphorylation when the cells were incubated with the enzyme and its substrate, ammonium and aspartate, or ammonium, which demonstrates that the NH4+ triggers intracellular phosphotransferase activity. A 58 kDa phosphoprotein outstood, it being common to the three cell populations studied. There were also specific phosphorylable polypeptides in monocytes, polymorphonuclear leukocytes, and lymphocytes. Escherichia coli L-asparaginase, binds the plasma membrane in normal human immune cells, catalyzing the L-asparagine substrate. The products of its activity: aspartate and NH4+ modify the extracellular environment, particularly the latter since it could diffuse into the cytosol and modify the pH, which would activate signal transduction pathways associated with the phosphorylation of substrates.

  5. Transcriptional Profiling of Human Endogenous Retrovirus Group HERV-K(HML-2) Loci in Melanoma

    PubMed Central

    Schmitt, Katja; Reichrath, Jörg; Roesch, Alexander; Meese, Eckart; Mayer, Jens

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies suggested a role for the human endogenous retrovirus (HERV) group HERV-K(HML-2) in melanoma because of upregulated transcription and expression of HERV-K(HML-2)-encoded proteins. Very little is known about which HML-2 loci are transcribed in melanoma. We assigned >1,400 HML-2 cDNA sequences generated from various melanoma and related samples to genomic HML-2 loci, identifying a total of 23 loci as transcribed. Transcription profiles of loci differed significantly between samples. One locus was found transcribed only in melanoma-derived samples but not in melanocytes and might represent a marker for melanoma. Several of the transcribed loci harbor ORFs for retroviral Gag and/or Env proteins. Env-encoding loci were transcribed only in melanoma. Specific investigation of rec and np9 transcripts indicated transcription of protein encoding loci in melanoma and melanocytes hinting at the relevance of Rec and Np9 in melanoma. UVB irradiation changed transcription profiles of loci and overall transcript levels decreased in melanoma and melanocytes. We further identified transcribed HML-2 loci formed by reverse transcription of spliced HML-2 transcripts by L1 machinery or in a retroviral fashion, with loci potentially encoding HML-2-like proteins. We reveal complex, sample-specific transcription of HML-2 loci in melanoma and related samples. Identified HML-2 loci and proteins encoded by those loci are particularly relevant for further studying the role of HML-2 in melanoma. Transcription of HERVs appears as a complex mechanism requiring specific studies to elucidate which HERV loci are transcribed and how transcribed HERVs may be involved in disease. PMID:23338945

  6. Human endogenous retrovirus HERV-Fc1 association with multiple sclerosis susceptibility: a meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    de la Hera, Belén; Varadé, Jezabel; García-Montojo, Marta; Alcina, Antonio; Fedetz, María; Alloza, Iraide; Astobiza, Ianire; Leyva, Laura; Fernández, Oscar; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Antigüedad, Alfredo; Arroyo, Rafael; Álvarez-Lafuente, Roberto; Vandenbroeck, Koen; Matesanz, Fuencisla; Urcelay, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) are repetitive sequences derived from ancestral germ-line infections by exogenous retroviruses and different HERV families have been integrated in the genome. HERV-Fc1 in chromosome X has been previously associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) in Northern European populations. Additionally, HERV-Fc1 RNA levels of expression have been found increased in plasma of MS patients with active disease. Considering the North-South latitude gradient in MS prevalence, we aimed to evaluate the role of HERV-Fc1on MS risk in three independent Spanish cohorts. A single nucleotide polymorphism near HERV-Fc1, rs391745, was genotyped by Taqman chemistry in a total of 2473 MS patients and 3031 ethnically matched controls, consecutively recruited from: Northern (569 patients and 980 controls), Central (883 patients and 692 controls) and Southern (1021 patients and 1359 controls) Spain. Our results were pooled in a meta-analysis with previously published data. Significant associations of the HERV-Fc1 polymorphism with MS were observed in two Spanish cohorts and the combined meta-analysis with previous data yielded a significant association [rs391745 C-allele carriers: pM-H = 0.0005; ORM-H (95% CI) = 1.27 (1.11-1.45)]. Concordantly to previous findings, when the analysis was restricted to relapsing remitting and secondary progressive MS samples, a slight enhancement in the strength of the association was observed [pM-H = 0.0003, ORM-H (95% CI) = 1.32 (1.14-1.53)]. Association of the HERV-Fc1 polymorphism rs391745 with bout-onset MS susceptibility was confirmed in Southern European cohorts.

  7. Human Endogenous Retrovirus HERV-Fc1 Association with Multiple Sclerosis Susceptibility: A Meta-Analysis

    PubMed Central

    García-Montojo, Marta; Alcina, Antonio; Fedetz, María; Alloza, Iraide; Astobiza, Ianire; Leyva, Laura; Fernández, Oscar; Izquierdo, Guillermo; Antigüedad, Alfredo; Arroyo, Rafael; Álvarez-Lafuente, Roberto; Vandenbroeck, Koen; Matesanz, Fuencisla; Urcelay, Elena

    2014-01-01

    Background Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) are repetitive sequences derived from ancestral germ-line infections by exogenous retroviruses and different HERV families have been integrated in the genome. HERV-Fc1 in chromosome X has been previously associated with multiple sclerosis (MS) in Northern European populations. Additionally, HERV-Fc1 RNA levels of expression have been found increased in plasma of MS patients with active disease. Considering the North-South latitude gradient in MS prevalence, we aimed to evaluate the role of HERV-Fc1on MS risk in three independent Spanish cohorts. Methods A single nucleotide polymorphism near HERV-Fc1, rs391745, was genotyped by Taqman chemistry in a total of 2473 MS patients and 3031 ethnically matched controls, consecutively recruited from: Northern (569 patients and 980 controls), Central (883 patients and 692 controls) and Southern (1021 patients and 1359 controls) Spain. Our results were pooled in a meta-analysis with previously published data. Results Significant associations of the HERV-Fc1 polymorphism with MS were observed in two Spanish cohorts and the combined meta-analysis with previous data yielded a significant association [rs391745 C-allele carriers: pM-H = 0.0005; ORM-H (95% CI) = 1.27 (1.11–1.45)]. Concordantly to previous findings, when the analysis was restricted to relapsing remitting and secondary progressive MS samples, a slight enhancement in the strength of the association was observed [pM-H = 0.0003, ORM-H (95% CI) = 1.32 (1.14–1.53)]. Conclusion Association of the HERV-Fc1 polymorphism rs391745 with bout-onset MS susceptibility was confirmed in Southern European cohorts. PMID:24594754

  8. Endogenous and exogenous porphyrins as photosensitizers in the Hep-2 human carcinoma cell line.

    PubMed

    Alvarez, M G; Milanesio, M; Rivarola, V; Durantini, E; Batlle, A; Fukuda, H

    2009-07-01

    The photodynamic activity of three photosensitizers (PS): AL-induced PPIX, the porphyrin derivative 5-(4-trimethylammoniumphenyl)-10, 5, 20-tris (2,4,6- trimethoxyphenyl) porphyrin (CP) and the molecular dyad porphyrin-C(60) (P-C(60)), the last two incorporated into liposomal vesicles, was evaluated on Hep-2 human larynx carcinoma cell line. ALA-induced accumulation of the endogenous PS PPIX, reached saturation values between 5 and 24 h incubation time; the maximal PPIX content was 5.7 nmol/106 cells. The same intracellular level was accumulated when the cationic porphyrin CP was used, while the amount of P-C(60) attained was 1.5 nmol/106 cells. Under violet-blue exciting light, the fluorescence of PPIX and P-C(60) was found in the cytoplasm showing a granular appearance indicating lysosomal localization. CP was mainly detected as a filamentous pattern characteristic of mitochondrial localization. No dark cytotoxicity was observed using 1mM ALA, 5 microM CP and 1 microM P-C(60) after 24 h incubation. Cell morphology was analyzed using Hoechst-33258, toluidine blue staining, TUNEL assay and DNA fragmentation, 24 h after irradiation with 54 J/cm2. When photosensitized with ALA and P-C(60), chromatine condensation characteristic of apoptotic cell death was found; instead, 58 % of necrotic cells were observed with CP. The results show that in the Hep-2 cells, of the three PS analyzed, the molecular dyad P-C(60) was more efficient than CP and PPIX, and confirm that PDT can induce different mechanisms of cell death depending on the PS and the irradiation dose.

  9. Human gut microbes impact host serum metabolome and insulin sensitivity.

    PubMed

    Pedersen, Helle Krogh; Gudmundsdottir, Valborg; Nielsen, Henrik Bjørn; Hyotylainen, Tuulia; Nielsen, Trine; Jensen, Benjamin A H; Forslund, Kristoffer; Hildebrand, Falk; Prifti, Edi; Falony, Gwen; Le Chatelier, Emmanuelle; Levenez, Florence; Doré, Joel; Mattila, Ismo; Plichta, Damian R; Pöhö, Päivi; Hellgren, Lars I; Arumugam, Manimozhiyan; Sunagawa, Shinichi; Vieira-Silva, Sara; Jørgensen, Torben; Holm, Jacob Bak; Trošt, Kajetan; Kristiansen, Karsten; Brix, Susanne; Raes, Jeroen; Wang, Jun; Hansen, Torben; Bork, Peer; Brunak, Søren; Oresic, Matej; Ehrlich, S Dusko; Pedersen, Oluf

    2016-07-21

    Insulin resistance is a forerunner state of ischaemic cardiovascular disease and type 2 diabetes. Here we show how the human gut microbiome impacts the serum metabolome and associates with insulin resistance in 277 non-diabetic Danish individuals. The serum metabolome of insulin-resistant individuals is characterized by increased levels of branched-chain amino acids (BCAAs), which correlate with a gut microbiome that has an enriched biosynthetic potential for BCAAs and is deprived of genes encoding bacterial inward transporters for these amino acids. Prevotella copri and Bacteroides vulgatus are identified as the main species driving the association between biosynthesis of BCAAs and insulin resistance, and in mice we demonstrate that P. copri can induce insulin resistance, aggravate glucose intolerance and augment circulating levels of BCAAs. Our findings suggest that microbial targets may have the potential to diminish insulin resistance and reduce the incidence of common metabolic and cardiovascular disorders.

  10. Interaction of imatinib mesylate with human serum transferrin: The comparative spectroscopic studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Śliwińska-Hill, Urszula

    2017-02-01

    Imatinib mesylate (Imt) is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor mainly used in the treatment of Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia (Ph + CML). Human serum transferrin is the most abundant serum protein responsible for the transport of iron ions and many endogenous and exogenous ligands. In this study the mechanism of interactions between the imatinib mesylate and all states of transferrin (apo-Tf, Htf and holo-Tf) has been investigated by fluorescence, ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis), circular dichroism (CD) and zeta potential spectroscopic methods. Based on the experimental results it was proved that under physiological conditions the imatinib mesylate binds to the each form of transferrin with a binding constant c.a. 105 M- 1. The thermodynamic parameters indicate that hydrogen bonds and van der Waals were involved in the interaction of apo-Tf with the drug and hydrophobic and ionic strength participate in the reaction of Htf and holo-Tf with imatinib mesylate. Moreover, it was shown that common metal ions, Zn2 + and Ca2 + strongly influenced apo-Tf-Imt binding constant. The CD studies showed that there are no conformational changes in the secondary structure of the proteins. No significant changes in secondary structure of the proteins upon binding with the drug and instability of apo-Tf-Imt system are the desirable effects from pharmacological point of view.

  11. [Effect of new peptide bioregulators livagen and epitalon on enkephalin-degrading enzymes in human serum].

    PubMed

    Kost, N V; Sokolov, O Iu; Gabaeva, M V; Zolotarev, Iu A; Malinin, V V; Khavinson, V Kh

    2003-01-01

    The effect of new peptide bioregulators--Livagen (Lys-Glu-Asp-Ala) and Epitalon (Ala-Glu-Asp-Gly)--on endogenous opioid system was studied, particularly, their ability to change the activity of enkephalin-degrading enzymes from serum and interact with opioid receptors of the brain membrane fraction. Enkephalinase activity was assayed in vitro by the rate of 3H-Leu-enkephalin hydrolysis in the presence of the tested peptides. Livagen and Epitalon inhibited enkephalin-degrading enzymes from human serum. Livagen proved to be more efficient also as compared to well-known peptidase inhibitors such as puromycin, leupeptin, and D-PAM. The dose-inhibitory effect curves for Livagen and Epitalon were plotted; their IC50 equaled 20 and 500 microM, respectively. The interaction between the peptides and opioid receptors was estimated using a radioreceptor method with [3H][D-Ala2, D-Leu5]-enkephalin. No interaction was observed between the tested peptides and mu- or delta-opioid receptors of the membrane fraction from the rat brain.

  12. Interaction of imatinib mesylate with human serum transferrin: The comparative spectroscopic studies.

    PubMed

    Śliwińska-Hill, Urszula

    2017-02-15

    Imatinib mesylate (Imt) is a tyrosine kinase inhibitor mainly used in the treatment of Philadelphia chromosome-positive chronic myelogenous leukemia (Ph+CML). Human serum transferrin is the most abundant serum protein responsible for the transport of iron ions and many endogenous and exogenous ligands. In this study the mechanism of interactions between the imatinib mesylate and all states of transferrin (apo-Tf, Htf and holo-Tf) has been investigated by fluorescence, ultraviolet-visible (UV-vis), circular dichroism (CD) and zeta potential spectroscopic methods. Based on the experimental results it was proved that under physiological conditions the imatinib mesylate binds to the each form of transferrin with a binding constant c.a. 10(5)M(-1). The thermodynamic parameters indicate that hydrogen bonds and van der Waals were involved in the interaction of apo-Tf with the drug and hydrophobic and ionic strength participate in the reaction of Htf and holo-Tf with imatinib mesylate. Moreover, it was shown that common metal ions, Zn(2+) and Ca(2+) strongly influenced apo-Tf-Imt binding constant. The CD studies showed that there are no conformational changes in the secondary structure of the proteins. No significant changes in secondary structure of the proteins upon binding with the drug and instability of apo-Tf-Imt system are the desirable effects from pharmacological point of view.

  13. Endogenous Generation of Singlet Oxygen and Ozone in Human and Animal Tissues: Mechanisms, Biological Significance, and Influence of Dietary Components

    PubMed Central

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that exposing antibodies or amino acids to singlet oxygen results in the formation of ozone (or an ozone-like oxidant) and hydrogen peroxide and that human neutrophils produce both singlet oxygen and ozone during bacterial killing. There is also mounting evidence that endogenous singlet oxygen production may be a common occurrence in cells through various mechanisms. Thus, the ozone-producing combination of singlet oxygen and amino acids might be a common cellular occurrence. This paper reviews the potential pathways of formation of singlet oxygen and ozone in vivo and also proposes some new pathways for singlet oxygen formation. Physiological consequences of the endogenous formation of these oxidants in human tissues are discussed, as well as examples of how dietary factors may promote or inhibit their generation and activity. PMID:27042259

  14. Endogenous Generation of Singlet Oxygen and Ozone in Human and Animal Tissues: Mechanisms, Biological Significance, and Influence of Dietary Components.

    PubMed

    Onyango, Arnold N

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have shown that exposing antibodies or amino acids to singlet oxygen results in the formation of ozone (or an ozone-like oxidant) and hydrogen peroxide and that human neutrophils produce both singlet oxygen and ozone during bacterial killing. There is also mounting evidence that endogenous singlet oxygen production may be a common occurrence in cells through various mechanisms. Thus, the ozone-producing combination of singlet oxygen and amino acids might be a common cellular occurrence. This paper reviews the potential pathways of formation of singlet oxygen and ozone in vivo and also proposes some new pathways for singlet oxygen formation. Physiological consequences of the endogenous formation of these oxidants in human tissues are discussed, as well as examples of how dietary factors may promote or inhibit their generation and activity.

  15. HPLC and GC/MS determination of deuterated vitamin K (phylloquinone) in human serum after ingestion of deuterium-labeled broccoli.

    PubMed

    Dolnikowski, Gregory G.; Sun, Zhiyong; Grusak, Michael A.; Peterson, James W.; Booth, Sarah L.

    2002-03-01

    The ability to intrinsically label plant constituents with stable isotopes has the potential to advance the study of vitamin K-absorption and metabolism in humans. Broccoli, a primary food source of phylloquinone (VK-1), was grown hydroponically using 31 atom % deuterium oxide in order to label VK-1 within the food matrix. Deuterium-labeled broccoli (115 g; 168 &mgr;g VK-1) was fed to one male subject in a single serving. Multiple serum samples were drawn throughout the subsequent 24-hr period. Reversed-phase HPLC was used to extract and purify VK-1 in both broccoli and serum. Ion abundances of the deuterium-labeled and unlabeled (endogenous) VK-1 were determined using GC/MS in negative chemical ionization mode. No sample derivatization was required. Endogenous VK-1 produced isotopomers from m/z 450 to m/z 453. The labeled VK-1 isotopomers in the broccoli were from m/z 452 to m/z 467, with the most abundant isotopomer being m/z 458 (14.1% of total labeled VK-1). The GC/MS chromatograms from serum revealed both endogenous VK-1 and VK-1 derived from the deuterium-labeled broccoli. The profile of labeled VK-1 isotopomers in serum was identical to the VK-1 isotopomer profile in labeled broccoli, indicating that no deuterium was lost due to exchange either in the body or in sample preparation. At 4 hr following broccoli intake, there was an 81.1% enrichment of phylloquinone in serum; labeled VK-1 was no longer detectable in serum at 24 hr. Use of isotope labeled vegetables enables one to discriminate exogenous intake of VK-1 from endogenous pools and ultimately to determine bioavailability of VK-1 from foods.

  16. A MALDI-MS-based quantitative analytical method for endogenous estrone in human breast cancer cells

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Kyoung-Jin; Kim, Hee-Jin; Park, Han-Gyu; Hwang, Cheol-Hwan; Sung, Changmin; Jang, Kyoung-Soon; Park, Sung-Hee; Kim, Byung-Gee; Lee, Yoo-Kyung; Yang, Yung-Hun; Jeong, Jae Hyun; Kim, Yun-Gon

    2016-01-01

    The level of endogenous estrone, one of the three major naturally occurring estrogens, has a significant correlation with the incidence of post-menopausal breast cancer. However, it is challenging to quantitatively monitor it owing to its low abundance. Here, we develop a robust and highly sensitive mass-assisted laser desorption/ionization mass spectrometry (MALDI-MS)-based quantitative platform to identify the absolute quantities of endogenous estrones in a variety of clinical specimens. The one-step modification of endogenous estrone provided good linearity (R2 > 0.99) and significantly increased the sensitivity of the platform (limit of quantitation: 11 fmol). In addition, we could identify the absolute amount of endogenous estrones in cells of the breast cancer cell line MCF-7 (34 fmol/106 cells) by using a deuterated estrone as an internal standard. Finally, by applying the MALDI-MS-based quantitative method to endogenous estrones, we successfully monitored changes in the metabolic expression level of estrones (17.7 fmol/106 letrozole-treated cells) in MCF-7 cells resulting from treatment with an aromatase inhibitor. Taken together, these results suggest that this MALDI-MS-based quantitative approach may be a general method for the targeted metabolomics of ketone-containing metabolites, which can reflect clinical conditions and pathogenic mechanisms. PMID:27091422

  17. Fragmentation of Contaminant and Endogenous DNA in Ancient Samples Determined by Shotgun Sequencing; Prospects for Human Palaeogenomics

    PubMed Central

    Sanchez-Quinto, Federico; Ramirez, Oscar; Calafell, Francesc; Civit, Sergi; Lalueza-Fox, Carles

    2011-01-01

    Background Despite the successful retrieval of genomes from past remains, the prospects for human palaeogenomics remain unclear because of the difficulty of distinguishing contaminant from endogenous DNA sequences. Previous sequence data generated on high-throughput sequencing platforms indicate that fragmentation of ancient DNA sequences is a characteristic trait primarily arising due to depurination processes that create abasic sites leading to DNA breaks. Methodology/Principals Findings To investigate whether this pattern is present in ancient remains from a temperate environment, we have 454-FLX pyrosequenced different samples dated between 5,500 and 49,000 years ago: a bone from an extinct goat (Myotragus balearicus) that was treated with a depurinating agent (bleach), an Iberian lynx bone not subjected to any treatment, a human Neolithic sample from Barcelona (Spain), and a Neandertal sample from the El Sidrón site (Asturias, Spain). The efficiency of retrieval of endogenous sequences is below 1% in all cases. We have used the non-human samples to identify human sequences (0.35 and 1.4%, respectively), that we positively know are contaminants. Conclusions We observed that bleach treatment appears to create a depurination-associated fragmentation pattern in resulting contaminant sequences that is indistinguishable from previously described endogenous sequences. Furthermore, the nucleotide composition pattern observed in 5′ and 3′ ends of contaminant sequences is much more complex than the flat pattern previously described in some Neandertal contaminants. Although much research on samples with known contaminant histories is needed, our results suggest that endogenous and contaminant sequences cannot be distinguished by the fragmentation pattern alone. PMID:21904610

  18. In vivo detection of oral epithelial cancer using endogenous fluorescence lifetime imaging: a pilot human study (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jo, Javier A.; Hwang, Dae Yon; Palma, Jorge; Cheng, Shuna; Cuenca, Rodrigo; Malik, Bilal; Jabbour, Joey; Cheng, Lisa; Wright, John; Maitland, Kristen

    2016-03-01

    Endogenous fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) provides direct access to the concomitant functional and biochemical changes accompanying tissue transition from benign to precancerous and cancerous. Since FLIM can noninvasively measure different and complementary biomarkers of precancer and cancer, we hypothesize that it will aid in clinically detecting early oral epithelial cancer. Our group has recently demonstrated the detection of benign from premalignant and malignant lesions based on endogenous multispectral FLIM in the hamster cheek-pouch model. Encouraged by these positive preliminary results, we have developed a handheld endoscope capable of acquiring multispectral FLIM images in real time from the oral mucosa. This novel FLIM endoscope is being used for imaging clinically suspicious pre-malignant and malignant lesions from patients before undergoing tissue biopsy for histopathological diagnosis of oral epithelial cancer. Our preliminary results thus far are already suggesting the potential of endogenous FLIM for distinguishing a variety of benign lesions from advanced dysplasia and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). To the best of out knowledge, this is the first in vivo human study aiming to demonstrate the ability to predict the true malignancy of clinically suspicious lesions using endogenous FLIM. If successful, the resulting clinical tool will allow noninvasive real-time detection of epithelial precancerous and cancerous lesions in the oral mucosa and could potentially be used to assist at every step involved on the clinical management of oral cancer patients, from early screening and diagnosis, to treatment and monitoring of recurrence.

  19. Endogenous Klebsiella pneumoniae endophthalmitis.

    PubMed

    Yin, Wenpeng; Zhou, Haijiang; Li, Chunsheng

    2014-10-01

    Klebsiella pneumonia is a common human pathogen, and endogenous endophthalmitis is a vision-threatening infection presentedwith pain, redness, decreased vision acuity, and intraocular inflammation. Endogenous endophthalmitis caused by Klebsiella pneumoniae is uncommon and usually happens in patients with immunosuppression conditions. Diabetes is a predisposing risk factor, and liver abscess is a major source of Klebsiella pneumonia endogenous endophthalmitis (KPEE). Here, we report a case of KPEE in a patient who lost his vision in one eye after treatment.

  20. Classification and characterization of human endogenous retroviruses; mosaic forms are common.

    PubMed

    Vargiu, Laura; Rodriguez-Tomé, Patricia; Sperber, Göran O; Cadeddu, Marta; Grandi, Nicole; Blikstad, Vidar; Tramontano, Enzo; Blomberg, Jonas

    2016-01-22

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) represent the inheritance of ancient germ-line cell infections by exogenous retroviruses and the subsequent transmission of the integrated proviruses to the descendants. ERVs have the same internal structure as exogenous retroviruses. While no replication-competent HERVs have been recognized, some retain up to three of four intact ORFs. HERVs have been classified before, with varying scope and depth, notably in the RepBase/RepeatMasker system. However, existing classifications are bewildering. There is a need for a systematic, unifying and simple classification. We strived for a classification which is traceable to previous classifications and which encompasses HERV variation within a limited number of clades. The human genome assembly GRCh 37/hg19 was analyzed with RetroTector, which primarily detects relatively complete Class I and II proviruses. A total of 3173 HERV sequences were identified. The structure of and relations between these proviruses was resolved through a multi-step classification procedure that involved a novel type of similarity image analysis ("Simage") which allowed discrimination of heterogeneous (noncanonical) from homogeneous (canonical) HERVs. Of the 3173 HERVs, 1214 were canonical and segregated into 39 canonical clades (groups), belonging to class I (Gamma- and Epsilon-like), II (Beta-like) and III (Spuma-like). The groups were chosen based on (1) sequence (nucleotide and Pol amino acid), similarity, (2) degree of fit to previously published clades, often from RepBase, and (3) taxonomic markers. The groups fell into 11 supergroups. The 1959 noncanonical HERVs contained 31 additional, less well-defined groups. Simage analysis revealed several types of mosaicism, notably recombination and secondary integration. By comparing flanking sequences, LTRs and completeness of gene structure, we deduced that some noncanonical HERVs proliferated after the recombination event. Groups were further divided into

  1. Modulation of human endogenous retrovirus (HERV) transcription during persistent and de novo HIV-1 infection.

    PubMed

    Vincendeau, Michelle; Göttesdorfer, Ingmar; Schreml, Julia M H; Wetie, Armand G Ngounou; Mayer, Jens; Greenwood, Alex D; Helfer, Markus; Kramer, Susanne; Seifarth, Wolfgang; Hadian, Kamyar; Brack-Werner, Ruth; Leib-Mösch, Christine

    2015-03-24

    The human genome contains multiple LTR elements including human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) that together account for approximately 8-9% of the genomic DNA. At least 40 different HERV groups have been assigned to three major HERV classes on the basis of their homologies to exogenous retroviruses. Although most HERVs are silenced by a variety of genetic and epigenetic mechanisms, they may be reactivated by environmental stimuli such as exogenous viruses and thus may contribute to pathogenic conditions. The objective of this study was to perform an in-depth analysis of the influence of HIV-1 infection on HERV activity in different cell types. A retrovirus-specific microarray that covers major HERV groups from all three classes was used to analyze HERV transcription patterns in three persistently HIV-1 infected cell lines of different cellular origins and in their uninfected counterparts. All three persistently infected cell lines showed increased transcription of multiple class I and II HERV groups. Up-regulated transcription of five HERV taxa (HERV-E, HERV-T, HERV-K (HML-10) and two ERV9 subgroups) was confirmed by quantitative reverse transcriptase PCR analysis and could be reversed by knock-down of HIV-1 expression with HIV-1-specific siRNAs. Cells infected de novo by HIV-1 showed stronger transcriptional up-regulation of the HERV-K (HML-2) group than persistently infected cells of the same origin. Analysis of transcripts from individual members of this group revealed up-regulation of predominantly two proviral loci (ERVK-7 and ERVK-15) on chromosomes 1q22 and 7q34 in persistently infected KE37.1 cells, as well as in de novo HIV-1 infected LC5 cells, while only one single HML-2 locus (ERV-K6) on chromosome 7p22.1 was activated in persistently infected LC5 cells. Our results demonstrate that HIV-1 can alter HERV transcription patterns of infected cells and indicate a correlation between activation of HERV elements and the level of HIV-1 production. Moreover

  2. CRISPR/Cas9-mediated endogenous protein tagging for RESOLFT super-resolution microscopy of living human cells.

    PubMed

    Ratz, Michael; Testa, Ilaria; Hell, Stefan W; Jakobs, Stefan

    2015-04-20

    Overexpression is a notorious concern in conventional and especially in super-resolution fluorescence light microscopy studies because it may cause numerous artifacts including ectopic sub-cellular localizations, erroneous formation of protein complexes, and others. Nonetheless, current live cell super-resolution microscopy studies generally rely on the overexpression of a host protein fused to a fluorescent protein. Here, we establish CRISPR/Cas9-mediated generation of heterozygous and homozygous human knockin cell lines expressing fluorescently tagged proteins from their respective native genomic loci at close to endogenous levels. We tagged three different proteins, exhibiting various localizations and expression levels, with the reversibly switchable fluorescent protein rsEGFP2. We demonstrate the benefit of endogenous expression levels compared to overexpression and show that typical overexpression-induced artefacts were avoided in genome-edited cells. Fluorescence activated cell sorting analysis revealed a narrow distribution of fusion protein expression levels in genome-edited cells, compared to a pronounced variability in transiently transfected cells. Using low light intensity RESOLFT (reversible saturable optical fluorescence transitions) nanoscopy we show sub-diffraction resolution imaging of living human knockin cells. Our strategy to generate human cell lines expressing fluorescent fusion proteins at endogenous levels for RESOLFT nanoscopy can be extended to other fluorescent tags and super-resolution approaches.

  3. Association Between Serum Endogenous Secretory Receptor for Advanced Glycation End Products and Risk of Type 2 Diabetes Mellitus with Combined Depression in the Chinese Population

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Yulian; Wang, Tao; Liang, Jixing; Lin, Wei; Li, Liantao; Wen, Junping; Lin, Lixiang

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Objective The role of the endogenous secretory receptor for advanced glycation end products (esRAGE) in depression of diabetes patients and its clinical significance are unclear. This study investigated the role of serum esRAGE in patients with type 2 diabetes mellitus with depression in the Chinese population. Patients and Methods One hundred nineteen hospitalized patients with type 2 diabetes were recruited at Fujian Provincial Hospital (Fuzhou, China) from February 2010 to January 2011. All selected subjects were assessed with the Hamilton Rating Scale for Depression (HAMD). Among them, 71 patients with both type 2 diabetes and depression were included. All selected subjects were examined for the following: esRAGE concentration, glycosylated hemoglobin (HbA1c), blood lipids, C-reactive protein, trace of albumin in urine, and carotid artery intima-media thickness (IMT). Association between serum esRAGE levels and risk of type 2 diabetes mellitus with depression was also analyzed. Results There were statistically significant differences in gender, age, body mass index, waist circumference, and treatment methods between the group with depression and the group without depression (P<0.05). Multiple linear regression analysis showed that HAMD scores were negatively correlated with esRAGE levels (standard regression coefficient −0.270, P<0.01). HAMD-17 scores were positively correlated with IMT (standard regression coefficient 0.183, P<0.05) and with HbA1c (standard regression coefficient 0.314, P<0.01). Conclusions Female gender, younger age, obesity, poor glycemic control, complications, and insulin therapy are all risk factors of type 2 diabetes mellitus with combined depression in the Chinese population. Inflammation and atherosclerosis play an important role in the pathogenesis of depression. esRAGE is a protective factor of depression among patients who have type 2 diabetes. PMID:22856651

  4. Identification and characterization of endogenous viral elements for the three key schistosomes of humans.

    PubMed

    Li, Na; Li, Quhuan

    2015-01-01

    Endogenous viral elements (EVEs) are widely distributed throughout eukaryotic genomes, and their evolution and potential function have attracted a lot of interest. Draft genome sequences for Schistosoma mansoni, Schistosoma japonicum and Schistosoma haematobium are now available; however, information about EVEs in blood flukes of the genus schistosoma is scanty. Here, genome-wide survey into the putative EVE sequences of the three key schistosome genomes were present. Totally 4, 117 gene sequences were identified, including retrovirus-like gypsy elements, RNA viruses and dsDNA viruses. Compared with S. japonicum and S. haematobium, S. mansoni appeared to greatly out numbered by gypsy members. Phylogenetic analysis revealed one novel endogenous retrovirus element in S. mansoni. This initial characterization of schistosomes showed that schistosomes harbour distinct EVEs that may have played an important evolutionary role. Studies of schistosomes' endogenous viruses helped us to glance at an earlier viral event in the class Trematoda, greatly broadening the field of palaeovirology.

  5. Relationship among serum taurine, serum adipokines, and body composition during 8-week human body weight control program.

    PubMed

    You, Jeong Soon; Park, Ji Yeon; Zhao, Xu; Jeong, Jin Seok; Choi, Mi Ja; Chang, Kyung Ja

    2013-01-01

    Human adipose tissue is not only a storage organ but also an active endocrine organ to release adipokines. This study was conducted to investigate the relationship among serum taurine and adipokine levels, and body composition during 8-week human body weight control program in obese female college students. The program consisted of diet therapy, exercise, and behavior modification. After the program, body weight, body fat mass, percent body fat, and body mass index (BMI) were significantly decreased. Serum triglyceride (TG), total cholesterol (TC), and low-density lipoprotein cholesterol (LDL-C) levels were significantly decreased. Also serum adiponectin level was significantly increased and serum leptin level was significantly decreased. There were no differences in serum taurine and homocysteine levels. The change of serum adiponectin level was positively correlated with change of body fat mass and percent body fat. These results may suggest that body fat loss by human body weight control program is associated with an increase in serum adiponectin in obese female college students. Therefore, further study such as taurine intervention study is needed to know more exact correlation between dietary taurine intake and serum adipokines or body composition.

  6. Generation of a fluorescently labeled endogenous protein library in living human cells.

    PubMed

    Sigal, Alex; Danon, Tamar; Cohen, Ariel; Milo, Ron; Geva-Zatorsky, Naama; Lustig, Gila; Liron, Yuvalal; Alon, Uri; Perzov, Natalie

    2007-01-01

    We present a protocol to tag proteins expressed from their endogenous chromosomal locations in individual mammalian cells using central dogma tagging. The protocol can be used to build libraries of cell clones, each expressing one endogenous protein tagged with a fluorophore such as the yellow fluorescent protein. Each round of library generation produces 100-200 cell clones and takes about 1 month. The protocol integrates procedures for high-throughput single-cell cloning using flow cytometry, high-throughput cDNA generation and 3' rapid amplification of cDNA ends, semi-automatic protein localization screening using fluorescent microscopy and freezing cells in 96-well format.

  7. Photoexcited riboflavin induces oxidative damage to human serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hirakawa, Kazutaka; Yoshioka, Takuto

    2015-08-01

    Photoexcited riboflavin induced damage of human serum albumin (HSA), a water soluble protein, resulting in the diminishment of fluorescence from the tryptophan residue. Because riboflavin hardly photosensitized singlet oxygen generation and sodium azide, a singlet oxygen quencher, did not inhibit protein damage, electron transfer-mediated oxidation of HSA was speculated. Fluorescence lifetime of riboflavin was not affected by HSA, suggesting that the excited triplet state of riboflavin is responsible for protein damage through electron transfer. In addition, the preventive effect of xanthone derivatives, triplet quenchers, on photosensitized protein damage could be evaluated using this photosensitized reaction system of riboflavin and HSA.

  8. Crystallizations of human serum amyloid P component (SAP)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    O'Hara, B. P.; Wood, S. P.; Oliva, G.; White, H. E.; Pepys, M. B.

    1988-07-01

    Human serum amyloid P component (SAP) crystallizes readily by batch methods at its isoelectric pH of 5.5 in the presence of calcium ions and small quantities of PEG 6000. Gel filtration under similar conditions shows the protein to be pentameric while under more physiological conditions of pH and ionic strength it is known to exist as stable decamers. The protein exhibits a calcium dependent affinity for the β-D-galactopyranoside pyruvate acetal moiety of agarose. The isolated sugar has been successfully employed as a crystallization additive to modify growth rate and crystal habit.

  9. Three-dimensional structure of human serum albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C.; He, Xiao-Min; Munson, Sibyl H.; Twigg, Pamela D.; Gernert, Kim M.; Broom, M. Beth; Miller, Teresa Y.

    1989-01-01

    The three-dimensional structure of human serum albumin has been solved at 6.0 A resolution by the method of multiple isomorphous replacement. Crystals were grown from solutions of polyethylene glycol in the infrequently observed space group P42(1)2 and diffracted X-rays to lattice d-spacings of less than 2.9 A. The electron density maps are of high quality and revealed the structure as a predominantly alpha-helical globin protein in which the course of the polypeptide can be traced. The binding loci of several organic compounds have been determined.

  10. Biomolecular Interaction Study of Cyclolinopeptide A with Human Serum Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Rempel, Ben; Gui, Bo; Maley, Jason; Reaney, Martin; Sammynaiken, Ramaswami

    2010-01-01

    The kinetics, energetics, and structure of Cyclolinopeptide A binding with Human Serum Albumin were investigated with surface plasmon resonance and circular dichroism. The complex is formed through slow recognition kinetics that is temperature sensitive in the range of 20°C–37°C. The overall reaction was observed to be endothermic (ΔH = 204 kJ mol−1) and entropy driven (ΔS = 746 J mol−1K−1) with overall small changes to the tertiary structure. PMID:21436992

  11. Simple and rapid determination of myristicin in human serum.

    PubMed

    Dawidowicz, Andrzej L; Dybowski, Michal P

    2013-01-01

    Myristicin (5-allyl-1-methoxy-2,3-methylenodioxybenzene) is the main component of nutmeg (Myristica fragrans Houtt.) essential oil. The increasing use of myristicin as a cheap hallucinogenic intoxicant, frequently causing fatal cases of myristicin poisoning, requires new methods for determination of this compound in blood. This report describes the rapid, simple, and useful procedure for myristicin analysis in human serum, involving myristicin-protein complex degradation before chromatographic analysis. The developed method is characterized by a high recovery (above 99 %), a low detection limit (6.0 ng/g) and good repeatability (average RDS of 2.01 %).

  12. THERMODYNAMIC CHARACTERIZATION OF METAL PHTHALOCYANINES-HUMAN SERUM ALBUMIN INTERACTIONS

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Cecil L.

    2012-01-01

    The temperature dependence of the binding constants for human serum albumin and sulfonated metal-phthalocyanines were estimated by fluorescence spectroscopy. Stern-Volmer’s analysis and Chipman’s fits provided binding data for van’t Hoff calculations of the thermodynamic parameters governing these interactions. Results show that the formations of the HSA- phthalocyanine complexes are favorable processes by both the ΔH° and ΔS°. However, the formation of HSA-AIPcS4 has a stronger dependence than HSA-ZnPcS 4on ΔS°. PMID:24058291

  13. Influence of honeybee sting on peptidome profile in human serum.

    PubMed

    Matysiak, Jan; Światły, Agata; Hajduk, Joanna; Matysiak, Joanna; Kokot, Zenon J

    2015-05-22

    The aim of this study was to explore the serum peptide profiles from honeybee stung and non-stung individuals. Two groups of serum samples obtained from 27 beekeepers were included in our study. The first group of samples was collected within 3 h after a bee sting (stung beekeepers), and the samples were collected from the same person a second time after at least six weeks after the last bee sting (non-stung beekeepers). Peptide profile spectra were determined using MALDI-TOF mass spectrometry combined with Omix, ZipTips and magnetic beads based on weak-cation exchange (MB-WCX) enrichment strategies in the mass range of 1-10 kDa. The samples were classified, and discriminative models were established by using the quick classifier, genetic algorithm and supervised neural network algorithms. All of the statistical algorithms used in this study allow distinguishing analyzed groups with high statistical significance, which confirms the influence of honeybee sting on the serum peptidome profile. The results of this study may broaden the understanding of the human organism's response to honeybee venom. Due to the fact that our pilot study was carried out on relatively small datasets, it is necessary to conduct further proteomic research of the response to honeybee sting on a larger group of samples.

  14. Quantification of Interactions between Serum Albumin and Endogenous Free Fatty Acids or Exogenous Chemicals by Stable Isotope-Coded Mass Spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Li, Tingting; Yue, Yingxia; Li, Jianjian; Wang, Xiaoli; Fu, Jieying; Zhong, Hongying

    2011-08-11

    As primary endogenous ligands of serum albumin, free fatty acids exert versatile effects on the albumin conformation through cooperative or competitive interactions with exogenous chemicals. Based on equilibrium partition between n-hexane and aqueous phases, we have established three indexes, defined as R A, R V, and R T, for quantitative assessment of the intrinsic binding affinity, the affinitive variation induced by exogenous chemicals, and the topological dependence of albumin affinity, respectively. When albumin molecules in the aqueous phase are in native or denatured forms, or disturbed by exogenous chemicals, corresponding changes of free fatty acids in the n-hexane phase can be quantified by an iFFAM (isotope-coded free fatty acid methylation) approach. Free fatty acids from the control and the sample are differentially derived by d0- or d3-methanol and analyzed by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry. Changes of fatty acids can be revealed by peak ratios of d0- or d3-labeled fragment ions of fatty acid methyl esters.

  15. A Panel of Serum MiRNA Biomarkers for the Diagnosis of Severe to Mild Traumatic Brain Injury in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Bhomia, Manish; Balakathiresan, Nagaraja S.; Wang, Kevin K.; Papa, Linda; Maheshwari, Radha K.

    2016-01-01

    MicroRNAs (MiRNAs) are small endogenous RNA molecules and have emerged as novel serum diagnostic biomarkers for several diseases due to their stability and detection at minute quantities. In this study, we have identified a serum miRNA signature in human serum samples of mild to severe TBI, which can be used for diagnosis of mild and moderate TBI (MMTBI). Human serum samples of MMTBI, severe TBI (STBI), orthopedic injury and healthy controls were used and miRNA profiling was done using taqman real time PCR. The real time PCR data for the MMTBI, STBI and orthopedic injury was normalized to the control samples which showed upregulation of 39, 37 and 33 miRNAs in MMTBI, STBI and orthopedic injury groups respectively. TBI groups were compared to orthopedic injury group and an up-regulation of 18 and 20 miRNAs in MMTBI and STBI groups was observed. Among these, a signature of 10 miRNAs was found to be present in both MMTBI and STBI groups. These 10 miRNAs were validated in cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) from STBI and four miRNAs were found to be upregulated in CSF. In conclusion, we identified a subset of 10 unique miRNAs which can be used for diagnosis of MMTBI and STBI. PMID:27338832

  16. Deep-Dive Targeted Quantification for Ultrasensitive Analysis of Proteins in Nondepleted Human Blood Plasma/Serum and Tissues.

    PubMed

    Nie, Song; Shi, Tujin; Fillmore, Thomas L; Schepmoes, Athena A; Brewer, Heather; Gao, Yuqian; Song, Ehwang; Wang, Hui; Rodland, Karin D; Qian, Wei-Jun; Smith, Richard D; Liu, Tao

    2017-09-05

    Mass spectrometry-based targeted proteomics (e.g., selected reaction monitoring, SRM) is emerging as an attractive alternative to immunoassays for protein quantification. Recently we have made significant progress in SRM sensitivity for enabling quantification of low nanograms per milliliter to sub-naograms per milliliter level proteins in nondepleted human blood plasma/serum without affinity enrichment. However, precise quantification of extremely low abundance proteins (e.g., ≤ 100 pg/mL in blood plasma/serum) using targeted proteomics approaches still remains challenging, especially for these samples without available antibodies for enrichment. To address this need, we have developed an antibody-independent deep-dive SRM (DD-SRM) approach that capitalizes on multidimensional high-resolution reversed-phase liquid chromatography (LC) separation for target peptide separation and enrichment combined with precise selection of target peptide fractions of interest, significantly improving SRM sensitivity by ∼5 orders of magnitude when compared to conventional LC-SRM. Application of DD-SRM to human serum and tissue provides precise quantification of endogenous proteins at the ∼10 pg/mL level in nondepleted serum and at <10 copies per cell level in tissue. Thus, DD-SRM holds great promise for precisely measuring extremely low abundance proteins or protein modifications, especially when high-quality antibodies are not available.

  17. Effects of endogenous formaldehyde in nasal tissues on inhaled formaldehyde dosimetry predictions in the rat, monkey, and human nasal passages.

    PubMed

    Schroeter, Jeffry D; Campbell, Jerry; Kimbell, Julia S; Conolly, Rory B; Clewell, Harvey J; Andersen, Melvin E

    2014-04-01

    Formaldehyde is a nasal carcinogen in rodents at high doses and is an endogenous compound that is present in all living cells. Due to its high solubility and reactivity, quantitative risk estimates for inhaled formaldehyde have relied on internal dose estimates in the upper respiratory tract. Dosimetry calculations are complicated by the presence of endogenous formaldehyde concentrations in the respiratory mucosa. Anatomically accurate computational fluid dynamics (CFD) models of the rat, monkey, and human nasal passages were used to simulate uptake of inhaled formaldehyde. An epithelial structure was implemented in the nasal CFD models to estimate formaldehyde absorption from air:tissue partitioning, species-specific metabolism, first-order clearance, DNA binding, and endogenous formaldehyde production. At an exposure concentration of 1 ppm, predicted formaldehyde nasal uptake was 99.4, 86.5, and 85.3% in the rat, monkey, and human, respectively. Endogenous formaldehyde in nasal tissues did not significantly affect wall mass flux or nasal uptake predictions at exposure concentrations > 500 ppb; however, reduced nasal uptake was predicted at lower exposure concentrations. At an exposure concentration of 1 ppb, predicted nasal uptake was 17.5 and 42.8% in the rat and monkey; net desorption of formaldehyde was predicted in the human model. The nonlinear behavior of formaldehyde nasal absorption will affect the dose-response analysis and subsequent risk estimates at low exposure concentrations. Updated surface area partitioning of nonsquamous epithelium and average flux values in regions where DNA-protein cross-links and cell proliferation rates were measured in rats and monkeys are reported for use in formaldehyde risk models of carcinogenesis.

  18. Tuning the serum persistence of human serum albumin domain III:diabody fusion proteins

    PubMed Central

    Kenanova, Vania E.; Olafsen, Tove; Salazar, Felix B.; Williams, Lawrence E.; Knowles, Scott; Wu, Anna M.

    2010-01-01

    The long circulation persistence of human serum albumin (HSA) is enabled by its domain III (DIII) interaction with the neonatal Fc receptor (FcRn). A protein scaffold based on HSA DIII was designed. To modify the serum half life of the scaffold, residues H535, H510, and H464 were individually mutated to alanine. HSA DIII wild type (WT) and variants were fused to the anti-carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) T84.66 diabody (Db), radiolabeled with 124I and injected into xenografted athymic mice for serial PET/CT imaging. All proteins targeted the CEA-positive tumor. The mean residence times (MRT) of the proteins, calculated by quantifying blood activity from the PET images, were: Db-DIII WT (56.7 h), H535A (25 h), H510A (20 h), H464A (17 h), compared with Db (2.9 h). Biodistribution confirmed the order of blood clearance from slow to fast: Db-DIII WT > H535A > H510A > H464A > Db with 4.0, 2.0, 1.8, 1.6 and 0.08 %ID/g of remaining blood activity at 51 h, respectively. This study demonstrates that attenuating the DIII–FcRn interaction provides a way of controlling the pharmacokinetics of the entire Db-DIII fusion protein without compromising tumor targeting. H464 appears to be most crucial for FcRn binding (greatest reduction in MRT), followed by H510 and H535. By mutating the DIII scaffold, we can dial serum kinetics for imaging or therapy applications. PMID:20802234

  19. Comparative Analysis of Human Growth Hormone in Serum Using SPRi, Nano-SPRi and ELISA Assays

    PubMed Central

    Henrich, Vincent C.; Sandros, Marinella G.

    2016-01-01

    Sensitive and selective methods for the detection of human growth hormone (hGH) over a wide range of concentrations (high levels of 50-100 ng ml−1 and minimum levels of 0.03 ng ml−1) in circulating blood are essential as variable levels may indicate altered physiology. For example, growth disorders occurring in childhood can be diagnosed by measuring levels of hGH in blood. Also, the misuse of recombinant hGH in sports not only poses an ethical issue it also presents serious health threats to the abuser. One popular strategy for measuring hGH misuse, relies on the detection of the ratio of 22 kDa hGH to total hGH, as non-22 kDa endogenous levels drop after exogenous recombinant hGH (rhGH) administration.Surface plasmon resonance imaging (SPRi) is an analytical tool that allows direct (label-free) monitoring and visualization of biomolecular interactions by recording changes of the refractive index adjacent to the sensor surface in real time. In contrast, the most frequently used colorimetric method, enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) uses enzyme labeled detection antibodies to indirectly measure analyte concentration after the addition of a substrate that induces a color change. To increase detection sensitivity, amplified SPRi uses a sandwich assay format and near infrared quantum dots (QDs) to increase signal strength. After direct SPRi detection of recombinant rhGH in spiked human serum, the SPRi signal is amplified by the sequential injection of detection antibody coated with near-infrared QDs (Nano-SPRi). In this study, the diagnostic potential of direct and amplified SPRi was assessed for measuring rhGH spiked in human serum and compared directly with the capabilities of a commercially available ELISA kit. PMID:26780354

  20. Human Serum Butyrylcholinesterase: A Bioscavenger for the Protection of Humans from Organophosphorus Exposure

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-10-01

    enzymes. All animals exposed to GB vapor for 60 min showed signs of cardiac and neurological toxicity and died following exposure. Animals exposed to GB...min showed signs of cardiac and neurological toxicity and died following exposure. Animals exposed to GB vapor for 10 min also died, but showed signs...examined. The exogenous administration of AChE from fetal bovine serum and BChE from equine and human (Hu) serum, has been successfully used as a safe

  1. Effects of Macromolecular Crowding on Human Adipose Stem Cell Culture in Fetal Bovine Serum, Human Serum, and Defined Xeno-Free/Serum-Free Conditions

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Michelle Hui Ching; Mäkinen, Laura; Ang, Xiu Min; Mannerström, Bettina; Raghunath, Michael; Miettinen, Susanna

    2017-01-01

    Microenvironment plays an important role for stem cell proliferation and differentiation. Macromolecular crowding (MMC) was recently shown to assist stem cells in forming their own matrix microenvironment in vitro. The ability of MMC to support adipose stem cell (ASC) proliferation, metabolism, and multilineage differentiation was studied under different conditions: fetal bovine serum- (FBS-) and human serum- (HS-) based media and xeno- and serum-free (XF/SF) media. Furthermore, the immunophenotype of ASCs under MMC was evaluated. The proliferative capacity of ASCs under MMC was attenuated in each condition. However, osteogenic differentiation was enhanced under MMC, shown by increased deposition of mineralized matrix in FBS and HS cultures. Likewise, significantly greater lipid droplet accumulation and increased collagen IV deposition indicated enhanced adipogenesis under MMC in FBS and HS cultures. In contrast, chondrogenic differentiation was attenuated in ASCs expanded under MMC. The ASC immunophenotype was maintained under MMC with significantly higher expression of CD54. However, MMC impaired metabolic activity and differentiation capacity of ASCs in XF/SF conditions. Both the supportive and inhibitory effects of MMC on ASC are culture condition dependent. In the presence of serum, MMC maintains ASC immunophenotype and enhances adipogenic and osteogenic differentiation at the cost of reduced proliferation. PMID:28465691

  2. Fluorescence lifetime measurements of native and glycated human serum albumin and bovine serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Narahari V.; Joshi, Virgina O. d.; Contreras, Silvia; Gil, Herminia; Medina, Honorio; Siemiarczuk, Aleksander

    1999-05-01

    Nonenzymatic glycation, also known as Maillard reaction, plays an important role in the secondary complications of the diabetic pathology and aging, therefore, human serum albumin (HSA) and bovine serum albumin (BSA) were glycated by a conventional method in our laboratory using glucose as the glycating agent. Fluorescence lifetime measurements were carried out with a laser strobe fluorometer equipped with a nitrogen/dye laser and a frequency doubler as a pulsed excitation source. The samples were excited at 295 nm and the emission spectra were recorded at 345 nm. The obtained decay curves were tried for double and triple exponential functions. It has been found that the shorter lifetime increases for glycated proteins as compared with that of the native ones. For example, in the case of glycated BSA the lifetime increased from 1.36 ns to 2.30 ns. Similarly, for HSA, the lifetime increases from 1.58 ns to 2.26 ns. Meanwhile, the longer lifetime changed very slightly for both proteins (from 6.52 ns to 6.72 ns). The increase in the lifetime can be associated with the environmental effect; originated from the attachment of glucose to some lysine residues. A good example is Trp 214 which is in the cage of Lys 225, Lys 212, Lys 233, Lys 205, Lys 500, Lys 199 and Lys 195. If fluorescence lifetime technique is calibrated and properly used it could be employed for assessing glycation of proteins.

  3. Systematic identification and characterization of regulatory elements derived from human endogenous retroviruses.

    PubMed

    Ito, Jumpei; Sugimoto, Ryota; Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Yamada, Shiro; Kimura, Tetsuaki; Hayano, Takahide; Inoue, Ituro

    2017-07-01

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) and other long terminal repeat (LTR)-type retrotransposons (HERV/LTRs) have regulatory elements that possibly influence the transcription of host genes. We systematically identified and characterized these regulatory elements based on publicly available datasets of ChIP-Seq of 97 transcription factors (TFs) provided by ENCODE and Roadmap Epigenomics projects. We determined transcription factor-binding sites (TFBSs) using the ChIP-Seq datasets and identified TFBSs observed on HERV/LTR sequences (HERV-TFBSs). Overall, 794,972 HERV-TFBSs were identified. Subsequently, we identified "HERV/LTR-shared regulatory element (HSRE)," defined as a TF-binding motif in HERV-TFBSs, shared within a substantial fraction of a HERV/LTR type. HSREs could be an indication that the regulatory elements of HERV/LTRs are present before their insertions. We identified 2,201 HSREs, comprising specific associations of 354 HERV/LTRs and 84 TFs. Clustering analysis showed that HERV/LTRs can be grouped according to the TF binding patterns; HERV/LTR groups bounded to pluripotent TFs (e.g., SOX2, POU5F1, and NANOG), embryonic endoderm/mesendoderm TFs (e.g., GATA4/6, SOX17, and FOXA1/2), hematopoietic TFs (e.g., SPI1 (PU1), GATA1/2, and TAL1), and CTCF were identified. Regulatory elements of HERV/LTRs tended to locate nearby and/or interact three-dimensionally with the genes involved in immune responses, indicating that the regulatory elements play an important role in controlling the immune regulatory network. Further, we demonstrated subgroup-specific TF binding within LTR7, LTR5B, and LTR5_Hs, indicating that gains or losses of the regulatory elements occurred during genomic invasions of the HERV/LTRs. Finally, we constructed dbHERV-REs, an interactive database of HERV/LTR regulatory elements (http://herv-tfbs.com/). This study provides fundamental information in understanding the impact of HERV/LTRs on host transcription, and offers insights into the

  4. Systematic identification and characterization of regulatory elements derived from human endogenous retroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Sugimoto, Ryota; Nakaoka, Hirofumi; Inoue, Ituro

    2017-01-01

    Human endogenous retroviruses (HERVs) and other long terminal repeat (LTR)-type retrotransposons (HERV/LTRs) have regulatory elements that possibly influence the transcription of host genes. We systematically identified and characterized these regulatory elements based on publicly available datasets of ChIP-Seq of 97 transcription factors (TFs) provided by ENCODE and Roadmap Epigenomics projects. We determined transcription factor-binding sites (TFBSs) using the ChIP-Seq datasets and identified TFBSs observed on HERV/LTR sequences (HERV-TFBSs). Overall, 794,972 HERV-TFBSs were identified. Subsequently, we identified “HERV/LTR-shared regulatory element (HSRE),” defined as a TF-binding motif in HERV-TFBSs, shared within a substantial fraction of a HERV/LTR type. HSREs could be an indication that the regulatory elements of HERV/LTRs are present before their insertions. We identified 2,201 HSREs, comprising specific associations of 354 HERV/LTRs and 84 TFs. Clustering analysis showed that HERV/LTRs can be grouped according to the TF binding patterns; HERV/LTR groups bounded to pluripotent TFs (e.g., SOX2, POU5F1, and NANOG), embryonic endoderm/mesendoderm TFs (e.g., GATA4/6, SOX17, and FOXA1/2), hematopoietic TFs (e.g., SPI1 (PU1), GATA1/2, and TAL1), and CTCF were identified. Regulatory elements of HERV/LTRs tended to locate nearby and/or interact three-dimensionally with the genes involved in immune responses, indicating that the regulatory elements play an important role in controlling the immune regulatory network. Further, we demonstrated subgroup-specific TF binding within LTR7, LTR5B, and LTR5_Hs, indicating that gains or losses of the regulatory elements occurred during genomic invasions of the HERV/LTRs. Finally, we constructed dbHERV-REs, an interactive database of HERV/LTR regulatory elements (http://herv-tfbs.com/). This study provides fundamental information in understanding the impact of HERV/LTRs on host transcription, and offers insights into the

  5. Molecular characteristics of Human Endogenous Retrovirus type-W in schizophrenia and bipolar disorder.

    PubMed

    Perron, H; Hamdani, N; Faucard, R; Lajnef, M; Jamain, S; Daban-Huard, C; Sarrazin, S; LeGuen, E; Houenou, J; Delavest, M; Moins-Teisserenc, H; Moins-Teiserenc, H; Bengoufa, D; Yolken, R; Madeira, A; Garcia-Montojo, M; Gehin, N; Burgelin, I; Ollagnier, G; Bernard, C; Dumaine, A; Henrion, A; Gombert, A; Le Dudal, K; Charron, D; Krishnamoorthy, R; Tamouza, R; Leboyer, M

    2012-12-04

    Epidemiological and genome-wide association studies of severe psychiatric disorders such as schizophrenia (SZ) and bipolar disorder (BD), suggest complex interactions between multiple genetic elements and environmental factors. The involvement of genetic elements such as Human Endogenous Retroviruses type 'W' family (HERV-W) has consistently been associated with SZ. HERV-W envelope gene (env) is activated by environmental factors and encodes a protein displaying inflammation and neurotoxicity. The present study addressed the molecular characteristics of HERV-W env in SZ and BD. Hundred and thirty-six patients, 91 with BD, 45 with SZ and 73 healthy controls (HC) were included. HERV-W env transcription was found to be elevated in BD (P<10-4) and in SZ (P=0.012) as compared with HC, but with higher values in BD than in SZ group (P<0.01). The corresponding DNA copy number was paradoxically lower in the genome of patients with BD (P=0.0016) or SZ (P<0.0003) than in HC. Differences in nucleotide sequence of HERV-W env were found between patients with SZ and BD as compared with HC, as well as between SZ and BD. The molecular characteristics of HERV-W env also differ from what was observed in Multiple Sclerosis (MS) and may represent distinct features of the genome of patients with BD and SZ. The seroprevalence for Toxoplasma gondii yielded low but significant association with HERV-W transcriptional level in a subgroup of BD and SZ, suggesting a potential role in particular patients. A global hypothesis of mechanisms inducing such major psychoses is discussed, placing HERV-W at the crossroads between environmental, genetic and immunological factors. Thus, particular infections would act as activators of HERV-W elements in earliest life, resulting in the production of an HERV-W envelope protein, which then stimulates pro-inflammatory and neurotoxic cascades. This hypothesis needs to be further explored as it may yield major changes in our understanding and treatment of

  6. Clinical breath analysis: discriminating between human endogenous compounds and exogenous (environmental) chemical confounders.

    PubMed

    Pleil, Joachim D; Stiegel, Matthew A; Risby, Terence H

    2013-03-01

    Volatile organic compounds (VOCs) in exhaled breath originate from current or previous environmental exposures (exogenous compounds) and internal metabolic (anabolic and catabolic) production (endogenous compounds). The origins of certain VOCs in breath presumed to be endogenous have been proposed to be useful as preclinical biomarkers of various undiagnosed diseases including lung cancer, breast cancer, and cardio-pulmonary disease. The usual approach is to develop difference algorithms comparing VOC profiles from nominally healthy controls to cohorts of patients presenting with a documented disease, and then to apply the resulting rules to breath profiles of subjects with unknown disease status. This approach to diagnosis has a progression of sophistication; at the most rudimentary level, all measurable VOCs are included in the model. The next level corrects exhaled VOC concentrations for current inspired air concentrations. At the highest level, VOCs exhibiting discriminatory value also require a plausible biochemical pathway for their production before inclusion. Although these approaches have all shown some level of success, there is concern that pattern recognition is prone to error from environmental contamination and between-subject variance. In this paper, we explore the underlying assumptions for the interpretation and assignment of endogenous compounds with probative value for assessing changes. Specifically, we investigate the influence of previous exposures, elimination mechanisms and partitioning of exogenous compounds as confounders of true endogenous compounds. We provide specific examples based on a simple classical pharmacokinetic approach to identify potential misinterpretations of breath data and propose some remedies.

  7. A New Nanobody-Based Biosensor to Study Endogenous PARP1 In Vitro and in Live Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Nüske, Stefan; Scholz, Armin M.; Bogner, Jacqueline; Ruf, Benjamin; Zolghadr, Kourosh; Drexler, Sophie E.; Drexler, Guido A.; Girst, Stefanie; Greubel, Christoph; Reindl, Judith; Siebenwirth, Christian; Romer, Tina; Friedl, Anna A.; Rothbauer, Ulrich

    2016-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerase 1 (PARP1) is a key player in DNA repair, genomic stability and cell survival and it emerges as a highly relevant target for cancer therapies. To deepen our understanding of PARP biology and mechanisms of action of PARP1-targeting anti-cancer compounds, we generated a novel PARP1-affinity reagent, active both in vitro and in live cells. This PARP1-biosensor is based on a PARP1-specific single-domain antibody fragment (~ 15 kDa), termed nanobody, which recognizes the N-terminus of human PARP1 with nanomolar affinity. In proteomic approaches, immobilized PARP1 nanobody facilitates quantitative immunoprecipitation of functional, endogenous PARP1 from cellular lysates. For cellular studies, we engineered an intracellularly functional PARP1 chromobody by combining the nanobody coding sequence with a fluorescent protein sequence. By following the chromobody signal, we were for the first time able to monitor the recruitment of endogenous PARP1 to DNA damage sites in live cells. Moreover, tracing of the sub-nuclear translocation of the chromobody signal upon treatment of human cells with chemical substances enables real-time profiling of active compounds in high content imaging. Due to its ability to perform as a biosensor at the endogenous level of the PARP1 enzyme, the novel PARP1 nanobody is a unique and versatile tool for basic and applied studies of PARP1 biology and DNA repair. PMID:26950694

  8. Native human interferon-α is a strong inductor of endogenous cytokines involved in the suppression of procollagen type I.

    PubMed

    Santak, G; Santak, M; Forčić, D

    2013-09-01

    Native human interferon-α (nHuIFN-α) has a stronger reductive effect on procollagen type I mRNA expression than recombinant human interferon-α (rHuIFN-α). It is partially due to the additive activity of interleukin-1β (IL-1β), which is present in small concentrations in nHuIFN-α. Here, we show that the reductive effect is also the result of the endogenous cytokines induced by the activity of nHuIFN-α. In the culture of MRC5 fibroblasts, we have further found that nHuIFN-α induces endogenous interferons in higher amounts than rHuIFN-α, measured with PCR. That is more pronounced when interferon-γ (IFN-γ) is measured. This result puts a new light on IFN-γ activity in the nHuIFN-α treatment because its role was neglected due to the loss of its activity during the nHuIFN-α preparation process. The findings lead to the conclusion that endogenous cytokines play a significant role in the nHuIFN-α -mediated reduction of procollagen type I mRNA and are therefore an important factor in potential therapeutic usage. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Masson SAS. All rights reserved.

  9. Endogenous circadian rhythm in human motor activity uncoupled from circadian influences on cardiac dynamics.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, Plamen Ch; Hu, Kun; Hilton, Michael F; Shea, Steven A; Stanley, H Eugene

    2007-12-26

    The endogenous circadian pacemaker influences key physiologic functions, such as body temperature and heart rate, and is normally synchronized with the sleep/wake cycle. Epidemiological studies demonstrate a 24-h pattern in adverse cardiovascular events with a peak at approximately 10 a.m. It is unknown whether this pattern in cardiac risk is caused by a day/night pattern of behaviors, including activity level and/or influences from the internal circadian pacemaker. We recently found that a scaling index of cardiac vulnerability has an endogenous circadian peak at the circadian phase corresponding to approximately 10 a.m., which conceivably could contribute to the morning peak in cardiac risk. Here, we test whether this endogenous circadian influence on cardiac dynamics is caused by circadian-mediated changes in motor activity or whether activity and heart rate dynamics are decoupled across the circadian cycle. We analyze high-frequency recordings of motion from young healthy subjects during two complementary protocols that decouple the sleep/wake cycle from the circadian cycle while controlling scheduled behaviors. We find that static activity properties (mean and standard deviation) exhibit significant circadian rhythms with a peak at the circadian phase corresponding to 5-9 p.m. ( approximately 9 h later than the peak in the scale-invariant index of heartbeat fluctuations). In contrast, dynamic characteristics of the temporal scale-invariant organization of activity fluctuations (long-range correlations) do not exhibit a circadian rhythm. These findings suggest that endogenous circadian-mediated activity variations are not responsible for the endogenous circadian rhythm in the scale-invariant structure of heartbeat fluctuations and likely do not contribute to the increase in cardiac risk at approximately 10 a.m.

  10. Endogenous circadian rhythm in human motor activity uncoupled from circadian influences on cardiac dynamics

    PubMed Central

    Ivanov, Plamen Ch.; Hu, Kun; Hilton, Michael F.; Shea, Steven A.; Stanley, H. Eugene

    2007-01-01

    The endogenous circadian pacemaker influences key physiologic functions, such as body temperature and heart rate, and is normally synchronized with the sleep/wake cycle. Epidemiological studies demonstrate a 24-h pattern in adverse cardiovascular events with a peak at ≈10 a.m. It is unknown whether this pattern in cardiac risk is caused by a day/night pattern of behaviors, including activity level and/or influences from the internal circadian pacemaker. We recently found that a scaling index of cardiac vulnerability has an endogenous circadian peak at the circadian phase corresponding to ≈10 a.m., which conceivably could contribute to the morning peak in cardiac risk. Here, we test whether this endogenous circadian influence on cardiac dynamics is caused by circadian-mediated changes in motor activity or whether activity and heart rate dynamics are decoupled across the circadian cycle. We analyze high-frequency recordings of motion from young healthy subjects during two complementary protocols that decouple the sleep/wake cycle from the circadian cycle while controlling scheduled behaviors. We find that static activity properties (mean and standard deviation) exhibit significant circadian rhythms with a peak at the circadian phase corresponding to 5–9 p.m. (≈9 h later than the peak in the scale-invariant index of heartbeat fluctuations). In contrast, dynamic characteristics of the temporal scale-invariant organization of activity fluctuations (long-range correlations) do not exhibit a circadian rhythm. These findings suggest that endogenous circadian-mediated activity variations are not responsible for the endogenous circadian rhythm in the scale-invariant structure of heartbeat fluctuations and likely do not contribute to the increase in cardiac risk at ≈10 a.m. PMID:18093917

  11. Characterisation of the endogenous human peripheral serotonin transporter SLC6A4 reveals surface expression without N-glycosylation.

    PubMed

    Chamba, Anita; Holder, Michelle J; Barnes, Nicholas M; Gordon, John

    2008-11-15

    RT-PCR confirmed that human cell lines of diverse peripheral origins express transcripts for the serotonin transporter (sert/slc6a4). Molecular weights reported for the translated protein appear to be quite variable however. Here we compared directly immunoreactive protein generated from cloned sert transfected into HEK293 with that carried endogenously among the cell lines. The dominant glycosylated 85-95 kDa immunoreactive species contained in HEK-sert transfectants was poorly represented in any native cell: instead, discrete 70 and 60 kDa bands were universally detected. Biotinylation of lymphoid cells revealed that the endogenous non-glycosylated 60 kDa but not 70 kDa protein was available at the surface to access exogenous ligands.

  12. Characterization of Human AB Serum for Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Expansion

    PubMed Central

    dos Santos, Vanessa Tieko Marques; Mizukami, Amanda; Orellana, Maristela Delgado; Caruso, Samia Rigotto; da Silva, Fernanda Borges; Traina, Fabiola; de Lima Prata, Karen; Covas, Dimas Tadeu; Swiech, Kamilla

    2017-01-01

    Background So far, using human blood-derived components appears to be the most efficient and safest approach available for mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) expansion. In this paper, we report on the characterization of human AB serum (AB HS) produced by using different plasma sources, and its use as an alternative supplement to MSC expansion. Methods Two plasma sources were used for AB HS production: plasma removed from whole blood after 24 h of collection (PC > 24 h) and plasma, cryoprecipitate reduced (PCryoR). The biochemical profile and quality of the produced AB HS batches were analyzed and their ability to support MSC cell growth after different storage times (0, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months) was evaluated. Results The two plasma sources used showed similar characteristics regarding biochemical constituents and quality parameters and were effective in promoting MSC growth. MSCs cultured in medium supplemented with 10% AB HS presented similar doubling times and cumulative population doublings when compared to the 10% fetal bovine serum(FBS)-supplemented culture while maintaining immunophenotype, functional features, and cytogenetic profile. Conclusion Overall, the results indicate that AB HS is an efficient FBS substitute and can be used for at least 12 months after production without impairing cell proliferation and quality. PMID:28275329

  13. Characterization of Human AB Serum for Mesenchymal Stromal Cell Expansion.

    PubMed

    Dos Santos, Vanessa Tieko Marques; Mizukami, Amanda; Orellana, Maristela Delgado; Caruso, Samia Rigotto; da Silva, Fernanda Borges; Traina, Fabiola; de Lima Prata, Karen; Covas, Dimas Tadeu; Swiech, Kamilla

    2017-01-01

    So far, using human blood-derived components appears to be the most efficient and safest approach available for mesenchymal stromal cell (MSC) expansion. In this paper, we report on the characterization of human AB serum (AB HS) produced by using different plasma sources, and its use as an alternative supplement to MSC expansion. Two plasma sources were used for AB HS production: plasma removed from whole blood after 24 h of collection (PC > 24 h) and plasma, cryoprecipitate reduced (PCryoR). The biochemical profile and quality of the produced AB HS batches were analyzed and their ability to support MSC cell growth after different storage times (0, 3, 6, 9 and 12 months) was evaluated. The two plasma sources used showed similar characteristics regarding biochemical constituents and quality parameters and were effective in promoting MSC growth. MSCs cultured in medium supplemented with 10% AB HS presented similar doubling times and cumulative population doublings when compared to the 10% fetal bovine serum(FBS)-supplemented culture while maintaining immunophenotype, functional features, and cytogenetic profile. Overall, the results indicate that AB HS is an efficient FBS substitute and can be used for at least 12 months after production without impairing cell proliferation and quality.

  14. Interaction of mycotoxin zearalenone with human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Poór, Miklós; Kunsági-Máté, Sándor; Bálint, Mónika; Hetényi, Csaba; Gerner, Zsófia; Lemli, Beáta

    2017-03-27

    Zearalenone (ZEN) is a mycotoxin produced mainly by Fusarium species. Fungal contamination of cereals and plants can result in the formation of ZEN, leading to its presence in different foods, animal feeds, and drinks. Because ZEN is an endocrine disruptor, it causes reproductive disorders in farm animals and hyperoestrogenic syndromes in humans. Despite toxicokinetic properties of ZEN were studied in more species, we have no information regarding the interaction of ZEN with serum albumin. Since albumin commonly plays an important role in the toxicokinetics of different toxins, interaction of ZEN with albumin has of high biological importance. Therefore the interaction of ZEN with human serum albumin (HSA) was investigated using spectroscopic methods, ultrafiltration, and molecular modeling studies. Fluorescence spectroscopic studies demonstrate that ZEN forms complex with HSA. Binding constant (K) of ZEN-HSA complex was quantified with fluorescence quenching technique. The determined binding constant (logK=5.1) reflects the strong interaction of ZEN with albumin suggesting the potential biological importance of ZEN-HSA complex formation. Based on the results of the investigations with site markers as well as docking studies, ZEN occupies a non-conventional binding site on HSA. Considering the above listed observations, we should keep in mind this interaction if we would like to precisely understand the toxicokinetic behavior of ZEN.

  15. Binding of human serum amyloid P-component to phosphocholine.

    PubMed

    Christner, R B; Mortensen, R F

    1994-11-01

    Human serum amyloid P-component (SAP) and C-reactive protein (CRP) are structurally similar pentraxins composed of five identical subunits in a disc-like configuration and display Ca(2+)-dependent binding reactivity to a variety of unrelated ligands. CRP is generally classified and defined as a phosphocholine (PC)-binding protein, whereas SAP is identified as a polysaccharide-binding protein. We examined the PC-binding activity of human SAP and compared it to human CRP since many of the biological activities of CRP are triggered upon PC-binding. SAP was able to bind to immobilize PC in a saturable, Ca(2+)-dependent manner but with lower avidity than CRP in direct competitive binding assays. The affinity of the binding of SAP to soluble [14C]PC was slightly lower than the affinity of CRP; however, the valence of SAP was only one PC-binding site/pentraxin or 2/protein vs 5 such sites per CRP molecule. Both SAP and CRP displayed a similar binding preference for PC vs phosphoethanolamine (PE). Two monoclonal antibodies (mAb) generated against the PC-binding site of SAP also reacted with the PC-binding site of CRP and inhibited PC-binding by both pentraxins. A mAb specific for the PC-binding site on CRP also inhibited SAP binding to PC. SAP was also recognized by two anti-idiotypic mAb that shared reactivity with the TEPC-15 PC-binding myeloma protein and the PC-binding site of CRP. Both pentraxins could be isolated from human serum by affinity chromatography on either PC- or PE-substituted agarose beads. The findings indicate that SAP is also a PC-binding protein.

  16. Increased sialidase activity in serum of cancer patients: Identification of sialidase and inhibitor activities in human serum.

    PubMed

    Hata, Keiko; Tochigi, Tatsuo; Sato, Ikuro; Kawamura, Sadafumi; Shiozaki, Kazuhiro; Wada, Tadashi; Takahashi, Kohta; Moriya, Setsuko; Yamaguchi, Kazunori; Hosono, Masahiro; Miyagi, Taeko

    2015-04-01

    Aberrant sialylation in glycoproteins and glycolipids is a characteristic feature of malignancy. Human sialidases, which catalyze the removal of sialic acid residues from glycoconjugates, have been implicated in cancer progression. They have been detected in a wide variety of human cells and tissues, but few studies have focused on their existence in human serum. Among the four types identified to date, we previously demonstrated that plasma membrane-associated ganglioside sialidase (NEU3) is markedly upregulated in various human cancers, including examples in the colon and prostate. Here, using a sensitive assay method, we found a significant increase of sialidase activity in the serum of patients with prostate cancer compared with that in healthy subjects having low activity, if any. Activity was apparent with gangliosides as substrates, but only to a very limited extent with 4-methylumbelliferyl sialic acid, a good synthetic substrate for sialidases other than human NEU3. The serum sialidase was also almost entirely immunoprecipitated with anti-NEU3 antibody, but not with antibodies for other sialidases. Interestingly, sera additionally contained inhibitory activity against the sialidase and also against recombinant human NEU3. The sialidase and inhibitor activities could be separated by exosome isolation and by hydrophobic column chromatography. The serum sialidase was assessed by a sandwich ELISA method using two anti-NEU3 antibodies. The results provide strong evidence that the serum sialidase is, in fact, NEU3, and this subtype may, therefore, be a potential utility for novel diagnosis of human cancers.

  17. Adaptive cytoprotection against deoxycholate-induced injury in human gastric cells in vitro: is there a role for endogenous prostaglandins?

    PubMed

    Kokoska, E R; Smith, G S; Rieckenberg, C L; Deshpande, Y; Banan, A; Miller, T A

    1998-04-01

    The majority of previous work investigating adaptive cytoprotection has involved in vivo studies, which have suggested that this protective response is in large part mediated by endogenous prostaglandins (PGs). The aim of this study was to investigate adaptive cytoprotection under in vitro conditions in human gastric cells and to better delineate the role of endogenous PGs in this protective response. AGS cells (a human gastric carcinoma cell line) were characterized morphologically and subsequently used for all experiments. Sodium deoxycholate was used as both the mild irritant and the damaging agent, and cell injury was quantified using both a commercial viability/cytotoxicity kit as well as transepithelial permeability studies. Finally, endogenous PG synthesis in response to varying concentrations of deoxycholate was determined. AGS cells were determined to be morphologically similar to gastric mucous cells. Pretreatment of cells with low-dose deoxycholate significantly attenuated injury upon subsequent exposure to damaging concentrations of deoxycholate, and this protection was determined to be dependent upon both concentration and duration of mild irritant exposure. Preincubation of AGS cells with indomethacin reversed protection induced by mild irritant pretreatment and also significantly increased cellular susceptibility to injury. Results of the permeability studies closely paralleled those assessing cell mortality. While deoxycholate exposure increased PG synthesis, the concentrations required were much higher than those needed to initiate protection. Adaptive cytoprotection exists in AGS cells under in vitro conditions independent of intact blood flow, neural innervation, or circulating humoral mediators. While this protection is reversed by indomethacin, it appears that this reversal results from increased cellular injury secondary to diminished basal PGs, rather than inhibition of endogenous PG synthesis.

  18. Serum from humans on long-term calorie restriction enhances stress resistance in cell culture

    PubMed Central

    Salvatore, Francesco; Crosby, Seth D.; Fontana, Luigi

    2013-01-01

    Calorie restriction (CR) without malnutrition is the most robust intervention to slow aging and extend healthy lifespan in experimental model organisms. Several metabolic and molecular adaptations have been hypothesized to play a role in mediating the anti-aging effects of CR, including enhanced stress resistance, reduced oxidative stress and several neuroendocrine modifications. However, little is known about the independent effect of circulating factors in modulating key molecular pathways. In this study, we used sera collected from individuals practicing long-term CR and from age- and sex-matched individuals on a typical US diet to culture human primary fibroblasts and assess the effects on gene expression and stress resistance. We show that treatment of cultured cells with CR sera caused increased expression of stress-response genes and enhanced tolerance to oxidants. Cells cultured in serum from CR individuals showed a 30% increase in resistance to H2O2 damage. Consistently, SOD2 and GPX1 mRNA, two key endogenous antioxidant enzymes, were increased by 2 and 2.5 folds respectively in cells cultured with CR sera. These cellular and molecular adaptations mirror some of the key effects of CR in animals, and further suggest that circulating factors contribute to the CR-mediated protection against oxidative stress and stress-response in humans as well. PMID:23912304

  19. Determining the molecular interactions of perfluorinated carboxylic acids with human sera and isolated human serum albumin using nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    D'eon, Jessica C; Simpson, André J; Kumar, Rajeev; Baer, Andrew J; Mabury, Scott A

    2010-08-01

    Perfluorooctanoate (PFOA) is ubiquitous in North American human sera and has a serum half-life of 3.5 years in humans. The molecular interactions that lead to the bioaccumulation of these hydrophobic and lipophobic molecules in human blood are not well understood. Perfluorohexanoic acid (PFHxA) and PFOA were used as model perfluorinated carboxylic acids (PFCAs) to characterize the major site of PFCA interaction in human sera. Using novel heteronuclear saturation transfer difference nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy experiments, human serum albumin (HSA) was identified as the major site of interaction for both PFHxA and PFOA in human sera. Heteronuclear single quantum coherence nuclear magnetic resonance experiments were then performed to interrogate site-specific interactions of PFHxA and PFOA with isolated HSA. Perfluorohexanoic acid was found to bind specifically to Sudlow's drug-binding site II, whereas PFOA interacted preferentially with Sudlow's drug-binding site I at the lower concentration, with additional interactions developing at the higher concentration. These experiments highlight the utility of nuclear magnetic resonance spectrometry as a tool to observe the in situ interactions of chemical contaminants with biological systems. Both PFCAs displaced the endogenous HSA ligand oleic acid at concentrations lower than observed for the drugs ibuprofen and phenylbutazone, which are established HSA ligands. Interactions between PFCAs and HSA may affect the pharmacokinetics and distribution of fatty acids and certain drugs in the human body and warrant further investigation. Copyright 2010 SETAC

  20. Human serum albumin nanoparticles for efficient delivery of Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase gene

    PubMed Central

    Mo, Yun; Barnett, Micheal E.; Takemoto, Dolores; Davidson, Harriet

    2007-01-01

    Purpose To assess the potential of human serum albumin nanoparticles (HSA NP) as a nonviral vector for ocular delivery of Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) gene. Methods Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD1) gene-encapsulated nanoparticles (NP) were developed using human serum albumin (HSA), an endogenous protein, by a desolvation-crosslinking method. The pSOD-loaded HSA NP was evaluated for in vitro release characteristics, stability against DNase I and vitreous humor degradation, cytotoxicity, cellular uptake mechanisms, in vitro transfection efficiency, and in vivo gene expression. In vitro studies employed cultured human retinal pigment epithelial (ARPE-19) cells and in vivo studies employed a mouse model. For cell uptake analysis, fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-labeled human serum albumin (HSA) was used. Results Plasmid containing SOD1 gene was encapsulated in HSA by a desolvation-crosslinking method. Gene-loaded HSA NP has a mean size of 120 nm, zeta potential of -44 mV, and plasmid encapsulation efficiency of 84%. At high crosslinking degree, HSA NP sustained the in vitro release of plasmid over 6 days, and stabilized plasmid DNA against DNase I and vitreous humor degradation. No cytotoxicity was observed in ARPE 19 cells treated with blank HSA NP at concentrations up to 5 mg/ml for 96 h. Cellular uptake of HSA NP was via receptor-mediated endocytosis that involves primarily caveolae-pathways. Confocal analysis indicated rapid endo/lysosomal escape of HSA NP. Further, confocal studies indicated that HSA readily enters the cell nucleus. In vitro, pSOD-HSA NP resulted in more than 80% transfection efficiency in ARPE-19 cells, which was 5 fold higher than Lipofectamine. HSA NP-transfected cells exhibited enhanced SOD1 activity that was 5 fold higher than untreated cells, indicating the overexpression of the functional gene. Intravitreal injection of HSA NP to the mouse eye at a dose of 130 ng of plasmid produced detectable level of fusion protein expression at

  1. Plant-derived recombinant human serum transferrin demonstrates multiple functions.

    PubMed

    Brandsma, Martin E; Diao, Hong; Wang, Xiaofeng; Kohalmi, Susanne E; Jevnikar, Anthony M; Ma, Shengwu

    2010-05-01

    Human serum transferrin (hTf) is the major iron-binding protein in human plasma, having a vital role in iron transport. Additionally, hTf has many other uses including antimicrobial functions and growth factor effects on mammalian cell proliferation and differentiation. The multitask nature of hTf makes it highly valuable for different therapeutic and commercial applications. However, the success of hTf in these applications is critically dependent on the availability of high-quality hTf in large amounts. In this study, we have developed plants as a novel platform for the production of recombinant (r)hTf. We show here that transgenic plants are an efficient system for rhTf production, with a maximum accumulation of 0.25% total soluble protein (TSP) (or up to 33.5 microg/g fresh leaf weight). Furthermore, plant-derived rhTf retains many of the biological activities synonymous with native hTf. In particular, rhTf reversibly binds iron in vitro, exhibits bacteriostatic activity, supports cell proliferation in serum-free medium and can be internalized into mammalian cells in vitro. The success of this study validates the future application of plant rhTf in a variety of fields. Of particular interest is the use of plant rhTf as a novel carrier for cell-specific or oral delivery of protein/peptide drugs for the treatment of human diseases such as diabetes.To demonstrate this hypothesis, we have additionally expressed an hTf fusion protein containing glucagon-like peptide 1 (GLP-1) or its derivative in plants. Here, we show that plant-derived hTf-GLP-1 fusion proteins retain the ability to be internalized by mammalian cells when added to culture medium in vitro.

  2. PET Measures of Endogenous Opioid Neurotransmission Predict Impulsiveness Traits in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Love, Tiffany M.; Stohler, Christian S.; Zubieta, Jon-Kar

    2011-01-01

    Objective The endogenous opioid system and μ-opioid receptors are known to interface environmental events, both positive (e.g., relevant emotional stimuli) and negative (e.g., stressors) with pertinent behavioral responses, regulating motivated behavior. Here we examined the degree to which trait impulsiveness, the tendency to act on cravings and urges rather than delaying gratification, is predicted by either baseline μ-opioid receptor availability or the response of this system to a standardized, experientially-matched stressor. Method Nineteen (19) young healthy male volunteers completed a personality questionnaire (NEO PI-R) and positron emission tomography scans with the μ-opioid receptor selective radiotracer [11C]carfentanil. Measures of receptor concentrations were obtained at rest and during the receipt of an experimentally maintained pain stressor of matched intensity between subjects. Baseline receptor levels and stress-induced activation of μ-opioid neurotransmission were compared between subjects scoring above and below the population median of the NEO impulsiveness subscale and the orthogonal dimension, deliberation, expected to interact with it. Results High impulsiveness and low deliberation scores were associated with significantly higher regional μ-opioid receptor concentrations and greater stress-induced endogenous opioid system activation. Effects were obtained in regions involved in motivated behavior and the effects of drugs of abuse: prefrontal and orbitofrontal cortex, anterior cingulate, thalamus, nucleus accumbens and basolateral amygdala. Mu-opioid receptor availability, and the magnitude of stress-induced endogenous opioid activation in these regions accounted for 21 to 49% of the variance in these personality traits. Conclusions Our data demonstrate that individual differences in the function of the endogenous μ-opioid system predicts personality traits that confer vulnerability or resiliency for risky behaviors, such as the

  3. Hydrolysis of platelet-activating factor by human serum paraoxonase.

    PubMed Central

    Rodrigo, L; Mackness, B; Durrington, P N; Hernandez, A; Mackness, M I

    2001-01-01

    Human serum paraoxonase (human PON1) has been shown to be important in the metabolism of phospholipid and cholesteryl ester hydroperoxides, thereby preventing the oxidation of low-density lipoprotein (LDL) and retarding atherogenesis. However, the exact substrate specificity of PON1 has not been established. In the present study we show that purified PON1 hydrolyses platelet-activating factor (PAF). We could find no evidence for contamination of our preparation with authentic platelet-activating-factor acetylhydrolase (PAFAH) by immunoblotting with a PAFAH monoclonal antibody or by sequencing the purified protein. In addition the specific PAFAH inhibitor SB-222657 did not affect the ability of PON1 to hydrolyse PAF (30.1+/-2.8 micromol/min per mg of protein with no inhibitor; 31.4+/-2.2 micromol/min per mg of protein with 100 nM inhibitor) or phenyl acetate (242.6+/-30.8 versus 240.8+/-31.5 micromol/min per mg of protein with and without inhibitor respectively). SB-222657 was also unable to inhibit PAF hydrolysis by isolated human high-density lipoprotein (HDL), but completely abolished the activity of human LDL. Ostrich (Struthio camelus) HDL, which does not contain PON1, was unable to hydrolyse PAF. These data provide evidence that PON1 may limit the action of this bioactive pro-inflammatory phospholipid. PMID:11171072

  4. Inhibitory effect of betel nut extracts on endogenous nitrosation in humans.

    PubMed

    Stich, H F; Ohshima, H; Pignatelli, B; Michelon, J; Bartsch, H

    1983-06-01

    Extracts of betel nut (Areca catechu) were tested for their capacity to inhibit the endogenous formation of nitrosamines by measurement of the amount of urinary N-nitroso-L-proline (NPRO) following ingestion of sodium nitrate (300 mg) and L-proline (300 mg) by 2 volunteers. A water extract of the dried nuts, an ether extract containing mainly (+)-catechin and (-)-epicatechin, and a caffeine-precipitated n-butyl alcohol extract containing primarily proanthocyanidins (tannins) strongly reduced the endogenous formation of NPRO. An average of 14.7 and 10.9 micrograms NPRO (8 expts per individual) was excreted in the urine of the 2 volunteers over a 24-hour period following the intake of sodium nitrate and L-proline. The water extract and the proanthocyanidin (tannin)-containing extract, both of which contain the dose equivalent of one-quarter of a nut, reduced the excreted NPRO to background levels, which varied from 0.5 to 3.6 micrograms and from 0.6 to 2.1 micrograms (6 expts) in 24-hour urine samples from the 2 volunteers. These results may exemplify the way in which naturally occurring phenolics, which are ingested daily in relatively large quantities, could affect the endogenous formation of carcinogenic nitrosamines.

  5. Depletion of endogenous interleukin-10 augments interleukin-1 beta secretion by Mycobacterium bovis BCG-reactive human cells.

    PubMed

    Méndez-Samperio, P; Garcia-Martinez, E; Hernandez-Garay, M; Solis-Cardona, M

    1997-03-01

    In this study, we found evidence that the interleukin-10 (IL-10) protein is functionally relevant in Mycobacterium bovis BCG-induced cytokine synthesis, as neutralization of endogenously synthesized IL-10 in human cells activated with BCG resulted in a two- to threefold increase in the level of IL-1 beta. When exogenous recombinant human IL-10 was added to human mononuclear cells, a significant reduction of BCG-induced IL-1 beta secretion was observed. This inhibitory effect was not attributed to a cytotoxic effect, since trypan blue exclusion studies indicated no loss of cell viability in the presence of IL-10, and it was specific, as it was completely abolished in the presence of anti-IL-10 neutralizing monoclonal antibody while an irrelevant antibody used as a control had no effect. Taken together, these are the first studies that demonstrate that the depletion of endogenous IL-10 via anti-IL-10 antibody results in a very significantly enhanced BCG-induced IL-1 beta secretion and that the addition of exogenous IL-10 to human mononuclear cells stimulated with BCG inhibits IL-1 beta production. Further experimental work is needed to determine if the neutralization of IL-10 activity via anti-IL-10 antibody indeed enhances cytokine synthesis in vivo. However, the present results may be of importance, since the use of anti-IL-10 antibody could presumably contribute to the protective immunity induced by BCG against tuberculosis via an increase in cytokine synthesis that would amplify antimicrobial systems.

  6. Human Lung Carcinoma Reaction against Metabolic Serum Deficiency Stress

    PubMed Central

    Nakhjavani, Maryam; Nikounezhad, Nastaran; Ashtarinezhad, Azadeh; Shirazi, Farshad H.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer treatment is still of the greatest challenges that health care providers and patients are facing. One of the unsolved problems in cancer treatment is cells’ reaction to metabolic stress caused by harsh nutritional conditions around tumor. In order to be able to treat this disease properly, it is important to understand the true nature of the disease. In fact, the cells inside the central part of the tumor lack sufficient access to blood vessels, nutrients, and growth signals. After tumor shrinkage, the cells are exposed to favorable environmental conditions and might regrow and cause tumor recurrence. The main purpose of this study was to investigate the effect of serum starvation, as a type of metabolic stress, on human lung cancer cell line, A549. These cells were treated with 10% (control), 0.5% and 0.25% serum for 1 to 5 days. At 24 h intervals, the cells were released with 10% serum supplemented media. Starved or released cells were studied for their cycle and morphology. The results showed that the cells were actually arrested at G1 phase and following exposure to optimal conditions, the cells could be back to their cycle again. Furthermore, sub-G1 apoptotic cells population was not increased within the starvation period, while control cells had significant increase in sub-G1 cells. Morphological studies also showed that starved cells could make denser colonies while control cells were entering death phase. These observations provide some evidence for the generation of some effective resistance phenomena in cancer cells against harsh metabolic conditions. PMID:28243278

  7. Human platelet lysate: Replacing fetal bovine serum as a gold standard for human cell propagation?

    PubMed

    Burnouf, Thierry; Strunk, Dirk; Koh, Mickey B C; Schallmoser, Katharina

    2016-01-01

    The essential physiological role of platelets in wound healing and tissue repair builds the rationale for the use of human platelet derivatives in regenerative medicine. Abundant growth factors and cytokines stored in platelet granules can be naturally released by thrombin activation and clotting or artificially by freeze/thaw-mediated platelet lysis, sonication or chemical treatment. Human platelet lysate prepared by the various release strategies has been established as a suitable alternative to fetal bovine serum as culture medium supplement, enabling efficient propagation of human cells under animal serum-free conditions for a multiplicity of applications in advanced somatic cell therapy and tissue engineering. The rapidly increasing number of studies using platelet derived products for inducing human cell proliferation and differentiation has also uncovered a considerable variability of human platelet lysate preparations which limits comparability of results. The main variations discussed herein encompass aspects of donor selection, preparation of the starting material, the possibility for pooling in plasma or additive solution, the implementation of pathogen inactivation and consideration of ABO blood groups, all of which can influence applicability. This review outlines the current knowledge about human platelet lysate as a powerful additive for human cell propagation and highlights its role as a prevailing supplement for human cell culture capable to replace animal serum in a growing spectrum of applications. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  8. LLL12 inhibits endogenous and exogenous interleukin-6-induced STAT3 phosphorylation in human pancreatic cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Liu, Aiguo; Liu, Yan; Li, Pui-Kai; Li, Chenglong; Lin, Jiayuh

    2011-06-01

    Pancreatic cancer is one of the most serious types of cancer, with a five-year survival rate at only 6%. There is a critical need to develop more effective treatments for pancreatic cancer. Growing evidence shows that chronic inflammation plays a crucial role in tumor initiation and progression. Here we demonstrated that the endogenous expression of the inflammatory cytokine interleukin-6 (IL-6) correlates with signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3) phosphorylation in human pancreatic cancer cells. Inhibition of the endogenous IL-6/STAT3 pathway reduces cell viability. Exogenous IL-6 induces STAT3 phosphorylation, but differently induces phosphorylation of STAT3 upstream kinases, Janus kinase 1(JAK1), JAK2, and tyrosine kinase 2 (TYK2). Interestingly, LLL12, a nonpeptide, cell-permeable small molecule, selectively blocked exogenous IL-6-induced STAT3 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation in both PANC-1 and ASPC-1 pancreatic cancer cell lines independently of the phosphorylation of JAK1, JAK2, and TYK2. These results suggest that the inhibition of endogenous and exogenous IL-6-mediated STAT3 signaling may be a potential therapeutic approach for pancreatic cancer.

  9. Endogenous Circadian Regulation of Pro-inflammatory Cytokines and Chemokines in the Presence of Bacterial Lipopolysaccharide in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Rahman, Shadab A.; Castanon-Cervantes, Oscar; Scheer, Frank A.J.L.; Shea, Steven A.; Czeisler, Charles A.; Davidson, Alec J.; Lockley, Steven W.

    2015-01-01

    Various aspects of immune response exhibit 24-hour variations suggesting that infection susceptibility and treatment efficacy may vary by time of day. Whether these 24-hour variations are endogenous or evoked by changes in environmental or behavioral conditions is not known. We assessed the endogenous circadian control and environmental and behavioral influences on ex-vivo lipopolysaccharide stimulation of whole blood in thirteen healthy participants under 48 hours of baseline conditions with standard sleep-wake schedules and 40–50 hours of constant environmental and behavioral (constant routine; CR) conditions. Significant 24-hour rhythms were observed under baseline conditions in Monocyte Chemotactic Protein, Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor and Interleukin 8 but not Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha whereas significant 24-hour rhythms were observed in all four immune factors under CR conditions. The rhythm amplitudes, expressed as a percentage of mean, were comparable between immune factors and across conditions. In contrast, the acrophase time (time of the fitted peak) was different between immune factors, and included daytime and nighttime peaks and changes across behavioral conditions. These results suggest that the endogenous circadian system underpins the temporal organization of immune responses in humans with additional effects of external environmental and behavioral cycles. These findings have implications for understanding the adverse effects of recurrent circadian disruption and sleep curtailment on immune function. PMID:25452149

  10. Endogenous circadian regulation of pro-inflammatory cytokines and chemokines in the presence of bacterial lipopolysaccharide in humans.

    PubMed

    Rahman, Shadab A; Castanon-Cervantes, Oscar; Scheer, Frank A J L; Shea, Steven A; Czeisler, Charles A; Davidson, Alec J; Lockley, Steven W

    2015-07-01

    Various aspects of immune response exhibit 24-h variations suggesting that infection susceptibility and treatment efficacy may vary by time of day. Whether these 24-h variations are endogenous or evoked by changes in environmental or behavioral conditions is not known. We assessed the endogenous circadian control and environmental and behavioral influences on ex-vivo lipopolysaccharide stimulation of whole blood in thirteen healthy participants under 48h of baseline conditions with standard sleep-wake schedules and 40-50h of constant environmental and behavioral (constant routine; CR) conditions. Significant 24-h rhythms were observed under baseline conditions in Monocyte Chemotactic Protein, Granulocyte-Macrophage Colony-Stimulating Factor and Interleukin 8 but not Tumor Necrosis Factor alpha whereas significant 24-h rhythms were observed in all four immune factors under CR conditions. The rhythm amplitudes, expressed as a percentage of mean, were comparable between immune factors and across conditions. In contrast, the acrophase time (time of the fitted peak) was different between immune factors, and included daytime and nighttime peaks and changes across behavioral conditions. These results suggest that the endogenous circadian system underpins the temporal organization of immune responses in humans with additional effects of external environmental and behavioral cycles. These findings have implications for understanding the adverse effects of recurrent circadian disruption and sleep curtailment on immune function. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Single particle conformations of human serum albumin by electron microscopy.

    PubMed

    Ueno, Yutaka; Mio, Muneyo; Sato, Chikara; Mio, Kazuhiro

    2007-06-01

    Using single particle images taken by electron microscopy, pH-dependent conformational changes of human serum albumin were investigated. Despite the noisy particle images of negatively stained serum albumin (67 kDa), our novel algorithm for automated particle picking and reference-free classification resulted in the appropriate grouping of the particle images. Iteratively aligned particle images in the same group provided recognizable image features for individual groups. In a pH 7.0 study, monomer images were consistent with an available crystal structure model; the dimer images were separated into different classes. At pH 3.5, the monomer images were similar to those at pH 7.0; slight differences included a small number of elongated conformations and increased population of larger multimers. Our images were also compared with projection images of an atomic model from crystallography, and demonstrated consistency of the molecular conformation both at pH 7.0 and pH 3.5. Our classification method was effective in discriminating monomers from a mixture of different conformations of the protein, enabling the study of the conformational dynamics of small proteins, using the atomic model as a reference.

  12. Determination of phosphodiesterase I activity in human blood serum.

    PubMed

    Hynie, I; Meuffels, M; Poznanski, W J

    1975-09-01

    Phosphodiesterase I (EC 3.1.4.1) activity was detected in normal human blood serum. The enzyme is stable at laboratory temperature for three days, but is inactivated at pH less than 7. The pH for optimum activity increases with the substrate concentration (under the conditions used, from pH 9.0 to 10.2) and, conversely, the Km increases with pH and buffer concentration. The enzyme is inhibited by ethylenediaminetetraacetate but not by phosphate (0.1 mol/liter). We developed a simple quantitative method for its determination, based on hydrolysis of the p-nitrophenyl ester of thymidine 5'-monophosphate and subsequent measurement of the liberated p-nitrophenol at 400 nm in NaOH (0.1 mol/liter). Normal values (mean +/- 2 SD) were determined to be 33 +/- 6.4 U/liter. Preliminary studies indicate that phosphodiesterase I activity is greater than normal in serum of patients with necrotic changes in the liver or kidney or in cases of breast cancer, but not in that of patients with myocardial infarction, bone cancer, lung cancer, or chronic liver cirrhosis.

  13. Investigation of the interaction between flavonoids and human serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bi, Shuyun; Ding, Lan; Tian, Yuan; Song, Daqian; Zhou, Xin; Liu, Xia; Zhang, Hanqi

    2004-10-01

    The interactions of flavonoids, including quercetin, rutin, hyperin and baicalin, with human serum albumin (HSA) were studied. Fluorescence emission spectra of HSA in the presence of the investigated compounds, recorded at the excitation and emission wavelength of 280 and 290-500 nm, respectively, clearly showed that these compounds quenched the fluorescence of HSA. The binding constants and the number of binding sites of the flavonoids with HSA were obtained by three different calculation methods and the results obtained by these methods were compared. The effects of various metal ions on the binding constants of these flavonoids with HSA were also studied. Based on the mechanism of the Förster energy transference, the energy transfer efficiency between the acceptors and HSA were found. The relationship between the structure characteristics of these compounds and binding properties of the flavonoids and HSA was explored.

  14. Three-dimensional structure of human serum albumin

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C.; He, Xiao-Min; Twigg, Pamela D.; Casale, Elena

    1991-01-01

    The binding locations to human serum albumin (HSA) of several drug molecules were determined at low resolution using crystallographic methods. The principal binding sites are located within subdomains IIA and IIIA. Preliminary studies suggest that an approach to increasing the in vivo efficacy of drugs which are rendered less effective or ineffective by virtue of their interaction with HSA, would be the use of competitive displacement in drug therapies and/or the development of a general inhibitor to the site within subdomain IIIA. These findings also suggest that the facilitated transfer of various ligands across organ/circulatory interfaces such as liver, kidney, and brain may be associated with binding to the IIIA subdomain.

  15. Hydrophobic conjugated microporous polymers for sorption of human serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zheng, Chunli; Du, Miaomiao; Feng, Shanshan; Sun, Hanxue; Li, An; He, Chi; Zhang, TianCheng; Wang, Qiaorui; Wei, Wei

    2016-02-01

    This paper investigated the sorption of human serum albumin (HSA) from water by three kinds of conjugated microporous polymers (CMPs) with surface hydrophobicity and intrinsic porosity. It was found that the three CMPs captured HSA with fast sorption kinetics and good working capacity. Equilibrium was obtained at 80 min for all the tests, and the maximum sorption quantity (qm) ranged from 0.07 to 0.14 mg/mg. With the increase in the particle external surface area of the CMPs, a greater extent of HSA sorption was achieved. Moreover, promoting the dispersion of CMPs in HSA aqueous solution was also beneficial to the extraction. Attenuated Total Reflection Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy verified the interactions between the CMPs and the Nsbnd H, Cdbnd O, and Csbnd N groups of HSA. This paper might provide fundamental guidance for the practical application of CMPs to proteins separation and recovery.

  16. Targeted Quantification of the Glycated Peptides of Human Serum Albumin.

    PubMed

    Vannuruswamy, Garikapati; Korwar, Arvind M; Jagadeeshaprasad, Mashanipalya G; Kulkarni, Mahesh J

    2017-01-01

    Glycated human serum albumin (HSA) serves as an important marker for monitoring the glycemic status. Developing methods for unambiguous identification and quantification of glycated peptides of HSA using high-throughput technologies such as mass spectrometry has a great clinical significance. The following protocol describes the construction of reference spectral libraries for Amadori-modified lysine (AML), N(ε)-(carboxymethyl) lysine (CML)-, and N(ε)-(carboxyethyl)lysine (CEL)-modified peptides of synthetically modified HSA using high-resolution mass spectrometers. The protocol also describes work flows, for unambiguous identification and quantification of glycated modified peptides of HSA in clinical plasma using standard spectral libraries by various mass spectrometry approaches such as parallel reaction monitoring (PRM), sequential window acquisition of all theoretical fragment ion spectra (SWATH), and MS(E).

  17. Human serum albumin crystals and method of preparation

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Carter, Daniel C. (Inventor)

    1989-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) crystals are provided in the form of tetragonal plates having the space groups P42(sub 1)2, the crystals being grown to sizes in excess of 0.5 mm in two dimensions and a thickness of 0.1 mm. Growth of the crystals is carried out by a hanging drop method wherein a precipitant solution containing polyethylene glycol (PEG) and a phosphate buffer is mixed with an HSA solution, and a droplet of mixed solution is suspended over a well of precipitant solution. Crystals grow to the desired size in 3 to 7 days. Concentration of reagents, pH and other parameters are controlled within prescribed limits. The resulting crystals exhibit a size and quality such as to allow performance of x ray diffraction studies and enable the conduct of drug binding studies as well as genetic engineering studies.

  18. [Study on the interaction of doxycycline with human serum albumin].

    PubMed

    Hu, Tao-Ying; Chen, Lin; Liu, Ying

    2014-05-01

    The present study was designed to investigate the interaction of doxycycline (DC) with human serum albumin (HSA) by the inner filter effects, displacement experiments and molecular docking methods, based on classic multi-spectroscopy. With fluorescence quenching method at 298 and 310 K, the binding constants Ka, were determined to be 2. 73 X 10(5) and 0. 74X 10(5) L mol-1, respectively, and there was one binding site between DC and HSA, indicating that the binding of DC to HSA was strong, and the quenching mechanism was a static quenching. The thermodynamic parameters (enthalpy change, AH and enthropy change, delta S) were calculated to be -83. 55 kJ mol-1 and -176. 31 J mol-1 K-1 via the Vant' Hoff equation, which indicated that the interaction of DC with HSA was driven mainly by hydrogen bonding and van der Waals forces. Based on the Föster's theory of non-radiation energy transfer, the specific binding distance between Trp-214 (acceptor) and DC (donor) was 4. 98 nm, which was similar to the result confirmed by molecular docking. Through displacement experiments, sub-domain IIA of HSA was assigned to possess the high-affinity binding site of DC. Three-dimensional fluorescence spectra indicated that the binding of DC to HSA induced the conformation change of HSA and increased the disclosure of some part of hydrophobic regions that had been buried before. The results of FTIR spectroscopy showed that DC bound to HSA led to the slight unfolding of the polypeptide chain of HSA. Furthermore, the binding details between DC and HSA were further confirmed by molecular docking methods, which revealed that DC was bound at sub-domain IIA through multiple interactions, such as hydrophobic effect, polar forces and pi-pi interactions. The experimental results provide theoretical basis and reliable data for the study of the interaction between small drug molecule and human serum albumin

  19. Two-photon excited spectroscopies of ex vivo human skin endogenous species irradiated by femtosecond laser pulses

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Jianxin; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Luo, Tianshu; Zhao, Jingjun

    2006-10-01

    Two-photon excited spectroscopies from ex vivo human skin are investigated by using a femtosecond laser and a confocal microscope (Zeiss LSM 510 META). In the dermis, collagen is responsible for second harmonic generation (SHG); elastin, nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH), melanin and porphyrin are the primary endogenous sources of two-photon excited autofluorescence. In the epidermis, keratin, NADH, melanin and porphyrins contribute to autofluorescence signals. The results also show that the SHG spectra have the ability to shift with the excitation wavelength and the autofluorescence spectra display a red shift of the spectral peaks when increasing the excitation wavelength. These results may have practical implications for diagnosis of skin diseases.

  20. Serum Immunoglobulin A Cross-Strain Blockade of Human Noroviruses

    PubMed Central

    Lindesmith, Lisa C.; Beltramello, Martina; Swanstrom, Jesica; Jones, Taylor A.; Corti, Davide; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Baric, Ralph S.

    2015-01-01

    Background. Human noroviruses are the leading cause of acute viral gastroenteritis, justifying vaccine development despite a limited understanding of strain immunity. After genogroup I (GI).1 norovirus infection and immunization, blockade antibody titers to multiple virus-like particles (VLPs) increase, suggesting that GI cross-protection may occur. Methods. Immunoglobulin (Ig)A was purified from sera collected from GI.1-infected participants, and potential neutralization activity was measured using a surrogate neutralization assay based on antibody blockade of ligand binding. Human and mouse monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) were produced to multiple GI VLPs to characterize GI epitopes. Results. Immunoglobulin A purified from day 14 post-GI.1 challenge sera blocked binding of GI.1, GI.3, and GI.4 to carbohydrate ligands. In some subjects, purified IgA preferentially blocked binding of other GI VLPs compared with GI.1, supporting observations that the immune response to GI.1 infection may be influenced by pre-exposure history. For other subjects, IgA equivalently blocked multiple GI VLPs. Only strain-specific mAbs recognized blockade epitopes, whereas strain cross-reactive mAbs recognized nonblockade epitopes. Conclusions. These studies are the first to describe a functional role for serum IgA in norovirus immunity and the first to characterize human monoclonal antibodies to GI strains, expanding our understanding of norovirus immunobiology. PMID:26180833

  1. Human serum inhibits adhesion and biofilm formation in Candida albicans

    PubMed Central

    2014-01-01

    Background Candida albicans can form biofilms on intravenous catheters; this process plays a key role in the pathogenesis of catheter infections. This study evaluated the effect of human serum (HS) on C. albicans biofilm formation and the expression of adhesion-related genes in vitro. A C. albicans laboratory strain (ATCC90028) and three clinical strains were grown for 24 h in RPMI 1640 supplemented with HS or RPMI 1640 alone (as a control). The growth of biofilm cells of four strains was monitored by a Live Cell Movie Analyzer, and by XTT reduction assay. The expression of the adhesion-related genes BCR1, ALS1, ALS3, HWP1 and ECE1 was analyzed by RT-PCR at three time points (60 min, 90 min, and 24 h). Results In the adhesion phase, C. albicans cells kept a Brownian movement in RPMI medium containing HS until a large number of germ tubes were formed. In the control group, C. albicans cells quickly adhered to the bottom of the reaction plate. Compared with RPMI 1640, medium supplemented with 3–50% HS caused a significant decrease in biofilm development (all p < 0.001). However, the presence of HS had no significant inhibitory effect on the pre-adhered biofilms (all p > 0.05). Biofilm formation was also inhibited by heat-inactivated and proteinase K pre-treated HS. The presence of 50% HS did not significantly affect the planktonic growth of C. albicans (p > 0.05). At three time points, HS inhibited expression of the ALS1 and ALS3 genes and promoted expression of the HWP1 and ECE1 genes. Significant up-regulation of BCR1 was observed only at the 90-min point. Conclusions Human serum reduces biofilm formation by inhibiting the adhesion of C. albicans cells. This response may be associated with the down-regulation of adhesion-related genes ALS1, ALS3 and BCR1. The inhibitory serum component is protease-resistant and heat stable. PMID:24673895

  2. Serum sialic acid and CEA concentrations in human breast cancer.

    PubMed

    Hogan-Ryan, A; Fennelly, J J; Jones, M; Cantwell, B; Duffy, M J

    1980-04-01

    The concentration of bound sialic acid in the sera of 56 normal subjects and 65 subjects with breast cancer was measured, in order to determine (1) whether serum sialic acid concentrations are raised in breast cancer and (2) whether the concentration of sialic acid in serum reflects tumour stage. The amount of sialic acid in serum was compared to serum carcinoembryonic antigen (CEA) values. Urinary hydroxyproline and serum alkaline phosphatase concentrations were used as indicators of bone and liver involvement. Erythrocyte sedimentation rate (ESR) was also measured. Significantly elevated serum sialic acid concentrations were found in breast cancer, and showed correlation with tumour stage. Serum sialic acid values did not correlate with CEA values. The results suggest that measurement of serum sialic acid concentrations may be of adjunctive value in assessing tumour stage.

  3. Endogenous retrovirus drives hitherto unknown proapoptotic p63 isoforms in the male germ line of humans and great apes.

    PubMed

    Beyer, Ulrike; Moll-Rocek, Julian; Moll, Ute M; Dobbelstein, Matthias

    2011-03-01

    TAp63, but not its homolog p53, eliminates oocytes that suffered DNA damage. An equivalent gene for guarding the male germ line is currently not known. Here we identify hitherto unknown human p63 transcripts with unique 5'-ends derived from incorporated exons upstream of the currently mapped TP63 gene. These unique p63 transcripts are highly and specifically expressed in testis. Their most upstream region corresponds to a LTR of the human endogenous retrovirus 9 (ERV9). The insertion of this LTR upstream of the TP63 locus occurred only recently in evolution and is unique to humans and great apes (Hominidae). A corresponding p63 protein is the sole p63 species in healthy human testis, and is strongly expressed in spermatogenic precursors but not in mature spermatozoa. In response to DNA damage, this human male germ-cell-encoded TAp63 protein (designated GTAp63) is activated by caspase cleavage near its carboxyterminal domain and induces apoptosis. Human testicular cancer tissues and cell lines largely lost p63 expression. However, pharmacological inhibition of histone deacetylases completely restores p63 expression in testicular cancer cells (>3,000-fold increase). Our data support a model whereby testis-specific GTAp63 protects the genomic integrity of the male germ line and acts as a tumor suppressor. In Hominidae, this guardian function was greatly enhanced by integration of an endogenous retrovirus upstream of the TP63 locus that occurred 15 million years ago. By providing increased germ-line stability, this event may have contributed to the evolution of hominids and enabled their long reproductive periods.

  4. Endogenous retrovirus drives hitherto unknown proapoptotic p63 isoforms in the male germ line of humans and great apes

    PubMed Central

    Beyer, Ulrike; Moll-Rocek, Julian; Moll, Ute M.; Dobbelstein, Matthias

    2011-01-01

    TAp63, but not its homolog p53, eliminates oocytes that suffered DNA damage. An equivalent gene for guarding the male germ line is currently not known. Here we identify hitherto unknown human p63 transcripts with unique 5′-ends derived from incorporated exons upstream of the currently mapped TP63 gene. These unique p63 transcripts are highly and specifically expressed in testis. Their most upstream region corresponds to a LTR of the human endogenous retrovirus 9 (ERV9). The insertion of this LTR upstream of the TP63 locus occurred only recently in evolution and is unique to humans and great apes (Hominidae). A corresponding p63 protein is the sole p63 species in healthy human testis, and is strongly expressed in spermatogenic precursors but not in mature spermatozoa. In response to DNA damage, this human male germ-cell–encoded TAp63 protein (designated GTAp63) is activated by caspase cleavage near its carboxyterminal domain and induces apoptosis. Human testicular cancer tissues and cell lines largely lost p63 expression. However, pharmacological inhibition of histone deacetylases completely restores p63 expression in testicular cancer cells (>3,000-fold increase). Our data support a model whereby testis-specific GTAp63 protects the genomic integrity of the male germ line and acts as a tumor suppressor. In Hominidae, this guardian function was greatly enhanced by integration of an endogenous retrovirus upstream of the TP63 locus that occurred 15 million years ago. By providing increased germ-line stability, this event may have contributed to the evolution of hominids and enabled their long reproductive periods. PMID:21300884

  5. A Micrograting Sensor for DNA Hybridization and Antibody Human Serum Albumin-Antigen Human Serum Albumin Interaction Experiments

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chathirat, Naphat; Atthi, Nithi; Hruanun, Charndet; Poyai, Amporn; Leasen, Suthisa; Osotchan, Tanakorn; Hodak, Jose H.

    2011-01-01

    A biosensor structure comprising silicon nitride (Si3N4) micrograting arrays coated with a spin-on-glass (SOG) material was investigated. This grating structure was located on a silicon groove, which was etched by a deep reactive ion etching (DRIE) process. The biosensor was used as a specific detector of DNA molecules and antibody-antigen interactions. In our DNA sensing experiments, the first step was the activation of the grating surface with amine functional groups, followed by attachment of a 23-base oligonucleotide probe layer for hybridization with a complementary target DNA. The sensing device was tested for detecting specific antigen/antibody interactions for human serum albumin (HSA) and antigen bovine serum albumin (BSA). The readout system consisted of a white light lamp that illuminated a small spot on the grating surface at normal incidence through a fiber optic probe with a spectrometer used to collect the reflected light through a second fiber. We show that these sensing devices have the capability to detect DNA as well as antigen-antibody binding for HSA. The detection sensitivity for HSA was better than that for DNA mainly owing to the larger size and concomitant refractive index changes upon binding to the sensor. We show that it is possible to quantify the amount of biomolecules bound to the grating surface by measuring the wavelength shift of the reflectance spectra upon exposure to the samples.

  6. Impact of sample extraction on the accurate measurement of progesterone in human serum by liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry.

    PubMed

    Ke, Yuyong; Gonthier, Renaud; Labrie, Fernand

    2017-05-01

    In the present study, the impact of the extraction solvent on the accuracy of endogenous progesterone assay in human serum has been investigated using two selective reaction monitoring (SRM) transitions (315>97 & 315>109). Higher levels of noise and more interference were observed when more polar solvents were used for extraction, thus resulting in serious bias of the measured values of progesterone in serum. This is confirmed by monitoring the ion ratio of 315>97-315>109. This issue could not be easily resolved by changes in MS/MS transitions or chromatography conditions. More bias was observed with the SRM transition 315>109 for the polar solvent extraction. Hexane and 1-chlorobutane (polarity index of 0 and 1, respectively) did provide the cleanest samples with a lower noise level in the chromatograms. Moreover, the measured values of progesterone were not changed with different SRM transitions or longer retention time in search of an improved separation. Recovery tests of progesterone have been performed with 1-chlorobutane in matrices with phosphate buffered saline (PBS) 1x, PBS 1×3% bovine serum albumin (BSA), stripped serum/H2O (1:1) and unstripped serum. The recovery (70%∼80%) consistency is observed not only at different levels but also in different matrices. The equivalent recovery between PBS 1x, PBS 1×3% BSA and unstripped serum shows that the impact of progesterone binding to serum proteins on the measurement accuracy can be avoided with this sample preparation procedure. No significant matrix effect on the determination of progesterone was observed with 1-chlorobutane. Within the range of 12.5-2000pg/mL, a good linearity is observed with R>0.99 and weighting factor 1/X. Bias and covariance efficiency of QCs are within 10%. With 1-chlorobutane as the extraction solvent, the concentration of progesterone was measured where the range for postmenopausal serum is 5.74∼91.7pg/mL, which is well below the reported concentrations of 314 pg/mL∼942pg

  7. Differential capacity of chaperone-rich lysates in cross-presenting human endogenous and exogenous melanoma differentiation antigens.

    PubMed

    Bleifuss, Elke; Bendz, Henriette; Sirch, Birgit; Thompson, Sylvia; Brandl, Anna; Milani, Valeria; Graner, Michael W; Drexler, Ingo; Kuppner, Maria; Katsanis, Emmanuel; Noessner, Elfriede; Issels, Rolf-Dieter

    2008-12-01

    The goal of immune-based tumor therapies is the activation of immune cells reactive against a broad spectrum of tumor-expressed antigens. Vaccines based on chaperone proteins appear promising as these proteins naturally exist as complexes with various protein fragments including those derived from tumor-associated antigens. Multi-chaperone systems are expected to have highest polyvalency as different chaperones can carry distinct sets of antigenic fragments. A free-solution isoelectric focusing (FS-IEF) technique was established to generate chaperone-rich cell lysates (CRCL). Results from murine systems support the contention that CRCL induce superior anti-tumor responses than single chaperone vaccines. We established an in vitro model for human melanoma to evaluate the capacity of CRCL to transfer endogenously expressed tumor antigens to the cross-presentation pathway of dendritic cells (DC) for antigen-specific T cell stimulation. CRCL prepared from human melanoma lines contained the four major chaperone proteins Hsp/Hsc70, Hsp90, Grp94/gp96 and calreticulin. The chaperones within the melanoma cell-derived CRCL were functionally active in that they enhanced cross-presentation of exogenous peptides mixed into the CRCL preparation. Superior activity was observed for Hsp70-rich CRCL obtained from heat-stressed melanoma cells. Despite the presence of active chaperones, melanoma cell-derived CRCL failed to transfer endogenously expressed melanoma-associated antigens to DC for cross-presentation and cytotoxic T cell (CTL) recognition, even after increasing intracellular protein levels of tumor antigen or chaperones. These findings reveal limitations of the CRCL approach regarding cross-presentation of endogenously expressed melanoma-associated antigens. Yet, CRCL may be utilized as vehicles to enhance the delivery of exogenous antigens for DC-mediated cross-presentation and T cell stimulation.

  8. Regulation of amantadine hydrochloride binding with IIA subdomain of human serum albumin by fatty acid chains.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng; Lee, Philbert; Ma, Zhiyuan; Ma, Li; Yang, Guoping; Wu, Xiaoyang; Liang, Hong

    2013-01-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is a major protein component of blood plasma that has been exploited to bind and transport a wide variety of endogenous and exogenous organic compounds. Although anionic drugs readily associate with the IIA subdomain of HSA, most cationic drugs poorly associate with HSA at this subdomain. In this study, we propose to improve the association between cationic drugs and HSA by modifying HSA with fatty acid chains. For our experiments, we tested amantadine hydrochloride, a cationic drug with antiviral and antiparkinsonian effects. Our results suggest that extensive myristoylation of HSA can help stabilize the interaction between amantadine and HSA in vitro. Our X-ray crystallography data further elucidate the structural basis of this regulation. Additionally, our crystallography data suggest that anionic drugs, with a functional carboxylate group, may enhance the association between amantadine and HSA by a mechanism similar to myristoylation. Ultimately, our results provide critical structural insight into this novel association between cationic drugs and the HSA IIA subdomain, raising the tempting possibility to fully exploit the unique binding capacity of HSA's IIA subdomain to achieve simultaneous delivery of anionic and cationic drugs.

  9. Human consumption of methyleugenol and its elimination from serum.

    PubMed Central

    Schecter, Arnold; Lucier, George W; Cunningham, Michael L; Abdo, Kamal M; Blumenthal, Greg; Silver, Andrew G; Melnick, Ron; Portier, Christopher; Barr, Dana B; Barr, John R; Stanfill, Stephen B; Patterson, Donald G; Needham, Larry L; Stopford, Woodhall; Masten, Scott; Mignogna, Jill; Tung, Kuang Chi

    2004-01-01

    Under a mandate from the U.S. Congress, the National Toxicology Program (NTP) of the U.S. Department of Health and Human Services conducts animal bioassays for carcinogenicity of potentially toxic chemicals to which the U.S. population might be exposed. Methyleugenol, a natural as well as synthesized substance, was nominated for study because it is structurally similar to safrole, a known animal carcinogen. Methyleugenol was found to be a very potent multisite carcinogen in male and female F344/N rats and B6C3F1 mice at all doses tested in 2-year NTP bioassays using gavage dosing. For this reason, human toxicokinetic studies were added to the traditional NTP protocol. A commercial brand of gingersnaps was found by chemists at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention to contain a relatively high concentration of methyleugenol. After thorough scientific and clinical review, and approval by a National Institutes of Health institutional review board for the protection of human subjects, a study was conducted with nine healthy adult male and female human volunteers. The volunteers were given 12 gingersnaps for breakfast. Blood was drawn immediately before the meal and at 15, 30, 60, and 120 min afterward. The mean +/- SD fasting level of methyleugenol in serum was 16.2 +/- 4.0 pg/g wet weight. Peak blood levels were found at 15 min (mean +/- SD, 53.9 +/- 7.3 pg/g wet weight), followed by a rapid decline; the half-life of elimination was about 90 min. The peak levels were within the range of methyleugenol blood levels in the U.S. population, as measured concurrently in a subset of nonfasting participants in the Third National Health and Nutrition Examination Survey (NHANES III). PMID:15121510

  10. [Endogenous hypertriglyceridemia].

    PubMed

    Tsukamoto, Kazuhisa

    2013-09-01

    Endogenous hypertriglyceridemia, which includes familial hypertriglyceridemia and idiopathic hypertriglyceridemia, is characterized by the increased level of VLDL-triglycerides in the blood. Increased production of VLDL from the liver and the decreased catabolism of VLDL-TG in the vessel, which are also the main metabolic features of insulin resistance, have been proposed to be the causes of endogenous hypertriglyceridemia. Genetic factors responsible for endogenous hypertriglyceridemia have been elucidated in several studies, however, these factors have so far not been clearly identified yet; thus the causes of endogenous hypertriglyceridemia would be polygenic. Recent advances in the genetic analytical methods like genome-wide association study would hopefully unveil the whole pictures of endogenous hypertriglyceridemia.

  11. THE ACTIVATING EFFECT OF CALCIUM ON A BACTERICIDAL SUBSTANCE FOR BACILLUS SUBTILIS IN HUMAN SERUM

    PubMed Central

    Jacox, Ralph F.

    1950-01-01

    An enhanced bactericidal activity of human serum for B. subtilis develops during many different forms of illness, e.g. carcinoma, virus and bacterial infections, and during acute coronary occlusion. This increased bactericidal effect cannot be related to leucocytosis, fever, serum complement, C-reactive protein, or a specific antibody reaction. The serum bactericidal factor becomes inactive in decalcified serum, but active again when optimal concentrations of calcium are added. Magnesium does not cause reactivation. PMID:15428579

  12. The nature of human serum insulin-like activity (ILA): characterization of ILA in serum and serum fractions obtained by acid-ethanol extraction and adsorption chromatography

    PubMed Central

    Poffenbarger, Philip L.; Ensinck, John W.; Hepp, Dieter K.; Williams, Robert H.

    1968-01-01

    Studies were undertaken in an attempt to clarify the apparent heterogeneous nature of human serum insulin-like activity. Methods of preparative zone electrophoresis on Pevikon, acid-ethanol extraction of trichloroacetic acid serum protein precipitates, adsorption chromatography on DEAE-cellulose and Dowex 50, gel filtration chromatography, and insulin antiserum immunoreactivity were used. The results establish the presence of a substance in serum with in vitro biological properties similar to insuln but with different physicochemical properties. The major portion of serum ILA measured by bioassay techniques can be attributed to the effects of this substance. Whereas the in vitro biological effects of this substance on muscle and adipose cells were similar to those of crystalline insulin, the substance is distinguished from insulin by: (1) the failure of insulin antiserum to inhibit its in vitro biological effect; (2) a slower electrophoretic mobility (in the gamma-beta globulin zone); and (3) a larger molecular weight, between 40,000 and 50,000 in these studies. It is similar to insulin since both are soluble in acid-ethanol. The results further indicate that previously described insulin-like activity in gamma-beta globulin preparations, the major portion of total serum insulin activity described in acid-ethanol extracts of serum, “bound” insulin, “atypical” insulin, and antibody nonsuppressible insulin-like activity bioassayed in diluted serum are all one and the same substance. PMID:4170389

  13. Stabilization of a hydrophobic recombinant cytokine by human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Hawe, Andrea; Friess, Wolfgang

    2007-11-01

    The objective was to evaluate the impact of pH and NaCl content on aggregation, particle formation, and solubility of a hydrophobic recombinant human cytokine in formulations with human serum albumin (HSA) as stabilizing excipient. While cytokine-HSA formulations were stable at physiological pH, a tremendous increase in turbidity at pH 5.0, close to the isoelectric point of HSA was caused by a partially irreversible precipitation. By dynamic light scattering (DLS), disc centrifugation, atomic force microscopy (AFM), and light obscuration it could be shown that the turbidity was mainly caused by particles larger than 120 nm. SDS-PAGE provided evidence that the precipitation at pH 5.0 was mainly caused by the cytokine. The HSA-stabilizers Na-octanoate and Na-N-acetyltryptophante were less effective in preventing the turbidity increase of unstabilized-HSA compared to NaCl. The interactions between HSA and cytokine were weakened by NaCl, as determined by fluorescence spectroscopy. The positive effect of NaCl on the formulation could be attributed to a direct stabilization of HSA and weaker interactions between HSA and the cytokine, which in consequence provided an overall stabilization of the cytokine. Copyright 2007 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  14. Human Serum Albumin Complexed with Myristate and AZT

    SciTech Connect

    Zhu, Lili; Yang, Feng; Chen, Liqing; Meehan, Edward J.; Huang, Mingdong

    2008-06-16

    3'-Azido-3'-deoxythymidine (AZT) is the first clinically effective drug for the treatment of human immunodeficiency virus infection. The drug interaction with human serum albumin (HSA) has been an important component in understanding its mechanism of action, especially in drug distribution and in drug-drug interaction on HSA in the case of multi-drug therapy. We present here crystal structures of a ternary HSA-Myr-AZT complex and a quaternary HSA-Myr-AZT-SAL complex (Myr, myristate; SAL, salicylic acid). From this study, a new drug binding subsite on HSA Sudlow site 1 was identified. The presence of fatty acid is needed for the creation of this subsite due to fatty acid induced conformational changes of HSA. Thus, the Sudlow site 1 of HSA can be divided into three non-overlapped subsites: a SAL subsite, an indomethacin subsite and an AZT subsite. Binding of a drug to HSA often influences simultaneous binding of other drugs. From the HSA-Myr-AZT-SAL complex structure, we observed the coexistence of two drugs (AZT and SAL) in Sudlow site 1 and the competition between these two drugs in subdomain IB. These results provide new structural information on HSA-drug interaction and drug-drug interaction on HSA.

  15. Characterization of human epidermal growth factor in human serum and urine under native conditions.

    PubMed

    Aybay, Cemalettin; Karakus, Resul; Yucel, Aysegul

    2006-07-01

    The objective of this study was to investigate the molecular nature of the human epidermal growth factor (EGF) in serum and urine samples of normal subjects. Recombinant EGF emerged as a single peak and did not interact with human IgG1 and albumin up to the concentration of 12 microg/ml. Freshly separated human serum contained only trace amounts of EGF. However, EGF appeared and increased in serum separated from blood after spontaneous overnight clotting. The authentic 6 kDa form of EGF made up nearly 40% of the total EGF in serum and revealed relatively homogeneous feature. The remaining immunoreactive fractions corresponded to 160 kDa proEGF. Immunoreactive EGF in blood seemed to be associated with the EGF release from platelets. TSKgel G3000SW chromatography of freshly-voided morning and day urines revealed that urine samples mainly contained two major form of EGF; a high-molecular-weight (HMW) and low-molecular-weight (LMW) forms. In the sense of molecular nature of EGF contents, morning urine was more heterogeneous than day urine of the same individuals. The LMW form of EGF in morning urine, in which its proportion was more than 90% of the total EGF, revealed further heterogeneous feature generally containing three to four different components.

  16. Identification, characterization, and comparative genomic distribution of the HERV-K (HML-2) group of human endogenous retroviruses

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Integration of retroviral DNA into a germ cell may lead to a provirus that is transmitted vertically to that host's offspring as an endogenous retrovirus (ERV). In humans, ERVs (HERVs) comprise about 8% of the genome, the vast majority of which are truncated and/or highly mutated and no longer encode functional genes. The most recently active retroviruses that integrated into the human germ line are members of the Betaretrovirus-like HERV-K (HML-2) group, many of which contain intact open reading frames (ORFs) in some or all genes, sometimes encoding functional proteins that are expressed in various tissues. Interestingly, this expression is upregulated in many tumors ranging from breast and ovarian tissues to lymphomas and melanomas, as well as schizophrenia, rheumatoid arthritis, and other disorders. Results No study to date has characterized all HML-2 elements in the genome, an essential step towards determining a possible functional role of HML-2 expression in disease. We present here the most comprehensive and accurate catalog of all full-length and partial HML-2 proviruses, as well as solo LTR elements, within the published human genome to date. Furthermore, we provide evidence for preferential maintenance of proviruses and solo LTR elements on gene-rich chromosomes of the human genome and in proximity to gene regions. Conclusions Our analysis has found and corrected several errors in the annotation of HML-2 elements in the human genome, including mislabeling of a newly identified group called HML-11. HML-elements have been implicated in a wide array of diseases, and characterization of these elements will play a fundamental role to understand the relationship between endogenous retrovirus expression and disease. PMID:22067224

  17. RNA Trans-Splicing Targeting Endogenous β-Globin Pre-Messenger RNA in Human Erythroid Cells.

    PubMed

    Uchida, Naoya; Washington, Kareem N; Mozer, Brian; Platner, Charlotte; Ballantine, Josiah; Skala, Luke P; Raines, Lydia; Shvygin, Anna; Hsieh, Matthew M; Mitchell, Lloyd G; Tisdale, John F

    2017-02-14

    Sickle cell disease results from a point mutation in exon 1 of the β-globin gene (total 3 exons). Replacing sickle β-globin exon 1 (and exon 2) with a normal sequence by trans-splicing is a potential therapeutic strategy. Therefore, this study sought to develop trans-splicing targeting β-globin pre-messenger RNA among human erythroid cells. Binding domains from random β-globin sequences were comprehensively screened. Six candidates had optimal binding, and all targeted intron 2. Next, lentiviral vectors encoding RNA trans-splicing molecules were constructed incorporating a unique binding domain from these candidates, artificial 5' splice site, and γ-globin cDNA, and trans-splicing was evaluated in CD34(+) cell-derived erythroid cells from healthy individuals. Lentiviral transduction was efficient, with vector copy numbers of 9.7 to 15.3. The intended trans-spliced RNA product, including exon 3 of endogenous β-globin and γ-globin, was detected at the molecular level. Trans-splicing efficiency was improved to 0.07-0.09% by longer binding domains, including the 5' splice site of intron 2. In summary, screening was performed to select efficient binding domains for trans-splicing. Detectable levels of trans-splicing were obtained for endogenous β-globin RNA in human erythroid cells. These methods provide the basis for future trans-splicing directed gene therapy.

  18. The human endogenous retrovirus link between genes and environment in multiple sclerosis and in multifactorial diseases associating neuroinflammation.

    PubMed

    Perron, Hervé; Lang, Alois

    2010-08-01

    Endogenous retroviruses represent about 8% of the human genome and belong to the superfamily of transposable and retrotransposable genetic elements. Altogether, these mobile genetic elements and their numerous inactivated "junk" sequences represent nearly one half of the human DNA. Nonetheless, a significant part of this "non-conventional" genome has retained potential activity. Epigenetic control is notably involved in silencing most of these genetic elements but certain environmental factors such as viruses are known to dysregulate their expression in susceptible cells. More particularly, embryonal cells with limited gene methylation are most susceptible to uncontrolled activation of these mobile genetic elements by, e.g., viral infections. In particular, certain viruses transactivate promoters from endogenous retroviral family type W (HERV-W). HERV-W RNA was first isolated in circulating viral particles (Multiple Sclerosis-associated RetroViral element, MSRV) that have been associated with the evolution and prognosis of multiple sclerosis. HERV-W elements encode a powerful immunopathogenic envelope protein (ENV) that activates a pro-inflammatory and autoimmune cascade through interaction with Toll-like receptor 4 on immune cells. This ENV protein has repeatedly been detected in MS brain lesions and may be involved in other diseases. Epigenetic factors controlling HERV-W ENV protein expression then reveal critical. This review addresses the gene-environment epigenetic interface of such HERV-W elements and its potential involvement in disease.

  19. A critical review of reports of endogenous psychedelic N, N-dimethyltryptamines in humans: 1955-2010.

    PubMed

    Barker, Steven A; McIlhenny, Ethan H; Strassman, Rick

    2012-01-01

    Three indole alkaloids that possess differing degrees of psychotropic/psychedelic activity have been reported as endogenous substances in humans; N,N-dimethyltryptamine (DMT), 5-hydroxy-DMT (bufotenine, HDMT), and 5-methoxy-DMT (MDMT). We have undertaken a critical review of 69 published studies reporting the detection or detection and quantitation of these compounds in human body fluids. In reviewing this literature, we address the methods applied and the criteria used in the determination of the presence of DMT, MDMT, and HDMT. The review provides a historical perspective of the research conducted from 1955 to 2010, summarizing the findings for the individual compounds in blood, urine, and/or cerebrospinal fluid. A critique of the data is offered that addresses the strengths and weaknesses of the methods and approaches to date. The review also discusses the shortcomings of the existing data in light of more recent findings and how these may be overcome. Suggestions for the future directions of endogenous psychedelics research are offered.

  20. The exclusion of human serum albumin by human dermal collagenous fibres and within human dermis.

    PubMed Central

    Bert, J L; Mathieson, J M; Pearce, R H

    1982-01-01

    Preparations of dermal collagenous fibres and slices of human dermis have been equilibrated with 125I-labelled monomeric human serum albumin. The space inaccessible to the albumin in the fibres and in the dermis was determined by subtraction of the accessible space, calculated from the radioactivity of the specimen, from its total fluid. For a fibre preparation examined in detail, the fluid exclusion was independent of the concentration of either albumin or collagen. Binding of albumin to the fibres was not demonstrable. Three fibre preparations excluded albumin from 3.75 +/- 0.96, 3.55 +/- 0.67, and 2.05 +/- 0.39 g of fluid/g of collagen (+/-S.D.). Slices from three specimens of dermis excluded albumin from 1.45 +/- 0.08 g of fluid/g of insoluble solids or 1.57 +/- 0.11 g of fluid/g of collagen (+/-S.D.). Thus the exclusion of albumin by dermis was much less than expected from its content of collagenous fibres. On the basis of these data and the published composition of dermis, the concentration of albumin in the accessible interstitial space was estimated to be close to that in the plasma. PMID:7082298

  1. Neutralization of Epstein-Barr Virus by Nonimmune Human Serum

    PubMed Central

    Nemerow, Glen R.; Jensen, Fred C.; Cooper, Neil R.

    1982-01-01

    These studies were carried out to investigate the mechanism of neutralization of purified Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) by fresh human serum from normal individuals lacking antibody to the EBV viral capsid (VCA) and nuclear antigens (EBNA). Such individuals thus lack serological evidence of immunity to EBV. Although an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) with highly purified immobilized EBV detected low levels of IgG antibody reactive with EBV in these normal nonimmune sera, this antibody failed to neutralize EBV in the absence of complement. Studies with depleted sera and mixtures of purified complement proteins at physiologic concentrations showed that the IgG antibody and C1, C4, C2, and C3 of the classical pathway were able to fully neutralize EBV. Mixtures of the purified components of the alternative pathway at physiologic concentrations failed to neutralize purified EBV in the presence or absence of the antibody and the alternative pathway did not potentiate classical pathway-mediated neutralization. No evidence for a requirement for C8 was obtained, precluding lysis as the mechanism of neutralization. Since C3 deposition on the viral surface accompanied classical pathway activation, viral neutralization is most likely secondary to the accumulation of complement protein on the viral surface. A coating of protein on the virus could interfere with attachment to, or penetration of potentially susceptible cells. Experiments were undertaken to determine the specificity of the IgG antibody in the sera of EBV nonimmune individuals which, together with complement, neutralized EBV. Both purified EBV and herpes simplex I (HSV-1) absorbed the EBV ELISA reactivity and EBV-neutralizing activity of nonimmune sera, whereas another member of the herpesvirus group, cytomegalovirus, was inactive in this regard. HSV-1 was quantitatively more efficient than EBV in absorbing reactivity, a finding that indicates that the antibody has a higher affinity for HSV-1 than for EBV

  2. Cloning of the functional promoter for human insulin-like growth factor binding protein-4 gene: endogenous regulation.

    PubMed

    Dai, B; Widen, S G; Mifflin, R; Singh, P

    1997-01-01

    The majority of the colon cancers analyzed to-date express insulin-like growth factor binding protein (IGFBP)-4, and antisense inhibition of IGFBP-4 messenger RNA (mRNA) confers a growth advantage to the cells in response to endogenous and exogenous IGFs. We recently reported a significant up-regulation of IGFBP-4 expression in a human colon cancer cell line (CaCo2) on spontaneous differentiation of the cells in culture. This suggests that the expression of IGFBP-4 may be related to growth and differentiation of colon cancer cells. To study the endogenous factors involved in the transcriptional regulation of IGFBP-4, we have isolated and sequenced the human (h) IGFBP-4 promoter. The approximately 1.3 kilobase pair (kb) 5' flanking region of the IGFBP-4 gene is GC rich and possesses several potential regulatory elements. These elements include a typical TATA box with sequence TATAA, located -299 nt from the initiation ATG codon. The cap site is located 14 nt downstream of the TATA box as determined by primer extension analysis. A 1.4-kb DNA fragment including the 1.254 kb 5' flanking region of the hIGFBP-4 gene was subcloned into a luciferase reporter vector (pGL-2 basic) either in the sense (BP-4-S-pGL) (S) or antisense (BP-4-AS-pGL) (AS) (negative control) orientation, relative to the luciferase coding sequence in the vector. CaCo2 cells were transfected with either the S or the AS vectors on days 2-10 of culture; cotransfection with the SV40-beta-Galactidose (Gal) vector was used to correct for transfection efficiency. The ratio of luciferase/beta-Gal expression by CaCo2 cells transfected with the S vectors increased significantly from days 3 and 4 to days 5 and 6 of culture, followed by a sharp decline on days 7-9, resembling the pattern of endogenous expression of IGFBP-4 by the cells; the expression of luciferase by the AS vectors remained low and insignificant. These results thus suggest that the approximately 1.4 kb 5' flanking region of the IGFBP-4 gene

  3. A potential role for endogenous proteins as sacrificial sunscreens and antioxidants in human tissues.

    PubMed

    Hibbert, Sarah A; Watson, Rachel E B; Gibbs, Neil K; Costello, Patrick; Baldock, Clair; Weiss, Anthony S; Griffiths, Christopher E M; Sherratt, Michael J

    2015-08-01

    Excessive ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure of the skin is associated with adverse clinical outcomes. Although both exogenous sunscreens and endogenous tissue components (including melanins and tryptophan-derived compounds) reduce UVR penetration, the role of endogenous proteins in absorbing environmental UV wavelengths is poorly defined. Having previously demonstrated that proteins which are rich in UVR-absorbing amino acid residues are readily degraded by broadband UVB-radiation (containing UVA, UVB and UVC wavelengths) here we hypothesised that UV chromophore (Cys, Trp and Tyr) content can predict the susceptibility of structural proteins in skin and the eye to damage by physiologically relevant doses (up to 15.4 J/cm(2)) of solar UVR (95% UVA, 5% UVB). We show that: i) purified suspensions of UV-chromophore-rich fibronectin dimers, fibrillin microfibrils and β- and γ-lens crystallins undergo solar simulated radiation (SSR)-induced aggregation and/or decomposition and ii) exposure to identical doses of SSR has minimal effect on the size or ultrastructure of UV chromophore-poor tropoelastin, collagen I, collagen VI microfibrils and α-crystallin. If UV chromophore content is a factor in determining protein stability in vivo, we would expect that the tissue distribution of Cys, Trp and Tyr-rich proteins would correlate with regional UVR exposure. From bioinformatic analysis of 244 key structural proteins we identified several biochemically distinct, yet UV chromophore-rich, protein families. The majority of these putative UV-absorbing proteins (including the late cornified envelope proteins, keratin associated proteins, elastic fibre-associated components and β- and γ-crystallins) are localised and/or particularly abundant in tissues that are exposed to the highest doses of environmental UVR, specifically the stratum corneum, hair, papillary dermis and lens. We therefore propose that UV chromophore-rich proteins are localised in regions of high UVR exposure

  4. Deep brain stimulation of the periaqueductal gray releases endogenous opioids in humans.

    PubMed

    Sims-Williams, Hugh; Matthews, Julian C; Talbot, Peter S; Love-Jones, Sarah; Brooks, Jonathan Cw; Patel, Nikunj K; Pickering, Anthony E

    2017-02-01

    Deep brain stimulation (DBS) of the periaqueductal gray (PAG) is used in the treatment of severe refractory neuropathic pain. We tested the hypothesis that DBS releases endogenous opioids to exert its analgesic effect using [(11)C]diprenorphine (DPN) positron emission tomography (PET). Patients with de-afferentation pain (phantom limb pain or Anaesthesia Dolorosa (n=5)) who obtained long-lasting analgesic benefit from DBS were recruited. [(11)C]DPN and [(15)O]water PET scanning was performed in consecutive sessions; first without, and then with PAG stimulation. The regional cerebral tracer distribution and kinetics were quantified for the whole brain and brainstem. Analysis was performed on a voxel-wise basis using statistical parametric mapping (SPM) and also within brainstem regions of interest and correlated to the DBS-induced improvement in pain score and mood. Brain-wide analysis identified a single cluster of reduced [(11)C]DPN binding (15.5% reduction) in the caudal, dorsal PAG following DBS from effective electrodes located in rostral dorsal/lateral PAG. There was no evidence for an accompanying focal change in blood flow within the PAG. No correlation was found between the change in PAG [(11)C]DPN binding and the analgesic effect or the effect on mood (POMSSV) of DBS. The analgesic effect of DBS in these subjects was not altered by systemic administration of the opioid antagonist naloxone (400ug). These findings indicate that DBS of the PAG does indeed release endogenous opioid peptides focally within the midbrain of these neuropathic pain patients but we are unable to further resolve the question of whether this release is responsible for the observed analgesic benefit.

  5. Dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethanes (DDTs) in human hair and serum in rural and urban areas in South China.

    PubMed

    He, Chun-Tao; Yan, Xiao; Wang, Mei-Huan; Zheng, Xiao-Bo; Chen, Ke-Hui; Guo, Mi-Na; Zheng, Jing; Chen, She-Jun

    2017-05-01

    Human hair has been employed as a biomarker for exposure to persistent organic pollutants (POPs), but information on the source of dichloro-diphenyl-trichloroethane (DDT) and its metabolites in hair is limited. The present study investigated the contamination of DDTs in human hair from a rural area and an urban area of South China and compared with those in human serum and indoor dust. The concentrations of ∑DDTs ranged from 2.30 to 489ng/g, with a median of 21.8ng/g in human hair. The ∑DDT concentrations (median=40.8ng/g) in female hair were significantly higher than those in male hair (median=20.6ng/g). There were significantly positive correlations between the concentrations of DDTs and ages in both the female and male hair, but the age-dependence for DDTs in serum was less significant. The profile of DDT analogues in female hair, differing from that in the male hair, was more similar to that in the indoor dust, suggesting a more important role of exogenous exposure in female hair. We estimated that exogenous source is responsible for approximately 11% and 20% of the burden of DDTs in the male and female hair, respectively. Adjusted multiple linear regression model showed significantly positive association between the p,p'-DDE concentrations in the paired hair and serum samples, indicating that endogenous origins are the primary sources of DDTs in the hair of the residents in the study areas. Our findings demonstrated that human hair is a reliable biomarker for body burden of DDTs and can be used in epidemiology research and retrospective assessment of DDT exposure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Depletion of endogenous interleukin-10 augments interleukin-1 beta secretion by Mycobacterium bovis BCG-reactive human cells.

    PubMed Central

    Méndez-Samperio, P; Garcia-Martinez, E; Hernandez-Garay, M; Solis-Cardona, M

    1997-01-01

    In this study, we found evidence that the interleukin-10 (IL-10) protein is functionally relevant in Mycobacterium bovis BCG-induced cytokine synthesis, as neutralization of endogenously synthesized IL-10 in human cells activated with BCG resulted in a two- to threefold increase in the level of IL-1 beta. When exogenous recombinant human IL-10 was added to human mononuclear cells, a significant reduction of BCG-induced IL-1 beta secretion was observed. This inhibitory effect was not attributed to a cytotoxic effect, since trypan blue exclusion studies indicated no loss of cell viability in the presence of IL-10, and it was specific, as it was completely abolished in the presence of anti-IL-10 neutralizing monoclonal antibody while an irrelevant antibody used as a control had no effect. Taken together, these are the first studies that demonstrate that the depletion of endogenous IL-10 via anti-IL-10 antibody results in a very significantly enhanced BCG-induced IL-1 beta secretion and that the addition of exogenous IL-10 to human mononuclear cells stimulated with BCG inhibits IL-1 beta production. Further experimental work is needed to determine if the neutralization of IL-10 activity via anti-IL-10 antibody indeed enhances cytokine synthesis in vivo. However, the present results may be of importance, since the use of anti-IL-10 antibody could presumably contribute to the protective immunity induced by BCG against tuberculosis via an increase in cytokine synthesis that would amplify antimicrobial systems. PMID:9067646

  7. ‘There and back again’: revisiting the pathophysiological roles of human endogenous retroviruses in the post-genomic era

    PubMed Central

    Magiorkinis, Gkikas; Belshaw, Robert; Katzourakis, Aris

    2013-01-01

    Almost 8% of the human genome comprises endogenous retroviruses (ERVs). While they have been shown to cause specific pathologies in animals, such as cancer, their association with disease in humans remains controversial. The limited evidence is partly due to the physical and bioethical restrictions surrounding the study of transposons in humans, coupled with the major experimental and bioinformatics challenges surrounding the association of ERVs with disease in general. Two biotechnological landmarks of the past decade provide us with unprecedented research artillery: (i) the ultra-fine sequencing of the human genome and (ii) the emergence of high-throughput sequencing technologies. Here, we critically assemble research about potential pathologies of ERVs in humans. We argue that the time is right to revisit the long-standing questions of human ERV pathogenesis within a robust and carefully structured framework that makes full use of genomic sequence data. We also pose two thought-provoking research questions on potential pathophysiological roles of ERVs with respect to immune escape and regulation. PMID:23938753

  8. A role for endogenous mono-hydroxy-eicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs) in the regulation of human neutrophil migration.

    PubMed Central

    Goetzl, E J

    1980-01-01

    The possibility that endogenous monohydroxy-eicosatetraenoic acids (HETEs) derived from the lipoxygenation of arachidonic acid might serve a role in human neutrophil migration was examined by studying the effects of depletion of the intracellular HETEs on random migration and chemotaxis. The intracellular contents of approximately 2000 ng of 11-HETE and 500 ng of 5-HETE per 10(8) neutrophils are distributed preferentially in the cellular membranes and are increased by specific chemotactic factors. The depletion of intracellular HETEs that resulted from pre-incubating, washing and resuspending neutrophils in 3-20 microM 5,8,11,14-eicosatetraynoic acid (TYA), an inhibitor of lipoxygenase and cyclooxygenase activity, or in 5-10 microM nordihydroguaiaretic acid (NDGA), a selective inhibitor of lipoxygenase activity, was associated with suppression of neutrophil random migration and chemotaxis to several stimuli without evidence of cytotoxicity. Maximal suppression of migration was achieved by a 30-60 min preincubation with the inhibitors, a time-course analogous to that required for optimal depletion of the endogenous HETEs. In contrast, inhibitors of cyclooxygenase activity enhanced random migration and, to a lesser extent, chemotaxis. The inhibition of migration achieved by pre-incubating and maintaining the neutrophils in TYA or NDGA was fully reversed either by washing and resuspending the neutrophils in buffer or by the addition of purified neutrophil 5-HETE in quantities as small as 20 ng/2 x 10(6) neutrophils for random migration and 0.8 ng/2 x 10(6) neutrophils for chemotaxis, while the addition of 11-HETE was less effective. The relationship of the intracellular concentrations of endogenous HETEs to neutrophil migration is consistent with a potential role of the HETEs as cellular mediators. PMID:6776039

  9. Serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone strongly correlates with intratesticular testosterone in gonadotropin-suppressed normal men receiving various dosages of human chorionic gonadotropin

    PubMed Central

    Amory, John K.; Coviello, Andrea D.; Page, Stephanie T.; Anawalt, Bradley D.; Matsumoto, Alvin M.; Bremner, William J.

    2009-01-01

    Objective: To determine if serum concentrations of testosterone precursors would correlate with intratesticular testosterone (ITT) concentration measured directly by testicular aspiration and allow for a less invasive means of inferring ITT. Design: Controlled clinical study. Setting: Healthy volunteers in an academic research environment. Patients: Twenty-nine normal men. Intervention: We determined ITT concentration by testicular aspiration before and after treatment in men receiving exogenous testosterone to block endogenous gonadotropin production and randomly assigned to one of four doses of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) (0, 125 IU, 250 IU, 500 IU every other day) for 3 weeks. Outcome measures: The association between serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone, androstenedione and dihydroepiandrosterone (DHEA) and ITT. Results: With testosterone administration alone, serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone decreased significantly and increased significantly when 500 IU hCG was administered. End-of-treatment ITT strongly correlated with serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone. Moreover, serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone, but not androstenedione or DHEA, was independently associated with end-of-treatment ITT by multivariate linear regression. Conclusion: Serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone is highly correlated with ITT in gonadotropin suppressed normal men receiving testosterone and stimulated with hCG. Serum 17-hydroxyprogesterone is a surrogate biomarker of ITT and may be useful in research and in men receiving gonadotropin therapy for infertility. PMID:17462643

  10. Effect of human serum albumin on drug metabolism: structural evidence of esterase activity of human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Yang, Feng; Bian, Chuanbing; Zhu, Lili; Zhao, Gengxiang; Huang, Zixiang; Huang, Mingdong

    2007-02-01

    Human serum albumin (HSA) is the most abundant plasma protein in the human body with a plasma concentration of 0.6mM. HSA plays an important role in drug transport and metabolism. Enzymatic activity of HSA on different substrates or drugs has been studied and documented. The structural mechanism of this activity, however, is unknown. In this study, we have determined the crystal structures of HSA-myristate in a complex of aspirin and of salicylic acid, respectively. The crystal structure of HSA-myristate-aspirin illustrates that aspirin transfers acetyl group to Lys199 and is hydrolyzed into salicylic acid by HSA. The hydrolysis product, salicylic acid, remains bound to HSA at a similar location, but it shows a very different orientation when compared with the salicylic acid in the HSA-myristate-salicylic acid ternary complex. These results not only provide the structural evidence of esterase activity of HSA, and demonstrate the conformational plasticity of HSA on drug binding, but also may provide structural information for the modulation of HSA-drug interaction by computational approach based on HSA-drug structure.

  11. Chemometrics enhanced HPLC-DAD performance for rapid quantification of carbamazepine and phenobarbital in human serum samples.

    PubMed

    Vosough, Maryam; Ghafghazi, Shiva; Sabetkasaei, Masoumeh

    2014-02-01

    This paper describes development and validation of a simple and efficient bioanalytical procedure for simultaneous determination of phenobarbital and carbamazepine in human serum samples using high performance liquid chromatography with photodiode-array detection (HPLC-DAD) regarding a fast elution methodology in less than 5 min. Briefly, this method consisted of a simple deproteinization step of serum samples followed by HPLC analysis on a Bonus-RP column using an isocratic mode of elution with acetonitrile/K2HPO4 (pH=7.5) buffer solution (45:55). Due to the presence of serum endogenous components as non-calibrated components in the sample, second-order calibration based on multivariate curve resolution-alternating least squares (MCR-ALS), has been applied on a set of absorbance matrices collected as a function of retention time and wavelengths. Acceptable resolution and quantification results were achieved in the presence of matrix interferences and the second-order advantage was fully exploited. The average recoveries for carbamazepine and phenobarbital were 89.7% and 86.1% and relative standard deviation values were lower than 9%. Additionally, computed elliptical joint confidence region (EJCR) confirmed the accuracy of the proposed method and indicated the absence of both constant and proportional errors in the predicted concentrations. The developed method enabled the determination of the analytes in different serum samples in the presence of overlapped profiles, while keeping experimental time and extraction steps at minimum. Finally, the serum concentration levels of carbamazepine in three time intervals were reported for morphine-dependents who had received carbamazepine for treating their neuropathic pain. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Interactions of human serum albumin with doxorubicin in different media

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gun'ko, Vladimir M.; Turov, Vladimir V.; Krupska, Tetyana V.; Tsapko, Magdalina D.

    2017-02-01

    Interactions of human serum albumin (10 wt% H2O and 0.3 wt% sodium caprylate) with doxorubicin hydrochloride (1 wt%) were studied alone or with addition of HCl (3.6 wt% HCl) using 1H NMR spectroscopy. A model of hydrated HSA/12DOX was calculated using PM7 method with COSMO showing large variations in the binding constant depending on structural features of DOX/HSA complexes. DOX molecules/ions displace bound water from narrow intramolecular voids in HSA that leads to diminution of freezing-melting point depression of strongly bound water (SBW). Structure of weakly bound water (WBW) depends much weaker on the presence of DOX than SBW because a major fraction of DOX is bound to adsorption sites of HSA. Addition of HCl results in strong changes in structure of macromolecules and organization of water in hydration shells of HSA (i.e., mainly SBW) and in the solution (i.e., WBW + non-bound bulk water).

  13. Spectroscopic study on binding of rutin to human serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pastukhov, Alexander V.; Levchenko, Lidiya A.; Sadkov, Anatoli P.

    2007-10-01

    Steady-state and time-resolved fluorescence spectroscopy techniques were used to study the interaction of the flavonoid rutin with human serum albumin (HSA) as well as spectral properties of the protein-bound flavonoid. Both quenching of the intrinsic fluorescence of the protein (Trp214) and the ligand fluorescence, appearing upon complexation with HSA, were used to determine binding parameters. The binding constant determined from the quenching of the Trp214 fluorescence by rutin is equal to 6.87 ± 0.22 × 10 4 M -1 and that obtained from the fluorescence of HSA-bound rutin is 3.8 ± 0.4 × 10 4 M -1. Based on the Job plot analysis, the 1:1 binding stoichiometry for the HSA-rutin complex was determined. The efficient quenching of the Trp214 fluorescence by rutin, fluorescence resonance energy transfer from excited Trp214 to rutin, and competitive binding of warfarin indicate that the binding site for the flavonoid is situated within subdomain IIA of HSA. The presence of the sugar moiety in the flavonoid molecule reduces affinity of rutin for binding to HSA but does not affect the binding stoichiometry and location of the binding site compared with aglycone analogues.

  14. Interaction of Candida albicans with Human Leukocytes and Serum1

    PubMed Central

    Lehrer, Robert I.; Cline, Martin J.

    1969-01-01

    A quantitative assay of candidacidal activity based on differential staining of non-viable Candida albicans by methylene blue was developed and applied to studies of leukocytes from normal individuals and patients with fungal and other infections. Serum factors were necessary for optimal phagocytosis of C. albicans but lacked direct candidacidal activity. Normal human neutrophils (38 studies) killed 29.0 ± 7.4% of ingested C. albicans in 1 hr. Eosinophils and monocytes killed a smaller percentage. Neutrophil candidacidal activity did not require protein or ribonucleic acid synthesis by the leukocyte but was inhibited by anaerobic conditions, potassium cyanide, and colchicine. Leukocytes of a patient with hereditary myeloperoxidase deficiency and of three children with chronic granulomatous disease phagocytized C. albicans normally, yet failed to kill them. Our data suggest that the neutrophil can play an important role in resistance to Candida infection and that the lysosomal enzyme myeloperoxidase and its oxidant substrate hydrogen peroxide are the major participants in neutrophil candidacidal activity. Images PMID:4182532

  15. Interaction of perfluorooctanoic acid with human serum albumin

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Ling-Ling; Gao, Hong-Wen; Gao, Nai-Yun; Chen, Fang-Fang; Chen, Ling

    2009-01-01

    Background Recently, perfluorooctanoic acid (PFOA) has become a significant issue in many aspects of environmental ecology, toxicology, pathology and life sciences because it may have serious effects on the endocrine, immune and nervous systems and can lead to embryonic deformities and other diseases. Human serum albumin (HSA) is the major protein component of blood plasma and is called a multifunctional plasma carrier protein because of its ability to bind an unusually broad spectrum of ligands. Results The interaction of PFOA with HSA was investigated in the normal physiological condition by equilibrium dialysis, fluorospectrometry, isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC) and circular dichroism (CD). The non-covalent interaction is resulted from hydrogen bond, van der Waals force and hydrophobic stack. PFOA binding to HSA accorded with two-step binding model with the saturation binding numbers of PFOA, only 1 in the hydrophobic intracavity of HSA and 12 on the exposed outer surface. The interaction of PFOA with HSA is spontaneous and results in change of HSA conformation. The possible binding sites were speculated. Conclusion The present work suggested a characterization method for the intermolecular weak interaction. It is potentially useful for elucidating the toxigenicity of perfluorochemicals when combined with biomolecular function effect, transmembrane transport, toxicological testing and the other experiments. PMID:19442292

  16. Mechanism of singlet oxygen chemiluminescence enhancement by human serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Jing; Xing, Da; Chen, Qun

    2006-02-01

    Fluoresceinyl Cypridina Luciferin Analog (FCLA) is a chemiluminescence (CL) probe for detecting reactive oxygen species (ROS). Its detection efficiency of singlet oxygen can be significantly enhanced in the presence of human serum albumin (HSA). In the current study, the mechanism of the FCLA-HSA CL system is studied by means of direct CL measurement and spectroscopy techniques. Our results show that FCLA can combine with HSA via a single binding site to form a complex. The CL efficiency of the system is largely governed by an inter-system energy transfer between the two components upon interaction with singlet oxygen. The CL production reaches maximum in a synergetic manner when equal amount of FCLA and HSA are present simultaneously, but the production is less efficient at other ratios. This suggests that the FCLA-HSA system maybe used as a singlet oxygen detecting technique with higher sensitivity compared with that of conventional CL techniques. It may also provide a potential new technique for quantitatively analyze the presence of HSA in a sample.

  17. Photoreactions of macrocyclic dyes bound to human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Davila, J; Harriman, A

    1990-01-01

    The photophysical properties of tetrakis(4-sulfonatophenyl)porphyrin (H2TSPP), its tin (IV) complex (SnTSPP), aluminium(III) trisulfonatophthalocyanine (AIPCS), and the corresponding zinc(II) complex (ZnPCS), have been measured in H2O, D2O, and upon binding to human serum albumin (HSA). The triplet excited states of the various macrocyclic dyes generate singlet molecular oxygen, O2(1 delta g) in high quantum yield upon illumination in O2-saturated solution, even in the presence of HSA. The triplet states also abstract an electron from 4-aminophenol, forming the radical anion of the macrocycle. Quenching rate constants and quantum yields have been measured for the various processes in the presence and absence of HSA. It is found that HSA binds all the dyes at nonspecific sites close to the interface in such a manner that the dyes remain accessible to species residing in the solution phase. Dyes that do not possess axial ligands complexed to the central cation (e.g. H2TSPP, ZnPCS) are able to bind also at a deeper, more specific site on the protein where they are protected from species in solution. Under such conditions, triplet quenching by 4-aminophenol is restricted to long-distance electron tunnelling, for which the rate is relatively slow.

  18. Virus-Enabled Biosensor for Human Serum Albumin.

    PubMed

    Ogata, Alana F; Edgar, Joshua M; Majumdar, Sudipta; Briggs, Jeffrey S; Patterson, Shae V; Tan, Ming X; Kudlacek, Stephan T; Schneider, Christine A; Weiss, Gregory A; Penner, Reginald M

    2017-01-17

    The label-free detection of human serum albumin (HSA) in aqueous buffer is demonstrated using a simple, monolithic, two-electrode electrochemical biosensor. In this device, both millimeter-scale electrodes are coated with a thin layer of a composite containing M13 virus particles and the electronically conductive polymer poly(3,4-ethylenedioxy thiophene) or PEDOT. These virus particles, engineered to selectively bind HSA, serve as receptors in this biosensor. The resistance component of the electrical impedance, Zre, measured between these two electrodes provides electrical transduction of HSA binding to the virus-PEDOT film. The analysis of sample volumes as small as 50 μL is made possible using a microfluidic cell. Upon exposure to HSA, virus-PEDOT films show a prompt increase in Zre within 5 s and a stable Zre signal within 15 min. HSA concentrations in the range from 100 nM to 5 μM are detectable. Sensor-to-sensor reproducibility of the HSA measurement is characterized by a coefficient-of-variance (COV) ranging from 2% to 8% across this entire concentration range. In addition, virus-PEDOT sensors successfully detected HSA in synthetic urine solutions.

  19. Hydrophobically derivatized hyperbranched polyglycerol as a human serum albumin substitute.

    PubMed

    Kainthan, Rajesh K; Janzen, Johan; Kizhakkedathu, Jayachandran N; Devine, Dana V; Brooks, Donald E

    2008-04-01

    There is a huge clinical demand for Human Serum Albumin (HSA), with a world market of approximately $1.5B/year. Concern over prion and viral transmission in the blood supply has led to a need for safer substitutes and offers the opportunity for development of materials with enhanced properties over the presently available plasma expanders. We report here the synthesis and testing of a new synthetic plasma expander that can replace not only the osmotic and volume expansion properties of HSA but, uniquely, its binding and transport properties. We have synthesized several hyperbranched polyglycerols derivatized with hydrophobic groups and short poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) chains. The hydrophobic groups provide regions for binding fatty acids and other hydrophobic materials while PEG imparts the necessary protection from host defense systems and enhances circulation longevity. These polymers, being hyperbranched, have only a small effect on plasma viscosity. We have shown in vitro that our materials bind 2-3 moles palmitic acid per mole, do not activate the platelet, coagulation or complement systems and do not cause red cell aggregation. In mice these materials are non-toxic with circulation half-lives as high as 34h, controllable by manipulating the molecular weight and the degree of PEG derivatization.

  20. Interaction of glucocorticoids and progesterone derivatives with human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Abboud, Rola; Akil, Mohammad; Charcosset, Catherine; Greige-Gerges, Hélène

    2017-10-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) and progesterone derivatives (PGDs) are steroid hormones with well-known biological activities. Their interaction with human serum albumin (HSA) may control their distribution. Their binding to albumin is poorly studied in literature. This paper deals with the interaction of a series of GCs (cortisol, cortisone, prednisolone, prednisone, 6-methylprednisolone and 9-fluorocortisol acetate) and PGDs (progesterone, hydroxylated PGDs, methylated PGDs and dydrogesterone) with HSA solution (pH 7.4) at molar ratios steroid to HSA varying from 0 to 10. Similar titrations were conducted using Trp aqueous solution. Fluorescence titration method and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) are used. PGDs (except dydrogesterone), cortisone and 9-fluorocortisol acetate affected weakly the fluorescence of Trp in buffer solution while they decreased in a dose-dependent manner that of HSA. Their binding constants to HSA were then calculated. Moreover, displacement experiment was performed using bilirubin as a site marker. The binding constant of bilirubin to albumin was determined in the absence and presence of a steroid at a molar ratio steroid to HSA of 1. The results indicate that the steroids bind to HSA at site I in a pocket different from that of bilirubin. Furthermore, the peak positions of amide I and amide II bands of HSA were shifted in the presence of progesterone, dydrogesterone and GCs. Also a variation was observed in amide I region indicating the formation of hydrogen bonding between albumin and steroids. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Thermodynamic analysis of hydration in human serum heme-albumin

    SciTech Connect

    Baroni, Simona; Pariani, Giorgio; Fanali, Gabriella; Longo, Dario; Ascenzi, Paolo; Aime, Silvio; Fasano, Mauro

    2009-07-31

    Ferric human serum heme-albumin (heme-HSA) shows a peculiar nuclear magnetic relaxation dispersion (NMRD) behavior that allows to investigate structural and functional properties. Here, we report a thermodynamic analysis of NMRD profiles of heme-HSA between 20 and 60 {sup o}C to characterize its hydration. NMRD profiles, all showing two Lorentzian dispersions at 0.3 and 60 MHz, were analyzed in terms of modulation of the zero field splitting tensor for the S = {sup 5}/{sub 2} manifold. Values of correlation times for tensor fluctuation ({tau}{sub v}) and chemical exchange of water molecules ({tau}{sub M}) show the expected temperature dependence, with activation enthalpies of -1.94 and -2.46 {+-} 0.2 kJ mol{sup -1}, respectively. The cluster of water molecules located in the close proximity of the heme is progressively reduced in size by increasing the temperature, with {Delta}H = 68 {+-} 28 kJ mol{sup -1} and {Delta}S = 200 {+-} 80 J mol{sup -1} K{sup -1}. These results highlight the role of the water solvent in heme-HSA structure-function relationships.

  2. [Preparation of Human Serum Albumin Micro/Nanotubes].

    PubMed

    Jiao, Pei-pei; Guo, Yan-li; Niu, Ai-hua; Kang, Xiao-feng

    2016-01-01

    In this research, protein micro/nanotubes were fabricated by alternate layer-by-layer (LbL) assembly of human serum albumin (HSA) and polyethyleneimine (PEI) into polycarbonate (PC) membranes. The experimental conditions of pH values, ionic strength, the depositions cycles and the diameter of porous membrane were discussed. The morphology and composition of tubes were characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM), transmission electron microscope (TEM), fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FTIR) and energy dispersive spectroscopy (EDS). The results show that pH and ionic strength of the solution are the key factors that influence the effect of assembly. Micro/nanotubes with good opening hollow tubular structure were obtained when pH 7.4 HSA solution and pH 10.3 PEI solution without NaCl were used in synthesis procedure. The outer diameter of tube was dependent on the PC template, thus the micro/nanotubes size was controlled by the wall thickness, which can be adjusted by the number of layers of the HSA and PEI deposited along the pore walls. To avoid the thin wall being damaged in dissolving the template and vacuum drying, the PEI/HSA bilayer number should not be less than 3. The polar solvent N,N-dimethylformamide (DMF) can dissolve PC template to release the micro/nanotubes.

  3. Cooperative binding of drugs on human serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Varela, L. M.; Pérez-Rodríguez, M.; García, M.

    In order to explain the adsorption isotherms of the amphiphilic penicillins nafcillin and cloxacillin onto human serum albumin (HSA), a cooperative multilayer adsorption model is introduced, combining the Brunauer-Emmet-Teller (BET) adsorption isotherm with an amphiphilic ionic adsorbate, whose chemical potential is derived from Guggenheim's theory. The non-cooperative model has been previously proved to qualitatively predict the measured adsorption maxima of these drugs [Varela, L. M., García, M., Pérez-Rodríguez, M., Taboada, P., Ruso, J. M., and Mosquera, V., 2001, J. chem. Phys., 114, 7682]. The surface interactions among adsorbed drug molecules are modelled in a mean-field fashion, so the chemical potential of the adsorbate is assumed to include a term proportional to the surface coverage, the constant of proportionality being the lateral interaction energy between bound molecules. The interaction energies obtained from the empirical binding isotherms are of the order of tenths of the thermal energy, therefore suggesting the principal role of van der Waals forces in the binding process.

  4. Denaturation of Human Serum Albumin by Cerium (iii) Chloride

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Behbahani, G. Rezaei; Shalbafan, M.; Gheibi, N.; Barzegar, L.; Behbahani, H. Rezaei; Yaghdavaei, N.; Behbahani, Z. Rezaei

    2013-08-01

    Cerium (III) Chloride-induced conformational changes of human serum albumin, HSA, in phosphate buffer, 10 mM at pH 7.4 was investigated, using isothermal titration calorimetry (ITC), UV and fluorescence emission spectroscopic methods. The results indicate that CeCl3, Ce3+, induces irreversible denaturation of the HSA structure. The UV absorption intensity of HSA + Ce3+ shows a slight blueshift in the absorbance wavelength with increasing Ce3+ concentration. The fluorescence intensity was increased regularly and a slight redshift was observed in the emission wavelength. The HSA + Ce3+ complex quenches the fluorescence of HSA and changes the microenvironment of tryptophan residue. The emission intensity increases suggesting the loss of the tertiary structure of HSA. The results obtained from the ITC data are in agreement with the spectroscopic methods. The strong negative cooperativity of Ce3+ binding with HSA (Table 1) recovered from the extended solvation model, indicates that HSA has been denatured as a result of its interaction with Ce3+ ions.

  5. Synthetic human serum albumin Sudlow I binding site mimics.

    PubMed

    Karlsson, Björn C G; Rosengren, Annika M; Näslund, Inga; Andersson, Per Ola; Nicholls, Ian A

    2010-11-25

    Here, we report the design, synthesis, and characterization of molecularly imprinted polymer (MIP) derived mimics of the human serum albumin (HSA) Sudlow I site-the binding site for the anticoagulant warfarin. MIP design was based upon a combination of experimental ((1)H NMR) and computational (molecular dynamics) methods. Two MIPs and corresponding nonimprinted reference polymers were synthesized and characterized (scanning electron microscopy; nitrogen sorption; and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy). MIP-ligand recognition was examined using radioligand binding studies, where the largest number of selective sites was found in a warfarin-imprinted methacrylic acid-ethylene dimethacrylate copolymer (MAA-MIP). The warfarin selectivity of this MIP was confirmed using radioligand displacement and zonal chromatographic studies. A direct comparison of MIP-warfarin binding characteristics with those of the HSA Sudlow I binding site was made, and similarities in site population (per gram polymer or protein) and affinities were observed. The warfarin selectivity of the MIP suggests its potential for use as a recognition element in a MIP-based warfarin sensor and even as a model to aid in understanding and steering blood-plasma protein-regulated transport processes or even for the development of warfarin sensors.

  6. Interaction of Human Serum Albumin with Metal Protoporphyrins

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hu, Jie; Brancaleon, Lorenzo

    2015-03-01

    Fluorescence spectroscopy is widely used in biotechnology, nanotechnology, and molecular biophysics, since it can provide information on a wide range of molecular processes, e.g. the interactions of solvent molecules with fluorophores, conformational changes, and binding interactions etc. In this study, we present the photophysical properties of the interaction of human serum albumin (HSA) with a series of metal compound of Protoporphyrin IX (PPIX), including ZnPPIX, FePPIX, MgPPIX, MnPPIX and SnPPIX respectively, as well as the free base PPIX. Binding constants were retrieved independently using the Benesi-Hildebrand analysis of the porphyrin emission or absorption spectra and the fluorescence quenching (i.e. Stern-Volmer analysis) and reveal that the two methods yield a difference of approximately one order or magnitude between the two. Fluorescence lifetimes was used to probe whether binding of the porphyrin changes the conformation of the protein or if the interaction places the porphyrin at a location that can prompt resonance energy transfer with the lone Tryptophan residue. In recent years it has been discovered that HSA provides a specific binding site for metal-chelated protoporphyrins in subdomain IA. This has opened a novel field of study over the importance of this site for biomedical applications but it has also created the potential for a series of biotechnological applications of the HSA/protoporphyrin complexes. Our study provides a preliminary investigation of the interaction with metal-chelated protoporphyrins that had not been previously investigated.

  7. Superhydrophobic Effect on the Adsorption of Human Serum Albumin

    PubMed Central

    Leibner, Evan S.; Barnthip, Naris; Chen, Weinan; Baumrucker, Craig R.; Badding, John V.; Pishko, Michael; Vogler, Erwin A.

    2009-01-01

    Analytical protocol greatly influences measurement of human-serum albumin (HSA) adsorption to commercial expanded polytetrafluororethylene (ePTFE) exhibiting superhydrophobic wetting properties. Degassing of buffer solutions and evacuation of ePTFE adsorbent to remove trapped air immediately prior to contact with protein solutions are shown to be essential. Results obtained with ePTFE as a prototypical superhydrophobic test material suggest that vacuum degassing should be applied in the measurement of protein adsorption to any surface exhibiting superhydrophobicity. Solution depletion quantified using radiometry (I-125 labeled HSA) or electrophoresis yield different measures of adsorption, with nearly four-fold higher surface concentrations of unlabeled HSA measured by the electrophoresis method. This outcome is attributed to the influence of the radiolabel on HSA hydrophilicity which decreases radiolabeled-HSA affinity for a hydrophobic adsorbent in comparison to unlabeled HSA. These results indicate that radiometry underestimates the actual amount of protein adsorbed to a particular material. Removal of radiolabeled HSA adsorbed to ePTFE by 3X serial buffer rinses also shows that the remaining “bound fraction” was about 35% lower than the amount measured by radiometric depletion. This observation implies that measurement of protein bound after surface rinsing significantly underestimates the actual amount of protein concentrated by adsorption into the surface region of a protein-contacting material. PMID:19135420

  8. Effects of glycation on meloxicam binding to human serum albumin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trynda-Lemiesz, Lilianna; Wiglusz, Katarzyna

    2011-05-01

    The current study reports a binding of meloxicam a pharmacologically important new generation, non-steroidal anti-inflammatory drug to glycated form of the human serum albumin (HSA). The interaction of the meloxicam with nonglycated and glycated albumin has been studied at pH 7.4 in 0.05 M sodium phosphate buffer with 0.1 M NaCl, using fluorescence quenching technique and circular dichroism spectroscopy. Results of the present study have shown that the meloxicam could bind both forms of albumin glycated and nonglycated at a site, which was close to the tryptophan residues. Similarly, how for native albumin glycated form has had one high affinity site for the drug with association constants of the order of 10 5 M -1. The glycation process of the HSA significantly has affected the impact of the meloxicam on the binding of other ligands such as warfarin and bilirubin. The affinity of the glycated albumin for bilirubin as for native albumin has been reduced by meloxicam but observed effect was weaker by half (about 20%) compared with nonglycated albumin. In contrast to the native albumin meloxicam binding to glycated form of the protein only slightly affected the binding of warfarin. It seemed possible that the effects on warfarin binding might be entirely attributable to the Lys 199 modification which was in site I.

  9. [Effect of Human Serum Albumin on Endotoxin Scattering Photometry].

    PubMed

    Takahashi, Gaku; Shibata, Shigehiro; Kan, Shigenori; Inada, Katsuya; Endo, Shigeatsu

    2015-07-01

    Laser scattering photometry (ESP) is a newly developed plasma endotoxin assay method using horseshoe crab amebocyte lysate (AL) that recognizes small particles produced by polymerization of coagulin under the stirring conditions at 1000rpm. We elucidated the effect of human serum album (HSA) in the ESP method. AL was dissolved with 630μL of the specimen and a 200-μL aliquot was used for ESP; this conventional protocol was regarded as the ESP630 method. The ESP210 method was also used, i. e. AL was dissolved with 210μL of the specimen and a 200-μL aliquot was used for ESP. Water induced the agglutination, and HSA prolonged the agglutination time depending on its concentration especially in the ESP630 method. The water-induced agglutination was not inhibited by the addition of anti-factor C monoclonal antibody, and amidinophenyl benzoate hydrochloride, used as a clotting enzyme inhibitor, intensively inhibited the water-induced agglutination. Therefore, the water-induced agglutination was suggested to be a false-positive reaction to non-specific activation of the clotting enzyme. The HSA-induced prolongation of the reaction in the national health insurance-covered turbidimetric kinetic assay was not observed. HSA or plasma protein seemed to affect the result, especially in the ESP630 method, and a non-specific reaction was found to occur in the ESP methods.

  10. Endogenously Expressed IL-4Rα Promotes the Malignant Phenotype of Human Pancreatic Cancer In Vitro and In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Traub, Benno; Sun, Lie; Ma, Yongsu; Xu, Pengfei; Lemke, Johannes; Paschke, Stephan; Henne-Bruns, Doris; Knippschild, Uwe; Kornmann, Marko

    2017-03-28

    Exogenous interleukin-4 (IL-4) has been demonstrated to affect the growth of different human malignancies including pancreatic cancer cells. The aim of our study was to determine the role of endogenously expressed IL-4-receptor-α-chain (IL-4Rα) in pancreatic cancer cells. IL-4Rα-suppression was achieved by generating Capan-1 cells stably expressing shRNA targeting IL-4Rα. The malignant phenotype was characterized by assessing growth properties, directional and non-directional cell movement in vitro and tumor growth in vivo. Signaling pathways were analyzed upon IL-4 and IL-13 stimulation of wildtype (WT) and control-transfected cells compared to IL-4Rα-knockdown cells. Silencing of IL-4Rα resulted in reduced anchorage-dependent cell growth (p < 0.05) and reduced anchorage-independent colony size (p < 0.001) in vitro. Moreover, cell movement and migration was inhibited. IL-4 and IL-13 stimulation of Capan-1-WT cells induced activation of similar pathways like stimulation with Insulin-like growth factor (IGF)-I. This activation was reduced after IL-4Rα downregulation while IGF-I signaling seemed to be enhanced in knockdown-clones. Importantly, IL-4Rα silencing also significantly suppressed tumor growth in vivo. The present study indicates that endogenously expressed IL-4 and IL-4Rα contribute to the malignant phenotype of pancreatic cancer cells by activating diverse pro-oncogenic signaling pathways. Addressing these pathways may contribute to the treatment of the disease.

  11. A potential role for endogenous proteins as sacrificial sunscreens and antioxidants in human tissues

    PubMed Central

    Hibbert, Sarah A.; Watson, Rachel E.B.; Gibbs, Neil K.; Costello, Patrick; Baldock, Clair; Weiss, Anthony S.; Griffiths, Christopher E.M.; Sherratt, Michael J.

    2015-01-01

    Excessive ultraviolet radiation (UVR) exposure of the skin is associated with adverse clinical outcomes. Although both exogenous sunscreens and endogenous tissue components (including melanins and tryptophan-derived compounds) reduce UVR penetration, the role of endogenous proteins in absorbing environmental UV wavelengths is poorly defined. Having previously demonstrated that proteins which are rich in UVR-absorbing amino acid residues are readily degraded by broadband UVB-radiation (containing UVA, UVB and UVC wavelengths) here we hypothesised that UV chromophore (Cys, Trp and Tyr) content can predict the susceptibility of structural proteins in skin and the eye to damage by physiologically relevant doses (up to 15.4 J/cm2) of solar UVR (95% UVA, 5% UVB). We show that: i) purified suspensions of UV-chromophore-rich fibronectin dimers, fibrillin microfibrils and β- and γ-lens crystallins undergo solar simulated radiation (SSR)-induced aggregation and/or decomposition and ii) exposure to identical doses of SSR has minimal effect on the size or ultrastructure of UV chromophore-poor tropoelastin, collagen I, collagen VI microfibrils and α-crystallin. If UV chromophore content is a factor in determining protein stability in vivo, we would expect that the tissue distribution of Cys, Trp and Tyr-rich proteins would correlate with regional UVR exposure. From bioinformatic analysis of 244 key structural proteins we identified several biochemically distinct, yet UV chromophore-rich, protein families. The majority of these putative UV-absorbing proteins (including the late cornified envelope proteins, keratin associated proteins, elastic fibre-associated components and β- and γ-crystallins) are localised and/or particularly abundant in tissues that are exposed to the highest doses of environmental UVR, specifically the stratum corneum, hair, papillary dermis and lens. We therefore propose that UV chromophore-rich proteins are localised in regions of high UVR exposure

  12. Lack of evidence for a marked endogenous component determining food intake in humans during forced desynchrony.

    PubMed

    Waterhouse, Jim; Jones, Kay; Edwards, Ben; Harrison, Yvonne; Nevill, Alan; Reilly, Thomas

    2004-05-01

    In an attempt to investigate the relative importance of endogenous and exogenous factors in determining food intake, 14 healthy subjects were studied while living in an Isolation Unit (where external time cues were absent) for eighteen 28 h "days" (equal to 21 solar days). The subjects were free to spend their waking time as they chose, and they had a free choice of what they ate and when they ate it. The only restrictions were that no naps were allowed in the "daytime," that some time was required to perform a variety of tests at regular intervals throughout the 18.67 h waking periods, and that any food preparation had to be performed by the subjects themselves. Core (rectal) temperature and activity were monitored throughout, and the subjects answered a questionnaire on their eating habits at 3 h intervals during the waking periods. The questionnaire investigated reasons for eating or not eating a meal during the previous 3 h and, if a meal had been eaten, its type, the factors influencing that choice, and the subjects' subjective responses (hunger before, enjoyment during, and satiety after) to it. The results were analyzed (two-way ANOVA) in terms of both the imposed day length (the exogenous component) and the free-running period of the temperature rhythm (the endogenous component). Results indicated that by far the main reason for eating/not eating was hunger/lack of hunger rather than factors such as food availability and time-pressure. There were statistically significant effects of time within the imposed waking periods upon the type of meal eaten--"breakfast" tending to be a snack, "lunch" a small hot meal, and the "evening meal" a large hot meal. Hot meals (whether small or large) were associated with more hunger before the meal, more enjoyment of the meal, and a greater degree of satiety afterward than were cold meals. These effects suggest that the individuals adjusted their eating habits to fit in with the imposed wake times. By contrast, the effect

  13. Polyphenols and the Human Brain: Plant “Secondary Metabolite” Ecologic Roles and Endogenous Signaling Functions Drive Benefits12

    PubMed Central

    Kennedy, David O.

    2014-01-01

    Flavonoids and other polyphenols are ubiquitous plant chemicals that fulfill a range of ecologic roles for their home plant, including protection from a range of biotic and abiotic stressors and a pivotal role in the management of pathogenic and symbiotic soil bacteria and fungi. They form a natural part of the human diet, and evidence suggests that their consumption is associated with the beneficial modulation of a number of health-related variables, including those related to cardiovascular and brain function. Over recent years, the consensus as to the mechanisms responsible for these effects in humans has shifted away from polyphenols having direct antioxidant effects and toward their modulation of cellular signal transduction pathways. To date, little consideration has been given to the question of why, rather than how, these plant-derived chemicals might exert these effects. Therefore, this review summarizes the evidence suggesting that polyphenols beneficially affect human brain function and describes the current mechanistic hypotheses explaining these effects. It then goes on to describe the ecologic roles and potential endogenous signaling functions that these ubiquitous phytochemicals play within their home plant and discusses whether these functions drive their beneficial effects in humans via a process of “cross-kingdom” signaling predicated on the many conserved similarities in plant, microbial, and human cellular signal transduction pathways. PMID:25469384

  14. Polyphenols and the human brain: plant “secondary metabolite” ecologic roles and endogenous signaling functions drive benefits.

    PubMed

    Kennedy, David O

    2014-09-01

    Flavonoids and other polyphenols are ubiquitous plant chemicals that fulfill a range of ecologic roles for their home plant, including protection from a range of biotic and abiotic stressors and a pivotal role in the management of pathogenic and symbiotic soil bacteria and fungi. They form a natural part of the human diet, and evidence suggests that their consumption is associated with the beneficial modulation of a number of health-related variables, including those related to cardiovascular and brain function. Over recent years, the consensus as to the mechanisms responsible for these effects in humans has shifted away from polyphenols having direct antioxidant effects and toward their modulation of cellular signal transduction pathways. To date, little consideration has been given to the question of why, rather than how, these plant-derived chemicals might exert these effects. Therefore, this review summarizes the evidence suggesting that polyphenols beneficially affect human brain function and describes the current mechanistic hypotheses explaining these effects. It then goes on to describe the ecologic roles and potential endogenous signaling functions that these ubiquitous phytochemicals play within their home plant and discusses whether these functions drive their beneficial effects in humans via a process of “cross-kingdom” signaling predicated on the many conserved similarities in plant, microbial, and human cellular signal transduction pathways.

  15. Human serum albumin complexes with chlorophyll and chlorophyllin.

    PubMed

    Ouameur, A Ahmed; Marty, R; Tajmir-Riahi, H A

    2005-02-15

    Porphyrins and their metal derivatives are strong protein binders. Some of these compounds have been used for radiation sensitization therapy of cancer and are targeted to interact with cellular DNA and protein. The presence of several high-affinity binding sites on human serum albumin (HSA) makes it possible target for many organic and inorganic molecules. Chlorophyll a and chlorophyllin (a food-grade derivative of chlorophyll), the ubiquitous green plant pigment widely consumed by humans, are potent inhibitors of experimental carcinogenesis and interact with protein and DNA in many ways. This study was designed to examine the interaction of HSA with chlorophyll (Chl) and chlorophyllin (Chln) in aqueous solution at physiological conditions. Fourier transform infrared, UV-visible, and CD spectroscopic methods were used to determine the pigment binding mode, the binding constant, and the effects of porphyrin complexation on protein secondary structure. Spectroscopic results showed that chlorophyll and chlorophyllin are located along the polypeptide chains with no specific interaction. Stronger protein association was observed for Chl than for Chln, with overall binding constants of K(Chl) = 2.9 x 10(4)M(-1) and K(Chln) = 7.0 x 10(3)M(-1). The protein conformation was altered (infrared data) with reduction of alpha-helix from 55% (free HSA) to 41-40% and increase of beta-structure from 22% (free HSA) to 29-35% in the pigment-protein complexes. Using the CDSSTR program (CD data) also showed major reduction of alpha-helix from 66% (free HSA) to 58 and 55% upon complexation with Chl and Chln, respectively.

  16. Pathogen inactivation of human serum facilitates its clinical use for islet cell culture and subsequent transplantation.

    PubMed

    Ståhle, Magnus U; Brandhorst, Daniel; Korsgren, Olle; Knutson, Folke

    2011-01-01

    Serum is regarded as an essential supplement to promote survival and growth of cells during culture. However, the potential risk of transmitting diseases disqualifies the use of serum for clinical cell therapy in most countries. Hence, most clinical cell therapy programs have replaced human serum with human serum albumin, which can result in inferior quality of released cell products. Photochemical treatment of different blood products utilizing Intercept® technology has been shown to inactivate a broad variety of pathogens of RNA and DNA origin. The present study assesses the feasibility of using pathogen-inactivated, blood group-compatible serum for use in human pancreatic islet culture. Isolated human islets were cultured at 37°C for 3-4 days in CMRL 1066 supplemented with 10% of either pathogen-inactivated or nontreated human serum. Islet quality assessment included glucose-stimulated insulin release (perifusion), ADP/ATP ratio, cytokine expression, and posttransplant function in diabetic nude mice. No differences were found between islets cultured in pathogen-inactivated or control serum regarding stimulated insulin release, intracellular insulin content, and ADP/ATP ratio. Whether media was supplemented with treated or nontreated serum, islet expression of IL-6, IL-8, MCP-1, or tissue factor was not affected. The final diabetes-reversal rate of mice receiving islets cultured in pathogen-inactivated or nontreated serum was 78% and 87%, respectively (NS). As reported here, pathogen-inactivated human serum does not affect viability or functional integrity of cultured human islets. The implementation of this technology for RNA- and DNA-based pathogen inactivation should enable reintroduction of human serum for clinical cell therapy.

  17. Physiologically relevant plasma d,l-homocysteine concentrations mobilize Cd from human serum albumin.

    PubMed

    Sagmeister, Peter; Gibson, Matthew A; McDade, Kyle H; Gailer, Jürgen

    2016-08-01

    Although low-level chronic exposure of humans to cadmium (Cd(2+)) can result in a variety of adverse health effects, little is known about the role that its interactions with plasma proteins and small molecular weight (SMW) ligands in the bloodstream may play in delivering this metal to its target organs. To gain insight, a Cd-human serum albumin (HSA) 1:1 (molar ratio) complex was analyzed by size exclusion chromatography (SEC) coupled on-line to a flame atomic absorption spectrometer (FAAS). Using a phosphate buffered saline (PBS)-buffer mobile phase, the stability of the Cd-HSA complex was investigated in the presence of 2.0mM of SMW ligands, including taurine, acetaminophen, l-methionine, l-cysteine (Cys), d,l-homocysteine (hCys) or l-cysteine methyl-ester (Cys-Me). While taurine, acetaminophen and l-methionine did not affect its integrity, Cys, hCys and Cys-Me completely abstracted Cd from HSA. Subsequent investigations into the effect of 1.5, 1.0 and 0.5mM Cys and hCys on the integrity of the Cd-HSA complex revealed clear differences with regard to the nature of the eluting SMW-Cd species between these structurally related endogenous thiols. Interestingly, the Cd-specific chromatograms that were obtained for 0.5mM hCys revealed the elution of an apparent mixture of the parent Cd-HSA complex with a significant contribution of a structurally uncharacterized CdxhCysy species. Since this hCys concentration is encountered in blood plasma of hyperhomocysteinemia patients and since previous studies by others have revealed that a SH-containing carrier mediates the uptake of Cd into hepatocytes, our results suggest that plasma hCys may play a role in the toxicologically relevant translocation of Cd from the bloodstream to mammalian target organs.

  18. Downregulation of the endogenous opioid peptides in the dorsal striatum of human alcoholics

    PubMed Central

    Sarkisyan, Daniil; Hussain, Muhammad Z.; Watanabe, Hiroyuki; Kononenko, Olga; Bazov, Igor; Zhou, Xingwu; Yamskova, Olga; Krishtal, Oleg; Karpyak, Victor M.; Yakovleva, Tatiana; Bakalkin, Georgy

    2015-01-01

    The endogenous opioid peptides dynorphins and enkephalins may be involved in brain-area specific synaptic adaptations relevant for different stages of an addiction cycle. We compared the levels of prodynorphin (PDYN) and proenkephalin (PENK) mRNAs (by qRT-PCR), and dynorphins and enkephalins (by radioimmunoassay) in the caudate nucleus and putamen between alcoholics and control subjects. We also evaluated whether PDYN promoter variant rs1997794 associated with alcoholism affects PDYN expression. Postmortem specimens obtained from 24 alcoholics and 26 controls were included in final statistical analysis. PDYN mRNA and Met-enkephalin-Arg-Phe, a marker of PENK were downregulated in the caudate of alcoholics, while PDYN mRNA and Leu-enkephalin-Arg, a marker of PDYN were decreased in the putamen of alcoholics carrying high risk rs1997794 C allele. Downregulation of opioid peptides in the dorsal striatum may contribute to development of alcoholism including changes in goal directed behavior and formation of a compulsive habit in alcoholics. PMID:26029055

  19. Endomorphins, endogenous opioid peptides, induce apoptosis in human leukemia HL-60 cells.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xin; Chen, Qiang; Xue, Li-Ying; Ma, Xiao-Jun; Wang, Rui

    2004-11-01

    Opioids play a role in the apoptosis machinery. We studied the induction of apoptosis in endomorphin 1 (EM1) and endomorphin 2 (EM2), 2 newly isolated endogenous mu-opioid receptor agonists. These endomorphins were able to reduce the viability of cultured HL-60 cells. The antiproliferative properties of endomorphins appeared to be attributable to their induction of apoptotic cell death as determined by ultrastructural change, internucleosomal DNA fragmentation, and increased proportion of the subdiploid cell population. To elucidate molecular events in the apoptosis, protein expressions of Bcl-2, Bax, Fas, and FasL were measured by western blotting using specific antibodies in HL-60 cells. The level of Bcl-2 indicated down-regulation, but the Bax, Fas, and FasL expression showed up-regulation as compared with the untreated control cells. These data support the idea that endomorphins induce apoptosis in HL-60 cells through the activation of the Bcl-2-Bax and the Fas-FasL pathway. We suggest that endomorphins may play an important role in the regulation of tumor cell death.

  20. Protective effects of endomorphins, endogenous opioid peptides in the brain, on human low density lipoprotein oxidation.

    PubMed

    Lin, Xin; Xue, Li-Ying; Wang, Rui; Zhao, Qian-Yu; Chen, Qiang

    2006-03-01

    Neurodegenerative disorders are associated with oxidative stress. Low density lipoprotein (LDL) exists in the brain and is especially sensitive to oxidative damage. Oxidative modification of LDL has been implicated in the pathogenesis of neurodegenerative diseases. Therefore, protecting LDL from oxidation may be essential in the brain. The antioxidative effects of endomorphin 1 (EM1) and endomorphin 2 (EM2), endogenous opioid peptides in the brain, on LDL oxidation has been investigated in vitro. The peroxidation was initiated by either copper ions or a water-soluble initiator 2,2'-azobis(2-amidinopropane hydrochloride) (AAPH). Oxidation of the LDL lipid moiety was monitored by measuring conjugated dienes, thiobarbituric acid reactive substances, and the relative electrophoretic mobility. Low density lipoprotein oxidative modifications were assessed by evaluating apoB carbonylation and fragmentation. Endomorphins markedly and in a concentration-dependent manner inhibited Cu2+ and AAPH induced the oxidation of LDL, due to the free radical scavenging effects of endomorphins. In all assay systems, EM1 was more potent than EM2 and l-glutathione, a major intracellular water-soluble antioxidant. We propose that endomorphins provide protection against free radical-induced neurodegenerative disorders.

  1. Complement-Mediated Death of Ciliate Tetrahymena pyriformis Caused by Human Blood Serum.

    PubMed

    Ivanov, P A; Faktor, M I; Karpova, N S; Cheremnykh, E G; Brusov, O S

    2016-04-01

    Toxicity of human blood serum for ciliate Tetrahymena pyriformis is determined by the complement system. When ciliate are dying after being exposed to blood serum, cell membrane permeability for low-molecular-weight compounds significantly increases, probably due to pore formation. Serine protease inhibitors or exposure to physical factors inducing complement inactivation (e.g., heating up to 56°C) completely prevented ciliate death under the effect of human serum. Activation of serum complement upon interaction with Tetrahymena cells occurred by the classical or lectin pathway, while the contribution of the alternative activation pathway was negligible.

  2. Minimized human telomerase maintains telomeres and resolves endogenous roles of H/ACA proteins, TCAB1, and Cajal bodies.

    PubMed

    Vogan, Jacob M; Zhang, Xiaozhu; Youmans, Daniel T; Regalado, Samuel G; Johnson, Joshua Z; Hockemeyer, Dirk; Collins, Kathleen

    2016-08-15

    We dissected the importance of human telomerase biogenesis and trafficking pathways for telomere maintenance. Biological stability of human telomerase RNA (hTR) relies on H/ACA proteins, but other eukaryotes use other RNP assembly pathways. To investigate additional rationale for human telomerase assembly as H/ACA RNP, we developed a minimized cellular hTR. Remarkably, with only binding sites for telomerase reverse transcriptase (TERT), minimized hTR assembled biologically active enzyme. TERT overexpression was required for cellular interaction with minimized hTR, indicating that H/ACA RNP assembly enhances endogenous hTR-TERT interaction. Telomere maintenance by minimized telomerase was unaffected by the elimination of the telomerase holoenzyme Cajal body chaperone TCAB1 or the Cajal body scaffold protein Coilin. Surprisingly, wild-type hTR also maintained and elongated telomeres in TCAB1 or Coilin knockout cells, with distinct changes in telomerase action. Overall, we elucidate trafficking requirements for telomerase biogenesis and function and expand mechanisms by which altered telomere maintenance engenders human disease.

  3. Human motor neuron progenitor transplantation leads to endogenous neuronal sparing in 3 models of motor neuron loss.

    PubMed

    Wyatt, Tanya J; Rossi, Sharyn L; Siegenthaler, Monica M; Frame, Jennifer; Robles, Rockelle; Nistor, Gabriel; Keirstead, Hans S

    2011-01-01

    Motor neuron loss is characteristic of many neurodegenerative disorders and results in rapid loss of muscle control, paralysis, and eventual death in severe cases. In order to investigate the neurotrophic effects of a motor neuron lineage graft, we transplanted human embryonic stem cell-derived motor neuron progenitors (hMNPs) and examined their histopathological effect in three animal models of motor neuron loss. Specifically, we transplanted hMNPs into rodent models of SMA (Δ7SMN), ALS (SOD1 G93A), and spinal cord injury (SCI). The transplanted cells survived and differentiated in all models. In addition, we have also found that hMNPs secrete physiologically active growth factors in vivo, including NGF and NT-3, which significantly enhanced the number of spared endogenous neurons in all three animal models. The ability to maintain dying motor neurons by delivering motor neuron-specific neurotrophic support represents a powerful treatment strategy for diseases characterized by motor neuron loss.

  4. Generation and characterization of a unique reagent that recognizes a panel of recombinant human monoclonal antibody therapeutics in the presence of endogenous human IgG

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiangdan; Quarmby, Valerie; Ng, Carl; Chuntharapai, Anan; Shek, Theresa; Eigenbrot, Charles; Kelley, Robert F.; Shia, Steven; McCutcheon, Krista M; Lowe, John; Leddy, Cecilia; Coachman, Kyle; Cain, Gary; Chu, Felix; Hotzel, Isidro; Maia, Mauricio; Wakshull, Eric; Yang, Jihong

    2013-01-01

    Pharmacokinetic (PK) and immunohistochemistry (IHC) assays are essential to the evaluation of the safety and efficacy of therapeutic monoclonal antibodies (mAb) during drug development. These methods require reagents with a high degree of specificity because low concentrations of therapeutic antibody need to be detected in samples containing high concentrations of endogenous human immunoglobulins. Current assay reagent generation practices are labor-intensive and time-consuming. Moreover, these practices are molecule-specific and so only support one assay for one program at a time. Here, we describe a strategy to generate a unique assay reagent, 10C4, that preferentially recognizes a panel of recombinant human mAbs over endogenous human immunoglobulins. This “panel-specific” feature enables the reagent to be used in PK and IHC assays for multiple structurally-related therapeutic mAbs. Characterization revealed that the 10C4 epitope is conformational, extensive and mainly composed of non-CDR residues. Most key contact residues were conserved among structurally-related therapeutic mAbs, but the combination of these residues exists at low prevalence in endogenous human immunoglobulins. Interestingly, an indirect contact residue on the heavy chain of the therapeutic appears to play a critical role in determining whether or not it can bind to 10C4, but has no affect on target binding. This may allow us to improve the binding of therapeutic mAbs to 10C4 for assay development in the future. Here, for the first time, we present a strategy to develop a panel-specific reagent that can expedite the development of multiple clinical assays for structurally-related therapeutic mAbs. PMID:23774668

  5. Endogenous Reference Genes for Gene Expression Studies on Bicuspid Aortic Valve Associated Aortopathy in Humans

    PubMed Central

    Harrison, Oliver J.; Moorjani, Narain; Torrens, Christopher; Ohri, Sunil K.; Cagampang, Felino R.

    2016-01-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) disease is the most common congenital cardiac abnormality and predisposes patients to life-threatening aortic complications including aortic aneurysm. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) is one of the most commonly used methods to investigate underlying molecular mechanisms involved in aortopathy. The accuracy of the gene expression data is dependent on normalization by appropriate housekeeping (HK) genes, whose expression should remain constant regardless of aortic valve morphology, aortic diameter and other factors associated with aortopathy. Here, we identified an appropriate set of HK genes to be used as endogenous reference for quantifying gene expression in ascending aortic tissue using a spin column-based RNA extraction method. Ascending aortic biopsies were collected intra-operatively from patients undergoing aortic valve and/or ascending aortic surgery. These patients had BAV or tricuspid aortic valve (TAV), and the aortas were either dilated (≥4.5cm) or undilated. The cohort had an even distribution of gender, valve disease and hypertension. The expression stability of 12 reference genes were investigated (ATP5B, ACTB, B2M, CYC1, EIF4A2, GAPDH, SDHA, RPL13A, TOP1, UBC, YWHAZ, and 18S) using geNorm software. The most stable HK genes were found to be GAPDH, UBC and ACTB. Both GAPDH and UBC demonstrated relative stability regardless of valve morphology, aortic diameter, gender and age. The expression of B2M and SDHA were found to be the least stable HK genes. We propose the use of GAPDH, UBC and ACTB as reference genes for gene expression studies of BAV aortopathy using ascending aortic tissue. PMID:27727313

  6. Genetic variants of human organic anion transporter 4 demonstrate altered transport of endogenous substrates

    PubMed Central

    Shima, James E.; Komori, Takafumi; Taylor, Travis R.; Stryke, Doug; Kawamoto, Michiko; Johns, Susan J.; Carlson, Elaine J.; Ferrin, Thomas E.

    2010-01-01

    Apical reabsorption from the urine has been shown to be important for such processes as the maintenance of critical metabolites in the blood and the excretion of nephrotoxic compounds. The solute carrier (SLC) transporter OAT4 (SLC22A11) is expressed on the apical membrane of renal proximal tubule cells and is known to mediate the transport of a variety of xenobiotic and endogenous organic anions. Functional characterization of genetic variants of apical transporters thought to mediate reabsorption, such as OAT4, may provide insight into the genetic factors influencing the complex pathways involved in drug elimination and metabolite reclamation occurring in the kidney. Naturally occurring genetic variants of OAT4 were identified in public databases and by resequencing DNA samples from 272 individuals comprising 4 distinct ethnic groups. Nine total nonsynonymous variants were identified and functionally assessed using uptake of three radiolabeled substrates. A nonsense variant, R48Stop, and three other variants (R121C, V155G, and V155M) were found at frequencies of at least 2% in an ethnic group specific fashion. The L29P, R48Stop, and H469R variants displayed a complete loss of function, and kinetic analysis identified a reduced Vmax in the common nonsynonymous variants. Plasma membrane levels of OAT4 protein were absent or reduced in the nonfunctional variants, providing a mechanistic reason for the observed loss of function. Characterization of the genetic variants of reabsorptive transporters such as OAT4 is an important step in understanding variability in tubular reabsorption with important implications in innate homeostatic processes and drug disposition. PMID:20668102

  7. Genetic variants of human organic anion transporter 4 demonstrate altered transport of endogenous substrates.

    PubMed

    Shima, James E; Komori, Takafumi; Taylor, Travis R; Stryke, Doug; Kawamoto, Michiko; Johns, Susan J; Carlson, Elaine J; Ferrin, Thomas E; Giacomini, Kathleen M

    2010-10-01

    Apical reabsorption from the urine has been shown to be important for such processes as the maintenance of critical metabolites in the blood and the excretion of nephrotoxic compounds. The solute carrier (SLC) transporter OAT4 (SLC22A11) is expressed on the apical membrane of renal proximal tubule cells and is known to mediate the transport of a variety of xenobiotic and endogenous organic anions. Functional characterization of genetic variants of apical transporters thought to mediate reabsorption, such as OAT4, may provide insight into the genetic factors influencing the complex pathways involved in drug elimination and metabolite reclamation occurring in the kidney. Naturally occurring genetic variants of OAT4 were identified in public databases and by resequencing DNA samples from 272 individuals comprising 4 distinct ethnic groups. Nine total nonsynonymous variants were identified and functionally assessed using uptake of three radiolabeled substrates. A nonsense variant, R48Stop, and three other variants (R121C, V155G, and V155M) were found at frequencies of at least 2% in an ethnic group specific fashion. The L29P, R48Stop, and H469R variants displayed a complete loss of function, and kinetic analysis identified a reduced V(max) in the common nonsynonymous variants. Plasma membrane levels of OAT4 protein were absent or reduced in the nonfunctional variants, providing a mechanistic reason for the observed loss of function. Characterization of the genetic variants of reabsorptive transporters such as OAT4 is an important step in understanding variability in tubular reabsorption with important implications in innate homeostatic processes and drug disposition.

  8. Endogenous Reference Genes for Gene Expression Studies on Bicuspid Aortic Valve Associated Aortopathy in Humans.

    PubMed

    Harrison, Oliver J; Moorjani, Narain; Torrens, Christopher; Ohri, Sunil K; Cagampang, Felino R

    2016-01-01

    Bicuspid aortic valve (BAV) disease is the most common congenital cardiac abnormality and predisposes patients to life-threatening aortic complications including aortic aneurysm. Quantitative real-time reverse transcription PCR (qRT-PCR) is one of the most commonly used methods to investigate underlying molecular mechanisms involved in aortopathy. The accuracy of the gene expression data is dependent on normalization by appropriate housekeeping (HK) genes, whose expression should remain constant regardless of aortic valve morphology, aortic diameter and other factors associated with aortopathy. Here, we identified an appropriate set of HK genes to be used as endogenous reference for quantifying gene expression in ascending aortic tissue using a spin column-based RNA extraction method. Ascending aortic biopsies were collected intra-operatively from patients undergoing aortic valve and/or ascending aortic surgery. These patients had BAV or tricuspid aortic valve (TAV), and the aortas were either dilated (≥4.5cm) or undilated. The cohort had an even distribution of gender, valve disease and hypertension. The expression stability of 12 reference genes were investigated (ATP5B, ACTB, B2M, CYC1, EIF4A2, GAPDH, SDHA, RPL13A, TOP1, UBC, YWHAZ, and 18S) using geNorm software. The most stable HK genes were found to be GAPDH, UBC and ACTB. Both GAPDH and UBC demonstrated relative stability regardless of valve morphology, aortic diameter, gender and age. The expression of B2M and SDHA were found to be the least stable HK genes. We propose the use of GAPDH, UBC and ACTB as reference genes for gene expression studies of BAV aortopathy using ascending aortic tissue.

  9. Profiling Cys34 Adducts of Human Serum Albumin by Fixed-Step Selected Reaction Monitoring*

    PubMed Central

    Li, He; Grigoryan, Hasmik; Funk, William E.; Lu, Sixin Samantha; Rose, Sherri; Williams, Evan R.; Rappaport, Stephen M.

    2011-01-01

    A method is described for profiling putative adducts (or other unknown covalent modifications) at the Cys34 locus of human serum albumin (HSA), which represents the preferred reaction site for small electrophilic species in human serum. By comparing profiles of putative HSA-Cys34 adducts across populations of interest it is theoretically possible to explore environmental causes of degenerative diseases and cancer caused by both exogenous and endogenous chemicals. We report a novel application of selected-reaction-monitoring (SRM) mass spectrometry, termed fixed-step SRM (FS-SRM), that allows detection of essentially all HSA-Cys34 modifications over a specified range of mass increases (added masses). After tryptic digestion, HSA-Cys34 adducts are contained in the third largest peptide (T3), which contains 21 amino acids and an average mass of 2433.87 Da. The FS-SRM method does not require that exact masses of T3 adducts be known in advance but rather uses a theoretical list of T3-adduct m/z values separated by a fixed increment of 1.5. In terms of added masses, each triply charged parent ion represents a bin of ±2.3 Da between 9.1 Da and 351.1 Da. Synthetic T3 adducts were used to optimize FS-SRM and to establish screening rules based upon selected b- and y-series fragment ions. An isotopically labeled T3 adduct is added to protein digests to facilitate quantification of putative adducts. We used FS-SRM to generate putative adduct profiles from six archived specimens of HSA that had been pooled by gender, race, and smoking status. An average of 66 putative adduct hits (out of a possible 77) were detected in these samples. Putative adducts covered a wide range of concentrations, were most abundant in the mass range below 100 Da, and were more abundant in smokers than in nonsmokers. With minor modifications, the FS-SRM methodology can be applied to other nucleophilic sites and proteins. PMID:21193536

  10. Dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS) levels reflect endogenous LH production and response to human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) challenge in the older female macaque (Macaca fascicularis)

    PubMed Central

    Moran, Francisco M.; Chen, Jiangang; Gee, Nancy A.; Lohstroh, Pete; Lasley, Bill L.

    2012-01-01

    Hypothesis We propose that the adrenal gland of an older higher primate female animal model will respond to a human chorionic gonadotropic (hCG) hormone challenge by secreting additional dehydroepiandrosterone sulfate (DHEAS). Such a response in surgically and chemically-castrated animals will provide proof-of-concept and a validated animal model for future studies to explore the rise of DHEAS during the menopausal transition of women. Methods Twenty four 18–26 y/o female cynomolgus monkeys were screened for ovarian function then either ovariectomized (n=4) or treated with a gonadotropic releasing hormone agonist (GnRHa) (n=20) to block ovarian steroid production. Following a recovery period from surgery or down-regulation, a single dose challenge (1,000 IU; IM) of human chorionic gonadotropin (hCG) was then administered in order to determine if LH/CG could accelerate circulating DHEAS production. Serum DHEAS, bioactive LH and urinary metabolites of ovarian sex steroids were monitored before, during and following these treatments. Results Circulating LH bioactivity and immunoreactive DHEAS concentrations were suppressed in all animals 14 days post administration of GnRHa. Urinary metabolites of estradiol and progesterone remained low following surgery or the flare reaction to GnRHa. Circulating DHEAS levels were increased following hCG administration and the increase in individual animals was proportional to the pre-treatment DHEAS baseline. Circulating DHEAS concentrations were positively correlated to endogenous LH bioactive concentrations prior to, and were increased by hCG challenge while no concomitant change was observed in ovarian steroid hormone excretion. Conclusion These data demonstrate a positive adrenal androgen response to LH/CG in older female higher primates and suggests a mechanism for the rise in adrenal androgen production during the menopausal transition in women. These results also illustrate that the nonhuman primate animal model can be

  11. ENHANCED CONCENTRATION AND ANALYSIS METHOD FOR MEASURING WATER SOLUABLE ENDOGENOUS COMPOUNDS IN HUMAN BREATH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exhaled human breath analysis has become a standard technique for assessing exposure to exogenous volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as trihalomethanes from water chlorination; aromatics, hydrocarbons, and oxygenates from fuels usage; and various chlorinated solvents from i...

  12. ENHANCED CONCENTRATION AND ANALYSIS METHOD FOR MEASURING WATER SOLUABLE ENDOGENOUS COMPOUNDS IN HUMAN BREATH

    EPA Science Inventory

    Exhaled human breath analysis has become a standard technique for assessing exposure to exogenous volatile organic compounds (VOCs) such as trihalomethanes from water chlorination; aromatics, hydrocarbons, and oxygenates from fuels usage; and various chlorinated solvents from i...

  13. Aggregation of biopharmaceuticals in human plasma and human serum: implications for drug research and development.

    PubMed

    Arvinte, Tudor; Palais, Caroline; Green-Trexler, Erin; Gregory, Sonia; Mach, Henryk; Narasimhan, Chakravarthy; Shameem, Mohammed

    2013-01-01

    Analytical methods based on light microscopy, 90° light-scattering and surface plasmon resonance (SPR) allowed the characterization of aggregation that can occur when antibodies are mixed with human plasma. Light microscopy showed that aggregates formed when human plasma was mixed with 5% dextrose solutions of Herceptin(®) (trastuzumab) or Avastin(®) (bevacizumab) but not Remicade(®) (infliximab). The aggregates in the plasma-Herceptin(®)-5% dextrose solution were globular, size range 0.5-9 μm, with a mean diameter of 4 μm. The aggregates in the plasma-Avastin(®)-5% dextrose samples had a mean size of 2 μm. No aggregation was observed when 0.9% NaCl solutions of Herceptin(®), Avastin(®) and Remicade(®) were mixed with human plasma. 90° light-scattering measurements showed that aggregates were still present 2.5 h after mixing Herceptin(®) or Avastin(®) with 5% dextrose-plasma solution. A SPR method was utilized to qualitatively describe the extent of interactions of surface-bound antibodies with undiluted human serum. Increased binding was observed in the case of Erbitux(®) (cetuximab), whereas no binding was measured for Humira(®) (adalimumab). The binding of sera components to 13 monoclonal antibodies was measured and correlated with known serum binding properties of the antibodies. The data presented in this paper provide analytical methods to study the intrinsic and buffer-dependent aggregation tendencies of therapeutic proteins when mixed with human plasma and serum.

  14. Pyrogen reactions to human serum albumin during plasma exchange.

    PubMed

    Pool, M; McLeod, B C

    1995-01-01

    Reactions to human serum albumin (HSA) in therapeutic plasma exchange (TPE) are rare. Nevertheless, older literature describes possible adverse effects, including specific immune responses to albumin or other proteins, and reactions due to contaminating organisms or pyrogen. During an eight day period three patients in our unit had unusual reactions after infusion of 1.5-2 L of HSA. Patient 1 had trembling that persisted for 20 min. Patient 2 had shaking for 40 min despite calcium gluconate infusion, and fever to 100.8 degrees F. Patient 3 had severe rigors that subsided after 90 min when meperidine was finally given, and fever to 103.5 degrees F. Record reviews revealed that all three patients had received HSA from the same lot, and that only one other TPE patient had received HSA from that lot. Neither our pharmacy nor the manufacturer was aware of other reactions associated with that lot. Material from a bottle only partially infused to patient 3 was negative in culture and was negative for pyrogen when retested by the manufacturer. Nevertheless, because patients 1 and 2 had each had multiple previous uneventful TPEs and because all three patients tolerated subsequent TPEs without incident when another brand of HSA was used, we conclude that these patients had pyrogen reactions to the implicated HSA lot. This experience illustrates the value of cluster recognition in arousing suspicion of unusual reactions to HSA and the value of recorded lot numbers in pursuing such suspicions. Apheresis personnel should be aware of the potential for pyrogen reactions with HSA and should record lot numbers of all fluids infused during TPE.

  15. Structural basis of transport of lysophospholipids by human serum albumin

    SciTech Connect

    Guo, Shihui; Shi, Xiaoli; Yang, Feng; Chen, Liqing; Meehan, Edward J.; Bian, Chuanbing; Huang, Mingdong

    2010-10-08

    Lysophospholipids play important roles in cellular signal transduction and are implicated in many biological processes, including tumorigenesis, angiogenesis, immunity, atherosclerosis, arteriosclerosis, cancer and neuronal survival. The intracellular transport of lysophospholipids is through FA (fatty acid)-binding protein. Lysophospholipids are also found in the extracellular space. However, the transport mechanism of lysophospholipids in the extracellular space is unknown. HSA (human serum albumin) is the most abundant carrier protein in blood plasma and plays an important role in determining the absorption, distribution, metabolism and excretion of drugs. In the present study, LPE (lysophosphatidylethanolamine) was used as the ligand to analyse the interaction of lysophospholipids with HSA by fluorescence quenching and crystallography. Fluorescence measurement showed that LPE binds to HSA with a K{sub d} (dissociation constant) of 5.6 {micro}M. The presence of FA (myristate) decreases this binding affinity (K{sub d} of 12.9 {micro}M). Moreover, we determined the crystal structure of HSA in complex with both myristate and LPE and showed that LPE binds at Sudlow site I located in subdomain IIA. LPE occupies two of the three subsites in Sudlow site I, with the LPE acyl chain occupying the hydrophobic bottom of Sudlow site I and the polar head group located at Sudlow site I entrance region pointing to the solvent. This orientation of LPE in HSA suggests that HSA is capable of accommodating other lysophospholipids and phospholipids. The study provides structural information on HSA-lysophospholipid interaction and may facilitate our understanding of the transport and distribution of lysophospholipids.

  16. Low molecular weight silicones particularly facilitate human serum albumin denaturation.

    PubMed

    Nayef, Lamees M; Khan, Madiha F; Brook, Michael A

    2015-04-01

    There is a market trend towards the administration of therapeutic proteins using sterilized, pre-filled glass syringes lubricated with silicone oil. It has been widely reported that initially clear solutions of proteins can become turbid during transport and storage, with unclear outcomes with respect to bioefficacy. While the basic processes of interactions of proteins with hydrophobic entities, leading to denaturation and aggregation, are increasingly well understood, the apparently random occurrence of such processes in syringes is not. To better understand the parameters that may be responsible for this change, we report the systematic examination of a series of factors that can affect the behavior of the protein human serum albumin (HSA) when in contact with silicone oil in water. Fluorescence spectroscopy showed that greater mixing times and greater concentrations of silicones (polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS)), especially lower molecular weight hydrophobic silicones like octamethyltetracyclosiloxane (D4), were associated with increased protein denaturation. The turbidity of HSA solutions, due to the formation both of silicone oil-in-water (O/W) emulsions and protein aggregates, was also facilitated by the presence of D4. A series of mixtures of silicone oils, all of which exhibited a viscosity of 1000 cSt but which were comprised of different silicone constituents, clearly showed a correlation between the presence of lower molecular silicones and enhanced solution turbidity. While the addition of a non-ionic silicone-polyether surfactant led to greater turbidity by increasing the number of stabilized oil droplets, it was not accompanied by protein denaturation. These results are consistent with HSA denaturation and subsequent aggregation as a consequence of contact particularly with low molecular weight, hydrophobic silicones that are more mobile, leading to more efficient protein/silicone contact.

  17. Membrane changes induced by exposure of Escherichia coli to human serum.

    PubMed Central

    Kroll, H P; Bhakdi, S; Taylor, P W

    1983-01-01

    The effect of bactericidal concentrations of lysozyme-free human serum on parameters of membrane integrity has been studied in serum-susceptible and serum-resistant Escherichia coli strains. Serum treatment released all of the alkaline phosphatase from the periplasmic space of two rapidly serum-susceptible strains but did so at different rates. In contrast, no periplasmic enzyme was released from two serum-resistant strains or from one moderately susceptible smooth strain. Lysozyme-free serum and heat-inactivated serum released comparable amounts of 86Rb+ from preloaded cells at comparable rates, regardless of serum susceptibility. Serum decreased the rate of phospholipid biosynthesis in both serum-susceptible and serum-resistant strains. In susceptible but not in resistant strains, intracellular ATP pools were depleted after serum exposure. Outer membranes and cytoplasmic membranes were prepared from serum-treated E. coli, and assays for C3 and C5b-9(m) were performed. With rapidly susceptible strains, C3 deposition on the outer membrane without attachment of C5b-9(m) occurred during the short prekilling phase. Subsequent bacterial killing was accompanied by deposition of C5b-9(m), which was recovered with C3 exclusively in outer membrane fractions with increased density and by eventual total loss of recoverable cytoplasmic membranes. Minimal deposition of complement components, without accompanying cytoplasmic membrane loss, occurred with serum-resistant strains. Loss of recoverable cytoplasmic membrane was not due to the action of either serum or bacterial phospholipase A. The results raise the possibilities that C5b-9(m) primarily damages the outer membrane and that the bacteria themselves actively participate in the ensuing, as yet unclarified, metabolic reactions that finally lead to their death. Images PMID:6358036

  18. Clinical grade cultivation of human Schwann cell, by the using of human autologous serum instead of fetal bovine serum and without growth factors.

    PubMed

    Aghayan, Hamid-Reza; Arjmand, Babak; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Saberi, Hooshang; Soleimani, Masoud; Tavakoli, Seyed Amir-Hossein; Khodadadi, Abbas; Tirgar, Niloufar; Mohammadi-Jahani, Fereshteh

    2012-06-01

    Clinical grade cultivation of human schwann cell by the utilization of human autologous serum instead of fetal bovine serum, and also avoiding any growth factors, can increase safety level of this procedure in cases of clinical cell transplantation. The aim of this study was demonstration of the feasibility of clinical grade schwann cell cultivation. In this experimental study after obtaining consent from close relatives we harvested 10 sural nerves from brain death donors and then cultured in 10 seperated culture media plus autologous serum. We also prepared autologous serum from donor's whole blood. Then cultured cells were evaluated by S100 antibody staining for both morphology and purity. Cell purity range was from 97% to 99% (mean=98.11 ± 0.782%). Mean of the cell count was 14,055.56 ± 2,480.479 per micro liter. There was not significant correlation between cell purity and either the culture period or the age of donors (P>0.05). The spearman correlation coefficient for the cell purity with the period or the age of donors was 0.21 and 0.09, respectively. We demonstrated the feasibility of clinical grade schwann cell cultivation by the using of human autologous serum instead of fetal bovine serum and also without the using of growth factors. We also recommended all cell preparation facilities to adhere to the GMP and other similar quality disciplines especially in the preparation of clinically-used cell products.

  19. Improvement of serum antioxidant status in humans after the acute intake of apple juices.

    PubMed

    Vieira, Francilene G K; Di Pietro, Patricia F; da Silva, Edson L; Borges, Graciele S C; Nunes, Eduardo C; Fett, Roseane

    2012-03-01

    It i