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Sample records for human skin in-vivo

  1. Multiphoton spectroscopy of human skin in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breunig, Hans G.; Weinigel, Martin; König, Karsten

    2012-03-01

    In vivo multiphoton-intensity images and emission spectra of human skin are reported. Optical sections from different depths of the epidermis and dermis have been measured with near-infrared laser-pulse excitation. While the intensity images reveal information on the morphology, the spectra show emission characteristics of main endogenous skin fluorophores like keratin, NAD(P)H, melanin, elastin and collagen as well as of second harmonic generation induced by the excitation-light interaction with the dermal collagen network.

  2. Variables influencing the frictional behaviour of in vivo human skin.

    PubMed

    Veijgen, N K; Masen, M A; van der Heide, E

    2013-12-01

    In the past decades, skin friction research has focused on determining which variables are important to affect the frictional behaviour of in vivo human skin. Until now, there is still limited knowledge on these variables. This study has used a large dataset to identify the effect of variables on the human skin, subject characteristics and environmental conditions on skin friction. The data are obtained on 50 subjects (34 males and 16 females). Friction measurements represent the friction between in vivo human skin and an aluminium sample, assessed on three anatomical locations. The coefficient of friction increased significantly (p<0.05) with increasing age, increasing ambient temperature and increasing relative air humidity. A significant inversely proportional relationship was found between friction and both the amount of hair present on the skin and the height of the subject. Other outcome variables in this study were the hydration of the skin and the skin temperature.

  3. OCT monitoring of cosmetic creams in human skin in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Seung Hee; Yoon, Chang Han; Conroy, Leigh; Vitkin, I. Alex

    2012-02-01

    Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a tool currently used for noninvasive diagnosis of human disease as well as for monitoring treatment during or after therapy. In this study, OCT was used to examine penetration and accumulation of cosmetic creams on human hand skin. The samples varied in collagen content with one formulation containing soluble collagen as its primary active ingredient. Collagen is a major connective tissue protein that is essential in maintaining health vitality and strength of many organs. The penetration and localization of collagen in cosmetic creams is thought to be the main determinant of the efficacy of new collagen synthesis. Detection and quantification of collagen in cosmetic creams applied to skin may thus help predict the eventual efficacy of the product in skin collagen regeneration. We hypothesize that the topically applied collagen may be detectable by OCT through its modulation of skin scattering properties. To test this hypothesis, we used a FDML swept-source optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT) system. A particular location on the skin of two male adult volunteers was used to investigate 4 different cosmetic creams. The duration of OCT monitoring of cosmetic penetration into skin ranged from 5 minutes to 2 hours following topical application. The results showed that OCT can discriminate between a cream with collagen and other collagen-free formulations. Thus it seems feasible that OCT intensity can monitor the in vivo effects of topical application of collagen contained in cosmetic formulations.

  4. In vivo optical coherence tomography of human skin microstructure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sergeev, Alexander M.; Gelikonov, Valentin M.; Gelikonov, Grigory V.; Feldchtein, Felix I.; Pravdenko, Kirill I.; Shabanov, Dmitry V.; Gladkova, Natalia D.; Pochinko, Vitaly; Zhegalov, V.; Dmitriev, G.; Vazina, I.; Petrova, Galina P.; Nikulin, Nikolai K.

    1994-12-01

    A compact effective optical coherence tomography (OCT) system is presented. It contains approximately equals 0.3 mW superluminescent diode with spectral width 30 nm FWHM (providing approximately equals 15 micrometers longitudinal resolution) and fiber interferometer with integrated longitudinal scanning. The dynamic range 60 dB allows to observe structure of human skin in vivo up to 1.5 mm in depth. A comparison of obtained tomographs with data of histologic analysis of the same samples of the skin have been carried out to identify the observed structures and determine their optical properties. This technique allows one to perform noncontact, noninvasive diagnostic of early stages of different pathological state of the skin, to measure the burn depth and to observe the process of the recovery. Unlike scanning confocal microscopy, OCT is more suitable for an endoscopic investigation of the mucous membranes of hollow organs. Possible diagnostic applications include dermatology, gastroenterology, gynecology, urology, oncology, othorinolaryngology, transplantology. The most promising features are the potential possibility of differential diagnosis of precancer and various types of cancer, estimation of the invasion depth, differential diagnosis of inflammation and dystrophic processes, control of radical operative treatment.

  5. Modulation of skin collagen metabolism in aged and photoaged human skin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chung, J H; Seo, J Y; Choi, H R; Lee, M K; Youn, C S; Rhie, G; Cho, K H; Kim, K H; Park, K C; Eun, H C

    2001-11-01

    To the best of our knowledge, no study has been conducted to date to directly compare the collagen metabolism of photoaged and naturally aged human skin. In this study, we compared collagen synthesis, matrix metalloproteinase-1 levels, and gelatinase activity of sun-exposed and sun-protected skin of both young and old subjects. Using northern blot analysis, immunohistochemical stain, and Western blot analysis, we demonstrated that the levels of procollagen type I mRNA and protein in photoaged and naturally aged human skin in vivo are significantly lower than those of young skin. Furthermore, we demonstrated, by northern blot analysis, that the procollagen alpha1(I) mRNA expression of photoaged skin is much greater than that of sun-protected skin in the same individual. In situ hybridization and immunohistochemical stain were used to show that the expression of type I procollagen mRNA and protein in the fibroblasts of photoaged skin is greater than for naturally aged skin. In addition, it was found, by Western blot analysis using protein extracted from the dermal tissues, that the level of procollagen type I protein in photoaged skin is lower than that of naturally aged skin. The level of matrix metalloproteinase-1 protein and the activity of matrix metalloproteinase-2 were higher in the dermis of photoaged skin than in naturally aged skin. Our results suggest that the natural aging process decreases collagen synthesis and increases the expression of matrix metalloproteinases, whereas photoaging results in an increase of collagen synthesis and greater matrix metalloproteinase expression in human skin in vivo. Thus, the balance between collagen synthesis and degradation leading to collagen deficiency is different in photoaged and naturally aged skin.

  6. In vivo non-invasive multiphoton tomography of human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten; Riemann, Iris; Ehlers, Alexander; Le Harzic, Ronan

    2005-10-01

    High resolution non-invasive 3D imaging devices are required to detect pathogenic microorganisms such as Anthrax spores, bacteria, viruses, fungi and chemical agents entering biological tissues such as the epidermis. Due to the low light penetration depth and the biodamage potential, ultraviolet light sources can not be employed to realize intratissue imaging of bio- and chemohazards. We report on the novel near infrared laser technology multiphoton tomography and the high resolution 4D imaging tool DermaInspect for non-invasive detection of intratissue agents and their influence on cellular metabolism based on multiphoton autofluorescence imaging (MAI) and second harmonic generation (SHG). Femtosecond laser pulses in the spectral range of 750 nm to 850 nm have been used to image in vivo human skin with subcellular spatial and picosecond temporal resolution. The non-linear induced autofluorescence of both, skin tissues and microorganisms, originates mainly from naturally endogenous fluorophores/protein structures like NAD(P)H, flavins, keratin, collagen, elastin, porphyrins and melanin. Bacteria emit in the blue/green spectral range due to NAD(P)H and flavoproteins and, in certain cases, in the red spectral range due to the biosynthesis of Zn-porphyrins, coproporphyrin and protoporphyrin. Collagen and exogenous non-centrosymmetric molecules can be detected by SHG signals. The system DermaInspect consists of a wavelength-tunable compact 80/90 MHz Ti:sapphire laser, a scan module with galvo scan mirrors, piezo-driven objective, fast photon detector and time-resolved single photon counting unit. It can be used to perform optical sectioning and 3D autofluorescence lifetime imaging (τ-mapping) with 1 μm spatial resolution and 270 ps temporal resolution. The parameter fluorescence lifetime depends on the type of fluorophore and its microenvironment and can be used to distinguish bio- and chemohazards from cellular background and to gain information for pathogen

  7. [In vivo fluorescence spectroscopy of human skin: principles and application to penetration measurements].

    PubMed

    Harendt, N; Giese, K; Kölmel, K

    1994-08-01

    The fluorescence properties of untreated human skin and the penetration of topically applied drugs were measured in vivo using a commercially available fluorescence spectrometer which was adapted to in vivo-measurements on skin by means of optical fibres and a remote viewing head. The intensity and characteristics of the intrinsic fluorescences of human skin and their dependences upon several parameters like pigmentation, water content of the skin or depth of the horny layer are shown. The principles of the penetration measurements based on the fluorescence of the skin or the fluorescence of the drug topically applied to the skin are described and measurements of the penetration of some drugs are reported.

  8. Spectral characteristics of two-photon autofluorescence and second harmonic generation from human skin in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Breunig, Hans G.; König, Karsten

    2011-03-01

    We performed multiphoton imaging of human skin and recorded in combination the complete spectral content of the signals in vivo. The spectra represent the integration of multiphoton signals over the investigated regions of the epidermis and dermis. They are used to study depth-resolved in vivo emission characteristics of main endogenous skin fluorophores like keratin, NAD(P)H, collagen and elastin. The identification of the specific fluorophores is supported by analysis of additional in vivo fluorescence lifetime imaging. Furthermore, as a potential application of spectrally selective imaging the possibility to investigate the penetration of nanoparticles from sunscreen lotion into skin in vivo is discussed.

  9. Enhanced expression of cylooxygenase-2 by UV in aged human skin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Seo, Jin Young; Kim, Eun Kyung; Lee, Soo Hwan; Park, Kyung Chan; Kim, Kyu Han; Eun, Hee Chul; Chung, Jin Ho

    2003-01-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs) induced by UV may play important roles in UV-induced inflammation, photocarcinogenesis, and photoaging processes in human skin. The age-related PGE2 production and cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in the human skin in vivo remain unclear. The purpose of this study was to examine the influence of aging on UV-induced PGE2 production and COX-2 expression in human skin in vivo. We found that aged human skin produces higher amounts of PGE2 than young skin, when exposed to UV. The inductions of COX-2 mRNA and protein by UV in aged skin were higher than those in the young skin, whereas COX-1 mRNA expression remained unchanged. Aged human macrophage expressed higher amounts of PGE2 and COX-2 protein constitutively, and also induced these species after LPS treatment more so than young cells. Our data suggest that skin aging may increase susceptibility to the development of skin cancer and photoaging, by enhanced PGE2 and COX-2 expression due to UV in human skin in vivo.

  10. Laser system for optical biopsy and in-vivo study of the human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Borisova, Ekaterina G.; Avramov, Lachezar A.

    2001-04-01

    The aim of this study was to perform a preliminary evaluation of the diagnostic potential of noninvasive laser-induced autofluorescence spectroscopy (LIAFS) for human skin in vivo. The autofluorescence characterization of tissue relies on different spectral properties of tissue. It was demonstrated a differentiation between normal skin and skin with vitaligo. In our experimental investigation of the autofluorescence spectrum of human skin in vivo a nitrogen laser with excitation wavelength 337 nm was used. Two fluorescence bands were observed at 440 and 490 nm, these were attributed to reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NADH) and collagen. The intensity of the NADH emission band was markedly reduced in the skin with vitaligo compared with the normal skin, which could indicate different redox conditions in skin with vitaligo. The autofluorescence spectrum of human skin depends on the main internal absorbers, which are blood and melanin. In this study was described the effect caused by melanin content on the shape of the autofluorescence spectrum of human skin. Human skin fluorescence spectrum might provide dermatologists with important information and such investigations are successfully used now in skin disease diagnostics, in investigation of the environmental factor impact or for evaluation of treatment efficiency. The goal of this work is optimization of detection and diagnosis of hollow organs and skin.

  11. Contribution to the Determination of In Vivo Mechanical Characteristics of Human Skin by Indentation Test

    PubMed Central

    Zahouani, Hassan

    2013-01-01

    This paper proposes a triphasic model of intact skin in vivo based on a general phenomenological thermohydromechanical and physicochemical (THMPC) approach of heterogeneous media. The skin is seen here as a deforming stratified medium composed of four layers and made out of different fluid-saturated materials which contain also an ionic component. All the layers are treated as linear, isotropic materials described by their own behaviour law. The numerical simulations of in vivo indentation test performed on human skin are given. The numerical results correlate reasonably well with the typical observations of indented human skin. The discussion shows the versatility of this approach to obtain a better understanding on the mechanical behaviour of human skin layers separately. PMID:24324525

  12. In vivo optical elastography: stress and strain imaging of human skin lesions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Es'haghian, Shaghayegh; Gong, Peijun; Kennedy, Kelsey M.; Wijesinghe, Philip; Sampson, David D.; McLaughlin, Robert A.; Kennedy, Brendan F.

    2015-03-01

    Probing the mechanical properties of skin at high resolution could aid in the assessment of skin pathologies by, for example, detecting the extent of cancerous skin lesions and assessing pathology in burn scars. Here, we present two elastography techniques based on optical coherence tomography (OCT) to probe the local mechanical properties of skin. The first technique, optical palpation, is a high-resolution tactile imaging technique, which uses a complaint silicone layer positioned on the tissue surface to measure spatially-resolved stress imparted by compressive loading. We assess the performance of optical palpation, using a handheld imaging probe on a skin-mimicking phantom, and demonstrate its use on human skin. The second technique is a strain imaging technique, phase-sensitive compression OCE that maps depth-resolved mechanical variations within skin. We show preliminary results of in vivo phase-sensitive compression OCE on a human skin lesion.

  13. In vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy study of the vitamin A derivative perfusion through human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    dos Santos, Laurita; Téllez Soto, Claudio A.; Favero, Priscila P.; Martin, Airton A.

    2016-03-01

    In vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy is a powerful non-invasive technique able to analyse the skin constituents. This technique was applied to transdermal perfusion studies of the vitamin A derivative in human skin. The composition of the stratum corneum (lipid bilayer) is decisive for the affinity and transport of the vitamin through skin. The vitamin A is significantly absorbed by human skin when applied with water in oil emulsion or hydro-alcoholic gel. The purpose of this study is to elucidate the behaviour of vitamin A derivative into human skin without the presence of enhancers. The results showed that the intensity band of the derivative (around 1600 cm-1), which represents the -C=O vibrational mode, was detected in different stratum corneum depths (up to 20 μm). This Raman peak of vitamin A derivative has non-coincident band with the Raman spectra of the skin epidermis, demonstrating that compound penetrated in forearm skin.

  14. Dynamic in vivo mapping of model moisturiser ingress into human skin by GARfield MRI.

    PubMed

    Ciampi, Elisabetta; van Ginkel, Michael; McDonald, Peter J; Pitts, Simon; Bonnist, Eleanor Y M; Singleton, Scott; Williamson, Ann-Marie

    2011-02-01

    We describe the development of in vivo one-dimensional MRI (profiling) using a GARField (Gradient At Right angles to Field) magnet for the characterisation of side-of-hand human skin. For the first time and in vivo, we report measurements of the NMR longitudinal and transverse relaxation parameters and self-diffusivity of the upper layers of human skin with a nominal spatial resolution better than 10 µm. The results are correlated with in vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy measurements of water concentration and natural moisturiser factors, and discussed in terms of known skin biology and microstructure of the stratum corneum and viable epidermis. The application of model moisturiser solutions to the skin is followed and their dynamics of ingress are characterised using the MRI methodology developed. Selected hydrophilic and lipophilic formulations are studied. The results are corroborated by standard in vivo measurements of transepidermal water loss and hydration status. A further insight into moisturisation mechanisms is gained. The effect of two different penetration enhancers on a commonly used skin care oil is also discussed, and different timescales of oil penetration into the skin are reported depending on the type of enhancer.

  15. In vitro and in vivo study of dye diffusion into the human skin and hair follicles.

    PubMed

    Genina, Elina A; Bashkatov, Alexey N; Sinichkin, Yury P; Kochubey, Vyacheslav I; Lakodina, Nina A; Altshuler, Gregory B; Tuchin, Valery V

    2002-07-01

    We present experimental results on the in vitro and in vivo study of dye diffusion into human skin and hair follicles. We have studied some commercially available dyes for potential using in the laser selective thermolysis. The degree and the depth of hair follicle dyeing inside the skin were determined. For hairs in different stages the sebaceous gland was stated as a reservoir for a dye administration. It was found that the penetration depth of dyes is about 1.2 mm from the skin surface. We have developed the biocompatible Indocyanine Green lotions and the method for in vivo dyeing and dye in depth monitoring. Shift on 16-21 nm of absorption peak of Indocyanine Green to the longer wavelengths due to Indocyanine Green binding with cell proteins in the human skin was found.

  16. OCT-based label-free in vivo lymphangiography within human skin and areola

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, Utku; Qin, Wan; Qi, Xiaoli; Kalkan, Goknur; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-02-01

    Due to the limitations of current imaging techniques, visualization of lymphatic capillaries within tissue in vivo has been challenging. Here, we present a label-free high resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT) based lymphangiography (OLAG) within human skin in vivo. OLAG enables rapid (~seconds) mapping of lymphatic networks, along with blood vessel networks, over 8 mm x 8 mm of human skin and 5 mm x 5 mm of human areola. Moreover, lymphatic system’s response to inflammation within human skin is monitored throughout an acne lesion development over 7 days. The demonstrated results promise OLAG as a revolutionary tool in the clinical research and treatment of patients with pathologic conditions such as cancer, diabetes, and autoimmune diseases.

  17. OCT-based label-free in vivo lymphangiography within human skin and areola

    PubMed Central

    Baran, Utku; Qin, Wan; Qi, Xiaoli; Kalkan, Goknur; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2016-01-01

    Due to the limitations of current imaging techniques, visualization of lymphatic capillaries within tissue in vivo has been challenging. Here, we present a label-free high resolution optical coherence tomography (OCT) based lymphangiography (OLAG) within human skin in vivo. OLAG enables rapid (~seconds) mapping of lymphatic networks, along with blood vessel networks, over 8 mm x 8 mm of human skin and 5 mm x 5 mm of human areola. Moreover, lymphatic system’s response to inflammation within human skin is monitored throughout an acne lesion development over 7 days. The demonstrated results promise OLAG as a revolutionary tool in the clinical research and treatment of patients with pathologic conditions such as cancer, diabetes, and autoimmune diseases. PMID:26892830

  18. Application of the front detection photopiroelectric configuration to the study of in vivo human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gutierrez-Juarez, G.; Pichardo-Molina, J. L.; Rocha-Osornio, L. N.; Huerta-Franco, R.; Ivanov, R.; Huerta-Franco, B.; Cordova-Fraga, T.; Vargas-Luna, M.

    2005-06-01

    We report a novel method for measurements in vivo of the penetration of topically applied substances by inverse photopyroelectric configuration. This configuration was used to obtain the thermal effusivity, as a function of time, of in vivo human skin with ointments. This thermal magnitude was employed to characterize the penetration on the anterior-face of the volunteers forearm. This thermal effusivity was fitted with an exponential function in order to obtain a parameter (characteristic time) for the penetration. The substances used were a sunscreen and Vick Vaporub ointment. We found that the sunscreen have a characteristic time bigger that the Vick Vaporub ointment. The feasibility of skin hydration studies are discussed.

  19. Biomechanical properties of in vivo human skin from dynamic optical coherence elastography.

    PubMed

    Liang, Xing; Boppart, Stephen A

    2010-04-01

    Dynamic optical coherence elastography is used to determine in vivo skin biomechanical properties based on mechanical surface wave propagation. Quantitative Young's moduli are measured on human skin from different sites, orientations, and frequencies. Skin thicknesses, including measurements from different layers, are also measured simultaneously. Experimental results show significant differences among measurements from different skin sites, between directions parallel and orthogonal to Langer's lines, and under different skin hydration states. Results also suggest surface waves with different driving frequencies represent skin biomechanical properties from different layers in depth. With features such as micrometer-scale resolution, noninvasive imaging, and real-time processing from the optical coherence tomography technology, this optical measurement technique has great potential for measuring skin biomechanical properties in dermatology.

  20. Image segmentation for integrated multiphoton microscopy and reflectance confocal microscopy imaging of human skin in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Guannan; Lui, Harvey

    2015-01-01

    Background Non-invasive cellular imaging of the skin in vivo can be achieved in reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) and multiphoton microscopy (MPM) modalities to yield complementary images of the skin based on different optical properties. One of the challenges of in vivo microscopy is the delineation (i.e., segmentation) of cellular and subcellular architectural features. Methods In this work we present a method for combining watershed and level-set models for segmentation of multimodality images obtained by an integrated MPM and RCM imaging system from human skin in vivo. Results Firstly, a segmentation model based on watershed is introduced for obtaining the accurate structure of cell borders from the RCM image. Secondly,, a global region based energy level-set model is constructed for extracting the nucleus of each cell from the MPM image. Thirdly, a local region-based Lagrange Continuous level-set approach is used for segmenting cytoplasm from the MPM image. Conclusions Experimental results demonstrated that cell borders from RCM image and boundaries of cytoplasm and nucleus from MPM image can be obtained by our segmentation method with better accuracy and effectiveness. We are planning to use this method to perform quantitative analysis of MPM and RCM images of in vivo human skin to study the variations of cellular parameters such as cell size, nucleus size and other mophormetric features with skin pathologies. PMID:25694949

  1. In vivo multimodality video microscopy of human skin in the vertical plane (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Zhenguo; Tian, Yunxian; Zhao, Jianhua; Lui, Harvey; McLean, David I.; Zeng, Haishan

    2016-02-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) and multiphoton microscopy (MPM) are non-invasive methods of acquiring morphological images of the skin in vivo. Most research in this area focuses on instruments that are configured for two-dimensional imaging in a horizontal plane parallel to the skin surface. In contrast, conventional histopathologic evaluation of the skin is based on vertical tissue sections that show microscopic features and their interrelationships according to their depth within the skin. The ability to similarly depict the skin in the vertical plane during in vivo microscopic imaging poses several significant challenges with respect to imaging speed, resolution and extractable information. Aiming to address above challenges, we developed a laser scanning multimodal microscopy system which combines RCM and MPM, and has the ability to do fast xz scanning to achieve high resolution vertical "optical sectioning" of in vivo human skin at video rates. RCM and MPM images are obtained simultaneously and co-registered thereby providing complementary morphological information. To validate the performance of this system vertical section RCM and MPM microscopic images of normal human skin in vivo were obtained at half video rates (15 frames/s). Using our system it is possible to discern the following structures: all layers of the epidermis including the stratum lucidum, the dermal-epidermal junction, and the papillary dermis. Blood flow is also visible as evidenced by blood cell movement within vessels. The effective imaging depth is about 200 micrometers. This system provides a means of interrogating human skin noninvasively at an orientation analogous to conventional histological sectioning.

  2. Chromophore concentrations, absorption and scattering properties of human skin in-vivo

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Sheng-Hao; Bargo, Paulo; Durkin, Anthony; Kollias, Nikiforos

    2009-01-01

    Absorption and reduced scattering coefficients of in-vivo human skin provide critical information on non-invasive skin diagnoses for aesthetic and clinical purposes. To date, very few in-vivo skin optical properties have been reported. Previously, we reported absorption and scattering properties of in-vivo skin in the wavelength range from 650 to 1000nm using the diffusing probe in the “modified two-layer geometry”. In this study, we determine the spectra of skin optical properties continuously in the range from 500 to 1000nm. It was found that the concentration of chromophores, such as oxy-hemoglobin, deoxy-hemoglobin, and melanin, calculated based on the absorption spectra of eighteen subjects at wavelengths above and below 600nm were distinct because of the inherent difference in the interrogation region. The scattering power, which is related to the average scatterer’s size, demonstrates a clear contrast between skin phototypes, skin sites, and wavelengths. We also applied venous occlusion on forearms and found that the concentrations of oxy- and deoxy-hemoglobin as assessed at wavelengths above and below 600nm were different. Our results suggest that diffuse reflectance techniques with the visible and near infrared light sources can be employed to investigate the hemodynamics and optical properties of upper dermis and lower dermis. PMID:19687939

  3. In vivo multiphoton microscopy associated to 3D image processing for human skin characterization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baldeweck, T.; Tancrède, E.; Dokladal, P.; Koudoro, S.; Morard, V.; Meyer, F.; Decencière, E.; Pena, A.-M.

    2012-03-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has emerged in the past decade as a promising non-invasive skin imaging technique. The aim of this study was to assess whether multiphoton microscopy coupled to specific 3D image processing tools could provide new insights into the organization of different skin components and their age-related changes. For that purpose, we performed a clinical trial on 15 young and 15 aged human female volunteers on the ventral and dorsal side of the forearm using the DermaInspectR medical imaging device. We visualized the skin by taking advantage of intrinsic multiphoton signals from cells, elastic and collagen fibers. We also developed 3D image processing algorithms adapted to in vivo multiphoton images of human skin in order to extract quantitative parameters in each layer of the skin (epidermis and superficial dermis). The results show that in vivo multiphoton microscopy is able to evidence several skin alterations due to skin aging: morphological changes in the epidermis and modifications in the quantity and organization of the collagen and elastic fibers network. In conclusion, the association of multiphoton microscopy with specific image processing allows the three-dimensional organization of skin components to be visualized and quantified thus providing a powerful tool for cosmetic and dermatological investigations.

  4. Folic acid and creatine improve the firmness of human skin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Fischer, Frank; Achterberg, Volker; März, Annette; Puschmann, Stefan; Rahn, Christian-Dennis; Lutz, Vivien; Krüger, Andrea; Schwengler, Helge; Jaspers, Sören; Koop, Urte; Blatt, Thomas; Wenck, Horst; Gallinat, Stefan

    2011-03-01

    The decrease in firmness is a hallmark of skin aging. Accelerated by chronic sun exposure, fundamental changes occur within the dermal extracellular matrix over the years, mainly impairing the collagenous network. Based on the qualitative and quantitative assessment of skin firmness, in vitro and in vivo studies were carried out to elucidate the effects of topical folic acid and creatine to counteract this age-dependent reduction in the amount of collagen. Topical application of a commercially available formulation containing folic acid and creatine was performed to study effects on skin firmness in vivo using cutometric analysis. Imaging and quantification of collagen density were carried out using multiphoton laser scanning microscopy (MPLSM). To investigate the effects of these compounds on collagen gene expression, procollagen synthesis, and collagen fibril organization, complementary in vitro studies on cultured fibroblast-populated collagen gels were carried out. The underlying structural changes in the collagen network of young and aged sun-exposed facial skin in vivo were visualized by MPLSM. Topical application of a folic acid- and creatine-containing formulation significantly improved firmness of mature skin in vivo. Treatment of fibroblast-populated dermal equivalents with folic acid and creatine increased collagen gene expression and procollagen levels and improved collagen fiber density, suggesting that the in vivo effects are based on the overall improvement of the collagen metabolism. Employing MPLSM, dermal changes occurring in photo-aged human skin were visualized in an unprecedented manner and correlated to a loss of firmness. Treatment of aged skin with a topical formulation containing folic acid and creatine counteracted this age-dependent decline by exerting sustained effects on collagen metabolism. Our results support previous findings on the efficacy of these actives. © 2011 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  5. Excision repair of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers in human skin in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    D'Ambrosio, S.M.; Slazinski, L.; Whetstone, J.W.; Lowney, E.

    1981-09-01

    The induction and loss of pyrimidine dimers in human skin in vivo was determined using UV endonuclease, alkaline sucrose sedimentations, and the fluorescent detection of nonradiolabeled DNA. The number of dimers induced following exposure of the skin to radiation emitted from a Burdick UV-800 sunlamp was quantitated by reacting the extracted DNA with Micrococcus luteus endonuclease specific for pyrimidine dimers. Exposure to 15 and 30 seconds of radiation emitted from this lamp produced the formation of 12.8 and 23.6 dimers per 10(8) daltons DNA, respectively. Approximately 50% of the dimers induced were lost 58 min after irradiation. Only a small percentage (less than 10) remained 24 hr postirradiation. These data partially characterize the process by which pyrimidine dimers are excised from human skin DNA in vivo.

  6. In vivo measurements of human neck skin elasticity using MRI and finite element modeling.

    PubMed

    An, Yunqiang; Ji, Changjin; Li, Yong; Wang, Jianxia; Zhang, Xinyue; Huang, Yaqi

    2017-04-01

    The assessment of mechanical properties of the human skin is very important in investigating the mechanism of obstructive sleep apnea, a common disorder characterized by repetitive collapse and obstruction of the upper airway during sleep. In this study, a unique method, combining magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and finite element modeling (FEM), was developed to obtain the value of the in vivo elastic modulus of the neck skin. A total of 22 subjects, 16 males and six females, were recruited to participate in the MRI studies. The changes in the airway and the neck size resulting from fluid shift from the lower body to the neck were measured based on the MR images. A two-dimensional plane strain FE model was built to simulate such changes in the neck cross-section for each subject. Solving an inverse problem using FEM by matching the measured data, we obtained the in vivo elastic modulus of the neck skin to be 1.78 ± 1.73 MPa. Results showed that the elastic modulus tended to increase with age and body mass index for these subjects. A sensitivity analysis of the muscle and fat mechanical parameters was also performed to test their effects on the predicted skin elasticity. The unique method developed in this study for measuring the in vivo elastic modulus of the neck skin is quite effective, and the skin elasticity value obtained using this method is credible. © 2017 American Association of Physicists in Medicine.

  7. Imaging of zinc oxide nanoparticle penetration in human skin in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Zvyagin, Andrei V; Zhao, Xin; Gierden, Audrey; Sanchez, Washington; Ross, Justin A; Roberts, Michael S

    2008-01-01

    Zinc oxide (ZnO-nano) and titanium dioxide nanoparticles (20 to 30 nm) are widely used in several topical skin care products, such as sunscreens. However, relatively few studies have addressed the subdermal absorption of these nanoparticles in vivo. We report on investigation of the distribution of topically applied ZnO in excised and in vivo human skin, using multiphoton microscopy (MPM) imaging with a combination of scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and an energy-dispersive x-ray (EDX) technique to determine the level of penetration of nanoparticles into the sub-dermal layers of the skin. The good visualization of ZnO in skin achieved appeared to result from two factors. First, the ZnO principal photoluminescence at 385 nm is in the "quiet" spectral band of skin autofluorescence dominated by the endogenous skin fluorophores, i.e., NAD[P]H and FAD. Second, the two-photon action cross section of ZnO-nano [sigma(ZnO) ((TPEF)) approximately 0.26 GM; diameter, 18 nm] is high: approximately 500-fold of that inferred from its bulk third-order nonlinear susceptibility [Im chi(ZnO) ((3))], and is favorably compared to that of NAD[P]H and FAD. The overall outcome from MPM, SEM, and EDX studies was that, in humans in vivo, ZnO nanoparticles stayed in the stratum corneum (SC) and accumulated into skin folds and/or hair follicle roots of human skin. Given the lack of penetration of these nanoparticles past the SC and that the outermost layers of SC have a good turnover rate, these data suggest that the form of ZnO-nano studied here is unlikely to result in safety concerns.

  8. Impact of Humidity on In Vitro Human Skin Permeation Experiments for Predicting In Vivo Permeability.

    PubMed

    Ishida, Masahiro; Takeuchi, Hiroyuki; Endo, Hiromi; Yamaguchi, Jun-Ichi

    2015-12-01

    In vitro skin permeation studies have been commonly conducted to predict in vivo permeability for the development of transdermal therapeutic systems (TTSs). We clarified the impact of humidity on in vitro human skin permeation of two TTSs having different breathability and then elucidated the predictability of in vivo permeability based on in vitro experimental data. Nicotinell(®) TTS(®) 20 and Frandol(®) tape 40mg were used as model TTSs in this study. The in vitro human skin permeation experiments were conducted under humidity levels similar to those used in clinical trials (approximately 50%) as well as under higher humidity levels (approximately 95%). The skin permeability values of drugs at 95% humidity were higher than those at 50% humidity. The time profiles of the human plasma concentrations after TTS application fitted well with the clinical data when predicted based on the in vitro permeation parameters at 50% humidity. On the other hand, those profiles predicted based on the parameters at 95% humidity were overestimated. The impact of humidity was higher for the more breathable TTS; Frandol(®) tape 40mg. These results show that in vitro human skin permeation experiments should be investigated under realistic clinical humidity levels especially for breathable TTSs.

  9. Optical palpation in vivo: imaging human skin lesions using mechanical contrast.

    PubMed

    Es'haghian, Shaghayegh; Kennedy, Kelsey M; Gong, Peijun; Sampson, David D; McLaughlin, Robert A; Kennedy, Brendan F

    2015-01-01

    We demonstrate the first application of the recently proposed method of optical palpation to in vivo imaging of human skin. Optical palpation is a tactile imaging technique that probes the spatial variation of a sample's mechanical properties by producing an en face map of stress measured at the sample surface. This map is determined from the thickness of a translucent, compliant stress sensor placed between a loading element and the sample and is measured using optical coherence tomography. We assess the performance of optical palpation using a handheld imaging probe on skin-mimicking phantoms, and demonstrate its use on human skin lesions. Our results demonstrate the capacity of optical palpation to delineate the boundaries of lesions and to map the mechanical contrast between lesions and the surrounding normal skin.

  10. Photoprotective and anti-skin-aging effects of eicosapentaenoic acid in human skin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kim, Hyeon Ho; Cho, Soyun; Lee, Serah; Kim, Kyu Han; Cho, Kwang Hyun; Eun, Hee Chul; Chung, Jin Ho

    2006-05-01

    Skin aging can be attributed to photoaging (extrinsic) and chronological (intrinsic) aging. Photoaging and intrinsic aging are induced by damage to human skin attributable to repeated exposure to ultraviolet (UV) irradiation and to the passage of time, respectively. In our previous report, eicosapentaenoic acid (EPA) was found to inhibit UV-induced matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) expression in human dermal fibroblasts. Therefore, we investigated the effects of EPA on UV-induced skin damage and intrinsic aging by applying EPA topically to young and aged human skin, respectively. By immunohistochemical analysis and Western blotting, we found that topical application of EPA reduced UV-induced epidermal thickening and inhibited collagen decrease induced by UV light. It was also found that EPA attenuated UV-induced MMP-1 and MMP-9 expression by inhibiting UV-induced c-Jun phosphorylation, which is closely related to UV-induced activator protein-1 activation, and by inhibiting JNK and p38 activation. EPA also inhibited UV-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression without altering COX-1 expression. Moreover, it was found that EPA increased collagen and elastic fibers (tropoelastin and fibrillin-1) expression by increasing transformin growth factor-beta expression in aged human skin. Together, these results demonstrate that topical EPA has potential as an anti-skin-aging agent.

  11. In vivo characterization of structural changes after topical application of glucocorticoids in healthy human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jung, Sora; Lademann, Jürgen; Darvin, Maxim E.; Richter, Claudia; Pedersen, Claus Bang; Richter, Heike; Schanzer, Sabine; Kottner, Jan; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Røpke, Mads Almose

    2017-07-01

    Topical glucocorticoids (GC) are known to induce changes in human skin with the potential to develop skin atrophy. Here, atrophogenic effects and subsequent structural changes in the skin after topical application of GC were investigated in vivo. Sixteen healthy volunteers were topically treated daily on the forearms with clobetasol propionate, betamethasone dipropionate, and the petrolatum vehicle for 4 weeks. All treated skin areas and a nontreated control area were examined by ultrasound, optical coherence tomography, confocal laser scanning microscopy, multiphoton tomography (MPT), and resonance Raman spectroscopy at baseline 1 day after last application and 1 week after last application. Investigated parameters included stratum corneum thickness, epidermal, and full skin thickness, keratinocyte size and density, keratinocyte nucleus-to-cytoplasm ratio, skin surface classification, relative collagen and elastin signal intensity, second-harmonic generation-to-autofluorescence aging index of dermis (SAAID), and the antioxidant status of the skin. A reduction in epidermal and dermal skin thickness was observed in GC treated as well as in vehicle-treated and untreated skin areas on the volar forearm. MPT analysis showed an increased epidermal cell density and reduced cell size and nucleus-to-cytoplasm ratio and a significant increase of SAAID after GC treatment indicating a restructuring or compression of collagen fibers clinically being observed as atrophic changes.

  12. Birefringence and vascular imaging of in vivo human skin by Jones-matrix optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, En; Makita, Shuichi; Hong, Young-Joo; Kasaragod, Deepa; Yasuno, Yoshiaki

    2017-02-01

    A customized 1310-nm Jones-matrix optical coherence tomography (JM-OCT) for dermatological investigation was constructed and used for in vivo normal human skin tissue imaging. This system can simultaneously measure the threedimensional depth-resolved local birefringence, complex-correlation based OCT angiography (OCT-A), degree-ofpolarization- uniformity (DOPU) and scattering OCT intensity. By obtaining these optical properties of tissue, the morphology, vasculature, and collagen content of skin can be deduced and visualized. Structures in the deep layers of the epithelium were observed with depth-resolved local birefringence and polarization uniformity images. These results suggest high diagnostic and investigative potential of JM-OCT for dermatology.

  13. In vivo measurement of mid-infrared light scattering from human skin

    PubMed Central

    Michel, Anna P. M.; Liakat, Sabbir; Bors, Kevin; Gmachl, Claire F.

    2013-01-01

    Two mid-infrared light sources, a broadband source from a Fourier Transform Infrared Spectrometer (FTIR) and a pulsed Quantum Cascade (QC) Laser, are used to measure angle-resolved backscattering in vivo from human skin across a broad spectral range. Scattering profiles measured using the FTIR suggest limited penetration of the light into the skin, with most of the light interacting with the stratum corneum layer of the epidermis. Scattering profiles from the QC laser show modulation patterns with angle suggesting interaction with scattering centers in the skin. The scattering is attributed to interaction of the laser light with components such as collagen fibers and capillaries in the dermis layer of the skin. PMID:23577287

  14. In vivo Raman spectroscopy of biochemical changes in human skin by cosmetic application

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tosato, Maira Gaspar; dos Santos, Edson Pereira; Alves, Rani de Souza; Raniero, Leandro; Menezes, Priscila Fernanda C.; Kruger, Odivânia; Praes, Carlos Eduardo O.; Martin, Airton Abrahão

    2010-02-01

    The skin aging process is mainly accelerated by external agents such as sunlight, air humidity and surfactants action. Changes in protein structures and hydration during the aging process are responsible for skin morphological variations. In this work the human skin was investigated by in vivo Raman spectroscopy before and after the topical applications of a cosmetic on 17 healthy volunteers (age 60 to 75). In vivo Raman spectra of the skin were obtained with a Spectrometer SpectraPro- 2500i (Pi-Acton), CCD detector and a 785 nm laser excitation source, collected at the beginning of experiment without cream (T0), after 30 (T30) and 60 (T60) days using the product. The primary changes occurred in the following spectral regions: 935 cm-1 (νCC), 1060 cm-1 (lipids), 1174 to 1201 cm-1 (tryptofan, phenylalanine and tyrosine), 1302 cm-1 (phospholipids), 1520 to 1580 cm-1 (C=C) and 1650 cm-1 (amide I). These findings indicate that skin positive effects were enhanced by a continuous cream application.

  15. Molecular basis of retinol anti-ageing properties in naturally aged human skin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Shao, Y; He, T; Fisher, G J; Voorhees, J J; Quan, T

    2017-02-01

    Retinoic acid has been shown to improve the aged-appearing skin. However, less is known about the anti-ageing effects of retinol (ROL, vitamin A), a precursor of retinoic acid, in aged human skin in vivo. This study aimed to investigate the molecular basis of ROL anti-ageing properties in naturally aged human skin in vivo. Sun-protected buttock skin (76 ± 6 years old, n = 12) was topically treated with 0.4% ROL and its vehicle for 7 days. The effects of topical ROL on skin epidermis and dermis were evaluated by immunohistochemistry, in situ hybridization, Northern analysis, real-time RT-PCR and Western analysis. Collagen fibrils nanoscale structure and surface topology were analysed by atomic force microscopy. Topical ROL shows remarkable anti-ageing effects through three major types of skin cells: epidermal keratinocytes, dermal endothelial cells and fibroblasts. Topical ROL significantly increased epidermal thickness by stimulating keratinocytes proliferation and upregulation of c-Jun transcription factor. In addition to epidermal changes, topical ROL significantly improved dermal extracellular matrix (ECM) microenvironment; increasing dermal vascularity by stimulating endothelial cells proliferation and ECM production (type I collagen, fibronectin and elastin) by activating dermal fibroblasts. Topical ROL also stimulates TGF-β/CTGF pathway, the major regulator of ECM homeostasis, and thus enriched the deposition of ECM in aged human skin in vivo. 0.4% topical ROL achieved similar results as seen with topical retinoic acid, the biologically active form of ROL, without causing noticeable signs of retinoid side effects. 0.4% topical ROL shows remarkable anti-ageing effects through improvement of the homeostasis of epidermis and dermis by stimulating the proliferation of keratinocytes and endothelial cells, and activating dermal fibroblasts. These data provide evidence that 0.4% topical ROL is a promising and safe treatment to improve the naturally aged human skin

  16. Pituitary adenylate cyclase activating polypeptide: an important vascular regulator in human skin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Seeliger, Stephan; Buddenkotte, Jörg; Schmidt-Choudhury, Anjona; Rosignoli, Carine; Shpacovitch, Victoria; von Arnim, Ulrike; Metze, Dieter; Rukwied, Roman; Schmelz, Martin; Paus, Ralf; Voegel, Johannes J; Schmidt, Wolfgang E; Steinhoff, Martin

    2010-11-01

    Pituitary adenylate cyclase-activating peptide (PACAP) is an important neuropeptide and immunomodulator in various tissues. Although this peptide and its receptors (ie, VPAC1R, VPAC2R, and PAC1R) are expressed in human skin, their biological roles are unknown. Therefore, we tested whether PACAP regulates vascular responses in human skin in vivo. When injected intravenously, PACAP induced a significant, concentration-dependent vascular response (ie, flush, erythema, edema) and mediated a significant and concentration-dependent increase in intrarectal body temperature that peaked at 2.7°C. Topical application of PACAP induced marked concentration-dependent edema. Immunohistochemistry revealed a close association of PACAP-immunoreactive nerve fibers with mast cells and dermal blood vessels. VPAC1R was expressed by dermal endothelial cells, CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, mast cells, and keratinocytes, whereas VPAC2R was expressed only in keratinocytes. VPAC1R protein and mRNA were also detected in human dermal microvascular endothelial cells. The PACAP-induced change in cAMP production in these cells demonstrated VPAC1R to be functional. PACAP treatment of organ-cultured human skin strongly increased the number of CD31+ vessel cross-sections. Taken together, these results suggest that PACAP directly induces vascular responses that may be associated with neurogenic inflammation, indicating for the first time that PACAP may be a crucial vascular regulator in human skin in vivo. Antagonists to PACAP function may be beneficial for the treatment of inflammatory skin diseases with a neurogenic component.

  17. Using a portable terahertz spectrometer to measure the optical properties of in vivo human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echchgadda, Ibtissam; Grundt, Jessica E.; Tarango, Melissa; Ibey, Bennett L.; Tongue, Thomas; Liang, Min; Xin, Hao; Wilmink, Gerald J.

    2013-02-01

    Terahertz time-domain spectroscopy (THz-TDS) systems are capable of detecting small differences in water concentration levels in biological tissues. This feature makes THz devices excellent tools for the noninvasive assessment of skin; however, most conventional systems prove too cumbersome for limited-space environments. We previously demonstrated that a portable, compact THz spectrometer permitted measurement of porcine skin optical properties that were comparable to those collected with conventional systems. In order to move toward human use of this system, the goal for this study was to collect the optical properties, specifically the absorption coefficient (μa) and index of refraction (n), of human subjects in vivo. Spectra were collected from 0.1-2 THz, and measurements were made on the palm, ventral (inner) and dorsal (outer) forearm. Prior to each THz measurement, we used a multiprobe adapter system to measure each subject's skin hydration levels, transepidermal waterloss (TEWL), skin color, and degree of melanin pigmentation. Our results suggest that the measured optical properties were wide-ranging, and varied considerably for skin tissues with different hydration and melanin levels. These data provide a novel framework for accurate human tissue measurements using THz spectrometers in limited-space environments.

  18. In vivo quantification of human dermal skin aging using SHG and autofluorescence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Puschmann, Stefan; Rahn, Christian-Dennis; Wenck, Horst; Gallinat, Stefan; Fischer, Frank

    2012-03-01

    There are visible changes during skin aging. In the extracellular matrix these changes referred to as intrinsic aging (skin areas not exposed to sunlight) and extrinsic aging can be measured using various methods, such as subjective clinical evaluation, histology and molecular analysis. In this study we developed a new parameter for the non-invasive quantitative determination of dermal skin aging utilizing a five-dimensional intravital tomography (5D-IVT). This device, also known as 5D - multi-photon laser scanning microscopy, is a powerful tool to investigate (photo)aging-associated alterations in vivo. Structural alterations in the dermis of extrinsically aged (chronically sun-exposed) and intrinsically aged (sun-protected) human skin were recorded utilizing the collagen-specific second harmonic generation (SHG) signal and the elastin-specific autofluorescence (AF) signal. Recording took place in young and elderly volunteers. The resulting images were processed in order to gain the elastin percentage and the collagen percentage per image. Then, the elastin - to - collagen ratio (ELCOR) was calculated. With respect to volar forearm skin, the ELCOR significantly increased with age. In elderly volunteers, the ELCOR value calculated for the chronically sun-exposed temple area was significantly augmented compared with the sun-protected upper arm area. Based on 5D-IVT we introduce the ELCOR as a new means to quantify age-associated alterations in the extracellular matrix of in vivo human skin. This novel parameter is compared to the currently used "SHG to AF aging index" of the dermis (SAAID).

  19. Lipid ingredients in moisturizers can modulate skin responses to UV in barrier-disrupted human skin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Byun, Hee Jin; Cho, Kwang Hyun; Eun, Hee Chul; Lee, Min-Jung; Lee, Youngae; Lee, Serah; Chung, Jin Ho

    2012-02-01

    Chemicals with a molecular weight <500 and adequate lipid solubility can penetrate the intact human skin. As many lipid ingredients in moisturizers have molecular weights <500, the lipid ingredients may penetrate into the skin and affect skin responses to UV; however, little is known about this phenomenon. To evaluate the effects of major lipid ingredients in moisturizers on skin responses to UV in tape-stripped human skin in vivo. We evaluated the effects of three major lipid ingredients in moisturizers (cholesterol, linoleic acid, and a synthetic ceramide, N-oleoyl-phytosphingosine) on skin responses to UV in the tape-stripped skin of healthy volunteers. After 2 days of lipid-application, the areas were irradiated with UV, and skin samples were obtained 24h after irradiation. Histologic features and the expression of the markers of collagen metabolism and inflammatory mediators were evaluated. Compared to vehicle, topical cholesterol significantly decreased the degree of dermal inflammatory infiltrates and exocytosis, and also decreased the expression of MMP-1, IL-6, and IL-1ß mRNA. In contrast, topical linoleic acid increased the induction of apoptotic cells, and the expression of MMP-1 and IL-6 mRNA. N-oleoyl-phytosphingosine increased the expression of MMP-1 and IL-6 mRNA, while decreasing the expression of COX-2 mRNA. Topical cholesterol can protect the barrier-disrupted skin against UV-induced damage, while linoleic acid or N-oleoyl-phytosphingosine alone has the potential to aggravate the damage. Copyright © 2011 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Intense picosecond THz pulses alter gene expression in human skin tissue in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Titova, Lyubov V.; Ayesheshim, Ayesheshim K.; Golubov, Andrey; Rodriguez-Juarez, Rocio; Kovalchuk, Anna; Hegmann, Frank A.; Kovalchuk, Olga

    2013-02-01

    Pulsed terahertz (THz) imaging has been suggested as a novel high resolution, noninvasive medical diagnostic tool. However, little is known about the influence of pulsed THz radiation on human tissue, i.e., its genotoxicity and effects on cell activity and cell integrity. We have carried out a comprehensive investigation of the biological effects of THz radiation on human skin tissue using a high power THz pulse source and an in vivo full-thickness human skin tissue model. We have observed that exposure to intense THz pulses causes DNA damage and changes in the global gene expression profile in the exposed skin tissue. Several of the affected genes are known to play major roles in human cancer. While the changes in the expression levels of some of them suggest possible oncogenic effects of pulsed THz radiation, changes in the expression of the other cancer-related genes might have a protective influence. This study may serve as a roadmap for future investigations aimed at elucidating the exact roles that all the affected genes play in skin carcinogenesis and in response to pulsed THz radiation.

  1. Using a portable terahertz spectrometer to measure the optical properties of in vivo human skin.

    PubMed

    Echchgadda, Ibtissam; Grundt, Jessica A; Tarango, Melissa; Ibey, Bennett L; Tongue, Thomas; Liang, Min; Xin, Hao; Wilmink, Gerald J

    2013-12-01

    Terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy systems permit the measurement of a tissue's hydration level. This feature makes THz spectrometers excellent tools for the noninvasive assessment of skin; however, current systems are large, heavy and not ideal for clinical settings. We previously demonstrated that a portable, compact THz spectrometer permitted measurement of porcine skin optical properties that were comparable to those collected with conventional systems. In order to move toward human use of this system, the goal for this study was to measure the absorption coefficient (μa) and index of refraction (n) of human subjects in vivo. Spectra were collected from 0.1 to 2 THz, and measurements were made from skin at three sites: the palm, ventral and dorsal forearm. Additionally, we used a multiprobe adapter system to measure each subject's skin hydration levels, transepidermal water loss, and melanin concentration. Our results suggest that the measured optical properties varied considerably for skin tissues that exhibited dissimilar hydration levels. These data provide a framework for using compact THz spectrometers for clinical applications.

  2. Using a portable terahertz spectrometer to measure the optical properties of in vivo human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Echchgadda, Ibtissam; Grundt, Jessica A.; Tarango, Melissa; Ibey, Bennett L.; Tongue, Thomas; Liang, Min; Xin, Hao; Wilmink, Gerald J.

    2013-12-01

    Terahertz (THz) time-domain spectroscopy systems permit the measurement of a tissue's hydration level. This feature makes THz spectrometers excellent tools for the noninvasive assessment of skin; however, current systems are large, heavy and not ideal for clinical settings. We previously demonstrated that a portable, compact THz spectrometer permitted measurement of porcine skin optical properties that were comparable to those collected with conventional systems. In order to move toward human use of this system, the goal for this study was to measure the absorption coefficient (μa) and index of refraction (n) of human subjects in vivo. Spectra were collected from 0.1 to 2 THz, and measurements were made from skin at three sites: the palm, ventral and dorsal forearm. Additionally, we used a multiprobe adapter system to measure each subject's skin hydration levels, transepidermal water loss, and melanin concentration. Our results suggest that the measured optical properties varied considerably for skin tissues that exhibited dissimilar hydration levels. These data provide a framework for using compact THz spectrometers for clinical applications.

  3. Detection of advanced glycation end products (AGEs) on human skin by in vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martin, A. A.; Pereira, L.; Ali, S. M.; Pizzol, C. D.; Tellez, C. A.; Favero, P. P.; Santos, L.; da Silva, V. V.; Praes, C. E. O.

    2016-03-01

    The aging process involves the reduction in the production of the major components of skin tissue. During intrinsic aging and photoaging processes, in dermis of human skin, fibroblasts become senescent and have decreased activity, which produce low levels of collagen. Moreover, there is accumulation of advanced glycation end products (AGEs). AGEs have incidence in the progression of age-related diseases, principally in diabetes mellitus and in Alzheimer's diseases. AGEs causes intracellular damage and/or apoptosis leading to an increase of the free radicals, generating a crosslink with skin proteins and oxidative stress. The aim of this study is to detect AGEs markers on human skin by in vivo Confocal Raman spectroscopy. Spectra were obtained by using a Rivers Diagnostic System, 785 nm laser excitation and a CCD detector from the skin surface down to 120 μm depth. We analyzed the confocal Raman spectra of the skin dermis of 30 women volunteers divided into 3 groups: 10 volunteers with diabetes mellitus type II, 65-80 years old (DEW); 10 young healthy women, 20-33 years old (HYW); and 10 elderly healthy women, 65-80 years old (HEW). Pentosidine and glucosepane were the principally identified AGEs in the hydroxyproline and proline Raman spectral region (1000-800 cm-1), in the 1.260-1.320 cm-1 region assignable to alpha-helical amide III modes, and in the Amide I region. Pentosidine and glucosepane calculated vibrational spectra were performed through Density Functional Theory using the B3LYP functional with 3-21G basis set. Difference between the Raman spectra of diabetic elderly women and healthy young women, and between healthy elderly women and healthy young women were also obtained with the purpose of identifying AGEs Raman bands markers. AGEs peaks and collagen changes have been identified and used to quantify the glycation process in human skin.

  4. High-speed fiber based polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography of in vivo human skin.

    PubMed

    Saxer, C E; de Boer, J F; Park, B H; Zhao, Y; Chen, Z; Nelson, J S

    2000-09-15

    A high-speed single-mode fiber-based polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS OCT) system was developed. With a polarization modulator, Stokes parameters of reflected flight for four input polarization states are measured as a function of depth. A phase modulator in the reference arm of a Michelson interferometer permits independent control of the axial scan rate and carrier frequency. In vivo PS OCT images of human skin are presented, showing subsurface structures that are not discernible in conventional OCT images. A phase retardation image in tissue is calculated based on the reflected Stokes parameters of the four input polarization states.

  5. Combined In Vivo Confocal Raman Spectroscopy and Confocal Microscopy of Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Caspers, P. J.; Lucassen, G. W.; Puppels, G. J.

    2003-01-01

    In vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy is a noninvasive optical method to obtain detailed information about the molecular composition of the skin with high spatial resolution. In vivo confocal scanning laser microscopy is an imaging modality that provides optical sections of the skin without physically dissecting the tissue. A combination of both techniques in a single instrument is described. This combination allows the skin morphology to be visualized and (subsurface) structures in the skin to be targeted for Raman measurements. Novel results are presented that show detailed in vivo concentration profiles of water and of natural moisturizing factor for the stratum corneum that are directly related to the skin architecture by in vivo cross-sectional images of the skin. Targeting of skin structures is demonstrated by recording in vivo Raman spectra of sweat ducts and sebaceous glands in situ. In vivo measurements on dermal capillaries yielded high-quality Raman spectra of blood in a completely noninvasive manner. From the results of this exploratory study we conclude that the technique presented has great potential for fundamental skin research, pharmacology (percutaneous transport), clinical dermatology, and cosmetic research, as well as for noninvasive analysis of blood analytes, including glucose. PMID:12829511

  6. New developments in two-photon analysis of human skin in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riemann, I.; Schwarz, M.; Stracke, F.; Ehlers, A.; Dimitrow, E.; Kaatz, M.; König, K.; Le Harzic, R.

    2009-02-01

    Two-photon imaging of human skin using ultra short laser pulses can be used to obtain information about the state of cells and tissues by means of their natural autofluorescence. Using this method, it is possible to determine whether the normal cell pattern is disturbed or the autofluorescence is influenced by internal or external stimuli. Two-photon fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) can further enhance this providing information about physiological processes, fluorophores (like NAD(P)H, collagen, keratin, elastin, flavins, melanin,...) and external applied probes inside cells and tissue parts. For example the part of the cells metabolism and energy level can be determined by analyzing the NADH regarding its free / bound state and its oxidized / reduced state. The combination of two-photon imaging with FLIM may lead to a better understanding and diagnosis of skin reactions and disorders. We also present some results of in vivo simultaneous collagen and elastin measurements in skin dermis. Changes of dermal collagen and elastin content are characteristic for skin aging as well as for pathological skin conditions.

  7. Multiple spatially resolved reflection spectroscopy for in vivo determination of carotenoids in human skin and blood

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darvin, Maxim E.; Magnussen, Björn; Lademann, Juergen; Köcher, Wolfgang

    2016-09-01

    Non-invasive measurement of carotenoid antioxidants in human skin is one of the important tasks to investigate the skin physiology in vivo. Resonance Raman spectroscopy and reflection spectroscopy are the most frequently used non-invasive techniques in dermatology and skin physiology. In the present study, an improved method based on multiple spatially resolved reflection spectroscopy (MSRRS) was introduced. The results obtained were compared with those obtained using the ‘gold standard’ resonance Raman spectroscopy method and showed strong correlations for the total carotenoid concentration (R  =  0.83) as well as for lycopene (R  =  0.80). The measurement stability was confirmed to be better than 10% within the total temperature range from 5 °C to  +  30 °C and pressure contact between the skin and the MSRRS sensor from 800 Pa to 18 000 Pa. In addition, blood samples taken from the subjects were analyzed for carotenoid concentrations. The MSRRS sensor was calibrated on the blood carotenoid concentrations resulting in being able to predict with a correlation of R  =  0.79. On the basis of blood carotenoids it could be demonstrated that the MSRRS cutaneous measurements are not influenced by Fitzpatrick skin types I-VI. The MSRRS sensor is commercially available under the brand name biozoom.

  8. In vivo assessment of aged human skin with a unilateral NMR scanner.

    PubMed

    Bergman, Elad; Sarda, Yifat; Ritz, Noa; Sabo, Edmond; Navon, Gil; Bergman, Reuven; Nevo, Uri

    2015-06-01

    Human skin undergoes morphological and biochemical changes as a result of chronological aging and exposure to solar ultraviolet irradiation (photoaging). Noninvasive detection of these changes may aid in the prevention and treatment of both types of aging. This article presents a noninvasive method for the evaluation of aging skin with a unilateral stray field NMR scanner. These portable and inexpensive scanners may be suitable for in-depth skin characterization. In vivo profiles of sun-protected and sun-exposed skin from the forearms of female subjects of different ages (n = 9) were measured. Skin biopsies for histopathological examination were used as reference. T2 analysis with a bi-exponential decay model was applied and the extracted parameters were examined as markers for dermal aging. In the upper reticular dermis, a significant increase in the fraction of the slow T2 component and in the T2 value itself was found to correlate with chronological aging. For most subjects, there was an additional increase in the values of the slow T2 component and the T2 values from the sun-exposed forearm, superimposed on that measured for the sun-protected forearm. These results are in agreement with the decline in collagen content and the increase in free water content with aging. The results suggest that such a technique can be used as a tool for the assessment of aging, and that bi-exponential fitting can produce sensitive fingerprint parameters for the dermal alterations that occur during aging.

  9. Retinoids suppress cysteine-rich protein 61 (CCN1), a negative regulator of collagen homeostasis, in skin equivalent cultures and aged human skin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Quan, Taihao; Qin, Zhaoping; Shao, Yuan; Xu, Yiru; Voorhees, John J; Fisher, Gary J

    2011-07-01

    Alterations in connective tissue collagen are prominent features of both chronologically aged and photoaged (ageing because of sun exposure) human skin. These age-related abnormalities are mediated in part by cysteine-rich protein 61 (CCN1). CCN1 is elevated in the dermis of both chronologically aged and photoaged human skin in vivo and promotes aberrant collagen homeostasis by down-regulating type I collagen, the major structural protein in skin, and promoting collagen degradation. Vitamin A and its metabolites have been shown to improve chronologically aged and photoaged skin by promoting deposition of new collagen and preventing its degradation. Here, we investigated regulation of CCN1 expression by retinoids in skin equivalent cultures and chronologically aged and photoaged human skin in vivo. In skin equivalent cultures, all-trans retinoic acid (RA), the major bioactive form of vitamin A in skin, significantly increased type I procollagen and reduced collagenase (matrix metalloproteinases-1, MMP-1). Addition of recombinant human CCN1 to skin equivalent cultures significantly reduced type I procollagen and increased MMP-1. Importantly, RA significantly reduced CCN1 expression in skin equivalent cultures. Topical treatment with retinol (vitamin A, 0.4%) for 7days significantly reduced CCN1 mRNA and protein expression in both chronologically aged (80+years) and photoaged human skin in vivo, compared to vehicle-treated skin. These data indicate that the mechanism by which retinoids improve aged skin, through increased collagen production, involves down-regulation of CCN1.

  10. Evaluation of variations of biomolecular constituents in human skin in vivo by near-infrared Raman spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Zhiwei; Zeng, Haishan; MacAulay, Calum E.; Hamzavi, Iltefat; McLean, David I.; Lui, Harvey

    2001-10-01

    A portable and rapid near-infrared (NIR) Raman spectroscopy system together with a tissue Raman probe was developed and utilized to acquire in vivo skin Raman spectra at 785 nm excitation. We demonstrated that good quality in vivo skin Raman spectra free of interferences of fiber fluorescence and silica Raman signals can be acquired within 5 seconds. Distinct Raman peaks in the 800-1800 cm-1 range can be discerned clearly from various skin sites of the body. The intensity ratio of the Raman band at 1655 cm-1 to that at 1445 cm-1 was used to evaluate the variation of the protein/lipid depositions in the skin. The results show that the regional variations in the molecular composition and structure can be determined in vivo, suggesting that NIR Raman spectroscopy will be useful to non-invasively measure important biochemical parameters of human skin.

  11. Volumetric cutaneous microangiography of human skin in vivo by VCSEL swept-source optical coherence tomography

    SciTech Connect

    Woo June Choi; Wang, R K

    2014-08-31

    We demonstrate volumetric cutaneous microangiography of the human skin in vivo that utilises 1.3-μm high-speed sweptsource optical coherence tomography (SS-OCT). The swept source is based on a micro-electro-mechanical (MEMS)-tunable vertical cavity surface emission laser (VCSEL) that is advantageous in terms of long coherence length over 50 mm and 100 nm spectral bandwidth, which enables the visualisation of microstructures within a few mm from the skin surface. We show that the skin microvasculature can be delineated in 3D SS-OCT images using ultrahigh-sensitive optical microangiography (UHS-OMAG) with a correlation mapping mask, providing a contrast enhanced blood perfusion map with capillary flow sensitivity. 3D microangiograms of a healthy human finger are shown with distinct cutaneous vessel architectures from different dermal layers and even within hypodermis. These findings suggest that the OCT microangiography could be a beneficial biomedical assay to assess cutaneous vascular functions in clinic. (laser biophotonics)

  12. Assessment of penetration of quantum dots through in vitro and in vivo human skin using the human skin equivalent model and the tape stripping method

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Sang Hoon; Kim, Jae Hwan; Yi, Sang Min; Lee, Jung Pyo; Kim, Jin Ho; Sohn, Kyung Hee; Park, Kui Lea; Kim, Meyoung-Kon; Son, Sang Wook

    2010-04-09

    Quantum dots (QDs) are rapidly emerging as an important class of nanoparticles (NPs) with potential applications in medicine. However, little is known about penetration of QDs through human skin. This study investigated skin penetration of QDs in both in vivo and in vitro human skin. Using the tape stripping method, this study demonstrates for the first time that QDs can actually penetrate through the stratum corneum (SC) of human skin. Transmission electron microscope (TEM) and energy diverse X-ray (EDX) analysis showed accumulation of QDs in the SC of a human skin equivalent model (HSEM) after dermal exposure to QDs. These findings suggest possible transdermal absorption of QDs after dermal exposure over a relatively long period of time.

  13. Multispectral in vivo three-dimensional optical coherence tomography of human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alex, Aneesh; Považay, Boris; Hofer, Bernd; Popov, Sergei; Glittenberg, Carl; Binder, Susanne; Drexler, Wolfgang

    2010-03-01

    The capability of optical coherence tomography (OCT) to perform ``optical biopsy'' of tissues within a depth range of 1 to 2 mm with micron-scale resolution in real time makes it a promising biomedical imaging modality for dermatologic applications. Three high-speed, spectrometer-based frequency-domain OCT systems operating at 800 nm (20,000 A-scans/s), 1060 nm, and 1300 nm (both 47,000 A-scans/s) at comparable signal-to-noise ratio (SNR), SNR roll-off with scanning depth, and transverse resolution (<15 μm) were used to acquire 3-D tomograms of glabrous and hairy human skin in vivo. Images obtained using these three systems were compared in terms of penetration depth, resolution, and contrast. Normal as well as abnormal sites like moles and scar tissue were examined. In this preliminary study, skin pigmentation had little effect on penetration accomplished at three different wavelengths. The epidermis and dermal-epidermal junction could be properly delineated using OCT at 800 nm, and this wavelength offered better contrast over the other two wavelength regions. OCT at 1300 nm permits imaging of deeper dermal layers, critical for detecting deeper tumor boundaries and other deeper skin pathologies. The performance at 1060 nm compromises between the other wavelengths in terms of penetration depth and image contrast.

  14. Human Skin Collagenase. The Role of Serum Alpha-Globulins in the Control of Activity In Vivo and In Vitro

    PubMed Central

    Eisen, Arthur Z.; Bauer, Eugene A.; Jeffrey, John J.

    1971-01-01

    An antibody against human skin collagenase obtained from tissue culture has been used to demonstrate the presence of immunoreactive collagenase in human skin extracts that have no detectable enzyme activity. Gel filtration of these skin extracts permits the separation of collagenase in its active form from the other proteins in the crude mixture. The recovery of enzymatically active collagenase appears to be due to the chromatographic separation of the enzyme from the serum antiproteases, alpha1-antitrypsin and alpha2-macroglobulin, suggesting that collagenase activity in fresh tissue extracts is masked by these known collagenase inhibitors. These findings are supported by in vitro studies untilizing human skin explants in tissue culture. The demonstration of collagenase in vivo in human skin indicates that the enzyme is present at concentrations that are of physiologic significance in collagen remodeling. Evidence is also presented that these findings are not unique to human skin. Images PMID:4100048

  15. Multi-beam optical coherence tomography for microvascular imaging of human skin in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Chaoliang; Cheng, Kyle H. Y.; Jakubovic, Raphael; Jivraj, Jamil; Ramjist, Joel; Deorajh, Ryan; Gao, Wanrong; Yang, Victor X. D.

    2017-02-01

    In this paper, a multi-beam optical coherence tomography (OCT) was used to reconstruct the microvascular image of human skin in vivo with phase resolved Doppler OCT (PRDOCT), phase resolved Doppler variance (PRDV) and speckle variance OCT (svOCT), in which the blood flow image was calculated by averaging the four blood flow images obtained by the four beams. In PRDOCT method, it is difficult to detect the blood flow perpendicular to optical axis of the probe beam for single beam OCT, but the multi-beam scanning method can solve this because the input angles of the four probe beams are slightly different from each other. The proposed method can further improve the signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of the blood flow signals extracted by the three methods mentioned above.

  16. In vivo skin treatment with tissue-tolerable plasma influences skin physiology and antioxidant profile in human stratum corneum.

    PubMed

    Fluhr, Joachim W; Sassning, Sven; Lademann, Olaf; Darvin, Maxim E; Schanzer, Sabine; Kramer, Axel; Richter, Heike; Sterry, Wolfram; Lademann, Juergen

    2012-02-01

    The antimicrobial treatment of wounds is still a major problem. Tissue-tolerable electrical plasma (TTP) is a new approach for topical microbial disinfection of the skin surface. The aim of the present study was to investigate the influence of TTP on a carotenoid profile in relation to skin physiology parameters (epidermal barrier function, stratum corneum (SC) hydration, surface temperature and irritation parameters). We were interested in the interaction of TTP and the antioxidative network, as well as the consequences for skin physiology parameters. These parameters are also indicative of TTP safety in vivo. For plasma application, 'Kinpen 09' was used (surface exposure 30-43°C) for 3 s. Beta-carotene and water profiles were assessed by in vivo Raman microspectroscopy (skin composition analyzer 3510). Skin physiology parameters were measured with Tewameter TM 300, Corneometer CM 825, skin thermometer and Chromameter CR 300. All parameters were assessed non-invasively on seven healthy volunteers before and after plasma application in vivo. We could show that TTP application leads to a decrease in beta-carotene especially in the superficial SC. Skin-surface temperature increased by 1.74°C, while the transepidermal water loss (TEWL) increase indicated an impaired barrier function. SC hydration decreased as seen in water profile especially in the superficial layers and capacitance values. A slight increase in skin redness was measurable. The induction of reactive oxygen species is probably the major contributor of TTP efficacy in skin disinfection. Skin physiology parameters were influenced without damaging the skin or skin functions, indicating the safety of TTP under in vivo conditions.

  17. In vivo transformation of human skin with human papillomavirus type 11 from condylomatot acuminata

    SciTech Connect

    Kreider, J.W.; Howett, M.K.; Lill, N.L.; Bartlett, G.L.; Zaino, R.J.; Sedlacek, T.V.; Mortel, R.

    1986-08-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) have been implicated in the development of a number of human malignancies, but direct tests of their involvement have not been possible. The authors describe a system in which human skin from various skin from various sites was infected with HPV type 11 (HPV-11) extracted from vulvar condylomata and was grafted beneath the renal capsule of athymic mice. Most of the skin grafts so treated underwent morphological transformation, resulting in the development of condylomata identical to those which occur spontaneously in patients. Foreskins responded with the most vigorous proliferative response to HPV-11. The lesions produced the characteristic intranuclear group-specific antigen of papillomaviruses. Both dot blot and Southern blot analysis of DNA from the lesions revealed the presence of HPV-11 DNA in the transformed grafts. These results demonstrate the first laboratory system for the study of the interaction of human skin with an HPV. The method may be useful in understanding the mechanisms of HPV transformation and replication and is free of the ethical restraints which have impeded study. This system will allow the direct study of factors which permit neoplastic progression of HPV-induced cutaneous lesions in human tissues.

  18. High-resolution multiphoton tomography of human skin in vivo and in vitro

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Riemann, Iris; Dimitrov, Enrico; Fischer, Peter; Reif, Annette; Kaatz, Martin; Elsner, Peter; Konig, Karsten

    2004-09-01

    The novel compact femtosecond NIR (near infrared) laser imaging system DermaInspect was used to perform for the first time in vivo high resolution non-invasive 4D tomography of human skin based on multiphoton autofluorescence imaging and second harmonic generation (SHG). Using fast galvoscan mirrors, a time correlated single photon counting (TCSPC) module and femtosecond 80 MHz laser pulses in the spectral range of 750 nm-850 nm human skin was analyzed with subcellular spatial resolution (3D) and 250 ps temporal resolution (4D). The non-linear induced autofluorescence originates from naturally endogenous fluorophores and protein structures like NAD(P)H, flavins, phorphyrins, melanin, elastin and collagen. Collagenous structures were detected using SHG. Tissues of patients with dermatological disorders like nevi and melanoma have been investigated with a clear visualization of cells and intratissue structures. Further characterization of those components was performed by the fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) and the determination of two photon excitation spectra. This method of non invasive high resolution optical biopsy provides a painless diagnostic tool for dermatological applications.

  19. Removing noises caused by motion artefacts in microcirculation maps of human skin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chen, C; Shi, W; Gao, W

    2015-12-01

    This paper presents a zero-padding and cross-correlation technique-based correlation mapping optical coherence tomography (ZPCC-cmOCT) to reconstruct microcirculation maps of human skin in vivo, which can remove the background decorrelation noise caused by motion artefacts. In conventional correlation mapping optical coherence tomography method, the correlation degree of static tissue may be lowered by the motion artefacts due to cardiac and respiratory motion, resulting in background decorrelation noise in microcirculation maps. In zero-padding and cross-correlation technique-based correlation mapping optical coherence tomography method, structural images are first obtained by performing Fourier transform on zero-padded interference fringes, and then cross-correlation-based image registration is utilized to align local areas in two adjacent structural images. Finally, correlation mapping optical coherence tomography method is performed to generate microcirculation maps. Both phantom experiments and in vivo experiments were implemented and the results demonstrate that the proposed method is capable of providing microcirculation maps with the background decorrelation noise removed.

  20. In vivo barrier challenge and long-term recovery in human facial skin.

    PubMed

    Gorcea, Mihaela; Hadgraft, Jonathan; Lane, Majella E; Moore, David J

    2013-06-01

    Recently, we developed a biophysical approach to characterize in vivo facial cheek skin as a function of stratum corneum (SC) depth, barrier function and during a 24-h recovery period. The current study extends this work and characterizes the human facial cheek after barrier challenge and, for the first time, facial SC barrier recovery over a 4-week period. Changes in the corneocyte size over the 4-week recovery period, and correlations with changes in Trans-Epidermal Water Loss (TEWL) were monitored. This approach allows complete characterization of SC barrier function after a full biological regeneration of the SC barrier following tape stripping. The structural and compositional changes in facial cheek were investigated using Attenuated Total Reflectance-Fourier Transform Infra Red (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy, tape stripping, TEWL measurements and image analysis combined with optical microscopy to characterize the SC depth profile during the tape stripping stress and over 4-week recovery period. TEWL increased significantly from baseline after sequential tape stripping. Corneocyte size decreased with successive tape stripping. An inverse direct correlation was determined between TEWL and corneocyte surface area. After 4 weeks, the corneocyte size and TEWL for the facial cheek recovered 100% from the tape stripping procedure. The in vivo ATR-FTIR data demonstrated that lipid and sebum components on the surface of the facial cheek SC recovered within 24 h post tape stripping, whereas protein (Amide II) and water components recovered after 1 week.

  1. In vivo stepwise multi-photon activation fluorescence imaging of melanin in human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lai, Zhenhua; Gu, Zetong; Abbas, Saleh; Lowe, Jared; Sierra, Heidy; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; DiMarzio, Charles

    2014-03-01

    The stepwise multi-photon activated fluorescence (SMPAF) of melanin is a low cost and reliable method of detecting melanin because the activation and excitation can be a continuous-wave (CW) mode near infrared (NIR) laser. Our previous work has demonstrated the melanin SMPAF images in sepia melanin, mouse hair, and mouse skin. In this study, we show the feasibility of using SMPAF to detect melanin in vivo. in vivo melanin SMPAF images of normal skin and benign nevus are demonstrated. SMPAF images add specificity for melanin detection than MPFM images and CRM images. Melanin SMPAF is a promising technology to enable early detection of melanoma for dermatologists.

  2. Examination of wound healing after curettage by multiphoton tomography of human skin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Springer, S; Zieger, M; Böttcher, A; Lademann, J; Kaatz, M

    2017-11-01

    The multiphoton tomography (MPT) has evolved into a useful tool for the non-invasive investigation of morphological and biophysical characteristics of human skin in vivo. Until now, changes of the skin have been evaluated mainly by using clinical and histological techniques. In this study, the progress of wound healing was investigated by MPT over 3 weeks with a final examination after 24 months. Especially, the collagen degradation, reepithelization and tissue formation were examined. As specific parameter for wound healing and its course the second-harmonic generation-to-autofluorescence aging index of dermis (SAAID) was used. About 10 volunteers aged between 25 and 58 years were examined. Acute wounds were scanned with three Z-stacks taken per visit. The stacks were taken up to a depth of 225 μm at increments of 5 μm and a scan time for 3 seconds per scan. Subsequently, the SAAID was evaluated as an indicator for wound healing. Furthermore, single scans were taken for morphological investigations. The evaluation revealed a distinct difference in the SAAID behavior between the Z-stacks taken at each visit. Furthermore, the degradation of collagen and cells and their reappearance could be shown in the course of the visits. Clear differences in the curve behavior of the SAAID at every visit were shown in this study. The SAAID curves and morphological images could be correlated with findings of the clinical examination of different wound healing phases. Therefore, SAAID curves and morphological MPT imaging could provide a non-invasive tool for the determination of wound healing phases in patients in vivo. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. In vivo perfusion of human skin substitutes with microvessels formed by adult circulating endothelial progenitor cells.

    PubMed

    Kung, Elaine F; Wang, Feiya; Schechner, Jeffrey S

    2008-02-01

    At present, tissue-engineered human skin substitutes (HSSs) mainly function as temporary bioactive dressings due to inadequate perfusion. Failure to form functional vascular networks within the initial posttransplantation period compromises cell survival of the graft and its long-term viability in the wound bed. Our goal was to demonstrate that adult circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) seeded onto HSS can form functional microvessels capable of graft neovascularization and perfusion. Adult peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) underwent CD34 selection and endothelial cell (EC) culture conditions. After in vitro expansion, flow cytometry verified EC phenotype before their incorporation into HSS. After 2 weeks in vivo, immunohistochemical analysis, immunofluorescent microscopy, and microfil polymer perfusion were performed. CD34+ PBMCs differentiated into EPC demonstrating characteristic EC morphology and expression of CD31, Tie-2, and E-selectin after TNFalpha-induction. Numerous human CD31 and Ulex europaeus agglutinin-1 (UEA-1) microvessels within the engineered grafts (HSS/EPCs) inosculated with recipient murine circulation. Limitation of murine CD31 immunoreactivity to HSS margins showed angiogenesis was attributable to human EPC at 2 weeks posttransplantation. Delivery of intravenous rhodamine-conjugated UEA-1 and microfil polymer to HSS/EPCs demonstrated enhanced perfusion by functional microvessels compared to HSS control without EPCs. We successfully engineered functional microvessels in HSS by incorporating adult circulating EPCs. This autologous EC source can form vascular conduits enabling perfusion and survival of human bioengineered tissues.

  4. In-vitro and in-vivo study of dye diffusion into the human skin and hair follicles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genina, Elina A.; Bashkatov, Alexey N.; Sinichkin, Yurii P.; Kochubey, Vyacheslav I.; Lakodina, Nina A.; Perpelitzina, Olga A.; Altshuler, Gregory B.; Tuchin, Valery V.

    2000-11-01

    We present experimental results on in vitro and in vivo investigation of dye diffusion into the human skin and hair follicles. It was shown that dyeing as a method of enhancement of the absorption coefficient of hair follicle tissue components can be used for selective photodestruction of hair follicle and surrounding tissues. Strength and depth of hair follicle dyeing inside the skin were determined for various dyes.

  5. Applying tattoo dye as a third-harmonic generation contrast agent for in vivo optical virtual biopsy of human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tsai, Ming-Rung; Lin, Chen-Yu; Liao, Yi-Hua; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2013-02-01

    Third-harmonic generation (THG) microscopy has been reported to provide intrinsic contrast in elastic fibers, cytoplasmic membrane, nucleus, actin filaments, lipid bodies, hemoglobin, and melanin in human skin. For advanced molecular imaging, exogenous contrast agents are developed for a higher structural or molecular specificity. We demonstrate the potential of the commonly adopted tattoo dye as a THG contrast agent for in vivo optical biopsy of human skin. Spectroscopy and microscopy experiments were performed on cultured cells with tattoo dyes, in tattooed mouse skin, and in tattooed human skin to demonstrate the THG enhancement effect. Compared with other absorbing dyes or nanoparticles used as exogenous THG contrast agents, tattoo dyes are widely adopted in human skin so that future clinical biocompatibility evaluation is relatively achievable. Combined with the demonstrated THG enhancement effect, tattoo dyes show their promise for future clinical imaging applications.

  6. Remote in vivo imaging of human skin corneocytes by means of an optical fiber bundle

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dromard, Tanguy; Ravaine, Valérie; Ravaine, Serge; Lévêque, Jean-Luc; Sojic, Neso

    2007-05-01

    Human corneocytes forming the outermost layer of the epidermis (stratum corneum) were imaged in vivo by epifluorescence through a coherent optical fiber bundle. A very simple and rapid method to remotely visualize the cells forming this protective layer of the skin is presented. After the topical application of fluorescein, the distal face of an optical fiber bundle is gently applied perpendicularly onto the labeled skin (contact mode). Remote fluorescence images of the corneocytes are acquired in 50ms through the bundle comprising 30 000 individually cladded 3.5μm diameter optical fibers. The very short focal distance which is an intrinsic characteristic of such bundles, allows visualizing only the most superficial monolayer of cells in contact with the external environment. An image displays about 400-500 cells directly on the human body. The size and the arrangement of the corneocytes can thus be acquired and analyzed in a very simple and easy way. The method is flexible and can be used for any location on the human body. Using a gradient-index lens objective (magnification 2.8×) fused to the distal face of the bundle allows the shape of the corneocytes to be better resolved. In addition, the working distance is 300μm and hence this second approach works in a noncontact imaging mode. Both approaches are complementary and allow providing instantaneously either a global view of the cells with a possible statistical determination of their area or morphological information, which are essential for dermatology and cosmetic sciences. Finally, to improve the quality and the contrast of the recorded images, we tested silica nanoparticles containing fluorescein. In brief, this diagnostic method is nontoxic, painless, easy to use, noninvasive, and nondestructive.

  7. Optimization of the measurement procedure during multiphoton tomography of human skin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Springer, S; Zieger, M; Koenig, K; Kaatz, M; Lademann, J; Darvin, M E

    2016-08-01

    The in vivo multiphoton tomography has evolved into a useful tool for the non-invasive investigation of morphological and biophysical characteristics of human skin. Until now, changes of skin have been evaluated mainly by clinical and histological techniques. The current study addresses the effects of a changed acquisition time for single scans in a Z-stack on the directly related qualitative and quantitative interpretability of the data. A test area of the skin was used for scanning 12 Z-stacks of 10 volunteers aged between 25 and 34 years. The stacks were taken up to a depth of 220 μm at increments of 10 μm at four different times, 1, 3, 7, 13 s, per scan. Subsequently, the second harmonic generation (SHG)-to-autofluorescence aging index of dermis (SAAID) was evaluated at three different measuring depths, i.e. at the maximum of SHG as well as at depths of 60 and 150 μm. The evaluation did not reveal any significant differences in the SAAID behavior between the Z-stacks of each test area scanned at different acquisition times. However, the acquisition time of 1 s/frame increases the measurement stability without influencing the SAAID behavior. The resolution of subcellular structures decreases significantly at scan times ≤3 s, whereas the acquisition time from 7 to 13 s warrants a high image quality. The study has shown that there are no significant differences between the scan speeds per scan in a Z-stack and the resulting SAAID. Acquisition times of 7 s are suitable for the morphological evaluation whereas a further extension to 13 s does not result in any benefits. A scan time per image of 1 s is sufficient for the quantitative evaluation of SAAID thus substantially reducing the possible influence of movement artifacts. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  8. In Vivo Assessment of Acute UVB Responses in Normal and Xeroderma Pigmentosum (XP-C) Skin-Humanized Mouse Models

    PubMed Central

    García, Marta; Llames, Sara; García, Eva; Meana, Alvaro; Cuadrado, Natividad; Recasens, Mar; Puig, Susana; Nagore, Eduardo; Illera, Nuria; Jorcano, José Luis; Del Rio, Marcela; Larcher, Fernando

    2010-01-01

    In vivo studies of UVB effects on human skin are precluded by ethical and technical arguments on volunteers and inconceivable in cancer-prone patients such as those affected with Xeroderma Pigmentosum (XP). Establishing reliable models to address mechanistic and therapeutic matters thus remains a challenge. Here we have used the skin-humanized mouse system that circumvents most current model constraints. We assessed the UVB radiation effects including the sequential changes after acute exposure with respect to timing, dosage, and the relationship between dose and degree-sort of epidermal alteration. On Caucasian-derived regenerated skins, UVB irradiation (800 J/m2) induced DNA damage (cyclobutane pyrimidine dimers) and p53 expression in exposed keratinocytes. Epidermal disorganization was observed at higher doses. In contrast, in African descent–derived regenerated skins, physiological hyperpigmentation prevented tissue alterations and DNA photolesions. The acute UVB effects seen in Caucasian-derived engrafted skins were also blocked by a physical sunscreen, demonstrating the suitability of the system for photoprotection studies. We also report the establishment of a photosensitive model through the transplantation of XP-C patient cells as part of a bioengineered skin. The inability of XP-C engrafted skin to remove DNA damaged cells was confirmed in vivo. Both the normal and XP-C versions of the skin-humanized mice proved proficient models to assess UVB-mediated DNA repair responses and provide a strong platform to test novel therapeutic strategies. PMID:20558577

  9. A simple skin blister technique for the study of in vivo transmigration of human leukocytes.

    PubMed

    Davidsson, Lisa; Björkman, Lena; Christenson, Karin; Alsterholm, Mikael; Movitz, Charlotta; Thorén, Fredrik B; Karlsson, Anna; Welin, Amanda; Bylund, Johan

    2013-07-31

    The study of human leukocytes is almost exclusively conducted using cells isolated from peripheral blood. This is especially true for neutrophils, despite the fact that these cells are of main (pathological) importance in extravascular tissues upon e.g., infection and/or tissue damage. The journey from circulation to tissue is typically associated with a number of cellular changes, making the cells primed, or hyper-responsive, and in many aspects distinct from the cells present in circulation. Models to obtain in vivo transmigrated leukocytes from human tissue are available, but not widely used. We describe here an easy-to-use model for the study of local inflammation, stemming from limited tissue damage, which can be used to isolate viable and functional leukocytes. The model is based on the generation of aseptic skin blisters, formed by the application of negative pressure, and allows for investigations of the cellular infiltrate as well as of soluble mediators present in the exudate. We believe that this method, combined with modern analysis equipment suitable for small volumes and cell numbers, could be of great use for increasing our understanding of the nature and function of leukocytes that have left circulation and transmigrated to inflamed tissues.

  10. 3D bioprinting of functional human skin: production and in vivo analysis.

    PubMed

    Cubo, Nieves; Garcia, Marta; Del Cañizo, Juan F; Velasco, Diego; Jorcano, Jose L

    2016-12-05

    Significant progress has been made over the past 25 years in the development of in vitro-engineered substitutes that mimic human skin, either to be used as grafts for the replacement of lost skin, or for the establishment of in vitro human skin models. In this sense, laboratory-grown skin substitutes containing dermal and epidermal components offer a promising approach to skin engineering. In particular, a human plasma-based bilayered skin generated by our group, has been applied successfully to treat burns as well as traumatic and surgical wounds in a large number of patients in Spain. There are some aspects requiring improvements in the production process of this skin; for example, the relatively long time (three weeks) needed to produce the surface required to cover an extensive burn or a large wound, and the necessity to automatize and standardize a process currently performed manually. 3D bioprinting has emerged as a flexible tool in regenerative medicine and it provides a platform to address these challenges. In the present study, we have used this technique to print a human bilayered skin using bioinks containing human plasma as well as primary human fibroblasts and keratinocytes that were obtained from skin biopsies. We were able to generate 100 cm(2), a standard P100 tissue culture plate, of printed skin in less than 35 min (including the 30 min required for fibrin gelation). We have analysed the structure and function of the printed skin using histological and immunohistochemical methods, both in 3D in vitro cultures and after long-term transplantation to immunodeficient mice. In both cases, the generated skin was very similar to human skin and, furthermore, it was indistinguishable from bilayered dermo-epidermal equivalents, handmade in our laboratories. These results demonstrate that 3D bioprinting is a suitable technology to generate bioengineered skin for therapeutical and industrial applications in an automatized manner.

  11. In Vivo Imaging of Human and Mouse Skin with a Handheld Dual-Axis Confocal Fluorescence Microscope

    PubMed Central

    Gonzalez-Gonzalez, Emilio; Mandella, Michael J.; Kino, Gordon S.; Solgaard, Olav; Leake, Devin; Kaspar, Roger L.; Oro, Anthony; Contag, Christopher H.

    2013-01-01

    Advancing molecular therapies for the treatment of skin diseases will require the development of new tools that can reveal spatiotemporal changes in the microanatomy of the skin and associate these changes with the presence of the therapeutic agent. For this purpose, we evaluated a handheld dual-axis confocal (DAC) microscope that is capable of in vivo fluorescence imaging of skin, using both mouse models and human skin. Individual keratinocytes in the epidermis were observed in three-dimensional image stacks after topical administration of near-infrared (NIR) dyes as contrast agents. This suggested that the DAC microscope may have utility in assessing the clinical effects of a small interfering RNA (siRNA)-based therapeutic (TD101) that targets the causative mutation in pachyonychia congenita (PC) patients. The data indicated that (1) formulated indocyanine green (ICG) readily penetrated hyperkeratotic PC skin and normal callused regions compared with nonaffected areas, and (2) TD101-treated PC skin revealed changes in tissue morphology, consistent with reversion to nonaffected skin compared with vehicle-treated skin. In addition, siRNA was conjugated to NIR dye and shown to penetrate through the stratum corneum barrier when topically applied to mouse skin. These results suggest that in vivo confocal microscopy may provide an informative clinical end point to evaluate the efficacy of experimental molecular therapeutics. PMID:21191407

  12. Weight-bearing-induced changes in the microtopography and structural stiffness of human skin in vivo following immobility periods.

    PubMed

    Dobos, Gabor; Gefen, Amit; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Kottner, Jan

    2015-01-01

    Pressure ulcers (PUs) are injuries to the skin and underlying tissues, caused by sustained deformations and occur frequently in aged patients. Skin microtopography and stiffness affect the interaction of skin with contact surfaces contributing to PU development. We simulated immobility in 20 healthy females (mean age 69.9 years). Skin microtopography and stiffness were measured at the PU predilection sites before and after loading. Skin roughness decreased at the heels by 18.1% after 90 minutes (p = 0.022), but remained unchanged at the sacrum and the upper back. Structural elasticity and elastic deformations increased at all skin areas; changes over time were significant at the sacrum (p = 0.005) and the heel, (p = 0.002). The residual skin deformation increased at all skin areas after loading significantly at the sacrum (32.0%, p = 0.013) and upper back (20.6%, p = 0.007). The structural "biological" elasticity of the skin decreased significantly at the upper back after loading, but remained unchanged at the heels. All skin changes recovered after unloading. Results indicate that prolonged loading causes structural skin changes in humans in vivo in PU predilection sites. The pathogenesis of PUs is different at the heels, the sacral and upper back skin.

  13. In vivo imaging of microvascular changes in inflammatory human skin induced by tape stripping and mosquito saliva using optical microangiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Baran, Utku; Choi, Woo J.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2015-03-01

    Tape stripping on human skin induces mechanical disruptions of the epidermal barrier that lead to minor skin inflammation which leads to temporary changes in microvasculature. On the other hand, when mosquitoes probe the skin for blood feeding, they inject saliva in dermal tissue. Mosquito saliva is known to exert various biological activities, such as dermal mast cell degranulation, leading to fluid extravasation and neutrophil influx. This inflammatory response remain longer than the tape stripping caused inflammation. In this study, we demonstrate the capabilities of swept-source optical coherence tomography (OCT) in detecting in vivo microvascular response of inflammatory human skin. Optical microangiography (OMAG), noninvasive volumetric microvasculature in vivo imaging method, has been used to track the vascular responses after tape stripping and mosquito bite. Vessel density has been quantified and used to correlate with the degree of skin irritation. The proved capability of OMAG technique in visualizing the microvasculature network under inflamed skin condition can play an important role in clinical trials of treatment and diagnosis of inflammatory skin disorders as well as studying mosquito bite's perception by the immune system and its role in parasite transmission.

  14. Quantitative characterization of mechanically indented in vivo human skin in adults and infants using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huang, Pin-Chieh; Pande, Paritosh; Shelton, Ryan L.; Joa, Frank; Moore, Dave; Gillman, Elisa; Kidd, Kimberly; Nolan, Ryan M.; Odio, Mauricio; Carr, Andrew; Boppart, Stephen A.

    2017-03-01

    Influenced by both the intrinsic viscoelasticity of the tissue constituents and the time-evolved redistribution of fluid within the tissue, the biomechanical response of skin can reflect not only localized pathology but also systemic physiology of an individual. While clinical diagnosis of skin pathologies typically relies on visual inspection and manual palpation, a more objective and quantitative approach for tissue characterization is highly desirable. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is an interferometry-based imaging modality that enables in vivo assessment of cross-sectional tissue morphology with micron-scale resolution, which surpasses those of most standard clinical imaging tools, such as ultrasound imaging and magnetic resonance imaging. This pilot study investigates the feasibility of characterizing the biomechanical response of in vivo human skin using OCT. OCT-based quantitative metrics were developed and demonstrated on the human subject data, where a significant difference between deformed and nondeformed skin was revealed. Additionally, the quantified postindentation recovery results revealed differences between aged (adult) and young (infant) skin. These suggest that OCT has the potential to quantitatively assess the mechanically perturbed skin as well as distinguish different physiological conditions of the skin, such as changes with age or disease.

  15. Haptic characterization of human skin in vivo in response to shower gels using a magnetic levitation device.

    PubMed

    Yardley, R; Fan, A; Masters, J; Mascaro, S

    2016-02-01

    Skin products such as shower gels have a direct impact on skin health and wellness. Although qualitative haptic characterization through explicit, verbal measures in consumer studies are often sufficient for general comparison on consumer perceived skin feel, a quantitative approach is desired to characterize minute changes in skin condition in response to various skin products. Prior research has sought to characterize the haptic properties of human skin in vitro and in vivo, but very few studies have compared the haptic effects of commercial skin products having relatively similar formulations. In addition, related studies have typically utilized simple, low-precision devices and fixtures. The purpose of this study was to use a precision magnetic levitation haptic device to characterize the frictional properties of human skin in vivo before, during, and after treatment with commercially available shower gels, to capture the entire cycle of consumer experience on skin feel. A hybrid force-position control algorithm was used to control a precision magnetic levitation haptic device with silicone tactor to stroke the human skin (on the volar forearm) in vivo. Position and force data were collected from 32 human subjects using eight different commercially available shower gels, while stroking the skin before, during, and after treatment. The data were analyzed to produce coefficients of friction and viscous damping constant, which were used as metrics for comparing the effects of each shower gel type. Other factors investigated include skin test location, order, and subject age and gender. Results showed significant differences between the effects of eight various shower gels, especially after accounting for variance between subjects. Most notably, Shower Gel four with high level of petrolatum, along with Shower Gels five and six with low levels of castoryl maleate (a skin lipid analog), as well as Shower Gel two with high levels of vegetable oils yielded higher skin

  16. Analysis of the in vivo confocal Raman spectral variability in human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogilevych, Borys; dos Santos, Laurita; Rangel, Joao L.; Grancianinov, Karen J. S.; Sousa, Mariane P.; Martin, Airton A.

    2015-06-01

    Biochemical composition of the skin changes in each layer and, therefore, the skin spectral profile vary with the depth. In this work, in vivo Confocal Raman spectroscopy studies were performed at different skin regions and depth profile (from the surface down to 10 μm) of the stratum corneum, to verify the variability and reproducibility of the intra- and interindividual Raman data. The Raman spectra were collected from seven healthy female study participants using a confocal Raman system from Rivers Diagnostic, with 785 nm excitation line and a CCD detector. Measurements were performed in the volar forearm region, at three different points at different depth, with the step of 2 μm. For each depth point, three spectra were acquired. Data analysis included the descriptive statistics (mean, standard deviation and residual) and Pearson's correlation coefficient calculation. Our results show that inter-individual variability is higher than intraindividual variability, and variability inside the SC is higher than on the skin surface. In all these cases we obtained r values, higher than 0.94, which correspond to high correlation between Raman spectra. It reinforces the possibility of the data reproducibility and direct comparison of in vivo results obtained with different study participants of the same age group and phototype.

  17. Near-infrared autofluorescence imaging of cutaneous melanins and human skin in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Han, Xiao; Lui, Harvey; McLean, David I.; Zeng, Haishan

    2009-03-01

    In recent years, near-infrared (NIR) autofluorescence imaging has been explored as a novel technique for tissue evaluation and diagnosis. We present an NIR fluorescence imaging system optimized for the dermatologic clinical setting, with particular utility for the direct characterization of cutaneous melanins in vivo. A 785-nm diode laser is coupled into a ring light guide to uniformly illuminate the skin. A bandpass filter is used to purify the laser light for fluorescence excitation, while a long-pass filter is used to block the main laser wavelength but pass the spontaneous components for NIR reflectance imaging. A computer-controlled filter holder is used to switch these two filters to select between reflectance and fluorescence imaging modes. Both the reflectance and fluorescence photons are collected by an NIR-sensitive charge-coupled device (CCD) camera to form the respective images. Preliminary results show that cutaneous melanin in pigmented skin disorders emits higher NIR autofluorescence than surrounding normal tissue. This confirmed our previous findings from NIR fluorescence spectroscopy study of cutaneous melanins and provides a new approach to directly image the distributions of cutaneous melanins in the skin. In-vivo NIR autofluorescence images may be useful for clinical evaluation and diagnosis of pigmented skin lesions, including melanoma.

  18. Ethosomes for skin delivery of ammonium glycyrrhizinate: in vitro percutaneous permeation through human skin and in vivo anti-inflammatory activity on human volunteers.

    PubMed

    Paolino, Donatella; Lucania, Giuseppe; Mardente, Domenico; Alhaique, Franco; Fresta, Massimo

    2005-08-18

    The aim of this work was the evaluation of various ethosomal suspensions made up of water, phospholipids and ethanol at various concentrations for their potential application in dermal administration of ammonium glycyrrhizinate, a useful drug for the treatment of various inflammatory-based skin diseases. Physicochemical characterization of ethosomes was carried out by photon correlation spectroscopy and freeze fracture electron microscopy. The percutaneous permeation of ammonium glycyrrhizinate/ethosomes was evaluated in vitro through human stratum corneum and epidermis membranes by using Franz's cells and compared with the permeation profiles of drug solutions either in water or in a water-ethanol mixture. Reflectance spectrophotometry was used as a non-invasive technique to evaluate the carrier toxicity, the drug permeation and the anti-inflammatory activity of ammonium glycyrrhizinate in a model of skin erythema in vivo on human volunteers. Ethosomal suspensions had mean sizes ranging from 350 nm to 100 nm as a function of ethanol and lecithin quantities, i.e., high amounts of ethanol and a low lecithin concentration provided ethosome suspensions with a mean size of approximately 100 nm and a narrow size distribution. In vitro and in vivo experiments were carried out by using an ethosome formulation made up of ethanol 45% (v/v) and lecithin 2% (w/v). The ethosome suspension showed a very good skin tolerability in human volunteers, also when applied for a long period (48 h). Ethosomes elicited an increase of the in vitro percutaneous permeation of both methylnicotinate and ammonium glycyrrhizinate. Ethosomes were able to significantly enhance the anti-inflammatory activity of ammonium glycyrrhizinate compared to the ethanolic or aqueous solutions of this drug. Some in vivo experiments also showed the ability of ethosome to ensure a skin accumulation and a sustained release of the ammonium glycyrrhizinate.

  19. Comparison of in vivo and ex vivo laser scanning microscopy and multiphoton tomography application for human and porcine skin imaging

    SciTech Connect

    Darvin, M E; Richter, H; Zhu, Y J; Meinke, M C; Knorr, F; Lademann, J; Gonchukov, S A; Koenig, K

    2014-07-31

    Two state-of-the-art microscopic optical methods, namely, confocal laser scanning microscopy in the fluorescence and reflectance regimes and multiphoton tomography in the autofluorescence and second harmonic generation regimes, are compared for porcine skin ex vivo and healthy human skin in vivo. All skin layers such as stratum corneum (SC), stratum spinosum (SS), stratum basale (SB), papillary dermis (PD) and reticular dermis (RD) as well as transition zones between these skin layers are measured noninvasively at a high resolution, using the above mentioned microscopic methods. In the case of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), measurements in the fluorescence regime were performed by using a fluorescent dye whose topical application on the surface is well suited for the investigation of superficial SC and characterisation of the skin barrier function. For investigations of deeply located skin layers, such as SS, SB and PD, the fluorescent dye must be injected into the skin, which markedly limits fluorescence measurements using CLSM. In the case of reflection CLSM measurements, the obtained results can be compared to the results of multiphoton tomography (MPT) for all skin layers excluding RD. CLSM cannot distinguish between dermal collagen and elastin measuring their superposition in the RD. By using MPT, it is possible to analyse the collagen and elastin structures separately, which is important for the investigation of anti-aging processes. The resolution of MPT is superior to CLSM. The advantages and limitations of both methods are discussed and the differences and similarities between human and porcine skin are highlighted. (laser biophotonics)

  20. Comparison of in vivo and ex vivo laser scanning microscopy and multiphoton tomography application for human and porcine skin imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darvin, M. E.; Richter, H.; Zhu, Y. J.; Meinke, M. C.; Knorr, F.; Gonchukov, S. A.; Koenig, K.; Lademann, J.

    2014-07-01

    Two state-of-the-art microscopic optical methods, namely, confocal laser scanning microscopy in the fluorescence and reflectance regimes and multiphoton tomography in the autofluorescence and second harmonic generation regimes, are compared for porcine skin ex vivo and healthy human skin in vivo. All skin layers such as stratum corneum (SC), stratum spinosum (SS), stratum basale (SB), papillary dermis (PD) and reticular dermis (RD) as well as transition zones between these skin layers are measured noninvasively at a high resolution, using the above mentioned microscopic methods. In the case of confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM), measurements in the fluorescence regime were performed by using a fluorescent dye whose topical application on the surface is well suited for the investigation of superficial SC and characterisation of the skin barrier function. For investigations of deeply located skin layers, such as SS, SB and PD, the fluorescent dye must be injected into the skin, which markedly limits fluorescence measurements using CLSM. In the case of reflection CLSM measurements, the obtained results can be compared to the results of multiphoton tomography (MPT) for all skin layers excluding RD. CLSM cannot distinguish between dermal collagen and elastin measuring their superposition in the RD. By using MPT, it is possible to analyse the collagen and elastin structures separately, which is important for the investigation of anti-aging processes. The resolution of MPT is superior to CLSM. The advantages and limitations of both methods are discussed and the differences and similarities between human and porcine skin are highlighted.

  1. Heavy water labeling of keratin as a non-invasive biomarker of skin turnover in vivo in rodents and humans.

    PubMed

    Lindwall, Glen; Hsieh, Elaine A; Misell, Lisa M; Chai, Christine M; Turner, Scott M; Hellerstein, Marc K

    2006-04-01

    Measurement of skin turnover has been problematic in humans. Heavy water (2H2O) labeling has recently been developed as a safe, simple method to study in vivo kinetics of many biosynthetic processes, including DNA and protein synthesis. Here, we apply this approach to the measurement of 2H incorporation into skin keratin and show close agreement between keratin and keratinocyte turnover data in the epidermis of rodents. Elevated turnover rates of both keratin and keratinocytes were observed in the epidermis of the flaky skin mouse, although topical treatments effective in human psoriasis had no effect on either turnover rate in these mice. In humans, keratin turnover was monitored non-invasively by serial tape stripping during and after 2H2O labeling. Kinetic data were consistent with previous estimates of epidermal turnover, with a lag time of 18 days before label appeared at the skin surface and a transit time of 4-5 weeks. Variability in skin keratin turnover rates was present among healthy individuals. In summary, 2H2O labeling of skin keratin represents a non-invasive approach for assessing skin turnover dynamics in pre-clinical models and in human subjects.

  2. In vivo visualization of microneedle conduits in human skin using laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bal, S.; Kruithof, A. C.; Liebl, H.; Tomerius, M.; Bouwstra, J.; Lademann, J.; Meinke, M.

    2010-03-01

    Solid microneedles enhance the penetration of drugs into the viable skin but little is known about the geometry of the conduits in vivo. Therefore, laser scanning microscopy was used to visualize the conduits of a microneedle system with needles at a length of 300 μm in 6 healthy subjects over a period of time. The model drug, a fluorescent dye was applied before and after piercing. Laser scanning microscopy was evaluated as being an excellent method to monitor the geometry and closure of the conduits over time. The used microneedle system was evaluated as suitable to enhance the transport of model drugs into the viable epidermis without bleeding and a short closure time of the conduits at the skin surface.

  3. Confocal Raman spectroscopy: In vivo biochemical changes in the human skin by topical formulations under UV radiation.

    PubMed

    Tosato, M G; Orallo, D E; Ali, S M; Churio, M S; Martin, A A; Dicelio, L

    2015-12-01

    A new approach to the study of the effects on human skin of mycosporine-like amino acids (MAAs) and gadusol (Gad) incorporated in polymer gel is proposed in this work. The depth profile and photoprotector effects of Pluronic F127® gels containing each of the natural actives were evaluated by in vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy aiming at the analysis of the biochemical changes on human skin. Hierarchical cluster analysis (HCA) showed that the data corresponding to different depths of the skin, from surface to 4 μm, and from 6 to 16 μm, remained in the same cluster. In vivo Raman spectra, classified into five different layers of epidermis according to their similarities, indicated that the amount of Gad gel increased by about 26% in the outermost layer of the stratum corneum (SC) and that MAAs gel at 2 μm depth was 103.4% higher than in the outermost layer of the SC. Variations in the SC of urocanic acid at 1490-1515 cm(-1) and 1652 cm(-1) and histidine at 1318 cm(-1) were calculated, before and after UV exposure with or without gels. With the application of gels the vibrational modes that correspond to lipids in trans conformation (1063 and 1128 cm(-1)) increased with respect to normal skin, whereas gauche conformation (1085 cm(-1)) disappeared. Our studies suggest that gels protected the skin against the stress of the natural defense mechanism caused by high levels of UV exposure.

  4. In vivo laser scanning microscopic investigation of the decontamination of hazardous substances from the human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lademann, J.; Patzelt, A.; Schanzer, S.; Richter, H.; Gross, I.; Menting, K. H.; Frazier, L.; Sterry, W.; Antoniou, C.

    2010-12-01

    The stimulation of the penetration of topically applied substances into the skin is a topic of intensive dermatological and pharmacological research. In this context, it was found that in addition to the intercellular penetration, the follicular penetration also represents an efficient penetration pathway. The hair follicles act as a long-term reservoir for topically applied substances. They are surrounded by all important target structures, such as blood capillaries, stem and dendritic cells. Therefore, the hair follicles, as well as the skin, need to be protected from hazardous substances. The traditional method of decontamination after respective accidental contacts consists of an intensive washing of the skin. However, during this mechanical procedure, the substances can be pushed even deeper into the hair follicles. In the present study, absorbent materials were applied to remove a fluorescent model substance from the skin without inducing mechanical stress. The results were compared to the decontamination effects obtained by intensive washing. Investigations were performed by means of in vivo laser scanning microscopy (LSM). The comparison revealed that decontamination with absorbent materials is more effective than decontamination with washing processes.

  5. Fluorescence dynamics of human epidermis (ex vivo) and skin (in vivo)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Salomatina, Elena V.; Pravdin, Alexander B.

    2003-10-01

    The temporal behavior of autofluorescence of human skin and epidermis under continuous UV-irradiation has been studied. Fluorescence spectra and kinetic curves of fluorescence intensity have been obtained. The fluorescence intensity recovery after dark period also has been examined. The vitiligo skin and epidermis were used for comparing their spectra with reflectance and fluorescence spectra of healthy skin. The epidermal samples were prepared using surface epidermis stripping technique. It has been concluded that fluorophores being undergone the UVA photobleaching are actually present in epidermal layer, and immediate pigment darkening does contribute, no less than a half of magnitude, to the autofluorescence decrease under continuous UVA irradiation.

  6. Ultraviolet a induces generation of squalene monohydroperoxide isomers in human sebum and skin surface lipids in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Ekanayake Mudiyanselage, Swarna; Hamburger, Matthias; Elsner, Peter; Thiele, Jens J

    2003-06-01

    At the outermost surface of human skin, skin surface lipids are first-line targets of solar ultraviolet radiation. Therefore, we hypothesized that ultraviolet A and ultraviolet B irradiation induce photo-oxidation of skin surface lipids. To test this, sebum samples were collected from facial skin of 17 healthy volunteers, weighed, and immediately irradiated with either ultraviolet B or ultraviolet A. Squalene, the major sebum lipid, as well as photo-oxidation products were identified in sebum lipid extracts by high-performance liquid chromatography analysis. Upon ultraviolet A exposures squalene was depleted in a concentration-dependent manner, whereas an unidentified sebum lipid photo-oxidation product was detected. Using high-performance thin layer chromatography, high-performance liquid chromatography, atmospheric pressure chemical ionization mass spectrometry, and nuclear magnetic resonance, unidentified sebum lipid photo-oxidation product was identified as a mixture of squalene monohydroperoxide isomers. Squalene monohydroperoxide isomers purified from sebum were identical with squalene monohydroperoxide isomers synthesized by preparative photo-oxidation of squalene. Squalene monohydroperoxide isomers were formed even after small suberythematogenic doses of ultraviolet A (5 J per cm2). Whereas physiologic baseline levels of squalene monohydroperoxide isomers in human skin were only slightly above detection limits, squalene monohydroperoxide isomer levels were strongly increased by suberythematogenic doses of ultraviolet A both in vitro and in vivo. High-performance liquid chromatography results could be complemented by a straightforward thin layer chromatography method for rapid screening of lipid peroxide formation in human sebum/skin surface lipids. In conclusion, specific squalene monohydroperoxide isomers were identified as highly ultraviolet A sensitive skin surface lipid breakdown products that may serve as a marker for photo-oxidative stress in vitro

  7. In vivo confirmation of hydration-induced changes in human-skin thickness, roughness and interaction with the environment.

    PubMed

    Dąbrowska, Agnieszka K; Adlhart, Christian; Spano, Fabrizio; Rotaru, Gelu-Marius; Derler, Siegfried; Zhai, Lina; Spencer, Nicholas D; Rossi, René M

    2016-09-15

    The skin properties, structure, and performance can be influenced by many internal and external factors, such as age, gender, lifestyle, skin diseases, and a hydration level that can vary in relation to the environment. The aim of this work was to demonstrate the multifaceted influence of water on human skin through a combination of in vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy and images of volar-forearm skin captured with the laser scanning confocal microscopy. By means of this pilot study, the authors have both qualitatively and quantitatively studied the influence of changing the depth-dependent hydration level of the stratum corneum (SC) on the real contact area, surface roughness, and the dimensions of the primary lines and presented a new method for characterizing the contact area for different states of the skin. The hydration level of the skin and the thickness of the SC increased significantly due to uptake of moisture derived from liquid water or, to a much lesser extent, from humidity present in the environment. Hydrated skin was smoother and exhibited higher real contact area values. The highest rates of water uptake were observed for the upper few micrometers of skin and for short exposure times.

  8. In vivo investigation of the efficiency of a nanoparticle-emulsion containing polihexanide on the human skin.

    PubMed

    Ulmer, M; Patzelt, A; Vergou, T; Richter, H; Müller, G; Kramer, A; Sterry, W; Czaika, V; Lademann, J

    2013-06-01

    Skin antisepsis is a key element for the prevention of surgical site infections, as well as for infections after injection and punctures. Recent investigations have shown that about 25% of the resident bacterial flora of the human skin resides within the hair follicle. These findings strongly suggest that the skin appendages play the role of a bacterial reservoir. The bacteria within the hair follicles therefore may be the cause of endogenous germ repopulation after skin antisepsis, highlighting the need for new antiseptic formulations that can sufficiently penetrate into the hair follicles. Various experiments have found that nano-sized particles as well as oil-in-water emulsions are efficient carriers for substances into the hair follicles. In the present study, we investigated the in vivo antiseptic potential of the particle-associated and aqueous polihexanide on the human skin by monitoring bacterial growth after antisepsis over a period of 2.5h. The experiments suggest that the use of a particle-bound antiseptic can achieve a better and longer lasting antisepsis of the human skin than in non-particulate form. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Hazards and benefits of in-vivo Raman spectroscopy of human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carter, Elizabeth A.; Williams, Adrian C.; Barry, Brian W.; Edwards, Howell G.

    1999-04-01

    The resurgence of Raman spectroscopy, in the late 1980's has led to an increase in the use of the technique for the analysis of biological tissues. Consequently, Raman spectroscopy is now regarded to be a well-established non- invasive, non-destructive technique, which is used to obtain good quality spectra from biological tissues with minimal fluorescence. What is presently of interest to our group is to develop further and establish the technique for in vivo investigations of healthy and diseased skin. This presentation discusses some potentially valuable clinical applications of the technique, and also highlights some of the experimental difficulties that were encountered when examining patients who were receiving treatment for psoriasis.

  10. [Cultivated human hair follicle cells are capable of integrating to skin structure in vivo].

    PubMed

    Cheremnykh, E S; Radiukhina, N V; Rutkevich, P N; Shevelev, A Ia; Vlasik, T N; Voroteliak, E A; Vasil'ev, A V; Terskikh, V V

    2010-01-01

    In the present study, human keratinocytes and dermal papilla cells were labeled to investigate their behaviour after intradermal transplantation. Cells were transduced by lentiviral vectors that bore marker gene encoding green fluorescent protein (copGFP) or red fluorescent protein (DsRed). A portion of transgene expressing cells was evaluated by flow cytometry. Genetic constructions that we used provided high level (> 95 %) of transduction of hair follicle cells. In vitro transduced cells were injected under the epidermis of human skin fragments, and these fragments were then transplanted under the skin of immunodeficient mice. Injected epidermal keratinocytes were found, mainly, in hair follicles and partially in a zone of interfollicular epidermis, while dermal papilla cells were found in papilla derma. The results of the present research show that the chosen genetic constructions obtained on a basis of human immunodeficiency lentivirs are capable of effective and stable transduction of human skin cells. Injected cells survived and were found in the corresponding structures of the skin.

  11. Percutaneous absorption and skin decontamination of PCBs: In vitro studies with human skin and in vivo studies in the rhesus monkey

    SciTech Connect

    Wester, R.C.; Maibach, H.I.; Bucks, D.A.; McMaster, J.; Mobayen, M.; Sarason, R.; Moore, A. )

    1990-12-01

    Knowledge of the entry of polychlorinated biphenyls through the skin into the body and subsequent disposition aids estimation of potential for human health hazard. (14C)Aroclor 1242 and (14C)Aroclor 1254 were separately administered intravenously and topically to rhesus monkeys. Following iv administration, 30-d excretion was 39.4 +/- 5.9% urine and 16.1 +/- 0.8% feces (total 55.5 +/- 5.1%) for Aroclor 1242, and 7.0 +/- 2.2% urine and 19.7 +/- 5.8% feces (total 26.7 +/- 7.5%) for Aroclor 1254. Mineral oil and trichlorobenzene are common PCB cosolvents in transformers. Skin absorption of Aroclor 1242 was 20.4 +/- 8.5% formulated in mineral oil and 18.0 +/- 3.8% in trichlorobenzene (p greater than .05). Absorption of Aroclor 1254 was 20.8 +/- 8.3% in mineral oil and 14.6 +/- 3.6% in trichlorobenzene (p greater than .05). PCBs are thus absorbed through skin, and excretion from the body is slow. Vehicle (trichlorobenzene or mineral oil) did not affect percutaneous absorption. In vitro skin absorption in human cadaver skin did not correlate with in vivo findings. This was due to lack of PCB partition from skin into the water receptor fluid, even with addition of 6% Oleth 20 (Volpo 20) solubilizer. Skin decontamination of PCBs showed soap and water to be as effective as or better than the solvent ethanol, mineral oil, and trichlorobenzene in removing PCBs from skin. There is a dynamic time lapse for PCBs between initial skin contact and skin absorption (irreversible removal). Thus initially most PCBs could be removed from skin, but this ability decreased with time to the point where at 24 h only about 25% of the initial PCB skin dose could be recovered with skin washing.

  12. In vivo evaluation of Fe in human skin employing X-Ray Fluorescence Methodology (XRF)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Estevam, M.; Appoloni, C. R.

    2007-02-01

    Recent technological improvements allow the method of in vivo XRF to provide useful sensibility for diagnostics or monitoring in biomedical applications. In cases of hereditary sanguine disorders as the β-thalassaemia or a genetic disorder like Haemochromatosis, there is a high concentration of elements as Fe, Zn and Cu in the skin and internal organs, due to the treatment of those abnormalities or due to the own dysfunction caused by the disease. The levels of Fe related to the patient bearers of the β-thalassaemia are determined, at the moment, measuring a protein in the sanguine current, called ferritin. The monitoring of the protein is ineffective in several situations, such as when the patient suffers any disturbance of health. Nowadays, the main forms of measuring the levels of those metals through hepatic storage are the biopsy of the liver, that is invasive and potentially dangerous, presenting a rate of mortality of 0.1%, and by means of magnetic susceptibilities that employs a quantum superconductor, which is highly expensive and there are only three main world centers with this equipment This work investigates the use of a Si PIN-diode detector and a 238Pu source (13 and 17keV; 13%; 95.2mCi; 86y) for the measurement of Fe skin levels compatible with those associated to the disease β-thalassaemia. XRF spectra were analyzed using a set of AXIL-WinQXAS programs elaborated and disseminated by the IAEA. The determination coefficient of the calibration model (sensitivity curve) was 0.97. Measurements on skin phantoms containing concentrations of Fe in the range from 10 to 150 parts per million (ppm), indicate that we are able to detect Fe at levels of the order of 15ppm, using monitoring periods of 50 seconds and skin entrance dose less than 10 mSv, The literature reports skin Fe levels from 15.0 to 60.0 ppm in normal persons and from 70 to 150 ppm in thalassaemics patients. So, the employed methodology allows the measurement of the skin Fe concentration.

  13. In vivo evaluation of Fe in human skin employing X-Ray Fluorescence Methodology (XRF)

    SciTech Connect

    Estevam, M.; Appoloni, C. R.

    2007-02-12

    Recent technological improvements allow the method of in vivo XRF to provide useful sensibility for diagnostics or monitoring in biomedical applications. In cases of hereditary sanguine disorders as the {beta}-thalassaemia or a genetic disorder like Haemochromatosis, there is a high concentration of elements as Fe, Zn and Cu in the skin and internal organs, due to the treatment of those abnormalities or due to the own dysfunction caused by the disease. The levels of Fe related to the patient bearers of the {beta}-thalassaemia are determined, at the moment, measuring a protein in the sanguine current, called ferritin. The monitoring of the protein is ineffective in several situations, such as when the patient suffers any disturbance of health. Nowadays, the main forms of measuring the levels of those metals through hepatic storage are the biopsy of the liver, that is invasive and potentially dangerous, presenting a rate of mortality of 0.1%, and by means of magnetic susceptibilities that employs a quantum superconductor, which is highly expensive and there are only three main world centers with this equipment This work investigates the use of a Si PIN-diode detector and a 238Pu source (13 and 17keV; 13%; 95.2mCi; 86y) for the measurement of Fe skin levels compatible with those associated to the disease {beta}-thalassaemia. XRF spectra were analyzed using a set of AXIL-WinQXAS programs elaborated and disseminated by the IAEA. The determination coefficient of the calibration model (sensitivity curve) was 0.97. Measurements on skin phantoms containing concentrations of Fe in the range from 10 to 150 parts per million (ppm), indicate that we are able to detect Fe at levels of the order of 15ppm, using monitoring periods of 50 seconds and skin entrance dose less than 10 mSv, The literature reports skin Fe levels from 15.0 to 60.0 ppm in normal persons and from 70 to 150 ppm in thalassaemics patients. So, the employed methodology allows the measurement of the skin Fe

  14. Design and commissioning of a directly coupled in-vivo multiphoton microscope for skin imaging in humans and large animals

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mulholland, William J.; Kendall, Mark A.

    2004-02-01

    The application of near infrared multiphoton excitation to the laser-scanning microscope was first conceived by Denk, Strickler and Webb in 1990. Since then, advances in design have seen the multiphoton laser scanning microscope (MPLSM) applied to a wide range of biological research areas, including skin imaging and vaccine delivery. The technique has the attributes of low phototoxicity, high-resolution functional imaging to depths in scattered tissues. These characteristics have encouraged engineers and scientists to develop in-vivo imaging systems. For these applications, laser excitation pulses can be delivered to the sample through optical fibers. Although this solution provides a number of advantages relating to movement and flexibility of the site of interest relative to the laser source, the peak powers that can be delivered down the fiber are limited. We report on the design and commissioning of a directly coupled in-vivo MPM system, optimised for the imaging of epidermal vaccines delivered to a range of biological models and humans. Specifically, we seek to apply the system to visualise in-vivo, the influence of hand-held, helium powered needle-free systems on skin cells. A standard Nikon E600FN microscope, dissected above the optical plane was cantilevered from a vibration isolated table using rigid support arms. The modified microscope was coupled to an infrared optimised Bio-Rad Radiance 2100MP, multiphoton dedicated laser scanning control and image acquisition system. Femtosecond laser pulses were provided by a 10W Verdi pumped Mira Ti:Sapphire laser, from Coherent Inc. The microscope was modified such that the transmission half may be selectively attached for conventional imaging with ex-vivo and cell culture samples, or removed for in-vivo imaging of skin sites on the body of humans and large animals. Optical performance of the system, and aspects of its design and commissioning are discussed in this paper.

  15. Thermal transport characteristics of human skin measured in vivo using ultrathin conformal arrays of thermal sensors and actuators.

    PubMed

    Webb, R Chad; Pielak, Rafal M; Bastien, Philippe; Ayers, Joshua; Niittynen, Juha; Kurniawan, Jonas; Manco, Megan; Lin, Athena; Cho, Nam Heon; Malyrchuk, Viktor; Balooch, Guive; Rogers, John A

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of the thermal transport properties of the skin can reveal changes in physical and chemical states of relevance to dermatological health, skin structure and activity, thermoregulation and other aspects of human physiology. Existing methods for in vivo evaluations demand complex systems for laser heating and infrared thermography, or they require rigid, invasive probes; neither can apply to arbitrary regions of the body, offers modes for rapid spatial mapping, or enables continuous monitoring outside of laboratory settings. Here we describe human clinical studies using mechanically soft arrays of thermal actuators and sensors that laminate onto the skin to provide rapid, quantitative in vivo determination of both the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity, in a completely non-invasive manner. Comprehensive analysis of measurements on six different body locations of each of twenty-five human subjects reveal systematic variations and directional anisotropies in the characteristics, with correlations to the thicknesses of the epidermis (EP) and stratum corneum (SC) determined by optical coherence tomography, and to the water content assessed by electrical impedance based measurements. Multivariate statistical analysis establishes four distinct locations across the body that exhibit different physical properties: heel, cheek, palm, and wrist/volar forearm/dorsal forearm. The data also demonstrate that thermal transport correlates negatively with SC and EP thickness and positively with water content, with a strength of correlation that varies from region to region, e.g., stronger in the palmar than in the follicular regions.

  16. Thermal Transport Characteristics of Human Skin Measured In Vivo Using Ultrathin Conformal Arrays of Thermal Sensors and Actuators

    PubMed Central

    Webb, R. Chad; Pielak, Rafal M.; Bastien, Philippe; Ayers, Joshua; Niittynen, Juha; Kurniawan, Jonas; Manco, Megan; Lin, Athena; Cho, Nam Heon; Malyrchuk, Viktor; Balooch, Guive; Rogers, John A.

    2015-01-01

    Measurements of the thermal transport properties of the skin can reveal changes in physical and chemical states of relevance to dermatological health, skin structure and activity, thermoregulation and other aspects of human physiology. Existing methods for in vivo evaluations demand complex systems for laser heating and infrared thermography, or they require rigid, invasive probes; neither can apply to arbitrary regions of the body, offers modes for rapid spatial mapping, or enables continuous monitoring outside of laboratory settings. Here we describe human clinical studies using mechanically soft arrays of thermal actuators and sensors that laminate onto the skin to provide rapid, quantitative in vivo determination of both the thermal conductivity and thermal diffusivity, in a completely non-invasive manner. Comprehensive analysis of measurements on six different body locations of each of twenty-five human subjects reveal systematic variations and directional anisotropies in the characteristics, with correlations to the thicknesses of the epidermis (EP) and stratum corneum (SC) determined by optical coherence tomography, and to the water content assessed by electrical impedance based measurements. Multivariate statistical analysis establishes four distinct locations across the body that exhibit different physical properties: heel, cheek, palm, and wrist/volar forearm/dorsal forearm. The data also demonstrate that thermal transport correlates negatively with SC and EP thickness and positively with water content, with a strength of correlation that varies from region to region, e.g., stronger in the palmar than in the follicular regions. PMID:25658947

  17. Modeling the mechanical response of in vivo human skin under a rich set of deformations.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Cormac; Taberner, Andrew; Nielsen, Poul

    2011-07-01

    Determining the mechanical properties of an individual's skin is important in the fields of pathology, biomedical device design, and plastic surgery. To address this need, we present a finite element model that simulates the skin of the anterior forearm and posterior upper arm under a rich set of three-dimensional deformations. We investigated the suitability of the Ogden and Tong and Fung strain energy functions along with a quasi-linear viscoelastic law. Using non-linear optimization techniques, we found material parameters and in vivo pre-stresses for different volunteers. The model simulated the experiments with errors-of-fit ranging from 13.7 to 21.5%. Pre-stresses ranging from 28 to 92 kPa were estimated. We show that using only in-plane experimental data in the parameter optimization results in a poor prediction of the out-of-plane response. The identifiability of the model parameters, which are evaluated using different determinability criteria, improves by increasing the number of deformation orientations in the experiments.

  18. In vivo low-coherence spectroscopic measurements of local hemoglobin absorption spectra in human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosschaart, Nienke; Faber, Dirk J.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Aalders, Maurice C. G.

    2011-10-01

    Localized spectroscopic measurements of optical properties are invaluable for diagnostic applications that involve layered tissue structures, but conventional spectroscopic techniques lack exact control over the size and depth of the probed tissue volume. We show that low-coherence spectroscopy (LCS) overcomes these limitations by measuring local attenuation and absorption coefficient spectra in layered phantoms. In addition, we demonstrate the first in vivo LCS measurements of the human epidermis and dermis only. From the measured absorption in two distinct regions of the dermal microcirculation, we determine total hemoglobin concentration (3.0+/-0.5 g/l and 7.8+/-1.2 g/l) and oxygen saturation.

  19. In vivo low-coherence spectroscopic measurements of local hemoglobin absorption spectra in human skin.

    PubMed

    Bosschaart, Nienke; Faber, Dirk J; van Leeuwen, Ton G; Aalders, Maurice C G

    2011-10-01

    Localized spectroscopic measurements of optical properties are invaluable for diagnostic applications that involve layered tissue structures, but conventional spectroscopic techniques lack exact control over the size and depth of the probed tissue volume. We show that low-coherence spectroscopy (LCS) overcomes these limitations by measuring local attenuation and absorption coefficient spectra in layered phantoms. In addition, we demonstrate the first in vivo LCS measurements of the human epidermis and dermis only. From the measured absorption in two distinct regions of the dermal microcirculation, we determine total hemoglobin concentration (3.0±0.5 g∕l and 7.8±1.2 g∕l) and oxygen saturation.

  20. High-speed fiber-based polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography of in vivo human skin

    SciTech Connect

    Saxer, Christopher E.; Boer, Johannes F. de; Park, B. Hyle; Zhao, Yonghua; Chen, Zhongping; Nelson, J. Stuart

    2000-09-15

    A high-speed single-mode fiber-based polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS OCT) system was developed. With a polarization modulator, Stokes parameters of reflected flight for four input polarization states are measured as a function of depth. A phase modulator in the reference arm of a Michelson interferometer permits independent control of the axial scan rate and carrier frequency. In vivo PS OCT images of human skin are presented, showing subsurface structures that are not discernible in conventional OCT images. A phase retardation image in tissue is calculated based on the reflected Stokes parameters of the four input polarization states. (c) 2000 Optical Society of America.

  1. In vivo confocal microscopy of human skin: a new design for cosmetology and dermatology.

    PubMed

    Corcuff, P; Gonnord, G; Piérard, G E; Lévéque, J L

    1996-08-01

    In-depth exploration of cellular structures in living human skin in situ is possible with the tandem scanning microscope (TSM). However, the rigid design of the microscope limited observations to the arms, hands, and fingers. A mobile version allowing the investigation of any parts of the body has been designed. The head containing the Nipkow disk and the optical path were the only part saved from the original TSM. This prototype can be used to observe, in real time, the different skin structures down to a depth of 200 microns and to measure the thickness of the different layers with micron precision level. The hydration of the stratum corneum (SC) could be assessed. For example, lengthy immersion of the hand in water led to an increase in SC thickness without affecting that of the living epidermis. Occlusive patch tests also showed that water and, even more so. propylene glycol, led to transient swelling of the SC. In dermatology, the example of psoriasis illustrated the value of the TSM for describing, measuring, and assessing pathologic skin changes. The availability of this noninvasive method for observing changes with time in a given skin site should prove useful for monitoring treatment efficacy. This tool opens up new insight for the investigation of cutaneous pathophysiology.

  2. Wideband optical elastography of in vivo human skin using geometrically focused surface waves

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kearney, Steven P.; Dai, Zoujun; Royston, Thomas J.

    2014-02-01

    Viscoelastic models are fit to shear moduli derived from geometrically focused surface waves (GFS) on human skin using viscoelastic wave theory. Unlike in previous studies on the analytical solution and experimental measurement of radially outward traveling surface waves, measurable radially inward traveling GFS waves can be generated over a wider range of frequencies as attenuation is countered by the converging nature of the wavefront. This enables a more accurate and broader assessment of both the shear storage and loss moduli of the material, which are expected to vary with frequency. In the present study, GFS waves are applied to human skin on the posterior side of the forearm using a scanning LASER Doppler vibrometer. Surface wave measurements can then be used to estimate the complex frequency dependent viscoelastic properties of biological tissue, which are affected by numerous pathologies. Using a phantom gel this technique was validated through comparison with other studies. It was found that spring-pot and fractional Voigt models yield a potentially stable model parameter for skin, but more study is needed to confirm. [Work supported by NIH: Grant # EB012142.

  3. In vivo reflectance-mode confocal microscopy assessments: impact of overweight on human skin microcirculation and histomorphology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Altintas, Ahmet A.; Aust, Matthias C.; Krämer, Robert; Vogt, Peter M.; Altintas, Mehmet A.

    2016-03-01

    Reflectance-mode confocal microscopy (RCM) enables in vivo assessment of the human skin. Impact of overweight on both human skin microcirculation and histomorphology has not been investigated in vivo. The purpose of this study is to evaluate both microcirculation and histomorphology in vivo in overweight. In 10 normotensive overweight nondiabetic individuals (OW-group, BMI 29.1±2.7 kg/m2) and 10 age- and sex-matched healthy lean controls (CO-group, BMI 20.4±1.9 kg/m2) the following parameters were evaluated using RCM: dermal blood cell flow (DBCF), density of dermal capillaries (DDC), epidermal thickness (ET), and epidermal cell size (ECS). DBCF was counted at 63.11±4.14 cells/min in OW-group and at 51.06±3.84 cells/min in CO-group (P<0.05). DDC was reduced in OW-group (4.91±0.39 capillaries/mm2) compared to the controls (6.02±0.64 capillaries/mm2, P<0.05). Histometric evaluation of ET reveals thickening in OW-group compared to the CO-group (54.79±4.25 μm versus 44.03±3.11 μm, P<0.05). ECS differed significantly (P<0.05) in OW-group (821.3±42.02 μm2) compared to the controls (772.6±34.79 μm2). Inverse correlation of dermal capillary density and overweight point to reduced total tissue perfusion while positive related blood cell flow reveals vasodilatation. Increase of both ET and cell size indicates remodeling of cutaneous histomorphology, maybe as an early stage of adiposity-related skin condition.

  4. Motion correction of in vivo three-dimensional optical coherence tomography of human skin using a fiducial marker

    PubMed Central

    Liew, Yih Miin; McLaughlin, Robert A.; Wood, Fiona M.; Sampson, David D.

    2012-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method based on a fiducial marker for correction of motion artifacts in 3D, in vivo, optical coherence tomography (OCT) scans of human skin and skin scars. The efficacy of this method was compared against a standard cross-correlation intensity-based registration method. With a fiducial marker adhered to the skin, OCT scans were acquired using two imaging protocols: direct imaging from air into tissue; and imaging through ultrasound gel into tissue, which minimized the refractive index mismatch at the tissue surface. The registration methods were assessed with data from both imaging protocols and showed reduced distortion of skin features due to motion. The fiducial-based method was found to be more accurate and robust, with an average RMS error below 20 µm and success rate above 90%. In contrast, the intensity-based method had an average RMS error ranging from 36 to 45 µm, and a success rate from 50% to 86%. The intensity-based algorithm was found to be particularly confounded by corrugations in the skin. By contrast, tissue features did not affect the fiducial-based method, as the motion correction was based on delineation of the flat fiducial marker. The average computation time for the fiducial-based algorithm was approximately 21 times less than for the intensity-based algorithm. PMID:22876343

  5. Influence of microneedle shape on the transport of a fluorescent dye into human skin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Bal, Suzanne M; Kruithof, Annelieke C; Zwier, Raphaël; Dietz, Ekkehart; Bouwstra, Joke A; Lademann, Jürgen; Meinke, Martina C

    2010-10-15

    Microneedles can enhance the penetration of vaccines into the skin for transcutaneous vaccination. In this study for the first time the influence of microneedle geometry on the transport through the formed conduits was visualised in human volunteers by confocal laser scanning microscopy. Three differently shaped 300 μm long microneedle arrays were selected and fluorescein was applied either before or after piercing. Based on the intensity a distinction was made between regions with high and low intensity fluorescence (HIF and LIF). The areas of both intensities were quantified over time. In most cases HIF areas were only present in the stratum corneum, while LIF areas were also present in the viable epidermis. The areas were larger if fluorescein was applied after piercing compared to before piercing. After 15 min almost no HIF was present anymore at the skin surface. The microneedle geometry, but not the manner of application affected the shape and depth of the conduits. In conclusion we showed that the different microneedle arrays are able to form conduits in the skin, but the geometry of the microneedles influences the penetration of the fluorescent dye. This is the first step towards a more rational design of microneedle arrays for transcutaneous vaccination.

  6. In vivo characterization of structural and optical properties of human skin by combined photothermal radiometry and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Verdel, Nina; Marin, Ana; Vidovič, Luka; Milanič, Matija; Majaron, Boris

    2017-02-01

    We have combined two optical techniques to enable simultaneous assessment of structure and composition of human skin in vivo: Pulsed photothermal radiometry (PPTR), which involves measurements of transient dynamics in midinfrared emission from sample surface after exposure to a light pulse, and diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) in visible part of the spectrum. Namely, while PPTR is highly sensitive to depth distribution of selected absorbers, DRS provides spectral information and thus enables differentiation between various chromophores. The accuracy and robustness of the inverse analysis is thus considerably improved compared to use of either technique on its own. Our analysis approach is simultaneous multi-dimensional fitting of the measured PPTR signals and DRS with predictions from a numerical model of light-tissue interaction (a.k.a. inverse Monte Carlo). By using a three-layer skin model (epidermis, dermis, and subcutis), we obtain a good match between the experimental and modeling data. However, dividing the dermis into two separate layers (i.e., papillary and reticular dermis) helps to bring all assessed parameter values within anatomically and physiologically plausible intervals. Both the quality of the fit and the assessed parameter values depend somewhat on the assumed scattering properties for skin, which vary in literature and likely depend on subject's age and gender, anatomical site, etc. In our preliminary experience, simultaneous fitting of the scattering properties is possible and leads to considerable improvement of the fit. The described approach may thus have a potential for simultaneous determination of absorption and scattering properties of human skin in vivo.

  7. A broad-spectrum sunscreen prevents UVA radiation-induced gene expression in reconstructed skin in vitro and in human skin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Marionnet, Claire; Grether-Beck, Susanne; Seité, Sophie; Marini, Alessandra; Jaenicke, Thomas; Lejeune, François; Bastien, Philippe; Rougier, André; Bernerd, Françoise; Krutmann, Jean

    2011-06-01

    The efficacy of sunscreens to protect against ultraviolet (UV) A radiation is usually assessed by measuring erythema formation and pigmentation. The biological relevance of these endpoints for UVA-induced skin damage, however, is not known. We therefore carried out two complementary studies to determine UVA protection provided by a broad-spectrum sunscreen product at a molecular level by studying UVA radiation-induced gene expression. One study was performed on human reconstructed skin in vitro with a semi-global gene expression analysis of 227 genes in fibroblasts and 244 in keratinocytes. The second one was conducted in vivo in human volunteers and focused on genes involved in oxidative stress response and photo-ageing (haeme oxygenase-1, superoxide dismutase-2, glutathione peroxidase, catalase, matrix metalloproteinase-1). In-vitro UVA radiation induced modulation of genes involved in extracellular matrix homeostasis, oxidative stress, heat shock responses, cell growth, inflammation and epidermal differentiation. Sunscreen pre-application abrogated or significantly reduced these effects, as underlined by unsupervised clustering analysis. The in vivo study confirmed that the sunscreen prevented UVA radiation-induced transcriptional expression of the five studied genes. These findings indicate the high efficacy of a broad-spectrum sunscreen in protecting human skin against UVA-induced gene responses and suggest that this approach is a biologically relevant complement to existing methods.

  8. In-vivo multiphoton microscopy (MPM) of laser-induced optical breakdown (LIOB) in human skin (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Balu, Mihaela; Lentsch, Griffin; Korta, Dorota; Konig, Karsten; Kelly, Kristen M.; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Zachary, Christopher B.

    2017-02-01

    We use a multiphoton microscopy (MPM)-based clinical microscope (MPTflex, JenLab, Germany) to describe changes in human skin following treatment with a fractional non-ablative laser (PicoWay, Candela). The treatment was based on a fractionated picosecond Nd:YAG laser (1064 and 532nm, 3mJ and 1.5mJ (no attenuation), respectively maximum energy/pulse, 100 microbeams/6mmx6mm). Improvements in skin appearance resulting from treatment with this laser have been noted but optimizing the efficacy depends on a thorough understanding of the specific skin response to treatment. MPM is a nonlinear laser scanning microscopy technique that features sub-cellular resolution and label-free molecular contrast. MPM contrast in skin is derived from second-harmonic generation of collagen and two-photon excited fluorescence of NADH/FAD+, elastin, keratin, melanin. In this pilot study, two areas on the arm of a volunteer (skin type II) were treated with the picoWay laser (1064nm, 3mJ; 532nm, 1.5mJ; 1pass). The skin response to treatment was imaged in-vivo at 8 time points over the following 4 weeks. MPM revealed micro-injuries present in epidermis. Damaged individual cells were distinguished after 3h and 24h from treatment with both wavelengths. Pigmented cells were particularly damaged in the process, suggesting that melanin is the main absorber and the primary target for laser induced optical breakdown. At later time points, clusters of cellular necrotic debris were imaged across the treated epidermis. These results represent the groundwork for future longitudinal studies on expanded number of subjects to understand the response to treatment in different skin types at different laser parameters, critical factors in optimizing treatment outcomes.

  9. Vehicle and enhancer effects on human skin penetration of aminophylline from cream formulations: evaluation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wang, Lai-Hao; Wang, Chia-Chen; Kuo, Su-Ching

    2007-01-01

    The effects of four essential oils (rosemary, ylang, lilacin, and peppermint oils), and three plant oils (jojoba oil, corn germ oil, and olive oil) on the permeation of aminophylline were studied using human skin. The permeation effects of these oils were compared with those of three chemical penetration enhancers. Although all oils enhanced the permeation of aminophylline, their effects were less than that of ethanol. Jojoba oil was found to be the most active, causing about a 32% peak height decrease of N-H bending absorbances in comparison with the control, while peppermint, lilacin, rosemary, and ylang oils caused 28%, 24%, 18%, and 12% peak height decreases, respectively. Microemulsions containing 10% jojoba oil and 30% corn germ oil were found to be superior vehicles for the percutaneous absorption of aminophylline. Comparision with results obtained from high-performance liquid chromatography shows good agreement.

  10. Doppler standard deviation imaging for clinical monitoring of in vivo human skin blood flow

    SciTech Connect

    Zhao, Yonghua; Chen, Zhongping; Saxer, Christopher; Shen, Qimin; Xiang, Shaohua; Boer, Johannes F. de; Nelson, J. Stuart

    2000-09-15

    We used a novel phase-resolved optical Doppler tomographic (ODT) technique with very high flow-velocity sensitivity (10 {mu}m/s) and high spatial resolution (10 {mu}m) to image blood flow in port-wine stain (PWS) birthmarks in human skin. In addition to the regular ODT velocity and structural images, we use the variance of blood flow velocity to map the PWS vessels. Our device combines ODT and therapeutic systems such that PWS blood flow can be monitored in situ before and after laser treatment. To the authors' knowledge this is the first clinical application of ODT to provide a fast semiquantitative evaluation of the efficacy of PWS laser therapy in situ and in real time. (c) 2000 Optical Society of America.

  11. Evaluation of carotenoids and reactive oxygen species in human skin after UV irradiation: a critical comparison between in vivo and ex vivo investigations.

    PubMed

    Meinke, Martina C; Müller, Robert; Bechtel, Anne; Haag, Stefan F; Darvin, Maxim E; Lohan, Silke B; Ismaeel, Fakher; Lademann, Jürgen

    2015-03-01

    UV irradiation is one of the most harmful exogenous factors for the human skin. In addition to the development of erythema, free radicals, that is reactive oxygen species (ROS), are induced under its influence and promote the development of oxidative stress in the skin. Several techniques are available for determining the effect of UV irradiation. Resonance Raman spectroscopy (RRS) measures the reduction of the carotenoid concentration, while electron paramagnetic resonance (EPR) spectroscopy enables the analysis of the production of free radicals. Depending on the method, the skin parameters are analysed in vivo or ex vivo. This study provides a critical comparison between in vivo and ex vivo investigations on the ROS formation and carotenoid depletion caused by UV irradiation in human skin. The oxygen content of tissue was also determined. It was shown that the antioxidant status measured in the skin samples in vivo and ex vivo was different. The depletion in the carotenoid concentration in vivo exceeded the value determined ex vivo by a factor of about 1.5, and the radical formation after UV irradiation was significantly greater in vivo by a factor of 3.5 than that measured in excised human skin, which can be explained by the lack of oxygen ex vivo.

  12. An innovative application of a small-scale motion analysis technique to quantify human skin deformation in vivo.

    PubMed

    Mahmud, Jamaluddin; Holt, Cathy A; Evans, Sam L

    2010-03-22

    This study highlights a new experimental method developed to measure full-field deformation of human skin in vivo. The technique uses a small-scale Qualisys (Sweden) 3D motion capture system and an array of reflective markers placed on the forearm of five healthy volunteers. A load of up to 1.5N was applied to induce skin deformation by pulling a fine wire attached to the centre of the marker configuration. Loading and marker displacements were recorded simultaneously. 3D marker trajectory data was generated for three different load directions. Tests were repeated to investigate accuracy and repeatability. Calibration results indicate the accuracy of the motion capture system with an average residual of 0.05 mm. The procedure was found to be repeatable and accurate for five repeated tests of measured displacements with a maximum variance of 5%. Experimental data are presented to demonstrate robustness and the ability to produce significant outputs. For all five subjects, at 1N load, the mean and standard deviations of skin axial and lateral displacements were found to be 11.7+/-1.6mm and 12.3+/-3.3mm, respectively. The axial displacements ratio (u(90)/u(0)) ranges from 0.63 to 1.45 with mean+/-standard deviation of 0.982+/-0.34 and 0.982+/-0.32 for left and right arms, respectively. The experiments generated useful and accurate data that can be used to study the viscoelastic, hyperelastic or anisotropic behaviour of human skin. The measured displacements will be analysed further to determine the mechanical properties of skin using inverse Finite Element Analysis and Ogden model.

  13. Discrimination of non-melanoma skin lesions from non-tumor human skin tissues in vivo using Raman spectroscopy and multivariate statistics.

    PubMed

    Silveira, Fabricio L; Pacheco, Marcos T T; Bodanese, Benito; Pasqualucci, Carlos A; Zângaro, Renato A; Silveira, Landulfo

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy was used to discriminate human non-melanoma skin lesions from non-tumor tissues in vivo. This work proposed the discrimination between non-melanoma (basal cell carcinoma, BCC; squamous cell carcinoma, SCC) and pre-cancerous lesions (actinic keratosis, AK) from benign lesions and normal (non-tumor group, NT) tissues, using near-infrared Raman spectroscopy with a Raman probe. Prior to surgery, the spectra of suspicious lesions were obtained in situ. The spectra of adjacent, clinically normal skin were also obtained. Lesions were resectioned and submitted for histopathology. The Raman spectra were measured using a Raman spectrometer (830 nm). Two types of discrimination models were developed to distinguish the different histopathological groups. The principal components analysis discriminant analysis (PCA/DA) and the partial least squares discriminant analysis (PLS/DA) were based on Euclidean, quadratic and Mahalanobis distances. PCA and PLS spectral vectors showed spectral features of skin constituents, such as lipids (between 1,250 cm(-1) and 1,300 cm(-1) and at 1,450 cm(-1)) and proteins (between 870 cm(-1) and 940 cm(-1), 1,240 cm(-1) and 1,271 cm(-1), and at 1,000 cm(-1) and 1,450 cm(-1)). Despite the small spectral differences between malignant lesions and benign tissues, the algorithms discriminated the spectra of non-melanoma skin and pre-cancerous lesions from benign and normal tissues, with an overall accuracy of 82.8% and 91.9%, respectively. PCA and PLS could discriminate Raman spectra of skin tissues, opening the way for an in vivo optical diagnosis. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. In vitro and in vivo assessment of the effect of Laurus novocanariensis oil and essential oil in human skin.

    PubMed

    Viciolle, E; Castilho, P; Rosado, C

    2012-12-01

    Laurus novocanariensis is an endemic plant from the Madeira Island forest that derives a fatty oil, with a strong spicy odour, from its berries that has been used for centuries in traditional medicine to treat skin ailments. This work aimed to investigate the effect of the application of both the oil and its essential oil on normal skin, to assess their safety and potential benefits. Diffusion studies with Franz cells using human epidermal membranes were conducted. The steady-state fluxes of two model molecules through untreated skin were compared with those obtained after a 2-h pre-treatment with either the oil or the essential oil. Additionally, eleven volunteers participated in the in vivo study that was conducted on the forearm and involved daily application of the oil for 5 days. Measurements were performed every day in the treated site with bioengineering methods that measure erythema, irritation and loss of barrier function. Slightly higher steady-state fluxes were observed for both the lipophilic and the hydrophilic molecule when the epidermal membranes were pre-treated. Nevertheless, such differences had no statistical significance, which seems to confirm that neither the oil nor the essential oil impaired the epidermal barrier. Results collected with the Chromameter, the Laser Doppler Flowmeter and the visual scoring are in agreement with those established in the in vitro study. They indicate that the repeated application of the oil did not cause erythema, because the results observed in the first day of the study were maintained throughout the week. Application of the oil did not affect the skin barrier function, because the transepidermal water loss remained constant throughout the study. The stratum corneum hydration was slightly reduced on days 4 and 5. This work shows that both the oil and the essential oil were well tolerated by the skin and did not cause significant barrier impairment or irritation.

  15. Multiphoton excitation microscopy of in vivo human skin. Functional and morphological optical biopsy based on three-dimensional imaging, lifetime measurements and fluorescence spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Masters, B R; So, P T; Gratton, E

    1998-02-09

    Two-photon excitation microscopy has the potential as an effective, noninvasive, diagnostic tool for in vivo examination of human deep tissue structure at the subcellular level. By using infrared photons as the excitation source in two-photon microscopy, a significant improvement in penetration depth can be achieved because of the much lower tissue scattering and absorption coefficients in the infrared wavelengths. Two-photon absorption occurs primarily at the focal point and provides the physical basis for optical sectioning. Multiphoton excitation microscopy at 730 nm was used to image in vivo human skin autofluorescence from the surface to a depth of about 200 microns. The spectroscopic data suggest that reduced pyridine nucleotides, NAD(P)H, are the primary source of the skin autofluorescence using 730 nm excitation. This study demonstrates the use of multiphoton excitation microscopy for functional imaging of the metabolic states of in vivo human skin cells and provides a functional and morphological optical biopsy.

  16. Molecular events underlying maggot extract promoted rat in vivo and human in vitro skin wound healing.

    PubMed

    Li, Pei-Nan; Li, Hong; Zhong, Li-Xia; Sun, Yuan; Yu, Li-Jun; Wu, Mo-Li; Zhang, Lin-Lin; Kong, Qing-You; Wang, Shou-Yu; Lv, De-Cheng

    2015-01-01

    Maggot extracts promote wound healing, but their bioactive part(s) and molecular effects on the regenerating tissues/cells remain largely unclear. These issues are addressed here by treating rat skin wounds, human keratinocyte line/HaCat and fibroblasts with maggot secretion/excretion, and the extracts of maggots without and with secretion/excretion. The wound closure rates, cell proliferation activities, and statuses of wound healing-related signaling pathways (STAT3, Notch1, Wnt2, NF-κB, and TGF-beta/Smad3) and their downstream gene expression (c-Myc, cyclin D1, and VEGF) are evaluated by multiple approaches. The results reveal that the maggot extracts, especially the one from the maggots without secretion/excretion, show the best wound healing-promoting effects in terms of quicker wound closure rates and more rapid growth of keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Of the five signaling pathways checked, the ones mediated by TGF-beta/Smad3, and STAT3 are activated in the untreated wounds and become further enhanced by the maggot extracts, accompanied with c-Myc, VEGF, and cyclin D1 up-regulation. Our results thus show (1) that both body extract and secretion/excretion of maggots contain favorable wound healing elements and (2) that the enhancement of TGF-beta/Smad3 and STAT3 signaling activities may be the main molecular effects of maggot extracts on the wound tissues.

  17. Non-invasive short-term assessment of retinoids effects on human skin in vivo using multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Tancrède-Bohin, E; Baldeweck, T; Decencière, E; Brizion, S; Victorin, S; Parent, N; Faugere, J; Souverain, L; Bagot, M; Pena, A-M

    2015-04-01

    The occlusive patch test developed for assessing topical retinoids activity in human skin has been extended as a short-term screening protocol for anti-ageing agents. In this model, biopsies are performed at the end of the occlusion period for morphological and immuno-histochemistry analysis. Multiphoton microscopy is a recent non-invasive imaging technique that combined with image processing tools allows the in vivo quantification of human skin modifications. To validate with gold standards of anti-ageing that are retinoids, the relevance of multiphoton microscopy for kinetic and quantitative assessment in this model. Twenty women, aged 50-65 years, were enrolled. Retinol 0.3% (RO) and Retinoic acid 0.025% (RA) were applied to the dorsal photo-damaged side of their forearm under occlusive patches for 12 days. A patch alone was applied to a third area as control. Evaluation was performed at day D0, D12 (end of treatment), D18 and D32 using multiphoton microscopy. Epidermal thickness, normalized area of the dermal-epidermal junction (DEJ) and melanin density were estimated using 3D image processing tools. Main significant results are: Epidermal thickening at D12, D18 and D32 with RO and at D12, D18 with RA vs. baseline and vs. Increased DEJ undulation at D32 with RO and at D12 with RA vs. baseline and vs. Decreased melanin content with RO (at D12 and D18 vs. baseline and at D32 vs. baseline and vs. control) and with RA (at D12 vs. baseline). This study shows that multiphoton microscopy associated to specific 3D image processing tools allows cutaneous effects induced by topical retinoids in this in vivo model to be non-invasively detected, quantified and followed over time. This innovative approach could be applied to the evaluation of other active compounds. © 2014 European Academy of Dermatology and Venereology.

  18. An unsupervised machine learning method for delineating stratum corneum in reflectance confocal microscopy stacks of human skin in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bozkurt, Alican; Kose, Kivanc; Fox, Christi A.; Dy, Jennifer; Brooks, Dana H.; Rajadhyaksha, Milind

    2016-02-01

    Study of the stratum corneum (SC) in human skin is important for research in barrier structure and function, drug delivery, and water permeability of skin. The optical sectioning and high resolution of reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) allows visual examination of SC non-invasively. Here, we present an unsupervised segmentation algorithm that can automatically delineate thickness of the SC in RCM images of human skin in-vivo. We mimic clinicians visual process by applying complex wavelet transform over non-overlapping local regions of size 16 x 16 μm called tiles, and analyze the textural changes in between consecutive tiles in axial (depth) direction. We use dual-tree complex wavelet transform to represent textural structures in each tile. This transform is almost shift-invariant, and directionally selective, which makes it highly efficient in texture representation. Using DT-CWT, we decompose each tile into 6 directional sub-bands with orientations in +/-15, 45, and 75 degrees and a low-pass band, which is the decimated version of the input. We apply 3 scales of decomposition by recursively transforming the low-pass bands and obtain 18 bands of different directionality at different scales. We then calculate mean and variance of each band resulting in a feature vector of 36 entries. Feature vectors obtained for each stack of tiles in axial direction are then clustered using spectral clustering in order to detect the textural changes in depth direction. Testing on a set of 15 RCM stacks produced a mean error of 5.45+/-1.32 μm, compared to the "ground truth" segmentation provided by a clinical expert reader.

  19. In vivo optical coherence tomography imaging of dissolution of hyaluronic acid microneedles in human skin (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Song, Seungri; Kim, Jung Dong; Bae, Jung-hyun; Chang, Sooho; Kim, Soocheol; Lee, Hyungsuk; Jeong, Dohyeon; Kim, Hong Kee; Joo, Chulmin

    2017-02-01

    Transdermal drug delivery (TDD) has been recently highlighted as an alternative to oral delivery and hypodermic injections. Among many methods, drug delivery using a microneedle (MN) is one of the promising administration strategies due to its high skin permeability, mininal invasiveness, and ease of injection. In addition, microneedle-based TDD is explored for cosmetic and therapeutic purposes, rapidly developing market of microneedle industry for general population. To date, visualization of microneedles inserted into biological tissue has primarily been performed ex vivo. MRI, CT and ultrasound imaging do not provide sufficient spatial resolution, and optical microscopy is not suitable because of their limited imaging depth; structure of microneedles located in 0.2 1mm into the skin cannot be visulalized. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) is a non-invasive, cross-sectional optical imaging modality for biological tissue with high spatial resolution and acquisition speed. Compared with ultrasound imaging, it exhibits superior spatial resolution (1 10 um) and high sensitivity, while providing an imaging depth of biological tissue down to 1 2 mm. Here, we present in situ imaging and analysis of the penetration and dissolution characteristics of hyaluronic acid based MNs (HA-MN) with various needle heights in human skin in vivo. In contrast to other studies, we measured the actual penetration depths of the HA-MNs by considering the experimentally measured refractive index of HA in the solid state. For the dissolution dynamics of the HA-MNs, time-lapse structural alteration of the MNs could be clearly visualized, and the volumetric changes of the MNs were measured with an image analysis algorithm.

  20. Previous chronic exogenous glucocorticoid administration in vivo does not affect functional characteristics and cellular lifespan of human skin fibroblasts in vitro.

    PubMed

    Pratsinis, Harris; Dimozi, Anastasia; Pilichos, Konstantinos; Tsagarakis, Stylianos; Yiacoumettis, Andreas M; Kletsas, Dimitris

    2011-06-01

    Excess of glucocorticoids (GCs) has been reported to lead to skin atrophy and impaired wound healing. The present study investigates whether human skin fibroblasts suffer permanent damages due to a long-term exposure to GC excess. Fibroblasts obtained from patients being under GC treatment for periods over one year were cultured under standard conditions in vitro, and studied regarding pivotal parameters involved in skin homeostasis and aging, i.e. collagen production, cell proliferation, and cellular replicative lifespan. No statistical differences were observed regarding these functions compared to those of normal human skin fibroblasts. Furthermore, no differences between normal and patient-derived cells were observed regarding their sensitivity to a supra-physiological cortisol concentration. In conclusion, the prolonged exposure of human skin fibroblasts in vivo to high concentrations of exogenously-administered GC does not lead to persistent adverse effects on their physiology.

  1. Percutaneous absorption of PCBs from soil: In vivo rhesus monkey, in vitro human skin, and binding to powdered human stratum corneum

    SciTech Connect

    Wester, R.C.; Maibach, H.I.; Sedik, L.; Melendres, J.; Wade, M. )

    1993-07-01

    Polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) are ubiquitous and persistent environmental pollutants. The major resident site for these PCBs is the soil, and human skin is frequently in contact with soil. Our objective was to determine the percutaneous absorption of the PCBs Aroclor 1242 and Aroclor 1254 from soil. PCB-contaminated soil was prepared at levels of 44 ppm Aroclor 1242 and 23 ppm Aroclor 1254. PCB concentrations on skin were 1.75 micrograms/cm2 for Aroclor 1242 and 0.91 microgram/cm2 for Aroclor 1254. In vivo percutaneous absorption in the rhesus monkey was determined by urinary and fecal [14C]-PCB excretion for a 5-wk period following topical dosing. Absorption of Aroclor 1242 was determined in vitro with human skin for comparative purposes. In vivo in the rhesus monkey the percutaneous absorption of Aroclor 1242 was 13.8 +/- 2.7 (SD)% of the dose and the absorption of Aroclor 1254 was 14.1 +/- 1.0%. These absorption amounts are similar to the absorption of Aroclor 1242 and 1254 from other vehicles (mineral oil, trichlorobenzene, acetone). With in vitro percutaneous absorption through human skin, most of the Aroclor 1242 and Aroclor 1254 resided in the skin and the amounts were dependent upon dosing vehicle (water > mineral oil > soil). Both PCBs readily partitioned from water into soil and human powdered stratum corneum. By difference the partitioning favored both PCBs going from soil into stratum corneum. These data emphasize the role of soil in percutaneous absorption and provide information for appropriate risk assessment.

  2. In vivo confocal Raman spectroscopic analysis of the effects of IR radiation in the stratum corneum of human skin (Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajasekaran, Ramu; Bergamo Lopes, Monica; Magrini, Taciana D.; Figueira Lopes Cançado, Ana Clara; Abrahao Martin, Airton

    2017-02-01

    Stratum Corneum is the outer covering of the body, which serves as a barrier to infection. The composition of the skin changes withexternal environmental factors, such as temperature, sun irradiation, air pollutants, chemical hazards, as well as other factors.Solar radiation,especially IR radiation is being used as medicine for wound healing processes, in cosmetology, in physiotherapy and warming of muscles. Also, it was reported that the IR radiation produces free radicals and the excess production of free radicals causes irreversible damages. It has been reported that heat may be transmitted by IR radiation, which results in raised skin temperature and the chronic heat exposure of human skin may cause alterations. Erythema igne is one such disease known to be caused by chronic heat exposure. Many techniques have been adopted for monitoring the changes in the skin, which includes the tape stripping and biopsy as the primary methodology. However, these in vitro techniques are invasive, time consuming, and may not provide the actual information as in in vivo conditions. Confocal Raman spectroscopy,which is non-invasive and real time was considered as a potential tool for the in vivo analysis of the distribution and characteristics of different metabolic conditions and their variations of the skin. In this regard, we aimed at in vivo characterization of the IR induced changes in the stratum corneum of human volunteers. The results of Raman spectral signatures with respect to the control and IR exposed skin will be discussed.

  3. In vivo analysis of tissue by Raman microprobe: examination of human skin lesions and esophagus Barrett's mucosa on an animal model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tfayli, Ali; Piot, Olivier; Derancourt, Sylvie; Cadiot, Guillaume; Diebold, Marie D.; Bernard, Philippe; Manfait, Michel

    2006-02-01

    In the last few years, Raman spectroscopy has been increasingly used for the characterization of normal and pathological tissues. A new Raman system, constituted of optic fibers bundle coupled to an axial Raman spectrometer (Horiba Jobin Yvon SAS), was developed for in vivo investigations. Here, we present in vivo analysis on two tissues: human skin and esophagus mucosa on a rat model. The skin is a directly accessible organ, representing a high diversity of lesions and cancers. Including malignant melanoma, basal cell carcinoma and the squamous cell carcinoma, skin cancer is the cancer with the highest incidence worldwide. Several Raman investigations were performed to discriminate and classify different types of skin lesions, on thin sections of biopsies. Here, we try to characterize in vivo the different types of skin cancers in order to be able to detect them in their early stages of development and to define precisely the exeresis limits. Barrett's mucosa was also studied by in vivo examination of rat's esophagus. Barrett's mucosa, induced by gastro-esophageal reflux, is a pretumoral state that has to be carefully monitored due to its high risk of evolution in adenocarcinoma. A better knowledge of the histological transformation of esophagus epithelium in a Barrett's type will lead to a more efficient detection of the pathology for its early diagnosis. To study these changes, an animal model (rats developing Barrett's mucosa after duodenum - esophagus anastomosis) was used. Potential of vibrational spectroscopy for Barrett's mucosa identification is assessed on this model.

  4. Gaussian-function-based deconvolution method to determine the penetration ability of petrolatum oil into in vivo human skin using confocal Raman microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choe, Chun-Sik; Lademann, Jürgen; Darvin, Maxim E.

    2014-10-01

    Human skin pre-treated with petrolatum was analyzed in vivo using confocal Raman microscopy in order to determine the penetration depth of the oil into the skin. The broad Raman peak (2820-3030 cm-1) measured in vivo on human skin in the high wavenumber region exhibits two prominent main Raman peaks at 2880 cm-1 and 2935 cm-1 that originated from cutaneous lipids and keratin and two main peak shoulders at 2850 cm-1 and 2980 cm-1 that originated from lipids and keratin, respectively. Topical application of petrolatum oil onto the skin gives rise to an increase of the intensity of the broad lipid-keratin Raman peak (2820-3030 cm-1). Herewith, not only the intensity of the lipid part but also of the keratin part is increased, making the normalization to keratin and the determination of the petrolatum penetration profile erroneous. To solve this problem, the Gaussian-function-based deconvolution method is introduced in analyzing the Raman spectrum of the lipid-keratin peak and the least square method is applied for analyzing the petrolatum penetration profile. Results obtained in vivo show that the petrolatum oil does not penetrate deeper than 10 µm into intact human skin.

  5. In vitro-in vivo correlation in skin permeation.

    PubMed

    Mohammed, D; Matts, P J; Hadgraft, J; Lane, M E

    2014-02-01

    In vitro skin permeation studies have been used extensively in the development and optimisation of delivery of actives in vivo. However, there are few reported correlations of such in vitro studies with in vivo data. The aim of this study was to investigate the skin permeation of a model active, niacinamide, both in vitro and in vivo. Conventional diffusion cell studies were conducted in human skin to determine niacinamide permeation from a range of vehicles which included dimethyl isosorbide (DMI), propylene glycol (PG), propylene glycol monolaurate (PGML), N-methyl 2-pyrrolidone (NMP), Miglyol 812N® (MG), and mineral oil (MO). Single, binary or ternary systems were examined. The same vehicles were subsequently examined to investigate niacinamide delivery in vivo. For this proof-of-concept study one donor was used for the in vitro studies and one volunteer for the in vivo investigations to minimise biovariability. Analysis of in vitro samples was conducted using HPLC and in vivo uptake of niacinamide was evaluated using Confocal Raman spectroscopy (CRS). The amount of niacinamide permeated through skin in vitro was linearly proportional to the intensity of the niacinamide signal determined in the stratum corneum in vivo. A good correlation was observed between the signal intensities of selected vehicles and niacinamide signal intensity. The findings provide further support for the use of CRS to monitor drug delivery into and across the skin. In addition, the results highlight the critical role of the vehicle and its disposition in skin for effective dermal delivery.

  6. Intravital multiphoton tomography as a novel tool for non-invasive in vivo analysis of human skin affected with atopic dermatitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huck, Volker; Gorzelanny, Christian; Thomas, Kai; Niemeyer, Verena; Luger, Thomas A.; König, Karsten; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2010-02-01

    Atopic Dermatitis (AD) is an inflammatory disease of human skin. Its pathogenesis is still unknown; however, dysfunctions of the epidermal barrier and the immune response are regarded as key factors for the development of AD. In our study we applied intravital multiphoton tomography (5D-IVT), equipped with a spectral-FLIM module for in-vivo and ex-vivo analysis of human skin affected with AD. In addition to the morphologic skin analysis, FLIM technology gain access to the metabolic status of the epidermal cells referring to the NADH specific fluorescence lifetime. We evaluated a characteristic 5D-IVT skin pattern of AD in comparison to histological sections and detected a correlation with the disease activity measured by SCORAD. FLIM analysis revealed a shift of the mean fluorescence lifetime (taum) of NADH, indicating an altered metabolic activity. Within an ex-vivo approach we have investigated cryo-sections of human skin with or without barrier defects. Spectral-FLIM allows the detection of autofluorescent signals that reflect the pathophysiological conditions of the defect skin barrier. In our study the taum value was shown to be different between healthy and affected skin. Application of the 5D-IVT allows non-invasive in-vivo imaging of human skin with a penetration depth of 150 μm. We could show that affected skin could be distinguished from healthy skin by morphological criteria, by FLIM and by spectral-FLIM. Further studies will evaluate the application of the 5D-IVT technology as a diagnostic tool and to monitor the therapeutic efficacy.

  7. An in vivo randomized study of human skin moisturization by a new confocal Raman fiber-optic microprobe: assessment of a glycerol-based hydration cream.

    PubMed

    Chrit, L; Bastien, P; Sockalingum, G D; Batisse, D; Leroy, F; Manfait, M; Hadjur, C

    2006-01-01

    In a recent study, we demonstrated the ability of the new confocal Raman microprobe to investigate molecular and structural human skin composition under in vivo conditions. Experiments were performed at different anatomical sites, different layers, and with intervolunteer comparison. We also carried out feasibility tests using this probe to determine depth profiles of water content within the skin. In the present investigation we employed this confocal Raman optical microprobe to rigorously objectify the resulting hydration capacities after application of a moisturizing enhancer. The in vivo experiments were performed on 26 healthy volunteers and measurements were undertaken on six areas of the volar forearm after a randomized application of hydrating agents. Responses were evaluated by calculating the water/protein band ratio, which determines the water content in the skin. Data collected with the Raman microprobe showed significant changes between baseline values of control and treated skins. Statistical analysis performed on these data revealed an increase in skin moisture after application of a glycerol-based cream, which is the most widely used hydrating agent. Our results demonstrate clearly the potentials of this confocal Raman microprobe in the screening of hydrating agents or molecules under in vivo conditions. In the cosmetics field, this promising and suitable technique will undoubtedly offer new opportunities of hydration skin test evaluation. Copyright (c) 2006 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  8. Effectiveness of hand-cleansing formulations containing tea tree oil assessed ex vivo on human skin and in vivo with volunteers using European standard EN 1499.

    PubMed

    Messager, S; Hammer, K A; Carson, C F; Riley, T V

    2005-03-01

    The efficacy of formulations containing tea tree oil (TTO) has been assessed in vitro in previous studies. Products that passed the European suspension test guidelines were investigated further in this study, in vivo with volunteers using the European handwashing method (EN 1499) and ex vivo using freshly excised human skin samples. The activity of 5% TTO in 0.001% Tween 80, in a hygienic skin wash (HSW) and in an alcoholic hygienic skin wash (AHSW) was investigated and compared with that of a non-medicated soft soap (SS, control). These formulations were assessed against Escherichia coli K12 as recommended by the European standard. In-vivo results showed that 5% TTO in Tween 80 and the AHSW were significantly more active than the SS after 1 min of handwashing. When assessed ex vivo, these two products were also significantly more active than the reference soap after 1 min of rubbing. Both methods showed that 5% TTO in Tween 80 was generally, although not always, more active than a handwash formulation, and that the AHSW was generally more active than the HSW, although this difference was not significant. The formulations tested, as well as the SS, were more active when assessed in vivo than ex-vivo against E. coli, although only the SS and the HSW were significantly more active in vivo. There appeared to be a pattern in the comparison between ex vivo and in vivo results. The antiseptics tested were, on average, 1.28+/-0.06 times more active when assessed in-vivo than when assessed ex vivo. Nevertheless, the main outcome of the European handwashing method is for the formulation tested to be significantly more active than the SS; both 5% TTO in Tween 80 and the AHSW achieved this both in-vivo and ex-vivo. TTO in Tween 80 and in formulations met the European in-vivo method requirements.

  9. Measurement of complex permittivities of biological materials and human skin in vivo in the frequency band

    SciTech Connect

    Ghodgaonkar, D.K.

    1987-01-01

    A new method, namely, modified infinite sample method, has been developed which is particularly suitable for millimeter-wave dielectric measurements of biological materials. In this method, an impedance transformer is used which reduces the reflectivity of the biological sample. Because of the effect of introducing impendance transformer, the measured reflection coefficients are more sensitive to the complex permittivities of biological samples. For accurate measurement of reflection coefficients, two automated measurment systems were developed which cover the frequencies range of 26.5-60 GHz. An uncertainty analysis was performed to get an estimate of the errors in the measured complex permittivities. The dielectric properties were measured for 10% saline solution, whole human blood, 200 mg/ml bovine serum albumin (BSA) solution and suspension of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells. The Maxwell-Fricke equation, which is derived from dielectric mixture theory, was used for determination bound water in BSA solution. The results of all biological samples were interpreted by fitting Debye relaxation and Cole-Cole model. It is observed that the dielectric data for the biological materials can be explained on the basis of Debye relaxation of water molecule.

  10. In-vivo Measurement of Complex Relative Permittivity for Human Skin Tissues Using Open-Ended Coaxial Probe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sato, Yusuke; Hirata, Akimasa; Fujiwara, Osamu

    We made in-vivo measurement of the complex relative permittivity of palm and sole in the frequency range from 100 MHz to 40 GHz with a network analyzer and an open-ended coaxial probe, which was compared with Gabriel in-vitro data for skin tissue to reveal that the in-vivo measurement results are mostly lower than the in-vitro data. For validation, we measured the dielectric constant of Teflon sheet with respect to its thickness from 0.05 mm to 5.00 mm, which showed that the open-ended coaxial probe provides sufficient measurement accuracy for Teflon with a thickness of over 0.5 mm, however, the probe data can be affected by the material beneath the Teflon with a thickness of less than 0.5 mm. This means that the in-vivo palm data derive from the epidermis and the dermis including blood, while the in-vivo sole data come from the epidermis. For further investigation, under the assumption that in-vitro data derive from a mixture of epidermis and blood, we calculated the complex relative permittivity for the compound from the Litchtenecker's law of exponent to show a possibility that due to the inclusion of blood, in-vitro measurement may provide a higher relative permittivity than in-vivo measurement.

  11. Combined multi-modal photoacoustic tomography, optical coherence tomography (OCT) and OCT angiography system with an articulated probe for in vivo human skin structure and vasculature imaging

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Mengyang; Chen, Zhe; Zabihian, Behrooz; Sinz, Christoph; Zhang, Edward; Beard, Paul C.; Ginner, Laurin; Hoover, Erich; Minneman, Micheal P.; Leitgeb, Rainer A.; Kittler, Harald; Drexler, Wolfgang

    2016-01-01

    Cutaneous blood flow accounts for approximately 5% of cardiac output in human and plays a key role in a number of a physiological and pathological processes. We show for the first time a multi-modal photoacoustic tomography (PAT), optical coherence tomography (OCT) and OCT angiography system with an articulated probe to extract human cutaneous vasculature in vivo in various skin regions. OCT angiography supplements the microvasculature which PAT alone is unable to provide. Co-registered volumes for vessel network is further embedded in the morphologic image provided by OCT. This multi-modal system is therefore demonstrated as a valuable tool for comprehensive non-invasive human skin vasculature and morphology imaging in vivo. PMID:27699106

  12. Combined multi-modal photoacoustic tomography, optical coherence tomography (OCT) and OCT angiography system with an articulated probe for in vivo human skin structure and vasculature imaging.

    PubMed

    Liu, Mengyang; Chen, Zhe; Zabihian, Behrooz; Sinz, Christoph; Zhang, Edward; Beard, Paul C; Ginner, Laurin; Hoover, Erich; Minneman, Micheal P; Leitgeb, Rainer A; Kittler, Harald; Drexler, Wolfgang

    2016-09-01

    Cutaneous blood flow accounts for approximately 5% of cardiac output in human and plays a key role in a number of a physiological and pathological processes. We show for the first time a multi-modal photoacoustic tomography (PAT), optical coherence tomography (OCT) and OCT angiography system with an articulated probe to extract human cutaneous vasculature in vivo in various skin regions. OCT angiography supplements the microvasculature which PAT alone is unable to provide. Co-registered volumes for vessel network is further embedded in the morphologic image provided by OCT. This multi-modal system is therefore demonstrated as a valuable tool for comprehensive non-invasive human skin vasculature and morphology imaging in vivo.

  13. In vivo, high-resolution, three-dimensional imaging of port wine stain microvasculature in human skin.

    PubMed

    Liu, Gangjun; Jia, Wangcun; Nelson, J Stuart; Chen, Zhongping

    2013-12-01

    used to quantitatively image in vivo skin micro-vasculature. Analysis of the PWS and normal skin blood vessels were performed and the results can provide quantitative information to optimize laser treatment on an individual patient basis. © 2013 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  14. Mechanical characterisation of in vivo human skin using a 3D force-sensitive micro-robot and finite element analysis.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Cormac; Taberner, Andrew; Nielsen, Poul

    2011-02-01

    The complex mechanical properties of skin have been the subject of much study in recent years. Several experimental methods developed to measure the mechanical properties of skin in vivo, such as suction or torsion, are unable to measure skin's anisotropic characteristics. An experiment characterising the mechanical properties of in vivo human skin using a novel force-sensitive micro-robot is presented. The micro-robot applied in-plane deformations to the anterior forearm and the posterior upper arm. The behaviour of the skin in each area is highly nonlinear, anisotropic, and viscoelastic. The response of the upper arm skin is very dependent on the orientation of the arm. A finite element model consisting of an Ogden strain energy function and quasi-linear viscoelasticity was developed to simulate the experiments. An orthogonal initial stress field, representing the in vivo skin tension, was used as an additional model parameter. The model simulated the experiments accurately with an error-of-fit of 17.5% for the anterior lower forearm area, 6.5% for the anterior upper forearm and 9.3% for the posterior upper arm. The maximum in vivo tension in each area determined by the model was 6.2 Nm(-1) in the anterior lower forearm, 11.4 Nm(-1) in anterior upper forearm and 5.6 Nm(-1) in the posterior upper arm. The results also show that a finite element model with a neo-Hookean strain energy function cannot simulate the experiments with the same accuracy.

  15. Non-invasive in-vivo Raman spectroscopic measurement of the dynamics of the antioxidant substance lycopene in the human skin after a dietary supplementation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darvin, M. E.; Gersonde, I.; Albrecht, H.; Sterry, W.; Lademann, J.

    2007-05-01

    A non-invasive optical method based on resonance Raman spectroscopy was used for the in vivo detection of the concentration of the carotenoid antioxidant substance lycopene in the human skin. The physiological variation of the level of lycopene in the skin during a 6 month period was measured daily in 7 volunteers. It was shown that all volunteers had a different individual level of lycopene in the skin, depending on the lifestyle of volunteers. It was shown that the supplementation of the foodstuffs containing lycopene, such as tomato products and some fruits, increases the level of lycopene in the skin. The increase in the lycopene level can be usually observed on the next day after the supplementation. The present results demonstrate that a diet rich in products containing a high amount of carotenoids, such as lycopene, can be an efficient strategy to increase the carotenoid level of the skin.

  16. Effects of various vehicles on skin hydration in vivo.

    PubMed

    Wiedersberg, S; Leopold, C S; Guy, R H

    2009-01-01

    The stratum corneum, the outermost layer of the skin, regulates the passive loss of water to the environment. Furthermore, it is well accepted that drug penetration is influenced by skin hydration, which may be manipulated by the application of moisturizing or oleaginous vehicles. Measurements of transepidermal water loss (TEWL), and of skin hydration using a corneometer, were used to assess the effect of different vehicles on stratum corneum barrier function in vivo in human volunteers. A microemulsion significantly increased skin hydration relative to a reference vehicle based on medium chain triglycerides; in contrast, Transcutol(R) lowered skin hydration. TEWL measurements confirmed these observations. Copyright 2009 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  17. Application of the critical angle method to refractive index measurement of human skin in vivo under partial contact.

    PubMed

    Yoshida, Kenichiro; Ohkubo, Kohji; Ojima, Nobutoshi; Iwata, Kayoko

    2013-03-01

    We adapted the critical angle method for measuring rough surfaces under partial contact to acquire an in vivo skin refractive index (RI). Assuming that the total reflection is the simple sum of reflection from areas that are in contact and reflection from those that are not in contact, the RI can be estimated even for partial contact with a rough surface. We found that cheek skin is sufficiently soft that a sufficiently large area can be in contact and that the critical angle was detectable. The RIs of the cheeks of adult females were measured. The RI range was about 1.51 to 1.53, at a wavelength of 550 nm, without considering systematic errors. The RIs of cheeks are significantly correlated with their conductance, which corresponds to their water content. We determined the relationship between the RI and conductance within the variation of skin under normal conditions; this relationship was theoretically obtained in previous studies. In the present study, a direct in vivo measurement method was developed that enabled us to measure the RI in daily life, although this method contains errors for several reasons, including disregarding absorption.

  18. In vivo confocal Raman microspectroscopy of the human skin: highlighting of spectral markers associated to aging via a research of correlation between Raman and biometric mechanical measurements.

    PubMed

    Eklouh-Molinier, Christophe; Gaydou, Vincent; Froigneux, Emmanuel; Barlier, Pascale; Couturaud, Virginie; Manfait, Michel; Piot, Olivier

    2015-11-01

    Skin plays a protective role against the loss of water and external aggression, including mechanical stresses. These crucial functions are ensured by different cutaneous layers, particularly the stratum corneum (SC). During aging, the human skin reveals some apparent modifications of functionalities such as a loss of elasticity. Our investigations aimed at demonstrating that Raman microspectroscopy, as a label-free technique with a high molecular specificity, is efficient to assess in vivo the molecular composition of the skin and the alterations underwent during aging. Our approach was based on a search for correlation between Raman data collected on healthy female volunteers of different ages (from 21 to 70 years old) by means of a remote confocal Raman and skin firmness measurements used as a reference method. Raman and biometric data were then submitted to a partial least square (PLS)-based data processing. Our experiments demonstrated the potential of Raman microspectroscopy to provide an objective in vivo assessment of the skin "biological age" that can be very different from the "chronological age" of the person. In addition, Raman features sensitive to the elasticity and the fatigability of the SC were highlighted. Thereafter, calibration transfer functions were constructed to show the possibility to compare the results obtained during two distinct measurement campaigns conducted with two Raman probes of the same conception. This approach could lead to several interesting prospects, in particular by objectifying the effects of dermocosmetic products on the superficial layers of the skin and by accessing some underlying molecular mechanisms.

  19. Far-infrared in vivo signature of human skin by terahertz time-domain spectroscopy using waveform rebuilding technology

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Xiangjun; Liu, Jianjun; Hong, Zhi

    2010-11-01

    We present terahertz time-domain spectroscopy characterization of human thumb skin in reflection measurement mode with waveform rebuilding technology. The thumb skin contacts one side of a high resistive silicon wafer with 3 mm thick, and here is an orthogonal incidence of the THz pulse putting on the other side of the wafer. We rebuild the time domain signal from silicon-skin interface as a sample signal by the signal from the air-silicon interface as a reference and a Fresnel transform function between them. Material parameters were calculated by minimizing the difference between the measured sample waveform and a rebuilt one in time domain. The double Debye model parameters for the thumb skin were fitted. The method has potential to research complex layer-structures in skin if a precise model is built.

  20. Changes in S100A8 expression in UV-irradiated and aged human skin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Mee; Kim, Yeon Kyung; Eun, Hee Chul; Chung, Jin Ho

    2009-08-01

    S100A8, a calcium-binding protein, is associated with keratinocyte differentiation, inflammation and wound healing. S100A8 is induced by various skin stresses and diseases, which suggests that S100A8 plays a role in those processes. However, it has not been reported how the expression of S100A8 is affected during skin aging or whether S100A8 plays a role in the skin aging process. In this study, we investigated the changes in S100A8 mRNA and protein following acute UV irradiation to human buttock skin and by intrinsic aging and photoaging in human sun-protected (upper-inner arm) and sun-exposed (forearm) skin of elderly subjects. Real-time PCR, western blot and immunohistochemical staining analyses of UV-irradiated young buttock skin revealed that S100A8 protein expression was increased at 24 h (3.0-fold) and 48 h (4.4-fold) after UV irradiation. S100A8 mRNA and protein were more highly expressed by 2.3- and 4.0-fold, respectively, in the sun-protected skin of elderly people than in that of young people. In addition, the sun-exposed skin of elderly expressed more S100A8 mRNA and protein than the sun-protected skin of the same individuals. In immunohistochemical staining, facial (photoaged) skin > or = 72 years showed higher epidermal expression of S100A8 than that of the other age groups. Based on the above results, our data suggest that the expression of S100A8 is affected by acute UV irradiation, intrinsic aging and photoaging processes.

  1. Comparative evaluation of the effect of permeation enhancers, lipid nanoparticles and colloidal silica on in vivo human skin penetration of quercetin.

    PubMed

    Scalia, S; Franceschinis, E; Bertelli, D; Iannuccelli, V

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this study was to evaluate emulsions containing a penetration enhancer, lipid nanoparticles (LNs) or colloidal silica as systems to improve the topical delivery of the flavonoid quercetin. The skin penetration of quercetin was investigated in vivo on human volunteers by tape stripping. Quercetin-loaded LNs were prepared using hot high-pressure homogenization and characterized by means of dynamic light scattering and release studies. The location of the silica nanoparticles in the skin was determined by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry assay of silicon in the stratum corneum strips. The penetration enhancer diethylene glycol monoethyl ether did not produce any significant increase in the fraction of the applied quercetin dose permeated in vivo into human stratum corneum (17.1 ± 3.2%) compared to the control emulsion (18.1 ± 2.3%). A greater but statistically nonsignificant accumulation of the flavonoid in the human horny layer (21.2 ± 2.9% of the applied dose) was measured following topical application of quercetin-loaded LNs (mean particle size: 527 nm). On the other hand, the addition of colloidal silica (average particle diameter: 486 nm) to the emulsion (2%, w/w) significantly increased the in vivo uptake of quercetin by the human stratum corneum to 26.7 ± 4.1% of the applied dose, the enhancing effect on permeation being more marked in the deepest horny layer strips. The measured in vivo skin penetration profile of colloidal silica showed that silica particles diffused down to the intermediate region of the human horny layer and hence could act as carrier for quercetin. Copyright © 2012 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  2. Atomic Hydrogen Surrounded by Water Molecules, H(H2O)m, Modulates Basal and UV-Induced Gene Expressions in Human Skin In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Shin, Mi Hee; Park, Raeeun; Nojima, Hideo; Kim, Hyung-Chel; Kim, Yeon Kyung; Chung, Jin Ho

    2013-01-01

    Recently, there has been much effort to find effective ingredients which can prevent or retard cutaneous skin aging after topical or systemic use. Here, we investigated the effects of the atomic hydrogen surrounded by water molecules, H(H2O)m, on acute UV-induced responses and as well as skin aging. Interestingly, we observed that H(H2O)m application to human skin prevented UV-induced erythema and DNA damage. And H(H2O)m significantly prevented UV-induced MMP-1, COX-2, IL-6 and IL-1β mRNA expressions in human skin in vivo. We found that H(H2O)m prevented UV-induced ROS generation and inhibited UV-induced MMP-1, COX-2 and IL-6 expressions, and UV-induced JNK and c-Jun phosphorylation in HaCaT cells. Next, we investigated the effects of H(H2O)m on intrinsically aged or photoaged skin of elderly subjects. In intrinsically aged skin, H(H2O)m application significantly reduced constitutive expressions of MMP-1, IL-6, and IL-1β mRNA. Additionally, H(H2O)m significantly increased procollagen mRNA and also decreased MMP-1 and IL-6 mRNA expressions in photoaged facial skin. These results demonstrated that local application of H(H2O)m may prevent UV-induced skin inflammation and can modulate intrinsic skin aging and photoaging processes. Therefore, we suggest that modifying the atmospheric gas environment within a room may be a new way to regulate skin functions or skin aging. PMID:23637886

  3. Measurements of the thermal coefficient of optical attenuation at different depth regions of in vivo human skins using optical coherence tomography: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Su, Ya; Yao, X Steve; Li, Zhihong; Meng, Zhuo; Liu, Tiegen; Wang, Longzhi

    2015-02-01

    We present detailed measurement results of optical attenuation's thermal coefficients (referenced to the temperature of the skin surface) in different depth regions of in vivo human forearm skins using optical coherence tomography (OCT). We first design a temperature control module with an integrated optical probe to precisely control the surface temperature of a section of human skin. We propose a method of using the correlation map to identify regions in the skin having strong correlations with the surface temperature of the skin and find that the attenuation coefficient in these regions closely follows the variation of the surface temperature without any hysteresis. We observe a negative thermal coefficient of attenuation in the epidermis. While in dermis, the slope signs of the thermal coefficient of attenuation are different at different depth regions for a particular subject, however, the depth regions with a positive (or negative) slope are different in different subjects. We further find that the magnitude of the thermal coefficient of attenuation coefficient is greater in epidermis than in dermis. We believe the knowledge of such thermal properties of skins is important for several noninvasive diagnostic applications, such as OCT glucose monitoring, and the method demonstrated in this paper is effective in studying the optical and biological properties in different regions of skin.

  4. Measurements of the thermal coefficient of optical attenuation at different depth regions of in vivo human skins using optical coherence tomography: a pilot study

    PubMed Central

    Su, Ya; Yao, X. Steve; Li, Zhihong; Meng, Zhuo; Liu, Tiegen; Wang, Longzhi

    2015-01-01

    We present detailed measurement results of optical attenuation’s thermal coefficients (referenced to the temperature of the skin surface) in different depth regions of in vivo human forearm skins using optical coherence tomography (OCT). We first design a temperature control module with an integrated optical probe to precisely control the surface temperature of a section of human skin. We propose a method of using the correlation map to identify regions in the skin having strong correlations with the surface temperature of the skin and find that the attenuation coefficient in these regions closely follows the variation of the surface temperature without any hysteresis. We observe a negative thermal coefficient of attenuation in the epidermis. While in dermis, the slope signs of the thermal coefficient of attenuation are different at different depth regions for a particular subject, however, the depth regions with a positive (or negative) slope are different in different subjects. We further find that the magnitude of the thermal coefficient of attenuation coefficient is greater in epidermis than in dermis. We believe the knowledge of such thermal properties of skins is important for several noninvasive diagnostic applications, such as OCT glucose monitoring, and the method demonstrated in this paper is effective in studying the optical and biological properties in different regions of skin. PMID:25780740

  5. Recovery of aging-related size increase of skin epithelial cells: in vivo mouse and in vitro human study.

    PubMed

    Sokolov, Igor; Guz, Natali V; Iyer, Swaminathan; Hewitt, Amy; Sokolov, Nina A; Erlichman, Joseph S; Woodworth, Craig D

    2015-01-01

    The size increase of skin epithelial cells during aging is well-known. Here we demonstrate that treatment of aging cells with cytochalasin B substantially decreases cell size. This decrease was demonstrated on a mouse model and on human skin cells in vitro. Six nude mice were treated by topical application of cytochalasin B on skin of the dorsal left midsection for 140 days (the right side served as control for placebo treatment). An average decrease in cell size of 56±16% resulted. A reduction of cell size was also observed on primary human skin epithelial cells of different in vitro age (passages from 1 to 8). A cell strain obtained from a pool of 6 human subjects was treated with cytochalasin B in vitro for 12 hours. We observed a decrease in cell size that became statistically significant and reached 20-40% for cells of older passage (6-8 passages) whereas no substantial change was observed for younger cells. These results may be important for understanding the aging processes, and for cosmetic treatment of aging skin.

  6. Recovery of Aging-Related Size Increase of Skin Epithelial Cells: In vivo Mouse and In vitro Human Study

    PubMed Central

    Sokolov, Igor; Guz, Natali V.; Iyer, Swaminathan; Hewitt, Amy; Sokolov, Nina A.; Erlichman, Joseph S.; Woodworth, Craig D.

    2015-01-01

    The size increase of skin epithelial cells during aging is well-known. Here we demonstrate that treatment of aging cells with cytochalasin B substantially decreases cell size. This decrease was demonstrated on a mouse model and on human skin cells in vitro. Six nude mice were treated by topical application of cytochalasin B on skin of the dorsal left midsection for 140 days (the right side served as control for placebo treatment). An average decrease in cell size of 56±16% resulted. A reduction of cell size was also observed on primary human skin epithelial cells of different in vitro age (passages from 1 to 8). A cell strain obtained from a pool of 6 human subjects was treated with cytochalasin B in vitro for 12 hours. We observed a decrease in cell size that became statistically significant and reached 20–40% for cells of older passage (6–8 passages) whereas no substantial change was observed for younger cells. These results may be important for understanding the aging processes, and for cosmetic treatment of aging skin. PMID:25807526

  7. Intravital multiphoton tomography as an appropriate tool for non-invasive in vivo analysis of human skin affected with atopic dermatitis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Huck, Volker; Gorzelanny, Christian; Thomas, Kai; Mess, Christian; Dimitrova, Valentina; Schwarz, Martin; Riemann, Iris; Niemeyer, Verena; Luger, Thomas A.; König, Karsten; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2011-03-01

    Increasing incidence of inflammatory skin diseases such as Atopic Dermatitis (AD) has been noted in the past years. According to recent estimations around 15% of newborn subjects are affected with a disease severity that requires medical treatment. Although its pathogenesis is multifactorial, recent reports indicate that an impaired physical skin barrier predispose for the development of AD. The major part of this barrier is formed by the stratum corneum (SC) wherein corneocytes are embedded in a complex matrix of proteins and lipids. Its components were synthesized in the stratum granulosum (SG) and secreted via lamellar bodies at the SC/SG interface. Within a clinical in vivo study we focused on the skin metabolism at the SC/SG interface in AD affected patients in comparison to healthy subjects. Measurement of fluorescence life-time of NADH provides access to the metabolic state of skin. Due to the application of a 5D intravital tomographic skin analysis we facilitate the non-invasive investigation of human epidermis in the longitudinal course of AD therapy. We could ascertain by blinded analysis of 40 skin areas of 20 patients in a three month follow-up that the metabolic status at the SC/SG interface was altered in AD compromised skin even in non-lesional, apparent healthy skin regions. This illustrates an impaired skin barrier formation even at non-affected skin of AD subjects appearing promotive for the development of acute skin inflammation. Therefore, our findings allow a deeper understanding of the individual disease development and the improved management of the therapeutic intervention in clinical application.

  8. Responsive corneosurfametry following in vivo skin preconditioning.

    PubMed

    Uhoda, E; Goffin, V; Pierard, G E

    2003-12-01

    Skin is subjected to many environmental threats, some of which altering the structure and function of the stratum corneum. Among them, surfactants are recognized factors that may influence irritant contact dermatitis. The present study was conducted to compare the variations in skin capacitance and corneosurfametry (CSM) reactivity before and after skin exposure to repeated subclinical injuries by 2 hand dishwashing liquids. A forearm immersion test was performed on 30 healthy volunteers. 2 daily soak sessions were performed for 5 days. At inclusion and the day following the last soak session, skin capacitance was measured and cyanoacrylate skin-surface strippings were harvested. The latter specimens were used for the ex vivo microwave CSM. Both types of assessments clearly differentiated the 2 hand dishwashing liquids. The forearm immersion test allowed the discriminant sensitivity of CSM to increase. Intact skin capacitance did not predict CSM data. By contrast, a significant correlation was found between the post-test conductance and the corresponding CSM data. In conclusion, a forearm immersion test under realistic conditions can discriminate the irritation potential between surfactant-based products by measuring skin conductance and performing CSM. In vivo skin preconditioning by surfactants increases CSM sensitivity to the same surfactants.

  9. Flurbiprofen PLGA-PEG nanospheres: role of hydroxy-β-cyclodextrin on ex vivo human skin permeation and in vivo topical anti-inflammatory efficacy.

    PubMed

    Vega, Estefanía; Egea, M Antònia; Garduño-Ramírez, M Luisa; García, M Luisa; Sánchez, Elena; Espina, Marta; Calpena, Ana Cristina

    2013-10-01

    In this study, flurbiprofen (FB) loaded poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and PLGA with poly(ethylene glycol) (PLGA-PEG) nanospheres (NSs) with and without hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HPβCD) were developed as skin controlled delivery systems. X-ray diffraction was used to determine the physical state of the entrapped drug. Results showed that the drug in PLGA NSs was present in the form of a molecular dispersion (dissolved state) in the polymers, whereas in PLGA-PEG NSs, the drug was present in both molecular dispersion and crystalline forms. Furthermore, HPβCD provided solubilization of the free FB present on the surface of the PLGA-PEG NSs and a complete amorphosization of the drug was obtained. Optical analyses using TurbiscanLab(®) demonstrated that HPβCD provided an efficient steric stability of the NSs, preventing particle aggregation. The ex vivo permeation profiles of the NSs and conventional FB solution were evaluated using human skin. Results demonstrated that only PLGA-PEG NSs showed slight permeation improvement. However, after 24h, the FB retained in the skin was about 9-fold higher with NSs compared with the control solution, attributed to the reservoir effect of NSs acting as a depot, sustaining the drug and limiting its systemic absorption. In vivo performance of NSs was evaluated by assessing anti-inflammatory efficacy in TPA-induced mouse ear edema. Topically applied NSs significantly decreased in vivo inflammation compared to the control solution and the anti-inflammatory efficacy of HPβCD NSs was stronger than NSs without HPβCD. In vivo skin irritation evaluated by the in vivo Draize test showed no irritation of the formulations tested. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  10. In-vivo fluorescence dosimetry of aminolevulinate-based protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) accumulation in human nonmelanoma skin cancers and precancers

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Warren, Christine B.; Lohser, Sara; Chang, Sung; Bailin, Philip A.; Maytin, Edward V.

    2009-06-01

    PDT is clinically useful for precancers (actinic keratoses; AK) of the skin, but the optimal duration for 5-ALA application is still controversial. For basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC), cure rates remain inferior to surgical excision. Lack of knowledge about regional levels of PpIX levels within target tissues clearly contribute to these suboptimal results. To investigate PpIX levels achievable in human skin neoplasias in-vivo, a clinical study to monitor PpIX accumulation in vivo was performed. PpIX-fluorescence in patients undergoing ALA-PDT for facial AK was monitored via real-time in-vivo fluorescence dosimetry, with measurements q20 min following application of 5-ALA (Levulan Kerastick). PpIX accumulation followed linear kinetics in nearly all cases. The slopes varied widely, and did not correlate with clinical outcome in all patients. Some patients with a low accumulation of PpIX fluorescence had a good response to therapy, whereas others with high PpIX accumulation required repeat treatment (although not necessarily of the same lesion). PpIX accumulation rates did correlate to a certain degree with the overall amount of erythema. We conclude that unknown factors besides PpIX levels must be critical for the response to treatment. To assess the relationship between PpIX levels in various skin cancers, patients undergoing routine Mohs surgery for BCC or SCC were measured by in-vivo dosimetry at 2 h after 5-ALA application. Overall, a progressive increase in PpIX signal during malignant progression was observed, in the following rank order: Normal skin < AK < SCC ~ BCC.

  11. Changes in the redox state and endogenous fluorescence of in vivo human skin due to intrinsic and photo-aging, measured by multiphoton tomography with fluorescence lifetime imaging.

    PubMed

    Sanchez, Washington Y; Obispo, Clara; Ryan, Elizabeth; Grice, Jeffrey E; Roberts, Michael S

    2013-06-01

    Ultraviolet radiation from solar exposure is a key extrinsic factor responsible for premature skin aging (i.e., photo-aging). Recent advances using in vivo multiphoton tomography (MPT) demonstrate the efficacy of this approach to assess intrinsic and extrinsic skin aging as an alternative to existing invasive techniques. In this study, we measured changes in epidermal autofluorescence, dermal collagen second harmonic generation (SHG), and the redox state of solar-exposed and solar-protected human skin by MPT with fluorescence lifetime imaging (MPT-FLIM). Twenty-four volunteers across four age categories (20 to 29, 30 to 39, 40 to 49, and 50 to 59 years old; six volunteers each) were recruited for MPT-FLIM imaging of the dorsal (solar-exposed; photo-damaged) and volar (solar-protected) forearm. We demonstrate a higher intensity of dermal collagen SHG within the volar forearm compared to dorsal solar-exposed skin. Redox imaging of each epidermal skin stratum by FLIM demonstrates an increase in fluorescence lifetime in the solar-exposed dorsal forearm that is more apparent in aged skin. The results of this study suggest the redox state of the viable epidermis is a key marker in assessing intrinsic and photo-damage skin aging, in combination with changes in autofluorescence and SHG.

  12. Changes in the redox state and endogenous fluorescence of in vivo human skin due to intrinsic and photo-aging, measured by multiphoton tomography with fluorescence lifetime imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sanchez, Washington Y.; Obispo, Clara; Ryan, Elizabeth; Grice, Jeffrey E.; Roberts, Michael S.

    2013-06-01

    Ultraviolet radiation from solar exposure is a key extrinsic factor responsible for premature skin aging (i.e., photo-aging). Recent advances using in vivo multiphoton tomography (MPT) demonstrate the efficacy of this approach to assess intrinsic and extrinsic skin aging as an alternative to existing invasive techniques. In this study, we measured changes in epidermal autofluorescence, dermal collagen second harmonic generation (SHG), and the redox state of solar-exposed and solar-protected human skin by MPT with fluorescence lifetime imaging (MPT-FLIM). Twenty-four volunteers across four age categories (20 to 29, 30 to 39, 40 to 49, and 50 to 59 years old; six volunteers each) were recruited for MPT-FLIM imaging of the dorsal (solar-exposed; photo-damaged) and volar (solar-protected) forearm. We demonstrate a higher intensity of dermal collagen SHG within the volar forearm compared to dorsal solar-exposed skin. Redox imaging of each epidermal skin stratum by FLIM demonstrates an increase in fluorescence lifetime in the solar-exposed dorsal forearm that is more apparent in aged skin. The results of this study suggest the redox state of the viable epidermis is a key marker in assessing intrinsic and photo-damage skin aging, in combination with changes in autofluorescence and SHG.

  13. In vivo percutaneous absorption of boric acid, borax, and disodium octaborate tetrahydrate in humans compared to in vitro absorption in human skin from infinite and finite doses.

    PubMed

    Wester, R C; Hui, X; Hartway, T; Maibach, H I; Bell, K; Schell, M J; Northington, D J; Strong, P; Culver, B D

    1998-09-01

    Literature from the first half of this century report concern for toxicity from topical use of boric acid, but assessment of percutaneous absorption has been impaired by lack of analytical sensitivity. Analytical methods in this study included inductively coupled plasma-mass spectrometry which now allows quantitation of percutaneous absorption of 10B in 10B-enriched boric acid, borax, and disodium octaborate tetrahydrate (DOT) in biological matrices. This made it possible, in the presence of comparatively large natural dietary boron intakes for the in vivo segment of this study, to quantify the boron passing through skin. Human volunteers were dosed with 10B-enriched boric acid, 5.0%, borax, 5.0%, or disodium octaborate tetrahydrate, 10%, in aqueous solutions. Urinalysis, for boron and changes in boron isotope ratios, was used to measure absorption. Boric acid in vivo percutaneous absorption was 0.226 (SD = 0.125) mean percentage dose, with flux and permeability constant (Kp) calculated at 0.009 microgram/cm2/h and 1.9 x 10(-7) cm/h, respectively. Borax absorption was 0.210 (SD = 0.194) mean percentage of dose, with flux and Kp calculated at 0.009 microgram/cm2/h and 1.8 x 10(-7) cm/h, respectively. DOT absorption was 0.122 (SD = 0.108) mean percentage, with flux and Kp calculated at 0.01 microgram/cm2/h and 1.0 x 10(-7) cm/h, respectively. Pretreatment with the potential skin irritant 2% sodium lauryl sulfate had no effect on boron skin absorption. In vitro human skin percentage of doses of boric acid absorbed were 1.2 for a 0.05% solution, 0.28 for a 0.5% solution, and 0.70 for a 5.0% solution. These absorption amounts translated into flux values of, respectively, 0.25, 0.58, and 14.58 micrograms/cm2/h and permeability constants (Kp) of 5.0 x 10(-4), 1.2 x 10(-4), and 2.9 x 10(-4) cm/h for the 0.05, 0.5, and 5.0% solutions. The above in vitro doses were at infinite, 1000 microliters/cm2 volume. At 2 microliters/cm2 (the in vivo dosing volume), flux decreased some

  14. In vivo multiphoton imaging of human skin: assessment of topical corticosteroid-induced epidermis atrophy and depigmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ait El Madani, Hassan; Tancrède-Bohin, Emmanuelle; Bensussan, Armand; Colonna, Anne; Dupuy, Alain; Bagot, Martine; Pena, Ana-Maria

    2012-02-01

    Multiphoton microscopy has emerged in the past decade as a promising tool for noninvasive skin imaging. Our aim was to evaluate the potential of multiphoton microscopy to detect topical corticosteroids side effects within the epidermis and to provide new insights into their dynamics. Healthy volunteers were topically treated with clobetasol propionate on a small region of their forearms under overnight occlusion for three weeks. The treated region of each patient was investigated at D0, D7, D15, D22 (end of the treatment), and D60. Our study shows that multiphoton microscopy allows for the detection of corticoid-induced epidermis modifications: thinning of stratum corneum compactum and epidermis, decrease of keratinocytes size, and changes in their morphology from D7 to D22. We also show that multiphoton microscopy enables in vivo three-dimensional (3-D) quantitative assessment of melanin content. We observe that melanin density decreases during treatment and almost completely disappears at D22. Moreover, these alterations are reversible as they are no longer present at D60. Our study demonstrates that multiphoton microscopy is a convenient and powerful tool for noninvasive 3-D dynamical studies of skin integrity and pigmentation.

  15. Comparison of in vivo immune responses following transplantation of vascularized and non-vascularized human dermo-epidermal skin substitutes.

    PubMed

    Klar, Agnes S; Biedermann, Thomas; Simmen-Meuli, Claudia; Reichmann, Ernst; Meuli, Martin

    2017-03-01

    Autologous bio-engineered dermo-epidermal skin substitutes (DESS) represent an alternative therapeutic option for a definitive treatment of skin defects in human patients. Largely, the interaction of host immune cells with transplanted DESS is considered to be essential for the granulation tissue formation, graft take, and its functionality. The aim of this study was to compare the spatiotemporal distribution and density of host-derived monocytes/macrophages and granulocytes in vascularized (vascDESS) versus non-vascularized DESS (non-vascDESS) in a rat model. Keratinocytes and the stromal vascular fraction (SVF) were derived from human skin or human adipose tissue, respectively. Human SVF containing both endothelial and mesenchymal/stromal progenitors was used to develop a vascularized collagen type I-based dermal component in vitro. The donor-matched, monolayer-expanded adipose stromal cells lacking endothelial cells were used as a negative control. Subsequently, human keratinocytes were seeded on top of hydrogels to build dermo-epidermal skin grafts. After transplantation onto full-thickness skin wounds on the back of immuno-incompetent rats, grafts were excised and analyzed after 1 and 3 weeks. The expression of distinct inflammatory cell markers specific for host-derived monocytes/macrophages (CD11b, CD68) or granulocytes (HIS48) was analyzed by immunofluorescence microscopy. All skin grafts were infiltrated by host-derived monocytes/macrophages (CD11b(+), CD68(+)) and granulocytes (HIS48(+)) between 1-3 week post-transplantation. When compared to non-vascDESS, the vascDESS showed an increased granulocyte infiltration at all time points analyzed with the majority of cells scattered throughout the whole dermal part. Whereas a moderate number of rat monocytes/macrophages (CD11b(+), CD68(+)) were found in vascDESS at 1 week, only a few cells were detected in non-vascDESS. We observed a time-dependent decrease of monocytes/macrophages in all transplants at 3

  16. Skin metabolism of aminophenols: Human keratinocytes as a suitable in vitro model to qualitatively predict the dermal transformation of 4-amino-2-hydroxytoluene in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Goebel, C. Hewitt, N.J.; Kunze, G.; Wenker, M.; Hein, D.W.; Beck, H.; Skare, J.

    2009-02-15

    4-Amino-2-hydroxytolune (AHT) is an aromatic amine ingredient in oxidative hair colouring products. As skin contact occurs during hair dyeing, characterisation of dermal metabolism is important for the safety assessment of this chemical class. We have compared the metabolism of AHT in the human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT with that observed ex-vivo in human skin and in vivo (topical application versus oral (p.o.) and intravenous (i.v.) route). Three major metabolites of AHT were excreted, i.e. N-acetyl-AHT, AHT-sulfate and AHT-glucuronide. When 12.5 mg/kg AHT was applied topically, the relative amounts of each metabolite were altered such that N-acetyl-AHT product was the major metabolite (66% of the dose in comparison with 37% and 32% of the same applied dose after i.v. and p.o. administration, respectively). N-acetylated products were the only metabolites detected in HaCaT cells and ex-vivo whole human skin discs for AHT and p-aminophenol (PAP), an aromatic amine known to undergo N-acetylation in vivo. Since N-acetyltransferase 1 (NAT1) is the responsible enzyme, kinetics of AHT was further compared to the standard NAT1 substrate p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) in the HaCaT model revealing similar values for K{sub m} and V{sub max}. In conclusion NAT1 dependent dermal N-acetylation of AHT represents a 'first-pass' metabolism effect in the skin prior to entering the systemic circulation. Since the HaCaT cell model represents a suitable in vitro assay for addressing the qualitative contribution of the skin to the metabolism of topically-applied aromatic amines it may contribute to a reduction in animal testing.

  17. Skin metabolism of aminophenols: human keratinocytes as a suitable in vitro model to qualitatively predict the dermal transformation of 4-amino-2-hydroxytoluene in vivo.

    PubMed

    Goebel, C; Hewitt, N J; Kunze, G; Wenker, M; Hein, D W; Beck, H; Skare, J

    2009-02-15

    4-Amino-2-hydroxytolune (AHT) is an aromatic amine ingredient in oxidative hair colouring products. As skin contact occurs during hair dyeing, characterisation of dermal metabolism is important for the safety assessment of this chemical class. We have compared the metabolism of AHT in the human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT with that observed ex-vivo in human skin and in vivo (topical application versus oral (p.o.) and intravenous (i.v.) route). Three major metabolites of AHT were excreted, i.e. N-acetyl-AHT, AHT-sulfate and AHT-glucuronide. When 12.5 mg/kg AHT was applied topically, the relative amounts of each metabolite were altered such that N-acetyl-AHT product was the major metabolite (66% of the dose in comparison with 37% and 32% of the same applied dose after i.v. and p.o. administration, respectively). N-acetylated products were the only metabolites detected in HaCaT cells and ex-vivo whole human skin discs for AHT and p-aminophenol (PAP), an aromatic amine known to undergo N-acetylation in vivo. Since N-acetyltransferase 1 (NAT1) is the responsible enzyme, kinetics of AHT was further compared to the standard NAT1 substrate p-aminobenzoic acid (PABA) in the HaCaT model revealing similar values for K(m) and V(max). In conclusion NAT1 dependent dermal N-acetylation of AHT represents a 'first-pass' metabolism effect in the skin prior to entering the systemic circulation. Since the HaCaT cell model represents a suitable in vitro assay for addressing the qualitative contribution of the skin to the metabolism of topically-applied aromatic amines it may contribute to a reduction in animal testing.

  18. UV decreases the synthesis of free fatty acids and triglycerides in the epidermis of human skin in vivo, contributing to development of skin photoaging.

    PubMed

    Kim, Eun Ju; Jin, Xing-Ji; Kim, Yeon Kyung; Oh, In Kyung; Kim, Ji Eun; Park, Chi-Hyun; Chung, Jin Ho

    2010-01-01

    Although fatty acids are known to be important in various skin functions, their roles on photoaging in human skin are poorly understood. We investigated the alteration of lipid metabolism in the epidermis by photoaging and acute UV irradiation in human skin. UV irradiated young volunteers (21-33 years, n=6) and elderly volunteers (70-75 years, n=7) skin samples were obtained by punch biopsy. Then the epidermis was separated from dermis and lipid metabolism was investigated. We observed that the amounts of free fatty acids (FFA) and triglycerides (TG) in the epidermis of photoaged or acutely UV irradiated human skin were significantly decreased. The expressions of genes related to lipid synthesis, including acetyl-CoA carboxylase (ACC), fatty acid synthase (FAS), stearoyl-CoA desaturase (SCD), sterol regulatory element binding proteins (SREBPs), and peroxisome proliferator-activated receptors (PPARgamma) were also markedly decreased. To elucidate the significance of these changes of epidermal lipids in human skin, we investigated the effects of TG or various inhibitors for the enzymes involved in TG synthesis on the expression of matrix metalloproteinase-1 (MMP-1) in cultured human epidermal keratinocytes. We demonstrated that triolein (TG) reduced basal and UV-induced MMP-1 mRNA expression. In addition, each inhibitor for various lipid synthesis enzymes, such as TOFA (ACC inhibitor), cerulenin (FAS inhibitor) and trans-10, cis-12-CLA (SCD inhibitor), increased the MMP-1 expression significantly in a dose-dependent manner. We also demonstrated that triolein could inhibit cerulenin-induced MMP-1 expression. Furthermore, topical application of triolein (10%) significantly prevented UV-induced MMP-13, COX-2, and IL-1beta expression in hairless mice. Our results suggest that TG and FFA may play important roles in photoaging of human skin. Copyright 2009 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Mean cell size and collagen orientation from 2D Fourier analysis on confocal laser scanning microscopy and two-photon fluorescence microscopy on human skin in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucassen, Gerald W.; Bakker, Bernard L.; Neerken, Sieglinde; Hendriks, Rob F. M.

    2003-07-01

    We present results from 2D Fourier analysis on 3D stacks of images obtained by confocal laser scanning reflectance microscopy (CLSM) and two-photon fluorescence microscopy (2PM) on human skin in vivo. CLSM images were obtained with a modified commercial system (Vivascope1000, Lucid Inc, excitation wavelength 830 nm) equipped with a piezo-focusing element (350 μm range) for depth positioning of the objective lens. 2PM was performed with a specially designed set-up with excitation wavelength 730 nm. Mean cell size in the epidermal layer and structural orientation in the dermal layer have been determined as a function of depth by 2D Fourier analysis. Fourier analysis on microscopic images enables automatic non-invasive quantitative structural analysis (mean cell size and orientation) of living human skin.

  20. Evaluating the Photoprotective Effects of Ochre on Human Skin by In Vivo SPF Assessment: Implications for Human Evolution, Adaptation and Dispersal

    PubMed Central

    Rifkin, Riaan F.; Dayet, Laure; Queffelec, Alain; Summers, Beverley; Lategan, Marlize; d’Errico, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Archaeological indicators of cognitively modern behaviour become increasingly prevalent during the African Middle Stone Age (MSA). Although the exploitation of ochre is viewed as a key feature of the emergence of modern human behaviour, the uses to which ochre and ochre-based mixtures were put remain ambiguous. Here we present the results of an experimental study exploring the efficacy of ochre as a topical photoprotective compound. This is achieved through the in vivo calculation of the sun protection factor (SPF) values of ochre samples obtained from Ovahimba women (Kunene Region, Northern Namibia) and the Palaeozoic Bokkeveld Group deposits of the Cape Supergroup (Western Cape Province, South Africa). We employ visible spectroscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (ED-XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and granulometric analyses to characterise ochre samples. The capacity of ochre to inhibit the susceptibility of humans to the harmful effects of exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is confirmed and the mechanisms implicated in the efficacy of ochre as a sunscreen identified. It is posited that the habitual application of ochre may have represented a crucial innovation for MSA humans by limiting the adverse effects of ultraviolet exposure. This may have facilitated the colonisation of geographic regions largely unfavourable to the constitutive skin colour of newly arriving populations. PMID:26353012

  1. Evaluating the Photoprotective Effects of Ochre on Human Skin by In Vivo SPF Assessment: Implications for Human Evolution, Adaptation and Dispersal.

    PubMed

    Rifkin, Riaan F; Dayet, Laure; Queffelec, Alain; Summers, Beverley; Lategan, Marlize; d'Errico, Francesco

    2015-01-01

    Archaeological indicators of cognitively modern behaviour become increasingly prevalent during the African Middle Stone Age (MSA). Although the exploitation of ochre is viewed as a key feature of the emergence of modern human behaviour, the uses to which ochre and ochre-based mixtures were put remain ambiguous. Here we present the results of an experimental study exploring the efficacy of ochre as a topical photoprotective compound. This is achieved through the in vivo calculation of the sun protection factor (SPF) values of ochre samples obtained from Ovahimba women (Kunene Region, Northern Namibia) and the Palaeozoic Bokkeveld Group deposits of the Cape Supergroup (Western Cape Province, South Africa). We employ visible spectroscopy, energy-dispersive X-ray fluorescence (ED-XRF), X-ray diffraction (XRD) and granulometric analyses to characterise ochre samples. The capacity of ochre to inhibit the susceptibility of humans to the harmful effects of exposure to ultraviolet radiation (UVR) is confirmed and the mechanisms implicated in the efficacy of ochre as a sunscreen identified. It is posited that the habitual application of ochre may have represented a crucial innovation for MSA humans by limiting the adverse effects of ultraviolet exposure. This may have facilitated the colonisation of geographic regions largely unfavourable to the constitutive skin colour of newly arriving populations.

  2. In vivo multiphoton imaging of the eyelid skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batista, Ana; Breunig, Hans Georg; Uchugonova, Aisada; König, Karsten

    2017-02-01

    Multiphoton tomography (MPT) has become an important imaging method for non-invasive and high-resolution imaging of the skin in vivo. Due to the nonlinear excitation, by using near-infrared (NIR) light, 3D information is intrinsically provided. In combination with fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM), it is possible to obtain both structural and metabolic data. Human in vivo measurements are usually limited to easily accessible regions. However, often imaging of specific body parts such as the eyelid are of interest for cosmetic reasons. By using the clinically certified multiphoton imaging tomograph MPTflex this demand can be fulfilled. An articulated mirror arm and scan-detector head enable imaging at otherwise difficult-to-access areas. We show the characterization of the epidermal and upper dermal layers of the eyelid skin of human volunteers in vivo based on endogenous autofluorescence intensity, lifetime, and second-harmonic generation signals. Skin properties such as the epidermal thickness were also assessed. Furthermore, the influence of an anti-aging cream on the eyelid and forearm skin was investigated. Changes of the skin epidermis autofluorescence lifetime were observed after two-weeks long application of an anti-aging cream. The SHG-to-AF aging index of dermis (SAAID) increased during that time.

  3. Dietary Aloe Vera Supplementation Improves Facial Wrinkles and Elasticity and It Increases the Type I Procollagen Gene Expression in Human Skin in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cho, Soyun; Lee, Serah; Lee, Min-Jung; Lee, Dong Hun; Won, Chong-Hyun; Kim, Sang Min

    2009-01-01

    Background No studies have yet been undertaken to determine the effect of aloe gel on the clinical signs and biochemical changes of aging skin. Objective We wanted to determine whether dietary aloe vera gel has anti-aging properties on the skin. Methods Thirty healthy female subjects over the age of 45 were recruited and they received 2 different doses (low-dose: 1,200 mg/d, high-dose: 3,600 mg/d) of aloe vera gel supplementation for 90 days. Their baseline status was used as a control. At baseline and at completion of the study, facial wrinkles were measured using a skin replica, and facial elasticity was measured by an in vivo suction skin elasticity meter. Skin samples were taken before and after aloe intake to compare the type I procollagen and matrix metalloproteinase 1 (MMP-1) mRNA levels by performing real-time RT-PCR. Results After aloe gel intake, the facial wrinkles improved significantly (p<0.05) in both groups, and facial elasticity improved in the lower-dose group. In the photoprotected skin, the type I procollagen mRNA levels were increased in both groups, albeit without significance; the MMP-1 mRNA levels were significantly decreased in the higher-dose group. Type I procollagen immunostaining was substantially increased throughout the dermis in both groups. Conclusion Aloe gel significantly improves wrinkles and elasticity in photoaged human skin, with an increase in collagen production in the photoprotected skin and a decrease in the collagen-degrading MMP-1 gene expression. However, no dose-response relationship was found between the low-dose and high-dose groups. PMID:20548848

  4. Three-dimensional full-range complex Fourier domain optical coherence tomography for in-vivo volumetric imaging of human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Nan; Bu, Peng; Guo, Xin; Wang, Xiangzhao

    2011-11-01

    A three dimensional full-range complex Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (complex FDOCT) system based on sinusoidal phase-modulating method is proposed. With the system, the range of imaging depth is doubled and the sensitivity degradation with the lateral scan distance is avoided. Fourier analysis of B-scan data along lateral scan distance is used for reconstructing the complex spectral interferograms. The B-scan based Fourier method improves the system tolerance of sample movement and makes data processing less time consuming. In vivo volumetric imaging of human skin with the proposed full-range FDOCT system is demonstrated. The mirror image rejection ratio is about 30 dB. The stratum corneum, the epidermis and the upper dermis of skin can be clearly identified in the reconstructed three dimensional FDOCT images.

  5. Three-dimensional full-range complex Fourier domain optical coherence tomography for in-vivo volumetric imaging of human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nan, Nan; Bu, Peng; Guo, Xin; Wang, Xiangzhao

    2012-03-01

    A three dimensional full-range complex Fourier domain optical coherence tomography (complex FDOCT) system based on sinusoidal phase-modulating method is proposed. With the system, the range of imaging depth is doubled and the sensitivity degradation with the lateral scan distance is avoided. Fourier analysis of B-scan data along lateral scan distance is used for reconstructing the complex spectral interferograms. The B-scan based Fourier method improves the system tolerance of sample movement and makes data processing less time consuming. In vivo volumetric imaging of human skin with the proposed full-range FDOCT system is demonstrated. The mirror image rejection ratio is about 30 dB. The stratum corneum, the epidermis and the upper dermis of skin can be clearly identified in the reconstructed three dimensional FDOCT images.

  6. Increased epidermal cell proliferation in normal human skin in vivo following local administration of interferon-gamma.

    PubMed Central

    Barker, J. N.; Goodlad, J. R.; Ross, E. L.; Yu, C. C.; Groves, R. W.; MacDonald, D. M.

    1993-01-01

    Recombinant human interferon-gamma was administered intradermally (10 micrograms in 0.1 ml) to healthy adult human volunteers from day 1 to day 3, and epidermal cell proliferation was measured on whole skin biopsies at day 6. Three independent parameters were assessed, namely, a) epidermal keratin-16 expression, b) keratinocyte proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression, and c) keratinocyte silver nucleolar organizer region counts. Significantly increased scores for each parameter were observed after interferon-gamma injection (P < 0.01 in each case) compared to site-matched controls. Keratin-16 expression was confined to suprabasal epidermis, whereas proliferating cell nuclear antigen and silver nucleolar organizer region counts were particularly elevated in the basal epidermis. Taken together with previous findings, these studies indicate both proinflammatory and growth regulatory roles for interferon-gamma in human skin. These data are likely to be of particular importance to pathophysiological mechanisms of psoriasis and related cutaneous inflammatory diseases. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 PMID:7682760

  7. Dose-dependent vitamin C uptake and radical scavenging activity in human skin measured with in vivo electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Lauer, Anna-Christina; Groth, Norbert; Haag, Stefan F; Darvin, Maxim E; Lademann, Jürgen; Meinke, Martina C

    2013-01-01

    Vitamin C is a potent radical scavenger and a physiological part of the antioxidant system in human skin. The aim of this study was to measure changes in the radical-scavenging activity of human skin in vivo due to supplementation with different doses of vitamin C and at different time points. Therefore, 33 volunteers were supplemented with vitamin C or placebo for 4 weeks. The skin radical-scavenging activity was measured with electron paramagnetic resonance spectroscopy. After 4 weeks, the intake of 100 mg vitamin C/day resulted in a significant increase in the radical-scavenging activity by 22%. Intake of 180 mg/day even resulted in a significant increase of 37%. No changes were found in the placebo group. A part of the study population was additionally measured after 2 weeks: in this group radical scavenging had already reached maximal activity after 2 weeks. In conclusion, orally administered vitamin C increases the radical-scavenging activity of the skin. The effect occurs fast and is enhanced with higher doses of vitamin C.

  8. A comparison of the in vivo effects of ketotifen, clemastine, chlorpheniramine and sodium cromoglycate on histamine and allergen induced weals in human skin.

    PubMed Central

    Phillips, M J; Meyrick Thomas, R H; Moodley, I; Davies, R J

    1983-01-01

    The effect of ketotifen was compared with that of clemastine and chlorpheniramine, known antihistamines, and sodium cromoglycate, a drug considered to have mast cell "stabilizing' properties on histamine and allergen wealing reactions in human skin, in random order, double-blind, placebo controlled studies. Ketotifen was significantly more potent in the inhibition of both histamine (P less than 0.001) and allergen (P less than 0.001) skin wealing reactions than either clemastine or chlorpheniramine. Sodium cromoglycate had no significant effect on either histamine or allergen skin wealing reactions in any of the concentrations tested. However ketotifen, like clemastine, had a significantly greater inhibitory effect on histamine than on allergen induced weals (P less than 0.001) and both drugs were shown to act as competitive antagonists of histamine. Ketotifen has been shown to be a potent anti-histamine but there is no evidence from these in vivo studies to suggest that it has any additional inhibitory activity on release of mediators from mast cells in human skin. PMID:6405771

  9. Influence of age and sun exposure on the biophysical properties of the human skin: an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Adhoute, H; de Rigal, J; Marchand, J P; Privat, Y; Leveque, J L

    1992-06-01

    The physical properties of the skin were measured by using noninvasive methods on 72 people displaying various levels of solar elastosis on the neck. The physical parameters measured were the skin extensibility, the elastic recovery, the skin colour, the skin thickness and the electrical conductance. The correlation between the above parameters, the clinical grades of elastosis and the chronological age of each subject were studied using two different statistical approaches. They both showed that elastotic skin is less elastic, dryer, darker, more erythematous and less yellowish than the nonexposed skin. The similarities and differences between the properties of elastotic skin and purely chronologically aged skin are discussed.

  10. Impact of refractive index mismatches on coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering and multiphoton autofluorescence tomography of human skin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Weinigel, M; Breunig, H G; Darvin, M E; Klemp, M; Röwert-Huber, J; Lademann, J; König, K

    2015-09-07

    Optical non-linear multimodal tomography is a powerful diagnostic imaging tool to analyse human skin based on its autofluorescence and second-harmonic generation signals. Recently, the field of clinical non-linear imaging has been extended by adding coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS)-a further optical sectioning method for the detection of non-fluorescent molecules. However, the heterogeneity of refractive indices of different substances in complex tissues like human skin can have a strong influence on CARS image formation and requires careful clinical interpretation of the detected signals. Interestingly, very regular patterns are present in the CARS images, which have no correspondence to the morphology revealed by autofluorescence at the same depth. The purpose of this paper is to clarify this phenomenon and to sensitize users for possible artefacts. A further part of this paper is the detailed comparison of CARS and autofluorescence images of healthy human skin in vivo covering the complete epidermis and part of the upper dermis by employing the flexible medical non-linear tomograph MPTflex CARS.

  11. 5D-intravital tomography as a novel tool for non-invasive in-vivo analysis of human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten; Weinigel, Martin; Breunig, Hans G.; Gregory, Axel; Fischer, Peter; Kellner-Höfer, Marcel; Bückle, Rainer; Schwarz, Martin; Riemann, Iris; Stracke, Frank; Huck, Volker; Gorzelanny, Christian; Schneider, Stefan W.

    2010-02-01

    Some years ago, CE-marked clinical multiphoton systems for 3D imaging of human skin with subcellular resolution have been launched. These tomographs provide optical biopsies with submicron resolution based on two-photon excited autofluorescence (NAD(P)H, flavoproteins, keratin, elastin, melanin, porphyrins) and second harmonic generation by collagen. The 3D tomograph was now transferred into a 5D imaging system by the additional detection of the emission spectrum and the fluorescence lifetime based on spatially and spectrally resolved time-resolved single photon counting. The novel 5D intravital tomograph (5D-IVT) was employed for the early detection of atopic dermatitis and the analysis of treatment effects.

  12. Combined multimodal photoacoustic tomography, optical coherence tomography (OCT) and OCT based angiography system for in vivo imaging of multiple skin disorders in human(Conference Presentation)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liu, Mengyang; Chen, Zhe; Sinz, Christoph; Rank, Elisabet; Zabihian, Behrooz; Zhang, Edward Z.; Beard, Paul C.; Kittler, Harald; Drexler, Wolfgang

    2017-02-01

    All optical photoacoustic tomography (PAT) using a planar Fabry-Perot interferometer polymer film sensor has been demonstrated for in vivo human palm imaging with an imaging penetration depth of 5 mm. The relatively larger vessels in the superficial plexus and the vessels in the dermal plexus are visible in PAT. However, due to both resolution and sensitivity limits, all optical PAT cannot reveal the smaller vessels such as capillary loops and venules. Melanin absorption also sometimes causes difficulties in PAT to resolve vessels. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) based angiography, on the other hand, has been proven suitable for microvasculature visualization in the first couple millimeters in human. In our work, we combine an all optical PAT system with an OCT system featuring a phase stable akinetic swept source. This multimodal PAT/OCT/OCT-angiography system provides us co-registered human skin vasculature information as well as the structural information of cutaneous. The scanning units of the sub-systems are assembled into one probe, which is then mounted onto a portable rack. The probe and rack design gives six degrees of freedom, allowing the multimodal optical imaging probe to access nearly all regions of human body. Utilizing this probe, we perform imaging on patients with various skin disorders as well as on healthy controls. Fused PAT/OCT-angiography volume shows the complete blood vessel network in human skin, which is further embedded in the morphology provided by OCT. A comparison between the results from the disordered regions and the normal regions demonstrates the clinical translational value of this multimodal optical imaging system in dermatology.

  13. Dose-survival relationship for epithelial cells of human skin after multifraction irradiation: evaluation by a quantitative method in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Arcangeli, G.; Mauro, F.; Nervi, C.; Withers, H.R.

    1980-07-01

    The dose-survival relationship for normal epithelial cells after single and fractionated radiation exposures has been established by Withers for the mouse, but it is not available for humans according to a strict criterion for survival of single cell reproductive integrity. In an attempt to obtain such a quantitative estimation, 2 patients requiring radical radiation therapy to the chest wall were treated according to particular Multiple Daily Fractionation (MDF) protocols: i) 250 + 150 + 150 rad/day, 4 hr interval, 5 days/week; and ii) 150 + 150 + 150 + 150 rad/day, 3.5 hr interval, 5 days/week. In both cases, different strips of skin received different total doses: 6300, 6850, and 7150 rad, and 6300, 6750, and 7200 rad, respectively. In case (i), moist desquamation appeared and thereafter repopulating colonies of epithelium could be recognized and counted. Using these counts a survival curve having a D/sub o/ value of 490 +- 150 rad was estimated according to the formula proposed by Withers. In case (ii), no moist desquamation was reached at the doses delivered. The difference observed may imply that the initial region of the survival curve deviates appreciably from exponential between doses of 150 and 250 rad. If such is the case, a /sub 1/D/sub o/ value of 490 rad may represent an underestimate. These results are discussed from the point of view of both the shape of the survival curve and the effectiveness of nonconventional fractionation courses.

  14. Automatic motion correction for in vivo human skin optical coherence tomography angiography through combined rigid and nonrigid registration

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wei, David Wei; Deegan, Anthony J.; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2017-06-01

    When using optical coherence tomography angiography (OCTA), the development of artifacts due to involuntary movements can severely compromise the visualization and subsequent quantitation of tissue microvasculatures. To correct such an occurrence, we propose a motion compensation method to eliminate artifacts from human skin OCTA by means of step-by-step rigid affine registration, rigid subpixel registration, and nonrigid B-spline registration. To accommodate this remedial process, OCTA is conducted using two matching all-depth volume scans. Affine transformation is first performed on the large vessels of the deep reticular dermis, and then the resulting affine parameters are applied to all-depth vasculatures with a further subpixel registration to refine the alignment between superficial smaller vessels. Finally, the coregistration of both volumes is carried out to result in the final artifact-free composite image via an algorithm based upon cubic B-spline free-form deformation. We demonstrate that the proposed method can provide a considerable improvement to the final en face OCTA images with substantial artifact removal. In addition, the correlation coefficients and peak signal-to-noise ratios of the corrected images are evaluated and compared with those of the original images, further validating the effectiveness of the proposed method. We expect that the proposed method can be useful in improving qualitative and quantitative assessment of the OCTA images of scanned tissue beds.

  15. In vitro and in vivo comparison of dermal irritancy of jet fuel exposure using EpiDerm (EPI-200) cultured human skin and hairless rats.

    PubMed

    Chatterjee, Abhijit; Babu, R Jayachandra; Klausner, M; Singh, Mandip

    2006-12-01

    The purpose of this study was to evaluate an in vitro EpiDerm human skin model (EPI-200) to study the irritation potential of jet fuels (JP-8 and JP-8+100). Parallel in vivo studies on hairless rats on the dermal irritancy of jet fuels were also conducted. Cytokines are an important part of an irritation and inflammatory cascade, which are expressed in upon dermal exposures of irritant chemicals even when there are no obvious visible marks of irritation on the skin. We have chosen two primary cytokines (IL-1alpha and TNF-1alpha) as markers of irritation response of jet fuels. Initially, the EPI-200 was treated with different quantities of JP-8 and JP-8+100 to determine quantities which did not cause significant cytotoxicity, as monitored using the MTT assay and paraffin embedded histological cross-sections. Volumes of 2.5-50 microl/tissue (approximately 4.0-78 microl/cm2) of JP-8 and JP-8+100 showed a dose dependent loss of tissue viability and morphological alterations of the tissue. At a quantity of 1.25 microl/tissue (approximately 2.0 microl/cm2), no significant change in tissue viability or morphology was observed for exposure time extending to 48 h. Nonetheless, this dose induced significant increase in IL-1alpha and TNF-alpha release versus non-treated controls after 24 and 48 h. In addition, IL-1alpha release for JP-8+100 was significantly higher than that observed for JP-8, but TNF-alpha release after 48 h exposure to these two jet fuels was the same. These findings parallel in vivo studies on hairless rats, which indicated higher irritation levels due to JP-8+100 versus JP-8. In vivo, transepidermal water loss (TEWL) and IL-1alpha expression levels followed the order JP-8+100 > JP-8 > control. Further, in vivo TNF-alpha levels for JP-8 and JP-8+100 were also elevated but not significantly different from one another. In aggregate, these findings indicate that EPI-200 tissue model can be utilized as an alternative to the use of animals in evaluating dermal

  16. A modified algorithm for continuous wave near infrared spectroscopy applied to in-vivo animal experiments and on human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Klaessens, John H. G. M.; Hopman, Jeroen C. W.; Liem, K. Djien; de Roode, Rowland; Verdaasdonk, Rudolf M.; Thijssen, Johan M.

    2008-02-01

    Continuous wave Near Infrared Spectroscopy is a well known non invasive technique for measuring changes in tissue oxygenation. Absorption changes (ΔO2Hb and ΔHHb) are calculated from the light attenuations using the modified Lambert Beer equation. Generally, the concentration changes are calculated relative to the concentration at a starting point in time (delta time method). It is also possible, under certain assumptions, to calculate the concentrations by subtracting the equations at different wavelengths (delta wavelength method). We derived a new algorithm and will show the possibilities and limitations. In the delta wavelength method, the assumption is that the oxygen independent attenuation term will be eliminated from the formula even if its value changes in time, we verified the results with the classical delta time method using extinction coefficients from different literature sources for the wavelengths 767nm, 850nm and 905nm. The different methods of calculating concentration changes were applied to the data collected from animal experiments. The animals (lambs) were in a stable normoxic condition; stepwise they were made hypoxic and thereafter they returned to normoxic condition. The two algorithms were also applied for measuring two dimensional blood oxygen saturation changes in human skin tissue. The different oxygen saturation levels were induced by alterations in the respiration and by temporary arm clamping. The new delta wavelength method yielded in a steady state measurement the same changes in oxy and deoxy hemoglobin as the classical delta time method. The advantage of the new method is the independence of eventual variation of the oxygen independent attenuations in time.

  17. Quercus suber cork extract displays a tensor and smoothing effect on human skin: an in vivo study.

    PubMed

    Coquet, C; Bauza, E; Oberto, G; Berghi, A; Farnet, A M; Ferré, E; Peyronel, D; Dal Farra, C; Domloge, N

    2005-01-01

    Recently, it has become indispensable for anti-aging active ingredients to provide a visible and immediate smoothing antiwrinkle effect. In Quercus suber, suberin is the most important structural component of cork cell walls. Studies have shown that suberin is made up mostly of hydroxycarboxylic acids and that it is endowed with many special mechanical and chemical properties that evoke a possible smoothing effect on the surface of the skin. Therefore, we were interested in investigating the effect of this cork extract on the skin's surface in a double-blind clinical study. The study was conducted in 15 healthy volunteers, aged 22 to 52 years. The volunteers applied a gel formula with 3% of cork extract, or placebo gel, on each forearm. Skin surface roughness was evaluated visually by pictures and by silicone replicas 1 and 2 h after application, followed by statistical analysis using the matched-pairs McNemar statistical test. McNemar analysis of the pictures revealed that application of cork extract on the skin resulted in a highly significant reduction of roughness 1 h after application. This effect was observed in 73.3% of volunteers. Two hours after cork extract application, a highly significant improvement of skin roughness was found in 78.6% of volunteers. Moreover, silicone replica treatment confirmed significant improvement in average of roughness at 2 h. These results demonstrate that cork extract provides a remarkable and highly significant tensor and smoothing effect on the skin, which could be of great use in anti-aging skin care products.

  18. Confocal imaging of benign and malignant proliferative skin lesions in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gonzalez, Salvador; Rajadhyaksha, Milind M.; Anderson, R. Rox

    1999-06-01

    Near-infrared confocal reflectance microscopy (CM) provides non- invasive real-time images of thin en-face tissue sections with high resolution and contrast. Imaging of cells, nuclei, other organelles, microvessels, and hair follicles has been possible at resolution comparable to standard histology, to a maximum depth of 250-300 μm in human skin in vivo. We have characterized psoriasis as a prototype of benign proliferative skin conditions, and non-pigmented skin malignancies in vivo based on their unstained, native histologic features using CM. Our data shows that reflectance CM may potentially diagnose and morphometrically evaluate proliferative skin lesions in vivo.

  19. Kinetic Profile of Inflammation Markers in Human Skin In vivo Following Exposure to Ultraviolet B Indicates Synchronic Release of Cytokines and Prostanoids.

    PubMed

    Quist, Sven R; Wiswedel, Ingrid; Quist, Jennifer; Gollnick, Harald P

    2016-11-02

    Ultraviolet B (UVB) irradiation affects epidermal cells, which respond via a cascade of inflammation markers. After initial in vitro and ex vivo experiments, this study used cutaneous microdialysis to generate a kinetic profile for 16 cytokines and 4 prostanoids in human skin in vivo. Skin areas 9 cm2 were irradiated with UVB (2× minimal erythematous dose) 16 h after catheter placement in the dermis of the volar forearms of healthy volunteers. Dialysates were collected at 4-h intervals up to 64 h and analysed for 5- and 8-iso-PGF2α, 9α,11α-PGF2α and PGE2 by gas chromatography-mass spectrometry (GC/MS). Dialysates were also analysed for interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-2, IL-3, IL-4, IL-5, IL-6, IL-8, IL-10, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α, Fas ligand (FasL), interferon-γ-inducible protein-10 (IP-10), monocyte chemoattractant protein 1 (MCP-1), RANTES, eotaxin, and granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) using a multiplex-based cytometric-bead-array. In conclusion, 3 peaks with synchronic release of T helper (TH) 1-directed inflammatory cytokines and prostanoids could be detected post-UVB: an early phase (4-12 h), an intermediate phase (16-24 h) and a late phase (32-40 h). A TH2-directed cytokine response was detectable at intermediate and late phases.

  20. Kinetics of carotenoid distribution in human skin in vivo after exogenous stress: disinfectant and wIRA-induced carotenoid depletion recovers from outside to inside

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fluhr, Joachim W.; Caspers, Peter; van der Pol, J. Andre; Richter, Heike; Sterry, Wolfram; Lademann, Juergen; Darvin, Maxim E.

    2011-03-01

    The human organism has developed a protection system against the destructive effect of free radicals. The aim of the present study was to investigate the extent of exogenous stress factors such as disinfectant and IR-A radiation on the skin, and their influence on the kinetics of carotenoids distribution during the recovery process. Ten healthy volunteers were assessed with resonance spectroscopy using an Argon-laser at 488 nm to excite the carotenoids in vivo. Additionally, Raman-confocal-micro-spectroscopy measurements were performed using a model 3510 Skin Composition Analyzer with spatially resolved measurements down to 30 μm. The measurements were performed at a baseline of 20, 40, 60, and 120 min after an external stressor consisting either of water-filtered infrared A (wIRA) with 150 mW/cm2 or 1 ml/cm2 of an alcoholic disinfectant. Both Raman methods were capable to detect the infrared-induced depletion of carotenoids. Only Raman-microspectroscopy could reveal the carotenoids decrease after topical disinfectant application. The carotenoid-depletion started at the surface. After 60 min, recovery starts at the surface while deeper parts were still depleted. The disinfectant- and wIRA-induced carotenoid depletion in the epidermis recovers from outside to inside and probably delivered by sweat and sebaceous glands. We could show that the Raman microscopic spectroscopy is suited to analyze the carotenoid kinetic of stress effects and recovery.

  1. Feasibility of measuring arsenic and selenium in human skin using in vivo x-ray fluorescence (XRF)--a comparison of methods.

    PubMed

    Shehab, H; Desouza, E D; O'Meara, J; Pejović-Milić, A; Chettle, D R; Fleming, D E B; McNeill, F E

    2016-01-01

    In recent years, in vivo measurement systems of arsenic in skin by K-shell x-ray fluorescence (XRF) have been developed, including one which was applied in a pilot study of human subjects. Improved tube-based approaches suggest the method can be further exploited for in vivo studies. Recently, it has been suggested that selenium deficiency is correlated with arsenic toxicity. A non-invasive measurement of both elements could therefore be of potential interest. The main aim of this current study was to evaluate and compare the performance of an upgraded portable XRF system and an advanced version of the benchtop XRF system for both selenium and arsenic. This evaluation was performed in terms of arsenic and selenium Kα detection limits for a 4W gold anode Olympus InnovX Delta portable analyzer (40 kVp) in polyester resin skin-mimicking phantoms. Unlike the polychromatic source earlier reported in the literature, the benchtop tube-based technique involves monochromatic excitation (25 W silver anode, manufactured by x-ray optics, XOS) and a higher throughput detector type. Use of a single exciting energy allows for a lower in vivo dose delivered and superior signal-noise ratio. For the portable XRF method, arsenic and selenium minimum detection limits (MDLs) of 0.59  ±  0.03 ppm and 0.75  ±  0.02 ppm respectively were found for 1 min measurement times. The MDLs for arsenic and selenium using the benchtop system were found to be 0.35  ±  0.01 ppm and 0.670  ±  0.004 ppm respectively for 30 min measurement times. In terms of a figure of merit (FOM), allowing for dose as well as MDL, the benchtop system was found to be superior for arsenic and the two systems were equivalent, within error, for selenium. We shall discuss the performance and possible improvements of each system, their ease of use and potential for field application.

  2. Topical stabilized retinol treatment induces the expression of HAS genes and HA production in human skin in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Li, Wen-Hwa; Wong, Heng-Kuan; Serrano, José; Randhawa, Manpreet; Kaur, Simarna; Southall, Michael D; Parsa, Ramine

    2017-05-01

    Skin Aging manifests primarily with wrinkles, dyspigmentations, texture changes, and loss of elasticity. During the skin aging process, there is a loss of moisture and elasticity in skin resulting in loss of firmness finally leading to skin sagging. The key molecule involved in skin moisture is hyaluronic acid (HA), which has a significant water-binding capacity. HA levels in skin decline with age resulting in decrease in skin moisture, which may contribute to loss of firmness. Clinical trials have shown that topically applied ROL effectively reduces wrinkles and helps retain youthful appearance. In the current study, ROL was shown to induce HA production and stimulates the gene expression of all three forms of hyaluronic acid synthases (HAS) in normal human epidermal keratinocytes monolayer cultures. Moreover, in human skin equivalent tissues and in human skin explants, topical treatment of tissues with a stabilized-ROL formulation significantly induced the gene expression of HAS mRNA concomitant with an increased HA production. Finally, in a vehicle-controlled human clinical study, histochemical analysis confirmed increased HA accumulation in the epidermis in ROL-treated human skin as compared to vehicle. These results show that ROL increases skin expression of HA, a significant contributing factor responsible for wrinkle formation and skin moisture, which decrease during aging. Taken together with the activity to increase collagen, elastin, and cell proliferation, these studies establish that retinol provides multi-functional activity for photodamaged skin.

  3. Setup and dosimetry for exposure of human skin in vivo to RF-EMF at 900 MHz.

    PubMed

    Toivonen, Tommi; Toivo, Tim; Puranen, Lauri; Jokela, Kari

    2008-04-01

    The aim of this study was a dosimetrical analysis of an experimental setup used in the exposure of 10 female volunteers to GSM 900 radiation. The exposure was carried out by irradiating a small region of the right forearms of the volunteers for 1 h, after which biopsies were taken from the exposed skin for protein analysis. The source of irradiation was a half-wave dipole fed with a computer controlled GSM phone. The specific absorption rate (SAR) induced in the skin biopsy was assessed by computer simulations. The numerical model of the arm consisted of a muscle tissue simulating cylinder covered with thin skin (1 mm) and fat (3 mm) layers. The simulation models were validated by measurements with a homogeneous cylindrical liquid phantom. The average SAR value in the biopsy was 1.3 W/kg and the estimated uncertainty +/-20% (K = 2). The main source of error was found to be variations in the distance of the forearm from the dipole (10 +/- 1 mm). Other significant sources of uncertainty are individual variations of the fat layer and arm thicknesses, and the uncertainty of radio frequency (RF) power measurement.

  4. Dexpanthenol modulates gene expression in skin wound healing in vivo.

    PubMed

    Heise, R; Skazik, C; Marquardt, Y; Czaja, K; Sebastian, K; Kurschat, P; Gan, L; Denecke, B; Ekanayake-Bohlig, S; Wilhelm, K-P; Merk, H F; Baron, J M

    2012-01-01

    Topical application of dexpanthenol is widely used in clinical practice for the improvement of wound healing. Previous in vitro experiments identified a stimulatory effect of pantothenate on migration, proliferation and gene regulation in cultured human dermal fibroblasts. To correlate these in vitro findings with the more complex in vivo situation of wound healing, a clinical trial was performed in which the dexpanthenol-induced gene expression profile in punch biopsies of previously injured and dexpanthenol-treated skin in comparison to placebo-treated skin was analyzed at the molecular level by Affymetrix® GeneChip analysis. Upregulation of IL-6, IL-1β, CYP1B1, CXCL1, CCL18 and KAP 4-2 gene expression and downregulation of psorasin mRNA and protein expression were identified in samples treated topically with dexpanthenol. This in vivo study might provide new insight into the molecular mechanisms responsible for the effect of dexpanthenol in wound healing and shows strong correlations to previous in vitro data using cultured dermal fibroblasts.

  5. Skin thickness effects on in vivo LXRF

    SciTech Connect

    Preiss, I.L.; Washington, W. II

    1995-12-31

    The analysis of lead concentration in bone utilizing LXRF can be adversely effected by overlying issue. A quantitative measure of the attenuation of the 10.5 keV Pb L a x-ray signal by skin and skin equivalent plastic has been conducted. Concentration ranges in plaster of Paris and goat bone from 7 to 90 ppm with attenuators of Lucite{reg_sign} and pig skin were examined. It is concluded that no quantitative or semi quantitative analysis can be achieved if overlying sue thickness exceeds 3 mm for Ph concentrations of less than 30 porn Ph in bone.

  6. Percutaneous absorption of nicotinic acid, phenol, benzoic acid and triclopyr butoxyethyl ester through rat and human skin in vitro: further validation of an in vitro model by comparison with in vivo data.

    PubMed

    Hotchkiss, S A; Hewitt, P; Caldwell, J; Chen, W L; Rowe, R R

    1992-10-01

    The in vitro percutaneous absorption of three model compounds, nicotinic acid, phenol and benzoic acid, and the herbicide triclopyr butoxyethyl ester (triclopyr BEE) has been investigated in flow-through diffusion cells using skin from male Fischer 344 rats and humans. After the application of the four chemicals to the epidermal surface of unoccluded full-thickness rat skin, the absorption of each compound across the skin and into the receptor fluid at 72 hr reached 3.7 +/- 0.3, 5.7 +/- 0.6, 26.7 +/- 3.7 and 48.3 +/- 1.2% (mean +/- SD, n = 2-7) of the applied dose for triclopyr BEE, nicotinic acid, phenol and benzoic acid, respectively. After the application of the four chemicals to the epidermal surface of unoccluded full-thickness human skin, the absorption of each compound across the skin and into the receptor fluid at 72 hr was significantly (P < 0.05) less than through rat skin, reaching 0.7 +/- 0.1, 0.7 +/- 0.2, 18.8 +/- 1.3 and 37.8 +/- 6.9% (mean +/- SD, n = 2-7) of the applied dose for triclopyr BEE, nicotinic acid, phenol and benzoic acid, respectively. Occlusion of the skin surface with teflon caps often significantly (P < 0.05) enhanced the percutaneous absorption of the model compounds, although this effect was not uniform, varying with the compound under study and the skin (rat or human) used. When rat skin was occluded with teflon caps, the extent of absorption at 72 hr reached 8.6 +/- 0.8, 36.2 +/- 1.7 and 51.8 +/- 3.3% (mean +/- SD, n = 3-4) for nicotinic acid, phenol and benzoic acid, respectively. Corresponding values for human skin occluded with teflon caps were 3.3 +/- 1.6, 47.1 +/- 0.5 and 65.5 +/- 7.1% (mean +/- SD, n = 3-4). The experiments on the absorption of each model compound through rat and human skin were repeated and there was generally good agreement between the results from the two sets of experiments. The in vitro data reported compare favourably with data obtained by other workers using both in vitro and in vivo methodologies

  7. Fluorescence spectral imaging of dihydroxyacetone on skin in vivo.

    PubMed

    Forest, Susan E; Grothaus, Jeff T; Ertel, Keith D; Rader, Charlie; Plante, Janyl

    2003-05-01

    Dihydroxyacetone (DHA) has been proposed as a potential alternative to dansyl chloride for use as a fluorescence marker on skin to assess stratum corneum turnover time in vivo. However, the fluorescence from DHA on skin has not been adequately studied. To address this void, a noninvasive, noncontact spectral imaging system is used to characterize the fluorescence spectrum of DHA on skin in vivo and to determine the optimal wavelengths over which to collect the DHA signal that minimizes the contributions from skin autofluorescence. The DHA-skin fluorescence signal dominates the 580-680 nm region of the visible spectrum when excited with ultraviolet radiation in the 320-400 nm wavelength region (UVA). An explanation of the time-dependent spectral features is proposed in terms of DHA polymerization and binding to skin.

  8. In vivo multiphoton tomography of skin cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten; Riemann, Iris; Ehlers, Alexander; Buckle, Rainer; Dimitrow, Enrico; Kaatz, Martin; Fluhr, Joachim; Elsner, Peter

    2006-02-01

    The multiphoton tomograph DermaInspect was used to perform first clinical studies on the early non-invasive detection of skin cancer based on non-invasive optical sectioning of skin by two-photon autofluorescence and second harmonic generation. In particular, deep-tissue pigmented lesions -nevi- have been imaged with intracellular resolution using near infrared (NIR) femtosecond laser radiation. So far, more than 250 patients have been investigated. Cancerous tissues showed significant morphological differences compared to normal skin layers. In the case of malignant melanoma, the occurrence of luminescent melanocytes has been detected. Multiphoton tomography will become a novel non-invasive method to obtain high-resolution 3D optical biopsies for early cancer detection, treatment control, and in situ drug screening.

  9. Effects of a skin-massaging device on the ex-vivo expression of human dermis proteins and in-vivo facial wrinkles.

    PubMed

    Caberlotto, Elisa; Ruiz, Laetitia; Miller, Zane; Poletti, Mickael; Tadlock, Lauri

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical and geometrical cues influence cell behaviour. At the tissue level, almost all organs exhibit immediate mechanical responsiveness, in particular by increasing their stiffness in direct proportion to an applied mechanical stress. It was recently shown in cultured-cell models, in particular with fibroblasts, that the frequency of the applied stress is a fundamental stimulating parameter. However, the influence of the stimulus frequency at the tissue level has remained elusive. Using a device to deliver an oscillating torque that generates cyclic strain at different frequencies, we studied the effect(s) of mild skin massage in an ex vivo model and in vivo. Skin explants were maintained ex vivo for 10 days and massaged twice daily for one minute at various frequencies within the range of 65-85 Hz. Biopsies were analysed at D0, D5 and D10 and processed for immuno-histological staining specific to various dermal proteins. As compared to untreated skin explants, the massaging procedure clearly led to higher rates of expression, in particular for decorin, fibrillin, tropoelastin, and procollagen-1. The mechanical stimulus thus evoked an anti-aging response. Strikingly, the expression was found to depend on the stimulus frequency with maximum expression at 75Hz. We then tested whether this mechanical stimulus had an anti-aging effect in vivo. Twenty Caucasian women (aged 65-75y) applied a commercial anti-aging cream to the face and neck, followed by daily treatments using the anti-aging massage device for 8 weeks. A control group of twenty-two women, with similar ages to the first group, applied the cream alone. At W0, W4 and W8, a blinded evaluator assessed the global facial wrinkles, skin texture, lip area, cheek wrinkles, neck sagging and neck texture using a clinical grading scale. We found that combining the massaging device with a skin anti-aging formulation amplified the beneficial effects of the cream.

  10. Effects of a skin-massaging device on the ex-vivo expression of human dermis proteins and in-vivo facial wrinkles

    PubMed Central

    Caberlotto, Elisa; Ruiz, Laetitia; Miller, Zane; Poletti, Mickael; Tadlock, Lauri

    2017-01-01

    Mechanical and geometrical cues influence cell behaviour. At the tissue level, almost all organs exhibit immediate mechanical responsiveness, in particular by increasing their stiffness in direct proportion to an applied mechanical stress. It was recently shown in cultured-cell models, in particular with fibroblasts, that the frequency of the applied stress is a fundamental stimulating parameter. However, the influence of the stimulus frequency at the tissue level has remained elusive. Using a device to deliver an oscillating torque that generates cyclic strain at different frequencies, we studied the effect(s) of mild skin massage in an ex vivo model and in vivo. Skin explants were maintained ex vivo for 10 days and massaged twice daily for one minute at various frequencies within the range of 65–85 Hz. Biopsies were analysed at D0, D5 and D10 and processed for immuno-histological staining specific to various dermal proteins. As compared to untreated skin explants, the massaging procedure clearly led to higher rates of expression, in particular for decorin, fibrillin, tropoelastin, and procollagen-1. The mechanical stimulus thus evoked an anti-aging response. Strikingly, the expression was found to depend on the stimulus frequency with maximum expression at 75Hz. We then tested whether this mechanical stimulus had an anti-aging effect in vivo. Twenty Caucasian women (aged 65-75y) applied a commercial anti-aging cream to the face and neck, followed by daily treatments using the anti-aging massage device for 8 weeks. A control group of twenty-two women, with similar ages to the first group, applied the cream alone. At W0, W4 and W8, a blinded evaluator assessed the global facial wrinkles, skin texture, lip area, cheek wrinkles, neck sagging and neck texture using a clinical grading scale. We found that combining the massaging device with a skin anti-aging formulation amplified the beneficial effects of the cream. PMID:28249037

  11. Reconstructing in-vivo reflectance spectrum of pigmented skin lesion by Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuang; He, Qingli; Zhao, Jianhua; Lui, Harvey; Zeng, Haishan

    2012-03-01

    In dermatology applications, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy has been extensively investigated as a promising tool for the noninvasive method to distinguish melanoma from benign pigmented skin lesion (nevus), which is concentrated with the skin chromophores like melanin and hemoglobin. We carried out a theoretical study to examine melanin distribution in human skin tissue and establish a practical optical model for further pigmented skin investigation. The theoretical simulation was using junctional nevus as an example. A multiple layer skin optical model was developed on established anatomy structures of skin, the published optical parameters of different skin layers, blood and melanin. Monte Carlo simulation was used to model the interaction between excitation light and skin tissue and rebuild the diffuse reflectance process from skin tissue. A testified methodology was adopted to determine melanin contents in human skin based on in vivo diffuse reflectance spectra. The rebuild diffuse reflectance spectra were investigated by adding melanin into different layers of the theoretical model. One of in vivo reflectance spectra from Junctional nevi and their surrounding normal skin was studied by compare the ratio between nevus and normal skin tissue in both the experimental and simulated diffuse reflectance spectra. The simulation result showed a good agreement with our clinical measurements, which indicated that our research method, including the spectral ratio method, skin optical model and modifying the melanin content in the model, could be applied in further theoretical simulation of pigmented skin lesions.

  12. Reconstructing in-vivo reflectance spectrum of pigmented skin lesion by Monte Carlo simulation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Shuang; He, Qingli; Zhao, Jianhua; Lui, Harvey; Zeng, Haishan

    2011-11-01

    In dermatology applications, diffuse reflectance spectroscopy has been extensively investigated as a promising tool for the noninvasive method to distinguish melanoma from benign pigmented skin lesion (nevus), which is concentrated with the skin chromophores like melanin and hemoglobin. We carried out a theoretical study to examine melanin distribution in human skin tissue and establish a practical optical model for further pigmented skin investigation. The theoretical simulation was using junctional nevus as an example. A multiple layer skin optical model was developed on established anatomy structures of skin, the published optical parameters of different skin layers, blood and melanin. Monte Carlo simulation was used to model the interaction between excitation light and skin tissue and rebuild the diffuse reflectance process from skin tissue. A testified methodology was adopted to determine melanin contents in human skin based on in vivo diffuse reflectance spectra. The rebuild diffuse reflectance spectra were investigated by adding melanin into different layers of the theoretical model. One of in vivo reflectance spectra from Junctional nevi and their surrounding normal skin was studied by compare the ratio between nevus and normal skin tissue in both the experimental and simulated diffuse reflectance spectra. The simulation result showed a good agreement with our clinical measurements, which indicated that our research method, including the spectral ratio method, skin optical model and modifying the melanin content in the model, could be applied in further theoretical simulation of pigmented skin lesions.

  13. In vivo observation of age-related structural changes of dermal collagen in human facial skin using collagen-sensitive second harmonic generation microscope equipped with 1250-nm mode-locked Cr:Forsterite laser

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yasui, Takeshi; Yonetsu, Makoto; Tanaka, Ryosuke; Tanaka, Yuji; Fukushima, Shu-ichiro; Yamashita, Toyonobu; Ogura, Yuki; Hirao, Tetsuji; Murota, Hiroyuki; Araki, Tsutomu

    2013-03-01

    In vivo visualization of human skin aging is demonstrated using a Cr:Forsterite (Cr:F) laser-based, collagen-sensitive second harmonic generation (SHG) microscope. The deep penetration into human skin, as well as the specific sensitivity to collagen molecules, achieved by this microscope enables us to clearly visualize age-related structural changes of collagen fiber in the reticular dermis. Here we investigated intrinsic aging and/or photoaging in the male facial skin. Young subjects show dense distributions of thin collagen fibers, whereas elderly subjects show coarse distributions of thick collagen fibers. Furthermore, a comparison of SHG images between young and elderly subjects with and without a recent life history of excessive sun exposure show that a combination of photoaging with intrinsic aging significantly accelerates skin aging. We also perform image analysis based on two-dimensional Fourier transformation of the SHG images and extracted an aging parameter for human skin. The in vivo collagen-sensitive SHG microscope will be a powerful tool in fields such as cosmeceutical sciences and anti-aging dermatology.

  14. In vivo observation of age-related structural changes of dermal collagen in human facial skin using collagen-sensitive second harmonic generation microscope equipped with 1250-nm mode-locked Cr:Forsterite laser.

    PubMed

    Yasui, Takeshi; Yonetsu, Makoto; Tanaka, Ryosuke; Tanaka, Yuji; Fukushima, Shu-ichiro; Yamashita, Toyonobu; Ogura, Yuki; Hirao, Tetsuji; Murota, Hiroyuki; Araki, Tsutomu

    2013-03-01

    In vivo visualization of human skin aging is demonstrated using a Cr:Forsterite (Cr:F) laser-based, collagen-sensitive second harmonic generation (SHG) microscope. The deep penetration into human skin, as well as the specific sensitivity to collagen molecules, achieved by this microscope enables us to clearly visualize age-related structural changes of collagen fiber in the reticular dermis. Here we investigated intrinsic aging and/or photoaging in the male facial skin. Young subjects show dense distributions of thin collagen fibers, whereas elderly subjects show coarse distributions of thick collagen fibers. Furthermore, a comparison of SHG images between young and elderly subjects with and without a recent life history of excessive sun exposure show that a combination of photoaging with intrinsic aging significantly accelerates skin aging. We also perform image analysis based on two-dimensional Fourier transformation of the SHG images and extracted an aging parameter for human skin. The in vivo collagen-sensitive SHG microscope will be a powerful tool in fields such as cosmeceutical sciences and anti-aging dermatology.

  15. Mechanism and biological relevance of blue-light (420-453 nm)-induced nonenzymatic nitric oxide generation from photolabile nitric oxide derivates in human skin in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Opländer, Christian; Deck, Annika; Volkmar, Christine M; Kirsch, Michael; Liebmann, Jörg; Born, Matthias; van Abeelen, Frank; van Faassen, Ernst E; Kröncke, Klaus-Dietrich; Windolf, Joachim; Suschek, Christoph V

    2013-12-01

    Human skin contains photolabile nitric oxide (NO) derivates such as nitrite and S-nitrosothiols, which upon UVA radiation decompose under high-output NO formation and exert NO-specific biological responses such as increased local blood flow or reduced blood pressure. To avoid the injurious effects of UVA radiation, we here investigated the mechanism and biological relevance of blue-light (420-453 nm)-induced nonenzymatic NO generation from photolabile nitric oxide derivates in human skin in vitro and in vivo. As quantified by chemiluminescence detection (CLD), at physiological pH blue light at 420 or 453 nm induced a significant NO formation from S-nitrosoalbumin and also from aqueous nitrite solutions by a to-date not entirely identified Cu(1+)-dependent mechanism. As detected by electron paramagnetic resonance spectrometry in vitro with human skin specimens, blue light irradiation significantly increased the intradermal levels of free NO. As detected by CLD in vivo in healthy volunteers, irradiation of human skin with blue light induced a significant emanation of NO from the irradiated skin area as well as a significant translocation of NO from the skin surface into the underlying tissue. In parallel, blue light irradiation caused a rapid and significant rise in local cutaneous blood flow as detected noninvasively by using micro-light-guide spectrophotometry. Irradiation of human skin with moderate doses of blue light caused a significant increase in enzyme-independent cutaneous NO formation as well as NO-dependent local biological responses, i.e., increased blood flow. The effects were attributed to blue-light-induced release of NO from cutaneous photolabile NO derivates. Thus, in contrast to UVA, blue-light-induced NO generation might be therapeutically used in the treatment of systemic and local hemodynamic disorders that are based on impaired physiological NO production or bioavailability. © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Terahertz spectroscopy of pigmentary skin nevi in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaitsev, K. I.; Chernomyrdin, N. V.; Kudrin, K. G.; Reshetov, I. V.; Yurchenko, S. O.

    2015-09-01

    Pigmentary skin nevi are studied in vivo using terahertz pulsed spectroscopy. Dielectric parameters of healthy skin and dysplastic and nondysplastic nevi are reconstructed and analyzed. The fact that complex permittivities of the samples substantially differ in the terahertz spectral range can be used for early noninvasive diagnostics of dysplastic nevi, which are precursors of melanoma (the most dangerous skin cancer). A method is proposed to identify various dysplastic and nondysplastic nevi using the analysis of terahertz dielectric characteristics. It is demonstrated that terahertz pulsed spectroscopy is promising for early noninvasive diagnostics of dysplastic nevi and melanomas of the skin.

  17. Monte Carlo simulation of near infrared autofluorescence measurements of in vivo skin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Shuang; Zhao, Jianhua; Lui, Harvey; He, Qingli; Zeng, Haishan

    2011-12-02

    The autofluorescence properties of normal human skin in the near-infrared (NIR) spectral range were studied using Monte Carlo simulation. The light-tissue interactions including scattering, absorption and anisotropy propagation of the regenerated autofluorescence photons in the skin tissue were taken into account in the theoretical modeling. Skin was represented as a turbid seven-layered medium. To facilitate the simulation, ex vivo NIR autofluorescence spectra and images from different skin layers were measured from frozen skin vertical sections to define the intrinsic fluorescence properties. Monte Carlo simulation was then used to study how the intrinsic fluorescence spectra were distorted by the tissue reabsorption and scattering during in vivo measurements. We found that the reconstructed model skin spectra were in good agreement with the measured in vivo skin spectra from the same anatomical site as the ex vivo tissue sections, demonstrating the usefulness of this modeling. We also found that difference exists over the melanin fluorescent wavelength range (880-910 nm) between the simulated spectrum and the measured in vivo skin spectrum from a different anatomical site. This difference suggests that melanin contents may affect in vivo skin autofluorescence properties, which deserves further investigation.

  18. In vivo multiphoton endoscopy of endogenous skin fluorophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlers, Alexander; Schenkl, Selma; Riemann, Iris; Messerschmidt, Bernhard; Kaatz, Martin; Bückle, Rainer; König, Karsten

    2007-02-01

    Multiphoton tomography offers a painless method to examine patients under natural physiological conditions in vivo. Multiphoton excitation induces a weak autofluorescence of naturally endogenous fluorescent bio-molecules, such as flavines, NAD(P)H, metal-free porphyrines, components of lipofuscin, elastin and keratin. Additionally, collagen can be detected by second harmonic generation (SHG). Due to the nonlinearity, the effects occur only in a very tight focus, where the photon density is high enough. This leads to high axial and lateral resolution of <1μm without any need of a confocal detection and avoids out-of-focus damage. The limited depth range, given by the working distance of the focusing optics, is overcome with a gradient index-lens (GRIN-lens) based endoscope. In this work we present the first results of clinical applications in vivo of gradient-index lens endoscopes. Images of e.g. elastin and collagen (SHG) in the dermal layer of human skin are presented.

  19. Acute skin barrier disruption with repeated tape stripping: an in vivo model for damage skin barrier.

    PubMed

    Gao, Yanrui; Wang, Xuemin; Chen, Shuangyu; Li, Shuyuan; Liu, Xiaoping

    2013-05-01

    To establish a model of standardized acute barrier disruption, investigate the response of normal human to repeated tape stripping, and analyze the change of damaged skin with non-invasive examination techniques for skin, such as TEWL and squamometry. Repeated tape stripping with corneofix was applied on three different anatomical sites; the measurement of TEWL was performed on the baseline and after every 5 strips. Then, the samples of corneofix were analyzed using Visioscan VC98 and squamometry. The parameter of TEWL and cohesion score show stable change trend. TEWL increased with frequency of stripping and were significantly higher compared with that of baseline on three sites. The results of staining of corneofix showed that the intercorneocyte cohesion is increased with the number of strips, and the more the number of strips, the more the fixation of dye per cell. The changes in the skin barrier function of different sites were different after it accepted physical stimulation, the process of damaging skin barrier could be divided into three stages based on the △TEWL. In addition, through stripping the skin of an adult, the in vivo model of damaged skin barrier could be setup. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  20. Characterization of Temperature Profiles in Skin and Transdermal Delivery System When Exposed to Temperature Gradients In Vivo and In Vitro.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Qian; Murawsky, Michael; LaCount, Terri; Hao, Jinsong; Kasting, Gerald B; Newman, Bryan; Ghosh, Priyanka; Raney, Sam G; Li, S Kevin

    2017-07-01

    Performance of a transdermal delivery system (TDS) can be affected by exposure to elevated temperature, which can lead to unintended safety issues. This study investigated TDS and skin temperatures and their relationship in vivo, characterized the effective thermal resistance of skin, and identified the in vitro diffusion cell conditions that would correlate with in vivo observations. Experiments were performed in humans and in Franz diffusion cells with human cadaver skin to record skin and TDS temperatures at room temperature and with exposure to a heat flux. Skin temperatures were regulated with two methods: a heating lamp in vivo and in vitro, or thermostatic control of the receiver chamber in vitro. In vivo basal skin temperatures beneath TDS at different anatomical sites were not statistically different. The maximum tolerable skin surface temperature was approximately 42-43°C in vivo. The temperature difference between skin surface and TDS surface increased with increasing temperature, or with increasing TDS thermal resistance in vivo and in vitro. Based on the effective thermal resistance of skin in vivo and in vitro, the heating lamp method is an adequate in vitro method. However, the in vitro-in vivo correlation of temperature could be affected by the thermal boundary layer in the receiver chamber.

  1. In vivo skin penetration of salicylic compounds in hairless rats.

    PubMed

    Simonsen, Lene; Petersen, Mads B; Groth, Lotte

    2002-10-01

    The in vivo skin penetration of four salicylic compounds was investigated using a hairless rat model, which allowed for non-occluded, finite dose application, and free mobility of the rats throughout the test period. The model compounds were applied in equimolal concentrations of 0.4 mmol/g dimethyl isosorbide. At certain times (0.5-24 h) the rats were killed, and the amount of test compound on the skin surface, in the stratum corneum, and in the deeper viable skin layers was determined. Significant different skin concentrations were found with the following ranking: [(14)C]diethylamine salicylate>[(14)C]salicylic acid>[(14)C]salicylamide>[(14)C]butyl salicylate. In addition, the in vivo percutaneous rate of absorption was in the following order: [(14)C]butyl salicylate>[(14)C]salicylic acid> or =[(14)C]salicylamide>[(14)C]diethylamine salicylate. [(14)C]Butyl salicylate was rapidly absorbed and completely depleted from the surface 3 h post application. In comparison with [(14)C]salicylic acid, the ionic [(14)C]diethylamine salicylate had larger surface depots and penetrated the skin at a lower rate. The relatively hydrophilic [(14)C]salicylamide also had larger surface depots but much lower skin levels. For comparison, the in vitro permeation of the formulations was studied through freshly excised hairless rat skin using Franz diffusions cells, and an agreement between the techniques was found.

  2. Non-invasive in vivo determination of the carotenoids beta-carotene and lycopene concentrations in the human skin using the Raman spectroscopic method

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darvin, M. E.; Gersonde, I.; Meinke, M.; Sterry, W.; Lademann, J.

    2005-08-01

    Resonance Raman spectroscopy was used as a fast and non-invasive optical method of measuring the absolute concentrations of beta-carotene and lycopene in living human skin. Beta-carotene and lycopene have different absorption values at 488 and 514.5 nm and, consequently, the Raman lines for beta-carotene and lycopene have different scattering efficiencies at 488 and 514.5 nm excitations. These differences were used for the determination of the concentrations of beta-carotene and lycopene. Using multiline Ar+ laser excitation, clearly distinguishable carotenoid Raman spectra can be obtained which are superimposed on a large fluorescence background. The Raman signals are characterized by two prominent Stokes lines at 1160 and 1525 cm-1, which have nearly identical relative intensities. Both substances were detected simultaneously. The Raman spectra are obtained rapidly, i.e. within about 10 s, and the required laser light exposure level is well within safety standards. The disturbance of the measurements by non-homogeneous skin pigmentation was avoided by using a relatively large measuring area of 35 mm2. It was shown that beta-carotene and lycopene distribution in human skin strongly depends upon the skin region studied and drastically changed inter-individually. Skin beta-carotene and lycopene concentrations are lower in smokers than in non-smokers and higher in the vegetarian group.

  3. In Vivo Skin Solvent Penetration Measurements Using Opto-thermal Radiometry and Fingerprint Sensor

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Xiao, Perry; Ou, X.; Ciortea, L. I.; Berg, E. P.; Imhof, R. E.

    2012-11-01

    This latest study on in vivo transdermal drug delivery by using opto-thermal radiometry and a capacitance-based fingerprint sensor is presented. A small amount of solvent was applied on the test sites of a volar forearm for a few minutes; opto-thermal measurements and fingerprint sensor measurements were performed both before the solvent application and periodically after. The results showed that, by selecting different detection wavelengths, opto-thermal radiometry could give the information either on the water concentration within skin or the solvent concentration within skin. The capacitance-based fingerprint sensor could clearly visualize solvent penetration through in vivo human skin, as it generated dynamic two-dimensional (2D) images of solvent distribution within skin, and combining with tape stripping, it was also possible to get solvent 3D depth profiles within skin. The correlation between opto-thermal transient emission radiometry and fingerprint sensor measurements was also evaluated.

  4. Increased in vivo skin penetration of quantum dots with UVR and in vitro quantum dot cytotoxicity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mortensen, Luke; Zheng, Hong; Faulknor, Renea; De Benedetto, Anna; Beck, Lisa; DeLouise, Lisa A.

    2009-02-01

    The growing presence of quantum dots (QD) in a variety of biological, medical, and electronics applications means an increased risk of human exposure in manufacturing, research, and consumer use. However, very few studies have investigated the susceptibility of skin to penetration of QD - the most common exposure route- and the results of those that exist are conflicting. This suggests that a technique allowing determination of skin barrier status and prediction of skin permeability to QD would be of crucial interest as recent findings have provided evidence of in vitro cytotoxicity and long-term in vivo retention in the body for most QD surface chemistries. Our research focuses on barrier status of the skin (intact and with ultraviolet radiation induced barrier defect) and its impact on QD skin penetration. These model studies are particularly relevant to the common application condition of NP containing sunscreen and SPF cosmetics to UV exposed skin. Herein we present our initial efforts to develop an in vivo model of nanoparticle skin penetration using the SKH-1 hairless mouse with transepidermal water loss (TEWL) to evaluate skin barrier status and determine its ability to predict QD penetration. Our results show that ultraviolet radiation increases both TEWL and skin penetration of QD. Additionally, we demonstrate cytotoxic potential of QD to skin cells using a metastatic melanoma cell line. Our research suggests future work in specific targeting of nanoparticles, to prevent or enhance penetration. This knowledge will be used to develop powerful therapeutic agents, decreased penetration cosmetic nanoparticles, and precise skin cancer imaging modalities.

  5. Alternatives to In Vivo Draize Rabbit Eye and Skin Irritation Tests with a Focus on 3D Reconstructed Human Cornea-Like Epithelium and Epidermis Models.

    PubMed

    Lee, Miri; Hwang, Jee-Hyun; Lim, Kyung-Min

    2017-07-01

    Human eyes and skin are frequently exposed to chemicals accidentally or on purpose due to their external location. Therefore, chemicals are required to undergo the evaluation of the ocular and dermal irritancy for their safe handling and use before release into the market. Draize rabbit eye and skin irritation test developed in 1944, has been a gold standard test which was enlisted as OECD TG 404 and OECD TG 405 but it has been criticized with respect to animal welfare due to invasive and cruel procedure. To replace it, diverse alternatives have been developed: (i) For Draize eye irritation test, organotypic assay, in vitro cytotoxicity-based method, in chemico tests, in silico prediction model, and 3D reconstructed human cornea-like epithelium (RhCE); (ii) For Draize skin irritation test, in vitro cytotoxicity-based cell model, and 3D reconstructed human epidermis models (RhE). Of these, RhCE and RhE models are getting spotlight as a promising alternative with a wide applicability domain covering cosmetics and personal care products. In this review, we overviewed the current alternatives to Draize test with a focus on 3D human epithelium models to provide an insight into advancing and widening their utility.

  6. Alternatives to In Vivo Draize Rabbit Eye and Skin Irritation Tests with a Focus on 3D Reconstructed Human Cornea-Like Epithelium and Epidermis Models

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Miri; Hwang, Jee-Hyun; Lim, Kyung-Min

    2017-01-01

    Human eyes and skin are frequently exposed to chemicals accidentally or on purpose due to their external location. Therefore, chemicals are required to undergo the evaluation of the ocular and dermal irritancy for their safe handling and use before release into the market. Draize rabbit eye and skin irritation test developed in 1944, has been a gold standard test which was enlisted as OECD TG 404 and OECD TG 405 but it has been criticized with respect to animal welfare due to invasive and cruel procedure. To replace it, diverse alternatives have been developed: (i) For Draize eye irritation test, organotypic assay, in vitro cytotoxicity-based method, in chemico tests, in silico prediction model, and 3D reconstructed human cornea-like epithelium (RhCE); (ii) For Draize skin irritation test, in vitro cytotoxicity-based cell model, and 3D reconstructed human epidermis models (RhE). Of these, RhCE and RhE models are getting spotlight as a promising alternative with a wide applicability domain covering cosmetics and personal care products. In this review, we overviewed the current alternatives to Draize test with a focus on 3D human epithelium models to provide an insight into advancing and widening their utility. PMID:28744350

  7. Combined Raman spectroscopy and autofluoresence imaging method for in vivo skin tumor diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zakharov, V. P.; Bratchenko, I. A.; Myakinin, O. O.; Artemyev, D. N.; Khristoforova, Y. A.; Kozlov, S. V.; Moryatov, A. A.

    2014-09-01

    The fluorescence and Raman spectroscopy (RS) combined method of in vivo detection of malignant human skin cancer was demonstrated. The fluorescence analysis was used for detection of abnormalities during fast scanning of large tissue areas. In suspected cases of malignancy the Raman spectrum analysis of biological tissue was performed to determine the type of neoplasm. A special RS phase method was proposed for in vivo identification of skin tumor. Quadratic Discriminant Analysis was used for tumor type classification on phase planes. It was shown that the application of phase method provides a diagnosis of malignant melanoma with a sensitivity of 89% and a specificity of 87%.

  8. Investigation of in-vivo skin autofluorescence lifetimes under long-term cw optical excitation

    SciTech Connect

    Lihachev, A; Ferulova, I; Vasiljeva, K; Spigulis, J

    2014-08-31

    The main results obtained during the last five years in the field of laser-excited in-vivo human skin photobleaching effects are presented. The main achievements and results obtained, as well as methods and experimental devices are briefly described. In addition, the impact of long-term 405-nm cw low-power laser excitation on the skin autofluorescence lifetime is experimentally investigated. (laser biophotonics)

  9. In vivo hyperspectral imaging and differentiation of skin cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zherdeva, Larisa A.; Bratchenko, Ivan A.; Myakinin, Oleg O.; Moryatov, Alexander A.; Kozlov, Sergey V.; Zakharov, Valery P.

    2016-10-01

    Results of hyperspectral imaging analysis for in vivo visualization of skin neoplasms are presented. 16 melanomas, 19 basal cell carcinomas and 10 benign tumors with different stages of neoplasm growth were tested. The HSI system provide skin tissue images with 5 nm spectral resolution in the range of 450-750 nm with automatic stabilization of each frame compensating displacement of the scanning area due to spontaneous macro-movements of the patient. The integrated optical densities in 530-600 and 600-670 nm ranges are used for real-time hemoglobin and melanin distribution imaging in skin tissue. It was shown that the total accuracy of skin cancer identification exceeds 90% and 70% for differentiation of melanomas from BCC and begihn tumors. It was demonstrated the possibility for HSI classification of melanomas of different stages.

  10. Humanized in vivo Model for Autoimmune Diabetes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2009-02-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-07-1-0121 TITLE: Humanized in vivo Model for Autoimmune Diabetes PRINCIPAL INVESTIGATOR: Gerald T Nepom, M.D., Ph.D...4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE Sa. CONTRACT NUMBER Humanized in vivo Model for Autoimmune Diabetes Sb. GRANT NUMBER W81XWH-07-1-0121 Sc. PROGRAM ELEMENT...therapies. This research study entails using humanized mice manifesting type 1 diabetes (T1 D)-associated human HLA molecules to address the fate and

  11. In vivo activation of human immunodeficiency virus type 1 long terminal repeat by UV type A (UV-A) light plus psoralen and UV-B light in the skin of transgenic mice.

    PubMed Central

    Morrey, J D; Bourn, S M; Bunch, T D; Jackson, M K; Sidwell, R W; Barrows, L R; Daynes, R A; Rosen, C A

    1991-01-01

    UV irradiation has been shown to activate the human immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) long terminal repeat (LTR) in cell culture; however, only limited studies have been described in vivo. UV light has been categorized as UV-A (400 to 315 nm), -B (315 to 280 nm), or -C (less than 280 nm); the longer wavelengths are less harmful but more penetrative. Highly penetrative UV-A radiation constitutes the vast majority of UV sunlight reaching the earth's surface but is normally harmless. UV-B irradiation is more harmful but less prevalent than UV-A. In this report, the HIV-1 LTR-luciferase gene in the skin of transgenic mice was markedly activated when exposed to UV-B irradiation. The LTR in the skin of transgenic mice pretreated topically with a photosensitizing agent (psoralen) was also activated to similar levels when exposed to UV-A light. A 2-h exposure to sunlight activated the LTR in skin treated with psoralen, whereas the LTR in skin not treated with psoralen was activated after 7 h of sunlight exposure. The HIV-1 LTR-beta-galactosidase reporter gene was preferentially activated by UV-B irradiation in a small population of epidermal cells. The transgenic mouse models carrying HIV-1 LTR-luciferase and LTR-beta-galactosidase reporter genes have been used to demonstrate the in vivo UV-induced activation of the LTR and might be used to evaluate other environmental factors or pharmacologic substances that might potentially activate the HIV-1 LTR in vivo. Images PMID:1908029

  12. In vivo fluorescence spectroscopy and imaging of ALA-induced endogenous porphyrins in skin after Er:YAG ablation of human stratum corneum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Schneckenburger, Herbert; Boehncke, Wolf-Henning; Hibst, Raimund

    1994-09-01

    Limited regions of human stratum corneum were removed by laser ablation using an Er:YAG laser. Immediately after this procedure, an ointment containing 5-aminolevulinic acid (ALA) was applied topically to the laser-treated and surrounding skin. The time-dependent ALA- induced biosynthesis of protoporphyrin IX was measured by fluorescence detection. Fluorescence in the red spectral region was found to occur in the ablated skin regions only. Time-resolved measurements showed the formation of long-lived fluorophores (16 ns) indicating the presence of ALA-induced monomeric porphyrin. Naturally occurring fluorophores (NAD(P)H, flavins, collagen, elastin) possess shorter fluorescence decay times. Therefore, time-gated measurements in the nanosecond region enable the specific detection of ALA-stimulated porphyrin fluorescence by choosing an appropriate time-window. In addition, detection of backscattered excitation light can be avoided. High-contrast video images of ALA-incubated fluorescent areas were obtained using this novel imaging technique.

  13. In vivo spectroscopy of healthy skin and pathology in terahertz frequency range

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaytsev, Kirill I.; Kudrin, Konstantin G.; Reshetov, Igor V.; Gavdush, Arseniy A.; Chernomyrdin, Nikita V.; Karasik, Valeriy E.; Yurchenko, Stanislav O.

    2015-01-01

    Biomedical applications of terahertz (THz) technology and, in particular, THz pulsed spectroscopy have attracted considerable interest in the scientific community. A lot of papers have been dedicated to studying the ability for human disease diagnosis, including the diagnosis of human skin cancers. In this paper we have studied the THz material parameters and THz dielectric properties of human skin and pathology in vivo, and THz pulsed spectroscopy has been utilized for this purpose. We have found a contrast between material parameters of basal cell carcinoma and healthy skin, and we have also compared the THz material parameters of dysplastic and non-dysplastic pigmentary nevi in order to study the ability for early melanoma diagnosis. Significant differences between the THz material parameters of healthy skin and pathology have been detected, thus, THz pulsed spectroscopy promises to be become an effective tool for non-invasive diagnosis of skin neoplasms.

  14. In vivo skin elastography with high-definition optical videos.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Yong; Brodell, Robert T; Mostow, Eliot N; Vinyard, Christopher J; Marie, Hazel

    2009-08-01

    Continuous measurements of biomechanical properties of skin provide potentially valuable information to dermatologists for both clinical diagnosis and quantitative assessment of therapy. This paper presents an experimental study on in vivo imaging of skin elastic properties using high-definition optical videos. The objective is to (i) investigate whether skin property abnormalities can be detected in the computed strain elastograms, (ii) quantify property abnormalities with a Relative Strain Index (RSI), so that an objective rating system can be established, (iii) determine whether certain skin diseases are more amenable to optical elastography and (iv) identify factors that may have an adverse impact on the quality of strain elastograms. There are three steps in optical skin elastography: (i) skin deformations are recorded in a video sequence using a high-definition camcorder, (ii) a dense motion field between two adjacent video frames is obtained using a robust optical flow algorithm, with which a cumulative motion field between two frames of a larger interval is derived and (iii) a strain elastogram is computed by applying two weighted gradient filters to the cumulative motion data. Experiments were carried out using videos of 25 patients. In the three cases presented in this article (hypertrophic lichen planus, seborrheic keratosis and psoriasis vulgaris), abnormal tissues associated with the skin diseases were successfully identified in the elastograms. There exists a good correspondence between the shape of property abnormalities and the area of diseased skin. The computed RSI gives a quantitative measure of the magnitude of property abnormalities that is consistent with the skin stiffness observed on clinical examinations. Optical elastography is a promising imaging modality that is capable of capturing disease-induced property changes. Its main advantage is that an elastogram presents a continuous description of the spatial variation of skin properties on

  15. Release of markedly increased quantities of prostaglandin D2 from the skin in vivo in humans after the application of cinnamic aldehyde.

    PubMed

    VanderEnde, D S; Morrow, J D

    2001-07-01

    Cinnamic aldehyde is a common fragrance additive in foods and various health and beauty products. Application of cinnamic aldehyde to the skin of humans can induce cutaneous vasodilatation characterized by erythema, urticaria, and stinging. Previous studies have suggested that prostaglandins (PGs) may mediate the vasodilation, but the causative PG has not been established. We have shown that cutaneous vasodilatation induced by compounds such as sorbic acid and methylnicotinate is mediated by PGD2. Our purpose was to determine whether cutaneous vasodilatation induced by cinnamic aldehyde is mediated by PGD2 in humans. Topical application of 1% cinnamic aldehyde to the forearms of 3 human volunteers resulted in cutaneous flushing and 25- to 42-fold increases in the levels of the major circulating metabolite of PGD2, 9alpha, 11beta-PGF2, in blood drawn from the antecubital vein draining the treated sites. There was no increase in other vasodilatory mediators, including PGE2, PGI2, or histamine. The release of PGD2 was concentration dependent. Cutaneous vasodilatation and PGD2 release were markedly decreased by the administration of aspirin, but were not significantly altered by pretreatment with the selective cyclooxygenase-2 inhibitor rofecoxib, suggesting that the formation of PGD2 is dependent on cyclooxygenase-1. The cutaneous vasodilatation induced by cinnamic aldehyde is mediated to a large extent by the release of PGD2 from a cellular source in the skin.

  16. Luminescence monitoring of particle delivery into rat skin in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Volkova, E. K.; Yanina, I. Y.; Genina, E. A.; Dolotov, L. E.; Bashkatov, A. N.; Genin, V. D.; Konyukhova, J. G.; Popov, A. P.; Kozintseva, M. D.; Speranskaya, E.; Lomova, M.; Terentyuk, G. S.; Bucharskaya, A. B.; Navolokin, N. A.; Goryacheva, I. Y.; Kochubey, V. I.; Gorin, D. A.; Tuchin, V. V.; Sukhorukov, G. B.

    2015-07-01

    Delivery of upconversion microparticles [Y2O3:Yb, Er] and quantum dots (CuInS2/ZnS coated with PEG-based amphiphilic polymer) into rat skin using the fractional laser microablation has been studied in vivo. Luminescence spectroscopy, optical coherence tomography, confocal microscopy, and histochemical analysis were used for visualization of nanoparticles in microchannels. Results have shown that the upconversion microparticles are detected more efficiently in comparison with the quantum dots. The fluorescence intensity of the inserted upconversion microparticles is higher, when the Omnipaque™ was applied as a skin optical clearing agent. The fluorescent images of upconversion nanoparticle distribution indicate the advantage of particle delivery into skin by ultrasound.

  17. The ubiquitous cellular transcriptional factor USF targets the varicella-zoster virus open reading frame 10 promoter and determines virulence in human skin xenografts in SCIDhu mice in vivo.

    PubMed

    Che, Xibing; Berarducci, Barbara; Sommer, Marvin; Ruyechan, William T; Arvin, Ann M

    2007-04-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) open reading frame 10 (ORF10) is a determinant of virulence in SCIDhu skin xenografts but not in human T cells in vivo. In this analysis of the regulation of ORF10 transcription, we have identified four ORF10-related transcripts, including a major 1.3-kb RNA spanning ORF10 only and three other read-through transcripts. Rapid-amplification-of-cDNA-ends experiments indicated that the 1.3-kb transcript of ORF10 has single initiation and termination sites. In transient expression assays, the ORF10 promoter was strongly stimulated by the major VZV transactivator, IE62. Deletion analyses revealed approximate boundaries for the full ORF10 promoter activity between -75 and -45 and between +5 and -8, relative to the ORF10 transcription start site. The recombinant virus POKA10-Deltapro, with the ORF10 promoter deletion, blocked transcription of ORF10 and also of ORF9A and ORF9 mRNAs, whereas expression of read-through ORF9A/9/10 and ORF9/10 transcripts was increased, compensating for the loss of the monocistronic mRNAs. The cellular factor USF bound specifically to its consensus site within the ORF10 promoter and was required for IE62 transactivation, whereas disrupting the predicted TATA boxes or Oct-1 binding elements had no effect. The USF binding site was disrupted in the recombinant virus, POKA10-proDeltaUSF, and no ORF10 protein was produced. Both ORF10 promoter mutants reduced VZV replication in SCIDhu skin xenografts. These observations provided further evidence of the contribution of the ORF10 protein to VZV pathogenesis in skin and demonstrated that VZV depends upon the cellular transcriptional factor USF to support its virulence in human skin in vivo.

  18. Motion-artifact-robust, polarization-resolved second-harmonic-generation microscopy based on rapid polarization switching with electro-optic Pockells cell and its application to in vivo visualization of collagen fiber orientation in human facial skin.

    PubMed

    Tanaka, Yuji; Hase, Eiji; Fukushima, Shuichiro; Ogura, Yuki; Yamashita, Toyonobu; Hirao, Tetsuji; Araki, Tsutomu; Yasui, Takeshi

    2014-04-01

    Polarization-resolved second-harmonic-generation (PR-SHG) microscopy is a powerful tool for investigating collagen fiber orientation quantitatively with low invasiveness. However, the waiting time for the mechanical polarization rotation makes it too sensitive to motion artifacts and hence has hampered its use in various applications in vivo. In the work described in this article, we constructed a motion-artifact-robust, PR-SHG microscope based on rapid polarization switching at every pixel with an electro-optic Pockells cell (PC) in synchronization with step-wise raster scanning of the focus spot and alternate data acquisition of a vertical-polarization-resolved SHG signal and a horizontal-polarization-resolved one. The constructed PC-based PR-SHG microscope enabled us to visualize orientation mapping of dermal collagen fiber in human facial skin in vivo without the influence of motion artifacts. Furthermore, it implied the location and/or age dependence of the collagen fiber orientation in human facial skin. The robustness to motion artifacts in the collagen orientation measurement will expand the application scope of SHG microscopy in dermatology and collagen-related fields.

  19. Motion-artifact-robust, polarization-resolved second-harmonic-generation microscopy based on rapid polarization switching with electro-optic Pockells cell and its application to in vivo visualization of collagen fiber orientation in human facial skin

    PubMed Central

    Tanaka, Yuji; Hase, Eiji; Fukushima, Shuichiro; Ogura, Yuki; Yamashita, Toyonobu; Hirao, Tetsuji; Araki, Tsutomu; Yasui, Takeshi

    2014-01-01

    Polarization-resolved second-harmonic-generation (PR-SHG) microscopy is a powerful tool for investigating collagen fiber orientation quantitatively with low invasiveness. However, the waiting time for the mechanical polarization rotation makes it too sensitive to motion artifacts and hence has hampered its use in various applications in vivo. In the work described in this article, we constructed a motion-artifact-robust, PR-SHG microscope based on rapid polarization switching at every pixel with an electro-optic Pockells cell (PC) in synchronization with step-wise raster scanning of the focus spot and alternate data acquisition of a vertical-polarization-resolved SHG signal and a horizontal-polarization-resolved one. The constructed PC-based PR-SHG microscope enabled us to visualize orientation mapping of dermal collagen fiber in human facial skin in vivo without the influence of motion artifacts. Furthermore, it implied the location and/or age dependence of the collagen fiber orientation in human facial skin. The robustness to motion artifacts in the collagen orientation measurement will expand the application scope of SHG microscopy in dermatology and collagen-related fields. PMID:24761292

  20. Microarray Analysis of Host Cell Gene Transcription in Response to Varicella-Zoster Virus Infection of Human T Cells and Fibroblasts In Vitro and SCIDhu Skin Xenografts In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Jeremy O.; Arvin, Ann M.

    2003-01-01

    During primary infection, varicella-zoster virus (VZV) is spread via lymphocytes to skin, where it induces a rash and establishes latency in sensory ganglia. A live, attenuated varicella vaccine (vOka) was generated by using the VZV Oka strain (pOka), but the molecular basis for vOka attenuation remains unknown. Little is known concerning the effects of wild-type or attenuated VZV on cellular gene regulation in the host cells that are critical for pathogenesis. In this study, transcriptional profiles of primary human T cells and fibroblasts infected with VZV in cell culture were determined by using 40,000-spot human cDNA microarrays. Cellular gene transcription in human skin xenografts in SCID mice that were infected with VZV in vivo was also evaluated. The profiles of cellular gene transcripts that were induced or inhibited in infected human foreskin fibroblasts (HFFs), T cells, and skin in response to pOka and vOka infection were similar. However, significant alterations in cellular gene regulation were observed among the three differentiated human cell types that were examined, suggesting specific differences in the biological consequences of VZV infection related to the target cell. Changes in cellular gene transcription detected by microarray analysis were confirmed for selected genes by quantitative real-time reverse transcription-PCR analysis of VZV-infected cells. Interestingly, the transcription of caspase 8 was found to be decreased in infected T cells but not in HFFs or skin, which may signify a tissue-specific antiapoptosis mechanism. The use of microarrays to demonstrate differences in effects on host cell genes in primary, biologically relevant cell types provides background information for experiments to link these various response phenotypes with mechanisms of VZV pathogenesis that are important for the natural course of human infection. PMID:12502844

  1. Towards in vivo breast skin characterization using multiphoton microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Batista, Ana; Uchugonova, Aisada; Breunig, Hans Georg; König, Karsten

    2017-02-01

    Breast cancer, the most common type of cancer in women worldwide, as well as its treatment (e.g. radiation therapy) can affect the human skin. Multiphoton imaging could provide new insights into these skin alterations non-invasively and with high-resolution. As a preparation for a later investigation involving patients, areas of the breast and forearm skin of healthy volunteers were imaged using the clinically certified multiphoton imaging tomograph MPTflex based on endogenous skin autofluorescence and second-harmonic signals. Depth-resolved image stacks were acquired in consecutive weeks to explore the influence of hormonal variations on the skin properties. Both breasts were considered and up to three different areas were imaged per session. Acquisition parameters were optimized to minimize artifacts caused by breathing-motion. As a first result, skin properties, such as the epidermal thickness, appear to be influenced by hormonal variations.

  2. A Guide to Studying Human Hair Follicle Cycling In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Oh, Ji Won; Kloepper, Jennifer; Langan, Ewan A; Kim, Yongsoo; Yeo, Joongyeub; Kim, Min Ji; Hsi, Tsai-Ching; Rose, Christian; Yoon, Ghil Suk; Lee, Seok-Jong; Seykora, John; Kim, Jung Chul; Sung, Young Kwan; Kim, Moonkyu; Paus, Ralf; Plikus, Maksim V

    2016-01-01

    Hair follicles (HFs) undergo lifelong cyclical transformations, progressing through stages of rapid growth (anagen), regression (catagen), and relative "quiescence" (telogen). Given that HF cycling abnormalities underlie many human hair growth disorders, the accurate classification of individual cycle stages within skin biopsies is clinically important and essential for hair research. For preclinical human hair research purposes, human scalp skin can be xenografted onto immunocompromised mice to study human HF cycling and manipulate long-lasting anagen in vivo. Although available for mice, a comprehensive guide on how to recognize different human hair cycle stages in vivo is lacking. In this article, we present such a guide, which uses objective, well-defined, and reproducible criteria, and integrates simple morphological indicators with advanced, (immuno)-histochemical markers. This guide also characterizes human HF cycling in xenografts and highlights the utility of this model for in vivo hair research. Detailed schematic drawings and representative micrographs provide examples of how best to identify human HF stages, even in suboptimally sectioned tissue, and practical recommendations are given for designing human-on-mouse hair cycle experiments. Thus, this guide seeks to offer a benchmark for human hair cycle stage classification, for both hair research experts and newcomers to the field.

  3. A guide to studying human hair follicle cycling in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Oh, Ji Won; Kloepper, Jennifer; Langan, Ewan A.; Kim, Yongsoo; Yeo, Joongyeub; Kim, Min Ji; Hsi, Tsai-Ching; Rose, Christian; Yoon, Ghil Suk; Lee, Seok-Jong; Seykora, John; Kim, Jung Chul; Sung, Young Kwan

    2015-01-01

    Hair follicles (HFs) undergo life-long cyclical transformations, progressing through stages of rapid growth (anagen), regression (catagen), and relative “quiescence” (telogen). Since HF cycling abnormalities underlie many human hair growth disorders, the accurate classification of individual cycle stages within skin biopsies is clinically important and essential for hair research. For preclinical human hair research purposes, human scalp skin can be xenografted onto immunocompromised mice to study human HF cycling and manipulate long-lasting anagen in vivo. While available for mice, a comprehensive guide on how to recognize different human hair cycle stages in vivo is lacking. Here, we present such a guide, which uses objective, well-defined, and reproducible criteria and integrates simple morphological indicators with advanced, (immuno)-histochemical markers. This guide also characterizes human HF cycling in xenografts and highlights the utility of this model for in vivo hair research. Detailed schematic drawings and representative micrographs provide examples of how best to identify human HF stages, even in sub-optimally sectioned tissue, and practical recommendations are given for designing human-on-mouse hair cycle experiments. Thus, this guide seeks to offer a benchmark for human hair cycle stage classification, for both hair research experts and newcomers to the field. PMID:26763421

  4. Photobleaching effects on in vivo skin autofluorescence lifetime

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ferulova, Inesa; Lihachev, Alexey; Spigulis, Janis

    2015-05-01

    The autofluorescence lifetime of healthy human skin was measured using excitation provided by a picosecond diode laser operating at a wavelength of 405 nm and with fluorescence emission collected at 475 and 560 nm. In addition, spectral and temporal responses of healthy human skin and intradermal nevus in the spectral range 460 to 610 nm were studied before and after photobleaching. A decrease in the autofluorescences lifetimes changes was observed after photobleaching of human skin. A three-exponential model was used to fit the signals, and under this model, the most significant photoinduced changes were observed for the slowest lifetime component in healthy skin at the spectral range 520 to 610 nm and intradermal nevus at the spectral range 460 to 610 nm.

  5. In vivo iontophoretic delivery of salmon calcitonin across microporated skin.

    PubMed

    Vemulapalli, Viswatej; Bai, Yun; Kalluri, Haripriya; Herwadkar, Anushree; Kim, Hyun; Davis, Shawn P; Friden, Phil M; Banga, Ajay K

    2012-08-01

    The purpose of this study was to determine the effect of microneedle (MN) technology and its combination with iontophoresis (ITP) on the in vivo transdermal delivery of salmon calcitonin (sCT). Maltose MNs (500 µm) were used to porate skin prior to application of the drug, with or without ITP. Micropores created by maltose MNs were characterized by histological sectioning and calcein imaging studies, which indicated uniformity of the created micropores. In vivo studies were performed in hairless rats to assess the degree of enhancement achieved by ITP (0.2 mA/cm² for 1 h), MNs (81 MNs), and their combination. In vivo studies indicate a serum maximal concentration of 0.61 ± 0.42 ng/mL, 1.79 ± 0.72 ng/mL, and 5.51 ± 0.32 ng/mL for ITP, MNs, and combination treatment, respectively. MN treatment alone increased serum concentration 2.5-fold and the combination treatment increased the concentration ninefold as compared with iontophoretic treatment alone. Combination treatment of ITP and MNs resulted in the highest delivery of sCT and therapeutic levels were achieved within 5 min of administration.

  6. The Effect of Polyhexanide, Octenidine Dihydrochloride, and Tea Tree Oil as Topical Antiseptic Agents on In Vivo Microcirculation of the Human Skin: A Noninvasive Quantitative Analysis.

    PubMed

    Rothenberger, Jens; Krauss, Sabrina; Tschumi, Christian; Rahmanian-Schwarz, Afshin; Schaller, Hans-Eberhard; Held, Manuel

    2016-10-01

    Antiseptics are indispensable for wound management and should focus not only on the efficacy in reducing the bacterial burden but also on how much they interfere in wound healing. In this study, the authors analyzed the direct effect of topical antiseptic agents on the microcirculation of intact human skin. The perfusion dynamics were assessed before, and 10 minutes after, the volunteers' fingers of the right hand (n = 20) were immersed in the following solutions - octenidine dihydrochloride, polyhexanide, tea tree oil, and saline solution. The authors used the Oxygen to See (LEA Medizintechnik GmbH, Giessen, Germany) diagnostic device for noninvasive determination of oxygen supply in microcirculation of blood perfused tissues, which combines a laser light to determine blood flow, as well as white light to determine hemoglobin oxygenation and the relative amount of hemoglobin. Tea tree oil (÷19.0%) (B. Braun Melsungen AG, Melsungen, Germany) and polyhexanide (÷12.4%) (Lavanid, Serag Wiessner GmbH, Naila, Germany) caused a significant increase in blood flow compared to the negative control (-25.6%). Octenidine (Octenisept, Schülke & Mayr GmbH, Norderstedt, Germany) showed a nonsignificant trend towards an increase in blood flow (÷7.2%). There were alterations in the values of hemoglobin oxygenation and the relative amount of hemoglobin, but these were not significant. Perfusion is an important factor for wound healing. Therefore, it might be advantageous if antiseptic agents would increase blood flow. Tea tree oil and polyhexanide have a positive effect on skin blood flow and can therefore be used especially in critically perfused wounds, provided the adverse reactions and the antimicrobial efficacy are comparable.

  7. Complex spectral OCT in human eye imaging in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Targowski, Piotr; Wojtkowski, Maciej; Kowalczyk, Andrzej; Bajraszewski, Tomasz; Szkulmowski, Maciej; Gorczyńska, Iwona

    2004-01-01

    Complex spectral optical coherence tomography in comparison to spectral optical coherence tomography produces images free of parasitic terms with extended measurement range. This technique requires stability of the object during at least three consecutive measurements. In this paper we present how to improve this technique to make measurements less sensitive to involuntary eye movements. The first images of human skin and anterior chamber of the eye in vivo based on complex spectral optical coherence tomography are presented.

  8. An optimized in vivo multiple-baseline stereo imaging system for skin wrinkles

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lee, Onseok; Lee, Gunwoo; Oh, Jangseok; Kim, Mingi; Oh, Chilhwan

    2010-12-01

    Recent developments in computer vision have attempted to mimic human visual physiology. One application of this technology is the evaluation of skin wrinkles. We have developed a non-convergence stereo system that can be calibrated in vivo and can be controlled to the level of microns for baseline. We are able to obtain more accurate 3D information by calibrating nonlinear interrelations between the disparity of object and depth information.

  9. In vivo terahertz imaging of rat skin burns

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tewari, Priyamvada; Kealey, Colin P.; Bennett, David B.; Bajwa, Neha; Barnett, Kelli S.; Singh, Rahul S.; Culjat, Martin O.; Stojadinovic, Alexander; Grundfest, Warren S.; Taylor, Zachary D.

    2012-04-01

    A reflective, pulsed terahertz (THz) imaging system was used to acquire high-resolution (d10-90/ λ~1.925) images of deep, partial thickness burns in a live rat. The rat's abdomen was burned with a brass brand heated to ~220°C and pressed against the skin with contact pressure for ~10 sec. The burn injury was imaged beneath a Mylar window every 15 to 30 min for up to 7 h. Initial images display an increase in local water concentration of the burned skin as evidenced by a marked increase in THz reflectivity, and this likely correlates to the post-injury inflammatory response. After ~1 h the area of increased reflectivity consolidated to the region of skin that had direct contact with the brand. Additionally, a low reflecting ring of tissue could be observed surrounding the highly reflective burned tissue. We hypothesize that these regions of increased and decreased reflectivity correlate to the zones of coagulation and stasis that are the classic foundation of burn wound histopathology. While further investigations are necessary to confirm this hypothesis, if true, it likely represents the first in vivo THz images of these pathologic zones and may represent a significant step forward in clinical application of THz technology.

  10. Simulating the three-dimensional deformation of in vivo facial skin.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Cormac; Taberner, Andrew J; Nielsen, Poul M F; Fels, Sidney

    2013-12-01

    Characterising the mechanical properties of human facial skin is a challenging but important endeavour with applications in biomedicine, surgery simulation, forensics, and animation. Many existing computer models of the face are not based on in vivo facial skin deformation data but rather on experiments using in vitro facial skin or other soft tissues. The facial skin of five volunteers was subjected to a rich set of deformations using a micro-robotic device. The force-displacement response was recorded for each deformation. All volunteers' facial skin exhibited a non-linear, anisotropic, and viscoelastic force-displacement response. We propose a finite element model that simulated the experimental deformations with error-of-fits ranging from 11% to 23%. The skin was represented by an Ogden strain energy function and a quasi-linear viscoelastic law. From non-linear optimisation procedures, we determined material parameters and in vivo pre-stresses for the central cheek area of five volunteers and five other facial points on one volunteer. Pre-stresses ranged from 15.9kPa to 89.4kPa. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Imaging the mechanical stiffness of skin lesions by in vivo acousto-optical elastography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kirkpatrick, Sean J.; Wang, Ruikang K.; Duncan, Donald D.; Kulesz-Martin, Molly; Lee, Ken

    2006-10-01

    Optical elastography is an imaging modality that relies on variations in the local mechanical properties of biological tissues as the contrast mechanism for image formation. Skin lesions, such as melanomas and other invasive conditions, are known to alter the arrangement of collagen fibers in the skin and thus should lead to alterations in local skin mechanical properties. We report on an acousto-optical elastography (AOE) imaging modality for quantifying the mechanical behavior of skin lesions. The method relies upon stimulating the tissue with a low frequency acoustic force and imaging the resulting strains in the tissue by means of quantifying the magnitude of the dynamic shift in a back-reflected laser speckle pattern from the skin. The magnitude of the shift reflects the local stiffness of the tissue. We demonstrate AOE on a tissue-mimicking phantom, an in vivo mouse melanoma lesion and two types of in vivo human melanocytic nevi. The skin lesions we examined were found to have distinct mechanical properties that appear to correlate with the varying degrees of dermal involvement of the lesions.

  12. In vivo optical investigation of short term skin water contact and moisturizer application using NIR spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Qassem, M; Kyriacou, P A

    2013-01-01

    Nowadays, a number of noninvasive methods and instruments are available to inspect the biophysical properties and effects of various applicants on human skin, providing quantitative measurements and more details regarding the interactions between skin and various products. Such methods include Near Infrared Spectroscopy (NIRS), a technique which over the years, has gained quite a reputation in being able to accurately determine moisture levels and water contents due to its sensitivity to hydrogen bonding. This paper reports preliminary results of an in vivo study carried out on the skin of a small number of human participants, investigating the optical response of human skin after direct short-term contact with water followed by application of a moisturizer, using a highly advanced spectrophotometer in the region of 900-2100 nm, and equipped with a reflectance fibre optic probe. Results obtained here certainly raise some questions regarding the optical characteristics of different skin types and the influence of frequent moisturizer use, as well as the varying response between different water bands in the NIR region. Future work will focus on gaining more knowledge about these, in order to further improve optical skin measurements, and hopefully support the design and development of a portable and/or miniaturized optical device that could provide reliable, accurate and fast skin hydration readings in real time.

  13. In vivo multiphoton tomography in skin aging studies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    König, Karsten; Bückle, Rainer; Weinigel, Martin; Köhler, Johannes; Elsner, Peter; Kaatz, Martin

    2009-02-01

    High-resolution clinical multiphoton tomography based on the femtosecond laser system DermaInspect has been performed on hundreds of patients and volunteers in Australia, Asia, and Europe. The system enables the in vivo detection of the elastin and the collagen network as well as the imaging of melanin clusters in aging spots. The epidermis-dermis junction can be detected with submicron resolution. One major applications of this novel HighTech imaging tool is the determination of the skin aging index SAAID as well as the study of the effects of anti-aging products. In particular, the stimulated biosynthesis of collagen can be investigated over long periods of time. The system with its sub-500 nm lateral resolution is able to image age-related modifications of the extracellular matrix on the level of a single elastin fiber.

  14. Archaea on human skin.

    PubMed

    Probst, Alexander J; Auerbach, Anna K; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The recent era of exploring the human microbiome has provided valuable information on microbial inhabitants, beneficials and pathogens. Screening efforts based on DNA sequencing identified thousands of bacterial lineages associated with human skin but provided only incomplete and crude information on Archaea. Here, we report for the first time the quantification and visualization of Archaea from human skin. Based on 16 S rRNA gene copies Archaea comprised up to 4.2% of the prokaryotic skin microbiome. Most of the gene signatures analyzed belonged to the Thaumarchaeota, a group of Archaea we also found in hospitals and clean room facilities. The metabolic potential for ammonia oxidation of the skin-associated Archaea was supported by the successful detection of thaumarchaeal amoA genes in human skin samples. However, the activity and possible interaction with human epithelial cells of these associated Archaea remains an open question. Nevertheless, in this study we provide evidence that Archaea are part of the human skin microbiome and discuss their potential for ammonia turnover on human skin.

  15. Archaea on Human Skin

    PubMed Central

    Probst, Alexander J.; Auerbach, Anna K.; Moissl-Eichinger, Christine

    2013-01-01

    The recent era of exploring the human microbiome has provided valuable information on microbial inhabitants, beneficials and pathogens. Screening efforts based on DNA sequencing identified thousands of bacterial lineages associated with human skin but provided only incomplete and crude information on Archaea. Here, we report for the first time the quantification and visualization of Archaea from human skin. Based on 16 S rRNA gene copies Archaea comprised up to 4.2% of the prokaryotic skin microbiome. Most of the gene signatures analyzed belonged to the Thaumarchaeota, a group of Archaea we also found in hospitals and clean room facilities. The metabolic potential for ammonia oxidation of the skin-associated Archaea was supported by the successful detection of thaumarchaeal amoA genes in human skin samples. However, the activity and possible interaction with human epithelial cells of these associated Archaea remains an open question. Nevertheless, in this study we provide evidence that Archaea are part of the human skin microbiome and discuss their potential for ammonia turnover on human skin. PMID:23776475

  16. Establishment of a murine epidermal cell line suitable for in vitro and in vivo skin modelling

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Skin diseases are a major health problem. Some of the most severe conditions involve genetic disorders, including cancer. Several of these human diseases have been modelled in genetically modified mice, thus becoming a highly valuable preclinical tool for the treatment of these pathologies. However, development of three-dimensional models of skin using keratinocytes from normal and/or genetically modified mice has been hindered by the difficulty to subculture murine epidermal keratinocytes. Methods We have generated a murine epidermal cell line by serially passaging keratinocytes isolated from the back skin of adult mice. We have termed this cell line COCA. Cell culture is done in fully defined media and does not require feeder cells or any other coating methods. Results COCA retained its capacity to differentiate and stratify in response to increased calcium concentration in the cell culture medium for more than 75 passages. These cells, including late passage, can form epidermis-like structures in three-dimensional in vitro models with a well-preserved pattern of proliferation and differentiation. Furthermore, these cells form epidermis in grafting assays in vivo, and do not develop tumorigenic ability. Conclusions We propose that COCA constitutes a good experimental system for in vitro and in vivo skin modelling. Also, cell lines from genetically modified mice of interest in skin biology could be established using the method we have developed. COCA keratinocytes would be a suitable control, within a similar background, when studying the biological implications of these alterations. PMID:21510892

  17. Estimating skin permeability from physicochemical characteristics of drugs: a comparison between conventional models and an in vivo-based approach.

    PubMed

    Farahmand, Sara; Maibach, Howard I

    2009-06-22

    This study evaluates the correlation of some widely used skin permeability predictive models with a recently proposed empirical model based on human in vivo dermatopharmacokinetic data. Drug fluxes through the skin have been calculated using in vitro- and in vivo-based models, and observed in vivo data, and the values compared. Most in vitro-based models underestimate the in vivo data by 1-100-fold. The discrepancy between observed data and prediction reaches the maximum (1000-10,000-fold underestimation) for nicotine (with the smallest molecular weight and logK(oct)), nitroglycerin (with the largest number of hydrogen bond acceptor groups), and for oxybutynin (with the largest molecular weight and logK(oct)) where there was a 1000-fold flux overestimation. However, most models correlated well with the in vivo data and the in vivo-based model (p<0.05). The vehicle effect and using non-steady state in vivo data in the flux calculations partly account for the observed discrepancies between predicted and observed values. Nevertheless, these results reveal the need for further refinement of skin permeability predictive equations, using the steady state in vivo data, and consideration of formulation effect.

  18. In vivo terahertz pulsed spectroscopy of dysplastic and non-dysplastic skin nevi

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaytsev, Kirill I.; Chernomyrdin, Nikita V.; Kudrin, Konstantin G.; Gavdush, Arseniy A.; Nosov, Pavel A.; Yurchenko, Stanislav O.; Reshetov, Igor V.

    2016-08-01

    The results of the in vivo terahertz (THz) pulsed spectroscopy (TPS) of pigmentary skin nevi are reported. Observed THz dielectric permittivity of healthy skin and dysplastic and non-dysplastic skin nevi exhibits significant contrast in THz frequency range. Dysplastic skin nevus is a precursor of melanoma, which is reportedly the most dangerous cancer of the skin. Therefore, the THz dielectric spectroscopy is potentially an effective tool for non-invasive early diagnosis of melanomas of the skin.

  19. In vivo human crystalline lens topography

    PubMed Central

    Ortiz, Sergio; Pérez-Merino, Pablo; Gambra, Enrique; de Castro, Alberto; Marcos, Susana

    2012-01-01

    Custom high-resolution high-speed anterior segment spectral domain optical coherence tomography (OCT) was used to characterize three-dimensionally (3-D) the human crystalline lens in vivo. The system was provided with custom algorithms for denoising and segmentation of the images, as well as for fan (scanning) and optical (refraction) distortion correction, to provide fully quantitative images of the anterior and posterior crystalline lens surfaces. The method was tested on an artificial eye with known surfaces geometry and on a human lens in vitro, and demonstrated on three human lenses in vivo. Not correcting for distortion overestimated the anterior lens radius by 25% and the posterior lens radius by more than 65%. In vivo lens surfaces were fitted by biconicoids and Zernike polynomials after distortion correction. The anterior lens radii of curvature ranged from 10.27 to 14.14 mm, and the posterior lens radii of curvature ranged from 6.12 to 7.54 mm. Surface asphericities ranged from −0.04 to −1.96. The lens surfaces were well fitted by quadrics (with variation smaller than 2%, for 5-mm pupils), with low amounts of high order terms. Surface lens astigmatism was significant, with the anterior lens typically showing horizontal astigmatism (Z22 ranging from −11 to −1 µm) and the posterior lens showing vertical astigmatism (Z22 ranging from 6 to 10 µm). PMID:23082289

  20. Glucocorticoids enhance the in vivo migratory response of human monocytes.

    PubMed

    Yeager, Mark P; Pioli, Patricia A; Collins, Jane; Barr, Fiona; Metzler, Sara; Sites, Brian D; Guyre, Paul M

    2016-05-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) are best known for their potent anti-inflammatory effects. However, an emerging model for glucocorticoid (GC) regulation of in vivo inflammation also includes a delayed, preparatory effect that manifests as enhanced inflammation following exposure to an inflammatory stimulus. When GCs are transiently elevated in vivo following exposure to a stressful event, this model proposes that a subsequent period of increased inflammatory responsiveness is adaptive because it enhances resistance to a subsequent stressor. In the present study, we examined the migratory response of human monocytes/macrophages following transient in vivo exposure to stress-associated concentrations of cortisol. Participants were administered cortisol for 6h to elevate in vivo cortisol levels to approximate those observed during major systemic stress. Monocytes in peripheral blood and macrophages in sterile inflammatory tissue (skin blisters) were studied before and after exposure to cortisol or placebo. We found that exposure to cortisol induced transient upregulation of monocyte mRNA for CCR2, the receptor for monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1/CCL2) as well as for the chemokine receptor CX3CR1. At the same time, mRNA for the transcription factor IκBα was decreased. Monocyte surface expression of CCR2 but not CX3CR1 increased in the first 24h after cortisol exposure. Transient exposure to cortisol also led to an increased number of macrophages and neutrophils in fluid derived from a sterile inflammatory site in vivo. These findings suggest that the delayed, pro-inflammatory effects of cortisol on the human inflammatory responses may include enhanced localization of effector cells at sites of in vivo inflammation.

  1. Optical properties of neonatal skin measured in vivo as a function of age and skin pigmentation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bosschaart, Nienke; Mentink, Rosaline; Kok, Joke H.; van Leeuwen, Ton G.; Aalders, Maurice C. G.

    2011-09-01

    Knowledge of the optical properties of neonatal skin is invaluable when developing new, or improving existing optical techniques for use at the neonatal intensive care. In this article, we present in vivo measurements of the absorption μa and reduced scattering coefficient μs' of neonatal skin between 450 and 600 nm and assess the influence of age and skin pigmentation on the optical properties. The optical properties were measured using a spatially resolved, steady state diffuse reflectance spectroscopy setup, combined with a modified spatially resolved diffusion model. The method was validated on phantoms with known values for the absorption and reduced scattering coefficient. Values of μa and μs' were obtained from the skin at four different body locations (forehead, sternum, hand, and foot) of 60 neonates with varying gestational age, postnatal age, and skin pigmentation. We found that μa ranged from 0.02 to 1.25 mm-1 and μs' was in the range of 1 to 2.8 mm-1 (5th to 95th percentile of the patient population), independent of body location. In contrast to previous studies, no to very weak correlation was observed between the optical properties and gestational maturity, but a strong dependency of the absorption coefficient on postnatal age was found for dark skinned patients.

  2. Optical properties of neonatal skin measured in vivo as a function of age and skin pigmentation.

    PubMed

    Bosschaart, Nienke; Mentink, Rosaline; Kok, Joke H; van Leeuwen, Ton G; Aalders, Maurice C G

    2011-09-01

    Knowledge of the optical properties of neonatal skin is invaluable when developing new, or improving existing optical techniques for use at the neonatal intensive care. In this article, we present in vivo measurements of the absorption μ(a) and reduced scattering coefficient μ(s) (') of neonatal skin between 450 and 600 nm and assess the influence of age and skin pigmentation on the optical properties. The optical properties were measured using a spatially resolved, steady state diffuse reflectance spectroscopy setup, combined with a modified spatially resolved diffusion model. The method was validated on phantoms with known values for the absorption and reduced scattering coefficient. Values of μ(a) and μ(s) (') were obtained from the skin at four different body locations (forehead, sternum, hand, and foot) of 60 neonates with varying gestational age, postnatal age, and skin pigmentation. We found that μ(a) ranged from 0.02 to 1.25 mm(-1) and μ(s) (') was in the range of 1 to 2.8 mm(-1) (5th to 95th percentile of the patient population), independent of body location. In contrast to previous studies, no to very weak correlation was observed between the optical properties and gestational maturity, but a strong dependency of the absorption coefficient on postnatal age was found for dark skinned patients.

  3. In vivo assessment of the structure of skin microcirculation by reflectance confocal-laser-scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sugata, Keiichi; Osanai, Osamu; Kawada, Hiromitsu

    2012-02-01

    One of the major roles of the skin microcirculation is to supply oxygen and nutrition to the surrounding tissue. Regardless of the close relationship between the microcirculation and the surrounding tissue, there are few non-invasive methods that can evaluate both the microcirculation and its surrounding tissue at the same site. We visualized microcapillary plexus structures in human skin using in vivo reflectance confocal-laser-scanning microscopy (CLSM), Vivascope 3000® (Lucid Inc., USA) and Image J software (National Institutes of Health, USA) for video image processing. CLSM is a non-invasive technique that can visualize the internal structure of the skin at the cellular level. In addition to internal morphological information such as the extracellular matrix, our method reveals capillary structures up to the depth of the subpapillary plexus at the same site without the need for additional optical systems. Video images at specific depths of the inner forearm skin were recorded. By creating frame-to-frame difference images from the video images using off-line video image processing, we obtained images that emphasize the brightness depending on changes of intensity coming from the movement of blood cells. Merging images from different depths of the skin elucidates the 3-dimensional fine line-structure of the microcirculation. Overall our results show the feasibility of a non-invasive, high-resolution imaging technique to characterize the skin microcirculation and the surrounding tissue.

  4. A finite element model of the face including an orthotropic skin model under in vivo tension.

    PubMed

    Flynn, Cormac; Stavness, Ian; Lloyd, John; Fels, Sidney

    2015-01-01

    Computer models of the human face have the potential to be used as powerful tools in surgery simulation and animation development applications. While existing models accurately represent various anatomical features of the face, the representation of the skin and soft tissues is very simplified. A computer model of the face is proposed in which the skin is represented by an orthotropic hyperelastic constitutive model. The in vivo tension inherent in skin is also represented in the model. The model was tested by simulating several facial expressions by activating appropriate orofacial and jaw muscles. Previous experiments calculated the change in orientation of the long axis of elliptical wounds on patients' faces for wide opening of the mouth and an open-mouth smile (both 30(o)). These results were compared with the average change of maximum principal stress direction in the skin calculated in the face model for wide opening of the mouth (18(o)) and an open-mouth smile (25(o)). The displacements of landmarks on the face for four facial expressions were compared with experimental measurements in the literature. The corner of the mouth in the model experienced the largest displacement for each facial expression (∼11-14 mm). The simulated landmark displacements were within a standard deviation of the measured displacements. Increasing the skin stiffness and skin tension generally resulted in a reduction in landmark displacements upon facial expression.

  5. Human tendon behaviour and adaptation, in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Magnusson, S Peter; Narici, Marco V; Maganaris, Constantinos N; Kjaer, Michael

    2008-01-01

    Tendon properties contribute to the complex interaction of the central nervous system, muscle–tendon unit and bony structures to produce joint movement. Until recently limited information on human tendon behaviour in vivo was available; however, novel methodological advancements have enabled new insights to be gained in this area. The present review summarizes the progress made with respect to human tendon and aponeurosis function in vivo, and how tendons adapt to ageing, loading and unloading conditions. During low tensile loading or with passive lengthening not only the muscle is elongated, but also the tendon undergoes significant length changes, which may have implications for reflex responses. During active loading, the length change of the tendon far exceeds that of the aponeurosis, indicating that the aponeurosis may more effectively transfer force onto the tendon, which lengthens and stores elastic energy subsequently released during unloading, in a spring-like manner. In fact, data recently obtained in vivo confirm that, during walking, the human Achilles tendon provides elastic strain energy that can decrease the energy cost of locomotion. Also, new experimental evidence shows that, contrary to earlier beliefs, the metabolic activity in human tendon is remarkably high and this affords the tendon the ability to adapt to changing demands. With ageing and disuse there is a reduction in tendon stiffness, which can be mitigated with resistance exercises. Such adaptations seem advantageous for maintaining movement rapidity, reducing tendon stress and risk of injury, and possibly, for enabling muscles to operate closer to the optimum region of the length–tension relationship. PMID:17855761

  6. Modulation of skin pigmentation by the tetrapeptide PKEK: in vitro and in vivo evidence for skin whitening effects.

    PubMed

    Marini, Alessandra; Farwick, Mike; Grether-Beck, Susanne; Brenden, Heidi; Felsner, Ingo; Jaenicke, Thomas; Weber, Monika; Schild, Jennifer; Maczkiewitz, Ursula; Köhler, Tim; Bonfigli, Adriana; Pagani, Valerie; Krutmann, Jean

    2012-02-01

    Uneven skin pigmentation is a significant cosmetic concern, and the identification of topically applicable molecules to address this issue is of general interest. We report that the tetrapeptide PKEK (Pro-Lys-Glu-Lys) can exert skin whitening effects based on one in vitro and four double-blinded vehicle-controlled in vivo studies. (i) Treatment of human keratinocytes with PKEK significantly reduced UVB-stimulated mRNA expression of interleukin (IL)-6, IL-8 and TNF-α and, most importantly, proopiomelanocorticotropin (POMC), i.e. a gene encoding the pigmentation-inducing soluble mediator α- (α-MSH). (ii) PKEK treatment significantly inhibited UVB-induced upregulation of genes encoding for IL-1α, IL-6, IL-8, TNF-α as well as POMC and tyrosinase in 10 healthy volunteers pretreated with PKEK for 4 weeks once daily. (iii) In a study enrolling 39 Caucasian women, facial pigment spots significantly faded after 6 weeks when PKEK was combined with the skin whitener sodium ascorbyl phosphate (SAP), whereas PKEK or SAP alone led to less pronounced fading of the pigment spots. (iv) Addition of PKEK enhanced the skin whitening potency of a SAP-containing preparation if applied for 8 weeks to the back of hands of 19 Caucasians. (v) 27 Japanese women were treated on their faces twice daily with an SAP only or a PKEK+SAP-containing formulation for 8 weeks. Application of PKEK+SAP significantly reduced skin pigmentation by 26% and by 18% according to SCINEXA score. We demonstrate that PKEK has the capacity to reduce UVB-induced skin pigmentation and may be suited to serve as a skin tone-modulating agent in cosmetic products. © 2011 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  7. Chromophores in human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Young, Antony R.

    1997-05-01

    Human skin, especially the epidermis, contains several major solar ultraviolet-radiation- (UVR-) absorbing endogenous chromophores including DNA, urocanic acid, amino acids, melanins and their precursors and metabolites. The lack of solubility of melanins prevents their absorption spectra being defined by routine techniques. Indirect spectroscopic methods show that their spectral properties depend on the stimulus for melanogenesis. The photochemical consequences of UVR absorption by some epidermal chromophores are relatively well understood whereas we lack a detailed understanding of the consequent photobiological and clinical responses. Skin action spectroscopy is not a reliable way of relating a photobiological outcome to a specific chromophore but is important for UVR hazard assessment. Exogenous chromophores may be administered to the skin in combination with UVR exposure for therapeutic benefit, or as sunscreens for the prevention of sunburn and possibly skin cancer.

  8. Exploring Valrubicin's Effect on Propionibacterium Acnes-Induced Skin Inflammation in Vitro and in Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Rottboell, Louise; de Foenss, Sarah; Thomsen, Kenneth; Christiansen, Helle; Andersen, Stine M.; Dam, Tomas N.; Rosada, Cecilia

    2015-01-01

    Acne is a common skin disease involving colonization with Propionibacterium acnes (P. acnes), hyperproliferation of the follicular epithelium and inflammatory events. Valrubicin is a second-generation anthracycline, non-toxic upon contact, and available in a topical formulation. Valrubicin’s predecessor doxorubicin possesses antibacterial effects and previously we demonstrated that valrubicin inhibits keratinocyte proliferation and skin inflammation suggesting beneficial topical treatment of acne with valrubicin. This study aims to investigate valrubicin’s possible use in acne treatment by testing valrubicin’s antibacterial effects against P. acnes and P. acnes-induced skin inflammation in vitro and in vivo. Valrubicin was demonstrated not to possess antibacterial effects against P. acnes. Additionally, valrubicin was demonstrated not to reduce mRNA and protein expression levels of the inflammatory markers interleukin (IL)-1β, IL-8, and tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α in vitro in human keratinocytes co-cultured with P. acnes. Moreover, in vivo, valrubicin, applied both topically and intra-dermally, was not able to reduce signs of inflammation in mouse ears intra-dermally injected with P. acnes. Taken together, this study does not support beneficial antibacterial and anti inflammatory effects of topical valrubicin treatment of acne. PMID:26734122

  9. Role of the Varicella-Zoster Virus Gene Product Encoded by Open Reading Frame 35 in Viral Replication In Vitro and in Differentiated Human Skin and T Cells In Vivo

    PubMed Central

    Ito, Hideki; Sommer, Marvin H.; Zerboni, Leigh; Baiker, Armin; Sato, Bunji; Liang, Ruibin; Hay, John; Ruyechan, William; Arvin, Ann M.

    2005-01-01

    Although genes related to varicella-zoster virus (VZV) open reading frame 35 (ORF35) are conserved in the herpesviruses, information about their contributions to viral replication and pathogenesis is limited. Using a VZV cosmid system, we deleted ORF35 to produce two null mutants, designated rOkaΔ35(#1) and rOkaΔ35(#2), and replaced ORF35 at a nonnative site, generating two rOkaΔ35/35@Avr mutants. ORF35 Flag-tagged recombinants were made by inserting ORF35-Flag at the nonnative Avr site as the only copy of ORF35, yielding rOkaΔ35/35Flag@Avr, or as a second copy, yielding rOka35Flag@Avr. Replication of rOkaΔ35 viruses was diminished in melanoma and Vero cells in a 6-day analysis of growth kinetics. Plaque sizes of rOkaΔ35 mutants were significantly smaller than those of rOka in melanoma cells. Infection of melanoma cells with rOkaΔ35 mutants was associated with disrupted cell fusion and polykaryocyte formation. The small plaque phenotype was not corrected by growth of rOkaΔ35 mutants in melanoma cells expressing the major VZV glycoprotein E, gE. The rOkaΔ35/35@Avr viruses displayed growth kinetics and plaque morphologies that were indistinguishable from those of rOka. Analysis with ORF35-Flag recombinants showed that the ORF35 gene product localized predominantly to the nuclei of infected cells. Evaluations in the SCIDhu mouse model demonstrated that ORF35 was required for efficient VZV infection of skin and T-cell xenografts, although the decrease in infectivity was most significant in skin. These mutagenesis experiments indicated that ORF35 was dispensable for VZV replication, but deleting ORF35 diminished growth in cultured cells and was associated with attenuated VZV infection of differentiated human skin and T cells in vivo. PMID:15795267

  10. In vivo potential of recombinant granulysin against human tumors

    PubMed Central

    Al-Wasaby, Sameer; de Miguel, Diego; Aporta, Adriana; Naval, Javier; Conde, Blanca; Martínez-Lostao, Luis; Anel, Alberto

    2015-01-01

    9 kDa granulysin is a protein present in the granules of human CTL and NK cells, with cytolytic activity against microbes and tumors. Previous work from our group demonstrated that this granulysin isoform induced apoptosis in vitro on hematological tumor cells and on primary tumor cells from B-CLL patients. In the present work, recombinant 9 kDa granulysin was used as an anti-tumoral agent to study its in vivo effect on tumor development in athymic “nude” mice models bearing human breast adenocarcinoma MDA-MB-231 or multiple myeloma NCI-H929–derived xenografts. Granulysin prevented the in vivo development of detectable MDA-MB-231-derived tumors. In addition, recombinant granulysin was able to completely eradicate NCI-H929-derived tumors. All granulysin-treated tumors exhibited signs of apoptosis induction and an increased NK cell infiltration inside the tumor tissue comparing to control ones. Moreover, no in vivo deleterious effects of the recombinant 9 kDa granulysin doses used in this study were observed on the skin or on the internal organs of the animals. In conclusion, granulysin was able to inhibit the progression of MDA-MB-231-derived xenografts and also to eradicate multiple myeloma NCI-H929-derived xenografts. This work opens the door to the initiation of preclinical and possibly clinical studies for the use of 9 kDa granulysin as a new anti-tumoral treatment. PMID:26405603

  11. In vivo skin penetration of macromolecules in irritant contact dermatitis.

    PubMed

    Abdel-Mottaleb, Mona M A; Lamprecht, Alf

    2016-12-30

    Recently, a selective preferential accumulation of polymeric nanoparticles (in the size range around 100nm) has been observed in the follicular system of dermatitis skin. The present investigation aimed at clearly investigating the effect of irritant contact dermatitis on the barrier permeability for colloidal systems below this size range, namely quantum dots and hydrophilic macromolecules. Irritant dermatitis was induced in mice and the penetrability of quantum dots (5nm) and hydrophilic dextran molecules has been tracked in both healthy and inflamed skin using confocal laser scanning microscopy. The selective accumulation of the quantum dots was clearly observed in inflamed skin while hydrophilic dextran behaved similarly in both healthy and inflamed skin. The therapeutic potential for the transdermal delivery of peptide drugs through inflamed skin has been also tested in rats. Results revealed that the transdermal permeation of insulin and calcitonin was not significantly enhanced in dermatitis compared to healthy skin. On the other side, permeation through stripped skin was significantly higher. However, the effect was limited and shorter compared to the SC injection where tmin was 0.5h and 2h with a 70% and 46% reduction in blood glucose levels for the stripped skin and the SC injection respectively. Similarly, tmin was 4h and 8h with area under the curve of 161±65% and 350±97% for the stripped skin and the SC injection respectively. In conclusion, the changes in skin permeability accompanied with skin inflammation did not affect its permeability to peptide drugs. Our findings also underline that experiments with the tape stripped skin model as a surrogate for inflamed skin can risk misleading conclusions due to significant difference of skin permeability between the tape stripped skin and inflamed skin. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. In vivo mechanical characterization of human liver.

    PubMed

    Nava, A; Mazza, E; Furrer, M; Villiger, P; Reinhart, W H

    2008-04-01

    The mechanical behavior of human liver has been characterized with aspiration experiments. Measurements have been performed in vivo under sterile conditions during open surgery. Twenty-three measurements on six healthy human livers were performed using the same loading history for each test, so to allow a direct comparison of the measured deformations. The measurement results are reported and the experimental uncertainties evaluated. One of the main objectives of the present paper is to share information on the in vivo mechanical response of human liver with the biomechanics research community: the present data can be used for mechanical model development and validation purposes. The parameters of a quasi-linear viscoelastic model have been determined from the experimental data by means of inverse finite element calculations. The corresponding linear elastic modulus is compared with values from the literature. In particular, a significant discrepancy has been found with respect to the values proposed by Carter et al. [Carter, F.J., Frank, T.G., Davies, P.J., McLean, D., Cuschieri, A., 2001. Measurement and modelling of the compliance of human and porcine organs. Medical Image Analysis 5, 231-236] and the reasons for this difference are discussed. The predictive capabilities of the quasi-linear viscoelastic model and the Rubin Bodner non-linear elastic-viscoplastic model are compared with respect to the tissue response in repeated aspiration cycles. Finally, for demonstration purposes, the constitutive model corresponding to the "average" liver response has been implemented into a finite element whole liver model and used for simulations related to liver surgery.

  13. In vivo monitoring of external pressure induced hemodynamics in skin tissue using optical coherence tomography angiography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, Woo June; Wang, Hequn; Wang, Ruikang K.

    2015-03-01

    Characterization of the relationship between external pressure and blood flow is important in the examination of pressure-induced disturbance in tissue microcirculation. Optical coherence tomography (OCT) angiography is a promising imaging technique, capable of providing the noninvasive extraction of functional vessels within the skin tissue with capillary-scale resolution. Here, we present a feasibility study of OCT angiography to monitor effect of external pressures on blood perfusion in human skin tissue in vivo. Graded external pressure is loaded normal to the surface of the nailfold tissue of a healthy human. The incremental loading is applied step by step and then followed by an immediate release. Concurrent OCT imaging of the nailfold is performed during the pre/post loading. Blood perfusion images including baseline (at pre-loading) and corresponding tissue strain maps are calculated from 3D OCT dataset obtained at the different applied pressures, allowing visualization of capillary perfusion events at stressed nailfold tissue. The results indicate that the perfusion progressively decreases with the constant increase of tissue strain. Reactive hyperemia is occurred right after the removal of the pressure corresponding to quick drop of the increased strain. The perfusion is returned to the baseline level after a few minutes. These findings suggest that OCT microangiography may have great potential for quantitatively assessing tissue microcirculation in the locally pressed tissue in vivo.

  14. Free water content and monitoring of healing processes of skin burns studied by microwave dielectric spectroscopy in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hayashi, Yoshihito; Miura, Nobuhiro; Shinyashiki, Naoki; Yagihara, Shin

    2005-02-21

    We have investigated the dielectric properties of human skin in vivo at frequencies up to 10 GHz using a time-domain reflectometry method with open-ended coaxial probes. Since gamma-dispersion results from the reorientation of free water molecules, the free water content of skin is quantitatively determined by dielectric measurements. The free water content of finger skin increased by about 10% after soaking in 37 degrees C water for 30 min, and it systematically decreased again through the drying process, as expected. Thus this analytical method has been applied to the study of skin burns. The free water content of burned human cheek skin due to hydrofluoric acid was significantly lower than that of normal skin, and the burned skin recovered through the healing process. In the case of a human hand skin burn due to heat, although the free water content was almost the same as that of normal skin at the beginning, it decreased during the healing process for the first 10 days, then began to increase. Although the number of test subjects was one for each experiment, it was shown that free water content is a good indicator for evaluating skin health and can be well monitored by dielectric spectroscopy.

  15. Free water content and monitoring of healing processes of skin burns studied by microwave dielectric spectroscopy in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hayashi, Yoshihito; Miura, Nobuhiro; Shinyashiki, Naoki; Yagihara, Shin

    2005-02-01

    We have investigated the dielectric properties of human skin in vivo at frequencies up to 10 GHz using a time-domain reflectometry method with open-ended coaxial probes. Since γ-dispersion results from the reorientation of free water molecules, the free water content of skin is quantitatively determined by dielectric measurements. The free water content of finger skin increased by about 10% after soaking in 37 °C water for 30 min, and it systematically decreased again through the drying process, as expected. Thus this analytical method has been applied to the study of skin burns. The free water content of burned human cheek skin due to hydrofluoric acid was significantly lower than that of normal skin, and the burned skin recovered through the healing process. In the case of a human hand skin burn due to heat, although the free water content was almost the same as that of normal skin at the beginning, it decreased during the healing process for the first 10 days, then began to increase. Although the number of test subjects was one for each experiment, it was shown that free water content is a good indicator for evaluating skin health and can be well monitored by dielectric spectroscopy.

  16. Optical clearing of skin under action of glycerol: Ex vivo and in vivo investigations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Genina, E. A.; Bashkatov, A. N.; Sinichkin, Yu. P.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2010-08-01

    The behavior of optical parameters of the skin of a laboratory rat under the action of an aqueous solution of glycerol is studied ex vivo and in vivo. It is found that the collimated transmission coefficient of ex vivo skin samples increases by a factor of 20-40-fold depending on the wavelength in the studied spectral range, and the diffuse reflection coefficient of skin in vivo decreases on the average by 16%. The results presented can be useful for many methods of laser therapy and optical diagnostics of skin diseases and localization of subcutaneous neoplasms.

  17. Clinical applicability of in vivo fluorescence confocal microscopy for noninvasive diagnosis and therapeutic monitoring of nonmelanoma skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Astner, Susanne; Dietterle, Susanne; Otberg, Nina; Röwert-Huber, Hans-Joachim; Stockfleth, Eggert; Lademann, Jürgen

    2008-01-01

    Excisional biopsies and routine histology remains the gold standard for the histomorphologic evaluation of normal and diseased skin. However, there is increasing interest in the development of noninvasive optical technologies for evaluation, diagnosis, and monitoring of skin disease in vivo. Fluorescent confocal microscopy is an innovative optical technology that has previously been used for morphologic evaluation of live human tissue. We evaluate the clinical applicability of a fluorescent confocal laser scanning microscope (FLSM) for a systematic evaluation of normal and diseased skin in vivo and in correlation with routine histology. A total of 40 patients were recruited to participate in the study. Skin sites of 10 participants with no prior history of skin disease served as controls and to evaluate topographic variations of normal skin in vivo. Thirty patients with a suspected diagnosis of nonmelanoma skin cancer were evaluated, whereby FLSM features of actinic keratoses (AK) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) were recorded in an observational analysis. Selected BCCs were monitored for their skin response to topical therapy using Imiquimod as an immune-response modifier. A commercially available fluorescence microscope (OptiScan Ltd., Melbourne, Australia) was used to carry out all FLSM evaluations. Common FLSM features to AK and BCC included nuclear pleomorphism at the level of the granular and spinous layer and increased vascularity in the superficial dermal compartment. Even though the presence of superficial disruption and mere atypia of epidermal keratinocytes was more indicative of AK, the nesting of atypical basal cells, increased blood vessel tortuosity, and nuclear polarization were more typical for BCC. All diagnoses were confirmed by histology. FLSM allowed a monitoring of the local immune response following therapy with Imiquimod and demonstrated a continuous normalization of diseased skin on repeated evaluations over time. This study illustrates

  18. In vivo skin dose measurement in breast conformal radiotherapy

    PubMed Central

    Soleymanifard, Shokouhozaman; Noghreiyan, Atefeh Vejdani; Ghorbani, Mahdi; Jamali, Farideh; Davenport, David

    2016-01-01

    Aim of the study Accurate skin dose assessment is necessary during breast radiotherapy to assure that the skin dose is below the tolerance level and is sufficient to prevent tumour recurrence. The aim of the current study is to measure the skin dose and to evaluate the geometrical/anatomical parameters that affect it. Material and methods Forty patients were simulated by TIGRT treatment planning system and treated with two tangential fields of 6 MV photon beam. Wedge filters were used to homogenise dose distribution for 11 patients. Skin dose was measured by thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD-100) and the effects of beam incident angle, thickness of irradiated region, and beam entry separation on the skin dose were analysed. Results Average skin dose in treatment course of 50 Gy to the clinical target volume (CTV) was 36.65 Gy. The corresponding dose values for patients who were treated with and without wedge filter were 35.65 and 37.20 Gy, respectively. It was determined that the beam angle affected the average skin dose while the thickness of the irradiated region and the beam entry separation did not affect dose. Since the skin dose measured in this study was lower than the amount required to prevent tumour recurrence, application of bolus material in part of the treatment course is suggested for post-mastectomy advanced breast radiotherapy. It is more important when wedge filters are applied to homogenize dose distribution. PMID:27358592

  19. Differences in pyrimidine dimer removal between rat skin cells in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Mullaart, E.; Lohman, P.H.; Vijg, J.

    1988-03-01

    Pyrimidine dimers, the most abundant type of DNA lesions induced by ultraviolet light (UV), are rapidly repaired in human skin fibroblasts in vitro. In the same cell type from rats, however, there is hardly any removal of such dimers. To investigate whether this low capacity of rat skin cells to repair lesions in their DNA is an inherent characteristic of this species or an artifact due to cell culturing, we measured the removal of UV-induced pyrimidine dimers from rat epidermal keratinocytes both in vitro and in vivo. Epidermal keratinocytes in vitro were unable to remove any dimers over the first 3 h after UV-irradiation, while only about 20% was removed during a repair period of 24 h. In this respect, these cells were not different from cultured rat fibroblasts. In contrast to the results obtained with keratinocytes in vitro, we observed a rapid repair of pyrimidine dimers in UV-irradiated keratinocytes in vivo over the first 3 h; this rapid repair phase was followed by a much slower repair phase between 3 and 24 h. These results are discussed in terms of the possibility that mammalian cells are able to switch from one DNA repair pathway to another.

  20. Real-time in vivo imaging collagen in lymphedematous skin using multiphoton microscopy.

    PubMed

    Wu, Xiufeng; Zhuo, Shuangmu; Chen, Jianxin; Liu, Ningfei

    2011-01-01

    Changes of dermal collagen are characteristic for chronic lymphedema. To evaluate these changes, a real-time imaging based on two-photon excited fluorescence and second-harmonic generation was developed for investigating collagen of lymphedematous mouse and rat tail skin in vivo. Our findings showed that the technique could image the morphological changes and distribution of collagen in lymphedematous mouse and rat tail skin in vivo. More importantly, it may allow visualization of dynamic collagen alteration during the progression of lymphedema. Our findings demonstrated that multiphoton microscopy may have potential in a clinical setting as an in vivo diagnostic and monitoring system for therapy in lymphology.

  1. Leishmania infection of canine skin fibroblasts in vivo.

    PubMed

    Hervás Rodríguez, J; Mozos, E; Méndez, A; Pérez, J; Gómez-Villamandos, J C

    1996-07-01

    In this paper we describe two cases of naturally occurring leishmaniasis in dogs in which Leishmania sp. amastigotes are found within the cytoplasm of fibroblasts. The infected cells were identified histologically, immunohistochemically, and ultrastructurally as fibroblasts. This is the first report of leishmaniasis in any species in which amastigotes were identified in vivo within fibroblasts.

  2. The isolated perfused human skin flap model: A missing link in skin penetration studies?

    PubMed

    Ternullo, Selenia; de Weerd, Louis; Flaten, Gøril Eide; Holsæter, Ann Mari; Škalko-Basnet, Nataša

    2017-01-01

    Development of effective (trans)dermal drug delivery systems requires reliable skin models to evaluate skin drug penetration. The isolated perfused human skin flap remains metabolically active tissue for up to 6h during in vitro perfusion. We introduce the isolated perfused human skin flap as a close-to-in vivo skin penetration model. To validate the model's ability to evaluate skin drug penetration the solutions of a hydrophilic (calcein) and a lipophilic (rhodamine) fluorescence marker were applied. The skin flaps were perfused with modified Krebs-Henseleit buffer (pH7.4). Infrared technology was used to monitor perfusion and to select a well-perfused skin area for administration of the markers. Flap perfusion and physiological parameters were maintained constant during the 6h experiments and the amount of markers in the perfusate was determined. Calcein was detected in the perfusate, whereas rhodamine was not detectable. Confocal images of skin cross-sections shoved that calcein was uniformly distributed through the skin, whereas rhodamine accumulated in the stratum corneum. For comparison, the penetration of both markers was evaluated on ex vivo human skin, pig skin and cellophane membrane. The proposed perfused flap model enabled us to distinguish between the penetrations of the two markers and could be a promising close-to-in vivo tool in skin penetration studies and optimization of formulations destined for skin administration. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  3. Penetration of titanium dioxide nanoparticles through slightly damaged skin in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Xie, Guangping; Lu, Weixin; Lu, Dongmin

    2015-12-18

    Titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO2-NPs) have been widely developed for versatile use, but the potential risk form their skin exposure is still unclear. To evaluate this risk, the skin penetration of TiO2-NPs is necessary to be understood first. The aims of this study are to investigated the penetration of TiO2-NPs through slightly damaged skin and intact skin in vitro and in vivo. TiO2-NPs with a diameter of 20 nm was labeled with 125I.The skin of rat was treated with 2% SLS solution and obtained as slightly damaged skin. The 125I labeled TiO2-NPs (125I-TiO2-NPs)solution and 0.9% PS solution were added into the donor chamber and receptor chamber of static diffusion cells which clamped the skin at the middle of two half-cells, respectively. During 24 hours, samples were extracted from the receptor chamber and counted for 1 min using γ-counter to detect the radioactivity. The skin penetration of TiO2-NPs in vitro was expressed as the percentage of radioactivity of receptor chamber solution compared with total radioactivity in the donor chamber. Thereafter, the 125I-TiO2-NPs was exposed to the rats. After 1 day and 3 days, the blood and tissues of rats were harvested, weighed and counted for 1 min using γ-counter to detect the tissue radioactivity. The skin penetration of TiO2-NPs in vivo was expressed as the percentage dose per gram tissue (% dose/g). In the skin penetration experiment in vitro, the radioactivity of receptor chamber solution through damaged skin was higher than that of through intact skin and was about 2% radioactivity of donor chamber on 24 h. In the skin penetration experiment in vivo, the radioactivity of blood and tissues of rats after exposing to 125I-TiO2-NPs solution though damaged skin or intact skin were less than 0.05% dose/g on 1 d and quickly declined on 3 d. The skin penetration rates of TiO2-NPs through slightly damaged skin and intact skin in vitro and vivo were lower than the rate of free 125I in the TiO2-NPs solution. The TiO2

  4. In vivo skin capacitive imaging analysis by using grey level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM).

    PubMed

    Ou, Xiang; Pan, Wei; Xiao, Perry

    2014-01-02

    We present our latest work on in vivo skin capacitive imaging analysis by using grey level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM). The in vivo skin capacitive images were taken by a capacitance based fingerprint sensor, the skin capacitive images were then analysed by GLCM. Four different GLCM feature vectors, angular second moment (ASM), entropy (ENT), contrast (CON) and correlation (COR), are selected to describe the skin texture. The results show that angular second moment increases as age increases, and entropy decreases as age increases. The results also suggest that the angular second moment values and the entropy values reflect more about the skin texture, whilst the contrast values and the correlation values reflect more about the topically applied solvents. The overall results shows that the GLCM is an effective way to extract and analyse the skin texture information, which can potentially be a valuable reference for evaluating effects of medical and cosmetic treatments.

  5. Skin imaged by femtosecond laser irradiation: a risk assessment for in vivo applications

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fischer, F.; Volkmer, B.; Puschmann, S.; Greinert, R.; Breitbart, W.; Kiefer, J.; Wepf, R.

    2006-04-01

    During the last couple of years new imaging techniques using femtosecond lasers (fs-lasers) in the near infrared spectral range evolved for a variety of in vitro applications. We wanted to know, whether fs-lasers have a non-invasive imaging potential for in vivo applications for human skin. So far, little is known about possible risks of this irradiation type. To estimate the risk of irradiation damage in human skin we used a "biological dosimeter" in this investigation. We irradiated fresh human skin samples with both an fs-laser and a solar simulator (UV-source) for comparison. DNA damage introduced in the epidermis was evaluated using fluorescent antibodies against cyclobutane-pyrimidin-dimers (CPDs) in combination with immuno-fluorescence image analysis. Various fs-irradiation regimes were evaluated differing in laser power and step width of horizontal irradiation scans. When using 15 mW or 30 mW fs-laser power combined with horizontal irradiation scans applied every 5 mm in depth around the epidermal-dermal junction no induction of CPDs was found. However, induction of CPDs could be seen using 60 mW laser power and 5 μm step width. Narrowing the step width to 1 mm and using increasing laser power (up to 35 mW) from the surface of the skin to the epidermis led to CPD formation, too. Quantitative comparison of CPD production at various laser regimes with CPD production using a solar simulator was done. We could show that the number of CPDs formed by the 60 mW laser irradiation regime is comparable to an UV-irradiation giving 0.6 MED (minimal erythemal dose). The smaller step width laser irradiation regime (1 μm step width and up to 35 mW) was comparable to a UV-irradiation regime resulting in 0.45 MED.

  6. Engineering melanoma progression in a humanized environment in vivo.

    PubMed

    Kiowski, Gregor; Biedermann, Thomas; Widmer, Daniel S; Civenni, Gianluca; Burger, Charlotte; Dummer, Reinhard; Sommer, Lukas; Reichmann, Ernst

    2012-01-01

    To overcome the lack of effective therapeutics for aggressive melanoma, new research models closely resembling the human disease are required. Here we report the development of a fully orthotopic, humanized in vivo model for melanoma, faithfully recapitulating human disease initiation and progression. To this end, human melanoma cells were seeded into engineered human dermo-epidermal skin substitutes. Transplantation onto the back of immunocompromised rats consistently resulted in the development of melanoma, displaying the hallmarks of their parental tumors. Importantly, all initial steps of disease progression were recapitulated, including the incorporation of the tumor cells into their physiological microenvironment, transition of radial to vertical growth, and establishment of highly vascularized, aggressive tumors with dermal involvement. Because all cellular components can be individually accessed using this approach, it allows manipulation of the tumor cells, as well as of the keratinocyte and stromal cell populations. Therefore, in one defined model system, tumor cell-autonomous and non-autonomous pathways regulating human disease progression can be investigated in a humanized, clinically relevant context.

  7. Electrical measurement of the hydration state of the skin surface in vivo.

    PubMed

    Tagami, H

    2014-09-01

    Healthy skin surface is smooth and soft, because it is covered by the properly hydrated stratum corneum (SC), an extremely thin and soft barrier membrane produced by the underlying normal epidermis. By contrast, the skin surfaces covering pathological lesions exhibit dry and scaly changes and the SC shows poor barrier function. The SC barrier function has been assessed in vivo by instrumentally measuring transepidermal water loss (TEWL). However, there was a lack of any appropriate method for evaluating the hydration state of the skin surface in vivo until 1980 when we reported the feasibility of employing high-frequency conductance or capacitance to evaluate it quickly and accurately. With such measurements, we can assess easily the moisturizing efficacy of various topical agents in vivo as well as the distribution pattern of water in the SC by combining it with a serial tape-stripping procedure of the skin surface. © 2014 The Author BJD © 2014 British Association of Dermatologists.

  8. Tissue Engineered Human Skin Equivalents

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zheng; Michniak-Kohn, Bozena B.

    2012-01-01

    Human skin not only serves as an important barrier against the penetration of exogenous substances into the body, but also provides a potential avenue for the transport of functional active drugs/reagents/ingredients into the skin (topical delivery) and/or the body (transdermal delivery). In the past three decades, research and development in human skin equivalents have advanced in parallel with those in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. The human skin equivalents are used commercially as clinical skin substitutes and as models for permeation and toxicity screening. Several academic laboratories have developed their own human skin equivalent models and applied these models for studying skin permeation, corrosivity and irritation, compound toxicity, biochemistry, metabolism and cellular pharmacology. Various aspects of the state of the art of human skin equivalents are reviewed and discussed. PMID:24300178

  9. In vivo measurements of skin barrier: comparison of different methods and advantages of laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Patzelt, A.; Sterry, W.; Lademann, J.

    2010-12-01

    A major function of the skin is to provide a protective barrier at the interface between external environment and the organism. For skin barrier measurement, a multiplicity of methods is available. As standard methods, the determination of the transepidermal water loss (TEWL) as well as the measurement of the stratum corneum hydration, are widely accepted, although they offer some obvious disadvantages such as increased interference liability. Recently, new optical and spectroscopic methods have been introduced to investigate skin barrier properties in vivo. Especially, laser scanning microscopy has been shown to represent an excellent tool to study skin barrier integrity in many areas of relevance such as cosmetology, occupation, diseased skin, and wound healing.

  10. Ranking of aqueous surfactant-humectant systems based on an analysis of in vitro and in vivo skin barrier perturbation measurements.

    PubMed

    Ghosh, Saswata; Hornby, Sidney; Grove, Gary; Zerwick, Charles; Appa, Yohini; Blankschtein, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    We propose that skin electrical current measurements can be used in vitro to effectively rank aqueous solutions containing surfactants and humectants (the enhancer) contacting the skin, relative to a PBS aqueous solution (the control) contacting the skin, based on their ability to perturb the skin aqueous pores. Specifically, we develop an in vitro ranking metric using the increase in the skin electrical current induced by an enhancer relative to the control. Aqueous contacting solutions containing (i) surfactants [SDS (sodium dodecyl sulfate)] and C(12)E(6) [dodecyl hexa (ethylene oxide)], (ii) humectants (glycerol and propylene glycol), and (iii) a control (PBS) were studied. Utilizing the new in vitro ranking metric, these aqueous contacting solutions were ranked as follows (from the mildest to the harshest): glycerol < propylene glycol < PBS < C(12)E(6) < SDS. In order to further develop this ranking methodology, which can potentially lead to the reduction, or elimination, of costly and time-consuming procedures, such as human and animal testing and trial-and-error screening in vivo, it was important to correlate the findings of the in vitro ranking metric with direct in vivo skin barrier measurements. For this purpose, in vivo soap chamber measurements, including transepidermal water loss, visual skin dryness, and chromameter erythema measurements, were carried out on human volunteers using the aqueous surfactant-humectant solutions described above. The results of these in vivo measurements were found to be consistent with the ranking results obtained using the in vitro ranking metric. To further explore the validity of our model and to verify the skin barrier mitigating effect of glycerol, in vivo soap chamber measurements were carried out for aqueous SDS solutions containing 10 wt% added glycerol. These in vivo measurements support our recent in vitro finding that glycerol reduces the average radius and the pore number density of the skin aqueous pores, such

  11. Humanized In Vivo Model for Streptococcal Impetigo

    PubMed Central

    Scaramuzzino, Dominick A.; McNiff, Jennifer M.; Bessen, Debra E.

    2000-01-01

    An in vivo model for group A streptococcal (GAS) impetigo was developed, whereby human neonatal foreskin engrafted onto SCID mice was superficially damaged and bacteria were topically applied. Severe infection, indicated by a purulent exudate, could be induced with as few as 1,000 CFU of a virulent strain. Early findings (48 h) showed a loss of stratum corneum and adherence of short chains of gram-positive cocci to the external surface of granular keratinocytes. This was followed by an increasing infiltration of polymorphonuclear leukocytes (neutrophils) of mouse origin, until a thick layer of pus covered an intact epidermis, with massive clumps of cocci accumulated at the outer rim of the pus layer. By 7 days postinoculation, the epidermis was heavily eroded; in some instances, the dermis contained pockets (ulcers) filled with cocci, similar to that observed for ecthyma. Importantly, virulent GAS underwent reproduction, resulting in a net increase in CFU of 20- to 14,000-fold. The majority of emm pattern D strains had a higher gross pathology score than emm pattern A, B, or C (A–C) strains, consistent with epidemiological findings that pattern D strains have a strong tendency to cause impetigo, whereas pattern A–C strains are more likely to cause pharyngitis. PMID:10768985

  12. Oncogenic Radiation Abscopal Effects In Vivo: Interrogating Mouse Skin

    SciTech Connect

    Mancuso, Mariateresa; Leonardi, Simona; Giardullo, Paola; Pasquali, Emanuela; Tanori, Mirella; De Stefano, Ilaria; Casciati, Arianna; Naus, Christian C.; Pazzaglia, Simonetta; Saran, Anna

    2013-08-01

    Purpose: To investigate the tissue dependence in transmission of abscopal radiation signals and their oncogenic consequences in a radiosensitive mouse model and to explore the involvement of gap junction intercellular communication (GJIC) in mediating radiation tumorigenesis in off-target mouse skin. Methods and Materials: Patched1 heterozygous (Ptch1{sup +/−}) mice were irradiated at postnatal day 2 (P2) with 10 Gy of x-rays. Individual lead cylinders were used to protect the anterior two-thirds of the body, whereas the hindmost part was directly exposed to radiation. To test the role of GJICs and their major constituent connexin43 (Cx43), crosses between Ptch1{sup +/−} and Cx43{sup +/−} mice were similarly irradiated. These mouse groups were monitored for their lifetime, and skin basal cell carcinomas (BCCs) were counted and recorded. Early responses to DNA damage - Double Strand Breaks (DSBs) and apoptosis - were also evaluated in shielded and directly irradiated skin areas. Results: We report abscopal tumor induction in the shielded skin of Ptch1{sup +/−} mice after partial-body irradiation. Endpoints were induction of early nodular BCC-like tumors and macroscopic infiltrative BCCs. Abscopal tumorigenesis was significantly modulated by Cx43 status, namely, Cx43 reduction was associated with decreased levels of DNA damage and oncogenesis in out-of-field skin, suggesting a key role of GJIC in transmission of oncogenic radiation signals to unhit skin. Conclusions: Our results further characterize the nature of abscopal responses and the implications they have on pathologic processes in different tissues, including their possible underlying mechanistic bases.

  13. The in vivo melanocytotoxicity and depigmenting potency of N-2,4-acetoxyphenyl thioethyl acetamide in the skin and hair.

    PubMed

    Jimbow, M; Marusyk, H; Jimbow, K

    1995-10-01

    It has been shown previously that N-acetyl-4-S-cysteaminylphenol (N-Ac-4-S-CAP) is a tyrosinase substrate and a potent depigmenting agent of dark skin and black hair. The present study evaluated the depigmenting potency of an acetyl derivative of N-Ac-4-S-CAP, N-2,4-acetoxyphenyl thioethyl acetamide (NAP-TEA) in the skin and hair. We tested for (i) in vitro metabolites in the skin after topical application, and (ii) in vivo depigmenting potency in the skin and hair. We found that NAP-TEA was stable in water, but was converted to N-Ac-4-S-CAP after topical application to human skin. Therefore, although NAP-TEA was not a tyrosinase substrate, it could react with tyrosinase after being converted to N-Ac-4-S-CAP by O-deacetylation in vivo. NAP-TEA produced marked depigmentation of dark skin (Yucatan pig) after daily topical application. When given by intraperitoneal injection, it resulted in complete loss of hair colour (white) grown at the epilated site in adult C57 black mice after daily administration for 10 days, and incomplete loss of coat colour (silver grey) in newborn C57 black mice after a single administration. The depigmentation of the skin and hair was reversible. Split-dopa preparation and electron microscopy indicated that this depigmentation is primarily related to (i) a marked decrease in the number of functioning melanocytes and melanized melanosomes, (ii) a decrease in the number of melanosomes transferred to keratinocytes, and (iii) selective degeneration/inactivation of melanocytes, and deposition of melanin-like material in the Golgi cisternae, coated vesicles and melanosomes, where tyrosinase is reported to be located. We propose the NAP-TEA is converted in vivo to N-Ac-4-S-CAP which, via interaction with tyrosinase, causes reversible depigmentation of the skin and hair.

  14. Image-based haptic roughness estimation and rendering for haptic palpation from in vivo skin image.

    PubMed

    Kim, Kwangtaek

    2017-08-08

    Despite the advancement of measuring technologies, there was a need for palpation by hands to be able to better diagnose skin diseases and to learn about the tactile properties of in vivo skin surface. However, directly touching in vivo skin surface can cause secondary infections or damages. Therefore, a technology providing infection- and damage-free skin palpations and precise haptic skin roughness rendering is needed. A multidimensional (2D and 3D) rendering system was developed for multimodal (visual and haptic) rendering that can run with any given in vivo input skin images. For haptic rendering, a commercial haptic device with 3 degrees of freedom (3DOF), Geomagic Touch X, was used. To improve haptic roughness rendering, a force shading algorithm that reduces force discontinuity on rough surface patches but preserves the original roughness values was implemented and applied. In addition, a new image-based roughness estimation method was introduced and the results were compared with haptic roughness results to verify roughness rendering in the system. The developed haptic roughness rendering system will help to diagnose abnormalities on in vivo skin surfaces by virtual haptic palpation with no concern about secondary infections or damages (caused by touch interactions) especially in case of psoriasis, atopic dermatitis, or aging, which results in significant changes of skin roughness. Besides, the system can also be a good tool to examine skin condition changes before and after the use of skin care products (cosmetics). In addition, the proposed 2D skin roughness estimation method can be applied for mobile applications to provide an online roughness estimation tool with a simple phone camera.

  15. The optics of human skin

    SciTech Connect

    Anderson, R.R.; Parrish, J.A.

    1981-07-01

    An integrated review of the transfer of optical radiation into human skin is presented, aimed at developing useful models for photomedicine. The component chromophores of epidermis and stratum corneum in general determine the attenuation of radiation in these layers, moreso than does optical scattering. Epidermal thickness and melanization are important factors for UV wavelengths less than 300 nm, whereas the attenuation of UVA (320-400 nm) and visible radiation is primarily via melanin. The selective penetration of all optical wavelengths into psoriatic skin can be maximized by application of clear lipophilic liquids, which decrease regular reflectance by a refractive-index matching mechanism. Sensitivity to wavelengths less than 320 nm can be enhanced by prolonged aqueous bathing, which extracts urocanic acid and other diffusible epidermal chromophores. Optical properties of the dermis are modelled using the Kubelka-Munk approach, and calculations of scattering and absorption coefficients are presented. This simple approach allows estimates of the penetration of radiation in vivo using noninvasive measurements of cutaneous spectral remittance (diffuse reflectance). Although the blood chromophores Hb, HbO/sup 2/, and bilirubin determine dermal absorption of wavelengths longer than 320 nm, scattering by collagen fibers largely determines the depths to which these wavelengths penetrate the dermis, and profoundly modifies skin colors. An optical ''window'' exists between 600 and 1300 nm, which offers the possibility of treating large tissue volumes with certain long-wavelength photosensitizers. Moreover, whenever photosensitized action spectra extend across the near UV and/or visible spectrum, judicious choice of wavelengths allows some selection of the tissue layers directly affected.

  16. Non-invasive in vivo methods for investigation of the skin barrier physical properties.

    PubMed

    Darlenski, R; Sassning, S; Tsankov, N; Fluhr, J W

    2009-06-01

    Skin as an organ of protection covers the body and accomplishes multiple defensive functions. The intact skin represents a barrier to the uncontrolled loss of water, proteins, and plasma components from the organism. Due to its complex structure, the epidermal barrier with its major component, stratum corneum, is the rate-limiting unit for the penetration of exogenous substances through the skin. The epidermal barrier is not a static structure. The permeability barrier status can be modified by different external and internal factors such as climate, physical stressors, and a number of skin and systemic diseases. Today, different non-invasive approaches are used to monitor the skin barrier physical properties in vivo. The quantification of parameters such as transepidermal water loss, stratum corneum hydration, and skin surface acidity is essential for the integral evaluation of the epidermal barrier status. Novel methods such as in vivo confocal Raman microspectroscopy offer the possibility for precise and detailed characterization of the skin barrier. This paper will allow the readership to get acquainted with the non-invasive, in vivo methods for the investigation of the skin barrier.

  17. In vivo confocal Raman microspectroscopy of the skin: noninvasive determination of molecular concentration profiles.

    PubMed

    Caspers, P J; Lucassen, G W; Carter, E A; Bruining, H A; Puppels, G J

    2001-03-01

    Confocal Raman spectroscopy is introduced as a noninvasive in vivo optical method to measure molecular concentration profiles in the skin. It is shown how it can be applied to determine the water concentration in the stratum corneum as a function of distance to the skin surface, with a depth resolution of 5 microm. The resulting in vivo concentration profiles are in qualitative and quantitative agreement with published data, obtained by in vitro X-ray microanalysis of skin samples. Semi-quantitative concentration profiles were determined for the major constituents of natural moisturizing factor (serine, glycine, pyrrolidone-5-carboxylic acid, arginine, ornithine, citrulline, alanine, histidine, urocanic acid) and for the sweat constituents lactate and urea. A detailed description is given of the signal analysis methodology that enables the extraction of this information from the skin Raman spectra. No other noninvasive in vivo method exists that enables an analysis of skin molecular composition as a function of distance to the skin surface with similar detail and spatial resolution. Therefore, it may be expected that in vivo confocal Raman spectroscopy will find many applications in basic and applied dermatologic research.

  18. Monogenic human skin disorders.

    PubMed

    Lemke, Johannes R; Kernland-Lang, Kristin; Hörtnagel, Konstanze; Itin, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Human genodermatoses represent a broad and partly confusing spectrum of countless rare diseases with confluent and overlapping phenotypes often impeding a precise diagnosis in an affected individual. High-throughput sequencing techniques have expedited the identification of novel genes and have dramatically simplified the establishment of genetic diagnoses in such heterogeneous disorders. The precise genetic diagnosis of a skin disorder is crucial for the appropriate counselling of patients and their relatives regarding the course of the disease, prognosis and recurrence risks. Understanding the underlying pathophysiology is a prerequisite to understanding the disease and developing specific, targeted or individualized therapeutic approaches. We aimed to create a comprehensive overview of human genodermatoses and their respective genetic aetiology known to date. We hope this may represent a useful tool in guiding dermatologists towards genetic diagnoses, providing patients with individual knowledge on the respective disorder and applying novel research findings to clinical practice.

  19. Confocal Raman spectroscopy: In vivo measurement of physiological skin parameters - A pilot study.

    PubMed

    Binder, Lisa; SheikhRezaei, Safoura; Baierl, Andreas; Gruber, Lukas; Wolzt, Michael; Valenta, Claudia

    2017-08-10

    In vivo application of confocal Raman spectroscopy (CRS) allows non-invasive depth measurement of the skin. Thereby obtained knowledge of the skin composition is essential to reliably assess the actual skin state. Besides other components, the skin cholesterol concentration is of interest; however, little is known about its connection to the cholesterol concentration quantified in venous blood. In this study, the skin composition of the volar forearm was characterised in vivo using CRS. In particular, the potential of CRS as a non-invasive method to determine cholesterol levels was validated. Raman spectra of the volar forearm of 15 participants were recorded twice within two weeks. Depth concentration profiles for major skin components were generated. Stratum corneum (SC) thickness was calculated from water concentration profiles. In order to examine the usability of dermal CRS for cholesterol level determination, results were compared to fasting total cholesterol values in venous blood as determined by an enzymatic method. Depth concentration profiles for the skin components of interest showed a comparable curve progression for the participants. It was possible to link changes in concentration to physiological processes. Moreover, age-related differences could be found. Several novel mathematical approaches for the comparison of the skin cholesterol content and the blood cholesterol concentration have been developed. However, no correlation passed the Bonferroni multiple testing correction. CRS serves as useful tool for the in vivo monitoring of skin components and hydration. Concentration depth profiles provide information about the current skin condition. No distinct correlation between the skin and blood cholesterol concentration was found within the scope of the present study. Concerning this matter, the heterogeneous distribution of cholesterol in the skin may be a factor influencing these results. Copyright © 2017 Japanese Society for Investigative

  20. Non-invasive measurement of micro-area skin impedance in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Dachao; Liang, Wenshuai; Liu, Tongkun; Yu, Haixia; Xu, Kexin

    2011-12-01

    Volume measurement of interstitial fluid transdermally extracted is important in continuous glucose monitoring instrument. The volume of transdermally extracted interstitial fluid could be determined by a skin permeability coefficient. If the skin impedance which is the indicator of skin permeability coefficient can be accurately measured, the volume of interstitial fluid can be calculated based on the relationship between the indicator and the skin permeability coefficient. The possibility of using the skin impedance to indicate the skin permeability coefficient is investigated. A correlation model between the skin impedance and the skin permeability coefficient is developed. A novel non-invasive method for in vivo, real-time, and accurate measurement of skin impedance within a micro skin area is brought forward. The proposed measurement method is based on the theory that organisms saliva and interstitial fluid are equipotential. An electrode is put on the surface of a micro skin area and another one is put in the mouth to be fully contacted with saliva of an animal in the experiments. The electrode in mouth is used to replace the implantable subcutaneous electrode for non-invasive measurement of skin impedance in vivo. A biologically compatible AC current with amplitude of 100mv and frequency of 10Hz is applied to stimulate the micro skin area by the two electrodes. And then the voltage and current between the two electrodes are measured to calculate the skin impedance within a micro skin area. The measurement results by electrode in mouth are compared with the results by subcutaneous electrode in animal experiments and they are consistent so the proposed measurement method is verified well. The effect of moisture and pressure for the measurement is also studied in the paper.

  1. Numerical assessment of thermal response associated with in vivo skin electroporation: the importance of the composite skin model.

    PubMed

    Becker, S M; Kuznetsov, A V

    2007-06-01

    Electroporation is an approach used to enhance transdermal transport of large molecules in which the skin is exposed to a series of electric pulses. The structure of the transport inhibiting outer layer, the stratum corneum, is temporarily destabilized due to the development of microscopic pores. Consequently agents that are ordinarily unable to pass into the skin are able to pass through this outer barrier. Of possible concern when exposing biological tissue to an electric field is thermal tissue damage associated with Joule heating. This paper shows the importance of using a composite model in calculating the electrical and thermal effects associated with skin electroporation. A three-dimensional transient finite-volume model of in vivo skin electroporation is developed to emphasize the importance of representing the skin's composite layers and to illustrate the underlying relationships between the physical parameters of the composite makeup of the skin and resulting thermal damage potential.

  2. Solid lipid nanoparticles as carrier for sunscreens: in vitro release and in vivo skin penetration.

    PubMed

    Wissing, S A; Müller, R H

    2002-06-17

    The aim of this study was the comparison of two different formulations (solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) and conventional o/w emulsion) as carrier systems for the molecular sunscreen oxybenzone. The influence of the carrier on the rate of release was studied in vitro with a membrane-free model. The release rate could be decreased by up to 50% with the SLN formulation. Further in vitro measurements with static Franz diffusion cells were performed. In vivo, penetration of oxybenzone into stratum corneum on the forearm was investigated by the tape stripping method. It was shown that the rate of release is strongly dependent upon the formulation and could be decreased by 30-60% in SLN formulations. In all test models, oxybenzone was released and penetrated into human skin more quickly and to a greater extent from the emulsions. The rate of release also depends upon the total concentration of oxybenzone in the formulation. In vitro-in vivo correlations could be made qualitatively.

  3. Targeting of NADPH oxidase in vitro and in vivo suppresses fibroblast activation and experimental skin fibrosis.

    PubMed

    Dosoki, Heba; Stegemann, Agatha; Taha, Muna; Schnittler, Hans; Luger, Thomas A; Schröder, Katrin; Distler, Jörg H W; Kerkhoff, Claus; Böhm, Markus

    2017-01-01

    Although there is increasing evidence that oxidative stress is involved in collagen synthesis and myofibroblast activation, the NADPH oxidase (Nox) system is incompletely investigated in the context of human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) and skin fibrosis. Using the pan-Nox inhibitor diphenyleneiodonium (DPI) as an initial tool, we show that gene expression of collagen type I, α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA) and fibronectin 1 is suppressed in HDFs. Detailed expression analysis of all Nox isoforms and adaptors revealed expression of RNA and protein expression of Nox4, p22(phox) and Poldip2 but neither Nox1 nor Nox2. Nox4 could be immunolocalized to the endoplasmic reticulum. Importantly, TGF-β1 had a dose- and time-dependent upregulating effect on NADH activity and Nox4 gene expression in HDFs. Genetic silencing of Nox4 as demonstrated by siRNA in HDFs as well as in murine fibroblasts established from Nox4 knockout mice confirmed that TGF-β1 -mediated collagen type I gene, α-SMA and fibronectin 1 gene expressions were Nox4-dependent. This TGF-β1 effect was mediated by Smad3 as shown by in silico promoter analysis, pharmacological inhibition and gene silencing of Smad3. The relevance of these findings is highlighted in the bleomycin-induced scleroderma mouse model. DPI treatment attenuated skin fibrosis and myofibroblast activation. Moreover, Nox4 knockdown by siRNA reduced skin collagen synthesis, α-SMA and fibronectin 1 expression in vivo. Finally, analyses of HDFs from patients with systemic sclerosis confirmed the expression of Nox4 and its adaptors, whereas Nox1 and Nox2 were not detectable. Our findings indicate that Nox4 targeting is a promising future treatment for fibrotic skin diseases. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  4. Study of the vitamins A, E and C esters penetration into the skin by confocal Raman spectroscopy in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mogilevych, Borys; Isensee, Debora; Rangel, Joao L.; Dal Pizzol, Carine; Martinello, Valeska C. A.; Dieamant, Gustavo C.; Martin, Airton A.

    2015-06-01

    Vitamins A, E and C play important role in skin homeostasis and protection. Hence, they are extensively used in many cosmetic and cosmeceutic products. However, their molecules are unstable, and do not easily penetrate into the skin, which drastically decreases its efficiency in topical formulations. Liposoluble derivative of the vitamin A - retinyl palmitate, vitamin E - tocopheryl acetate, and vitamin C - tetraisopalmitoyl ascorbic acid, are more stable, and are frequently used as an active ingredient in cosmetic products. Moreover, increased hydrophobicity of these molecules could lead to a higher skin penetration. The aim of this work is to track and compare the absorption of the liposoluble derivatives of the vitamins and their encapsulated form, into the healthy human skin in vivo. We used Confocal Raman Spectroscopy (CRS) that is proven to be helpful in label-free non-destructive investigation of the biochemical composition and molecular conformational analysis of the biological samples. The measurements were performed in the volar forearm of the 10 healthy volunteers. Skin was treated with both products, and Raman spectra were obtained after 15 min, 3 hours, and 6 hours after applying the formulation. 3510 Skin Composition Analyzer (River Diagnostics, The Netherlands) with 785 nm laser excitation was used to acquire information in the fingerprint region. Significant difference in permeation of the products was observed. Whereas only free form of retinyl palmitate penetrate the skin within first 15 minutes, all three vitamin derivatives were present under the skin surface in case of nanoparticulated form.

  5. In vivo gene silencing following non-invasive siRNA delivery into the skin using a novel topical formulation.

    PubMed

    Hegde, Vikas; Hickerson, Robyn P; Nainamalai, Sitheswaran; Campbell, Paul A; Smith, Frances J D; McLean, W H Irwin; Pedrioli, Deena M Leslie

    2014-12-28

    Therapeutics based on short interfering RNAs (siRNAs), which act by inhibiting the expression of target transcripts, represent a novel class of potent and highly specific next-generation treatments for human skin diseases. Unfortunately, the intrinsic barrier properties of the skin combined with the large size and negative charge of siRNAs make epidermal delivery of these macromolecules quite challenging. To help evaluate the in vivo activity of these therapeutics and refine delivery strategies we generated an innovative reporter mouse model that predominantly expresses firefly luciferase (luc2p) in the paw epidermis--the region of murine epidermis that most closely models the tissue architecture of human skin. Combining this animal model with state-of-the-art live animal imaging techniques, we have developed a real-time in vivo analysis work-flow that has allowed us to compare and contrast the efficacies of a wide range nucleic acid-based gene silencing reagents in the skin of live animals. While inhibition was achieved with all of the reagents tested, only the commercially available "self-delivery" modified Accell-siRNAs (Dharmacon) produced potent and sustained in vivo gene silencing. Together, these findings highlight just how informative reliable reporter mouse models can be when assessing novel therapeutics in vivo. Using this work-flow, we developed a novel clinically-relevant topical formulation that facilitates non-invasive epidermal delivery of unmodified and "self-delivery" siRNAs. Remarkably, a sustained >40% luc2p inhibition was observed after two 1-hour treatments with Accell-siRNAs in our topical formulation. Importantly, our ability to successfully deliver siRNA molecules topically brings these novel RNAi-based therapeutics one-step closer to clinical use.

  6. In vivo quantitative analysis of the effect of hydration (immersion and Vaseline treatment) in skin layers using high-resolution MRI and magnetisation transfer contrast.

    PubMed

    Mirrashed, Fakhereh; Sharp, Jonathan C

    2004-02-01

    Many claims are made as to the efficacy of topical preparations in moisturising the skin, yet most of these claims cannot be substantiated by scientific study for the skin layers beneath the stratum corneum, and yield no information on the remainder of the epidermis and dermis. This argues for an in vivo quantitative method for measuring the effect of water loading extended to various layers of the skin. Detailed high-resolution in vivo MRI studies of hydration and dehydration of finger pad skin layers were conducted on one normal subject using two moisturisation methods (topical white soft paraffin (Vaseline) and water immersion). The dehydration study was carried out immediately following removal from prolonged skin moisturisation. Inter-individual variability for skin hydration (group study) was studied in seven healthy volunteers at 0 and 7 h hydration with Vaseline. Location dependence in skin hydration was investigated on the same subject by looking into the hydration of forearm and finger pad skin. System stability and measurement reproducibility was verified through a detailed phantom study. Images of normal and hydrated human skin were obtained in vivo at voxel dimensions of 50 micromx150 micromx1000 microm. The effect of hydration and dehydration as a function of exposure to moisturiser (i.e. water and Vaseline) on the image signal intensity, observed T1, and interaction of free and bound water in specific tissues were identified and correlated with existing physiological knowledge. Swelling of stratum corneum due to hydration was expressed as an in vivo model of tissue hydration. Results of the dehydration study showed that the changes due to the previous hydration of the skin are reversible for all skin layers. For both moisturisation methods (i.e. Vaseline and skin bathing), the effects of hydration and dehydration on the skin were similar. The trends of the MRI parameters for finger pad and arm skin were similar. The group study showed low inter

  7. The effects of heat on skin barrier function and in vivo dermal absorption.

    PubMed

    Oliveira, Gabriela; Leverett, Jesse C; Emamzadeh, Mandana; Lane, Majella E

    2014-04-10

    Enhanced delivery of ingredients across the stratum corneum (SC) is of great interest for improving the efficacy of topically applied formulations. Various methods for improving dermal penetration have been reported including galvanic devices and micro-needles. From a safety perspective it is important that such approaches do not compromise SC barrier function. This study investigates the influence of topically applied heat in vivo on the dermal uptake and penetration of a model active, allantoin from gel and lotion formulations. A custom designed device was used to deliver 42°C for 30s daily to human subjects after application of two formulations containing allantoin. The results were compared with sites treated with formulations containing no active and no heat, and a control site. In addition to penetration of allantoin, the integrity of the SC was monitored using trans-epidermal water loss (TEWL) measurements. The results showed that just 30s of 42°C topically applied heat was enough to cause significantly more penetration of allantoin from the lotion formulation compared with no application of heat. TEWL data indicated that the integrity of the skin was not compromised by the treatment. However, the application of heat did not promote enhanced penetration of the active from the gel formulation. Vehicle composition is therefore an important factor when considering thermal enhancement strategies for targeting actives to the skin.

  8. Comparison of human and porcine skin for characterization of sunscreens

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weigmann, Hans-Jürgen; Schanzer, Sabine; Patzelt, Alexa; Bahaban, Virginie; Durat, Fabienne; Sterry, Wolfram; Lademann, Jürgen

    2009-03-01

    The universal sun protection factor (USPF) characterizing sunscreen efficacy based on spectroscopically determined data, which were obtained using the tape stripping procedure. The USPF takes into account the complete ultraviolet (UV) spectral range in contrast to the classical sun protection factor (SPF). Until now, the USPF determination has been evaluated only in human skin. However, investigating new filters not yet licensed excludes in vivo investigation on human skin but requires the utilization of a suitable skin model. The penetration behavior and the protection efficacy of 10 commercial sunscreens characterized by USPF were investigated, comparing human and porcine skin. The penetration behavior found for typical UV filter substances is nearly identical for both skin types. The comparison of the USPF obtained for human and porcine skin results in a linear relation between both USPF values with a correlation factor R2=0.98. The results demonstrate the possibility for the use of porcine skin to determine the protection efficacy of sunscreens.

  9. In vitro Percutaneous Absorption of Niacinamide and Phytosterols and in vivo Evaluation of their Effect on Skin Barrier Recovery.

    PubMed

    Offerta, Alessia; Bonina, Francesco; Gasparri, Franco; Zanardi, Andrea; Micicche, Lucia; Puglia, Carmelo

    2016-01-01

    In this study, we evaluated different strategies to optimize the percutaneous absorption of niacinamide (NA) and soy phytosterols (FITO) by making use of solid lipid nanoparticles (SLN) and penetration enhancers, such as the hydrogenated lecithin. The evaluation of the skin permeation of NA and FITO has been effected in vitro using excised human skin (i.e., stratum corneum-epidermis or SCE). Furthermore, we evaluated the in vivo effect that NA and FITO has on skin barrier recovery after the topical application; using the extent of methyl nicotinate (MN)-induced erythema in damaged skin as a parameter to determine the rate of stratum corneum recovery. Results pointed out the importance of these strategies as valid tools for NA and FITO topical delivery. In fact, soy lecithin based formulations were able to increase the percutaneous absorption of the two active ingredients, while SLN guaranteed an interesting delayed and sustained release of FITO. In vivo evaluation showed clearly that the formulation containing both the actives (NA and FITO) is able to recover about 95% of skin barrier integrity eight days after tape stripping. This effect is probably due to the "synergistic effect" of NA and FITO.

  10. Enhanced in vitro and in vivo skin deposition of apigenin delivered using ethosomes.

    PubMed

    Shen, Li-Na; Zhang, Yong-Tai; Wang, Qin; Xu, Ling; Feng, Nian-Ping

    2014-01-02

    The aim of this study was to develop and evaluate a novel topical delivery system for apigenin by using ethosomes. An optimal apigenin-loaded ethosome formulation was identified by means of uniform design experiments. Skin deposition and transdermal flux of apigenin loaded in ethosomes, liposomes, and deformable liposomes were compared in vitro and in vivo. The efficiency of apigenin encapsulation increased with an increase in the amount of phospholipids in ethosome formulations. Moreover, skin deposition and transdermal flux of apigenin improved with an increase in the levels of phospholipids (Lipoid S 75) and short-chain alcohols (propylene glycol and ethanol), but decreased with an increase in the ratio of propylene glycol to ethanol. Profiles of skin deposition versus time for ethosomes varied markedly between in vivo and in vitro studies compared with those of liposomes or deformable liposomes. Optimized ethosomes showed superior skin targeting both in vitro and in vivo. Moreover, they had the strongest effect on reduction of cyclooxygenase-2 levels in mouse skin inflammation induced by ultraviolet B (UVB) light. Therefore, apigenin-loaded ethosomes represent a promising therapeutic approach for the treatment of UVB-induced skin inflammation.

  11. Polarization speckle imaging as a potential technique for in vivo skin cancer detection

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tchvialeva, Lioudmila; Dhadwal, Gurbir; Lui, Harvey; Kalia, Sunil; Zeng, Haishan; McLean, David I.; Lee, Tim K.

    2013-06-01

    Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the Western world. In order to accurately detect the disease, especially malignant melanoma-the most fatal form of skin cancer-at an early stage when the prognosis is excellent, there is an urgent need to develop noninvasive early detection methods. We believe that polarization speckle patterns, defined as a spatial distribution of depolarization ratio of traditional speckle patterns, can be an important tool for skin cancer detection. To demonstrate our technique, we conduct a large in vivo clinical study of 214 skin lesions, and show that statistical moments of the polarization speckle pattern could differentiate different types of skin lesions, including three common types of skin cancers, malignant melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma, and two benign lesions, melanocytic nevus and seborrheic keratoses. In particular, the fourth order moment achieves better or similar sensitivity and specificity than many well-known and accepted optical techniques used to differentiate melanoma and seborrheic keratosis.

  12. Polarization speckle imaging as a potential technique for in vivo skin cancer detection.

    PubMed

    Tchvialeva, Lioudmila; Dhadwal, Gurbir; Lui, Harvey; Kalia, Sunil; Zeng, Haishan; McLean, David I; Lee, Tim K

    2013-06-01

    Skin cancer is the most common cancer in the Western world. In order to accurately detect the disease, especially malignant melanoma-the most fatal form of skin cancer-at an early stage when the prognosis is excellent, there is an urgent need to develop noninvasive early detection methods. We believe that polarization speckle patterns, defined as a spatial distribution of depolarization ratio of traditional speckle patterns, can be an important tool for skin cancer detection. To demonstrate our technique, we conduct a large in vivo clinical study of 214 skin lesions, and show that statistical moments of the polarization speckle pattern could differentiate different types of skin lesions, including three common types of skin cancers, malignant melanoma, squamous cell carcinoma, basal cell carcinoma, and two benign lesions, melanocytic nevus and seborrheic keratoses. In particular, the fourth order moment achieves better or similar sensitivity and specificity than many well-known and accepted optical techniques used to differentiate melanoma and seborrheic keratosis.

  13. Determination of in vivo skin moisture level by near-infrared reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Saknite, Inga; Spigulis, Janis

    2015-03-01

    Near-infrared spectroscopy has a potential for noninvasive determination of skin moisture level due to high water absorption. In this study, diffuse reflectance spectra of in vivo skin were acquired in the spectral range of 900 nm to 1700 nm by using near-infrared spectrometer, optical fiber and halogen bulb light source. Absorption changes after applying skin moisturizers were analyzed over time at different body sites. Results show difference in absorption when comparing dry and normal skin. Comparison of absorption changes over time after applying moisturizer at different body sites is analyzed and discussed. Some patterns of how skin reacts to different skin moisturizers are shown, although no clear pattern can be seen due to signal noise.

  14. In vivo comparison of near infrared lasers for skin welding.

    PubMed

    Tabakoğlu, Haşim Ozgür; Gülsoy, Murat

    2010-05-01

    The skin closure abilities of near infrared lasers and suturing were compared by histological examination and mechanical tensile tests during a 21-day healing period. One-centimeter incisions on the dorsal skin of Wistar rats were treated by one of the closing techniques: (a) soldering, using an 809 nm diode laser (0.5 W, 5 s) with 25% bovine serum albumin (BSA) and 2.5 mg/ml indocyanine green (ICG); (b) direct welding with a 980 nm diode laser (0.5 W, 5 s); (c) direct welding with a 1,070 nm fiber laser (0.5 W, 5 s); (d) suturing. Six spots (79.61 J/cm(2) for each spot) were applied through the incisions. Healing was inspected on the 1st, 4th, 7th, 14th, and 21st post-operative days. The closure index (CI), thermally altered area (TAA), granulation area (GA) and epidermal thickness (ET) were determined by histological examination. Tensile tests were performed at a 5 mm/min crosshead speed up to the first opening along the incision. Immediate superficial closure with high CI values was found for the laser-irradiated incisions at the early phase of recovery. Clear welds without thermal damage were observed for the group irradiated at 1,070 nm. For the sutured group, the incisions remained unclosed for the first day, and openings through the incision were observed. At the end of the 21-day recovery period, no differences between experimental groups were observed in terms of the CI, GA and ET values. However, the tensile strength of the groups irradiated at 980 nm and 1,070 nm was found to be higher than that of the sutured incisions. The laser welding techniques were found to be reliable in terms of immediate and mechanically strong closure compared with suturing. Of them, 1,070 nm laser welding yielded noticeably stronger bonds, with minimal scarring at the end of the 21-days of recovery.

  15. In vitro and in vivo percutaneous absorption of retinol from cosmetic formulations: significance of the skin reservoir and prediction of systemic absorption.

    PubMed

    Yourick, Jeffrey J; Jung, Connie T; Bronaugh, Robert L

    2008-08-15

    The percutaneous absorption of retinol (Vitamin A) from cosmetic formulations was studied to predict systemic absorption and to understand the significance of the skin reservoir in in vitro absorption studies. Viable skin from fuzzy rat or human subjects was assembled in flow-through diffusion cells for in vitro absorption studies. In vivo absorption studies using fuzzy rats were performed in glass metabolism cages for collection of urine, feces, and body content. Retinol (0.3%) formulations (hydroalcoholic gel and oil-in-water emulsion) containing (3)H-retinol were applied and absorption was measured at 24 or 72 h. All percentages reported are % of applied dose. In vitro studies using human skin and the gel and emulsion vehicles found 0.3 and 1.3% retinol, respectively, in receptor fluid at 24 h. Levels of absorption in the receptor fluid increased over 72 h with the gel and emulsion vehicles. Using the gel vehicle, in vitro rat skin studies found 23% in skin and 6% in receptor fluid at 24 h, while 72-h studies found 18% in skin and 13% in receptor fluid. Thus, significant amounts of retinol remained in rat skin at 24 h and decreased over 72 h, with proportional increases in receptor fluid. In vivo rat studies with the gel found 4% systemic absorption of retinol after 24 h and systemic absorption did not increase at 72 h. Retinol remaining in rat skin after in vivo application was 18% and 13% of the applied dermal dose after 24 and 72 h, respectively. Similar observations were made with the oil-in water emulsion vehicle in the rat. Retinol formed a reservoir in rat skin both in vivo and in vitro. Little additional retinol was bioavailable after 24 h. Comparison of these in vitro and in vivo results for absorption through rat skin indicates that the 24-h in vitro receptor fluid value accurately estimated 24-h in vivo systemic absorption. Therefore, the best single estimate of retinol systemic absorption from in vitro human skin studies is the 24-h receptor fluid

  16. In vitro and in vivo percutaneous absorption of retinol from cosmetic formulations: Significance of the skin reservoir and prediction of systemic absorption

    SciTech Connect

    Yourick, Jeffrey J. Jung, Connie T.; Bronaugh, Robert L.

    2008-08-15

    The percutaneous absorption of retinol (Vitamin A) from cosmetic formulations was studied to predict systemic absorption and to understand the significance of the skin reservoir in in vitro absorption studies. Viable skin from fuzzy rat or human subjects was assembled in flow-through diffusion cells for in vitro absorption studies. In vivo absorption studies using fuzzy rats were performed in glass metabolism cages for collection of urine, feces, and body content. Retinol (0.3%) formulations (hydroalcoholic gel and oil-in-water emulsion) containing {sup 3}H-retinol were applied and absorption was measured at 24 or 72 h. All percentages reported are % of applied dose. In vitro studies using human skin and the gel and emulsion vehicles found 0.3 and 1.3% retinol, respectively, in receptor fluid at 24 h. Levels of absorption in the receptor fluid increased over 72 h with the gel and emulsion vehicles. Using the gel vehicle, in vitro rat skin studies found 23% in skin and 6% in receptor fluid at 24 h, while 72-h studies found 18% in skin and 13% in receptor fluid. Thus, significant amounts of retinol remained in rat skin at 24 h and decreased over 72 h, with proportional increases in receptor fluid. In vivo rat studies with the gel found 4% systemic absorption of retinol after 24 h and systemic absorption did not increase at 72 h. Retinol remaining in rat skin after in vivo application was 18% and 13% of the applied dermal dose after 24 and 72 h, respectively. Similar observations were made with the oil-in water emulsion vehicle in the rat. Retinol formed a reservoir in rat skin both in vivo and in vitro. Little additional retinol was bioavailable after 24 h. Comparison of these in vitro and in vivo results for absorption through rat skin indicates that the 24-h in vitro receptor fluid value accurately estimated 24-h in vivo systemic absorption. Therefore, the best single estimate of retinol systemic absorption from in vitro human skin studies is the 24-h receptor

  17. Measurement of diffusion of fluorescent compounds and autofluorescence in skin in vivo using a confocal instrument

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Buttenschoen, K. K.; Sutton, E. E.; Daly, D.; Girkin, J. M.

    2016-02-01

    Using compact and affordable instrumentation based upon fluorescent confocal imaging we have tracked the movement of autofluorescent compounds through skin in near real time with high temporal and spatial resolution and sensitivity. The ability to measure the diffusion of compounds through skin with such resolution plays an important role for applications such as monitoring the penetration of pharmaceuticals applied to skin and assessing the integrity of the skin barrier. Several measurement methods exist, but they suffer from a number of problems such as being slow, expensive, non-portable and lacking sensitivity. To address these issues, we adapted a technique that we previously developed for tracking fluorescent compounds in the eye to measure the autofluorescence and the diffusion of externally applied fluorescent compounds in skin in vivo. Results are presented that show the change in autofluorescence of the volar forearm over the course of a week. We furthermore demonstrate the ability of the instrument to measure the diffusion speed and depth of externally applied fluorescent compounds both in healthy skin and after the skin barrier function has been perturbed. The instrument is currently being developed further for increased sensitivity and multi-wavelength excitation. We believe that the presented instrument is suitable for a large number of applications in fields such as assessment of damage to the skin barrier, development of topical and systemic medication and tracking the diffusion of fluorescent compounds through skin constructs as well as monitoring effects of skin products and general consumer products which may come into contact with the skin.

  18. In vivo antinuclear antibodies of the skin: A rare phenomenon on direct immunofluorescence.

    PubMed

    Chhabra, Seema; Arora, Sandeep Kumar; Minz, Ranjana Walker; Dogra, Suneel

    2013-04-15

    Detection of immunoglobulins in epidermal cell nuclei or in vivo antinuclear antibodies on direct immunoflorescence microscopy of skin biopsies is an easily detectable immunopathologic feature. It is an unusual, but not totally rare, occurrence in systemic connective tissue disorders. This positive epidermal nuclear reaction is found to be commonly associated with immunoglobulin G.

  19. Multiple sulfatase deficiency (mucosulfatidosis): impaired degradation of labeled sulfated compounds in cultured skin fibroblasts in vivo.

    PubMed

    Eto, Y; Numaguchi, S; Tahara, T; Rennert, O M

    1980-10-01

    Skin fibroblasts from a Japanese patient with multiple sulfatase deficiency (MSD) (Mucosulfatidosis) were studied with regard to metabolism of various sulfated compounds in vivo. Several sulfatase activities (arylsulfatases A, B and C, cholesterol sulfatase, heparin N-sulfatase) were deficient in skin fibroblasts grown in F-10 CO2 medium. The accumulation and degradation of 35S-sulfatide, 35S-mucopolysaccharides, 14C-cholesterol sulfate by MSD cells were also studied, comparing them to control, Hunter and metachromatic leukodystrophy cells. MSD fibroblasts accumulated and failed to degrade these compounds in vivo. Cholesterol sulfate was also incorporated into the control and pathological cells, and MSD cells were unable to hydrolyze cholesterol sulfate, though cholesterol sulfate is known to be hydrolyzed in the non-lysosomal subfraction. From these data it is clear that multiple enzyme deficiencies in MSD fibroblasts can be demonstrated in vivo.

  20. The top skin-associated genes: a comparative analysis of human and mouse skin transcriptomes.

    PubMed

    Gerber, Peter Arne; Buhren, Bettina Alexandra; Schrumpf, Holger; Homey, Bernhard; Zlotnik, Albert; Hevezi, Peter

    2014-06-01

    The mouse represents a key model system for the study of the physiology and biochemistry of skin. Comparison of skin between mouse and human is critical for interpretation and application of data from mouse experiments to human disease. Here, we review the current knowledge on structure and immunology of mouse and human skin. Moreover, we present a systematic comparison of human and mouse skin transcriptomes. To this end, we have recently used a genome-wide database of human gene expression to identify genes highly expressed in skin, with no, or limited expression elsewhere - human skin-associated genes (hSAGs). Analysis of our set of hSAGs allowed us to generate a comprehensive molecular characterization of healthy human skin. Here, we used a similar database to generate a list of mouse skin-associated genes (mSAGs). A comparative analysis between the top human (n=666) and mouse (n=873) skin-associated genes (SAGs) revealed a total of only 30.2% identity between the two lists. The majority of shared genes encode proteins that participate in structural and barrier functions. Analysis of the top functional annotation terms revealed an overlap for morphogenesis, cell adhesion, structure, and signal transduction. The results of this analysis, discussed in the context of published data, illustrate the diversity between the molecular make up of skin of both species and grants a probable explanation, why results generated in murine in vivo models often fail to translate into the human.

  1. Do TRPV1 antagonists increase the risk for skin tumourigenesis? A collaborative in vitro and in vivo assessment.

    PubMed

    Park, Miyoung; Naidoo, Anita A; Burns, Angie; Choi, Jin Kyu; Gatfield, Kelly M; Vidgeon-Hart, Martin; Bae, Il-Hong; Lee, Chang Seok; Choi, Gyeyoung; Powell, Andrew J; Park, Young-Ho; Fagg, Rajni

    2017-08-16

    A recent hypothesis suggesting that the pharmacological target TRPV1 (transient receptor potential vanilloid subfamily, member 1) may function as a tumour suppressor, which potentially impacts the development of TRPV1 antagonist therapeutics for a range of conditions. However, little is known about the long-term physiologic effects of TRPV1 blockade in the skin. In vitro and in vivo studies suggested that the potent TRPV1 competitive antagonist AMG-9810 promoted proliferation in N/TERT1 cells (telomerase-immortalised primary human keratinocytes 1) and tumour development in mouse skin that was mediated through EGFR/Akt/mTOR signalling. We attempted to reproduce the reported in vitro and in vivo findings to further explore this hypothesis to understand the underlying mechanism and the risk associated with TRPV1 antagonism in the skin. In vitro proliferation studies using multiple methods and topical application with AMG-9810 and structurally similar TRPV1 antagonists such as SB-705498 and PAC-14028 were performed. Although we confirmed expression of TRPV1 in primary human epidermal keratinocytes (HEKn) and spontaneously immortalised human keratinocytes (HaCaT), we were unable to demonstrate cell proliferation in either cell type or any clear evidence of increased expression of proteins in the EGFR/Akt/mTOR signalling pathway with these molecules. We were also unable to demonstrate skin tumour promotion or underlying molecular mechanisms involved in the EGFR/Akt/mTOR signalling pathway in a single-dose and two-stage carcinogenesis mouse study treated with TRPV1 antagonists. In conclusion, our data suggest that inhibiting the pharmacological function of TRPV1 in skin by specific antagonists has not been considered to be indicative of skin tumour development.

  2. Enhanced optical clearing of skin in vivo and optical coherence tomography in-depth imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wen, Xiang; Jacques, Steven L.; Tuchin, Valery V.; Zhu, Dan

    2012-06-01

    The strong optical scattering of skin tissue makes it very difficult for optical coherence tomography (OCT) to achieve deep imaging in skin. Significant optical clearing of in vivo rat skin sites was achieved within 15 min by topical application of an optical clearing agent PEG-400, a chemical enhancer (thiazone or propanediol), and physical massage. Only when all three components were applied together could a 15 min treatment achieve a three fold increase in the OCT reflectance from a 300 μm depth and 31% enhancement in image depth Zthreshold.

  3. Skin decontamination with mineral cationic carrier against sarin determined in vivo.

    PubMed

    Vucemilović, Ante; Hadzija, Mirko; Jukić, Ivan

    2009-06-01

    Our Institute's nuclear, biological, and chemical defense research team continuously investigates and develops preparations for skin decontamination against nerve agents. In this in vivo study, we evaluated skin decontamination efficacy against sarin by a synthetic preparation called Mineral Cationic Carrier (MCC) with known ion exchange, absorption efficacy and bioactive potential. Mice were treated with increasing doses of sarin applied on their skin, and MCC was administered immediately after contamination. The results showed that decontamination with MCC could achieve therapeutic efficacy corresponding to 3 x LD(50) of percutaneous sarin and call for further research.

  4. In vivo skin dose measurement using MOSkin detectors in tangential breast radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jong, W L; Ung, N M; Wong, J H D; Ng, K H; Wan Ishak, W Z; Abdul Malik, R; Phua, V C E; Cutajar, D L; Metcalfe, P E; Rosenfeld, A B; Ho, G F

    2016-11-01

    The purpose of this study is to measure patient skin dose in tangential breast radiotherapy. Treatment planning dose calculation algorithm such as Pencil Beam Convolution (PBC) and in vivo dosimetry techniques such as radiochromic film can be used to accurately monitor radiation doses at tissue depths, but they are inaccurate for skin dose measurement. A MOSFET-based (MOSkin) detector was used to measure skin dose in this study. Tangential breast radiotherapies ("bolus" and "no bolus") were simulated on an anthropomorphic phantom and the skin doses were measured. Skin doses were also measured in 13 patients undergoing each of the techniques. In the patient study, the EBT2 measurements and PBC calculation tended to over-estimate the skin dose compared with the MOSkin detector (p<0.05) in the "no bolus radiotherapy". No significant differences were observed in the "bolus radiotherapy" (p>0.05). The results from patients were similar to that of the phantom study. This shows that the EBT2 measurement and PBC calculation, while able to predict accurate doses at tissue depths, are inaccurate in predicting doses at build-up regions. The clinical application of the MOSkin detectors showed that the average total skin doses received by patients were 1662±129cGy (medial) and 1893±199cGy (lateral) during "no bolus radiotherapy". The average total skin doses were 4030±72cGy (medial) and 4004±91cGy (lateral) for "bolus radiotherapy". In some cases, patient skin doses were shown to exceed the dose toxicity level for skin erythema. Hence, a suitable device for in vivo dosimetry is necessary to accurately determine skin dose. Copyright © 2016 Associazione Italiana di Fisica Medica. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Relevance of in vivo models in melanoma skin cancer

    SciTech Connect

    Setlow, R.B.

    1995-12-31

    A discussion of possible wavelength dependence of induction of cutaneous malignant melanoma (CMM) is provided. Strengths and weaknesses of various experimental approaches to better understanding of the prevalence of CMM in different human populations including latitude effects are compared. Further the advantages and limitations of the use of the laboratory opossum (Monodelphis domestic), transgenic mice containing SV40 ongogene sequences under tyrosinase promoter control, and a backcross hybrid fish of the genus Xenophorus are contrasted.

  6. Analysis of Reparative Activity of Platelet Lysate: Effect on Cell Monolayer Recovery In Vitro and Skin Wound Healing In Vivo.

    PubMed

    Sergeeva, N S; Shanskii, Ya D; Sviridova, I K; Karalkin, P A; Kirsanova, V A; Akhmedova, S A; Kaprin, A D

    2016-11-01

    Platelet lysate prepared from donor platelet concentrate and pooled according to a developed technique stimulates migration of multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells of the human adipose tissue and promotes healing of the monolayer defect in cultures of human fibroblasts and multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells in vitro in concentrations close those of fetal calf serum (5-10%). Lysate of platelets from platelet-rich rat blood plasma stimulated healing of the skin defect by promoting epithelialization and granulation tissue formation. The regenerative properties of platelet lysate in vivo increased with increasing its concentration.

  7. Genome Wide Evaluation of Normal Human Tissue in Response to Controlled, In vivo Low-Dose Low LET Ionizing Radiation Exposure: Pathways and Mechanisms Final Report, September 2013

    SciTech Connect

    Rocke, David M.

    2013-09-09

    During course of this project, we have worked in several areas relevant to low-dose ionizing radiation. Using gene expression to measure biological response, we have examined the response of human skin exposed in-vivo to radation, human skin exposed ex-vivo to radiation, and a human-skin model exposed to radiation. We have learned a great deal about the biological response of human skin to low-dose ionizing radiation.

  8. Automated in vivo 3D high-definition optical coherence tomography skin analysis system.

    PubMed

    Ai Ping Yow; Jun Cheng; Annan Li; Srivastava, Ruchir; Jiang Liu; Wong, Damon Wing Kee; Hong Liang Tey

    2016-08-01

    The in vivo assessment and visualization of skin structures can be performed through the use of high resolution optical coherence tomography imaging, also known as HD-OCT. However, the manual assessment of such images can be exhaustive and time consuming. In this paper, we present an analysis system to automatically identify and quantify the skin characteristics such as the topography of the surface of the skin and thickness of the epidermis in HD-OCT images. Comparison of this system with manual clinical measurements demonstrated its potential for automatic objective skin analysis and diseases diagnosis. To our knowledge, this is the first report of an automated system to process and analyse HD-OCT skin images.

  9. In vivo optical virtual biopsy of human oral mucosa with harmonic generation microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Tsai, Ming-Rung; Chen, Szu-Yu; Shieh, Dar-Bin; Lou, Pei-Jen; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2011-01-01

    Recent clinical studies on human skin indicated that in vivo multi-harmonic generation microscopy (HGM) can achieve sub-micron resolution for histopathological analysis with a high penetration depth and leave no energy or photodamages in the interacted tissues. It is thus highly desired to apply HGM for in vivo mucosa histopathological diagnosis. In this paper, the first in vivo optical virtual biopsy of human oral mucosa by using epi-HGM is demonstrated. We modified an upright microscope to rotate the angle of objective for in vivo observation. Our clinical study reveals the capability of HGM to in vivo image cell distributions in human oral mucosa, including epithelium and lamina propria with a high penetration depth greater than 280 μm and a high spatial resolution better than 500 nm. We also found that the third-harmonic-generation (THG) contrast on nucleus depends strongly on its thicknesses, in agreement with a numerical simulation. Besides, 4% acetic acid was found to be able to enhance the THG contrast of nucleus in oral mucosa, while such enhancement was found to decay due to the metabolic clearance of the contrast enhancer by the oral mucosa. Our clinical study indicated that, the combined epi-THG and epi-second-harmonic-generation (SHG) microscopy is a promising imaging tool for in vivo noninvasive optical virtual biopsy and disease diagnosis in human mucosa. PMID:21833368

  10. Advances in the in Vivo Raman Spectroscopy of Malignant Skin Tumors Using Portable Instrumentation

    PubMed Central

    Kourkoumelis, Nikolaos; Balatsoukas, Ioannis; Moulia, Violetta; Elka, Aspasia; Gaitanis, Georgios; Bassukas, Ioannis D.

    2015-01-01

    Raman spectroscopy has emerged as a promising tool for real-time clinical diagnosis of malignant skin tumors offering a number of potential advantages: it is non-intrusive, it requires no sample preparation, and it features high chemical specificity with minimal water interference. However, in vivo tissue evaluation and accurate histopathological classification remain a challenging task for the successful transition from laboratory prototypes to clinical devices. In the literature, there are numerous reports on the applications of Raman spectroscopy to biomedical research and cancer diagnostics. Nevertheless, cases where real-time, portable instrumentations have been employed for the in vivo evaluation of skin lesions are scarce, despite their advantages in use as medical devices in the clinical setting. This paper reviews the advances in real-time Raman spectroscopy for the in vivo characterization of common skin lesions. The translational momentum of Raman spectroscopy towards the clinical practice is revealed by (i) assembling the technical specifications of portable systems and (ii) analyzing the spectral characteristics of in vivo measurements. PMID:26132563

  11. Advances in the in Vivo Raman Spectroscopy of Malignant Skin Tumors Using Portable Instrumentation.

    PubMed

    Kourkoumelis, Nikolaos; Balatsoukas, Ioannis; Moulia, Violetta; Elka, Aspasia; Gaitanis, Georgios; Bassukas, Ioannis D

    2015-06-26

    Raman spectroscopy has emerged as a promising tool for real-time clinical diagnosis of malignant skin tumors offering a number of potential advantages: it is non-intrusive, it requires no sample preparation, and it features high chemical specificity with minimal water interference. However, in vivo tissue evaluation and accurate histopathological classification remain a challenging task for the successful transition from laboratory prototypes to clinical devices. In the literature, there are numerous reports on the applications of Raman spectroscopy to biomedical research and cancer diagnostics. Nevertheless, cases where real-time, portable instrumentations have been employed for the in vivo evaluation of skin lesions are scarce, despite their advantages in use as medical devices in the clinical setting. This paper reviews the advances in real-time Raman spectroscopy for the in vivo characterization of common skin lesions. The translational momentum of Raman spectroscopy towards the clinical practice is revealed by (i) assembling the technical specifications of portable systems and (ii) analyzing the spectral characteristics of in vivo measurements.

  12. Varicella-zoster virus infection of human neural cells in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Baiker, Armin; Fabel, Klaus; Cozzio, Antonio; Zerboni, Leigh; Fabel, Konstanze; Sommer, Marvin; Uchida, Nobuko; He, Dongping; Weissman, Irving; Arvin, Ann M.

    2004-01-01

    Varicella-zoster virus (VZV) establishes latency in sensory ganglia and causes herpes zoster upon reactivation. These investigations in a nonobese diabetic severe combined immunodeficient mouse-human neural cell model showed that VZV infected both neurons and glial cells and spread efficiently from cell to cell in vivo. Neural cell morphology and protein synthesis were preserved, in contrast to destruction of epithelial cells by VZV. Expression of VZV genes in neural cells was characterized by nuclear retention of the major viral transactivating protein and a block in synthesis of the predominant envelope glycoprotein. The attenuated VZV vaccine strain retained infectivity for neurons and glial cells in vivo. VZV gene expression in differentiated human neural cells in vivo differs from neural infection by herpes simplex virus, which is characterized by latency-associated transcripts, and from lytic VZV replication in skin. The chimeric nonobese diabetic severe combined immunodeficient mouse model may be useful for investigating other neurotropic human viruses. PMID:15247414

  13. Investigation of the cutaneous response to recall antigen in humans in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Akbar, A N; Reed, J R; Lacy, K E; Jackson, S E; Vukmanovic-Stejic, M; Rustin, M H A

    2013-01-01

    In this paper we provide a detailed description of an experimental method for investigating the induction and resolution of recall immune response to antigen in humans in vivo. This involves the injection of tuberculin purified protein derivative (PPD) into the skin, followed by inducing suction blisters at the site of injection, from which leucocytes and cytokines that are involved in the response can be isolated and characterized. Using this technique we found that although the majority of CD4+ T cells in the skin that are present early in the response express cutaneous lymphocyte antigen (CLA), the expression of this marker is reduced significantly in later phases. This may enable these cells to leave the skin during immune resolution. Furthermore, interleukin (IL)-2 production can be detected both in CD4+ T cells and also in the blister fluid at the peak of the response at day 7, indicating that mediators found in the blister fluid are representative of the cytokine microenvironment in vivo. Finally, we found that older humans have defective ability to respond to cutaneous PPD challenge, but this does not reflect a global immune deficit as they have similar numbers of circulating functional PPD-specific CD4+ T cells as young subjects. The use of the blister technology enables further characterization of the skin specific defect in older humans and also general mechanisms that govern immune regulation in vivo. PMID:23607634

  14. Optical characterization of murine model's in-vivo skin using Mueller matrix polarimetric imaging

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mora-Núñez, Azael; Martinez-Ponce, Geminiano; Garcia-Torales, Guillermo

    2015-12-01

    Mueller matrix polarimetric imaging (MMPI) provides a complete characterization of an anisotropic optical medium. Subsequent single value decomposition allows image interpretation in terms of basic optical anisotropies, such as depolarization, diattenuation, and retardance. In this work, healthy in-vivo skin at different anatomical locations of a biological model (Rattus norvegicus) was imaged by the MMPI technique using 532nm coherent illumination. The body parts under study were back, abdomen, tail, and calvaria. Because skin components are randomly distributed and skin thickness depends on its location, polarization measures arise from the average over a single detection element (pixel) and on the number of free optical paths, respectively. Optical anisotropies over the imaged skin indicates, mainly, the presence of components related to the physiology of the explored region. In addition, a MMPI-based comparison between a tumor on the back of one test subject and proximal healthy skin was made. The results show that the single values of optical anisotropies can be helpful in distinguishing different areas of in-vivo skin and also lesions.

  15. High resolution in-vivo imaging of skin with full field optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dalimier, E.; Bruhat, Alexis; Grieve, K.; Harms, F.; Martins, F.; Boccara, C.

    2014-03-01

    Full-field OCT (FFOCT) has the ability to provide en-face images with a very good axial sectioning as well as a very high transverse resolution (about 1 microns in all directions). Therefore it offers the possibility to visualize biological tissues with very high resolution both on the axial native view, and on vertical reconstructed sections. Here we investigated the potential dermatological applications of in-vivo skin imaging with FFOCT. A commercial FFOCT device was adapted for the in-vivo acquisition of stacks of images on the arm, hand and finger. Several subjects of different benign and pathological skin conditions were tested. The images allowed measurement of the stratum corneum and epidermis thicknesses, measurement of the stratum corneum refractive index, size measurement and count of the keratinocytes, visualization of the dermal-epidermal junction, and visualization of the melanin granules and of the melanocytes. Skins with different pigmentations could be discriminated and skin pathologies such as eczema could be identified. The very high resolution offered by FFOCT both on axial native images and vertical reconstructed sections allows for the visualization and measurement of a set of parameters useful for cosmetology and dermatology. In particular, FFOCT is a potential tool for the understanding and monitoring of skin hydration and pigmentation, as well as skin inflammation.

  16. Evaluation of Paeonol Skin-Target Delivery from Its Microsponge Formulation: In Vitro Skin Permeation and In Vivo Microdialysis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li; Jiang, Xiao; Zhang, Bin; Liu, Zhi-Gang; Li, Xue-Ling; Weng, Li-Dong; Zuo, Ting; Liu, Qiang

    2013-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to design a novel topical skin-target drug-delivery system, the paeonol microsponge, and to investigate its drug-release patterns in dosage form, both in vitro and in vivo. Paeonol microsponges were prepared using the quasi-emulsion solvent-diffusion method. In vitro release studies were carried out using Franz diffusion cells, while in vivo studies were investigated by microdialysis after the paeonol microsponges were incorporated into a cream base. In vitro release studies showed that the drug delivered via microsponges increased the paeonol permeation rate. Ex vivo drug-deposition studies showed that the microsponge formulation improved drug residence in skin. In addition, in vivo microdialysis showed that the values for the area under the concentration versus time curve (AUC) for the paeonol microsponge cream was much higher than that of paeonol cream without microsponges. Maximum time (Tmax) was 220 min for paeonol microsponge cream and 480 min for paeonol cream, while the half-life (t1/2) of paeonol microsponge cream (935.1 min) was almost twice that of paeonol cream (548.6 min) in the skin (n = 3). Meanwhile, in the plasma, the AUC value for paeonol microsponge cream was half that of the paeonol cream. Based on these results, paeonol-loaded microsponge formulations could be a better alternative for treating skin disease, as the formulation increases drug bioavailability by lengthening the time of drug residence in the skin and should reduce side-effects because of the lower levels of paeonol moving into the circulation. PMID:24278204

  17. A bioartificial dermal regeneration template promotes skin cell proliferation in vitro and enhances large skin wound healing in vivo.

    PubMed

    Chang, Peng; Guo, Bingyu; Hui, Qiang; Liu, Xiaoyan; Tao, Kai

    2017-04-11

    A novel bioartificial dermal regeneration template has been developed using platelet-rich plasma and acellular animal skin collagen sponge for the treatment of larger area and full thickness skin wounds. This platelet-rich plasma-collagen sponge keeps native skin structure and contains huge amounts of growth factors. The effect of this bioartificial dermal regeneration template was tested in vitro and in vivo via a mimic poor wound healing process by adding collagenase I into cell culture medium or the wound area. The in vitro experimental results indicated that the rat skin cells grew faster and produced more collagen in platelet-rich plasma-collagen sponge with collagenase than those treated either with collagen sponge plus collagenase, or collagenase, or control group without treatment. The in vivo experiments were performed by large rat skin wounds, 1.5 cm diameter, treated either with collagenase, or collagenase plus collagen sponge, or collagenase plus platelet-rich plasma-collagen sponge. The wound without treatment was used as a control. The wounds treated with collagenase-containing platelet-rich plasma-collagen sponge healed 4 times faster than the untreated wounds, 6 times faster than the collagenase treated wounds, 2.4 times faster than collagenase-containing collagen sponge treated wounds. The immunostaining indicated that the healed tissues in the wound areas treated with collagenase-containing platelet-rich plasma-collagen sponge were composed of collagen type I and collagen III with blood vessels and hair follicles. The results demonstrated that this collagenase-containing platelet-rich plasma-collagen sponge works as a bioartificial dermal regeneration template. The application of this collagenase-containing platelet-rich plasma-collagen sponge promotes the traumatic skin wound healing and permits the reconstitution of the inherent barrier functions of the skin.

  18. In vivo measurement of breast skin elasticity and breast skin thickness.

    PubMed

    Sutradhar, Alok; Miller, Michael J

    2013-02-01

    The mechanical properties of the breast skin play an important role in explaining the changes associated with radiotherapy, tissue expansion, and breast reconstruction surgery. Quantitative measurement of mechanical properties of breast skin is essential for surgical preplanning and outcome prediction. We have measured the skin elasticity properties and skin thickness of the breast using noninvasive methods. The DermaLab suction cup and the DermaScanC ultrasound were used to measure the modulus of elasticity and the skin thickness, respectively. Measurements were taken in 16 different locations on the breast in 23 female patients, also with patients in supine and upright position. Different analytical models (plate, membrane, large deformation) that can represent the experiment were studied to extract the elasticity modulus. The average modulus of breast skin elasticity found was 344 ± 88 kPa (Mean ± SD) with 95% confidence interval being 306-382 kPa. The range of the modulus was 195-480 kPa. The average thickness of breast skin was 1.55 ± 0.25 mm with a range of 0.83-2.4 mm. Regional variations of breast skin elasticity properties and breast skin thickness were observed. No direct correlations of biomechanical properties with age or breast thickness were observed. No significant difference was observed in the elasticity modulus between the supine and upright patient positions. © 2012 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  19. SkinChip, a new tool for investigating the skin surface in vivo.

    PubMed

    Lévêque, Jean Luc; Querleux, Bernard

    2003-11-01

    Non-invasive methods used for characterizing skin micro-relief and skin surface hydration were developed in the 1980s. Although they allowed some progress in the knowledge of skin properties, they are not completely satisfactory in many aspects. Today, new technologies are emerging that may address such issues. We adapted the technology produced by the ST Microelectronics Company for sensing fingerprint for the measurement of skin surface properties. Accordingly, we developed acquisition software for obtaining routinely the distribution of skin surface capacitance along different body sites. Image analysis softwares were also processed for collecting both the main orientations of the micro-relief lines and their density. The average value of skin capacitance is also obtained. The images allow a highly precise observation of the skin topography that can be easily quantified in terms of line density and line orientation. The mean gray levels of the images appear much closely correlated to the Corneometer values. This new device appears to be a very convenient way for characterizing the properties of the skin surface. With regard to hydration, it usefully provides both the average value and the hydration chart of the investigated skin zones.

  20. The connection between in vitro water uptake and in vivo skin moisturization.

    PubMed

    Sagiv, Assaf E; Marcus, Yizhak

    2003-11-01

    Humectancy or hygroscopy is the water absorption tendency of a substance from the surroundings. Our interest, from the clinical point of view, consists of correlating this tendency in vitro and its effect in vivo for the development of drugs and formulations for the treatment of dry skin syndrome or diseases accompanied by dry skin. In vitro, water absorption was measured using the comparative isopiestic method. This method is based on bringing the vapor of the water to isothermal equilibrium between a reference system and the material to be studied. The in vivo model on guinea-pigs for the dry skin syndrome tested the therapeutic ability of mono-, di- and tri-glycerols to provide moisture to dry skin leading to healing. The moisture content in the stratum corneum was measured with a Corneometer CM 825 PC that measures merely the presence of high dielectric material (humectant or water), whereas the Mexameter MX 16 measures a pathological parameter - the erythema. Adding hydroxyl groups to a consecutive set of polyhydroxyalkanes increases the humectancy of the polyols in vitro. This elevation was found to be linear at low relative humidities (Relative humidity=31.9% and 37 degrees C). In vivo, moisture was returned to normal within a week in all three groups. However, only glycerol managed to abolish the erythema within 7 days. A rise in water absorption ability in vitro, at a rate of about 0.25 mol water per hydroxyl group was revealed in a consecutive set of glycerols (mono-, di- and tri-glycerols). One would expect that the better humectant is a material, i.e. in which the higher its physical ability to hold water in vitro the more effective it will be in recovering skin dryness. We have found, however, that glycerol, which has the lowest humectant activity in vitro, from the set of glycerols, di- and tri-glycerol, has been proven to be the best for eliminating the signs of skin dryness. Accordingly, we propose to distinguish between the in vitro humectancy (i

  1. In vivo impedance measurements on nerves and surrounding skeletal muscles in rats and human body.

    PubMed

    Prokhorov, E; Llamas, F; Morales-Sánchez, E; González-Hernández, J; Prokhorov, A

    2002-05-01

    The aim of the work was to use impedance measurements to find the location of nerves under the human skin. In vivo impedance measurements were performed on exposed nervous and muscular tissues of rats. Similarly, the impedance measurements were also performed on the skin of six men, over the median nerve at the wrist, as well as 4-5 mm away from this location. Results obtained with rats have shown that the relative permittivity and conductivity of nerves are larger (by almost two orders of magnitude) than those observed for the muscular tissues surrounding the nerve. The results obtained on human skin in the frequency range of 20-200 kHz, when the electrodes were placed over the nerve, show lower resistance and higher capacitance than in the other areas measured. These preliminary results indicate that it may be possible to use impedance measurements to find the location of exposed nerves and also nerves under the skin.

  2. Freeze-drying as a preserving preparation technique for in vitro testing of human skin.

    PubMed

    Franzen, Lutz; Vidlářová, Lucie; Kostka, Karl-Heinz; Schaefer, Ulrich F; Windbergs, Maike

    2013-01-01

    In vitro testing of drugs with excised human skin is a valuable prerequisite for clinical studies. However, the analysis of excised human skin presents several obstacles. Ongoing drug diffusion, microbial growth and changes in hydration state influence the results of drug penetration studies. In this work, we evaluate freeze-drying as a preserving preparation method for skin samples to overcome these obstacles. We analyse excised human skin before and after freeze-drying and compare these results with human skin in vivo. Based on comprehensive thermal and spectroscopic analysis, we demonstrate comparability to in vivo conditions and exclude significant changes within the skin samples due to freeze-drying. Furthermore, we show that freeze-drying after skin incubation with drugs prevents growth of drug crystals on the skin surface due to drying effects. In conclusion, we introduce freeze-drying as a preserving preparation technique for in vitro testing of human skin. © 2013 John Wiley & Sons A/S.

  3. Developmental Changes in Neonatal and Infant Skin Structures During the First 6 Months: In Vivo Observation.

    PubMed

    Miyauchi, Yuki; Shimaoka, Yayoi; Fujimura, Tsutomu; Koike, Yumi; Yatabe, Michio; Nishikawa, Masakatsu; Hayashi, Masaru; Sugata, Keiichi; Moriwaki, Shigeru; Hatamochi, Atsushi

    2016-05-01

    Developmental changes of structures in neonatal and infant skin have not been well characterized. The purpose of this study was to clarify changes in skin structures during neonatal and infant growth in vivo. Fifteen healthy, full-term neonates (seven girls, eight boys) were studied. The measurements were performed 4 to 7 days (neonate) and 1, 3, and 6 months after birth on the buttock, upper thigh, and ventral forearm skin using a confocal laser scanning microscope. Developmental changes in dermoepidermal junction structures, stratum corneum thickness, epidermal thickness, and microvascular development were investigated. A significant decrease in stratum corneum thickness was observed over the 3 months after birth. Dermal papillae were not observed in neonatal skin but were observed gradually over the next 3 months. Epidermal thickness, determined from the skin surface to the bottom of the epidermal layer, increased significantly from 4 to 7 days to 1 month of age, indicating the formation of dermal papillae and rete ridges. Complicated microvascular structures were observed in neonatal skin but disappeared gradually and were observed only at the dermal papillae at 3 months of age. Our results reveal that infant skin is in a developmental stage structurally up to 3 months of age, paralleling skin functional and developmental maturation. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  4. In vitro and in vivo transdermal delivery capacity of quantum dots through mouse skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chu, Maoquan; Wu, Qiang; Wang, Jiaxu; Hou, Shengke; Miao, Yi; Peng, Jinliang; Sun, Ye

    2007-11-01

    CdTe quantum dots (QDs) with red fluorescence have been used to study their transdermal delivery capacity through mouse skin. The results showed that the QDs could permeate through skin, either separated from or still attached to live mice. Although the fluorescence emitted by the QDs could only be found in the skin and muscle cells located under the mouse skins coated with QDs, an inductive coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry (ICP-AES) study indicated that the main organs, such as the heart, liver, spleen, lung, kidney and brain, all contained a significant quantity of Cd atoms. Moreover, these Cd atoms could remain in vivo for at least one week. As a control, the concentration of Cd atoms in normal mice not coated with QDs was very low.

  5. In vivo infrared and Raman spectroscopy of human stratum corneum

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lucassen, Gerald W.; Caspers, Peter J.; Puppels, Gerwin J.

    1998-04-01

    ATR-FTIR spectroscopy and Raman spectroscopy were employed to obtain information about the molecular composition and hydration of skin in vivo. Both techniques enable the in vivo acquisition of high quality spectra within 10-30s at a spectral resolution of 8cm-1. The penetration depth of ATR-FTIR is about 1.5 (Mu) m. Raman spectra could be obtained with a resolution of about 5 micrometers . ATR-FTIR spectra of hydrated stratum corneum were analyzed using a band fitting algorithm. By means of this algorithm the signal contributions of water relative to protein signal contributions could be determined. The results of Raman microspectroscopic experiments on frozen sections and isolated skin components were used for the interpretation of Raman spectra obtained in vivo. Information was obtained about lipid components present in the stratum corneum. These were shown to vary widely between individuals and between different locations on the body. The combination of these spectroscopic techniques may prove to be valuable for applications in dermatology and skin care.

  6. In vivo localized proton spectroscopic studies of human gastrocnemius muscle

    SciTech Connect

    Narayana, P.A.; Jackson, E.F.; Hazle, J.D.; Fotedar, L.K.; Kulkarni, M.V.; Flamig, D.P.

    1988-10-01

    In vivo proton magnetic resonance spectroscopy studies of gastrocnemius muscle were performed in six normal volunteers. Both spatially resolved spectroscopy (SPARS) and stimulated echo acquisition mode (STEAM) sequences were used for volume localization. A number of water suppression sequences have been combined with these localization schemes. Among the various techniques investigated in these studies, STEAM with an inversion pulse (T1-discriminated spectrum) seems to have the best potential for in vivo localized high-resolution proton spectroscopy studies of human muscle.

  7. Laser skin rejuvenation: epidermal changes and collagen remodeling evaluated by in vivo confocal microscopy.

    PubMed

    Longo, Caterina; Galimberti, Michela; De Pace, Barbara; Pellacani, Giovanni; Bencini, Pier Luca

    2013-05-01

    Fractionated carbon dioxide (CO2) laser resurfacing is an effective treatment of skin aging. Several studies investigated the morphologic changes due to this laser treatment by using skin biopsies or animal model. Recently, reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) has emerged as a new tool that can "optically" scan the skin in vivo with a nearly histologic resolution and in a totally noninvasive modality. Our study aims to analyze the skin changes following the ablative fractional CO2 laser sessions by using RCM. Ten patients were subjected to ablative fractional CO2 laser sessions for skin aging. Confocal microscopic images were acquired at baseline (w0), 3 weeks (w3), 6 weeks (w6), and 12 weeks (w12) after laser session. Previously identified confocal parameters were used to assess the skin aging at baseline and after treatment. At w3, the epidermis showed a complete disappearance of the mottled pigmentation upon RCM along with the presence of few Langherans' cells. The collagen type as seen upon RCM observed at baseline was replaced by a newly formed collagen type of long, bright and straight fibers (collagen remodeling). These fibers were parallel arranged and observed throughout the entire RCM mosaic. At w6 and w12 the confocal aspects of the skin was unchanged compared to w3. RCM confirmed the presence of an intense collagen remodeling following laser resurfacing. In line with previous studies, this collagen showed a peculiar arrangement and distribution. The collagen remodeling was still present after 3 months and confirms the long-term effect of the treatment. This is the first time that the skin can be analyzed in vivo at patient's bedside. In the near future, RCM can be an essential adjunct for Clinicians to measure the effects of laser treatment and possibly to gain new insights into the development of side effects.

  8. In-vivo dynamic characterization of microneedle skin penetration using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Enfield, Joey; O'Connell, Marie-Louise; Lawlor, Kate; Jonathan, Enock; O'Mahony, Conor; Leahy, Martin

    2010-07-01

    The use of microneedles as a method of circumventing the barrier properties of the stratum corneum is receiving much attention. Although skin disruption technologies and subsequent transdermal diffusion rates are being extensively studied, no accurate data on depth and closure kinetics of microneedle-induced skin pores are available, primarily due to the cumbersome techniques currently required for skin analysis. We report on the first use of optical coherence tomography technology to image microneedle penetration in real time and in vivo. We show that optical coherence tomography (OCT) can be used to painlessly measure stratum corneum and epidermis thickness, as well as microneedle penetration depth after microneedle insertion. Since OCT is a real-time, in-vivo, nondestructive technique, we also analyze skin healing characteristics and present quantitative data on micropore closure rate. Two locations (the volar forearm and dorsal aspect of the fingertip) have been assessed as suitable candidates for microneedle administration. The results illustrate the applicability of OCT analysis as a tool for microneedle-related skin characterization.

  9. Wide-Field Spatial Mapping of In Vivo Tattoo Skin Optical Properties Using Modulated Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Ayers, Frederick R.; Cuccia, David J.; Kelly, Kristen M.; Durkin, Anthony J.

    2009-01-01

    Background and Objectives Modulated imaging is a new modality capable of wide-field, spatially resolved measurement of in vivo optical properties. Based on spatial light modulation, the method is inexpensive, non-contact, and allows spatial mapping of tissue absorption and reduced scattering coefficients at any wavelength between 450 and 1,100 nm. Currently, clinicians rely on qualitative visual inspection to guide parameter selection for laser-based tattoo removal. MI provides quantitative measurements of multi-colored tattooed skin which may help guide treatment and objectively assess response. Study Design/Materials and Methods We have measured the spatially varying optical properties of multicolored tattooed skin over a 50 mm × 50 mm field of view at wavelengths ranging from 650 to 970 nm using MI. These measurements were compared to a similar field of view of non-tattooed skin from an adjacent area. Results We have determined the differentiated optical properties in vivo of multi-colored tattooed skin versus non-tattooed skin. Conclusions MI provides spatially resolved quantitative information with potential for quantitative assessment of response to treatment and may provide guidance for laser tattoo removal in the future. PMID:19588528

  10. In vivo diffuse reflectance micro-spectroscopy for correction of Raman depth profiles acquired on skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Roig, Blandine; Koenig, Anne; Perraut, François; Piot, Olivier; Manfait, Michel; Dinten, Jean-Marc

    2016-04-01

    Confocal Raman microspectroscopy is a relevant and useful tool to perform in vivo diagnosis of cutaneous tissues noninvasively and without labeling. This optical technique provides in-depth molecular and conformational characterization of skin. Unfortunately, spectral distortions occur due to elastic scattering. Our objective is to correct the attenuation of in-depth Raman peaks intensity by considering elastic scattering in biological tissues. In this purpose, a correction model was constructed using skin scattering properties as parameters thus enabling quantitative analysis. The work presented here is a technique of in vivo Diffuse Reflectance Micro-Spectroscopy called Micro-DRS. It achieves optical properties characterization in the skin layers probed by Raman microspectroscopy. The Micro-DRS setup can easily be coupled to a confocal Raman micro-probe to perform simultaneous measurements. Thanks to Monte Carlo simulations and experimental results obtained on homemade solid phantoms mimicking skin optical properties, we show that it is possible to measure the absorption coefficient μa, the reduced scattering coefficient μs', the scattering coefficient μs and the anisotropy of scattering g with this new apparatus. The measured scattering properties can be used subsequently as parameters in our correction model. Coupled to a Raman micro-spectrometer, Micro-DRS enables a quantitative analysis when tracking drug penetration through skin and it can be used independently to provide additional diagnosing criterions.

  11. In vivo Raman Confocal Spectroscopy in the Investigation of the Skin Barrier.

    PubMed

    Darlenski, Razvigor; Fluhr, Joachim W

    2016-01-01

    The epidermal barrier, predominantly attributed to the stratum corneum (SC), is the outermost part of our body that comprises multiple defensive functions against exogenous attacks and the loss of body substances, e.g. water. A novel investigative method, in vivo Raman confocal spectroscopy (RCS), is employed to study the composition of the epidermal barrier and compounds penetrating the epidermis both in a space-resolved manner. By using this method, a semiquantitative analysis of skin barrier constituents can be evaluated, namely SC lipids, natural moisturizing factor components and sweat constituents. The technique enables to examine epidermal barrier impairment in experimental settings as well as the penetration of exogenous substances into the epidermis, e.g. retinol. RCS can reveal microcompositional changes in the skin barrier as a function of age. We also review the use of RCS in studying antioxidant defense components. This chapter discusses the application of in vivo RCS in the investigation of the epidermal barrier.

  12. Rapid observation of unfixed, unstained human skin biopsy specimens with confocal microscopy and visualization

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Masters, Barry R.; Aziz, David J.; Gmitro, Arthur F.; Kerr, James H.; O'Grady, Terence C.; Goldman, Leon

    1997-10-01

    The use of reflected light confocal microscopy is proposed to rapidly observe unfixed, unstained biopsy specimens of human skin. Reflected light laser scanning confocal microscopy was used to compare a freshly excised, unfixed, unstained biopsy specimen, and in vivo human skin. Optical sections from the ex vivo biopsy specimen of human skin and in vivo human skin were converted to red-green anaglyphs for 3D visualization. Contrast was derived from intrinsic differences in the scattering properties of the organelles and cells within the tissue. Individual cellular layers were observed in both tissues from the surface to the papillary dermis. Confocal microscopy of an unfixed, unstained biopsy specimen showed cells and cell nuclei of the stratum spinosum. Confocal microscopy of in vivo human skin demonstrated optical sectioning through a hair shaft on the upper hand. The combination of reflected light confocal microscopy and 3D visualization with red-green anaglyphs provides a rapid technique for observing fresh biopsies of human skin.

  13. In vivo terahertz spectroscopy of pigmentary skin nevi: Pilot study of non-invasive early diagnosis of dysplasia

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zaytsev, Kirill I.; Kudrin, Konstantin G.; Karasik, Valeriy E.; Reshetov, Igor V.; Yurchenko, Stanislav O.

    2015-02-01

    In vivo terahertz (THz) spectroscopy of pigmentary skin nevi is performed. The in vivo THz dielectric characteristics of healthy skin and dysplastic and non-dysplastic skin nevi are reconstructed and analyzed. The dielectric permittivity curves of these samples in the THz range exhibit significant differences that could allow non-invasive early diagnosis of dysplastic nevi, which are melanoma precursors. An approach for differentiating dysplastic and non-dysplastic skin nevi using the THz dielectric permittivity is proposed. The results demonstrate that THz pulsed spectroscopy is potentially an effective tool for non-invasive early diagnosis of dysplastic nevi and melanomas of the skin.

  14. In vitro constitution and in vivo implantation of engineered skin constructs with sweat glands.

    PubMed

    Huang, Sha; Xu, Yongan; Wu, Changhao; Sha, Deqian; Fu, Xiaobing

    2010-07-01

    Despite the rapid development of engineered skin, such skin still lacks skin appendages. Sweat glands, one of the skin appendages, play key roles in the maintenance of homeostasis and temperature regulation. In this study, we tested whether sweat glands could be integrated into engineered skin constructs to improve the quality of tissue regeneration. Using gelatin microspheres(containing epidermal growth factor [EGF]) as multifunctional vehicles, we cultured sweat gland cells (SGCs) on them and delivered SGCs-microspheres complex (SMC) into the engineered skin construct, which was created in vitro by culturing human keratinocytes on top of a fibroblast-embedded collagen-based matrix in an organotypic co-culture model. This engineered skin construct was then transplanted onto full-thickness cutaneous wounds in an athymic murine model. EGF-loaded microspheres displayed more cellular growth-promoting efficiency, and thus SMC was an available means for SGCs delivery. Constitution of the engineered skin constructs formed a skin-like pattern in vitro. Remarkably, SMC could differentiate toward a sweat gland-like structure in vitro within the hybrid matrix. Furthermore, the degree of wound healing in mice with this skin construct implantation was better than that with controls. This engineered skin construct could be used as a promising tool for regeneration of sweat glands in skin repair and a valuable engineered strategy for constitution of appendage-containing engineered skin models.

  15. Characterization of MOSkin detector for in vivo skin dose measurement during megavoltage radiotherapy.

    PubMed

    Jong, Wei Loong; Wong, Jeannie Hsiu Ding; Ung, Ngie Min; Ng, Kwan Hoong; Ho, Gwo Fuang; Cutajar, Dean L; Rosenfeld, Anatoly B

    2014-09-08

    In vivo dosimetry is important during radiotherapy to ensure the accuracy of the dose delivered to the treatment volume. A dosimeter should be characterized based on its application before it is used for in vivo dosimetry. In this study, we characterize a new MOSFET-based detector, the MOSkin detector, on surface for in vivo skin dosimetry. The advantages of the MOSkin detector are its water equivalent depth of measurement of 0.07 mm, small physical size with submicron dosimetric volume, and the ability to provide real-time readout. A MOSkin detector was calibrated and the reproducibility, linearity, and response over a large dose range to different threshold voltages were determined. Surface dose on solid water phantom was measured using MOSkin detector and compared with Markus ionization chamber and GAFCHROMIC EBT2 film measurements. Dependence in the response of the MOSkin detector on the surface of solid water phantom was also tested for different (i) source to surface distances (SSDs); (ii) field sizes; (iii) surface dose; (iv) radiation incident angles; and (v) wedges. The MOSkin detector showed excellent reproducibility and linearity for dose range of 50 cGy to 300 cGy. The MOSkin detector showed reliable response to different SSDs, field sizes, surface, radiation incident angles, and wedges. The MOSkin detector is suitable for in vivo skin dosimetry.

  16. Spectral investigation of normal skin tissue in vivo via fiber-optical evanescent wave Fourier transform infrared (FEW-FTIR) spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kano, Angelique

    2001-11-01

    New applications for the Fiberoptic Evanescent Wave Fourier Transform (FEW-FTIR) method have been developed for the diagnostics of skin surfaces. Our technique allows for the detection of functional groups in the molecular structure of skin tissue noninvasively and in vivo. The FEW-FTIR spectroscopic method is direct, nondestructive, and fast. Our optical fibers for the middle infrared (MIR) range are nontoxic, nonhygroscopic, flexible, and characterized by extremely low losses. This combination of traditional FTIR spectroscopy and advanced fiber technology has enabled us to noninvasively investigate normal skin tissue in vivo in the range of 900 to 4000 cm-1. The second derivative spectra of the baseline-corrected and normalized data have been calculated to determine the peak positions. We have obtained for the first time a more detailed understanding of normal skin tissue fusing FTIR spectroscopy. Despite the complex nature of human skin tissue, the MIR spectra of normal human skin surface tissue has some basic characteristics seen in all cases. The results of our surface analysis of skin tissue are discussed in terms of spectral parameters, band assignments, and molecular structural similarities and differences. Our results have revealed that our spectral parameters can be separated into four distinct classes, providing us with a preliminary model of normal human skin tissue.

  17. Fluorescence lifetime imaging of human skin and hair

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ehlers, A.; Riemann, I.; Anhut, T.; Kaatz, M.; Elsner, P.; König, K.

    2006-02-01

    Multiphoton imaging has developed into an important technique for in-vivo research in life sciences. With the laser System DermaInspect (JenLab, Germany) laser radiation from a Ti:Sapphire laser is used to generate multiphotonabsorption deep in the human skin in vivo. The resulting autofluorescence radiation arises from endogenous fluorophores such as NAD(P)H, flavines, collagen, elastin, porphyrins und melanin. Second harmonic generation (SHG) was used to detect collagen structures in the dermal layer. Femtosecond laser multiphoton imaging offers the possibility of high resolution optical tomography of human skin as well as fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) with picosecond time resolution. In this work a photon detector with ultrashort rise time of less than 30ps was applied to FLIM measurements of human skin and hair with different pigmentation. Fluorescence lifetime images of different human hair types will be discussed.

  18. Diffusion of (2-/sup 14/C)diazepam across hairless mouse skin and human skin

    SciTech Connect

    Koch, R.L.; Palicharla, P.; Groves, M.J.

    1987-05-01

    The objectives of this study were to investigate the absorption of diazepam applied topically to the hairless mouse in vivo and to determine the diffusion of diazepam across isolated hairless mouse skin and human skin. (/sup 14/C)Diazepam was readily absorbed after topical administration to the intact hairless mouse, a total of 75.8% of the /sup 14/C-label applied being recovered in urine and feces. Diazepam was found to diffuse across human and hairless mouse skin unchanged in experiments with twin-chambered diffusion cells. The variation in diffusion rate or the flux for both human and mouse tissues was greater among specimens than between duplicate or triplicate trials for a single specimen. Fluxes for mouse skin (stratum corneum, epidermis, and dermis) were greater than for human skin (stratum corneum and epidermis): 0.35-0.61 microgram/cm2/h for mouse skin vs 0.24-0.42 microgram/cm2/h for human skin. The permeability coefficients for mouse skin ranged from 1.4-2.4 X 10(-2)cm/h compared with 0.8-1.4 X 10(-2)cm/h for human skin. Although human stratum corneum is almost twice the thickness of that of the hairless mouse, the diffusion coefficients for human skin were 3-12 times greater (0.76-3.31 X 10(-6) cm2/h for human skin vs 0.12-0.27 X 10(-6) cm2/h for hairless mouse) because of a shorter lag time for diffusion across human skin. These differences between the diffusion coefficients and diffusion rates (or permeability coefficients) suggest that the presence of the dermis may present some barrier properties. In vitro the dermis may require complete saturation before the diazepam can be detected in the receiving chamber.

  19. Low-dose methotrexate enhances aminolevulinate-based photodynamic therapy in skin carcinoma cells in vitro and in vivo.

    PubMed

    Anand, Sanjay; Honari, Golara; Hasan, Tayyaba; Elson, Paul; Maytin, Edward V

    2009-05-15

    To improve treatment efficacy and tumor cell selectivity of delta-aminolevulinic acid (ALA)-based photodynamic therapy (PDT) via pretreatment of cells and tumors with methotrexate to enhance intracellular photosensitizer levels. Skin carcinoma cells, in vitro and in vivo, served as the model system. Cultured human SCC13 and HEK1 cells, normal keratinocytes, and in vivo skin tumor models were preconditioned with methotrexate for 72 h and then incubated with ALA for 4 h. Changes in protoporphyrin IX (PpIX) levels and cell survival after light exposure were assessed. Methotrexate preconditioning of monolayer cultures preferentially increased intracellular PpIX levels 2- to 4-fold in carcinoma cells versus normal keratinocytes. Photodynamic killing was synergistically enhanced by the combined therapy compared with PDT alone. Methotrexate enhancement of PpIX levels was achieved over a broad methotrexate concentration range (0.0003-1.0 mg/L; 0.6 nmol/L-2 mmol/L). PpIX enhancement correlated with changes in protein expression of key porphyrin pathway enzymes, approximately 4-fold increase in coproporphyrinogen oxidase and stable or slightly decreased expression of ferrochelatase. Differentiation markers (E-cadherin, involucrin, and filaggrin) were also selectively induced by methotrexate in carcinoma cells. In vivo relevance was established by showing that methotrexate preconditioning enhances PpIX accumulation in three models: (a) organotypic cultures of immortalized keratinocytes, (b) chemically induced skin tumors in mice; and (c) human A431 squamous cell tumors implanted subcutaneously in mice. Combination therapy using short-term exposure to low-dose methotrexate followed by ALA-PDT should be further investigated as a new combination modality to enhance efficacy and selectivity of PDT for epithelial carcinomas.

  20. Determination of the thickness and structure of the skin barrier by in vivo laser scanning microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lademann, J.; Richter, H.; Astner, S.; Patzelt, A.; Knorr, F.; Sterry, W.; Antoniou, Ch

    2008-04-01

    Normal skin barrier function is an essential aspect of skin homeostasis and regeneration. Dynamic inflammatory, proliferative and neoplastic skin processes such as wound healing, psoriasis and contact dermatitis are associated with a significant disruption of the skin barrier. In recent years, there has been increasing interest in evaluating cosmetic and pharmacologic products for their ability to restore these protective properties. The gold standard for characterization of barrier function has been the measurement of the transepidermal water loss, however the disadvantage of this method is its interference with several endogenous and exogenous factors such as hydration, perspiration and topically applied substances. This study was aimed to test the clinical applicability of a fluorescence confocal laser scanning microscope (LSM) for a systematic morphologic analysis of the structure, integrity and thickness of the stratum corneum in 10 otherwise healthy volunteers. The influence of skin treatment with commercial moisturizing cream on skin barrier function was evaluated in serial non-invasive examinations. Our findings showed that in vivo LSM may represent a simple and efficient method for the characterization of skin barrier properties, such as the thickness and hydration of the stratum corneum.

  1. Humanized in vivo Model for Autoimmune Diabetes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2010-05-07

    complexes in the thymus. As T cell CD4 avidity interaction with the 2 domain of the MHC class II has been shown to contribute positively to thymic T...mice (DR4) were generated as previously de- scribed [ 2 ]. These C57BL/6 I-Abo/o mice express a human- mouse chimeric class II molecule in which the TcR...transgenic for the type 1 diabetes- associated human MHC class II allele, DRB1*0401. J Clin Invest 1996;98:2597e603. [9] Kim J, Richter W, Aanstoot HJ

  2. Skin Diseases: Cross-section of human skin

    MedlinePlus

    Skip Navigation Bar Home Current Issue Past Issues Skin Diseases Cross-section of human skin Past Issues / Fall 2008 Table of Contents For ... Logical Images, Inc. I n the areas of skin health and skin diseases, the NIH's National Institute ...

  3. Remote skin tissue diagnostics in vivo by fiber optic evanescent wave Fourier transform infrared (FEW-FTIR) spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Afanasyeva, Natalia I.; Kolyakov, Sergei F.; Butvina, Leonid N.

    1998-04-01

    The new method of fiber-optical evanescent wave Fourier transform IR (FEW-FTIR) spectroscopy has been applied to the diagnostics of normal tissue, as well as precancerous and cancerous conditions. The FEW-FTIR technique is nondestructive and sensitive to changes of vibrational spectra in the IR region, without heating and damaging human and animal skin tissue. Therefore this method and technique is an ideal diagnostic tool for tumor and cancer characterization at an early stage of development on a molecular level. The application of fiber optic technology in the middle IR region is relatively inexpensive and can be adapted easily to any commercially available tabletop FTIR spectrometers. This method of diagnostics is fast, remote, and can be applied to many fields Noninvasive medical diagnostics of skin cancer and other skin diseases in vivo, ex vivo, and in vitro allow for the development convenient, remote clinical applications in dermatology and related fields. The spectral variations from normal to pathological skin tissue and environmental influence on skin have been measured and assigned in the regions of 850-4000 cm-1. The lipid structure changes are discussed. We are able to develop the spectral histopathology as a fast and informative tool of analysis.

  4. Prevention of DNA damage in human skin by topical sunscreens.

    PubMed

    Olsen, Catherine M; Wilson, Louise F; Green, Adèle C; Biswas, Neela; Loyalka, Juhi; Whiteman, David C

    2017-05-01

    There is strong evidence that topical sunscreens, designed to protect against ultraviolet radiation (UVR)-induced erythema, decrease the amount of UVR to which the skin is exposed, but their effectiveness in reducing UVR-induced DNA damage in vivo has not been well quantified. We systematically reviewed the published literature (1990-2015) to determine whether sunscreens prevent DNA damage in human skin when applied prior to UVR exposure. We included experimental studies measuring UVR-induced DNA damage in human skin in vivo with and without sunscreens and excluded studies conducted in animal models and cell lines. Eligible studies were identified by computerized search of bibliographic databases, supplemented by hand-searching the reference lists of retrieved articles. We identified ten eligible studies. Despite heterogeneity in methodological approaches, including the sun protection factors of the sunscreens assessed, range of skin types examined, the UVR exposure time and dose, the timing of post-irradiation biopsies and in the markers of DNA damage examined, all studies reported markedly reduced (or nil) UVR-induced DNA damage on sunscreen-protected skin. Our review of the experimental evidence supports a protective effect of topical sunscreens in preventing UVR-induced DNA damage in human skin cells in vivo. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  5. Genetic identification of C-fibers that detect massage-like stroking of hairy skin in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Vrontou, Sophia; Wong, Allan M.; Rau, Kristofer K.; Koerber, H. Richard; Anderson, David J.

    2012-01-01

    Stroking of the skin produces pleasant sensations that can occur during social interactions with conspecifics, such as grooming1. Despite numerous physiological studies (reviewed in ref. 2), molecularly defined sensory neurons that detect pleasant stroking of hairy skin3,4 in vivo have not been reported. Previously, we identified a rare population of unmyelinated sensory neurons that express the G protein-coupled receptor (GPCR) MrgprB45,6. These neurons exclusively innervate hairy skin with large terminal arborizations7 that resemble the receptive fields of C-tactile (CT) afferents in humans8. Unlike other molecularly defined mechanosensory C-fiber subtypes9,10, MrgprB4+ neurons could not be detectably activated by sensory stimulation of the skin ex vivo. Therefore, we developed a preparation for calcium imaging in their spinal projections during stimulation of the periphery in intact animals. MrgprB4+ neurons were activated by massage-like stroking of hairy skin, but not by noxious punctate mechanical stimulation. By contrast, a different population of C-fibers expressing MrgprD11 was activated by pinching but not by stroking, consistent with previous physiological and behavioral data10,12. Pharmacogenetic activation of MrgprB4- expressing neurons in freely behaving animals promoted conditioned place preference13, suggesting that such activation is positively reinforcing and/or anxiolytic. These data open the way to understanding the function of MrgprB4 neurons during natural behaviors, and provide a general approach to functionally characterizing genetically identified subsets of somatosensory neurons in vivo. PMID:23364746

  6. Topical drug delivery by a polymeric nanosphere gel: Formulation optimization and in vitro and in vivo skin distribution studies.

    PubMed

    Batheja, Priya; Sheihet, Larisa; Kohn, Joachim; Singer, Adam J; Michniak-Kohn, Bozena

    2011-01-20

    Tyrosine-derived nanospheres have demonstrated potential as effective carriers for the topical delivery of lipophilic molecules. In this investigation, a gel formulation containing nanospheres was developed for effective skin application and enhanced permeation. Carbopol and HPMC hydrophilic gels were evaluated for dispersion of these nanospheres. Sparingly water soluble diclofenac sodium (DS) and lipophilic Nile Red were used as model compounds. DS was used to determine the optimum polymer type, viscosity and release properties of the gel while fluorescent Nile Red was used in in vitro and in vivo skin distribution studies. In addition, the effect of a penetration enhancer, Azone, on the skin delivery was investigated. Dispersion of Nile Red-loaded nanospheres in 1% w/v HPMC gel produced a uniform and stable dispersion with suitable rheological properties for topical application, without any short-term cellular toxicity or tissue irritation. In vitro permeation studies using human cadaver skin revealed that the deposition of Nile Red via the nanosphere gel in the upper and lower dermis was 1.4 and 1.8 fold higher, respectively, than the amount of Nile Red deposited via an aqueous nanosphere formulation. In vivo, the HPMC gel containing Nile Red-loaded nanospheres significantly enhanced (1.4 fold) the permeation of Nile Red to the porcine stratum corneum/epidermis compared to the aqueous Nile Red-loaded nanospheres. An additional increase (1.4 fold) of Nile Red deposition in porcine stratum corneum/epidermis was achieved by incorporation of Azone (0.2M) into the nanosphere gel formulation. Therefore, tyrosine-derived nanospheres dispersed in gels offer promise for the topical delivery of lipophilic drugs and personal care agents to skin for treatment of cancers, psoriasis, eczema, and microbial infections. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. The human parental brain: in vivo neuroimaging.

    PubMed

    Swain, James E

    2011-07-01

    Interacting parenting thoughts and behaviors, supported by key brain circuits, critically shape human infants' current and future behavior. Indeed, the parent-infant relationship provides infants with their first social environment, forming templates for what they can expect from others, how to interact with them and ultimately how they go on to themselves to be parents. This review concentrates on magnetic resonance imaging experiments of the human parent brain, which link brain physiology with parental thoughts and behaviors. After reviewing brain imaging techniques, certain social cognitive and affective concepts are reviewed, including empathy and trust-likely critical to parenting. Following that is a thorough study-by-study review of the state-of-the-art with respect to human neuroimaging studies of the parental brain-from parent brain responses to salient infant stimuli, including emotionally charged baby cries and brief visual stimuli to the latest structural brain studies. Taken together, this research suggests that networks of highly conserved hypothalamic-midbrain-limbic-paralimbic-cortical circuits act in concert to support parental brain responses to infants, including circuits for limbic emotion response and regulation. Thus, a model is presented in which infant stimuli activate sensory analysis brain regions, affect corticolimbic limbic circuits that regulate emotional response, motivation and reward related to their infant, ultimately organizing parenting impulses, thoughts and emotions into coordinated behaviors as a map for future studies. Finally, future directions towards integrated understanding of the brain basis of human parenting are outlined with profound implications for understanding and contributing to long term parent and infant mental health.

  8. The human parental brain: In vivo neuroimaging

    PubMed Central

    Swain, James E.

    2015-01-01

    Interacting parenting thoughts and behaviors, supported by key brain circuits, critically shape human infants’ current and future behavior. Indeed, the parent–infant relationship provides infants with their first social environment, forming templates for what they can expect from others, how to interact with them and ultimately how they go on to themselves to be parents. This review concentrates on magnetic resonance imaging experiments of the human parent brain, which link brain physiology with parental thoughts and behaviors. After reviewing brain imaging techniques, certain social cognitive and affective concepts are reviewed, including empathy and trust—likely critical to parenting. Following that is a thorough study-by-study review of the state-of-the-art with respect to human neuroimaging studies of the parental brain—from parent brain responses to salient infant stimuli, including emotionally charged baby cries and brief visual stimuli to the latest structural brain studies. Taken together, this research suggests that networks of highly conserved hypothalamic–midbrain–limbic–paralimbic–cortical circuits act in concert to support parental brain responses to infants, including circuits for limbic emotion response and regulation. Thus, a model is presented in which infant stimuli activate sensory analysis brain regions, affect corticolimbic limbic circuits that regulate emotional response, motivation and reward related to their infant, ultimately organizing parenting impulses, thoughts and emotions into coordinated behaviors as a map for future studies. Finally, future directions towards integrated understanding of the brain basis of human parenting are outlined with profound implications for understanding and contributing to long term parent and infant mental health. PMID:21036196

  9. Humanized in vivo Model for Autoimmune Diabetes

    DTIC Science & Technology

    2008-02-01

    Noorchashm H , Noorchashm N, Kern J, Rostami SY, Barker CF, Naji A. B-cells are required for the initiation of insulitis and sialitis in nonobese...HUnrath KA H , HYue BBH, HMiyake T H , HFalk BAH, HNepom GTH. 2007. Autoreactive human T-cell receptor initiates insulitis and impaired glucose...AAALAC-accredited animal facility. For intraperitoneal glucose tolerance tests (IPGTT) mice were fasted (given water only) for 6 h . At the end of 6 h mice

  10. Diet-induced obesity skin changes monitored by in vivo SHG and ex vivo CARS microscopy.

    PubMed

    Haluszka, Dóra; Lőrincz, Kende; Kiss, Norbert; Szipőcs, Róbert; Kuroli, Enikő; Gyöngyösi, Nóra; Wikonkál, Norbert M

    2016-11-01

    Obesity related metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes have severe consequences on our skin. Latest developments in nonlinear microscopy allow the use of noninvasive, label free imaging methods, such as second harmonic generation (SHG) and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), for early diagnosis of metabolic syndrome-related skin complications by 3D imaging of the skin and the connective tissue. Our aim was to study effects of various types of diet-induced obesity in mice using these methods. We examined mice on different diets for 32 weeks. The collagen morphology was evaluated four times in vivo by SHG microscopy, and adipocytes were examined once at the end of experiment by ex vivo CARS method. A strong correlation was found between the body weight and the adipocyte size, while we found that the SHG intensity of dermal collagen reduces considerably with increasing body weight. Obese mice on high-fat diet showed worse results than those on high-fat - high-fructose diet. Animals on high-fructose diet did not gain more weight than those on ordinary diet despite of the increased calorie intake, but their collagen damage was nonetheless significant. Obesity and high sugar intake damages the skin, mainly the dermal connective tissue and subcutaneous adipose tissue, which efficiently can be monitored by in vivo SHG and ex vivo CARS microscopy.

  11. Diet-induced obesity skin changes monitored by in vivo SHG and ex vivo CARS microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Haluszka, Dóra; Lőrincz, Kende; Kiss, Norbert; Szipőcs, Róbert; Kuroli, Enikő; Gyöngyösi, Nóra; Wikonkál, Norbert M.

    2016-01-01

    Obesity related metabolic syndrome and type 2 diabetes have severe consequences on our skin. Latest developments in nonlinear microscopy allow the use of noninvasive, label free imaging methods, such as second harmonic generation (SHG) and coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS), for early diagnosis of metabolic syndrome-related skin complications by 3D imaging of the skin and the connective tissue. Our aim was to study effects of various types of diet-induced obesity in mice using these methods. We examined mice on different diets for 32 weeks. The collagen morphology was evaluated four times in vivo by SHG microscopy, and adipocytes were examined once at the end of experiment by ex vivo CARS method. A strong correlation was found between the body weight and the adipocyte size, while we found that the SHG intensity of dermal collagen reduces considerably with increasing body weight. Obese mice on high-fat diet showed worse results than those on high-fat - high-fructose diet. Animals on high-fructose diet did not gain more weight than those on ordinary diet despite of the increased calorie intake, but their collagen damage was nonetheless significant. Obesity and high sugar intake damages the skin, mainly the dermal connective tissue and subcutaneous adipose tissue, which efficiently can be monitored by in vivo SHG and ex vivo CARS microscopy. PMID:27895989

  12. Microencapsulation of a cyclodextrin complex of the UV filter, butyl methoxydibenzoylmethane: in vivo skin penetration studies.

    PubMed

    Scalia, Santo; Coppi, Gilberto; Iannuccelli, Valentina

    2011-01-25

    Lipid microparticles loaded with the complex between hydroxypropyl-β-cyclodextrin (HP-β-CD) and the sunscreen agent, butyl methoxydibenzoylmethane (BMDBM) were evaluated for their effect on the UV filter percutaneous penetration. The microparticles were prepared by the melt emulsification technique using tristearin as lipidic material and hydrogenate phosphatidylcholine as the surfactant. Human skin penetration was investigated in vivo by the tape stripping technique, a minimal invasive procedure based on the progressive removal of the upper cutaneous layers (stratum corneum) with adhesive tape strips. The amount of sunscreen fixed to each strip was determined by HPLC after solvent extraction. The recovery of the UV filter from spiked adhesive tapes was >94.4% and the precision of the method was better than 7.6% relative standard deviation. Non-encapsulated BMDBM, its complex with HP-β-CD, the lipid microparticles loaded with the sunscreen alone or the BMDBM/HP-β-CD complex were introduced into oil-in-water emulsions and applied to human volunteers. Compared to the cream with the non-encapsulated sunscreen agent (percentage of the applied dose penetrated, 9.7%±2.5), the amount of BMDBM diffusing into the stratum corneum was increased by the formulations containing the BMDBM/HP-β-CD complex (17.1%±3.2 of the applied dose) or the microparticles loaded with BMDBM only (15.1%±2.7 of the applied dose). On the contrary, a significant decrease in the level of UV filter penetrated into the stratum corneum was achieved by the cream containing the microencapsulated BMDBM/HP-β-CD complex (percentage of the applied dose penetrated, 6.0%±1.5). The reduced BMDBM percutaneous penetration attained by the latter system should enhance the UV filter efficacy and limit potential toxicological risks. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. In vivo skin chromophore mapping using a multimode imaging dermoscope (SkinSpec)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    MacKinnon, Nicholas; Vasefi, Fartash; Gussakovsky, Eugene; Bearman, Gregory; Chave, Robert; Farkas, Daniel L.

    2013-02-01

    We introduce a multimode dermoscope (SkinSpectTM) we developed for early detection of melanoma by combining fluorescence, polarization and hyperspectral imaging. Acquired reflection image datacubes were input to a wavelength-dependent linear model to extract the relative contributions of skin chromophores at every pixel. The oxy-hemoglobin, deoxy hemoglobin, melanin concentrations, and hemoglobin oxygen saturation by the single step linear least square fitting and Kubelka-Munk tissue model using cross polarization data cubes were presented. The comprehensive data obtained by SkinSpect can be utilized to improve the accuracy of skin chromophore decomposition algorithm with less computation cost. As an example in this work, the deoxy-hemoglobin over-estimation error in highly pigmented lesion due to melanin and deoxy hemoglobin spectral cross talk were analyzed and corrected using two-step linear least square fitting procedure at different wavelength ranges. The proposed method also tested in skin with underlying vein area for validating the proof of concept.

  14. Homogeneous transport in a heterogeneous membrane: water diffusion across human stratum corneum in vivo.

    PubMed Central

    Kalia, Y N; Pirot, F; Guy, R H

    1996-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine whether a structurally heterogeneous biomembrane, human stratum corneum (SC), behaved as a homogeneous barrier to water transport. The question is relevant because the principal function of the SC in vivo is to provide a barrier to the insensible loss of tissue water across the skin. Impedance spectra (IS) of the skin and measurements of the rate of transepidermal water loss (TEWL) were recorded sequentially in vivo in human subjects as layers of the SC were progressively removed by the serial application of adhesive tape strips. The low-frequency (< or = 100 rad s-1) impedance of skin was much more significantly affected by tape stripping than the higher frequency values; removal of the outermost SC layer had the largest effect. In contrast, TEWL changed little as the outer SC layers were stripped off, but increased dramatically when 6-8 microns of the tissue had been removed. It follows that the two noninvasive techniques probe SC barrier integrity in somewhat different ways. After SC removal, recovery of barrier function, as assessed by increasing values of the low-frequency impedance, apparently proceeded faster than TEWL decreased to the prestripping control. The variation of TEWL as a function of SC removal behaved in a manner entirely consistent with a homogeneous barrier, thereby permitting the apparent SC diffusivity of water to be found. Skin impedance (low frequency) was correlated with the relative concentration of water within the SC, thus providing an in vivo probe for skin hydration. Finally, the SC permeability coefficient to water, as a function of SC thickness, was calculated and correlated with the corresponding values of skin admittance derived from IS. PMID:8913606

  15. Histological study of subcutaneous fat at NIR laser treatment of the rat skin in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yanina, I. Y.; Svenskaya, Yu. I.; Navolokin, N. A.; Matveeva, O. V.; Bucharskaya, A. B.; Maslyakova, G. N.; Gorin, D. A.; Sukhorukov, G. B.; Tuchin, V. V.

    2015-07-01

    The goal of this work is to quantify impact of in vivo photochemical treatment using indocyanine green (ICG) or encapsulated ICG and NIR laser irradiation through skin of rat with obesity by the follow up tissue sampling and histochemistry. After 1 hour elapsed since 1-min light exposure samples of rat skin with subcutaneous tissue of thickness of 1.5-2.5 mm were taken by surgery from rats within marked 4-zones of the skin site. For hematoxylin-eosin histological examination of excised tissue samples, fixation was carried out by 10%-formaldehyde solution. For ICG and encapsulated ICG subcutaneous injection and subsequent 1-min diode laser irradiation with power density of 8 W/cm2, different necrotic regions with lipolysis of subcutaneous fat were observed. The obtained data can be used for safe layer-by-layer laser treatment of obesity and cellulite.

  16. Human Epidermal Langerhans Cells Maintain Immune Homeostasis in Skin by Activating Skin Resident Regulatory T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Seneschal, Julien; Clark, Rachael A.; Gehad, Ahmed; Baecher-Allan, Clare M.; Kupper, Thomas S.

    2013-01-01

    Recent discoveries indicate that the skin of a normal individual contains 10-20 billion resident memory T cells ( which include various T helper, T cytotoxic, and T regulatory subsets, that are poised to respond to environmental antigens. Using only autologous human tissues, we report that both in vitro and in vivo, resting epidermal Langerhan cells (LC) selectively and specifically induced the activation and proliferation of skin resident regulatory T cells (Treg), a minor subset of skin resident memory T cells. In the presence of foreign pathogen, however, the same LC activated and induced proliferation of effector memory T (Tem) cells and limited Treg cells activation. These underappreciated properties of LC: namely maintenance of tolerance in normal skin, and activation of protective skin resident memory T cells upon infectious challenge, help clarify the role of LC in skin. PMID:22560445

  17. Characterization of pigmented dermo-epidermal skin substitutes in a long-term in vivo assay.

    PubMed

    Böttcher-Haberzeth, Sophie; Biedermann, Thomas; Klar, Agnieszka S; Widmer, Daniel S; Neuhaus, Kathrin; Schiestl, Clemens; Meuli, Martin; Reichmann, Ernst

    2015-01-01

    In our laboratory, we have been using human pigmented dermo-epidermal skin substitutes for short-term experiments since several years. Little is known, however, about the long-term biology of such constructs after transplantation. We constructed human, melanocyte-containing dermo-epidermal skin substitutes of different (light and dark) pigmentation types and studied them in a long-term animal experiment. Developmental and maturational stages of the epidermal and dermal compartment as well as signs of homoeostasis were analysed 15 weeks after transplantation. Keratinocytes, melanocytes and fibroblasts from human skin biopsies were isolated and assembled into dermo-epidermal skin substitutes. These were transplanted onto immuno-incompetent rats and investigated 15 weeks after transplantation. Chromameter evaluation showed a consistent skin colour between 3 and 4 months after transplantation. Melanocytes resided in the epidermal basal layer in physiological numbers and melanin accumulated in keratinocytes in a supranuclear position. Skin substitutes showed a mature epidermis in a homoeostatic state and the presence of dermal components such as Fibrillin and Tropoelastin suggested advanced maturation. Overall, pigmented dermo-epidermal skin substitutes show a promising development towards achieving near-normal skin characteristics and epidermal and dermal tissue homoeostasis. In particular, melanocytes function correctly over several months whilst remaining in a physiological, epidermal position and yield a pigmentation resembling original donor skin colour. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. In-vivo differentiation of photo-aged epidermis skin by texture-based classification

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Xiaoman; Weng, Cuncheng; Yu, Biying; Li, Hui

    2014-11-01

    Two sets of in vivo female cheek skin epidermis images were analyzed through gray level co-occurrence matrix (GLCM) and fast fourier transform (FFT). One set was derived from women in their 20s and the other from women more than 60 years of age. GLCM was used to evaluate the texture features of the regions of interest within the cheek epidermis, and texture classification was subsequently performed. During texture classification, 25 images (320×240 pixels) in each age set were randomly selected. Three texture features, i.e., energy, contrast, and correlation, were obtained from the skin images and analyzed at four orientations (0°, 45°,90°, and 135°), accompanied by different distances between two pixels. The textures of the different aging skins were characterized by FFT, which provides the dermatoglyph orientation index. The differences in the textures between the young and old skin samples can be well described by the FFT dermatoglyph orientation index. The texture features varied among the different aging skins, which provide a versatile platform for differentiating the statuses of aging skins.

  19. Tryptophan hydroxylase expression in human skin cells.

    PubMed

    Slominski, Andrzej; Pisarchik, Alexander; Johansson, Olle; Jing, Chen; Semak, Igor; Slugocki, George; Wortsman, Jacobo

    2003-10-15

    We attempted to further characterize cutaneous serotoninergic and melatoninergic pathways evaluating the key biosynthetic enzyme tryptophan hydroxylase (TPH). There was wide expression of TPH mRNA in whole human skin, cultured melanocytes and melanoma cells, dermal fibroblasts, squamous cell carcinoma cells and keratinocytes. Gene expression was associated with detection of TPH immunoreactive species by Western blotting. Characterization of the TPH immunoreactive species performed with two different antibodies showed expression of the expected protein (55-60 kDa), and of forms with higher and lower molecular weights. This pattern of broad spectrum of TPH expression including presumed degradation products suggests rapid turnover of the enzyme, as previously reported in mastocytoma cells. RP-HPLC of skin extracts showed fluorescent species with the retention time of serotonin and N-acetylserotonin. Immunocytochemistry performed in skin biopsies localized TPH immunoreactivity to normal and malignant melanocytes. We conclude that while the TPH mRNA and protein are widely expressed in cultured normal and pathological epidermal and dermal skin cells, in vivo TPH expression is predominantly restricted to cells of melanocytic origin.

  20. Imaging immune response of skin mast cells in vivo with two-photon microscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Chunqiang; Pastila, Riikka K.; Lin, Charles P.

    2012-02-01

    Intravital multiphoton microscopy has provided insightful information of the dynamic process of immune cells in vivo. However, the use of exogenous labeling agents limits its applications. There is no method to perform functional imaging of mast cells, a population of innate tissue-resident immune cells. Mast cells are widely recognized as the effector cells in allergy. Recently their roles as immunoregulatory cells in certain innate and adaptive immune responses are being actively investigated. Here we report in vivo mouse skin mast cells imaging with two-photon microscopy using endogenous tryptophan as the fluorophore. We studied the following processes. 1) Mast cells degranulation, the first step in the mast cell activation process in which the granules are released into peripheral tissue to trigger downstream reactions. 2) Mast cell reconstitution, a procedure commonly used to study mast cells functioning by comparing the data from wild type mice, mast cell-deficient mice, and mast-cell deficient mice reconstituted with bone marrow-derived mast cells (BMMCs). Imaging the BMMCs engraftment in tissue reveals the mast cells development and the efficiency of BMMCs reconstitution. We observed the reconstitution process for 6 weeks in the ear skin of mast cell-deficient Kit wsh/ w-sh mice by two-photon imaging. Our finding is the first instance of imaging mast cells in vivo with endogenous contrast.

  1. Quantitative analysis of intrinsic skin aging in dermal papillae by in vivo harmonic generation microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Liao, Yi-Hua; Kuo, Wei-Cheng; Chou, Sin-Yo; Tsai, Cheng-Shiun; Lin, Guan-Liang; Tsai, Ming-Rung; Shih, Yuan-Ta; Lee, Gwo-Giun; Sun, Chi-Kuang

    2014-01-01

    Chronological skin aging is associated with flattening of the dermal-epidermal junction (DEJ), but to date no quantitative analysis focusing on the aging changes in the dermal papillae (DP) has been performed. The aim of the study is to determine the architectural changes and the collagen density related to chronological aging in the dermal papilla zone (DPZ) by in vivo harmonic generation microscopy (HGM) with a sub-femtoliter spatial resolution. We recruited 48 Asian subjects and obtained in vivo images on the sun-protected volar forearm. Six parameters were defined to quantify 3D morphological changes of the DPZ, which we analyzed both manually and computationally to study their correlation with age. The depth of DPZ, the average height of isolated DP, and the 3D interdigitation index decreased with age, while DP number density, DP volume, and the collagen density in DP remained constant over time. In vivo high-resolution HGM technology has uncovered chronological aging-related variations in DP, and sheds light on real-time quantitative skin fragility assessment and disease diagnostics based on collagen density and morphology. PMID:25401037

  2. In vivo interstitial glucose characterization and monitoring in the skin by ATR-FTIR spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Skrebova Eikje, Natalja

    2011-03-01

    Successful development of real-time non-invasive glucose monitoring would represent a major advancement not only in the treatment and management of patients with diabetes mellitus and carbohydrate metabolism disorders, but also for understanding in those biochemical, metabolic and (patho-)physiological processes of glucose at the molecular level in vivo. Here, ATR-FTIR spectroscopy technique has been challenged not only for in vivo measurement of interstitial glucose levels, but also for their non-invasive molecular qualitative and quantitative comparative characterization in the skin tissue. The results, based on calculated mean values of determined 5 glucose-specific peaks in the glucose-related 1000-1160 cm-1 region, showed intra- and inter-subject differences in interstitial glucose activity levels with their changes at different times and doses of OGTT, while raising questions about the relationships between interstitial and blood glucose levels. In conclusion, the introduction of ATR-FTIR spectroscopy technique has opened up an access to the interstitial fluid space in the skin tissue for interstitial glucose characterization and monitoring in vivo. Though interstitial versus blood glucose monitoring has different characteristics, it can be argued that accurate and precise measurements of interstitial glucose levels may be more important clinically.

  3. Resonance Raman spectroscopic evaluation of skin carotenoids as a biomarker of carotenoid status for human studies

    USDA-ARS?s Scientific Manuscript database

    Resonance Raman Spectroscopy (RRS) is a non-invasive method that has been developed to assess carotenoid status in human tissues including human skin in vivo. Skin carotenoid status, as assessed by RRS, has been suggested as a promising biomarker for use in human studies. This manuscript describes...

  4. Characterization of a new MOSFET detector configuration for in vivo skin dosimetry

    SciTech Connect

    Scalchi, Paolo; Francescon, Paolo; Rajaguru, Priyadarshini

    2005-06-15

    The dose released to the patient skin during a radiotherapy treatment is important when the skin is an organ at risk, or on the contrary, is included in the target volume. Since most treatment planning programs do not predict dose within several millimeters of the body surface, it is important to have a method to verify the skin dose for the patient who is undergoing radiotherapy. A special type of metal oxide semiconductors field-effect transistors (MOSFET) was developed to perform in vivo skin dosimetry for radiotherapy treatments. Water-equivalent depth (WED), both manufacturing and sensor reproducibility, dependence on both field size and angulation of the sensor were investigated using 6 MV photon beams. Patient skin dosimetries were performed during 6 MV total body irradiations (TBI). The resulting WEDs ranged from 0.04 and 0.15 mm (0.09 mm on average). The reproducibility of the sensor response, for doses of 50 cGy, was within {+-}2% (maximum deviation) and improves with increasing sensitivity or dose level. As to the manufacturing reproducibility, it was found to be {+-}0.055 mm. No WED dependence on the field size was verified, but possible variations of this quantity with the field size could be hidden by the assessment uncertainty. The angular dependence, for both phantom-surface and in-air setups, when referred to the mean response, is within {+-}27% until 80 deg. rotations. The results of the performed patient skin dosimetries showed that, normally, our TBI setup was suitable to give skin the prescribed dose, but, for some cases, interventions were necessary: as a consequence the TBI setup was corrected. The water-equivalent depth is, on average, less than the thinnest thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). In addition, when compared with TLDs, the skin MOSFETs have significant advantages, like immediate both readout and reuse, as well as the permanent storage of dose. These sensors are also waterproof. The in vivo dosimetries performed prove the

  5. Characterization of a new MOSFET detector configuration for in vivo skin dosimetry.

    PubMed

    Scalchi, Paolo; Francescon, Paolo; Rajaguru, Priyadarshini

    2005-06-01

    The dose released to the patient skin during a radiotherapy treatment is important when the skin is an organ at risk, or on the contrary, is included in the target volume. Since most treatment planning programs do not predict dose within several millimeters of the body surface, it is important to have a method to verify the skin dose for the patient who is undergoing radiotherapy. A special type of metal oxide semiconductors field-effect transistors (MOSFET) was developed to perform in vivo skin dosimetry for radiotherapy treatments. Water-equivalent depth (WED), both manufacturing and sensor reproducibility, dependence on both field size and angulation of the sensor were investigated using 6 MV photon beams. Patient skin dosimetries were performed during 6 MV total body irradiations (TBI). The resulting WEDs ranged from 0.04 and 0.15 mm (0.09 mm on average). The reproducibility of the sensor response, for doses of 50 cGy, was within +/-2% (maximum deviation) and improves with increasing sensitivity or dose level. As to the manufacturing reproducibility, it was found to be +/-0.055 mm. No WED dependence on the field size was verified, but possible variations of this quantity with the field size could be hidden by the assessment uncertainty. The angular dependence, for both phantom-surface and in-air setups, when referred to the mean response, is within +/-27% until 80 degree rotations. The results of the performed patient skin dosimetries showed that, normally, our TBI setup was suitable to give skin the prescribed dose, but, for some cases, interventions were necessary: as a consequence the TBI setup was corrected. The water-equivalent depth is, on average, less than the thinnest thermoluminescent dosimeters (TLD). In addition, when compared with TLDs, the skin MOSFETs have significant advantages, like immediate both readout and reuse, as well as the permanent storage of dose. These sensors are also waterproof. The in vivo dosimetries performed prove the

  6. Antimelanogenic chemicals with in vivo efficacy against skin pigmentation in guinea pigs.

    PubMed

    Hong, Seung Deok; Yoon, Da Young; Lee, Seungmean; Han, Sang-Bae; Kim, Youngsoo

    2014-10-01

    Ultraviolet (UV) radiation under sunlight stimulates skin pigmentation through immediately affecting the oxidative modification of existing melanin pigments and the spatial redistribution of pigmented melanosomes followed by the up-regulation of melanogenic genes in delayed kinetics. However, abnormal accumulation and synthesis of melanin biopolymers are responsible for skin disorders with more pigmented patches. Chemical-based regulation of the hyperpigmented disorders has been a long-standing goal for cosmetic and pharmaceutical applications. A large number of the chemicals with antimelanogenic activity have met with limited or no success in the treatment of skin patients, since they may not overcome the challenge of penetrating the skin barrier. Guinea pig skin displays similar kinetic parameters to human skin in the transdermal absorption of numerous chemicals, thus can serve as the surrogate for human skin. Here, we provide a concise review of our current understanding of the chemical-based therapy against skin hyperpigmentation in UV-irradiated guinea pig models, suggest molecular mechanisms of the action and emphasize the translation from preclinical outcomes to skin patients.

  7. Sexual hormones in human skin.

    PubMed

    Zouboulis, C C; Chen, W-C; Thornton, M J; Qin, K; Rosenfield, R

    2007-02-01

    The skin locally synthesizes significant amounts of sexual hormones with intracrine or paracrine actions. The local level of each sexual steroid depends upon the expression of each of the androgen- and estrogen-synthesizing enzymes in each cell type, with sebaceous glands and sweat glands being the major contributors. Sebocytes express very little of the key enzyme, cytochrome P450c17, necessary for synthesis of the androgenic prohormones dehydroepiandrosterone and androstenedione, however, these prohormones can be converted by sebocytes and sweat glands, and probably also by dermal papilla cells, into more potent androgens like testosterone and dihydrotestosterone. Five major enzymes are involved in the activation and deactivation of androgens in skin. Androgens affect several functions of human skin, such as sebaceous gland growth and differentiation, hair growth, epidermal barrier homeostasis and wound healing. Their effects are mediated by binding to the nuclear androgen receptor. Changes of isoenzyme and/or androgen receptor levels may have important implications in the development of hyperandrogenism and the associated skin diseases such as acne, seborrhoea, hirsutism and androgenetic alopecia. On the other hand, estrogens have been implicated in skin aging, pigmentation, hair growth, sebum production and skin cancer. Estrogens exert their actions through intracellular receptors or via cell surface receptors, which activate specific second messenger signaling pathways. Recent studies suggest specific site-related distribution of ERalpha and ERbeta in human skin. In contrast, progestins play no role in the pathogenesis of skin disorders. However, they play a major role in the treatment of hirsutism and acne vulgaris, where they are prescribed as components of estrogen-progestin combination pills and as anti-androgens. These combinations enhance gonadotropin suppression of ovarian androgen production. Estrogen-progestin treatment can reduce the need for shaving

  8. In vivo comparative documentation of skin hydration by confocal Raman microscopy, SkinSensor, Skicon, and NovaMeter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Guojin; Papillon, Aline; Ruvolo, Eduardo, Jr.; Bargo, Paulo R.; Kollias, Nikiforos

    2010-02-01

    The stratum corneum provides a vital physical barrier that protects against external insults and excessive internal water loss. Water activity is thought as a key factor to maintain proper skin barrier integrity via regulating enzyme activities and lipid phase behavior. Consequently, maintenance of an optimal hydration level in SC becomes an important clinical and cosmetic concern. The objective methods to assess SC hydration are based on either electrical or optical measurements. Electrical techniques used in the current study include high frequency conductance (Skicon), impedance (Nova DPM) and DC I-V curve (Skinsensor). Confocal Raman Microscopy was utilized to document water profile versus depth, and this technique is based on inelastic scattering of monochromatic light from different chemical species of skin. Water patches were applied on the 14 subjects' forearm for 20 minutes and 1.5 hrs. Skin hydration levels for individuals were documented by utilizing the mentioned above instruments in vivo. Results show that patterns of water profiles upon the hydration are significantly different among the individuals and these differences may be related to skin barrier function integrity. The intrinsic water content and water absorption upon the hydration were summed corresponding to different depths (3 μm and 15 μm) from the data obtained by confocal Raman microscopy. These results were correlated to the readings from electrical approaches. Superficial (3 μm) but not deeper layer (15 μm) water contents correlated well with the readings from SkinSensor. Neither depth measurements correlate well with the Skicon. There is strong correlation between the data acquired with Skicon and SkinSensor.

  9. Handheld confocal Raman microspectrometer for in-vivo skin cancer measurement

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lieber, Chad A.; Ellis, Darrel L.; Billheimer, D. D.; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2004-07-01

    Several studies have demonstrated Raman spectroscopy to be capable of tissue diagnosis with accuracy rivaling that of histopathologic analysis. This technique obtains biochemical-specific information noninvasively, and can eliminate the pain, time, and cost associated with biopsy and pathological analysis. Furthermore, when used in a confocal arrangement, Raman spectra can be obtained from localized regions of the tissue. Skin cancers are an ideal candidate for this emerging technology, due to their obvious accessibility and presentation at specific depths. However, most commercially available confocal Raman microspectrometers are large, rigid systems ill-suited for clinical application. We developed a bench-top confocal Raman microspectrometer using a portable external-cavity diode laser excitation source. This system was used to study several skin lesions in vitro. Results show the depth-resolved Raman spectra can diagnose in vitro skin lesions with 96% sensitivity, 88% specificity, and 86% pathological classification accuracy. Based on the success of this study, a portable Raman system with a handheld confocal microscope was developed for clinical application. Preliminary in vivo data show several distinct spectral differences between skin pathologies. Diagnostic algorithms are planned for this continuing study to assess the capability of Raman spectroscopy for clinical skin cancer diagnosis.

  10. In-vivo fluorescence detection and imaging of porphyrin-producing bacteria in the human skin and in the oral cavity for diagnosis of acne vulgaris, caries, and squamous cell carcinoma

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koenig, Karsten; Schneckenburger, Herbert; Hemmer, Joerg; Tromberg, Bruce J.; Steiner, Rudolf W.

    1994-05-01

    Certain bacteria are able to synthesize metal-free fluorescent porphyrins and can therefore be detected by sensitive autofluorescence measurements in the red spectral region. The porphyrin-producing bacterium Propionibacterium acnes, which is involved in the pathogenesis of acne vulgaris, was localized in human skin. Spectrally resolved fluorescence images of bacteria distribution in the face were obtained by a slow-scan CCD camera combined with a tunable liquid crystal filter. The structured autofluorescence of dental caries and dental plaque in the red is caused by oral bacteria, like Bacteroides or Actinomyces odontolyticus. `Caries images' were created by time-gated imaging in the ns-region after ultrashort laser excitation. Time-gated measurements allow the suppression of backscattered light and non-porphyrin autofluorescence. Biopsies of oral squamous cell carcinoma exhibited red autofluorescence in necrotic regions and high concentrations of the porphyrin-producing bacterium Pseudomonas aerigunosa. These studies suggest that the temporal and spectral characteristics of bacterial autofluorescence can be used in the diagnosis and treatment of a variety of diseases.

  11. Infrared neural stimulation of human spinal nerve roots in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Cayce, Jonathan M.; Wells, Jonathon D.; Malphrus, Jonathan D.; Kao, Chris; Thomsen, Sharon; Tulipan, Noel B.; Konrad, Peter E.; Jansen, E. Duco; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Abstract. Infrared neural stimulation (INS) is a neurostimulation modality that uses pulsed infrared light to evoke artifact-free, spatially precise neural activity with a noncontact interface; however, the technique has not been demonstrated in humans. The objective of this study is to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of INS in humans in vivo. The feasibility of INS in humans was assessed in patients (n=7) undergoing selective dorsal root rhizotomy, where hyperactive dorsal roots, identified for transection, were stimulated in vivo with INS on two to three sites per nerve with electromyogram recordings acquired throughout the stimulation. The stimulated dorsal root was removed and histology was performed to determine thermal damage thresholds of INS. Threshold activation of human dorsal rootlets occurred in 63% of nerves for radiant exposures between 0.53 and 1.23  J/cm2. In all cases, only one or two monitored muscle groups were activated from INS stimulation of a hyperactive spinal root identified by electrical stimulation. Thermal damage was first noted at 1.09  J/cm2 and a 2∶1 safety ratio was identified. These findings demonstrate the success of INS as a fresh approach for activating human nerves in vivo and providing the necessary safety data needed to pursue clinically driven therapeutic and diagnostic applications of INS in humans. PMID:26157986

  12. Infrared neural stimulation of human spinal nerve roots in vivo.

    PubMed

    Cayce, Jonathan M; Wells, Jonathon D; Malphrus, Jonathan D; Kao, Chris; Thomsen, Sharon; Tulipan, Noel B; Konrad, Peter E; Jansen, E Duco; Mahadevan-Jansen, Anita

    2015-01-01

    Infrared neural stimulation (INS) is a neurostimulation modality that uses pulsed infrared light to evoke artifact-free, spatially precise neural activity with a noncontact interface; however, the technique has not been demonstrated in humans. The objective of this study is to demonstrate the safety and efficacy of INS in humans in vivo. The feasibility of INS in humans was assessed in patients ([Formula: see text]) undergoing selective dorsal root rhizotomy, where hyperactive dorsal roots, identified for transection, were stimulated in vivo with INS on two to three sites per nerve with electromyogram recordings acquired throughout the stimulation. The stimulated dorsal root was removed and histology was performed to determine thermal damage thresholds of INS. Threshold activation of human dorsal rootlets occurred in 63% of nerves for radiant exposures between 0.53 and [Formula: see text]. In all cases, only one or two monitored muscle groups were activated from INS stimulation of a hyperactive spinal root identified by electrical stimulation. Thermal damage was first noted at [Formula: see text] and a [Formula: see text] safety ratio was identified. These findings demonstrate the success of INS as a fresh approach for activating human nerves in vivo and providing the necessary safety data needed to pursue clinically driven therapeutic and diagnostic applications of INS in humans.

  13. In vivo determination of optical properties and fluorophore characteristics of non-melanoma skin cancer

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajaram, Narasimhan; Kovacic, Dianne; Migden, Michael F.; Reichenberg, Jason S.; Nguyen, Tri H.; Tunnell, James W.

    2009-02-01

    Diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) and laser-induced fluorescence (LIF) techniques have widely been used as noninvasive tools for early cancer detection in several organs including the cervix, oral cavity and gastrointestinal tract. Using a combined DOS/LIF approach, one can simultaneously measure the morphology and biochemical composition of tissue and use these features to diagnose malignancy. We report for the first time to our knowledge both the optical properties and native fluorophore characteristics of non-melanoma skin cancer in the UV-visible range. We collected in vivo diffuse reflectance and intrinsic fluorescence measurements from 44 skin lesions on 37 patients. The skin sites were further categorized into three groups of non-melanoma skin cancer according to histopathology: 1) pre-cancerous actinic keratosis 2) malignant squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and 3) basal cell carcinoma (BCC). We used a custom-built probe-based clinical system that collects both white light reflectance and laser-induced fluorescence in the wavelength range of 350-700 nm. We extracted the blood volume fraction, oxygen saturation, blood vessel size, tissue microarchitecture and melanin content from diffuse reflectance measurements. In addition, we determined the native fluorophore contributions of NADH, collagen and FAD from laser-induced fluorescence for all groups. The scattering from tissue decreased with progression from clinically normal to precancerous actinic keratosis to malignant SCC. A similar trend was observed for clinically normal skin and malignant BCC. Statistically significant differences were observed in the collagen contributions, which were lower in malignant SCC and BCC as compared to normal skin. Our data demonstrates that the mean optical properties and fluorophore contributions of normal, benign and malignant nonmelanoma cancers are significantly different from each other and can potentially be used as biomarkers for the early detection of skin cancer.

  14. Solvent effects in permeation assessed in vivo by skin surface biopsy

    PubMed Central

    Rosado, Catarina; Rodrigues, Luis Monteiro

    2003-01-01

    Background Transdermal drug delivery has become an important means of drug administration. It presents numerous advantages but it is still limited by the small number of drugs with a suitable profile. The use of solvents that affect the skin barrier function is one of the classic strategies of penetration enhancement. Some of these solvents have well characterised actions on the stratum corneum, but the majority are still selected using empirical criteria. The objective of this work was to conduct a systematic study on the ability to affect skin permeation of solvents commonly used in transdermal formulations. An innovative methodology in this area was employed, consisting of the combination of skin surface biopsy with colorimetry. Methods The study compared in vivo differences in the permeation of a hydrophilic (methylene blue) and a lipophilic (Sudan III) dye, after treatment of the skin with different vehicles. Consecutive skin surface biopsies of each site were taken and the cumulative amounts of the dyes in the stripped stratum corneum were measured by reflectance colourimetry. Results Results indicate that the amount of methylene blue present in the stratum corneum varied significantly with different skin pre-treatments. Some solvents provided a 1.5 fold penetration enhancement but others decreased by almost half the permeation of the dye. The permeation of Sudan III was less significantly affected by solvent pre-treatment. Conclusions This study has only superficially explored the potential of the combination of skin surface biopsy and colourimetry, but the encouraging results obtained confirm that the methodology can be extended to the study of more complex formulations. PMID:14680512

  15. In vivo characterization of hair and skin derived carbon quantum dots with high quantum yield as long-term bioprobes in zebrafish

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Jing-Hui; Niu, Aping; Li, Jing; Fu, Jian-Wei; Xu, Qun; Pei, De-Sheng

    2016-11-01

    Carbon quantum dots (CDs) were widely investigated because of their tunable fluorescence properties and low toxicity. However, so far there have been no reports on in vivo functional studies of hair and skin derived CDs. Here, hair derived CDs (HCDs) and skin derived CDs (SCDs) were produced by using human hair and pig skin as precursors. The quantum yields (QYs) of HCDs and SCDs were quite high, compared to citric acid derived CDs (CCDs). HCDs and SCDs possess optimal photostability, hypotoxicity and biocompatibility in zebrafish, indicating that HCDs and SCDs possess the capacity of being used as fluorescence probes for in vivo biological imaging. The long-time observation for fluorescence alternation of CDs in zebrafish and the quenching assay of CDs by ATP, NADH and Fe3+ ions demonstrated that the decaying process of CDs in vivo might be induced by the synergistic effect of the metabolism process. All results indicated that large batches and high QYs of CDs can be acquired by employing natural and nontoxic hair and skin as precursors. To our knowledge, this is the first time to report SCDs, in vivo comparative studies of HCDs, SCDs and CCDs as bioprobes, and explore their mechanism of photostability in zebrafish.

  16. In vivo characterization of hair and skin derived carbon quantum dots with high quantum yield as long-term bioprobes in zebrafish

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Jing-Hui; Niu, Aping; Li, Jing; Fu, Jian-Wei; Xu, Qun; Pei, De-Sheng

    2016-01-01

    Carbon quantum dots (CDs) were widely investigated because of their tunable fluorescence properties and low toxicity. However, so far there have been no reports on in vivo functional studies of hair and skin derived CDs. Here, hair derived CDs (HCDs) and skin derived CDs (SCDs) were produced by using human hair and pig skin as precursors. The quantum yields (QYs) of HCDs and SCDs were quite high, compared to citric acid derived CDs (CCDs). HCDs and SCDs possess optimal photostability, hypotoxicity and biocompatibility in zebrafish, indicating that HCDs and SCDs possess the capacity of being used as fluorescence probes for in vivo biological imaging. The long-time observation for fluorescence alternation of CDs in zebrafish and the quenching assay of CDs by ATP, NADH and Fe3+ ions demonstrated that the decaying process of CDs in vivo might be induced by the synergistic effect of the metabolism process. All results indicated that large batches and high QYs of CDs can be acquired by employing natural and nontoxic hair and skin as precursors. To our knowledge, this is the first time to report SCDs, in vivo comparative studies of HCDs, SCDs and CCDs as bioprobes, and explore their mechanism of photostability in zebrafish. PMID:27886267

  17. In vivo reflectance confocal microscopy imaging of melanocytic skin lesions: consensus terminology glossary and illustrative images.

    PubMed

    Scope, Alon; Benvenuto-Andrade, Cristiane; Agero, Anna-Liza C; Malvehy, Josep; Puig, Susana; Rajadhyaksha, Milind; Busam, Klaus J; Marra, Diego E; Torres, Abel; Propperova, Iva; Langley, Richard G; Marghoob, Ashfaq A; Pellacani, Giovanni; Seidenari, Stefania; Halpern, Allan C; Gonzalez, Salvador

    2007-10-01

    Reflectance confocal microscopy (RCM) has been used for over 10 years for in vivo skin imaging. However, to date no standard RCM terminology has been published. To establish a glossary of terms for RCM evaluation of melanocytic lesions. Prominent RCM researchers were presented with RCM images of melanocytic lesions. Reviewers evaluated RCM images for image quality, lesion architecture, and cellular details. Reviewers could utilize published descriptors or contribute unpublished terminology to describe lesion attributes. An online meeting was conducted to reach consensus that integrates and defines existing and new RCM descriptive terms. We present a glossary with descriptors of image quality, normal skin morphology, lesion architecture, and cellular details for RCM evaluation of melanocytic lesions. Usefulness of the glossary in RCM diagnosis of melanocytic lesions needs to be assessed. Standardization of terminology is important toward implementation of RCM in the clinical setting.

  18. Quantification and visualization of cellular NAD(P)H in young and aged female facial skin with in vivo two-photon tomography.

    PubMed

    Miyamoto, K; Kudoh, H

    2013-07-01

    In vivo two-photon tomography is a novel noninvasive three-dimensional optical skin imaging technology with subcellular resolution which enables the sensitive detection of endogenous fluorophores. One of these fluorophores, NAD(P)H (a coenzyme which plays an important role in the release of free energy during glycolysis, and influences filaggrin and lipid synthesis), can be selectively detected in keratinocytes (granular cells) with two-photon tomography. To quantify NAD(P)H levels in subsurface human facial skin in vivo as a measure to determine if there are changes with age. A total of 80 healthy Asian females were enrolled in this study, aged 21-68 years. Measurements were performed on facial skin using in vivo two-photon tomography (DermaInspect/MPTflex™, JenLab GmbH, Jena, Germany). The laser beam scans a skin field of interest in pulses, focused at a depth to reach the granular layer. The near-infrared laser pulses excite the endogenous fluorophores NAD(P)H. Image processing was performed to obtain high-resolution autofluorescence images (optical biopsies) and to quantify the fluorescent grey scale to determine NAD(P)H levels. Additional skin surface measures taken were hydration (corneometer), elasticity (cutometer) and wrinkles (image capture and analysis). Statistically significant changes in all measured parameters as a function of age were observed. Most importantly, the mean fluorescent grey scale values for NAD(P)H in the youngest group studied (women in their 20s) was 38.8 (SD ± 12.39), while that of the oldest group studied (women in their 60s) was 32.7 (SD ± 12.47). These NAD(P)H levels are statistically significantly different (P = 0.0078). The level of NAD(P)H in the epidermis is significantly greater in younger vs. older skin in vivo. This likely reflects decreased production and/or increased degradation of NAD(P)H in older skin, possibly as a result of chronological ageing and environmental damage (e.g. photodamage). NAD(P)H levels in

  19. Multimodal fluorescence molecular imaging for in vivo characterization of skin cancer using endogenous and exogenous fluorophores

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Miller, Jessica P.; Habimana-Griffin, LeMoyne; Edwards, Tracy S.; Achilefu, Samuel

    2017-06-01

    Similarity of skin cancer with many benign skin pathologies requires reliable methods to detect and differentiate the different types of these lesions. Previous studies have explored the use of disparate optical techniques to identify and estimate the invasive nature of melanoma and basal cell carcinoma with varying outcomes. Here, we used a concerted approach that provides complementary information for rapid screening and characterization of tumors, focusing on squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin. Assessment of in vivo autofluorescence lifetime (FLT) imaging of endogenous fluorophores that are excitable at longer wavelengths (480 nm) than conventional NADH and FAD revealed a decrease in the short FLT component for SCC compared to normal skin, with mean values of 0.57±0.026 ns and 0.61±0.021 ns, respectively (p=0.004). Subsequent systemic administration of a near-infrared fluorescent molecular probe in SCC bearing mice, followed by the implementation of image processing methods on data acquired from two-dimensional and three-dimensional fluorescence molecular imaging, allowed us to estimate the tumor volume and depth, as well as quantify the fluorescent probe in the tumor. The result suggests the involvement of lipofuscin-like lipopigments and riboflavin in SCC metabolism and serves as a model for staging SCC.

  20. Multimodal fluorescence molecular imaging for in vivo characterization of skin cancer using endogenous and exogenous fluorophores.

    PubMed

    Miller, Jessica P; Habimana-Griffin, LeMoyne; Edwards, Tracy S; Achilefu, Samuel

    2017-06-01

    Similarity of skin cancer with many benign skin pathologies requires reliable methods to detect and differentiate the different types of these lesions. Previous studies have explored the use of disparate optical techniques to identify and estimate the invasive nature of melanoma and basal cell carcinoma with varying outcomes. Here, we used a concerted approach that provides complementary information for rapid screening and characterization of tumors, focusing on squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) of the skin. Assessment of in vivo autofluorescence lifetime (FLT) imaging of endogenous fluorophores that are excitable at longer wavelengths (480 nm) than conventional NADH and FAD revealed a decrease in the short FLT component for SCC compared to normal skin, with mean values of 0.57 ± 0.026 ?? ns and 0.61 ± 0.021 ?? ns , respectively ( p = 0.004 ). Subsequent systemic administration of a near-infrared fluorescent molecular probe in SCC bearing mice, followed by the implementation of image processing methods on data acquired from two-dimensional and three-dimensional fluorescence molecular imaging, allowed us to estimate the tumor volume and depth, as well as quantify the fluorescent probe in the tumor. The result suggests the involvement of lipofuscin-like lipopigments and riboflavin in SCC metabolism and serves as a model for staging SCC.

  1. Clinical study of noninvasive in vivo melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers using multimodal spectral diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Lim, Liang; Nichols, Brandon; Migden, Michael R; Rajaram, Narasimhan; Reichenberg, Jason S; Markey, Mia K; Ross, Merrick I; Tunnell, James W

    2014-01-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the diagnostic capability of a multimodal spectral diagnosis (SD) for in vivo noninvasive disease diagnosis of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers. We acquired reflectance, fluorescence, and Raman spectra from 137 lesions in 76 patients using custom-built optical fiber-based clinical systems. Biopsies of lesions were classified using standard histopathology as malignant melanoma (MM), nonmelanoma pigmented lesion (PL), basal cell carcinoma (BCC), actinic keratosis (AK), and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Spectral data were analyzed using principal component analysis. Using multiple diagnostically relevant principal components, we built leave-one-out logistic regression classifiers. Classification results were compared with histopathology of the lesion. Sensitivity/specificity for classifying MM versus PL (12 versus 17 lesions) was 100%/100%, for SCC and BCC versus AK (57 versus 14 lesions) was 95%/71%, and for AK and SCC and BCC versus normal skin (71 versus 71 lesions) was 90%/85%. The best classification for nonmelanoma skin cancers required multiple modalities; however, the best melanoma classification occurred with Raman spectroscopy alone. The high diagnostic accuracy for classifying both melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer lesions demonstrates the potential for SD as a clinical diagnostic device.

  2. Clinical study of noninvasive in vivo melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers using multimodal spectral diagnosis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lim, Liang; Nichols, Brandon; Migden, Michael R.; Rajaram, Narasimhan; Reichenberg, Jason S.; Markey, Mia K.; Ross, Merrick I.; Tunnell, James W.

    2014-11-01

    The goal of this study was to determine the diagnostic capability of a multimodal spectral diagnosis (SD) for in vivo noninvasive disease diagnosis of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers. We acquired reflectance, fluorescence, and Raman spectra from 137 lesions in 76 patients using custom-built optical fiber-based clinical systems. Biopsies of lesions were classified using standard histopathology as malignant melanoma (MM), nonmelanoma pigmented lesion (PL), basal cell carcinoma (BCC), actinic keratosis (AK), and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Spectral data were analyzed using principal component analysis. Using multiple diagnostically relevant principal components, we built leave-one-out logistic regression classifiers. Classification results were compared with histopathology of the lesion. Sensitivity/specificity for classifying MM versus PL (12 versus 17 lesions) was 100%;/100%;, for SCC and BCC versus AK (57 versus 14 lesions) was 95%;/71%, and for AK and SCC and BCC versus normal skin (71 versus 71 lesions) was 90%/85%. The best classification for nonmelanoma skin cancers required multiple modalities; however, the best melanoma classification occurred with Raman spectroscopy alone. The high diagnostic accuracy for classifying both melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer lesions demonstrates the potential for SD as a clinical diagnostic device.

  3. Glabridin nanosuspension for enhanced skin penetration: formulation optimization, in vitro and in vivo evaluation.

    PubMed

    Wang, W P; Hul, J; Sui, H; Zhao, Y S; Feng, J; Liu, C

    2016-05-01

    Glabridin, a polyphenolic flavonoid from licorice, has inspired great interest for its antioxidant, anti-inflammatory and skin-lightening activities. However, low water solubility and poor stability of glabridin impedes its topical application in cosmetic products and therapies of dermal diseases. The purpose of this study was to develop a nanosuspension formulation of glabridin to improve its skin permeation. Glabridin nanosuspensions were prepared using anti-solvent precipitation-homogenization method, and Box-Behnken design was adopted to investigate the effects of crucial formulation variables on particle size and to optimize the nanosuspension formulation. The optimal formulation consisted of 0.25% glabridin, 0.47% Poloxamer 188 and 0.11% Polyvinylpyrrolidone K30, and the obtained nanosuspension showed an average particle size of 149.2 nm with a polydispersity index of 0.254. Furthermore, the nanosuspension exhibited significantly enhanced drug permeation flux of glabridin through rat skin with no lag phase both in vitro and in vivo, compared to the coarse suspension and physical mixture. The glabridin nanosuspension showed no significant particle aggregates and a drug loss of 5.46% after storage for 3 months at room temperature. With its enhanced skin penetration, the nanosuspension might be a more preferable formulation for topical administration of poorly soluble glabridin.

  4. Clinical study of noninvasive in vivo melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers using multimodal spectral diagnosis

    PubMed Central

    Lim, Liang; Nichols, Brandon; Migden, Michael R.; Rajaram, Narasimhan; Reichenberg, Jason S.; Markey, Mia K.; Ross, Merrick I.; Tunnell, James W.

    2014-01-01

    Abstract. The goal of this study was to determine the diagnostic capability of a multimodal spectral diagnosis (SD) for in vivo noninvasive disease diagnosis of melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancers. We acquired reflectance, fluorescence, and Raman spectra from 137 lesions in 76 patients using custom-built optical fiber-based clinical systems. Biopsies of lesions were classified using standard histopathology as malignant melanoma (MM), nonmelanoma pigmented lesion (PL), basal cell carcinoma (BCC), actinic keratosis (AK), and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC). Spectral data were analyzed using principal component analysis. Using multiple diagnostically relevant principal components, we built leave-one-out logistic regression classifiers. Classification results were compared with histopathology of the lesion. Sensitivity/specificity for classifying MM versus PL (12 versus 17 lesions) was 100%/100%, for SCC and BCC versus AK (57 versus 14 lesions) was 95%/71%, and for AK and SCC and BCC versus normal skin (71 versus 71 lesions) was 90%/85%. The best classification for nonmelanoma skin cancers required multiple modalities; however, the best melanoma classification occurred with Raman spectroscopy alone. The high diagnostic accuracy for classifying both melanoma and nonmelanoma skin cancer lesions demonstrates the potential for SD as a clinical diagnostic device. PMID:25375350

  5. A useful way to develop effective in vivo skin optical clearing agents.

    PubMed

    Shi, Rui; Guo, Li; Zhang, Chao; Feng, Wei; Li, Peng; Ding, Zhihua; Zhu, Dan

    2016-12-23

    Skin optical clearing has shown tremendous potential in improving various optical imaging performances, but there is some certain blindness in screening out high-efficiency in vivo optical clearing methods. In this work, three optical clearing agents: sucrose (Suc), fructose (Fruc) and PEG-400 (PEG), and two chemical penetration enhancers: propylene glycol (PG) and thiazone (Thiaz) were used. PEG was firstly mixed with the two penetration enhancers, respectively, and then mixed with Fruc and Suc, respectively, to obtain six kinds of skin optical clearing agents (SOCAs). Optical coherence tomography angiography was applied to monitor SOCAs-induced changes in imaging performances, skin optical properties, refractive index mismatching extent, and permeability rate. Experimental results demonstrated that PEG+Thiaz+Suc has the optimal capacity in enhancing the imaging performances, decreasing the scattering and the refractive index mismatching since Thiaz is superior to PG, and Suc is superior to Fruc. This study indicates that the optimal SOCA can be obtained directly by means of additionally adding or replacing the similar category substance in preexisting SOCAs with some more effective reagents. It not only provides an optimal SOCA, but also provides a useful way to develop more effective SOCAs. Cross-section skin structural texture (a), reconstructed blood flow distribution information (b), before or after treated with different SOCAs.

  6. Sequential activation of ground pads reduces skin heating during radiofrequency tumor ablation: in vivo porcine results.

    PubMed

    Schutt, David J; Swindle, M Michael; Helke, Kristi L; Bastarrika, Gorka; Schwarz, Florian; Haemmerich, Dieter

    2010-03-01

    Skin burns below ground pads during monopolar RF ablation are increasingly prevalent, thereby hindering the development of higher power RF generators capable of creating larger tumor ablation zones in combination with multiple or new applicators. Our goal was to evaluate reduction in skin temperatures via additional ground pads in an in vivo porcine model. Three ground pads placed on the animal's abdomen were activated either simultaneously or sequentially, where activation timing was adjusted to equilibrate skin temperature below each pad. Thirteen RF ablations (n = 4 simultaneous at 300 W, n = 5 sequential at 300 W, and n = 4 sequential at 375 W) were performed for 12 min via two internally cooled cluster electrodes placed in the gluteus maximus of domestic swine. Temperature rise at each pad and burn degree as determined via histology were compared. Ablation zone size was determined via T2-weighted MRI. Maximum temperature rise was significantly higher with simultaneous activation than with either of the sequential activation group (21.4 degrees C versus 8.1 degrees C or 9.6 degrees C, p < 0.01). Ablation zone diameters during simultaneous (300 W) and sequential activations (300 and 375 W) were and 6.9 +/- 0.3, 5.6 +/- 0.3, and 7.5 +/- 0.6 cm, respectively. Sequential activation of multiple ground pads results in significantly lower skin temperatures and less severe burns, as measured by histological examination.

  7. Polarization-Sensitive Hyperspectral Imaging in vivo: A Multimode Dermoscope for Skin Analysis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Vasefi, Fartash; MacKinnon, Nicholas; Saager, Rolf B.; Durkin, Anthony J.; Chave, Robert; Lindsley, Erik H.; Farkas, Daniel L.

    2014-05-01

    Attempts to understand the changes in the structure and physiology of human skin abnormalities by non-invasive optical imaging are aided by spectroscopic methods that quantify, at the molecular level, variations in tissue oxygenation and melanin distribution. However, current commercial and research systems to map hemoglobin and melanin do not correlate well with pathology for pigmented lesions or darker skin. We developed a multimode dermoscope that combines polarization and hyperspectral imaging with an efficient analytical model to map the distribution of specific skin bio-molecules. This corrects for the melanin-hemoglobin misestimation common to other systems, without resorting to complex and computationally intensive tissue optical models. For this system's proof of concept, human skin measurements on melanocytic nevus, vitiligo, and venous occlusion conditions were performed in volunteers. The resulting molecular distribution maps matched physiological and anatomical expectations, confirming a technologic approach that can be applied to next generation dermoscopes and having biological plausibility that is likely to appeal to dermatologists.

  8. The role of TRPV1 channel in aged human skin.

    PubMed

    Lee, Young Mee; Kang, So Min; Chung, Jin Ho

    2012-02-01

    Transient receptor potential vanilloid 1 (TRPV1) is a member of the nonselective cationic channel family. Activation of TRPV1 induces an influx of divalent and monovalent cations (i.e., Ca(2+), Na(+), and Mg(2+)) which are activated by capsaicin, heat, and acid. TRPV1 is known to be expressed in the epidermis, but little is known about the physiological significance and functional role of TRPV1 in skin. Recent studies suggested that heat- and ultraviolet (UV)-induced matrix metalloproteinases-1 (MMP-1) expression may be partly mediated by TRPV1 activation in human keratinocytes. Also, heat and UV increased expression of TRPV1 proteins in human skin in vivo. TRPV1 protein was expressed more in the sun-protected (upper-inner arm) skin of the elderly than in young subjects. In addition, the photoaged (forearm) skin of the elderly showed increased TRPV1 expression compared to sun-protected skin of the same individuals. The increased TRPV1 expression in the old skin implies that TRPV1 may be related to senile skin symptoms, such as senile pruritus and neurogenic inflammation. This review provides a summary of current researches on the role of TRPV1 channel in human skin, especially in aged skin. Copyright © 2011 Japanese Society for Investigative Dermatology. Published by Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  9. How biophysical in vivo testing techniques can be used to characterize full thickness skin equivalents.

    PubMed

    Houcine, A; Delalleau, A; Heraud, S; Guiraud, B; Payre, B; Duplan, H; Delisle, M-B; Damour, O; Bessou-Touya, S

    2016-08-01

    The reliability of the biophysical properties of skin equivalents (SEs) remains a challenge for medical applications and for product efficacy tests following the European Directive 2003/15/EC2 on the prohibition of animal experiments for cosmetic products. We propose to adapt the biophysical in vivo testing techniques to compare full thickness model growth vs. time. The interest in using such techniques lies in possible comparisons between in vivo and in vitro skin as well as monitoring samples over the culture time. High frequency ultrasound technique, optical coherence tomography (OCT), and laser scanning microscopy were used to analyze SEs morphology at days D42 and D60 whereas their microstructure was assessed through transmission electron microscopy and classical histology. A correlation between these observations and mechanical measurements has been proposed so as to underline the consequence of both the development of the dermis elastic fibers and the epidermis differentiation. Ultrasounds measurements show a highly homogeneous dermis whereas the OCT technique clearly distinguishes the stratum corneum and the living epidermis. The increase in the thicknesses of these layers as well as the growth in elastin and collagen fibers results in strong modifications of the samples mechanical properties. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Multi-spectral mapping of in vivo skin hemoglobin and melanin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Jakovels, Dainis; Spigulis, Janis; Saknite, Inga

    2010-04-01

    The multi-spectral imaging technique has been used for distant mapping of in-vivo skin chromophores by analyzing spectral data at each reflected image pixel and constructing 2-D maps of the relative concentrations of oxy-/deoxyhemoglobin and melanin. Instead of using a broad visible-NIR spectral range, this study focuses on narrowed spectral band 500-700 nm, so speeding-up the signal processing procedure. Regression analysis confirmed that superposition of three Gaussians is optimal analytic approximation for the oxy-hemoglobin absorption tabular spectrum in this spectral band, while superposition of two Gaussians fits well for deoxy-hemoglobin absorption and exponential function - for melanin absorption. The proposed approach was clinically tested for three types of in-vivo skin provocations - ultraviolet irradiance, chemical reaction with vinegar essence and finger arterial occlusion. Spectral range 500-700 nm provided better sensitivity to oxy-hemoglobin changes and higher response stability to melanin than two reduced ranges 500-600 nm and 530-620 nm.

  11. In vivo skin absorption dynamics of topically applied pharmaceuticals monitored by fiber-optic diffuse reflectance spectroscopy

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ki-Hong; Jheon, Sanghoon; Kim, Jong-Ki

    2007-03-01

    A simple non-invasive ultra-violet/visible (UV/vis) diffusive reflectance spectroscopy combined with fiber-optics was investigated to elicit the dynamics of skin penetration in vivo of a pharmaceutical, aminolevulinic acid polyethylene glycol cream (5-ALA-PEG cream). Temporal data of the reflectance, R( λ), were measured from a bare skin region and from a skin region treated with 5-ALA cream. The difference in apparent optical density [(ΔAOD) = Δ log[1/ R( λ)

  12. In vivo measurement of skin erythema and pigmentation: new means of implementation of diffuse reflectance spectroscopy with a commercial instrument.

    PubMed

    Stamatas, G N; Zmudzka, B Z; Kollias, N; Beer, J Z

    2008-09-01

    Various physical, chemical and biological insults, including exposure to ultraviolet (UV) radiation, cause erythema and change in pigmentation in human skin. These reactions provide an important measure of the cutaneous response to the insult. To present a new implementation of a method for objective in vivo measurement of erythema and pigmentation. The method is based on acquisition of reflectance spectra in the visible range using a commercially available spectrophotometer. The probe of this instrument incorporates an integrating sphere that captures the light remitted from the skin in a wide range of angles. We corrected the acquired reflectance spectra for the contribution of specular reflections by an amount given by the Fresnel equation and verified this correction experimentally. This correction is particularly important when measurements are performed on heavily pigmented skin. The corrected reflectance spectra are then transformed into absorbance spectra. To analyse these spectra, we developed an algorithm which can be used to calculate apparent concentrations of oxyhaemoglobin, deoxyhaemoglobin and melanin. This method was tested in clinical studies of skin reactions induced by exposure to UV radiation. These experiments involved three groups of subjects with progressively darker complexion (constitutive pigmentation). Each group consisted of 10 subjects. Erythema was measured 1 day after UV exposure, and pigmentation (melanin content) 1 week later. Results Distinct apparent absorbance spectra were obtained for dark, intermediate and fair skin. There was good agreement between reconstructed spectra and experimental data at relevant wavelengths. Difference absorption spectra were able to show the dose dependence of UV-induced responses, and erythema and pigmentation values obtained by the spectroscopic method showed good correlation with those derived by subjective visual grading. The results demonstrate that the presented methodology provides an objective

  13. In Vitro and In Vivo Studies on Protective Action of N-Phenethyl Caffeamide against Photodamage of Skin

    PubMed Central

    Kuo, Yueh-Hsiung; Chen, Chien-Wen; Chu, Yin; Lin, Ping; Chiang, Hsiu-Mei

    2015-01-01

    In our previous study, N-phenethyl caffeamide (K36) was proved to act as an antioxidant and an antiphotoaging agent by inhibiting type I procollagen degradation and stimulating collagen synthesis in human skin fibroblasts. In the present study, in vitro and in vivo experiments were conducted to investigate the mechanism of action and the antiinflammatory and antiphotoaging activity of K36. K36 reduced UVB-induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) and inducible nitric oxide synthases (iNOS) expression by regulating IκB and p-IκB expression. K36 also inhibited the nuclear translocation of NF-κB. Furthermore, the inhibition of mitogen-activated protein (MAP) kinases by K36 was attributed to the downregulation of COX-2. Topically applying K36 led to efficient antiwrinkle formation and reduced UVB-induced erythema and thickness of epidermis in hairless mice. In addition, K36 penetrated into the skin of hairless mice. Our findings show that K36 has significant beneficial effects on antioxidant, antiinflammatory, and antiphotoaging activity and suggest that K36 can be developed as an antiaging agent for cosmetic and skin care products. PMID:26367260

  14. Characterization of a MOSkin detector for in vivo skin dose measurements during interventional radiology procedures

    SciTech Connect

    Safari, M. J.; Wong, J. H. D.; Ng, K. H.; Jong, W. L.; Cutajar, D. L.; Rosenfeld, A. B.

    2015-05-15

    Purpose: The MOSkin is a MOSFET detector designed especially for skin dose measurements. This detector has been characterized for various factors affecting its response for megavoltage photon beams and has been used for patient dose measurements during radiotherapy procedures. However, the characteristics of this detector in kilovoltage photon beams and low dose ranges have not been studied. The purpose of this study was to characterize the MOSkin detector to determine its suitability for in vivo entrance skin dose measurements during interventional radiology procedures. Methods: The calibration and reproducibility of the MOSkin detector and its dependency on different radiation beam qualities were carried out using RQR standard radiation qualities in free-in-air geometry. Studies of the other characterization parameters, such as the dose linearity and dependency on exposure angle, field size, frame rate, depth-dose, and source-to-surface distance (SSD), were carried out using a solid water phantom under a clinical x-ray unit. Results: The MOSkin detector showed good reproducibility (94%) and dose linearity (99%) for the dose range of 2 to 213 cGy. The sensitivity did not significantly change with the variation of SSD (±1%), field size (±1%), frame rate (±3%), or beam energy (±5%). The detector angular dependence was within ±5% over 360° and the dose recorded by the MOSkin detector in different depths of a solid water phantom was in good agreement with the Markus parallel plate ionization chamber to within ±3%. Conclusions: The MOSkin detector proved to be reliable when exposed to different field sizes, SSDs, depths in solid water, dose rates, frame rates, and radiation incident angles within a clinical x-ray beam. The MOSkin detector with water equivalent depth equal to 0.07 mm is a suitable detector for in vivo skin dosimetry during interventional radiology procedures.

  15. A new alternative method for testing skin irritation using a human skin model: a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Miles, A; Berthet, A; Hopf, N B; Gilliet, M; Raffoul, W; Vernez, D; Spring, P

    2014-03-01

    Studies assessing skin irritation to chemicals have traditionally used laboratory animals; however, such methods are questionable regarding their relevance for humans. New in vitro methods have been validated, such as the reconstructed human epidermis (RHE) model (Episkin®, Epiderm®). The comparison (accuracy) with in vivo results such as the 4-h human patch test (HPT) is 76% at best (Epiderm®). There is a need to develop an in vitro method that better simulates the anatomo-pathological changes encountered in vivo. To develop an in vitro method to determine skin irritation using human viable skin through histopathology, and compare the results of 4 tested substances to the main in vitro methods and in vivo animal method (Draize test). Human skin removed during surgery was dermatomed and mounted on an in vitro flow-through diffusion cell system. Ten chemicals with known non-irritant (heptylbutyrate, hexylsalicylate, butylmethacrylate, isoproturon, bentazon, DEHP and methylisothiazolinone (MI)) and irritant properties (folpet, 1-bromohexane and methylchloroisothiazolinone (MCI/MI)), a negative control (sodiumchloride) and a positive control (sodiumlaurylsulphate) were applied. The skin was exposed at least for 4h. Histopathology was performed to investigate irritation signs (spongiosis, necrosis, vacuolization). We obtained 100% accuracy with the HPT model; 75% with the RHE models and 50% with the Draize test for 4 tested substances. The coefficients of variation (CV) between our three test batches were <0.1, showing good reproducibility. Furthermore, we reported objectively histopathological irritation signs (irritation scale): strong (folpet), significant (1-bromohexane), slight (MCI/MI at 750/250ppm) and none (isoproturon, bentazon, DEHP and MI). This new in vitro test method presented effective results for the tested chemicals. It should be further validated using a greater number of substances; and tested in different laboratories in order to suitably

  16. Measuring skin aging using optical coherence tomography in vivo: a validation study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Trojahn, Carina; Dobos, Gabor; Richter, Claudia; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Kottner, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Dermal and epidermal structures in human skin change during intrinsic and extrinsic aging. Epidermal thickness is one of the most often reported parameters for the assessment of skin aging in cross-sectional images captured by optical coherence tomography (OCT). We aimed to identify further parameters for the noninvasive measurement of skin aging of sun-exposed and sun-protected areas utilizing OCT. Based on a literature review, seven parameters were inductively developed. Three independent raters assessed these parameters using four-point scales on images of female subjects of two age groups. All items could be detected and quantified in our sample. Interrater agreement ranged between 25.0% and 83.3%. The item scores "stratum corneum reflectivity," "upper dermal reflectivity," and "dermoepidermal contrast" showed significant differences between age groups on the volar and dorsal forearm indicating that they were best able to measure changes during skin aging. "Surface unevenness" was associated with the skin roughness parameters, Rz and Rmax, on the inner upper arm and volar forearm supporting the criterion validity of this parameter on sun-protected skin areas. Based on the interrater agreement and the ability to differentiate between age groups, these four parameters are being considered as the best candidates for measuring skin aging in OCT images.

  17. Measuring skin aging using optical coherence tomography in vivo: a validation study.

    PubMed

    Trojahn, Carina; Dobos, Gabor; Richter, Claudia; Blume-Peytavi, Ulrike; Kottner, Jan

    2015-04-01

    Dermal and epidermal structures in human skin change during intrinsic and extrinsic aging. Epidermal thickness is one of the most often reported parameters for the assessment of skin aging in cross-sectional images captured by optical coherence tomography (OCT). We aimed to identify further parameters for the noninvasive measurement of skin aging of sun-exposed and sun-protected areas utilizing OCT. Based on a literature review, seven parameters were inductively developed. Three independent raters assessed these parameters using four-point scales on images of female subjects of two age groups. All items could be detected and quantified in our sample. Interrater agreement ranged between 25.0% and 83.3%. The item scores “stratum corneum reflectivity,” “upper dermal reflectivity,” and “dermoepidermal contrast” showed significant differences between age groups on the volar and dorsal forearm indicating that they were best able to measure changes during skin aging. “Surface unevenness” was associated with the skin roughness parameters, Rz and Rmax, on the inner upper arm and volar forearm supporting the criterion validity of this parameter on sun-protected skin areas. Based on the interrater agreement and the ability to differentiate between age groups, these four parameters are being considered as the best candidates for measuring skin aging in OCT images.

  18. Generation of human/rat xenograft animal model for the study of human donor stem cell behaviors in vivo

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yan; Xiao, Dong; Pan, Xing-Hua; Zhang, Ruo-Shuang; Cui, Guang-Hui; Chen, Xi-Gu

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To accurately and realistically elucidate human stem cell behaviors in vivo and the fundamental mechanisms controlling human stem cell fates in vivo, which is urgently required in regenerative medicine and treatments for some human diseases, a surrogate human-rat chimera model was developed. METHODS: Human-rat chimeras were achieved by in utero transplanting low-density mononuclear cells from human umbilical cord blood into the fetal rats at 9-11 d of gestation, and subsequently, a variety of methods, including flow cytometry, PCR as well as immunohistochemical assay, were used to test the human donor contribution in the recipients. RESULTS: Of 29 live-born recipients, 19 had the presence of human CD45+ cells in peripheral blood (PB) detected by flow cytometry, while PCR analysis on genomic DNA from 11 different adult tissues showed that 14 selected from flow cytometry-positive 19 animals possessed of donor-derived human cell engraftment in multiple tissues (i.e. liver, spleen, thymus, heart, kidney, blood, lung, muscle, gut and skin) examined at the time of tissue collection, as confirmed by detecting human β2-microglobulin expression using immunohistochemistry. In this xenogeneic system, the engrafted donor-derived human cells persisted in multiple tissues for at least 6 mo after birth. Moreover, transplanted human donor cells underwent site-specific differentiation into CK18-positive human cells in chimeric liver and CD45-positive human cells in chimeric spleen and thymus of recipients. CONCLUSION: Taken together, these findings suggest that we successfully developed human-rat chimeras, in which xenogeneic human cells exist up to 6 mo later. This humanized small animal model, which offers an in vivo environment more closely resembling to the situations in human, provides an invaluable and effective approach for in vivo investigating human stem cell behaviors, and further in vivo examining fundamental mechanisms controlling human stem cell fates in the

  19. In vivo imaging of the human rod photoreceptor mosaic

    PubMed Central

    Doble, Nathan; Choi, Stacey S.; Codona, Johanan L.; Christou, Julian; Enoch, Jay M.; Williams, David R.

    2011-01-01

    Although single cone receptors have been imaged in the living human eye, there has been no observation of rods in vivo. Using an adaptive optics (AO) ophthalmoscope and post processing, evidence of rod mosaic was observed at 5° and 10° eccentricities in the horizontal, temporal retina. For 4 normal human subjects, small structures were observed in between the larger cones, and were observed repeatedly at the same locations on different days and with varying wavelengths. Image analysis gave spacings that agree well with rod measurements from histological data. PMID:21209677

  20. Data sources for in vivo molecular profiling of human phenotypes.

    PubMed

    Cardozo, Timothy; Gupta, Priyanka; Ni, Eric; Young, Lauren M; Tivon, Doreen; Felsovalyi, Klara

    2016-11-01

    Molecular profiling of human diseases has been approached at the genetic (DNA), expression (RNA), and proteomic (protein) levels. An important goal of these efforts is to map observed molecular patterns to specific, mechanistic organic entities, such as loci in the genome, individual RNA molecules or defined proteins or protein assemblies. Importantly, such maps have been historically approached in the more intuitive context of a theoretical individual cell, but diseases are better described in reality using an in vivo framework, namely a library of several tissue-specific maps. In this article, we review the existing data atlases that can be used for this purpose and identify critical gaps that could move the field forward from cellular to in vivo dimensions. WIREs Syst Biol Med 2016, 8:472-484. doi: 10.1002/wsbm.1354 For further resources related to this article, please visit the WIREs website.

  1. CCN1 contributes to skin connective tissue aging by inducing age-associated secretory phenotype in human skin dermal fibroblasts.

    PubMed

    Quan, Taihao; Qin, Zhaoping; Robichaud, Patrick; Voorhees, John J; Fisher, Gary J

    2011-08-01

    Dermal connective tissue collagen is the major structural protein in skin. Fibroblasts within the dermis are largely responsible for collagen production and turnover. We have previously reported that dermal fibroblasts, in aged human skin in vivo, express elevated levels of CCN1, and that CCN1 negatively regulates collagen homeostasis by suppressing collagen synthesis and increasing collagen degradation (Quan et al. Am J Pathol 169:482-90, 2006, J Invest Dermatol 130:1697-706, 2010). In further investigations of CCN1 actions, we find that CCN1 alters collagen homeostasis by promoting expression of specific secreted proteins, which include matrix metalloproteinases and proinflammatory cytokines. We also find that CCN1-induced secretory proteins are elevated in aged human skin in vivo. We propose that CCN1 induces an "Age-Associated Secretory Phenotype", in dermal fibroblasts, which mediates collagen reduction and fragmentation in aged human skin.

  2. Human platelet gel supernatant inactivates opportunistic wound pathogens on skin.

    PubMed

    Edelblute, Chelsea M; Donate, Amy L; Hargrave, Barbara Y; Heller, Loree C

    2015-01-01

    Activation of human platelets produces a gel-like substance referred to as platelet rich plasma or platelet gel. Platelet gel is used clinically to promote wound healing; it also exhibits antimicrobial properties that may aid in the healing of infected wounds. The purpose of this study was to quantify the efficacy of human platelet gel against the opportunistic bacterial wound pathogens Acinetobacter baumannii, Pseudomonas aeruginosa, and Staphylococcus aureus on skin. These opportunistic pathogens may exhibit extensive antibiotic resistance, necessitating the development of alternative treatment options. The antimicrobial efficacy of platelet gel supernatants was quantified using an in vitro broth dilution assay, an ex vivo inoculated skin assay, and in an in vivo skin decontamination assay. Human platelet gel supernatants were highly bactericidal against A. baumannii and moderately but significantly bactericidal against S. aureus in vitro and in the ex vivo skin model. P. aeruginosa was not inactivated in vitro; a low but significant inactivation level was observed ex vivo. These supernatants were quite effective at inactivating a model organism on skin in vivo. These results suggest application of platelet gel has potential clinical applicability, not only in the acceleration of wound healing, but also against relevant bacteria causing wound infections.

  3. An analytical model of skin: comparison with experimental results in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Woodward, Ruth M.

    2005-04-01

    Terahertz pulsed imaging is a non-invasive, non-ionizing imaging technique, using electromagnetic radiation defined in the frequency range 0.1 THz to 10 THz. Using reflection imaging systems with a frequency range 0.1 THz to 4 THz a far field diffraction limited lateral resolution of 3 mm to 110 microns is attainable. A three layer analytical model has been developed to simulate the hydration properties of skin in reflection. Earlier in vivo hydration measurements of the volar forearm and palm of the hand (thenar) are compared to this model. The time-domain analysis technique "time post pulse" (TPP) used to differentiate between diseased and normal tissue in a study of basal cell carcinoma was applied to the data. An increase in the value of TPP is observed with occlusion in the viable epidermis. This is attributed to an increase in the flux of water across the epidermis or dermis with increased stratum corneum hydration. This is verified by the literature. The change is observed in less than six minutes occlusion, making terahertz technology one of the most sensitive techniques for monitoring skin hydration levels. The contrast observed at the stratum corneum-viable epidermis interface is similar to that seen between diseased and normal tissue. Although water provides a good marker for studying diseased tissue, comparing results from DNA and protein analysis, it is not yet possible to conclude whether the contrast observed in basal cell carcinoma is due to increased water within the diseased tissue, a change in the vibrational modes of water with other functional groups, or a change in the vibrational modes of the functional groups alone. Further studies are required to determine whether terahertz technology is capable of differentiating between different histological subtypes in a collective system such as skin at a macroscopic level. The three layer analytical model provides a useful adjunct for identifying the source of contrast observed in the top surface of

  4. Review of the results of the in vivo dosimetry during total skin electron beam therapy

    PubMed Central

    Guidi, Gabriele; Gottardi, Giovanni; Ceroni, Paola; Costi, Tiziana

    2013-01-01

    This work reviews results of in vivo dosimetry (IVD) for total skin electron beam (TSEB) therapy, focusing on new methods, data emerged within 2012. All quoted data are based on a careful review of the literature reporting IVD results for patients treated by means of TSEB therapy. Many of the reviewed papers refer mainly to now old studies and/or old guidelines and recommendations (by IAEA, AAPM and EORTC), because (due to intrinsic rareness of TSEB-treated pathologies) only a limited number of works and reports with a large set of numerical data and proper statistical analysis is up-to-day available in scientific literature. Nonetheless, a general summary of the results obtained by the now numerous IVD techniques available is reported; innovative devices and methods, together with areas of possible further and possibly multicenter investigations for TSEB therapies are highlighted. PMID:24936333

  5. Handheld Diffuse Reflectance Spectral Imaging (DRSi) for in-vivo characterization of skin

    PubMed Central

    Bish, Sheldon F.; Sharma, Manu; Wang, Youmin; Triesault, Nicholas J.; Reichenberg, Jason S.; Zhang, John X.J.; Tunnell, James W.

    2014-01-01

    Diffuse reflectance spectroscopy provides a noninvasive means to measure optical and physiological properties of tissues. To expand on these measurements, we have developed a handheld diffuse reflectance spectral imaging (DRSi) system capable of acquiring wide field hyperspectral images of tissue. The image acquisition time was approximately 50 seconds for a 50x50 pixel image. A transport model was used to fit each spectra for reduced scattering coefficient, hemoglobin concentration and melanin concentration resulting in optical property maps. The system was validated across biologically relevant levels of reduced scattering (5.14% error) and absorption (8.34% error) using tissue simulating phantoms. DRSi optical property maps of a pigmented skin lesion were acquired in vivo. These trends in optical properties were consistent with previous observations using point probe devices. PMID:24575350

  6. Effects of seaweed Laminaria japonica extracts on skin moisturizing activity in vivo.

    PubMed

    Choi, Jae-Suk; Moon, Woi Sook; Choi, Ji Na; Do, Kee Hun; Moon, Sun Hwa; Cho, Kwang Keun; Han, Chae-Jeong; Choi, In Soon

    2013-01-01

    Twelve species of edible seaweed from the coast of Korea were screened for skin moisturizing activity. We placed the lead of a Corneometer on an approximately 6-cm2 test area of the forearm and measured both untreated skin (control) and skin treated with test moisturizing creams either containing or not containing 5% water:propylene glycol (50:50) extracts of seaweeds. Over the 8-h observation period, the strongest activity of the Laminaria japonica extracts occurred at the 2-h period. For the 10% extract, hydration with the L. japonica extract increased by 14.44% compared with a placebo. Transepidermal water loss (TEWL) was also measured using a test cream with 10% L. japonica extract. For up to 8 h after applying the creams, TEWL was decreased to 4.01 g/cm2, which was approximately 20% of that seen with the control. We suggest that the L. japonica extract hydrates skin via the humectants and hydrocolloids that it contains. To confirm the safety of L. japonica extracts, we performed a patch test on human skin. The results suggested that at moderate doses humans can safely use the extracts. For commercial applications, we evaluated the physicochemical characteristics of the test cream products, including Hunter L, a, and b values; pH; refractive index; and coefficient of viscosity. L. japonica extract did not affect overall formulations of the test cream product in any of the tested aspects. These results suggest that L. japonica extract is a promising ingredient in moisturizing formulations.

  7. Triparanol suppresses human tumor growth in vitro and in vivo

    SciTech Connect

    Bi, Xinyu; Han, Xingpeng; Zhang, Fang; He, Miao; Zhang, Yi; Zhi, Xiu-Yi; Zhao, Hong

    2012-08-31

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstrate Triparanol can block proliferation in multiple cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstrate Triparanol can induce apoptosis in multiple cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Proved Triparanol can inhibit Hedgehog signaling in multiple cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Demonstrated Triparanol can impede tumor growth in vivo in mouse xenograft model. -- Abstract: Despite the improved contemporary multidisciplinary regimens treating cancer, majority of cancer patients still suffer from adverse effects and relapse, therefore posing a significant challenge to uncover more efficacious molecular therapeutics targeting signaling pathways central to tumorigenesis. Here, our study have demonstrated that Triparanol, a cholesterol synthesis inhibitor, can block proliferation and induce apoptosis in multiple human cancer cells including lung, breast, liver, pancreatic, prostate cancer and melanoma cells, and growth inhibition can be rescued by exogenous addition of cholesterol. Remarkably, we have proved Triparanol can significantly repress Hedgehog pathway signaling in these human cancer cells. Furthermore, study in a mouse xenograft model of human lung cancer has validated that Triparanol can impede tumor growth in vivo. We have therefore uncovered Triparanol as potential new cancer therapeutic in treating multiple types of human cancers with deregulated Hedgehog signaling.

  8. In vivo behavior of murine epidermal cell lines derived from initiated and noninitiated skin.

    PubMed

    Conti, C J; Fries, J W; Viaje, A; Miller, D R; Morris, R; Slaga, T J

    1988-01-15

    The in vivo behavior of cell cultures derived from normal and carcinogen-treated mouse epidermis was studied by implanting the cultures in a s.c. vascularized bed protected by a silicone chamber. Cells derived from normal adult mouse epidermis as well as cells derived from tumor-promoter-treated skin were unable to grow in these systems. Conversely, cell lines derived from skin initiated with single doses of N-methyl-N'-nitro-N-nitrosoguanidine or 9,10-dimethyl-1,2-benzanthracene proliferated in these chambers, reforming an epithelial structure. The type of structure in the chambers varied, ranging from formation of almost normal epithelia to atypical invasive behavior. The variable in vivo behavior among the different cell lines may be attributed to the initiation agent, the number of passages of the cultures, random genetic events, the strain of mouse, or a combination of these factors. Most of the cell types used in this study and all the cell lines that were able to grow in these chambers were selected for resistance to Ca-induced terminal differentiation. However, resistance to terminal differentiation according to the Ca2+ switch does not always correlate with the ability to grow in the chambers, since cell lines derived from spontaneous foci of resistance failed to grow in this system. These studies showed some of the possibilities of the SC silicone chambers to study the histogenic potential of cell lines derived from carcinogen-treated epidermis. This system also appears suitable to study the complex relationship between epidermal cells and specialized (dermal) stroma.

  9. Characterization and antioxidant activity in vitro and in vivo of polysaccharide purified from Rana chensinensis skin.

    PubMed

    Wang, Zhanyong; Zhao, Yuanyuan; Su, Tingting; Zhang, Jing; Wang, Fei

    2015-08-01

    Preliminary characterization and antioxidant activity in vitro and in vivo investigation of the polysaccharide fraction named as RCSP II, which was extracted from Rana chensinensis skin, were performed. Results indicated that RCSP II comprised glucose, galactose, and mannose in a molar ratio of 87.82:2.77:1.54 with a molecular weight of 12.8 kDa. Antioxidant activity assay in vitro showed that RCSP II exhibited 75.2% scavenging activity against 2,2'-azino-bis(3-ethylbenz-thiazoline-6-sulfonic acid) radicals at the concentration of 2500 mg/L and 85.1% against chelated ferrous ion at 4000 mg/L. Antioxidant activity assay in vivo further showed that RCSP II increased the activities of antioxidant enzymes, decreased the levels of malondialodehyde, and enhanced total antioxidant capabilities in livers and sera of d-galactose induced mice. These results suggested that RCSP II could have potential antioxidant applications as medicine or functional food.

  10. In vitro/in vivo characterization of nanoemulsion formulation of metronidazole with improved skin targeting and anti-rosacea properties.

    PubMed

    Yu, Meng; Ma, Huixian; Lei, Mingzhu; Li, Nan; Tan, Fengping

    2014-09-01

    Topical skin treatment was limited due to the lack of suitable delivery system with significant cutaneous localization and systemic safety. The aim of this study was to develop and optimize a nanoemulsion (NE) to enhance targeting localization of metronidazole (MTZ) in skin layers. In vitro studies were used to optimize NE formulations, and a series of experiments were carried in vitro and in vivo to validate the therapeutic efficacy of MTZ-loaded optimal NE. NE type selection and D-optimal design study were applied to optimize NE formulation with maximum skin retention and minimum skin penetration. Three formulation variables: Oil X1 (Labrafil), Smix X2 (a mixture of Cremophor EL/Tetraethylene glycol, 2:1 w/w) and water X3 were included in D-design. The system was assessed for skin retention Y1, cumulative MTZ amount after 24 h Y2 and droplet size Y3. Following optimization, the values of formulation components (X1, X2 and X3) were 4.13%, 16.42% and 79.45%, respectively. The optimized NE was assessed for viscosity, droplet size, morphological study and in vitro permeation in pig skin. Distributions of MTZ were validated by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Active agent of NE transferred into deeper skin and localized in epidermal/dermal layers after 24 h, which showed significant advantages of the optimal NE over Gel. The skin targeting localization and minimal systemic escape of optimal NE was further proved by in vivo study on rat skin. Current in vitro-in vivo correlation (IVIVC) enabled the prediction of pharmacokinetic profile of MTZ from in vitro permeation results. Further, the in vivo anti-rosacea efficacy of optimal formulation was investigated by pharmacodynamics study on mice ear. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  11. TRANSIENT GENOME-WIDE TRANSCRIPTIONAL RESPONSE TO LOW-DOSE IONIZING RADIATION IN VIVO IN HUMANS

    PubMed Central

    Berglund, Susanne R.; Rocke, David M.; Dai, Jian; Schwietert, Chad W.; Santana, Alison; Stern, Robin L.; Lehmann, Joerg; Hartmann Siantar, Christine L.; Goldberg, Zelanna

    2009-01-01

    Purpose The in vivo effects of low-dose low linear energy transfer ionizing radiation on healthy human skin are largely unknown. Using a patient-based tissue acquisition protocol, we have performed a series of genomic analyses on the temporal dynamics over a 24-hour period to determine the radiation response after a single exposure of 10 cGy. Methods and Materials RNA from each patient tissue sample was hybridized to an Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 array. Data analysis was performed on selected gene groups and pathways. Results Nineteen gene groups and seven gene pathways that had been shown to be radiation responsive were analyzed. Of these, nine gene groups showed significant transient transcriptional changes in the human tissue samples, which returned to baseline by 24 hours postexposure. Conclusions Low doses of ionizing radiation on full-thickness human skin produce a definable temporal response out to 24 hours postexposure. Genes involved in DNA and tissue remodeling, cell cycle transition, and inflammation show statistically significant changes in expression, despite variability between patients. These data serve as a reference for the temporal dynamics of ionizing radiation response following low-dose exposure in healthy full-thickness human skin. PMID:17996396

  12. Transient Genome-Wide Transcriptional Response to Low-Dose Ionizing Radiation In Vivo in Humans

    SciTech Connect

    Berglund, Susanne R.; Rocke, David M.; Dai Jian; Schwietert, Chad W.; Santana, Alison; Stern, Robin L.; Lehmann, Joerg; Hartmann Siantar, Christine L.; Goldberg, Zelanna

    2008-01-01

    Purpose: The in vivo effects of low-dose low linear energy transfer ionizing radiation on healthy human skin are largely unknown. Using a patient-based tissue acquisition protocol, we have performed a series of genomic analyses on the temporal dynamics over a 24-hour period to determine the radiation response after a single exposure of 10 cGy. Methods and Materials: RNA from each patient tissue sample was hybridized to an Affymetrix Human Genome U133 Plus 2.0 array. Data analysis was performed on selected gene groups and pathways. Results: Nineteen gene groups and seven gene pathways that had been shown to be radiation responsive were analyzed. Of these, nine gene groups showed significant transient transcriptional changes in the human tissue samples, which returned to baseline by 24 hours postexposure. Conclusions: Low doses of ionizing radiation on full-thickness human skin produce a definable temporal response out to 24 hours postexposure. Genes involved in DNA and tissue remodeling, cell cycle transition, and inflammation show statistically significant changes in expression, despite variability between patients. These data serve as a reference for the temporal dynamics of ionizing radiation response following low-dose exposure in healthy full-thickness human skin.

  13. The Microbiota of the Human Skin.

    PubMed

    Egert, Markus; Simmering, Rainer

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this chapter is to sum up important progress in the field of human skin microbiota research that was achieved over the last years.The human skin is one of the largest and most versatile organs of the human body. Owing to its function as a protective interface between the largely sterile interior of the human body and the highly microbially contaminated outer environment, it is densely colonized with a diverse and active microbiota. This skin microbiota is of high importance for human health and well-being. It is implicated in several severe skin diseases and plays a major role in wound infections. Many less severe, but negatively perceived cosmetic skin phenomena are linked with skin microbes, too. In addition, skin microorganisms, in particular on the human hands, are crucial for the field of hygiene research. Notably, apart from being only a potential source of disease and contamination, the skin microbiota also contributes to the protective functions of the human skin in many ways. Finally, the analysis of structure and function of the human skin microbiota is interesting from a basic, evolutionary perspective on human microbe interactions.Key questions in the field of skin microbiota research deal with (a) a deeper understanding of the structure (species inventory) and function (physiology) of the healthy human skin microbiota in space and time, (b) the distinction of resident and transient skin microbiota members, (c) the distinction of beneficial skin microorganisms from microorganisms or communities with an adverse or sickening effect on their hosts, (d) factors shaping the skin microbiota and its functional role in health and disease, (e) strategies to manipulate the skin microbiota for therapeutic reasons.

  14. Influence of IR radiation on the carotenoid content in human skin

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Darvin, M. E.; Zastrov, L.; Gonchukov, S. A.; Lademann, J.

    2009-12-01

    It is shown that the infrared irradiation decreases the content of β-carotene and lycopene carotenoids in human skin. A decrease in the content of β-carotene and lycopene may indicate that the IR radiation, as well as the UV radiation, is capable of forming free radicals in human skin. The investigations were performed in vivo using the technique of resonance Raman scattering developed by us for the noninvasive determination of antioxidant potential in skin.

  15. Persistent DNA Damage after High Dose In Vivo Gamma Exposure of Minipig Skin

    PubMed Central

    Ahmed, Emad A.; Agay, Diane; Schrock, Gerrit; Drouet, Michel; Meineke, Viktor; Scherthan, Harry

    2012-01-01

    Background Exposure to high doses of ionizing radiation (IR) can lead to localized radiation injury of the skin and exposed cells suffer dsDNA breaks that may elicit cell death or stochastic changes. Little is known about the DNA damage response after high-dose exposure of the skin. Here, we investigate the cellular and DNA damage response in acutely irradiated minipig skin. Methods and Findings IR-induced DNA damage, repair and cellular survival were studied in 15 cm2 of minipig skin exposed in vivo to ∼50 Co-60 γ rays. Skin biopsies of control and 4 h up to 96 days post exposure were investigated for radiation-induced foci (RIF) formation using γ-H2AX, 53BP1, and active ATM-p immunofluorescence. High-dose IR induced massive γ-H2AX phosphorylation and high 53BP1 RIF numbers 4 h, 20 h after IR. As time progressed RIF numbers dropped to a low of <1% of keratinocytes at 28–70 days. The latter contained large RIFs that included ATM-p, indicating the accumulation of complex DNA damage. At 96 days most of the cells with RIFs had disappeared. The frequency of active-caspase-3-positive apoptotic cells was 17-fold increased 3 days after IR and remained >3-fold elevated at all subsequent time points. Replicating basal cells (Ki67+) were reduced 3 days post IR followed by increased proliferation and recovery of epidermal cellularity after 28 days. Conclusions Acute high dose irradiation of minipig epidermis impaired stem cell replication and induced elevated apoptosis from 3 days onward. DNA repair cleared the high numbers of DBSs in skin cells, while RIFs that persisted in <1% cells marked complex and potentially lethal DNA damage up to several weeks after exposure. An elevated frequency of keratinocytes with persistent RIFs may thus serve as indicator of previous acute radiation exposure, which may be useful in the follow up of nuclear or radiological accident scenarios. PMID:22761813

  16. Development of an innervated model of human skin.

    PubMed

    Khammo, Nancy; Ogilvie, Jane; Clothier, Richard H

    2007-10-01

    Neuronal cell responses and interactions with the epithelial and fibroblastic cells of the skin are a key factor in the production in vivo of the irritation/inflammatory response. Currently, few in vitro models are available that contain dermal, epidermal and the relevant neuronal components. The primary objective of this study was to produce and maintain a 3-D in vitro model of human skin containing these elements. The relevant neuronal component was supplied by adding sensory neurons derived from the dorsal root ganglion (DRG). Since adult neuronal cells do not grow significantly in vivo or in vitro, and since it is very difficult to obtain such cells from humans, it was necessary to employ embryonic rat DRG cells. The ultimate purpose of this model is to improve prediction of the in vivo skin irritancy potential of chemicals and formulations, without the need to use animal models. In addition, this approach has also been applied to the in vitro human eye and bronchial 3-D models being developed in the FRAME Alternatives Laboratory.

  17. Antiphotoaging Effect of Conditioned Medium of Dedifferentiated Adipocytes on Skin In Vivo and In Vitro: A Mechanistic Study

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Yang; Zhang, Jia-an; Xu, Yan; Guo, Shi-lei; Wang, Shen; Wu, Di; Wang, Ying

    2015-01-01

    Photoaging of skin occurs partially due to decreased synthesis and increased degradation of dermal collagen. Antiphotoaging therapy aims to counteract these effects. This study aimed to investigate whether secretory factors from dedifferentiated adipocytes (DAs) could alleviate photoaging in human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) and in mice and to clarify the underlying mechanism. DAs were acquired and verified based on cellular biomarkers and multilineage differentiation potential. The concentrations of several cytokines in conditioned medium from DAs (DA-CM) were determined. In vivo pathological changes, collagen types I and III, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and -3 were evaluated following the injection of 10-fold concentrated DA-CM into photoaged mice. In vitro, the effect of DA-CM on stress-induced premature senescence in HDFs was investigated by 5-ethynyl-2′-deoxyuridine (EdU) staining and β-galactosidase staining. The influence of DA-CM and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) on the secretion of collagen types I and III, MMP-1, and MMP-3 in HDFs was evaluated by ELISA. In vivo, we found that subcutaneously injected 10-fold concentrated DA-CM increased the expression of collagen types I and III. In vitro, DA-CM clearly mitigated the decreased cell proliferation and delayed the senescence status in HDFs induced by ultraviolet B (UVB). HDFs treated with DA-CM exhibited higher collagen types I and III secretion and significantly lower MMP-1 and MMP-3 secretion. The TGF-β1-neutralizing antibody could partially reduce the recovery effect. Our results suggest that DAs may be useful for aging skin and their effects are mainly due to secreted factors, especially TGF-β1, which stimulate collagen synthesis and alleviate collagen degradation in HDFs. PMID:25517994

  18. Antiphotoaging effect of conditioned medium of dedifferentiated adipocytes on skin in vivo and in vitro: a mechanistic study.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yang; Zhang, Jia-an; Xu, Yan; Guo, Shi-lei; Wang, Shen; Wu, Di; Wang, Ying; Luo, Dan; Zhou, Bing-rong

    2015-05-01

    Photoaging of skin occurs partially due to decreased synthesis and increased degradation of dermal collagen. Antiphotoaging therapy aims to counteract these effects. This study aimed to investigate whether secretory factors from dedifferentiated adipocytes (DAs) could alleviate photoaging in human dermal fibroblasts (HDFs) and in mice and to clarify the underlying mechanism. DAs were acquired and verified based on cellular biomarkers and multilineage differentiation potential. The concentrations of several cytokines in conditioned medium from DAs (DA-CM) were determined. In vivo pathological changes, collagen types I and III, and matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-1 and -3 were evaluated following the injection of 10-fold concentrated DA-CM into photoaged mice. In vitro, the effect of DA-CM on stress-induced premature senescence in HDFs was investigated by 5-ethynyl-2'-deoxyuridine (EdU) staining and β-galactosidase staining. The influence of DA-CM and transforming growth factor-β1 (TGF-β1) on the secretion of collagen types I and III, MMP-1, and MMP-3 in HDFs was evaluated by ELISA. In vivo, we found that subcutaneously injected 10-fold concentrated DA-CM increased the expression of collagen types I and III. In vitro, DA-CM clearly mitigated the decreased cell proliferation and delayed the senescence status in HDFs induced by ultraviolet B (UVB). HDFs treated with DA-CM exhibited higher collagen types I and III secretion and significantly lower MMP-1 and MMP-3 secretion. The TGF-β1-neutralizing antibody could partially reduce the recovery effect. Our results suggest that DAs may be useful for aging skin and their effects are mainly due to secreted factors, especially TGF-β1, which stimulate collagen synthesis and alleviate collagen degradation in HDFs.

  19. Determination of in vivo protein synthesis in human palatine tonsil.

    PubMed

    Januszkiewicz, Anna; Klaude, Maria; Loré, Karin; Andersson, Jan; Ringdén, Olle; Rooyackers, Olav; Wernerman, Jan

    2005-02-01

    The palatine tonsils are constantly exposed to ingested or inhaled antigens which, in turn, lead to a permanent activation of tonsillar immune cells, even in a basic physiological state. The aim of the present study was to investigate if the immunological activation of the human palatine tonsil is reflected by a high metabolic activity, as determined by in vivo measurement of protein synthesis. The protein synthesis rate of the tonsil was also compared with that of the circulating T-lymphocytes, the total blood mononuclear cells and the whole population of blood leucocytes. Phenotypic characterization of immune-competent cells in tonsil tissue and blood was performed by flow cytometry. Pinch tonsil biopsies were taken after induction of anaesthesia in healthy adult patients (n=12) scheduled for ear surgery, uvulopalatopharyngoplasty or nose surgery. Protein synthesis was quantitatively determined during a 90-min period by a flooding-dose technique. The in vivo protein synthesis rate in the palatine tonsils was 22.8+/-5.7%/24 h (mean+/-S.D.), whereas protein synthesis in the circulating T-lymphocytes was 10.7+/-3.4%/24 h, in mononuclear cells was 10.8+/-2.8%/24 h and in leucocytes was 3.2+/-1.2%/24 h. CD3+ lymphocytes were the most abundant cell population in the tonsil. The in vivo protein synthesis rate in human tonsils was higher compared with the circulating immune cells. This high metabolic rate may reflect the permanent immunological activity present in human tonsils, although cell phenotypes and activity markers do not explain the differences.

  20. In vivo imaging of human burn injuries with polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kim, Ki Hean; Pierce, Mark C.; Maguluri, Gopi; Park, B. Hyle; Yoon, Sang June; Lydon, Martha; Sheridan, Robert; de Boer, Johannes F.

    2012-06-01

    The accurate determination of burn depth is critical in the clinical management of burn wounds. Polarization-sensitive optical coherence tomography (PS-OCT) has been proposed as a potentially non-invasive method for determining burn depth by measuring thermally induced changes in the structure and birefringence of skin, and has been investigated in pre-clinical burn studies with animal models and ex vivo human skin. In this study, we applied PS-OCT to the in-vivo imaging of two pediatric burn patients. Deep and superficial burned skins along with contralateral controls were imaged in 3D. The imaging size was 8 mm×6 mm×2 mm in width, length, and depth in the air respectively, and the imaging time was approximately 6 s per volume. Superficially burned skins exhibited the same layered structure as the contralateral controls, but more visible vasculature and reduced birefringence compared to the contralateral controls. In contrast, a deeply burned skin showed loss of the layered structure, almost absent vasculature, and smaller birefringence compared to superficial burns. This study suggested the vasculature and birefringence as parameters for characterizing burn wounds.

  1. In vivo photoacoustic microscopy of human cutaneous microvasculature and a nevus

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Favazza, Christopher P.; Jassim, Omar; Cornelius, Lynn A.; Wang, Lihong V.

    2011-01-01

    In several human volunteers, photoacoustic microscopy (PAM) has been utilized for noninvasive cutaneous imaging of the skin microvasculature and a melanocytic nevus. Microvascular networks in both acral and nonacral skin were imaged, and multiple features within the skin have been identified, including the stratum corneum, epidermal-dermal junction, and subpapillary vascular plexus. Several vascular and structural differences between acral and nonacral skin were also observed in the photoacoustic images. In addition, a nevus was photoacoustically imaged, excised, and histologically analyzed. The photoacoustic images allowed for in vivo measurement of tumor thickness, depth, and microvasculature-values confirmed by histologic examination. The presented images demonstrate the potential of PAM to aid in the study and evaluation of cutaneous microcirculation and analysis of pigmented lesions. Through its ability to three-dimensionally image the structure and function of the microvasculature and pigmented lesions, PAM can have a clinical impact in diagnosis and assessment of systemic diseases that affect the microvasculature such as diabetes and cardiovascular disease, cutaneous malignancies such as melanoma, and potentially other skin disorders.

  2. Detectability of contrast agents for video-rate confocal reflectance microscopy of skin and microcirculation in vivo

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rajadhyaksha, Milind M.; Gonzalez, Salvador

    2003-06-01

    The lack of structure-specific contrast limits the usefulness of confocal reflectance microscopy to morphologic investigations at the cellular- and nuclear-level in human and animal skin in vivo. Morphologic and functional imaging at specific organelle- and ultrastructure-levels will require contrast agents that may be used and detected in vivo. High-resolution confocal reflectance imaging is based on the detection of singly back-scattered photons, where contrast is provided by variations in the refractive indices of microstructures. We carried out a quantitative Mie back-scatter analysis and imaging experiments to understand signal detectability of reflectance contrast agents for visualizing human skin and animal microcirculation. When imaging at video-rate with illumination of 10 milliwatts at 1064 nm, we detect 100-104 photons/pixel from the epidermis to dermis, relative to a background of 100 photons; this provides a signal-to-noise ratio of 3-40 and signal-to-background of 1-100. Organelles of size (d) 0.1-1.0 μm with refractive indices (n) of 1.34-1.45 (relative to n=1.34 for epidermis, n=1.38 for dermis) back-scatter 10-104 photons/pixel. Exogenous contrast agents such as liposomes (n=1.41, d=0.7 μm) and polystyrene microspheres (d=0.2-1.0 μm, n=1.57; 100-105 photons/pixel) are detectable and they strongly enhance the contrast of microcirculation in the dermis of Sprague-Dawley rats. Topically applied 5% acetic acid causes the intra-nuclear 30-100 nm-thin chromatin filaments to condense into 1-5 μm-thick strands, increasing back-scattered signal from 100 to 104 photons/pixels, making the nuclei appear bright and easily detectable in basal cell cancers. Such analyses provide a basis for optimizing confocal microscope design for detectability of contrast agents in vivo.

  3. Tattooing of skin results in transportation and light-induced decomposition of tattoo pigments--a first quantification in vivo using a mouse model.

    PubMed

    Engel, Eva; Vasold, Rudolf; Santarelli, Francesco; Maisch, Tim; Gopee, Neera V; Howard, Paul C; Landthaler, Michael; Bäumler, Wolfgang

    2010-01-01

    Millions of people are tattooed with inks that contain azo pigments. The pigments contained in tattoo inks are manufactured for other uses with no established history of safe use in humans and are injected into the skin at high densities (2.5 mg/cm(2)). Tattoo pigments disseminate after tattooing throughout the human body and although some may photodecompose at the injection site by solar or laser light exposure, the extent of transport or photodecomposition under in vivo conditions remains currently unknown. We investigated the transport and photodecomposition of the widely used tattoo Pigment Red 22 (PR 22) following tattooing into SKH-1 mice. The pigment was extracted quantitatively at different times after tattooing. One day after tattooing, the pigment concentration was 186 microg/cm(2) skin. After 42 days, the amount of PR 22 in the skin has decreased by about 32% of the initial value. Exposure of the tattooed skin, 42 days after tattooing, to laser light reduced the amount of PR 22 by about 51% as compared to skin not exposed to laser light. A part of this reduction is as a result of photodecomposition of PR 22 as shown by the detection of corresponding hazardous aromatic amines. Irradiation with solar radiation simulator for 32 days caused a pigment reduction of about 60% and we again assume pigment decomposition in the skin. This study is the first quantitative estimate of the amount of tattoo pigments transported from the skin into the body or decomposed by solar or laser radiation.

  4. In vivo terahertz reflection imaging of human scars during and after the healing process.

    PubMed

    Fan, Shuting; Ung, Benjamin S Y; Parrott, Edward P J; Wallace, Vincent P; Pickwell-MacPherson, Emma

    2017-09-01

    We use terahertz imaging to measure four human skin scars in vivo. Clear contrast between the refractive index of the scar and surrounding tissue was observed for all of the scars, despite some being difficult to see with the naked eye. Additionally, we monitored the healing process of a hypertrophic scar. We found that the contrast in the absorption coefficient became less prominent after a few months post-injury, but that the contrast in the refractive index was still significant even months post-injury. Our results demonstrate the capability of terahertz imaging to quantitatively measure subtle changes in skin properties and this may be useful for improving scar treatment and management. © 2017 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. In vivo assessment of human burn scars through automated quantification of vascularity using optical coherence tomography

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Liew, Yih Miin; McLaughlin, Robert A.; Gong, Peijun; Wood, Fiona M.; Sampson, David D.

    2013-06-01

    In scars arising from burns, objective assessment of vascularity is important in the early identification of pathological scarring, and in the assessment of progression and treatment response. We demonstrate the first clinical assessment and automated quantification of vascularity in cutaneous burn scars of human patients in vivo that uses optical coherence tomography (OCT). Scar microvasculature was delineated in three-dimensional OCT images using speckle decorrelation. The diameter and area density of blood vessels were automatically quantified. A substantial increase was observed in the measured density of vasculature in hypertrophic scar tissues (38%) when compared against normal, unscarred skin (22%). A proliferation of larger vessels (diameter≥100 μm) was revealed in hypertrophic scarring, which was absent from normal scars and normal skin over the investigated physical depth range of 600 μm. This study establishes the feasibility of this methodology as a means of clinical monitoring of scar progression.

  6. Human papillomaviruses and skin cancer.

    PubMed

    Smola, Sigrun

    2014-01-01

    Human papillomaviruses (HPVs) infect squamous epithelia and can induce hyperproliferative lesions. More than 120 different HPV types have been characterized and classified into five different genera. While mucosal high-risk HPVs have a well-established causal role in anogenital carcinogenesis, the biology of cutaneous HPVs is less well understood. The clinical relevance of genus beta-PV infection has clearly been demonstrated in patients suffering from epidermodysplasia verruciformis (EV), a rare inherited disease associated with ahigh rate of skin cancer. In the normal population genus beta-PV are suspected to have an etiologic role in skin carcinogenesis as well but this is still controversially discussed. Their oncogenic potency has been investigated in mouse models and in vitro. In 2009, the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC) classified the genus beta HPV types 5 and 8 as "possible carcinogenic" biological agents (group 2B) in EV disease. This chapter will give an overview on the knowns and unknowns of infections with genus beta-PV and discuss their potential impact on skin carcinogenesis in the general population.

  7. Real-time Raman spectroscopy for automatic in vivo skin cancer detection: an independent validation.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Jianhua; Lui, Harvey; Kalia, Sunil; Zeng, Haishan

    2015-11-01

    In a recent study, we have demonstrated that real-time Raman spectroscopy could be used for skin cancer diagnosis. As a translational study, the objective of this study is to validate previous findings through a completely independent clinical test. In total, 645 confirmed cases were included in the analysis, including a cohort of 518 cases from a previous study, and an independent cohort of 127 new cases. Multi-variant statistical data analyses including principal component with general discriminant analysis (PC-GDA) and partial least squares (PLS) were used separately for lesion classification, which generated similar results. When the previous cohort (n = 518) was used as training and the new cohort (n = 127) was used as testing, the area under the receiver operating characteristic curve (ROC AUC) was found to be 0.889 (95 % CI 0.834-0.944; PLS); when the two cohorts were combined, the ROC AUC was 0.894 (95 % CI 0.870-0.918; PLS) with the narrowest confidence intervals. Both analyses were comparable to the previous findings, where the ROC AUC was 0.896 (95 % CI 0.846-0.946; PLS). The independent study validates that real-t