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Sample records for human sperm nucleus

  1. Automatic detection and segmentation of sperm head, acrosome and nucleus in microscopic images of human semen smears.

    PubMed

    Shaker, Fariba; Monadjemi, S Amirhassan; Naghsh-Nilchi, Ahmad Reza

    2016-08-01

    Manual assessment of sperm morphology is subjective and error prone so developing automatic methods is vital for a more accurate assessment. The first step in automatic evaluation of sperm morphology is sperm head detection and segmentation. In this paper a complete framework for automatic sperm head detection and segmentation is presented. After an initial thresholding step, the histogram of the Hue channel of HSV color space is used, in addition to size criterion, to discriminate sperm heads in microscopic images. To achieve an improved segmentation of sperm heads, an edge-based active contour method is used. Also a novel tail point detection method is proposed to refine the segmentation by locating and removing the midpiece from the segmented head. An algorithm is also proposed to separate the acrosome and nucleus using morphological operations. Dice coefficient is used to evaluate the segmentation performance. The proposed methods are evaluated using a publicly available dataset. The proposed method has achieved segmentation accuracy of 0.92 for sperm heads, 0.84 for acrosomes and 0.87 for nuclei, with the standard deviation of 0.05, which significantly outperforms the current state-of-the-art. Also our tail detection method achieved true detection rate of 96%. In this paper we presented a complete framework for sperm detection and segmentation which is totally automatic. It is shown that using active contours can improve the segmentation results of sperm heads. Our proposed algorithms for tail detection and midpiece removal further improved the segmentation results. The results indicate that our method achieved higher Dice coefficients with less dispersion compared to the existing solutions. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ireland Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. [The effect of overtraining on human sperm chromatin structure].

    PubMed

    Ding, Xiao-ping; Yan, Su-wen; Zhang, Ning; Zhang, Li; Tang, Jie; Lu, Hai-ou

    2003-08-01

    To identify the effects of overtraining on human sperm DNA. Molecular epidemiological investigation of 249 men from different groups (training and non-training) was carried out by using flow cytometer to detect the integrity and damage of in situ DNA of sperm nucleus, and sperm chromatin structure assay was performed. The average COMPalpha(t) in training group was 11.02% while that in control group was 5.90% (P < 0.01). COMPalpha(t) was significantly correlated with sperm activity (r = 0.41, P < 0.05). Overtraining could induce sperm DNA injury and affect sperm activity, thus to decrease the potentiality of reproduction.

  3. The sperm nucleus: chromatin, RNA and the nuclear matrix

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Graham D.; Lalancette, Claudia; Linnemann, Amelia K.; Leduc, Frédéric; Boissonneault, Guylain; Krawetz, Stephen A.

    2017-01-01

    Within the sperm nucleus the paternal genome remains functionally inert and protected following protamination. This is marked by a structural morphogenesis that is heralded by a striking reduction in nuclear volume. Despite these changes, both human and mouse spermatozoa maintain low levels of nucleosomes that appear non-randomly distributed throughout the genome. These regions may be necessary for organizing higher order genomic structure through interactions with the nuclear matrix. The promoters of this transcriptionally quiescent genome are differentially marked by modified histones that may poise downstream epigenetic effects. This notion is supported by increasing evidence that the embryo inherits these differing levels of chromatin organization. In concert with the suite of RNAs retained in the mature sperm they may synergistically interact to direct early embryonic gene expression. Irrespective, these features reflect the transcriptional history of spermatogenic differentiation. As such they may soon be utilized as clinical markers of male fertility. In this review we explore and discuss how this may be orchestrated. PMID:20876223

  4. Ultrastructural Morphology of Sperm from Human Globozoospermia.

    PubMed

    Ricci, Giuseppe; Andolfi, Laura; Zabucchi, Giuliano; Luppi, Stefania; Boscolo, Rita; Martinelli, Monica; Zweyer, Marina; Trevisan, Elisa

    2015-01-01

    Globozoospermia is a rare disorder characterized by the presence of sperm with round head, lacking acrosome. Coiling tail around the nucleus has been reported since early human studies, but no specific significance has conferred it. By contrast, studies on animal models suggest that coiling tail around the nucleus could represent a crucial step of defective spermatogenesis, resulting in round-headed sperm. No observations, so far, support the transfer of this hypothesis to human globozoospermia. The purpose of this work was to compare ultrastructural morphology of human and mouse model globozoospermic sperm. Sperm have been investigated by using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The images that we obtained show significant similarities to those described in GOPC knockout mice, an animal model of globozoospermia. By using this model as reference, we were able to identify the probable steps of the tail coiling process in human globozoospermia. Although we have no evidence that there is the same pathophysiology in man and knocked-out mouse, the similarities between these ultrastructural observations in human and those in the experimental model are very suggestive. This is the first demonstration of the existence of relevant morphological homologies between the tail coiling in animal model and human globozoospermia.

  5. Ultrastructural Morphology of Sperm from Human Globozoospermia

    PubMed Central

    Ricci, Giuseppe; Andolfi, Laura; Zabucchi, Giuliano; Luppi, Stefania; Boscolo, Rita; Martinelli, Monica; Zweyer, Marina; Trevisan, Elisa

    2015-01-01

    Globozoospermia is a rare disorder characterized by the presence of sperm with round head, lacking acrosome. Coiling tail around the nucleus has been reported since early human studies, but no specific significance has conferred it. By contrast, studies on animal models suggest that coiling tail around the nucleus could represent a crucial step of defective spermatogenesis, resulting in round-headed sperm. No observations, so far, support the transfer of this hypothesis to human globozoospermia. The purpose of this work was to compare ultrastructural morphology of human and mouse model globozoospermic sperm. Sperm have been investigated by using scanning and transmission electron microscopy. The images that we obtained show significant similarities to those described in GOPC knockout mice, an animal model of globozoospermia. By using this model as reference, we were able to identify the probable steps of the tail coiling process in human globozoospermia. Although we have no evidence that there is the same pathophysiology in man and knocked-out mouse, the similarities between these ultrastructural observations in human and those in the experimental model are very suggestive. This is the first demonstration of the existence of relevant morphological homologies between the tail coiling in animal model and human globozoospermia. PMID:26436098

  6. Chromosomal abnormalities in human sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.H.

    1985-01-01

    The ability to analyze human sperm chromosome complements after penetration of zona pellucida-free hamster eggs provides the first opportunity to study the frequency and type of chromosomal abnormalities in human gametes. Two large-scale studies have provided information on normal men. We have studied 1,426 sperm complements from 45 normal men and found an abnormality rate of 8.9%. Brandriff et al. (5) found 8.1% abnormal complements in 909 sperm from 4 men. The distribution of numerical and structural abnormalities was markedly dissimilar in the 2 studies. The frequency of aneuploidy was 5% in our sample and only 1.6% in Brandriff's, perhaps reflecting individual variability among donors. The frequency of 24,YY sperm was low: 0/1,426 and 1/909. This suggests that the estimates of nondisjunction based on fluorescent Y body data (1% to 5%) are not accurate. We have also studied men at increased risk of sperm chromosomal abnormalities. The frequency of chromosomally unbalanced sperm in 6 men heterozygous for structural abnormalities varied dramatically: 77% for t11;22, 32% for t6;14, 19% for t5;18, 13% for t14;21, and 0% for inv 3 and 7. We have also studied 13 cancer patients before and after radiotherapy and demonstrated a significant dose-dependent increase of sperm chromosome abnormalities (numerical and structural) 36 months after radiation treatment.

  7. Hierarchical radial and polar organisation of chromosomes in human sperm.

    PubMed

    Millan, N M; Lau, P; Hann, M; Ioannou, D; Hoffman, D; Barrionuevo, M; Maxson, W; Ory, S; Tempest, H G

    2012-10-01

    It is well established that chromosomes occupy distinct positions within the interphase nuclei, conferring a potential functional implication to the genome. In addition, alterations in the nuclear organisation patterns have been associated with disease phenotypes (e.g. cancer or laminopathies). The human sperm is the smallest cell in the body with specific DNA packaging and the mission of delivering the paternal genome to the oocyte during fertilisation. Studies of nuclear organisation in the sperm have postulated nonrandom chromosome position and have proposed a chromocentre model with the centromeres facing toward the interior and the telomeres toward the periphery of the nucleus. Most studies have assessed the nuclear address in the sperm longitudinally predominantly using centromeric or telomeric probes and to a lesser extent with whole chromosome paints. To date, studies investigating the radial organisation of human sperm have been limited. The purpose of this study was to utilise whole chromosome paints for six clinically important chromosomes (18, 19, 21, 22, X, and Y) to investigate nuclear address by assessing their radial and longitudinal nuclear organisation. A total of 10,800 sperm were analysed in nine normozoospermic individuals. The results have shown nonrandom chromosome position for all chromosomes using both methods of analysis. We present novel radial and polar analysis of chromosome territory localization within the human sperm nucleus. Specifically, a hierarchical organisation was observed radially with chromosomes organised from the interior to the periphery (chromosomes 22, 21, Y, X, 19, and 18 respectively) and polar organisation from the sperm head to tail (chromosomes X, 19, Y, 22, 21, and 18, respectively). We provide evidence of defined nuclear organisation in the human sperm and discuss the function of organisation and potential possible clinical ramifications of these results in regards to male infertility and early human development.

  8. Detection of alterations in human sperm using magnetic orientation techniques

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sakhnini, Lama; Dairi, Maheen; Manaa, Hacene

    2007-09-01

    In this study we report on magnetic orientation of human sperms. Samples were taken from 17 donors. Normal human sperms became oriented with their long axis perpendicular to the magnetic field ( 1 Tesla maximum). Total orientation was achieved with magnetic field at about one Tesla, while for abnormal sperms the magnetic behavior was different. The dependence of the measured degree of orientation on the intensity of the magnetic field was in good agreement with the theoretical equation for the magnetic orientation of diamagnetic substances. As a result for a numerical analysis based on the equation, the anisotropic diamagnetic susceptibility of normal sperm was found to be ▵ χ= 8×10 -20 J/T2. The degree of orientation was influenced by the alterations in the shape of the head, body or the tail. It has been suggested that the DNA in the sperm head retain the strong magnetic anisotropy to counter balance the magnetic anisotropy retained by flagellum microtubules. Recent studies demonstrated a well-defined nuclear architecture in human sperm nucleus, where the head morphology has significant correlation with sperm chromatin structure assay SCSA. Then as the methods to evaluate SCSA can be difficult and expensive our simple magnetic orientation technique can be an alternative to diagnose alteration in DNA.

  9. Human sperm rheotaxis: a passive physical process

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Zhuoran; Liu, Jun; Meriano, Jim; Ru, Changhai; Xie, Shaorong; Luo, Jun; Sun, Yu

    2016-01-01

    A long-standing question in natural reproduction is how mammalian sperm navigate inside female reproductive tract and finally reach the egg cell, or oocyte. Recently, fluid flow was proposed as a long–range guidance cue for sperm navigation. Coitus induces fluid flow from oviduct to uterus, and sperm align themselves against the flow direction and swim upstream, a phenomenon termed rheotaxis. Whether sperm rheotaxis is a passive process dominated by fluid mechanics, or sperm actively sense and adapt to fluid flow remains controversial. Here we report the first quantitative study of sperm flagellar motion during human sperm rheotaxis and provide direct evidence indicating that sperm rheotaxis is a passive process. Experimental results show that there is no significant difference in flagellar beating amplitude and asymmetry between rheotaxis-turning sperm and those sperm swimming freely in the absence of fluid flow. Additionally, fluorescence image tracking shows no Ca2+ influx during sperm rheotaxis turning, further suggesting there is no active signal transduction during human sperm rheotaxis. PMID:27005727

  10. Human sperm rheotaxis: a passive physical process

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhang, Zhuoran; Liu, Jun; Meriano, Jim; Ru, Changhai; Xie, Shaorong; Luo, Jun; Sun, Yu

    2016-03-01

    A long-standing question in natural reproduction is how mammalian sperm navigate inside female reproductive tract and finally reach the egg cell, or oocyte. Recently, fluid flow was proposed as a long–range guidance cue for sperm navigation. Coitus induces fluid flow from oviduct to uterus, and sperm align themselves against the flow direction and swim upstream, a phenomenon termed rheotaxis. Whether sperm rheotaxis is a passive process dominated by fluid mechanics, or sperm actively sense and adapt to fluid flow remains controversial. Here we report the first quantitative study of sperm flagellar motion during human sperm rheotaxis and provide direct evidence indicating that sperm rheotaxis is a passive process. Experimental results show that there is no significant difference in flagellar beating amplitude and asymmetry between rheotaxis-turning sperm and those sperm swimming freely in the absence of fluid flow. Additionally, fluorescence image tracking shows no Ca2+ influx during sperm rheotaxis turning, further suggesting there is no active signal transduction during human sperm rheotaxis.

  11. Mitotic chromosome condensation in the sperm nucleus during post fertilization maturation division in urechis eggs

    PubMed Central

    Das, NK; Barker, C

    1976-01-01

    Changes in the morphology of the sperm nucleus in the egg cytoplasm are mong the immediate events in nucleocytoplasmic interactions during early embryogenesis. Soon after its entrance into the egg cytoplasm, the sperm nucleus of various organisms increases in size with the transformation of condensed chromatin to a diffuse state, resembling the chromatin of an interphase nucleus (2, 13, 15, 16). This is followed by a close association or fusion of male and female pronuclei (2, 13, 15, 16). Cytoplasmic influences on nuclear morphology have also been demonstrated clearly in nuclear transplantation and cell fusion studies (10, 11). Reactivation of the nucleus, such as the transplanted brain nucleus in Xenopus egg cytoplasm or the hen erythrocyte nucleus in interphase cytoplasm of HeLa cells, is accompanied by nuclear enlargement and chromatin dispersion (10, 11). However, premature mitotic-like chromosome condensation takes place in the nuclei of sperm or interphase cells fused with mitotic cells (9, 12). Thus, chromosome dispersion and condensation seem to depend on the state of the cytoplasm in which the nucleus is present. These observations imply that the initial morphological changes in the sperm nucleus after fertilization may very well be dependent on the state of maturation of eggs at the time of sperm entry. Unfertilized eggs of Urechis caupo, a marine echiuroid worm, are stored at the diakinesis stage. These eggs complete maturation division after insemination and this is followed by fusion of male and female pronuclei (5, 8). Therefore, Urechis caupo is a suitable organism in which to study the response of the sperm nucleus to the changing state of the egg cytoplasm during and after postfertilization maturation division. PMID:54357

  12. ATPases, ion exchangers and human sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Peralta-Arias, Rubén D; Vívenes, Carmen Y; Camejo, María I; Piñero, Sandy; Proverbio, Teresa; Martínez, Elizabeth; Marín, Reinaldo; Proverbio, Fulgencio

    2015-05-01

    Human sperm has several mechanisms to control its ionic milieu, such as the Na,K-ATPase (NKA), the Ca-ATPase of the plasma membrane (PMCA), the Na(+)/Ca(2) (+)-exchanger (NCX) and the Na(+)/H(+)-exchanger (NHE). On the other hand, the dynein-ATPase is the intracellular motor for sperm motility. In this work, we evaluated NKA, PMCA, NHE, NCX and dynein-ATPase activities in human sperm and investigated their correlation with sperm motility. Sperm motility was measured by Computer Assisted Semen Analysis. It was found that the NKA activity is inhibited by ouabain with two Ki (7.9 × 10(-9) and 9.8 × 10(-5) M), which is consistent with the presence of two isoforms of α subunit of the NKA in the sperm plasma membranes (α1 and α4), being α4 more sensitive to ouabain. The decrease in NKA activity is associated with a reduction in sperm motility. In addition, sperm motility was evaluated in the presence of known inhibitors of NHE, PMCA and NCX, such as amiloride, eosin, and KB-R7943, respectively, as well as in the presence of nigericin after incubation with ouabain. Amiloride, eosin and KB-R7943 significantly reduced sperm motility. Nigericin reversed the effect of ouabain and amiloride on sperm motility. Dynein-ATPase activity was inhibited by acidic pH and micromolar concentrations of Ca(2) (+). We explain our results in terms of inhibition of the dynein-ATPase in the presence of higher cytosolic H(+) and Ca(2) (+), and therefore inhibition of sperm motility. © 2015 Society for Reproduction and Fertility.

  13. Laser radiation and motility patterns of human sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Lenzi, A.; Claroni, F.; Gandini, L.; Lombardo, F.; Barbieri, C.; Lino, A.; Dondero, F. )

    1989-01-01

    Human sperm were exposed in vitro to laser radiation. An increase in progressive sperm motility was associated with a faster rate of sperm ATP consumption. Computer-assisted analysis of sperm motility confirmed the positive effect of laser irradiation on velocity and linearity of sperm.

  14. Impact of Bep or Carboplatin Chemotherapy on Testicular Function and Sperm Nucleus of Subjects with Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

    PubMed Central

    Ghezzi, Marco; Berretta, Massimiliano; Bottacin, Alberto; Palego, Pierfrancesco; Sartini, Barbara; Cosci, Ilaria; Finos, Livio; Selice, Riccardo; Foresta, Carlo; Garolla, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    Young males have testicular germ cells tumors (TGCT) as the most common malignancy and its incidence is increasing in several countries. Besides unilateral orchiectomy (UO), the treatment of TGCT may include surveillance, radiotherapy, or chemotherapy (CT), basing on tumor histology and stage of disease. It is well known that both radio and CT may have negative effects on testicular function, affecting spermatogenesis, and sex hormones. Many reports investigated these aspects in patients treated with bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin (BEP), after UO. In contrast no data are available on the side effects of carboplatin treatment in these patients. We included in this study 212 consecutive subjects who undergone to sperm banking at our Andrology and Human Reproduction Unit after UO for TGCT. Hundred subjects were further treated with one or more BEP cycles (BEP-group), 54 with carboplatin (CARB group), and 58 were just surveilled (S-group). All patients were evaluated for seminal parameters, sperm aneuploidy, sperm DNA, sex hormones, volume of the residual testis at baseline (T0) and after 12 (T1) and 24 months (T2) from UO or end of CT. Seminal parameters, sperm aneuploidies, DNA status, gonadic hormones, and testicular volume at baseline were not different between groups. At T1, we observed a significant reduction of sperm concentration and sperm count in the BEP group versus baseline and versus both Carb and S-group. A significant increase of sperm aneuploidies was present at T1 in the BEP group. Similarly, the same group at 1 had altered sperm DNA integrity and fragmentation compared with baseline, S-group and Carb group. These alterations were persistent after 2 years from the end of BEP treatment. Despite a slight improvement at T2, the BEP group had still higher percentages of sperm aneuploidies than other groups. No impairment of sperm aneuploidies and DNA status were observed in the Carb group both after 1 and 2 years from the end of treatment. Despite

  15. Constancy in Human Sperm DNA Content

    PubMed Central

    Sarkar, Siddhartha; Jones, O. W.; Shioura, Norio

    1974-01-01

    The frequency distribution of DNA content of human sperm was measured in an automated flow microfluorometer. The flow method measures the DNA content by quantifying the amount of fluorescence emitted by the fluorescent Feulgen stained DNA of single sperm cells suspended in microdroplets. The variability in the mean value for the haploid amount of DNA in sperm from 15 randomly chosen donors was less than 1%. Statistical tests on the observed frequency distribution data indicated that each sperm population probably consists of two homogenous components present in almost equal proportions but differing in mean DNA content. The difference in their modal values for DNA is within the range of known values of DNA difference between the two sex chromosomes. Sperm of donors segregating balanced translocations, when compared to the random samples as a class, showed greater variability in the mean DNA content. Images PMID:4530319

  16. Nitric oxide inhibition of human sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Weinberg, J B; Doty, E; Bonaventura, J; Haney, A F

    1995-08-01

    To determine the effect of nitric oxide (NO) on sperm motility in vitro. Normal human sperm separated by centrifugation through a discontinuous Percoll gradient and subsequent swim-up were incubated for up to 24 hours with NO donors, with and without the known NO quencher hemoglobin, as well as with agents that raise intracellular cyclic 3',5'-guanosine monophosphate (cGMP). Sperm respiration was determined by a tetrazolium-formazan spectrophotometric assay. Andrology laboratory. Absolute sperm motility and respiration. Sperm incubated with the NO donors 1 mM nitroprusside, 100 to 125 microM 3-morpholinosydnonimine, and 25 to 125 microM pure nitric oxide gas dissolved in buffer were inhibited in motility in a dose-dependent fashion. The inhibition could be reversed by the NO quencher hemoglobin. Agents that raise cellular cGMP (dibutyryl cGMP or 8-bromo-cGMP) did not inhibit motility. Nitric oxide inhibited sperm respiration, as measured by the tetrazolium-formazan assay. Nitric oxide reduces sperm motility, possibly by a mechanism involving inhibition of cellular respiration independent of an elevation of intracellular cGMP. Nitric oxide elaborated in the female or male genital tract in vivo could adversely influence sperm function and fertility.

  17. Membrane hyperpolarization during human sperm capacitation

    PubMed Central

    López-González, I.; Torres-Rodríguez, P.; Sánchez-Carranza, O.; Solís-López, A.; Santi, C.M.; Darszon, A.; Treviño, C.L.

    2014-01-01

    Sperm capacitation is a complex and indispensable physiological process that spermatozoa must undergo in order to acquire fertilization capability. Spermatozoa from several mammalian species, including mice, exhibit a capacitation-associated plasma membrane hyperpolarization, which is necessary for the acrosome reaction to occur. Despite its importance, this hyperpolarization event has not been adequately examined in human sperm. In this report we used flow cytometry to show that a subpopulation of human sperm indeed undergo a plasma membrane hyperpolarization upon in vitro capacitation. This hyperpolarization correlated with two other well-characterized capacitation parameters, namely an increase in intracellular pH and Ca2+ concentration, measured also by flow cytometry. We found that sperm membrane hyperpolarization was completely abolished in the presence of a high external K+ concentration (60 mM), indicating the participation of K+ channels. In order to identify, which of the potential K+ channels were involved in this hyperpolarization, we used different K+ channel inhibitors including charybdotoxin, slotoxin and iberiotoxin (which target Slo1) and clofilium (a more specific blocker for Slo3). All these K+ channel antagonists inhibited membrane hyperpolarization to a similar extent, suggesting that both members of the Slo family may potentially participate. Two very recent papers recorded K+ currents in human sperm electrophysiologically, with some contradictory results. In the present work, we show through immunoblotting that Slo3 channels are present in the human sperm membrane. In addition, we found that human Slo3 channels expressed in CHO cells were sensitive to clofilium (50 μM). Considered altogether, our data indicate that Slo1 and Slo3 could share the preponderant role in the capacitation-associated hyperpolarization of human sperm in contrast to what has been previously reported for mouse sperm, where Slo3 channels are the main contributors to the

  18. The egg nucleus regulates the behavior of sperm nuclei as well as cycling of MPF in physiologically polyspermic newt eggs.

    PubMed

    Iwao, Y; Sakamoto, N; Takahara, K; Yamashita, M; Nagahama, Y

    1993-11-01

    The possible role of the egg nucleus in regulating the behavior of sperm nuclei and the cycling of maturation-promoting factor (MPF) was investigated in the physiologically polyspermic eggs of the newt Cynops pyrrhogaster. Many sperm entered all areas of the egg, but only one sperm pronucleus, the principal sperm pronucleus, moved to the center of the animal hemisphere to form a zygote nucleus with the egg pronucleus. All sperm and egg pronuclei synthesized DNA, but the zygote nucleus completed the synthesis of DNA 0.5-1 hr earlier than the accessory sperm nuclei. Entrance into M phase by the accessory sperm nuclei was delayed to a greater and greater extent with increasing distance of these nuclei from the zygote nucleus. When DNA in the egg nucleus was damaged by uv irradiation, not only were both prophase and M phase in the zygote nucleus prolonged, but also the MPF cycle was delayed. Some accessory sperm nuclei in the animal hemisphere escaped degeneration to form additional bipolar spindles, so that delayed multipolar cleavage occurred. The MPF activity in the vegetal hemisphere was less than 25% of that found in the animal hemisphere at M phase in normally fertilized eggs. The levels of immunologically detectable proteins that contained the sequence PSTAIR in vegetal hemispheres were less than 25% of those in animal hemispheres. These results indicate that the egg nucleus of the Cynops egg is involved in the control of the activation of MPF and that the accessory sperm nuclei in the vegetal hemisphere degenerate as a result of the lack of components that are indispensable for entry into M phase.

  19. Toxicants and human sperm chromatin integrity.

    PubMed

    Delbès, Geraldine; Hales, Barbara F; Robaire, Bernard

    2010-01-01

    The integrity of the paternal genome is essential as the spermatozoon can bring genetic damage into the oocyte at fertilization and contribute to the development of abnormal pregnancy outcome. During the past two decades, many assays have been developed to measure sperm DNA strand breaks, chromatin structure and compaction and assess the proteins associated with the DNA, as well as epigenetic modifications. Using these assays, it has been shown that exposure to physical agents or chemicals, including therapeutic drugs and environmental toxicants, can affect the integrity of sperm chromatin, inducing structural, genetic and/or epigenetic abnormalities. The mechanisms by which such damage is triggered are still largely unresolved and the susceptibility of each individual will depend on their genetic background, lifestyle and exposure to various insults. Depending on the nature of the chemicals, they may directly target the DNA, induce an oxidative stress, or modify the epigenetic elements. The significance of measuring the sperm chromatin integrity comes from the fact that this end-point correlates well with the low IVF and ICSI outcomes, and idiopathic infertility. Nevertheless, it is hard to establish a direct link between the paternal sperm chromatin integrity and the health of the future generations. Thus, it seems essential to undertake studies that will resolve the impact of chemical and environmental factors on chromatin structure and epigenetic components of human spermatozoa and to elucidate what sperm nuclear end-points are predictors of the quality of progeny outcome.

  20. Cytogenetics of human sperm: Structural aberrations and DNA replication

    SciTech Connect

    Brandriff, B.F.; Gordon, L.A.; Carrano, A.V.

    1989-07-11

    The human sperm-hamster egg system, first introduced in 1978 (Rudak et al), has yielded some important insights into questions on chromosomal integrity of human sperm. In this system, human sperm are co-incubated with eggs from the golden hamster. After the gametes fuse, eggs are cultured overnight and approximately 15 hours after fusion, display the haploid chromosomal complement of individual human sperm cells. These chromosomes can be analyzed by standard banding techniques to identify and quantify structural and numerical abnormalities in single sperm. 32 refs., 1 fig.

  1. LOCALIZATION OF SP22 ON HUMAN SPERM OF DIFFERING QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    LOCALIZATION OF SP22 ON HUMAN SPERM OF DIFFERING QUALITY. AE Lavers*1, GR Klinefelter2, DW Hamilton1, KP Roberts1, 1University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN and 2US EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC.
    SP22 is a sperm membrane protein that has been implicated in sperm function d...

  2. LOCALIZATION OF SP22 ON HUMAN SPERM OF DIFFERING QUALITY

    EPA Science Inventory

    LOCALIZATION OF SP22 ON HUMAN SPERM OF DIFFERING QUALITY. AE Lavers*1, GR Klinefelter2, DW Hamilton1, KP Roberts1, 1University of Minnesota, Minneapolis, MN and 2US EPA, Research Triangle Park, NC.
    SP22 is a sperm membrane protein that has been implicated in sperm function d...

  3. Cofilin is correlated with sperm quality and influences sperm fertilizing capacity in humans.

    PubMed

    Chen, S M; Chen, X M; Lu, Y L; Liu, B; Jiang, M; Ma, Y X

    2016-11-01

    Spermatozoa should undergo a series of biochemical modifications in female reproduction tract, which is collectively called sperm capacitation. The capacitated spermatozoa can bind to the egg zona pellucida, resulting in the occurrence of acrosome reaction which enabled spermatozoa penetrate into the egg. The formation of actin plays an important role in these processes. Actin polymerized during sperm capacitation, but the polymers dispersed before acrosome reaction. In this study, we take our focus on actin-binding protein, cofilin. Our results showed that the % and intensity of sperm expressing cofilin in normal sperm were significantly higher than in abnormal sperm, and the sperm expressing cofilin was correlated with sperm quality. Furthermore, treatment with anti-cofilin antibody increased the percentage of sperm capacitation and inhibited progesterone- or A23187- induced acrosome reaction in a dose-dependent manner. The presence of 100 ng/mL anti-cofilin antibodies markedly blocked the sperm penetration of zona-free hamster eggs. Besides, immunofluorescence results revealed that cofilin was colocalized with F-actin in the midpiece of spermatozoa; however, phospho-cofilin was expressed in the tail rather than in the midpiece of spermatozoa, which was not colocalized with F-actin in spermatozoa. Moreover, western blot revealed that phospho-cofilin increased in sperm capacitation, and the total cofilin and cofilin in insoluble fraction increased in acrosome reaction; immunofluorescence results showed that the amount of cofilin in acrosome increased in sperm capacitation. In conclusion, our study revealed that cofilin expression in human sperm is correlated with sperm quality and the alterations of cofilin and phospho-cofilin in fertilization affects sperm capacitation, acrosome reaction, and spermatozoa-oocyte fusion.

  4. Inhibition of viral reverse transcriptase and human sperm DNA polymerase by anti-sperm antibodies.

    PubMed Central

    Witkin, S S; Higgins, P J; Bendich, A

    1978-01-01

    The IgG fraction of serum from a rabbit immunized with detergent-prepared human sperm nuclei inhibited the DNA polymerase activities in human sperm and seminal fluid as well as the partially purified reverse transcriptase of the baboon endogenous type-C retrovirus (BEV). The analogous enzymes from lysates of oncogenic type-C viruses was unaffected. IgG from the serum of individual partners from infertile marriages similarly inhibited both purified BEV reverse transcriptase and human sperm DNA polymerase, but not a DNA polymerase isolated from human prostatic fluid. The data suggest that BEV reverse transcriptase and the human sperm DNA polymerase are antigenically related. Furthermore, the sperm appears to be auto-antigenic and the antibodies thus formed may be capable of interfering with reproductive success. PMID:82498

  5. Assessment of sperm nucleus integrity in infertile men: a novel research field for anthropology in the molecular era.

    PubMed

    Lavranos, Giagkos; Manolakou, Panagiota; Katsiki, Evangelia; Angelopoulou, Roxani

    2013-12-01

    Anthropology has always been particularly interested in the origin of human life and the development towards adulthood. Although originally working with skeletal measurements and bio-morphological markers in modern populations, it has now entered the growing field of applied molecular biology. This relatively recent advance allows the detailed study of major events in human development and senescence. For instance, sperm DNA integrity and chromatin re-organization are crucial factors for fertilization and embryo development. Clinical researchers have developed improved methods for the evaluation of DNA integrity and protaminosis in sperm nuclei, such as the TUNEL and the CMA3 assays. DNA damage in spermatozoal nuclei is detected using the TUNEL assay which depends on the specific enzymatic reaction of TdT with the end strand breaks of DNA. Protaminosis in spermatozoal nucleus is evaluated using CMA3 assay, which is based on the in situ competition between CMA3 and protamines. Such measurements may provide useful data on human reproductive health, aiding the explanation of demographic differences across the world.

  6. The staining pattern of human sperm with Diff Quik: relationship with sperm head morphology and a sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA).

    PubMed

    Moska, Natalie; Murray, Elaine; Wakefield, Penelope; Matson, Phillip

    2011-03-01

    The dark staining of human sperm heads by Diff Quik is significantly correlated with abnormal sperm head morphology (r=0.51, p<0.0001), but is not associated with changes in sperm chromatin detected by a sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA; r=0.18, p>0.09). Whilst valuable in the assessment of head morphology, it is concluded that Diff Quik staining is not a useful substitute for the SCSA to assess human sperm chromatin.

  7. Insights into the lysine acetylproteome of human sperm.

    PubMed

    Sun, Guohai; Jiang, Min; Zhou, Tao; Guo, Yueshuai; Cui, Yiqiang; Guo, Xuejiang; Sha, Jiahao

    2014-09-23

    Protein lysine acetylation is a dynamic and reversible post-modification that is known to play diverse functions in eukaryotes. Nevertheless, the composition and function of non-histone lysine acetylation in gametes remain unknown. In humans, only capacitated sperm have the capacity to fertilize an egg. In the present study, we found complex composition of lysine acetylated proteins in capacitated human sperm. In vitro fertilization inhibition assay by anti-acetyllysine antibody showed essential roles of lysine acetylation in fertilization. And inhibition of lysine deacetylases, the histone deacetylases, by trichostatin A and nicotinamide, could significantly suppress sperm motility. After immunopurification enrichment of acetylpeptides with anti-acetyllysine antibody and high-throughput liquid chromatography-tandem mass spectrometry identification, we characterized 1206 lysine acetylated sites, corresponding to 576 lysine acetylated proteins in human capacitated sperm. Bioinformatics analysis showed that these proteins are associated with sperm functions, including motility, capacitation, acrosome reaction and sperm-egg interaction. Thus, lysine acetylation is expected to be an important regulatory mechanism for sperm functions. And our characterization of lysine acetylproteome could be a rich resource for the study of male fertility. Mature sperm are almost transcriptionally and translationally silent, thus post-translational modifications play important roles in sperm functions. Till now, only two types of PTMs, phosphorylation and glycosylation, are well studied in normal human sperm based on large scale proteomics. In the present study, we established the acetylproteome of capacitated human sperm. Over 1000 lysine acetylated sites were identified. Bioinformatics analysis shows that lysine acetylated proteins participate in many biological events of sperm functions. We further provided functional data that the lysine acetylation is essential for sperm motility

  8. Cytoplasmic connection of sperm cells to the pollen vegetative cell nucleus: potential roles of the male germ unit revisited.

    PubMed

    McCue, Andrea D; Cresti, Mauro; Feijó, José A; Slotkin, R Keith

    2011-03-01

    The male germ cells of angiosperm plants are neither free-living nor flagellated and therefore are dependent on the unique structure of the pollen grain for fertilization. During angiosperm male gametogenesis, an asymmetric mitotic division produces the generative cell, which is completely enclosed within the cytoplasm of the larger pollen grain vegetative cell. Mitotic division of the generative cell generates two sperm cells that remain connected by a common extracellular matrix with potential intercellular connections. In addition, one sperm cell has a cytoplasmic projection in contact with the vegetative cell nucleus. The shared extracellular matrix of the two sperm cells and the physical association of one sperm cell to the vegetative cell nucleus forms a linkage of all the genetic material in the pollen grain, termed the male germ unit. Found in species representing both the monocot and eudicot lineages, the cytoplasmic projection is formed by vesicle formation and microtubule elongation shortly after the formation of the generative cell and tethers the male germ unit until just prior to fertilization. The cytoplasmic projection plays a structural role in linking the male germ unit, but potentially plays other important roles. Recently, it has been speculated that the cytoplasmic projection and the male germ unit may facilitate communication between the somatic vegetative cell nucleus and the germinal sperm cells, via RNA and/or protein transport. This review focuses on the nature of the sperm cell cytoplasmic projection and the potential communicative function of the male germ unit.

  9. Highlights on ultrastructural pathology of human sperm.

    PubMed

    Joshi, Narahari V; Cruz, Ibis; Osuna, Jesus A

    2011-01-01

    Applications of atomic force microscopy to ultrastructural investigation of human spermatozoa are -discussed, with particular emphasis to their most common pathological alterations, which are recognized to be associated with male infertility. Morphological alterations can be located in the head, neck piece, and/or in the flagellum. The consequences of these defects on infertility-related topics are examined in the light of aberrations caused in varicocele and in other spermatozoa morphological alterations like globozoospermia, oligoasthenospermia, and in semen from patients with HIV syndrome. Special attention is given to the temperature effects on sperm abnormalities. The application of the present approach to pharmacology, namely, the development of male contraceptive methods, is also referred.

  10. Human sperm chromosome analysis after subzonal sperm insemination of hamster oocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Cozzi, J.

    1994-09-01

    Sperm microinjection techniques, subzonal sperm insemination (SUZI) and intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI), have achieved a wide spread clinical application for the treatment of male infertility. To date, only one study has focused on sperm karyotypes after microinjection. Martin et al. reported a very high incidence of abnormal human sperm complements after ICSI into hamster oocytes. In the present study, are reported the first human sperm karyotypes after SUZI of hamster oocytes. Spermatozoa from two control donors were treated by calcium ionophore A23187 and injected under the zona of hamster eggs. The microinjected eggs were then cultured for cytogenetic analysis of the pronuclei. Out of 47 analyzed sperm chromosome metaphases, 5 (10.6%) were abnormal, 4 (8.5%) were hypohaploid and 1 (2.1%) had a structural abnormality. The sex ratio was not significantly different from the expected 1:1 ratio. Rates of chromosomal abnormalities in microinjected spermatozoa were similar to those observed in spermatozoa inseminated with zona free eggs, suggesting that SUZI procedure per se does not increase sperm chromosomal abnormalities.

  11. SpermBlue: a new universal stain for human and animal sperm which is also amenable to automated sperm morphology analysis.

    PubMed

    van der Horst, G; Maree, L

    2009-12-01

    Our study was aimed at exploring a simple procedure to stain differentially the acrosome, head, midpiece, and flagellum of human and animal sperm. A further prerequisite was that sperm morphology of the stained samples could be analyzed using automated sperm morphology analysis (ASMA). We developed a new staining process using SpermBlue fixative and SpermBlue stain, which are iso-osmotic in relation to semen. The entire fixation and staining processes requires only 25 min. Three main steps are required. First, a routine sperm smear is made by either using semen or sperm in a diluting medium. The smear is allowed to air dry at room temperature. Second, the smear is fixed for 10 min by either placing the slide with the dried smear in a staining tray containing SpermBlue fixative or by adding 1 ml SpermBlue fixative to the slide. Third, the fixed smear is stained for 15 min by either immersing the slide in a staining tray containing SpermBlue stain or adding four drops of SpermBlue stain to the fixed smear. The stained slide is dipped gently in distilled water followed by air drying and mounting in DPX or an equivalent medium. The method is simple and suitable for field conditions. Sperm of human, three monkey species, horse, boar, bull, ram, mouse, rat, domestic chicken, fish, and invertebrate species were stained successfully using the SpermBlue staining process. SpermBlue stains human and animal sperm different hues or intensities of blue. It is possible to distinguish clearly the acrosome, sperm head, midpiece, principal piece of the tail, and even the short end piece. The Sperm Class Analyzer ASMA system was used successfully to quantify sperm head and midpiece measurements automatically at either 600 x or 1000 x magnification for most of the species studied.

  12. Organisation of the human dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Koutcherov, Yuri; Mai, Juergen K; Ashwell, Ken W; Paxinos, George

    2004-01-19

    This study used acetylcholinesterase (AChE) histochemistry to reveal the organization of the dorsomedial hypothalamic nucleus (DM) in the human. Topographically, the human DM is similar to DM in the monkey and rat. It is wedged between the paraventricular nucleus, dorsally, and the ventromedial nucleus, ventrally. Laterally, DM borders the lateral hypothalamic area while medially it approaches the 3rd ventricle. The AChE staining distinguished two subcompartments of the human DM: the larger diffuse and the smaller compact DM. The subcompartmental organization of the human DM appears homologous to that found in the monkey and less complex than that reported in rats. Understanding of the organization of DM creates meaningful anatomical reference for physiological and pharmacological studies in the human hypothalamus.

  13. Dynamic risk control by human nucleus accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Lopez-Sosa, Fernando; Gonzalez-Rosa, Javier Jesus; Galarza, Ana; Avecillas, Josue; Pineda-Pardo, Jose Angel; Lopez-Ibor, Juan José; Reneses, Blanca; Barcia, Juan Antonio

    2015-01-01

    Real-world decisions about reward often involve a complex counterbalance of risk and value. Although the nucleus accumbens has been implicated in the underlying neural substrate, its criticality to human behaviour remains an open question, best addressed with interventional methodology that probes the behavioural consequences of focal neural modulation. Combining a psychometric index of risky decision-making with transient electrical modulation of the nucleus accumbens, here we reveal profound, highly dynamic alteration of the relation between probability of reward and choice during therapeutic deep brain stimulation in four patients with treatment-resistant psychiatric disease. Short-lived phasic electrical stimulation of the region of the nucleus accumbens dynamically altered risk behaviour, transiently shifting the psychometric function towards more risky decisions only for the duration of stimulation. A critical, on-line role of human nucleus accumbens in dynamic risk control is thereby established. PMID:26428667

  14. Dynamic risk control by human nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Nachev, Parashkev; Lopez-Sosa, Fernando; Gonzalez-Rosa, Javier Jesus; Galarza, Ana; Avecillas, Josue; Pineda-Pardo, Jose Angel; Lopez-Ibor, Juan José; Reneses, Blanca; Barcia, Juan Antonio; Strange, Bryan

    2015-12-01

    Real-world decisions about reward often involve a complex counterbalance of risk and value. Although the nucleus accumbens has been implicated in the underlying neural substrate, its criticality to human behaviour remains an open question, best addressed with interventional methodology that probes the behavioural consequences of focal neural modulation. Combining a psychometric index of risky decision-making with transient electrical modulation of the nucleus accumbens, here we reveal profound, highly dynamic alteration of the relation between probability of reward and choice during therapeutic deep brain stimulation in four patients with treatment-resistant psychiatric disease. Short-lived phasic electrical stimulation of the region of the nucleus accumbens dynamically altered risk behaviour, transiently shifting the psychometric function towards more risky decisions only for the duration of stimulation. A critical, on-line role of human nucleus accumbens in dynamic risk control is thereby established.

  15. Study of human sperm motility post cryopreservation

    PubMed Central

    Oberoi, Bhavni; Kumar, Sushil; Talwar, Pankaj

    2014-01-01

    Background Cryopreservation of spermatozoa is a widely used technique to preserve the fertility of males. It can also benefit the armed forces personnel who are to be sent for long recruitments, while leaving their families behind. This study, apart from studying the effects of freezing and thawing, reveals the effect of the post thaw interval on the motility of the human spermatozoa and thus widens the insemination window period. Methods A detailed semen analysis was carried out as per the WHO guidelines for 25 samples. The samples were then washed, analysed and frozen in liquid nitrogen. The semen samples were subsequently thawed and similarly analysed after 20 min and 40 min of thawing. This was then followed by statistical analysis of the comparative motilities. Results Motility of sperms is found to decrease after cryopreservation. However, the study revealed that after thawing a significant increase in the motility of the sperms was noted with the progression of time (p < 0.05). Conclusion By simulating conditions similar to the in vivo conditions for the post thaw semen samples, we can safely wait, confirm the parameters like motility and count, and then inseminate the samples instead of blindly inseminating them immediately after thawing. PMID:25382909

  16. Functional distribution of synapsin I in human sperm

    PubMed Central

    Coleman, William L.; Kulp, Adam C.; Venditti, Jennifer J.

    2015-01-01

    Proteins known to function during cell–cell communication and exocytosis in neurons and other secretory cells have recently been reported in human sperm. Synapsins are a group of proteins that have been very well characterized in neurons, but little is known about synapsin function in other cell types. Based upon previous findings and the known function of synapsin, we tested the hypothesis that synapsin I was present in human sperm. Washed, capacitated, and acrosome induced sperm preparations were used to evaluate the functional distribution of synapsin I using immunocytochemistry. Protein extracts from mouse brain, mouse testis/epididymis, and human semen were used for protein blotting techniques. Immunolocalization revealed synapsin I was enriched in the sperm equatorial segment. Protein extracts from mouse brain, mouse testis/epididymis, and human semen were positive for synapsin I using several different antibodies, and dot blot results were confirmed by Western blot analyses. Finally, treatment of capacitated and acrosome reaction induced samples with anti-synapsin antibodies significantly reduced sperm motility. Localization of synapsin I in human sperm is a novel finding. The association of synapsin I with the sperm equatorial segment and effects on motility are suggestive of a role associated with capacitation and/or acrosome reaction, processes that render sperm capable of fertilizing an oocyte. PMID:26566474

  17. Human sperm tail proteome suggests new endogenous metabolic pathways.

    PubMed

    Amaral, Alexandra; Castillo, Judit; Estanyol, Josep Maria; Ballescà, José Luís; Ramalho-Santos, João; Oliva, Rafael

    2013-02-01

    Proteomic studies are contributing greatly to our understanding of the sperm cell, and more detailed descriptions are expected to clarify additional cellular and molecular sperm attributes. The aim of this study was to characterize the subcellular proteome of the human sperm tail and, hopefully, identify less concentrated proteins (not found in whole cell proteome studies). Specifically, we were interested in characterizing the sperm metabolic proteome and gaining new insights into the sperm metabolism issue. Sperm were isolated from normozoospermic semen samples and depleted of any contaminating leukocytes. Tail fractions were obtained by means of sonication followed by sucrose-gradient ultracentrifugation, and their purity was confirmed via various techniques. Liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry of isolated sperm tail peptides resulted in the identification of 1049 proteins, more than half of which had not been previously described in human sperm. The categorization of proteins according to their function revealed two main groups: proteins related to metabolism and energy production (26%), and proteins related to sperm tail structure and motility (11%). Interestingly, a great proportion of the metabolic proteome (24%) comprised enzymes involved in lipid metabolism, including enzymes for mitochondrial beta-oxidation. Unexpectedly, we also identified various peroxisomal proteins, some of which are known to be involved in the oxidation of very long chain fatty acids. Analysis of our data using Reactome suggests that both mitochondrial and peroxisomal pathways might indeed be active in sperm, and that the use of fatty acids as fuel might be more preponderant than previously thought. In addition, incubation of sperm with the fatty acid oxidation inhibitor etomoxir resulted in a significant decrease in sperm motility. Contradicting a common concept in the literature, we suggest that the male gamete might have the capacity to obtain energy from endogenous

  18. Applications of human sperm parameters for monitoring

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrobek, A.J.

    1985-11-01

    Very few studies of male reproductive hazards in the workplace are being done, and there are several underlying problems slowing the process in this infant field. First, the interaction of many diverse disciplines from management, labor, government, medicine, and science is often required. Outlooks and incentives are generally in conflict from the outset. Second, there is considerable complacency because no workplace agent as toxic as DBCP has been found. Third, there is as yet no requirement to assess the human male reproductive effects of a compound before large groups of men are permitted to work with it. Fourth, there is a poor opinion of the available epidemiological methods as indicators of abnormal reproductive outcome, because they are expensive, prone to confounding factors, and small numbers of exposed men (and pregnancies at risk) limit their sensitivity. Fifth, sperm tests have been criticized for their variability, subjectivity, and lack of standardization. 68 refs., 2 tabs.

  19. Localization and identification of sumoylated proteins in human sperm: excessive sumoylation is a marker of defective spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Vigodner, Margarita; Shrivastava, Vibha; Gutstein, Leah Elisheva; Schneider, Jordana; Nieves, Edward; Goldstein, Marc; Feliciano, Miriam; Callaway, Myrasol

    2013-01-01

    Sumoylation is a type of post-translational modification that is implicated in the regulation of numerous cellular events. However, its role in the function of human sperm has not yet been characterized. In this study, both immunofluorescence and electron microscopy revealed that small ubiquitin-like modifiers (SUMO) SUMO1 and SUMO2/3 were highly enriched in the neck area of human sperm that is associated with the redundant nuclear envelope and were also detectable in the flagella and some head regions. Similar localization patterns of SUMO were also observed in mouse and fly sperm. Nonmotile, two-tailed, curled tailed, misshapen, microcephalic (small head) and aciphalic (no head) sperm exhibited abnormally high levels of sumoylation in their neck and tail regions relative to normal sperm. Numerous sumoylated proteins, ranging from 20 to 260 kDa, were detected via western blotting and identified by mass spectrometry, and 55 SUMO targets that were present specifically in human sperm, and not in the control fraction, corresponded to flagella proteins, proteins involved in the maturation and differentiation of sperm, heat shock proteins and important glycolytic and mitochondrial enzymes. The targets that were identified included proteins with specific functions in germ cells and sperm, such as heat shock-related 70-kDa protein 2, outer dense fiber protein 3, A-kinase anchor proteins 3 and 4, L-lactate dehydrogenase C, sperm protein associated with the nucleus on the X chromosome B/F, valosin-containing protein, seminogelins, histone H4 and ubiquitin. Coimmunoprecipitation experiments confirmed the sumoylation of semenogelin and indicated that some sperm proteins are modified by sumoylation and ubiquitination simultaneously. Numerous proteins are modified by sumoylation in human sperm; excessive sumoylation is a marker of defective spermatozoa.

  20. Ketamine inhibits human sperm function by Ca(2+)-related mechanism.

    PubMed

    He, Yuanqiao; Zou, Qianxing; Li, Bingda; Chen, Houyang; Du, Xiaohong; Weng, Shiqi; Luo, Tao; Zeng, Xuhui

    2016-09-09

    Ketamine, a dissociative anesthetic, which was widely used in human and animal medicine, has become a popular recreational drug, as it can induce hallucinatory effects. Ketamine abuse can cause serious damage to many aspects of the organism, mainly reflected in the nervous system and urinary system. It has also been reported that ketamine can impair the male genital system. However, the detailed effect of ketamine on human spermatozoa remains unclear. Thus, we investigated the in vitro effects of ketamine on human sperm functions, to elucidate the underlying mechanism. Human sperm were treated in vitro with different concentrations of ketamine (0, 0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 1 g/L). The results showed that 0.25-1 g/L ketamine inhibited sperm total motility, progressive motility and linear velocity, in a dose-dependent manner. In addition, the sperm's ability to penetrate viscous medium and the progesterone-induced acrosome reaction were significantly inhibited by ketamine. Ketamine did not affect sperm viability, capacitation and spontaneous acrosome reaction. The intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i), which is a central factor in the regulation of human sperm function, was decreased by ketamine (0.125-1 g/L) in a dose-dependent manner. Furthermore, the currents of the sperm-specific Ca(2+) channel, CatSper, which modulates Ca(2+) influx in sperm, were inhibited by ketamine (0.125-1 g/L) in a dose-dependent manner. Our findings suggest that ketamine induces its toxic effects on human sperm functions by reducing sperm [Ca(2+)]i through inhibition of CatSper channel. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  1. TRPM8, a Versatile Channel in Human Sperm

    PubMed Central

    Ocampo, Ana Y.; Serrano, Carmen J.; Castellano, Laura E.; Hernández-González, Enrique O.; Chirinos, Mayel; Larrea, Fernando; Beltrán, Carmen; Treviño, Claudia L.

    2009-01-01

    Background The transient receptor potential channel (TRP) family includes more than 30 proteins; they participate in various Ca2+ dependent processes. TRPs are functionally diverse involving thermal, chemical and mechanical transducers which modulate the concentration of intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i). Ca2+ triggers and/or regulates principal sperm functions during fertilization such as motility, capacitation and the acrosome reaction. Nevertheless, the presence of the TRPM subfamily in sperm has not been explored. Principal Findings Here we document with RT-PCR, western blot and immunocitochemistry analysis the presence of TRPM8 in human sperm. We also examined the participation of this channel in sperm function using specific agonists (menthol and temperature) and antagonists (BCTC and capsazepine). Computer-aided sperm analysis revealed that menthol did not significantly alter human sperm motility. In contrast, menthol induced the acrosome reaction in human sperm. This induction was inhibited about 70% by capsazepine (20 µM) and 80% by BCTC (1.6 µM). Activation of TRPM8 either by temperature or menthol induced [Ca2+]i increases in human sperm measured by fluorescence in populations or individual sperm cells, effect that was also inhibited by capsazepine (20 µM) and BCTC (1.6 µM). However, the progesterone and ZP3-induced acrosome reaction was not inhibited by capsazepine or BCTC, suggesting that TRPM8 activation triggers this process by a different signaling pathway. Conclusions This is the first report dealing with the presence of a thermo sensitive channel (TRPM8) in human sperm. This channel could be involved in cell signaling events such as thermotaxis or chemotaxis. PMID:19582168

  2. Exploring the Cytoskeleton During Intracytoplasmic Sperm Injection in Humans

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Rawe, Vanesa Y.; Chemes, Héctor

    Understanding the cellular events during fertilization in mammals is a major challenge that can contribute to the improvement of future infertility treatments in humans and reproductive performance in farm animals. Of special interest is the role of the oocyte and sperm cytoskeleton during the initial interaction between gametes. The aim of this chapter is to describe methods for studying cytoskeletal features during in vitro fertilization after intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) in humans. The following protocols will provide a detailed description of how to perform immunodetection and imaging of human eggs, zygotes, and sperm by fluorescence (confocal and epifluorescence) and electron microscopy.

  3. [Molecular identification of Ca2+ channels in human ejaculated sperm].

    PubMed

    Li, Lu; Liu, Ji-Hong; Li, Jia-Gui; Ye, Zhang-Qun; Wang, Xiu-Lai

    2006-10-01

    To identify the types of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels (VDCCs) in human ejaculated sperm using molecular technology. Based on the WHO criteria, the donated semen was screened by computer-aided sperm analysis (CASA), the sperm optimized by swim-up method, and the VDCCs' alpha1 subunits examined by reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR). Such mRNA messages as alpha1H, alpha1G, alpha1E, alpha1B and alpha1C were detected, but alpha1A and alpha1D were not. Human motile sperms express multiple VDCC RNAs, among which T-type and non-L-type channel messages are likely to be predominantly expressed. Not only T-type but also non-L-type calcium channels may be major gates for the external calcium influx, which helps regulate sperm motility and acrosome reaction.

  4. Digital holographic microscopy for the evaluation of human sperm structure.

    PubMed

    Coppola, G; Di Caprio, G; Wilding, M; Ferraro, P; Esposito, G; Di Matteo, L; Dale, R; Coppola, G; Dale, B

    2014-11-01

    The morphology of the sperm head has often been correlated with the outcome of in vitro fertilization, and has been shown to be the sole parameter in semen of value in predicting the success of intracytoplasmic sperm injection and intracytoplasmic morphologically selected sperm injection. In this paper, we have studied whether digital holographic microscopy (DHM) may be useful to obtain quantitative data on human sperm head structure and compared this technique with high-power digitally enhanced Nomarski optics. The main advantage of digital holography is that high-resolution three-dimensional quantitative sample imaging may be automatically produced by numerical refocusing of a two-dimensional image at different object planes without any mechanical scanning. We show that DHM generates useful information on the dimensions and structure of human sperm, not revealed by conventional phase-contrast microscopy, in particular the volume of vacuoles, and suggest its use as an additional prognostic tool in assisted reproduction technology.

  5. 1H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of live human sperm.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, S; Calvert, S J; Paley, M N; Pacey, A A

    2017-07-01

    Can 1H Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy (MRS) be used to obtain information about the molecules and metabolites in live human spermatozoa? Percoll-based density gradient centrifugation (DGC) followed by a further two washing steps, yielded enough sperm with minimal contamination (<0.01%) from seminal fluid to permit effective MRS which detected significant differences (P < 0.05) in the choline/glycerophosphocholine (GPC), lipid and lactate regions of the 1H MRS spectrum between sperm in the pellet and those from the 40%/80% interface. Current methods to examine sperm are either limited in their value (e.g. semen analysis) or are destructive (e.g. immunohistochemistry, sperm DNA testing). A few studies have previously used MRS to examine sperm, but these have either looked at seminal plasma from men with different ejaculate qualities or at the molecules present in pooled samples of lyophilized sperm. Sperm suspended in phosphate buffered saline (PBS) at 37°C were examined by 1H MRS scanning using a 1H excitation-sculpting solvent suppression sequence after recovery from fresh ejaculates by one of three different methods: (i) simple centrifugation; (ii) DGC with one wash; or (iii) DGC with two washes. In the case of DGC, sperm were collected both from the pellet ('80%' sperm) and the 40/80 interface ('40%' sperm). Spectrum processing was carried out using custom Matlab scripts to determine; the degree of seminal plasma/Percoll contamination, the minimum sperm concentration for 1H MRS detection and differences between the 1H MRS spectra of '40%' and '80%' sperm. DGC with two washes minimized the 1H MRS peak intensity for both seminal plasma and Percoll/PBS solution contamination while retaining sperm specific peaks. For the MRS scanner used in this study, the minimum sperm concentration required to produce a choline/GPC 1H MRS peak greater than 3:1 signal to noise ratio (SNR) was estimated at ~3 × 106/ml. The choline/GPC and lactate/lipid regions of the 1H spectrum

  6. Kinetics of human sperm acrosomal exocytosis.

    PubMed

    Sosa, C M; Pavarotti, M A; Zanetti, M N; Zoppino, F C M; De Blas, G A; Mayorga, L S

    2015-03-01

    The acrosome reaction is a unique event in the lifespan of sperm characterized by the exocytosis of the acrosomal content and the release of hybrid vesicles formed by patches of the outer acrosomal membrane and the plasma membrane. This unique regulated exocytosis is mediated by essentially the same membrane fusion machinery present in neuroendocrine cells. However, whereas secretion in neuroendocrine cells occurs in less than a second, the acrosome reaction is normally assessed after several minutes of incubation with inducers. In this report, we measured the kinetics of human sperm exocytosis triggered by two stimuli (calcium ionophore and progesterone) by using electron microscopy and three different approaches based on the incorporation of fluorescent Pisum sativum agglutinin into the acrosome upon opening of fusion pores connecting the extracellular medium with the acrosomal lumen. The results with the different methods are consistent with a slow kinetics (t½ = 14 min). We also manipulated the system to measure different steps of the process. We observed that cytosolic calcium increased with a relatively fast kinetics (t½ = 0.1 min). In contrast, the swelling of the acrosomal granule that precedes exocytosis was a slow process (t½ = 13 min). When swelling was completed, the fusion pore opening was fast (t½ = 0.2 min). The results indicate that acrosomal swelling is the slowest step and it determines the kinetics of the acrosome reaction. After the swelling is completed, the efflux of calcium from intracellular stores triggers fusion pores opening and the release of hybrid vesicles in seconds.

  7. Stability, delivery and functions of human sperm RNAs at fertilization.

    PubMed

    Sendler, Edward; Johnson, Graham D; Mao, Shihong; Goodrich, Robert J; Diamond, Michael P; Hauser, Russ; Krawetz, Stephen A

    2013-04-01

    Increasing attention has focused on the significance of RNA in sperm, in light of its contribution to the birth and long-term health of a child, role in sperm function and diagnostic potential. As the composition of sperm RNA is in flux, assigning specific roles to individual RNAs presents a significant challenge. For the first time RNA-seq was used to characterize the population of coding and non-coding transcripts in human sperm. Examining RNA representation as a function of multiple methods of library preparation revealed unique features indicative of very specific and stage-dependent maturation and regulation of sperm RNA, illuminating their various transitional roles. Correlation of sperm transcript abundance with epigenetic marks suggested roles for these elements in the pre- and post-fertilization genome. Several classes of non-coding RNAs including lncRNAs, CARs, pri-miRNAs, novel elements and mRNAs have been identified which, based on factors including relative abundance, integrity in sperm, available knockout data of embryonic effect and presence or absence in the unfertilized human oocyte, are likely to be essential male factors critical to early post-fertilization development. The diverse and unique attributes of sperm transcripts that were revealed provides the first detailed analysis of the biology and anticipated clinical significance of spermatozoal RNAs.

  8. Coarse-Graining the Fluid Flow around a Human Sperm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ishimoto, Kenta; Gadêlha, Hermes; Gaffney, Eamonn A.; Smith, David J.; Kirkman-Brown, Jackson

    2017-03-01

    The flagellar beat is extracted from human sperm digital imaging microscopy and used to determine the flow around the cell and its trajectory, via boundary element simulation. Comparison of the predicted cell trajectory with observation demonstrates that simulation can predict fine-scale sperm dynamics at the qualitative level. The flow field is also observed to reduce to a time-dependent summation of regularized Stokes flow singularities, approximated at leading order by a blinking force triplet. Such regularized singularity decompositions may be used to upscale cell level detail into population models of human sperm motility.

  9. Coarse-Graining the Fluid Flow around a Human Sperm.

    PubMed

    Ishimoto, Kenta; Gadêlha, Hermes; Gaffney, Eamonn A; Smith, David J; Kirkman-Brown, Jackson

    2017-03-24

    The flagellar beat is extracted from human sperm digital imaging microscopy and used to determine the flow around the cell and its trajectory, via boundary element simulation. Comparison of the predicted cell trajectory with observation demonstrates that simulation can predict fine-scale sperm dynamics at the qualitative level. The flow field is also observed to reduce to a time-dependent summation of regularized Stokes flow singularities, approximated at leading order by a blinking force triplet. Such regularized singularity decompositions may be used to upscale cell level detail into population models of human sperm motility.

  10. Artificial oocyte activation in intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycles using testicular sperm in human in vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    Kang, Hee Jung; Lee, Sun-Hee; Park, Yong-Seog; Lim, Chun Kyu; Ko, Duck Sung; Yang, Kwang Moon; Park, Dong-Wook

    2015-06-01

    Artificial oocyte activation (AOA) is an effective method to avoid total fertilization failure in human in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer (IVF-ET) cycles. AOA performed using a calcium ionophore can induce calcium oscillation in oocytes and initiate the fertilization process. We evaluated the usefulness of AOA with a calcium ionophore in cases of total fertilization failure in previous cycles and in cases of severe male factor infertility patients with non-motile spermatozoa after pentoxifylline (PF) treatment. The present study describes 29 intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI)-AOA cycles involving male factor infertility at Cheil General Hospital from January 2006 to June 2013. Patients were divided into two groups (control, n=480; AOA, n=29) depending on whether or not AOA using a calcium ionophore (A23187) was performed after testicular sperm extraction-ICSI (TESE-ICSI). The AOA group was further split into subgroups according to sperm motility after PF treatment: i.e., motile sperm-injected (n=12) and non-motile sperm-injected (n=17) groups (total n=29 cycles). The good embryo rate (52.3% vs. 66.9%), pregnancy rate (20.7% vs. 52.1%), and delivery rate (10.3% vs. 40.8%) were lower in the PF/AOA group than in the control group. When evaluating the effects of restoration of sperm motility after PF treatment on clinical outcomes there was no difference in fertilization rate (66.6% vs. 64.7% in non-motile and motile sperm, respectively), pregnancy rate (17.6% vs. 33.3%), or delivery rate (5.9% vs. 16.7%) between the two groups. We suggest that oocyte activation is a useful method to ensure fertilization in TESE-ICSI cycles regardless of restoration of sperm motility after PF treatment. AOA may be useful in selected patients who have a low fertilization rate or total fertilization failure.

  11. Artificial oocyte activation in intracytoplasmic sperm injection cycles using testicular sperm in human in vitro fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Kang, Hee Jung; Lee, Sun-Hee; Park, Yong-Seog; Lim, Chun Kyu; Ko, Duck Sung; Yang, Kwang Moon

    2015-01-01

    Objective Artificial oocyte activation (AOA) is an effective method to avoid total fertilization failure in human in vitro fertilization-embryo transfer (IVF-ET) cycles. AOA performed using a calcium ionophore can induce calcium oscillation in oocytes and initiate the fertilization process. We evaluated the usefulness of AOA with a calcium ionophore in cases of total fertilization failure in previous cycles and in cases of severe male factor infertility patients with non-motile spermatozoa after pentoxifylline (PF) treatment. Methods The present study describes 29 intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI)-AOA cycles involving male factor infertility at Cheil General Hospital from January 2006 to June 2013. Patients were divided into two groups (control, n=480; AOA, n=29) depending on whether or not AOA using a calcium ionophore (A23187) was performed after testicular sperm extraction-ICSI (TESE-ICSI). The AOA group was further split into subgroups according to sperm motility after PF treatment: i.e., motile sperm-injected (n=12) and non-motile sperm-injected (n=17) groups (total n=29 cycles). Results The good embryo rate (52.3% vs. 66.9%), pregnancy rate (20.7% vs. 52.1%), and delivery rate (10.3% vs. 40.8%) were lower in the PF/AOA group than in the control group. When evaluating the effects of restoration of sperm motility after PF treatment on clinical outcomes there was no difference in fertilization rate (66.6% vs. 64.7% in non-motile and motile sperm, respectively), pregnancy rate (17.6% vs. 33.3%), or delivery rate (5.9% vs. 16.7%) between the two groups. Conclusion We suggest that oocyte activation is a useful method to ensure fertilization in TESE-ICSI cycles regardless of restoration of sperm motility after PF treatment. AOA may be useful in selected patients who have a low fertilization rate or total fertilization failure. PMID:26161332

  12. Immunoglobulin G Expression in Human Sperm and Possible Functional Significance

    PubMed Central

    Yan, Meiling; Zhang, Xiaoyu; Pu, Qinxue; Huang, Tao; Xie, Qingdong; Wang, Yan; Li, Jing; Wang, Yun; Gu, Huan; Huang, Tianhua; Li, Zhiling; Gu, Jiang

    2016-01-01

    Immunoglobulin G (IgG), the major molecule of the immune system, which was traditionally thought to be produced by differentiated B-lymphocytes, had recently been found in non-immune cells including spermatozoa of rabbit testis. To study if human sperms could produce IgG that might play a role in fertilization, we employed immunofluorescent staining, Western blot, in situ hybridization, RT-PCR (reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction) and immunoelectron microscope and found that human sperms were capable of synthesizing IgG. IgG protein and mRNA were detected in the cytoplasm, mainly the neck region of the sperm and IgG immunoreactivity was found to cover the entire sperm cell. The essential enzymes necessary for IgG synthesis and class switching, RAG1 (recombination activating gene 1), RAG2 (recombination activating gene 2) and AID (activation-induced cytidine deaminase), were also detected in the sperm cells. Furthermore, we found that anti-IgG antibody could inhibit sperm from penetrating Zona-free hamster egg with statistical significance. These discoveries suggested that immunoglobulin G could be produced by human sperms and it might play a role during fertilization. PMID:26833114

  13. Probiotic administration improves sperm quality in asthenozoospermic human donors.

    PubMed

    Valcarce, D G; Genovés, S; Riesco, M F; Martorell, P; Herráez, M P; Ramón, D; Robles, V

    2017-04-26

    The objective of this study is to analyse the effect of the ingestion of two selected antioxidant probiotics strains (Lactobacillus rhamnosus CECT8361 and Bifidobacterium longum CECT7347) on sperm quality parameters in asthenozoospermic males after three and six weeks of administration. Nine asthenozoospermic men without any medical treatment under similar diet conditions participated in the study. The quality of individual sperm samples was evaluated before (previous to ingestion), during (after 3 and 6 weeks of ingestion) and after probiotic administration (3 and 6 weeks after finishing the treatment). Sperm motility was evaluated by computer-assisted sperm analysis system, DNA fragmentation by sperm chromatin structure assay, cell viability by flow cytometry and measurement of intracellular H2O2 (reactive oxygen species; ROS) by flow cytometry using dichloro-dihydrofluorescein diacetate. Sperm motility was drastically improved after the treatment (approximately 6 fold change), DNA fragmentation was statistically reduced after probiotic administration from (approximately 1.2 fold change) and intracellular H2O2 level was decreased (approximately 3.5 fold change). Cell viability was not affected by the treatment. The significant improvement in sperm motility and the decrease in DNA fragmentation reported in this study provide preliminary evidence that probiotics could be administrated to improve motility and decrease DNA fragmentation and ROS levels in asthenozoospermic human males.

  14. Effects of metronidazole, ipronidazole, and dibromochloropropane on rabbit and human sperm motility and fertility.

    PubMed

    Foote, Robert H

    2002-01-01

    Treatment of protozoal pathogens in the reproductive system with chemical agents exposes flagellated sperm cells to potential toxicants. A widely used antiprotozoal agent is metronidazole. Its effect on rabbit and human sperm was compared with a more soluble 5-nitroazole compound, ipronidazole, and with a systemic environmental toxicant, dibromochloropropane (DBCP). The percentages of motile rabbit and human sperm incubated with the compounds, the velocity of sperm, migration of sperm in polyacrylamide gel, young born in rabbits, and penetration of hamster oocytes by treated human sperm were measured in seven experiments. Up to 10mg/ml metronidazole and 1mg/ml DBCP had little effect on most sperm characteristics. However, 10mg/ml metronidazole and 5mg/ml of ipronidazole increased attachment of human sperm to hamster oocytes, but oocyte penetration was unaffected. Rabbit sperm exposed to 5mg/ml ipronidazole were infertile. No oocytes were penetrated by DBCP-treated human sperm.

  15. Not All Sperm Are Equal: Functional Mitochondria Characterize a Subpopulation of Human Sperm with Better Fertilization Potential

    PubMed Central

    Sousa, Ana Paula; Amaral, Alexandra; Baptista, Marta; Tavares, Renata; Caballero Campo, Pedro; Caballero Peregrín, Pedro; Freitas, Albertina; Paiva, Artur; Almeida-Santos, Teresa; Ramalho-Santos, João

    2011-01-01

    Human sperm samples are very heterogeneous and include a low amount of truly functional gametes. Distinct strategies have been developed to characterize and isolate this specific subpopulation. In this study we have used fluorescence microscopy and fluorescence-activated cell sorting to determine if mitochondrial function, as assessed using mitochondrial-sensitive probes, could be employed as a criterion to obtain more functional sperm from a given ejaculate. We first determined that mitochondrial activity correlated with the quality of distinct human samples, from healthy donors to patients with decreased semen quality. Furthermore, using fluorescence-activated cell sorting to separate sperm with active and inactive mitochondria we found that this was also true within samples. Indeed, sperm with active mitochondria defined a more functional subpopulation, which contained more capacitated and acrosome intact cells, sperm with lower chromatin damage, and, crucially, sperm more able to decondense and participate in early development using both chemical induction and injection into mature bovine oocytes. Furthermore, cell sorting using mitochondrial activity produced a more functional sperm subpopulation than classic swim-up, both in terms of improvement in a variety of functional sperm parameters and in statistical significance. In conclusion, whatever the true biological role of sperm mitochondria in fertilization, mitochondrial activity is a clear hallmark of human sperm functionality. PMID:21448461

  16. Functional and ultrastructural features of DNA-fragmented human sperm.

    PubMed

    Muratori, M; Piomboni, P; Baldi, E; Filimberti, E; Pecchioli, P; Moretti, E; Gambera, L; Baccetti, B; Biagiotti, R; Forti, G; Maggi, M

    2000-01-01

    The functional significance of deoxyribonucleic acid (DNA) fragmentation in ejaculated human sperm is unclear. In this study the extent of DNA strand breakage in swim-up selected spermatozoa was evaluated by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated fluorescein-dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL)-coupled flow cytometry and correlated with several functional and morphological sperm parameters. The extent of DNA fragmentation (mean = 11.07%+/-8.00%, range = 0.79%-42.64%, n = 140) was positively related to abnormal morphology and associated with defects of the sperm tail. A negative correlation was found between DNA breakage and progressive motility. When a stepwise multiple linear regression model was used to analyze the relationship between DNA fragmentation and the aforementioned parameters, only motility results were included in the model. The presence of spermatozoa showing submicroscopic characteristics resembling those of somatic apoptosis has been reported in human ejaculate. To verify whether sperm DNA fragmentation was associated with the presence of such apoptotic-like cells, we performed electron microscopy and TUNEL-coupled flow cytometry in a limited number of sperm samples (n = 24). Although we did not observe any significant relationship between DNA breakage and the characteristics that are suggestive of apoptosis, an association was found with several ultrastructural features, indicating an impaired motility. Hence, we conclude that in ejaculated sperm, DNA fragmentation does not correspond to the apoptosis-like phenomenon and that it is associated with defects of motility.

  17. Post-Translational Modifications of Histones in Human Sperm.

    PubMed

    Krejčí, Jana; Stixová, Lenka; Pagáčová, Eva; Legartová, Soňa; Kozubek, Stanislav; Lochmanová, Gabriela; Zdráhal, Zbyněk; Sehnalová, Petra; Dabravolski, Siarhei; Hejátko, Jan; Bártová, Eva

    2015-10-01

    We examined the levels and distribution of post-translationally modified histones and protamines in human sperm. Using western blot immunoassay, immunofluorescence, mass spectrometry (MS), and FLIM-FRET approaches, we analyzed the status of histone modifications and the protamine P2. Among individual samples, we observed variability in the levels of H3K9me1, H3K9me2, H3K27me3, H3K36me3, and H3K79me1, but the level of acetylated (ac) histones H4 was relatively stable in the sperm head fractions, as demonstrated by western blot analysis. Sperm heads with lower levels of P2 exhibited lower levels of H3K9ac, H3K9me1, H3K27me3, H3K36me3, and H3K79me1. A very strong correlation was observed between the levels of P2 and H3K9me2. FLIM-FRET analysis additionally revealed that acetylated histones H4 are not only parts of sperm chromatin but also appear in a non-integrated form. Intriguingly, H4ac and H3K27me3 were detected in sperm tail fractions via western blot analysis. An appearance of specific histone H3 and H4 acetylation and H3 methylation in sperm tail fractions was also confirmed by both LC-MS/MS and MALDI-TOF MS analysis. Taken together, these data indicate that particular post-translational modifications of histones are uniquely distributed in human sperm, and this distribution varies among individuals and among the sperm of a single individual.

  18. Human sperm chromosomes obtained from hamster eggs after sperm capacitation in TEST-yolk buffer

    SciTech Connect

    Brandriff, B.; Gordon, L.; Watchmaker, G.

    1985-01-01

    Human sperm chromosomes were obtained after capacitation with TES-Tris (TEST) yolk buffer and fusion with Syrian hamster eggs. Semen samples could be stored at 4/sup 0/C for 3 days and remain functional in the assay system. The efficiency of TEST yolk buffer for obtaining karyotypes was as good as, or greater than, the efficiency of standard BWW medium containing human serum albumin. 16 references, 3 tables.

  19. Aneuploidy detection in human sperm nuclei using PRINS technique

    SciTech Connect

    Girardet, A.; Coignet, L.; Andreo, B.

    1996-08-23

    Rapid and specific identification of chromosomes can be attained in situ using the PRimed IN Situ (PRINS) labelling technique. We have adapted this technique to mature human sperm in combination with a protocol for simultaneous decondensation and denaturation of sperm nuclei. This strategy allowed us to obtain double labelling of human spermatozoa in a <2-hr reaction. In the present study, we report the estimates of disomy for chromosomes 3, 7, 10, 11, and 17 on 64,642 spermatozoa from 2 normal males. The incidences of disomy ranged from 0.28-0.34%. There were no significant interindividual or interchromosomal differences in disomy rates. 27 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  20. The role of sperm proteasomes during sperm aster formation and early zygote development: implications for fertilization failure in humans.

    PubMed

    Rawe, Vanesa Y; Díaz, Emilce S; Abdelmassih, Roger; Wójcik, Cezary; Morales, Patricio; Sutovsky, Peter; Chemes, Héctor E

    2008-03-01

    BACKGROUND Sperm aster organization during bovine and human fertilization requires a paternally-derived centriole that must first disengage from the sperm tail connecting-piece. We investigated the participation of the 26S proteasome in this process. METHODS Proteasome localization and enzymatic activity were studied in normal and pathological human spermatozoa by immunocytochemistry and enzyme-substrate assays. The role of proteasomes during bovine zygote development was investigated using a pharmacological proteasome-inhibitor, MG132, and with anti-proteasome antibodies delivered by Streptolysin O-permeabilization or with the Chariot reagent. Human zygotes discarded after ICSI failures (n = 28) were also examined. RESULTS Proteasomes were localized in the sperm acrosome and connecting-piece, as well as in the pronuclei of bovine and human zygotes. Proteasomal enzymatic activities were decreased in defective human spermatozoa. Disrupted sperm aster formation and pronuclear development were found after pharmacological and immunological block of proteasomes in human/bovine spermatozoa and oocytes, as well as in 28 discarded human post-ICSI fertilization failures. CONCLUSIONS Specific proteasome inhibition disrupts sperm aster formation and pronuclear development/apposition in bovine and human zygotes. Human spermatozoa with defective centriolar/pericentriolar structures have decreased proteasomal enzymatic activity. Release of a functional sperm centriole that acts as a zygote microtubule-organizing center probably relies on selective proteasomal proteolysis. These findings suggest an important role of sperm proteasomes in zygotic development.

  1. Cytotoxic and Genotoxic Effects of Acephate on Human Sperm

    PubMed Central

    Dhanushka, M. A. Thamali

    2017-01-01

    Extensive use of organophosphorus pesticides (OPs) could alter semen quality and sperm DNA at different stages of spermatogenesis. Acephate is a highly toxic extensively used OP and, therefore, we aimed to evaluate the effects of acephate on human semen quality and sperm DNA integrity. Sperm collected from healthy males were exposed to 0, 50, 100, and 200 μg/mL of acephate and incubated for 1 h, 2 h, and 3 h. Subsequently, sperm motility, vitality, functional integrity of plasma membrane, sperm capacitation, and DNA damage were examined. Result showed a significant decline of the motility at 100 μg/mL after 3 h and with 200 μg/mL after 1 h, 2 h, and 3 h. Viability was significantly reduced at 200 μg/mL after 2 h and 3 h. Functional integrity was significantly affected at 100 μg/mL after 3h and in 200 μg/mL dose after 2 h and 3h. Similarly, sperm capacitation was significantly affected at 200 μg/mL after 1 h, 2 h, and 3 h and at 100 μg/mL at 3 h. DNA damage was significantly increased only in 200 μg/mL dose after 3 h. The study suggests that exposure to acephate may result in alterations of sperm structure and function thus contributing towards deteriorating in human semen quality triggering infertility. PMID:28392800

  2. Human sperm chromatin stabilization: a proposed model including zinc bridges.

    PubMed

    Björndahl, Lars; Kvist, Ulrik

    2010-01-01

    The primary focus of this review is to challenge the current concepts on sperm chromatin stability. The observations (i) that zinc depletion at ejaculation allows a rapid and total sperm chromatin decondensation without the addition of exogenous disulfide cleaving agents and (ii) that the human sperm chromatin contains one zinc for every protamine for every turn of the DNA helix suggest an alternative model for sperm chromatin structure may be plausible. An alternative model is therefore proposed, that the human spermatozoon could at ejaculation have a rapidly reversible zinc dependent chromatin stability: Zn(2+) stabilizes the structure and prevents the formation of excess disulfide bridges by a single mechanism, the formation of zinc bridges with protamine thiols of cysteine and potentially imidazole groups of histidine. Extraction of zinc enables two biologically totally different outcomes: immediate decondensation if chromatin fibers are concomitantly induced to repel (e.g. by phosphorylation in the ooplasm); otherwise freed thiols become committed into disulfide bridges creating a superstabilized chromatin. Spermatozoa in the zinc rich prostatic fluid (normally the first expelled ejaculate fraction) represent the physiological situation. Extraction of chromatin zinc can be accomplished by the seminal vesicular fluid. Collection of the ejaculate in one single container causes abnormal contact between spermatozoa and seminal vesicular fluid affecting the sperm chromatin stability. There are men in infertile couples with low content of sperm chromatin zinc due to loss of zinc during ejaculation and liquefaction. Tests for sperm DNA integrity may give false negative results due to decreased access for the assay to the DNA in superstabilized chromatin.

  3. Human sperm cytogenetics and the one-cell zygote

    SciTech Connect

    Brandriff, B.F.; Gordon, L.A.

    1989-11-27

    Human reproductive wastage is known to be a common event. One major cause of embryonic and fetal losses is chromosomal aberrations, identified by karyotyping spontaneous abortion material and in vitro fertilized human embryos. Karyotyping of human gametes has made it possible to document types and frequencies of chromosomal aberrations directly in eggs and sperm themselves. Our studies with human sperm from normal, healthy men support the view that chromosome-specific aneuploidy does in fact occur, and that frequencies of structural chromosomal aberrations appear to be person specific and stable over time. The types of structural aberrations identified suggest that normal human spermiogenesis may be vulnerable to breakage events or precursor lesions leading to such breakage events. After entry into egg cytoplasm and preceding the formation of first-cleavage mitotic chromosomes, the male as well as the female genome replicate their DNA in a pattern qualitatively similar to that in somatic cells. However, at present it is not known what relationship exists between spontaneous chromosome breaks seen at first cleavage and DNA replication activities. Limited data on survivors of radiotherapy lend support to the view that long-term effects on sperm chromosomal integrity can be identified. Studies on sperm cytogenetics thus have the potential for identifying adverse environmental effects on human spermatogenesis as monitored by this well-defined endpoint. 32 refs., 2 figs., 1 tab.

  4. Sperm DNA fragmentation affects epigenetic feature in human male pronucleus.

    PubMed

    Rajabi, H; Mohseni-Kouchesfehani, H; Eslami-Arshaghi, T; Salehi, M

    2017-03-06

    To evaluate whether the sperm DNA fragmentation affects male pronucleus epigenetic factors, semen analysis was performed and DNA fragmentation was assessed by the method of sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA). Human-mouse interspecies fertilisation was used to create human male pronucleus. Male pronucleus DNA methylation and H4K12 acetylation were evaluated by immunostaining. Results showed a significant positive correlation between the level of sperm DNA fragmentation and DNA methylation in male pronuclei. In other words, an increase in DNA damage caused an upsurge in DNA methylation. In the case of H4K12 acetylation, no correlation was detected between DNA damage and the level of histone acetylation in the normal group, but results for the group in which male pronuclei were derived from sperm cells with DNA fragmentation, increased DNA damage led to a decreased acetylation level. Sperm DNA fragmentation interferes with the active demethylation process and disrupts the insertion of histones into the male chromatin in the male pronucleus, following fertilisation. © 2017 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  5. Use of laptop computers connected to internet through Wi-Fi decreases human sperm motility and increases sperm DNA fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Avendaño, Conrado; Mata, Ariela; Sanchez Sarmiento, César A; Doncel, Gustavo F

    2012-01-01

    To evaluate the effects of laptop computers connected to local area networks wirelessly (Wi-Fi) on human spermatozoa. Prospective in vitro study. Center for reproductive medicine. Semen samples from 29 healthy donors. Motile sperm were selected by swim up. Each sperm suspension was divided into two aliquots. One sperm aliquot (experimental) from each patient was exposed to an internet-connected laptop by Wi-Fi for 4 hours, whereas the second aliquot (unexposed) was used as control, incubated under identical conditions without being exposed to the laptop. Evaluation of sperm motility, viability, and DNA fragmentation. Donor sperm samples, mostly normozoospermic, exposed ex vivo during 4 hours to a wireless internet-connected laptop showed a significant decrease in progressive sperm motility and an increase in sperm DNA fragmentation. Levels of dead sperm showed no significant differences between the two groups. To our knowledge, this is the first study to evaluate the direct impact of laptop use on human spermatozoa. Ex vivo exposure of human spermatozoa to a wireless internet-connected laptop decreased motility and induced DNA fragmentation by a nonthermal effect. We speculate that keeping a laptop connected wirelessly to the internet on the lap near the testes may result in decreased male fertility. Further in vitro and in vivo studies are needed to prove this contention. Copyright © 2012 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Geometrical guidance and trapping transition of human sperm cells

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guidobaldi, A.; Jeyaram, Y.; Berdakin, I.; Moshchalkov, V. V.; Condat, C. A.; Marconi, V. I.; Giojalas, L.; Silhanek, A. V.

    2014-03-01

    The guidance of human sperm cells under confinement in quasi-2D microchambers is investigated using a purely physical method to control their distribution. Transport property measurements and simulations are performed with diluted sperm populations, for which effects of geometrical guidance and concentration are studied in detail. In particular, a trapping transition at convex angular wall features is identified and analyzed. We also show that highly efficient microratchets can be fabricated by using curved asymmetric obstacles to take advantage of the spermatozoa specific swimming strategy.

  7. Sperm-immobilizing monoclonal antibody to human seminal plasma antigens.

    PubMed Central

    Shigeta, M; Watanabe, T; Maruyama, S; Koyama, K; Isojima, S

    1980-01-01

    Rat spleen cells immunized to human azoospermic semen (a mixture of seminal plasma components) and mouse myeloma cells (P3/X63 Ag8U1; P3U1) (Marguilies et al., 1976) were successfully fused with polyethylene glycol (PEG 1500) and 19 of 89 fused cell cultures were found to produce sperm-immobilizing antibody. The cells that produced antibody indicating the highest sperm-immobilizing activity were distributed into wells for further recloning and 10 clones producing sperm-immobilizing antibody were established. The clone (1C4) producing the highest antibody titre was found to produce a large amount of IgG in culture supernatants and to contain a mixture of rat and mouse chromosomes. It was proved by immunodiffusion test that the monoclonal antibody was produced to the human seminal plasma antigen No. 7 which is common to human milk protein. Using this hybridoma which produced a large amount of monoclonal sperm-immobilizing antibody, a new method could be developed for purifying human seminal plasma antigen by immunoaffinity chromatography with bound antibody from the hybridoma. Images Fig. 1 Fig. 2 Fig. 3 Fig. 4 PMID:6783353

  8. Human genetic mapping studies using single sperm typing

    SciTech Connect

    Hubert, R.S.

    1993-01-01

    Sperm typing is a powerful technique that uses the polymerase chain reaction (PCR) to analyze DNA sequences within single sperm cells in order to construct genetic maps. This methodology was used to estimate the recombination fraction between D3S2 and D3S2 which was found to be 0.28 (95% CI = 0.20-0.36). Pedigree analysis was unable to determine genetic distance between these two markers due to their low informativeness. We also showed that dinucleotide and tetranucleotide repeat polymorphisms can be analyzed in single cells without using radioactivity or denaturing gels. This provides a rich new source of DANA polymorphisms for genetic mapping by sperm typing. In addition, an approach that uses the sperm typing methodology is described that can define the physical boundaries of meiotic recombination hotspots. The hotspot at 4p16.3 near the Huntington disease gene was localized to an interval between D4S10 and D4S126. These studies demonstrated the usefulness of sperm typing as a tool for the study of human genetic.

  9. Detection of aneuploidy in human sperm.

    PubMed

    Kapp, R W

    1979-08-01

    Adequate methods for monitoring any type of gametic mutation directly in man are virtually nonexistent. A method is presented by which one can monitor Y chromosomal nondisjunction directly in the male gamete by quantifying the number of spermatozoa with two fluorescent bodies (YFF) in 1000 sperm counted. Dried semen slides are stained with quinacrine dihydrochloride and examined under a fluorescent microscope with dark field illumination. This method eliminates the biopsy required for other meiotic studies and further eliminates bias in gametogenic selection by evaluating ejaculated mature spermatozoa. Since chromosomal numerical errors are found in 0.4% of term births and 35% of miscarriages, it is evident that chromosomal aneuploidy constitutes the major mutagenic load in man. In view of the increases observed in the incidence of YFF sperm in patients receiving antineoplastic therapy and in the DBCP-exposed workers, it may be prudent for men who have a history of exposure to mutagens and who are contemplating reproduction to be evaluated by this method prior to attempting conception. Further, this procedure could also be applied to the clinical phase of new drug testing to evaluate the effects of that agent with respect to aneuploidy since the increases in Y chromosomal nondisjunction may well act as a barometer for increases in overall autosomal nondisjunction.

  10. Detection of aneuploidy in human sperm.

    PubMed Central

    Kapp, R W

    1979-01-01

    Adequate methods for monitoring any type of gametic mutation directly in man are virtually nonexistent. A method is presented by which one can monitor Y chromosomal nondisjunction directly in the male gamete by quantifying the number of spermatozoa with two fluorescent bodies (YFF) in 1000 sperm counted. Dried semen slides are stained with quinacrine dihydrochloride and examined under a fluorescent microscope with dark field illumination. This method eliminates the biopsy required for other meiotic studies and further eliminates bias in gametogenic selection by evaluating ejaculated mature spermatozoa. Since chromosomal numerical errors are found in 0.4% of term births and 35% of miscarriages, it is evident that chromosomal aneuploidy constitutes the major mutagenic load in man. In view of the increases observed in the incidence of YFF sperm in patients receiving antineoplastic therapy and in the DBCP-exposed workers, it may be prudent for men who have a history of exposure to mutagens and who are contemplating reproduction to be evaluated by this method prior to attempting conception. Further, this procedure could also be applied to the clinical phase of new drug testing to evaluate the effects of that agent with respect to aneuploidy since the increases in Y chromosomal nondisjunction may well act as a barometer for increases in overall autosomal nondisjunction. PMID:387399

  11. Non-genetic contributions of the sperm nucleus to embryonic development

    PubMed Central

    Yamauchi, Yasuhiro; Shaman, Jeffrey A; Ward, W Steven

    2011-01-01

    Recent data from several laboratories have provided evidence that the newly fertilized oocyte inherits epigenetic signals from the sperm chromatin that are required for proper embryonic development. For the purposes of this review, the term epigenetic is used to describe all types of molecular information that are transmitted from the sperm cell to the embryo. There are at least six different forms of epigenetic information that have already been established as being required for proper embryogenesis in mammals or for which there is evidence that it may do so. These are (i) DNA methylation; (ii) sperm-specific histones, (iii) other chromatin-associated proteins; (iv) the perinuclear theca proteins; (v) sperm-born RNAs and, the focus of this review; and (vi) the DNA loop domain organization by the sperm nuclear matrix. These epigenetic signals should be considered when designing protocols for the manipulation and cryopreservation of spermatozoa for assisted reproductive technology as necessary components for effective fertilization and subsequent embryo development. PMID:20953203

  12. High-throughput flowing upstream sperm sorting in a retarding flow field for human semen analysis.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jen-Kuei; Chen, Peng-Chun; Lin, Yu-Nan; Wang, Chia-Woei; Pan, Li-Chern; Tseng, Fan-Gang

    2017-03-13

    In this paper, we propose a microfluidic device capable of generating a retarding flow field for the sorting and separation of human motile sperm in a high-throughput manner. The proposed sorting/separation process begins with a rapid flow field in a straight-flow zone to carry sperm into a sorting zone to maintain the sperm's mobility. The sorting zone consists of a diffuser-type sperm sorter to differentiate sperm with different motilities based on the flowing upstream nature of human sperm in a retarding flow field. The dead sperm will then be separated from the live ones by passing through a dumbbell flow field to the outlet for disposal. The proposed flowing upstream sperm sorter (FUSS) is designed to imitate the selection mechanism found in the female body when sperm swim into the uterus. The experimental results demonstrate the utility of this device with regard to throughput (approximately 200 000 sperm per minute and a maximum of 200 million cells per mL), efficiency (90% of selected sperm are mobile), and the ability to select sperm with high motility (∼20% of sperm with a velocity exceeding 120 μm s(-1)). The proposed device is suitable for intrauterine insemination as well as in vitro fertilization thanks to the highly efficient sorting process not interfering with the natural function and energy resource of human sperm.

  13. In vitro penetration of human sperm into bovine cervical mucus: effects of sperm washing and exposure to low temperature.

    PubMed

    Stumpf, P G; Lloyd, T

    1985-01-01

    Standardized bovine cervical mucus penetration by human sperm in vitro provides information for evaluating male fertility. Normal semen specimens from 20 sperm donors and 17 infertile men were tested for cervical mucus penetration. Rigorous control of test temperature was necessary to guarantee the reliability and reproducibility of cervical mucus penetration. Sperm washing was found to significantly improve cervical mucus penetration for infertile men, from 18 +/- 2.2 to 27 +/- 3.4 mm, P less than .025. Sperm washing for normal donors had no apparent effect on cervical mucus penetration (58 +/- 1.5 mm prewash, 55 +/- 1.7 mm postwash, P greater than .1). The authors conclude that: 1) temperature for cervical mucus penetration testing is critical to reliability, and 2) cervical mucus penetration is a useful screening tool for in vitro procedures proposed to improve sperm function.

  14. Sex aneuploidy of unfertilized human oocytes after intracytoplasmic sperm injection

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, G.; Ward, D.C.; Jones, E.E.

    1994-09-01

    Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) has recently achieved successful fertilization and pregnancy in human in vitro fertilization, particularly in cases of severe male factor infertility. One criticism of this novel clinical technique is that it bypasses the natural selection process of fertilization. We use fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) to analyze oocytes which fail to fertilize after ICSI in the Yale IVF Program. The purpose of this study is to determine whether failed fertilization after ICSI can be attributed to sex chromosome aneuploidy in the oocyte. Fertilization of oocytes is determined by the presence of two pronuclei on light microscopic examination (400X). Multi-probe FISH with DAPI (4,6,-diamino-2-phenyl-indole) counterstain is then performed to determine oocyte ploidy and the presence of decondensed sperm. Centromeric probes for X, Y and 17 are used simultaneously in each oocyte for in situ hybridization to oocyte chromatin. In all oocytes examined after ICSI to date, unfertilized oocytes have decondensed sperm DNA present confirming appropriate intracytoplasmic placement of the sperm. Preliminary results obtained from 31 oocytes have not identified any sex chromosome aneuploidies. The FISH technique used in post-ICSI oocytes is a model system for delineating genetic causes of failed fertilization in the human.

  15. Human sperm sex chromosome disomy and sperm DNA damage assessed by the neutral comet assay.

    PubMed

    McAuliffe, M E; Williams, P L; Korrick, S A; Dadd, R; Marchetti, F; Martenies, S E; Perry, M J

    2014-10-10

    Is there an association between human sperm sex chromosome disomy and sperm DNA damage? An increase in human sperm XY disomy was associated with higher comet extent; however, there was no other consistent association of sex chromosome disomies with DNA damage. There is limited published research on the association between sex chromosome disomy and sperm DNA damage and the findings are not consistent across studies. We conducted a cross-sectional study of 190 men (25% ever smoker, 75% never smoker) from subfertile couples presenting at the Massachusetts General Hospital Fertility Clinic from January 2000 to May 2003. Multiprobe fluorescence in situ hybridization for chromosomes X, Y and 18 was used to determine XX, YY, XY and total sex chromosome disomy in sperm nuclei using an automated scoring method. The neutral comet assay was used to measure sperm DNA damage, as reflected by comet extent, percentage DNA in the comet tail, and tail distributed moment. Univariate and multiple linear regression models were constructed with sex chromosome disomy (separate models for each of the four disomic conditions) as the independent variable, and DNA damage parameters (separate models for each measure of DNA damage) as the dependent variable. Men with current or past smoking history had significantly greater comet extent (µm: regression coefficients with 95% CI) [XX18: 15.17 (1.98, 28.36); YY18: 14.68 (1.50, 27.86); XY18: 15.41 (2.37, 28.45); Total Sex Chromosome Disomy: 15.23 (2.09, 28.38)], and tail distributed moment [XX18: 3.01 (0.30, 5.72); YY18: 2.95 (0.24, 5.67); XY18: 3.04 (0.36, 5.72); Total Sex Chromosome Disomy: 3.10 (0.31, 5.71)] than men who had never smoked. In regression models adjusted for age and smoking, there was a positive association between XY disomy and comet extent. For an increase in XY disomy from 0.56 to 1.47% (representing the 25th to 75th percentile), there was a mean increase of 5.08 µm in comet extent. No other statistically significant

  16. The toxic effect of opioid analgesics on human sperm motility in vitro.

    PubMed

    Xu, Bo; Wang, Zhi-Ping; Wang, Yan-Juan; Lu, Pei-Hua; Wang, Li-Jun; Wang, Xiao-Hai

    2013-04-01

    Opioid analgesics are the most common therapeutic analgesic for acute pain. In this study, the toxicological and pharmacological features of a group of opioid analgesics were characterized by the motility of human sperm. Aliquots of sperm were incubated with various concentrations of opioid analgesics in vitro. Computer-assisted sperm analysis was used to assess sperm motility at 15 minutes, 2 hours, and 4 hours after drug addition to the medium. Butorphanol and dezocine showed marked reduction of motility after incubation with sperm for 15 minutes. Butorphanol was more effective than dezocine in immobilizing sperm. Other opioids studied, such as fentanyl, alfentanil, and sufentanil, showed only partial inhibitory activity. Based on the data reported herein, we have found that butorphanol and dezocine exert a sperm-immobilizing effect. However, fentanyl, alfentanil, and sufentanil exhibit only partial inhibition of sperm motility. Given the increasing use of opioids and their potential effect on sperm motility, these findings are greatly relevant to male reproductive health.

  17. Human sperm sex chromosome disomy and sperm DNA damage assessed by the neutral comet assay

    PubMed Central

    McAuliffe, M.E.; Williams, P.L.; Korrick, S.A.; Dadd, R.; Marchetti, F.; Martenies, S.E.; Perry, M.J.

    2014-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Is there an association between human sperm sex chromosome disomy and sperm DNA damage? SUMMARY ANSWER An increase in human sperm XY disomy was associated with higher comet extent; however, there was no other consistent association of sex chromosome disomies with DNA damage. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY There is limited published research on the association between sex chromosome disomy and sperm DNA damage and the findings are not consistent across studies. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, AND DURATION We conducted a cross-sectional study of 190 men (25% ever smoker, 75% never smoker) from subfertile couples presenting at the Massachusetts General Hospital Fertility Clinic from January 2000 to May 2003. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS Multiprobe fluorescence in situ hybridization for chromosomes X, Y and 18 was used to determine XX, YY, XY and total sex chromosome disomy in sperm nuclei using an automated scoring method. The neutral comet assay was used to measure sperm DNA damage, as reflected by comet extent, percentage DNA in the comet tail, and tail distributed moment. Univariate and multiple linear regression models were constructed with sex chromosome disomy (separate models for each of the four disomic conditions) as the independent variable, and DNA damage parameters (separate models for each measure of DNA damage) as the dependent variable. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE Men with current or past smoking history had significantly greater comet extent (µm: regression coefficients with 95% CI) [XX18: 15.17 (1.98, 28.36); YY18: 14.68 (1.50, 27.86); XY18: 15.41 (2.37, 28.45); Total Sex Chromosome Disomy: 15.23 (2.09, 28.38)], and tail distributed moment [XX18: 3.01 (0.30, 5.72); YY18: 2.95 (0.24, 5.67); XY18: 3.04 (0.36, 5.72); Total Sex Chromosome Disomy: 3.10 (0.31, 5.71)] than men who had never smoked. In regression models adjusted for age and smoking, there was a positive association between XY disomy and comet extent. For an increase in XY

  18. Mirror-symmetry breakings in human sperm rheotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoop, Norbert; Bukatin, Anton; Kukhtevich, Igor; Dunkel, Jörn; Kantsler, Vasily

    2015-11-01

    Rheotaxis, the directed response to fluid velocity gradients, has been shown to facilitate stable upstream-swimming of mammalian sperm cells along solid surfaces, suggesting a robust mechanism for long-distance navigation during fertilization. However, the dynamics by which a human sperm orients itself w.r.t ambient flows is poorly understood. Here, we combine microfluidic experiments with mathematical modeling and 3D flagellar beat reconstruction to quantify the response of individual sperm cells in time-varying flow fields. Single-cell tracking reveals two kinematically distinct swimming states that entail opposite turning behaviors under flow reversal. We constrain an effective 2D model for the turning dynamics through systematic large-scale parameter scans, and find good quantitative agreement with experiments. We present comprehensive 3D data demonstrating the rolling dynamics of freely swimming sperm cells around their longitudinal axis. Contrary to current beliefs, this analysis uncovers ambidextrous flagellar waveforms and shows that the cell's turning direction is is not defined by the rolling direction. Instead, the different rheotactic turning behaviors are linked to a broken mirror-symmetry in the midpiece section, likely arising from a buckling instability.

  19. Mirror-symmetry breakings in human sperm rheotaxis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Stoop, Norbert; Bukatin, Anton; Kukhtevich, Igor; Dunkel, Joern; Kantsler, Vasily

    Rheotaxis, the directed response to fluid velocity gradients, has been shown to facilitate stable upstream-swimming of mammalian sperm cells along solid surfaces, suggesting a robust mechanism for long-distance navigation during fertilization. However, the dynamics by which a human sperm orients itself w.r.t. ambient flows is poorly understood. Here, we combine microfluidic experiments with mathematical modeling and 3D flagellar beat reconstruction to quantify the response of individual sperm cells in time-varying flow fields. Single-cell tracking reveals two kinematically distinct swimming states that entail opposite turning behaviors under flow reversal. We constrain an effective 2D model for the turning dynamics through systematic large-scale parameter scans, and find good quantitative agreement with experiments. We present comprehensive 3D data demonstrating the rolling dynamics of freely swimming sperm cells around their longitudinal axis. Contrary to current beliefs, this analysis uncovers ambidextrous flagellar waveforms and shows that the cell's turning direction is is not defined by the rolling direction. Instead, the different rheotactic turning behaviors are linked to a broken mirror-symmetry in the midpiece section, likely arising from a buckling instability.

  20. Environmental car exhaust pollution damages human sperm chromatin and DNA.

    PubMed

    Calogero, A E; La Vignera, S; Condorelli, R A; Perdichizzi, A; Valenti, D; Asero, P; Carbone, U; Boggia, B; De Rosa, N; Lombardi, G; D'Agata, R; Vicari, L O; Vicari, E; De Rosa, M

    2011-06-01

    The adverse role of traffic pollutants on male fertility is well known. Aim of this study was to evaluate their effects on sperm chromatin/DNA integrity. To accomplish this, 36 men working at motorway tollgates and 32 unexposed healthy men (controls) were enrolled. All of them were interviewed about their lifestyle. Hormone, semen samples, and environmental and biological markers of pollution were evaluated. Sperm chromatin and DNA integrity were evaluated by flow cytometry following propidium iodide staining and TUNEL assay, respectively. LH, FSH, and testosterone serum levels were within the normal range in tollgate workers. Sperm concentration, total sperm count, total and progressive motility, and normal forms were significantly lower in these men compared with controls. Motorway tollgate workers had a significantly higher percentage of spermatozoa with damaged chromatin and DNA fragmentation, a late sign of apoptosis, compared with controls. A significant direct correlation was found between spermatozoa with damaged chromatin or fragmented DNA and the length of occupational exposure, suggesting a time-dependent relationship. This study showed that car exhaust exposure has a genotoxic effect on human spermatozoa. This may be of relevant importance not only for the reproductive performance of the men exposed, but also for the offspring health.

  1. A Human Lectin Microarray for Sperm Surface Glycosylation Analysis.

    PubMed

    Sun, Yangyang; Cheng, Li; Gu, Yihua; Xin, Aijie; Wu, Bin; Zhou, Shumin; Guo, Shujuan; Liu, Yin; Diao, Hua; Shi, Huijuan; Wang, Guangyu; Tao, Sheng-Ce

    2016-09-01

    Glycosylation is one of the most abundant and functionally important protein post-translational modifications. As such, technology for efficient glycosylation analysis is in high demand. Lectin microarrays are a powerful tool for such investigations and have been successfully applied for a variety of glycobiological studies. However, most of the current lectin microarrays are primarily constructed from plant lectins, which are not well suited for studies of human glycosylation because of the extreme complexity of human glycans. Herein, we constructed a human lectin microarray with 60 human lectin and lectin-like proteins. All of the lectins and lectin-like proteins were purified from yeast, and most showed binding to human glycans. To demonstrate the applicability of the human lectin microarray, human sperm were probed on the microarray and strong bindings were observed for several lectins, including galectin-1, 7, 8, GalNAc-T6, and ERGIC-53 (LMAN1). These bindings were validated by flow cytometry and fluorescence immunostaining. Further, mass spectrometry analysis showed that galectin-1 binds several membrane-associated proteins including heat shock protein 90. Finally, functional assays showed that binding of galectin-8 could significantly enhance the acrosome reaction within human sperms. To our knowledge, this is the first construction of a human lectin microarray, and we anticipate it will find wide use for a range of human or mammalian studies, alone or in combination with plant lectin microarrays. © 2016 by The American Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Inc.

  2. A Human Lectin Microarray for Sperm Surface Glycosylation Analysis *

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Yangyang; Cheng, Li; Gu, Yihua; Xin, Aijie; Wu, Bin; Zhou, Shumin; Guo, Shujuan; Liu, Yin; Diao, Hua; Shi, Huijuan; Wang, Guangyu; Tao, Sheng-ce

    2016-01-01

    Glycosylation is one of the most abundant and functionally important protein post-translational modifications. As such, technology for efficient glycosylation analysis is in high demand. Lectin microarrays are a powerful tool for such investigations and have been successfully applied for a variety of glycobiological studies. However, most of the current lectin microarrays are primarily constructed from plant lectins, which are not well suited for studies of human glycosylation because of the extreme complexity of human glycans. Herein, we constructed a human lectin microarray with 60 human lectin and lectin-like proteins. All of the lectins and lectin-like proteins were purified from yeast, and most showed binding to human glycans. To demonstrate the applicability of the human lectin microarray, human sperm were probed on the microarray and strong bindings were observed for several lectins, including galectin-1, 7, 8, GalNAc-T6, and ERGIC-53 (LMAN1). These bindings were validated by flow cytometry and fluorescence immunostaining. Further, mass spectrometry analysis showed that galectin-1 binds several membrane-associated proteins including heat shock protein 90. Finally, functional assays showed that binding of galectin-8 could significantly enhance the acrosome reaction within human sperms. To our knowledge, this is the first construction of a human lectin microarray, and we anticipate it will find wide use for a range of human or mammalian studies, alone or in combination with plant lectin microarrays. PMID:27364157

  3. Acetylproteomic analysis reveals functional implications of lysine acetylation in human spermatozoa (sperm).

    PubMed

    Yu, Heguo; Diao, Hua; Wang, Chunmei; Lin, Yan; Yu, Fudong; Lu, Hui; Xu, Wei; Li, Zheng; Shi, Huijuan; Zhao, Shimin; Zhou, Yuchuan; Zhang, Yonglian

    2015-04-01

    Male infertility is a medical condition that has been on the rise globally. Lysine acetylation of human sperm, an essential posttranslational modification involved in the etiology of sperm abnormality, is not fully understood. Therefore, we first generated a qualified pan-anti-acetyllysine monoclonal antibody to characterize the global lysine acetylation of uncapacitated normal human sperm with a proteomics approach. With high enrichment ratios that were up to 31%, 973 lysine-acetylated sites that matched to 456 human sperm proteins, including 671 novel lysine acetylation sites and 205 novel lysine-acetylated proteins, were identified. These proteins exhibited conserved motifs XXXKYXXX, XXXKFXXX, and XXXKHXXX, were annotated to function in multiple metabolic processes, and were localized predominantly in the mitochondrion and cytoplasmic fractions. Between the uncapacitated and capacitated sperm, different acetylation profiles in regard to functional proteins involved in sperm capacitation, sperm-egg recognition, sperm-egg plasma fusion, and fertilization were observed, indicating that acetylation of functional proteins may be required during sperm capacitation. Bioinformatics analysis revealed association of acetylated proteins with diseases and drugs. Novel acetylation of voltage-dependent anion channel proteins was also found. With clinical sperm samples, we observed differed lysine acetyltransferases and lysine deacetylases expression between normal sperm and abnormal sperm of asthenospermia or necrospermia. Furthermore, with sperm samples impaired by epigallocatechin gallate to mimic asthenospermia, we observed that inhibition of sperm motility was partly through the blockade of voltage-dependent anion channel 2 Lys-74 acetylation combined with reduced ATP levels and mitochondrial membrane potential. Taken together, we obtained a qualified pan-anti-acetyllysine monoclonal antibody, analyzed the acetylproteome of uncapacitated human sperm, and revealed

  4. Acetylproteomic Analysis Reveals Functional Implications of Lysine Acetylation in Human Spermatozoa (sperm)*

    PubMed Central

    Yu, Heguo; Diao, Hua; Wang, Chunmei; Lin, Yan; Yu, Fudong; Lu, Hui; Xu, Wei; Li, Zheng; Shi, Huijuan; Zhao, Shimin; Zhou, Yuchuan; Zhang, Yonglian

    2015-01-01

    Male infertility is a medical condition that has been on the rise globally. Lysine acetylation of human sperm, an essential posttranslational modification involved in the etiology of sperm abnormality, is not fully understood. Therefore, we first generated a qualified pan-anti-acetyllysine monoclonal antibody to characterize the global lysine acetylation of uncapacitated normal human sperm with a proteomics approach. With high enrichment ratios that were up to 31%, 973 lysine-acetylated sites that matched to 456 human sperm proteins, including 671 novel lysine acetylation sites and 205 novel lysine-acetylated proteins, were identified. These proteins exhibited conserved motifs XXXKYXXX, XXXKFXXX, and XXXKHXXX, were annotated to function in multiple metabolic processes, and were localized predominantly in the mitochondrion and cytoplasmic fractions. Between the uncapacitated and capacitated sperm, different acetylation profiles in regard to functional proteins involved in sperm capacitation, sperm-egg recognition, sperm-egg plasma fusion, and fertilization were observed, indicating that acetylation of functional proteins may be required during sperm capacitation. Bioinformatics analysis revealed association of acetylated proteins with diseases and drugs. Novel acetylation of voltage-dependent anion channel proteins was also found. With clinical sperm samples, we observed differed lysine acetyltransferases and lysine deacetylases expression between normal sperm and abnormal sperm of asthenospermia or necrospermia. Furthermore, with sperm samples impaired by epigallocatechin gallate to mimic asthenospermia, we observed that inhibition of sperm motility was partly through the blockade of voltage-dependent anion channel 2 Lys-74 acetylation combined with reduced ATP levels and mitochondrial membrane potential. Taken together, we obtained a qualified pan-anti-acetyllysine monoclonal antibody, analyzed the acetylproteome of uncapacitated human sperm, and revealed

  5. The shape of the human lens nucleus with accommodation.

    PubMed

    Hermans, Erik; Dubbelman, Michiel; van der Heijde, Rob; Heethaar, Rob

    2007-07-31

    Knowledge about geometric properties such as shape and volume and Poisson's ratio of the nucleus can be used in the mechanical and optical modeling of the accommodation process. Therefore, Scheimpflug imaging was used to determine the shape of the human lens nucleus during accommodation in five subjects. To describe the shape of the nucleus, we fitted a parametric model of the cross-sectional geometry to the gradient of the Scheimpflug images using the Hough transform. The geometric model made it possible to estimate the anterior and the posterior central radius, central thickness, equatorial diameter, and cross-sectional area of the nucleus. Assuming that the nucleus is rotationally symmetric, the volume of the nucleus can be estimated by integrating around the circumference. For all five subjects, the results show that during accommodation the nucleus became more convex and that the central thickness increased whereas the equatorial diameter decreased. This decrease in equatorial diameter of the nucleus with accommodation is in accordance with the Helmholtz accommodation theory. Finally, the volume of the nucleus (on average 35 mm(3)) showed no significant change during accommodation in any of the subjects, presumably due to the fact that the human nucleus consists of incompressible material with a Poisson's ratio that is near .5.

  6. Development of the human dentate nucleus.

    PubMed

    Mihajlovic, P; Zecevic, N

    1986-01-01

    The developing human dentate nucleus (DN) was studied in a series of specimens of various pre- and postnatal ages ranging from 8 gestational weeks (gw) to 10 years, in Golgi-impregnated and Nissl-stained material. The DN emerges from the cerebellar white matter at around 16 gestational weeks (gw) as a thick band of cells (600-700 micron in width) that gradually attenuates to a final width of 150-250 micron as it undergoes extensive infolding beginning around 24 gw. The highly convoluted configuration of the adult DN is recognizable by 35 gw. Around 16 gw, two basic classes of DN neurons can be identified. Differentiation of these neurons is especially intensive during the mid-gestational period (20-25 gw). At this time the size of cell bodies increases, dendrites branch profusely and acquire spines. A second, slower phase of maturation consisting of addition of secondary and tertiary branches, continues into the postnatal period. At all prenatal ages examined, dentate neurons are morphologically more mature than the Purkinje cells in the overlying cortex. DN neurons of premature infants did not show cytomorphological differences when compared with babies born at term.

  7. Human semen prostaglandins do not affect sperm motility and migration.

    PubMed

    Procaccini, J C; Gimeno, M F; Kesserü, E; Asch, R H

    1985-01-01

    Prostaglandin (PG) E2, PGF2 alpha and testosterone (T) concentrations were determined in the seminal plasma of 57 fertility-clinic patients. Results (mean less than SE) were: PGE2, 3.44 +/- 0.38 mu/ml; PGF2 alpha, 138 +/- 0.33 micrograms/ml; T, 429.54 +/- 14.01 pg/ml. The material was divided into 4 groups: normospermic, oligozoospermic, asthenozoospermic and azoospermic. No statistically significant differences were found among the values of the different groups, except for PGE2, which was found to be increased in the asthenozoospermic group. Sperm migration patterns were assessed in each semen sample, using the Kremer capillary tube test and human cervical mucus. Considering each semen sample individually, no correlations whatever were found among sperm count, motility and migration parameters and the respective concentrations of both PGs and T, nor was there a correlation among PGE2, PGF2 alpha, and T values of the same sample.

  8. Raman Spectroscopy of DNA Packaging in Individual Human Sperm Cells distinguishes Normal from Abnormal Cells

    SciTech Connect

    Huser, T; Orme, C; Hollars, C; Corzett, M; Balhorn, R

    2009-03-09

    Healthy human males produce sperm cells of which about 25-40% have abnormal head shapes. Increases in the percentage of sperm exhibiting aberrant sperm head morphologies have been correlated with male infertility, and biochemical studies of pooled sperm have suggested that sperm with abnormal shape may contain DNA that has not been properly repackaged by protamine during spermatid development. We have used micro-Raman spectroscopy to obtain Raman spectra from individual human sperm cells and examined how differences in the Raman spectra of sperm chromatin correlate with cell shape. We show that Raman spectra of individual sperm cells contain vibrational marker modes that can be used to assess the efficiency of DNA-packaging for each cell. Raman spectra obtained from sperm cells with normal shape provide evidence that DNA in these sperm is very efficiently packaged. We find, however, that the relative protein content per cell and DNA packaging efficiencies are distributed over a relatively wide range for sperm cells with both normal and abnormal shape. These findings indicate that single cell Raman spectroscopy should be a valuable tool in assessing the quality of sperm cells for in-vitro fertilization.

  9. Raman spectroscopy of DNA packaging in individual human sperm cells distinguishes normal from abnormal cells.

    PubMed

    Huser, Thomas; Orme, Christine A; Hollars, Christopher W; Corzett, Michele H; Balhorn, Rod

    2009-05-01

    Healthy human males produce sperm cells of which about 25-40% have abnormal head shapes. Increases in the percentage of sperm exhibiting aberrant sperm head morphologies have been correlated with male infertility, and biochemical studies of pooled sperm have suggested that sperm with abnormal shape may contain DNA that has not been properly repackaged by protamine during spermatid development. We have used micro-Raman spectroscopy to obtain Raman spectra from individual human sperm cells and examined how differences in the Raman spectra of sperm chromatin correlate with cell shape. We show that Raman spectra of individual sperm cells contain vibrational marker modes that can be used to assess the efficiency of DNA-packaging for each cell. Raman spectra obtained from sperm cells with normal shape provide evidence that DNA in these sperm is very efficiently packaged. We find, however, that the relative protein content per cell and DNA packaging efficiencies are distributed over a relatively wide range for sperm cells with both normal and abnormal shape. These findings indicate that single cell Raman spectroscopy should be a valuable tool in assessing the quality of sperm cells for in-vitro fertilization.

  10. Functional features and protein network of human sperm-egg interaction.

    PubMed

    Sabetian, Soudabeh; Shamsir, Mohd Shahir; Abu Naser, Mohammed

    2014-12-01

    Elucidation of the sperm-egg interaction at the molecular level is one of the unresolved problems in sexual reproduction, and understanding the molecular mechanism is crucial in solving problems in infertility and failed in vitro fertilization (IVF). Many molecular interactions in the form of protein-protein interactions (PPIs) mediate the sperm-egg membrane interaction. Due to the complexity of the problem such as difficulties in analyzing in vivo membrane PPIs, many efforts have failed to comprehensively elucidate the fusion mechanism and the molecular interactions that mediate sperm-egg membrane fusion. The main purpose of this study was to reveal possible protein interactions and associated molecular function during sperm-egg interaction using a protein interaction network approach. Different databases have been used to construct the human sperm-egg interaction network. The constructed network revealed new interactions. These included CD151 and CD9 in human oocyte that interact with CD49 in sperm, and CD49 and ITGA4 in sperm that interact with CD63 and CD81, respectively, in the oocyte. These results showed that the different integrins in sperm may be involved in human sperm-egg interaction. It was also suggested that sperm ADAM2 plays a role as a protein candidate involved in sperm-egg membrane interaction by interacting with CD9 in the oocyte. Interleukin-4 receptor activity, receptor signaling protein tyrosine kinase activity, and manganese ion transmembrane transport activity are the major molecular functions in sperm-egg interaction protein network. The disease association analysis indicated that sperm-egg interaction defects are also reflected in other disease networks such as cardiovascular, hematological, and breast cancer diseases. By analyzing the network, we identified the major molecular functions and disease association genes in sperm-egg interaction protein. Further experimental studies will be required to confirm the significance of these new

  11. The human sperm proteome 2.0: An integrated resource for studying sperm functions at the level of posttranslational modification.

    PubMed

    Wang, Ying; Wan, Jinyuan; Ling, Xiufeng; Liu, Mingxi; Zhou, Tao

    2016-10-01

    Various types of PTMs play important roles in the regulation of sperm proteins. However, most large-scale proteomic studies only focused on a single type of modification due to the limitation of enrichment methods. To investigate the complex composition of modified sperm proteins, we constructed the human sperm proteome 2.0 that integrated lysine acetylated, phosphorylated, N-linked glycosylated, and protein N-terminal acetylated proteins from previously published proteomic datasets. A total of 6069 modified sites on 2132 proteins were annotated. Functional enrichment analyses showed that different types of modified sperm proteins displayed different functional distributions. We found that acetylated, phosphorylated, and glycosylated proteins are more directly involved in sperm functions. While N-termnial acetylated proteins and nonmodified proteins appear to be more associated with the basic cellular functions. Thus, it is efficient to search for fertility-associated biomarkers in acetylated, phosphorylated, and glycosylated proteins. We also predicted modification cross-talks within the same proteins or between different proteins that provided potential hotspot targets for understanding the regulation of sperm functions via multiple modifications.

  12. Cryotolerance of stallion spermatozoa is related to ROS production and mitochondrial membrane potential rather than to the integrity of sperm nucleus.

    PubMed

    Yeste, M; Estrada, E; Rocha, L G; Marín, H; Rodríguez-Gil, J E; Miró, J

    2015-03-01

    Although cryopreservation of stallion spermatozoa allows long-term preservation of spermatozoa from particular stallions and facilitates international trade, it is understood to inflict damages on sperm cells that may finally reduce their fertilizing ability. In addition, individual differences are known to exist in the sperm ability to withstand freeze-thawing protocols. To date, these differences have mainly been reported on the basis of sperm motility and membrane integrity. For this reason, the present work sought to determine differences between good (good freezability ejaculates: GFE) and poor (poor freezability ejaculates: PFE) freezability stallion ejaculates in other sperm parameters, including peroxide and superoxide levels, potential of mitochondrial membrane and nuclear integrity. With this purpose, a total of 24 stallion ejaculates were cryopreserved and classified into two groups (GFE vs. PFE), depending on their sperm membrane integrity and motility after freeze-thawing. From the total of 24 ejaculates, 13 were classified as GFE and the other 11 were classified as PFE. Apart from differences in sperm membrane permeability and lipid disorder after freeze-thawing, GFE presented significantly (p < 0.05) higher percentages of viable spermatozoa with high content of peroxides and of superoxides than PFE. In contrast, and despite cryopreservation of stallion spermatozoa increasing DNA fragmentation and disrupting disulphide bonds in sperm head proteins, no significant differences between GFE and PFE were seen. We can thus conclude that good and poor freezability stallion ejaculates differ in their reactive oxygen species levels after cryopreservation, but not in the damage extent on sperm nucleus.

  13. Feasibility of multichannel human cochlear nucleus stimulation.

    PubMed

    Luetje, C M; Whittaker, C K; Geier, L; Mediavilla, S J; Shallop, J K

    1992-01-01

    Bipolar electrical stimulation of the brainstem cochlear nucleus (CN) following acoustic tumor removal in an only-hearing ear can provide beneficial hearing. However, the benefits of multichannel stimulation have yet to be defined. Following removal of a second acoustic tumor in a patient with neurofibromatosis 2, a Nucleus mini-22 channel implant device was inserted with the electrode array tip from the foramen of Luschka cephalad along the root entry zone of the eighth nerve, secured by a single suture superficially in the brain stem. Initial stimulation on the sixth postoperative day indicated that electrodes 18 to 22 were capable of CN stimulation without seventh nerve stimulation. Presumed electrode migration precluded further CN stimulation 1 month later. This report illustrates the feasibility of brainstem CN stimulation with an existing multichannel system.

  14. Gadolinium, a mechano-sensitive channel blocker, inhibits osmosis-initiated motility of sea- and freshwater fish sperm, but does not affect human or ascidian sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Krasznai, Zoltán; Morisawa, Masaaki; Krasznai, Zoárd Tibor; Morisawa, Sachiko; Inaba, Kazuo; Bazsáné, Zsuzsa Kassai; Rubovszky, Bálint; Bodnár, Béla; Borsos, Antal; Márián, Teréz

    2003-08-01

    Exposure to hypo-osmotic or hyperosmotic environment triggers the initiation of fish sperm motility. In this article, we report that calcium and potassium channel blockers do not influence motility of puffer fish sperm but calmodulin antagonists reversibly decrease it, suggesting that calmodulin-Ca(2+) interactions are prerequisite for the initiation of sperm motility in this species. Gadolinium (a stretch activated ion channel blocker) decreased the motility of puffer fish sperm from 92 +/- 3% to 6 +/- 3% and that of carp sperm from 91 +/- 7% to 3.5 +/- 4.3% in a dose-dependent manner (10-40 micro M). The effect of gadolinium was reversible, suggesting that stretch activated ion channels participate in the initiation of sperm motility of the two species. Gadolinium inhibits changes in the isoelectric point of certain proteins of puffer fish sperm, which occur when sperm motility is initiated in a hypertonic solution. Anisotropy measurements showed that hypo-osmotic treatment, which initiates carp sperm motility, increased membrane fluidity. When hypo-osmotic treatment was given in the presence of gadolinium, the sperm membrane remained as rigid as in quiescent cells, while motility was blocked. By contrast, gadolinium did not influence the motility parameters of Ciona or human sperm. Based on these lines of evidence, we suggest that conformational changes of mechanosensitive membrane proteins are involved in osmolality-dependent but not osmolality-independent sperm.

  15. Molecular identification of Ca2+ channels in human sperm.

    PubMed

    Park, Jin-Yong; Ahn, Hyun-Jong; Gu, Jung-Gyu; Lee, Keun-Ho; Kim, Jin-Sung; Kang, Ho-Won; Lee, Jung-Ha

    2003-08-31

    The acrosome reaction is a Ca(2+)-dependent exocytotic process that is a prerequisite step for fertilization. External calcium entry through voltage-activated Ca(2+) channels is known to be essential in inducing the acrosome reaction of mammalian spermatozoa. Due to their complex geometry, however, electrophysiological identification of sperm Ca(2+) channels has been limited. Here we identified Ca(2+) channel mRNAs expressed in motile human sperm using RT-PCR and their levels were compared using RNase protection assays. L-type, non- L-type, and T-type Ca(2+) channel mRNAs were detected by RT-PCR using degenerate primers. Cloning and sequencing of the PCR products revealed alpha1B, alpha1C, alpha1E, alpha1G, and alpha1H sequences. RT-PCR using specific primers repeatedly detected alpha1B, alpha1C, alpha1E, alpha1G, and alpha1H mRNAs, and additionally alpha1I mRNA. But alpha1A and alpha1D messages were not detected. Relative expression levels of the detected Ca(2+) channel subtypes were compared by RNase protection assays. The abundance of detected mRNA messages was in the following order: alpha1H alpha1G alpha1E alpha1B alpha1C alpha1I. These findings indicated that human motile sperm express multiple voltage-activated Ca(2+) channel RNAs among which T-type and non-L-type channel messages are likely to be predominantly expressed. Based on their relative expression levels, we propose that not only T-type but also non-L-type calcium channels may be major gates for the external calcium influx, required for the acrosome reaction.

  16. Development of the human dorsal nucleus of the vagus.

    PubMed

    Cheng, Gang; Zhu, Hua; Zhou, Xiangtian; Qu, Jia; Ashwell, K W S; Paxinos, G

    2008-01-01

    The dorsal nucleus of the vagus nerve plays an integral part in the control of visceral function. The aim of the present study was to correlate structural and chemical changes in the developing nucleus with available data concerning functional maturation of human viscera and reflexes. The fetal development (ages 9 to 26 weeks) of the human dorsal nucleus of the vagus nerve has been examined with the aid of Nissl staining and immunocytochemistry for calbindin and tyrosine hydroxylase. By 13 weeks, the dorsal vagal nucleus emerges as a distinct structure with at least two subnuclei visible in Nissl stained preparations. By 15 weeks, three subnuclei (dorsal intermediate, centrointermediate and ventrointermediate) were clearly discernible at the open medulla level with caudal and caudointermediate subnuclei visible at the level of the area postrema. All subnuclei known to exist in the adult were visible by 21 weeks and cytoarchitectonic differentiation of the nucleus was largely completed by 25 weeks. The adult distribution pattern of calbindin and tyrosine hydroxylase immunoreactive neurons was also largely completed by 21 weeks, although morphological differentiation of labeled neurons continued until the last age examined (26 weeks). The structural development of the dorsal nucleus of the vagus nerve appears to occur in parallel with functional maturation of the cardiovascular and gastric movements, which the nucleus controls.

  17. Role of human- and animal-sperm studies in the evaluation of male reproductive hazards

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrobek, A.J.; Gordon, L.; Watchmaker, G.

    1982-04-07

    Human sperm tests provide a direct means of assessing chemically induced spermatogenic dysfunction in man. Available tests include sperm count, motility, morphology (seminal cytology), and Y-body analyses. Over 70 different human exposures have been monitored in various groups of exposed men. The majority of exposures studied showed a significant change from control in one or more sperm tests. When carefully controlled, the sperm morphology test is statistically the most sensitive of these human sperm tests. Several sperm tests have been developed in nonhuman mammals for the study of chemical spermatotoxins. The sperm morphology test in mice has been the most widely used. Results with this test seem to be related to germ-cell mutagenicity. In general, animal sperm tests should play an important role in the identification and assessment of potential human reproductive hazards. Exposure to spermatotoxins may lead to infertility, and more importantly, to heritable genetic damage. While there are considerable animal and human data suggesting that sperm tests may be used to detect agents causing infertility, the extent to which these tests detect heritable genetic damage remains unclear. (ERB)

  18. Dialkyl Phosphate Urinary Metabolites and Chromosomal Abnormalities in Human Sperm

    PubMed Central

    Figueroa, Zaida I.; Young, Heather A.; Meeker, John D.; Martenies, Sheena E.; Barr, Dana Boyd; Gray, George; Perry, Melissa J.

    2015-01-01

    Background The past decade has seen numerous human health studies seeking to characterize the impacts of environmental exposures, such as organophosphate (OP) insecticides, on male reproduction. Despite an extensive literature on OP toxicology, many hormone-mediated effects on the testes are not well understood. Objectives This study investigated environmental exposures to OPs and their association with the frequency of sperm chromosomal abnormalities (i.e., disomy) among adult men. Methods Men (n=159) from a study assessing the impact of environmental exposures on male reproductive health were included in this investigation. Multi-probe fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) for chromosomes X, Y, and 18 was used to determine XX18, YY18, XY18 and total disomy in sperm nuclei. Urine was analyzed using gas chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry for concentrations of dialkyl phosphate (DAP) metabolites of OPs [dimethylphosphate (DMP); dimethylthiophosphate (DMTP); dimethyldithiophosphate (DMDTP); diethylphosphate (DEP); diethylthiophosphate (DETP); and diethyldithiophosphate (DEDTP)]. Poisson regression was used to model the association between OP exposures and disomy measures. Incidence rate ratios (IRRs) were calculated for each disomy type by exposure quartiles for most metabolites, controlling for age, race, BMI, smoking, specific gravity, total sperm concentration, motility, and morphology. Results A significant positive trend was seen for increasing IRRs by exposure quartiles of DMTP, DMDTP, DEP and DETP in XX18, YY18, XY18 and total disomy. A significant inverse association was observed between DMP and total disomy. Findings for total sum of DAP metabolites concealed individual associations as those results differed from the patterns observed for each individual metabolite. Dose-response relationships appeared nonmonotonic, with most of the increase in disomy rates occurring between the second and third exposure quartiles and without additional

  19. Characterization of fertilization-blocking monoclonal antibody 1G12 with human sperm-immobilizing activity

    PubMed Central

    KOMORI, S; KAMEDA, K; SAKATA, K; HASEGAWA, A; TOJI, H; TSUJI, Y; SHIBAHARA, H; KOYAMA, K; ISOJIMA, S

    1997-01-01

    A mouse hybridoma (1G12) producing sperm-immobilizing MoAb to human sperm was established and characterized in order to study the antigens relevant to sperm immobilization by antibodies. MoAb 1G12 had strong sperm-immobilizing and agglutinating activities and also showed a fertilization-blocking activity on in vitro fertilization tests. The antibody absorption experiments showed that MoAb 1G12 reacted not only to ejaculated sperm but also human seminal plasma, suggesting that the corresponding antigen might be a sperm coating antigen. The MoAb also reacted with peripheral blood lymphocytes. In histochemical studies, the epithelia of corpus epididymis were most strongly stained. Ejaculated sperm were stained with a granular pattern for their entire surface by immunofluorescence. MoAb 1G12 recognized polymorphic glycoproteins of 15–25 kD in the ejaculated sperm extract in Western blot analysis. After deglycosilation of the sperm extract, only a single staining band of under 15 kD was detected by MoAb 1G12. This suggests that the antigen epitope recognized by MoAb 1G12 might be a peptide of the core portion of the glycoprotein. MoAb 1G12 might be a useful tool for studying the mechanism of egg–sperm interaction, and also be applied to identifying the corresponding antigen by using gene technology. PMID:9328135

  20. Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptors (FGFRs) in Human Sperm: Expression, Functionality and Involvement in Motility Regulation

    PubMed Central

    Saucedo, Lucía; Buffa, Gabriela N.; Rosso, Marina; Guillardoy, Tomás; Góngora, Adrian; Munuce, María J.

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors receptors (FGFRs) have been widely characterized in somatic cells, but there is scarce evidence of their expression and function in mammalian gametes. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the expression of FGFRs in human male germ cells, to determine sperm FGFR activation by the FGF2 ligand and their participation in the regulation of sperm motility. The expression of FGFR1, 2, 3 and 4 mRNAs and proteins in human testis and localization of these receptors in germ cells of the seminiferous epithelium was demonstrated. In ejaculated sperm, FGFRs were localized to the acrosomal region and flagellum. Sperm exposure to FGF2 caused an increase in flagellar FGFR phosphorylation and activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and protein kinase B (PKB or Akt) signaling pathways. Incubation with FGF2 led to a significant increase in the percentage of total and progressive sperm motility, as well as in sperm kinematics. All responses were prevented by sperm preincubation with BGJ398, a specific inhibitor of FGFR tyrosine kinase activity. In addition to confirming the expression of FGFRs in germ cells of the human testis, our study describes for the first time the presence, localization and functionality of human sperm FGFRs, and provides evidence of the beneficial effect of FGF2 upon sperm motility. PMID:25970615

  1. Fibroblast Growth Factor Receptors (FGFRs) in Human Sperm: Expression, Functionality and Involvement in Motility Regulation.

    PubMed

    Saucedo, Lucía; Buffa, Gabriela N; Rosso, Marina; Guillardoy, Tomás; Góngora, Adrian; Munuce, María J; Vazquez-Levin, Mónica H; Marín-Briggiler, Clara

    2015-01-01

    Fibroblast growth factors receptors (FGFRs) have been widely characterized in somatic cells, but there is scarce evidence of their expression and function in mammalian gametes. The objective of the present study was to evaluate the expression of FGFRs in human male germ cells, to determine sperm FGFR activation by the FGF2 ligand and their participation in the regulation of sperm motility. The expression of FGFR1, 2, 3 and 4 mRNAs and proteins in human testis and localization of these receptors in germ cells of the seminiferous epithelium was demonstrated. In ejaculated sperm, FGFRs were localized to the acrosomal region and flagellum. Sperm exposure to FGF2 caused an increase in flagellar FGFR phosphorylation and activation of extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) and protein kinase B (PKB or Akt) signaling pathways. Incubation with FGF2 led to a significant increase in the percentage of total and progressive sperm motility, as well as in sperm kinematics. All responses were prevented by sperm preincubation with BGJ398, a specific inhibitor of FGFR tyrosine kinase activity. In addition to confirming the expression of FGFRs in germ cells of the human testis, our study describes for the first time the presence, localization and functionality of human sperm FGFRs, and provides evidence of the beneficial effect of FGF2 upon sperm motility.

  2. The nature of human sperm head vacuoles: a systematic literature review.

    PubMed

    Boitrelle, Florence; Guthauser, Bruno; Alter, Laura; Bailly, Marc; Wainer, Robert; Vialard, François; Albert, Martine; Selva, Jacqueline

    2013-01-01

    Motile sperm organelle morphology examination (MSOME) involves the use of differential interference contrast microscopy (also called Nomarski contrast) at high magnification (at least 6300x) to improve the observation of live human spermatozoa. In fact, this technique evidences sperm head vacuoles that are not necessarily seen at lower magnifications - particularly if the vacuoles are small (i.e. occupying <4% of the sperm head's area). However, a decade after MSOME's introduction, it is still not clear whether sperm head vacuoles are nuclear, acrosomal and/or membrane-related in nature. In an attempt to clarify this debate, we performed a systematic literature review in accordance with the PRISMA guidelines. The PubMed database was searched from 2001 onwards with the terms "MSOME", "human sperm vacuoles", "high-magnification, sperm". Out of 180 search results, 21 relevant English-language publications on the nature of human sperm head vacuoles were finally selected and reviewed. Our review of the literature prompted us to conclude that sperm-head vacuoles are nuclear in nature and are related to chromatin condensation failure and (in some cases) sperm DNA damage.

  3. High-throughput sorting and analysis of human sperm with a ring-shaped laser trap.

    PubMed

    Shao, Bing; Shi, Linda Z; Nascimento, Jaclyn M; Botvinick, Elliot L; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Berns, Michael W; Esener, Sadik C

    2007-06-01

    Sperm motility is an important concept in fertility research. To this end, single spot laser tweezers have been used to quantitatively analyze the motility of individual sperm. However, this method is limited with throughput (single sperm per spot), lacks the ability of in-situ sorting based on motility and chemotaxis, requires high laser power (hundreds of milliWatts) and can not be used to dynamically monitor changes in sperm swimming behavior under the influence of a laser beam. Here, we report a continuous 3-D ring-shaped laser trap which could be used for multi-level and high-throughput (tens to hundred sperm per ring) sperm sorting based on their motility and chemotaxis. Under a laser power of only tens of milliWatts, human sperm with low to medium velocity are slowed down, stopped, or forced to change their trajectories to swim along the ring due to the optical gradient force in the radial direction. This is the first demonstration of parallel sperm sorting based on motility with optical trapping technology. In addition, by making the sperm swimming along the circumference of the ring, the effect of laser radiation, optical force and external obstacles on sperm energetics are investigated in a more gentle and quantitative way. The application of this method could be extended to motility and bio-tropism studies of other self-propelled cells, such as algae and bacteria.

  4. Expression of human protamine P1 in sperm of transgenic mice

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrobek, A.J.; Keith, C.; Stilwell, J.; Lowe, X.; Anderson, G.

    1994-12-31

    Transgenic mice were produced by pronuclear injection with DNA constructs containing human protamine P1 cDNA recombined with a murine protamine P1 promoter, and were identified by PCR. Expression of human P1 was investigated using huplm, a monoclonal antibody specific for human P1, applied to murine testicular cells, smears of epididymal sperm, and smears of detergent-isolated sperm nuclei. Various antibodies and nontransgenic littermates were used as controls. Two male founders (T3 and T7) sired more than five generations of transgenic offspring each with continued expression of human P1 in their sperm. Transgenic animals appear of normal fertility with sperm of typical nuclear morphology. The human P1 transgene was expressed postmeioticly in both lines, as expected. Nearly 100% of sperm of T3 and T7 hemizygotes labeled with huplm, consistent with complete diffusion of human P1 protein through the intercellular bridge of spermatogenic cells. Human P1 labeling of sperm nuclei was not visibly affected by sonication or by treatment with the detergent MATAB or the reducing agent DTT. A third founder female (T5) showed a transmission pattern consistent with insertion of the transgene into an X chromosome; her transgenic offspring expressed human P1 in only a small fraction of sperm. Human P1 transgenes may serve as efficient targets for germinal mutations and transgenicmice may provide promising models for investigating the DNA complexes.

  5. Equatorial segment protein (ESP) is a human alloantigen involved in sperm-egg binding and fusion.

    PubMed

    Wolkowicz, M J; Digilio, L; Klotz, K; Shetty, J; Flickinger, C J; Herr, J C

    2008-01-01

    The equatorial segment of the sperm head is known to play a role in fertilization; however, the specific sperm molecules contributing to the integrity of the equatorial segment and in binding and fusion at the oolemma remain incomplete. Moreover, identification of molecular mediators of fertilization that are also immunogenic in humans is predicted to advance both the diagnosis and treatment of immune infertility. We previously reported the cloning of Equatorial Segment Protein (ESP), a protein localized to the equatorial segment of ejaculated human sperm. ESP is a biomarker for a subcompartment of the acrosomal matrix that can be traced through all stages of acrosome biogenesis (Wolkowicz et al, 2003). In the present study, ESP immunoreacted on Western blots with 4 (27%) of 15 antisperm antibody (ASA)-positive serum samples from infertile male patients and 2 (40%) of 5 ASA-positive female sera. Immunofluorescent studies revealed ESP in the equatorial segment of 89% of acrosome-reacted sperm. ESP persisted as a defined equatorial segment band on 100% of sperm tightly bound to the oolemma of hamster eggs. Antisera to recombinant human ESP inhibited both oolemmal binding and fusion of human sperm in the hamster egg penetration assay. The results indicate that ESP is a human alloantigen involved in sperm-egg binding and fusion. Defined recombinant sperm immunogens, such as ESP, may offer opportunities for differential diagnosis of immune infertility.

  6. Isolation of human single chain variable fragment antibodies against specific sperm antigens for immunocontraceptive development

    PubMed Central

    Samuel, A.S.; Naz, R.K.

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND Contraceptive vaccines can provide valuable alternatives to current methods of contraception. We describe here the development of sperm-reactive human single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies of defined sperm specificity for immunocontraception. METHODS Peripheral blood leukocytes (PBL) from antisperm antibody-positive immunoinfertile and vasectomized men were activated with human sperm antigens in vitro, and the complementary DNA prepared and PCR-amplified using primers based on all the variable regions of heavy and light chains of immunoglobulins. The scFv repertoire was cloned into pCANTAB5E vector to create a human scFv antibody library. RESULTS Panning of the library against specific sperm antigens yielded several clones, and the four strongest reactive were selected for further analysis. These clones had novel sequences with unique complementarity-determining regions. ScFv antibodies were expressed, purified and analyzed for human sperm reactivity and effect on human sperm function. AFA-1 and FAB-7 scFv antibodies both reacted with fertilization antigen-1 antigen, but against different epitopes. YLP20 antibody reacted with the expected human sperm protein of 48 ± 5 kDa. The fourth antibody, AS16, reacted with an 18 kDa sperm protein and seems to be a human homologue of the mouse monoclonal recombinant antisperm antibody that causes sperm agglutination. All these antibodies inhibited human sperm function. CONCLUSIONS This is the first study to report the use of phage display technology to obtain antisperm scFv antibodies of defined antigen specificity. These antibodies will find clinical applications in the development of novel immunocontraceptives, and specific diagnostics for immunoinfertility. PMID:18372255

  7. Sperm Competition in Humans: Mate Guarding Behavior Negatively Correlates with Ejaculate Quality

    PubMed Central

    Leivers, Samantha; Rhodes, Gillian; Simmons, Leigh W.

    2014-01-01

    In species where females mate with multiple males, the sperm from these males must compete to fertilise available ova. Sexual selection from sperm competition is expected to favor opposing adaptations in males that function either in the avoidance of sperm competition (by guarding females from rival males) or in the engagement in sperm competition (by increased expenditure on the ejaculate). The extent to which males may adjust the relative use of these opposing tactics has been relatively neglected. Where males can successfully avoid sperm competition from rivals, one might expect a decrease in their expenditure on tactics for the engagement in sperm competition and vice versa. In this study, we examine the relationship between mate guarding and ejaculate quality using humans as an empirical model. We found that men who performed fewer mate guarding behaviors produced higher quality ejaculates, having a greater concentration of sperm, a higher percentage of motile sperm and sperm that swam faster and less erratically. These effects were found independent of lifestyle factors or factors related to male quality. Our findings suggest that male expenditure on mate guarding and on the ejaculate may represent alternative routes to paternity assurance in humans. PMID:25250582

  8. Detection of aneuploid human sperm by fluorescence in situ hybridization: Evidence for a donor difference in frequency of sperm disomic for chromosomes 1 and Y

    SciTech Connect

    Robbins, W.A. Lawrence Livermore National Lab., CA ); Segraves, R.; Pinkel, D. ); Wyrobek, A.J. )

    1993-04-01

    Fluorescence in situ hybridization with repetitive-sequence DNA probes was used to detect human sperm disomic for chromosomes 1 and Y in three healthy men. Data on these same men had been obtained previously, using the human-sperm/hamster-egg cytogenetic technique, providing a cytogenetic reference for validating sperm hybridization measurements. Air-dried smears were prepared from semen samples and treated with DTT and lithium diiodosalicylate to expand sperm chromatin. Hybridization with fluorescently tagged DNA probes for chromosomes 1 (pUC177) or Y (pY3.4) yielded average frequencies of sperm with two fluorescent domains of 14.2[+-]2.4/10,000 and 5.6[+-]1.6/10,000 sperm, respectively. These frequencies did not differ statistically from frequencies of hyperploidy observed for these chromosomes with the hamster technique. In addition, frequencies of disomic sperm from one donor were elevated [approximately]2.5-fold above those of other donors, for both chromosomes 1 (P = .045) and Y (P = .01), consistent with a trend found with the hamster technique. The authors conclude that fluorescence in situ hybridization to sperm chromosomes provides a valid and promising measure of the frequency of disomic human sperm. 43 refs., 1 fig., 4 tabs.

  9. Evolutionary conservation of mammalian sperm proteins associates with overall, not tyrosine, phosphorylation in human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Schumacher, Julia; Ramljak, Sanja; Asif, Abdul R; Schaffrath, Michael; Zischler, Hans; Herlyn, Holger

    2013-12-06

    We investigated possible associations between sequence evolution of mammalian sperm proteins and their phosphorylation status in humans. As a reference, spermatozoa from three normozoospermic men were analyzed combining two-dimensional gel electrophoresis, immunoblotting, and mass spectrometry. We identified 99 sperm proteins (thereof 42 newly described) and determined the phosphorylation status for most of them. Sequence evolution was studied across six mammalian species using nonsynonymous/synonymous rate ratios (dN/dS) and amino acid distances. Site-specific purifying selection was assessed employing average ratios of evolutionary rates at phosphorylated versus nonphosphorylated amino acids (α). According to our data, mammalian sperm proteins do not show statistically significant sequence conservation difference, no matter if the human ortholog is a phosphoprotein with or without tyrosine (Y) phosphorylation. In contrast, overall phosphorylation of human sperm proteins, i.e., phosphorylation at serine (S), threonine (T), and/or Y residues, associates with above-average conservation of sequences. Complementary investigations suggest that numerous protein-protein interactants constrain sequence evolution of sperm phosphoproteins. Although our findings reject a special relevance of Y phosphorylation for sperm functioning, they still indicate that overall phosphorylation substantially contributes to proper functioning of sperm proteins. Hence, phosphorylated sperm proteins might be considered as prime candidates for diagnosis and treatment of reduced male fertility.

  10. Effects of electromagnetic radiation from a cellular phone on human sperm motility: an in vitro study.

    PubMed

    Erogul, Osman; Oztas, Emin; Yildirim, Ibrahim; Kir, Tayfun; Aydur, Emin; Komesli, Gokhan; Irkilata, Hasan Cem; Irmak, Mehmet Kemal; Peker, Ahmet Fuat

    2006-10-01

    There has been growing public concern on the effects of electromagnetic radiation (EMR) emitted by cellular phones on human health. Many studies have recently been published on this topic. However, possible consequences of the cellular phone usage on human sperm parameters have not been investigated adequately. A total number of 27 males were enrolled in the study. The semen sample obtained from each participant was divided equally into two parts. One of the specimens was exposed to EMR emitted by an activated 900 MHz cellular phone, whereas the other was not. The concentration and motility of the specimens were compared to analyze the effects of EMR. Assessment of sperm movement in all specimens was performed using four criteria: (A) rapid progressive, (B) slow progressive, (C) nonprogressive, (D) no motility. Statistically significant changes were observed in the rapid progressive, slow progressive and no-motility categories of sperm movement. EMR exposure caused a subtle decrease in the rapid progressive and slow progressive sperm movement. It also caused an increase in the no-motility category of sperm movement. There was no statistically significant difference in the sperm concentration between two groups. These data suggest that EMR emitted by cellular phone influences human sperm motility. In addition to these acute adverse effects of EMR on sperm motility, long-term EMR exposure may lead to behavioral or structural changes of the male germ cell. These effects may be observed later in life, and they are to be investigated more seriously.

  11. Chemosensory Ca2+ Dynamics Correlate with Diverse Behavioral Phenotypes in Human Sperm*

    PubMed Central

    Veitinger, Thomas; Riffell, Jeffrey R.; Veitinger, Sophie; Nascimento, Jaclyn M.; Triller, Annika; Chandsawangbhuwana, Charlie; Schwane, Katlen; Geerts, Andreas; Wunder, Frank; Berns, Michael W.; Neuhaus, Eva M.; Zimmer, Richard K.; Spehr, Marc; Hatt, Hanns

    2011-01-01

    In the female reproductive tract, mammalian sperm undergo a regulated sequence of prefusion changes that “prime” sperm for fertilization. Among the least understood of these complex processes are the molecular mechanisms that underlie sperm guidance by environmental chemical cues. A “hard-wired” Ca2+ signaling strategy that orchestrates specific motility patterns according to given functional requirements is an emerging concept for regulation of sperm swimming behavior. The molecular players involved, the spatiotemporal characteristics of such motility-associated Ca2+ dynamics, and the relation between a distinct Ca2+ signaling pattern and a behavioral sperm phenotype, however, remain largely unclear. Here, we report the functional characterization of two human sperm chemoreceptors. Using complementary molecular, physiological, and behavioral approaches, we comparatively describe sperm Ca2+ responses to specific agonists of these novel receptors and bourgeonal, a known sperm chemoattractant. We further show that individual receptor activation induces specific Ca2+ signaling patterns with unique spatiotemporal dynamics. These distinct Ca2+ dynamics are correlated to a set of stimulus-specific stereotyped behavioral responses that could play vital roles during various stages of prefusion sperm-egg chemical communication. PMID:21454470

  12. Chemical UV filters can affect human sperm function in a progesterone-like manner.

    PubMed

    Rehfeld, Anders; Egeberg, Dorte; Almstrup, Kristian; Holm Petersen, Jørgen; Dissing, Steen; Skakkebæk, Niels Erik

    2017-09-05

    Human sperm cell function must be precisely regulated to achieve natural fertilization. Progesterone released by the cumulus cells surrounding the egg induces a Ca2+-influx into human sperm cells via the CatSper Ca2+-channel and thereby controls sperm function. Multiple chemical UV filters have been shown to induce a Ca2+-influx through CatSper, thus mimicking the effect of progesterone on Ca2+-signaling. We hypothesized that these UV filters could also mimic the effect of progesterone on sperm function. We examined 29 UV filters allowed in sunscreens in the US and/or EU for their ability to affect acrosome reaction, penetration, hyperactivation, and viability in human sperm cells. We found that, similar to progesterone, the UV filters 4-MBC, 3-BC, Meradimate, Octisalate, BCSA, HMS and OD-PABA induced acrosome reaction, and 3-BC increased sperm penetration into a viscous medium. The capacity of the UV filters to induce acrosome reaction and increase sperm penetration was positively associated with the ability of the UV filters to induce a Ca2+-influx. None of the UV filters induced significant changes in the proportion of hyperactivated cells. In conclusion, chemical UV filters that mimic the effect of progesterone on Ca2+-signaling in human sperm cells, can similarly mimic the effect of progesterone on acrosome reaction and sperm penetration. Human exposure to these chemical UV filters may impair fertility by interfering with sperm function, e.g. through induction of premature acrosome reaction. Further studies are needed to confirm the results in vivo.

  13. Neurophysiological evaluation of the pedunculopontine nucleus in humans.

    PubMed

    Profice, P; Mazzone, P; Pilato, F; Dileone, M; Insola, A; Ranieri, F; Di Lazzaro, V

    2011-10-01

    The pedunculopontine nucleus (PPTg) is constituted by a heterogeneous cluster of neurons located in caudal mesencephalic tegmentum which projects to the thalamus to trigger thalamocortical rhythms and the brainstem to modulate muscle tone and locomotion. It has been investigated as potential deep brain stimulation (DBS) target for treating Parkinson's disease (PD) symptoms. Neurophysiological studies conducted in humans using DBS electrodes for exploring functional properties of PPTg in vivo, reviewed in this paper, demonstrated that the functional connections between PPTg and cortex, basal ganglia, brainstem network involved in sleep/wake control, and spinal cord can be explored in vivo and provided useful insights about the physiology of this nucleus and pathophysiology of PD.

  14. The small RNA content of human sperm reveals pseudogene-derived piRNAs complementary to protein-coding genes

    PubMed Central

    Pantano, Lorena; Jodar, Meritxell; Bak, Mads; Ballescà, Josep Lluís; Tommerup, Niels; Oliva, Rafael; Vavouri, Tanya

    2015-01-01

    At the end of mammalian sperm development, sperm cells expel most of their cytoplasm and dispose of the majority of their RNA. Yet, hundreds of RNA molecules remain in mature sperm. The biological significance of the vast majority of these molecules is unclear. To better understand the processes that generate sperm small RNAs and what roles they may have, we sequenced and characterized the small RNA content of sperm samples from two human fertile individuals. We detected 182 microRNAs, some of which are highly abundant. The most abundant microRNA in sperm is miR-1246 with predicted targets among sperm-specific genes. The most abundant class of small noncoding RNAs in sperm are PIWI-interacting RNAs (piRNAs). Surprisingly, we found that human sperm cells contain piRNAs processed from pseudogenes. Clusters of piRNAs from human testes contain pseudogenes transcribed in the antisense strand and processed into small RNAs. Several human protein-coding genes contain antisense predicted targets of pseudogene-derived piRNAs in the male germline and these piRNAs are still found in mature sperm. Our study provides the most extensive data set and annotation of human sperm small RNAs to date and is a resource for further functional studies on the roles of sperm small RNAs. In addition, we propose that some of the pseudogene-derived human piRNAs may regulate expression of their parent gene in the male germline. PMID:25904136

  15. The subthalamic nucleus influences visuospatial attention in humans.

    PubMed

    Schmalbach, Barbara; Günther, Veronika; Raethjen, Jan; Wailke, Stefanie; Falk, Daniela; Deuschl, Günther; Witt, Karsten

    2014-03-01

    Spatial attention is a lateralized feature of the human brain. Whereas the role of cortical areas of the nondominant hemisphere on spatial attention has been investigated in detail, the impact of the BG, and more precisely the subthalamic nucleus, on signs and symptoms of spatial attention is not well understood. Here we used unilateral deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus to reversibly, specifically, and intraindividually modify the neuronal BG outflow and its consequences on signs and symptoms of visuospatial attention in patients suffering from Parkinson disease. We tested 13 patients with Parkinson disease and chronic deep brain stimulation in three stimulation settings: unilateral right and left deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus as well as bilateral deep brain stimulation of the subthalamic nucleus. In all three stimulation settings, the patients viewed a set of pictures while an eye-tracker system recorded eye movements. During the exploration of the visual stimuli, we analyzed the time spent in each visual hemispace, as well as the number, duration, amplitude, peak velocity, acceleration peak, and speed of saccades. In the unilateral left-sided stimulation setting, patients show a shorter ipsilateral exploration time of the extrapersonal space, whereas number, duration, and speed of saccades did not differ between the different stimulation settings. These results demonstrated reduced visuospatial attention toward the side contralateral to the right subthalamic nucleus that was not being stimulated in a unilateral left-sided stimulation. Turning on the right stimulator, the reduced visuospatial attention vanished. These results support the involvement of the subthalamic nucleus in modulating spatial attention. Therefore, the subthalamic nucleus is part of the subcortical network that subserves spatial attention.

  16. Topology of chromosome centromeres in human sperm nuclei with high levels of DNA damage

    PubMed Central

    Wiland, Ewa; Fraczek, Monika; Olszewska, Marta; Kurpisz, Maciej

    2016-01-01

    Several studies have shown that the ‘poor’ sperm DNA quality appears to be an important factor affecting male reproductive ability. In the case of sperm cells from males with the correct somatic karyotype but with deficient spermatogenesis, resulting in a high degree of sperm DNA fragmentation, we observed changes in the preferential topology of the chromosome 7, 9, 15, 18, X and Y centromeres. The changes occurred in radial localization and may have been directly linked to the sperm chromatin damage. This conclusion is mainly based on a comparison of FISH signals that were observed simultaneously in the TUNEL-positive and TUNEL-negative sperm cells. The analyzed cells originated from the same ejaculated sample and FISH was performed on the same slides, after in situ TUNEL reaction. Based on the observed changes and previous data, it appears that the sperm nucleus architecture can be disrupted by a variety of factors and has a negative influence on spermatogenesis at the same time. Often, these factors coexist (e.g. chromosomal translocations, aneuploidies, a higher DNA fragmentation, abnormal seminology), but no direct correlations between the factors were observed. PMID:27558650

  17. Small human sperm vacuoles observed under high magnification are pocket-like nuclear concavities linked to chromatin condensation failure.

    PubMed

    Boitrelle, F; Albert, M; Petit, J-M; Ferfouri, F; Wainer, R; Bergere, M; Bailly, M; Vialard, F; Selva, J

    2013-08-01

    Since an embryo's ability to grow to the blastocyst stage and implant can be improved by selection of a normal spermatozoon with a vacuole-free head, this study set out to determine the nature of small sperm vacuoles observed under high magnification (>×6300). For 15 infertile men with various sperm profiles, high-magnification microscopy was used to select motile, morphometrically normal spermatozoa with no vacuoles (n=450) or more than two small vacuoles (each of which occupied less than 4% of the head's area; n=450). Spermatozoa acrosome reaction status and degree of chromatin condensation were analysed. Three-dimensional deconvolution microscopy was used to accurately image the nucleus and acrosome at all depths in all spermatozoa. In all 450 spermatozoa with small vacuoles, the latter were seen to be abnormal, DNA-free nuclear concavities. Spermatozoa with small vacuoles were significantly more likely than vacuole-free spermatozoa to have noncondensed chromatin (39.8% versus 9.3%, respectively; P<0.0001). There was no significant difference between the two groups of spermatozoa in terms of acrosome reaction status. No association between chromatin condensation and acrosome reaction status was observed. Small human sperm vacuoles observed under high magnification are pocket-like nuclear concavities related to failure of chromatin condensation.

  18. Liquid nitrogen vapor is comparable to liquid nitrogen for storage of cryopreserved human sperm: evidence from the characteristics of post-thaw human sperm.

    PubMed

    Hu, Jingmei; Zhao, Shidou; Xu, Chengyan; Zhang, Lin; Lu, Shaoming; Cui, Linlin; Ma, Jinlong; Chen, Zi-Jiang

    2015-11-01

    To compare the differences in the characteristics of post-thaw human sperm after storage in either liquid nitrogen (LN2; -196 °C) or LN2 vapor (-167 °C). Experimental study. University hospital. Thirty healthy volunteers who agreed to donate their normal semen samples for infertility or research were included in the study. Semen samples (n = 30) were divided into eight aliquots and frozen. Four aliquots of each human semen sample were stored in LN2 (-196 °C), and the other four aliquots were stored in LN2 vapor (-167 °C). After 1, 3, 6, or 12 months, samples were thawed and analyzed. The motility was evaluated by the manual counting method. The viability was estimated by eosin staining. The morphology was analyzed by Diff-Quik staining. The sperm DNA integrity was determined with acridine orange fluorescent staining, and acrosin activity was assayed by the modified Kennedy method. The characteristics of post-thaw human sperm, including motility, viability, morphology, DNA integrity, and acrosin activity, showed no significant difference between LN2 and LN2 vapor storage for the different time periods. LN2 vapor was comparable to LN2 in post-thaw sperm characteristics, suggesting that LN2 vapor may be substituted for LN2 for the long-term storage of human sperm. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Validation of a laboratory‐developed test of human sperm capacitation

    PubMed Central

    Moody, Melissa A.; Cardona, Cristina; Simpson, Alana J.; Smith, T. Timothy; Travis, Alexander J.

    2017-01-01

    Sperm must undergo capacitation to become fertilization competent. Here we validated that monosialotetrahexosylganglioside (GM1) localization patterns, which were assessed in the Cap‐Score™ Sperm Function Test, reflect a capacitated state in human sperm. First, we defined patterns representing sperm that do or do not respond to stimuli for capacitation. Sperm with “capacitated” patterns had exposed acrosomal carbohydrates and underwent acrosome exocytosis in response to calcium ionophore (A23187). Precision was evaluated by percent change of the Cap‐Score measured for 50, 100, 150, and 200 sperm. Changes of 11%, 6%, and 5% were observed (n ≥ 23); therefore, we counted ≥150 sperm per condition. Variance within and between readers was evaluated using 20 stitched image files generated from unique ejaculates. Two trained readers randomly resampled each image 20 times, reporting an average standard deviation of 3 Cap‐Score units and coefficient of variation of 13% when rescoring samples, with no difference between readers. Semen liquefaction times ≤2 hr and mechanical liquefaction with Pasteur or wide‐orifice transfer pipettes did not alter Cap‐Score values. However, liquefaction with chymotrypsin (p = 0.002) and bromelain (p = 0.049) reduced response to capacitating stimuli and induced membrane damage, while counterintuitively improving sperm motility. Together, these data validate the Cap‐Score assay for the intended purpose of providing information on sperm capacitation and male fertility. In addition to its clinical utility as a diagnostic tool, this test of sperm function can reveal the impact of common practices of semen handling on the ability of sperm to respond to capacitation stimuli. PMID:28418600

  20. Heat Shock Protein 90 Has Roles in Intracellular Calcium Homeostasis, Protein Tyrosine Phosphorylation Regulation, and Progesterone-Responsive Sperm Function in Human Sperm

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Aijun; Jiang, Youfang; Xie, Haifeng; Shi, Qixian; Zhang, Songying; Ni, Ya

    2014-01-01

    Heat shock protein 90 plays critical roles in client protein maturation, signal transduction, protein folding and degradation, and morphological evolution; however, its function in human sperm is not fully understood. Therefore, our objective in this study was to elucidate the mechanism by which heat shock protein 90 exerts its effects on human sperm function. By performing indirect immunofluorescence staining, we found that heat shock protein 90 was localized primarily in the neck, midpiece, and tail regions of human sperm, and that its expression increased with increasing incubation time under capacitation conditions. Geldanamycin, a specific inhibitor of heat shock protein 90, was shown to inhibit this increase in heat shock protein 90 expression in western blotting analyses. Using a multifunctional microplate reader to examine Fluo-3 AM-loaded sperm, we observed for the first time that inhibition of heat shock protein 90 by using geldanamycin significantly decreased intracellular calcium concentrations during capacitation. Moreover, western blot analysis showed that geldanamycin enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation of several proteins, including heat shock protein 90, in a dose-dependent manner. The effects of geldanamycin on human sperm function in the absence or presence of progesterone was evaluated by performing chlortetracycline staining and by using a computer-assisted sperm analyzer. We found that geldanamycin alone did not affect sperm capacitation, hyperactivation, and motility, but did so in the presence of progesterone. Taken together, these data suggest that heat shock protein 90, which increases in expression in human sperm during capacitation, has roles in intracellular calcium homeostasis, protein tyrosine phosphorylation regulation, and progesterone-stimulated sperm function. In this study, we provide new insights into the roles of heat shock protein 90 in sperm function. PMID:25541943

  1. Effect of potash alum (aluminium potassium sulphate) on human semen and sperm.

    PubMed

    Singh, H P; Singh, C K; Singh, R R

    1998-04-01

    25 normal and healthy human volunteers were engaged in this investigation. The different concentration of potash alum solution have different effects on sperm, motility/death and fructose level of the semen. Higher concentration have higher effects.

  2. Comparison of human sperm morphometry assessment models based on zona pellucida selectivity.

    PubMed

    Garrett, C; Liu, D Y; Baker, H W G

    2007-01-01

    Computer image analysis improves the objectivity and reproducibility of conventional assessments of sperm morphology. We have extended this objectivity by using the physiological process of sperm-zona pellucida (ZP) binding to classify 'normal' sperm morphometry. Linear regression analysis of the morphometric differences between sperm in semen, swim-up and ZP bound samples (n=53) was used to establish 12 "zona preferred" morphometric parameters from which two different morphometric evaluations of an individual sperm's potential for motility and ability to bind to the ZP of human oocytes were calculated. The two models, %Z and %ZB, were then tested, together with conventional morphometry assessments of percent "normal" and other semen variables, against experimental sperm-ZP binding rates (n=64) and natural pregnancy rates in sub-fertile couples (n= 1191). Although %ZB was the most significantly related semen variable to sperm-ZP binding rate, the simpler %Z was more significant in the Cox regression model for natural pregnancy rates in sub-fertile couples. In multivariate analysis, the only additional significant covariates were sperm straight line velocity and female age. %Z is therefore the most appropriate and also easiest of our morphometry assessments to be applied to commercial CASA systems which offer a morphometry module with stain density analysis.

  3. Low amounts of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species define human sperm quality.

    PubMed

    Marques, Mónica; Sousa, Ana Paula; Paiva, Artur; Almeida-Santos, Teresa; Ramalho-Santos, João

    2014-06-01

    We have applied the mitochondria-specific superoxide fluorescent probe MitoSOX Red (MitoSOX) to detect mitochondria-specific reactive oxygen species (mROS) production in human sperm samples using flow cytometry. We show that human ejaculates are heterogeneous in terms of mROS production, with three subpopulations clearly detectable, comprising sperm that produce increasing amounts of mROS (MitoSOX-, MitoSOX+, and MitoSOX++). The sperm subpopulation producing the lowest amount of mROS represented the most functional subset of male gametes within the ejaculate, as it was correlated with the highest amount of live and non-apoptotic sperm and increased both in samples with better semen parameters and in samples processed by both density-gradient centrifugation and swim-up, both known to select for higher quality sperm. Importantly, the MitoSOX- subpopulation was clearly more prevalent in samples that gave rise to pregnancies following assisted reproduction. Our work, therefore, not only describe discreet human sperm heterogeneity at the mROS level but also suggests that mROS may represent a strategy to both evaluate sperm samples and isolate the most functional gametes for assisted reproduction. © 2014 Society for Reproduction and Fertility.

  4. Automatic Tracking and Motility Analysis of Human Sperm in Time-Lapse Images.

    PubMed

    Urbano, Leonardo F; Masson, Puneet; VerMilyea, Matthew; Kam, Moshe

    2017-03-01

    We present a fully automated multi-sperm tracking algorithm. It has the demonstrated capability to detect and track simultaneously hundreds of sperm cells in recorded videos while accurately measuring motility parameters over time and with minimal operator intervention. Algorithms of this kind may help in associating dynamic swimming parameters of human sperm cells with fertility and fertilization rates. Specifically, we offer an image processing method, based on radar tracking algorithms, that detects and tracks automatically the swimming paths of human sperm cells in timelapse microscopy image sequences of the kind that is analyzed by fertility clinics. Adapting the well-known joint probabilistic data association filter (JPDAF), we automatically tracked hundreds of human sperm simultaneously and measured their dynamic swimming parameters over time. Unlike existing CASA instruments, our algorithm has the capability to track sperm swimming in close proximity to each other and during apparent cell-to-cell collisions. Collecting continuously parameters for each sperm tracked without sample dilution (currently impossible using standard CASA systems) provides an opportunity to compare such data with standard fertility rates. The use of our algorithm thus has the potential to free the clinician from having to rely on elaborate motility measurements obtained manually by technicians, speed up semen processing, and provide medical practitioners and researchers with more useful data than are currently available.

  5. Comparison of Cryopreserved Human Sperm between Ultra Rapid Freezing and Slow Programmable Freezing: Effect on Motility, Morphology and DNA Integrity.

    PubMed

    Tongdee, Pattama; Sukprasert, Matchuporn; Satirapod, Chonticha; Wongkularb, Anna; Choktanasiri, Wicham

    2015-05-01

    Cryopreservation of sperm is common methods to preserve male fertility. Sperm freezing, suggest slow programmable freezing caused lower change of sperm morphology than sperm freezing in vapor of liquid nitrogen. Ultra rapid freezing is easy to be worked on, less time, low cost and does not need high experience. To compare the effect on sperm motility, morphology and DNA integrity of post-thawed sperm after ultra rapid freezing and slow programmable freezing methods. Experimental study at laboratory of infertility unit, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Faculty of Medicine Ramathibodi Hospital. Thirty-seven semen samples with normal semen analysis according to World Health Organization (WHO) 1999 [normal sperm volume ( 2 ml) and normal sperm concentration (≥ 20 x10(6)/ml) and sperm motility (≥ 50%)]. Semen samples were washed. Then each semen sample was divided into six cryovials. Two cryovials, 0.5 ml each, were cryopreserved by slow programmable freezing. Four 0.25 ml containing cryovials, were cryopreserved by ultra rapidfreezing method. After cryopreservationfor 1 month, thawedprocess was carried out at room temperature. Main outcomes are sperm motility was determined by Computer-Assisted Semen Analysis (CASA), sperm morphology was determined by eosin-methylene blue staining and sperm DNA integrity was assessed by TUNEL assay. Sperm motility was reduced significantly by both methods, from 70.4 (9.0)% to 29.1 (12.3)% in slowprogrammable freezing and to 19.7 (9.8)% in ultra rapid freezing (p < 0.05). Sperm motility decreased significantly more by ultra rapid freezing (p < 0.001). The percentage of normal sperm morphology and DNA integrity were also reduced significantly by both methods. However, no significant difference between the two methods was found (p > 0.05). Cryopreservation of human sperm for 1 month significantly decreased sperm motility, morphology and DNA integrity in both methods. However sperm motility was decreased more by ultra rapid

  6. Pharmacological investigation of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels in human ejaculatory sperm in vitro.

    PubMed

    Li, Lu; Liu, Jihong; Li, Jiagui; Ye, Zhangqun

    2006-01-01

    The types of the voltage-dependent calcium channels (VDCCs) in human ejaculatory sperm and the effects of calcium channel blocker (CCB) on human sperm motility parameters in vitro were investigated. The human sperm motility parameters in vitro in response to the pharmacological agents nifedipine (NIF, inhibitor of L-type VDCC) and co-conotoxin (GVIA, inhibitor of N-type VDCC) were compared and analyzed statistically. The results showed that NIF (1, 5, 10 micromol/L) could not only significantly affect human sperm's shape but also spermatozoa motility after incubated at least 10 min in vitro (P<0.001). GVIA (0.1, 0.5 and 1 micromol/L) could just only significantly affect human sperm's progressive motility (a %+b %) after incubated for 20 min in vitro (P<0.01), but they both could not significantly affect spermic abnormality rate. It is suggested that L-type VDCC, non L-type VDCCs and isoform of L-type VDCC exist in the cell membrane of human sperm solely or together, and they participate in the spermic physiological processes especially the spermic motility.

  7. Trehalose sustains a higher post-thaw sperm motility than sucrose in vitrified human sperm.

    PubMed

    Schulz, M; Risopatrón, J; Matus, G; Pineda, E; Rojas, C; Isachenko, V; Isachenko, E; Sánchez, R

    2017-05-25

    One of the cryopreservation methods that best preserves sperm function is vitrification. However, comparative studies have not been performed to evaluate the effect of nonpermeable cryoprotectors on sperm function for prolonged periods of time post-devitrification. These times are necessary, especially in in vitro fertilisation and intrauterine insemination, for gamete interaction and then fertilisation to occur, while maintaining motility to arrive at the fertilisation site. In this study, sucrose (.25 m) and trehalose (.1 and .05 m) were compared in essential parameters like motility and plasma membrane integrity for 12 hr. Post-devitrification sperm motility using .1 m trehalose was 68.9%, higher than that obtained with .05 m trehalose (59.9%, p < .0081) and .25 m sucrose (57.9%, p < .0002). Similar results were obtained at 6 and 12 hr with .1 m trehalose (58.0% and 42.3% respectively) compared to .05 m trehalose (p < .0184 and p < .033) and .25 m sucrose (p < .0001 and p < .0012).There was no difference between .25 m sucrose and .05 m trehalose. Membrane integrity was best preserved at time 0 by .1 m trehalose (p < .05), but there was no significance at 6 and 12 hr compared to sucrose. Our results suggest that for assisted reproduction techniques that require motile spermatozoa for a longer period of time, use of .1 m trehalose is recommended in the sperm vitrification technique. © 2016 Blackwell Verlag GmbH.

  8. Low physiological levels of prostaglandins E2 and F2α improve human sperm functions.

    PubMed

    Rios, Mariana; Carreño, Daniela V; Oses, Carolina; Barrera, Nelson; Kerr, Bredford; Villalón, Manuel

    2016-03-01

    Prostaglandins (PGs) have been reported to be present in the seminal fluid and cervical mucus, affecting different stages of sperm maturation from spermatogenesis to the acrosome reaction. This study assessed the effects of low physiological PGE2 and PGF2α concentrations on human sperm motility and on the ability of the spermatozoa to bind to the zona pellucida (ZP). Human spermatozoa were isolated from seminal samples with normal concentration and motility parameters and incubated with 1μM PGE2, 1μM PGF2α or control solution to determine sperm motility and the ability to bind to human ZP. The effects of both PGs on intracellular calcium levels were determined. Incubation for 2 or 18h with PGE2 or PGF2α resulted in a significant (P<0.05) increase in the percentage of spermatozoa with progressive motility. In contrast with PGF2α, PGE2 alone induced an increase in sperm intracellular calcium levels; however, the percentage of sperm bound to the human ZP was doubled for both PGs. These results indicate that incubation of human spermatozoa with low physiological levels of PGE2 or PGF2α increases sperm functions and could improve conditions for assisted reproduction protocols.

  9. Fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) is present in human spermatozoa and is related with sperm motility. The use of recombinant FGF2 to improve motile sperm recovery.

    PubMed

    Garbarino Azúa, D J; Saucedo, L; Giordana, S; Magri, M L; Buffone, M G; Neuspiller, F; Vazquez-Levin, M H; Marín-Briggiler, C I

    2017-09-01

    Fibroblast growth factors (FGFs) and their receptors (FGFRs) regulate several functions of somatic cells. In a previous work, we reported FGFR expression in human spermatozoa and their involvement in motility. This study aimed to evaluate the presence and localization of fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2) in human spermatozoa, to determine the relationship of FGF2 levels with conventional semen parameters and to assess the effect of recombinant FGF2 (rFGF2) on sperm recovery in a selection procedure. Western immunoblotting analysis using an antibody against FGF2 revealed an 18-kDa band in sperm protein extracts. The protein was immunolocalized in the sperm flagellum and acrosomal region, as well as in all germ cells. Sperm FGF2 levels, assessed by flow cytometry, showed a positive (p < 0.05) correlation with sperm concentration, motility, total sperm number and total motile cells per ejaculate. Moreover, samples with abnormal motility depicted diminished (p < 0.01) FGF2 levels compared to those with normal motility. Spermatozoa exposed to rFGF2 bound the protein, exhibited higher (p < 0.05) total and motile sperm recoveries, and increased (p < 0.01) kinematic parameters after the swim-up. Findings herein presented lead to consider sperm FGF2 level as a potential marker of sperm quality, and rFGF2 as a supplement for improving sperm recovery in selection techniques. © 2017 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  10. [Influence of Storage Temperature and Cryopreservation Conditions on the Extent of Human Sperm DNA Fragmentation].

    PubMed

    Simonenko, E Yu; Garmaeva, S B; Yakovenko, S A; Grigorieva, A A; Tverdislov, V A; Mironova, A G; Aprishko, V P

    2016-01-01

    With the direct labeling procedure for detecting DNA fragmentation we explored the influence of the different storage temperature conditions as well as different methods of cryopreservation on the structure of DNA organization in the human sperm. 19 sperm samples obtained from healthy men with normozoospermia (according to the criteria of the World Health Organization) were used for investigation. A significant increase of human sperm DNA-fragmentation was observed after 8 hours of incubation at +39 degrees C (by 76.7%) and at +37 degrees C (by 68.9%). It was found that sperm cooling with the use of a cryoprotectant immediately after thawing did not produce significant differences in the extent of DNA fragmentation, although samples, containing cryoprotectants, showed a sharp increase of DNA fragmentation after 24 hours of incubation, that could suggest cryoprotectant cytotoxicity.

  11. [Application study of human sperm motility bioassay in IVF laboratory quality control].

    PubMed

    Cai, Xia; Pomeroy, Kimball O; Mattox, John H

    2006-07-01

    To investigate the sensitivity of human sperm survival bioassay to using known concentrations of potential toxin of formalin and to elevate the application value of human sperm motility assay as a quality control method in detecting the components used in IVF program. Fresh semen was obtained from healthy males at andrology laboratory by masturbation. Sperm was processed on a gradient column of isolate medium and PBS medium. In experiment 1, the medium with 0.25%, 0.75% concentration of formalin and control medium were added to the Falcon culture tubes containing HTF medium with or without 0.3% bovine albumin serum and with or without light mineral oil. In experiment 2, in 3 types of culture tubes containing HTF medium with or without 0.3% bovine albumin serum and with or without light mineral oil, the sperm was exposed to each culture tube and cultured for 24 and 48 hrs at room temperature, and the motile sperms were counted under the microscope. The average sperm motility index in the HTF medium with 0.25% formalin at 24 hrs was 0.594 +/- 0.331, significantly higher than in the HTF medium with 0.75% formalin (0.450 +/- 0.284) (P < 0.01). In the medium containing 0.25% and 0.75% formalin with 0.3% bovine albumin serum and light mineral oil, the average sperm survival indexes were 0.683 +/- 0.334 and 0.527 +/- 0.345, respectively, higher than without bovine albumin serum and light mineral oil (0.394 +/- 0.311 and 0.424 +/- 0.311). The average sperm index of 7 ml tissue culture tube made in Denmark was 0.677 +/- 0.335, higher than the other two types of culture tubes made in the USA (0.551 +/- 0.317 and 0.596 +/- 0.327) (P < 0.001). When the sperm cultured in the medium with 0.3% bovine albumin serum and light mineral oil, the average sperm survival indexes were 0.821 +/- 0.259 and 0.645 +/- 0.335, respectively, higher than without bovine albumin serum or light mineral oil (0.571 +/- 0.321 and 0.395 +/- 0.245) (P < 0.01). The sperm survival bioassay is a sensitivity

  12. Characterization of Mammalian ADAM2 and Its Absence from Human Sperm

    PubMed Central

    Choi, Heejin; Jin, Sora; Kwon, Jun Tae; Kim, Jihye; Jeong, Juri; Kim, Jaehwan; Jeon, Suyeon; Park, Zee Yong; Jung, Kang-Jin; Park, Kwangsung; Cho, Chunghee

    2016-01-01

    The members of the ADAM (a disintegrin and metalloprotease) family are membrane-anchored multi-domain proteins that play prominent roles in male reproduction. ADAM2, which was one of the first identified ADAMs, is the best studied ADAM in reproduction. In the male germ cells of mice, ADAM2 and other ADAMs form complexes that contribute to sperm-sperm adhesion, sperm-egg interactions, and the migration of sperm in the female reproductive tract. Here, we generated specific antibodies against mouse and human ADAM2, and investigated various features of ADAM2 in mice, monkeys and humans. We found that the cytoplasmic domain of ADAM2 might enable the differential association of this protein with other ADAMs in mice. Western blot analysis with the anti-human ADAM2 antibodies showed that ADAM2 is present in the testis and sperm of monkeys. Monkey ADAM2 was found to associate with chaperone proteins in testis. In humans, we identified ADAM2 as a 100-kDa protein in the testis, but failed to detect it in sperm. This is surprising given the results in mice and monkeys, but it is consistent with the failure of ADAM2 identification in the previous proteomic analyses of human sperm. These findings suggest that the reproductive functions of ADAM2 differ between humans and mice. Our protein analysis showed the presence of potential ADAM2 complexes involving yet-unknown proteins in human testis. Taken together, our results provide new information regarding the characteristics of ADAM2 in mammalian species, including humans. PMID:27341348

  13. Human Sperm Quality and Metal Toxicants: Protective Effects of some Flavonoids on Male Reproductive Function.

    PubMed

    Jamalan, Mostafa; Ghaffari, Mohammad Ali; Hoseinzadeh, Pooneh; Hashemitabar, Mahmoud; Zeinali, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Metals can cause male infertility through affection of spermatogenesis and sperm quality. Strong evidences confirm that male infertility in metal-exposed humans is mediated via various mechanisms such as production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Flavonoids have antioxidant and metal chelating properties which make them suitable candidates for neutralizing adverse effects of metals on semen quality. In the current study, we have evaluated the effects of five types of flavonoids (rutin, naringin, kaempferol, quercetin, and catechin) on recovery of sperm motility and prevention of membrane oxidative damage from aluminum chloride (AlCl3), cadmium chloride (CdCl2), and lead chloride (PbCl4). In this experimental study, motility and lipid peroxidation of metalexposed sperm was investigated in the presence of different concentrations of five kinds of flavonoids. Malondialdehyde (MDA) production was assessed as a lipid peroxidation marker. Aluminum chloride (AlCl3), cadmium chloride (CdCl2), and lead chloride (PbCl4) diminished sperm motility. Treatment of metal-exposed sperm with rutin, naringin, and kaempferol attenuated the negative effects of the metals on sperm motility. Quercetin and catechin decreased the motility of metal-exposed sperm. Based on the MDA production results, only AlCl3 significantly induced lipid peroxidation. Treatment with rutin, naringin, and kaempferol significantly decreased MDA production.

  14. Human Sperm Quality and Metal Toxicants: Protective Effects of some Flavonoids on Male Reproductive Function

    PubMed Central

    Jamalan, Mostafa; Ghaffari, Mohammad Ali; Hoseinzadeh, Pooneh; Hashemitabar, Mahmoud; Zeinali, Majid

    2016-01-01

    Background Metals can cause male infertility through affection of spermatogenesis and sperm quality. Strong evidences confirm that male infertility in metal-exposed humans is mediated via various mechanisms such as production of reactive oxygen species (ROS). Flavonoids have antioxidant and metal chelating properties which make them suitable candidates for neutralizing adverse effects of metals on semen quality. In the current study, we have evaluated the effects of five types of flavonoids (rutin, naringin, kaempferol, quercetin, and catechin) on recovery of sperm motility and prevention of membrane oxidative damage from aluminum chloride (AlCl3), cadmium chloride (CdCl2), and lead chloride (PbCl4). Materials and Methods In this experimental study, motility and lipid peroxidation of metalexposed sperm was investigated in the presence of different concentrations of five kinds of flavonoids. Malondialdehyde (MDA) production was assessed as a lipid peroxidation marker. Results Aluminum chloride (AlCl3), cadmium chloride (CdCl2), and lead chloride (PbCl4) diminished sperm motility. Treatment of metal-exposed sperm with rutin, naringin, and kaempferol attenuated the negative effects of the metals on sperm motility. Quercetin and catechin decreased the motility of metal-exposed sperm. Conclusion Based on the MDA production results, only AlCl3 significantly induced lipid peroxidation. Treatment with rutin, naringin, and kaempferol significantly decreased MDA production. PMID:27441055

  15. Isolation and characterization of a human sperm antigen gene h-Sp-1.

    PubMed

    Kanazawa, Ri-Ichiro; Komori, Shinji; Sakata, Kazuko; Tanaka, Hiroyuki; Sawai, Hideaki; Tsuji, Yoshiyuki; Koyama, Koji

    2003-08-01

    We isolated and characterized a human sperm antigen gene (h-Sp-1) from human testis complementary DNA using antiserum against the human sperm membrane. Northern blot analysis detected two transcripts (2.3 and 1.1 kb) of the h-Sp-1 gene. The 2.3-kb transcript is ubiquitous, whereas the 1.1-kb transcript is specific to the human testis with a high level of expression. Determination of the base sequence of h-Sp-1 showed a size of 2170 bp and 43.4% homology with human synaptophysin. The base sequence indicates a molecule consisting of 259 amino acids, with four hydrophilic and four hydrophobic regions. In order to further characterize the h-Sp-1 molecule, we synthesized the probable region of amino acids with high antigenicity based on the amino acid sequence (amino acid nos. 174-198) and immunized rabbits to prepare an antiserum. In our experimental model of fertilization between human sperm and zona pellucida-free hamster ova, partial inhibition of fertilization was observed. We were able to synthesize a large quantity of recombinant protein by inserting the h-Sp-1 gene into a baculovirus vector and infecting spodoptera frugiperda culture cells (sf9 insect cells). The synthesized protein had a molecular weight of 30 kDa. We then immunized Balb/c mice with this protein to prepare a monoclonal antibody (G3G9), which was used to localize the h-Sp-1 molecule in sperm and tissues (e.g. testis). The h-Sp-1 molecule was present in the cell membrane from the head to tail of human sperm. Staining of the testis and epididymis also showed h-Sp-1 to be present in spermatogonia, spermatocyte, sperm and epididymal duct epithelium. These findings suggest that the h-Sp-1 molecule is expressed in sperm and testes and plays a role in fertilization.

  16. Human sperm centrin levels & outcome of intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI)--a pilot study.

    PubMed

    Hinduja, Indira; Zaveri, Kusum; Baliga, Nishitha

    2008-11-01

    The objective of the present study was to compare the levels of sperm centrin a centrosomal protein that influences cell migration, in normal fertile donors and in oligoasthenozoospermic males (count 5 million/ml and motility <40%, grade c+d) undergoing intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) and to correlate with the outcome of ICSI. The prospective study carried out at Inkus IVF Centre, Mumbai, India, during (January-December 2003). It included 20 normal fertile donor males (group I) and 20 oligoasthnozoospermic (OA) males (group II). Group II was further divided in II a and II b according to the centrin levels. Centrin levels were measured by using enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) in both groups. All participants underwent an ICSI procedure and the levels of centrin and outcome of ICSI were correlated. Centrin levels were significantly lower (P<0.001) in group II (0.39) as compared with group I (1.34). With centrin levels <0.45 optical density (OD) (group II a) the pregnancy rate was further reduced, with only 2 pregnancies (out of 14) both of which, ended in abortion. Cases in group II showed levels of centrin much lower than in the fertile group. Further lowered centrin levels were associated with lowered pregnancy rates in OA males, but statistically was not significant. The study revealed that lower centrin levels in OA males resulted in lower pregnancy percentage in this group after ICSI. Disturbances in centrosomal protein could be one of the possible causes of ICSI failure.

  17. Dual use of Diff-Quik-like stains for the simultaneous evaluation of human sperm morphology and chromatin status.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Ana Paula M; Tavares, Renata S; Velez de la Calle, Juan Felipe; Figueiredo, Helena; Almeida, Vasco; Almeida-Santos, Teresa; Ramalho-Santos, João

    2009-01-01

    Sperm chromatin status and nuclear DNA damage can be detected using well-established assays. However, most techniques are time-consuming and/or involve elaborate protocols and equipment. We have recently developed a simple and fast method to monitor sperm chromatin status in field conditions using the Diff-Quik assay which is employed in fertility clinics to assess sperm morphology with standard bright field microscopy. In the present study, we demonstrate that any Diff-Quik-like stain can easily, reproducibly and routinely monitor human sperm chromatin status as well. Different Diff-Quik-like stains were used to assess sperm morphology and the presence of abnormal dark nuclear staining in human sperm from four ART centres. The TUNEL assay was performed in the same samples, and fertility outcomes were assessed. A significant correlation was found between TUNEL-positive sperm and dark sperm nuclei. Moreover, associations were also found between the percentage of dark sperm nuclei and seminal parameters, embryo development rate, embryo quality and clinical pregnancy, as well as with cryptorchidism, and there was a tendency towards an association with age. A value of 32% abnormal staining is suggested as a predictive threshold for embryo development and pregnancy. Our results show that any Diff-Quik-like stain, already implemented in most laboratories to assess sperm morphology, can be adapted as an indicator for chromatin status in human sperm.

  18. The role of ezrin-associated protein network in human sperm capacitation

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Lei; Chen, Wen; Zhao, Chun; Huo, Ran; Guo, Xue-Jiang; Lin, Min; Huang, Xiao-Yan; Mao, Yun-Dong; Zhou, Zuo-Min; Sha, Jia-Hao

    2010-01-01

    Membrane modifications in sperm cells represent a key step in sperm capacitation; however, the molecular basis of these modifications is not fully understood. Ezrin is the best-studied member of the ezrin/radixin/merlin family. As a cross-linker between the cortical cytoskeleton and plasma membrane proteins, ezrin contributes to remodeling of the membrane surface structure. Furthermore, activated ezrin and the Rho dissociation inhibitor, RhoGDI, promote the formation of cortical cytoskeleton-polymerized actin through Rho activation. Thus, ezrin, actin, RhoGDI, Rho and plasma membrane proteins form a complicated network in vivo, which contributes to the assembly of the structure of the membrane surface. Previously, we showed that ezrin and RhoGDI1 are expressed in human testes. Thus, we sought to determine whether the ezrin–RhoGDI1–actin–membrane protein network has a role in human sperm capacitation. Our results by Western blot indicate that ezrin is activated by phosphorylation of the threonine567 residue during capacitation. Co-immunoprecipitation studies revealed that, during sperm capacitation, the interaction between ezrin and RhoGDI1 increases, and phosphostaining of two dimensional electrophoresis gels showed that RhoGDI1 is phosphorylated, suggesting that RhoGDI1 dissociates from RhoA and leads to actin polymerization on the sperm head. We speculate that activated ezrin interacts with polymerized actin and the glycosylated membrane protein cd44 after capacitation. Blocking sperm capacitation using ezrin- or actin-specific monoclonal antibodies decreases their acrosome reaction (AR) rate, but has no effect on the AR alone. Taken together, our results show that a network consisting of ezrin, RhoGDI1, RhoA, F-actin and membrane proteins functions to influence the modifications that occur on the membrane of the sperm head during human sperm capacitation. PMID:20711218

  19. CASA derived human sperm abnormalities: correlation with chromatin packing and DNA fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Sivanarayana, T; Krishna, Ch Ravi; Prakash, G Jaya; Krishna, K Murali; Madan, K; Rani, B Sireesha; Sudhakar, G; Raju, G A Rama

    2012-12-01

    The present study was undertaken to evaluate the effects of morphokinetic abnormalities of human spermatozoa on chromatin packing and DNA integrity and possible beneficial effects of sperm selection in ICSI. Semen samples from 1002 patients were analysed for morphology and motility using CASA. Protamine status and DNA fragmentation were analysed by chromomycin A3 staining and sperm chromatin dispersion assay respectively. Sperms with elongated, thin, round, pyri, amorphous, micro and macro forms were significantly higher in teratozoospermic and oligoasthenoteratozoospermic groups. Significant difference in chromatin packing and DNA fragmentation index was observed in these abnormal groups compared with normal. Similarly significant correlation was also seen between abnormal motility parameters and DNA fragmentation index in asthenozoospermic group compared with normal. Specific abnormal morphological forms have higher incidence of chromatin packing abnormalities and DNA fragmentation. Using these sperms in ICSI might have an impact on fertilization, embryo development and abortion rates. These can be selectively avoided during ICSI procedure to improve ART outcome.

  20. Reduction of sperm cholesterol:phospholipid ratio is a possible mechanism for enhancement of human sperm binding to the zona pellucida following incubation with phosphatidylcholine liposomes.

    PubMed

    Gamzu, R; Yogev, L; Paz, G; Yavetz, H; Lichtenberg, D

    1997-09-01

    TEST (TES (N-tris[hydroxymethyl]methyl-2-aminoethanesulfonic acid) and Tris) yolk buffer (TYB) has recently been shown to improve the binding capacity of spermatozoa to zona pellucidae. The present study had two objectives: 1) to elucidate which component(s) of TYB dominates this effect and 2) to define the responsible mechanism. Sperm samples obtained from subfertile men were incubated for 2 h in either TYB or media containing egg yolk lipoproteins or phospholipids. After incubation, sperm binding was tested by the hemizona assay. Yolk lipoprotein-treated spermatozoa bound hemizonae with efficiency equal to that of the spermatozoa incubated in control medium. Conversely, incubation of spermatozoa in media containing either TYB, yolk-phospholipids, or pure phosphatidylcholine (PC) resulted in a 2- to 3-fold increased binding capacity (p < 0.01). A close correlation was found between the effect of yolk-phospholipids and TYB on the binding capacity of the same sperm samples, compared to spermatozoa incubated in control medium. Incubation of spermatozoa in yolk phospholipid medium caused a dose-dependent increase of sperm binding capacity (p < 0.05). Treatment of sperm samples with 1 mg/ml or more of purified PC preparation also resulted in a reduction of the sperm cholesterol:phospholipid molar ratio. Significant correlations between the effects of the treatments on sperm cholesterol: phospholipid molar ratio and sperm binding were obtained with yolk-phospholipids (r = -0.55) or 1 mg/ml purified PC (r = -0.61). We conclude that 1) the enhanced binding capacity of human spermatozoa following TYB treatment is probably due to yolk-phospholipids, mainly egg yolk PC; and 2) it appears that the enhanced binding capacity of human spermatozoa following treatment with egg yolk-containing media may be a result of the reduction of the cholesterol:phospholipid molar ratio in the sperm cells.

  1. Concentration-dependent Sildenafil citrate (Viagra) effects on ROS production, energy status, and human sperm function.

    PubMed

    Sousa, Maria Inês; Amaral, Sandra; Tavares, Renata Santos; Paiva, Carla; Ramalho-Santos, João

    2014-04-01

    Literature regarding the effects of sildenafil citrate on sperm function remains controversial. In the present study, we specifically wanted to determine if mitochondrial dysfunction, namely membrane potential, reactive oxygen species production, and changes in energy content, are involved in in vitro sildenafil-induced alterations of human sperm function. Sperm samples of healthy men were incubated in the presence of 0.03, 0.3, and 3 μM sildenafil citrate in a phosphate buffered saline (PBS)-based medium for 2, 3, 12, and 24 hours. Sperm motility and viability were evaluated and mitochondrial function, i.e., mitochondrial membrane potential and mitochondrial superoxide production were assessed using flow-cytometry. Additionally, adenosine triphosphate (ATP) levels were determined by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) analysis. Results show a decrease in sperm motility correlated with the level of mitochondria-generated superoxide, without a visible effect on mitochondrial membrane potential or viability upon exposure to sildenafil. The effect on both motility and superoxide production was higher for the intermediate concentration of sildenafil (0.3 µM) indicating that the in vitro effects of sildenafil on human sperm do not vary linearly with drug concentration. Adenosine triphosphate levels also decreased following sildenafil exposure, but this decrease was only detected after a decrease in motility was already evident. These results suggest that along with the level of ATP and mitochondrial function other factors are involved in the early sildenafil-mediated decline in sperm motility. However, the further decrease in ATP levels and increase in mitochondria-generated reactive oxygen species after 24 hours of exposure might further contribute towards declining sperm motility.

  2. Subcellular localization of phospholipase Cζ in human sperm and its absence in DPY19L2-deficient sperm are consistent with its role in oocyte activation

    PubMed Central

    Escoffier, Jessica; Yassine, Sandra; Lee, Hoi Chang; Martinez, Guillaume; Delaroche, Julie; Coutton, Charles; Karaouzène, Thomas; Zouari, Raoudha; Metzler-Guillemain, Catherine; Pernet-Gallay, Karin; Hennebicq, Sylviane; Ray, Pierre F.; Fissore, Rafael; Arnoult, Christophe

    2015-01-01

    We recently identified the DPY19L2 gene as the main genetic cause of human globozoospermia (70%) and described that Dpy19l2 knockout (KO) mice faithfully reproduce the human phenotype of globozoospermia making it an excellent model to characterize the molecular physiopathology of globozoospermia. Recent case studies on non-genetically characterized men with globozoospermia showed that phospholipase C, zeta (PLCζ), the sperm factor thought to induce the Ca2+ oscillations at fertilization, was absent from their sperm, explaining the poor fertilization potential of these spermatozoa. Since 30% of globozoospermic men remain genetically uncharacterized, the absence of PLCζ in DPY19L2 globozoospermic men remains to be formally established. Moreover, the precise localization of PLCζ and the reasons underlying its loss during spermatogenesis in globozoospermic patients are still not understood. Herein, we show that PLCζ is absent, or its presence highly reduced, in human and mouse sperm with DPY19L2-associated globozoospermia. As a consequence, fertilization with sperm from Dpy19l2 KO mice failed to initiate Ca2+ oscillations and injected oocytes remained arrested at the metaphase II stage, although a few human oocytes injected with DPY19L2-defective sperm showed formation of 2-pronuclei embryos. We report for the first time the subcellular localization of PLCζ in control human sperm, which is along the inner acrosomal membrane and in the perinuclear theca, in the area corresponding to the equatorial region. Because these cellular components are absent in globozoospermic sperm, the loss of PLCζ in globozoospermic sperm is thus consistent and reinforces the role of PLCζ as an oocyte activation factor necessary for oocyte activation. In our companion article, we showed that chromatin compaction during spermiogenesis in Dpy19l2 KO mouse is defective and leads to sperm DNA damage. Together, these defects explain the poor fertilization potential of DPY19L2

  3. INDIVIDUAL VARIATION IN THE FREQUENCY OF SPERM ANEUPLOIDY IN HUMANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    To examine interindividual differences in sperm chromosome aneuploidy, repeated semen specimens were obtained from a group of ten healthy men, aged 20-21 at the start of the study, and analyzed by multi-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis to determine the fre...

  4. INDIVIDUAL VARIATION IN THE FREQUENCY OF SPERM ANEUPLOIDY IN HUMANS

    EPA Science Inventory

    To examine interindividual differences in sperm chromosome aneuploidy, repeated semen specimens were obtained from a group of ten healthy men, aged 20-21 at the start of the study, and analyzed by multi-color fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) analysis to determine the fre...

  5. Involvement of mitochondrial activity in mediating ELF-EMF stimulatory effect on human sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Iorio, Roberto; Delle Monache, Simona; Bennato, Francesca; Di Bartolomeo, Claudia; Scrimaglio, Renato; Cinque, Benedetta; Colonna, Rosella Cardigno

    2011-01-01

    It has recently been reported that the exposure of human spermatozoa to an extremely low frequency (ELF) electromagnetic field (EMF) with a square waveform of 5 mT amplitude and frequency of 50 Hz improves sperm motility. The functional relationship between the energy metabolism and the enhancement of human sperm motility induced by ELF-EMF was investigated. Sperm exposure to ELF-EMF resulted in a progressive and significant increase of mitochondrial membrane potential and levels of ATP, ADP and NAD(+) that was associated with a progressive and significant increase in the sperm kinematic parameters. No significant effects were detected on other parameters such as ATP/ADP ratio and energy charge. When carbamoyl cyanide m-chlorophenylhydrazone (CICCP) was applied to inhibit the oxidative phosphorylation in the mitochondria, the values of energy parameters and motility in the sperm incubated in the presence of glucose and exposed to ELF-EMF did not change, thus indicating that the glycolysis was not involved in mediating ELF-EMF stimulatory effect on motility. By contrast, when pyruvate and lactate were provided instead of glucose, the energy status and motility increased significantly in ELF-EMF-treated sperm. Under these culture conditions, the inhibition of glycolitic metabolism by 2-deoxy-D-glucose (DOG) again resulted in increased values of energy and kinematic parameters, indicating that gluconeogenesis was not involved in producing glucose for use in glycolysis. We concluded that the key role in mediating the stimulatory effects exerted by ELF-EMF on human sperm motility is played by mitochondrial oxidative phosphorylation rather than glycolysis.

  6. Mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization increases reactive oxygen species production and decreases mean sperm velocity but is not associated with DNA fragmentation in human sperm.

    PubMed

    Treulen, F; Uribe, P; Boguen, R; Villegas, J V

    2016-02-01

    Does induction of mitochondrial outer membrane permeabilization (MOMP) in vitro affect specific functional parameters of human spermatozoa? Our findings show that MOMP induction increases intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) and decreases mean sperm velocity but does not alter DNA integrity. MOMP in somatic cells is related to a variety of apoptotic traits, such as alteration of mitochondrial membrane potential (ΔΨm), and increase in ROS production and DNA fragmentation. Although the presence of these apoptotic features has been reported in spermatozoa, to date the effects of MOMP on sperm function and DNA integrity have not been analysed. The study included spermatozoa from fertile donors. Motile sperm were obtained using the swim-up method. The highly motile sperm were collected and diluted with human tubal fluid to a final cell concentration of 5 × 10(6) ml(-1). To induce MOMP, selected sperm were treated at 37°C for 4 h with a mimetic of a Bcl-2 pro-apoptotic protein, ABT-737. MOMP was evaluated by relocating of cytochrome c. In addition, the effect of ABT-737 on mitochondrial inner membrane permeabilization was assessed using the calcein-AM/cobalt chloride method. In turn, ΔΨm was evaluated with JC-1 staining, intracellular ROS production with dihydroethidium, sperm motility was analysed by computer-assisted sperm analysis and DNA fragmentation by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labelling (TUNEL) assay. Measurements were performed by flow cytometry. MOMP was associated with ΔΨm dissipation (P < 0.05), increased ROS production (P < 0.05) and decreased mean sperm velocity (P < 0.05), but it was not associated with DNA fragmentation. MOMP did not induce a large increase in ROS, which could explain the negligible effect of MOMP on sperm DNA fragmentation under our experimental conditions. The study was carried out in vitro using highly motile sperm, selected by swim-up, from healthy donors. The results obtained in this

  7. Co-incubation of human spermatozoa with anti-VDAC antibody reduced sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Liu, Bianjiang; Tang, Min; Han, Zhijian; Li, Jie; Zhang, Jiexiu; Lu, Pei; Song, Ninghong; Wang, Zengjun; Yin, Changjun; Zhang, Wei

    2014-01-01

    Voltage-dependent anion channel (VDAC), a channel protein, exists in the outer mitochondrial membrane of somatic cells and is involved in multiple physiological and pathophysiological processes. Up until now, little has been known about VDAC in male germ cells. In the present study, the relationship between VDAC and human sperm motility was explored. Highly motile human spermatozoa were incubated in vitro with anti-VDAC antibody. Total sperm motility, straight line velocity (VSL), curvilinear velocity (VCL), and average path velocity (VAP) were recorded. Intracellular free calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i), pH value (pHi), and ATP content were determined. Co-incubation with anti-VDAC antibody reduced VSL, VCL, and VAP of spermatozoa. Co-incubation further reduced [Ca(2+)]i. Anti-VDAC antibody did not significantly alter total sperm motility, pHi and intracellular ATP content. The data suggest that co-incubation with anti-VDAC antibody reduces sperm motility through inhibition of Ca(2+) transmembrane flow. In this way, VDAC participates in the modulation of human sperm motility through mediating Ca(2+) transmembrane transport and exchange.

  8. Essential Role of CFTR in PKA-Dependent Phosphorylation, Alkalinization, and Hyperpolarization During Human Sperm Capacitation.

    PubMed

    Puga Molina, Lis C; Pinto, Nicolás A; Torres Rodríguez, Paulina; Romarowski, Ana; Vicens Sanchez, Alberto; Visconti, Pablo E; Darszon, Alberto; Treviño, Claudia L; Buffone, Mariano G

    2017-06-01

    Mammalian sperm require to spend a limited period of time in the female reproductive tract to become competent to fertilize in a process called capacitation. It is well established that HCO3(-) is essential for capacitation because it activates the atypical soluble adenylate cyclase ADCY10 leading to cAMP production, and promotes alkalinization of cytoplasm, and membrane hyperpolarization. However, how HCO3(-) is transported into the sperm is not well understood. There is evidence that CFTR activity is involved in the human sperm capacitation but how this channel is integrated in the complex signaling cascades associated with this process remains largely unknown. In the present work, we have analyzed the extent to which CFTR regulates different events in human sperm capacitation. We observed that inhibition of CFTR affects HCO3(-) -entrance dependent events resulting in lower PKA activity. CFTR inhibition also affected cAMP/PKA-downstream events such as the increase in tyrosine phosphorylation, hyperactivated motility, and acrosome reaction. In addition, we demonstrated for the first time, that CFTR and PKA activity are essential for the regulation of intracellular pH, and membrane potential in human sperm. Addition of permeable cAMP partially recovered all the PKA-dependent events altered in the presence of inh-172 which is consistent with a role of CFTR upstream of PKA activation. J. Cell. Physiol. 232: 1404-1414, 2017. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. Role of C-type natriuretic peptide in the function of normal human sperm

    PubMed Central

    Xia, Hui; Chen, Yao; Wu, Ke-Jia; Zhao, Hu; Xiong, Cheng-Liang; Huang, Dong-Hui

    2016-01-01

    C-type natriuretic peptide (CNP) is a newly discovered type of local regulatory factor that mediates its biological effects through the specific, membrane-bound natriuretic peptide receptor-B (NPR-B). Recent studies have established that CNP is closely related to male reproductive function. The aims of this study were to determine the distribution of CNP/NPR-B in human ejaculated spermatozoa through different methods (such as immunolocalization, real time polymerase chain reaction and Western Blot), and then to evaluate the influence of CNP on sperm function in vitro, such as motility and acrosome reaction. Human semen samples were collected from consenting donors who met the criteria of the World Health Organization for normozoospermia. Our results show that the specific receptor NPR-B of CNP is localized in the acrosomal region of the head and the membrane of the front-end tail of the sperm, and there is no signal of CNP in human sperm. Compared with the control, CNP can induce a significant dose-dependent increase in spermatozoa motility and acrosome reaction. In summary, CNP/NPR-B can affect sperm motility and acrosome reaction, thus regulating the reproductive function of males. CNP may be a new key factor in regulating sperm function. PMID:25926602

  10. Aquaporins in the human testis and spermatozoa - identification, involvement in sperm volume regulation and clinical relevance.

    PubMed

    Yeung, C H; Callies, C; Tüttelmann, F; Kliesch, S; Cooper, T G

    2010-08-01

    Despite the high water-permeability of human spermatozoa, little is known about the identity and the role of aquaporins (AQP) in them or germ cells. Using ejaculates from donors, sperm AQPs were identified by western blotting followed by the analysis of mRNA with RT-PCR. Protein expression in the testis and spermatozoa was localized by immunocytochemistry. Inhibitors were used to investigate the involvement of aquaporins in water transport when ejaculated spermatozoa were swollen in medium mimicking uterine hypo-osmolality by quinine that blocks volume regulation. Sperm AQP7 and AQP8 in 39 infertile patients and 11 healthy donors were quantified by flow cytometry. AQP1 was absent from spermatozoa. Sperm and testicular AQP7-9 had nucleotide sequences identical to those of somatic cells but AQP8 mRNA also showed shorter variants. AQP7 was expressed abundantly by round and elongated spermatids and ejaculated spermatozoa, AQP8 by all germ cells and spermatozoa, and AQP9 rarely by spermatocytes or Sertoli cells. Protein bands showed specificity by western blotting for AQP7 and AQP8 but not AQP9. The absence of sperm AQP9 was further suggested by the ineffectiveness of its inhibitor phloretin in blocking quinine-induced swelling, but HgCl(2,) which inhibits AQP8, was effective. Sperm AQP7 expression was correlated with progressive motility and was lower in patients than in donors. Sperm AQP8 expression was inversely correlated with the extent of sperm coiling, which is a swelling phenomenon, but showed no difference between patients and donors. In conclusion, AQP7 and AQP8 were identified in human spermatozoa and could play a role in glycerol metabolism and water transport respectively.

  11. [Influence of the metabolite produced by Trichomonas vaginalis on human sperm motility in vitro].

    PubMed

    Han, Qingjiang; Liu, Jihong; Wang, Tao; Xiao, Hengjun; Fang, Zhengming

    2004-04-01

    To investigate the effects of the metabolite produced by Trichomonas vaginalis on human sperm motility in vitro. Trichomonas vaginalis having been cultured, the culture solution containing metabolite was obtained by removing the protozoa, then diluted into 3 kinds of concentration. Sperm was obtained from 10 healthy fertile men by masturbation and prepared by swim-up technique to produce a spermatozoon solution of high motility. Every sperm sample was divided into 4 groups (A, B, C, D). Unused culture solution was added to Group A as control, and the other 3 groups (B, C, D) were respectively incubated with the above used culture solution at 3 kinds of concentration (1.2 x 10(9)/L, 6 x 10(8)/L, 1.2 x 10(8)/L). Measurements were carried out at 30 s, 1 h, 2 h, 4 h, 6 h by CASA. Sperm motility decreased in both Group B and C markedly, and the effects displayed a concentration- and time-dependent manner. The metabolite of Trichomonas vaginalis can reduce human sperm motility in vitro, and may be one of the causes of infertility.

  12. Toxicology Study of Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes and Reduced Graphene Oxide in Human Sperm

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Asghar, Waseem; Shafiee, Hadi; Velasco, Vanessa; Sah, Vasu R.; Guo, Shirui; El Assal, Rami; Inci, Fatih; Rajagopalan, Adhithi; Jahangir, Muntasir; Anchan, Raymond M.; Mutter, George L.; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Ozkan, Cengiz S.; Demirci, Utkan

    2016-08-01

    Carbon-based nanomaterials such as single-walled carbon nanotubes and reduced graphene oxide are currently being evaluated for biomedical applications including in vivo drug delivery and tumor imaging. Several reports have studied the toxicity of carbon nanomaterials, but their effects on human male reproduction have not been fully examined. Additionally, it is not clear whether the nanomaterial exposure has any effect on sperm sorting procedures used in clinical settings. Here, we show that the presence of functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT-COOH) and reduced graphene oxide at concentrations of 1–25 μg/mL do not affect sperm viability. However, SWCNT-COOH generate significant reactive superoxide species at a higher concentration (25 μg/mL), while reduced graphene oxide does not initiate reactive species in human sperm. Further, we demonstrate that exposure to these nanomaterials does not hinder the sperm sorting process, and microfluidic sorting systems can select the sperm that show low oxidative stress post-exposure.

  13. Toxicology Study of Single-walled Carbon Nanotubes and Reduced Graphene Oxide in Human Sperm

    PubMed Central

    Asghar, Waseem; Shafiee, Hadi; Velasco, Vanessa; Sah, Vasu R.; Guo, Shirui; El Assal, Rami; Inci, Fatih; Rajagopalan, Adhithi; Jahangir, Muntasir; Anchan, Raymond M.; Mutter, George L.; Ozkan, Mihrimah; Ozkan, Cengiz S.; Demirci, Utkan

    2016-01-01

    Carbon-based nanomaterials such as single-walled carbon nanotubes and reduced graphene oxide are currently being evaluated for biomedical applications including in vivo drug delivery and tumor imaging. Several reports have studied the toxicity of carbon nanomaterials, but their effects on human male reproduction have not been fully examined. Additionally, it is not clear whether the nanomaterial exposure has any effect on sperm sorting procedures used in clinical settings. Here, we show that the presence of functionalized single walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNT-COOH) and reduced graphene oxide at concentrations of 1–25 μg/mL do not affect sperm viability. However, SWCNT-COOH generate significant reactive superoxide species at a higher concentration (25 μg/mL), while reduced graphene oxide does not initiate reactive species in human sperm. Further, we demonstrate that exposure to these nanomaterials does not hinder the sperm sorting process, and microfluidic sorting systems can select the sperm that show low oxidative stress post-exposure. PMID:27538480

  14. Choline Dehydrogenase Polymorphism rs12676 Is a Functional Variation and Is Associated with Changes in Human Sperm Cell Function

    PubMed Central

    Johnson, Amy R.; Lao, Sai; Wang, Tongwen; Galanko, Joseph A.; Zeisel, Steven H.

    2012-01-01

    Approximately 15% of couples are affected by infertility and up to half of these cases arise from male factor infertility. Unidentified genetic aberrations such as chromosomal deletions, translocations and single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) may be the underlying cause of many cases of idiopathic male infertility. Deletion of the choline dehydrogenase (Chdh) gene in mice results in decreased male fertility due to diminished sperm motility; sperm from Chdh−/− males have decreased ATP concentrations likely stemming from abnormal sperm mitochondrial morphology and function in these cells. Several SNPs have been identified in the human CHDH gene that may result in altered CHDH enzymatic activity. rs12676 (G233T), a non-synonymous SNP located in the CHDH coding region, is associated with increased susceptibility to dietary choline deficiency and risk of breast cancer. We now report evidence that this SNP is also associated with altered sperm motility patterns and dysmorphic mitochondrial structure in sperm. Sperm produced by men who are GT or TT for rs12676 have 40% and 73% lower ATP concentrations, respectively, in their sperm. rs12676 is associated with decreased CHDH protein in sperm and hepatocytes. A second SNP located in the coding region of IL17BR, rs1025689, is linked to altered sperm motility characteristics and changes in choline metabolite concentrations in sperm. PMID:22558321

  15. The effect of environmental exposure to pyrethroids and DNA damage in human sperm.

    PubMed

    Jurewicz, Joanna; Radwan, Michał; Wielgomas, Bartosz; Sobala, Wojciech; Piskunowicz, Marta; Radwan, Paweł; Bochenek, Michał; Hanke, Wojciech

    2015-01-01

    The present study was designed to investigate whether environmental exposure to pyrethroids was associated with sperm DNA damage. Between January 2008 and April 2011 286 men under 45 years of age with a normal sperm concentration of 15-300 10(6)/ml [WHO 2010] were recruited from an infertility clinic in Lodz, Poland. Participants were interviewed and provided urine, saliva, and semen samples. The pyrethroids metabolites: 3-phenoxybenzoic acid (3PBA), cis-3-(2,2-dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane carboxylic acid (CDCCA), trans-3-(2,2-dichlorovinyl)-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane carboxylic acid (TDCCA), and cis-2,2-dibromovinyl-2,2-dimethylcyclopropane-carboxylic acid (DBCA) were analyzed in the urine using a validated gas chromatography ion-tap mass spectrometry method. Sperm DNA damage was assessed using a flow cytometry based on sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA). A positive association was observed between CDCCA >50th percentile and the percentage of medium DNA fragmentation index (M DFI) and percentage of immature sperms (HDS) (p = 0.04, p = 0.04 respectively). The level of 3PBA >50th percentile in urine was positively related to the percentage of high DNA fragmentation index (H DFI) (p = 0.03). The TDCCA, DBCA levels, and the sum of pyrethroid metabolites were not associated with any sperm DNA damage measures. Our results suggest that environmental pyrethroid exposure may affect sperm DNA damage measures index indicated the reproductive effects of pyrethroid exposure on adult men. In view of the importance of human reproductive health and the widespread usage of pyrethroids, it is important to further investigate these correlations.

  16. The role of mitochondria in energy production for human sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Piomboni, P; Focarelli, R; Stendardi, A; Ferramosca, A; Zara, V

    2012-04-01

    Mitochondria of spermatozoa are different from the corresponding organelles of somatic cells, in both their morphology and biochemistry. The biochemical differences are essentially related to the existence of specific enzyme isoforms, which are characterized by peculiar kinetic and regulatory properties. As mitochondrial energy metabolism is a key factor supporting several sperm functions, these organelles host critical metabolic pathways during germ cell development and fertilization. Furthermore, spermatozoa can use different substrates, and therefore activate different metabolic pathways, depending on the available substrates and the physico-chemical conditions in which they operate. This versatility is critical to ensure fertilization success. However, the most valuable aspect of mitochondria function in all types of cells is the production of chemical energy in the form of ATP which can be used, in the case of spermatozoa, for sustaining sperm motility. The latter, on the other hand, represents one of the major determinants of male fertility. Accordingly, the presence of structural and functional alterations in mitochondria from asthenozoospermic subjects confirms the important role played by these organelles in energy maintenance of sperm motility. The present study gives an overview of the current knowledge on the energy-producing metabolic pathways operating inside human sperm mitochondria and critically analyse the differences with respect to somatic mitochondria. Such a comparison has also been carried out between the functional characteristics of human sperm mitochondria and those of other mammalian species. A deeper understanding of mitochondrial energy metabolism could open up new avenues of investigation in bioenergetics of human sperm mitochondria, both in physiological and pathological conditions.

  17. Human sperm chromosomes. Long-term effect of cancer treatment

    SciTech Connect

    Genesca, A.; Caballin, M.R.; Miro, R.; Benet, J.; Bonfill, X.; Egozcue, J. )

    1990-06-01

    The long-term cytogenetic effect of radio- or chemotherapy or both on male germ cells was evaluated by study of the chromosomal abnormalities in spermatozoa of four men treated for cancer 5-18 years earlier. The cytogenetic analysis of 422 sperm metaphases showed no differences in the aneuploidy rate. The incidence of structural chromosome aberrations was 14.0%, however, which is much higher than in controls. Thus, the high incidence of structurally aberrant spermatozoa observed in our long-term study indicates that antitumoral treatments affect stem-cell spermatogonia and that aberrant cells can survive germinal selection and produce abnormal spermatozoa.

  18. HT-COMET: a novel automated approach for high throughput assessment of human sperm chromatin quality

    PubMed Central

    Albert, Océane; Reintsch, Wolfgang E.; Chan, Peter; Robaire, Bernard

    2016-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Can we make the comet assay (single-cell gel electrophoresis) for human sperm a more accurate and informative high throughput assay? SUMMARY ANSWER We developed a standardized automated high throughput comet (HT-COMET) assay for human sperm that improves its accuracy and efficiency, and could be of prognostic value to patients in the fertility clinic. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY The comet assay involves the collection of data on sperm DNA damage at the level of the single cell, allowing the use of samples from severe oligozoospermic patients. However, this makes comet scoring a low throughput procedure that renders large cohort analyses tedious. Furthermore, the comet assay comes with an inherent vulnerability to variability. Our objective is to develop an automated high throughput comet assay for human sperm that will increase both its accuracy and efficiency. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION The study comprised two distinct components: a HT-COMET technical optimization section based on control versus DNAse treatment analyses (n = 3–5), and a cross-sectional study on 123 men presenting to a reproductive center with sperm concentrations categorized as severe oligozoospermia, oligozoospermia or normozoospermia. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS Sperm chromatin quality was measured using the comet assay: on classic 2-well slides for software comparison; on 96-well slides for HT-COMET optimization; after exposure to various concentrations of a damage-inducing agent, DNAse, using HT-COMET; on 123 subjects with different sperm concentrations using HT-COMET. Data from the 123 subjects were correlated to classic semen quality parameters and plotted as single-cell data in individual DNA damage profiles. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE We have developed a standard automated HT-COMET procedure for human sperm. It includes automated scoring of comets by a fully integrated high content screening setup that compares well with the most commonly used semi

  19. Sperm chromatin released by nucleases.

    PubMed

    Nazarov, Igor B; Shlyakhtenko, Luda S; Lyubchenko, Yuri L; Zalenskaya, Irina A; Zalensky, Andrei O

    2008-01-01

    In human spermatozoa, 15-20% of histones are retained in the nucleus to coexist with protamines. Hypothetically, nucleohistone regions of sperm chromatin mark DNA sequences for distinctive processing during fertilization and early embryogenesis. The structural organization and molecular composition of nucleohistones in human spermatozoa is poorly studied. Here, we isolate and characterize fractions of sperm chromatin that are solubilized by endogenous and micrococcal nucleases. Chromatin isolated by either nuclease have a nucleosomal organization with the periodicity of approximately 195 bp (endogenous nuclease digest) and approximately 189 bp (micrococcal nuclease digest), which is similar to that of somatic cells. A distinct feature of sperm nucleohistone is its specific compact supra-nucleosomal organization that was demonstrated by two-dimensional electrophoresis and by atomic force microscopy. The latter technique showed compacted fiber arrays composed of globular particles with the prevailing diameter of approximately 16 nm. A rough estimation indicates that histones may cover continuous stretches of >50 kbp of sperm DNA. This initial characterization of sperm chromatin solubilized by nucleases is important for our understanding of the bipartite structural organization of the paternal genome.

  20. Attention modulates responses in the human lateral geniculate nucleus.

    PubMed

    O'Connor, Daniel H; Fukui, Miki M; Pinsk, Mark A; Kastner, Sabine

    2002-11-01

    Attentional mechanisms are important for selecting relevant information and filtering out irrelevant information from cluttered visual scenes. Selective attention has previously been shown to affect neural activity in both extrastriate and striate visual cortex. Here, evidence from functional brain imaging shows that attentional response modulation is not confined to cortical processing, but can occur as early as the thalamic level. We found that attention modulated neural activity in the human lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) in several ways: it enhanced neural responses to attended stimuli, attenuated responses to ignored stimuli and increased baseline activity in the absence of visual stimulation. The LGN, traditionally viewed as the gateway to visual cortex, may also serve as a 'gatekeeper' in controlling attentional response gain.

  1. Research on the Vertical Transmission of Hepatitis C Gene from Father-to-child via Human Sperm.

    PubMed

    Ma, Mingfu; Zhu, Yijian; Wang, Dian; Hou, Zhiwei; Huang, Jihua; Zhang, Danyan; Xie, Qingdong; Wan, Ling; Zhao, Letian; Wei, Li; Li, Lianbing; Huang, Tianhua

    2016-01-01

    The aim was to develop a better experimental model which could facilitate further studies assessing the vertical HCV gene transmission via human spermatozoa, and verify the possibility of father-to-child transmission of the HCV gene. The recombinant plasmid pIRES2-EGFP-HCV C was constructed. Fluorescence in situ hybridization was performed to detect the integration of the HCV C gene in human sperm genome and in zygote's pronucleus. Successful construction of recombinant plasmid pIRES2-EGFP-HCV C was confirmed by restriction mapping, PCR, and sequencing. Positive HCV C DNA signals were observed in sperm heads, human sperm chromosomes and two-cell embryos in transfected samples. No positive signal was found in normal control and HCV infected groups. The recombinant plasmid pIRES2-EGFP-HCV C was successfully constructed. The HCV C gene was able to pass through the sperm membrane and integrate into the sperm genome. Human sperm carrying the HCV C gene was able to achieve normal fertilization. The replication of the sperm-mediated HCV C gene was synchronized with that of the host genome. Our results provide direct evidence for vertical transmission of the HCV C gene from father-to-child via human sperm.

  2. [The establishment and application of network human sperm bank management information system].

    PubMed

    Ke, Wenhong; Hu, Ronggui; Jiang, Hong

    2004-01-01

    To build network human sperm bank management information system. The system was developed with SQL Server 2000 and Power Builders 8.0. The system consisted of 4 modules: file management, physical check-up and laboratory examination management, sperm examination and freezing management, supply and follows-up management. The system worked by long-distance transmission and real time supervision. The system possesses the advantages of huge information content, great safety and high confidentiality, as well as the functions of long-distance transmission and real time supervision.

  3. ANALYSIS OR THE POTENTIAL SPERM BIOMARKER, SP22, IN HUMAN SEMEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    ANALYSIS OF THE POTENTIAL SPERM BIOMARKER SP22 IN HUMAN SEMEN
    Rebecca A. Morris Ph.D.1, Gary R. Klinefelter Ph.D.1, Naomi L. Roberts 1, Juan D. Suarez 1,
    Lillian F. Strader 1, Susan C. Jeffay 1 and Sally D. Perreault Ph.D.1

    1 U.S. EPA / ORD / National Health a...

  4. EVALUATION OF CHROMOMYCIN A3 ASSAY IN HUMAN SPERM AFTER SIMULATED OVERNIGHT SHIPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    EVALUATION OF CHROMOMYCIN A3ASSAY IN HUMAN SPERM AFTER SIMULATED OVERNIGHT SHIPMENT.
    SC Jeffay1, R Morris Buus1, LF Strader1, AF Olshan2, DP Evenson3, SD Perreault1. 1US EPA/ORD, RTP, NC;2UNC-CH, Chapel Hill, NC;3SDSU, Brookings, SD.

    Semen collection kits that allow ...

  5. Molecular architecture of the human sperm IZUMO1 and egg JUNO fertilization complex.

    PubMed

    Aydin, Halil; Sultana, Azmiri; Li, Sheng; Thavalingam, Annoj; Lee, Jeffrey E

    2016-06-23

    Fertilization is an essential biological process in sexual reproduction and comprises a series of molecular interactions between the sperm and egg. The fusion of the haploid spermatozoon and oocyte is the culminating event in mammalian fertilization, enabling the creation of a new, genetically distinct diploid organism. The merger of two gametes is achieved through a two-step mechanism in which the sperm protein IZUMO1 on the equatorial segment of the acrosome-reacted sperm recognizes its receptor, JUNO, on the egg surface. This recognition is followed by the fusion of the two plasma membranes. IZUMO1 and JUNO proteins are indispensable for fertilization, as constitutive knockdown of either protein results in mice that are healthy but infertile. Despite their central importance in reproductive medicine, the molecular architectures of these proteins and the details of their functional roles in fertilization are not known. Here we present the crystal structures of human IZUMO1 and JUNO in unbound and bound conformations. The human IZUMO1 structure exhibits a distinct boomerang shape and provides structural insights into the IZUMO family of proteins. Human IZUMO1 forms a high-affinity complex with JUNO and undergoes a major conformational change within its N-terminal domain upon binding to the egg-surface receptor. Our results provide insights into the molecular basis of sperm-egg recognition, cross-species fertilization, and the barrier to polyspermy, thereby promising benefits for the rational development of non-hormonal contraceptives and fertility treatments for humans and other mammals.

  6. ANALYSIS OR THE POTENTIAL SPERM BIOMARKER, SP22, IN HUMAN SEMEN

    EPA Science Inventory

    ANALYSIS OF THE POTENTIAL SPERM BIOMARKER SP22 IN HUMAN SEMEN
    Rebecca A. Morris Ph.D.1, Gary R. Klinefelter Ph.D.1, Naomi L. Roberts 1, Juan D. Suarez 1,
    Lillian F. Strader 1, Susan C. Jeffay 1 and Sally D. Perreault Ph.D.1

    1 U.S. EPA / ORD / National Health a...

  7. EVALUATION OF CHROMOMYCIN A3 ASSAY IN HUMAN SPERM AFTER SIMULATED OVERNIGHT SHIPMENT

    EPA Science Inventory

    EVALUATION OF CHROMOMYCIN A3ASSAY IN HUMAN SPERM AFTER SIMULATED OVERNIGHT SHIPMENT.
    SC Jeffay1, R Morris Buus1, LF Strader1, AF Olshan2, DP Evenson3, SD Perreault1. 1US EPA/ORD, RTP, NC;2UNC-CH, Chapel Hill, NC;3SDSU, Brookings, SD.

    Semen collection kits that allow ...

  8. Comparison of three different techniques of human sperm DNA isolation for methylation assay.

    PubMed

    Yuan, Hong-fang; Kuete, Martin; Su, Li; Yang, Fan; Hu, Zhi-yong; Tian, Bo-zhen; Zhang, Hui-ping; Zhao, Kai

    2015-12-01

    Human sperm DNA is an important genetic and epigenetic material, whose chromatin structure differs from that of somatic cells. As such, conventional methods for DNA extraction of somatic cells may not be suitable for obtaining sperm DNA. In this study, we evaluated and compared three sperm DNA extraction techniques, namely, modified guanidinium thiocyanate method (method A), traditional phenol-chloroform method (method B), and TianGen kit method (method C). Spectrophotometry and agarose gel electrophoresis analyses showed that method A produced DNA with higher quantity and purity than those of methods B and C (P<0.01). PCR results revealed that method A was more reliable in amplifying DEAD-box polypeptide 4 (DDX4) and copy number variations (CNVs) than methods B and C, which generated false-positive errors. The results of sperm DNA methylation assay further indicated that methods A and B were effective, and the former yielded higher quantitative accuracy. In conclusion, the modified guanidinium thiocyanate method provided high quality and reliable results and could be an optimal technique for extracting sperm DNA for methylation assay.

  9. Segmentation and tracking of human sperm cells using spatio- temporal representation and clustering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Berezansky, Michael; Greenspan, Hayit; Cohen-Or, Daniel; Eitan, Osnat

    2007-03-01

    This work proposes an algorithm for segmentation and tracking of human sperm. The algorithm analyzes video sequences containing multiple moving sperms and produces video segmentation maps and moving objects trajectories. Sperm trajectories analysis is widely used in computer-aided sperm analysis (CASA) systems. Several researches show that CASA systems face a problem when dealing with the "actual" or "perceived" collisions of sperms. The proposed algorithm reduces the probability of wrong trajectory construction related to collisions. We represent the video data using a 4-dimensional model containing spatial and temporal coordinates and the direction of optical flow vectors. The video sequence is divided into a succession of overlapping subsequences. The video data of each subsequence is grouped in the feature domain using the mean shift procedure. We identify clusters corresponding to moving objects in each subsequence. The complete trajectories are reconstructed by matching clusters that are most likely to represent that same object in adjacent subsequences. The clusters are matched using heuristics which are based on cluster overlaps, and by solving a specially formulated linear assignment problem. Tracking results are evaluated for different video sequences containing different types of motions and collisions.

  10. Bimodal rheotactic behavior reflects flagellar beat asymmetry in human sperm cells

    PubMed Central

    Bukatin, Anton; Kukhtevich, Igor; Stoop, Norbert; Dunkel, Jörn; Kantsler, Vasily

    2015-01-01

    Rheotaxis, the directed response to fluid velocity gradients, has been shown to facilitate stable upstream swimming of mammalian sperm cells along solid surfaces, suggesting a robust physical mechanism for long-distance navigation during fertilization. However, the dynamics by which a human sperm orients itself relative to an ambient flow is poorly understood. Here, we combine microfluidic experiments with mathematical modeling and 3D flagellar beat reconstruction to quantify the response of individual sperm cells in time-varying flow fields. Single-cell tracking reveals two kinematically distinct swimming states that entail opposite turning behaviors under flow reversal. We constrain an effective 2D model for the turning dynamics through systematic large-scale parameter scans, and find good quantitative agreement with experiments at different shear rates and viscosities. Using a 3D reconstruction algorithm to identify the flagellar beat patterns causing left or right turning, we present comprehensive 3D data demonstrating the rolling dynamics of freely swimming sperm cells around their longitudinal axis. Contrary to current beliefs, this 3D analysis uncovers ambidextrous flagellar waveforms and shows that the cell’s turning direction is not defined by the rolling direction. Instead, the different rheotactic turning behaviors are linked to a broken mirror symmetry in the midpiece section, likely arising from a buckling instability. These results challenge current theoretical models of sperm locomotion. PMID:26655343

  11. Aluminum exposure for 60days at human dietary levels impairs spermatogenesis and sperm quality in rats.

    PubMed

    Martinez, Caroline Silveira; Escobar, Alyne Gourlart; Uranga-Ocio, José Antonio; Peçanha, Franck Maciel; Vassallo, Dalton Valentim; Exley, Christopher; Miguel, Marta; Wiggers, Giulia Alessandra

    2017-08-18

    Concerns about environmental aluminum (Al) and reproductive health have been raised. We investigated the effects of Al exposure at a human relevant dietary level and a high level exposure to Al. Experiment 1 (Lower level) rats were treated orally for 60 days: a) controls - ultrapure water; b) aluminum at 1.5mg/kg bw/day and c) aluminum at 8.3mg/kg bw/day. Experiment 2 (High level) rats were treated for 42 days: a) controls - ultrapure water; b) aluminum at 100mg/kg bw/day. Al decreased sperm count, daily sperm production, sperm motility, normal morphological sperm, impaired testis histology; increased oxidative stress in reproductive organs and inflammation in testis. Our study shows the specific presence of Al in the germinative cells and, that low concentrations of Al in testes (3.35μg/g) are sufficient to impair spermatogenesis and sperm quality. Our findings provide a better understanding of the reproductive health risk of Al. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Thawed human sperm quality is influenced by the volume of the cryopreserved specimen.

    PubMed

    Abush, Ayelet; Hauser, Ron; Paz, Gedalia; Kleiman, Sandra E; Lehavi, Ofer; Yavetz, Haim; Yogev, Leah

    2014-03-01

    To test the effect of sperm specimen volume in the freezing-thawing process on specimen quality. Experimental prospective study. Tertiary academic medical center. Fifty high-quality sperm donors donated ∼3 times each. Sperm samples were split into two aliquots and frozen in volumes of 0.25 mL and 0.5 mL. Semen analyses. Eight sperm quality parameters of thawed specimens. Thawed 0.5-mL specimens had a higher percentage of motility and viability, progressive motility concentration, percentage of cells with high mitochondrial membrane potential, and intact chromatin compared with 0.25-mL specimens. Although there were fewer cells with intact acrosomes in the 0.5-mL thawed samples, they had a similar ability to respond to ionophore by acrosome reaction as the 0.25-mL specimens. Both groups had similar percentages of cells with oxidative stress and numbers of cells that bound to the zona pellucida. The remaining air volume in the straw and freezing medium composition had a minimal effect on tested parameters. Better quality thawed human sperm was achieved after cryopreservation of high volumes compared with low volumes of specimens. Air volume in the straw had no influence on specimen quality. Copyright © 2014 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. The CatSper channel: a polymodal chemosensor in human sperm.

    PubMed

    Brenker, Christoph; Goodwin, Normann; Weyand, Ingo; Kashikar, Nachiket D; Naruse, Masahiro; Krähling, Miriam; Müller, Astrid; Kaupp, U Benjamin; Strünker, Timo

    2012-04-04

    The sperm-specific CatSper channel controls the intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) and, thereby, the swimming behaviour of sperm. In humans, CatSper is directly activated by progesterone and prostaglandins-female factors that stimulate Ca(2+) influx. Other factors including neurotransmitters, chemokines, and odorants also affect sperm function by changing [Ca(2+)](i). Several ligands, notably odorants, have been proposed to control Ca(2+) entry and motility via G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) and cAMP-signalling pathways. Here, we show that odorants directly activate CatSper without involving GPCRs and cAMP. Moreover, membrane-permeable analogues of cyclic nucleotides that have been frequently used to study cAMP-mediated Ca(2+) signalling also activate CatSper directly via an extracellular site. Thus, CatSper or associated protein(s) harbour promiscuous binding sites that can host various ligands. These results contest current concepts of Ca(2+) signalling by GPCR and cAMP in mammalian sperm: ligands thought to activate metabotropic pathways, in fact, act via a common ionotropic mechanism. We propose that the CatSper channel complex serves as a polymodal sensor for multiple chemical cues that assist sperm during their voyage across the female genital tract.

  14. The dynamics of human sperm droplets on a liquid crystal and polymer composite film

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lu, Farn; Lin, Yi-Hsin; Tsai, Wan-Chen; Li, Jiong-Juan; Chu, Ting-Yu; Hsu, Hsu-Kuan; Li, Wang-Yang

    2010-02-01

    A switchable surface using a liquid crystal and polymer composite film (LCPCF) based on phase separation between liquid crystals (LC) and polymers after photopolymerization is developed recently. The wettability of LCPCF is electrically tunable because of the orientation of liquid crystal directors anchored among the polymer grains under an in-planed electric field. A water droplet on the top of LCPCF can be manipulated under an inhomogeneous electric field on the LCPCF owning to the wettability gradient. The dynamics of a droplet of human sperms on the LCPCF is demonstrated as well. Three motions of sperm droplets are observed: the droplet collapse and the droplet stretch,. We found that the dynamics, concentrations, and activities of spermatozoa, affect the motions of a sperm droplet. The potential applications of LCPCF are polarizer-free displays, liquid lenses, and the microfluidic device in assisted reproductive technology (ART)

  15. TRPV4 is endogenously expressed in vertebrate spermatozoa and regulates intracellular calcium in human sperm.

    PubMed

    Kumar, Ashutosh; Majhi, Rakesh Kumar; Swain, Nirlipta; Giri, S C; Kar, Sujata; Samanta, Luna; Goswami, Chandan

    2016-05-13

    Transient Receptor Potential Vanilloid sub-type 4 (TRPV4) is a non-selective cationic channel involved in regulation of temperature, osmolality and different ligand-dependent Ca(2+)-influx. Recently, we have demonstrated that TRPV4 is conserved in all vertebrates. Now we demonstrate that TRPV4 is endogenously expressed in all vertebrate sperm cells ranging from fish to mammals. In human sperm, TRPV4 is present as N-glycosylated protein and its activation induces Ca(2+)-influx. Its expression and localization differs in swim-up and swim-down cells suggesting that TRPV4 is an important determining factor for sperm motility. We demonstrate that pharmacological activation or inhibition of TRPV4 regulates Ca(2+)-wave propagation from head to tail. Such findings may have wide application in male fertility-infertility, contraception and conservation of endangered species as well. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. A human-mouse hybridoma producing monoclonal antibody against human sperm coating antigen.

    PubMed Central

    Kyurkchiev, S D; Shigeta, M; Koyama, K; Isojima, S

    1986-01-01

    Since anti-sperm antibodies were first discovered in the sera of women, the relationship of these antibodies to sterility has been studied by many investigators. In order to determine the antigens of spermatozoa responsible for raising antibodies to spermatozoa in humans, many studies have been carried out by purifying human spermatozoa cell membrane and seminal plasma components. Since it was found that the purification was difficult by physiochemical procedures, the immunoaffinity chromatography bound monoclonal antibody (Mab) to spermatozoa antigens was attempted for this purpose. The establishment of hybridomas producing Mabs to human seminal plasma and human spermatozoa was reported by Shigeta et al. (1980), Isojima, Koyoma & Fujiwara (1982), Lee et al. (1982) and Isahakia & Alexander (1984). The ordinary approaches to obtain the Mabs consisted of xenogenic immunization with human semen and cell fusion of immunized spleen cells with mouse myeloma cells. However, the antigenic epitopes of human spermatozoa, which induced antibody production, are xenogenic for the mouse, and therefore there is a possibility that there is a difference in recognized antigenic epitopes in humans as isotypic and in mice as xenogenic. In order to study these antigenic epitopes, which correspond to antibodies against spermatozoa in women, the establishment of human-mouse hybridomas, which produced anti-semen antibodies as produced in sterile women, became essential. In these studies, we used recently developed cell fusion techniques to fuse immunized human peripheral lymphocytes with mouse myeloma cells. PMID:3456978

  17. DNA flow cytometry of human spermatozoa: consistent stoichiometric staining of sperm DNA using a novel decondensation protocol.

    PubMed

    Kovács, Tamás; Békési, Gyöngyi; Fábián, Akos; Rákosy, Zsuzsa; Horváth, Gábor; Mátyus, László; Balázs, Margit; Jenei, Attila

    2008-10-01

    Rapid flow cytometric measurement of the frequency of aneuploid human sperms is in increasing demand but development of an exploitable method is hindered by difficulties of stoichiometric staining of sperm DNA. An aggressive decondensation protocol is needed after which cell integrity still remains intact. We used flow cytometry to examine the effect of lithium diiodosalicylate (LIS, chaotropic agent) on fluorescence intensity of propidium iodide-treated human spermatozoa from 10 normozoospermic men. When flow cytometric identification of diploid spermatozoa was achieved, validation was performed after sorting by three-color FISH. In contrast with the extremely variable histograms of nondecondensed sperms, consistent identification of haploid and diploid spermatozoa was possible if samples were decondensed with LIS prior to flow cytometry. A 76-fold enrichment of diploid sperms was observed in the sorted fractions by FISH. A significant correlation was found between the proportion of sorted cells and of diploid sperms by FISH. Application of LIS during the preparation of sperm for flow cytometry appears to ensure the stoichiometric staining of sperm DNA, making quantification of aneuploid sperm percentage possible. To our knowledge this is the first report in terms of separating spermatozoa with confirmedly abnormal chromosomal content. High correlation between the proportion of cells identified as having double DNA content by flow cytometry and diploid sperm by FISH allows rapid calculation of diploidy rate.

  18. Lectin binding of human sperm associates with DEFB126 mutation and serves as a potential biomarker for subfertility

    PubMed Central

    Xin, Aijie; Cheng, Li; Diao, Hua; Wu, Yancheng; Zhou, Shumin; Shi, Changgen; Sun, Yangyang; Wang, Peng; Duan, Shiwei; Zheng, Jufen; Wu, Bin; Yuan, Yao; Gu, Yihua; Chen, Guowu; Sun, Xiaoxi; Shi, Huijuan; Tao, Shengce; Zhang, Yonglian

    2016-01-01

    Coating on the sperm surface, glycocalyx, plays a key role in sperm motility, maturation and fertilization. A comprehensive profile of sperm surface glycans will greatly facilitate both basic researches and clinical studies. Because of the capability of recognizing different glycan moieties, lectins are widely used in glycobiology. However, lacking high-throughput technology, limited lectins have been reported for analyzing the glycan of human sperm. In this study, we employed a lectin microarray for profiling the surface glycans of human sperm, on which 54 out of 91 lectins showed positive binding. Based on this technique, we compared lectin binding profiling of sperm with homozygous DEFB126 mutation (del/del) with that of wild type (wt/wt). DEFB126 was reported to contribute to the sialylation on sperm surface and its homozygous mutation was related to male subfertility. Six lectins (Jacalin/AIA, GHA, ACL, MPL, VVL and ABA) were found to develop lower binding affinity to sperm with del/del. Further validation showed that these lectins, especially ABA and MPL, can be potential biomarkers for clinical diagnosis of subfertility due to the mutation of DEFB126. Our research provides insight into the detection of some unexplained male subfertility, and the lectin microarray is generally applicable for infertility/subfertility sperm biomarker discovery. PMID:26832966

  19. Lectin binding of human sperm associates with DEFB126 mutation and serves as a potential biomarker for subfertility.

    PubMed

    Xin, Aijie; Cheng, Li; Diao, Hua; Wu, Yancheng; Zhou, Shumin; Shi, Changgen; Sun, Yangyang; Wang, Peng; Duan, Shiwei; Zheng, Jufen; Wu, Bin; Yuan, Yao; Gu, Yihua; Chen, Guowu; Sun, Xiaoxi; Shi, Huijuan; Tao, Shengce; Zhang, Yonglian

    2016-02-01

    Coating on the sperm surface, glycocalyx, plays a key role in sperm motility, maturation and fertilization. A comprehensive profile of sperm surface glycans will greatly facilitate both basic researches and clinical studies. Because of the capability of recognizing different glycan moieties, lectins are widely used in glycobiology. However, lacking high-throughput technology, limited lectins have been reported for analyzing the glycan of human sperm. In this study, we employed a lectin microarray for profiling the surface glycans of human sperm, on which 54 out of 91 lectins showed positive binding. Based on this technique, we compared lectin binding profiling of sperm with homozygous DEFB126 mutation (del/del) with that of wild type (wt/wt). DEFB126 was reported to contribute to the sialylation on sperm surface and its homozygous mutation was related to male subfertility. Six lectins (Jacalin/AIA, GHA, ACL, MPL, VVL and ABA) were found to develop lower binding affinity to sperm with del/del. Further validation showed that these lectins, especially ABA and MPL, can be potential biomarkers for clinical diagnosis of subfertility due to the mutation of DEFB126. Our research provides insight into the detection of some unexplained male subfertility, and the lectin microarray is generally applicable for infertility/subfertility sperm biomarker discovery.

  20. PUTATIVE CREATINE KINASE M-ISOFORM IN HUMAN SPERM IS IDENTIFIED AS THE 70-KILODALTON HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN HSPA2

    EPA Science Inventory

    THE PUTATIVE CREATINE KINASE M-ISOFORM IN HUMAN SPERM
    IS IDENTIFIED AS THE 70 kDa HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN HSPA2

    * Gabor Huszar1, Kathryn Stone2, David Dix3 and Lynne Vigue1
    1The Sperm Physiology Laboratory, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 2 W.M. Keck Foundatio...

  1. PUTATIVE CREATINE KINASE M-ISOFORM IN HUMAN SPERM IS IDENTIFIED AS THE 70-KILODALTON HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN HSPA2

    EPA Science Inventory

    THE PUTATIVE CREATINE KINASE M-ISOFORM IN HUMAN SPERM
    IS IDENTIFIED AS THE 70 kDa HEAT SHOCK PROTEIN HSPA2

    * Gabor Huszar1, Kathryn Stone2, David Dix3 and Lynne Vigue1
    1The Sperm Physiology Laboratory, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, 2 W.M. Keck Foundatio...

  2. Large Scale 7436-bp Deletions in Human Sperm Mitochondrial DNA with Spermatozoa Dysfunction and Male Infertility.

    PubMed

    Ambulkar, Prafulla S; Waghmare, Jwalant E; Chaudhari, Ajay R; Wankhede, Vandana R; Tarnekar, Aaditya M; Shende, Moreshwar R; Pal, Asoke K

    2016-11-01

    Mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA are essential to sperm motility and fertility. It controls growth, development and differentiation through oxidation energy supply. Mitochondrial (mtDNA) deletions or mutation are frequently attributed to defects of sperm motility and finally these deletions lead to sperm dysfunction and causes infertility in male. To investigate the correlation between large scale 7436-bp deletions in sperm mtDNA and non-motility of sperm in asthenozoospermia and Oligoasthenoteratozoospermia (OAT) infertile men. The present prospective study was carried out in Human Genetic Division, Department of Anatomy, Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences, Sevagram from June 2014 to July 2016. We have studied 110 asthenozoospermia and OAT infertile men whose semen profile indicated abnormal motility and 50 normal fertile controls. Of 110 infertile men, 70 had asthenozoospermia and 40 had OAT. Fractionations of spermatozoa were done in each semen sample on the basis of their motility by percoll gradients discontinuous technique. Long-range PCR was used for detection of 7436-bp deletions in sperm mtDNA and was confirmed by primer shift technique. Overall eight subjects (8/110; 7.2%) of which six (6/70; 8.57%) asthenozoospermia and two (2/40; 5%) OAT had shown deletions of 7436-bp. In 40% percoll fraction had more non-motile spermatozoa than 80% percoll fraction. The non-motile spermatozoa in 40% percoll fractions showed more mtDNA deletions (7.2%) than the motile spermatozoa in 80% percoll fraction (2.7%). The sequencing of flanking regions of deleted mtDNA confirmed 7436-bp deletions. Interestingly, no deletions were found in control subjects. Though, the frequency of 7436-bp deletions in sperm mtDNA was low in infertile cases but meaningful indications were there when results were compared with controls. It is indicated that large scale deletions 7436-bp of mtDNA is associated with abnormal sperm motility. The 7436-bp deletions of mtDNA in spermatozoa

  3. Large Scale 7436-bp Deletions in Human Sperm Mitochondrial DNA with Spermatozoa Dysfunction and Male Infertility

    PubMed Central

    Ambulkar, Prafulla S.; Waghmare, Jwalant E.; Chaudhari, Ajay R.; Wankhede, Vandana R.; Tarnekar, Aaditya M.; Shende, Moreshwar R.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction Mitochondria and mitochondrial DNA are essential to sperm motility and fertility. It controls growth, development and differentiation through oxidation energy supply. Mitochondrial (mtDNA) deletions or mutation are frequently attributed to defects of sperm motility and finally these deletions lead to sperm dysfunction and causes infertility in male. Aim To investigate the correlation between large scale 7436-bp deletions in sperm mtDNA and non-motility of sperm in asthenozoospermia and Oligoasthenoteratozoospermia (OAT) infertile men. Materials and Methods The present prospective study was carried out in Human Genetic Division, Department of Anatomy, Mahatma Gandhi Institute of Medical Sciences, Sevagram from June 2014 to July 2016. We have studied 110 asthenozoospermia and OAT infertile men whose semen profile indicated abnormal motility and 50 normal fertile controls. Of 110 infertile men, 70 had asthenozoospermia and 40 had OAT. Fractionations of spermatozoa were done in each semen sample on the basis of their motility by percoll gradients discontinuous technique. Long-range PCR was used for detection of 7436-bp deletions in sperm mtDNA and was confirmed by primer shift technique. Results Overall eight subjects (8/110; 7.2%) of which six (6/70; 8.57%) asthenozoospermia and two (2/40; 5%) OAT had shown deletions of 7436-bp. In 40% percoll fraction had more non-motile spermatozoa than 80% percoll fraction. The non-motile spermatozoa in 40% percoll fractions showed more mtDNA deletions (7.2%) than the motile spermatozoa in 80% percoll fraction (2.7%). The sequencing of flanking regions of deleted mtDNA confirmed 7436-bp deletions. Interestingly, no deletions were found in control subjects. Conclusion Though, the frequency of 7436-bp deletions in sperm mtDNA was low in infertile cases but meaningful indications were there when results were compared with controls. It is indicated that large scale deletions 7436-bp of mtDNA is associated with abnormal

  4. Chemical UV Filters Mimic the Effect of Progesterone on Ca(2+) Signaling in Human Sperm Cells.

    PubMed

    Rehfeld, A; Dissing, S; Skakkebæk, N E

    2016-11-01

    Progesterone released by cumulus cells surrounding the egg induces a Ca(2+) influx into human sperm cells via the cationic channel of sperm (CatSper) Ca(2+) channel and controls multiple Ca(2+)-dependent responses essential for fertilization. We hypothesized that chemical UV filters may mimic the physiological action of progesterone on CatSper, thus affecting Ca(2+) signaling in human sperm cells. We examined 29 UV filters allowed in sunscreens in the United States and/or the European Union for their ability to induce Ca(2+) signals in human sperm by applying measurements of the intracellular free Ca(2+) concentration. We found that 13 UV filters induced a significant Ca(2+) signal at 10 μM. Nine UV filters induced Ca(2+) signals primarily by activating the CatSper channel. The UV filters 3-benzylidene camphor (3-BC) and benzylidene camphor sulfonic acid competitively inhibited progesterone-induced Ca(2+) signals. Dose-response relations for the UV filters showed that the Ca(2+) signal-inducing effects began in the nanomolar-micromolar range. Single-cell Ca(2+) measurements showed a Ca(2+) signal-inducing effect of the most potent UV filter, 3-BC, at 10 nM. Finally, we demonstrated that the 13 UV filters acted additively in low-dose mixtures to induce Ca(2+) signals. In conclusion, 13 of 29 examined UV filters (44%) induced Ca(2+) signals in human sperm. Nine UV filters primarily activated CatSper and thereby mimicked the effect of progesterone. The UV filters 3-BC and benzylidene camphor sulfonic acid competitively inhibited progesterone-induced Ca(2+) signals. In vivo exposure studies are needed to investigate whether UV filter exposure affects human fertility.

  5. Hydrogen Peroxide Modifies Human Sperm Peroxiredoxins in a Dose-Dependent Manner1

    PubMed Central

    O'Flaherty, Cristian; Rico de Souza, Angela

    2010-01-01

    Low levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS) modulate signaling pathways required for human sperm activation, but high levels impair sperm function, leading to infertility. Peroxiredoxins (PRDXs) are enzymes with a dual role as ROS scavengers and modulators of ROS-dependent signaling. The present study aimed to characterize PRDXs in human spermatozoa and possible modifications resulting from hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). We found PRDX1, PRDX4, PRDX5, and PRDX6 in both seminal plasma and spermatozoa. Using immunocytochemistry, we demonstrated that these PRDXs are differentially localized in the head, acrosome, mitochondrial sheath, and flagellum. These observations were confirmed by immunoblotting using cytosolic, Triton-soluble and -insoluble, and head and flagella sperm fractions. PRDXs are dose-dependently modified by H2O2, as seen by the formation of disulfide bridges and high-molecular-mass complexes. This first study, to our knowledge, on PRDXs in human spermatozoa indicates that PRDX1, PRDX4, PRDX5, and PRDX6 are modified when spermatozoa are challenged with H2O2. This suggests that PRDXs may protect these cells at high levels of H2O2 but could also control H2O2 levels within different cell compartments so that normal sperm activation can occur. PMID:20864641

  6. Con A-binding protein Zn-α2-glycoprotein on human sperm membrane is related to acrosome reaction and sperm fertility.

    PubMed

    Liu, Y; Qu, F; Cao, X; Chen, G; Guo, Q; Ying, X; Guo, W; Lu, L; Ding, Z

    2012-04-01

    Fertilization, the recognition and fusion between spermatozoa and oocyte, involves various molecules on the spermatozoa and oocyte membranes. Concanavalin A (ConA)-binding proteins may be one of the molecules involved in mammal spermatozoa fertilization; however, their structure and function remain largely unknown. Here, we initially identified a ConA-binding protein, Zn-α2-glycoprotein (ZAG), involved in regulating the acrosome reaction (AR) of human spermatozoa. ZAG is localized on the pre-equatorial region covering the acrosome, neck and tail (some parts of middle piece and principal piece respectively) regions of the acrosome intact human spermatozoa, and disappears in the acrosomal region of the acrosome-reacted spermatozoa. Polyclonal antibodies against human recombinant ZAG significantly reduced the AR and sperm capability binding to human zona pellucida or penetration into zona-free hamster oocytes. Furthermore, assessment of the signaling pathways regulated by ZAG revealed that ZAG affects sperm AR through both the cAMP/PKA and PKC pathways. These results indicate that ZAG, which is present on the human sperm membrane, plays a critical role in the AR and subsequently, may be involved in sperm fertility.

  7. Aneuploidy in human sperm: The use of multicolor FISH to test various theories of nondisjunction

    SciTech Connect

    Spriggs, E.L.; Martin, R.H.

    1996-02-01

    While it is known that all chromosomes are susceptible to meiotic nondisjunction, it is not clear whether all chromosomes display the same frequency of nondisjunction. By use of multicolor FISH and chromosome-specific probes, the frequency of disomy in human sperm was determined for chromosomes 1, 2, 4, 9, 12, 15, 16, 18, 20, and 21, and the sex chromosomes. A minimum of 10,000 sperm nuclei were scored from each of five healthy, chromosomally normal donors for every chromosome studied, giving a total of 418,931 sperm nuclei. The mean frequencies of disomy obtained were 0.09% for chromosome 1; 0.08% for chromosome 2; 0.11% for chromosome 4; 0.14% for chromosome 9; 0.16% for chromosome 12; 0.11% for chromosomes 15, 16, and 18; 0.12% for chromosome 20; 0.29% for chromosome 21; and 0.43% for the sex chromosomes. Data for chromosomes 1, 12, 15, and 18, and the sex chromosomes have been published elsewhere. When the mean frequencies of disomy were compared, the sex chromosomes and chromosome 21 had significantly higher frequencies of disomy than that of any other autosome studied. These results corroborate the pooled data obtained from human sperm karyotypes and suggest that the sex chromosome bivalent and the chromosome 21 bivalent are more susceptible to nondisjunction during spermatogenesis. From these findings, theories proposed to explain the variable incidence of nondisjunction can be supported or discarded as improbable. 33 refs., 4 tabs.

  8. Oocyte activation ability correlates with head flatness and presence of perinuclear theca substance in human and mouse sperm.

    PubMed

    Ito, Chizuru; Akutsu, Hidenori; Yao, Ryoji; Kyono, Koichi; Suzuki-Toyota, Fumie; Toyama, Yoshiro; Maekawa, Mamiko; Noda, Tetsuo; Toshimori, Kiyotaka

    2009-10-01

    Recent studies indicate that round-headed sperm cannot activate oocytes and lack the postacrosomal sheath (PAS) or perinuclear theca (PT), although normal flat-headed sperm can activate oocytes and do have PAS (PT). In this study, we investigated how oocyte activation ability correlates with sperm head morphology (round and flat) and the presence of PT, by studying MN13, a representative molecule of the PT. We analyzed sperm with flat and round heads from infertile patients with globozoospermia (n = 1) and teratozoospermia (n = 1), and also from GOPC(-/-) mice, an animal model of human globozoospermia. Differential interference contrast image analysis, immunocytochemistry with MN13 antibody, transmission electron microscopy and an oocyte activation assay (assessing pronucleus formation) with ICSI were used. Flat-headed (control) sperm from both a healthy fertile volunteer man and wild-type mice had MN13 and PAS (PT). Flat-headed sperm (<5% of the population) from GOPC(-/-) mice also had both MN13 and PAS (PT), and they showed high oocyte activation ability. In contrast, round-headed sperm from a globozoospermia patient (100%) and GOPC(-/-) mice (>95% of the population) had neither MN13, nor PAS (PT), nor oocyte activation ability. Oocyte activation was higher in flat- versus round-headed sperm from GOPC(-/-) mice (P < 0.05). Oocyte activation ability may be related to sperm head flatness and presence of MN13 and PAS (PT) in human and mouse sperm. This information is a first step towards the possibility of selecting good-quality sperm with high oocyte activation ability for ICSI.

  9. A double-blinded comparison of in situ TUNEL and aniline blue versus flow cytometry acridine orange for the determination of sperm DNA fragmentation and nucleus decondensation state index.

    PubMed

    Hamidi, Jamal; Frainais, Christophe; Amar, Edouard; Bailly, Eric; Clément, Patrice; Ménézo, Yves

    2015-08-01

    The impact of sperm DNA fragmentation on assisted reproductive technology (ART) successes, in terms of outcome, is now established. High levels of DNA strand breaks severely affect the probability of pregnancy. The importance of sperm nucleus condensation in early embryogenesis and, subsequently, on the quality of the conceptus is now emerging. In this article we have compared in situ analyses with terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL) (for DNA fragmentation) with aniline blue (AB) (for nucleus decondensation), versus flow cytometry (FC) after acridine orange staining, in a double-blinded analysis. In our hands, TUNEL and acridine orange give perfectly comparable results. For decondensation the results are also comparable, but the double-stranded green fluorescence obtained with acridine orange seems to slightly underestimate the decondensation status obtained with AB.

  10. An in vitro study of the effect of mifepristone and ulipristal acetate on human sperm functions.

    PubMed

    Ko, J K Y; Huang, V W; Li, R H W; Yeung, W S B; Ho, P C; Chiu, P C N

    2014-11-01

    Ulipristal acetate (UPA) and mifepristone are currently well-established agents for emergency contraception. Both drugs are selective progestogen receptor modulators which have been shown to have better efficacy than the widely used levonorgestrel in prevention of pregnancy. However, there is only limited information on the action of UPA on sperm function. The present study compared the in vitro biological effects of mifepristone and UPA on human sperm functions. Spermatozoa from semen samples with normal semen parameters were isolated. Capacitated spermatozoa were pre-incubated with 0.04, 0.4, 4 and 40 μM mifepristone or UPA for 1 h. Sperm motility, viability, DNA integrity, capacitation, spontaneous acrosome reaction, spontaneous hyperactivation, zona pellucida (ZP) binding capability and intracellular calcium concentration ([Ca(2+)]i) were determined. The effects of mifepristone and UPA on progesterone-induced acrosome reaction, hyperactivation and [Ca(2+)]i were also studied. Our results showed that mifepristone and UPA dose-dependently suppressed progesterone-induced acrosome reaction, hyperactivation and [Ca(2+)]i at concentrations ≥0.4 μM in human spermatozoa. Both compounds did not affect sperm motility, viability, DNA integrity, capacitation, spontaneous acrosome reaction, spontaneous hyperactivation, ZP binding capability and [Ca(2+)]i. This study demonstrated that UPA and mifepristone modulate human sperm functions by acting as progesterone antagonists. The results enable us to gain a better understanding of the mechanisms by which mifepristone and UPA work for emergency contraception, and provide a scientific basis for their clinical application. © 2014 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  11. Paternal-age effects on sperm aneuploidy investigated in mice and humans by three-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrobek, A.J.; Lowe, X.; Holland, N.T.

    1994-09-01

    We conducted a cross-species comparison of the effects of paternal age on sperm aneuploidy in mice and humans. A new murine assay was developed to detect sperm hyperhaploidy and polyploidy for chromosomes X, Y, and 8 using fluorescence in situ hybridization with chromosome-specific DNA probes, to serve as a direct corollate to the three-chromosome method developed early for human sperm. Sperm aneuploidy was evaluated in eight male B6C3F1 male mice (aged 22.5-30.5 mo) and compared to young controls (2.4 mo). The aged group showed significant ({approximately}2.0-fold) increases in hyperhaploidies involving chromosomes X, Y and 8, with the greatest effects seen in the oldest animals. Sperm aneuploidy was also evaluated in two groups of healthy men who differed in mean age [46.8{plus_minus}3.1 (n=4) vs. 28.5{plus_minus}5.0 (n=10) yrs], using the three-chromosome method. The older group showed a statistically significant increase in hyperhaploid sperm for both sex chromosomes. Additional controlled human studies are planned. Taken together, the murine and human data are consistent with a positive effect of paternal age on sperm aneuploidy. In both species, the strongest age effect was observed for hyperhaploidies of chromosome Y. Future studies are needed to investigate the shape of the age-effect curve and to evaluate chromosomal differences, especially for humans in their late reproductive years.

  12. AMP-activated kinase in human spermatozoa: identification, intracellular localization, and key function in the regulation of sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Calle-Guisado, Violeta; de Llera, Ana Hurtado; Martin-Hidalgo, David; Mijares, Jose; Gil, Maria C; Alvarez, Ignacio S; Bragado, Maria J; Garcia-Marin, Luis J

    2016-09-27

    AMP-activated kinase (AMPK), a protein that regulates energy balance and metabolism, has recently been identified in boar spermatozoa where regulates key functional sperm processes essential for fertilization. This work's aims are AMPK identification, intracellular localization, and their role in human spermatozoa function. Semen was obtained from healthy human donors. Sperm AMPK and phospho-Thr172-AMPK were analyzed by Western blotting and indirect immunofluorescence. High- and low-quality sperm populations were separated by a 40%-80% density gradient. Human spermatozoa motility was evaluated by an Integrated Semen Analysis System (ISAS) in the presence or absence of the AMPK inhibitor compound C (CC). AMPK is localized along the human spermatozoa, at the entire acrosome, midpiece and tail with variable intensity, whereas its active form, phospho-Thr172-AMPK, shows a prominent staining at the acrosome and sperm tail with a weaker staining in the midpiece and the postacrosomal region. Interestingly, spermatozoa bearing an excess residual cytoplasm show strong AMPK staining in this subcellular compartment. Both AMPK and phospho-Thr172-AMPK human spermatozoa contents exhibit important individual variations. Moreover, active AMPK is predominant in the high motility sperm population, where shows a stronger intensity compared with the low motility sperm population. Inhibition of AMPK activity in human spermatozoa by CC treatment leads to a significant reduction in any sperm motility parameter analyzed: percent of motile sperm, sperm velocities, progressivity, and other motility coefficients. This work identifies and points out AMPK as a new molecular mechanism involved in human spermatozoa motility. Further AMPK implications in the clinical efficiency of assisted reproduction and in other reproductive areas need to be studied.

  13. Functional imaging of the human lateral geniculate nucleus and pulvinar.

    PubMed

    Kastner, Sabine; O'Connor, Daniel H; Fukui, Miki M; Fehd, Hilda M; Herwig, Uwe; Pinsk, Mark A

    2004-01-01

    In the human brain, little is known about the functional anatomy and response properties of subcortical nuclei containing visual maps such as the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN) and the pulvinar. Using functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) at 3 tesla (T), collective responses of neural populations in the LGN were measured as a function of stimulus contrast and flicker reversal rate and compared with those obtained in visual cortex. Flickering checkerboard stimuli presented in alternation to the right and left hemifields reliably activated the LGN. The peak of the LGN activation was found to be on average within +/-2 mm of the anatomical location of the LGN, as identified on high-resolution structural images. In all visual areas except the middle temporal (MT), fMRI responses increased monotonically with stimulus contrast. In the LGN, the dynamic response range of the contrast function was larger and contrast gain was lower than in the cortex. Contrast sensitivity was lowest in the LGN and V1 and increased gradually in extrastriate cortex. In area MT, responses were saturated at 4% contrast. Response modulation by changes in flicker rate was similar in the LGN and V1 and occurred mainly in the frequency range between 0.5 and 7.5 Hz; in contrast, in extrastriate areas V4, V3A, and MT, responses were modulated mainly in the frequency range between 7.5 and 20 Hz. In the human pulvinar, no activations were obtained with the experimental designs used to probe response properties of the LGN. However, regions in the mediodorsal right and left pulvinar were found to be consistently activated by bilaterally presented flickering checkerboard stimuli, when subjects attended to the stimuli. Taken together, our results demonstrate that fMRI at 3 T can be used effectively to study thalamocortical circuits in the human brain.

  14. LYZL6, an acidic, bacteriolytic, human sperm-related protein, plays a role in fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Huang, Peng; Li, Wenshu; Yang, Zhifang; Zhang, Ning; Xu, Yixin; Bao, Jianying; Jiang, Deke; Dong, Xianping

    2017-01-01

    Lysozyme-like proteins (LYZLs) belong to the c-type lysozyme/α-lactalbumin family and are selectively expressed in the mammalian male reproductive tract. Two members, human sperm lysozyme-like protein (SLLP) -1 and mouse LYZL4, have been reported to contribute to fertilization but show no bacteriolytic activity. Here, we focused on the possible contribution of LYZL6 to immunity and fertilization. In humans, LYZL6 was selectively expressed by the testis and epididymis and became concentrated on spermatozoa. Native LYZL6 isolated from sperm extracts exhibited bacteriolytic activity against Micrococcus lysodeikticus. Recombinant LYZL6 (rLYZL6) reached its peak activity at pH 5.6 and 15 mM of Na+, and could inhibit the growth of Gram-positive, but not Gram-negative bacteria. Nevertheless, the bacteriolytic activity of rLYZL6 proved to be much lower than that of human lysozyme under physiological conditions. Immunodetection with a specific antiserum localized the LYZL6 protein on the postacrosomal membrane of mature spermatozoa. Immunoneutralization of LYZL6 significantly decreased the numbers of human spermatozoa fused with zona-free hamster eggs in a dose-dependent manner in vitro. Thus, we report here for the first time that LYZL6, an acidic, bacteriolytic and human sperm-related protein, is likely important for fertilization but not for the innate immunity of the male reproductive tract. PMID:28182716

  15. First steps in the development of a functional assay for human sperm using pig oocytes.

    PubMed

    Canovas, Sebastian; Coy, Pilar; Gomez, Emilio

    2007-01-01

    The use of mammalian oocytes to assess human sperm functionality could be a helpful tool with potential applications in clinical and research programs. In an attempt to develop the pig model, the aim of the present work was to study the interaction between human spermatozoa and pig oocytes at the zona pellucida (ZP), the oolemma, and the ooplasm levels. In vitro matured pig oocytes and human spermatozoa from fertile and low-fertility donors were employed. The induction of the acrosome reaction by the ZP, the ability of the sperm to penetrate the oocyte after coincubation, and the male pronuclear formation after ICSI were evaluated. Human spermatozoa can bind to pig ZP and undergo the acrosome reaction (15% to 58%, depending on the individual); they are not able to fuse with the oolemma but they can decondense and form a male pronucleus (40%-100%) when injected into pig oocytes. In conclusion, this study shows that pig oocytes can be a useful model to assess human sperm functionality.

  16. Differential extraction and enrichment of human sperm surface proteins in a proteome: identification of immunocontraceptive candidates.

    PubMed

    Shetty, J; Diekman, A B; Jayes, F C; Sherman, N E; Naaby-Hansen, S; Flickinger, C J; Herr, J C

    2001-08-01

    The objective of this study was to discover previously unknown human sperm surface proteins that may be candidate contraceptive vaccinogens. To this end, methods of concentrating human sperm proteins for microsequencing by mass spectrometry were used, which increased the likelihood of identifying surface proteins. Vectorial labeling, differential extraction and two-dimensional (2-D) gel electrophoresis were employed to identify and isolate proteins accessible at the cell surface. Percoll harvested or swim-up sperm were either solubilized directly or solubilized after surface labeling with sulfo-succinimidyl-6-(biotinamido)hexanoate (sulfo-NHS-LC-biotin). Comparisons were made of proteins extracted with four lysis buffers: (i) Celis buffer containing 9.8 M urea and 2% Igepal CA-630; (ii) 1% Triton X (TX)-100; (iii) 1.7% TX-114 followed by phase partitioning; or (iv) 1 M NaCl. Blots of proteins separated by high-resolution 2-D electrophoresis were probed with avidin and antibodies to known proteins specific for three domains: the sperm surface (SAGA-1), the acrosome (SP-10), and the cytoskeleton (alpha-tubulin). Celis buffer (45 min) extracted proteins from all three major compartments. However, a 20-s extraction in Celis buffer enriched for several proteins and enabled the identification of several novel peptides by mass spectrometry. Mild extraction with TX-100 or 1 M NaCl solubilized mainly membrane and acrosomal proteins, but not cytoskeletal proteins. Comparison of biotinylated proteins extracted by each method showed that the major vectorially labeled proteins solubilized by Celis buffer were also solubilized by TX-100, TX-114, and 1 M NaCl. Extraction with TX-114 followed by phase-partitioning significantly enriched hydrophobic surface proteins and aided resolution and isolation. Eight protein spots microsequenced following all these extraction methods proved to be novel sperm molecules.

  17. Nuclear Sm antigens in the sperm of different organisms.

    PubMed

    Delgado, F; Brito, M; Concha, I I; Schroeder, R; Burzio, L O

    1994-08-01

    Immunoblot analysis of sperm protein from several species revealed the presence of polypeptides recognised by anti-Sm sera obtained from patients with systemic lupus erythematosus. Immunoreactive polypeptides in human, bull, mouse and rat sperm were identified as protein B', B and D as compared with the Sm polypeptides of HeLa cells. In the sperm of rooster, the teleost fish Cyprinus carpio and the mussel Choromytilus chorus, the immunoreactive polypeptide profile was more complex. To ascertain the sperm origin of the Sm antigens, immunolocalisation with anti-Sm serum was carried out. The results demonstrated that in all the species studied staining was confined to the sperm nucleus, confirming that some polypeptides of the small nuclear ribonucleoprotein complex are present in the gamete.

  18. Luteinizing hormone modulates intracellular calcium, protein tyrosine phosphorylation and motility during human sperm capacitation.

    PubMed

    López-Torres, Aideé S; González-González, María E; Mata-Martínez, Esperanza; Larrea, Fernando; Treviño, Claudia L; Chirinos, Mayel

    2017-02-05

    In order to fertilize, spermatozoa must undergo physiological and biochemical changes during their transit along the female reproductive tract before reaching and fusing with the oocyte, process known as capacitation. Sperm modifications associated with capacitation are modulated by their interaction with molecules present in the female reproductive tract. During the woman fertile window, some reproductive hormones reach their maximum concentrations in serum, such as the luteinizing hormone (LH). Since spermatozoa preparing to fertilize may be exposed to LH, the purpose of this work was to study the effects of this hormone on intracellular Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca(2+)]i), protein tyrosine phosphorylation, sperm motility and acrosome reaction under capacitating conditions. The results showed that LH increases the duration and amplitude of Ca(2+) oscillations. Furthermore, motility analysis indicated that LH decreases rapid progressive motility and that sperm hyperactivation as well as several kinetic parameters augment in the presence of 0.5 and 1 μg/ml of the hormone. In addition, these two hormone concentrations also consistently promoted protein tyrosine phosphorylation. However, no effects on acrosome reaction were observed. In conclusion, the evidence indicates that LH modulates several sperm function variables involved in capacitation, suggesting that may have an important and unexplored role during human fertilization. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Differential DNA Methylation Regions in Adult Human Sperm following Adolescent Chemotherapy: Potential for Epigenetic Inheritance

    PubMed Central

    Shnorhavorian, Margarett; Schwartz, Stephen M.; Stansfeld, Barbara; Sadler-Riggleman, Ingrid; Beck, Daniel

    2017-01-01

    Background The potential that adolescent chemotherapy can impact the epigenetic programming of the germ line to influence later life adult fertility and promote epigenetic inheritance was investigated. Previous studies have demonstrated a number of environmental exposures such as abnormal nutrition and toxicants can promote sperm epigenetic changes that impact offspring. Methods Adult males approximately ten years after pubertal exposure to chemotherapy were compared to adult males with no previous exposure. Sperm were collected to examine differential DNA methylation regions (DMRs) between the exposed and control populations. Gene associations and correlations to genetic mutations (copy number variation) were also investigated. Methods and Findings A signature of statistically significant DMRs was identified in the chemotherapy exposed male sperm. The DMRs, termed epimutations, were found in CpG desert regions of primarily 1 kilobase size. Observations indicate adolescent chemotherapy exposure can promote epigenetic alterations that persist in later life. Conclusions This is the first observation in humans that an early life chemical exposure can permanently reprogram the spermatogenic stem cell epigenome. The germline (i.e., sperm) epimutations identified suggest chemotherapy has the potential to promote epigenetic inheritance to the next generation. PMID:28146567

  20. Sperm attraction to a follicular factor(s) correlates with human egg fertilizability.

    PubMed Central

    Ralt, D; Goldenberg, M; Fetterolf, P; Thompson, D; Dor, J; Mashiach, S; Garbers, D L; Eisenbach, M

    1991-01-01

    Spermatozoa normally encounter the egg at the fertilization site (in the Fallopian tube) within 24 hr after ovulation. A considerable fraction of the spermatozoa ejaculated into the female reproductive tract of mammals remains motionless in storage sites until ovulation, when the spermatozoa resume maximal motility and reach the fertilization site within minutes. The nature of the signal for sperm movement is not known, but one possible mechanism is attraction of spermatozoa to a factor(s) released from the egg. We have obtained evidence in favor of such a possibility by showing that human spermatozoa accumulate in follicular fluid in vitro. This accumulation into follicular fluid was higher by 30-260% than that observed with buffer alone and was highly significant (P less than 10(-8)). Not all of the follicular fluids caused sperm accumulation; however, there was a remarkably strong correlation (P less than 0.0001) between the ability of follicular fluid from a particular follicle to cause sperm accumulation and the ability of the egg, obtained from the same follicle, to be fertilized. These findings suggest that attraction may be a key event in the fertilization process and may give an insight into the mechanism underlying early egg-sperm communication. Images PMID:2011591

  1. Pregnancy and childhood health and developmental outcomes with the use of posthumous human sperm.

    PubMed

    Robson, Stephen J; Campbell, Simone; McDonald, Janelle; Tremellen, Kelton; Carlin, Emily; Maybury, Genevieve

    2015-10-01

    Although there is now considerable experience in obtaining sperm from a cadaver, there is little or no published data regarding pregnancy, birth and long-term childhood health and development outcomes when posthumous sperm is used in in vitro fertilisation (IVF). We report the results from treatment of four women undergoing IVF treatment using posthumously acquired human sperm from their deceased partners. In all cases, testicular tissue was obtained in a mortuary setting, and the duration from death to posthumous sperm retrieval ranged from 12 to 48 h. The age of women treated ranged from 31 to 41 years. Fertilization rates ranged from 40 to 100%. Singleton pregnancies were obtained for each of the four women. One pregnancy was complicated by preterm birth at 31 weeks; the other three delivered at term. One baby was growth restricted but morphologically normal; the other children had term birthweights in the normal range. All four children were have shown normal health and developmental outcomes, with the follow-up ranging from 1 to 7 years.

  2. Cellular components of the human medial amygdaloid nucleus.

    PubMed

    Dall'Oglio, Aline; Xavier, Léder L; Hilbig, Arlete; Ferme, Denise; Moreira, Jorge E; Achaval, Matilde; Rasia-Filho, Alberto A

    2013-02-15

    The medial nucleus (Me) is a superficial component of the amygdaloid complex. Here we assessed the density and morphology of the neurons and glial cells, the glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP) immunoreactivity, and the ultrastructure of the synaptic sites in the human Me. The optical fractionator method was applied. The Me presented an estimated mean neuronal density of 1.53 × 10⁵ neurons/mm³ (greater in the left hemisphere), more glia (72% of all cells) than neurons, and a nonneuronal:neuronal ratio of 2.7. Golgi-impregnated neurons had round or ovoid, fusiform, angular, and polygonal cell bodies (10-30 μm in diameter). The length of the dendrites varied, and pleomorphic spines were found in sparsely spiny or densely spiny cells (1.5-5.2 spines/dendritic μm). The axons in the Me neuropil were fine or coarsely beaded, and fibers showed simple or notably complex collateral terminations. The protoplasmic astrocytes were either isolated or formed small clusters and showed GFAP-immunoreactive cell bodies and multiple branches. Furthermore, we identified both asymmetrical (with various small, clear, round, electron-lucent vesicles and, occasionally, large, dense-core vesicles) and symmetrical (with small, flattened vesicles) axodendritic contacts, also including multisynaptic spines. The astrocytes surround and may compose tripartite or tetrapartite synapses, the latter including the extracellular matrix between the pre- and the postsynaptic elements. Interestingly, the terminal axons exhibited a glomerular-like structure with various asymmetrical contacts. These new morphological data on the cellular population and synaptic complexity of the human Me can contribute to our knowledge of its role in health and pathological conditions.

  3. The Pattern of Tyrosine Phosphorylation in Human Sperm in Response to Binding to Zona Pellucida or Hyaluronic Acid

    PubMed Central

    Sati, Leyla; Cayli, Sevil; Delpiano, Elena; Sakkas, Denny

    2014-01-01

    In mammalian species, acquisition of sperm fertilization competence is dependent on the phenomenon of sperm capacitation. One of the key elements of capacitation is protein tyrosine phosphorylation (TP) in various sperm membrane regions. In previous studies performed, the pattern of TP was examined in human sperm bound to zona pellucida of oocytes. In the present comparative study, TP patterns upon sperm binding to the zona pellucida or hyaluronic acid (HA) were investigated in spermatozoa arising from the same semen samples. Tyrosine phosphorylation, visualized by immunofluorescence, was localized within the acrosomal cap, equatorial head region, neck, and the principal piece. Tyrosine phosphorylation has increased in a time-related manner as capacitation progressed, and the phosphorylation pattern was identical within the principal piece and neck, regardless of the sperm bound to the zona pellucida or HA. Thus, the data demonstrated that the patterns of sperm activation-related TP were similar regardless of the spermatozoa bound to zona pellucida or HA. Further, sperm with incomplete development, as detected by excess cytoplasmic retention, failed to exhibit TP. PMID:24077441

  4. Sperm nuclear DNA fragmentation rate is associated with differential protein expression and enriched functions in human seminal plasma.

    PubMed

    Intasqui, Paula; Camargo, Mariana; Del Giudice, Paula T; Spaine, Deborah M; Carvalho, Valdemir M; Cardozo, Karina H M; Zylbersztejn, Daniel S; Bertolla, Ricardo P

    2013-10-01

    To analyse the proteomic profile of seminal plasma with the aim of identifying the proteins and post-genomic pathways associated with sperm DNA fragmentation. A cross-sectional study including 89 subjects from a human reproduction service was carried out. All semen samples were assessed for sperm DNA fragmentation using a comet assay. Results from 60 sperm were analysed using Komet 6.0.1 software and the 'Olive tail moment' variable was used to stratify these into low and high sperm DNA fragmentation groups. Seminal plasma proteins from the two groups were pooled and used for proteomic analysis. Quantitative data were used for functional enrichment studies. Seventy-two proteins were identified or quantified in seminal plasma. Of these, nine were differentially expressed in the low group and 21 in the high group. Forty-two proteins were conserved between these groups. Functional enrichment analysis indicated that sperm DNA fragmentation was related to functions such as lipoprotein particle remodelling and regulation, fatty acid binding and immune response. Proteins found exclusively in the low group may be involved in correcting spermatogenesis and/or improving sperm function. Proteins in the high group were associated with increased innate immune response, sperm motility and/or maturation and inhibition of mitochondrial apoptosis. Protein expression and post-genomic pathways of seminal plasma differ according to the rate of sperm DNA integrity. © 2013 The Authors. BJU International © 2013 BJU International.

  5. Sperm is epigenetically programmed to regulate gene transcription in embryos

    PubMed Central

    Teperek, Marta; Simeone, Angela; Gaggioli, Vincent; Miyamoto, Kei; Allen, George E.; Erkek, Serap; Kwon, Taejoon; Marcotte, Edward M.; Zegerman, Philip; Bradshaw, Charles R.; Peters, Antoine H.F.M.; Gurdon, John B.; Jullien, Jerome

    2016-01-01

    For a long time, it has been assumed that the only role of sperm at fertilization is to introduce the male genome into the egg. Recently, ideas have emerged that the epigenetic state of the sperm nucleus could influence transcription in the embryo. However, conflicting reports have challenged the existence of epigenetic marks on sperm genes, and there are no functional tests supporting the role of sperm epigenetic marking on embryonic gene expression. Here, we show that sperm is epigenetically programmed to regulate embryonic gene expression. By comparing the development of sperm- and spermatid-derived frog embryos, we show that the programming of sperm for successful development relates to its ability to regulate transcription of a set of developmentally important genes. During spermatid maturation into sperm, these genes lose H3K4me2/3 and retain H3K27me3 marks. Experimental removal of these epigenetic marks at fertilization de-regulates gene expression in the resulting embryos in a paternal chromatin-dependent manner. This demonstrates that epigenetic instructions delivered by the sperm at fertilization are required for correct regulation of gene expression in the future embryos. The epigenetic mechanisms of developmental programming revealed here are likely to relate to the mechanisms involved in transgenerational transmission of acquired traits. Understanding how parental experience can influence development of the progeny has broad potential for improving human health. PMID:27034506

  6. MOLECULAR ARCHITECTURE OF THE HUMAN SPERM IZUMO1 AND EGG JUNO FERTILIZATION COMPLEX

    PubMed Central

    Aydin, Halil; Sultana, Azmiri; Li, Sheng; Thavalingam, Annoj; Lee, Jeffrey E.

    2017-01-01

    Fertilization is an essential biological process in sexual reproduction and comprises a series of molecular interactions between the sperm and egg1,2. The fusion of haploid spermatozoon and oocyte is the culminating event in mammalian fertilization, enabling the creation of a new genetically distinct diploid organism3,4. The merger of two gametes is achieved through a two-step mechanism where the sperm Izumo1 on the equatorial segment of the acrosome-reacted sperm recognizes its receptor Juno, on the egg surface4–6. This is followed by the fusion of two plasma membranes. Izumo1 and Juno proteins are indispensable for fertilization as constitutive knockout of either Izumo1 or Juno result in mice that are healthy but infertile5,6. Despite their central importance in reproductive medicine, the molecular architectures and the details of their functional roles in fertilization are not known. Here, we present the crystal structures of the human Izumo1 and Juno in unbound and bound conformations. The human Izumo1 structure exhibits a distinct boomerang shape and provides the first structural insights into the Izumo family of proteins7. Human Izumo1 forms a high-affinity complex with Juno and undergoes a major conformational change within its N-terminal domain upon binding to the egg-surface receptor. Our results provide new insights into the molecular basis of sperm-egg recognition, cross-species fertilization, and barrier to polyspermy, thus promising benefits for the rational development of novel non-hormonal contraceptives and fertility treatments for humans and other species of mammals. PMID:27309818

  7. Single human sperm cryopreservation method using hollow-core agarose capsules.

    PubMed

    Araki, Yasuyuki; Yao, Tatsuma; Asayama, Yuta; Matsuhisa, Akio; Araki, Yasuhisa

    2015-10-01

    To develop an efficient cryopreservation method using a single sperm. Experimental study. Laboratory of a private institute. A fertile donor. We produced hollow-core capsules with agarose walls. A single human sperm was injected into each capsule as per the conventional intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) method. The capsules that contained the spermatozoa were cryopreserved on polycarbonate or nylon mesh sheets using nitrogen vapor. Before their use, the capsules were thawed and recovered. The motile spermatozoa in the capsules were counted. The recovery rates of the agarose capsules and the spermatozoa in these capsules after thawing and the mortality and survival rates of the spermatozoa. The recovery rates of the capsules were 91.5% (75/82) using polycarbonate sheets (PS) and 98.3% (59/60) using mesh sheets (MS) after thawing. The recovered capsules were not at all damaged. The recovery rates of the spermatozoa were 91.5% (75/82) using PS and 96.7% (58/60) using MS. Sperm motility rates were 85.3% (64/75) and 82.8% (48/58), whereas the survival rates of the immotile spermatozoa by the hypoosmotic swelling test were 81.8% (9/11) and 50.0% (5/10); furthermore, the total survival rates of the spermatozoa were 97.3% (73/75) and 91.4% (53/58) using PS and MS, respectively. There was no significant difference between the results obtained using PS and MS. A cryopreservation method for a single sperm using an agarose capsule has been developed. The method is expected to be useful in ICSI treatment in patients with few spermatozoa. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Evidence for a motor somatotopy in the cerebellar dentate nucleus--an FMRI study in humans.

    PubMed

    Küper, Michael; Thürling, Markus; Stefanescu, Roxana; Maderwald, Stefan; Roths, Johannes; Elles, Hans G; Ladd, Mark E; Diedrichsen, Jörn; Timmann, Dagmar

    2012-11-01

    Previous anatomical studies in monkeys have shown that forelimb motor representation is located caudal to hindlimb representation within the dorso-rostral dentate nucleus. Here we investigate human dentate nucleus motor somatotopy by means of ultra-highfield (7 T) functional magnetic brain imaging (fMRI). Twenty five young healthy males participated in the study. Simple finger and foot movement tasks were performed to identify dentate nucleus motor areas. Recently developed normalization procedures for group analyses were used for the cerebellar cortex and the cerebellar dentate nucleus. Cortical activations were in good accordance with the known somatotopy of the human cerebellar cortex. Dentate nucleus activations following motor tasks were found in particular in the ipsilateral dorso-rostral nucleus. Activations were also present in other parts of the nucleus including the contralateral side, and there was some overlap between the body part representations. Within the ipsilateral dorso-rostral dentate, finger activations were located caudally compared to foot movement-related activations in fMRI group analysis. Likewise, the centre of gravity (COG) for the finger activation was more caudal than the COG of the foot activation across participants. A multivariate analysis of variance (MANOVA) on the x, y, and z coordinates of the COG indicated that this difference was significant (P = 0.043). These results indicate that in humans, the lower and upper limbs are arranged rostro-caudally in the dorsal aspect of the dentate nucleus, which is consistent with studies in non-human primates.

  9. Flow cytometry of sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Gledhill, B.L.

    1987-09-21

    This brief paper summarizes automated flow cytometric determination of sperm morphology and flow cytometry/sorting of sperm with application to sex preselection. In the latter context, mention is made of results of karyotypic determination of sex chromosome ratios in albumin-processed human sperm. 23 refs., 1 fig., 1 tab.

  10. Higher-order genome organization in platypus and chicken sperm and repositioning of sex chromosomes during mammalian evolution

    PubMed Central

    Tsend-Ayush, Enkhjargal; Dodge, Natasha; Mohr, Julia; Casey, Aaron; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Kremitzki, Colin L.; Schatzkamer, Kyriena; Graves, Tina; Warren, Wesley C.

    2013-01-01

    In mammals, chromosomes occupy defined positions in sperm, whereas previous work in chicken showed random chromosome distribution. Monotremes (platypus and echidnas) are the most basal group of living mammals. They have elongated sperm like chicken and a complex sex chromosome system with homology to chicken sex chromosomes. We used platypus and chicken genomic clones to investigate genome organization in sperm. In chicken sperm, about half of the chromosomes investigated are organized non-randomly, whereas in platypus chromosome organization in sperm is almost entirely non-random. The use of genomic clones allowed us to determine chromosome orientation and chromatin compaction in sperm. We found that in both species chromosomes maintain orientation of chromosomes in sperm independent of random or non-random positioning along the sperm nucleus. The distance of loci correlated with the total length of sperm nuclei, suggesting that chromatin extension depends on sperm elongation. In platypus, most sex chromosomes cluster in the posterior region of the sperm nucleus, presumably the result of postmeiotic association of sex chromosomes. Chicken and platypus autosomes sharing homology with the human X chromosome located centrally in both species suggesting that this is the ancestral position. This suggests that in some therian mammals a more anterior position of the X chromosome has evolved independently. PMID:18726609

  11. Higher-order genome organization in platypus and chicken sperm and repositioning of sex chromosomes during mammalian evolution.

    PubMed

    Tsend-Ayush, Enkhjargal; Dodge, Natasha; Mohr, Julia; Casey, Aaron; Himmelbauer, Heinz; Kremitzki, Colin L; Schatzkamer, Kyriena; Graves, Tina; Warren, Wesley C; Grützner, Frank

    2009-02-01

    In mammals, chromosomes occupy defined positions in sperm, whereas previous work in chicken showed random chromosome distribution. Monotremes (platypus and echidnas) are the most basal group of living mammals. They have elongated sperm like chicken and a complex sex chromosome system with homology to chicken sex chromosomes. We used platypus and chicken genomic clones to investigate genome organization in sperm. In chicken sperm, about half of the chromosomes investigated are organized non-randomly, whereas in platypus chromosome organization in sperm is almost entirely non-random. The use of genomic clones allowed us to determine chromosome orientation and chromatin compaction in sperm. We found that in both species chromosomes maintain orientation of chromosomes in sperm independent of random or non-random positioning along the sperm nucleus. The distance of loci correlated with the total length of sperm nuclei, suggesting that chromatin extension depends on sperm elongation. In platypus, most sex chromosomes cluster in the posterior region of the sperm nucleus, presumably the result of postmeiotic association of sex chromosomes. Chicken and platypus autosomes sharing homology with the human X chromosome located centrally in both species suggesting that this is the ancestral position. This suggests that in some therian mammals a more anterior position of the X chromosome has evolved independently.

  12. Genetic dosage and position effect of small supernumerary marker chromosome (sSMC) in human sperm nuclei in infertile male patient

    PubMed Central

    Olszewska, Marta; Wanowska, Elzbieta; Kishore, Archana; Huleyuk, Nataliya; Georgiadis, Andrew P.; Yatsenko, Alexander N.; Mikula, Mariya; Zastavna, Danuta; Wiland, Ewa; Kurpisz, Maciej

    2015-01-01

    Chromosomes occupy specific distinct areas in the nucleus of the sperm cell that may be altered in males with disrupted spermatogenesis. Here, we present alterations in the positioning of the human chromosomes 15, 18, X and Y between spermatozoa with the small supernumerary marker chromosome (sSMC; sSMC+) and spermatozoa with normal chromosome complement (sSMC−), for the first time described in the same ejaculate of an infertile, phenotypically normal male patient. Using classical and confocal fluorescent microscopy, the nuclear colocalization of chromosomes 15 and sSMC was analyzed. The molecular cytogenetic characteristics of sSMC delineated the karyotype as 47,XY,+der(15)(pter->p11.2::q11.1->q11.2::p11.2->pter)mat. Analysis of meiotic segregation showed a 1:1 ratio of sSMC+ to sSMC− spermatozoa, while evaluation of sperm aneuploidy status indicated an increased level of chromosome 13, 18, 21 and 22 disomy, up to 7 × (2.7 − 15.1). Sperm chromatin integrity assessment did not reveal any increase in deprotamination in the patient’s sperm chromatin. Importantly, we found significant repositioning of chromosomes X and Y towards the nuclear periphery, where both chromosomes were localized in close proximity to the sSMC. This suggests the possible influence of sSMC/XY colocalization on meiotic chromosome division, resulting in abnormal chromosome segregation, and leading to male infertility in the patient. PMID:26616419

  13. Neural Correlates of Decision Thresholds in the Human Subthalamic Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Herz, Damian M; Zavala, Baltazar A; Bogacz, Rafal; Brown, Peter

    2016-04-04

    If humans are faced with difficult choices when making decisions, the ability to slow down responses becomes critical in order to avoid suboptimal choices. Current models of decision making assume that the subthalamic nucleus (STN) mediates this function by elevating decision thresholds, thereby requiring more evidence to be accumulated before responding [1-9]. However, direct electrophysiological evidence for the exact role of STN during adjustment of decision thresholds is lacking. Here, we show that trial-by-trial variations in STN low-frequency oscillatory activity predict adjustments of decision thresholds before subjects make a response. The relationship between STN activity and decision thresholds critically depends on the subjects' level of cautiousness. While increased oscillatory activity of the STN predicts elevated decision thresholds during high levels of cautiousness, it predicts decreased decision thresholds during low levels of cautiousness. This context-dependent relationship may be mediated by increased influence of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC)-STN pathway on decision thresholds during high cautiousness. Subjects who exhibit a stronger increase in phase alignment of low-frequency oscillatory activity in mPFC and STN before making a response have higher decision thresholds and commit fewer erroneous responses. Together, our results demonstrate that STN low-frequency oscillatory activity and corresponding mPFC-STN coupling are involved in determining how much evidence subjects accumulate before making a decision. This finding might explain why deep-brain stimulation of the STN can impair subjects' ability to slow down responses and can induce impulsive suboptimal decisions.

  14. Processing of emotional information in the human subthalamic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Buot, Anne; Welter, Marie-Laure; Karachi, Carine; Pochon, Jean-Baptiste; Bardinet, Eric; Yelnik, Jérôme; Mallet, Luc

    2013-12-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an efficient target for treating patients with Parkinson's disease as well as patients with obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) using high frequency stimulation (HFS). In both Parkinson's disease and OCD patients, STN-HFS can trigger abnormal behaviours, such as hypomania and impulsivity. To investigate if this structure processes emotional information, and whether it depends on motor demands, we recorded subthalamic local field potentials in 16 patients with Parkinson's disease using deep brain stimulation electrodes. Recordings were made with and without dopaminergic treatment while patients performed an emotional categorisation paradigm in which the response varied according to stimulus valence (pleasant, unpleasant and neutral) and to the instruction given (motor, non-motor and passive). Pleasant, unpleasant and neutral stimuli evoked an event related potential (ERP). Without dopamine medication, ERP amplitudes were significantly larger for unpleasant compared with neutral pictures, whatever the response triggered by the stimuli; and the magnitude of this effect was maximal in the ventral part of the STN. No significant difference in ERP amplitude was observed for pleasant pictures. With dopamine medication, ERP amplitudes were significantly increased for pleasant compared with neutral pictures whatever the response triggered by the stimuli, while ERP amplitudes to unpleasant pictures were not modified. These results demonstrate that the ventral part of the STN processes the emotional valence of stimuli independently of the motor context and that dopamine enhances processing of pleasant information. These findings confirm the specific involvement of the STN in emotional processes in human, which may underlie the behavioural changes observed in patients with deep brain stimulation.

  15. Neural Correlates of Decision Thresholds in the Human Subthalamic Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Herz, Damian M.; Zavala, Baltazar A.; Bogacz, Rafal; Brown, Peter

    2016-01-01

    Summary If humans are faced with difficult choices when making decisions, the ability to slow down responses becomes critical in order to avoid suboptimal choices. Current models of decision making assume that the subthalamic nucleus (STN) mediates this function by elevating decision thresholds, thereby requiring more evidence to be accumulated before responding [1, 2, 3, 4, 5, 6, 7, 8, 9]. However, direct electrophysiological evidence for the exact role of STN during adjustment of decision thresholds is lacking. Here, we show that trial-by-trial variations in STN low-frequency oscillatory activity predict adjustments of decision thresholds before subjects make a response. The relationship between STN activity and decision thresholds critically depends on the subjects’ level of cautiousness. While increased oscillatory activity of the STN predicts elevated decision thresholds during high levels of cautiousness, it predicts decreased decision thresholds during low levels of cautiousness. This context-dependent relationship may be mediated by increased influence of the medial prefrontal cortex (mPFC)-STN pathway on decision thresholds during high cautiousness. Subjects who exhibit a stronger increase in phase alignment of low-frequency oscillatory activity in mPFC and STN before making a response have higher decision thresholds and commit fewer erroneous responses. Together, our results demonstrate that STN low-frequency oscillatory activity and corresponding mPFC-STN coupling are involved in determining how much evidence subjects accumulate before making a decision. This finding might explain why deep-brain stimulation of the STN can impair subjects’ ability to slow down responses and can induce impulsive suboptimal decisions. PMID:26996501

  16. Progesterone and 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone. Novel stimulators of calcium influx in human sperm.

    PubMed

    Blackmore, P F; Beebe, S J; Danforth, D R; Alexander, N

    1990-01-25

    Progesterone and 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone (but not other steroids such as testosterone, corticosterone, beta-estradiol, estrone, dehydroepiandrosterone, 20 alpha-hydroxypregnen-3-one, androstenedione, and pregnenolone) were shown to cause an immediate increase, in free cytosolic calcium ([Ca2+]i) in both capacitated and noncapacitated human sperm, using the fluorescent indicator fura 2. Significant increases in [Ca2+]i were observed with 10 ng/ml progesterone, while maximum effects were seen with 1 microgram/ml progesterone. Two other steroids 11 beta-hydroxyprogesterone and 5 alpha-pregnane-3,20-dione exhibited significant activity to increase [Ca2+]i. This increase in [Ca2+]i elicited by progesterone was entirely due to Ca2+ influx from the extracellular medium since the increase in [Ca2+]i was blocked by the Ca2+ chelator EGTA (2.5 mM) and the Ca2+ channel antagonist La3+ (0.25 mM) when added to the medium containing 2.5 mM Ca2+. Progesterone also stimulated the uptake of Mn2+ into sperm as measured by the quenching of fura 2 fluorescence. Progesterone has been found in human follicular fluid at levels capable of stimulating increases in [Ca2+]i. The similarities in responses induced by human follicular fluid and progesterone an increase in [Ca2+]i, and hence the acrosome reaction, is progesterone and/or 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone. Progesterone (1 microgram/ml) did not increase [Ca2+]i in somatic cells such as adipocytes, hepatocytes, Balb/c 3T3 cells, normal rat kidney, or DDT1 MF-2 cells. The effects of these progestins to increase [Ca2+]i, by activating a receptor-operated calcium channel, is the first report of such an activity in sperm. This phenomena possibly opens up a new field of steroid action in the area of sterility, fertility, and contraception at the level of the sperm.

  17. AB222. Enolase1 (ENO1) and glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI) are good markers to predict human sperm freezability

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Xuping; Wang, Shangqian; Wang, Wei; Xu, Yang; Sun, Hongyong; Wang, Zengjun; Zhang, Wei

    2016-01-01

    Objective Sperm cryopreservation is a method to preserve sperm samples for a long period. However, the fertility of sperm decreases markedly after freezing and thawing in a certain amount of samples. The aim of the present study was to find useful and reliable predictive biomarkers of the capacity to withstand the freeze-thawing process in human ejaculates. Methods We chose the two proteins as probable markers of sperm freezing capacity. Ejaculate samples were separated into good freezability ejaculates (GFE) and poor freezability ejaculates (PFE) according to progressive motility of the sperm after thawing. Before starting cryopreservation protocols, the two proteins from each group were compared using western blot analysis and immunofluorescence. Results Results showed that normalized content of enolase1 (ENO1) (P<0.05) and glucose-6-phosphate isomerase (GPI) (P<0.01) were both significantly higher in GFE than in PFE. The association of ENO1 and GPI with post thaw sperm viability and motility was confirmed using Pearson’s linear correlation. Conclusions In conclusion, ENO1 and GPI can be used as markers of human sperm freezability before starting the cryopreservation procedure.

  18. Sperm-derived WW domain-binding protein, PAWP, elicits calcium oscillations and oocyte activation in humans and mice.

    PubMed

    Aarabi, Mahmoud; Balakier, Hanna; Bashar, Siamak; Moskovtsev, Sergey I; Sutovsky, Peter; Librach, Clifford L; Oko, Richard

    2014-10-01

    Mammalian zygotic development is initiated by sperm-mediated intracellular calcium oscillations, followed by activation of metaphase II-arrested oocytes. Sperm postacrosomal WW binding protein (PAWP) fulfils the criteria set for an oocyte-activating factor by inducing oocyte activation and being stored in the perinuclear theca, the sperm compartment whose content is first released into oocyte cytoplasm during fertilization. However, proof that PAWP initiates mammalian zygotic development relies on demonstration that it acts upstream of oocyte calcium oscillations. Here, we show that PAWP triggers calcium oscillations and pronuclear formation in human and mouse oocytes similar to what is observed during intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Most important, sperm-induced calcium oscillations are blocked by coinjection of a competitive inhibitor, derived from the WWI domain-binding motif of PAWP, implying the requirement of sperm PAWP and an oocyte-derived WWI domain protein substrate of PAWP for successful fertilization. Sperm-delivered PAWP is, therefore, a unique protein with a nonredundant role during human and mouse fertilization, required to trigger zygotic development. Presented data confirm our previous findings in nonmammalian models and suggest potential applications of PAWP in the diagnosis and treatment of infertility.- © FASEB.

  19. Advanced forensic validation for human spermatozoa identification using SPERM HY-LITER™ Express with quantitative image analysis.

    PubMed

    Takamura, Ayari; Watanabe, Ken; Akutsu, Tomoko

    2017-01-19

    Identification of human semen is indispensable for the investigation of sexual assaults. Fluorescence staining methods using commercial kits, such as the series of SPERM HY-LITER™ kits, have been useful to detect human sperm via strong fluorescence. These kits have been examined from various forensic aspects. However, because of a lack of evaluation methods, these studies did not provide objective, or quantitative, descriptions of the results nor clear criteria for the decisions reached. In addition, the variety of validations was considerably limited. In this study, we conducted more advanced validations of SPERM HY-LITER™ Express using our established image analysis method. Use of this method enabled objective and specific identification of fluorescent sperm's spots and quantitative comparisons of the sperm detection performance under complex experimental conditions. For body fluid mixtures, we examined interference with the fluorescence staining from other body fluid components. Effects of sample decomposition were simulated in high humidity and high temperature conditions. Semen with quite low sperm concentrations, such as azoospermia and oligospermia samples, represented the most challenging cases in application of the kit. Finally, the tolerance of the kit against various acidic and basic environments was analyzed. The validations herein provide useful information for the practical applications of the SPERM HY-LITER™ Express kit, which were previously unobtainable. Moreover, the versatility of our image analysis method toward various complex cases was demonstrated.

  20. [Detection of human sperm morphology and acrosome reaction with Coomassie brilliant blue staining].

    PubMed

    Lu, Hai-Yi; Lu, Jin-Chun; Hu, Yu-An; Wang, Yong-Mei; Huang, Yu-Feng

    2002-01-01

    To evaluate the application of Coomassie brilliant blue (CBB) G250 staining for the detection of human sperm deformity rate, rate of intact acrosome and acrosome reaction. The smear of spermatozoa before and after capacitation and induced acrosome reaction with progesterone (P) were stained with 0.05% CBB G250 and Wright-Giemisa solution respectively, and visualized with light microscopy. The deformity rate of spermatozoa, rate of intact acrosome and acrosome reaction were calculated. There was no any difference in detection of deformity rate of spermatozoa and rate of intact acrosome with CBB G250 and Wright-Giemisa staining(P < 0.05). The sperm population of acrosome reaction with induced P was divided by CBB staining into two types: positive staining with dark violet blue on acrosome cap and pale or negative staining on the same area. The rate of the latter was increasing with increasing inductive time, maybe representative of the rate of acrosome reaction. The mean rate was(75.1 +/- 3.8)% after induced for 1 h. CBB G250 staining is a reliable method for assessment of the human sperm morphology and acrosome reaction.

  1. Stability of the human sperm DNA methylome to folic acid fortification and short-term supplementation.

    PubMed

    Chan, D; McGraw, S; Klein, K; Wallock, L M; Konermann, C; Plass, C; Chan, P; Robaire, B; Jacob, R A; Greenwood, C M T; Trasler, J M

    2017-02-01

    Do short-term and long-term exposures to low-dose folic acid supplementation alter DNA methylation in sperm? No alterations in sperm DNA methylation patterns were found following the administration of low-dose folic acid supplements of 400 μg/day for 90 days (short-term exposure) or when pre-fortification of food with folic acid and post-fortification sperm samples (long-term exposure) were compared. Excess dietary folate may be detrimental to health and DNA methylation profiles due to folate's role in one-carbon metabolism and the formation of S-adenosyl methionine, the universal methyl donor. DNA methylation patterns are established in developing male germ cells and have been suggested to be affected by high-dose (5 mg/day) folic acid supplementation. This is a control versus treatment study where genome-wide sperm DNA methylation patterns were examined prior to fortification of food (1996-1997) in men with no history of infertility at baseline and following 90-day exposure to placebo (n = 9) or supplement containing 400 μg folic acid/day (n = 10). Additionally, pre-fortification sperm DNA methylation profiles (n = 19) were compared with those of a group of post-fortification (post-2004) men (n = 8) who had been exposed for several years to dietary folic acid fortification. Blood and seminal plasma folate levels were measured in participants before and following the 90-day treatment with placebo or supplement. Sperm DNA methylation was assessed using the whole-genome and genome-wide techniques, MassArray epityper, restriction landmark genomic scanning, methyl-CpG immunoprecipitation and Illumina HumanMethylation450 Bead Array. Following treatment, supplemented individuals had significantly higher levels of blood and seminal plasma folates compared to placebo. Initial first-generation genome-wide analyses of sperm DNA methylation showed little evidence of changes when comparing pre- and post-treatment samples. With Illumina HumanMethylation450 BeadChip arrays

  2. Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma signaling in human sperm physiology

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Li-Li; Xian, Hua; Cao, Jing-Chen; Zhang, Chong; Zhang, Yong-Hui; Chen, Miao-Miao; Qian, Yi; Jiang, Ming

    2015-01-01

    Peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ) is a member of the PPARs, which are transcription factors of the steroid receptor superfamily. PPARγ acts as an important molecule for regulating energy homeostasis, modulates the hypothalamic-pituitary-gonadal (HPG) axis, and is reciprocally regulated by HPG. In the human, PPARγ protein is highly expressed in ejaculated spermatozoa, implying a possible role of PPARγ signaling in regulating sperm energy dissipation. PPARγ protein is also expressed in Sertoli cells and germ cells (spermatocytes). Its activation can be induced during capacitation and the acrosome reaction. This mini-review will focus on how PPARγ signaling may affect fertility and sperm quality and the potential reversibility of these adverse effects. PMID:25851655

  3. The role and importance of cofilin in human sperm capacitation and the acrosome reaction.

    PubMed

    Megnagi, Bar; Finkelstein, Maya; Shabtay, Ortal; Breitbart, Haim

    2015-12-01

    The spermatozoon is capable of fertilizing an oocyte only after undergoing several biochemical changes in the female reproductive tract, referred to as capacitation. The capacitated spermatozoon interacts with the egg zona pellucida and undergoes the acrosome reaction, which enables its penetration into the egg and fertilization. Actin dynamics play a major role throughout all these processes. Actin polymerization occurs during capacitation, whereas prior to the acrosome reaction, F-actin must undergo depolymerization. In the present study, we describe the presence of the actin-severing protein, cofilin, in human sperm. We examined the function and regulation of cofilin during human sperm capacitation and compared it to gelsolin, an actin-severing protein that was previously investigated by our group. In contrast to gelsolin, we found that cofilin is mainly phosphorylated/inhibited at the beginning of capacitation, and dephosphorylation occurs towards the end of the process. In addition, unlike gelsolin, cofilin phosphorylation is not affected by changing the cellular levels of PIP2. Despite the different regulation of the two proteins, the role of cofilin appears similar to that of gelsolin, and its activation leads to actin depolymerization, inhibition of sperm motility and induction of the acrosome reaction. Moreover, like gelsolin, cofilin translocates from the tail to the head during capacitation. In summary, gelsolin and cofilin play a similar role in F-actin depolymerization prior to the acrosome reaction but their pattern of phosphorylation/inactivation during the capacitation process is different. Thus, for the sperm to achieve high levels of F-actin along the capacitation process, both proteins must be inactivated at different times and, in order to depolymerize F-actin, both must be activated prior to the acrosome reaction.

  4. Oxidative stress markers: Can they be used to evaluate human sperm quality?

    PubMed Central

    Cruz, Daniel Filipe; Lume, Catarina; Silva, Joana Vieira; Nunes, Alexandra; Castro, Inês; Silva, Rafaela; Silva, Vladimiro; Ferreira, Rita; Fardilha, Margarida

    2015-01-01

    Objective To study the effects of an acute lifestyle change in human semen oxidative stress (OS) by applying seminal parameters and OS markers and to study the feasibility of mid-infrared spectroscopy with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) as a complementary tool to evaluate the effects of OS on human sperm samples. Material and methods Sperm samples were collected from healthy male students (n=8) who voluntarily submitted themselves to acute lifestyle changes during academic festivities. The samples were obtained before and after the academic festivities and were compared by basic semen analyses and OS markers, namely with thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS) and total thiol (SH) groups by spectrophotometric assays and carbonyl (CO) groups by slot blot. The samples were also submitted for spectroscopic analysis to evaluate the feasibility of FT-IR coupled with multivariate analysis to calibrate OS biomarkers. Statistical analysis was performed applying paired Wilcoxon tests. Results Acute lifestyle alterations during academic week festivities were associated with a significant decrease in the percentage of normal spermatozoa in the ejaculate (p=0.011) and a decrease in sperm concentration and in semen volume. Regarding OS, acute lifestyle changes promoted a significant increment of TBARS (p=0.018) and an increasing trend in the SH group. With FT-IR and multivariate analysis, it was possible to develop calibration models to the following protein OS biomarkers: SH groups and CO. Conclusions Acute lifestyle changes during academic festivities have negative effects on sperm quality, in both conventional seminal parameters and OS markers. The evaluation of OS biomarkers and FT-IR could improve andrology diagnosis and therapeutic follow-up. PMID:26623149

  5. Oxidative stress markers: Can they be used to evaluate human sperm quality?

    PubMed

    Cruz, Daniel Filipe; Lume, Catarina; Silva, Joana Vieira; Nunes, Alexandra; Castro, Inês; Silva, Rafaela; Silva, Vladimiro; Ferreira, Rita; Fardilha, Margarida

    2015-12-01

    To study the effects of an acute lifestyle change in human semen oxidative stress (OS) by applying seminal parameters and OS markers and to study the feasibility of mid-infrared spectroscopy with Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) as a complementary tool to evaluate the effects of OS on human sperm samples. Sperm samples were collected from healthy male students (n=8) who voluntarily submitted themselves to acute lifestyle changes during academic festivities. The samples were obtained before and after the academic festivities and were compared by basic semen analyses and OS markers, namely with thiobarbituric acid reactive species (TBARS) and total thiol (SH) groups by spectrophotometric assays and carbonyl (CO) groups by slot blot. The samples were also submitted for spectroscopic analysis to evaluate the feasibility of FT-IR coupled with multivariate analysis to calibrate OS biomarkers. Statistical analysis was performed applying paired Wilcoxon tests. Acute lifestyle alterations during academic week festivities were associated with a significant decrease in the percentage of normal spermatozoa in the ejaculate (p=0.011) and a decrease in sperm concentration and in semen volume. Regarding OS, acute lifestyle changes promoted a significant increment of TBARS (p=0.018) and an increasing trend in the SH group. With FT-IR and multivariate analysis, it was possible to develop calibration models to the following protein OS biomarkers: SH groups and CO. Acute lifestyle changes during academic festivities have negative effects on sperm quality, in both conventional seminal parameters and OS markers. The evaluation of OS biomarkers and FT-IR could improve andrology diagnosis and therapeutic follow-up.

  6. A model for the importance of zinc in the dynamics of human sperm chromatin stabilization after ejaculation in relation to sperm DNA vulnerability.

    PubMed

    Björndahl, Lars; Kvist, Ulrik

    2011-02-01

    The focus of this review is the dual functions of the sperm chromatin stabilization and how external factors can interfere with these functions. Zinc depletion after ejaculation allows for rapid and total sperm chromatin decondensation without addition of exogenous disulfide cleaving agents. Zinc depletion without concomitant repulsion of chromatin fibers induces another type of stability that requires exogenous disulfide cleaving agents to allow decondensation. It is essential to extend the present concept, that the sperm chromatin stability is based on disulfide bridges only, to include also the functions of Zn(2+). It is suggested that the chromatin stability of the ejaculated human spermatozoon is rapidly reversible due to the dual function of Zn(2+) that stabilizes the structure and prevents the formation of excess disulfide bridges by a single mechanism: the formation of zinc bridges involving protamine thiols of cysteine and potentially also imidazole groups of histidine. Extraction of zinc from the freshly ejaculated spermatozoon allows two totally different biological results: (1) immediate decondensation if chromatin fibers concomitantly are induced to repel (e.g., through phosphorylation in the ooplasm) and (2) thiols freed from Zn(2+) are available to form disulfide bridges creating a superstabilized chromatin. Spermatozoa in the zinc rich prostatic fluid (in first ejaculated fraction) represent physiology. Extraction of chromatin zinc can be caused by unphysiological exposure of spermatozoa to the zinc chelating and oxidative seminal vesicular fluid, a situation common to most assisted reproductive techniques (ART) laboratories where the entire ejaculate is collected into a single container in which spermatozoa and secretions are mixed during at least 30 min. Some men in infertile couples have low content of sperm chromatin zinc due to loss of zinc during ejaculation and liquefaction. Tests for sperm DNA integrity may give false negative results due to

  7. Reliability of aneuploidy estimates in human sperm: Results of fluorescence in situ hybridization studies using two different scoring criteria

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.H. |; Rademaker, A.

    1994-09-01

    Aneuploidy estimates for individual chromosomes in human sperm have varied more than 10-fold in different laboratories using fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH). These laboratories use different scoring criteria in the assessment of a disomic sperm. In order to determine reliable estimates of aneuploidy, we have investigated whether scoring criteria affect the aneuploidy frequency in human sperm. Aneuploidy estimates for chromosomes 1(pUC1.77), 12(pBR12), X(XC) and Y(DYZ3Z) were obtained in human sperm from five donors using multicolor FISH analysis to provide an internal control to differentiate between nullisomy and lack of hybridization and between disomy and diploidy. Disomy frequencies were obtained by scoring a minimum of 10,000 sperm for each chromosome probe per donor. This analysis was replicated for two scoring criteria: one scoring criterion used one-half a signal domain as the minimum distance between two signals to be counted as two and thus disomic; the other scoring criterion set one signal domain as the minimum distance between two signals. A total of 120,870 sperm were assessed using one half domain as the scoring criterion and 113,478 were scored using one domain as the criterion. The mean percent disomy for chromosomes 1, 12, X, Y and XY was .18, .16, .15, .19, .25 respectively using the one-half domain criterion and .08, .17, .07, .12, .16 respectively using the one domain criterion. The percent disomy decreased significantly with use of one domain as the minimum distance for signal separation for all chromosomes except chromosome number 12. These lower disomy frequencies correlated well with frequencies derived from human sperm karyotypes analyzed in our laboratory. This suggests that the fluorescent signals for chromosomes 1, X and Y split into more than one domain in decondensed interphase sperm and use of the one-half domain criterion leads to an overestimate of aneuploidy frequencies.

  8. 2-APB-potentiated channels amplify CatSper-induced Ca2+ signals in human sperm

    PubMed Central

    Lefièvre, Linda; Nash, Katherine; Mansell, Steven; Costello, Sarah; Punt, Emma; Correia, Joao; Morris, Jennifer; Kirkman-Brown, Jackson; Wilson, Stuart M.; Barratt, Christopher L. R.; Publicover, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    Ca2+i signalling is pivotal to sperm function. Progesterone, the best-characterized agonist of human sperm Ca2+i signalling, stimulates a biphasic [Ca2+]i rise, comprising a transient and subsequent sustained phase. In accordance with recent reports that progesterone directly activates CatSper, the [Ca2+]i transient was detectable in the anterior flagellum (where CatSper is expressed) 1–2 s before responses in the head and neck. Pre-treatment with 5 μM 2-APB (2-aminoethoxydiphenyl borate), which enhances activity of store-operated channel proteins (Orai) by facilitating interaction with their activator [STIM (stromal interaction molecule)] ‘amplified’ progesterone-induced [Ca2+]i transients at the sperm neck/midpiece without modifying kinetics. The flagellar [Ca2+]i response was unchanged. 2-APB (5 μM) also enhanced the sustained response in the midpiece, possibly reflecting mitochondrial Ca2+ accumulation downstream of the potentiated [Ca2+]i transient. Pre-treatment with 50–100 μM 2-APB failed to potentiate the transient and suppressed sustained [Ca2+]i elevation. When applied during the [Ca2+]i plateau, 50–100 μM 2-APB caused a transient fall in [Ca2+]i, which then recovered despite the continued presence of 2-APB. Loperamide (a chemically different store-operated channel agonist) enhanced the progesterone-induced [Ca2+]i signal and potentiated progesterone-induced hyperactivated motility. Neither 2-APB nor loperamide raised pHi (which would activate CatSper) and both compounds inhibited CatSper currents. STIM and Orai were detected and localized primarily to the neck/midpiece and acrosome where Ca2+ stores are present and the effects of 2-APB are focussed, but store-operated currents could not be detected in human sperm. We propose that 2-APB-sensitive channels amplify [Ca2+]i elevation induced by progesterone (and other CatSper agonists), amplifying, propagating and providing spatio-temporal complexity in [Ca2+]i signals of human sperm. PMID

  9. Ubiquitin Carboxy-Terminal HydrolaseL3 Correlates with Human Sperm Count, Motility and Fertilization

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Meijiao; Yu, Tinghe; Hu, Lina; Cheng, Zhi; Li, Min

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase L3 (UCHL3) belongs to the group of deubiquitinating enzymes and plays a part in apoptosis of germ cells and the differentiation of spermatocytes into spermatids. However, the exact role of UCHL3 in human spermatogenesis and sperm function remains unknown. Here we examined the level and activity of UCHL3 in spermatozoa from men with asthenozoospermia (A), oligoasthenozoospermia (OA) or normozoospermia (N). Immunofluorescence indicated that UCHL3 was mainly localized in the acrosome and throughout the flagella, and western blotting revealed a lower level in A or OA compared with N (p < 0.05). The catalytic activity of UCHL3 was decreased in spermatozoa from A or OA (p < 0.05, p < 0.001, respectively). The level and activity of UCHL3 were positively correlated with sperm count, concentration and motility. The UCHL3 level was positively correlated with the normal fertilization rate (FR) and percentage of embryos suitable for transfer/cryopreservation of in vitro fertilization (IVF). The UCHL3 activity was also positively correlated with FR, the percentage of embryos suitable for transfer/cryopreservation and high-quality embryos rate of IVF. Aforementioned correlations were not manifested in intra-cytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). These findings suggest that UCHL3 may play a role in male infertility. PMID:27780264

  10. Human semen cryopreservation: a sperm DNA fragmentation study with alkaline and neutral Comet assay.

    PubMed

    Ribas-Maynou, J; Fernández-Encinas, A; García-Peiró, A; Prada, E; Abad, C; Amengual, M J; Navarro, J; Benet, J

    2014-01-01

    Sperm cryopreservation is widely used for both research and reproduction purposes, but its effect on sperm DNA damage remains controversial. Sperm DNA fragmentation (SDF) has become an important biomarker to assess male infertility. In particular, the differentiation between single- and double-stranded DNA fragmentation (ssSDF and dsSDF) has clinical implications for male infertility where ssSDF is associated with reduced fertility, whereas dsSDF is associated with increased risk of miscarriage. In this study, semen samples from 30 human males have been analysed in both fresh and cryopreserved using the alkaline and neutral Comet assays. Results show an increase of about 10% of ssSDF, assessed by the alkaline Comet assay, regardless of the male fertility status. Neutral Comet analysis of dsSDF does not show any statistical increase when comparing fresh and cryopreserved samples in any of the patient groups. Results support previous reports that oxidative stress is the major effector in DNA damage during sample cryopreservation, as, on one hand, ssSDF has previously been related to oxidative damage and, on the other hand, we have not found any effect on dsSDF. Therefore, there might be a slight risk of decreased fertility after using a freezed sample, but no evidence for increased miscarriage risk from cryopreserved spermatozoa should be expected. © 2013 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  11. Sperm-induced calcium oscillations of human oocytes show distinct features in oocyte center and periphery.

    PubMed

    Tesarik, J; Sousa, M; Mendoza, C

    1995-06-01

    Temporal and spatial characteristics of explosive periodic increases (spikes) of intracellular free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) induced by sperm in human oocytes (Ca2+ oscillations) were analyzed by confocal laser scanning microscopy and compared to Ca2+ oscillations induced in oocytes by the thiol reagent thimerosal. During the steady-state period of sperm-induced Ca2+ oscillations, each individual [Ca2+]i spike invariably began from a focus in oocyte periphery and spread throughout the entire peripheral region before propagating to the central ooplasm. This peripheral Ca2+ wave was immediately followed by an explosive [Ca2+]i increase in the central ooplasm. However, this central [Ca2+]i rise only peaked when [Ca2+]i in the peripheral ooplasm was already on the decline. Moreover, the peak [Ca2+]i values were always considerably higher in the oocyte center than in the periphery. In contrast, thimerosal-induced Ca2+ oscillations did not show this particular form of propagation. These data show that sperm-induced Ca2+ oscillations have a unique pattern of spatial dynamics and suggest that the bulk of Ca2+ mobilized during each spike is released from stores that have a relatively high threshold for Ca(2+)-induced Ca2+ release (CICR). These stores are poorly developed, if not absent, in the oocyte cortex, and CICR from them is triggered by previous CICR from another type of store with a lower threshold that are preferentially located in the oocyte cortex and act as a detonator.

  12. Effects of very rapid versus vapor phase freezing on human sperm parameters.

    PubMed

    Darvishnia, Hamid; Lakpour, Niknam; Lahijani, Maryam Shams; Heidari-Vala, Hamed; Akhondi, Mohammad A; Zeraati, Hojjat; Sadeghi, Mohammad Reza

    2013-12-01

    The aim of the present study was to compare the effects of two freezing methods, vapor phase and very rapid freezing, with and without cryoprotectant on semen parameters in men with normal semen criteria. Cryopreservation was done on semen samples from 31 men by two methods of vapor phase freezing and very rapid freezing, with and without Test Yolk buffered glycerol (TYBG) as cryoprotectant. The motility, viability, acrosome and DNA integrity were evaluated on fresh and post-thaw samples. Post-thaw sperm progressive motility was significantly higher in the presence of TYBG in the vapor phase cryopreservation (%6.30 ± 3.74) compared with the very rapid freezing method (%2.2 ± 1.97 and %4.00 ± 2.42 in the presence and absence of TYBG, respectively). There was no significant difference in viability, acrosome status and DNA integrity between two methods in presence or absence of TYBG. The very rapid freezing method in the absence of TYBG showed better sperm motility but viability, acrosome and DNA integrity were similar to the presence of TYBG. The results show that cryopreservation of human spermatozoa together with seminal plasma by using vapor phase method is better than very rapid freezing method to preserve sperm progressive motility; however very rapid freezing method is quick and simple and do not require special cryoprotectant. It can be used for cryopreservation of small number of spermatozoa in IVF centers.

  13. Chemotherapy induces transient sex chromosomal and autosomal aneuploidy in human sperm.

    PubMed

    Robbins, W A; Meistrich, M L; Moore, D; Hagemeister, F B; Weier, H U; Cassel, M J; Wilson, G; Eskenazi, B; Wyrobek, A J

    1997-05-01

    Each year more than 20,000 children and young persons of reproductive age are exposed to known mutagens in the form of chemo- and/or radiotherapy for cancer in the States. As more of these treatments are effective there is growing concern that genetic defects are introduced in the germ cells of these young patients. It is well documented for male rodents that treatment with chemo- and radio-therapeutic agents before mating can cause genetic damage in the germ line, and the magnitude of heritable effects depends on the spermatogenic cell stage treated. Similar germinal effects are suspected to occur in humans but remain unproven. Hodgkin's disease (HD) is an example of a malignancy which is typically diagnosed during a patient's reproductive years. In our study we observed eight male HD patients who were treated with NOVP (Novanthrone, Oncovin, Vinblastine, Prednisone) chemotherapy. We evaluated sperm aneuploidy using multi-colour fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), and found approximately 5-fold increases in sperm with disomies, diploidies and complex genotypes involving chromosome X, Y and 8. Increases in sex chromosome aneuploidies arose from segregation errors at meiosis I as well as meiosis II. The aneuploidy effects were transient, however, declining to pretreatment levels within approximately 100 days after the end of the therapy. When compared with normal men, some HD patients showed higher proportions of certain sperm aneuploidy types even before their first therapy.

  14. Increased N6-methyladenosine in Human Sperm RNA as a Risk Factor for Asthenozoospermia.

    PubMed

    Yang, Ying; Huang, Wei; Huang, Jing-Tao; Shen, Fan; Xiong, Jun; Yuan, Er-Feng; Qin, Shan-shan; Zhang, Ming; Feng, Yu-Qi; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Liu, Song-Mei

    2016-04-13

    Male infertility is a worldwide medical problem. Asthenozoospermia is a common cause of infertility. Epigenetic modifications of DNA and histones have been shown to influence human infertility, but no research has explored whether N(6)-methyladenosine (m(6)A) level in RNA is associated with asthenozoospermia. Here, we collected a total of 52 semen samples, including 20 asthenozoospermia patients and 32 healthy controls. An LC-ESI-MS/MS method was used to detect m(6)A contents in sperm RNA, and real-time PCR was performed to determine the mRNA expression of demethylase (FTO, ALKBH5), methyltransferase (METTL3, METTL14, WTAP) and an m(6)A-selective-binding protein (YTHDF2). We found that m(6)A content (p = 0.033) and the mRNA expression of METTL3 (p = 0.016) and METTL14 (p = 0.025) in asthenozoospermia patients were significantly higher than those of controls. Increased m(6)A content was a risk factor for asthenozoospermia (odds ratio (OR) 3.229, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.178 - 8.853, p = 0.023). Moreover, m(6)A content was correlated with the expression of METTL3 (r = 0.303, p = 0.032) and with sperm motility (progressive motility: r = -0.288, p = 0.038; non-progressive motility: r = -0.293, p = 0.037; immotility: r = 0.387, p = 0.005). Our data suggest that increased m(6)A content is a risk factor for asthenozoospermia and affects sperm motility. Methyltransferases, particularly METTL3, play key roles in increasing m(6)A contents in sperm RNA.

  15. Increased N6-methyladenosine in Human Sperm RNA as a Risk Factor for Asthenozoospermia

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Ying; Huang, Wei; Huang, Jing-Tao; Shen, Fan; Xiong, Jun; Yuan, Er-Feng; Qin, Shan-shan; Zhang, Ming; Feng, Yu-Qi; Yuan, Bi-Feng; Liu, Song-Mei

    2016-01-01

    Male infertility is a worldwide medical problem. Asthenozoospermia is a common cause of infertility. Epigenetic modifications of DNA and histones have been shown to influence human infertility, but no research has explored whether N6-methyladenosine (m6A) level in RNA is associated with asthenozoospermia. Here, we collected a total of 52 semen samples, including 20 asthenozoospermia patients and 32 healthy controls. An LC-ESI-MS/MS method was used to detect m6A contents in sperm RNA, and real-time PCR was performed to determine the mRNA expression of demethylase (FTO, ALKBH5), methyltransferase (METTL3, METTL14, WTAP) and an m6A-selective-binding protein (YTHDF2). We found that m6A content (p = 0.033) and the mRNA expression of METTL3 (p = 0.016) and METTL14 (p = 0.025) in asthenozoospermia patients were significantly higher than those of controls. Increased m6A content was a risk factor for asthenozoospermia (odds ratio (OR) 3.229, 95% confidence interval (CI) 1.178 – 8.853, p = 0.023). Moreover, m6A content was correlated with the expression of METTL3 (r = 0.303, p = 0.032) and with sperm motility (progressive motility: r = −0.288, p = 0.038; non-progressive motility: r = −0.293, p = 0.037; immotility: r = 0.387, p = 0.005). Our data suggest that increased m6A content is a risk factor for asthenozoospermia and affects sperm motility. Methyltransferases, particularly METTL3, play key roles in increasing m6A contents in sperm RNA. PMID:27072590

  16. Human sperm acrosome reaction-initiating activity associated with the human cumulus oophorus and mural granulosa cells.

    PubMed

    Siiteri, J E; Dandekar, P; Meizel, S

    1988-04-01

    This report describes the detection and partial characterization of preovulatory human cumulus oophorus and mural granulosa cell-associated activity capable of initiating the human sperm acrosome reaction (AR) in vitro. Fragments of preovulatory human cumulus (cells plus extracellular matrix) were washed 3 times, incubated for 24 hr and the spent media and washes assayed for their ability to initiate the human sperm acrosome reaction (AR) in vitro. AR activity was present in the first two washes but not the third wash; however, AR activity was recovered in the spent medium after 3 X-washed fragments were incubated for 24 hr under conditions which maintained the viability of the cumulus cells. The spent media of preovulatory human mural granulosa cells contained AR-initiating activity after 1-3, 3-6, and 6-9 days of culture. The properties of the AR activity present in spent media of human cumulus fragments included resistance to loss of activity during treatment with pronase; resistance to loss of activity during treatment with chondroitinase ABC or bacterial hyaluronidase; heat stability after overnight incubation; lack of extraction by chloroform-methanol; an apparent molecular weight (MW) of 50,000, as determined by Sephadex G-75 column chromatography; conversion to a lower apparent MW activity by incubation with pronase. These properties are also characteristic of a fraction derived by Sephadex G-75 chromatography of preovulatory human follicular fluid which also has been shown to stimulate the human sperm acrosome reaction in vitro. The AR activity from spent media of human mural granulosa cells is also found in a 50,000 MW Sephadex G-75 fraction. We propose that the sources of the 50,000 MW human follicular fluid AR activity are the cumulus oophorus and the mural granulosa cells.

  17. Clinically relevant enhancement of human sperm motility using compounds with reported phosphodiesterase inhibitor activity

    PubMed Central

    Tardif, Steve; Madamidola, Oladipo A.; Brown, Sean G.; Frame, Lorna; Lefièvre, Linda; Wyatt, Paul G.; Barratt, Christopher L.R.; Martins Da Silva, Sarah J.

    2014-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Can we identify compound(s) with reported phosphodiesterase inhibitor (PDEI) activity that could be added to human spermatozoa in vitro to enhance their motility without compromising other sperm functions? SUMMARY ANSWER We have identified several compounds that produce robust and effective stimulation of sperm motility and, importantly, have a positive response on patient samples. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY For >20 years, the use of non-selective PDEIs, such as pentoxifylline, has been known to influence the motility of human spermatozoa; however, conflicting results have been obtained. It is now clear that human sperm express several different phosphodiesterases and these are compartmentalized at different regions of the cells. By using type-specific PDEIs, differential modulation of sperm motility may be achieved without adversely affecting other functions such as the acrosome reaction (AR). STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION This was a basic medical research study examining sperm samples from normozoospermic donors and subfertile patients attending the Assisted Conception Unit (ACU), Ninewells Hospital Dundee for diagnostic semen analysis, IVF and ICSI. Phase 1 screened 43 commercially available compounds with reported PDEI activity to identify lead compounds that stimulate sperm motility. Samples were exposed (20 min) to three concentrations (1, 10 and 100 µM) of compound, and selected candidates (n = 6) progressed to Phase 2, which provided a more comprehensive assessment using a battery of in vitro sperm function tests. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS All healthy donors and subfertile patients were recruited at the Medical Research Institute, University of Dundee and ACU, Ninewells Hospital Dundee (ethical approval 08/S1402/6). In Phase 1, poor motility cells recovered from the 40% interface of the discontinuous density gradient were used as surrogates for patient samples. Pooled samples from three to four different donors were utilized in

  18. Effect of brain-derived neurotrophic factor on sperm function, oxidative stress and membrane integrity in human.

    PubMed

    Najafi, A; Amidi, F; Sedighi Gilani, M A; Moawad, A R; Asadi, E; Khanlarkhni, N; Fallah, P; Rezaiian, Z; Sobhani, A

    2017-03-01

    Oxidative stress has negative impacts on the clinical outcomes of assisted reproduction techniques. The brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF) promotes the viability of nerve cells and is known to decrease oxidative stress and apoptosis in different cells. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of BDNF treatment on human sperm functions that are known to be essential for fertilisation. Our findings showed that treatment of human spermatozoa with 0.133 nM BDNF significantly increased the percentages of both total (P = 0.001) and progressive (P < 0.01) motile sperm cells compared to those observed in the nontreated (control) group. We also showed that the mean fluorescence intensity of DCFH-DA, as an indicator of intracellular reactive oxygen species, was significantly lower (P < 0.05) in spermatozoa treated with BDNF compared to the control group. Treatment of spermatozoa with BDNF significantly decreased the percentages of both dead (P = 0.001) and apoptotic-like sperm cells (P < 0.05) compared to the control group. On the other hand, BDNF treatment significantly increased the percentage of viable sperm cells compared to the control (P = 0.001). In conclusion, BDNF has protective effects against oxidative stress in spermatozoa and could improve sperm functions that are essential for sperm-egg fusion and subsequent fertilisation.

  19. Detection of sex chromosomal aneuploidies X-X, Y-Y, and X-Y in human sperm using two-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrobek, A.J.; Robbins, W.A. |; Pinkel, D.; Weier, H.U.; Mehraein, Y. |

    1994-10-15

    Sex chromosome aneuploidy is the most common numerical chromosomal abnormality in humans at birth and a substantial portion of these abnormalities involve paternal chromosomes. An efficient method is presented for using air-dried smears of human semen to detect the number of X and Y chromosomes in sperm chromatin using two-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization. Air-dried semen smears were pre-treated with dithiothreitol and 3,4-diiodosalicylate salt to decondense the sperm chromatin and then were hybridized with repetitive sequence DNA probes that had been generated by PCR and differentially labeled. Hybridizations with X and Y specific probes showed the expected ratio of 50%X:50%Y bearing sperm. Sperm carrying extra fluorescence domains representing disomy for the X or Y chromosomes occurred at frequencies of {approximately} 4 per 10,000 sperm each. Cells carrying both X and Y fluorescence domains occurred at a frequency of {approximately} 6/10,000. Thus, the overall frequency of sperm that carried an extra sex chromosome was 1.4/1,000. The frequencies of sperm carrying sex chromosome aneuploidies determined by hybridization did not differ statistically from those reported from the same laboratory using the human-sperm/hamster-egg cytogenetic technique. Multi-chromosome fluorescence in situ hybridization to sperm is a promising method for assessing sex-ratio alterations in human semen and for determining the fraction of sperm carrying sex or other chromosome aneuploidies which may be transmissible to offspring. 44 refs., 1 fig., 3 tabs.

  20. Ability of abnormally-shaped human spermatozoa to adhere to and penetrate zona-free hamster eggs: correlation with sperm morphology and postincubation motility.

    PubMed

    Bronson, Richard A; Bronson, Susan K; Oula, Lucila D

    2007-01-01

    A body of evidence indicates that morphologically abnormal human spermatozoa may exhibit impaired ability to fertilize. Yet teratospermia has widely varying etiologies, including associations with varicoceles, following fever, cigarette smoking, and exposure to polychlorinated biphenyls. Abnormalities of sperm shape in mice have also been shown to be associated with autosomal gene mutations. These varying causes of teratospermia could have different molecular consequences reflected in altered sperm function. We studied the ability of morphologically abnormal human sperm to penetrate zona-free hamster eggs as a measure of their ability to undergo an acrosome reaction and gamete membrane fusion. Motile sperm from ejaculates containing 15% normal sperm or less, as judged by World Health Organization (1999) criteria, were recovered by ISolate density centrifugation and capacitated by overnight incubation. Zona-free hamster eggs were inseminated with 1 x 10(6) motile capacitated cells and scored for sperm penetration after 3 hours of coincubation. A significant trend was found between the percent of abnormal spermatozoa within the ejaculate and impaired egg-penetrating ability, reflected in the percent of eggs penetrated, the number of penetrating sperm per egg, and the number of sperm adherent to the oolemma. Because only acrosome-reacted human spermatozoa adhere to the oolemma, these results support the notion that abnormally shaped sperm may exhibit an impaired ability to undergo an acrosome reaction. A correlation was also noted between the loss of motility of sperm following overnight incubation and impairment of their ability to undergo gamete membrane fusion. These results confirm prior findings at the level of the zona pellucida that abnormally shaped sperm exhibit functional abnormalities. However, a wide variation was observed between men in the behavior of such sperm, including occasionally high rates of egg penetration. These observations suggest that

  1. In vitro assessment of some sperm function following exposure to levonorgestrel in human fallopian tubes

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Background The mechanism of action of levonorgestrel (LNG) as emergency contraception (EC) remains a subject of debate and its effect on sperm function has been only partially explained. The aim of this study was to assess whether LNG at a similar dose to those found in serum following oral intake for EC could affect spermatozoa when exposed to human fallopian tubes in vitro. Methods Fifteen mini-laparotomies were performed, the side on which ovulation occurred was recorded, and both tubes were removed and perfused with a suspension containing 1 × 10(6) motile spermatozoa, with or without LNG. Following 4-hour incubation, the tubes were sectioned to separate the isthmus and the ampulla. Each segment was flushed and the material was evaluated to quantify the number of motile sperm, the number of spermatozoa adhering to the oviductal epithelium and the acrosome reaction (AR) rate. Results The addition of LNG did not significantly alter the number of recovered motile spermatozoa either at the isthmus or at the ampulla, nor did it have any effect on the number of recovered spermatozoa adhered to the human tubal epithelium. Furthermore, LNG did not affect the AR rate. No significant differences were found even when the side on which ovulation occurred was taken into account. Conclusions In a similar dose to that observed in serum following oral intake for EC, LNG had no effect on the number of motile spermatozoa recovered from the human fallopian tubes in vitro, on their adhesion to the tubal epithelium, distribution or AR rate. The possible effect of LNG as EC on sperm function remains poorly understood. PMID:22289514

  2. Selection of functional human sperm with higher DNA integrity and fewer reactive oxygen species

    PubMed Central

    Asghar, Waseem; Velasco, Vanessa; Kingsley, James L.; Shoukat, Muhammad S.; Shafiee, Hadi; Anchan, Raymond M.; Mutter, George L.; Tüzel, Erkan; Demirci, Utkan

    2014-01-01

    Fertilization and reproduction are central to the survival and propagation of a species. Couples who cannot reproduce naturally have to undergo in vitro clinical procedures. An integral part of these clinical procedures includes isolation of healthy sperm from raw semen. Existing sperm sorting methods are not efficient and isolate sperm having high DNA fragmentation and reactive oxygen species, and suffer from multiple manual steps and variations between embryologists. Inspired by in vivo natural sperm sorting mechanisms where vaginal mucus becomes less viscous to form microchannels to guide sperm towards egg, we present a chip that efficiently sorts healthy, motile and morphologically normal sperm without centrifugation. Higher percentage of sorted sperm show significantly lesser reactive oxygen species and DNA fragmentation than the conventional swim-up method. The presented chip is an easy-to-use high throughput sperm sorter that provides standardized sperm sorting assay with less reliance on embryologist’s skills, facilitating reliable operational steps. PMID:24753434

  3. Ultrastructural and DNA fragmentation analyses in swim-up selected human sperm.

    PubMed

    Piomboni, P; Bruni, E; Capitani, S; Gambera, L; Moretti, E; La Marca, A; De Leo, V; Baccetti, B

    2006-01-01

    Seventeen sperm samples were evaluated by transmission electron microscopy (TEM) before and after swim-up separation. DNA-fragmentation was tested by terminal d-UTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) in unselected and selected semen samples, and the results were analyzed in relation to sperm ultrastructural characteristics detected by TEM. A significant improvement in mean numbers and percentages of structurally normal sperm was observed after swim-up selection, corresponding to a significant decrease in the percentage of necrotic and apoptotic sperm, while the percentage of sperm with immature nuclei did not change significantly. TUNEL indicated a significant decrease in chromatin-fragmented sperm after swim-up. Swim up selection based on sperm motility excludes many sperm with ultrastructural evidence of necrosis (absent or reacted acrosome, disrupted chromatin, broken plasma membrane) and apoptosis (misshapen nuclei with marginated chromatin), as confirmed by TUNEL analysis. Nevertheless, immature sperm with elliptical or roundish nuclei, misshapen acrosomes and uncondensed chromatin remain part of fertilizing pool.

  4. Elemental composition of human semen is associated with motility and genomic sperm defects among older men

    PubMed Central

    Schmid, Thomas E.; Grant, Patrick G.; Marchetti, Francesco; Weldon, Rosana H.; Eskenazi, Brenda; Wyrobek, Andrew J.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND Older men tend to have poorer semen quality and are generally at higher risks for infertility and abnormal reproductive outcomes. METHODS We employed proton-induced X-ray emission (PIXE, 3 MeV proton beam) to investigate the concentrations of zinc, copper, calcium, sulfur, chlorine, potassium, titanium, iron and nickel in washed sperm and seminal plasma from non-smoking groups of 10 older men (65–80 years old) and 10 younger men (22–28 years old) who were concurrently assayed for sperm function and genomicly defective sperm. RESULTS The older group showed elevated zinc, copper and calcium in sperm and elevated sulfur in seminal plasma compared with the younger men. The older group also showed reduced motility as well as increased sperm DNA fragmentation, achondroplasia mutations, DNA strand breaks and chromosomal aberrations. Sperm calcium and copper were positively associated with sperm DNA fragmentation (P < 0.03). Seminal sulfur was positively associated with sperm DNA fragmentation and chromosomal aberrations (P < 0.04), and negatively associated with sperm motility (P < 0.05). Sperm calcium was negatively associated with sperm motility, independent of male age (P = 0.01). CONCLUSIONS We identified major differences in elemental concentrations between sperm and seminal plasma and that higher sperm copper, sulfur and calcium are quantitatively associated with poorer semen quality and increased frequencies of genomic sperm defects. PMID:23042799

  5. Shuttling of the autoantigen La between nucleus and cell surface after uv irradiation of human keratinocytes

    SciTech Connect

    Bachmann, M.; Chang, S.; Slor, H.; Kukulies, J.; Mueller, W.E. )

    1990-12-01

    During the past years we have established that the nuclear autoantigen La shuttles between the nucleus and the cytoplasm in tumor cells after inhibition of transcription or virus infection. We reinvestigated this shuttling using primary human keratinocytes from both healthy donors and patients with xeroderma pigmentosum. Ultraviolet irradiation resulted in both an inhibition of transcription and a translocation of La protein from the nucleus to the cytoplasm. After a prolonged inhibition of transcription La protein relocated into the nucleus and assembled with nuclear storage regions. The uv-induced shuttling included a translocation to the cell surface, where La protein colocalized with epidermal growth factor receptors.

  6. DNA fragmentation of human sperm can be detected by ligation-mediated real-time polymerase chain reaction.

    PubMed

    Lim, Jung Jin; Lee, Jin Il; Kim, Dong Hwan; Song, Seung-Hun; Kim, Hyung Joon; Lee, Woo Sik; Lee, Dong Ryul

    2013-12-01

    To determine whether ligation-mediated real-time polymerase chain reaction (LM-RT-PCR), which combines LM-PCR, and RT-PCR, can detect sperm DNA fragmentation (DF) in human semen samples. Three-way comparison of terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL), sperm chromatin dispersion (SCD), and LM-RT-PCR for detecting sperm DNA fragmentation. University hospital-based research laboratory. Twenty-five men presenting at an infertility clinic. Basic analysis of sperm concentration, motility, vitality, and morphology, with each semen sample equally divided into three aliquots that were evaluated for fragmentation using TUNEL, SCD, and LM-RT-PCR assays. In TUNEL and SCD assays, counts of the number of sperm with tetramethylrhodamine (TMR) red signals or no halo; in LM-RT-PCR results, evaluation of the threshold cycles (Ct) and relative fluorescence unit (RFU) values. The median percentage of sperm with positive results for fragmentation in the TUNEL and SCD assays were 20.5% and 20.7%, respectively. To compare the accuracy of the TUNEL, SCD, and LM-RT-PCR assays, we divided the semen samples into two groups according to the TUNEL results: low and high percentage of sperm fragmentation. In the LM-RT-PCR results, the values of the cycles of threshold (Ct) and relative fluorescence unit (RFU) statistically significantly differed between the low and high percentage of sperm fragmentation groups. Comparisons among the TUNEL, SCD, and LM-RT-PCR assays revealed that the correlation patterns according to DNA fragmentation were similar in both the groups with high and low percentage of DNA fragmentation. Our morphologic analysis indicated that the fragmentation of sperm DNA did not appear to influence sperm morphology. These results indicate that the LM-RT-PCR technique is another useful tool for detecting DNA fragmentation, a parameter of sperm quality in human semen alone or combined with TUNEL or SCD assays. Copyright © 2013 American Society for

  7. High resolution DNA content measurements of mammalian sperm

    SciTech Connect

    Pinkel, D.; Lake, S.; Gledhill, B.L.; Van Dilla, M.A.; Stephenson, D.; Watchmaker, G.

    1982-01-01

    The high condensation and flat shape of the mammalian sperm nucleus present unique difficulties to flow cytometric measurement of DNA content. Chromatin compactness makes quantitative fluorescent staining for DNA difficult and causes a high index of refraction. The refractive index makes optical measurements sensitive to sperm head orientation. We demonstrate that the optical problems can be overcome using the commercial ICP22 epiillumination flow cytometer (Ortho Instruments, Westwood, MA) or a specially built cell orientating flow cytometer (OFCM). The design and operation of the OFCM are described. Measurements of the angular dependence of fluorescence from acriflavine stained rabbit sperm show that it is capable of orienting flat sperm with a tolerance of +-7/sup 0/. Differences in the angular dependence for the similarly shaped bull and rabbit sperm allow discrimination of these cells. We show that DNA staining with 4-6 diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) or an ethidium bromide mithramycin combination allows resolution of the X and Y populations in mouse sperm. They have also been successful with sperm from the bull, ram, rabbit, and boar. Reliable results with human sperm are not obtained. The accuracy of the staining and measurement techniques are verified by the correct determination of the relative content of these two populations in sperm from normal mice and those with the Cattanach (7 to X) translocation. Among the potential uses of these techniques are measurement of DNA content errors induced in sperm due to mutagen exposure, and assessment of the fractions of X and Y sperm in semen that may have one population artifically enriched.

  8. Prolonged expansion of human nucleus pulposus cells expressing human telomerase reverse transcriptase mediated by lentiviral vector.

    PubMed

    Wu, Jianhong; Wang, Deli; Ruan, Dike; He, Qing; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Chaofeng; Xin, Hongkui; Xu, Cheng; Liu, Yue

    2014-01-01

    Human degenerative disc disease (DDD) is characterized by progressive loss of human nucleus pulposus (HNP) cells and extracellular matrix, in which the massive deposition are secreted by HNP cells. Cell therapy to supplement HNP cells to degenerated discs has been thought to be a promising strategy to treat DDD. However, obtaining a large quality of fully functional HNP cells has been severely hampered by limited proliferation capacity of HNP cells in vitro. Previous studies have used lipofectamine or recombinant adeno-associated viral (rAAV) vectors to deliver human telomerase reverse transcriptase (hTERT) into ovine or HNP cells to prolong the activity of nucleus pulposus cells with limited success. Here we developed a lentiviral vector bearing both hTERT and a gene encoding green fluorescence protein (L-hTERT/EGFP). This vector efficiently mediated both hTERT and EGFP into freshly isolated HNP cells. The expressions of both transgenes in L-hTERT/EGFP transduced HNP cells were detected up to day 210 post viral infection, which was twice as long as rAAV vector did. Furthermore, we observed restored telomerase activity, maintained telomere length, delayed cell senescence, and increased cell proliferation rate in those L-hTERT/EGFP transduced HNP cells. Our study suggests that lentiviral vector might be a useful gene delivery vehicle for HNP cell therapy to treat DDD.

  9. Evaluation of chromatin integrity in human sperm using acridine orange staining with different fixatives and after cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Chohan, K R; Griffin, J T; Carrell, D T

    2004-10-01

    Staining of cells with acridine orange (AO) has been widely accepted as a predictor of DNA damage in many cell types. Because of variability of protocols used in previous studies, the AO staining technique has not been widely accepted as a screening test to predict DNA damage in human sperm. In order to further validate the use of AO staining, sperm were evaluated using numerous variations in the staining protocol. This study also elucidated the effects of cryopreservation on sperm DNA. Sperm fixation in Carnoy's solution showed significantly (P < 0.05) more DNA damage (29.9 +/- 4.5%) than 2% glutaraldehyde (14.4 +/- 2.1%), 4% paraformaldehyde (5.5 +/- 1.7%), no fixation (15.8 +/- 4.3%) but did not differ from Diff Quik solution (19.2 +/- 5.8%). No difference was observed for sperm DNA damage assessment using a 0.2 m (15.5 +/- 3.2%) or 0.3 m (14.9 +/- 3.3%) concentration of Na(2)HPO(4).7H(2)O in the AO staining solution. Frozen-thawed semen samples showed increased damage to sperm DNA under both Carnoy's (fresh: 10.9 +/- 1.3%; frozen: 30.8 +/- 2.9%; P < 0.05) and Diff Quik fixation (fresh: 6.2 +/- 0.8; frozen: 17.1 +/- 2.5%P < 0.05). Present data also showed that spermatozoa from some individuals are more prone to DNA damage after freezing and thawing procedures than others. In conclusion, Carnoy's fixative provides a better predictive value for DNA damage to sperm using AO staining. Additionally, cryopreservation increased damage to the sperm DNA.

  10. Human cataractous lens nucleus implanted in a sheep eye lens as a model for phacoemulsification training.

    PubMed

    Kayikçioğlu, Ozcan; Eğrilmez, Sait; Emre, Sinan; Erakgün, Tansu

    2004-03-01

    We describe a realistic and inexpensive experimental cataract model for phacoemulsification training. After a capsulorhexis is performed, a deep cavity in the lens of an enucleated sheep eye is formed by phacoemulsification through a lateral incision. An undamaged human cataractous lens nucleus obtained by extracapsular cataract extraction is inserted in the preformed cavity, resting in the center of a cortex cushion. Phacoemulsification training is performed through a corneal tunnel incision. The experimental model is prepared with a human cataractous lens nucleus of the preferred hardness, simulating nuclear phacoemulsification in humans.

  11. Genome wide identification of promoter binding sites for H4K12ac in human sperm and its relevance for early embryonic development

    PubMed Central

    Paradowska, Agnieszka S.; Miller, David; Spiess, Andrej-Nikolai; Vieweg, Markus; Cerna, Martina; Dvorakova-Hortova, Katerina; Bartkuhn, Marek; Schuppe, Hans-Christian; Weidner, Wolfgang; Steger, Klaus

    2012-01-01

    Sperm chromatin reveals two characteristic features in that protamines are the predominant nuclear proteins and remaining histones are highly acetylated. Histone H4 acetylated at lysine 12 (H4K12ac) is localized in the post-acrosomal region, while protamine-1 is present within the whole nucleus. Chromatin immunoprecipitation in combination with promoter array analysis allowed genome-wide identification of H4K12ac binding sites. Previously, we reported enrichment of H4K12ac at CTCF binding sites and promoters of genes involved in developmental processes. Here, we demonstrate that H4K12ac is enriched predominantly between ± 2 kb from the transcription start site. In addition, we identified developmentally relevant H4K12ac-associated promoters with high expression levels of their transcripts stored in mature sperm. The highest expressed mRNA codes for testis-specific PHD finger protein-7 (PHF7), suggesting an activating role of H4K12ac in the regulatory elements of this gene. H4K12ac-associated genes revealed a weak correlation with genes expressed at 4-cell stage human embryos, while 23 H4K12ac-associated genes were activated in 8-cell embryo and 39 in the blastocyst. Genes activated in 4-cell embryos are involved in gene expression, histone fold and DNA-dependent transcription, while genes expressed in the blastocyst were classified as involved in developmental processes. Immunofluorescence staining detected H4K12ac from the murine male pronucleus to early stages of embryogenesis. Aberrant histone acetylation within developmentally important gene promoters in infertile men may reflect insufficient sperm chromatin compaction, which may result in inappropriate transfer of epigenetic information to the oocyte. PMID:22894908

  12. The relationship between sperm head retardance using polarized light microscopy and clinical outcomes.

    PubMed

    Vermey, Belinda G; Chapman, Michael G; Cooke, Simon; Kilani, Suha

    2015-01-01

    In human sperm head, birefringence can be seen under polarized light resulting from highly ordered structures within the acrosome and nucleus. Selecting sperm with partial head birefringence improves success of clinical pregnancies in patients with severe male factor infertility. The aim of this study was to establish a range of retardance in sperm heads using polarized light microscopy to select an optimum sperm for intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI). Sperm heads of 63 couples undergoing ICSI in women aged 38 years or younger were imaged at the time of ICSI and later analysed for retardance blinded to embryo and cycle outcomes. Sperm head retardance was similar irrespective of whether fertilization occurred. Quality of embryos on day 3 and day 5 were higher when sperm were selected with head retardance ranging from 0.56 nm or greater to 0.91 nm or less. Selection of sperm with head retardance ranging from 0.56 nm or greater to 0.91 nm or less was associated with higher clinical pregnancy rates (OR 3.74 95% CI 1.43 to 9.77). Optimum sperm for selection at the time of ICSI was with head retardance within the range 0.56 nm or greater to 0.91 nm or less. Copyright © 2014 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  13. The laminin-induced acrosome reaction in human sperm is mediated by Src kinases and the proteasome.

    PubMed

    Tapia, Silvia; Rojas, Marcelo; Morales, Patricio; Ramirez, Marco A; Diaz, Emilce S

    2011-08-01

    The aim of this work was to determine whether laminin (Ln), an extracellular matrix protein, induces the intracellular events that may be involved in producing the acrosome reaction in human sperm. To this end, we evaluated the effect of Ln on tyrosine phosphorylation, intracellular calcium concentration, proteasome activity, and phosphorylation in human sperm. Aliquots of highly motile sperm selected with a Percoll gradient, were incubated with different concentrations of Ln (0-20 μg/ml) for different periods (0-18 h). The percentage of viable acrosome-reacted sperm was evaluated using fluorescein isothiocyanate-labeled Pisum sativum agglutinin and Hoechst 33258 DNA dye. Tyrosine phosphorylation was evaluated by Western blot analysis. The chymotrypsin-like activity of the proteasome was evaluated with a fluorogenic peptide, and intracellular calcium concentration was measured with fura-2. The results indicate that Ln stimulated the acrosome reaction of human sperm in a dose-dependent manner. This increase was drastically inhibited in the presence of herbimycin A, SU6656, and epoxomicin. In addition, Ln increased proteasome activity and phosphorylation; both events were inhibited by herbimycin A and SU6656. Finally, Ln induced an increase in intracellular calcium concentration, which was inhibited by SU6656 and epoxomicin. These results suggest that Ln is able to induce the acrosome reaction. This effect may be mediated by Src kinase and the proteasome, with the consequent induction of a calcium influx.

  14. Protective effect of butylated hydroxytoluene on sperm function in human spermatozoa cryopreserved by vitrification technique.

    PubMed

    Merino, O; Aguagüiña, W E; Esponda, P; Risopatrón, J; Isachenko, E; Isachenko, V; Sánchez, R

    2015-03-01

    Butylhydroxytoluene (BHT), a synthetic analogue of vitamin E, shows antioxidant and antiviral properties and has been successfully used for mammalian sperm cryopreservation. In this study, BHT was included in a vitrification solution to determine its cryoprotective effect on human spermatozoa. Spermatozoa were selected by swim-up and vitrified in close sealed straw using either a combination of human tubal fluid (HTF), sucrose and BHT 1 mm (VMBHT), or only HTF and sucrose (VM). The optimal concentration of BHT was determined by the observation of preserved progressive sperm motility (PSM) after warming and detection of plasma membrane (PMI), membrane mitochondrial potential (ΔΨm) and DNA integrity. The presence of reactive oxygen species (ROS) was also detected. The PSM was significantly higher in the VMBHT group (80.86 ± 5.41%) compared with the VM group (68.9 ± 3.67%) (P < 0.05). Butylhydroxytoluene significantly preserved DNA integrity (4.0 ± 0.1% versus 6.1 ± 1.6%; P < 0.05) and reduced ROS production (5.5 ± 2.2 versus 8.6 ± 1.8%; P < 0.05). Plasma membrane and ΔΨm showed no statistical differences. One millimolar BHT effectively maintained cell function and due to its antioxidant and antiviral properties could be used in semen cryopreservation of patients with viral infections transmitted by seminal plasma.

  15. Raman microspectroscopy of nucleus and cytoplasm for human colon cancer diagnosis.

    PubMed

    Liu, Wenjing; Wang, Hongbo; Du, Jingjing; Jing, Chuanyong

    2017-11-15

    Subcellular Raman analysis is a promising clinic tool for cancer diagnosis, but constrained by the difficulty of deciphering subcellular spectra in actual human tissues. We report a label-free subcellular Raman analysis for use in cancer diagnosis that integrates subcellular signature spectra by subtracting cytoplasm from nucleus spectra (Nuc.-Cyt.) with a partial least squares-discriminant analysis (PLS-DA) model. Raman mapping with the classical least-squares (CLS) model allowed direct visualization of the distribution of the cytoplasm and nucleus. The PLS-DA model was employed to evaluate the diagnostic performance of five types of spectral datasets, including non-selective, nucleus, cytoplasm, ratio of nucleus to cytoplasm (Nuc./Cyt.), and nucleus minus cytoplasm (Nuc.-Cyt.), resulting in diagnostic sensitivity of 88.3%, 84.0%, 98.4%, 84.5%, and 98.9%, respectively. Discriminating between normal and cancerous cells of actual human tissues through subcellular Raman markers is feasible, especially when using the nucleus-cytoplasm difference spectra. The subcellular Raman approach had good stability, and had excellent diagnostic performance for rectal as well as colon tissues. The insights gained from this study shed new light on the general applicability of subcellular Raman analysis in clinical trials. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Involvement of homocysteine, homocysteine thiolactone, and paraoxonase type 1 (PON-1) in the etiology of defective human sperm function.

    PubMed

    Aitken, R J; Flanagan, H M; Connaughton, H; Whiting, S; Hedges, A; Baker, M A

    2016-03-01

    This study reports, for the first time, the significant (p ≤ 0.01) accumulation of homocysteine residues in low density, defective sperm suspensions isolated from patients attending an infertility clinic. This overabundance of homocysteine was not related to a deficiency in folate availability but may have been a reflection of the oxidative stress that characterizes such defective sperm populations. Direct addition of the homocysteine cyclic congener, homocysteine thiolactone, to human spermatozoa resulted in the rapid induction of mitochondrial reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation (p < 0.001), the stimulation of lipid peroxidation (p < 0.01), the promotion of tyrosine phosphorylation (p < 0.001), and the suppression of sperm motility (p < 0.001) in the absence of any significant impact on DNA integrity. The parent homocysteine molecule was less active and took 24 h to stimulate mitochondrial ROS production possibly because of the need to convert this compound to the corresponding thiolactone before it could exert a measureable biological effect. Thiolactone was also effective in suppressing the carboxymethylation of key proteins in the sperm tail, which are thought to be involved in the regulation of sperm movement. The major enzyme responsible for removing thiolactone from proteins, paraoxonase (PON-1), was shown to be a major target for alkylation by lipid aldehydes, such as 4-hydroxynonenal, generated as a consequence of oxidative stress. Exposure of human spermatozoa to such aldehydes resulted in a dose-dependent accumulation of homocysteine in spermatozoa (p < 0.03). These results suggest that one of the consequences of oxidative stress in mammalian spermatozoa is the inhibition of PON-1, which then enhances the availability of homocysteine thiolactone to interact with the epsilon-amino group of lysine residues on sperm proteins, triggering a raft of significant biological changes in these cells that ultimately compromise sperm function.

  17. [Sequential observation of human sperm penetration into zona pellucida-free hamster oocytes by scanning electron microscopy].

    PubMed

    Tsuiki, A; Hoshi, K; Saito, A; Kyono, K; Hoshiai, H; Suzuki, M; Horiuchi, T

    1983-10-01

    Yanagimachi et al. have shown that zona pellucida-free hamster oocytes can be penetrated by capacitated and acrosome-reacted human spermatozoa, and both pronuclei be formed. Recently, it has been said that this technique may be used to test the fertilizing ability of human sperm for clinical use. We have made scanning electron microscopic studies of the interaction of these heterologous gametes, especially the mechanisms of sperm entry into the oocytes. Our results are as follows: The surface of the oocyte is covered with numerous microvilli, which are found to be evenly and densely distributed on the vitellus surface. The surface of the first polar body already released is smooth and microvilli-free. Most spermatozoa lie flat on the vitellus surface, but a few are oriented perpendicularly to the vitellus surface. Most bound sperm had lost their acrosomal caps, because a ridge exists at the leading edge of the equatorial segment. Many microvilli are shown to participate in sperm-egg contact. Initially most microvilli appeared to grasp and immobilize the anterior tip of the sperm head. But as gamete interaction proceeded, microvilli were overlying the postacrosomal region, and observed adjacent to the plasma membrane of the postacrosomal region. The postacrosomal region is first incorporated into the ooplasma, the anterior tip of sperm head being the last portion to be incorporated. The microvilli of the oolenmal surface where sperm penetrated did not show major changes in size or appearance, and the so-called "incorporation cone" was not observed. Our scanning electron micrographs show that the microvillar portion of the oolenma greatly participates in this heterologous gamate interaction.

  18. Automated Analysis of Human Sperm Number and Concentration (Oligospermia) Using Otsu Threshold Method and Labelling

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Susrama, I. G.; Purnama, K. E.; Purnomo, M. H.

    2016-01-01

    Oligospermia is a male fertility issue defined as a low sperm concentration in the ejaculate. Normally the sperm concentration is 20-120 million/ml, while Oligospermia patients has sperm concentration less than 20 million/ml. Sperm test done in the fertility laboratory to determine oligospermia by checking fresh sperm according to WHO standards in 2010 [9]. The sperm seen in a microscope using a Neubauer improved counting chamber and manually count the number of sperm. In order to be counted automatically, this research made an automation system to analyse and count the sperm concentration called Automated Analysis of Sperm Concentration Counters (A2SC2) using Otsu threshold segmentation process and morphology. Data sperm used is the fresh sperm directly in the analysis in the laboratory from 10 people. The test results using A2SC2 method obtained an accuracy of 91%. Thus in this study, A2SC2 can be used to calculate the amount and concentration of sperm automatically

  19. Inhibition of sperm capacitation and fertilizing capacity by adjudin is mediated by chloride and its channels in humans

    PubMed Central

    Li, Kun; Ni, Ya; He, Yi; Chen, Wen-Ying; Lu, Jian-Xin; Cheng, C. Yan; Ge, Ren-Shan; Shi, Qi-Xian

    2013-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Does adjudin disrupt chloride ion (Cl−) ion transport function in human sperm and impede sperm capacitation and fertilizing ability in vitro? SUMMARY ANSWER In this study the results indicate that adjudin is a potent blocker of Cl− channels: disrupting Cl− ion transport function results in a decline in sperm capacitation and fertilizing ability in humans in vitro. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY Although our previous studies have demonstrated that adjudin exerts its effect by disrupting sertoli-germ cell adhesion junctions, most notably apical ectoplasmic specialization by targeting testin and actin filament bundles that disrupts the actin-based cytoskeleton in sertoli cells, it remains unclear whether adjudin impedes Cl− ion transport function in the human sperm. STUDY DESIGIN, SIZE AND DURATION Semen samples were obtained from 45 fertile men (aged 25–32). Spermatozoa were isolated from the semen in the human tube fluid (HTF) medium by centrifugation through a discontinuous Percoll gradient, and incubated with adjudin at 10 nM–10 µM and/or other reagents under capacitating conditions for 0–5 h. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS We evaluated the effect of adjudin and different reagents on sperm functions with which they were incubated at 37°C. Sperm motility and hyperactivation were analyzed by a computer-assisted sperm analysis (CASA) system. Sperm capacitation and the acrosome reaction were assessed by chlortetracycline fluorescence staining. Sperm fertilizing ability was evaluated by sperm penetration of zona-free hamster egg assay, and cellular cAMP levels in spermatozoa were quantified by the EIA kit. The proteins tyrosine, serine and threonine phosphorylation in the presence or absence of adjudin were analyzed by means of a immunodetection of spermatozoa, especially, compared the effect of adjudin on sperm hyperactivation and capacitation in the complete HTF medium with the Cl−-deficient HTF medium as well as the various Cl

  20. Traceability of human sperm samples by direct tagging with polysilicon microbarcodes.

    PubMed

    Novo, Sergi; Mora-Espí, Inmaculada; Gómez-Martínez, Rodrigo; Barrios, Leonardo; Ibáñez, Elena; Such, Xavier; Duch, Marta; Mora, Xavier; Plaza, José Antonio; Nogués, Carme

    2015-08-01

    The increasing number of patients undergoing assisted reproductive technology (ART) treatments and of cycles performed in fertility centres has led to some traceability errors. Although the incidence of mismatching errors is extremely low, any error is unacceptable, therefore different strategies have been developed to further minimize these errors, such as manual double-witnessing or electronic witnessing systems. More recently, our group developed a direct tagging method consisting of attaching microbarcodes directly to the zona pellucida of human oocytes/embryos. Here, this method is taken a step further by using these microbarcodes to tag human semen samples, demonstrating that the barcodes are not toxic and do not interfere in the selection of motile spermatozoa nor in the cryopreservation of the sperm samples. In addition, when this tagging system was applied to an animal model (rabbit), pregnancy rate and kitten viability were not affected. Copyright © 2015 Reproductive Healthcare Ltd. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  1. Incompatibility of nucleus and mitochondria causes xenomitochondrial cybrid unviable across human, mouse, and pig cells.

    PubMed

    Yu, Guanghui; Tian, Jianhui; Yin, Jingdong; Li, Qiuyan; Zhao, Xingbo

    2014-04-03

    The nucleus and mitochondria are on correlative dependence; they interact in the process of protein transportation and energy metabolism. The compatibility of nucleus and mitochondria is essential for interspecies somatic cell nuclear transfer (iSCNT) and xenomitochondrial cybrid. In order to test the compatibility of nucleus and mitochondria among human, mouse, and pig cells, we compared the performances of cybrids that fused inter- and intra-species. The ρ0 cells from human and pig cell lines were created as nucleus donors which were transfected with GFP-neo for cell selective system in advance, and mitochondria donor cells were labeled by Mitochondria-RFP. Human and mouse platelets were also used as a mitochondrial donor. Results indicated that all interspecies cybrids declined to die in 2-4 d after the cell fusion in the selection medium, while intraspecies cybrid cells survived and formed stable clones. As a conclusion, the incompatibility between nucleus and mitochondria is the critical factor for the formation of interspecies cybrids.

  2. In vitro human immunodeficiency virus and sperm cell interaction mediated by the mannose receptor.

    PubMed

    Cardona-Maya, Walter; Velilla, Paula A; Montoya, Carlos Julio; Cadavid, Ángela; Rugeles, María T

    2011-12-01

    Leukocytes are considered to be the main source of HIV-1 infection in semen. However, HIV-1 interaction with spermatozoa has also been demonstrated, suggesting that both spermatozoa and leukocytes might play a role during sexual transmission of HIV-1. The purpose of the present study was to evaluate if HIV-1 particles interact with sperm cells through the mannose receptor (MR), and then to determine the ability of "infected" sperm cells to transmit the virus to susceptible targets. The expression of classical HIV-1 receptor and co-receptors and the MR by sperm cells was determined by flow cytometry; the interaction in vitro between sperm and HIV-1 was evaluated by fluorescence microscopy. Additionally, the in vitro interaction of sperm cells and HIV-1 was determined detecting viral nucleic acids by PCR. D-Mannose was used to block HIV-1-sperm cell interaction. Sperm cells preincubated with HIV-1 particles and activated mononuclear cells were co-cultured to determine viral transmission. The presence of viral RNA was detected in 28% of the samples in which sperm cells were preincubated with HIV-1 particles. Mannose was able to block interaction in 75% of the cases. Finally, we demonstrated that "infected" sperm cells were able to transmit the HIV-1 infection to susceptible targets. In conclusion, these results indicate that the MR is involved in sperm cell-HIV-1 interaction. Our results also suggest that sperm cells could be an important source of infection.

  3. Gestational surrogacy for a human immunodeficiency virus seropositive sperm donor: what are the ethics?

    PubMed

    Adams, Karen E

    2003-01-01

    Clinics that provide assisted reproductive technology (ART) are guided by general guidelines set forth by the American Society for Reproductive Medicine and its Ethics Committee and are free to set their own policies within those guidelines. This article presents a case in which a university clinic was presented with a novel request. A same-sex male couple, both positive for the human immunodeficiency virus (HIV), asked to use one of the couple's sperm to establish a pregnancy in an unrelated gestational surrogate through in vitro fertilization, intracytoplasmic sperm injection, and embryo transfer. The couple's argument in favor of such a plan was that no documented case of HIV seroconversion had so far occurred in recipients of gametes from HIV-positive donors. Since gestational surrogates routinely accept the risks inherent in pregnancy and childbearing, an informed surrogate should be allowed to accept the risks of such an arrangement. They further argued that if no clinic were willing to provide such services, data regarding seroconversion would never be obtained. The university ethics committee examined the fertility clinic's policies and found the clinic's refusal to provide such services to be completely consistent with its policy that allows providing services to HIV-discordant couples, same-sex couples, and gestational surrogates, but that always acts to protect the surrogate from exposure to infectious risk.

  4. Quantitative measurements of human sperm nuclei using automated microscopy and image analysis

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrobek, A.J.; Firpo, M. ); Sudar, D. )

    1993-01-01

    A package of computer codes, called Morphometry Automation Program (MAP), was developed to (a) detect human sperm smeared onto glass slides, (b) measure more than 30 aspects of the size, shape, texture, and staining of their nuclei, and (c) retain operator evaluation of the process. MAP performs the locating and measurement functions automatically, without operator assistance. In addition to standard measurements, MAP utilizes axial projections of nuclear area and stain intensity to detect asymmetries. MAP also stores for each cell the gray-scale images for later display and evaluation, and it retains coordinates for optional relocation and inspection under the microscope. MAP operates on the Quantitative Image Processing System (QUIPS) at LLNL. MAP has potential applications in the evaluation of infertility and in reproductive toxicology, such as (a) classifying sperm into clinical shape categories for assessing fertility status, (b) identifying subtle effects of host factors (diet, stress, etc.), (c) assessing the risk of potential spermatogenic toxicants (tobacco, drugs, etc.), and (d) investigating associations with abnormal pregnancy outcomes (time to pregnancy, early fetal loss, etc.).

  5. Morphological and morphometrical maturation of ventral cochlear nucleus in human foetus.

    PubMed

    Mishra, Sabita; Roy, T S; Wadhwa, Shashi

    2017-03-21

    Auditory impulses perceived by the hair cells of the organ of corti are relayed in the cochlear nucleus, the first relay station in the brainstem, by the cochlear nerve. The human foetus is well known to respond to sound during the last trimester of gestation. On the contrary, studies conducted in rat, cat and mouse have shown that these mammals have an immature auditory system at the time of birth. There are very few reports available regarding the morphological and functional maturation of the cochlear nucleus in human. Although the human cochlear nucleus neurons attain adult morphological characters by mid-gestation, there are hardly any studies discussing the functional maturation of the cochlear nucleus. Hence the present study was aimed at observing the morphological as well as functional maturation of the human foetal cochlear nuclei at various gestational ages. Morphological maturation was observed qualitatively while stereological estimation of the volume of well defined ventral cochlear nucleus (VCN) was calculated by the Cavalieri principle; neuronal count and density was estimated by dissector principle. The functional maturation was assessed by observing the expression of synaptophysin, a synaptic marker, at different gestational ages and by the presence of parvalbumin, a calcium binding functional neuronal marker by immunohistochemistry. Neurons showed coarse Nissl's substance and well developed cell processes and gradual increase in cell size by the 24th-30th gestational week. Synaptophysin labeling in the complete cochlear nucleus was observed at 20 weeks of gestation. Adult pattern of synaptophysin labeling was observed finally at37weeks of gestation. Earliest presence of parvalbumin expression was detected at 16 weeks of gestation and a distinct adult pattern was seen at 37 weeks of gestation. This study concluded that morphological and functional maturation of the human cochlear nuclei occurs simultaneously during mid-gestation which represents

  6. Nerve growth factor promotes human sperm motility in vitro by increasing the movement distance and the number of A grade spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Lin, Kai; Ding, Xue-Feng; Shi, Cui-Ge; Zeng, Dan; QuZong, SuoLang; Liu, Shu-Hong; Wu, Yan; LuoBu, GeSang; Fan, Ming; Zhao, Y-Q

    2015-11-01

    Nerve growth factor (NGF) was first found in the central nervous system and is now well known for its multiple pivotal roles in the nervous system and immune system. However, more and more evidences showed that NGF and its receptors TrkA and p75 were also found in the head and tail of spermatozoa, which indicate the possible effect of NGF on the sperm motility. Nevertheless, the exact role of NGF in the human sperm motility remains unclear until now. In this study, we investigated the effect of NGF on human sperm motility, and the results showed that NGF could promote human sperm motility in vitro by increasing the movement distance and the number of A grade spermatozoa. Further analysis demonstrated that NGF promoted the sperm motility in a dose-dependent manner in vitro. These results may facilitate the further studies on human fertility and assisted reproduction techniques.

  7. Cholinergic Circuitry of the Human Nucleus Basalis and Its Fate in Alzheimer's Disease

    PubMed Central

    Mesulam, M.-Marsel

    2014-01-01

    The nucleus basalis is located at the confluence of the limbic and reticular activating systems. It receives dopaminergic input from the ventral tegmental area/substantia nigra, serotonergic input from the raphe nuclei, and noradrenergic input from the nucleus locus coeruleus. Its cholinergic contingent, known as Ch4, provides the principal source of acetylcholine for the cerebral cortex and amygdala. More than half of presynaptic varicosities along its cholinergic axons make traditional synaptic contacts with cortical neurons. Limbic and paralimbic cortices of the brain receive the heaviest cholinergic input from Ch4 and are also the principal sources of reciprocal cortical projections back to the nucleus basalis. This limbic affiliation explains the role of the nucleus basalis in modulating the impact and memorability of incoming sensory information. The anatomical continuity of the nucleus basalis with other basomedial limbic structures may underlie its early and high vulnerability to the tauopathy and neurofibrillary degeneration of Alzheimer's disease. The tauopathy in Ch4 eventually leads to the degeneration of the cholinergic axons that it sends to the cerebral cortex. The early involvement of Ch4 has a magnifying effect on Alzheimer's pathology, because neurofibrillary degeneration in a small number of neurons can perturb neurotransmission in all cortical areas. Although the exact contribution of the Ch4 lesion to the cognitive changes of Alzheimer's disease remains poorly understood, the cholinergic circuitry of the nucleus basalis is emerging as one of the most strategically positioned and behaviorally consequential modulatory systems of the human cerebral cortex. PMID:23852922

  8. Characterization of non-olfactory GPCRs in human sperm with a focus on GPR18

    PubMed Central

    Flegel, Caroline; Vogel, Felix; Hofreuter, Adrian; Wojcik, Sebastian; Schoeder, Clara; Kieć-Kononowicz, Katarzyna; Brockmeyer, Norbert H.; Müller, Christa E.; Becker, Christian; Altmüller, Janine; Hatt, Hanns; Gisselmann, Günter

    2016-01-01

    G protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs) transduce external chemical cues into intracellular signals and are involved in a plethora of physiological processes, but knowledge regarding the function of these receptors in spermatozoa is limited. In the present study, we performed RNA-Seq and analyzed the expression of the all GPCRs except olfactory receptors in human spermatozoa. We revealed the expression of up to 223 different GPCR transcripts in human spermatozoa (FPKM > 0.1) and identified GPR18, a newly described cannabinoid receptor, together with GPR137 and GPR135, as one of the three most highly expressed GPCRs. To date, the expression of GPR18 was completely unknown in human spermatozoa. We confirmed GPR18 expression using RT-PCR and immuncytochemistry experiments and localized the GPR18 protein in the midpiece of human spermatozoa. Stimulation of human spermatozoa with the GPR18 ligand N-arachidonoylglycine induced the phosphorylation of 12 protein kinases, some of them are for example known to be involved in the acrosome reaction. In line with this, N-arachidonoylglycine affected the cytoskeleton by changing levels of F-actin and inducing the acrosome reaction in human spermatozoa in a concentration-dependent manner. Our results indicate that GPR18 might be involved in physiological processes of human spermatozoa, suggesting GPR18 to be a potential player in sperm physiology. PMID:27572937

  9. Rapid feedback processing in human nucleus accumbens and motor thalamus.

    PubMed

    Schüller, Thomas; Gruendler, Theo O J; Jocham, Gerhard; Klein, Tilmann A; Timmermann, Lars; Visser-Vandewalle, Veerle; Kuhn, Jens; Ullsperger, Markus

    2015-04-01

    The nucleus accumbens (NAcc) and thalamus are integral parts in models of feedback processing. Deep brain stimulation (DBS) has been successfully employed to alleviate symptoms of psychiatric conditions including obsessive-compulsive disorder (OCD) and Tourette's syndrome (TS). Common target structures are the NAcc and the ventral anterior and ventro-lateral nuclei (VA/VL) of the thalamus, for OCD and TS, respectively. The feedback related negativity (FRN) is an event-related potential associated with feedback processing reflecting posterior medial frontal cortex (pMFC) activity. Here we report on three cases where we recorded scalp EEG and local field potentials (LFP) from externalized electrodes located in the NAcc or thalamus (VA/VL) while patients engaged in a modified time estimation task, known to engage feedback processing and elicit the FRN. Additionally, scalp EEG were recorded from 29 healthy participants (HP) engaged in the same task. The signal in all structures (pMFC, NAcc, and thalamus) was differently modulated by positive and negative feedback. LFP activity in the NAcc showed a biphasic time course after positive feedback during the FRN time interval. Negative feedback elicited a much weaker and later response. In the thalamus a monophasic modulation was recorded during the FRN time interval. Again, this modulation was more pronounced after positive performance feedback compared to negative feedback. In channels outside the target area no modulation was observed. The surface-FRN was reliably elicited on a group level in HP and showed no significant difference following negative feedback between patients and HP. German Clinical Trial Register: Neurocognitive specification of dysfunctions within basal ganglia-cortex loops and their therapeutic modulation by deep brain stimulation in patients with obsessive compulsive disorder and Tourette syndrome, http://www.drks.de/DRKS00005316. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Bulky DNA adducts in human sperm associated with semen parameters and sperm DNA fragmentation in infertile men: a cross-sectional study

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background DNA adducts are widely used marker of DNA damage induced by environmental pollutants. The present study was designed to explore whether sperm polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon-DNA adducts were associated with sperm DNA integrity and semen quality. Methods A total of 433 Han Chinese men were recruited from an infertility clinic. Immunofluorescence was applied to analyze sperm PAH-DNA adducts. Sperm DNA fragmentation was detected by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase (Tdt)-mediated dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL) assay. Results After adjustment for potential confounders using linear regression, sperm PAH-DNA adducts were negatively associated with sperm concentration, total sperm count, sperm motility, and curvilinear velocity (VCL). In addition, a positive relationship between sperm PAH-DNA adducts and sperm DNA fragmentation was found. Conclusions Our findings suggested an inverse association between sperm PAH-DNA adducts and semen quality, and provided the first epidemiologic evidence of an adverse effect of PAH-DNA adducts on sperm DNA integrity. PMID:24073787

  11. Vitrified sperm banks: the new aseptic technique for human spermatozoa allows cryopreservation at -86 °C.

    PubMed

    Sánchez, R; Risopatrón, J; Schulz, M; Villegas, J V; Isachenko, V; Isachenko, E

    2012-12-01

    The vitrification technique is simple, quick, cost-effective and has showed a significantly stronger cryoprotective effect in contrast to conventional freezing. The method is based on the rapid cooling of the cell by direct immersion in liquid nitrogen (LN (2) ), thereby avoiding the formation of ice crystals, due to the lower risk of water thawing, which impairs cell function. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effect of storage at -86 °C compared to the conventional -196 °C (under LN (2) ) on essential parameters of the functioning of aseptically vitrified human sperm. Sperm motility, integrity of mitochondrial membrane potential and the rate of DNA fragmentation were determined. The comparison of -86 °C and -196 °C demonstrated no statistical difference in sperm progressive motility (73% vs. 77%), integrity of mitochondrial membrane potential (71% vs. 74%) or DNA fragmentation (3.1% vs. 2.9%). In conclusion, aseptically vitrified sperm can be preserved at -86 °C; eliminating the use of LN (2) simplifies and significantly reduces the costs associated with storage in sperm banks by decreasing the time and space needed for storage, the effort in finding stored samples, and by improving safety for the operator. However, for prolonged storage further studies are needed.

  12. Sperm fucosyltransferase-5 mediates spermatozoa-oviductal epithelial cell interaction to protect human spermatozoa from oxidative damage.

    PubMed

    Huang, Venus Wenxin; Lee, Cheuk-Lun; Lee, Yin-Lau; Lam, Kevin K W; Ko, Jennifer K Y; Yeung, William S B; Ho, Pak-Chung; Chiu, Philip C N

    2015-06-01

    Oxidative damage by reactive oxygen species (ROS) is a major cause of sperm dysfunction. Excessive ROS generation reduces fertilization and enhances DNA damage of spermatozoa. Interaction between spermatozoa and oviductal epithelial cells improves the fertilizing ability of and reduces chromatin damage in spermatozoa. Our previous data showed that oviductal epithelial cell membrane proteins interact with the human spermatozoa and protect them from ROS-induced reduction in sperm motility, membrane integrity and DNA integrity. Sperm fucosyltransferase-5 (sFUT5) is a membrane carbohydrate-binding protein on human spermatozoa. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that sFUT5 is involved in human spermatozoa-oviduct interaction and the beneficial effects of such interaction on the fertilizing ability of human spermatozoa. Anti-sFUT5 antibody-treated spermatozoa had reduced binding to oviductal membrane proteins. It is consistent with the result that affinity-purified sFUT5 is bound to the epithelial lining of human oviduct and to the immortalized human oviductal epithelial cell line, OE-E6/E7. Pretreatment of spermatozoa with anti-sFUT5 antibody and oviductal membrane proteins with sFUT5 suppressed the protective action of oviductal membrane proteins against ROS/cryopreservation-induced oxidative damage in spermatozoa. Asialofetuin, a reported sFUT5 substrate, can partly mimic the protective effect of oviductal epithelial cell membrane proteins on sperm motility, membrane and DNA integrity. The results enhance our understanding on the protective mechanism of oviduct on sperm functions.

  13. Oral antioxidant treatment partly improves integrity of human sperm DNA in infertile grade I varicocele patients.

    PubMed

    Gual-Frau, Josep; Abad, Carlos; Amengual, María J; Hannaoui, Naim; Checa, Miguel A; Ribas-Maynou, Jordi; Lozano, Iris; Nikolaou, Alexandros; Benet, Jordi; García-Peiró, Agustín; Prats, Juan

    2015-09-01

    Infertile males with varicocele have the highest percentage of sperm cells with damaged DNA, compared to other infertile groups. Antioxidant treatment is known to enhance the integrity of sperm DNA; however, there are no data on the effects in varicocele patients. We thus investigated the potential benefits of antioxidant treatment specifically in grade I varicocele males. Twenty infertile patients with grade I varicocele were given multivitamins (1500 mg L-Carnitine, 60 mg vitamin C, 20 mg coenzyme Q10, 10 mg vitamin E, 200 μg vitamin B9, 1 μg vitamin B12, 10 mg zinc, 50 μg selenium) daily for three months. Semen parameters including total sperm count, concentration, progressive motility, vitality, and morphology were determined before and after treatment. In addition, sperm DNA fragmentation and the amount of highly degraded sperm cells were analyzed by Sperm Chromatin Dispersion. After treatment, patients showed an average relative reduction of 22.1% in sperm DNA fragmentation (p = 0.02) and had 31.3% fewer highly degraded sperm cells (p = 0.07). Total numbers of sperm cells were increased (p = 0.04), but other semen parameters were unaffected. These data suggest that sperm DNA integrity in grade I varicocele patients may be improved by oral antioxidant treatment.

  14. Epigenetic heterogeneity of developmentally important genes in human sperm: Implications for assisted reproduction outcome

    PubMed Central

    Kuhtz, Juliane; Schneider, Eberhard; El Hajj, Nady; Zimmermann, Lena; Fust, Olga; Linek, Bartosz; Seufert, Rudolf; Hahn, Thomas; Schorsch, Martin; Haaf, Thomas

    2014-01-01

    The molecular basis of male infertility is poorly understood, the majority of cases remaining unsolved. The association of aberrant sperm DNA methylation patterns and compromised semen parameters suggests that disturbances in male germline epigenetic reprogramming contribute to this problem. So far there are only few data on the epigenetic heterogeneity of sperm within a given sample and how to select the best sperm for successful infertility treatment. Limiting dilution bisulfite sequencing of small pools of sperm from fertile donors did not reveal significant differences in the occurrence of abnormal methylation imprints between sperm with and without morphological abnormalities. Intracytoplasmic morphologically selected sperm injection was not associated with an improved epigenetic quality, compared to standard intracytoplasmatic sperm injection. Deep bisulfite sequencing (DBS) of 2 imprinted and 2 pluripotency genes in sperm from men attending a fertility center showed that in both samples with normozoospermia and oligoasthenoteratozoospermia (OAT) the vast majority of sperm alleles was normally (de)methylated and the percentage of epimutations (allele methylation errors) was generally low (<1%). However, DBS allowed one to identify and quantify these rare epimutations with high accuracy. Sperm samples not leading to a pregnancy, in particular in the OAT group, had significantly more epimutations in the paternally methylated GTL2 gene than samples leading to a live birth. All 13 normozoospermic and 13 OAT samples leading to a child had <1% GTL2 epimutations, whereas one (7%) of 14 normozoospermic and 7 (50%) of 14 OAT samples without pregnancy displayed 1–14% GTL2 epimutations. PMID:25625849

  15. Short-term storage of human spermatozoa in electrolyte-free medium without freezing maintains sperm chromatin integrity better than cryopreservation.

    PubMed

    Riel, Jonathan M; Yamauchi, Yasuhiro; Huang, Thomas T F; Grove, John; Ward, Monika A

    2011-09-01

    Previous attempts to maintain human spermatozoa without freezing were based on short-term storage in component-rich medium and led to fast decline in motility and increased incidence of chromosome breaks. Here we report a new method in which sperm are maintained without freezing in an electrolyte-free medium (EFM) composed of glucose and bovine serum albumin. Human sperm were stored in EFM or human tubal fluid medium (HTFM) or were cryopreserved, and their motility, viability, and DNA integrity were examined at different intervals. Cryopreservation led to significant decline in sperm motility and viability and induced DNA fragmentation. Sperm stored in EFM maintained motility and viability for up to 4 and 7 wk, respectively, much longer than sperm stored in HTFM (<2 and <4 wk, respectively). DNA integrity, assessed with comet assay, was also maintained significantly better in EFM than in HTFM. One-week storage in EFM yielded motility and viability similar to that of cryopreserved sperm, but DNA integrity was significantly higher, resembling that of fresh sperm. After several weeks of storage in EFM, sperm were able to activate oocytes, undergo chromatin remodeling, and form normal zygotic chromosomes after intracytoplasmic sperm injection. This study demonstrated that human spermatozoa can be stored in EFM without freezing for several weeks while maintaining motility, viability, and chromatin integrity and that 1-wk storage in EFM offers better protection of sperm DNA integrity than cryopreservation. Sperm storage in EFM may become a viable option for the physicians working in assisted reproduction technology clinics, which would avoid cryodamage.

  16. Post-translational cleavage of Hv1 in human sperm tunes pH- and voltage-dependent gating.

    PubMed

    Berger, Thomas K; Fußhöller, David M; Goodwin, Normann; Bönigk, Wolfgang; Müller, Astrid; Dokani Khesroshahi, Nasim; Brenker, Christoph; Wachten, Dagmar; Krause, Eberhard; Kaupp, U Benjamin; Strünker, Timo

    2017-03-01

    In human sperm, proton flux across the membrane is controlled by the voltage-gated proton channel Hv1. We show that sperm harbour both Hv1 and an N-terminally cleaved isoform termed Hv1Sper. The pH-control of Hv1Sper and Hv1 is distinctively different. Hv1Sper and Hv1 can form heterodimers that combine features of both constituents. Cleavage and heterodimerization of Hv1 might represent an adaptation to the specific requirements of pH control in sperm. In human sperm, the voltage-gated proton channel Hv1 controls the flux of protons across the flagellar membrane. Here, we show that sperm harbour Hv1 and a shorter isoform, termed Hv1Sper. Hv1Sper is generated from Hv1 by removal of 68 amino acids from the N-terminus by post-translational proteolytic cleavage. The pH-dependent gating of the channel isoforms is distinctly different. In both Hv1 and Hv1Sper, the conductance-voltage relationship is determined by the pH difference across the membrane (∆pH). However, simultaneous changes in intracellular and extracellular pH that leave ΔpH constant strongly shift the activation curve of Hv1Sper but not that of Hv1, demonstrating that cleavage of the N-terminus tunes pH sensing in Hv1. Moreover, we show that Hv1 and Hv1Sper assemble as heterodimers that combine features of both constituents. We suggest that cleavage and heterodimerization of Hv1 represents an adaptation to the specific requirements of pH control in sperm. © 2016 The Authors. The Journal of Physiology © 2016 The Physiological Society.

  17. Profiling signaling proteins in human spermatozoa: biomarker identification for sperm quality evaluation.

    PubMed

    Silva, Joana Vieira; Freitas, Maria João; Correia, Bárbara Regadas; Korrodi-Gregório, Luís; Patrício, António; Pelech, Steven; Fardilha, Margarida

    2015-10-01

    To determine the correlation between semen basic parameters and the expression and activity of signaling proteins. In vitro studies with human spermatozoa. Academic research institute. Thirty-seven men provided semen samples for routine analysis. None. Basic semen parameters tracked included sperm DNA fragmentation (SDF), the expression levels of 75 protein kinases, and the phosphorylation/cleavage patterns of 18 signaling proteins in human spermatozoa. The results indicated that the phosphorylated levels of several proteins (Bad, GSK-3β, HSP27, JNK/SAPK, mTOR, p38 MAPK, and p53), as well as cleavage of PARP (at D214) and Caspase-3 (at D175), were significantly correlated with motility parameters. Additionally, the percentage of morphologically normal spermatozoa demonstrated a significant positive correlation with the phosphorylated levels of p70 S6 kinase and, in turn, head defects and the teratozoospermia index (TZI) showed a significant negative correlation with the phosphorylated levels of Stat3. There was a significant positive correlation between SDF and the teratozoospermia index, as well as the presence of head defects. In contrast, SDF negatively correlated with the percentage of morphologically normal spermatozoa and the phosphorylation of Akt and p70 S6 kinase. Subjects with varicocele demonstrated a significant negative correlation between head morphological defects and the phosphorylated levels of Akt, GSK3β, p38 MAPK, and Stat1. Additionally, 34 protein kinases were identified as expressed in their total protein levels in normozoospermic samples. This study contributed toward establishing a biomarker "fingerprint" to assess sperm quality on the basis of molecular parameters. Copyright © 2015 American Society for Reproductive Medicine. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. The quality of sperm preparation medium affects the motility, viability, and DNA integrity of human spermatozoa

    PubMed Central

    Anbari, Fatemeh; Halvaei, Iman; Nabi, Ali; Ghazali, Shahin; Khalili, Mohammad Ali; Johansson, Lars

    2016-01-01

    AIM: The goal was to compare the effects of three different sperm preparation media on sperm motility, viability, and DNA integrity of semen samples from normozoospermic men. METHODS: A total of 15 normozoospermic males were included in the study. The semen analysis (SA) was performed in accordance with the WHO guidelines (2010). After SA, each sample was divided into three aliquots, and swim-up was performed with three different sperm preparation media (Sperm Preparation Media, Origio, Denmark; Ham's F10, Biochrome, Berlin, Germany; and VitaSperm™, Innovative Biotech, Iran). Sperm motility, viability, and DNA fragmentation were evaluated at 0, 1, 2, and 24 h after swim-up. RESULTS: There were no significant differences, at any time intervals, in the total sperm motility between the different sperm preparation media. However, the rate of progressive motility was significantly higher in spermatozoa prepared using the media from Origio in comparison with VitaSperm™ (P = 0.03), whereas no significant difference was found against Ham's F10 medium. No significant differences in sperm viability were seen between the media products. However, 1 h after swim-up, the extent of sperm DNA fragmentation was lower in the medium from Origio versus VitaSperm™ (P = 0.02). CONCLUSIONS: The data showed that the quality of medium for preparation of semen samples from normozoospermic men significantly affects the performance of spermatozoa in assisted conception programs. PMID:28216914

  19. The quality of sperm preparation medium affects the motility, viability, and DNA integrity of human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Anbari, Fatemeh; Halvaei, Iman; Nabi, Ali; Ghazali, Shahin; Khalili, Mohammad Ali; Johansson, Lars

    2016-01-01

    The goal was to compare the effects of three different sperm preparation media on sperm motility, viability, and DNA integrity of semen samples from normozoospermic men. A total of 15 normozoospermic males were included in the study. The semen analysis (SA) was performed in accordance with the WHO guidelines (2010). After SA, each sample was divided into three aliquots, and swim-up was performed with three different sperm preparation media (Sperm Preparation Media, Origio, Denmark; Ham's F10, Biochrome, Berlin, Germany; and VitaSperm™, Innovative Biotech, Iran). Sperm motility, viability, and DNA fragmentation were evaluated at 0, 1, 2, and 24 h after swim-up. There were no significant differences, at any time intervals, in the total sperm motility between the different sperm preparation media. However, the rate of progressive motility was significantly higher in spermatozoa prepared using the media from Origio in comparison with VitaSperm™ (P = 0.03), whereas no significant difference was found against Ham's F10 medium. No significant differences in sperm viability were seen between the media products. However, 1 h after swim-up, the extent of sperm DNA fragmentation was lower in the medium from Origio versus VitaSperm™ (P = 0.02). The data showed that the quality of medium for preparation of semen samples from normozoospermic men significantly affects the performance of spermatozoa in assisted conception programs.

  20. Pronuclear epigenetic modification of protamine deficient human sperm following injection into mouse oocytes.

    PubMed

    Rajabi, Hoda; Mohseni-Kouchesfehani, Homa; Mohammadi-Sangcheshmeh, Abdollah; Farifteh-Nobijari, Fattaneh; Salehi, Mohammad

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic abnormalities and abnormal chromatin structure in sperm may lead to male infertility. Protamine deficiency is among the disorders of chromatin structure in sperm. The study of epigenetic changes in male pronuclei is necessary since abnormal sperm is sometimes used to create embryos using assisted reproductive techniques. The present study was carried out to compare epigenetic global marks in male pronuclei derived from normal and protamine deficient sperm cells. To do so, interspecies fertilization was used to obtain the male pronucleus. Normal and protamine deficient sperm cells, which were identified by chromomycin A3 staining, were injected into mouse oocytes. Oocytes were cultured until pronuclear formation and were then labeled with different antibodies (anti 5-methylcytosine, anti 5-hydroxymethylcytosine, and anti acetyl H4K12). Based on the fluorescence intensity, the level of each of these epigenetic factors was determined and they revealed a significant relationship between the level of sperm protamine deficiency and sperm epigenetic factors. Protamine deficiency was found to be associated with an increased methylation (p=0) and decreased hydroxymethylation rate (p=0.015) of the male pronucleus chromatin. However, no association was found between protamine deficiency and the level of H4K12 acetylation (p=0.548). Also, the efficiency of fertilization in protamine deficient sperm cells was less than normal. These results suggest that protamine deficient sperm cells lead to the formation of epigenetically altered pronuclei.

  1. Motility of carp spermatozoa is associated with profound changes in the sperm proteome.

    PubMed

    Dietrich, Mariola A; Dietrich, Grzegorz J; Mostek, Agnieszka; Ciereszko, Andrzej

    2016-04-14

    In freshwater cyprinids, spermatozoa are quiescent in seminal plasma and sperm motility is initiated by a decrease in osmolality (hypo-osmotic shock) after discharge into the aqueous environment. However, it is unknown at present if and to what extent changes in proteins are involved in carp sperm motility. Therefore, the aim of our study was to identify proteins related to carp sperm motility through a comparison of immobilized and activated carp spermatozoa using a 2D-DIGE approach. Our results, for the first time indicated that carp sperm motility is associated with changes in protein content. Seventy-two differentially expressed proteins were identified. These proteins are mainly involved in ubiquitin-proteasome pathways, glycolysis, the TCA cycle, remodeling and are putatively related to sperm energy metabolism and motility. Moreover proteins associated with oxidative stress responses, signal transduction by Ca(2+)-dependent MAPK cascades, and PKC and protein folding have been identified. The proteins involved in carp sperm motility were localized to the cytoplasm, mitochondria, cytoskeleton, nucleus and sperm membrane. The identification of a high number of proteins involved in carp sperm motility would contribute to current knowledge about the molecular mechanisms of sperm motility in freshwater fish. To the best of our knowledge, few changes in proteins involved in the initiation of fish sperm motility have been identified. This is a limited number of proteins compared with the 80 recently identified proteins involved in human sperm motility. However, no proteomic studies of sperm motility have yet been performed on freshwater fish. Our present study allowed for the first time a comprehensive characterization of the proteins associated with carp sperm motility and a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying sperm motility activation and maintenance. The application of 2D-DIGE facilitated the identification proteins crucial for sperm

  2. The clinical significance of calcium-signalling pathways mediating human sperm hyperactivation

    PubMed Central

    Alasmari, Wardah; Barratt, Christopher L.R.; Publicover, Stephen J.; Whalley, Katherine M.; Foster, Erica; Kay, Vanessa; Martins da Silva, Sarah; Oxenham, Senga K.

    2013-01-01

    failed responses in patients’ needs to be established. The focus of this study was on using 4AP, which mobilizes stored Ca2+ and is a potent inducer of HA. The n values for other agonists, especially calcium assessments, are smaller. WIDER IMPLICATIONS OF THE FINDINGS Previous studies have shown a significant relationship between basal levels of HA, calcium responses to progesterone and IVF fertilization rates. Here, we have systematically investigated the ability/failure of human sperm to generate Ca2+ signals and HA in response to targeted pharmacological challenge and, related defects in these responses to IVF success. [Ca2+]i signalling is fundamental for sperm motility and data from this study will lead to assessment of the nature of these defects using techniques such as single-cell imaging and patch clamping. STUDY FUNDING/COMPETING INTEREST(S) Resources from a Wellcome Trust Project Grant (#086470, Publicover and Barratt PI) primarily funded the study. The authors have no competing interests. PMID:23406974

  3. Serial interactome capture of the human cell nucleus.

    PubMed

    Conrad, Thomas; Albrecht, Anne-Susann; de Melo Costa, Veronica Rodrigues; Sauer, Sascha; Meierhofer, David; Ørom, Ulf Andersson

    2016-04-04

    Novel RNA-guided cellular functions are paralleled by an increasing number of RNA-binding proteins (RBPs). Here we present 'serial RNA interactome capture' (serIC), a multiple purification procedure of ultraviolet-crosslinked poly(A)-RNA-protein complexes that enables global RBP detection with high specificity. We apply serIC to the nuclei of proliferating K562 cells to obtain the first human nuclear RNA interactome. The domain composition of the 382 identified nuclear RBPs markedly differs from previous IC experiments, including few factors without known RNA-binding domains that are in good agreement with computationally predicted RNA binding. serIC extends the number of DNA-RNA-binding proteins (DRBPs), and reveals a network of RBPs involved in p53 signalling and double-strand break repair. serIC is an effective tool to couple global RBP capture with additional selection or labelling steps for specific detection of highly purified RBPs.

  4. Nitric oxide stimulates human sperm motility via activation of the cyclic GMP/protein kinase G signaling pathway.

    PubMed

    Miraglia, Erica; De Angelis, Federico; Gazzano, Elena; Hassanpour, Hossain; Bertagna, Angela; Aldieri, Elisabetta; Revelli, Alberto; Ghigo, Dario

    2011-01-01

    Nitric oxide (NO), a modulator of several physiological processes, is involved in different human sperm functions. We have investigated whether NO may stimulate the motility of human spermatozoa via activation of the soluble guanylate cyclase (sGC)/cGMP pathway. Sperm samples obtained by masturbation from 70 normozoospermic patients were processed by the swim-up technique. The kinetic parameters of the motile sperm-rich fractions were assessed by computer-assisted sperm analysis. After a 30-90  min incubation, the NO donor S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) exerted a significant enhancing effect on progressive motility (77, 78, and 78% vs 66, 65, and 62% of the control at the corresponding time), straight linear velocity (44, 49, and 48 μm/s vs 34, 35, and 35.5 μm/s), curvilinear velocity (81, 83, and 84 μm/s vs 68 μm/s), and average path velocity (52, 57, and 54 μm/s vs 40, 42, and 42 μm/s) at 5 μM but not at lower concentrations, and in parallel increased the synthesis of cGMP. A similar effect was obtained with the NO donor spermine NONOate after 30 and 60  min. The GSNO-induced effects on sperm motility were abolished by 1H-[1,2,4]oxadiazolo-[4,3-a]quinoxalin-1-one (a specific sGC inhibitor) and mimicked by 8-bromo-cGMP (8-Br-cGMP; a cell-permeating cGMP analog); the treatment with Rp-8-Br-cGMPS (an inhibitor of cGMP-dependent protein kinases) prevented both the GSNO- and the 8-Br-cGMP-induced responses. On the contrary, we did not observe any effect of the cGMP/PRKG1 (PKG) pathway modulators on the onset of hyperactivated sperm motility. Our results suggest that NO stimulates human sperm motility via the activation of sGC, the subsequent synthesis of cGMP, and the activation of cGMP-dependent protein kinases.

  5. Effect of prostaglandins on human sperm function in vitro and seminal adenosine triphosphate content.

    PubMed

    Gottlieb, C; Svanborg, K; Eneroth, P; Bygdeman, M

    1988-02-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the effect of addition of physiologic amounts of different prostaglandins normally present in semen, on sperm motility, on sperm penetration capacity in cervical mucus in vitro, and on the adenosine triphosphate (ATP) concentration in semen. Semen samples were obtained from volunteers who were attending the fertility outpatient clinic. Sperm motility was measured on a video recorder with a built-in timer, sperm penetration by the Kremer test, and ATP by bioluminescence assay. The addition of 19-hydroxy prostaglandin (PG) E to ejaculates positively stimulated sperm motility and sperm penetration capacity. The opposite effect was observed with 19-hydroxy PGF. PGE1, PGE2, and PGF2 alpha had no effect on either parameter, while PGF1 alpha reduced the sperm motility. The addition of 19-hydroxy PGE to ejaculates increased and the addition of 19-hydroxy PGF reduced semen concentrations of ATP. However, only the last-mentioned effect was statistically significant (P less than 0.05). It is suggested that, in particular, 19-hydroxy PGE and 19-hydroxy PGF are important regulators of sperm motility and that the effect may be mediated via effects on the ATP content in the spermatozoa.

  6. Different Levels of DNA Methylation Detected in Human Sperms after Morphological Selection Using High Magnification Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Cassuto, Nino Guy; Montjean, Debbie; Siffroi, Jean-Pierre; Bouret, Dominique; Marzouk, Flora; Copin, Henri; Benkhalifa, Moncef

    2016-01-01

    Objective. To analyze DNA methylation levels between two groups of spermatozoa taken from the same sample, following morphological selection by high magnification (HM) at 6100x microscopy. A prospective study was conducted and studied 876 spermatozoa from 10 randomly selected men. Sperm morphology was characterized at HM according to criteria previously established. High-scoring Score 6 and low-scoring Score 0 sperm were selected. Sperm DNA methylation level was assessed using an immunoassay method targeting 5-methylcytosine residues by fluorescence microscopy with imaging analysis system to detect DNA methylation in single spermatozoon. Results. In total, 448 S6 spermatozoa and 428 S0 spermatozoa were analyzed. A strong relationship was found between sperm DNA methylation levels and sperm morphology observed at HM. Sperm DNA methylation level in the S6 group was significantly lower compared with that in the S0 group (p < 10−6), OR = 2.4; and p < 0.001, as determined using the Wilcoxon test. Conclusion. Differences in DNA methylation levels are associated with sperm morphology variations as observed at HM, which allows spermatozoa with abnormal levels to be discarded and ultimately decrease birth defects, malformations, and epigenetic diseases that may be transmitted from sperm to offspring in ICSI. PMID:27148551

  7. Perimovement decrease of alpha/beta oscillations in the human nucleus accumbens

    PubMed Central

    Dürschmid, Stefan; Rutledge, Robb B.; Zaehle, Tino; Schmitt, Friedhelm C.; Kaufmann, Jörn; Voges, Jürgen; Heinze, Hans-Jochen; Dolan, Raymond J.; Schoenfeld, Mircea Ariel

    2016-01-01

    The human nucleus accumbens is thought to play an important role in guiding future action selection via an evaluation of current action outcomes. Here we provide electrophysiological evidence for a more direct, i.e., online, role during action preparation. We recorded local field potentials from the nucleus accumbens in patients with epilepsy undergoing surgery for deep brain stimulation. We found a consistent decrease in the power of alpha/beta oscillations (10–30 Hz) before and around the time of movements. This perimovement alpha/beta desynchronization was observed in seven of eight patients and was present both before instructed movements in a serial reaction time task as well as before self-paced, deliberate choices in a decision making task. A similar beta decrease over sensorimotor cortex and in the subthalamic nucleus has been directly related to movement preparation and execution. Our results support the idea of a direct role of the human nucleus accumbens in action preparation and execution. PMID:27486103

  8. Development of the lateral amygdaloid nucleus in the human fetus: transient presence of discrete cytoarchitectonic units.

    PubMed

    Nikolić, I; Kostović, I

    1986-01-01

    The cytoarchitectonic development of the lateral amygdaloid nucleus has been studied on Nissl-stained sections through brains of human fetuses ranging between 11 to 24 weeks of gestation. The first sign of cytoarchitectonic inhomogeneity of the lateral amygdaloid nucleus is the appearance of 2-3 ovoid cell clusters around 12 weeks of gestation. Between 12.5-16 weeks of gestation, the ventral part of the lateral amygdaloid nucleus contains 7-11 columnar cell clusters separated by "septa" of lower cell-packing density. These columnar clusters, stretching in the rostrocaudal direction, appear on cross-section as ovoid structures elongated in the ventrodorsal direction. In subsequent development (16-24 weeks of gestation) this distinct columnar appearance becomes less obvious, owing to the disappearance of "septa" along the dorsal edges of cellular clusters. This process begins first in the medial part of the columnar field. As a result, the cytoarchitectonic units gradually fuse into a homogeneous grey mass. However, the ventral part of the columnar field retains an undulated appearance throughout late gestation, showing multiple indentations as a sign of former cytoarchitectonic inhomogeneities. In conclusion, the fetal lateral amygdaloid nucleus contains a number of cytoarchitectonic "moduli" which could serve as a new parameter for an estimation of histogenetic maturity of the human amygdala. This transient cytoarchitectonic inhomogeneity could be a sign of the temporary predominance of one characteristic afferent-efferent system during a given developmental stage. Alternatively, it could reflect a clustered type of neurogenesis.

  9. Intracellular translocation and differential accumulation of cell-penetrating peptides in bovine spermatozoa: evaluation of efficient delivery vectors that do not compromise human sperm motility.

    PubMed

    Jones, Sarah; Lukanowska, Monika; Suhorutsenko, Julia; Oxenham, Senga; Barratt, Christopher; Publicover, Steven; Copolovici, Dana Maria; Langel, Ülo; Howl, John

    2013-07-01

    Do cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) translocate into spermatozoa and, if so, could they be utilized to deliver a much larger protein cargo? Chemically diverse polycationic CPPs rapidly and efficiently translocate into spermatozoa. They exhibit differential accumulation within intracellular compartments without detrimental influences upon cellular viability or motility but they are relatively ineffective in transporting larger proteins. Endocytosis, the prevalent route of protein internalization into eukaryotic cells, is severely compromised in mature spermatozoa. Thus, the translocation of many bioactive agents into sperm is relatively inefficient. However, the delivery of bioactive moieties into mature spermatozoa could be significantly improved by the identification and utility of an efficient and inert vectorial delivery technology. CPP translocation efficacies, their subsequent differential intracellular distribution and the influence of peptides upon viability were determined in bovine spermatozoa. Temporal analyses of sperm motility in the presence of exogenously CPPs utilized normozoospermic human donor samples. CPPs were prepared by manual, automated and microwave-enhanced solid phase synthesis. Confocal fluorescence microscopy determined the intracellular distribution of rhodamine-conjugated CPPs in spermatozoa. Quantitative uptake and kinetic analyses compared the translocation efficacies of chemically diverse CPPs and conjugates of biotinylated CPPs and avidin. 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt (MTS) conversion assays were employed to analyse the influence of CPPs upon sperm cell viability and sperm class assays determined the impact of CPPs on motility in capacitated and non-capacitated human samples. Chemically heterogeneous CPPs readily translocated into sperm to accumulate within discrete intracellular compartments. Mitoparan (INLKKLAKL(Aib)KKIL), for example, specifically accumulated

  10. Acidic hyaluronidase activity is present in mouse sperm and is reduced in the absence of SPAM1: Evidence for a Role for Hyaluronidase 3 in mouse and human sperm

    PubMed Central

    Reese, Kristen L.; Aravindan, Rolands G.; Griffiths, Genevieve S.; Shao, Minghai; Wang, Yipei; Galileo, Deni S.; Atmuri, Vasantha; Triggs-Raine, Barbara L.; Martin-DeLeon, Patricia A.

    2010-01-01

    The molecular mechanisms underlying sperm penetration of the physical barriers surrounding the oocyte have not been completely delineated. Although neutral-active or “reproductive” hyaluronidases (hyases), exemplified by Sperm Adhesion Molecule 1 (SPAM1), are thought to be responsible for hyaluronan digestion in the egg vestments and for sperm-zona binding, their roles in mouse sperm have been recently questioned. Here we report that acidic “somatic” Hyaluronidase 3 (HYAL3) exists in two isoforms in human (~47 kDa, ~55 kDa) and mouse (~44, ~47kDa) sperm where it resides on the plasma membrane over the head and midpiece. Mouse isoforms are differentially distributed in the soluble (SAP), membrane (MBP), and acrosome-reacted (AR) fraction where they are most abundant. Comparisons of zymography of Hyal3 null and wild-type (WT) AR and MBP fractions show significant HYAL3 activity at pH 3 and 4, and less at 7. At pH 4, a second acid-active hyase band at ~57 kDa is present in the AR fraction. HYAL3 activity was confirmed using immunoprecipitated HYAL3 and spectrophotometry. In total proteins, hyase activity was higher at pH 6 than at 4 where Spam1 nulls had significantly (P<0.01) diminished activity, indicating that murine SPAM1 has acidic activity. Although fully fertile, Hyal3 null sperm showed delayed cumulus penetration and reduced acrosomal exocytosis. HYAL3, similar to SPAM1 with which it shares 74.6% structural similarity, exists in epididymal tissue/fluid from which it is acquired by caudal mouse sperm in vitro. Our results indicate for the first time the concerted activity of both neutral- and acid-active hyaluronidases in sperm. PMID:20586096

  11. Abnormal lateral geniculate nucleus and optic chiasm in human albinism.

    PubMed

    Mcketton, Larissa; Kelly, Krista R; Schneider, Keith A

    2014-08-01

    Our objective was to measure how the misrouting of retinal ganglion cell (RGC) fibers affects the organization of the optic chiasm and lateral geniculate nuclei (LGN) in human albinism. We compared the chiasmal structures and the LGN in both pigmented controls and patients with albinism by using high-resolution structural magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). We studied 12 patients with oculocutaneous albinism and 12 age-matched pigmented controls. Using a 3T MRI scanner, we acquired a T1 -weighted three-dimensional magnetization-prepared rapid gradient-echo (MPRAGE) image of the whole brain, oriented so that the optic nerves, chiasm, and tracts were in the same plane. We acquired multiple proton density-weighted images centered on the thalamus and midbrain, and averaged them to increase the signal, enabling precise manual tracing of the anatomical boundaries of the LGN. Albinism patients exhibited significantly smaller diameters of the optic nerves, chiasm and tracts, and optic chiasm and LGN volume compared with controls (P < 0.001 for all). The reductions in chiasmal diameters in the albinism compared with the control group can be attributed to the abnormal crossing of optic fibers and the reduction of RGCs in the central retina. The volume of the LGN devoted to the center of the visual field may be reduced in albinism due to fewer RGCs representing the area where the fovea would normally lie. Our data may be clinically useful in addressing how genetic deficits compromise proper structural and functional development in the brain. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  12. Birth after human chorionic gonadotropin-primed oocyte in vitro maturation and fertilization with testicular sperm in a normo-ovulatory patient

    PubMed Central

    González-Ortega, Claudia; Piña-Aguilar, Raul Eduardo; Cancino-Villareal, Patricia; Gutiérrez-Gutiérrez, Antonio Martin

    2016-01-01

    In this report, we present a case of in vitro maturation (IVM) with surgical retrieved testicular sperm in a normo-ovulatory female. Human chorionic gonadotropin-primed IVM, testicular biopsy for sperm retrieval and intracytoplasmic sperm injection with fresh sperm were performed. Fourteen cumulus-oocyte complexes were obtained in germinal vesicle or metaphase I stage, eight oocytes reached metaphase II, seven presumptive zygotes were obtained, and three cleavage stages embryos in day 2 were transferred producing a singleton pregnancy. A single healthy newborn was obtained. Our results suggest that IVM may be an alternative for in vitro fertilization in normo-ovulatory women even if surgical retrieval of sperm is needed. Further research is required to depict contributing factors to the success of IVM in indications different from polycystic ovaries syndrome and the role of male gamete. PMID:27803591

  13. Transient features of the thalamic reticular nucleus in the human foetal brain.

    PubMed

    Ulfig, N; Nickel, J; Bohl, J

    1998-12-01

    The architectonic organization and neuronal types of the human foetal reticular nucleus (RN)--with special reference to transient characteristics--have been investigated using antisera against calretinin, parvalbumin and neurofilament epitopes of somata and dendrites (SMI 311). The RN consists of four subdivisions (clearly distinguishable in the 6/7th gestational month): The main portion appears as a prominent structure on account of its extension and high packing density of neurons which coexpress calretinin and parvalbumin. These two calcium-binding proteins are also expressed by the perireticular nucleus forming a conspicuous grey within the internal capsule. Perireticular cells form clusters which are in continuity with the main portion, globus pallidus, ganglionic eminence and pregeniculate nucleus. In double-labellings, a medial subnucleus stands out distinctly as it only expresses calretinin. SMI 311-immunopreparations show neurons revealing a high degree of diversification and elaborated dendritic trees. Several transient characteristics become obvious: the perireticular nucleus, not visible in the adult, represents a distinct entity in the human foetal brain. The main portion and the pregeniculate nucleus appearing as prominent greys are dramatically reduced in size later on. The percentage of RN-neurons expressing calretinin, the diversity of neuronal types and elaborated dendritic trees are reduced. The transient features can be correlated with the RN's putative functional roles in development: early RN-afferents to the dorsal thalamus may represent pioneer fibres providing guiding cues for outgrowing axons from or into the thalamus. Moreover, the RN may serve as an intermediate target for growing axons which are sorted and directed towards different final targets.

  14. Effect of drinking water disinfection by-products in human peripheral blood lymphocytes and sperm.

    PubMed

    Ali, Aftab; Kurzawa-Zegota, Malgorzata; Najafzadeh, Mojgan; Gopalan, Rajendran C; Plewa, Michael J; Anderson, Diana

    2014-12-01

    Drinking water disinfection by-products (DBPs) are generated by the chemical disinfection of water and may pose hazards to public health. Two major classes of DBPs are found in finished drinking water: haloacetic acids (HAAs) and trihalomethanes (THMs). HAAs are formed following disinfection with chlorine, which reacts with iodide and bromide in the water. Previously the HAAs were shown to be cytotoxic, genotoxic, mutagenic, teratogenic and carcinogenic. To determine the effect of HAAs in human somatic and germ cells and whether oxidative stress is involved in genotoxic action. In the present study both somatic and germ cells have been examined as peripheral blood lymphocytes and sperm. The effects of three HAA compounds: iodoacetic acid (IAA), bromoacetic acid (BAA) and chloroacetic acid (CAA) were investigated. After determining appropriate concentration responses, oxygen radical involvement with the antioxidants, butylated hydroxanisole (BHA) and the enzyme catalase, were investigated in the single cell gel electrophoresis (Comet) assay under alkaline conditions, >pH 13 and the micronucleus assay. In the Comet assay, BHA and catalase were able to reduce DNA damage in each cell type compared to HAA alone. In the micronucleus assay, micronuclei (MNi) were found in peripheral lymphocytes exposed to all three HAAs and catalase and BHA were in general, able to reduce MNi induction, suggesting oxygen radicals play a role in both assays. These observations are of concern to public health since both human somatic and germ cells show similar genotoxic responses. Copyright © 2014. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  15. Sequencing of isolated sperm cells for direct haplotyping of a human genome.

    PubMed

    Kirkness, Ewen F; Grindberg, Rashel V; Yee-Greenbaum, Joyclyn; Marshall, Christian R; Scherer, Stephen W; Lasken, Roger S; Venter, J Craig

    2013-05-01

    There is increasing evidence that the phenotypic effects of genomic sequence variants are best understood in terms of variant haplotypes rather than as isolated polymorphisms. Haplotype analysis is also critically important for uncovering population histories and for the study of evolutionary genetics. Although the sequencing of individual human genomes to reveal personal collections of sequence variants is now well established, there has been slower progress in the phasing of these variants into pairs of haplotypes along each pair of chromosomes. Here, we have developed a distinct approach to haplotyping that can yield chromosome-length haplotypes, including the vast majority of heterozygous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in an individual human genome. This approach exploits the haploid nature of sperm cells and employs a combination of genotyping and low-coverage sequencing on a short-read platform. In addition to generating chromosome-length haplotypes, the approach can directly identify recombination events (averaging 1.1 per chromosome) with a median resolution of <100 kb.

  16. Sequencing of isolated sperm cells for direct haplotyping of a human genome

    PubMed Central

    Kirkness, Ewen F.; Grindberg, Rashel V.; Yee-Greenbaum, Joyclyn; Marshall, Christian R.; Scherer, Stephen W.; Lasken, Roger S.; Venter, J. Craig

    2013-01-01

    There is increasing evidence that the phenotypic effects of genomic sequence variants are best understood in terms of variant haplotypes rather than as isolated polymorphisms. Haplotype analysis is also critically important for uncovering population histories and for the study of evolutionary genetics. Although the sequencing of individual human genomes to reveal personal collections of sequence variants is now well established, there has been slower progress in the phasing of these variants into pairs of haplotypes along each pair of chromosomes. Here, we have developed a distinct approach to haplotyping that can yield chromosome-length haplotypes, including the vast majority of heterozygous single-nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) in an individual human genome. This approach exploits the haploid nature of sperm cells and employs a combination of genotyping and low-coverage sequencing on a short-read platform. In addition to generating chromosome-length haplotypes, the approach can directly identify recombination events (averaging 1.1 per chromosome) with a median resolution of <100 kb. PMID:23282328

  17. Comparative cytotoxicity and genotoxicity of particulate and soluble hexavalent chromium in human and sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) skin cells.

    PubMed

    Li Chen, Tânia; LaCerte, Carolyne; Wise, Sandra S; Holmes, Amie; Martino, Julieta; Wise, John Pierce; Thompson, W Douglas; Wise, John Pierce

    2012-01-01

    Chromium (Cr) is a global marine pollutant, present in marine mammal tissues. Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is a known human carcinogen. In this study, we compare the cytotoxic and clastogenic effects of Cr(VI) in human (Homo sapiens) and sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) skin fibroblasts. Our data show that increasing concentrations of both particulate and soluble Cr(VI) induce increasing amounts of cytotoxicity and clastogenicity in human and sperm whale skin cells. Furthermore, the data show that sperm whale cells are resistant to these effects exhibiting less cytotoxicity and genotoxicity than the human cells. Differences in Cr uptake accounted for some but not all of the differences in particulate and soluble Cr(VI) genotoxicity, although it did explain the differences in particulate Cr(VI) cytotoxicity. Altogether, the data indicate that Cr(VI) is a genotoxic threat to whales, but also suggest that whales have evolved cellular mechanisms to protect them against the genotoxicity of environmental agents such as Cr(VI). Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Comparative Cytotoxicity and Genotoxicity of Particulate and Soluble Hexavalent Chromium in Human and Sperm Whale (Physeter macrocephalus) Skin Cells

    PubMed Central

    Li Chen, Tânia; LaCerte, Carolyne; Wise, Sandra S.; Holmes, Amie; Martino, Julieta; Wise, John Pierce; Thompson, W. Douglas; Wise, John Pierce

    2014-01-01

    Chromium (Cr) is a global marine pollutant, present in marine mammal tissues. Hexavalent chromium [Cr(VI)] is a known human carcinogen. In this study we compare the cytotoxic and clastogenic effects of Cr(VI) in human (Homo sapiens) and sperm whale (Physeter macrocephalus) skin fibroblasts. Our data show that increasing concentrations of both particulate and soluble Cr(VI) induce increasing amounts of cytotoxicity and clastogenicity in human and sperm whale skin cells. Furthermore, the data show that sperm whale cells are resistant to these effects exhibiting less cytotoxicity and genotoxicity than the human cells. Differences in Cr uptake accounted for some but not all of the differences in particulate and soluble Cr(VI) genotoxicity, although it did explain the differences in particulate Cr(VI) cytotoxicity. Altogether the data indicate that Cr(VI) is a genotoxic threat to whales, but also suggest that whales have evolved cellular mechanisms to protect them against the genotoxicity of environmental agents such as Cr(VI). PMID:21466859

  19. Intracellular mitochondrial DNA transfers to the nucleus in human cancer cells.

    PubMed

    Ju, Young Seok

    2016-06-01

    Genome instability is a well-known hallmark of cancer cells. With the revolution of high-throughput sequencing technologies, our knowledge of somatically acquired genome structural variation (SV) has greatly improved over the last decade. Remarkably, surveys of thousands of human whole-cancer genomes have shown that chromosomal rearrangements are frequently combined with mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) fragments somatically transferred to the nucleus. The high transfer rate and features of integration breakpoints provide clues for understanding the potential mechanisms underlying these events and provide insights into the role of mtDNA segments transferred into the nucleus. In this review, I discuss our current understanding of somatic nuclear transfer of mitochondrial DNA into the nuclear genome of human cancer cells.

  20. Types, Causes, Detection and Repair of DNA Fragmentation in Animal and Human Sperm Cells

    PubMed Central

    González-Marín, Clara; Gosálvez, Jaime; Roy, Rosa

    2012-01-01

    Concentration, motility and morphology are parameters commonly used to determine the fertilization potential of an ejaculate. These parameters give a general view on the quality of sperm but do not provide information about one of the most important components of the reproductive outcome: DNA. Either single or double DNA strand breaks can set the difference between fertile and infertile males. Sperm DNA fragmentation can be caused by intrinsic factors like abortive apoptosis, deficiencies in recombination, protamine imbalances or oxidative stress. Damage can also occur due to extrinsic factors such as storage temperatures, extenders, handling conditions, time after ejaculation, infections and reaction to medicines or post-testicular oxidative stress, among others. Two singular characteristics differentiate sperm from somatic cells: Protamination and absence of DNA repair. DNA repair in sperm is terminated as transcription and translation stops post-spermiogenesis, so these cells have no mechanism to repair the damage occurred during their transit through the epididymis and post-ejaculation. Oocytes and early embryos have been shown to repair sperm DNA damage, so the effect of sperm DNA fragmentation depends on the combined effects of sperm chromatin damage and the capacity of the oocyte to repair it. In this contribution we review some of these issues. PMID:23203048

  1. [High mechanical stretch stress promotes degeneration of the human nucleus pulposus cells through NF-κb signaling pathway].

    PubMed

    Wang, S J; Sun, Z Y; Liu, C; Yan, P; Liang, H; Huang, K; Wang, D G; Li, Y; Tian, J W

    2017-07-04

    Objective: To investigate the effect of high mechanical stretch stress(HMS)on human nucleus pulposus cells and its regulatory mechanism. Methods: The non-degenerated nucleus pulposus tissue (Pfirrmannhuman nucleus pulposus cells were isolated and cultured. In the presence or absence of pretreatment with the NF-κB specific blocker Bay11-7082, the cultured human nucleus pulposus cells were loaded cyclic mechanical stretch stress(CMS) with different parameters using the Flexercell system.The cell culture medium was collected and the secretion of inflammatory cytokines was detected by Elisa. The nucleus pulposus cells loaded with cyclic mechanical stretch stress(CMS) was collected, the changes of NF-κB/P65 signal pathway were detected, The mRNA and protein levels' expression changes were detected by RT-PCR and WB; after human nucleus pulposus cells were exposed to IL-1β, with or without Bay11-7082, the changes of P65 were detected by immunofluorescence. Results: Those mechanical stretch stress of high amplitude (9%, 19%), low frequency (0.01 Hz) and long duration (72 h) led to degeneration of human nucleus pulposus cells, while the mechanical stretch stress of low amplitude (3%), low frequency and long duration could not promote the degeneration process; the mechanical stretch stress of high amplitude(19%), low-frequency(0.01 Hz) could promote the release of inflammatory cytokines of human nucleus pulposus cells after 24 h duration; high-amplitude, low-frequency mechanical stretch stress could activate the NF-κB signaling pathway in human nucleus pulposus cells, Bay11-7082 could block the process; immunofluorescence showed that IL-1β could promote the phosphorylation of P65 in the cytoplasm of human nucleus pulposus cells and promote the entry of P65 into the cell nucleus process, Bay11-7082 could block those processes; Bay11-7082, the specific blocking agent of NF-κB signaling pathway, could

  2. Hemizona assay: use of fresh versus salt-stored human oocytes to evaluate sperm binding potential to the zona pellucida.

    PubMed

    Kruger, T F; Oehninger, S; Franken, D R; Hodgen, G D

    1991-06-01

    The hemizona assay (HZA) has a high predictive value for in vitro fertilization (IVF) results. Oocyte quality plays a significant role in the validation of this test. The question was asked whether human salt-stored oocytes (up to 30 days) are damaged and subsequently lose their sperm binding capacity when compared to fresh human oocytes. Equivalent binding in both the salt-stored and the fresh group of oocytes was observed in the hemizonae incubated with normal semen as well as in their matching halves incubated with semen from an infertile man. Based on the results, we conclude that salt-stored oocytes (pH 7.0) give reliable information regarding sperm binding potential under HZA conditions.

  3. p,p′-DDE activates CatSper and compromises human sperm function at environmentally relevant concentrations

    PubMed Central

    Tavares, Renata S.; Mansell, Steven; Barratt, Christopher L.R.; Wilson, Stuart M.; Publicover, Stephen J.; Ramalho-Santos, João

    2013-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Is the environmental endocrine disruptor p,p′-dichlorodiphenyldichloroethylene (p,p′-DDE) able to induce non-genomic changes in human sperm and consequently affect functional sperm parameters? SUMMARY ANSWER p,p′-DDE promoted Ca2+ flux into human sperm by activating CatSper channels even at doses found in human reproductive fluids, ultimately compromising sperm parameters important for fertilization. WHAT IS KNOWN ALREADY p,p′-DDE may promote non-genomic actions and interact directly with pre-existing signaling pathways, as already observed in other cell types. However, although often found in both male and female reproductive fluids, its effects on human spermatozoa function are not known. STUDY DESIGN, SIZE, DURATION Normozoospermic sperm samples from healthy individuals were included in this study. Samples were exposed to several p,p′-DDE concentrations for 3 days at 37°C and 5% CO2 in vitro to mimic the putative continuous exposure to this toxicant in the female reproductive tract in vivo. Shorter p,p′-DDE incubation periods were also performed in order to monitor sperm rapid Ca2+ responses. All experiments were repeated on a minimum of five sperm samples from different individuals. PARTICIPANTS/MATERIALS, SETTING, METHODS All healthy individuals were recruited at the Biosciences School, University of Birmingham, the Medical Research Institute, University of Dundee and in the Human Reproduction Service at University Hospitals of Coimbra. Intracellular Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) was monitored by imaging single spermatozoa loaded with Oregon Green BAPTA-1AM and further whole-cell patch-clamp recordings were performed to validate our results. Sperm viability and acrosomal integrity were assessed using the LIVE/DEAD sperm vitality kit and the acrosomal content marker PSA-FITC, respectively. MAIN RESULTS AND THE ROLE OF CHANCE p,p′-DDE rapidly increased [Ca2+]i (P < 0.05) even at extremely low doses (1 pM and 1 nM), with magnitudes of

  4. Plasma membrane Ca2+-ATPase 4: interaction with constitutive nitric oxide synthases in human sperm and prostasomes which carry Ca2+/CaM-dependent serine kinase

    PubMed Central

    Andrews, Rachel E.; Galileo, Deni S.; Martin-DeLeon, Patricia A.

    2015-01-01

    Deletion of the gene encoding the widely conserved plasma membrane calcium ATPase 4 (PMCA4), a major Ca2+ efflux pump, leads to loss of sperm motility and male infertility in mice. PMCA4's partners in sperm and how its absence exerts its effect on fertility are unknown. We hypothesize that in sperm PMCA4 interacts with endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS) and neuronal nitric oxide synthase (nNOS) which are rapidly activated by Ca2+, and that these fertility-modulating proteins are present in prostasomes, which deliver them to sperm. We show that in human sperm PMCA4 is present on the acrosome, inner acrosomal membrane, posterior head, neck, midpiece and the proximal principal piece. PMCA4 localization showed inter- and intra-individual variation and was most abundant at the posterior head/neck junction, co-localizing with NOSs. Co-immunoprecipitations (Co-IP) revealed a close association of PMCA4 and the NOSs in Ca2+ ionophore-treated sperm but much less so in uncapacitated untreated sperm. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) showed a similar Ca2+-related association: PMCA4 and the NOSs are within 10 nm apart, and preferentially so in capacitated, compared with uncapacitated, sperm. FRET efficiencies varied, being significantly (P < 0.001) higher at high cytosolic Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]c) in capacitated sperm than at low [Ca2+]c in uncapacitated sperm for the PMCA4-eNOS complex. These dynamic interactions were not seen for PMCA4-nNOS complexes, which had the highest FRET efficiencies. Further, along with Ca2+/CaM-dependent serine kinase (CASK), PMCA4 and the NOSs are present in the seminal plasma, specifically in prostasomes where Co-IP showed complexes similar to those in sperm. Finally, flow cytometry demonstrated that following co-incubation of sperm and seminal plasma, PMCA4 and the NOSs can be delivered in vitro to sperm via prostasomes. Our findings indicate that PMCA4 interacts simultaneously with the NOSs preferentially at high [Ca2+]c in

  5. Export of Precursor tRNAIle from the Nucleus to the Cytoplasm in Human Cells

    PubMed Central

    Wei, Min; Zhao, Xia; Liu, Mi; Niu, Meijuan; Seif, Elias; Kleiman, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    In the current concept, tRNA maturation in vertebrate cells, including splicing of introns, trimming of 5’ leader and 3’ trailer, and adding of CCA, is thought to occur exclusively in the nucleus. Here we provide evidence to challenge this concept. Unspliced intron-containing precursor tRNAIle was identified in Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) virions, which are synthesized in the cytoplasm. Northern blot, confocal microscopy and quantitative RT-PCR further verified enrichment of this unspliced tRNAIle within the cytoplasm in human cells. In addition to containing an intron, the cytoplasmic precursor tRNAIle also contains a short incompletely processed 5´ leader and a 3´ trailer, which abundance is around 1000 fold higher than the nuclear precursor tRNAIle with long 5’ leader and long 3’ trailer. In vitro data also suggest that the cytoplasmic unspliced end-immature precursor tRNAIle could be processed by short isoform of RNase Z, but not long isoform of RNase Z. These data suggest that precursor tRNAs could export from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in human cells, instead of be processed only in the nucleus. PMID:27101286

  6. Export of Precursor tRNAIle from the Nucleus to the Cytoplasm in Human Cells.

    PubMed

    Wei, Min; Zhao, Xia; Liu, Mi; Niu, Meijuan; Seif, Elias; Kleiman, Lawrence

    2016-01-01

    In the current concept, tRNA maturation in vertebrate cells, including splicing of introns, trimming of 5' leader and 3' trailer, and adding of CCA, is thought to occur exclusively in the nucleus. Here we provide evidence to challenge this concept. Unspliced intron-containing precursor tRNAIle was identified in Human Immunodeficiency Virus type 1 (HIV-1) virions, which are synthesized in the cytoplasm. Northern blot, confocal microscopy and quantitative RT-PCR further verified enrichment of this unspliced tRNAIle within the cytoplasm in human cells. In addition to containing an intron, the cytoplasmic precursor tRNAIle also contains a short incompletely processed 5´ leader and a 3´ trailer, which abundance is around 1000 fold higher than the nuclear precursor tRNAIle with long 5' leader and long 3' trailer. In vitro data also suggest that the cytoplasmic unspliced end-immature precursor tRNAIle could be processed by short isoform of RNase Z, but not long isoform of RNase Z. These data suggest that precursor tRNAs could export from the nucleus to the cytoplasm in human cells, instead of be processed only in the nucleus.

  7. Human lactoferrin transgenic rabbits produced efficiently using dimethylsulfoxide-sperm-mediated gene transfer.

    PubMed

    Li, Lan; Shen, Wei; Min, Lingjiang; Dong, Huansheng; Sun, Yujiang; Pan, Qingjie

    2006-01-01

    Transgenic animal mammary gland bioreactors are used to produce recombinant proteins. However, it is difficult to validate whether these transgenic domestic animals are able to express the recombinant protein efficiently in their mammary glands before the birth of transgenic offspring. In the present study, a simple and efficient method was established to evaluate the functionality of animal mammary gland tissue-expressed cassettes. The gene transfer vector pGBC2LF was constructed, and the expression of human lactoferrin (LF) gene was controlled by the goat beta-casein gene 5' flanking sequence. To obtain the most efficient transfection, the influence of DNA concentration, dimethylsulfoxide (DMSO) concentration, and the ratio of linear-to-circular DNA required for associating DNA with spermatozoa were evaluated. Transfection of exogenous DNA into rabbit spermatozoa was found to be efficient using 30 microg mL(-1) DNA, DMSO at a final concentration of 3%, and a 3 : 1 ratio of linear-to-circular DNA, with 29 of 85 (34.1%) in vitro-fertilised embryos being transgenic. Using DMSO-sperm-mediated gene transfer (DMSO-SMGT), 89 rabbit offspring were produced, with 46 of these (57.1%) being transgenic. As mammary gland bioreactor models, 17 of 21 (81%) transgenic female rabbits could express human LF protein in their glands. During lactation of the transgenic rabbits, the highest level of human LF protein expressed was 153 +/- 31 microg mL(-1), and the mean expression level in all of the transgenic rabbits was 103 +/- 20 microg mL(-1) in the third week, declining gradually after this time. Our results demonstrate that transgenic rabbits produced by DMSO-SMGT were able to express human LF protein in the correct tissue.

  8. Sperm Patch-Clamp

    PubMed Central

    Lishko, Polina; Clapham, David E.; Navarro, Betsy; Kirichok, Yuriy

    2014-01-01

    Sperm intracellular pH and calcium concentration ([Ca2+]i) are two central factors that control sperm activity within the female reproductive tract. As such, the ion channels of the sperm plasma membrane that alter intracellular sperm [Ca2+] and pH play important roles in sperm physiology and the process of fertilization. Indeed, sperm ion channels regulate sperm motility, control sperm chemotaxis toward the egg in some species, and may trigger the acrosome reaction. Until recently, our understanding of these important molecules was rudimentary due to the inability to patch-clamp spermatozoa and directly record the activity of these ion channels under voltage clamp. Recently, we overcame this technical barrier and developed a method for reproducible application of the patch-clamp technique to mouse and human spermatozoa. This chapter covers important aspects of application of the patch-clamp technique to spermatozoa, such as selection of the electrophysiological equipment, isolation of spermatozoa for patch-clamp experiments, formation of the gigaohm seal with spermatozoa, and transition into the whole-cell mode of recording. We also discuss potential pitfalls in application of the patch-clamp technique to flagellar ion channels. PMID:23522465

  9. Formation of tRNA granules in the nucleus of heat-induced human cells

    SciTech Connect

    Miyagawa, Ryu; Mizuno, Rie; Watanabe, Kazunori; Ijiri, Kenichi

    2012-02-03

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNAs are tranlocated into the nucleus in heat-induced HeLa cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNAs form the unique granules in the nucleus. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer tRNA ganules overlap with nuclear stress granules. -- Abstract: The stress response, which can trigger various physiological phenomena, is important for living organisms. For instance, a number of stress-induced granules such as P-body and stress granule have been identified. These granules are formed in the cytoplasm under stress conditions and are associated with translational inhibition and mRNA decay. In the nucleus, there is a focus named nuclear stress body (nSB) that distinguishes these structures from cytoplasmic stress granules. Many splicing factors and long non-coding RNA species localize in nSBs as a result of stress. Indeed, tRNAs respond to several kinds of stress such as heat, oxidation or starvation. Although nuclear accumulation of tRNAs occurs in starved Saccharomyces cerevisiae, this phenomenon is not found in mammalian cells. We observed that initiator tRNA{sup Met} (Meti) is actively translocated into the nucleus of human cells under heat stress. During this study, we identified unique granules of Meti that overlapped with nSBs. Similarly, elongator tRNA{sup Met} was translocated into the nucleus and formed granules during heat stress. Formation of tRNA granules is closely related to the translocation ratio. Then, all tRNAs may form the specific granules.

  10. Identification of Motile Sperm Domain–Containing Protein 2 as Regulator of Human Monocyte Migration

    PubMed Central

    Yacov, Niva; Salem, Yaniv; Propheta-Meiran, Oshrat; Ishai, Eti; Breitbart, Eyal

    2017-01-01

    Binding of chemokines to their cognate receptors on monocytes instigates a cascade of events that directs these cells to migrate to sites of inflammation and cancerous tissues. Although targeting of selected chemokine receptors on monocytes exhibited preclinical efficacy, attempts to translate these studies to the clinic have failed thus far, possibly due to redundancy of the target receptor. We reveal that motile sperm domain–containing protein 2 (MOSPD2), a protein with a previously unknown function, regulates monocyte migration in vitro. This protein was found to be expressed on the cytoplasmic membrane of human monocytes. Silencing or neutralizing MOSPD2 in monocytes restricted their migration when induced by different chemokines. Mechanistically, silencing MOSPD2 inhibited signaling events following chemokine receptor ligation. When tested for expression in other immune cell subsets, MOSPD2 was apparent also, though less abundantly, in neutrophils, but not in lymphocytes. Thus, in the presence of neutralizing Abs, neutrophil migration was inhibited to some extent whereas lymphocyte migration remained intact. In view of these results, we suggest MOSPD2 as a potential target protein for treating diseases in which monocyte and neutrophil accumulation is correlated with pathogenesis. PMID:28137892

  11. Identification of Motile Sperm Domain-Containing Protein 2 as Regulator of Human Monocyte Migration.

    PubMed

    Mendel, Itzhak; Yacov, Niva; Salem, Yaniv; Propheta-Meiran, Oshrat; Ishai, Eti; Breitbart, Eyal

    2017-03-01

    Binding of chemokines to their cognate receptors on monocytes instigates a cascade of events that directs these cells to migrate to sites of inflammation and cancerous tissues. Although targeting of selected chemokine receptors on monocytes exhibited preclinical efficacy, attempts to translate these studies to the clinic have failed thus far, possibly due to redundancy of the target receptor. We reveal that motile sperm domain-containing protein 2 (MOSPD2), a protein with a previously unknown function, regulates monocyte migration in vitro. This protein was found to be expressed on the cytoplasmic membrane of human monocytes. Silencing or neutralizing MOSPD2 in monocytes restricted their migration when induced by different chemokines. Mechanistically, silencing MOSPD2 inhibited signaling events following chemokine receptor ligation. When tested for expression in other immune cell subsets, MOSPD2 was apparent also, though less abundantly, in neutrophils, but not in lymphocytes. Thus, in the presence of neutralizing Abs, neutrophil migration was inhibited to some extent whereas lymphocyte migration remained intact. In view of these results, we suggest MOSPD2 as a potential target protein for treating diseases in which monocyte and neutrophil accumulation is correlated with pathogenesis. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  12. Disrupting the wall accumulation of human sperm cells by artificial corrugation

    PubMed Central

    Jeyaram, Y.; Condat, C. A.; Oviedo, M.; Berdakin, I.; Moshchalkov, V. V.; Giojalas, L. C.; Silhanek, A. V.; Marconi, V. I.

    2015-01-01

    Many self-propelled microorganisms are attracted to surfaces. This makes their dynamics in restricted geometries very different from that observed in the bulk. Swimming along walls is beneficial for directing and sorting cells, but may be detrimental if homogeneous populations are desired, such as in counting microchambers. In this work, we characterize the motion of human sperm cells ∼60 μm long, strongly confined to ∼25 μm shallow chambers. We investigate the nature of the cell trajectories between the confining surfaces and their accumulation near the borders. Observed cell trajectories are composed of a succession of quasi-circular and quasi-linear segments. This suggests that the cells follow a path of intermittent trappings near the top and bottom surfaces separated by stretches of quasi-free motion in between the two surfaces, as confirmed by depth resolved confocal microscopy studies. We show that the introduction of artificial petal-shaped corrugation in the lateral boundaries removes the tendency of cells to accumulate near the borders, an effect which we hypothesize may be valuable for microfluidic applications in biomedicine. PMID:26015834

  13. Structure and kinetic characterization of human sperm-specific glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, GAPDS.

    PubMed

    Chaikuad, Apirat; Shafqat, Naeem; Al-Mokhtar, Ruby; Cameron, Gus; Clarke, Anthony R; Brady, R Leo; Oppermann, Udo; Frayne, Jan; Yue, Wyatt W

    2011-04-15

    hGAPDS (human sperm-specific glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase) is a glycolytic enzyme essential for the survival of spermatozoa, and constitutes a potential target for non-hormonal contraception. However, enzyme characterization of GAPDS has been hampered by the difficulty in producing soluble recombinant protein. In the present study, we have overexpressed in Escherichia coli a highly soluble form of hGAPDS truncated at the N-terminus (hGAPDSΔN), and crystallized the homotetrameric enzyme in two ligand complexes. The hGAPDSΔN-NAD+-phosphate structure maps the two anion-recognition sites within the catalytic pocket that correspond to the conserved Ps site and the newly recognized Pi site identified in other organisms. The hGAPDSΔN-NAD+-glycerol structure shows serendipitous binding of glycerol at the Ps and new Pi sites, demonstrating the propensity of these anion-recognition sites to bind non-physiologically relevant ligands. A comparison of kinetic profiles between hGAPDSΔN and its somatic equivalent reveals a 3-fold increase in catalytic efficiency for hGAPDSΔN. This may be attributable to subtle amino acid substitutions peripheral to the active centre that influence the charge properties and protonation states of catalytic residues. Our data therefore elucidate structural and kinetic features of hGAPDS that might provide insightful information towards inhibitor development.

  14. Carbocyanine Dye Usage in Demarcating Boundaries of the Aged Human Red Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Onodera, Satoru; Hicks, T. Philip

    2010-01-01

    Background Though the adult human magnocellular Red nucleus (mNr) is essentially vestigial and its boundaries with neighbouring structures have never been well demarcated, human studies in utero have shown a well developed semilunar mNr wrapping around the caudal parvicellular Red nucleus (pNr), similar to what is seen in quadrupeds. In the present study, we have sought to better delineate the morphological determinants of the adult human Red nucleus (ahRn). Methods and Findings Serial sections of ahRn show fine myelinated fibers arising from pNr and turning toward the central tegmental tract. DiI was deposited within a well restricted region of ahRn at the fasciculus retroflexus level and the extent of label determined. Nissl-stained serial sections allowed production of a 3-D mNr model, showing rudimentary, vestigial morphology compared with its well developed infant homologue. DiI within this vestigial mNr region at the level of the oculomotor nerve showed labeled giant/large mNr neurons, coarse fiber bundles at the ventral tegmental decussation and lateral lemniscal label. Conclusions Large amounts of DiI and a long incubation time have proven useful in aged human brain as a marker of long axons and large cell bodies of projecting neurons such as the rubrospinal projection and for clarifying nuclear boundaries of closed nuclei (e.g., the large human pNr). Our 3D model of adult human mNr appeared shrunken in shape and axially rotated compared with the infant mNr, the rotation being a common feature among mammalian mNr. PMID:21203458

  15. Mobilisation of Ca2+ stores and flagellar regulation in human sperm by S-nitrosylation: a role for NO synthesised in the female tract

    PubMed Central

    Machado-Oliveira, Gisela; Lefièvre, Linda; Ford, Christopher; Herrero, M Belen; Barratt, Christopher; Connolly, Thomas J; Nash, Katherine; Morales-Garcia, Aduen; Kirkman-Brown, Jackson; Publicover, Steve

    2009-01-01

    Summary Generation of NO by nitric oxide synthase (NOS) is implicated in gamete interaction and fertilisation. Exposure of human spermatozoa to NO donors caused mobilisation of stored Ca2+ by a mechanism that did not require activation of guanylate cyclase but was mimicked by S-nitroso-glutathione (GSNO; an S-nitrosylating agent). Application of dithiothreitol, to reduce protein –SNO groups, rapidly reversed the actions of NO and GSNO on [Ca2+]i. The effects of NO, GSNO and dithiothreitol on sperm protein S-nitrosylation, assessed using the biotin switch method, closely paralleled their actions on [Ca2+]i. Immunofluorescent staining revealed constitutive and inducible NOS in human oviduct and cumulus (the cellular layer investing the oocyte). 4,5-diaminofluorescein (DAF) staining demonstrated production of NO by these tissues. Incubation of human sperm with oviduct explants induced sperm protein S-nitrosylation resembling that induced by NO donors and GSNO. Progesterone (a product of cumulus cells) also mobilises stored Ca2+ in human sperm. Pre-treatment of sperm with NO greatly enhanced the effect of progesterone on [Ca2+]i, resulting in a prolonged increase in flagellar excursion. We conclude that NO regulates mobilisation of stored Ca2+ in human sperm by protein S-nitrosylation, that this action is synergistic with progesterone and that this synergism is potentially highly significant in gamete interactions leading to fertilisation. PMID:18842814

  16. Quantitative Phosphoproteomics Analysis Reveals a Key Role of Insulin Growth Factor 1 Receptor (IGF1R) Tyrosine Kinase in Human Sperm Capacitation*

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Jing; Qi, Lin; Huang, Shaoping; Zhou, Tao; Guo, Yueshuai; Wang, Gaigai; Guo, Xuejiang; Zhou, Zuomin; Sha, Jiahao

    2015-01-01

    One of the most important changes during sperm capacitation is the enhancement of tyrosine phosphorylation. However, the mechanisms of protein tyrosine phosphorylation during sperm capacitation are not well studied. We used label-free quantitative phosphoproteomics to investigate the overall phosphorylation events during sperm capacitation in humans and identified 231 sites with increased phosphorylation levels. Motif analysis using the NetworKIN algorithm revealed that the activity of tyrosine phosphorylation kinases insulin growth factor 1 receptor (IGF1R)/insulin receptor is significantly enriched among the up-regulated phosphorylation substrates during capacitation. Western blotting further confirmed inhibition of IGF1R with inhibitors GSK1904529A and NVP-AEW541, which inhibited the increase in tyrosine phosphorylation levels during sperm capacitation. Additionally, sperm hyperactivated motility was also inhibited by GSK1904529A and NVP-AEW541 but could be up-regulated by insulin growth factor 1, the ligand of IGF1R. Thus, the IGF1R-mediated tyrosine phosphorylation pathway may play important roles in the regulation of sperm capacitation in humans and could be a target for improvement in sperm functions in infertile men. PMID:25693802

  17. Low Concentrations of Hydrogen Peroxide Activate the Antioxidant Defense System in Human Sperm Cells.

    PubMed

    Evdokimov, V V; Barinova, K V; Turovetskii, V B; Muronetz, V I; Schmalhausen, E V

    2015-09-01

    The effect of low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide (10-100 µM) on sperm motility and on the activity of the sperm enzyme glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase (GAPDS) was investigated. Incubation of semen samples with 10 and 100 µM hydrogen peroxide increased the content of spermatozoa with progressive motility by 20 and 18%, respectively, and enhanced the activity of GAPDS in the sperm cells by 27 and 20% compared to a semen sample incubated without additions. It was also found that incubation with 10 µM hydrogen peroxide increased the content of reduced glutathione (GSH) in sperm cells by 50% on average compared to that in the control samples. It is supposed that low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide activate the pentose phosphate pathway, resulting in NADPH synthesis and the reduction of the oxidized glutathione by glutathione reductase yielding GSH. The formed GSH reduces the oxidized cysteine residues of the GAPDS active site, increasing the activity of the enzyme, which in turn enhances the content of sperm cells with progressive motility. Thus, the increase in motile spermatozoa in the presence of low concentrations of hydrogen peroxide can serve as an indicator of normal functioning of the antioxidant defense system in sperm cells.

  18. Scoring human sperm morphology using Testsimplets and Diff-Quik slides.

    PubMed

    Natali, Ilaria; Muratori, Monica; Sarli, Valentina; Vannuccini, Mario; Cipriani, Sonia; Niccoli, Laura; Giachini, Claudia

    2013-04-01

    To compare two staining methods to assess sperm morphology: Diff-Quik (DQ), which is the fastest of the recommended techniques, and Testsimplets (TS), a technique that uses prestained slides and is quite popular in in vitro fertilization (IVF) centers. Prospective study. Patients at the Sterility Center of the Obstetrics and Gynecology Unit of the Hospital of S.S. Cosma and Damiano (Azienda USL 3 of Pistoia, Italy). 104 randomly enrolled male patients evaluated by the seminology laboratory. None. Statistical comparison of sperm morphology results obtained after staining of semen samples both with DQ and TS. Our data show that TS gives a statistically significantly lower number of normal forms than DQ (median: 6% [range: 0-29%] vs. 12% [range: 0-40%], respectively) as well as an overestimation of sperm head defects (median: 92.0% [range: 67%-100%] vs. 82.3% [range: 55%-100%], respectively). The two staining methods should not be considered equivalent. Specifically, the lower reference limit established by the World Health Organization is not appropriate when sperm morphology is assessed by TS. The routine application of TS in the evaluation of sperm morphology is therefore not recommended because it leads to an overestimation of patients with sperm morphology values below the lower reference limit (4%), thus potentially influencing clinical decisions. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  19. Human glaucoma and neural degeneration in intracranial optic nerve, lateral geniculate nucleus, and visual cortex

    PubMed Central

    Gupta, N; Ang, L‐C; de Tilly, L Noël; Bidaisee, L; Yücel, Y H

    2006-01-01

    The pathology of glaucoma has been extensively studied at the level of the retina and optic nerve head. Here the first clinicopathological case of human glaucoma is reported demonstrating degenerative changes in the brain involving the intracranial optic nerve, lateral geniculate nucleus, and visual cortex. Pathological evidence of neural degeneration in this patient is correlated with clinical, optic nerve head, visual field, and neuroradiology findings. Neuropathology in the glaucoma brain is compared to age matched controls. In the presence of advanced human glaucoma with 50% visual field loss, neural damage is evident in multiple vision stations within the brain. PMID:16464969

  20. Locations of movement-related cells in the human subthalamic nucleus in Parkinson's disease.

    PubMed

    Theodosopoulos, Philip V; Marks, William J; Christine, Chadwick; Starr, Philip A

    2003-07-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) is an emerging target for deep brain stimulator (DBS) implantation for the treatment of advanced Parkinson's disease (PD). Understanding the somatotopic organization of the STN is important for surgical navigation within the nucleus. We analyzed intraoperative data obtained during 54 procedures for the implantation of STN stimulators to assess the locations of movement-related cells. Cells were considered movement-related if they exhibited modulation of the cell discharge during passive movement of the contralateral upper or lower extremity. Microelectrode track reconstructions were plotted on a human brain atlas, using the location of the DBS electrode from postoperative magnetic resonance images as a registration mark in reconstructing microelectrode track locations. Movement-related cells were predominantly located in the dorsal part of the nucleus. The majority of the cells were related to proximal joint manipulation. Arm-related cells were located laterally and at the rostral and caudal poles, whereas leg-related cells were located medially and centrally. The finding of three or more leg-related cells on a given microelectrode track was predictive of a medial localization within the motor area. Our findings are consistent with the small number of published studies on STN somatopy in the human and the nonhuman primate.

  1. Gene expression profile of the nucleus accumbens of human cocaine abusers: evidence for dysregulation of myelin

    PubMed Central

    Albertson, Dawn N.; Pruetz, Barb; Schmidt, Carl J.; Kuhn, Donald M.; Kapatos, Gregory; Bannon, Michael J.

    2008-01-01

    Chronic cocaine abuse induces long-term neural adaptations as a consequence of alterations in gene expression. This study was undertaken to identify those transcripts differentially regulated in the nucleus accumbens of human cocaine abusers. Affymetrix microarrays were used to measure transcript abundance in 10 cocaine abusers and 10 control subjects matched for age, race, sex, and brain pH. As expected, gene expression of cocaine- and amphetamine-regulated transcript (CART) was increased in the nucleus accumbens of cocaine abusers. The most robust and consistent finding, however, was a decrease in the expression of a number of myelin-related genes, including myelin basic protein (MBP), proteolipid protein (PLP), and myelin-associated oligodendrocyte basic protein (MOBP). The differential expression seen by microarray for CART as well as MBP, MOBP, and PLP was verified by RT–PCR. In addition, immunohistochemical experiments revealed a decrease in the number of MBP-immunoreactive oligodendrocytes present in the nucleus accumbens and surrounding white matter of cocaine abusers. These findings suggest a dysregulation of myelin in human cocaine abusers. PMID:15009677

  2. Rostrocaudal changes in neuronal cell size in human lateral vestibular nucleus.

    PubMed

    Diaz, C; Suarez, C; Navarro, A; Gonzalez del Rey, C; Tolivia, J

    1993-07-09

    A cytoarchitectonic and morphometric study of the human lateral vestibular nucleus (LVN) is presented. In sagittal sections, the LVN appears as a triangular cell group rostrally located near the motor trigeminal nucleus and caudally near the vestibular root. The estimated volume is 13.49 mm3 with a neuronal population of 25,046 cells and 1855 neurons/mm3 in density. The average neuronal cross-sectional area changes from a minimum caudally (380.02 +/- 7.23 microns 2) to a maximum rostrally (825.16 +/- 25.10 microns 2). Four types of neurons can be observed: small (< 200 microns 2), medium (200-500 microns 2), large (500-100 microns 2) and giant or Deiter's cells (> 1000 microns 2). The small and medium cells constitute 62%, large cells 26% and the giant cells only 12% of the neuronal population.

  3. Why so many sperm cells? Not only a possible means of mitigating the hazards inherent to human reproduction but also an indicator of an exaptation

    PubMed Central

    Barlow, Peter W.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT Redundancy—the excess of supply over necessity—has recently been proposed for human sperm cells. However, the apparent superfluity of cell numbers may be necessary in order to circumvent the hazards, many of which can be quantified, that can occur during the transition from gametogenesis within the testes to zygosis within the female reproductive tract. Sperm cell numbers are directly related to testicular volume, and it is owing to a redundancy, and the possible exaptation, of this latter parameter that a putative excess of sperm cells is perceived. PMID:27574542

  4. In vitro cytophotometry evaluation of gamma-radiation effects on human sperm cell by acridine orange staining.

    PubMed

    Roux, C; Neveux, Y; Dadoune, J P

    1990-01-01

    Effects of gamma-radiations on human sperm nuclei in vitro were studied by cytophotometrical quantification on fixed smears stained by acridine orange some of which had undergone heat-treatment. Following irradiations at different doses (0.0, 2.5, 5.0, 7.5 gy) using a cobalt source, changes in distribution of acridine orange fluorescences emitted by nuclei (total fluorescence greater than 515 nm versus green fluorescence = 525 nm) appeared to be dose-dependent. Heat-treatment of irradiated heads was confirmed to be a complementary procedure necessary for a good evaluation of the initial degree in chromatin compactness. Chromatin alterations related to changes in emitted fluorescence could be due to the initial fragility of the DNA-nucleoprotein complex. These preliminary results suggest that the normality of sperm chromatin could be used as a biologic dosimeter.

  5. Human sperm quality and lipid content after migration into normal ovulatory human cervical mucus containing low numbers of leukocytes

    PubMed Central

    Chakroun-Feki, Nozha; Therond, Patrice; Couturier, Martine; Eustache, Florence; Limea, Gerard; Legrand, Alain; Jouannet, Pierre; Auger, Jacques

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate whether a relationship exists between the presence of low numbers of leukocytes in normal ovulatory cervical mucus and sperm quality and lipid content after migration. The percentages of live, motile and morphologically normal spermatozoa, movement parameters assessed by computer-aided sperm analysis (CASA), and ionophore-induced acrosome reaction measured by flow cytometry were determined before and after migration. High-performance liquid chromatography with ultraviolet detection was used to measure the sperm lipid content, including the various diacyl subspecies. The number of leukocytes found in solubilized mucus samples was counted using a haemocytometric method. Overall, the presence of leukocytes in the cervical mucus samples did not significantly influence sperm motility and morphology, sperm kinematic parameters, or the sperm content in sphingomyelin or cholesterol. In contrast, after migration, the decrease in various sperm diacyls and the level of induced acrosome reaction was significantly less pronounced in mucus samples containing ≥ 104 leukocytes than in mucus samples with no or rare leukocytes whereas the level of induced acrosome reaction was higher. The present data suggest that the low level of leukocytes found in normal ovulatory cervical mucus could influence the process of sperm lipid remodelling/capacitation. PMID:19182821

  6. Sperm chromatin dispersion test in the assessment of DNA fragmentation and aneuploidy in human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Balasuriya, A; Speyer, B; Serhal, P; Doshi, A; Harper, J C

    2011-05-01

    Sperm DNA damage is thought to be increased in men with male factor infertility. Previous studies suggest a correlation between sperm DNA fragmentation and aneuploidy. The sperm chromatin dispersion (SCD) test was modified to produce the Halosperm Kit. The SCD-fluorescent in-situ hybridization (FISH) test allows the simultaneous detection of DNA fragmentation and aneuploidy on the same sperm cell. The objectives of this study were to validate the SCD, SCD-FISH and Halosperm tests for the analysis of sperm DNA fragmentation and compare them to the sperm chromatin structure assay (SCSA). Semen samples from 20 males undergoing IVF/intracytoplasmic sperm injection were processed using FISH, SCD-FISH, SCD and Halosperm, and compared with SCSA results. There was a significant difference between FISH and SCD-FISH results in the detection of aneuploidy (P=0.000) and the level of sperm DNA fragmentation in the samples subjected to SCSA and SCD (P=0.001) or SCSA and SCD-FISH (P=0.001). There was no significant correlation between DNA fragmentation and aneuploidy. If sperm aneuploidy is to be determined, more reliable results will be obtained if FISH is performed rather than SCD-FISH. A lack of validation and unknown clinical significance question the value of DNA fragmentation assays. DNA damage in the male germ line may result in adverse clinical outcomes and the pathophysiology and clinical consequences of sperm DNA damage are being actively researched. Many DNA fragmentation assays such as the Halosperm Kit have been developed recently and are now available at a commercial level. Unfortunately, aimed at vulnerable couples with difficulty conceiving, many of these tests have not been clinically validated. Despite its plausible appeal and fervour of its supporters, the benefits of widespread DNA testing that only achieves the distressing of couples with the knowledge that effectual therapeutic strategies are absent are questionable. Commercially, however, it is no doubt

  7. Large human sperm vacuoles observed in motile spermatozoa under high magnification: nuclear thumbprints linked to failure of chromatin condensation.

    PubMed

    Boitrelle, F; Ferfouri, F; Petit, J M; Segretain, D; Tourain, C; Bergere, M; Bailly, M; Vialard, F; Albert, M; Selva, J

    2011-07-01

    An embryo's ability to grow and implant can be improved by selection of a normal spermatozoon with a vacuole-free head. However, large vacuoles in spermatozoa have yet to be fully characterized. The present study aimed to determine whether these vacuoles are of nuclear, membrane and/or acrosomal origin. We studied 15 infertile patients with differing sperm profiles. For each sperm sample, we used high-magnification (×10 000) contrast microscopy to select and assess 30 normal 'top' spermatozoa and 30 spermatozoa with a large sperm-head vacuole (≥ 25% of the head's cross-sectional area). We subsequently analysed the spermatozoa's degree of chromatin condensation (aniline blue staining), DNA fragmentation (terminal deoxyribonucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick-end labelling assay) and chromosome content (fluorescence in situ hybridization X,Y,18). Atomic force microscopy enabled us to map the plasma sperm membrane in detail. Three-dimensional deconvolution microscopy enabled us to reconstruct images of the nucleus and acrosome in 'top' and 'vacuolated' spermatozoa. We studied a total of 450 'top' spermatozoa and 450 vacuolated spermatozoa. The rate of non-condensed chromatin was higher for 'vacuolated' spermatozoa than for 'top' spermatozoa (36.2 ± 1.9 versus 7.6 ± 1.3%, respectively; P < 0.0001). 'Top' and 'vacuolated' spermatozoa did not differ significantly in terms of DNA fragmentation (0.7 ± 0.4 versus 1.3 ± 0.4% respectively; P = 0.25) or aneuploidy (1.1 ± 0.5 versus 2.2 ± 0.7% respectively; P = 0.21). The majority of aneuploid spermatozoa (9 out of 15) lacked chromatin condensation. In all vacuolated spermatozoa, the acrosome was intact, the plasma membrane was sunken but intact and the large vacuole was identified as an abnormal, 'thumbprint'-like nuclear concavity covered by acrosomal and plasmic membranes. The large vacuole appears to be a nuclear 'thumbprint' linked to failure of chromatin condensation.

  8. Mapping Fifteen Trace Elements in Human Seminal Plasma and Sperm DNA.

    PubMed

    Ali, Sazan; Chaspoul, Florence; Anderson, Loundou; Bergé-Lefranc, David; Achard, Vincent; Perrin, Jeanne; Gallice, Philippe; Guichaoua, Marie

    2017-02-01

    Studies suggest a relationship between semen quality and the concentration of trace elements in serum or seminal plasma. However, trace elements may be linked to DNA and capable of altering the gene expression patterns. Thus, trace element interactions with DNA may contribute to the mechanisms for a trans-generational reproductive effect. We developed an analytical method to determine the amount of trace elements bound to the sperm DNA, and to estimate their affinity for the sperm DNA by the ratio: R = Log [metal concentration in the sperm DNA/metal concentration in seminal plasma]. We then analyzed the concentrations of 15 trace elements (Al, Cd, Cr, Cu, Hg, Mn, Mo, Ni, Pb, Ti, V, Zn, As, Sb, and Se) in the seminal plasma and the sperm DNA in 64 normal and 30 abnormal semen specimens with Inductively Coupled Plasma/Mass Spectrometry (ICP-MS). This study showed all trace elements were detected in the seminal plasma and only metals were detected in the sperm DNA. There was no correlation between the metals' concentrations in the seminal plasma and the sperm DNA. Al had the highest affinity for DNA followed by Pb and Cd. This strong affinity is consistent with the known mutagenic effects of these metals. The lowest affinity was observed for Zn and Ti. We observed a significant increase of Al linked to the sperm DNA of patients with oligozoospermia and teratozoospermia. Al's reproductive toxicity might be due to Al linked to DNA, by altering spermatogenesis and expression patterns of genes involved in the function of reproduction.

  9. Assessment of human sperm morphology by strict criteria: comparison of wet preparation versus stained with the modified Diff-Quik method.

    PubMed

    Oral, E; Yetis, O; Elibol, F; Senol, H; Irez, T; Aksu, F M

    2002-01-01

    Routine semen examination remains an important tool for the diagnosis and treatment in human subfertility. Of all semen parameters, sperm morphology seems to be one of the most powerful indicators of a man's fertilizing potential in vitro and in vivo. Lack of standardization of sperm morphology assessments remains the main reason for the usefulness of this parameter. The aim of this study was to analyze the agreement between the wet-stained preparations versus those stained with modified Diff-Quik for sperm morphology. A total of 100 unselected semen samples from infertile couples were analyzed. Sperm morphology was evaluated with unstained specimens and following modified Diff-Quik staining according to the strict (Kruger classification) criteria by two different examiners (intralaboratory blind assessment). Mean percentages of morphologically normal spermatozoa were identical on wet and stained preparation slides (4.79 vs. 4.61, p >.05). Wide divergence of results was found with respect to the percentage of sperm with head and midpiece defects with the two different preparations (p >.001). The percentage of sperm tail defects was similar in both methods (p >.05). Simple linear regression analysis between the two methods revealed very good correlation for the morphologically normal spermatozoa (r =.83), but poor correlation for the sperm head, midpiece, and tail defects (r =.25,.25, and.28, respectively). Wet preparation is suitable only for the morphologically normal spermatozoa, but to determine the percentage of the defective spermatozoa, staining the smear is recommended.

  10. Evaluation of human sperm chromatin status after selection using a modified Diff-Quik stain indicates embryo quality and pregnancy outcomes following in vitro fertilization.

    PubMed

    Tavares, R S; Silva, A F; Lourenço, B; Almeida-Santos, T; Sousa, A P; Ramalho-Santos, J

    2013-11-01

    Sperm chromatin/DNA damage can be measured by a variety of assays. However, it has been reported that these tests may lose prognostic value in Assisted Reproductive Technology (ART) cycles when assessed in post-prepared samples, possibly due to the normalizing effect promoted by sperm preparation procedures. We have recently implemented a modified version of the Diff-Quik staining assay that allows for the evaluation of human sperm chromatin status in native samples, together with standard sperm morphology assessment. However, the value of this parameter in terms of predicting in vitro fertilization (IVF) and Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) outcomes after sperm selection is unknown. In this study, data from 138 couples undergoing in vitro fertilization (IVF) or Intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) treatments showed that sperm chromatin integrity was significantly improved after density gradient centrifugation and swim up (p < 0.001), but no correlations were found with fertilization or embryo development rates (p > 0.05). However, sperm samples presenting lower percentages of damaged chromatin were associated with better quality (Grade I) embryos in both ART procedures (p < 0.05) and clinical pregnancy among IVF couples (p < 0.05). Furthermore, regression analysis confirmed the clinical value of Diff-Quik staining in predicting IVF (but not ICSI) clinical pregnancy (OR: 0.927, 95% CI: 0.871-0.985, p = 0.015), and a threshold value of 34.25% for this parameter was established. The proportion of IVF couples achieving a clinical pregnancy was reduced 1.9-fold when the percentage of abnormal dark staining was ≥34.25% (p = 0.05). In conclusion, the Diff-Quik staining assay provides useful information regarding ART success, particularly in IVF cycles, where some degree of 'natural' sperm selection may occur; but not in ICSI, where sperm selection is operator dependent. This quick and low-cost assay is suggested as an alternative method to detect

  11. Quantitative analysis of spiny neurons in the adult human caudate nucleus: can it confirm the current qualitative cell classification?

    PubMed

    Krstonošić, Bojana; Milošević, Nebojša T; Marić, Dušica L; Babović, Siniša S

    2015-09-01

    The caudate nucleus, as a part of the striatum (neostriatum or dorsal striatum), is involved in the control of cognitive, motor and limbic functions. The majority of the caudate nucleus cells are projection spiny neurons, whose activity is determined by excitatory inputs from the cortex, thalamus, globus pallidus and brainstem. A qualitative analysis of human caudate nucleus neurons involves the description of the structure and features of cells, and accordingly, their classification into an appropriate type. The aim of this study is to determine the justification of the current qualitative classification of spiny neurons in the precommissural head of the human caudate nucleus by quantifying morphological properties of neurons. After the qualitative analysis of microscopic images of the Golgi-impregnated caudate nucleus neurons, five morphological properties of cells were measured/quantified. In terms of the dendritic field area, caudate nucleus neurons were divided into two subgroups: small and large neurons. In our sample of 251 projection nerve cells, 58.17 % (146) were small and 41.83 % (105) were large neurons. These data show that suggested groups of spiny neurons in the human caudate nucleus differ in their morphology. Since the structure and function of cells are closely correlated, it is possible that these morphologically different types of neurons may represent different functional groups.

  12. Modern human sperm freezing: Effect on DNA, chromatin and acrosome integrity.

    PubMed

    Rahiminia, Tahereh; Hosseini, Akram; Anvari, Morteza; Ghasemi-Esmailabad, Saeed; Talebi, Ali Reza

    2017-08-01

    Presence of vitrification method in sperm freezing and the introduction of solid surface vitrification beside rapid freezing in vapour, opens an easy and safe way to help infertility centres. While the effects of cryopreservation on motility, morphology and viability of sperm are documented, the question of the probable alteration of sperm DNA, chromatin and acrosome integrity after freezing and thawing procedures in different methods is still controversial. Normal sample were collected according to WHO strict criteria. Sperm suspensions were mixed 1:1 with 0.5 M sucrose and divided into four equal aliquots for freezing: fresh, nitrogen direct immersion vitrification (Vit), solid surface vitrification (SSV) and in vapour (Vapour). Sperm suspensions were transferred into a 0.25 ml sterile plastic. Then straw was inserted inside the 0.5 ml straw. For thawing, the straws were immersed in a 42 °C water bath. Beside the sperm parameters, we assessed the acrosome reaction by double staining, chromatin integrity by toluidine blue (Tb) and chromomycin A3 (CMA3) and DNA integrity by terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase dUTP nick end labelling (TUNEL) respectively. In progressive motility, the highest rate occurred in Vit (39.9 ± 13.3). Moreover, the lowest rate of immotile sperm was in Vit (32.7 ± 16.3). In normal morphology, the group Vit was similar to the fresh, while SSV and Vapour were significantly different from the fresh. The percentage of acrosome-reacted sperms was more in Vit (81.3 ± 10.2) than the fresh group. TUNEL+ results showed that DNA fragmentation was significantly increased in Vit (p-value = 0.025). While in SSV and Vapour results were comparable to fresh. There was a significant correlation between TUNEL+ and normal morphology, TB, CMA3 and presence of intact acrosome. Sperm in Vapour was healthier in terms of DNA, chromatin and acrosome integrity. In contrast of higher motility and normal morphology; DNA, chromatin and acrosome

  13. Sperm-Egg Interaction: Evidence for Boar Sperm Plasma Membrane Receptors for Porcine Zona Pellucida

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Rudolph N.; Russell, Lonnie; Bundman, Donna; Freund, Matthew

    1980-01-01

    Freshly ejaculated, noncapacitated boar sperm bind rapidly and in large numbers to pig egg zona pellucida in vitro. In the present study, the number of sperm bound decreased sharply when sperm motility was lowered by energy poisons or by reducing the temperature. Highly motile sperm from humans, guinea pigs, and rats, added at concentrations ten times higher than control sperm, did not bind to the porcine zona. At the same high concentration, a small number of hamster and bull sperm bound to the zona. Binding of boar sperm to the zona pellucida was blocked almost completely by diluted whole antiserum to sperm plasma membranes and by univalent (Fab) antibody to these membranes. When antibody to sperm plasma membrane was first absorbed with plasma membrane vesicles, sperm binding was not inhibited. These results provide direct evidence for the existence of sperm plasma membrane receptors for the zona pellucida of the pig.

  14. Human spermatozoa possess an IL4I1 l-amino acid oxidase with a potential role in sperm function.

    PubMed

    Houston, B; Curry, B; Aitken, R J

    2015-06-01

    Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are known to play an important role in the regulation of human sperm function. In this study, we demonstrate for the first time that human spermatozoa possess interleukin-induced gene 1 (IL4I1), an l-amino acid oxidase (LAAO) which is capable of generating ROS on exposure to aromatic amino acids in the presence of oxygen. The preferred substrates were found to be phenylalanine and tryptophan while the enzyme was located in the acrosomal region and midpiece of these cells. In contrast to equine and bovine spermatozoa, enzyme activity was lost as soon as the spermatozoa became non-viable. On a cell-to-cell basis human spermatozoa were also shown to generate lower levels of hydrogen peroxide than their equine counterparts on exposure to phenylalanine. Stimulation of LAAO activity resulted in the induction of several hallmarks of capacitation including tyrosine phosphorylation of the sperm flagellum and concomitant activation of phospho-SRC expression. In addition, stimulation of LAAO resulted in an increase in the levels of acrosomal exocytosis in both the presence and absence of progesterone stimulation, via mechanisms that could be significantly reversed by the presence of catalase. As is often the case with free radical-mediated phenomena, prolonged exposure of human spermatozoa to phenylalanine resulted in the stimulation of apoptosis as indicated by significant increases in mitochondrial superoxide generation and the activation of intracellular caspases. These results confirm the existence of an LAAO in human spermatozoa with a potential role in driving the redox regulation of sperm capacitation and acrosomal exocytosis.

  15. Empirical Derivation of Correction Factors for Human Spiral Ganglion Cell Nucleus and Nucleolus Count Units.

    PubMed

    Robert, Mark E; Linthicum, Fred H

    2016-01-01

    Profile count method for estimating cell number in sectioned tissue applies a correction factor for double count (resulting from transection during sectioning) of count units selected to represent the cell. For human spiral ganglion cell counts, we attempted to address apparent confusion between published correction factors for nucleus and nucleolus count units that are identical despite the role of count unit diameter in a commonly used correction factor formula. We examined a portion of human cochlea to empirically derive correction factors for the 2 count units, using 3-dimensional reconstruction software to identify double counts. The Neurotology and House Histological Temporal Bone Laboratory at University of California at Los Angeles. Using a fully sectioned and stained human temporal bone, we identified and generated digital images of sections of the modiolar region of the lower first turn of cochlea, identified count units with a light microscope, labeled them on corresponding digital sections, and used 3-dimensional reconstruction software to identify double-counted count units. For 25 consecutive sections, we determined that double-count correction factors for nucleus count unit (0.91) and nucleolus count unit (0.92) matched the published factors. We discovered that nuclei and, therefore, spiral ganglion cells were undercounted by 6.3% when using nucleolus count units. We determined that correction factors for count units must include an element for undercounting spiral ganglion cells as well as the double-count element. We recommend a correction factor of 0.91 for the nucleus count unit and 0.98 for the nucleolus count unit when using 20-µm sections. © American Academy of Otolaryngology—Head and Neck Surgery Foundation 2015.

  16. Nuclear configuration and neuronal types of the nucleus niger in the brain of the human adult.

    PubMed

    Braak, H; Braak, E

    1986-01-01

    The pigmentoarchitectonic analysis of the human nucleus niger reveals three main territories: Pars compacta, pars diffusa and pars reticulata. Seven subnuclei are recognized within the pars compacta. The nerve cell types forming the nucleus niger were investigated using a Golgi de-impregnation technique in combination with counterstaining of intraneuronally deposited pigment granules. Three principal types of neurons were defined: Type I was a medium-sized to large neuron, mainly encountered in the pars compacta, giving off a few thick and sparsely branching dendrites. These cells were richly endowed with elongated patches of Nissl material that were mainly found in the peripheral portions of the dendrites. One pole of the cell body contained tightly packed neuromelanin granules. Type II neurons were mainly found in the pars reticulata. They were variable in size and shape and generated, similar to type I neurons, extended and sparsely branching dendrites. Type II neurons were devoid of neuromelanin. A considerable number of these cells were lacking in lipofuscin deposits as well. Type III neurons occurred in all portions of the nuclear complex. The small cell body gave rise to a few thin and spineless dendrites. The axon and filiform processes of the dendrites showed small varicosities irregularly spaced apart. The pale cytoplasm contained small and intensely stained lipofuscin granules, which did not tend to agglomerate. Intraneuronally deposited neuromelanin and lipofuscin pigment can be considered a natural marker of the neuronal type in the nucleus niger of the human adult. The technique and the data provide a basis for investigations of the aged and the diseased human brain.

  17. Preparation, characterization, and determination of immunological activities of transfer factor specific to human sperm antigen.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianwei; Kong, Cui; Yuan, Zhaohong; Luo, Junmin; Ma, Rui; Yu, Jiang; Cao, Jinghe

    2013-01-01

    OBJECTIVE. The objective of this study was to prepare, characterize, and determine immunological activities of specific transfer factor (STF) specific to human sperm antigen (HSA) for the preparation of antisperm contraceptive vaccine that can be used as an immunocontraceptive. METHODS. HSA-STF was prepared using the spleens of rabbits vaccinated with HSA. The specific immunological activities were examined by lymphocyte proliferation test (LPT), leukocyte adhesion inhibition test (LAIT), and by determining the concentrations of IL-4, γ -IFN, and IL-21. HSA-STF was a helveolous substance, having a pH value of 7.0 ± 0.4 and UV absorption maxima at 258 ± 6 nm. It contained seventeen amino acids; glycine and glutamic acids were the highest in terms of concentrations (38.8 μ g/mL and 36.3 μ g/mL, resp.). RESULTS. The concentration of polypeptide was 2.34 ± 0.31 mg/mL, and ribose was 0.717 ± 0.043 mg/mL. The stimulation index for lymphocyte proliferation test was 1.84, and the leukocyte adhesion inhibition rate was 37.7%. There was a statistically significant difference between the cultural lymphocytes with HSA-STF and non-HSA-STF for γ -IFN and IL-21 (P < 0.05), but there was no statistical significance for IL-4 (P > 0.05). CONCLUSION. HSA-STF was prepared and characterized successfully. It had immunological activity which could transfer the immune response specific to HSA and prove to be a potential candidate for the development of male immunocontraceptive agents.

  18. A novel SoxB2 gene is required for maturation of sperm nucleus during spermiogenesis in the Chinese mitten crab, Eriocheir sinensis

    PubMed Central

    Liu, Zhi-Qiang; Jiang, Xue-Hui; Qi, Hai-Yan; Xiong, Liang-Wei; Qiu, Gao-Feng

    2016-01-01

    SRY-related HMG box (Sox) genes are characterized by the presence of a DNA-binding HMG domain and involved in a diverse range of developmental processes. In this study, we identified a novel Sox gene, designated as EsSoxB2-1, from the Chinese mitten crab Eriocheir sinensis. The EsSoxB2-1 encodes a protein of 259 amino acids, sharing the highest identity with the beetle Tribolium castaneum SOX21b. Unlike insect Sox21b, however, EsSoxB2-1 is intronless and exhibits a gonad-specific expression pattern at both mRNA and protein level. Two core promoters in 5′ flanking region were demonstrated to be essential for inducing transcriptional regulatory activity. The transcription of EsSoxB2-1 mRNA begins in spermatogonia stage, while the translation of EsSOXB2-1 protein initiates at spermiogenesis stage. Interestingly, EsSOXB2-1 protein was exclusively localized in the nucleus of spermatid and spermatozoa even at the end of acrosome reaction, and was bound to the uncondensed chromatin in nucleoplasm of mature spermatozoa. Knockdown of EsSoxB2-1 by RNAi leads to abnormal transformation of the nucleus during spermiogenesis. Together, these findings demonstrated the requirement of EsSoxB2-1 for the spermatozoa nucleus maturation and also suggested that EsSoxB2-1 would be delivered into fertilized eggs along with chromatins as a paternal transcription factor for regulating early embryonic development. PMID:27561408

  19. Neuronal activity in the human subthalamic nucleus encodes decision conflict during action selection

    PubMed Central

    Zaghloul, Kareem A.; Weidemann, Christoph T.; Lega, Bradley C.; Jaggi, Jurg L.; Baltuch, Gordon H.; Kahana, Michael J.

    2012-01-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN), which receives excitatory inputs from the cortex and has direct connections with the inhibitory pathways of the basal ganglia, is well positioned to efficiently mediate action selection. Here, we use microelectrode recordings captured during deep brain stimulation surgery as participants engage in a decision task to examine the role of the human STN in action selection. We demonstrate that spiking activity in the STN increases when participants engage in a decision, and that the level of spiking activity increases with the degree of decision conflict. These data implicate the STN as an important mediator of action selection during decision processes. PMID:22396419

  20. Environmental and Occupational Pesticide Exposure and Human Sperm Parameters: A Systematic Review

    PubMed Central

    Martenies, Sheena E.; Perry, Melissa J.

    2013-01-01

    Of continuing concern are the associations between environmental or occupational exposures to pesticides and semen quality parameters. Prior research has indicated that there may be associations between exposure to pesticides of a variety of classes and decreased sperm health. The intent of this review was to summarize the most recent evidence related to pesticide exposures and commonly used semen quality parameters, including concentration, motility and morphology. The recent literature was searched for studies published between January, 2007 and August, 2012 that focused on environmental or occupational pesticide exposures. Included in the review are 17 studies, 15 of which reported significant associations between exposure to pesticides and semen quality indicators. Two studies also investigated the roles genetic polymorphisms may play in the strength or directions of these associations. Specific pesticides targeted for study included dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), and abamectin. Pyrethroids and organophosphates were analyzed as classes of pesticides rather than as individual compounds, primarily due to the limitations of exposure assessment techniques. Overall, a majority of the studies reported significant associations between pesticide exposure and sperm parameters. A decrease in sperm concentration was the most commonly reported finding among all of the pesticide classes investigated. Decreased motility was also associated with exposures to each of the pesticide classes, although these findings were less frequent across studies. An association between pesticide exposure and sperm morphology was less clear, with only two studies reporting an association. The evidence presented in this review continues to support the hypothesis that exposures to pesticides at environmentally or occupationally relevant levels may be associated with decreased sperm health. Future work in this area should focus on associations between specific

  1. Environmental and occupational pesticide exposure and human sperm parameters: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Martenies, Sheena E; Perry, Melissa J

    2013-05-10

    Of continuing concern are the associations between environmental or occupational exposures to pesticides and semen quality parameters. Prior research has indicated that there may be associations between exposure to pesticides of a variety of classes and decreased sperm health. The intent of this review was to summarize the most recent evidence related to pesticide exposures and commonly used semen quality parameters, including concentration, motility and morphology. The recent literature was searched for studies published between January 2007 and August 2012 that focused on environmental or occupational pesticide exposures. Included in the review are 17 studies, 15 of which reported significant associations between exposure to pesticides and semen quality indicators. Two studies also investigated the roles genetic polymorphisms may play in the strength or directions of these associations. Specific pesticides targeted for study included dichlorodiphenyltrichloroethane (DDT), hexachlorocyclohexane (HCH), and abamectin. Pyrethroids and organophosphates were analyzed as classes of pesticides rather than as individual compounds, primarily due to the limitations of exposure assessment techniques. Overall, a majority of the studies reported significant associations between pesticide exposure and sperm parameters. A decrease in sperm concentration was the most commonly reported finding among all of the pesticide classes investigated. Decreased motility was also associated with exposures to each of the pesticide classes, although these findings were less frequent across studies. An association between pesticide exposure and sperm morphology was less clear, with only two studies reporting an association. The evidence presented in this review continues to support the hypothesis that exposures to pesticides at environmentally or occupationally relevant levels may be associated with decreased sperm health. Future work in this area should focus on associations between specific

  2. Mathematical Model of Neuronal Morphology: Prenatal Development of the Human Dentate Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Rajković, Katarina; Bačić, Goran; Ristanović, Dušan; Milošević, Nebojša T.

    2014-01-01

    The aim of the study was to quantify the morphological changes of the human dentate nucleus during prenatal development using mathematical models that take into account main morphometric parameters. The camera lucida drawings of Golgi impregnated neurons taken from human fetuses of gestational ages ranging from 14 to 41 weeks were analyzed. Four morphometric parameters, the size of the neuron, the dendritic complexity, maximum dendritic density, and the position of maximum density, were obtained using the modified Scholl method and fractal analysis. Their increase during the entire prenatal development can be adequately fitted with a simple exponential. The three parameters describing the evolution of branching complexity of the dendritic arbor positively correlated with the increase of the size of neurons, but with different rate constants, showing that the complex development of the dendritic arbor is complete during the prenatal period. The findings of the present study are in accordance with previous crude qualitative data on prenatal development of the human dentate nucleus, but provide much greater amount of fine details. The mathematical model developed here provides a sound foundation enabling further studies on natal development or analyzing neurological disorders during prenatal development. PMID:24995329

  3. Prediction error as a linear function of reward probability is coded in human nucleus accumbens.

    PubMed

    Abler, Birgit; Walter, Henrik; Erk, Susanne; Kammerer, Hannes; Spitzer, Manfred

    2006-06-01

    Reward probability has been shown to be coded by dopamine neurons in monkeys. Phasic neuronal activation not only increased linearly with reward probability upon expectation of reward, but also varied monotonically across the range of probabilities upon omission or receipt of rewards, therefore modeling discrepancies between expected and received rewards. Such a discrete coding of prediction error has been suggested to be one of the basic principles of learning. We used functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) to show that the human dopamine system codes reward probability and prediction error in a similar way. We used a simple delayed incentive task with a discrete range of reward probabilities from 0%-100%. Activity in the nucleus accumbens of human subjects strongly resembled the phasic responses found in monkey neurons. First, during the expectation period of the task, the fMRI signal in the human nucleus accumbens (NAc) increased linearly with the probability of the reward. Second, during the outcome phase, activity in the NAc coded the prediction error as a linear function of reward probabilities. Third, we found that the Nac signal was correlated with individual differences in sensation seeking and novelty seeking, indicating a link between individual fMRI activation of the dopamine system in a probabilistic paradigm and personality traits previously suggested to be linked with reward processing. We therefore identify two different covariates that model activity in the Nac: specific properties of a psychological task and individual character traits.

  4. The cytoarchitecture of the adult human parabrachial nucleus: a Nissl and Golgi study.

    PubMed

    Gioia, M; Rodella, L; Petruccioli, M G; Bianchi, R

    2000-01-01

    The parabrachial nucleus (PBN) plays important roles in numerous autonomic functions and in pain modulation. In different animal species, three main regions of the PBN have been identified: the m-PB, the l-PB, and the Kolliker-Fuse nucleus (KF). The KF has not been identified in humans. The present study used Nissl and Golgi-Cox material and morphoquantitative methods to investigate the cytoarchitectural organization of the adult human PBN, paying particular attention to neuronal features endowed with functional significance, i. e. the arborization of the neurons. The PBN neuron population is made up of elements which are heterogeneous in size, shape and dendritic arborization, and grouped into two regions, the lateral and medial PBN (l- and m-PB). It has been suggested that some large sized neurons located in the ventral region of the m-PB might be the counterpart of the KF. In the m-PB the fusiform neurons are the most numerous cells; in the l-PB the multipolar neurons prevail, and are particularly numerous in the dorsal l-PB. Since the dendritic arborization is generally the main target of afferent projections to a neuron, it is possible that the l-PB, and in particular its dorsal region, might be the main site for the endings of afferences to the human PBN.

  5. Distinct populations of neurons respond to emotional valence and arousal in the human subthalamic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Sieger, Tomáš; Serranová, Tereza; Růžička, Filip; Vostatek, Pavel; Wild, Jiří; Šťastná, Daniela; Bonnet, Cecilia; Novák, Daniel; Růžička, Evžen; Urgošík, Dušan; Jech, Robert

    2015-01-01

    Both animal studies and studies using deep brain stimulation in humans have demonstrated the involvement of the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in motivational and emotional processes; however, participation of this nucleus in processing human emotion has not been investigated directly at the single-neuron level. We analyzed the relationship between the neuronal firing from intraoperative microrecordings from the STN during affective picture presentation in patients with Parkinson’s disease (PD) and the affective ratings of emotional valence and arousal performed subsequently. We observed that 17% of neurons responded to emotional valence and arousal of visual stimuli according to individual ratings. The activity of some neurons was related to emotional valence, whereas different neurons responded to arousal. In addition, 14% of neurons responded to visual stimuli. Our results suggest the existence of neurons involved in processing or transmission of visual and emotional information in the human STN, and provide evidence of separate processing of the affective dimensions of valence and arousal at the level of single neurons as well. PMID:25713375

  6. Protein differences between normal and oligospermic human sperm demonstrated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Morgentaler, A; Schopperle, W M; Crocker, R H; DeWolf, W C

    1990-11-01

    Protein expression by sperm obtained from men with normal semen analysis and men with oligospermia were evaluated by two-dimensional gel electrophoresis. Proteins were solubilized in a 9.5 M urea/2% Nonidet-P40 (LKB, Bromma, Sweden) lysis buffer and underwent second dimension separation on 10 to 16% polyacrylamide gradient gels. A set of 36 invariant proteins was identified in all normospermic samples, whereas 8 of 10 evaluable oligospermic samples lacked 1 or more of the invariant proteins. Proteins absent in oligospermic samples may be critical to normal sperm function and may serve as markers for infertility.

  7. Are there intracellular Ca2+ oscillations correlated with flagellar beating in human sperm? A three vs. two-dimensional analysis.

    PubMed

    Corkidi, G; Montoya, F; Hernández-Herrera, P; Ríos-Herrera, W A; Müller, M F; Treviño, C L; Darszon, A

    2017-09-01

    Are there intracellular Ca2+ ([Ca2+]i) oscillations correlated with flagellar beating in human sperm? The results reveal statistically significant [Ca2+]i oscillations that are correlated with the human sperm flagellar beating frequency, when measured in three-dimensions (3D). Fast [Ca2+]i oscillations that are correlated to the beating flagellar frequency of cells swimming in a restricted volume have been detected in hamster sperm. To date, such findings have not been confirmed in any other mammalian sperm species. An important question that has remained regarding these observations is whether the fast [Ca2+]i oscillations are real or might they be due to remaining defocusing effects of the Z component arising from the 3D beating of the flagella. Healthy donors whose semen samples fulfill the WHO criteria between the age of 18-28 were selected. Cells from at least six different donors were utilized for analysis. Approximately the same number of experimental and control cells were analyzed. Motile cells were obtained by the swim-up technique and were loaded with Fluo-4 (Ca2+ sensitive dye) or with Calcein (Ca2+ insensitive dye). Ni2+ was used as a non-specific plasma membrane Ca2+ channel blocker. Fluorescence data and flagella position were acquired in 3D. Each cell was recorded for up to 5.6 s within a depth of 16 microns with a high speed camera (coupled to an image intensifier) acquiring at a rate of 3000 frames per second, while an oscillating objective vibrated at 90 Hz via a piezoelectric device. From these samples, eight experimental and nine control sperm cells were analyzed in both 2D and 3D. We have implemented a new system that allows [Ca2+]i measurements of the human sperm flagellum beating in 3D. These measurements reveal statistically significant [Ca2+]i oscillations that correlate with the flagellar beating frequency. These oscillations may arise from intracellular sources and/or Ca2+ transporters, as they were insensitive to external Ni2+, a non

  8. Properties of Membranes Derived from the Total Lipids Extracted from the Human Lens Cortex and Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Mainali, Laxman; Raguz, Marija; O’Brien, William J.; Subczynski, Witold K.

    2013-01-01

    Human lens lipid membranes prepared using a rapid solvent exchange method from the total lipids extracted from the clear lens cortex and nucleus of 41- to 60-year-old donors were investigated using electron paramagnetic resonance spin-labeling. Profiles of the phospholipid alkyl-chain order, fluidity, oxygen transport parameter, and hydrophobicity were assessed across coexisting membrane domains. Membranes prepared from the lens cortex and nucleus were found to contain two distinct lipid environments, the bulk phospholipid-cholesterol domain and the cholesterol bilayer domain (CBD). The alkyl chains of phospholipids were strongly ordered at all depths, indicating that the amplitude of the wobbling motion of alkyl chains was small. However, profiles of the membrane fluidity, which explicitly contain time (expressed as the spin-lattice relaxation rate) and depend on the rotational motion of spin labels, show relatively high fluidity of alkyl chains close to the membrane center. Profiles of the oxygen transport parameter and hydrophobicity have a rectangular shape and also indicate a high fluidity and hydrophobicity of the membrane center. The amount of CBD was greater in nuclear membranes than in cortical membranes. The presence of the CBD in lens lipid membranes, which at 37°C showed a permeability coefficient for oxygen about 60% smaller than across a water layer of the same thickness, would be expected to raise the barrier for oxygen transport across the fiber cell membrane. Properties of human membranes are compared with those obtained for membranes made of lipids extracted from cortex and nucleus of porcine and bovine eye lenses. PMID:23438364

  9. Shedding light on the controversy surrounding the temporal decline in human sperm counts: a systematic review.

    PubMed

    Cocuzza, Marcello; Esteves, Sandro C

    2014-01-01

    We systematically examined the evidence of declining sperm counts and the hypothesis that an increased exposure to environmental pollutants is responsible for such decline. Search engines, including PUBMED, MEDLINE, EMBASE, BIOSIS, and Cochrane library, were used to identify epidemiologic studies published from 1985 to 2013. We concluded that there is no enough evidence to confirm a worldwide decline in sperm counts. Also, there seems to be no scientific truth of a causative role for endocrine disruptors in the temporal decline of sperm production. Such assumptions are based on few meta-analyses and retrospective studies, while other well-conducted researches could not confirm these findings. We acknowledge that difficult-to-control confounding factors in the highly variable nature of semen, selection criteria, and comparability of populations from different time periods in secular-trend studies, the quality of laboratory methods for counting sperm, and apparently geographic variations in semen quality are the main issues that complicate the interpretation of the available evidence. Owing to the importance of this subject and the uncertainties still prevailing, there is a need not only for continuing monitoring of semen quality, reproductive hormones, and xenobiotics, but also for a better definition of fecundity.

  10. Human Sperm DNA Fragmentation and its Correlation with Conventional Semen Parameters

    PubMed Central

    Evgeni, Evangelini; Charalabopoulos, Konstantinos; Asimakopoulos, Byron

    2014-01-01

    Background The initial step in the diagnostic investigation of male infertility has been traditionally based on the conventional seminal profile. However, there are significant limitations regarding its ability to determine the underlying mechanisms that cause the disorder. Sperm DNA fragmentation has emerged as a potential causative factor of reproductive failure and its assessment has been suggested as a useful adjunct to the laboratory methodology of male infertility evaluation, especially before the application of assisted reproduction technology (ART). Methods A review of recent bibliography was carried out in PubMed by the use of relevant keywords, in order to evaluate the possible correlation between the conventional seminal parameters and sperm DNA fragmentation assessment as diagnostic tools in male infertility evaluation. Results A comprehensive diagnostic approach of male infertility should be based on a combination of diagnostic attributes, derived from the conventional semen analysis, as well as the investigation of genomic integrity testing. Conclusion Due to its strong correlation with several aspects of ART procedures and further consequences for the offspring, sperm DNA fragmentation is a parameter worth integrating in routine clinical practice. However, additional large scale studies focusing on specific subgroups of infertile men who may benefit from an efficient therapeutic management based on the optimization of sperm DNA integrity are needed. PMID:24696791

  11. Evidence for Rapid Oxidative Phosphorylation and Lactate Fermentation in Motile Human Sperm by Hyperpolarized (13)C Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy.

    PubMed

    Reynolds, Steven; Ismail, Nurul Fadhlina Bt; Calvert, Sarah J; Pacey, Allan A; Paley, Martyn N J

    2017-06-28

    Poor sperm motility is a common cause of male infertility for which there are no empirical therapies. Sperm motility is powered by adenosine triphosphate but the relative importance of lactate fermentation and Oxidative Phosphorylation (OxPhos) is debated. To study the relationship between energy metabolism and sperm motility we used dissolution Dynamic Nuclear Polarization (dDNP) for the first time to show the rapid conversion of (13)C1-pyruvate to lactate and bicarbonate, indicating active glycolytic and OxPhos metabolism in sperm. The magnitude of both lactate and bicarbonate signals were positively correlated with the concentration of progressively motile sperm. After controlling for sperm concentration, increased progressive sperm motility generated more pyruvate conversion to lactate and bicarbonate. The technique of dDNP allows 'snapshots' of sperm metabolism to be tracked over the different stages of their life. This may provide help to uncover the causes of poor sperm motility and suggest new approaches for novel treatments or therapies.

  12. Kisspeptin Expression in the Human Infundibular Nucleus in Relation to Sex, Gender Identity, and Sexual Orientation.

    PubMed

    Taziaux, Melanie; Staphorsius, Annemieke S; Ghatei, Mohammad A; Bloom, Stephen R; Swaab, Dick F; Bakker, Julie

    2016-06-01

    Since the discovery of its central role in reproduction, our functional neuroanatomical knowledge of the hypothalamic kisspeptin system is predominantly based on animal studies. Although sex differences in kisspeptin expression have been shown in humans in adulthood, the developmental origin of this sex difference is unknown. Our objectives were to determine the following: 1) when during development the sex difference in kisspeptin expression in the infundibular nucleus would emerge and 2) whether this sex difference is related to sexual orientation or transsexuality. Postmortem hypothalamic tissues were collected by The Netherlands Brain Bank, and sections were stained for kisspeptin by immunohistochemistry. Hypothalami of 43 control subjects were categorized into three periods: infant/prepubertal (six girls, seven boys), adult (11 women, seven men), and elderly (six aged women, six aged men). Eight male-to-female (MTF) transsexuals, three HIV(+) heterosexual men, and five HIV(+) homosexual men were also analyzed. We estimated the total number of kisspeptin-immunoreactive neurons within the infundibular nucleus. Quantitative analysis confirmed that the human infundibular kisspeptin system exhibits a female-dominant sex difference. The number of kisspeptin neurons is significantly greater in the infant/prepubertal and elderly periods compared with the adult period. Finally, in MTF transsexuals, but not homosexual men, a female-typical kisspeptin expression was observed. These findings suggest that infundibular kisspeptin neurons are sensitive to circulating sex steroid hormones throughout life and that the sex reversal observed in MTF transsexuals might reflect, at least partially, an atypical brain sexual differentiation.

  13. Movement-related frequency modulation of beta oscillatory activity in the human subthalamic nucleus.

    PubMed

    Foffani, G; Bianchi, A M; Baselli, G; Priori, A

    2005-10-15

    Event-related changes of brain electrical rhythms are typically analysed as amplitude modulations of local field potential (LFP) oscillations, like radio amplitude modulation broadcasting. In telecommunications, frequency modulation (FM) is less susceptible to interference than amplitude modulation (AM) and is therefore preferred for high-fidelity transmissions. Here we hypothesized that LFP rhythms detected from deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes implanted in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in patients with Parkinson's disease could represent movement-related activity not only in AM but also in FM. By combining adaptive autoregressive identification with spectral power decomposition, we were able to show that FM of low-beta (13-20 Hz) and high-beta (20-35 Hz) rhythms significantly contributes to the involvement of the human STN in movement preparation, execution and recovery, and that the FM patterns are regulated by the dopamine levels in the system. Movement-related FM of beta oscillatory activity in the human subthalamic nucleus therefore provides a novel informational domain for rhythm-based pathophysiological models of cortico-basal ganglia processing.

  14. β- and γ-Actins in the nucleus of human melanoma A375 cells.

    PubMed

    Migocka-Patrzałek, Marta; Makowiecka, Aleksandra; Nowak, Dorota; Mazur, Antonina J; Hofmann, Wilma A; Malicka-Błaszkiewicz, Maria

    2015-11-01

    Actin is a highly conserved protein that is expressed in all eukaryotic cells and has essential functions in the cytoplasm and the nucleus. Nuclear actin is involved in transcription by all three RNA polymerases, chromatin remodelling, RNA processing, intranuclear transport, nuclear export and in maintenance of the nuclear architecture. The nuclear actin level and polymerization state are important factors regulating nuclear processes such as transcription. Our study shows that, in contrast to the cytoplasm, the majority of endogenous nuclear actin is unpolymerized in human melanoma A375 cells. Most mammalian cells express the two non-muscle β- and γ-actin isoforms that differ in only four amino acids. Despite their sequence similarity, studies analysing the cytoplasmic functions of these isoforms demonstrated that β- and γ-actins show differences in localization and function. However, little is known about the involvement of the individual actin isoforms in nuclear processes. Here, we used the human melanoma A375 cell line to analyse actin isoforms in regard to their nuclear localization. We show that both β- and γ-non-muscle actin isoforms are present in nuclei of these cells. Immunolocalization studies demonstrate that both isoforms co-localize with RNA polymerase II and hnRNP U. However, we observe differences in the ratio of cytoplasmic to nuclear actin distribution between the isoforms. We show that β-actin has a significantly higher nucleus-to-cytoplasm ratio than γ-actin.

  15. Movement-related frequency modulation of beta oscillatory activity in the human subthalamic nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Foffani, G; Bianchi, AM; Baselli, G; Priori, A

    2005-01-01

    Event-related changes of brain electrical rhythms are typically analysed as amplitude modulations of local field potential (LFP) oscillations, like radio amplitude modulation broadcasting. In telecommunications, frequency modulation (FM) is less susceptible to interference than amplitude modulation (AM) and is therefore preferred for high-fidelity transmissions. Here we hypothesized that LFP rhythms detected from deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes implanted in the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in patients with Parkinson's disease could represent movement-related activity not only in AM but also in FM. By combining adaptive autoregressive identification with spectral power decomposition, we were able to show that FM of low-beta (13–20 Hz) and high-beta (20–35 Hz) rhythms significantly contributes to the involvement of the human STN in movement preparation, execution and recovery, and that the FM patterns are regulated by the dopamine levels in the system. Movement-related FM of beta oscillatory activity in the human subthalamic nucleus therefore provides a novel informational domain for rhythm-based pathophysiological models of cortico-basal ganglia processing. PMID:16123109

  16. Aneuploidy detection for chromosomes 1, X and Y by fluorescence in situ hybridization in human sperm from oligoasthenoteratozoospermic patients

    SciTech Connect

    Pang, M.G.; Zackowski, J.L.; Acosta, A.A.

    1994-09-01

    Oligoasthenoteratozoospermic males (n=15) were investigated for infertility as compared with proven fertile donors. The oligoasthenoteratozoospermic population showed a mean sperm concentration of 9.7 x 10{sup 6}/ml (Range 4.2-19.7), mean motility of 38.5% (Range 10.6-76.8) and morphology (measured by the percentage of normal forms evaluated by strict criteria) with a mean of 3.49% (Range 1.5-5.0). Fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH) using satellite DNA probes specific for chromosomes 1 (puc 1.77), X (alpha satellite), and Y (satellite-III at Yqh) was performed on human interphase sperm nuclei. DNA probes were either directly labelled with rhodamine-dUTP, FITC-dUTP, or biotinylated by nick translation. Hybridization and signal detection were done by routine laboratory protocols. Microscopic analysis was performed using a cooled CCD camera attached to an epi-fluorescent microscope. After hybridization, fertile donors yielded a frequency of 0.96% (n=12) nullisomic, 98.5% (n=1231) monosomic and 0.96% (n=12) disomic for chromosome 1, whereas oligoasthenoteratozoospermic males yielded a frequency of 16% (n=600) nullisomic, 74.5% (n=2792) monosomic and 9.9% (n=370) disomic. In addition, fertile donors yielded a frequency of 45.7% (n=633) monosomic and 0.7% (n=11) disomic for chromosome X, whereas oligoasthenoteratozoospermic males yielded a frequency of 38.7% (n=760) monosomic and 0.8% (n=13) disomic. Chromosome Y frequencies for fertile donors showed 44.6% (n=614) monosomic and 0.6% (n=2) disomic, whereas oligoasthenoteratozoospermic males yielded a frequency of 33.2% (n=701) monosomic and 0.8% (n=15) disomic. This suggests that the frequency of nullisomy for chromosome 1 is significantly higher (p<0.001) in sperm from oligoasthenoteratozoospermic makes versus sperm from our fertile donors. We conclude that FISH is a powerful tool to determine the frequency of aneuploidy in sperm from oligoasthenoteratozoospermic patients.

  17. Three-dimensional positioning and structure of chromosomes in a human prophase nucleus

    DOE PAGES

    Chen, Bo; Yusuf, Mohammed; Hashimoto, Teruo; ...

    2017-07-21

    The human genetic material is packaged into 46 chromosomes. The structure of chromosomes is known at the lowest level, where the DNA chain is wrapped around a core of eight histone proteins to form nucleosomes. Around a million of these nucleosomes, each about 11 nm in diameter and 6 nm in thickness, are wrapped up into the complex organelle of the chromosome, whose structure is mostly known at the level of visible light microscopy to form a characteristic cross shape in metaphase. However, the higher-order structure of human chromosomes, between a few tens and hundreds of nanometers, has not beenmore » well understood. We show a three-dimensional (3D) image of a human prophase nucleus obtained by serial block-face scanning electron microscopy, with 36 of the complete set of 46 chromosomes captured within it. The acquired image allows us to extract quantitative 3D structural information about the nucleus and the preserved, intact individual chromosomes within it, including their positioning and full spatial morphology at a resolution of around 50 nm in three dimensions. The chromosome positions were found, at least partially, to follow the pattern of chromosome territories previously observed only in interphase. The 3D conformation shows parallel, planar alignment of the chromatids, whose occupied volumes are almost fully accounted for by the DNA and known chromosomal proteins. Here, we also propose a potential new method of identifying human chromosomes in three dimensions, on the basis of the measurements of their 3D morphology.« less

  18. Aneuploidy in 165,330 human sperm; results of two- and three-colour fluorescence in situ hybridization for chromosomes 1, 12, 15, 18, X, and Y

    SciTech Connect

    Spriggs, E.L.; Martin, R.H. |

    1994-09-01

    To understand the mechanisms that affect aneuploidy, fluorescence in situ hybridization (FISH), using chromosome-specific centromeric probes, was employed to screen a large population of human sperm for numerical errors. To determine the true rate of disomy for chromosomes 1, 12, 15, 18, two-color FISH was performed, and for the gonosomes, three-color FISH. The use of multiple, differently-colored probes allows one to distingish a true disomic sperm from a diploid cell. For each centromeric probe, a minimum of 10,000 sperm nuclei for each of five donors was scored, giving a total count of 165,330 sperm nuclei. The incidence of disomic sperm for the sex chromosomes was significantly increased as compared to the frequency for the autosomes ({chi}{sup 2}=232.3, p<0.001), confirming the results observed in studies of sperm karyotypes and spontaneous abortions. The disomy frequencies for autosomes 1, 12, 15, and 18 were found to be uniform. Inter-donor heterogeneity for disomy frequencies was found to exist for the sex chromosomes and for chromosomes 1 and 15, suggesting significant variation among normal men.

  19. The relationship between environmental exposures to phthalates and DNA damage in human sperm using the neutral comet assay.

    PubMed Central

    Duty, Susan M; Singh, Narendra P; Silva, Manori J; Barr, Dana B; Brock, John W; Ryan, Louise; Herrick, Robert F; Christiani, David C; Hauser, Russ

    2003-01-01

    Phthalates are industrial chemicals widely used in many commercial applications. The general population is exposed to phthalates through consumer products as well as through diet and medical treatments. To determine whether environmental levels of phthalates are associated with altered DNA integrity in human sperm, we selected a population without identified sources of exposure to phthalates. One hundred sixty-eight subjects recruited from the Massachusetts General Hospital Andrology Laboratory provided a semen and a urine sample. Eight phthalate metabolites were measured in urine by using high-performance liquid chromatography and tandem mass spectrometry; data were corrected for urine dilution by adjusting for specific gravity. The neutral single-cell microgel electrophoresis assay (comet assay) was used to measure DNA integrity in sperm. VisComet image analysis software was used to measure comet extent, a measure of total comet length (micrometers); percent DNA in tail (tail%), a measure of the proportion of total DNA present in the comet tail; and tail distributed moment (TDM), an integrated measure of length and intensity (micrometers). For an interquartile range increase in specific gravity-adjusted monoethyl phthalate (MEP) level, the comet extent increased significantly by 3.6 micro m [95% confidence interval (95% CI), 0.74-6.47]; the TDM also increased 1.2 micro m (95% CI, -0.05 to 2.38) but was of borderline significance. Monobutyl, monobenzyl, monomethyl, and mono-2-ethylhexyl phthalates were not significantly associated with comet assay parameters. In conclusion, this study represents the first human data to demonstrate that urinary MEP, at environmental levels, is associated with increased DNA damage in sperm. PMID:12842768

  20. Comparative sperm ultrastructure in Nemertea.

    PubMed

    von Döhren, J; Beckers, P; Vogeler, R; Bartolomaeus, T

    2010-07-01

    Although the monophyly of Nemertea is strongly supported by unique morphological characters and results of molecular phylogenetic studies, their ingroup relationships are largely unresolved. To contribute solving this problem we studied sperm ultrastructure of 12 nemertean species that belong to different subtaxa representing the commonly recognized major monophyletic groups. The study yielded a set of 26 characters with an unexpected variation among species of the same genus (Tubulanus and Procephalothrix species), whereas other species varied in metric values or only one character state (Ramphogordius). In some species, the sperm nucleus has grooves (Zygonemertes virescens, Amphiporus imparispinosus) that may be twisted and give a spiral shape to the sperm head (Paranemertes peregrina, Emplectonema gracile). To make the characters from sperm ultrastructure accessible for further phylogenetic analyses, they were coded in a character matrix. Published data for eight species turned out to be sufficiently detailed to be included. Comparative evaluation of available information on the sperm ultrastructure suggests that subtaxa of Heteronemertea and Hoplonemertea are supported as monophyletic by sperm morphology. However, the data do not provide information on the existing contradictions regarding the internal relationships of "Palaeonemertea." Nevertheless, our study provides evidence that sperm ultrastructure yields numerous potentially informative characters that will be included in upcoming phylogenetic analyses.

  1. The effects of sildenafil on human sperm function in healthy volunteers

    PubMed Central

    Purvis, Ken; Muirhead, Gary J; Harness, Jane A

    2002-01-01

    Aims This double-blind, randomized, four-period, two-way crossover study was conducted to evaluate the acute effects of oral sildenafil (100-mg single dose) on sperm motility, count, density, morphology and vitality as well as ejaculate volume and viscosity in healthy male subjects. The concentrations of sildenafil and its primary circulating metabolite UK-103,320 were measured in ejaculate and compared with those in plasma. The study also included assessments of safety and tolerability. Methods A total of 17 healthy male volunteers aged 19–34 years were randomized to receive a single 100-mg dose of sildenafil for two periods and a single dose of placebo for two periods, with each period separated by a minimum of 5–7 days. Sperm and ejaculate properties were evaluated from semen samples taken at screening and 1.5 h after dose. An additional semen sample was collected 4 h after dose, and drug and metabolite concentrations were measured in this sample and the sample taken 1.5 h after dose for comparison with plasma concentrations. Blood samples were collected before each dose and 0.25, 0.5, 1, 2, 3, 4 and 6 h after dose for measurement of sildenafil and metabolite concentrations. Results Sildenafil had no statistically significant effect on sperm motility, count or density; the percentage of abnormal sperm forms; or the percentage of living sperm. It also did not affect ejaculate volume or viscosity. All measures were within normal ranges. Sildenafil distributed into the semen rapidly, resulting in significant correlations between concentrations of sildenafil in the semen and total (R2 = 0.588) or free (R2 = 0.454) plasma concentrations (P <0.0001). Total semen concentrations of sildenafil were 18% of total plasma concentrations. UK-103,320 appeared to distribute more slowly from the plasma into the semen, resulting in a lack of correlation between semen and plasma concentrations. The amount of sildenafil and UK-103,320 in the ejaculate was small (<2×10−4% of

  2. Sperm studies in anesthesiologists

    SciTech Connect

    Wyrobek, A.J.; Brodsky, J.; Gordon, l.; Moore, D.H., II; Watchmaker, G.; Cohen, E.N.

    1981-11-01

    Semen samples were collected from 46 anesthesiologists each of whom had worked a minimum of one year in hospital operating rooms ventilated with modern gas-scavenging devices. Samples collected from 26 beginning residents in anesthesiology served as controls. Concentrations of sperm and percentage of sperm having abnormal head shapes were determined for each sample. No significant differences were found between anesthesiologists and beginning residents. Limiting the analyses to men having no confounding factors (varicocele, recent illness, medications, heavy smoking, frequent sauna use) did not change the results. The sperm concentration and morphology in 13 men did not change signficantly after one year of exposure to anesthetic gases. However, the group of men who had one or more confounding factors (excluding exposure to anesthetic gases) showed significantly higher percentages of sperm abnormalities than did the group of men without such factors. These results suggest that limited exposure to anesthetic gases does not significantly affect sperm production as judged by changes in sperm concentration and morphology. These data are reassuring, but since the hospitals surveyed used modern gas-scavenging devices, men who are occupationally exposed to anesthetic gases without this protection should be studied for fuller assessment of the possible human spermatotoxic effects.

  3. Single-nucleus RNA-seq of differentiating human myoblasts reveals the extent of fate heterogeneity

    PubMed Central

    Zeng, Weihua; Jiang, Shan; Kong, Xiangduo; El-Ali, Nicole; Ball, Alexander R.; Ma, Christopher I-Hsing; Hashimoto, Naohiro; Yokomori, Kyoko; Mortazavi, Ali

    2016-01-01

    Myoblasts are precursor skeletal muscle cells that differentiate into fused, multinucleated myotubes. Current single-cell microfluidic methods are not optimized for capturing very large, multinucleated cells such as myotubes. To circumvent the problem, we performed single-nucleus transcriptome analysis. Using immortalized human myoblasts, we performed RNA-seq analysis of single cells (scRNA-seq) and single nuclei (snRNA-seq) and found them comparable, with a distinct enrichment for long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in snRNA-seq. We then compared snRNA-seq of myoblasts before and after differentiation. We observed the presence of mononucleated cells (MNCs) that remained unfused and analyzed separately from multi-nucleated myotubes. We found that while the transcriptome profiles of myoblast and myotube nuclei are relatively homogeneous, MNC nuclei exhibited significant heterogeneity, with the majority of them adopting a distinct mesenchymal state. Primary transcripts for microRNAs (miRNAs) that participate in skeletal muscle differentiation were among the most differentially expressed lncRNAs, which we validated using NanoString. Our study demonstrates that snRNA-seq provides reliable transcriptome quantification for cells that are otherwise not amenable to current single-cell platforms. Our results further indicate that snRNA-seq has unique advantage in capturing nucleus-enriched lncRNAs and miRNA precursors that are useful in mapping and monitoring differential miRNA expression during cellular differentiation. PMID:27566152

  4. Human Cytomegalovirus IE1 Protein Disrupts Interleukin-6 Signaling by Sequestering STAT3 in the Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Reitsma, Justin M.; Sato, Hiromi; Nevels, Michael

    2013-01-01

    In the canonical STAT3 signaling pathway, binding of agonist to receptors activates Janus kinases that phosphorylate cytoplasmic STAT3 at tyrosine 705 (Y705). Phosphorylated STAT3 dimers accumulate in the nucleus and drive the expression of genes involved in inflammation, angiogenesis, invasion, and proliferation. Here, we demonstrate that human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) infection rapidly promotes nuclear localization of STAT3 in the absence of robust phosphorylation at Y705. Furthermore, infection disrupts interleukin-6 (IL-6)-induced phosphorylation of STAT3 and expression of a subset of IL-6-induced STAT3-regulated genes, including SOCS3. We show that the HCMV 72-kDa immediate-early 1 (IE1) protein associates with STAT3 and is necessary to localize STAT3 to the nucleus during infection. Furthermore, expression of IE1 is sufficient to disrupt IL-6-induced phosphorylation of STAT3, binding of STAT3 to the SOCS3 promoter, and SOCS3 gene expression. Finally, inhibition of STAT3 nuclear localization or STAT3 expression during infection is linked to diminished HCMV genome replication. Viral gene expression is also disrupted, with the greatest impact seen following viral DNA synthesis. Our study identifies IE1 as a new regulator of STAT3 intracellular localization and IL-6 signaling and points to an unanticipated role of STAT3 in HCMV infection. PMID:23903834

  5. Single-nucleus RNA-seq of differentiating human myoblasts reveals the extent of fate heterogeneity.

    PubMed

    Zeng, Weihua; Jiang, Shan; Kong, Xiangduo; El-Ali, Nicole; Ball, Alexander R; Ma, Christopher I-Hsing; Hashimoto, Naohiro; Yokomori, Kyoko; Mortazavi, Ali

    2016-12-01

    Myoblasts are precursor skeletal muscle cells that differentiate into fused, multinucleated myotubes. Current single-cell microfluidic methods are not optimized for capturing very large, multinucleated cells such as myotubes. To circumvent the problem, we performed single-nucleus transcriptome analysis. Using immortalized human myoblasts, we performed RNA-seq analysis of single cells (scRNA-seq) and single nuclei (snRNA-seq) and found them comparable, with a distinct enrichment for long non-coding RNAs (lncRNAs) in snRNA-seq. We then compared snRNA-seq of myoblasts before and after differentiation. We observed the presence of mononucleated cells (MNCs) that remained unfused and analyzed separately from multi-nucleated myotubes. We found that while the transcriptome profiles of myoblast and myotube nuclei are relatively homogeneous, MNC nuclei exhibited significant heterogeneity, with the majority of them adopting a distinct mesenchymal state. Primary transcripts for microRNAs (miRNAs) that participate in skeletal muscle differentiation were among the most differentially expressed lncRNAs, which we validated using NanoString. Our study demonstrates that snRNA-seq provides reliable transcriptome quantification for cells that are otherwise not amenable to current single-cell platforms. Our results further indicate that snRNA-seq has unique advantage in capturing nucleus-enriched lncRNAs and miRNA precursors that are useful in mapping and monitoring differential miRNA expression during cellular differentiation.

  6. Notochordal cell-derived conditioned medium protects human nucleus pulposus cells from stress-induced apoptosis.

    PubMed

    Mehrkens, Arne; Matta, Ajay; Karim, Muhammad Zia; Kim, Sarah; Fehlings, Michael G; Schaeren, Stefan; Mark Erwin, William

    2017-04-01

    Degenerative disc disease (DDD) remains without an effective therapy and presents a costly burden to society. Based upon prior reports concerning the effects of notochordal cell-conditioned medium (NCCM) on disc cells, we performed a proof of principle study to determine whether NCCM could reduce cytotoxic stress-induced apoptosis in human disc nucleus pulposus (NP) cells. This is an "in vitro" fundamental or basic science study. Nucleus pulpous cells derived from 15 patients undergoing spinal surgery were treated with interleukin (IL)-1β and Fas ligand or etoposide in the presence of NCCM. We determined pro- or antiapoptotic events using activated caspase assays and determined genomic regulation of apoptosis using polymerase chain reaction arrays validated using Western blotting methods. We interrogated cellular apoptotic regulation using JC-1 dye and flow cytometry and performed enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays to evaluate NP inflammatory cytokine secretion. Notochordal cell-conditioned medium inhibits cytotoxic stress-induced caspase-9 and -3/7 activities and maintains the mitochondrial membrane potential in human NP cells, thereby suppressing the intrinsic apoptotic pathway. Gene expression analysis revealed the X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein as a key player responsible for evading etoposide-induced apoptosis in the presence of NCCM, and we verified these data using Western blotting. Enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay results revealed distinct differences in IL-6 and IL-8 secretions by NP cells in response to etoposide in the presence of NCCM. Here we demonstrate for the first time that NCCM reduces cytotoxic stress-induced apoptosis in human NP cells. Soluble factors present in NCCM could be harnessed for the development of novel therapeutics for the treatment of DDD. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Intracellular translocation and differential accumulation of cell-penetrating peptides in bovine spermatozoa: evaluation of efficient delivery vectors that do not compromise human sperm motility

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Sarah; Lukanowska, Monika; Suhorutsenko, Julia; Oxenham, Senga; Barratt, Christopher; Publicover, Steven; Copolovici, Dana Maria; Langel, Ülo; Howl, John

    2013-01-01

    STUDY QUESTION Do cell penetrating peptides (CPPs) translocate into spermatozoa and, if so, could they be utilized to deliver a much larger protein cargo? SUMMARY ANSWER Chemically diverse polycationic CPPs rapidly and efficiently translocate into spermatozoa. They exhibit differential accumulation within intracellular compartments without detrimental influences upon cellular viability or motility but they are relatively ineffective in transporting larger proteins. WHAT IS ALREADY KNOWN Endocytosis, the prevalent route of protein internalization into eukaryotic cells, is severely compromised in mature spermatozoa. Thus, the translocation of many bioactive agents into sperm is relatively inefficient. However, the delivery of bioactive moieties into mature spermatozoa could be significantly improved by the identification and utility of an efficient and inert vectorial delivery technology. STUDY DESIGN CPP translocation efficacies, their subsequent differential intracellular distribution and the influence of peptides upon viability were determined in bovine spermatozoa. Temporal analyses of sperm motility in the presence of exogenously CPPs utilized normozoospermic human donor samples. MATERIALS AND METHODS CPPs were prepared by manual, automated and microwave-enhanced solid phase synthesis. Confocal fluorescence microscopy determined the intracellular distribution of rhodamine-conjugated CPPs in spermatozoa. Quantitative uptake and kinetic analyses compared the translocation efficacies of chemically diverse CPPs and conjugates of biotinylated CPPs and avidin. 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-5-(3-carboxymethoxyphenyl)-2-(4-sulfophenyl)-2H-tetrazolium, inner salt (MTS) conversion assays were employed to analyse the influence of CPPs upon sperm cell viability and sperm class assays determined the impact of CPPs on motility in capacitated and non-capacitated human samples. MAIN RESULTS Chemically heterogeneous CPPs readily translocated into sperm to accumulate within

  8. Classification of adult human dentate nucleus border neurons: Artificial neural networks and multidimensional approach.

    PubMed

    Grbatinić, Ivan; Milošević, Nebojša

    2016-09-07

    Primary aim in this study is to investigate whether external and internal border neurons of adult human dentate nucleus express the same neuromorphological features or belong to a different morphological types i.e. whether can be classified not only by way of their topology as external and internal, but also based on their morphological features or in addition to their topology also by way of their morphology. Secondary aim is to determine and compare various methodologies in order to perform the first aim in a more accurate and efficient manner. Blocks of tissue were cut out from the adult human cerebellum and stained according to the Kopsch-Bubenaite method. Border neurons of the dentate nucleus were investigated and digitized under the light microscope and processed thereafter. Seventeen parameters quantifying various aspects of neuron morphology are then measured. They can be categorized as shape, magnitude, complexity, length and branching parameters. Analyzes used are neural networks, separate unifactor, cluster, principal component, discriminant and correlation-comparison analysis. The external and internal border neurons differ significantly in six of the seventeen parameters investigated, mainly concerning dendritic ramification patterns, overall shape of dendritic tree and dendritic length. All six methodological approaches are in accordance showing slight clustering of data. Classification is based on six parameters: neuron (field) area, dendritic (field) area, total dendrite length, and position of maximal dendritic arborization density. Cluster analysis shows two data clusters. Separate unifactor analysis demonstrates inter-cluster differences with statistical significance (p < 0.05) for all six parameters separately. Principal component, discriminant and correlation-comparison analysis further prove the result on a more factor integrate manner and explain it, respectively. Thus, these neurons can be classified, not only according to their location but

  9. Direct evidence for suppression of recombination within two pericentric inversions in humans: a new sperm-FISH technique.

    PubMed Central

    Jaarola, M; Martin, R H; Ashley, T

    1998-01-01

    Crossover within a pericentric inversion produces reciprocal recombinant chromosomes that are duplicated/deficient for all chromatin distal to the breakpoints. In view of this fact, a new technique is presented for estimating the frequency of recombination within pericentric inversions. YAC probes were selected from within the q- and p-arm flanking regions of two human inversions, and two-color FISH analysis was performed on sperm from heterozygous inversion carriers. A total of 6,006 sperm were analyzed for chromosome 1 inversion (p31q12), and 3,168 were analyzed for chromosome 8 inversion (p23q22). Both inversions displayed suppression of crossing-over, although the amount of suppression differed between the two inversions. The recombination frequency of 13.1% recorded for chromosome 8 inversion was similar to the frequency of 11.4% previously estimated by the human/hamster-fusion method. For chromosome 1 inversion, the recombination frequency of 0. 4% reported here was below the limits of detection of the fusion technique. The simplicity of the FISH technique and the ease of scoring facilitate analysis of a sample-population size much larger than previously had been possible. PMID:9634501

  10. Exposure to widespread environmental endocrine disrupting chemicals and human sperm sex ratio.

    PubMed

    Jurewicz, Joanna; Radwan, Michał; Sobala, Wojciech; Radwan, Paweł; Jakubowski, Lucjusz; Wielgomas, Bartosz; Ligocka, Danuta; Brzeźnicki, Sławomir; Hanke, Wojciech

    2016-06-01

    In recent years, a trend toward a declining proportion of male births has been noted in several, but not all, industrialized countries. The underlying reason for the drop in the sex ratio is unclear, but one theory states that widespread environmental endocrine disrupting chemicals affecting the male reproductive system in a negative manner could be part of the explanation. The present study was designed to investigate whether the urinary phthalate, pyrethroids and polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons metabolites concentrations were associated with sperm Y:X ratio. The study population consisted of 194 men aged under 45 years of age who attended infertility clinic in Lodz, Poland for diagnostic purposes with normal semen concentration of 20-300 mln/ml or with slight oligozoospermia (semen concentration of 15-20 mln/ml) (WHO, 1999). The Y:X ratio was assessed by fluorescent in situ hybridization. Urinary concentrations of 1-hydroxypyrene were measured by high performance liquid chromatography, phthalate metabolites were analyzed using a procedure based on the LC-MS/MS methods and metabolites of synthetic pyrethroids were assessed by gas chromatography ion-tap mass spectrometry method. After adjustment for potential confounders (past diseases, age, abstinence, smoking, alcohol consumption, sperm concentration, motility, morphology) 5OH MEHP, CDCCA to TDCCA and 1-OHP was negatively related to Y:X sperm chromosome ratio (p = 0.033, p < 0.001, p = 0.047 respectively). As this is the first study to elucidate the association between the level of metabolites of widespread environmental endocrine disrupting chemicals (phthalates, synthetic pyrethroids, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons) on sex chromosome ratio in sperm therefore, these findings require further replication in other populations. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  11. Nucleus-nucleus potentials

    SciTech Connect

    Satchler, G.R.

    1983-01-01

    The significance of a nucleus-nucleus potential is discussed. Information about such potentials obtained from scattering experiments is reviewed, including recent examples of so-called rainbow scattering that probe the potential at smaller distances. The evidence for interactions involving the nuclear spins is summarized, and their possible origin in couplings to non-elastic channels. Various models of the potentials are discussed.

  12. Can the controversy about the putative role of the human female orgasm in sperm transport be settled with our current physiological knowledge of coitus?

    PubMed

    Levin, Roy J

    2011-06-01

    Spermatozoal uptake, facilitated by uterine contractions induced by oxytocin at orgasm during coitus, has been a long term concept. Studies attempting its support, however, have been poorly examined especially in the context of the changes in the female genital tract activated by sexual arousal. To examine experimental support for the concept. Using a variety of search engines, mainly peer reviewed articles and un-reviewed books were examined relating to sperm transport and function in the human female genital tract in the absence and presence of arousal to orgasm. Identifying evidence-based data to support authority-based opinion. All the experimental observations of sperm or model substitute's transport have been undertaken in women who were not sexually aroused. They fail to take into account that arousal creates vaginal tenting lifting the cervico-uterine complex into the false pelvis away from the ejaculated semen. This delays sperm uptake and transport making conclusions from these observations invalid in relation to transport during coitus. Studies injecting oxytocin have not used women in their sexually aroused state and used supraphysiological doses unlikely to be comparable with coitus and orgasm. The proposal that the transport of extra sperm by oxytocin-induced uterine contractions at orgasm is needed to facilitate fertility ignores possible harm from increased sperm numbers creating polyspermy and sperm enzyme release causing ovum degeneration, leading to decreased fertility. The role of sperm motility in their uptake from the vagina into the cervix as opposed to en bloc transfer through uterine archimyometrial-mediated transport in the absence of orgasm is at present unresolvable because of conflicting studies. The bulk of the reported evidence favors the conclusion that the female orgasm, with its concomitant central release of oxytocin, has little or no effective role in the transport of spermatozoa in natural human coitus. © 2010 International

  13. Characterization of a human glycoprotein with a potential role in sperm-egg fusion: cDNA cloning, immunohistochemical localization, and chromosomal assignment of the gene (AEGL1)

    SciTech Connect

    Hayashi, Masaru; Fujimoto, Seiichiro; Takano, Hiroko

    1996-03-05

    Acidic epididymal glycoprotein (AEG), thus far identified only in rodents, is one of the sperm surface proteins involved in the fusion of the sperm and egg plasma membranes. In the present study, we describe the isolation and characterization of cDNA encoding a human glycoprotein related to AEG. Although this protein, designated ARP (AEG-related protein), is not the ortholog of rodent AEG, it resembles AEG in that it is an epididymal secretory glycoprotein that binds to the postacrosomal region of the sperm head. The fact that no AEG mRNA can be detected in the human epididymis suggests that ARP might be the functional counterpart of rodent AEG. The gene encoding ARP (AEGL1) was mapped by fluorescence in situ hybridization to 6p21.1-p21.2. This result indicates that AEGL1 and the mouse gene for AEG are located in the chromosomal segments with conserved syntenies. 43 refs., 6 figs.

  14. Assessment of aneuploidy for chromosomes 8, 9, 13, 16, and 21 in human sperm by using primed in situ labeling technique

    SciTech Connect

    Pellestor, F.; Girardet, A.; Coignet, L.; Andreo, B.; Charlieu, J.P.

    1996-04-01

    The incidence of aneuploidy was estimated for chromosomes 8, 9, 13, 16, and 21 in mature human spermatozoa by primed in situ (PRINS) labeling technique. This method allows us to perform a chromosome-specific detection by in situ annealing of a centromeric specific primer. A dual color PRINS protocol was adapted to human sperm. The decondensation and the denaturation of sperm nuclei were simultaneously performed by 3-M NaOH treatment. Double labeling of spermatozoa was obtained in < 2 h. A total of 96,292 sperm nuclei were analyzed by two independent observers. The estimates of disomy were 0.31 % for chromosome 8, 0.28% for chromosome 9, 0.28% for chromosome 13, 0.26% for chromosome 16, and 0.32% for chromosome 21. These homogeneous findings suggest an equal distribution of aneuploidies among all autosomal chromosomes in males. 26 refs., 1 fig., 2 tabs.

  15. Decoding gripping force based on local field potentials recorded from subthalamic nucleus in humans.

    PubMed

    Tan, Huiling; Pogosyan, Alek; Ashkan, Keyoumars; Green, Alexander L; Aziz, Tipu; Foltynie, Thomas; Limousin, Patricia; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Hariz, Marwan; Brown, Peter

    2016-11-18

    The basal ganglia are known to be involved in the planning, execution and control of gripping force and movement vigour. Here we aim to define the nature of the basal ganglia control signal for force and to decode gripping force based on local field potential (LFP) activities recorded from the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in patients with deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes. We found that STN LFP activities in the gamma (55-90 Hz) and beta (13-30m Hz) bands were most informative about gripping force, and that a first order dynamic linear model with these STN LFP features as inputs can be used to decode the temporal profile of gripping force. Our results enhance the understanding of how the basal ganglia control gripping force, and also suggest that deep brain LFPs could potentially be used to decode movement parameters related to force and movement vigour for the development of advanced human-machine interfaces.

  16. Perturbation of nucleo-cytoplasmic transport affects size of nucleus and nucleolus in human cells.

    PubMed

    Ganguly, Abira; Bhattacharjee, Chumki; Bhave, Madhura; Kailaje, Vaishali; Jain, Bhawik K; Sengupta, Isha; Rangarajan, Annapoorni; Bhattacharyya, Dibyendu

    2016-03-01

    Size regulation of human cell nucleus and nucleolus are poorly understood subjects. 3D reconstruction of live image shows that the karyoplasmic ratio (KR) increases by 30-80% in transformed cell lines compared to their immortalized counterpart. The attenuation of nucleo-cytoplasmic transport causes the KR value to increase by 30-50% in immortalized cell lines. Nucleolus volumes are significantly increased in transformed cell lines and the attenuation of nucleo-cytoplasmic transport causes a significant increase in the nucleolus volume of immortalized cell lines. A cytosol and nuclear fraction swapping experiment emphasizes the potential role of unknown cytosolic factors in nuclear and nucleolar size regulation. © 2016 Federation of European Biochemical Societies.

  17. Sexual selection and the evolution of sperm quality.

    PubMed

    Fitzpatrick, John L; Lüpold, Stefan

    2014-12-01

    Sperm experience intense and varied selection that dramatically impacts the evolution of sperm quality. Selection acts to ensure that sperm are fertilization-competent and able to overcome the many challenges experienced on their way towards eggs. However, simply being able to fertilize an egg is not enough to ensure male fertility in most species. Owing to the prevalence of female multiple mating throughout the animal kingdom, successful fertilization requires sperm to outcompete rival sperm. In addition, females can actively influence sperm quality, storage or utilization to influence male fertility. This review provides an overview of how these selective forces influence the evolution of sperm quality. After exploring the link between sperm traits and male fertility, we examine how post-mating competition between rival ejaculates influences the evolution of sperm quality. We then describe how complex genetic, social and sexual interactions influence sperm quality, focusing on the importance of seminal fluid and interactions between sperm and the female's reproductive tract. In light of the complexities of selection on sperm traits, greater use of multivariate approaches that incorporate male-male, sperm-sperm and sperm-female interactions to study sperm quality will enhance our understanding of how selection acts on sperm traits and factors influencing male fertility. Because the metric of male reproductive success--fertilization--is the same across the animal kingdom, we argue that information about sperm evolution gained from non-human animals has enormous potential to further our understanding of the factors that impact human fertility.

  18. Susceptibility of human sperm to in situ DNA denaturation is strongly correlated with DNA strand breaks identified by single-cell electrophoresis.

    PubMed

    Aravindan, G R; Bjordahl, J; Jost, L K; Evenson, D P

    1997-10-10

    Susceptibility of mammalian sperm DNA to low pH- or heat-induced denaturation in situ has shown very strong dose-response relationships with animal and human exposure to chemical and physical toxicants and also fertility potential. In this study, 23 human semen samples representing a wide range in percentage (7-86%) of sperm exhibiting abnormally high susceptibility of DNA in situ to denaturation were studied for the integrity of their DNA using alkaline comet assay (single-cell microgel electrophoresis, pH 10.0). The percentage of comets observed for these samples ranged from 5 to 95%; these data correlated strongly with the percentage of sperm with increased DNA denaturability (r = 0.973; P < 0.001). Labeling of 3' ends of nicked DNA sites with 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine 5'-triphosphate (BrdUTP) followed by tagging with FITC-BrdUTP monoclonal antibody and flow cytometry also indicated significantly strong correlations of BrdUTP incorporation with both abnormal susceptibility of DNA to denaturation (r = 0.859, P < 0.001) and comet assay (r = 0.812, P < 0.001). The relationship among susceptibility of sperm chromatin to acid denaturation in situ, BrdUTP incorporation, and formation of comets suggests that DNA fragmentation monitored by these assays may have important physiological relevance in terms of sperm quality and fertility potential.

  19. The relationship between paternal age, sex ratios, and aneuploidy frequencies in human sperm, as assessed by multicolor FISH

    SciTech Connect

    Martin, R.H.; Spriggs, E. |; Ko, E.

    1995-12-01

    We studied the frequencies of X- and Y-chromosome bearing sperm, diploidy and disomy for chromosomes 1, 12, X, and Y in sperm from 10 normal men aged 21 - 52 years, to determine whether there was any relationship between donor age and any of these variables. Multicolor FISH was used to control for lack of probe hybridization and to distinguish diploid sperm from disomic sperm. A minimum of 10,000 sperm per donor was evaluated for each chromosome, for a total of 225,846 sperm studied. Sperm were considered disomic if two fluorescent signals were separated by a minimal distance of one signal domain. The mean frequencies of X- and Y-bearing sperm were 50.1% and 49.0%, respectively; not significantly different from 50%. There was no correlation between paternal age and {open_quotes}sex ratio {close_quotes} in sperm. Similarly, there was no association between the frequency of diploid sperm (mean, .16%; range, .06%-.42%) and donor age. For disomy frequencies, there was no relationship between donor age and disomy 12 (mean, .16%; range, .10%-.25%), XX (mean, .07%; range, .03%-.17%), and XY sperm (mean, .16%; range, .08%-.24%). There was a significant increase in the frequency of YY sperm (P = .04; mean, .18%; range, .10%-.43%) and disomy 1 sperm (P = .01; mean, .11%; range, .05%-.18%) with donor age. In summary, our results do not support a correlation between paternal age and sex ratio or diploidy. A relationship between paternal age and disomy was observed for disomy 1 and YY sperm but not for disomy 12, XX or XY sperm. 37 refs., 3 tabs.

  20. Nucleus and cell size changes in human bulbar conjunctival cells after soft contact lens wear, as assessed by impression cytology.

    PubMed

    Doughty, Michael J; Naase, Taher

    2008-06-01

    To specifically assess the nucleus size and its relationship to cell size for human bulbar conjunctival cells. Impression cytology samples were taken from the nasal side of the intra-palpebral zone of the bulbar conjunctival surface from 20 young adult white European males, half of whom were successful daily soft contact lens wearers. A Millcell-CM filter was used, after topical anaesthesia with oxybuprocaine 0.4%, which was stained with Giemsa and colour images taken at 400x magnification by light microscopy. The images were graded and also a 35mm was prepared. From the projected image, an overlay method was used to outline the borders such that the cell and nucleus areas could be measured by planimetry. The group mean cell area values were 267+/-59microm(2) (n=10, +/-S.D.) and 1028+/-357microm(2) for the non-contact lens wearers and contact lens wearers, respectively. The cell nucleus areas were 64+/-11microm(2) and 99+/-19microm(2), respectively. Both the cell areas and nucleus area values were statistically different between the two groups (p<0.001). These studies confirm that soft contact lens wear can result in cell enlargement (squamous metaplasia) of the bulbar conjunctival cells. With this cell enlargement, the nucleus-to-cytoplasm ratio also changes, but the nucleus size generally increases (rather than decreases).

  1. cDNA cloning and characterization of a human sperm antigen (SPAG6) with homology to the product of the Chlamydomonas PF16 locus.

    PubMed

    Neilson, L I; Schneider, P A; Van Deerlin, P G; Kiriakidou, M; Driscoll, D A; Pellegrini, M C; Millinder, S; Yamamoto, K K; French, C K; Strauss, J F

    1999-09-15

    Serum from an infertile male with high-titer anti-sperm antibodies was used to identify a novel human sperm antigen by screening of a testis expression library. The clone, initially designated Repro-SA-1 (HUGO-approved symbol SPAG6), was found to encode a sequence highly enriched in testis. The deduced amino acid sequence of the full-length cDNA revealed striking homology to the product of the Chlamydomonas reinhardtii PF16 locus, which encodes a protein localized to the central pair of the flagellar axoneme. The human gene encodes 1.8- and 2.8-kb mRNAs highly expressed in testis but not in prostate, ovary, spleen, thymus, small intestine, colon, peripheral blood leukocytes, heart, brain, placenta, liver, muscle, kidney, and pancreas. The gene was mapped to chromosome 10p11.2-p12. Antibodies raised against SPAG6 sequences localized the protein to the tails of permeabilized human sperm. Both the Chlamydomonas protein and SPAG6 contain eight contiguous armadillo repeats, which place them in a family of proteins known to mediate protein-protein interactions. The cloning of the human homologue of the Chlamydomonas PF16 locus provides a new avenue to explore the role of the axoneme central pair in human sperm function. Copyright 1999 Academic Press.

  2. Rare earths exposure and male infertility: the injury mechanism study of rare earths on male mice and human sperm.

    PubMed

    Chen, Jun; Xiao, Heng-Jun; Qi, Tao; Chen, Di-Ling; Long, He-Ming; Liu, Song-Hao

    2015-02-01

    The weight; testis/body coefficient; levels of LDH, SDH, SODH, G-6PD, and testosterone; cell cycle; and cell apoptosis of the male mice were influenced after being treated with 200 mg/[kg/day] of rare earths suspension for 3 weeks. The "Raman fingerprints" of the human sperm DNA exposed to 0.040 mg/ml CeCl3 were very different from those of the untreated; the Raman bands at 789 cm(-1) (backbone phosphodiester), PO4 backbone at 1,094 cm(-1), methylene deformation mode at 1,221 cm(-1), methylene deformation mode at 1,485 cm(-1), and amide II at 1,612 cm(-1), of which intensities and shifts were changed, might be the diagnostic biomarkers or potential therapeutic targets. The injury mechanism might be that the rare earths influence the oxidative stress and blood testosterone barrier, tangle the big biomolecule concurrently, which might cause the testicular cells and vascular system disorder and/or dysfunction, and at the same time change the physical and chemical properties of the sperm directly.

  3. Partition of the organochlorine insecticide lindane into the human sperm surface induces membrane depolarization and Ca2+ influx.

    PubMed Central

    Silvestroni, L; Fiorini, R; Palleschi, S

    1997-01-01

    The effects of the insecticide lindane (the gamma-isomer of 1,2,3,4,5,6-hexachlorocyclohexane) on membrane potential, cytosolic free Ca2+ concentration ([Ca2+]i) and surface biophysical properties were studied in human spermatozoa. The insecticide induces rapid, transient and reproducible membrane depolarization and opening of voltage-dependent Ca2+ channels leading to an increase in [Ca2+]i. In contrast with the effect in somatic cells, lindane did not affect gamma-aminobutyric acid receptor-linked Cl- currents. Ca2+ and K+ currents were found to drive lindane-induced membrane depolarization and repolarization respectively, whereas Na+ and Cl- fluxes appear not to have a role in the phenomenon. The insecticide was still able to produce membrane depolarization both in the combined absence of extracellular Ca2+ and Na+ and in high-K+ buffer, suggesting that lindane alters the membrane dipole potential. In agreement with this, Laurodan and Prodan fluorescence spectroscopy revealed that lindane partition into the sperm plasma membrane lowers water molecular dynamics in the uppermost region of the membrane external leaflet, probably as the result of reordering of water dipoles. We propose that the first effect of lindane partitioning into the sperm plasma membrane is a change in the membrane dipole potential, which results in the activation of membrane-located Ca2+-influx pathways. PMID:9032455

  4. Cryopreservation of hamster oocytes: effects of vitrification or freezing on human sperm penetration of zona-free hamster oocytes.

    PubMed

    Critser, J K; Arneson, B W; Aaker, D V; Ball, G D

    1986-08-01

    Three experiments were conducted for evaluation of the efficacy of conventional freezing or vitrification of hamster oocytes for use in a human sperm penetration assay (hSPA). In experiment 1, oocytes were cryopreserved and evaluated for survival on the basis of morphologic criteria. Survival of vitrified oocytes and that of frozen oocytes were not different, whereas all cryopreserved groups had lower survival than noncryopreserved controls. In experiment 2, oocytes were conventionally frozen or vitrified and evaluated in an hSPA. Vitrified oocytes had a lower frequency of sperm penetration than frozen oocytes, and all cryopreserved groups had lower penetration rates than untreated controls. In experiment 3, oocytes were exposed to the cryoprotectant used to vitrify (VS1) or freeze (DMSO) but not cooled prior to evaluation in an hSPA. Exposure to DMSO but not VS1 reduced hSPA values. It is concluded from these experiments that while all cryopreserved oocytes do not survive, at current stages of development conventionally frozen oocytes perform better than vitrified oocytes in the hSPA and losses associated with conventional freezing procedures may be related to cryoprotectant exposure, whereas vitrification losses are more probably due to events associated with rapid cooling and/or warming of the oocytes.

  5. High-dose folic acid supplementation alters the human sperm methylome and is influenced by the MTHFR C677T polymorphism

    PubMed Central

    Aarabi, Mahmoud; San Gabriel, Maria C.; Chan, Donovan; Behan, Nathalie A.; Caron, Maxime; Pastinen, Tomi; Bourque, Guillaume; MacFarlane, Amanda J.; Zini, Armand; Trasler, Jacquetta

    2015-01-01

    Dietary folate is a major source of methyl groups required for DNA methylation, an epigenetic modification that is actively maintained and remodeled during spermatogenesis. While high-dose folic acid supplementation (up to 10 times the daily recommended dose) has been shown to improve sperm parameters in infertile men, the effects of supplementation on the sperm epigenome are unknown. To assess the impact of 6 months of high-dose folic acid supplementation on the sperm epigenome, we studied 30 men with idiopathic infertility. Blood folate concentrations increased significantly after supplementation with no significant improvements in sperm parameters. Methylation levels of the differentially methylated regions of several imprinted loci (H19, DLK1/GTL2, MEST, SNRPN, PLAGL1, KCNQ1OT1) were normal both before and after supplementation. Reduced representation bisulfite sequencing (RRBS) revealed a significant global loss of methylation across different regions of the sperm genome. The most marked loss of DNA methylation was found in sperm from patients homozygous for the methylenetetrahydrofolate reductase (MTHFR) C677T polymorphism, a common polymorphism in a key enzyme required for folate metabolism. RRBS analysis also showed that most of the differentially methylated tiles were located in DNA repeats, low CpG-density and intergenic regions. Ingenuity Pathway Analysis revealed that methylation of promoter regions was altered in several genes involved in cancer and neurobehavioral disorders including CBFA2T3, PTPN6, COL18A1, ALDH2, UBE4B, ERBB2, GABRB3, CNTNAP4 and NIPA1. Our data reveal alterations of the human sperm epigenome associated with high-dose folic acid supplementation, effects that were exacerbated by a common polymorphism in MTHFR. PMID:26307085

  6. Recombinant human ZP3-induced sperm acrosome reaction: evidence for the involvement of T- and L-type voltage-gated calcium channels.

    PubMed

    José, Omar; Hernández-Hernández, Oscar; Chirinos, Mayel; González-González, María Elena; Larrea, Fernando; Almanza, Angélica; Felix, Ricardo; Darszon, Alberto; Treviño, Claudia L

    2010-05-14

    For successful fertilization mammalian spermatozoa must undergo the acrosome reaction (AR), an exocytotic event that allows this cell to penetrate the outer layer of the oocyte, the zona pellucida (ZP). Four glycoproteins (ZP1-ZP4) compose the human ZP, being ZP3 the physiological inductor of the AR. This process requires changes in intracellular Ca(2+) concentration ([Ca(2+)](i)) involving not fully understood mechanisms. Even in mouse sperm, the pharmacologically documented participation of voltage-gated Ca(2+) (Ca(V)) channels and store-operated channels (SOCs) in the ZP-induced AR is being debated. The situation in human sperm is even less clear due to the limited availability of human ZP. Here, we used recombinant human ZP3 (rhZP3) produced in baculovirus-infected Sf9 cells to investigate the involvement of Ca(V) channels in the human sperm AR. Our findings showed that Ni(2+) and mibefradil at concentrations that block T-type or Ca(V)3 channels, and nimodipine and diltiazem that block L-type or Ca(V)1 channels, significantly inhibited the rhZP3-initiated AR. On the other hand, the AR was insensitive to concentrations of omega-Agatoxin IVA, omega-Conotoxin GVIA and SNX-482 that block P/Q, N and R-type channels, respectively (Ca(V)2 channels). Our overall findings suggest that Ca(V)1 and Ca(V)3 channels participate in human sperm AR. Consistent with this, we detected in human sperm transcripts for the Ca(V)1 auxiliary subunits, alpha(2)delta, beta(1), beta(2) and beta(4), but not the neuronal specific isoforms beta(3) and gamma(2).

  7. Measurement of the Nucleus Area and Nucleus/Cytoplasm and Mitochondria/Nucleus Ratios in Human Colon Tissues by Dual-Colour Two-Photon Microscopy Imaging

    PubMed Central

    Su Lim, Chang; Sun Kim, Eun; Yeon Kim, Ji; Taek Hong, Seung; Jai Chun, Hoon; Eun Kang, Dong; Rae Cho, Bong

    2015-01-01

    We developed two-photon (TP) probes for DNA (ABI-Nu), cytoplasm (Pyr-CT), and mitochondria (BF-MT). We found that ABI-Nu binds to AT in the minor groove, while ABI-Nu and BF-MT are effective for tracking in the cytoplasm and mitochondria, respectively. These probes showed very large effective two-photon action cross section values of 2230, 1555, and 790 Göppert-Mayer units (1 GM  =  10−50 cm4 s photon−1molecule−1) at 740 nm with emission maxima at 473, 561, and 560 nm, respectively, in each organelle. Using these probes, we quantitatively estimated the mean nuclear area and the ratios of nuclei to cytoplasm and mitochondria to nuclei in human colon tissues by dual-colour two-photon microscopy imaging within 2  h after biopsy. The mean nuclear area and the nuclei to cytoplasm and mitochondria to cytoplasm ratios increased in the following order: normal colon mucosa

  8. Measurement of the Nucleus Area and Nucleus/Cytoplasm and Mitochondria/Nucleus Ratios in Human Colon Tissues by Dual-Colour Two-Photon Microscopy Imaging.

    PubMed

    Su Lim, Chang; Sun Kim, Eun; Yeon Kim, Ji; Taek Hong, Seung; Jai Chun, Hoon; Eun Kang, Dong; Rae Cho, Bong

    2015-12-17

    We developed two-photon (TP) probes for DNA (ABI-Nu), cytoplasm (Pyr-CT), and mitochondria (BF-MT). We found that ABI-Nu binds to AT in the minor groove, while ABI-Nu and BF-MT are effective for tracking in the cytoplasm and mitochondria, respectively. These probes showed very large effective two-photon action cross section values of 2230, 1555, and 790 Göppert-Mayer units (1 GM  =  10(-50) cm(4) s photon(-1) molecule(-1)) at 740 nm with emission maxima at 473, 561, and 560 nm, respectively, in each organelle. Using these probes, we quantitatively estimated the mean nuclear area and the ratios of nuclei to cytoplasm and mitochondria to nuclei in human colon tissues by dual-colour two-photon microscopy imaging within 2  h after biopsy. The mean nuclear area and the nuclei to cytoplasm and mitochondria to cytoplasm ratios increased in the following order: normal colon mucosa

  9. Chondroprotective supplementation promotes the mechanical properties of injectable scaffold for human nucleus pulposus tissue engineering.

    PubMed

    Foss, Berit L; Maxwell, Thomas W; Deng, Ying

    2014-01-01

    A result of intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration, the nucleus pulposus (NP) is no longer able to withstand applied load leading to pain and disability. The objective of this study is to fabricate a tissue-engineered injectable scaffold with chondroprotective supplementation in vitro to improve the mechanical properties of a degenerative NP. Tissue-engineered scaffolds were fabricated using different concentrations of alginate and calcium chloride and mechanically evaluated. Fabrication conditions were based on structural and mechanical resemblance to the native NP. Chondroprotective supplementation, glucosamine (GCSN) and chondroitin sulfate (CS), were added to scaffolds at concentrations of 0:0µg/mL (0:0-S), 125:100µg/mL (125:100-S), 250:200µg/mL (250:200-S), and 500:400µg/mL (500:400-S), GCSN and CS, respectively. Scaffolds were used to fabricate tissue-engineered constructs through encapsulation of human nucleus pulposus cells (HNPCs). The tissue-engineered constructs were collected at days 1, 14, and 28 for biochemical and biomechanical evaluations. Confocal microscopy showed HNPC viability and rounded morphology over the 28 day period. MTT analysis resulted in significant increases in cell proliferation for each group. Collagen type II ELISA quantification and compressive aggregate moduli (HA) showed increasing trends for both 250:200-S and the 500:400-S groups on Day 28 with significantly greater HA compared to 0:0-S group. Glycosaminoglycan and water content decreased for all groups. Results indicate the increased mechanical properties of the 250:200-S and the 500:400-S was due to production of a functional matrix. This study demonstrated potential for a chondroprotective supplemented injectable scaffold to restore biomechanical function of a degenerative disc through the production of a mechanically functional matrix. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Distinctive Profiles of Gene Expression in the Human Nucleus Accumbens Associated with Cocaine and Heroin Abuse

    PubMed Central

    Albertson, Dawn N; Schmidt, Carl J; Kapatos, Gregory; Bannon, Michael J

    2008-01-01

    Drug abuse is thought to induce long-term cellular and behavioral adaptations as a result of alterations in gene expression. Understanding the molecular consequences of addiction may contribute to the development of better treatment strategies. This study utilized highthroughput Affymetrix microarrays to identify gene expression changes in the post-mortem nucleus accumbens of chronic heroin abusers. These data were analyzed independently and in relation to our previously reported data involving human cocaine abusers, in order to determine which expression changes were drug specific and which may be common to the phenomenon of addiction. A significant decrease in the expression of numerous genes encoding proteins involved in presynaptic release of neurotransmitter was seen in heroin abusers, a finding not seen in the cocaine-abusing cohort. Conversely, the striking decrease in myelin-related genes observed in cocaine abusers was not evident in our cohort of heroin subjects. Overall, little overlap in gene expression profiles was seen between the two drug-abusing cohorts: out of the approximately 39 000 transcripts investigated, the abundance of only 25 was significantly changed in both cocaine and heroin abusers, with nearly one-half of these being altered in opposite directions. These data suggest that the profiles of nucleus accumbens gene expression associated with chronic heroin or cocaine abuse are largely unique, despite what are thought to be common effects of these drugs on dopamine neurotransmission in this brain region. A re-examination of our current assumptions about the commonality of molecular mechanisms associated with substance abuse seems warranted. PMID:16710320

  11. 1H-n.m.r. and c.d. studies of haem orientational disorder in sperm-whale myoglobin and human haemoglobin.

    PubMed Central

    Aojula, H S; Wilson, M T; Moore, G R; Williamson, D J

    1988-01-01

    1H-n.m.r. and c.d. studies on sperm-whale myoglobin show that the c.d. signal in the Soret region is inversely and linearly related to the proportion of minor isomer present. An alternative method, 'pH jump', is described for inducing orientational disorder in sperm-whale myoglobin without recourse to reconstitution. 1H-n.m.r. studies on human haemoglobin A indicate little heterogeneity in freshly isolated haemoglobin A, but the effect is enhanced in freeze-dried Sigma haemoglobin A. PMID:3390144

  12. Ultra-High Field MRI Post Mortem Structural Connectivity of the Human Subthalamic Nucleus, Substantia Nigra, and Globus Pallidus

    PubMed Central

    Plantinga, Birgit R.; Roebroeck, Alard; Kemper, Valentin G.; Uludağ, Kâmil; Melse, Maartje; Mai, Jürgen; Kuijf, Mark L.; Herrler, Andreas; Jahanshahi, Ali; ter Haar Romeny, Bart M.; Temel, Yasin

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: The subthalamic nucleus, substantia nigra, and globus pallidus, three nuclei of the human basal ganglia, play an important role in motor, associative, and limbic processing. The network of the basal ganglia is generally characterized by a direct, indirect, and hyperdirect pathway. This study aims to investigate the mesoscopic nature of these connections between the subthalamic nucleus, substantia nigra, and globus pallidus and their surrounding structures. Methods: A human post mortem brain specimen including the substantia nigra, subthalamic nucleus, and globus pallidus was scanned on a 7 T MRI scanner. High resolution diffusion weighted images were used to reconstruct the fibers intersecting the substantia nigra, subthalamic nucleus, and globus pallidus. The course and density of these tracks was analyzed. Results: Most of the commonly established projections of the subthalamic nucleus, substantia nigra, and globus pallidus were successfully reconstructed. However, some of the reconstructed fiber tracks such as the connections of the substantia nigra pars compacta to the other included nuclei and the connections with the anterior commissure have not been shown previously. In addition, the quantitative tractography approach showed a typical degree of connectivity previously not documented. An example is the relatively larger projections of the subthalamic nucleus to the substantia nigra pars reticulata when compared to the projections to the globus pallidus internus. Discussion: This study shows that ultra-high field post mortem tractography allows for detailed 3D reconstruction of the projections of deep brain structures in humans. Although the results should be interpreted carefully, the newly identified connections contribute to our understanding of the basal ganglia. PMID:27378864

  13. Relationship between serum dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyls and post-testicular maturation in human sperm.

    PubMed

    Paul, Raiza; Moltó, Julia; Ortuño, Nuria; Romero, Alejandro; Bezos, Carlos; Aizpurua, Jon; Gómez-Torres, María José

    2017-07-10

    The relationship between dioxin-like polychlorinated biphenyl (DL-PCB) levels in serum and semen parameters were investigated. Our case-control included two groups of patients. Total concentrations of PCBs were significantly higher in the low semen quality (n=24) than in the normal semen quality (n=26) group. A significant negative correlation was found between PCB 126 and viability in men with low semen quality, while PCBs 77 and 81 were positively correlated with morphology, and PCB 118, mono-ortho and total DL-PCBs were positively correlated with volume. In the normal semen quality group, PCB 189 and 118 were negatively correlated with sperm motility and volume, respectively. In addition, positive significant correlations were found between PCB 77, 23 and total non-ortho PCBs with regard to morphology. Our findings suggest that sperm motility, viability, volume and morphology are parameters sensitive to alteration by exposure to DL-PCBs, although PCB effects on spermatogenesis were not of clinical significance. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Quality of human spermatozoa: relationship between high-magnification sperm morphology and DNA integrity.

    PubMed

    Maettner, R; Sterzik, K; Isachenko, V; Strehler, E; Rahimi, G; Alabart, J L; Sánchez, R; Mallmann, P; Isachenko, E

    2014-06-01

    The aim of this work is to establish the relationship between the morphology of Intracytoplasmic Morphologically Selected Sperm Injection (IMSI)-selected spermatozoa and their DNA integrity. The 45 ejaculates were randomly distributed into three treatment groups: normozoospermic, oligoasthenozoospermic and oligoasthenotheratozoospermic samples. The evaluation of DNA integrity was performed using the sperm chromatin dispersion test. It was established that DNA integrity of spermatozoa is strongly dependent on ejaculate quality (P < 0.05). The count of spermatozoa with nonfragmented DNA in normozoospermic samples was high and independent from IMSI-morphological classes (Class 1 versus Class 3, respectively) (P > 0.1). With decreased ejaculate quality, the percentage of spermatozoa with nonfragmented DNA decreased significantly (P < 0.05) independent from morphological class. Nevertheless, the rate of IMSI-selected spermatozoa with fragmented DNA within of Class 1 in normozoospermic (Group 1), in oligoasthenozoospermic (Group 2) and in oligoasthenotheratozoospermic (Group 3) samples was 21.1%, 31.8% and 54.1%, respectively. In conclusion, there is a direct relationship between morphological parameters of spermatozoa and their DNA integrity. However, the IMSI technique alone is not enough for the selection of spermatozoa with intact nuclei.

  15. Cryopreservation of a small number of human sperm using enzymatically fabricated, hollow hyaluronan microcapsules handled by conventional ICSI procedures.

    PubMed

    Tomita, Kazuhisa; Sakai, Shinji; Khanmohammadi, Mehdi; Yamochi, Takayuki; Hashimoto, Shu; Anzai, Masayuki; Morimoto, Yoshiharu; Taya, Masahito; Hosoi, Yoshihiko

    2016-04-01

    We investigated whether enzymatically fabricated hyaluronan (HA) microcapsules were feasible for use in the cryopreservation of a small number of sperm. HA microcapsules were fabricated using a system of water-immiscible fluid under laminar flow. Three sperm were injected into a hollow HA microcapsule using a micromanipulator. Capsules containing injected sperm were incubated in a freezing medium composed of sucrose as the cryoprotectant and then placed in a Cryotop® device and plunged into liquid nitrogen. After thawing, the capsule was degraded by hyaluronidase, and the recovery rate of sperm and their motility were investigated. The HA microcapsule measuring 200 μm in diameter and with a 30-μm thick membrane was handled using a conventional intracytoplasmic sperm injection (ICSI) system, and the procedure involved the injection of sperm into the capsule. The HA microcapsules containing sperm were cryopreserved in a Cryotop® device and decomposed by the addition of hyaluronidase. The recovery rate of sperm after cryopreservation and degradation of HA microcapsules was sufficient for use in clinical practice (90 %). Hollow HA microcapsules can be used for the cryopreservation of a small number of sperm without producing adverse effects on sperm quality.

  16. Intrinsic connectivity between the hippocampus, nucleus accumbens, and ventral tegmental area in humans.

    PubMed

    Kahn, I; Shohamy, D

    2013-03-01

    Recent studies suggest that memory formation in the hippocampus is modulated by the motivational significance of events, allowing past experience to adaptively guide behavior. The effects of motivation on memory are thought to depend on interactions between the hippocampus, the ventral tegmental area (VTA), and the nucleus accumbens (NAcc). Indeed, animal studies reveal anatomical pathways for circuit-level interaction between these regions. However, a homologue circuit connectivity in humans remains to be shown. We characterized this circuitry in humans by exploiting spontaneous low-frequency modulations in the fMRI signal (termed resting-state functional connectivity), which are thought to reflect functionally related regions and their organization into functional networks in the brain. We examined connectivity in this network across two datasets (hi-resolution, n = 100; standard resolution, n = 894). Results reveal convergent connectivity between the hippocampus, and both the NAcc and the VTA centered on ventral regions in the body of the hippocampus. Additionally, we found individual differences in the strength of connectivity within this network. Together, these results provide a novel task-independent characterization of circuitry underlying interactions between the hippocampus, NAcc, and VTA and provide a framework with which to understand how connectivity might reflect and constrain the effects of motivation on memory.

  17. The human subthalamic nucleus and globus pallidus internus differentially encode reward during action control.

    PubMed

    Justin Rossi, Peter; Peden, Corinna; Castellanos, Oscar; Foote, Kelly D; Gunduz, Aysegul; Okun, Michael S

    2017-04-01

    The subthalamic nucleus (STN) and globus pallidus internus (GPi) have recently been shown to encode reward, but few studies have been performed in humans. We investigated STN and GPi encoding of reward and loss (i.e., valence) in humans with Parkinson's disease. To test the hypothesis that STN and GPi neurons would change their firing rate in response to reward- and loss-related stimuli, we recorded the activity of individual neurons while participants performed a behavioral task. In the task, action choices were associated with potential rewarding, punitive, or neutral outcomes. We found that STN and GPi neurons encode valence-related information during action control, but the proportion of valence-responsive neurons was greater in the STN compared to the GPi. In the STN, reward-related stimuli mobilized a greater proportion of neurons than loss-related stimuli. We also found surprising limbic overlap with the sensorimotor regions in both the STN and GPi, and this overlap was greater than has been previously reported. These findings may help to explain alterations in limbic function that have been observed following deep brain stimulation therapy of the STN and GPi. Hum Brain Mapp 38:1952-1964, 2017. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  18. Perceptual Learning of Contrast Detection in the Human Lateral Geniculate Nucleus.

    PubMed

    Yu, Qinlin; Zhang, Peng; Qiu, Jiang; Fang, Fang

    2016-12-05

    The brain is continuously modified by perceptual experience throughout life. Perceptual learning, which refers to the long-term performance improvement resulting from practice, has been widely used as a paradigm to study experience-dependent brain plasticity in adults [1, 2]. In the visual system, adult plasticity is largely believed to be restricted to the cortex, with subcortical structures losing their capacity for change after a critical period of development [3, 4]. Although various cortical mechanisms have been shown to mediate visual perceptual learning [5-12], there has been no reported investigation of perceptual learning in subcortical nuclei. Here, human subjects were trained on a contrast detection task for 30 days, leading to a significant contrast sensitivity improvement that was specific to the trained eye and the trained visual hemifield. Training also resulted in an eye- and hemifield-specific fMRI signal increase to low-contrast patterns in the magnocellular layers of the lateral geniculate nucleus (LGN), even when subjects did not pay attention to the patterns. Such an increase was absent in the parvocellular layers of the LGN and visual cortical areas. Furthermore, the behavioral benefit significantly correlated with the neural enhancement. These findings suggest that LGN signals can be amplified by training to detect faint patterns. Neural plasticity induced by perceptual learning in human adults might not be confined to the cortical level but might occur as early as at the thalamic level. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Automatic segmentation of the caudate nucleus from human brain MR images.

    PubMed

    Xia, Yan; Bettinger, Keith; Shen, Lin; Reiss, Allan L

    2007-04-01

    We describe a knowledge-driven algorithm to automatically delineate the caudate nucleus (CN) region of the human brain from a magnetic resonance (MR) image. Since the lateral ventricles (LVs) are good landmarks for positioning the CN, the algorithm first extracts the LVs, and automatically localizes the CN from this information guided by anatomic knowledge of the structure. The face validity of the algorithm was tested with 55 high-resolution T1-weighted magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) datasets, and segmentation results were overlaid onto the original image data for visual inspection. We further evaluated the algorithm by comparing automated segmentation results to a "gold standard" established by human experts for these 55 MR datasets. Quantitative comparison showed a high intraclass correlation between the algorithm and expert as well as high spatial overlap between the regions-of-interest (ROIs) generated from the two methods. The mean spatial overlap +/- standard deviation (defined by the intersection of the 2 ROIs divided by the union of the 2 ROIs) was equal to 0.873 +/- 0.0234. The algorithm has been incorporated into a public domain software program written in Java and, thus, has the potential to be of broad benefit to neuroimaging investigators interested in basal ganglia anatomy and function.

  20. Proliferation-dependent positioning of individual centromeres in the interphase nucleus of human lymphoblastoid cell lines.

    PubMed

    Ollion, Jean; Loll, François; Cochennec, Julien; Boudier, Thomas; Escudé, Christophe

    2015-07-01

    The cell nucleus is a highly organized structure and plays an important role in gene regulation. Understanding the mechanisms that sustain this organization is therefore essential for understanding genome function. Centromeric regions (CRs) of chromosomes have been known for years to adopt specific nuclear positioning patterns, but the significance of this observation is not yet completely understood. Here, using a combination of fluorescence in situ hybridization and immunochemistry on fixed human cells and high-throughput imaging, we directly and quantitatively investigated the nuclear positioning of specific human CRs. We observe differential attraction of individual CRs toward both the nuclear border and the nucleoli, the former being enhanced in nonproliferating cells and the latter being enhanced in proliferating cells. Similar positioning patterns are observed in two different lymphoblastoid cell lines. Moreover, the positioning of CRs differs from that of noncentromeric regions, and CRs display specific orientations within chromosome territories. These results suggest the existence of not-yet-characterized mechanisms that drive the nuclear positioning of CRs and therefore pave the way toward a better understanding of how CRs affect nuclear organization.

  1. Clusterin Facilitates Exchange of Glycosyl Phosphatidylinositol-Linked SPAM1 Between Reproductive Luminal Fluids and Mouse and Human Sperm Membranes1

    PubMed Central

    Griffiths, Genevieve S.; Galileo, Deni S.; Aravindan, Rolands G.; Martin-DeLeon, Patricia A.

    2009-01-01

    Glycosyl phosphatidylinositol (GPI)-linked proteins, which are involved in post-testicular maturation of sperm and have a role in fertilization, are acquired on the sperm surface from both vesicular and membrane-free soluble fractions of epididymal luminal fluid (LF) and uterine LF. Herein, we investigate the mechanism of uptake of these proteins from the soluble fraction of LFs using sperm adhesion molecule 1 (SPAM1) as a model. Ultracentrifugation and native Western blot analysis of the soluble fraction revealed that SPAM1 is present in low-molecular-weight (monomeric) and high-molecular-weight (oligomeric) complexes. The latter are incapable of transferring SPAM1 and may serve to produce monomers. Monomers are stabilized by hydrophobic interactions with clusterin (CLU), a lipid carrier that is abundantly expressed in LFs. We show that CLU is involved in the transfer of SPAM1 monomers, whose delivery was decreased by anti-CLU antibody under normal and apolipoprotein-enhanced conditions. Coimmunoprecipitation revealed an intimate association of CLU with SPAM1. Both plasma and recombinant CLU had a dose-related effect on transfer efficiency: high concentrations reduced and low concentrations enhanced delivery of SPAM1 to human and mouse sperm membranes, reflecting physiological states in the epididymal tract. We propose a lipid exchange model (akin to the lipid-poor model for cholesterol efflux) for the delivery of GPI-linked proteins to sperm membranes via CLU. Our investigation defines specific conditions for membrane-free GPI-linked protein transfer in vitro and could lead to technology for improving fertility or treating sperm pathology by the addition of relevant GPI-linked proteins critical for successful fertilization in humans and domestic animals. PMID:19357365

  2. Identifying molecular phenotype of nucleus pulposus cells in human intervertebral disc with aging and degeneration.

    PubMed

    Tang, Xinyan; Jing, Liufang; Richardson, William J; Isaacs, Robert E; Fitch, Robert D; Brown, Christopher R; Erickson, Melissa M; Setton, Lori A; Chen, Jun

    2016-08-01

    Previous study claimed that disc degeneration may be preceded by structure and matrix changes in the intervertebral disc (IVD) which coincide with the loss of distinct notochordally derived nucleus pulposus (NP) cells. However, the fate of notochordal cells and their molecular phenotype change during aging and degeneration in human are still unknown. In this study, a set of novel molecular phenotype markers of notochordal NP cells during aging and degeneration in human IVD tissue were revealed with immunostaining and flow cytometry. Furthermore, the potential of phenotype juvenilization and matrix regeneration of IVD cells in a laminin-rich pseudo-3D culture system were evaluated at day 28 by immunostaining, Safranin O, and type II collagen staining. Immunostaining and flow cytometry demonstrated that transcriptional factor Brachyury T, neuronal-related proteins (brain abundant membrane attached signal protein 1, Basp1; Neurochondrin, Ncdn; Neuropilin, Nrp-1), CD24, and CD221 were expressed only in juvenile human NP tissue, which suggested that these proteins may be served as the notochordal NP cell markers. However, the increased expression of CD54 and CD166 with aging indicated that they might be referenced as the potential biomarker for disc degeneration. In addition, 3D culture maintained most of markers in juvenile NP, and rescued the expression of Basp1, Ncdn, and Nrp 1 that disappeared in adult NP native tissue. These findings provided new insight into molecular profile that may be used to characterize the existence of a unique notochordal NP cells during aging and degeneration in human IVD cells, which will facilitate cell-based therapy for IVD regeneration. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Orthop Res 34:1316-1326, 2016. © 2016 Orthopaedic Research Society. Published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  3. Sperm Motility in Flow

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Guasto, Jeffrey; Juarez, Gabriel; Stocker, Roman

    2012-11-01

    A wide variety of plants and animals reproduce sexually by releasing motile sperm that seek out a conspecific egg, for example in the reproductive tract for mammals or in the water column for externally fertilizing organisms. Sperm are aided in their quest by chemical cues, but must also contend with hydrodynamic forces, resulting from laminar flows in reproductive tracts or turbulence in aquatic habitats. To understand how velocity gradients affect motility, we subjected swimming sperm to a range of highly-controlled straining flows using a cross-flow microfluidic device. The motion of the cell body and flagellum were captured through high-speed video microscopy. The effects of flow on swimming are twofold. For moderate velocity gradients, flow simply advects and reorients cells, quenching their ability to cross streamlines. For high velocity gradients, fluid stresses hinder the internal bending of the flagellum, directly inhibiting motility. The transition between the two regimes is governed by the Sperm number, which compares the external viscous stresses with the internal elastic stresses. Ultimately, unraveling the role of flow in sperm motility will lead to a better understanding of population dynamics among aquatic organisms and infertility problems in humans.

  4. Efficient production by sperm-mediated gene transfer of human decay accelerating factor (hDAF) transgenic pigs for xenotransplantation

    PubMed Central

    Lavitrano, Marialuisa; Bacci, Maria Laura; Forni, Monica; Lazzereschi, Davide; Di Stefano, Carla; Fioretti, Daniela; Giancotti, Paola; Marfé, Gabriella; Pucci, Loredana; Renzi, Luigina; Wang, Hongjun; Stoppacciaro, Antonella; Stassi, Giorgio; Sargiacomo, Massimo; Sinibaldi, Paola; Turchi, Valeria; Giovannoni, Roberto; Della Casa, Giacinto; Seren, Eraldo; Rossi, Giancarlo

    2002-01-01

    A large number of hDAF transgenic pigs to be used for xenotransplantation research were generated by using sperm-mediated gene transfer (SMGT). The efficiency of transgenesis obtained with SMGT was much greater than with any other method. In the experiments reported, up to 80% of pigs had the transgene integrated into the genome. Most of the pigs carrying the hDAF gene transcribed it in a stable manner (64%). The great majority of pigs that transcribed the gene expressed the protein (83%). The hDAF gene was transmitted to progeny. Expression was stable and found in caveolae as it is in human cells. The expressed gene was functional based on in vitro experiments performed on peripheral blood mononuclear cells. These results show that our SMGT approach to transgenesis provides an efficient procedure for studies involving large animal models. PMID:12393815

  5. Determination of sperm acrosin activity in the arctic fox (Alopex lagopus L.)--using method developed for human spermatozoa.

    PubMed

    Stasiak, K; Janicki, B; Glogowski, J

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to adapt a method to determine acrosin activity of human spermatozoa to arctic fox (Alopex lagopus L.) spermatozoa. We modified this method by reducing sperm count per sample from 1 divided by 10 x 10(6) to 25 divided by 200 x 10(3), incubation time from 180 minutes to 60 minutes, and Triton X-100 concentration in the reaction mixture from 0.01% to 0.005% per 100 cm3. It has also confirmed that arctic fox seminal plasma is rich in proteinases and their inhibitors. To completely abolish the inhibitory effect of seminal plasma on acrosin activity it is recommended to wash the spermatozoa four times. Benzamidine served an inhibitor of acrosin activity.

  6. Patch clamp studies of human sperm under physiological ionic conditions reveal three functionally and pharmacologically distinct cation channels.

    PubMed

    Mansell, S A; Publicover, S J; Barratt, C L R; Wilson, S M

    2014-05-01

    Whilst fertilizing capacity depends upon a K(+) conductance (GK) that allows the spermatozoon membrane potential (Vm) to be held at a negative value, the characteristics of this conductance in human sperm are virtually unknown. We therefore studied the biophysical/pharmacological properties of the K(+) conductance in spermatozoa from normal donors held under voltage/current clamp in the whole cell recording configuration. Our standard recording conditions were designed to maintain quasi-physiological, Na(+), K(+) and Cl(-) gradients. Experiments that explored the effects of ionic substitution/ion channel blockers upon membrane current/potential showed that resting Vm was dependent upon a hyperpolarizing K(+) current that flowed via channels that displayed only weak voltage dependence and limited (∼7-fold) K(+) versus Na(+) selectivity. This conductance was blocked by quinidine (0.3 mM), bupivacaine (3 mM) and clofilium (50 µM), NNC55-0396 (2 µM) and mibefradil (30 µM), but not by 4-aminopyridine (2 mM, 4-AP). Progesterone had no effect upon the hyperpolarizing K(+) current. Repolarization after a test depolarization consistently evoked a transient inward 'tail current' (ITail) that flowed via a second population of ion channels with poor (∼3-fold) K(+) versus Na(+) selectivity. The activity of these channels was increased by quinidine, 4-AP and progesterone. Vm in human sperm is therefore dependent upon a hyperpolarizing K(+) current that flows via channels that most closely resemble those encoded by Slo3. Although 0.5 µM progesterone had no effect upon these channels, this hormone did activate the pharmacologically distinct channels that mediate ITail. In conclusion, this study reveals three functionally and pharmacologically distinct cation channels: Ik, ITail, ICatSper.

  7. Proteomic Analyses Reveal Common Promiscuous Patterns of Cell Surface Proteins on Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Sperms

    PubMed Central

    Gu, Bin; Zhang, Jiarong; Wu, Ying; Zhang, Xinzong; Tan, Zhou; Lin, Yuanji; Huang, Xiao; Chen, Liangbiao; Yao, Kangshou; Zhang, Ming

    2011-01-01

    Background It has long been proposed that early embryos and reproductive organs exhibit similar gene expression profiles. However, whether this similarity is propagated to the protein level remains largely unknown. We have previously characterised the promiscuous expression pattern of cell surface proteins on mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells. As cell surface proteins also play critical functions in human embryonic stem (hES) cells and germ cells, it is important to reveal whether a promiscuous pattern of cell surface proteins also exists for these cells. Methods and Principal Findings Surface proteins of hES cells and human mature sperms (hSperms) were purified by biotin labelling and subjected to proteomic analyses. More than 1000 transmembrane or secreted cell surface proteins were identified on the two cell types, respectively. Proteins from both cell types covered a large variety of functional categories including signal transduction, adhesion and transporting. Moreover, both cell types promiscuously expressed a wide variety of tissue specific surface proteins, and some surface proteins were heterogeneously expressed. Conclusions/Significance Our findings indicate that the promiscuous expression of functional and tissue specific cell surface proteins may be a common pattern in embryonic stem cells and germ cells. The conservation of gene expression patterns between early embryonic cells and reproductive cells is propagated to the protein level. These results have deep implications for the cell surface signature characterisation of pluripotent stem cells and germ cells and may lead the way to a new area of study, i.e., the functional significance of promiscuous gene expression in pluripotent and germ cells. PMID:21559292

  8. Sperm function test

    PubMed Central

    Talwar, Pankaj; Hayatnagarkar, Suryakant

    2015-01-01

    With absolute normal semen analysis parameters it may not be necessary to shift to specialized tests early but in cases with borderline parameters or with history of fertilization failure in past it becomes necessary to do a battery of tests to evaluate different parameters of spermatozoa. Various sperm function tests are proposed and endorsed by different researchers in addition to the routine evaluation of fertility. These tests detect function of a certain part of spermatozoon and give insight on the events in fertilization of the oocyte. The sperms need to get nutrition from the seminal plasma in the form of fructose and citrate (this can be assessed by fructose qualitative and quantitative estimation, citrate estimation). They should be protected from the bad effects of pus cells and reactive oxygen species (ROS) (leukocyte detection test, ROS estimation). Their number should be in sufficient in terms of (count), structure normal to be able to fertilize eggs (semen morphology). Sperms should have intact and functioning membrane to survive harsh environment of vagina and uterine fluids (vitality and hypo-osmotic swelling test), should have good mitochondrial function to be able to provide energy (mitochondrial activity index test). They should also have satisfactory acrosome function to be able to burrow a hole in zona pellucida (acrosome intactness test, zona penetration test). Finally, they should have properly packed DNA in the nucleus to be able to transfer the male genes (nuclear chromatic decondensation test) to the oocyte during fertilization. PMID:26157295

  9. Obesity-related DNA methylation at imprinted genes in human sperm: Results from the TIEGER study.

    PubMed

    Soubry, Adelheid; Guo, Lisa; Huang, Zhiqing; Hoyo, Cathrine; Romanus, Stephanie; Price, Thomas; Murphy, Susan K

    2016-01-01

    Epigenetic reprogramming in mammalian gametes resets methylation marks that regulate monoallelic expression of imprinted genes. In males, this involves erasure of the maternal methylation marks and establishment of paternal-specific methylation to appropriately guide normal development. The degree to which exogenous factors influence the fidelity of methylation reprogramming is unknown. We previously found an association between paternal obesity and altered DNA methylation in umbilical cord blood, suggesting that the father's endocrine, nutritional, or lifestyle status could potentiate intergenerational heritable epigenetic abnormalities. In these analyses, we examine the relationship between male overweight/obesity and DNA methylation status of imprinted gene regulatory regions in the gametes. Linear regression models were used to compare sperm DNA methylation percentages, quantified by bisulfite pyrosequencing, at 12 differentially methylated regions (DMRs) from 23 overweight/obese and 44 normal weight men. Our study population included 69 volunteers from The Influence of the Environment on Gametic Epigenetic Reprogramming (TIEGER) study, based in NC, USA. After adjusting for age and fertility patient status, semen from overweight or obese men had significantly lower methylation percentages at the MEG3 (β = -1.99; SE = 0.84; p = 0.02), NDN (β = -1.10; SE = 0.47; p = 0.02), SNRPN (β = -0.65; SE = 0.27; p = 0.02), and SGCE/PEG10 (β = -2.5; SE = 1.01; p = 0.01) DMRs. Our data further suggest a slight increase in DNA methylation at the MEG3-IG DMR (β = +1.22; SE = 0.59; p = 0.04) and H19 DMR (β = +1.37; SE = 0.62; p = 0.03) in sperm of overweight/obese men. Our data support that male overweight/obesity status is traceable in the sperm epigenome. Further research is needed to understand the effect of such changes and the point of origin of DNA methylation differences between lean and

  10. In Vitro Effect of Cell Phone Radiation on Motility, DNA Fragmentation and Clusterin Gene Expression in Human Sperm

    PubMed Central

    Zalata, Adel; El-Samanoudy, Ayman Z; Shaalan, Dalia; El-Baiomy, Youssef; Mostafa, Taymour

    2015-01-01

    Background Use of cellular phones emitting radiofrequency electromagnetic field (RF-EMF) has been increased exponentially and become a part of everyday life. This study aimed to investigate the effects of in vitro RF-EMF exposure emitted from cellular phones on sperm motility index, sperm DNA fragmentation and seminal clusterin (CLU) gene expression. Materials and Methods In this prospective study, a total of 124 semen samples were grouped into the following main categories: i. normozoospermia (N, n=26), ii. asthenozoospermia (A, n=32), iii. asthenoteratozoospermia (AT, n=31) and iv. oligoasthenoteratozoospermia (OAT, n=35). The same semen samples were then divided into two portions non-exposed and exposed samples to cell phone radiation for 1 hour. Before and immediately after exposure, both aliquots were subjected to different assessments for sperm motility, acrosin activity, sperm DNA fragmentation and CLU gene expression. Statistical differences were analyzed using paired t student test for comparisons between two sub-groups where p<0.05 was set as significant. Results There was a significant decrease in sperm motility, sperm linear velocity, sperm linearity index, and sperm acrosin activity, whereas there was a significant increase in sperm DNA fragmentation percent, CLU gene expression and CLU protein levels in the exposed semen samples to RF-EMF compared with non-exposed samples in OAT>AT>A>N groups, respectively (p<0.05). Conclusion Cell phone emissions have a negative impact on exposed sperm motility index, sperm acrosin activity, sperm DNA fragmentation and seminal CLU gene expression, especially in OAT cases. PMID:25918601

  11. Influence of progesterone and 17 alpha hydroxyprogesterone upon the BANA-hydrolytic activity of human sperm.

    PubMed

    Valencia-Sánchez, A; Mercado-Pichardo, E

    1991-01-01

    Our knowledge about temporal relationships between reproductive processes and defined changes in the plasmatic concentrations of 17 beta-estradiol, Follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH), Luteinizing hormone (LH) and progesterone (P) is still incomplete. Is known that in periovulatory phase the chance of fertilization increases to its maximum. The results obtained using different concentration of P have shown that at high concentration a fast liberation or/and exposure of the BANA-hydrolytic (B-H) activity is present. However, with low concentrations of P the enzymatic activity keeps a relation with the exposure time. In similar experimental conditions and using 17 alpha-hydroxyprogesterone it has been no change in the B-H activity. The results obtained in the present study suggest that the P possibly acts upon the sperm stimulating its hydrolytic activity, allowing its penetration through the zona pellucida of the ovum.

  12. [Relationship between the characteristics of the human sperm movement and their attachment to the zona pellucida].

    PubMed

    Ben Ali, H

    2013-02-01

    Our objective was to study the relationships between the characteristics of the movement of sperm and their attachment to the zona pellucida. Study related to 47 patients candidates with an IVF protocol. The puncture of the ovocytes was carried out under general anesthesia under echography control after stimulated cycles using association is the citrate of clomifene and the HMG or the busereline and the HMG. Study of the mobility of the spermatozoa was carried out thanks to a videomicrography computer-assisted before and after treatment of sperm in Percoll. The setting in contact of the spermatozoa with the ovocytes having given failures of in vitro fertilization and beforehand preserved in a saline solution was carried out during 90 minutes with 37 °C, air-CO2 with 5%. After incubation, the spermatozoa fixed at the zona pellucida, are counted thanks to a meter with hand. The study of the test of fixing of the spermatozoa at the zona pellucida showed that the interaction spermatozoa/ovocytes is correlated positively with the parameters of the mobility analyzed by videomicrography computer-assisted: Vcl, Vsl and the ALH. The performance of the test requires a preliminary epididymal maturation of the spermatozoa in particular the ontogenesis of the spermatic sites of recognition for the zona pellucida. A deterioration of this stage of maturation led to failures of recognition and fixing at the zona pellucida. The test can predict the outcome of IVF and towards the good technique of medical assistance to procreation (AMP). Copyright © 2012. Published by Elsevier Masson SAS.

  13. Adapted methods for scanning electron microscopy in assessment of human sperm morphology.

    PubMed

    Nussdorfer, Petra; Cilenšek, Ines; Zorn, Branko; Petrovič, Daniel

    2017-07-21

    Infertility is a widespread problem, and in some cases, the routine basic semen analysis is not sufficient to detect the cause of male infertility. The use of the scanning electron microscope (SEM) could provide a detailed insight into spermatozoa morphology, but it requires specific sample preparation techniques. The purpose of this study was to select, adjust, and optimize a method for the preparation of spermatozoa samples prior to SEM analysis, and to establish the protocol required for its use in clinical practice. We examined sperm samples of 50 men. The samples were fixed with modified iso-osmolar aldehyde solution followed by osmium post-fixation. In the first method, dehydration of the cells and subsequent critical point drying (CPD) were performed on a coverglass. In the second method, the samples were dehydrated in centrifuge tubes; hexamethyldisilazane (HMDS) was used as a drying agent instead of CPD, and the samples were air-dried. The third procedure was based on membrane filters. The samples were dehydrated and dried with HMDS in a Gooch crucible, continuously, without centrifugation or redispersion of the sample. Our results showed that the fixation with modified iso-osmolar aldehyde solution followed by osmium post-fixation, and combined with dehydration and CPD on a coverglass, is the most convenient procedure for SEM sample preparation. In the case of small-size samples or low sperm concentration, dehydration and drying with HMDS on the membrane filter enabled the best reliability, repeatability, and comparability of the results. The presented procedures are suitable for routine use, and they can be applied to confirm as well as to correct a diagnosis.

  14. The impact of sperm protamine deficiency and sperm DNA damage on human male fertility: a systematic review and meta-analysis.

    PubMed

    Ni, K; Spiess, A-N; Schuppe, H-C; Steger, K

    2016-09-01

    Existing literature suggests evidence that protamine deficiency is related to DNA damage and male fertility. In this meta-analysis, we analyzed the relationship between the ratio of protamine-1 and protamine-2 with male fertility and the association of protamine deficiency with sperm DNA damage. Quality of available cohort studies was evaluated using the Newcastle-Ottawa Scale checklist. Summary effect estimates with 95% confidence intervals (CI) were derived using a random effects model. The effect of the protamine ratio on male fertility was analyzed in nine studies demonstrating a significantly higher value of the protamine ratio in subfertile men (n = 633) when compared with controls (n = 453, SMD = 0.46, 95% CI 0.25-0.66, Z = 4.42, p < 0.00001). Both protamine mRNA (SMD = 0.45, 95% CI 0.11-0.79, Z = 2.63, p = 0.009) and protein ratio (SMD = 0.46, 95% CI 0.25-0.68, Z = 4.22, p < 0.0001) showed significantly increased values in subfertile patients. The association between protamine deficiency and DNA damage was analyzed in 12 studies (n = 845) exhibiting a combined overall correlation coefficient (COR) of 0.53 (95% CI 0.28-0.71, Z = 3.87, p < 0.001). Protamine deficiency measured by CMA3 staining was significantly associated with sperm DNA damage (COR = 0.71, 95% CI 0.48-0.85, Z = 4.87, p < 0.001), whereas the P1/P2 ratio was not (COR = 0.17, 95% CI -0.16 to 0.46, Z = 0.99, p = 0.33). It is concluded that the protamine ratio represents a suitable biomarker for the assessment of sperm quality and protamine deficiency is closely related with sperm DNA damage. © 2016 American Society of Andrology and European Academy of Andrology.

  15. Mechanical behavior of the human lumbar intervertebral disc with polymeric hydrogel nucleus implant: An experimental and finite element study

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Joshi, Abhijeet Bhaskar

    The origin of the lower back pain is often the degenerated lumbar intervertebral disc (IVD). We are proposing replacement of the degenerated nucleus by a PVA/PVP polymeric hydrogel implant. We hypothesize that a polymeric hydrogel nucleus implant can restore the normal biomechanics of the denucleated IVD by mimicking the natural load transfer phenomenon as in case of the intact IVD. Lumbar IVDs (n = 15) were harvested from human cadavers. In the first part, specimens were tested in four different conditions for compression: Intact, bone in plug, denucleated and Implanted. Hydrogel nucleus implants were chosen to have line-to-line fit in the created nuclear cavity. In the second part, nucleus implant material (modulus) and geometric (height and diameter) parameters were varied and specimens (n = 9) were tested. Nucleus implants with line-to-line fit significantly restored (88%) the compressive stiffness of the denucleated IVD. The synergistic effect between the implant and the intact annulus resulted in the nonlinear increase in implanted IVD stiffness, where Poisson effect of the hydrogel played major role. Nucleus implant parameters were observed to have a significant effect on the compressive stiffness. All implants with modulus in the tested range restored the compressive stiffness. The undersize implants resulted in incomplete restoration while oversize implants resulted in complete restoration compared to the BI condition. Finite element models (FEM) were developed to simulate the actual test conditions and validated against the experimental results for all conditions. The annulus (defined as hyperelastic, isotropic) mainly determined the nonlinear response of the IVD. Validated FEMs predicted 120--3000 kPa as a feasible range for nucleus implant modulus. FEMs also predicted that overdiameter implant would be more effective than overheight implant in terms of stiffness restoration. Underdiameter implants, initially allowed inward deformation of the annulus and

  16. Human sperm protein encyclopedia and alloantigen index: mining novel allo-antigens using sera from ASA-positive infertile patients and vasectomized men.

    PubMed

    Shetty, Jagathpala; Bronson, Richard A; Herr, John C

    2008-01-01

    Anti-sperm antibodies (ASA) are an important cause of immunological infertility. The objective of this study was to identify immunodominant sperm antigens recognized by anti-sperm antibodies (ASA) in serum samples of infertile men, women and vasectomized men. High-resolution two-dimensional gel electrophoresis was employed to separate human sperm proteins using isoelectric focusing (IEF) or nonequilibrium pH gradient electrophoresis (NEPHGE), followed by PAGE and Western blotting. Serum samples from five infertile male and five infertile female subjects that contained ASA as assayed by the immunobead binding test (IBT), were analyzed by Western blotting using NEPHGE gels followed by enhanced chemiluminescence (ECL) to identify the basic sperm antigens reactive to the sera. Serum samples from five fertile male and five fertile female subjects that were ASA-negative by IBT were used as controls. Serum samples from six vasectomized men collected before vasectomy and at different time intervals until 6 months after vasectomy were analyzed by Western blotting using IEF gels. The ECL blots were analyzed to compare immunoreactivity between serum samples from fertile and infertile subjects and identify antigens unique to sera of the infertile subjects. Similarly, immunoreactivity between serum samples from pre- and post-vasectomy was compared to identify antigens unique to sera collected following vasectomy. Five allo-antigenic basic protein spots were recognized by sera from infertile males but not from fertile subjects. Five sperm iso-antigenic basic spots were recognized by infertile female subjects. Two among six of the vasectomized men's sera showed a difference in the Western blot profile 6 months after vasectomy, recognizing at least one new protein spot in each case when compared to pre-vasectomy sera. The acrosomal protein SP-10 was identified as an alloantigen recognized by a post-vasectomy serum. Molecular identities of the known allo- and iso

  17. IL-1β induces apoptosis and autophagy via mitochondria pathway in human degenerative nucleus pulposus cells

    PubMed Central

    Shen, Jieliang; Xu, Shengxi; Zhou, Hao; Liu, Huzhe; Jiang, Wei; Hao, Jie; Hu, Zhenming

    2017-01-01

    IL-1β has been reported highly expressed in degenerative intervertebral disc, and our previous study indicated IL-1β facilitates apoptosis of human degenerative nucleus pulposus (NP) cell. However, the underlying molecular mechanism remains unclear. We here demonstrate that IL-1β played a significantly pro-apoptotic effect under serum deprivation. IL-1β decreased Bcl-2/Bax ratio and enhanced cytochrome C released from mitochondria to cytosol, which proved mitochondria-meidated apoptosis was induced. Subsequently, mitochondria damage was detected under IL-1β stimualtion. In addition, IL-1β-mediated injuried mitochondria contributes to activate autophagy. However, pretreatment with the autophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine showed the potential in further elevating the apoptosis rate induced by IL-1β in NP cells. Our results indicated that the mitochondrial pathway was involved in IL-1β-induced apoptosis of NP cells. Meanwhile, the damaged mitochondria-induced autophagy played a protective role against apoptosis, suggesting a postive feedback mechanism under inflammatory stress. PMID:28120948

  18. Human Subthalamic Nucleus Theta and Beta Oscillations Entrain Neuronal Firing During Sensorimotor Conflict

    PubMed Central

    Zavala, Baltazar; Damera, Srikanth; Dong, Jian Wilson; Lungu, Codrin; Brown, Peter; Zaghloul, Kareem A.

    2017-01-01

    Recent evidence has suggested that prefrontal cortical structures may inhibit impulsive actions during conflict through activation of the subthalamic nucleus (STN). Consistent with this hypothesis, deep brain stimulation to the STN has been associated with altered prefrontal cortical activity and impaired response inhibition. The interactions between oscillatory activity in the STN and its presumably antikinetic neuronal spiking, however, remain poorly understood. Here, we simultaneously recorded intraoperative local field potential and spiking activity from the human STN as participants performed a sensorimotor action selection task involving conflict. We identified several STN neuronal response types that exhibited different temporal dynamics during the task. Some neurons showed early, cue-related firing rate increases that remained elevated longer during high conflict trials, whereas other neurons showed late, movement-related firing rate increases. Notably, the high conflict trials were associated with an entrainment of individual neurons by theta- and beta-band oscillations, both of which have been observed in cortical structures involved in response inhibition. Our data suggest that frequency-specific activity in the beta and theta bands influence STN firing to inhibit impulsivity during conflict. PMID:26494798

  19. Decoding gripping force based on local field potentials recorded from subthalamic nucleus in humans

    PubMed Central

    Tan, Huiling; Pogosyan, Alek; Ashkan, Keyoumars; Green, Alexander L; Aziz, Tipu; Foltynie, Thomas; Limousin, Patricia; Zrinzo, Ludvic; Hariz, Marwan; Brown, Peter

    2016-01-01

    The basal ganglia are known to be involved in the planning, execution and control of gripping force and movement vigour. Here we aim to define the nature of the basal ganglia control signal for force and to decode gripping force based on local field potential (LFP) activities recorded from the subthalamic nucleus (STN) in patients with deep brain stimulation (DBS) electrodes. We found that STN LFP activities in the gamma (55–90 Hz) and beta (13–30m Hz) bands were most informative about gripping force, and that a first order dynamic linear model with these STN LFP features as inputs can be used to decode the temporal profile of gripping force. Our results enhance the understanding of how the basal ganglia control gripping force, and also suggest that deep brain LFPs could potentially be used to decode movement parameters related to force and movement vigour for the development of advanced human-machine interfaces. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.19089.001 PMID:27855780

  20. Resveratrol protects against mitochondrial dysfunction through autophagy activation in human nucleus pulposus cells.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Baolong; Xu, Linfei; Zhuo, Naiqiang; Shen, Jieliang

    2017-09-05

    Intervertebral disc degeneration (IVDD) is closely related with aging, whereas mitochondrial damage is a common feature of aging that results in cell apoptosis. Resveratrol (RES) is a natural antioxidant that protects against mitochondrial dysfunction in various cells. This study aimed to investigate the protective role of RES against mitochondrial dysfunction and human nucleus pulposus cell (NPC) apoptosis. We found that mitochondrial dysfunction and NPC apoptosis could be induced under oxidative stress by 100 μmol/l of H2O2. However, RES tended to attenuate the H2O2-mediated cytotoxicity. Therefore, autophagic state was evaluated in NPCs to further reveal the underlying mechanism. Results showed that RES reversed the impaired autophagy induced by H2O2, and this increased autophagic flux was confirmed by the addition of bafilomycin A1. Moreover, pretreatment with 3-methyladenine showed that the potential mechanism of RES to prevent deteriorating mitochondrial function and cell apoptosis was related to autophagy activation. Furthermore, MRI and histological detection were employed to provide more solid evidence that RES injection in an IVDD rabbit model effectively retards the degenerative process of the intervertebral discs in vivo. In summary, these results suggested that RES could alleviate mitochondrial dysfunction and cell apoptosis under oxidative stress and may delay the progression of disc degeneration, whose mechanism is associated with an advantageous role of autophagy induced by RES. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  1. Ultraviolet-induced movement of the human DNA repair protein, xeroderma pigmentosum type G, in the nucleus

    SciTech Connect

    Park, M.S.; Knauf, J.A.; Pendergrass, S.H.

    1996-08-06

    Xeroderma pigmentosum type G (XPG) is a human genetic disease exhibiting extreme sensitivity to sunlight. XPG patients are defective XPG endonuclease, which is an enzyme essential for DNA repair of the major kinds of solar ultraviolet (UV)-induced DNA damages. Here we describe a novel dynamics of this protein within the cell nucleus after UV irradiation of human cells. USing confocal microscopy, we have localized the immunofluorescent, antigenic signal of XPG protein to foci throughout the cell nucleus. Our biochemical studies also established that XPG protein forms a tight association with nuclear structure(s). In human skin fibroblast cells, the number of XPG foci decreased within 2 h after UV irradiation, whereas total nuclear XPG fluorescence intensity remained constant, suggesting redistribution of XPG from a limited number of nuclear foci to the nucleus overall. Within 8 h after UV, most XPG antigenic signal was found as foci. Using {beta}-galactosidase-XPG fusion constructs ({beta}-gal-XPG) transfected into HeLa cells, we have identified a single region of XPG that is evidently responsible both for foci formation and for the UV dynamic response. The fusion protein carrying the C terminus of XPG (amino acids 1146-1185) localized {beta}-gal specific antigenic signal to foci and to the nucleolus regions. After UV irradiation, antigenic {beta}-gal translocated reversibly from the subnuclear structures to the whole nucleus with kinetics very similar to the movements of XPG protein. These findings lead us to propose a model in which distribution of XPG protein may regulate the rate of DNA repair within transcriptionally active and inactive compartments of the cell nucleus. 50 refs., 5 figs., 1 tab.

  2. The influence of ginger (Zingiber officinale) on human sperm quality and DNA fragmentation: A double-blind randomized clinical trial

    PubMed Central

    Hosseini, Jalil; Mardi Mamaghani, Azar; Hosseinifar, Hani; Sadighi Gilani, Mohammad Ali; Dadkhah, Farid; Sepidarkish, Mahdi

    2016-01-01

    Background: Although the effectiveness of ginger as an antioxidant agent has been exploited, little human research has been conducted on its activity on male reproductive functions. Objective: This study was designed to investigate the effects of ginger (Zingiber officinale) on sperm DNA fragmentation (SDF) in infertile men. Materials and Methods: This randomized double-blind, placebo-controlled trial with a 1:1 allocation was performed on 100 infertility treatment candidates who were admitted to Royan Institute for Reproductive Biomedicine, Tehran, Iran. Patients were randomly assigned to receive one of two treatments: ginger and placebo. Patients were given a 3-month oral treatment (members received capsules containing 250 mg of ginger powder twice a day in ginger and a placebo in other group). Before and after treatment, standardized semen samples were obtained to determine sperm concentration, motility, and SDF according to World Health Organization. Results: There was no significant difference between two groups regarding SDF at baseline (53.48. 95%CI: 37.95-69.02) in cases and (56.75, 95%CI: 40.01-73.5) in controls. The average positive percentage of SDF in patients receiving ginger (17.77, 95%CI: 6.16-29.39) was lower compared with placebo (40.54, 95%CI: 23.94-57.13) after three month of treatment (p=0.02). In multivariate analysis, SDF was significantly lower in patients receiving ginger compared with placebo (mean difference: 3.21, 95%CI: 0.78-5.63, p=0.009). There were no significant differences between two groups regarding to semen parameters. Conclusion: The present study has demonstrated that ginger in a controlled study of efficacy was effective in decreasing SDF in infertile men. PMID:27679829

  3. Compartmentalization of a Unique ADP/ATP Carrier Protein SFEC (Sperm Flagellar Energy Carrier, AAC4) with Glycolytic Enzymes in the Fibrous Sheath of the Human Sperm Flagellar Principal Piece

    PubMed Central

    Kim, Young-Hwan; Haidl, Gerhard; Schaefer, Martina; Egner, Ursula; Herr, John C.

    2007-01-01

    The longest part of the sperm flagellum, the principal piece, contains the fibrous sheath, a cytoskeletal element unique to spermiogenesis. We performed mass spectrometry proteomics on isolated human fibrous sheaths identifying a unique ADP/ATP carrier protein, SFEC [AAC4], seven glycolytic enzymes previously unreported in the human sperm fibrous sheath, and sorbitol dehydrogenase. SFEC, pyruvate kinase and aldolase were co-localized by immunofluorescence to the principal piece. A homology model constructed for SFEC predicted unique residues at the entrance to the nucleotide binding pocket of SFEC that are absent in other human ADP/ATP carriers, suggesting opportunities for selective drug targeting. This study provides the first evidence of a role for an ADP/ATP carrier family member in glycolysis. The co-localization of SFEC and glycolytic enzymes in the fibrous sheath supports a growing literature that the principal piece of the flagellum is capable of generating and regulating ATP independently from mitochondrial oxidation in the mid-piece. A model is proposed that the fibrous sheath represents a highly ordered complex, analogous to the electron transport chain, in which adjacent enzymes in the glycolytic pathway are assembled to permit efficient flux of energy substrates and products with SFEC serving to mediate energy generating and energy consuming processes in the distal flagellum, possibly as a nucleotide shuttle between flagellar glycolysis, protein phosphorylation and mechanisms of motility. PMID:17137571

  4. Sperm Competition, Sperm Numbers and Sperm Quality in Muroid Rodents

    PubMed Central

    Gómez Montoto, Laura; Magaña, Concepción; Tourmente, Maximiliano; Martín-Coello, Juan; Crespo, Cristina; Luque-Larena, Juan José

    2011-01-01

    Sperm competition favors increases in relative testes mass and production efficiency, and changes in sperm phenotype that result in faster swimming speeds. However, little is known about its effects on traits that contribute to determine the quality of a whole ejaculate (i.e., proportion of motile, viable, morphologically normal and acrosome intact sperm) and that are key determinants of fertilization success. Two competing hypotheses lead to alternative predictions: (a) sperm quantity and quality traits co-evolve under sperm competition because they play complementary roles in determining ejaculate's competitive ability, or (b) energetic constraints force trade-offs between traits depending on their relevance in providing a competitive advantage. We examined relationships between sperm competition levels, sperm quantity, and traits that determine ejaculate quality, in a comparative study of 18 rodent species using phylogenetically controlled analyses. Total sperm numbers were positively correlated to proportions of normal sperm, acrosome integrity and motile sperm; the latter three were also significantly related among themselves, suggesting no trade-offs between traits. In addition, testes mass corrected for body mass (i.e., relative testes mass), showed a strong association with sperm numbers, and positive significant associations with all sperm traits that determine ejaculate quality with the exception of live sperm. An “overall sperm quality” parameter obtained by principal component analysis (which explained 85% of the variance) was more strongly associated with relative testes mass than any individual quality trait. Overall sperm quality was as strongly associated with relative testes mass as sperm numbers. Thus, sperm quality traits improve under sperm competition in an integrated manner suggesting that a combination of all traits is what makes ejaculates more competitive. In evolutionary terms this implies that a complex network of genetic and

  5. Protective effects of in vitro treatment with zinc, d-aspartate and coenzyme q10 on human sperm motility, lipid peroxidation and DNA fragmentation

    PubMed Central

    2013-01-01

    Background Spermatozoa are extremely vulnerable to oxidative stress caused by the unbalance between concentrations of reactive oxygen species and antioxidant scavenging systems present inside the male reproductive tract. In spite of a large number of clinical studies that claimed the beneficial effects of antioxidant oral administration on sperm physiology and fertility, only a few studies were addressed to evaluate their effects on spermatozoa in vitro. Main aims of the present study were to assess the influence of zinc, D-aspartate and coenzyme Q10, included in the dietary supplement Genadis (Merck Serono), on human sperm motility, DNA fragmentation and lipid peroxidation. Methods Semen samples, obtained from forty-four patients (23–30 years of age) were enrolled in this study, twenty-four were normospermic and twenty patients were oligospermic. Semen samples were analysed for sperm progressive motility and kinetics through computer assisted analysis, DNA fragmentation and lipid peroxidation. Results Main results showed that in both normo and oligospermic samples, total and progressive sperm motility is maintained by in vitro treatment with zinc, D-aspartate and coenzyme Q10, whereas a significant decrease of these parameters occurs in parallel samples incubated in medium alone. Zinc, D-aspartate and coenzyme Q10 also prevented the decrease of sperm kinetics but such an effect was highly significant only in oligospermic samples. Moreover, they also protected spermatozoa by the increase of DNA fragmentation and lipid peroxidation. Conclusions Zinc, D-aspartate and coenzyme Q10 exert a direct protective effect on human spermatozoa preventing the decrease of motility and the increase of DNA fragmentation and lipid peroxidation during in vitro culture. PMID:23958080

  6. Protective effects of in vitro treatment with zinc, d-aspartate and coenzyme q10 on human sperm motility, lipid peroxidation and DNA fragmentation.

    PubMed

    Talevi, Riccardo; Barbato, Vincenza; Fiorentino, Ilaria; Braun, Sabrina; Longobardi, Salvatore; Gualtieri, Roberto

    2013-08-16

    Spermatozoa are extremely vulnerable to oxidative stress caused by the unbalance between concentrations of reactive oxygen species and antioxidant scavenging systems present inside the male reproductive tract. In spite of a large number of clinical studies that claimed the beneficial effects of antioxidant oral administration on sperm physiology and fertility, only a few studies were addressed to evaluate their effects on spermatozoa in vitro. Main aims of the present study were to assess the influence of zinc, D-aspartate and coenzyme Q10, included in the dietary supplement Genadis (Merck Serono), on human sperm motility, DNA fragmentation and lipid peroxidation. Semen samples, obtained from forty-four patients (23-30 years of age) were enrolled in this study, twenty-four were normospermic and twenty patients were oligospermic. Semen samples were analysed for sperm progressive motility and kinetics through computer assisted analysis, DNA fragmentation and lipid peroxidation. Main results showed that in both normo and oligospermic samples, total and progressive sperm motility is maintained by in vitro treatment with zinc, D-aspartate and coenzyme Q10, whereas a significant decrease of these parameters occurs in parallel samples incubated in medium alone. Zinc, D-aspartate and coenzyme Q10 also prevented the decrease of sperm kinetics but such an effect was highly significant only in oligospermic samples. Moreover, they also protected spermatozoa by the increase of DNA fragmentation and lipid peroxidation. Zinc, D-aspartate and coenzyme Q10 exert a direct protective effect on human spermatozoa preventing the decrease of motility and the increase of DNA fragmentation and lipid peroxidation during in vitro culture.

  7. The apoptotic profile of human cumulus cells changes with patient age and after exposure to sperm but not in relation to oocyte maturity.

    PubMed

    Moffatt, Odette; Drury, Sarah; Tomlinson, Matthew; Afnan, Masoud; Sakkas, Denny

    2002-05-01

    To determine the expression of apoptosis-associated molecules on cumulus cells removed from individual oocytes of different maturity, inseminated oocytes and to investigate the possibility of an age-dependent expression. Analysis of apoptosis in cumulus cells isolated from oocytes of different stages of maturity. Assisted reproductive technology program of the Birmingham Women's Hospital, Birmingham, UK. Patients undergoing intracytoplasmic sperm injection or IVF cycles. Percentage of positive cumulus cells when assessed for nuclear DNA damage using the terminal deoxyuridine nucleotide end-labeling assay or stained with antibodies [Fas, Fas ligand, the antiapoptotic protein Bcl-xl, and the RNA-binding protein (TIAR)]. Cumulus cells collected from mature oocytes showed no significant difference in the percentage of apoptotic markers compared to those recovered from immature oocytes, whereas those from patients >/=38 years differed significantly. When cumulus cells were exposed to sperm the levels of apoptotic markers altered significantly from those not exposed to sperm. The results show that the cumulus cells of human oocytes