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Sample records for human spliceosomal u1

  1. Therapeutic activity of modified U1 core spliceosomal particles.

    PubMed

    Rogalska, Malgorzata Ewa; Tajnik, Mojca; Licastro, Danilo; Bussani, Erica; Camparini, Luca; Mattioli, Chiara; Pagani, Franco

    2016-04-04

    Modified U1 snRNAs bound to intronic sequences downstream of the 5' splice site correct exon skipping caused by different types of mutations. Here we evaluate the therapeutic activity and structural requirements of these exon-specific U1 snRNA (ExSpeU1) particles. In a severe spinal muscular atrophy, mouse model, ExSpeU1, introduced by germline transgenesis, increases SMN2 exon 7 inclusion, SMN protein production and extends life span. In vitro, RNA mutant analysis and silencing experiments show that while U1A protein is dispensable, the 70K and stem loop IV elements mediate most of the splicing rescue activity through improvement of exon and intron definition. Our findings indicate that precise engineering of the U1 core spliceosomal RNA particle has therapeutic potential in pathologies associated with exon-skipping mutations.

  2. Therapeutic activity of modified U1 core spliceosomal particles

    PubMed Central

    Rogalska, Malgorzata Ewa; Tajnik, Mojca; Licastro, Danilo; Bussani, Erica; Camparini, Luca; Mattioli, Chiara; Pagani, Franco

    2016-01-01

    Modified U1 snRNAs bound to intronic sequences downstream of the 5′ splice site correct exon skipping caused by different types of mutations. Here we evaluate the therapeutic activity and structural requirements of these exon-specific U1 snRNA (ExSpeU1) particles. In a severe spinal muscular atrophy, mouse model, ExSpeU1, introduced by germline transgenesis, increases SMN2 exon 7 inclusion, SMN protein production and extends life span. In vitro, RNA mutant analysis and silencing experiments show that while U1A protein is dispensable, the 70K and stem loop IV elements mediate most of the splicing rescue activity through improvement of exon and intron definition. Our findings indicate that precise engineering of the U1 core spliceosomal RNA particle has therapeutic potential in pathologies associated with exon-skipping mutations. PMID:27041075

  3. Intrinsic Disorder in the Human Spliceosomal Proteome

    PubMed Central

    Korneta, Iga; Bujnicki, Janusz M.

    2012-01-01

    The spliceosome is a molecular machine that performs the excision of introns from eukaryotic pre-mRNAs. This macromolecular complex comprises in human cells five RNAs and over one hundred proteins. In recent years, many spliceosomal proteins have been found to exhibit intrinsic disorder, that is to lack stable native three-dimensional structure in solution. Building on the previous body of proteomic, structural and functional data, we have carried out a systematic bioinformatics analysis of intrinsic disorder in the proteome of the human spliceosome. We discovered that almost a half of the combined sequence of proteins abundant in the spliceosome is predicted to be intrinsically disordered, at least when the individual proteins are considered in isolation. The distribution of intrinsic order and disorder throughout the spliceosome is uneven, and is related to the various functions performed by the intrinsic disorder of the spliceosomal proteins in the complex. In particular, proteins involved in the secondary functions of the spliceosome, such as mRNA recognition, intron/exon definition and spliceosomal assembly and dynamics, are more disordered than proteins directly involved in assisting splicing catalysis. Conserved disordered regions in spliceosomal proteins are evolutionarily younger and less widespread than ordered domains of essential spliceosomal proteins at the core of the spliceosome, suggesting that disordered regions were added to a preexistent ordered functional core. Finally, the spliceosomal proteome contains a much higher amount of intrinsic disorder predicted to lack secondary structure than the proteome of the ribosome, another large RNP machine. This result agrees with the currently recognized different functions of proteins in these two complexes. PMID:22912569

  4. A 10S galectin-3–U1 snRNP complex assembles into active spliceosomes

    PubMed Central

    Haudek, Kevin C.; Voss, Patricia G.; Wang, John L.; Patterson, Ronald J.

    2016-01-01

    In previous studies, we reported that fractionation of HeLa cell nuclear extracts on glycerol gradients revealed an endogenous ∼10S particle that contained galectin-3 and U1 snRNP and this particle was sufficient to load the galectin polypeptide onto a pre-mRNA substrate. We now document that this interaction between the galectin-3–U1 snRNP particle and the pre-mRNA results in a productive spliceosomal complex, leading to intermediates and products of the splicing reaction. Nuclear extracts were depleted of U1 snRNP with a concomitant loss of splicing activity. Splicing activity in the U1-depleted extract can be reconstituted by the galectin-3–U1 snRNP particle, isolated by immunoprecipitation of the 10S region (fractions 3–5) of the glycerol gradient with anti-galectin-3 antibodies. In contrast, parallel anti-galectin-3 immunoprecipitation of free galectin-3 molecules not in a complex with U1 snRNP (fraction 1 of the same gradient), failed to restore splicing activity. These results indicate that the galectin-3–U1 snRNP-pre-mRNA ternary complex is a functional E complex and that U1 snRNP is required to assemble galectin-3 onto an active spliceosome. PMID:27105840

  5. An Atomic Structure of the Human Spliceosome.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Xiaofeng; Yan, Chuangye; Hang, Jing; Finci, Lorenzo I; Lei, Jianlin; Shi, Yigong

    2017-05-18

    Mechanistic understanding of pre-mRNA splicing requires detailed structural information on various states of the spliceosome. Here we report the cryo electron microscopy (cryo-EM) structure of the human spliceosome just before exon ligation (the C(∗) complex) at an average resolution of 3.76 Å. The splicing factor Prp17 stabilizes the active site conformation. The step II factor Slu7 adopts an extended conformation, binds Prp8 and Cwc22, and is poised for selection of the 3'-splice site. Remarkably, the intron lariat traverses through a positively charged central channel of RBM22; this unusual organization suggests mechanisms of intron recruitment, confinement, and release. The protein PRKRIP1 forms a 100-Å α helix linking the distant U2 snRNP to the catalytic center. A 35-residue fragment of the ATPase/helicase Prp22 latches onto Prp8, and the quaternary exon junction complex (EJC) recognizes upstream 5'-exon sequences and associates with Cwc22 and the GTPase Snu114. These structural features reveal important mechanistic insights into exon ligation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  6. Comprehensive proteomic analysis of the human spliceosome

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Zhou, Zhaolan; Licklider, Lawrence J.; Gygi, Steven P.; Reed, Robin

    2002-09-01

    The precise excision of introns from pre-messenger RNA is performed by the spliceosome, a macromolecular machine containing five small nuclear RNAs and numerous proteins. Much has been learned about the protein components of the spliceosome from analysis of individual purified small nuclear ribonucleoproteins and salt-stable spliceosome `core' particles. However, the complete set of proteins that constitutes intact functional spliceosomes has yet to be identified. Here we use maltose-binding protein affinity chromatography to isolate spliceosomes in highly purified and functional form. Using nanoscale microcapillary liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry, we identify ~145 distinct spliceosomal proteins, making the spliceosome the most complex cellular machine so far characterized. Our spliceosomes comprise all previously known splicing factors and 58 newly identified components. The spliceosome contains at least 30 proteins with known or putative roles in gene expression steps other than splicing. This complexity may be required not only for splicing multi-intronic metazoan pre-messenger RNAs, but also for mediating the extensive coupling between splicing and other steps in gene expression.

  7. Large-Scale Proteomic Analysis of the Human Spliceosome

    PubMed Central

    Rappsilber, Juri; Ryder, Ursula; Lamond, Angus I.; Mann, Matthias

    2002-01-01

    In a previous proteomic study of the human spliceosome, we identified 42 spliceosome-associated factors, including 19 novel ones. Using enhanced mass spectrometric tools and improved databases, we now report identification of 311 proteins that copurify with splicing complexes assembled on two separate pre-mRNAs. All known essential human splicing factors were found, and 96 novel proteins were identified, of which 55 contain domains directly linking them to functions in splicing/RNA processing. We also detected 20 proteins related to transcription, which indicates a direct connection between this process and splicing. This investigation provides the most detailed inventory of human spliceosome-associated factors to date, and the data indicate a number of interesting links coordinating splicing with other steps in the gene expression pathway. PMID:12176931

  8. Functional mammalian spliceosomal complex E contains SMN complex proteins in addition to U1 and U2 snRNPs.

    PubMed

    Makarov, Evgeny M; Owen, Nicholas; Bottrill, Andrew; Makarova, Olga V

    2012-03-01

    Spliceosomes remove introns from primary gene transcripts. They assemble de novo on each intron through a series of steps that involve the incorporation of five snRNP particles and multiple non-snRNP proteins. In mammals, all the intermediate complexes have been characterized on one transcript (MINX), with the exception of the very first, complex E. We have purified this complex by two independent procedures using antibodies to either U1-A or PRPF40A proteins, which are known to associate at an early stage of assembly. We demonstrate that the purified complexes are functional in splicing using commitment assays. These complexes contain components expected to be in the E complex and a number of previously unrecognized factors, including survival of motor neurons (SMN) and proteins of the SMN-associated complex. Depletion of the SMN complex proteins from nuclear extracts inhibits formation of the E complex and causes non-productive complexes to accumulate. This suggests that the SMN complex stabilizes the association of U1 and U2 snRNPs with pre-mRNA. In addition, the antibody to PRPF40A precipitated U2 snRNPs from nuclear extracts, indicating that PRPF40A associates with U2 snRNPs.

  9. Functional mammalian spliceosomal complex E contains SMN complex proteins in addition to U1 and U2 snRNPs

    PubMed Central

    Makarov, Evgeny M.; Owen, Nicholas; Bottrill, Andrew; Makarova, Olga V.

    2012-01-01

    Spliceosomes remove introns from primary gene transcripts. They assemble de novo on each intron through a series of steps that involve the incorporation of five snRNP particles and multiple non-snRNP proteins. In mammals, all the intermediate complexes have been characterized on one transcript (MINX), with the exception of the very first, complex E. We have purified this complex by two independent procedures using antibodies to either U1-A or PRPF40A proteins, which are known to associate at an early stage of assembly. We demonstrate that the purified complexes are functional in splicing using commitment assays. These complexes contain components expected to be in the E complex and a number of previously unrecognized factors, including survival of motor neurons (SMN) and proteins of the SMN-associated complex. Depletion of the SMN complex proteins from nuclear extracts inhibits formation of the E complex and causes non-productive complexes to accumulate. This suggests that the SMN complex stabilizes the association of U1 and U2 snRNPs with pre-mRNA. In addition, the antibody to PRPF40A precipitated U2 snRNPs from nuclear extracts, indicating that PRPF40A associates with U2 snRNPs. PMID:22110043

  10. Interaction between the RNA binding domains of Ser-Arg splicing factor 1 and U1-70K snRNP protein determines early spliceosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Cho, Suhyung; Hoang, Amy; Sinha, Rahul; Zhong, Xiang-Yang; Fu, Xiang-Dong; Krainer, Adrian R; Ghosh, Gourisankar

    2011-05-17

    It has been widely accepted that the early spliceosome assembly begins with U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (U1 snRNP) binding to the 5' splice site (5'SS), which is assisted by the Ser/Arg (SR)-rich proteins in mammalian cells. In this process, the RS domain of SR proteins is thought to directly interact with the RS motif of U1-70K, which is subject to regulation by RS domain phosphorylation. Here we report that the early spliceosome assembly event is mediated by the RNA recognition domains (RRM) of serine/arginine-rich splicing factor 1 (SRSF1), which bridges the RRM of U1-70K to pre-mRNA by using the surface opposite to the RNA binding site. Specific mutation in the RRM of SRSF1 that disrupted the RRM-RRM interaction also inhibits the formation of spliceosomal E complex and splicing. We further demonstrate that the hypo-phosphorylated RS domain of SRSF1 interacts with its own RRM, thus competing with U1-70K binding, whereas the hyper-phosphorylated RS domain permits the formation of a ternary complex containing ESE, an SR protein, and U1 snRNP. Therefore, phosphorylation of the RS domain in SRSF1 appears to induce a key molecular switch from intra- to intermolecular interactions, suggesting a plausible mechanism for the documented requirement for the phosphorylation/dephosphorylation cycle during pre-mRNA splicing.

  11. Characterization of purified human Bact spliceosomal complexes reveals compositional and morphological changes during spliceosome activation and first step catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Bessonov, Sergey; Anokhina, Maria; Krasauskas, Andrius; Golas, Monika M.; Sander, Bjoern; Will, Cindy L.; Urlaub, Henning; Stark, Holger; Lührmann, Reinhard

    2010-01-01

    To better understand the compositional and structural dynamics of the human spliceosome during its activation, we set out to isolate spliceosomal complexes formed after precatalytic B but prior to catalytically active C complexes. By shortening the polypyrimidine tract of the PM5 pre-mRNA, which lacks a 3′ splice site and 3′ exon, we stalled spliceosome assembly at the activation stage. We subsequently affinity purified human Bact complexes under the same conditions previously used to isolate B and C complexes, and analyzed their protein composition by mass spectrometry. A comparison of the protein composition of these complexes allowed a fine dissection of compositional changes during the B to Bact and Bact to C transitions, and comparisons with the Saccharomyces cerevisiae Bact complex revealed that the compositional dynamics of the spliceosome during activation are largely conserved between lower and higher eukaryotes. Human SF3b155 and CDC5L were shown to be phosphorylated specifically during the B to Bact and Bact to C transition, respectively, suggesting these modifications function at these stages of splicing. The two-dimensional structure of the human Bact complex was determined by electron microscopy, and a comparison with the B complex revealed that the morphology of the human spliceosome changes significantly during its activation. The overall architecture of the human and S. cerevisiae Bact complex is similar, suggesting that many of the higher order interactions among spliceosomal components, as well as their dynamics, are also largely conserved. PMID:20980672

  12. Structural and functional analysis of the human spliceosomal DEAD-box helicase Prp28

    SciTech Connect

    Möhlmann, Sina; Mathew, Rebecca; Neumann, Piotr; Schmitt, Andreas; Lührmann, Reinhard; Ficner, Ralf

    2014-06-01

    The crystal structure of the helicase domain of the human spliceosomal DEAD-box protein Prp28 was solved by SAD. The binding of ADP and ATP by Prp28 was studied biochemically and analysed with regard to the crystal structure. The DEAD-box protein Prp28 is essential for pre-mRNA splicing as it plays a key role in the formation of an active spliceosome. Prp28 participates in the release of the U1 snRNP from the 5′-splice site during association of the U5·U4/U6 tri-snRNP, which is a crucial step in the transition from a pre-catalytic spliceosome to an activated spliceosome. Here, it is demonstrated that the purified helicase domain of human Prp28 (hPrp28ΔN) binds ADP, whereas binding of ATP and ATPase activity could not be detected. ATP binding could not be observed for purified full-length hPrp28 either, but within an assembled spliceosomal complex hPrp28 gains ATP-binding activity. In order to understand the structural basis for the ATP-binding deficiency of isolated hPrp28, the crystal structure of hPrp28ΔN was determined at 2.0 Å resolution. In the crystal the helicase domain adopts a wide-open conformation, as the two RecA-like domains are extraordinarily displaced from the productive ATPase conformation. Binding of ATP is hindered by a closed conformation of the P-loop, which occupies the space required for the γ-phosphate of ATP.

  13. Members of a family of proteins (the RD family) detected by a U1 70K monoclonal antibody are present in spliceosomal complexes.

    PubMed Central

    Staknis, D; Reed, R

    1995-01-01

    We have characterized a monoclonal antibody (mAb) to the U1 snRNP component U1 70K. We find that this antibody recognizes several proteins, in addition to U1 70K, in purified spliceosomal complexes and in total HeLa cell nuclear extract preparations. The novel mAb U1 70K antigens can also be specifically immunoprecipitated by the antibody. Similarly to U1 70K, many of the mAb U1 70K antigens can be phosphorylated by a co-purifying kinase activity. The epitope recognized by mAb U1 70K was previously shown to be a repeating arginine/aspartate (RD) dipeptide. Thus we have designated the novel mAb U1 70K antigens the RD family. Comparison of mAb U1 70K with a recently characterized antibody, mAb 16H3, whose epitope is a repeating R/D or R/E motif, showed that a large subset of the antigens are common. In contrast, most of the mAb U1 70K antigens are distinct from the proteins detected by mAb 104, an antibody to the SR family of splicing factors. Images PMID:7479068

  14. HnRNP L and HnRNP A1 Induce Extended U1 snRNA Interactions with an Exon to Repress Spliceosome Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Chiou, Ni-ting; Shankarling, Ganesh; Lynch, Kristen W.

    2013-01-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing is catalyzed through the activity of the spliceosome, a dynamic enzymatic complex. Forcing aberrant interactions within the spliceosome can reduce splicing efficiency and alter splice site choice; however, it is unknown whether such alterations are naturally exploited mechanisms of splicing regulation. Here we demonstrate that hnRNP L represses CD45 exon 4 by recruiting hnRNP A1 to a sequence upstream of the 5’ splice site. Together, hnRNP L and A1 induce extended contacts between the 5’ splice site-bound U1 snRNA and neighboring exonic sequences which, in turn, inhibit stable association of U6 snRNA and subsequent catalysis. Importantly, analysis of several exons regulated by hnRNP L shows a clear relationship between the potential for binding of hnRNP A1 and U1 snRNA, and the effect of hnRNP L on splicing. Together our results demonstrate conformational perturbations within the spliceosome are a naturally occurring and generalizable mechanism for controlling alternative splicing decisions. PMID:23394998

  15. Purification and electron microscopic visualization of functional human spliceosomes

    PubMed Central

    Zhou, Zhaolan; Sim, Jeonggu; Griffith, Jack; Reed, Robin

    2002-01-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing takes place in a large and highly dynamic complex known as the spliceosome. Here we report the optimization of a maltose-binding protein (MBP) affinity-purification method to isolate functional spliceosomes for electron microscopic analysis. Visualization of the spliceosome preparations revealed distinct 40–60 nm particles. Immunogold-conjugated antibodies to spliceosome components specifically label these particles, which are eliminated by treatment with either RNase or protease. Moreover, spliceosomes assembled on two different pre-mRNAs are indistinguishable. This first visualization of purified functional spliceosomes assembled in vitro reveals striking structural features, including one or more central cavities and multiple elongate lobes. PMID:12215496

  16. A fraction of the transcription factor TAF15 participates in interactions with a subset of the spliceosomal U1 snRNP complex.

    PubMed

    Leichter, Michael; Marko, Marija; Ganou, Vassiliki; Patrinou-Georgoula, Meropi; Tora, László; Guialis, Apostolia

    2011-12-01

    RNA/ssDNA-binding proteins comprise an emerging class of multifunctional proteins with an anticipated role in coupling transcription with RNA processing. We focused here on the highly related transcription factors of the TET sub-class: TLS/FUS, EWS and in particular the least studied member TAF15. An extensive array of immunoprecipitation studies on differentially extracted HeLa nuclei revealed the specific association of TAF15 with the spliceosomal U1 snRNP complex, as deduced by the co-precipitating U1 snRNA, U1-70K and Sm proteins. Additionally, application of anti-U1 RNP autoantibodies identified TAF15 in the immunoprecipitates. Minor fractions of nuclear TAF15 and U1 snRNP were involved in this association. Pull-down assays using recombinant TAF15 and U1 snRNP-specific proteins (U1-70K, U1A and U1C) provided in vitro evidence for a direct protein-protein interaction between TAF15 and U1C, which required the N-terminal domain of TAF15. The ability of TAF15 to directly contact RNA, most likely RNA pol II transcripts, was supported by in vivo UV cross-linking studies in the presence of α-amanitin. By all findings, the existence of a functionally discrete subset of U1 snRNP in association with TAF15 was suggested and provided further support for the involvement of U1 snRNP components in early steps of coordinated gene expression.

  17. Protein phosphatase 2A family members (PP2A and PP6) associate with U1 snRNP and the spliceosome during pre-mRNA splicing

    PubMed Central

    Kamoun, Malek; Filali, Mohammed; Murray, Michael V.; Awasthi, Sita; Wadzinski, Brian E.

    2013-01-01

    Protein phosphorylation and dephosphorylation are both important for multiple steps in the splicing pathway. Members of the PP1 and PP2A subfamilies of phospho-serine/threonine phosphatases play essential but redundant roles in the second step of the splicing reaction. PP6, a member of the PP2A subfamily, is the mammalian homologue of yeast Sit4p and ppe1, which are involved in cell cycle regulation; however, the involvement of PP6 in the splicing pathway remains unclear. Here we show that PP2A family members physically associate with the spliceosome throughout the splicing reaction. PP2A holoenzyme and PP6 were found stably associated with U1 snRNP. Together our findings indicate that these phosphatases regulate splicing catalysis involving U1 snRNP and suggest an important evolutionary conserved role of PP2A family phosphatases in pre-mRNA splicing. PMID:24064353

  18. The transition in spliceosome assembly from complex E to complex A purges surplus U1 snRNPs from alternative splice sites.

    PubMed

    Hodson, Mark J; Hudson, Andrew J; Cherny, Dmitry; Eperon, Ian C

    2012-08-01

    Spliceosomes are assembled in stages. The first stage forms complex E, which is characterized by the presence of U1 snRNPs base-paired to the 5' splice site, components recognizing the 3' splice site and proteins thought to connect them. The splice sites are held in close proximity and the pre-mRNA is committed to splicing. Despite this, the sites for splicing appear not to be fixed until the next complex (A) forms. We have investigated the reasons why 5' splice sites are not fixed in complex E, using single molecule methods to determine the stoichiometry of U1 snRNPs bound to pre-mRNA with one or two strong 5' splice sites. In complex E most transcripts with two alternative 5' splice sites were bound by two U1 snRNPs. However, the surplus U1 snRNPs were displaced during complex A formation in an ATP-dependent process requiring an intact 3' splice site. This process leaves only one U1 snRNP per complex A, regardless of the number of potential sites. We propose a mechanism for selection of the 5' splice site. Our results show that constitutive splicing components need not be present in a fixed stoichiometry in a splicing complex.

  19. The transition in spliceosome assembly from complex E to complex A purges surplus U1 snRNPs from alternative splice sites

    PubMed Central

    Hodson, Mark J.; Hudson, Andrew J.; Cherny, Dmitry; Eperon, Ian C.

    2012-01-01

    Spliceosomes are assembled in stages. The first stage forms complex E, which is characterized by the presence of U1 snRNPs base-paired to the 5′ splice site, components recognizing the 3′ splice site and proteins thought to connect them. The splice sites are held in close proximity and the pre-mRNA is committed to splicing. Despite this, the sites for splicing appear not to be fixed until the next complex (A) forms. We have investigated the reasons why 5′ splice sites are not fixed in complex E, using single molecule methods to determine the stoichiometry of U1 snRNPs bound to pre-mRNA with one or two strong 5′ splice sites. In complex E most transcripts with two alternative 5′ splice sites were bound by two U1 snRNPs. However, the surplus U1 snRNPs were displaced during complex A formation in an ATP-dependent process requiring an intact 3′ splice site. This process leaves only one U1 snRNP per complex A, regardless of the number of potential sites. We propose a mechanism for selection of the 5′ splice site. Our results show that constitutive splicing components need not be present in a fixed stoichiometry in a splicing complex. PMID:22505580

  20. A high throughput splicing assay identifies new classes of inhibitors of human and yeast spliceosomes

    PubMed Central

    Effenberger, Kerstin A.; Perriman, Rhonda J.; Bray, Walter M.; Lokey, R. Scott; Ares, Manuel; Jurica, Melissa S.

    2014-01-01

    The spliceosome is the macromolecular machine responsible for pre-mRNA splicing, an essential step in eukaryotic gene expression. During splicing a myriad of subunits join and leave the spliceosome as it works on the pre-mRNA substrate. Strikingly, there are very few small molecules known to interact with the spliceosome. Splicing inhibitors are needed to capture transient spliceosome conformations and probe important functional components. Such compounds may also have chemotherapeutic applications, as links between splicing and cancer are increasingly uncovered. To identify new splicing inhibitors, we developed a high throughput assay for in vitro splicing using an RT-qPCR readout. In a pilot screen of 3,080 compounds we identified three small molecules that inhibit splicing in HeLa extract by interfering with different stages of human spliceosome assembly. Two of the compounds similarly impact spliceosomes in yeast extracts, suggesting selective targeting of conserved components. By examining related molecules, we identified chemical features required for the activity of two of the splicing inhibitors. In addition to verifying our assay procedure and paving the way to larger screens, these studies establish new compounds as chemical probes for investigating the splicing machinery. PMID:23771823

  1. Stem-loop 4 of U1 snRNA is essential for splicing and interacts with the U2 snRNP-specific SF3A1 protein during spliceosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Sharma, Shalini; Wongpalee, Somsakul Pop; Vashisht, Ajay; Wohlschlegel, James A; Black, Douglas L

    2014-11-15

    The pairing of 5' and 3' splice sites across an intron is a critical step in spliceosome formation and its regulation. Interactions that bring the two splice sites together during spliceosome assembly must occur with a high degree of specificity and fidelity to allow expression of functional mRNAs and make particular alternative splicing choices. Here, we report a new interaction between stem-loop 4 (SL4) of the U1 snRNA, which recognizes the 5' splice site, and a component of the U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (snRNP) complex, which assembles across the intron at the 3' splice site. Using a U1 snRNP complementation assay, we found that SL4 is essential for splicing in vivo. The addition of free U1-SL4 to a splicing reaction in vitro inhibits splicing and blocks complex assembly prior to formation of the prespliceosomal A complex, indicating a requirement for a SL4 contact in spliceosome assembly. To characterize the interactions of this RNA structure, we used a combination of stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC), biotin/Neutravidin affinity pull-down, and mass spectrometry. We show that U1-SL4 interacts with the SF3A1 protein of the U2 snRNP. We found that this interaction between the U1 snRNA and SF3A1 occurs within prespliceosomal complexes assembled on the pre-mRNA. Thus, SL4 of the U1 snRNA is important for splicing, and its interaction with SF3A1 mediates contact between the 5' and 3' splice site complexes within the assembling spliceosome. © 2014 Sharma et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press.

  2. Stem–loop 4 of U1 snRNA is essential for splicing and interacts with the U2 snRNP-specific SF3A1 protein during spliceosome assembly

    PubMed Central

    Sharma, Shalini; Wongpalee, Somsakul Pop; Vashisht, Ajay; Wohlschlegel, James A.; Black, Douglas L.

    2014-01-01

    The pairing of 5′ and 3′ splice sites across an intron is a critical step in spliceosome formation and its regulation. Interactions that bring the two splice sites together during spliceosome assembly must occur with a high degree of specificity and fidelity to allow expression of functional mRNAs and make particular alternative splicing choices. Here, we report a new interaction between stem–loop 4 (SL4) of the U1 snRNA, which recognizes the 5′ splice site, and a component of the U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (snRNP) complex, which assembles across the intron at the 3′ splice site. Using a U1 snRNP complementation assay, we found that SL4 is essential for splicing in vivo. The addition of free U1-SL4 to a splicing reaction in vitro inhibits splicing and blocks complex assembly prior to formation of the prespliceosomal A complex, indicating a requirement for a SL4 contact in spliceosome assembly. To characterize the interactions of this RNA structure, we used a combination of stable isotope labeling by amino acids in cell culture (SILAC), biotin/Neutravidin affinity pull-down, and mass spectrometry. We show that U1-SL4 interacts with the SF3A1 protein of the U2 snRNP. We found that this interaction between the U1 snRNA and SF3A1 occurs within prespliceosomal complexes assembled on the pre-mRNA. Thus, SL4 of the U1 snRNA is important for splicing, and its interaction with SF3A1 mediates contact between the 5′ and 3′ splice site complexes within the assembling spliceosome. PMID:25403181

  3. Semiquantitative Proteomic Analysis of the Human Spliceosome via a Novel Two-Dimensional Gel Electrophoresis Method ▿ §

    PubMed Central

    Agafonov, Dmitry E.; Deckert, Jochen; Wolf, Elmar; Odenwälder, Peter; Bessonov, Sergey; Will, Cindy L.; Urlaub, Henning; Lührmann, Reinhard

    2011-01-01

    More than 200 proteins associate with human spliceosomes, but little is known about their relative abundances in a given spliceosomal complex. Here we describe a novel two-dimensional (2D) electrophoresis method that allows separation of high-molecular-mass proteins without in-gel precipitation and thus without loss of protein. Using this system coupled with mass spectrometry, we identified 171 proteins altogether on 2D maps of stage-specific spliceosomal complexes. By staining with a fluorescent dye with a wide linear intensity range, we could quantitate and categorize proteins as present in high, moderate, or low abundance. Affinity-purified human B, Bact, and C complexes contained 69, 63, and 72 highly/moderately abundant proteins, respectively. The recruitment and release of spliceosomal proteins were followed based on their abundances in A, B, Bact, and C spliceosomal complexes. Staining with a phospho-specific dye revealed that approximately one-third of the proteins detected in human spliceosomal complexes by 2D gel analyses are phosphorylated. The 2D gel electrophoresis system described here allows for the first time an objective view of the relative abundances of proteins present in a particular spliceosomal complex and also sheds additional light on the spliceosome's compositional dynamics and the phosphorylation status of spliceosomal proteins at specific stages of splicing. PMID:21536652

  4. Major spliceosome defects cause male infertility and are associated with nonobstructive azoospermia in humans

    PubMed Central

    Wu, Hao; Sun, Liwei; Wen, Yang; Liu, Yujuan; Yu, Jun; Mao, Feiyu; Wang, Ya; Tong, Chao; Hu, Zhibin; Sha, Jiahao; Liu, Mingxi; Xia, Laixin

    2016-01-01

    Processing of pre-mRNA into mRNA is an important regulatory mechanism in eukaryotes that is mediated by the spliceosome, a huge and dynamic ribonucleoprotein complex. Splicing defects are implicated in a spectrum of human disease, but the underlying mechanistic links remain largely unresolved. Using a genome-wide association approach, we have recently identified single nucleotide polymorphisms in humans that associate with nonobstructive azoospermia (NOA), a common cause of male infertility. Here, using genetic manipulation of corresponding candidate loci in Drosophila, we show that the spliceosome component SNRPA1/U2A is essential for male fertility. Loss of U2A in germ cells of the Drosophila testis does not affect germline stem cells, but does result in the accumulation of mitotic spermatogonia that fail to differentiate into spermatocytes and mature sperm. Lack of U2A causes insufficient splicing of mRNAs required for the transition of germ cells from proliferation to differentiation. We show that germ cell-specific disruption of other components of the major spliceosome manifests with the same phenotype, demonstrating that mRNA processing is required for the differentiation of spermatogonia. This requirement is conserved, and expression of human SNRPA1 fully restores spermatogenesis in U2A mutant flies. We further report that several missense mutations in human SNRPA1 that inhibit the assembly of the major spliceosome dominantly disrupt spermatogonial differentiation in Drosophila. Collectively, our findings uncover a conserved and specific requirement for the major spliceosome during the transition from spermatogonial proliferation to differentiation in the male testis, suggesting that spliceosome defects affecting the differentiation of human spermatogonia contribute to NOA. PMID:27035939

  5. The 5' end of U2 snRNA is in close proximity to U1 and functional sites of the pre-mRNA in early spliceosomal complexes.

    PubMed

    Dönmez, Gizem; Hartmuth, Klaus; Kastner, Berthold; Will, Cindy L; Lührmann, Reinhard

    2007-02-09

    Recognition and pairing of the correct 5' and 3' splice sites (ss) of a pre-mRNA are critical events that occur early during spliceosome assembly. Little is known about the spatial organization in early spliceosomal complexes of the U1 and U2 snRNPs, which together with several non-snRNP proteins, are involved in juxtapositioning the functional sites of the pre-mRNA. To better understand the molecular mechanisms of splice-site recognition/pairing, we have examined the organization of U2 relative to U1 and pre-mRNA in spliceosomal complexes via hydroxyl-radical probing with Fe-BABE-tethered U2 snRNA. These studies reveal that functional sites of the pre-mRNA are located close to the 5' end of U2 both in E and A complexes. U2 is also positioned close to U1 in a defined orientation already in the E complex, and their relative spatial organization remains largely unchanged during the E to A transition.

  6. Spliceosomal Immunophilins

    PubMed Central

    Mesa, Annia; Somarelli, Jason A.; Herrera, Rene J.

    2008-01-01

    The spliceosome is a dynamic, macromolecular complex, which removes non-protein-coding introns from pre-mRNA to form mature mRNA in a process known as splicing. This ribonucleoprotein assembly is comprised of five uridine-rich small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) as well as over 300 proteins. In humans, several of the known splicing factors are members of the immunophilin superfamily. Immunophilins are peptidyl-prolyl cis-trans isomerases that catalyze the conversion of proteins from cis to trans at Xaa-Pro bonds. Our review of the data portrays a picture of this protein family as activators of spliceosomal proteins by way of folding and transport. PMID:18544344

  7. Modeling of the U1 snRNP assembly pathway in alternative splicing in human cells using Petri nets.

    PubMed

    Kielbassa, J; Bortfeldt, R; Schuster, S; Koch, I

    2009-02-01

    The investigation of spliceosomal processes is currently a topic of intense research in molecular biology. In the molecular mechanism of alternative splicing, a multi-protein-RNA complex - the spliceosome - plays a crucial role. To understand the biological processes of alternative splicing, it is essential to comprehend the biogenesis of the spliceosome. In this paper, we propose the first abstract model of the regulatory assembly pathway of the human spliceosomal subunit U1. Using Petri nets, we describe its highly ordered assembly that takes place in a stepwise manner. Petri net theory represents a mathematical formalism to model and analyze systems with concurrent processes at different abstraction levels with the possibility to combine them into a uniform description language. There exist many approaches to determine static and dynamic properties of Petri nets, which can be applied to analyze biochemical systems. In addition, Petri net tools usually provide intuitively understandable graphical network representations, which facilitate the dialog between experimentalists and theoreticians. Our Petri net model covers binding, transport, signaling, and covalent modification processes. Through the computation of structural and behavioral Petri net properties and their interpretation in biological terms, we validate our model and use it to get a better understanding of the complex processes of the assembly pathway. We can explain the basic network behavior, using minimal T-invariants which represent special pathways through the network. We find linear as well as cyclic pathways. We determine the P-invariants that represent conserved moieties in a network. The simulation of the net demonstrates the importance of the stability of complexes during the maturation pathway. We can show that complexes that dissociate too fast, hinder the formation of the complete U1 snRNP.

  8. Biochemical and proteomic analysis of spliceosome factors interacting with intron-1 of human papillomavirus type-16.

    PubMed

    Martínez-Salazar, Martha; López-Urrutia, Eduardo; Arechaga-Ocampo, Elena; Bonilla-Moreno, Raul; Martínez-Castillo, Macario; Díaz-Hernández, Job; Del Moral-Hernández, Oscar; Cedillo-Barrón, Leticia; Martines-Juarez, Víctor; De Nova-Ocampo, Monica; Valdes, Jesús; Berumen, Jaime; Villegas-Sepúlveda, Nicolás

    2014-12-05

    The human papillomavirus type 16 (HPV-16) E6/E7 spliced transcripts are heterogeneously expressed in cervical carcinoma. The heterogeneity of the E6/E7 splicing profile might be in part due to the intrinsic variation of splicing factors in tumor cells. However, the splicing factors that bind the E6/E7 intron 1 (In-1) have not been defined. Therefore, we aimed to identify these factors; we used HeLa nuclear extracts (NE) for in vitro spliceosome assembly. The proteins were allowed to bind to an RNA/DNA hybrid formed by the In-1 transcript and a 5'-biotinylated DNA oligonucleotide complementary to the upstream exon sequence, which prevented interference in protein binding to the intron. The hybrid probes bound with the nuclear proteins were coupled to streptavidin magnetic beads for chromatography affinity purification. Proteins were eluted and identified by mass spectrometry (MS). Approximately 170 proteins were identified by MS, 80% of which were RNA binding proteins, including canonical spliceosome core components, helicases and regulatory splicing factors. The canonical factors were identified as components of the spliceosomal B-complex. Although 35-40 of the identified factors were cognate splicing factors or helicases, they have not been previously detected in spliceosome complexes that were assembled using in vivo or in vitro models.

  9. Cryo-EM structure of a human spliceosome activated for step 2 of splicing.

    PubMed

    Bertram, Karl; Agafonov, Dmitry E; Liu, Wen-Ti; Dybkov, Olexandr; Will, Cindy L; Hartmuth, Klaus; Urlaub, Henning; Kastner, Berthold; Stark, Holger; Lührmann, Reinhard

    2017-02-16

    Spliceosome rearrangements facilitated by RNA helicase PRP16 before catalytic step two of splicing are poorly understood. Here we report a 3D cryo-electron microscopy structure of the human spliceosomal C complex stalled directly after PRP16 action (C*). The architecture of the catalytic U2-U6 ribonucleoprotein (RNP) core of the human C* spliceosome is very similar to that of the yeast pre-Prp16 C complex. However, in C* the branched intron region is separated from the catalytic centre by approximately 20 Å, and its position close to the U6 small nuclear RNA ACAGA box is stabilized by interactions with the PRP8 RNase H-like and PRP17 WD40 domains. RNA helicase PRP22 is located about 100 Å from the catalytic centre, suggesting that it destabilizes the spliced mRNA after step two from a distance. Comparison of the structure of the yeast C and human C* complexes reveals numerous RNP rearrangements that are likely to be facilitated by PRP16, including a large-scale movement of the U2 small nuclear RNP.

  10. Cwc2 and its human homologue RBM22 promote an active conformation of the spliceosome catalytic centre

    PubMed Central

    Rasche, Nicolas; Dybkov, Olexandr; Schmitzová, Jana; Akyildiz, Berktan; Fabrizio, Patrizia; Lührmann, Reinhard

    2012-01-01

    RNA-structural elements play key roles in pre-mRNA splicing catalysis; yet, the formation of catalytically competent RNA structures requires the assistance of spliceosomal proteins. We show that the S. cerevisiae Cwc2 protein functions prior to step 1 of splicing, and it is not required for the Prp2-mediated spliceosome remodelling that generates the catalytically active B* complex, suggesting that Cwc2 plays a more sophisticated role in the generation of a functional catalytic centre. In active spliceosomes, Cwc2 contacts catalytically important RNA elements, including the U6 internal stem-loop (ISL), and regions of U6 and the pre-mRNA intron near the 5′ splice site, placing Cwc2 at/near the spliceosome's catalytic centre. These interactions are evolutionarily conserved, as shown by studies with Cwc2's human counterpart RBM22, indicating that Cwc2/RBM22–RNA contacts are functionally important. We propose that Cwc2 induces an active conformation of the spliceosome's catalytic RNA elements. Thus, the function of RNA–RNA tertiary interactions within group II introns, namely to induce an active conformation of domain V, may be fulfilled by proteins that contact the functionally analogous U6-ISL, within the spliceosome. PMID:22246180

  11. RNA structure analysis of human spliceosomes reveals a compact 3D arrangement of snRNAs at the catalytic core

    PubMed Central

    Anokhina, Maria; Bessonov, Sergey; Miao, Zhichao; Westhof, Eric; Hartmuth, Klaus; Lührmann, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    Although U snRNAs play essential roles in splicing, little is known about the 3D arrangement of U2, U6, and U5 snRNAs and the pre-mRNA in active spliceosomes. To elucidate their relative spatial organization and dynamic rearrangement, we examined the RNA structure of affinity-purified, human spliceosomes before and after catalytic step 1 by chemical RNA structure probing. We found a stable 3-way junction of the U2/U6 snRNA duplex in active spliceosomes that persists minimally through step 1. Moreover, the formation of alternating, mutually exclusive, U2 snRNA conformations, as observed in yeast, was not detected in different assembly stages of human spliceosomal complexes (that is, B, Bact, or C complexes). Psoralen crosslinking revealed an interaction during/after step 1 between internal loop 1 of the U5 snRNA, and intron nucleotides immediately downstream of the branchpoint. Using the experimentally derived structural constraints, we generated a model of the RNA network of the step 1 spliceosome, based on the crystal structure of a group II intron through homology modelling. The model is topologically consistent with current genetic, biochemical, and structural data. PMID:24002212

  12. Dramatically reduced spliceosome in Cyanidioschyzon merolae

    PubMed Central

    Stark, Martha R.; Dunn, Elizabeth A.; Dunn, William S. C.; Grisdale, Cameron J.; Daniele, Anthony R.; Halstead, Matthew R. G.; Fast, Naomi M.

    2015-01-01

    The human spliceosome is a large ribonucleoprotein complex that catalyzes pre-mRNA splicing. It consists of five snRNAs and more than 200 proteins. Because of this complexity, much work has focused on the Saccharomyces cerevisiae spliceosome, viewed as a highly simplified system with fewer than half as many splicing factors as humans. Nevertheless, it has been difficult to ascribe a mechanistic function to individual splicing factors or even to discern which are critical for catalyzing the splicing reaction. We have identified and characterized the splicing machinery from the red alga Cyanidioschyzon merolae, which has been reported to harbor only 26 intron-containing genes. The U2, U4, U5, and U6 snRNAs contain expected conserved sequences and have the ability to adopt secondary structures and form intermolecular base-pairing interactions, as in other organisms. C. merolae has a highly reduced set of 43 identifiable core splicing proteins, compared with ∼90 in budding yeast and ∼140 in humans. Strikingly, we have been unable to find a U1 snRNA candidate or any predicted U1-associated proteins, suggesting that splicing in C. merolae may occur without the U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle. In addition, based on mapping the identified proteins onto the known splicing cycle, we propose that there is far less compositional variability during splicing in C. merolae than in other organisms. The observed reduction in splicing factors is consistent with the elimination of spliceosomal components that play a peripheral or modulatory role in splicing, presumably retaining those with a more central role in organization and catalysis. PMID:25733880

  13. Malleable ribonucleoprotein machine: protein intrinsic disorder in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae spliceosome

    PubMed Central

    Coelho Ribeiro, Maria de Lourdes; Espinosa, Julio; Islam, Sameen; Martinez, Osvaldo; Thanki, Jayesh Jamnadas; Mazariegos, Stephanie; Nguyen, Tam; Larina, Maya; Xue, Bin

    2013-01-01

    Recent studies revealed that a significant fraction of any given proteome is presented by proteins that do not have unique 3D structures as a whole or in significant parts. These intrinsically disordered proteins possess dramatic structural and functional variability, being especially enriched in signaling and regulatory functions since their lack of fixed structure defines their ability to be involved in interaction with several proteins and allows them to be re-used in multiple pathways. Among recognized disorder-based protein functions are interactions with nucleic acids and multi-target binding; i.e., the functions ascribed to many spliceosomal proteins. Therefore, the spliceosome, a multimegadalton ribonucleoprotein machine catalyzing the excision of introns from eukaryotic pre-mRNAs, represents an attractive target for the focused analysis of the abundance and functionality of intrinsic disorder in its proteinaceous components. In yeast cells, spliceosome consists of five small nuclear RNAs (U1, U2, U4, U5, and U6) and a range of associated proteins. Some of these proteins constitute cores of the corresponding snRNA-protein complexes known as small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs). Other spliceosomal proteins have various auxiliary functions. To gain better understanding of the functional roles of intrinsic disorder, we have studied the prevalence of intrinsically disordered proteins in the yeast spliceosome using a wide array of bioinformatics methods. Our study revealed that similar to the proteins associated with human spliceosomes (Korneta & Bujnicki, 2012), proteins found in the yeast spliceosome are enriched in intrinsic disorder. PMID:23638354

  14. The Natural Product N-Palmitoyl-l-leucine Selectively Inhibits Late Assembly of Human Spliceosomes.

    PubMed

    Effenberger, Kerstin A; James, Robert C; Urabe, Veronica K; Dickey, Bailey J; Linington, Roger G; Jurica, Melissa S

    2015-11-13

    The spliceosome is a dynamic complex of five structural RNAs and dozens of proteins, which assemble together to remove introns from nascent eukaryotic gene transcripts in a process called splicing. Small molecules that target different components of the spliceosome represent valuable research tools to investigate this complicated macromolecular machine. However, the current collection of spliceosome inhibitors is very limited. To expand the toolkit we used a high-throughput in vitro splicing assay to screen a collection of pre-fractions of natural compounds derived from marine bacteria for splicing inhibition. Further fractionation of initial hits generated individual peaks of splicing inhibitors that interfere with different stages of spliceosome assembly. With additional characterization of individual peaks, we identified N-palmitoyl-l-leucine as a new splicing inhibitor that blocks a late stage of spliceosome assembly. Structure-activity relationship analysis of the compound revealed that length of carbon chain is important for activity in splicing, as well as for effects on the cytological profile of cells in culture. Together these results demonstrate that our combination of in vitro splicing analysis with complex natural product libraries is a powerful strategy for identifying new small molecule tools with which to probe different aspects of spliceosome assembly and function.

  15. The Natural Product N-Palmitoyl-l-leucine Selectively Inhibits Late Assembly of Human Spliceosomes*

    PubMed Central

    Effenberger, Kerstin A.; James, Robert C.; Urabe, Veronica K.; Dickey, Bailey J.; Linington, Roger G.; Jurica, Melissa S.

    2015-01-01

    The spliceosome is a dynamic complex of five structural RNAs and dozens of proteins, which assemble together to remove introns from nascent eukaryotic gene transcripts in a process called splicing. Small molecules that target different components of the spliceosome represent valuable research tools to investigate this complicated macromolecular machine. However, the current collection of spliceosome inhibitors is very limited. To expand the toolkit we used a high-throughput in vitro splicing assay to screen a collection of pre-fractions of natural compounds derived from marine bacteria for splicing inhibition. Further fractionation of initial hits generated individual peaks of splicing inhibitors that interfere with different stages of spliceosome assembly. With additional characterization of individual peaks, we identified N-palmitoyl-l-leucine as a new splicing inhibitor that blocks a late stage of spliceosome assembly. Structure-activity relationship analysis of the compound revealed that length of carbon chain is important for activity in splicing, as well as for effects on the cytological profile of cells in culture. Together these results demonstrate that our combination of in vitro splicing analysis with complex natural product libraries is a powerful strategy for identifying new small molecule tools with which to probe different aspects of spliceosome assembly and function. PMID:26408199

  16. Spliceosomal intronogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Sujin; Stevens, Scott W.

    2016-01-01

    The presence of intervening sequences, termed introns, is a defining characteristic of eukaryotic nuclear genomes. Once transcribed into pre-mRNA, these introns must be removed within the spliceosome before export of the processed mRNA to the cytoplasm, where it is translated into protein. Although intron loss has been demonstrated experimentally, several mysteries remain regarding the origin and propagation of introns. Indeed, documented evidence of gain of an intron has only been suggested by phylogenetic analyses. We report the use of a strategy that detects selected intron gain and loss events. We have experimentally verified, to our knowledge, the first demonstrations of intron transposition in any organism. From our screen, we detected two separate intron gain events characterized by the perfect transposition of a reporter intron into the yeast genes RPL8B and ADH2, respectively. We show that the newly acquired introns are able to be removed from their respective pre-mRNAs by the spliceosome. Additionally, the novel allele, RPL8Bint, is functional when overexpressed within the genome in a strain lacking the Rpl8 paralogue RPL8A, demonstrating that the gene targeted for intronogenesis is functional. PMID:27217561

  17. Multiple protein–protein interactions converging on the Prp38 protein during activation of the human spliceosome

    PubMed Central

    Schütze, Tonio; Ulrich, Alexander K.C.; Apelt, Luise; Will, Cindy L.; Bartlick, Natascha; Seeger, Martin; Weber, Gert; Lührmann, Reinhard; Stelzl, Ulrich; Wahl, Markus C.

    2016-01-01

    Spliceosomal Prp38 proteins contain a conserved amino-terminal domain, but only higher eukaryotic orthologs also harbor a carboxy-terminal RS domain, a hallmark of splicing regulatory SR proteins. We show by crystal structure analysis that the amino-terminal domain of human Prp38 is organized around three pairs of antiparallel α-helices and lacks similarities to RNA-binding domains found in canonical SR proteins. Instead, yeast two-hybrid analyses suggest that the amino-terminal domain is a versatile protein–protein interaction hub that possibly binds 12 other spliceosomal proteins, most of which are recruited at the same stage as Prp38. By quantitative, alanine surface-scanning two-hybrid screens and biochemical analyses we delineated four distinct interfaces on the Prp38 amino-terminal domain. In vitro interaction assays using recombinant proteins showed that Prp38 can bind at least two proteins simultaneously via two different interfaces. Addition of excess Prp38 amino-terminal domain to in vitro splicing assays, but not of an interaction-deficient mutant, stalled splicing at a precatalytic stage. Our results show that human Prp38 is an unusual SR protein, whose amino-terminal domain is a multi-interface protein–protein interaction platform that might organize the relative positioning of other proteins during splicing. PMID:26673105

  18. Interactions between Giardia duodenalis Sm proteins and their association with spliceosomal snRNAs.

    PubMed

    Gómez, Vanessa; Wasserman, Moisés

    2017-02-01

    Giardia duodenalis is a parasite that colonises the intestines of humans and other vertebrates, causing diarrhoea and poor nutrient absorption. G. duodenalis is sometimes considered an early diverging eukaryote, and its genome exhibits simplified molecular machinery for many cellular processes, which makes it an interesting model to study. The spliceosome, one of the most complex molecular machines in the eukaryotic cell, is responsible for intron excision and exon splicing. Just over a decade ago, it was believed that the G. duodenalis genome did not contain introns or undergo splicing. Research now shows that this speculation was incorrect and that uncommon mechanisms, such as trans-splicing from different genes, occur. In silico studies of the parasite suggest the possibility of a simplified spliceosome and spliceosomal small nuclear RNA (snRNA) candidates; however, none of these components have been identified in vivo. Here, we developed a strategy to study the in vivo expression, interactions and localisation of these spliceosome components in G. duodenalis. Haemagglutinin (HA)-tagged SmB and SmD3 proteins, which form part of the spliceosome core, were overexpressed in the parasite. Immunoprecipitation with anti-HA revealed that the SmD3 protein is associated with the proteins SmB, SmD1, SmD2, SmE and SmF in vivo. In addition, the U1, U2 and U4 snRNA candidates reported previously were found in the protein complex, suggesting that these molecules are spliceosomal snRNAs of G. duodenalis and they contained a 2,2,7-trimethylguanosine modification at their 5' end. Our data indicate that the actively expressed spliceosome in G. duodenalis is similar to that of highly evolved protists and higher animals.

  19. Primary structure of a human arginine-rich nuclear protein that colocalizes with spliceosome components

    SciTech Connect

    Chaudhary, N.; McMahon, C.; Blobel, G. )

    1991-09-15

    The cDNA for a 54-kDa nuclear protein (p54) has been cloned from a human hepatoma expression library. Contained within p54 is an arginine/serine-rich region similar to segments of several proteins that participate in pre-mRNA splicing including the 70-kDa component of U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (snRNP) and the Drosophila transformer and suppressor-of-white-apricot proteins. The arginine/serine-rich region is dominated by a series of 8-amino acid imperfect repetitive motifs (consensus sequence, Arg-Arg-Ser-Arg-Ser-Arg-Ser-Arg). Antibodies raised against synthetic peptides of p54 react with an {approximately}70-kDa protein on immunoblots of HeLa cell and rat liver nuclear proteins. This apparent discrepancy in mass is also observed when p54 mRNA is translated in vitro. Indirect immunofluorescence studies in HeLa cells show that p54 is distributed throughout the nucleus in a speckled pattern, with an additional diffuse labeling of the nucleus excluding the nucleoli. Double immunofluorescence experiments indicate that these punctate regions are coincident with the speckles seen in cells stained with antibodies against several constituents of the pre-mRNA splicing machinery. Sedimentation analysis of HeLa cell extracts on sucrose gradients showed that p54 migrates at 4-6 S, indicating that the protein is not a tightly associated component of snRNPs. Although the function of p54 is not yet known, the structure and immunolocalization data suggest that this protein may have a role in pre-mRNA processing.

  20. Novel regulatory principles of the spliceosomal Brr2 RNA helicase and links to retinal disease in humans.

    PubMed

    Mozaffari-Jovin, Sina; Wandersleben, Traudy; Santos, Karine F; Will, Cindy L; Lührmann, Reinhard; Wahl, Markus C

    2014-01-01

    For each round of pre-mRNA splicing, a spliceosome is assembled anew on its substrate. RNA-protein remodeling events required for spliceosome assembly, splicing catalysis, and spliceosome disassembly are driven and controlled by a conserved group of ATPases/RNA helicases. The activities of most of these enzymes are timed by their recruitment to the spliceosome. The Brr2 enzyme, however, which mediates spliceosome catalytic activation, is a stable subunit of the spliceosome, and thus, requires special regulation. Recent structural and functional studies have revealed diverse mechanisms whereby an RNaseH-like and a Jab1/MPN-like domain of the Prp8 protein regulate Brr2 activity during splicing both positively and negatively. Reversible Brr2 inhibition might in part be achieved via an intrinsically unstructured element of the Prp8 Jab1/MPN domain, a concept widespread in biological systems. Mutations leading to changes in the Prp8 Jab1/MPN domain, which are linked to a severe form of retinitis pigmentosa, disrupt Jab1/MPN-mediated regulation of Brr2.

  1. Human U1 small nuclear RNA genes: extensive conservation of flanking sequences suggests cycles of gene amplification and transposition.

    PubMed Central

    Bernstein, L B; Manser, T; Weiner, A M

    1985-01-01

    The DNA immediately flanking the 164-base-pair U1 RNA coding region is highly conserved among the approximately 30 human U1 genes. The U1 multigene family also contains many U1 pseudogenes (designated class I) with striking although imperfect flanking homology to the true U1 genes. Using cosmid vectors, we now have cloned, characterized, and partially sequenced three 35-kilobase (kb) regions of the human genome spanning U1 homologies. Two clones contain one true U1 gene each, and the third bears two class I pseudogenes 9 kb apart in the opposite orientation. We show by genomic blotting and by direct DNA sequence determination that the conserved sequences surrounding U1 genes are much more extensive than previously estimated: nearly perfect sequence homology between many true U1 genes extends for at least 24 kb upstream and at least 20 kb downstream from the U1 coding region. In addition, the sequences of the two new pseudogenes provide evidence that class I U1 pseudogenes are more closely related to each other than to true genes. Finally, it is demonstrated elsewhere (Lindgren et al., Mol. Cell. Biol. 5:2190-2196, 1985) that both true U1 genes and class I U1 pseudogenes map to chromosome 1, but in separate clusters located far apart on opposite sides of the centromere. Taken together, these results suggest a model for the evolution of the U1 multigene family. We speculate that the contemporary family of true U1 genes was derived from a more ancient family of U1 genes (now class I U1 pseudogenes) by gene amplification and transposition. Gene amplification provides the simplest explanation for the clustering of both U1 genes and class I pseudogenes and for the conservation of at least 44 kb of DNA flanking the U1 coding region in a large fraction of the 30 true U1 genes. Images PMID:3837185

  2. Spliceosome structure and function.

    PubMed

    Will, Cindy L; Lührmann, Reinhard

    2011-07-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing is catalyzed by the spliceosome, a multimegadalton ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex comprised of five snRNPs and numerous proteins. Intricate RNA-RNA and RNP networks, which serve to align the reactive groups of the pre-mRNA for catalysis, are formed and repeatedly rearranged during spliceosome assembly and catalysis. Both the conformation and composition of the spliceosome are highly dynamic, affording the splicing machinery its accuracy and flexibility, and these remarkable dynamics are largely conserved between yeast and metazoans. Because of its dynamic and complex nature, obtaining structural information about the spliceosome represents a major challenge. Electron microscopy has revealed the general morphology of several spliceosomal complexes and their snRNP subunits, and also the spatial arrangement of some of their components. X-ray and NMR studies have provided high resolution structure information about spliceosomal proteins alone or complexed with one or more binding partners. The extensive interplay of RNA and proteins in aligning the pre-mRNA's reactive groups, and the presence of both RNA and protein at the core of the splicing machinery, suggest that the spliceosome is an RNP enzyme. However, elucidation of the precise nature of the spliceosome's active site, awaits the generation of a high-resolution structure of its RNP core.

  3. Spliceosome Structure and Function

    PubMed Central

    Will, Cindy L.; Lührmann, Reinhard

    2011-01-01

    SUMMARY Pre-mRNA splicing is catalyzed by the spliceosome, a multimegadalton ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex comprised of five snRNPs and numerous proteins. Intricate RNA-RNA and RNP networks, which serve to align the reactive groups of the pre-mRNA for catalysis, are formed and repeatedly rearranged during spliceosome assembly and catalysis. Both the conformation and composition of the spliceosome are highly dynamic, affording the splicing machinery its accuracy and flexibility, and these remarkable dynamics are largely conserved between yeast and metazoans. Because of its dynamic and complex nature, obtaining structural information about the spliceosome represents a major challenge. Electron microscopy has revealed the general morphology of several spliceosomal complexes and their snRNP subunits, and also the spatial arrangement of some of their components. X-ray and NMR studies have provided high resolution structure information about spliceosomal proteins alone or complexed with one or more binding partners. The extensive interplay of RNA and proteins in aligning the pre-mRNA's reactive groups, and the presence of both RNA and protein at the core of the splicing machinery, suggest that the spliceosome is an RNP enzyme. However, elucidation of the precise nature of the spliceosome's active site, awaits the generation of a high-resolution structure of its RNP core. PMID:21441581

  4. Spliceostatin A inhibits spliceosome assembly subsequent to prespliceosome formation

    PubMed Central

    Roybal, Gabriel A.; Jurica, Melissa S.

    2010-01-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing is catalyzed by the large ribonucleoprotein spliceosome. Spliceosome assembly is a highly dynamic process in which the complex transitions through a number of intermediates. Recently, the potent anti-tumor compound Spliceostatin A (SSA) was shown to inhibit splicing and to interact with an essential component of the spliceosome, SF3b. However, it was unclear whether SSA directly impacts the spliceosome and, if so, by what mechanism, which limits interpretation of the drugs influence on splicing. Here, we report that SSA inhibits pre-mRNA splicing by interfering with the spliceosome subsequent to U2 snRNP addition. We demonstrate that SSA inhibition of spliceosome assembly requires ATP, key pre-mRNA splicing sequences and intact U1 and U2 snRNAs. Furthermore all five U snRNAs in addition to the SSA molecule associate with pre-mRNA during SSA inhibition. Kinetic analyses reveal that SSA impedes the A to B complex transition. Remarkably, our data imply that, in addition to its established function in early U2 snRNP recruitment, SF3b plays a role in later maturation of spliceosomes. This work establishes SSA as a powerful tool for dissecting the dynamics of spliceosomes in cells. In addition our data will inform the design of synthetic splicing modulator compounds for targeted anti-tumor treatment. PMID:20529876

  5. Modified nucleotides at the 5' end of human U2 snRNA are required for spliceosomal E-complex formation.

    PubMed

    Dönmez, Gizem; Hartmuth, Klaus; Lührmann, Reinhard

    2004-12-01

    U2 snRNA, a key player in nuclear pre-mRNA splicing, contains a 5'-terminal m3G cap and many internal modifications. The latter were shown in vertebrates to be generally required for U2 function in splicing, but precisely which residues are essential and their role in snRNP and/or spliceosome assembly is presently not clear. Here, we investigated the roles of individual modified nucleotides of HeLa U2 snRNA in pre-mRNA splicing, using a two-step in vitro reconstitution/complementation assay. We show that the three pseudouridines and five 2'O-methyl groups within the first 20 nucleotides of U2 snRNA, but not the m3G cap, are required for efficient pre-mRNA splicing. Individual pseudouridines were not essential, but had cumulative effects on U2 function. In contrast, four of five 2'O-methylations (at positions 1, 2, 12, and 19) were individually required for splicing. The in vitro assembly of 17S U2 snRNPs was not dependent on the presence of modified U2 residues. However, individual internal modifications were required for the formation of the ATP-independent early spliceosomal E complex. Our data strongly suggest that modifications within the first 20 nucleotides of U2 play an important role in facilitating the interaction of U2 with U1 snRNP and/or other factors within the E complex.

  6. Variant U1 snRNAs are implicated in human pluripotent stem cell maintenance and neuromuscular disease

    PubMed Central

    Vazquez-Arango, Pilar; Vowles, Jane; Browne, Cathy; Hartfield, Elizabeth; Fernandes, Hugo J. R.; Mandefro, Berhan; Sareen, Dhruv; James, William; Wade-Martins, Richard; Cowley, Sally A.; Murphy, Shona; O'Reilly, Dawn

    2016-01-01

    The U1 small nuclear (sn)RNA (U1) is a multifunctional ncRNA, known for its pivotal role in pre-mRNA splicing and regulation of RNA 3′ end processing events. We recently demonstrated that a new class of human U1-like snRNAs, the variant (v)U1 snRNAs (vU1s), also participate in pre-mRNA processing events. In this study, we show that several human vU1 genes are specifically upregulated in stem cells and participate in the regulation of cell fate decisions. Significantly, ectopic expression of vU1 genes in human skin fibroblasts leads to increases in levels of key pluripotent stem cell mRNA markers, including NANOG and SOX2. These results reveal an important role for vU1s in the control of key regulatory networks orchestrating the transitions between stem cell maintenance and differentiation. Moreover, vU1 expression varies inversely with U1 expression during differentiation and cell re-programming and this pattern of expression is specifically de-regulated in iPSC-derived motor neurons from Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) type 1 patient's. Accordingly, we suggest that an imbalance in the vU1/U1 ratio, rather than an overall reduction in Uridyl-rich (U)-snRNAs, may contribute to the specific neuromuscular disease phenotype associated with SMA. PMID:27536002

  7. Conformational heterogeneity of the protein-free human spliceosomal U2-U6 snRNA complex

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Caijie; Bachu, Ravichandra; Popović, Milena; Devany, Matthew; Brenowitz, Michael; Schlatterer, Jörg C.; Greenbaum, Nancy L.

    2013-01-01

    The complex formed between the U2 and U6 small nuclear (sn)RNA molecules of the eukaryotic spliceosome plays a critical role in the catalysis of precursor mRNA splicing. Here, we have used enzymatic structure probing, 19F NMR, and analytical ultracentrifugation techniques to characterize the fold of a protein-free biophysically tractable paired construct representing the human U2-U6 snRNA complex. Results from enzymatic probing and 19F NMR for the complex in the absence of Mg2+ are consistent with formation of a four-helix junction structure as a predominant conformation. However, 19F NMR data also identify a lesser fraction (up to 14% at 25°C) of a three-helix conformation. Based upon this distribution, the calculated ΔG for inter-conversion to the four-helix structure from the three-helix structure is approximately −4.6 kJ/mol. In the presence of 5 mM Mg2+, the fraction of the three-helix conformation increased to ∼17% and the Stokes radius, measured by analytical ultracentrifugation, decreased by 2%, suggesting a slight shift to an alternative conformation. NMR measurements demonstrated that addition of an intron fragment to the U2-U6 snRNA complex results in displacement of U6 snRNA from the region of Helix III immediately 5′ of the ACAGAGA sequence of U6 snRNA, which may facilitate binding of the segment of the intron adjacent to the 5′ splice site to the ACAGAGA sequence. Taken together, these observations indicate conformational heterogeneity in the protein-free human U2-U6 snRNA complex consistent with a model in which the RNA has sufficient conformational flexibility to facilitate inter-conversion between steps of splicing in situ. PMID:23426875

  8. Conformational heterogeneity of the protein-free human spliceosomal U2-U6 snRNA complex.

    PubMed

    Zhao, Caijie; Bachu, Ravichandra; Popovic, Milena; Devany, Matthew; Brenowitz, Michael; Schlatterer, Jörg C; Greenbaum, Nancy L

    2013-04-01

    The complex formed between the U2 and U6 small nuclear (sn)RNA molecules of the eukaryotic spliceosome plays a critical role in the catalysis of precursor mRNA splicing. Here, we have used enzymatic structure probing, (19)F NMR, and analytical ultracentrifugation techniques to characterize the fold of a protein-free biophysically tractable paired construct representing the human U2-U6 snRNA complex. Results from enzymatic probing and (19)F NMR for the complex in the absence of Mg(2+) are consistent with formation of a four-helix junction structure as a predominant conformation. However, (19)F NMR data also identify a lesser fraction (up to 14% at 25°C) of a three-helix conformation. Based upon this distribution, the calculated ΔG for inter-conversion to the four-helix structure from the three-helix structure is approximately -4.6 kJ/mol. In the presence of 5 mM Mg(2+), the fraction of the three-helix conformation increased to ∼17% and the Stokes radius, measured by analytical ultracentrifugation, decreased by 2%, suggesting a slight shift to an alternative conformation. NMR measurements demonstrated that addition of an intron fragment to the U2-U6 snRNA complex results in displacement of U6 snRNA from the region of Helix III immediately 5' of the ACAGAGA sequence of U6 snRNA, which may facilitate binding of the segment of the intron adjacent to the 5' splice site to the ACAGAGA sequence. Taken together, these observations indicate conformational heterogeneity in the protein-free human U2-U6 snRNA complex consistent with a model in which the RNA has sufficient conformational flexibility to facilitate inter-conversion between steps of splicing in situ.

  9. CryoEM structures of two spliceosomal complexes: starter and dessert at the spliceosome feast

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thi Hoang Duong; Galej, Wojciech P; Fica, Sebastian M; Lin, Pei-Chun; Newman, Andrew J; Nagai, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    The spliceosome is formed on pre-mRNA substrates from five small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (U1, U2, U4/U6 and U5 snRNPs), and numerous non-snRNP factors. Saccharomyces cerevisiae U4/U6.U5 tri-snRNP comprises U5 snRNA, U4/U6 snRNA duplex and approximately 30 proteins and represents a substantial part of the spliceosome before activation. Schizosaccharomyces pombe U2.U6.U5 spliceosomal complex is a post-catalytic intron lariat spliceosome containing U2 and U5 snRNPs, NTC (nineteen complex), NTC-related proteins (NTR), U6 snRNA, and an RNA intron lariat. Two recent papers describe near-complete atomic structures of these complexes based on cryoEM single-particle analysis. The U4/U6.U5 tri-snRNP structure provides crucial insight into the activation mechanism of the spliceosome. The U2.U6.U5 complex reveals the striking architecture of NTC and NTR and important features of the group II intron-like catalytic RNA core remaining after spliced mRNA is released. These two structures greatly advance our understanding of the mechanism of pre-mRNA splicing. PMID:26803803

  10. Alternative Spliceosome Assembly Pathways Revealed by Single Molecule Fluorescence Microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Shcherbakova, Inna; Hoskins, Aaron A.; Friedman, Larry J.; Serebrov, Victor; Corrêa, Ivan R.; Xu, Ming-Qun; Gelles, Jeff; Moore, Melissa J.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Removal of introns from nascent transcripts (pre-mRNAs) by the spliceosome is an essential step in eukaryotic gene expression. Previous studies have suggested that the earliest steps in spliceosome assembly in yeast are highly ordered, with stable recruitment of U1 snRNP to the 5' splice site necessarilypreceding recruitment of U2 snRNP to the branch site to form the “pre-spliceosome”. Using Colocalization Single Molecule Spectroscopy (CoSMoS) to follow initial spliceosome assembly on eight different S. cerevisiae pre-mRNAs, we here demonstrate that active yeast spliceosomes can form by both U1-first and U2-first pathways. Both assembly pathways yield prespliceosomes functionally equivalent for subsequent U5•U4/U6 tri-snRNP recruitment and for intron excision. Although fractional flux through the two pathways varies on different introns, both are operational on all introns studied. Thus, multiple pathways exist toassemble functional spliceosomes. These observations provide new insight into the mechanisms of cross-intron coordination of initial spliceosome assembly. PMID:24075986

  11. U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein complex and RNA splicing alterations in Alzheimer’s disease

    PubMed Central

    Bai, Bing; Hales, Chadwick M.; Chen, Ping-Chung; Gozal, Yair; Dammer, Eric B.; Fritz, Jason J.; Wang, Xusheng; Xia, Qiangwei; Duong, Duc M.; Street, Craig; Cantero, Gloria; Cheng, Dongmei; Jones, Drew R.; Wu, Zhiping; Li, Yuxin; Diner, Ian; Heilman, Craig J.; Rees, Howard D.; Wu, Hao; Lin, Li; Szulwach, Keith E.; Gearing, Marla; Mufson, Elliott J.; Bennett, David A.; Montine, Thomas J.; Seyfried, Nicholas T.; Wingo, Thomas S.; Sun, Yi E.; Jin, Peng; Hanfelt, John; Willcock, Donna M.; Levey, Allan; Lah, James J.; Peng, Junmin

    2013-01-01

    Deposition of insoluble protein aggregates is a hallmark of neurodegenerative diseases. The universal presence of β-amyloid and tau in Alzheimer’s disease (AD) has facilitated advancement of the amyloid cascade and tau hypotheses that have dominated AD pathogenesis research and therapeutic development. However, the underlying etiology of the disease remains to be fully elucidated. Here we report a comprehensive study of the human brain-insoluble proteome in AD by mass spectrometry. We identify 4,216 proteins, among which 36 proteins accumulate in the disease, including U1-70K and other U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (U1 snRNP) spliceosome components. Similar accumulations in mild cognitive impairment cases indicate that spliceosome changes occur in early stages of AD. Multiple U1 snRNP subunits form cytoplasmic tangle-like structures in AD but not in other examined neurodegenerative disorders, including Parkinson disease and frontotemporal lobar degeneration. Comparison of RNA from AD and control brains reveals dysregulated RNA processing with accumulation of unspliced RNA species in AD, including myc box-dependent-interacting protein 1, clusterin, and presenilin-1. U1-70K knockdown or antisense oligonucleotide inhibition of U1 snRNP increases the protein level of amyloid precursor protein. Thus, our results demonstrate unique U1 snRNP pathology and implicate abnormal RNA splicing in AD pathogenesis. PMID:24023061

  12. Physical and genetic interactions of yeast Cwc21p, an ortholog of human SRm300/SRRM2, suggest a role at the catalytic center of the spliceosome

    PubMed Central

    Grainger, Richard J.; Barrass, J. David; Jacquier, Alain; Rain, Jean-Christophe; Beggs, Jean D.

    2009-01-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Cwc21p is a protein of unknown function that is associated with the NineTeen Complex (NTC), a group of proteins involved in activating the spliceosome to promote the pre-mRNA splicing reaction. Here, we show that Cwc21p binds directly to two key splicing factors—namely, Prp8p and Snu114p—and becomes the first NTC-related protein known to dock directly to U5 snRNP proteins. Using a combination of proteomic techniques we show that the N-terminus of Prp8p contains an intramolecular fold that is a Snu114p and Cwc21p interacting domain (SCwid). Cwc21p also binds directly to the C-terminus of Snu114p. Complementary chemical cross-linking experiments reveal reciprocal protein footprints between the interacting Prp8 and Cwc21 proteins, identifying the conserved cwf21 domain in Cwc21p as a Prp8p binding site. Genetic and functional interactions between Cwc21p and Isy1p indicate that they have related functions at or prior to the first catalytic step of splicing, and suggest that Cwc21p functions at the catalytic center of the spliceosome, possibly in response to environmental or metabolic changes. We demonstrate that SRm300, the only SR-related protein known to be at the core of human catalytic spliceosomes, is a functional ortholog of Cwc21p, also interacting directly with Prp8p and Snu114p. Thus, the function of Cwc21p is likely conserved from yeast to humans. PMID:19854871

  13. Physical and genetic interactions of yeast Cwc21p, an ortholog of human SRm300/SRRM2, suggest a role at the catalytic center of the spliceosome.

    PubMed

    Grainger, Richard J; Barrass, J David; Jacquier, Alain; Rain, Jean-Christophe; Beggs, Jean D

    2009-12-01

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Cwc21p is a protein of unknown function that is associated with the NineTeen Complex (NTC), a group of proteins involved in activating the spliceosome to promote the pre-mRNA splicing reaction. Here, we show that Cwc21p binds directly to two key splicing factors-namely, Prp8p and Snu114p-and becomes the first NTC-related protein known to dock directly to U5 snRNP proteins. Using a combination of proteomic techniques we show that the N-terminus of Prp8p contains an intramolecular fold that is a Snu114p and Cwc21p interacting domain (SCwid). Cwc21p also binds directly to the C-terminus of Snu114p. Complementary chemical cross-linking experiments reveal reciprocal protein footprints between the interacting Prp8 and Cwc21 proteins, identifying the conserved cwf21 domain in Cwc21p as a Prp8p binding site. Genetic and functional interactions between Cwc21p and Isy1p indicate that they have related functions at or prior to the first catalytic step of splicing, and suggest that Cwc21p functions at the catalytic center of the spliceosome, possibly in response to environmental or metabolic changes. We demonstrate that SRm300, the only SR-related protein known to be at the core of human catalytic spliceosomes, is a functional ortholog of Cwc21p, also interacting directly with Prp8p and Snu114p. Thus, the function of Cwc21p is likely conserved from yeast to humans.

  14. Structural basis of the RNA-binding specificity of human U1A protein.

    PubMed Central

    Allain, F H; Howe, P W; Neuhaus, D; Varani, G

    1997-01-01

    The RNP domain is a very common eukaryotic protein domain involved in recognition of a wide range of RNA structures and sequences. Two structures of human U1A in complex with distinct RNA substrates have revealed important aspects of RNP-RNA recognition, but have also raised intriguing questions concerning the origin of binding specificity. The beta-sheet of the domain provides an extensive RNA-binding platform for packing aromatic RNA bases and hydrophobic protein side chains. However, many interactions between functional groups on the single-stranded nucleotides and residues on the beta-sheet surface are potentially common to RNP proteins with diverse specificity and therefore make only limited contribution to molecular discrimination. The refined structure of the U1A complex with the RNA polyadenylation inhibition element reported here clarifies the role of the RNP domain principal specificity determinants (the variable loops) in molecular recognition. The most variable region of RNP proteins, loop 3, plays a crucial role in defining the global geometry of the intermolecular interface. Electrostatic interactions with the RNA phosphodiester backbone involve protein side chains that are unique to U1A and are likely to be important for discrimination. This analysis provides a novel picture of RNA-protein recognition, much closer to our current understanding of protein-protein recognition than that of DNA-protein recognition. PMID:9312034

  15. Variant U1 snRNAs are implicated in human pluripotent stem cell maintenance and neuromuscular disease.

    PubMed

    Vazquez-Arango, Pilar; Vowles, Jane; Browne, Cathy; Hartfield, Elizabeth; Fernandes, Hugo J R; Mandefro, Berhan; Sareen, Dhruv; James, William; Wade-Martins, Richard; Cowley, Sally A; Murphy, Shona; O'Reilly, Dawn

    2016-12-15

    The U1 small nuclear (sn)RNA (U1) is a multifunctional ncRNA, known for its pivotal role in pre-mRNA splicing and regulation of RNA 3' end processing events. We recently demonstrated that a new class of human U1-like snRNAs, the variant (v)U1 snRNAs (vU1s), also participate in pre-mRNA processing events. In this study, we show that several human vU1 genes are specifically upregulated in stem cells and participate in the regulation of cell fate decisions. Significantly, ectopic expression of vU1 genes in human skin fibroblasts leads to increases in levels of key pluripotent stem cell mRNA markers, including NANOG and SOX2. These results reveal an important role for vU1s in the control of key regulatory networks orchestrating the transitions between stem cell maintenance and differentiation. Moreover, vU1 expression varies inversely with U1 expression during differentiation and cell re-programming and this pattern of expression is specifically de-regulated in iPSC-derived motor neurons from Spinal Muscular Atrophy (SMA) type 1 patient's. Accordingly, we suggest that an imbalance in the vU1/U1 ratio, rather than an overall reduction in Uridyl-rich (U)-snRNAs, may contribute to the specific neuromuscular disease phenotype associated with SMA. © The Author(s) 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  16. Spliceosome assembly and composition.

    PubMed

    Matlin, Arianne J; Moore, Melissa J

    2007-01-01

    Cells control alternative splicing by modulating assembly of the pre-mRNA splicing machinery at competing splice sites. Therefore, a working knowledge of spliceosome assembly is essential for understanding how alternative splice site choices are achieved. In this chapter, we review spliceosome assembly with particular emphasis on the known steps and factors subject to regulation during alternative splice site selection in mammalian cells. We also review recent advances regarding similarities and differences between the in vivo and in vitro assembly pathways, as well as proofreading mechanisms contributing to the fidelity of splice site selection.

  17. 5′ exon interactions within the human spliceosome establish a framework for exon junction complex structure and assembly

    PubMed Central

    Reichert, Vienna L.; Le Hir, Hervé; Jurica, Melissa S.; Moore, Melissa J.

    2002-01-01

    A general consequence of pre-mRNA splicing is the stable deposition of several proteins 20–24 nucleotides (nt) upstream of exon–exon junctions on spliced mRNAs. This exon junction complex (EJC) contains factors involved in mRNA export, cytoplasmic localization, and nonsense-mediated mRNA decay. Here we probed the mechanism and timing of EJC assembly. Over the course of splicing, the 5′ exon is subject to numerous dynamic protein–RNA interactions involving at least nine distinct polypeptides. Within the fully assembled spliceosome, these interactions afford protection to the last 25–27 nt of the 5′ exon intermediate. Coincident with exon ligation, interactions at the 3′ end of the 5′ exon disappear, and new species associate with position −24. Mass spectrometry and Western blotting of purified H, C, and mRNP complexes revealed that at least one EJC component, REF/Aly, can interact with pre-mRNA prior to spliceosome assembly, whereas Y14, Magoh, RNPS1, UAP56, and SRm160 are found in intermediate-containing spliceosomes. Upon exon ligation, association of RNPS1, UAP56, and SRm160 is destabilized. In contrast, REF/Aly, Y14, and Magoh remain stably bound to spliced mRNA, indicating that these three proteins are components of the EJC core. PMID:12414731

  18. RSR-2, the Caenorhabditis elegans ortholog of human spliceosomal component SRm300/SRRM2, regulates development by influencing the transcriptional machinery.

    PubMed

    Fontrodona, Laura; Porta-de-la-Riva, Montserrat; Morán, Tomás; Niu, Wei; Díaz, Mònica; Aristizábal-Corrales, David; Villanueva, Alberto; Schwartz, Simó; Reinke, Valerie; Cerón, Julián

    2013-06-01

    Protein components of the spliceosome are highly conserved in eukaryotes and can influence several steps of the gene expression process. RSR-2, the Caenorhabditis elegans ortholog of the human spliceosomal protein SRm300/SRRM2, is essential for viability, in contrast to the yeast ortholog Cwc21p. We took advantage of mutants and RNA interference (RNAi) to study rsr-2 functions in C. elegans, and through genetic epistasis analysis found that rsr-2 is within the germline sex determination pathway. Intriguingly, transcriptome analyses of rsr-2(RNAi) animals did not reveal appreciable splicing defects but instead a slight global decrease in transcript levels. We further investigated this effect in transcription and observed that RSR-2 colocalizes with DNA in germline nuclei and coprecipitates with chromatin, displaying a ChIP-Seq profile similar to that obtained for the RNA Polymerase II (RNAPII). Consistent with a novel transcription function we demonstrate that the recruitment of RSR-2 to chromatin is splicing-independent and that RSR-2 interacts with RNAPII and affects RNAPII phosphorylation states. Proteomic analyses identified proteins associated with RSR-2 that are involved in different gene expression steps, including RNA metabolism and transcription with PRP-8 and PRP-19 being the strongest interacting partners. PRP-8 is a core component of the spliceosome and PRP-19 is the core component of the PRP19 complex, which interacts with RNAPII and is necessary for full transcriptional activity. Taken together, our study proposes that RSR-2 is a multifunctional protein whose role in transcription influences C. elegans development.

  19. RSR-2, the Caenorhabditis elegans Ortholog of Human Spliceosomal Component SRm300/SRRM2, Regulates Development by Influencing the Transcriptional Machinery

    PubMed Central

    Fontrodona, Laura; Porta-de-la-Riva, Montserrat; Morán, Tomás; Niu, Wei; Díaz, Mònica; Aristizábal-Corrales, David; Villanueva, Alberto; Schwartz, Simó; Reinke, Valerie; Cerón, Julián

    2013-01-01

    Protein components of the spliceosome are highly conserved in eukaryotes and can influence several steps of the gene expression process. RSR-2, the Caenorhabditis elegans ortholog of the human spliceosomal protein SRm300/SRRM2, is essential for viability, in contrast to the yeast ortholog Cwc21p. We took advantage of mutants and RNA interference (RNAi) to study rsr-2 functions in C. elegans, and through genetic epistasis analysis found that rsr-2 is within the germline sex determination pathway. Intriguingly, transcriptome analyses of rsr-2(RNAi) animals did not reveal appreciable splicing defects but instead a slight global decrease in transcript levels. We further investigated this effect in transcription and observed that RSR-2 colocalizes with DNA in germline nuclei and coprecipitates with chromatin, displaying a ChIP-Seq profile similar to that obtained for the RNA Polymerase II (RNAPII). Consistent with a novel transcription function we demonstrate that the recruitment of RSR-2 to chromatin is splicing-independent and that RSR-2 interacts with RNAPII and affects RNAPII phosphorylation states. Proteomic analyses identified proteins associated with RSR-2 that are involved in different gene expression steps, including RNA metabolism and transcription with PRP-8 and PRP-19 being the strongest interacting partners. PRP-8 is a core component of the spliceosome and PRP-19 is the core component of the PRP19 complex, which interacts with RNAPII and is necessary for full transcriptional activity. Taken together, our study proposes that RSR-2 is a multifunctional protein whose role in transcription influences C. elegans development. PMID:23754964

  20. The Arabidopsis homolog of human minor spliceosomal protein U11-48K plays a crucial role in U12 intron splicing and plant development

    PubMed Central

    Xu, Tao; Kim, Bo Mi; Kwak, Kyung Jin; Jung, Hyun Ju; Kang, Hunseung

    2016-01-01

    The minor U12 introns are removed from precursor mRNAs by the U12 intron-specific minor spliceosome. Among the seven ribonucleoproteins unique to the minor spliceosome, denoted as U11/U12-20K, U11/U12-25K, U11/U12-31K, U11/U12-65K, U11-35K, U11-48K, and U11-59K, the roles of only U11/U12-31K and U11/U12-65K have been demonstrated in U12 intron splicing and plant development. Here, the functional role of the Arabidopsis homolog of human U11-48K in U12 intron splicing and the development of Arabidopsis thaliana was examined using transgenic knockdown plants. The u11-48k mutants exhibited several defects in growth and development, such as severely arrested primary inflorescence stems, formation of serrated leaves, production of many rosette leaves after bolting, and delayed senescence. The splicing of most U12 introns analyzed was impaired in the u11-48k mutants. Comparative analysis of the splicing defects and phenotypes among the u11/u12-31k, u11-48k, and u11/12-65k mutants showed that the severity of abnormal development was closely correlated with the degree of impairment in U12 intron splicing. Taken together, these results provide compelling evidence that the Arabidopsis homolog of human U11-48K protein, as well as U11/U12-31K and U11/U12-65K proteins, is necessary for correct splicing of U12 introns and normal plant growth and development. PMID:27091878

  1. M48U1 and Tenofovir combination synergistically inhibits HIV infection in activated PBMCs and human cervicovaginal histocultures

    PubMed Central

    Musumeci, Giuseppina; Bon, Isabella; Lembo, David; Cagno, Valeria; Re, Maria Carla; Signoretto, Caterina; Diani, Erica; Lopalco, Lucia; Pastori, Claudia; Martin, Loïc; Ponchel, Gilles; Gibellini, Davide; Bouchemal, Kawthar

    2017-01-01

    Microbicides are considered a promising strategy for preventing human immunodeficiency virus (HIV-1) transmission and disease. In this report, we first analyzed the antiviral activity of the miniCD4 M48U1 peptide formulated in hydroxyethylcellulose (HEC) hydrogel in activated peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) infected with R5- and X4–tropic HIV-1 strains. The results demonstrate that M48U1 prevented infection by several HIV-1 strains including laboratory strains, and HIV-1 subtype B and C strains isolated from the activated PBMCs of patients. M48U1 also inhibited infection by two HIV-1 transmitted/founder infectious molecular clones (pREJO.c/2864 and pTHRO.c/2626). In addition, M48U1 was administered in association with tenofovir, and these two antiretroviral drugs synergistically inhibited HIV-1 infection. In the next series of experiments, we tested M48U1 alone or in combination with tenofovir in HEC hydrogel with an organ-like structure mimicking human cervicovaginal tissue. We demonstrated a strong antiviral effect in absence of significant tissue toxicity. Together, these results indicate that co-treatment with M48U1 plus tenofovir is an effective antiviral strategy that may be used as a new topical microbicide to prevent HIV-1 transmission. PMID:28145455

  2. U2 snRNA-protein contacts in purified human 17S U2 snRNPs and in spliceosomal A and B complexes.

    PubMed

    Dybkov, Olexandr; Will, Cindy L; Deckert, Jochen; Behzadnia, Nastaran; Hartmuth, Klaus; Lührmann, Reinhard

    2006-04-01

    The 17S U2 snRNP plays an essential role in branch point selection and catalysis during pre-mRNA splicing. Much remains to be learned about the molecular architecture of the U2 snRNP, including which proteins contact the functionally important 5' end of the U2 snRNA. Here, RNA-protein interactions within immunoaffinity-purified human 17S U2 snRNPs were analyzed by lead(II)-induced RNA cleavage and UV cross-linking. Contacts between the U2 snRNA and SF3a60, SF3b49, SF3b14a/p14 and SmG and SmB were detected. SF3b49 appears to make multiple contacts, interacting with the 5' end of U2 and nucleotides in loops I and IIb. SF3a60 also contacted different regions of the U2 snRNA, including the base of stem-loop I and a bulge in stem-loop III. Consistent with it contacting the pre-mRNA branch point adenosine, SF3b14a/p14 interacted with the U2 snRNA near the region that base pairs with the branch point sequence. A comparison of U2 cross-linking patterns obtained with 17S U2 snRNP versus purified spliceosomal A and B complexes revealed that RNA-protein interactions with stem-loop I and the branch site-interacting region of U2 are dynamic. These studies provide important insights into the molecular architecture of 17S U2 snRNPs and reveal U2 snRNP remodeling events during spliceosome assembly.

  3. U2 snRNA-Protein Contacts in Purified Human 17S U2 snRNPs and in Spliceosomal A and B Complexes

    PubMed Central

    Dybkov, Olexandr; Will, Cindy L.; Deckert, Jochen; Behzadnia, Nastaran; Hartmuth, Klaus; Lührmann, Reinhard

    2006-01-01

    The 17S U2 snRNP plays an essential role in branch point selection and catalysis during pre-mRNA splicing. Much remains to be learned about the molecular architecture of the U2 snRNP, including which proteins contact the functionally important 5′ end of the U2 snRNA. Here, RNA-protein interactions within immunoaffinity-purified human 17S U2 snRNPs were analyzed by lead(II)-induced RNA cleavage and UV cross-linking. Contacts between the U2 snRNA and SF3a60, SF3b49, SF3b14a/p14 and SmG and SmB were detected. SF3b49 appears to make multiple contacts, interacting with the 5′ end of U2 and nucleotides in loops I and IIb. SF3a60 also contacted different regions of the U2 snRNA, including the base of stem-loop I and a bulge in stem-loop III. Consistent with it contacting the pre-mRNA branch point adenosine, SF3b14a/p14 interacted with the U2 snRNA near the region that base pairs with the branch point sequence. A comparison of U2 cross-linking patterns obtained with 17S U2 snRNP versus purified spliceosomal A and B complexes revealed that RNA-protein interactions with stem-loop I and the branch site-interacting region of U2 are dynamic. These studies provide important insights into the molecular architecture of 17S U2 snRNPs and reveal U2 snRNP remodeling events during spliceosome assembly. PMID:16537922

  4. Solution structure of human U1 snRNA. Derivation of a possible three-dimensional model.

    PubMed Central

    Krol, A; Westhof, E; Bach, M; Lührmann, R; Ebel, J P; Carbon, P

    1990-01-01

    The solution structure of human U1 snRNA was investigated by using base-specific chemical probes (dimethylsulfate, carbodiimide, diethylpyrocarbonate) and RNase V1. Chemical reagents were employed under various conditions of salt and temperature and allowed information at the Watson-Crick base-pairing positions to be obtained for 66% of the U1 snRNA bases. Double-stranded or stacked regions were examined with RNase V1. The dat gained from these experiments extend and support the previous 2D model for U1snRNA. However, to elucidate some aspects of the solution data that could not be accounted for by the secondary structure model, the information gathered from structure probing was used to provide the experimental basis required to construct and to test a tertiary structure model by computer graphics modeling. As a result, U1 snRNA is shown to adopt an asymmetrical X-shape that is formed by two helical domains, each one being generated by coaxial stacking of helices at the U1 snRNA cruciform. Chemical reactivities and model building show that a few nucleotides, previously proposed to be unpaired, can form A.G and U.U non Watson-Crick base-pairs, notably in stem-loop B. The structural model we propose for regions G12 to A124 integrates stereochemical constraints and is based both on solution structure data and sequence comparisons between U1 snRNAs. Images PMID:2374709

  5. Cytochrome P450 2U1, a very peculiar member of the human P450s family.

    PubMed

    Dhers, L; Ducassou, L; Boucher, J-L; Mansuy, D

    2017-05-01

    Cytochrome P450 2U1 (CYP2U1) exhibits several distinctive characteristics among the 57 human CYPs, such as its presence in almost all living organisms with a highly conserved sequence, its particular gene organization with only five exons, its major location in thymus and brain, and its protein sequence involving an unusually long N-terminal region containing 8 proline residues and an insert of about 20 amino acids containing 5 arginine residues after the transmembrane helix. Few substrates, including fatty acids, N-arachidonoylserotonin (AS), and some drugs, have been reported so far. However, its biological roles remain largely unknown, even though CYP2U1 mutations have been involved in some pathological situations, such as complicated forms of hereditary spastic paraplegia. These data together with its ability to hydroxylate some fatty acids and AS suggest its possible role in lipid metabolism.

  6. Endogenous U2·U5·U6 snRNA complexes in S. pombe are intron lariat spliceosomes

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Weijun; Shulha, Hennady P.; Ashar-Patel, Ami; Yan, Jing; Green, Karin M.; Query, Charles C.; Rhind, Nick; Weng, Zhiping; Moore, Melissa J.

    2014-01-01

    Excision of introns from pre-mRNAs is mediated by the spliceosome, a multi-megadalton complex consisting of U1, U2, U4/U6, and U5 snRNPs plus scores of associated proteins. Spliceosome assembly and disassembly are highly dynamic processes involving multiple stable intermediates. In this study, we utilized a split TAP-tag approach for large-scale purification of an abundant endogenous U2·U5·U6 complex from Schizosaccharomyces pombe. RNAseq revealed this complex to largely contain excised introns, indicating that it is primarily ILS (intron lariat spliceosome) complexes. These endogenous ILS complexes are remarkably resistant to both high-salt and nuclease digestion. Mass spectrometry analysis identified 68, 45, and 43 proteins in low-salt-, high-salt-, and micrococcal nuclease-treated preps, respectively. The protein content of a S. pombe ILS complex strongly resembles that previously reported for human spliced product (P) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae ILS complexes assembled on single pre-mRNAs in vitro. However, the ATP-dependent RNA helicase Brr2 was either substoichiometric in low-salt preps or completely absent from high-salt and MNase preps. Because Brr2 facilitates spliceosome disassembly, its relative absence may explain why the ILS complex accumulates logarithmically growing cultures and the inability of S. pombe extracts to support in vitro splicing. PMID:24442611

  7. Endogenous U2·U5·U6 snRNA complexes in S. pombe are intron lariat spliceosomes.

    PubMed

    Chen, Weijun; Shulha, Hennady P; Ashar-Patel, Ami; Yan, Jing; Green, Karin M; Query, Charles C; Rhind, Nick; Weng, Zhiping; Moore, Melissa J

    2014-03-01

    Excision of introns from pre-mRNAs is mediated by the spliceosome, a multi-megadalton complex consisting of U1, U2, U4/U6, and U5 snRNPs plus scores of associated proteins. Spliceosome assembly and disassembly are highly dynamic processes involving multiple stable intermediates. In this study, we utilized a split TAP-tag approach for large-scale purification of an abundant endogenous U2·U5·U6 complex from Schizosaccharomyces pombe. RNAseq revealed this complex to largely contain excised introns, indicating that it is primarily ILS (intron lariat spliceosome) complexes. These endogenous ILS complexes are remarkably resistant to both high-salt and nuclease digestion. Mass spectrometry analysis identified 68, 45, and 43 proteins in low-salt-, high-salt-, and micrococcal nuclease-treated preps, respectively. The protein content of a S. pombe ILS complex strongly resembles that previously reported for human spliced product (P) and Saccharomyces cerevisiae ILS complexes assembled on single pre-mRNAs in vitro. However, the ATP-dependent RNA helicase Brr2 was either substoichiometric in low-salt preps or completely absent from high-salt and MNase preps. Because Brr2 facilitates spliceosome disassembly, its relative absence may explain why the ILS complex accumulates logarithmically growing cultures and the inability of S. pombe extracts to support in vitro splicing.

  8. Human spliceosomal protein CWC22 plays a role in coupling splicing to exon junction complex deposition and nonsense-mediated decay

    PubMed Central

    Alexandrov, Andrei; Colognori, David; Shu, Mei-Di; Steitz, Joan A.

    2012-01-01

    The multiprotein exon junction complex (EJC) that is deposited upstream of spliced junctions orchestrates downstream events in the life of a metazoan mRNA, including its surveillance via the nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) pathway. However, the mechanism by which the spliceosome mediates EJC formation is not well understood. We show that human eIF4G-like spliceosomal protein (h)CWC22 directly interacts with the core EJC component eIF4AIII in vitro and in vivo; mutations at the predicted hCWC22/eIF4AIII interface disrupt association. In vivo depletion of hCWC22, as for yeast Cwc22p, causes a splicing defect, resulting in decreased levels of mature cellular mRNAs. Nonetheless, hCWC22 depletion yields increased levels of spliced RNA from the unusual nonsense codon-containing U22 host gene, which is a natural substrate of NMD. To test whether hCWC22 acts in NMD through coupling splicing to EJC deposition, we searched for mutations in hCWC22 that affect eIF4AIII deposition without affecting splicing. Addition of hCWC22(G168Y) with a mutation at the putative hCWC22/eIF4AIII interface exacerbates the defect in splicing-dependent deposition of eIF4AIII(T334V) with a mutation reported to be in direct contact with mRNA, linking hCWC22 to the process of EJC deposition in vitro. Importantly, the addition of hCWC22(G168Y) affects deposition of eIF4AIII(T334V) without inhibiting splicing or the efficiency of deposition of the endogenous eF4AIII(WT) in the same reaction, demonstrating hCWC22’s specific role in eIF4AIII deposition in addition to its role in splicing. The essential splicing factor CWC22 has, therefore, acquired functions in EJC assembly and NMD during evolution from single-celled to complex eukaryotes. PMID:23236153

  9. The U1 snRNP-associated factor Luc7p affects 5' splice site selection in yeast and human.

    PubMed

    Puig, Oscar; Bragado-Nilsson, Elisabeth; Koski, Terhi; Séraphin, Bertrand

    2007-01-01

    yLuc7p is an essential subunit of the yeast U1 snRNP and contains two putative zinc fingers. Using RNA-protein cross-linking and directed site-specific proteolysis (DSSP), we have established that the N-terminal zinc finger of yLuc7p contacts the pre-mRNA in the 5' exon in a region close to the cap. Modifying the pre-mRNA sequence in the region contacted by yLuc7p affects splicing in a yLuc7p-dependent manner indicating that yLuc7p stabilizes U1 snRNP-pre-mRNA interaction, thus reminding of the mode of action of another U1 snRNP component, Nam8p. Database searches identified three putative human yLuc7p homologs (hLuc7A, hLuc7B1 and hLuc7B2). These proteins have an extended C-terminal tail rich in RS and RE residues, a feature characteristic of splicing factors. Consistent with a role in pre-mRNA splicing, hLuc7A localizes in the nucleus and antibodies raised against hLuc7A specifically co-precipitate U1 snRNA from human cell extracts. Interestingly, hLuc7A overexpression affects splicing of a reporter in vivo. Taken together, our data suggest that the formation of a wide network of protein-RNA interactions around the 5' splice site by U1 snRNP-associated factors contributes to alternative splicing regulation.

  10. Brr2 plays a role in spliceosomal activation in addition to U4/U6 unwinding

    PubMed Central

    Zhang, Lingdi; Li, Xueni; Hill, Ryan C.; Qiu, Yan; Zhang, Wenzheng; Hansen, Kirk C.; Zhao, Rui

    2015-01-01

    Brr2 is a DExD/H-box RNA helicase that is responsible for U4/U6 unwinding, a critical step in spliceosomal activation. Brr2 is a large protein (∼250 kD) that consists of an N-terminal domain (∼500 residues) with unknown function and two Hel308-like modules that are responsible for RNA unwinding. Here we demonstrate that removal of the entire N-terminal domain is lethal to Saccharomyces cerevisiae and deletion of the N-terminal 120 residues leads to splicing defects and severely impaired growth. This N-terminal truncation does not significantly affect Brr2's helicase activity. Brr2-Δ120 can be successfully assembled into the tri-snRNP (albeit at a lower level than the WT Brr2) and the spliceosomal B complex. However, the truncation significantly impairs spliceosomal activation, leading to a dramatic reduction of U5, U6 snRNAs and accumulation of U1 snRNA in the Bact complex. The N-terminal domain of Brr2 does not seem to be directly involved in regulating U1/5'ss unwinding. Instead, the N-terminal domain seems to be critical for retaining U5 and U6 snRNPs during/after spliceosomal activation through its interaction with snRNAs and possibly other spliceosomal proteins, revealing a new role of Brr2 in spliceosomal activation in addition to U4/U6 unwinding. PMID:25670679

  11. Brr2 plays a role in spliceosomal activation in addition to U4/U6 unwinding.

    PubMed

    Zhang, Lingdi; Li, Xueni; Hill, Ryan C; Qiu, Yan; Zhang, Wenzheng; Hansen, Kirk C; Zhao, Rui

    2015-03-31

    Brr2 is a DExD/H-box RNA helicase that is responsible for U4/U6 unwinding, a critical step in spliceosomal activation. Brr2 is a large protein (∼250 kD) that consists of an N-terminal domain (∼500 residues) with unknown function and two Hel308-like modules that are responsible for RNA unwinding. Here we demonstrate that removal of the entire N-terminal domain is lethal to Saccharomyces cerevisiae and deletion of the N-terminal 120 residues leads to splicing defects and severely impaired growth. This N-terminal truncation does not significantly affect Brr2's helicase activity. Brr2-Δ120 can be successfully assembled into the tri-snRNP (albeit at a lower level than the WT Brr2) and the spliceosomal B complex. However, the truncation significantly impairs spliceosomal activation, leading to a dramatic reduction of U5, U6 snRNAs and accumulation of U1 snRNA in the B(act) complex. The N-terminal domain of Brr2 does not seem to be directly involved in regulating U1/5'ss unwinding. Instead, the N-terminal domain seems to be critical for retaining U5 and U6 snRNPs during/after spliceosomal activation through its interaction with snRNAs and possibly other spliceosomal proteins, revealing a new role of Brr2 in spliceosomal activation in addition to U4/U6 unwinding.

  12. Functional spliceosomal A complexes can be assembled in vitro in the absence of a penta-snRNP

    PubMed Central

    Behzadnia, Nastaran; Hartmuth, Klaus; Will, Cindy L.; Lührmann, Reinhard

    2006-01-01

    Two different models currently exist for the assembly pathway of the spliceosome, namely, the traditional model, in which spliceosomal snRNPs associate in a stepwise, ordered manner with the pre-mRNA, and the holospliceosome model, in which all spliceosomal snRNPs preassemble into a penta-snRNP complex. Here we have tested whether the spliceosomal A complex, which contains solely U1 and U2 snRNPs bound to pre-mRNA, is a functional, bona fide assembly intermediate. Significantly, A complexes affinity-purified from nuclear extract depleted of U4/U6 snRNPs (and thus unable to form a penta-snRNP) supported pre-mRNA splicing in nuclear extract depleted of U2 snRNPs, whereas naked pre-mRNA did not. Mixing experiments with purified A complexes and naked pre-mRNA additionally confirmed that under these conditions, A complexes do not form de novo. Thus, our studies demonstrate that holospliceosome formation is not a prerequisite for generating catalytically active spliceosomes and that, at least in vitro, the U1 and U2 snRNPs can functionally associate with the pre-mRNA, prior to and independent of the tri-snRNP. The ability to isolate functional spliceosomal A complexes paves the way to study in detail subsequent spliceosome assembly steps using purified components. PMID:16880538

  13. Effects of the U1C L13 mutation and temperature regulation of yeast commitment complex formation

    PubMed Central

    Du, Hansen; Tardiff, Daniel F.; Moore, Melissa J.; Rosbash, Michael

    2004-01-01

    The U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle U1C protein has a zinc finger-like structure (C2H2 motif) at its N terminus, which is conserved from yeast to humans. Mutations of amino acid L13 within this domain rescue the essential function of the helicase protein Prp28p. Prp28p has been implicated in unwinding the 5′ splice site (5′ss)–U1 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) base-pairing, to allow replacement of U1 snRNA with U6 snRNA during spliceosome assembly. The L13 phenotype has therefore been interpreted to indicate that WT U1C contributes to 5′ss–U1 snRNA stabilization by binding to the RNA duplex. We show here that an L13 mutant extract cannot form stable base-pairing at room temperature but is permissive for U1–5′ss base-pairing at low temperature. This phenotype is similar to that of a U1C-depleted extract, indicating that the U1C L13 mutation is a strong loss-of-function mutation. The two mutant extracts are unlike a WT extract, which undergoes stable pairing at room temperature but little or no pairing at low temperature. Taken together with previous results and the failure to observe a direct interaction of U1C with the U1–5′ss duplex, the data suggest that U1C contributes indirectly to stable U1–5′ss base-pairing under permissive conditions. A model is proposed to account for the L13 results. PMID:15465910

  14. Re-refinement of the spliceosomal U4 snRNP core-domain structure.

    PubMed

    Li, Jade; Leung, Adelaine K; Kondo, Yasushi; Oubridge, Chris; Nagai, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    The core domain of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP), comprised of a ring of seven paralogous proteins bound around a single-stranded RNA sequence, functions as the assembly nucleus in the maturation of U1, U2, U4 and U5 spliceosomal snRNPs. The structure of the human U4 snRNP core domain was initially solved at 3.6 Å resolution by experimental phasing using data with tetartohedral twinning. Molecular replacement from this model followed by density modification using untwinned data recently led to a structure of the minimal U1 snRNP at 3.3 Å resolution. With the latter structure providing a search model for molecular replacement, the U4 core-domain structure has now been re-refined. The U4 Sm site-sequence AAUUUUU has been shown to bind to the seven Sm proteins SmF-SmE-SmG-SmD3-SmB-SmD1-SmD2 in an identical manner as the U1 Sm-site sequence AAUUUGU, except in SmD1 where the bound U replaces G. The progression from the initial to the re-refined structure exemplifies a tortuous route to accuracy: where well diffracting crystals of complex assemblies are initially unavailable, the early model errors are rectified by exploiting preliminary interpretations in further experiments involving homologous structures. New insights are obtained from the more accurate model.

  15. Re-refinement of the spliceosomal U4 snRNP core-domain structure

    PubMed Central

    Li, Jade; Leung, Adelaine K.; Kondo, Yasushi; Oubridge, Chris; Nagai, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    The core domain of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP), comprised of a ring of seven paralogous proteins bound around a single-stranded RNA sequence, functions as the assembly nucleus in the maturation of U1, U2, U4 and U5 spliceosomal snRNPs. The structure of the human U4 snRNP core domain was initially solved at 3.6 Å resolution by experimental phasing using data with tetartohedral twinning. Molecular replacement from this model followed by density modification using untwinned data recently led to a structure of the minimal U1 snRNP at 3.3 Å resolution. With the latter structure providing a search model for molecular replacement, the U4 core-domain structure has now been re-refined. The U4 Sm site-sequence AAUUUUU has been shown to bind to the seven Sm proteins SmF–SmE–SmG–SmD3–SmB–SmD1–SmD2 in an identical manner as the U1 Sm-site sequence AAUUUGU, except in SmD1 where the bound U replaces G. The progression from the initial to the re-refined structure exemplifies a tortuous route to accuracy: where well diffracting crystals of complex assemblies are initially unavailable, the early model errors are rectified by exploiting preliminary interpretations in further experiments involving homologous structures. New insights are obtained from the more accurate model. PMID:26894541

  16. A review of craniofacial disorders caused by spliceosomal defects.

    PubMed

    Lehalle, D; Wieczorek, D; Zechi-Ceide, R M; Passos-Bueno, M R; Lyonnet, S; Amiel, J; Gordon, C T

    2015-11-01

    The spliceosome is a large ribonucleoprotein complex that removes introns from pre-mRNA transcripts. Mutations in EFTUD2, encoding a component of the major spliceosome, have recently been identified as the cause of mandibulofacial dysostosis, Guion-Almeida type (MFDGA), characterized by mandibulofacial dysostosis, microcephaly, external ear malformations and intellectual disability. Mutations in several other genes involved in spliceosomal function or linked aspects of mRNA processing have also recently been identified in human disorders with specific craniofacial malformations: SF3B4 in Nager syndrome, an acrofacial dysostosis (AFD); SNRPB in cerebrocostomandibular syndrome, characterized by Robin sequence and rib defects; EIF4A3 in the AFD Richieri-Costa-Pereira syndrome, characterized by Robin sequence, median mandibular cleft and limb defects; and TXNL4A in Burn-McKeown syndrome, involving specific craniofacial dysmorphisms. Here, we review phenotypic and molecular aspects of these syndromes. Given the apparent sensitivity of craniofacial development to defects in mRNA processing, it is possible that mutations in other proteins involved in spliceosomal function will emerge in the future as causative for related human disorders.

  17. Nuclear cyclophilins affect spliceosome assembly and function in vitro.

    PubMed

    Adams, B M; Coates, Miranda N; Jackson, S RaElle; Jurica, Melissa S; Davis, Tara L

    2015-07-15

    Cyclophilins are ubiquitously expressed proteins that bind to prolines and can catalyse cis/trans isomerization of proline residues. There are 17 annotated members of the cyclophilin family in humans, ubiquitously expressed and localized variously to the cytoplasm, nucleus or mitochondria. Surprisingly, all eight of the nuclear localized cyclophilins are found associated with spliceosomal complexes. However, their particular functions within this context are unknown. We have therefore adapted three established assays for in vitro pre-mRNA splicing to probe the functional roles of nuclear cyclophilins in the context of the human spliceosome. We find that four of the eight spliceosom-associated cyclophilins exert strong effects on splicing in vitro. These effects are dose-dependent and, remarkably, uniquely characteristic of each cyclophilin. Using both qualitative and quantitative means, we show that at least half of the nuclear cyclophilins can act as regulatory factors of spliceosome function in vitro. The present work provides the first quantifiable evidence that nuclear cyclophilins are splicing factors and provides a novel approach for future work into small molecule-based modulation of pre-mRNA splicing. © 2015 Authors; published by Portland Press Limited.

  18. Nuclear cyclophilins affect spliceosome assembly and function in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Adams, B.M.; Coates, Miranda N.; Jackson, S. RaElle; Jurica, Melissa S.; Davis, Tara L.

    2015-01-01

    Cyclophilins are ubiquitously expressed proteins that bind to prolines and can catalyse cis/trans isomerization of proline residues. There are 17 annotated members of the cyclophilin family in humans, ubiquitously expressed and localized variously to the cytoplasm, nucleus or mitochondria. Surprisingly, all eight of the nuclear localized cyclophilins are found associated with spliceosomal complexes. However, their particular functions within this context are unknown. We have therefore adapted three established assays for in vitro pre-mRNA splicing to probe the functional roles of nuclear cyclophilins in the context of the human spliceosome. We find that four of the eight spliceosom-associated cyclophilins exert strong effects on splicing in vitro. These effects are dose-dependent and, remarkably, uniquely characteristic of each cyclophilin. Using both qualitative and quantitative means, we show that at least half of the nuclear cyclophilins can act as regulatory factors of spliceosome function in vitro. The present work provides the first quantifiable evidence that nuclear cyclophilins are splicing factors and provides a novel approach for future work into small molecule-based modulation of pre-mRNA splicing. PMID:25967372

  19. Prp8 protein: At the heart of the spliceosome

    PubMed Central

    GRAINGER, RICHARD J.; BEGGS, JEAN D.

    2005-01-01

    Pre-messenger RNA (pre-mRNA) splicing is a central step in gene expression. Lying between transcription and protein synthesis, pre-mRNA splicing removes sequences (introns) that would otherwise disrupt the coding potential of intron-containing transcripts. This process takes place in the nucleus, catalyzed by a large RNA–protein complex called the spliceosome. Prp8p, one of the largest and most highly conserved of nuclear proteins, occupies a central position in the catalytic core of the spliceosome, and has been implicated in several crucial molecular rearrangements that occur there. Recently, Prp8p has also come under the spotlight for its role in the inherited human disease, Retinitis Pigmentosa. Prp8 is unique, having no obvious homology to other proteins; however, using bioinformatical analysis we reveal the presence of a conserved RNA recognition motif (RRM), an MPN/JAB domain and a putative nuclear localization signal (NLS). Here, we review biochemical and genetical data, mostly related to the human and yeast proteins, that describe Prp8’s central role within the spliceosome and its molecular interactions during spliceosome formation, as splicing proceeds, and in post-splicing complexes. PMID:15840809

  20. A subset of human 35S U5 proteins, including Prp19, function prior to catalytic step 1 of splicing

    PubMed Central

    Makarova, Olga V; Makarov, Evgeny M; Urlaub, Henning; Will, Cindy L; Gentzel, Marc; Wilm, Matthias; Lührmann, Reinhard

    2004-01-01

    During catalytic activation of the spliceosome, snRNP remodeling events occur, leading to the formation of a 35S U5 snRNP that contains a large group of proteins, including Prp19 and CDC5, not found in 20S U5 snRNPs. To investigate the function of 35S U5 proteins, we immunoaffinity purified human spliceosomes that had not yet undergone catalytic activation (designated BΔU1), which contained U2, U4, U5, and U6, but lacked U1 snRNA. Comparison of the protein compositions of BΔU1 and activated B* spliceosomes revealed that, whereas U4/U6 snRNP proteins are stably associated with BΔU1 spliceosomes, 35S U5-associated proteins (which are present in B*) are largely absent, suggesting that they are dispensable for complex B formation. Indeed, immunodepletion/complementation experiments demonstrated that a subset of 35S U5 proteins including Prp19, which form a stable heteromeric complex, are required prior to catalytic step 1 of splicing, but not for stable integration of U4/U6.U5 tri-snRNPs. Thus, comparison of the proteomes of spliceosomal complexes at defined stages can provide information as to which proteins function as a group at a particular step of splicing. PMID:15175653

  1. Comprehensive in vivo RNA-binding site analyses reveal a role of Prp8 in spliceosomal assembly

    PubMed Central

    Li, Xueni; Zhang, Wenzheng; Xu, Tao; Ramsey, Jolene; Zhang, Lingdi; Hill, Ryan; Hansen, Kirk C.; Hesselberth, Jay R.; Zhao, Rui

    2013-01-01

    Prp8 stands out among hundreds of splicing factors as a protein that is intimately involved in spliceosomal activation and the catalytic reaction. Here, we present the first comprehensive in vivo RNA footprints for Prp8 in budding yeast obtained using CLIP (cross-linking and immunoprecipitation)/CRAC (cross-linking and analyses of cDNAs) and next-generation DNA sequencing. These footprints encompass known direct Prp8-binding sites on U5, U6 snRNA and intron-containing pre-mRNAs identified using site-directed cross-linking with in vitro assembled small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) or spliceosome. Furthermore, our results revealed novel Prp8-binding sites on U1 and U2 snRNAs. We demonstrate that Prp8 directly cross-links with U2, U5 and U6 snRNAs and pre-mRNA in purified activated spliceosomes, placing Prp8 in position to bring the components of the active site together. In addition, disruption of the Prp8 and U1 snRNA interaction reduces tri-snRNP level in the spliceosome, suggesting a previously unknown role of Prp8 in spliceosomal assembly through its interaction with U1 snRNA. PMID:23393194

  2. Membrane-bound human orphan cytochrome P450 2U1: Sequence singularities, construction of a full 3D model, and substrate docking.

    PubMed

    Ducassou, Lionel; Dhers, Laura; Jonasson, Gabriella; Pietrancosta, Nicolas; Boucher, Jean-Luc; Mansuy, Daniel; André, François

    2017-09-01

    Human cytochrome P450 2U1 (CYP2U1) is an orphan CYP that exhibits several distinctive characteristics among the 57 human CYPs with a highly conserved sequence in almost all living organisms. We compared its protein sequence with those of the 57 human CYPs and constructed a 3D structure of a full-length CYP2U1 model bound to a POPC membrane. We also performed docking experiments of arachidonic acid (AA) and N-arachidonoylserotonin (AS) in this model. The protein sequence of CYP2U1 displayed two unique characteristics when compared to those of the human CYPs, the presence of a longer N-terminal region upstream of the putative trans-membrane helix (TMH) containing 8 proline residues, and of an insert of about 20 amino acids containing 5 arginine residues between helices A' and A. Its N-terminal part upstream of TMH involved an additional short terminal helix, in a manner similar to what was reported in the crystal structure of Saccharomyces cerevisiae CYP51. Our model also showed a specific interaction between the charged residues of insert AA' and phosphate groups of lipid polar heads, suggesting a possible role of this insert in substrate recruitment. Docking of AA and AS in this model showed these substrates in channel 2ac, with the terminal alkyl chain of AA or the indole ring of AS close to the heme, in agreement with the reported CYP2U1-catalyzed AA and AS hydroxylation regioselectivities. This model should be useful to find new endogenous or exogenous CYP2U1 substrates and to interpret the regioselectivity of their hydroxylation. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. and Société Française de Biochimie et Biologie Moléculaire (SFBBM). All rights reserved.

  3. Arrested yeast splicing complexes indicate stepwise snRNP recruitment during in vivo spliceosome assembly

    PubMed Central

    Tardiff, Daniel F.; Rosbash, Michael

    2006-01-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing is catalyzed by the spliceosome, a macromolecular machine dedicated to intron removal and exon ligation. Despite an abundance of in vitro information and a small number of in vivo studies, the pathway of yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) in vivo spliceosome assembly remains uncertain. To address this situation, we combined in vivo depletions of U1, U2, or U5 snRNAs with chromatin immunoprecipitation (ChIP) analysis of other splicing snRNPs along an intron-containing gene. The data indicate that snRNP recruitment to nascent pre-mRNA predominantly proceeds via the canonical three-step assembly pathway: first U1, then U2, and finally the U4/U6•U5 tri-snRNP. Tandem affinity purification (TAP) using a U2 snRNP-tagged protein allowed the characterization of in vivo assembled higher-order splicing complexes. Consistent with an independent snRNP assembly pathway, we observed high levels of U1–U2 prespliceosomes under U5-depletion conditions, and we observed significant levels of a U2/U5/U6/Prp19-complex mature splicing complex under wild-type conditions. These complexes have implications for the steady-state distribution of snRNPs within nuclei and also reinforce the stepwise recruitment of U1, U2, and the tri-snRNP during in vivo spliceosome assembly. PMID:16618970

  4. An Exon-Specific U1snRNA Induces a Robust Factor IX Activity in Mice Expressing Multiple Human FIX Splicing Mutants

    PubMed Central

    Balestra, Dario; Scalet, Daniela; Pagani, Franco; Rogalska, Malgorzata Ewa; Mari, Rosella; Bernardi, Francesco; Pinotti, Mirko

    2016-01-01

    In cellular models we have demonstrated that a unique U1snRNA targeting an intronic region downstream of a defective exon (Exon-specific U1snRNA, ExSpeU1) can rescue multiple exon-skipping mutations, a relevant cause of genetic disease. Here, we explored in mice the ExSpeU1 U1fix9 toward two model Hemophilia B-causing mutations at the 5′ (c.519A > G) or 3′ (c.392-8T > G) splice sites of F9 exon 5. Hydrodynamic injection of wt-BALB/C mice with plasmids expressing the wt and mutant (hFIX-2G5′ss and hFIX-8G3′ss) splicing-competent human factor IX (hFIX) cassettes resulted in the expression of hFIX transcripts lacking exon 5 in liver, and in low plasma levels of inactive hFIX. Coinjection of U1fix9, but not of U1wt, restored exon inclusion of variants and in the intrinsically weak FIXwt context. This resulted in appreciable circulating hFIX levels (mean ± SD; hFIX-2G5′ss, 1.0 ± 0.5 µg/ml; hFIX-8G3′ss, 1.2 ± 0.3 µg/ml; and hFIXwt, 1.9 ± 0.6 µg/ml), leading to a striking shortening (from ~100 seconds of untreated mice to ~80 seconds) of FIX-dependent coagulation times, indicating a hFIX with normal specific activity. This is the first proof-of-concept in vivo that a unique ExSpeU1 can efficiently rescue gene expression impaired by distinct exon-skipping variants, which extends the applicability of ExSpeU1s to panels of mutations and thus cohort of patients. PMID:27701399

  5. The spliceosome and its metal ions.

    PubMed

    Butcher, Samuel E

    2011-01-01

    The spliceosome is a massive complex of 5 RNAs and many proteins that associate to catalyze precursor messenger RNA splicing. The process of splicing involves two phosphoryl transfer reactions that result in intron excision and ligation of the flanking exons. Since it is required for normal protein production in eukaryotic cells, pre-mRNA splicing is an essential step in gene expression. Although high resolution structural views of the spliceosome do not yet exist, a growing body of evidence indicates that the spliceosome is a magnesium-dependent enzyme that utilizes catalytic metal ions to stabilize both transition states during the two phosphoryl transfer steps of splicing. A wealth of data also indicate that the core of the spliceosome is comprised of RNA, and suggest that the spliceosome may be a ribozyme. This chapter presents the evidence for metal ion catalysis by the spliceosome, draws comparisons to similar RNA enzymes, and discusses the future directions for research into the mechanism of pre-mRNA splicing.

  6. The human U1-70K snRNP protein: cDNA cloning, chromosomal localization, expression, alternative splicing and RNA-binding.

    PubMed Central

    Spritz, R A; Strunk, K; Surowy, C S; Hoch, S O; Barton, D E; Francke, U

    1987-01-01

    We have isolated and sequenced cDNA clones encoding the human U1-70K snRNP protein, and have mapped this locus (U1AP1) to human chromosome 19. The gene produces two size classes of RNA, a major 1.7-kb RNA and a minor 3.9-kb RNA. The 1.7-kb species appears to be the functional mRNA; the role of the 3.9-kb RNA, which extends further in the 5' direction, is unclear. The actual size of the hU1-70K protein is probably 52 kd, rather than 70 kd. The protein contains three regions similar to known nucleic acid-binding proteins, and it binds RNA in an in vitro assay. Comparison of the cDNA sequences indicates that there are multiple subclasses of mRNA that arise by alternative pre-mRNA splicing of at least four alternative exon segments. This suggests that multiple forms of the hU1-70K protein may exist, possibly with different functions in vivo. Images PMID:2447561

  7. The spliceosome is a therapeutic vulnerability in MYC-driven cancer

    PubMed Central

    Hsu, Tiffany Y-T.; Simon, Lukas M.; Neill, Nicholas; Marcotte, Richard; Sayad, Azin; Bland, Christopher S.; Echeverria, Gloria V.; Sun, Tingting; Kurley, Sarah J.; Tyagi, Siddhartha; Karlin, Kristen L.; Dominguez-Vidaña, Rocio; Hartman, Jessica D.; Renwick, Alexander; Scorsone, Kathleen; Bernardi, Ronald J.; Skinner, Samuel O.; Jain, Antrix; Orellana, Mayra; Lagisetti, Chandraiah; Golding, Ido; Jung, Sung Y.; Neilson, Joel R.; Zhang, Xiang H.-F.; Cooper, Thomas A.; Webb, Thomas R.; Neel, Benjamin G.; Shaw, Chad A.; Westbrook, Thomas F.

    2016-01-01

    c-MYC (MYC) overexpression or hyperactivation is one of the most common drivers of human cancer. Despite intensive study, the MYC oncogene remains recalcitrant to therapeutic inhibition. MYC is a transcription factor, and many of its pro-tumorigenic functions have been attributed to its ability to regulate gene expression programs1–3. Notably, oncogenic MYC activation has also been shown to increase total RNA and protein production in many tissue and disease contexts4–7. While such increases in RNA and protein production may endow cancer cells with pro-tumor hallmarks, this elevation in synthesis may also generate new or heightened burden on MYC-driven cancer cells to properly process these macromolecules8. Herein, we discover the spliceosome as a new target of oncogenic stress in MYC-driven cancers. We identify BUD31 as a MYC-synthetic lethal gene, and demonstrate that BUD31 is a component of the core spliceosome required for its assembly and catalytic activity. Core spliceosomal factors (SF3B1, U2AF1, and others) associated with BUD31 are also required to tolerate oncogenic MYC. Notably, MYC hyperactivation induces an increase in total pre-mRNA synthesis, suggesting an increased burden on the core spliceosome to process pre-mRNA. In contrast to normal cells, partial inhibition of the spliceosome in MYC-hyperactivated cells leads to global intron retention, widespread defects in pre-mRNA maturation, and deregulation of many essential cell processes. Importantly, genetic or pharmacologic inhibition of the spliceosome in vivo impairs survival, tumorigenicity, and metastatic proclivity of MYC-dependent breast cancers. Collectively, these data suggest that oncogenic MYC confers a collateral stress on splicing and that components of the spliceosome may be therapeutic entry points for aggressive MYC-driven cancers. PMID:26331541

  8. Origin of Spliceosomal Introns and Alternative Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Irimia, Manuel; Roy, Scott William

    2014-01-01

    In this work we review the current knowledge on the prehistory, origins, and evolution of spliceosomal introns. First, we briefly outline the major features of the different types of introns, with particular emphasis on the nonspliceosomal self-splicing group II introns, which are widely thought to be the ancestors of spliceosomal introns. Next, we discuss the main scenarios proposed for the origin and proliferation of spliceosomal introns, an event intimately linked to eukaryogenesis. We then summarize the evidence that suggests that the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA) had remarkably high intron densities and many associated characteristics resembling modern intron-rich genomes. From this intron-rich LECA, the different eukaryotic lineages have taken very distinct evolutionary paths leading to profoundly diverged modern genome structures. Finally, we discuss the origins of alternative splicing and the qualitative differences in alternative splicing forms and functions across lineages. PMID:24890509

  9. The spliceosome: a flexible, reversible macromolecular machine

    PubMed Central

    Hoskins, Aaron A.; Moore, Melissa J.

    2012-01-01

    With more than a hundred individual RNA and protein parts and a highly dynamic assembly and disassembly pathway, the spliceosome is arguably the most complicated macromolecular machine in the eukaryotic cell. This complexity has made kinetic and mechanistic analysis of splicing incredibly challenging. Yet recent technological advances are now providing tools for understanding this process in much greater detail. Ranging from genome-wide analyses of splicing and creation of an orthogonal spliceosome in vivo, to purification of active spliceosomes and observation of single molecules in vitro, such new experimental approaches are yielding significant insight into the inner workings of this remarkable machine. These experiments are rewriting the textbooks, with a new picture emerging of a dynamic, malleable machine heavily influenced by the identity of its pre-mRNA substrate. PMID:22480731

  10. A dynamic bulge in the U6 RNA internal stem–loop functions in spliceosome assembly and activation

    PubMed Central

    McManus, C. Joel; Schwartz, Matthew L.; Butcher, Samuel E.; Brow, David A.

    2007-01-01

    The highly conserved internal stem–loop (ISL) of U6 spliceosomal RNA is unwound for U4/U6 complex formation during spliceosome assembly and reformed upon U4 release during spliceosome activation. The U6 ISL is structurally similar to Domain 5 of group II self-splicing introns, and contains a dynamic bulge that coordinates a Mg++ ion essential for the first catalytic step of splicing. We have analyzed the causes of growth defects resulting from mutations in the Saccharomyces cerevisiae U6 ISL-bulged nucleotide U80 and the adjacent C67–A79 base pair. Intragenic suppressors and enhancers of the cold-sensitive A79G mutation, which replaces the C–A pair with a C–G pair, suggest that it stabilizes the ISL, inhibits U4/U6 assembly, and may also disrupt spliceosome activation. The lethality of mutations C67A and C67G results from disruption of base-pairing potential between U4 and U6, as these mutations are fully suppressed by compensatory mutations in U4 RNA. Strikingly, suppressor analysis shows that the lethality of the U80G mutation is due not only to formation of a stable base pair with C67, as previously proposed, but also another defect. A U6-U80G strain in which mispairing with position 67 is prevented grows poorly and assembles aberrant spliceosomes that retain U1 snRNP and fail to fully unwind the U4/U6 complex at elevated temperatures. Our data suggest that the U6 ISL bulge is important for coupling U1 snRNP release with U4/U6 unwinding during spliceosome activation. PMID:17925343

  11. Solution structure of the first RNA recognition motif domain of human spliceosomal protein SF3b49 and its mode of interaction with a SF3b145 fragment

    PubMed Central

    Nameki, Nobukazu; Tsuda, Kengo; Takahashi, Mari; Sato, Atsuko; Tochio, Naoya; Inoue, Makoto; Terada, Takaho; Kigawa, Takanori; Kobayashi, Naohiro; Shirouzu, Mikako; Ito, Takuhiro; Sakamoto, Taiichi; Wakamatsu, Kaori; Güntert, Peter; Takahashi, Seizo; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki

    2016-01-01

    Abstract The spliceosomal protein SF3b49, a component of the splicing factor 3b (SF3b) protein complex in the U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein, contains two RNA recognition motif (RRM) domains. In yeast, the first RRM domain (RRM1) of Hsh49 protein (yeast orthologue of human SF3b49) reportedly interacts with another component, Cus1 protein (orthologue of human SF3b145). Here, we solved the solution structure of the RRM1 of human SF3b49 and examined its mode of interaction with a fragment of human SF3b145 using NMR methods. Chemical shift mapping showed that the SF3b145 fragment spanning residues 598–631 interacts with SF3b49 RRM1, which adopts a canonical RRM fold with a topology of β1‐α1‐β2‐β3‐α2‐β4. Furthermore, a docking model based on NOESY measurements suggests that residues 607–616 of the SF3b145 fragment adopt a helical structure that binds to RRM1 predominantly via α1, consequently exhibiting a helix–helix interaction in almost antiparallel. This mode of interaction was confirmed by a mutational analysis using GST pull‐down assays. Comparison with structures of all RRM domains when complexed with a peptide found that this helix–helix interaction is unique to SF3b49 RRM1. Additionally, all amino acid residues involved in the interaction are well conserved among eukaryotes, suggesting evolutionary conservation of this interaction mode between SF3b49 RRM1 and SF3b145. PMID:27862552

  12. Solution structure of the first RNA recognition motif domain of human spliceosomal protein SF3b49 and its mode of interaction with a SF3b145 fragment.

    PubMed

    Kuwasako, Kanako; Nameki, Nobukazu; Tsuda, Kengo; Takahashi, Mari; Sato, Atsuko; Tochio, Naoya; Inoue, Makoto; Terada, Takaho; Kigawa, Takanori; Kobayashi, Naohiro; Shirouzu, Mikako; Ito, Takuhiro; Sakamoto, Taiichi; Wakamatsu, Kaori; Güntert, Peter; Takahashi, Seizo; Yokoyama, Shigeyuki; Muto, Yutaka

    2017-02-01

    The spliceosomal protein SF3b49, a component of the splicing factor 3b (SF3b) protein complex in the U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein, contains two RNA recognition motif (RRM) domains. In yeast, the first RRM domain (RRM1) of Hsh49 protein (yeast orthologue of human SF3b49) reportedly interacts with another component, Cus1 protein (orthologue of human SF3b145). Here, we solved the solution structure of the RRM1 of human SF3b49 and examined its mode of interaction with a fragment of human SF3b145 using NMR methods. Chemical shift mapping showed that the SF3b145 fragment spanning residues 598-631 interacts with SF3b49 RRM1, which adopts a canonical RRM fold with a topology of β1-α1-β2-β3-α2-β4. Furthermore, a docking model based on NOESY measurements suggests that residues 607-616 of the SF3b145 fragment adopt a helical structure that binds to RRM1 predominantly via α1, consequently exhibiting a helix-helix interaction in almost antiparallel. This mode of interaction was confirmed by a mutational analysis using GST pull-down assays. Comparison with structures of all RRM domains when complexed with a peptide found that this helix-helix interaction is unique to SF3b49 RRM1. Additionally, all amino acid residues involved in the interaction are well conserved among eukaryotes, suggesting evolutionary conservation of this interaction mode between SF3b49 RRM1 and SF3b145.

  13. Spliceosome twin introns in fungal nuclear transcripts.

    PubMed

    Flipphi, Michel; Fekete, Erzsébet; Ag, Norbert; Scazzocchio, Claudio; Karaffa, Levente

    2013-08-01

    The spliceosome is an RNA/protein complex, responsible for intron excision from eukaryotic nuclear transcripts. In bacteria, mitochondria and plastids, intron excision does not involve the spliceosome, but occurs through mechanisms dependent on intron RNA secondary and tertiary structure. For group II/III chloroplast introns, "twintrons" (introns within introns) have been described. The excision of the external intron, and thus proper RNA maturation, necessitates prior removal of the internal intron, which interrupts crucial sequences of the former. We have here predicted analogous instances of spliceosomal twintrons ("stwintrons") in filamentous fungi. In two specific cases, where the internal intron interrupts the donor of the external intron after the first or after the second nucleotide, respectively, we show that intermediates with the sequence predicted by the "stwintron" hypothesis, are produced in the splicing process. This implies that two successive rounds of RNA scanning by the spliceosome are necessary to produce the mature mRNA. The phylogenetic distributions of the stwintrons we have identified suggest that they derive from "late" events, subsequent to the appearance of the host intron. They may well not be limited to fungal nuclear transcripts, and their generation and eventual disappearance in the evolutionary process are relevant to hypotheses of intron origin and alternative splicing.

  14. Spliceosomal intron size expansion in domesticated grapevine (Vitis vinifera)

    PubMed Central

    2011-01-01

    Background Spliceosomal introns are important components of eukaryotic genes as their structure, sizes and contents reflect the architecture of gene and genomes. Intron size, determined by both neutral evolution, repetitive elements activities and potential functional constraints, varies significantly in eukaryotes, suggesting unique dynamics and evolution in different lineages of eukaryotic organisms. However, the evolution of intron size, is rarely studied. To investigate intron size dynamics in flowering plants, in particular domesticated grapevines, a survey of intron size and content in wine grape (Vitis vinifera Pinot Noir) genes was conducted by assembling and mapping the transcriptome of V. vinifera genes from ESTs to characterize and analyze spliceosomal introns. Results Uncommonly large size of spliceosomal intron was observed in V. vinifera genome, otherwise inconsistent with overall genome size dynamics when comparing Arabidopsis, Populus and Vitis. In domesticated grapevine, intron size is generally not related to gene function. The composition of enlarged introns in grapevines indicated extensive transposable element (TE) activity within intronic regions. TEs comprise about 80% of the expanded intron space and in particular, recent LTR retrotransposon insertions are enriched in these intronic regions, suggesting an intron size expansion in the lineage leading to domesticated grapevine, instead of size contractions in Arabidopsis and Populus. Comparative analysis of selected intronic regions in V. vinifera cultivars and wild grapevine species revealed that accelerated TE activity was associated with grapevine domestication, and in some cases with the development of specific cultivars. Conclusions In this study, we showed intron size expansion driven by TE activities in domesticated grapevines, likely a result of long-term vegetative propagation and intensive human care, which simultaneously promote TE proliferation and repress TE removal mechanisms

  15. Spliceosomal intron size expansion in domesticated grapevine (Vitis vinifera).

    PubMed

    Jiang, Ke; Goertzen, Leslie R

    2011-03-08

    Spliceosomal introns are important components of eukaryotic genes as their structure, sizes and contents reflect the architecture of gene and genomes. Intron size, determined by both neutral evolution, repetitive elements activities and potential functional constraints, varies significantly in eukaryotes, suggesting unique dynamics and evolution in different lineages of eukaryotic organisms. However, the evolution of intron size, is rarely studied. To investigate intron size dynamics in flowering plants, in particular domesticated grapevines, a survey of intron size and content in wine grape (Vitis vinifera Pinot Noir) genes was conducted by assembling and mapping the transcriptome of V. vinifera genes from ESTs to characterize and analyze spliceosomal introns. Uncommonly large size of spliceosomal intron was observed in V. vinifera genome, otherwise inconsistent with overall genome size dynamics when comparing Arabidopsis, Populus and Vitis. In domesticated grapevine, intron size is generally not related to gene function. The composition of enlarged introns in grapevines indicated extensive transposable element (TE) activity within intronic regions. TEs comprise about 80% of the expanded intron space and in particular, recent LTR retrotransposon insertions are enriched in these intronic regions, suggesting an intron size expansion in the lineage leading to domesticated grapevine, instead of size contractions in Arabidopsis and Populus. Comparative analysis of selected intronic regions in V. vinifera cultivars and wild grapevine species revealed that accelerated TE activity was associated with grapevine domestication, and in some cases with the development of specific cultivars. In this study, we showed intron size expansion driven by TE activities in domesticated grapevines, likely a result of long-term vegetative propagation and intensive human care, which simultaneously promote TE proliferation and repress TE removal mechanisms such as recombination. The intron

  16. U1A Complex

    SciTech Connect

    2014-10-28

    Some of the most sophisticated experiments in the stockpile stewardship program are conducted in an environmentally safe manner, nearly 1000 feet below the ground at the site. The U1a complex a sprawling underground laboratory and tunnel complex is home to a number of unique capabilities.

  17. U1A Complex

    ScienceCinema

    None

    2016-07-12

    Some of the most sophisticated experiments in the stockpile stewardship program are conducted in an environmentally safe manner, nearly 1000 feet below the ground at the site. The U1a complex a sprawling underground laboratory and tunnel complex is home to a number of unique capabilities.

  18. A Novel Yeast U2 snRNP Protein, Snu17p, Is Required for the First Catalytic Step of Splicing and for Progression of Spliceosome Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Gottschalk, Alexander; Bartels, Cornelia; Neubauer, Gitte; Lührmann, Reinhard; Fabrizio, Patrizia

    2001-01-01

    We have isolated and microsequenced Snu17p, a novel yeast protein with a predicted molecular mass of 17 kDa that contains an RNA recognition motif. We demonstrate that Snu17p binds specifically to the U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) and that it is part of the spliceosome, since the pre-mRNA and the lariat-exon 2 are specifically coprecipitated with Snu17p. Although the SNU17 gene is not essential, its knockout leads to a slow-growth phenotype and to a pre-mRNA splicing defect in vivo. In addition, the first step of splicing is dramatically decreased in extracts prepared from the snu17 deletion (snu17Δ) mutant. This defect is efficiently reversed by the addition of recombinant Snu17p. To investigate the step of spliceosome assembly at which Snu17p acts, we have used nondenaturing gel electrophoresis. In Snu17p-deficient extracts, the spliceosome runs as a single slowly migrating complex. In wild-type extracts, usually at least two distinct complexes are observed: the prespliceosome, or B complex, containing the U2 but not the U1 snRNP, and the catalytically active spliceosome, or A complex, containing the U2, U6, and U5 snRNPs. Northern blot analysis and affinity purification of the snu17Δ spliceosome showed that it contains the U1, U2, U6, U5, and U4 snRNPs. The unexpected stabilization of the U1 snRNP and the lack of dissociation of the U4 snRNP suggest that loss of Snu17p inhibits the progression of spliceosome assembly prior to U1 snRNP release and after [U4/U6.U5] tri-snRNP addition. PMID:11287609

  19. U1 snRNP-dependent function of TIAR in the regulation of alternative RNA processing of the human calcitonin/CGRP pre-mRNA.

    PubMed

    Zhu, Hui; Hasman, Robert A; Young, Katherine M; Kedersha, Nancy L; Lou, Hua

    2003-09-01

    Alternative RNA processing of human calcitonin/CGRP pre-mRNA is regulated by an intronic enhancer element. Previous studies have demonstrated that multiple sequence motifs within the enhancer and a number of trans-acting factors play critical roles in the regulation. Here, we report the identification of TIAR as a novel player in the regulation of human calcitonin/CGRP alternative RNA processing. TIAR binds to the U tract sequence motif downstream of a pseudo 5' splice site within the previously characterized intron enhancer element. Binding of TIAR promotes inclusion of the alternative 3'-terminal exon located more than 200 nucleotides upstream from the U tract. In cells that preferentially include this exon, overexpression of a mutant TIAR that lacks the RNA binding domains suppressed inclusion of this exon. In this report, we also demonstrate an unusual novel interaction between U6 snRNA and the pseudo 5' splice site, which was shown previously to bind U1 snRNA. Interestingly, TIAR binding to the U tract sequence depends on the interaction of not only U1 but also U6 snRNA with the pseudo 5' splice site. Conversely, TIAR binding promotes U6 snRNA binding to its target. The synergistic relationship between TIAR and U6 snRNA strongly suggests a novel role of U6 snRNP in regulated alternative RNA processing.

  20. The role of RNA structure in the interaction of U1A protein with U1 hairpin II RNA.

    PubMed

    Law, Michael J; Rice, Andrew J; Lin, Patti; Laird-Offringa, Ite A

    2006-07-01

    The N-terminal RNA Recognition Motif (RRM1) of the spliceosomal protein U1A interacting with its target U1 hairpin II (U1hpII) has been used as a paradigm for RRM-containing proteins interacting with their RNA targets. U1A binds to U1hpII via direct interactions with a 7-nucleotide (nt) consensus binding sequence at the 5' end of a 10-nt loop, and via hydrogen bonds with the closing C-G base pair at the top of the RNA stem. Using surface plasmon resonance (Biacore), we have examined the role of structural features of U1hpII in binding to U1A RRM1. Mutational analysis of the closing base pair suggests it plays a minor role in binding and mainly prevents "breathing" of the loop. Lengthening the stem and nontarget part of the loop suggests that the increased negative charge of the RNA might slightly aid association. However, this is offset by an increase in dissociation, which may be caused by attraction of the RRM to nontarget parts of the RNA. Studies of a single stranded target and RNAs with untethered loops indicate that structure is not very relevant for association but is important for complex stability. In particular, breaking the link between the stem and the 5' side of the loop greatly increases complex dissociation, presumably by hindering simultaneous contacts between the RRM and stem and loop nucleotides. While binding of U1A to a single stranded target is much weaker than to U1hpII, it occurs with nanomolar affinity, supporting recent evidence that binding of unstructured RNA by U1A has physiological significance.

  1. The role of RNA structure in the interaction of U1A protein with U1 hairpin II RNA

    PubMed Central

    Law, Michael J.; Rice, Andrew J.; Lin, Patti; Laird-Offringa, Ite A.

    2006-01-01

    The N-terminal RNA Recognition Motif (RRM1) of the spliceosomal protein U1A interacting with its target U1 hairpin II (U1hpII) has been used as a paradigm for RRM-containing proteins interacting with their RNA targets. U1A binds to U1hpII via direct interactions with a 7-nucleotide (nt) consensus binding sequence at the 5′ end of a 10-nt loop, and via hydrogen bonds with the closing C–G base pair at the top of the RNA stem. Using surface plasmon resonance (Biacore), we have examined the role of structural features of U1hpII in binding to U1A RRM1. Mutational analysis of the closing base pair suggests it plays a minor role in binding and mainly prevents “breathing” of the loop. Lengthening the stem and nontarget part of the loop suggests that the increased negative charge of the RNA might slightly aid association. However, this is offset by an increase in dissociation, which may be caused by attraction of the RRM to nontarget parts of the RNA. Studies of a single stranded target and RNAs with untethered loops indicate that structure is not very relevant for association but is important for complex stability. In particular, breaking the link between the stem and the 5′ side of the loop greatly increases complex dissociation, presumably by hindering simultaneous contacts between the RRM and stem and loop nucleotides. While binding of U1A to a single stranded target is much weaker than to U1hpII, it occurs with nanomolar affinity, supporting recent evidence that binding of unstructured RNA by U1A has physiological significance. PMID:16738410

  2. Spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles repeatedly cycle through Cajal bodies.

    PubMed

    Stanek, David; Pridalová-Hnilicová, Jarmila; Novotný, Ivan; Huranová, Martina; Blazíková, Michaela; Wen, Xin; Sapra, Aparna K; Neugebauer, Karla M

    2008-06-01

    The Cajal body (CB) is a nuclear structure closely associated with import and biogenesis of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs). Here, we tested whether CBs also contain mature snRNPs and whether CB integrity depends on the ongoing snRNP splicing cycle. Sm proteins tagged with photoactivatable and color-maturing variants of fluorescent proteins were used to monitor snRNP behavior in living cells over time; mature snRNPs accumulated in CBs, traveled from one CB to another, and they were not preferentially replaced by newly imported snRNPs. To test whether CB integrity depends on the snRNP splicing cycle, two human orthologues of yeast proteins involved in distinct steps in spliceosome disassembly after splicing, hPrp22 and hNtr1, were depleted by small interfering RNA treatment. Surprisingly, depletion of either protein led to the accumulation of U4/U6 snRNPs in CBs, suggesting that reassembly of the U4/U6.U5 tri-snRNP was delayed. Accordingly, a relative decrease in U5 snRNPs compared with U4/U6 snRNPs was observed in CBs, as well as in nuclear extracts of treated cells. Together, the data show that particular phases of the spliceosome cycle are compartmentalized in living cells, with reassembly of the tri-snRNP occurring in CBs.

  3. Co-evolution of SNF spliceosomal proteins with their RNA targets in trans-splicing nematodes.

    PubMed

    Strange, Rex Meade; Russelburg, L Peyton; Delaney, Kimberly J

    2016-08-01

    Although the mechanism of pre-mRNA splicing has been well characterized, the evolution of spliceosomal proteins is poorly understood. The U1A/U2B″/SNF family (hereafter referred to as the SNF family) of RNA binding spliceosomal proteins participates in both the U1 and U2 small interacting nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs). The highly constrained nature of this system has inhibited an analysis of co-evolutionary trends between the proteins and their RNA binding targets. Here we report accelerated sequence evolution in the SNF protein family in Phylum Nematoda, which has allowed an analysis of protein:RNA co-evolution. In a comparison of SNF genes from ecdysozoan species, we found a correlation between trans-splicing species (nematodes) and increased phylogenetic branch lengths of the SNF protein family, with respect to their sister clade Arthropoda. In particular, we found that nematodes (~70-80 % of pre-mRNAs are trans-spliced) have experienced higher rates of SNF sequence evolution than arthropods (predominantly cis-spliced) at both the nucleotide and amino acid levels. Interestingly, this increased evolutionary rate correlates with the reliance on trans-splicing by nematodes, which would alter the role of the SNF family of spliceosomal proteins. We mapped amino acid substitutions to functionally important regions of the SNF protein, specifically to sites that are predicted to disrupt protein:RNA and protein:protein interactions. Finally, we investigated SNF's RNA targets: the U1 and U2 snRNAs. Both are more divergent in nematodes than arthropods, suggesting the RNAs have co-evolved with SNF in order to maintain the necessarily high affinity interaction that has been characterized in other species.

  4. At the origin of spliceosomal introns

    PubMed Central

    Collemare, Jérôme; van der Burgt, Ate; de Wit, Pierre J.G.M.

    2013-01-01

    The recent discovery of introner-like elements (ILEs) in six fungal species shed new light on the origin of regular spliceosomal introns (RSIs) and the mechanism of intron gains. These novel spliceosomal introns are found in hundreds of copies, are longer than RSIs and harbor stable predicted secondary structures. Yet, they are prone to degeneration in sequence and length to become undistinguishable from RSIs, suggesting that ILEs are predecessors of most RSIs. In most fungi, other near-identical introns were found duplicated in lower numbers in the same gene or in unrelated genes, indicating that intron duplication is a widespread phenomenon. However, ILEs are associated with the majority of intron gains, suggesting that the other types of duplication are of minor importance to the overall gains of introns. Our data support the hypothesis that ILEs’ multiplication corresponds to the main mechanism of intron gain in fungi. PMID:23750299

  5. A spliceosome intermediate with loosely associated tri-snRNP accumulates in the absence of Prp28 ATPase activity.

    PubMed

    Boesler, Carsten; Rigo, Norbert; Anokhina, Maria M; Tauchert, Marcel J; Agafonov, Dmitry E; Kastner, Berthold; Urlaub, Henning; Ficner, Ralf; Will, Cindy L; Lührmann, Reinhard

    2016-07-05

    The precise role of the spliceosomal DEAD-box protein Prp28 in higher eukaryotes remains unclear. We show that stable tri-snRNP association during pre-catalytic spliceosomal B complex formation is blocked by a dominant-negative hPrp28 mutant lacking ATPase activity. Complexes formed in the presence of ATPase-deficient hPrp28 represent a novel assembly intermediate, the pre-B complex, that contains U1, U2 and loosely associated tri-snRNP and is stalled before disruption of the U1/5'ss base pairing interaction, consistent with a role for hPrp28 in the latter. Pre-B and B complexes differ structurally, indicating that stable tri-snRNP integration is accompanied by substantial rearrangements in the spliceosome. Disruption of the U1/5'ss interaction alone is not sufficient to bypass the block by ATPase-deficient hPrp28, suggesting hPrp28 has an additional function at this stage of splicing. Our data provide new insights into the function of Prp28 in higher eukaryotes, and the requirements for stable tri-snRNP binding during B complex formation.

  6. A spliceosome intermediate with loosely associated tri-snRNP accumulates in the absence of Prp28 ATPase activity

    PubMed Central

    Boesler, Carsten; Rigo, Norbert; Anokhina, Maria M.; Tauchert, Marcel J.; Agafonov, Dmitry E.; Kastner, Berthold; Urlaub, Henning; Ficner, Ralf; Will, Cindy L.; Lührmann, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    The precise role of the spliceosomal DEAD-box protein Prp28 in higher eukaryotes remains unclear. We show that stable tri-snRNP association during pre-catalytic spliceosomal B complex formation is blocked by a dominant-negative hPrp28 mutant lacking ATPase activity. Complexes formed in the presence of ATPase-deficient hPrp28 represent a novel assembly intermediate, the pre-B complex, that contains U1, U2 and loosely associated tri-snRNP and is stalled before disruption of the U1/5′ss base pairing interaction, consistent with a role for hPrp28 in the latter. Pre-B and B complexes differ structurally, indicating that stable tri-snRNP integration is accompanied by substantial rearrangements in the spliceosome. Disruption of the U1/5′ss interaction alone is not sufficient to bypass the block by ATPase-deficient hPrp28, suggesting hPrp28 has an additional function at this stage of splicing. Our data provide new insights into the function of Prp28 in higher eukaryotes, and the requirements for stable tri-snRNP binding during B complex formation. PMID:27377154

  7. The architecture of the spliceosomal U4/U6.U5 tri-snRNP

    PubMed Central

    Nguyen, Thi Hoang Duong; Galej, Wojciech P.; Bai, Xiao-chen; Savva, Christos G.; Newman, Andrew J.; Scheres, Sjors H. W.; Nagai, Kiyoshi

    2015-01-01

    U4/U6.U5 tri-snRNP is a 1.5 MDa pre-assembled spliceosomal complex comprising U5 snRNA, extensively base-paired U4/U6 snRNAs and >30 proteins, including the key components Prp8, Brr2 and Snu114. The tri-snRNP combines with a pre-mRNA substrate bound to U1 and U2 snRNPs and transforms into a catalytically active spliceosome following extensive compositional and conformational changes triggered by unwinding of the U4/U6 snRNAs. CryoEM single-particle reconstruction of yeast tri-snRNP at 5.9Å resolution reveals the essentially complete organization of its RNA and protein components. The single-stranded region of U4 snRNA between its 3′-stem-loop and the U4/U6 snRNA stem I is loaded into the Brr2 helicase active site ready for unwinding. Snu114 and the N-terminal domain of Prp8 position U5 snRNA to insert its Loop I, which aligns the exons for splicing, into the Prp8 active site cavity. The structure provides crucial insights into the activation process and the active site of the spliceosome. PMID:26106855

  8. An engineered U1 small nuclear RNA rescues splicing-defective coagulation F7 gene expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Balestra, D; Faella, A; Margaritis, P; Cavallari, N; Pagani, F; Bernardi, F; Arruda, V R; Pinotti, M

    2014-02-01

    The ability of the spliceosomal small nuclear RNA U1 (U1snRNA) to rescue pre-mRNA splicing impaired by mutations makes it an attractive therapeutic molecule. Coagulation factor deficiencies due to splicing mutations are relatively frequent and could therefore benefit from this strategy. However, the effects of U1snRNAs in vivo remain unknown. To assess the rescue of the F7 c.859+5G>A splicing mutation (FVII+5A), causing severe human factor VII (hFVII) deficiency, by the modified U1snRNA+5a (U1+5a) in a murine model. Mice expressing the human F7 c.859+5G>A mutant were generated following liver-directed expression by plasmid or recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector administration. The rescue of the splice-site defective pre-mRNA by U1+5a was monitored in liver and plasma through hFVII-specific assays. Injection of plasmids encoding the U1+5a rescued plasma hFVII levels, which increased from undetectable to ~8.5% of those obtained with the wild-type hFVII plasmid control. To assess long-term effects, mice were injected with low and high doses of two AAV vectors encoding the FVII+5A splice site mutant as template to be corrected by U1+5a. This strategy resulted in hFVII plasma levels of 3.9 ± 0.8 or 23.3 ± 5.1 ng mL(-1) in a dose-dependent manner, corresponding in patients to circulating FVII levels of ~1-4.5% of normal. Moreover, in both experimental models, we also detected correctly spliced hFVII transcripts and hFVII-positive cells in liver cells. Here we provide the first in vivo proof-of-principle of the rescue of the expression of a splicing-defective F7 mutant by U1snRNAs, thus highlighting their therapeutic potential in coagulation disorders. © 2013 International Society on Thrombosis and Haemostasis.

  9. An engineered U1 small nuclear RNA rescues splicing-defective coagulation F7 gene expression in mice

    PubMed Central

    Balestra, D; Faella, A; Margaritis, P; Cavallari, N; Pagani, F; Bernardi, F; Arruda, V R; Pinotti, M

    2014-01-01

    Background The ability of the spliceosomal small nuclear RNA U1 (U1snRNA) to rescue pre-mRNA splicing impaired by mutations makes it an attractive therapeutic molecule. Coagulation factor deficiencies due to splicing mutations are relatively frequent and could therefore benefit from this strategy. However, the effects of U1snRNAs in vivo remain unknown. Objectives To assess the rescue of the F7 c.859+5G>A splicing mutation (FVII+5A), causing severe human factor VII (hFVII) deficiency, by the modified U1snRNA+5a (U1+5a) in a murine model. Methods Mice expressing the human F7 c.859+5G>A mutant were generated following liver-directed expression by plasmid or recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector administration. The rescue of the splice-site defective pre-mRNA by U1+5a was monitored in liver and plasma through hFVII-specific assays. Results Injection of plasmids encoding the U1+5a rescued plasma hFVII levels, which increased from undetectable to ∼8.5% of those obtained with the wild-type hFVII plasmid control. To assess long-term effects, mice were injected with low and high doses of two AAV vectors encoding the FVII+5A splice site mutant as template to be corrected by U1+5a. This strategy resulted in hFVII plasma levels of 3.9 ± 0.8 or 23.3 ± 5.1 ng mL−1 in a dose-dependent manner, corresponding in patients to circulating FVII levels of ∼1–4.5% of normal. Moreover, in both experimental models, we also detected correctly spliced hFVII transcripts and hFVII-positive cells in liver cells. Conclusions Here we provide the first in vivo proof-of-principle of the rescue of the expression of a splicing-defective F7 mutant by U1snRNAs, thus highlighting their therapeutic potential in coagulation disorders. PMID:24735116

  10. An engineered U1 small nuclear RNA rescues splicing defective coagulation F7 gene expression in mice.

    PubMed

    Balestra, D; Faella, A; Margaritis, P; Cavallari, N; Pagani, F; Bernardi, F; Arruda, V R; Pinotti, M

    2014-02-01

    The ability of the spliceosomal small nuclear RNA U1 (U1snRNA) to rescue pre-mRNA splicing impaired by mutations makes it an attractive therapeutic molecule. Coagulation factor deficiencies due to splicing mutations are relatively frequent and could therefore benefit from this strategy. However, the effects of U1snRNAs in vivo remain unknown. To assess the rescue of the F7 c.859+5G>A splicing mutation (FVII+5A), causing severe human factor VII (hFVII) deficiency, by the modified U1snRNA+5a (U1+5a) in a murine model. Mice expressing the human F7 c.859+5G>A mutant were generated following liver-directed expression by plasmid or recombinant adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector administration. The rescue of the splice-site defective pre-mRNA by U1+5a was monitored in liver and plasma through hFVII-specific assays. Injection of plasmids encoding the U1+5a rescued plasma hFVII levels, which increased from undetectable to ~8.5% of those obtained with the wild-type hFVII plasmid control. To assess long-term effects, mice were injected with low and high doses of two AAV vectors encoding the FVII+5A splice site mutant as template to be corrected by U1+5a. This strategy resulted in hFVII plasma levels of 3.9 ± 0.8 or 23.3 ± 5.1 ng mL⁻¹ in a dose-dependent manner, corresponding in patients to circulating FVII levels of ~1-4.5% of normal. Moreover, in both experimental models, we also detected correctly spliced hFVII transcripts and hFVII-positive cells in liver cells. Here we provide the first in vivo proof of-principle of the rescue of the expression of a splicing-defective F7 mutant by U1snRNAs, thus highlighting their therapeutic potential in coagulation disorders.

  11. Spliceosomal snRNA modifications and their function

    PubMed Central

    Karijolich, John; Yu, Yi-Tao

    2014-01-01

    Spliceosomal snRNAs are extensively 2'-O-methylated and pseudouridylated. The modified nucleotides are relatively highly conserved across species, and are often clustered in regions of functional importance in pre-mRNA splicing. Over the past decade, the study of the mechanisms and functions of spliceosomal snRNA modifications has intensified. Two independent mechanisms behind these modifications, RNA-independent (protein-only) and RNA-dependent (RNA-guided), have been discovered. The role of spliceosomal snRNA modifications in snRNP biogenesis and spliceosome assembly has also been verified. PMID:20215871

  12. Identification of a small molecule inhibitor that stalls splicing at an early step of spliceosome activation

    PubMed Central

    Sidarovich, Anzhalika; Will, Cindy L; Anokhina, Maria M; Ceballos, Javier; Sievers, Sonja; Agafonov, Dmitry E; Samatov, Timur; Bao, Penghui; Kastner, Berthold; Urlaub, Henning; Waldmann, Herbert; Lührmann, Reinhard

    2017-01-01

    Small molecule inhibitors of pre-mRNA splicing are important tools for identifying new spliceosome assembly intermediates, allowing a finer dissection of spliceosome dynamics and function. Here, we identified a small molecule that inhibits human pre-mRNA splicing at an intermediate stage during conversion of pre-catalytic spliceosomal B complexes into activated Bact complexes. Characterization of the stalled complexes (designated B028) revealed that U4/U6 snRNP proteins are released during activation before the U6 Lsm and B-specific proteins, and before recruitment and/or stable incorporation of Prp19/CDC5L complex and other Bact complex proteins. The U2/U6 RNA network in B028 complexes differs from that of the Bact complex, consistent with the idea that the catalytic RNA core forms stepwise during the B to Bact transition and is likely stabilized by the Prp19/CDC5L complex and related proteins. Taken together, our data provide new insights into the RNP rearrangements and extensive exchange of proteins that occurs during spliceosome activation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.23533.001 PMID:28300534

  13. Tumor suppressor microRNAs are downregulated in myelodysplastic syndrome with spliceosome mutations

    PubMed Central

    Aslan, Derya; Garde, Christian; Nygaard, Mette Katrine; Helbo, Alexandra Søgaard; Dimopoulos, Konstantinos; Hansen, Jakob Werner; Severinsen, Marianne Tang; Treppendahl, Marianne Bach; Sjø, Lene Dissing; Grønbæk, Kirsten; Kristensen, Lasse Sommer

    2016-01-01

    Spliceosome mutations are frequently observed in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). However, it is largely unknown how these mutations contribute to the disease. MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small noncoding RNAs, which have been implicated in most human cancers due to their role in post transcriptional gene regulation. The aim of this study was to analyze the impact of spliceosome mutations on the expression of miRNAs in a cohort of 34 MDS patients. In total, the expression of 76 miRNAs, including mirtrons and splice site overlapping miRNAs, was accurately quantified using reverse transcriptase quantitative PCR. The majority of the studied miRNAs have previously been implicated in MDS. Stably expressed miRNA genes for normalization of the data were identified using GeNorm and NormFinder algorithms. High-resolution melting assays covering all mutational hotspots within SF3B1, SRSF2, and U2AF1 (U2AF35) were developed, and all detected mutations were confirmed by Sanger sequencing. Overall, canonical miRNAs were downregulated in spliceosome mutated samples compared to wild-type (P = 0.002), and samples from spliceosome mutated patients clustered together in hierarchical cluster analyses. Among the most downregulated miRNAs were several tumor-suppressor miRNAs, including several let-7 family members, miR-423, and miR-103a. Finally, we observed that the predicted targets of the most downregulated miRNAs were involved in apoptosis, hematopoiesis, and acute myeloid leukemia among other cancer- and metabolic pathways. Our data indicate that spliceosome mutations may play an important role in MDS pathophysiology by affecting the expression of tumor suppressor miRNA genes involved in the development and progression of MDS. PMID:26848861

  14. Sm and Sm-like proteins belong to a large family: identification of proteins of the U6 as well as the U1, U2, U4 and U5 snRNPs.

    PubMed Central

    Séraphin, B

    1995-01-01

    Several small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs), including the spliceosomal U1, U2, U4 and U5 snRNAs, are associated with Sm proteins. These eight small proteins form a heteromeric complex that binds to snRNAs and plays a major role in small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) biogenesis and transport. These proteins are also a major target for autoantibodies in the human disease systemic lupus erythematosus. By sequence comparison I have shown that all the known Sm proteins share a common structural motif which might explain their immunological cross-reactivity. Database searches using this motif uncovered a large number of Sm-like proteins from plants, animals and fungi. These proteins have been grouped in at least 13 different subfamilies. Genes encoding divergent yeast members were cloned and used to produce tagged fusion proteins. Some of these proteins are canonical Sm proteins as they associate with the yeast U1, U2, U4/U6 and U5 snRNAs. Surprisingly, one Sm-like protein was found to be a component of the U6 snRNP. These findings have implications for the structure of the Sm protein complex, spliceosomal snRNP evolution, snRNA transport and modification as well as the involvement of Sm proteins in systemic lupus erythematosus. Images PMID:7744014

  15. U1h Superstructure

    SciTech Connect

    Glen Sykes

    2000-11-01

    The U1H Shaft Project is a design build subcontract to supply the U. S. Department of Energy (DOE) a 1,045 ft. deep, 20 ft. diameter, concrete lined shaft for unspecified purposes. The subcontract awarded to Atkinson Construction by Bechtel Nevada to design and construct the shaft for the DOE has been split into phases with portions of the work being released as dictated by available funding. The first portion released included the design for the shaft, permanent hoist, headframe, and collar arrangement. The second release consisted of constructing the shaft collar to a depth of 110 ft., the service entry, utility trenches, and installation of the temporary sinking plant. The temporary sinking plant included the installation of the sinking headframe, the sinking hoist, two deck winches, the shaft form, the sinking work deck, and temporary utilities required to sink the shaft. Both the design and collar construction were completed on schedule. The third release consisted of excavating and lining the shaft to the station depth of approximately 950 feet. Work is currently proceeding on this production sinking phase. At a depth of approximately 600 feet, Atkinson has surpassed production expectation and is more than 3 months ahead of schedule. Atkinson has employed the use of a Bobcat 331 excavator as the primary means of excavation. the shaft is being excavated entirely in an alluvial deposit with varying degrees of calcium carbonate cementation. Several more work packages are expected to be released in the near future. The remaining work packages include, construction of the shaft station a depth of 975 ft. and construction of the shaft sump to a depth of 1,045 ft., installation of the loading pocket and station steel and equipment, installation of the shaft steel and guides, installation of the shaft utilities, and installation of the permanent headframe, hoist, collar utilities, and facilities.

  16. Contribution of the tyrosines to the structure and function of the human U1A N-terminal RNA binding domain.

    PubMed Central

    Kranz, J. K.; Lu, J.; Hall, K. B.

    1996-01-01

    RNA binding domains (RBDs) are members of a large family of proteins that share minimal sequence conservation but adopt an alpha beta sandwich global fold. Defining the contributions of specific amino acids to RBD structure and RNA binding is critical to understanding the functions of these proteins. In these experiments with the human U1A N-terminal RNA binding domain (RBD1), the contributions from each of its four tyrosines to protein structure, stability, and RNA binding were measured. Each tyrosine was substituted with phenylalanine and one other selected residue, and the resulting proteins were characterized by chemical denaturation to measure their unfolding free energy, by binding free energies to the wild-type RNA hairpin, and by 19F NMR to probe for structural changes. Features of the protein identified in these experiments include a possible tyrosine/lysine contact in an alpha-helix, which may be an example of an energetically favorable aromatic/amino side chain interaction. One long loop of the protein, which shows unusual 15N backbone and tyrosine side-chain dynamics, is implicated in protein:protein association. The diverse interactions of the four tyrosine residues in the organization of RBD1 illustrate how each member of this family of proteins will have unique molecular details that contribute to function. PMID:8844847

  17. Interaction between the Spliceosomal Pre-mRNA Branch Site and U2 snRNP Protein p14.

    PubMed

    Perea, William; Schroeder, Kersten T; Bryant, Amy N; Greenbaum, Nancy L

    2016-02-02

    We have probed the molecular basis of recognition between human spliceosomal U2 snRNP protein p14 and RNA targets representing the intron branch site region. Interaction of an RNA duplex representing the branch site helix perturbed at least 10 nuclear magnetic resonance cross-peaks of (15)N-labeled p14. However, similar chemical shift changes were observed upon interaction with a duplex without the bulged branch site residue, suggesting that binding of p14 to RNA is nonspecific and does not recognize the branch site. We propose that the p14-RNA interaction screens charges on the backbone of the branch site during spliceosome assembly.

  18. Use of the U1A protein to facilitate crystallization and structure determination of large RNAs

    PubMed Central

    Ferré-D’Amaré, Adrian R.

    2016-01-01

    Summary The preparation of well-ordered crystals of RNAs with complex three-dimensional architecture can be facilitated by engineering a binding site for the spliceosomal protein U1A into a functionally and structurally dispensable stem-loop of the RNA of interest. Once suitable crystals are obtained, the U1A protein, of known structure, can be employed to facilitate preparation of heavy atom or anomalously scattering atom derivatives, or as a source of partial model phases for the molecular replacement method. Here, we describe the methods for making U1A preparations suitable for cocrystallization with RNA. As an example, the cocrystallization of the tetracycline aptamer with U1A is also described. PMID:26227038

  19. Spliceosomal protein E regulates neoplastic cell growth by modulating expression of Cyclin E/CDK2 and G2/M checkpoint proteins

    PubMed Central

    Li, Z; Pützer, B M

    2008-01-01

    Small nuclear ribonucleoproteins are essential splicing factors. We previously identified the spliceosomal protein E (SmE) as a downstream effector of E2F1 in p53-deficient human carcinoma cells. Here, we investigated the biological relevance of SmE in determining the fate of cancer and non-tumourigenic cells. Adenovirus-mediated expression of SmE selectively reduces growth of cancerous cells due to decreased cell proliferation but not apoptosis. A similar growth inhibitory effect for SmD1 suggests that this is a general function of Sm-family members. Deletion of Sm-motifs reveals the importance of the Sm-1 domain for growth suppression. Consistently, SmE overexpression leads to inhibition of DNA synthesis and G2 arrest as shown by BrdU-incorporation and MPM2-staining. Real-time RT-PCR and immunoblotting showed that growth arrest by SmE directly correlates with the reduction of cyclin E, CDK2, CDC25C and CDC2 expression, and up-regulation of p27Kip. Importantly, SmE activity was not associated with enhanced expression of other spliceosome components such as U1 SnRNP70, suggesting that the growth inhibitory effect of SmE is distinct from its pre-mRNA splicing function. Furthermore, specific inactivation of SmE by shRNA significantly increased the percentage of cells in S phase, whereas the amount of G2/M arrested cells was reduced. Our data provide evidence that Sm proteins function as suppressors of tumour cell growth and may have major implications as cancer therapeutics. PMID:18208561

  20. Spliceosomal protein E regulates neoplastic cell growth by modulating expression of cyclin E/CDK2 and G2/M checkpoint proteins.

    PubMed

    Li, Z; Pützer, B M

    2008-12-01

    Small nuclear ribonucleoproteins are essential splicing factors. We previously identified the spliceosomal protein E (SmE) as a downstream effector of E2F1 in p53-deficient human carcinoma cells. Here, we investigated the biological relevance of SmE in determining the fate of cancer and non-tumourigenic cells. Adenovirus-mediated expression of SmE selectively reduces growth of cancerous cells due to decreased cell proliferation but not apoptosis. A similar growth inhibitory effect for SmD1 suggests that this is a general function of Sm-family members. Deletion of Sm-motifs reveals the importance of the Sm-1 domain for growth suppression. Consistently, SmE overexpression leads to inhibition of DNA synthesis and G2 arrest as shown by BrdU-incorporation and MPM2-staining. Real-time RT-PCR and immunoblotting showed that growth arrest by SmE directly correlates with the reduction of cyclin E, CDK2, CDC25C and CDC2 expression, and up-regulation of p27Kip. Importantly, SmE activity was not associated with enhanced expression of other spliceosome components such as U1 SnRNP70, suggesting that the growth inhibitory effect of SmE is distinct from its pre-mRNA splicing function. Furthermore, specific inactivation of SmE by shRNA significantly increased the percentage of cells in S phase, whereas the amount of G2/M arrested cells was reduced. Our data provide evidence that Sm proteins function as suppressors of tumour cell growth and may have major implications as cancer therapeutics.

  1. Mutations in the Spliceosome Component CWC27 Cause Retinal Degeneration with or without Additional Developmental Anomalies.

    PubMed

    Xu, Mingchu; Xie, Yajing Angela; Abouzeid, Hana; Gordon, Christopher T; Fiorentino, Alessia; Sun, Zixi; Lehman, Anna; Osman, Ihab S; Dharmat, Rachayata; Riveiro-Alvarez, Rosa; Bapst-Wicht, Linda; Babino, Darwin; Arno, Gavin; Busetto, Virginia; Zhao, Li; Li, Hui; Lopez-Martinez, Miguel A; Azevedo, Liliana F; Hubert, Laurence; Pontikos, Nikolas; Eblimit, Aiden; Lorda-Sanchez, Isabel; Kheir, Valeria; Plagnol, Vincent; Oufadem, Myriam; Soens, Zachry T; Yang, Lizhu; Bole-Feysot, Christine; Pfundt, Rolph; Allaman-Pillet, Nathalie; Nitschké, Patrick; Cheetham, Michael E; Lyonnet, Stanislas; Agrawal, Smriti A; Li, Huajin; Pinton, Gaëtan; Michaelides, Michel; Besmond, Claude; Li, Yumei; Yuan, Zhisheng; von Lintig, Johannes; Webster, Andrew R; Le Hir, Hervé; Stoilov, Peter; Amiel, Jeanne; Hardcastle, Alison J; Ayuso, Carmen; Sui, Ruifang; Chen, Rui; Allikmets, Rando; Schorderet, Daniel F

    2017-04-06

    Pre-mRNA splicing factors play a fundamental role in regulating transcript diversity both temporally and spatially. Genetic defects in several spliceosome components have been linked to a set of non-overlapping spliceosomopathy phenotypes in humans, among which skeletal developmental defects and non-syndromic retinitis pigmentosa (RP) are frequent findings. Here we report that defects in spliceosome-associated protein CWC27 are associated with a spectrum of disease phenotypes ranging from isolated RP to severe syndromic forms. By whole-exome sequencing, recessive protein-truncating mutations in CWC27 were found in seven unrelated families that show a range of clinical phenotypes, including retinal degeneration, brachydactyly, craniofacial abnormalities, short stature, and neurological defects. Remarkably, variable expressivity of the human phenotype can be recapitulated in Cwc27 mutant mouse models, with significant embryonic lethality and severe phenotypes in the complete knockout mice while mice with a partial loss-of-function allele mimic the isolated retinal degeneration phenotype. Our study describes a retinal dystrophy-related phenotype spectrum as well as its genetic etiology and highlights the complexity of the spliceosomal gene network. Copyright © 2017 American Society of Human Genetics. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Computational screen for spliceosomal RNA genes aids in defining the phylogenetic distribution of major and minor spliceosomal components.

    PubMed

    Dávila López, Marcela; Rosenblad, Magnus Alm; Samuelsson, Tore

    2008-05-01

    The RNA molecules of the spliceosome are critical for specificity and catalysis during splicing of eukaryotic pre-mRNA. In order to examine the evolution and phylogenetic distribution of these RNAs, we analyzed 149 eukaryotic genomes representing a broad range of phylogenetic groups. RNAs were predicted using high-sensitivity local alignment methods and profile HMMs in combination with covariance models. The results provide the most comprehensive view so far of the phylogenetic distribution of spliceosomal RNAs. RNAs were predicted in many phylogenetic groups where these RNA were not previously reported. Examples are RNAs of the major (U2-type) spliceosome in all fungal lineages, in lower metazoa and many protozoa. We also identified the minor (U12-type) spliceosomal U11 and U6atac RNAs in Acanthamoeba castellanii, where U12 spliceosomal RNA as well as minor introns were reported recently. In addition, minor-spliceosome-specific RNAs were identified in a number of phylogenetic groups where previously such RNAs were not observed, including the nematode Trichinella spiralis, the slime mold Physarum polycephalum and the fungal lineages Zygomycota and Chytridiomycota. The detailed map of the distribution of the U12-type RNA genes supports an early origin of the minor spliceosome and points to a number of occasions during evolution where it was lost.

  3. Computational screen for spliceosomal RNA genes aids in defining the phylogenetic distribution of major and minor spliceosomal components

    PubMed Central

    López, Marcela Dávila; Alm Rosenblad, Magnus; Samuelsson, Tore

    2008-01-01

    The RNA molecules of the spliceosome are critical for specificity and catalysis during splicing of eukaryotic pre-mRNA. In order to examine the evolution and phylogenetic distribution of these RNAs, we analyzed 149 eukaryotic genomes representing a broad range of phylogenetic groups. RNAs were predicted using high-sensitivity local alignment methods and profile HMMs in combination with covariance models. The results provide the most comprehensive view so far of the phylogenetic distribution of spliceosomal RNAs. RNAs were predicted in many phylogenetic groups where these RNA were not previously reported. Examples are RNAs of the major (U2-type) spliceosome in all fungal lineages, in lower metazoa and many protozoa. We also identified the minor (U12-type) spliceosomal U11 and U6atac RNAs in Acanthamoeba castellanii, where U12 spliceosomal RNA as well as minor introns were reported recently. In addition, minor-spliceosome-specific RNAs were identified in a number of phylogenetic groups where previously such RNAs were not observed, including the nematode Trichinella spiralis, the slime mold Physarum polycephalum and the fungal lineages Zygomycota and Chytridiomycota. The detailed map of the distribution of the U12-type RNA genes supports an early origin of the minor spliceosome and points to a number of occasions during evolution where it was lost. PMID:18390578

  4. Phosphorylation of spliceosomal protein SAP 155 coupled with splicing catalysis

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Changyu; Chua, Katrin; Seghezzi, Wolfgang; Lees, Emma; Gozani, Or; Reed, Robin

    1998-01-01

    The U2 snRNP component SAP 155 contacts pre-mRNA on both sides of the branch site early in spliceosome assembly and is therefore positioned near or at the spliceosome catalytic center. We have isolated a cDNA encoding human SAP 155 and identified its highly related Saccharomyces cerevisiae homolog (50% identity). The carboxy-terminal two-thirds of SAP 155 shows the highest conservation and is remarkably similar to the regulatory subunit A of the phosphatase PP2A. Significantly, SAP 155 is phosphorylated concomitant with or just after catalytic step one, making this the first example of a protein modification tightly regulated with splicing catalysis. PMID:9585501

  5. Structure and function of an RNase H domain at the heart of the spliceosome

    PubMed Central

    Pena, Vladimir; Rozov, Alexey; Fabrizio, Patrizia; Lührmann, Reinhard; Wahl, Markus C

    2008-01-01

    Precursor-messenger RNA (pre-mRNA) splicing encompasses two sequential transesterification reactions in distinct active sites of the spliceosome that are transiently established by the interplay of small nuclear (sn) RNAs and spliceosomal proteins. Protein Prp8 is an active site component but the molecular mechanisms, by which it might facilitate splicing catalysis, are unknown. We have determined crystal structures of corresponding portions of yeast and human Prp8 that interact with functional regions of the pre-mRNA, revealing a phylogenetically conserved RNase H fold, augmented by Prp8-specific elements. Comparisons to RNase H–substrate complexes suggested how an RNA encompassing a 5′-splice site (SS) could bind relative to Prp8 residues, which on mutation, suppress splice defects in pre-mRNAs and snRNAs. A truncated RNase H-like active centre lies next to a known contact region of the 5′SS and directed mutagenesis confirmed that this centre is a functional hotspot. These data suggest that Prp8 employs an RNase H domain to help assemble and stabilize the spliceosomal catalytic core, coordinate the activities of other splicing factors and possibly participate in chemical catalysis of splicing. PMID:18843295

  6. A noncanonical PWI domain in the N-terminal helicase-associated region of the spliceosomal Brr2 protein.

    PubMed

    Absmeier, Eva; Rosenberger, Leonie; Apelt, Luise; Becke, Christian; Santos, Karine F; Stelzl, Ulrich; Wahl, Markus C

    2015-04-01

    The spliceosomal RNA helicase Brr2 is required for the assembly of a catalytically active spliceosome on a messenger RNA precursor. Brr2 exhibits an unusual organization with tandem helicase units, each comprising dual RecA-like domains and a Sec63 homology unit, preceded by a more than 400-residue N-terminal helicase-associated region. Whereas recent crystal structures have provided insights into the molecular architecture and regulation of the Brr2 helicase region, little is known about the structural organization and function of its N-terminal part. Here, a near-atomic resolution crystal structure of a PWI-like domain that resides in the N-terminal region of Chaetomium thermophilum Brr2 is presented. CD spectroscopic studies suggested that this domain is conserved in the yeast and human Brr2 orthologues. Although canonical PWI domains act as low-specificity nucleic acid-binding domains, no significant affinity of the unusual PWI domain of Brr2 for a broad spectrum of DNAs and RNAs was detected in band-shift assays. Consistently, the C. thermophilum Brr2 PWI-like domain, in the conformation seen in the present crystal structure, lacks an expanded positively charged surface patch as observed in at least one canonical, nucleic acid-binding PWI domain. Instead, in a comprehensive yeast two-hybrid screen against human spliceosomal proteins, fragments of the N-terminal region of human Brr2 were found to interact with several other spliceosomal proteins. At least one of these interactions, with the Prp19 complex protein SPF27, depended on the presence of the PWI-like domain. The results suggest that the N-terminal region of Brr2 serves as a versatile protein-protein interaction platform in the spliceosome and that some interactions require or are reinforced by the PWI-like domain.

  7. Saccharomyces cerevisiae U1 small nuclear RNA secondary structure contains both universal and yeast-specific domains.

    PubMed Central

    Kretzner, L; Krol, A; Rosbash, M

    1990-01-01

    The five small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) involved in mammalian pre-mRNA splicing (U1, U2, U4, U5, and U6) are well conserved in length, sequence, and especially secondary structure. These five snRNAs from Saccharomyces cerevisiae show notable size and sequence differences from their metazoan counterparts. This is most striking for the large S. cerevisiae U1 and U2 snRNAs, for which no secondary structure models currently exist. Because of the importance of U1 snRNA in the early steps of "spliceosome" assembly, we wanted to compare the highly conserved secondary structure of metazoan U1 snRNA (approximately 165 nucleotides) with that of S. cerevisiae U1 snRNA (568 nucleotides). To this end, we have cloned and sequenced the U1 gene from two other yeast species possessing large U1 RNAs. Using computer-derived structure predictions, phylogenetic comparisons, and structure probing, we have arrived at a secondary structure model for S. cerevisiae U1 snRNA. The results show that most elements of higher eukaryotic U1 snRNA secondary structure are conserved in S. cerevisiae. The hundreds of "extra" nucleotides of yeast U1 RNA, also highly structured, suggest that large insertions and/or deletions have occurred during the evolution of the U1 gene. Images PMID:2405391

  8. The 65 and 110 kDa SR-related proteins of the U4/U6⋅U5 tri-snRNP are essential for the assembly of mature spliceosomes

    PubMed Central

    Makarova, Olga V.; Makarov, Evgeny M.; Lührmann, Reinhard

    2001-01-01

    The association of the U4/U6⋅U5 tri-snRNP with pre-spliceosomes is a poorly understood step in the spliceosome assembly pathway. We have identified two human tri-snRNP proteins (of 65 and 110 kDa) that play an essential role in this process. Characterization by cDNA cloning of the 65 and 110 kDa proteins revealed that they are likely orthologues of the yeast spliceosomal proteins Sad1p and Snu66p, respectively. Immunodepletion of either protein from the HeLa cell nuclear extracts inhibited pre-mRNA splicing due to a block in the formation of mature spliceosomes, but had no effect on the integrity of the U4/U6⋅U5 tri-snRNP. Spliceosome assembly and splicing catalysis could be restored to the respective depleted extract by the addition of recombinant 65 or 110 kDa protein. Our data demonstrate that both proteins are essential for the recruitment of the tri-snRNP to the pre-spliceosome but not for the maintenance of the tri-snRNP stability. Moreover, since both proteins contain an N-terminal RS domain, they could mediate the association of the tri-snRNP with pre-spliceosomes by interaction with members of the SR protein family. PMID:11350945

  9. Interleukin 1 induces expression of the human immunodeficiency virus alone and in synergy with interleukin 6 in chronically infected U1 cells: inhibition of inductive effects by the interleukin 1 receptor antagonist.

    PubMed Central

    Poli, G; Kinter, A L; Fauci, A S

    1994-01-01

    In the present study we have observed that interleukin (IL) 1 alpha or IL-1 beta directly induced expression of human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) in the latently infected human promonocytic cell line U1. In addition, IL-1 synergized with IL-6, but not with tumor necrosis factor, in the upregulation of virus expression in U1 cells as measured by accumulation of steady-state mRNAs and production of reverse transcriptase activity. The HIV inductive effect of IL-1 was blocked by transforming growth factor beta, anti-IL-1 antibodies, or monoclonal antibodies directed to the type 1, but not to the type 2, cell surface receptor for IL-1; the latter actually caused enhancement of the IL-1-mediated effect. Unlike tumor necrosis factor alpha, IL-1 either alone or in combination with IL-6 did not induce activation of the transcription activating factor NF-kappa B above the constitutive levels of unstimulated U1 cells. Finally, the IL-1 receptor antagonist effectively blocked IL-1-mediated direct and synergistic inductive effects on virus production. Thus, IL-1 may be an important mediator of HIV expression, and blocking of IL-1 expression and/or its effects may have a potential therapeutic role in the inhibition of HIV expression in infected individuals. Images Fig. 2 Fig. 3 PMID:7506410

  10. A bipartite U1 site represses U1A expression by synergizing with PIE to inhibit nuclear polyadenylation.

    PubMed

    Guan, Fei; Caratozzolo, Rose M; Goraczniak, Rafal; Ho, Eric S; Gunderson, Samuel I

    2007-12-01

    U1A protein negatively autoregulates itself by polyadenylation inhibition of its own pre-mRNA by binding as two molecules to a 3'UTR-located Polyadenylation Inhibitory Element (PIE). The (U1A)2-PIE complex specifically blocks U1A mRNA biosynthesis by inhibiting polyA tail addition, leading to lower mRNA levels. U1 snRNP bound to a 5'ss-like sequence, which we call a U1 site, in the 3'UTRs of certain papillomaviruses leads to inhibition of viral late gene expression via a similar mechanism. Although such U1 sites can also be artificially used to potently silence reporter and endogenous genes, no naturally occurring U1 sites have been found in eukaryotic genes. Here we identify a conserved U1 site in the human U1A gene that is, unexpectedly, within a bipartite element where the other part represses the U1 site via a base-pairing mechanism. The bipartite element inhibits U1A expression via a synergistic action with the nearby PIE. Unexpectedly, synergy is not based on stabilizing binding of the inhibitory factors to the 3'UTR, but rather is a property of the larger ternary complex. Inhibition targets the biosynthetic step of polyA tail addition rather than altering mRNA stability. This is the first example of a functional U1 site in a cellular gene and of a single gene containing two dissimilar elements that inhibit nuclear polyadenylation. Parallels with other examples where U1 snRNP inhibits expression are discussed. We expect that other cellular genes will harbor functional U1 sites.

  11. A U1 snRNP-Specific Assembly Pathway Reveals the SMN Complex as a Versatile RNP Exchange

    PubMed Central

    So, Byung Ran; Wan, Lili; Zhang, Zhenxi; Li, Pilong; Babiash, Eric; Duan, Jingqi; Younis, Ihab; Dreyfuss, Gideon

    2016-01-01

    Despite their equal stoichiometry in spliceosomes, U1 snRNP (U1) is typically the most abundant snRNP in vertebrates. What regulates U1 over-abundance and snRNP repertoire in general is unknown. Sm core assembly is a key step in snRNP biogenesis mediated by the SMN complex. All pre-snRNAs are delivered by the snRNA-specific RNA-binding protein (RBP) Gemin5 to join SMN-Gemin2-recruited Sm proteins. Here, we find that the U1-specific RBP U1-70K bridges pre-U1 to SMN-Gemin2-Sm, establishing an additional, Gemin5-independent Sm core assembly pathway. We show that U1-70K hijacks SMN-Gemin2-Sm, enhancing U1’s and inhibiting other snRNAs’ Sm core assembly, thereby promoting U1 over-abundance and regulating snRNP repertoire. Ubiquitous SMN-Gemin2’s surprising ability to facilitate transactions between different RBPs and RNAs explains its puzzling multi-RBP valency and myriad transcriptome perturbations associated with SMN’s deficiency in neurodegenerative spinal muscular atrophy. We propose that SMN-Gemin2 is a versatile RNP exchange that functions broadly in RNA metabolism. PMID:26828962

  12. Cwc21p promotes the second step conformation of the spliceosome and modulates 3′ splice site selection

    PubMed Central

    Gautam, Amit; Grainger, Richard J.; Vilardell, J.; Barrass, J. David; Beggs, Jean D.

    2015-01-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing involves two transesterification steps catalyzed by the spliceosome. How RNA substrates are positioned in each step and the molecular rearrangements involved, remain obscure. Here, we show that mutations in PRP16, PRP8, SNU114 and the U5 snRNA that affect this process interact genetically with CWC21, that encodes the yeast orthologue of the human SR protein, SRm300/SRRM2. Our microarray analysis shows changes in 3′ splice site selection at elevated temperature in a subset of introns in cwc21Δ cells. Considering all the available data, we propose a role for Cwc21p positioning the 3′ splice site at the transition to the second step conformation of the spliceosome, mediated through its interactions with the U5 snRNP. This suggests a mechanism whereby SRm300/SRRM2, might influence splice site selection in human cells. PMID:25740649

  13. Origin and evolution of spliceosomal introns.

    PubMed

    Rogozin, Igor B; Carmel, Liran; Csuros, Miklos; Koonin, Eugene V

    2012-04-16

    Evolution of exon-intron structure of eukaryotic genes has been a matter of long-standing, intensive debate. The introns-early concept, later rebranded 'introns first' held that protein-coding genes were interrupted by numerous introns even at the earliest stages of life's evolution and that introns played a major role in the origin of proteins by facilitating recombination of sequences coding for small protein/peptide modules. The introns-late concept held that introns emerged only in eukaryotes and new introns have been accumulating continuously throughout eukaryotic evolution. Analysis of orthologous genes from completely sequenced eukaryotic genomes revealed numerous shared intron positions in orthologous genes from animals and plants and even between animals, plants and protists, suggesting that many ancestral introns have persisted since the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA). Reconstructions of intron gain and loss using the growing collection of genomes of diverse eukaryotes and increasingly advanced probabilistic models convincingly show that the LECA and the ancestors of each eukaryotic supergroup had intron-rich genes, with intron densities comparable to those in the most intron-rich modern genomes such as those of vertebrates. The subsequent evolution in most lineages of eukaryotes involved primarily loss of introns, with only a few episodes of substantial intron gain that might have accompanied major evolutionary innovations such as the origin of metazoa. The original invasion of self-splicing Group II introns, presumably originating from the mitochondrial endosymbiont, into the genome of the emerging eukaryote might have been a key factor of eukaryogenesis that in particular triggered the origin of endomembranes and the nucleus. Conversely, splicing errors gave rise to alternative splicing, a major contribution to the biological complexity of multicellular eukaryotes. There is no indication that any prokaryote has ever possessed a spliceosome or

  14. Origin and evolution of spliceosomal introns

    PubMed Central

    2012-01-01

    Evolution of exon-intron structure of eukaryotic genes has been a matter of long-standing, intensive debate. The introns-early concept, later rebranded ‘introns first’ held that protein-coding genes were interrupted by numerous introns even at the earliest stages of life's evolution and that introns played a major role in the origin of proteins by facilitating recombination of sequences coding for small protein/peptide modules. The introns-late concept held that introns emerged only in eukaryotes and new introns have been accumulating continuously throughout eukaryotic evolution. Analysis of orthologous genes from completely sequenced eukaryotic genomes revealed numerous shared intron positions in orthologous genes from animals and plants and even between animals, plants and protists, suggesting that many ancestral introns have persisted since the last eukaryotic common ancestor (LECA). Reconstructions of intron gain and loss using the growing collection of genomes of diverse eukaryotes and increasingly advanced probabilistic models convincingly show that the LECA and the ancestors of each eukaryotic supergroup had intron-rich genes, with intron densities comparable to those in the most intron-rich modern genomes such as those of vertebrates. The subsequent evolution in most lineages of eukaryotes involved primarily loss of introns, with only a few episodes of substantial intron gain that might have accompanied major evolutionary innovations such as the origin of metazoa. The original invasion of self-splicing Group II introns, presumably originating from the mitochondrial endosymbiont, into the genome of the emerging eukaryote might have been a key factor of eukaryogenesis that in particular triggered the origin of endomembranes and the nucleus. Conversely, splicing errors gave rise to alternative splicing, a major contribution to the biological complexity of multicellular eukaryotes. There is no indication that any prokaryote has ever possessed a spliceosome

  15. Uranus moon - 1985U1

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1986-01-01

    Several craters are seen on the surface of 1985U1, one of several small moons of Uranus discovered by Voyager 2. The spacecraft acquired this single image -- the only close-up it obtained of any of the new moons -- on Jan. 24, 1986. At the time, Voyager was at a distance of about 500,000 kilometers (300,000 miles) from 1985U1, yielding a resolution of about 10 km (6 mi) in this clear-filter, narrow-angle image. The moon was found Dec. 3O, 1985; it was the first and largest of nearly a dozen satellites discovered by the spacecraft cameras. This image shows 1985U1 to be a dark, nearly spherical object, with a diameter of about 150 km (90 mi); the dark surface reflects only 7 percent of the incident light. The picture was inserted into the Voyager encounter sequence late in its development. This image has had a complex history, having been recorded on the spacecraft tape recorder and first played back during the late afternoon of Jan. 24. An antenna-pointing problem at one of the Australian tracking stations led to loss of the data, so the image had to be transmitted a second time. It was successfully received shortly before 6 p.m. PST Jan. 26. The Voyager project is managed for NASA by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory.

  16. U1 snDNA clusters in grasshoppers: chromosomal dynamics and genomic organization

    PubMed Central

    Anjos, A; Ruiz-Ruano, F J; Camacho, J P M; Loreto, V; Cabrero, J; de Souza, M J; Cabral-de-Mello, D C

    2015-01-01

    The spliceosome, constituted by a protein set associated with small nuclear RNA (snRNA), is responsible for mRNA maturation through intron removal. Among snRNA genes, U1 is generally a conserved repetitive sequence. To unveil the chromosomal/genomic dynamics of this multigene family in grasshoppers, we mapped U1 genes by fluorescence in situ hybridization in 70 species belonging to the families Proscopiidae, Pyrgomorphidae, Ommexechidae, Romaleidae and Acrididae. Evident clusters were observed in all species, indicating that, at least, some U1 repeats are tandemly arrayed. High conservation was observed in the first four families, with most species carrying a single U1 cluster, frequently located in the third or fourth longest autosome. By contrast, extensive variation was observed among Acrididae, from a single chromosome pair carrying U1 to all chromosome pairs carrying it, with occasional occurrence of two or more clusters in the same chromosome. DNA sequence analysis in Eyprepocnemis plorans (species carrying U1 clusters on seven different chromosome pairs) and Locusta migratoria (carrying U1 in a single chromosome pair) supported the coexistence of functional and pseudogenic lineages. One of these pseudogenic lineages was truncated in the same nucleotide position in both species, suggesting that it was present in a common ancestor to both species. At least in E. plorans, this U1 snDNA pseudogenic lineage was associated with 5S rDNA and short interspersed elements (SINE)-like mobile elements. Given that we conclude in grasshoppers that the U1 snDNA had evolved under the birth-and-death model and that its intragenomic spread might be related with mobile elements. PMID:25248465

  17. U1 snDNA clusters in grasshoppers: chromosomal dynamics and genomic organization.

    PubMed

    Anjos, A; Ruiz-Ruano, F J; Camacho, J P M; Loreto, V; Cabrero, J; de Souza, M J; Cabral-de-Mello, D C

    2015-02-01

    The spliceosome, constituted by a protein set associated with small nuclear RNA (snRNA), is responsible for mRNA maturation through intron removal. Among snRNA genes, U1 is generally a conserved repetitive sequence. To unveil the chromosomal/genomic dynamics of this multigene family in grasshoppers, we mapped U1 genes by fluorescence in situ hybridization in 70 species belonging to the families Proscopiidae, Pyrgomorphidae, Ommexechidae, Romaleidae and Acrididae. Evident clusters were observed in all species, indicating that, at least, some U1 repeats are tandemly arrayed. High conservation was observed in the first four families, with most species carrying a single U1 cluster, frequently located in the third or fourth longest autosome. By contrast, extensive variation was observed among Acrididae, from a single chromosome pair carrying U1 to all chromosome pairs carrying it, with occasional occurrence of two or more clusters in the same chromosome. DNA sequence analysis in Eyprepocnemis plorans (species carrying U1 clusters on seven different chromosome pairs) and Locusta migratoria (carrying U1 in a single chromosome pair) supported the coexistence of functional and pseudogenic lineages. One of these pseudogenic lineages was truncated in the same nucleotide position in both species, suggesting that it was present in a common ancestor to both species. At least in E. plorans, this U1 snDNA pseudogenic lineage was associated with 5S rDNA and short interspersed elements (SINE)-like mobile elements. Given that we conclude in grasshoppers that the U1 snDNA had evolved under the birth-and-death model and that its intragenomic spread might be related with mobile elements.

  18. Organellar maturases: A window into the evolution of the spliceosome.

    PubMed

    Schmitz-Linneweber, Christian; Lampe, Marie-Kristin; Sultan, Laure D; Ostersetzer-Biran, Oren

    2015-09-01

    During the evolution of eukaryotic genomes, many genes have been interrupted by intervening sequences (introns) that must be removed post-transcriptionally from RNA precursors to form mRNAs ready for translation. The origin of nuclear introns is still under debate, but one hypothesis is that the spliceosome and the intron-exon structure of genes have evolved from bacterial-type group II introns that invaded the eukaryotic genomes. The group II introns were most likely introduced into the eukaryotic genome from an α-proteobacterial predecessor of mitochondria early during the endosymbiosis event. These self-splicing and mobile introns spread through the eukaryotic genome and later degenerated. Pieces of introns became part of the general splicing machinery we know today as the spliceosome. In addition, group II introns likely brought intron maturases with them to the nucleus. Maturases are found in most bacterial introns, where they act as highly specific splicing factors for group II introns. In the spliceosome, the core protein Prp8 shows homology to group II intron-encoded maturases. While maturases are entirely intron specific, their descendant of the spliceosomal machinery, the Prp8 protein, is an extremely versatile splicing factor with multiple interacting proteins and RNAs. How could such a general player in spliceosomal splicing evolve from the monospecific bacterial maturases? Analysis of the organellar splicing machinery in plants may give clues on the evolution of nuclear splicing. Plants encode various proteins which are closely related to bacterial maturases. The organellar genomes contain one maturase each, named MatK in chloroplasts and MatR in mitochondria. In addition, several maturase genes have been found in the nucleus as well, which are acting on mitochondrial pre-RNAs. All plant maturases show sequence deviation from their progenitor bacterial maturases, and interestingly are all acting on multiple organellar group II intron targets. Moreover

  19. Splicing Functions and Global Dependency on Fission Yeast Slu7 Reveal Diversity in Spliceosome Assembly

    PubMed Central

    Banerjee, Shataparna; Khandelia, Piyush; Melangath, Geetha; Bashir, Samirul; Nagampalli, Vijaykrishna

    2013-01-01

    The multiple short introns in Schizosaccharomyces pombe genes with degenerate cis sequences and atypically positioned polypyrimidine tracts make an interesting model to investigate canonical and alternative roles for conserved splicing factors. Here we report functions and interactions of the S. pombe slu7+ (spslu7+) gene product, known from Saccharomyces cerevisiae and human in vitro reactions to assemble into spliceosomes after the first catalytic reaction and to dictate 3′ splice site choice during the second reaction. By using a missense mutant of this essential S. pombe factor, we detected a range of global splicing derangements that were validated in assays for the splicing status of diverse candidate introns. We ascribe widespread, intron-specific SpSlu7 functions and have deduced several features, including the branch nucleotide-to-3′ splice site distance, intron length, and the impact of its A/U content at the 5′ end on the intron's dependence on SpSlu7. The data imply dynamic substrate-splicing factor relationships in multiintron transcripts. Interestingly, the unexpected early splicing arrest in spslu7-2 revealed a role before catalysis. We detected a salt-stable association with U5 snRNP and observed genetic interactions with spprp1+, a homolog of human U5-102k factor. These observations together point to an altered recruitment and dependence on SpSlu7, suggesting its role in facilitating transitions that promote catalysis, and highlight the diversity in spliceosome assembly. PMID:23754748

  20. Evolutionarily divergent spliceosomal snRNAs and a conserved non-coding RNA processing motif in Giardia lamblia

    PubMed Central

    Hudson, Andrew J.; Moore, Ashley N.; Elniski, David; Joseph, Joella; Yee, Janet; Russell, Anthony G.

    2012-01-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) have diverse essential biological functions in all organisms, and in eukaryotes, two such classes of ncRNAs are the small nucleolar (sno) and small nuclear (sn) RNAs. In this study, we have identified and characterized a collection of sno and snRNAs in Giardia lamblia, by exploiting our discovery of a conserved 12 nt RNA processing sequence motif found in the 3′ end regions of a large number of G. lamblia ncRNA genes. RNA end mapping and other experiments indicate the motif serves to mediate ncRNA 3′ end formation from mono- and di-cistronic RNA precursor transcripts. Remarkably, we find the motif is also utilized in the processing pathway of all four previously identified trans-spliced G. lamblia introns, revealing a common RNA processing pathway for ncRNAs and trans-spliced introns in this organism. Motif sequence conservation then allowed for the bioinformatic and experimental identification of additional G. lamblia ncRNAs, including new U1 and U6 spliceosomal snRNA candidates. The U6 snRNA candidate was then used as a tool to identity novel U2 and U4 snRNAs, based on predicted phylogenetically conserved snRNA–snRNA base-pairing interactions, from a set of previously identified G. lamblia ncRNAs without assigned function. The Giardia snRNAs retain the core features of spliceosomal snRNAs but are sufficiently evolutionarily divergent to explain the difficulties in their identification. Most intriguingly, all of these snRNAs show structural features diagnostic of U2-dependent/major and U12-dependent/minor spliceosomal snRNAs. PMID:23019220

  1. Evolutionarily divergent spliceosomal snRNAs and a conserved non-coding RNA processing motif in Giardia lamblia.

    PubMed

    Hudson, Andrew J; Moore, Ashley N; Elniski, David; Joseph, Joella; Yee, Janet; Russell, Anthony G

    2012-11-01

    Non-coding RNAs (ncRNAs) have diverse essential biological functions in all organisms, and in eukaryotes, two such classes of ncRNAs are the small nucleolar (sno) and small nuclear (sn) RNAs. In this study, we have identified and characterized a collection of sno and snRNAs in Giardia lamblia, by exploiting our discovery of a conserved 12 nt RNA processing sequence motif found in the 3' end regions of a large number of G. lamblia ncRNA genes. RNA end mapping and other experiments indicate the motif serves to mediate ncRNA 3' end formation from mono- and di-cistronic RNA precursor transcripts. Remarkably, we find the motif is also utilized in the processing pathway of all four previously identified trans-spliced G. lamblia introns, revealing a common RNA processing pathway for ncRNAs and trans-spliced introns in this organism. Motif sequence conservation then allowed for the bioinformatic and experimental identification of additional G. lamblia ncRNAs, including new U1 and U6 spliceosomal snRNA candidates. The U6 snRNA candidate was then used as a tool to identity novel U2 and U4 snRNAs, based on predicted phylogenetically conserved snRNA-snRNA base-pairing interactions, from a set of previously identified G. lamblia ncRNAs without assigned function. The Giardia snRNAs retain the core features of spliceosomal snRNAs but are sufficiently evolutionarily divergent to explain the difficulties in their identification. Most intriguingly, all of these snRNAs show structural features diagnostic of U2-dependent/major and U12-dependent/minor spliceosomal snRNAs.

  2. A unique spatial arrangement of the snRNPs within the native spliceosome emerges from in silico studies.

    PubMed

    Frankenstein, Ziv; Sperling, Joseph; Sperling, Ruth; Eisenstein, Miriam

    2012-06-06

    The spliceosome is a mega-Dalton ribonucleoprotein (RNP) assembly that processes primary RNA transcripts, producing functional mRNA. The electron microscopy structures of the native spliceosome and of several spliceosomal subcomplexes are available; however, the spatial arrangement of the latter within the native spliceosome is not known. We designed a computational procedure to efficiently fit thousands of conformers into the spliceosome envelope. Despite the low resolution limitations, we obtained only one model that complies with the available biochemical data. Our model localizes the five small nuclear RNPs (snRNPs) mostly within the large subunit of the native spliceosome, requiring only minor conformation changes. The remaining free volume presumably accommodates additional spliceosomal components. The constituents of the active core of the spliceosome are juxtaposed, forming a continuous surface deep within the large spliceosomal cavity, which provides a sheltered environment for the splicing reaction. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  3. A Unique Spatial Arrangement of the snRNPs within the Native Spliceosome Emerges from In-Silico Studies

    PubMed Central

    Frankenstein, Ziv; Sperling, Joseph; Sperling, Ruth; Eisenstein, Miriam

    2012-01-01

    Summary The spliceosome is a mega-Dalton ribonucleoprotein (RNP) assembly that processes primary RNA transcripts, producing functional mRNA. The electron microscopy structures of the native spliceosome and of several spliceosomal subcomplexes are available but the spatial arrangement of the latter within the native spliceosome is not known. We designed a new computational procedure to efficiently fit thousands of conformers into the spliceosome envelope. Despite the low resolution limitations, we obtained only one model that complies with the available biochemical data. Our model localizes the five small nuclear RNPs (snRNPs) mostly within the large subunit of the native spliceosome, requiring only minor conformation changes. The remaining free volume presumably accommodates additional spliceosomal components. The constituents of the active core of the spliceosome are juxtaposed, forming a continuous surface deep within the large spliceosomal cavity, which provides a sheltered environment for the splicing reaction. PMID:22578543

  4. Systematic genome-wide annotation of spliceosomal proteins reveals differential gene family expansion

    PubMed Central

    Barbosa-Morais, Nuno L.; Carmo-Fonseca, Maria; Aparício, Samuel

    2006-01-01

    Although more than 200 human spliceosomal and splicing-associated proteins are known, the evolution of the splicing machinery has not been studied extensively. The recent near-complete sequencing and annotation of distant vertebrate and chordate genomes provides the opportunity for an exhaustive comparative analysis of splicing factors across eukaryotes. We describe here our semiautomated computational pipeline to identify and annotate splicing factors in representative species of eukaryotes. We focused on protein families whose role in splicing is confirmed by experimental evidence. We visually inspected 1894 proteins and manually curated 224 of them. Our analysis shows a general conservation of the core spliceosomal proteins across the eukaryotic lineage, contrasting with selective expansions of protein families known to play a role in the regulation of splicing, most notably of SR proteins in metazoans and of heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoproteins (hnRNP) in vertebrates. We also observed vertebrate-specific expansion of the CLK and SRPK kinases (which phosphorylate SR proteins), and the CUG-BP/CELF family of splicing regulators. Furthermore, we report several intronless genes amongst splicing proteins in mammals, suggesting that retrotransposition contributed to the complexity of the mammalian splicing apparatus. PMID:16344558

  5. The role of positively charged amino acids and electrostatic interactions in the complex of U1A protein and U1 hairpin II RNA

    PubMed Central

    Law, Michael J.; Linde, Michael E.; Chambers, Eric J.; Oubridge, Chris; Katsamba, Phinikoula S.; Nilsson, Lennart; Haworth, Ian S.; Laird-Offringa, Ite A.

    2006-01-01

    Previous kinetic investigations of the N-terminal RNA recognition motif (RRM) domain of spliceosomal protein U1A, interacting with its RNA target U1 hairpin II, provided experimental evidence for a ‘lure and lock’ model of binding in which electrostatic interactions first guide the RNA to the protein, and close range interactions then lock the two molecules together. To further investigate the ‘lure’ step, here we examined the electrostatic roles of two sets of positively charged amino acids in U1A that do not make hydrogen bonds to the RNA: Lys20, Lys22 and Lys23 close to the RNA-binding site, and Arg7, Lys60 and Arg70, located on ‘top’ of the RRM domain, away from the RNA. Surface plasmon resonance-based kinetic studies, supplemented with salt dependence experiments and molecular dynamics simulation, indicate that Lys20 predominantly plays a role in association, while nearby residues Lys22 and Lys23 appear to be at least as important for complex stability. In contrast, kinetic analyses of residues away from the RNA indicate that they have a minimal effect on association and stability. Thus, well-positioned positively charged residues can be important for both initial complex formation and complex maintenance, illustrating the multiple roles of electrostatic interactions in protein–RNA complexes. PMID:16407334

  6. Regulation of Prp43-mediated disassembly of spliceosomes by its cofactors Ntr1 and Ntr2

    PubMed Central

    Fourmann, Jean-Baptiste; Tauchert, Marcel J.; Ficner, Ralf

    2017-01-01

    Abstract The DEAH-box NTPase Prp43 disassembles spliceosomes in co-operation with the cofactors Ntr1/Spp382 and Ntr2, forming the NTR complex. How Prp43 is regulated by its cofactors to discard selectively only intron-lariat spliceosomes (ILS) and defective spliceosomes and to prevent disassembly of earlier and properly assembled/wild-type spliceosomes remains unclear. First, we show that Ntr1΄s G-patch motif (Ntr1GP) can be replaced by the GP motif of Pfa1/Sqs1, a Prp43΄s cofactor in ribosome biogenesis, demonstrating that the specific function of Ntr1GP is to activate Prp43 for spliceosome disassembly and not to guide Prp43 to its binding site in the spliceosome. Furthermore, we show that Ntr1΄s C-terminal domain (CTD) plays a safeguarding role by preventing Prp43 from disrupting wild-type spliceosomes other than the ILS. Ntr1 and Ntr2 can also discriminate between wild-type and defective spliceosomes. In both type of spliceosomes, Ntr1-CTD impedes Prp43-mediated disassembly while the Ntr1GP promotes disassembly. Intriguingly, Ntr2 plays a specific role in defective spliceosomes, likely by stabilizing Ntr1 and allowing Prp43 to enter a productive interaction with the GP motif of Ntr1. Our data indicate that Ntr1 and Ntr2 act as ‘doorkeepers’ and suggest that both cofactors inspect the RNP structure of spliceosomal complexes thereby targeting suboptimal spliceosomes for Prp43-mediated disassembly. PMID:27923990

  7. Assembly of ribosomes and spliceosomes: complex ribonucleoprotein machines

    PubMed Central

    Staley, Jonathan P; Woolford, John L

    2009-01-01

    Summary Ribosomes and spliceosomes are ribonucleoprotein nanomachines that catalyze translation of mRNA to synthesize proteins and splicing of introns from pre-mRNAs, respectively. Assembly of ribosomes involves more than 300 proteins and RNAs, and that of spliceosomes over 100 proteins and RNAs. Construction of these enormous ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs) is a dynamic process, in which the nascent RNPs undergo numerous ordered rearrangements of RNA-RNA, RNA-protein, and protein-protein interactions. Here we outline similar principles that have emerged from studies of ribosome and spliceosome assembly. Constituents of both RNPs form subassembly complexes, which can simplify the task of assembly and segregate functions of assembly factors. Reorganization of RNP topology, and proofreading of proper assembly, are catalyzed by protein- or RNA- dependent ATPases or GTPases. Dynamics of intermolecular interactions may be facilitated or regulated by cycles of posttranslational modifications. Despite this repertoire of tools, mistakes occur in RNP assembly or in processing of RNA substrates. Quality control mechanisms recognize and turnover misassembled RNPs and reject improper substrates. PMID:19167202

  8. Structure of a yeast step II catalytically activated spliceosome.

    PubMed

    Yan, Chuangye; Wan, Ruixue; Bai, Rui; Huang, Gaoxingyu; Shi, Yigong

    2017-01-13

    Each cycle of precursor messenger RNA (pre-mRNA) splicing comprises two sequential reactions, first freeing the 5' exon and generating an intron lariat-3' exon and then ligating the two exons and releasing the intron lariat. The second reaction is executed by the step II catalytically activated spliceosome (known as the C* complex). Here, we present the cryo-electron microscopy structure of a C* complex from Saccharomyces cerevisiae at an average resolution of 4.0 angstroms. Compared with the preceding spliceosomal complex (C complex), the lariat junction has been translocated by 15 to 20 angstroms to vacate space for the incoming 3'-exon sequences. The step I splicing factors Cwc25 and Yju2 have been dissociated from the active site. Two catalytic motifs from Prp8 (the 1585 loop and the β finger of the ribonuclease H-like domain), along with the step II splicing factors Prp17 and Prp18 and other surrounding proteins, are poised to assist the second transesterification. These structural features, together with those reported for other spliceosomal complexes, yield a near-complete mechanistic picture on the splicing cycle. Copyright © 2017, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  9. Assembly of ribosomes and spliceosomes: complex ribonucleoprotein machines.

    PubMed

    Staley, Jonathan P; Woolford, John L

    2009-02-01

    Ribosomes and spliceosomes are ribonucleoprotein nanomachines that catalyze translation of mRNA to synthesize proteins and splicing of introns from pre-mRNAs, respectively. Assembly of ribosomes involves more than 300 proteins and RNAs, and that of spliceosomes over 100 proteins and RNAs. Construction of these enormous ribonucleoprotein particles (RNPs) is a dynamic process, in which the nascent RNPs undergo numerous ordered rearrangements of RNA-RNA, RNA-protein, and protein-protein interactions. Here we outline similar principles that have emerged from studies of ribosome and spliceosome assembly. Constituents of both RNPs form subassembly complexes, which can simplify the task of assembly and segregate functions of assembly factors. Reorganization of RNP topology, and proofreading of proper assembly, are catalyzed by protein- or RNA-dependent ATPases or GTPases. Dynamics of intermolecular interactions may be facilitated or regulated by cycles of post-translational modifications. Despite this repertoire of tools, mistakes occur in RNP assembly or in processing of RNA substrates. Quality control mechanisms recognize and turnover misassembled RNPs and reject improper substrates.

  10. The nuclear cap-binding complex interacts with the U4/U6·U5 tri-snRNP and promotes spliceosome assembly in mammalian cells.

    PubMed

    Pabis, Marta; Neufeld, Noa; Steiner, Michaela C; Bojic, Teodora; Shav-Tal, Yaron; Neugebauer, Karla M

    2013-08-01

    The nuclear cap-binding complex (CBC) binds to the 7-methyl guanosine cap present on every RNA polymerase II transcript. CBC has been implicated in many aspects of RNA biogenesis; in addition to roles in miRNA biogenesis, nonsense-mediated decay, 3'-end formation, and snRNA export from the nucleus, CBC promotes pre-mRNA splicing. An unresolved question is how CBC participates in splicing. To investigate CBC's role in splicing, we used mass spectrometry to identify proteins that copurify with mammalian CBC. Numerous components of spliceosomal snRNPs were specifically detected. Among these, three U4/U6·U5 snRNP proteins (hBrr2, hPrp4, and hPrp31) copurified with CBC in an RNA-independent fashion, suggesting that a significant fraction of CBC forms a complex with the U4/U6·U5 snRNP and that the activity of CBC might be associated with snRNP recruitment to pre-mRNA. To test this possibility, CBC was depleted from HeLa cells by RNAi. Chromatin immunoprecipitation and live-cell imaging assays revealed decreased cotranscriptional accumulation of U4/U6·U5 snRNPs on active transcription units, consistent with a requirement for CBC in cotranscriptional spliceosome assembly. Surprisingly, recruitment of U1 and U2 snRNPs was also affected, indicating that RNA-mediated interactions between CBC and snRNPs contribute to splicing. On the other hand, CBC depletion did not impair snRNP biogenesis, ruling out the possibility that decreased snRNP recruitment was due to changes in nuclear snRNP concentration. Taken together, the data support a model whereby CBC promotes pre-mRNA splicing through a network of interactions with and among spliceosomal snRNPs during cotranscriptional spliceosome assembly.

  11. The G-patch protein Spp2 couples the spliceosome-stimulated ATPase activity of the DEAH-box protein Prp2 to catalytic activation of the spliceosome

    PubMed Central

    Warkocki, Zbigniew; Schneider, Cornelius; Mozaffari-Jovin, Sina; Schmitzová, Jana; Höbartner, Claudia

    2015-01-01

    Structural rearrangement of the activated spliceosome (Bact) to yield a catalytically active complex (B*) is mediated by the DEAH-box NTPase Prp2 in cooperation with the G-patch protein Spp2. However, how the energy of ATP hydrolysis by Prp2 is coupled to mechanical work and what role Spp2 plays in this process are unclear. Using a purified splicing system, we demonstrate that Spp2 is not required to recruit Prp2 to its bona fide binding site in the Bact spliceosome. In the absence of Spp2, the Bact spliceosome efficiently triggers Prp2’s NTPase activity, but NTP hydrolysis is not coupled to ribonucleoprotein (RNP) rearrangements leading to catalytic activation of the spliceosome. Transformation of the Bact to the B* spliceosome occurs only when Spp2 is present and is accompanied by dissociation of Prp2 and a reduction in its NTPase activity. In the absence of spliceosomes, Spp2 enhances Prp2’s RNA-dependent ATPase activity without affecting its RNA affinity. Our data suggest that Spp2 plays a major role in coupling Prp2’s ATPase activity to remodeling of the spliceosome into a catalytically active machine. PMID:25561498

  12. Plant-specific SR-related protein atSR45a interacts with spliceosomal proteins in plant nucleus.

    PubMed

    Tanabe, Noriaki; Kimura, Ayako; Yoshimura, Kazuya; Shigeoka, Shigeru

    2009-06-01

    Serine/arginine-rich (SR) protein and its homologues (SR-related proteins) are important regulators of constitutive and/or alternative splicing and other aspects of mRNA metabolism. To clarify the contribution of a plant-specific and stress-responsive SR-related protein, atSR45a, to splicing events, here we analyzed the interaction of atSR45a with the other splicing factors by conducting a yeast two-hybrid assay and a bimolecular fluorescence complementation analysis. The atSR45a-1a and -2 proteins, the presumed mature forms produced by alternative splicing of atSR45a, interacted with U1-70K and U2AF(35)b, splicing factors for the initial definition of 5' and 3' splice sites, respectively, in the early stage of spliceosome assembly. Both proteins also interacted with themselves, other SR proteins (atSR45 and atSCL28), and PRP38-like protein, a homologue of the splicing factor essential for cleavage of the 5' splice site. The mapping of deletion mutants of atSR45a proteins revealed that the C-terminal arginine/serine-rich (RS) domain of atSR45a proteins are required for the interaction with U1-70K, U2AF(35)b, atSR45, atSCL28, PRP38-like protein, and themselves, and the N-terminal RS domain enhances the interaction efficiency. Interestingly, the distinctive N-terminal extension in atSR45a-1a protein, but not atSR45a-2 protein, inhibited the interaction with these splicing factors. These findings suggest that the atSR45a proteins help to form the bridge between 5' and 3' splice sites in the spliceosome assembly and the efficiency of spliceosome formation is affected by the expression ratio of atSR45a-1a and atSR45a-2.

  13. RPL30 regulation of splicing reveals distinct roles for Cbp80 in U1 and U2 snRNP cotranscriptional recruitment.

    PubMed

    Bragulat, Mireia; Meyer, Markus; Macías, Sara; Camats, Maria; Labrador, Mireia; Vilardell, Josep

    2010-10-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing is catalyzed by the spliceosome, and its control is essential for correct gene expression. While splicing repressors typically interfere with transcript recognition by spliceosomal components, the yeast protein L30 blocks spliceosomal rearrangements required for the engagement of U2 snRNP (small ribonucleoprotein particle) to its own transcript RPL30. Using a mutation in the RPL30 binding site that disrupts this repression, we have taken a genetic approach to reveal that regulation of splicing is restored in this mutant by deletion of the cap-binding complex (CBC) component Cbp80. Indeed, our data indicate that Cbp80 plays distinct roles in the recognition of the intron by U1 and U2 snRNP. It promotes the initial 5' splice site recognition by U1 and, independently, facilitates U2 recruitment, depending on sequences located in the vicinity of the 5' splice site. These results reveal a novel function for CBC in splicing and imply that these molecular events can be the target of a splicing regulator.

  14. Spliceosomal snRNAs: Mg(2+)-dependent chemistry at the catalytic core?

    PubMed

    Villa, Tommaso; Pleiss, Jeffrey A; Guthrie, Christine

    2002-04-19

    Since the discovery of self-splicing RNAs, it has been suspected that the snRNAs are the catalytic components of the spliceosome. Recent evidence supports both the catalytic potential of the spliceosomal snRNAs and their resemblance to elements of group II introns.

  15. Link of NTR-Mediated Spliceosome Disassembly with DEAH-Box ATPases Prp2, Prp16, and Prp22

    PubMed Central

    Chen, Hsin-Chou; Tseng, Chi-Kang; Tsai, Rong-Tzong; Chung, Che-Sheng

    2013-01-01

    The DEAH-box ATPase Prp43 is required for disassembly of the spliceosome after the completion of splicing or after the discard of the spliceosome due to a splicing defect. Prp43 associates with Ntr1 and Ntr2 to form the NTR complex and is recruited to the spliceosome via the interaction of Ntr2 and U5 component Brr2. Ntr2 alone can bind to U5 and to the spliceosome. To understand how NTR might mediate the disassembly of spliceosome intermediates, we arrested the spliceosome at various stages of the assembly pathway and assessed its susceptibility to disassembly. We found that NTR could catalyze the disassembly of affinity-purified spliceosomes arrested specifically after the ATP-dependent action of DEAH-box ATPase Prp2, Prp16, or Prp22 but not at steps before the action of these ATPases or upon their binding to the spliceosome. These results link spliceosome disassembly to the functioning of splicing ATPases. Analysis of the binding of Ntr2 to each splicing complex has revealed that the presence of Prp16 and Slu7, which also interact with Brr2, has a negative impact on Ntr2 binding. Our study provides insights into the mechanism by which NTR can be recruited to the spliceosome to mediate the disassembly of spliceosome intermediates when the spliceosome pathway is retarded, while disassembly is prevented in normal reactions. PMID:23166295

  16. Evolutionary dynamics of U12-type spliceosomal introns

    PubMed Central

    2010-01-01

    Background Many multicellular eukaryotes have two types of spliceosomes for the removal of introns from messenger RNA precursors. The major (U2) spliceosome processes the vast majority of introns, referred to as U2-type introns, while the minor (U12) spliceosome removes a small fraction (less than 0.5%) of introns, referred to as U12-type introns. U12-type introns have distinct sequence elements and usually occur together in genes with U2-type introns. A phylogenetic distribution of U12-type introns shows that the minor splicing pathway appeared very early in eukaryotic evolution and has been lost repeatedly. Results We have investigated the evolution of U12-type introns among eighteen metazoan genomes by analyzing orthologous U12-type intron clusters. Examination of gain, loss, and type switching shows that intron type is remarkably conserved among vertebrates. Among 180 intron clusters, only eight show intron loss in any vertebrate species and only five show conversion between the U12 and the U2-type. Although there are only nineteen U12-type introns in Drosophila melanogaster, we found one case of U2 to U12-type conversion, apparently mediated by the activation of cryptic U12 splice sites early in the dipteran lineage. Overall, loss of U12-type introns is more common than conversion to U2-type and the U12 to U2 conversion occurs more frequently among introns of the GT-AG subtype than among introns of the AT-AC subtype. We also found support for natural U12-type introns with non-canonical terminal dinucleotides (CT-AC, GG-AG, and GA-AG) that have not been previously reported. Conclusions Although complete loss of the U12-type spliceosome has occurred repeatedly, U12 introns are extremely stable in some taxa, including eutheria. Loss of U12 introns or the genes containing them is more common than conversion to the U2-type. The degeneracy of U12-type terminal dinucleotides among natural U12-type introns is higher than previously thought. PMID:20163699

  17. Mass spectrometry–based relative quantification of proteins in precatalytic and catalytically active spliceosomes by metabolic labeling (SILAC), chemical labeling (iTRAQ), and label-free spectral count

    PubMed Central

    Schmidt, Carla; Grønborg, Mads; Deckert, Jochen; Bessonov, Sergey; Conrad, Thomas; Lührmann, Reinhard; Urlaub, Henning

    2014-01-01

    The spliceosome undergoes major changes in protein and RNA composition during pre-mRNA splicing. Knowing the proteins—and their respective quantities—at each spliceosomal assembly stage is critical for understanding the molecular mechanisms and regulation of splicing. Here, we applied three independent mass spectrometry (MS)–based approaches for quantification of these proteins: (1) metabolic labeling by SILAC, (2) chemical labeling by iTRAQ, and (3) label-free spectral count for quantification of the protein composition of the human spliceosomal precatalytic B and catalytic C complexes. In total we were able to quantify 157 proteins by at least two of the three approaches. Our quantification shows that only a very small subset of spliceosomal proteins (the U5 and U2 Sm proteins, a subset of U5 snRNP-specific proteins, and the U2 snRNP-specific proteins U2A′ and U2B′′) remains unaltered upon transition from the B to the C complex. The MS-based quantification approaches classify the majority of proteins as dynamically associated specifically with the B or the C complex. In terms of experimental procedure and the methodical aspect of this work, we show that metabolically labeled spliceosomes are functionally active in terms of their assembly and splicing kinetics and can be utilized for quantitative studies. Moreover, we obtain consistent quantification results from all three methods, including the relatively straightforward and inexpensive label-free spectral count technique. PMID:24448447

  18. Phase distribution of spliceosomal introns: implications for intron origin.

    PubMed

    Nguyen, Hung D; Yoshihama, Maki; Kenmochi, Naoya

    2006-09-08

    The origin of spliceosomal introns is the central subject of the introns-early versus introns-late debate. The distribution of intron phases is non-uniform, with an excess of phase-0 introns. Introns-early explains this by speculating that a fraction of present-day introns were present between minigenes in the progenote and therefore must lie in phase-0. In contrast, introns-late predicts that the nonuniformity of intron phase distribution reflects the nonrandomness of intron insertions. In this paper, we tested the two theories using analyses of intron phase distribution. We inferred the evolution of intron phase distribution from a dataset of 684 gene orthologs from seven eukaryotes using a maximum likelihood method. We also tested whether the observed intron phase distributions from 10 eukaryotes can be explained by intron insertions on a genome-wide scale. In contrast to the prediction of introns-early, the inferred evolution of intron phase distribution showed that the proportion of phase-0 introns increased over evolution. Consistent with introns-late, the observed intron phase distributions matched those predicted by an intron insertion model quite well. Our results strongly support the introns-late hypothesis of the origin of spliceosomal introns.

  19. Monoclonal antibody specific to a subclass of polyproline-Arg motif provides evidence for the presence of an snRNA-free spliceosomal Sm protein complex in vivo: implications for molecular interactions involving proline-rich sequences of Sm B/B' proteins.

    PubMed

    Filali, M; Qiu, J; Awasthi, S; Fischer, U; Monos, D; Kamoun, M

    1999-08-01

    The human spliceosomal Sm B/B' proteins are essential for the biogenesis of the snRNP particles. B/B' proteins contain several clusters of the PPPPGM/IR sequence, which occurs within the C-terminus of Sm B/B'. This sequence is very similar to the PPPPPGHR sequence of the cytoplasmic tail of the CD2 receptor and closely resembles the class II of SH3 ligands, suggesting a similarly important role. We report that a monoclonal antibody (3E10) against the PPPPPGHR sequence recognizes spliceosomal Sm B/B' proteins. Proteins that are specifically immunoprecipitated by 3E10 include Sm B, B', D1, D2, D3, E, F, and G. However, unlike Y12 and other anti-Sm immunoprecipitates, 3E10 immunoprecipitates appear to lack the U1 snRNP-specific proteins A and C and U snRNAs. These findings indicate that 3E10 recognizes a subset of Sm protein core and suggest the presence of snRNA-free Sm protein complex(es) in vivo. We propose that the epitope binding for 3E10 may become unaccessible upon interactions of Sm proteins and their subsequent incorporation into the core particles. The Sm proline-rich sequences may have an important role in mediating protein-protein interactions necessary for the proper snRNP core assembly or function, or both. To our knowledge, 3E10 is the first well characterized mAb specific for a subclass of polyproline-arg motif recognizing Sm B/B' and CD2 proteins. 3E10 antibody can be used to further characterize the nature of protein components in the snRNA-free Sm subcore protein complex(es) that are formed during the snRNP core assembly steps.

  20. Anomaly-free version of SU(2)U(1)U(1)/sup '/

    SciTech Connect

    Ponce, W.A.

    1987-08-01

    The most general anomaly-free version of the SU(2) x U(1) x U(1)' local gauge-invariant model is presented here, for two different Higgs structures (the minimal ones), as an extension of the SU(2) x U(1) Glashow-Weinberg-Salam model.

  1. Origin of a peculiar extra U(1)

    SciTech Connect

    Barr, S.M.; Dorsner, I.

    2005-07-01

    The origin of a family-independent ''extra U(1)'', discovered by Barr, Bednarz, and Benesh and independently by Ma, and whose phenomenology has recently been studied by Ma and Roy, is discussed. Even though it satisfies anomaly constraints in a highly economical way, with just a single extra triplet of leptons per family, this extra U(1) cannot come from four-dimensional grand unification. However, it is shown here that it can come from a Pati-Salam scheme with an extra U(1), which explains the otherwise surprising cancellation of anomalies.

  2. Molecular architecture of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae activated spliceosome.

    PubMed

    Rauhut, Reinhard; Fabrizio, Patrizia; Dybkov, Olexandr; Hartmuth, Klaus; Pena, Vladimir; Chari, Ashwin; Kumar, Vinay; Lee, Chung-Tien; Urlaub, Henning; Kastner, Berthold; Stark, Holger; Lührmann, Reinhard

    2016-09-23

    The activated spliceosome (B(act)) is in a catalytically inactive state and is remodeled into a catalytically active machine by the RNA helicase Prp2, but the mechanism is unclear. Here, we describe a 3D electron cryomicroscopy structure of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae B(act) complex at 5.8-angstrom resolution. Our model reveals that in B(act), the catalytic U2/U6 RNA-Prp8 ribonucleoprotein core is already established, and the 5' splice site (ss) is oriented for step 1 catalysis but occluded by protein. The first-step nucleophile-the branchsite adenosine-is sequestered within the Hsh155 HEAT domain and is held 50 angstroms away from the 5'ss. Our structure suggests that Prp2 adenosine triphosphatase-mediated remodeling leads to conformational changes in Hsh155's HEAT domain that liberate the first-step reactants for catalysis.

  3. Functional splicing network reveals extensive regulatory potential of the core spliceosomal machinery.

    PubMed

    Papasaikas, Panagiotis; Tejedor, J Ramón; Vigevani, Luisa; Valcárcel, Juan

    2015-01-08

    Pre-mRNA splicing relies on the poorly understood dynamic interplay between >150 protein components of the spliceosome. The steps at which splicing can be regulated remain largely unknown. We systematically analyzed the effect of knocking down the components of the splicing machinery on alternative splicing events relevant for cell proliferation and apoptosis and used this information to reconstruct a network of functional interactions. The network accurately captures known physical and functional associations and identifies new ones, revealing remarkable regulatory potential of core spliceosomal components, related to the order and duration of their recruitment during spliceosome assembly. In contrast with standard models of regulation at early steps of splice site recognition, factors involved in catalytic activation of the spliceosome display regulatory properties. The network also sheds light on the antagonism between hnRNP C and U2AF, and on targets of antitumor drugs, and can be widely used to identify mechanisms of splicing regulation.

  4. Prp22 and Spliceosome Components Regulate Chromatin Dynamics in Germ-Line Polyploid Cells

    PubMed Central

    Klusza, Stephen; Novak, Amanda; Figueroa, Shirelle; Palmer, William; Deng, Wu-Min

    2013-01-01

    During Drosophila oogenesis, the endopolyploid nuclei of germ-line nurse cells undergo a dramatic shift in morphology as oogenesis progresses; the easily-visible chromosomes are initially polytenic during the early stages of oogenesis before they transiently condense into a distinct ‘5-blob’ configuration, with subsequent dispersal into a diffuse state. Mutations in many genes, with diverse cellular functions, can affect the ability of nurse cells to fully decondense their chromatin, resulting in a ‘5-blob arrest’ phenotype that is maintained throughout the later stages of oogenesis. However, the mechanisms and significance of nurse-cell (NC) chromatin dispersal remain poorly understood. Here, we report that a screen for modifiers of the 5-blob phenotype in the germ line isolated the spliceosomal gene peanuts, the Drosophila Prp22. We demonstrate that reduction of spliceosomal activity through loss of peanuts promotes decondensation defects in NC nuclei during mid-oogenesis. We also show that the Prp38 spliceosomal protein accumulates in the nucleoplasm of nurse cells with impaired peanuts function, suggesting that spliceosomal recycling is impaired. Finally, we reveal that loss of additional spliceosomal proteins impairs the full decondensation of NC chromatin during later stages of oogenesis, suggesting that individual spliceosomal subcomplexes modulate expression of the distinct subset of genes that are required for correct morphology in endopolyploid nurse cells. PMID:24244416

  5. The spliceosome catalyzes debranching in competition with reverse of the first chemical reaction

    PubMed Central

    Tseng, Chi-Kang; Cheng, Soo-Chen

    2013-01-01

    Splicing of nuclear pre-mRNA occurs via two steps of the transesterification reaction, forming a lariat intermediate and product. The reactions are catalyzed by the spliceosome, a large ribonucleoprotein complex composed of five small nuclear RNAs and numerous protein factors. The spliceosome shares a similar catalytic core structure with that of fungal group II introns, which can self-splice using the same chemical mechanism. Like group II introns, both catalytic steps of pre-mRNA splicing can efficiently reverse on the affinity-purified spliceosome. The spliceosome also catalyzes a hydrolytic spliced-exon reopening reaction as observed in group II introns, indicating a strong link in their evolutionary relationship. We show here that, by arresting splicing after the first catalytic step, the purified spliceosome can catalyze debranching of lariat-intron-exon 2. The debranching reaction, although not observed in group II introns, has similar monovalent cation preferences as those for splicing catalysis of group II introns. The debranching reaction is in competition with the reverse Step 1 reaction influenced by the ionic environment and the structure of components binding near the catalytic center, suggesting that the catalytic center of the spliceosome can switch between different conformations to direct different chemical reactions. PMID:23681507

  6. Modulation of splicing catalysis for therapeutic targeting of leukemias with spliceosomal mutations

    PubMed Central

    Lee, Stanley Chun-Wei; Dvinge, Heidi; Kim, Eunhee; Cho, Hana; Micol, Jean-Baptiste; Chung, Young Rock; Durham, Benjamin H.; Yoshimi, Akihide; Kim, Young Joon; Thomas, Michael; Lobry, Camille; Chen, Chun-Wei; Pastore, Alessandro; Taylor, Justin; Wang, Xujun; Krivtsov, Andrei; Armstrong, Scott A.; Palacino, James; Buonamici, Silvia; Smith, Peter G.; Bradley, Robert K.; Abdel-Wahab, Omar

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in spliceosomal genes are commonly found in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and acute myeloid leukemia (AML)1–3. These mutations occur at highly recurrent amino acid residues and perturb normal splice site and exon recognition4–6. Spliceosomal mutations are always heterozygous and rarely co-occur with one another, suggesting that cells may only tolerate a partial deviation from normal splicing activity. To test this hypothesis, we engineered mice that express the SRSF2P95H mutation, which commonly occurs in MDS and AML, in an inducible hemizygous manner in hematopoietic cells. These mice developed lethal bone marrow failure, demonstrating that Srsf2-mutant cells depend on the wildtype Srsf2 allele for survival. In the context of leukemia, treatment with the spliceosome inhibitor E71077,8 resulted in significant reductions in leukemic burden specifically in isogenic mouse leukemias and patient-derived xenograft (PDX) AMLs carrying spliceosomal mutations. While in vivo E7107 exposure resulted in widespread intron retention and cassette exon skipping regardless of Srsf2 genotype, the magnitude of splicing inhibition following E7107 treatment was greater in Srsf2-mutant versus wildtype leukemias, consistent with its differential effect on survival in these two genotypes. Collectively, these data provide genetic and pharmacologic evidence that leukemias with spliceosomal mutations are preferentially susceptible to additional splicing perturbations in vivo compared with wildtype counterparts. Modulation of spliceosome function may provide a novel therapeutic avenue in genetically defined subsets of MDS and AML patients. PMID:27135740

  7. SKIP Is a Component of the Spliceosome Linking Alternative Splicing and the Circadian Clock in Arabidopsis[W

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Xiaoxue; Wu, Fangming; Xie, Qiguang; Wang, Huamei; Wang, Ying; Yue, Yanling; Gahura, Ondrej; Ma, Shuangshuang; Liu, Lei; Cao, Ying; Jiao, Yuling; Puta, Frantisek; McClung, C. Robertson; Xu, Xiaodong; Ma, Ligeng

    2012-01-01

    Circadian clocks generate endogenous rhythms in most organisms from cyanobacteria to humans and facilitate entrainment to environmental diurnal cycles, thus conferring a fitness advantage. Both transcriptional and posttranslational mechanisms are prominent in the basic network architecture of circadian systems. Posttranscriptional regulation, including mRNA processing, is emerging as a critical step for clock function. However, little is known about the molecular mechanisms linking RNA metabolism to the circadian clock network. Here, we report that a conserved SNW/Ski-interacting protein (SKIP) domain protein, SKIP, a splicing factor and component of the spliceosome, is involved in posttranscriptional regulation of circadian clock genes in Arabidopsis thaliana. Mutation in SKIP lengthens the circadian period in a temperature-sensitive manner and affects light input and the sensitivity of the clock to light resetting. SKIP physically interacts with the spliceosomal splicing factor Ser/Arg-rich protein45 and associates with the pre-mRNA of clock genes, such as PSEUDORESPONSE REGULATOR7 (PRR7) and PRR9, and is necessary for the regulation of their alternative splicing and mRNA maturation. Genome-wide investigations reveal that SKIP functions in regulating alternative splicing of many genes, presumably through modulating recognition or cleavage of 5′ and 3′ splice donor and acceptor sites. Our study addresses a fundamental question on how the mRNA splicing machinery contributes to circadian clock function at a posttranscriptional level. PMID:22942380

  8. PRP16, a DEAH-box RNA helicase, is recruited to the spliceosome primarily via its nonconserved N-terminal domain.

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Y; Guthrie, C

    1998-01-01

    Dynamic rearrangement of RNA structure is crucial for intron recognition and formation of the catalytic core during pre-mRNA splicing. Three of the splicing factors that contain sequence motifs characteristic of the DExD/DExH-box family of RNA-dependent ATPases (Prp16, Prp22, and the human homologue of Brr2) recently have been shown to unwind RNA duplexes in vitro, providing biochemical evidence that they may direct structural rearrangements on the spliceosome. Notably, however, the unwinding activity of these proteins is sequence nonspecific, raising the question of how their functional specificity is determined. Because the highly conserved DExD/DExH-box domain in these proteins is typically flanked by one or more nonconserved domains, we have tested the hypothesis that the nonconserved regions of Prp16 determine the functional specificity of the protein. We found that the nonconserved N-terminal domain of Prp16 is (1) essential for viability, (2) required for the nuclear localization of Prp16, and (3) capable of binding to the spliceosome specifically at the step of Prp16 function. Moreover, this domain can interact with the rest of the protein to allow trans-complementation. Based on these results, we propose that the spliceosomal target of the unwinding activity of Prp16, and possibly other DExD/DExH-box splicing factors as well, is defined by factors that specifically interact with the nonconserved domains of the protein. PMID:9769096

  9. The Spliceosomal Phosphopeptide P140 Controls the Lupus Disease by Interacting with the HSC70 Protein and via a Mechanism Mediated by γδ T Cells

    PubMed Central

    Page, Nicolas; Schall, Nicolas; Strub, Jean-Marc; Quinternet, Marc; Chaloin, Olivier; Décossas, Marion; Cung, Manh Thong; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Briand, Jean-Paul; Muller, Sylviane

    2009-01-01

    The phosphopeptide P140 issued from the spliceosomal U1-70K snRNP protein is recognized by lupus CD4+ T cells, transiently abolishes T cell reactivity to other spliceosomal peptides in P140-treated MRL/lpr mice, and ameliorates their clinical features. P140 modulates lupus patients' T cell response ex vivo and is currently included in phase IIb clinical trials. Its underlying mechanism of action remains elusive. Here we show that P140 peptide binds a unique cell-surface receptor, the constitutively-expressed chaperone HSC70 protein, known as a presenting-protein. P140 induces apoptosis of activated MRL/lpr CD4+ T cells. In P140-treated mice, it increases peripheral blood lymphocyte apoptosis and decreases B cell, activated T cell, and CD4−CD8−B220+ T cell counts via a specific mechanism strictly depending on γδ T cells. Expression of inflammation-linked genes is rapidly regulated in CD4+ T cells. This work led us to identify a powerful pathway taken by a newly-designed therapeutic peptide to immunomodulate lupus autoimmunity. PMID:19390596

  10. The spliceosomal phosphopeptide P140 controls the lupus disease by interacting with the HSC70 protein and via a mechanism mediated by gammadelta T cells.

    PubMed

    Page, Nicolas; Schall, Nicolas; Strub, Jean-Marc; Quinternet, Marc; Chaloin, Olivier; Décossas, Marion; Cung, Manh Thong; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Briand, Jean-Paul; Muller, Sylviane

    2009-01-01

    The phosphopeptide P140 issued from the spliceosomal U1-70K snRNP protein is recognized by lupus CD4(+) T cells, transiently abolishes T cell reactivity to other spliceosomal peptides in P140-treated MRL/lpr mice, and ameliorates their clinical features. P140 modulates lupus patients' T cell response ex vivo and is currently included in phase IIb clinical trials. Its underlying mechanism of action remains elusive. Here we show that P140 peptide binds a unique cell-surface receptor, the constitutively-expressed chaperone HSC70 protein, known as a presenting-protein. P140 induces apoptosis of activated MRL/lpr CD4(+) T cells. In P140-treated mice, it increases peripheral blood lymphocyte apoptosis and decreases B cell, activated T cell, and CD4(-)CD8(-)B220(+) T cell counts via a specific mechanism strictly depending on gammadelta T cells. Expression of inflammation-linked genes is rapidly regulated in CD4(+) T cells. This work led us to identify a powerful pathway taken by a newly-designed therapeutic peptide to immunomodulate lupus autoimmunity.

  11. Vought O3U-1 Corsair

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    Vought O3U-1 Corsair: This aircraft, the Vought O3U-1 Corsair, was the first aircraft tested in the Full Scale Tunnel. It is shown here during preliminary tests in the FST before the balance was enclosed. NACA engineers checked the lift and drag characteristics of several aircraft with the results of earlier flight tests. Smith DeFrance concluded NACA TR No. 459, 'The agreement that has been obtained between the flight and full-scale tunnel results, together with the consistent manner in which measurements can be repeated when check tests are made, has demonstrated the accuracy and value of the equipment for aeronautical research.' (p. 298)

  12. A novel intra-U1 snRNP cross-regulation mechanism: alternative splicing switch links U1C and U1-70K expression.

    PubMed

    Rösel-Hillgärtner, Tanja Dorothe; Hung, Lee-Hsueh; Khrameeva, Ekaterina; Le Querrec, Patrick; Gelfand, Mikhail S; Bindereif, Albrecht

    2013-01-01

    The U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP)-specific U1C protein participates in 5' splice site recognition and regulation of pre-mRNA splicing. Based on an RNA-Seq analysis in HeLa cells after U1C knockdown, we found a conserved, intra-U1 snRNP cross-regulation that links U1C and U1-70K expression through alternative splicing and U1 snRNP assembly. To investigate the underlying regulatory mechanism, we combined mutational minigene analysis, in vivo splice-site blocking by antisense morpholinos, and in vitro binding experiments. Alternative splicing of U1-70K pre-mRNA creates the normal (exons 7-8) and a non-productive mRNA isoform, whose balance is determined by U1C protein levels. The non-productive isoform is generated through a U1C-dependent alternative 3' splice site, which requires an adjacent cluster of regulatory 5' splice sites and binding of intact U1 snRNPs. As a result of nonsense-mediated decay (NMD) of the non-productive isoform, U1-70K mRNA and protein levels are down-regulated, and U1C incorporation into the U1 snRNP is impaired. U1-70K/U1C-deficient particles are assembled, shifting the alternative splicing balance back towards productive U1-70K splicing, and restoring assembly of intact U1 snRNPs. Taken together, we established a novel feedback regulation that controls U1-70K/U1C homeostasis and ensures correct U1 snRNP assembly and function.

  13. Alternatively spliced, spliceosomal twin introns in Helminthosporium solani.

    PubMed

    Ág, Norbert; Flipphi, Michel; Karaffa, Levente; Scazzocchio, Claudio; Fekete, Erzsébet

    2015-12-01

    Spliceosomal twin introns, "stwintrons", have been defined as complex intervening sequences that carry a second intron ("internal intron") interrupting one of the conserved sequence domains necessary for their correct splicing via consecutive excision events. Previously, we have described and experimentally verified stwintrons in species of Sordariomycetes, where an "internal intron" interrupted the donor sequence of an "external intron". Here we describe and experimentally verify two novel stwintrons of the potato pathogen Helminthosporium solani. One instance involves alternative splicing of an internal intron interrupting the donor domain of an external intron and a second one interrupting the acceptor domain of an overlapping external intron, both events leading to identical mature mRNAs. In the second case, an internal intron interrupts the donor domain of the external intron, while an alternatively spliced intron leads to an mRNA carrying a premature chain termination codon. We thus extend the stwintron concept to the acceptor domain and establish a link of the occurrence of stwintrons with that of alternative splicing.

  14. A role for ubiquitin in the spliceosome assembly pathway

    PubMed Central

    Bellare, Priya; Small, Eliza C; Huang, Xinhua; Wohlschlegel, James A; Staley, Jonathan P; Sontheimer, Erik J

    2009-01-01

    The spliceosome uses numerous strategies to regulate its function in mRNA maturation. Ubiquitin regulates many cellular processes, but its potential roles during splicing are unknown. We have developed a new strategy that reveals a direct role for ubiquitin in the dynamics of splicing complexes. A ubiquitin mutant (I44A) that can enter the conjugation pathway but is compromised in downstream functions diminishes splicing activity by reducing the levels of the U4/U6-U5 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP). Similarly, an inhibitor of ubiquitin’s protein-protein interactions, ubistatin A, reduces U4/U6-U5 triple snRNP levels in vitro. When ubiquitin interactions are blocked, ATP-dependent disassembly of purified U4/U6-U5 particles is accelerated, indicating a direct role for ubiquitin in repressing U4/U6 unwinding. Finally, we show that the conserved splicing factor Prp8 is ubiquitinated within purified triple snRNPs. These results reveal a previously unknown ubiquitin-dependent mechanism for controlling the pre-mRNA splicing pathway. PMID:18425143

  15. CryoEM structure of the spliceosome immediately after branching

    PubMed Central

    Galej, Wojciech P.; Wilkinson, Max E.; Fica, Sebastian M.; Oubridge, Chris; Newman, Andrew J.; Nagai, Kiyoshi

    2016-01-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing proceeds by two consecutive trans-esterification reactions via a lariat-intron intermediate. We present the 3.8Å cryoEM structure of the spliceosome immediately after lariat formation. The 5’-splice site is cleaved but remains close to the catalytic Mg2+ site in the U2/U6 snRNA triplex, and the 5’-phosphate of the intron nucleotide G(+1) is linked to the branch adenosine 2’OH. The 5’-exon is held between the Prp8 N-terminal and Linker domains, and base-pairs with U5 snRNA loop 1. Non-Watson-Crick interactions between the branch helix and 5’-splice site dock the branch adenosine into the active site, while intron nucleotides +3 to +6 base-pair with the U6 snRNA ACAGAGA sequence. Isy1 and the step one factors Yju2 and Cwc25 stabilise docking of the branch helix. The intron downstream of the branch site emerges between the Prp8 RT and Linker domains and extends towards Prp16 helicase, suggesting a plausible mechanism of remodelling before exon ligation. PMID:27459055

  16. The function of spliceosome components in open mitosis.

    PubMed

    Hofmann, Jennifer C; Husedzinovic, Alma; Gruss, Oliver J

    2010-01-01

    Spatial separation of eukaryotic cells into the nuclear and cytoplasmic compartment permits uncoupling of DNA transcription from translation of mRNAs and allows cells to modify newly transcribed pre mRNAs extensively. Intronic sequences (introns), which interrupt the coding elements (exons), are excised ("spliced") from pre-mRNAs in the nucleus to yield mature mRNAs. This not only enables alternative splicing as an important source of proteome diversity, but splicing is also an essential process in all eukaryotes and knock-out or knock-down of splicing factors frequently results in defective cell proliferation and cell division. However, higher eukaryotes progress through cell division only after breakdown of the nucleus ("open mitosis"). Open mitosis suppresses basic nuclear functions such as transcription and splicing, but allows separate, mitotic functions of nuclear proteins in cell division. Mitotic defects arising after loss-of-function of splicing proteins therefore could be an indirect consequence of compromised splicing in the closed nucleus of the preceding interphase or reflect a direct contribution of splicing proteins to open mitosis. Although experiments to directly distinguish between these two alternatives have not been reported, indirect evidence exists for either hypotheses. In this review, we survey published data supporting an indirect function of splicing in open mitosis or arguing for a direct function of spliceosomal proteins in cell division.

  17. A high density of ancient spliceosomal introns in oxymonad excavates

    PubMed Central

    Slamovits, Claudio H; Keeling, Patrick J

    2006-01-01

    Background Certain eukaryotic genomes, such as those of the amitochondriate parasites Giardia and Trichomonas, have very low intron densities, so low that canonical spliceosomal introns have only recently been discovered through genome sequencing. These organisms were formerly thought to be ancient eukaryotes that diverged before introns originated, or at least became common. Now however, they are thought to be members of a supergroup known as excavates, whose members generally appear to have low densities of canonical introns. Here we have used environmental expressed sequence tag (EST) sequencing to identify 17 genes from the uncultivable oxymonad Streblomastix strix, to survey intron densities in this most poorly studied excavate group. Results We find that Streblomastix genes contain an unexpectedly high intron density of about 1.1 introns per gene. Moreover, over 50% of these are at positions shared between a broad spectrum of eukaryotes, suggesting theyare very ancient introns, potentially present in the last common ancestor of eukaryotes. Conclusion The Streblomastix data show that the genome of the ancestor of excavates likely contained many introns and the subsequent evolution of introns has proceeded very differently in different excavate lineages: in Streblomastix there has been much stasis while in Trichomonas and Giardia most introns have been lost. PMID:16638131

  18. A Stochastic View of Spliceosome Assembly and Recycling in the Nucleus

    PubMed Central

    Desterro, Joana M. P; Lührmann, Reinhard; Carmo-Fonseca, Maria

    2007-01-01

    How splicing factors are recruited to nascent transcripts in the nucleus in order to assemble spliceosomes on newly synthesised pre-mRNAs is unknown. To address this question, we compared the intranuclear trafficking kinetics of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNP) and non-snRNP proteins in the presence and absence of splicing activity. Photobleaching experiments clearly show that spliceosomal proteins move continuously throughout the entire nucleus independently of ongoing transcription or splicing. Using quantitative experimental data, a mathematical model was applied for spliceosome assembly and recycling in the nucleus. The model assumes that splicing proteins move by Brownian diffusion and interact stochastically with binding sites located at different subnuclear compartments. Inhibition of splicing, which reduces the number of pre-mRNA binding sites available for spliceosome assembly, was modeled as a decrease in the on-rate binding constant in the nucleoplasm. Simulation of microscopy experiments before and after splicing inhibition yielded results consistent with the experimental observations. Taken together, our data argue against the view that spliceosomal components are stored in nuclear speckles until a signal triggers their recruitment to nascent transcripts. Rather, the results suggest that splicing proteins are constantly diffusing throughout the entire nucleus and collide randomly and transiently with pre-mRNAs. PMID:17967051

  19. Supergravity solutions without triholomorphic U(1) isometries

    SciTech Connect

    Ghezelbash, A. M.

    2008-12-15

    We investigate the construction of five-dimensional supergravity solutions that do not have any triholomorphic U(1) isometries. We construct a class of solutions that in various limits of parameters reduces to many of previously constructed five-dimensional supergravity solutions based on both hyper-Kaehler base spaces that can be put into a Gibbons-Hawking form and hyper-Kaehler base spaces that cannot be put into a Gibbons-Hawking form. We find a new solution which is over triaxial Bianchi type IX Einstein-hyper-Kaehler base space with no triholomorphic U(1) symmetry. One special case of this solution corresponds to a five-dimensional solution based on Eguchi-Hanson type II geometry.

  20. Mutations in U4atac snRNA, a Component of the Minor Spliceosome, in the Developmental Disorder MOPD I

    PubMed Central

    He, Huiling; Liyanarachchi, Sandya; Akagi, Keiko; Nagy, Rebecca; Li, Jingfeng; Dietrich, Rosemary C; Li, Wei; Sebastian, Nikhil; Wen, Bernard; Xin, Baozhong; Singh, Jarnail; Yan, Pearlly; Alder, Hansjuerg; Haan, Eric; Wieczorek, Dagmar; Albrecht, Beate; Puffenberger, Erik; Wang, Heng; Westman, Judith A.; Padgett, Richard A; Symer, David E; de la Chapelle, Albert

    2012-01-01

    Small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) are essential factors in mRNA splicing. By homozygosity mapping and deep sequencing, we show that a gene encoding U4atac snRNA, a component of the minor U12-dependent spliceosome, is mutated in individuals with microcephalic osteodysplastic primordial dwarfism type I (MOPD I), a severe developmental disorder characterized by extreme intrauterine growth retardation and multiple organ abnormalities. Functional assays show that mutations (30G>A, 51G>A, 55G>A, and 111G>A) associated with MOPD I cause defective U12-dependent splicing. Endogenous U12-dependent but not U2-dependent introns are poorly spliced in MOPD I patient fibroblast cells while introduction of wild type U4atac snRNA into MOPD I cells enhances U12-dependent splicing. These results illustrate the critical role of minor intron splicing in human development. PMID:21474760

  1. Spliceosomal gene mutations in myelodysplasia: molecular links to clonal abnormalities of hematopoiesis

    PubMed Central

    Inoue, Daichi; Bradley, Robert K.; Abdel-Wahab, Omar

    2016-01-01

    Genomic analyses of the myeloid malignancies and clonal disorders of hematopoiesis that may give rise to these disorders have identified that mutations in genes encoding core spliceosomal proteins and accessory regulatory splicing factors are among the most common targets of somatic mutations. These spliceosomal mutations often occur in a mutually exclusive manner with one another and, in aggregate, account for the most frequent class of mutations in patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) in particular. Although substantial progress has been made in understanding the effects of several of these mutations on splicing and splice site recognition, functional connections linking the mechanistic changes in splicing induced by these mutations to the phenotypic consequences of clonal and aberrant hematopoiesis are not yet well defined. This review describes our current understanding of the mechanistic and biological effects of spliceosomal gene mutations in MDSs as well as the regulation of splicing throughout normal hematopoiesis. PMID:27151974

  2. Exhaustive analysis of the modular structure of the spliceosomal assembly network: a Petri net approach.

    PubMed

    Bortfeldt, Ralf H; Schuster, Stefan; Koch, Ina

    2010-01-01

    Spliceosomes are macro-complexes involving hundreds of proteins with many functional interactions. Spliceosome assembly belongs to the key processes that enable splicing of mRNA and modulate alternative splicing. A detailed list of factors involved in spliceosomal reactions has been assorted over the past decade, but, their functional interplay is often unknown and most of the present biological models cover only parts of the complete assembly process. It is a challenging task to build a computational model that integrates dispersed knowledge and combines a multitude of reaction schemes proposed earlier.Because for most reactions involved in spliceosome assembly kinetic parameters are not available, we propose a discrete modeling using Petri nets, through which we are enabled to get insights into the system's behavior via computation of structural and dynamic properties. In this paper, we compile and examine reactions from experimental reports that contribute to a functional spliceosome. All these reactions form a network, which describes the inventory and conditions necessary to perform the splicing process. The analysis is mainly based on system invariants. Transition invariants (T-invariants) can be interpreted as signaling routes through the network. Due to the huge number of T-invariants that arise with increasing network size and complexity, maximal common transition sets (MCTS) and T-clusters were used for further analysis. Additionally, we introduce a false color map representation, which allows a quick survey of network modules and the visual detection of single reactions or reaction sequences, which participate in more than one signaling route. We designed a structured model of spliceosome assembly, which combines the demands on a platform that i) can display involved factors and concurrent processes, ii) offers the possibility to run computational methods for knowledge extraction, and iii) is successively extendable as new insights into spliceosome

  3. Exhaustive analysis of the modular structure of the spliceosomal assembly network: a petri net approach.

    PubMed

    Bortfeldt, Ralf H; Schuster, Stefan; Koch, Ina

    2011-01-01

    Spliceosomes are macro-complexes involving hundreds of proteins with many functional interactions. Spliceosome assembly belongs to the key processes that enable splicing of mRNA and modulate alternative splicing. A detailed list of factors involved in spliceosomal reactions has been assorted over the past decade, but, their functional interplay is often unknown and most of the present biological models cover only parts of the complete assembly process. It is a challenging task to build a computational model that integrates dispersed knowledge and combines a multitude of reaction schemes proposed earlier. Because for most reactions involved in spliceosome assembly kinetic parameters are not available, we propose a discrete modeling using Petri nets, through which we are enabled to get insights into the system's behavior via computation of structural and dynamic properties. In this paper, we compile and examine reactions from experimental reports that contribute to a functional spliceosome. All these reactions form a network, which describes the inventory and conditions necessary to perform the splicing process. The analysis is mainly based on system invariants. Transition invariants (T-invariants) can be interpreted as signaling routes through the network. Due to the huge number of T-invariants that arise with increasing network size and complexity, maximal common transition sets (MCTS) and T-clusters were used for further analysis. Additionally, we introduce a false color map representation, which allows a quick survey of network modules and the visual detection of single reactions or reaction sequences, which participate in more than one signaling route. We designed a structured model of spliceosome assembly, which combines the demands on a platform that i) can display involved factors and concurrent processes, ii) offers the possibility to run computational methods for knowledge extraction, and iii) is successively extendable as new insights into spliceosome

  4. Definition of a spliceosome interaction domain in yeast Prp2 ATPase.

    PubMed

    Edwalds-Gilbert, Gretchen; Kim, Dong-Ho; Silverman, Edward; Lin, Ren-Jang

    2004-02-01

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae splicing factor Prp2 is an RNA-dependent ATPase required before the first transesterification reaction in pre-mRNA splicing. Prp2 binds to the spliceosome in the absence of ATP and is released following ATP hydrolysis. It contains three domains: a unique N-terminal domain, a helicase domain that is highly conserved in the DExD/H protein family, and a C-terminal domain that is conserved in spliceosomal DEAH proteins Prp2, Prp16, Prp22, and Prp43. We examined the role of each domain of Prp2 by deletion mutagenesis. Whereas deletions of either the helicase or C-terminal domain are lethal, deletions in the N-terminal domain have no detectable effect on Prp2 activity. Overexpression of the C-terminal domain of Prp2 exacerbates the temperature-sensitive phenotype of a prp2(Ts) strain, suggesting that the C-domain interferes with the activity of the Prp2(Ts) protein. A genetic approach was then taken to study interactions between Prp2 and the spliceosome. Previously, we isolated dominant negative mutants in the helicase domain of Prp2 that inhibit the activity of wild-type Prp2 when the mutant protein is overexpressed. We mutagenized one prp2 release mutant gene and screened for loss of dominant negative function. Several weak binding mutants were isolated and mapped to the C terminus of Prp2, further indicating the importance of the C terminus in spliceosome binding. This study is the first to indicate that amino acid substitutions outside the helicase domain can abolish spliceosome contact and splicing activity of a spliceosomal DEAH protein.

  5. DExD/H-box Prp5 protein is in the spliceosome during most of the splicing cycle.

    PubMed

    Kosowski, Tomasz R; Keys, Heather R; Quan, Tiffani K; Ruby, Stephanie W

    2009-07-01

    The DExD/H-box Prp5 protein (Prp5p) is an essential, RNA-dependent ATPase required for pre-spliceosome formation during nuclear pre-mRNA splicing. In order to understand how this protein functions, we used in vitro, biochemical assays to examine its association with the spliceosome from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. GST-Prp5p in splicing assays pulls down radiolabeled pre-mRNA as well as splicing intermediates and lariat product, but reduced amounts of spliced mRNA. It cosediments with active spliceosomes isolated by glycerol gradient centrifugation. In ATP-depleted extracts, GST-Prp5p associates with pre-mRNA even in the absence of spliceosomal snRNAs. Maximal selection in either the presence or absence of ATP requires a pre-mRNA with a functional intron. Prp5p is present in the commitment complex and functions in subsequent pre-spliceosome formation. Reduced Prp5p levels decrease levels of commitment, pre-spliceosomal and spliceosomal complexes. Thus Prp5p is most likely an integral component of the spliceosome, being among the first splicing factors associating with pre-mRNA and remaining until spliceosome disassembly. The results suggest a model in which Prp5p recruits the U2 snRNP to pre-mRNA in the commitment complex and then hydrolyzes ATP to promote stable association of U2 in the pre-spliceosome. They also suggest that Prp5p could have multiple ATP-independent and ATP-dependent functions at several stages of the splicing cycle.

  6. The NineTeen Complex (NTC) and NTC-associated proteins as targets for spliceosomal ATPase action during pre-mRNA splicing

    PubMed Central

    de Almeida, Rogerio Alves; O’Keefe, Raymond T

    2015-01-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing is an essential step in gene expression that removes intron sequences efficiently and accurately to produce a mature mRNA for translation. It is the large and dynamic RNA-protein complex called the spliceosome that catalyzes intron removal. To carry out splicing the spliceosome not only needs to assemble correctly with the pre-mRNA but the spliceosome requires extensive remodelling of its RNA and protein components to execute the 2 steps of intron removal. Spliceosome remodelling is achieved through the action of ATPases that target both RNA and proteins to produce spliceosome conformations competent for each step of spliceosome activation, catalysis and disassembly. An increasing amount of research has pointed to the spliceosome associated NineTeen Complex (NTC) of proteins as targets for the action of a number of the spliceosomal ATPases during spliceosome remodelling. In this point-of-view article we present the latest findings on the changes in the NTC that occur following ATPase action that are required for spliceosome activation, catalysis and disassembly. We proposed that the NTC is one of the main targets of ATPase action during spliceosome remodelling required for pre-mRNA splicing. PMID:25654271

  7. Supersymmetric U(1)Y‧⊗ U(1)B-L extension of the Standard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Montero, J. C.; Pleitez, V.; Sánchez-Vega, B. L.; Rodriguez, M. C.

    2017-06-01

    We build a supersymmetric version with SU(3)C ⊗ SU(2)L ⊗ U(1)Y‧⊗ U(1)B-L gauge symmetry, where Y‧ is a new charge and B and L are the usual baryonic and leptonic numbers. The model has three right-handed neutrinos with identical B - L charges, and can accommodate all fermion masses at the tree level. In particular, the type I seesaw mechanism is implemented for the generation of the active neutrino masses. We obtain the mass spectra of all sectors and for the scalar one we also give the flat directions allowed by the model.

  8. Vought O3U-1 'Corsair'

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    1931-01-01

    Vought O3U-1 'Corsair' in Full-Scale Tunnel (FST). This photograph was taken in September 1931 after the balance had been enclosed. This aircraft was also used earlier during the summer for preliminary tests in the FST and as the subject of some of the first publicity photographs taken of FST operations. NACA engineers checked the lift and drag characteristics of several aircraft with the results of earlier flight tests. Smith DeFrance concluded NACA TR No. 459, 'The agreement that has been obtained between the flight and full-scale tunnel results, together with the consistent manner in which measurements can be repeated when check tests are made, has demonstrated the accuracy and value of the equipment for aeronautical research.' (p. 298)

  9. Anomalous Flavor U(1)_X for Everything

    SciTech Connect

    Dreiner, Herbi K.; Murayama, Hitoshi; Thormeier, Marc

    2003-12-01

    We present an ambitious model of flavor, based on an anomalous U(1)_X gauge symmetry with one flavon, only two right-handed neutrinos and only two mass scales: M_{grav} and m_{3/2}. In particular, there are no new scales introduced for right-handed neutrino masses. The X-charges of the matter fields are such that R-parity is conserved exactly, higher-dimensional operators are sufficiently suppressed to guarantee a proton lifetime in agreement with experiment, and the phenomenology is viable for quarks, charged leptons, as well as neutrinos. In our model one of the three light neutrinos automatically is massless. The price we have to pay for this very successful model are highly fractional X-charges which can likely be improved with less restrictive phenomenological ansatze for mass matrices.

  10. Spliceosomal peptide P140 for immunotherapy of systemic lupus erythematosus: results of an early phase II clinical trial.

    PubMed

    Muller, Sylviane; Monneaux, Fanny; Schall, Nicolas; Rashkov, Rasho K; Oparanov, Boycho A; Wiesel, Philippe; Geiger, Jean-Marie; Zimmer, Robert

    2008-12-01

    To assess the safety, tolerability, and efficacy of spliceosomal peptide P140 (IPP-201101; sequence 131-151 of the U1-70K protein phosphorylated at Ser140), which is recognized by lupus CD4+ T cells, in the treatment of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE). An open-label, dose-escalation phase II study was conducted in two centers in Bulgaria. Twenty patients (2 male and 18 female) with moderately active SLE received 3 subcutaneous (SC) administrations of a clinical batch of P140 peptide at 2-week intervals. Clinical evaluation was performed using approved scales. A panel of autoantibodies, including antinuclear antibodies, antibodies to extractable nuclear antigens (U1 RNP, SmD1, Ro/SSA, La/SSB), and antibodies to double-stranded DNA (anti-dsDNA), chromatin, cardiolipin, and peptides of the U1-70K protein, was tested by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). The plasma levels of C-reactive protein, total Ig, IgG, IgG subclasses, IgM, IgA, and IgE, and of the cytokines interleukin-2 and tumor necrosis factor alpha were measured by ELISA and nephelometry. IgG anti-dsDNA antibody levels decreased by at least 20% in 7 of 10 patients who received 3 x 200 microg IPP-201101 (group 1), but only in 1 patient in the group receiving 3 x 1,000 microg IPP-201101 (group 2). Physician's global assessment of disease activity scores and scores on the SLE Disease Activity Index were significantly decreased in group 1. The changes occurred progressively in the population of responders, increased in magnitude during the treatment period, and were sustained. No clinical or biologic adverse effects were observed in the individuals, except for some local irritation at the highest concentration. IPP-201101 was found to be safe and well tolerated by subjects. Three SC doses of IPP-201101 at 200 microg significantly improved the clinical and biologic status of lupus patients.

  11. Single molecule analysis reveals reversible and irreversible steps during spliceosome activation

    PubMed Central

    Hoskins, Aaron A; Rodgers, Margaret L; Friedman, Larry J; Gelles, Jeff; Moore, Melissa J

    2016-01-01

    The spliceosome is a complex machine composed of small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) and accessory proteins that excises introns from pre-mRNAs. After assembly the spliceosome is activated for catalysis by rearrangement of subunits to form an active site. How this rearrangement is coordinated is not well-understood. During activation, U4 must be released to allow U6 conformational change, while Prp19 complex (NTC) recruitment is essential for stabilizing the active site. We used multi-wavelength colocalization single molecule spectroscopy to directly observe the key events in Saccharomyces cerevisiae spliceosome activation. Following binding of the U4/U6.U5 tri-snRNP, the spliceosome either reverses assembly by discarding tri-snRNP or proceeds to activation by irreversible U4 loss. The major pathway for NTC recruitment occurs after U4 release. ATP stimulates both the competing U4 release and tri-snRNP discard processes. The data reveal the activation mechanism and show that overall splicing efficiency may be maintained through repeated rounds of disassembly and tri-snRNP reassociation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14166.001 PMID:27244240

  12. Spliceosome discards intermediates via the DEAH box ATPase Prp43p.

    PubMed

    Mayas, Rabiah M; Maita, Hiroshi; Semlow, Daniel R; Staley, Jonathan P

    2010-06-01

    To promote fidelity in nuclear pre-mRNA splicing, the spliceosome rejects and discards suboptimal substrates that have engaged the spliceosome. Whereas DExD/H box ATPases have been implicated in rejecting suboptimal substrates, the mechanism for discarding suboptimal substrates has remained obscure. Corroborating evidence that suboptimal, mutated lariat intermediates can be exported to the cytoplasm for turnover, we have found that the ribosome can translate mutated lariat intermediates. By glycerol gradient analysis, we have found that the spliceosome can dissociate mutated lariat intermediates in vivo in a manner that requires the DEAH box ATPase Prp43p. Through an in vitro assay, we demonstrate that Prp43p promotes the discard of suboptimal and optimal 5' exon and lariat intermediates indiscriminately. Finally, we demonstrate a requirement for Prp43p in repressing splicing at a cryptic splice site. We propose a model for the fidelity of exon ligation in which the DEAH box ATPase Prp22p slows the flow of suboptimal intermediates through exon ligation and Prp43p generally promotes discard of intermediates, thereby establishing a pathway for turnover of stalled intermediates. Because Prp43p also promotes spliceosome disassembly after exon ligation, this work establishes a parallel between the discard of suboptimal intermediates and the dissociation of a genuine excised intron product.

  13. Spliceosome discards intermediates via the DEAH box ATPase Prp43p

    PubMed Central

    Mayas, Rabiah M.; Maita, Hiroshi; Semlow, Daniel R.; Staley, Jonathan P.

    2010-01-01

    To promote fidelity in nuclear pre-mRNA splicing, the spliceosome rejects and discards suboptimal substrates that have engaged the spliceosome. Whereas DExD/H box ATPases have been implicated in rejecting suboptimal substrates, the mechanism for discarding suboptimal substrates has remained obscure. Corroborating evidence that suboptimal, mutated lariat intermediates can be exported to the cytoplasm for turnover, we have found that the ribosome can translate mutated lariat intermediates. By glycerol gradient analysis, we have found that the spliceosome can dissociate mutated lariat intermediates in vivo in a manner that requires the DEAH box ATPase Prp43p. Through an in vitro assay, we demonstrate that Prp43p promotes the discard of suboptimal and optimal 5′ exon and lariat intermediates indiscriminately. Finally, we demonstrate a requirement for Prp43p in repressing splicing at a cryptic splice site. We propose a model for the fidelity of exon ligation in which the DEAH box ATPase Prp22p slows the flow of suboptimal intermediates through exon ligation and Prp43p generally promotes discard of intermediates, thereby establishing a pathway for turnover of stalled intermediates. Because Prp43p also promotes spliceosome disassembly after exon ligation, this work establishes a parallel between the discard of suboptimal intermediates and the dissociation of a genuine excised intron product. PMID:20463285

  14. Aberrant RNA splicing and mutations in spliceosome complex in acute myeloid leukemia

    PubMed Central

    2017-01-01

    The spliceosome, the cellular splicing machinery, regulates RNA splicing of messenger RNA precursors (pre-mRNAs) into maturation of protein coding RNAs. Recurrent mutations and copy number changes in genes encoding spliceosomal proteins and splicing regulatory factors have tumor promoting or suppressive functions in hematological malignancies, as well as some other cancers. Leukemia stem cell (LSC) populations, although rare, are essential contributors of treatment failure and relapse. Recent researches have provided the compelling evidence that link the erratic spicing activity to the LSC phenotype in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In this article, we describe the diverse roles of aberrant splicing in hematological malignancies, particularly in AML and their contributions to the characteristics of LSC. We review these promising strategies to exploit the addiction of aberrant spliceosomal machinery for anti-leukemic therapy with aim to eradicate LSC. However, given the complexity and plasticity of spliceosome and not fully known functions of splicing in cancer, the challenges facing the development of the therapeutic strategies targeting RAN splicing are highlighted and future directions are discussed too. PMID:28217708

  15. The core spliceosome as target and effector of non-canonical ATM signaling

    PubMed Central

    Tresini, Maria; Warmerdam, Daniël O.; Kolovos, Petros; Snijder, Loes; Vrouwe, Mischa G.; Demmers, Jeroen A.A.; van IJcken, Wilfred F.J.; Grosveld, Frank G.; Medema, René H.; Hoeijmakers, Jan H.J.; Mullenders, Leon H.F.; Vermeulen, Wim; Marteijn, Jurgen A.

    2015-01-01

    In response to DNA damage tissue homoeostasis is ensured by protein networks promoting DNA repair, cell cycle arrest or apoptosis. DNA damage response signaling pathways coordinate these processes, partly by propagating gene expression-modulating signals. DNA damage influences not only abundance of mRNAs, but also their coding information through alternative splicing. Here we show that transcription-blocking DNA lesions promote chromatin displacement of late-stage spliceosomes and initiate a positive feedback loop centered on the signaling kinase ATM. We propose that initial spliceosome displacement and subsequent R-loop formation is triggered by pausing of RNA polymerase at DNA lesions. In turn, R-loops activate ATM which signals to further impede spliceosome organization and augment UV-triggered alternative splicing at genome-wide level. Our findings define the R-loop-dependent ATM activation by transcription-blocking lesions as an important event in the DNA damage response of non-replicating cells and highlight a key role for spliceosome displacement in this process. PMID:26106861

  16. Aberrant RNA splicing and mutations in spliceosome complex in acute myeloid leukemia.

    PubMed

    Zhou, Jianbiao; Chng, Wee-Joo

    2017-01-01

    The spliceosome, the cellular splicing machinery, regulates RNA splicing of messenger RNA precursors (pre-mRNAs) into maturation of protein coding RNAs. Recurrent mutations and copy number changes in genes encoding spliceosomal proteins and splicing regulatory factors have tumor promoting or suppressive functions in hematological malignancies, as well as some other cancers. Leukemia stem cell (LSC) populations, although rare, are essential contributors of treatment failure and relapse. Recent researches have provided the compelling evidence that link the erratic spicing activity to the LSC phenotype in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In this article, we describe the diverse roles of aberrant splicing in hematological malignancies, particularly in AML and their contributions to the characteristics of LSC. We review these promising strategies to exploit the addiction of aberrant spliceosomal machinery for anti-leukemic therapy with aim to eradicate LSC. However, given the complexity and plasticity of spliceosome and not fully known functions of splicing in cancer, the challenges facing the development of the therapeutic strategies targeting RAN splicing are highlighted and future directions are discussed too.

  17. Recruitment of the NineTeen Complex to the activated spliceosome requires AtPRMT5

    PubMed Central

    Deng, Xian; Lu, Tiancong; Wang, Lulu; Gu, Lianfeng; Sun, Jing; Kong, Xiangfeng; Liu, Chunyan; Cao, Xiaofeng

    2016-01-01

    Protein arginine methylation, catalyzed by protein arginine methyltransferases (PRMTs), is involved in a multitude of biological processes in eukaryotes. Symmetric arginine dimethylation mediated by PRMT5 modulates constitutive and alternative pre-mRNA splicing of diverse genes to regulate normal growth and development in multiple species; however, the underlying molecular mechanism remains largely unknown. A genetic screen for suppressors of an Arabidopsis symmetric arginine dimethyltransferase mutant, atprmt5, identified two gain-of-function alleles of pre-mRNA processing factor 8 gene (prp8-8 and prp8-9), the highly conserved core component of the U5 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) and the spliceosome. These two atprmt5 prp8 double mutants showed suppression of the developmental and splicing alterations of atprmt5 mutants. In atprmt5 mutants, the NineTeen complex failed to be assembled into the U5 snRNP to form an activated spliceosome; this phenotype was restored in the atprmt5 prp8-8 double mutants. We also found that loss of symmetric arginine dimethylation of Sm proteins prevents recruitment of the NineTeen complex and initiation of spliceosome activation. Together, our findings demonstrate that symmetric arginine dimethylation has important functions in spliceosome assembly and activation, and uncover a key molecular mechanism for arginine methylation in pre-mRNA splicing that impacts diverse developmental processes. PMID:27114555

  18. NOUGHT MAY ENDURE BUT MUTABILITY*: SPLICEOSOME DYNAMICS AND THE REGULATION OF SPLICING

    PubMed Central

    Smith, Duncan J.; Query, Charles C.; Konarska, Maria M.

    2008-01-01

    SUMMARY The spliceosome is both compositionally and conformationally dynamic. Each transition along the splicing pathway presents an opportunity for progression, pausing or discard, allowing splice site choice to be regulated throughout both the assembly and catalytic phases of the reaction. PMID:18570869

  19. A protein map of the yeast activated spliceosome as obtained by electron microscopy

    PubMed Central

    Sun, Chengfu; Rigo, Norbert; Fabrizio, Patrizia; Kastner, Berthold; Lührmann, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    We have elucidated the spatial arrangement of proteins and snRNP subunits within the purified spliceosomal Bact complex from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, using negative-stain immunoelectron microscopy. The Bact spliceosome exhibits a mushroom-like shape with a main body connected to a foot and a steep and a shallow slope. The U5 core components, including proteins Snu114 and Prp8, are located in the main body and foot, while Brr2 is on the shallow slope. U2 snRNP components and the RNA helicase Prp2 were predominantly located in the upper regions of both slopes. While several proteins of the “nineteen complex” are located on the steep slope, Prp19, Cef1, and the U6 snRNA-binding protein Cwc2 are on the main body. Our results also indicate that the catalytic core RNP of the spliceosome resides in its main body. We thus assign distinct domains of the Bact complex to its snRNP and protein components, and we provide first structural insights into the remodeling events at the spliceosome during its transformation from the B to the Bact complex. PMID:27368340

  20. Spliceosome integrity is defective in the motor neuron diseases ALS and SMA

    PubMed Central

    Tsuiji, Hitomi; Iguchi, Yohei; Furuya, Asako; Kataoka, Ayane; Hatsuta, Hiroyuki; Atsuta, Naoki; Tanaka, Fumiaki; Hashizume, Yoshio; Akatsu, Hiroyasu; Murayama, Shigeo; Sobue, Gen; Yamanaka, Koji

    2013-01-01

    Two motor neuron diseases, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), are caused by distinct genes involved in RNA metabolism, TDP-43 and FUS/TLS, and SMN, respectively. However, whether there is a shared defective mechanism in RNA metabolism common to these two diseases remains unclear. Here, we show that TDP-43 and FUS/TLS localize in nuclear Gems through an association with SMN, and that all three proteins function in spliceosome maintenance. We also show that in ALS, Gems are lost, U snRNA levels are up-regulated and spliceosomal U snRNPs abnormally and extensively accumulate in motor neuron nuclei, but not in the temporal lobe of FTLD with TDP-43 pathology. This aberrant accumulation of U snRNAs in ALS motor neurons is in direct contrast to SMA motor neurons, which show reduced amounts of U snRNAs, while both have defects in the spliceosome. These findings indicate that a profound loss of spliceosome integrity is a critical mechanism common to neurodegeneration in ALS and SMA, and may explain cell-type specific vulnerability of motor neurons. PMID:23255347

  1. Metal ion catalysis during group II intron self-splicing: parallels with the spliceosome

    PubMed Central

    Sontheimer, Erik J.; Gordon, Peter M.; Piccirilli, Joseph A.

    1999-01-01

    The identical reaction pathway executed by the spliceosome and self-splicing group II intron ribozymes has prompted the idea that both may be derived from a common molecular ancestor. The minimal sequence and structural similarities between group II introns and the spliceosomal small nuclear RNAs, however, have left this proposal in question. Mechanistic comparisons between group II self-splicing introns and the spliceosome are therefore important in determining whether these two splicing machineries may be related. Here we show that 3′-sulfur substitution at the 5′ splice site of a group II intron causes a metal specificity switch during the first step of splicing. In contrast, 3′-sulfur substitution has no significant effect on the metal specificity of the second step of cis-splicing. Isolation of the second step uncovers a metal specificity switch that is masked during the cis-splicing reaction. These results demonstrate that group II intron ribozymes are metalloenzymes that use a catalytic metal ion for leaving group stabilization during both steps of self-splicing. Furthermore, because 3′-sulfur substitution of a spliceosomal intron has precisely the same effects as were observed during cis-splicing of the group II intron, these results provide striking parallels between the catalytic mechanisms employed by these two systems. PMID:10398685

  2. CEF1/CDC5 alleles modulate transitions between catalytic conformations of the spliceosome

    PubMed Central

    Query, Charles C.; Konarska, Maria M.

    2012-01-01

    Conformational change within the spliceosome is required between the first and second catalytic steps of pre-mRNA splicing. A prior genetic screen for suppressors of an intron mutant that stalls between the two steps yielded both prp8 and non-prp8 alleles that suppressed second-step splicing defects. We have now identified the strongest non-prp8 suppressors as alleles of the NTC (Prp19 complex) component, CEF1. These cef1 alleles generally suppress second-step defects caused by a variety of intron mutations, mutations in U6 snRNA, or deletion of the second-step protein factor Prp17, and they can activate alternative 3′ splice sites. Genetic and functional interactions between cef1 and prp8 alleles suggest that they modulate the same event(s) in the first-to-second-step transition, most likely by stabilization of the second-step spliceosome; in contrast, alleles of U6 snRNA that also alter this transition modulate a distinct event, most likely by stabilization of the first-step spliceosome. These results implicate a myb-like domain of Cef1/CDC5 in interactions that modulate conformational states of the spliceosome and suggest that alteration of these events affects splice site use, resulting in alternative splicing-like patterns in yeast. PMID:22408182

  3. Prevalent and distinct spliceosomal 3′-end processing mechanisms for fungal telomerase RNA

    PubMed Central

    Qi, Xiaodong; Rand, Dustin P.; Podlevsky, Joshua D.; Li, Yang; Mosig, Axel; Stadler, Peter F.; Chen, Julian J.-L.

    2015-01-01

    Telomerase RNA (TER) is an essential component of the telomerase ribonucleoprotein complex. The mechanism for TER 3′-end processing is highly divergent among different organisms. Here we report a unique spliceosome-mediated TER 3′-end cleavage mechanism in Neurospora crassa which is distinct from that found specifically in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. While the S. pombe TER intron contains the canonical 5′-splice site GUAUGU, the N. crassa TER intron contains a non-canonical 5′-splice site AUAAGU that alone prevents the second step of splicing and promotes spliceosomal cleavage. The unique N. crassa TER 5′-splice site sequence is evolutionarily conserved in TERs from Pezizomycotina and early branching Taphrinomycotina species. This suggests that the widespread and basal N. crassa-type spliceosomal cleavage mechanism is more ancestral than the S. pombe-type. The discovery of a prevalent, yet distinct, spliceosomal cleavage mechanism throughout diverse fungal clades furthers our understanding of TER evolution and non-coding RNA processing. PMID:25598218

  4. TDRD6 mediates early steps of spliceosome maturation in primary spermatocytes

    PubMed Central

    Akpınar, Müge; Fanourgakis, Grigorios; Fu, Jun; Anasstasiadis, Konstantinos; Dahl, Andreas

    2017-01-01

    Tudor containing protein 6 (TDRD6) is a male germ line-specific protein essential for chromatoid body (ChB) structure, elongated spermatid development and male fertility. Here we show that in meiotic prophase I spermatocytes TDRD6 interacts with the key protein arginine methyl transferase PRMT5, which supports splicing. TDRD6 also associates with spliceosomal core protein SmB in the absence of RNA and in an arginine methylation dependent manner. In Tdrd6-/- diplotene spermatocytes PRMT5 association with SmB and arginine dimethylation of SmB are much reduced. TDRD6 deficiency impairs the assembly of spliceosomes, which feature 3.5-fold increased levels of U5 snRNPs. In the nucleus, these deficiencies in spliceosome maturation correlate with decreased numbers of SMN-positive bodies and Cajal bodies involved in nuclear snRNP maturation. Transcriptome analysis of TDRD6-deficient diplotene spermatocytes revealed high numbers of splicing defects such as aberrant usage of intron and exons as well as aberrant representation of splice junctions. Together, this study demonstrates a novel function of TDRD6 in spliceosome maturation and mRNA splicing in prophase I spermatocytes. PMID:28263986

  5. Control of mouse U1a and U1b snRNA gene expression by differential transcription.

    PubMed Central

    Cáceres, J F; McKenzie, D; Thimmapaya, R; Lund, E; Dahlberg, J E

    1992-01-01

    The expression of mouse embryonic U1 snRNA (mU1b) genes is subject to stage- and tissue-specific control, being restricted to early embryos and adult tissues that contain a high proportion of stem cells capable of further differentiation. To determine the mechanism of this control we have sought to distinguish between differential RNA stability and regulation of U1 gene promoter activity in several cell types. We demonstrate here that mU1b RNA can accumulate to high levels in permanently transfected mouse 3T3 and C127 fibroblast cells which normally do not express the endogenous U1b genes, and apparently can do so without significantly interfering with cell growth. Expression of transfected chimeric U1 genes in such cells is much more efficient when their promoters are derived from a constitutively expressed mU1a gene rather than from an mU1b gene. In transgenic mice, introduced U1 transgenes with an mU1b 5' flanking region are subject to normal tissue-specific control, indicating that U1b promoter activity is restricted to tissues that normally express U1b genes. Inactivation of the embryonic genes during normal differentiation is not associated with methylation of upstream CpG-rich sequences; however, in NIH 3T3 fibroblasts, the 5' flanking regions of endogenous mU1b genes are completely methylated, indicating that DNA methylation serves to imprint the inactive state of the mU1b genes in cultured cells. Based on these results, we propose that the developmental control of U1b gene expression is due to differential activity of mU1a and mU1b promoters rather than to differential stability of U1a and U1b RNAs. Images PMID:1508717

  6. Potential effect of spliceosome inhibition in small cell lung cancer irrespective of the MYC status

    PubMed Central

    Rozeboom, Leslie; Yu, Hui; Ellison, Kim; Rivard, Christopher J.; Mitsudomi, Tetsuya; Hirsch, Fred R.

    2017-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer (SCLC) is a highly aggressive malignancy with few therapeutic advances in the treatment in recent decades. Based on a recent study that identified the spliceosome as a therapeutic vulnerability in MYC-driven breast cancers, we evaluated the efficacy of a spliceosome inhibitor in SCLC cell lines and analyzed the correlation with MYC status. Among 23 SCLC cell lines examined, eight showed high MYC protein expression (> 80% positive cells) by immunohistochemistry (IHC), while 10 cell lines demonstrated no staining for MYC. The remaining five cell lines showed weak staining (< 40% positive cells). All four cell lines that were previously demonstrated to have MYC gene amplification were positive for MYC by IHC. Four cell lines with high MYC expression and four with low MYC expression were used in further analysis. A spliceosome inhibitor, pladienolide B, showed high efficacy (IC50 < 12nM) in all eight cell lines tested, irrespective of the MYC IHC or MYC gene amplification status. We observed that the four cell lines with higher sensitivity to the spliceosome inhibitor were established from patients with prior chemotherapy. Therefore we chronically treated H1048 cells, that were established from a treatment-naïve patient, with cisplatin for 4 weeks, and found that H1048-cisplatin treated cells became more sensitive to pladienolide B. In conclusion, our in vitro results indicate that spliceosome inhibitors would be promising molecular target drugs in SCLC irrespective of the MYC status, especially in the second-line settings after an effective front-line chemotherapy. PMID:28192473

  7. LETTER TO THE EDITOR: U(1) × U(1) × U(1) symmetry of the Kimura 3ST model and phylogenetic branching processes

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bashford, J. D.; Jarvis, P. D.; Sumner, J. G.; Steel, M. A.

    2004-02-01

    An analysis of the Kimura 3ST model of DNA sequence evolution is given on the basis of its continuous Lie symmetries. The rate matrix commutes with a U(1) × U(1) × U(1) phase subgroup of the group GL(4) of 4 × 4 invertible complex matrices acting on a linear space spanned by the four nucleic acid base letters. The diagonal 'branching operator' representing speciation is defined, and shown to intertwine the U(1) × U(1) × U(1) action. Using the intertwining property, a general formula for the probability density on the leaves of a binary tree under the Kimura model is derived, which is shown to be equivalent to established phylogenetic spectral transform methods.

  8. Tetramers reveal IL-17-secreting CD4+ T cells that are specific for U1-70 in lupus and mixed connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Kattah, Nicole H; Newell, Evan W; Jarrell, Justin Ansel; Chu, Alvina D; Xie, Jianming; Kattah, Michael G; Goldberger, Ofir; Ye, Jessica; Chakravarty, Eliza F; Davis, Mark M; Utz, Paul J

    2015-03-10

    Antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells are implicated in the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), but little is known about the peptide antigens that they recognize and their precise function in disease. We generated a series of MHC class II tetramers of I-E(k)-containing peptides from the spliceosomal protein U1-70 that specifically stain distinct CD4(+) T-cell populations in MRL/lpr mice. The T-cell populations recognize an epitope differing only by the presence or absence of a single phosphate residue at position serine(140). The frequency of CD4(+) T cells specific for U1-70(131-150):I-E(k) (without phosphorylation) correlates with disease severity and anti-U1-70 autoantibody production. These T cells also express RORγt and produce IL-17A. Furthermore, the U1-70-specific CD4(+) T cells that produce IL-17A are detected in a subset of patients with SLE and are significantly increased in patients with mixed connective tissue disease. These studies provide tools for studying antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells in lupus, and demonstrate an antigen-specific source of IL-17A in autoimmune disease.

  9. Tetramers reveal IL-17–secreting CD4+ T cells that are specific for U1-70 in lupus and mixed connective tissue disease

    PubMed Central

    Kattah, Nicole H.; Newell, Evan W.; Jarrell, Justin Ansel; Chu, Alvina D.; Xie, Jianming; Kattah, Michael G.; Goldberger, Ofir; Ye, Jessica; Chakravarty, Eliza F.; Davis, Mark M.; Utz, Paul J.

    2015-01-01

    Antigen-specific CD4+ T cells are implicated in the autoimmune disease systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), but little is known about the peptide antigens that they recognize and their precise function in disease. We generated a series of MHC class II tetramers of I-Ek–containing peptides from the spliceosomal protein U1-70 that specifically stain distinct CD4+ T-cell populations in MRL/lpr mice. The T-cell populations recognize an epitope differing only by the presence or absence of a single phosphate residue at position serine140. The frequency of CD4+ T cells specific for U1-70(131-150):I-Ek (without phosphorylation) correlates with disease severity and anti–U1-70 autoantibody production. These T cells also express RORγt and produce IL-17A. Furthermore, the U1-70–specific CD4+ T cells that produce IL-17A are detected in a subset of patients with SLE and are significantly increased in patients with mixed connective tissue disease. These studies provide tools for studying antigen-specific CD4+ T cells in lupus, and demonstrate an antigen-specific source of IL-17A in autoimmune disease. PMID:25713364

  10. Secluded U(1) below the weak scale

    SciTech Connect

    Pospelov, Maxim

    2009-11-01

    A secluded U(1) sector with weak admixture to photons, O(10{sup -2}-10{sup -3}), and the scale of the breaking below 1 GeV represents a natural yet poorly constrained extension of the standard model. We analyze g-2 of muons and electrons together with other precision QED data, as well as radiative decays of strange particles to constrain the mass-mixing angle (m{sub V}-{kappa}) parameter space. We point out that m{sub V}{approx_equal}214 MeV and {kappa}{sup 2}>3x10{sup -5} can be consistent with the hypothesis of the HyperCP Collaboration, which seeks to explain the anomalous energy distribution of muon pairs in the {sigma}{sup +}{yields}p{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} process by a resonance, without direct contradiction to the existing data on radiative kaon decays. The same parameters lead to an O(fewx10{sup -9}) upward correction to the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon, possibly relaxing some tension between the experimental value and theoretical determinations of g-2. The ultrafine energy resolution scan of the e{sup +}e{sup -}{yields}{mu}{sup +}{mu}{sup -} cross section and dedicated analysis of lepton spectra from K{sup +}{yields}{pi}{sup +}e{sup +}e{sup -} decays should be able to provide a conclusive test of this hypothesis and improve the constraints on the model.

  11. Small nuclear ribonucleoproteins of Drosophila: Identification of U1 RNA-associated proteins and their behavior during heat shock

    SciTech Connect

    Wieben, E.D.; Pederson, T.

    1982-08-01

    In Drosophila, two nuclear proteins of approximately 26,000 and 14,000 molecular weight are recognized by a human autoimmune antibody for mammalian ribonucleoprotein (RNP) particles that contain U1 small nuclear RNA. The antibody-selected Drosophila RNP contains, in addition to these two proteins, a single RNA species that has been identified as U1 by hybridization with a cloned Drosophila U1 DNA probe. Small nuclear RNP isolated from human cells under the same conditions as used for Drosophila and selected by the anti-U1 RNP-specific antibody contains eight proteins, two of which are similar in molecular weight to the two Drosophila U1 RNP proteins. Thus, even though the nucleotide sequences of Drosophila and human U1 RNA are about 72% homologous, and the corresponding RNPs are both recognized by the same human autoantibody, Drosophila U1 RNP appears to have a simpler protein complement that its mammalian counterpart. The two Drosophila U1 RNA-associated proteins are synthesized at normal or slightly increased rates during the heat shock response and are incorporated into antibody-recognizable RNP complexes. This raises the possibility that U1 RNP is an indispensable nuclear element for cell survival during heat shock.

  12. A central role of Cwc25 in spliceosome dynamics during the catalytic phase of pre-mRNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Tseng, Chi-Kang; Chung, Che-Sheng; Chen, Hsin-Chou; Cheng, Soo-Chen

    2017-04-01

    Splicing of precursor mRNA occurs via two consecutive steps of transesterification reaction; both require ATP and several proteins. Despite the energy requirement in the catalytic phase, incubation of the purified spliceosome under proper ionic conditions can elicit competitive reversible transesterification, debranching, and spliced-exon-reopening reactions without the necessity for ATP or other factors, suggesting that small changes in the conformational state of the spliceosome can lead to disparate chemical consequences for the substrate. We show here that Cwc25 plays a central role in modulating the conformational state of the catalytic spliceosome during normal splicing reactions. Cwc25 binds tightly to the spliceosome after the reaction and is then removed from the spliceosome, which normally requires DExD/H-box protein Prp16 and ATP hydrolysis, to allow the occurrence of the second reaction. When deprived of Cwc25, the purified first-step spliceosome catalyzes both forward and reverse splicing reactions under normal splicing conditions without requiring energy. Both reactions are inhibited when Cwc25 is added back, presumably due to the stabilization of first-step conformation. Prp16 is dispensable for the second reaction when splicing is carried out under conditions that destabilize Cwc25. We also show that the purified precatalytic spliceosome can catalyze two steps of the reaction at a low efficiency without requiring Cwc25, Slu7, or Prp18 when incubated under proper conditions. Our study reveals conformational modulation of the spliceosome by Cwc25 and Prp16 in stabilization and destabilization of first-step conformation, respectively, to facilitate the splicing process. © 2017 Tseng et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  13. Dissection of the factor requirements for spliceosome disassembly and the elucidation of its dissociation products using a purified splicing system

    PubMed Central

    Fourmann, Jean-Baptiste; Schmitzová, Jana; Christian, Henning; Urlaub, Henning; Ficner, Ralf; Boon, Kum-Loong; Fabrizio, Patrizia; Lührmann, Reinhard

    2013-01-01

    The spliceosome is a single-turnover enzyme that needs to be dismantled after catalysis to both release the mRNA and recycle small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) for subsequent rounds of pre-mRNA splicing. The RNP remodeling events occurring during spliceosome disassembly are poorly understood, and the composition of the released snRNPs are only roughly known. Using purified components in vitro, we generated post-catalytic spliceosomes that can be dissociated into mRNA and the intron-lariat spliceosome (ILS) by addition of the RNA helicase Prp22 plus ATP and without requiring the step 2 proteins Slu7 and Prp18. Incubation of the isolated ILS with the RNA helicase Prp43 plus Ntr1/Ntr2 and ATP generates defined spliceosomal dissociation products: the intron-lariat, U6 snRNA, a 20–25S U2 snRNP containing SF3a/b, an 18S U5 snRNP, and the “nineteen complex” associated with both the released U2 snRNP and intron-lariat RNA. Our system reproduces the entire ordered disassembly phase of the spliceosome with purified components, which defines the minimum set of agents required for this process. It enabled us to characterize the proteins of the ILS by mass spectrometry and identify the ATPase action of Prp43 as necessary and sufficient for dissociation of the ILS without the involvement of Brr2 ATPase. PMID:23431055

  14. Prp2-mediated protein rearrangements at the catalytic core of the spliceosome as revealed by dcFCCS

    PubMed Central

    Ohrt, Thomas; Prior, Mira; Dannenberg, Julia; Odenwälder, Peter; Dybkov, Olexandr; Rasche, Nicolas; Schmitzová, Jana; Gregor, Ingo; Fabrizio, Patrizia; Enderlein, Jörg; Lührmann, Reinhard

    2012-01-01

    The compositional and conformational changes during catalytic activation of the spliceosome promoted by the DEAH box ATPase Prp2 are only poorly understood. Here, we show by dual-color fluorescence cross-correlation spectroscopy (dcFCCS) that the binding affinity of several proteins is significantly changed during the Prp2-mediated transition of precatalytic Bact spliceosomes to catalytically activated B* spliceosomes from Saccharomyces cerevisiae. During this step, several proteins, including the zinc-finger protein Cwc24, are quantitatively displaced from the B* complex. Consistent with this, we show that Cwc24 is required for step 1 but not for catalysis per se. The U2-associated SF3a and SF3b proteins Prp11 and Cus1 remain bound to the B* spliceosome under near-physiological conditions, but their binding is reduced at high salt. Conversely, high-affinity binding sites are created for Yju2 and Cwc25 during catalytic activation, consistent with their requirement for step 1 catalysis. Our results suggest high cooperativity of multiple Prp2-mediated structural rearrangements at the spliceosome's catalytic core. Moreover, dcFCCS represents a powerful tool ideally suited to study quantitatively spliceosomal protein dynamics in equilibrium. PMID:22535589

  15. The canonical GU dinucleotide at the 5' splice site is recognized by p220 of the U5 snRNP within the spliceosome.

    PubMed Central

    Reyes, J L; Kois, P; Konforti, B B; Konarska, M M

    1996-01-01

    Specific recognition of the 5' splice site (5'SS) by the spliceosome components was studied using a simple in vitro system in which a short 5'SS RNA oligonucleotide specifically induces the assembly of snRNP particles into spliceosome-like complexes and actively participates in a trans-splicing reaction. Short-range cross-liking demonstrates that a U5 snRNP protein component, p220 (the human analogue of the yeast Prp8) specifically interacts with the invariant GU dinucleotide at the 5' end of the intron. The GU:p220 interaction can be detected in the functional splicing complex B. Although p220 has been known to contact several nucleotides around the 5' splice junction, the p220:GU dinucleotide interaction described here is remarkably specific. Consistent with the high conservation of the GU, even minor modifications of this element affect recognition of the 5'SS RNA by p220. Substitution of uridine at the GU with base analogues containing a large methyl or iodo group, but not a smaller flouro group at base position 5, interferes with association of 5'SS RNA with snRNP complexes and their functional participation in splicing. PMID:8608445

  16. Phosphorylated SAP155, the spliceosomal component, is localized to chromatin in postnatal mouse testes

    SciTech Connect

    Eto, Ko; Sonoda, Yoshiyuki; Jin, Yuji; Abe, Shin-ichi

    2010-03-19

    SAP155 is an essential component of the spliceosome and its phosphorylation is required for splicing catalysis, but little is known concerning its expression and regulation during spermatogenesis in postnatal mouse testes. We report that SAP155 is ubiquitously expressed in nuclei of germ and Sertoli cells within the seminiferous tubules of 6- and 35-day postpartum (dpp) testes. Analyses by fractionation of testes revealed that (1) phosphorylated SAP155 was found in the fraction containing nuclear structures at 6 dpp in amounts much larger than that at other ages; (2) non-phosphorylated SAP155 was detected in the fraction containing nucleoplasm; and (3) phosphorylated SAP155 was preferentially associated with chromatin. Our findings suggest that the active spliceosome, containing phosphorylated SAP155, performs pre-mRNA splicing on chromatin concomitant with transcription during testicular development.

  17. Defective minor spliceosome mRNA processing results in isolated familial growth hormone deficiency.

    PubMed

    Argente, Jesús; Flores, Raquel; Gutiérrez-Arumí, Armand; Verma, Bhupendra; Martos-Moreno, Gabriel Á; Cuscó, Ivon; Oghabian, Ali; Chowen, Julie A; Frilander, Mikko J; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A

    2014-03-01

    The molecular basis of a significant number of cases of isolated growth hormone deficiency remains unknown. We describe three sisters affected with severe isolated growth hormone deficiency and pituitary hypoplasia caused by biallelic mutations in the RNPC3 gene, which codes for a minor spliceosome protein required for U11/U12 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) formation and splicing of U12-type introns. We found anomalies in U11/U12 di-snRNP formation and in splicing of multiple U12-type introns in patient cells. Defective transcripts include preprohormone convertases SPCS2 and SPCS3 and actin-related ARPC5L genes, which are candidates for the somatotroph-restricted dysfunction. The reported novel mechanism for familial growth hormone deficiency demonstrates that general mRNA processing defects of the minor spliceosome can lead to very narrow tissue-specific consequences.

  18. Crystal structures of a group II intron maturase reveal a missing link in spliceosome evolution

    PubMed Central

    Zhao, Chen; Pyle, Anna Marie

    2016-01-01

    Group II introns are self-splicing ribozymes that are essential in many organisms, and they are hypothesized to share a common evolutionary ancestor with the spliceosome. While structural similarity of RNA components supports this connection, it is of interest to determine whether associated protein factors also share an evolutionary heritage. Here we present the crystal structures of reverse transcriptase (RT) domains from two group II intron encoded proteins (maturases) from Roseburia intestinalis and Eubacterium rectale, obtained at 1.2 Å and 2.1 Å respectively. Their architecture is more similar to the spliceosomal Prp8 RT-like domain than to any other RTs, and they share substantial similarity with flaviviral RNA polymerases. The RT domain itself is sufficient for binding intron RNA with high affinity and specificity, and it is contained within an active RT enzyme. These studies provide a foundation for understanding structure-function relationships within group II intron–maturase complexes. PMID:27136328

  19. Defective minor spliceosome mRNA processing results in isolated familial growth hormone deficiency

    PubMed Central

    Argente, Jesús; Flores, Raquel; Gutiérrez-Arumí, Armand; Verma, Bhupendra; Martos-Moreno, Gabriel Á; Cuscó, Ivon; Oghabian, Ali; Chowen, Julie A; Frilander, Mikko J; Pérez-Jurado, Luis A

    2014-01-01

    The molecular basis of a significant number of cases of isolated growth hormone deficiency remains unknown. We describe three sisters affected with severe isolated growth hormone deficiency and pituitary hypoplasia caused by biallelic mutations in the RNPC3 gene, which codes for a minor spliceosome protein required for U11/U12 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) formation and splicing of U12-type introns. We found anomalies in U11/U12 di-snRNP formation and in splicing of multiple U12-type introns in patient cells. Defective transcripts include preprohormone convertases SPCS2 and SPCS3 and actin-related ARPC5L genes, which are candidates for the somatotroph-restricted dysfunction. The reported novel mechanism for familial growth hormone deficiency demonstrates that general mRNA processing defects of the minor spliceosome can lead to very narrow tissue-specific consequences. Subject Categories Genetics, Gene Therapy ' Genetic Disease; Metabolism PMID:24480542

  20. Early commitment of yeast pre-mRNA to the spliceosome pathway.

    PubMed

    Legrain, P; Seraphin, B; Rosbash, M

    1988-09-01

    Pre-mRNA splicing in vitro is preceded by complex formation (spliceosome assembly). U2 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) is found in the earliest form of the spliceosome detected by native gel electrophoresis, both in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in metazoan extracts. To examine the requirements for the formation of this early complex (band III) in yeast extracts, we cleaved the U2 snRNA by oligonucleotide-directed RNase H digestion. U2 snRNA depletion by this means inhibits both splicing and band III formation. Using this depleted extract, we were able to design a chase experiment which shows that a pre-mRNA substrate is committed to the spliceosome assembly pathway in the absence of functional U2 snRNP. Interactions occurring during the commitment step are highly resistant to the addition of an excess of unlabeled substrate and require little or no ATP. Sequence requirements for this commitment step have been analyzed by competition experiments with deletion mutants: both the 5' splice site consensus sequence and the branch point TACTAAC box sequence are necessary. These experiments strongly suggest that the initial assembly process requires a trans-acting factor(s) (RNA and/or proteins) that recognizes and stably binds to the two consensus sequences of the pre-mRNA prior to U2 snRNP binding.

  1. Structure of a yeast catalytic step I spliceosome at 3.4 Å resolution.

    PubMed

    Wan, Ruixue; Yan, Chuangye; Bai, Rui; Huang, Gaoxingyu; Shi, Yigong

    2016-08-26

    Each cycle of pre-messenger RNA splicing, carried out by the spliceosome, comprises two sequential transesterification reactions, which result in the removal of an intron and the joining of two exons. Here we report an atomic structure of a catalytic step I spliceosome (known as the C complex) from Saccharomyces cerevisiae, as determined by cryo-electron microscopy at an average resolution of 3.4 angstroms. In the structure, the 2'-OH of the invariant adenine nucleotide in the branch point sequence (BPS) is covalently joined to the phosphate at the 5' end of the 5' splice site (5'SS), forming an intron lariat. The freed 5' exon remains anchored to loop I of U5 small nuclear RNA (snRNA), and the 5'SS and BPS of the intron form duplexes with conserved U6 and U2 snRNA sequences, respectively. Specific placement of these RNA elements at the catalytic cavity of Prp8 is stabilized by 15 protein components, including Snu114 and the splicing factors Cwc21, Cwc22, Cwc25, and Yju2. These features, representing the conformation of the spliceosome after the first-step reaction, predict structural changes that are needed for the execution of the second-step transesterification reaction.

  2. Diabetic polyneuropathy, sensory neurons, nuclear structure and spliceosome alterations: a role for CWC22.

    PubMed

    Kobayashi, Masaki; Chandrasekhar, Ambika; Cheng, Chu; Martinez, Jose A; Ng, Hilarie; de la Hoz, Cristiane; Zochodne, Douglas W

    2017-03-01

    Unique deficits in the function of adult sensory neurons as part of their early neurodegeneration might account for progressive polyneuropathy during chronic diabetes mellitus. Here, we provide structural and functional evidence for aberrant pre-mRNA splicing in a chronic type 1 model of experimental diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN). Cajal bodies (CBs), unique nuclear substructures involved in RNA splicing, increased in number in diabetic sensory neurons, but their expected colocalization with survival motor neuron (SMN) proteins was reduced - a mislocalization described in motor neurons of spinal muscular atrophy. Small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs), also participants in the spliceosome, had abnormal multiple nuclear foci unassociated with CBs, and their associated snRNAs were reduced. CWC22, a key spliceosome protein, was aberrantly upregulated in diabetic dorsal root ganglia (DRG), and impaired neuronal function. CWC22 attenuated sensory neuron plasticity, with knockdown in vitro enhancing their neurite outgrowth. Further, axonal delivery of CWC22 siRNA unilaterally to locally knock down the aberrant protein in diabetic nerves improved aspects of sensory function in diabetic mice. Collectively, our findings identify subtle but significant alterations in spliceosome structure and function, including dysregulated CBs and CWC22 overexpression, in diabetic sensory neurons that offer new ideas regarding diabetic sensory neurodegeneration in polyneuropathy.

  3. Diabetic polyneuropathy, sensory neurons, nuclear structure and spliceosome alterations: a role for CWC22

    PubMed Central

    Kobayashi, Masaki; Chandrasekhar, Ambika; Cheng, Chu; Martinez, Jose A.; Ng, Hilarie; de la Hoz, Cristiane

    2017-01-01

    ABSTRACT Unique deficits in the function of adult sensory neurons as part of their early neurodegeneration might account for progressive polyneuropathy during chronic diabetes mellitus. Here, we provide structural and functional evidence for aberrant pre-mRNA splicing in a chronic type 1 model of experimental diabetic polyneuropathy (DPN). Cajal bodies (CBs), unique nuclear substructures involved in RNA splicing, increased in number in diabetic sensory neurons, but their expected colocalization with survival motor neuron (SMN) proteins was reduced – a mislocalization described in motor neurons of spinal muscular atrophy. Small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs), also participants in the spliceosome, had abnormal multiple nuclear foci unassociated with CBs, and their associated snRNAs were reduced. CWC22, a key spliceosome protein, was aberrantly upregulated in diabetic dorsal root ganglia (DRG), and impaired neuronal function. CWC22 attenuated sensory neuron plasticity, with knockdown in vitro enhancing their neurite outgrowth. Further, axonal delivery of CWC22 siRNA unilaterally to locally knock down the aberrant protein in diabetic nerves improved aspects of sensory function in diabetic mice. Collectively, our findings identify subtle but significant alterations in spliceosome structure and function, including dysregulated CBs and CWC22 overexpression, in diabetic sensory neurons that offer new ideas regarding diabetic sensory neurodegeneration in polyneuropathy. PMID:28250049

  4. Mutant U2AF1-expressing cells are sensitive to pharmacological modulation of the spliceosome

    PubMed Central

    Shirai, Cara Lunn; White, Brian S.; Tripathi, Manorama; Tapia, Roberto; Ley, James N.; Ndonwi, Matthew; Kim, Sanghyun; Shao, Jin; Carver, Alexa; Saez, Borja; Fulton, Robert S.; Fronick, Catrina; O'Laughlin, Michelle; Lagisetti, Chandraiah; Webb, Thomas R.; Graubert, Timothy A.; Walter, Matthew J.

    2017-01-01

    Somatic mutations in spliceosome genes are detectable in ∼50% of patients with myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS). We hypothesize that cells harbouring spliceosome gene mutations have increased sensitivity to pharmacological perturbation of the spliceosome. We focus on mutant U2AF1 and utilize sudemycin compounds that modulate pre-mRNA splicing. We find that haematopoietic cells expressing mutant U2AF1(S34F), including primary patient cells, have an increased sensitivity to in vitro sudemycin treatment relative to controls. In vivo sudemycin treatment of U2AF1(S34F) transgenic mice alters splicing and reverts haematopoietic progenitor cell expansion induced by mutant U2AF1 expression. The splicing effects of sudemycin and U2AF1(S34F) can be cumulative in cells exposed to both perturbations—drug and mutation—compared with cells exposed to either alone. These cumulative effects may result in downstream phenotypic consequences in sudemycin-treated mutant cells. Taken together, these data suggest a potential for treating haematological cancers harbouring U2AF1 mutations with pre-mRNA splicing modulators like sudemycins. PMID:28067246

  5. Birth of new spliceosomal introns in fungi by multiplication of introner-like elements.

    PubMed

    van der Burgt, Ate; Severing, Edouard; de Wit, Pierre J G M; Collemare, Jérôme

    2012-07-10

    Spliceosomal introns are noncoding sequences that separate exons in eukaryotic genes and are removed from pre-messenger RNAs by the splicing machinery. Their origin has remained a mystery in biology since their discovery because intron gains seem to be infrequent in many eukaryotic lineages. Although a few recent intron gains have been reported, none of the proposed gain mechanisms can convincingly explain the high number of introns in present-day eukaryotic genomes. Here we report on particular spliceosomal introns that share high sequence similarity and are reminiscent of introner elements. These elements multiplied in unrelated genes of six fungal genomes and account for the vast majority of intron gains in these fungal species. Such introner-like elements (ILEs) contain all typical characteristics of regular spliceosomal introns (RSIs) but are longer and predicted to harbor more stable secondary structures. However, dating of multiplication events showed that they degenerate in sequence and length within 100,000 years to eventually become indistinguishable from RSIs. We suggest that ILEs not only account for intron gains in six fungi but also in ancestral eukaryotes to give rise to most RSIs by a yet unknown multiplication mechanism. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  6. Rearrangement of competing U2 RNA helices within the spliceosome promotes multiple steps in splicing

    PubMed Central

    Perriman, Rhonda J.; Ares, Manuel

    2007-01-01

    Nuclear pre-messenger RNA (pre-mRNA) splicing requires multiple spliceosomal small nuclear RNA (snRNA) and pre-mRNA rearrangements. Here we reveal a new snRNA conformational switch in which successive roles for two competing U2 helices, stem IIa and stem IIc, promote distinct splicing steps. When stem IIa is stabilized by loss of stem IIc, rapid ATP-independent and Cus2p-insensitive prespliceosome formation occurs. In contrast, hyperstabilized stem IIc improves the first splicing step on aberrant branchpoint pre-mRNAs and rescues temperature-sensitive U6–U57C, a U6 mutation that also suppresses first-step splicing defects of branchpoint mutations. A second, later role for stem IIa is revealed by its suppression of a cold-sensitive allele of the second-step splicing factor PRP16. Our data expose a spliceosomal progression cycle of U2 stem IIa formation, disruption by stem IIc, and then reformation of stem IIa before the second catalytic step. We propose that the competing stem IIa and stem IIc helices are key spliceosomal RNA elements that optimize juxtaposition of the proper reactive sites during splicing. PMID:17403781

  7. Forks in the tracks: Group II introns, spliceosomes, telomeres and beyond.

    PubMed

    Agrawal, Rajendra Kumar; Wang, Hong-Wei; Belfort, Marlene

    2016-12-01

    Group II introns are large catalytic RNAs that form a ribonucleoprotein (RNP) complex by binding to an intron-encoded protein (IEP). The IEP, which facilitates both RNA splicing and intron mobility, has multiple activities including reverse transcriptase. Recent structures of a group II intron RNP complex and of IEPs from diverse bacteria fuel arguments that group II introns are ancestrally related to eukaryotic spliceosomes as well as to telomerase and viruses. Furthermore, recent structural studies of various functional states of the spliceosome allow us to draw parallels between the group II intron RNP and the spliceosome. Here we present an overview of these studies, with an emphasis on the structure of the IEPs in their isolated and RNA-bound states and on their evolutionary relatedness. In addition, we address the conundrum of the free, albeit truncated IEPs forming dimers, whereas the IEP bound to the intron ribozyme is a monomer in the mature RNP. Future studies needed to resolve some of the outstanding issues related to group II intron RNP function and dynamics are also discussed.

  8. Dysregulation of spliceosome gene expression in advanced prostate cancer by RNA-binding protein PSF.

    PubMed

    Takayama, Ken-Ichi; Suzuki, Takashi; Fujimura, Tetsuya; Yamada, Yuta; Takahashi, Satoru; Homma, Yukio; Suzuki, Yutaka; Inoue, Satoshi

    2017-09-26

    Developing therapeutic approaches are necessary for treating hormone-refractory prostate cancer. Activation of androgen receptor (AR) and its variants' expression along with the downstream signals are mostly important for disease progression. However, the mechanism for marked increases of AR signals and its expression is still unclear. Here, we revealed that various spliceosome genes are aberrantly induced by RNA-binding protein PSF, leading to enhancement of the splicing activities for AR expression. Our high-speed sequence analyses identified global PSF-binding transcripts. PSF was shown to stabilize and activate key long noncoding RNAs and AR-regulated gene expressions in prostate cancer cells. Interestingly, mRNAs of spliceosome-related genes are putative primary targets of PSF. Their gene expressions are up-regulated by PSF in hormone-refractory prostate cancer. Moreover, PSF coordinated these spliceosome proteins to form a complex to promote AR splicing and expression. Thus, targeting PSF and its related pathways implicates the therapeutic possibility for hormone-refractory prostate cancer.

  9. Mutation of Arabidopsis SPLICEOSOMAL TIMEKEEPER LOCUS1 Causes Circadian Clock Defects[W

    PubMed Central

    Jones, Matthew A.; Williams, Brian A.; McNicol, Jim; Simpson, Craig G.; Brown, John W.S.; Harmer, Stacey L.

    2012-01-01

    The circadian clock plays a crucial role in coordinating plant metabolic and physiological functions with predictable environmental variables, such as dusk and dawn, while also modulating responses to biotic and abiotic challenges. Much of the initial characterization of the circadian system has focused on transcriptional initiation, but it is now apparent that considerable regulation is exerted after this key regulatory step. Transcript processing, protein stability, and cofactor availability have all been reported to influence circadian rhythms in a variety of species. We used a genetic screen to identify a mutation within a putative RNA binding protein (SPLICEOSOMAL TIMEKEEPER LOCUS1 [STIPL1]) that induces a long circadian period phenotype under constant conditions. STIPL1 is a homolog of the spliceosomal proteins TFP11 (Homo sapiens) and Ntr1p (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) involved in spliceosome disassembly. Analysis of general and alternative splicing using a high-resolution RT-PCR system revealed that mutation of this protein causes less efficient splicing of most but not all of the introns analyzed. In particular, the altered accumulation of circadian-associated transcripts may contribute to the observed mutant phenotype. Interestingly, mutation of a close homolog of STIPL1, STIP-LIKE2, does not cause a circadian phenotype, which suggests divergence in function between these family members. Our work highlights the importance of posttranscriptional control within the clock mechanism. PMID:23110899

  10. The DExD/H-box ATPase Prp2p destabilizes and proofreads the catalytic RNA core of the spliceosome

    PubMed Central

    Wlodaver, Alissa M.; Staley, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    After undergoing massive RNA and protein rearrangements during assembly, the spliceosome undergoes a final, more subtle, ATP-dependent rearrangement that is essential for catalysis. This rearrangement requires the DEAH-box protein Prp2p, an RNA-dependent ATPase. Prp2p has been implicated in destabilizing interactions between the spliceosome and the protein complexes SF3 and RES, but a role for Prp2p in destabilizing RNA–RNA interactions has not been explored. Using directed molecular genetics in budding yeast, we have found that a cold-sensitive prp2 mutation is suppressed not only by mutations in SF3 and RES components but also by a range of mutations that disrupt the spliceosomal catalytic core element U2/U6 helix I, which is implicated in juxtaposing the 5′ splice site and branch site and in positioning metal ions for catalysis within the context of a putative catalytic triplex; indeed, mutations in this putative catalytic triplex also suppressed a prp2 mutation. Remarkably, we also found that prp2 mutations rescue lethal mutations in U2/U6 helix I. These data provide evidence that RNA elements that comprise the catalytic core are already formed at the Prp2p stage and that Prp2p destabilizes these elements, directly or indirectly, both to proofread spliceosome activation and to promote reconfiguration of the spliceosome to a fully competent, catalytic conformation. PMID:24442613

  11. The 35S U5 snRNP Is Generated from the Activated Spliceosome during In vitro Splicing

    PubMed Central

    2015-01-01

    Primary gene transcripts of eukaryotes contain introns, which are removed during processing by splicing machinery. Biochemical studies In vitro have identified a specific pathway in which introns are recognised and spliced out. This occurs by progressive formation of spliceosomal complexes designated as E, A, B, and C. The composition and structure of these spliceosomal conformations have been characterised in many detail. In contrast, transitions between the complexes and the intermediates of these reactions are currently less clear. We have previously isolated a novel 35S U5 snRNP from HeLa nuclear extracts. The protein composition of this particle differed from the canonical 20S U5 snRNPs but was remarkably similar to the activated B* spliceosomes. Based on this observation we have proposed a hypothesis that 35S U5 snRNPs represent a dissociation product of the spliceosome after both transesterification reactions are completed. Here we provide experimental evidence that 35S U5 snRNPs are generated from the activated B* spliceosomes during In vitro splicing. PMID:26020933

  12. Spliceosome assembly in the absence of stable U4/U6 RNA pairing

    PubMed Central

    Burke, Jordan E.; Butcher, Samuel E.; Brow, David A.

    2015-01-01

    The cycle of spliceosome assembly, intron excision, and spliceosome disassembly involves large-scale structural rearrangements of U6 snRNA that are functionally important. U6 enters the splicing pathway bound to the Prp24 protein, which chaperones annealing of U6 to U4 RNA to form a U4/U6 di-snRNP. During catalytic activation of the assembled spliceosome, U4 snRNP is released and U6 is paired to U2 snRNA. Here we show that point mutations in U4 and U6 that decrease U4/U6 base-pairing in vivo are lethal in combination. However, this synthetic phenotype is rescued by a mutation in U6 that alters a U6–Prp24 contact and stabilizes U2/U6. Remarkably, the resulting viable triple mutant strain lacks detectable U4/U6 base-pairing and U4/U6 di-snRNP. Instead, this strain accumulates free U4 snRNP, protein-free U6 RNA, and a novel complex containing U2/U6 di-snRNP. Further mutational analysis indicates that disruption of the U6–Prp24 interaction rather than stabilization of U2/U6 renders stable U4/U6 di-snRNP assembly nonessential. We propose that an essential function of U4/U6 pairing is to displace Prp24 from U6 RNA, and thus a destabilized U6–Prp24 complex renders stable U4/U6 pairing nonessential. PMID:25762536

  13. Mapping epitopes of U1-70K autoantibodies at single-amino acid resolution.

    PubMed

    Haddon, David James; Jarrell, Justin Ansel; Diep, Vivian K; Wand, Hannah E; Price, Jordan V; Tangsombatvisit, Stephanie; Credo, Grace M; Mackey, Sally; Dekker, Cornelia L; Baechler, Emily C; Liu, Chih Long; Varma, Madoo; Utz, Paul J

    2015-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying development of ribonucleoprotein (RNP) autoantibodies are unclear. The U1-70K protein is the predominant target of RNP autoantibodies, and the RNA binding domain has been shown to be the immunodominant autoantigenic region of U1-70K, although the specific epitopes are not known. To precisely map U1-70K epitopes, we developed silicon-based peptide microarrays with >5700 features, corresponding to 843 unique peptides derived from the U1-70K protein. The microarrays feature overlapping peptides, with single-amino acid resolution in length and location, spanning amino acids 110-170 within the U1-70K RNA binding domain. We evaluated the serum IgG of a cohort of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE; n = 26) using the microarrays, and identified multiple reactive epitopes, including peptides 116-121 and 143-148. Indirect peptide ELISA analysis of the sera of patients with SLE (n = 88) revealed that ∼14% of patients had serum IgG reactivity to 116-121, while reactivity to 143-148 appeared to be limited to a single patient. SLE patients with serum reactivity to 116-121 had significantly lower SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) scores at the time of sampling, compared to non-reactive patients. Minimal reactivity to the peptides was observed in the sera of healthy controls (n = 92). Competitive ELISA showed antibodies to 116-121 bind a common epitope in U1-70K (68-72) and the matrix protein M1 of human influenza B viruses. Institutional Review Boards approved this study. Knowledge of the precise epitopes of U1-70K autoantibodies may provide insight into the mechanisms of development of anti-RNP, identify potential clinical biomarkers and inform ongoing clinical trails of peptide-based therapeutics.

  14. Mapping epitopes of U1-70K autoantibodies at single-amino acid resolution

    PubMed Central

    Haddon, David James; Jarrell, Justin Ansel; Diep, Vivian K.; Wand, Hannah E.; Price, Jordan V.; Tangsombatvisit, Stephanie; Credo, Grace M.; Mackey, Sally; Dekker, Cornelia L.; Baechler, Emily C.; Liu, Chih Long; Varma, Madoo; Utz, Paul J.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms underlying development of ribonucleoprotein (RNP) autoantibodies are unclear. The U1-70K protein is the predominant target of RNP autoantibodies, and the RNA binding domain has been shown to be the immunodominant autoantigenic region of U1-70K, although the specific epitopes are not known. To precisely map U1-70K epitopes, we developed silicon-based peptide microarrays with >5700 features, corresponding to 843 unique peptides derived from the U1-70K protein. The microarrays feature overlapping peptides, with single-amino acid resolution in length and location, spanning amino acids 110–170 within the U1-70K RNA binding domain. We evaluated the serum IgG of a cohort of patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE; n = 26) using the microarrays, and identified multiple reactive epitopes, including peptides 116–121 and 143–148. Indirect peptide ELISA analysis of the sera of patients with SLE (n = 88) revealed that ~14% of patients had serum IgG reactivity to 116–121, while reactivity to 143–148 appeared to be limited to a single patient. SLE patients with serum reactivity to 116–121 had significantly lower SLE Disease Activity Index (SLEDAI) scores at the time of sampling, compared to non-reactive patients. Minimal reactivity to the peptides was observed in the sera of healthy controls (n = 92). Competitive ELISA showed antibodies to 116–121 bind a common epitope in U1-70K (68–72) and the matrix protein M1 of human influenza B viruses. Institutional Review Boards approved this study. Knowledge of the precise epitopes of U1-70K autoantibodies may provide insight into the mechanisms of development of anti-RNP, identify potential clinical biomarkers and inform ongoing clinical trails of peptide-based therapeutics. PMID:26333287

  15. A ;gauged; U(1) Peccei-Quinn symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fukuda, Hajime; Ibe, Masahiro; Suzuki, Motoo; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.

    2017-08-01

    The Peccei-Quinn (PQ) solution to the strong CP problem requires an anomalous global U (1) symmetry, the PQ symmetry. The origin of such a convenient global symmetry is quite puzzling from the theoretical point of view in many aspects. In this paper, we propose a simple prescription which provides an origin of the PQ symmetry. There, the global U (1) PQ symmetry is virtually embedded in a gauged U (1) PQ symmetry. Due to its simplicity, this mechanism can be implemented in many conventional models with the PQ symmetry.

  16. Underground storage tank 291-D1U1: Closure plan

    SciTech Connect

    Mancieri, S.; Giuntoli, N.

    1993-09-01

    The 291-D1U1 tank system was installed in 1983 on the north side of Building 291. It supplies diesel fuel to the Building 291 emergency generator and air compressor. The emergency generator and air compressor are located southwest and southeast, respectively, of the tank (see Appendix B, Figure 2). The tank system consists of a single-walled, 2,000- gallon, fiberglass tank and a fuel pump system, fill pipe, vent pipe, electrical conduit, and fuel supply and return piping. The area to be excavated is paved with asphalt and concrete. It is not known whether a concrete anchor pad is associated with this tank. Additionally, this closure plan assumes that the diesel tank is below the fill pad. The emergency generator and air compressor for Building 291 and its associated UST, 291-D1U1, are currently in use. The generator and air compressor will be supplied by a temporary above-ground fuel tank prior to the removal of 291-D1U1. An above-ground fuel tank will be installed as a permanent replacement for 291-D1U1. The system was registered with the State Water Resources Control Board on June 27, 1984, as 291-41D and has subsequently been renamed 291-D1U1. Figure 1 (see Appendix B) shows the location of the 291-D1U1 tank system in relation to the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL). Figure 2 (see Appendix B) shows the 291-D1U1 tank system in relation to Building 291. Figure 3 (see Appendix B) shows a plan view of the 291-D1U1 tank system.

  17. Inflationary Magnetogenesis with On-shell Local U(1) Symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Domènech, Guillem; Lin, Chunshan; Sasaki, Misao

    2017-08-01

    We propose a new mechanism for inflationary magnetogenesis in which the local U(1) symmetry is broken during inflation. Nevertheless it is shown that the U(1) symmetry is recovered on-shell. We find that it is free from both the strong coupling and back reaction problems, and can explain the origin of cosmic magnetic fields on intergalactic scales, whose existence has been strongly suggested by recent observations.

  18. U(1) axial charge in the chiral limit

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ji, Xiangdong

    1990-07-01

    The U(1) axial-vector form factor is studied using an unsubtracted dispersion relation. The associated axial charge is shown to be analytic in quark masses in the chiral limit although individual terms in the Cheng-Li separation exhibit large isospin and flavor-SU(3) symmetry breaking. A new separation of the U(1) axial charge is proposed, based on the wave functions of the physical states entering in the spectral density.

  19. Dirac-fermionic dark matter in U(1)X models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Alves, Alexandre; Berlin, Asher; Profumo, Stefano; Queiroz, Farinaldo S.

    2015-10-01

    We study a number of U(1)X models featuring a Dirac fermion dark matter particle. We perform a comprehensive analysis which includes the study of corrections to the muon magnetic moment, dilepton searches with LHC data, as well as direct and indirect dark matter detection constraints. We consider four different coupling structures, namely U(1) B-L , U(1) d-u , U(1)universal, and U{(1)}_{10+overline{5}} , all motivated by compelling extensions to the standard model. We outline the viable and excluded regions of parameter space using a large set of probes. Our key findings are that (i) the combination of direct detection and collider constraints rule out dark matter particle masses lighter than ˜ 1 TeV, unless rather suppressed Z '-fermion couplings exist, and that (ii) for several of the models under consideration, collider constraints rule out Z ' masses up to ˜ 3 TeV. Lastly, we show that we can accommodate the recent Diboson excess reported by ATLAS collaboration within the U(1) d- u model.

  20. Spliceosome SNRNP200 Promotes Viral RNA Sensing and IRF3 Activation of Antiviral Response

    PubMed Central

    Tremblay, Nicolas; Baril, Martin; Chatel-Chaix, Laurent; Es-Saad, Salwa; Park, Alex Young; Koenekoop, Robert K.; Lamarre, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Spliceosomal SNRNP200 is a Ski2-like RNA helicase that is associated with retinitis pigmentosa 33 (RP33). Here we found that SNRNP200 promotes viral RNA sensing and IRF3 activation through the ability of its amino-terminal Sec63 domain (Sec63-1) to bind RNA and to interact with TBK1. We show that SNRNP200 relocalizes into TBK1-containing cytoplasmic structures upon infection, in contrast to the RP33-associated S1087L mutant, which is also unable to rescue antiviral response of SNRNP200 knockdown cells. This functional rescue correlates with the Sec63-1-mediated binding of viral RNA. The hindered IFN-β production of knockdown cells was further confirmed in peripheral blood cells of RP33 patients bearing missense mutation in SNRNP200 upon infection with Sendai virus (SeV). This work identifies a novel immunoregulatory role of the spliceosomal SNRNP200 helicase as an RNA sensor and TBK1 adaptor for the activation of IRF3-mediated antiviral innate response. PMID:27454487

  1. Novel Introner-Like Elements in fungi Are Involved in Parallel Gains of Spliceosomal Introns.

    PubMed

    Collemare, Jérôme; Beenen, Henriek G; Crous, Pedro W; de Wit, Pierre J G M; van der Burgt, Ate

    2015-01-01

    Spliceosomal introns are key components of the eukaryotic gene structure. Although they contributed to the emergence of eukaryotes, their origin remains elusive. In fungi, they might originate from the multiplication of invasive introns named Introner-Like Elements (ILEs). However, so far ILEs have been observed in six fungal species only, including Fulvia fulva and Dothistroma septosporum (Dothideomycetes), arguing against ILE insertion as a general mechanism for intron gain. Here, we identified novel ILEs in eight additional fungal species that are phylogenetically related to F. fulva and D. septosporum using PCR amplification with primers derived from previously identified ILEs. The ILE content appeared unique to each species, suggesting independent multiplication events. Interestingly, we identified four genes each containing two gained ILEs. By analysing intron positions in orthologues of these four genes in Ascomycota, we found that three ILEs had inserted within a 15 bp window that contains regular spliceosomal introns in other fungal species. These three positions are not the result of intron sliding because ILEs are newly gained introns. Furthermore, the alternative hypothesis of an inferred ancestral gain followed by independent losses contradicts the observed degeneration of ILEs. These observations clearly indicate three parallel intron gains in four genes that were randomly identified. Our findings suggest that parallel intron gain is a phenomenon that has been highly underestimated in ILE-containing fungi, and likely in the whole fungal kingdom.

  2. Reprogramming the Dynamin 2 mRNA by Spliceosome-mediated RNA Trans-splicing

    PubMed Central

    Trochet, Delphine; Prudhon, Bernard; Jollet, Arnaud; Lorain, Stéphanie; Bitoun, Marc

    2016-01-01

    Dynamin 2 (DNM2) is a large GTPase, ubiquitously expressed, involved in membrane trafficking and regulation of actin and microtubule cytoskeletons. DNM2 mutations cause autosomal dominant centronuclear myopathy which is a rare congenital myopathy characterized by skeletal muscle weakness and histopathological features including nuclear centralization in absence of regeneration. No curative treatment is currently available for the DNM2-related autosomal dominant centronuclear myopathy. In order to develop therapeutic strategy, we evaluated here the potential of Spliceosome-Mediated RNA Trans-splicing technology to reprogram the Dnm2-mRNA in vitro and in vivo in mice. We show that classical 3′-trans-splicing strategy cannot be considered as accurate therapeutic strategy regarding toxicity of the pre-trans-splicing molecules leading to low rate of trans-splicing in vivo. Thus, we tested alternative strategies devoted to prevent this toxicity and enhance frequency of trans-splicing events. We succeeded to overcome the toxicity through a 5′-trans-splicing strategy which also allows detection of trans-splicing events at mRNA and protein levels in vitro and in vivo. These results suggest that the Spliceosome-Mediated RNA Trans-splicing strategy may be used to reprogram mutated Dnm2-mRNA but highlight the potential toxicity linked to the molecular tools which have to be carefully investigated during preclinical development. PMID:27623444

  3. Crystal structure of Prp8 reveals active site cavity of the spliceosome.

    PubMed

    Galej, Wojciech P; Oubridge, Chris; Newman, Andrew J; Nagai, Kiyoshi

    2013-01-31

    The active centre of the spliceosome consists of an intricate network formed by U5, U2 and U6 small nuclear RNAs, and a pre-messenger-RNA substrate. Prp8, a component of the U5 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle, crosslinks extensively with this RNA catalytic core. Here we present the crystal structure of yeast Prp8 (residues 885-2413) in complex with Aar2, a U5 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle assembly factor. The structure reveals tightly associated domains of Prp8 resembling a bacterial group II intron reverse transcriptase and a type II restriction endonuclease. Suppressors of splice-site mutations, and an intron branch-point crosslink, map to a large cavity formed by the reverse transcriptase thumb, and the endonuclease-like and RNaseH-like domains. This cavity is large enough to accommodate the catalytic core of group II intron RNA. The structure provides crucial insights into the architecture of the spliceosome active site, and reinforces the notion that nuclear pre-mRNA splicing and group II intron splicing have a common origin.

  4. A Shotgun Proteomics Approach Reveals a New Toxic Role for Alzheimer's Disease Aβ Peptide: Spliceosome Impairment.

    PubMed

    Nuzzo, Domenico; Inguglia, Luigi; Walters, Jessica; Picone, Pasquale; Di Carlo, Marta

    2017-03-06

    Proteomic changes have been described in many neurodegenerative diseases, including Alzheimer's disease (AD). However, the early events in the onset of the pathology are yet to be fully elucidated. A cell model system in which LAN5 neuroblastoma cells were incubated for a short time with a recombinant form of Aβ42 was utilized. Proteins extracted from these cells were subjected to shotgun proteomics analysis by LTQ-Orbitrap-MS followed by label-free quantitation. By bioinformatics tools we found that the most significant of those found to be up-regulated were related to cytoskeletal dynamics (Rho related) and membrane-related processes. The most significant of the down-regulated proteins were hnRNP-related. In particular, hnRNPs involved in ribosomal biogenesis and in splicing were down-regulated. The latter of these processes stood out as it was highlighted ubiquitously and with the highest significance in the results of every analysis. Furthermore, our findings revealed down-regulation at every stage of the splicing process through down-regulation of every subunit of the spliceosome. Dysregulation of the spliceosome was also confirmed using a Western blot. In conclusion, these data suggest dysregulation of the proteins and processes identified as early events in pathogenesis of AD following Aβ accumulation.

  5. Novel Introner-Like Elements in fungi Are Involved in Parallel Gains of Spliceosomal Introns

    PubMed Central

    Crous, Pedro W.; de Wit, Pierre J. G. M.; van der Burgt, Ate

    2015-01-01

    Spliceosomal introns are key components of the eukaryotic gene structure. Although they contributed to the emergence of eukaryotes, their origin remains elusive. In fungi, they might originate from the multiplication of invasive introns named Introner-Like Elements (ILEs). However, so far ILEs have been observed in six fungal species only, including Fulvia fulva and Dothistroma septosporum (Dothideomycetes), arguing against ILE insertion as a general mechanism for intron gain. Here, we identified novel ILEs in eight additional fungal species that are phylogenetically related to F. fulva and D. septosporum using PCR amplification with primers derived from previously identified ILEs. The ILE content appeared unique to each species, suggesting independent multiplication events. Interestingly, we identified four genes each containing two gained ILEs. By analysing intron positions in orthologues of these four genes in Ascomycota, we found that three ILEs had inserted within a 15 bp window that contains regular spliceosomal introns in other fungal species. These three positions are not the result of intron sliding because ILEs are newly gained introns. Furthermore, the alternative hypothesis of an inferred ancestral gain followed by independent losses contradicts the observed degeneration of ILEs. These observations clearly indicate three parallel intron gains in four genes that were randomly identified. Our findings suggest that parallel intron gain is a phenomenon that has been highly underestimated in ILE-containing fungi, and likely in the whole fungal kingdom. PMID:26046656

  6. Cross talk between spliceosome and microprocessor defines the fate of pre-mRNA.

    PubMed

    Mattioli, Chiara; Pianigiani, Giulia; Pagani, Franco

    2014-01-01

    The spliceosome and the microprocessor complex (MPC) are two important processing machineries that act on precursor (pre)-mRNA. Both cleave the pre-mRNA to generate spliced mature transcripts and microRNAs (miRNAs), respectively. While spliceosomes identify in a complex manner correct splice sites, MPCs typically target RNA hairpins (pri-miRNA hairpins). In addition, pre-mRNA transcripts can contain pri-miRNA-like hairpins that are cleaved by the MPC without generating miRNAs. Recent evidence indicates that the position of hairpins on pre-mRNA, their distance from splice sites, and the relative efficiency of cropping and splicing contribute to determine the fate of a pre-mRNA. Depending on these factors, a pre-mRNA can be preferentially used to generate a miRNA, a constitutively or even an alternative spliced transcript. For example, competition between splicing and cropping on splice-site-overlapping miRNAs (SO miRNAs) results in alternative spliced isoforms and influences miRNA biogenesis. In several cases, the outcome of a pre-mRNA transcript and its final handling as miRNA or mRNA substrate can be frequently closely connected to the functional relationships between diverse pre-mRNA processing events. These events are influenced by both gene context and physiopathological conditions.

  7. The Dengue Virus NS5 Protein Intrudes in the Cellular Spliceosome and Modulates Splicing

    PubMed Central

    Shah, Priya; Pozzi, Berta; Gebhard, Leopoldo G.; Mammi, Pablo; Yanovsky, Marcelo J.; Andino, Raul; Krogan, Nevan; Srebrow, Anabella; Gamarnik, Andrea V.

    2016-01-01

    Dengue virus NS5 protein plays multiple functions in the cytoplasm of infected cells, enabling viral RNA replication and counteracting host antiviral responses. Here, we demonstrate a novel function of NS5 in the nucleus where it interferes with cellular splicing. Using global proteomic analysis of infected cells together with functional studies, we found that NS5 binds spliceosome complexes and modulates endogenous splicing as well as minigene-derived alternative splicing patterns. In particular, we show that NS5 alone, or in the context of viral infection, interacts with core components of the U5 snRNP particle, CD2BP2 and DDX23, alters the inclusion/exclusion ratio of alternative splicing events, and changes mRNA isoform abundance of known antiviral factors. Interestingly, a genome wide transcriptome analysis, using recently developed bioinformatics tools, revealed an increase of intron retention upon dengue virus infection, and viral replication was improved by silencing specific U5 components. Different mechanistic studies indicate that binding of NS5 to the spliceosome reduces the efficiency of pre-mRNA processing, independently of NS5 enzymatic activities. We propose that NS5 binding to U5 snRNP proteins hijacks the splicing machinery resulting in a less restrictive environment for viral replication. PMID:27575636

  8. Interactions of Arabidopsis RS domain containing cyclophilins with SR proteins and U1 and U11 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein-specific proteins suggest their involvement in pre-mRNA Splicing.

    PubMed

    Lorkovic, Zdravko J; Lopato, Sergiy; Pexa, Monika; Lehner, Reinhard; Barta, Andrea

    2004-08-06

    Ser/Arg (SR)-rich proteins are important splicing factors in both general and alternative splicing. By binding to specific sequences on pre-mRNA and interacting with other splicing factors via their RS domain they mediate different intraspliceosomal contacts, thereby helping in splice site selection and spliceosome assembly. While characterizing new members of this protein family in Arabidopsis, we have identified two proteins, termed CypRS64 and CypRS92, consisting of an N-terminal peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase domain and a C-terminal domain with many SR/SP dipeptides. Cyclophilins possess a peptidyl-prolyl cis/trans isomerase activity and are implicated in protein folding, assembly, and transport. CypRS64 interacts in vivo and in vitro with a subset of Arabidopsis SR proteins, including SRp30 and SRp34/SR1, two homologs of mammalian SF2/ASF, known to be important for 5' splice site recognition. In addition, both cyclophilins interact with U1-70K and U11-35K, which in turn are binding partners of SRp34/SR1. CypRS64 is a nucleoplasmic protein, but in most cells expressing CypRS64-GFP fusion it was also found in one to six round nuclear bodies. However, co-expression of CypRS64 with its binding partners resulted in re-localization of CypRS64 from the nuclear bodies to nuclear speckles, indicating functional interactions. These findings together with the observation that binding of SRp34/SR1 to CypRS64 is phosphorylation-dependent indicate an involvement of CypRS64 in nuclear pre-mRNA splicing, possibly by regulating phosphorylation/dephosphorylation of SR proteins and other spliceosomal components. Alternatively, binding of CypRS64 to proteins important for 5' splice site recognition suggests its involvement in the dynamics of spliceosome assembly.

  9. Cloning of the cDNA for U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle 70K protein from Arabidopsis thaliana

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Reddy, A. S.; Czernik, A. J.; An, G.; Poovaiah, B. W.

    1992-01-01

    We cloned and sequenced a plant cDNA that encodes U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) 70K protein. The plant U1 snRNP 70K protein cDNA is not full length and lacks the coding region for 68 amino acids in the amino-terminal region as compared to human U1 snRNP 70K protein. Comparison of the deduced amino acid sequence of the plant U1 snRNP 70K protein with the amino acid sequence of animal and yeast U1 snRNP 70K protein showed a high degree of homology. The plant U1 snRNP 70K protein is more closely related to the human counter part than to the yeast 70K protein. The carboxy-terminal half is less well conserved but, like the vertebrate 70K proteins, is rich in charged amino acids. Northern analysis with the RNA isolated from different parts of the plant indicates that the snRNP 70K gene is expressed in all of the parts tested. Southern blotting of genomic DNA using the cDNA indicates that the U1 snRNP 70K protein is coded by a single gene.

  10. Endothelial cell-binding activity of anti-U1-ribonucleoprotein antibodies in patients with connective tissue diseases

    PubMed Central

    Okawa-Takatsuji, M; Aotsuka, S; Uwatoko, S; Takaono, M; Iwasaki, K; Kinoshita, M; Sumiya, M

    2001-01-01

    In order to elucidate the immunological properties of anti-U1-ribonucleoprotein (RNP) antibody, one of the autoantibodies detected in patients with connective tissue diseases (CTDs), we tested the endothelial cell-binding by anti-U1-RNP antibodies and epitopes on human pulmonary artery endothelial cells (HPAECs) to which the autoantibody bound. IgG fractions positive for anti-U1-RNP from patients with CTDs bound to the HPAECs. Furthermore, intact and F(ab′)2 IgG anti-U1-RNP purified by affinity chromatography also bound to endothelial cells. The binding activity of IgG fractions positive for anti-U1-RNP to the endothelial cells could be effectively absorbed by U1-RNP-Sepharose. An immunoblotting assay of purified IgG anti-U1-RNP antibodies showed that these antibodies could bind to various membrane proteins of NP40-treated HPAECs such as 68, 48, 43, 38, 33, 29, 28 and 24 kDa. Some bands, 68, 33, 28 and 24 kDa, seemed to correspond to components of U1-RNP, i.e. 68 kDa, A, B′ and C peptides, respectively. We confirmed that the anti-U1-RNP antibody from patients with CTDs can directly recognize a variety of antigens on the endothelial surface of the pulmonary artery, including the components of U1-RNP or other unknown polypeptides. These results suggest that binding to pulmonary artery endothelial cells of this autoantibody may be one of the triggers of endothelial cell inflammation in CTDs. PMID:11703381

  11. The network organization of protein interactions in the spliceosome is reproduced by the simple rules of food-web models

    PubMed Central

    Pires, Mathias M.; Cantor, Maurício; Guimarães, Paulo R.; de Aguiar, Marcus A. M.; dos Reis, Sérgio F.; Coltri, Patricia P.

    2015-01-01

    The network structure of biological systems provides information on the underlying processes shaping their organization and dynamics. Here we examined the structure of the network depicting protein interactions within the spliceosome, the macromolecular complex responsible for splicing in eukaryotic cells. We show the interactions of less connected spliceosome proteins are nested subsets of the connections of the highly connected proteins. At the same time, the network has a modular structure with groups of proteins sharing similar interaction patterns. We then investigated the role of affinity and specificity in shaping the spliceosome network by adapting a probabilistic model originally designed to reproduce food webs. This food-web model was as successful in reproducing the structure of protein interactions as it is in reproducing interactions among species. The good performance of the model suggests affinity and specificity, partially determined by protein size and the timing of association to the complex, may be determining network structure. Moreover, because network models allow building ensembles of realistic networks while encompassing uncertainty they can be useful to examine the dynamics and vulnerability of intracelullar processes. Unraveling the mechanisms organizing the spliceosome interactions is important to characterize the role of individual proteins on splicing catalysis and regulation. PMID:26443080

  12. The EF-G-like GTPase Snu114p Regulates Spliceosome Dynamics Mediated by Brr2p, a DExD/H-box ATPase

    PubMed Central

    Small, Eliza C.; Leggett, Stephanie R.; Winans, Adrienne A.; Staley, Jonathan P.

    2012-01-01

    Summary Binding of a pre-mRNA substrate triggers spliceosome activation while the release of the mRNA product triggers spliceosome disassembly. The mechanisms that underlie the regulation of these rearrangements remain unclear. We find evidence that the GTPase Snu114p mediates the regulation of spliceosome activation and disassembly. Specifically, both unwinding of U4/U6, required for spliceosome activation, and disassembly of the post-splicing U2/U6•U5•intron complex are repressed by Snu114p bound to GDP and derepressed by Snu114 bound to GTP or nonhydrolyzable GTP analogs. Further, similar to U4/U6 unwinding, spliceosome disassembly requires the DExD/H-box ATPase Brr2p. Together, our data define a common mechanism for regulating and executing spliceosome activation and disassembly. Although sequence similarity with EF-G suggests Snu114p functions as a molecular motor, our findings indicate that Snu114p functions as a classic regulatory G protein. We propose that Snu114p serves as a signal-dependent switch that transduces signals to Brr2p to control spliceosome dynamics. PMID:16885028

  13. Origin of the U(1) field mass in superconductors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Koizumi, Hiroyasu

    2017-05-01

    Recently, a new theory for superconductivity has been put forward, in which the persistent current generation is attributed to the emergent singularities of the electronic wave function that are created by the spin-twisting itinerant circular motion of electrons. The persistent current generated by this mechanism behaves in every respect like supercurrent in superconductors, yielding the flux quantum h/2e and the Josephson frequency 2eV/h, where h is Planck’s constant, -e is the electron charge, and V is the voltage across the Josephson junction. The mass generation of the U(1) gauge field (or the Meissner effect) in the new theory is due to the emergence of topological objects, ‘instantons’ generated by the single-valued requirement of the wave function in the presence of the emergent singularities. The current standard theory of superconductivity is based on the BCS theory, and explains the emergence of superconductivity as due to the global U(1) gauge symmetry breaking realized by the Cooper pair formation. The U(1) field mass generation is believed to be due to this global U(1) gauge symmetry breaking. However, the feasibility of this mechanism has been questioned since no known interaction can prepare the global U(1) symmetry broken state from the normal state. We argue here that the U(1) mass generation in the BCS superconductor can be attributed to the one by the instanton mentioned above if the Rashba spin-orbit interaction is added. Then, the occurrence of persistent current generation becomes due to the instanton formation, and the role of the Cooper pair formation is to stabilize the instanton by providing an energy gap for perturbative excitations. Upon forming the Cooper pair, the instanton is stabilized and persistent current generation becomes possible. Thus, the superconducting transition temperature coincides with the Cooper pair formation temperature.

  14. In vitro synthesis of vertebrate U1 snRNA.

    PubMed Central

    Lund, E; Dahlberg, J E

    1989-01-01

    We have developed a DNA-dependent in vitro transcription system for vertebrate snRNA genes. By isolating the nuclei (germinal vesicles, GVs) of Xenopus laevis oocytes under oil to maintain the in vivo composition of their internal milieu, we are able to prepare nuclei that retain their ability to synthesize snRNAs efficiently. Homogenates of these GVs synthesize correctly initiated and terminated U1 snRNA using exogenous X.laevis U1 genes as templates. The templates may be either injected into the nucleus prior to its isolation or added to the nuclear homogenate. Images PMID:2714253

  15. On the Partical Conservation of the U(1) Current

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kawarabayashi, K.; Ohta, N.

    1981-11-01

    Recently proposed partial conservation of the U(1) current(PCU1C) is applied to estimate the decay rates of various OZIforbidden processes. The results obtained are in good agreement withexperiments and thus indicate the important role played by the U(1)axial-vector anomaly in these decay processes. Octet Jp = (1/2)+ baryons are next introduced into this scheme and low energy theorems related to the θ dependence of the matrix elements are investigated. Physical consequences of non-zero θ (strong CP-violation) are also discussed with the help of the PCU1C. The results are used to give the bound on θ.

  16. Disrupted auto-regulation of the spliceosomal gene SNRPB causes cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome.

    PubMed

    Lynch, Danielle C; Revil, Timothée; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Bhoj, Elizabeth J; Innes, A Micheil; Lamont, Ryan E; Lemire, Edmond G; Chodirker, Bernard N; Taylor, Juliet P; Zackai, Elaine H; McLeod, D Ross; Kirk, Edwin P; Hoover-Fong, Julie; Fleming, Leah; Savarirayan, Ravi; Majewski, Jacek; Jerome-Majewska, Loydie A; Parboosingh, Jillian S; Bernier, Francois P

    2014-07-22

    Elucidating the function of highly conserved regulatory sequences is a significant challenge in genomics today. Certain intragenic highly conserved elements have been associated with regulating levels of core components of the spliceosome and alternative splicing of downstream genes. Here we identify mutations in one such element, a regulatory alternative exon of SNRPB as the cause of cerebro-costo-mandibular syndrome. This exon contains a premature termination codon that triggers nonsense-mediated mRNA decay when included in the transcript. These mutations cause increased inclusion of the alternative exon and decreased overall expression of SNRPB. We provide evidence for the functional importance of this conserved intragenic element in the regulation of alternative splicing and development, and suggest that the evolution of such a regulatory mechanism has contributed to the complexity of mammalian development.

  17. Disrupted auto-regulation of the spliceosomal gene SNRPB causes cerebro–costo–mandibular syndrome

    PubMed Central

    Lynch, Danielle C.; Revil, Timothée; Schwartzentruber, Jeremy; Bhoj, Elizabeth J.; Innes, A. Micheil; Lamont, Ryan E.; Lemire, Edmond G.; Chodirker, Bernard N.; Taylor, Juliet P.; Zackai, Elaine H.; McLeod, D. Ross; Kirk, Edwin P.; Hoover-Fong, Julie; Fleming, Leah; Savarirayan, Ravi; Boycott, Kym; MacKenzie, Alex; Brudno, Michael; Bulman, Dennis; Dyment, David; Majewski, Jacek; Jerome-Majewska, Loydie A.; Parboosingh, Jillian S.; Bernier, Francois P.

    2014-01-01

    Elucidating the function of highly conserved regulatory sequences is a significant challenge in genomics today. Certain intragenic highly conserved elements have been associated with regulating levels of core components of the spliceosome and alternative splicing of downstream genes. Here we identify mutations in one such element, a regulatory alternative exon of SNRPB as the cause of cerebro–costo–mandibular syndrome. This exon contains a premature termination codon that triggers nonsense-mediated mRNA decay when included in the transcript. These mutations cause increased inclusion of the alternative exon and decreased overall expression of SNRPB. We provide evidence for the functional importance of this conserved intragenic element in the regulation of alternative splicing and development, and suggest that the evolution of such a regulatory mechanism has contributed to the complexity of mammalian development. PMID:25047197

  18. Expression, localization, and clinical application of the RNA binding domain of U1-70kD in HEp-2 cells.

    PubMed

    Song, Yang; Chen, Shun-le; Shen, Nan; Xue, Feng; Ye, Ping; Bao, Chun-de; Gu, Yue-ying; Yu, Chong-zhao; Lu, Liang-jing

    2015-01-01

    To develop an improved substrate for indirect immunofluorescent test (IIF) to detect anti-U1-70kD autoantibodies. The RNA binding domain of U1-70kD (U1BD) complementary DNA was obtained from human larynx carcinoma cell line HEp-2 by reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) and cloned into the mammalian expression vector pEGFP-C1. The recombinant plasmid pEGFP-U1BD was transfected into HEp-2 cells. Immunoblotting (IBT), confocal fluorescence microscopy, and IIF were used to confirm the expression, localization, and antigenicity of fusion proteins of green fluorescent protein (GFP) in transfected HEp-2 cells, which were then analyzed by IIF using human reference sera and compared with untransfected HEp-2 cells simultaneously. (1) The HEp-U1BD cells thus obtained retained their ability to express U1BD-GFP, which showed the antigenicity of U1BD with a characteristic phenotype in IIF. (2) Fifteen IBT-positive anti-U1-70kD sera presented with characteristic cytoplasmic staining on HEp-U1BD by IIF, but five sera without the 70kD reactive band in IBT were not found in the presence of HEp-U1BD pattern. Ten sera of healthy donors couldn't react with HEp-2 and HEp-U1BD at 1:80 attenuant degrees. (3) No differences in expression, localization, or morphology were observed when HEp-U1BD or HEp-2 interacted with the reference sera that could react with Ro/SSA, La/SSB, centromere, histone, and Scl-70 antigens in routine IIF test. HEp-U1BD cells kept the immunofluorescent properties of HEp-2 cells in an immunofluorescence anti-nuclear antibody (IFANA) test and could be potentially used as a substrate for routine IFANA detection. © 2015 by the Association of Clinical Scientists, Inc.

  19. An investigation of a role for U2 snRNP spliceosomal components in regulating transcription.

    PubMed

    McKay, Susannah L; Johnson, Tracy L

    2011-01-24

    There is mounting evidence to suggest that the synthesis of pre-mRNA transcripts and their subsequent splicing are coordinated events. Previous studies have implicated the mammalian spliceosomal U2 snRNP as having a novel role in stimulating transcriptional elongation in vitro through interactions with the elongation factors P-TEFb and Tat-SF1; however, the mechanism remains unknown [1]. These factors are conserved in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a fact that suggests that a similar interaction may occur in yeast to stimulate transcriptional elongation in vivo. To address this possibility we have looked for evidence of a role for the yeast Tat-SF1 homolog, Cus2, and the U2 snRNA in regulating transcription. Specifically, we have performed a genetic analysis to look for functional interactions between Cus2 or U2 snRNA and the P-TEFb yeast homologs, the Bur1/2 and Ctk1/2/3 complexes. In addition, we have analyzed Cus2-deleted or -overexpressing cells and U2 snRNA mutant cells to determine if they show transcription-related phenotypes similar to those displayed by the P-TEFb homolog mutants. In no case have we been able to observe phenotypes consistent with a role for either spliceosomal factor in transcription elongation. Furthermore, we did not find evidence for physical interactions between the yeast U2 snRNP factors and the P-TEFb homologs. These results suggest that in vivo, S. cerevisiae do not exhibit functional or physical interactions similar to those exhibited by their mammalian counterparts in vitro. The significance of the difference between our in vivo findings and the previously published in vitro results remains unclear; however, we discuss the potential importance of other factors, including viral proteins, in mediating the mammalian interactions.

  20. An Investigation of a Role for U2 snRNP Spliceosomal Components in Regulating Transcription

    PubMed Central

    McKay, Susannah L.; Johnson, Tracy L.

    2011-01-01

    There is mounting evidence to suggest that the synthesis of pre-mRNA transcripts and their subsequent splicing are coordinated events. Previous studies have implicated the mammalian spliceosomal U2 snRNP as having a novel role in stimulating transcriptional elongation in vitro through interactions with the elongation factors P-TEFb and Tat-SF1; however, the mechanism remains unknown [1]. These factors are conserved in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, a fact that suggests that a similar interaction may occur in yeast to stimulate transcriptional elongation in vivo. To address this possibility we have looked for evidence of a role for the yeast Tat-SF1 homolog, Cus2, and the U2 snRNA in regulating transcription. Specifically, we have performed a genetic analysis to look for functional interactions between Cus2 or U2 snRNA and the P-TEFb yeast homologs, the Bur1/2 and Ctk1/2/3 complexes. In addition, we have analyzed Cus2-deleted or -overexpressing cells and U2 snRNA mutant cells to determine if they show transcription-related phenotypes similar to those displayed by the P-TEFb homolog mutants. In no case have we been able to observe phenotypes consistent with a role for either spliceosomal factor in transcription elongation. Furthermore, we did not find evidence for physical interactions between the yeast U2 snRNP factors and the P-TEFb homologs. These results suggest that in vivo, S. cerevisiae do not exhibit functional or physical interactions similar to those exhibited by their mammalian counterparts in vitro. The significance of the difference between our in vivo findings and the previously published in vitro results remains unclear; however, we discuss the potential importance of other factors, including viral proteins, in mediating the mammalian interactions. PMID:21283673

  1. Assembly and disassembly of spliceosomes along a specific pre-messenger RNP fiber.

    PubMed

    Kiseleva, E; Wurtz, T; Visa, N; Daneholt, B

    1994-12-15

    Transcriptionally active Balbiani ring (BR) genes in the salivary glands of the dipteran Chironomus tentans were studied by immunoelectron microscopy to establish the distribution of spliceosome components along a specific pre-messenger ribonucleoprotein (pre-mRNP) fiber. The BR genes are 35-40 kb in size with three introns close to the 5' end and one close to the 3' end; a very large middle portion lacks introns. As a rule the 5' introns are spliced concomitant with transcription in the promoter proximal third of the gene, while the 3' intron is spliced post-transcriptionally. The BR genes with growing pre-mRNPs were visualized in situ, while completed and released pre-mRNPs were isolated from the nucleoplasm and studied unfolded on a grid surface. An anti-snRNP antibody (Y12) bound mainly to the promoter proximal third of the BR gene (86%) and only to a minor extent to the middle and distal thirds (7 and 7% respectively). An antibody to an hnRNP protein reacted with the proximal, middle and distal regions to an increasing extent (17, 38 and 45% respectively), reflecting the increase in size of the growing transcription product. In the nucleoplasmic pre-mRNP particle only one end of the RNP fiber was labeled by Y 12, presumably the 3' end; the anti-hnRNP antibody decorated the entire RNP fiber. Thus, the snRNPs do not associate along the whole pre-mRNP fiber but rather bind to the 5' and 3' ends, i.e. the regions containing the introns. The results also imply that the spliceosomes both assemble and disassemble rapidly on the pre-mRNP fiber.

  2. Finite-temperature screening of U (1) fractons

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pretko, Michael

    2017-09-01

    We investigate the finite-temperature screening behavior of three-dimensional U (1 ) spin-liquid phases with fracton excitations. Several features are shared with the conventional U (1 ) spin liquid. The system can exhibit spin-liquid physics over macroscopic length scales at low temperatures, but screening effects eventually lead to a smooth finite-temperature crossover to a trivial phase at sufficiently large distances. However, unlike more conventional U (1 ) spin liquids, we find that complete low-temperature screening of fractons requires not only very large distances, but also very long time scales. At the longest time scales, a charged disturbance (fracton) will acquire a screening cloud of other fractons, resulting in only short-range correlations in the system. At intermediate time scales, on the other hand, a fracton can only be partially screened by a cloud of mobile excitations, leaving weak power-law correlations in the system. Such residual power-law correlations may be a useful diagnostic in an experimental search for U (1 ) fracton phases.

  3. Underground storage tank 511-D1U1 closure plan

    SciTech Connect

    Mancieri, S.; Giuntoli, N.

    1993-09-01

    This document contains the closure plan for diesel fuel underground storage tank 511-D1U1 and appendices containing supplemental information such as staff training certification and task summaries. Precision tank test data, a site health and safety plan, and material safety data sheets are also included.

  4. trans-splicing to spliceosomal U2 snRNA suggests disruption of branch site-U2 pairing during pre-mRNA splicing.

    PubMed

    Smith, Duncan J; Query, Charles C; Konarska, Maria M

    2007-06-22

    Pairing between U2 snRNA and the branch site of spliceosomal introns is essential for spliceosome assembly and is thought to be required for the first catalytic step of splicing. We have identified an RNA comprising the 5' end of U2 snRNA and the 3' exon of the ACT1-CUP1 reporter gene, resulting from a trans-splicing reaction in which a 5' splice site-like sequence in the universally conserved branch site-binding region of U2 is used in trans as a 5' splice site for both steps of splicing in vivo. Formation of this product occurs in functional spliceosomes assembled on reporter genes whose 5' splice sites are predicted to bind poorly at the spliceosome catalytic center. Multiple spatially disparate splice sites in U2 can be used, calling into question both the fate of its pairing to the branch site and the details of its role in splicing catalysis.

  5. The target of the DEAH-box NTP triphosphatase Prp43 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae spliceosomes is the U2 snRNP-intron interaction.

    PubMed

    Fourmann, Jean-Baptiste; Dybkov, Olexandr; Agafonov, Dmitry E; Tauchert, Marcel J; Urlaub, Henning; Ficner, Ralf; Fabrizio, Patrizia; Lührmann, Reinhard

    2016-04-26

    The DEAH-box NTPase Prp43 and its cofactors Ntr1 and Ntr2 form the NTR complex and are required for disassembling intron-lariat spliceosomes (ILS) and defective earlier spliceosomes. However, the Prp43 binding site in the spliceosome and its target(s) are unknown. We show that Prp43 fused to Ntr1's G-patch motif (Prp43_Ntr1GP) is as efficient as the NTR in ILS disassembly, yielding identical dissociation products and recognizing its natural ILS target even in the absence of Ntr1's C-terminal-domain (CTD) and Ntr2. Unlike the NTR, Prp43_Ntr1GP disassembles earlier spliceosomal complexes (A, B, B(act)), indicating that Ntr2/Ntr1-CTD prevents NTR from disrupting properly assembled spliceosomes other than the ILS. The U2 snRNP-intron interaction is disrupted in all complexes by Prp43_Ntr1GP, and in the spliceosome contacts U2 proteins and the pre-mRNA, indicating that the U2 snRNP-intron interaction is Prp43's major target.

  6. The target of the DEAH-box NTP triphosphatase Prp43 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae spliceosomes is the U2 snRNP-intron interaction

    PubMed Central

    Fourmann, Jean-Baptiste; Dybkov, Olexandr; Agafonov, Dmitry E; Tauchert, Marcel J; Urlaub, Henning; Ficner, Ralf; Fabrizio, Patrizia; Lührmann, Reinhard

    2016-01-01

    The DEAH-box NTPase Prp43 and its cofactors Ntr1 and Ntr2 form the NTR complex and are required for disassembling intron-lariat spliceosomes (ILS) and defective earlier spliceosomes. However, the Prp43 binding site in the spliceosome and its target(s) are unknown. We show that Prp43 fused to Ntr1's G-patch motif (Prp43_Ntr1GP) is as efficient as the NTR in ILS disassembly, yielding identical dissociation products and recognizing its natural ILS target even in the absence of Ntr1’s C-terminal-domain (CTD) and Ntr2. Unlike the NTR, Prp43_Ntr1GP disassembles earlier spliceosomal complexes (A, B, Bact), indicating that Ntr2/Ntr1-CTD prevents NTR from disrupting properly assembled spliceosomes other than the ILS. The U2 snRNP-intron interaction is disrupted in all complexes by Prp43_Ntr1GP, and in the spliceosome contacts U2 proteins and the pre-mRNA, indicating that the U2 snRNP-intron interaction is Prp43’s major target. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.15564.001 PMID:27115347

  7. Underground storage tank 431-D1U1, Closure Plan

    SciTech Connect

    Mancieri, S.

    1993-09-01

    This document contains information about the decommissioning of Tank 431-D1U1. This tank was installed in 1965 for diesel fuel storage. This tank will remain in active usage until closure procedures begin. Soils and ground water around the tank will be sampled to check for leakage. Appendices include; proof of proper training for workers, health and safety briefing record, task hazard analysis summary, and emergency plans.

  8. Lattice U(1) gauge model in 3+1 dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Hamer, C.J.; Aydin, M. )

    1991-06-15

    The stochastic truncation method has been used to calculate the ground-state energy and string tension for the compact lattice U(1) gauge model in 3+1 dimensions. Finite-size behavior characteristic of a line of fixed points at weak coupling is clearly evident. No sign is seen of a first-order transition at the end point of the critical line: the data seem most consistent with a normal second-order transition.

  9. Involvement of the spliceosomal U4 small nuclear RNA in heterochromatic gene silencing at fission yeast centromeres.

    PubMed

    Chinen, Madoka; Morita, Misato; Fukumura, Kazuhiro; Tani, Tokio

    2010-02-19

    prp13-1 is one of the mutants isolated in a screen for defective pre-mRNA splicing at a nonpermissive temperature in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We cloned the prp13(+) gene and found that it encodes U4 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) involved in the assembly of the spliceosome. The prp13-1 mutant produced elongated cells, a phenotype similar to cell division cycle mutants, and displays a high incidence of lagging chromosomes on anaphase spindles. The mutant is hypersensitive to the microtubule-destabilizing drug thiabendazole, supporting that prp13-1 has a defect in chromosomal segregation. We found that the prp13-1 mutation resulted in expression of the ura4(+) gene inserted in the pericentromeric heterochromatin region and reduced recruitment of the heterochromatin protein Swi6p to that region, indicating defects in the formation of pericentromeric heterochromatin, which is essential for the segregation of chromosomes, in prp13-1. The formation of centromeric heterochromatin is induced by the RNA interference (RNAi) system in S. pombe. In prp13-1, the processing of centromeric noncoding RNAs to siRNAs, which direct the heterochromatin formation, was impaired and unprocessed noncoding RNAs were accumulated. These results suggest that U4 snRNA is required for the RNAi-directed heterochromatic gene silencing at the centromeres. In relation to the linkage between the spliceosomal U4 snRNA and the RNAi-directed formation of heterochromatin, we identified a mRNA-type intron in the centromeric noncoding RNAs. We propose a model in which the assembly of the spliceosome or a sub-spliceosome complex on the intron-containing centromeric noncoding RNAs facilitates the RNAi-directed formation of heterochromatin at centromeres, through interaction with the RNA-directed RNA polymerase complex.

  10. Involvement of the Spliceosomal U4 Small Nuclear RNA in Heterochromatic Gene Silencing at Fission Yeast Centromeres*

    PubMed Central

    Chinen, Madoka; Morita, Misato; Fukumura, Kazuhiro; Tani, Tokio

    2010-01-01

    prp13-1 is one of the mutants isolated in a screen for defective pre-mRNA splicing at a nonpermissive temperature in fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. We cloned the prp13+ gene and found that it encodes U4 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) involved in the assembly of the spliceosome. The prp13-1 mutant produced elongated cells, a phenotype similar to cell division cycle mutants, and displays a high incidence of lagging chromosomes on anaphase spindles. The mutant is hypersensitive to the microtubule-destabilizing drug thiabendazole, supporting that prp13-1 has a defect in chromosomal segregation. We found that the prp13-1 mutation resulted in expression of the ura4+ gene inserted in the pericentromeric heterochromatin region and reduced recruitment of the heterochromatin protein Swi6p to that region, indicating defects in the formation of pericentromeric heterochromatin, which is essential for the segregation of chromosomes, in prp13-1. The formation of centromeric heterochromatin is induced by the RNA interference (RNAi) system in S. pombe. In prp13-1, the processing of centromeric noncoding RNAs to siRNAs, which direct the heterochromatin formation, was impaired and unprocessed noncoding RNAs were accumulated. These results suggest that U4 snRNA is required for the RNAi-directed heterochromatic gene silencing at the centromeres. In relation to the linkage between the spliceosomal U4 snRNA and the RNAi-directed formation of heterochromatin, we identified a mRNA-type intron in the centromeric noncoding RNAs. We propose a model in which the assembly of the spliceosome or a sub-spliceosome complex on the intron-containing centromeric noncoding RNAs facilitates the RNAi-directed formation of heterochromatin at centromeres, through interaction with the RNA-directed RNA polymerase complex. PMID:20018856

  11. An exon-specific U1 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) strategy to correct splicing defects

    PubMed Central

    Fernandez Alanis, Eugenio; Pinotti, Mirko; Dal Mas, Andrea; Balestra, Dario; Cavallari, Nicola; Rogalska, Malgorzata E.; Bernardi, Francesco; Pagani, Franco

    2012-01-01

    A significant proportion of disease-causing mutations affect precursor-mRNA splicing, inducing skipping of the exon from the mature transcript. Using F9 exon 5, CFTR exon 12 and SMN2 exon 7 models, we characterized natural mutations associated to exon skipping in Haemophilia B, cystic fibrosis and spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), respectively, and the therapeutic splicing rescue by using U1 small nuclear RNA (snRNA). In minigene expression systems, loading of U1 snRNA by complementarity to the normal or mutated donor splice sites (5′ss) corrected the exon skipping caused by mutations at the polypyrimidine tract of the acceptor splice site, at the consensus 5′ss or at exonic regulatory elements. To improve specificity and reduce potential off-target effects, we developed U1 snRNA variants targeting non-conserved intronic sequences downstream of the 5′ss. For each gene system, we identified an exon-specific U1 snRNA (ExSpeU1) able to rescue splicing impaired by the different types of mutations. Through splicing-competent cDNA constructs, we demonstrated that the ExSpeU1-mediated splicing correction of several F9 mutations results in complete restoration of secreted functional factor IX levels. Furthermore, two ExSpeU1s for SMA improved SMN exon 7 splicing in the chromosomal context of normal cells. We propose ExSpeU1s as a novel therapeutic strategy to correct, in several human disorders, different types of splicing mutations associated with defective exon definition. PMID:22362925

  12. Zinc finger-like structure in U1-specific protein C is essential for specific binding to U1 snRNP.

    PubMed Central

    Nelissen, R L; Heinrichs, V; Habets, W J; Simons, F; Lührmann, R; van Venrooij, W J

    1991-01-01

    The U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (snRNP) contains three specific proteins denoted 70K, A and C, in addition to the common proteins. Specific functions of these proteins are not known although recently protein C was shown to be involved in the binding of U1 snRNP to the 5' splice site of a pre-mRNA. Unlike proteins A and 70K, U1-C lacks an RNA binding domain (RNP-80 motif) and does not appear to bind directly to U1 snRNA. However, at the amino terminal end protein C contains a zinc finger-like structure of the CC-HH type found in transcription factor TF IIIA. Several lines of evidence indicate that the zinc finger-like structure is essential for the binding of protein C to U1 snRNP particles: i) deletion analysis of protein C showed that the N-terminal 45 amino acids are sufficient for binding to U1 snRNPs, ii) modification of the cysteine residues in the N-terminal domain with N-ethylmaleimide and iii) single point mutations of the cysteines and histidines contributing to the putative zinc finger abolished binding of protein C to U1 snRNPs. Interestingly, unlike the proteins U1-A and U1-70K the U1-C protein is unable to bind to naked U1 snRNA. On the other hand it is shown that protein C does not bind to the known protein constituents of the U1 particle without the U1 snRNA being present. These data indicate that the binding of protein C to U1 snRNP is dependent on the presence of both the U1 snRNA and one or more of the U1 snRNP proteins. Images PMID:1826349

  13. Entanglement entropy of U (1) quantum spin liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pretko, Michael; Senthil, T.

    2016-09-01

    We here investigate the entanglement structure of the ground state of a (3 +1 )-dimensional U (1 ) quantum spin liquid, which is described by the deconfined phase of a compact U (1 ) gauge theory. A gapless photon is the only low-energy excitation, with matter existing as deconfined but gapped excitations of the system. It is found that, for a given bipartition of the system, the elements of the entanglement spectrum can be grouped according to the electric flux between the two regions, leading to a useful interpretation of the entanglement spectrum in terms of electric charges living on the boundary. The entanglement spectrum is also given additional structure due to the presence of the gapless photon. Making use of the Bisognano-Wichmann theorem and a local thermal approximation, these two contributions to the entanglement (particle and photon) are recast in terms of boundary and bulk contributions, respectively. Both pieces of the entanglement structure give rise to universal subleading terms (relative to the area law) in the entanglement entropy, which are logarithmic in the system size (logL ), as opposed to the subleading constant term in gapped topologically ordered systems. The photon subleading logarithm arises from the low-energy conformal field theory and is essentially local in character. The particle subleading logarithm arises due to the constraint of closed electric loops in the wave function and is shown to be the natural generalization of topological entanglement entropy to the U (1 ) spin liquid. This contribution to the entanglement entropy can be isolated by means of the Grover-Turner-Vishwanath construction (which generalizes the Kitaev-Preskill scheme to three dimensions).

  14. Higgs Bosons in the NMSSM and its U(1) Extensions

    SciTech Connect

    Gunion, John F.

    2008-11-23

    I specify the characteristics of a Higgs boson that would be 'ideal' in the light of current data and theoretical attractiveness. I then review why it is that the Higgs bosons of the Standard Model and the Minimal Supersymmetric Model cannot be ideal whereas the lightest Higgs boson of the Next to Minimal Supersymmetric Model can be ideal. Experimental consequences for Higgs and supersymmetry discovery are then reviewed. I then examine the alternatives to the NMSSM in which the MSSM is extended via an extra U(1) symmetry.

  15. Baryogenesis and dark matter in U(1) extensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Feng, Wan-Zhe; Nath, Pran

    2017-05-01

    A brief review is given of some recent works where baryogenesis and dark matter have a common origin within the U(1) extensions of the Standard Model (SM) and of the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model (MSSM). The models considered generate the desired baryon asymmetry and the dark matter to baryon ratio. In one model, all of the fundamental interactions do not violate lepton number, and the total B - L in the Universe vanishes. In addition, one may also generate a normal hierarchy of neutrino masses and mixings in conformity with the current data. Specifically, one can accommodate 𝜃13 ˜ 9∘ consistent with the data from Daya Bay reactor neutrino experiment.

  16. [Research on the association between U2-dependent spliceosome gene and hepatocellular cancer].

    PubMed

    Song, Wei; Zhu, Beibei; Tian, Yao; Zhong, Rong; Tian, Jing; Miao, Xiaoping; Wang, Li

    2015-06-01

    To determine the association between U2-dependent spliceosome related 8 key genes and hepatocellular cancer (HCC). A two-stage case-control study was conducted. Twenty-two candidate tag single nucleotide polymorphisms (tagSNPs) were genotyped by TaqMan Openarray assay in a screened population that living in Central China (378 HCC incident cases and 461 controls). Frequencies of 4 SNPs (rs2074733, rs9608886, rs7288947 and rs5994293) showed significant difference between cases and controls in the screened population and then genotyped by TaqMan real-time polymerase chain reaction in the validation Chinese Han population from Beijing (428 cases and 647 controls). The rs5994293 in SF3A1 gene showed a significant association with HCC in both screened population and combined population. Subjects with G allele had a lower risk of HCC, compared to those with the TT genotype. OR appeared to be 0.70 (95% CI: 0.58-0.84, false discovery rate adjusted P = 0.000 5) for the combined population. An additive interaction between smoking, drinking alcohol and rs5994293 TT was observed in HBsAg negative subjects of the combined populations. Our results showed an association existing between SF3A1 rs5994293 and HCC. These findings should be confirmed by further independently large-scale population studies and functional analysis.

  17. Unique genome of dicyemid mesozoan: highly shortened spliceosomal introns in conservative exon/intron structure.

    PubMed

    Ogino, Kazutoyo; Tsuneki, Kazuhiko; Furuya, Hidetaka

    2010-01-01

    Dicyemids are enigmatic endoparasites, or endosymbionts, living in the renal sac of benthic cephalopod molluscs. The body of dicyemids consists of only 9-41 cells, with neither extracellular matrices nor differentiated tissues. Due to the unusually simple body organization, dicyemids have long been the subject of phylogenetic controversy. Molecular evidences suggest dicyemids are lophotrochozoans that have secondarily lost many morphological characters. We studied 40 genes of the dicyemid Dicyema japonicum and found that their spliceosomal introns are very short (mean length=26 bp). This size was shorter than that of introns of animals, such as Fugu rubripes and Oikopleura dioica which possess compact genome and introns. In the intron size, the dicyemid was nearly equal to the chlorarachniophyte Bigelowiella natans nucleomorph (18-21 bp) which has the shortest introns of any known eukaryote. Despite the short introns, the intron density (5.3 introns/gene) of the dicyemid is similar to that in model invertebrates. In addition, the exon/intron structure of the dicyemid is more similar to vertebrates than to the model invertebrates. These results suggest that the positions of the introns are possibly conserved under functional constraints.

  18. Crystal structure of Prp8 reveals active site cavity of the spliceosome

    PubMed Central

    Galej, Wojciech P.; Oubridge, Chris; Newman, Andrew J.; Nagai, Kiyoshi

    2012-01-01

    The active centre of the spliceosome consists of an intricate network formed by U5, U2 and U6 snRNAs, and a pre-mRNA substrate. Prp8, a component of the U5 snRNP, crosslinks extensively with this RNA catalytic core. We present the crystal structure of yeast Prp8 (residues 885-2413) in complex with the U5 snRNP assembly factor Aar2. The structure reveals new tightly associated domains of Prp8 resembling a bacterial group II intron reverse transcriptase and a type II restriction endonuclease. Suppressors of splice site mutations and an intron branchpoint crosslink map to a large cavity formed by the reverse transcriptase thumb, endonuclease-like and the RNaseH-like domains. This cavity is large enough to accommodate the catalytic core of group II intron RNA. The structure provides crucial insights into the architecture of the spliceosome’s active site and reinforces the notion that nuclear pre-mRNA splicing and group II intron splicing have a common origin. PMID:23354046

  19. Evidence for a group II intron-like catalytic triplex in the spliceosome

    PubMed Central

    Piccirilli, Joseph A.; Staley, Jonathan P.

    2014-01-01

    To catalyze pre-mRNA splicing, U6 snRNA positions two metals that interact directly with the scissile phosphates. The U6 metal ligands correspond stereospecifically to metal ligands within the catalytic domain V of a group II self-splicing intron. In domain V, the ligands are organized by base-triple interactions, which also juxtapose the 3′ splice site with the catalytic metals. However, in the spliceosome, the mechanism for organizing catalytic metals and recruiting the substrate has remained unclear. Here we show by genetics, crosslinking, and biochemistry in yeast that analogous triples form in U6 and promote catalytic metal binding and both chemical steps of splicing. Because the triples include an element that defines the 5′ splice site, the triples also provide a mechanism for juxtaposing the pre-mRNA substrate with the catalytic metals. Our data indicate that U6 adopts a group II intron-like tertiary conformation to catalyze splicing. PMID:24747940

  20. Prp43p Is a DEAH-Box Spliceosome Disassembly Factor Essential for Ribosome Biogenesis

    PubMed Central

    Combs, D. Joshua; Nagel, Roland J.; Ares, Manuel; Stevens, Scott W.

    2006-01-01

    The known function of the DEXH/D-box protein Prp43p is the removal of the U2, U5, and U6 snRNPs from the postsplicing lariat-intron ribonucleoprotein complex. We demonstrate that affinity-purified Prp43p-associated material includes the expected spliceosomal components; however, we also identify several preribosomal complexes that are specifically purified with Prp43p. Conditional prp43 mutant alleles confer a 35S pre-rRNA processing defect, with subsequent depletion of 27S and 20S precursors. Upon a shift to a nonpermissive temperature, both large and small-ribosomal-subunit proteins accumulate in the nucleolus of prp43 mutants. Pulse-chase analysis demonstrates delayed kinetics of 35S, 27S, and 20S pre-rRNA processing with turnover of these intermediates. Microarray analysis of pre-mRNA splicing defects in prp43 mutants shows a very mild effect, similar to that of nonessential pre-mRNA splicing factors. Prp43p is the first DEXH/D-box protein shown to function in both RNA polymerase I and polymerase II transcript metabolism. Its essential function is in its newly characterized role in ribosome biogenesis of both ribosomal subunits, positioning Prp43p to regulate both pre-mRNA splicing and ribosome biogenesis. PMID:16382144

  1. Tempo and mode of spliceosomal intron evolution in actin of foraminifera.

    PubMed

    Flakowski, Jérôme; Bolivar, Ignacio; Fahrni, José; Pawlowski, Jan

    2006-07-01

    Spliceosomal introns are present in almost all eukaryotic genes, yet little is known about their origin and turnover in the majority of eukaryotic phyla. There is no agreement whether most introns are ancestral and have been lost in some lineage or have been gained recently. We addressed this question by analyzing the spatial and temporal distribution of introns in actins of foraminifera, a group of testate protists whose exceptionally rich fossil record permits the calibration of molecular phylogenies to date intron origins. We identified 24 introns dispersed along the sequence of two foraminiferan actin paralogues and actin deviating proteins, an unconventional type of fast-evolving actin found in some foraminifera. Comparison of intron positions indicates that 20 of 24 introns are specific to foraminifera. Four introns shared between foraminifera and other eukaryotes were interpreted as parallel gains because they have been found only in single species belonging to phylogenetically distinctive lineages. Moreover, additional recent intron gain due to the transfer between the actin paralogues was observed in two cultured species. Based on a relaxed molecular clock timescale, we conclude that intron gains in actin took place throughout the evolution of foraminifera, with the oldest introns inserted between 550 and 500 million years ago and the youngest ones acquired less than 100 million years ago.

  2. The spliceosome-associated protein Mfap1 binds to VCP in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Rode, Sandra; Ohm, Henrike; Zipfel, Jaqueline

    2017-01-01

    Posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression contributes to many developmental transitions. Previously, we found that the AAA chaperone Valosin-Containing Protein (VCP) regulates ecdysone-dependent dendrite pruning of Drosophila class IV dendritic arborization (c4da) neurons via an effect on RNA metabolism. In a search for RNA binding proteins associated with VCP, we identified the spliceosome-associated protein Mfap1, a component of the tri-snRNP complex. Mfap1 is a nucleolar protein in neurons and its levels are regulated by VCP. Mfap1 binds to VCP and TDP-43, a disease-associated RNA-binding protein. via distinct regions in its N- and C-terminal halfs. Similar to vcp mutations, Mfap1 overexpression causes c4da neuron dendrite pruning defects and mislocalization of TDP-43 in these cells, but genetic analyses show that Mfap1 is not a crucial VCP target during dendrite pruning. Finally, rescue experiments with a lethal mfap1 mutant show that the VCP binding region is not essential for Mfap1 function, but may act to increase its stability or activity. PMID:28837687

  3. The spliceosome-associated protein Mfap1 binds to VCP in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Rode, Sandra; Ohm, Henrike; Zipfel, Jaqueline; Rumpf, Sebastian

    2017-01-01

    Posttranscriptional regulation of gene expression contributes to many developmental transitions. Previously, we found that the AAA chaperone Valosin-Containing Protein (VCP) regulates ecdysone-dependent dendrite pruning of Drosophila class IV dendritic arborization (c4da) neurons via an effect on RNA metabolism. In a search for RNA binding proteins associated with VCP, we identified the spliceosome-associated protein Mfap1, a component of the tri-snRNP complex. Mfap1 is a nucleolar protein in neurons and its levels are regulated by VCP. Mfap1 binds to VCP and TDP-43, a disease-associated RNA-binding protein. via distinct regions in its N- and C-terminal halfs. Similar to vcp mutations, Mfap1 overexpression causes c4da neuron dendrite pruning defects and mislocalization of TDP-43 in these cells, but genetic analyses show that Mfap1 is not a crucial VCP target during dendrite pruning. Finally, rescue experiments with a lethal mfap1 mutant show that the VCP binding region is not essential for Mfap1 function, but may act to increase its stability or activity.

  4. A pseudouridine residue in the spliceosome core is part of the filamentous growth program in yeast

    PubMed Central

    Basak, Anindita; Query, Charles C.

    2014-01-01

    SUMMARY Pseudouridine nucleobases, while abundant in tRNAs, rRNAs, and snRNAs, are not known to have physiologic roles in cell differentiation. We have identified a novel pseudouridine residue (Ψ28) on spliceosomal U6 snRNA that is induced during filamentous growth of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Pus1p catalyzes this modification and is up-regulated during filamentation. Several U6 snRNA mutants are strongly pseudouridylated at Ψ28; remarkably, these U6 mutants activate pseudo-hyphal growth, dependent upon Pus1p, arguing that U6-Ψ28 per se can initiate at least part of the filamentous growth program, a conclusion confirmed using a designer snoRNA targeting U6-U28 pseudouridylation. Conversely, mutants that block U6-U28 pseudouridylation inhibit pseudo-hyphal growth. U6-U28 pseudouridylation changes the efficiency of splicing of suboptimal introns; thus, Pus1p-dependent pseudouridylation of U6 snRNA contributes to the filamentation growth program. PMID:25127136

  5. SART3-Dependent Accumulation of Incomplete Spliceosomal snRNPs in Cajal Bodies.

    PubMed

    Novotný, Ivan; Malinová, Anna; Stejskalová, Eva; Matějů, Daniel; Klimešová, Klára; Roithová, Adriana; Švéda, Martin; Knejzlík, Zdeněk; Staněk, David

    2015-01-13

    Cajal bodies (CBs) are evolutionarily conserved nuclear structures involved in the metabolism of spliceosomal small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs). CBs are not present in all cell types, and the trigger for their formation is not yet known. Here, we depleted cells of factors required for the final steps of snRNP assembly and assayed for the presence of stalled intermediates in CBs. We show that depletion induces formation of CBs in cells that normally lack these nuclear compartments, suggesting that CB nucleation is triggered by an imbalance in snRNP assembly. Accumulation of stalled intermediates in CBs depends on the di-snRNP assembly factor SART3. SART3 is required for both the induction of CB formation as well as the tethering of incomplete snRNPs to coilin, the CB scaffolding protein. We propose a model wherein SART3 monitors tri-snRNP assembly and sequesters incomplete particles in CBs, thereby allowing cells to maintain a homeostatic balance of mature snRNPs in the nucleoplasm.

  6. Littlest Seesaw model from S 4 × U(1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    King, Stephen F.; Luhn, Christoph

    2016-09-01

    We show how a minimal (littlest) seesaw model involving two right-handed neutrinos and a very constrained Dirac mass matrix, with one texture zero and two independent Dirac masses, may arise from S 4 ×U(1) symmetry in a semi-direct supersymmetric model. The resulting CSD3 form of neutrino mass matrix only depends on two real mass parameters plus one undetermined phase. We show how the phase may be fixed to be one of the cube roots of unity by extending the S 4 × U(1) symmetry to include a product of Z 3 factors together with a CP symmetry, which is spontaneously broken leaving a single residual Z 3 in the charged lepton sector and a residual Z 2 in the neutrino sector, with suppressed higher order corrections. With the phase chosen from the cube roots of unity to be -2π /3, the model predicts a normal neutrino mass hierarchy with m 1 = 0, reactor angle θ 13 = 8 .7°, solar angle θ 12 = 34°, atmospheric angle θ 23 = 44°, and CP violating oscillation phase δ CP = -93°, depending on the fit of the model to the neutrino masses.

  7. Repair of Rhodopsin mRNA by Spliceosome-Mediated RNA Trans-Splicing: A New Approach for Autosomal Dominant Retinitis Pigmentosa

    PubMed Central

    Berger, Adeline; Lorain, Stéphanie; Joséphine, Charlène; Desrosiers, Melissa; Peccate, Cécile; Voit, Thomas; Garcia, Luis; Sahel, José-Alain; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre

    2015-01-01

    The promising clinical results obtained for ocular gene therapy in recent years have paved the way for gene supplementation to treat recessively inherited forms of retinal degeneration. The situation is more complex for dominant mutations, as the toxic mutant gene product must be removed. We used spliceosome-mediated RNA trans-splicing as a strategy for repairing the transcript of the rhodopsin gene, the gene most frequently mutated in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. We tested 17 different molecules targeting the pre-mRNA intron 1, by transient transfection of HEK-293T cells, with subsequent trans-splicing quantification at the transcript level. We found that the targeting of some parts of the intron promoted trans-splicing more efficiently than the targeting of other areas, and that trans-splicing rate could be increased by modifying the replacement sequence. We then developed cell lines stably expressing the rhodopsin gene, for the assessment of phenotypic criteria relevant to the pathogenesis of retinitis pigmentosa. Using this model, we showed that trans-splicing restored the correct localization of the protein to the plasma membrane. Finally, we tested our best candidate by AAV gene transfer in a mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa that expresses a mutant allele of the human rhodopsin gene, and demonstrated the feasibility of trans-splicing in vivo. This work paves the way for trans-splicing gene therapy to treat retinitis pigmentosa due to rhodopsin gene mutation and, more generally, for the treatment of genetic diseases with dominant transmission. PMID:25619725

  8. Repair of rhodopsin mRNA by spliceosome-mediated RNA trans-splicing: a new approach for autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa.

    PubMed

    Berger, Adeline; Lorain, Stéphanie; Joséphine, Charlène; Desrosiers, Melissa; Peccate, Cécile; Voit, Thomas; Garcia, Luis; Sahel, José-Alain; Bemelmans, Alexis-Pierre

    2015-05-01

    The promising clinical results obtained for ocular gene therapy in recent years have paved the way for gene supplementation to treat recessively inherited forms of retinal degeneration. The situation is more complex for dominant mutations, as the toxic mutant gene product must be removed. We used spliceosome-mediated RNA trans-splicing as a strategy for repairing the transcript of the rhodopsin gene, the gene most frequently mutated in autosomal dominant retinitis pigmentosa. We tested 17 different molecules targeting the pre-mRNA intron 1, by transient transfection of HEK-293T cells, with subsequent trans-splicing quantification at the transcript level. We found that the targeting of some parts of the intron promoted trans-splicing more efficiently than the targeting of other areas, and that trans-splicing rate could be increased by modifying the replacement sequence. We then developed cell lines stably expressing the rhodopsin gene, for the assessment of phenotypic criteria relevant to the pathogenesis of retinitis pigmentosa. Using this model, we showed that trans-splicing restored the correct localization of the protein to the plasma membrane. Finally, we tested our best candidate by AAV gene transfer in a mouse model of retinitis pigmentosa that expresses a mutant allele of the human rhodopsin gene, and demonstrated the feasibility of trans-splicing in vivo. This work paves the way for trans-splicing gene therapy to treat retinitis pigmentosa due to rhodopsin gene mutation and, more generally, for the treatment of genetic diseases with dominant transmission.

  9. Mutation-adapted U1 snRNA corrects a splicing error of the dopa decarboxylase gene.

    PubMed

    Lee, Ni-Chung; Lee, Yu-May; Chen, Pin-Wen; Byrne, Barry J; Hwu, Wuh-Liang

    2016-12-01

    Aromatic l-amino acid decarboxylase (AADC) deficiency is an inborn error of monoamine neurotransmitter synthesis, which results in dopamine, serotonin, epinephrine and norepinephrine deficiencies. The DDC gene founder mutation IVS6 + 4A > T is highly prevalent in Chinese patients with AADC deficiency. In this study, we designed several U1 snRNA vectors to adapt U1 snRNA binding sequences of the mutated DDC gene. We found that only the modified U1 snRNA (IVS-AAA) that completely matched both the intronic and exonic U1 binding sequences of the mutated DDC gene could correct splicing errors of either the mutated human DDC minigene or the mouse artificial splicing construct in vitro. We further injected an adeno-associated viral (AAV) vector to express IVS-AAA in the brain of a knock-in mouse model. This treatment was well tolerated and improved both the survival and brain dopamine and serotonin levels of mice with AADC deficiency. Therefore, mutation-adapted U1 snRNA gene therapy can be a promising method to treat genetic diseases caused by splicing errors, but the efficiency of such a treatment still needs improvements. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  10. Cooperative binding of TIA-1 and U1 snRNP in K-SAM exon splicing activation

    SciTech Connect

    Gesnel, Marie-Claude; Theoleyre, Sandrine; Del Gatto-Konczak, Fabienne; Breathnach, Richard . E-mail: breathna@nantes.inserm.fr

    2007-07-13

    In 293 cells, splicing of the human fibroblast growth factor receptor-2 K-SAM alternative exon is inefficient, but can be made efficient by provoking TIA-1 binding to the U-rich IAS1 sequence downstream from the exon's 5' splice site. We show here that TIA-1 domains known to interact with U1 snRNP and to recruit it to 5' splice sites in vitro are required for TIA-1 activation of K-SAM exon splicing in vivo. We further show that tethering downstream from the K-SAM exon a fusion between the U1 snRNP component U1C and the bacteriophage MS2 coat protein provokes IAS1-dependent exon splicing, and present evidence that the fusion functions after its incorporation into U1 snRNP. Our in vivo data, taken together with previous in vitro results, show that K-SAM splicing activation involves cooperative binding of TIA-1 and U1 snRNP to the exon's 5' splice site region.

  11. Exactly solvable U (1) × U (1) boson models for integer and fractional quantum Hall insulators in two dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Motrunich, Olexei; Geraedts, Scott

    2013-03-01

    We present a solvable boson model with U (1) × U (1) symmetry in (2+1) dimensions that realizes insulating phases with a quantized Hall conductivity σxy. The model is short-ranged, with no topological terms, and can be realized by a local Hamiltonian. For one set of parameters, the model has a non-fractionalized phase with σxy = 2 n in appropriate units, with n an integer. In this case, the physical origin is dynamical binding between n bosons of one species and a vortex of the other species and condensation of such composites. Other choices for the parameters of the model yield a phase with σxy = 2c/d , where c and d are mutually prime integers. In this phase, c bosons dynamically bind to d vortices and such objects condense. The are two species of excitations that are bosonic by themselves but carry fractional charge 1 / d and have mutual statistics 2 πb/d , where b is an integer such that ad - bc = 1 , and a is also an integer. The model can be studied using sign-free Monte Carlo. We have performed simulations which include a boundary between a quantum Hall insulator and a trivial insulator, and found gapless edge states on the boundary.

  12. U(1) prime dark matter and R-parity violation

    SciTech Connect

    Brahm, D.E.

    1990-04-01

    Attempts to understand physics beyond the Standard Model must face many phenomenological constraint, from recent Z{sup {degree}} data, neutral current measurements, cosmology and astrophysics, neutrino experiments, tests of lepton-and baryon-number conservation and CP violation, and many other ongoing experiments. The most interesting models are those which are allowed by current data, but offer predictions which can soon be experimentally confirmed or refuted. Two classes of such models are explored in this dissertation. The first, containing an extra U(1){prime} gauge group, has a dark matter candidate which could soon be detected. The second, incorporating supersymmetry with R-parity violation, predicts rare Z{sup {degree}} decays at LEP; some of these models can already be ruled out by LEP data and gluino searches at the Tevatron. 54 refs., 31 figs.

  13. Subdimensional particle structure of higher rank U (1 ) spin liquids

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pretko, Michael

    2017-03-01

    Spin liquids are conventionally described by gauge theories with a vector gauge field. However, there exists a wider class of spin liquids with higher rank tensors as the gauge variable. In this work, we focus on (3+1)-dimensional spin liquids described by U (1 ) symmetric tensor gauge theories, which have recently been shown to be stable gapless spin liquids. We investigate the particle structure of these tensor gauge theories and find that they have deep connections with the "fracton" models recently discovered by Vijay, Haah, and Fu. Tensor gauge theories have more conservation laws than the simple charge conservation law of rank 1 theories. These conservation laws place severe restrictions on the motion of particles. Particles in some models are fully immobile (fractons), while other models have particles restricted to motion along lower-dimensional subspaces.

  14. Charge crossover at the U(1)-Higgs phase transition

    SciTech Connect

    Freire, Filipe; Litim, Daniel F.

    2001-08-15

    The type-I region of phase transitions at finite temperature of the U(1)-Higgs theory in 3+1 dimensions is investigated in detail using a Wilsonian renormalization group. We consider, in particular, the quantitative effects induced through the crossover of the scale-dependent Abelian charge from the Gaussian to a nontrivial Abelian fixed point. As a result, the strength of the first-order phase transition is weakened. Analytical solutions to approximate flow equations are obtained, and all characteristics of the phase transition are discussed and compared to the results obtained from perturbation theory. In addition, we present a detailed quantitative study regarding the dependence of the physical observables on the coarse-graining scheme. This results in error bars for the regularization scheme (RS) dependence. We find quantitative evidence for an intimate link between the RS dependence and truncations of flow equations.

  15. SU(2) x U(1) vacuum and the Centauro events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, D.; Balasubrahmanyan, V. K.; Streitmatter, R. E.

    1985-01-01

    It is proposed that the fireballs invoked to explain the Centauro events are bubbles of a metastable superdense state of nuclear matter, created in high energy (E approximately 10 to the 15th power eV) cosmic ray collisions at the top of the atmosphere. If these bubbles are created with a Lorentz factor gamma approximately equals 10 at their CM frame, the objections against the origin of these events in cosmic ray interactions are overcome. A relationship then between their lifetime, tau, and the threshold energy for bubble formation, E sub th, appears to be insensitive to the value of tau and always close to E sub th approximately 10 to 15th power eV. Finally it is speculated that these bubbles might be manifestations of the SU(2) x U(1) false vacuum excited in these collisions. The absence of in the Centauro events is then explained by the decay modes of these excitations.

  16. Drosophila melanogaster genes for U1 snRNA variants and their expression during development.

    PubMed Central

    Lo, P C; Mount, S M

    1990-01-01

    We have cloned and characterized a complete set of seven U1-related sequences from Drosophila melanogaster. These sequences are located at the three cytogenetic loci 21D, 82E, and 95C. Three of these sequences have been previously studied: one U1 gene at 21D which encodes the prototype U1 sequence (U1a), one U1 gene at 82E which encodes a U1 variant with a single nucleotide substitution (U1b), and a pseudogene at 82E. The four previously uncharacterized genes are another U1b gene at 82E, two additional U1a genes at 95C, and a U1 gene at 95C which encodes a new variant (U1c) with a distinct single nucleotide change relative to U1a. Three blocks of 5' flanking sequence similarity are common to all six full length genes. Using specific primer extension assays, we have observed that the U1b RNA is expressed in Drosophila Kc cells and is associated with snRNP proteins, suggesting that the U1b-containing snRNP particles are able to participate in the process of pre-mRNA splicing. We have also examined the expression throughout Drosophila development of the two U1 variants relative to the prototype sequence. The U1c variant is undetectable by our methods, while the U1b variant exhibits a primarily embryonic pattern reminiscent of the expression of certain U1 variants in sea urchin, Xenopus, and mouse. Images PMID:2124674

  17. The MUC1 Extracellular Domain Subunit Is Found in Nuclear Speckles and Associates with Spliceosomes

    PubMed Central

    Kumar, Priyadarsina; Ji, Jennifer W.; Martsching, Lindsay; Douglas, Gordon C.

    2012-01-01

    MUC1 is a large transmembrane glycoprotein and oncogene expressed by epithelial cells and overexpressed and underglycosylated in cancer cells. The MUC1 cytoplasmic subunit (MUC1-C) can translocate to the nucleus and regulate gene expression. It is frequently assumed that the MUC1 extracellular subunit (MUC1-N) does not enter the nucleus. Based on an unexpected observation that MUC1 extracellular domain antibody produced an apparently nucleus-associated staining pattern in trophoblasts, we have tested the hypothesis that MUC1-N is expressed inside the nucleus. Three different antibodies were used to identify MUC1-N in normal epithelial cells and tissues as well as in several cancer cell lines. The results of immunofluorescence and confocal microscopy analyses as well as subcellular fractionation, Western blotting, and siRNA/shRNA studies, confirm that MUC1-N is found within nuclei of all cell types examined. More detailed examination of its intranuclear distribution using a proximity ligation assay, subcellular fractionation, and immunoprecipitation suggests that MUC1-N is located in nuclear speckles (interchromatin granule clusters) and closely associates with the spliceosome protein U2AF65. Nuclear localization of MUC1-N was abolished when cells were treated with RNase A and nuclear localization was altered when cells were incubated with the transcription inhibitor 5,6-dichloro-1-b-d-ribofuranosylbenzimidazole (DRB). While MUC1-N predominantly associated with speckles, MUC1-C was present in the nuclear matrix, nucleoli, and the nuclear periphery. In some nuclei, confocal microscopic analysis suggest that MUC1-C staining is located close to, but only partially overlaps, MUC1-N in speckles. However, only MUC1-N was found in isolated speckles by Western blotting. Also, MUC1-C and MUC1-N distributed differently during mitosis. These results suggest that MUC1-N translocates to the nucleus where it is expressed in nuclear speckles and that MUC1-N and MUC1-C have

  18. The large N-terminal region of the Brr2 RNA helicase guides productive spliceosome activation

    PubMed Central

    Absmeier, Eva; Wollenhaupt, Jan; Mozaffari-Jovin, Sina; Becke, Christian; Lee, Chung-Tien; Preussner, Marco; Heyd, Florian; Urlaub, Henning; Lührmann, Reinhard; Santos, Karine F.; Wahl, Markus C.

    2015-01-01

    The Brr2 helicase provides the key remodeling activity for spliceosome catalytic activation, during which it disrupts the U4/U6 di-snRNP (small nuclear RNA protein), and its activity has to be tightly regulated. Brr2 exhibits an unusual architecture, including an ∼500-residue N-terminal region, whose functions and molecular mechanisms are presently unknown, followed by a tandem array of structurally similar helicase units (cassettes), only the first of which is catalytically active. Here, we show by crystal structure analysis of full-length Brr2 in complex with a regulatory Jab1/MPN domain of the Prp8 protein and by cross-linking/mass spectrometry of isolated Brr2 that the Brr2 N-terminal region encompasses two folded domains and adjacent linear elements that clamp and interconnect the helicase cassettes. Stepwise N-terminal truncations led to yeast growth and splicing defects, reduced Brr2 association with U4/U6•U5 tri-snRNPs, and increased ATP-dependent disruption of the tri-snRNP, yielding U4/U6 di-snRNP and U5 snRNP. Trends in the RNA-binding, ATPase, and helicase activities of the Brr2 truncation variants are fully rationalized by the crystal structure, demonstrating that the N-terminal region autoinhibits Brr2 via substrate competition and conformational clamping. Our results reveal molecular mechanisms that prevent premature and unproductive tri-snRNP disruption and suggest novel principles of Brr2-dependent splicing regulation. PMID:26637280

  19. The final stages of spliceosome maturation require Spp2p that can interact with the DEAH box protein Prp2p and promote step 1 of splicing.

    PubMed Central

    Roy, J; Kim, K; Maddock, J R; Anthony, J G; Woolford, J L

    1995-01-01

    Pre-mRNA processing occurs by assembly of splicing factors on the substrate to form the spliceosome followed by two consecutive RNA cleavage-ligation reactions. The Prp2 protein hydrolyzes ATP and is required for the first reaction (Yean SL, Lin RJ, 1991, Mol Cell Biol 11:5571-5577; Kim SH, Smith J, Claude A, Lin RJ, 1992, EMBO J 11:2319-2326). The Saccharomyces cerevisiae SPP2 gene was previously identified as a high-copy suppressor of temperature-sensitive prp2 mutants (Last RL, Maddock JR, Woolford JL Jr, 1987, Genetics 117:619-631). We have characterized the function of Spp2p in vivo and in vitro. Spp2p is an essential protein required for the first RNA cleavage reaction in vivo. Depletion of Spp2p from yeast cells results in accumulation of unspliced pre-mRNAs. A temperature-sensitive spp2-1 mutant accumulates pre-mRNAs in vivo and is unable to undergo the first splicing reaction in vitro. However, spliceosomal complexes are assembled in extracts prepared from the mutant. We show that Spp2p function is required after spliceosome assembly but prior to the first reaction. Spp2p associates with the spliceosome before the first RNA cleavage reaction and is likely to be released from the spliceosome following ATP hydrolysis by Prp2p. The Prp2 and Spp2 proteins are capable of physically interacting with each other. These results suggest that Spp2p interacts with Prp2p in the spliceosome prior to the first cleavage-ligation reaction. Spp2p is the first protein that has been found to interact with a DEAD/H box splicing factor. Images FIGURE 1 FIGURE 2 FIGURE 3 FIGURE 4 FIGURE 5 FIGURE 6 FIGURE 7 FIGURE 8 FIGURE 9 PMID:7493316

  20. Genetic suppression of intronic +1G mutations by compensatory U1 snRNA changes in Caenorhabditis elegans.

    PubMed Central

    Zahler, Alan M; Tuttle, John D; Chisholm, Andrew D

    2004-01-01

    Mutations to the canonical +1G of introns, which are commonly found in many human inherited disease alleles, invariably result in aberrant splicing. Here we report genetic findings in C. elegans that aberrant splicing due to +1G mutations can be suppressed by U1 snRNA mutations. An intronic +1G-to-U mutation, e936, in the C. elegans unc-73 gene causes aberrant splicing and loss of gene function. We previously showed that mutation of the sup-39 gene promotes splicing at the mutant splice donor in e936 mutants. We demonstrate here that sup-39 is a U1 snRNA gene; suppressor mutations in sup-39 are compensatory substitutions in the 5' end, which enhance recognition of the mutant splice donor. sup-6(st19) is an allele-specific suppressor of unc-13(e309), which contains an intronic +1G-to-A transition. The e309 mutation activates a cryptic splice site, and sup-6(st19) restores splicing to the mutant splice donor. sup-6 also encodes a U1 snRNA and the mutant contains a compensatory substitution at its 5' end. This is the first demonstration that U1 snRNAs can act to suppress the effects of mutations to the invariant +1G of introns. These findings are suggestive of a potential treatment of certain alleles of inherited human genetic diseases. PMID:15342508

  1. Structure and expression of the Drosophila melanogaster gene for the U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle 70K protein.

    PubMed Central

    Mancebo, R; Lo, P C; Mount, S M

    1990-01-01

    A genomic clone encoding the Drosophila U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle 70K protein was isolated by hybridization with a human U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle 70K protein cDNA. Southern blot and in situ hybridizations showed that this U1 70K gene is unique in the Drosophila genome, residing at cytological position 27D1,2. Polyadenylated transcripts of 1.9 and 3.1 kilobases were observed. While the 1.9-kilobase mRNA is always more abundant, the ratio of these two transcripts is developmentally regulated. Analysis of cDNA and genomic sequences indicated that these two RNAs encode an identical protein with a predicted molecular weight of 52,879. Comparison of the U1 70K proteins predicted from Drosophila, human, and Xenopus cDNAs revealed 68% amino acid identity in the most amino-terminal 214 amino acids, which include a sequence motif common to many proteins which bind RNA. The carboxy-terminal half is less well conserved but is highly charged and contains distinctive arginine-rich regions in all three species. These arginine-rich regions contain stretches of arginine-serine dipeptides like those found in transformer, transformer-2, and suppressor-of-white-apricot proteins, all of which have been identified as regulators of mRNA splicing in Drosophila melanogaster. Images PMID:1692955

  2. Generating technique for U(1){sup 3} 5D supergravity

    SciTech Connect

    Gal'tsov, Dmitri V.; Scherbluk, Nikolai G.

    2008-09-15

    We develop a generating technique for solutions of U(1){sup 3} 5D supergravity via dimensional reduction to three dimensions. This theory, which recently attracted attention in connection with black rings, can be viewed as a consistent truncation of the T{sup 6} compactification of the 11-dimensional supergravity. Its further reduction to three dimensions accompanied by dualization of the vector fields leads to a 3D gravity coupled sigma model on the homogeneous space SO(4,4)/SO(4)xSO(4) or SO(4,4)/SO(2,2)xSO(2,2) depending on the signature of the three-space. We construct a 8x8 matrix representation of these cosets in terms of lower-dimensional blocks. Using it we express a solution generating transformations in terms of potentials and identify those preserving asymptotic conditions relevant to black holes and black rings. As an application we derive the doubly rotating black hole solution with three independent charges. A suitable contraction of the above cosets is used to construct a new representation of the coset G{sub 2(2)}/(SL(2,R)xSL(2,R)) relevant for minimal five-dimensional supergravity.

  3. SU(2) x U(1) vacuum and the Centauro events

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Kazanas, D.; Balasubrahmanyan, V. K.; Streitmatter, R. E.

    1984-01-01

    It is proposed that the fireballs invoked to explain the Centauro events are bubbles of a metastable superdense state of nuclear matter, created in high energy (E is approximately 10 to the 15th power eV) cosmic ray collisions at the top of the atmosphere. If these bubbles are created with a Lorentz factor gamma approximately = 10 at their CM frame, the objections against the origin of these events in cosmic ray interactions are overcome. Assuming further, that the Centauro events are to the explosive decay of these metastable bubbles, a relationship between their lifetime, tau, and the threshold energy for bubble formation, E sub th, is derived. The minimum lifetime consistent with such an interpretation in tau is approximately 10 to the -8th power sec, while the E sub th appears to be insensitive to the value of tau and always close to E sub th is approximately 10 to the 15th power eV. Finally it is speculated that if the available CM energy is thermalized in such collisions, these bubbles might be manifestations of excitations of the SU(2) x U(1) false vacuum. The absence of neutral pions in the Centauro events is then explained by the decay of these excitations.

  4. Monopoles and Confinement in U(1) Lattice Gauge Theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Copeland, Timothy John

    Available from UMI in association with The British Library. Requires signed TDF. Confinement in U(1) gauge theory is investigated, with particular emphasis on the role of monopoles. Starting from the work of Polyakov, the theoretical aspects are considered first, in some detail. This leads to the conclusion that the conventional techniques for analysing Monte Carlo data may not be adequate, and motivates the development of an alternative interpretation based on the theoretical insight gained. This takes more account of the expected physical properties of the theory, and does not assume beforehand that one type of behaviour (perturbative, or monopole driven) dominates. It is found that better fits to the Monte Carlo data can be achieved this way than by using the conventional methods, although different string tensions are found. The small distance behaviour is found to be best explained in terms of Coulomb effects, rather than the Luscher vibrating string picture sometimes used before. Perturbative calculations are made of Wilson loops on lattices of different shapes, and some comparisons with Monte Carlo data are made. Comments are made on the significance of these results for four dimensions, and for SU(2) and SU(3).

  5. Transcriptional co-activator protein p100 interacts with snRNP proteins and facilitates the assembly of the spliceosome

    PubMed Central

    Yang, Jie; Välineva, Tuuli; Hong, Jingxin; Bu, Tianxu; Yao, Zhi; Jensen, Ole N.; Frilander, Mikko J.; Silvennoinen, Olli

    2007-01-01

    Transcription and pre-mRNA splicing are the key nuclear processes in eukaryotic gene expression, and identification of factors common to both processes has suggested that they are functionally coordinated. p100 protein has been shown to function as a transcriptional co-activator for several transcription factors. p100 consists of staphylococcal nuclease (SN)-like and Tudor-SN (TSN) domains of which the SN-like domains have been shown to function in transcription, but the function of TSN domain has remained elusive. Here we identified interaction between p100 and small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNP) that function in pre-mRNA splicing. The TSN domain of p100 specifically interacts with components of the U5 snRNP, but also with the other spliceosomal snRNPs. In vitro splicing assays revealed that the purified p100, and specifically the TSN domain of p100, accelerates the kinetics of the spliceosome assembly, particularly the formation of complex A, and the transition from complex A to B. Consistently, the p100 protein, as well as the separated TSN domain, enhanced the kinetics of the first step of splicing in an in vitro splicing assay in dose-dependent manner. Thus our results suggest that p100 protein is a novel dual function regulator of gene expression that participates via distinct domains in both transcription and splicing. PMID:17576664

  6. Genetic Interaction Mapping Reveals a Role for the SWI/SNF Nucleosome Remodeler in Spliceosome Activation in Fission Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Patrick, Kristin L.; Ryan, Colm J.; Xu, Jiewei; Lipp, Jesse J.; Nissen, Kelly E.; Roguev, Assen; Shales, Michael; Krogan, Nevan J.; Guthrie, Christine

    2015-01-01

    Although numerous regulatory connections between pre-mRNA splicing and chromatin have been demonstrated, the precise mechanisms by which chromatin factors influence spliceosome assembly and/or catalysis remain unclear. To probe the genetic network of pre-mRNA splicing in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, we constructed an epistatic mini-array profile (E-MAP) and discovered many new connections between chromatin and splicing. Notably, the nucleosome remodeler SWI/SNF had strong genetic interactions with components of the U2 snRNP SF3 complex. Overexpression of SF3 components in ΔSWI/SNF cells led to inefficient splicing of many fission yeast introns, predominantly those with non-consensus splice sites. Deletion of SWI/SNF decreased recruitment of the splicing ATPase Prp2, suggesting that SWI/SNF promotes co-transcriptional spliceosome assembly prior to first step catalysis. Importantly, defects in SWI/SNF as well as SF3 overexpression each altered nucleosome occupancy along intron-containing genes, illustrating that the chromatin landscape both affects—and is affected by—co-transcriptional splicing. PMID:25825871

  7. Genetic interaction mapping reveals a role for the SWI/SNF nucleosome remodeler in spliceosome activation in fission yeast.

    PubMed

    Patrick, Kristin L; Ryan, Colm J; Xu, Jiewei; Lipp, Jesse J; Nissen, Kelly E; Roguev, Assen; Shales, Michael; Krogan, Nevan J; Guthrie, Christine

    2015-03-01

    Although numerous regulatory connections between pre-mRNA splicing and chromatin have been demonstrated, the precise mechanisms by which chromatin factors influence spliceosome assembly and/or catalysis remain unclear. To probe the genetic network of pre-mRNA splicing in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, we constructed an epistatic mini-array profile (E-MAP) and discovered many new connections between chromatin and splicing. Notably, the nucleosome remodeler SWI/SNF had strong genetic interactions with components of the U2 snRNP SF3 complex. Overexpression of SF3 components in ΔSWI/SNF cells led to inefficient splicing of many fission yeast introns, predominantly those with non-consensus splice sites. Deletion of SWI/SNF decreased recruitment of the splicing ATPase Prp2, suggesting that SWI/SNF promotes co-transcriptional spliceosome assembly prior to first step catalysis. Importantly, defects in SWI/SNF as well as SF3 overexpression each altered nucleosome occupancy along intron-containing genes, illustrating that the chromatin landscape both affects--and is affected by--co-transcriptional splicing.

  8. Requirements for gene silencing mediated by U1 snRNA binding to a target sequence

    PubMed Central

    Abad, Xabi; Vera, Maria; Jung, Stephen P.; Oswald, Evelyn; Romero, Inés; Amin, Vaibhav; Fortes, Puri; Gunderson, Samuel I.

    2008-01-01

    U1 interference (U1i) is a novel method to block gene expression. U1i requires expression of a 5′-end-mutated U1 snRNA designed to base pair to the 3′-terminal exon of the target gene's pre-mRNA that leads to inhibition of polyadenylation. Here, we show U1i is robust (≥95%) and a 10-nt target length is sufficient for good silencing. Surprisingly, longer U1 snRNAs, which could increase annealing to the target, fail to improve silencing. Extensive mutagenesis of the 10-bp U1 snRNA:target duplex shows that any single mismatch different from GU at positions 3–8, destroys silencing. However, mismatches within the other positions give partial silencing, suggesting that off-target inhibition could occur. The specificity of U1i may be enhanced, however, by the fact that silencing is impaired by RNA secondary structure or by splicing factors binding nearby, the latter mediated by Arginine-Serine (RS) domains. U1i inhibition can be reconstituted in vivo by tethering of RS domains of U1-70K and U2AF65. These results help to: (i) define good target sites for U1i; (ii) identify and understand natural cellular examples of U1i; (iii) clarify the contribution of hydrogen bonding to U1i and to U1 snRNP binding to 5′ splice sites and (iv) understand the mechanism of U1i. PMID:18299285

  9. Restrained dark U (1 )d at low energies

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Correia, Fagner C.; Fajfer, Svjetlana

    2016-12-01

    We investigate a spontaneously broken U (1 )d gauge symmetry with a muon-specific dark Higgs. Our first goal is to verify how the presence of a new dark Higgs, ϕ , and a dark gauge boson, V , can simultaneously face the anomalies from the muon magnetic moment and the proton charge radius. Second, by assuming that V must decay to an electron-positron pair, we explore the corresponding parameter space determined with the low-energy constraints coming from K →μ X , electron (g -2 )e, K →μ νμe+e-, K →μ νμμ+μ-, and τ →ντμ νμe+e-. We focus on the scenario where the V mass is below ˜2 mμ and the ϕ mass runs from few MeV to 250 MeV, with V -photon mixing of the order ˜O (10-3). Among weak process at low energies, we check the influence of the new light vector on kaon decays as well as on the scattering e+e-→μ+μ-e+e- and discuss the impact of the dark Higgs on e+e-→μ+μ-μ+μ-. Finally, we consider contributions of the V -photon mixing in the decays π0→γ e+e-, η →γ e+e-, ρ →π e+e-, K*→K e+e-, and ϕ (1020 )→η e+e-.

  10. The spliceosome U2 snRNP factors promote genome stability through distinct mechanisms; transcription of repair factors and R-loop processing.

    PubMed

    Tanikawa, M; Sanjiv, K; Helleday, T; Herr, P; Mortusewicz, O

    2016-12-19

    Recent whole-exome sequencing of malignancies have detected recurrent somatic mutations in U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein complex (snRNP) components of the spliceosome. These factors have also been identified as novel players in the DNA-damage response (DDR) in several genome-wide screens and proteomic analysis. Although accumulating evidence implies that the spliceosome has an important role in genome stability and is an emerging hallmark of cancer, its precise role in DNA repair still remains elusive. Here we identify two distinct mechanisms of how spliceosome U2 snRNP factors contribute to genome stability. We show that the spliceosome maintains protein levels of essential repair factors, thus contributing to homologous recombination repair. In addition, real-time laser microirradiation analysis identified rapid recruitment of the U2 snRNP factor SNRPA1 to DNA-damage sites. Functional analysis of SNRPA1 revealed a more immediate and direct role in preventing R-loop-induced DNA damage. Our present study implies a complex interrelation between transcription, mRNA splicing and the DDR. Cells require rapid spatio-temporal coordination of these chromatin transactions to cope with various forms of genotoxic stress.

  11. The spliceosome U2 snRNP factors promote genome stability through distinct mechanisms; transcription of repair factors and R-loop processing

    PubMed Central

    Tanikawa, M; Sanjiv, K; Helleday, T; Herr, P; Mortusewicz, O

    2016-01-01

    Recent whole-exome sequencing of malignancies have detected recurrent somatic mutations in U2 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein complex (snRNP) components of the spliceosome. These factors have also been identified as novel players in the DNA-damage response (DDR) in several genome-wide screens and proteomic analysis. Although accumulating evidence implies that the spliceosome has an important role in genome stability and is an emerging hallmark of cancer, its precise role in DNA repair still remains elusive. Here we identify two distinct mechanisms of how spliceosome U2 snRNP factors contribute to genome stability. We show that the spliceosome maintains protein levels of essential repair factors, thus contributing to homologous recombination repair. In addition, real-time laser microirradiation analysis identified rapid recruitment of the U2 snRNP factor SNRPA1 to DNA-damage sites. Functional analysis of SNRPA1 revealed a more immediate and direct role in preventing R-loop-induced DNA damage. Our present study implies a complex interrelation between transcription, mRNA splicing and the DDR. Cells require rapid spatio-temporal coordination of these chromatin transactions to cope with various forms of genotoxic stress. PMID:27991914

  12. The DEAH-box protein PRP22 is an ATPase that mediates ATP-dependent mRNA release from the spliceosome and unwinds RNA duplexes.

    PubMed Central

    Wagner, J D; Jankowsky, E; Company, M; Pyle, A M; Abelson, J N

    1998-01-01

    Of the proteins required for pre-mRNA splicing, at least four, the DEAH-box proteins, are closely related due to the presence of a central 'RNA helicase-like' region, and extended homology through a large portion of the protein. A major unresolved question is the function of these proteins. Indirect evidence suggests that several of these proteins are catalysts for important structural rearrangements in the spliceosome. However, the mechanism for the proposed alterations is presently unknown. We present evidence that PRP22, a DEAH-box protein required for mRNA release from the spliceosome, unwinds RNA duplexes in a concentration- and ATP-dependent manner. This demonstrates that PRP22 can modify RNA structure directly. We also show that the PRP22-dependent release of mRNA from the spliceosome is an ATP-dependent process and that recombinant PRP22 is an ATPase. Non-hydrolyzable ATP analogs did not substitute for ATP in the RNA-unwinding reaction, suggesting that ATP hydrolysis is required for this reaction. Specific mutation of a putative ATP phosphate-binding motif in the recombinant protein eliminated the ATPase and RNA-unwinding capacity. Significantly, these data suggest that the DEAH-box proteins act directly on RNA substrates within the spliceosome. PMID:9582286

  13. The splicing factor Prp17 interacts with the U2, U5 and U6 snRNPs and associates with the spliceosome pre- and post-catalysis.

    PubMed

    Sapra, Aparna K; Khandelia, Piyush; Vijayraghavan, Usha

    2008-12-15

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae PRP17-null mutants are temperature-sensitive for growth. In vitro splicing with extracts lacking Prp17 are kinetically slow for the first step of splicing and are arrested for the second step at temperatures greater than 34 degrees C. In the present study we show that these stalled spliceosomes are compromised for an essential conformational switch that is triggered by Prp16 helicase. These results suggest a plausible mechanistic basis for the second-step arrest in prp17Delta extracts and support a role for Prp17 in conjunction with Prp16. To understand the association of Prp17 with spliceosomes we used a functional epitope-tagged protein in co-immunoprecipitation experiments. Examination of co-precipitated snRNAs (small nuclear RNAs) show that Prp17 interacts with U2, U5 and U6 snRNPs (small nuclear ribonucleoproteins) but it is not a core component of any one snRNP. Prp17 association with in-vitro-assembled spliceosome complexes on actin pre-mRNAs was also investigated. Although the U5 snRNP proteins Prp8 and Snu114 are found in early pre-spliceosomes that contain all five snRNPs, Prp17 is not detectable at this step; however, Prp17 is present in the subsequent pre-catalytic A1 complex, containing unspliced pre-mRNA, formed after the dissociation of U4 snRNP. Thus Prp17 joins the spliceosome prior to both catalytic reactions. Our results indicate continued interactions in catalytic spliceosomes that contain reaction intermediates and in post-splicing complexes containing the lariat intron. These Prp17-spliceosome association analyses provide a biochemical basis for the delayed first step in prp17Delta and explain the previously known multiple genetic interactions between Prp17, factors of the Prp19-complex [NTC (nineteen complex)], functional elements in U2 and U5 snRNAs and other second-step splicing factors.

  14. Correct mRNA Processing at a Mutant TT Splice Donor in FANCC Ameliorates the Clinical Phenotype in Patients and Is Enhanced by Delivery of Suppressor U1 snRNAs

    PubMed Central

    Hartmann, Linda; Neveling, Kornelia; Borkens, Stephanie; Schneider, Hildegard; Freund, Marcel; Grassman, Elke; Theiss, Stephan; Wawer, Angela; Burdach, Stefan; Auerbach, Arleen D.; Schindler, Detlev; Hanenberg, Helmut; Schaal, Heiner

    2010-01-01

    The U1 small nuclear RNA (U1 snRNA) as a component of the major U2-dependent spliceosome recognizes 5′ splice sites (5′ss) containing GT as the canonical dinucleotide in the intronic positions +1 and +2. The c.165+1G>T germline mutation in the 5′ss of exon 2 of the Fanconi anemia C (FANCC) gene commonly predicted to prevent correct splicing was identified in nine FA patients from three pedigrees. RT-PCR analysis of the endogenous FANCC mRNA splicing pattern of patient-derived fibroblasts revealed aberrant mRNA processing, but surprisingly also correct splicing at the TT dinucleotide, albeit with lower efficiency. This consequently resulted in low levels of correctly spliced transcript and minute levels of normal posttranslationally processed FANCD2 protein, indicating that this naturally occurring TT splicing might contribute to the milder clinical manifestations of the disease in these patients. Functional analysis of this FANCC 5′ss within splicing reporters revealed that both the noncanonical TT dinucleotide and the genomic context of FANCC were required for the residual correct splicing at this mutant 5′ss. Finally, use of lentiviral vectors as a delivery system to introduce expression cassettes for TT-adapted U1 snRNAs into primary FANCC patient fibroblasts allowed the correction of the DNA-damage-induced G2 cell-cycle arrest in these cells, thus representing an alternative transcript-targeting approach for genetic therapy of inherited splice-site mutations. PMID:20869034

  15. Light sterile neutrinos, dark matter, and new resonances in a U(1) extension of the MSSM

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Hebbar, A.; Lazarides, G.; Shafi, Q.

    2017-09-01

    We present ψ'MSSM, a model based on a U(1) ψ' extension of the minimal supersymmetric standard model. The gauge symmetry U(1)ψ', also known as U(1)N,is a linear combination of the U(1) χ and U(1)ψ subgroups of E6. The model predicts the existence of three sterile neutrinos with masses ≲0.1 eV , if the U(1)ψ' breaking scale is of order 10 TeV. Their contribution to the effective number of neutrinos at nucleosynthesis is Δ Nν≃0.29. The model can provide a variety of possible cold dark matter candidates including the lightest sterile sneutrino. If the U(1) ψ' breaking scale is increased to 1 03 TeV , the sterile neutrinos, which are stable on account of a Z2symmetry, become viable warm dark matter candidates. The observed value of the standard model Higgs boson mass can be obtained with relatively light stop quarks thanks to the D-term contribution from U(1)ψ'. The model predicts diquark and diphoton resonances which may be found at an updated LHC. The well-known μ problem is resolved and the observed baryon asymmetry of the universe can be generated via leptogenesis. The breaking of U(1)ψ' produces superconducting strings that may be present in our galaxy. A U(1) R symmetry plays a key role in keeping the proton stable and providing the light sterile neutrinos.

  16. Single field inflation in supergravity with a U(1) gauge symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Heurtier, L.; Khalil, S.; Moursy, A. E-mail: skhalil@zewailcity.edu.eg

    2015-10-01

    A single field inflation based on a supergravity model with a shift symmetry and U(1) extension of the MSSM is analyzed. We show that one of the real components of the two U(1) charged scalar fields plays the role of inflaton with an effective scalar potential similar to the ''new chaotic inflation'' scenario. Both non-anomalous and anomalous (with Fayet-Iliopoulos term) U(1) are studied. We show that the non-anomalous U(1) scenario is consistent with data of the cosmic microwave background and recent astrophysical measurements. A possible kinetic mixing between U(1) and U(1){sub B−L} is considered in order to allow for natural decay channels of the inflaton, leading to a reheating epoch. Upper limits on the reheating temperature thus turn out to favour an intermediate (∼ O(10{sup 13}) GeV) scale B−L symmetry breaking.

  17. Single field inflation in supergravity with a U(1) gauge symmetry

    SciTech Connect

    Heurtier, L.; Khalil, S.; Moursy, A.

    2015-10-19

    A single field inflation based on a supergravity model with a shift symmetry and U(1) extension of the MSSM is analyzed. We show that one of the real components of the two U(1) charged scalar fields plays the role of inflaton with an effective scalar potential similar to the “new chaotic inflation” scenario. Both non-anomalous and anomalous (with Fayet-Iliopoulos term) U(1) are studied. We show that the non-anomalous U(1) scenario is consistent with data of the cosmic microwave background and recent astrophysical measurements. A possible kinetic mixing between U(1) and U(1){sub B−L} is considered in order to allow for natural decay channels of the inflaton, leading to a reheating epoch. Upper limits on the reheating temperature thus turn out to favour an intermediate (∼O(10{sup 13}) GeV) scale B−L symmetry breaking.

  18. Spin Tests of 1/20-Scale Models of the Chance Vought Revised XF6U-1 and F6U-1 Airplanes, TED No. NACA 2390

    NASA Technical Reports Server (NTRS)

    Klinar, Walter J.; Berman, Theodore

    1948-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the Langley 20-foot free-spinning tunnel on the 1/20-scale model of the Chance Vought XF6U-1 airplane altered to represent the XF6U-1 airplane as it will be spin-tested in flight, and also altered to represent the F6U-1 airplane as it will be produced for service use. Spin tests were made to determine the effects of control settings and movements at the normal loading. The results show that the spins obtained on the revised XF6U-1 airplane will be oscillatory in roll and yaw and that recoveries by rudder reversal will be rapid. Model test results indicate that the F6U-1 airplane will probably not spin. Inasmuch as the results of this investigation show that the new designs are as good as or better than the original XF6U-1 design in regard to spin recovery, it is felt that the conclusions and recommendations reached for the original design can be applied to the new designs for all loading conditions.

  19. Ribonucleoprotein assembly defects correlate with spinal muscular atrophy severity and preferentially affect a subset of spliceosomal snRNPs.

    PubMed

    Gabanella, Francesca; Butchbach, Matthew E R; Saieva, Luciano; Carissimi, Claudia; Burghes, Arthur H M; Pellizzoni, Livio

    2007-09-26

    Spinal muscular atrophy (SMA) is a motor neuron disease caused by reduced levels of the survival motor neuron (SMN) protein. SMN together with Gemins2-8 and unrip proteins form a macromolecular complex that functions in the assembly of small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) of both the major and the minor splicing pathways. It is not known whether the levels of spliceosomal snRNPs are decreased in SMA. Here we analyzed the consequence of SMN deficiency on snRNP metabolism in the spinal cord of mouse models of SMA with differing phenotypic severities. We demonstrate that the expression of a subset of Gemin proteins and snRNP assembly activity are dramatically reduced in the spinal cord of severe SMA mice. Comparative analysis of different tissues highlights a similar decrease in SMN levels and a strong impairment of snRNP assembly in tissues of severe SMA mice, although the defect appears smaller in kidney than in neural tissue. We further show that the extent of reduction in both Gemin proteins expression and snRNP assembly activity in the spinal cord of SMA mice correlates with disease severity. Remarkably, defective SMN complex function in snRNP assembly causes a significant decrease in the levels of a subset of snRNPs and preferentially affects the accumulation of U11 snRNP--a component of the minor spliceosome--in tissues of severe SMA mice. Thus, impairment of a ubiquitous function of SMN changes the snRNP profile of SMA tissues by unevenly altering the normal proportion of endogenous snRNPs. These findings are consistent with the hypothesis that SMN deficiency affects the splicing machinery and in particular the minor splicing pathway of a rare class of introns in SMA.

  20. Prp8, the pivotal protein of the spliceosomal catalytic center, evolved from a retroelement-encoded reverse transcriptase

    PubMed Central

    Dlakić, Mensur; Mushegian, Arcady

    2011-01-01

    Prp8 is the largest and most highly conserved protein of the spliceosome, encoded by all sequenced eukaryotic genomes but missing from prokaryotes and viruses. Despite all evidence that Prp8 is an integral part of the spliceosomal catalytic center, much remains to be learned about its molecular functions and evolutionary origin. By analyzing sequence and structure similarities between Prp8 and other protein domains, we show that its N-terminal region contains a putative bromodomain. The central conserved domain of Prp8 is related to the catalytic domain of reverse transcriptases (RTs) and is most similar to homologous enzymes encoded by prokaryotic retroelements. However, putative catalytic residues in this RT domain are only partially conserved and may not be sufficient for the nucleotidyltransferase activity. The RT domain is followed by an uncharacterized sequence region with relatives found in fungal RT-like proteins. This part of Prp8 is predicted to adopt an α-helical structure and may be functionally equivalent to diverse maturase/X domains of retroelements and to the thumb domain of retroviral RTs. Together with a previously identified C-terminal domain that has an RNaseH-like fold, our results suggest evolutionary connections between Prp8 and ancient mobile elements. Prp8 may have evolved by acquiring nucleic acid–binding domains from inactivated retroelements, and their present-day role may be in maintaining proper conformation of the bound RNA cofactors and substrates of the splicing reaction. This is only the second example—the other one being telomerase—of the RT recruitment from a genomic parasite to serve an essential cellular function. PMID:21441348

  1. 13. DETAIL, U1 CONNECTION (NORTH TRUSS), FROM SOUTHWEST AND BELOW, ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. DETAIL, U1 CONNECTION (NORTH TRUSS), FROM SOUTHWEST AND BELOW, SHOWING PIN CONNECTION AT VERTICAL MEMBER U1-L1, TOP CHORD, INCLINED ENDPOST U1-L0, DIAGONAL EYEBAR RODS, AND LATERAL BRACING INCLUDING PORTION OF EAST PORTAL STRUT WITH LATTICE BARS AND BRACE - Virginia Department of Transportation Bridge No. 6051, Spanning Catoctin Creek at State Route 673 (Featherbottom Road), Waterford, Loudoun County, VA

  2. Symmetry enriched U(1) topological orders for dipole-octupole doublets on a pyrochlore lattice

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Li, Yao-Dong; Chen, Gang

    2017-01-01

    Symmetry plays a fundamental role in our understanding of both conventional symmetry breaking phases and the more exotic quantum and topological phases of matter. We explore the experimental signatures of symmetry enriched U(1) quantum spin liquids (QSLs) on the pyrochlore lattice. We point out that the Ce local moment of the newly discovered pyrochlore QSL candidate Ce2Sn2O7 , is a dipole-octupole doublet. The generic model for these unusual doublets supports two distinct symmetry enriched U(1) QSL ground states in the corresponding quantum spin ice regimes. These two U(1) QSLs are dubbed dipolar U(1) QSL and octupolar U(1) QSL. While the dipolar U(1) QSL has been discussed in many contexts, the octupolar U(1) QSL is rather unique. Based on the symmetry properties of the dipole-octupole doublets, we predict the peculiar physical properties of the octupolar U(1) QSL, elucidating the unique spectroscopic properties in the external magnetic fields. We further predict the Anderson-Higgs transition from the octupolar U(1) QSL driven by the external magnetic fields. We identify the experimental relevance with the candidate material Ce2Sn2O7 and other dipole-octupole doublet systems.

  3. Mechanistic insights into human pre-mRNA splicing of human ultra-short introns: potential unusual mechanism identifies G-rich introns.

    PubMed

    Sasaki-Haraguchi, Noriko; Shimada, Makoto K; Taniguchi, Ichiro; Ohno, Mutsuhito; Mayeda, Akila

    2012-06-29

    It is unknown how very short introns (<65 nt; termed 'ultra-short' introns) could be spliced in a massive spliceosome (>2.7 MDa) without steric hindrance. By screening an annotated human transcriptome database (H-InvDB), we identified three model ultra-short introns: the 56-nt intron in the HNRNPH1 (hnRNP H1) gene, the 49-nt intron in the NDOR1 (NADPH dependent diflavin oxidoreductase 1) gene, and the 43-nt intron in the ESRP2 (epithelial splicing regulatory protein 2) gene. We verified that these endogenous ultra-short introns are spliced, and also recapitulated this in cultured cells transfected with the corresponding mini-genes. The splicing of these ultra-short introns was repressed by a splicing inhibitor, spliceostatin A, suggesting that SF3b (a U2 snRNP component) is involved in their splicing processes. The 56-nt intron containing a pyrimidine-rich tract was spliced out in a lariat form, and this splicing was inhibited by the disruption of U1, U2, or U4 snRNA. In contrast, the 49- and 43-nt introns were purine-rich overall without any pyrimidine-rich tract, and these lariat RNAs were not detectable. Remarkably, shared G-rich intronic sequences in the 49- and 43-nt introns were required for their splicing, suggesting that these ultra-short introns may recruit a novel auxiliary splicing mechanism linked to G-rich intronic splicing enhancers.

  4. H2B Ubiquitylation Modulates Spliceosome Assembly and Function in Budding Yeast

    PubMed Central

    Hérissant, Lucas; Moehle, Erica A.; Bertaccini, Diego; Van Dorsselaer, Alain; Schaeffer-Reiss, Christine; Guthrie, Christine; Dargemont, Catherine

    2014-01-01

    Background information Commitment to splicing occurs co-transcriptionally, but a major unanswered question is the extent to which various modifications of chromatin, the template for transcription in vivo, contribute to the regulation of splicing. Results Here we perform genome-wide analyses showing that inhibition of specific marks – H2B ubiquitylation, H3K4 methylation, and H3K36 methylation – perturbs splicing in budding yeast, with each modification exerting gene-specific effects. Furthermore, semi-quantitative mass spectrometry on purified nuclear mRNPs and chromatin immunoprecipitation analysis on intron-containing genes indicated that H2B ubiquitylation, but not Set1-, Set2- or Dot1-dependent H3 methylation, stimulates recruitment of the early splicing factors, namely U1 and U2 snRNPs, onto nascent RNAs. Conclusions These results suggest that histone modifications impact splicing of distinct subsets of genes using distinct pathways. PMID:24476359

  5. 46 CFR 54.01-10 - Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies U-1(g)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2010 CFR

    2010-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2010-10-01 2010-10-01 false Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies U-1(g)). 54... ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS General Requirements § 54.01-10 Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies U-1(g)). (a) Pressure vessels in which steam is generated are classed as “Unfired Steam Boilers” except...

  6. 46 CFR 54.01-10 - Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies U-1(g)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2012-10-01 2012-10-01 false Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies U-1(g)). 54.01-10 Section 54.01-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS General Requirements § 54.01-10 Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies U-1(g...

  7. 46 CFR 54.01-10 - Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies U-1(g)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2013-10-01 2013-10-01 false Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies U-1(g)). 54.01-10 Section 54.01-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS General Requirements § 54.01-10 Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies U-1(g...

  8. 46 CFR 54.01-10 - Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies U-1(g)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2014-10-01 2014-10-01 false Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies U-1(g)). 54.01-10 Section 54.01-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS General Requirements § 54.01-10 Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies U-1(g...

  9. 46 CFR 54.01-10 - Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies U-1(g)).

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2011 CFR

    2011-10-01

    ... 46 Shipping 2 2011-10-01 2011-10-01 false Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies U-1(g)). 54.01-10 Section 54.01-10 Shipping COAST GUARD, DEPARTMENT OF HOMELAND SECURITY (CONTINUED) MARINE ENGINEERING PRESSURE VESSELS General Requirements § 54.01-10 Steam-generating pressure vessels (modifies U-1(g...

  10. Phenomenological study on the wino radiative decay in anomalous U(1){sup '} models

    SciTech Connect

    Fucito, Francesco; Lionetto, Andrea; Pacifici, Daniel Ricci; Racioppi, Antonio

    2010-12-01

    An extension of the standard model by at least one extra U(1) gauge symmetry has been investigated by many authors. In this paper we explore the possibility that this extra U(1) is anomalous. One possible signature of this model could be given by the photons produced in the decays of the next to lightest supersymmetric particle into the lightest supersymmetric particle.

  11. The U1-snRNP complex: structural properties relating to autoimmune pathogenesis in rheumatic diseases

    PubMed Central

    Kattah, Nicole H.; Kattah, Michael G.; Utz, Paul J.

    2011-01-01

    Summary The U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particle (snRNP) is a target of autoreactive B cells and T cells in several rheumatic diseases including systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE) and mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD). We propose that inherent structural properties of this autoantigen complex, including common RNA-binding motifs, B and T-cell epitopes, and a unique stimulatory RNA molecule, underlie its susceptibility as a target of the autoimmune response. Immune mechanisms that may contribute to overall U1-snRNP immunogenicity include epitope spreading through B and T-cell interactions, apoptosis-induced modifications, and Toll-like receptor (TLR) activation through stimulation by U1-snRNA. We conclude that understanding the interactions between U1-snRNP and the immune system will provide insights into why certain patients develop anti-U1-snRNP autoimmunity, and more importantly how to effectively target therapies against this autoimmune response. PMID:20192997

  12. At the origin of spliceosomal introns: Is multiplication of introner-like elements the main mechanism of intron gain in fungi?

    PubMed

    Collemare, Jérôme; van der Burgt, Ate; de Wit, Pierre J G M

    2013-03-01

    The recent discovery of introner-like elements (ILEs) in six fungal species shed new light on the origin of regular spliceosomal introns (RSIs) and the mechanism of intron gains. These novel spliceosomal introns are found in hundreds of copies, are longer than RSIs and harbor stable predicted secondary structures. Yet, they are prone to degeneration in sequence and length to become undistinguishable from RSIs, suggesting that ILEs are predecessors of most RSIs. In most fungi, other near-identical introns were found duplicated in lower numbers in the same gene or in unrelated genes, indicating that intron duplication is a widespread phenomenon. However, ILEs are associated with the majority of intron gains, suggesting that the other types of duplication are of minor importance to the overall gains of introns. Our data support the hypothesis that ILEs' multiplication corresponds to the main mechanism of intron gain in fungi.

  13. A model of the matter-antimatter asymmetry and cold dark matter with U(1)B - L ⊗ U(1)D

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yang, Wei-Min

    2016-11-01

    I suggest an effective model between the GUT and the electroweak scale. It only introduces the two symmetries of U(1) B - L and U(1)D besides the SM groups. The two symmetries are individually broken at the reheating temperature of the universe of 1012 GeV and the scale of 3 ∼ 4 TeV. The model can simultaneously accommodate the tiny neutrino masses, the matter-antimatter asymmetry and the cold dark matter (CDM). In particular, the model gives some interesting results and predictions, for instance, the neutrinos are of Dirac nature and their masses are related to the U(1)D breaking, the size of the matter-antimatter asymmetry is closely related to the mass hierarchy of the quarks and charged leptons, the CDM mass is probably in the range of 250 ∼ 350 GeV. Finally, it is feasible to test the model in future collider experiments.

  14. Closure report for underground storage tank 141-R3U1 and its associated underground piping

    SciTech Connect

    Mallon, B.J.; Blake, R.G.

    1994-03-01

    Underground storage tank UST 141-R3U1 at Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL), was registered with the State Water Resources Control Board on June 27, 1984. This tank system consisted of a concrete tank, lined with polyvinyl chloride, and approximately 100 feet of PVC underground piping. UST 141-R3U1 had a capacity of 450 gallons. The underground piping connected three floor drains and one sink inside Building 141 to UST 141-R3U1. The wastewater collected in UST 141-R3U1 contained organic solvents, metals, and inorganic acids. On November 30, 1987, the 141-R3U1 tank system failed a precision tank test. The 141-R3U1 tank system was subsequently emptied and removed from service pending further precision tests to determine the location of the leak within the tank system. A precision tank test on February 5, 1988, was performed to confirm the November 30, 1987 test. Four additional precision tests were performed on this tank system between February 25, 1988, and March 6, 1988. The leak was located where the inlet piping from Building 141 penetrates the concrete side of UST 141-R3U1. The volume of wastewater that entered the backfill and soil around and/or beneath UST 141-R3U1 is unknown. On December 13, 1989, the LLNL Environmental Restoration Division submitted a plan to close UST 141-R3U1 and its associated piping to the Alameda County Department of Environmental Health. UST 141-R3U1 was closed as an UST, and shall be used instead as additional secondary containment for two aboveground storage tanks.

  15. Inflection-point inflation in a hyper-charge oriented U(1 ) X model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Nobuchika; Okada, Satomi; Raut, Digesh

    2017-03-01

    Inflection-point inflation is an interesting possibility to realize a successful slow-roll inflation when inflation is driven by a single scalar field, with its value during inflation below the Planck mass (ϕI≲MPl). In order for a renormalization group (RG) improved effective λ ϕ4 potential to develop an inflection point, the running quartic coupling λ (ϕ ) must exhibit a minimum with an almost vanishing value in its RG evolution, namely λ (ϕI)≃0 and βλ(ϕI)≃0 , where βλ is the beta function of the quartic coupling. In this paper, we consider the inflection-point inflation in the context of the minimal U(1 ) X extended Standard Model (SM), a generalization of the minimal U (1 )B -L model, where the U(1 ) X symmetry is realized as a linear combination of the SM U(1 ) Y and the U (1 )B -L gauge symmetries. We identify the U(1 ) X Higgs field with the inflaton field. For successful inflection-point inflation to be consistent with the current cosmological observations, the mass ratios among the U(1 ) X gauge boson, the right-handed neutrinos, and the U(1 ) X Higgs boson are fixed. Focusing on the case that the U(1 ) X gauge symmetry is mostly oriented towards the SM U(1 ) Y direction, we investigate a consistency between the inflationary predictions and the latest LHC Run 2 results on the search for a narrow resonance with the dilepton final state. In addition, the inflection-point inflation provides a unique prediction for the running of the spectral index α ≃-2.7 ×10-3(60/N) 2 (N is the e-folding number), which can be tested in the near future.

  16. Stable tri-snRNP integration is accompanied by a major structural rearrangement of the spliceosome that is dependent on Prp8 interaction with the 5' splice site.

    PubMed

    Boesler, Carsten; Rigo, Norbert; Agafonov, Dmitry E; Kastner, Berthold; Urlaub, Henning; Will, Cindy L; Lührmann, Reinhard

    2015-11-01

    Exon definition is the predominant initial spliceosome assembly pathway in higher eukaryotes, but it remains much less well-characterized compared to the intron-defined assembly pathway. Addition in trans of an excess of 5'ss containing RNA to a splicing reaction converts a 37S exon-defined complex, formed on a single exon RNA substrate, into a 45S B-like spliceosomal complex with stably integrated U4/U6.U5 tri-snRNP. This 45S complex is compositonally and structurally highly similar to an intron-defined spliceosomal B complex. Stable tri-snRNP integration during B-like complex formation is accompanied by a major structural change as visualized by electron microscopy. The changes in structure and stability during transition from a 37S to 45S complex can be induced in affinity-purified cross-exon complexes by adding solely the 5'ss RNA oligonucleotide. This conformational change does not require the B-specific proteins, which are recruited during this stabilization process, or site-specific phosphorylation of hPrp31. Instead it is triggered by the interaction of U4/U6.U5 tri-snRNP components with the 5'ss sequence, most importantly between Prp8 and nucleotides at the exon-intron junction. These studies provide novel insights into the conversion of a cross-exon to cross-intron organized spliceosome and also shed light on the requirements for stable tri-snRNP integration during B complex formation. © 2015 Boesler et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  17. A two-step approach for sequencing spliceosome-related genes as a complementary diagnostic assay in MDS patients with ringed sideroblasts.

    PubMed

    Janusz, Kamila; Del Rey, Mónica; Abáigar, María; Collado, Rosa; Ivars, David; Hernández-Sánchez, María; Valiente, Alberto; Robledo, Cristina; Benito, Rocío; Díez-Campelo, María; Ramos, Fernando; Kohlmann, Alexander; Cañizo, Consuelo Del; Hernández-Rivas, Jesús María

    2017-02-04

    Our study aimed to analyze the presence of mutations in SF3B1 and other spliceosome-related genes in myelodysplastic syndromes with ringed sideroblasts (MDS-RS) by combining conventional Sanger and next-generation sequencing (NGS) methods, and to determine the feasibility of this approach in a clinical setting. 122 bone marrow samples from MDS-RS patients were studied. Initially, exons 14 and 15 of the SF3B1 gene were analyzed by Sanger sequencing. Secondly, they were studied by NGS covering besides SF3B1, SRSF2, U2AF1 and ZRSR2 genes. An 86% of all patients showed mutations in the SF3B1 gene. Six of them, which were not identifiable by conventional sequencing in the first diagnostic step, were revealed by NGS. In addition, 19.5% of cases showed mutations in other splicing genes: SRSF2, U2AF1, and ZRSR2. Furthermore, 8.7% of patients had two mutations in SF3B1, SF3B1 and SRSF2, and SF3B1 and U2AF1, while 5.7% showed no mutations in the four spliceosome-related genes analyzed. The combined use of conventional Sanger and NGS allows the identification of mutations in spliceosome-related genes in almost all MDS patients with RS. This two-step approach is affordable and could be useful as a complementary technique in cases with an unclear diagnosis.

  18. The ribosomal translocase homologue Snu114p is involved in unwinding U4/U6 RNA during activation of the spliceosome

    PubMed Central

    Bartels, Cornelia; Klatt, Christine; Lührmann, Reinhard; Fabrizio‡, Patrizia

    2002-01-01

    Snu114p is a yeast U5 snRNP protein homologous to the ribosomal elongation factor EF-2. Snu114p exhibits the same domain structure as EF-2, including the G-domain, but with an additional N-terminal domain. To test whether Snu114p in the spliceosome is involved in rearranging RNA secondary structures (by analogy to EF-2 in the ribosome), we created conditionally lethal mutants. Deletion of this N-terminal domain (snu114ΔN) leads to a temperature-sensitive phenotype at 37°C and a pre-mRNA splicing defect in vivo. Heat treatment of snu114ΔN extracts blocked splicing in vitro before the first step. The snu114ΔN still associates with the tri-snRNP, and the stability of this particle is not significantly impaired by thermal inactivation. Heat treatment of snu114ΔN extracts resulted in accumulation of arrested spliceosomes in which the U4 RNA was not efficiently released, and we show that U4 is still base paired with the U6 RNA. This suggests that Snu114p is involved, directly or indirectly, in the U4/U6 unwinding, an essential step towards spliceosome activation. PMID:12189173

  19. Proteins cross-linked to U1 RNA by ultraviolet irradiation

    SciTech Connect

    Marti, A.; Jimenez, R.; Matos, J.

    1987-05-01

    Proteins associated to U1 RNA react with antinuclear antibodies obtained from sera of patients with autoimmune diseases. K.B. cells were labeled with /sup 3/H-amino acids of /sup 3/H-uridine. The U1 RNA particles were immunoprecipitated. Protein and RNA analysis was by electrophoresis and fluorography. The ratio of material at the top of the RNA gel to the U1 RNA band was 0.79. After exposure of the cells to UV irradiation, the ratio was 5.04. A substantial amount of U1 RNA was cross-linked to proteins or other nuclear components. Protein patterns obtained from U1 RNP particles subjected to UV irradiation revealed a change in electrophoretic mobility by four proteins in the molecular range of 14,000 to 28,000 daltons. The 33,000 dalton protein was reduced by 50% but its electrophoretic mobility was unchanged. The protein band at 68,000 daltons was unchanged in amount or mobility by UV irradiation. It is concluded that the low molecular weight proteins (14,000 - 28,000) and the protein of 33,000 daltons are in close proximity to U1 RNA and possibly play a role in the molecular function(s) attributed to U1 RNA.

  20. Inflection-point inflation in a hyper-charge oriented U(1)X model

    DOE PAGES

    Okada, Nobuchika; Okada, Satomi; Raut, Digesh

    2017-03-31

    Inflection-point inflation is an interesting possibility to realize a successful slow-roll inflation when inflation is driven by a single scalar field with its value during inflation below the Planck mass (ΦI≲MPl). In order for a renormalization group (RG) improved effective λΦ4 potential to develop an inflection-point, the running quartic coupling λ(Φ) must exhibit a minimum with an almost vanishing value in its RG evolution, namely λ(ΦI)≃0 and βλ(ΦI)≃0, where βλ is the beta-function of the quartic coupling. Here in this paper, we consider the inflection-point inflation in the context of the minimal gauged U(1)X extended Standard Model (SM), which ismore » a generalization of the minimal U(1)B$-$L model, and is constructed as a linear combination of the SM U(1)Y and U(1)B$-$L gauge symmetries. We identify the U(1)X Higgs field with the inflaton field. For a successful inflection-point inflation to be consistent with the current cosmological observations, the mass ratios among the U(1)X gauge boson, the right-handed neutrinos and the U(1)X Higgs boson are fixed. Focusing on the case that the extra U(1)X gauge symmetry is mostly aligned along the SM U(1)Y direction, we investigate a consistency between the inflationary predictions and the latest LHC Run-2 results on the search for a narrow resonance with the di-lepton final state.« less

  1. Four-dimensional quantum oscillator and magnetic monopole with U(1) dynamical group

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bakhshi, Z.; Panahi, H.; Golchehre, S. G.

    2017-09-01

    By using an appropriate transformation, it was shown that the quantum system of four-dimensional (4D) simple harmonic oscillator can describe the motion of a charged particle in the presence of a magnetic monopole field. It was shown that the Dirac magnetic monopole has the hidden algebra of U(1) symmetry and by reducing the dimensions of space, the U(1) × U(1) dynamical group for 4D harmonic oscillator quantum system was obtained. Using the group representation and based on explicit solution of the obtained differential equation, the spectrum of system was calculated.

  2. New U(1) gauge model of radiative lepton masses with sterile neutrino and dark matter

    DOE PAGES

    Adhikari, Rathin; Borah, Debasish; Ma, Ernest

    2016-02-23

    Here, an anomaly-free U(1) gauge extension of the standard model (SM) is presented. Only one Higgs doublet with a nonzero vacuum expectation is required as in the SM. New fermions and scalars as well as all SM particles transform nontrivially under this U(1), resulting in a model of three active neutrinos and one sterile neutrino, all acquiring radiative masses. Charged-lepton masses are also radiative as well as the mixing between active and sterile neutrinos. At the same time, a residual Z2 symmetry of the U(1) gauge symmetry remains exact, allowing for the existence of dark matter.

  3. A dominant negative mutation in the conserved RNA helicase motif 'SAT' causes splicing factor PRP2 to stall in spliceosomes.

    PubMed Central

    Plumpton, M; McGarvey, M; Beggs, J D

    1994-01-01

    To characterize sequences in the RNA helicase-like PRP2 protein of Saccharomyces cerevisiae that are essential for its function in pre-mRNA splicing, a pool of random PRP2 mutants was generated. A dominant negative allele was isolated which, when overexpressed in a wild-type yeast strain, inhibited cell growth by causing a defect in pre-mRNA splicing. This defect was partially alleviated by simultaneous co-overexpression of wild-type PRP2. The dominant negative PRP2 protein inhibited splicing in vitro and caused the accumulation of stalled splicing complexes. Immunoprecipitation with anti-PRP2 antibodies confirmed that dominant negative PRP2 protein competed with its wild-type counterpart for interaction with spliceosomes, with which the mutant protein remained associated. The PRP2-dn1 mutation led to a single amino acid change within the conserved SAT motif that in the prototype helicase eIF-4A is required for RNA unwinding. Purified dominant negative PRP2 protein had approximately 40% of the wild-type level of RNA-stimulated ATPase activity. As ATPase activity was reduced only slightly, but splicing activity was abolished, we propose that the dominant negative phenotype is due primarily to a defect in the putative RNA helicase activity of PRP2 protein. Images PMID:8112301

  4. All exactly solvable U(1)-invariant quantum spin 1 chains from Hecke algebra

    SciTech Connect

    Alcarez, F.C. ); Koberle, R. ); Lima-Santos, A. )

    1992-12-10

    In this paper, the authors obtain all exactly integrable spin 1 quantum chains, which are U(1) invariant and satisfy the Hecke algebra. The authors present various generalizations for arbitrary spin S and discuss their solution via Bethe ansatz methods.

  5. 40 CFR Table U-1 to Subpart U of... - CO2 Emission Factors for Common Carbonates

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2014 CFR

    2014-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 21 2014-07-01 2014-07-01 false CO2 Emission Factors for Common.... 98, Subpt. U, Table U-1 Table U-1 to Subpart U of Part 98—CO2 Emission Factors for Common Carbonates Mineral name—carbonate CO2 emission factor(tons CO2/ton carbonate) Limestone—CaCO3 0.43971...

  6. 40 CFR Table U-1 to Subpart U of... - CO2 Emission Factors for Common Carbonates

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2013 CFR

    2013-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2013-07-01 2013-07-01 false CO2 Emission Factors for Common.... 98, Subpt. U, Table U-1 Table U-1 to Subpart U of Part 98—CO2 Emission Factors for Common Carbonates Mineral name—carbonate CO2 emission factor(tons CO2/ton carbonate) Limestone—CaCO3 0.43971...

  7. 40 CFR Table U-1 to Subpart U of... - CO2 Emission Factors for Common Carbonates

    Code of Federal Regulations, 2012 CFR

    2012-07-01

    ... 40 Protection of Environment 22 2012-07-01 2012-07-01 false CO2 Emission Factors for Common.... 98, Subpt. U, Table U-1 Table U-1 to Subpart U of Part 98—CO2 Emission Factors for Common Carbonates Mineral name—carbonate CO2 emission factor(tons CO2/ton carbonate) Limestone—CaCO3 0.43971...

  8. Closure report for underground storage tank 161-R1U1 and its associated underground piping

    SciTech Connect

    Mallon, B.J.; Blake, R.G.

    1994-05-01

    Underground storage tank (UST) 161-31 R at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was registered with the State Water Resources Control Board on June 27, 1984. UST 161-31R was subsequently renamed UST 161-R1U1 (Fig. A-1, Appendix A). UST 161-R1U1 was installed in 1976, and had a capacity of 383 gallons. This tank system consisted of a fiberglass reinforced plastic tank, approximately 320 feet of polyvinyl chloride (PVC) underground piping from Building 161, and approximately 40 feet of PVC underground piping from Building 160. The underground piping connected laboratory drains and sinks inside Buildings 160 and 161 to UST 161-R1U1. The wastewater collected in UST 161-R1U1, contained organic solvents, metals, inorganic acids, and radionuclides, most of which was produced within Building 161. On June 28, 1989, the UST 161-R1U1 piping system.around the perimeter of Building 161 failed a precision test performed by Gary Peters Enterprises (Appendix B). The 161-R1U1 tank system was removed from service after the precision test. In July 1989, additional hydrostatic tests and helium leak detection tests were performed (Appendix B) to determine the locations of the piping failures in the Building 161 piping system. The locations of the piping system failures are shown in Figure A-2 (Appendix A). On July 11, 1989, LLNL submitted an Unauthorized Release Report to Alameda County Department of Environmental Health (ACDEH), Appendix C.

  9. Tuned and non-Higgsable U(1)s in F-theory

    DOE PAGES

    Wang, Yi-Nan

    2017-03-01

    We study the tuning of U(1) gauge fields in F-theory models on a base of general dimension. We construct a formula that computes the change in Weierstrass moduli when such a U(1) is tuned, based on the Morrison-Park form of a Weierstrass model with an additional rational section. Using this formula, we propose the form of “minimal tuning” on any base, which corresponds to the case where the decrease in the number of Weierstrass moduli is minimal. Applying this result, we discover some universal features of bases with non-Higgsable U(1)s. Mathematically, a generic elliptic fibration over such a base hasmore » additional rational sections. Physically, this condition implies the existence of U(1) gauge group in the low-energy supergravity theory after compactification that cannot be Higgsed away. In particular, we show that the elliptic Calabi-Yau manifold over such a base has a small number of complex structure moduli. We also suggest that non-Higgsable U(1)s can never appear on any toric bases. Finally, we construct the first example of a threefold base with non-Higgsable U(1)s.« less

  10. Hidden gauged U (1 ) model: Unifying scotogenic neutrino and flavor dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Yu, Jiang-Hao

    2016-06-01

    In both scotogenic neutrino and flavor dark matter models, the dark sector communicates with the standard model fermions via Yukawa portal couplings. We propose an economic scenario where the scotogenic neutrino and a flavored mediator share the same inert Higgs doublet and all are charged under a hidden gauged U (1 ) symmetry. The dark Z2 symmetry in the dark sector is regarded as the remnant of this hidden U (1 ) symmetry breaking. In particular, we investigate a dark U (1 )D [and also U (1 )B-L] model which unifies the scotogenic neutrino and top-flavored mediator. Thus dark tops and dark neutrinos are the standard model fermion partners, and the dark matter could be the inert Higgs or the lightest dark neutrino. We note that this model has rich collider signatures on dark tops, the inert Higgs and the Z' gauge boson. Moreover, the scalar associated to the U (1 )D [and also U (1 )B -L ] symmetry breaking could explain the 750 GeV diphoton excess reported by ATLAS and CMS recently.

  11. Structural requirements for the functional activity of a U1 snRNA gene enhancer.

    PubMed Central

    Cheung, C H; Fan, Q N; Stumph, W E

    1993-01-01

    The transcriptional enhancer of a chicken U1 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) gene contains a GC-box, an octamer motif, and an SPH motif that are recognized by the transcription factors Sp1, Oct-1, and SBF respectively. Previous work indicated that the octamer and the SPH motifs were both required for U1 gene enhancer activity in frog oocytes when the U1 gene was coinjected with a competing snRNA gene template. Here we show that neither two copies of the octamer motif, nor two copies of the SPH motif, can effectively substitute for the natural combination of octamer and SPH. Furthermore, neither the octamer nor the SPH motif (in the absence of the other) functioned efficiently in combination with a GC-box. Alteration of the spacing between the octamer and SPH motifs also reduced U1 template activity. Several potential cis-acting elements other than the SPH motif, with one possible exception among those tested, were unable to cooperate with the octamer motif to effectively enhance U1 gene expression. These results indicate that rather stringent structural requirements exist with respect to the essential cis-acting motifs present in the U1 enhancer, possibly reflecting the unique properties of the transcription complexes assembled on snRNA gene promoters. Images PMID:8441636

  12. Tuned and non-Higgsable U(1)s in F-theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wang, Yi-Nan

    2017-03-01

    We study the tuning of U(1) gauge fields in F-theory models on a base of general dimension. We construct a formula that computes the change in Weierstrass moduli when such a U(1) is tuned, based on the Morrison-Park form of a Weierstrass model with an additional rational section. Using this formula, we propose the form of "minimal tuning" on any base, which corresponds to the case where the decrease in the number of Weierstrass moduli is minimal. Applying this result, we discover some universal features of bases with non-Higgsable U(1)s. Mathematically, a generic elliptic fibration over such a base has additional rational sections. Physically, this condition implies the existence of U(1) gauge group in the low-energy supergravity theory after compactification that cannot be Higgsed away. In particular, we show that the elliptic Calabi-Yau manifold over such a base has a small number of complex structure moduli. We also suggest that non-Higgsable U(1)s can never appear on any toric bases. Finally, we construct the first example of a threefold base with non-Higgsable U(1)s.

  13. Induced fit or conformational selection for RNA/U1A folding

    PubMed Central

    Qin, Fang; Chen, Yue; Wu, Maoying; Li, Yixue; Zhang, Jian; Chen, Hai-Feng

    2010-01-01

    The hairpin II of U1 snRNA can bind U1A protein with high affinity and specificity. NMR spectra suggest that the loop region of apo-RNA is largely unstructured and undergoes a transition from unstructured to well-folded upon U1Abinding. However, the mechanism that RNA folding coupled protein binding is poorly understood. To get an insight into the mechanism, we have performed explicit-solvent molecular dynamics (MD) to study the folding kinetics of bound RNA and apo-RNA. Room-temperature MD simulations suggest that the conformation of bound RNA has significant adjustment and becomes more stable upon U1A binding. Kinetic analysis of high-temperature MD simulations shows that bound RNA and apo-RNA unfold via a two-state process, respectively. Both kinetics and free energy landscape analyses indicate that bound RNA folds in the order of RNA contracting, U1A binding, and tertiary folding. The predicted Φ-values suggest that A8, C10, A11, and G16 are key bases for bound RNA folding. Mutant Arg52Gln analysis shows that electrostatic interaction and hydrogen bonds between RNA and U1A (Arg52Gln) decrease. These results are in qualitative agreement with experiments. Furthermore, this method could be used in other studies about biomolecule folding upon receptor binding. PMID:20354153

  14. SF3B1/Hsh155 HEAT motif mutations affect interaction with the spliceosomal ATPase Prp5, resulting in altered branch site selectivity in pre-mRNA splicing

    PubMed Central

    Tang, Qing; Rodriguez-Santiago, Susana; Wang, Jing; Pu, Jia; Yuste, Andrea; Gupta, Varun; Moldón, Alberto; Xu, Yong-Zhen; Query, Charles C.

    2016-01-01

    Mutations in the U2 snRNP component SF3B1 are prominent in myelodysplastic syndromes (MDSs) and other cancers and have been shown recently to alter branch site (BS) or 3′ splice site selection in splicing. However, the molecular mechanism of altered splicing is not known. We show here that hsh155 mutant alleles in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, counterparts of SF3B1 mutations frequently found in cancers, specifically change splicing of suboptimal BS pre-mRNA substrates. We found that Hsh155p interacts directly with Prp5p, the first ATPase that acts during spliceosome assembly, and localized the interacting regions to HEAT (Huntingtin, EF3, PP2A, and TOR1) motifs in SF3B1 associated with disease mutations. Furthermore, we show that mutations in these motifs from both human disease and yeast genetic screens alter the physical interaction with Prp5p, alter branch region specification, and phenocopy mutations in Prp5p. These and other data demonstrate that mutations in Hsh155p and Prp5p alter splicing because they change the direct physical interaction between Hsh155p and Prp5p. This altered physical interaction results in altered loading (i.e., “fidelity”) of the BS–U2 duplex into the SF3B complex during prespliceosome formation. These results provide a mechanistic framework to explain the consequences of intron recognition and splicing of SF3B1 mutations found in disease. PMID:28087715

  15. Functional analysis of U1-70K interacting SR proteins in pre-mRNA splicing in Arabidopsis

    SciTech Connect

    A.S.N. Reddy

    2008-11-25

    Proteins of a serine/arginine-rich (SR) family are part of the spliceosome and are implicated in both constitutive and alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs. With the funding from DOE we have been studying alternative of splicing of genes encoding serine/arginine-rich (SR) proteins and the roles of SR proteins that interact with U1-70K in regulating basic and alternative splicing. Alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs of Arabidopsis serine/arginine-rich proteins and its regulation by hormones and stresses: We analyzed the splicing of all 19 Arabidopsis genes in different tissues, during different seedling stages and in response to various hormonal and stress treatments. Remarkably, about 90 different transcripts are produced from 15 SR genes, thereby increasing the transcriptome complexity of SR genes by about five fold. Using the RNA isolated from polysomes we have shown that most of the splice variants are recruited for translation. Alternative splicing of some SR genes is controlled in a developmental and tissue-specific manner (Palusa et al., 2007). Interestingly, among the various hormones and abiotic stresses tested, temperature stress (cold and heat) and ultraviolet light dramatically altered alternative splicing of pre-mRNAs of several SR genes whereas hormones altered the splicing of only two SR genes (Palusa et al., 2007). Localization and dynamics of a novel serine/arginine-rich protein that interacts with U1-70K: We analyzed the intranuclear movement of SR45 fused to GFP by fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP) and fluorescence loss in photobleaching (FLIP). We demonstrate that the movement of GFP-SR45 is ATP-dependent. Interestingly, inhibition of transcription or phosphorylation slowed the mobility of GFP-SR45 (Ali et al., 2006). Our studies have revealed that the nuclear localization signals are located in arg/ser-rich domains (RS) 1 and 2, whereas the speckle targeting signals are exclusively present in RS2 (Ali et al., 2006). The regulation of

  16. Structure and thermodynamics of a conserved U2 snRNA domain from yeast and human.

    PubMed

    Sashital, Dipali G; Venditti, Vincenzo; Angers, Cortney G; Cornilescu, Gabriel; Butcher, Samuel E

    2007-03-01

    The spliceosome is a dynamic ribonucleoprotein complex responsible for the removal of intron sequences from pre-messenger RNA. The highly conserved 5' end of the U2 small nuclear RNA (snRNA) makes key base-pairing interactions with the intron branch point sequence and U6 snRNA. U2 stem I, a stem-loop located in the 5' region of U2, has been implicated in spliceosome assembly and may modulate the folding of the U2 and U6 snRNAs in the spliceosome active site. Here we present the NMR structures of U2 stem I from human and Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These sequences represent the two major classes of U2 stem I, distinguished by the identity of tandem wobble pairs (UU/UU in yeast and CA/GU in human) and the presence of post-transcriptional modifications (four 2'-O-methyl groups and two pseudouracils in human). The structures reveal that the UU/UU and CA/GU tandem wobble pairs are nearly isosteric. The tandem wobble pairs separate two thermodynamically distinct regions of Watson-Crick base pairs, with the modified nucleotides in human stem I conferring a significant increase in stability. We hypothesize that the separate thermodynamic stabilities of U2 stem I exist to allow the structure to transition through different folded conformations during spliceosome assembly and catalysis.

  17. Higgs phenomenology in Type-I 2HDM with U(1) H Higgs gauge symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, P.; Omura, Yuji; Yu, Chaehyun

    2014-01-01

    It is well known that generic two-Higgs-doublet models (2HDMs) suffer from potentially large Higgs-mediated flavor-changing neutral current (FCNC) problem, unless additional symmetries are imposed on the Higgs fields thereby respecting the Natural Flavor Conservation Criterion (NFC) by Glashow and Weinberg. A common way to respect the NFC is to impose Z 2 symmetry which is softly broken by a dim-2 operator. Another new way is to introduce local U(1) H Higgs flavor symmetry that distinguishes one Higgs doublet from the other. In this paper, we consider the Higgs phenomenology in Type-I 2HDMs with the U(1) H symmetry with the simplest U(1) H assignments that the SM fermions are all neutral under U(1) H , and we make detailed comparison with the ordinary Type-I 2HDM. After imposing various constraints such as vacuum stability and perturbativity as well as the electroweak precision observables and collider search bounds on charged Higgs boson, we find that the allowed Higgs signal strengths in our model are much broader than those in the ordinary Type-I 2HDM, because of newly introduced U(1) H -charged singlet scalar and U(1) H gauge boson. Still the ATLAS data on gg → h → γγ cannot be accommodated. Our model could be distinguished from the ordinary 2HDM with the Z 2 symmetry in a certain parameter region and some channels. If the couplings of the new boson turn out to be close to those in the SM, it would be essential to search for extra U(1) H gauge boson and/or one more neutral scalar boson to distinguish two models.

  18. A diversity of U1 small nuclear RNAs in the silk moth Bombyx mori.

    PubMed

    Sierra-Montes, J M; Pereira-Simon, S; Freund, A V; Ruiz, L M; Szmulewicz, M N; Herrera, R J

    2003-01-01

    Variants of U1 small nuclear RNAs (snRNAs) have been previously detected in a permanent cell line (BmN) of the silk moth Bombyx mori. In this study, the existence of U1 snRNA isoforms in the silk gland (SG) of the organism is investigated. The polyploidy (approximately 200,000X the 2N somatic value) state of the B. mori silk gland cells represents a unique system to explore the potential presence and differential expression of multiple U1 variants in a normal tissue. B. mori U1-specific RT-PCR libraries from the silk gland were generated and five U1 isoforms were isolated and characterized. Nucleotide differences, structural alterations, as well as protein and RNA interaction sites were examined in these variants and compared to the previously reported isoforms from the transformed BmN cell line. In all these SG U1 variants, variant sites and inter-species differences are located in moderately conserved regions. Substitutional or compensatory changes were found in the double stranded areas and clustered in moderately conserved regions. Some of the changes generate stronger base pairing. Calculated free energy (DeltaG) values for the entire U1 snRNA secondary structures and for the individual stem/loops (I, II, III and IV) domains of the isoforms were generated and compared to determine their structural stability. Using phylogenetic analysis, an evolutionary parallelism is observed between the polymorphic sites in B. mori and variant locations found among animal and plant species.

  19. A U1-U2 snRNP interaction network during intron definition.

    PubMed

    Shao, Wei; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Cao, Yang; Xu, Yong-Zhen; Query, Charles C

    2012-01-01

    The assembly of prespliceosomes is responsible for selection of intron sites for splicing. U1 and U2 snRNPs recognize 5' splice sites and branch sites, respectively; although there is information regarding the composition of these complexes, little is known about interaction among the components or between the two snRNPs. Here we describe the protein network of interactions linking U1 and U2 snRNPs with the ATPase Prp5, important for branch site recognition and fidelity during the first steps of the reaction, using fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The U1 snRNP core protein U1A binds to a novel SR-like protein, Rsd1, which has homologs implicated in transcription. Rsd1 also contacts S. pombe Prp5 (SpPrp5), mediated by SR-like domains in both proteins. SpPrp5 then contacts U2 snRNP through SF3b, mediated by a conserved DPLD motif in Prp5. We show that mutations in this motif have consequences not only in vitro (defects in prespliceosome formation) but also in vivo, yielding intron retention and exon skipping defects in fission yeast and altered intron recognition in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, indicating that the U1-U2 network provides critical, evolutionarily conserved contacts during intron definition.

  20. A U1-U2 snRNP Interaction Network during Intron Definition

    PubMed Central

    Shao, Wei; Kim, Hyun-Soo; Cao, Yang

    2012-01-01

    The assembly of prespliceosomes is responsible for selection of intron sites for splicing. U1 and U2 snRNPs recognize 5′ splice sites and branch sites, respectively; although there is information regarding the composition of these complexes, little is known about interaction among the components or between the two snRNPs. Here we describe the protein network of interactions linking U1 and U2 snRNPs with the ATPase Prp5, important for branch site recognition and fidelity during the first steps of the reaction, using fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The U1 snRNP core protein U1A binds to a novel SR-like protein, Rsd1, which has homologs implicated in transcription. Rsd1 also contacts S. pombe Prp5 (SpPrp5), mediated by SR-like domains in both proteins. SpPrp5 then contacts U2 snRNP through SF3b, mediated by a conserved DPLD motif in Prp5. We show that mutations in this motif have consequences not only in vitro (defects in prespliceosome formation) but also in vivo, yielding intron retention and exon skipping defects in fission yeast and altered intron recognition in budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, indicating that the U1-U2 network provides critical, evolutionarily conserved contacts during intron definition. PMID:22064476

  1. Phenomenology of dark matter in chiral U(1 ) X dark sector

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ko, P.; Nomura, Takaaki

    2016-12-01

    We consider dark matter physics in a model for the dark sector with extra dark U(1 ) X gauge symmetry. The dark sector is composed of exotic fermions that are charged under both dark U(1 ) X and the standard model SU(3 ) C×U (1 )Y gauge groups, as well as standard model singlet complex scalars Φ and X with nonzero U(1 ) X charge. In this model, there are two dark matter candidates—a scalar and a fermion—both of which are stabilized by accidental Z2 symmetry. Their thermal relic density, and direct and indirect detection constraints are discussed in detail and we search for the parameter space of the model accommodating dark matter observations. We also discuss constraints from diphoton resonance searches associated with the scalar field which breaks the dark U(1 ) X , in a way consistent with dark matter physics. In addition, implications for collider physics are discussed, focusing on the production cross section of the scalar boson.

  2. Cytochrome P450 107U1 is required for sporulation and antibiotic production in Streptomyces coelicolor

    PubMed Central

    Tian, Zhenghua; Cheng, Qian; Yoshimoto, Francis K.; Lei, Li; Lamb, David C.; Guengerich, F. Peter

    2013-01-01

    The filamentous bacterium Streptomyces coelicolor has a complex life cycle involving the formation of hair-like aerial mycelia on the colony surface, which differentiate into chains of spores. Genes required for the initiation of aerial mycelium formation have been termed ‘bld’ (bald), describing the smooth, undifferentiated colonies of mutant strains. We report the identification of a new bld gene designated as sco3099 and biochemical analysis of its encoded enzyme, cytochrome P450 (P450, or CYP) 107U1. Deletion of sco3099 resulted in a mutant defective in aerial hyphae sporulation and sensitive to heat shock, indicating that P450 107U1 plays a key role in growth and development of S. coelicolor. This is the first P450 reported to participate in a sporulation process in Streptomycetes. The substrate and catalytic properties of P450 107U1 were further investigated in mass spectrometry-based metabolomic studies. Glycocholic acid (from the medium) was identified as a substrate of P450 107U1 and was oxidized to glyco-7-oxo-deoxycholic acid. Although this reaction is apparently not relevant to the observed sporulation deficiency, it suggests that P450 107U1 might exert its physiological function by oxidizing other steroid-like molecules. PMID:23357279

  3. Pseudouridines in U2 snRNA stimulate the ATPase activity of Prp5 during spliceosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Wu, Guowei; Adachi, Hironori; Ge, Junhui; Stephenson, David; Query, Charles C; Yu, Yi-Tao

    2016-03-15

    Pseudouridine (Ψ) is the most abundant internal modification identified in RNA, and yet little is understood of its effects on downstream reactions. Yeast U2 snRNA contains three conserved Ψs (Ψ35, Ψ42, and Ψ44) in the branch site recognition region (BSRR), which base pairs with the pre-mRNA branch site during splicing. Here, we show that blocks to pseudouridylation at these positions reduce the efficiency of pre-mRNA splicing, leading to growth-deficient phenotypes. Restoration of pseudouridylation at these positions using designer snoRNAs results in near complete rescue of splicing and cell growth. These Ψs interact genetically with Prp5, an RNA-dependent ATPase involved in monitoring the U2 BSRR-branch site base-pairing interaction. Biochemical analysis indicates that Prp5 has reduced affinity for U2 snRNA that lacks Ψ42 and Ψ44 and that Prp5 ATPase activity is reduced when stimulated by U2 lacking Ψ42 or Ψ44 relative to wild type, resulting in inefficient spliceosome assembly. Furthermore, in vivo DMS probing analysis reveals that pseudouridylated U2, compared to U2 lacking Ψ42 and Ψ44, adopts a slightly different structure in the branch site recognition region. Taken together, our results indicate that the Ψs in U2 snRNA contribute to pre-mRNA splicing by directly altering the binding/ATPase activity of Prp5. © 2016 The Authors.

  4. Multivalent binding of formin-binding protein 21 (FBP21)-tandem-WW domains fosters protein recognition in the pre-spliceosome.

    PubMed

    Klippel, Stefan; Wieczorek, Marek; Schümann, Michael; Krause, Eberhard; Marg, Berenice; Seidel, Thorsten; Meyer, Tim; Knapp, Ernst-Walter; Freund, Christian

    2011-11-04

    The high abundance of repetitive but nonidentical proline-rich sequences in spliceosomal proteins raises the question of how these known interaction motifs recruit their interacting protein domains. Whereas complex formation of these adaptors with individual motifs has been studied in great detail, little is known about the binding mode of domains arranged in tandem repeats and long proline-rich sequences including multiple motifs. Here we studied the interaction of the two adjacent WW domains of spliceosomal protein FBP21 with several ligands of different lengths and composition to elucidate the hallmarks of multivalent binding for this class of recognition domains. First, we show that many of the proteins that define the cellular proteome interacting with FBP21-WW1-WW2 contain multiple proline-rich motifs. Among these is the newly identified binding partner SF3B4. Fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) analysis reveals the tandem-WW domains of FBP21 to interact with splicing factor 3B4 (SF3B4) in nuclear speckles where splicing takes place. Isothermal titration calorimetry and NMR shows that the tandem arrangement of WW domains and the multivalency of the proline-rich ligands both contribute to affinity enhancement. However, ligand exchange remains fast compared with the NMR time scale. Surprisingly, a N-terminal spin label attached to a bivalent ligand induces NMR line broadening of signals corresponding to both WW domains of the FBP21-WW1-WW2 protein. This suggests that distinct orientations of the ligand contribute to a delocalized and semispecific binding mode that should facilitate search processes within the spliceosome.

  5. SIMP from a strong U(1) gauge theory with a monopole condensation

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kamada, Ayuki; Yamada, Masaki; Yanagida, Tsutomu T.; Yonekura, Kazuya

    2016-09-01

    We provide a variant model of a strongly interacting massive particle (SIMP), where composite dark matter (DM) comes from a strongly interacting U(1) theory. We first explain a non-Abelian version of the model with an additional singlet field, which is mixed with the Higgs field to maintain kinetic equilibrium between the hidden and Standard Model (SM) sectors. The mixing leads to signals that would be detected by future collider experiments, direct DM detection experiments, and beam-dump experiments. Then we investigate a U(1) theory with a scalar monopole, where U(1) charged particles are confined by a monopole condensation. In this model, the radial component of the monopole can mix with the Higgs field, so that we do not need to introduce the additional singlet field.

  6. Oscillating asymmetric sneutrino dark matter from the maximally U(1)L supersymmetric inverse seesaw

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Shao-Long; Kang, Zhaofeng

    2016-10-01

    The inverse seesaw mechanism provides an attractive approach to generate small neutrino mass, which origins from a tiny U(1)L breaking. In this paper, we work in the supersymmetric version of this mechanism, where the singlet-like sneutrino could be an asymmetric dark matter (ADM) candidate in the maximally U(1)L symmetric limit. However, even a tiny δm, the mass splitting between sneutrino and anti-sneutrino as a result of the tiny U(1)L breaking effect, could lead to fast oscillation between sneutrino and anti-sneutrino and thus spoils the ADM scenario. We study the evolution of this oscillation and find that a weak scale sneutrino, which tolerates a relatively larger δm ∼10-5 eV, is strongly favored. We also investigate possible natural ways to realize that small δm in the model.

  7. Dilatometric study of U1-xAmxO2±δ and U1-xCexO2±δ reactive sintering

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Horlait, Denis; Feledziak, Alex; Lebreton, Florent; Clavier, Nicolas; Prieur, Damien; Dacheux, Nicolas; Delahaye, Thibaud

    2013-10-01

    In order to reduce the radiotoxicity of nuclear fuel waste, the transmutation of americium in U1-xAmxO2±δ dedicated fuels is considered. A convenient route to produce such fuels is reactive sintering from a UO2+δ/AmO2-δ green pellet, i.e., a single heat treatment during which both the densification and the formation of the U1-xAmxO2±δ solid solution occur. The mechanisms of such sintering are however barely known and require experimental data. In this aim, the densification through reactive sintering of a UO2+δ/AmO2-δ sample was monitored by dilatometry. The obtained results were compared to those reported for the formation of the U1-xAmxO2±δ solid solution monitored by in situ high-temperature X-ray diffraction. To assess the use of Ce as a substitute of Am, similar dilatometric studies were also carried out on UO2+δ/CeO2 pellets. Obtained results show that the use of a reactive sintering causes a delay in the densification process associated to the competition between solid solution formation and densification, which yields limitations in pellet final densities. The importance of redox behavior of Am (or Ce) on the achievement of solid solution formation and densification are also discussed, especially based on discrepancies in densification behavior between UO2+δ/AmO2-δ and UO2+δ/CeO2.

  8. Modular invariant gaugino condensation in the presence of ananomalous U(1)*

    SciTech Connect

    Gaillard, Mary K.; Giedt, Joel; Mints, Aleksey L.

    2003-12-10

    Starting from the previously constructed effective supergravity theory below the scale of U(1) breaking in orbifold compactifications of the weakly coupled heterotic string, we study the effective theory below the scale of supersymmetry breaking by gaugino and matter condensation in a hidden sector. Questions we address include vacuum stability and the masses of the various moduli fields, including those associated with flat directions at the U(1) breaking scale, and of their fermionic superpartners. The issue of soft supersymmetry-breaking masses in the observable sector presents a particularly serious challenge for this class of models.

  9. Remarks on mass and angular momenta for U(1){sup 2}-invariant initial data

    SciTech Connect

    Alaee, Aghil Kunduri, Hari K.

    2016-03-15

    We extend Brill’s positive mass theorem to a large class of asymptotically flat, maximal, U(1){sup 2}-invariant initial data sets on simply connected four dimensional manifolds Σ. Moreover, we extend the local mass angular momenta inequality result [A. Alaee and H. K. Kunduri, Classical Quantum Gravity 32(16), 165020 (2015)] for U(1){sup 2} invariant black holes to the case with nonzero stress energy tensor with positive matter density and energy-momentum current invariant under the above symmetries.

  10. Constraining minimal anomaly free U(1) extensions of the Standard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ekstedt, Andreas; Enberg, Rikard; Ingelman, Gunnar; Löfgren, Johan; Mandal, Tanumoy

    2016-11-01

    We consider a class of minimal anomaly free U(1) extensions of the Standard Model with three generations of right-handed neutrinos and a complex scalar. Using electroweak precision constraints, new 13 TeV LHC data, and considering theoretical limitations such as perturbativity, we show that it is possible to constrain a wide class of models. By classifying these models with a single parameter, κ, we can put a model independent upper bound on the new U(1) gauge coupling g z . We find that the new dilepton data puts strong bounds on the parameters, especially in the mass region M Z ' ≲ 3 TeV.

  11. Molecular architecture of the human U4/U6.U5 tri-snRNP.

    PubMed

    Agafonov, Dmitry E; Kastner, Berthold; Dybkov, Olexandr; Hofele, Romina V; Liu, Wen-Ti; Urlaub, Henning; Lührmann, Reinhard; Stark, Holger

    2016-03-25

    The U4/U6.U5 triple small nuclear ribonucleoprotein (tri-snRNP) is a major spliceosome building block. We obtained a three-dimensional structure of the 1.8-megadalton human tri-snRNP at a resolution of 7 angstroms using single-particle cryo-electron microscopy (cryo-EM). We fit all known high-resolution structures of tri-snRNP components into the EM density map and validated them by protein cross-linking. Our model reveals how the spatial organization of Brr2 RNA helicase prevents premature U4/U6 RNA unwinding in isolated human tri-snRNPs and how the ubiquitin C-terminal hydrolase-like protein Sad1 likely tethers the helicase Brr2 to its preactivation position. Comparison of our model with cryo-EM three-dimensional structures of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae tri-snRNP and Schizosaccharomyces pombe spliceosome indicates that Brr2 undergoes a marked conformational change during spliceosome activation, and that the scaffolding protein Prp8 is also rearranged to accommodate the spliceosome's catalytic RNA network. Copyright © 2016, American Association for the Advancement of Science.

  12. Spontaneous SUSY breaking with anomalous U(1) symmetry by meta-stable vacuum

    SciTech Connect

    Nishino, Hiroyuki

    2008-11-23

    We will discuss a SUSY breaking model with anomalous U(1) symmetry. We discard R-symmetry and allow non-renormalizable terms for the model. It will be shown that certain class of models, where the number of positively charged fields is larger than that of negatively charged fields, can have meta-stable SUSY breaking vacuum.

  13. Geophysical investigation of the 216-U-1/2 pipeline, 200 west area

    SciTech Connect

    Fassett, J.W; Bergstrom, K.A., Westinghouse Hanford

    1996-08-22

    Ground-penetrating radar was used at three locations in an attempt to locate and determine the depth of the 216-U-1/2 pipeline. Many anomalies were found, all very useful to the project, but only some of which were identified with the pipeline.

  14. Quark seesaw mechanism, dark U (1 ) symmetry, and the baryon-dark matter coincidence

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Gu, Pei-Hong; Mohapatra, Rabindra N.

    2017-09-01

    We attempt to understand the baryon-dark matter coincidence problem within the quark seesaw extension of the standard model where parity invariance is used to solve the strong C P problem. The S U (2 )L×S U (2 )R×U (1 )B -L gauge symmetry of this model is extended by a dark U (1 )X group plus inclusion of a heavy neutral vector-like fermion χL ,R charged under the dark group which plays the role of dark matter. All fermions are Dirac type in this model. Decay of heavy scalars charged under U (1 )X leads to simultaneous asymmetry generation of the dark matter and baryons after sphaleron effects are included. The U (1 )X group not only helps to stabilize the dark matter but also helps in the elimination of the symmetric part of the dark matter via χ -χ ¯ annihilation. For dark matter mass near the proton mass, it explains why the baryon and dark matter abundances are of similar magnitude (the baryon-dark matter coincidence problem). This model is testable in low threshold (sub-keV) direct dark matter search experiments.

  15. Draft Genome Sequence of Erythromycin- and Oxytetracycline-Sensitive Nocardia seriolae Strain U-1 (NBRC 110359)

    PubMed Central

    Sukeda, Masaki; Shimizu, Masato; Yamane, Jin; Ohnishi, Kouhei; Oshima, Syun-ichirou

    2016-01-01

    In Japan, the emergence of macrolide- and oxytetracycline-resistant strains of Nocardia seriolae has previously been reported. Here, we describe the draft genome sequence of N. seriolae strain U-1, isolated in 2011 from a diseased yellowtail in Kagoshima Prefecture. The draft genome does not have any genes responsible for macrolide and tetracycline resistance. PMID:26798107

  16. 13. DETAIL, U1 JOINT, FROM BELOW AND SOUTH, SHOWING RIVETED ...

    Library of Congress Historic Buildings Survey, Historic Engineering Record, Historic Landscapes Survey

    13. DETAIL, U1 JOINT, FROM BELOW AND SOUTH, SHOWING RIVETED CONNECTION, AND INTERSECTION OF END POST, VERTICAL, DIAGONAL AND UPPER CHORD MEMBERS AND LATERAL BRACING - Glendale Road Bridge, Spanning Deep Creek Lake on Glendale Road, McHenry, Garrett County, MD

  17. Cluster algorithm for two-dimensional U(1) lattice gauge theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Sinclair, R.

    1992-03-01

    We use gauge fixing to rewrite the two-dimensional U(1) pure gauge model with Wilson action and periodic boundary conditions as a nonfrustrated XY model on a closed chain. The Wolff single-cluster algorithm is then applied, eliminating critical slowing down of topological modes and Polyakov loops.

  18. Competition between the ATPase Prp5 and branch region-U2 snRNA pairing modulates the fidelity of spliceosome assembly.

    PubMed

    Xu, Yong-Zhen; Query, Charles C

    2007-12-14

    ATPase-facilitated steps during spliceosome function have been postulated to afford opportunities for kinetic proofreading. Spliceosome assembly requires the ATPase Prp5p, whose activity might thus impact fidelity during initial intron recognition. Using alanine mutations in S. cerevisiae Prp5p, we identified a suboptimal intron whose splicing could be improved by altered Prp5p activity and then, using this intron, screened for potent prp5 mutants. These prp5 alleles specifically alter branch region selectivity, with improved splicing in vivo of suboptimal substrates correlating with reduced ATPase activity in vitro for a series of mutants in ATPase motif III (SAT). Because these effects are abrogated by compensatory U2 snRNA mutations or other changes that increase branch region-U2 pairing, these results explicitly link a fidelity event with a defined physical structure, the branch region-U2 snRNA duplex, and provide strong evidence that progression of the splicing pathway requires branch region-U2 snRNA pairing prior to Prp5p-facilitated conformational change.

  19. Identification of a novel nuclear localization signal and speckle-targeting sequence of tuftelin-interacting protein 11, a splicing factor involved in spliceosome disassembly

    SciTech Connect

    Tannukit, Sissada; Crabb, Tara L.; Hertel, Klemens J.; Wen, Xin; Jans, David A.; Paine, Michael L.

    2009-12-18

    Tuftelin-interacting protein 11 (TFIP11) is a protein component of the spliceosome complex that promotes the release of the lariat-intron during late-stage splicing through a direct recruitment and interaction with DHX15/PRP43. Expression of TFIP11 is essential for cell and organismal survival. TFIP11 contains a G-patch domain, a signature motif of RNA-processing proteins that is responsible for TFIP11-DHX15 interactions. No other functional domains within TFIP11 have been described. TFIP11 is localized to distinct speckled regions within the cell nucleus, although excluded from the nucleolus. In this study sequential C-terminal deletions and mutational analyses have identified two novel protein elements in mouse TFIP11. The first domain covers amino acids 701-706 (VKDKFN) and is an atypical nuclear localization signal (NLS). The second domain is contained within amino acids 711-735 and defines TFIP11's distinct speckled nuclear localization. The identification of a novel TFIP11 nuclear speckle-targeting sequence (TFIP11-STS) suggests that this domain directly interacts with additional spliceosomal components. These data help define the mechanism of nuclear/nuclear speckle localization of the splicing factor TFIP11, with implications for it's function.

  20. Classically conformal U(1 ) ' extended standard model, electroweak vacuum stability, and LHC Run-2 bounds

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Das, Arindam; Oda, Satsuki; Okada, Nobuchika; Takahashi, Dai-suke

    2016-06-01

    We consider the minimal U(1 ) ' extension of the standard model (SM) with the classically conformal invariance, where an anomaly-free U(1 ) ' gauge symmetry is introduced along with three generations of right-handed neutrinos and a U(1 ) ' Higgs field. Since the classically conformal symmetry forbids all dimensional parameters in the model, the U(1 ) ' gauge symmetry is broken by the Coleman-Weinberg mechanism, generating the mass terms of the U(1 ) ' gauge boson (Z' boson) and the right-handed neutrinos. Through a mixing quartic coupling between the U(1 ) ' Higgs field and the SM Higgs doublet field, the radiative U(1 ) ' gauge symmetry breaking also triggers the breaking of the electroweak symmetry. In this model context, we first investigate the electroweak vacuum instability problem in the SM. Employing the renormalization group equations at the two-loop level and the central values for the world average masses of the top quark (mt=173.34 GeV ) and the Higgs boson (mh=125.09 GeV ), we perform parameter scans to identify the parameter region for resolving the electroweak vacuum instability problem. Next we interpret the recent ATLAS and CMS search limits at the LHC Run-2 for the sequential Z' boson to constrain the parameter region in our model. Combining the constraints from the electroweak vacuum stability and the LHC Run-2 results, we find a bound on the Z' boson mass as mZ'≳3.5 TeV . We also calculate self-energy corrections to the SM Higgs doublet field through the heavy states, the right-handed neutrinos and the Z' boson, and find the naturalness bound as mZ'≲7 TeV , in order to reproduce the right electroweak scale for the fine-tuning level better than 10%. The resultant mass range of 3.5 TeV ≲mZ'≲7 TeV will be explored at the LHC Run-2 in the near future.

  1. Light dark matter from the U(1){sub X} sector in the NMSSM with gauge mediation

    SciTech Connect

    Kang, Zhaofeng; Li, Tianjun; Liu, Tao; Tong, Chunli; Yang, Jin Min E-mail: tli@itp.ac.cn E-mail: piggy1983@gmail.com

    2011-01-01

    Cosmic ray anomalies observed by PAMELA and Fermi-LAT experiments may be interpreted by heavy (TeV-scale) dark matter annihilation enhanced by Sommerfeld effects mediated by a very light (sub-GeV) U(1){sub X} gauge boson, while the recent direct searches from CoGeNT and DAMA/LIBRA experiments may indicate a rather light ( ∼ 7 GeV) dark matter with weak interaction. Motivated by these apparently different scales, we consider a gauge mediated next-to-the minimal supersymmetric standard model (NMSSM) entended with a light U(1){sub X} sector plus a heavy sector ( H-bar {sub h},H{sub h}), which can provide both a light ( ∼ 7 GeV) and a heavy (TeV-scale) dark matter without introducing any ad hoc new scale. Through the Yukawa coupling between H{sub h} and the messager fields, the U(1){sub X} gauge symmetry is broken around the GeV scale radiatively and a large negative m{sub S}{sup 2} is generated for the NMSSM singlet S. Furthermore, the small kinetic mixing parameter between U(1){sub X} and U(1){sub Y} is predicted to be θ ∼ 10{sup −5}−10{sup −6} after integrating out the messengers. Such a light dark matter, which can have a normal relic density from the late decay of the right-handed sneutrino (assumed to be the ordinary next-to-the lightest supersymmetric particle and thermally produced in the early Universe), can serve a good candidate to explain the recent CoGeNT and DAMA/LIBRA results.

  2. FgPrp4 Kinase Is Important for Spliceosome B-Complex Activation and Splicing Efficiency in Fusarium graminearum

    PubMed Central

    Jiang, Cong; Li, Yang; Li, Chaohui; Liu, Huiquan; Kang, Zhensheng; Xu, Jin-Rong

    2016-01-01

    PRP4 encodes the only kinase among the spliceosome components. Although it is an essential gene in the fission yeast and other eukaryotic organisms, the Fgprp4 mutant was viable in the wheat scab fungus Fusarium graminearum. Deletion of FgPRP4 did not block intron splicing but affected intron splicing efficiency in over 60% of the F. graminearum genes. The Fgprp4 mutant had severe growth defects and produced spontaneous suppressors that were recovered in growth rate. Suppressor mutations were identified in the PRP6, PRP31, BRR2, and PRP8 orthologs in nine suppressor strains by sequencing analysis with candidate tri-snRNP component genes. The Q86K mutation in FgMSL1 was identified by whole genome sequencing in suppressor mutant S3. Whereas two of the suppressor mutations in FgBrr2 and FgPrp8 were similar to those characterized in their orthologs in yeasts, suppressor mutations in Prp6 and Prp31 orthologs or FgMSL1 have not been reported. Interestingly, four and two suppressor mutations identified in FgPrp6 and FgPrp31, respectively, all are near the conserved Prp4-phosphorylation sites, suggesting that these mutations may have similar effects with phosphorylation by Prp4 kinase. In FgPrp31, the non-sense mutation at R464 resulted in the truncation of the C-terminal 130 aa region that contains all the conserved Prp4-phosphorylation sites. Deletion analysis showed that the N-terminal 310-aa rich in SR residues plays a critical role in the localization and functions of FgPrp4. We also conducted phosphoproteomics analysis with FgPrp4 and identified S289 as the phosphorylation site that is essential for its functions. These results indicated that FgPrp4 is critical for splicing efficiency but not essential for intron splicing, and FgPrp4 may regulate pre-mRNA splicing by phosphorylation of other components of the tri-snRNP although itself may be activated by phosphorylation at S289. PMID:27058959

  3. Preparation and identification of anti-transforming growth factor β1 U1 small nuclear RNA chimeric ribozyme in vitro

    PubMed Central

    Lin, Ju-Sheng; Song, Yu-Hu; Kong, Xin-Juan; Li, Bin; Liu, Nan-Zhi; Wu, Xiao-Li; Jin, You-Xin

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To study the preparation and cleavage activity of anti-transforming growth factor (TGF)β1 U1 small nuclear (sn) RNA chimeric hammerhead ribozymes in vitro. METHODS: TGFβ1 partial gene fragment was cloned into T-vector at the downstream of T7 promoter. 32p-labeled TGFβ1 partial transcripts as target RNA were transcribed in vitro and purified by denaturing polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (PAGE). Anti-TGFβ1 ribozymes were designed by computer, then synthetic ribozyme fragments were cloned into the U1 ribozyme vector pZeoU1EcoSpe containing U1 snRNA promoter/enhancer and terminator. 32p-labeled U1 snRNA chimeric ribozyme transcripts were gel-purified, incubated with target-RNAs at different conditions and autoradiographed after running denaturing PAGE. RESULTS: Active U1snRNA chimeric ribozyme (U1Rz803) had the best cleavage activity at 50 °C; at 37 °C, it was active, Km = 34.48 nmol/L, Kcat = 0.14 min-1; while the point mutant ribozyme U1Rz803m had no cleavage activity, so these indicated the design of U1Rz803 was correct. CONCLUSION: U1Rz803 prepared in this study possessed the perfect specific catalytic cleavage activity. These results indicate U1 snRNA chimeric ribozyme U1Rz803 may suppress the expression of TGFβ1 in vivo, therefore it may provide a new avenue for the treatment of liver fibrosis in the future. PMID:12632521

  4. Kagome Chiral Spin Liquid as a Gauged U (1 ) Symmetry Protected Topological Phase

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    He, Yin-Chen; Bhattacharjee, Subhro; Pollmann, Frank; Moessner, R.

    2015-12-01

    While the existence of a chiral spin liquid (CSL) on a class of spin-1 /2 kagome antiferromagnets is by now well established numerically, a controlled theoretical path from the lattice model leading to a low-energy topological field theory is still lacking. This we provide via an explicit construction starting from reformulating a microscopic model for a CSL as a lattice gauge theory and deriving the low-energy form of its continuum limit. A crucial ingredient is the realization that the bosonic spinons of the gauge theory exhibit a U (1 ) symmetry protected topological (SPT) phase, which upon promoting its U (1 ) global symmetry to a local gauge structure ("gauging"), yields the CSL. We suggest that such an explicit lattice-based construction involving gauging of a SPT phase can be applied more generally to understand topological spin liquids.

  5. Program package for multicanonical simulations of U(1) lattice gauge theory-Second version

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bazavov, Alexei; Berg, Bernd A.

    2013-03-01

    A new version STMCMUCA_V1_1 of our program package is available. It eliminates compatibility problems of our Fortran 77 code, originally developed for the g77 compiler, with Fortran 90 and 95 compilers. New version program summaryProgram title: STMC_U1MUCA_v1_1 Catalogue identifier: AEET_v1_1 Licensing provisions: Standard CPC license, http://cpc.cs.qub.ac.uk/licence/licence.html Programming language: Fortran 77 compatible with Fortran 90 and 95 Computers: Any capable of compiling and executing Fortran code Operating systems: Any capable of compiling and executing Fortran code RAM: 10 MB and up depending on lattice size used No. of lines in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 15059 No. of bytes in distributed program, including test data, etc.: 215733 Keywords: Markov chain Monte Carlo, multicanonical, Wang-Landau recursion, Fortran, lattice gauge theory, U(1) gauge group, phase transitions of continuous systems Classification: 11.5 Catalogue identifier of previous version: AEET_v1_0 Journal Reference of previous version: Computer Physics Communications 180 (2009) 2339-2347 Does the new version supersede the previous version?: Yes Nature of problem: Efficient Markov chain Monte Carlo simulation of U(1) lattice gauge theory (or other continuous systems) close to its phase transition. Measurements and analysis of the action per plaquette, the specific heat, Polyakov loops and their structure factors. Solution method: Multicanonical simulations with an initial Wang-Landau recursion to determine suitable weight factors. Reweighting to physical values using logarithmic coding and calculating jackknife error bars. Reasons for the new version: The previous version was developed for the g77 compiler Fortran 77 version. Compiler errors were encountered with Fortran 90 and Fortran 95 compilers (specified below). Summary of revisions: epsilon=one/10**10 is replaced by epsilon/10.0D10 in the parameter statements of the subroutines u1_bmha.f, u1_mucabmha.f, u1wl

  6. U(1) gauge theory on a spatial lattice: duality, photons, and shadow states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Weber, Axel

    2013-05-01

    We present a Hamiltonian approach to compact and noncompact (pure) U(1) gauge theory on a regular cubic spatial lattice in (2 + 1) and (3 + 1) dimensions. The diagonalization of the kinetic part of the Hamiltonian via Fourier transformation of the wave functionals induces an electromagnetic duality transformation. The dual variables are naturally associated with the dual lattice. The notation we borrow from algebraic topology suggests a straightforward generalization to irregular spatial lattices. We determine the states of the theory in the different representations in the strong- and weak-coupling limits, and compare the vacuum and the coherent states in the weak-coupling limit with the (shadow) states obtained some years ago by Varadarajan and Ashtekar and Lewandowski in an ultraviolet-regularized version of loop-quantized continuum U(1) gauge theory. Possible implications for the formulation of a nonperturbative renormalization group in loop-quantized theories and the description of confinement in non-abelian gauge theories are discussed.

  7. Dirac dark matter and b →s ℓ+ℓ- with U(1) gauge symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Celis, Alejandro; Feng, Wan-Zhe; Vollmann, Martin

    2017-02-01

    We revisit the possibility of a Dirac fermion dark matter candidate in the light of current b →s ℓ+ℓ- anomalies by investigating a minimal extension of the Standard Model with a horizontal U(1 ) ' local symmetry. Dark matter stability is protected by a remnant Z2 symmetry arising after spontaneous symmetry breaking of U(1 ) '. The associated Z' gauge boson can accommodate current hints of new physics in b →s ℓ+ℓ- decays, and acts as a vector portal between dark matter and the visible sector. We find that the model is severely constrained by a combination of precision measurements at flavor factories, LHC searches for dilepton resonances, as well as direct and indirect dark matter searches. Despite this, viable regions of the parameter space accommodating the observed dark matter relic abundance and the b →s ℓ+ℓ-anomalies still persist for dark matter and Z ' masses in the TeV range.

  8. Yukawa couplings in SU(3)×SU(2)×U(1) Y orbifold models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Casas, J. A.; Muñoz, C.

    1988-09-01

    We analyze the Yukawa couplings of the first SU(3)×SU(2)×U(1) Y orbifold models recently obtained. In these models the rank is naturally lowered due to the presence of a Fayet-Iliopoulos term associated with an “anomalous” U(1) in the four-dimensional theory. It is shown that the phenomenological viability of the models selects a favoured class of vacua. In particular, for the specific examples considered, some twisted fields with one moded oscillator acting, must acquire non-vanishing VEVs. However other possibilities may exist. We also find that all the baryon and lepton violating operators can be, in general, avoided in a completely natural way.

  9. D-branes and extended characters in SL(2,R)/U(1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Fotopoulos, Angelos; Niarchos, Vasilis; Prezas, Nikolaos

    2005-03-01

    We present a detailed study of D-branes in the axially gauged SL(2/U(1) coset conformal field theory for integer level k. Our analysis is based on the modular bootstrap approach and utilizes the extended SL(2,R)/U(1) characters and the embedding of the parafermionic coset algebra in the N=2 superconformal algebra. We propose three basic classes of boundary states corresponding to D0-, D1- and D2-branes. We verify that these boundary states satisfy the Cardy consistency conditions and discuss their physical properties. The D0- and D1-branes agree with those found in earlier work by Ribault and Schomerus using different methods (descent from the Euclidean AdS model). The D2-branes are new. They are not, in general, space-filling but extend from the asymptotic circle at infinity up to a minimum distance ρ⩾0 from the tip of the cigar.

  10. Low energy dynamics of U(1) vortices in systems with cholesteric vacuum structure

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Peterson, Adam J.; Shifman, Mikhail; Tallarita, Gianni

    2015-02-01

    We discuss flux tubes in systems with U(1) gauge, and spin-orbit locked SO(3) S + L symmetry. The spin-orbit locking is achieved explicitly in the Lagrangian by introducing a parity violating twist term which causes the spontaneous breaking of SO(3) S + L → SO(2) . Additionally, this term causes a spontaneous breaking of the translational symmetry along a particular direction. Thus, the system appears with a cholesteric vacuum under certain conditions of the parameter space. With this term, the system admits U(1) topologically stable vortices with additional structure in the vortex cores. This added structure leads to additional moduli appearing in the low energy dynamics. We determine these solutions and their low energy theory.

  11. Shaft Sinking at the Nevada Test Site, U1h Shaft Project

    SciTech Connect

    B. Briggs; R. Musick

    2001-03-01

    The U1h Shaft Project is a design/build subcontract to construct one 6.1 meter (m) (20 feet (ft)) finished diameter shaft to a depth of 321.6 m (1,055 ft.) at the Nevada Test Site. Atkinson Construction was subcontracted by Bechtel Nevada to construct the U1h Shaft for the U.S. Department of Energy. The project consists of furnishing and installing the sinking plant, construction of the 321.6 m (1,055 ft.) of concrete lined shaft, development of a shaft station at a depth of 297.5 m (976 ft.), and construction of a loading pocket at the station. The outfitting of the shaft and installation of a new hoist may be incorporated into the project at a later date. This paper will describe the design phase, the excavation and lining operation, shaft station construction and the contractual challenges encountered on this project.

  12. Kagome Chiral Spin Liquid as a Gauged U(1) Symmetry Protected Topological Phase.

    PubMed

    He, Yin-Chen; Bhattacharjee, Subhro; Pollmann, Frank; Moessner, R

    2015-12-31

    While the existence of a chiral spin liquid (CSL) on a class of spin-1/2 kagome antiferromagnets is by now well established numerically, a controlled theoretical path from the lattice model leading to a low-energy topological field theory is still lacking. This we provide via an explicit construction starting from reformulating a microscopic model for a CSL as a lattice gauge theory and deriving the low-energy form of its continuum limit. A crucial ingredient is the realization that the bosonic spinons of the gauge theory exhibit a U(1) symmetry protected topological (SPT) phase, which upon promoting its U(1) global symmetry to a local gauge structure ("gauging"), yields the CSL. We suggest that such an explicit lattice-based construction involving gauging of a SPT phase can be applied more generally to understand topological spin liquids.

  13. Role of the U(1) ghost beyond leading order in a large-Nc expansion

    SciTech Connect

    Hrayr Matevosyan; Anthony Thomas

    2008-09-01

    The 1/Nc expansion is one of the very few methods we have for generating a systematic expansion of QCD at the energy scale relevant to hadron structure. The present formulation of this theory relies on 't Hooft's double-line notation for calculating the leading order of a diagram in the 1/Nc expansion, where the local SU(Nc) gauge symmetry is substituted by a U(Nc) symmetry and the associated U(1) ghost field is ignored. In the current work we demonstrate the insufficiency of this formulation for describing certain non-planar diagrams. We derive a more complete set of Feynman rules that include the U(1) ghost field and provide a useful tool for calculating both color factors and 1/Nc orders of given color-singlet diagrams.

  14. Chiral four-dimensional F-theory compactifications with SU(5) and multiple U(1)-factors

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cvetič, Mirjam; Grassi, Antonella; Klevers, Denis; Piragua, Hernan

    2014-04-01

    We develop geometric techniques to determine the spectrum and the chiral indices of matter multiplets for four-dimensional F-theory compactifications on elliptic Calabi-Yau fourfolds with rank two Mordell-Weil group. The general elliptic fiber is the Calabi-Yau onefold in dP 2. We classify its resolved elliptic fibrations over a general base B. The study of singularities of these fibrations leads to explicit matter representations, that we determine both for U(1) × U(1) and SU(5) × U(1) × U(1) constructions. We determine for the first time certain matter curves and surfaces using techniques involving prime ideals. The vertical cohomology ring of these fourfolds is calculated for both cases and general formulas for the Euler numbers are derived. Explicit calculations are presented for a specific base B = ℙ3. We determine the general G 4-flux that belongs to of the resolved Calabi-Yau fourfolds. As a by-product, we derive for the first time all conditions on G 4-flux in general F-theory compactifications with a non-holomorphic zero section. These conditions have to be formulated after a circle reduction in terms of Chern-Simons terms on the 3D Coulomb branch and invoke M-theory/F-theory duality. New Chern-Simons terms are generated by Kaluza-Klein states of the circle compactification. We explicitly perform the relevant field theory computations, that yield non-vanishing results precisely for fourfolds with a non-holomorphic zero section. Taking into account the new Chern-Simons terms, all 4D matter chiralities are determined via 3D M-theory/F-theory duality. We independently check these chiralities using the subset of matter surfaces we determined. The presented techniques are general and do not rely on toric data.

  15. Dark Matter in Supersymmetric U(1){sub B-L} Model

    SciTech Connect

    Khalil, S.; Okada, H.

    2009-04-17

    We analyze the dark matter problem in the context of supersymmetric, U(1){sub B-L} model. In this model, the lightest neutalino can be B-L gaugino Z-tilde{sub B-L} or Higgsinos {chi}-tilde{sub 1,2} dominated. We examine the thermal relic abundance of these particles and discuss the prospects for their direct detection if they form part of our galactic halo.

  16. A local formulation of lattice Wess-Zumino model with exact U(1)R symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kikukawa, Yoshio; Suzuki, Hiroshi

    2005-02-01

    A lattice Wess-Zumino model is formulated on the basis of Ginsparg-Wilson fermions. In perturbation theory, our formulation is equivalent to the formulation by Fujikawa and Ishibashi and by Fujikawa. Our formulation is, however, free from a singular nature of the latter formulation due to an additional auxiliary chiral supermultiplet on a lattice. The model posssesses an exact U(1)R symmetry as a supersymmetric counterpart of the Lüscher lattice chiral U(1) symmetry. A restration of the supersymmetric Ward-Takahashi identity in the continuum limit is analyzed in renormalized perturbation theory. In the one-loop level, a supersymmetric continuum limit is ensured by suitably adjusting a coefficient of a single local term tilde F*tilde F. The non-renormalization theorem holds to this order of perturbation theory. In higher orders, on the other hand, coefficents of local terms with dimension <= 4 that are consistent with the U(1)R symmetry have to be adjusted for a supersymmetric continuum limit. The origin of this complexicity in higher-order loops is clarified on the basis of the Reisz power counting theorem. Therefore, from a view point of supersymmetry, the present formulation is not quite better than a lattice Wess-Zumino model formulated by using Wilson fermions, although a number of coefficients which require adjustment is much less due to the exact U(1)R symmetry. We also comment on an exact non-linear fermionic symmetry which corresponds to the one studied by Bonini and Feo; an existence of this exact symmetry itself does not imply a restoration of supersymmetry in the continuum limit without any adjustment of parameters.

  17. Minimal flavor violation in the minimal U(1)B-L model and resonant leptogenesis

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Nobuchika; Orikasa, Yuta; Yamada, Toshifumi

    2012-10-01

    We investigate the resonant leptogenesis scenario in the minimally U(1)B-L extended standard model with minimal flavor violation. In our model, the U(1)B-L gauge symmetry is broken at the TeV scale and standard model singlet neutrinos gain Majorana masses of order TeV. In addition, we introduce a flavor symmetry on the singlet neutrinos at a scale higher than TeV. The flavor symmetry is explicitly broken by the neutrino Dirac Yukawa coupling, which induces splittings in the singlet neutrino Majorana masses at lower scales through renormalization group evolutions. We call this setup minimal flavor violation. The mass splittings are proportional to the tiny Dirac Yukawa coupling, and hence they automatically enhance the CP asymmetry parameter necessary for the resonant leptogenesis mechanism. In this paper, we calculate the baryon number yield by solving the Boltzmann equations, including the effects of U(1)B-L gauge boson that also has TeV scale mass and causes washing-out of the singlet neutrinos in the course of thermal leptogenesis. The Dirac Yukawa coupling for neutrinos is fixed in terms of neutrino oscillation data and an arbitrary 3×3 complex-valued orthogonal matrix. We show that the right amount of baryon number asymmetry can be achieved through thermal leptogenesis in the context of the minimal flavor violation with singlet neutrinos and U(1)B-L gauge boson at the TeV scale. These particles can be discovered at the LHC in the near future.

  18. A conserved intronic U1 snRNP-binding sequence promotes trans-splicing in Drosophila.

    PubMed

    Gao, Jun-Li; Fan, Yu-Jie; Wang, Xiu-Ye; Zhang, Yu; Pu, Jia; Li, Liang; Shao, Wei; Zhan, Shuai; Hao, Jianjiang; Xu, Yong-Zhen

    2015-04-01

    Unlike typical cis-splicing, trans-splicing joins exons from two separate transcripts to produce chimeric mRNA and has been detected in most eukaryotes. Trans-splicing in trypanosomes and nematodes has been characterized as a spliced leader RNA-facilitated reaction; in contrast, its mechanism in higher eukaryotes remains unclear. Here we investigate mod(mdg4), a classic trans-spliced gene in Drosophila, and report that two critical RNA sequences in the middle of the last 5' intron, TSA and TSB, promote trans-splicing of mod(mdg4). In TSA, a 13-nucleotide (nt) core motif is conserved across Drosophila species and is essential and sufficient for trans-splicing, which binds U1 small nuclear RNP (snRNP) through strong base-pairing with U1 snRNA. In TSB, a conserved secondary structure acts as an enhancer. Deletions of TSA and TSB using the CRISPR/Cas9 system result in developmental defects in flies. Although it is not clear how the 5' intron finds the 3' introns, compensatory changes in U1 snRNA rescue trans-splicing of TSA mutants, demonstrating that U1 recruitment is critical to promote trans-splicing in vivo. Furthermore, TSA core-like motifs are found in many other trans-spliced Drosophila genes, including lola. These findings represent a novel mechanism of trans-splicing, in which RNA motifs in the 5' intron are sufficient to bring separate transcripts into close proximity to promote trans-splicing.

  19. A conserved intronic U1 snRNP-binding sequence promotes trans-splicing in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Gao, Jun-Li; Fan, Yu-Jie; Wang, Xiu-Ye; Zhang, Yu; Pu, Jia; Li, Liang; Shao, Wei; Zhan, Shuai; Hao, Jianjiang

    2015-01-01

    Unlike typical cis-splicing, trans-splicing joins exons from two separate transcripts to produce chimeric mRNA and has been detected in most eukaryotes. Trans-splicing in trypanosomes and nematodes has been characterized as a spliced leader RNA-facilitated reaction; in contrast, its mechanism in higher eukaryotes remains unclear. Here we investigate mod(mdg4), a classic trans-spliced gene in Drosophila, and report that two critical RNA sequences in the middle of the last 5′ intron, TSA and TSB, promote trans-splicing of mod(mdg4). In TSA, a 13-nucleotide (nt) core motif is conserved across Drosophila species and is essential and sufficient for trans-splicing, which binds U1 small nuclear RNP (snRNP) through strong base-pairing with U1 snRNA. In TSB, a conserved secondary structure acts as an enhancer. Deletions of TSA and TSB using the CRISPR/Cas9 system result in developmental defects in flies. Although it is not clear how the 5′ intron finds the 3′ introns, compensatory changes in U1 snRNA rescue trans-splicing of TSA mutants, demonstrating that U1 recruitment is critical to promote trans-splicing in vivo. Furthermore, TSA core-like motifs are found in many other trans-spliced Drosophila genes, including lola. These findings represent a novel mechanism of trans-splicing, in which RNA motifs in the 5′ intron are sufficient to bring separate transcripts into close proximity to promote trans-splicing. PMID:25838544

  20. Slavnov and Gaudin-Korepin Formulas for Models without U(1) Symmetry: the Twisted XXX Chain

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Belliard, Samuel; Pimenta, Rodrigo A.

    2015-12-01

    We consider the XXX spin-1/2 Heisenberg chain on the circle with an arbitrary twist. We characterize its spectral problem using the modified algebraic Bethe anstaz and study the scalar product between the Bethe vector and its dual. We obtain modified Slavnov and Gaudin-Korepin formulas for the model. Thus we provide a first example of such formulas for quantum integrable models without U(1) symmetry characterized by an inhomogenous Baxter T-Q equation.

  1. The 5'-terminal sequence of U1 RNA complementary to the consensus 5' splice site of hnRNA is single-stranded in intact U1 snRNP particles.

    PubMed Central

    Rinke, J; Appel, B; Blöcker, H; Frank, R; Lührmann, R

    1984-01-01

    The 5'-terminal region of U1 snRNA is highly complementary to the consensus exon-intron regions of hnRNA and it has been suggested that U1 snRNP might play a role in the splicing of the pre-mRNA by intermolecular base-pairing between these regions. Here the secondary structure of the 5' terminus of U1 RNA in the isolated native U1 snRNP particle has been investigated by site-directed enzymatic cleavage of the RNA. Individual oligodeoxynucleotides complementary to various sequences within the first 15 nucleotides of the 5' terminus of U1 RNA have been tested for their ability to form stable DNA X RNA hybrids, with subsequent cleavage of the U1 RNA by RNase H. Our results show unequivocally that the 9 nucleotides at the 5' terminus which are complementary to a consensus 5' splice site are indeed single-stranded in the intact U1 snRNP particle, and are not protected by snRNP proteins. However, they also indicate that the U1 sequence complementary to an intron's consensus 3' end is not readily available for intermolecular base-pairing, either in the intact U1 snRNP particle or in the deproteinized U1 RNA molecule. Therefore our data favour the possibility that U1 snRNP plays a role only in the recognition of a 5' splice site of hnRNA, rather than being involved in the alignment of both ends of an intron for splicing. Images PMID:6203096

  2. Geology of the U-1a. 01 horizontal drift complex, southwestern Yucca Flat, Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    Drellack, S.L. Jr.; Thompson, P.H.; Rayburn, C.J.

    1989-03-01

    The U-1a.01 complex, site of a Los Alamos National Laboratory-sponsored experiment, is located in southwestern Yucca Flat on the Nevada Test Site. The complex is comprised of the vertical U-1a shaft, two large-diameter cable access holes, and approximately 229 m (750') of horizontal drift mined within alluvium 292.6 m (960') below the surface. Geologic mapping and related work at U-1a.01 afforded a unique opportunity to observe and evaluate the characteristics of alluvium in the subsurface of Yucca Flat, and to compare the results with surface and drill hole alluvium data. The Los Alamos Support Group of the Fenix and Scisson, Inc. Geology and Hydrology Division carried out a program of mapping, sampling and photography while mining was in progress, with the dual purpose of characterizing the geology of the site and documenting the mining operation. This report details the products and the results of that effort. 12 refs., 8 figs., 25 tabs.

  3. The PSI–U1 snRNP interaction regulates male mating behavior in Drosophila

    PubMed Central

    Wang, Qingqing; Taliaferro, J. Matthew; Klibaite, Ugne; Hilgers, Valérie; Shaevitz, Joshua W.; Rio, Donald C.

    2016-01-01

    Alternative pre-mRNA splicing (AS) is a critical regulatory mechanism that operates extensively in the nervous system to produce diverse protein isoforms. Fruitless AS isoforms have been shown to influence male courtship behavior, but the underlying mechanisms are unknown. Using genome-wide approaches and quantitative behavioral assays, we show that the P-element somatic inhibitor (PSI) and its interaction with the U1 small nuclear ribonucleoprotein complex (snRNP) control male courtship behavior. PSI mutants lacking the U1 snRNP-interacting domain (PSIΔAB mutant) exhibit extended but futile mating attempts. The PSIΔAB mutant results in significant changes in the AS patterns of ∼1,200 genes in the Drosophila brain, many of which have been implicated in the regulation of male courtship behavior. PSI directly regulates the AS of at least one-third of these transcripts, suggesting that PSI–U1 snRNP interactions coordinate the behavioral network underlying courtship behavior. Importantly, one of these direct targets is fruitless, the master regulator of courtship. Thus, PSI imposes a specific mode of regulatory control within the neuronal circuit controlling courtship, even though it is broadly expressed in the fly nervous system. This study reinforces the importance of AS in the control of gene activity in neurons and integrated neuronal circuits, and provides a surprising link between a pleiotropic pre-mRNA splicing pathway and the precise control of successful male mating behavior. PMID:27114556

  4. Evidence of effective axial U (1 ) symmetry restoration at high temperature QCD

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Tomiya, A.; Cossu, G.; Aoki, S.; Fukaya, H.; Hashimoto, S.; Kaneko, T.; Noaki, J.; Jlqcd Collaboration

    2017-08-01

    We study the axial U (1 ) symmetry at a finite temperature in two-flavor lattice QCD. Employing the Möbius domain-wall fermions, we generate gauge configurations slightly above the critical temperature Tc with different lattice sizes L =2 - 4 fm . Our action allows frequent topology tunneling while keeping good chiral symmetry close enough to that of overlap fermions. This allows us to recover full chiral symmetry by an overlap/domain-wall reweighting. Above the phase transition, a strong suppression of the low-lying modes is observed in both overlap and domain-wall Dirac spectra. We, however, find a sizable violation of the Ginsparg-Wilson relation in the Möbius domain-wall Dirac eigenmodes, which dominates the signals of the axial U (1 ) symmetry breaking near the chiral limit. We also find that the use of the overlap fermion only in the valence sector is dangerous since it suffers from the artifacts due to partial quenching. Reweighting the Möbius domain-wall fermion determinant to that of the overlap fermion, we observe the axial U(1) breaking to vanish in the chiral limit, which is stable against the changes of the lattice volume and lattice spacing.

  5. Galactic gamma ray excess and dark matter phenomenology in a U(1) B- L model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Anirban; Choubey, Sandhya; Khan, Sarif

    2016-08-01

    In this work, we have considered a gauged U(1)B-L extension of the Standard Model (SM) with three right handed neutrinos for anomaly cancellation and two additional SM singlet complex scalars with nontrivial B-L charges. One of these is used to spontaneously break the U(1)B-L gauge symmetry, leading to Majorana masses for the neutrinos through the standard Type I seesaw mechanism, while the other becomes the dark matter (DM) candidate in the model. We test the viability of the model to simultaneously explain the DM relic density observed in the CMB data as well as the Galactic Centre (GC) γ-ray excess seen by Fermi-LAT. We show that for DM masses in the range 40-55 GeV and for a wide range of U(1)B-L gauge boson masses, one can satisfy both these constraints if the additional neutral Higgs scalar has a mass around the resonance region. In studying the dark matter phenomenology and GC excess, we have taken into account theoretical as well as experimental constraints coming from vacuum stability condition, Planck bound on DM relic density, LHC and LUX and present allowed areas in the model parameter space consistent with all relevant data, calculate the predicted gamma ray flux from the GC and discuss the related phenomenology.

  6. Engineering assessment and certification of integrity of the 325-I1U1 tank system

    SciTech Connect

    Schwartz, W W; Graser, D A

    1991-12-01

    This Engineering Assessment and Certification of Integrity of retention tank 325-I1U1 of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory has been prepared in response to 40 CFR 265.191 for an existing tank system that stores hazardous waste and does not have secondary containment. This technical assessment has been reviewed by an independent, qualified, California-registered professional engineer, who has certified the tank system to be adequately designed and compatible with the stored waste so that it will not collapse, rupture, or fail. Certification of the 325-I1U1 tank system is qualified by the fact that 40 CFR 265-193 requires that a system be upgraded to include secondary containment when it reaches 15 years of age or within two years after January 12, 1987, whichever comes later. Tank 325-I1U1 was built in 1968 and required upgrading to secondary containment by January 12, 1989. This Engineering Assessment has been prepared as Best Management practice since this tank system was in service after January 12, 1989, but is not in use at this time. This document will be kept on file at the facility. Certification and documentation of the onground retention tank 325-I1O1, which is part of the 325-I1 retention tank system, is not included in this assessment. A discussion of tank 325-I1O1, however, is included in this report to provide a complete description of the 325-I1 retention tank system.

  7. Differentiating U (1)' supersymmetric models with right sneutrino and neutralino dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Araz, Jack Y.; Frank, Mariana; Fuks, Benjamin

    2017-07-01

    We perform a detailed analysis of dark matter signals of supersymmetric models containing an extra U (1)'gauge group. We investigate scenarios in which either the right sneutrino or the lightest neutralino are phenomenologically acceptable dark matter candidates and we explore the parameter spaces of different supersymmetric realisations featuring an extra U (1)'. We impose consistency with low energy observables, with known mass limits for the superpartners and Z' bosons, as well as with Higgs boson signal strengths, and we moreover verify that predictions for the anomalous magnetic moment of the muon agree with the experimental value and require that the dark matter candidate satisfies the observed relic density and direct and indirect dark matter detection constraints. For the case where the sneutrino is the dark matter candidate, we find distinguishing characteristics among different U (1)' mixing angles. If the neutralino is the lightest supersymmetric particle, its mass is heavier than that of the light sneutrino in scenarios where the latter is a dark matter candidate, the parameter space is less restricted and differentiation between models is more difficult. We finally comment on the possible collider tests of these models.

  8. Phase diagram of a lattice U(1) gauge theory with gauge fixing

    SciTech Connect

    Bock, W.; Golterman, M.F.; Shamir, Y.

    1998-09-01

    As a first step towards a nonperturbative investigation of the gauge-fixing (Rome) approach to lattice chiral gauge theories we study a U(1) model with an action that includes a local gauge-fixing term and a mass counterterm for the gauge fields. The model is studied on the trivial orbit so that only the dynamics of the longitudinal gauge degrees of freedom is taken into account. Mean-field and numerical calculations reveal that the phase diagram of this {open_quotes}reduced{close_quotes} model contains, in addition to ferromagnetic (FM), antiferromagnetic (AM) and paramagnetic (PM) phases, also a novel so-called helicoidal ferromagnetic (FMD) phase with broken U(1) symmetry and a nonvanishing condensate of the vector field. The continuum limit is defined by approaching the FM-FMD phase transition from within the FM phase. We show that the global U(1) symmetry is restored in this continuum limit, both numerically and in perturbation theory. The numerical results for the magnetization in the FM and FMD phases are in good agreement with perturbation theory. {copyright} {ital 1998} {ital The American Physical Society}

  9. Cation and Vacancy Disorder in U1-yNdyO2.00-X Alloys

    DOE PAGES

    Barabash, Rozaliya I.; Voit, Stewart L.; Aidhy, Dilpuneet S.; ...

    2015-09-14

    In this study, the intermixing and clustering of U/Nd, O, and vacancies were studied by both laboratory and synchrotron-based x-ray diffraction in U1-yNdyO2-X alloys. It was found that an increased holding time at the high experimental temperature during initial alloy preparation results in a lower disorder of the Nd distribution in the alloys. Adjustment of the oxygen concentration in the U1-yNdyO2-X alloys with different Nd concentrations was accompanied by the formation of vacancies on the oxygen sublattice and a nanocrystalline component. The lattice parameters in the U1-yNdyO2-X alloys were also found to deviate significantly from Vegard's law when the Ndmore » concentration was high (53%) and decreased with increasing oxygen concentration. Such changes indicate the formation of large vacancy concentrations during oxygen adjustment at these high temperatures. Finally, the change in the vacancy concentration after the oxygen adjustment was estimated relative to Nd concentration and oxygen stoichiometry.« less

  10. FIMP and muon ( g - 2) in a U(1) Lμ- Lτ model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Biswas, Anirban; Choubey, Sandhya; Khan, Sarif

    2017-02-01

    The tightening of the constraints on the standard thermal WIMP scenario has forced physicists to propose alternative dark matter (DM) models. One of the most popular alternate explanations of the origin of DM is the non-thermal production of DM via freeze-in. In this scenario the DM never attains thermal equilibrium with the thermal soup because of its feeble coupling strength (˜10-12) with the other particles in the thermal bath and is generally called the Feebly Interacting Massive Particle (FIMP). In this work, we present a gauged U(1) Lμ- Lτ extension of the Standard Model (SM) which has a scalar FIMP DM candidate and can consistently explain the DM relic density bound. In addition, the spontaneous breaking of the U(1) Lμ- Lτ gauge symmetry gives an extra massive neutral gauge boson Z μτ which can explain the muon ( g - 2) data through its additional one-loop contribution to the process. Lastly, presence of three right-handed neutrinos enable the model to successfully explain the small neutrino masses via the Type-I seesaw mechanism. The presence of the spontaneously broken U(1) Lμ- Lτ gives a particular structure to the light neutrino mass matrix which can explain the peculiar mixing pattern of the light neutrinos.

  11. Mixed-state form factors of U(1) twist fields in the Dirac theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Chen, Yixiong

    2016-08-01

    Using the ‘Liouville space’ (the space of operators) of the massive Dirac theory, we define mixed-state form factors of U(1) twist fields. We consider mixed states with density matrices diagonal in the asymptotic particle basis. This includes the thermal Gibbs state as well as all generalized Gibbs ensembles of the Dirac theory. When the mixed state is specialized to a thermal Gibbs state, using a Riemann-Hilbert problem and low-temperature expansion, we obtain finite-temperature form factors of U(1) twist fields. We then propose the expression for form factors of U(1) twist fields in general diagonal mixed states. We verify that these form factors satisfy a system of nonlinear functional differential equations, which is derived from the trace definition of mixed-state form factors. At last, under weak analytic conditions on the eigenvalues of the density matrix, we write down the large distance form factor expansions of two-point correlation functions of these twist fields. Using the relation between the Dirac and Ising models, this provides the large-distance expansion of the Rényi entropy (for integer Rényi parameter) in the Ising model in diagonal mixed states.

  12. U1-RNP and TLR receptors in the pathogenesis of mixed connective tissue diseasePart I. The U1-RNP complex and its biological significance in the pathogenesis of mixed connective tissue disease.

    PubMed

    Paradowska-Gorycka, Agnieszka

    2015-01-01

    Mixed connective tissue disease (MCTD) is a rare autoimmune syndrome, signified by complex interactions between disease-related phenomena, including inflammation, proliferative vascular arteriopathy, thrombotic events and humoral autoimmune processes. It is still controversial whether MCTD is a distinct clinical entity among systemic connective tissue diseases, although several authors consider that it is distinct and underline characteristic, distinct clinical, serological and immunogenetic features. The putative target of autoimmunity in MCTD is U1-RNP, which is a complex of U1-RNA and small nuclear RNP. Both the U1-RNA component and the specific proteins, particularly U1-70K, engage immune cells and their receptors in a complex network of interactions that ultimately lead to autoimmunity, inflammation, and tissue injury. U1-RNA is capable of inducing manifestations consistent with TLR activation. Stimulation of innate immunity by native RNA molecules with a double-stranded secondary structure may help explain the high prevalence of autoimmunity to RNA binding proteins.

  13. An siRNA Screen Identifies the U2 snRNP Spliceosome as a Host Restriction Factor for Recombinant Adeno-associated Viruses

    PubMed Central

    Schreiber, Claire A.; Sakuma, Toshie; Izumiya, Yoshihiro; Holditch, Sara J.; Hickey, Raymond D.; Bressin, Robert K.; Basu, Upamanyu; Koide, Kazunori; Asokan, Aravind; Ikeda, Yasuhiro

    2015-01-01

    Adeno-associated viruses (AAV) have evolved to exploit the dynamic reorganization of host cell machinery during co-infection by adenoviruses and other helper viruses. In the absence of helper viruses, host factors such as the proteasome and DNA damage response machinery have been shown to effectively inhibit AAV transduction by restricting processes ranging from nuclear entry to second-strand DNA synthesis. To identify host factors that might affect other key steps in AAV infection, we screened an siRNA library that revealed several candidate genes including the PHD finger-like domain protein 5A (PHF5A), a U2 snRNP-associated protein. Disruption of PHF5A expression selectively enhanced transgene expression from AAV by increasing transcript levels and appears to influence a step after second-strand synthesis in a serotype and cell type-independent manner. Genetic disruption of U2 snRNP and associated proteins, such as SF3B1 and U2AF1, also increased expression from AAV vector, suggesting the critical role of U2 snRNP spliceosome complex in this host-mediated restriction. Notably, adenoviral co-infection and U2 snRNP inhibition appeared to target a common pathway in increasing expression from AAV vectors. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of U2 snRNP by meayamycin B, a potent SF3B1 inhibitor, substantially enhanced AAV vector transduction of clinically relevant cell types. Further analysis suggested that U2 snRNP proteins suppress AAV vector transgene expression through direct recognition of intact AAV capsids. In summary, we identify U2 snRNP and associated splicing factors, which are known to be affected during adenoviral infection, as novel host restriction factors that effectively limit AAV transgene expression. Concurrently, we postulate that pharmacological/genetic manipulation of components of the spliceosomal machinery might enable more effective gene transfer modalities with recombinant AAV vectors. PMID:26244496

  14. An siRNA Screen Identifies the U2 snRNP Spliceosome as a Host Restriction Factor for Recombinant Adeno-associated Viruses.

    PubMed

    Schreiber, Claire A; Sakuma, Toshie; Izumiya, Yoshihiro; Holditch, Sara J; Hickey, Raymond D; Bressin, Robert K; Basu, Upamanyu; Koide, Kazunori; Asokan, Aravind; Ikeda, Yasuhiro

    2015-08-01

    Adeno-associated viruses (AAV) have evolved to exploit the dynamic reorganization of host cell machinery during co-infection by adenoviruses and other helper viruses. In the absence of helper viruses, host factors such as the proteasome and DNA damage response machinery have been shown to effectively inhibit AAV transduction by restricting processes ranging from nuclear entry to second-strand DNA synthesis. To identify host factors that might affect other key steps in AAV infection, we screened an siRNA library that revealed several candidate genes including the PHD finger-like domain protein 5A (PHF5A), a U2 snRNP-associated protein. Disruption of PHF5A expression selectively enhanced transgene expression from AAV by increasing transcript levels and appears to influence a step after second-strand synthesis in a serotype and cell type-independent manner. Genetic disruption of U2 snRNP and associated proteins, such as SF3B1 and U2AF1, also increased expression from AAV vector, suggesting the critical role of U2 snRNP spliceosome complex in this host-mediated restriction. Notably, adenoviral co-infection and U2 snRNP inhibition appeared to target a common pathway in increasing expression from AAV vectors. Moreover, pharmacological inhibition of U2 snRNP by meayamycin B, a potent SF3B1 inhibitor, substantially enhanced AAV vector transduction of clinically relevant cell types. Further analysis suggested that U2 snRNP proteins suppress AAV vector transgene expression through direct recognition of intact AAV capsids. In summary, we identify U2 snRNP and associated splicing factors, which are known to be affected during adenoviral infection, as novel host restriction factors that effectively limit AAV transgene expression. Concurrently, we postulate that pharmacological/genetic manipulation of components of the spliceosomal machinery might enable more effective gene transfer modalities with recombinant AAV vectors.

  15. Gauge mediation to effective supersymmetry through U(1)s with a dynamical supersymmetry breaking, and string compactification

    SciTech Connect

    Jeong, Kwang Sik; Kim, Jihn E.; Seo, Min-Seok

    2011-10-01

    We investigate the possibility of U(1){sup '} mediation, leading to an effective SUSY where the first two family sfermions are above 100 TeV but the third family sfermions and the Higgs doublets are in the TeV region (or the light stop (t-tilde{sub l}) case). The U(1)' gaugino, Zprimino (Z'-ino), needs not to be at a TeV scale, but needs to be somewhat lighter than the messenger scale. We consider two cases, one the mediation is only through U(1){sup '} and the other through U(1)' and the electroweak hypercharge U(1){sub Y}. In the SUSY field theory framework, we calculate the superpartner mass spectra for these two cases. We also point out that the particle species needed for these mechanisms are already obtained from a Z{sub 12-I} orbifold compactification.

  16. Peccei-Quinn invariant singlet extended SUSY with anomalous U(1) gauge symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Im, Sang Hui; Seo, Min-Seok

    2015-05-01

    Recent discovery of the SM-like Higgs boson with m h ≃ 125 GeV motivates an extension of the minimal supersymmetric standard model (MSSM), which involves a singlet Higgs superfield with a sizable Yukawa coupling to the doublet Higgs superfields. We examine such singlet-extended SUSY models with a Peccei-Quinn (PQ) symmetry that originates from an anomalous U(1) A gauge symmetry. We focus on the specific scheme that the PQ symmetry is spontaneously broken at an intermediate scale v PQ ˜ m SUSY M Pl by an interplay between Planck scale suppressed operators and tachyonic soft scalar mass induced dominantly by the U(1) A D-term D A . This scheme also results in spontaneous SUSY breaking in the PQ sector, generating the gaugino masses when it is transmitted to the MSSM sector by the conventional gauge mediation mechanism. As a result, the MSSM soft parameters in this scheme are induced mostly by the U(1) A D-term and the gauge mediated SUSY breaking from the PQ sector, so that the sparticle masses can be near the present experimental bounds without causing the SUSY flavor problem. The scheme is severely constrained by the condition that a phenomenologically viable form of the low energy operators of the singlet and doublet Higgs superfields is generated by the PQ breaking sector in a way similar to the Kim-Nilles solution of the μ problem, and the resulting Higgs mass parameters allow the electroweak symmetry breaking with small tan β. We find two minimal models with two singlet Higgs superfields, satisfying this condition with a relatively simple form of the PQ breaking sector, and briefly discuss some phenomenological aspects of the model.

  17. Atomic quantum simulation of a three-dimensional U(1) gauge-Higgs model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Kuno, Yoshihito; Sakane, Shinya; Kasamatsu, Kenichi; Ichinose, Ikuo; Matsui, Tetsuo

    2016-12-01

    In this paper, we study theoretically atomic quantum simulations of a U(1) gauge-Higgs model on a three-dimensional (3D) spatial lattice by using an extended Bose-Hubbard model with intersite repulsions on a 3D optical lattice. Here, the phase and density fluctuations of the boson variable on each site of the optical lattice describe the vector potential and the electric field on each link of the gauge-model lattice, respectively. The target gauge model is different from the standard Wilson-type U(1) gauge-Higgs model because it has plaquette and Higgs interactions with asymmetric couplings in the space-time directions. Nevertheless, the corresponding quantum simulation is still important as it provides us with a platform to study unexplored time-dependent phenomena characteristic of each phase in the general gauge-Higgs models. To determine the phase diagram of the gauge-Higgs model at zero temperature, we perform Monte Carlo simulations of the corresponding 3+1-dimensional U(1) gauge-Higgs model, and obtain the confinement and Higgs phases. To investigate the dynamical properties of the gauge-Higgs model, we apply the Gross-Pitaevskii equations to the extended Bose-Hubbard model. We simulate the time evolution of an electric flux that initially is put on a straight line connecting two external point charges. We also calculate the potential energy between this pair of charges and obtain the string tension in the confinement phase. Finally, we propose a feasible experimental setup for the atomic simulations of this quantum gauge-Higgs model on the 3D optical lattice. These results may serve as theoretical guides for future experiments.

  18. Extended quantum U(1)-liquid phase in a three-dimensional quantum dimer model

    SciTech Connect

    Sikora, Olga; Shannon, Nic; Pollmann, Frank; Penc, Karlo; Fulde, Peter

    2011-09-15

    Recently, quantum dimer models have attracted a great deal of interest as a paradigm for the study of exotic quantum phases. Much of this excitement has centered on the claim that a certain class of quantum dimer model can support a quantum U(1)-liquid phase with deconfined fractional excitations in three dimensions. These fractional monomer excitations are quantum analogs of the magnetic monopoles found in spin ice. In this paper, we use extensive quantum Monte Carlo simulations to establish the ground-state phase diagram of the quantum dimer model on the three-dimensional diamond lattice as a function of the ratio {mu} of the potential to kinetic-energy terms in the Hamiltonian. We find that, for {mu}{sub c}=0.75{+-}0.02, the model undergoes a first-order quantum phase transition from an ordered ''R state'' into an extended quantum U(1)-liquid phase, which terminates in a quantum critical Rokhsar-Kivelson (RK) point for {mu}=1. This confirms the published field-theoretical scenario. We present detailed evidence for the existence of the U(1)-liquid phase and indirect evidence for the existence of its photon and monopole excitations. Simulations are benchmarked against a variety of exact and perturbative results, and a comparison is made of different variational wave functions. We also explore the ergodicity of the quantum dimer model on a diamond lattice within a given flux sector, identifying a new conserved quantity related to transition graphs of dimer configurations. These results complete and extend the previous analysis of O. Sikora et al.[Phys. Rev. Lett. 103, 247001 (2009)].

  19. Renormalization of Tensorial Group Field Theories: Abelian U(1) Models in Four Dimensions

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Carrozza, Sylvain; Oriti, Daniele; Rivasseau, Vincent

    2014-04-01

    We tackle the issue of renormalizability for Tensorial Group Field Theories (TGFT) including gauge invariance conditions, with the rigorous tool of multi-scale analysis, to prepare the ground for applications to quantum gravity models. In the process, we define the appropriate generalization of some key QFT notions, including connectedness, locality and contraction of (high) subgraphs. We also define a new notion of Wick ordering, corresponding to the subtraction of (maximal) melonic tadpoles. We then consider the simplest examples of dynamical 4-dimensional TGFT with gauge invariance conditions for the Abelian U(1) case. We prove that they are super-renormalizable for any polynomial interaction.

  20. U(1)-invariant membranes: The geometric formulation, Abel, and pendulum differential equations

    SciTech Connect

    Zheltukhin, A. A.; Trzetrzelewski, M.

    2010-06-15

    The geometric approach to study the dynamics of U(1)-invariant membranes is developed. The approach reveals an important role of the Abel nonlinear differential equation of the first type with variable coefficients depending on time and one of the membrane extendedness parameters. The general solution of the Abel equation is constructed. Exact solutions of the whole system of membrane equations in the D=5 Minkowski space-time are found and classified. It is shown that if the radial component of the membrane world vector is only time dependent, then the dynamics is described by the pendulum equation.

  1. Decaying neutralino dark matter in anomalous U(1){sub H} models

    SciTech Connect

    Sierra, D. Aristizabal; Restrepo, D.; Zapata, Oscar

    2009-09-01

    In supersymmetric models extended with an anomalous U(1){sub H} different R-parity violating couplings can yield an unstable neutralino. We show that in this context astrophysical and cosmological constraints on neutralino decaying dark matter forbid bilinear R-parity breaking neutralino decays and lead to a class of purely trilinear R-parity violating scenarios in which the neutralino is stable on cosmological scales. We have found that among the resulting models some of them become suitable to explain the observed anomalies in cosmic-ray electron/positron fluxes.

  2. U(1) gauge invariant field equations on k=1 Robertson-Walker Universe

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dariescu, C.; Dariescu, M.-A.

    2001-09-01

    We start with an U(1) gauge invariant tetradic formulation of the Klein-Gordon-Maxwell system of equations on spatially closed Robertson-Walker spacetimes. For the matter-dominated Universe, a compact timelike coordinate is introduced in analysing the general form of the complex scalar field solutions of Gordon equation. It technically follows that each parity given state is conformally built up of three Einateinian particle states (i.e. the ones unambigously defined in Einstein's static Universe). Finally, we derive non-trivial closed form solutions of the sourceless Maxwell equations, pointing out a kind of almost universal geometrodynamically generated burst of electromagnetic radiation.

  3. Fermion masses and mixing in SU(5)×D4 × U(1) model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahl Laamara, R.; Loualidi, M. A.; Miskaoui, M.; Saidi, E. H.

    2017-03-01

    We propose a supersymmetric SU (5) ×Gf GUT model with flavor symmetry Gf =D4 × U (1) providing a good description of fermion masses and mixing. The model has twenty eight free parameters, eighteen are fixed to produce approximative experimental values of the physical parameters in the quark and charged lepton sectors. In the neutrino sector, the TBM matrix is generated at leading order through type I seesaw mechanism, and the deviation from TBM studied to reconcile with the phenomenological values of the mixing angles. Other features in the charged sector such as Georgi-Jarlskog relations and CKM mixing matrix are also studied.

  4. Loop suppressed light fermion masses with U (1 )R gauge symmetry

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Nomura, Takaaki; Okada, Hiroshi

    2017-07-01

    We propose a model with a two-Higgs doublet, where quark and charged-lepton masses in the first and second families are induced at one-loop level, and neutrino masses are induced at the two-loop level. In our model, we introduce an extra U (1 )R gauge symmetry that plays a crucial role in achieving desired terms in no conflict with anomaly cancellation. We show the mechanism to generate fermion masses, the resultant mass matrices, and Yukawa interactions in mass eigenstates, and we discuss several interesting phenomenologies such as the muon anomalous magnetic dipole moment and the dark matter candidate that arise from this model.

  5. Proton hexality from an anomalous flavor U(1) and neutrino masses: Linking to the string scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Dreiner, Herbi K.; Luhn, Christoph; Murayama, Hitoshi; Thormeier, Marc

    2008-05-01

    We devise minimalistic gauged U(1 Froggatt-Nielsen models which at low-energy give rise to the recently suggested discrete gauge Z-symmetry, proton hexality, thus stabilizing the proton. Assuming three generations of right-handed neutrinos, with the proper choice of X-charges, we obtain viable neutrino masses. Furthermore, we find scenarios such that no X-charged hidden sector superfields are needed, which from a bottom-up perspective allows the calculation of g, g and G's Kač-Moody levels. The only mass scale apart from M is m.

  6. The (2 + 1)-d U(1) quantum link model masquerading as deconfined criticality

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Banerjee, D.; Jiang, F.-J.; Widmer, P.; Wiese, U.-J.

    2013-12-01

    The (2 + 1)-d U(1) quantum link model is a gauge theory, amenable to quantum simulation, with a spontaneously broken SO(2) symmetry emerging at a quantum phase transition. Its low-energy physics is described by a (2 + 1)-d RP(1) effective field theory, perturbed by an SO(2) breaking operator, which prevents the interpretation of the emergent pseudo-Goldstone boson as a dual photon. At the quantum phase transition, the model mimics some features of deconfined quantum criticality, but remains linearly confining. Deconfinement only sets in at high temperature. Dedicated to the memory of Bernard B Beard (1957-2012).

  7. Systematic U(1 ) B - L extensions of loop-induced neutrino mass models with dark matter

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ho, Shu-Yu; Toma, Takashi; Tsumura, Koji

    2016-08-01

    We study the gauged U(1 ) B - L extensions of the models for neutrino masses and dark matter. In this class of models, tiny neutrino masses are radiatively induced through the loop diagrams, while the origin of the dark matter stability is guaranteed by the remnant of the gauge symmetry. Depending on how the lepton number conservation is violated, these models are systematically classified. We present complete lists for the one-loop Z2 and the two-loop Z3 radiative seesaw models as examples of the classification. The anomaly cancellation conditions in these models are also discussed.

  8. Vibrationally resolved 2a 2u-1 photoionization of C 6F 6

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Wu, Chuanyong; Poliakoff, E. D.

    1998-07-01

    We report vibrationally resolved results on 2a 2u-1 photoionization of C 6F 6. Vibrational branching ratios are determined for the ring breathing mode by measuring dispersed fluorescence spectra of the C 6F 6+ ( B˜ 2A2 u→ X˜ 2E1 g) transition. Data are presented in the excitation energy range from 20 to 35 eV, and the vibrational branching ratios show a striking departure from Franck-Condon behavior from 20 to 25 eV. This deviation is attributed to a shape resonance.

  9. U(1){sub R} mediation from the flux compactification in six dimensions

    SciTech Connect

    Lee, Hyun Min

    2008-11-23

    We consider a supersymmetric completion of codimension-two branes with nonzero tension in a 6D gauged supergravity. As a consequence, we obtain the football solution with 4D Minkowski space as a new supersymmetric background that preserves 4D N = 1 SUSY. In the presence of brane multiplets, we derive the 4D effective supergravity action for the football background and show that the remaining modulus can be stabilized by a bulk non-perturbative correction with brane uplifting potentials at a zero vacuum energy. We find that the U(1){sub R} mediation can be a dominant source of SUSY breaking for a brane scalar with nonzero R charge.

  10. Deconfinement Phase Transition in a 3D Nonlocal U(1) Lattice Gauge Theory

    SciTech Connect

    Arakawa, Gaku; Ichinose, Ikuo; Matsui, Tetsuo; Sakakibara, Kazuhiko

    2005-06-03

    We introduce a 3D compact U(1) lattice gauge theory having nonlocal interactions in the temporal direction, and study its phase structure. The model is relevant for the compact QED{sub 3} and strongly correlated electron systems like the t-J model of cuprates. For a power-law decaying long-range interaction, which simulates the effect of gapless matter fields, a second-order phase transition takes place separating the confinement and deconfinement phases. For an exponentially decaying interaction simulating matter fields with gaps, the system exhibits no signals of a second-order transition.

  11. Gaussian effective potential for the standard model SU(2)xU(1) electroweak theory

    SciTech Connect

    Siringo, Fabio; Marotta, Luca

    2008-07-01

    The Gaussian effective potential is derived for the non-Abelian SU(2)xU(1) gauge theory of electroweak interactions. At variance with naive derivations, the Gaussian effective potential is proven to be a genuine variational tool in any gauge. The role of ghosts is discussed and the unitarity gauge is shown to be the only choice which allows calculability without insertion of further approximations. The full non-Abelian calculation confirms the existence of a light Higgs boson in the nonperturbative strong coupling regime of the Higgs sector.

  12. Fermion mass hierarchy and nonhierarchical mass ratios in SU(5)xU(1){sub F}

    SciTech Connect

    Duque, Luis F.; Gutierrez, Diego A.; Nardi, Enrico; Norena, Jorge

    2008-08-01

    We consider a SU(5)xU(1){sub F} grand unified theory (GUT)-flavor model in which the number of effects that determine the charged fermions Yukawa matrices is much larger than the number of observables, resulting in a hierarchical fermion spectrum with no particular regularities. The GUT-flavor symmetry is broken by flavons in the adjoint of SU(5), realizing a variant of the Froggatt-Nielsen mechanism that gives rise to a large number of effective operators. By assuming a common mass for the heavy fields and universality of the fundamental Yukawa couplings, we reduce the number of free parameters to one. The observed fermion mass spectrum is reproduced thanks to selection rules that discriminate among various contributions. Bottom-tau Yukawa unification is preserved at leading order, but there is no unification for the first two families. Interestingly, U(1){sub F} charges alone do not determine the hierarchy, and can only give upper bounds on the parametric suppression of the Yukawa operators.

  13. The neutralino sector in the U(1)-extended supersymmetric Standard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Choi, S. Y.; Haber, H. E.; Kalinowski, J.; Zerwas, P. M.

    2007-08-01

    Motivated by grand unified theories and string theories we analyze the general structure of the neutralino sector in the USSM, an extension of the minimal supersymmetric Standard Model that involves a broken extra U(1) gauge symmetry. This supersymmetric U(1)-extended model includes an Abelian gauge superfield and a Higgs singlet superfield in addition to the standard gauge and Higgs superfields of the MSSM. The interactions between the MSSM fields and the new fields are in general weak and the mixing is small, so that the coupling of the two subsystems can be treated perturbatively. As a result, the mass spectrum and mixing matrix in the neutralino sector can be analyzed analytically and the structure of this 6-state system is under good theoretical control. We describe the decay modes of the new states and the impact of this extension on decays of the original MSSM neutralinos, including radiative transitions in cross-over zones. Production channels in cascade decays at the LHC and pair production at ee colliders are also discussed.

  14. Role of the U(1) ghost beyond leading order in a large-Nc expansion

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Matevosyan, Hrayr H.; Thomas, Anthony W.

    2008-11-01

    The 1/Nc expansion is one of the very few methods we have for generating a systematic expansion of QCD at the energy scale relevant to hadron structure. The present formulation of this theory relies on the double-line notation for calculating the leading order of a diagram in the 1/Nc expansion, where the local SU(Nc) gauge symmetry is substituted by a U(Nc) symmetry and the associated U(1) ghost field is ignored. In the current work we demonstrate the insufficiency of this formulation for describing certain non-planar diagrams of interest in current attempts to model QCD. We derive a more complete set of Feynman rules that include the U(1) ghost field and provide a useful tool for calculating both color factors and 1/Nc orders of all color-singlet diagrams. Note: Authored by Jefferson Science Associates, LLC under US DOE contract no DE-AC05-06OR23177. The US Government retains a non-exclusive, paid-up, irrevocable, world-wide license to publish or reproduce this manuscript for US Government purposes.

  15. Z ', Higgses and heavy neutrinos in U(1)' models: from the LHC to the GUT scale

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accomando, Elena; Corianò, Claudio; Rose, Luigi Delle; Fiaschi, Juri; Marzo, Carlo; Moretti, Stefano

    2016-07-01

    We study a class of non-exotic minimal U(1)' extensions of the Standard Model, which includes all scenarios that are anomaly-free with the ordinary fermion content augmented by one Right-Handed neutrino per generation, wherein the new Abelian gauge group is spontaneously broken by the non-zero Vacuum Expectation Value of an additional Higgs singlet field, in turn providing mass to a Z ' state. By adopting the B - L example, whose results can be recast into those pertaining to the whole aforementioned class, and allowing for both scalar and gauge mixing, we first extract the surviving parameter space in presence of up-to-date theoretical and experimental constraints. Over the corresponding parameter configurations, we then delineate the high energy behaviour of such constructs in terms of their stability and perturbativity. Finally, we highlight key production and decay channels of the new states entering the spectra of this class of models, i.e., heavy neutrinos, a second Higgs state and the Z ', which are amenable to experimental investigation at the Large Hadron Collider. We therefore set the stage to establish a direct link between measurements obtainable at the Electro-Weak scale and the dynamics of the underlying model up to those where a Grand Unification Theory embedding a U(1)' can be realised.

  16. Z'-portal right-handed neutrino dark matter in the minimal U(1 ) X extended Standard Model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Okada, Nobuchika; Okada, Satomi

    2017-02-01

    We consider a concise dark matter (DM) scenario in the context of a nonexotic U(1) extension of the Standard Model (SM), where a new U(1 ) X gauge symmetry is introduced along with three generations of right-handed neutrinos (RHNs) and a SM gauge singlet Higgs field. The model is a generalization of the minimal gauged U (1 )B -L (baryon number minus lepton number) extension of the SM, in which the extra U(1 ) X gauge symmetry is expressed as a linear combination of the SM U(1 ) Y and U (1 )B -L gauge symmetries. We introduce a Z2-parity and assign an odd-parity only for one RHN among all particles, so that this Z2-odd RHN plays the role of DM. The so-called minimal seesaw mechanism is implemented in this model with only two Z2-even RHNs. In this context, we investigate the physics of RHN DM, focusing on the case where this DM particle communicates with the SM particles through the U(1 ) X gauge boson (Z' boson). This "Z'-portal RHN DM" scenario is controlled by only three free parameters: the U(1 ) X gauge coupling (αX), the Z' boson mass (mZ'), and the U(1 ) X charge of the SM Higgs doublet (xH). We consider various phenomenological constraints to identify a phenomenologically viable parameter space. The most important constraints are the observed DM relic abundance and the latest LHC Run-2 results on the search for a narrow resonance with the dilepton final state. We find that these are complementary with each other and narrow the allowed parameter region, leading to the lower mass bound of mZ'≳2.7 TeV .

  17. Axion and neutrino physics in a U (1 )-enhanced supersymmetric model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Ahn, Y. H.

    2017-07-01

    Motivated by the flavored Peccei-Quinn symmetry for unifying the flavor physics and string theory, we construct an explicit model by introducing a U (1 ) symmetry such that the U (1 )X-[gravity]2 anomaly-free condition together with the standard model flavor structure demands additional sterile neutrinos as well as no axionic domain-wall problem. Such additional sterile neutrinos play the role of realizing baryogenesis via a new Affleck-Dine leptogenesis. We provide grounds for interpreting the U (1 )X symmetry as a fundamental symmetry of nature. The model will resolve rather recent but fast-growing issues in astroparticle physics, including leptonic mixings and C P violation in neutrino oscillation, high-energy neutrinos, QCD axions, and axion cooling of stars. The QCD axion decay constant, through its connection to the astrophysical constraints of stellar evolution and the SM fermion masses, is shown to be fixed at FA=1.30-0.54+0.66×1 09 GeV (consequently, its mass is ma=4.3 4-1.49+3.37 meV and the axion-photon coupling is |ga γ γ|=1.30-0.45+1.01×10-12 GeV-1 ). Interestingly enough, we show that neutrino oscillations at low energies could be connected to astronomical-scale baseline neutrino oscillations. The model predicts the nonobservational neutrinoless double beta (0 ν β β ) decay rate as well as a remarkable pattern between the leptonic Dirac C P phase (δC P) and the atmospheric mixing angle (θ23); e.g., δC P≃22 0 ° - 24 0 ° , 120°-140° for θ23=42.3 ° for normal mass ordering, and δC P≃28 3 ° , 250°, 100°, 70° for θ23=49.5 ° for the inverted one. We stress that future measurements on the θ23, 0 ν β β decay rate, the sum of active neutrino masses, the track-to-shower ratio of a cosmic neutrino, astrophysical constraints on axions, QCD axion mass, and the axion-photon coupling are of importance to test the model in the near future.

  18. TG-43 U1 based dosimetric characterization of model 67-6520 Cs-137 brachytherapy source

    SciTech Connect

    Meigooni, Ali S.; Wright, Clarissa; Koona, Rafiq A.; Awan, Shahid B.; Granero, Domingo; Perez-Calatayud, Jose; Ballester, Facundo

    2009-10-15

    Purpose: Brachytherapy treatment has been a cornerstone for management of various cancer sites, particularly for the treatment of gynecological malignancies. In low dose rate brachytherapy treatments, {sup 137}Cs sources have been used for several decades. A new {sup 137}Cs source design has been introduced (model 67-6520, source B3-561) by Isotope Products Laboratories (IPL) for clinical application. The goal of the present work is to implement the TG-43 U1 protocol in the characterization of the aforementioned {sup 137}Cs source. Methods: The dosimetric characteristics of the IPL {sup 137}Cs source are measured using LiF thermoluminescent dosimeters in a Solid Water phantom material and calculated using Monte Carlo simulations with the GEANT4 code in Solid Water and liquid water. The dose rate constant, radial dose function, and two-dimensional anisotropy function of this source model were obtained following the TG-43 U1 recommendations. In addition, the primary and scatter dose separation (PSS) formalism that could be used in convolution/superposition methods to calculate dose distributions around brachytherapy sources in heterogeneous media was studied. Results: The measured and calculated dose rate constants of the IPL {sup 137}Cs source in Solid Water were found to be 0.930({+-}7.3%) and 0.928({+-}2.6%) cGy h{sup -1} U{sup -1}, respectively. The agreement between these two methods was within our experimental uncertainties. The Monte Carlo calculated value in liquid water of the dose rate constant was {Lambda}=0.948({+-}2.6%) cGy h{sup -1} U{sup -1}. Similarly, the agreement between measured and calculated radial dose functions and the anisotropy functions was found to be within {+-}5%. In addition, the tabulated data that are required to characterize the source using the PSS formalism were derived. Conclusions: In this article the complete dosimetry of the newly designed {sup 137}Cs IPL source following the AAPM TG-43 U1 dosimetric protocol and the PSS

  19. Dynamic Contacts of U2, RES, Cwc25, Prp8 and Prp45 Proteins with the Pre-mRNA Branch-Site and 3' Splice Site during Catalytic Activation and Step 1 Catalysis in Yeast Spliceosomes

    PubMed Central

    Schneider, Cornelius; Agafonov, Dmitry E.; Schmitzová, Jana; Hartmuth, Klaus; Fabrizio, Patrizia; Lührmann, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about contacts in the spliceosome between proteins and intron nucleotides surrounding the pre-mRNA branch-site and their dynamics during splicing. We investigated protein-pre-mRNA interactions by UV-induced crosslinking of purified yeast Bact spliceosomes formed on site-specifically labeled pre-mRNA, and analyzed their changes after conversion to catalytically-activated B* and step 1 C complexes, using a purified splicing system. Contacts between nucleotides upstream and downstream of the branch-site and the U2 SF3a/b proteins Prp9, Prp11, Hsh49, Cus1 and Hsh155 were detected, demonstrating that these interactions are evolutionarily conserved. The RES proteins Pml1 and Bud13 were shown to contact the intron downstream of the branch-site. A comparison of the Bact crosslinking pattern versus that of B* and C complexes revealed that U2 and RES protein interactions with the intron are dynamic. Upon step 1 catalysis, Cwc25 contacts with the branch-site region, and enhanced crosslinks of Prp8 and Prp45 with nucleotides surrounding the branch-site were observed. Cwc25’s step 1 promoting activity was not dependent on its interaction with pre-mRNA, indicating it acts via protein-protein interactions. These studies provide important insights into the spliceosome's protein-pre-mRNA network and reveal novel RNP remodeling events during the catalytic activation of the spliceosome and step 1 of splicing. PMID:26393790

  20. Dynamic Contacts of U2, RES, Cwc25, Prp8 and Prp45 Proteins with the Pre-mRNA Branch-Site and 3' Splice Site during Catalytic Activation and Step 1 Catalysis in Yeast Spliceosomes.

    PubMed

    Schneider, Cornelius; Agafonov, Dmitry E; Schmitzová, Jana; Hartmuth, Klaus; Fabrizio, Patrizia; Lührmann, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Little is known about contacts in the spliceosome between proteins and intron nucleotides surrounding the pre-mRNA branch-site and their dynamics during splicing. We investigated protein-pre-mRNA interactions by UV-induced crosslinking of purified yeast B(act) spliceosomes formed on site-specifically labeled pre-mRNA, and analyzed their changes after conversion to catalytically-activated B* and step 1 C complexes, using a purified splicing system. Contacts between nucleotides upstream and downstream of the branch-site and the U2 SF3a/b proteins Prp9, Prp11, Hsh49, Cus1 and Hsh155 were detected, demonstrating that these interactions are evolutionarily conserved. The RES proteins Pml1 and Bud13 were shown to contact the intron downstream of the branch-site. A comparison of the B(act) crosslinking pattern versus that of B* and C complexes revealed that U2 and RES protein interactions with the intron are dynamic. Upon step 1 catalysis, Cwc25 contacts with the branch-site region, and enhanced crosslinks of Prp8 and Prp45 with nucleotides surrounding the branch-site were observed. Cwc25's step 1 promoting activity was not dependent on its interaction with pre-mRNA, indicating it acts via protein-protein interactions. These studies provide important insights into the spliceosome's protein-pre-mRNA network and reveal novel RNP remodeling events during the catalytic activation of the spliceosome and step 1 of splicing.

  1. Stable tri-snRNP integration is accompanied by a major structural rearrangement of the spliceosome that is dependent on Prp8 interaction with the 5′ splice site

    PubMed Central

    Boesler, Carsten; Rigo, Norbert; Agafonov, Dmitry E.; Kastner, Berthold; Urlaub, Henning; Will, Cindy L.; Lührmann, Reinhard

    2015-01-01

    Exon definition is the predominant initial spliceosome assembly pathway in higher eukaryotes, but it remains much less well-characterized compared to the intron-defined assembly pathway. Addition in trans of an excess of 5′ss containing RNA to a splicing reaction converts a 37S exon-defined complex, formed on a single exon RNA substrate, into a 45S B-like spliceosomal complex with stably integrated U4/U6.U5 tri-snRNP. This 45S complex is compositonally and structurally highly similar to an intron-defined spliceosomal B complex. Stable tri-snRNP integration during B-like complex formation is accompanied by a major structural change as visualized by electron microscopy. The changes in structure and stability during transition from a 37S to 45S complex can be induced in affinity-purified cross-exon complexes by adding solely the 5′ss RNA oligonucleotide. This conformational change does not require the B-specific proteins, which are recruited during this stabilization process, or site-specific phosphorylation of hPrp31. Instead it is triggered by the interaction of U4/U6.U5 tri-snRNP components with the 5′ss sequence, most importantly between Prp8 and nucleotides at the exon–intron junction. These studies provide novel insights into the conversion of a cross-exon to cross-intron organized spliceosome and also shed light on the requirements for stable tri-snRNP integration during B complex formation. PMID:26385511

  2. The Arabidopsis U11/U12-65K is an indispensible component of minor spliceosome and plays a crucial role in U12 intron splicing and plant development.

    PubMed

    Jung, Hyun Ju; Kang, Hunseung

    2014-06-01

    The U12-dependent introns have been identified in a wide range of eukaryotes and are removed from precursor-mRNAs by U12 intron-specific minor spliceosome. Although several proteins unique to minor spliceosome have been identified, the nature of their effect on U12 intron splicing as well as plant growth and development remain largely unknown. Here, we characterized the functional role of an U12-type spliceosomal protein, U11/U12-65K in Arabidopsis thaliana. The transgenic knockdown plants generated by artificial miRNA-mediated silencing strategy exhibited severe defect in growth and development, such as severely arrested primary inflorescence stems, serrated leaves, and the formation of many rosette leaves after bolting. RNA sequencing and reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) analyses revealed that splicing of 198 out of the 234 previously predicted U12 intron-containing genes and 32 previously unidentified U12 introns was impaired in u11/u12-65k mutant. Moreover, the U11/U12-65K mutation affected alternative splicing, as well as U12 intron splicing, of many introns. Microarray analysis revealed that the genes involved in cell wall biogenesis and function, plant development, and metabolic processes are differentially expressed in the mutant plants. U11/U12-65K protein bound specifically to U12 small nuclear RNA (snRNA), which is necessary for branch-point site recognition. Taken together, these results provide clear evidence that U11/U12-65K is an indispensible component of minor spliceosome and involved in U12 intron splicing and alternative splicing of many introns, which is crucial for plant development.

  3. Diphoton decay for a 750 GeV scalar boson in a U(1)X model

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Martinez, R.; Ochoa, F.; Sierra, C. F.

    2016-12-01

    In the context of a nonuniversal and anomaly free U(1)X extension of the standard model, we examine the decay of a 750 GeV scalar singlet state, ξχ, as a possible explanation of the observed diphoton excess announced by the ATLAS and CMS collaborations at CERN-LHC collider. The one-loop decay to photons is allowed through three heavy singlet quarks and one charged Higgs boson into the loop. We obtain, for different width approximations and for masses of the exotic singlet quarks in the region [ 900 , 3000 ] GeV, a production cross section σ (pp →ξχ → γγ) compatible with ATLAS and CMS collaborations data. We also include another scalar singlet, σ, as a dark matter candidate that may couple with the 750 GeV scalar at tree level with production cross sections in agreement with ATLAS and CMS.

  4. Family nonuniversal U(1){sup '} gauge symmetries and b{yields}s transitions

    SciTech Connect

    Barger, Vernon; Everett, Lisa; Jiang Jing; Langacker, Paul; Liu Tao; Wagner, Carlos E. M.

    2009-09-01

    We present a correlated analysis for the {delta}B=1, 2 processes which occur via b{yields}s transitions within models with a family nonuniversal U(1){sup '}. We take a model-independent approach and only require family universal charges for the first and second generations and small fermion mixing angles. The results of our analysis show that within this class of models, the anomalies in B{sub s}-B{sub s} mixing and the time-dependent CP asymmetries of the penguin-dominated B{sub d}{yields}({pi},{phi},{eta}{sup '},{rho},{omega},f{sub 0})K{sub S} decays can be accommodated.

  5. Expression of Ruminococcus albus xylanase gene ( xynA) in Streptococcus bovis 12-U-1.

    PubMed

    Nakamura, Mutsumi; Nagamine, Takafumi; Harada, Chisato; Tajima, Kiyoshi; Matsui, Hiroki; Benno, Yoshimi

    2003-07-01

    The objective of this study was to ligate the xylanase gene A ( xynA) isolated from Ruminococcus albus 7 into the promoter and signal-peptide region of the lichenase [beta-(1,3-1,4)-glucanase] gene of Streptococcus bovis JB1. This fusion gene was inserted into the pSBE11 vector, and the resulting recombinant, plasmid pXA, was used to transform S. bovis 12-U-1 cells. The transformant, S. bovis 12UXA, secreted the xylanase, which was stable against freeze-thaw treatment and long-time incubation at 37 degrees C. The introduction of pXA and production of xylanase did not affect cell growth, and the xylanase produced degraded xylan from oat-spelt and birchwood.

  6. Canonical quantization of four- and five-dimensional U(1) gauge theories

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Shnerb, N.; Horwitz, L. P.

    1993-12-01

    We discuss the canonical quantization of an interacting massless U(1) gauge field using a bosonic gauge-fixing method. We present a way to make the transformation between the Lorentz and the Coulomb gauge of such theories, without using an explicit representation of the fields in terms of creation-annihilation operators. We demonstrate this method in the case of Maxwell photons interacting with Schrödinger electrons and then we treat, with the same methods, a system of higher-dimensional equations appearing in the framework of a manifestly covariant relativistic quantum theory. The nonrelativistic limit of the Coulomb term for such a theory is discussed and compared to the Fokker action appearing in the Wheeler-Feynman action-at-a-distance theory for electromagnetic interactions.

  7. Engineering assessment and certification of integrity of the 141-R1U1 tank system

    SciTech Connect

    Graser, D.A. )

    1990-09-01

    This Engineering Assessment and Certification of Integrity of retention tank 141-R1U1 is in response to the requirements of 40 CFR 265.191 for an existing tank system that stores hazardous waste and does not have secondary containment. This technical assessment has been reviewed by an independent, qualified, California registered professional engineer, who has certified the tank system to be adequately designed and compatible with the stored waste so that it will not collapse rupture, or fail. This document will be kept on file at the facility. Onground retention tanks 141-R1O1 and 141-R1O2, which are also part of the 141-R1 retention tank system, do not have secondary containment; consequently, certification documentation for these tanks is not included in this assessment. A discussion of the onground tanks, however, is included in this report to provide a complete description of the 141-R1 retention tank system. 8 refs., 7 figs.

  8. b {r-arrow} s transitions in family-dependent U(1)' models.

    SciTech Connect

    Barger, V.; Everett, L.; Jiang, J.; Langacker, P.; Liu, T.; Wagner, C. E. M.; High Energy Physics; Univ. of Chicago; Univ. of Wisconsin; Inst. for Advanced Study

    2009-01-01

    We analyze flavor-changing-neutral-current (FCNC) effects in the b {yields} s transitions that are induced by family non-universal U(1){prime} gauge symmetries. After systematically developing the necessary formalism, we present a correlated analysis for the {Delta}B = 1,2 processes. We adopt a model-independent approach in which we only require family-universal charges for the first and second generations and small fermion mixing angles. We analyze the constraints on the resulting parameter space from B{sub s}-{bar B} mixing and the time-dependent CP asymmetries of the penguin-dominated B{sub d} {yields} ({pi},{phi}, {eta}{prime}, {rho},{omega},f0)K{sub S} decays. Our results indicate that the currently observed discrepancies in some of these modes with respect to the Standard Model predictions can be consistently accommodated within this general class of models.

  9. Family non-universal U(1)' gauge symmetries and b {r_arrow} s transitions.

    SciTech Connect

    Barger, V.; Everett, L.; Jiang, J.; Langacker, P.; Liu, T.; Wagner, C .E. M.; High Energy Physics; Univ. of Chicago; Univ. of Wisconsin at Madison; Inst. for Advanced Study

    2009-01-01

    We present a correlated analysis for the {Delta}B = 1, 2 processes which occur via b {yields} s transitions within models with a family nonuniversal U(1){prime}. We take a model-independent approach and only require family universal charges for the first and second generations and small fermion mixing angles. The results of our analysis show that within this class of models, the anomalies in B{sub s}-B{sub s}{sup -} mixing and the time-dependent CP asymmetries of the penguin-dominated B{sub d} {yields} ({pi},{psi},{eta}{prime},{rho},{omega},f{sub 0})K{sub S} decays can be accommodated.

  10. Seismic evaluation of the U1a complex at the Nevada Test Site

    SciTech Connect

    McCamant, R R; Davito, A M; Hahn, K R; Murray, R C; Ng, D S; Sahni, V K; Schnechter, K M; Van Dyke, M

    1998-10-16

    As part of an overall safety evaluation of the Ula Complex, a seismic evaluation of structures, systems, and components (SSC) was conducted. A team of seismic, safety, and operation engineers from Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL), Bechtel Nevada (BN) and Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) was chartered to perform the seismic evaluation. The UlA Complex is located in Area 1 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) in Nevada. The complex is a test facility for physics experiments in support of the Science Based Stockpile Stewardship Program. The Ula Complex consists of surface and subsurface facilities. The subsurface facility is a tunnel complex located 963 feet below the surface. The seismic evaluation of U 1 a Complex is required to comply with the DOE Natural Phenomena Policy. This policy consists of an order, an implementing guide, and standards which provide guidance for design and evaluation of SSCs, categorization of SSCs, characterization of site, and hazard level definition.

  11. Curvature-squared multiplets, evanescent effects, and the U(1) anomaly in N =4 supergravity

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bern, Zvi; Edison, Alex; Kosower, David; Parra-Martinez, Julio

    2017-09-01

    We evaluate one-loop amplitudes of N =4 supergravity in D dimensions using the double-copy procedure that expresses gravity integrands in terms of corresponding ones in Yang-Mills theory. We organize the calculation in terms of a set of gauge-invariant tensors, allowing us to identify evanescent contributions. Among the latter, we find the matrix elements of supersymmetric completions of curvature-squared operators. In addition, we find that such evanescent terms and the U(1)-anomalous contributions to one-loop N =4 amplitudes are tightly intertwined. The appearance of evanescent operators in N =4 supergravity and their relation to anomalies raises the question of their effect on the known four-loop divergence in this theory. We provide bases of gauge-invariant tensors and corresponding projectors useful for Yang-Mills theories as a by-product of our analysis.

  12. Novel SM-like Higgs decay into displaced heavy neutrino pairs in U(1)' models

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Accomando, Elena; Rose, Luigi Delle; Moretti, Stefano; Olaiya, Emmanuel; Shepherd-Themistocleous, Claire H.

    2017-04-01

    We examine the observability of heavy neutrino ( ν h ) signatures of a U(1)' enlarged Standard Model (SM) encompassing three heavy Majorana neutrinos alongside the known light neutrino states at the the Large Hadron Collider (LHC). We show that heavy neutrinos can be rather long-lived particles producing distinctive displaced vertices that can be accessed in the CERN LHC detectors. We concentrate here on the gluon fusion production mechanism gg → H 1,2 → ν h ν h , where H 1 is the discovered SM-like Higgs and H 2 is a heavier state, yielding displaced leptons following ν h decays into weak gauge bosons. Using data collected by the end of the LHC Run 2, these signatures would prove to be accessible with negligibly small background.

  13. Absence of U(1) anomalous superamplitudes in N ≥ 5 supergravities

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Freedman, Daniel Z.; Kallosh, Renata; Murli, Divyanshu; Van Proeyen, Antoine; Yamada, Yusuke

    2017-05-01

    We list all potential candidates for U(1) anomalous non-local 1-loop 4-point amplitudes and higher loop UV divergences in N ≥ 5 supergravities. The relevant chiral superinvariants are constructed from linearized chiral superfields and define the corresponding superamplitudes. The anomalous amplitudes, of the kind present in N = 4, are shown to be absent in N ≥ 5. In N = 6 supergravity the result is deduced from the double-copy ( N = 4) Y M × ( N = 2) Y M model, whereas in N = 5, 8 the result on absence of anomalous amplitudes is derived in supergravities as well as in the ( N = 4) Y M × ( N - 4) Y M double-copy models.

  14. Integrable spin chain for the SL(2,R)/U(1) black hole sigma model.

    PubMed

    Ikhlef, Yacine; Jacobsen, Jesper Lykke; Saleur, Hubert

    2012-02-24

    We introduce a spin chain based on finite-dimensional spin-1/2 SU(2) representations but with a non-Hermitian "Hamiltonian" and show, using mostly analytical techniques, that it is described at low energies by the SL(2,R)/U(1) Euclidian black hole conformal field theory. This identification goes beyond the appearance of a noncompact spectrum; we are also able to determine the density of states, and show that it agrees with the formulas in [J. Maldacena, H. Ooguri, and J. Son, J. Math. Phys. (N.Y.) 42, 2961 (2001)] and [A. Hanany, N. Prezas, and J. Troost, J. High Energy Phys. 04 (2002) 014], hence providing a direct "physical measurement" of the associated reflection amplitude.

  15. Simulations of Cold Electroweak Baryogenesis: hypercharge U(1) and the creation of helical magnetic fields

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Mou, Zong-Gang; Saffin, Paul M.; Tranberg, Anders

    2017-06-01

    We perform numerical simulations of Cold Electroweak Baryogenesis, including for the first time in the Bosonic sector the full electroweak gauge group SU(2) × U(1) and CP-violation. We find that the maximum generated baryon asymmetry is reduced by a factor of three relative to the SU(2)-only model of [1], but that the quench time dependence is very similar. In addition, we compute the magnitude of the helical magnetic fields, and find that it is proportional to the strength of CP-violation and dependent on quench time, but is not proportional to the magnitude of the baryon asymmetry as proposed in [2, 3]. Astrophysical signatures of primordial magnetic helicity can therefore not in general be used as evidence that electroweak baryogenesis has taken place.

  16. Functional renormalization group for the U (1 )-T56 tensorial group field theory with closure constraint

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Lahoche, Vincent; Ousmane Samary, Dine

    2017-02-01

    This paper is focused on the functional renormalization group applied to the T56 tensor model on the Abelian group U (1 ) with closure constraint. For the first time, we derive the flow equations for the couplings and mass parameters in a suitable truncation around the marginal interactions with respect to the perturbative power counting. For the second time, we study the behavior around the Gaussian fixed point, and show that the theory is nonasymptotically free. Finally, we discuss the UV completion of the theory. We show the existence of several nontrivial fixed points, study the behavior of the renormalization group flow around them, and point out evidence in favor of an asymptotically safe theory.

  17. A guide to flat direction analysis in anomalous U(1) models

    SciTech Connect

    Irges, N.; Lavignac, S. |

    1997-12-01

    The authors suggest a systematic procedure to study D- and F-flat directions in a large class of models with an anomalous U(1). This class of models is characterized by the existence of a vacuum that breaks all Abelian gauge symmetries connecting the observable sector to the hidden sector. They show that, under some conditions, there is no other stable vacuum that breaks these symmetries. As a consequence, the model yields definite (order of magnitude) predictions for low-energy mass hierarchies. Then they study generic flat directions and identify the ones that may lead to undesirable vacua. They give necessary conditions for those to be lifted, and show that supersymmetry breaking only slightly affects the conclusions from the flat direction analysis.

  18. Defective control of pre-messenger RNA splicing in human disease.

    PubMed

    Chabot, Benoit; Shkreta, Lulzim

    2016-01-04

    Examples of associations between human disease and defects in pre-messenger RNA splicing/alternative splicing are accumulating. Although many alterations are caused by mutations in splicing signals or regulatory sequence elements, recent studies have noted the disruptive impact of mutated generic spliceosome components and splicing regulatory proteins. This review highlights recent progress in our understanding of how the altered splicing function of RNA-binding proteins contributes to myelodysplastic syndromes, cancer, and neuropathologies.

  19. Defective control of pre–messenger RNA splicing in human disease

    PubMed Central

    Shkreta, Lulzim

    2016-01-01

    Examples of associations between human disease and defects in pre–messenger RNA splicing/alternative splicing are accumulating. Although many alterations are caused by mutations in splicing signals or regulatory sequence elements, recent studies have noted the disruptive impact of mutated generic spliceosome components and splicing regulatory proteins. This review highlights recent progress in our understanding of how the altered splicing function of RNA-binding proteins contributes to myelodysplastic syndromes, cancer, and neuropathologies. PMID:26728853

  20. Improvement of SMN2 Pre-mRNA Processing Mediated by Exon-Specific U1 Small Nuclear RNA

    PubMed Central

    Dal Mas, Andrea; Rogalska, Malgorzata Ewa; Bussani, Erica; Pagani, Franco

    2015-01-01

    Exon-specific U1 snRNAs (ExSpe U1s) are modified U1 snRNAs that interact with intronic sequences downstream of the 5′ splice site (ss) by complementarity. This process restores exon skipping caused by different types of mutation. We have investigated the molecular mechanism and activity of these molecules in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a genetic neuromuscular disease where a silent exonic transition on the survival motor neuron 2 (SMN2) leads to exon 7 (E7) skipping. By using different cellular models, we show that a single chromosome-integrated copy of ExSpe U1 induced a significant correction of endogenous SMN2 E7 splicing and resulted in the restoration of the corresponding SMN protein levels. Interestingly, the analysis of pre-mRNA transcript abundance and decay showed that ExSpe U1s promote E7 inclusion and stabilizes the SMN pre-mRNA intermediate. This selective effect on pre-mRNA stability resulted in higher levels of SMN mRNAs in comparison with those after treatment with an antisense oligonucleotide (AON) that targets corresponding intronic sequences. In mice harboring the SMN2 transgene, AAV-mediated delivery of ExSpe U1 increased E7 inclusion in brain, heart, liver, kidney, and skeletal muscle. The positive effect of ExSpe U1s on SMN pre-mRNA processing highlights their therapeutic potential in SMA and in other pathologies caused by exon-skipping mutations. PMID:25557785

  1. Improvement of SMN2 pre-mRNA processing mediated by exon-specific U1 small nuclear RNA.

    PubMed

    Dal Mas, Andrea; Rogalska, Malgorzata Ewa; Bussani, Erica; Pagani, Franco

    2015-01-08

    Exon-specific U1 snRNAs (ExSpe U1s) are modified U1 snRNAs that interact with intronic sequences downstream of the 5' splice site (ss) by complementarity. This process restores exon skipping caused by different types of mutation. We have investigated the molecular mechanism and activity of these molecules in spinal muscular atrophy (SMA), a genetic neuromuscular disease where a silent exonic transition on the survival motor neuron 2 (SMN2) leads to exon 7 (E7) skipping. By using different cellular models, we show that a single chromosome-integrated copy of ExSpe U1 induced a significant correction of endogenous SMN2 E7 splicing and resulted in the restoration of the corresponding SMN protein levels. Interestingly, the analysis of pre-mRNA transcript abundance and decay showed that ExSpe U1s promote E7 inclusion and stabilizes the SMN pre-mRNA intermediate. This selective effect on pre-mRNA stability resulted in higher levels of SMN mRNAs in comparison with those after treatment with an antisense oligonucleotide (AON) that targets corresponding intronic sequences. In mice harboring the SMN2 transgene, AAV-mediated delivery of ExSpe U1 increased E7 inclusion in brain, heart, liver, kidney, and skeletal muscle. The positive effect of ExSpe U1s on SMN pre-mRNA processing highlights their therapeutic potential in SMA and in other pathologies caused by exon-skipping mutations. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Structural basis for the recognition of spliceosomal SmN/B/B’ proteins by the RBM5 OCRE domain in splicing regulation

    PubMed Central

    Mourão, André; Bonnal, Sophie; Soni, Komal; Warner, Lisa; Bordonné, Rémy; Valcárcel, Juan; Sattler, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The multi-domain splicing factor RBM5 regulates the balance between antagonistic isoforms of the apoptosis-control genes FAS/CD95, Caspase-2 and AID. An OCRE (OCtamer REpeat of aromatic residues) domain found in RBM5 is important for alternative splicing regulation and mediates interactions with components of the U4/U6.U5 tri-snRNP. We show that the RBM5 OCRE domain adopts a unique β–sheet fold. NMR and biochemical experiments demonstrate that the OCRE domain directly binds to the proline-rich C-terminal tail of the essential snRNP core proteins SmN/B/B’. The NMR structure of an OCRE-SmN peptide complex reveals a specific recognition of poly-proline helical motifs in SmN/B/B’. Mutation of conserved aromatic residues impairs binding to the Sm proteins in vitro and compromises RBM5-mediated alternative splicing regulation of FAS/CD95. Thus, RBM5 OCRE represents a poly-proline recognition domain that mediates critical interactions with the C-terminal tail of the spliceosomal SmN/B/B’ proteins in FAS/CD95 alternative splicing regulation. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.14707.001 PMID:27894420

  3. CTNNBL1 facilitates the association of CWC15 with CDC5L and is required to maintain the abundance of the Prp19 spliceosomal complex

    PubMed Central

    van Maldegem, Febe; Maslen, Sarah; Johnson, Christopher M.; Chandra, Anita; Ganesh, Karuna; Skehel, Mark; Rada, Cristina

    2015-01-01

    In order to catalyse the splicing of messenger RNA, multiple proteins and RNA components associate and dissociate in a dynamic highly choreographed process. The Prp19 complex is a conserved essential part of the splicing machinery thought to facilitate the conformational changes the spliceosome undergoes during catalysis. Dynamic protein interactions often involve highly disordered regions that are difficult to study by structural methods. Using amine crosslinking and hydrogen–deuterium exchange coupled to mass spectrometry, we describe the architecture of the Prp19 sub-complex that contains CTNNBL1. Deficiency in CTNNBL1 leads to delayed initiation of cell division and embryonic lethality. Here we show that in vitro CTNNBL1 enhances the association of CWC15 and CDC5L, both core Prp19 complex proteins and identify an overlap in the region of CDC5L that binds either CTNNBL1 or CWC15 suggesting the two proteins might exchange places in the complex. Furthermore, in vivo, CTNNBL1 is required to maintain normal levels of the Prp19 complex and to facilitate the interaction of CWC15 with CDC5L. Our results identify a chaperone function for CTNNBL1 within the essential Prp19 complex, a function required to maintain the integrity of the complex and to support efficient splicing. PMID:26130721

  4. Regulation of constitutive and alternative splicing by PRMT5 reveals a role for Mdm4 pre-mRNA in sensing defects in the spliceosomal machinery.

    PubMed

    Bezzi, Marco; Teo, Shun Xie; Muller, Julius; Mok, Wei Chuen; Sahu, Sanjeeb Kumar; Vardy, Leah A; Bonday, Zahid Q; Guccione, Ernesto

    2013-09-01

    The tight control of gene expression at the level of both transcription and post-transcriptional RNA processing is essential for mammalian development. We here investigate the role of protein arginine methyltransferase 5 (PRMT5), a putative splicing regulator and transcriptional cofactor, in mammalian development. We demonstrate that selective deletion of PRMT5 in neural stem/progenitor cells (NPCs) leads to postnatal death in mice. At the molecular level, the absence of PRMT5 results in reduced methylation of Sm proteins, aberrant constitutive splicing, and the alternative splicing of specific mRNAs with weak 5' donor sites. Intriguingly, the products of these mRNAs are, among others, several proteins regulating cell cycle progression. We identify Mdm4 as one of these key mRNAs that senses the defects in the spliceosomal machinery and transduces the signal to activate the p53 response, providing a mechanistic explanation of the phenotype observed in vivo. Our data demonstrate that PRMT5 is a master regulator of splicing in mammals and uncover a new role for the Mdm4 pre-mRNA, which could be exploited for anti-cancer therapy.

  5. Identification of human short introns.

    PubMed

    Abebrese, Emmanuel L; Ali, Syed H; Arnold, Zachary R; Andrews, Victoria M; Armstrong, Katharine; Burns, Lindsay; Crowder, Hannah R; Day, R Thomas; Hsu, Daniel G; Jarrell, Katherine; Lee, Grace; Luo, Yi; Mugayo, Daphine; Raza, Zain; Friend, Kyle

    2017-01-01

    Canonical pre-mRNA splicing requires snRNPs and associated splicing factors to excise conserved intronic sequences, with a minimum intron length required for efficient splicing. Non-canonical splicing-intron excision without the spliceosome-has been documented; most notably, some tRNAs and the XBP1 mRNA contain short introns that are not removed by the spliceosome. There have been some efforts to identify additional short introns, but little is known about how many short introns are processed from mRNAs. Here, we report an approach to identify RNA short introns from RNA-Seq data, discriminating against small genomic deletions. We identify hundreds of short introns conserved among multiple human cell lines. These short introns are often alternatively spliced and are found in a variety of RNAs-both mRNAs and lncRNAs. Short intron splicing efficiency is increased by secondary structure, and we detect both canonical and non-canonical short introns. In many cases, splicing of these short introns from mRNAs is predicted to alter the reading frame and change protein output. Our findings imply that standard gene prediction models which often assume a lower limit for intron size fail to predict short introns effectively. We conclude that short introns are abundant in the human transcriptome, and short intron splicing represents an added layer to mRNA regulation.

  6. Entanglement entropy in (3 + 1)-d free U(1) gauge theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Soni, Ronak M.; Trivedi, Sandip P.

    2017-02-01

    We consider the entanglement entropy for a free U(1) theory in 3+1 dimensions in the extended Hilbert space definition. By taking the continuum limit carefully we obtain a replica trick path integral which calculates this entanglement entropy. The path integral is gauge invariant, with a gauge fixing delta function accompanied by a Faddeev -Popov determinant. For a spherical region it follows that the result for the logarithmic term in the entanglement, which is universal, is given by the a anomaly coefficient. We also consider the extractable part of the entanglement, which corresponds to the number of Bell pairs which can be obtained from entanglement distillation or dilution. For a spherical region we show that the coefficient of the logarithmic term for the extractable part is different from the extended Hilbert space result. We argue that the two results will differ in general, and this difference is accounted for by a massless scalar living on the boundary of the region of interest.

  7. Implications of SU(2)_L x U(1) Symmetry for SIM(2) Invariant Neutrino Masses

    SciTech Connect

    Alan Dunn; Thomas Mehen

    2006-10-16

    We consider SU(2){sub L} x U(1) gauge invariant generalizations of a nonlocal, Lorentz violating mass term for neutrinos that preserves a SIM(2) subgroup. This induces Lorentz violating effects in QED as well as tree-level lepton family number violating interactions. Measurements of g{sub e} - 2 with trapped electrons severely constrain possible SIM(2) mass terms for electrons which violate C invariance. We study Lorentz violating effects in a C invariant and SIM(2) invariant extension of QED. We examine the Lorentz violating interactions of nonrelativistic electrons with electromagnetic fields to determine their impact on the spectroscopy of hydrogen-like atoms and g{sub e} - 2 measurements with trapped electrons. Generically, Lorentz violating corrections are suppressed by m{sub v}{sup 2}/m{sub e}{sup 2} and are within experimental limits. We study one-loop corrections to electron and photon self-energies and point out the need for a prescription to handle IR divergences induced by the nonlocality of the theory. We also calculate the tree level contribution to {mu} {yields} e + {gamma} from SIM(2) invariant mass terms.

  8. U(1 )×SU (2 ) gauge invariance made simple for density functional approximations

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pittalis, S.; Vignale, G.; Eich, F. G.

    2017-07-01

    A semirelativistic density-functional theory that includes spin-orbit couplings and Zeeman fields on equal footing with the electromagnetic potentials, is an appealing framework to develop a unified first-principles computational approach for noncollinear magnetism, spintronics, orbitronics, and topological states. The basic variables of this theory include the paramagnetic current and the spin-current density, besides the particle and the spin density, and the corresponding exchange-correlation (xc) energy functional is invariant under local U (1 )×SU (2 ) gauge transformations. The xc-energy functional must be approximated to enable practical applications, but, contrary to the case of the standard density functional theory, finding simple approximations suited to deal with realistic atomistic inhomogeneities has been a long-standing challenge. Here we propose a way out of this impasse by showing that approximate gauge-invariant functionals can be easily generated from existing approximate functionals of ordinary density-functional theory by applying a simple minimal substitution on the kinetic energy density, which controls the short-range behavior of the exchange hole. Our proposal opens the way to the construction of approximate, yet nonempirical functionals, which do not assume weak inhomogeneity and therefore may have a wide range of applicability in atomic, molecular, and condensed matter physics.

  9. All supersymmetric solutions of 3D U(1)3 gauged supergravity.

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Colgáin, Eoin Ó.

    2015-11-01

    D3-branes wrapping constant curvature Riemann surfaces give rise to 2D N=(0,2) SCFTs, where the superconformal fixed-points are mapped to vacua of 3D N=2 U(1)3 gauged supergravity. In this work we determine the fermionic supersymmetry variations of the theory and present all supersymmetric solutions. For spacetimes with a timelike Killing vector, we identify new timelike warped AdS3 (Gödel) and timelike warped dS3 fixed-points. We outline the construction of numerical solutions interpolating between fixed-points, demonstrate that these flows are driven by an irrelevant scalar operator in the SCFT and identify the inverse of the superpotential as a candidate c-function. We further classify all spacetimes with a null Killing vector, in the process producing loci in parameter space where null-warped AdS3 vacua with Schrödinger z = 2 symmetry exist. We construct non-supersymmetric spacelike warped AdS3 geometries based on D3-branes.

  10. Dark matter in U(1) extensions of the MSSM with gauge kinetic mixing

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bélanger, Genevève; Da Silva, Jonathan; Tran, Hieu Minh

    2017-06-01

    The gauge kinetic mixing in general is allowed in models with multiple Abelian gauge groups. In this paper, we investigate the gauge kinetic mixing in the framework of U(1) extensions of the minimal supersymmetric extension of the standard model (SM). It enlarges the viable parameter space, and has an important effect on the particle mass spectrum as well as the Z2 coupling with matters. The SM-like Higgs boson mass can be enhanced with a nonzero kinetic mixing parameter and the muon g -2 tension is slightly less severe than in the case of no mixing. We present the results from both benchmark analysis and global parameter scan. Various theoretical and phenomenological constraints have been considered. The recent LHC searches for the Z2-boson are important for the case of large positive kinetic mixing where the Z2 coupling is enhanced, and severely constrain scenarios with MZ 2<2.8 TeV . The viable dark matter candidate predicted by the model is either the neutralino or the right-handed sneutrino. Cosmological constraints from dark matter searches play a significant role in excluding the parameter space. Portions of the parameter space with relatively low sparticle mass spectrum can be successfully explored in the LHC run-2 as well as future linear colliders and dark matter searches.

  11. Neutrino mixing and R K anomaly in U(1) X models: a bottom-up approach

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Bhatia, Disha; Chakraborty, Sabyasachi; Dighe, Amol

    2017-03-01

    We identify a class of U(1) X models which can explain the R K anomaly and the neutrino mixing pattern, by using a bottom-up approach. The different X-charges of lepton generations account for the lepton universality violation required to explain R K . In addition to the three right-handed neutrinos needed for the Type-I seesaw mechanism, these minimal models only introduce an additional doublet Higgs and a singlet scalar. While the former helps in reproducing the quark mixing structure, the latter gives masses to neutrinos and the new gauge boson Z '. Our bottom-up approach determines the X-charges of all particles using theoretical consistency and experimental constraints. We find the parameter space allowed by the constraints from neutral meson mixing, rare b → s decays and direct collider searches for Z '. Such a Z ' may be observable at the ongoing run of the Large Hadron Collider with a few hundred fb-1 of integrated luminosity.

  12. Reduction of Einstein's equations for vacuum space-times with spacelike U(1) isometry groups

    SciTech Connect

    Moncrief, V.

    1986-03-01

    We consider vacuum space-times with spacelike U(1) isometry groups which are defined on manifolds of the form R x B/sub n/, where B/sub n/ is an arbitrary S/sup 1/-bundle over the two-sphere. We reduce the Einstein equations for this problem to a system of ''harmonic map'' equations defined over the base manifold R x S/sup 2/ equipped with a Lorentzian metric determined uniquely by the solution of an associated nonlinear elliptic system. The harmonic map fields (which have a range space diffeomorphic to the hyperbolic two-plane) represent the unconstrained, dynamical degrees of freedom of the gravitational field. We give a complete discussion of the existence and uniqueness of solutions of the associated elliptic system and also display a Geroch-type solution generating technique for globally transforming the space of solutions associated with any one non-trivial bundle, R x B/sub n/..-->..R x S/sup 2/, to that of any other such bundle. The basic techniques could readily be generalized to treat S/sup 1/-bundles over R x M where M is a compact two-manifold of arbitrary genus. In the higher genus cases the Teichmueller space of conformally diffeomorphic Riemannian metrics over M arises as an additional component of the configuration manifold. For Mroughly-equalS/sup 2/ this space collapses to a point, which slightly simplifies the analysis.

  13. Dark Matter's secret liaisons: phenomenology of a dark U(1) sector with bound states

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Cirelli, Marco; Panci, Paolo; Petraki, Kalliopi; Sala, Filippo; Taoso, Marco

    2017-05-01

    Dark matter (DM) charged under a dark U(1) force appears in many extensions of the Standard Model, and has been invoked to explain anomalies in cosmic-ray data, as well as a self-interacting DM candidate. In this paper, we perform a comprehensive phenomenological analysis of such a model, assuming that the DM abundance arises from the thermal freeze-out of the dark interactions. We include, for the first time, bound-state effects both in the DM production and in the indirect detection signals, and quantify their importance for FERMI, AMS-02, and CMB experiments. We find that DM in the mass range 1 GeV to 100 TeV, annihilating into dark photons of MeV to GeV mass, is in conflict with observations. Instead, DM annihilation into heavier dark photons is viable. We point out that the late decays of multi-GeV dark photons can produce significant entropy and thus dilute the DM density. This can lower considerably the dark coupling needed to obtain the DM abundance, and in turn relax the existing constraints.

  14. Sterile neutrino portal to Dark Matter I: the U(1) B- L case

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Escudero, Miguel; Rius, Nuria; Sanz, Verónica

    2017-02-01

    In this paper we explore the possibility that the sterile neutrino and Dark Matter sectors in the Universe have a common origin. We study the consequences of this assumption in the simple case of coupling the dark sector to the Standard Model via a global U(1) B-L , broken down spontaneously by a dark scalar. This dark scalar provides masses to the dark fermions and communicates with the Higgs via a Higgs portal coupling. We find an interesting interplay between Dark Matter annihilation to dark scalars — the CP-even that mixes with the Higgs and the CP-odd which becomes a Goldstone boson, the Majoron — and heavy neutrinos, as well as collider probes via the coupling to the Higgs. Moreover, Dark Matter annihilation into sterile neutrinos and its subsequent decay to gauge bosons and quarks, charged leptons or neutrinos lead to indirect detection signatures which are close to current bounds on the gamma ray flux from the galactic center and dwarf galaxies.

  15. Boundary conditions, gauge fixing ambiguities and exact expectation values in U(1) lattice gauge theory

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Pinto, Carlos

    2016-03-01

    We analyze the interplay between gauge fixing and boundary conditions in two-dimensional U(1) lattice gauge theory. We show on the basis of a general argument that periodic boundary conditions result in an ill-defined weak coupling approximation but that the approximation can be made well-defined if the boundaries are fixed to zero. We confirm this result in the particular case of the Feynman gauge. We show that the zero momentum mode divergence in the propagator that appears in the Feynman gauge vanishes when the weak coupling approximation is well-defined. In addition we obtain exact results (for arbitrary coupling), including finite size corrections, for the partition function and for general one-point and two-point functions in the axial gauge under both periodic and zero boundary conditions and confirm these results numerically. The dependence of these objects on both lattice size and coupling constant is investigated using specific examples. These exact results may provide insight into similar gauge fixing issues in more complex models.

  16. Description of work for 216-U-1 and 216-U-2 stainless steel pipeline integrity testing

    SciTech Connect

    Wasemiller, M.A.

    1994-06-30

    The objectives of this integrity test are to (1) inspect the interior of this pipeline by in-line camera survey and (2) if required, conduct a pressure test on a section of the pipeline. The U-1 and U-2 Cribs were constructed in 1951. From March 1952 to June 1967, the site received cell drainage from Tank 5-2 in the 221-U Building nd waste from the 224-U Building via the overflow from the 241-U-361 Settling Tank. From June 1957 to July 1957, the site received waste from the 224-U Building via the overflow from the 241-U-361 Settling Tank and contaminated solvent from the 276-U Settling Tank solvent storage area. The discharge of 221-U waste was discontinued during shutdown of production operations. From July 1957 to May 1967, the site received waste from the 224-U Building and equipment decontamination and reclamation wastes from operations in the 221-U Building canyon. The scope of work is encompassed in five steps: (1) obtaining access to the pipeline in order to perform an in-line camera survey of the line to the greatest extent possible, (2) evaluating the need for further investigation of the pipeline, (3) blanking the line, as needed, to perform a pressure test, (4) conducting the pressure test, as needed, and (5) documenting the ability of the line to maintain pressure.

  17. Chiral U(1) flavor models and flavored Higgs doublets: the top FB asymmetry and the W jj

    SciTech Connect

    Ko, P.; Omura, Yuji; Yu, Chaehyun

    2012-01-01

    We present U(1) flavor models for leptophobic Z' with flavor dependent couplings to the right-handed up-type quarks in the Standard Model (SM), which can accommodate the recent data on the top forward-backward (FB) asymmetry and the dijet resonance associated with a W boson reported by CDF Collaboration. Such flavor-dependent leptophobic charge assignments generally require extra chiral fermions for anomaly cancellation. Also the chiral nature of U(1)' flavor symmetry calls for new U(1)'-charged Higgs doublets in order for the SM fermions to have realistic renormalizable Yukawa couplings. The stringent constraints from the top FB asymmetry at the Tevatron and the same sign top pair production at the LHC can be evaded due to contributions of the extra Higgs doublets. We also show that the extension could realize cold dark matter candidates.

  18. Numerical solutions of Einstein's equations for cosmological spacetimes with spatial topology S3 and symmetry group U(1)

    NASA Astrophysics Data System (ADS)

    Beyer, F.; Escobar, L.; Frauendiener, J.

    2016-02-01

    In this paper we consider the single patch pseudospectral scheme for tensorial and spinorial evolution problems on the 2-sphere presented by Beyer et al. [Classical Quantum Gravity 32, 175013 (2015); Classical Quantum Gravity31, 075019 (2014)], which is based on the spin-weighted spherical harmonics transform. We apply and extend this method to Einstein's equations and certain classes of spherical cosmological spacetimes. More specifically, we use the hyperbolic reductions of Einstein's equations obtained in the generalized wave map gauge formalism combined with Geroch's symmetry reduction, and focus on cosmological spacetimes with spatial S3 -topologies and symmetry groups U(1) or U (1U (1 ) . We discuss analytical and numerical issues related to our implementation. We test our code by reproducing the exact inhomogeneous cosmological solutions of the vacuum Einstein field equations obtained by Beyer and Hennig [Classical Quantum G